Science.gov

Sample records for acellular simulated body

  1. Long-term in vitro degradation of PDLLA/bioglass bone scaffolds in acellular simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Blaker, J J; Nazhat, S N; Maquet, V; Boccaccini, A R

    2011-02-01

    The long-term (600days) in vitro degradation of highly porous poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA)/Bioglass-filled composite foams developed for bone tissue engineering scaffolds has been investigated in simulated body fluid (SBF). Foams of ∼93% porosity were produced by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS). The degradation profile for foams of neat PDLLA and the influence of Bioglass addition were comprehensively assessed in terms of changes in dimensional stability, pore morphology, weight loss, molecular weight and mechanical properties (dry and wet states). It is shown that the degradation process proceeded in several stages: (a) a quasi-stable stage, where water absorption and plasticization occurred together with weight loss due to Bioglass particle loss and dissolution, resulting in decreased wet mechanical properties; (b) a stage showing a slight increase in the wet mechanical properties and a moderate decrease in dimensions, with the properties remaining moderately constant until the onset of significant weight loss, whilst molecular weight continued to decrease; (c) an end stage of massive weight loss, disruption of the pore structure and the formation of blisters and embrittlement of the scaffold (evident on handling). The findings from this long-term in vitro degradation investigation underpin studies that have been and continue to be performed on highly porous poly(α-hydroxyesters) scaffolds filled with bioactive glasses for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:20849987

  2. Electronic Falling Body Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, John M.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an analog electronic simulator for the motion of an object projected horizontally in a vertical acceleration field. The device features adjustable values for the horizontal speeds and "gravity." Trajectories are displayed on an oscilloscope. (Author/CP)

  3. Cosmological N-body Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, George

    1994-05-01

    .90ex> }}} The ``N'' in N-body calculations has doubled every year for the last two decades. To continue this trend, the UW N-body group is working on algorithms for the fast evaluation of gravitational forces on parallel computers and establishing rigorous standards for the computations. In these algorithms, the computational cost per time step is ~ 10(3) pairwise forces per particle. A new adaptive time integrator enables us to perform high quality integrations that are fully temporally and spatially adaptive. SPH--smoothed particle hydrodynamics will be added to simulate the effects of dissipating gas and magnetic fields. The importance of these calculations is two-fold. First, they determine the nonlinear consequences of theories for the structure of the Universe. Second, they are essential for the interpretation of observations. Every galaxy has six coordinates of velocity and position. Observations determine two sky coordinates and a line of sight velocity that bundles universal expansion (distance) together with a random velocity created by the mass distribution. Simulations are needed to determine the underlying structure and masses. The importance of simulations has moved from ex post facto explanation to an integral part of planning large observational programs. I will show why high quality simulations with ``large N'' are essential to accomplish our scientific goals. This year, our simulations have N >~ 10(7) . This is sufficient to tackle some niche problems, but well short of our 5 year goal--simulating The Sloan Digital Sky Survey using a few Billion particles (a Teraflop-year simulation). Extrapolating past trends, we would have to ``wait'' 7 years for this hundred-fold improvement. Like past gains, significant changes in the computational methods are required for these advances. I will describe new algorithms, algorithmic hacks and a dedicated computer to perform Billion particle simulations. Finally, I will describe research that can be enabled by

  4. Comparison of toxicities of acellular pertussis vaccine with whole cell pertussis vaccine in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Sato, H

    1991-01-01

    There is no suitable animal model for pertussis encephalopathy in humans. In this study, we have compared the toxicity of acellular pertussis vaccine with whole cell pertussis vaccine in mice or guinea pigs. Two lots of acellular and two lots of whole cell vaccine produced in different countries were assayed in the test. 1. There was no statistical difference in mouse protective potency between these acellular or whole cell pertussis vaccines. 2. There were no differences in chemical ingredients between acellular and whole cell pertussis vaccines except for protein nitrogen content. The protein nitrogen content of whole cell vaccine was at least three times higher than that of the acellular product. 3. Anti-PT antibody productivity of the acellular vaccine was higher than that of the whole cell vaccine. 4. Anti-agglutinogen antibody productivity of the whole cell vaccine was higher than that of the acellular vaccine. 5. There was no pyrogenic activity with the acellular vaccine, but high pyrogenicity was seen with whole cell vaccine. 6. There was high body-weight decreasing toxicity in mice and guinea pigs by the whole cell vaccine. 7. The mice died when they received whole cell pertussis vaccine iv, but no deaths occurred in the mice which received acellular pertussis vaccine. PMID:1778317

  5. Laboratory Simulation Of Upper-Body Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantz, R.; Vykukal, H.; Webbon, B.

    1992-01-01

    Paper describes exercise method evoking muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and thermoregulatory responses typical of activity involving upper body, to simulate effects of working in zero gravity in space suit. Used in research on thermoregulatory subsystem of advanced portable life-support system for space suit. Discusses requirements for simulation of zero-gravity work in space suit and describes evolution of method through three versions. In preferred version, one performs arm-crank ergometry with gimbaled body-support mechanism that react forces at feet.

  6. A simulation method for the fruitage body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ling; Song, Weng-lin; Wang, Lei

    2009-07-01

    An effective visual modeling for creating the fruitage body has been present. According to the geometry shape character of fruitage, we build up its face model base on ellipsoid deformation. The face model is relation with radius. We consider different radius become a face in the fruitage, and uses same method to simulate the shape of fruitage inside. The body model is formed by combine face model and radius direction. Our method can simulate virtual inter and outer structure for fruitage body. The method decreases a lot of data and increases display speed. Another, the texture model of fruitage is defined by sum of different base function. This kind of method is simple and speed. We show the feasibility of our method by creating a winter-jujube and an apricot. They include exocorp, mesocorp and endocarp. It is useful that develop virtual plant.

  7. Robust three-body water simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tainter, C. J.; Pieniazek, P. A.; Lin, Y.-S.; Skinner, J. L.

    2011-05-01

    The most common potentials used in classical simulations of liquid water assume a pairwise additive form. Although these models have been very successful in reproducing many properties of liquid water at ambient conditions, none is able to describe accurately water throughout its complicated phase diagram. The primary reason for this is the neglect of many-body interactions. To this end, a simulation model with explicit three-body interactions was introduced recently [R. Kumar and J. L. Skinner, J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 8311 (2008), 10.1021/jp8009468]. This model was parameterized to fit the experimental O-O radial distribution function and diffusion constant. Herein we reparameterize the model, fitting to a wider range of experimental properties (diffusion constant, rotational correlation time, density for the liquid, liquid/vapor surface tension, melting point, and the ice Ih density). The robustness of the model is then verified by comparing simulation to experiment for a number of other quantities (enthalpy of vaporization, dielectric constant, Debye relaxation time, temperature of maximum density, and the temperature-dependent second and third virial coefficients), with good agreement.

  8. Realistic Simulation for Body Area and Body-To-Body Networks

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Muhammad Mahtab; Ben Hamida, Elyes; Ben Arbia, Dhafer; Maman, Mickael; Mani, Francesco; Denis, Benoit; D’Errico, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present an accurate and realistic simulation for body area networks (BAN) and body-to-body networks (BBN) using deterministic and semi-deterministic approaches. First, in the semi-deterministic approach, a real-time measurement campaign is performed, which is further characterized through statistical analysis. It is able to generate link-correlated and time-varying realistic traces (i.e., with consistent mobility patterns) for on-body and body-to-body shadowing and fading, including body orientations and rotations, by means of stochastic channel models. The full deterministic approach is particularly targeted to enhance IEEE 802.15.6 proposed channel models by introducing space and time variations (i.e., dynamic distances) through biomechanical modeling. In addition, it helps to accurately model the radio link by identifying the link types and corresponding path loss factors for line of sight (LOS) and non-line of sight (NLOS). This approach is particularly important for links that vary over time due to mobility. It is also important to add that the communication and protocol stack, including the physical (PHY), medium access control (MAC) and networking models, is developed for BAN and BBN, and the IEEE 802.15.6 compliance standard is provided as a benchmark for future research works of the community. Finally, the two approaches are compared in terms of the successful packet delivery ratio, packet delay and energy efficiency. The results show that the semi-deterministic approach is the best option; however, for the diversity of the mobility patterns and scenarios applicable, biomechanical modeling and the deterministic approach are better choices. PMID:27104537

  9. Realistic Simulation for Body Area and Body-To-Body Networks.

    PubMed

    Alam, Muhammad Mahtab; Ben Hamida, Elyes; Ben Arbia, Dhafer; Maman, Mickael; Mani, Francesco; Denis, Benoit; D'Errico, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present an accurate and realistic simulation for body area networks (BAN) and body-to-body networks (BBN) using deterministic and semi-deterministic approaches. First, in the semi-deterministic approach, a real-time measurement campaign is performed, which is further characterized through statistical analysis. It is able to generate link-correlated and time-varying realistic traces (i.e., with consistent mobility patterns) for on-body and body-to-body shadowing and fading, including body orientations and rotations, by means of stochastic channel models. The full deterministic approach is particularly targeted to enhance IEEE 802.15.6 proposed channel models by introducing space and time variations (i.e., dynamic distances) through biomechanical modeling. In addition, it helps to accurately model the radio link by identifying the link types and corresponding path loss factors for line of sight (LOS) and non-line of sight (NLOS). This approach is particularly important for links that vary over time due to mobility. It is also important to add that the communication and protocol stack, including the physical (PHY), medium access control (MAC) and networking models, is developed for BAN and BBN, and the IEEE 802.15.6 compliance standard is provided as a benchmark for future research works of the community. Finally, the two approaches are compared in terms of the successful packet delivery ratio, packet delay and energy efficiency. The results show that the semi-deterministic approach is the best option; however, for the diversity of the mobility patterns and scenarios applicable, biomechanical modeling and the deterministic approach are better choices. PMID:27104537

  10. N-body simulations of γ gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas dos Santos, Marcelo; Winther, Hans A.; Mota, David F.; Waga, Ioav

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated structure formation in the γ gravity f(R) model with N-body simulations. The γ gravity model is a proposal which, unlike other viable f(R) models, not only changes the gravitational dynamics, but can in principle also have signatures at the background level that are different from those obtained in ΛCDM (Cosmological constant, Cold Dark Matter). The aim of this paper is to study the nonlinear regime of the model in the case where, at late times, the background differs from ΛCDM. We quantify the signatures produced on the power spectrum, the halo mass function, and the density and velocity profiles. To appreciate the features of the model, we have compared it to ΛCDM and the Hu-Sawicki f(R) models. For the considered set of parameters we find that the screening mechanism is ineffective, which gives rise to deviations in the halo mass function that disagree with observations. This does not rule out the model per se, but requires choices of parameters such that | fR0 | is much smaller, which would imply that its cosmic expansion history cannot be distinguished from ΛCDM at the background level.

  11. Whole body measurement systems. [for weightlessness simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogle, J. S. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A system for measuring the volume and volume variations of a human body under zero gravity conditions is disclosed. An enclosed chamber having a defined volume and arranged for receiving a human body is provided with means for infrasonically varying the volume of the chamber. The changes in volume produce resultant changes in pressure, and under substantially isentropic conditions, an isentropic relationship permits a determination of gas volume which, in turn, when related to total chamber volume permits a determination of the body volume. By comparison techniques, volume changes of a human independent of gravity conditions can be determined.

  12. In vitro assessment of biodurability: acellular systems.

    PubMed Central

    de Meringo, A; Morscheidt, C; Thélohan, S; Tiesler, H

    1994-01-01

    The assessment of biodurability of man-made vitreous fibers is essential to the limitation of health hazards associated with human exposure to environments in which respirable fibers are present. In vitro acellular systems provide effective test methods of measuring fiber solubility provided care is taken to select the most suitable solvent and test conditions for the specific fiber type and dimension. PMID:7882955

  13. Human acellular dermal wound matrix: evidence and experience.

    PubMed

    Kirsner, Robert S; Bohn, Greg; Driver, Vickie R; Mills, Joseph L; Nanney, Lillian B; Williams, Marie L; Wu, Stephanie C

    2015-12-01

    A chronic wound fails to complete an orderly and timely reparative process and places patients at increased risk for wound complications that negatively impact quality of life and require greater health care expenditure. The role of extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in normal and chronic wound repair. Not only is ECM the largest component of the dermal skin layer, but also ECM proteins provide structure and cell signalling that are necessary for successful tissue repair. Chronic wounds are characterised by their inflammatory and proteolytic environment, which degrades the ECM. Human acellular dermal matrices, which provide an ECM scaffold, therefore, are being used to treat chronic wounds. The ideal human acellular dermal wound matrix (HADWM) would support regenerative healing, providing a structure that could be repopulated by the body's cells. Experienced wound care investigators and clinicians discussed the function of ECM, the evidence related to a specific HADWM (Graftjacket(®) regenerative tissue matrix, Wright Medical Technology, Inc., licensed by KCI USA, Inc., San Antonio, TX), and their clinical experience with this scaffold. This article distills these discussions into an evidence-based and practical overview for treating chronic lower extremity wounds with this HADWM. PMID:24283346

  14. Design and Synthesis of an Artificial Pulmonary Pleura for High Throughput Studies in Acellular Human Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Darcy E.; Fenn, Spencer L.; Bonenfant, Nicholas R.; Marks, Elliot R.; Borg, Zachary; Saunders, Patrick; Oldinski, Rachael A.; Weiss, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Whole organ decellularization of complex organs, such as lungs, presents a unique opportunity for use of acellular scaffolds for ex vivo tissue engineering or for studying cell-extracellular matrix interactions ex vivo. A growing body of literature investigating decellularizing and recellularizing rodent lungs has provided important proof of concept models and rodent lungs are readily available for high throughput studies. In contrast, comparable progress in large animal and human lungs has been impeded owing to more limited availability and difficulties in handling larger tissue. While the use of smaller segments of acellular large animal or human lungs would maximize usage from a single lung, excision of small acellular segments compromises the integrity of the pleural layer, leaving the terminal ends of blood vessels and airways exposed. We have developed a novel pleural coating using non-toxic ionically crosslinked alginate or photocrosslinked methacrylated alginate which can be applied to excised acellular lung segments, permits inflation of small segments, and significantly enhances retention of cells inoculated through cannulated airways or blood vessels. Further, photocrosslinking methacrylated alginate, using eosin Y and triethanolamine (TEOA) at 530nm wavelength, results in a mechanically stable pleural coating that permits effective cyclic 3-dimensional stretch, i.e. mechanical ventilation, of individual segments. PMID:25750684

  15. A General Simulation Method for Multiple Bodies in Proximate Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    Methods of unsteady aerodynamic simulation for an arbitrary number of independent bodies flying in close proximity are considered. A novel method to efficiently detect collision contact points is described. A method to compute body trajectories in response to aerodynamic loads, applied loads, and inter-body collisions is also given. The physical correctness of the methods are verified by comparison to a set of analytic solutions. The methods, combined with a Navier-Stokes solver, are used to demonstrate the possibility of predicting the unsteady aerodynamics and flight trajectories of moving bodies that involve rigid-body collisions.

  16. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wei-ling; Qiu, Long-hai; Lian, Jia-yan; Li, Jia-chun; Hu, Jun; Liu, Xiao-lin

    2016-01-01

    Vascularization of acellular nerves has been shown to contribute to nerve bridging. In this study, we used a 10-mm sciatic nerve defect model in rats to determine whether cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of injured acellular nerves. The rat nerve defects were treated with acellular nerve grafting (control group) alone or acellular nerve grafting combined with intraperitoneal injection of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (experimental group). As shown through two-dimensional imaging, the vessels began to invade into the acellular nerve graft from both anastomotic ends at day 7 post-operation, and gradually covered the entire graft at day 21. The vascular density, vascular area, and the velocity of revascularization in the experimental group were all higher than those in the control group. These results indicate that cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves. PMID:27127495

  17. N-body simulations of disks. [of stellar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohl, F.

    1975-01-01

    The methods used in large-scale n-body simulations are discussed. However, the present review concentrates on results already obtained in n-body simulations using systems containing up to 200,000 simulation stars. Results are presented which show that the stability criterion developed for flattened systems applies only to truly axisymmetric instabilities. Purely stellar disks acquire rather large velocity dispersions, generally two or more times the velocity dispersion required by Toomre (1964) for axisymmetric stability. In computer simulations, the bar-forming instability can be prevented only by comparatively large velocity dispersions. However, simulations including the effects of the galactic halo and core as a fixed background field show that bar formation can be prevented for fixed halo components as large or larger than the self-consistent disk component. Experiments performed to determine the collisional relaxation time for large-scale gravitational n-body calculations show that these models are indeed 'collisionless'.

  18. Data from acellular human heart matrix.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Pedro L; Fernández-Santos, M Eugenia; Espinosa, M Angeles; González-Nicolas, M Angeles; Acebes, Judith R; Costanza, Salvatore; Moscoso, Isabel; Rodríguez, Hugo; García, Julio; Romero, Jesús; Kren, Stefan M; Bermejo, Javier; Yotti, Raquel; Del Villar, Candelas Pérez; Sanz-Ruiz, Ricardo; Elizaga, Jaime; Taylor, Doris A; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    Perfusion decellularization of cadaveric hearts removes cells and generates a cell-free extracellular matrix scaffold containing acellular vascular conduits, which are theoretically sufficient to perfuse and support tissue-engineered heart constructs. This article contains additional data of our experience decellularizing and testing structural integrity and composition of a large series of human hearts, "Acellular human heart matrix: a critical step toward whole heat grafts" (Sanchez et al., 2015) [1]. Here we provide the information about the heart decellularization technique, the valve competence evaluation of the decellularized scaffolds, the integrity evaluation of epicardial and myocardial coronary circulation, the pressure volume measurements, the primers used to assess cardiac muscle gene expression and, the characteristics of donors, donor hearts, scaffolds and perfusion decellularization process. PMID:27331090

  19. Post-Newtonian N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarseth, Sverre J.

    2007-06-01

    We report on the first fully consistent conventional cluster simulation which includes terms up to the third-order post-Newtonian approximation. Numerical problems for treating extremely energetic binaries orbiting a single massive object are circumvented by employing the special `wheel-spoke' regularization method of Zare which has not been used in large-N simulations before. Idealized models containing N = 1 × 105 particles of mass 1Msolar with a central black hole (BH) of 300Msolar have been studied on GRAPE-type computers. An initial half-mass radius of rh ~= 0.1 pc is sufficiently small to yield examples of relativistic coalescence. This is achieved by significant binary shrinkage within a density cusp environment, followed by the generation of extremely high eccentricities which are induced by Kozai cycles and/or resonant relaxation. More realistic models with white dwarfs and 10 times larger half-mass radii also show evidence of general relativity effects before disruption. An experimentation with the post-Newtonian terms suggests that reducing the time-scales for activating the different orders progressively may be justified for obtaining qualitatively correct solutions without aiming for precise predictions of the final gravitational radiation wave form. The results obtained suggest that the standard loss-cone arguments underestimate the swallowing rate in globular clusters containing a central BH.

  20. Computer simulation of multigrid body dynamics and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaminadham, M.; Moon, Young I.; Venkayya, V. B.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to set up and analyze benchmark problems on multibody dynamics and to verify the predictions of two multibody computer simulation codes. TREETOPS and DISCOS have been used to run three example problems - one degree-of-freedom spring mass dashpot system, an inverted pendulum system, and a triple pendulum. To study the dynamics and control interaction, an inverted planar pendulum with an external body force and a torsional control spring was modeled as a hinge connected two-rigid body system. TREETOPS and DISCOS affected the time history simulation of this problem. System state space variables and their time derivatives from two simulation codes were compared.

  1. Extended Eden model reproduces growth of an acellular slime mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Geri; Halvorsrud, Ragnhild; Meakin, Paul

    1999-11-01

    A stochastic growth model was used to simulate the growth of the acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum on substrates where the nutrients were confined in separate drops. Growth of Physarum on such substrates was previously studied experimentally and found to produce a range of different growth patterns [Phys. Rev. E 57, 941 (1998)]. The model represented the aging of cluster sites and differed from the original Eden model in that the occupation probability of perimeter sites depended on the time of occupation of adjacent cluster sites. This feature led to a bias in the selection of growth directions. A moderate degree of persistence was found to be crucial to reproduce the biological growth patterns under various conditions. Persistence in growth combined quick propagation in heterogeneous environments with a high probability of locating sources of nutrients.

  2. Whole-body mathematical model for simulating intracranial pressure dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakin, William D. (Inventor); Penar, Paul L. (Inventor); Stevens, Scott A. (Inventor); Tranmer, Bruce I. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A whole-body mathematical model (10) for simulating intracranial pressure dynamics. In one embodiment, model (10) includes 17 interacting compartments, of which nine lie entirely outside of intracranial vault (14). Compartments (F) and (T) are defined to distinguish ventricular from extraventricular CSF. The vasculature of the intracranial system within cranial vault (14) is also subdivided into five compartments (A, C, P, V, and S, respectively) representing the intracranial arteries, capillaries, choroid plexus, veins, and venous sinus. The body's extracranial systemic vasculature is divided into six compartments (I, J, O, Z, D, and X, respectively) representing the arteries, capillaries, and veins of the central body and the lower body. Compartments (G) and (B) include tissue and the associated interstitial fluid in the intracranial and lower regions. Compartment (Y) is a composite involving the tissues, organs, and pulmonary circulation of the central body and compartment (M) represents the external environment.

  3. Robotic Simulation of Flexible-Body Spacecraft Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brannan, Justin C.; Carignan, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    A robotic testbed has been developed to conduct hardware-in-the-loop simulations of a robotic servicer interacting with a client satellite on-orbit. By creating an analytical model of a satellite with flexible appendages, it is possible to simulate the system response to external force and torque inputs and compare the predicted system motion to a robot mass simulator outfitted with physical appendages. This validation effort includes multiple test cases that encompass the types of interaction forces a satellite might experience during a nominal on-orbit servicing mission and aims to show the simulation's ability to capture the physical system response. After incorporating the flexible-body dynamics into the robotic mass simulator at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), a hardware-in-the-loop simulation can be used to characterize the potential impact of structural flexibility on an end-to-end satellite servicing mission.

  4. Discreteness noise versus force errors in N-body simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Hut, Piet; Makino, Jun

    1993-01-01

    A low accuracy in the force calculation per time step of a few percent for each particle pair is sufficient for collisionless N-body simulations. Higher accuracy is made meaningless by the dominant discreteness noise in the form of two-body relaxation, which can be reduced only by increasing the number of particles. Since an N-body simulation is a Monte Carlo procedure in which each particle-particle force is essentially random, i.e., carries an error of about 1000 percent, the only requirement is a systematic averaging-out of these intrinsic errors. We illustrate these assertions with two specific examples in which individual pairwise forces are deliberately allowed to carry significant errors: tree-codes on supercomputers and algorithms on special-purpose machines with low-precision hardware.

  5. N-Body Simulations of Disk Galaxy Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Jeannette; Messick, Garrett; The, Lih-Sin

    2004-11-01

    We present results of N-body simulations for two interacting disk galaxies. The simulated galaxies are initially modeled with parameters fitting observations of the Milky Way Galaxy. We use a four-component model of a disk, dark matter halo, spheroid, and central concentration. In our present simulations, we neglect the gas component and associated star formation. Among our analysis, we address the question of member transference from one galaxy to another. We also examine the rate of member ejections from each disk system and final configurations after the disk interactions.

  6. Acellular organ scaffolds for tumor tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guller, Anna; Trusova, Inna; Petersen, Elena; Shekhter, Anatoly; Kurkov, Alexander; Qian, Yi; Zvyagin, Andrei

    2015-12-01

    Rationale: Tissue engineering (TE) is an emerging alternative approach to create models of human malignant tumors for experimental oncology, personalized medicine and drug discovery studies. Being the bottom-up strategy, TE provides an opportunity to control and explore the role of every component of the model system, including cellular populations, supportive scaffolds and signalling molecules. Objectives: As an initial step to create a new ex vivo TE model of cancer, we optimized protocols to obtain organ-specific acellular matrices and evaluated their potential as TE scaffolds for culture of normal and tumor cells. Methods and results: Effective decellularization of animals' kidneys, ureter, lungs, heart, and liver has been achieved by detergent-based processing. The obtained scaffolds demonstrated biocompatibility and growthsupporting potential in combination with normal (Vero, MDCK) and tumor cell lines (C26, B16). Acellular scaffolds and TE constructs have been characterized and compared with morphological methods. Conclusions: The proposed methodology allows creation of sustainable 3D tumor TE constructs to explore the role of organ-specific cell-matrix interaction in tumorigenesis.

  7. Long-lived spiral waves in N-body simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comins, Neil F.; Schroeder, Michael C.

    1989-01-01

    Results of N-body simulations of disc galaxies using a two-dimensional Cartesian N-body code are presented. Both trailing arm spirals (TAS) and leading arm spirals (LAS) were used with varieties of pitch angles and pattern speeds. LAS perturbations transferred their energy to TAS via swing amplification; TAS perturbations led to TAS arms. In both cases the spiral arms persisted for more than 5 rotation periods, but the maximum amplitude 2-armed spirals were generated by LAS perturbations. The persistence of the trailing arm spiral waves is thought to be caused by the kinematic spiral arm mechanism described by Kalnajs (1973).

  8. Model reduction in the simulation of interconnected flexible bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eke, Fidelis O.; Man, Guy K.

    1988-01-01

    Given the control system specifications for a system of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies, methods now exist for determining the system modes that do not interact 'strongly' with the controller. Once these important system modes are known, there still remains the problem of determining the modes of individual bodies that should be retained, since, in the final analysis, it is the modal information at the component level that must be fed into any multibody simulation code. Systematic identification of these component modes is achieved through a two-phase matrix diagonalization process starting with judiciously chosen submatrices of the system modal matrix.

  9. Direct simulation of hypersonic flows over blunt slender bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. N.; Cuda, V., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Results of a numerical study of low-density hypersonic flow about cylindrically blunted wedges and spherically blunted cones with body half angles of 0, 5, and 10 deg are presented. Most of the transitional flow regime encountered during entry between the free molecule and continuum regimes is simulated for a reentry velocity of 7.5 km/s by including freestream conditions of 70 to 100 km. The bodies are at zero angle of incidence and have diffuse and finite catalytic surfaces. Translational, thermodynamic, and chemical nonequilibrium effects are considered in the numerical simulation by utilizing the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The numerical simulations show that noncontinuum effects such as surface temperature jump, and velocity slip are evident for all cases considered. The onset of chemical dissociation occurs at a simulated altitude of 96 km for the two-dimensional configurations. Comparisons between the DSMC and continuum viscous shock-layer calculations highlight the significant difference in flowfield structure predicted by the two methods.

  10. n-body simulations using message passing parallel computers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grama, A. Y.; Kumar, V.; Sameh, A.

    The authors present new parallel formulations of the Barnes-Hut method for n-body simulations on message passing computers. These parallel formulations partition the domain efficiently incurring minimal communication overhead. This is in contrast to existing schemes that are based on sorting a large number of keys or on the use of global data structures. The new formulations are augmented by alternate communication strategies which serve to minimize communication overhead. The impact of these communication strategies is experimentally studied. The authors report on experimental results obtained from an astrophysical simulation on an nCUBE2 parallel computer.

  11. Simulation of Wearable Antennas for Body Centric Wireless Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Richard; Rütschlin, Marc; Wittig, Tilmann; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2015-11-01

    The performance of a body area network (BAN) is strongly dependent on several parameters which make wireless communication quite challenging. For instance, the performance of the antenna itself could be affected by its geometric deformation when the structure is directly integrated into clothes. Operation of the antenna close to the human body necessitates adjusting its design for the intended applications whereas the maximum SAR value estimated in such conditions has to respect the standards. In this context, simulation tools that can take into account specific biological models offer a range of possibilities for investigating and optimizing the performance of BAN devices. Two different applications are presented here: the case of an RFID tag operating at 870 MHz, and a UWB antenna working in a frequency range between 3 and 6 GHz. The simulation tools developed by CST are used in this context to optimize the implementation of BAN devices shown in this paper.

  12. Acellular Biomaterials: An Evolving Alternative to Cell-Based Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Burdick, Jason A.; Mauck, Robert L.; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Acellular biomaterials can stimulate the local environment to repair tissues without the regulatory and scientific challenges of cell-based therapies. A greater understanding of the mechanisms of such endogenous tissue repair is furthering the design and application of these biomaterials. We discuss recent progress in acellular materials for tissue repair, using cartilage and cardiac tissues as examples of applications with substantial intrinsic hurdles, but where human translation is now occurring. PMID:23486777

  13. Million-Body Star Cluster Simulations: Comparisons between Monte Carlo and Direct N-body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Carl L.; Morscher, Meagan; Wang, Long; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A.; Spurzem, Rainer

    2016-08-01

    We present the first detailed comparison between million-body globular cluster simulations computed with a Hénon-type Monte Carlo code, CMC, and a direct N-body code, NBODY6++GPU. Both simulations start from an identical cluster model with 106 particles, and include all of the relevant physics needed to treat the system in a highly realistic way. With the two codes "frozen" (no fine-tuning of any free parameters or internal algorithms of the codes) we find good agreement in the overall evolution of the two models. Furthermore, we find that in both models, large numbers of stellar-mass black holes (>1000) are retained for 12 Gyr. Thus, the very accurate direct N-body approach confirms recent predictions that black holes can be retained in present-day, old globular clusters. We find only minor disagreements between the two models and attribute these to the small-N dynamics driving the evolution of the cluster core for which the Monte Carlo assumptions are less ideal. Based on the overwhelming general agreement between the two models computed using these vastly different techniques, we conclude that our Monte Carlo approach, which is more approximate, but dramatically faster compared to the direct N-body, is capable of producing an accurate description of the long-term evolution of massive globular clusters even when the clusters contain large populations of stellar-mass black holes.

  14. Spherical indentation of free-standing acellular extracellular matrix membranes.

    PubMed

    Cloonan, Aidan J; O'Donnell, Michael R; Lee, William T; Walsh, Michael T; De Barra, Eamonn; McGloughlin, Tim M

    2012-01-01

    Numerous scaffold materials have been developed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications to replace or repair damaged tissues and organs. Naturally occurring scaffold materials derived from acellular xenogeneic and autologous extracellular matrix (ECM) are currently in clinical use. These biological scaffold materials possess inherent variations in mechanical properties. Spherical indentation or ball burst testing has commonly been used to evaluate ECM and harvested tissue due to its ease of use and simulation of physiological biaxial loading, but has been limited by complex material deformation profiles. An analytical methodology has been developed and applied to experimental load-deflection data of a model hyperelastic material and lyophilized ECM scaffolds. An optimum rehydration protocol was developed based on water absorption, hydration relaxation and dynamic mechanical analysis. The analytical methodology was compared with finite element simulations of the tests and excellent correlation was seen between the computed biaxial stress resultants and geometry deformations. A minimum rehydration period of 5 min at 37°C was sufficient for the evaluated multilaminated ECM materials. The proposed approach may be implemented for convenient comparative analysis of ECM materials and source tissues, process optimization or during lot release testing. PMID:21864728

  15. Simulation of Strongly Correlated Quantum Many-Body Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgin, Ersen

    In this thesis, we address the problem of solving for the properties of interacting quantum many-body systems in thermal equilibrium. The complexity of this problem increases exponentially with system size, limiting exact numerical simulations to very small systems. To tackle more complex systems, one needs to use heuristic algorithms that approximate solutions to these systems. Belief propagation is one such algorithm that we discuss in chapters 2 and 3. Using belief propagation, we demonstrate that it is possible to solve for static properties of highly correlated quantum many-body systems for certain geometries at all temperatures. In chapter 4, we generalize the multiscale renormalization ansatz to the anyonic setting to solve for the ground state properties of anyonic quantum many-body systems. The algorithms we present in chapters 2, 3, and 4 are very successful in certain settings, but they are not applicable to the most general quantum mechanical systems. For this, we propose using quantum computers as we discuss in chapter 5. The dimension reduction algorithm we consider in chapter 5 enables us to prepare thermal states of any quantum many-body system on a quantum computer faster than any previously known algorithm. Using these thermal states as the initialization of a quantum computer, one can study both static and dynamic properties of quantum systems without any memory overhead.

  16. Simulating typical entanglement with many-body Hamiltonian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Yoshifumi; Murao, Mio

    2011-11-15

    We study the time evolution of the amount of entanglement generated by one-dimensional spin-1/2 Ising-type Hamiltonians composed of many-body interactions. We investigate sets of states randomly selected during the time evolution generated by several types of time-independent Hamiltonians by analyzing the distributions of the amount of entanglement of the sets. We compare such entanglement distributions with that of typical entanglement, entanglement of a set of states randomly selected from a Hilbert space with respect to the unitarily invariant measure. We show that the entanglement distribution obtained by a time-independent Hamiltonian can simulate the average and standard deviation of the typical entanglement, if the Hamiltonian contains suitable many-body interactions. We also show that the time required to achieve such a distribution is polynomial in the system size for certain types of Hamiltonians.

  17. Many-body localization: Entanglement and efficient numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, Frank

    Many-body localization (MBL) occurs in isolated quantum systems when Anderson localization persists in the presence of finite interactions. To understand this phenomenon, the development of new efficient numerical methods to find highly excited many-body eigenstates is essential. In this talk, we will discuss two complimentary approaches to simulate MBL systems: First, we introduce a variant of the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method that obtains individual highly excited eigenstates of MBL systems to machine precision accuracy at moderate to large disorder. This method explicitly takes advantage of the local spatial structure and the low entanglement which is characteristic for MBL eigenstates. Second, we propose an approach to directly find an approximate compact representation of the diagonalizing unitary by using a variational unitary matrix-product operator.

  18. Simulation capability for dynamics of two-body flexible satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, F.; Zetkov, G.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis and computer program were prepared to realistically simulate the dynamic behavior of a class of satellites consisting of two end bodies separated by a connecting structure. The shape and mass distribution of the flexible end bodies are arbitrary; the connecting structure is flexible but massless and is capable of deployment and retraction. Fluid flowing in a piping system and rigid moving masses, representing a cargo elevator or crew members, have been modeled. Connecting structure characteristics, control systems, and externally applied loads are modeled in easily replaced subroutines. Subroutines currently available include a telescopic beam-type connecting structure as well as attitude, deployment, spin and wobble control. In addition, a unique mass balance control system was developed to sense and balance mass shifts due to the motion of a cargo elevator. The mass of the cargo may vary through a large range. Numerical results are discussed for various types of runs.

  19. Dynamic mixing in magma bodies - Theory, simulations, and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Spera, Frank J.; Yuen, David A.; Sewell, Granville

    1989-01-01

    The magma-mixing process is different from the mantle mixing process in that the mixing components of magma are dynamically active, with the melt density depending strongly on composition. This paper describes simulations of time-dependent variable-viscosity double-diffusive convection which were carried out to investigate quantitatively the mixing dynamics of magma in melt-dominated magma bodies. Results show that the dynamics of double-diffusive convection can impart complex patterns of composition, through time and space. The mixing time depends nonlinearly on many factors, including heat flux driving convection, the rate of diffusion of chemical species, the relative importance of thermal and chemical buoyancy, the viscosities of the mixing components, and the shape of the magma body.

  20. CFD Approaches for Simulation of Wing-Body Stage Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Gomez, Reynaldo J.; Scallion, William I.

    2004-01-01

    A collection of computational fluid dynamics tools and techniques are being developed and tested for application to stage separation and abort simulation for next-generation launch vehicles. In this work, an overset grid Navier-Stokes flow solver has been enhanced and demonstrated on a matrix of proximity cases and on a dynamic separation simulation of a belly-to-belly wing-body configuration. Steady cases show excellent agreement between Navier-Stokes results, Cartesian grid Euler solutions, and wind tunnel data at Mach 3. Good agreement has been obtained between Navier-Stokes, Euler, and wind tunnel results at Mach 6. An analysis of a dynamic separation at Mach 3 demonstrates that unsteady aerodynamic effects are not important for this scenario. Results provide an illustration of the relative applicability of Euler and Navier-Stokes methods to these types of problems.

  1. Flow Simulation of N2B Hybrid Wing Body Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyoungjin; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2012-01-01

    The N2B hybrid wing body aircraft was conceptually designed to meet environmental and performance goals for the N+2 generation transport set by the subsonic fixed wing project. In this study, flow fields around the N2B configuration is simulated using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver using unstructured meshes. Boundary conditions at engine fan face and nozzle exhaust planes are provided by response surfaces of the NPSS thermodynamic engine cycle model. The present flow simulations reveal challenging design issues arising from boundary layer ingestion offset inlet and nacelle-airframe interference. The N2B configuration can be a good test bed for application of multidisciplinary design optimization technology.

  2. Parallelizing N-Body Simulations on a Heterogeneous Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenborg, T. N.

    2009-10-01

    This thesis evaluates quantitatively the effectiveness of a new technique for parallelising direct gravitational N-body simulations on a heterogeneous computing cluster. In addition to being an investigation into how a specific computational physics task can be optimally load balanced across the heterogeneity factors of a distributed computing cluster, it is also, more generally, a case study in effective heterogeneous parallelisation of an all-pairs programming task. If high-performance computing clusters are not designed to be heterogeneous initially, they tend to become so over time as new nodes are added, or existing nodes are replaced or upgraded. As a result, effective techniques for application parallelisation on heterogeneous clusters are needed if maximum cluster utilisation is to be achieved and is an active area of research. A custom C/MPI parallel particle-particle N-body simulator was developed, validated and deployed for this evaluation. Simulation communication proceeds over cluster nodes arranged in a logical ring and employs nonblocking message passing to encourage overlap of communication with computation. Redundant calculations arising from force symmetry given by Newton's third law are removed by combining chordal data transfer of accumulated forces with ring passing data transfer. Heterogeneity in node computation speed is addressed by decomposing system data across nodes in proportion to node computation speed, in conjunction with use of evenly sized communication buffers. This scheme is shown experimentally to have some potential in improving simulation performance in comparison with an even decomposition of data across nodes. Techniques for further heterogeneous cluster load balancing are discussed and remain an opportunity for further work.

  3. N-body simulations for coupled scalar-field cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baojiu; Barrow, John D.

    2011-01-15

    We describe in detail the general methodology and numerical implementation of consistent N-body simulations for coupled-scalar-field models, including background cosmology and the generation of initial conditions (with the different couplings to different matter species taken into account). We perform fully consistent simulations for a class of coupled-scalar-field models with an inverse power-law potential and negative coupling constant, for which the chameleon mechanism does not work. We find that in such cosmological models the scalar-field potential plays a negligible role except in the background expansion, and the fifth force that is produced is proportional to gravity in magnitude, justifying the use of a rescaled gravitational constant G in some earlier N-body simulation works for similar models. We then study the effects of the scalar coupling on the nonlinear matter power spectra and compare with linear perturbation calculations to see the agreement and places where the nonlinear treatment deviates from the linear approximation. We also propose an algorithm to identify gravitationally virialized matter halos, trying to take account of the fact that the virialization itself is also modified by the scalar-field coupling. We use the algorithm to measure the mass function and study the properties of dark-matter halos. We find that the net effect of the scalar coupling helps produce more heavy halos in our simulation boxes and suppresses the inner (but not the outer) density profile of halos compared with the {Lambda}CDM prediction, while the suppression weakens as the coupling between the scalar field and dark-matter particles increases in strength.

  4. Acellular Dermal Matrix in Rotator Cuff Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Joseph; Mirzayan, Raffy

    2016-01-01

    The success of rotator cuff repair (RCR) surgery can be measured clinically (validated outcome scores, range of motion) as well as structurally (re-tear rates using imaging studies). Regardless of repair type or technique, most studies have shown that patients do well clinically. However, multiple studies have also shown that structurally, the failure rate can be very high. A variety of factors, including poor tendon quality, age over 63 years, smoking, advanced fatty infiltration into the muscle, and the inability of the tendon to heal to bone, have been implicated as the cause of the high re-tear rate in RCRs. The suture-tendon interface is felt to be the weakest link in the RCR construct, and suture pullout through the tendon is believed to be the most common method of failure. This review of the published literature seeks to determine if there is support for augmentation of RCR with acellular dermal matrices to strengthen the suture-tendon interface and reduce the re-tear rate. PMID:27552454

  5. Local stochastic non-Gaussianity and N-body simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kendrick M.; LoVerde, Marilena E-mail: marilena@ias.edu

    2011-11-01

    Large-scale clustering of highly biased tracers of large-scale structure has emerged as one of the best observational probes of primordial non-Gaussianity of the local type (i.e. f{sub NL}{sup local}). This type of non-Gaussianity can be generated in multifield models of inflation such as the curvaton model. Recently, Tseliakhovich, Hirata, and Slosar showed that the clustering statistics depend qualitatively on the ratio of inflaton to curvaton power ξ after reheating, a free parameter of the model. If ξ is significantly different from zero, so that the inflaton makes a non-negligible contribution to the primordial adiabatic curvature, then the peak-background split ansatz predicts that the halo bias will be stochastic on large scales. In this paper, we test this prediction in N-body simulations. We find that large-scale stochasticity is generated, in qualitative agreement with the prediction, but that the level of stochasticity is overpredicted by ≈ 30%. Other predictions, such as ξ independence of the halo bias, are confirmed by the simulations. Surprisingly, even in the Gaussian case we do not find that halo model predictions for stochasticity agree consistently with simulations, suggesting that semi-analytic modeling of stochasticity is generally more difficult than modeling halo bias.

  6. Numerical simulation of separated flows past bluff bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrou, Andreas Neophytou

    1986-12-01

    The steady two-dimensional flow past bluff bodies is simulated numerically using a hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian model. The boundary layer effects, such as the location of the separation points and the rate of the generation of vorticity, are determined by a boundary layer solver. This solver uses Prandtl's boundary layer equations transformed by the Falkner-Skan transformation and then solved using a cubic spline approximation and a mean weighted residual technique. The vorticity generated at separation is discretized into elemental point vortices and convected downstream into the wake in a Lagrangian manner. The wake is modeled in a finite Eulerian computational domain using a modified Cloud-in-Cell (CIC) method. The velocity field at each time step is obtained as a solution to the rotationality condition using the finite element method in a cartesian mesh with nine-node elements and biquadratic shape functions. The biquadratic shape functions introduce a higher order interpolation scheme for the distribution of the vorticity at the nodal points than the bilinear (area) interpolation used in the original CIC method. The higher order interpolation as used in the CIC formulation performs better than the bilinear interpolation of the original method. This is demonstrated by the simulation of an isolated Rankine vortex. The ability of the CIC method to simulate the dynamics of vortex structures is also tested for the cases of flow past a flat plate and a circular cylinder.

  7. Challenges to acellular biological scaffold mediated skeletal muscle tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Corona, Benjamin T; Greising, Sarah M

    2016-10-01

    Volumetric muscle loss (VML) injuries present a complex and heterogeneous clinical problem that results in a chronic loss of muscle tissue and strength. The primary limitation to muscle tissue regeneration after VML injury is the frank loss of all native muscle constituents in the defect, especially satellite cells and the basal lamina. Recent advancements in regenerative medicine have set forth encouraging and emerging translational and therapeutic options for these devastating injuries including the surgical implantation of acellular biological scaffolds. While these biomaterials can modulate the wound environment, the existing data do not support their capacity to promote appreciable muscle fiber regeneration that can contribute to skeletal muscle tissue functional improvements. An apparent restriction of endogenous satellite cell (i.e., pax7(+)) migration to acellular biological scaffolds likely underlies this deficiency. This work critically evaluates the role of an acellular biological scaffold in orchestrating skeletal muscle tissue regeneration, specifically when used as a regenerative medicine approach for VML injury. PMID:27472161

  8. The biasing scheme in N-body simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom

    1991-01-01

    A popular prescription for the galaxy formation, i.e., identifying peaks in the linear density field as sites of galaxy formation, is numerically justified under the Cold Dark Matter cosmogony. In particular, the peak-background scheme, originally developed to simplify analytic calculations of peak properties in a Gaussian random density field, is proven to be an excellent prescription for assigning peak tracers in low-resolution N-body simulations through many statistical comparisons. It is found that statistical properties of peak tracers allocated by the peak-background scheme closely resemble those of true peaks when the background smoothing length is about three times the galaxy scale and the correspondence improves as they evolve gravitationally. It is also shown that these peak particles are indeed strongly associated with nonlinear objects that are presently collapsed.

  9. N-BODY SIMULATION OF THE STEPHAN'S QUINTET

    SciTech Connect

    Renaud, Florent; Appleton, Philip N.; Xu, C. Kevin

    2010-11-20

    The evolution of compact groups of galaxies may represent one of the few places in the nearby universe in which massive galaxies are being forged through a complex set of processes involving tidal interaction, ram-pressure stripping, and perhaps finally 'dry mergers' of galaxies stripped of their cool gas. Using collisionless N-body simulations, we propose a possible scenario for the formation of one of the best-studied compact groups: Stephan's Quintet. We define a serial approach which allows us to consider the history of the group as a sequence of galaxy-galaxy interactions seen as relatively separate events in time, but chained together in such a way as to provide a plausible scenario that ends in the current configuration of the galaxies. By covering a large set of parameters, we claim that it is very unlikely that both major tidal tails of the group have been created by the interaction between the main galaxy and a single intruder. We propose instead a scenario based on two satellites orbiting the main disk, plus the recent involvement of an additional interloper, coming from the background at high speed. This purely N-body study of the quintet will provide a parameter-space exploration of the basic dynamics of the group that can be used as a basis for a more sophisticated N-body/hydrodynamic study of the group that is necessary to explain the giant shock structure and other purely gaseous phenomena observed in both the cold, warm and hot gas in the group.

  10. Second-order variational equations for N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rein, Hanno; Tamayo, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    First-order variational equations are widely used in N-body simulations to study how nearby trajectories diverge from one another. These allow for efficient and reliable determinations of chaos indicators such as the Maximal Lyapunov characteristic Exponent (MLE) and the Mean Exponential Growth factor of Nearby Orbits (MEGNO). In this paper we lay out the theoretical framework to extend the idea of variational equations to higher order. We explicitly derive the differential equations that govern the evolution of second-order variations in the N-body problem. Going to second order opens the door to new applications, including optimization algorithms that require the first and second derivatives of the solution, like the classical Newton's method. Typically, these methods have faster convergence rates than derivative-free methods. Derivatives are also required for Riemann manifold Langevin and Hamiltonian Monte Carlo methods which provide significantly shorter correlation times than standard methods. Such improved optimization methods can be applied to anything from radial-velocity/transit-timing-variation fitting to spacecraft trajectory optimization to asteroid deflection. We provide an implementation of first- and second-order variational equations for the publicly available REBOUND integrator package. Our implementation allows the simultaneous integration of any number of first- and second-order variational equations with the high-accuracy IAS15 integrator. We also provide routines to generate consistent and accurate initial conditions without the need for finite differencing.

  11. Numerical techniques for large cosmological N-body simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efstathiou, G.; Davis, M.; White, S. D. M.; Frenk, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques for carrying out large N-body simulations of the gravitational evolution of clustering in the fundamental cube of an infinite periodic universe are described and compared. The accuracy of the forces derived from several commonly used particle mesh schemes is examined, showing how submesh resolution can be achieved by including short-range forces between particles by direct summation techniques. The time integration of the equations of motion is discussed, and the accuracy of the codes for various choices of 'time' variable and time step is tested by considering energy conservation as well as by direct analysis of particle trajectories. Methods for generating initial particle positions and velocities corresponding to a growing mode representation of a specified power spectrum of linear density fluctuations are described. The effects of force resolution are studied and different simulation schemes are compared. An algorithm is implemented for generating initial conditions by varying the number of particles, the initial amplitude of density fluctuations, and the initial peculiar velocity field.

  12. New material model for simulating large impacts on rocky bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonge, A.; Barnouin, O.; Ramesh, K.

    2014-07-01

    Large impact craters on an asteroid can provide insights into its internal structure. These craters can expose material from the interior of the body at the impact site [e.g., 1]; additionally, the impact sends stress waves throughout the body, which interrogate the asteroid's interior. Through a complex interplay of processes, such impacts can result in a variety of motions, the consequence of which may appear as lineaments that are exposed over all or portions of the asteroid's surface [e.g., 2,3]. While analytic, scaling, and heuristic arguments can provide some insight into general phenomena on asteroids, interpreting the results of a specific impact event, or series of events, on a specific asteroid geometry generally necessitates the use of computational approaches that can solve for the stress and displacement history resulting from an impact event. These computational approaches require a constitutive model for the material, which relates the deformation history of a small material volume to the average force on the boundary of that material volume. In this work, we present a new material model that is suitable for simulating the failure of rocky materials during impact events. This material model is similar to the model discussed in [4]. The new material model incorporates dynamic sub-scale crack interactions through a micro-mechanics-based damage model, thermodynamic effects through the use of a Mie-Gruneisen equation of state, and granular flow of the fully damaged material. The granular flow model includes dilatation resulting from the mutual interaction of small fragments of material (grains) as they are forced to slide and roll over each other and includes a P-α type porosity model to account for compaction of the granular material in a subsequent impact event. The micro-mechanics-based damage model provides a direct connection between the flaw (crack) distribution in the material and the rate-dependent strength. By connecting the rate

  13. New material model for simulating large impacts on rocky bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonge, A.; Barnouin, O.; Ramesh, K.

    2014-07-01

    Large impact craters on an asteroid can provide insights into its internal structure. These craters can expose material from the interior of the body at the impact site [e.g., 1]; additionally, the impact sends stress waves throughout the body, which interrogate the asteroid's interior. Through a complex interplay of processes, such impacts can result in a variety of motions, the consequence of which may appear as lineaments that are exposed over all or portions of the asteroid's surface [e.g., 2,3]. While analytic, scaling, and heuristic arguments can provide some insight into general phenomena on asteroids, interpreting the results of a specific impact event, or series of events, on a specific asteroid geometry generally necessitates the use of computational approaches that can solve for the stress and displacement history resulting from an impact event. These computational approaches require a constitutive model for the material, which relates the deformation history of a small material volume to the average force on the boundary of that material volume. In this work, we present a new material model that is suitable for simulating the failure of rocky materials during impact events. This material model is similar to the model discussed in [4]. The new material model incorporates dynamic sub-scale crack interactions through a micro-mechanics-based damage model, thermodynamic effects through the use of a Mie-Gruneisen equation of state, and granular flow of the fully damaged material. The granular flow model includes dilatation resulting from the mutual interaction of small fragments of material (grains) as they are forced to slide and roll over each other and includes a P-α type porosity model to account for compaction of the granular material in a subsequent impact event. The micro-mechanics-based damage model provides a direct connection between the flaw (crack) distribution in the material and the rate-dependent strength. By connecting the rate

  14. Direct numerical simulation of the sea flows around blunt bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyushin, Pavel V.; Gushchin, Valentin A.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present paper is the demonstration of the opportunities of the mathematical modeling of the separated flows of the sea water around blunt bodies on the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) in the Boussinesq approximation. The 3D density stratified incompressible viscous fluid flows around a sphere have been investigated by means of the direct numerical simulation (DNS) on supercomputers and the visualization of the 3D vortex structures in the wake. For solving of NSE the Splitting on physical factors Method for Incompressible Fluid flows (SMIF) with hybrid explicit finite difference scheme (second-order accuracy in space, minimum scheme viscosity and dispersion, capable for work in wide range of the Reynolds (Re) and the internal Froude (Fr) numbers and monotonous) has been developed and successfully applied. The different transitions in sphere wakes with increasing of Re (10 < Re < 500) and decreasing of Fr (0.005 < Fr < 100) have been investigated in details. Thus the classifications of the viscous fluid flow regimes around a sphere have been refined.

  15. Relaxation in N-body simulations of spherical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellwood, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    I present empirical measurements of the rate of relaxation in N-body simulations of stable spherical systems and distinguish two separate types of relaxation: energy diffusion that is largely independent of particle mass, and energy exchange between particles of differing masses. While diffusion is generally regarded as a Fokker-Planck process, it can equivalently be viewed as the consequence of collective oscillations that are driven by shot noise. Empirical diffusion rates scale as N-1 in inhomogeneous models, in agreement with Fokker-Planck predictions, but collective effects cause relaxation to scale more nearly as N-1/2 in the special case of a uniform sphere. I use four different methods to compute the gravitational field, and a 100-fold range in the numbers of particles in each case. I find the rate at which energy is exchanged between particles of differing masses does not depend at all on the force determination method, but I do find the energy diffusion rate is marginally lower when a field method is used. The relaxation rate in 3D is virtually independent of the method used because it is dominated by distant encounters; any method to estimate the gravitational field that correctly captures the contributions from distant particles must also capture their statistical fluctuations and the collective modes they drive.

  16. FORMING CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS: N-BODY SIMULATIONS OF KEPLER-34

    SciTech Connect

    Lines, S.; Leinhardt, Z. M.; Paardekooper, S.; Baruteau, C.; Thebault, P.

    2014-02-10

    Observations of circumbinary planets orbiting very close to the central stars have shown that planet formation may occur in a very hostile environment, where the gravitational pull from the binary should be very strong on the primordial protoplanetary disk. Elevated impact velocities and orbit crossings from eccentricity oscillations are the primary contributors to high energy, potentially destructive collisions that inhibit the growth of aspiring planets. In this work, we conduct high-resolution, inter-particle gravity enabled N-body simulations to investigate the feasibility of planetesimal growth in the Kepler-34 system. We improve upon previous work by including planetesimal disk self-gravity and an extensive collision model to accurately handle inter-planetesimal interactions. We find that super-catastrophic erosion events are the dominant mechanism up to and including the orbital radius of Kepler-34(AB)b, making in situ growth unlikely. It is more plausible that Kepler-34(AB)b migrated from a region beyond 1.5 AU. Based on the conclusions that we have made for Kepler-34, it seems likely that all of the currently known circumbinary planets have also migrated significantly from their formation location with the possible exception of Kepler-47(AB)c.

  17. SKID: Finding Gravitationally Bound Groups in N-body Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N-Body Shop

    2011-02-01

    SKID finds gravitationally bound groups in N-body simulations. The SKID program will group different types of particles depending on the type of input binary file. This could be either dark matter particles, gas particles, star particles or gas and star particles depending on what is in the input tipsy binary file. Once groups with at least a certain minimum number of members have been determined, SKID will remove particles which are not bound to the group. SKID must use the original positions of all the particles to determine whether or not particles are bound. This procedure which we call unbinding, is again dependent on the type of grouping we are dealing with. There are two cases, one for dark matter only or star particles only (case 1 unbinding), the other for inputs including gas (also stars in a dark matter environment this is case 2 unbinding). Skid version 1.3 is a much improved version of the old denmax-1.1 version. The new name was given to avoid confusion with the DENMAX program of Gelb & Bertschinger, and although it is based on the same idea it represents a substantial evolution in the method.

  18. Corrosion and tribocorrosion of hafnium in simulated body fluids.

    PubMed

    Rituerto Sin, J; Neville, A; Emami, N

    2014-08-01

    Hafnium is a passive metal with good biocompatibility and osteogenesis, however, little is known about its resistance to wear and corrosion in biological environments. The corrosion and tribocorrosion behavior of hafnium and commercially pure (CP) titanium in simulated body fluids were investigated using electrochemical techniques. Cyclic polarization scans and open circuit potential measurements were performed in 0.9% NaCl solution and 25% bovine calf serum solution to assess the effect of organic species on the corrosion behavior of the metal. A pin-on-plate configuration tribometer and a three electrode electrochemical cell were integrated to investigate the tribocorrosion performance of the studied materials. The results showed that hafnium has good corrosion resistance. The corrosion density currents measured in its passive state were lower than those measured in the case of CP titanium; however, it showed a higher tendency to suffer from localized corrosion, which was more acute when imperfections were present on the surface. The electrochemical breakdown of the oxide layer was retarded in the presence of proteins. Tribocorrosion tests showed that hafnium has the ability to quickly repassivate after the oxide layer was damaged; however, it showed higher volumetric loss than CP titanium in equivalent wear-corrosion conditions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 102B: 1157-1164, 2014. PMID:24376175

  19. N-body simulations of viscous instability of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salo, Heikki; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2010-04-01

    We study viscous instability of planetary rings in terms of N-body simulations. We show that for rings composed of fairly elastic particles (e.g. as in Hatzes et al. [Hatzes, A., Bridges, F.G., Lin, D.N.C., 1988. Collisional properties of ice spheres at low impact velocities. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 231, 1091-1115]) the instability may lead to the spontaneous formation of dense ringlets in a background of lower density. In most parts of Saturn's rings the particle collisions are probably much more dissipative, as suggested by the presence of self-gravity wakes, and classic viscous instability should be suppressed. However, our results demonstrate that the mechanism of viscous instability itself is valid. The dynamical effects of size-dependent elasticity in a system with a size distribution have never been studied before. We show that this may in principle lead to a size-selective viscous instability, small particles concentrating on ringlets against the more uniform background of large particles.

  20. Classical simulation of quantum many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yichen

    Classical simulation of quantum many-body systems is in general a challenging problem for the simple reason that the dimension of the Hilbert space grows exponentially with the system size. In particular, merely encoding a generic quantum many-body state requires an exponential number of bits. However, condensed matter physicists are mostly interested in local Hamiltonians and especially their ground states, which are highly non-generic. Thus, we might hope that at least some physical systems allow efficient classical simulation. Starting with one-dimensional (1D) quantum systems (i.e., the simplest nontrivial case), the first basic question is: Which classes of states have efficient classical representations? It turns out that this question is quantitatively related to the amount of entanglement in the state, for states with "little entanglement'' are well approximated by matrix product states (a data structure that can be manipulated efficiently on a classical computer). At a technical level, the mathematical notion for "little entanglement'' is area law, which has been proved for unique ground states in 1D gapped systems. We establish an area law for constant-fold degenerate ground states in 1D gapped systems and thus explain the effectiveness of matrix-product-state methods in (e.g.) symmetry breaking phases. This result might not be intuitively trivial as degenerate ground states in gapped systems can be long-range correlated. Suppose an efficient classical representation exists. How can one find it efficiently? The density matrix renormalization group is the leading numerical method for computing ground states in 1D quantum systems. However, it is a heuristic algorithm and the possibility that it may fail in some cases cannot be completely ruled out. Recently, a provably efficient variant of the density matrix renormalization group has been developed for frustration-free 1D gapped systems. We generalize this algorithm to all (i.e., possibly frustrated) 1D

  1. Possible role of dentin matrix in region-specific deposition of cellular and acellular extrinsic fibre cementum.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yoshiro; Sakai, Hideo; Watanabe, Eiko; Ideguchi-Ohma, Noriko; Jayawardena, Chantha K; Arai, Kazumi; Asawa, Yukiyo; Nakano, Yukiko; Shuda, Yoko; Sakamoto, Yujiro; Terashima, Tatsuo

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism whereby a region-specific deposition of the two types of cementum (cellular cementum and acellular extrinsic fibre cementum) is regulated on the growing root surface was tested using bisphosphonate-affected teeth of young rats and guinea pigs. The animals were injected subcutaneously with 8 or 10 mg P x kg body weight(-1) x day(-1) of 1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-bisphosphonate (HEBP) for 1 or 2 weeks. In rat molars, HEBP prevented mineralization of newly formed root dentin matrix and totally inhibited de novo deposition of acellular extrinsic fibre cementum. Instead, thick cellular cementum was induced on the non-mineralized root dentin surface, irrespective of the position of the root. In both animals, cellular cementum was also induced on the non-mineralized surface of root analogue dentin in HEBP-affected incisors, where only acellular extrinsic fibre cementum is deposited under normal conditions. In normal rat molars, dentin sialoprotein (DSP) was concentrated along the dentin-cellular cementum border, but not that of dentin and acellular extrinsic fibre cementum. In HEBP-affected rat incisors, DSP was shown to penetrate through the non-mineralized dentin into the surrounding tissues, but not through the mineralized portions. These data suggest that, at the site of cellular cementum formation, putative inducing factors for cellular cementum might diffuse into the periodontal space through the newly deposited mantle dentin matrix before it is mineralized. At earlier stages of root formation, mantle dentin might mineralize more promptly not to allow such diffusion. The timing of mineralization of mantle dentin matrix might be the key determinant of the types of the cementum deposited on the growing root surface. PMID:14756246

  2. Smooth Potential Chaos and N-Body Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandrup, Henry E.; Sideris, Ioannis V.

    2003-03-01

    Integrations in fixed N-body realizations of smooth density distributions corresponding to a chaotic galactic potential can be used to derive reliable estimates of the largest (finite-time) Lyapunov exponent χS associated with an orbit in the smooth potential generated from the same initial condition, even though the N-body orbit is typically characterized by an N-body exponent χN>>χS. This can be accomplished by either comparing initially nearby orbits in a single N-body system or tracking orbits with the same initial condition evolved in two different N-body realizations of the same smooth density.

  3. A comparative study of acellular nerve xenografts and allografts in repairing rat facial nerve defects.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haitao; Xiao, Hongxi; Liu, Huawei; Niu, Yu; Yan, Rongzeng; Hu, Min

    2015-10-01

    Acellular nerves are composed of a basal lamina tube, which retains sufficient bioactivity to promote axon regeneration, thereby repairing peripheral nerve gaps. However, the clinical application of acellular allografts has been restricted due to its limited availability. To investigate whether xenografts, a substitute to allograft acellular nerves in abundant supply, could efficiently promote nerve regeneration, rabbit and rat acellular nerve grafts were used to reconstruct 1 cm defects in Wistar rat facial nerves. Autologous peroneal nerve grafts served as a positive control group. A total of 12 weeks following the surgical procedure, the axon number, myelinated axon number, myelin sheath thickness, and nerve conduction velocity of the rabbit and rat‑derived acellular nerve grafts were similar, whereas the fiber diameter of the rabbit‑derived acellular xenografts decreased, as compared with those of rat‑derived acellular allografts. Autografts exerted superior effects on nerve regeneration; however, no significant difference was observed between the axon number in the autograft group, as compared with the two acellular groups. These results suggested that autografts perform better than acellular nerve grafts, and chemically extracted acellular allografts and xenografts have similar effects on the regeneration of short facial nerve defects. PMID:26239906

  4. Numerical Simulation of Floating Bodies in Extreme Free Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng Zheng; Causon, Derek; Mingham, Clive; Qiang, Ling

    2010-05-01

    and efficient. Firstly, extreme design wave conditions are generated in an empty NWT and compared with physical experiments as a precursor to calculations to investigate the survivability of the Bobber device operating in a challenging wave climate. Secondly, we consider a bench-mark test case involving in a first order regular wave maker acting on a fixed cylinder and Pelamis. Finally, a floating Bobber has been simulated under extreme wave conditions. These results will be reported at the meeting. Causon D.M., Ingram D.M., Mingham C.G., Yang G. Pearson R.V. (2000). Calculation of shallow water flows using a Cartesian cut cell approach. Advances in Water resources, 23: 545-562. Causon D.M., Ingram D.M., Mingham C.G. (2000). A Cartesian cut cell method for shallow water flows with moving boundaries. Advances in Water resources, 24: 899-911. Dalzell J.F. 1999 A note on finite depth second-order wave-wave interactions. Appl. Ocean Res. 21, 105-111. Ning D.Z., Zang J., Liu S.X. Eatock Taylor R. Teng B. & Taylor P.H. 2009 Free surface and wave kinematics for nonlinear focused wave groups. J. Ocean Engineering. Accepted. Hu Z.Z., Causon D.M., Mingham C.M. and Qian L.(2009). Numerical wave tank study of a wave energy converter in heave. Proceedlings 19th ISOPE conference, Osaka, Japan Qian L., Causon D.M. & Mingham C.G., Ingram D.M. 2006 A free-surface capturing method for two fluid flows with moving bodies. Proc. Roy. Soc. London, Vol. A 462 21-42.

  5. Bluff Body Flow Simulation Using a Vortex Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony Leonard; Phillippe Chatelain; Michael Rebel

    2004-09-30

    Heavy ground vehicles, especially those involved in long-haul freight transportation, consume a significant part of our nation's energy supply. it is therefore of utmost importance to improve their efficiency, both to reduce emissions and to decrease reliance on imported oil. At highway speeds, more than half of the power consumed by a typical semi truck goes into overcoming aerodynamic drag, a fraction which increases with speed and crosswind. Thanks to better tools and increased awareness, recent years have seen substantial aerodynamic improvements by the truck industry, such as tractor/trailer height matching, radiator area reduction, and swept fairings. However, there remains substantial room for improvement as understanding of turbulent fluid dynamics grows. The group's research effort focused on vortex particle methods, a novel approach for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Where common CFD methods solve or model the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid which stretches from the truck surface outward, vortex particle methods solve the vorticity equation on a Lagrangian basis of smooth particles and do not require a grid. They worked to advance the state of the art in vortex particle methods, improving their ability to handle the complicated, high Reynolds number flow around heavy vehicles. Specific challenges that they have addressed include finding strategies to accurate capture vorticity generation and resultant forces at the truck wall, handling the aerodynamics of spinning bodies such as tires, application of the method to the GTS model, computation time reduction through improved integration methods, a closest point transform for particle method in complex geometrics, and work on large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling.

  6. Modal reduction strategies for interconnected flexible bodies simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eke, F. O.; Man, G. K.

    1989-01-01

    Multi-body dynamics programs require characterization of each body. The Galileo spacecraft system modes to be retained were determined using available criteria, modal influence coefficients, and bode. The descent to component level was achieved via a two-phase diagonalization process starting with submatrices of truncated augmented system modal matrix.

  7. Rigid Body Motion in Stereo 3D Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the difficulties experienced by first-grade students studying rigid body motion at Sofia University. Most quantities describing the rigid body are in relations that the students find hard to visualize and understand. They also lose the notion of cause-result relations between vector quantities, such as the relation between…

  8. Body Constraints on Motor Simulation in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conson, Massimiliano; Hamilton, Antonia; De Bellis, Francesco; Errico, Domenico; Improta, Ilaria; Mazzarella, Elisabetta; Trojano, Luigi; Frolli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Developmental data suggested that mental simulation skills become progressively dissociated from overt motor activity across development. Thus, efficient simulation is rather independent from current sensorimotor information. Here, we tested the impact of bodily (sensorimotor) information on simulation skills of adolescents with Autism Spectrum…

  9. Infection in the Nasal Tip Caused by Acellular Dermal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kun Hee

    2015-12-01

    A 19-year-old female patient visited our clinic for rhinoplasty. She complained about her low take-off point, which was apparent in profile view, and wanted slight tip projection. She refused additional cartilage harvesting from ears or ribs but consented to the use of homologous tissue, including acellular dermal matrix, for her dorsum and tip. Septoturbinoplasty was performed, and only a very small amount of septal cartilage could be harvested. It was used as both the columellar strut and the alar rim graft. Nasal dorsum and tip were augmented with acellular dermal matrix. Three months postoperatively, she experienced a few episodes of edema and redness on her nasal tip, followed by pus exudation from the nasal skin. Six months postoperatively, she underwent revision rhinoplasty for removal of inflamed grafts, and onlay tip graft with homologous rib cartilage was performed. Nasal dorsum or tip grafts are an integral part of Asian rhinoplasty. Autogenous tissue is the gold standard for grafting materials. However, the limited availability of autogenous tissue and the preference of patients and surgeons for artificial surgical implants make Asian rhinoplasty challenging. Unavailability of autogenous cartilage and patient refusal of artificial implants led to the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in the nasal dorsum and tip for this case. This is the first report of postoperative complication because of infection rather than absorption after ADM use. PMID:26894006

  10. Extreme Environment Simulation - Current and New Capabilities to Simulate Venus and Other Planetary Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kremic, Tibor; Vento, Dan; Lalli, Nick; Palinski, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Science, technology, and planetary mission communities have a growing interest in components and systems that are capable of working in extreme (high) temperature and pressure conditions. Terrestrial applications range from scientific research, aerospace, defense, automotive systems, energy storage and power distribution, deep mining and others. As the target environments get increasingly extreme, capabilities to develop and test the sensors and systems designed to operate in such environments will be required. An application of particular importance to the planetary science community is the ability for a robotic lander to survive on the Venus surface where pressures are nearly 100 times that of Earth and temperatures approach 500C. The scientific importance and relevance of Venus missions are stated in the current Planetary Decadal Survey. Further, several missions to Venus were proposed in the most recent Discovery call. Despite this interest, the ability to accurately simulate Venus conditions at a scale that can test and validate instruments and spacecraft systems and accurately simulate the Venus atmosphere has been lacking. This paper discusses and compares the capabilities that are known to exist within and outside the United States to simulate the extreme environmental conditions found in terrestrial or planetary surfaces including the Venus atmosphere and surface. The paper then focuses on discussing the recent additional capability found in the NASA Glenn Extreme Environment Rig (GEER). The GEER, located at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is designed to simulate not only the temperature and pressure extremes described, but can also accurately reproduce the atmospheric compositions of bodies in the solar system including those with acidic and hazardous elements. GEER capabilities and characteristics are described along with operational considerations relevant to potential users. The paper presents initial operating results and concludes

  11. Ectopic bone formation in rapidly fabricated acellular injectable dense collagen-Bioglass hybrid scaffolds via gel aspiration-ejection.

    PubMed

    Miri, Amir K; Muja, Naser; Kamranpour, Neysan O; Lepry, William C; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Clarke, Susan A; Nazhat, Showan N

    2016-04-01

    Gel aspiration-ejection (GAE) has recently been introduced as an effective technique for the rapid production of injectable dense collagen (IDC) gel scaffolds with tunable collagen fibrillar densities (CFDs) and microstructures. Herein, a GAE system was applied for the advanced production and delivery of IDC and IDC-Bioglass(®) (IDC-BG) hybrid gel scaffolds for potential bone tissue engineering applications. The efficacy of GAE in generating mineralizable IDC-BG gels (from an initial 75-25 collagen-BG ratio) produced through needle gauge numbers 8G (3.4 mm diameter and 6 wt% CFD) and 14G (1.6 mm diameter and 14 wt% CFD) was investigated. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of as-made gels revealed an increase in collagen fibril alignment with needle gauge number. In vitro mineralization of IDC-BG gels was confirmed where carbonated hydroxyapatite was detected as early as day 1 in simulated body fluid, which progressively increased up to day 14. In vivo mineralization of, and host response to, acellular IDC and IDC-BG gel scaffolds were further investigated following subcutaneous injection in adult rats. Mineralization, neovascularization and cell infiltration into the scaffolds was enhanced by the addition of BG and at day 21 post injection, there was evidence of remodelling of granulation tissue into woven bone-like tissue in IDC-BG. SHG imaging of explanted scaffolds indicated collagen fibril remodelling through cell infiltration and mineralization over time. In sum, the results suggest that IDC-BG hybrid gels have osteoinductive properties and potentially offer a novel therapeutic approach for procedures requiring the injectable delivery of a malleable and dynamic bone graft that mineralizes under physiological conditions. PMID:26871889

  12. Message in the "Body": Effects of Simulation in Sentence Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Manami

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the role of mental simulation in message formulation and grammatical encoding in two typologically distinct languages, English and Japanese. It examines relationships among physical motion, mental simulation, and sentence production, following the claims of Perceptual Symbol Systems (Barsalou, 1999) that people understand…

  13. Efficiency and capabilities of multi-body simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandervoort, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Simulation efficiency and capability go hand in hand. The more capability you have the lower the efficiency will be. The efficiency and capabilities are discussed. The lesson learned about generic simulation is: Don't rule out any capabilities at the beginning, but keep each one on a switch so it can be bypassed when warranted by a specific application.

  14. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of the movement of the flexible body under different constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yuzhen; Li, Jun; Zhu, Linhang; Du, Jiayou; Jin, Yingzi; Lin, Peifeng

    2014-12-01

    For the large deformation of the flexible body may cause the fluid grid distortion, which will make the numerical calculation tedious, even to end, the numerical simulation of the flexible body coupling with the fluid is always a tough problem. In this paper, the flexible body is under two kinds of constrained conditions and the ratio of length-diameter is 1:30. The Reynolds number of the airflow is 513, belonging to the area of low Reynolds number. The control equations of the coupling of flexible body with airflow are built and the adaptive grid control method is adopted to conduct the three-dimensional numerical simulation of the movement of the flexible body. The numerical results show that it is possible to simulate the characteristics of the flexible body's movement in the low Reynolds number airflow when the appropriate control equations are modeled and suitable equation-solving method is adopted. Unconstrained flexible body would turn over forward along the airflow's diffusion direction, while constrained flexible body in the flow field will make periodic rotation motion along the axis of the flexible body, and the bending deformation is more obvious than that of unconstrained flexible body. The preliminary three-dimensional numerical simulation can provide references for further research on the characteristics of the yarn movement in high Reynolds number airflow.

  15. Visualization of N-body Simulations in Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knop, Robert A.; Ames, J.; Djorgovski, G.; Farr, W.; Hut, P.; Johnson, A.; McMillan, S.; Nakasone, A.; Vesperini, E.

    2010-01-01

    We report on work to use virtual worlds for visualizing the results of N-body calculations, on three levels. First, we have written a demonstration 3-body solver entirely in the scripting language of the popularly used virtual world Second Life. Second, we have written a physics module for the open source virtual world OpenSim that performs N-body calculations as the physics engine for the server, allowing natural 3-d visualization of the solution as the solution is being performed. Finally, we give an initial report on the potential use of virtual worlds to visualize calculations which have previously been performed, or which are being performed in other processes and reported to the virtual world server. This work has been performed as part of the Meta-Institute of Computational Astrophysics (MICA). http://www.mica-vw.org

  16. The direct numerical simulations of the turbulent wakes of axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, J. J.; Metcalfe, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Results of direct numerical simulations of turbulence are compared with both laboratory data and self-similarity theory for the case of the turbulent wakes of towed, axisymmetric bodies. In general, the agreement of the simulation results with both the laboratory data and the self-similarity theory is good, although the comparisons are hampered by inadequate procedures for initializing the numerical simulations.

  17. Computer simulation of plasma and N-body problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Miller, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    The following FORTRAN language computer codes are presented: (1) efficient two- and three-dimensional central force potential solvers; (2) a three-dimensional simulator of an isolated galaxy which incorporates the potential solver; (3) a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulator of the Jeans instability in an infinite self-gravitating compressible gas; and (4) a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulator of a rotating self-gravitating compressible gaseous system of which rectangular coordinate and superior polar coordinate versions were written.

  18. G-Guidance Interface Design for Small Body Mission Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Carson, John; Phan, Linh

    2008-01-01

    The G-Guidance software implements a guidance and control (G and C) algorithm for small-body, autonomous proximity operations, developed under the Small Body GN and C task at JPL. The software is written in Matlab and interfaces with G-OPT, a JPL-developed optimization package written in C that provides G-Guidance with guaranteed convergence to a solution in a finite computation time with a prescribed accuracy. The resulting program is computationally efficient and is a prototype of an onboard, real-time algorithm for autonomous guidance and control. Two thruster firing schemes are available in G-Guidance, allowing tailoring of the software for specific mission maneuvers. For example, descent, landing, or rendezvous benefit from a thruster firing at the maneuver termination to mitigate velocity errors. Conversely, ascent or separation maneuvers benefit from an immediate firing to avoid potential drift toward a second body. The guidance portion of this software explicitly enforces user-defined control constraints and thruster silence times while minimizing total fuel usage. This program is currently specialized to small-body proximity operations, but the underlying method can be generalized to other applications.

  19. Porcine acellular lung matrix for wound healing and abdominal wall reconstruction: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Moure, Joseph S; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Rhudy, Jessica R; Cabrera, Fernando J; Acharya, Ghanashyam S; Tasciotti, Ennio; Sakamoto, Jason; Nichols, Joan E

    2016-01-01

    Surgical wound healing applications require bioprosthetics that promote cellular infiltration and vessel formation, metrics associated with increased mechanical strength and resistance to infection. Porcine acellular lung matrix is a novel tissue scaffold known to promote cell adherence while minimizing inflammatory reactions. In this study, we evaluate the capacity of porcine acellular lung matrix to sustain cellularization and neovascularization in a rat model of subcutaneous implantation and chronic hernia repair. We hypothesize that, compared to human acellular dermal matrix, porcine acellular lung matrix would promote greater cell infiltration and vessel formation. Following pneumonectomy, porcine lungs were processed and characterized histologically and by scanning electron microscopy to demonstrate efficacy of the decellularization. Using a rat model of subcutaneou implantation, porcine acellular lung matrices (n = 8) and human acellular dermal matrices (n = 8) were incubated in vivo for 6 weeks. To evaluate performance under mechanically stressed conditions, porcine acellular lung matrices (n = 7) and human acellular dermal matrices (n = 7) were implanted in a rat model of chronic ventral incisional hernia repair for 6 weeks. After 6 weeks, tissues were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin and Masson’s trichrome staining to quantify cell infiltration and vessel formation. Porcine acellular lung matrices were shown to be successfully decellularized. Following subcutaneous implantation, macroscopic vessel formation was evident. Porcine acellular lung matrices demonstrated sufficient incorporation and showed no evidence of mechanical failure after ventral hernia repair. Porcine acellular lung matrices demonstrated significantly greater cellular density and vessel formation when compared to human acellular dermal matrix. Vessel sizes were similar across all groups. Cell infiltration and vessel formation are well-characterized metrics of incorporation

  20. Porcine acellular lung matrix for wound healing and abdominal wall reconstruction: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Moure, Joseph S; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Rhudy, Jessica R; Cabrera, Fernando J; Acharya, Ghanashyam S; Tasciotti, Ennio; Sakamoto, Jason; Nichols, Joan E

    2016-01-01

    Surgical wound healing applications require bioprosthetics that promote cellular infiltration and vessel formation, metrics associated with increased mechanical strength and resistance to infection. Porcine acellular lung matrix is a novel tissue scaffold known to promote cell adherence while minimizing inflammatory reactions. In this study, we evaluate the capacity of porcine acellular lung matrix to sustain cellularization and neovascularization in a rat model of subcutaneous implantation and chronic hernia repair. We hypothesize that, compared to human acellular dermal matrix, porcine acellular lung matrix would promote greater cell infiltration and vessel formation. Following pneumonectomy, porcine lungs were processed and characterized histologically and by scanning electron microscopy to demonstrate efficacy of the decellularization. Using a rat model of subcutaneou implantation, porcine acellular lung matrices (n = 8) and human acellular dermal matrices (n = 8) were incubated in vivo for 6 weeks. To evaluate performance under mechanically stressed conditions, porcine acellular lung matrices (n = 7) and human acellular dermal matrices (n = 7) were implanted in a rat model of chronic ventral incisional hernia repair for 6 weeks. After 6 weeks, tissues were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining to quantify cell infiltration and vessel formation. Porcine acellular lung matrices were shown to be successfully decellularized. Following subcutaneous implantation, macroscopic vessel formation was evident. Porcine acellular lung matrices demonstrated sufficient incorporation and showed no evidence of mechanical failure after ventral hernia repair. Porcine acellular lung matrices demonstrated significantly greater cellular density and vessel formation when compared to human acellular dermal matrix. Vessel sizes were similar across all groups. Cell infiltration and vessel formation are well-characterized metrics of incorporation

  1. Forward dynamics simulation of human body under tilting perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, D.; Pasha Zanoosi, A. A.; Sadeghi-Mehr, M.

    2012-02-01

    Human body uses different strategies to maintain its stability and these strategies vary from fixed-foot strategies to strategies which foot is moved in order to increase the support base. Tilting movement of foot is one type of the perturbations usually is exposed to human body. In the presence of such perturbations human body must employ appropriate reactions to prevent threats like falling. But it is not clear that how human body maintains its stability by central nervous system (CNS). At present study it is tried that by presenting a musculoskeletal model of human lower extremity with four links, three degrees of freedom (DOF) and eight skeletal muscles, the level of muscle activations causes the maintenance of stability, be investigated. Using forward dynamics solution, leads to a more general problem, rather than inverse dynamics. Hence, forward dynamics solution by forward optimization has been used for solving this highly nonlinear problem. To this end, first the system's equations of motion has been derived using lagrangian dynamics. Eight Hill-type muscles as actuators of the system were modeled. Because determination of muscle forces considering their number is an undetermined problem, optimization of an appropriate goal function should be practiced. For optimization problem, the characteristics of genetic algorithms as a method based on direct search, and the direct collocation method, has been profited. Also by considering requirements of problem, some constraints such as conservation of model stability are entered into optimization procedure. Finally to investigate validation of model, the results from optimization and experimental data are compared and good agreements are obtained.

  2. Cardiovascular model for the simulation of exercise, lower body negative pressure, and tilt experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croston, R. C.; Fitzjerrell, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical model and digital computer simulation of the human cardiovascular system and its controls have been developed to simulate pulsatile dynamic responses to the cardiovascular experiments of the Skylab missions and to selected physiological stresses of manned space flight. Specific model simulations of the bicycle ergometry, lower body negative pressure, and tilt experiments have been developed and verified for 1-g response by comparison with available experimental data. The zero-g simulations of two Skylab experiments are discussed.

  3. The Million-Body Problem: Particle Simulations in Astrophysics

    ScienceCinema

    Rasio, Fred [Northwestern University

    2009-09-01

    Computer simulations using particles play a key role in astrophysics. They are widely used to study problems across the entire range of astrophysical scales, from the dynamics of stars, gaseous nebulae, and galaxies, to the formation of the largest-scale structures in the universe. The 'particles' can be anything from elementary particles to macroscopic fluid elements, entire stars, or even entire galaxies. Using particle simulations as a common thread, this talk will present an overview of computational astrophysics research currently done in our theory group at Northwestern. Topics will include stellar collisions and the gravothermal catastrophe in dense star clusters.

  4. Ligament reconstruction with tendon interposition using an acellular dermal allograft for thumb carpometacarpal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Zanaros, George; Sotereanos, Dean G

    2009-03-01

    Ligament reconstruction tendon interposition arthroplasty is currently the preferred technique for carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb by most surgeons. Despite its efficacy, morbidity has been associated with the harvest of the flexor carpi radialis tendon. Using an allograft as material for arthroplasty, donor site morbidity is avoided. In this report, we present our surgical technique to perform ligament reconstruction tendon interposition arthroplasty using an acellular dermal matrix allograft (GraftJacket) in patients with Eaton stages II, III, and IV symptomatic first carpometacarpal arthritis.One hundred thumbs with trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis underwent surgical treatment using GraftJacket allograft instead of the flexor carpi radialis tendon autograft. Each patient was followed for a minimum of 12 months. The surgical procedure included trapezial excision and identification of the flexor carpi radialis. The allograft was cut to create a 15-cm strip. The ligament reconstruction was performed by passing the strip around the flexor carpi radialis tendon and suturing it to the base of the thumb metacarpal base through an intramedullary drill hole. The remaining portion of the allograft was fashioned as an interposition mass (anchovy) and interposed between the scaphoid and the base of the first metacarpal.All but 1 patient experienced significant improvement in his or her pain scale rating and grip and pinch strengths. Outcomes from this study compare very favorably with those of other series. No patients experienced a foreign body reaction or infection in this series. We believe that the use of an acellular dermal allograft for both ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition provides a safe and an effective alternative technique for the treatment of advanced first carpometacarpal arthritis. PMID:19276927

  5. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  6. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-07-15

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  7. Bluff-body flow simulations using hybrid RANS/LES.

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Christopher John; DeChant, Lawrence Justin.; Payne, Jeffrey L.; Blottner, Frederick G.

    2003-06-01

    The Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) and steady-state Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence modeling approaches are examined for the incompressible flow over a square cross-section cylinder at a Reynolds number of 21,400. A compressible flow code is used which employes a second-order Roe upwind spatial discretization. Efforts are made to assess the numerical accuracy of the DES predictions with regards to statistical convergence, iterative convergence, and temporal and spatial discretization error. Three-dimensional DES simulations compared well with two-dimensional DES simulations, suggesting that the dominant vortex shedding mechanism is effectively two-dimensional. The two-dimensional simulations are validated via comparison to experimental data for mean and RMS velocities as well as Reynolds stress in the cylinder wake. The steady-state RANS models significantly overpredict the size of the recirculation zone, thus underpredicting the drag coefficient relative to the experimental value. The DES model is found to give good agreement with the experimental velocity data in the wake, drag coefficient, and recirculation zone length.

  8. Analytical stability and simulation response study for a coupled two-body system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, K. M.; Roberts, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical stability study and a digital simulation response study of two connected rigid bodies are documented. Relative rotation of the bodies at the connection is allowed, thereby providing a model suitable for studying system stability and response during a soft-dock regime. Provisions are made of a docking port axes alignment torque and a despin torque capability for encountering spinning payloads. Although the stability analysis is based on linearized equations, the digital simulation is based on nonlinear models.

  9. Phase II trial of whole-cell pertussis vaccine vs an acellular vaccine containing agglutinogens.

    PubMed

    Miller, E; Ashworth, L A; Robinson, A; Waight, P A; Irons, L I

    1991-01-12

    An acellular pertussis vaccine containing agglutinogens 2 and 3, pertussis toxin, and filamentous haemagglutinin was developed by the Centre for Applied Microbiology and Research in the UK. 188 infants were entered into a randomised blind trial and received either the acellular or a whole-cell vaccine, combined with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, in a 3, 5, and 8-10 month schedule. Local reactions were similar in the two groups but significantly fewer infants had systemic symptoms after the acellular vaccine. Mean log-antibody titres to the agglutinogen and toxin components were higher with the acellular than with the whole-cell vaccine. Persistence of antibodies one year after the third dose was also better in the acellular group. PMID:1670725

  10. Use of an Acellular Regenerative Tissue Matrix Over Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, D. Heath

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Bioengineered skin grafts, including acellular dermal matrices, may be effective in treating lower extremity and trunk wounds that are not responsive to traditional wound management. Acellular dermal wound matrix is derived from human acellular dermal wound matrix (HADWM) tissue and provides a scaffold that supports cellular repopulation and revascularization. The major structural components of the dermis are retained during processing, and a single application has been shown to help achieve wound closure. Methods: This patient case series examined the use of HADWM on lower extremity and trunk wounds in 11 patients (6 male and 5 female) with a mean age of 55 years (range: 31–83 years). Wounds were debrided 1 to 2 times, followed by placement of HADWM (range: 4–330 cm2) on wounds that varied from the dorsal surface of the foot, lower abdomen, and lower extremity to the Achilles flap. A nonadherent layer in conjunction with bacitracin was placed over HADWM. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) was placed over the HADWM and initiated continuously at −125 mm Hg for 1 to 2 weeks. After the application of NPWT, HADWM was covered with various gauze dressings using mineral oil. Results: All patients completed their treatment successfully, and follow-up ranged from 1 week to 6 months. One patient experienced an infection, which resulted in partial graft loss that required replacement with HADWM and NPWT. No additional complications occurred in the other patients. Conclusions: This patient case series demonstrated successful use of HADWM and NPWT, which further supports published studies documenting HADWM success in chronic wounds. PMID:24324850

  11. Whooping cough, twenty years from acellular vaccines introduction.

    PubMed

    Greco, D; Esposito, S; Tozzi, A; Pandolfi, E; Icardi, G; Giammanco, A

    2015-01-01

    Clinical pertussis resulting from infection with B. pertussis is a significant medical and public health problem, despite the huge success of vaccination that has greatly reduced its incidence. The whole cell vaccine had an undeniable success over the last 50 years, but its acceptance was strongly inhibited by fear, only partially justified, of severe side effects, but also, in the Western world, by the difficulty to enter in combination with other vaccines: today multi-vaccine formulations are essential to maintain a high vaccination coverage. The advent of acellular vaccines was greeted with enthusiasm by the public health world: in the Nineties, several controlled vaccine trials were carried out: they demonstrated a high safety and good efficacy of new vaccines. In fact, in the Western world, the acellular vaccines completely replaced the whole cells ones. In the last years, ample evidence on the variety of protection of these vaccines linked to the presence of different antigens of Bordetella pertussis was collected. It also became clear that the protection provided, on average around 80%, leaves every year a significant cohort of vaccinated susceptible even in countries with a vaccination coverage of 95%, such as Italy. Finally, it was shown that, as for the pertussis disease, protection decreases over time, to leave a proportion of adolescents and adults unprotected. Waiting for improved pertussis vaccines, the disease control today requires a different strategy that includes a booster at 5 years for infants, but also boosters for teenagers and young adults, re-vaccination of health care personnel, and possibly of pregnant women and of those who are in contact with infants (cocooning). Finally, the quest for better vaccines inevitably tends towards pertussis acellular vaccines with at least three components, which have demonstrated superior effectiveness and have been largely in use in Italy for fifteen years. PMID:26051141

  12. Finite element simulation of food transport through the esophageal body

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Fung, Tat Ching; Chian, Kerm Sim; Chong, Chuh Khiun

    2007-01-01

    The peristaltic transport of swallowed material in the esophagus is a neuro-muscular function involving the nerve control, bolus-structure interaction, and structure-mechanics relationship of the tissue. In this study, a finite element model (FEM) was developed to simulate food transport through the esophagus. The FEM consists of three components, i.e., tissue, food bolus and peristaltic wave, as well as the interactions between them. The transport process was simulated as three stages, i.e., the filling of fluid, contraction of circular muscle and traveling of peristaltic wave. It was found that the maximal passive intraluminal pressure due to bolus expansion was in the range of 0.8-10 kPa and it increased with bolus volume and fluid viscosity. It was found that the highest normal and shear stresses were at the inner surface of muscle layer. In addition, the peak pressure required for the fluid flow was predicted to be 1-15 kPa at the bolus tail. The diseases of systemic sclerosis or osteogenesis imperfecta, with the remodeled microstructures and mechanical properties, might induce the malfunction of esophageal transport. In conclusion, the current simulation was demonstrated to be able to capture the main characteristics in the intraluminal pressure and bolus geometry as measured experimentally. Therefore, the finite element model established in this study could be used to further explore the mechanism of esophageal transport in various clinical applications. PMID:17457965

  13. Modeling and Simulation of Anchoring Processess for Small Body Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Mazahar, Hammad; Negrut, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes recent work done in modeling and simulation of anchoring processes in granular media, with applications to anchoring on a Near Earth Object (NEO), where the forces due to interactions with the regolith are much stronger than the local surface gravity field. This effort is part of a larger systems engineering capability developed at JPL to answer key questions, validate requirements, conduct key system and mission trades,and evaluate performance and risk related to NEO operations for any proposed human or robotic missions to a NEO.

  14. TOXIWASP: A DYNAMIC MODEL FOR SIMULATING THE TRANSPORT AND FATE OF TOXIC CHEMICALS IN WATER BODIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    TOXIWASP is a dynamic model for simulating the transport and fate of toxic chemicals in water bodies. Two state variables are simulated: organic chemical and total sediment. The generalized chemical model can be used for problems requiring dynamic transport and loading capabiliti...

  15. Simulations of Bluff Body Flow Interaction for Noise Source Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Medi R.; Lockard David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Neuhart, Dan H.; McGinley, Catherine B.

    2006-01-01

    The current study is a continuation of our effort to characterize the details of flow interaction between two cylinders in a tandem configuration. This configuration is viewed to possess many of the pertinent flow features of the highly interactive unsteady flow field associated with the main landing gear of large civil transports. The present effort extends our previous two-dimensional, unsteady, Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes computations to three dimensions using a quasilaminar, zonal approach, in conjunction with a two-equation turbulence model. Two distinct separation length-to-diameter ratios of L/D = 3.7 and 1.435, representing intermediate and short separation distances between the two cylinders, are simulated. The Mach 0.166 simulations are performed at a Reynolds number of Re = 1.66 105 to match the companion experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. Extensive comparisons with the measured steady and unsteady surface pressure and off-surface particle image velocimetry data show encouraging agreement. Both prominent and some of the more subtle trends in the mean and fluctuating flow fields are correctly predicted. Both computations and the measured data reveal a more robust and energetic shedding process at L/D = 3.7 in comparison with the weaker shedding in the shorter separation case of L/D = 1.435. The vortex shedding frequency based on the computed surface pressure spectra is in reasonable agreement with the measured Strouhal frequency.

  16. Direct numerical simulation of rigid bodies in multiphase flow within an Eulerian framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauschenberger, P.; Weigand, B.

    2015-06-01

    A new method is presented to simulate rigid body motion in the Volume-of-Fluid based multiphase code Free Surface 3D. The specific feature of the new method is that it works within an Eulerian framework without the need for a Lagrangian representation of rigid bodies. Several test cases are shown to prove the validity of the numerical scheme. The technique is able to conserve the shape of arbitrarily shaped rigid bodies and predict terminal velocities of rigid spheres. The instability of a falling ellipsoid is captured. Multiple rigid bodies including collisions may be considered using only one Volume-of-Fluid variable which allows to simulate the drafting, kissing and tumbling phenomena of two rigid spheres. The method can easily be extended to rigid bodies undergoing phase change processes.

  17. Numerical Simulation of the Sedimentation of a Tripole-like Body in an Incompressible Viscous Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez, L H.; Glowinski, R; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2002-08-01

    In this note, we discuss the application of a methodology combining distributed Lagrange multiplier based fictitious domain techniques, finite-element approximations and operator splitting, to the numerical simulation of the motion of a tripole-like rigid body falling in a Newtonian incompressible viscous fluid. The motion of the body is driven by the hydrodynamical forces and gravity. The numerical simulation shows that the distribution of mass of this rigid body and added moment of inertia compared to a simple cylinder (circular or elliptic) plays a significant role on the particle-fluid interaction. Apparently, for the parameters examined, the action of the moving rigid body on the fluid is stronger than the hydrodynamic forces acting on the rigid body.

  18. Influence of winter temperature and simulated climate change on body mass and fat body depletion during diapause in adults of the solitary bee, Osmia rufa (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae).

    PubMed

    Fliszkiewicz, Monika; Giejdasz, Karol; Wasielewski, Oskar; Krishnan, Natraj

    2012-12-01

    The influence of simulated climate change on body weight and depletion of fat body reserves was studied during diapause in the European solitary bee Osmia rufa L. (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae). Insects (females) were reared and collected from outdoor nests from September to March. One cohort of females was weighed and dissected immediately for analyses, whereas another cohort was subjected to simulated warmer temperature (15°C for 7 d) before analyses. A gradual decline in body mass and fat body content was recorded with declining temperatures from September to January in female bees from natural conditions. Temperature increased gradually from January to March with a further decline in body mass and fat body content. The fat body development index dropped from five in September-October (≈ 89% individuals) to four for the period from November to February (≈ 84% individuals) and further to three in March (95% individuals) before emergence. Simulated warmer winter temperature also resulted in a similar decline in body weight and fat body content; however, body weight and fat body content declined faster. The fat body development index dropped to three in December in the majority of individuals and continued at this level until March just before emergence. Taken together, our data indicate an earlier depletion of fat body reserves under simulated climate change conditions that may impact ovarian development and reproductive fitness in O. rufa. PMID:23321111

  19. A simple model simulating a fan as a source of axial and circumferential body forces

    2002-07-01

    This software can be used in a computational fluids dynamics (CFD) code to represent a fan as a source of axial and circumferential body forces. The combined software can be used effectively in car design analyses that involve many underhood thermal management simulations. FANMOD uses as input the rotational speed of the fan, geometric fan data, and the lift and drag coefficients of the blades, and predicts the body forces generated by the fan inmore » the axial and circumferential directions. These forces can be used as momentum forces in a CFD code to simulate the effect of the fan in an underhood thermal management simulation.« less

  20. A Special-Purpose Computer forN-Body Simulations: GRAPE-2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Tomoyoshi; Makino, Junichiro; Fukushige, Toshiyuki; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Sugimoto, Daiichiro

    1993-06-01

    We have developed GRAPE-2A, which is a back-end processor used to accelerate simulations of gravitational N-body systems, such as stellar clusters, a proto planetary system, and the structure formation of the universe. GRAPE-2A calculates the forces exerted on one particle from all other particles. The host computer, which is connected to GRAPE-2A through a VME bus, performs other calculations, such as time integration. In the simulation of gravitational N-body systems, almost all of the computing time is consumed in calculating the forces between particles. GRAPE-2A performs this force calculation with a speed that is much faster than that of a general-purpose computer. GRAPE-2A can be used for cosmological N-body simulations with periodic boundary conditions using the Ewald method, and for molecular-dynamics simulations of proteins and crystals. The computational speed of GRAPE-2A is 180 Mflops.

  1. Acellular dermal matrices in breast reconstructions - a literature review.

    PubMed

    Skovsted Yde, Simon; Brunbjerg, Mette Eline; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg

    2016-08-01

    During the last two decades, acellular dermal matrices (ADM) have been more widely used in reconstructive procedures i.e. breast reconstructions. Several, both synthetic and biologic products derived from human, porcine and bovine tissue, have been introduced. Until this point postoperative complications for the acellular dermal matrices, as a group, have been the main focus. The purpose of this literature review is to summarize the current knowledge on the each biologic product used in breast reconstructions, including product specific complication frequencies. A systematic search of the literature was performed in the PubMed and EMBASE databases, identifying 55 relevant articles, mainly evidence level III. AlloDerm seems to be associated with severe complicating matters in the reconstructive process compared to other products. This could be due to the higher number of investigating studies relative to the others. The surgical area faces certain challenges comparing results, due to surgical variance, the data collection and follow-up. More well-defined guidelines and more high-evidence randomized studies could increase the overall level of evidence in this area. PMID:26881927

  2. Unsteady transonic flow simulation on a full-span-wing-body configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Goorjian, Peter M.

    1987-01-01

    The presence of a body influences both the aerodynamic and aeroelastic performance of wings. Such effects are more pronounced in the transonic regime. To accurately account for the effect of the body, particularly when the wings are experiencing asymmetric modal motions, it is necessary to model the full configuration in the nonlinear transonic regime. In this study, full-span-wing-body configurations are simulated for the first time by a theoretical method that uses the unsteady potential equations based on the small-disturbance theory. The body geometry is modeled exactly as the physical shape, instead of as a rectangular box, which has been done in the past. Steady pressure computations for wing-body configurations compare well with the available experimental data. Unsteady pressure computations when the wings are oscillating in asymmetric modes show significant influence of the body.

  3. Simulation and study of stratified flows around finite bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushchin, V. A.; Matyushin, P. V.

    2016-06-01

    The flows past a sphere and a square cylinder of diameter d moving horizontally at the velocity U in a linearly density-stratified viscous incompressible fluid are studied. The flows are described by the Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation. Variations in the spatial vortex structure of the flows are analyzed in detail in a wide range of dimensionless parameters (such as the Reynolds number Re = Ud/ ν and the internal Froude number Fr = U/( Nd), where ν is the kinematic viscosity and N is the buoyancy frequency) by applying mathematical simulation (on supercomputers of Joint Supercomputer Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences) and three-dimensional flow visualization. At 0.005 < Fr < 100, the classification of flow regimes for the sphere (for 1 < Re < 500) and for the cylinder (for 1 < Re < 200) is improved. At Fr = 0 (i.e., at U = 0), the problem of diffusion-induced flow past a sphere leading to the formation of horizontal density layers near the sphere's upper and lower poles is considered. At Fr = 0.1 and Re = 50, the formation of a steady flow past a square cylinder with wavy hanging density layers in the wake is studied in detail.

  4. NVision: A 3D Visualization Environment for N-Body Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markiel, J. A.

    2000-05-01

    NVision: A 3D Visualization Environment for N-Body Simulations We are developing a set of packages for 3D visualization and analysis of our numerical N-body simulations. These tools are intended to be generalizable to a wide range of related problems including cosmological, planetary dynamics, and molecular dynamics simulations. The applications and source code will be fully available to the community. To prototype this project we have adopted the Java platform with the newly released Java3D extension to take advantage of its portability, object-oriented environment, and availability of extensive documentation and class libraries. We will describe the goals and design principles of the project and demo the currently implemented features, including visualization of cosmological simulations and the simulated collision of two rubble-pile asteroids. This research is supported by NSF grants AST99-73209 and AST99-79891.

  5. Numerical simulation of tidal evolution of a viscoelastic body modelled with a mass-spring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouard, Julien; Quillen, Alice C.; Efroimsky, Michael; Giannella, David

    2016-05-01

    We use a damped mass-spring model within an N-body code to simulate the tidal evolution of the spin and orbit of a self-gravitating viscoelastic spherical body moving around a point-mass perturber. The damped mass-spring model represents a Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic solid. We measure the tidal quality function (the dynamical Love number k2 divided by the tidal quality factor Q) from the numerically computed tidal drift of the semimajor axis of the binary. The shape of k2/Q, as a function of the principal tidal frequency, reproduces the kink shape predicted by Efroimsky for the tidal response of near-spherical homogeneous viscoelastic rotators. We demonstrate that we can directly simulate the tidal evolution of spinning viscoelastic objects. In future, the mass-spring N-body model can be generalized to inhomogeneous and/or non-spherical bodies.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of efficient data acquisition for an entire-body PET scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isnaini, Ismet; Obi, Takashi; Yoshida, Eiji; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-07-01

    Conventional PET scanners can image the whole body using many bed positions. On the other hand, an entire-body PET scanner with an extended axial FOV, which can trace whole-body uptake images at the same time and improve sensitivity dynamically, has been desired. The entire-body PET scanner would have to process a large amount of data effectively. As a result, the entire-body PET scanner has high dead time at a multiplex detector grouping process. Also, the entire-body PET scanner has many oblique line-of-responses. In this work, we study an efficient data acquisition for the entire-body PET scanner using the Monte Carlo simulation. The simulated entire-body PET scanner based on depth-of-interaction detectors has a 2016-mm axial field-of-view (FOV) and an 80-cm ring diameter. Since the entire-body PET scanner has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits, the NECR of the entire-body PET scanner decreases. But, single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into multiple parts. Our choice of 3 groups of axially-arranged detectors has shown to increase the peak NECR by 41%. An appropriate choice of maximum ring difference (MRD) will also maintain the same high performance of sensitivity and high peak NECR while at the same time reduces the data size. The extremely-oblique line of response for large axial FOV does not contribute much to the performance of the scanner. The total sensitivity with full MRD increased only 15% than that with about half MRD. The peak NECR was saturated at about half MRD. The entire-body PET scanner promises to provide a large axial FOV and to have sufficient performance values without using the full data.

  7. The simulation of electrostatic coupling intra-body communication based on finite-element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yong; Yang, Guang; Hao, Qun; Wang, Ming

    2008-12-01

    Intra-body Body Communication (IBC) is a communication technology in which human body is used as a signal transmission medium. Due to its unique characters, IBC technology is proposed as a novel and promising technology for personal area network (PAN), computer network access, implant biomedical monitoring, human energy transmission, etc. In this paper, investigation has been done in the computer simulation of the electrostatic coupling IBC by using the developed finite-element models, in which (1) the incidence and reflection of electronic signal in the upper arm model were analyzed by using the theory of electromagnetic wave, (2) the finite-element models of electrostatic coupling IBC were developed by using the electromagnetic analysis package of ANSYS software, (3) the signal attenuation of electrostatic coupling IBC were simulated under the conditions of different signal frequency, electrodes direction, electrodes size and transmission distance. Finally, some important conclusions are deduced on the basis of simulation results.

  8. Multibody Simulation Software Testbed for Small-Body Exploration and Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, James C.; Mandic, Milan

    2011-01-01

    G-TAG is a software tool for the multibody simulation of a spacecraft with a robotic arm and a sampling mechanism, which performs a touch-and-go (TAG) maneuver for sampling from the surface of a small celestial body. G-TAG utilizes G-DYN, a multi-body simulation engine described in the previous article, and interfaces to controllers, estimators, and environmental forces that affect the spacecraft. G-TAG can easily be adapted for the analysis of the mission stress cases to support the design of a TAG system, as well as for comprehensive Monte Carlo simulations to analyze and evaluate a particular TAG system design. Any future small-body mission will benefit from using G-TAG, which has already been extensively used in Comet Odyssey and Galahad Asteroid New Frontiers proposals.

  9. 2HOT: An Improved Parallel Hashed Oct-Tree N-Body Algorithm for Cosmological Simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Warren, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    We report on improvements made over the past two decades to our adaptive treecode N-body method (HOT). A mathematical and computational approach to the cosmological N-body problem is described, with performance and scalability measured up to 256k (2 18 ) processors. We present error analysis and scientific application results from a series of more than ten 69 billion (4096 3 ) particle cosmological simulations, accounting for 4×10 20 floating point operations. These results include the first simulations using the new constraints on the standard model of cosmology from the Planck satellite. Our simulations set a new standard for accuracymore » and scientific throughput, while meeting or exceeding the computational efficiency of the latest generation of hybrid TreePM N-body methods.« less

  10. Simulations of dipolar fluids using effective many-body isotropic interactions.

    PubMed

    Sindt, Julien O; Camp, Philip J

    2015-07-14

    The partition function of a system with pairwise-additive anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions is equal to that of a hypothetical system with many-body isotropic interactions [G. Stell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 32, 286 (1974)]. The effective many-body interactions contain n-body contributions of all orders. Each contribution is known as an expansion in terms of the particle-particle distances r, and the coefficients are temperature dependent. The leading-order two-body term is the familiar -r(-6) attraction, and the leading-order three-body term is equivalent to the Axilrod-Teller interaction. In this work, a fluid of particles with the leading-order two-body and three-body interactions is compared to an equivalent dipolar soft-sphere fluid. Molecular simulations are used to determine the conditions under which the effective many-body interactions reproduce the fluid-phase structures of the dipolar system. The effective many-body interaction works well at moderately high temperatures but fails at low temperatures where particle chaining is expected to occur. It is shown that an adjustment of the coefficients of the two-body and three-body terms leads to a good description of the structure of the dipolar fluid even in the chaining regime, due primarily to the ground-state linear configuration of the three-body Axilrod-Teller interaction. The vapor-liquid phase diagrams of systems with different Axilrod-Teller contributions are determined. As the strength of the three-body interaction is increased, the critical temperature and density both decrease and disappear completely above a threshold strength, where chaining eventually suppresses the condensation transition. PMID:26178112

  11. Simulation of SAR in the Human Body to Determine Effects of RF Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michiyama, Tetsuyuki; Nikawa, Yoshio

    The body area network (BAN) has attracted attention because of its potential for high-grade wireless communication technology and its safety and high durability. Also, human area transmission of a BAN propagating at an ultra-wide band (UWB) has been demonstrated recently. When considering the efficiency of electromagnetic (EM) propagation inside the human body for BAN and hyperthermia treatment using RF, it is important to determine the mechanism of EM dissipation in the human body. A body heating system for hyperthermia must deposit EM energy deep inside the body. Also, it is important that the EM field generated by the implant system is sufficiently strong. In this study, the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution is simulated using an EM simulator to consider the biological transmission mechanism and its effects. To utilize the EM field distribution using an implant system for hyperthermia treatment, the SAR distribution inside the human body is simulated. As a result, the SAR distribution is concentrated on the surface of human tissue, the muscle-bolus interface, the pancreas, the stomach, the spleen and the regions around bones. It can also be concentrated in bone marrow and cartilage. From these results, the appropriate location for the implant system is revealed on the basis of the current distribution and differences in the wave impedance of interfacing tissues. The possibility of accurate data transmission and suitable treatment planning is confirmed.

  12. A generic multi-flex-body dynamics, controls simulation tool for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Ken W.; Lee, John F.; Singh, Ramen P.; Schubele, Buddy

    1991-01-01

    An order (n) multiflex body Space Station simulation tool is introduced. The flex multibody modeling is generic enough to model all phases of Space Station from build up through to Assembly Complete configuration and beyond. Multibody subsystems such as the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) undergoing a prescribed translation and rotation are also allowed. The software includes aerodynamic, gravity gradient, and magnetic field models. User defined controllers can be discrete or continuous. Extensive preprocessing of 'body by body' NASTRAN flex data is built in. A significant aspect, too, is the integrated controls design capability which includes model reduction and analytic linearization.

  13. The modeling of the whole human body and the simulations of the waveguide intra-body communication by using the finite-element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yong; Chu, Yingfang; Zhang, Kai; Kang, Bangzhi; Hao, Qun

    2010-11-01

    The simulation based on the finite-element (FE) method plays an important role in the investigation of the intra-body communication (IBC). In this paper, the method for modeling the whole human body based on the finite-element method is proposed, while a finite-element model of the whole human body used for the simulations of the waveguide intra-body communication has been developed. Finally, the simulations of the waveguide IBC with different signal transmission paths have been achieved by using the developed finite-element model. Moreover, both the potential distributions and the signal attenuations of the simulation results are discussed in detail, which indicate that the proposed method and model offer the significant advantages in the theoretical analysis and the system design of the waveguide intra-body communication.

  14. Robotic simulation of flexible-body spacecraft dynamics in a satellite servicing testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannan, Justin Cory

    Satellite failures that once led to end-of-life may eventually be addressed using robotic servicing platforms. The ability to model and simulate the physical interaction between two free-floating spacecraft is a key aspect of robotic servicing, and understanding how large appendages such as solar panels, antenna arrays and booms affect the combined system dynamics may be critical to mission operations. This research presents a model of the coupled rigid- and flexible-body satellite dynamics that can be implemented on a robotic satellite simulator. The coupled dynamics are validated against a commercially available dynamics software package, and robot hardware-in-the-loop tests are conducted to demonstrate how the dynamics model is able to predict the response of a robot mass simulator outfitted with physical appendages. Through both validation efforts, a flexible-body simulation is developed to observe the resulting dynamics of a given satellite system on-orbit.

  15. Application of acellular dermis and autograft on burns and scars.

    PubMed

    Ramos Duron, L E; Martínez Pardo, M E; Olivera Zavaleta, V; Silva Diaz, T; Reyes Frías, M L; Luna Zaragoza, D

    1999-01-01

    The cases of two patients with burns treated with dermis allograft and of one patient for lip reconstructive aesthetic filling treated with less than one mm3 of radiosterilised acellular dermis are presented. This paper emphasizes the treatment with radiosterilised dermal grafts with a permanent character so far. Hospitals, therefore, can satisfy the demand for this kind of tissue in the case of disaster and patients with serious injuries. In the cases cited, histocompatibility analysis was not required, thus having the advantage of long-time storage of the radiosterilised dermis used on these patients. Neither inflammatory reaction nor acute phase re-absorption were observed. Moreover, shrink (contract) healing was diminished. After two years, the results are still satisfactory. PMID:10853787

  16. Fast Generation of Ensembles of Cosmological N-Body Simulations via Mode-Resampling

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M D; Cole, S; Frenk, C S; Szapudi, I

    2011-02-14

    We present an algorithm for quickly generating multiple realizations of N-body simulations to be used, for example, for cosmological parameter estimation from surveys of large-scale structure. Our algorithm uses a new method to resample the large-scale (Gaussian-distributed) Fourier modes in a periodic N-body simulation box in a manner that properly accounts for the nonlinear mode-coupling between large and small scales. We find that our method for adding new large-scale mode realizations recovers the nonlinear power spectrum to sub-percent accuracy on scales larger than about half the Nyquist frequency of the simulation box. Using 20 N-body simulations, we obtain a power spectrum covariance matrix estimate that matches the estimator from Takahashi et al. (from 5000 simulations) with < 20% errors in all matrix elements. Comparing the rates of convergence, we determine that our algorithm requires {approx}8 times fewer simulations to achieve a given error tolerance in estimates of the power spectrum covariance matrix. The degree of success of our algorithm indicates that we understand the main physical processes that give rise to the correlations in the matter power spectrum. Namely, the large-scale Fourier modes modulate both the degree of structure growth through the variation in the effective local matter density and also the spatial frequency of small-scale perturbations through large-scale displacements. We expect our algorithm to be useful for noise modeling when constraining cosmological parameters from weak lensing (cosmic shear) and galaxy surveys, rescaling summary statistics of N-body simulations for new cosmological parameter values, and any applications where the influence of Fourier modes larger than the simulation size must be accounted for.

  17. Protection against pertussis by acellular pertussis vaccines (Takeda, Japan): household contact studies in Kawasaki City, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kato, T; Goshima, T; Nakajima, N; Kaku, H; Arimoto, Y; Hayashi, F

    1989-12-01

    To evaluate the vaccine efficacy of an acellular pertussis vaccine which has been in clinical use in Japan since 1981, a retrospective study was performed by a questionnaire survey of secondary pertussis attacks through family contact in 146 children with pertussis diagnosed in the period from January 1981 through May 1988. In this study, acellular vaccine made by Takeda Pharmaceutical Company, which contains a high level of FHA (filamentous hemagglutinin), a low level of PT (pertussis toxin) and a small amount of agglutinogen, was evaluated. Secondary pertussis attacks through family contact were found in 17 of 29 siblings (58.6%) not immunized with pertussis vaccine. On the other hand, 27 siblings immunized with Takeda's acellular vaccine were exposed to pertussis through family contact and a secondary attack was seen in only one of them (3.7%). The present study revealed an efficacy rate of 93.7% for Takeda's acellular pertussis vaccine. PMID:2516396

  18. [Protection against pertussis by Japanese T type acellular pertussis vaccine: household contact study in Kawasaki City].

    PubMed

    Kato, T; Matsuyoshi, S; Goshima, T; Nakajima, N; Yamamoto, H; Arimoto, Y; Kaku, H; Hayashi, F

    1989-09-01

    To evaluate the vaccine efficacy of acellular pertussis vaccine which has been in clinical use in Japan since 1981, a retrospective study was made by a questionnaire from secondary pertussis attack through family contact in 149 children with pertussis diagnosed in the period from January 1981 through May 1988. In this study, Takeda's acellular vaccine which contains a high level of FHA, low level of PT and a small amount of agglutinogen, was evaluated. Secondary pertussis attacks through family contact were found in 17 of 29 siblings (58.6%) not immunized with pertussis vaccine. On the other hand of the siblings immunized with Takeda's acellular vaccine 27 were exposed to pertussis through family contact and a secondary attack was seen in only one of them (3.4%). The present study revealed an efficacy rate of 94.2% for the Takeda's acellular pertussis vaccine. PMID:2509597

  19. Protection against pertussis by Takeda's acellular pertussis vaccine: household contact studies in Kawasaki City, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kato, T; Kaku, H; Arimoto, Y

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the vaccine efficacy of an acellular pertussis vaccine which has been in clinical use in Japan since 1981, a retrospective study was performed by a questionnaire survey of secondary pertussis attacks through family contact in 146 children with pertussis diagnosed in the period from January 1981 through May 1988. In this study, Takeda's acellular vaccine which contains a high level of FHA, low level of PT and a small amount of agglutinogen, was evaluated. Secondary pertussis attacks through family contact were found in 17 of 27 siblings (62.9%) not immunized with pertussis vaccine. On the other hand, 26 siblings immunized with Takeda's acellular vaccine were exposed to pertussis through family contact and a secondary attack was seen in only one of them (3.8%). The present study revealed an efficacy rate of 93.9% for Takeda's acellular pertussis vaccine. PMID:3078808

  20. Rigid body dynamics approach to Stokesian dynamics simulations of nonspherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutteh, Ramzi

    2010-05-01

    We describe an algorithm for performing Stokesian dynamics (SD) simulations of suspensions of arbitrary shape rigid particles with hydrodynamic interactions, modeled as rigid groups of spheres, the hydrodynamic mobility matrix of which is accurately computable by several established schemes for spheres. The algorithm is based on Stokesian rigid body equations of translational and rotational motion, which we have derived by an approach formally analogous to that of Newtonian rigid body dynamics. Particle orientation is represented in terms of Euler parameters (quaternion of rotation). This rigid body SD algorithm (RBSDA) complements recently described constraint SD algorithms [R. Kutteh, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 9280 (2003); R. Kutteh, Phys. Rev. E 69, 011406 (2004)], over which it offers the same computational advantages in imposing total rigidity that the basic rigid body molecular dynamics (MD) algorithm offers over constraint MD algorithms. We show that SD simulation results generated with the RBSDA, in bounded and unbounded geometries, agree very well with those from experiment and other SD and non-SD methods, and are numerically identical to those from a constraint SD algorithm, HSHAKE. Finally, for completeness we also describe a third (additional to the constraint SD and rigid body SD approaches) more traditional approach for SD simulations of arbitrary shape rigid particles modeled as rigid groups of spheres.

  1. Rigid body dynamics approach to Stokesian dynamics simulations of nonspherical particles.

    PubMed

    Kutteh, Ramzi

    2010-05-01

    We describe an algorithm for performing Stokesian dynamics (SD) simulations of suspensions of arbitrary shape rigid particles with hydrodynamic interactions, modeled as rigid groups of spheres, the hydrodynamic mobility matrix of which is accurately computable by several established schemes for spheres. The algorithm is based on Stokesian rigid body equations of translational and rotational motion, which we have derived by an approach formally analogous to that of Newtonian rigid body dynamics. Particle orientation is represented in terms of Euler parameters (quaternion of rotation). This rigid body SD algorithm (RBSDA) complements recently described constraint SD algorithms [R. Kutteh, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 9280 (2003); R. Kutteh, Phys. Rev. E 69, 011406 (2004)], over which it offers the same computational advantages in imposing total rigidity that the basic rigid body molecular dynamics (MD) algorithm offers over constraint MD algorithms. We show that SD simulation results generated with the RBSDA, in bounded and unbounded geometries, agree very well with those from experiment and other SD and non-SD methods, and are numerically identical to those from a constraint SD algorithm, HSHAKE. Finally, for completeness we also describe a third (additional to the constraint SD and rigid body SD approaches) more traditional approach for SD simulations of arbitrary shape rigid particles modeled as rigid groups of spheres. PMID:20459156

  2. The Rufous Hummingbird in hovering flight -- full-body 3D immersed boundary simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira de Sousa, Paulo; Luo, Haoxiang; Bocanegra Evans, Humberto

    2009-11-01

    Hummingbirds are an interesting case study for the development of micro-air vehicles since they combine the high flight stability of insects with the low metabolic power per unit of body mass of bats, during hovering flight. In this study, simulations of a full-body hummingbird in hovering flight were performed at a Reynolds number around 3600. The simulations employ a versatile sharp-interface immersed boundary method recently enhanced at our lab that can treat thin membranes and solid bodies alike. Implemented on a Cartesian mesh, the numerical method allows us to capture the vortex dynamics of the wake accurately and efficiently. The whole-body simulation will allow us to clearly identify the three general patterns of flow velocity around the body of the hummingbird referred in Altshuler et al. (Exp Fluids 46 (5), 2009). One focus of the current study is to understand the interaction between the wakes of the two wings at the end of the upstroke, and how the tail actively defects the flow to contribute to pitch stability. Another focus of the study will be to identify the pair of unconnected loops underneath each wing.

  3. Advances in Chimera Grid Tools for Multi-Body Dynamics Simulations and Script Creation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation contains information about (1) Framework for multi-body dynamics - Geometry Manipulation Protocol (GMP), (2) Simulation procedure using Chimera Grid Tools (CGT) and OVERFLOW-2 (3) Further recent developments in Chimera Grid Tools OVERGRID, Grid modules, Script library and (4) Future work.

  4. Dynamic Simulation and Static Matching for Action Prediction: Evidence from Body Part Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Anne; Brandstadter, Simone; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Accurately predicting other people's actions may involve two processes: internal real-time simulation (dynamic updating) and matching recently perceived action images (static matching). Using a priming of body parts, this study aimed to differentiate the two processes. Specifically, participants played a motion-controlled video game with…

  5. RAY-RAMSES: a code for ray tracing on the fly in N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreira, Alexandre; Llinares, Claudio; Bose, Sownak; Li, Baojiu

    2016-05-01

    We present a ray tracing code to compute integrated cosmological observables on the fly in AMR N-body simulations. Unlike conventional ray tracing techniques, our code takes full advantage of the time and spatial resolution attained by the N-body simulation by computing the integrals along the line of sight on a cell-by-cell basis through the AMR simulation grid. Moroever, since it runs on the fly in the N-body run, our code can produce maps of the desired observables without storing large (or any) amounts of data for post-processing. We implemented our routines in the RAMSES N-body code and tested the implementation using an example of weak lensing simulation. We analyse basic statistics of lensing convergence maps and find good agreement with semi-analytical methods. The ray tracing methodology presented here can be used in several cosmological analysis such as Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect studies as well as modified gravity. Our code can also be used in cross-checks of the more conventional methods, which can be important in tests of theory systematics in preparation for upcoming large scale structure surveys.

  6. Phantom-GRAPE: SIMD accelerated numerical library for N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, Ataru; Yoshikawa, Kohji; Nitadori, Keigo; Okamoto, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    Phantom-GRAPE is a numerical software library to accelerate collisionless N-body simulation with SIMD instruction set on x86 architecture. The Newton's forces and also central forces with an arbitrary shape f(r), which have a finite cutoff radius r_cut (i.e. f(r)=0 at r>r_cut), can be quickly computed.

  7. Monte Carlo Simulations for the Purpose of Efficiency Curve Calibration for the Fastscan Whole Body Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Hannah Robyn

    In order to be able to qualify and quantify radiation exposure in terms of dose, a Fastscan whole body counter must be calibrated correctly. Current calibration methods do not take the full range of body types into consideration when creating efficiency curve calibrations. The goal of this work is the creation of a Monte Carlo (MCNP) model, that allows the simulation of efficiency curves for a diverse population of subjects. Models were created for both the Darlington and the Pickering Fastscan WBCs, and the simulations were benchmarked against experimental results with good agreement. The Pickering Fastscan was found to have agreement to within +/-9%, and the Darlington Fastscan had agreement to within +/-11%. Further simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of increased body fat on the detected activity, as well as locating the position of external contamination using front/back ratios of activity. Simulations were also conducted to create efficiency calibrations that had good agreement with the manufacturer's efficiency curves. The work completed in this thesis can be used to create efficiency calibration curves for unique body compositions in the future.

  8. Dynamically coupled fluid body interactions in vorticity-based numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2008-11-01

    A novel method is presented for robustly simulating coupled dynamics in fluid-body interactions with vorticity-based flow solvers. In this work, the fluid dynamics are simulated with a viscous vortex particle method. In the first substep of each time increment, the fluid convective and diffusive processes are treated, while a predictor is used to independently advance the body configuration. An iterative corrector is then used to simultaneously remove the spurious slip - via vorticity flux - and compute the end-of-step body configuration. Fluid inertial forces are isolated and combined with body inertial terms to ensure robust treatment of dynamics for bodies of arbitrary mass. The method is demonstrated for dynamics of articulated rigid bodies, including a falling cylinder, flow-induced vibration of a circular cylinder and free swimming of a three-link 'fish'. The error and momentum conservation properties of the method are explored. In the case of the vibrating cylinder, comparison with previous work demonstrates good agreement.

  9. Simulation and Analyses of Multi-Body Separation in Launch Vehicle Staging Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Hotchko, Nathaniel J.; Samareh, Jamshid; Covell, Peter F.; Tartabini, Paul V.

    2006-01-01

    The development of methodologies, techniques, and tools for analysis and simulation of multi-body separation is critically needed for successful design and operation of next generation launch vehicles. As a part of this activity, ConSep simulation tool is being developed. ConSep is a generic MATLAB-based front-and-back-end to the commercially available ADAMS. solver, an industry standard package for solving multi-body dynamic problems. This paper discusses the 3-body separation capability in ConSep and its application to the separation of the Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) from the External Tank (ET) and the Orbiter. The results are compared with STS-1 flight data.

  10. Stellar evolution in N-body simulations of disk galaxies. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comins, N. F.

    1983-01-01

    The Kalnajs (1972, 1976) Omega models of global mass and velocity distributions are employed in the present two-dimensional N-body simulation, which allows for a spectrum of particle masses, stellar explosions, explosion remnant interactions with an interstellar medium, and the creation of new stars from the gas. Two sequences of runs using the Omega values of 0.8 and 0.9 examine the separate and combined effects of particle mass distribution, the gravitational influence of an interstellar gas distribution on the N-body particles, and stellar evolution, allowing for stellar explosions and star formation from the gas. It is found that both Omega values' nonequilibrium results dramatically change when evolution is allowed to occur. These results call for more realistic coupled N-body and evolution simulations in order to improve the understanding of disk galaxy evolution.

  11. Three-body interactions in complex fluids: Virial coefficients from simulation finite-size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, Douglas J.; Wilding, Nigel B.

    2014-06-28

    A simulation technique is described for quantifying the contribution of three-body interactions to the thermodynamical properties of coarse-grained representations of complex fluids. The method is based on a new approach for determining virial coefficients from the measured volume-dependent asymptote of a certain structural function. By comparing the third virial coefficient B{sub 3} for a complex fluid with that of an approximate coarse-grained model described by a pair potential, three body effects can be quantified. The strategy is applicable to both Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation. Its utility is illustrated via measurements of three-body effects in models of star polymers and in highly size-asymmetrical colloid-polymer mixtures.

  12. Cosmological N-body Simulation of Galaxy and Large-Scale Structure Formation: The Gravity Frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly

    2015-04-01

    One of the first N-body simulations done almost 50 years ago had only 200 self-gravitating particles. Even this first baby step made substantial impact on understanding how astronomical objects should form. Now powerful supercomputers and new algorithms allow astronomers produce N-body simulations that employ up to a trillion dark matter particles and produce vital theoretical predictions regarding formation, evolution, structure and statistics of objects ranging from dwarf galaxies to clusters and superclusters of galaxies. With only gravity involved in these theoretical models, one would naively expect that by now we should know everything we need about N-body dynamics of cosmological fluctuations. Not the case. It appears that the Universe was not cooperative and gave us divergencies in the initial conditions generated during the Inflation epoch and subsequent expansion of the Universe - the infinite phase-space density and divergent density fluctuations. Ever increasing observational demands on statistics and accuracy of theoretical predictions is another driving force for more realistic and larger N-body simulations. Large current and new planned observational projects such as BOSS, eBOSS, Euclid, LSST will bring information on spatial distribution, motion, and properties of millions of galaxies at different redshifts. Direct simulations of evolution of gas and formation of stars for millions of forming galaxies will not be available for years leaving astronomers with the only option - to develop methods to combine large N-body simulations with models of galaxy formation to produce accurate theoretical predictions. I will discuss the current status of the field and directions of its development.

  13. Global High-resolution N-body Simulation of Planet Formation. I. Planetesimal-driven Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kominami, J. D.; Daisaka, H.; Makino, J.; Fujimoto, M.

    2016-03-01

    We investigated whether outward planetesimal-driven migration (PDM) takes place or not in simulations when the self-gravity of planetesimals is included. We performed N-body simulations of planetesimal disks with a large width (0.7-4 au) that ranges over the ice line. The simulations consisted of two stages. The first-stage simulations were carried out to see the runaway growth phase using the planetesimals of initially the same mass. The runaway growth took place both at the inner edge of the disk and at the region just outside the ice line. This result was utilized for the initial setup of the second-stage simulations, in which the runaway bodies just outside the ice line were replaced by the protoplanets with about the isolation mass. In the second-stage simulations, the outward migration of the protoplanet was followed by the stopping of the migration due to the increase of the random velocity of the planetesimals. Owing to this increase of random velocities, one of the PDM criteria derived in Minton & Levison was broken. In the current simulations, the effect of the gas disk is not considered. It is likely that the gas disk plays an important role in PDM, and we plan to study its effect in future papers.

  14. Development of a Multi-body Dynamics Simulation Tool for Tracked Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Kunsoo; Choi, Jinhwan; Yoo, Honghee

    Multi-body Dynamics simulation of tracked vehicles is very useful not only for the analysis of dynamic behaviors, but also for the performance evaluation of the chassis controllers. The track tension is closely related to the maneuverability of tracked vehicles and the durability of tracks and suspension systems. In order to minimize the excessive load on the tracks and to prevent the peal-off of tracks from the sprocket, the track tension needs to be maintained at the optimum level throughout the maneuver. In this paper, a co-simulation tool is developed such that the performance of the track tension control system can be investigated for various maneuvering tasks. The MBD (multi-body dynamics) vehicle model for tracked vehicles is very complicated (189 bodies, 36 revolute joints, 152 bushing elements and 954 degrees of freedom) and cannot be easily implemented in commercial software. Besides, the track tension controller based on fuzzy logic can be easily constructed in the commercial control software. Therefore, co-simulation methodology is proposed so that the designed tension controller is interfaced into the MBD simulation software. The performance of the tension control system is verified through the proposed co-simulation tool.

  15. On the simulation of indistinguishable fermions in the many-body Wigner formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Sellier, J.M. Dimov, I.

    2015-01-01

    The simulation of quantum systems consisting of interacting, indistinguishable fermions is an incredible mathematical problem which poses formidable numerical challenges. Many sophisticated methods addressing this problem are available which are based on the many-body Schrödinger formalism. Recently a Monte Carlo technique for the resolution of the many-body Wigner equation has been introduced and successfully applied to the simulation of distinguishable, spinless particles. This numerical approach presents several advantages over other methods. Indeed, it is based on an intuitive formalism in which quantum systems are described in terms of a quasi-distribution function, and highly scalable due to its Monte Carlo nature. In this work, we extend the many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method to the simulation of indistinguishable fermions. To this end, we first show how fermions are incorporated into the Wigner formalism. Then we demonstrate that the Pauli exclusion principle is intrinsic to the formalism. As a matter of fact, a numerical simulation of two strongly interacting fermions (electrons) is performed which clearly shows the appearance of a Fermi (or exchange–correlation) hole in the phase-space, a clear signature of the presence of the Pauli principle. To conclude, we simulate 4, 8 and 16 non-interacting fermions, isolated in a closed box, and show that, as the number of fermions increases, we gradually recover the Fermi–Dirac statistics, a clear proof of the reliability of our proposed method for the treatment of indistinguishable particles.

  16. GalevNB: a conversion from N-body simulations to observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Ying; Olczak, Christoph; Guo, Di-Feng; Spurzem, Rainer; Kotulla, Ralf

    2016-03-01

    We present GalevNB (Galev for N-body simulations), a utility that converts fundamental stellar properties of N-body simulations into observational properties using the GALEV (GAlaxy EVolutionary synthesis models) package, and allowing direct comparisons between observations and N-body simulations. It works by converting fundamental stellar properties, such as stellar mass, temperature, luminosity and metallicity into observational magnitudes for a variety of filters used by mainstream instruments/telescopes, such as HST, ESO, SDSS, 2MASS, etc., and into spectra that span the range from far-UV (90 Å) to near-IR (160 μm). As an application, we use GalevNB to investigate the secular evolution of the spectral energy distribution (SED) and color magnitude diagram (CMD) of a simulated star cluster over a few hundred million years. With the results given by GalevNB we discover a UV-excess in the SED of the cluster over the whole simulation time. We also identify four candidates that contribute to the FUV peak: core helium burning stars, second asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, white dwarfs and naked helium stars.

  17. On the simulation of indistinguishable fermions in the many-body Wigner formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, J. M.; Dimov, I.

    2015-01-01

    The simulation of quantum systems consisting of interacting, indistinguishable fermions is an incredible mathematical problem which poses formidable numerical challenges. Many sophisticated methods addressing this problem are available which are based on the many-body Schrödinger formalism. Recently a Monte Carlo technique for the resolution of the many-body Wigner equation has been introduced and successfully applied to the simulation of distinguishable, spinless particles. This numerical approach presents several advantages over other methods. Indeed, it is based on an intuitive formalism in which quantum systems are described in terms of a quasi-distribution function, and highly scalable due to its Monte Carlo nature. In this work, we extend the many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method to the simulation of indistinguishable fermions. To this end, we first show how fermions are incorporated into the Wigner formalism. Then we demonstrate that the Pauli exclusion principle is intrinsic to the formalism. As a matter of fact, a numerical simulation of two strongly interacting fermions (electrons) is performed which clearly shows the appearance of a Fermi (or exchange-correlation) hole in the phase-space, a clear signature of the presence of the Pauli principle. To conclude, we simulate 4, 8 and 16 non-interacting fermions, isolated in a closed box, and show that, as the number of fermions increases, we gradually recover the Fermi-Dirac statistics, a clear proof of the reliability of our proposed method for the treatment of indistinguishable particles.

  18. On computing stress in polymer systems involving multi-body potentials from molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yao E-mail: jhsong@cec.sc.edu; Song, Jeong-Hoon E-mail: jhsong@cec.sc.edu

    2014-08-07

    Hardy stress definition has been restricted to pair potentials and embedded-atom method potentials due to the basic assumptions in the derivation of a symmetric microscopic stress tensor. Force decomposition required in the Hardy stress expression becomes obscure for multi-body potentials. In this work, we demonstrate the invariance of the Hardy stress expression for a polymer system modeled with multi-body interatomic potentials including up to four atoms interaction, by applying central force decomposition of the atomic force. The balance of momentum has been demonstrated to be valid theoretically and tested under various numerical simulation conditions. The validity of momentum conservation justifies the extension of Hardy stress expression to multi-body potential systems. Computed Hardy stress has been observed to converge to the virial stress of the system with increasing spatial averaging volume. This work provides a feasible and reliable linkage between the atomistic and continuum scales for multi-body potential systems.

  19. Flow Simulation of N3-X Hybrid Wing-Body Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyoungjin; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2013-01-01

    System studies show that a N3-X hybrid wing-body aircraft with a turboelectric distributed propulsion system using a mail-slot inlet/nozzle nacelle can meet the environmental and performance goals for N+3 generation transports (three generations beyond the current air transport technology level) set by NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing Project. In this study, a Navier-Stokes flow simulation of N3-X on hybrid unstructured meshes was conducted, including the mail-slot propulsor. The geometry of the mail-slot propulsor was generated by a CAD (Computer-Aided Design)-free shape parameterization. A body force approach was used for a more realistic and efficient simulation of the turning and loss effects of the fan blades and the inlet-fan interactions. Flow simulation results of the N3-X demonstrates the validity of the present approach.

  20. Particle-Based Simulation of Shock-Induced Deformation of Elastic Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamura, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Nakayama, K.

    Shock-induced deformations of solid bodies are of practical interest to those who are concerned with explosive processing of materials, demolition of buildings, precautions against accidental explosions, etc. In order to simulate the shock-induced deformations of solid bodies, a large number of numerical codes based on continuum mechanics, which are called hydrocodes, have been developed so far [1, 2]. When the amount of deformation is relatively small, Lagrangian hydrocodes have been used to simulate the dynamic response of shock-loaded materials. When the deformation is large, Eulerian hydrocodes have been utilized instead. This is because the computational grids distorted along with the deformation of materials in the Lagrangian approach make the simulations either inaccurate or unstable, while the Eulerian approach where grids are fixed in space can handle such large deformations of materials. On the contrary, material interfaces that are precisely defined in the Lagrangian approach are not traced exactly in the Eulerian one.

  1. Computational modelling of string body interaction for the violin family and simulation of wolf notes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inácio, O.; Antunes, J.; Wright, M. C. M.

    2008-02-01

    Most theoretical studies of bowed-string instruments deal with isolated strings, pinned on fixed supports. In others, the instrument body dynamics have been accounted by using extremely simplified models of the string-body interaction through the instrument bridge. Such models have, nevertheless, been instrumental to the understanding of a very common and musically undesirable phenomenon known as the wolf note—a strong beating interplay between string and body vibrations. Cellos, bad and good, are particularly prone to this problem. In previous work, a computational method that allows efficient time-domain modelling of bowed strings based on a modal approach has been introduced. This has been extended to incorporate the complex dynamics of real-life instrument bodies, and their coupling to the string motions, using experimental dynamical body data. The string is modelled using its unconstrained modes, assuming pinned-pinned boundary conditions at the tailpiece and the nut. At the intermediary bridge location, the string-body coupling is enforced using the body impulse-response or modal data, as measured at the instrument bridge. In the present paper, this computational approach is applied to a specific cello, which provided experimental wolf-behaviour data under several bowing conditions, as well as laboratory measurements of the bridge impulse responses on which the numerical simulations were based. Interesting aspects of the string-body dynamical responses are highlighted by numerical simulations and the corresponding sounds and animations produced. Finally, a qualitative (and, when possible, quantitative) comparison of the experimental and numerical results is presented.

  2. Single-shot simulations of dynamic quantum many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakmann, Kaspar; Kasevich, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Single experimental shots of ultracold quantum gases sample the many-particle probability distribution. In a few cases such single shots could be successfully simulated from a given many-body wavefunction, but for realistic time-dependent many-body dynamics this has been difficult to achieve. Here, we show how single shots can be simulated from numerical solutions of the time-dependent many-body Schrödinger equation. Using this approach, we provide first-principle explanations for fluctuations in the collision of attractive Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), for the appearance of randomly fluctuating vortices and for the centre-of-mass fluctuations of attractive BECs in a harmonic trap. We also show how such simulations provide full counting distributions and correlation functions of any order. Such calculations have not been previously possible and our method is broadly applicable to many-body systems whose phenomenology is driven by information beyond what is typically available in low-order correlation functions.

  3. RANS Simulation of the Heave Response of a Two-Body Floating Point Wave Absorber: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y.; Li, Y.

    2011-03-01

    A preliminary study on a two-body floating wave absorbers is presented in this paper. A Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes computational method is applied for analyzing the hydrodynamic heave response of the absorber in operational wave conditions. The two-body floating wave absorber contains a float section and a submerged reaction section. For validation purposes, our model is first assumed to be locked. The two sections are forced to move together with each other. The locked single body model is used in a heave decay test, where the RANS result is validated with the experimental measurement. For the two-body floating point absorber simulation, the two sections are connected through a mass-spring-damper system, which is applied to simulate the power take-off mechanism under design wave conditions. Overall, the details of the flow around the absorber and its nonlinear interaction with waves are investigated, and the power absorption efficiency of the two-body floating wave absorber in waves with a constant value spring-damper system is examined.

  4. Numerical simulation of a moving rigid body in a rarefied gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Samir; Tiwari, Sudarshan; Klar, Axel; Hardt, Steffen

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we present a numerical scheme to simulate a moving rigid body with arbitrary shape suspended in a rarefied gas. The rarefied gas is simulated by solving the Boltzmann equation using a DSMC particle method. The motion of the rigid body is governed by the Newton-Euler equations, where the force and the torque on the rigid body are computed from the momentum transfer of the gas molecules colliding with the body. On the other hand, the motion of the rigid body influences the gas flow in its surroundings. We validate the numerical scheme by considering a moving piston problem in 1D and the Einstein relation for Brownian motion of the suspended particle in 3D. In the piston problem it is shown that the equilibrium position of the moving piston converges to the analytical solution for a wide range of Knudsen numbers. In the case of Brownian motion the translational as well as the rotational degrees of freedom are taken into account. In this case it is shown that the numerically computed translational and rotational diffusion coefficients converge to the theoretical values. Finally, the motion of an object of complex shape under the influence of a thermophoretic force is investigated.

  5. Vertical structures induced by propeller moonlets: Comparison of hydrodynamical model and N-body box simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, H.; Seiß, M.; Salo, H.; Spahn, F.

    2014-04-01

    Small moonlets in Saturn's rings induce propeller called structures into the surrounding ring material. Images of Saturn's rings, taken by the Cassini spacecraft near Saturn's equinox in 2009, show shadows cast by these propellers [1], offering the opportunity to study their vertical structure. We compare results from an extended hydrodynamical propeller model with results from local N-body box simulations of propeller structures. In the hydrodynamical model, maximal propeller heights are determined from the gravitational scattering of the ring particles by the moonlet. Afterwards the disturbed balance of viscous heating and collisional cooling is considered as main mechanism of the propeller height relaxation [2]. For the N-body box simulations we use the code by Salo [3], which was also applied in the propeller simulations of [4] and [5]. We find that the exponential height relaxation predicted by the hydrodynamical modelling is confirmed by N-body simulations of non-self gravitating ring particles. By projecting the propeller height evolution of the hydrodynamical model into observations of the shadows cast by the Earhart propeller, we determine the exponential cooling constant of the height relaxation. With this cooling constant we estimate collision frequencies of about 6 collisions per particle per orbit in the propeller gap region or about 11 collisions per particle per orbit in the propeller wake region of the Earhart propeller. The N-body simulations lead to maximal propeller heights between 60 to 70 percent of the Hill radius of the corresponding moonlet. Moonlet sizes estimated by this relation are in fair agreement with size estimates from radial propeller scalings [5, 6] for propeller structures with observed shadows.

  6. Towards Interactive Medical Content Delivery Between Simulated Body Sensor Networks and Practical Data Center.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaobo; Li, Wei; Song, Jeungeun; Hossain, M Shamim; Mizanur Rahman, Sk Md; Alelaiwi, Abdulhameed

    2016-10-01

    With the development of IoT (Internet of Thing), big data analysis and cloud computing, traditional medical information system integrates with these new technologies. The establishment of cloud-based smart healthcare application gets more and more attention. In this paper, semi-physical simulation technology is applied to cloud-based smart healthcare system. The Body sensor network (BSN) of system transmit has two ways of data collection and transmission. The one is using practical BSN to collect data and transmitting it to the data center. The other is transmitting real medical data to practical data center by simulating BSN. In order to transmit real medical data to practical data center by simulating BSN under semi-physical simulation environment, this paper designs an OPNET packet structure, defines a gateway node model between simulating BSN and practical data center and builds a custom protocol stack. Moreover, this paper conducts a large amount of simulation on the real data transmission through simulation network connecting with practical network. The simulation result can provides a reference for parameter settings of fully practical network and reduces the cost of devices and personnel involved. PMID:27562482

  7. Vlasov simulation of the interaction between the solar wind and a dielectric body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Takayuki; Kimura, Tetsuya; Togano, Kentaro; Fukazawa, Keiichiro; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Miyoshi, Takahiro; Terada, Naoki; Nakamura, Takuma K. M.; Ogino, Tatsuki

    2011-01-01

    The global structure of wake field behind an unmagnetized object in the solar wind is studied by means of a 2.5-dimensional full-electromagnetic Vlasov simulation. The interaction of a plasma flow with an unmagnetized object is quite different from that with a magnetized object such as the Earth. Due to the absence of the global magnetic field, the unmagnetized object absorbs plasma particles that reach the surface, generating a plasma cavity called "wake" on the antisolar side of the object. For numerical simulations of electromagnetic structures around the wake, it is important to include the charging effect in global-scale simulations. The present study is one of the first attempts to study the formation of wake fields via a full-kinetic Vlasov simulation. It has been confirmed that the spatial structures of wake fields depend on the direction of interplanetary magnetic fields as well as the distance from the body.

  8. Vlasov simulation of the interaction between the solar wind and a dielectric body

    SciTech Connect

    Umeda, Takayuki; Kimura, Tetsuya; Togano, Kentaro; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Ogino, Tatsuki; Fukazawa, Keiichiro; Miyoshi, Takahiro; Terada, Naoki; Nakamura, Takuma K. M.

    2011-01-15

    The global structure of wake field behind an unmagnetized object in the solar wind is studied by means of a 2.5-dimensional full-electromagnetic Vlasov simulation. The interaction of a plasma flow with an unmagnetized object is quite different from that with a magnetized object such as the Earth. Due to the absence of the global magnetic field, the unmagnetized object absorbs plasma particles that reach the surface, generating a plasma cavity called ''wake'' on the antisolar side of the object. For numerical simulations of electromagnetic structures around the wake, it is important to include the charging effect in global-scale simulations. The present study is one of the first attempts to study the formation of wake fields via a full-kinetic Vlasov simulation. It has been confirmed that the spatial structures of wake fields depend on the direction of interplanetary magnetic fields as well as the distance from the body.

  9. Investigation of the Regenerative Capacity of an Acellular Porcine Medial Meniscus for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Joanne; Fisher, John; Ingham, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we have described the development of an acellular porcine meniscal scaffold. The aims of this study were to determine the immunocompatibility of the scaffold and capacity for cellular attachment and infiltration to gain insight into its potential for meniscal repair and replacement. Porcine menisci were decellularized by exposing the tissue to freeze–thaw cycles, incubation in hypotonic tris buffer, 0.1% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate in hypotonic buffer plus protease inhibitors, nucleases, hypertonic buffer followed by disinfection using 0.1% (v/v) peracetic, and final washing in phosphate-buffered saline. In vivo immunocompatibility was assessed after implantation of the acellular meniscal scaffold subcutaneously into galactosyltransferase knockout mice for 3 months in comparison to fresh and acellular tissue treated with α-galactosidase (negative control). The cellular infiltrates in the explants were assessed by histology and characterized using monoclonal antibodies against: CD3, CD4, CD34, F4/80, and C3c. Static culture was used to assess the potential of acellular porcine meniscal scaffold to support the attachment and infiltration of primary human dermal fibroblasts and primary porcine meniscal cells in vitro. The explants were surrounded by capsules that were more pronounced for the fresh meniscal tissue compared to the acellular tissues. Cellular infiltrates compromised mononuclear phagocytes, CD34-positive cells, and nonlabeled fibroblastic cells. T-lymphocytes were sparse in all explanted tissue types and there was no evidence of C3c deposition. The analysis revealed an absence of a specific immune response to all of the implanted tissues. Acellular porcine meniscus was shown to be capable of supporting the attachment and infiltration of primary human fibroblasts and primary porcine meniscal cells. In conclusion, acellular porcine meniscal tissue exhibits excellent immunocompatibility and potential for cellular regeneration in the longer

  10. Turbine Powered Simulator Calibration and Testing for Hybrid Wing Body Powered Airframe Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, Patrick R.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Long, Kurtis R.; James, Kevin D.; Tompkins, Daniel M.; Beyar, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Propulsion airframe integration testing on a 5.75% scale hybrid wing body model us- ing turbine powered simulators was completed at the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-foot test section. Four rear control surface con gurations including a no control surface de ection con guration were tested with the turbine powered simulator units to investigate how the jet exhaust in uenced the control surface performance as re- lated to the resultant forces and moments on the model. Compared to ow-through nacelle testing on the same hybrid wing body model, the control surface e ectiveness was found to increase with the turbine powered simulator units operating. This was true for pitching moment, lift, and drag although pitching moment was the parameter of greatest interest for this project. With the turbine powered simulator units operating, the model pitching moment was seen to increase when compared to the ow-through nacelle con guration indicating that the center elevon and vertical tail control authority increased with the jet exhaust from the turbine powered simulator units.

  11. Large eddy simulation of flows after a bluff body: Coherent structures and mixing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pei; Han, Chao; Chen, Yiliang

    2013-10-01

    This paper performs large eddy simulations (LES) to investigate coherent structures in the flows after the Sydney bluff-body burner, a circular bluff body with an orifice at its center. The simulations are validated by comparison to existing experimental data. The Q function method is used to visualize the instantaneous vortex structures. Three kinds of structures are found, a cylindrical shell structure in the outer shear layer, a ring structure and some hairpin-like structures in the inner shear layer. An eduction scheme is employed to investigate the coherent structures in this flow. Some large streaks constituted by counter-rotating vortices are found in the outer shear layer and some well-organized strong structures are found in the inner shear layer. Finally, the influences of coherent structures on scalar mixing are studied and it is shown that scalar in the recirculation region is transported outward by coherent structures.

  12. Clouds-in-clouds, clouds-in-cells physics for many-body plasma simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, C.K.; Fuss, D.

    1997-08-01

    A clouds-interacting-with-clouds, clouds-in-cells method (CIC) is presented for many-body nonlinear plasma problems. Density and force are obtained by assuming that the particles have finite size, are tenuous, and may pass through one another; the particles are thus called clouds. They obey a Coulomb force ({approx} 1/r or 1/r{sup 3}) when separated and a linear force ({approx}r) when overlapping, allowing simple harmonic oscillations at small separation. CIC is contrasted with the zero-size particle and nearest-grid-point approach, ZSP-NGP. CIC appears to have substantially less unwanted noise than ZSP-NGP and should be more useful in simulating dense plasmas. Initial runs have been encouraging. The methods may find use in other many-body simulations, such as with stars, or with particles in phase space. 9 refs., 13 figs.

  13. Flight-Simulated Launch-Pad-Abort-to-Landing Maneuvers for a Lifting Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Rivers, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an in-flight investigation of the feasibility of conducting a successful landing following a launch-pad abort of a vertically-launched lifting body are presented. The study attempted to duplicate the abort-to-land-ing trajectory from the point of apogee through final flare and included the steep glide and a required high-speed, low-altitude turn to the runway heading. The steep glide was flown by reference to ground-provided guidance. The low-altitude turn was flown visually with a reduced field- of-view duplicating that of the simulated lifting body. Results from the in-flight experiment are shown to agree with ground-based simulation results; however, these tests should not be regarded as a definitive due to performance and control law dissimilarities between the two vehicles.

  14. Simulation of the many-body dynamical quantum Hall effect in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan-Wei; Yang, Xu-Chen

    2016-05-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to simulate the many-body dynamical quantum Hall effect with ultra-cold bosonic atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We first show that the required model Hamiltonian of a spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain with an effective magnetic field and tunable parameters can be realized in this system. For dynamical response to ramping the external fields, the quantized plateaus emerge in the Berry curvature of the interacting atomic spin chain as a function of the effective spin-exchange interaction. The quantization of this response in the parameter space with the interaction-induced topological transition characterizes the many-body dynamical quantum Hall effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this phenomenon can be observed in practical cold atom experiments with numerical simulations.

  15. Wavelet-based adaptive numerical simulation of unsteady 3D flow around a bluff body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Stefano, Giuliano; Vasilyev, Oleg

    2012-11-01

    The unsteady three-dimensional flow past a two-dimensional bluff body is numerically simulated using a wavelet-based method. The body is modeled by exploiting the Brinkman volume-penalization method, which results in modifying the governing equations with the addition of an appropriate forcing term inside the spatial region occupied by the obstacle. The volume-penalized incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically solved by means of the adaptive wavelet collocation method, where the non-uniform spatial grid is dynamically adapted to the flow evolution. The combined approach is successfully applied to the simulation of vortex shedding flow behind a stationary prism with square cross-section. The computation is conducted at transitional Reynolds numbers, where fundamental unstable three-dimensional vortical structures exist, by well-predicting the unsteady forces arising from fluid-structure interaction.

  16. Comparative study of the biodegradability of porous silicon films in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Peckham, J; Andrews, G T

    2015-01-01

    The biodegradability of oxidized microporous, mesoporous and macroporous silicon films in a simulated body fluid with ion concentrations similar to those found in human blood plasma were studied using gravimetry. Film dissolution rates were determined by periodically weighing the samples after removal from the fluid. The dissolution rates for microporous silicon were found to be higher than those for mesoporous silicon of comparable porosity. The dissolution rate of macroporous silicon was much lower than that for either microporous or mesoporous silicon. This is attributed to the fact that its specific surface area is much lower than that of microporous and mesoporous silicon. Using an equation adapted from [Surf. Sci. Lett. 306 (1994), L550-L554], the dissolution rate of porous silicon in simulated body fluid can be estimated if the film thickness and specific surface area are known. PMID:25585985

  17. Cartesian Off-Body Grid Adaption for Viscous Time- Accurate Flow Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    An improved solution adaption capability has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid CFD code. Building on the Cartesian off-body approach inherent in OVERFLOW and the original adaptive refinement method developed by Meakin, the new scheme provides for automated creation of multiple levels of finer Cartesian grids. Refinement can be based on the undivided second-difference of the flow solution variables, or on a specific flow quantity such as vorticity. Coupled with load-balancing and an inmemory solution interpolation procedure, the adaption process provides very good performance for time-accurate simulations on parallel compute platforms. A method of using refined, thin body-fitted grids combined with adaption in the off-body grids is presented, which maximizes the part of the domain subject to adaption. Two- and three-dimensional examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness and performance of the adaption scheme.

  18. A Numerical Simulation of a Fishlike Body's Self-propelled C-start

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G.; Yu, Y. L.; Tong, B. G.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a numerical method to deal with a two-dimensional deformable fishlike body's large deformation self-propelled swimming. Overset grids are employed to discretize the flow domain around the large deforming body which is simulated by a foil. The kinematics, energetics and the flow structures of a typical C-start are predicted by a coupling solution of the two-dimensional incompressible fluid dynamics and the deforming body dynamics. As a typical practice, the foil performs a C-start-like motion in stationary water based on the prescribed deforming mode. It is found that the locomotion of the foil is similar to a real fish's C-start and the hydrodynamic efficiency of this C-start model is about 29% which is close to the value calculated by the previous theoretical estimation. Particularly, a structure of three significant concentrated vortices is discovered in the wake.

  19. Attitude dynamics simulation subroutines for systems of hinge-connected rigid bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischer, G. E.; Likins, P. W.

    1974-01-01

    Several computer subroutines are designed to provide the solution to minimum-dimension sets of discrete-coordinate equations of motion for systems consisting of an arbitrary number of hinge-connected rigid bodies assembled in a tree topology. In particular, these routines may be applied to: (1) the case of completely unrestricted hinge rotations, (2) the totally linearized case (all system rotations are small), and (3) the mixed, or partially linearized, case. The use of the programs in each case is demonstrated using a five-body spacecraft and attitude control system configuration. The ability of the subroutines to accommodate prescribed motions of system bodies is also demonstrated. Complete listings and user instructions are included for these routines (written in FORTRAN V) which are intended as multi- and general-purpose tools in the simulation of spacecraft and other complex electromechanical systems.

  20. Positive Tensor Network Approach for Simulating Open Quantum Many-Body Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, A. H.; Jaschke, D.; Silvi, P.; Kliesch, M.; Calarco, T.; Eisert, J.; Montangero, S.

    2016-06-01

    Open quantum many-body systems play an important role in quantum optics and condensed matter physics, and capture phenomena like transport, the interplay between Hamiltonian and incoherent dynamics, and topological order generated by dissipation. We introduce a versatile and practical method to numerically simulate one-dimensional open quantum many-body dynamics using tensor networks. It is based on representing mixed quantum states in a locally purified form, which guarantees that positivity is preserved at all times. Moreover, the approximation error is controlled with respect to the trace norm. Hence, this scheme overcomes various obstacles of the known numerical open-system evolution schemes. To exemplify the functioning of the approach, we study both stationary states and transient dissipative behavior, for various open quantum systems ranging from few to many bodies.

  1. Positive Tensor Network Approach for Simulating Open Quantum Many-Body Systems.

    PubMed

    Werner, A H; Jaschke, D; Silvi, P; Kliesch, M; Calarco, T; Eisert, J; Montangero, S

    2016-06-10

    Open quantum many-body systems play an important role in quantum optics and condensed matter physics, and capture phenomena like transport, the interplay between Hamiltonian and incoherent dynamics, and topological order generated by dissipation. We introduce a versatile and practical method to numerically simulate one-dimensional open quantum many-body dynamics using tensor networks. It is based on representing mixed quantum states in a locally purified form, which guarantees that positivity is preserved at all times. Moreover, the approximation error is controlled with respect to the trace norm. Hence, this scheme overcomes various obstacles of the known numerical open-system evolution schemes. To exemplify the functioning of the approach, we study both stationary states and transient dissipative behavior, for various open quantum systems ranging from few to many bodies. PMID:27341253

  2. Assessment of simulated high-dose partial-body irradiation by PCC-R assay

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Ivonne; García, Omar; Lamadrid, Ana I.; Gregoire, Eric; González, Jorge E.; Morales, Wilfredo; Martin, Cécile; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc; Voisin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The estimation of the dose and the irradiated fraction of the body is important information in the primary medical response in case of a radiological accident. The PCC-R assay has been developed for high-dose estimations, but little attention has been given to its applicability for partial-body irradiations. In the present work we estimated the doses and the percentage of the irradiated fraction in simulated partial-body radiation exposures at high doses using the PCC-R assay. Peripheral whole blood of three healthy donors was exposed to doses from 0–20 Gy, with 60Co gamma radiation. To simulate partial body irradiations, irradiated and non-irradiated blood was mixed to obtain proportions of irradiated blood from 10–90%. Lymphocyte cultures were treated with Colcemid and Calyculin-A before harvest. Conventional and triage scores were performed for each dose, proportion of irradiated blood and donor. The Papworth's u test was used to evaluate the PCC-R distribution per cell. A dose-response relationship was fitted according to the maximum likelihood method using the frequencies of PCC-R obtained from 100% irradiated blood. The dose to the partially irradiated blood was estimated using the Contaminated Poisson method. A new D0 value of 10.9 Gy was calculated and used to estimate the initial fraction of irradiated cells. The results presented here indicate that by PCC-R it is possible to distinguish between simulated partial- and whole-body irradiations by the u-test, and to accurately estimate the dose from 10–20 Gy, and the initial fraction of irradiated cells in the interval from 10–90%. PMID:23596200

  3. NOVel Adaptive softening for collisionless N-body simulations: eliminating spurious haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Alexander; Read, Justin I.; Agertz, Oscar; Iannuzzi, Francesca; Power, Chris

    2016-05-01

    We describe a NOVel form of Adaptive softening (NOVA) for collisionless N-body simulations, implemented in the RAMSES adaptive mesh refinement code. In RAMSES - that we refer to as a `standard N-body method' - cells are only split if they contain more than eight particles (a mass refinement criterion). Here, we introduce an additional criterion that the particle distribution within each cell be sufficiently isotropic, as measured by the ratio of the maximum to minimum eigenvalues of its moment of inertia tensor: η = λmax/λmin. In this way, collapse is only refined if it occurs along all three axes, ensuring that the softening ɛ is always of order twice the largest interparticle spacing in a cell. This more conservative force softening criterion is designed to minimize spurious two-body effects, while maintaining high force resolution in collapsed regions of the flow. We test NOVA using an antisymmetric perturbed plane wave collapse (`Valinia' test) before applying it to warm dark matter (WDM) simulations. For the Valinia test, we show that - unlike the standard N-body method - NOVA produces no numerical fragmentation while still being able to correctly capture fine caustics and shells around the collapsing regions. For the WDM simulations, we find that NOVA converges significantly more rapidly than standard N-body, producing little or no spurious haloes on small scales. We will use NOVA in forthcoming papers to study the issue of halo formation below the free-streaming mass Mfs; filament stability; and to obtain new constraints on the temperature of dark matter.

  4. Unsteady aerodynamic simulation of multiple bodies in relative motion: A prototype method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    A prototype method for time-accurate simulation of multiple aerodynamic bodies in relative motion is presented. The method is general and features unsteady chimera domain decomposition techniques and an implicit approximately factored finite-difference procedure to solve the time-dependent thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. The method is applied to a set of two- and three- dimensional test problems to establish spatial and temporal accuracy, quantify computational efficiency, and begin to test overall code robustness.

  5. Direct numerical simulations of rigid body dispersions. I. Mobility/friction tensors of assemblies of spheres.

    PubMed

    Molina, John J; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2013-12-21

    An improved formulation of the "Smoothed Profile" method is introduced to perform direct numerical simulations of arbitrary rigid body dispersions in a Newtonian host solvent. Previous implementations of the method were restricted to spherical particles, severely limiting the types of systems that could be studied. The validity of the method is carefully examined by computing the friction/mobility tensors for a wide variety of geometries and comparing them to reference values obtained from accurate solutions to the Stokes-Equation. PMID:24359350

  6. Three-dimensional finite element simulations of vertebral body thermal treatment (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Patel, Samit J.; Morris, Ronit; Hoopes, P. J.; Bergeron, Jeffrey A.; Mahajan, Roop

    2005-04-01

    Lower back pain affects a large group of people worldwide and when in its early stages, has no viable interventional treatment. In order to avoid the eventuality of an invasive surgical procedure, which is further down the Care Pathway, an interventional treatment that is minimally invasive and arrests the patient's pain would be of tremendous clinical benefit. There is a hypothesis that if the basivertebral nerve in the vertebral body is defunctionalized, lower back pain may be lessened. To further investigate creating a means to provide localized thermal therapy, bench and animal studies were planned, but to help select the applicator configuration and placement, numerical modeling studies were undertaken. A 3D finite element model was utilized to predict the electric field pattern and power deposition pattern of radiofrequency (RF) based electrodes. Three types of tissues were modeled: 1) porcine (ex-vivo), ovine (in-vivo preclinical), and 3) human (ex-vivo, in-vivo). Two types of RF devices were simulated: 1) a pair of converging, hollow electrodes, and 2) an in-line pair of spaced-apart electrodes. Temperature distributions over time were plotted using the electric field results and the bioheat equation. Since the thermal and electrical properties of the vertebral bodies of porcine, ovine, and human tissue were not available, measurements were undertaken to capture these data to input into the model. The measurements of electrical and thermal properties of cancellous and cortical vertebral body were made over a range of temperatures. The simulation temperature results agreed with live animal and human cadaver studies. In addition, the lesion shapes predicted in the simulations matched CT and MRI studies done during the chronic ovine study, as well as histology results. In conclusion, the simulations aided in shaping and sizing the RF electrodes, as well as positioning them in the vertebral body structures to assure that the basivertebral nerve was ablated, but

  7. WINE-1: Special-Purpose Computer forN-Body Simulations with a Periodic Boundary Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushige, Toshiyuki; Makino, Junichiro; Ito, Tomoyoshi; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Sugimoto, Daiichiro

    1993-06-01

    We have developed WINE-1 (Wave space INtegrator for Ewald method), a special-purpose computer for N-body simulations with a periodic boundary condition. In N-body simulations with a periodic boundary condition such as cosmological N-body simulations, we use the Ewald method to calculate the gravitational interaction. With the Ewald method, we can calculate the interaction more accurately than a calculation with other methods, such as the PM method, the P(3) M method, or the tree algorithm. In the Ewald method, the total force exerted on a particle is divided into contributions from real space and wave-number space so that the infinite sum can converge exponentially in both spaces. WINE is a special-purpose computer used to calculate the interaction in wave-number space. WINE is connected to a host computer via the VME bus. We have developed the first machine, WINE-1. It is made of one board having a size of 38 cm by 40 cm, on which 31 LSI chips and 46 IC chips are wire-wrapped. The peak speed of WINE-1 is equivalent to 480 Mflops. The summation in real space is calculated using a GRAPE system, another special-purpose computer for the direct calculation of the interparticle force. For example, we can perform a cosmological N-body simulation for N=80,000 (500 steps) within a week if we use GRAPE-2A for the summation in real space and WINE-1 for that in wave-number space.

  8. Comparative biological activities of acellular pertussis vaccines produced by Kitasato.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Izumiya, K; Sato, T; Yoshino, K; Nakagawa, N; Ohoishi, M; Hoshino, M

    1991-04-01

    The quality of 14 lots of acellular pertussis-diphtheria-tetanus (AC-PDT) vaccines manufactured by the Kitasato Institute during the period 1987-1990 were investigated. The geometric means of HSU, LPU, and BWDU were 0.078, 0.257, and 7.33 per ml respectively. The potency was higher than 14 IU per ml. These results indicated the consistency of the Kitasato AC-PDT vaccines. The antibody response to the AC-PDT vaccines was measured in primary and secondary vaccinated mice by ELISA. IgG antibody response to FHA and PT was obtained in all immunized mice (P less than 0.001) after the primary injection. In contrast, IgG antibody response to fimbriae 2 showed a significant titer rise (P less than 0.001) after the booster injection. The results indicated that the Kitasato AC-P vaccines consisted of protein, PT and FHA as the major antigens, and a little agglutinogen as the minor antigen. PMID:1798236

  9. [Experimental, clinical and immunologic assessment of acellular staphylococcal vaccine "Staphylovac"].

    PubMed

    Egorova, N B; Efremova, V N; Kurbatova, E A; Gruber, I M

    2008-01-01

    Results of experimental, clinical and immunological effects of acellular dry staphylococcal vaccine "Staphylovac" developed in Mechnikov Research Institute of Vaccines and Sera are presented. Original mildly virulent strains of Staphylococcus aureus having high immunogenicity, and intra- and interspecies protective activity against different representatives of opportunistic microflora were used for construction of the preparation. Low-toxicity and weak anapylactogenicity of the vaccine were established. In experiments on mice, guinea pigs and rabbits significant protective, antigenic and immunomodulate activity of the preparation was revealed with low sensitization of animals. Clinical trials performed in different centers showed that inclusion of vaccinotherapy in complex treatment of chronic staphylococcal infections (chronic pyodermia, lung abscess etc.) resulted in prolonged pathologic locus, decrease of number and severity of exacerbations, prolongation of remission, and complete recovery in significant number of patients. Activation of innate and adaptive immunity was revealed in the same patients. It was shown on the large group of athletes that administration of the vaccine by aerosol route prevents disruption of immunologic adaptation occurring due to excess physical activity and stress situations during competitions. PMID:19186558

  10. A Complication Analysis of 2 Acellular Dermal Matrices in Prosthetic-based Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Page, Eugenia K.; Hart, Alexandra; Rudderman, Randall; Carlson, Grant W.; Losken, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acellular dermal matrices (ADM) are now routine in postmastectomy prosthetic-based breast reconstruction. The goal of the current study was to compare the complications of 2 ADM products—AlloDerm and Cortiva. Methods: A retrospective analysis of prosthetic-based breast reconstruction in Atlanta, Ga., over 5 years. Inclusion criteria were the use of the ADM types (AlloDerm or Cortiva) and use of a tissue expander or implant. Statistical analysis compared group demographics, risk factors, and early complications. Results: Of the 298 breast reconstructions, 174 (58.4%) used AlloDerm and 124 (41.6%) used Cortiva. There was no difference in overall complication frequency (16 AlloDerm and 18 Cortiva; P = 0.195). Within specific categories, there was a difference in mastectomy skin flap necrosis, but, based on further regression analysis, this was attributable to differences in body mass index (P = 0.036). Furthermore, there were no differences in the rates of infection (6 AlloDerm and 5 Cortiva; P = 1.0), seroma/hematoma (9 AlloDerm and 7 Cortiva; P = 1.0), or drain duration (13.2 day AlloDerm and 14.2 day Cortiva, P = 0.2). By using a general estimating equation for binomial logistical regression, it was found that only current tobacco use (P = 0.033) was a significant predictor for a complication. Trending predictors were body mass index (P = 0.074) and age (P = 0.093). The type of matrix was not a significant predictor for any of the recorded complication (P = 0.160). Conclusions: Although AlloDerm is well established, we have shown that Cortiva has an equivalent complication frequency. Future work will focus on long-term outcome measures and histological evaluation of vascularization and integration. PMID:27536479

  11. Modeling, simulation and optimization approaches for design of lightweight car body structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Morteza

    Simulation-based design optimization and finite element method are used in this research to investigate weight reduction of car body structures made of metallic and composite materials under different design criteria. Besides crashworthiness in full frontal, offset frontal, and side impact scenarios, vibration frequencies, static stiffness, and joint rigidity are also considered. Energy absorption at the component level is used to study the effectiveness of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite material with consideration of different failure criteria. A global-local design strategy is introduced and applied to multi-objective optimization of car body structures with CFRP components. Multiple example problems involving the analysis of full-vehicle crash and body-in-white models are used to examine the effect of material substitution and the choice of design criteria on weight reduction. The results of this study show that car body structures that are optimized for crashworthiness alone may not meet the vibration criterion. Moreover, optimized car body structures with CFRP components can be lighter with superior crashworthiness than the baseline and optimized metallic structures.

  12. General relativistic N-body simulations in the weak field limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamek, Julian; Daverio, David; Durrer, Ruth; Kunz, Martin

    2013-11-01

    We develop a formalism for general relativistic N-body simulations in the weak field regime, suitable for cosmological applications. The problem is kept tractable by retaining the metric perturbations to first order, the first derivatives to second order, and second derivatives to all orders, thus taking into account the most important nonlinear effects of Einstein gravity. It is also expected that any significant “backreaction” should appear at this order. We show that the simulation scheme is feasible in practice by implementing it for a plane-symmetric situation and running two test cases, one with only cold dark matter, and one which also includes a cosmological constant. For these plane-symmetric situations, the deviations from the usual Newtonian N-body simulations remain small and, apart from a nontrivial correction to the background, can be accurately estimated within the Newtonian framework. The correction to the background scale factor, which is a genuine backreaction effect, can be robustly obtained with our algorithm. Our numerical approach is also naturally suited for the inclusion of extra relativistic fields and thus for dark energy or modified gravity simulations.

  13. Acceleration of hybrid MPI parallel NBODY6++ for large N-body globular cluster simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long; Spurzem, Rainer; Aarseth, Sverre; Nitadori, Keigo; Berczik, Peter; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Naab, Thorsten

    2016-02-01

    Previous research on globular clusters (GCs) dynamics is mostly based on semi-analytic, Fokker-Planck, Monte-Carlo methods and on direct N-body (NB) simulations. These works have great advantages but also limits since GCs are massive and compact and close encounters and binaries play very important roles in their dynamics. The former three methods make approximations and assumptions, while expensive computing time and number of stars limit the latter method. The current largest direct NB simulation has ~ 500k stars (Heggie 2014). Here, we accelerate the direct NB code NBODY6++ (which extends NBODY6 to supercomputers by using MPI) with new parallel computing technologies (GPU, OpenMP + SSE/AVX). Our aim is to handle large N (up to 106) direct NB simulations to obtain better understanding of the dynamical evolution of GCs.

  14. Real-time simulation model of the HL-20 lifting body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Cruz, Christopher I.; Ragsdale, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    A proposed manned spacecraft design, designated the HL-20, has been under investigation at Langley Research Center. Included in that investigation are flight control design and flying qualities studies utilizing a man-in-the-loop real-time simulator. This report documents the current real-time simulation model of the HL-20 lifting body vehicle, known as version 2.0, presently in use at NASA Langley Research Center. Included are data on vehicle aerodynamics, inertias, geometries, guidance and control laws, and cockpit displays and controllers. In addition, trim case and dynamic check case data is provided. The intent of this document is to provide the reader with sufficient information to develop and validate an equivalent simulation of the HL-20 for use in real-time or analytical studies.

  15. Apatite-forming ability of vinylphosphonic acid-based copolymer in simulated body fluid: effects of phosphate group content.

    PubMed

    Hamai, Ryo; Shirosaki, Yuki; Miyazaki, Toshiki

    2016-10-01

    Phosphate groups on materials surfaces are known to contribute to apatite formation upon exposure of the materials in simulated body fluid and improved affinity of the materials for osteoblast-like cells. Typically, polymers containing phosphate groups are organic matrices consisting of apatite-polymer composites prepared by biomimetic process using simulated body fluid. Ca(2+) incorporation into the polymer accelerates apatite formation in simulated body fluid owing because of increase in the supersaturation degree, with respect to apatite in simulated body fluid, owing to Ca(2+) release from the polymer. However, the effects of phosphate content on the Ca(2+) release and apatite-forming abilities of copolymers in simulated body fluid are rather elusive. In this study, a phosphate-containing copolymer prepared from vinylphosphonic acid, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate was examined. The release of Ca(2+) in Tris-NaCl buffer and simulated body fluid increased as the additive amount of vinylphosphonic acid increased. However, apatite formation was suppressed as the phosphate groups content increased despite the enhanced release of Ca(2+) from the polymer. This phenomenon was reflected by changes in the surface zeta potential. Thus, it was concluded that the apatite-forming ability of vinylphosphonic acid-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-triethylene glycol dimethacrylate copolymer treated with CaCl2 solution was governed by surface state rather than Ca(2+) release in simulated body fluid. PMID:27585911

  16. Large-scale hydrodynamical and N-body simulations of viscous overstability in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latter, H.; Rein, H.; Ogilvie, G.

    2012-09-01

    We aim to understand axisymmetric structure formation in Saturn's A and B-rings on scales of 100 m to several kms through nonlinear hydrodynamical and N-body simulations of the viscous overstability. The viscous overstability is a robust generator of structure on short scales, as witnessed by previous hydrodynamical and N-body simulations (Schmidt and Tscharnuter 1999, Salo et al. 2001), and is hence the most likely candidate responsible for recently observed periodic microstructure (Colwell et al. 2007, Thomson et al. 2007). It is also possible that during its nonlinear saturation the instability gives rise to axisymmetric patterns on slightly longer scales that may correspond to observed irregular structure on 1-10 km (Porco et al. 2005, Latter and Ogilvie 2009, 2010). Our hydrodynamical and N-body simulations are undertaken in local Cartesian domains that can extend over 10 km in radius and can be evolved forward in time for more than 1000 orbits. These hence provide the scope to fully describe the nonlinear saturation of the overstability and to mainfest the full range of its dynamics. Self-gravity is omitted at this stage, but will be included in future work. Nonlinear wavetrains dominate all the simulations, and we associate them with the observed periodic microstructure. The preferred lengthscale of these waves (~200 m) is set by secondary modulational instabilities. These wavetrains undergo small chaotic fluctuations in their phases and amplitudes, and may be punctuated by more formidable `wave-defects', that are distributed on longer scales (~ 1-5 km). It is possible that the defects are connected to the irregular larger-scale variations observed. We also speculate on the azimuthal extent of the waves and the influence of self-gravity wakes on their dynamics.

  17. Drift trajectories of a floating human body simulated in a hydraulic model of Puget Sound.

    PubMed

    Ebbesmeyer, C C; Haglund, W D

    1994-01-01

    After a young man jumped off a 221-foot (67 meters) high bridge, the drift of the body that beached 20 miles (32 km) away at Alki Point in Seattle, Washington was simulated with a hydraulic model. Simulations for the appropriate time period were performed using a small floating bead to represent the body in the hydraulic model at the University of Washington. Bead movements were videotaped and transferred to Computer Aided Drafting (AutoCAD) charts on a personal computer. Because of strong tidal currents in the narrow passage under the bridge (The Narrows near Tacoma, WA), small changes in the time of the jump (+/- 30 minutes) made large differences in the distance the body traveled (30 miles; 48 km). Hydraulic and other types of oceanographic models may be located by contacting technical experts known as physical oceanographers at local universities, and can be utilized to demonstrate trajectories of floating objects and the time required to arrive at selected locations. Potential applications for forensic death investigators include: to be able to set geographic and time limits for searches; determine potential origin of remains found floating or beached; and confirm and correlate information regarding entry into the water and sightings of remains. PMID:8113703

  18. Numerical simulations of impacts involving porous bodies. II. Comparison with laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutzi, Martin; Michel, Patrick; Hiraoka, Kensuke; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Benz, Willy

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we compare the outcome of high-velocity impact experiments on porous targets, composed of pumice, with the results of simulations by a 3D SPH hydrocode in which a porosity model has been implemented. The different populations of small bodies of our Solar System are believed to be composed, at least partially, of objects with a high degree of porosity. To describe the fragmentation of such porous objects, a different model is needed than that used for non-porous bodies. In the case of porous bodies, the impact process is not only driven by the presence of cracks which propagate when a stress threshold is reached, it is also influenced by the crushing of pores and compaction. Such processes can greatly affect the whole body's response to an impact. Therefore, another physical model is necessary to improve our understanding of the collisional process involving porous bodies. Such a model has been developed recently and introduced successfully in a 3D SPH hydrocode [Jutzi, M., Benz, W., Michel, P., 2008. Icarus 198, 242-255]. Basic tests have been performed which already showed that it is implemented in a consistent way and that theoretical solutions are well reproduced. However, its full validation requires that it is also capable of reproducing the results of real laboratory impact experiments. Here we present simulations of laboratory experiments on pumice targets for which several of the main material properties have been measured. We show that using the measured material properties and keeping the remaining free parameters fixed, our numerical model is able to reproduce the outcome of these experiments carried out under different impact conditions. This first complete validation of our model, which will be tested for other porous materials in the future, allows us to start addressing problems at larger scale related to small bodies of our Solar System, such as collisions in the Kuiper Belt or the formation of a family by the disruption of a porous

  19. Three-Body Abrasion Testing Using Lunar Dust Simulants to Evaluate Surface System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Budinski, Kenneth G.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Klaus, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous unexpected operational issues relating to the abrasive nature of lunar dust, such as scratched visors and spacesuit pressure seal leaks, were encountered during the Apollo missions. To avoid reoccurrence of these unexpected detrimental equipment problems on future missions to the Moon, a series of two- and three-body abrasion tests were developed and conducted in order to begin rigorously characterizing the effect of lunar dust abrasiveness on candidate surface system materials. Two-body scratch tests were initially performed to examine fundamental interactions of a single particle on a flat surface. These simple and robust tests were used to establish standardized measurement techniques for quantifying controlled volumetric wear. Subsequent efforts described in the paper involved three-body abrasion testing designed to be more representative of actual lunar interactions. For these tests, a new tribotester was developed to expose samples to a variety of industrial abrasives and lunar simulants. The work discussed in this paper describes the three-body hardware setup consisting of a rotating rubber wheel that applies a load on a specimen as a loose abrasive is fed into the system. The test methodology is based on ASTM International (ASTM) B611, except it does not mix water with the abrasive. All tests were run under identical conditions. Abraded material specimens included poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), hardened 1045 steel, 6061-T6 aluminum (Al) and 1018 steel. Abrasives included lunar mare simulant JSC- 1A-F (nominal size distribution), sieved JSC-1A-F (<25 m particle diameter), lunar highland simulant NU-LHT-2M, alumina (average diameter of 50 m used per ASTM G76), and silica (50/70 mesh used per ASTM G65). The measured mass loss from each specimen was converted using standard densities to determine total wear volume in cm3. Abrasion was dominated by the alumina and the simulants were only similar to the silica (i.e., sand) on the softer materials of

  20. Simulation, Modeling and Feedback Control of the flow around a Square-Back Bluff Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Longa, Laurent; Morgans, Aimee; Imperial College London-Flow Control Team

    2015-11-01

    Because of capacity, aesthetic and comfort requirements, most road vehicles are not streamlined but blunt bluff bodies. The flow exhibits a large wake recirculation area leading to high pressure drag, which at highway speeds, represents the main source of energy loss. In this work, Large Eddy Simulations of the flow past a square-back bluff body with interacting shear layers are performed with the aim of reducing aerodynamic drag. A linear feedback control strategy is applied to increase the back face pressure and therefore obtain drag reduction. Synthetic jets located along the perimeter of the back face are used for actuation while body mounted sensors record the base pressure. System identification, via harmonic actuator forcing, is used to characterize the flow response to actuation, which is assumed to be dynamically linear. Based on the identified frequency response, a feedback controller is designed in the frequency domain which aims to either attenuate or amplify base pressure fluctuations by shaping of the sensitivity transfer function. This is first done for a D-shaped body. Current work extends this strategy to a simplified lorry geometry on which experiments were carried out recently.

  1. Effects of obesity on occupant responses in frontal crashes: a simulation analysis using human body models.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangnan; Cao, Libo; Reed, Matthew P; Rupp, Jonathan D; Hu, Jingwen

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of obesity on occupant responses in frontal crashes using whole-body human finite element (FE) models representing occupants with different obesity levels. In this study, the geometry of THUMS 4 midsize male model was varied using mesh morphing techniques with target geometries defined by statistical models of external body contour and exterior ribcage geometry. Models with different body mass indices (BMIs) were calibrated against cadaver test data under high-speed abdomen loading and frontal crash conditions. A parametric analysis was performed to investigate the effects of BMI on occupant injuries in frontal crashes based on the Taguchi method while controlling for several vehicle design parameters. Simulations of obese occupants predicted significantly higher risks of injuries to the thorax and lower extremities in frontal crashes compared with non-obese occupants, which is consistent with previous field data analyses. These higher injury risks are mainly due to the increased body mass and relatively poor belt fit caused by soft tissues for obese occupants. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using a parametric human FE model to investigate the obesity effects on occupant responses in frontal crashes. PMID:24666169

  2. Formation Of The Haumea System: Checking Alternative Scenarios By N-body Based Numerical Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirouin, Audrey; Bagati, A. C.; Ortiz, J.; Duffard, R.; Benavidez, P.; Richardson, D.

    2010-10-01

    Haumea is one of the most studied and probably one of the most interesting Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) and a fast spinning dwarf planet (Rabinowitz et al., 2006; Thirouin et al. 2010) that has at least two satellites and whose orbital elements are related to a group/family of bodies. A catastrophic collision at high relative velocity (around 3 km/s) between two bodies in the 1000-1500 km size range and a mass ratio 0.2 has been suggested for the formation of the 'family' and the presence of satellites (Brown et al. 2007). Leinhardt et al. (2010) proposed another mechanism in which two 1300 km size bodies undergo a grazing collision with reacculumation of part of the mass and dispersion of the rest, partly into satellites. The likelihood of both scenarios is small when tested against collisional and dynamical evolution model predictions of collisional probabilities. Furthermore, these mechanisms have trouble in explaining the velocity dispersion of the family members and the fast spin of Haumea. Schlichting and Sari (2009) proposed that a former collision at low speed formed a proto-satellite that should lately undergo a final impact finally leading to the current observed system. In this work, we propose alternative mechanisms for the formation of the Haumea system ant test them by means of N-body numerical simulations (PKDGRAV code. Richardson, 1994).

  3. In Vitro Studies Evaluating Leaching of Mercury from Mine Waste Calcine Using Simulated Human Body Fluids

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In vitro bioaccessibility (IVBA) studies were carried out on samples of mercury (Hg) mine-waste calcine (roasted Hg ore) by leaching with simulated human body fluids. The objective was to estimate potential human exposure to Hg due to inhalation of airborne calcine particulates and hand-to-mouth ingestion of Hg-bearing calcines. Mine waste calcines collected from Hg mines at Almadén, Spain, and Terlingua, Texas, contain Hg sulfide, elemental Hg, and soluble Hg compounds, which constitute primary ore or compounds formed during Hg retorting. Elevated leachate Hg concentrations were found during calcine leaching using a simulated gastric fluid (as much as 6200 μg of Hg leached/g sample). Elevated Hg concentrations were also found in calcine leachates using a simulated lung fluid (as much as 9200 μg of Hg leached/g), serum-based fluid (as much as 1600 μg of Hg leached/g), and water of pH 5 (as much as 880 μg of Hg leached/g). The leaching capacity of Hg is controlled by calcine mineralogy; thus, calcines containing soluble Hg compounds contain higher leachate Hg concentrations. Results indicate that ingestion or inhalation of Hg mine-waste calcine may lead to increased Hg concentrations in the human body, especially through the ingestion pathway. PMID:20491469

  4. Hierarchical tree algorithm for collisional N-body simulations on GRAPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushige, Toshiyuki; Kawai, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    We present an implementation of the hierarchical tree algorithm on the individual timestep algorithm (the Hermite scheme) for collisional N-body simulations, running on the GRAPE-9 system, a special-purpose hardware accelerator for gravitational many-body simulations. Such a combination of the tree algorithm and the individual timestep algorithm was not easy on the previous GRAPE system mainly because its memory addressing scheme was limited only to sequential access to a full set of particle data. The present GRAPE-9 system has an indirect memory addressing unit and a particle memory large enough to store all the particle data and also the tree node data. The indirect memory addressing unit stores interaction lists for the tree algorithm, which is constructed on the host computer, and, according to the interaction lists, force pipelines calculate only the interactions necessary. In our implementation, the interaction calculations are significantly reduced compared to direct N2 summation in the original Hermite scheme. For example, we can achieve about a factor 30 of speedup (equivalent to about 17 teraflops) against the Hermite scheme for a simulation of an N = 106 system, using hardware of a peak speed of 0.6 teraflops for the Hermite scheme.

  5. Hierarchical tree algorithm for collisional N-body simulations on GRAPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushige, Toshiyuki; Kawai, Atsushi

    2016-03-01

    We present an implementation of the hierarchical tree algorithm on the individual timestep algorithm (the Hermite scheme) for collisional N-body simulations, running on the GRAPE-9 system, a special-purpose hardware accelerator for gravitational many-body simulations. Such a combination of the tree algorithm and the individual timestep algorithm was not easy on the previous GRAPE system mainly because its memory addressing scheme was limited only to sequential access to a full set of particle data. The present GRAPE-9 system has an indirect memory addressing unit and a particle memory large enough to store all the particle data and also the tree node data. The indirect memory addressing unit stores interaction lists for the tree algorithm, which is constructed on the host computer, and, according to the interaction lists, force pipelines calculate only the interactions necessary. In our implementation, the interaction calculations are significantly reduced compared to direct N2 summation in the original Hermite scheme. For example, we can achieve about a factor 30 of speedup (equivalent to about 17 teraflops) against the Hermite scheme for a simulation of an N = 106 system, using hardware of a peak speed of 0.6 teraflops for the Hermite scheme.

  6. Nonlinear stochastic biasing of halos: Analysis of cosmological N-body simulations and perturbation theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masanori; Matsubara, Takahiko

    2013-06-01

    It is crucial to understand and model a behavior of galaxy biasing for future ambitious galaxy redshift surveys. Using 40 large cosmological N-body simulations for a standard ΛCDM cosmology, we study the cross-correlation coefficient between matter and the halo density field, which is an indicator of the stochasticity of bias, over a wide redshift range 0≤z≤3. The cross-correlation coefficient is important to extract information on the matter density field, e.g., by combining galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements. We compare the simulation results with integrated perturbation theory (iPT) proposed by one of the present authors and standard perturbation theory combined with a phenomenological model of local bias. The cross-correlation coefficient derived from the iPT agrees with N-body simulation results down to r˜15(10)h-1Mpc within 0.5 (1.0)% for all redshifts and halo masses we consider. The standard perturbation theory with local bias does not explain complicated behaviors on quasilinear scales at low redshifts, while roughly reproduces the general behavior of the cross-correlation coefficient on fully nonlinear scales. The iPT is powerful to predict the cross-correlation coefficient down to quasilinear regimes with a high precision.

  7. Quantification of discreteness effects in cosmological N-body simulations: Initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, M.; Marcos, B.

    2007-03-15

    The relation between the results of cosmological N-body simulations, and the continuum theoretical models they simulate, is currently not understood in a way which allows a quantification of N dependent effects. In this first of a series of papers on this issue, we consider the quantification of such effects in the initial conditions of such simulations. A general formalism developed in [A. Gabrielli, Phys. Rev. E 70, 066131 (2004).] allows us to write down an exact expression for the power spectrum of the point distributions generated by the standard algorithm for generating such initial conditions. Expanded perturbatively in the amplitude of the input (i.e. theoretical, continuum) power spectrum, we obtain at linear order the input power spectrum, plus two terms which arise from discreteness and contribute at large wave numbers. For cosmological type power spectra, one obtains as expected, the input spectrum for wave numbers k smaller than that characteristic of the discreteness. The comparison of real space correlation properties is more subtle because the discreteness corrections are not as strongly localized in real space. For cosmological type spectra the theoretical mass variance in spheres and two-point correlation function are well approximated above a finite distance. For typical initial amplitudes this distance is a few times the interparticle distance, but it diverges as this amplitude (or, equivalently, the initial redshift of the cosmological simulation) goes to zero, at fixed particle density. We discuss briefly the physical significance of these discreteness terms in the initial conditions, in particular, with respect to the definition of the continuum limit of N-body simulations.

  8. Rahman Prize Talk: Pushing the frontier in the simulation of correlated quantum many body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Matthias

    Amazing progress in the simulation of correlated quantum many body systems has been achieved in the past two decades by combining significant advances in new algorithms with efficient implementations on ever faster supercomputers. This has enabled the accurate simulation of an increasing number of problems and helped settle many open questions. I will review a selection of results that my collaborators and I have worked on, from quantum phase transitions in quantum magnets, over supersolidity of bosons in lattice models and Helium-4 to recent simulations of correlated fermions and quantum gases. I will then provide an outlook to the future and discuss how in the short term analog quantum simulators can help tackle problems for which no efficient simulation algorithms exist and how in the longer term quantum computers can be used to solve many of the still open questions in the field. I will finally connect to the topic of the remainder of this symposium by touching on how the design of new topological materials will help in the construction of these quantum computers.

  9. Halo Statistics Analysis Within Medium Volume Cosmological N-Body Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinovic, N.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present halo statistics analysis of a Λ CDM N-body cosmological simulation (from first halo formation until z = 0). We study mean major merger rate as a function of time, where for time we consider both per redshift and per Gyr dependence. For latter we find that it scales as the well known power law (1+z)^n for which we obtain n = 2.4. The halo mass function and halo growth function are derived and compared both with analytical and empirical fits. We analyse halo growth through out entire simulation, making it possible to continuously monitor evolution of halo number density within given mass ranges. The halo formation redshift is studied exploring possibility for a new simple preliminary analysis during the simulation run. Visualization of the simulation is portrayed as well. At redshifts z = 0-7 halos from simulation have good statistics for further analysis especially in mass range of 10^{11} - 10^{14} M_{⊙}/h.

  10. Characterization of a lower-body exoskeleton for simulation of space-suited locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Christopher E.; Newman, Dava J.

    2008-02-01

    In a previous analysis of suited and unsuited locomotion energetics, we found evidence that space suits act as springs during running. Video images from the lunar surface suggest that knee torques create, in large part, this spring effect. We hypothesized that a lower-body exoskeleton, properly constructed, could be used to simulate the knee torques of a range of space suits. Here we report characterization of a lower-body exoskeleton. Equivalent spring stiffness of each exoskeleton leg varies as a function of exoskeleton knee angle and load, and the exoskeleton joint-torque relationship closely matches the current NASA space suit, or Extravehicular Mobility Unit, knee torques in form and magnitude. We have built an exoskeleton with two physical non-linear springs, which achieve space-suit like joint-torques. Therefore space-suit legs act as springs, with this effect most pronounced when locomotion requires large changes in knee flexion such as during running.

  11. MHD simulations of large conducting bodies moving through a planetary magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, A.; Schröer, A.

    1998-01-01

    The interaction between a large body with finite conductivity moving relatively to a planetary magnetic field and the magnetospheric plasma is studied by means of numerical simulations in the framework of resistive MHD. Applications discussed are spacecrafts (tethered satellites) in the Earth's ionosphere and the interaction of Jupiter with its satellite Io. The interaction excites MHD waves in which consequence an electrical current flow through the conductor is generated which extends into the surrounding plasma and propagates along the Alfvén characteristics. Thus, kinetic energy is converted into electrical energy which may be utilized for satellite projects or explain Jupiter's decametric radiation. The linear and nonlinear evolution of the plasma environment and the current system is investigated with special care taken of the principal phenomena occuring in the vicinity of the conducting body.

  12. Barred Galaxy Photometry: Comparing results from the Cananea sample with N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassoula, E.; Gadotti, D. A.; Carrasco, L.; Bosma, A.; de Souza, R. E.; Recillas, E.

    2009-11-01

    We compare the results of the photometrical analysis of barred galaxies with those of a similar analysis from N-body simulations. The photometry is for a sample of nine barred galaxies observed in the J and K[s] bands with the CANICA near infrared (NIR) camera at the 2.1 m telescope of the Observatorio Astrofísico Guillermo Haro (OAGH) in Cananea, Sonora, Mexico. The comparison includes radial ellipticity profiles and surface brightness (density for the N-body galaxies) profiles along the bar major and minor axes. We find very good agreement, arguing that the exchange of angular momentum within the galaxy plays a determinant role in the evolution of barred galaxies.

  13. [Pertussis vaccines: acellular versus whole cell. Perhaps a return to the past?].

    PubMed

    Cofré, José

    2015-10-01

    The resurgence of pertussis in the world and in our country has questioned the effectiveness of cellular and acellular vaccines. The reason why pertussis has not been controlled or eliminated after 70 years of implementation of the vaccination is probably multifactorial. This article, on the basis of questions and answers, describes the benefits and limitations of both cellular and acellular vaccines and suggests new strategies of vaccination in childhood. It is a fact that the currently applied vaccination does not eliminate the circulation of Bordetella pertussis in the community. Perhaps the introduction of vaccines with live B. pertussis, inhalation, will be able to eliminate the disease around the world. PMID:26633113

  14. Plastic Surgery and Acellular Dermal Matrix: Highlighting Trends from 1999 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Daar, David A; Gandy, Jessica R; Clark, Emily G; Mowlds, Donald S; Paydar, Keyianoosh Z; Wirth, Garrett A

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has ushered in a rapidly expanding global discussion regarding acellular dermal matrix (ADM) applications, economic analyses, technical considerations, benefits, and risks, with recent emphasis on ADM use in breast surgery. This study aims to evaluate global trends in ADM research using bibliometric analysis. The top nine Plastic Surgery journals were determined by impact factor (IF). Each issue of the nine journals between 1999 and 2013 was accessed to compile a database of articles discussing ADM. Publications were further classified by IF, authors’ geographic location, study design, and level of evidence (LOE, I-V). Productivity index and productivity share were calculated for each region. In total, 256 ADM articles were accessed. The annual global publication volume increased significantly by 4.2 (0.87) articles per year (p<0.001), with a mean productivity index of 36.3 (59.0). The mean impact factor of the nine journals increased significantly from 0.61 (0.11) to 2.47 (0.99) from 1993 to 2013 (p<0.001). Despite this increase in the global ADM literature, the majority of research was of weaker LOE (level I: 2.29% and level II: 9.17%). USA contributed the most research (87%), followed by Asia (4.76%) and Western Europe (4.71%). USA contributed the greatest volume of research. Regarding clinical application of ADM, the majority of publications focused on ADM use in breast surgery, specifically breast reconstruction (154 articles, 60.2%). The majority of research was of lower LOE; thus, efforts should be made to strengthen the body of literature, particularly with regard to cost analysis. PMID:27579264

  15. Plastic Surgery and Acellular Dermal Matrix: Highlighting Trends from 1999 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Daar, David A; Gandy, Jessica R; Clark, Emily G; Mowlds, Donald S; Paydar, Keyianoosh Z; Wirth, Garrett A

    2016-05-01

    The last decade has ushered in a rapidly expanding global discussion regarding acellular dermal matrix (ADM) applications, economic analyses, technical considerations, benefits, and risks, with recent emphasis on ADM use in breast surgery. This study aims to evaluate global trends in ADM research using bibliometric analysis. The top nine Plastic Surgery journals were determined by impact factor (IF). Each issue of the nine journals between 1999 and 2013 was accessed to compile a database of articles discussing ADM. Publications were further classified by IF, authors' geographic location, study design, and level of evidence (LOE, I-V). Productivity index and productivity share were calculated for each region. In total, 256 ADM articles were accessed. The annual global publication volume increased significantly by 4.2 (0.87) articles per year (p<0.001), with a mean productivity index of 36.3 (59.0). The mean impact factor of the nine journals increased significantly from 0.61 (0.11) to 2.47 (0.99) from 1993 to 2013 (p<0.001). Despite this increase in the global ADM literature, the majority of research was of weaker LOE (level I: 2.29% and level II: 9.17%). USA contributed the most research (87%), followed by Asia (4.76%) and Western Europe (4.71%). USA contributed the greatest volume of research. Regarding clinical application of ADM, the majority of publications focused on ADM use in breast surgery, specifically breast reconstruction (154 articles, 60.2%). The majority of research was of lower LOE; thus, efforts should be made to strengthen the body of literature, particularly with regard to cost analysis. PMID:27579264

  16. Histologic Characterization of Acellular Dermal Matrices in a Porcine Model of Tissue Expander Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Christopher A.; Dearth, Christopher L.; Reing, Janet E.; Kramer, Caroline R.; Gagne, Darcy H.; Crapo, Peter M.; Garcia, Onelio; Badhwar, Amit; Scott, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) have been commonly used in expander-based breast reconstruction to provide inferolateral prosthesis coverage. Although the clinical performance of these biologic scaffold materials varies depending on a number of factors, an in-depth systematic characterization of the host response is yet to be performed. The present study evaluates the biochemical composition and structure of two ADMs, AlloDerm® Regenerative Tissue Matrix and AlloMax™ Surgical Graft, and provides a comprehensive spatiotemporal characterization in a porcine model of tissue expander breast reconstruction. Methods: Each ADM was characterized with regard to thickness, permeability, donor nucleic acid content, (residual double-stranded DNA [dsDNA]), and growth factors (basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF], vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], and transforming growth factor-beta 1 [TGF-β1]). Cytocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro cell culture on the ADMs. The host response was evaluated at 4 and 12 weeks at various locations within the ADMs using established metrics of the inflammatory and tissue remodeling response: cell infiltration, multinucleate giant cell formation, extent of ADM remodeling, and neovascularization. Results: AlloMax incorporated more readily with surrounding host tissue as measured by earlier and greater cell infiltration, fewer foreign body giant cells, and faster remodeling of ADM. These findings correlated with the in vitro composition and cytocompatibility analysis, which showed AlloMax to more readily support in vitro cell growth. Conclusions: AlloMax and AlloDerm demonstrated distinct remodeling characteristics in a porcine model of tissue expander breast reconstruction. PMID:24941900

  17. In vitro mineralization of surface-modified porous polycaprolactone scaffolds in simulated body fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Chengyun; Cheng, Haimei; Zhu, Wenjun; Yin, Zhaoyi; Chen, Hao; Zheng, Huade; Lei, Shumei; Yin, Shiheng; Tan, Guoxin

    2008-11-01

    Porous polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds were fabricated by combination of porogen-leaching and freeze-drying processes. Ice particulates were used as porogen materials. The porous PCL scaffolds were modified by potassium hydroxide solution with concentration of 1 mol/L at room temperature for 8 h, subsequently biomineralized in simulated body fluid for 2 h and 8 h, respectively. The microstructure and characteristics of the PCL scaffolds were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and EDS. The results showed (1) PCL scaffolds had high degree of connectivity and different pore sizes. (2) Plate-like apatite was observed on the surface of the scaffolds after being immersed into SBF for 8 h.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of interparticle spacing and many-body effect in gold supracrystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, X P; Ni, Y; He, L H

    2016-04-01

    Interparticle spacing in supracrystals is a crucial parameter for photoelectric applications as it dominates the transport rates between neighboring nanoparticles (NPs). Based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate interparticle spacing in alkylthiol-stabilized gold supracrystals as a function of the NP size, ligand length and external pressure. The repulsive many-body interactions in the supracrystals are also quantified by comparing the interparticle spacing with that between two individual NPs at equilibrium. Our results are consistent with available experiments, and are expected to help precise control of interparticle spacing in supracrystal devices. PMID:26909856

  19. Efficient time-symmetric simulation of torqued rigid bodies using Jacobi elliptic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celledoni, E.; Säfström, N.

    2006-05-01

    If the three moments of inertia are distinct, the solution to the Euler equations for the free rigid body is given in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. Using the arithmetic-geometric mean algorithm (Abramowitz and Stegun 1992 Handbook of Mathematical Functions with Formulas, Graphs, and Mathematical Tables (New York: Dover)), these functions can be calculated efficiently and accurately. Compared to standard numerical ODE and Lie-Poisson solvers, the overall approach yields a faster and more accurate numerical solution to the Euler equations. This approach is designed for mass asymmetric rigid bodies. In the case of symmetric bodies, the exact solution is available in terms of trigonometric functions, see Dullweber et al (1997 J. Chem. Phys. 107 5840-51), Reich (1996 Fields Inst. Commun. 10 181-91) and Benettin et al (2001 SIAM J. Sci. Comp. 23 1189-203) for details. In this paper, we consider the case of asymmetric rigid bodies subject to external forces. We consider a strategy similar to the symplectic splitting method proposed in Reich (1996 Fields Inst. Commun. 10 181-91) and Dullweber et al (1997 J. Chem. Phys. 107 5840-51). The method proposed here is time-symmetric. We decompose the vector field of our problem into a free rigid body (FRB) problem and another completely integrable vector field. The FRB problem consists of the Euler equations and a differential equation for the 3 × 3 orientation matrix. The Euler equations are integrated exactly while the matrix equation is approximated using a truncated Magnus series. In our experiments, we observe that the overall numerical solution benefits greatly from the very accurate solution of the Euler equations. We apply the method to the heavy top and the simulation of artificial satellite attitude dynamics.

  20. Higher moments of primordial non-Gaussianity and N-body simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, Saroj; Shandera, Sarah; Dalal, Neal E-mail: shandera@gravity.psu.edu

    2014-06-01

    We perform cosmological N-body simulations with non-Gaussian initial conditions generated from two independent fields. The dominant contribution to the perturbations comes from a purely Gaussian field, but we allow the second field to have local non-Gaussianity that need not be weak. This scenario allows us to adjust the relative importance of non-Gaussian contributions beyond the skewness, producing a scaling of the higher moments different from (and stronger than) the scaling in the usual single field local ansatz. We compare semi-analytic prescriptions for the non-Gaussian mass function, large scale halo bias, and stochastic bias against the simulation results. We discuss applications of this work to large scale structure measurements that can test a wider range of models for the primordial fluctuations than is usually explored.

  1. Relationship between trawl selectivity and fish body size in a simulated population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng; Liang, Zhenlin; Huang, Liuyi; Tang, Yanli; He, Xin

    2013-03-01

    Trawl is a main fishing gear in Chinese fishery, capturing large fish and letting small ones at large. However, long-term use of trawl would result in changes of phenotypic traits of the fish stocks, such as smaller size-at-age and earlier age-at-maturation. In this study, we simulated a fish population with size characteristics of trawl fishing and the population produces one generation of offspring and lives for one year, used trawl to exploit the simulated fish population, and captured individuals by body size. We evaluated the impact of the changes on selectivity parameters, such as selective range and the length at 50% retention. Under fishing pressure, we specified the selectivity parameters, and determined that smaller selection rates and greater length at 50% retention were associated with an increased tendency towards miniaturization.

  2. Computer-Simulation Surrogates for Optimization: Application to Trapezoidal Ducts and Axisymmetric Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, John C.; Paraschivoiu, Marius; Yesilyurt, Serhat; Patera, Anthony T.

    1995-01-01

    Engineering design and optimization efforts using computational systems rapidly become resource intensive. The goal of the surrogate-based approach is to perform a complete optimization with limited resources. In this paper we present a Bayesian-validated approach that informs the designer as to how well the surrogate performs; in particular, our surrogate framework provides precise (albeit probabilistic) bounds on the errors incurred in the surrogate-for-simulation substitution. The theory and algorithms of our computer{simulation surrogate framework are first described. The utility of the framework is then demonstrated through two illustrative examples: maximization of the flowrate of fully developed ow in trapezoidal ducts; and design of an axisymmetric body that achieves a target Stokes drag.

  3. Recent advances in numerical simulation and control of asymmetric flows around slender bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Wong, Tin-Chee; Sharaf, Hazem H.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    The problems of asymmetric flow around slender bodies and its control are formulated using the unsteady, compressible, thin-layer or full Navier-Stokes equations which are solved using an implicit, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. The problem is numerically simulated for both locally-conical and three-dimensional flows. The numerical applications include studies of the effects of relative incidence, Mach number and Reynolds number on the flow asymmetry. For the control of flow asymmetry, the numerical simulation cover passive and active control methods. For the passive control, the effectiveness of vertical fins placed in the leeward plane of geometric symmetry and side strakes with different orientations is studied. For the active control, the effectiveness of normal and tangential flow injection and surface heating and a combination of these methods is studied.

  4. Evaluation of upper body muscle activity during cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waye, A. B.; Krygiel, R. G.; Susin, T. B.; Baptista, R.; Rehnberg, L.; Heidner, G. S.; de Campos, F.; Falcão, F. P.; Russomano, T.

    2013-09-01

    Performance of efficient single-person cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is vital to maintain cardiac and cerebral perfusion during the 2-4 min it takes for deployment of advanced life support during a space mission. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential differences in upper body muscle activity during CPR performance at terrestrial gravity (+1Gz) and in simulated microgravity (μG). Muscle activity of the triceps brachii, erector spinae, rectus abdominis and pectoralis major was measured via superficial electromyography in 20 healthy male volunteers. Four sets of 30 external chest compressions (ECCs) were performed on a mannequin. Microgravity was simulated using a body suspension device and harness; the Evetts-Russomano (ER) method was adopted for CPR performance in simulated microgravity. Heart rate and perceived exertion via Borg scores were also measured. While a significantly lower depth of ECCs was observed in simulated microgravity, compared with +1Gz, it was still within the target range of 40-50 mm. There was a 7.7% decrease of the mean (±SEM) ECC depth from 48 ± 0.3 mm at +1Gz, to 44.3 ± 0.5 mm during microgravity simulation (p < 0.001). No significant difference in number or rate of compressions was found between the two conditions. Heart rate displayed a significantly larger increase during CPR in simulated microgravity than at +1Gz, the former presenting a mean (±SEM) of 23.6 ± 2.91 bpm and the latter, 76.6 ± 3.8 bpm (p < 0.001). Borg scores were 70% higher post-microgravity compressions (17 ± 1) than post +1Gz compressions (10 ± 1) (p < 0.001). Intermuscular comparisons showed the triceps brachii to have significantly lower muscle activity than each of the other three tested muscles, in both +1Gz and microgravity. As shown by greater Borg scores and heart rate increases, CPR performance in simulated microgravity is more fatiguing than at +1Gz. Nevertheless, no significant difference in muscle activity between conditions

  5. Maps of CMB lensing deflection from N-body simulations in Coupled Dark Energy Cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Carmelita; Baldi, Marco; Baccigalupi, Carlo E-mail: marco.baldi5@unibo.it E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2013-09-01

    We produce lensing potential and deflection-angle maps in order to simulate the weak gravitational lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) via ray-tracing through the COupled Dark Energy Cosmological Simulations (CoDECS), the largest suite of N-body simulations to date for interacting Dark Energy cosmologies. The constructed maps faithfully reflect the N-body cosmic structures on a range of scales going from the arcminute to the degree scale, limited only by the resolution and extension of the simulations. We investigate the variation of the lensing pattern due to the underlying Dark Energy (DE) dynamics, characterised by different background and perturbation behaviours as a consequence of the interaction between the DE field and Cold Dark Matter (CDM). In particular, we study in detail the results from three cosmological models differing in the background and perturbations evolution at the epoch in which the lensing cross section is most effective, corresponding to a redshift of ∼ 1, with the purpose to isolate their imprints in the lensing observables, regardless of the compatibility of these models with present constraints. The scenarios investigated here include a reference ΛCDM cosmology, a standard coupled DE (cDE) scenario, and a ''bouncing'' cDE scenario. For the standard cDE scenario, we find that typical differences in the lensing potential result from two effects: the enhanced growth of linear CDM density fluctuations with respect to the ΛCDM case, and the modified nonlinear dynamics of collapsed structures induced by the DE-CDM interaction. As a consequence, CMB lensing highlights the DE impact in the cosmological expansion, even in the degenerate case where the amplitude of the linear matter density perturbations, parametrised through σ{sub 8}, is the same in both the standard cDE and ΛCDM cosmologies. For the ''bouncing'' scenario, we find that the two opposite behaviours of the lens density contrast and of the matter abundance lead to

  6. N-body simulations with generic non-Gaussian initial conditions II: halo bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Verde, Licia

    2012-03-01

    We present N-body simulations for generic non-Gaussian initial conditions with the aim of exploring and modelling the scale-dependent halo bias. This effect is evident on very large scales requiring large simulation boxes. In addition, the previously available prescription to implement generic non-Gaussian initial conditions has been improved to keep under control higher-order terms which were spoiling the power spectrum on large scales. We pay particular attention to the differences between physical, inflation-motivated primordial bispectra and their factorizable templates, and to the operational definition of the non-Gaussian halo bias (which has both a scale-dependent and an approximately scale-independent contributions). We find that analytic predictions for both the non-Gaussian halo mass function and halo bias work well once a fudge factor (which was introduced before but still lacks convincing physical explanation) is calibrated on simulations. The halo bias remains therefore an extremely promising tool to probe primordial non-Gaussianity and thus to give insights into the physical mechanism that generated the primordial perturbations. The simulation outputs and tables of the analytic predictions will be made publicly available via the non-Gaussian comparison project web site http://icc.ub.edu/~liciaverde/NGSCP.html.

  7. Algorithm for simulation of quantum many-body dynamics using dynamical coarse-graining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasin, M.; Kosloff, R.

    2010-04-01

    An algorithm for simulation of quantum many-body dynamics having su(2) spectrum-generating algebra is developed. The algorithm is based on the idea of dynamical coarse-graining. The original unitary dynamics of the target observables—the elements of the spectrum-generating algebra—is simulated by a surrogate open-system dynamics, which can be interpreted as weak measurement of the target observables, performed on the evolving system. The open-system state can be represented by a mixture of pure states, localized in the phase space. The localization reduces the scaling of the computational resources with the Hilbert-space dimension n by factor n3/2(lnn)-1 compared to conventional sparse-matrix methods. The guidelines for the choice of parameters for the simulation are presented and the scaling of the computational resources with the Hilbert-space dimension of the system is estimated. The algorithm is applied to the simulation of the dynamics of systems of 2×104 and 2×106 cold atoms in a double-well trap, described by the two-site Bose-Hubbard model.

  8. Immunogenicity and safety of a monovalent, multicomponent acellular pertussis vaccine in 15 month-6-year-old German children. Monovalent Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Study Group.

    PubMed

    Stehr, K; Heininger, U; Uhlenbusch, R; Angersbach, P; Hackell, J; Eckhardt, T

    1995-03-01

    Immunization against pertussis has been re-recommended for healthy children in Germany in 1991. In addition the former restriction of immunizing only in the first 2 years of life was abolished. In children born before 1991 immunization rates against pertussis were 15% or less. With the new recommendations physicians are now faced with an increasing demand of parents for catch-up vaccinations in these children. Since they were immunized against diphtheria and tetanus previously monovalent pertussis vaccines are needed for this indication. Therefore a monovalent, multicomponent acellular pertussis vaccine was studied in 249 German children 15 months to 6 years of age. Three doses were administered at 6-10 week intervals. Reactogenicity and antibody responses against the vaccine antigens pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), 69-kd antigen (pertactin) and fimbriae-2 (agglutinogen) were investigated. Local and systemic reactions were minimal in frequency and severity. Antibody responses against all vaccine antigens were pronounced with 93%-100% of vaccinees demonstrating at least four fold titre rises above pre-immunization after the third dose. These findings indicate that this monovalent, multicomponent acellular pertussis vaccine with excellent immunogenicity and low reactogenicity is an appropriate candidate for closing immunization gaps in older children in countries with previously low vaccination rates against pertussis. Based on the results of this study the monovalent acellular pertussis vaccine was licensed in Germany in January 1994. PMID:7758519

  9. Potential sites for the perception of gravity in the acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, I.; Briegleb, W.

    Recently a gravisensitivity of the acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum, which possesses no specialized gravireceptor, could be established by conducting experiments under simulated and under real near weightlessness. In these experiments macroplasmodia showed a modulation of their contraction rhythm followed by regulation phenomena. Until now the perception mechanism for the gravistimulus is unknown, but several findings indicate the involvement of mitochondria: A) During the impediment of respiration the Og-reaction is inhibited and the regulation is reduced. B) The response to a light stimulus and the following regulation phenomena strongly resemble the behavior during exposure to Og, the only difference is that the two reactions are directed into opposite directions. In the blue-light reaction a flavin of the mitochondrial matrix seems to be involved in the light perception. C) The contraction rhythm as well as its modulations are coupled to rhythmic changes in the levels of ATP and calcium ions, involving the mitochondria as sites of energy production and of Ca++-storage. - So the mitochondria could be the site of the regulation and they possibly are the receptor sites for the light and gravity stimuli. - Also the observation of a morphologic polarity of the slime mold's plasmodial strands has to be considered: Cross-sections reveal that the ectoplasmic wall surrounding the streaming endoplasm is much thinner on the physically lower side than on the upper side of the strand - this applies to strands lying on or hanging on a horizontal surface. So, in addition to the mitochondria, also the morphologic polarity may be involved in the perception mechanism of the observed gravisensitivity and of the recently established geotaxis. - The potential role of the nuclei and of the contractile elements in the perception of gravity is also discussed.

  10. When clusters collide - A numerical Hydro/N-body simulation of merging galaxy clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roettiger, Kurt; Burns, Jack; Loken, Chris

    1993-01-01

    A 3D numerical simulation of two merging clusters of galaxies, using a hybrid Hydro/N-body code, is presented. The hydrodynamics of the code is solved by an Eulerian finite difference method. Initial results disclose that the X-ray emission of the dominant cluster becomes elongated and broadened; heating occurs at the core of the dominant cluster as a result of multiple shocks, and high velocity gas motions within the intracluster medium. It is predicted that clusters which have undergone recent mergers and do not have cooling flows will have high peculiar gas velocities and that the shocks and turbulence generated during the merger may power cluster-wide radio halos. Prolonged high-velocity gas motions through the dominant cluster core possibly play a major role in the formation and shaping of wide-angle tailed radio sources associated with central dominant galaxies. The N-body component of the simulation reveals the subcluster to be dispersed as it passes through the dominant cluster.

  11. Robust human body model injury prediction in simulated side impact crashes.

    PubMed

    Golman, Adam J; Danelson, Kerry A; Stitzel, Joel D

    2016-01-01

    This study developed a parametric methodology to robustly predict occupant injuries sustained in real-world crashes using a finite element (FE) human body model (HBM). One hundred and twenty near-side impact motor vehicle crashes were simulated over a range of parameters using a Toyota RAV4 (bullet vehicle), Ford Taurus (struck vehicle) FE models and a validated human body model (HBM) Total HUman Model for Safety (THUMS). Three bullet vehicle crash parameters (speed, location and angle) and two occupant parameters (seat position and age) were varied using a Latin hypercube design of Experiments. Four injury metrics (head injury criterion, half deflection, thoracic trauma index and pelvic force) were used to calculate injury risk. Rib fracture prediction and lung strain metrics were also analysed. As hypothesized, bullet speed had the greatest effect on each injury measure. Injury risk was reduced when bullet location was further from the B-pillar or when the bullet angle was more oblique. Age had strong correlation to rib fractures frequency and lung strain severity. The injuries from a real-world crash were predicted using two different methods by (1) subsampling the injury predictors from the 12 best crush profile matching simulations and (2) using regression models. Both injury prediction methods successfully predicted the case occupant's low risk for pelvic injury, high risk for thoracic injury, rib fractures and high lung strains with tight confidence intervals. This parametric methodology was successfully used to explore crash parameter interactions and to robustly predict real-world injuries. PMID:26158552

  12. Biomineralization of hydroxyapatite in silver ion-exchanged nanocrystalline ZSM-5 zeolite using simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Balwinder; Srivastava, Rajendra; Satpati, Biswarup; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2015-11-01

    Silver ion-exchanged nanocrystalline zeolite (Ag-Nano-ZSM-5) and silver ion-exchanged conventional zeolite (Ag-ZSM-5) were synthesized. Zeolites were incubated in simulated body fluid at 310K for different time periods to grow hydroxyapatite in their matrixes. Significant large amount of hydroxyapatite was grown in Ag-Nano-ZSM-5 matrix after incubation in simulated body fluid when compared to Ag-ZSM-5. The resultant material was characterized using X-ray diffraction, N2-adsorption, scanning/transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, and inductively coupled plasma analysis. Mechanical properties such as compressive modulus, compressive strength, and strain at failure of the parent materials were evaluated. Biocompatibility assays suggested that Ag-Nano-ZSM-5 and hydroxyapatite grown in Ag-Nano-ZSM-5 were compatible and did not impose any toxicity to RAW 264.7 cells macrophase and Caco2 cells suggesting considerable potential for biomedical applications such as bone implants. PMID:26255163

  13. Peculiar velocities in redshift space: formalism, N-body simulations and perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, Teppei; Seljak, Uroš; Vlah, Zvonimir; Desjacques, Vincent E-mail: useljak@berkeley.edu E-mail: Vincent.Desjacques@unige.ch

    2014-05-01

    Direct measurements of peculiar velocities of galaxies and clusters of galaxies can in principle provide explicit information on the three dimensional mass distribution, but this information is modulated by the fact that velocity field is sampled at galaxy positions, and is thus probing galaxy momentum. We derive expressions for the cross power spectrum between the density and momentum field and the auto spectrum of the momentum field in redshift space, by extending the distribution function method to these statistics. The resulting momentum cross and auto power spectra in redshift space are expressed as infinite sums over velocity moment correlators in real space, as is the case for the density power spectrum in redshift space. We compute each correlator using Eulerian perturbation theory (PT) and halo biasing model and compare the resulting redshift-space velocity statistics to those measured from N-body simulations for both dark matter and halos. We find that in redshift space linear theory predictions for the density-momentum cross power spectrum as well as for the momentum auto spectrum fail to predict the N-body results at very large scales. On the other hand, our nonlinear PT prediction for these velocity statistics, together with real-space power spectrum for dark matter from simulations, improves the accuracy for both dark matter and halos. We also present the same analysis in configuration space, computing the redshift-space pairwise mean infall velocities and velocity correlation function and compare to nonlinear PT.

  14. SVD-GFD scheme to simulate complex moving body problems in 3D space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Yu, P.; Yeo, K. S.; Khoo, B. C.

    2010-03-01

    The present paper presents a hybrid meshfree-and-Cartesian grid method for simulating moving body incompressible viscous flow problems in 3D space. The method combines the merits of cost-efficient and accurate conventional finite difference approximations on Cartesian grids with the geometric freedom of generalized finite difference (GFD) approximations on meshfree grids. Error minimization in GFD is carried out by singular value decomposition (SVD). The Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) form of the Navier-Stokes equations on convecting nodes is integrated by a fractional-step projection method. The present hybrid grid method employs a relatively simple mode of nodal administration. Nevertheless, it has the geometrical flexibility of unstructured mesh-based finite-volume and finite element methods. Boundary conditions are precisely implemented on boundary nodes without interpolation. The present scheme is validated by a moving patch consistency test as well as against published results for 3D moving body problems. Finally, the method is applied on low-Reynolds number flapping wing applications, where large boundary motions are involved. The present study demonstrates the potential of the present hybrid meshfree-and-Cartesian grid scheme for solving complex moving body problems in 3D.

  15. Curvilinear Immersed Boundary Method for Simulating Fluid Structure Interaction with Complex 3D Rigid Bodies.

    PubMed

    Borazjani, Iman; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2008-08-10

    The sharp-interface CURVIB approach of Ge and Sotiropoulos [L. Ge, F. Sotiropoulos, A Numerical Method for Solving the 3D Unsteady Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in Curvilinear Domains with Complex Immersed Boundaries, Journal of Computational Physics 225 (2007) 1782-1809] is extended to simulate fluid structure interaction (FSI) problems involving complex 3D rigid bodies undergoing large structural displacements. The FSI solver adopts the partitioned FSI solution approach and both loose and strong coupling strategies are implemented. The interfaces between immersed bodies and the fluid are discretized with a Lagrangian grid and tracked with an explicit front-tracking approach. An efficient ray-tracing algorithm is developed to quickly identify the relationship between the background grid and the moving bodies. Numerical experiments are carried out for two FSI problems: vortex induced vibration of elastically mounted cylinders and flow through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve at physiologic conditions. For both cases the computed results are in excellent agreement with benchmark simulations and experimental measurements. The numerical experiments suggest that both the properties of the structure (mass, geometry) and the local flow conditions can play an important role in determining the stability of the FSI algorithm. Under certain conditions unconditionally unstable iteration schemes result even when strong coupling FSI is employed. For such cases, however, combining the strong-coupling iteration with under-relaxation in conjunction with the Aitken's acceleration technique is shown to effectively resolve the stability problems. A theoretical analysis is presented to explain the findings of the numerical experiments. It is shown that the ratio of the added mass to the mass of the structure as well as the sign of the local time rate of change of the force or moment imparted on the structure by the fluid determine the stability and convergence of the FSI

  16. Curvilinear Immersed Boundary Method for Simulating Fluid Structure Interaction with Complex 3D Rigid Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-01-01

    The sharp-interface CURVIB approach of Ge and Sotiropoulos [L. Ge, F. Sotiropoulos, A Numerical Method for Solving the 3D Unsteady Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in Curvilinear Domains with Complex Immersed Boundaries, Journal of Computational Physics 225 (2007) 1782–1809] is extended to simulate fluid structure interaction (FSI) problems involving complex 3D rigid bodies undergoing large structural displacements. The FSI solver adopts the partitioned FSI solution approach and both loose and strong coupling strategies are implemented. The interfaces between immersed bodies and the fluid are discretized with a Lagrangian grid and tracked with an explicit front-tracking approach. An efficient ray-tracing algorithm is developed to quickly identify the relationship between the background grid and the moving bodies. Numerical experiments are carried out for two FSI problems: vortex induced vibration of elastically mounted cylinders and flow through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve at physiologic conditions. For both cases the computed results are in excellent agreement with benchmark simulations and experimental measurements. The numerical experiments suggest that both the properties of the structure (mass, geometry) and the local flow conditions can play an important role in determining the stability of the FSI algorithm. Under certain conditions unconditionally unstable iteration schemes result even when strong coupling FSI is employed. For such cases, however, combining the strong-coupling iteration with under-relaxation in conjunction with the Aitken’s acceleration technique is shown to effectively resolve the stability problems. A theoretical analysis is presented to explain the findings of the numerical experiments. It is shown that the ratio of the added mass to the mass of the structure as well as the sign of the local time rate of change of the force or moment imparted on the structure by the fluid determine the stability and convergence of the

  17. Dynamic modeling and simulation of multi-body systems using the Udwadia-Kalaba theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Han; Zhen, Shengchao; Chen, Ye-Hwa

    2013-09-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted for falling U-chain, but explicit analytic form of the general equations of motion was not presented. Several modeling methods were developed for fish robots, however they just focused on the whole fish’s locomotion which does little favor to understand the detailed swimming behavior of fish. Udwadia-Kalaba theory is used to model these two multi-body systems and obtain explicit analytic equations of motion. For falling U-chain, the mass matrix is non-singular. Second-order constraints are used to get the constraint force and equations of motion and the numerical simulation is conducted. Simulation results show that the chain tip falls faster than the freely falling body. For fish robot, two-joint Carangiform fish robot is focused on. Quasi-steady wing theory is used to approximately calculate fluid lift force acting on the caudal fin. Based on the obtained explicit analytic equations of motion (the mass matrix is singular), propulsive characteristics of each part of the fish robot are obtained. Through these two cases of U chain and fish robot, how to use Udwadia-Kalaba equation to obtain the dynamical model is shown and the modeling methodology for multi-body systems is presented. It is also shown that Udwadia-Kalaba theory is applicable to systems whether or not their mass matrices are singular. In the whole process of applying Udwadia-Kalaba equation, Lagrangian multipliers and quasi-coordinates are not used. Udwadia-Kalaba theory is creatively applied to dynamical modeling of falling U-chain and fish robot problems and explicit analytic equations of motion are obtained.

  18. Corneal Stroma Regeneration with Acellular Corneal Stroma Sheets and Keratocytes in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao Yun; Zhang, Yun; Zhu, Dan; Lu, Yang; Zhou, Guangdong; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Zhang, Wen Jie

    2015-01-01

    Acellular corneal stroma matrix has been used for corneal stroma engineering. However, because of its compact tissue structure, regrowth of keratocytes into the scaffold is difficult. Previously, we developed a sandwich model for cartilage engineering using acellular cartilage sheets. In the present study, we tested this model for corneal stroma regeneration using acellular porcine corneal stroma (APCS) sheets and keratocytes. Porcine corneas were decellularized by NaCl treatment, and the APCS was cut into 20-μm-thick sheets. A rabbit corneal stroma defect model was created by lamellar keratoplasty and repaired by transplantation of five pieces of APCS sheets with keratocytes. Six months after transplantation, transparent corneas were present in the experimental group, which were confirmed by anterior segment optical coherence tomography examination and transmittance examination. The biomechanical properties in the experimental group were similar to those of normal cornea. Histological analyses showed an even distribution of keratocytes and well-oriented matrix in the stroma layer in the experimental group. Together, these results demonstrated that the sandwich model using acellular corneal stroma sheets and keratocytes could be potentially useful for corneal stroma regeneration. PMID:26167895

  19. Repair of a Gingival Fenestration Using an Acellular Dermal Matrix Allograft.

    PubMed

    Breault, Lawrence G; Brentson, Raquel C; Fowler, Edward B; Bisch, Frederick C

    2016-01-01

    A case report illustrating the successful treatment of a gingival fenestration with an acellular dermal matrix (ADM) allograft. After 2½ months of healing, the ADM was completely integrated into the soft tissues of the mandibular anterior gingiva with complete resolution of the gingival fenestration, resulting in excellent gingival esthetics. PMID:26874103

  20. Numerical methods for the simulation of complex multi-body flows with applications for the integrated Space Shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.

    1992-01-01

    The following papers are presented: (1) numerical methods for the simulation of complex multi-body flows with applications for the Integrated Space Shuttle vehicle; (2) a generalized scheme for 3-D hyperbolic grid generation; (3) collar grids for intersecting geometric components within the Chimera overlapped grid scheme; and (4) application of the Chimera overlapped grid scheme to simulation of Space Shuttle ascent flows.

  1. Driving Competence in Mild Dementia with Lewy Bodies: In Search of Cognitive Predictors Using Driving Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Yamin, Stephanie; Stinchcombe, Arne; Gagnon, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Driving is a multifactorial behaviour drawing on multiple cognitive, sensory, and physical systems. Dementia is a progressive and degenerative neurological condition that impacts the cognitive processes necessary for safe driving. While a number of studies have examined driving among individuals with Alzheimer's disease, less is known about the impact of Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) on driving safety. The present study compared simulated driving performance of 15 older drivers with mild DLB with that of 21 neurologically healthy control drivers. DLB drivers showed poorer performance on all indicators of simulated driving including an increased number of collisions in the simulator and poorer composite indicators of overall driving performance. A measure of global cognitive function (i.e., the Mini Mental State Exam) was found to be related to the overall driving performance. In addition, measures of attention (i.e., Useful Field of View, UFOV) and space processing (Visual Object and Space Perception, VOSP, Test) correlated significantly with a rater's assessment of driving performance. PMID:26713169

  2. Experimental quantum simulations of many-body physics with trapped ions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ch; Porras, Diego; Schaetz, Tobias

    2012-02-01

    Direct experimental access to some of the most intriguing quantum phenomena is not granted due to the lack of precise control of the relevant parameters in their naturally intricate environment. Their simulation on conventional computers is impossible, since quantum behaviour arising with superposition states or entanglement is not efficiently translatable into the classical language. However, one could gain deeper insight into complex quantum dynamics by experimentally simulating the quantum behaviour of interest in another quantum system, where the relevant parameters and interactions can be controlled and robust effects detected sufficiently well. Systems of trapped ions provide unique control of both the internal (electronic) and external (motional) degrees of freedom. The mutual Coulomb interaction between the ions allows for large interaction strengths at comparatively large mutual ion distances enabling individual control and readout. Systems of trapped ions therefore exhibit a prominent system in several physical disciplines, for example, quantum information processing or metrology. Here, we will give an overview of different trapping techniques of ions as well as implementations for coherent manipulation of their quantum states and discuss the related theoretical basics. We then report on the experimental and theoretical progress in simulating quantum many-body physics with trapped ions and present current approaches for scaling up to more ions and more-dimensional systems. PMID:22790343

  3. ATOMISTIC SIMULATIONS OF DIFFUSIONAL CREEP IN A NANOCRYSTALLINE BODY-CENTERED CUBIC MATERIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Paul C. Millett; Tapan Desai; Vesselin Yamakov; Dieter Wolf

    2008-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study diffusion-accommodated creep deformation in nanocrystalline molybdenum, a body-centered cubic metal. In our simulations, the microstructures are subjected to constant-stress loading at levels below the dislocation nucleation threshold and at high temperatures (i.e., T > 0.75Tmelt), thereby ensuring that the overall deformation is indeed attributable to atomic self-diffusion. The initial microstructures were designed to consist of hexagonally shaped columnar grains bounded by high-energy asymmetric tilt grain boundaries (GBs). Remarkably the creep rates, which exhibit a double-exponential dependence on temperature and a double power-law dependence on grain size, indicate that both GB diffusion in the form of Coble creep and lattice diffusion in the form of Nabarro–Herring creep contribute to the overall deformation. For the first time in an MD simulation, we observe the formation and emission of vacancies from high-angle GBs into the grain interiors, thus enabling bulk diffusion.

  4. `Grandeur in this view of life': N-body simulation models of the Galactic habitable zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukotić, B.; Steinhauser, D.; Martinez-Aviles, G.; Ćirković, M. M.; Micic, M.; Schindler, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present an isolated Milky-Way-like simulation in the GADGET2 N-body smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code. The Galactic disc star formation rate (SFR) surface densities and a stellar mass indicative of the Solar neighbourhood are used as thresholds to model the distribution of stellar mass in life-friendly environments. SFR and stellar component density are calculated by averaging the GADGET2 particle properties on a 2D grid mapped on the Galactic plane. The peak values for possibly habitable stellar mass surface density move from 10 to 15 kpc cylindrical galactocentric distance in a 10-Gyr simulated time span. At 10 Gyr, the simulation results imply the following. Stellar particles that have spent almost all of their lifetime in habitable-friendly conditions typically reside at ˜16 kpc from the Galactic Centre and are ˜3 Gyr old. Stellar particles that have spent ≥90 per cent of their 4-5 Gyr long lifetime in habitable-friendly conditions are also predominantly found in the outskirts of the Galactic disc. Fewer than 1 per cent of these particles can be found at a typical Solar system galactocentric distance of 8-10 kpc. Our results imply that the evolution of an isolated spiral galaxy is likely to result in galactic civilizations emerging at the outskirts of the galactic disc around stellar hosts younger than the Sun.

  5. N-body simulations of terrestrial planet formation under the influence of a hot Jupiter

    SciTech Connect

    Ogihara, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro E-mail: ogihara@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the formation of multiple-planet systems in the presence of a hot Jupiter (HJ) using extended N-body simulations that are performed simultaneously with semianalytic calculations. Our primary aims are to describe the planet formation process starting from planetesimals using high-resolution simulations, and to examine the dependences of the architecture of planetary systems on input parameters (e.g., disk mass, disk viscosity). We observe that protoplanets that arise from oligarchic growth and undergo type I migration stop migrating when they join a chain of resonant planets outside the orbit of an HJ. The formation of a resonant chain is almost independent of our model parameters, and is thus a robust process. At the end of our simulations, several terrestrial planets remain at around 0.1 AU. The formed planets are not equal mass; the largest planet constitutes more than 50% of the total mass in the close-in region, which is also less dependent on parameters. In the previous work of this paper, we have found a new physical mechanism of induced migration of the HJ, which is called a crowding-out. If the HJ opens up a wide gap in the disk (e.g., owing to low disk viscosity), crowding-out becomes less efficient and the HJ remains. We also discuss angular momentum transfer between the planets and disk.

  6. "Grandeur in this view of life": N-body simulation models of the Galactic habitable zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukotić, B.; Steinhauser, D.; Martinez-Aviles, G.; Ćirković, M. M.; Micic, M.; Schindler, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present an isolated Milky Way-like simulation in GADGET2 N-body SPH code. The Galactic disk star formation rate (SFR) surface densities and stellar mass indicative of Solar neighbourhood are used as thresholds to model the distribution of stellar mass in life friendly environments. SFR and stellar component density are calculated averaging the GADGET2 particle properties on a 2D grid mapped on the Galactic plane. The peak values for possibly habitable stellar mass surface density move from 10 to 15 kpc cylindrical galactocentric distance in 10 Gyr simulated time span. At 10 Gyr the simulation results imply the following. Stellar particles which have spent almost all of their life time in habitable friendly conditions reside typically at ˜16 kpc from Galactic centre and are ˜3 Gyr old. Stellar particles that have spent ≥90% of their 4 - 5 Gyr long life time in habitable friendly conditions, are also predominantly found in the outskirts of the Galactic disk. Less then 1% of these particles can be found at a typical Solar system galactocentric distance of 8 - 10 kpc. Our results imply that the evolution of an isolated spiral galaxy is likely to result in galactic civilizations emerging at the outskirts of the galactic disk around stellar hosts younger than the Sun.

  7. Direct Large-Scale N-Body Simulations of Planetesimal Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Quinn, Thomas; Stadel, Joachim; Lake, George

    2000-01-01

    We describe a new direct numerical method for simulating planetesimal dynamics in which N˜10 6 or more bodies can be evolved simultaneously in three spatial dimensions over hundreds of dynamical times. This represents several orders of magnitude improvement in resolution over previous studies. The advance is made possible through modification of a stable and tested cosmological code optimized for massively parallel computers. However, owing to the excellent scalability and portability of the code, modest clusters of workstations can treat problems with N˜10 5 particles in a practical fashion. The code features algorithms for detection and resolution of collisions and takes into account the strong central force field and flattened Keplerian disk geometry of planetesimal systems. We demonstrate the range of problems that can be addressed by presenting simulations that illustrate oligarchic growth of protoplanets, planet formation in the presence of giant planet perturbations, the formation of the jovian moons, and orbital migration via planetesimal scattering. We also describe methods under development for increasing the timescale of the simulations by several orders of magnitude.

  8. Acellular ostrich corneal stroma used as scaffold for construction of tissue-engineered cornea

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xian-Ning; Zhu, Xiu-Ping; Wu, Jie; Wu, Zheng-Jie; Yin, Yong; Xiao, Xiang-Hua; Su, Xin; Kong, Bin; Pan, Shi-Yin; Yang, Hua; Cheng, Yan; An, Na; Mi, Sheng-Li

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess acellular ostrich corneal matrix used as a scaffold to reconstruct a damaged cornea. METHODS A hypertonic saline solution combined with a digestion method was used to decellularize the ostrich cornea. The microstructure of the acellular corneal matrix was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The mechanical properties were detected by a rheometer and a tension machine. The acellular corneal matrix was also transplanted into a rabbit cornea and cytokeratin 3 was used to check the immune phenotype. RESULTS The microstructure and mechanical properties of the ostrich cornea were well preserved after the decellularization process. In vitro, the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium results revealed that extracts of the acellular ostrich corneas (AOCs) had no inhibitory effects on the proliferation of the corneal epithelial or endothelial cells or on the keratocytes. The rabbit lamellar keratoplasty showed that the transplanted AOCs were transparent and completely incorporated into the host cornea while corneal turbidity and graft dissolution occurred in the acellular porcine cornea (APC) transplantation. The phenotype of the reconstructed cornea was similar to a normal rabbit cornea with a high expression of cytokeratin 3 in the superficial epithelial cell layer. CONCLUSION We first used AOCs as scaffolds to reconstruct damaged corneas. Compared with porcine corneas, the anatomical structures of ostrich corneas are closer to those of human corneas. In accordance with the principle that structure determines function, a xenograft lamellar keratoplasty also confirmed that the AOC transplantation generated a superior outcome compared to that of the APC graft. PMID:27158598

  9. Effects of the decellularization method on the local stiffness of acellular lungs.

    PubMed

    Melo, Esther; Garreta, Elena; Luque, Tomas; Cortiella, Joaquin; Nichols, Joan; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Lung bioengineering, a novel approach to obtain organs potentially available for transplantation, is based on decellularizing donor lungs and seeding natural scaffolds with stem cells. Various physicochemical protocols have been used to decellularize lungs, and their performance has been evaluated in terms of efficient decellularization and matrix preservation. No data are available, however, on the effect of different decellularization procedures on the local stiffness of the acellular lung. This information is important since stem cells directly sense the rigidity of the local site they are engrafting to during recellularization, and it has been shown that substrate stiffness modulates cell fate into different phenotypes. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the decellularization procedure on the inhomogeneous local stiffness of the acellular lung on five different sites: alveolar septa, alveolar junctions, pleura, and vessels' tunica intima and tunica adventitia. Local matrix stiffness was measured by computing Young's modulus with atomic force microscopy after decellularizing the lungs of 36 healthy rats (Sprague-Dawley, male, 250-300 g) with four different protocols with/without perfusion through the lung circulatory system and using two different detergents (sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS] and 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate [CHAPS]). The local stiffness of the acellular lung matrix significantly depended on the site within the matrix (p<0.001), ranging from ∼ 15 kPa at the alveolar septum to ∼ 60 kPa at the tunica intima. Acellular lung stiffness (p=0.003) depended significantly, albeit modestly, on the decellularization process. Whereas perfusion did not induce any significant differences in stiffness, the use of CHAPS resulted in a ∼ 35% reduction compared with SDS, the influence of the detergent being more important in the tunica intima. In conclusion, lung matrix stiffness is considerably inhomogeneous, and

  10. Development and Characterization of Acellular Porcine Pulmonary Valve Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Korossis, Sotirios A.; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul; Jennings, Louise M; Fisher, John; Ingham, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Currently available replacement heart valves all have limitations. This study aimed to produce and characterize an acellular, biocompatible porcine pulmonary root conduit for reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract e.g., during Ross procedure. A process for the decellularization of porcine pulmonary roots was developed incorporating trypsin treatment of the adventitial surface of the scraped pulmonary artery and sequential treatment with hypotonic Tris buffer (HTB; 10 mM Tris pH 8.0, 0.1% (w/v) EDTA, and 10 KIU aprotinin), 0.1% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate in HTB, two cycles of DNase and RNase, and sterilization with 0.1% (v/v) peracetic acid. Histology confirmed an absence of cells and retention of the gross histoarchitecture. Immunohistochemistry further confirmed cell removal and partial retention of the extracellular matrix, but a loss of collagen type IV. DNA levels were reduced by more than 96% throughout all regions of the acellular tissue and no functional genes were detected using polymerase chain reaction. Total collagen levels were retained but there was a significant loss of glycosaminoglycans following decellularization. The biomechanical, hydrodynamic, and leaflet kinematics properties were minimally affected by the process. Both immunohistochemical labeling and antibody absorption assay confirmed a lack of α-gal epitopes in the acellular porcine pulmonary roots and in vitro biocompatibility studies indicated that acellular leaflets and pulmonary arteries were not cytotoxic. Overall the acellular porcine pulmonary roots have excellent potential for development of a tissue substitute for right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction e.g., during the Ross procedure. PMID:24786313

  11. Large eddy simulation of the flow around bluff body with drag reduction device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Anazi, Khalid Qaied

    This thesis focuses on the use of LES to simulate the flow around elliptical bluff body with blunt trailing edge fitted with open base cavity. The main objective of this study is to determine the effects of the cavity on the drag of the body. A secondary but important objective is to demonstrate that LES can provide accurate representation of the flow around this bluff body. Moreover, LES results can complement the available experimental results in order to provide a much better understanding of the flow. The simulations were carried out at a Reynolds number of 2.6×104 based on the height of the body using Spalart-Allmaras RANS model while the LES were performed using Smagorinsky dynamic model. A grid-independence test was conducted using three grids which contain 0.85M, 1.3M and 1.7M cells, respectively. This test shows that the results are grid-independent. The LES results predicted the mean flow field in the near wake with good accuracy as compared to the experimental mean flow field obtained. The base pressure results show that the base pressure coefficient for the base model was around -0.56, which agrees well with the experimental results .By attaching the cavity, the base pressure has increased. The increase in base pressure coefficient was around 44% using 1/3 h cavity and this agrees well with the experimental measurements. The RANS predicted drag coefficient of 0.56 for the base model and 0.471 for the cavity model. This represents a difference of 8% for the base model and 34% for the cavity model when compared with experiment drag coefficients (0.61 for the base model and 0.35 for the cavity model). For the LES, the drag coefficient of the base model was around 0.65 (6.5% difference) and using the cavity, the drag coefficient was reduced to around 0.37 (5.74% difference). Details of the mean velocity components have been compared with experimental data at various locations in the wake region of the flow. Observation on the comparison between LES and

  12. Charge-dependent many-body exchange and dispersion interactions in combined QM/MM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuechler, Erich R.; Giese, Timothy J.; York, Darrin M.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate modeling of the molecular environment is critical in condensed phase simulations of chemical reactions. Conventional quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations traditionally model non-electrostatic non-bonded interactions through an empirical Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential which, in violation of intuitive chemical principles, is bereft of any explicit coupling to an atom's local electronic structure. This oversight results in a model whereby short-ranged exchange-repulsion and long-ranged dispersion interactions are invariant to changes in the local atomic charge, leading to accuracy limitations for chemical reactions where significant atomic charge transfer can occur along the reaction coordinate. The present work presents a variational, charge-dependent exchange-repulsion and dispersion model, referred to as the charge-dependent exchange and dispersion (QXD) model, for hybrid QM/MM simulations. Analytic expressions for the energy and gradients are provided, as well as a description of the integration of the model into existing QM/MM frameworks, allowing QXD to replace traditional LJ interactions in simulations of reactive condensed phase systems. After initial validation against QM data, the method is demonstrated by capturing the solvation free energies of a series of small, chlorine-containing compounds that have varying charge on the chlorine atom. The model is further tested on the SN2 attack of a chloride anion on methylchloride. Results suggest that the QXD model, unlike the traditional LJ model, is able to simultaneously obtain accurate solvation free energies for a range of compounds while at the same time closely reproducing the experimental reaction free energy barrier. The QXD interaction model allows explicit coupling of atomic charge with many-body exchange and dispersion interactions that are related to atomic size and provides a more accurate and robust representation of non-electrostatic non-bonded QM/MM interactions.

  13. Charge-dependent many-body exchange and dispersion interactions in combined QM/MM simulations.

    PubMed

    Kuechler, Erich R; Giese, Timothy J; York, Darrin M

    2015-12-21

    Accurate modeling of the molecular environment is critical in condensed phase simulations of chemical reactions. Conventional quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations traditionally model non-electrostatic non-bonded interactions through an empirical Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential which, in violation of intuitive chemical principles, is bereft of any explicit coupling to an atom's local electronic structure. This oversight results in a model whereby short-ranged exchange-repulsion and long-ranged dispersion interactions are invariant to changes in the local atomic charge, leading to accuracy limitations for chemical reactions where significant atomic charge transfer can occur along the reaction coordinate. The present work presents a variational, charge-dependent exchange-repulsion and dispersion model, referred to as the charge-dependent exchange and dispersion (QXD) model, for hybrid QM/MM simulations. Analytic expressions for the energy and gradients are provided, as well as a description of the integration of the model into existing QM/MM frameworks, allowing QXD to replace traditional LJ interactions in simulations of reactive condensed phase systems. After initial validation against QM data, the method is demonstrated by capturing the solvation free energies of a series of small, chlorine-containing compounds that have varying charge on the chlorine atom. The model is further tested on the SN2 attack of a chloride anion on methylchloride. Results suggest that the QXD model, unlike the traditional LJ model, is able to simultaneously obtain accurate solvation free energies for a range of compounds while at the same time closely reproducing the experimental reaction free energy barrier. The QXD interaction model allows explicit coupling of atomic charge with many-body exchange and dispersion interactions that are related to atomic size and provides a more accurate and robust representation of non-electrostatic non-bonded QM/MM interactions. PMID

  14. N-BODY SIMULATION OF PLANETESIMAL FORMATION THROUGH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY AND COAGULATION. II. ACCRETION MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Michikoshi, Shugo; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro E-mail: kokubo@th.nao.ac.j

    2009-10-01

    The gravitational instability of a dust layer is one of the scenarios for planetesimal formation. If the density of a dust layer becomes sufficiently high as a result of the sedimentation of dust grains toward the midplane of a protoplanetary disk, the layer becomes gravitationally unstable and spontaneously fragments into planetesimals. Using a shearing box method, we performed local N-body simulations of gravitational instability of a dust layer and subsequent coagulation without gas and investigated the basic formation process of planetesimals. In this paper, we adopted the accretion model as a collision model. A gravitationally bound pair of particles is replaced by a single particle with the total mass of the pair. This accretion model enables us to perform long-term and large-scale calculations. We confirmed that the formation process of planetesimals is the same as that in the previous paper with the rubble pile models. The formation process is divided into three stages: the formation of nonaxisymmetric structures; the creation of planetesimal seeds; and their collisional growth. We investigated the dependence of the planetesimal mass on the simulation domain size. We found that the mean mass of planetesimals formed in simulations is proportional to L {sup 3/2} {sub y}, where L{sub y} is the size of the computational domain in the direction of rotation. However, the mean mass of planetesimals is independent of L{sub x} , where L{sub x} is the size of the computational domain in the radial direction if L{sub x} is sufficiently large. We presented the estimation formula of the planetesimal mass taking into account the simulation domain size.

  15. Charge-dependent many-body exchange and dispersion interactions in combined QM/MM simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kuechler, Erich R.; Giese, Timothy J.; York, Darrin M.

    2015-12-21

    Accurate modeling of the molecular environment is critical in condensed phase simulations of chemical reactions. Conventional quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations traditionally model non-electrostatic non-bonded interactions through an empirical Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential which, in violation of intuitive chemical principles, is bereft of any explicit coupling to an atom’s local electronic structure. This oversight results in a model whereby short-ranged exchange-repulsion and long-ranged dispersion interactions are invariant to changes in the local atomic charge, leading to accuracy limitations for chemical reactions where significant atomic charge transfer can occur along the reaction coordinate. The present work presents a variational, charge-dependent exchange-repulsion and dispersion model, referred to as the charge-dependent exchange and dispersion (QXD) model, for hybrid QM/MM simulations. Analytic expressions for the energy and gradients are provided, as well as a description of the integration of the model into existing QM/MM frameworks, allowing QXD to replace traditional LJ interactions in simulations of reactive condensed phase systems. After initial validation against QM data, the method is demonstrated by capturing the solvation free energies of a series of small, chlorine-containing compounds that have varying charge on the chlorine atom. The model is further tested on the S{sub N}2 attack of a chloride anion on methylchloride. Results suggest that the QXD model, unlike the traditional LJ model, is able to simultaneously obtain accurate solvation free energies for a range of compounds while at the same time closely reproducing the experimental reaction free energy barrier. The QXD interaction model allows explicit coupling of atomic charge with many-body exchange and dispersion interactions that are related to atomic size and provides a more accurate and robust representation of non-electrostatic non-bonded QM

  16. Digital quantum simulation of many-body non-Markovian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweke, R.; Sanz, M.; Sinayskiy, I.; Petruccione, F.; Solano, E.

    2016-08-01

    We present an algorithmic method for the digital quantum simulation of many-body locally indivisible non-Markovian open quantum systems. It consists of two parts: first, a Suzuki-Lie-Trotter decomposition of the global system propagator into the product of subsystem propagators, which may not be quantum channels, and second, an algorithmic procedure for the implementation of the subsystem propagators through unitary operations and measurements on a dilated space. By providing rigorous error bounds for the relevant Suzuki-Lie-Trotter decomposition, we are able to analyze the efficiency of the method, and connect it with an appropriate measure of the local indivisibility of the system. In light of our analysis, the proposed method is expected to be experimentally achievable for a variety of interesting cases.

  17. CIRCUMBINARY PLANET FORMATION IN THE KEPLER-16 SYSTEM. I. N-BODY SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Meschiari, Stefano

    2012-06-10

    The recently discovered circumbinary planets (Kepler-16 b, Kepler 34-b, Kepler 35-b) represent the first direct evidence of the viability of planet formation in circumbinary orbits. We report on the results of N-body simulations investigating planetesimal accretion in the Kepler-16 b system, focusing on the range of impact velocities under the influence of both stars' gravitational perturbation and friction from a putative protoplanetary disk. Our results show that planet formation might be effectively inhibited for a large range in semimajor axis (1.75 {approx}< a{sub P} {approx}< 4 AU), suggesting that the planetary core must have either migrated from outside 4 AU or formed in situ very close to its current location.

  18. Measured force on elongated bodies in a simulated low-Earth orbit environment

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, C. A.; Ketsdever, A. D.; Gimelshein, S. F.

    2014-12-09

    An overview of the development of a magnetically filtered atomic oxygen plasma source and the application of the source to study low-Earth orbit drag on elongated bodies is presented. Plasma diagnostics show that the magnetic filter plasma source produces atomic oxygen ions (O{sup +}) with streaming energies equivalent to the relative orbital environment of approximately 5eV and can supply the appropriate density for LEO simulation. Previous research has demonstrated that momentum transfer between ions and metal surfaces is equivalent to the momentum transfer expected for neutral molecules with similar energy, due to charge exchange occurring prior to momentum transfer. Total drag measurements of aluminum cuboid geometries of varying length to diameter ratios immersed in the extracted plasma plume are presented as a function of streaming ion energy.

  19. REBOUNDx: A library for adding additional effects to N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, Daniel; Rein, Hanno; Shi, Pengshuai

    2016-05-01

    Many astrophysical applications involve additional perturbations beyond point-source gravity. We have recently developed REBOUNDx, a library for adding such effects in numerical simulations with the open-source N-body package REBOUND. Various implementations have different numerical properties that in general depend on the underlying integrator employed. In particular, I will discuss adding velocity-dependent/dissipative effects to widely used symplectic integrators, and how one can estimate the introduced numerical errors using the operator-splitting formalism traditionally applied to symplectic integrators. Finally, I will demonstrate how to use the code, and how the Python wrapper we have developed for REBOUND/REBOUNDx makes it easy to interactively leverage powerful analysis, visualization and parallelization libraries.

  20. Measured force on elongated bodies in a simulated low-Earth orbit environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, C. A.; Ketsdever, A. D.; Gimelshein, S. F.

    2014-12-01

    An overview of the development of a magnetically filtered atomic oxygen plasma source and the application of the source to study low-Earth orbit drag on elongated bodies is presented. Plasma diagnostics show that the magnetic filter plasma source produces atomic oxygen ions (O+) with streaming energies equivalent to the relative orbital environment of approximately 5eV and can supply the appropriate density for LEO simulation. Previous research has demonstrated that momentum transfer between ions and metal surfaces is equivalent to the momentum transfer expected for neutral molecules with similar energy, due to charge exchange occurring prior to momentum transfer. Total drag measurements of aluminum cuboid geometries of varying length to diameter ratios immersed in the extracted plasma plume are presented as a function of streaming ion energy.

  1. Unsteady Navier-Stokes simulation of the canard-wing-body ramp motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Eugene L.; Obayashi, Shigeru; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1993-01-01

    A time-accurate thin-layer Navier-Stokes simulation of the unsteady flowfield is performed for a typical canard-wing-body configuration undergoing ramp motions. The computations are made at a transonic Mach number of 0.90 and for ramp angles from 0 to 15 degrees. Accuracy is determined by comparisons with steady-state experimental data and with spatial and time-step refinement studies. During the ramp motion, the computational results show improved dynamic lift performance and a strong canard-wing interaction for the canard-on configuration. Formation of the canard leading-edge vortex is inhibited in the early stages of the ramp motion. An analysis performed on the transient flowfield after the ramp motion ends shows that the canard vortex rapidly gains strength and vortex breakdown eventually occurs. These characteristics of the canard vortex have significant influences on wing performance.

  2. The Electrochemical Behavior of TiN/316LSS Material in Simulated Body Fluid Solution.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Dinh Thi Mai; Pham, Thi Nam; Huong, Ho Thu; Phuong, Nguyen Thu; Hang, To Thi Xuan; Vy, Uong Van; Hoang, Thai

    2015-05-01

    We report on the fabrication and the electrochemical behavior of TiN film on the 316L stainless steel (316LSS) material in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution for implant application. The characterization results indicate that the coated TiN is completely crystalline with (111) crystal orientation. Electrochemical results of 316LSS and TiN/316LSS material after 21 days of immersion in SBF show that the durability of the TiN/316LSS is much higher than that of 316LSS, which registers a very low corrosion current density (about tens of nA cm(-2)). The formation of hydroxyapatite on the surface of the TiN/316LSS is also confirmed by SEM, EDX, X-ray and IR spectroscopy. PMID:26505019

  3. Quantification of discreteness effects in cosmological N-body simulations. II. Evolution up to shell crossing

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, M.; Marcos, B.

    2007-11-15

    We apply a recently developed perturbative formalism which describes the evolution under their self-gravity of particles displaced from a perfect lattice to quantify precisely, up to shell crossing, the effects of discreteness in dissipationless cosmological N-body simulations. We give simple expressions, explicitly dependent on the particle density, for the evolution of power in each mode as a function of redshift. For typical starting redshifts the effect of finite particle number is to slow down slightly the growth of power compared to that in the fluid limit (e.g., by about 10% at half the Nyquist frequency), and to induce also dispersion in the growth as a function of direction at a comparable level. In the limit that the initial redshift tends to infinity, at fixed particle density, the evolution in fact diverges from that in the fluid limit (described by the Zeldovich approximation). Contrary to widely held belief, this means that a simulation started at a redshift much higher than the redshift of shell crossing actually gives a worse, rather than a better, result. We also study how these effects are modified when there is a small-scale regularization of the gravitational force. We show that such a smoothing may reduce the anisotropy of the discreteness effects, but it then increases their average effect. This behavior illustrates the fact that the discreteness effects described here are distinct from those usually considered in this context, due to two-body collisions. Indeed the characteristic time for divergence from the collisionless limit is proportional to N{sup 2/3}, rather than N/logN in the latter case.

  4. Sub-discretized surface model with application to contact mechanics in multi-body simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S; Williams, J

    2008-02-28

    The mechanics of contact between rough and imperfectly spherical adhesive powder grains are often complicated by a variety of factors, including several which vary over sub-grain length scales. These include several traction factors that vary spatially over the surface of the individual grains, including high energy electron and acceptor sites (electrostatic), hydrophobic and hydrophilic sites (electrostatic and capillary), surface energy (general adhesion), geometry (van der Waals and mechanical), and elasto-plastic deformation (mechanical). For mechanical deformation and reaction, coupled motions, such as twisting with bending and sliding, as well as surface roughness add an asymmetry to the contact force which invalidates assumptions for popular models of contact, such as the Hertzian and its derivatives, for the non-adhesive case, and the JKR and DMT models for adhesive contacts. Though several contact laws have been offered to ameliorate these drawbacks, they are often constrained to particular loading paths (most often normal loading) and are relatively complicated for computational implementation. This paper offers a simple and general computational method for augmenting contact law predictions in multi-body simulations through characterization of the contact surfaces using a hierarchically-defined surface sub-discretization. For the case of adhesive contact between powder grains in low stress regimes, this technique can allow a variety of existing contact laws to be resolved across scales, allowing for moments and torques about the contact area as well as normal and tangential tractions to be resolved. This is especially useful for multi-body simulation applications where the modeler desires statistical distributions and calibration for parameters in contact laws commonly used for resolving near-surface contact mechanics. The approach is verified against analytical results for the case of rough, elastic spheres.

  5. Simulated Body Fluid Nucleation of Three-Dimensional Printed Elastomeric Scaffolds for Enhanced Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nathan J; Tan, Wilhelmina Nanrui; Shen, Charlie; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-07-01

    Osseous tissue defects caused by trauma present a common clinical problem. Although traditional clinical procedures have been successfully employed, several limitations persist with regards to insufficient donor tissue, disease transmission, and inadequate host-implant integration. Therefore, this work aims to address current limitations regarding inadequate host tissue integration through the use of a novel elastomeric material for three-dimensional (3D) printing biomimetic and bioactive scaffolds. A novel thermoplastic polyurethane-based elastomeric composite filament (Gel-Lay) was used to manufacture porous scaffolds. In an effort to render the scaffolds more bioactive, the flexible scaffolds were subsequently incubated in simulated body fluid at various time points and evaluated for enhanced mechanical properties along with the effects on cell adhesion, proliferation, and 3-week osteogenesis. This work is the first reported use of a novel class of flexible elastomeric materials for the manufacture of 3D printed bioactive scaffold fabrication allowing efficient and effective nucleation of hydroxyapatite (HA) leading to increased nanoscale surface roughness while retaining the bulk geometry of the predesigned structure. Scaffolds with interconnected microfibrous filaments of ∼260 μm were created and nucleated in simulated body fluid that facilitated cell adhesion and spreading after only 24 h in culture. The porous structure further allowed efficient nucleation, exchange of nutrients, and metabolic waste removal during new tissue formation. Through the incorporation of osteoconductive HA, human fetal osteoblast adhesion and differentiation were greatly enhanced thus setting the tone for further exploration of this novel material for biomedical and tissue regenerative applications. PMID:27298115

  6. Modeling flow around bluff bodies and predicting urban dispersion using large eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yu-Heng; Meneveau, Charles; Parlange, Marc B

    2006-04-15

    Modeling air pollutant transport and dispersion in urban environments is especially challenging due to complex ground topography. In this study, we describe a large eddy simulation (LES) tool including a new dynamic subgrid closure and boundary treatment to model urban dispersion problems. The numerical model is developed, validated, and extended to a realistic urban layout. In such applications fairly coarse grids must be used in which each building can be represented using relatively few grid-points only. By carrying out LES of flow around a square cylinder and of flow over surface-mounted cubes, the coarsest resolution required to resolve the bluff body's cross section while still producing meaningful results is established. Specifically, we perform grid refinement studies showing that at least 6-8 grid points across the bluff body are required for reasonable results. The performance of several subgrid models is also compared. Although effects of the subgrid models on the mean flow are found to be small, dynamic Lagrangian models give a physically more realistic subgrid-scale (SGS) viscosity field. When scale-dependence is taken into consideration, these models lead to more realistic resolved fluctuating velocities and spectra. These results set the minimum grid resolution and subgrid model requirements needed to apply LES in simulations of neutral atmospheric boundary layer flow and scalar transport over a realistic urban geometry. The results also illustrate the advantages of LES over traditional modeling approaches, particularly its ability to take into account the complex boundary details and the unsteady nature of atmospheric boundary layer flow. Thus LES can be used to evaluate probabilities of extreme events (such as probabilities of exceeding threshold pollutant concentrations). Some comments about computer resources required for LES are also included. PMID:16683605

  7. Study of variation in human upper body parameters and motion for use in robotics based simulation.

    PubMed

    Lura, Derek J; Carey, Stephanie L; Dubey, Rajiv V

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the variations in human upper body motion of subjects completing activities of daily living. This study was completed to serve as a reference to evaluate the quality of simulated of human motion. In this paper we define the variation in motion as the variation in subjects' parameters (link lengths), joint angles, and hand positions, for a given task. All of these variations are related by forward kinematic equations. Motion data from eight healthy right hand dominant adults performing three activities of daily living (brushing hair, drinking from a cup, and opening a door) were collected using an eight camera Vicon motion analysis system. Subject parameters were calculated using relative positions of functional joint center locations between segments. Joint angles were calculated by Euler angle rotations between body segments. Hand position was defined as the origin of the hand frame relative to the pelvis frame. The variance of recorded human motion was analyzed based on the standard deviations of subject parameters, joint angles, and hand positions. Variances in joint angles were found to be similar in magnitude to root mean squared error of kinematics based motion simulation. To evaluate the relative variance, the forward kinematic solutions of the trials were found after removing subject parameter variance and reducing joint angle variance. The variance in the forward kinematic solution was then compared to the recorded hand position variance. Reductions in subject parameter and joint angle variance produced a proportionally much smaller reduction in the calculated hand position variance. Using the average instead of individual subject parameters had only a small impact on hand position variance. Modifying joint angles to reduce variance had a greater impact on the calculated hand position variance than using average subject parameters, but was still a relatively small change. Future work will focus on using these results to create formalized

  8. A Multirate Variable-timestep Algorithm for N-body Solar System Simulations with Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, P. W.; Newman, W. I.

    2016-03-01

    We present and analyze the performance of a new algorithm for performing accurate simulations of the solar system when collisions between massive bodies and test particles are permitted. The orbital motion of all bodies at all times is integrated using a high-order variable-timestep explicit Runge-Kutta Nyström (ERKN) method. The variation in the timestep ensures that the orbital motion of test particles on eccentric orbits or close to the Sun is calculated accurately. The test particles are divided into groups and each group is integrated using a different sequence of timesteps, giving a multirate algorithm. The ERKN method uses a high-order continuous approximation to the position and velocity when checking for collisions across a step. We give a summary of the extensive testing of our algorithm. In our largest simulation—that of the Sun, the planets Earth to Neptune and 100,000 test particles over 100 million years—the relative error in the energy after 100 million years was of the order of 10-11.

  9. Small-body deflection techniques using spacecraft: Techniques in simulating the fate of ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Stephen R.; Yu, Yang; Michel, Patrick; Jutzi, Martin

    2016-04-01

    We define a set of procedures to numerically study the fate of ejecta produced by the impact of an artificial projectile with the aim of deflecting an asteroid. Here we develop a simplified, idealized model of impact conditions that can be adapted to fit the details of specific deflection-test scenarios, such as what is being proposed for the AIDA project. Ongoing studies based upon the methodology described here can be used to inform observational strategies and safety conditions for an observing spacecraft. To account for ejecta evolution, the numerical strategies we are employing are varied and include a large N-Body component, a smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) component, and an application of impactor scaling laws. Simulations that use SPH-derived initial conditions show high-speed ejecta escaping at low angles of inclination, and very slowly moving ejecta lofting off the surface at higher inclination angles, some of which reimpacts the small-body surface. We are currently investigating the realism of this and other models' behaviors. Next steps will include the addition of solar perturbations to the model and applying the protocol developed here directly to specific potential mission concepts such as the proposed AIDA scenario.

  10. Power production locality of bluff body flutter mills using fully coupled 2D direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, J. M.; Desjardin, P. E.

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional, fully coupled direct numerical simulations (DNS) are conducted to examine the local energy dynamics of a flexible cantilevered plate in the wake of a two-dimensional circular cylinder. The motion of the cantilevered plate is described using a finite element formulation and a fully compressible, finite volume Navier Stokes solver is used to compute the flow field. A sharp interface level set method is employed in conjunction with a ghost fluid method to describe the immersed boundaries of the bluff body and flexible plate. DNS is first conducted to validate the numerical methodology and compared with previous studies of flexible cantilevered plates and flow over bluff bodies; excellent agreement with previous results is observed. A newly defined power production/loss geometry metric is introduced based on surface curvature and plate velocity. The metric is found to be useful for determining which sections of the plate will produce energy based on curvature and deflection rate. Scatter plots and probability measures are presented showing a high correlation between the direction of energy transfer (i.e., to or from the plate) and the sign of the newly defined curvature-deflection-rate metric. The findings from this study suggest that a simple local geometry/kinematic based metric can be devised to aid in the development and design of flexible wind energy harvesting flutter mills.

  11. Evaluation of microwave landing system approaches in a wide-body transport simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, L. G.; Feather, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the suitability of flying complex curved approaches using the microwave landing system (MLS) with a wide-body transport aircraft. Fifty pilots in crews of two participated in the evaluation using a fixed-base simulator that emulated an MD-11 aircraft. Five approaches, consisting of one straight-in approach and four curved approaches, were flown by the pilots using a flight director. The test variables include the following: (1) manual and autothrottles; (2) wind direction; and (3) type of navigation display. The navigation display was either a map or a horizontal situation indicator (HSI). A complex wind that changed direction and speed with altitude, and included moderate turbulence, was used. Visibility conditions were Cat 1 or better. Subjective test data included pilot responses to questionnaires and pilot comments. Objective performance data included tracking accuracy, position error at decision height, and control activity. Results of the evaluation indicate that flying curved MLS approaches with a wide-body transport aircraft is operationally acceptable, depending upon the length of the final straight segment and the complexity of the approach.

  12. The GENGA code: gravitational encounters in N-body simulations with GPU acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, Simon L.; Stadel, Joachim G.

    2014-11-20

    We describe an open source GPU implementation of a hybrid symplectic N-body integrator, GENGA (Gravitational ENcounters with Gpu Acceleration), designed to integrate planet and planetesimal dynamics in the late stage of planet formation and stability analyses of planetary systems. GENGA uses a hybrid symplectic integrator to handle close encounters with very good energy conservation, which is essential in long-term planetary system integration. We extended the second-order hybrid integration scheme to higher orders. The GENGA code supports three simulation modes: integration of up to 2048 massive bodies, integration with up to a million test particles, or parallel integration of a large number of individual planetary systems. We compare the results of GENGA to Mercury and pkdgrav2 in terms of energy conservation and performance and find that the energy conservation of GENGA is comparable to Mercury and around two orders of magnitude better than pkdgrav2. GENGA runs up to 30 times faster than Mercury and up to 8 times faster than pkdgrav2. GENGA is written in CUDA C and runs on all NVIDIA GPUs with a computing capability of at least 2.0.

  13. Preliminary subsonic aerodynamic model for simulation studies of the HL-20 lifting body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Cruz, Christopher I.

    1992-01-01

    A nonlinear, six-degree-of-freedom aerodynamic model for an early version of the HL-20 lifting body is described and compared with wind tunnel data upon which it is based. Polynomial functions describing most of the aerodynamic parameters are given and tables of these functions are presented. Techniques used to arrive at these functions are described. Basic aerodynamic coefficients were modeled as functions of angles of attack and sideslip. Vehicle lateral symmetry was assumed. Compressibility (Mach) effects were ignored. Control-surface effectiveness was assumed to vary linearly with angle of deflection and was assumed to be invariant with the angle of sideslip. Dynamic derivatives were obtained from predictive aerodynamic codes. Landing-gear and ground effects were scaled from Space Shuttle data. The model described is provided to support pilot-in-the-loop simulation studies of the HL-20. By providing the data in tabular format, the model is suitable for the data interpolation architecture of many existing engineering simulation facilities. Because of the preliminary nature of the data, however, this model is not recommended for study of the absolute performance of the HL-20.

  14. Confrontation of top-hat spherical collapse against dark halos from cosmological N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, Daichi; Kitayama, Tetsu; Osato, Ken; Sasaki, Shin; Suto, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    The top-hat spherical collapse model (TSC) is one of the most fundamental analytical frameworks to describe the non-linear growth of cosmic structure. TSC has motivated, and been widely applied in, various investigations even in the current era of precision cosmology. While numerous studies exist to examine its validity against numerical simulations in a statistical fashion, there are few analyses which compare the TSC dynamics in an individual object-wise basis, which is what we attempt in the present paper. We extract 100 halos at z = 0 from a cosmological N-body simulation according to the conventional TSC criterion for the spherical over-density. Then we trace back their spherical counterparts at earlier epochs. Just prior to the turn-around epoch of the halos, their dynamics are well approximated by TSC, but their turn-around epochs are systematically delayed and the virial radii are larger by ˜20% on average relative to the TSC predictions. We find that this systematic deviation can mainly be ascribed to the non-uniformity/inhomogeneity of dark matter density profiles and the non-zero velocity dispersions, both of which are neglected in TSC. In particular, the inside-out collapse and shell-crossing of dark matter halos play an important role in generating the significant velocity dispersion. The implications of the present result are briefly discussed.

  15. Simulation of surface EMG for the analysis of muscle activity during whole body vibratory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fratini, Antonio; Bifulco, Paolo; Romano, Maria; Clemente, Fabrizio; Cesarelli, Mario

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to reproduce the effect of motor-unit synchronization on surface EMG recordings during vibratory stimulation to highlight vibration evoked muscle activity. The authors intended to evaluate, through numerical simulations, the changes in surface EMG spectrum in muscles undergoing whole body vibration stimulation. In some specific bands, in fact, vibration induced motion artifacts are also typically present. In addition, authors meant to compare the simulated EMGs with respect to real recordings in order to discriminate the effect of synchronization of motor units discharges with vibration frequencies from motion artifacts. Computations were performed using a model derived from previous studies and modified to consider the effect of vibratory stimulus, the motor unit synchronization and the endplates-electrodes relative position on the EMG signal. Results revealed that, in particular conditions, synchronization of MUs' discharge generates visible peaks at stimulation frequency and its harmonics. However, only a part of the total power of surface EMGs might be enclosed within artifacts related bands (± 1 Hz centered at the stimulation frequency and its superior harmonics) even in case of strong synchronization of motor units discharges with the vibratory stimulus. PMID:24183387

  16. An Integrated Simulation of a Wing-Body Combination for a Hovering Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Mehmet; Dilek, Ezgi; Erzincanli, Belkis

    2015-11-01

    The parallel large-scale unstructured finite volume method based on an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation has been applied in order to investigate the near wake structure of a hovering Drosophila flight. DISTENE MeshGems-Hexa algorithm based on the octree method is used to generate the all hexahedral mesh for the wing-body combination. The mesh deformation algorithm is based on the indirect radial basis function (RBF) method at each time level while avoiding remeshing in order to enhance numerical robustness. The large-scale numerical simulations are carried out for a flapping Drosophila in hover flight. The λ2-criterion proposed by Jeong and Hussain (1995) is used for investigating the time variation of the Eulerian coherent structures in the near wake. In addition, the Lagrangian coherent structures is also investigated using finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) fields. The present simulations reveal highly detailed near wake topology for a hovering Drosophila. This is very useful in terms of understanding physics in biological flights which can provide a very useful tool for designing bio-inspired MAVs. The authors acknowledge financial support from Turkish National Scientific and Technical Research Council (TUBITAK) through project numbers 111M332 and 214M293.

  17. Large eddy simulation of forced ignition of an annular bluff-body burner

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, V.; Domingo, P.; Vervisch, L.

    2010-03-15

    The optimization of the ignition process is a crucial issue in the design of many combustion systems. Large eddy simulation (LES) of a conical shaped bluff-body turbulent nonpremixed burner has been performed to study the impact of spark location on ignition success. This burner was experimentally investigated by Ahmed et al. [Combust. Flame 151 (2007) 366-385]. The present work focuses on the case without swirl, for which detailed measurements are available. First, cold-flow measurements of velocities and mixture fractions are compared with their LES counterparts, to assess the prediction capabilities of simulations in terms of flow and turbulent mixing. Time histories of velocities and mixture fractions are recorded at selected spots, to probe the resolved probability density function (pdf) of flow variables, in an attempt to reproduce, from the knowledge of LES-resolved instantaneous flow conditions, the experimentally observed reasons for success or failure of spark ignition. A flammability map is also constructed from the resolved mixture fraction pdf and compared with its experimental counterpart. LES of forced ignition is then performed using flamelet fully detailed tabulated chemistry combined with presumed pdfs. Various scenarios of flame kernel development are analyzed and correlated with typical flow conditions observed in this burner. The correlations between, velocities and mixture fraction values at the sparking time and the success or failure of ignition, are then further discussed and analyzed. (author)

  18. Fabrication of DNA/Hydroxyapatite nanocomposites by simulated body fluid for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, Takayuki; Okamoto, Masami

    2015-05-01

    The hydroxyapatite (HA) formation on the surface of DNA molecules in simulated body fluid (SBF) was examined. The osteoconductivity is estimated using SBF having ion concentrations approximately equal to those of human blood plasma. After immersion for 4 weeks in SBF at 36.5 °C, the HA crystallites possessing 1-14 micrometer in diameter grew on the surface of DNA molecules. The leaf flake-like and spherical shapes morphologies were observed through scanning electron microscopy analysis. Original peaks of both of DNA and HA were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The Ca/P ratio (1.1-1.5) in HA was estimated by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. After biomineralization, the calculated weight ratio of DNA/HA was 18/82 by thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis. The molecular orbital computer simulation has been used to probe the interaction of DNA with two charge-balancing ions, CaOH+ and C a H2P O4+ . The adsorption enthalpy of the two ions on DNA having negative value was the evidence for the interface in mineralization of HA in SBF.

  19. Fabrication of DNA/Hydroxyapatite nanocomposites by simulated body fluid for gene delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, Takayuki; Okamoto, Masami

    2015-05-22

    The hydroxyapatite (HA) formation on the surface of DNA molecules in simulated body fluid (SBF) was examined. The osteoconductivity is estimated using SBF having ion concentrations approximately equal to those of human blood plasma. After immersion for 4 weeks in SBF at 36.5 °C, the HA crystallites possessing 1-14 micrometer in diameter grew on the surface of DNA molecules. The leaf flake-like and spherical shapes morphologies were observed through scanning electron microscopy analysis. Original peaks of both of DNA and HA were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The Ca/P ratio (1.1-1.5) in HA was estimated by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. After biomineralization, the calculated weight ratio of DNA/HA was 18/82 by thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis. The molecular orbital computer simulation has been used to probe the interaction of DNA with two charge-balancing ions, CaOH{sup +} and CaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup +}. The adsorption enthalpy of the two ions on DNA having negative value was the evidence for the interface in mineralization of HA in SBF.

  20. The many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method for time-dependent ab-initio quantum simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sellier, J.M. Dimov, I.

    2014-09-15

    The aim of ab-initio approaches is the simulation of many-body quantum systems from the first principles of quantum mechanics. These methods are traditionally based on the many-body Schrödinger equation which represents an incredible mathematical challenge. In this paper, we introduce the many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method in the context of distinguishable particles and in the absence of spin-dependent effects. Despite these restrictions, the method has several advantages. First of all, the Wigner formalism is intuitive, as it is based on the concept of a quasi-distribution function. Secondly, the Monte Carlo numerical approach allows scalability on parallel machines that is practically unachievable by means of other techniques based on finite difference or finite element methods. Finally, this method allows time-dependent ab-initio simulations of strongly correlated quantum systems. In order to validate our many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method, as a case study we simulate a relatively simple system consisting of two particles in several different situations. We first start from two non-interacting free Gaussian wave packets. We, then, proceed with the inclusion of an external potential barrier, and we conclude by simulating two entangled (i.e. correlated) particles. The results show how, in the case of negligible spin-dependent effects, the many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method provides an efficient and reliable tool to study the time-dependent evolution of quantum systems composed of distinguishable particles.

  1. Quantum dynamics of atomic coherence in a spin-1 condensate: Mean-field versus many-body simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plimak, L. I.; Weiß, C.; Walser, R.; Schleich, W. P.

    2006-08-01

    We analyse and numerically simulate the full many-body quantum dynamics of a spin-1 condensate in the single spatial mode approximation. Initially, the condensate is in a "ferromagnetic" state with all spins aligned along the y axis and the magnetic field pointing along the z axis. In the course of evolution the spinor condensate undergoes a characteristic change of symmetry, which in a real experiment could be a signature of spin-mixing many-body interactions. The results of our simulations are conveniently visualised within the picture of irreducible tensor operators.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of {sup 40}K in-vivo body-count spectra for different body shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Schillaci, M.E.; Brown, T.H.

    1996-06-01

    Over the course of several years of measuring in-vivo spectra (whole-body counts) in search of transuranic radionuclides, it has been observed that, relative to the count rate in a region around 80 keV (defined as region 3), large persons have relatively higher count rates than thin persons at around 60 keV (region 2, where an {sup 241}Am line is expected), and relatively lower count rates at around 17 keV (region 1, where both {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am lines are expected). The observed data can be understood in terms of relative amounts of scattering and absorption of the 1.461-MeV photon from {sup 40}K, which occurs naturally in the human body. For larger persons, increased scattering causes the Compton peak to shift to lower energies, thereby increasing the count rate in region 2 relative to region 3. Also, because of increased absorption of very low energy photons, the count rate in region 1 decreases relative to region 3. To test this hypothesis, we compute the Spectrum of photons emerging from cylindrical human phantoms of various dimensions, assuming a variety of distributions of {sup 40}K within the phantom. The calculations are carried out using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. The results of these calculations qualitatively agree with the observations and support our hypothesis.

  3. High-order large-eddy simulation of flow over the ``Ahmed body'' car model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguez, M.; Pasquetti, R.; Serre, E.

    2008-09-01

    The structure of the turbulent flow over a simplified automotive model, the Ahmed body (S. R. Ahmed and G. Ramm, SAE Paper No. 8403001, 1984) with a 25° slanted back face, is investigated using high-order large-eddy simulations (LESs) at Reynolds number Re =768000. The numerical approach is carried out with a multidomain spectral Chebyshev-Fourier solver and the bluff body is modeled with a pseudopenalization method. The LES capability is implemented thanks to a spectral vanishing viscosity (SVV) technique, with particular attention to the near wall region. Such a SVV-LES approach is extended for the first time to an industrial three-dimensional turbulent flow over a complex geometry. In order to better understand the interactions between flow separations and the dynamic behavior of the released vortex wake, a detailed analysis of the flow structures is provided. The topology of the flow is well captured showing a partial separation of the boundary layer over the slanted face and the occurrence of two strong contrarotating trailing vortices expanding farther in the wake. The interactions of these large vortices with smaller structures reminiscent of horseshoe vortices, within the shear layer over the slanted face, form large helical structures providing strong unsteady phenomena in the wake. Mean velocity fields and turbulence statistics show a global agreement with the reference experiments of Lienhart et al. (DGLR Fach Symposium der AG SRAB, Stuttgart University, 15-17 November 2000). In order to provide a deeper insight into the nature of turbulence, the flow is analyzed using power spectra and the invariant theory of turbulence of Lumley [Adv. Appl. Mech. 18, 123 (1978)].

  4. Use of an acellular flowable dermal replacement scaffold on lower extremity sinus tract wounds: a retrospective series.

    PubMed

    Brigido, Stephen A; Schwartz, Edward; McCarroll, Raymond; Hardin-Young, Janet

    2009-04-01

    A novel injectable human dermal matrix has been developed for the treatment of complex diabetic sinus tract wounds. Bioengineered grafts are commercially available that have been somewhat effective in treating chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers; however, these bioengineered grafts are only available in sheet form. These therapies are less effective in treating complex or irregularly shaped wounds that demonstrate tunnels or extensions into deep soft tissue. One acellular graft (GRAFTJACKET, Matrix, Wright Medical Technology, Arlington, Tennessee) that has been shown to effectively treat open wounds is also available in a micronized form (GRAFTJACKET Xpress Scaffold, Wright Medical Technology). This human dermal graft forms a flowable soft tissue scaffold that can be delivered via syringe into tunneling wounds. In this retrospective series, 12 patients with deep tunneling wounds were treated with GRAFTJACKET Xpress Scaffold and followed for 12 weeks. Complete wound healing was achieved in 10 of 12 patients within the 12-week evaluation. The average time to complete healing was 8.5 weeks, whereas the average time to depth healing was 7.8 weeks. The data from the study suggest that this injectable human dermal matrix has unique properties that allow it to facilitate healing of complex tunneling diabetic foot ulcers. The material is easy to prepare and inject into the wound, thereby preventing the necessity of extensive surgical exposure. The matrix supports neo-subcutaneous tissue formation and allows the body to rapidly repair these wounds. PMID:19825754

  5. FLY. A parallel tree N-body code for cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Becciani, U.; Ferro, D.

    2003-10-01

    FLY is a parallel treecode which makes heavy use of the one-sided communication paradigm to handle the management of the tree structure. In its public version the code implements the equations for cosmological evolution, and can be run for different cosmological models. This reference guide describes the actual implementation of the algorithms of the public version of FLY, and suggests how to modify them to implement other types of equations (for instance, the Newtonian ones). Program summary Title of program: FLY Catalogue identifier: ADSC Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSC Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: Cray T3E, Sgi Origin 3000, IBM SP Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested: Unicos 2.0.5.40, Irix 6.5.14, Aix 4.3.3 Programming language used: Fortran 90, C Memory required to execute with typical data: about 100 Mwords with 2 million-particles Number of bits in a word: 32 Number of processors used: parallel program. The user can select the number of processors >=1 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: parallelized Number of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4615604 Distribution format: tar gzip file Keywords: Parallel tree N-body code for cosmological simulations Nature of physical problem: FLY is a parallel collisionless N-body code for the calculation of the gravitational force. Method of solution: It is based on the hierarchical oct-tree domain decomposition introduced by Barnes and Hut (1986). Restrictions on the complexity of the program: The program uses the leapfrog integrator schema, but could be changed by the user. Typical running time: 50 seconds for each time-step, running a 2-million-particles simulation on an Sgi Origin 3800 system with 8 processors having 512 Mbytes RAM for each processor. Unusual features of the program: FLY

  6. Constraints on dark matter particles from theory, galaxy observations, and N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyanovsky, D.; de Vega, H. J.; Sanchez, N. G.

    2008-02-01

    Mass bounds on dark matter (DM) candidates are obtained for particles that decouple in or out of equilibrium while ultrarelativistic with arbitrary isotropic and homogeneous distribution functions. A coarse grained Liouville invariant primordial phase-space density D is introduced which depends solely on the distribution function at decoupling. The density D is explicitly computed and combined with recent photometric and kinematic data on dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies in the Milky Way (dShps) and the observed DM density today yielding upper and lower bounds on the mass, primordial phase-space densities, and velocity dispersion of the DM candidates. Combining these constraints with recent results from N-body simulations yields estimates for the mass of the DM particles in the range of a few keV. We establish in this way a direct connection between the microphysics of decoupling in or out of equilibrium and the constraints that the particles must fulfill to be suitable DM candidates. If chemical freeze-out occurs before thermal decoupling, light bosonic particles can Bose condense. We study such Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) as a dark matter candidate. It is shown that, depending on the relation between the critical (Tc) and decoupling (Td) temperatures, a BEC light relic could act as cold DM but the decoupling scale must be higher than the electroweak scale. The condensate hastens the onset of the nonrelativistic regime and tightens the upper bound on the particle’s mass. A nonequilibrium scenario which describes particle production and partial thermalization, sterile neutrinos produced out of equilibrium, and other DM models is analyzed in detail and the respective bounds on mass, primordial phase-space density, and velocity dispersion are obtained. Thermal relics with m˜fewkeV that decouple when ultrarelativistic and sterile neutrinos produced resonantly or nonresonantly lead to a primordial phase-space density compatible with cored dShps and disfavor

  7. Singularity free N-body simulations called 'Dynamic Universe Model' don't require dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naga Parameswara Gupta, Satyavarapu

    For finding trajectories of Pioneer satellite (Anomaly), New Horizons satellite going to Pluto, the Calculations of Dynamic Universe model can be successfully applied. No dark matter is assumed within solar system radius. The effect on the masses around SUN shows as though there is extra gravitation pull toward SUN. It solves the Dynamics of Extra-solar planets like Planet X, satellite like Pioneer and NH for 3-Position, 3-velocity 3-accelaration for their masses, considering the complex situation of Multiple planets, Stars, Galaxy parts and Galaxy centre and other Galaxies Using simple Newtonian Physics. It already solved problems Missing mass in Galaxies observed by galaxy circular velocity curves successfully. Singularity free Newtonian N-body simulations Historically, King Oscar II of Sweden an-nounced a prize to a solution of N-body problem with advice given by Güsta Mittag-Leffler in 1887. He announced `Given a system of arbitrarily many mass points that attract each according to Newton's law, under the assumption that no two points ever collide, try to find a representation of the coordinates of each point as a series in a variable that is some known function of time and for all of whose values the series converges uniformly.'[This is taken from Wikipedia]. The announced dead line that time was1st June 1888. And after that dead line, on 21st January 1889, Great mathematician Poincaré claimed that prize. Later he himself sent a telegram to journal Acta Mathematica to stop printing the special issue after finding the error in his solution. Yet for such a man of science reputation is important than money. [ Ref Book `Celestial mechanics: the waltz of the planets' By Alessandra Celletti, Ettore Perozzi, page 27]. He realized that he has been wrong in his general stability result! But till now nobody could solve that problem or claimed that prize. Later all solutions resulted in singularities and collisions of masses, given by many people

  8. Prosthetic Breast Reconstruction With Acellular Dermal Matrices: Achieving Predictability and Reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Nahabedian, Maurice Y

    2016-05-01

    The use of acellular dermal matrices in the setting of prosthetic breast reconstruction has captured the attention of many plastic surgeons. The regenerative capacity of these materials has provided additional tissue support to the mastectomy skin flaps with the ultimate result of improving surgical and aesthetic outcomes. Despite the benefits, there remains a significant diversity with regard to outcomes with some surgeons reporting increased morbidity. The reasons for this are varied but ultimately related to differences in patient selection and surgical techniques. The purpose of this article is to provide strategies for using acellular dermal matrix to achieve success in a manner that is usually associated with outcomes that are predictable and reproducible. PMID:27579223

  9. Pioneering technique using Acellular Dermal Matrix in the rescue of a radiation ulcer

    PubMed Central

    NASEEM, S.; PATEL, A.D.; DEVALIA, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy as an adjuvant to mastectomy is integral to the treatment of breast cancer, but can result in skin ulceration. Skin ulceration following radiotherapy is traditionally managed by removing the implant and allowing the skin to heal by secondary intention. Case report A 42-year-old woman underwent radiotherapy following a breast reconstruction. She developed a 2 x 3cm radiation ulcer. The ulcer was managed by removing the implant and performing capsulectomy. A Beckers 50 expander was placed and reinforced with acellular dermal matrix inferolaterally. At follow-up the patient had a good cosmetic outcome. Conclusion Post-radiation skin ulcers present a challenge to treat with no current standardised management. The use of acellular dermal matrix may present a new technique to promote healing in these testing cases. PMID:27142826

  10. Prosthetic Breast Reconstruction With Acellular Dermal Matrices: Achieving Predictability and Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The use of acellular dermal matrices in the setting of prosthetic breast reconstruction has captured the attention of many plastic surgeons. The regenerative capacity of these materials has provided additional tissue support to the mastectomy skin flaps with the ultimate result of improving surgical and aesthetic outcomes. Despite the benefits, there remains a significant diversity with regard to outcomes with some surgeons reporting increased morbidity. The reasons for this are varied but ultimately related to differences in patient selection and surgical techniques. The purpose of this article is to provide strategies for using acellular dermal matrix to achieve success in a manner that is usually associated with outcomes that are predictable and reproducible. PMID:27579223

  11. DermACELL: Human Acellular Dermal Matrix Allograft A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cole, Windy E

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes often causes ulcers on the feet of diabetic patients. A 56-year-old, insulin-dependent, diabetic woman presented to the wound care center with a Wagner grade 3 ulcer of the right heel. She reported a 3-week history of ulceration with moderate drainage and odor and had a history of ulceration and osteomyelitis in the contralateral limb. Rigorous wound care, including hospitalization; surgical incision and drainage; intravenous antibiotic drug therapy; vacuum-assisted therapy; and a new room temperature, sterile, human acellular dermal matrix graft were used to heal the wound, save her limb, and restore her activities of daily living. This case presentation involves alternative treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer with this new acellular dermal matrix, DermACELL. PMID:27031550

  12. Impact disruption of gravity-dominated bodies: New simulation data and scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movshovitz, N.; Nimmo, F.; Korycansky, D. G.; Asphaug, E.; Owen, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    We present results from a suite of 169 hydrocode simulations of collisions between planetary bodies with radii from 100 to 1000 km. The simulation data are used to derive a simple scaling law for the threshold for catastrophic disruption, defined as a collision that leads to half the total colliding mass escaping the system post impact. For a target radius 100 ≤ RT ≤ 1000km and a mass MT and a projectile radius rp ≤ RT and mass mp we find that a head-on impact with velocity magnitude v is catastrophic if the kinetic energy of the system in the center of mass frame, K = 0.5MTmpv2 /(MT +mp) , exceeds a threshold value K* that is a few times U =(3 / 5) G MT2/RT +(3 / 5) G mp2 /rp + GMTmp /(RT +rp) , the gravitational binding energy of the system at the moment of impact; G is the gravitational constant. In all head-on collision runs we find K* =(5.5 ± 2.9) U . Oblique impacts are catastrophic when the fraction of kinetic energy contained in the volume of the projectile intersecting the target during impact exceeds ∼2 K* for 30° impacts and ∼3.5 K* for 45° impacts. We compare predictions made with this scaling to those made with existing scaling laws in the literature extrapolated from numerical studies on smaller targets. We find significant divergence between predictions where in general our results suggest a lower threshold for disruption except for highly oblique impacts with rp ≪ RT. This has implications for the efficiency of collisional grinding in the asteroid belt (Morbidelli et al., [2009] Icarus, 204, 558-573), Kuiper belt (Greenstreet et al., [2015] Icarus, 258, 267-288), and early Solar System accretion (Chambers [2013], Icarus, 224, 43-56).

  13. Results from N-body Simulations of the Outer Edge of Saturn's B Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Joseph M.; Spitale, J. N.

    2012-10-01

    The outer edge of Saturn's B ring is confined by satellite Mimas'm=2 inner Lindblad resonance, whose perturbations forces the large m=2 pattern that the Cassini spacecraft sees there. However Cassini observations also reveal the presence other unforced modes there, where the departure from circularity varies sinusoidally in m*longitude for m=1 on up to m=5 (Spitale & Porco 2010, Nicholson et al 2012). The meaning of these unforced normal modes is unclear, but they might indicate the viscous overstability (Borderies et al 1985, Longaretti & Rappaport 1999). We have studied these unforced normal modes in N-body simulations of the B ring, done by seeding the ring-edge with m=2 or m=3 shapes and then letting the disturbance evolve over time due to the ring's self gravity. We find that the amplitude of the forced m=2 pattern due to Mimas, as well as the pattern speeds of the unforced modes, are all consistent with the B ring-edge having a surface density of about 200 gm/cm^2. The pattern speeds of unforced normal modes are sensitive to ring surface density, so this technique can also be applied to Saturn's narrow ringlets, many of which exhibit a spectrum of normal modes whose observed pattern speeds could be used to infer ringlet masses. We also note that these unforced normal modes persist in the simulations without any damping for a hundred years or 10^5 orbits, despite the model ring's viscosity of 100 cm^2/sec. Which suggests that these normal modes, which are quite common in Saturn's rings and ringlets, might instead be due to past disturbances in the rings, such as an impact by cometary debris cloud (Hedman et al 2007, Showalter et al 2011), or maybe due to the gravitational impulse that can occur during a close encounter with a large comet like Saturn-crossing Chiron.

  14. Navier-Stokes Simulation of the Canard-Wing-Body Longitudinal Dynamic Stability Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Eugene L.; VanDalsem, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Many modern aircraft are canard-configured for aircraft control and improved aerodynamic performance. Canards can often enhance aircraft cruise performance, maneuverability and agility. For close-coupled canard configurations, the aerodynamic interaction between the canard and wing significantly changes the flow characteristics of the wing. In unsteady flow, such changes in the flow structure and performance of wings can be quite pronounced. Accurate modeling of the unsteady aerodynamics is essential for potential CFD design and analysis of such configurations. A time-accurate numerical simulation is performed to study the unsteady aerodynamic interaction between a canard and wing with emphasis on the effects of the canard on the configuration's dynamic response characteristics. The thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes Equations with various turbulence models are used in this study. Computations are made on a generic, analytically-defined, close-coupled canard-wing-body configuration which has been the subject of numerous previously published experimental studies during the 1970's to mid-80's. More recently, a series of steady-flow simulations has been performed and published by the author. In the current study, the configuration is given prescribed ramp and oscillatory motions in order to predict characteristics such as the damping-in-pitch and oscillatory longitudinal stability parameters. The current computations are made at high-subsonic and transonic Mach numbers, moderate angles-of- attack from -4 to 20 degrees, and at various pitch rates and reduced frequencies. Comparisons of pressures and integrated force quantities (e.g. lift, drag, pitching moment and selected dynamic parameters) are made with other published computational results and available experimental data. Results showing the unsteady effects of the canard on surface pressures, integrated forces, canard-wing vortex interaction and vortex breakdown will be presented.

  15. Outcomes of allogenic acellular matrix therapy in treatment of diabetic foot wounds: an initial experience.

    PubMed

    Martin, Billy R; Sangalang, Melinda; Wu, Stephanie; Armstrong, David G

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes of persons with UT grade 2A neuropathic diabetic foot wounds treated with an acellular matrix. Data were abstracted for 17 consecutive patients with diabetes--76.5% males, aged 61.5 +/- 8.5 years with a mean glycated haemoglobin of 9.2 +/- 2.2% presenting for care at a large, multidisciplinary wound care centre. All patients received surgical debridement for their diabetic foot wounds and were placed on therapy consisting of a single application of an acellular matrix graft (GraftJacket; Wright Medical Technologies, Arlington, TN, USA) with dressing changes taking place weekly. Outcomes evaluated included time to complete wound closure and proportion of patients achieving wound closure in 20 weeks. Acellular matrix therapy was used as initial therapy and was sutured or stapled in place under a silicone-based non adherent dressing. Therapy was then followed by a moisture-retentive dressing until complete epithelialisation. In total, 82.4% of wounds measuring a mean 4.6 +/- 3.2 cm(2) healed in the 20-week evaluation period. For those that healed in this period, healing took place in a mean 8.9 +/- 2.7 weeks. We conclude that a regimen consisting of moist wound healing using an acellular matrix dressing may be a useful adjunct to appropriate diabetic foot ulcer care for deep, non-infected, non-ischaemic wounds. We await the completion of further trials in this area to confirm or refute this initial assessment. PMID:16722865

  16. Hertwig's epithelial root sheath cell behavior during initial acellular cementogenesis in rat molars.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki; Yamamoto, Tomomaya; Yamada, Tamaki; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Hongo, Hiromi; Oda, Kimimitsu; Amizuka, Norio

    2014-11-01

    This study was designed to examine developing acellular cementum in rat molars by immunohistochemistry, to elucidate (1) how Hertwig's epithelial root sheath disintegrates and (2) whether epithelial sheath cells transform into cementoblasts through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Initial acellular cementogenesis was divided into three developmental stages, which can be seen in three different portions of the root: portion 1, where the epithelial sheath is intact; portion 2, where the epithelial sheath becomes fragmented; and portion 3, where acellular cementogenesis begins. Antibodies against three kinds of matrix proteinases, which degrade epithelial sheath-maintaining factors, including basement membrane and desmosomes, were used to investigate proteolytic activity of the epithelial sheath. Tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNALP) and keratin were used to investigate EMT. Epithelial sheath cells showed immunoreactivity for all three enzymes at fragmentation, which suggests that epithelial sheath disintegration is enzymatically mediated. Dental follicle cells and cementoblasts showed intense immunoreactivity for TNALP, and from portion 1 through to 3, the reaction extended from the alveolar bone-related zone to the root-related zone. Cells possessing keratin/TNALP double immunoreactivity were virtually absent. Keratin-positive epithelial sheath cells showed negligible immunoreactivity for TNALP, and epithelial cells did not appear to migrate to the dental follicle. Together, these findings suggest that a transition phenotype between epithelial cells and cementoblasts does not exist in the developing dental follicle and hence that epithelial sheath cells do not undergo EMT during initial acellular cementogenesis. In brief, this study supports the notion that cementoblasts derive from the dental follicle. PMID:24859538

  17. Simulations of dusty plasmas using a special-purpose computer system designed for gravitational N-body problems

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, K.; Mizuno, Y.; Hibino, S.; Inuzuka, H.; Cao, Y.; Liu, Y.; Yazawa, K.

    2006-01-15

    Simulations of dusty plasmas were performed using GRAPE-6, a special-purpose computer designed for gravitational N-body problems. The collective behavior of dust particles, which are injected into the plasma, was studied by means of three-dimensional computer simulations. As an example of a dusty plasma simulation, experiments on Coulomb crystals in plasmas are simulated. Formation of a quasi-two-dimensional Coulomb crystal has been observed under typical laboratory conditions. Another example was to simulate movement of dust particles in plasmas under microgravity conditions. Fully three-dimensional spherical structures of dust clouds have been observed. For the simulation of a dusty plasma in microgravity with 3x10{sup 4} particles, GRAPE-6 can perform the whole operation 1000 times faster than by using a Pentium 4 1.6 GHz processor.

  18. Biomechanical evaluation of acellular collagen matrix augmented Achilles tendon repair in sheep.

    PubMed

    Song, Lin; Olsen, Raymond E; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Davisson, Twana

    2010-01-01

    The rate of rerupture of repaired Achilles tendon in young and athletic populations remains high despite improvement in surgical techniques, suture design, and postsurgical management. Acellular biological matrices can be used to enhance the immediate strength of repaired tendons and to serve as scaffolds for cell in-growth and constructive tissue remodeling. A number of commercially available matrices have been used clinically, albeit with varying degrees of success and failure. The disparity is likely attributable to the different physical and biochemical properties of individual matrices. In this study, we investigated the biomechanical characteristics of 2 different acellular collagen matrices, namely TissueMend and GraftJacket, using a sheep Achilles tendon repair model. Static and cyclic creep, cyclic and linear construct stiffness, maximum load to failure, and displacement at maximum load were determined at time zero. We found that the maximum load to failure, displacement, and ultimate failure mode were similar between tendons augmented with either acellular collagen matrix; however, TissueMend augmentation yielded lower creep and smaller construct elongation than did GraftJacket. The results indicated that the strength of TissueMend-augmented tendons and GraftJacket-augmented tendons was not statistically significantly different, although tendons augmented with TissueMend displayed greater stiffness, which may be clinically advantageous in the restoration of ruptured tendons. PMID:20797586

  19. Immunolocation of proteoglycans and bone-related noncollagenous glycoproteins in developing acellular cementum of rat molars.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Domon, T; Takahashi, S; Arambawatta, A K S; Wakita, M

    2004-09-01

    To elucidate the roles of proteoglycans of (PGs), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and osteopontin (OPN) in cementogenesis, their distribution was investigated in developing and established acellular cementum of rat molars by an immunoperoxidase method. To characterize PGs, antibodies against five species of glycosaminoglycans (GAGS), chondroitin-4-sulfate (C4S), chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S), unsulfated chondroitin (C0S), dermatan sulfate (DS), and keratan sulfate (KS) were used. Routine histological staining was also applied. With onset of dentin mineralization, the initial cementum appeared on the dentin surface as a hematoxylin-stained fibril-poor layer. Subsequently, primitive principal fibers attached to the initial cementum. As the acellular cementum containing extrinsic fibers covered the initial cementum, the intal cementum formed the cemento-dentinal junction. Following immunohistochemistry at the earliest time of cementogenesis, the initial cementum was intensely immunoreactive for C4S, C6S, C0S, BSP, and OPN. After the initial cementum was embedded, neither the cemento-dentinal junction nor the cementum was immunoreactive for any GAG species. However, the cementum was immunoreactive for any GAG species. However, the cementum and cemento-dentinal were consistently immunoreactive for BSP. Although the cemento-dentinal junction was consistently immunoreactive for OPN, the remaining cementum showed no significant immunoreactivity. Thus, initial acellular cementogenesis requires a dense accumulation of PGs, BSP, and OPN, which may be associated with the mineralization process independently of collagen fibrils and initial principal fiber attachment. PMID:15278434

  20. Preparation and characterization of an acellular bovine pericardium intended for manufacture of valve bioprostheses.

    PubMed

    Goissis, Gilberto; Giglioti, Aparecida de Fátima; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2011-05-01

    Major problems with biological heart valves post-implantation are associated with progressive structural deterioration and calcification attributed to glutaraldehyde processing, dead cells, and cell fragments present in the native tissue. In spite of these problems, glutaraldehyde still is the reagent of choice. The results with acellular matrix xenograft usually prepared by detergent treatment in association with enzymes are rather conflicting because while preserving mechanical properties, tissue morphology and collagen structure are process dependent. This work describes a chemical approach for the preparation of an acellular bovine pericardium matrix intended for the manufacture of heart valve bioprostheses. Cell removal was performed by an alkaline extraction in the presence of calcium salts for periods ranging from 6 to 48 h. The results showed that cell removal was achieved after 12 h, with swelling and negative charge increasing with processing time. Nevertheless, collagen fibril structure, ability to form fibrils, and stability to collagenase were progressive after 24-h processing. There was no denaturation of the collagen matrix. A process is described for the preparation of acellular bovine pericardium matrices with preserved fibril structure and morphology for the manufacture of cardiac valve bioprostheses and may be used in other applications for tissue reconstruction. PMID:21595716

  1. Localized corrosion behaviour in simulated human body fluids of commercial Ni-Ti orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, G; Vicentini, B

    1999-04-01

    The corrosion performances in simulated human body fluids of commercial equiatomic Ni-Ti orthodontic wires having various shape and size and produced by different manufacturers were evaluated; for comparison purposes wires made of stainless steel and of cobalt-based alloy were also examined. Potentiodynamic tests in artificial saliva at 40 degrees C indicated a sufficient pitting resistance for the Ni-Ti wires, similar to that of cobalt-based alloy wire; the stainless steel wire, instead, exhibited low pitting potential. Potentiodynamic tests at 40 degrees C in isotonic saline solution (0.9% NaCl) showed, for Ni-Ti and stainless steel wires, pitting potential values in the range approximately 200-400 mV and approximately 350 mV versus SCE, respectively: consequently, according to literature data (Hoar TP, Mears DC. Proc Roy Soc A 1996;294:486-510), these materials should be considered potentially susceptible to pitting; only the cobalt-based alloy should be immune from pitting. The localized corrosion potentials determined in the same environment by the ASTM F746 test (approximately 0-200 mV and 130 mV versus SCE for Ni-Ti and stainless steel, respectively) pointed out that for these materials an even higher risk of localized corrosion. Slight differences in localized corrosion behaviour among the various Ni-Ti wires were detected. PMID:10353661

  2. The role of cloud collisions in N-body simulations of disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaric, Mario

    1993-09-01

    I have created a cloud collision recipe for use in N-body, polar grid, 3-d code. As a result of collisions two clouds can undergo one of four major processes: coalescence, fragmentation, star formation, and dynamical disturbance. I tested my recipe in simulations of disk galaxies, both isolated and interacting. In cases of isolated disks, I have found that cloud collisions play a key role in bulge formation by scattering stars out of the disk plane, which then end up forming a bulge. I have also shown that cloud collisions turn an initially uniform cloud size spectrum into an exponential size spectrum, agreeing very well with observations by Solomon and Rivolo (1989). In addition, I have shown that a disk needs to have a stellar component to form a bar. The bar then often has blobs at its ends, primarily composed of older stars. As a case of interacting disks, I have studied NGC 2535/6, and found that it seems the primary stayed relatively isolated for a few rotation periods, and consequently relaxed to some degree. Then the companion started tidally interacting with the primary, changing its morphology, intensifying cloud collision rates, and bringing about an earlier onset of star formation, which does not reach the same maximum value as in comparable isolated disk.

  3. Osteoblast activity on anodized titania nanotubes: effect of simulated body fluid soaking time.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Cem; Demirbilek, Murat; Calişkan, Nazli; Demirbilek, Melike Erol; Denkbaş, Emir Baki

    2012-06-01

    Early phase osseointegration is crucial for orthopedic implants. For the improvement of osseointegrative properties of orthopedic implants several surface modification methods such as acid etching, hydroxyapatite (HA) coating and sandblasting can be applied. In this article titanium implants were anodized to possess nanotubular titania structures on the surface. Titania nanotube structures with a 45-50 nm of average inner diameter were obtained and to enhance bioactivity, samples were soaked in 10X simulated body fluid (SBF) for apatite deposition on surface for different time periods (1, 2, 3, 5, 8 hours). Apatitic calcium phosphate deposited surfaces were analyzed with infrared spectrometry and wettability studies. Effect of soaking time on osteoblast cell was investigated by cell viability, alkaline phosphatase activity tests and morphological evaluations. As a result, 3 hours of soaking time was found as the optimum time period (p < 0.005). This in vitro study indicated that soaking in 10X SBF can be a rapid and economical technique to enhance osseointegration of anodized titanium implants however excess and/or uncontrolled HA coating of titania layer limits the bioactive potential of the implant. PMID:22764418

  4. Many-body dissipative particle dynamics simulation of liquid/vapor and liquid/solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Arienti, Marco; Pan, Wenxiao; Li, Xiaoyi; Karniadakis, George E.

    2011-05-27

    The combination of short-range repulsive and long-range attractive forces in Many-body Dissipative Particle Dynamics (MDPD) is examined at a vapor/liquid and liquid/solid interface. Based on the radial distribution of the virial pressure in a drop at equilibrium, a systematic study is carried out to characterize the sensitivity of the surface tension coefficient with respect to the inter-particle interaction parameters. For the first time, this study highlights the approximately cubic dependence of the surface tension coefficient on the bulk density of the fluid. In capillary flow, MDPD solutions are shown to satisfy the condition on the wavelength of an axial disturbance leading to the pinch-off of a cylindrical liquid thread. Correctly, no pinch-off occurs below the cutoff wavelength. MDPD is augmented by a set of bell-shaped weight functions to model interaction with a solid wall. There, hydrophilic and hydrophobic behaviors, including the occurrence of slip in the latter, are reproduced using a modification in the weight function that avoids particle clustering. Finally, the dynamics of droplets entering an inverted Y-shaped fracture junction is correctly captured in simulations parameterized by the Bond number, proving the flexibility of MDPD in modeling interface-dominated flows.

  5. Many-body dissipative particle dynamics simulation of liquid/vapor and liquid/solid interactions.

    PubMed

    Arienti, Marco; Pan, Wenxiao; Li, Xiaoyi; Karniadakis, George

    2011-05-28

    The combination of short-range repulsive and long-range attractive forces in many-body dissipative particle dynamics (MDPD) is examined at a vapor/liquid and liquid/solid interface. Based on the radial distribution of the virial pressure in a drop at equilibrium, a systematic study is carried out to characterize the sensitivity of the surface tension coefficient with respect to the inter-particle interaction parameters. For the first time, the approximately cubic dependence of the surface tension coefficient on the bulk density of the fluid is evidenced. In capillary flow, MDPD solutions are shown to satisfy the condition on the wavelength of an axial disturbance leading to the pinch-off of a cylindrical liquid thread; correctly, no pinch-off occurs below the cutoff wavelength. Moreover, in an example that illustrates the cascade of fluid dynamics behaviors from potential to inertial-viscous to stochastic flow, the dynamics of the jet radius is consistent with the power law predictions of asymptotic analysis. To model interaction with a solid wall, MDPD is augmented by a set of bell-shaped weight functions; hydrophilic and hydrophobic behaviors, including the occurrence of slip in the latter, are reproduced using a modification in the weight function that avoids particle clustering. The dynamics of droplets entering an inverted Y-shaped fracture junction is shown to be correctly captured in simulations parametrized by the Bond number, confirming the flexibility of MDPD in modeling interface-dominated flows. PMID:21639431

  6. Dependence of ion concentration in simulated body fluid on apatite precipitation on titania surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Akira; Nakano, Masayuki; Hieda, Junko; Ohtake, Naoto; Akasaka, Hiroki

    2015-08-01

    Titanium and its alloys are used as biomaterials, because of their high biocompatibility. Apatite precipitates on a titania surface in vivo, and living bone and titanium alloy are coupled through the thin apatite layer. The initial precipitation behavior of apatite on titania in simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions was evaluated and the effect of inorganic ions in the SBF was investigated. Measurement using the SPR phenomenon was used to evaluate the initial apatite precipitation. An SBF containing approximately equal ion concentrations to those in blood plasma was added to a titania surface and the SPR profile was obtained, from which the initial apatite precipitation rate was found to be 1.14 nm/h. Furthermore, the relationship between the inorganic concentration and the precipitation rate was determined for SBFs with different Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations. Apatite precipitation did not occur in the SBF with a low Na+ concentration, whereas the initial apatite precipitation rate in the SBF that did not contain Ca2+ was 0.32 nm/h. According to these results, Ca2+ has little effect on the initial apatite precipitation. In the initial reaction of apatite precipitation, sodium titanate is formed by the absorption of Na+. Next, calcium titanate precipitates upon the substitution of Na+ with Ca2+. Finally, Na+, phosphate ions and hydroxyl ions are attracted to the surface and apatite is formed. Thus, the rate-limiting factor in the initial nucleation of apatite is the Na+ concentration.

  7. Corrosion fatigue behavior of a biocompatible ultrafine-grained niobium alloy in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Rubitschek, F; Niendorf, T; Karaman, I; Maier, H J

    2012-01-01

    The present study reports on the corrosion fatigue behavior of ultrafine-grained (UFG) Niobium 2 wt-% Zirconium (NbZr) alloy in simulated body fluid (SBF). The alloy was processed using multipass equal channel angular processing at room temperature, resulting in a favorable combination of high strength and ductility along with superior biocompatibility and excellent corrosion resistance. Electrochemical measurements revealed stable passive behavior in SBF saline solutions, similar to conventional Ti-6Al-4V alloy. High-cycle fatigue tests showed no alteration in the crack initiation behavior due to the SBF environment, and an absence of pitting and corrosion products. More severe test conditions were obtained in the fatigue crack growth experiments in saline environments. Crack growth rates in UFG NbZr were marginally increased in SBF as compared to laboratory air at a constant test frequency of 20 Hz. Upon a 100 fold decrease in the test frequency, slightly higher crack growth rates were observed only in the near-threshold region. Such excellent corrosion and corrosion fatigue properties of UFG NbZr recommend it as an attractive new material for biomedical implants. PMID:22100093

  8. Comparative study of micromixing models in transported scalar PDF simulations of turbulent nonpremixed bluff body flames

    SciTech Connect

    Merci, Bart; Roekaerts, Dirk; Naud, Bertrand; Pope, Stephen B.

    2006-07-15

    Numerical simulation results are presented for turbulent jet diffusion flames with various levels of turbulence-chemistry interaction, stabilized behind a bluff body (Sydney Flames HM1-3). Interaction between turbulence and combustion is modeled with the transported joint-scalar PDF approach. The mass density function transport equation is solved in a Lagrangian manner. A second-moment-closure turbulence model is applied to obtain accurate mean flow and turbulent mixing fields. The behavior of two micromixing models is discussed: the Euclidean minimum spanning tree model and the modified Curl coalescence dispersion model. The impact of the micromixing model choice on the results in physical space is small, although some influence becomes visible as the amount of local extinction increases. Scatter plots and profiles of conditional means and variances of thermochemical quantities, conditioned on the mixture fraction, are discussed both within and downstream of the recirculation region. A distinction is made between local extinction and incomplete combustion, based on the CO species mass fraction. The differences in qualitative behavior between the micromixing models are explained and quantitative comparison to experimental data is made. (author)

  9. A performance comparison of different graphics processing units running direct N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.; Spera, M.

    2013-11-01

    Hybrid computational architectures based on the joint power of Central Processing Units (CPUs) and Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) are becoming popular and powerful hardware tools for a wide range of simulations in biology, chemistry, engineering, physics, etc. In this paper we present a performance comparison of various GPUs available on market when applied to the numerical integration of the classic, gravitational, N-body problem. To do this, we developed an OpenCL version of the parallel code HiGPUs used for these tests, because this portable version is the only apt to work on GPUs of different makes. The main general result is that we confirm the reliability, speed and cheapness of GPUs when applied to the examined kind of problems (i.e. when the forces to evaluate are dependent on the mutual distances, as it happens in gravitational physics and molecular dynamics). More specifically, we find that also the cheap GPUs built to be employed just for gaming applications are very performant in terms of computing speed also in scientific applications and, although with some limitations concerning on-board memory, can be a good choice to build a cheap and efficient machine for scientific applications.

  10. Hydroxyapatite-Coated Magnesium-Based Biodegradable Alloy: Cold Spray Deposition and Simulated Body Fluid Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorakma, Abdullah C. W.; Zuhailawati, Hussain; Aishvarya, V.; Dhindaw, B. K.

    2013-10-01

    A simple modified cold spray process in which the substrate of AZ51 alloys were preheated to 400 °C and sprayed with hydroxyapatite (HAP) using high pressure cold air nozzle spray was designed to get biocompatible coatings of the order of 20-30 μm thickness. The coatings had an average modulus of 9 GPa. The biodegradation behavior of HAP-coated samples was tested by studying with simulated body fluid (SBF). The coating was characterized by FESEM microanalysis. ICPOES analysis was carried out for the SBF solution to know the change in ion concentrations. Control samples showed no aluminum corrosion but heavy Mg corrosion. On the HAP-coated alloy samples, HAP coatings started dissolving after 1 day but showed signs of regeneration after 10 days of holding. All through the testing period while the HAP coating got eroded, the surface of the sample got deposited with different apatite-like compounds and the phase changed with course from DCPD to β-TCP and β-TCMP. The HAP-coated samples clearly improved the biodegradability of Mg alloy, attributed to the dissolution and re-precipitation of apatite showed by the coatings as compared to the control samples.

  11. N-body simulations with a cosmic vector for dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlesi, Edoardo; Knebe, Alexander; Yepes, Gustavo; Gottlöber, Stefan; Jiménez, Jose Beltrán.; Maroto, Antonio L.

    2012-07-01

    We present the results of a series of cosmological N-body simulations of a vector dark energy (VDE) model, performed using a suitably modified version of the publicly available GADGET-2 code. The set-ups of our simulations were calibrated pursuing a twofold aim: (1) to analyse the large-scale distribution of massive objects and (2) to determine the properties of halo structure in this different framework. We observe that structure formation is enhanced in VDE, since the mass function at high redshift is boosted up to a factor of 10 with respect to Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM), possibly alleviating tensions with the observations of massive clusters at high redshifts and early reionization epoch. Significant differences can also be found for the value of the growth factor, which in VDE shows a completely different behaviour, and in the distribution of voids, which in this cosmology are on average smaller and less abundant. We further studied the structure of dark matter haloes more massive than 5 × 1013 h-1 M⊙, finding that no substantial difference emerges when comparing spin parameter, shape, triaxiality and profiles of structures evolved under different cosmological pictures. Nevertheless, minor differences can be found in the concentration-mass relation and the two-point correlation function, both showing different amplitudes and steeper slopes. Using an additional series of simulations of a ΛCDM scenario with the same ? and σ8 used in the VDE cosmology, we have been able to establish whether the modifications induced in the new cosmological picture were due to the particular nature of the dynamical dark energy or a straightforward consequence of the cosmological parameters. On large scales, the dynamical effects of the cosmic vector field can be seen in the peculiar evolution of the cluster number density function with redshift, in the shape of the mass function, in the distribution of voids and on the characteristic form of the growth index γ(z). On

  12. High cycle fatigue behavior of implant Ti-6Al-4V in air and simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-jie; Cui, Shi-ming; He, Chao; Li, Jiu-kai; Wang, Qing-yuan

    2014-01-01

    Ti-6Al-4V implants that function as artificial joints are usually subjected to long-term cyclic loading. To study long-term fatigue behaviors of implant Ti-6Al-4V in vitro and in vivo conditions exceeding 107 cycles, constant stress amplitude fatigue experiments were carried out at ultrasonic frequency (20 kHz) with two different surface conditions (ground and polished) in ambient air and in a simulated body fluid. The initiation mechanisms of fatigue cracks were investigated with scanning electron microscopy. Improvement of fatigue strength is pronounced for polished specimens below 106 cycles in ambient air since fatigue cracks are initiated from surfaces of specimens. While the cycles exceed 106, surface conditions have no effect on fatigue behaviors because the defects located within the specimens become favorable sites for crack initiation. The endurance limit at 108 cycles of polished Ti-6Al-4V specimens decreases by 7% if it is cycled in simulated body fluid instead of ambient air. Fracture surfaces show that fatigue failure is initiated from surfaces in simulated body fluid. Surface improvement has a beneficial effect on fatigue behaviors of Ti-6Al-4V at high stress amplitudes. The fatigue properties of Ti-6Al-4V deteriorate and the mean endurance limits decrease significantly in simulated body fluid. PMID:24211906

  13. Computer Simulation and Analysis on Flow Characteristics and Distribution Patterns of Polymethylmethacrylate in Lumbar Vertebral Body and Vertebral Pedicle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Da; Liu, Xu-li; Zhang, Bo; Liao, Dong-fa; Li, Zhi-qiang; Zhou, Jiang-jun; Kang, Xia; Zheng, Wei; Lei, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to analyze the flow and distribution of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in vertebral body through computer simulation. Cadaveric lumbar vertebrae were scanned through electron beam tomography (EBT). The data was imported into Mimics software to build computational model. Vertebral body center and junction of pedicle and vertebral body were chosen as injection points. Silicone oil with viscosity of 100,000 cSt matching with PMMA bone cement was chosen for injection. The flow and distribution of silicone oil were analyzed using Fluent software. In vertebral body, silicone oil formed a circle-like shape centered by injection point on transverse and longitudinal sections, finally forming a sphere-like shape as a whole. Silicone oil diffused along lateral and posterior walls forming a circle-like shape on transverse section centered by injection point in pedicle, eventually forming a sphere-like shape as a whole. This study demonstrated that silicone oil flowed and diffused into a circle-like shape centered by injection point and finally formed a sphere-like shape as a whole in both vertebral body and pedicle. The flow and distribution of silicon oil in computational model could simulate PMMA distribution in vertebral body. It may provide theoretical evidence to reduce PMMA leakage risk during percutaneous vertebroplasty. PMID:26770969

  14. Numerical simulation of the wake variation due to the change of after-body configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kiyohira; Zhu, Ming

    1993-09-01

    Wake variation due to the difference of the after body configuration is numerically studied for the notch-back car-like body by using the finite volume method. The relationship between the wake and the drag is also investigated. Calculated results denote that the intensity of the longitudinal vortices has close relation with the pressure drag of the after-body.

  15. Synchronous concerted multiple-body photodissociation of oxalyl chloride explored by ab initio-based dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qiu; Shen, Lin; Fang, Wei-Hai

    2013-07-14

    Photo-induced multiple body dissociation is of fundamental interest in chemistry and physics. A description of the mechanism associated with n-body (n ≥ 3) photodissociation has proven to be an intriguing and yet challenging issue in the field of chemical dynamics. Oxalyl chloride, (ClCO)2, is the sole molecule reported up to date that can undergo four-body dissociation following absorption of a single UV photon, with a rich history of mechanistic debate. In the present work, the combined electronic structure calculations and dynamics simulations have been performed at the advanced level, which provides convincing evidence for resolving the mechanistic debate. More importantly, synchronous and asynchronous concertedness were explored for the first time for the (ClCO)2 photodissociation, which is based on the simulated time constants for the C-C and C-Cl bond fissions. Upon photoexcitation of (ClCO)2 to the S1 state, the adiabatic C-C or C-Cl fission takes place with little possibility. The four-body dissociation to 2Cl((2)P) and 2CO((1)Σ) was determined to a dominant channel with its branch of ∼0.7, while the three-body dissociation to ClCO((2)A(')) + CO((1)Σ) + Cl((2)P) was predicted to play a minor role in the (ClCO)2 photodissociation at 193 nm. Both the four-body and three-body dissociations are non-adiabatic processes, which proceed in a synchronous concerted way as a result of the S1 → S0 internal conversion. There is a little possibility for two-body dissociation to occur in the S0 and S1 states. PMID:23862946

  16. Isotopic outcomes of N-body accretion simulations: Constraints on equilibration processes during large impacts from Hf/W observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; Agnor, C. B.

    2006-03-01

    Most estimates of planetary core formation timescales using hafnium-tungsten (Hf-W) isotopes employ analytical expressions assuming either continuous planetary growth or instantaneous core formation. In contrast, dynamical modelling of planetary accretion suggests that the final stage of terrestrial planet formation is punctuated by multiple large and stochastic impacts. Such giant impacts have significant thermal and isotopic consequences. We present a framework for calculating the Hf-W isotope evolution of individual bodies based on the results of an N-body accretion simulation and assuming constant partition coefficients. The results show that smaller bodies exhibit a larger range in isotopic values than larger bodies, because the latter have suffered more impacts. The analytical core formation timescales calculated using these isotopic values can differ very significantly from the timing of the final giant impact each planet actually experiences. Simulations in which 1) even the largest impactors undergo re-equilibration with the target's mantle, rather than the cores merging directly, and 2) the original planetary embryos possessed radially variable iron : silicate ratios, produce results which are consistent with the observed physical and isotopic characteristics of inner solar system bodies. Varying W partition coefficients (due to changing mantle oxidation state) or initial planetesimal Hf / W ratios might produce similar isotopic outcomes, and potentially permit core mergers without violating the isotopic constraints. The style of re-equilibration required suggests that magma oceans were present on Mars-sized and larger bodies; an alternative for bodies of Mars-size and smaller is that the bulk of the mass was delivered as impactors much smaller than the target. For Mars we conclude that a prolonged (˜10 Myr) accretion process is both dynamically and isotopically plausible. We also predict likely Pd-Ag isotopic anomalies for Vesta-, Mars- and Earth

  17. Wind-tunnel investigation of the descent characteristics of bodies of revolution simulating anti-personnel bombs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, S. H.

    1951-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free spinning tunnel to study the relative behavior in descent of a number of homogeneous balsa bodies of revolution simulating anti-personnel bombs with a small cylindrical exploding device suspended approximately 10 feet below the bomb. The bodies of revolution included hemispherical, near-hemispherical, and near-paraboloid shapes. The ordinates of one near-paraboloid shape were specified by the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, U. S. Army. The behavior of the various bodies without the cylinder was also investigated. The results of the investigation indicated that several of the bodies descended vertically with their longitudinal axis, suspension line, and small cylinder in a vertical attitude,. However, the body, the ordinates of which had been specified by the Office of the Chief of Ordnance, U. S. Army, oscillated considerably from a vertical attitude while descending and therefore appeared unsuitable for its intended use. The behavior of this body became satisfactory when its center of gravity was moved well forward from its original position. In general, the results indicated that the descent characteristics of the bodies of revolution become more favorable as their shapes approached that of a hemisphere.

  18. Advances in Turbulent Combustion Dynamics Simulations in Bluff-Body Stabilized Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovar, Jonathan Michael

    This work examines the three main aspects of bluff-body stabilized flames: stationary combustion, lean blow-out, and thermo-acoustic instabilities. For the cases of stationary combustion and lean blow-out, an improved version of the Linear Eddy Model approach is used, while in the case of thermo-acoustic instabilities, the effect of boundary conditions on the predictions are studied. The improved version couples the Linear Eddy Model with the full-set of resolved scale Large Eddy Simulation equations for continuity, momentum, energy, and species transport. In traditional implementations the species equations are generally solved using a Lagrangian method which has some significant limitations. The novelty in this work is that the Eulerian species concentration equations are solved at the resolved scale and the Linear Eddy Model is strictly used to close the species production term. In this work, the improved Linear Eddy Model approach is applied to predict the flame properties inside the Volvo rig and it is shown to over-predict the flame temperature and normalized velocity when compared to experimental data using a premixed single step global propane reaction with an equivalence ratio of 0.65. The model is also applied to predict lean blow-out and is shown to predict a stable flame at an equivalence ratio of 0.5 when experiments achieve flame extinction at an equivalence ratio of 0.55. The improved Linear Eddy Model is, however, shown to be closer to experimental data than a comparable reactive flow simulation that uses laminar closure of the species source terms. The thermo-acoustic analysis is performed on a combustor rig designed at the Air Force Research Laboratory. The analysis is performed using a premixed single step global methane reaction for laminar reactive flow and shows that imposing a non-physical boundary condition at the rig exhaust will result in the suppression of acoustic content inside the domain and can alter the temperature contours in non

  19. Supermassive Black Hole Growth and Merger Rates from Cosmological N-body Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Micic, Miroslav; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Abel, Tom; /SLAC

    2007-10-29

    Understanding how seed black holes grow into intermediate and supermassive black holes (IMBHs and SMBHs, respectively) has important implications for the duty-cycle of active galactic nuclei (AGN), galaxy evolution, and gravitational wave astronomy. Most studies of the cosmological growth and merger history of black holes have used semianalytic models and have concentrated on SMBH growth in luminous galaxies. Using high resolution cosmological N-body simulations, we track the assembly of black holes over a large range of final masses - from seed black holes to SMBHs - over widely varying dynamical histories. We used the dynamics of dark matter halos to track the evolution of seed black holes in three different gas accretion scenarios. We have found that growth of a Sagittarius A* - size SMBH reaches its maximum mass M{sub SMBH}={approx}10{sup 6}M{sub {circle_dot}} at z{approx}6 through early gaseous accretion episodes, after which it stays at near constant mass. At the same redshift, the duty-cycle of the host AGN ends, hence redshift z=6 marks the transition from an AGN to a starburst galaxy which eventually becomes the Milky Way. By tracking black hole growth as a function of time and mass, we estimate that the IMBH merger rate reaches a maximum of R{sub max}=55 yr{sup -1} at z=11. From IMBH merger rates we calculate N{sub ULX}=7 per Milky Way type galaxy per redshift in redshift range 2 {approx}< z {approx}< 6.

  20. Oral Factors Affecting Titanium Elution and Corrosion: An In Vitro Study Using Simulated Body Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Suito, Hideki; Iwawaki, Yuki; Goto, Takaharu; Tomotake, Yoritoki; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Ti, which is biocompatible and resistant to corrosion, is widely used for dental implants, particularly in patients allergic to other materials. However, numerous studies have reported on Ti allergy and the in vitro corrosion of Ti. This study investigated the conditions that promote the elution of Ti ions from Ti implants. Methods Specimens of commercially pure Ti, pure nickel, a magnetic alloy, and a gold alloy were tested. Each specimen was immersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF) whose pH value was controlled (2.0, 3.0, 5.0, 7.4, and 9.0) using either hydrochloric or lactic acid. The parameters investigated were the following: duration of immersion, pH of the SBF, contact with a dissimilar metal, and mechanical stimulus. The amounts of Ti ions eluted were measured using a polarized Zeeman atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results Eluted Ti ions were detected after 24 h (pH of 2.0 and 3.0) and after 48 h (pH of 9.0). However, even after 4 weeks, eluted Ti ions were not detected in SBF solutions with pH values of 5.0 and 7.4. Ti elution was affected by immersion time, pH, acid type, mechanical stimulus, and contact with a dissimilar metal. Elution of Ti ions in a Candida albicans culture medium was observed after 72 h. Significance Elution of Ti ions in the SBF was influenced by its pH and by crevice corrosion. The results of this study elucidate the conditions that lead to the elution of Ti ions in humans, which results in implant corrosion and Ti allergy. PMID:23762461

  1. Reproducibility of a continuous ramp lower body negative pressure protocol for simulating hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Victoria L; Rickards, Caroline A

    2015-01-01

    Central hypovolemia elicited by application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) has been used extensively to simulate hemorrhage in human subjects. Traditional LBNP protocols incorporate progressive steps in pressure held for specific time intervals. The aim of this study was to assess the reproducibility of applying continuous LBNP at a constant rate until presyncope to replicate actual bleeding. During two trials (≥4 weeks intervening), LBNP was applied at a rate of 3 mmHg/min in 18 healthy human subjects (12M; 6F) until the onset of presyncopal symptoms. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), stroke volume (SV), total peripheral resistance (TPR), mean middle and posterior cerebral artery velocities (MCAv, PCAv), and cerebral oxygen saturation (ScO2) were measured continuously. Time to presyncope (TTPS) and hemodynamic responses were compared between the two trials. TTPS (1649 ± 98 sec vs. 1690 ± 88 sec; P = 0.47 [t-test]; r = 0.77) and the subsequent magnitude of central hypovolemia (%Δ SV −54 ± 4% vs. −53 ± 4%; P = 0.55) were similar between trials. There were no statistically distinguishable differences at either baseline (P ≥ 0.17) or presyncope between trials for HR, MAP, TPR, mean MCAv, mean PCAv, or ScO2 (P ≥ 0.19). The rate of change from baseline to presyncope for all hemodynamic responses was also similar between trials (P ≥ 0.12). Continuous LBNP applied at a rate of 3 mmHg/min was reproducible in healthy human subjects, eliciting similar reductions in central blood volume and subsequent reflex hemodynamic responses. PMID:26607173

  2. Charge optimized many-body (COMB) potential for dynamical simulation of Ni-Al phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Aakash; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Liang, Tao; Choudhary, Kamal; Noordhoek, Mark J.; Cheng, Yu-Ting; Phillpot, Simon R.; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2015-08-01

    An interatomic potential for the Ni-Al system is presented within the third-generation charge optimized many-body (COMB3) formalism. The potential has been optimized for Ni3Al, or the γ‧ phase in Ni-based superalloys. The formation energies predicted for other Ni-Al phases are in reasonable agreement with first-principles results. The potential further predicts good mechanical properties for Ni3Al, which includes the values of the complex stacking fault (CSF) and the anti-phase boundary (APB) energies for the (1 1 1) and (1 0 0) planes. It is also used to investigate dislocation propagation across the Ni3Al (1 1 0)-Ni (1 1 0) interface, and the results are consistent with simulation results reported in the literature. The potential is further used in combination with a recent COMB3 potential for Al2O3 to investigate the Ni3Al (1 1 1)-Al2O3 (0 0 01) interface, which has not been modeled previously at the classical atomistic level due to the lack of a reactive potential to describe both Ni3Al and Al2O3 as well as interactions between them. The calculated work of adhesion for this interface is predicted to be 1.85 J m-2, which is in agreement with available experimental data. The predicted interlayer distance is further consistent with the available first-principles results for Ni (1 1 1)-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1).

  3. Vlasov simulation of the interaction between the solar wind and a dielectric body with magnetic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Y.; Umeda, T.; Ogino, T.

    2012-12-01

    The interaction of a plasma flow with an unmagnetized object is quite different from that with a magnetized object such as the Earth. Due to the absence of the global magnetic field, the unmagnetized object absorbs plasma particles which reach the surface, generating a plasma cavity called "wake" in the anti-solar side of the object. Since the velocity of the solar wind (SW) is larger than the thermal velocity of ions, ions cannot penetrate into the nightside of the moon. However, ions were observed in the deep wake by a Japanese spacecraft SELENE (KAGUYA) which is orbiting the moon in a polar orbit around 100km altitude. A key mechanism of this phenomenon is thought to be scattering of SW ions at the lunar dayside surface by an interaction between the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and a lunar magnetic anomaly. In the present study, we examine entry processes of ions into the wake due to the interaction between IMF and the magnetic anomaly via a full-kinetic Vlasov simulation. There are two processes that the ion entry into the wake. A shock is formed by the interaction between the dipole magnetic field and the SW. A part of SW ions are reflected at the shock and enter the wake due to the ion gyro motion. On the other hand, the electric field toward the body is generated by the negative charge on the nightside surface. SW ions enter the wake due to the out-of-plane magnetic convection induced by the electric field.

  4. A PARALLEL MONTE CARLO CODE FOR SIMULATING COLLISIONAL N-BODY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Pattabiraman, Bharath; Umbreit, Stefan; Liao, Wei-keng; Choudhary, Alok; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Memik, Gokhan; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2013-02-15

    We present a new parallel code for computing the dynamical evolution of collisional N-body systems with up to N {approx} 10{sup 7} particles. Our code is based on the Henon Monte Carlo method for solving the Fokker-Planck equation, and makes assumptions of spherical symmetry and dynamical equilibrium. The principal algorithmic developments involve optimizing data structures and the introduction of a parallel random number generation scheme as well as a parallel sorting algorithm required to find nearest neighbors for interactions and to compute the gravitational potential. The new algorithms we introduce along with our choice of decomposition scheme minimize communication costs and ensure optimal distribution of data and workload among the processing units. Our implementation uses the Message Passing Interface library for communication, which makes it portable to many different supercomputing architectures. We validate the code by calculating the evolution of clusters with initial Plummer distribution functions up to core collapse with the number of stars, N, spanning three orders of magnitude from 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 7}. We find that our results are in good agreement with self-similar core-collapse solutions, and the core-collapse times generally agree with expectations from the literature. Also, we observe good total energy conservation, within {approx}< 0.04% throughout all simulations. We analyze the performance of the code, and demonstrate near-linear scaling of the runtime with the number of processors up to 64 processors for N = 10{sup 5}, 128 for N = 10{sup 6} and 256 for N = 10{sup 7}. The runtime reaches saturation with the addition of processors beyond these limits, which is a characteristic of the parallel sorting algorithm. The resulting maximum speedups we achieve are approximately 60 Multiplication-Sign , 100 Multiplication-Sign , and 220 Multiplication-Sign , respectively.

  5. Computerized Simulation Of Whole Body Dynamics: Aspects Of Human Movement Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, Ronald L.; Zernicke, Ronald F.

    1982-02-01

    Recent developments in the modeling of multi-body system dynamics are incorporated into an integrated, computer-oriented method for analyzing human body motion. The formulation, which represents the human body as a set of 17 finite, rigid-body segments including hands, feet, arms, legs, head, neck, and upper and lower torso, also accounts for the effects of connective tissues and muscles with non-linear springs and dampers at the connections of the linked rigid-bodies. Specific application of this biomathematical modeling of the body segments includes the estimation of musculoskeletal injury potential during aircraft and land vehicular crashes. With the integration of the output dynamics of the model, the injury profiles of the occupants, and human tissue tolerance limits, a more complete analysis and reconstruction of the details of the human occupant trajectory responses and injury incurrence can be made.

  6. High fidelity quasi steady-state aerodynamic model effects on race vehicle performance predictions using multi-body simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrfeld-Halterman, J. A.; Uddin, M.

    2016-07-01

    We described in this paper the development of a high fidelity vehicle aerodynamic model to fit wind tunnel test data over a wide range of vehicle orientations. We also present a comparison between the effects of this proposed model and a conventional quasi steady-state aerodynamic model on race vehicle simulation results. This is done by implementing both of these models independently in multi-body quasi steady-state simulations to determine the effects of the high fidelity aerodynamic model on race vehicle performance metrics. The quasi steady state vehicle simulation is developed with a multi-body NASCAR Truck vehicle model, and simulations are conducted for three different types of NASCAR race tracks, a short track, a one and a half mile intermediate track, and a higher speed, two mile intermediate race track. For each track simulation, the effects of the aerodynamic model on handling, maximum corner speed, and drive force metrics are analysed. The accuracy of the high-fidelity model is shown to reduce the aerodynamic model error relative to the conventional aerodynamic model, and the increased accuracy of the high fidelity aerodynamic model is found to have realisable effects on the performance metric predictions on the intermediate tracks resulting from the quasi steady-state simulation.

  7. Evaluating acellular versus cellular perfusate composition during prolonged ex vivo lung perfusion after initial cold ischaemia for 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Becker, Simon; Steinmeyer, Jasmin; Avsar, Murat; Höffler, Klaus; Salman, Jawad; Haverich, Axel; Warnecke, Gregor; Ochs, Matthias; Schnapper, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has developed as a powerful technique to evaluate particularly marginal donor lungs prior to transplantation. In this study, acellular and cellular perfusate compositions were compared in an identical experimental setting as no consensus has been reached on a preferred technique yet. Porcine lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h on the basis of an acellular or a cellular perfusate composition after 24 h of cold ischaemia as defined organ stress. During perfusion, haemodynamic and respiratory parameters were monitored. After EVLP, the lung condition was assessed by light and transmission electron microscopy. Aerodynamic parameters did not show significant differences between groups and remained within the in vivo range during EVLP. Mean oxygenation indices were 491 ± 39 in the acellular group and 513 ± 53 in the cellular group. Groups only differed significantly in terms of higher pulmonary artery pressure and vascular resistance in the cellular group. Lung histology and ultrastructure were largely well preserved after prolonged EVLP and showed only minor structural alterations which were similarly present in both groups. Prolonged acellular and cellular EVLP for 12 h are both feasible with lungs prechallenged by ischaemic organ stress. Physiological and ultrastructural analysis showed no superiority of either acellular or cellular perfusate composition. PMID:26264867

  8. Comparison of two anthropomorphic phantoms as a calibration tool for whole-body counter using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Manohari, M; Mathiyarasu, R; Rajagopal, V; Venkatraman, B

    2015-04-01

    The whole-body counting facility at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research uses an in-house built Masonite cut-sheet phantom for the calibration of whole-body monitors. Recently, an Indian Adult BOMAB phantom was procured as an additional utility to augment the facility. The present study is to generate full-energy peak efficiencies (FEPE) of the shielded chair (SC) whole-body counting system using the new BOMAB phantom through Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The values are compared with that of the Masonite phantom. First, the SC was modelled along with the Masonite phantom to estimate the FEPE values and Compton scattering factors (CSFs) for different energies. The simulated values were validated against the measurements using the Masonite cut-sheet phantom (Masonite phantom). The validated SC model was used along with the Indian adult BOMAB phantom to estimate the FEPEs and the CSFs. The simulated BOMAB phantom values were compared with the simulated Masonite phantom values. The maximum deviation for both the FEPEs and CSFs was ±10% validating the use of the Masonite phantom as a calibration tool representing an Indian adult. PMID:25406363

  9. Chaotic versus nonchaotic stochastic dynamics in Monte Carlo simulations: a route for accurate energy differences in N-body systems.

    PubMed

    Assaraf, Roland; Caffarel, Michel; Kollias, A C

    2011-04-15

    We present a method to efficiently evaluate small energy differences of two close N-body systems by employing stochastic processes having a stability versus chaos property. By using the same random noise, energy differences are computed from close trajectories without reweighting procedures. The approach is presented for quantum systems but can be applied to classical N-body systems as well. It is exemplified with diffusion Monte Carlo simulations for long chains of hydrogen atoms and molecules for which it is shown that the long-standing problem of computing energy derivatives is solved. PMID:21568537

  10. Attitude dynamics simulation subroutines for systems of hinge-connected rigid bodies with nonrigid appendages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischer, G. E.; Likins, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Three computer subroutines designed to solve the vector-dyadic differential equations of rotational motion for systems that may be idealized as a collection of hinge-connected rigid bodies assembled in a tree topology, with an optional flexible appendage attached to each body are reported. Deformations of the appendages are mathematically represented by modal coordinates and are assumed small. Within these constraints, the subroutines provide equation solutions for (1) the most general case of unrestricted hinge rotations, with appendage base bodies nominally rotating at a constant speed, (2) the case of unrestricted hinge rotations between rigid bodies, with the restriction that those rigid bodies carrying appendages are nominally nonspinning, and (3) the case of small hinge rotations and nominally nonrotating appendages. Sample problems and their solutions are presented to illustrate the utility of the computer programs.

  11. I Sing the Body Electric: Students Use Computer Simulations To Enhance their Understanding of Human Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Frances

    1998-01-01

    Describes how computer simulations can enhance students' learning of physiology. Discusses how computer models enhance experimentation; using computer modeling in high school science; three steps in students' writing of a simulation; and the value of simulations. Lists six software vendors who offer packages on the PC or Macintosh platforms. (AEF)

  12. Comparison of Intrinsic Alignment of Galaxies in MassiveBlack-II Hydroynamic and N-body Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenneti, Ananth; Mandelbaum, Rachel; DiMatteo, Tiziana; Khandai, Nishikanta

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic alignment of galaxies with the large-scale density field is an important astrophysical systematic in upcoming weak lensing surveys whilst offering insights into galaxy formation and evolution. We compare the intrinsic alignments of galaxies in the cosmological hydrodynamic MassiveBlack-II (MBII) simulation that includes stellar matter and AGN feedback, in a volume of (100h-1Mpc)3 with that of a dark matter only N-body simulation (DMO) performed with the same volume, resolution, cosmological parameters, and initial conditions. For subhalos matched in the two simulations, we find that the axis ratios of the dark matter subhalos of MBII, obtained using the reduced inertia tensor are larger, meaning that subhalos in MB-II are rounder than in the DMO simulation. The shapes of stellar matter in subhalos of MBII are more misaligned with the shapes of dark matter in the corresponding subhalos of the DMO simulation when compared to the misalignment with dark matter shapes of MBII. The fractional change in the mean misalignment angle is larger in galaxies of low mass and it varies from ~ 37% - 13% as we go from low to high mass galaxies. Similarly, the projected intrinsic alignment density-shape correlation function, wδ+ for the shapes of galaxies in the MBII simulation is smaller in comparison to the wδ+ obtained using shapes of dark matter subhalos in DMO with larger decrease at low mass thresholds. These results are necessary if we wish to map the intrinsic alignments from hydrodynamic simulations onto large mock catalogs based on N-body simulations that will be used by upcoming surveys to interpret weak lensing measurements.

  13. Laboratory Simulated Impact Shock on Ices relevant to Planetary icy Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nna Mvondo, D.; Khare, B. N.; McKay, C. P.; Ishihara, T.

    2006-12-01

    Several icy satellites of the outer planets show impact cratering features and it is recognised that this process may have played a crucial role in the formation and evolution of icy bodies. The effect of impact by extraterrestrial objects into the surface is commonly related to physical changes. Most of the research applied to impacts on ices has been developed to study and understand the cratering formation process and their physical, geophysical characteristics. Chemical changes and synthesis occurring on icy planetary surfaces are generally explained by the influence of UV photons and high-energy charged particles on ices. Nonetheless, impact process onto ices could be a source of local or global endogenic process and could be especially advantageous as an efficient energy source for driving interesting chemistry. Impacts can ensure that icy surfaces are eventually exposed, for a limited period of time, to aqueous melt in impact craters and ejecta and one can imagine that impurities included in the ice may undergo hydrolysis and other reactions under such conditions. Upon impact, the kinetic energy of the bolide is transferred to the ground liberating a great deal of stress energy which could initiate in situ a diverse series of chemical reactions in the fracture zone beneath the crater (Borucki et al., 2002; Jones and Lewis, 1987). Here we present a new approach testing in laboratory the chemistry conducted by impacts into planetary ices and we report the first experimental results. We have irradiated with a powerful pulsed laser icy mixtures of pure water ices containing CO2, Na2CO3, CH3OH and CH3OH / (NH4)2SO4 at 77K. GC-MS and FTIR analyses show that hydrogen peroxide, carbon monoxide and methanol are formed in irradiated H2O / CO2 ices. Ice containing sodium carbonate generates under simulated impact CO and CO2 which are also produced in impacted H2O / CH3OH and H2O / CH3OH / (NH4)2SO4 ices. But, in both latter icy mixtures, methane and more complex

  14. Degradation behavior of hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanocomposite in simulated body fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Liuyun, Jiang; Chengdong, Xiong; Lixin, Jiang; Lijuan, Xu

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: In this manuscript, we initiated a systematic study to investigate the effect of HA on thermal properties, inner structure, reduction of mechanical strength, surface morphology and the surface deposit of n-HA/PLGA composite with respect to the soaking time. The results showed that n-HA played an important role in improving the degradation behavior of n-HA/PLGA composite, which can accelerate the degradation of n-HA/PLGA composite and endow it with bioactivity, after n-HA was detached from PLGA during the degradation, so that n-HA/PLGA composite may have a more promising prospect of the clinical application than pure PLGA as bone fracture internal fixation materials, and the results would be of reference significance to predict the in vivo degradation and biological properties. - Highlights: • Effect of n-HA on degradation behavior of n-HA/PLGA composite was investigated. • Degradation behaviors of n-HA/PLGA and PLGA were carried out in SBF for 6 months. • Viscosity, thermal properties, inner structure and bending strength were tested. • n-HA can accelerate the degradation and endows it with bioactivity. - Abstract: To investigate the effect of hydroxyapatite(HA) on the degradation behavior of hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (HA/PLGA) nanocomposite, the degradation experiment of n-HA/PLGA composite and pure PLGA were carried out by soaking in simulated body fluid(SBF) at 37 °C for 1, 2, 4 and 6 months. The change of intrinsic viscosity, thermal properties, inner structure, bending strength reduction, surface morphology and the surface deposit of n-HA/PLGA composite and pure PLGA with respect to the soaking time were investigated by means of UbbeloHde Viscometer, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), scanning electron microscope(SEM), electromechanical universal tester, a conventional camera and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that n-HA played an important role in improving the degradation behavior of n

  15. Surface structure and biocompatibility of demineralized dentin matrix granules soaked in a simulated body fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akazawa, Toshiyuki; Murata, Masaru; Hino, Jun; Nagano, Futami; Shigyo, Tatsuhiro; Nomura, Takafumi; Inano, Hiroyuki; Itabashi, Kohji; Yamagishi, Tohru; Nakamura, Katsuo; Takahashi, Touru; Iida, Shunji; Kashiwazaki, Haruhiko

    2012-12-01

    Demineralized dentin matrix (DDM) granules with excellent biocompatibility were easily prepared using unnecessary human teeth by a new cooling-pulverizing and demineralizing technique. Extracted human teeth were pulverized together with saline ice at 12,000 rpm-rotation number of a ZrO2 blade for 30 s in a ZrO2 vessel. The pulverized granules exhibited the particle size distribution of 0.5-2 mm that was efficient for regeneration of alveolar bone. The (Ca/P) ratios of the granules were 1.60-1.66, which were close to the stoichiometric value of 1.67 for standard hydroxyapatite (HAp). Small amounts of Na+ and Mg2+ ions present at less than 1% were detected. The pulverized granules were dissolved with stirring under 500 rpm for 10-60 min in 2.0%-HNO3 solutions to obtain partial or complete DDM granules. As the dissolution time increased, crystallinity of HAp phase lowered and asperity on surfaces of the granules became outstanding due to elution of mineral components. At the dissolution of 60 min, the pulverizing granules were completely demineralized and the weight decreased to about one-fifth. To improve surface activity of the DDM granules without denaturation of bone growth factors, the DDM granules were soaked at 309.5 K and pH 7.40 in a simulated body fluid (SBF). HAp microcrystals were gradually precipitated on surfaces of the DDM granules with increasing the soaking time. Different morphology of the precipitates was observed, depending on the demineralization situation of the pulverized granules. For the DDM with low dissolution efficiency of 42%, porous bone-like apatites at 24 h after the soaking and fiber-oriented aggregates at 144 h were recognized. The bioactive DDM granules were implanted into the subcutaneous tissues of the back region of rats. At 4 weeks after the implantation, bio-absorption by comparatively small amounts of multi-giant cells was recognized around the surface layers of DDM granules.

  16. A Biodegradation Study of SBA-15 Microparticles in Simulated Body Fluid and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngjin; Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Jung Heon; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jaeyun

    2015-06-16

    Mesoporous silica has received considerable attention as a drug delivery vehicle because of its large surface area and large pore volume for loading drugs and large biomolecules. Recently, mesoporous silica microparticles have shown potential as a three-dimensional vaccine platform for modulating dendritic cells via spontaneous assembly of microparticles in a specific region after subcutaneous injection. For further in vivo applications, the biodegradation behavior of mesoporous silica microparticles must be studied and known. Until now, most biodegradation studies have focused on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs); here, we report the biodegradation of hexagonally ordered mesoporous silica, SBA-15, with micrometer-sized lengths (∼32 μm with a high aspect ratio). The degradation of SBA-15 microparticles was investigated in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in mice by analyzing the structural change over time. SBA-15 microparticles were found to degrade in SBF and in vivo. The erosion of SBA-15 under biological conditions led to a loss of the hysteresis loop in the nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherm and fingerprint peaks in small-angle X-ray scattering, specifically indicating a degradation of ordered mesoporous structure. Via comparison to previous results of degradation of MSNs in SBF, SBA-15 microparticles degraded faster than MCM-41 nanoparticles presumably because SBA-15 microparticles have a pore size (∼8 nm) and a pore volume larger than those of MCM-41 mesoporous silica. The surface functional groups, the residual amounts of organic templates, and the hydrothermal treatment during the synthesis could affect the rate of degradation of SBA-15. In in vivo testing, previous studies focused on the evaluation of toxicity of mesoporous silica particles in various organs. In contrast, we studied the change in the physical properties of SBA-15 microparticles depending on the duration after subcutaneous injection. The pristine SBA-15 microparticles injected

  17. Micropatterned TiO₂ nanotube surfaces for site-selective nucleation of hydroxyapatite from simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Pittrof, Andreas; Bauer, Sebastian; Schmuki, Patrik

    2011-01-01

    TiO₂ nanotube layers can provide greatly enhanced kinetics for hydroxyapatite formation from simulated body fluid compared with smooth, compact TiO₂ surfaces. In the present work we show how this contrast in reactivity can be used to create highly defined lateral microstructures where bone-like hydroxyapatite can be deposited with very high selectivity. For this we used a photolithographic approach to produce micropatterned TiO₂ nanotube layers surrounded by compact oxide that were then immersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. Not only the tubular vs. flat geometry but also the finding that compact oxides created in phosphate electrolytes in particular suppress apatite deposition are crucial for a very high reactivity contrast. Overall the results show the feasibility of stimulating hydroxyapatite deposition at surface locations where needed or desired. This provides a valuable tool for biomedical device design. PMID:20883841

  18. Importance of Three-Body Interactions in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Demonstrated with the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Spencer R; Nakata, Hiroya; Nagata, Takeshi; Mayes, Maricris; Alexeev, Yuri; Fletcher, Graham; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Gordon, Mark S

    2016-04-12

    The analytic first derivative with respect to nuclear coordinates is formulated and implemented in the framework of the three-body fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. The gradient has been derived and implemented for restricted second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, as well as for both restricted and unrestricted Hartree-Fock and density functional theory. The importance of the three-body fully analytic gradient is illustrated through the failure of the two-body FMO method during molecular dynamics simulations of a small water cluster. The parallel implementation of the fragment molecular orbital method, its parallel efficiency, and its scalability on the Blue Gene/Q architecture up to 262 144 CPU cores are also discussed. PMID:26913837

  19. Florid pustular dermatitis of breast: A case report on a unusual complication from acellular dermal matrix use

    PubMed Central

    James, Justin; Jackson, Lee; Saunders, Christobel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic erythematous reaction of the breast (Red breast syndrome) is a known complication following breast reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix. However pustular dermatitis like presentation is not previously known. Presentation of case We present a 42-year-old lady who developed bilateral pustular dermatitis like appearance following breast reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix slings. Though surgical washout was done, both expanders and flex HD could be preserved. Discussion Acellular dermal matrix use is the only possible explanation for such a presentation and this can be considered a variant of red breast syndrome. Conclusion Pustular dermatitis like presentation can be associated with acelluar dermal matrix use and should be considered in similar clinical presentations, since this can avoid unnecessary surgical procedures. PMID:27058152

  20. Study report on combining diagnostic and therapeutic considerations with subsystem and whole-body simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furukawa, S.

    1975-01-01

    Current applications of simulation models for clinical research described included tilt model simulation of orthostatic intolerance with hemorrhage, and modeling long term circulatory circulation. Current capabilities include: (1) simulation of analogous pathological states and effects of abnormal environmental stressors by the manipulation of system variables and changing inputs in various sequences; (2) simulation of time courses of responses of controlled variables by the altered inputs and their relationships; (3) simulation of physiological responses of treatment such as isotonic saline transfusion; (4) simulation of the effectiveness of a treatment as well as the effects of complication superimposed on an existing pathological state; and (5) comparison of the effectiveness of various treatments/countermeasures for a given pathological state. The feasibility of applying simulation models to diagnostic and therapeutic research problems is assessed.

  1. A hybrid Cartesian/immersed boundary method for simulating flows with 3D, geometrically complex, moving bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, Anvar; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2005-08-01

    A numerical method is developed for solving the 3D, unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in Cartesian domains containing immersed boundaries of arbitrary geometrical complexity moving with prescribed kinematics. The governing equations are discretized on a hybrid staggered/non-staggered grid layout using second-order accurate finite-difference formulas. The discrete equations are integrated in time via a second-order accurate dual-time-stepping, artificial compressibility iteration scheme. Unstructured, triangular meshes are employed to discretize complex immersed boundaries. The nodes of the surface mesh constitute a set of Lagrangian control points used to track the motion of the flexible body. At every instant in time, the influence of the body on the flow is accounted for by applying boundary conditions at Cartesian grid nodes located in the exterior but in the immediate vicinity of the body by reconstructing the solution along the local normal to the body surface. Grid convergence tests are carried out for the flow induced by an oscillating sphere in a cubic cavity, which show that the method is second-order accurate. The method is validated by applying it to calculate flow in a Cartesian domain containing a rigid sphere rotating at constant angular velocity as well as flow induced by a flapping wing. The ability of the method to simulate flows in domains with arbitrarily complex moving bodies is demonstrated by applying to simulate flow past an undulating fish-like body and flow past an anatomically realistic planktonic copepod performing an escape-like maneuver.

  2. Electrochemical characterization of AISI 316L stainless steel in contact with simulated body fluid under infection conditions.

    PubMed

    López, Danián Alejandro; Durán, Alicia; Ceré, Silvia Marcela

    2008-05-01

    Titanium and cobalt alloys, as well as some stainless steels, are among the most frequently used materials in orthopaedic surgery. In industrialized countries, stainless steel devices are used only for temporary implants due to their lower corrosion resistance in physiologic media when compared to other alloys. However, due to economical reasons, the use of stainless steel alloys for permanent implants is very common in developing countries. The implantation of foreign bodies is sometimes necessary in the modern medical practice. However, the complex interactions between the host and the can implant weaken the local immune system, increasing the risk of infections. Therefore, it is necessary to further study these materials as well as the characteristics of the superficial film formed in physiologic media in infection conditions in order to control their potential toxicity due to the release of metallic ions in the human body. This work presents a study of the superficial composition and the corrosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel and the influence of its main alloying elements when they are exposed to an acidic solution that simulates the change of pH that occurs when an infection develops. Aerated simulated body fluid (SBF) was employed as working solution at 37 degrees C. The pH was adjusted to 7.25 and 4 in order to reproduce normal body and disease state respectively. Corrosion resistance was measured by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and anodic polarization curves. PMID:17999036

  3. Computer simulations of comet- and asteroidlike bodies passing through the Venusian atmosphere: Preliminary results on atmospheric and ground shock effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddy, D.; Hatfield, D.; Hassig, P.; Rosenblatt, M.; Soderblom, L.; Dejong, E.

    1992-01-01

    We have completed computer simulations that model shock effects in the venusian atmosphere caused during the passage of two cometlike bodies 100 m and 1000 m in diameter and an asteroidlike body 10 km in diameter. Our objective is to examine hypervelocity-generated shock effects in the venusian atmosphere for bodies of different types and sizes in order to understand the following: (1) their deceleration and depth of penetration through the atmosphere; and (2) the onset of possible ground-surface shock effects such as splotches, craters, and ejecta formations. The three bodies were chosen to include both a range of general conditions applicable to Venus as well as three specific cases of current interest. These calculations use a new multiphase computer code (DICE-MAZ) designed by California Research & Technology for shock-dynamics simulations in complex environments. The code was tested and calibrated in large-scale explosion, cratering, and ejecta research. It treats a wide range of different multiphase conditions, including material types (vapor, melt, solid), particle-size distributions, and shock-induced dynamic changes in velocities, pressures, temperatures (internal energies), densities, and other related parameters, all of which were recorded in our calculations.

  4. Constructing Human Skin Equivalents on Porcine Acellular Peritoneum Extracellular Matrix for In Vitro Irritation Testing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Chin; Zhang, Zheng; Florek, Charles; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena B

    2016-01-01

    The irritancy of topical products has to be investigated to ensure the safety and compliance. Although several reconstructed human epidermal models have been adopted by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to replace in vivo animal irritation testing, these models are based on a single cell type and lack dermal components, which may be insufficient to reflect all of the components of irritation. In our study, we investigated the use of acellular porcine peritoneum extracellular matrix as a substrate to construct full-thickness human skin equivalents (HSEs) for use as irritation screening tool. The acellular peritoneum matrix (APM) exhibited excellent skin cell attachment (>80%) and proliferation for human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). APM-HSEs based on coculture of HDF and HaCaT were prepared. Increased HDF seeding density up to 5 × 10(4)/cm(2) resulted in APM-HSEs with a thicker and more organized epidermis. The epidermis of APM-HSEs expressed keratin 15, a keratinocyte proliferation marker, and involucrin, a differentiation marker, respectively. To assess the use of APM-HSEs for irritation testing, six proficiency chemicals, including three nonirritants (phosphate-buffered saline, polyethylene glycol 400, and isopropanol) and three irritants (1-bromohexane, heptanol, and sodium dodecyl sulfate) were applied. The APM-HSEs were able to discriminate nonirritants from irritants based on the viability. Levels of cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1α, IL-1ra, IL-6, IL-8, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]) in these treatment groups further assisted the irritancy ranking. In conclusion, we have developed partially differentiated full-thickness APM-HSEs based on acellular porcine peritoneum matrix, and these APM-HSEs demonstrated utility as an in vitro irritation screening tool. PMID:26415037

  5. The Human Umbilical Vein with Wharton's Jelly as an Allogeneic, Acellular Construct for Vocal Fold Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Maritza L.; McFetridge, Peter S.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of the decellularized human umbilical vein (HUV) as an allogeneic, acellular extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold for engineering the vocal fold lamina propria in vitro. HUV specimens with Wharton's jelly on the abluminal surface were uniformly dissected from native umbilical cords using an automated procedure and subjected to a novel saline-based decellularization treatment for removal of potentially antigenic epitopes. Human vocal fold fibroblasts from primary culture were seeded onto the resulting acellular constructs and cultured for 21 days. The structures of decellularized and fibroblast-repopulated HUV constructs and the attachment, proliferation, and infiltration of fibroblasts were examined with light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Changes in the relative densities of collagen in the constructs associated with decellularization and recellularization were quantified using digital image analysis. In addition, fibroblasts infiltrating the scaffolds were released by cell recovery and quantified by counting. Viscoelastic properties of the scaffolds were measured using a linear, simple-shear rheometer at phonatory frequencies. Results showed that an acellular ECM construct with an intact three-dimensional structure of Wharton's jelly was fabricated. Vocal fold fibroblasts readily attached on the abluminal surface of the construct with high viability, with significant cellular infiltration up to approximately 600 μm deep into the construct. A significant increase in collagen expression was observed with recellularization. The elastic modulus and dynamic viscosity of the fibroblast-repopulated scaffolds were comparable to those of the human vocal fold lamina propria. These findings supported the potential of the construct as a possible surgical allograft for vocal fold restoration and reconstruction. PMID:19456236

  6. Electrochemical Investigations of Polycaprolactone-Coated AZ31 Mg Alloy in Earle's Balance Salt Solution and Conventional Simulated Body Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, Benjamin M.; Zhang, Lei

    2016-06-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL) coating has been shown to increase the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys when exposed to a simulated body fluid. A PCL dip coating was applied to AZ31 Mg alloy. Samples were immersed in both Earle's Balance Salt Solution (EBSS) and conventional simulated body fluids (c-SBF) up to 14 days. Microscopic morphology, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to evaluate the corrosion behavior changes of PCL coatings against immersion times in EBSS and c-SBF as compared to the uncoated AZ31 substrate. PCL-coated samples demonstrated improved corrosion resistance compared to bare AZ31 in both EBSS and c-SBF, indicating that the PCL coating exhibited good corrosion protection of AZ31 in simulated body fluid. Samples immersed in EBSS showed significantly higher electrochemical impedance values and slower corrosion progression as compared to the samples in c-SBF, because of the decreased chloride content and CO2 buffering mechanism of the EBSS.

  7. JSPAM: A restricted three-body code for simulating interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, J. F.; Holincheck, A. J.; Harvey, A.

    2016-07-01

    Restricted three-body codes have a proven ability to recreate much of the disturbed morphology of actual interacting galaxies. As more sophisticated n-body models were developed and computer speed increased, restricted three-body codes fell out of favor. However, their supporting role for performing wide searches of parameter space when fitting orbits to real systems demonstrates a continuing need for their use. Here we present the model and algorithm used in the JSPAM code. A precursor of this code was originally described in 1990, and was called SPAM. We have recently updated the software with an alternate potential and a treatment of dynamical friction to more closely mimic the results from n-body tree codes. The code is released publicly for use under the terms of the Academic Free License ("AFL") v. 3.0 and has been added to the Astrophysics Source Code Library.

  8. Current opinions on indications and algorithms for acellular dermal matrix use in primary prosthetic breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Vu, Michael M; Kim, John Y S

    2015-06-01

    Acellular dermal matrix (ADM) is widely used in primary prosthetic breast reconstruction. Many indications and contraindications to use ADM have been reported in the literature, and their use varies by institution and surgeon. Developing rational, tested algorithms to determine when ADM is appropriate can significantly improve surgical outcomes and reduce costs associated with ADM use. We review the important indications and contraindications, and discuss the algorithms that have been put forth so far. Further research into algorithmic decision-making for ADM use will allow optimized balancing of cost with risk and benefit. PMID:26161304

  9. Mechanisms by which acellular biologic scaffolds promote functional skeletal muscle restoration.

    PubMed

    Badylak, Stephen F; Dziki, Jenna L; Sicari, Brian M; Ambrosio, Fabrisia; Boninger, Michael L

    2016-10-01

    Acellular biologic scaffolds derived from extracellular matrix have been investigated in preclinical and clinical studies as a regenerative medicine approach for volumetric muscle loss treatment. The present manuscript provides a review of previous studies supporting the use of extracellular matrix derived biologic scaffolds for the promotion of functional skeletal muscle tissue formation that is contractile and innervated. The manuscript also identifies key mechanisms that have been associated with ECM-mediated skeletal muscle repair, and provides hypotheses as to why there have been variable outcomes, ranging from successful to unsatisfactory, associated with ECM bioscaffold implantation in the skeletal muscle injury microenvironment. PMID:27376561

  10. Segmental composition of whole-body impedance cardiogram estimated by computer simulations and clinical experiments.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, P K; Kööbi, T; Hyttinen, J; Malmivuo, J

    2000-03-01

    Whole-body impedance cardiography (ICGWB) has been proposed as a feasible means of measuring cardiac output (CO). However, the source distribution of heart-related impedance variations in the whole body is not known. To establish how much of a signal originates in each segment of the body and what the contribution of each is to stroke volume (SV) in ICGWB, impedance in the extremities and trunk were investigated in 15 healthy volunteers. In addition, the theoretical measurement properties of ICGWB were studied using a computer model of the whole-body anatomy as a volume conductor. The model confirmed the expected result that most of the basal impedance originates from the extremities. Clinical experiments revealed that the heart-related amplitude variations in the ICGWB signal originate more evenly from various body segments, the trunk slightly more than the arms or legs. The heart-related ICGWB signal represents a weighted sum of segmental pulsatile events in the body yielding physiologically meaningful data on almost the whole circulatory system. PMID:10735977

  11. Control of propulsion and body lift during the first two stances of sprint running: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Debaere, Sofie; Delecluse, Christophe; Aerenhouts, Dirk; Hagman, Friso; Jonkers, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to relate the contribution of lower limb joint moments and individual muscle forces to the body centre of mass (COM) vertical and horizontal acceleration during the initial two steps of sprint running. Start performance of seven well-trained sprinters was recorded using an optoelectronic motion analysis system and two force plates. Participant-specific torque-driven and muscle-driven simulations were conducted in OpenSim to quantify, respectively, the contributions of the individual joints and muscles to body propulsion and lift. The ankle is the major contributor to both actions during the first two stances, with an even larger contribution in the second compared to the first stance. Biarticular gastrocnemius is the main muscle contributor to propulsion in the second stance. The contribution of the hip and knee depends highly on the position of the athlete: During the first stance, where the athlete runs in a forward bending position, the knee contributes primarily to body lift and the hip contributes to propulsion and body lift. In conclusion, a small increase in ankle power generation seems to affect the body COM acceleration, whereas increases in hip and knee power generation tend to affect acceleration less. PMID:25798644

  12. Clinical application of cultured epithelial autografts on acellular dermal matrices in the treatment of extended burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Fang, Taolin; Lineaweaver, William C; Sailes, Frederick C; Kisner, Carson; Zhang, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Achieving permanent replacement of skin in extensive full-thickness and deep partial-thickness burn injuries and chronic wounds remains one of the fundamental surgical problems. Presently, split-thickness skin grafts are still considered the best material for surgical repair of an excised burn wound. However, in burns that affect greater than 50% of total body surface area, the patient has insufficient areas of unaffected skin from which split-thickness skin grafts can be harvested. The use of cultured epithelial (or epidermal) autografts (CEAs) has achieved satisfactory results. But the take rate of CEAs is poor in full-thickness bed or in chronically infected area. Providing temporary cover with allograft skin, or a more permanent allodermis, may increase clinical take. This review aims to (1) describe the use of CEAs in the regeneration of the epidermis, (2) introduce the application of the acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) in the clinics, and (3) enhance understanding of the CEAs applied with ADM as an appropriate strategy to treat the extended burn injuries. The current evidence regarding the cultured epithelial cell or keratinocyte autograft and dermal grafts applied in the treatment of burn injuries was investigated with an extensive electronic and manual search (MEDLINE and EMBASE). The included literature (N=136 publications) was critically evaluated focusing on the efficacy and safety of this technique in improving the healing of the deep dermal and full-thickness burn injuries. This review concluded that the use of ADM with CEAs is becoming increasingly routine, particularly as a life-saving tool after acute thermal trauma. PMID:24322642

  13. Flow in complex domains simulated by Dissipative Particle Dynamics driven by geometry-specific body-forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Deng, Mingge; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how the quality of simulations by Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) of flows in complex geometries is greatly enhanced when driven by body forces suitably tailored to the geometry. In practice, the body force fields are most conveniently chosen to be the pressure gradient of the corresponding Navier-Stokes (N-S) flow. In the first of three examples, the driving-force required to yield a stagnation-point flow is derived from the pressure field of the potential flow for a lattice of counter-rotating line vortices. Such a lattice contains periodic squares bounded by streamlines with four vortices within them. Hence, the DPD simulation can be performed with periodic boundary conditions to demonstrate the value of a non-uniform driving-force without the need to model real boundaries. The second example is an irregular geometry consisting of a 2D rectangular cavity on one side of an otherwise uniform channel. The Navier-Stokes pressure field for the same geometry is obtained numerically, and its interpolated gradient is then employed as the driving-force for the DPD simulation. Finally, we present a third example, where the proposed method is applied to a complex 3D geometry of an asymmetric constriction. It is shown that in each case the DPD simulations closely reproduce the Navier-Stokes solutions. Convergence rates are found to be much superior to alternative methods; in addition, the range of convergence with respect to Reynolds number and Mach number is greatly extended.

  14. Linking long-term planetary N-body simulations with periodic orbits: application to white dwarf pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadou, Kyriaki I.; Veras, Dimitri

    2016-09-01

    Mounting discoveries of debris discs orbiting newly-formed stars and white dwarfs (WDs) showcase the importance of modeling the long-term evolution of small bodies in exosystems. WD debris discs are in particular thought to form from very long-term (0.1-5.0 Gyr) instability between planets and asteroids. However, the time-consuming nature of N-body integrators which accurately simulate motion over Gyrs necessitates a judicious choice of initial conditions. The analytical tools known as periodic orbits can circumvent the guesswork. Here, we begin a comprehensive analysis directly linking periodic orbits with N-body integration outcomes with an extensive exploration of the planar circular restricted three-body problem (CRTBP) with an outer planet and inner asteroid near or inside of the 2:1 mean motion resonance. We run nearly 1000 focused simulations for the entire age of the Universe (14 Gyr) with initial conditions mapped to the phase space locations surrounding the unstable and stable periodic orbits for that commensurability. In none of our simulations did the planar CRTBP architecture yield a long-timescale (≳ 0.25% of the age of the Universe) asteroid-star collision. The pericentre distance of asteroids which survived beyond this timescale (≈35 Myr) varied by at most about 60%. These results help affirm that collisions occur too quickly to explain WD pollution in the planar CRTBP 2:1 regime, and highlight the need for further periodic orbit studies with the eccentric and inclined TBP architectures and other significant orbital period commensurabilities.

  15. Distribution function approach to redshift space distortions. Part II: N-body simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, Teppei; Seljak, Uroš; McDonald, Patrick; Desjacques, Vincent E-mail: useljak@berkeley.edu E-mail: dvince@physik.uzh.ch

    2012-02-01

    Measurement of redshift-space distortions (RSD) offers an attractive method to directly probe the cosmic growth history of density perturbations. A distribution function approach where RSD can be written as a sum over density weighted velocity moment correlators has recently been developed. In this paper we use results of N-body simulations to investigate the individual contributions and convergence of this expansion for dark matter. If the series is expanded as a function of powers of μ, cosine of the angle between the Fourier mode and line of sight, then there are a finite number of terms contributing at each order. We present these terms and investigate their contribution to the total as a function of wavevector k. For μ{sup 2} the correlation between density and momentum dominates on large scales. Higher order corrections, which act as a Finger-of-God (FoG) term, contribute 1% at k ∼ 0.015hMpc{sup −1}, 10% at k ∼ 0.05hMpc{sup −1} at z = 0, while for k > 0.15hMpc{sup −1} they dominate and make the total negative. These higher order terms are dominated by density-energy density correlations which contributes negatively to the power, while the contribution from vorticity part of momentum density auto-correlation adds to the total power, but is an order of magnitude lower. For μ{sup 4} term the dominant term on large scales is the scalar part of momentum density auto-correlation, while higher order terms dominate for k > 0.15hMpc{sup −1}. For μ{sup 6} and μ{sup 8} we find it has very little power for k < 0.15hMpc{sup −1}, shooting up by 2–3 orders of magnitude between k < 0.15hMpc{sup −1} and k < 0.4hMpc{sup −1}. We also compare the expansion to the full 2-d P{sup ss}(k,μ), as well as to the monopole, quadrupole, and hexadecapole integrals of P{sup ss}(k,μ). For these statistics an infinite number of terms contribute and we find that the expansion achieves percent level accuracy for kμ < 0.15hMpc{sup −1} at 6-th order, but breaks down

  16. A Digital Simulation Program for Health Science Students to Follow Drug Levels in the Body

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavchansky, Salomon; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The Rayetheon Scientific Simulation Language (RSSL) program, an easily-used simulation on the CDC/6600 computer at the University of Texas at Austin, offers a simple method of solving differential equations on a digital computer. It is used by undergraduate biopharmaceutics-pharmacokinetics students and graduate students in all areas. (Author/LBH)

  17. A heterogeneous system based on GPU and multi-core CPU for real-time fluid and rigid body simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Junior, José Ricardo; Gonzalez Clua, Esteban W.; Montenegro, Anselmo; Lage, Marcos; Dreux, Marcelo de Andrade; Joselli, Mark; Pagliosa, Paulo A.; Kuryla, Christine Lucille

    2012-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamics in simulation has become an important field not only for physics and engineering areas but also for simulation, computer graphics, virtual reality and even video game development. Many efficient models have been developed over the years, but when many contact interactions must be processed, most models present difficulties or cannot achieve real-time results when executed. The advent of parallel computing has enabled the development of many strategies for accelerating the simulations. Our work proposes a new system which uses some successful algorithms already proposed, as well as a data structure organisation based on a heterogeneous architecture using CPUs and GPUs, in order to process the simulation of the interaction of fluids and rigid bodies. This successfully results in a two-way interaction between them and their surrounding objects. As far as we know, this is the first work that presents a computational collaborative environment which makes use of two different paradigms of hardware architecture for this specific kind of problem. Since our method achieves real-time results, it is suitable for virtual reality, simulation and video game fluid simulation problems.

  18. Investigation on aerodynamic characteristics of baseline-II E-2 blended wing-body aircraft with canard via computational simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Rizal E. M.; Ali, Zurriati; Kuntjoro, Wahyu; Wisnoe, Wirachman

    2012-06-01

    Previous wind tunnel test has proven the improved aerodynamic charasteristics of Baseline-II E-2 Blended Wing-Body (BWB) aircraft studied in Universiti Teknologi Mara. The E-2 is a version of Baseline-II BWB with modified outer wing and larger canard, solely-designed to gain favourable longitudinal static stability during flight. This paper highlights some results from current investigation on the said aircraft via computational fluid dynamics simulation as a mean to validate the wind tunnel test results. The simulation is conducted based on standard one-equation turbulence, Spalart-Allmaras model with polyhedral mesh. The ambience of the flight simulation is made based on similar ambience of wind tunnel test. The simulation shows lift, drag and moment results to be near the values found in wind tunnel test but only within angles of attack where the lift change is linear. Beyond the linear region, clear differences between computational simulation and wind tunnel test results are observed. It is recommended that different type of mathematical model be used to simulate flight conditions beyond linear lift region.

  19. Numerical simulation of steady supersonic flow over spinning bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturek, W. B.; Schiff, L. B.

    1982-01-01

    A recently reported parabolized Navier-Stokes code has been employed to compute the supersonic flowfield about a spinning cone and spinning and nonspinning ogive cylinder and boattailed bodies of revolution at moderate incidence. The computations were performed for flow conditions where extensive measurements for wall pressure, boundary-layer velocity profiles, and Magnus force had been obtained. Comparisons between the computational results and experiment indicate excellent agreement for angles of attack up to 6 deg. At angles greater than 6 deg discrepancies are noted which are tentatively attributed to turbulence modeling errors. The comparisons for Magnus effects show that the code accurately predicts the effects of body shape for the selected models.

  20. The use of acellular dermal matrix as a scaffold for periosteum replacement.

    PubMed

    Beniker, Dan; McQuillan, David; Livesey, Stephen; Urban, Robert M; Turner, Thomas M; Blum, Barbara; Hughes, Kim; Haggard, Warren O

    2003-05-01

    Three preclinical models were used to evaluate GraftJacket Acellular Periosteum Replacement Scaffold (Wright Medical Technology, Inc, Arlington, Tenn). The studies assessed the ability of the acellular dermal matrix to repopulate with cells, revascularize, provide a protected environment for bone defect restoration, and minimize fibrous tissue infiltration. An athymic nude rat muscle implantation study demonstrated a steady increase in cellular repopulation through days 2-21. The formation of blood vessels occurred between days 7-14 in this study. Results from a porcine femoral drill hole study indicated that the scaffold material was intact and adherent to surrounding bone and allowed cellular repopulation and vascular infiltration at a 5-week time period. A preliminary porcine segmental bone defect model at a 6-week time period demonstrated the ability of the scaffold material to protect the bone defect site as revealed by new bone formation within the margins of the defect and adjacent to the scaffold. The segmental model also indicated minimal to no soft tissue invasion into the defect site. The combined studies provided preliminary evidence that the dermal membrane material may be used as a scaffold for periosteum regeneration by allowing for cellular repopulation, revascularization, and bone defect restoration. PMID:12755232

  1. A preliminary study on the effects of acellular tissue graft augmentation in acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel K

    2008-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture injuries present surgical challenges because of the mechanical forces placed on this tendon. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an acellular human dermal tissue matrix, GraftJacket Matrix (Wright Medical Technology, Inc., Arlington, TN), as an augmentation material in acute Achilles tendon repair. Eleven consecutive patients with acute tendon ruptures were evaluated and followed up (20-31 months). Primary repair was followed by augmentation with the graft sutured circumferentially around the tendon. Patients were placed in an early functional rehabilitation program with postoperative evaluation at 3, 6, and 12 months. Outcome scores were calculated based on the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scoring system. At 20-month postoperative follow-up, there have been no cases of rerupture or recurrent pain. The average return-to-activity time was 11.8 +/- 0.75 weeks. These retrospective clinical results suggest that with an acellular human dermal tissue matrix to augment acute Achilles tendon, primary repair offers a desirable return-to-activity time without any rerupture or complications. ACFAS Level of Clinical Evidence: 2c. PMID:18156058

  2. Achilles tendon repair with acellular tissue graft augmentation in neglected ruptures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel K

    2007-01-01

    Neglected Achilles tendon rupture injuries present surgical challenges because of the quality and quantity of tendon tissue during repair combined with the magnitude of mechanical forces placed on this tendon. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of an acellular human dermal tissue matrix, GRAFTJACKET, as an augmentation material in neglected Achilles tendon repair. Nine patients with neglected Achilles tendon ruptures were evaluated and followed up for a minimum of 20 months. Primary repair was followed by augmentation with the graft and suturing circumferentially around the tendon. Patients were placed in an early, functional rehabilitation program with postoperative evaluation at 3, 6, and 12 months. Outcome scores were calculated based on the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scoring system. At 20 to 30 months postoperative follow-up range, there has been no incidence of re-rupture or recurrent pain. The average return-to-activity time was 15.2 +/- 1.7 weeks. The results from this retrospective clinical series suggest that using an acellular human dermal tissue matrix to augment neglected Achilles tendon rupture primary repair offers desirable return-to-activity time points and viable surgical alternative over previously reported surgical options. PMID:17980842

  3. Aseptic versus Sterile Acellular Dermal Matrices in Breast Reconstruction: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Mendenhall, Shaun D.; Neumeister, Michael W.; Cederna, Paul S.; Momoh, Adeyiza O.

    2016-01-01

    Background: As the use of acellular dermal matrices in breast reconstruction has become more commonplace and efforts are made to improve on postoperative outcomes, the method of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) processing (aseptic versus sterile) has become a subject of interest. This article provides an updated overview of the critical aspects of ADM processing in addition to application of ADMs in single- and two-stage breast reconstruction, a review of the morbidity associated with ADM use, and alternatives. Methods: A literature review was performed in PubMed identifying recent systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and head-to-head comparisons on aseptically processed ADM and sterile-processed ADM in implant-based breast reconstruction. Results: Recent meta-analyses have shown a 2- to 3-fold increase in infections and tissue expander/implant explantation rates and a 3- to 4-fold increase in seroma formation compared with non-ADM reconstruction techniques. Comparisons of aseptic and sterile ADMs in multiple studies have shown no significant difference in infection rates and equivocal findings for other specific complications such as seroma formation. Conclusions: Current evidence on the impact of processing techniques that improve ADM sterility on postoperative morbidity in implant breast reconstruction is unclear. Deficiencies of the available data highlight the need for well-designed, multicenter, randomized controlled studies that will aid in optimizing outcomes in implant-based breast reconstruction. PMID:27536502

  4. Screening for Oxidative Stress Elicited by Engineered Nanomaterials: Evaluation of Acellular DCFH Assay

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Anoop K.; Bello, Dhimiter; Budhlall, Bridgette; Rogers, Eugene; Milton, Donald K.

    2012-01-01

    The DCFH assay is commonly used for measuring free radicals generated by engineered nanomaterials (ENM), a well-established mechanism of ENM toxicity. Concerns exist over susceptibility of the DCFH assay to: assay conditions, adsorption of DCFH onto ENM, fluorescence quenching and light scattering. These effects vary in magnitude depending on ENM physiochemical properties and concentration. A rigorous evaluation of this method is still lacking. The objective was to evaluate performance of the DCFH assay for measuring ENM-induced free radicals. A series of diverse and well-characterized ENM were tested in the acellular DCFH assay. We investigated the effect of sonication conditions, dispersion media, ENM concentration, and the use of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on the DCFH results. The acellular DCFH assay suffers from high background signals resulting from dye auto-oxidation and lacks sensitivity and robustness. DCFH oxidation is further enhanced by HRP. The number of positive ENM in the assay and their relative ranking changed as a function of experimental conditions. An inverse dose relationship was observed for several Carbon-based ENM. Overall, these findings indicate the importance of having standardized assays for evaluating ENM toxicity and highlights limitations of the DCFH assay for measuring ENM-induced free radicals. PMID:22942866

  5. Deficiency in acellular cementum and periodontal attachment in bsp null mice.

    PubMed

    Foster, B L; Soenjaya, Y; Nociti, F H; Holm, E; Zerfas, P M; Wimer, H F; Holdsworth, D W; Aubin, J E; Hunter, G K; Goldberg, H A; Somerman, M J

    2013-02-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an extracellular matrix protein found in mineralized tissues of the skeleton and dentition. BSP is multifunctional, affecting cell attachment and signaling through an RGD integrin-binding region, and acting as a positive regulator for mineral precipitation by nucleating hydroxyapatite crystals. BSP is present in cementum, the hard tissue covering the tooth root that anchors periodontal ligament (PDL) attachment. To test our hypothesis that BSP plays an important role in cementogenesis, we analyzed tooth development in a Bsp null ((-/-)) mouse model. Developmental analysis by histology, histochemistry, and SEM revealed a significant reduction in acellular cementum formation on Bsp (-/-) mouse molar and incisor roots, and the cementum deposited appeared hypomineralized. Structural defects in cementum-PDL interfaces in Bsp (-/-) mice caused PDL detachment, likely contributing to the high incidence of incisor malocclusion. Loss of BSP caused progressively disorganized PDL and significantly increased epithelial down-growth with aging. Bsp (-/-) mice displayed extensive root and alveolar bone resorption, mediated by increased RANKL and the presence of osteoclasts. Results collected here suggest that BSP plays a non-redundant role in acellular cementum formation, likely involved in initiating mineralization on the root surface. Through its importance to cementum integrity, BSP is essential for periodontal function. PMID:23183644

  6. Sterile acellular dermal collagen as a treatment for rippling deformity of breast.

    PubMed

    Busse, Brittany; Orbay, Hakan; Sahar, David E

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic implants are frequently used for breast augmentation and breast reconstruction following mastectomy. Unfortunately, long-term aesthetic results of prosthetic breast restoration may be hindered by complications such as rippling, capsular contracture, and implant malposition. The advent of use of acellular dermal matrices has greatly improved the outcomes of prosthetic breast reconstruction. We describe a case of rippling deformity of breast that was treated using an acellular dermal matrix product, AlloMax. The patient presented with visible rippling of bilateral prosthetic breast implants as well as significant asymmetry of the breasts after multiple excisional biopsies for right breast ductal carcinoma in situ. A 6 × 10 cm piece of AlloMax was placed on the medial aspect of each breast between the implant and the skin flap. Follow-up was performed at 1 week, 3 months, and 1 year following the procedure. The patient recovered well from the surgery and there were no complications. At her first postoperative follow-up the patient was extremely satisfied with the result. At her 3-month and 1-year follow-up she had no recurrence of her previous deformity and no new deformity. PMID:25610697

  7. Repair of lacerated anterior tibial tendon with acellular tissue graft augmentation.

    PubMed

    DiDomenico, Lawrence A; Blasko, Gregory A; Cane, Laurence; Cross, Davina J

    2012-01-01

    In the present case report, we describe the surgical repair of a complete laceration of the anterior tibial tendon using acellular human dermal tissue matrix. A 17-year-old, elite league hockey player was injured in the locker room when a teammate still clad in ice skates stepped on his bare left foot. After evaluation at a local emergency department, the patient presented to our office the next day for additional evaluation. It was determined that surgery would be performed using acellular tissue graft augmentation, followed by physical therapy. Within 7 weeks of the injury, the athlete returned to his original level of activity. At 3 years of follow-up, he was playing Division 1 hockey at the university level. We believe that augmentation of the tendon repair with the grafting material enhanced the tendon tensile strength and promoted ingrowth through vascular channels. This, combined with the patient's dedication to physical therapy, led to excellent recovery in less time than anticipated. PMID:22762944

  8. Creation and implantation of acellular rat renal ECM-based scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Peloso, Andrea; Ferrario, Jacopo; Maiga, Benedetta; Benzoni, Ilaria; Bianco, Carolina; Citro, Antonio; Currao, Manuela; Malara, Alessandro; Gaspari, Annalisa; Balduini, Alessandra; Abelli, Massimo; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Dionigi, Paolo; Orlando, Giuseppe; Maestri, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Kidney transplantation is the only potentially curative treatment for patient facing end-stage renal disease, and it is now routinely used. Its use is mainly limited by the supply of transplantable donor organs, which far exceeds the demand. Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering offer promising means for overcoming this shortage. In the present study, we developed and validated a protocol for producing acellular rat renal scaffolds. Left kidneys were removed from 26 male Lewis rats (weights: 250–350 g) and decellularized by means of aortic anterograde perfusion with ionic and anionic detergents (Triton X-100 1% and SDS 1%, respectively). 19 scaffolds thus obtained (and contralateral native kidneys as controls) were deeply characterized in order to evaluate the decellularization quality, the preservation of extracellular matrix components and resultant micro-angioarchitecture structure. The other 7 were transplanted into 7 recipient rats that had undergone unilateral nephrectomy. Recipients were sacrificed on post-transplantation day 7 and the scaffolds subjected to histologic studies. The dual-detergent protocol showed, with only 5 h of perfusion per organ, to obtain thoroughly decellularized renal scaffolds consisting almost exclusively of extracellular matrix. Finally the macro- and the microarchitecture of the renal parenchyma were well preserved, and the grafts were implanted with ease. Seven days after transplant, the scaffolds were morphologically intact although all vascular structures were obstructed with thrombi. Production and implantation of acellular rat renal scaffolds is a suitable platform for further studies on regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. PMID:26186418

  9. Alternatives to HIST for acellular pertussis vaccines: progress and challenges in replacement

    PubMed Central

    Arciniega, J.; Wagner, L.; Prymula, R.; Sebo, P.; Isbrucker, R.; Descampe, B.; Chapsal, J.M.; Costanzo, A.; Hendriksen, C.; Hoonaker, M.; Nelson, S.; Lidster, K.; Casey, W.; Allen, D.

    2016-01-01

    The ‘International Workshop on Alternatives to the Murine Histamine Sensitization Test for Acellular Pertussis Vaccines: Progress and Challenges in the Replacement of HIST’ was held on 24 August 2014, in Prague, Czech Republic, as a satellite meeting to the 9 th World Congress on Alternatives and Animal Use in the Life Sciences. Participants discussed the progress and challenges associated with the development, validation, and implementation of in vitro assays as replacements for the histamine sensitisation test (HIST) for acellular pertussis vaccines. Discussions focused on the consistency approach, the necessary framework for regulatory acceptance of a harmonised method, and recent international efforts towards the development of in vitro assays to replace the HIST. Workshop participants agreed that acceptable alternatives to the HIST should be based on ADP ribosylation-mediated cell intoxication and therefore that the CHO cell clustering assay, which measures cell intoxication, should be further pursued and developed as a possible replacement for the HIST. Participants also agreed to continue ongoing multinational discussions involving national and international standardisation authorities to reach consensus and to organise collaborative studies in this context for assay characterisation and calibration of reference materials. PMID:27506225

  10. Multiplex immunoassay for in vitro characterization of acellular pertussis antigens in combination vaccines.

    PubMed

    Agnolon, Valentina; Bruno, Cristina; Galletti, Bruno; Mori, Elena; Ugozzoli, Mildred; Pergola, Carlo; O'Hagan, Derek T; Baudner, Barbara C

    2016-02-17

    Vaccines characterization is required to ensure physical, chemical, and biological integrity of antigens and adjuvants. Current analytical methods mostly require complete antigen desorption from aluminum-based adjuvants and are not always suitable to distinguish individual antigens in multivalent formulations. Here, Luminex technology is proposed to improve the analytics of vaccine characterization. As proof of concept, TdaP (tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis) combination, adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide, was chosen as model formulation to quantify and determine the level of adsorption of acellular pertussis (aP) antigens onto adjuvant surface at the same time. The assay used specific antibodies bound to magnetic microspheres presenting unique digital signatures for each pertussis antigen, allowing the simultaneous recognition of respective antigens in the whole vaccine, avoiding laborious procedures for adjuvant separation. Accurate and reproducible quantification of aP antigens in TdaP vaccine has been achieved in the range 0.78-50 ng/mL, providing simultaneously information on antigen identity, quantity, and degree of adsorption to aluminum hydroxide. The current study could further be considered as a model to set up in vitro potency assays thus supporting the replacement of animal tests accordingly to the 3Rs concept. PMID:26784684

  11. Combining N-body accretion simulations with partitioning experiments in a statistical model of terrestrial planet accretion and core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R. A.; Ciesla, F.; Campbell, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The terrestrial planets accreted in a series of increasingly large and violent collisions. Simultaneously, metallic cores segregated from their silicate mantles, acquiring their modern compositions through high pressure (P), high temperature (T) partitioning reactions. Here we present a model that couples these aspects of early planetary evolution, building on recent accretion simulations and experimental results. We have run 100 N-body simulations of terrestrial planet accretion, with Jupiter and Saturn on either circular (CJS) or eccentric (EJS) orbits, to gain insight into the statistics of this highly stochastic process (Fischer and Ciesla, 2014). An Earth (Mars) analogue forms in 84-92% (2-10%) of our simulations. We draw on our recent high P-T metal-silicate partitioning experiments of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Si, and O in a diamond anvil cell to 100 GPa and 5500 K. In our model, N-body simulations describe the delivery, masses, and original locations of planetary building blocks. As planets accrete, their core and mantle compositions are modified by high P-T reactions with each collision (Rubie et al., 2011). By utilizing a large number of N-body simulations, we obtain a statistical view and observe a wide range of outcomes. We use this model to predict the core compositions of Earth-like planets. For partial equilibration of the mantle at 50% of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressure, we find that their cores contain 6.9 ± 1.8 wt% Si and 4.8 ± 2.3 wt% O (Figure), with this uncertainty due entirely to variations in accretion history in our 100 simulations. This composition is consistent with the seismologically-inferred density of Earth's core, based on comparisons to high P-T equations of state (Fischer et al., 2011, 2014). Earth analogues experience 0.7 ± 0.1 or 0.9 ± 0.2 log units of oxidation during accretion in EJS or CJS simulations respectively, which is due to both the effects of high P-T partitioning and the temporal evolution of the Earth analogue

  12. Exploiting quantum parallelism to simulate quantum random many-body systems.

    PubMed

    Paredes, B; Verstraete, F; Cirac, J I

    2005-09-30

    We present an algorithm that exploits quantum parallelism to simulate randomness in a quantum system. In our scheme, all possible realizations of the random parameters are encoded quantum mechanically in a superposition state of an auxiliary system. We show how our algorithm allows for the efficient simulation of dynamics of quantum random spin chains with known numerical methods. We propose an experimental realization based on atoms in optical lattices in which disorder could be simulated in parallel and in a controlled way through the interaction with another atomic species. PMID:16241634

  13. Space Station Common Berthing Mechanism, a multi-body simulation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, Ian

    1993-02-01

    This paper discusses an application of multi-body dynamic analysis conducted at the Boeing Company in connection with the Space Station (SS) Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM). After introducing the hardware and analytical objectives we will focus on some of the day-to-day computational issues associated with this type of analysis.

  14. Assessing the Potential Value for an Automated Body Condition Scoring System through Stochastic Simulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Automated body condition scoring (BCS) through extraction of information from digital images has been demonstrated to be feasible; and commercial technologies are being developed. The primary objective of this research was to identify the factors that influence the potential profitability of investi...

  15. Assessing the potential value of automated body condition scoring through stochastic simulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Automated body condition scoring (BCS) using digital images has been shown to be feasible. The primary objective of this research was to identify factors that influence the profitability of investment in an automated BCS system. An expert opinion survey was conducted to provide estimates for potenti...

  16. Space Station Common Berthing Mechanism, a multi-body simulation application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Searle, Ian

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses an application of multi-body dynamic analysis conducted at the Boeing Company in connection with the Space Station (SS) Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM). After introducing the hardware and analytical objectives we will focus on some of the day-to-day computational issues associated with this type of analysis.

  17. Numerical simulation of upstream disturbance on flows around a slender body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, David; Tobak, Murray

    1993-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the thin-layer approximation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations have been obtained for flows around an ogive-cylinder body with and without a small fixed disturbance placed upstream of the body tip. Locating the disturbance at positions in the flow field upstream of the tip provokes the same range of behavior of the asymmetric flow that was numerically produced earlier by use of a geometrical disturbance on the body tip. Results remain consistent with the presence of a convective instability mechanism, and demonstrate the potential for a precise mapping of the body's receptivity to fixed disturbances in the flow field. Numerical solutions were also obtained for the flow-field responses to impulsive upstream disturbances to determine whether there is a growing response to an asymmetric impulsive disturbance that is consistent with presence of a convective instability mechanism. Results for surface pressure are interpreted with the aid of a mathematical model. The model suggests that the observed growth of surface pressure gradient with time and distance along a ray in response to an asymmetnc impulsive disturbance is in accord with the solution of a Ginzberg-Landau equation, with distinguishing features of the solution being consistent with the convective instability mode of behavior.

  18. The full two-body-problem: Simulation, analysis, and application to the dynamics, characteristics, and evolution of binary asteroid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahnestock, Eugene Gregory

    The Full Two-Body-Problem (F2BP) describes the dynamics of two unconstrained rigid bodies in close proximity, having arbitrary spatial distribution of mass, charge, or similar field quantity, and interacting through a mutual potential dependent on that distribution. While the F2BP has applications in areas as wide ranging as molecular dynamics to satellite formation flying, this dissertation focuses on its application to natural bodies in space with nontrivial mass distribution interacting through mutual gravitational potential, i.e. binary asteroids. This dissertation first describes further development and implementation of methods for accurate and efficient F2BP propagation based upon a flexible method for computing the mutual potential between bodies modeled as homogenous polyhedra. Next application of these numerical tools to the study of binary asteroid (66391) 1999 KW4 is summarized. This system typifies the largest class of NEO binaries, which includes nearly half of them, characterized by a roughly oblate spheroid primary rotating rapidly and roughly triaxial ellipsoid secondary in on-average synchronous rotation. Thus KW4's dynamics generalize to any member of that class. Analytical formulae are developed which separately describe the effects of primary oblateness and secondary triaxial ellipsoid shape on frequencies of system motions revealed through the F2BP simulation. These formulae are useful for estimating inertia elements and highest-level internal mass distributions of bodies in any similar system, simply from standoff observation of these motion frequencies. Finally precise dynamical simulation and analysis of the motion of test particles within the time-varying gravity field of the F2BP system is detailed. This Restricted Full-detail Three-Body-Problem encompasses exploration of three types of particle motion within a binary asteroid: (1) Orbital motion such as that for a spacecraft flying within the system about the primary, secondary, or

  19. Swarm-NG: A CUDA library for Parallel n-body Integrations with focus on simulations of planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dindar, Saleh; Ford, Eric B.; Juric, Mario; Yeo, Young In; Gao, Jianwei; Boley, Aaron C.; Nelson, Benjamin; Peters, Jörg

    2013-10-01

    We present Swarm-NG, a C++ library for the efficient direct integration of many n-body systems using a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), such as NVIDIA's Tesla T10 and M2070 GPUs. While previous studies have demonstrated the benefit of GPUs for n-body simulations with thousands to millions of bodies, Swarm-NG focuses on many few-body systems, e.g., thousands of systems with 3…15 bodies each, as is typical for the study of planetary systems. Swarm-NG parallelizes the simulation, including both the numerical integration of the equations of motion and the evaluation of forces using NVIDIA's "Compute Unified Device Architecture" (CUDA) on the GPU. Swarm-NG includes optimized implementations of 4th order time-symmetrized Hermite integration and mixed variable symplectic integration, as well as several sample codes for other algorithms to illustrate how non-CUDA-savvy users may themselves introduce customized integrators into the Swarm-NG framework. To optimize performance, we analyze the effect of GPU-specific parameters on performance under double precision. For an ensemble of 131072 planetary systems, each containing three bodies, the NVIDIA Tesla M2070 GPU outperforms a 6-core Intel Xeon X5675 CPU by a factor of ˜2.75. Thus, we conclude that modern GPUs offer an attractive alternative to a cluster of CPUs for the integration of an ensemble of many few-body systems. Applications of Swarm-NG include studying the late stages of planet formation, testing the stability of planetary systems and evaluating the goodness-of-fit between many planetary system models and observations of extrasolar planet host stars (e.g., radial velocity, astrometry, transit timing). While Swarm-NG focuses on the parallel integration of many planetary systems, the underlying integrators could be applied to a wide variety of problems that require repeatedly integrating a set of ordinary differential equations many times using different initial conditions and/or parameter values.

  20. Interposition Porcine Acellular Dermal Matrix Xenograft Successful Alternative in Treatment for Massive Rotator Cuff

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Julie; Zgonis, Miltiadis H.; Reay, Kathleen Dolores; Mayer, Stephanie W.; Boggess, Blake; Toth, Alison P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Despite advances in the surgical techniques of rotator cuff repair (RCR), the management of massive rotator cuff tears in shoulders without glenohumeral arthritis poses a difficult problem for surgeons. Failure of massive rotator cuff repairs range from 20-90% at one to two years postoperatively using arthrography, ultrasound, or magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, there are inconsistent outcomes reported with debridement alone of massive rotator cuff tears as well as limitations seen with other current methods of operative intervention including arthroplasty and tendon transfers. The purpose of this prospective, comparative study was to determine if the repair of massive rotator cuff tears using an interposition porcine acellular dermal matrix xenograft improves subjective function, pain, range of motion, and strength at greater than two years follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the largest prospective series reporting outcomes of using porcine acellular dermal matrix xenograft as an interposition graft. Methods: Thirty-seven patients (37 shoulders) with an average age of 66 years (range 51-80 years) were prospectively followed for 33 months (range 23-48) following massive RCR using porcine acellular dermal matrix interposition xenograft. Subjective outcomes were measured using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain score (0-10, 0 = no pain), Modified American Shoulder and Elbow Score (M-ASES), and Short-Form12 (SF-12) scores. Preoperative and postoperative objective outcome measures included active range of motion and supraspinatus and infraspinatus manual muscle strength. Postoperative outcome measures included quantitative muscle strength using a dynamometer and static and dynamic ultrasonography to assess the integrity of the repair. Results: Average VAS pain score decreased from 4.5 to 1.1 (P<0.001). Average postoperative M-ASES was 89.23. Average postoperative SF-12 was 52.6. Mean forward flexion, external and internal rotation significantly

  1. Nature’s Starships. II. Simulating the Synthesis of Amino Acids in Meteorite Parent Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Alyssa K.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Pearce, Ben K. D.

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are known for having high water and organic material contents, including amino acids. Here we address the origin of amino acids in the warm interiors of their parent bodies (planetesimals) within a few million years of their formation, and we connect this with the astrochemistry of their natal protostellar disks. We compute both the total amino acid abundance pattern and the relative frequencies of amino acids within the CM2 (e.g., Murchison) and CR2 chondrite subclasses based on Strecker reactions within these bodies. We match the relative frequencies to well within an order of magnitude among both CM2 and CR2 meteorites for parent body temperatures <200°C. These temperatures agree with 3D models of young planetesimal interiors. We find theoretical abundances of approximately 7 × 105 parts per billion, which is in agreement with the average observed abundance in CR2 meteorites of (4 ± 7) × 105, but an order of magnitude higher than the average observed abundance in CM2 meteorites of (2 ± 2) × 104. We find that the production of hydroxy acids could be favored over the production of amino acids within certain meteorite parent bodies (e.g., CI1, CM2) but not others (e.g., CR2). This could be due to the relatively lower NH3 abundances within CI1 and CM2 meteorite parent bodies, which leads to less amino acid synthesis. We also find that the water content in planetesimals is likely to be the main cause of variance between carbonaceous chondrites of the same subclass. We propose that amino acid abundances are primarily dependent on the ammonia and water content of planetesimals that are formed in chemically distinct regions within their natal protostellar disks.

  2. DSMC Simulations of Blunt Body Flows for Mars Entries: Mars Pathfinder and Mars Microprobe Capsules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; Price, Joseph M.

    1997-01-01

    The hypersonic transitional flow aerodynamics of the Mars Pathfinder and Mars Microprobe capsules are simulated with the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Calculations of axial, normal, and static pitching coefficients were obtained over an angle of attack range comparable to actual flight requirements. Comparisons are made with modified Newtonian and free-molecular-flow calculations. Aerothermal results were also obtained for zero incidence entry conditions.

  3. Simulating Non-Specific Influences of Body Posture and Temperature on Thigh-Bioimpedance Spectroscopy during Continuous Monitoring Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, A. H.; Leonhardt, S.

    2013-04-01

    Application of bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) for continuous monitoring of body fluid volumes is gaining considerable importance in personal health care. Unless laboratory conditions are applied, both whole-body or segmental BIS configurations are subject to nonspecific influences (e.g. temperature and change in body position) reducing the method's accuracy and reproducibility. In this work, a two-compartment mathematical model, which describes the thigh segment, has been adapted to simulate fluid and solute kinetics during change in body position or variation in skin temperature. The model is an improved version of our previous one offering a good tradeoff between accuracy and simplicity. It represents the kinetics of fluid redistribution, sodium-, potassium-, and protein-concentrations based on simple equations to predict the time course of BIS variations. Validity of the model was verified in five subjects (following a sequence of 7 min supine, 20 min standing, and 40 min supine). The output of the model may reduce possible influences on BIS by up to 80%.

  4. Physics-based Simulation of Human Posture Using 3D Whole Body Scanning Technology for Astronaut Space Suit Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kyu-Jung

    2005-01-01

    Over the past few years high precision three-dimensional (3D) full body laser scanners have been developed to be used as a powerful anthropometry tool for quantification of the morphology of the human body. The full body scanner can quickly extract body characteristics in non-contact fashion. It is required for the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) to have capabilities for kinematics simulation of a digital human at various postures whereas the laser scanner only allows capturing a single static posture at each time. During this summer fellowship period a theoretical study has been conducted to estimate an arbitrary posture with a series of example postures through finite element (FE) approximation and found that four-point isoparametric FE approximation would result in reasonable maximum position errors less than 5%. Subsequent pilot scan experiments demonstrated that a bead marker with a nominal size of 6 mm could be used as a marker for digitizing 3-D coordinates of anatomical landmarks for further kinematic analysis. Two sessions of human subject testing were conducted for reconstruction of an arbitrary postures from a set of example postures for each joint motion for the forearm/hand complex and the whole upper extremity.

  5. Thermal Gaussian molecular dynamics for quantum dynamics simulations of many-body systems: application to liquid para-hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Ionut; Deckman, Jason; Fredrickson, Laura J; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A

    2011-05-01

    A new method, here called thermal Gaussian molecular dynamics (TGMD), for simulating the dynamics of quantum many-body systems has recently been introduced [I. Georgescu and V. A. Mandelshtam, Phys. Rev. B 82, 094305 (2010)]. As in the centroid molecular dynamics (CMD), in TGMD the N-body quantum system is mapped to an N-body classical system. The associated both effective Hamiltonian and effective force are computed within the variational Gaussian wave-packet approximation. The TGMD is exact for the high-temperature limit, accurate for short times, and preserves the quantum canonical distribution. For a harmonic potential and any form of operator Â, it provides exact time correlation functions C(AB)(t) at least for the case of B, a linear combination of the position, x, and momentum, p, operators. While conceptually similar to CMD and other quantum molecular dynamics approaches, the great advantage of TGMD is its computational efficiency. We introduce the many-body implementation and demonstrate it on the benchmark problem of calculating the velocity time auto-correlation function for liquid para-hydrogen, using a system of up to N = 2592 particles. PMID:21548675

  6. A novel method of studying total body water content using a resonant cavity: experiments and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Martin P.; Clegg, Janet; Stone, Darren A.

    2003-01-01

    A novel electromagnetic method of obtaining total body water is proposed, in which the water content is obtained from the dielectric properties as measured by a resonant perturbation technique. A screened room acts as a radio-frequency cavity, in our case resonating at 59 MHz, a frequency at which both real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity of tissues are correlated to their moisture content. The presence of a human subject in the room leads to both a negative shift in the room's resonant frequency and a reduction in its Q-factor. We simulated the room and the body using the transmission line matrix (TLM) method, a computational electromagnetic code which models the problem in the time domain. Experiment and numerical model showed good agreement for two orientations of the subject. The sensitivity of the technique was investigated by measuring the response before and after the subject drank a small quantity of water, less than 2% of body mass. The resulting change in the resonant frequency was significant, and was also predicted by the numerical model. The proposed technique for studying body composition is simple, non-invasive and employs non-ionizing radio waves at low power.

  7. Uncertainty budget for a whole body counter in the scan geometry and computer simulation of the calibration phantoms.

    PubMed

    Schlagbauer, M; Hrnecek, E; Rollet, S; Fischer, H; Brandl, A; Kindl, P

    2007-01-01

    At the Austrian Research Centers Seibersdorf (ARCS), a whole body counter (WBC) in the scan geometry is used to perform routine measurements for the determination of radioactive intake of workers. The calibration of the WBC is made using bottle phantoms with a homogeneous activity distribution. The same calibration procedures have been simulated using Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code and FLUKA and the results of the full energy peak efficiencies for eight energies and five phantoms have been compared with the experimental results. The deviation between experiment and simulation results is within 10%. Furthermore, uncertainty budget evaluations have been performed to find out which parameters make substantial contributions to these differences. Therefore, statistical errors of the Monte Carlo simulation, uncertainties in the cross section tables and differences due to geometrical considerations have been taken into account. Comparisons between these results and the one with inhomogeneous distribution, for which the activity is concentrated only in certain parts of the body (such as head, lung, arms and legs), have been performed. The maximum deviation of 43% from the homogeneous case has been found when the activity is concentrated on the arms. PMID:17656442

  8. A complementary gravitational N-body simulation algorithm for investigation of chaotic advection in astrophysical and cosmological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Reinaldo

    The gravitational N-body simulations have become a powerful tool for testing the theories of structure formation in astrophysical and cosmological systems. In particular, it has been shown that the statistical characterization of dark matter distribution is an important ingredient in the investigation of large-scale structure formation in the Hubble volume simulated from the GADGET-VC algorithm. Recently, an established statistical method was used to demonstrate the importance of considering chaotic advection (or Lagrange Turbulence) [1] in combination with gravitational instabilities in the Λ-CDM simulations performed from the Virgo Consortium (VC) [2]. Working as a complementary tool of the GADGET-VC algorithm, the LAC-INPE and the IC-UFF develop the COsmic LAgrangian TUrbulence Simulator (COLATUS) to perform gravitational N-body simulations allowing the computation of the velocity directional angle of a single particle at every time-step and then the evaluation of its energy power spectrum. To achieve its objective COLATUS compute the gravitational forces by using a direct summation scheme. COLATUS is implemented in a Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) by using the Nvidia graphics processing units (GPUs) to reduce the simulation runtime. We use the simulator for testing a hypothesis of an alternative cosmological scenario where the dark matter is interpreted as spatio-temporal deformations due to an alternative coupled expanding universe [3]. These deformations are included as the action of relativistic potentials. In the present work we show the preliminary simulations including up to 10(6) particles using 1536 cores of NVIDIA GTX680. The respective energy power spectra are shown for several deformation potentials which are discussed into the alternative inhomogeneous cosmological context. [1] Caretta, C.A. et al. Evidence of turbulence-like universality in the formation of galaxy-sized dark matter haloes. Astron. Astrophys 487 (2008) 445-451. [2] Rosa

  9. Numerical simulation of vortical flow over an elliptical-body missile at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsome, R. N.; Adams, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical solutions to the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are given for the flow about an elliptical body missile (3:1 ellipse) at a Mach number of 2.5 and a unit Reynolds number of 6.56 x 10 to the 6th/m. At high angles of attack, the flow is dominated by large-scale free vortices which occur in the lee-side flow field due to crossflow boundary-layer separation. Emphasis is focused on the accurate prediction of the lee-side vortical flow. Solutions are presented for both symmetric and asymmetric (body rolled 45 deg) configurations at 10 deg and 20 deg angle of attack. The computed results are compared with experimental surface pressure coefficients and vapor-screen photographs. Excellent agreement is obtained in all cases.

  10. Simulation of millimeter-wave body images and its application to biometric recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Moreno, Miriam; Fierrez, Julian; Vera-Rodriguez, Ruben; Parron, Josep

    2012-06-01

    One of the emerging applications of the millimeter-wave imaging technology is its use in biometric recognition. This is mainly due to some properties of the millimeter-waves such as their ability to penetrate through clothing and other occlusions, their low obtrusiveness when collecting the image and the fact that they are harmless to health. In this work we first describe the generation of a database comprising 1200 synthetic images at 94 GHz obtained from the body of 50 people. Then we extract a small set of distance-based features from each image and select the best feature subsets for person recognition using the SFFS feature selection algorithm. Finally these features are used in body geometry authentication obtaining promising results.

  11. A new model to predict weak-lensing peak counts. I. Comparison with N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chieh-An; Kilbinger, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Context. Weak-lensing peak counts have been shown to be a powerful tool for cosmology. They provide non-Gaussian information of large scale structures and are complementary to second-order statistics. Aims: We propose a new flexible method for predicting weak-lensing peak counts, which can be adapted to realistic scenarios, such as a real source distribution, intrinsic galaxy alignment, mask effects, and photo-z errors from surveys. The new model is also suitable for applying the tomography technique and nonlinear filters. Methods: A probabilistic approach to modeling peak counts is presented. First, we sample halos from a mass function. Second, we assign them density profiles. Third, we place those halos randomly on the field of view. The creation of these "fast simulations" requires much less computing time than do N-body runs. Then, we perform ray-tracing through these fast simulation boxes and select peaks from weak-lensing maps to predict peak number counts. The computation is achieved by our Camelus algorithm. Results: We compare our results to N-body simulations to validate our model. We find that our approach is in good agreement with full N-body runs. We show that the lensing signal dominates shape noise and Poisson noise for peaks with S/N between 4 and 6. Also, counts from the same S/N range are sensitive to Ωm and σ8. We show how our model can distinguish between various combinations of those two parameters. Conclusions: In this paper, we offer a powerful tool for studying weak-lensing peaks. The potential of our forward model is its high flexibility, which makes the using peak counts under realistic survey conditions feasible. The Camelus source code is released via the website http://www.cosmostat.org/software/camelus/

  12. The evaluation of upper body muscle activity during the performance of external chest compressions in simulated hypogravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krygiel, Rebecca G.; Waye, Abigail B.; Baptista, Rafael Reimann; Heidner, Gustavo Sandri; Rehnberg, Lucas; Russomano, Thais

    2014-04-01

    BACKGROUND: This original study evaluated the electromyograph (EMG) activity of four upper body muscles: triceps brachii, erector spinae, upper rectus abdominis, and pectoralis major, while external chest compressions (ECCs) were performed in simulated Martian hypogravity using a Body Suspension Device, counterweight system, and standard full body cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) mannequin. METHOD: 20 young, healthy male subjects were recruited. One hundred compressions divided into four sets, with roughly six seconds between each set to indicate 'ventilation', were performed within approximately a 1.5 minute protocol. Chest compression rate, depth and number were measured along with the subject's heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). RESULTS: All mean values were used in two-tailed t-tests using SPSS to compare +1 Gz values (control) versus simulated hypogravity values. The AHA (2005) compression standards were maintained in hypogravity. RPE and HR increased by 32% (p < 0.001) and 44% (p = 0.002), respectively, when ECCs were performed during Mars simulation, in comparison to +1 Gz. In hypogravity, the triceps brachii showed significantly less activity (p < 0.001) when compared with the other three muscles studied. The comparison of all the other muscles showed no difference at +1 Gz or in hypogravity. CONCLUSIONS: This study was among the first of its kind, however several limitations were faced which hopefully will not exist in future studies. Evaluation of a great number of muscles will allow space crews to focus on specific strengthening exercises within their current training regimes in case of a serious cardiac event in hypogravity.

  13. Simulations of Heated Bluff-Bodies with the Multi-Speed Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frapolli, Nicolò; Chikatamarla, Shyam S.; Karlin, Ilya

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of heated circular and square cylinders are performed in order to validate a recently introduced entropic thermal lattice Boltzmann model (Frapolli et al. in Phys Rev E 90:043306, 2014), and the new boundary conditions for complex walls and multi-speed lattices. Validation is carried out by comparing simulation results with other reference simulations and experiments. For the hydrodynamic field, the wake structure was analyzed by means of the wake recirculation length for both steady and unsteady two-dimensional regimes, by comparing the Strouhal number of the vortex shedding associated with the first instability of the hydrodynamic field, and qualitatively by showing the streamlines for different Reynolds numbers. For the thermal part of the simulations, isotherms and mean Nusselt number are qualitatively and quantitatively compared with the literature results. All the computed quantities are found to agree excellently with the reference data available in the literature. This opens door for accurate simulations in complex geometries in thermal and compressible flow regimes with multi-speed lattices.

  14. Changes of body fluid and hematology in toad and their rehabilitation following intermittent exposure to simulated high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, H. M.; Boral, M. C.

    1986-06-01

    Three groups of adult male toads were exposed intermittently in a decompression chamber for a daily period of 4 and 8 hours at a time for 6 consecutive days to an “altitude” of 12,000; 18,000 and 24,000 feet (3658; 5486; 7315 m) respectively. Most of the exposed animals were sacrificed immediately after the last exposure, but only a few animals experiencing 8 hours of exposure were sacrificed after a further 16 hours of exposure at normal atmospheric pressure. Eight hours of daily exposure for 6 days causes a decrease of body fluids and an increase of hematological parameters in all the altitude exposed animals compared with to the changes noted in the animals having 4 hours of daily exposure for 6 days at the same altitude levels. The animals that were exposed to pressures equivalent to altitudes of 12,000 and 18,000 feet daily for 8 hours were found to return nearly to their normal body fluids and hematological balance after 16 hours of exposure to normal atmospheric pressure, whereas the animals exposed for a similar period at an equivalent 24,000 feet failed to get back their normal balance of body fluids and hematology after 16 hours of exposure at normal atmospheric pressure. The present experiment shows that the body weight loss and changes of body fluid and hematological parameters in the toad after exposure to simulated high altitude are due not only to dehydration, but suggest that hypoxia may also have a role.

  15. Computer Simulation Study of Human Locomotion with a Three-Dimensional Entire-Body Neuro-Musculo-Skeletal Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Kazunori; Yokoi, Takashi

    In the present study, the computer simulation technique to autonomously generate running motion from walking was developed using a three-dimensional entire-body neuro-musculo-skeletal model. When maximizing locomotive speed was employed as the evaluative criterion, the initial walking pattern could not transition to a valid running motion. When minimizing the period of foot-ground contact was added to this evaluative criterion, the simulation model autonomously produced appropriate three-dimensional running. Changes in the neuronal system showed the fatigue coefficient of the neural oscillators to reduce as locomotion patterns transitioned from walking to running. Then, when the running speed increased, the amplitude of the non-specific stimulus from the higher center increased. These two changes indicate mean that the improvement in responsiveness of the neuronal system is important for the transition process from walking to running, and that the comprehensive activation level of the neuronal system is essential in the process of increasing running speed.

  16. N-BODY SIMULATIONS OF SATELLITE FORMATION AROUND GIANT PLANETS: ORIGIN OF ORBITAL CONFIGURATION OF THE GALILEAN MOONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ogihara, Masahiro; Ida, Shigeru E-mail: ida@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2012-07-01

    As the number of discovered extrasolar planets has been increasing, diversity of planetary systems requires studies of new formation scenarios. It is important to study satellite formation in circumplanetary disks, which is often viewed as analogous to formation of rocky planets in protoplanetary disks. We investigated satellite formation from satellitesimals around giant planets through N-body simulations that include gravitational interactions with a circumplanetary gas disk. Our main aim is to reproduce the observable properties of the Galilean satellites around Jupiter through numerical simulations, as previous N-body simulations have not explained the origin of the resonant configuration. We performed accretion simulations based on the work of Sasaki et al., in which an inner cavity is added to the model of Canup and Ward. We found that several satellites are formed and captured in mutual mean motion resonances outside the disk inner edge and are stable after rapid disk gas dissipation, which explains the characteristics of the Galilean satellites. In addition, owing to the existence of the disk edge, a radial compositional gradient of the Galilean satellites can also be reproduced. An additional objective of this study is to discuss orbital properties of formed satellites for a wide range of conditions by considering large uncertainties in model parameters. Through numerical experiments and semianalytical arguments, we determined that if the inner edge of a disk is introduced, a Galilean-like configuration in which several satellites are captured into a 2:1 resonance outside the disk inner cavity is almost universal. In fact, such a configuration is produced even for a massive disk {approx}> 10{sup 4} g cm{sup -2} and rapid type I migration. This result implies the inevitability of a Galilean satellite formation in addition to providing theoretical predictions for extrasolar satellites. That is, we can predict a substantial number of exomoon systems in the 2

  17. Serial lung model for simulation and parameter estimation in body plethysmography.

    PubMed

    Verbraak, A F; Bogaard, J M; Beneken, J E; Hoorn, E; Versprille, A

    1991-05-01

    A serial lung model with a compressible segment has been implemented to simulate different types of lung and airway disorders such as asthma, emphysema, fibrosis and upper airway obstruction. The model described can be used during normal breathing, and moreover the compliant segment is structured according to more recent physiological data. A parameter estimation technique was applied and its reliability and uniqueness were tested by means of sine wave input signals. The characteristics of the alveolar pressure/flow patterns simulated with the model agree to a great extent with those found in the literature. In the case of absence of noise the parameter estimation routine produced unique solutions for different simulated pathologic classes. The sensitivity of the different parameters depended on the values belonging to each class of pathology. Some more simplified models are presented and their advantages over the complex model in special types of pathology are demonstrated. Noise added to the simulated flow appeared to have no influence on the estimated parameters, in contradiction to the effects with noise added to the pressure signal. In that case effective resistance was accurately estimated. Where parameters had no influence, as for instance upper airway resistance in emphysema or peripheral airway resistance in upper airway obstruction, the measurement accuracy was less. In all other cases, a satisfactory accuracy could be obtained. PMID:1943264

  18. A simulation of a bluff-body stabilized turbulent premixed flame using LES-PDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeonglae; Pope, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    A turbulent premixed flame stabilized by a triangular cylinder as a flame-holder is simulated. The computational condition matches the Volvo experiments (Sjunnesson et al. 1992). Propane is premixed at a fuel lean condition of ϕ = 0 . 65 . For this reactive simulation, LES-PDF formulation is used, similar to Yang et al. (2012). The evolution of Lagrangian particles is simulated by solving stochastic differential equations modeling transport of the composition PDF. Mixing is modeled by the modified IEM model (Viswanathan et al. 2011). Chemical reactions are calculated by ISAT and for the good load balancing, PURAN distribution of ISAT tables is applied (Hiremath et al. 2012). To calculate resolved density, the two-way coupling (Popov & Pope 2013) is applied, solving a transport equation of resolved specific volume to reduce statistical noise. A baseline calculation shows a good agreement with the experimental measurements in turbulence statistics, temperature, and minor species mass fractions. Chemical reaction does not significantly contribute to the overall computational cost, in contrast to non-premixed flame simulations (Hiremath et al. 2013), presumably due to the restricted manifold of the purely premixed flame in the composition space.

  19. Mathematical Simulation of the Extraction of a Blending Agent from Cylindrical Bodies in the Semicontinuous Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudobashta, S. P.; Kosheleva, M. K.; Kartashov, É. M.

    2016-06-01

    A problem of the kinetics of extraction of a blending agent from cylindrical bodies in an apparatus of semicontinuous action (periodic for the solid phase and continuous for the liquid phase) in which the liquid phase is completely mixed was formulated and solved analytically. The kinetics of the indicated process at different specific flow rates of the liquid phase was analyzed with the use of a numerical method. Recommendations on the use of the solution obtained for calculating the kinetics of extraction of technological contaminants from textile materials in the process of their flushing are given

  20. Mathematical Simulation of the Extraction of a Blending Agent from Cylindrical Bodies in the Semicontinuous Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudobashta, S. P.; Kosheleva, M. K.; Kartashov, É. M.

    2016-05-01

    A problem of the kinetics of extraction of a blending agent from cylindrical bodies in an apparatus of semicontinuous action (periodic for the solid phase and continuous for the liquid phase) in which the liquid phase is completely mixed was formulated and solved analytically. The kinetics of the indicated process at different specific flow rates of the liquid phase was analyzed with the use of a numerical method. Recommendations on the use of the solution obtained for calculating the kinetics of extraction of technological contaminants from textile materials in the process of their flushing are given

  1. Parallel, out-of-core methods for N-body simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, J.; Warren, M.S.

    1997-03-01

    Hierarchical treecodes have, to a large extent, converted the compute-bound N-body problem into a memory-bound problem. The large ratio of DRAM to disk pricing suggests use of out-of-core techniques to overcome memory capacity limitations. The authors describe a parallel, out-of-core treecode library, targeted at machines with independent secondary storage associated with each processor. Borrowing the space-filling curve techniques from the in-core library, and manually paging, resulting in excellent spatial and temporal locality and very good performance.

  2. Free surface flow simulation with application to bluff body flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocabiyik, S.; Bozkaya, C.

    2015-03-01

    To better understand the interaction of a free surface wave motion with moving bluff bodies, a two-dimensional numerical study of the forced streamwise oscillation of a circular cylinder beneath a free surface is conducted based on a two-fluid model. Computations are carried out at a Reynolds number of R = 200, a fixed displacement amplitude, A = 0.13 and the forcing frequency-to-natural shedding frequency ratios, f/ f 0 = 1.5,2.5,3.5. Finite volume discretization of the special integral form of two-dimensional continuity and unsteady Navier-Stokes equations (when a solid body is present) are performed on a fixed Cartesian grid. Improved volume-of-fluid method is used to discretize the free surface. The laminar asymmetric flow regimes in the near wake region and the fluid forces are analyzed at a fixed Froude number of Fr = 0.4 and for submergence depths at h = 0.25,0.5,0.75. A comparison of the present results with the case in the absence of a free surface is also included to illustrate the effects of inclusion of a free surface. The code validation in special cases shows good comparisons with previous numerical and experimental results. Flow regime analyses include free surface physics-based analysis, and results confirm findings of a recent work of Brøns et al. [25].

  3. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Corrosion Behavior of Co/CeO2 Nanocomposite Coatings in Simulating Body Fluid Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benea, Lidia

    2013-02-01

    A series of Co/CeO2 (25 nm) nanocomposite coating materials by electrodeposition were successfully prepared containing different cerium oxide composition in the cobalt-plating bath. Stainless steel (304L) was used as support material for nanocomposite coatings. The nano-CeO2 is uniformly incorporated into cobalt matrix, and the effect on surface morphologies was identified by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Codeposition of nano-CeO2 particles with cobalt disturbs the regular surface morphology of the cobalt coatings. It should be noted that the as-prepared Co/CeO2 nanocomposite coatings were found to be much superior in corrosion resistance over those of pure cobalt coatings materials based on a series of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements in simulating body fluid solution. With increase in the nano-CeO2 particles concentration in the cobalt electrolyte, it is observed that the corrosion resistance of Co/CeO2 increases. Co/CeO2 nanocomposite coatings have higher polarization resistance as compared with pure cobalt layers in simulating body fluid solution.

  4. Dental ceramics coated with bioactive glass: Surface changes after exposure in a simulated body fluid under static and dynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulou, L.; Kontonasaki, E.; Zorba, T.; Chatzistavrou, X.; Pavlidou, E.; Paraskevopoulos, K.; Sklavounos, S.; Koidis, P.

    2003-07-01

    Bioactive materials develop a strong bond with living tissues through a carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite layer, similar to that of bone. The fabrication of a thin bioactive glass coating on dental ceramics used in metal-ceramic restorations, could provide a bioactive surface, which in combination with a tissue regenerative technique could lead to periodontal tissues attachment. The aim of this study was the in vitro investigation of the surface structure changes of dental ceramics used in metal-ceramic restorations, coated with a bioactive glass heat-treated at 950 °C, after exposure in a simulated body fluid (SBF) under two different soaking conditions. Coating of dental ceramics with a bioactive glass resulted in the formation of a stable and well bonded with the ceramic substrate thin layer. The growth of a well-attached carbonate apatite layer on their surface after immersion in a simulated body fluid is well evidenced under both experimental conditions, although in static environment the rate of apatite growth is constant and the grown layers seem to be more dense and compact compared with the respective layers observed on specimens under dynamic conditions.

  5. Degradation of Ti-6Al-4V alloy under cyclic loading in a simulated body environment with cell culturing.

    PubMed

    Doi, Kotaro; Miyabe, Sayaka; Tsuchiya, Hiroaki; Fujimoto, Shinji

    2016-03-01

    The present study reports the corrosion fatigue of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy using cyclic deformation test in a simulated body fluid under cell culturing for the first time. Cyclic deformation tests were carried out using three types of specimens to reveal the effects of proteins and cells on the corrosion fatigue of the alloy. For the 1-day-immersed and 1-week-immersed specimens, tensile specimens were soaked in a simulated body fluid for 1 day and 1 week, respectively, before cyclic deformation test, whereas for the cell-cultured specimen, MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells were seeded and then cultured on tensile specimens for 1 week. The incubation period for crack initiation was longer for the cell-cultured and 1-week-immersed specimens compared to that for the 1-day-immersed specimen. On the other hand, crack propagation period for the cell-cultured and 1-week-immersed specimens was shorter than that for the 1-day-immersed specimen. These results indicate that proteins and cells adhered on the alloy surface inhibit metal dissolution at newly created surface emerged by cyclic deformation to suppress crack initiation, whereas they accelerate crack propagation because dissolution at crack tip is accelerated in the occluded space formed under proteins and cells. PMID:26651063

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of delamination of a stiff, body-centered-cubic crystalline film from a compliant Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, L. M.; Zhou, X. W.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Moody, N. R.; Ballarini, R.; Gerberich, W. W.

    2009-10-01

    Compliant substrate technology offers an effective approach to grow high-quality multilayered films, of importance to microelectronics and microelectromechanical systems devices. By using a thin, soft substrate to relieve the mismatch strain of an epitaxial film, the critical thickness of misfit dislocation formation in the overlayer is effectively increased. Experiments have indicated that stiff films deposited onto Si substrates can delaminate at the interface. However, the atomic mechanisms of the deformation and the fracture of the films have not been well studied. Here, we have applied molecular dynamics simulations to study the delamination of a stiff body-centered-cubic crystalline film from a compliant Si substrate due to tensile loading. The observed mechanical behavior is shown to be relatively independent of small changes in temperature, loading rate, and system size. Fracture occurs at the interface between the two materials resulting in nearly atomically clean surfaces. Dislocations are seen to nucleate in the body-centered-cubic film prior to delamination. At higher strains, a phase change to a face centered cubic is observed within the body-centered-cubic film, facilitating extensive dislocation growth and interaction. The various defects that form prior to fracture are discussed and related to the mechanical properties of the system.

  7. Bio-Templated Growth of Bone Minerals from Modified Simulated Body Fluid on Nanofibrous Decellularized Natural Tissues.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingying; Wang, Jie; Zhu, Ye; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-04-01

    Small intestine submucosal (SIS) membrane used in this study is a decellularized, naturally occurring nanofibrous scaffold derived from a submucosal layer of porcine small intestine. It is predominantly composed of type I collagen fibers. Here we studied the bio-templated growth of hydroxylapatite (HAP) bone minerals on the SIS membrane from a modified simulated body fluid (1.5 SBF) at the body temperature, namely, under a near-physiological condition, in order to evaluate its bone bioactivity, the capability of the membrane in bonding with bone tissue once implanted in vivo. Minute HAP crystals were successfully nucleated on the SIS membranes from 1.5 SBF at the body temperature. The crystals were preferentially nucleated along the collagen fibers constituting the SIS membranes. HAP was the major crystalline mineral phase formed during the whole period of time and a minor crystalline phase of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) appeared after the membranes were incubated for 96 h. We also found that the mineralization for 8 h most significantly promoted the osteogenic differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by evaluating the formation of osteogenic markers in MSCs including alkaline phosphatase (early stage marker) as well as osteocalcin and osteopontin (late stage markers). Hence, SIS membranes show excellent bone bioactivity and once mineralized, can significantly promote the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. PMID:27301201

  8. Scalable Parallel Formulations of the Barnes-Hut Method for n-Body Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grama, Ananth Y.; Kumar, Vipin; Sameh, Ahmed

    In this paper, we present two new parallel formulations of the Barnes-Hut method. These parallel formulations are especially suited for simulations with irregular particle densities. We first present a parallel formulation that uses a static partioning of the domain and assignment of subdomains to processors. We demonstrate that this scheme delivers acceptable load balance, and coupled with two collective communication operations, it yields good performance. We present a second parallel formulation which combines static decomposition of the domain with an assignment of subdomains to processors based on Morton ordering. This alleviates the load imbalance inherent in the first scheme. The second parallel formulation is inspired by two currently best known parallel algorithms for the Barnes-Hut method. We present an experimental evaluation of these schemes on a 256 processor nCUBE2 parallel computer for an astrophysical simulation.

  9. Multiple-body simulation with emphasis on integrated Space Shuttle vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ing-Tsau

    1993-02-01

    The program to obtain intergrid communications - Pegasus - was enhanced to make better use of computing resources. Periodic block tridiagonal and penta-diagonal diagonal routines in OVERFLOW were modified to use a better algorithm to speed up the calculation for grids with periodic boundary conditions. Several programs were added to collar grid tools and a user friendly shell script was developed to help users generate collar grids. User interface for HYPGEN was modified to cope with the changes in HYPGEN. ET/SRB attach hardware grids were added to the computational model for the space shuttle and is currently incorporated into the refined shuttle model jointly developed at Johnson Space Center and Ames Research Center. Flow simulation for the integrated space shuttle vehicle at flight Reynolds number was carried out and compared with flight data as well as the earlier simulation for wind tunnel Reynolds number.

  10. Multiple-body simulation with emphasis on integrated Space Shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Ing-Tsau

    1993-01-01

    The program to obtain intergrid communications - Pegasus - was enhanced to make better use of computing resources. Periodic block tridiagonal and penta-diagonal diagonal routines in OVERFLOW were modified to use a better algorithm to speed up the calculation for grids with periodic boundary conditions. Several programs were added to collar grid tools and a user friendly shell script was developed to help users generate collar grids. User interface for HYPGEN was modified to cope with the changes in HYPGEN. ET/SRB attach hardware grids were added to the computational model for the space shuttle and is currently incorporated into the refined shuttle model jointly developed at Johnson Space Center and Ames Research Center. Flow simulation for the integrated space shuttle vehicle at flight Reynolds number was carried out and compared with flight data as well as the earlier simulation for wind tunnel Reynolds number.

  11. Gestational and Early Postnatal Exposure to Simulated High Altitude Does Not Modify Postnatal Body Mass Growth Trajectory in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Champin, Graciela M.; Bozzini, Clarisa; Alippi, Rosa M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bozzini, Carlos E, Graciela M. Champin, Clarisa Bozzini, and Rosa M. Alippi. Gestational and Early Postnatal Exposure to Simulated High Altitude Does Not Modify Postnatal Body Mass Growth Trajectory in the Rat. High Alt Med Biol 15:418–421, 2014.—Postnatal hypoxia blunts body mass growth. It is also known that the quality of the fetal environment can influence the subsequent adult phenotype. The main purpose of the study was to determine whether gestational hypoxia and early postnatal hypoxia are able to blunt growth when the offspring is raised under normoxia. Hypobaric hypoxia was induced in simulated high altitude (SHA) chambers in which air was maintained at 380 mmHg (5450 m). Mature Sprague-Dawley rats of both sexes were divided in normoxic (NX) and hypoxic (HX) groups and, in the case of the HX group, maintained for 1 month at 5450 m. Mating was then allowed under NX or HX conditions. Offspring were NX-NX, NX-HX, HX-HX, or HX-NX: the first term indicates NX or HX during both gestation and the first 30 days of life; the second term indicates NX or HX during postnatal life between days 30 and 133. Body mass (g) was measured periodically and body mass growth rate (BMGR, g/d) was estimated between days 33 and 65 of postnatal life. Results can be summarized as follows: 1) BM was significantly higher in NX than in HX rats at weaning; 2) BMGR was not significantly different between NX-NX and HX-NX rats, and between HX-HX and NX-HX animals; and 3) BMGR was significantly higher in rats living under NX conditions than in those living under HX conditions during postnatal life. Data suggest that that hypobaric hypoxia during gestational and early postnatal development of rats does not alter the regulation of body mass growth in rats when compared to that seen under sea-level conditions. PMID:25184739

  12. Quantitative analysis of voids in percolating structures in two-dimensional N-body simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Patrick M.; Melott, Adrian L.; Shandarin, Sergei F.

    1993-01-01

    We present in this paper a quantitative method for defining void size in large-scale structure based on percolation threshold density. Beginning with two-dimensional gravitational clustering simulations smoothed to the threshold of nonlinearity, we perform percolation analysis to determine the large scale structure. The resulting objective definition of voids has a natural scaling property, is topologically interesting, and can be applied immediately to redshift surveys.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of shielded chair whole body counting system with Masonite cut sheet phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohari, M.; Mathiyarasu, R.; Rajagopal, V.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-05-01

    The shielded chair wholebody counting system used at IGCAR is calibrated experimentally using Masonite cut sheet phantom loaded with single radionuclide of known activity. Multiple point sources of a particular radionuclide are distributed at mid-thickness in each segment of the phantom during calibration. Though the detector can be used for the measurement of gamma photons upto 3000 keV, the experimental calibration is done only upto 1500 keV according to the requirement of measurement of fission and activation products, which emits gamma energies predominantly in the regions below 1500 keV. The expertize in numerical Monte Carlo simulation was utilized to obtain the efficiency values above 1500 keV. This paper focuses on the validation of the shielded chair counting system model using the Masonite cut sheet phantom measurements and applying the validated model to extend the energy range of the calibration upto 3 MeV. A good agreement of the theoretically simulated and experimental 137Cs spectrum with respect to the spectral shape, counts in all the energy regions and the photopeak efficiency validated the modeling of the counting system. A mathematical function to fit the counting efficiencies with photon energies was developed and a set of fitting parameters were established so that the efficiency value of any energy upto 3 MeV can be obtained without performing experimental efficiency calibration. The efficiency values obtained from the fit were compared with experimental ones and found to be in agreement, i.e., within 8% for the 250-1500 keV energy range. The Compton scattering factors (CSFs) at different low energies due to high energy photons were also simulated. The theoretical and experimental CSFs were compared and found to be matching within ±20%. Simulations with uniform source distribution inside the Masonite phantom has shown that the current source distribution followed at IGCAR gives efficiency values within ±5% compared to that of uniform

  14. Estimating non-circular motions in barred galaxies using numerical N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randriamampandry, T. H.; Combes, F.; Carignan, C.; Deg, N.

    2015-12-01

    The observed velocities of the gas in barred galaxies are a combination of the azimuthally averaged circular velocity and non-circular motions, primarily caused by gas streaming along the bar. These non-circular flows must be accounted for before the observed velocities can be used in mass modelling. In this work, we examine the performance of the tilted-ring method and the DISKFIT algorithm for transforming velocity maps of barred spiral galaxies into rotation curves (RCs) using simulated data. We find that the tilted-ring method, which does not account for streaming motions, under-/overestimates the circular motions when the bar is parallel/perpendicular to the projected major axis. DISKFIT, which does include streaming motions, is limited to orientations where the bar is not aligned with either the major or minor axis of the image. Therefore, we propose a method of correcting RCs based on numerical simulations of galaxies. We correct the RC derived from the tilted-ring method based on a numerical simulation of a galaxy with similar properties and projections as the observed galaxy. Using observations of NGC 3319, which has a bar aligned with the major axis, as a test case, we show that the inferred mass models from the uncorrected and corrected RCs are significantly different. These results show the importance of correcting for the non-circular motions and demonstrate that new methods of accounting for these motions are necessary as current methods fail for specific bar alignments.

  15. Quantum Drude oscillator model of atoms and molecules: Many-body polarization and dispersion interactions for atomistic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Andrew P.; Crain, Jason; Sokhan, Vlad P.; Whitfield, Troy W.; Martyna, Glenn J.

    2013-04-01

    Treating both many-body polarization and dispersion interactions is now recognized as a key element in achieving the level of atomistic modeling required to reveal novel physics in complex systems. The quantum Drude oscillator (QDO), a Gaussian-based, coarse grained electronic structure model, captures both many-body polarization and dispersion and has linear scale computational complexity with system size, hence it is a leading candidate next-generation simulation method. Here, we investigate the extent to which the QDO treatment reproduces the desired long-range atomic and molecular properties. We present closed form expressions for leading order polarizabilities and dispersion coefficients and derive invariant (parameter-free) scaling relationships among multipole polarizability and many-body dispersion coefficients that arise due to the Gaussian nature of the model. We show that these “combining rules” hold to within a few percent for noble gas atoms, alkali metals, and simple (first-row hydride) molecules such as water; this is consistent with the surprising success that models with underlying Gaussian statistics often exhibit in physics. We present a diagrammatic Jastrow-type perturbation theory tailored to the QDO model that serves to illustrate the rich types of responses that the QDO approach engenders. QDO models for neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, designed to reproduce gas phase properties, are constructed and their condensed phase properties explored via linear scale diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) and path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations. Good agreement with experimental data for structure, cohesive energy, and bulk modulus is found, demonstrating a degree of transferability that cannot be achieved using current empirical models or fully ab initio descriptions.

  16. N-body simulations of cohesion in dense planetary rings: A study of cohesion parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Randall P.; Richardson, Derek C.

    2012-06-01

    We present results from a large suite of simulations of Saturn's dense A and B rings using a new model of particle sticking in local simulations (Perrine, R.P., Richardson, D.C., Scheeres, D.J. [2011]. Icarus 212, 719-735). In this model, colliding particles can be incorporated into or help fragment rigid aggregations on the basis of certain user-specified parameters that can represent van der Waals forces or interlocking surface frost layers. Our investigation is motivated by laboratory results that show that interpenetration of surface layers can allow impacting frost-covered ice spheres to stick together. In these experiments, cohesion only occurs below specific impact speeds, which happen to be characteristic of impact speeds in Saturn's rings. Our goal is to determine if weak bonding is consistent with ring observations, to constrain cohesion parameters in light of existing ring observations, to make predictions about particle populations throughout the rings, and to discover other diagnostics that may constrain bonding parameters. We considered the effects of five parameters on the equilibrium characteristics of our ring simulations: speed-based merge and fragmentation limits, bond strength, ring surface density, and patch orbital distance (i.e., the A or B ring), some with both monodisperse and polydisperse comparison cases. In total, we present data from 95 simulations. We find that weak cohesion is consistent with observations of the A and B rings (e.g., French, R.G., Nicholson, P.D. [2000]. Icarus 145, 502-523), and we present a range of simulation parameters that reproduce the observed size distribution and maximum particle size. It turns out that the parameters that match observations differ between the A and B rings, and we discuss the potential implications of this result. We also comment on other observable consequences of cohesion for the rings, such as optical depth and scale height effects, and discuss whether very large objects (e.g., "propeller

  17. Effective management of major lower extremity wounds using an acellular regenerative tissue matrix: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Brigido, Stephen A; Boc, Steven F; Lopez, Ramon C

    2004-01-01

    Wound healing is a significant problem in orthopedics. Graftjacket tissue matrix (Wright Medical Technology, Inc, Arlington, Tenn), a novel acellular regenerative tissue matrix, has been designed to aid wound closure. A prospective, randomized study was initiated to determine the efficacy of this tissue product in wound repair compared with conventional treatment. Lower extremity wounds are refractile to healing in patients with diabetes mellitus. Therefore, researchers used diabetic foot ulcers to evaluate the efficacy of GraftJacket tissue matrix in wound repair. Only a single administration of the tissue matrix was required. After 1 month of treatment, preliminary results demonstrate that this novel tissue matrix promotes faster healing at a statistically significant rate over conventional treatment. Because wounds in this series of patients are deep and circulation around the wound is poor, the preliminary results suggest that this tissue matrix will be applicable to other types of orthopedic wounds. PMID:14763548

  18. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy Evaluation of an Acellular Dermis Tissue Transplant (Epiflex®)

    PubMed Central

    Hohenberger, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The structure of a biological scaffold is a major determinant of its biological characteristics and its interaction with cells. An acellular dermis tissue transplant must undergo a series of processing steps, to remove cells and genetic material and provide the sterility required for surgical use. During manufacturing and sterilization the structure and composition of tissue transplants may change. The composition of the human cell-free dermis transplant Epiflex® was investigated with specific attention paid to its structure, matrix composition, cellular content and biomechanics. We demonstrated that after processing, the structure of Epiflex remains almost unchanged with an intact collagen network and extracellular matrix (ECM) protein composition providing natural cell interactions. Although the ready to use transplant does contain some cellular and DNA debris, the processing procedure results in a total destruction of cells and active DNA which is a requirement for an immunologically inert and biologically safe substrate. Its biomechanical parameters do not change significantly during the processing. PMID:23056225

  19. Tissue-engineered acellular small diameter long-bypass grafts with neointima-inducing activity.

    PubMed

    Mahara, Atsushi; Somekawa, Shota; Kobayashi, Naoki; Hirano, Yoshiaki; Kimura, Yoshiharu; Fujisato, Toshiya; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2015-07-01

    Researchers have attempted to develop efficient antithrombogenic surfaces, and yet small-caliber artificial vascular grafts are still unavailable. Here, we demonstrate the excellent patency of tissue-engineered small-caliber long-bypass grafts measuring 20-30 cm in length and having a 2-mm inner diameter. The inner surface of an acellular ostrich carotid artery was modified with a novel heterobifunctional peptide composed of a collagen-binding region and the integrin α4β1 ligand, REDV. Six grafts were transplanted in the femoral-femoral artery crossover bypass method. Animals were observed for 20 days and received no anticoagulant medication. No thrombogenesis was observed on the luminal surface and five cases were patent. In contrast, all unmodified grafts became occluded, and severe thrombosis was observed. The vascular grafts reported here are the first successful demonstrations of short-term patency at clinically applicable sizes. PMID:25941782

  20. Gravity related behavior of the acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, I.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the experiment is to investigate the effect of near weightlessness on a single cell. The test object is the acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum. This cell is composed of a network of protoplastic strands which perform rhythmic contractions in the minute range. These contractions of the strands' ectoplastic walls generate the force to drive the vigorous shuttle streaming of fluid protoplasm inside the strands (hydrostatic pressure flow). A net transport of protoplasm in one direction determines the direction of the cell's locomotion itself. In this way, gravity modifies the contraction rhythm of the strands, the streaming velocity of protoplasm in the strands, and the direction of locomotion of the whole slime mold (geotaxis). The other parts of this experiment will address the major question of how this cell, which does not possess any specialized gravireceptors, gets the information about the direction of the gravity vector. Details of the experimental setup are given.

  1. Coloring linens with excimer lasers to simulate the body image of the Turin Shroud.

    PubMed

    Baldacchini, Giuseppe; Di Lazzaro, Paolo; Murra, Daniele; Fanti, Giulio

    2008-03-20

    The body image of the Turin Shroud has not yet been explained by traditional science; so a great interest in a possible mechanism of image formation still exists. We present preliminary results of excimer laser irradiation (wavelength of 308 nm) of a raw linen fabric and of a linen cloth. The permanent coloration of both linens is a threshold effect of the laser beam intensity, and it can be achieved only in a narrow range of irradiation parameters, which are strongly dependent on the pulse width and time sequence of laser shots. We also obtained the first direct evidence of latent images impressed on linen that appear in a relatively long period (one year) after laser irradiation that at first did not generate a clear image. The results are compared with the characteristics of the Turin Shroud, reflecting the possibility that a burst of directional ultraviolet radiation may have played a role in the formation of the Shroud image. PMID:18709075

  2. Navier-Stokes simulation of rotor-body flowfield in hover using overset grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, G. R.; Ahmad, J. U.

    1993-01-01

    A free-wake Navier-Stokes numerical scheme and multiple Chimera overset grids have been utilized for calculating the quasi-steady hovering flowfield of a Boeing-360 rotor mounted on an axisymmetric whirl-tower. The entire geometry of this rotor-body configuration is gridded-up with eleven different overset grids. The composite grid has 1.3 million grid points for the entire flow domain. The numerical results, obtained using coarse grids and a rigid rotor assumption, show a thrust value that is within 5% of the experimental value at a flow condition of M(sub tip) = 0.63, Theta(sub c) = 8 deg, and Re = 2.5 x 10(exp 6). The numerical method thus demonstrates the feasibility of using a multi-block scheme for calculating the flowfields of complex configurations consisting of rotating and non-rotating components.

  3. Coloring linens with excimer lasers to simulate the body image of the Turin Shroud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldacchini, Giuseppe; di Lazzaro, Paolo; Murra, Daniele; Fanti, Giulio

    2008-03-01

    The body image of the Turin Shroud has not yet been explained by traditional science; so a great interest in a possible mechanism of image formation still exists. We present preliminary results of excimer laser irradiation (wavelength of 308 nm) of a raw linen fabric and of a linen cloth. The permanent coloration of both linens is a threshold effect of the laser beam intensity, and it can be achieved only in a narrow range of irradiation parameters, which are strongly dependent on the pulse width and time sequence of laser shots. We also obtained the first direct evidence of latent images impressed on linen that appear in a relatively long period (one year) after laser irradiation that at first did not generate a clear image. The results are compared with the characteristics of the Turin Shroud, reflecting the possibility that a burst of directional ultraviolet radiation may have played a role in the formation of the Shroud image.

  4. Simulated acute central Mycoplasma infections in rats induce fever, anorexia, body mass stunting and lethargy but spare memory.

    PubMed

    Swanepoel, Tanya; Sabbar, Mariam; Baartman, Tamzyn L; Laburn, Helen P; Mitchell, Duncan; Dukhan, Tanusha; Harden, Lois M

    2016-09-01

    Despite the documented post-infectious neurological complications of a central nervous system (CNS) Mycoplasma infection in humans, very few studies have investigated the acute inflammatory responses and sickness behaviours induced by CNS Mycoplasma infections. We therefore determined the effect of acute central administration of fibroblast-stimulating lipopeptide-1 (FSL-1), derived from Mycoplasma salivarium, and FAM-20 from a more pathogenic species, namely Mycoplasma pneumoniae, on behavioural and inflammatory responses in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats had radiotransmitters implanted, intra-abdominally, to measure body temperature and cage activity continuously. After recovery from surgery, rats were conditioned in a fear conditioning task and then immediately received an intra-cisterna magna (i.c.m.) injection of either: (1) FSL-1 (10 or 100μg/5μl) or its vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline, 5μl), or (2) FAM-20 (10 or 100μg/5μl) or its vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide, 5μl). Body mass and food intake were measured daily. Memory was assessed seven days after injection using fear conditioning tests. A single, i.c.m. injection of either FSL-1 or FAM-20 induced profound, dose-dependent fever, anorexia, lethargy and body mass stunting in rats. Moreover, rats that received an i.c.m. injection of 100μg/5μl FAM-20 had a significant increase in the concentration of IL-1β in both the hypothalamus and the hippocampus for ~27h after injection. Seven days after FSL-1 or FAM-20 injection, when body mass of rats still was stunted, they maintained their memory for fear of the context and for fear of the tone, despite the increase in hippocampal IL-1β concentration after FAM-20 administration. Thus, acute simulated CNS Mycoplasma infections caused pronounced sickness responses and brain inflammation in rats, but spared fear memory. PMID:27180133

  5. Size-frequency distributions of fragments from SPH/ N-body simulations of asteroid impacts: Comparison with observed asteroid families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durda, Daniel D.; Bottke, William F.; Nesvorný, David; Enke, Brian L.; Merline, William J.; Asphaug, Erik; Richardson, Derek C.

    2007-02-01

    We investigate the morphology of size-frequency distributions (SFDs) resulting from impacts into 100-km-diameter parent asteroids, represented by a suite of 161 SPH/N-body simulations conducted to study asteroid satellite formation [Durda, D.D., Bottke, W.F., Enke, B.L., Merline, W.J., Asphaug, E., Richardson, D.C., Leinhardt, Z.M., 2004. Icarus 170, 243-257]. The spherical basalt projectiles range in diameter from 10 to 46 km (in equally spaced mass increments in logarithmic space, covering six discrete sizes), impact speeds range from 2.5 to 7 km/s (generally in 1 km/s increments), and impact angles range from 15° to 75° (nearly head-on to very oblique) in 15° increments. These modeled SFD morphologies match very well the observed SFDs of many known asteroid families. We use these modeled SFDs to scale to targets both larger and smaller than 100 km in order to gain insights into the circumstances of the impacts that formed these families. Some discrepancies occur for families with parent bodies smaller than a few tens of kilometers in diameter (e.g., 832 Karin), however, so due caution should be used in applying our results to such small families. We find that ˜20 observed main-belt asteroid families are produced by the catastrophic disruption of D >100 km parent bodies. Using these data as constraints, collisional modeling work [Bottke Jr., W.F., Durda, D.D., Nesvorný, D., Jedicke, R., Morbidelli, A., Vokrouhlický, D., Levison, H.F., 2005b. Icarus 179, 63-94] suggests that the threshold specific energy, QD∗, needed to eject 50% of the target body's mass is very close to that predicted by Benz and Asphaug [Benz, W., Asphaug, E., 1999. Icarus 142, 5-20].

  6. Physiological distal drift in rat molars contributes to acellular cementum formation.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Shinobu; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Nishioka, Takashi; Suzuki, Osamu; Sasano, Yasuyuki; Igarashi, Kaoru

    2013-08-01

    Occlusal forces may induce the physiological teeth migration in humans, but there is little direct evidence. Rat molars are known to migrate distally during aging, possibly caused by occlusal forces. The purpose of this study was to determine if a reduction in occlusion would decrease teeth migration and affect associated periodontal structures such as cementum. To reduce occlusal forces, the right upper first molar (M1) in juvenile rats was extracted. The transition of the position of upper second molar (M2) and formation of M2 cementum was followed during aging. From the cephalometric analyses, upper M2 was located more anterior compared with the original position with aging after M1 extraction. Associated with this "slowing-down" of the physiological drift, cementum thickness on distal surface, but not on mesial surface, of M2 root was significantly increased. The accumulation of alizarin red as vital stain indicative of calcification, was observed in the distal cementum of M2 root only on the side of M1 extraction. Extraction of M1 that results in less functional loading, distinctly attenuates the physiological drift only in the upper dentition. The decreased physiological drift appears to activate acellular cementum formation only on distal surface of M2 root, perhaps due to reduced mechanical stress associated with the attenuated distal drift. In conclusion, the physiological distal drift in rat molars appears to be largely driven by the occlusal force and also affects the formation of acellular cementum. These findings provide additional direct evidence for an important role of occlusal forces in tooth migration. PMID:23775928

  7. Is Sterile Better Than Aseptic? Comparing the Microbiology of Acellular Dermal Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Gabriel M.; Nasser, Ahmed E.; Phillips, Brett T.; Gersch, Robert P.; Fourman, Mitchell S.; Lilo, Sarit E.; Fritz, Jason R.; Khan, Sami U.; Dagum, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Postoperative infections are a major complication associated with tissue-expander-based breast reconstruction. The use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in this surgery has been identified as a potential reservoir of infection, prompting the development of sterile ADM. Although aseptic and sterile ADMs have been investigated, no study has focused on the occurrence and clinical outcome of bacterial colonization before implantation. Methods: Samples of aseptic AlloDerm, sterile Ready-To-Use AlloDerm, and AlloMax were taken before implantation. These samples were incubated in Tryptic soy broth overnight before being streaked on Trypticase soy agar, MacConkey agar, and 5% blood agar plates for culture and incubated for 48 hours. Culture results were cross-referenced with patient outcomes for 1 year postoperatively. Results: A total of 92 samples of ADM were collected from 63 patients. There were 15 cases of postoperative surgical site infection (16.3%). Only 1 sample of ADM (AlloMax) showed growth of Escherichia coli, which was likely a result of contamination. That patient did not develop any infectious sequelae. Patient outcomes showed no difference in the incidence of seroma or infection between sterile and aseptic ADMs. Conclusions: This study evaluates the microbiology of acellular dermal matrices before use in breast reconstruction. No difference was found in the preoperative bacterial load of either aseptic or sterile ADM. No significant difference was noted in infection or seroma formation. Given these results, we believe aseptic processing used on ADMs is equivalent to sterile processing in our patient cohort in terms of clinical infection and seroma occurrence postoperatively. PMID:27482500

  8. Vlasov Simulation of the Interaction Between the Solar Wind and a Dielectric Body with Magnetic Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Y.; Umeda, T.; Ogino, T.

    2011-12-01

    The interaction of a plasma flow with an unmagnetized object is quite different from that with a magnetized object such as the Earth. Due to the absence of the global magnetic field, the unmagnetized object absorbs plasma particles which reach the surface, generating a plasma cavity called wake in the anti-solar side of the object. Since the velocity of the solar wind (SW) is larger than the thermal velocity of ions, ions cannot penetrate into the nightside of the moon. However, ions were observed in the deep wake by a Japanese spacecraft KAGUYA (SELENE) which is orbiting the moon in a polar orbit around 100km altitude. A key mechanism of this phenomenon is thought to be scattering of SW ions at the lunar dayside surface by an interaction between the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and a lunar magnetic anomaly. In the present study, we examine structure of the wake due to the interaction between IMF and the magnetic anomaly via a full-kinetic Vlasov simulation. We performed one of the first global Vlasov simulations of magnetosphere. We assumed a 2.5D Cartesian system in which spatial grids are taken in the 2D plane and velocity grids are taken in 3D space. There exists an insulative sphere, in which the charge accumulates at the surface. The intrinsic magnetic field of the object as the magnetic anomaly is assumed to be the 2D dipole magnetic field. The solar wind also carries an IMF. The simulation results suggest that the magnetic anomaly on the dayside surface of the moon would affect to the formation of the wake field. The structure of plasma void is modified by the convection of magnetic field motion.

  9. Corrosion resistance of porous NiTi biomedical alloy in simulated body fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stergioudi, F.; Vogiatzis, C. A.; Pavlidou, E.; Skolianos, S.; Michailidis, N.

    2016-09-01

    The corrosion performance of two porous NiTi in physiological and Hank’s solutions was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization, cyclic polarization and impedance spectroscopy. Electric models simulating the corrosion mechanism at early stages of immersion were proposed, accounting for both microstructural observations and electrochemical results. Results indicate that both porous samples were susceptible to localized corrosion. The porosity increase (from 7% to 18%) resulted in larger and wider pore openings, thus favoring the corrosion resistance of 18% porous NiTi. Strengthening of corrosion resistance was observed in Hank’s solution. The pore morphology and micro-galvanic corrosion phenomena were determining factors affecting the corrosion resistance.

  10. Keeping it real: revisiting a real-space approach to running ensembles of cosmological N-body simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Orban, Chris

    2013-05-01

    In setting up initial conditions for ensembles of cosmological N-body simulations there are, fundamentally, two choices: either maximizing the correspondence of the initial density field to the assumed fourier-space clustering or, instead, matching to real-space statistics and allowing the DC mode (i.e. overdensity) to vary from box to box as it would in the real universe. As a stringent test of both approaches, I perform ensembles of simulations using power law and a ''powerlaw times a bump'' model inspired by baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), exploiting the self-similarity of these initial conditions to quantify the accuracy of the matter-matter two-point correlation results. The real-space method, which was originally proposed by Pen 1997 [1] and implemented by Sirko 2005 [2], performed well in producing the expected self-similar behavior and corroborated the non-linear evolution of the BAO feature observed in conventional simulations, even in the strongly-clustered regime (σ{sub 8}∼>1). In revisiting the real-space method championed by [2], it was also noticed that this earlier study overlooked an important integral constraint correction to the correlation function in results from the conventional approach that can be important in ΛCDM simulations with L{sub box}∼<1 h{sup −1}Gpc and on scales r∼>L{sub box}/10. Rectifying this issue shows that the fourier space and real space methods are about equally accurate and efficient for modeling the evolution and growth of the correlation function, contrary to previous claims. An appendix provides a useful independent-of-epoch analytic formula for estimating the importance of the integral constraint bias on correlation function measurements in ΛCDM simulations.

  11. Model-Form Uncertainty Quantification in RANS Simulation of Wing-Body Junction Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinlong; Wang, Jianxun; Xiao, Heng

    2015-11-01

    Junction flow, known as one of the remaining challenges for computational aerodynamics, occurs when a boundary layer encounters an obstacle mounted on the surface. Previous studies have shown that the RANS models are not capable to provide satisfactory prediction. In this work, a novel open-box, physics-informed Bayesian framework is used to quantify the model-form uncertainties in RANS simulation of junction flow. The first objective is to correct the bias in RANS prediction, by utilizing several observation data. The second one is to quantify the model-form uncertainties, which can enable risk-informed decision-making. To begin with a standard RANS simulation, which is performed on a 3:2 elliptic nose and NACA0020 tail cylinder, uncertainties with empirical prior knowledge and physical constraints are directly injected into the Reynolds stresses term, and the unbiased knowledge from observation data is incorporated by an iterative ensemble Kalman method. Current results show that the bias in the quantities of interest (QoIs) of the RANS prediction, e.g., mean velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, etc, can be significantly corrected by this novel Bayesian framework. The probability density distributions of QoIs show that the model-form uncertainty can be quantified as well.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Planar and Axisymmetric Unsteady Flows Over Vibrating Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat, N. Kolluru

    1991-02-01

    Engineering applications of unsteady boundary layers are numerous and of great importance in hydro and aero dynamics. Relatively little research however is focussed on understanding the flow structure if the perturbations in the flow are caused by the motion of flexible boundaries rather than by time dependent variations in the flow itself. A model is therefore developed to examine the hydrodynamic characteristics of external laminar flow over an arbitrarily shaped body, a portion of which is subjected to harmonic motion. A vorticity-stream function formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations is used. A boundary fitted coordinate system is adopted to allow accurate modeling in the presence of the time dependent motion of the body surface. The flow equations are solved using a Thompson Tri Diagonal Finite Difference Algorithm. Inviscid-viscous interaction theory is used to split the model domain and save computational time. The model is tested by comparison to selected numerical, experimental or analytical results for flow over a cavity, boundary layer flow along a flat plate and time dependent flow in a channel with wavy walls. The model is then applied to predict the flow over a flat plate and circular cylinder with a section forced in simple harmonic motion. The nonlinear response of the flow is investigated for various Reynolds numbers, Re, Strouhal number, St, (ratio of the flow advective time scale to the plate or cylinder oscillation period), vibration amplitude ration, bf{H _ 0} (vibration amplitude divided by plate or cylinder vibrating section length) and the vibration mode number, n. The time varying friction (bf{C_ f}) and pressure ( bf{C_ p}) coefficients along the vibrating plate and cylinder are analyzed using Fast Fourier Transform techniques (FFT). Model results show that for low St and bf {H_ 0} the response of the external flow to the plate vibration amplitude is linear and there is little up or downstream influence. For high St, Re and bf{H_ 0

  13. Acellularization-Induced Changes in Tensile Properties Are Organ Specific - An In-Vitro Mechanical and Structural Analysis of Porcine Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Aust, Gabriela; Boldt, Andreas; Fritsch, Sebastian; Keil, Isabel; Koch, Holger; Möbius, Robert; Scheidt, Holger A.; Wagner, Martin F. X.; Hammer, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Though xenogeneic acellular scaffolds are frequently used for surgical reconstruction, knowledge of their mechanical properties is lacking. This study compared the mechanical, histological and ultrastructural properties of various native and acellular specimens. Materials and Methods Porcine esophagi, ureters and skin were tested mechanically in a native or acellular condition, focusing on the elastic modulus, ultimate tensile stress and maximum strain. The testing protocol for soft tissues was standardized, including the adaption of the tissue’s water content and partial plastination to minimize material slippage as well as templates for normed sample dimensions and precise cross-section measurements. The native and acellular tissues were compared at the microscopic and ultrastructural level with a focus on type I collagens. Results Increased elastic modulus and ultimate tensile stress values were quantified in acellular esophagi and ureters compared to the native condition. In contrast, these values were strongly decreased in the skin after acellularization. Acellularization-related decreases in maximum strain were found in all tissues. Type I collagens were well-preserved in these samples; however, clotting and a loss of cross-linking type I collagens was observed ultrastructurally. Elastins and fibronectins were preserved in the esophagi and ureters. A loss of the epidermal layer and decreased fibronectin content was present in the skin. Discussion Acellularization induces changes in the tensile properties of soft tissues. Some of these changes appear to be organ specific. Loss of cross-linking type I collagen may indicate increased mechanical strength due to decreasing transverse forces acting upon the scaffolds, whereas fibronectin loss may be related to decreased load-bearing capacity. Potentially, the alterations in tissue mechanics are linked to organ function and to the interplay of cells and the extracellular matrix, which is different in

  14. Rotation of Lipids in Membranes: Molecular Dynamics Simulation, 31P Spin-Lattice Relaxation, and Rigid-Body Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Klauda, Jeffery B.; Roberts, Mary F.; Redfield, Alfred G.; Brooks, Bernard R.; Pastor, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations and 31P-NMR spin-lattice (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}R_{1}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) relaxation rates from 0.022 to 21.1 T of fluid phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers are compared. Agreement between experiment and direct prediction from simulation indicates that the dominant slow relaxation (correlation) times of the dipolar and chemical shift anisotropy spin-lattice relaxation are ∼10 ns and 3 ns, respectively. Overall reorientation of the lipid body, consisting of the phosphorus, glycerol, and acyl chains, is well described within a rigid-body model. Wobble, with \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}D_{{\\bot}}=\\end{equation*}\\end{document} 1–2 × 108 s−1, is the primary component of the 10 ns relaxation; this timescale is consistent with the tumbling of a lipid-sized cylinder in a medium with the viscosity of liquid hexadecane. The value for \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}D_{{\\Vert}},\\end{equation*}\\end{document} the diffusion constant for rotation about the long axis of the lipid body, is difficult to determine precisely because of averaging by fast motions and wobble; it is tentatively estimated to be 1 × 107 s−1. The resulting D‖/D⊥

  15. Navier-Stokes simulation of a close-coupled canard-wing-body configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Eugene L.

    1991-01-01

    The thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the flow about a coplanar close-coupled canard-wing-body configuration at a transonic Mach number of 0.90 and at angles of attack ranging from 0 to 12 degrees. The influence of the canard on the wing flowfield, including canard-wing vortex interaction and wing vortex breakdown, is investigated. A study of canard downwash and canard leading-edge vortex effects, which are the primary mechanisms of the canard-wing interaction, is emphasized. Comparisons between the computations and experimental measurements of surface pressure coefficients, lift, drag and pitching moment data are favorable. A grid refinement study for configurations with and without canard shows that accurate results are obtained using a refined grid for angles of attack where vortex burst is present. At an angle of attack of approximately 12 deg, favorable canard-wing interaction which delays wing vortex breakdown is indicated by the computations and is in good agreement with experimental findings.

  16. Fabrication of nanotube arrays on commercially pure titanium and their apatite-forming ability in a simulated body fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Hsueh-Chuan; Wu, Shih-Ching; Hsu, Shih-Kuang; Chang, Yu-Chen; Ho, Wen-Fu

    2015-02-15

    In this study, we investigated self-organized TiO{sub 2} nanotubes that were grown using anodization of commercially pure titanium at 5 V or 10 V in NH{sub 4}F/NaCl electrolyte. The nanotube arrays were annealed at 450 °C for 3 h to convert the amorphous nanotubes to anatase and then they were immersed in simulated body fluid at 37 °C for 0.5, 1, and 14 days. The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate the apatite-formation abilities of anodized Ti nanotubes with different tube diameters and lengths. The nanotubes that formed on the surfaces of Ti were examined using a field emission scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. When the anodizing potential was increased from 5 V to 10 V, the pore diameter of the nanotube increased from approximately 24–30 nm to 35–53 nm, and the tube length increased from approximately 590 nm to 730 nm. In vitro testing of the heat-treated nanotube arrays indicated that Ca-P formation occurred after only 1 day of immersion in simulated body fluid. This result was particularly apparent in the samples that were anodized at 10 V. It was also found that the thickness of the Ca-P layer increases as the applied potential for anodized c.p. Ti increases. The average thickness of the Ca-P layer on Ti that was anodized at 5 V and 10 V was approximately 170 nm and 190 nm, respectively, after immersion in simulated body fluid for 14 days. - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanotube on Ti surface was formed by anodic oxidation in a NaCl/NH{sub 4}F solution. • TiO{sub 2} layers show a tube length of 590 nm and 730 nm at 5 V and 10 V, respectively. • After soaking in SBF, Ca-P layer completely covered the entire nanotubular surfaces. • The Ca-P layer was thicker on the Ti surface anodized at 10 V.

  17. Core Formation And Gravothermal Collapse Of Self-interacting Dark Matter Halos: Monte Carlo N-body simulation versus Conducting Fluid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Jun; Shapiro, P. R.

    2007-12-01

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) has been proposed to solve the cuspy core problem of dark matter halos in standard CDM. There are two ways to investigate the effect of the 2-body, non-gravitational, elastic collisions of SIDM, Monte-Carlo N-body simulation and a conducting fluid model. The former is a gravitational N-body simulation with a Monte Carlo algorithm for the SIDM scattering that changes the direction of N-body particles randomly according to a given scattering cross section. The latter is a system of fluid conservation equations with a thermal conduction that describes the collisional effect, which was originally invented to describe the gravothermal collapse of globular clusters. Our previous work found a significant disagreement as regards the strength of collisionality required to solve cuspy core problem. However the two methods have not been properly tested against each other. Here, we make direct comparisons between Monte Carlo N-body simulations and analytic and numerical solutions of the conducting fluid (gaseous) model, for various isolated self-interacting dark matter halos. The N-body simulations reproduce the analytical self-similar solution of gravothermal collapse in the fluid model when one free parameter, the coefficient of heat conduction C, is chosen to be 0.75. The gravothermal collapse results of the simulations agrees well with our 1D numerical hydro solutions of the fluid model within 20% for other initial conditions, including Plummer model, Hernquist profile and NFW profile. In conclusion the conducting fluid model is in reasonably good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulations for isolated halos. We will pursue the origin of the reported disagreement between two methods in a cosmological environment by comparing new N-body simulations with fully cosmological initial conditions.

  18. Supine exercise during lower body negative pressure effectively simulates upright exercise in normal gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Ballard, R. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Exercise within a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) chamber in supine posture was compared with similar exercise against Earth's gravity (without LBNP) in upright posture in nine healthy male volunteers. We measured footward force with a force plate, pressure in soleus and tibialis anterior muscles of the leg with transducer-tipped catheters, calf volume by strain gauge plethysmography, heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures during two conditions: 1) exercise in supine posture within an LBNP chamber during 100-mmHg LBNP (exercise-LBNP) and 2) exercise in upright posture against Earth's gravity without LBNP (exercise-1 G). Subjects exercised their ankle joints (dorsi- and plantarflexions) for 5 min during exercise-LBNP and for 5 min during exercise-1 G. Mean footward force produced during exercise-LBNP (743 +/- 37 N) was similar to that produced during exercise-1 G (701 +/- 24 N). Peak contraction pressure in the antigravity soleus muscle during exercise-LBNP (115 +/- 10 mmHg) was also similar to that during exercise-1 G (103 +/- 13 mmHg). Calf volume increased significantly by 3.3 +/- 0.5% during exercise-LBNP compared with baseline values. Calf volume did not increase significantly during exercise-1 G. Heart rate was significantly higher during exercise-LBNP (99 +/- 5 beats/min) than during exercise-1 G (81 +/- 3 beats/min). These results indicate that exercise in supine posture within an LBNP chamber can produce similar musculoskeletal stress in the legs and greater systemic cardiovascular stress than exercise in the upright posture against Earth's gravity.

  19. A Regularized Galerkin Boundary Element Method (RGBEM) for Simulating Potential Flow About Zero Thickness Bodies

    SciTech Connect

    GHARAKHANI,ADRIN; WOLFE,WALTER P.

    1999-10-01

    The prediction of potential flow about zero thickness membranes by the boundary element method constitutes an integral component of the Lagrangian vortex-boundary element simulation of flow about parachutes. To this end, the vortex loop (or the panel) method has been used, for some time now, in the aerospace industry with relative success [1, 2]. Vortex loops (with constant circulation) are equivalent to boundary elements with piecewise constant variation of the potential jump. In this case, extending the analysis in [3], the near field potential velocity evaluations can be shown to be {Omicron}(1). The accurate evaluation of the potential velocity field very near the parachute surface is particularly critical to the overall accuracy and stability of the vortex-boundary element simulations. As we will demonstrate in Section 3, the boundary integral singularities, which arise due to the application of low order boundary elements, may lead to severely spiked potential velocities at vortex element centers that are near the boundary. The spikes in turn cause the erratic motion of the vortex elements, and the eventual loss of smoothness of the vorticity field and possible numerical blow up. In light of the arguments above, the application of boundary elements with (at least) a linear variation of the potential jump--or, equivalently, piecewise constant vortex sheets--would appear to be more appropriate for vortex-boundary element simulations. For this case, two strategies are possible for obtaining the potential flow field. The first option is to solve the integral equations for the (unknown) strengths of the surface vortex sheets. As we will discuss in Section 2.1, the challenge in this case is to devise a consistent system of equations that imposes the solenoidality of the locally 2-D vortex sheets. The second approach is to solve for the unknown potential jump distribution. In this case, for commonly used C{sup o} shape functions, the boundary integral is singular at

  20. Dissolution and precipitation behaviors of silicon-containing ceramic coating on Mg-Zn-Ca alloy in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yaokun; Chen, Chuanzhong; Wang, Diangang; Huang, Danlan

    2014-10-01

    We prepared Si-containing and Si-free coatings on Mg-1.74Zn-0.55Ca alloy by micro-arc oxidation. The dissolution and precipitation behaviors of Si-containing coating in simulated body fluid (SBF) were discussed. Corrosion products were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS). Electrochemical workstation, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES), flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS) and pH meter were employed to detect variations of electrochemical parameter and ions concentration respectively. Results indicate that the fast formation of calcium phosphates is closely related to the SiOx(n-) groups, which induce the heterogeneous nucleation of amorphous hydroxyapatite (HA) by sorption of calcium and phosphate ions. PMID:25174544

  1. Hybrid RANS/LES simulations of bluff-body flows on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvetti, Maria Vittoria; Camarri, Simone; Koobus, Bruno; Dervieux, Alain

    2004-11-01

    A hybrid RANS/LES model is set up by blending a k-\\varepsilon model and the Smagorinsky model according to the LNS idea [1], i.e. using the minimum value among the eddy viscosities given by the RANS and the LES closures. The Navier-Stokes equations are discretized by a mixed finite-volume/finite-element formulation applicable to unstrucured grid. A low diffusion MUSCL scheme, designed for LES, is adopted [2]. Both explicit (Runge-Kutta) and implicit (second-order accurate) time advancing can be used. The hybrid model is applied to the simulation of the flows around a square cylinder and around a sphere. Results are compared with those obtained with RANS and LES and with experimental data. REFERENCES: [1] P.Batten.LNS-An approach towards embedded LES. In phAIAA Paper 2002-0427. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2002. [2] S.Camarri,M.V.Salvetti,B.Koobus and A.Dervieux. A low-diffusion MUSCL scheme for LES on unstructured grids. phComputers and Fluids 2003; 33:1101-1129.

  2. DSMC Simulation of Separated Flows About Flared Bodies at Hypersonic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a numerical study of interacting hypersonic flows at conditions that can be produced in ground-based test facilities. The computations are made with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird. The focus is on Mach 10 flows about flared axisymmetric configurations, both hollow cylinder flares and double cones. The flow conditions are those for which experiments have been or will be performed in the ONERA R5Ch low-density wind tunnel and the Calspan-University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel. The range of flow conditions, model configurations, and model sizes provides a significant range of shock/shock and shock/boundary layer interactions at low Reynolds number conditions. Results presented will highlight the sensitivity of the calculations to grid resolution, contrast the differences in flow structure for hypersonic cold flows and those of more energetic but still low enthalpy flows, and compare the present results with experimental measurements for surface heating, pressure, and extent of separation.

  3. Evaluation of an Anthropometric Human Body Model for Simulated EVA Task Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etter, Brad

    1996-01-01

    One of the more mission-critical tasks performed in space is extravehicular activity (EVA) which requires the astronaut to be external to the station or spacecraft, and subsequently at risk from the many threats posed by space. These threats include, but are not limited to: no significant atmosphere, harmful electromagnetic radiation, micrometeoroids, and space debris. To protect the astronaut from this environment, a special EVA suit is worn which is designed to maintain a sustainable atmosphere (at 1/3 atmosphere) and provide protection against the hazards of space. While the EVA suit serves these functions well, it does impose limitations on the astronaut as a consequence of the safety it provides. Since the astronaut is in a virtual vacuum, any atmospheric pressure inside the suit serves to pressurize the suit and restricts mobility of flexible joints (such as fabric). Although some of the EVA suit joints are fixed, rotary-style joints, most of the mobility is achieved by the simple flexibility of the fabric. There are multiple layers of fabric, each of which serves a special purpose in the safety of the astronaut. These multiple layers add to the restriction of motion the astronaut experiences in the space environment. Ground-based testing is implemented to evaluate the capability of EVA-suited astronauts to perform the various tasks in space. In addition to the restriction of motion imposed by the EVA suit, most EVA activity is performed in a micro-gravity (weight less) environment. To simulate weightlessness EVA-suited testing is performed in a neutral buoyancy simulator (NBS). The NBS is composed of a large container of water (pool) in which a weightless environment can be simulated. A subject is normally buoyant in the pressurized suit; however he/she can be made neutrally buoyant with the addition of weights. In addition, most objects the astronaut must interface with in the NBS sink in water and flotation must be added to render them "weightless". The

  4. Preserving the Posttrapeziectomy Space with a Human Acellular Dermal Matrix Spacer: A Pilot Case Series of Patients with Thumb Carpometacarpal Joint Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Caroline A.; Ellis, Chandra V.; Cohen, Myles J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Advanced thumb carpometacarpal arthritis is widely treated with trapeziectomy and tendon interposition despite donor-site morbidities. Trapeziectomy alone leaves a postresection space, leading to proximal metacarpal migration and scaphoid/trapezoid impingement. Prosthetic implants have been unsuccessful due to particulate debris, silicone synovitis, osteolysis, and migration. Recent studies have shown successful use of allograft for interposition material in the posttrapeziectomy space both in animal and human models. To obviate the need for autologous tissue, maintain thumb length, and reduce the risk of scaphoid impingement, the senior author developed an interposition arthroplasty technique using a spacer constructed from human acellular dermal matrix (HADM). Methods: Sixteen patients with Eaton stage III–IV thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis received the above procedure from the 2 senior authors. HADM was imbricated to fill the posttrapeziectomy space and secured to the volar capsule and metacarpal base. Pre- and postoperative trapezial space on radiograph, pain scores, and grip strength were recorded. Results: Six months postoperatively, radiographs showed an average joint space loss of 11%. Heights postoperatively were not significantly different from immediate postoperative heights (P ≥ 0.01). At 6 months, patients had improved pain and grip strength (P ≤ 0.01). No infections, foreign body reactions, or other complications occurred. Conclusions: HADM has been used extensively in other forms of reconstruction and has been shown to incorporate into surrounding tissues through neovascularization. Our early results illustrate that HADM can safely fill the dead space left by trapeziectomy. PMID:25289260

  5. Hybrid simulation approach incorporating microscopic interaction along with rigid body degrees of freedom for stacking between base pairs.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Manas; Halder, Sukanya; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2016-04-01

    Stacking interaction between the aromatic heterocyclic bases plays an important role in the double helical structures of nucleic acids. Considering the base as rigid body, there are total of 18 degrees of freedom of a dinucleotide step. Some of these parameters show sequence preferences, indicating that the detailed atomic interactions are important in the stacking. Large variants of non-canonical base pairs have been seen in the crystallographic structures of RNA. However, their stacking preferences are not thoroughly deciphered yet from experimental results. The current theoretical approaches use either the rigid body degrees of freedom where the atomic information are lost or computationally expensive all atom simulations. We have used a hybrid simulation approach incorporating Monte-Carlo Metropolis sampling in the hyperspace of 18 stacking parameters where the interaction energies using AMBER-parm99bsc0 and CHARMM-36 force-fields were calculated from atomic positions. We have also performed stacking energy calculations for structures from Monte-Carlo ensemble by Dispersion corrected density functional theory. The available experimental data with Watson-Crick base pairs are compared to establish the validity of the method. Stacking interaction involving A:U and G:C base pairs with non-canonical G:U base pairs also were calculated and showed that these structures were also sequence dependent. This approach could be useful to generate multiscale modeling of nucleic acids in terms of coarse-grained parameters where the atomic interactions are preserved. This method would also be useful to predict structure and dynamics of different base pair steps containing non Watson-Crick base pairs, as found often in the non-coding RNA structures. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 212-226, 2016. PMID:26600167

  6. A high-order adaptive Cartesian cut-cell method for simulation of compressible viscous flow over immersed bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, Balaji; Menon, Suresh

    2016-09-01

    A new adaptive finite volume conservative cut-cell method that is third-order accurate for simulation of compressible viscous flows is presented. A high-order reconstruction approach using cell centered piecewise polynomial approximation of flow quantities, developed in the past for body-fitted grids, is now extended to the Cartesian based cut-cell method. It is shown that the presence of cut-cells of very low volume results in numerical oscillations in the flow solution near the embedded boundaries when standard small cell treatment techniques are employed. A novel cell clustering approach for polynomial reconstruction in the vicinity of the small cells is proposed and is shown to achieve smooth representation of flow field quantities and their derivatives on immersed interfaces. It is further shown through numerical examples that the proposed clustering method achieves the design order of accuracy and is fairly insensitive to the cluster size. Results are presented for canonical flow past a single cylinder and a sphere at different flow Reynolds numbers to verify the accuracy of the scheme. Investigations are then performed for flow over two staggered cylinders and the results are compared with prior data for the same configuration. All the simulations are carried out with both quadratic and cubic reconstruction, and the results indicate a clear improvement with the cubic reconstruction. The new cut-cell approach with cell clustering is able to predict accurate results even at relatively low resolutions. The ability of the high-order cut-cell method in handling sharp geometrical corners and narrow gaps is also demonstrated using various examples. Finally, three-dimensional flow interactions between a pair of spheres in cross flow is investigated using the proposed cut-cell scheme. The results are shown to be in excellent agreement with past studies, which employed body-fitted grids for studying this complex case.

  7. Satellite alignment. I. Distribution of substructures and their dependence on assembly history from n-body simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yang Ocean; Lin, W. P.; Yu, Yu; Kang, X.; Dutton, Aaron; Macciò, Andrea V. E-mail: linwp@shao.ac.cn

    2014-05-01

    Observations have shown that the spatial distribution of satellite galaxies is not random, but aligned with the major axes of central galaxies. This alignment is dependent on galaxy properties, such that red satellites are more strongly aligned than blue satellites. Theoretical work conducted to interpret this phenomenon has found that it is due to the non-spherical nature of dark matter halos. However, most studies overpredict the alignment signal under the assumption that the central galaxy shape follows the shape of the host halo. It is also not clear whether the color dependence of alignment is due to an assembly bias or an evolution effect. In this paper we study these problems using a cosmological N-body simulation. Subhalos are used to trace the positions of satellite galaxies. It is found that the shapes of dark matter halos are mis-aligned at different radii. If the central galaxy shares the same shape as the inner host halo, then the alignment effect is weaker and agrees with observational data. However, it predicts almost no dependence of alignment on the color of satellite galaxies, though the late accreted subhalos show stronger alignment with the outer layer of the host halo than their early accreted counterparts. We find that this is due to the limitation of pure N-body simulations where satellite galaxies without associated subhalos ('orphan galaxies') are not resolved. These orphan (mostly red) satellites often reside in the inner region of host halos and should follow the shape of the host halo in the inner region.

  8. Satellite Alignment. I. Distribution of Substructures and their Dependence on Assembly History from N-body Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. O.; Lin, W. P.; Kang, X.; Dutton, Aaron; Yu, Yu; Macciò, Andrea V.

    2014-05-01

    Observations have shown that the spatial distribution of satellite galaxies is not random, but aligned with the major axes of central galaxies. This alignment is dependent on galaxy properties, such that red satellites are more strongly aligned than blue satellites. Theoretical work conducted to interpret this phenomenon has found that it is due to the non-spherical nature of dark matter halos. However, most studies overpredict the alignment signal under the assumption that the central galaxy shape follows the shape of the host halo. It is also not clear whether the color dependence of alignment is due to an assembly bias or an evolution effect. In this paper we study these problems using a cosmological N-body simulation. Subhalos are used to trace the positions of satellite galaxies. It is found that the shapes of dark matter halos are mis-aligned at different radii. If the central galaxy shares the same shape as the inner host halo, then the alignment effect is weaker and agrees with observational data. However, it predicts almost no dependence of alignment on the color of satellite galaxies, though the late accreted subhalos show stronger alignment with the outer layer of the host halo than their early accreted counterparts. We find that this is due to the limitation of pure N-body simulations where satellite galaxies without associated subhalos ("orphan galaxies") are not resolved. These orphan (mostly red) satellites often reside in the inner region of host halos and should follow the shape of the host halo in the inner region.

  9. Nanostructured hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) composite coating for controlling magnesium degradation in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ian; Akari, Khalid; Liu, Huinan

    2013-09-20

    Biodegradable magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have many attractive properties (e.g. comparable mechanical properties to cortical bone) for orthopedic implant applications, but they degrade too rapidly in the human body to meet clinical requirements. Nanostructured hydroxyapatite (nHA)/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) composite coatings provide synergistic properties for controlling degradation of Mg-based substrates and improving bone-implant integration. In this study, nHA/PLGA composites were spin coated onto Mg-based substrates and the results showed that the nHA/PLGA coatings retained nano-scale features with nHA dispersed in PLGA matrix. In comparison with non-coated Mg, the nHA/PLGA composite coated Mg increased the corrosion potential and decreased the corrosion current in revised simulated body fluid (rSBF). After 24 h of immersion in rSBF, increased calcium phosphate (CaP) deposition and formation of Mg-substituted CaP rosettes were observed on the surface of the nHA/PLGA coated Mg, indicating greater bioactivity. In contrast, no significant CaP was deposited on the PLGA coated Mg. Since both PLGA coating and nHA/PLGA coating showed some degree of delamination from Mg-based substrates during extended immersion in rSBF, the coating processing and properties should be further optimized in order to take full advantage of biodegradable Mg and nHA/PLGA nanocomposites for orthopedic applications. PMID:23975041

  10. Nanostructured hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) composite coating for controlling magnesium degradation in simulated body fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ian; Akari, Khalid; Liu, Huinan

    2013-09-01

    Biodegradable magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have many attractive properties (e.g. comparable mechanical properties to cortical bone) for orthopedic implant applications, but they degrade too rapidly in the human body to meet clinical requirements. Nanostructured hydroxyapatite (nHA)/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) composite coatings provide synergistic properties for controlling degradation of Mg-based substrates and improving bone-implant integration. In this study, nHA/PLGA composites were spin coated onto Mg-based substrates and the results showed that the nHA/PLGA coatings retained nano-scale features with nHA dispersed in PLGA matrix. In comparison with non-coated Mg, the nHA/PLGA composite coated Mg increased the corrosion potential and decreased the corrosion current in revised simulated body fluid (rSBF). After 24 h of immersion in rSBF, increased calcium phosphate (CaP) deposition and formation of Mg-substituted CaP rosettes were observed on the surface of the nHA/PLGA coated Mg, indicating greater bioactivity. In contrast, no significant CaP was deposited on the PLGA coated Mg. Since both PLGA coating and nHA/PLGA coating showed some degree of delamination from Mg-based substrates during extended immersion in rSBF, the coating processing and properties should be further optimized in order to take full advantage of biodegradable Mg and nHA/PLGA nanocomposites for orthopedic applications.

  11. Three-dimensional scaffolds of acellular human and porcine lungs for high throughput studies of lung disease and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Darcy E.; Bonenfant, Nicholas R.; Sokocevic, Dino; DeSarno, Michael; Borg, Zachary; Parsons, Charles; Brooks, Elice M.; Platz, Joseph; Khalpey, Zain; Hoganson, David M.; Deng, Bin; Lam, Ying Wai; Oldinski, Rachael A.; Ashikaga, Takamaru; Weiss, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Acellular scaffolds from complex whole organs such as lung are being increasingly studied for ex vivo organ generation and for in vitro studies of cell-extracellular matrix interactions. We have established effective methods for efficient de- and recellularization of large animal and human lungs including techniques which allow multiple small segments (∼1–3cm3) to be excised that retain 3-dimensional lung structure. Coupled with the use of a synthetic pleural coating, cells can be selectively physiologically inoculated via preserved vascular and airway conduits. Inoculated segments can be further sliced for high throughput studies. Further, we demonstrate thermography as a powerful noninvasive technique for monitoring perfusion decellularization and for evaluating preservation of vascular and airway networks following human and porcine lung decellularization. Collectively, these techniques are a significant step forward as they allow high throughput in vitro studies from a single lung or lobe in a more biologically relevant, three-dimensional acellular scaffold. PMID:24411675

  12. Pectus excavatum postsurgical outcome based on preoperative soft body dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Antonio H. J.; Rodrigues, Pedro L.; Fonseca, Jaime; Pinho, A. C. M.; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Vilaça, João L.

    2012-02-01

    Pectus excavatum is the most common congenital deformity of the anterior chest wall, in which an abnormal formation of the rib cage gives the chest a caved-in or sunken appearance. Today, the surgical correction of this deformity is carried out in children and adults through Nuss technic, which consists in the placement of a prosthetic bar under the sternum and over the ribs. Although this technique has been shown to be safe and reliable, not all patients have achieved adequate cosmetic outcome. This often leads to psychological problems and social stress, before and after the surgical correction. This paper targets this particular problem by presenting a method to predict the patient surgical outcome based on pre-surgical imagiologic information and chest skin dynamic modulation. The proposed approach uses the patient pre-surgical thoracic CT scan and anatomical-surgical references to perform a 3D segmentation of the left ribs, right ribs, sternum and skin. The technique encompasses three steps: a) approximation of the cartilages, between the ribs and the sternum, trough b-spline interpolation; b) a volumetric mass spring model that connects two layers - inner skin layer based on the outer pleura contour and the outer surface skin; and c) displacement of the sternum according to the prosthetic bar position. A dynamic model of the skin around the chest wall region was generated, capable of simulating the effect of the movement of the prosthetic bar along the sternum. The results were compared and validated with patient postsurgical skin surface acquired with Polhemus FastSCAN system.

  13. Evaluation of an Anthropometric Human Body Model for Simulated EVA Task Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etter, Brad

    1996-01-01

    One of the more mission-critical tasks performed in space is extravehicular activity (EVA) which requires the astronaut to be external to the station or spacecraft, and subsequently at risk from the many threats posed by space. These threats include, but are not limited to: no significant atmosphere, harmful electromagnetic radiation, micrometeoroids, and space debris. To protect the astronaut from this environment, a special EVA suit is worn which is designed to maintain a sustainable atmosphere (at 1/3 atmosphere) and provide protection against the hazards of space. While the EVA suit serves these functions well, it does impose limitations on the astronaut as a consequence of the safety it provides. Since the astronaut is in a virtual vacuum, any atmospheric pressure inside the suit serves to pressurize the suit and restricts mobility of flexible joints (such as fabric). Although some of the EVA suit joints are fixed, rotary-style joints, most of the mobility is achieved by the simple flexibility of the fabric. There are multiple layers of fabric, each of which serves a special purpose in the safety of the astronaut. These multiple layers add to the restriction of motion the astronaut experiences in the space environment. Ground-based testing is implemented to evaluate the capability of EVA-suited astronauts to perform the various tasks in space. In addition to the restriction of motion imposed by the EVA suit, most EVA activity is performed in a micro-gravity (weight less) environment. To simulate weightlessness EVA-suited testing is performed in a neutral buoyancy simulator (NBS). The NBS is composed of a large container of water (pool) in which a weightless environment can be simulated. A subject is normally buoyant in the pressurized suit; however he/she can be made neutrally buoyant with the addition of weights. In addition, most objects the astronaut must interface with in the NBS sink in water and flotation must be added to render them "weightless". The

  14. Comparing outcomes of asteroid impact simulations to observed main-belt families: Exploring the effects of parent body size and internal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavidez, P.; Durda, D.; Enke, B.; Richardson, D.; Asphaug, E.; Campo Bagatin, A.

    2014-07-01

    Some previous works focused on reproducing the size frequency distribution (SFD) of asteroid families through impact simulations, following the same strategy to compare the SFDs. This strategy, firstly applied by Durda et al. (2007), can also be used to estimate the parent-body diameter of observed asteroid families by plotting the (morphologically matching) modeled SFD and the observed family SFD to the same scale on the same plot. This strategy assumes that impact outcomes based on numerical simulations for targets of a particular fixed size are scalable to the observed families that originated from parent bodies perhaps significantly larger or smaller than those that have been modeled. This approximation appears to be reasonable (to zeroth order) for most observed families. However, it may well break down when the gravitational acceleration of the family's parent body is significantly larger or smaller than our modeled parent body. In this work, we study the range of applicability of such technique comparing the modeled SFDs from impacts simulations for parent bodies with different sizes and internal structures. We performed new SPH and N-body simulations for targets of 400 km. Here we used the same numerical technique as that in Benavidez et al. (2012) and Durda et al. (2004). Thus, we have a large set of impact simulations for two different sizes (100 and 400 km) and internal structures (monolithic and rubble-pile). These simulations comprise a homogenous set of 600 simulations covering a wide range of impactor diameters, impact speeds, and impact angles. We will present our preliminary results of this study, addressing the differences presented by cratering events and super-catastrophic impacts. Also, we will include a comparison with asteroid families with large progenitors.

  15. Human acellular dermal matrix for repair of abdominal wall defects: review of clinical experience and experimental data.

    PubMed

    Holton, Luther H; Kim, Daniel; Silverman, Ronald P; Rodriguez, Eduardo D; Singh, Navin; Goldberg, Nelson H

    2005-01-01

    The use of prosthetic mesh for the tension-free repair of incisional hernias has been shown to be more effective than primary suture repair. Unfortunately, prosthetic materials can be a suboptimal choice in a variety of clinical scenarios. In general, prosthetic materials should not be implanted into sites with known contamination or infection because they lack an endogenous vascular network and are thus incapable of clearing bacteria. This is of particular relevance to the repair of recurrent hernias, which are often refractory to repair because of indolent bacterial colonization that weakens the site and retards appropriate healing. Although fascia lata grafts and muscle flaps can be employed for tension-free hernia repairs, they carry the potential for significant donor site morbidity. Recently, a growing number of clinicians have used human acellular dermal matrix as a graft material for the tension-free repair of ventral hernias. This material has been shown to become revascularized in both animal and human subjects. Once repopulated with a vascular network, this graft material is theoretically capable of clearing bacteria, a property not found in prosthetic graft materials. Unlike autologous materials such as fascial grafts and muscle flaps, acellular dermal matrix can be used without subjecting the patient to additional morbidity in the form of donor site complications. This article presents a thorough review of the current literature, describing the properties of human acellular dermal matrix and discussing both animal and human studies of its clinical performance. In addition to the review of previously published clinical experiences, we discuss our own preliminary results with the use of acellular dermal matrix for ventral hernia repair in 46 patients. PMID:16218902

  16. Dynamical friction in head-on galaxy collisions. I. Analytical calculations and restricted three-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, P.; Dupraz, C.

    1994-10-01

    The accretion of a small satellite by a big elliptical galaxy is acknowledged as a key phenomenon in the dynamics of galaxies. It is held responsible for the formation of most fine structures which are observed in ellipticals. Circular orbits for the satellite have been studied in most work so far. However, they may not be representative of the general phenomenon, as their geometry prevents the process from being time-dependent in a genuine way. Here is the first of two articles devoted to the dynamical study of orbital decay during a head-on encounter. Analytical calculations give access to the mechanism of dynamical friction during the event. They consist in the coupled solution of the linearised Poisson and collisionless Boltzmann equations. Our results confirm that time now plays an active role: the drag force undergone by the satellite derives from the transient response of the galaxy and depends on the full past history of the event. As a consequence, dynamical friction is not strictly proportional to the local density as classically expected from Chandrasekhar's formula. Our study is refined by a harmonic analysis of the process. We extend these results by means of restricted three-body simulations. They allow us to deal with a compact satellite and to follow the accretion until merging with the galaxy. We adopt the Multiple Three-Body Algorithm, which naturally accounts for dynamical friction and proves equivalent to the analytical method inasmuch as self-gravity of the galactic wake is unimportant. A satellite along a radial trajectory is braked in a step-like way: its orbital energy is essentially dissipated when it crosses the galactic core. We discuss the dependence of this process on the parameters of the collision: initial energy, mass and radius of the intruder. The size is most important, because it determines both the nature of the galactic response and the ultimate fate of the object. However, we do not properly describe the strong distortion of

  17. Corrosion performance of MAO coatings on AZ31 Mg alloy in simulated body fluid vs. Earle's Balance Salt Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, Benjamin M.; Zhang, Lei; Li, Weiping; Ning, Chengyun; Chen, Cheng-fu; Gu, Yanhong

    2016-02-01

    Earle's Balance Salt Solution (EBSS) provides an alternative to the conventional simulated body fluids (c-SBF) and has been shown to better simulate the corrosion conditions in vivo. In this work, a series of tests were conducted to explore the corrosion performance of MAO-coated AZ31 samples in EBSS vs. c-SBF. Samples were produced by varying MAO process parameters and then immersed up to 21 days in both EBSS and c-SBF. The corrosion rates were evaluated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic scanning. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to compare the progression of microcracks across the surface of the coatings. The evaluation of cross-sectional thickness showed an increase in MAO coating thickness with the process voltage. MAO samples with a thicker coating generally have higher impedance and lower current density at the initial immersion time point of 0.5 h. Samples in EBSS showed higher initial impedance and lower current density values as compared to c-SBF counterparts for all process groups. Samples in EBSS demonstrated a much slower corrosion rate than c-SBF samples because of the decreased chloride content and CO2 buffering mechanism of the EBSS.

  18. Coarse Grained Simulations of the Electrolytes at the Water-Air Interface from Many Body Dissipative Particle Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2012-03-13

    Modeling interfacial properties is a major challenge for mesoscopic simulation methods. Many-body dissipative particle dynamics (MDPD) is then a promising method to model heterogeneous systems at long time and length scales. However no rule exists to obtain a set of MDPD parameters capable to reproduce the thermodynamic properties of a molecular system of a specific chemistry. In this letter, we provide a general multiscale method to obtain a set of parameters from atomistic simulations using Flory-Huggins theory (FH) to be used with dissipative particle dynamics. We demonstrate the high quality and the transferability of the resulting parameters on the salt concentration dependence of surface tension. We also show the specificity of inorganic salt at the water-air interface. Our results indicate that the increase of surface tension with the salt concentration cannot be explained in terms of the charge image concept based on the Wagner, Onsager, and Samaras theory but rather in terms of the ion hydration. PMID:26593339

  19. Simulation and Flight Evaluation of a Parameter Estimation Input Design Method for Hybrid-Wing-Body Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian R.; Ratnayake, Nalin A.

    2010-01-01

    As part of an effort to improve emissions, noise, and performance of next generation aircraft, it is expected that future aircraft will make use of distributed, multi-objective control effectors in a closed-loop flight control system. Correlation challenges associated with parameter estimation will arise with this expected aircraft configuration. Research presented in this paper focuses on addressing the correlation problem with an appropriate input design technique and validating this technique through simulation and flight test of the X-48B aircraft. The X-48B aircraft is an 8.5 percent-scale hybrid wing body aircraft demonstrator designed by The Boeing Company (Chicago, Illinois, USA), built by Cranfield Aerospace Limited (Cranfield, Bedford, United Kingdom) and flight tested at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California, USA). Based on data from flight test maneuvers performed at Dryden Flight Research Center, aerodynamic parameter estimation was performed using linear regression and output error techniques. An input design technique that uses temporal separation for de-correlation of control surfaces is proposed, and simulation and flight test results are compared with the aerodynamic database. This paper will present a method to determine individual control surface aerodynamic derivatives.

  20. Deep Anterior Lamellar Keratoplasty Using Irradiated Acellular Cornea with Amniotic Membrane Transplantation for Intractable Ocular Surface Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Sung Wook; Choi, Sang Uk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the clinical outcomes of deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) when sterile gamma-irradiated acellular corneal tissues (VisionGraft) are used in combination with amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) for intractable ocular surface diseases. Methods The medical records of fifteen patients who had DALK with AMT were retrospectively reviewed. Indications for surgery included ocular burn, bacterial keratitis, herpes simplex virus keratitis, corneal opacity with Stevens-Johnson syndrome, Mooren's ulcer, idiopathic myxoid degeneration of corneal stroma, and recurrent band keratopathy. DALK was performed using partial-thickness acellular corneal tissue and a temporary amniotic membrane patch was added at the end of the operation. Results All cases that underwent DALK with AMT became epithelialized within 2 postoperative weeks. Twelve patients showed favorable outcomes without graft rejection, corneal opacification, or neovascularization. The other three grafts developed corneal opacification and neovascularization, and required additional penetrating keratoplasty (PK). Unlike the results of previous PKs, there were no graft rejections and the graft clarity was well-maintained in these three cases for at least 8 months after PK. Conclusions DALK using sterile acellular corneal tissues in combination with AMT may be a good therapeutic strategy for treating intractable ocular surface diseases because of lowered immune rejection, fibroblast activation, and facilitation of epithelialization. Furthermore, DALK can help stabilize the ocular surface, prolong graft survival, and may allow better outcomes when combined with subsequent PK. PMID:25829823

  1. Management of failed and infected first metatarsophalangeal joint implant arthroplasty by reconstruction with an acellular dermal matrix: a case report.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Wissam E; Fahim, Ramy; Sciulli, Jessica M; Ehredt, Duane J

    2012-01-01

    Management of failed first metatarsophalangeal joint implant arthroplasty, especially in the face of infection, is an area of debate without a clear consensus. The purpose of the present report was to explore a new option of reconstructing the joint with an acellular dermal matrix substance in a single case study during a 12-month follow-up period. A staged approach that began with removal of the failed 2-component great toe implant, Koenig(®), excisional debridement of the wound with resection of the necrotic bone (proximal phalanx and distal portion of the first metatarsal bones), and culture-specific antibiosis therapy. The final stage included incorporating the acellular dermal matrix, Graftjacket(®) into the joint in an accordion-type fashion, and reconstruction of the joint capsule. Postoperative radiographs revealed a more rectus joint with some improvement in length. At 6 months postoperatively, magnetic resonance imaging revealed incorporation of the graft material into the joint. Finally, at the 1-year mark, the patient was pain free with satisfactory function at the first metatarsophalangeal joint during gait. This is the first reported case of salvaging failed and infected first metatarsophalangeal joint implant arthroplasty with incorporation of the acellular dermal matrix and provides a new option to consider in the future. PMID:22704789

  2. Development and Characterization of Acellular Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds from Porcine Menisci for Use in Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Chen; Chen, Ray-Neng; Jhan, Hua-Jing; Liu, Der-Zen; Ho, Hsiu-O; Mao, Yong; Kohn, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Given the growing number of arthritis patients and the limitations of current treatments, there is great urgency to explore cartilage substitutes by tissue engineering. In this study, we developed a novel decellularization method for menisci to prepare acellular extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds with minimal adverse effects on the ECM. Among all the acid treatments, formic acid treatment removed most of the cellular contents and preserved the highest ECM contents in the decellularized porcine menisci. Compared with fresh porcine menisci, the content of DNA decreased to 4.10%±0.03%, and there was no significant damage to glycosaminoglycan (GAG) or collagen. Histological staining also confirmed the presence of ECM and the absence of cellularity. In addition, a highly hydrophilic scaffold with three-dimensional interconnected porous structure was fabricated from decellularized menisci tissue. Human chondrocytes showed enhanced cell proliferation and synthesis of chondrocyte ECM including type II collagen and GAG when cultured in this acellular scaffold. Moreover, the scaffold effectively supported chondrogenesis of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, in vivo implantation was conducted in rats to assess the biocompatibility of the scaffolds. No significant inflammatory response was observed. The acellular ECM scaffold provided a native environment for cells with diverse physiological functions to promote cell proliferation and new tissue formation. This study reported a novel way to prepare decellularized meniscus tissue and demonstrated the potential as scaffolds to support cartilage repair. PMID:25919905

  3. Evaluation of respiratory model employing conventional NIH mice to access the immunity induced by cellular and acellular pertussis vaccines.

    PubMed

    Dias, Alexandre Alves de Souza de Oliveira; Boller, Maria Aparecida Affonso; Werneck, Lúcia Maria Correa; Hirata Junior, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2006-11-01

    The increasing number of pertussis cases reported on the last twenty years and the existence of new acellular vaccines reinforce the need of research for experimental models to assure the quality of available pertussis vaccines. In this study, allotments of whole-cell and acellular pertussis vaccines were tested through the Intranasal Challenge Model (INM) using conventional NIH mice. The results have been compared to those achieved by the "Gold standard" Intracerebral Challenge Model (ICM). In contrast to ICM, INM results did not show intralaboratorial variations. Statistical analysis by Anova and Ancova tests revealed that the INM presented reproducibility and allowed identification and separation of different products, including three-component and four-component accellular pertussis vaccines. INM revealed differences between pertussis vaccines. INM provides lower distress to the mice allowing the reduction of mice number including the possibility of using conventional mice (less expensive) under non-aseptic environment. Thus, INM may be used as an alternative method of verifying the consistence of allotment production, including acellular pertussis vaccines. PMID:17160282

  4. Development and Characterization of Acellular Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds from Porcine Menisci for Use in Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chen; Chen, Ray-Neng; Jhan, Hua-Jing; Liu, Der-Zen; Ho, Hsiu-O; Mao, Yong; Kohn, Joachim; Sheu, Ming-Thau

    2015-09-01

    Given the growing number of arthritis patients and the limitations of current treatments, there is great urgency to explore cartilage substitutes by tissue engineering. In this study, we developed a novel decellularization method for menisci to prepare acellular extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds with minimal adverse effects on the ECM. Among all the acid treatments, formic acid treatment removed most of the cellular contents and preserved the highest ECM contents in the decellularized porcine menisci. Compared with fresh porcine menisci, the content of DNA decreased to 4.10%±0.03%, and there was no significant damage to glycosaminoglycan (GAG) or collagen. Histological staining also confirmed the presence of ECM and the absence of cellularity. In addition, a highly hydrophilic scaffold with three-dimensional interconnected porous structure was fabricated from decellularized menisci tissue. Human chondrocytes showed enhanced cell proliferation and synthesis of chondrocyte ECM including type II collagen and GAG when cultured in this acellular scaffold. Moreover, the scaffold effectively supported chondrogenesis of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, in vivo implantation was conducted in rats to assess the biocompatibility of the scaffolds. No significant inflammatory response was observed. The acellular ECM scaffold provided a native environment for cells with diverse physiological functions to promote cell proliferation and new tissue formation. This study reported a novel way to prepare decellularized meniscus tissue and demonstrated the potential as scaffolds to support cartilage repair. PMID:25919905

  5. Multi-body simulation of a canine hind limb: model development, experimental validation and calculation of ground reaction forces

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Among other causes the long-term result of hip prostheses in dogs is determined by aseptic loosening. A prevention of prosthesis complications can be achieved by an optimization of the tribological system which finally results in improved implant duration. In this context a computerized model for the calculation of hip joint loadings during different motions would be of benefit. In a first step in the development of such an inverse dynamic multi-body simulation (MBS-) model we here present the setup of a canine hind limb model applicable for the calculation of ground reaction forces. Methods The anatomical geometries of the MBS-model have been established using computer tomography- (CT-) and magnetic resonance imaging- (MRI-) data. The CT-data were collected from the pelvis, femora, tibiae and pads of a mixed-breed adult dog. Geometric information about 22 muscles of the pelvic extremity of 4 mixed-breed adult dogs was determined using MRI. Kinematic and kinetic data obtained by motion analysis of a clinically healthy dog during a gait cycle (1 m/s) on an instrumented treadmill were used to drive the model in the multi-body simulation. Results and Discussion As a result the vertical ground reaction forces (z-direction) calculated by the MBS-system show a maximum deviation of 1.75%BW for the left and 4.65%BW for the right hind limb from the treadmill measurements. The calculated peak ground reaction forces in z- and y-direction were found to be comparable to the treadmill measurements, whereas the curve characteristics of the forces in y-direction were not in complete alignment. Conclusion In conclusion, it could be demonstrated that the developed MBS-model is suitable for simulating ground reaction forces of dogs during walking. In forthcoming investigations the model will be developed further for the calculation of forces and moments acting on the hip joint during different movements, which can be of help in context with the in silico development and

  6. Transients from initial conditions based on Lagrangian perturbation theory in N-body simulations II: the effect of the transverse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Tatekawa, Takayuki

    2014-04-01

    We study the initial conditions for cosmological N-body simulations for precision cosmology. In general, Zel'dovich approximation has been applied for the initial conditions of N-body simulations for a long time. These initial conditions provide incorrect higher-order growth. These error caused by setting up the initial conditions by perturbation theory is called transients. We investigated the impact of transient on non-Gaussianity of density field by performing cosmological N-body simulations with initial conditions based on first-, second-, and third-order Lagrangian perturbation theory in previous paper. In this paper, we evaluates the effect of the transverse mode in the third-order Lagrangian perturbation theory for several statistical quantities such as power spectrum and non-Gaussianty. Then we clarified that the effect of the transverse mode in the third-order Lagrangian perturbation theory is quite small.

  7. A comparison of theory and experiment for coupled rotor-body stability of a hingeless rotor model in hover under simulated vacuum conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    1988-01-01

    Two cases were selected for correlation from an experiment that examined the aeromechanical stability of a small-scale model rotor that used tantalum rods instead of blades to simulate vacuum conditions. The first case involved body roll freedom only while the second case included body pitch and roll degrees of freedom together. Analyses from Hughes Helicopters and the U.S. Army Aeromechanics Laboratory were compared with the data and the correlations ranged from poor to good.

  8. Healing rates for challenging rotator cuff tears utilizing an acellular human dermal reinforcement graft

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study presents a retrospective case series of the clinical and structural outcomes (1.5 T MRI) of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with acellular human dermal graft reinforcement performed by a single surgeon in patients with large, massive, and previously repaired rotator cuff tears. Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients with mean anterior to posterior tear size 3.87 ± 0.99 cm (median 4 cm, range 2.5–6 cm) were enrolled in the study and were evaluated for structural integrity using a high-field (1.5 T) MRI at an average of 16.8 months after surgery. The Constant-Murley scores, the Flexilevel Scale of Shoulder Function (Flex SF), scapular plane abduction, and strength were analyzed. Results: MRI results showed that the rotator cuff repair was intact in 85.7% (12/14) of the patients studied. Two patients had a Sugaya Type IV recurrent tear (2 of 14; 14.3%), which were both less than 1 cm. The Constant score increased from a preoperative mean of 49.72 (range 13–74) to a postoperative mean of 81.07 (range 45–92) (P value = 0.009). Flexilevel Scale of Shoulder Function (Flex SF) Score normalized to a 100-point scale improved from a preoperative mean of 53.69 to a postoperative mean of 79.71 (P value = 0.003). The Pain Score improved from a preoperative mean of 7.73 to a postoperative mean of 13.57 (P value = 0.008). Scapular plane abduction improved from a preoperative mean of 113.64° to a postoperative mean of 166.43° (P value = 0.010). The strength subset score improved from a preoperative mean of 1.73 kg to a postoperative mean of 7.52 kg (P value = 0.006). Conclusions: This study presents a safe and effective technique that may help improve the healing rates of large, massive, and revision rotator cuff tears with the use of an acellular human dermal allograft. This technique demonstrated favorable structural healing rates and statistically improved functional outcomes in the near term. Level of Evidence: 4. Retrospective case series. PMID

  9. Simulation of gait and gait initiation associated with body oscillating behavior in the gravity environment on the moon, mars and Phobos.

    PubMed

    Brenière, Y

    2001-04-01

    A double-inverted pendulum model of body oscillations in the frontal plane during stepping [Brenière and Ribreau (1998) Biol Cybern 79: 337-345] proposed an equivalent model for studying the body oscillating behavior induced by step frequency in the form of: (1) a kinetic body parameter, the natural body frequency (NBF), which contains gravity and which is invariable for humans, (2) a parametric function of frequency, whose parameter is the NBF, which explicates the amplitude ratio of center of mass to center of foot pressure oscillation, and (3) a function of frequency which simulates the equivalent torque necessary for the control of the head-arms-trunk segment oscillations. Here, this equivalent model is used to simulate the duration of gait initiation, i.e., the duration necessary to initiate and execute the first step of gait in subgravity, as well as to calculate the step frequencies that would impose the same minimum and maximum amplitudes of the oscillating responses of the body center of mass, whatever the gravity value. In particular, this simulation is tested under the subgravity conditions of the Moon, Mars, and Phobos, where gravity is 1/6, 3/8, and 1/1600 times that on the Earth, respectively. More generally, the simulation allows us to establish and discuss the conditions for gait adaptability that result from the biomechanical constraints particular to each gravity system. PMID:11324337

  10. Corrosion and Fretting Corrosion Studies of Medical Grade CoCrMo Alloy in a Clinically Relevant Simulated Body Fluid Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocran, Emmanuel K.; Guenther, Leah E.; Brandt, Jan-M.; Wyss, Urs; Ojo, Olanrewaju A.

    2015-06-01

    In modular hip implants, fretting corrosion at the head/neck and neck/stem interfaces has been identified as a major cause of early revision in hip implants, particularly those with heads larger than 32 mm. It has been found that the type of fluid used to simulate the fretting corrosion of biomedical materials is crucial for the reliability of laboratory tests. Therefore, to properly understand and effectively design against fretting corrosion damage in modular hips, there is the need to replicate the human body environment as closely as possible during in vitro testing. In this work, corrosion and fretting corrosion behavior of CoCrMo in 0.14 M NaCl, phosphate buffered saline, and in a clinically relevant novel simulated body fluid was studied using a variety of electrochemical characterization techniques and tribological experiments. Electrochemical, spectroscopy and tribo-electrochemical techniques employed include Potentiodynamic polarization, Potentiostatic polarization, Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, augur electron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy, and pin-on-disk wear simulation. The presence of phosphate ions in PBS accounted for the higher corrosion rate when compared with 0.14 M NaCl and the clinically relevant novel simulated body fluid. The low corrosion rates and the nature of the protective passive film formed in the clinically relevant simulated body fluid make it suitable for future corrosion and fretting corrosion studies.

  11. Numerical Simulations Of Catastrophic Disruption Of Porous Bodies: Application To Dark-type Asteroids And Kuiper-belt Family Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; Jutzi, M.; Richardson, D. C.; Benz, W.

    2010-10-01

    Asteroids of dark (e.g. C, D) taxonomic classes as well as Kuiper Belt objects and comets are believed to have high porosity, not only in the form of large voids but also in the form of micro-pores. The presence of such microscale porosity introduces additional physics in the impact process. We have enhanced our 3D SPH hydrocode, used to simulate catastrophic breakups, with a model of porosity [1] and validated it at small scale by comparison with impact experiments on pumice targets [2]. Our model is now ready to be applied to a large range of problems. In particular, accounting for the gravitational phase of an impact, we can study the formation of dark-type asteroid families, such as Veritas, and Kuiper-Belt families, such as Haumea. Recently we characterized for the first time the catastrophic impact energy threshold, usually called Q*D, as a function of the target's diameter, porosity, material strength and impact speed [3]. Regarding the mentioned families, our preliminary results show that accounting for porosity leads to different outcomes that may better represent their properties and constrain their definition. In particular, for Veritas, we find that its membership may need some revision [4]. The parameter space is still large, many interesting families need to be investigated and our model will be applied to a large range of cases. PM, MJ and DCR acknowledge financial support from the French Programme National de Planétologie, NASA PG&G "Small Bodies and Planetary Collisions" and NASA under Grant No. NNX08AM39G issued through the Office of Space Science, respectively. [1] Jutzi et al. 2008. Icarus 198, 242-255; [2] Jutzi et al. 2009. Icarus 201, 802-813; [3] Jutzi et al. 2010. Fragment properties at the catastrophic disruption threshold: The effect of the parent body's internal structure, Icarus 207, 54-65; [4] Michel et al. 2010. Icarus, submitted.

  12. ArcNLET: A GIS-based software to simulate groundwater nitrate load from septic systems to surface water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, J. Fernando; Ye, Ming; Wang, Liying; Lee, Paul Z.; Davis, Hal; Hicks, Rick

    2013-03-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS), or septic systems, can be a significant source of nitrates in groundwater and surface water. The adverse effects that nitrates have on human and environmental health have given rise to the need to estimate the actual or potential level of nitrate contamination. With the goal of reducing data collection and preparation costs, and decreasing the time required to produce an estimate compared to complex nitrate modeling tools, we developed the ArcGIS-based Nitrate Load Estimation Toolkit (ArcNLET) software. Leveraging the power of geographic information systems (GIS), ArcNLET is an easy-to-use software capable of simulating nitrate transport in groundwater and estimating long-term nitrate loads from groundwater to surface water bodies. Data requirements are reduced by using simplified models of groundwater flow and nitrate transport which consider nitrate attenuation mechanisms (subsurface dispersion and denitrification) as well as spatial variability in the hydraulic parameters and septic tank distribution. ArcNLET provides a spatial distribution of nitrate plumes from multiple septic systems and a load estimate to water bodies. ArcNLET's conceptual model is divided into three sub-models: a groundwater flow model, a nitrate transport and fate model, and a load estimation model which are implemented as an extension to ArcGIS. The groundwater flow model uses a map of topography in order to generate a steady-state approximation of the water table. In a validation study, this approximation was found to correlate well with a water table produced by a calibrated numerical model although it was found that the degree to which the water table resembles the topography can vary greatly across the modeling domain. The transport model uses a semi-analytical solution to estimate the distribution of nitrate within groundwater, which is then used to estimate a nitrate load using a mass balance argument. The estimates given by ArcNLET are

  13. A molecular H2 potential for heterogeneous simulations including polarization and many-body van der Waals interactions.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Keith; Cioce, Christian R; Belof, Jonathan L; Space, Brian; Space, Brian B

    2012-05-21

    A highly accurate aniostropic intermolecular potential for diatomic hydrogen has been developed that is transferable for molecular modeling in heterogeneous systems. The potential surface is designed to be efficacious in modeling mixed sorbates in metal-organic materials that include sorption interactions with charged interfaces and open metal sites. The potential parameters are compatible for mixed simulations but still maintain high accuracy while deriving dispersion parameters from a proven polarizability model. The potential includes essential physical interactions including: short-range repulsions, dispersion, and permanent and induced electrostatics. Many-body polarization is introduced via a point-atomic polarizability model that is also extended to account for many-body van der Waals interactions in a consistent fashion. Permanent electrostatics are incorporated using point partial charges on atomic sites. However, contrary to expectation, the best potentials are obtained by permitting the charges to take on values that do not reproduce the first non-vanishing moment of the electrostatic potential surface, i.e., the quadrupole moment. Potential parameters are fit to match ab initio energies for a representative range of dimer geometries. The resulting potential is shown to be highly effective by comparing to electronic structure calculations for a thermal distribution of trimer geometries, and by reproducing experimental bulk pressure-density isotherms. The surface is shown to be superior to other similarly portable potential choices even in tests on homogeneous systems without strong polarizing fields. The present streamlined approach to developing such potentials allows for a simple adaptation to other molecules amenable to investigation by high-level electronic structure methods. PMID:22612090

  14. From planetesimals to terrestrial planets: N-body simulations including the effects of nebular gas and giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, Ryuji; Stadel, Joachim; Moore, Ben

    2010-06-01

    We present results from a suite of N-body simulations that follow the formation and accretion history of the terrestrial planets using a new parallel treecode that we have developed. We initially place 2000 equal size planetesimals between 0.5 and 4.0 AU and the collisional growth is followed until the completion of planetary accretion (>100 Myr). A total of 64 simulations were carried out to explore sensitivity to the key parameters and initial conditions. All the important effect of gas in laminar disks are taken into account: the aerodynamic gas drag, the disk-planet interaction including Type I migration, and the global disk potential which causes inward migration of secular resonances as the gas dissipates. We vary the initial total mass and spatial distribution of the planetesimals, the time scale of dissipation of nebular gas (which dissipates uniformly in space and exponentially in time), and orbits of Jupiter and Saturn. We end up with 1-5 planets in the terrestrial region. In order to maintain sufficient mass in this region in the presence of Type I migration, the time scale of gas dissipation needs to be 1-2 Myr. The final configurations and collisional histories strongly depend on the orbital eccentricity of Jupiter. If today's eccentricity of Jupiter is used, then most of bodies in the asteroidal region are swept up within the terrestrial region owing to the inward migration of the secular resonance, and giant impacts between protoplanets occur most commonly around 10 Myr. If the orbital eccentricity of Jupiter is close to zero, as suggested in the Nice model, the effect of the secular resonance is negligible and a large amount of mass stays for a long period of time in the asteroidal region. With a circular orbit for Jupiter, giant impacts usually occur around 100 Myr, consistent with the accretion time scale indicated from isotope records. However, we inevitably have an Earth size planet at around 2 AU in this case. It is very difficult to obtain

  15. Overview of currently available Japanese acellular pertussis vaccines and future problems.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, H; Nii, R

    1988-01-01

    Acellular pertussis diphtheria, tetanus vaccine (APDT) was licensed in 1981 in Japan. This vaccine contains pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) and agglutinogen (AGG) as the main protective antigens. The new APDT vaccine produced by each company differs slightly in composition. There are two representative types of vaccine. One vaccine (B type) contains PT and FHA in a ratio of 1 to 1 and the other one (T type) contains PT and FHA in a ratio of 4 to 1 or 9 to 1 and also contains different amounts of AGG. We have been comparing the effectiveness of these two types of vaccine. The adverse reactions of APDT were local reactions such as redness and swelling, with a few febrile cases. No central nervous system adverse reactions were observed. The antibody protective level of this vaccine is also being investigated. After we changed from conventional vaccine to APDT, the frequency of serious adverse reactions was reduced and the number of pertussis infections also gradually decreased. This vaccine should be used for the children world-wide. PMID:3273618

  16. Human keratinocyte growth and differentiation on acellular porcine dermal matrix in relation to wound healing potential.

    PubMed

    Zajicek, Robert; Mandys, Vaclav; Mestak, Ondrej; Sevcik, Jan; Königova, Radana; Matouskova, Eva

    2012-01-01

    A number of implantable biomaterials derived from animal tissues are now used in modern surgery. Xe-Derma is a dry, sterile, acellular porcine dermis. It has a remarkable healing effect on burns and other wounds. Our hypothesis was that the natural biological structure of Xe-Derma plays an important role in keratinocyte proliferation and formation of epidermal architecture in vitro as well as in vivo. The bioactivity of Xe-Derma was studied by a cell culture assay. We analyzed growth and differentiation of human keratinocytes cultured in vitro on Xe-Derma, and we compared the results with formation of neoepidermis in the deep dermal wounds treated with Xe-Derma. Keratinocytes cultured on Xe-Derma submerged in the culture medium achieved confluence in 7-10 days. After lifting the cultures to the air-liquid interface, the keratinocytes were stratified and differentiated within one week, forming an epidermis with basal, spinous, granular, and stratum corneum layers. Immunohistochemical detection of high-molecular weight cytokeratins (HMW CKs), CD29, p63, and involucrin confirmed the similarity of organization and differentiation of the cultured epidermal cells to the normal epidermis. The results suggest that the firm natural structure of Xe-Derma stimulates proliferation and differentiation of human primary keratinocytes and by this way improves wound healing. PMID:22629190

  17. Cellular Response to a Novel Fetal Acellular Collagen Matrix: Implications for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rennert, Robert C.; Garg, Ravi K.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. PriMatrix (TEI Biosciences Inc., Boston, MA, USA) is a novel acellular collagen matrix derived from fetal bovine dermis that is designed for use in partial- and full-thickness wounds. This study analyzes the cellular response to PriMatrix in vivo, as well as the ability of this matrix to facilitate normal tissue regeneration. Methods. Five by five mm squares of rehydrated PriMatrix were implanted in a subcutaneous fashion on the dorsum of wild-type mice. Implant site tissue was harvested for histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and flow cytometric analyses at multiple time points until day 28. Results. PriMatrix implants were found to go through a biological progression initiated by a transient infiltrate of inflammatory cells, followed by mesenchymal cell recruitment and vascular development. IHC analysis revealed that the majority of the implanted fetal dermal collagen fibers persisted through day 28 but underwent remodeling and cellular repopulation to form tissue with a density and morphology consistent with healthy dermis. Conclusions. PriMatrix implants undergo progressive in vivo remodeling, facilitating the regeneration of histologically normal tissue through a mild inflammatory and progenitor cell response. Regeneration of normal tissue is especially important in a wound environment, and these findings warrant further investigation of PriMatrix in this setting. PMID:23970899

  18. Treatment of severe burn with DermACELL®, an acellular dermal matrix

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shyi-Gen; Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng; Wang, Chih-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    For treatment of skin burn injuries, there exist several methods of treatment related to tissue regeneration, including the use of autograft skin and cryopreserved skin. However, each method has drawbacks. An alternative method for tissue regeneration is allograft acellular dermal matrix, with potential as a biocompatible scaffold for new tissue growth. One recently produced material of this type is DermACELL®, which was used in this case presentation for treating a scar resulting from second- and third-degree burns in a 33-year-old female patient. The patient presented with significant hypertrophic scarring from the elbow to the hand and with limited wrist and elbow motion. The scarring was removed, and the patient was treated with a 1:3 mesh of DermACELL. The wound was resurfaced with a split thickness skin graft, and postoperative care included application of pressure garment and silicone sheet, as well as range of motion exercise and massage. At 30 days after DermACELL application, the wound appeared well-healed with little scar formation. At 180 days post-application, the wound continued to appear healed well without significant scar formation. Additionally, the wound was supple, and the patient experienced significant improvement in range of motion. In the case presented, DermACELL appears to have been a successful method of treatment for scarring due to severe burns by preventing further scar formation and improving range of motion. PMID:23071908

  19. Effect of dynamic seeding methods on the distribution of fibroblasts within human acellular dermis.

    PubMed

    Vitacolonna, Mario; Belharazem, Djeda; Hohenberger, Peter; Roessner, Eric D

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare different dynamic cell seeding methods regarding their seeding efficiency, homogeneity, infiltration depth and proliferation within a human acellular dermis. In addition, the growth behaviour was observed during a 12-day static in vitro culture. The dynamic methods included orbital-shaker seeding and the use of a plate centrifuge with different rotational speeds, combinations of low-pressure for matrix degassing and centrifugal seeding. Scaffolds were incubated for up to 12 days statically. Cell distribution and infiltration depth were analysed histologically at days 0, 4, 8 and 12. Seeding efficiency and cell proliferation were quantified with the MTT-assay at the same time points. Centrifugal seeding with 300g for 5 × 1 min combined with matrix degassing significantly increased the seeding efficiency and homogeneity compared to the other methods. However, following static culture, no cells were detectable after 4 days in the inner matrix zones. Furthermore, none of the degassing+centrifugation groups reached a significantly higher proliferation at day 8 compared to the reference. The use of a single dynamic method resulted in an inefficient cell seeding. We archived the highest seeding efficiency, homogeneity and infiltration depth using a combination of degassing+centrifugation at 300g for 5 × 1 min. PMID:25795264

  20. Calcification resistance for photooxidatively crosslinked acellular bovine jugular vein conduits in right-side heart implantation.

    PubMed

    Lü, Wei-Dong; Wang, An-Ping; Wu, Zhong-Shi; Zhang, Ming; Hu, Tie-Hui; Lei, Guang-Yan; Hu, Ye-Rong

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of decellularization plus photooxidative crosslinking and ethanol pretreatment on bioprosthetic tissue calcification. Photooxidatively crosslinked acellular (PCA) bovine jugular vein conduits (BJVCs) and their photooxidized controls (n = 5 each) were sterilized in a graded concentration of ethanol solutions for 4 h, and used to reconstruct dog right ventricular outflow tracts. At 1-year implantation, echocardiography showed similar hemodynamic performance, but obvious calcification for the photooxidized BJVC walls. Further histological examination showed intense calcium deposition colocalized with slightly degraded elastic fibers in the photooxidized BJVC walls, with sparsely distributed punctate calcification in the valves and other areas of walls. But PCA BJVCs had apparent degradation of elastic fibers in the walls, with only sparsely distributed punctate calcification in the walls and valves. Content assay demonstrated comparable calcium content for the two groups at preimplantation, whereas less calcium for the PCA group in the walls and similar calcium in the valvular leaflets compared with the photooxidized group at 1-year retrieval. Elastin content assay presented the conduit walls of PCA group had less elastin content at preimplantation, but similar content at 1-year retrieval compared with the photooxidized group. Phospholipid analysis showed phospholipid extraction by ethanol for the PCA group was more efficacious than the photooxidized group. These results indicate that PCA BJVCs resist calcification in right-side heart implantation owing to decellularization, further photooxidative crosslinking, and subsequent phospholipid extraction by ethanol at preimplantation. PMID:22615255

  1. Brainless but Multi-Headed: Decision Making by the Acellular Slime Mould Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Beekman, Madeleine; Latty, Tanya

    2015-11-20

    Because of its peculiar biology and the ease with which it can be cultured, the acellular slime mould Physarum polycephalum has long been a model organism in a range of disciplines. Due to its macroscopic, syncytial nature, it is no surprise that it has been a favourite amongst cell biologists. Its inclusion in the experimental tool kit of behavioural ecologists is much more recent. These recent studies have certainly paid off. They have shown that, for an organism that lacks a brain or central nervous system, P. polycephalum shows rather complex behaviour. For example, it is capable of finding the shortest path through a maze, it can construct networks as efficient as those designed by humans, it can solve computationally difficult puzzles, it makes multi-objective foraging decisions, it balances its nutrient intake and it even behaves irrationally. Are the slime mould's achievements simply "cute", worthy of mentioning in passing but nothing to take too seriously? Or do they hint at the fundamental processes underlying all decision making? We will address this question after reviewing the decision-making abilities of the slime mould. PMID:26189159

  2. Glycerolized Reticular Dermis as a New Human Acellular Dermal Matrix: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Pietro Maria; Balmativola, Davide; Cambieri, Irene; Scalzo, Maria Stella; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Annaratone, Laura; Casarin, Stefania; Fumagalli, Mara; Stella, Maurizio; Sapino, Anna; Castagnoli, Carlotta

    2016-01-01

    Human Acellular Dermal Matrices (HADM) are employed in various reconstructive surgery procedures as scaffolds for autologous tissue regeneration. The aim of this project was to develop a new type of HADM for clinical use, composed of glycerolized reticular dermis decellularized through incubation and tilting in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM). This manufacturing method was compared with a decellularization procedure already described in the literature, based on the use of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), on samples from 28 donors. Cell viability was assessed using an MTT assay and microbiological monitoring was performed on all samples processed after each step. Two surgeons evaluated the biomechanical characteristics of grafts of increasing thickness. The effects of the different decellularization protocols were assessed by means of histological examination and immunohistochemistry, and residual DNA after decellularization was quantified using a real-time TaqMan MGB probe. Finally, we compared the results of DMEM based decellularization protocol on reticular dermis derived samples with the results of the same protocol applied on papillary dermis derived grafts. Our experimental results indicated that the use of glycerolized reticular dermis after 5 weeks of treatment with DMEM results in an HADM with good handling and biocompatibility properties. PMID:26918526

  3. Glycerolized Reticular Dermis as a New Human Acellular Dermal Matrix: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Pietro Maria; Balmativola, Davide; Cambieri, Irene; Scalzo, Maria Stella; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Annaratone, Laura; Casarin, Stefania; Fumagalli, Mara; Stella, Maurizio; Sapino, Anna; Castagnoli, Carlotta

    2016-01-01

    Human Acellular Dermal Matrices (HADM) are employed in various reconstructive surgery procedures as scaffolds for autologous tissue regeneration. The aim of this project was to develop a new type of HADM for clinical use, composed of glycerolized reticular dermis decellularized through incubation and tilting in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM). This manufacturing method was compared with a decellularization procedure already described in the literature, based on the use of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), on samples from 28 donors. Cell viability was assessed using an MTT assay and microbiological monitoring was performed on all samples processed after each step. Two surgeons evaluated the biomechanical characteristics of grafts of increasing thickness. The effects of the different decellularization protocols were assessed by means of histological examination and immunohistochemistry, and residual DNA after decellularization was quantified using a real-time TaqMan MGB probe. Finally, we compared the results of DMEM based decellularization protocol on reticular dermis derived samples with the results of the same protocol applied on papillary dermis derived grafts. Our experimental results indicated that the use of glycerolized reticular dermis after 5 weeks of treatment with DMEM results in an HADM with good handling and biocompatibility properties. PMID:26918526

  4. Does Acellular Dermal Matrix Thickness Affect Complication Rate in Tissue Expander Based Breast Reconstruction?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. While the benefits of using acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) in breast reconstruction are well described, their use has been associated with additional complications. The purpose of this study was to determine if ADM thickness affects complications in breast reconstruction. Methods. A retrospective chart review was performed including all tissue expander based breast reconstructions with AlloDerm (LifeCell, Branchburg, NJ) over 4 years. We evaluated preoperative characteristics and assessed postoperative complications including seroma, hematoma, infection, skin necrosis, and need for reintervention. We reviewed ADM thickness and time to Jackson-Pratt (JP) drain removal. Results. Fifty-five patients underwent 77 ADM-associated tissue expander based breast reconstructions, with average age of 48.1 years and average BMI of 25.9. Average ADM thickness was 1.21 mm. We found higher complication rates in the thick ADM group. Significant associations were found between smokers and skin necrosis (p < 0.0001) and seroma and prolonged JP drainage (p = 0.0004); radiated reconstructed breasts were more likely to suffer infections (p = 0.0085), and elevated BMI is a significant predictor for increased infection rate (p = 0.0037). Conclusion. We found a trend toward increased complication rates with thicker ADMs. In the future, larger prospective studies evaluating thickness may provide more information.

  5. Does Acellular Dermal Matrix Thickness Affect Complication Rate in Tissue Expander Based Breast Reconstruction?

    PubMed

    Rose, Jessica F; Zafar, Sarosh N; Ellsworth Iv, Warren A

    2016-01-01

    Background. While the benefits of using acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) in breast reconstruction are well described, their use has been associated with additional complications. The purpose of this study was to determine if ADM thickness affects complications in breast reconstruction. Methods. A retrospective chart review was performed including all tissue expander based breast reconstructions with AlloDerm (LifeCell, Branchburg, NJ) over 4 years. We evaluated preoperative characteristics and assessed postoperative complications including seroma, hematoma, infection, skin necrosis, and need for reintervention. We reviewed ADM thickness and time to Jackson-Pratt (JP) drain removal. Results. Fifty-five patients underwent 77 ADM-associated tissue expander based breast reconstructions, with average age of 48.1 years and average BMI of 25.9. Average ADM thickness was 1.21 mm. We found higher complication rates in the thick ADM group. Significant associations were found between smokers and skin necrosis (p < 0.0001) and seroma and prolonged JP drainage (p = 0.0004); radiated reconstructed breasts were more likely to suffer infections (p = 0.0085), and elevated BMI is a significant predictor for increased infection rate (p = 0.0037). Conclusion. We found a trend toward increased complication rates with thicker ADMs. In the future, larger prospective studies evaluating thickness may provide more information. PMID:27190645

  6. Acellular Dermal Matrix in Reconstructive Breast Surgery: Survey of Current Practice among Plastic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. S.; Koolen, Pieter G. L.; Ashraf, Azra A.; Kim, Kuylhee; Mureau, Marc A. M.; Lee, Bernard T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) in plastic surgery have become increasingly popular particularly for breast reconstruction. Despite their advantages, questions exist regarding their association with a possible increased incidence of complications. We describe a collective experience of plastic surgeons’ use of ADMs in reconstructive breast surgery using an internet-based survey. Methods: Members of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons were recruited through voluntary, anonymous participation in an online survey. The web-based survey garnered information about participant demographics and their experience with ADM use in breast reconstruction procedures. After responses were collected, all data were anonymously processed. Results: Data were ascertained through 365 physician responses of which 99% (n = 361) completed the survey. The majority of participants were men (84.5%) between 51 and 60 years (37.4%); 84.2% used ADM in breast reconstruction, including radiated patients (79.7%). ADM use was not favored for nipple reconstruction (81.5%); 94.6% of participants used drains, and 87.8% administered antibiotics postoperatively. The most common complications were seroma (70.9%) and infection (16%), although 57.4% claimed anecdotally that overall complication rate was unchanged after incorporating ADM into their practice. High cost was a deterrent for ADM use (37.5%). Conclusions: Plastic surgeons currently use ADM in breast reconstruction for both immediate and staged procedures. Of those responding, a majority of plastic surgeons will incorporate drains and use postoperative antibiotics for more than 48 hours. PMID:25973359

  7. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of the Microstructure of Human Acellular Nerve Allograft.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shuang; Zhu, Qingtang; Liu, Xiaolin; Yang, Weihong; Jian, Yutao; Zhou, Xiang; He, Bo; Gu, Liqiang; Yan, Liwei; Lin, Tao; Xiang, Jianping; Qi, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The exact inner 3D microstructure of the human peripheral nerve has been a mystery for decades. Therefore, it has been difficult to solve several problems regarding peripheral nerve injury and repair. We used high-resolution X-ray computed microtomography (microCT) to scan a freeze-dried human acellular nerve allograft (hANA). The microCT images were then used to reconstruct a 3D digital model, which was used to print a 3D resin model of the nerve graft. The 3D digital model of the hANA allowed visualization of all planes. The magnified 3D resin model clearly showed the nerve bundles and basement membrane tubes of the hANA. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyse the microstructure of the hANA. Compared to the SEM images, the microCT image clearly demonstrated the microstructure of the hANA cross section at a resolution of up to 1.2 μm. The 3D digital model of the hANA facilitates a clear and easy understanding of peripheral nerve microstructure. Furthermore, the enlarged 3D resin model duplicates the unique inner structure of each individual hANA. This is a crucial step towards achieving 3D printing of a hANA or nerve that can be used as a nerve graft. PMID:27476584

  8. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of the Microstructure of Human Acellular Nerve Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shuang; Zhu, Qingtang; Liu, Xiaolin; Yang, Weihong; Jian, Yutao; Zhou, Xiang; He, Bo; Gu, Liqiang; Yan, Liwei; Lin, Tao; Xiang, Jianping; Qi, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The exact inner 3D microstructure of the human peripheral nerve has been a mystery for decades. Therefore, it has been difficult to solve several problems regarding peripheral nerve injury and repair. We used high-resolution X-ray computed microtomography (microCT) to scan a freeze-dried human acellular nerve allograft (hANA). The microCT images were then used to reconstruct a 3D digital model, which was used to print a 3D resin model of the nerve graft. The 3D digital model of the hANA allowed visualization of all planes. The magnified 3D resin model clearly showed the nerve bundles and basement membrane tubes of the hANA. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyse the microstructure of the hANA. Compared to the SEM images, the microCT image clearly demonstrated the microstructure of the hANA cross section at a resolution of up to 1.2 μm. The 3D digital model of the hANA facilitates a clear and easy understanding of peripheral nerve microstructure. Furthermore, the enlarged 3D resin model duplicates the unique inner structure of each individual hANA. This is a crucial step towards achieving 3D printing of a hANA or nerve that can be used as a nerve graft. PMID:27476584

  9. Preparation and characterization of an advanced collagen aggregate from porcine acellular dermal matrix.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhua; Dan, Nianhua; Dan, Weihua

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to extract and characterize an advanced collagen aggregate (Ag-col) from porcine acellular dermal matrix (pADM). Based on histological examination, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM), Ag-col was composed of the D-periodic cross-striated collagen fibrils and thick collagen fiber bundles with uneven diameters and non-orientated arrangement. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of pADM, Ag-col and Col were similar and revealed the presence of the triple helix. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis exhibited a slightly higher content of α-helix but inappreciably less amount of random coil structure in Ag-col compared to Col. Moreover, imino acid contents of pADM, Ag-col and Col were 222.43, 218.30 and 190.01 residues/1000 residues, respectively. From zeta potential analysis, a net charge of zero was found at pH 6.45 and 6.11 for Ag-col and Col, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study suggested that the Td of Ag-col was 20°C higher than that of Col as expected, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that Ag-col possessed a higher storage modulus but similar loss factor compared to Col. Therefore, the collagen aggregate from pADM could serve as a better alternative source of collagens for further applications in food and biological industries. PMID:27039117

  10. Purification design and practice for pertactin, the third component of acellular pertussis vaccine, from Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zenglan; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Qi; Li, Zhengjun; Liu, Yongdong; Zhang, Songping; Zhang, Guifeng; Ma, Guanghui; Luo, Jian; Su, Zhiguo

    2016-07-25

    Development of acellular pertussis vaccine (aPV) requires purification of several components from Bordetella pertussis. While the components pertussis toxin (PT) and filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) have been successfully purified, the third component, pertactin, proves to be a difficult target due to its very low concentration. In order to solve its purification problem, we performed the surface potential analysis with GRASP2 program. The results demonstrated that there are two major charge patches, one negative and one positive, which are located separately on this linear protein. For this special feature, we designed a dual ion exchange chromatography strategy including an anionic exchange and a cationic exchange process for separation of pertactin from the heat extract of B. pertussis. The initial anionic exchange chromatography concentrated the product from 1.7% to 14.6%, with recovery of 80%. The second cationic exchange chromatography increased the purity to 33%, with recovery of 83%. The final purification was accomplished by hydrophobic interaction chromatography, yielding a purity of 96%. The total recovery of the three columns was 61%. Characterization of the purified antigen was performed with CD, intrinsic fluorescence, HP-SEC and western-blot, showing that the purified protein kept its natural conformation and immune-reactivity. The rationally designed process proved to be feasible, and it is suitable for large-scale preparation of the third aPV component pertactin. PMID:27302339

  11. Complex ventral hernia repair with a human acellular dermal matrix and component separation: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Alvaro; Baldoni, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    We present a case series of 19 patients requiring complex abdominal hernia repairs. Patients presented with challenging clinical histories with 95% having multiple significant comorbidities including overweight or obesity (84%), hypertension (53%), diabetes (42%), cancer (26%), and pulmonary disease (16%). The majority of patients (68%) had prior abdominal infections and 53% had at least one failed prior hernia repair. Upon examination, fascial defects averaged 282 cm2. Anterior and posterior component separation was performed with placement of a human acellular dermal mesh. Midline abdominal closure under minimal tension was achieved primarily in all cases. Post-operative complications included 2 adverse events (11%) – one pulmonary embolism and one post-operative hemorrhage requiring transfusion; 6 wound-related complications (32%), 1 seroma (5%) and 1 patient with post-operative ileus (5%). Operative intervention was not required in any of the cases and most patients made an uneventful recovery. Increased patient age and longer OR time were independently predictive of early post-operative complications. At a median 2-year follow-up, three patients had a documented hernia recurrence (16%) and one patient was deceased due to unrelated causes. Conclusion Patients at high risk for post-operative events due to comorbidities, prior abdominal infection and failed mesh repairs do well following component separation reinforced with a human bioprosthetic mesh. Anticipated post-operative complications were managed conservatively and at a median 2-year follow-up, a low rate of hernia recurrence was observed with this approach. PMID:26288732

  12. Tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccination among women of childbearing age-United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Alissa C; Lu, Peng-Jun; Williams, Walter W; Ding, Helen; Meyer, Sarah A

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of pertussis in the United States has increased since the 1990s. Tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccination of pregnant women provides passive protection to infants. Tdap vaccination is currently recommended for pregnant women during each pregnancy, but coverage among pregnant women and women of childbearing age has been suboptimal. Data from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were used to determine national and state-specific Tdap vaccination coverage among women of childbearing age by self-reported pregnancy status at the time of the survey. Although this study could not assess coverage of Tdap vaccination received during pregnancy because questions on whether Tdap vaccination was received during pregnancy were not asked in BRFSS and NHIS, demographic and access-to-care factors associated with Tdap vaccination coverage in this population were assessed. Tdap vaccination coverage among all women 18-44 years old was 38.4% based on the BRFSS and 23.3% based on the NHIS. Overall, coverage did not differ by pregnancy status at the time of the survey. Coverage among all women 18-44 years old varied widely by state. Age, race and ethnicity, education, number of children in the household, and access-to-care characteristics were independently associated with Tdap vaccination in both surveys. We identified associations of demographic and access-to-care characteristics with Tdap vaccination that can guide strategies to improve vaccination rates in women during pregnancy. PMID:27372388

  13. Modeling of body tissues for Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy treatments planned with conventional x-ray CT systems.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku; Nakao, Minoru

    2016-07-01

    In the conventional procedure for accurate Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy, a CT number given to each pixel of a patient image is directly converted to mass density and elemental composition using their respective functions that have been calibrated specifically for the relevant x-ray CT system. We propose an alternative approach that is a conversion in two steps: the first from CT number to density and the second from density to composition. Based on the latest compilation of standard tissues for reference adult male and female phantoms, we sorted the standard tissues into groups by mass density and defined the representative tissues by averaging the material properties per group. With these representative tissues, we formulated polyline relations between mass density and each of the following; electron density, stopping-power ratio and elemental densities. We also revised a procedure of stoichiometric calibration for CT-number conversion and demonstrated the two-step conversion method for a theoretically emulated CT system with hypothetical 80 keV photons. For the standard tissues, high correlation was generally observed between mass density and the other densities excluding those of C and O for the light spongiosa tissues between 1.0 g cm(-3) and 1.1 g cm(-3) occupying 1% of the human body mass. The polylines fitted to the dominant tissues were generally consistent with similar formulations in the literature. The two-step conversion procedure was demonstrated to be practical and will potentially facilitate Monte Carlo simulation for treatment planning and for retrospective analysis of treatment plans with little impact on the management of planning CT systems. PMID:27300449

  14. Anti-cooperativity in hydrophobic interactions: A simulation study of spatial dependence of three-body effects and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Seishi; Chan, Hue Sun

    2001-07-01

    To better understand the energetics of hydrophobic core formation in protein folding under ambient conditions, the potential of mean force (PMF) for different three-methane configurations in an aqueous environment is computed by constant-pressure Monte Carlo sampling using the TIP4P model of water at 25 °C under atmospheric pressure. Whether the hydrophobic interaction is additive, cooperative or anti-cooperative is determined by whether the directly simulated three-methane PMF is equal to, more favorable, or less favorable than the sum of two-methane PMFs. To ensure that comparisons between PMFs are physically meaningful, a test-particle insertion technique is employed to provide unequivocal correspondence between zero PMF value and the nonexistent inter-methane interaction (zero reference-state free energy) experienced by a pair of methanes infinitely far apart. Substantial deviations from pairwise additivity are observed. Significantly, a majority of the three-methane configurations investigated exhibit anti-cooperativity. Previously simulated three-methane PMFs were defined along only one single coordinate. In contrast, our technique enables efficient computation of a three-methane PMF that depends on two independent position variables. The new results show that the magnitude and sign of nonadditivity exhibit a prominent angular dependence, highlighting the complexity of multiple-body hydrophobic interactions. Packing consideration of crystal-like constructs of an infinite number of methanes and analysis of methane sublimation and hydration data suggest that anti-cooperativity may be a prevalent feature in hydrophobic interactions. Ramifications for protein folding are discussed.

  15. MODELING PLANETARY SYSTEM FORMATION WITH N-BODY SIMULATIONS: ROLE OF GAS DISK AND STATISTICS COMPARED TO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Huigen; Zhou Jilin; Wang Su

    2011-05-10

    During the late stage of planet formation, when Mars-sized cores appear, interactions among planetary cores can excite their orbital eccentricities, accelerate their merging, and thus sculpt their final orbital architecture. This study contributes to the final assembling of planetary systems with N-body simulations, including the type I or II migration of planets and gas accretion of massive cores in a viscous disk. Statistics on the final distributions of planetary masses, semimajor axes, and eccentricities are derived and are comparable to those of the observed systems. Our simulations predict some new orbital signatures of planetary systems around solar mass stars: 36% of the surviving planets are giant planets (>10 M{sub +}). Most of the massive giant planets (>30 M{sub +}) are located at 1-10 AU. Terrestrial planets are distributed more or less evenly at <1-2 AU. Planets in inner orbits may accumulate at the inner edges of either the protostellar disk (3-5 days) or its magnetorotational instability dead zone (30-50 days). There is a planet desert in the mass-eccentricity diagram, i.e., a lack of planets with masses 0.005-0.08M{sub J} in highly eccentric orbits (e > 0.3-0.4). The average eccentricity ({approx}0.15) of the giant planets (>10 M{sub +}) is greater than that ({approx}0.05) of the terrestrial planets (<10 M{sub +}). A planetary system with more planets tends to have smaller planet masses and orbital eccentricities on average.

  16. Modeling of body tissues for Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy treatments planned with conventional x-ray CT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku; Nakao, Minoru

    2016-07-01

    In the conventional procedure for accurate Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy, a CT number given to each pixel of a patient image is directly converted to mass density and elemental composition using their respective functions that have been calibrated specifically for the relevant x-ray CT system. We propose an alternative approach that is a conversion in two steps: the first from CT number to density and the second from density to composition. Based on the latest compilation of standard tissues for reference adult male and female phantoms, we sorted the standard tissues into groups by mass density and defined the representative tissues by averaging the material properties per group. With these representative tissues, we formulated polyline relations between mass density and each of the following; electron density, stopping-power ratio and elemental densities. We also revised a procedure of stoichiometric calibration for CT-number conversion and demonstrated the two-step conversion method for a theoretically emulated CT system with hypothetical 80 keV photons. For the standard tissues, high correlation was generally observed between mass density and the other densities excluding those of C and O for the light spongiosa tissues between 1.0 g cm‑3 and 1.1 g cm‑3 occupying 1% of the human body mass. The polylines fitted to the dominant tissues were generally consistent with similar formulations in the literature. The two-step conversion procedure was demonstrated to be practical and will potentially facilitate Monte Carlo simulation for treatment planning and for retrospective analysis of treatment plans with little impact on the management of planning CT systems.

  17. BMI and Risk of Serious Upper Body Injury Following Motor Vehicle Crashes: Concordance of Real-World and Computer-Simulated Observations

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shankuan; Kim, Jong-Eun; Ma, Xiaoguang; Shih, Alan; Laud, Purushottam W.; Pintar, Frank; Shen, Wei; Heymsfield, Steven B.; Allison, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Men tend to have more upper body mass and fat than women, a physical characteristic that may predispose them to severe motor vehicle crash (MVC) injuries, particularly in certain body regions. This study examined MVC-related regional body injury and its association with the presence of driver obesity using both real-world data and computer crash simulation. Methods and Findings Real-world data were from the 2001 to 2005 National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System. A total of 10,941 drivers who were aged 18 years or older involved in frontal collision crashes were eligible for the study. Sex-specific logistic regression models were developed to analyze the associations between MVC injury and the presence of driver obesity. In order to confirm the findings from real-world data, computer models of obese subjects were constructed and crash simulations were performed. According to real-world data, obese men had a substantially higher risk of injury, especially serious injury, to the upper body regions including head, face, thorax, and spine than normal weight men (all p<0.05). A U-shaped relation was found between body mass index (BMI) and serious injury in the abdominal region for both men and women (p<0.05 for both BMI and BMI2). In the high-BMI range, men were more likely to be seriously injured than were women for all body regions except the extremities and abdominal region (all p<0.05 for interaction between BMI and sex). The findings from the computer simulation were generally consistent with the real-world results in the present study. Conclusions Obese men endured a much higher risk of injury to upper body regions during MVCs. This higher risk may be attributed to differences in body shape, fat distribution, and center of gravity between obese and normal-weight subjects, and between men and women. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:20361024

  18. Electrodeposition of HAp coatings on Ti6Al4V alloy and its electrochemical behavior in simulated body fluid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Dinh, Thi Mai; Thom Nguyen, Thi; Pham, Thi Nam; Phuong Nguyen, Thu; Thu Trang Nguyen, Thi; Hoang, Thai; Grossin, David; Bertrand, Ghislaine; Drouet, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings were prepared on Ti6Al4V substrate by electrodeposition method from electrolyte solution containing Ca(NO3)2, NH4H2PO4 and NaNO3. The results show that the HAp coatings were single phase crystals of HAp. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images present that HAp/Ti6Al4V have flake shapes which arrange to form like-coral agglomerates. In vitro test of the Ti6Al4V and HAp/Ti6Al4V in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution was investigated with different immersion times. pH of SBF solution decreased and the mass of materials increased. SEM images prove the formation of apatite on the surface of Ti6Al4V and HAp/Ti6Al4V. The corrosion current density during immersion time of substrate is always higher than the one of HAp/Ti6Al4V because the deposited HAp can protect well for the substrate.

  19. Tensor3D: A computer graphics program to simulate 3D real-time deformation and visualization of geometric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallozzi Lavorante, Luca; Dirk Ebert, Hans

    2008-07-01

    Tensor3D is a geometric modeling program with the capacity to simulate and visualize in real-time the deformation, specified through a tensor matrix and applied to triangulated models representing geological bodies. 3D visualization allows the study of deformational processes that are traditionally conducted in 2D, such as simple and pure shears. Besides geometric objects that are immediately available in the program window, the program can read other models from disk, thus being able to import objects created with different open-source or proprietary programs. A strain ellipsoid and a bounding box are simultaneously shown and instantly deformed with the main object. The principal axes of strain are visualized as well to provide graphical information about the orientation of the tensor's normal components. The deformed models can also be saved, retrieved later and deformed again, in order to study different steps of progressive strain, or to make this data available to other programs. The shape of stress ellipsoids and the corresponding Mohr circles defined by any stress tensor can also be represented. The application was written using the Visualization ToolKit, a powerful scientific visualization library in the public domain. This development choice, allied to the use of the Tcl/Tk programming language, which is independent on the host computational platform, makes the program a useful tool for the study of geometric deformations directly in three dimensions in teaching as well as research activities.

  20. Large Eddy Simulations of forced ignition of a non-premixed bluff-body methane flame with Conditional Moment Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Triantafyllidis, A.; Mastorakos, E.; Eggels, R.L.G.M.

    2009-12-15

    Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of forced ignition of a bluff-body stabilised non-premixed methane flame using the Conditional Moment Closure (CMC) turbulent combustion model have been performed. The aim is to investigate the feasibility of the use of CMC/LES for ignition problems and to examine which, if any, of the characteristics already observed in related experiments could be predicted. A three-dimensional formulation of the CMC equation was used with simple and detailed chemical mechanisms, and sparks with different parameters (location, size) were used. It was found that the correct pattern of flame expansion and overall flame appearance were predicted with reasonable accuracy with both mechanisms, but the detailed mechanism resulted in expansion rates closer to the experiment. Moreover, the distribution of OH was predicted qualitatively accurately, with patches of high and low concentration in the recirculation zone during the ignition transient, consistent with experimental data. The location of the spark relative to the recirculation zone was found to determine the pattern of the flame propagation and the total time for the flame stabilisation. The size was also an important parameter, since it was found that the flame extinguishes when the spark is very small, in agreement with expectations from experiment. The stabilisation mechanism of the flame was dominated by the convection and sub-grid scale diffusion of hot combustion products from the recirculation zone to the cold gases that enter the burner, as revealed by analysis of the CMC equation. (author)

  1. Corrosion fatigue behaviors of two biomedical Mg alloys - AZ91D and WE43 - In simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Gu, X N; Zhou, W R; Zheng, Y F; Cheng, Y; Wei, S C; Zhong, S P; Xi, T F; Chen, L J

    2010-12-01

    Magnesium alloys have been recently developed as biodegradable implant materials, yet there has been no study concerning their corrosion fatigue properties under cyclic loading. In this study the die-cast AZ91D (A for aluminum 9%, Z for zinc 1% and D for a fourth phase) and extruded WE43 (W for yttrium 4%, E for rare earth mischmetal 3%) alloys were chosen to evaluate their fatigue and corrosion fatigue behaviors in simulated body fluid (SBF). The die-cast AZ91D alloy indicated a fatigue limit of 50MPa at 10⁷ cycles in air compared to 20MPa at 10⁶ cycles tested in SBF at 37°C. A fatigue limit of 110MPa at 10⁷ cycles in air was observed for extruded WE43 alloy compared to 40MPa at 10⁷ cycles tested in SBF at 37°C. The fatigue cracks initiated from the micropores when tested in air and from corrosion pits when tested in SBF, respectively. The overload zone of the extruded WE43 alloy exhibited a ductile fracture mode with deep dimples, in comparison to a brittle fracture mode for the die-cast AZ91D. The corrosion rate of the two experimental alloys increased under cyclic loading compared to that in the static immersion test. PMID:20656074

  2. Homogeneous hydride formation path in α-Zr: Molecular dynamics simulations with the charge-optimized many-body potential

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Bai, Xian-Ming; Yu, Jianguo; Tonks, Michael R.; Noordhoek, Mark J.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2016-06-01

    A formation path for homogeneous γ hydride formation in hcp α-Zr, from solid solution to the ζ and then the γ hydride, was demonstrated using molecular static calculations and molecular dynamic simulations with the charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potential. Hydrogen has limited solubility in α-Zr. Once the solubility limit is exceeded, the stability of solid solution gives way to that of coherent hydride phases such as the ζ hydride by planar precipitation of hydrogen. At finite temperatures, the ζ hydride goes through a partial hcp-fcc transformation via 1/3 <1¯100> slip on the basal plane, and transforms into a mixture of γmore » hydride and α-Zr. In the ζ hydride, slip on the basal plane is favored thermodynamically with negligible barrier, and is therefore feasible at finite temperatures without mechanical loading. The transformation process involves slips of three equivalent shear partials, in contrast to that proposed in the literature where only a single shear partial was involved. The adoption of multiple slip partials minimizes the macroscopic shape change of embedded hydride clusters and the shear strain accumulation in the matrix, and thus reduces the overall barrier needed for homogeneous γ hydride formation. In conclusion, this formation path requires finite temperatures for hydrogen diffusion without mechanical loading. Therefore, it should be effective at the cladding operating conditions.« less

  3. Carbonated hydroxyapatite starting from calcite and different orthophosphates under moderate hydrothermal conditions: Synthesis and surface reactivity in simulated body fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Pham Minh, Doan Nzihou, Ange; Sharrock, Patrick

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Carbonated apatite (CAP) could be easily obtained from CaCO{sub 3} and orthophosphates. • Highest CaCO{sub 3} dissolution and apatitic carbonate content were obtained with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. • A-B-type CAP was formed. • The synthesized CAP was thermally stable up to 1000 °C. • This CAP showed high biomineralization activity before and after thermal treatment. - Abstract: The one-step synthesis of carbonated hydroxyapatite (CAP) using calcite and different orthophosphates was investigated in a closed batch reactor. Only orthophosphoric acid could lead to the complete decomposition of calcite particles, when the reaction temperature was set at 80 °C. On the other hand, the reaction time and the dilution of the initial calcite suspension had no significant influence on the formation of the solid products. CAP was formed as the main crystalline calcium phosphate with the carbonate content in the range of 4.2–4.6 wt.%. The thermal decarbonation of the synthesized CAP started at 750 °C but it was only significant at 1000 °C under air atmosphere. This thermal decarbonation was total at 1200 °C or above. All CAP samples and products following thermal treatments were found bioactive in the test using simulated body fluid (SBF) solution.

  4. Opportunities and constraints of presently used thermal manikins for thermo-physiological simulation of the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psikuta, Agnes; Kuklane, Kalev; Bogdan, Anna; Havenith, George; Annaheim, Simon; Rossi, René M.

    2016-03-01

    Combining the strengths of an advanced mathematical model of human physiology and a thermal manikin is a new paradigm for simulating thermal behaviour of humans. However, the forerunners of such adaptive manikins showed some substantial limitations. This project aimed to determine the opportunities and constraints of the existing thermal manikins when dynamically controlled by a mathematical model of human thermal physiology. Four thermal manikins were selected and evaluated for their heat flux measurement uncertainty including lateral heat flows between manikin body parts and the response of each sector to the frequent change of the set-point temperature typical when using a physiological model for control. In general, all evaluated manikins are suitable for coupling with a physiological model with some recommendations for further improvement of manikin dynamic performance. The proposed methodology is useful to improve the performance of the adaptive manikins and help to provide a reliable and versatile tool for the broad research and development domain of clothing, automotive and building engineering.

  5. Adding disk effects to N-body simulations with REBOUNDx: Application to overstability of resonances in exoplanet pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, Daniel; Rein, Hanno; Chen, Alice; bennett, morgan

    2015-12-01

    Mean-motion resonances (MMRs) are typically stable configurations for pairs of planets. Given that planets should migrate relative to one another in their natal disk, one might expect to have found most planets locked in such MMRs. The fact that most Kepler planets are not observed in MMRs therefore requires an explanation. Goldreich and Schlichting (2014) recently argued that, in fact, due to interactions with the protoplanetary disk, planets below a threshold mass should break out of the strongest MMRs, i.e., the MMRs become overstable.While follow-up work has studied the robustness of this result to varying orbital architectures, we focus on the specific numerical implementation of the disk effects, which translates into differing physical interpretations of the planet-disk interactions. We will present how these physical choices affect the parameter space in which overstability sets in, and how certain choices can generate spurious results. We will then extend our results to general cases of broad applicability, and summarize the merits and pitfalls of these different numerical implementations of perturbations from the protoplanetary disk, particularly in tightly packed systems.We have packaged these numerical implementations into REBOUNDx, an open-source C and Python package for incorporating planet-disk interactions, as well as additional effects (like post-newtonian corrections), into N-body simulations using REBOUND. We will give a brief demo that highlights its ease of installation and use, as well as its synergy with Python's powerful plotting and scientific analysis libraries.

  6. Quasar clustering in a galaxy and quasar formation model based on ultra high-resolution N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oogi, Taira; Enoki, Motohiro; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Makiya, Ryu; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    We investigate clustering properties of quasars using a new version of our semi-analytic model of galaxy and quasar formation with state-of-the-art cosmological N-body simulations. In this study, we assume that a major merger of galaxies triggers cold gas accretion on to a supermassive black hole and quasar activity. Our model can reproduce the downsizing trend of the evolution of quasars. We find that the median mass of quasar host dark matter haloes increases with cosmic time by an order of magnitude from z = 4 (a few 1011 M⊙) to z = 1 (a few 1012 M⊙), and depends only weakly on the quasar luminosity. Deriving the quasar bias through the quasar-galaxy cross-correlation function in the model, we find that the quasar bias does not depend on the quasar luminosity, similar to observed trends. This result reflects the fact that quasars with a fixed luminosity have various Eddington ratios and thus have various host halo masses that primarily determine the quasar bias. We also show that the quasar bias increases with redshift, which is in qualitative agreement with observations. Our bias value is lower than the observed values at high redshifts, implying that we need some mechanisms that make quasars inactive in low-mass haloes and/or that make them more active in high-mass haloes.

  7. Time-dependent electrochemical characterization of the corrosion of a magnesium rare-earth alloy in simulated body fluids.

    PubMed

    Rettig, Ralf; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2008-04-01

    The electrochemistry of the corrosion process of a magnesium rare-earth-alloy is studied in detail in simulated body fluid (m-SBF) over the first 5 days. The aim is to investigate the corrosion mechanism under in vitro conditions. For this purpose we also used electrolytes that contain only some of the components of SBF, they were compared to SBF to investigate the influence of the different ions in SBF. The influence of albumin on the corrosion process was studied with a solution containing m-SBF and albumin in physiological concentration. For this study, impedance spectroscopy series measurements were performed. Additional results were gained from polarization curves. We conclude from the study that the corrosion resistance is significantly lower in m-SBF than in simple isotonic NaCl-solution. Albumin may form a blocking layer on the surface in the first hours of exposure. The formed corrosion layers consisting of amorphous apatite have only a low protective ability. Further results show that the corrosion processes in SBFs follow a linear time-law. The results elucidate critical factors and mechanisms of the electrochemical corrosion process of magnesium rare-earth alloys in SBFs, this understanding is crucial for a successful application of Mg alloys in biomedical applications. PMID:17688266

  8. Cyclic delamination behavior of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on Ti-6Al-4V substrates in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Hayato; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to clarify the effect of a simulated body fluid (SBF) on the cyclic delamination behavior of a plasma-sprayed hydroxapatite (HAp) coating. A HAp coating is deposited on the surfaces of surgical metallic materials in order to enhance the bond between human bone and such surfaces. However, the HAp coating is susceptible to delamination by cyclic loading from the patient's gait. Although hip joints are subjected to both positive and negative moments, only the effects of tensile bending stresses on vertical crack propagation behavior have been investigated. Thus, the cyclic delamination behavior of a HAp coating was observed at the stress ratio R=-1 in order to determine the effects of tensile/compressive loading on the delamination behavior. The delamination growth rate increased with SBF immersion, which decreased the delamination life. Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the selective phase dissolution in the HAp coating was promoted at interfaces. Finite element analysis revealed that the energy release rate Gmax showed a positive value even in cases with compressive loading, which is a driving force for the delamination of a HAp coating. A prediction model for the delamination growth life was developed that combines a fracture mechanics parameter with the assumed stress-dependent dissolution rate. The predicted delamination life matched the experimental data well in cases of lower stress amplitudes with SBF. PMID:27287152

  9. In vitro degradation and mechanical integrity of calcium-containing magnesium alloys in modified-simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Kannan, M Bobby; Raman, R K Singh

    2008-05-01

    The successful applications of magnesium-based alloys as degradable orthopaedic implants are mainly inhibited due to their high degradation rates in physiological environment and consequent loss in the mechanical integrity. This study examines the degradation behaviour and the mechanical integrity of calcium-containing magnesium alloys using electrochemical techniques and slow strain rate test (SSRT) method, respectively, in modified-simulated body fluid (m-SBF). Potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results showed that calcium addition enhances the general and pitting corrosion resistances of magnesium alloys significantly. The corrosion current was significantly lower in AZ91Ca alloy than that in AZ91 alloy. Furthermore, AZ91Ca alloy exhibited a five-fold increase in the surface film resistance than AZ91 alloy. The SSRT results showed that the ultimate tensile strength and elongation to fracture of AZ91Ca alloy in m-SBF decreased only marginally (approximately 15% and 20%, respectively) in comparison with these properties in air. The fracture morphologies of the failed samples are discussed in the paper. The in vitro study suggests that calcium-containing magnesium alloys to be a promising candidate for their applications in degradable orthopaedic implants, and it is worthwhile to further investigate the in vivo corrosion behaviour of these alloys. PMID:18313746

  10. Distinctive expression of extracellular matrix molecules at mRNA and protein levels during formation of cellular and acellular cementum in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Y; Maruya, Y; Sato, H; Zhu, J X; Takahashi, I; Mizoguchi, I; Kagayama, M

    2001-02-01

    Little is known about differential expression of extracellular matrices secreted by cementoblasts between cellular and acellular cementum. We hypothesize that cementoblasts lining acellular cementum express extracellular matrix genes differently from those lining cellular cementum, thereby forming two distinct types of extracellular matrices. To test this hypothesis, we investigated spatial and temporal gene expression of selected extracellular matrix molecules, that is type I collagen, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin and osteopontin, during formation of both cellular and acellular cementum using in situ hybridization. In addition, their extracellularly deposited and accumulated proteins were examined immunohistochemically. The mRNA transcripts of pro-alpha1 (I) collagen were primarily localized in cementoblasts of cellular cementum and cementocytes, while those of bone sialoprotein were predominantly seen in cementoblasts lining acellular cementum. In contrast, osteocalcin was expressed by both types of cementoblasts and cementocytes and so was osteopontin but only transiently. Our immunohistochemical examination revealed that translated proteins were localized extracellularly where the genes had been expressed intracellularly. The present study demonstrated the distinctive expression of genes and proteins of the extracellular matrix molecules between cellular and acellular cementum. PMID:11432645

  11. Comparison of cardiovascular and biomechanical parameters of supine lower body negative pressure and upright lower body positive pressure to simulate activity in 1/6 G and 3/8 G

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Velderrain, Armando; Ruckstuhl, Heidi; Stahn, Alexander C.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    For future space exploration missions, it is important to determine the best method of simulating on Earth cardiovascular and biomechanical conditions for lunar and Martian gravities. For this purpose, we compared exercise performed within a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and a lower body positive pressure (LBPP) chamber. Twelve subjects underwent a protocol of resting and walking (0.25 Froude) within supine LBNP and upright LBPP simulation. Each protocol was performed in simulated 1/6 G and 3/8 G. We assessed heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure, oxygen consumption (V̇o2), normalized stride length, normalized vertical peak ground reaction force, duty factor, cadence, perceived exertion (Borg), and comfort of the subject. A mixed linear model was employed to determine effects of the simulation on the respective parameters. Furthermore, parameters were compared with predicted values for lunar and Martian gravities to determine the method that showed the best agreement. During walking, all cardiovascular and biomechanical parameters were unaffected by the simulation used for lunar and Martian gravities. During rest, HR and V̇o2 were lower in supine LBNP compared with upright LBPP. HR, V̇o2, and normalized vertical peak ground reaction force obtained with supine LBNP and upright LBPP showed good agreement with predicted values. Since supine LBNP and upright LBPP are lacking significant differences, we conclude that both simulations are suited to simulate the cardiovascular and biomechanical conditions during activity in lunar and Martian gravities. Operational characteristics and the intended application should be considered when choosing either supine LBNP or upright LBPP to simulate partial gravities on Earth. PMID:23640597

  12. Comparison of cardiovascular and biomechanical parameters of supine lower body negative pressure and upright lower body positive pressure to simulate activity in 1/6 G and 3/8 G.

    PubMed

    Schlabs, Thomas; Rosales-Velderrain, Armando; Ruckstuhl, Heidi; Stahn, Alexander C; Hargens, Alan R

    2013-07-15

    For future space exploration missions, it is important to determine the best method of simulating on Earth cardiovascular and biomechanical conditions for lunar and Martian gravities. For this purpose, we compared exercise performed within a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and a lower body positive pressure (LBPP) chamber. Twelve subjects underwent a protocol of resting and walking (0.25 Froude) within supine LBNP and upright LBPP simulation. Each protocol was performed in simulated 1/6 G and 3/8 G. We assessed heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure, oxygen consumption (Vo2), normalized stride length, normalized vertical peak ground reaction force, duty factor, cadence, perceived exertion (Borg), and comfort of the subject. A mixed linear model was employed to determine effects of the simulation on the respective parameters. Furthermore, parameters were compared with predicted values for lunar and Martian gravities to determine the method that showed the best agreement. During walking, all cardiovascular and biomechanical parameters were unaffected by the simulation used for lunar and Martian gravities. During rest, HR and Vo2 were lower in supine LBNP compared with upright LBPP. HR, Vo2, and normalized vertical peak ground reaction force obtained with supine LBNP and upright LBPP showed good agreement with predicted values. Since supine LBNP and upright LBPP are lacking significant differences, we conclude that both simulations are suited to simulate the cardiovascular and biomechanical conditions during activity in lunar and Martian gravities. Operational characteristics and the intended application should be considered when choosing either supine LBNP or upright LBPP to simulate partial gravities on Earth. PMID:23640597

  13. Numerical simulation of two-dimensional heat transfer in composite bodies with application to de-icing of aircraft components. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, D. F. K.

    1983-01-01

    Transient, numerical simulations of the de-icing of composite aircraft components by electrothermal heating were performed for a two dimensional rectangular geometry. The implicit Crank-Nicolson formulation was used to insure stability of the finite-difference heat conduction equations and the phase change in the ice layer was simulated using the Enthalpy method. The Gauss-Seidel point iterative method was used to solve the system of difference equations. Numerical solutions illustrating de-icer performance for various composite aircraft structures and environmental conditions are presented. Comparisons are made with previous studies. The simulation can also be used to solve a variety of other heat conduction problems involving composite bodies.

  14. Head and neck response of a finite element anthropomorphic test device and human body model during a simulated rotary-wing aircraft impact.

    PubMed

    White, Nicholas A; Danelson, Kerry A; Gayzik, F Scott; Stitzel, Joel D

    2014-11-01

    A finite element (FE) simulation environment has been developed to investigate aviator head and neck response during a