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Sample records for acero 15-5 ph

  1. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  2. Stress corrosion cracking properties of 15-5PH steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1993-01-01

    Unexpected occurrence of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15-5PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a highly acidified sodium chloride (NaCl) aqueous solution. The selected alloy for the study was a 15-5PH steel in the H900 condition. The slow strain rate technique was selected to test the metals specimens.

  3. The Structure and Properties of Diffusion Assisted Bonded Joints in 17-4 PH, Type 347, 15-5 PH and Nitronic 40 Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Diffusion assisted bonds are formed in 17-4 PH, 15-5 PH, type 347 and Nitronic 40 stainless steels using electrodeposited copper as the bonding agent. The bonds are analyzed by conventional metallographic, electron microprobe analysis, and scanning electron microscopic techniques as well as Charpy V-notch impact tests at temperatures of 77 and 300 K. Results are discussed in terms of a postulated model for the bonding process.

  4. 7 CFR 15.5 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Compliance. 15.5 Section 15.5 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NONDISCRIMINATION Nondiscrimination in Federally-Assisted Programs of the Department of Agriculture-Effectuation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 § 15.5 Compliance....

  5. 43 CFR 15.5 - Wrecks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wrecks. 15.5 Section 15.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.5 Wrecks. No person... coral formation....

  6. 43 CFR 15.5 - Wrecks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wrecks. 15.5 Section 15.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.5 Wrecks. No person... coral formation....

  7. 43 CFR 15.5 - Wrecks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Wrecks. 15.5 Section 15.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.5 Wrecks. No person... coral formation....

  8. 43 CFR 15.5 - Wrecks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wrecks. 15.5 Section 15.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.5 Wrecks. No person... coral formation....

  9. 30 CFR 15.5 - Test samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test samples. 15.5 Section 15.5 Mineral... § 15.5 Test samples. (a) Submission of test samples. (1) The applicant shall not submit explosives or... magazine for at least 30 days before gallery tests are conducted....

  10. 30 CFR 15.5 - Test samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test samples. 15.5 Section 15.5 Mineral... § 15.5 Test samples. (a) Submission of test samples. (1) The applicant shall not submit explosives or... magazine for at least 30 days before gallery tests are conducted....

  11. 30 CFR 15.5 - Test samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test samples. 15.5 Section 15.5 Mineral... § 15.5 Test samples. (a) Submission of test samples. (1) The applicant shall not submit explosives or... magazine for at least 30 days before gallery tests are conducted....

  12. 43 CFR 15.5 - Wrecks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wrecks. 15.5 Section 15.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.5 Wrecks. No person... coral formation....

  13. 46 CFR 194.15-5 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation. 194.15-5 Section 194.15-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Chemistry Laboratory and Scientific Laboratory §...

  14. 46 CFR 194.15-5 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation. 194.15-5 Section 194.15-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Chemistry Laboratory and Scientific Laboratory §...

  15. 46 CFR 194.15-5 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation. 194.15-5 Section 194.15-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Chemistry Laboratory and Scientific Laboratory §...

  16. 46 CFR 194.15-5 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....15-5 Ventilation. (a) Operations, reactions or experiments which produce toxic, noxious or corrosive... be equipped with acceptable flame screens. (b) Chemical laboratories shall be equipped with power ventilation system of the exhaust type serving the entire laboratory for use in the event of spills or...

  17. 46 CFR 194.15-5 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....15-5 Ventilation. (a) Operations, reactions or experiments which produce toxic, noxious or corrosive... be equipped with acceptable flame screens. (b) Chemical laboratories shall be equipped with power ventilation system of the exhaust type serving the entire laboratory for use in the event of spills or...

  18. 46 CFR 32.15-5 - Whistles-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Engineering) of this chapter. Note: Appendix A in 33 CFR subchapter D contains the International Regulations... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Whistles-T/ALL. 32.15-5 Section 32.15-5 Shipping COAST... Navigation Equipment § 32.15-5 Whistles—T/ALL. (a) (b) On tankships contracted for on and after November...

  19. 46 CFR 112.15-5 - Final emergency loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Final emergency loads. 112.15-5 Section 112.15-5... AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Loads § 112.15-5 Final emergency loads. On vessels required to have a... power loads must be arranged so that they can be energized from the final emergency power source:...

  20. 46 CFR 112.15-5 - Final emergency loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Final emergency loads. 112.15-5 Section 112.15-5... AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Loads § 112.15-5 Final emergency loads. On vessels required to have a... power loads must be arranged so that they can be energized from the final emergency power source:...

  1. 46 CFR 112.15-5 - Final emergency loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Final emergency loads. 112.15-5 Section 112.15-5... AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Loads § 112.15-5 Final emergency loads. On vessels required to have a... power loads must be arranged so that they can be energized from the final emergency power source:...

  2. 46 CFR 112.15-5 - Final emergency loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Final emergency loads. 112.15-5 Section 112.15-5... AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Loads § 112.15-5 Final emergency loads. On vessels required to have a... power loads must be arranged so that they can be energized from the final emergency power source:...

  3. 46 CFR 112.15-5 - Final emergency loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Final emergency loads. 112.15-5 Section 112.15-5... AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Loads § 112.15-5 Final emergency loads. On vessels required to have a... power loads must be arranged so that they can be energized from the final emergency power source:...

  4. 46 CFR 72.15-5 - Structural fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Structural fire protection. 72.15-5 Section 72.15-5... ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 72.15-5 Structural fire protection. See § 72.05-50 for ventilation requirements pertaining to structural fire protection....

  5. 46 CFR 32.15-5 - Whistles-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Engineering) of this chapter. Note: Appendix A in 33 CFR subchapter D contains the International Regulations... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Whistles-T/ALL. 32.15-5 Section 32.15-5 Shipping COAST... Navigation Equipment § 32.15-5 Whistles—T/ALL. (a) (b) On tankships contracted for on and after November...

  6. 46 CFR 32.15-5 - Whistles-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Engineering) of this chapter. Note: Appendix A in 33 CFR subchapter D contains the International Regulations... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Whistles-T/ALL. 32.15-5 Section 32.15-5 Shipping COAST... Navigation Equipment § 32.15-5 Whistles—T/ALL. (a) (b) On tankships contracted for on and after November...

  7. 46 CFR 32.15-5 - Whistles-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Engineering) of this chapter. Note: Appendix A in 33 CFR subchapter D contains the International Regulations... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Whistles-T/ALL. 32.15-5 Section 32.15-5 Shipping COAST... Navigation Equipment § 32.15-5 Whistles—T/ALL. (a) (b) On tankships contracted for on and after November...

  8. 46 CFR 32.15-5 - Whistles-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Engineering) of this chapter. Note: Appendix A in 33 CFR subchapter D contains the International Regulations... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Whistles-T/ALL. 32.15-5 Section 32.15-5 Shipping COAST... Navigation Equipment § 32.15-5 Whistles—T/ALL. (a) (b) On tankships contracted for on and after November...

  9. 46 CFR 71.15-5 - Alternate compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... rules and supplements are incorporated by reference into 46 CFR 8.110(b). ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alternate compliance. 71.15-5 Section 71.15-5 Shipping... Inspection of Vessels § 71.15-5 Alternate compliance. (a) In place of compliance with other...

  10. 46 CFR 91.15-5 - Alternate compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Approved classification society rules and supplements are incorporated by reference into 46 CFR 8.110(b). ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alternate compliance. 91.15-5 Section 91.15-5 Shipping... CERTIFICATION Inspection of Vessels § 91.15-5 Alternate compliance. (a) In place of compliance with...

  11. 46 CFR 91.15-5 - Alternate compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... Approved classification society rules and supplements are incorporated by reference into 46 CFR 8.110(b). ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alternate compliance. 91.15-5 Section 91.15-5 Shipping... CERTIFICATION Inspection of Vessels § 91.15-5 Alternate compliance. (a) In place of compliance with...

  12. 46 CFR 188.15-5 - Design of vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design of vessels. 188.15-5 Section 188.15-5 Shipping... PROVISIONS Equivalents § 188.15-5 Design of vessels. (a) In order not to inhibit design and application the Commandant may accept vessels of unusual, unique, special, or exotic design, both new and for...

  13. 46 CFR 56.15-5 - Fluid-conditioner fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fluid-conditioner fittings. 56.15-5 Section 56.15-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Fittings § 56.15-5 Fluid-conditioner fittings. (a) Fluid conditioner fittings certified in accordance with subpart 50.25 of...

  14. 46 CFR 168.15-5 - Location of crew spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Location of crew spaces. 168.15-5 Section 168.15-5... VESSELS Accommodations § 168.15-5 Location of crew spaces. (a) Quarters must be located so that sufficient... bulkhead, nor may such section or sections of any deck head occupied by quarters be below the deepest...

  15. 46 CFR 168.15-5 - Location of crew spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Location of crew spaces. 168.15-5 Section 168.15-5... VESSELS Accommodations § 168.15-5 Location of crew spaces. (a) Quarters must be located so that sufficient... bulkhead, nor may such section or sections of any deck head occupied by quarters be below the deepest...

  16. 46 CFR 168.15-5 - Location of crew spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Location of crew spaces. 168.15-5 Section 168.15-5... VESSELS Accommodations § 168.15-5 Location of crew spaces. (a) Quarters must be located so that sufficient... bulkhead, nor may such section or sections of any deck head occupied by quarters be below the deepest...

  17. 46 CFR 168.15-5 - Location of crew spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Location of crew spaces. 168.15-5 Section 168.15-5... VESSELS Accommodations § 168.15-5 Location of crew spaces. (a) Quarters must be located so that sufficient... bulkhead, nor may such section or sections of any deck head occupied by quarters be below the deepest...

  18. 46 CFR 168.15-5 - Location of crew spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Location of crew spaces. 168.15-5 Section 168.15-5... VESSELS Accommodations § 168.15-5 Location of crew spaces. (a) Quarters must be located so that sufficient... bulkhead, nor may such section or sections of any deck head occupied by quarters be below the deepest...

  19. 46 CFR 46.15-5 - Engineering requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Engineering requirements. 46.15-5 Section 46.15-5... Lakes Voyages § 46.15-5 Engineering requirements. (a) Bilge and ballast systems, piping, inlets and... subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter....

  20. 46 CFR 46.15-5 - Engineering requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Engineering requirements. 46.15-5 Section 46.15-5... Lakes Voyages § 46.15-5 Engineering requirements. (a) Bilge and ballast systems, piping, inlets and... subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter....

  1. 46 CFR 167.15-5 - Authority of marine inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Authority of marine inspectors. 167.15-5 Section 167.15-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Inspections § 167.15-5 Authority of marine inspectors. Marine inspectors may at any...

  2. 46 CFR 61.15-5 - Steam piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... removed and the piping thoroughly examined. (b) All steam piping subject to pressure from the main boiler... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steam piping. 61.15-5 Section 61.15-5 Shipping COAST... Periodic Tests of Piping Systems § 61.15-5 Steam piping. (a) Main steam piping shall be subjected to...

  3. 46 CFR 61.15-5 - Steam piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... removed and the piping thoroughly examined. (b) All steam piping subject to pressure from the main boiler... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steam piping. 61.15-5 Section 61.15-5 Shipping COAST... Periodic Tests of Piping Systems § 61.15-5 Steam piping. (a) Main steam piping shall be subjected to...

  4. 46 CFR 61.15-5 - Steam piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... removed and the piping thoroughly examined. (b) All steam piping subject to pressure from the main boiler... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steam piping. 61.15-5 Section 61.15-5 Shipping COAST... Periodic Tests of Piping Systems § 61.15-5 Steam piping. (a) Main steam piping shall be subjected to...

  5. 46 CFR 61.15-5 - Steam piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... removed and the piping thoroughly examined. (b) All steam piping subject to pressure from the main boiler... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steam piping. 61.15-5 Section 61.15-5 Shipping COAST... Periodic Tests of Piping Systems § 61.15-5 Steam piping. (a) Main steam piping shall be subjected to...

  6. 46 CFR 61.15-5 - Steam piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... removed and the piping thoroughly examined. (b) All steam piping subject to pressure from the main boiler... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Steam piping. 61.15-5 Section 61.15-5 Shipping COAST... Periodic Tests of Piping Systems § 61.15-5 Steam piping. (a) Main steam piping shall be subjected to...

  7. 46 CFR 111.15-5 - Battery installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Battery installation. 111.15-5 Section 111.15-5 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Storage Batteries and Battery Chargers: Construction and Installation § 111.15-5 Battery installation. (a) Large batteries. Each large battery installation must be in a room that is only for...

  8. 46 CFR 111.15-5 - Battery installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Battery installation. 111.15-5 Section 111.15-5 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Storage Batteries and Battery Chargers: Construction and Installation § 111.15-5 Battery installation. (a) Large batteries. Each large battery installation must be in a room that is only for...

  9. 46 CFR 111.15-5 - Battery installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Battery installation. 111.15-5 Section 111.15-5 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Storage Batteries and Battery Chargers: Construction and Installation § 111.15-5 Battery installation. (a) Large batteries. Each large battery installation must be in a room that is only for...

  10. 10 CFR 15.5 - Claims that are covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Claims that are covered. 15.5 Section 15.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DEBT COLLECTION PROCEDURES Application and Coverage § 15.5 Claims that are covered. (a... as referenced in Executive Order 12146 (3 CFR, 1980 Comp., pp. 409-412). (6) A claim once it...

  11. 46 CFR 46.15-5 - Engineering requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Engineering requirements. 46.15-5 Section 46.15-5... Lakes Voyages § 46.15-5 Engineering requirements. (a) Bilge and ballast systems, piping, inlets and... subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter....

  12. 46 CFR 46.15-5 - Engineering requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Engineering requirements. 46.15-5 Section 46.15-5... Lakes Voyages § 46.15-5 Engineering requirements. (a) Bilge and ballast systems, piping, inlets and... subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter....

  13. 46 CFR 46.15-5 - Engineering requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Engineering requirements. 46.15-5 Section 46.15-5... Lakes Voyages § 46.15-5 Engineering requirements. (a) Bilge and ballast systems, piping, inlets and... subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter....

  14. 25 CFR 15.5 - May I revoke my will?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May I revoke my will? 15.5 Section 15.5 Indians BUREAU OF... OSAGE NATION AND THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES Introduction § 15.5 May I revoke my will? Yes. You may revoke your will at any time. You may revoke your will by any means authorized by tribal or Federal...

  15. 76 FR 67253 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel ACERO AZUL; Invitation for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel ACERO AZUL... the vessel ACERO AZUL is: INTENDED COMMERCIAL USE OF VESSEL: ``Passenger for hire.'' GEOGRAPHIC...

  16. 46 CFR 12.15-5 - Physical and medical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Physical and medical requirements. 12.15-5 Section 12.15... REQUIREMENTS FOR RATING ENDORSEMENTS Qualified Member of the Engine Department § 12.15-5 Physical and medical requirements. The physical and medical requirements for an endorsement as QMED are found in § 10.215 of...

  17. 46 CFR 12.15-5 - Physical and medical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Physical and medical requirements. 12.15-5 Section 12.15... REQUIREMENTS FOR RATING ENDORSEMENTS Qualified Member of the Engine Department § 12.15-5 Physical and medical requirements. The physical and medical requirements for an endorsement as QMED are found in § 10.215 of...

  18. 46 CFR 12.15-5 - Physical and medical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Physical and medical requirements. 12.15-5 Section 12.15... REQUIREMENTS FOR RATING ENDORSEMENTS Qualified Member of the Engine Department § 12.15-5 Physical and medical requirements. The physical and medical requirements for an endorsement as QMED are found in § 10.215 of...

  19. 46 CFR 189.15-5 - Alternate compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... with the Alternate Compliance Program provisions of 46 CFR part 8. (b) For the purposes of this section... rules and supplements are incorporated by reference into 46 CFR 8.110(b). ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alternate compliance. 189.15-5 Section 189.15-5...

  20. 46 CFR 189.15-5 - Alternate compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... with the Alternate Compliance Program provisions of 46 CFR part 8. (b) For the purposes of this section... rules and supplements are incorporated by reference into 46 CFR 8.110(b). ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alternate compliance. 189.15-5 Section 189.15-5...

  1. 46 CFR 105.15-5 - Authority of marine inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Authority of marine inspectors. 105.15-5 Section 105.15... COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Inspection Required § 105.15-5 Authority of marine inspectors. (a) Marine inspectors may at any time lawfully inspect any vessel subject to the requirements...

  2. 33 CFR 67.15-5 - Seismographic and surveying operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seismographic and surveying operations. 67.15-5 Section 67.15-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES...

  3. 44 CFR 15.5 - Preservation of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.5 Preservation of property. At both Mt. Weather and NETC we prohibit: (a)...

  4. 14 CFR 15.5 - Administrative claim, who may file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative claim, who may file. 15.5... claim, who may file. (a) A claim for injury to, or loss of, property may be presented by the owner of... assert such a claim under applicable State law. (d) A claim for loss wholly compensated by an...

  5. 33 CFR 67.15-5 - Seismographic and surveying operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Seismographic and surveying... Marking Requirements § 67.15-5 Seismographic and surveying operations. All stakes, casings, pipes, and... facilitate seismographic or surveying operations shall be marked, in the manner prescribed by the...

  6. 33 CFR 67.15-5 - Seismographic and surveying operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Seismographic and surveying... Marking Requirements § 67.15-5 Seismographic and surveying operations. All stakes, casings, pipes, and... facilitate seismographic or surveying operations shall be marked, in the manner prescribed by the...

  7. 33 CFR 67.15-5 - Seismographic and surveying operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Seismographic and surveying... Marking Requirements § 67.15-5 Seismographic and surveying operations. All stakes, casings, pipes, and... facilitate seismographic or surveying operations shall be marked, in the manner prescribed by the...

  8. 46 CFR 59.15-5 - Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. 59.15-5 Section 59.15-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING REPAIRS TO BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Miscellaneous Boiler Repairs § 59.15-5 Stayed...

  9. 46 CFR 95.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates. 95.15-5 Section 95.15-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates. (a) General....

  10. 46 CFR 38.15-5 - Cargo hose-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose-TB/ALL. 38.15-5 Section 38.15-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS LIQUEFIED FLAMMABLE GASES Special Requirements § 38.15-5 Cargo hose—TB/ALL. (a) When the liquid and vapor line hoses used for loading and...

  11. 46 CFR 38.15-5 - Cargo hose-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo hose-TB/ALL. 38.15-5 Section 38.15-5 Shipping... § 38.15-5 Cargo hose—TB/ALL. (a) When the liquid and vapor line hoses used for loading and discharging... of the cargo. Hose used in refrigerated systems shall be suitable for the minimum temperature...

  12. 46 CFR 38.15-5 - Cargo hose-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo hose-TB/ALL. 38.15-5 Section 38.15-5 Shipping... § 38.15-5 Cargo hose—TB/ALL. (a) When the liquid and vapor line hoses used for loading and discharging... of the cargo. Hose used in refrigerated systems shall be suitable for the minimum temperature...

  13. 46 CFR 38.15-5 - Cargo hose-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo hose-TB/ALL. 38.15-5 Section 38.15-5 Shipping... § 38.15-5 Cargo hose—TB/ALL. (a) When the liquid and vapor line hoses used for loading and discharging... of the cargo. Hose used in refrigerated systems shall be suitable for the minimum temperature...

  14. 46 CFR 38.15-5 - Cargo hose-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo hose-TB/ALL. 38.15-5 Section 38.15-5 Shipping... § 38.15-5 Cargo hose—TB/ALL. (a) When the liquid and vapor line hoses used for loading and discharging... of the cargo. Hose used in refrigerated systems shall be suitable for the minimum temperature...

  15. 46 CFR 59.15-5 - Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. 59.15-5 Section... TO BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Miscellaneous Boiler Repairs § 59.15-5 Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. (a) Where the plate forming the walls of stayed furnaces or...

  16. 46 CFR 59.15-5 - Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. 59.15-5 Section... TO BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Miscellaneous Boiler Repairs § 59.15-5 Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. (a) Where the plate forming the walls of stayed furnaces or...

  17. 46 CFR 59.15-5 - Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. 59.15-5 Section... TO BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Miscellaneous Boiler Repairs § 59.15-5 Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. (a) Where the plate forming the walls of stayed furnaces or...

  18. 46 CFR 59.15-5 - Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. 59.15-5 Section... TO BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Miscellaneous Boiler Repairs § 59.15-5 Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. (a) Where the plate forming the walls of stayed furnaces or...

  19. 29 CFR 15.5 - Administrative claim; evidence or information to substantiate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Administrative claim; evidence or information to substantiate. 15.5 Section 15.5 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL... of a claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant is required to submit...

  20. 46 CFR 52.15-5 - Tube connections (modifies PWT-9 and PWT-11).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tube connections (modifies PWT-9 and PWT-11). 52.15-5... BOILERS Requirements for Watertube Boilers § 52.15-5 Tube connections (modifies PWT-9 and PWT-11)....

  1. 46 CFR 52.15-5 - Tube connections (modifies PWT-9 and PWT-11).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tube connections (modifies PWT-9 and PWT-11). 52.15-5... BOILERS Requirements for Watertube Boilers § 52.15-5 Tube connections (modifies PWT-9 and PWT-11)....

  2. 46 CFR 52.15-5 - Tube connections (modifies PWT-9 and PWT-11).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tube connections (modifies PWT-9 and PWT-11). 52.15-5... BOILERS Requirements for Watertube Boilers § 52.15-5 Tube connections (modifies PWT-9 and PWT-11)....

  3. 46 CFR 52.15-5 - Tube connections (modifies PWT-9 and PWT-11).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tube connections (modifies PWT-9 and PWT-11). 52.15-5... BOILERS Requirements for Watertube Boilers § 52.15-5 Tube connections (modifies PWT-9 and PWT-11)....

  4. 46 CFR 52.15-5 - Tube connections (modifies PWT-9 and PWT-11).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tube connections (modifies PWT-9 and PWT-11). 52.15-5... BOILERS Requirements for Watertube Boilers § 52.15-5 Tube connections (modifies PWT-9 and PWT-11)....

  5. 46 CFR 95.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates. (a) General. The amount of carbon dioxide required for each space shall be... supply of carbon dioxide need not be provided for each space protected. The total available supply...

  6. 46 CFR 193.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates. (a) General. The amount of carbon dioxide required for each.... A separate supply of carbon dioxide need not be provided for each space protected. The...

  7. 46 CFR 76.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rate. (a) General. The amount of carbon dioxide required for each space shall be as determined by... the purpose of determining the amount of carbon dioxide required, a cargo compartment will...

  8. 46 CFR 95.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates. (a) General. The amount of carbon dioxide required for each space shall be... supply of carbon dioxide need not be provided for each space protected. The total available supply...

  9. 46 CFR 193.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates. (a) General. The amount of carbon dioxide required for each space shall be... supply of carbon dioxide need not be provided for each space protected. The total available supply...

  10. 46 CFR 76.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rate. (a) General. The amount of carbon dioxide required for each space shall be as determined by... the purpose of determining the amount of carbon dioxide required, a cargo compartment will...

  11. 46 CFR 34.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 34.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates—T/ALL. (a) General. (1) The amount of carbon dioxide required for each space shall be as determined by... carbon dioxide required for each space shall be equal to the gross volume of the space in cubic...

  12. 46 CFR 76.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rate. (a) General. The amount of carbon dioxide required for each space shall be as determined by... the purpose of determining the amount of carbon dioxide required, a cargo compartment will...

  13. 46 CFR 34.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 34.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates—T/ALL. (a) General. (1) The amount of carbon dioxide required for each space shall be as determined by... carbon dioxide required for each space shall be equal to the gross volume of the space in cubic...

  14. 46 CFR 76.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rate. (a) General. The amount of carbon dioxide required for each space shall be as determined by... the purpose of determining the amount of carbon dioxide required, a cargo compartment will...

  15. 46 CFR 95.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates. (a) General. The amount of carbon dioxide required for each space shall be... supply of carbon dioxide need not be provided for each space protected. The total available supply...

  16. 46 CFR 34.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 34.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates—T/ALL. (a) General. (1) The amount of carbon dioxide required for each space shall be as determined by... carbon dioxide required for each space shall be equal to the gross volume of the space in cubic...

  17. 46 CFR 76.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rate. (a) General. The amount of carbon dioxide required for each space shall be as determined by... the purpose of determining the amount of carbon dioxide required, a cargo compartment will...

  18. 46 CFR 193.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates. (a) General. The amount of carbon dioxide required for each space shall be... supply of carbon dioxide need not be provided for each space protected. The total available supply...

  19. 46 CFR 34.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 34.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates—T/ALL. (a) General. (1) The amount of carbon dioxide required for each space shall be as determined by... carbon dioxide required for each space shall be equal to the gross volume of the space in cubic...

  20. 46 CFR 193.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates. (a) General. The amount of carbon dioxide required for each.... A separate supply of carbon dioxide need not be provided for each space protected. The...

  1. 46 CFR 34.15-5 - Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 34.15-5 Quantity, pipe sizes, and discharge rates—T/ALL. (a) General. (1) The amount of carbon dioxide required for each space shall be as determined by... carbon dioxide required for each space shall be equal to the gross volume of the space in cubic...

  2. 46 CFR 190.15-5 - Vessels using fuel having a flashpoint of 110 °F. or lower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... flashpoint of 110 °F. or lower. (a) Spaces containing machinery which uses, or tanks which contain, fuel... noted in Table 190.15-5(b) depending on the size of the space. Table 190.15-5(b) Size of space, cubic... to their housings. (d) Exhaust blower switches shall be located outside of any space required to...

  3. 46 CFR 24.15-5 - Canadian pleasure craft temporarily using navigable waters of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... waters of the United States. 24.15-5 Section 24.15-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... using navigable waters of the United States. Uninspected Canadian pleasure craft (uninspected vessels) temporarily using navigable waters of the United States may carry in lieu of the......

  4. 46 CFR 24.15-5 - Canadian pleasure craft temporarily using navigable waters of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... waters of the United States. 24.15-5 Section 24.15-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... using navigable waters of the United States. Uninspected Canadian pleasure craft (uninspected vessels) temporarily using navigable waters of the United States may carry in lieu of the......

  5. 46 CFR 24.15-5 - Canadian pleasure craft temporarily using navigable waters of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... waters of the United States. 24.15-5 Section 24.15-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... using navigable waters of the United States. Uninspected Canadian pleasure craft (uninspected vessels) temporarily using navigable waters of the United States may carry in lieu of the......

  6. 46 CFR 24.15-5 - Canadian pleasure craft temporarily using navigable waters of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... waters of the United States. 24.15-5 Section 24.15-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... using navigable waters of the United States. Uninspected Canadian pleasure craft (uninspected vessels) temporarily using navigable waters of the United States may carry in lieu of the......

  7. 46 CFR 24.15-5 - Canadian pleasure craft temporarily using navigable waters of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... waters of the United States. 24.15-5 Section 24.15-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... using navigable waters of the United States. Uninspected Canadian pleasure craft (uninspected vessels) temporarily using navigable waters of the United States may carry in lieu of the......

  8. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and imprinted genes on chromosome 11p15.5

    SciTech Connect

    Weksberg, R.; Perlikowski, S.; Squire, J.

    1994-09-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a syndrome characterized by generalized and regional overgrowth as well as a predisposition to specific embryonal tumors. We have previously reported biallelic expression of insulin like growth factor 2 (IGF2) in fibroblasts from sporadic cases of BWS. In these cells, the normal expression pattern for IGF2 is allele-specific and derived from the paternal allele. To determine whether biallelic expression of IGF2 in BWS patients results from aberrant regulation of a single gene or multiple genes in an imprinted domain, we undertook the study of a second gene in the 11p15.5 imprinted region. H19 is normally stringently regulated, expressed primarily from the maternal allele, and in many tissues reciprocal expression of H19 and IGF2 has been documented. Since no protein product for H19 has been identified, the RNA itself may be biologically active and it may have a tumor suppressor function. Moreover, H19 has been suggested as a candidate gene in BWS, especially in autosomal dominant pedigrees. Using an Rsa1 polymorphism in the transcribed region of H19, we found that the expression of H19 in 8 patients with sporadic BWS is consistently nonallelic and in the informative cases is always from the maternal allele. This is also true for the two cases of BWS where biallelic IGF2 expression has been documented. We conclude that IGF2 biallelic expression does not represent a general loss of imprint control. If H19 and IGF2 do normally respond to common signals within an imprinted domain at 11p15.5, we suggest that BWS patients with biallelic IGF2 expression can escape from such imprinting constraints. To study this region in more detail, we have developed a replication timing assay for IGF2 and H19 to determine whether loss of asynchronous replication accompanies biallelic IGF2 expression.

  9. On the Feasibility of Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks over IEEE 802.15.5 Mesh Topologies.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sanchez, Antonio-Javier; Losilla, Fernando; Rodenas-Herraiz, David; Cruz-Martinez, Felipe; Garcia-Sanchez, Felipe

    2016-05-05

    Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks (WMSNs) are a special type of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) where large amounts of multimedia data are transmitted over networks composed of low power devices. Hierarchical routing protocols typically used in WSNs for multi-path communication tend to overload nodes located within radio communication range of the data collection unit or data sink. The battery life of these nodes is therefore reduced considerably, requiring frequent battery replacement work to extend the operational life of the WSN system. In a wireless sensor network with mesh topology, any node may act as a forwarder node, thereby enabling multiple routing paths toward any other node or collection unit. In addition, mesh topologies have proven advantages, such as data transmission reliability, network robustness against node failures, and potential reduction in energy consumption. This work studies the feasibility of implementing WMSNs in mesh topologies and their limitations by means of exhaustive computer simulation experiments. To this end, a module developed for the Synchronous Energy Saving (SES) mode of the IEEE 802.15.5 mesh standard has been integrated with multimedia tools to thoroughly test video sequences encoded using H.264 in mesh networks.

  10. On the Feasibility of Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks over IEEE 802.15.5 Mesh Topologies.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sanchez, Antonio-Javier; Losilla, Fernando; Rodenas-Herraiz, David; Cruz-Martinez, Felipe; Garcia-Sanchez, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks (WMSNs) are a special type of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) where large amounts of multimedia data are transmitted over networks composed of low power devices. Hierarchical routing protocols typically used in WSNs for multi-path communication tend to overload nodes located within radio communication range of the data collection unit or data sink. The battery life of these nodes is therefore reduced considerably, requiring frequent battery replacement work to extend the operational life of the WSN system. In a wireless sensor network with mesh topology, any node may act as a forwarder node, thereby enabling multiple routing paths toward any other node or collection unit. In addition, mesh topologies have proven advantages, such as data transmission reliability, network robustness against node failures, and potential reduction in energy consumption. This work studies the feasibility of implementing WMSNs in mesh topologies and their limitations by means of exhaustive computer simulation experiments. To this end, a module developed for the Synchronous Energy Saving (SES) mode of the IEEE 802.15.5 mesh standard has been integrated with multimedia tools to thoroughly test video sequences encoded using H.264 in mesh networks. PMID:27164106

  11. On the Feasibility of Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks over IEEE 802.15.5 Mesh Topologies

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Sanchez, Antonio-Javier; Losilla, Fernando; Rodenas-Herraiz, David; Cruz-Martinez, Felipe; Garcia-Sanchez, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks (WMSNs) are a special type of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) where large amounts of multimedia data are transmitted over networks composed of low power devices. Hierarchical routing protocols typically used in WSNs for multi-path communication tend to overload nodes located within radio communication range of the data collection unit or data sink. The battery life of these nodes is therefore reduced considerably, requiring frequent battery replacement work to extend the operational life of the WSN system. In a wireless sensor network with mesh topology, any node may act as a forwarder node, thereby enabling multiple routing paths toward any other node or collection unit. In addition, mesh topologies have proven advantages, such as data transmission reliability, network robustness against node failures, and potential reduction in energy consumption. This work studies the feasibility of implementing WMSNs in mesh topologies and their limitations by means of exhaustive computer simulation experiments. To this end, a module developed for the Synchronous Energy Saving (SES) mode of the IEEE 802.15.5 mesh standard has been integrated with multimedia tools to thoroughly test video sequences encoded using H.264 in mesh networks. PMID:27164106

  12. Fatigue Crack Growth under High Pressure of Gaseous Hydrogen in a 15-5PH Martensitic Stainless Steel: Influence of Pressure and Loading Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Moriconi, C.; Benoit, G.; Halm, D.; Henaff, G.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the effect of gaseous hydrogen pressure in relation with the loading frequency on the fatigue crack growth behavior of a precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel is investigated. It is found that increasing the hydrogen pressure from 0.09 to 9 MPa induces an enhancement of the fatigue crack growth rates. This enhancement is pronounced particularly at higher stress intensity factor amplitudes at 9 MPa. Meanwhile, decreasing the frequency from 20 to 0.2 Hz under 0.9 MPa of hydrogen reveals a significant increase in the crack growth rates that tends to join the curve obtained under 9 MPa at 20 Hz, but with a different cracking mode. However, it is shown that the degradation in fatigue crack growth behavior derives from a complex interaction between the fatigue damage and the amount of hydrogen enriching the crack tip, which is dependent on the hydrogen pressure, loading frequency, and stress intensity factor level. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations of the fracture surfaces are used to support the explanations proposed to account for the observed phenomena.

  13. 46 CFR 190.15-5 - Vessels using fuel having a flashpoint of 110 °F. or lower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... having a flashpoint of 110 °F. or lower shall have natural supply and mechanical exhaust ventilation as required by this section. (b) The mechanical exhaust system shall be such as to assure the air changes as...) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-5 Vessels using fuel having...

  14. 46 CFR 190.15-5 - Vessels using fuel having a flashpoint of 110 °F. or lower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... having a flashpoint of 110 °F. or lower shall have natural supply and mechanical exhaust ventilation as required by this section. (b) The mechanical exhaust system shall be such as to assure the air changes as...) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-5 Vessels using fuel having...

  15. Development of a freeze-dried kit formulation for the preparation of 99mTc-NTP 15-5, a radiotracer for scintigraphic imaging of proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Aurélien; Gaumet, Vincent; Galmier, Marie-Josèphe; Besse, Sophie; Leal, Fernand; Gachon, Françoise; Viot, Gilles; Métin, Jacques; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Auzeloux, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    The cartilage-targeting strategy is based on the strong affinity of quaternary ammonium (QA) functions for cartilage proteoglycans. We use a bifunctional agent containing QA moiety and a polyazamacrocycle structure able to complex technetium-99m. (99m)Tc-NTP 15-5 was selected for its high stability and its high affinity for proteoglycans in vivo. Labeling conditions of NTP 15-5 were optimized, and a lyophilized kit was developed for radiolabeling of (99m)Tc-NTP 15-5 (radiochemical yields 94.6±1.8%). (99m)Tc-NTP 15-5 was stable and resulted in favorable biological evaluations.

  16. "Estudio tribologico de aceros para moldes. Aplicacion al moldeo por inyeccion de polibutilentereftalato reforzado con fibra de vidrio"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Mateo, Isidoro Jose

    fabricacion del molde, tienen una gran influencia sobre su comportamiento en servicio a lo largo de la vida util del molde. En la primera parte del presente estudio, a partir de ensayos punzon sobre disco, se ha determinado la relacion entre la resistencia al desgaste y la dureza de aceros para moldes obtenidos a partir de bloques de gran espesor, estudiando los principales mecanismos de desgaste que tienen lugar. A continuacion, con el fin de determinar el dano superficial que sufren los aceros para moldes en condiciones reales de inyeccion, se han estudiado distintos tipos de aceros utilizados comercialmente en moldes de inyeccion de polimeros y materiales compuestos, seleccionando las condiciones de operacion para determinar la variacion de la rugosidad superficial del acero en funcion del material inyectado, del numero de operaciones sucesivas de inyeccion y de la orientacion del flujo de inyeccion, mediante tecnicas de perfilometria optica y microscopia electronica de barrido. Ademas del dano superficial sufrido por el acero con el numero de piezas inyectadas, tambien se ha determinado la evolucion de la rugosidad superficial de los materiales inyectados, polibutilentereftalato (PBT) puro y materiales compuestos derivados de PBT por adicion de un 20 o un 50% en peso de fibra de vidrio. En el caso de las piezas inyectadas, se ha caracterizado su microestructura en funcion del flujo de inyeccion y de la densidad de fibra, se han determinado sus propiedades termicas y dinamico-mecanicas, asi como la variacion de la rugosidad superficial de las piezas inyectadas con el numero de operaciones de inyeccion y con la geometria de las distintas secciones de las piezas. Finalmente, se ha evaluado la resistencia a la abrasion de PBT reforzado con un 50% de fibra, en funcion del numero de piezas inyectadas y de la direccion de rayado con respecto a la orientacion del flujo de inyeccion.

  17. Premartensitic transition and relevant magnetic effects in Ni50Mn34In15.5Al0.5 alloy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuqin; Guo, Shaopu; Yu, Shuyun; Cheng, Hui; Wang, Ruilong; Xiao, Haibo; Xu, Lingfang; Xiong, Rui; Liu, Yong; Xia, Zhengcai; Yang, Changping

    2016-01-01

    Resistance measurement, in situ optical microscopic observation, thermal and magnetic measurements have been carried out on Ni50Mn34In15.5Al0.5 alloy. The existence of a pronounced premartensitic transition prior to martensitic transition can be characterized by microstructure evolution as well as exothermic peak and smooth decrease of resistance and magnetization with obvious hysteresis over a wide temperature range upon cooling. Consequently, the alloy undergoes two successive magneto-structural transitions consisting of premartensitic and martensitic transitions. Magnetoelastic coupling between magnetic and structural degrees of freedom would be responsible for the appearance of premartensitic transition, as evinced by the distinct shift of transitions temperatures to lower temperature with external applied field of 50 kOe. The inverse premartensitic transition induced by magnetic field results in large magnetoresistance, and contributes to the enhanced inverse magnetocaloric effect through enlarging the peak value and temperature interval of magnetic entropy change ΔSm. PMID:27183331

  18. Premartensitic transition and relevant magnetic effects in Ni50Mn34In15.5Al0.5 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuqin; Guo, Shaopu; Yu, Shuyun; Cheng, Hui; Wang, Ruilong; Xiao, Haibo; Xu, Lingfang; Xiong, Rui; Liu, Yong; Xia, Zhengcai; Yang, Changping

    2016-05-01

    Resistance measurement, in situ optical microscopic observation, thermal and magnetic measurements have been carried out on Ni50Mn34In15.5Al0.5 alloy. The existence of a pronounced premartensitic transition prior to martensitic transition can be characterized by microstructure evolution as well as exothermic peak and smooth decrease of resistance and magnetization with obvious hysteresis over a wide temperature range upon cooling. Consequently, the alloy undergoes two successive magneto-structural transitions consisting of premartensitic and martensitic transitions. Magnetoelastic coupling between magnetic and structural degrees of freedom would be responsible for the appearance of premartensitic transition, as evinced by the distinct shift of transitions temperatures to lower temperature with external applied field of 50 kOe. The inverse premartensitic transition induced by magnetic field results in large magnetoresistance, and contributes to the enhanced inverse magnetocaloric effect through enlarging the peak value and temperature interval of magnetic entropy change ΔSm.

  19. Neutron Photoproduction from 181Ta with Linearly Polarized γ-rays between 11 and 15.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, W.; Hauver, J.; Whisnant, C. S.; Ahmed, M.; Mueller, J.; Myers, L.; Stave, S.; Weller, H. R.

    2011-04-01

    Data have been collected at the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HIγS) to investigate neutron emission from a 181Ta target with linearly polarized gamma rays at Eγ = 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15.5 MeV. Liquid scintillator detectors were placed at scattering angles of 55°, 90° and 125° above, below and to the left and right of the target. Four additional detectors were placed at angles of 72° and 107° along the top and right. The Eγ dependence of the ratios of neutron yields, Ipara/Iperp are examined. The ratio at 90° should depend only on the P2 cos θ coefficient in the angular distribution. A comparison of these results will be discussed. Partially supported by the Department of Homeland Security through its Academic Research Initiative (ARI) program and by the NSF.

  20. Premartensitic transition and relevant magnetic effects in Ni50Mn34In15.5Al0.5 alloy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuqin; Guo, Shaopu; Yu, Shuyun; Cheng, Hui; Wang, Ruilong; Xiao, Haibo; Xu, Lingfang; Xiong, Rui; Liu, Yong; Xia, Zhengcai; Yang, Changping

    2016-01-01

    Resistance measurement, in situ optical microscopic observation, thermal and magnetic measurements have been carried out on Ni50Mn34In15.5Al0.5 alloy. The existence of a pronounced premartensitic transition prior to martensitic transition can be characterized by microstructure evolution as well as exothermic peak and smooth decrease of resistance and magnetization with obvious hysteresis over a wide temperature range upon cooling. Consequently, the alloy undergoes two successive magneto-structural transitions consisting of premartensitic and martensitic transitions. Magnetoelastic coupling between magnetic and structural degrees of freedom would be responsible for the appearance of premartensitic transition, as evinced by the distinct shift of transitions temperatures to lower temperature with external applied field of 50 kOe. The inverse premartensitic transition induced by magnetic field results in large magnetoresistance, and contributes to the enhanced inverse magnetocaloric effect through enlarging the peak value and temperature interval of magnetic entropy change ΔSm. PMID:27183331

  1. A cryptic familial rearrangement of 11p15.5, involving both imprinting centers, in a family with a history of short stature.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lindsay A; Rupps, Rosemarie; Peñaherrera, Maria S; Robinson, Wendy P; Patel, Millan S; Eydoux, Patrice; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2014-06-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features and body asymmetry. Both hypomethylation of the telomeric imprinting control region 1 (ICR1) at 11p15.5 and maternal duplication of 11p15.5 have been implicated in the etiology of this disorder. Here we report the origin and segregation of the first reported between-arm intrachromosomal insertion of 11p15.5 that encompasses both ICR1 and ICR2 in a multigenerational family with a history of short stature. One (or any odd number) crossover within the centromeric segment during meiosis would produce recombinant chromosomes; one with a duplication of the inserted segment and the other a deletion. In this 4-generation family, there were six instances of transmission of the recombinant chromosome with duplication of the11p15.5 segment, which leads to a SRS phenotype when maternally inherited and a Beckwith-Wiedemann phenotype when paternally transmitted. The size of the duplicated region is ~1.9 Mb as determined by microarray analysis. This study provides further evidence that maternally inherited duplications of 11p15.5 result in a SRS phenotype that includes short stature and other variable features. The methylation status of the extra copy of the duplicated region of 11p15.5 ultimately predicts the resulting phenotype. Thus, the different phenotype based on parental mode of transmission is of importance in the genetic counseling of these patients.

  2. A cryptic familial rearrangement of 11p15.5, involving both imprinting centers, in a family with a history of short stature.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lindsay A; Rupps, Rosemarie; Peñaherrera, Maria S; Robinson, Wendy P; Patel, Millan S; Eydoux, Patrice; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2014-06-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features and body asymmetry. Both hypomethylation of the telomeric imprinting control region 1 (ICR1) at 11p15.5 and maternal duplication of 11p15.5 have been implicated in the etiology of this disorder. Here we report the origin and segregation of the first reported between-arm intrachromosomal insertion of 11p15.5 that encompasses both ICR1 and ICR2 in a multigenerational family with a history of short stature. One (or any odd number) crossover within the centromeric segment during meiosis would produce recombinant chromosomes; one with a duplication of the inserted segment and the other a deletion. In this 4-generation family, there were six instances of transmission of the recombinant chromosome with duplication of the11p15.5 segment, which leads to a SRS phenotype when maternally inherited and a Beckwith-Wiedemann phenotype when paternally transmitted. The size of the duplicated region is ~1.9 Mb as determined by microarray analysis. This study provides further evidence that maternally inherited duplications of 11p15.5 result in a SRS phenotype that includes short stature and other variable features. The methylation status of the extra copy of the duplicated region of 11p15.5 ultimately predicts the resulting phenotype. Thus, the different phenotype based on parental mode of transmission is of importance in the genetic counseling of these patients. PMID:24668696

  3. Plant Habitat (PH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  4. pH Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  5. pH optrode

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Langry, Kevin C.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  6. 99mTc-NTP 15-5 assessment of the early therapeutic response of chondrosarcoma to zoledronic acid in the Swarm rat orthotopic model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since proteoglycans (PGs) appear as key partners in chondrosarcoma biology, PG-targeted imaging using the radiotracer 99mTc-N-(triethylammonium)-3-propyl-[15]ane-N5 (99mTc-NTP 15-5) developed by our group was previously demonstrated to be a good single-photon emission computed tomography tracer for cartilage neoplasms. We therefore initiated this new preclinical study to evaluate the relevance of 99mTc-NTP 15-5 imaging for the in vivo monitoring and quantitative assessment of chondrosarcoma response to zoledronic acid (ZOL) in the Swarm rat orthotopic model. Findings Rats bearing chondrosarcoma in the orthotopic paratibial location were treated by ZOL (100 μg/kg, subcutaneously) or phosphate-buffered saline, twice a week, from day 4 to day 48 post-tumor implantation. 99mTc-NTP 15-5 imaging was performed at regular intervals with the target-to-background ratio (TBR) determined. Tumor volume was monitored using a calliper, and histology was performed at the end of the study. From day 11 to day 48, mean TBR values ranged from 1.7 ± 0.6 to 2.3 ± 0.6 in ZOL-treated rats and from 2.1 ± 1.0 to 4.9 ± 0.9 in controls. Tumor growth inhibition was evidenced using a calliper from day 24 and associated to a decrease in PG content in treated tumor tissues (confirmed by histology). Conclusions This work demonstrated two proofs of concept: (1) biphosphonate therapy could be a promising therapeutic approach for chondrosarcoma; (2) 99mTc-NTP 15-5 is expected to offer a novel imaging modality for the in vivo evaluation of the extracellular matrix features of chondrosarcoma, which could be useful for the follow-up and quantitative assessment of proteoglycan ‘downregulation’ associated to the response to therapeutic attempts. PMID:23688107

  7. Urine pH test

    MedlinePlus

    A urine pH test measures the level of acid in urine. ... pH - urine ... meat products, or cheese can decrease your urine pH. ... to check for changes in your urine acid levels. It may be done to ... more effective when urine is acidic or non-acidic (alkaline).

  8. Familial 1.3-Mb 11p15.5p15.4 Duplication in Three Generations Causing Silver-Russell and Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Vals, Mari-Anne; Kahre, Tiina; Mee, Pille; Muru, Kai; Kallas, Eha; Žilina, Olga; Tillmann, Vallo; Õunap, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) are 2 opposite growth-affecting disorders. The common molecular cause for both syndromes is an abnormal regulation of genes in chromosomal region 11p15, where 2 imprinting control regions (ICR) control fetal and postnatal growth. Also, many submicroscopic chromosomal disturbances like duplications in 11p15 have been described among SRS and BWS patients. Duplications involving both ICRs cause SRS or BWS, depending on which parent the aberration is inherited from. We describe to our knowledge the smallest familial pure 1.3-Mb duplication in chromosomal region 11p15.5p15.4 that involves both ICRs and is present in 3 generations causing an SRS or BWS phenotype. PMID:26732610

  9. The crystallization, magnetic and magnetocaloric properties in Fe 76.5-xNb xSi 15.5B 7Au 1 ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa, N. Q.; Gam, D. T. H.; Chau, N.; The, N. D.; Yu, S.-C.

    2007-03-01

    Fe 76.5-xNb xSi 15.5B 7Au 1 ribbons ( x=0.0, 1.5, 3.0, 4.5) have been fabricated by rapid quenching technique. The DSC measurements indicated that both first exothermal peak Tp1 (of α-Fe(Si) phase) and second peak Tp2 (of boride phase) as well as crystallization activation energy increase with increasing Nb content substituted, whereas saturation magnetization of samples decreases with x, due to ferromagnetic dilution. Besides, Curie temperature of amorphous phase decreases with x, i.e. Nb stabilizes amorphous structure of ribbons. The investigation of magnetic entropy change of studied samples showed that it may lead to magnetocaloric effect around respective Curie temperature of amorphous phase.

  10. The pH Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

  11. Comparative Analysis of the 15.5kD Box C/D snoRNP Core Protein in the Primitive Eukaryote Giardia lamblia Reveals Unique Structural and Functional Features

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Shyamasri; Buhrman, Greg; Gagnon, Keith; Mattos, Carla; Brown, II, Bernard A.; Maxwell, E. Stuart

    2012-07-11

    Box C/D ribonucleoproteins (RNP) guide the 2'-O-methylation of targeted nucleotides in archaeal and eukaryotic rRNAs. The archaeal L7Ae and eukaryotic 15.5kD box C/D RNP core protein homologues initiate RNP assembly by recognizing kink-turn (K-turn) motifs. The crystal structure of the 15.5kD core protein from the primitive eukaryote Giardia lamblia is described here to a resolution of 1.8 {angstrom}. The Giardia 15.5kD protein exhibits the typical {alpha}-{beta}-{alpha} sandwich fold exhibited by both archaeal L7Ae and eukaryotic 15.5kD proteins. Characteristic of eukaryotic homologues, the Giardia 15.5kD protein binds the K-turn motif but not the variant K-loop motif. The highly conserved residues of loop 9, critical for RNA binding, also exhibit conformations similar to those of the human 15.5kD protein when bound to the K-turn motif. However, comparative sequence analysis indicated a distinct evolutionary position between Archaea and Eukarya. Indeed, assessment of the Giardia 15.5kD protein in denaturing experiments demonstrated an intermediate stability in protein structure when compared with that of the eukaryotic mouse 15.5kD and archaeal Methanocaldococcus jannaschii L7Ae proteins. Most notable was the ability of the Giardia 15.5kD protein to assemble in vitro a catalytically active chimeric box C/D RNP utilizing the archaeal M. jannaschii Nop56/58 and fibrillarin core proteins. In contrast, a catalytically competent chimeric RNP could not be assembled using the mouse 15.5kD protein. Collectively, these analyses suggest that the G. lamblia 15.5kD protein occupies a unique position in the evolution of this box C/D RNP core protein retaining structural and functional features characteristic of both archaeal L7Ae and higher eukaryotic 15.5kD homologues.

  12. Formation of spherical primary silicon crystals during semi-solid processing of hypereutectic Al-15.5wt%Si alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.I.; Lee, H.I.; Kim, M.I.

    1995-06-15

    Semi-solid state processing is considered as an attractive processing technique because of it offers several potential advantages such as energy saving for forming, reduction of microsegregation and porosity, especially for near net shape manufacturing of components. This technique is frequently applied to make sound casting products of hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys. On the other hand, hypereutectic Al-Si alloys have limited applications because of their inherent problems associated with poor machinability and mechanical properties, although the commercial potential for their outstanding resistance to wear and corrosion, higher hardness and low coefficient of thermal expansion is well recognized. To exploit the full potential of hypereutectic Al-Si alloys, semi-solid processing is utilized in an attempt to improve the mechanical properties through the spheroidization of primary Si crystals. The purpose of the present work is to provide the experimental evidence of the fragmentation of primary Si crystals in hypereutectic Al-15.5wt%Si alloy during semi-solid processing. Microstructural evolution during the isothermal shearing above the eutectic temperature of this alloy as a function of processing time is also reported.

  13. 973 nm wavelength stabilized hybrid ns-MOPA diode laser system with 15.5 W peak power and a spectral line width below 10 pm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Thi N.; Klehr, Andreas; Sumpf, Bernd; Wenzel, Hans; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2014-05-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) system for the generation of ns-pulses with high peak power, narrow spectral line width, and stabilized emission wavelength will be presented. The master oscillator is a distributed feedback (DFB) ridge waveguide (RW) laser. The tapered amplifier consists of one RW section and one flared gain-guided section. The DFB laser is operated in continuous wave mode and emits at 973.5 nm with a spectral line width below 10 pm. The RW section of the amplifier acts as an optical gate. The tapered section amplifies the generated optical pulse. An optical peak power of 15.5 W for a pulse width of 8 ns is obtained. The emission wavelength remains constant at all output power levels of the MOPA system for a fixed current into the DFB laser. The spectral power density of the ASE is 37 dB smaller than the lasing spectral power density. The spectral line width is smaller than 10 pm, limited by the resolution of the optical spectrum analyzer.

  14. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... esophagitis You may need to have the following tests if your doctor suspects esophagitis : Barium swallow Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (also called upper GI endoscopy)

  15. PhEDEx Data Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-04-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the "SiteDB" service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  16. Transverse development of the human jaws between the ages of 8.5 and 15.5 years, studied longitudinally with use of implants.

    PubMed

    Korn, E L; Baumrind, S

    1990-06-01

    We report longitudinal data on the transverse widening of the maxilla and mandible from a sample of normal subjects (11 males and 20 females) with metallic implants of the Bjork type. Data were from measurements on lateral and frontal (posterior-anterior) cephalograms generated at annual intervals between the ages of 8.5 and 15.5 years (although data were not available for all subjects at all time points). The maxillary data were, in general, similar to those reported by Bjork and Skieller (1974, 1977) for a smaller sample of slightly younger boys. During the age interval studied, transverse widening was greater in the more posterior part of the palate. [The mean annual rate of change in the posterior-most (zygomatic) region was 0.43 mm, sd = 0.18 mm; p less than 0.001.] Although the rate of palatal widening was not large in absolute terms, widening appeared to continue throughout the age interval under study, and there was no evidence to support the conventionally accepted idea that palatal growth in the transverse dimension tapers off substantially or even ceases during the age interval under observation. Evidence of statistically significant widening of the mandibular arch by means of transverse rotation of the osseous matrix was noted in nine of the 29 subjects for whom three-dimensional mandibular information was available. For these nine subjects, the estimated annual increase in mandibular arch angle ranged from 0.52 degrees to 1.40 degrees. As far as we are aware, this is the first report of mandibular matrix rotation in the transverse direction from a sample of subjects with metallic implants. The finding that spontaneous changes in this dimension are relatively common raises the possibility that classical attitudes concerning the immutability of osseous relationships in the symphyseal region during growth may be inappropriate.

  17. pH Optrode Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Zhou, Quan

    1995-01-01

    pH-sensitive chromophoric reagents immobilized in porous optical fibers. Optoelectronic instrumentation system measures acidity or alkalinity of aqueous nutrient solution. Includes one or more optrodes, which are optical-fiber chemical sensors, in sense, analogous to electrodes but not subject to some of spurious effects distorting readings taken by pH electrodes. Concept of optrodes also described in "Ethylene-Vapor Optrodes" (KSC-11579). pH optrode sensor head, with lead-in and lead-out optical fibers, convenient for monitoring solutions located away from supporting electronic equipment.

  18. Hydrological constraints of paleo-Lake Suguta in the Northern Kenya Rift during the African Humid Period (15-5 ka BP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junginger, Annett; Trauth, Martin H.

    2013-12-01

    During the African Humid Period (AHP, 15-5 ka BP) an almost 300 m deep paleo-lake covering 2200 km2 developed in the Suguta Valley, in the Northern Kenya Rift. Data from lacustrine sediments and paleo-shorelines indicate that a large paleo-lake already existed by 13.9 ka BP, and record rapid water level fluctuations of up to 100 m within periods of 100 years or less, and a final lowstand at the end of the AHP (5 ka BP). We used a hydro-balance model to assess the abruptness of these water level fluctuations and identify their causes. We observed that fluctuations within the AHP were caused by abrupt changes in precipitation of 26-40%. Despite the absence of continuous lacustrine data documenting the onset of the AHP in the Suguta Valley, we conclude from the hydro-balance model that only an abrupt onset to the AHP, prior to 14.8 ka BP, could have led to high water levels recorded. The modeling results suggest that the sudden increase in rainfall was the direct consequence of an eastward migration of the Congo Air Boundary (CAB), caused by an enhanced atmospheric pressure gradient between East Africa and southern Asia during a northern hemisphere (NH) summer insolation maximum. In contrast, the end of the AHP must have been gradual despite an abrupt change in the source of precipitation when a decreasing pressure gradient between Asia and Africa prevented the CAB from reaching the study area. This abruptness was probably buffered by a contemporaneous change in precession producing an insolation maximum at the equator during September-October. This change would have meant that the only rain source was the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), which would have carried a greater amount of moisture during the short rainy season thus slowing the fall in water level over a period of about 1000 years in association with the reduction in insolation. The results of this study provide an indication of the amount of time available for humans in north-eastern Africa to adapt

  19. Making pH Tangible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Elizabeth; Moss, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise in which students test the pH of different substances, study the effect of a buffer on acidic solutions by comparing the behavior of buffered and unbuffered solutions upon the addition of acid, and compare common over-the-counter antacid remedies. (MKR)

  20. Climatic controls on drainage basin topography - a synopsis of the western Andean flanks between 15.5 S and 41.5 S lat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehak, K.; Strecker, M. R.; Echtler, H. P.; Bookhagen, B.

    2007-12-01

    Topography in tectonically active mountain ranges is determined by the interplay between tectonics and climate. Due to the complexity of natural systems it is difficult to evaluate tectonic versus climatic contributions to the long- term landscape evolution. Previous studies suggest that rainfall and its variability strongly influence the morphology of river profiles and mountain ranges. However, it is still controversially discussed how drainage basins reflect tectonic and climatic processes. The Andean Cordillera provides a unique natural setting for studying the relationship between climate, tectonics, and topography. The Andes host various climatic zones with pronounced differences in rainfall regimes. In the central to southern western Andes, climate ranges from hyperarid in the Atacama Desert, 22 to 23°S lat, with a mean annual rainfall of ~ 5 mm/yr to year-round humid conditions south of Valdivia, ~ 40°S lat, with more than 2500 mm/yr. This zonation is controlled by hemisphere-scale atmospheric circulation patterns. With the exception of a northward shift of the Southern Hemisphere Westerlies during glacials the overall precipitation pattern has remained stable on the west coast of South America. The shelf width is reasonably constant along the margin. Uplift rate and lithology vary non-systematically and do not correlate with climatic parameters. Here, we present an analysis of 120 drainage basins along the watershed of the western Andean flank between 15.5 S and 41.5 S lat, using SRTMV3-90m data and a high-resolution rainfall dataset (TRMM 5x5 km). The basins comprise drainage areas of 1 to ~ 30 x 103 km2 and were split into subsets according to position and size. For each basin, we extracted 21 geometry, relief, and climate parameters in order to unravel the determinants of drainage-basin morphology. Our data shows that river-profile concavity and slope, hypsometric integral, basin maximum and mean elevation decrease with increasing rainfall and

  1. Group 2 PH: Medical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Guazzi, Marco; Labate, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to left heart disease, classified as Group 2, is a widely underestimated target of therapy. Prevention and treatment of initial subclinical stages are not valued as a priority in the management of this chronic disease population, whereas attention is high for PH consequences in patients with advanced heart failure (HF) requiring a left ventricular mechanical assist device or heart transplant candidates. Even so, there is a growing interest toward the evidence of a clinical and prognostic role of PH in the elderly populations and in HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Certainly, along with a prevalence definition not yet defined, the search for effective pharmacological approaches that might favorably affect the aging process and the natural history of HFpEF from earlier stages is not an easy task. Pharmacological studies that have tested some traditional pulmonary arterial hypertension approved drugs (i.e., prostanoids and endothelin-1 receptor blockers) primarily in PH and HF with reduced ejection fraction have not been positive, especially because of concomitant side effects, i.e., systemic hypotension, fluid retention and hepatic toxicity. In recent years, interest has moved toward drugs overexpressing the nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway with recent availability of well-tolerated selective pulmonary vasodilators, such as phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and guanylate cyclase stimulators. Single center studies performed with these drugs have shown good tolerability and safety profile providing alternating hemodynamic results mainly because of recruitment of patients at different stages of the pulmonary vascular disease. Nonetheless, the overexpression of NO pathway appears to remain the most solid background for targeting lung microvessel dysfunction and treating RV dysfunction since the earliest stages of the disease. PMID:27389809

  2. Synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of the novel sodium cobalt tellurate Na{sub 5}Co{sub 15.5}Te{sub 6}O{sub 36}

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Yue Jin; Yoshioka, Yuta; Wakeshima, Makoto; Tezuka, Keitaro; Imoto, Hideo

    2014-03-15

    The novel single crystal oxide Na{sub 5}Co{sub 15.5}Te{sub 6}O{sub 36} had been successfully synthesized by a self-flux method. Na{sub 5}Co{sub 15.5}Te{sub 6}O{sub 36} crystallizes in hexagonal symmetry, space group P6{sub 3}/m (No.176), with lattice parameters a=9.359 (3) Å, c=9.096 (8) Å, and Z=1. The structure is composed of combining the edge-sharing chains of octahedra, [TeO{sub 6}]{sup 6−} and [Co(1)O{sub 6}]{sup 10−} with the face-sharing chains of triangular prisms, [Co(2)O{sub 6}]{sup 10−} and [Co(3)(Na(3))O{sub 6}]{sup 10−}. Sodium ions partially occupy hexagonal channels along the c-axis that are formed by the connection of the chains. The magnetic susceptibility data show a long-range antiferromagnetic ordering with a Neel temperature of 52 K along the c axis. At temperatures above 200 K, the susceptibility corrected for the diamagnetic contribution can be fit to the Curie–Weiss law for Co{sup 2+} (S=3/2). The anisotropic ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic feature of Na{sub 5}Co{sub 15.5}Te{sub 6}O{sub 36} was obtained through field-dependent magnetization measurements at low temperature. The ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic behaviors can be considered from the interactions between the Co ions in 1D zig-zag chains formed by sharing the edges of the Co(1)O{sub 6} octahedra, and the interactions between the interchain Co ions, respectively. -- Graphical abstract: The unit cell (a) and perspective view along [001] (b) of novel single crystal oxide, Na{sub 5}Co{sub 15.5}Te{sub 6}O{sub 36}. Highlights: • A single crystal of Na{sub 5}Co{sub 15.5}Te{sub 6}O{sub 36} has been synthesized by a self-flux method. • Na{sub 5}Co{sub 15.5}Te{sub 6}O{sub 36} crystallizes in hexagonal symmetry with a space group P6{sub 3}/m. • Na{sub 5}Co{sub 15.5}Te{sub 6}O{sub 36} has an antiferromagnetic ordering with a Neel temperature of 52 K. • Na{sub 5}Co{sub 15.5}Te{sub 6}O{sub 36} shows anisotropic ferro- and antiferromagnetism at low temperatures.

  3. The Methods Behind PH WINS

    PubMed Central

    Leider, Jonathon P.; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Pineau, Vicki; Liu, Lin; Harper, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) has yielded the first-ever nationally representative sample of state health agency central office employees. The survey represents a step forward in rigorous, systematic data collection to inform the public health workforce development agenda in the United States. PH WINS is a Web-based survey and was developed with guidance from a panel of public health workforce experts including practitioners and researchers. It draws heavily from existing and validated items and focuses on 4 main areas: workforce perceptions about training needs, workplace environment and job satisfaction, perceptions about national trends, and demographics. This article outlines the conceptualization, development, and implementation of PH WINS, as well as considerations and limitations. It also describes the creation of 2 new data sets that will be available in public use for public health officials and researchers—a nationally representative data set for permanently employed state health agency central office employees comprising over 10 000 responses, and a pilot data set with approximately 12 000 local and regional health department staff responses. PMID:26422490

  4. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range.

  5. The pH of antiseptic cleansers

    PubMed Central

    Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Varothai, Supenya; Nuchkull, Piyavadee

    2014-01-01

    Background Daily bathing with antiseptic cleansers are proposed by some physicians as an adjunctive management of atopic dermatitis (AD). As atopic skin is sensitive, selection of cleansing products becomes a topic of concern. Objective Our purpose is to evaluate the pH of various antiseptic body cleansers to give an overview for recommendation to patients with AD. Methods Commonly bar and liquid cleansers consisted of antiseptic agents were measured for pH using pH meter and pH-indicator strips. For comparison, mild cleansers and general body cleansers were also measured. Results All cleansing bars had pH 9.8-11.3 except syndet bar that had neutral pH. For liquid cleansers, three cleansing agents had pH close to pH of normal skin, one of antiseptic cleansers, one of mild cleansers and another one of general cleansers. The rest of antiseptic cleansers had pH 8.9-9.6 while mild cleansers had pH 6.9-7.5. Syndet liquid had pH 7 and general liquid cleansers had pH 9.6. Conclusion The pH of cleanser depends on composition of that cleanser. Adding antiseptic agents are not the only factor determining variation of pH. Moreover, benefit of antiseptic properties should be considered especially in cases of infected skin lesions in the selection of proper cleansers for patients with AD. PMID:24527408

  6. Acid loading test (pH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003615.htm Acid loading test (pH) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the ...

  7. The SBP2 and 15.5 kD/Snu13p proteins share the same RNA binding domain: identification of SBP2 amino acids important to SECIS RNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Allmang, Christine; Carbon, Philippe; Krol, Alain

    2002-01-01

    Selenoprotein synthesis in eukaryotes requires the selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) RNA, a hairpin in the 3' untranslated region of selenoprotein mRNAs. The SECIS RNA is recognized by the SECIS-binding protein 2 (SBP2), which is a key player in this specialized translation machinery. The objective of this work was to obtain structural insight into the SBP2-SECIS RNA complex. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that SBP2 and the U4 snRNA-binding protein 15.5 kD/Snu13p share the same RNA binding domain of the L7A/L30 family, also found in the box H/ACA snoRNP protein Nhp2p and several ribosomal proteins. In corollary, we have detected a similar secondary structure motif in the SECIS and U4 RNAs. Combining the data of the crystal structure of the 15.5 kD-U4 snRNA complex, and the SBP2/15.5 kD sequence similarities, we designed a structure-guided strategy predicting 12 SBP2 amino acids that should be critical for SECIS RNA binding. Alanine substitution of these amino acids followed by gel shift assays of the SBP2 mutant proteins identified four residues whose mutation severely diminished or abolished SECIS RNA binding, the other eight provoking intermediate down effects. In addition to identifying key amino acids for SECIS recognition by SBP2, our findings led to the proposal that some of the recognition principles governing the 15.5 kD-U4 snRNA interaction must be similar in the SBP2-SECIS RNA complex. PMID:12403468

  8. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. Even though the regulation system of pH is very robust, tissue pH can be altered in many diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus. Traditional high-resolution optical imaging techniques, such as confocal microscopy, routinely image pH in cells and tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent dyes, which change their fluorescence properties with the surrounding pH. Since strong optical scattering in biological tissue blurs images at greater depths, high-resolution pH imaging is limited to penetration depths of 1mm. Here, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye in tissue phantoms. Using both opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we explored the possibility of recovering the pH values in tissue phantoms. In this paper, we demonstrate that PAM was capable of recovering pH values up to a depth of 2 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  9. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, C.J.

    1983-11-15

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

  10. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Charles J.

    1983-01-01

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe.

  11. 46 CFR 151.15-5 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Pressure-vacuum venting. A normally closed venting system fitted with a device to automatically limit the pressure or vacuum in the tank to design limits. Pressure-vacuum relief valves shall comply with the... devices in accordance with the requirements of § 54.15-13 of this chapter. (2) When a...

  12. 46 CFR 151.15-5 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... The maximum safety relief valve setting shall not exceed the maximum allowable working pressure of the tank. For cargoes carried at ambient temperatures, the minimum safety relief valve setting shall... pressure of the tank. The safety relief valves shall be of a type approved under subparts 162.001 or...

  13. 46 CFR 151.15-5 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... The maximum safety relief valve setting shall not exceed the maximum allowable working pressure of the tank. For cargoes carried at ambient temperatures, the minimum safety relief valve setting shall... pressure of the tank. The safety relief valves shall be of a type approved under subparts 162.001 or...

  14. 46 CFR 151.15-5 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... The maximum safety relief valve setting shall not exceed the maximum allowable working pressure of the tank. For cargoes carried at ambient temperatures, the minimum safety relief valve setting shall... pressure of the tank. The safety relief valves shall be of a type approved under subparts 162.001 or...

  15. 46 CFR 151.15-5 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... The maximum safety relief valve setting shall not exceed the maximum allowable working pressure of the tank. For cargoes carried at ambient temperatures, the minimum safety relief valve setting shall... pressure of the tank. The safety relief valves shall be of a type approved under subparts 162.001 or...

  16. 46 CFR 196.15-5 - Drafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of the water in which the vessel is then floating. (1) When an allowance for draft is made for density of the water in which the vessel is floating, this density is to be noted in the official logbook....

  17. 46 CFR 196.15-5 - Drafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of the water in which the vessel is then floating. (1) When an allowance for draft is made for density of the water in which the vessel is floating, this density is to be noted in the official logbook....

  18. 46 CFR 196.15-5 - Drafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of the water in which the vessel is then floating. (1) When an allowance for draft is made for density of the water in which the vessel is floating, this density is to be noted in the official logbook....

  19. 46 CFR 196.15-5 - Drafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of the water in which the vessel is then floating. (1) When an allowance for draft is made for density of the water in which the vessel is floating, this density is to be noted in the official logbook....

  20. 7 CFR 15.5 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... racial and ethnic data showing the extent to which members of minority groups are beneficiaries of..., as the Department or its Agencies finds necessary to apprise such persons of the protections...

  1. 46 CFR 63.15-5 - Strainers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING AUTOMATIC AUXILIARY BOILERS General... be self-cleaning, fitted with a bypass, or be capable of being cleaned without interrupting the fuel... strainer must meet the requirements for strainers found in UL 296 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR...

  2. 46 CFR 63.15-5 - Strainers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING AUTOMATIC AUXILIARY BOILERS General... be self-cleaning, fitted with a bypass, or be capable of being cleaned without interrupting the fuel... strainer must meet the requirements for strainers found in UL 296 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR...

  3. 46 CFR 63.15-5 - Strainers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING AUTOMATIC AUXILIARY BOILERS General... be self-cleaning, fitted with a bypass, or be capable of being cleaned without interrupting the fuel... strainer must meet the requirements for strainers found in UL 296 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR...

  4. 46 CFR 63.15-5 - Strainers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING AUTOMATIC AUXILIARY BOILERS General... be self-cleaning, fitted with a bypass, or be capable of being cleaned without interrupting the fuel... strainer must meet the requirements for strainers found in UL 296 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR...

  5. 46 CFR 63.15-5 - Strainers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING AUTOMATIC AUXILIARY BOILERS General... be self-cleaning, fitted with a bypass, or be capable of being cleaned without interrupting the fuel... strainer must meet the requirements for strainers found in UL 296 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR...

  6. 30 CFR 15.5 - Test samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... explosive units shall submit 140 units. (b) Condition and composition. Explosives and sheathed explosive... MINING PRODUCTS REQUIREMENTS FOR APPROVAL OF EXPLOSIVES AND SHEATHED EXPLOSIVE UNITS General Provisions... sheathed explosive units to be tested until requested to do so by MSHA. (2) The applicant shall submit...

  7. 30 CFR 15.5 - Test samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... explosive units shall submit 140 units. (b) Condition and composition. Explosives and sheathed explosive... MINING PRODUCTS REQUIREMENTS FOR APPROVAL OF EXPLOSIVES AND SHEATHED EXPLOSIVE UNITS General Provisions... sheathed explosive units to be tested until requested to do so by MSHA. (2) The applicant shall submit...

  8. Characterization of the interaction between protein Snu13p/15.5K and the Rsa1p/NUFIP factor and demonstration of its functional importance for snoRNP assembly.

    PubMed

    Rothé, Benjamin; Back, Régis; Quinternet, Marc; Bizarro, Jonathan; Robert, Marie-Cécile; Blaud, Magali; Romier, Christophe; Manival, Xavier; Charpentier, Bruno; Bertrand, Edouard; Branlant, Christiane

    2014-02-01

    The yeast Snu13p protein and its 15.5K human homolog both bind U4 snRNA and box C/D snoRNAs. They also bind the Rsa1p/NUFIP assembly factor, proposed to scaffold immature snoRNPs and to recruit the Hsp90-R2TP chaperone complex. However, the nature of the Snu13p/15.5K-Rsa1p/NUFIP interaction and its exact role in snoRNP assembly remained to be elucidated. By using biophysical, molecular and imaging approaches, here, we identify residues needed for Snu13p/15.5K-Rsa1p/NUFIP interaction. By NMR structure determination and docking approaches, we built a 3D model of the Snup13p-Rsa1p interface, suggesting that residues R249, R246 and K250 in Rsa1p and E72 and D73 in Snu13p form a network of electrostatic interactions shielded from the solvent by hydrophobic residues from both proteins and that residue W253 of Rsa1p is inserted in a hydrophobic cavity of Snu13p. Individual mutations of residues in yeast demonstrate the functional importance of the predicted interactions for both cell growth and snoRNP formation. Using archaeal box C/D sRNP 3D structures as templates, the association of Snu13p with Rsa1p is predicted to be exclusive of interactions in active snoRNPs. Rsa1p and NUFIP may thus prevent premature activity of pre-snoRNPs, and their removal may be a key step for active snoRNP production. PMID:24234454

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies two novel regions at 11p15.5-p13 and 1p31 with major impact on acute-phase serum amyloid A.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Carola; Albrecht, Eva; Hysi, Pirro G; Lagou, Vasiliki; Waldenberger, Melanie; Tönjes, Anke; Prokopenko, Inga; Heim, Katharina; Blackburn, Hannah; Ried, Janina S; Kleber, Marcus E; Mangino, Massimo; Thorand, Barbara; Peters, Annette; Hammond, Christopher J; Grallert, Harald; Boehm, Bernhard O; Kovacs, Peter; Geistlinger, Ludwig; Prokisch, Holger; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Spector, Tim D; Wichmann, H-Erich; Stumvoll, Michael; Soranzo, Nicole; März, Winfried; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Gieger, Christian

    2010-11-01

    Elevated levels of acute-phase serum amyloid A (A-SAA) cause amyloidosis and are a risk factor for atherosclerosis and its clinical complications, type 2 diabetes, as well as various malignancies. To investigate the genetic basis of A-SAA levels, we conducted the first genome-wide association study on baseline A-SAA concentrations in three population-based studies (KORA, TwinsUK, Sorbs) and one prospective case cohort study (LURIC), including a total of 4,212 participants of European descent, and identified two novel genetic susceptibility regions at 11p15.5-p13 and 1p31. The region at 11p15.5-p13 (rs4150642; p = 3.20×10(-111)) contains serum amyloid A1 (SAA1) and the adjacent general transcription factor 2 H1 (GTF2H1), Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome 5 (HPS5), lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), and lactate dehydrogenase C (LDHC). This region explains 10.84% of the total variation of A-SAA levels in our data, which makes up 18.37% of the total estimated heritability. The second region encloses the leptin receptor (LEPR) gene at 1p31 (rs12753193; p = 1.22×10(-11)) and has been found to be associated with CRP and fibrinogen in previous studies. Our findings demonstrate a key role of the 11p15.5-p13 region in the regulation of baseline A-SAA levels and provide confirmative evidence of the importance of the 1p31 region for inflammatory processes and the close interplay between A-SAA, leptin, and other acute-phase proteins. PMID:21124955

  10. Fetal scalp pH testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Normal pH: 7.25 to 7.35 Borderline pH: 7.20 to 7.25 The examples above are common measurements for results of these tests. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some ...

  11. pH [Measure of Acidity].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Paula

    This autoinstructional program deals with the study of the pH of given substances by using litmus and hydrion papers. It is a learning activity directed toward low achievers involved in the study of biology at the secondary school level. The time suggested for the unit is 25-30 minutes (plus additional time for further pH testing). The equipment…

  12. pH. Agricultural Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This lesson plan is intended for use in conducting classes on the effect of pH on plant growth. Presented first are an attention step/problem statement and a series of questions and answers designed to convey general information about soil pH and its effect on plants. The following topics are among those discussed: acidity and alkalinity; the…

  13. Middle School and pH?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herricks, Susan

    2007-01-01

    A local middle school requested that the Water Center of Advanced Materials for Purification of Water With Systems (WaterCAMPWS), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center, provide an introduction to pH for their seventh-grade water-based service learning class. After sorting through a multitude of information about pH, a…

  14. Response to the "Responsive PhD"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huyssen, David

    2007-01-01

    In June 2005, 50 graduate school deans gathered at Princeton to address the fact that the number of new PhDs conferred each year far exceeds the number of tenure-track academic jobs on offer. Under the auspices of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation's Responsive PhD Project, these deans spoke passionately about how American…

  15. Inexpensive and Disposable pH Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldcamp, Michael J.; Conklin, Alfred; Nelson, Kimberly; Marchetti, Jessica; Brashear, Ryan; Epure, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Inexpensive electrodes for the measurement of pH have been constructed using the ionophore tribenzylamine for sensing H[superscript +] concentrations. Both traditional liquid-membrane electrodes and coated-wire electrodes have been constructed and studied, and both exhibit linear, nearly Nernstian responses to changes in pH. Measurements of pH…

  16. Colorimetric determination of pH

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, E.W.; Buchanan, B.R.

    1991-12-31

    There is a need for a simple, rapid, reliable means for determining pH values of concentrated, high salt solutions without reliance on human eye and ambient light. The method comprises the steps of preparing a set of reference solutions, measuring the light absorption by each reference solution, adding indicator dye to each reference solution, measuring the light absorption by each such reference mixture, comparing the two solutions to determine the dye color at each pH, normalizing the spectra of mixture to the isosbestic point, and matching the color of the pH of the solution to one of the colors of the pHs in the reference solution set. In this way, the pH can be determined to within 0.1 pH unit, a far more precise method than using the human eye.

  17. Intracellular pH modulates quinary structure

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Rachel D; Guseman, Alex J; Pielak, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy can provide information about proteins in living cells. pH is an important characteristic of the intracellular environment because it modulates key protein properties such as net charge and stability. Here, we show that pH modulates quinary interactions, the weak, ubiquitous interactions between proteins and other cellular macromolecules. We use the K10H variant of the B domain of protein G (GB1, 6.2 kDa) as a pH reporter in Escherichia coli cells. By controlling the intracellular pH, we show that quinary interactions influence the quality of in-cell 15N–1H HSQC NMR spectra. At low pH, the quality is degraded because the increase in attractive interactions between E. coli proteins and GB1 slows GB1 tumbling and broadens its crosspeaks. The results demonstrate the importance of quinary interactions for furthering our understanding of protein chemistry in living cells. PMID:26257390

  18. Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction

    DOEpatents

    Maynard, John D.; Hendee, Shonn P.; Rohrscheib, Mark R.; Nunez, David; Alam, M. Kathleen; Franke, James E.; Kemeny, Gabor J.

    2005-09-13

    Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

  19. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD

    Cancer.gov

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  20. Cryptic translocation t(5;11)(q35;p15.5) with involvement of the NSD1 and NUP98 genes without 5q deletion in childhood acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Panarello, Claudio; Rosanda, Cristina; Morerio, Cristina

    2002-11-01

    The cryptic translocation t(5;11)(q35;p15.5), which creates a NSD1-NUP98 fusion gene, has been associated with a deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, del(5q), in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with differentiated phenotype. We screened five pediatric cases of AML with apparently normal karyotype by use of fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis and detected one case with early myeloid phenotype and poor clinical outcome, but with the same breakpoints and no del(5q). These findings point to the involvement of t(5;11) as an early event in leukemogenesis. Screening for this translocation in AML patients with apparently normal karyotype at onset is recommended.

  1. Eukaryotic diversity at pH extremes.

    PubMed

    Amaral-Zettler, Linda A

    2012-01-01

    Extremely acidic (pH < 3) and extremely alkaline (pH > 9) environments support a diversity of single-cell and to a lesser extent, multicellular eukaryotic life. This study compared alpha and beta diversity in eukaryotic communities from seven diverse aquatic environments with pH values ranging from 2 to 11 using massively-parallel pyrotag sequencing targeting the V9 hypervariable region of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. A total of 946 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recovered at a 6% cut-off level (94% similarity) across the sampled environments. Hierarchical clustering of the samples segregated the communities into acidic and alkaline groups. Similarity percentage (SIMPER) analysis followed by indicator OTU analysis (IOA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) were used to determine which characteristic groups of eukaryotic taxa typify acidic or alkaline extremes and the extent to which pH explains eukaryotic community structure in these environments. Spain's Rio Tinto yielded the fewest observed OTUs while Nebraska Sandhills alkaline lakes yielded the most. Distinct OTUs, including metazoan OTUs, numerically dominated pH extreme sites. Indicator OTUs included the diatom Pinnularia and unidentified opisthokonts (Fungi and Filasterea) in the extremely acidic environments, and the ciliate Frontonia across the extremely alkaline sites. Inferred from NMDS, pH explained only a modest fraction of the variation across the datasets, indicating that other factors influence the underlying community structure in these environments. The findings from this study suggest that the ability for eukaryotes to adapt to pH extremes over a broad range of values may be rare, but further study of taxa that can broadly adapt across diverse acidic and alkaline environments, respectively present good models for understanding adaptation and should be targeted for future investigations.

  2. Eukaryotic diversity at pH extremes

    PubMed Central

    Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.

    2013-01-01

    Extremely acidic (pH < 3) and extremely alkaline (pH > 9) environments support a diversity of single-cell and to a lesser extent, multicellular eukaryotic life. This study compared alpha and beta diversity in eukaryotic communities from seven diverse aquatic environments with pH values ranging from 2 to 11 using massively-parallel pyrotag sequencing targeting the V9 hypervariable region of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. A total of 946 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recovered at a 6% cut-off level (94% similarity) across the sampled environments. Hierarchical clustering of the samples segregated the communities into acidic and alkaline groups. Similarity percentage (SIMPER) analysis followed by indicator OTU analysis (IOA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) were used to determine which characteristic groups of eukaryotic taxa typify acidic or alkaline extremes and the extent to which pH explains eukaryotic community structure in these environments. Spain's Rio Tinto yielded the fewest observed OTUs while Nebraska Sandhills alkaline lakes yielded the most. Distinct OTUs, including metazoan OTUs, numerically dominated pH extreme sites. Indicator OTUs included the diatom Pinnularia and unidentified opisthokonts (Fungi and Filasterea) in the extremely acidic environments, and the ciliate Frontonia across the extremely alkaline sites. Inferred from NMDS, pH explained only a modest fraction of the variation across the datasets, indicating that other factors influence the underlying community structure in these environments. The findings from this study suggest that the ability for eukaryotes to adapt to pH extremes over a broad range of values may be rare, but further study of taxa that can broadly adapt across diverse acidic and alkaline environments, respectively present good models for understanding adaptation and should be targeted for future investigations. PMID:23335919

  3. MRF with adjustable pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2011-10-01

    Deterministic final polishing of high precision optics using sub-aperture processing with magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is an accepted practice throughout the world. A wide variety of materials can be successfully worked with aqueous (pH 10), magnetorheological (MR) fluids, using magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) and either ceria or nanodiamond nonmagnetic abrasives. Polycrystalline materials like zinc sulfide (ZnS) and zinc selenide (ZnSe) are difficult to polish at pH 10 with MRF, due to their grain size and the relatively low stiffness of the MR fluid lap. If microns of material are removed, the grain structure of the material begins to appear. In 2005, Kozhinova et al. (Appl. Opt. 44 4671-4677) demonstrated that lowering pH could improve MRF of ZnS. However, magnetic CI particle corrosion rendered their low pH approach unstable and unsuitable for commercial implementation. In 2009, Shafrir et al. described a sol-gel coating process for manufacturing a zirconia-coated CI particle that protects the magnetic core from aqueous corrosion (Appl. Opt .48 6797-6810). The coating process produces free nanozirconia polishing abrasives during the coating procedure, thereby creating an MR polishing powder that is "self-charged" with the polishing abrasive. By simply adding water, it was possible to polish optical glasses and ceramics with good stability at pH 8 for three weeks. The development of a corrosion resistant, MR polishing powder, opens up the possibility for polishing additional materials, wherein the pH may be adjusted to optimize effectiveness. In this paper we describe the CI coating process, the characterization of the coated powder, and procedures for making stable MR fluids with adjustable pH, giving polishing results for a variety of optical glasses and crystalline ceramics.

  4. Immobilized pH gradients (IPG) simulator--an additional step in pH gradient engineering: II. Nonlinear pH gradients.

    PubMed

    Righetti, P G; Tonani, C

    1991-12-01

    While in the companion paper (Tonani, C. & Righetti, P. G., Electrophoresis 1991, 12, 1011-1021) we gave the general outline of our new computer program, immobilized pH gradients (IPG) simulator, able to simulate and optimize linear pH gradients for isoelectric focusing in immobilized pH gradients, in the present report we extend the application of such a program to: (i) convex exponential gradients, (ii) logarithmic and (iii) polynomial gradients. Such gradients are meant to give equal space to protein spots in complex protein mixtures (e.g., cell lysates, biological fluids) and follow the statistical distribution of protein pI values along the pH axis. They will prove of fundamental importance in two-dimensional maps, both because they optimize the spreading of spots in the two-dimensional plane and because of the excellent reproducibility of immobilized pH gradients. The following concave exponential recipes are given: pH 3-8, pH 3-9, pH 3-10, pH 3-11, pH 4-7, pH 4-8, pH 4-9, pH 4-10, pH 4-11, pH 5-8, pH 5-9, and pH 5-10, as well as the most extended pH 2.5-11 interval. Two interesting logarithmic gradients are described: pH 3-6 and pH 3-7 and one sigmoidal (derived with a polynomial of 5th degree): pH 3-11.

  5. pH fluorescent probes: chlorinated fluoresceins.

    PubMed

    Ge, Feng-Yan; Chen, Li-Gong

    2008-01-01

    A series of regiospecific chlorinated fluoresceins have been synthesized by the reaction of the regiospecific chlorinated resorcinols with chlorinated phthalic anhydride. The regioisomers were successfully separated by chromatography. The photophysical properties of the obtained chlorinated fluoresceins were examined and found their absorption and emission maxima at long wavelength with high fluorescence quantum yield. Especially, pH-dependent properties of chlorinated fluoresceins have been studied in detail. These compounds show strongly pH-sensitive range of 3.5-7.0, and have lower pK (a) values than fluorescein. Furthermore, their fluorescent intensity could reach the maximum in the physiological environment of pH range 6.8-7.4. Due to higher fluorescence quantum yield and lower pK (a) values, chlorinated fluoresceins will be expected to be used as excellent pH fluorescent probes for pH measurement of the acidic cell.

  6. Pattern recognition of ocean pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Albert

    2016-09-01

    The manuscript shows how the few, scattered, latest measurements of ocean pH lacking a proper spatial and time coverage do not permit a meaningful computation of global trends, as the ocean pH is strongly variable in latitude, longitude and depth and very likely is subject to the multi-decadal oscillations that have been identified in the atmospheric and ocean systems. The proposed mathematical model is based on the assumption that the monthly averaged ocean pH may be described by the superposition of a linear trend and inter-annual, decadal and multi-decadal oscillations, with linear and sinusoidal regression coefficients requiring data that are presently unavailable.

  7. Ratiometric imaging of pH probes.

    PubMed

    Grillo-Hill, Bree K; Webb, Bradley A; Barber, Diane L

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of intracellular pH can be readily accomplished using tools and methods described in this chapter. We present a discussion of technical considerations of various ratiometric pH-sensitive probes including dyes and genetically encoded sensors. These probes can be used to measure pH across physical scales from macroscopic whole-mount tissues down to organelles and subcellular domains. We describe protocols for loading pH-sensitive probes into single cells or tissues and discuss ratiometric image acquisition and analysis.

  8. Element-specific electronic structure and magnetic properties of an epitaxial Ni51.6Mn32.9Sn15.5 thin film at the austenite-martensite transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumme, B.; Auge, A.; Herper, H. C.; Opahle, I.; Klar, D.; Teichert, N.; Joly, L.; Ohresser, P.; Landers, J.; Kappler, J. P.; Entel, P.; Hütten, A.; Wende, H.

    2015-06-01

    An austenite-martensite transition was observed in a 100-nm-thick Ni51.6Mn32.9Sn15.5 film by temperature-dependent resistivity and magnetization measurements, revealing a martensite starting temperature of MS≈260 K. The influence of the structural phase transition on the electronic structure and the magnetic properties was studied element specifically employing temperature-dependent x-ray-absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. In addition, density functional theory calculations have been performed to study the electronic and magnetic properties of both phases. It is shown that off-stoichiometric Ni-Mn-Sn alloys can exhibit a substantial magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy in the martensite phase. For Mn a change of the electronic structure and a strong increase of the ratio of orbital to spin magnetic moment ml/mS can be observed, whereas for Ni nearly no changes occur. Applying an external magnetic field of B =3 T reverses the change of the electronic structure of Mn and reduces the ratio of ml/mS from 13.5 to ≈1 % indicating a field-induced reverse martensitic transition.

  9. Assignment of the human fast skeletal troponin T gene (TNNT3) to chromosome 11p15.5: Evidence for the presence of 11pter in a monochromosome 9 somatic cell hybrid in NIGMS mapping panel 2

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Chengjian; Jha, P.K.; Sarkar, S.

    1996-02-01

    Human fast skeletal troponin T (TnT{sub f}), the tropomyosin binding component of the multisubunit troponin complex, plays an important role in the Ca{sup 2+} regulation of striated muscle contraction. Specific primers designed from the 3{prime} end of human TnT{sub f} cDNA were used to amplify an intronic region by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This TnT{sub f}-specific PCR product was detected from two somatic cell hybrids containing human chromosomes 9 and 11, respectively, in NIGMS mapping panel 2. However, further studies with other somatic hybrid cell lines (Bios Laboratory) localized the TnT{sub f} genomic probe generated by extended PCR, showing the sublocalization of the gene to band p15.5 on chromosome 11. This locus is of specific interest, as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and various childhood and adult tumor-related abnormalities have been mapped to this region. The study also indicates the presence of an 11pter region in the NIGMS cell hybrid GM10611, which has previously been reported to contain only human chromosome 9. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Evaluation of fluorimetric pH sensors for bioprocess monitoring at low pH.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Nils H; Schmidt, Michael; Krause, Christian; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Optical chemical sensors are the standard for pH monitoring in small-scale bioreactors such as microtiter plates, shaking flasks or other single-use bioreactors. The dynamic pH range of the so far commercially available fluorescent pH sensors applied in small-scale bioreactors is restricted to pH monitoring around neutral pH, although many fermentation processes are performed at pH < 6 on industrial scale. Thus, two new prototype acidic fluorescence pH sensors immobilized in single-use stirred-tank bioreactors, one with excitation at 470 nm and emission at 550 nm (sensor 470/550) and the other with excitation at 505 nm and emission at 600 nm (sensor 505/600), were characterized with respect to dynamic ranges and operational stability in representative fermentation media. Best resolution and dynamic range was observed with pH sensor 505/600 in mineral medium (dynamic range of 3.9 < pH < 7.2). Applying the same pH sensors to complex medium results in a drastic reduction of resolution and dynamic ranges. Yeast extract in complex medium was found to cause background fluorescence at the sensors' operating wavelength combinations. Optical isolation of the sensor by adding a black colored polymer layer above the sensor spot and fixing an aperture made of adhesive photoresistant foil between the fluorescence reader and the transparent bottom of the polystyrene reactors enabled full re-establishment of the sensor's characteristics. Reliability and operational stability of sensor 505/600 was shown by online pH monitoring (4.5 < pH < 5.8) of parallel anaerobic batch fermentations of Clostridium acetobutylicum for the production of acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) with offline pH measurements with a standard glass electrode as reference. PMID:25969385

  11. Monitoring fetal pH by telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, A.; Donahoe, T.; Jhabvala, M. D.; Ryan, W.

    1980-01-01

    Telemetry unit has been developed for possible use in measuring scalp-tissue pH and heart rate of unborn infant. Unit radius data to receiver as much as 50 ft. away. Application exists during hours just prior to childbirth to give warning of problems that might require cesarean delivery.

  12. Optoelectronic pH Meter: Further Details

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Anderson, Mejody M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of documents provides further detailed information about an optoelectronic instrument that measures the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium to within 0.1 unit in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. The instrument at an earlier stage of development was reported in Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium (MSC-23107), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 9 (September 2004), page 4a. To recapitulate: The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the medium flows as it is circulated through a bioreactor. The medium contains some phenol red, which is an organic pH-indicator dye. The cuvette sits between a light source and a photodetector. [The light source in the earlier version comprised red (625 nm) and green (558 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs); the light source in the present version comprises a single green- (560 nm)-or-red (623 nm) LED.] The red and green are repeatedly flashed in alternation. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red are processed electronically to obtain the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium. The optical absorbance of the phenol red in the green light varies as a known function of pH. Hence, the pH of the medium can be calculated from the aforesaid ratio.

  13. pH & Rate of Enzymatic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative and inexpensive way to measure the rate of enzymatic reaction is provided. The effects of different pH levels on the reaction rate of an enzyme from yeast are investigated and the results graphed. Background information, a list of needed materials, directions for preparing solutions, procedure, and results and discussion are…

  14. Development of sulfonamide AKT PH domain inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ahad, Ali Md.; Zuohe, Song; Du-Cuny, Lei; Moses, Sylvestor A.; Zhou, Li Li; Zhang, Shuxing; Powis, Garth; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.; Mash, Eugene A.

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway can lead to apoptosis in cancer cells. Previously we identified a lead sulfonamide that selectively bound to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of AKT and induced apoptosis when present at low micromolar concentrations. To examine the effects of structural modification, a set of sulfonamides related to the lead compound was designed, synthesized, and tested for binding to the expressed PH domain of AKT using a surface plasmon resonance-based competitive binding assay. Cellular activity was determined by means of an assay for pAKT production and a cell killing assay using BxPC3 cells. The most active compounds in the set are lipophilic and possess an aliphatic chain of the proper length. Results were interpreted with the aid of computational modeling. This paper represents the first structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of a large family of AKT PH domain inhibitors. Information obtained will be used in the design of the next generation of inhibitors of AKT PH domain function. PMID:21353784

  15. Ph.D.'s and the Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, James

    Throughout the last decade, Ph.D. recipients were accustomed to a job market in which demand for their services far exceeded supply. During the same period, manpower experts predicted this situation would continue in the foreseeable future. However, when the 60's ended, the employment illusion had been rudely dispelled by frantic reports of a…

  16. Teaching Physics Using PhET Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieman, C. E.; Adams, W. K.; Loeblein, P.; Perkins, K. K.

    2010-01-01

    PhET Interactive Simulations (sims) are now being widely used in teaching physics and chemistry. Sims can be used in many different educational settings, including lecture, individual or small group inquiry activities, homework, and lab. Here we will highlight a few ways to use them in teaching, based on our research and experiences using them in…

  17. What My Ph.D. Taught Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The author started in the Ph.D. program in comparative literature at Princeton in 1992, a year after she graduated from college. She fell in love with mythology and the classical traditions and find herself teaching literature. In the remainder of her time at Princeton, she precepted for four or five more classes, got the chance to join the…

  18. The Economic Contribution of PhDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Bernard H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper looks at what the value of a doctorate is, both to employers in particular and to society and the economy at large. Given the emphasis many universities and funding agencies/governments are putting upon the development of PhD programmes, this is an issue deserving attention. The paper tries to show how two separate but interrelated…

  19. The Ph.D. Value Proposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Atlanta University launched its doctor of arts in humanities (DAH) programs almost 40 years ago, and, since the 1988 merger with Clark College, Clark Atlanta University has continued to award the degrees. This fall, for the first time, its students will be able to earn Ph.D.s in humanities instead. In DAH programs around the country, there's been…

  20. The pH of Enceladus' ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, Christopher R.; Baross, John A.; Waite, J. Hunter

    2015-08-01

    Saturn's moon, Enceladus, is a geologically active waterworld. The prevailing paradigm is that there is a subsurface ocean that erupts to the surface, which leads to the formation of a plume of vapor and ice above the south polar region. The chemistry of the ocean is just beginning to be understood, but is of profound geochemical and astrobiological interest. Here, we determine the pH of the ocean using a thermodynamic model of carbonate speciation. Observational data from the Cassini spacecraft are used to make a chemical model of ocean water on Enceladus. The model suggests that Enceladus' ocean is a Na-Cl-CO3 solution with an alkaline pH of ∼11-12. The dominance of aqueous NaCl is a feature that Enceladus' ocean shares with terrestrial seawater, but the ubiquity of dissolved Na2CO3 suggests that soda lakes are more analogous to the Enceladus ocean. The high pH implies that the hydroxide ion should be relatively abundant, while divalent metals should be present at low concentrations owing to buffering by carbonates and phyllosilicates on the ocean floor. Carboxyl groups in dissolved organic species would be negatively charged, while amino groups would exist predominately in the neutral form. Knowledge of the pH improves our understanding of geochemical processes in Enceladus' ocean. The high pH is interpreted to be a key consequence of serpentinization of chondritic rock, as predicted by prior geochemical reaction path models; although degassing of CO2 from the ocean may also play a role depending on the efficiency of mixing processes in the ocean. Serpentinization leads to the generation of H2, a geochemical fuel that can support both abiotic and biological synthesis of organic molecules such as those that have been detected in Enceladus' plume. Serpentinization and H2 generation should have occurred on Enceladus, like on the parent bodies of aqueously altered meteorites; but it is unknown whether these critical processes are still taking place, or if

  1. Participation of liver progenitor cells in liver regeneration: lack of evidence in the AAF/PH rat model.

    PubMed

    Dusabineza, Ange-Clarisse; Van Hul, Noémi K; Abarca-Quinones, Jorge; Starkel, Peter; Najimi, Mustapha; Leclercq, Isabelle A

    2012-01-01

    When hepatocyte proliferation is impaired, liver progenitor cells (LPC) are activated to participate in liver regeneration. We used the 2-acetaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy (AAF/PH) model to evaluate the contribution of LPC to liver cell replacement and function restoration. Fischer rats subjected to AAF/PH (or PH alone) were investigated 7, 10 and 14 days post-hepatectomy. Liver mass recovery (LMR) was estimated, and the liver mass to body weight ratio calculated. We used serum albumin and bilirubin levels, and liver albumin mRNA levels to assess the liver function. LPC expansion was analyzed by cytokeratin 19 (CK19), glutathione S-transferase protein (GSTp) immunohistochemistry and by CK19, CD133, transforming growth factor-β1 and hepatocyte growth factor mRNA expression in livers. Cell proliferation was evaluated by Ki67 and BrdU immunostaining. Compared with PH alone where LMR was ∼100% 14 days post-PH, LMR was defective in AAF/PH rats (64.1±15.5%, P=0.0004). LPC expansion was scarce in PH livers (0.5±0.4% of CK19(+) area), but significant in AAF/PH livers (8.5±7.2% of CK19(+)), and inversely correlated to LMR (r(2)=0.63, P<0.0001). A quarter of AAF/PH animals presented liver failure (low serum albumin and high serum bilirubin) 14 days post-PH. Compared with animals with preserved function, this was associated with a lower LMR (50±6.8 vs 74.6±9.4%, P=0.0005), a decreased liver to body weight ratio (2±0.3 vs 3.5±0.6%, P=0.001), and a larger LPC expansion such as proliferating Ki67(+) LPC covered 17.4±4.2% of the liver parenchyma vs 3.1±1.5%, (P<0.0001). Amongst those, rare LPC with an intermediate hepatocyte-like phenotype were seen. Also, less than 2% of hepatocytes were engaged into the cell cycle (Ki67(+)), while more numerous (∼25% of hepatocytes) in the livers with preserved function. These observations suggest that, in this model, the efficient recovery of the liver function was ensured rather by the proliferation of mature hepatocytes

  2. Ultra-soft magnetic properties and correlated phase analysis by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy of Fe74Cu0.8Nb2.7Si15.5B7 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjura Hoque, S.; Liba, S. I.; Anirban, A.; Choudhury, Shamima; Akhter, Shireen

    2016-02-01

    A detailed study of magnetic softness has been performed on FINEMENT type of ribbons by investigating the BH loop with maximum applied field of 960 A/m. The ribbon with the composition of Fe74Cu0.8Nb2.7Si15.5B7 was synthesized by rapid solidification technique and the compositions volume fraction was controlled by changing the annealing condition. Detail phase analysis was performed through X-ray diffraction (XRD), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Mössbauer spectroscopy in order to correlate the ultrasoft magnetic properties with the volume fraction of amorphous and α-Fe(Si) soft nano composites. Bright (BF) and dark field (DF) image with selective area diffraction (SAD) patterns by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the sample annealed for the optimized annealed condition at 853 K for 3 min reveals nanocrystals with an average size between 10-15 nm possessing the bcc structure which matches with the grain size revealed by the X-ray diffraction. Kinetics of crystallization of α-Fe(Si) phases has been determined by DSC curves. Extremely small coercivity of 30.9 A/m and core loss of 2.5 W/Kg for the sample annealed at 853 K for 3 min was found. Similar values for other crystalline conditions were determined by using BH loop tracer with a maximum applied field of around 960 A/m. Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to determine chemical shift, hyperfine field distribution (HFD), and peak width of different phases. The volume fractions of the relative amount of amorphous and crystalline phases are also determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. High saturation magnetization along with ultrasoft magnetic properties exhibits very high potentials technological applications.

  3. What Is a pH Probe Study?

    MedlinePlus

    What is a pH Probe Study ? What is pH a probe study? M easuring the pH in the esophagus helps determine whether or not acid is coming up from the stomach. A pH probe study is usually done in patients where ...

  4. PH DEPENDENT TOXICITY OF FIVE METALS TO THREE MARINE ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pH of natural marine systems is relatively stable; this may explain why metal toxicity changes with pH have not been well documented. However, changes in metal toxicity with pH in marine waters are of concern in toxicity testing. During porewater toxicity testing pH can chang...

  5. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  6. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  7. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  8. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  9. Sensing pH with TMCs.

    PubMed

    Spalthoff, Christian; Göpfert, Martin C

    2016-07-01

    Transmembrane channel-like (TMC) proteins have been implicated in hair cell mechanotransduction, Drosophila proprioception, and sodium sensing in the nematode C. elegans. In this issue of Neuron, Wang et al. (2016) report that C. elegans TMC-1 mediates nociceptor responses to high pH, not sodium, allowing the nematode to avoid strongly alkaline environments in which most animals cannot survive. PMID:27387645

  10. Not Your Father's Ph.D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withrow, Brandon G.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how the author, a devoted blogger, confronts his fear that his virtual life is damaging his career prospects in academe. As a new Ph.D. in religious studies, the author has every reason to believe he will find a tenure-track job. He has read the numbers and know that, on average, job candidates spend two to five years in…

  11. Complexation Key to a pH Locked Redox Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Dangat, Yuvraj; Shams, Tahir; Khan, Khaliquz Zaman

    2016-01-01

    An unfavorable pH can block a feasible electron transfer for a pH dependent redox reaction. In this experiment, a series of potentiometric titrations demonstrate the sequential loss in feasibility of iron(II) dichromate redox reaction over a pH range of 0-4. The pH at which this reaction failed to occur was termed as a pH locked reaction. The…

  12. Pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Carl O.; Herman, Janet S.

    1991-02-01

    Previous studies of pyrite oxidation kinetics have concentrated primarily on the reaction at low pH, where Fe(III) has been assumed to be the dominant oxidant. Studies at circumneutral pH, necessitated by effective pH buffering in some pyrite oxidation systems, have often implicitly assumed that the dominant oxidant must be dissolved oxygen (DO), owing to the diminished solubility of Fe(III). In fact, Fe(III)(aq) is an effective pyrite oxidant at circumneutral pH, but the reaction cannot be sustained in the absence of DO. The purpose of this experimental study was to ascertain the relative roles of Fe(III) and DO in pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH. The rate of pyrite oxidation was first-order with respect to the ratio of surface area to solution volume. Direct determinations of both Fe(II) (aq)> and Fe(III) (aq) demonstrated a dramatic loss of Fe(II) from the solution phase in excess of the loss for which oxidation alone could account. Based on rate data, we have concluded that Fe(II) is adsorbed onto the pyrite surface. Furthermore, Fe(II) is preferred as an adsorbate to Fe(III), which we attribute to both electrostatic and acid-base selectivity. We also found that the rate of pyrite oxidation by either Fe(III) (aq) or DO is reduced in the presence of aqueous Fe(II), which leads us to conclude that, under most natural conditions, neither Fe(III) (aq) nor DO directly attacks the pyrite surface. The present evidence suggests a mechanism for pyrite oxidation that involves adsorbed Fe( II ) giving up electrons to DO and the resulting Fe(III) rapidly accepting electrons from the pyrite. The adsorbed Fe is, thus, cyclically oxidized and reduced, while it acts as a conduit for electrons traveling from pyrite to DO. Oxygen is transferred from the hydration sphere of the adsorbed Fe to pyrite S. The cycle of adsorbed Fe oxidation and reduction and the successive addition of oxygen to pyrite S continues until a stable sulfoxy species dissociates from the surface. Prior

  13. The Added Value of a PhD in Medicine--PhD Students' Perceptions of Acquired Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anttila, Henrika; Lindblom-Ylänne, Sari; Lonka, Kristi; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    PhD in the field of medicine is more common than in any other domain. Many medical doctors are driven towards PhD, but also students with other backgrounds (usually MSc) are conducting a PhD in medical schools. Higher education has invested a lot in developing generic and research competences. Still little is known about how PhD students…

  14. A 2.5-Mb transcript map of a tumor-suppressing subchromosomal transferable fragment from 11p15.5, and isolation and sequence analysis of three novel genes.

    PubMed

    Hu, R J; Lee, M P; Connors, T D; Johnson, L A; Burn, T C; Su, K; Landes, G M; Feinberg, A P

    1997-11-15

    11p15.5 is an important tumor-suppressor gene region, showing loss of heterozygosity in Wilms tumor, rhabdomyosarcoma, adrenocortical carcinoma, and lung, ovarian, and breast cancer. We previously mapped directly by genetic complementation a subtransferable fragment (STF) harboring an embryonal tumor-suppressor gene and spanning about 2.5 Mb. We have now mapped the centromeric end of this STF between D11S988 and D11S12 and its telomeric end between D11S1318 and TH. We have isolated a complete contig of PAC, P1, BAC, and cosmid genomic clones spanning the entire 2.5-Mb region defined by this STF, as well as more than 200 exons from these genomic clones using exon trapping. We have isolated genes in this region by directly screening DNA libraries as well as by database searching for ESTs. Nine of these genes have been reported previously by us and by others. However, the initial mapping of most of those genes was based on FISH or somatic cell hybrid analysis, and here we precisely define their physical location. These genes include RRM1, GOK (D11S4896E), Nup98, CARS, hNAP2 (NAP1L4), p57KIP2 (CDKN1C), KVLQT1 (KCNA9), TAPA-1, and ASCL2. In addition, we have identified several novel genes in this region, three of which, termed TSSC1, TSSC2, and TSSC3, are reported here. TSSC1 shows homology to Rb-associated protein p48 and chromatin assembly factor CAF1, and it is located between GOK and Nup98. TSSC2 is homologous to Caenorhabditis elegans beta-mannosyl transferase, and it lies between Nup98 and CARS. TSSC3 shows homology to mouse TDAG51, which is implicated in FasL-mediated apoptosis, and it is located between hNAP2 and p57KIP2. Thus, these genes may play a role in malignancies that involve this region.

  15. The panacea toolbox of a PhD biomedical student

    PubMed Central

    Skaik, Younis

    2014-01-01

    Doing a PhD (doctor of philosophy) for the sake of contribution to knowledge should give the student an immense enthusiasm through the PhD period. It is the time in one’s life that one spends to “hit the nail on the head” in a specific area and topic of interest. A PhD consists mostly of hard work and tenacity; however, luck and genius might also play a little role. You can pass all PhD phases without having both luck and genius. The PhD student should have pre-PhD and PhD toolboxes, which are “sine quibus non” for getting successfully a PhD degree. In this manuscript, the toolboxes of the PhD student are discussed. PMID:25674150

  16. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction.

  17. The pH of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, R. C.; Bishop, J. L.; Edwards, J. O.

    1993-01-01

    The Viking labeled release (LR) experiments provided data that can be used to determine the acid-base characteristics of the regolith. Constraints on the acid-base properties and redox potentials of the Martian surface material would provide additional information for determining what reactions are possible and defining formation conditions for the regolith. Calculations devised to determine the pH of Mars must include the amount of soluble acid species or base species present in the LR regolith sample and the solubility product of the carbonate with the limiting solubility. This analysis shows that CaCO3, either as calcite or aragonite, has the correct K(sub sp) to have produced the Viking LR successive injection reabsorption effects. Thus CaCO3 or another MeCO3 with very similar solubility characteristics must have been present on Mars. A small amount of soluble acid, but no more than 4 micro-mol per sample, could also have been present. It is concluded that the pH of the regolith is 7.2 +/- 0.1.

  18. Catalytic Decomposition of PH3 on Heated Tungsten Wire Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Hironobu; Nishihara, Yushin; Ishikawa, Takuma; Yamamoto, Shingo

    2012-08-01

    The catalytic decomposition processes of PH3 on heated tungsten surfaces were studied to clarify the mechanisms governing phosphorus doping into silicon substrates. Mass spectrometric measurements show that PH3 can be decomposed by more than 50% over 2000 K. H, P, PH, and PH2 radicals were identified by laser spectroscopic techniques. Absolute density measurements of these radical species, as well as their PH3 flow rate dependence, show that the major products on the catalyst surfaces are P and H atoms, while PH and PH2 are produced in secondary processes in the gas phase. In other words, catalytic decomposition, unlike plasma decomposition processes, can be a clean source of P atoms, which can be the only major dopant precursors. In the presence of an excess amount of H2, the apparent decomposition efficiency is small. This can be explained by rapid cyclic reactions including decomposition, deposition, and etching to reproduce PH3.

  19. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. PMID:24887564

  20. Intracellular pH in Sperm Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L.; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca2+ channel; Slo3, a K+ channel; the sperm-specific Na+/H+ exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. PMID:24887564

  1. Ian Douglass Coulter, PhD

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Douglas M

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on Dr. Ian Coulter’s accomplishments from the time he became Executive Vice-President of CMCC in 1981, until he ended his presidency with a year’s administrative leave in 1990. Annual planning initiatives, pedagogy, scholarship, conflicts, and the quest for university affiliation are discussed as well as his legacy to the College and the chiropractic profession. The term “adventurous” was first attributed to Coulter by Oswald Hall, PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto who had worked closely with Coulter in a major investigation of the chiropractic profession from 1976 to 1979. Throughout this article the author tries to capture the spirit of daring, innovation and intellect that permeated Coulter’s presidency, enthralling his advocates and confounding his detractors. PMID:17549218

  2. Steel slag raises pH of greenhouse substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dolomitic lime (DL) is the primary liming agent used for increasing pH in peatmoss-based substrates. Steel slag (SS) is a byproduct of the steel manufacturing industry that has been used to elevate field soil pH. The objective of this research was to determine the pH response of a peatmoss-based g...

  3. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  4. INFLUENCE OF PH AND REDOX CONDITIONS ON COPPER LEACHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leaching behavior of metals from a mineral processing waste at varying pH and redox conditions was studies. Effect of combinations of pH and Eh on leaching of copper is described. Leaching of copper was found to be dependent on both pH and Eh. Higher concentrations of Cu were ...

  5. Understanding Non-Traditional PhD Students Habitus--Implications for PhD Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Devika

    2015-01-01

    Against the background of vast changes in doctoral education and the emergence of non-traditional doctoral programmes, this paper investigates the habitus of non-traditional PhD students at a South African university. Bourdieu's conceptual tool of habitus informed the study. In-depth and open-ended interviews were conducted with 10 non-traditional…

  6. Comparison of Rumen Fluid pH by Continuous Telemetry System and Bench pH Meter in Sheep with Different Ranges of Ruminal pH

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Leonardo F.; Minervino, Antonio H. H.; Araújo, Carolina A. S. C.; Sousa, Rejane S.; Oliveira, Francisco L. C.; Rodrigues, Frederico A. M. L.; Meira-Júnior, Enoch B. S.; Barrêto-Júnior, Raimundo A.; Mori, Clara S.; Ortolani, Enrico L.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to compare the measurements of sheep ruminal pH using a continuous telemetry system or a bench pH meter using sheep with different degrees of ruminal pH. Ruminal lactic acidosis was induced in nine adult crossbred Santa Ines sheep by the administration of 15 g of sucrose per kg/BW. Samples of rumen fluid were collected at the baseline, before the induction of acidosis (T0) and at six, 12, 18, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the induction for pH measurement using a bench pH meter. During this 72-hour period, all animals had electrodes for the continuous measurement of pH. The results were compared using the Bland-Altman analysis of agreement, Pearson coefficients of correlation and determination, and paired analysis of variance with Student's t-test. The measurement methods presented a strong correlation (r = 0.94, P < 0.05) but the rumen pH that was measured continuously using a telemetry system resulted in lower values than the bench pH meter (overall mean of 5.38 and 5.48, resp., P = 0.0001). The telemetry system was able to detect smaller changes in rumen fluid pH and was more accurate in diagnosing both subacute ruminal lactic acidosis and acute ruminal lactic acidosis in sheep. PMID:24967422

  7. Proton Transport and pH Control in Fungi.

    PubMed

    Kane, Patricia M

    2016-01-01

    Despite diverse and changing extracellular environments, fungi maintain a relatively constant cytosolic pH and numerous organelles of distinct lumenal pH. Key players in fungal pH control are V-ATPases and the P-type proton pump Pma1. These two proton pumps act in concert with a large array of other transporters and are highly regulated. The activities of Pma1 and the V-ATPase are coordinated under some conditions, suggesting that pH in the cytosol and organelles is not controlled independently. Genomic studies, particularly in the highly tractable S. cerevisiae, are beginning to provide a systems-level view of pH control, including transcriptional responses to acid or alkaline ambient pH and definition of the full set of regulators required to maintain pH homeostasis. Genetically encoded pH sensors have provided new insights into localized mechanisms of pH control, as well as highlighting the dynamic nature of pH responses to the extracellular environment. Recent studies indicate that cellular pH plays a genuine signaling role that connects nutrient availability and growth rate through a number of mechanisms. Many of the pH control mechanisms found in S. cerevisiae are shared with other fungi, with adaptations for their individual physiological contexts. Fungi deploy certain proton transport and pH control mechanisms not shared with other eukaryotes; these regulators of cellular pH are potential antifungal targets. This review describes current and emerging knowledge proton transport and pH control mechanisms in S. cerevisiae and briefly discusses how these mechanisms vary among fungi.

  8. PhD Students' Work Conditions and Study Environment in University- and Industry-Based PhD Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolmos, A.; Kofoed, L. B.; Du, X. Y.

    2008-01-01

    During the last 10 years, new models of funding and training PhD students have been established in Denmark in order to integrate industry into the entire PhD education. Several programmes have been conducted where it is possible to co-finance PhD scholarships or to become an employee as an industrial PhD in a company. An important question is what…

  9. pH and the surface tension of water.

    PubMed

    Beattie, James K; Djerdjev, Alex M; Gray-Weale, Angus; Kallay, Nikola; Lützenkirchen, Johannes; Preočanin, Tajana; Selmani, Atiđa

    2014-05-15

    Despite the strong adsorption of hydroxide ions, the surface tension of water is almost independent of pH between pH 1 and 13 when the pH is adjusted by addition of HCl or NaOH. This is consistent with the Gibbs adsorption isotherm which measures the surface excess of all species in the double layer, if hydronium ions and hydroxide ions are adsorbed and sodium and chloride ions are not. The surface tension becomes pH dependent around pH 7 in millimolar NaCl or KCl solutions, for now sodium ions can replace hydronium ions as counterions to the adsorbed hydroxide ions.

  10. Intracellular pH of acid-tolerant ruminal bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B

    1991-01-01

    Acid-tolerant ruminal bacteria (Bacteroides ruminicola B1(4), Selenomonas ruminantium HD4, Streptococcus bovis JB1, Megasphaera elsdenii B159, and strain F) allowed their intracellular pH to decline as a function of extracellular pH and did not generate a large pH gradient across the cell membrane until the extracellular pH was low (less than 5.2). This decline in intracellular pH prevented an accumulation of volatile fatty acid anions inside the cells. PMID:1781695

  11. pH in atomic scale simulations of electrochemical interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Chan, Karen; Ahmed, Rizwan; Tripković, Vladimir; Björketun, Mårten E

    2013-07-01

    Electrochemical reaction rates can strongly depend on pH, and there is increasing interest in electrocatalysis in alkaline solution. To date, no method has been devised to address pH in atomic scale simulations. We present a simple method to determine the atomic structure of the metal|solution interface at a given pH and electrode potential. Using Pt(111)|water as an example, we show the effect of pH on the interfacial structure, and discuss its impact on reaction energies and barriers. This method paves the way for ab initio studies of pH effects on the structure and electrocatalytic activity of electrochemical interfaces.

  12. The Role of pH Regulation in Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-01-01

    Frequently observed phenotypes of tumours include high metabolic activity, hypoxia and poor perfusion; these act to produce an acidic microenvironment. Cellular function depends on pH homoeostasis, and thus, tumours become dependent on pH regulatory mechanisms. Many of the proteins involved in pH regulation are highly expressed in tumours, and their expression is often of prognostic significance. The more acidic tumour microenvironment also has important implications with regard to chemotherapeutic and radiotherapeutic interventions. In addition, we review pH-sensing mechanisms, the role of pH regulation in tumour phenotype and the use of pH regulatory mechanisms as therapeutic targets. PMID:27557536

  13. Time course of pH change in plant epidermis using microscopic pH imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Risako; Shimizu, Megumi; Kazama, Haruko; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2010-11-01

    We established a microscopic pH imaging system to track the time course of pH change in plant epidermis in vivo. In the previous research, we have found out that anthocyanin containing cells have higher pH. However, it was not clear whether the anthocyanin increased the pH or anthocyanin was synthesized result from the higher pH. Therefore, we further investigated the relationship between anthocyanin and pH change. To track the time course of pH change in plant epidermis, we established a system using luminescent imaging technique. We used HPTS (8-Hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-Trisulfonate) as pH indicator and applied excitation ratio imaging method. Luminescent image was converted to a pH distribution by obtained in vitro calibration using known pH solution. Cellular level observation was enabled by merging microscopic color picture of the same region to the pH change image. The established system was applied to epidermal cells of red-tip leaf lettuce, Lactuca Sativa L. and the time course was tracked in the growth process. We would discuss about the relationship between anthocyanin and pH change in plant epidermis.

  14. Intracellular pH of symbiotic dinoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbin, E. M.; Davy, S. K.

    2013-09-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) is likely to play a key role in maintaining the functional success of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, yet until now the pHi of the symbiotic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium) has never been quantified. Flow cytometry was used in conjunction with the ratiometric fluorescent dye BCECF to monitor changes in pHi over a daily light/dark cycle. The pHi of Symbiodinium type B1 freshly isolated from the model sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella was 7.25 ± 0.01 (mean ± SE) in the light and 7.10 ± 0.02 in the dark. A comparable effect of irradiance was seen across a variety of cultured Symbiodinium genotypes (types A1, B1, E1, E2, F1, and F5) which varied between pHi 7.21-7.39 in the light and 7.06-7.14 in the dark. Of note, there was a significant genotypic difference in pHi, irrespective of irradiance.

  15. Dipstick Spot urine pH does not accurately represent 24 hour urine PH measured by an electrode

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Mohamed; Sarkissian, Carl; Jianbo, Li; Calle, Juan; Monga, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To determine whether spot urine pH measured by dipstick is an accurate representation of 24 hours urine pH measured by an electrode. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed urine pH results of patients who presented to the urology stone clinic. For each patient we recorded the most recent pH result measured by dipstick from a spot urine sample that preceded the result of a 24-hour urine pH measured by the use of a pH electrode. Patients were excluded if there was a change in medications or dietary recommendations or if the two samples were more than 4 months apart. A difference of more than 0.5 pH was considered an inaccurate result. Results A total 600 patients were retrospectively reviewed for the pH results. The mean difference in pH between spot urine value and the 24 hours collection values was 0.52±0.45 pH. Higher pH was associated with lower accuracy (p<0.001). The accuracy of spot urine samples to predict 24-hour pH values of <5.5 was 68.9%, 68.2% for 5.5 to 6.5 and 35% for >6.5. Samples taken more than 75 days apart had only 49% the accuracy of more recent samples (p<0.002). The overall accuracy is lower than 80% (p<0.001). Influence of diurnal variation was not significant (p=0.588). Conclusions Spot urine pH by dipstick is not an accurate method for evaluation of the patients with urolithiasis. Patients with alkaline urine are more prone to error with reliance on spot urine pH. PMID:27286119

  16. In vitro synthesis and purification of PhIP-deoxyguanosine and PhIP-DNA oligomer covalent complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, J.

    1994-12-01

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is a heterocyclic amine compound formed when meats are cooked at high temperatures. PhIP damages DNA by forming covalent complexes with DNA carcinogen. In an effort to understand how the binding of PhIP to DNA may cause cancer, it is important to characterize the structures of PhIP-damaged DNA molecules. Our HPLC data support fluorescence and {sup 32}P Post-labeling studies which indicate the formation of several species of 2{prime}deoxyguanosine-(dG) or oligodeoxynucleotide-PhIP adducts. The reaction of PhIP with dG resulted in a reddish precipitate that was likely the major adduct, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-PhIP (dG-C8-PhIP) adduct, with a more polar adduct fraction remaining in the supernatant. Reversed-phase HPLC analysis of the adducts in the supernatant revealed the existence of species of much shorter retention times than the dG-C8-PhIP adduct, confirming that these species are more polar than dG-C8-PhIP. At least four adducts were formed in the reaction of PhIP with DNA oligomer. HPLC analysis of the PhIP-DNA oligomer supernatant after butanol extractions revealed four unresolved peaks which spectra had maximum wavelengths between 340 and 360 nm. Though adduct peaks were not completely resolved, there was {approximately}3 minutes interval between the DNA oligomer peak and the adduct peaks. Furthermore, fluorescence emission data of the DNA oligomer-PhIP adduct solution show heterogeneous binding. The more polar PhIP adducts were fraction-collected and their structures will be solved by nuclear magnetic resonance or x-ray crystallography.

  17. Continuous fetal tissue pH measurement in labor.

    PubMed

    Young, B K; Noumoff, J; Klein, S A; Katz, M

    1978-11-01

    Fifty-one women in labor had continuous monitoring of fetal scalp tissue pH, fetal heart rate by ECG, and uterine contractions. A miniature pH electrode secured by a double spiral fetal ECG electrode was used for measurement of fetal pH every 15 seconds. The results were correlated with fetal scalp blood pH values obtained simultaneously. Fetal scalp sampling is intermittent, requires repeated scalp incisions, is subject to errors due to air mixing and coagulation of the blood sample, and is uncomfortable for the parturient. Placement of the tissue pH electrode allows continuous data recording with the minimum discomfort to the patient and the least number of fetal scalp incisions. Clinical use of the tissue pH electrode might be a practical alternative to fetal scalp samples, if the data obtained accurately reflect fetal status.

  18. pH measurement of low-conductivity waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busenberg, Eurybiades; Plummer, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    pH is an important and commonly measured parameter of precipitation and other natural waters. The various sources of errors in pH measurement were analyzed and procedures for improving the accuracy and precision of pH measurements in natural waters with conductivities of < 100 uS/cm at 25 C are suggested. Detailed procedures are given for the preparation of dilute sulfuric acid standards to evaluate the performance of pH electrodes in low conductivity waters. A daily check of the pH of dilute sulfuric acid standards and deionized water saturated with a gas mixture of low carbon dioxide at partial pressure (air) prior to the measurement of the pH of low conductivity waters is suggested. (Author 's abstract)

  19. Cell wall pH and auxin transport velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Rayle, D.

    1984-01-01

    According to the chemiosmotic polar diffusion hypothesis, auxin pulse velocity and basal secretion should increase with decreasing cell wall pH. Experiments were designed to test this prediction. Avena coleoptile sections were preincubated in either fusicoccin (FC), cycloheximide, pH 4.0, or pH 8.0 buffer and subsequently their polar transport capacities were determined. Relative to controls, FC enhanced auxin (IAA) uptake while CHI and pH 8.0 buffer reduced IAA uptake. Nevertheless, FC reduced IAA pulse velocity while cycloheximide increased velocity. Additional experiments showed that delivery of auxin to receivers is enhanced by increased receiver pH. This phenomenon was overcome by a pretreatment of the tissue with IAA. Our data suggest that while acidic wall pH values facilitate cellular IAA uptake, they do not enhance pulse velocity or basal secretion. These findings are inconsistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis for auxin transport.

  20. Computer model of unstirred layer and intracellular pH changes. Determinants of unstirred layer pH.

    PubMed

    Marrannes, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Transmembrane acid-base fluxes affect the intracellular pH and unstirred layer pH around a superfused biological preparation. In this paper the factors influencing the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are studied. An analytical expression of the unstirred layer pH gradient in steady state is derived as a function of simultaneous transmembrane fluxes of (weak) acids and bases with the dehydration reaction of carbonic acid in equilibrium. Also a multicompartment computer model is described consisting of the extracellular bulk compartment, different unstirred layer compartments and the intracellular compartment. With this model also transient changes and the influence of carbonic anhydrase (CA) can be studied. The analytical expression and simulations with the multicompartment model demonstrate that in steady state the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are influenced by the size and type of transmembrane flux of acids and bases, their dissociation constant and diffusion coefficient, the concentration, diffusion coefficient and type of mobile buffers and the activity and location of CA. Similar principles contribute to the amplitude of the unstirred layer pH transients. According to these models an immobile buffer does not influence the steady-state pH, but reduces the amplitude of pH transients especially when these are fast. The unstirred layer pH provides useful information about transmembrane acid-base fluxes. This paper gives more insight how the unstirred layer pH and its transients can be interpreted. Methodological issues are discussed. PMID:23860924

  1. Computer model of unstirred layer and intracellular pH changes. Determinants of unstirred layer pH.

    PubMed

    Marrannes, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Transmembrane acid-base fluxes affect the intracellular pH and unstirred layer pH around a superfused biological preparation. In this paper the factors influencing the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are studied. An analytical expression of the unstirred layer pH gradient in steady state is derived as a function of simultaneous transmembrane fluxes of (weak) acids and bases with the dehydration reaction of carbonic acid in equilibrium. Also a multicompartment computer model is described consisting of the extracellular bulk compartment, different unstirred layer compartments and the intracellular compartment. With this model also transient changes and the influence of carbonic anhydrase (CA) can be studied. The analytical expression and simulations with the multicompartment model demonstrate that in steady state the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are influenced by the size and type of transmembrane flux of acids and bases, their dissociation constant and diffusion coefficient, the concentration, diffusion coefficient and type of mobile buffers and the activity and location of CA. Similar principles contribute to the amplitude of the unstirred layer pH transients. According to these models an immobile buffer does not influence the steady-state pH, but reduces the amplitude of pH transients especially when these are fast. The unstirred layer pH provides useful information about transmembrane acid-base fluxes. This paper gives more insight how the unstirred layer pH and its transients can be interpreted. Methodological issues are discussed.

  2. Chapter A6. Section 6.4. pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Radtke, Dean B.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of pH is critical to the understanding of the viability and vulnerability of environmental waters and is considered a master variable in determining the aqueous geochemistry of an aqueous system. pH is a measure that represents the hydrogen-ion concentration (activity) of a solution. This section of the National Field Manual (NFM) describes U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) guidance and protocols for measurement of pH in ground and surface waters.

  3. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Dige, Irene

    2016-03-09

    The pH in bacterial biofilms on teeth is of central importance for dental caries, a disease with a high worldwide prevalence. Nutrients and metabolites are not distributed evenly in dental biofilms. A complex interplay of sorption to and reaction with organic matter in the biofilm reduces the diffusion paths of solutes and creates steep gradients of reactive molecules, including organic acids, across the biofilm. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic methods, such as fluorescence life time imaging or pH ratiometry, can be employed to visualize pH in different microenvironments of dental biofilms. pH ratiometry exploits a pH-dependent shift in the fluorescent emission of pH-sensitive dyes. Calculation of the emission ratio at two different wavelengths allows determining local pH in microscopic images, irrespective of the concentration of the dye. Contrary to microelectrodes the technique allows monitoring both vertical and horizontal pH gradients in real-time without mechanically disturbing the biofilm. However, care must be taken to differentiate accurately between extra- and intracellular compartments of the biofilm. Here, the ratiometric dye, seminaphthorhodafluor-4F 5-(and-6) carboxylic acid (C-SNARF-4) is employed to monitor extracellular pH in in vivo grown dental biofilms of unknown species composition. Upon exposure to glucose the dye is up-concentrated inside all bacterial cells in the biofilms; it is thus used both as a universal bacterial stain and as a marker of extracellular pH. After confocal microscopic image acquisition, the bacterial biomass is removed from all pictures using digital image analysis software, which permits to exclusively calculate extracellular pH. pH ratiometry with the ratiometric dye is well-suited to study extracellular pH in thin biofilms of up to 75 µm thickness, but is limited to the pH range between 4.5 and 7.0.

  4. Field measurement of alkalinity and pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Ivan

    1964-01-01

    The behavior of electrometric pH equipment under field conditions departs from the behavior predicted from Nernst's law. The response is a linear function of pH, and hence measured pH values may be corrected to true pH if the instrument is calibrated with two reference solutions for each measurement. Alkalinity titrations may also be made in terms of true pH. Standard methods, such as colorimetric titrations, were rejected as unreliable or too cumbersome for rapid field use. The true pH of the end point of the alkalinity titration as a function of temperature, ionic strength, and total alkalinity has been calculated. Total alkalinity in potable waters is the most important factor influencing the end point pH, which varies from 5.38 (0 ? C, 5 ppm (parts per million) HC0a-) to 4.32 (300 ppm HC0a-,35 ? C), for the ranges of variables considered. With proper precautions, the pH may be determined to =i:0.02 pH and the alkalinity to =i:0.6 ppm HCO3- for many naturally occurring bodies of fresh water.

  5. Molecular aspects of bacterial pH sensing and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Krulwich, Terry A.; Sachs, George; Padan, Etana

    2011-01-01

    Diverse mechanisms for pH-sensing and cytoplasmic pH homeostasis enable most bacteria to tolerate or grow at external pH values that are outside the cytoplasmic pH range they must maintain for growth. The most extreme cases are exemplified by the extremophiles that inhabit environments whose pH is below 3 or above 11. Here we describe how recent insights into the structure and function of key molecules and their regulators reveal novel strategies of bacterial pH-homeostasis. These insights may help us better target certain pathogens and better harness the capacities of environmental bacteria. PMID:21464825

  6. Nanosensor aided photoacoustic measurement of pH in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Yoon, Hyung Ki; Kopelman, Raoul; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    pH plays a critical role in many aspects of cell and tissues physiology. Lower pH is also a typical characteristic of arthritic joints and tumor tissues. These pH anomalies are also exploited in different drug delivery mechanisms. Here we present, a new method of pH sensing in vivo using spectroscopic photoacoustic measurements facilitated by pH sensitive nanosensors. The nanosensors consist of Seminaphtharhodafluor (SNARF), a pH sensitive dye, encapsulated in a specially designed polyacrylamide hydrogel matrix with a hydrophobic core. The photoacoustic intensity ratio between the excitation wavelengths of 585nm and 565nm increases in the pH range from 6.0 to 8.0 and is used to determine the pH of the local environment. These nanosensors are biodegradable, biocompatible, have a long plasma lifetime and can be targeted to any type of cells or tissues by surface modification using proper targeting moieties. The encapsulation of the dye prevents the interaction of the dye with proteins in plasma and also reduces the dye degradation. The SNARF dye in its free form loses 90% of its absorbance in presence of albumin, a protein found in abundance in plasma, and this has severely limited its adaptation to in vivo environments. In comparison, the SNARF nanosensors lose only 16% of their absorbance in the same environment. We employ these nanosensors to demonstrate the feasibility of pH sensing in vivo through photoacoustic measurements on a rat joint model.

  7. Extracellular pH modulates GABAergic neurotransmission in rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z L; Huang, R Q

    2014-06-20

    Changes in extracellular pH have a modulatory effect on GABAA receptor function. It has been reported that pH sensitivity of the GABA receptor is dependent on subunit composition and GABA concentration. Most of previous investigations focused on GABA-evoked currents, which only reflect the postsynaptic receptors. The physiological relevance of pH modulation of GABAergic neurotransmission is not fully elucidated. In the present studies, we examined the influence of extracellular pH on the GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission in rat hypothalamic neurons. The inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), tonic currents, and the GABA-evoked currents were recorded with whole-cell patch techniques on the hypothalamic slices from Sprague-Dawley rats at 15-26 postnatal days. The amplitude and frequency of spontaneous GABA IPSCs were significantly increased while the external pH was changed from 7.3 to 8.4. In the acidic pH (6.4), the spontaneous GABA IPSCs were reduced in amplitude and frequency. The pH induced changes in miniature GABA IPSCs (mIPSCs) similar to that in spontaneous IPSCs. The pH effect on the postsynaptic GABA receptors was assessed with exogenously applied varying concentrations of GABA. The tonic currents and the currents evoked by sub-saturating concentration of GABA ([GABA]) (10 μM) were inhibited by acidic pH and potentiated by alkaline pH. In contrast, the currents evoked by saturating [GABA] (1mM) were not affected by pH changes. We also investigated the influence of pH buffers and buffering capacity on pH sensitivity of GABAA receptors on human recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors stably expressed in HEK 293 cells. The pH influence on GABAA receptors was similar in HEPES- and MES-buffered media, and not dependent on protonated buffers, suggesting that the observed pH effect on GABA response is a specific consequence of changes in extracellular protons. Our data suggest that the hydrogen ions suppress the GABAergic neurotransmission

  8. Notes on the Measurement of pH Values

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Rebak, R B

    2005-05-05

    The original definition of pH is: pH = -log a{sub H}. Where a{sub H} is the (relative) hydrogen ion activity. However, a single ion activity cannot be measured. Activities of individual ionic species are necessarily conventional. The pH number, of course, has in itself little absolute significance. As the negative of the logarithm of a product of a concentration (c or m) and an activity coefficient (y or {gamma}), it acquires its magnitude from the numerical scale adopted for the latter. Experimental pH measurements are nonetheless widely applied to the determination of thermodynamic equilibrium data such as pK values, on the assumption that they represent -log a{sub H} (or paH). The single ion activity coefficient approaches unity as the ionic strength goes to zero, so that activity becomes m or c and paH becomes pmH or pcH. pH is therefore defined operationally in terms of the operation or method used to measure it, that is, by means of a cell called an operational cell. The cell is standardized by solutions of assigned pH value (Reference Value pH Standard, Primary pH Standards and Operational Standards). Such standard reference solutions are buffer solutions whose pH values are assigned from measurements on cells with or without liquid junction. It must be emphasized that the definition of pH scale is quite different from the measurement of pH with glass-reference electrode-pH meter assemblies, where several standards are used in order to take into account possible deficiencies in the electrode and meter performance.

  9. Biomedical PhD education--an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Mulvany, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    The PhD, otherwise known as the doctor of philosophy or Dr. Phil., is an internationally recognized degree, indicating that the PhD graduate has received training in research under supervision. Traditionally, the PhD was the route to an academic career, with most successful PhD graduates receiving tenured university positions. However, over the past 20-30 years, and particularly the past 10 years, the situation has changed dramatically. Governments in many countries have invested massively in PhD education, believing that trained researchers will contribute to the 'knowledge society', and thus increase the competitiveness of their countries in the future economies of the world. Thus, only a small fraction of PhD graduates now end up in academic research. Yet, the PhD remains a research degree, and indeed, institutions have become heavily dependent on PhD students for their research output. The situation has thus created a paradox. On the one hand, it has become essential for institutions to have many PhD students and for the research performed to be of the highest level. On the other hand, the careers of PhD students are not necessarily going to be directly related to the research performed during their PhD studies. The purpose of this article is to explore how this seeming paradox is being addressed in biomedicine and to show that far from being inconsistent that the two aspects are in fact complementary. The article is based on the author's experience as Head of Aarhus Graduate School of Health Sciences 2002-2011 and his work with graduate schools across Europe and internationally through the organization ORPHEUS.

  10. Mapping Soil pH Buffering Capacity of Selected Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, A. R.; Kissel, D. E.; Chen, F.; West, L. T.; Adkins, W.; Rickman, D.; Luvall, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    Soil pH buffering capacity, since it varies spatially within crop production fields, may be used to define sampling zones to assess lime requirement, or for modeling changes in soil pH when acid forming fertilizers or manures are added to a field. Our objective was to develop a procedure to map this soil property. One hundred thirty six soil samples (0 to 15 cm depth) from three Georgia Coastal Plain fields were titrated with calcium hydroxide to characterize differences in pH buffering capacity of the soils. Since the relationship between soil pH and added calcium hydroxide was approximately linear for all samples up to pH 6.5, the slope values of these linear relationships for all soils were regressed on the organic C and clay contents of the 136 soil samples using multiple linear regression. The equation that fit the data best was b (slope of pH vs. lime added) = 0.00029 - 0.00003 * % clay + 0.00135 * % O/C, r(exp 2) = 0.68. This equation was applied within geographic information system (GIS) software to create maps of soil pH buffering capacity for the three fields. When the mapped values of the pH buffering capacity were compared with measured values for a total of 18 locations in the three fields, there was good general agreement. A regression of directly measured pH buffering capacities on mapped pH buffering capacities at the field locations for these samples gave an r(exp 2) of 0.88 with a slope of 1.04 for a group of soils that varied approximately tenfold in their pH buffering capacities.

  11. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhiwei; Xie, Min; Chen, Shengrong; Yao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na+/K+-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) analysis, the intracellular Ca2+ concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na+/K+-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility. PMID:26173069

  12. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji; Chen, Li; Li, Jie; Li, Hongjun; Hong, Zhiwei; Xie, Min; Chen, Shengrong; Yao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) analysis, the intracellular Ca2(+ )concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility.

  13. pH induced contrast in viscoelasticity imaging of biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Yapp, R D; Insana, M F

    2009-01-01

    Understanding contrast mechanisms and identifying discriminating features is at the heart of diagnostic imaging development. This report focuses on how pH influences the viscoelastic properties of biopolymers to better understand the effects of extracellular pH on breast tumour elasticity imaging. Extracellular pH is known to decrease as much as 1 pH unit in breast tumours, thus creating a dangerous environment that increases cellular mutatation rates and therapeutic resistance. We used a gelatin hydrogel phantom to isolate the effects of pH on a polymer network with similarities to the extracellular matrix in breast stroma. Using compressive unconfined creep and stress relaxation measurements, we systematically measured the viscoelastic features sensitive to pH by way of time domain models and complex modulus analysis. These results are used to determine the sensitivity of quasi-static ultrasonic elasticity imaging to pH. We found a strong elastic response of the polymer network to pH, such that the matrix stiffness decreases as pH was reduced, however the viscous response of the medium to pH was negligible. While physiological features of breast stroma such as proteoglycans and vascular networks are not included in our hydrogel model, observations in this study provide insight into viscoelastic features specific to pH changes in the collagenous stromal network. These observations suggest that the large contrast common in breast tumours with desmoplasia may be reduced under acidic conditions, and that viscoelastic features are unlikely to improve discriminability. PMID:19174599

  14. Intracellular pH regulation in chicken enterocytes: the importance of extracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Peral, M J; Calonge, M L; Ilundáin, A A

    1995-11-01

    The present work reports the effect of pHo on pHi and Na(+)-H+ exchanger activity. Intracellular pH tended to follow pHo, but the proton distribution across the cell membrane is not at electrochemical equilibrium. Removal of external Na+ acidified the cells by both reversing the direction of the Na(+)-H+ exchanger and hyperpolarizing the cell membrane potential. The relationship between pHo and the rate of Na(+)-dependent proton efflux following an acid load suggests that external protons interact with the Na(+)-H+ exchanger at a single site with an apparent pK (-log of the dissociation constant) of 7.22. The results demonstrate that maintenance of pHo in the physiological range is essential for maintenance of normal cell pH and that the activity of the Na(+)-H+ exchanger involved in pHi regulation is affected by external protons. The results also suggest that, at least at low pHo, some intracellular mechanism is involved in pHi regulation. PMID:8962700

  15. Consideration of Factors Affecting Strip Effluent PH and Sodium Content

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.

    2015-07-29

    A number of factors were investigated to determine possible reasons for why the Strip Effluent (SE) can sometimes have higher than expected pH values and/or sodium content, both of which have prescribed limits. All of the factors likely have some impact on the pH values and Na content.

  16. The Early Development of Electronic pH Meters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Wallis G.; de Levie, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A 19-year-old undergraduate at the University of Chicago, Kenneth Goode, in 1921 came up with the idea of an electronic pH meter, worked out some of its initial problems, and set in motion an international scientific effort that culminated in the current, wide availability of electronic pH meters. Except for the replacement of vacuum tubes by…

  17. The Importance of Having a Ph.D., Career Advice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A presentation on the importance of having a PhD to motivate Initiative to Maximize Student Diversity Program (IMSD) undergrads towards conducting research, pursuing careers in the biomedical field, applying to grad school, and getting a Ph.D., based upon ARS scientist's experiences as a student, a ...

  18. Microscale pH Titrations Using an Automatic Pipet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Edward B.; Kortz, Carrie L.; Taylor, Max A.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a microscale pH titration technique that utilizes an automatic pipet. A small aliquot (1-5 mL) of the analyte solution is titrated with repeated additions of titrant, and the pH is determined after each delivery. The equivalence point is determined graphically by either the second derivative method or a Gran plot. The pipet can be…

  19. Jeanne Murphy, PhD, CNM | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Jeanne Murphy, PhD, CNM is a postdoctoral Cancer Prevention Fellow in the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group in the Division of Cancer Prevention. She comes to BGCRG with a PhD from Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. She also completed a graduate certificate in Health Disparities and Health Inequality at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. |

  20. Effect of pH on biological phosphorus uptake.

    PubMed

    Serralta, J; Ferrer, J; Borrás, L; Seco, A

    2006-12-01

    An anaerobic aerobic laboratory scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated to study the effect of pH on enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Seven steady states were achieved under different operating conditions. In all of them, a slight variation in the pH value was observed during anaerobic phase. However, pH rose significantly during aerobic phase. The increase observed was due to phosphorus uptake and carbon dioxide stripping. When pH was higher than 8.2-8.25 the phosphorus uptake rate clearly decreased. The capability of Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) and Biological Nutrient Removal Model No. 1 (BNRM1) to simulate experimental results was evaluated. Both models successfully characterized the enhanced biological phosphorus removal performance of the SBR. Furthermore, BNRM1 also reproduced the pH variations observed and the decrease in the phosphorus uptake rate. This model includes a switch function in the kinetic expressions to represent the pH inhibition in biological processes. The pH inhibition constants related to polyphosphate storage process were obtained by adjusting model predictions to measured phosphorus concentrations. On the other hand, pH inhibition should be included in ASM2d to accurately simulate experimental phosphorus evolution observed in an A/O SBR.

  1. Research Collaboration and Commercialization: The PhD Candidate Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooley, Lawrence; Kenny, Breda

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores PhD students' perceptions of their entrepreneurial and commercial capabilities, their attitude towards university supports and the extent to which they engage in external collaboration. The study concentrated on current PhD researchers at one university in Ireland as a unit of analysis and provides encouraging evidence from the…

  2. A PH-INDUCED STRUCTURAL CHANGE IN BROMEGRASS MOSAIC VIRUS.

    PubMed

    INCARDONA, N L; KAESBERG, P

    1964-01-01

    Bromegrass mosaic virus undergoes a reversible decrease in its sedimentation coefficient when the pH is raised above pH 6.7. At pH 6 the sedimentation coefficient is 87 S, at pH 7 it is 79 S. Intrinsic viscosities determined at pH 6 and 7 are 3.64 and 5.5 x 10(-2) dl/gm. Diffusion coefficients are 1.56 x 10(-7) cm(2)/sec. and 1.44 x 10(-7) cm(2)/sec., respectively. Radii of gyration, measured by x-ray scattering, are 106 and 128 A. However, appropriate combination of sedimentation, diffusion, and viscosity coefficients at pH 6 and 7 yield the same molecular weight. Also, the zero-angle value of x-ray-scattered intensity, which is a function of molecular weight, is the same at the two pH's. These results suggest that bromegrass mosaic virus particles undergo a pH-induced change in structure. This change causes, among other things, an increase in the susceptibility of the particles to degradation by pancreatic ribonuclease. The shape of the titration curve between pH 6.3 and 6.9 is anomalous.

  3. Tracking the PhD Students' Daily Computer Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sim, Kwong Nui; van der Meer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated PhD students' computer activities in their daily research practice. Software that tracks computer usage (Manic Time) was installed on the computers of nine PhD students, who were at their early, mid and final stage in doing their doctoral research in four different discipline areas (Commerce, Humanities, Health Sciences and…

  4. Photoreversible changes in pH of pea phytochrome solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tokutomi, S.; Yamamoto, K.T.; Miyoshi, Y.; Furuya, M.

    1982-02-01

    Phytochrome is a chromoprotein that serves as the photoreceptor for a variety of photomorphogenic responses in plants. Phytochrome was isolated from etiolated pea seedlings. Photoinduced pH changes of an unbuffered solution of the phytochrome were monitored with a semimicrocombination pH electrode at pH 6.5. Red-light irradiation increased the pH of the medium. This alkalinization was reversed by a subsequent far-red-light irradiation. The magnitude and direction of the red-light-induced pH changes was dependent on the pH of the photocrome solution, and the maximum alkalinization was observed at pH 6.0, where the number of protons taken up per phytochrome monomer was 0.18. These results suggest that phytochrome is a multifunctional protein composed of a chromophoric domain and a hydrophobic domain. It is probable that the hydrophobic domain is responsible for the photoinduced change of hydrophobicity of phytochrome and that the ionizable groups responsible for the photoinduced pH changes are localized in the chromophoric domain. (JMT)

  5. pH sensitivity of epidermal growth factor receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Nunez, M; Mayo, K H; Starbuck, C; Lauffenburger, D

    1993-03-01

    The association/dissociation binding kinetics of 125I-labeled mouse epidermal growth factor (EGF) to receptors on human fibroblast cells in monolayer culture have been measured at 4 degrees C as a function of extracellular pH from pH 5-9. At pH 8, steady-state total binding is maximal. As pH is lowered to 6.5, total binding monotonically decreases dramatically. It changes further only slightly between pH 6.5 and 5 to about 20% of the maximum binding value. Scatchard binding plots at pH 7.5 and above show the commonly observed concave-upward, non-linear curve; as pH is lowered, this plot becomes much more linear, indicating that the "high affinity" bound receptor population is greatly diminished. Application of our ternary complex binding model [Mayo et al., J Biol Chem 264:17838-17844, 1989], which hypothesizes complexation of the EGF-bound receptor with a cell surface interaction molecule, indicates that pH may have some direct effects on ternary complex formation, but the major effect is on EGF-receptor dissociation. PMID:8501133

  6. Predicting Computer Science Ph.D. Completion: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, G. W.; Hughes, W. E., Jr.; Etzkorn, L. H.; Weisskopf, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of indicators that can be used to predict whether a student will succeed in a Computer Science Ph.D. program. The analysis was conducted by studying the records of 75 students who have been in the Computer Science Ph.D. program of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Seventy-seven variables were…

  7. Can Community Colleges Survive the PhD Glut?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Anita

    The impact of the current employment situation on hiring faculty for community college teaching is examined. It is concluded that prospects for improving the quality of learning in community colleges are not particularly enhanced by the apparently growing surplus of new PhDs in our field. On the contrary, it is suggested that hiring PhDs for…

  8. Rethinking PhD Learning Incorporating Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shacham, Miri; Od-Cohen, Yehudit

    2009-01-01

    This paper grows from research which focuses on the learning characteristics of PhD students, incorporating communities of practice both during their studies and beyond completion of their PhD, and drawing on theories of adult learning and lifelong learning. It shows how professional discourse enhances academic discourse through student engagement…

  9. PhDs in Australia, from the Beginning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Ian R.

    2012-01-01

    The Australian PhD is a relatively recent phenomenon, the first three being awarded in 1948. Before that, most Australian scholars typically went to Britain (predominantly) or the USA to undertake their doctoral studies. The aim of this research note is to provide a brief statistical history of the Australian PhD, noting changes over time between…

  10. The PhD Viva: A Space for Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Share, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the viva experiences of 87 social science PhD graduates from three Irish higher education institutions through a questionnaire that assessed outcome, preparation, conduct and post-viva. The majority were awarded their PhD with minor corrections, considered their viva as a summative assessment, and emphasised its purpose as…

  11. The Undergraduate Origins of PhD Economists Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Wendy A.; Siegfried, John J.

    2015-01-01

    The authors update prior analyses of the undergraduate origins of individuals who earn a PhD in economics in the United States. They include the list of the top institutions worldwide graduating the largest number of undergraduates who subsequently earn an economics PhD from a U.S. university and lists of American institutions with the largest…

  12. Variation of ocean pH in the Indonesia waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, Mutiara Rachmat; Setiawan, Agus; Safitri, Mediana

    2015-09-01

    The variation of ocean acidity (pH) in the Indonesia waters is strongly influenced by monsoon. Since the climate change tends to potentially change monsoonal variation over the Indonesian region, it will give also implication to the ocean pH variation. Moreover, changes of ocean pH will give effects to the marine lifes and their environment. In order to investigate this issue, we tried to calculate monthly variation of sea surface pH in the Indonesia waters based on monthly average temperature and salinity over past 18 years data. Temperature and salinity data used in this study were taken from the hydrodynamic model of Hamburg Shelf Ocean Model (HAMSOM), while alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were from World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA 2009). Algorithm from Ocean Carbon Model Intercomparison Project-version.3 (OCMIP-3) was used to calculate the pH. The estimation results indicate that pH variation in the Indonesia waters changes insignificantly over 18 years. El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) contribute to physical changes of seawater, but did not affect the pH significantly. The average pH of seawater is higher during northwest monsoon than during southeast monsoon.

  13. Earth & Space Science PhDs, Class of 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claudy, Nicholas; Henly, Megan; Migdalski, Chet

    This study documents the employment patterns and demographic characteristics of recent PhDs in earth and space science. It summarizes the latest annual survey of recent earth and space science PhDs conducted by the American Geological Institute, the American Geophysical Union, and the Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of…

  14. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode....

  15. What if We Made Fewer Ph.D.'s?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassuto, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    Whenever a discussion opens about nonacademic employment for Ph.D.s, it is not long before someone suggests reducing graduate-school admissions. "The market for full-time scholars has fallen off a cliff lately," this argument goes, "so why not just train fewer of them?" The strategy to reduce the number of Ph.D. students recurs in those…

  16. [Stop the compulsive PhD trajectory for junior doctors].

    PubMed

    Clevers, J C Hans

    2014-01-01

    It has become the rule rather than the exception that junior doctors in training spend 3-4 years on a research project, culminating in a thesis. Without a PhD, clinical career prospects within and outside academia look rather bleak. Here I argue that PhD degrees should be pursued only by the most talented and motivated young clinicians. PMID:24893817

  17. Simple fibre optic spectrophotometric cell for pH determination.

    PubMed

    Besar, S S; Kelly, S W; Greenhalgh, P A

    1989-03-01

    A simple, inexpensive fibre optic spectrophotometric cell has been developed for clinical use. The system may employ one of two indicator reagents for the measurement: phenol red and BDH universal indicator. The spectrophotometer uses two ultrabright LED sources and a PIN diode photodetector. The fibre is of the plastic type with a core diameter of 1.0 mm. Two alternative analytical methods are available: electronic or computer processing. In the case of phenol red the measuring range using computer processing is between 6.0 and 8.0 pH units, with an accuracy of 0.015 pH units. The range for electronic circuit processing is from 6.8 to 8.0 pH units with an accuracy of 0.02 pH units. Using a BDH universal indicator, the range for computer processing is between 5.5 and 8.5 pH units with an accuracy of 0.05 pH units, while with electronic processing the range is between 6.0 and 8.0 pH units with an accuracy of 0.03 pH units. A description of the optoelectronics, an analysis of the indicator reagents and the calibration procedure are presented here, together with some example results. PMID:2704218

  18. pH in atomic scale simulations of electrochemical interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Chan, Karen; Ahmed, Rizwan; Tripković, Vladimir; Björketun, Mårten E

    2013-07-01

    Electrochemical reaction rates can strongly depend on pH, and there is increasing interest in electrocatalysis in alkaline solution. To date, no method has been devised to address pH in atomic scale simulations. We present a simple method to determine the atomic structure of the metal|solution interface at a given pH and electrode potential. Using Pt(111)|water as an example, we show the effect of pH on the interfacial structure, and discuss its impact on reaction energies and barriers. This method paves the way for ab initio studies of pH effects on the structure and electrocatalytic activity of electrochemical interfaces. PMID:23703376

  19. Ratiometric Fluorescent pH Probes Based on Glycopolymers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyun; Zhang, Pengshan; Lu, Wei; Peng, Lun; Zhao, Yun; Chen, Gaojian

    2016-09-01

    Effectively detecting pH changes plays a critical role in exploring cellular functions and determining physiological and pathological processes. A novel ratiometric pH probe based on a glycopolymer, armored with properties of serum-stability, tumor-targeting, and pH monitoring, is designed. Random copolymers of 2-(methacrylamido) glucopyranose and fluorescein O-methacrylate are first synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. Acryloxyethyl thiocarbamoyl rhodamine B is then attached to the polymer chain to prepare ratiometric fluorescent pH probes via a thiol-ene reaction. The synthesized polymeric probes are characterized by NMR, gel permeation chromatography, UV-vis spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, and the fluorescence responses are examined in phosphate buffer at different pHs. The cytotoxicity and confocal imaging experiments of the probes are detected using HeLa cells, demonstrating a low toxicity and superior biocompatibility for detecting pH changes in bioapplications. PMID:27439338

  20. Ratiometric Fluorescent pH Probes Based on Glycopolymers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyun; Zhang, Pengshan; Lu, Wei; Peng, Lun; Zhao, Yun; Chen, Gaojian

    2016-09-01

    Effectively detecting pH changes plays a critical role in exploring cellular functions and determining physiological and pathological processes. A novel ratiometric pH probe based on a glycopolymer, armored with properties of serum-stability, tumor-targeting, and pH monitoring, is designed. Random copolymers of 2-(methacrylamido) glucopyranose and fluorescein O-methacrylate are first synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. Acryloxyethyl thiocarbamoyl rhodamine B is then attached to the polymer chain to prepare ratiometric fluorescent pH probes via a thiol-ene reaction. The synthesized polymeric probes are characterized by NMR, gel permeation chromatography, UV-vis spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, and the fluorescence responses are examined in phosphate buffer at different pHs. The cytotoxicity and confocal imaging experiments of the probes are detected using HeLa cells, demonstrating a low toxicity and superior biocompatibility for detecting pH changes in bioapplications.

  1. ['Sandwich PhD': considerations for a successful experience abroad].

    PubMed

    Salvetti, Marina de Goes; Bueno, Mariana; Gastaldo, Denise; Kimura, Amélia Fumiko; Pimenta, Cibele Andrucioli de Mattos

    2013-03-01

    International PhD internship, named "Sandwich PhD" in Brazil is an opportunity to improve research abilities, to become known in academic area and to establish and/or increase work opportunities in an international context. In this article, we describe key factors regarding the planning and development of the "Sandwich PhD" as experienced by professors and students involved in the collaboration between the School of Nursing, University of São Paulo and Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Canada. We also present the participation of PhD students' network as an alternative to the "Sandwich PhD". An international experience, when well-planned and developed correctly, promotes students' personal and professional development and favors the internationalization of Brazilian graduate programs and research groups.

  2. Continuous pH monitoring in a perfused bioreactor system using an optical pH sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Vani, Sundeep; Taylor, Thomas D.; Anderson, Melody M.

    2002-01-01

    Monitoring and regulating the pH of the solution in a bioprocess is one of the key steps in the success of bioreactor operation. An in-line optical pH sensor, based on the optical absorption properties of phenol red present in the medium, was developed and tested in this work for use in NASA space bioreactors based on a rotating wall-perfused vessel system supporting a baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cell culture. The sensor was tested over three 30-day and one 124-day cell runs. The pH sensor initially was calibrated and then used during the entire cell culture interval. The pH reported by the sensor was compared to that measured by a fiber optically coupled Shimadzu spectrophotometer and a blood gas analyzer. The maximum standard error of prediction for all the four cell runs for development pH sensor against BGA was +/-0.06 pH unit and for the fiber optically coupled Shimadzu spectrophotometer against the blood gas analyzer was +/-0.05 pH unit. The pH sensor system performed well without need of recalibration for 124 days. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Live cell imaging of lysosomal pH changes with pH responsive ratiometric lanthanide probes.

    PubMed

    Smith, David G; McMahon, Brian K; Pal, Robert; Parker, David

    2012-09-01

    Europium and terbium complexes of two structurally related ligands have been evaluated as optical probes to monitor changes in lysosomal pH; calibration using ionophores and fluorescent probes allows monitoring of the time dependence of lysosomal pH change, examining the green/red intensity ratio from internalised Tb-Eu complexes.

  4. Thermal processing of acidified foods with pH 4.1 to pH 4.6

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shelf-stable acidified foods with a pH at or below 4.6 must be processed to achieve a 5-log reduction for vegetative bacterial pathogens. Published research does not exist to adequately support the Food and Drug Administration process filings for products with pH 4.1–4.6 or to define critical limits...

  5. The Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome in leukemia. III. Complex Ph translocation plus inversion in chronic myelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R; Stebbins, R D; Hecht, F; Sandberg, A A

    1985-01-01

    Remarkable chromosome abnormalities were observed in bone marrow cells from a woman with chronic myelocytic leukemia and atypical tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection. Four chromosome breaks occurred at bands 1p13, 1q32, 11p15, and 22q11. These breaks resulted in a complex Philadelphia (Ph) translocation between chromosomes #1, #11, and #22 and in an inversion of chromosome #1. Oncogenes on these chromosomes include N-ras and c-sk on chromosome #1, c-H-ras on chromosome #11, and c-sis on chromosome #22. Complex chromosome rearrangements may facilitate multiple oncogene changes, thereby permitting several steps in cancer development to occur simultaneously.

  6. Improved granular activated carbon for the stabilization of wastewater PH

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, R.W.; Dussert, B.W.; Kovacic, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory studies have identified the cause of the pH rise, which occurs during water treatment with activated carbon, as an interaction between the naturally occurring anions and protons in the water and the carbon surface. The interaction can be described as an ion exchange type of phenomenon, in which the carbon surface sorbs the anions and corresponding hydronium ions from the water. These studies have shown that the anion sorption and resulting pH increase is independent of the raw material used for the activated carbon production, e.g. bituminous or subbituminous coal, peat, wood or coconut. Also, the pH excursions occur with virgin, reactivated, and acid washed granular carbons. Current pH control technologies focus on adjustment of the wastewater pH prior to discharge or recycle of the initial effluent water until the pH increase abates. However, improved water pH control options have been realized by altering the carbon surface through controlled oxidation rather than the water chemistry or extended preprocessing at the treatment site.

  7. Nanochannel pH gradient electrofocusing of proteins.

    PubMed

    Startsev, Michael A; Inglis, David W; Baker, Mark S; Goldys, Ewa M

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate matrix-free pH gradient electrofocusing of proteins within an 85 nm deep nanochannel. In contrast to conventional isoelectric focusing where the fluid does not move, this pH gradient method traps protein molecules flowing through a channel by balancing electric forces due to pH-dependent protein charge and viscous drag forces caused by electro-osmosis. The nanoscale depth of the device and the low voltage used limit convection relative to diffusion, thus producing a stable focused band of protein. R-Phycoerythrin (RPE) and Dylight labeled streptavidin (Dyl-Strep) were focused within a nanochannel using applied voltages between 0.4 and 1.6 V. Concentration enhancement factors of over 380 have been achieved within 5 min. Varying the buffer pH (between 2.7 and 7.2) at the boundaries of the nanochannel affected the shape of the focused bands. For RPE, a pH span of 4.5 (pH 2.7 to 7.2) yielded the narrowest peak while a span of 2.4 (pH 2.7 to 5.1) produced a significantly wider peak. Such matrix-free nanofluidic devices with pH gradient electrofocusing may enable on-chip integration of orthogonal separation techniques with mass spectrometry offering labor savings and enhanced performance. PMID:23819922

  8. A ph sensor based on a flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Ding

    pH sensor is an essential component used in many chemical, food, and bio-material industries. Conventional glass electrodes have been used to construct pH sensors, however, have some disadvantages. Glass electrodes are easily affected by alkaline or HF solution, they require a high input impedance pH meter, they often exhibit a sluggish response. In some specific applications, it is also difficult to use glass electrodes for in vivo biomedical or food monitoring applications due to the difficulty of size miniaturization, planarization and polymerization based on current manufacturing technologies. In this work, we have demonstrated a novel flexible pH sensor based on low-cost sol-gel fabrication process of iridium oxide (IrOx) sensing film (IROF). A pair of flexible miniature IrOx/AgCl electrode generated the action potential from the solution by electrochemical mechanism to obtain the pH level of the reagent. The fabrication process including sol-gel, thermal oxidation, and the electro-plating process of the silver chloride (AgCl) reference electrode were reported in the work. The IrOx film was verified and characterized using electron dispersive analysis (EDAX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The flexible pH sensor's performance and characterization have been investigated with different testing parameters such as sensitivity, response time, stability, reversibility, repeatability, selectivity and temperature dependence. The flexible IrOx pH sensors exhibited promising sensing performance with a near-Nernstian response of sensitivity which is between --51.1mV/pH and --51.7mV/pH in different pH levels ranging from 1.5 to 12 at 25°C. Two applications including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) diagnosis and food freshness wireless monitoring using our micro-flexible IrOx pH sensors were demonstrated. For the GERD diagnosing system, we embedded the micro flexible pH sensor on a 1.2cmx3.8cm of the capsule size of wireless sensor

  9. pH in physiological salt solutions: direct measurements.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsen, J; Norrie, B; Andersen, P K; Stokke, D B; Nedergaard, O A

    1990-11-01

    Calculations of pH in modified Krebs solutions by inserting PCO2 and total-CO2 in the Henderson-Hasselbalch (H.-H.) equation are obvious as the equation originally served for this purpose. An exact calculation of the relation between pH and PCO2 is complicated as the concentration of bicarbonate, the dissociation constant and the solubility of CO2 change. Furthermore, the dissociation constant in the H.-H. equation is constant only if activities are used in the equation instead of stoichiometric concentrations. We therefore investigated the influence of different carbon dioxide tensions and bicarbonate concentrations on directly measured pH of organ baths aerated with mass-spectrometric analyzed O2-CO2 gases. For reference precision buffers were used. The measured pH values differed distinctly from calculated pH values in the acidic and alkaline parts of the pH interval investigated (6.57-8.15). Measurements of actual pH with proper calibration standards therefore seem mandatory. PMID:2177306

  10. Titratable acidity of beverages influences salivary pH recovery.

    PubMed

    Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Fernández, Constanza Estefany; Brandão, Ana Carolina Siqueira; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    A low pH and a high titratable acidity of juices and cola-based beverages are relevant factors that contribute to dental erosion, but the relative importance of these properties to maintain salivary pH at demineralizing levels for long periods of time after drinking is unknown. In this crossover study conducted in vivo, orange juice, a cola-based soft drink, and a 10% sucrose solution (negative control) were tested. These drinks differ in terms of their pH (3.5 ± 0.04, 2.5 ± 0.05, and 5.9 ± 0.1, respectively) and titratable acidity (3.17 ± 0.06, 0.57 ± 0.04 and < 0.005 mmols OH- to reach pH 5.5, respectively). Eight volunteers with a normal salivary flow rate and buffering capacity kept 15 mL of each beverage in their mouth for 10 s, expectorated it, and their saliva was collected after 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 s. The salivary pH, determined using a mini pH electrode, returned to the baseline value at 30 s after expectoration of the cola-based soft drink, but only at 90 s after expectoration of the orange juice. The salivary pH increased to greater than 5.5 at 15 s after expectoration of the cola drink and at 30 s after expectoration of the orange juice. These findings suggest that the titratable acidity of a beverage influences salivary pH values after drinking acidic beverages more than the beverage pH.

  11. A ph sensor based on a flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Ding

    pH sensor is an essential component used in many chemical, food, and bio-material industries. Conventional glass electrodes have been used to construct pH sensors, however, have some disadvantages. Glass electrodes are easily affected by alkaline or HF solution, they require a high input impedance pH meter, they often exhibit a sluggish response. In some specific applications, it is also difficult to use glass electrodes for in vivo biomedical or food monitoring applications due to the difficulty of size miniaturization, planarization and polymerization based on current manufacturing technologies. In this work, we have demonstrated a novel flexible pH sensor based on low-cost sol-gel fabrication process of iridium oxide (IrOx) sensing film (IROF). A pair of flexible miniature IrOx/AgCl electrode generated the action potential from the solution by electrochemical mechanism to obtain the pH level of the reagent. The fabrication process including sol-gel, thermal oxidation, and the electro-plating process of the silver chloride (AgCl) reference electrode were reported in the work. The IrOx film was verified and characterized using electron dispersive analysis (EDAX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The flexible pH sensor's performance and characterization have been investigated with different testing parameters such as sensitivity, response time, stability, reversibility, repeatability, selectivity and temperature dependence. The flexible IrOx pH sensors exhibited promising sensing performance with a near-Nernstian response of sensitivity which is between --51.1mV/pH and --51.7mV/pH in different pH levels ranging from 1.5 to 12 at 25°C. Two applications including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) diagnosis and food freshness wireless monitoring using our micro-flexible IrOx pH sensors were demonstrated. For the GERD diagnosing system, we embedded the micro flexible pH sensor on a 1.2cmx3.8cm of the capsule size of wireless sensor

  12. Method for producing rapid pH changes

    DOEpatents

    Clark, J.H.; Campillo, A.J.; Shapiro, S.L.; Winn, K.R.

    A method of initiating a rapid pH change in a solution comprises irradiating the solution with an intense flux of electromagnetic radiation of a frequency which produces a substantial pK change to a compound in solution. To optimize the resulting pH change, the compound being irradiated in solution should have an excited state lifetime substantially longer than the time required to establish an excited state acid-base equilibrium in the solution. Desired pH changes can be accomplished in nanoseconds or less by means of picosecond pulses of laser radiation.

  13. Method for producing rapid pH changes

    DOEpatents

    Clark, John H.; Campillo, Anthony J.; Shapiro, Stanley L.; Winn, Kenneth R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of initiating a rapid pH change in a solution by irradiating the solution with an intense flux of electromagnetic radiation of a frequency which produces a substantial pK change to a compound in solution. To optimize the resulting pH change, the compound being irradiated in solution should have an excited state lifetime substantially longer than the time required to establish an excited state acid-base equilibrium in the solution. Desired pH changes can be accomplished in nanoseconds or less by means of picosecond pulses of laser radiation.

  14. Label-Free Carbon-Dots-Based Ratiometric Fluorescence pH Nanoprobes for Intracellular pH Sensing.

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Jingfang; He, Dinggeng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Liu, Jinquan; Tang, Jinlu; Yang, Xue; Huang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Measuring pH in living cells is of great importance for better understanding cellular functions as well as providing pivotal assistance for early diagnosis of diseases. In this work, we report the first use of a novel kind of label-free carbon dots for intracellular ratiometric fluorescence pH sensing. By simple one-pot hydrothermal treatment of citric acid and basic fuchsin, the carbon dots showing dual emission bands at 475 and 545 nm under single-wavelength excitation were synthesized. It is demonstrated that the fluorescence intensities of the as-synthesized carbon dots at the two emissions are pH-sensitive simultaneously. The intensity ratio (I475 nm/I545 nm) is linear against pH values from 5.2 to 8.8 in buffer solution, affording the capability as ratiometric probes for intracellular pH sensing. It also displays that the carbon dots show excellent reversibility and photostability in pH measurements. With this nanoprobe, quantitative fluorescence imaging using the ratio of two emissions (I475 nm/I545 nm) for the detection of intracellular pH were successfully applied in HeLa cells. In contrast to most of the reported nanomaterials-based ratiometric pH sensors which rely on the attachment of additional dyes, these carbon-dots-based ratiometric probes are low in toxicity, easy to synthesize, and free from labels. PMID:27334762

  15. Flow cytometric measurement of intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Chow, S; Hedley, D

    2001-05-01

    A number of fundamentally important biological processes, such as cell signaling and the initiation of mitosis, are accompanied by a change in intracellular pH. Flow cytometric measurement of pH is a generally straightforward procedure that can be done with any instrument equipped with a 488-nm argon laser. The overall approach is similar to that for calcium: generation of a calibration curve by imparting known changes in pH and interpolation of the test sample pH. This unit presents the traditional calibration method using high-potassium buffers and the proton ionophore nigericin and a more recently developed technique, the pseudo null method, which involves resuspension of cells in defined mixtures of weak acids and weak bases. PMID:18770756

  16. Commentary: PhDs in Biochemistry Education--5 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offerdahl, Erika G.; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research.

  17. Ashley Felix, Ph.D., M.P.H.

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) alumna, Ashley Felix, Ph.D., M.P.H., details her transition from pre-med student to an epidemiologist who focuses on studying the causes and prevention of disease.

  18. Commentary: PhDs in biochemistry education-5 years later.

    PubMed

    Offerdahl, Erika G; Momsen, Jennifer L; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research.

  19. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  20. The Training and Work of Ph.D. Physical Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.; Schweitzer, A. E.

    2003-05-01

    Doctoral education has often been viewed as the pinnacle of the formal education system. How useful is doctoral training in one's later career? In an NSF-funded project, we set out to perform a study of the training, careers, and work activities of Ph.D. physical scientists. The study included both in-depth interviews and a survey sent out to a sample of Ph.D. holders 4-8 years after graduation. Come and find out the results of this study: What skills are most Ph.D. physical scientists using? What should graduate programs be teaching? Are Ph.D.'s who are working in their specific field of training happier than their counterparts working different jobs? What skills and preparation lead to future job satisfaction, perhaps the most important indicator of the "success" of graduate education? A preprint and further details can be found at the project web site at: spot.colorado.edu/ phdcarer.

  1. 49 CFR 15.5 - Sensitive security information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 CFR 1542.303, 1544.305, or other authority; (ii) Issued by the Coast Guard under the Maritime Transportation Security Act, 33 CFR part 6, or 33 U.S.C. 1221 et seq. related to maritime security; or (iii) Any...) Information Circular issued by TSA under 49 CFR 1542.303 or 1544.305, or other authority; and (ii)...

  2. 49 CFR 15.5 - Sensitive security information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 CFR 1542.303, 1544.305, or other authority; (ii) Issued by the Coast Guard under the Maritime Transportation Security Act, 33 CFR part 6, or 33 U.S.C. 1221 et seq. related to maritime security; or (iii) Any...) Information Circular issued by TSA under 49 CFR 1542.303 or 1544.305, or other authority; and (ii)...

  3. 49 CFR 15.5 - Sensitive security information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 CFR 1542.303, 1544.305, or other authority; (ii) Issued by the Coast Guard under the Maritime Transportation Security Act, 33 CFR part 6, or 33 U.S.C. 1221 et seq. related to maritime security; or (iii) Any...) Information Circular issued by TSA under 49 CFR 1542.303 or 1544.305, or other authority; and (ii)...

  4. 49 CFR 15.5 - Sensitive security information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 CFR 1542.303, 1544.305, or other authority; (ii) Issued by the Coast Guard under the Maritime Transportation Security Act, 33 CFR part 6, or 33 U.S.C. 1221 et seq. related to maritime security; or (iii) Any...) Information Circular issued by TSA under 49 CFR 1542.303 or 1544.305, or other authority; and (ii)...

  5. 49 CFR 15.5 - Sensitive security information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 CFR 1542.303, 1544.305, or other authority; (ii) Issued by the Coast Guard under the Maritime Transportation Security Act, 33 CFR part 6, or 33 U.S.C. 1221 et seq. related to maritime security; or (iii) Any...) Information Circular issued by TSA under 49 CFR 1542.303 or 1544.305, or other authority; and (ii)...

  6. 46 CFR 56.15-5 - Fluid-conditioner fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... comparable to those of ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) or Section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2); (B) Subjecting a... the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2); or (C)...

  7. 46 CFR 56.15-5 - Fluid-conditioner fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... comparable to those of ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) or Section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2); (B) Subjecting a... the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2); or (C)...

  8. 46 CFR 189.15-5 - Alternate compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Engineering Systems, U.S. Coast Guard Stop 7509, 2703 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20593... with the Alternate Compliance Program provisions of 46 CFR part 8. (b) For the purposes of this section... are incorporated by reference into 46 CFR 8.110(b)....

  9. 46 CFR 189.15-5 - Alternate compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... with the Alternate Compliance Program provisions of 46 CFR part 8. (b) For the purposes of this section, a list of authorized classification societies, including information for ordering copies of approved... rules and supplements are incorporated by reference into 46 CFR 8.110(b)....

  10. 46 CFR 71.15-5 - Alternate compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... rules and supplements are incorporated by reference into 46 CFR 8.110(b). ... list of authorized classification societies, including information for ordering copies of approved classification society rules and supplements, is available from Commandant (CG-521), 2100 2nd St. SW., Stop...

  11. 46 CFR 91.15-5 - Alternate compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Approved classification society rules and supplements are incorporated by reference into 46 CFR 8.110(b). ... this section, a list of authorized classification societies, including information for ordering copies of approved classification society rules and supplements, is available from Commandant (CG-ENG),...

  12. 46 CFR 71.15-5 - Alternate compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... rules and supplements are incorporated by reference into 46 CFR 8.110(b). ... list of authorized classification societies, including information for ordering copies of approved classification society rules and supplements, is available from Commandant (CG-ENG), 2100 2nd St. SW., Stop...

  13. 46 CFR 91.15-5 - Alternate compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CFR 8.110(b). ... this section, a list of authorized classification societies, including information for ordering copies of approved classification society rules and supplements, is available at Coast Guard...

  14. 46 CFR 56.15-5 - Fluid-conditioner fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Class I, I-L, and II-L systems receiving ship motion dynamic analysis and nondestructive examination. For Class I, I-L, or II-L systems not receiving ship motion dynamic analysis and nondestructive... comparable to those of ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) or section VIII of the...

  15. 46 CFR 56.15-5 - Fluid-conditioner fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Class I, I-L, and II-L systems receiving ship motion dynamic analysis and nondestructive examination. For Class I, I-L, or II-L systems not receiving ship motion dynamic analysis and nondestructive... comparable to those of ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) or Section VIII of the...

  16. 46 CFR 111.15-5 - Battery installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... must be 1.6 mm (1/16 inch) thick lead or other material that is corrosion-resistant to the electrolyte... other material that is corrosion-resistant to the electrolyte of the battery. (g) Lining of...

  17. 46 CFR 111.15-5 - Battery installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... must be 1.6 mm (1/16 inch) thick lead or other material that is corrosion-resistant to the electrolyte... other material that is corrosion-resistant to the electrolyte of the battery. (g) Lining of...

  18. 46 CFR 71.15-5 - Alternate compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... King Jr. Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20593-7509; telephone 202-372-1372 or fax 202-372-1925. Approved classification society rules and supplements are incorporated by reference into 46 CFR 8.110(b)....

  19. 46 CFR 71.15-5 - Alternate compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... King Jr. Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20593-7509; telephone 202-372-1372 or fax 202-372-1925. Approved classification society rules and supplements are incorporated by reference into 46 CFR 8.110(b)....

  20. 46 CFR 189.15-5 - Alternate compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... with the Alternate Compliance Program provisions of 46 CFR part 8. (b) For the purposes of this section... are incorporated by reference into 46 CFR 8.110(b). ... Engineering Systems, U.S. Coast Guard Stop 7509, 2703 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue SE., Washington, DC...

  1. 47 CFR 15.5 - General conditions of operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... virtue of prior registration or certification of equipment, or, for power line carrier systems, on the... interference has been corrected. (d) Intentional radiators that produce Class B emissions (damped wave)...

  2. 47 CFR 15.5 - General conditions of operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... virtue of prior registration or certification of equipment, or, for power line carrier systems, on the... interference has been corrected. (d) Intentional radiators that produce Class B emissions (damped wave)...

  3. 47 CFR 15.5 - General conditions of operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... virtue of prior registration or certification of equipment, or, for power line carrier systems, on the... interference has been corrected. (d) Intentional radiators that produce Class B emissions (damped wave)...

  4. 47 CFR 15.5 - General conditions of operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... virtue of prior registration or certification of equipment, or, for power line carrier systems, on the... interference has been corrected. (d) Intentional radiators that produce Class B emissions (damped wave)...

  5. 47 CFR 15.5 - General conditions of operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... virtue of prior registration or certification of equipment, or, for power line carrier systems, on the... interference has been corrected. (d) Intentional radiators that produce Class B emissions (damped wave)...

  6. MD-PhD training: looking back and looking forward.

    PubMed

    Bonham, Ann C

    2014-01-01

    MD-PhD programs provide rigorous, integrated training for physician-scientists, enabling them to frame scientific questions in unique ways and to apply clinical insight to fundamental science. Few would question the influential contributions of MD-PhD physician-scientists in advancing medical science. In this issue of Academic Medicine, Jeffe et al affirm high levels of excellence in educational outcomes from MD-PhD training programs at U.S. MD-granting medical schools, especially programs that receive funding from the NIH Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). The author of this commentary observes that, in the face of current economic pressures, comprehensive, longitudinal national outcomes data from MSTP- and non-MSTP-funded MD-PhD programs will help verify the value provided by MD-PhD physician-scientists. She proposes that MD-PhD programs should better prepare the next generation of physician-scientists for future research environments, which will provide new technologies, venues, and modalities. These research environments will be more closely integrated within health care delivery systems, extend into diverse communities and regions, and employ complex technologies. MD-PhD physician-scientists also will train and gain expertise in broadening areas of research, such as health policy, health economics, clinical epidemiology, and medical informatics. Program leaders are ideally situated to foster innovative learning environments and methodologies. By sharing their innovations, they can help ensure production of a diverse MD-PhD physician-scientist workforce, prepared to engage in myriad research opportunities to meet patient and population needs in a new environment. PMID:24280863

  7. Glucosylceramide modulates endolysosomal pH in Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Sillence, Dan J

    2013-06-01

    GlcCer accumulation causes Gaucher disease where GlcCer breakdown is inhibited due to a hereditary deficiency in glucocerebrosidase. Glycolipids are endocytosed and targeted to the Golgi apparatus in normal cells but in Gaucher disease they are mistargeted to lysosomes. To better understand the role of GlcCer in endocytic sorting RAW macrophages were treated with Conduritol B-epoxide to inhibit GlcCer breakdown. Lipid analysis found increases in GlcCer led to accumulation of both triacylglycerol and cholesterol consistent with increased lysosomal pH. Ratio imaging of macrophages using both acridine orange and lysosensor yellow/blue to measure endolysosomal pH revealed increases in Conduritol B-epoxide treated RAW macrophages and Gaucher patient lymphoblasts. Increased endolysosomal pH was restricted to Gaucher lymphoblasts as no significant increases in pH were seen in Fabry, Krabbe, Tay-Sachs and GM1-gangliosidosis lymphoblasts. Substrate reduction therapy utilises inhibitors of GlcCer synthase to reduce storage in Gaucher disease. The addition of inhibitors of GlcCer synthesis to RAW macrophages also led to increases in cholesterol and triacylglycerol and an endolysosomal pH increase of up to 1 pH unit. GlcCer modulation appears specific since glucosylsphingosine but not galactosylsphingosine reversed the effects of GlcCer depletion. Although no acute effects on glycolipid trafficking were observed using bafilomycin A the results are consistent with a multistep model whereby increases in pH lead to altered trafficking via cholesterol accumulation. GlcCer modulates endolysosomal pH in lymphocytes suggesting an important role in normal lysosomes which may be disrupted in Gaucher disease. PMID:23628459

  8. The PhD in Writing Accompanied by an Exegesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Josie

    2005-01-01

    The position of this paper is to further the discussion on what constitutes academic assessment in the PhD by artefact and exegesis. In doing so, it explores some of the ideas that arose in setting up the PhD in creative writing at Swinburne University of Technology. Thus, I: (1) survey some of the questions that arise about the journeys made by…

  9. Urea sensors based on PVC membrane pH electrode.

    PubMed

    Głab, S; Koncki, R; Kopczewska, E; Wałcerz, I; Hulanicki, A

    1994-07-01

    Several procedures of urease immobilization on the surface of the polymeric membrane pH electrode with tri-n-dodecylamine as a neutral carrier were compared. The best results were obtained for the urea sensor with covalently bound urease. The sensor characteristics including the effect of buffer, pH and concentration and the effect of stirring rate are presented. These effects are in good agreement with theoretical expectations.

  10. Transport mechanism of a glutamate transporter homologue GltPh

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yurui; Postis, Vincent L.G.; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark; Goldman, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate transporters are responsible for uptake of the neurotransmitter glutamate in mammalian central nervous systems. Their archaeal homologue GltPh, an aspartate transporter isolated from Pyrococcus horikoshii, has been the focus of extensive studies through crystallography, MD simulations and single-molecule FRET (smFRET). Here, we summarize the recent research progress on GltPh, in the hope of gaining some insights into the transport mechanism of this aspartate transporter. PMID:27284058

  11. MD-PhD training: looking back and looking forward.

    PubMed

    Bonham, Ann C

    2014-01-01

    MD-PhD programs provide rigorous, integrated training for physician-scientists, enabling them to frame scientific questions in unique ways and to apply clinical insight to fundamental science. Few would question the influential contributions of MD-PhD physician-scientists in advancing medical science. In this issue of Academic Medicine, Jeffe et al affirm high levels of excellence in educational outcomes from MD-PhD training programs at U.S. MD-granting medical schools, especially programs that receive funding from the NIH Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). The author of this commentary observes that, in the face of current economic pressures, comprehensive, longitudinal national outcomes data from MSTP- and non-MSTP-funded MD-PhD programs will help verify the value provided by MD-PhD physician-scientists. She proposes that MD-PhD programs should better prepare the next generation of physician-scientists for future research environments, which will provide new technologies, venues, and modalities. These research environments will be more closely integrated within health care delivery systems, extend into diverse communities and regions, and employ complex technologies. MD-PhD physician-scientists also will train and gain expertise in broadening areas of research, such as health policy, health economics, clinical epidemiology, and medical informatics. Program leaders are ideally situated to foster innovative learning environments and methodologies. By sharing their innovations, they can help ensure production of a diverse MD-PhD physician-scientist workforce, prepared to engage in myriad research opportunities to meet patient and population needs in a new environment.

  12. Teaching Human Digestion and pH Using Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hanna

    2008-01-01

    Testing the pH of various liquids is one of the most popular activities in 5th- through 8th-grade classrooms. The author presents an extensive pH-testing lesson based on a 5E (engagement, exploration, explanation, extension, and evaluation) teaching model. The activity provides students with the opportunity to learn about pH and how it relates to…

  13. Mouthguard and sports drinks on tooth surface pH.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Y; Yang, T-C; Miyanaga, H; Tanaka, Y; Ikebe, K; Akimoto, N

    2014-09-01

    The influence of sports drinks and mouthguards on the pH level of tooth surface was examined. A custom-made mouthguard was fabricated for each subject. The pH level was measured by electric pH meter with sensitivity of 0.01 up to 30 min. Sports drinks (pH=3.75) containing 9.4% sugar were used in this study. Measurements were performed on a cohort of 23 female subjects without a mouthguard (control), wearing a mouthguard only (MG), wearing a mouthguard after 30 ml sports drink intake (SD+MG), wearing a mouthguard during a 5-min jogging exercise (MG+EX) and wearing a mouthguard during jogging after sports drink intake (SD+MG+EX). For 7 male subjects, the same measurements were performed while a sports drink was taken over the mouthguard (MG+SD, MD+EX+SD). MG showed statistically higher pH level than control (p<0.05). SD+MG exhibited a significant decrease in pH level, and SD+MG+EX exhibited even below the critical level of pH 5.5 in some subjects. When sports drinks were taken over the mouthguard, no significant differences in pH level were observed among the different conditions.Within the limitations of this study, it was suggested that wearing a mouthguard during exercise is in itself not a possible risk factor for dental caries, while wearing a mouthguard after consuming sports drinks is.

  14. Dysregulated pH in Tumor Microenvironment Checkmates Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The dysregulation of pH by cancerous cells of solid tumors is able to create a unique milieu that is in favor of progression, invasion and metastasis as well as chemo-/immuno-resistance traits of solid tumors. Bioelements involved in pH dysregulation provide new set of oncotargets, inhibition of which may result in better clinical outcome. Methods: To study the impacts of pH dysregulation, we investigated the tumor development and progression in relation with Warburg effect, glycolysis and formation of aberrant tumor microenvironment. Results: The upregulation of glucose transporter GLUT-1 and several enzymes involve in glycolysis exacerbates this phenomenon. The accumulation of lactic acids in cancer cells provokes upregulation of several transport machineries (MCT-1, NHE-1, CA IX and H+ pump V-ATPase) resulting in reinforced efflux of proton into extracellular fluid. This deviant event makes pH to be settled at 7.4 and 6.6 respectively in cancer cells cytoplasm and extracellular fluid within the tumor microenvironment, which in return triggers secretion of lysosomal components (various enzymes in acidic milieu with pH 5) into cytoplasm. All these anomalous phenomena make tumor microenvironment (TME) to be exposed to cocktail of various enzymes with acidic pH, upon which extracellular matrix (ECM) can be remodeled and even deformed, resulting in emergence of a complex viscose TME with high interstitial fluid pressure. Conclusion: It seems that pH dysregulation is able to remodel various physiologic functions and make solid tumors to become much more invasive and metastatic. It also can cause undesired resistance to chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Hence, cancer therapy needs to be reinforced using specific inhibitors of bioelements involved in pH dysregulation of TME in solid tumors. PMID:24455478

  15. Data Collection and Analysis Strategies for phMRI

    PubMed Central

    Mandeville, Joseph B.; Liu, Christina H.; Vanduffel, Wim; Marota, John J.A.; Jenkins, Bruce G.

    2014-01-01

    Although functional MRI traditionally has been applied mainly to study changes in task-induced brain function, evolving acquisition methodologies and improved knowledge of signal mechanisms have increased the utility of this method for studying responses to pharmacological stimuli, a technique often dubbed “phMRI”. The proliferation of higher magnetic field strengths and the use of exogenous contrast agent have boosted detection power, a critical factor for successful phMRI due to the restricted ability to average multiple stimuli within subjects. Receptor-based models of neurovascular coupling, including explicit pharmacological models incorporating receptor densities and affinities and data-driven models that incorporate weak biophysical constraints, have demonstrated compelling descriptions of phMRI signal induced by dopaminergic stimuli. This report describes phMRI acquisition and analysis methodologies, with an emphasis on data-driven analyses. As an example application, statistically efficient data-driven regressors were used to describe the biphasic response to the mu-opioid agonist remifentanil, and antagonism using dopaminergic and GABAergic ligands revealed modulation of the mesolimbic pathway. Results illustrate the power of phMRI as well as our incomplete understanding of mechanisms underlying the signal. Future directions are discussed for phMRI acquisitions in human studies, for evolving analysis methodologies, and for interpretative studies using the new generation of simultaneous PET/MRI scanners. PMID:24613447

  16. Economical wireless optical ratiometric pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuppu, Sandeep; Kostov, Yordan; Rao, Govind

    2009-04-01

    The development and application of a portable, wireless fluorescence-based optical pH sensor is presented. The design incorporates the MSP430 microcontroller as the control unit, an RF transceiver for wireless communication, digital filters and amplifiers and a USB-based communication module for data transmission. The pH sensor is based on ratiometric fluorescence detection from pH sensitive dye incorporated in a peel-and-stick patch. The ability of the instrument to detect the pH of the solution with contact only between the sensor patch and the solution makes it partially non-invasive. The instrument also has the ability to transmit data wirelessly, enabling its use in processes that entail stringent temperature control and sterility. The use of the microcontroller makes it a reliable, low-cost and low-power device. The luminous intensity of the light source can be digitally controlled to maximize the sensitivity of the instrument. It has a resolution of 0.05 pH. The sensor is accurate and reversible over the pH range of 6.5-9.

  17. Thermal and pH stability of pestiviruses.

    PubMed

    Depner, K; Bauer, T; Liess, B

    1992-09-01

    Three strains/isolates of hog cholera virus (HCV) and two strains/isolates each of cytopathogenic (cp) and non-cytopathogenic (ncp) biotype of bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV) were each exposed to pH 3, 3.5 and 4 at 4 degrees C, 21 degrees C and 37 degrees C in a number of combinations. Infectivity titration and half-life determinations following correlation and regression analysis showed a significant temperature-dependent shortening of half-lives within the pH range investigated. At pH 3, mean half-lives were more than tenfold lower when HCV was kept at an ambient temperature of 21 degrees C rather than at 4 degrees C. Additionally, in some of the strains/isolates tested, half-lives of HCV kept at 4 degrees C were four to ten times lower when the pH was raised from 3 to 4. BVDV appeared more sensitive at 4 degrees C and pH 3 than HCV, but equally sensitive at 21 degrees C. Differences in temperature or pH stability between cp and ncp biotypes of BVDV could not be statistically verified although, in general, the cp biotypes seemed to be more stable than the ncp strains/isolates.

  18. Monitoring pH and ORP in a SHARON reactor.

    PubMed

    Claros, J; Serralta, J; Seco, A; Ferrer, J; Aguado, D

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the valuable information provided by the on-line measurements of pH and oxidation reduction potential (ORP) in a continuous single high ammonia removal over nitrite (SHARON) reactor. A laboratory-scale SHARON reactor equipped with pH, ORP, electric conductivity and dissolved oxygen (DO) probes has been operated for more than one year. Nitrogen removal over nitrite has been achieved by adding methanol at the beginning of anoxic stages. Time evolution of pH and ORP along each cycle allows identifying the decrease in nitritation rate when ammonia is consumed during the aerobic phase and the end of the denitrification process during the anoxic phase. Therefore, monitoring pH and ORP can be used to develop a real-time control system aimed at optimizing the length of both aerobic and anoxic stages. Real-time control of methanol addition can be carried out by using the information provided by these probes: excessive methanol addition in the anoxic stage is clearly detected in the ORP profile of the following aerobic phase, while a deficit of methanol is detected in both pH and ORP profiles of that anoxic phase. Moreover, other valuable information such as the amount of ammonia nitrified, failures in DO measurements, excessive stirring during the anoxic stage and methanol dosage in the aerobic phase was also provided by the pH and ORP profiles.

  19. Structure of human saposin A at lysosomal pH

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Chris H.; Read, Randy J.; Deane, Janet E.

    2015-06-27

    A 1.8 Å resolution structure of the sphingolipid activator protein saposin A has been determined at pH 4.8, the physiologically relevant lysosomal pH for hydrolase enzyme activation and lipid-transfer activity. The saposins are essential cofactors for the normal lysosomal degradation of complex glycosphingolipids by acid hydrolase enzymes; defects in either saposin or hydrolase function lead to severe metabolic diseases. Saposin A (SapA) activates the enzyme β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which catalyzes the breakdown of β-d-galactocerebroside, the principal lipid component of myelin. SapA is known to bind lipids and detergents in a pH-dependent manner; this is accompanied by a striking transition from a ‘closed’ to an ‘open’ conformation. However, previous structures were determined at non-lysosomal pH. This work describes a 1.8 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure determined at the physiologically relevant lysosomal pH 4.8. In the absence of lipid or detergent at pH 4.8, SapA is observeed to adopt a conformation closely resembling the previously determined ‘closed’ conformation, showing that pH alone is not sufficient for the transition to the ‘open’ conformation. Structural alignments reveal small conformational changes, highlighting regions of flexibility.

  20. Characterisation and deployment of an immobilised pH sensor spot towards surface ocean pH measurements.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Jennifer S; Achterberg, Eric P; Rérolle, Victoire M C; Abi Kaed Bey, Samer; Floquet, Cedric F A; Mowlem, Matthew C

    2015-10-15

    The oceans are a major sink for anthropogenic atmospheric carbon dioxide, and the uptake causes changes to the marine carbonate system and has wide ranging effects on flora and fauna. It is crucial to develop analytical systems that allow us to follow the increase in oceanic pCO2 and corresponding reduction in pH. Miniaturised sensor systems using immobilised fluorescence indicator spots are attractive for this purpose because of their simple design and low power requirements. The technology is increasingly used for oceanic dissolved oxygen measurements. We present a detailed method on the use of immobilised fluorescence indicator spots to determine pH in ocean waters across the pH range 7.6-8.2. We characterised temperature (-0.046 pH/°C from 5 to 25 °C) and salinity dependences (-0.01 pH/psu over 5-35), and performed a preliminary investigation into the influence of chlorophyll on the pH measurement. The apparent pKa of the sensor spots was 6.93 at 20 °C. A drift of 0.00014 R (ca. 0.0004 pH, at 25 °C, salinity 35) was observed over a 3 day period in a laboratory based drift experiment. We achieved a precision of 0.0074 pH units, and observed a drift of 0.06 pH units during a test deployment of 5 week duration in the Southern Ocean as an underway surface ocean sensor, which was corrected for using certified reference materials. The temperature and salinity dependences were accounted for with the algorithm, R=0.00034-0.17·pH+0.15·S(2)+0.0067·T-0.0084·S·1.075. This study provides a first step towards a pH optode system suitable for autonomous deployment. The use of a short duration low power illumination (LED current 0.2 mA, 5 μs illumination time) improved the lifetime and precision of the spot. Further improvements to the pH indicator spot operations include regular application of certified reference materials for drift correction and cross-calibration against a spectrophotometric pH system. Desirable future developments should involve novel

  1. Local pH tracking in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, Chieh-Jui; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Chu, Jia-Yin; Hung, Yann; Chen, Yi-Ping; Chien, Fan-Ching; Chou, Keng C.; Chen, Peilin; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-02-01

    Continuous and simultaneous 3D single-particle movement and local pH detection in HeLa cells were demonstrated for the first time by combining fluorescent mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FMSNs) and a single-particle tracking (SPT) technique with a precision of ~10 nm. FMSNs, synthesized by the co-condensation of both pH-sensitive and reference dyes with a silica/surfactant source, allow long-term reliable ratiometric pH measurements with a precision better than 0.3 pH unit because of their excellent brightness and stability. pH variation in the surrounding area of FMSNs during endocytosis was monitored in real-time. Acidification and low mobility of FMSNs were observed at the early endocytic stage, whereas basification and high mobility of FMSNs were observed at the late stage. Our results indicate that it is possible to monitor local pH changes in the environments surrounding nanoparticles during the cellular uptake process of FMSNs, which provides much needed information for designing an efficient drug delivery nanosystem.Continuous and simultaneous 3D single-particle movement and local pH detection in HeLa cells were demonstrated for the first time by combining fluorescent mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FMSNs) and a single-particle tracking (SPT) technique with a precision of ~10 nm. FMSNs, synthesized by the co-condensation of both pH-sensitive and reference dyes with a silica/surfactant source, allow long-term reliable ratiometric pH measurements with a precision better than 0.3 pH unit because of their excellent brightness and stability. pH variation in the surrounding area of FMSNs during endocytosis was monitored in real-time. Acidification and low mobility of FMSNs were observed at the early endocytic stage, whereas basification and high mobility of FMSNs were observed at the late stage. Our results indicate that it is possible to monitor local pH changes in the environments surrounding nanoparticles during the cellular uptake process of FMSNs, which

  2. Atomistic simulations of liquid crystal mixtures of alkoxy substituted phenylpyrimidines 2PhP and PhP14.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fangyong; Earl, David J

    2012-03-28

    We study liquid crystal mixtures of alkoxy substituted phenylpyrimidines 2-[4-(butyloxy)phenyl]-5-(octyloxy)pyrimidine (2PhP) and 2-[4-(tetradecyloxy)phenyl]-5-(tetradecyloxy)pyrimidine (PhP14) using molecular dynamics simulations at the all atom level. The molecular length of PhP14 is 1.8 times that of 2PhP, resulting in an interesting binary mixture phase diagram. Our simulations are composed of 1000-1600 molecules for a total of 80,000-130,000 atomic sites, with total simulation times of 60-100 ns. We first show that a pure 2PhP system self-assembles into isotropic, nematic, smectic A and smectic C phases, and a pure PhP14 system self-assembles into isotropic and smectic C phases. Binary mixtures of PhP14 and 2PhP display a stabilization of the smectic A phase at the expense of the smectic C and nematic phases. We determine that the concentration-induced phase transition from the smectic C to the smectic A phase in the mixture is driven by an out-of-layer fluctuation arrangement of the molecules. We also observe that the tilt angle in the smectic C phases formed in the mixtures is concentration dependent. The results of our simulations are in good agreement with the experimental findings of Kapernaum et al. [J. Org. Chem. 5, 65 (2009)], thus showing that atomistic simulations are capable of reproducing the phase behavior of liquid crystal mixtures and can also provide microscopic details regarding the mechanisms that govern phase stability.

  3. A survey of beef muscle color and pH.

    PubMed

    Page, J K; Wulf, D M; Schwotzer, T R

    2001-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to define a beef carcass population in terms of muscle color, ultimate pH, and electrical impedance; to determine the relationships among color, pH, and impedance and with other carcasses characteristics; and to determine the effect of packing plant, breed type, and sex class on these variables. One thousand beef carcasses were selected at three packing plants to match the breed type, sex class, marbling score, dark-cutting discount, overall maturity, carcass weight, and yield grade distributions reported for the U.S. beef carcass population by the 1995 National Beef Quality Audit. Data collected on these carcasses included USDA quality and yield grade data and measurements of muscle color (L*, a*, b*), muscle pH, and electrical impedance of the longissimus muscle. About one-half (53.1%) of the carcasses fell within a muscle pH range of 5.40 to 5.49, and 81.3% of the carcasses fell within a longissimus muscle pH range of 5.40 to 5.59. A longissimus muscle pH of 5.87 was the approximate cut-off between normal and dark-cutting carcasses. Frequency distributions indicated that L* values were normally distributed, whereas a* and b* values were abnormally distributed (skewed because of a longer tail for lower values, a tail corresponding with dark-cutting carcasses). Electrical impedance was highly variable among carcasses but was not highly related to any other variable measured. Color measurements (L*, a*, b*) were correlated (P < 0.05) with lean maturity score (-.58, -.31, and -.43, respectively) and with muscle pH (-.40, -.58, and -.56, respectively). In addition, fat thickness was correlated with muscle pH and color (P < 0.05). There was a threshold at approximately .76 cm fat thickness, below which carcasses had higher muscle pH values and lower colorimeter readings. Steer carcasses (L* = 39.62, a* = 25.20, and b* = 11.03) had slightly higher colorimeter readings (P < 0.05) than heifer carcasses (L* = 39.20, a* = 24.78, and b

  4. A survey of beef muscle color and pH.

    PubMed

    Page, J K; Wulf, D M; Schwotzer, T R

    2001-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to define a beef carcass population in terms of muscle color, ultimate pH, and electrical impedance; to determine the relationships among color, pH, and impedance and with other carcasses characteristics; and to determine the effect of packing plant, breed type, and sex class on these variables. One thousand beef carcasses were selected at three packing plants to match the breed type, sex class, marbling score, dark-cutting discount, overall maturity, carcass weight, and yield grade distributions reported for the U.S. beef carcass population by the 1995 National Beef Quality Audit. Data collected on these carcasses included USDA quality and yield grade data and measurements of muscle color (L*, a*, b*), muscle pH, and electrical impedance of the longissimus muscle. About one-half (53.1%) of the carcasses fell within a muscle pH range of 5.40 to 5.49, and 81.3% of the carcasses fell within a longissimus muscle pH range of 5.40 to 5.59. A longissimus muscle pH of 5.87 was the approximate cut-off between normal and dark-cutting carcasses. Frequency distributions indicated that L* values were normally distributed, whereas a* and b* values were abnormally distributed (skewed because of a longer tail for lower values, a tail corresponding with dark-cutting carcasses). Electrical impedance was highly variable among carcasses but was not highly related to any other variable measured. Color measurements (L*, a*, b*) were correlated (P < 0.05) with lean maturity score (-.58, -.31, and -.43, respectively) and with muscle pH (-.40, -.58, and -.56, respectively). In addition, fat thickness was correlated with muscle pH and color (P < 0.05). There was a threshold at approximately .76 cm fat thickness, below which carcasses had higher muscle pH values and lower colorimeter readings. Steer carcasses (L* = 39.62, a* = 25.20, and b* = 11.03) had slightly higher colorimeter readings (P < 0.05) than heifer carcasses (L* = 39.20, a* = 24.78, and b

  5. Long-term stability monitoring of pH reference materials using primary pH method.

    PubMed

    Gonzaga, Fabiano Barbieri; Dias, Júlio Cesar

    2015-04-01

    This work presents the results from a series of stability studies for some batches of different aqueous pH reference materials, packed in high-density polyethylene (HDPE) bottles, taking primary pH measurements over long periods (time lengths from 18.4 to 21.0 months). The results obtained over time for acid and neutral buffer solutions (nominal pH values of 1.68, 4.00, and 6.86 at 25 °C), considering their uncertainties, were statistically similar, demonstrating the high stability of these materials. On the other hand, for the alkaline buffer solutions (nominal pH values of 9.18 and 10.01 at 25 °C), there was a clear decrease in the results over time, with pH variation rates around -8.5 × 10(-4) per month. The results showed that reference materials of the acid and neutral buffer solutions can be easily provided with small uncertainty values and long shelf lives in simple HDPE bottles closed under air atmosphere, whereas reference materials of the alkaline buffer solutions must have more limited shelf lives and higher uncertainty values (taking into account the pH decrease over time) or must be provided in special packaging (such as ampoules) to prevent carbon dioxide interference. PMID:25318462

  6. Ligand Accessibility and Bioactivity of a Hormone-Dendrimer Conjugate Depend on pH and pH History

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Bae, Sung Chul; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Mayne, Christopher G.; Granick, Steve; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen conjugates with a polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer have shown remarkably selective regulation of the non-genomic actions of estrogens in target cells. In response to pH changes, however, these estrogen-dendrimer conjugates (EDCs) display a major morphological transition that alters the accessibility of the estrogen ligands that compromises the bioactivity of the EDC. A sharp break in dynamic behavior near pH 7 occurs for three different ligands on the surface of a PAMAM-G6 dendrimer: a fluorophore (tetramethylrhodamine, TMR) and two estrogens (17α-ethynylestradiol and diphenolic acid). Collisional quenching and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy experiments with TMR-PAMAM reveal high ligand shielding above pH 7 and low shielding below pH 7. Furthermore, when pH was cycled from 8.5 (conditions of ligand-PAMAM conjugation) to 4.5 (e.g., endosome/lysosome) and through 6.5 (e.g., hypoxic environment) back to pH 8.5, the 17α-ethynylestradiol and diphenolic acid PAMAM conjugates experience a dramatic, irreversible loss in cell stimulatory activity; dynamic NMR studies indicate that the hormonal ligands had become occluded within the more hydrophobic core of the PAMAM dendrimer. Thus, the active state of these estrogen-dendrimer conjugates appears to be metastable. This pH-dependent irreversible masking of activity is of considerable relevance to the design of drug conjugates with amine-bearing PAMAM dendrimers. PMID:26186415

  7. Effect of systemic pH on pH sub i and lactic acid generation in exhaustive forearm exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, V.L.; Schubert, C.; Keller, U.; Mueller, S. Univ. of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington )

    1988-09-01

    To investigate whether changes in systemic pH affect intracellular pH (pH{sub i}), energy-rich phosphates, and lactic acid generation in muscle, eight normal volunteers performed exhaustive forearm exercise with arterial blood flow occluded for 2 min on three occasions. Subjects ingested 4 mmol/kg NH{sub 4}Cl (acidosis; A) or NaHCO{sub 3} (alkalosis; B) or nothing (control; C) 3 h before the exercise. Muscle pH{sub i} and phosphocreatine (PCr) content were measured with {sup 31}P-nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 31}P-NMR) spectroscopy during exercise and recovery. Lactate output during 0.5-7 min of recovery was calculated as deep venous-arterial concentration differences times forearm blood flow. Before exercise, blood pH and bicarbonate were lower in acidosis than alkalosis and intermediate in control. Lactic acid output during recovery was less with A than B and intermediate in C. PCr utilization and resynthesis were not affected by extracellular pH changes. pH{sub i} did not differ before exercise or at its end. Hence systemic acidosis inhibited and alkalosis stimulated lactic acid output. These findings suggest that systemic pH regulates cellular acid production, protecting muscle pH, at the expense of energy availability.

  8. Measuring Phagosome pH by Ratiometric Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paula; Guido, Daniele; Demaurex, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis is a fundamental process through which innate immune cells engulf bacteria, apoptotic cells or other foreign particles in order to kill or neutralize the ingested material, or to present it as antigens and initiate adaptive immune responses. The pH of phagosomes is a critical parameter regulating fission or fusion with endomembranes and activation of proteolytic enzymes, events that allow the phagocytic vacuole to mature into a degradative organelle. In addition, translocation of H(+) is required for the production of high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are essential for efficient killing and signaling to other host tissues. Many intracellular pathogens subvert phagocytic killing by limiting phagosomal acidification, highlighting the importance of pH in phagosome biology. Here we describe a ratiometric method for measuring phagosomal pH in neutrophils using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled zymosan as phagocytic targets, and live-cell imaging. The assay is based on the fluorescence properties of FITC, which is quenched by acidic pH when excited at 490 nm but not when excited at 440 nm, allowing quantification of a pH-dependent ratio, rather than absolute fluorescence, of a single dye. A detailed protocol for performing in situ dye calibration and conversion of ratio to real pH values is also provided. Single-dye ratiometric methods are generally considered superior to single wavelength or dual-dye pseudo-ratiometric protocols, as they are less sensitive to perturbations such as bleaching, focus changes, laser variations, and uneven labeling, which distort the measured signal. This method can be easily modified to measure pH in other phagocytic cell types, and zymosan can be replaced by any other amine-containing particle, from inert beads to living microorganisms. Finally, this method can be adapted to make use of other fluorescent probes sensitive to different pH ranges or other phagosomal activities, making it a generalized

  9. [Gastroesophageal reflux during pregnancy: 24-hour esophageal ph monitoring].

    PubMed

    Anton, C; Anton, E; Drug, V; Stanciu, C

    2001-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) occurs in 30-50% of all pregnancies. The progressive rise in plasma progesterone has been suggested as a possible mediator of GER during pregnancy. Recent advances in technology have made it possible to detect GER through monitoring of esophageal pH for prolonged periods, including sleep. 24-hour pH monitoring is the proper method for diagnosing GER in pregnant women. If 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring is to be a useful diagnostic tool, it must reliably discriminate GER patients despite daily variations in distal esophageal acid exposure. To address this issue, we studied 62 women (30 healthy non-pregnant women without GER symptoms and 32 pregnant women with GER symptoms-heartburn, acid regurgitation) with 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring. Intrasubject reproducibility of three pH parameters to discriminate the presence of abnormal acid reflux was determined (DeMeester score, Kaye score, circadian one hour diagram for pH < 4). Each patient was interviewed, using a reliable questionnaire detailing individual habits, life style characteristics and symptoms, at four time points during the first, second, third trimesters of pregnancy and post-partum period. Symptoms of GER are common in pregnancy and although GER rarely endangers maternal or fetal health, it can significantly affect patient comfort and quality of life. We conclude: 1. GER is almost constantly present during pregnancy, increasing with gestational age. 2. The most important pH--parameter is DeMcester score. 3. Heartburn disappear after delivery. 4. 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring is the gold standard for measuring acid exposure and is a reproducible test for the diagnosis of GER in pregnancy.

  10. Measuring Phagosome pH by Ratiometric Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paula; Guido, Daniele; Demaurex, Nicolas

    2015-12-07

    Phagocytosis is a fundamental process through which innate immune cells engulf bacteria, apoptotic cells or other foreign particles in order to kill or neutralize the ingested material, or to present it as antigens and initiate adaptive immune responses. The pH of phagosomes is a critical parameter regulating fission or fusion with endomembranes and activation of proteolytic enzymes, events that allow the phagocytic vacuole to mature into a degradative organelle. In addition, translocation of H(+) is required for the production of high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are essential for efficient killing and signaling to other host tissues. Many intracellular pathogens subvert phagocytic killing by limiting phagosomal acidification, highlighting the importance of pH in phagosome biology. Here we describe a ratiometric method for measuring phagosomal pH in neutrophils using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled zymosan as phagocytic targets, and live-cell imaging. The assay is based on the fluorescence properties of FITC, which is quenched by acidic pH when excited at 490 nm but not when excited at 440 nm, allowing quantification of a pH-dependent ratio, rather than absolute fluorescence, of a single dye. A detailed protocol for performing in situ dye calibration and conversion of ratio to real pH values is also provided. Single-dye ratiometric methods are generally considered superior to single wavelength or dual-dye pseudo-ratiometric protocols, as they are less sensitive to perturbations such as bleaching, focus changes, laser variations, and uneven labeling, which distort the measured signal. This method can be easily modified to measure pH in other phagocytic cell types, and zymosan can be replaced by any other amine-containing particle, from inert beads to living microorganisms. Finally, this method can be adapted to make use of other fluorescent probes sensitive to different pH ranges or other phagosomal activities, making it a generalized

  11. PH5 for integrating and archiving different data types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Steve; Hess, Derick; Beaudoin, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    PH5 is IRIS PASSCAL's file organization of HDF5 used for seismic data. The extensibility and portability of HDF5 allows the PH5 format to evolve and operate on a variety of platforms and interfaces. To make PH5 even more flexible, the seismic metadata is separated from the time series data in order to achieve gains in performance as well as ease of use and to simplify user interaction. This separation affords easy updates to metadata after the data are archived without having to access waveform data. To date, PH5 is currently used for integrating and archiving active source, passive source, and onshore-offshore seismic data sets with the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). Active development to make PH5 fully compatible with FDSN web services and deliver StationXML is near completion. We are also exploring the feasibility of utilizing QuakeML for active seismic source representation. The PH5 software suite, PIC KITCHEN, comprises in-field tools that include data ingestion (e.g. RefTek format, SEG-Y, and SEG-D), meta-data management tools including QC, and a waveform review tool. These tools enable building archive ready data in-field during active source experiments greatly decreasing the time to produce research ready data sets. Once archived, our online request page generates a unique web form and pre-populates much of it based on the metadata provided to it from the PH5 file. The data requester then can intuitively select the extraction parameters as well as data subsets they wish to receive (current output formats include SEG-Y, SAC, mseed). The web interface then passes this on to the PH5 processing tools to generate the requested seismic data, and e-mail the requester a link to the data set automatically as soon as the data are ready. PH5 file organization was originally designed to hold seismic time series data and meta-data from controlled source experiments using RefTek data loggers. The flexibility of HDF5 has enabled us to extend the use of PH5 in several

  12. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Nadine R. Martinez; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2−3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8. PMID:25875963

  13. Computational Analysis of the Binding Specificities of PH Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi; Liang, Zhongjie; Shen, Bairong; Hu, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains share low sequence identities but extremely conserved structures. They have been found in many proteins for cellular signal-dependent membrane targeting by binding inositol phosphates to perform different physiological functions. In order to understand the sequence-structure relationship and binding specificities of PH domains, quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and sequence-based combined with structure-based binding analysis were employed in our research. In the structural aspect, the binding specificities were shown to correlate with the hydropathy characteristics of PH domains and electrostatic properties of the bound inositol phosphates. By comparing these structure properties with sequence-based profiles of physicochemical properties, PH domains can be classified into four functional subgroups according to their binding specificities and affinities to inositol phosphates. The method not only provides a simple and practical paradigm to predict binding specificities for functional genomic research but also gives new insight into the understanding of the basis of diseases with respect to PH domain structures. PMID:26881206

  14. Low pH increases the yield of exosome isolation.

    PubMed

    Ban, Jae-Jun; Lee, Mijung; Im, Wooseok; Kim, Manho

    2015-05-22

    Exosomes are the extracellular vesicles secreted by various cells. Exosomes mediate intercellular communication by delivering a variety of molecules between cells. Cancer cell derived exosomes seem to be related with tumor progression and metastasis. Tumor microenvironment is thought to be acidic and this low pH controls exosome physiology, leading to tumor progression. Despite the importance of microenvironmental pH on exosome, most of exosome studies have been performed without regard to pH. Therefore, the difference of exosome stability and yield of isolation by different pH need to be studied. In this research, we investigated the yield of total exosomal protein and RNA after incubation in acidic, neutral and alkaline conditioned medium. Representative exosome markers were investigated by western blot after incubation of exosomes in different pH. As a result, the concentrations of exosomal protein and nucleic acid were significantly increased after incubation in the acidic medium compared with neutral medium. The higher levels of exosome markers including CD9, CD63 and HSP70 were observed after incubation in an acidic environment. On the other hand, no exosomal protein, exosomal RNA and exosome markers have been detected after incubation in an alkaline condition. In summary, our results indicate that the acidic condition is the favorable environment for existence and isolation of exosomes.

  15. Intracellular pH and the Control of Multidrug Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford; Roy, Deborshi; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-02-01

    Many anticancer drugs are classified as either weak bases or molecules whose binding to cellular structures is pH dependent. Accumulation of these drugs within tumor cells should be affected by transmembrane pH gradients. Indeed, development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells has been correlated with an alkaline shift of cytosolic pH. To examine the role of pH in drug partitioning, the distribution of two drugs, doxorubicin and daunomycin, was monitored in fibroblasts and myeloma cells. In both cell types the drugs rapidly accumulated within the cells. The highest concentrations were measured in the most acidic compartments-e.g., lysosomes. Modifying the cellular pH in drug-sensitive cells to mimic reported shifts in MDR caused an immediate change in the cellular drug concentration. Drug accumulation was enhanced by acidic shifts and reversed by alkaline shifts. All of these effects were rapid and reversible. These results demonstrate that the alkaline shift observed in MDR is sufficient to prevent the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs independent of active drug efflux.

  16. Tin(IV) halide complexes of AsPh3) The structures of trans-SnCl4(AsPh3)2 and SnBr4(AsPh3).AsPh3.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Mary F; Moldovan, Natalia L; Molloy, Kieran C; Muresan, Alexandra; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Ioan; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Luminita

    2004-12-01

    The structures of two 1 : 2 adducts between tin(IV) halides and AsPh(3) have been determined. SnCl(4)(AsPh(3))(2) adopts a six-coordinate geometry at tin in which the two organoarsine donors are mutually trans. In contrast, SnBr(4)(AsPh(3))(2) is five-coordinate at tin and only one arsine is directly bonded to the metal, in an axial site of the trigonal bipyramid. The second AsPh(3) group has a close contact with the axially bound bromine [As...Br: 3.567(3) angstroms], which is a unique structural variation that depicts an intermediate in a halogen-transfer reaction between Group 14 and Group 15 elements. AACVD using SnCl(4)(AsPh(3))(2) generates a film containing SnO(2) and a second crystalline material which is possibly SnCl(2), but which contains no arsenic. PMID:15558128

  17. Near-infrared noninvasive spectroscopic determination of pH

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Mary K.; Robinson, Mark R.

    1998-08-11

    Methods and apparatus for, preferably, determining noninvasively and in vitro pH in a human. The non-invasive method includes the steps of: generating light at three or more different wavelengths in the range of 1000 nm to 2500 nm; irradiating blood containing tissue; measuring the intensities of the wavelengths emerging from the blood containing tissue to obtain a set of at least three spectral intensities v. wavelengths; and determining the unknown values of pH. The determination of pH is made by using measured intensities at wavelengths that exhibit change in absorbance due to histidine titration. Histidine absorbance changes are due to titration by hydrogen ions. The determination of the unknown pH values is performed by at least one multivariate algorithm using two or more variables and at least one calibration model. The determined pH values are within the physiological ranges observed in blood containing tissue. The apparatus includes a tissue positioning device, a source, at least one detector, electronics, a microprocessor, memory, and apparatus for indicating the determined values.

  18. Ocean Acidification: Euphausia Pacifica's Response to Decreasing pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, H. N.; Cooper, H.

    2014-12-01

    The increasing rate of CO2 accumulating in Earth's oceans creates a threat to organisms that can lead to disturbances in their reproduction, survival and growth. Euphausia pacifica is the dominant species of krill in Monterey Bay, CA, and a keystone species in the bay's food web. Previous work on the effects of ocean acidification on the survival, growth and molting of E. pacifica have shown they are fairly tolerant to increased CO2 concentrations. However, less is known about energy costs associated with maintaining their internal pH levels which could affect food consumption, swimming behavior or growth activity. We hypothesized that krill exposed to high CO2 will increase their feeding rate on local species of phytoplankton to account for increased energy costs of pH buffering activity. We exposed experimental E. pacifica to waters of pH 7.6 (the expected pH surface waters in year 2100), and pH 8.0 (control) periods.test for acclimation or longer term stress. Feeding rates were calculated as changes in phytoplankton counts over 24 hours of feeding using Frost's equations (Frost 1972). Understanding the way E. pacifica is affected by ocean acidification is important because of the role they play as the primary food source for a variety of predators necessary to maintain the Pacific's ecology.

  19. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2008-02-01

    In an effort to encourage self-regulation of the astronomy job market, I examine the supply of, and demand for, astronomers over time. On the supply side, I document the production rate of Ph.D. astronomers from 1970 to 2006 using the UMI Dissertation Abstracts database, along with data from other independent sources. I compare the long-term trends in Ph.D. production with federal astronomy research funding over the same time period, and I demonstrate that additional funding is correlated with higher subsequent Ph.D. production. On the demand side, I monitor the changing patterns of employment using statistics about the number and types of jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register from 1984 to 2006. Finally, I assess the sustainability of the job market by normalizing this demand by the annual Ph.D. production. The most recent data suggest that there are now annual advertisements for about one postdoctoral job, half a faculty job, and half a research/support position for every new domestic Ph.D. recipient in astronomy and astrophysics. The average new astronomer might expect to hold up to 3 jobs before finding a steady position.

  20. Noninvasive Ph-telemetric Measurement of Gastrointestinal Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietze, Karen J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain experience with and validate the Heidelberg pH-telemetric methodology in order to determine if the pH-telemetric methodology would be a useful noninvasive measure of gastrointestinal transit time for future ground-based and in-flight drug evaluation studies. The Heidelberg pH metering system is a noninvasive, nonradioactive telemetric system that, following oral ingestion, continuously measures intraluminal pH of the stomach, duodenum, small bowel, ileocecal junction, and large bowel. Gastrointestinal motility profiles were obtained in normal volunteers using the lactulose breath-hydrogen and Heidelberg pH metering techniques. All profiles were obtained in the morning after an overnight fast. Heidelberg pH profiles were obtained in the fasting and fed states; lactulose breath-hydrogen profiles were obtained after a standard breakfast. Mouth-to-cecum transit time was measured as the interval from administration of lactulose (30 ml; 20 g) to a sustained increase in breath-hydrogen of 10 ppm or more. Gastric emptying time was measured as the interval from the administration of the Heidelberg capsule to a sustained increase in pH of three units or more.

  1. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2 to 3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~ 8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8.

  2. The Role of Ph Fronts in Tissue Electroporation Based Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Maglietti, Felipe; Michinski, Sebastian; Olaiz, Nahuel; Castro, Marcelo; Suárez, Cecilia; Marshall, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Treatments based on electroporation (EP) induce the formation of pores in cell membranes due to the application of pulsed electric fields. We present experimental evidence of the existence of pH fronts emerging from both electrodes during treatments based on tissue EP, for conditions found in many studies, and that these fronts are immediate and substantial. pH fronts are indirectly measured through the evanescence time (ET), defined as the time required for the tissue buffer to neutralize them. The ET was measured through a pH indicator imaged at a series of time intervals using a four-cluster hard fuzzy-c-means algorithm to segment pixels corresponding to the pH indicator at every frame. The ET was calculated as the time during which the number of pixels was 10% of those in the initial frame. While in EP-based treatments such as reversible (ECT) and irreversible electroporation (IRE) the ET is very short (though enough to cause minor injuries) due to electric pulse characteristics and biological buffers present in the tissue, in gene electrotransfer (GET), ET is much longer, enough to denaturate plasmids and produce cell damage. When any of the electric pulse parameters is doubled or tripled the ET grows and, remarkably, when any of the pulse parameters in GET is halved, the ET drops significantly. Reducing pH fronts has relevant implications for GET treatment efficiency, due to a substantial reduction of plasmid damage and cell loss. PMID:24278257

  3. Photonic porous silicon as a pH sensor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds do not heal within 3 months, and during the lengthy healing process, the wound is invariably exposed to bacteria, which can colonize the wound bed and form biofilms. This alters the wound metabolism and brings about a change of pH. In this work, porous silicon photonic films were coated with the pH-responsive polymer poly(2-diethylaminoethyl acrylate). We demonstrated that the pH-responsive polymer deposited on the surface of the photonic film acts as a barrier to prevent water from penetrating inside the porous matrix at neutral pH. Moreover, the device demonstrated optical pH sensing capability visible by the unaided eye. PMID:25177227

  4. The pH dependent Raman spectroscopic study of caffeine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Gu, Huaimin; Zhong, Liang; Hu, Yongjun; Liu, Fang

    2011-02-01

    First of all the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and normal Raman spectra of caffeine aqueous solution were obtained at different pH values. In order to obtain the detailed vibrational assignments of the Raman spectroscopy, the geometry of caffeine molecule was optimized by density functional theory (DFT) calculation. By comparing the SERS of caffeine with its normal spectra at different pH values; it is concluded that pH value can dramatically affect the SERS of caffeine, but barely affect the normal Raman spectrum of caffeine aqueous solution. It can essentially affect the reorientation of caffeine molecule to the Ag colloid surface, but cannot impact the vibration of functional groups and chemical bonds in caffeine molecule.

  5. Ionizable drugs and pH oscillators: buffering effects.

    PubMed

    Misra, Gauri P; Siegel, Ronald A

    2002-09-01

    It has been proposed that chemical pH oscillators may form a basis for periodic, pulsed drug delivery of weak acids and bases across lipophilic membranes. However, drugs have been shown to interfere with the ability of the chemical systems to oscillate, and rhythmic delivery of drugs by this means has been demonstrated only under constrained circumstances. Herein, we provide evidence that low concentrations of acidic drugs can attenuate and ultimately quench chemical pH oscillators, by a simple buffering mechanism. A model system consisting of the bromate-sulfite-marble pH oscillator in a continuous stirred tank reactor is used, along with acidic drugs of varying concentration and acid dissociation constant, pK(D). A published kinetic model for this oscillator is modified to account for the presence of acidic drug, and the results of this model are in qualitative agreement with the experimental results. PMID:12210047

  6. An analysis of Ph.D. examiners' reports in engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Elena; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing calls for an overall transformation of the nature of engineering Ph.D. programs and the way theses are assessed. There exists a need to understand the examination process to ensure the best quality outcome for candidates in engineering. The work we present in this paper uses data collected between 2003 and 2010 for a total of 1220 Australian Ph.D. theses by analysing examiner reports. Our analysis indicates that Ph.D. theses in engineering, N = 106, differ considerably from those in other fields in areas such as gender of candidates and examiners and the examiners' geographical location. We also found that assessment areas such as significance and contribution of the thesis, publications arising from the thesis, breadth, depth and recency of the literature review and communication and editorial correctness are areas in which the proportion of text of engineering examiners' comments differs significantly from other fields.

  7. Nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite prepared under various pH conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanivelu, R.; Mary Saral, A.; Ruban Kumar, A.

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) has sovereign biomedical application due to its excellent biocompatibility, chemical and crystallographic similitude with natural human bone. In this present work, we discussed about the role of pH in the synthesis of calcium phosphate compound using calcium nitrate tetrahydrate and di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate as starting materials by chemical precipitation method assisted with ultrasonic irradiation technique. 5% polyethylene glycol (PEG600) is added along with the precursors under various pH condition of 7, 9 and 11 respectively. The functional group analysis, crystallized size and fraction of crystallized size are confirmed using Fourier Transformation Infra-Red spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction pattern. Morphological observations are done by scanning electron microscope. The results revealed the presence of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite at pH above 9.

  8. Controllable dissociations of PH3 molecules on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qin; Lei, Yanhua; Shao, Xiji; Ming, Fangfei; Xu, Hu; Wang, Kedong; Xiao, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge that controllable dissociation of PH3 adsorption products PH x (x = 2, 1) can be realized by STM (scanning tunneling microscope) manipulation techniques at room temperature. Five dissociative products and their geometric structures are identified via combining STM experiments and first-principle calculations and simulations. In total we realize nine kinds of controllable dissociations by applying a voltage pulse among the PH3-related structures on Si(001). The dissociation rates of the five most common reactions are measured by the I-t spectrum method as a function of voltage. The suddenly increased dissociation rate at 3.3 V indicates a transition from multivibrational excitation to single-step excitation induced by inelastic tunneling electrons. Our studies prove that selectively breaking the chemical bonds of a single molecule on semiconductor surface by STM manipulation technique is feasible.

  9. PH and Electrochemical Responsive Materials for Corrosion Smart Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Calle, Luz M.

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion is a costly issue for military operations and civil industries. While most corrosion initiates from localized corrosion form, such as pitting, failure directly caused by localized corrosion is the most dangerous kind, because it is difficult to anticipate and prevent, occurs very suddenly and can be catastrophic. One way of preventing these failures is with a coating that can detect and heal localized corrosion. pH and other electrochemical changes are often associated with localized corrosion, so it is expected that materials that are pH or otherwise electrochemical responsive can be used to detect and control corrosion. This paper will review various pH and electrochemical responsive materials and their potential applications in corrosion smart coatings. Current research results in this field will also be reported.

  10. Photonic porous silicon as a pH sensor.

    PubMed

    Pace, Stephanie; Vasani, Roshan B; Zhao, Wei; Perrier, Sébastien; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds do not heal within 3 months, and during the lengthy healing process, the wound is invariably exposed to bacteria, which can colonize the wound bed and form biofilms. This alters the wound metabolism and brings about a change of pH. In this work, porous silicon photonic films were coated with the pH-responsive polymer poly(2-diethylaminoethyl acrylate). We demonstrated that the pH-responsive polymer deposited on the surface of the photonic film acts as a barrier to prevent water from penetrating inside the porous matrix at neutral pH. Moreover, the device demonstrated optical pH sensing capability visible by the unaided eye.

  11. Stabilization of Mercury in High pH Tank Sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, R.; Barton, J.

    2003-02-24

    DOE complex contains many tank sludges contaminated with mercury. The high pH of these tank sludges typically fails to stabilize the mercury, resulting in these radioactive wastes also being characteristically hazardous or mixed waste. The traditional treatment for soluble inorganic mercury species is precipitation as insoluble mercuric sulfide. Sulfide treatment and a commercial mercury-stabilizing product were tested on surrogate sludges at various alkaline pH values. Neither the sulfide nor the commercial product stabilized the mercury sufficiently at the high pH of the tank sludges to pass the Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP) treatment standards of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The commercial product also failed to stabilize the mercury in samples of the actual tank sludges.

  12. IMPACT OF WATER PH ON ZEBRA MUSSEL MORTALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2002-10-15

    The experiments conducted this past quarter have suggested that the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A is effective at killing zebra mussels throughout the entire range of pH values tested (7.2 to 8.6). Highest mortality was achieved at pH values characteristic of preferred zebra mussel waterbodies, i.e., hard waters with a range of 7.8 to 8.6. In all water types tested, however, ranging from very soft to very hard, considerable mussel kill was achieved (83 to 99% mean mortality), suggesting that regardless of the pH or hardness of the treated water, significant mussel kill can be achieved upon treatment with P. fluorescens strain CL0145A. These results further support the concept that this bacterium has significant potential for use as a zebra mussel control agent in power plant pipes receiving waters with a wide range of physical and chemical characteristics.

  13. Bicarbonate Increases Tumor pH and Inhibits Spontaneous Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Robey, Ian F.; Baggett, Brenda K.; Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Roe, Denise J.; Dosescu, Julie; Sloane, Bonnie F.; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Morse, David L.; Raghunand, Natarajan; Gatenby, Robert A.; Gillies, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The external pH of solid tumors is acidic as a consequence of increased metabolism of glucose and poor perfusion. Acid pH has been shown to stimulate tumor cell invasion and metastasis in vitro and in cells before tail vein injection in vivo. The present study investigates whether inhibition of this tumor acidity will reduce the incidence of in vivo metastases. Here, we show that oral NaHCO3 selectively increased the pH of tumors and reduced the formation of spontaneous metastases in mouse models of metastatic breast cancer. This treatment regimen was shown to significantly increase the extracellular pH, but not the intracellular pH, of tumors by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the export of acid from growing tumors by fluorescence microscopy of tumors grown in window chambers. NaHCO3 therapy also reduced the rate of lymph node involvement, yet did not affect the levels of circulating tumor cells, suggesting that reduced organ metastases were not due to increased intravasation. In contrast, NaHCO3 therapy significantly reduced the formation of hepatic metastases following intrasplenic injection, suggesting that it did inhibit extravasation and colonization. In tail vein injections of alternative cancer models, bicarbonate had mixed results, inhibiting the formation of metastases from PC3M prostate cancer cells, but not those of B16 melanoma. Although the mechanism of this therapy is not known with certainty, low pH was shown to increase the release of active cathepsin B, an important matrix remodeling protease. PMID:19276390

  14. Harvard College Observatory: Shapley's Factory for PhD Degrees?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welther, B. L.

    2000-12-01

    When Harlow Shapley assumed the Directorship of Harvard College Observatory in 1921, there was no program in place there to train the next generation of astronomers. In 1923, using the Pickering Fund for women assistants, Shapley hired a young English woman, Cecilia Payne, to work on stellar spectra. Just two short years later, Payne completed her research and wrote a celebrated thesis on stellar atmospheres. Because Harvard University was not prepared to confer a PhD degree on a woman at that time, Payne presented her thesis to Radcliffe College. Thus, in 1925 she became the first person to receive a PhD in astronomy for a research project at HCO. By 1933, a PhD in Astronomy had been conferred on eight graduate students who had undertaken research projects at HCO: four men who received their degree from Harvard, and four women, from Radcliffe. In subsequent years, however, the equal distribution of degrees for men and women quickly changed. When the 30th degree was bestowed in 1943, only 10 of the candidates were women. By 1955, when the 60th degree was conferred, only 14 women had received a PhD. In just two decades, then, the ratio of women astronomers had steadily dropped from a solid 50% at the height of the Shapley era to slightly less than 25% at his retirement. Also, until the mid-1960s, the women astronomers still had to apply to Radcliffe for their PhD degrees. This paper will briefly examine the funding and research topics of some of the HCO PhD candidates in the Shapley Era (1921-1955). It will also highlight some of their subsequent contributions to 20th-century American Astronomy.

  15. Manganese toxicity to fungi: influence of pH

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, H.; Stotzky, G.

    1981-10-01

    The effects of Mn on mycelial proliferation of fungi and the effect of pH on Mn toxicity were evaluated. Results indicated that the fungi exhibited wide differences in their sensitivities to Mn. Incipient inhibition (i.e., the level of Mn at which growth inhibition was noted initially, P < 0.05) for Scopulariopsis brevicaulis and Aspergillus giganteus occurred at 100 ppM Mn; for Rhizopus stolonifer, Arthrobotrys conoides, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Trichoderma viride, and Penicillium vermiculatum at 500 ppM Mn; for Cephalosporium sp. at 1000 ppM Mn; and for Gliocladium sp. at 1000 to 1500 ppM Mn; growth of Aspergillus clavatus was not inhibited even at 2000 ppM Mn. No growth of S. brevicaulis occurred at 500 ppM Mn and of R. stolonifer at 1500 ppM Mn. The levels of Mn causing incipient and/or total inhibition of mycelial growth of the fungi studied were comparable to the levels reported to inhibit mycelial proliferation of some phylloplane fungi. Only A. conoides showed significant (P < 0.5) stimulation of mycelial growth by Mn; 10, 50, and 100 ppM Mn increased growth rates over control (0 ppM Mn) values. There was no consistent trend in the effect of pH on Mn toxicity to the fungi. However, each fungus showed a definitive response to Mn at the different pH levels. Thus, increasing the pH from 5.5 to 8.5 did not significantly affect the toxicity of Mn to Gliocladium sp., P. vermiculatum, or A. niger. The toxicity of Mn to R. stolonifer and T. viride was not different at pH 5.5 and 6.5, but increasing the pH to 7.5 or 8.5 significantly enhanced the toxicity.

  16. Energy metabolism and intracellular pH in boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Kamp, G; Büsselmann, G; Jones, N; Wiesner, B; Lauterwein, J

    2003-10-01

    The effect of energy metabolism on intracellular pH was studied in boar spermatozoa using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and confocal microscopy with the pH-sensitive dye seminaphthorhodafluor (SNARF-1). Freshly ejaculated spermatozoa had a high adenylate energy charge (AEC=0.8), which decreased to 0.6 under aerobic conditions and to 0.2 under anaerobic conditions. Correspondingly, no ATP resonances but high AMP resonance were visible in (31)P-NMR-spectra of the spermatozoa. When an artificial oxygen buffer (Fluosol) and a purpose-built air supply system were used during (31)P-NMR data acquisition, ATP resonances reappeared whereas the AMP resonance disappeared. Boar spermatozoa kept under aerobic conditions have intracellular compartments that differ markedly in pH, as demonstrated by both (31)P-NMR spectroscopy and confocal microscopy. Using confocal microscopy, the midpiece of the flagellum in which all mitochondria are located was identified as an acidic compartment (pH(i-mp) 6.7). The intracellular pH of both the head (pH(i-h)) and the long principal piece of the flagellum (pH(i-pp)) were 7.2 and, thus, only slightly below the extracellular pH (pH(e) 7.3). Storage of spermatozoa in a glucose-free medium at 15 degrees C when they are immotile slowly shifted the pH(i-mp) from 6.7 to 6.9 within 20 h, whereas pH(i-h) and pH(i-pp) remained unchanged (pH 7.1-7.2). When glucose was present in the medium, all visible compartments of the spermatozoa as well as the medium were acidified to pH 6.2 within 20 h. Under these conditions a resonance at 4.8 mg kg(-1) appeared representing glycerol 3-phosphate.

  17. DETECTING EVOLUTIONARY TRANSFER OF GENES USING PhIGs(1).

    PubMed

    Boore, Jeffrey L

    2008-02-01

    Organisms have acquired plastids by convoluted paths that have provided multiple opportunities for gene transfer into a host nucleus from intracellular organisms, including the cyanobacterial ancestor of plastids, the proteobacterial ancestor of mitochondria, and both green and red algae whose engulfment has led to secondary acquisition of plastids. These gene movements are most accurately demonstrated by building phylogenetic trees that identify the evolutionary origin of each gene, and one effective tool for this is "PhIGs" (Phylogenetically Inferred Groups; http://PhIGs.org), a set of databases and computer tools with a Web interface for whole-genome evolutionary analysis. PhIGs takes as input gene sets of completely sequenced genomes, builds clusters of genes using a novel, graph-based approach, and reconstructs the evolutionary relationships among all gene families. The user can view and download the sequence alignments, compare intron-exon structures, and follow links to functional genomic databases. Currently, PhIGs contains 652,756 genes from 45 genomes grouped into 61,059 gene families. Graphical displays show the relative positions of these genes among genomes. PhIGs has been used to detect the evolutionary transfer of hundreds of genes from cyanobacteria and red algae into oömycete nuclear genomes, revealing that even though they have no plastids, their ancestors did, having secondarily acquired them from an intracellular red alga. A great number of genomes are soon to become available that are relevant to our broader understanding of the movement of genes among intracellular compartments after engulfing other organisms, and PhIGs will be an effective tool to interpret these gene movements.

  18. pH control in biological systems using calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Salek, S S; van Turnhout, A G; Kleerebezem, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-05-01

    Due to its abundance, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) has high potentials as a source of alkalinity for biotechnological applications. The application of CaCO3 in biological systems as neutralizing agent is, however, limited due to potential difficulties in controlling the pH. The objective of the present study was to determine the dominant processes that control the pH in an acid-forming microbial process in the presence of CaCO3. To achieve that, a mathematical model was made with a minimum set of kinetically controlled and equilibrium reactions that was able to reproduce the experimental data of a batch fermentation experiment using finely powdered CaCO3. In the model, thermodynamic equilibrium was assumed for all speciation, complexation and precipitation reactions whereas, rate limited reactions were included for the biological fatty acid production, the mass transfer of CO2 from the liquid phase to the gas phase and the convective transport of CO2 out of the gas phase. The estimated pH-pattern strongly resembled the measured pH, suggesting that the chosen set of kinetically controlled and equilibrium reactions were establishing the experimental pH. A detailed analysis of the reaction system with the aid of the model revealed that the pH establishment was most sensitive to four factors: the mass transfer rate of CO2 to the gas phase, the biological acid production rate, the partial pressure of CO2 and the Ca(+2) concentration in the solution. Individual influences of these factors on the pH were investigated by extrapolating the model to a continuously stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) case. This case study indicates how the pH of a commonly used continuous biotechnological process could be manipulated and adjusted by altering these four factors. Achieving a better insight of the processes controlling the pH of a biological system using CaCO3 as its neutralizing agent can result in broader applications of CaCO3 in biotechnological industries.

  19. CCD camera full range pH sensor array.

    PubMed

    Safavi, A; Maleki, N; Rostamzadeh, A; Maesum, S

    2007-01-15

    Changes in colors of an array of optical sensors that responds in full pH range were recorded using a CCD camera. The data of the camera were transferred to the computer through a capture card. Simple software was written to read the specific color of each sensor. In order to associate sensor array responses with pH values, a number of different mathematics and chemometrics methods were investigated and compared. The results show that the use of "Microsoft Excel's Solver" provides results which are in very good agreement with those obtained with chemometric methods such as artificial neural network (ANN) and partial least square (PLS) methods. PMID:19071333

  20. Metal/Metal Oxide Differential Electrode pH Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Buehler, Martin; Keymeulen, Didier

    2007-01-01

    Solid-state electrochemical sensors for measuring the degrees of acidity or alkalinity (in terms of pH values) of liquid solutions are being developed. These sensors are intended to supplant older electrochemical pH sensors that include glass electrode structures and reference solutions. The older sensors are fragile and subject to drift. The present developmental solid-state sensors are more rugged and are expected to be usable in harsh environments. The present sensors are based on a differential-electrode measurement principle. Each sensor includes two electrodes, made of different materials, in equilibrium with the solution of interest.

  1. Measurement and control of pH in hydrothermal solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wesolowski, D.J.; Palmer, D.A.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrogen-electrode concentration cells with liquid junction are routinely used to measure the pH of aqueous solutions from 0 to 300 C. Results include the dissociation constants of common acids and bases and the hydrolysis and complexation of metal ions in aqueous electrolytes over a wide range of salinities. Recently, we have utilized these cells to examine the sorption of H{sup +} on mineral surfaces, the solubility of minerals with continuous in situ pH measurement, and the thermal decompositon rates of organic acids.

  2. pH microprobe manipulated in microchannels using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Gavin S.; Klauke, Norbert; Monaghan, Paul; Padgett, Miles J.; Cooper, Jon

    2005-03-01

    SNARF-1 fluorochrome was used to functionalize 3μm diameter latex spheres making them sensitive to the pH of their environment, manifested as a change in their fluorescence. The fluorescence emission at 580nm was excited using a filtered xenon arc lamp at 515nm. A solution of functionalized latex spheres was placed between gold microelectrodes in a microfluidic channel. Optical tweezers were used to trap and manipulate the spheres in the vicinity of the microelectrodes, to map out the pH profile in the electrolyte solution, induced by passing 20 microsecond transient current pulses through the microelectrodes.

  3. Developing imidazoles as CEST MRI pH sensors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing; Song, Xiaolei; Ray Banerjee, Sangeeta; Li, Yuguo; Byun, Youngjoo; Liu, Guanshu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Pomper, Martin G; McMahon, Michael T

    2016-07-01

    A series of intra-molecular hydrogen bonded imidazoles and related heterocyclic compounds were screened for their N-H chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast properties. Of the compounds, imidazole-4,5-dicarboxamides (I45DCs) were found to provide the strongest contrast, with the contrast produced at a large chemical shift from water (7.8 ppm) and strongly dependent on pH. We have tested several probes based on this scaffold, and demonstrated that these probes could be applied for in vivo detection of kidney pH after intravenous administration. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27071959

  4. The formation of RCCCO and CCC(O)R (R = Me, Ph) neutral radicals from ionic precursors in the gas phase: the rearrangement of CCC(O)Ph.

    PubMed

    Peppe, Salvatore; McAnoy, Andrew M; Dua, Suresh; Bowie, John H

    2004-01-01

    Neutrals MeCCCO, CCC(O)Me, PhCCCO and CCC(O)Ph have been made by neutralisation of [MeCCCO](+), [CCC(O)Me](-), [PhCCCO](+) and [CC(CO)Ph](-). Neutrals MeCCCO, CCC(O)Me and PhCCCO are stable for the microsecond duration of the neutralisation experiment. A joint experimental and theoretical study (energies calculated at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ//B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory) suggests that the neutral radical CCC(O)Ph rearranges via a four-centred ipso radical cyclisation/ring opening to form the isomer PhCCCO in an exothermic reaction. (13)C labelling confirms that the rearrangement does not involve O migration. Some of the PhCCCO radicals formed in this reaction are sufficiently energised to effect decomposition to give PhCC and CO. PMID:15150822

  5. The anharmonic force fields of PH 3, PHF 2, PF 3, PH 5, and H 3PO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breidung, J.; Schneider, W.; Thiel, W.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    1990-04-01

    The cubic and quartic force fields of the title compounds are determined from ab initio SCF calculations using 6-31G ∗∗ and {TZP}/{TZ2P} basis sets. The computed geometries, vibration-rotation interaction constants, l-doubling constants, anharmonicity constants, and vibrational wavenumbers are compared with the available experimental data, especially for PH 3 and PF 3. Many experimentally unknown spectroscopic constants are predicted. A scaling procedure based on calculated harmonic and anharmonic force fields is proposed for predicting the vibrational wavenumbers of unknown molecules such as PH 5.

  6. Covalent organic frameworks as pH responsive signaling scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuwei; Shen, Xiaochen; Feng, Xiao; Xia, Hong; Mu, Ying; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-09-25

    A β-ketoenamine based covalent organic framework, COF-JLU4, was synthesized by condensation of 2,5-dimethoxyterephthalohydrazide with triformylphloroglucinol under solvothermal conditions. This COF has strong crystallinity, good porosity, photoluminescence properties and wettability for water. It can serve as the first COF-based fluorescent pH sensor in aqueous solutions. PMID:27545686

  7. Peer Mentorship and Transformational Learning: PhD Student Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jane P.; Ogenchuk, Marcella J.; Nsiah, Joseph K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to describe our peer mentorship experiences and explain how these experiences fostered transformational learning during our PhD graduate program in educational administration. As a literature backdrop, we discuss characteristics of traditional forms of mentorship and depict how our experiences of peer mentorship was…

  8. A remote query magnetoelastic pH sensor.

    PubMed

    Cai, Q Y; Grimes, C A

    2000-11-15

    A remote query magnetoelastic pH sensor comprised of a magnetoelastic thick-film coated with a mass-changing pH-responsive polymer is described. In response to a magnetic query field the magnetoelastic sensor mechanically vibrates at a characteristic frequency that is inversely dependent upon the mass of the attached polymer layer. As the magnetoelastic sensor is magnetostrictive the mechanical vibrations of the sensor launch magnetic flux that can be detected remotely from the sensor using a pickup coil. The pH responsive copolymer is synthesized from 20 mol% of acrylic acid and 80 mol% of iso-octyl acrylate and then deposited onto a magnetoelastic film by dip-coating. For a 1 micrometer polymer coating upon a 30 micrometer thick Metglas [The Metglas alloys are a registered trademark of Honeywell Corporation. For product information see: http://www.electronicmaterials.com:80/businesses/sem/amorph/page5_1_2.htm.] alloy 2826MB magnetoelastic film between pH 5 and 9 the change in resonant frequency is linear, approximately 285 Hz/pH or 0.6%/pH. The addition of 10 mmol/l of KCl to the test solution decreases the sensitivity of the polymer approximately 4%. PMID:12192686

  9. Carbon Nanotube Chemiresistor for Wireless pH Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Pingping; Kraut, Nadine D.; Feigel, Ian M.; Bai, Hao; Morgan, Gregory J.; Chen, Yanan; Tang, Yifan; Bocan, Kara; Stachel, Joshua; Berger, Lee; Mickle, Marlin; Sejdić, Ervin; Star, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    The ability to accurately measure real-time pH fluctuations in-vivo could be highly advantageous. Early detection and potential prevention of bacteria colonization of surgical implants can be accomplished by monitoring associated acidosis. However, conventional glass membrane or ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET) pH sensing technologies both require a reference electrode which may suffer from leakage of electrolytes and potential contamination. Herein, we describe a solid-state sensor based on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (ox-SWNTs) functionalized with the conductive polymer poly(1-aminoanthracene) (PAA). This device had a Nernstian response over a wide pH range (2-12) and retained sensitivity over 120 days. The sensor was also attached to a passively-powered radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag which transmits pH data through simulated skin. This battery-less, reference electrode free, wirelessly transmitting sensor platform shows potential for biomedical applications as an implantable sensor, adjacent to surgical implants detecting for infection.

  10. Ionic Liquid-Based Fluorescein Colorimetric pH Nanosensors

    PubMed Central

    Das, Susmita; Magut, Paul K. S.; de Rooy, Sergio L.; Hasan, Farhana; Warner, Isiah M.

    2014-01-01

    A novel pH sensitive, colorimetric ionic liquid nanosensor based on phosphonium salts of fluorescein is reported. Herein, fluorescein salts of various stoichiometries were synthesized by use of a trihexyltetradecylphosphonium cation [TTP]+ in combination with dianionic [FL]2− and monoanionic [FL]− fluorescein. Nanomaterials derived from these two compounds yielded contrasting colorimetric responses in neutral and acidic environments. Variations in fluorescence spectra as a function of pH were also observed. Examination of TEM and DLS data revealed significant expansion in the diameter of [TTP]2[FL] nanodroplets in acidic environments of variable pHs. A similar trend was also observed for [TTP][FL] nanoparticles. The pH dependent colorimetric and other optical properties of these nanomaterials are attributed to alterations in molecular orientations and stacking as suggested by measuring the absorption, fluorescence, and zeta potential. Since the pH is an important indicator for many diseases, including cancer, these nanosensors are considered to be potential candidates for biomedical applications. PMID:25264488

  11. Karl Krueger, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Karl Krueger received a PhD in biochemistry from Vanderbilt University and continued his research training at NIH as a postdoctoral fellow before joining the faculty at Georgetown University School of Medicine. His research throughout this period focused on different aspects of drug receptors and their role in the nervous system. |

  12. Richard Mazurchuk, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Richard Mazurchuk received a BS in Physics and MS and PhD in Biophysics from SUNY Buffalo. His research focused on developing novel multi-modality imaging techniques, contrast (enhancing) agents and methods to assess the efficacy of experimental therapeutics. |

  13. Christos Patriotis, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Christos Patriotis obtained his MSc in Biochemistry from the University of Sofia, Bulgaria in 1985 and his PhD in Molecular Biology from the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences in 1990. Postdoctoral training focused on signal transduction and tumor cell biology. |

  14. Vance Berger, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Vance Berger completed his PhD in statistics at Rutgers University in 1995, and then began working at the FDA. This is where he developed his research focus on biases and threats to the validity of medical studies, especially clinical trials. In 1999, Dr. Berger joined the NCI, and has remained ever since. |

  15. Promoting Creativity in PhD Supervision: Tensions and Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitelock, Denise; Faulkner, Dorothy; Miell, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the processes of collaborative creativity are just as important within the sociocultural context of PhD supervisory practice, as they are in other organizational and educational settings. In order to test this claim a series of interviews with supervisors and students were undertaken to uncover the pedagogic processes…

  16. The PhD Project: How Successful Is It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Bill N.; Williams, Satina V.; Walden, W. Darrell

    2011-01-01

    The PhD Project's mission to diversify the work force by increasing the diversity of business school faculty is quite admirable, but is the Project successful? To gather insights toward responding to that question and to offer suggestions, we reviewed three of the Project's objectives that relate most closely to minority doctoral students and…

  17. Recognition of Homeology by the Wheat Ph1 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, M. C.; Dubcovsky, J.; Dvorak, J.

    1996-01-01

    Chromosome 1A(m) of Triticum monococcum is closely homeologous to T. aestivum chromosome 1A but recombines with it little in the presence of the wheat suppressor of homeologous chromosome pairing, Ph1. In the absence of Ph1, the two chromosomes recombine as if they were completely homologous. Chromosomes having either terminal or interstitial segments of chromosome 1A(m) in 1A were constructed and their recombination with 1A was investigated in the presence of Ph1. No recombination was detected in the homeologous (1A(m)/1A) segments, irrespective of whether terminally or interstitially positioned in a chromosome, whereas the levels of recombination in the juxtaposed homologous (1A/1A) segments was normal or close to normal relative to completely homologous 1A chromosomes. These observations show that Ph1 does not regulate chromosome pairing by premeiotic chromosome alignment and a mitotic spindle-centromere interaction, as has been suggested, but processes homology along the entire length of chromosomes. PMID:8913760

  18. DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER AND METALS: EFFECTS OF PH ON PARTITIONING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eighteen Dutch soils were extracted in aqueous solutions at varying pH. Extracts were analyzed for Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn by ICP-AES. Extract dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was fractionated into three operationally defined fractions: hydrophilic acids (Hyd), fulvic acids (FA), an...

  19. Asad Umar, DVM, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Asad Umar received his PhD in Biochemistry and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, in 1993. He conducted his postdoctoral training in the laboratories of Patricia Gearhart in Baltimore, MD and Thomas Kunkel at the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences in Research Triangle Park, NC. Dr. |

  20. [Regulation effects of tourmaline on seawater pH value].

    PubMed

    Xia, Meisheng; Zhang, Hongmei; Hu, Caihong; Xu, Zirong

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy were employed to examine the characteristics of tourmaline produced in east Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, and batch experiments were conducted to study its regulation effects on seawater pH value. The factors affecting the regulation, such as the dosage of tourmaline and the salinity and initial pH value of seawater, were also studied. The results showed that tourmaline could regulate the seawater pH value from its initial 3 and 10 to 7.1 and 8.9, respectively, and the regulation effect was greater in the seawater with lower salinity, e.g., after 120 minutes treatment, the initial pH value (5.0) of the seawater with a salinity of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 35 was increased by 3.24, 3.16, 3.06, 2.99 and 2.85 unit, respectively. Tourmaline had little effect on seawater conductivity. This study would provide an experimental base for the application of tourmaline in aquaculture. PMID:16422525

  1. Improved pH buffering agent for sodium hypochlorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, J. R.; Veeder, L. N.

    1969-01-01

    Sodium citrate/citric acid was found to be an effective buffer for pH control when used with sodium hypochlorite. The mixture does not corrode aluminum. The buffer appears to form a type of conversion coating that may provide corrosion-resistant properties to aluminum in other applications.

  2. Miniaturized metal oxide pH sensors for bacteria detection.

    PubMed

    Uria, Naroa; Abramova, Natalia; Bratov, Andrey; Muñoz-Pascual, Francesc-Xavier; Baldrich, Eva

    2016-01-15

    It is well known that the metabolic activity of some microorganisms results in changes of pH of the culture medium, a phenomenon that can be used for detection and quantification of bacteria. However, conventional glass electrodes that are commonly used for pH measurements are bulky, fragile and expensive, which hinders their application in miniaturized systems and encouraged to the search for alternatives. In this work, two types of metal oxide pH sensors have been tested to detect the metabolic activity of the bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli). These pH sensors were produced on silicon chips with platinum metal contacts, onto which thin layers of IrOx or Ta2O5 were incorporated by two different methods (electrodeposition and e-beam sputtering, respectively). In order to facilitate measurement in small sample volumes, an Ag/AgCl pseudo-reference was also screen-printed in the chip and was assayed in parallel to an external Ag/AgCl reference electrode. As it is shown, the developed sensors generated results indistinguishable from those provided by a conventional glass pH-electrode but could be operated in significantly smaller sample volumes. After optimization of the detection conditions, the metal oxide sensors are successfully applied for detection of increasing concentrations of viable E. coli, with detection of less than 10(3)cfu mL(-1) in undiluted culture medium in just 5h.

  3. Doctoral Differences: Professional Doctorates and PhDs Compared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Ruth

    2005-01-01

    For more than a decade professional doctorates in Australia have continued to grow and diversify across a broadening array of disciplines. An empirical study of "The Doctoral Education Experience" in Australian universities included an examination of doctoral experiences in departments offering both PhD and professional doctorates. This paper…

  4. Structure of human saposin A at lysosomal pH

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Chris H.; Read, Randy J.; Deane, Janet E.

    2015-01-01

    The saposins are essential cofactors for the normal lysosomal degradation of complex glycosphingolipids by acid hydrolase enzymes; defects in either saposin or hydrolase function lead to severe metabolic diseases. Saposin A (SapA) activates the enzyme β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which catalyzes the breakdown of β-d-galactocerebroside, the principal lipid component of myelin. SapA is known to bind lipids and detergents in a pH-dependent manner; this is accompanied by a striking transition from a ‘closed’ to an ‘open’ conformation. However, previous structures were determined at non-lysosomal pH. This work describes a 1.8 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure determined at the physiologically relevant lysosomal pH 4.8. In the absence of lipid or detergent at pH 4.8, SapA is observeed to adopt a conformation closely resembling the previously determined ‘closed’ conformation, showing that pH alone is not sufficient for the transition to the ‘open’ conformation. Structural alignments reveal small conformational changes, highlighting regions of flexibility. PMID:26144235

  5. Legitimate Peripheral Participation and Supervising Ph.D. Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasrati, Mostafa

    2005-01-01

    This article is part of a larger scale project on some aspects of the process of academic socialization of a group of Iranian Ph.D. students studying in five UK universities, particularly focusing on the relationship between these students and their supervisors. The study included eight engineering and five social sciences/humanities students, as…

  6. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2007-05-01

    As in many sciences, the production rate of new Ph.D. astronomers is decoupled from the global demand for trained scientists. As noted by Thronson (1991, PASP, 103, 90), overproduction appears to be built into the system, making the mathematical formulation of surplus astronomer production similar to that for industrial pollution models -- an unintended side effect of the process. Following Harris (1994, ASP Conf., 57, 12), I document the production of Ph.D. astronomers from 1990 to 2005 using the online Dissertation Abstracts database. To monitor the changing patterns of employment, I examine the number of postdoctoral, tenure-track, and other jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register during this same period. Although the current situation is clearly unsustainable, it was much worse a decade ago with nearly 7 new Ph.D. astronomers in 1995 for every new tenure-track job. While the number of new permanent positions steadily increased throughout the late 1990's, the number of new Ph.D. recipients gradually declined. After the turn of the century, the production of new astronomers leveled off, but new postdoctoral positions grew dramatically. There has also been recent growth in the number of non-tenure-track lecturer, research, and support positions. This is just one example of a larger cultural shift to temporary employment that is happening throughout society -- it is not unique to astronomy.

  7. Measures for Ph.D. Evaluation: The Recruitment Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Agostino, Antonella; Fruzzetti, Stefania; Ghellini, Giulio; Neri, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In the last years the quality of Higher Education (HE) system and its evaluation have been key issues of the political and scientific debate on education policies all over Europe. In the wide landscape that involves the entire HE system we draw attention on the third level of its organization, i.e. the Ph.D. In particular, this paper discusses the…

  8. Online Ph.D. Program Delivery Models and Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorissen, Shari L.; Keen, James P.; Riedel, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide information to an online university that offers Ph.D. programs in three formats: knowledge area modules (or KAM, a type of faculty-led, self-directed doctoral study), course-based model, and mixed model (a combination of the KAM and course-based models). The investigators sought to determine why students…

  9. [Regulation effects of tourmaline on seawater pH value].

    PubMed

    Xia, Meisheng; Zhang, Hongmei; Hu, Caihong; Xu, Zirong

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy were employed to examine the characteristics of tourmaline produced in east Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, and batch experiments were conducted to study its regulation effects on seawater pH value. The factors affecting the regulation, such as the dosage of tourmaline and the salinity and initial pH value of seawater, were also studied. The results showed that tourmaline could regulate the seawater pH value from its initial 3 and 10 to 7.1 and 8.9, respectively, and the regulation effect was greater in the seawater with lower salinity, e.g., after 120 minutes treatment, the initial pH value (5.0) of the seawater with a salinity of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 35 was increased by 3.24, 3.16, 3.06, 2.99 and 2.85 unit, respectively. Tourmaline had little effect on seawater conductivity. This study would provide an experimental base for the application of tourmaline in aquaculture.

  10. An Analysis of Ph.D. Examiners' Reports in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Elena; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing calls for an overall transformation of the nature of engineering Ph.D. programs and the way theses are assessed. There exists a need to understand the examination process to ensure the best quality outcome for candidates in engineering. The work we present in this paper uses data collected between 2003…

  11. PhDs by Publications: An "Easy Way Out"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niven, Penelope; Grant, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    PhDs by publications are a relatively new model for doctoral research, especially in the context of the Humanities or Education. This paper describes two writers' experiences of conducting doctoral studies in this genre and in these faculties. Each discover alternative ways of employing a body of published research papers in development of an…

  12. Troubling Talk: Assembling the PhD Candidate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mewburn, I.

    2011-01-01

    When PhD students complain it is assumed there are problems and that troubles talk is evidence of a "sick" research candidature or culture. This paper argues that such a one-dimensional reading fails to attend closely to the academic identity work that is done when students talk together. Identity work has become a useful way of thinking about the…

  13. The role of pH fronts in reversible electroporation.

    PubMed

    Turjanski, Pablo; Olaiz, Nahuel; Maglietti, Felipe; Michinski, Sebastian; Suárez, Cecilia; Molina, Fernando Victor; Marshall, Guillermo

    2011-04-29

    We present experimental measurements and theoretical predictions of ion transport in agar gels during reversible electroporation (ECT) for conditions typical to many clinical studies found in the literature, revealing the presence of pH fronts emerging from both electrodes. These results suggest that pH fronts are immediate and substantial. Since they might give rise to tissue necrosis, an unwanted condition in clinical applications of ECT as well as in irreversible electroporation (IRE) and in electrogenetherapy (EGT), it is important to quantify their extent and evolution. Here, a tracking technique is used to follow the space-time evolution of these pH fronts. It is found that they scale in time as t(½), characteristic of a predominantly diffusive process. Comparing ECT pH fronts with those arising in electrotherapy (EChT), another treatment applying constant electric fields whose main goal is tissue necrosis, a striking result is observed: anodic acidification is larger in ECT than in EChT, suggesting that tissue necrosis could also be greater. Ways to minimize these adverse effects in ECT are suggested.

  14. The Role of pH Fronts in Reversible Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Pablo; Olaiz, Nahuel; Maglietti, Felipe; Michinski, Sebastian; Suárez, Cecilia; Molina, Fernando Victor; Marshall, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    We present experimental measurements and theoretical predictions of ion transport in agar gels during reversible electroporation (ECT) for conditions typical to many clinical studies found in the literature, revealing the presence of pH fronts emerging from both electrodes. These results suggest that pH fronts are immediate and substantial. Since they might give rise to tissue necrosis, an unwanted condition in clinical applications of ECT as well as in irreversible electroporation (IRE) and in electrogenetherapy (EGT), it is important to quantify their extent and evolution. Here, a tracking technique is used to follow the space-time evolution of these pH fronts. It is found that they scale in time as , characteristic of a predominantly diffusive process. Comparing ECT pH fronts with those arising in electrotherapy (EChT), another treatment applying constant electric fields whose main goal is tissue necrosis, a striking result is observed: anodic acidification is larger in ECT than in EChT, suggesting that tissue necrosis could also be greater. Ways to minimize these adverse effects in ECT are suggested. PMID:21559079

  15. Application of SERS Nanoparticles for Intracellular pH Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T; Talley, C; Colvin, M; Huser, T

    2004-10-21

    We present an alternative approach to optical probes that will ultimately allow us to measure chemical concentrations in microenvironments within cells and tissues. This approach is based on monitoring the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response of functionalized metal nanoparticles (50-100 nm in diameter). SERS allows for the sensitive detection of changes in the state of chemical groups attached to individual nanoparticles and small clusters. Here, we present the development of a nanoscale pH meter. The pH response of these nanoprobes is tested in a cell-free medium, measuring the pH of the solution immediately surrounding the nanoparticles. Heterogeneities in the SERS signal, which can result from the formation of small nanoparticle clusters, are characterized using SERS correlation spectroscopy and single particle/cluster SERS spectroscopy. The response of the nanoscale pH meters is tested under a wide range of conditions to approach the complex environment encountered inside living cells and to optimize probe performance.

  16. Consistency and Inconsistency in PhD Thesis Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid; Lovat, Terry; Fairbairn, Hedy

    2008-01-01

    This is a mixed methods investigation of consistency in PhD examination. At its core is the quantification of the content and conceptual analysis of examiner reports for 804 Australian theses. First, the level of consistency between what examiners say in their reports and the recommendation they provide for a thesis is explored, followed by an…

  17. Preferential intracellular pH regulation: hypotheses and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Shartau, Ryan B; Baker, Daniel W; Crossley, Dane A; Brauner, Colin J

    2016-08-01

    The regulation of vertebrate acid-base balance during acute episodes of elevated internal PCO2  is typically characterized by extracellular pH (pHe) regulation. Changes in pHe are associated with qualitatively similar changes in intracellular tissue pH (pHi) as the two are typically coupled, referred to as 'coupled pH regulation'. However, not all vertebrates rely on coupled pH regulation; instead, some preferentially regulate pHi against severe and maintained reductions in pHe Preferential pHi regulation has been identified in several adult fish species and an aquatic amphibian, but never in adult amniotes. Recently, common snapping turtles were observed to preferentially regulate pHi during development; the pattern of acid-base regulation in these species shifts from preferential pHi regulation in embryos to coupled pH regulation in adults. In this Commentary, we discuss the hypothesis that preferential pHi regulation may be a general strategy employed by vertebrate embryos in order to maintain acid-base homeostasis during severe acute acid-base disturbances. In adult vertebrates, the retention or loss of preferential pHi regulation may depend on selection pressures associated with the environment inhabited and/or the severity of acid-base regulatory challenges to which they are exposed. We also consider the idea that the retention of preferential pHi regulation into adulthood may have been a key event in vertebrate evolution, with implications for the invasion of freshwater habitats, the evolution of air breathing and the transition of vertebrates from water to land. PMID:27489212

  18. Regulation of Vacuolar pH in Citrus limon

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln Taiz

    2005-06-22

    The primary objective of this grant was to characterize the vacuolar V-ATPase of lemon fruits. Lemon fruit vacuoles have an internal pH of about 2.5. Since a typical plant vacuole has a luminal pH of around 5.5, the lemon fruit V-APTase must have special properties which allow it to acidify the lumen to such a low pH: (1) it might have a different structure; (2) it might have a different H{sup +}/ATP stoichiometry; and (3) it might be regulated differently. During the course of the investigations (which began in 1996) they characterized these aspects of the V-ATPases of both lemon fruits and lime fruits. They examined lime fruits because of the availability of both acidic limes with a low vacuolar pH and sweet limes, which have a much higher vacuolar pH. The existence of two types of lime fruits allowed a comparison of the V-ATPases of the two varieties. In this report they are including two publications from 1996 and 1997 as background for the later publications. A review article with Heven Sze on V-ATPase nomenclature was also generated during the funding period. In addition to the studies on citrus fruit vacuoles, they also initiated studies in two new areas: polar auxin transport and the regulation of stomatal opening by UV-B irradiation. These studies were intended to serve as a basis of future separate grants, but the proposals they submitted on these topics were not funded.

  19. Paternal Uniparental Disomy 11p15.5 in the Pancreatic Nodule of an Infant With Costello Syndrome: Shared Mechanism for Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia in Neonates With Costello and Beckwith–Wiedemann Syndrome and Somatic Loss of Heterozygosity in Costello Syndrome Driving Clonal Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Gripp, Karen W.; Robbins, Katherine M.; Sheffield, Brandon S.; Lee, Anna F.; Patel, Millan S.; Yip, Stephen; Doyle, Daniel; Stabley, Deborah; Sol-Church, Katia

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) entails a cancer predisposition and is caused by activating HRAS mutations, typically arising de novo in the paternal germline. Hypoglycemia is common in CS neonates. A previously reported individual with the rare HRAS p.Gln22Lys had hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Autopsy showed a discrete pancreatic nodule. The morphologic and immunohistochemistry findings, including loss of p57Kip2 protein, were identical to a focal lesion of congenital hyperinsulinism, however, no KCNJ11 or ABCC8 mutation was identified and germline derived DNA showed no alternation of the maternal or paternal 11p15 alleles. Here we report paternal uniparental disomy (pUPD) within the lesion, similar to the pUPD11p15.5 in Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). The similar extent of the pUPD suggests a similar mechanism driving hyperinsulinemia in both conditions. After coincidental somatic LOH and pUPD, the growth promoting effects of the paternally derived HRAS mutation, in combination with the increased function of the adjacent paternally expressed IGF2, may together result in clonal expansion. Although this somatic LOH within pancreatic tissue resulted in hyperinsulinism, similar LOH in mesenchymal cells may drive embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). Interestingly, biallelic IGF2 expression has been linked to rhabdomyosarcoma tumorigenesis and pUPD11 occurred in all 8 ERMS samples from CS individuals. Somatic KRAS and HRAS mutations occur with comparable frequency in isolated malignancies. Yet, the malignancy risk in CS is notably higher than in Noonan syndrome with a KRAS mutation. It is conceivable that HRAS co-localization with IGF2 and the combined effect of pUPD 11p15.5 on both genes contributes to the oncogenic potential. PMID:26572961

  20. Pork Quality Traits According to Postmortem pH and Temperature in Berkshire.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Wan; Kim, Chul Wook; Yang, Mi Ra; No, Gun Ryoung; Kim, Sam Woong; Kim, Il-Suk

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the role of pH and temperature postmortem, and to demonstrate the importance of these factors in determining meat quality. Postmortem pH 45min (pH at 45 min postmortem or initial pH) via analysis of Pearson's correlation showed high positive correlation with pH change pH c24 (pH change from pH 45min to pH 24h postmortem). However, postmortem pH after 24 h (pH 24h or ultimate pH) had a high negative correlation with pH change, pH c24 , CIE L*, and protein content. Initial temperature postmortem (T 1h ) was positively associated with a change in temperature from 45 min to 24 h postmortem (T c24 ) and cooking loss, but negatively correlated with water holding capacity. Temperature at 24 h postmortem (T 24h ) was negatively associated with T c24 . Collectively, these results indicate that higher initial pH was associated with higher pH c24 , T 1h , and T c24 . However, higher initial pH was associated with a reduction in carcass weight, backfat thickness, CIE a* and b*, water holding capacity, collagen and fat content, drip loss, and cooking loss as well as decreased shear force. In contrast, CIE a* and b*, drip loss, cooking loss, and shear force in higher ultimate pH was showed by a similar pattern to higher initial pH, whereas pH c24 , carcass weight, backfat thickness, water holding capacity, fat content, moisture content, protein content, T 1h , T 24h , and T c24 were exhibited by completely differential patterns (p<0.05). Therefore, we suggest that initial pH, ultimate pH, and temperatures postmortem are important factors in determining the meat quality of pork. PMID:27499661

  1. Impact of a Glycolic Acid-Containing pH 4 Water-in-Oil Emulsion on Skin pH.

    PubMed

    Behm, Barbara; Kemper, Michael; Babilas, Philipp; Abels, Christoph; Schreml, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The skin pH is crucial for physiological skin functions. A decline in stratum corneum acidity, as observed in aged or diseased skin, may negatively affect physiological skin functions. Therefore, glycolic acid-containing water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions adjusted to pH 4 were investigated regarding their effect on normal or increased skin pH. A pH 4 W/O emulsion was applied on three areas with pathologically increased skin surface pH in diabetics (n = 10). Further, a 28-day half-side trial (n = 30) was performed to test the long-term efficacy and safety of a pH 4 W/O emulsion (n = 30). In summary, the application of a pH 4 W/O emulsion reduced the skin pH in healthy, elderly and diabetic subjects, which may improve epidermal barrier functions.

  2. The PhEDEx next-gen website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, R.; Huang, C.-H.; Rossman, P.; Sundarrajan, P.; Wildish, T.

    2012-12-01

    PhEDEx is the data-transfer management solution written by CMS. It consists of agents running at each site, a website for presentation of information, and a web-based data-service for scripted access to information. The website allows users to monitor the progress of data-transfers, the status of site agents and links between sites, and the overall status and behaviour of everything about PhEDEx. It also allows users to make and approve requests for data-transfers and for deletion of data. It is the main point-of-entry for all users wishing to interact with PhEDEx. For several years, the website has consisted of a single perl program with about 10K SLOC. This program has limited capabilities for exploring the data, with only coarse filtering capabilities and no context-sensitive awareness. Graphical information is presented as static images, generated on the server, with no interactivity. It is also not well connected to the rest of the PhEDEx codebase, since much of it was written before the data-service was developed. All this makes it hard to maintain and extend. We are re-implementing the website to address these issues. The UI is being rewritten in Javascript, replacing most of the server-side code. We are using the YUI toolkit to provide advanced features and context-sensitive interaction, and will adopt a Javascript charting library for generating graphical representations client-side. This relieves the server of much of its load, and automatically improves server-side security. The Javascript components can be re-used in many ways, allowing custom pages to be developed for specific uses. In particular, standalone test-cases using small numbers of components make it easier to debug the Javascript than it is to debug a large server program. Information about PhEDEx is accessed through the PhEDEx data-service, since direct SQL is not available from the clients’ browser. This provides consistent semantics with other, externally written monitoring tools, which

  3. Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains Sustainable Catholyte pH and Improves Anolyte pH, Alkalinity, and Conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioelectrochemical system (BES) pH imbalances develop due to anodic proton-generating oxidation reactions and cathodic hydroxide-ion-generating reduction reactions. Until now, workers added unsustainable buffers to reduce the pH difference between the anode and cathode because the pH imbalance cont...

  4. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  8. From Rumors to Facts: Career Outcomes of English PhDs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerad, Maresi; Cerny, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Studies career paths of doctorates, examining the actual employment patterns of English PhDs 10 years after finishing their degrees. Discusses the many career paths of this cohort of English PhDs; characteristics of respondents; career paths within and outside of academe; satisfaction with current employment and value of the PhD; advice from PhDs;…

  9. 27 CFR 19.386 - Adjusting pH of denatured spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adjusting pH of denatured... of Articles Rules for Denaturing Spirits and Testing Denaturants § 19.386 Adjusting pH of denatured... neutralize the pH of denatured spirits. However, a proprietor may not adjust the pH with any substance...

  10. 27 CFR 19.386 - Adjusting pH of denatured spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adjusting pH of denatured... of Articles Rules for Denaturing Spirits and Testing Denaturants § 19.386 Adjusting pH of denatured... neutralize the pH of denatured spirits. However, a proprietor may not adjust the pH with any substance...

  11. 27 CFR 19.386 - Adjusting pH of denatured spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adjusting pH of denatured... of Articles Rules for Denaturing Spirits and Testing Denaturants § 19.386 Adjusting pH of denatured... neutralize the pH of denatured spirits. However, a proprietor may not adjust the pH with any substance...

  12. 27 CFR 19.386 - Adjusting pH of denatured spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjusting pH of denatured... of Articles Rules for Denaturing Spirits and Testing Denaturants § 19.386 Adjusting pH of denatured... neutralize the pH of denatured spirits. However, a proprietor may not adjust the pH with any substance...

  13. Morphosynthesis of alanine mesocrystals by pH control.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yurong; Cölfen, Helmut; Antonietti, Markus

    2006-06-01

    Crystallization of DL-alanine is studied as a single polymorph model case to analyze the different modes of crystallization of polar organic molecules in absence of any structure directing additives. Depending on supersaturation, which is controlled either by temperature or by pH, and in the absence of additives, crystallization by mesoscale assembly of nanoparticles is found over a wide range of conditions, leading to so-called mesocrystals. This supplements the classical molecule-based crystallization mechanism, which is identified at lower supersaturations and at pH values away from the isoelectric point (IEP). The resulting alanine crystals are characterized by SEM, XRD, and single-crystal analysis. Time-resolved conductivity measurements and dynamic light scattering of the reaction solutions reveal information about precursor structures and reaction kinetics. A formation mechanism is proposed for the alanine mesocrystals. PMID:16771332

  14. Biochar contribution to soil pH buffer capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonutare, Tonu; Krebstein, Kadri; Utso, Maarius; Rodima, Ako; Kolli, Raimo; Shanskiy, Merrit

    2014-05-01

    Biochar as ecologically clean and stable form of carbon has complex of physical and chemical properties which make it a potentially powerful soil amendment (Mutezo, 2013). Therefore during the last decade the biochar application as soil amendment has been a matter for a great number of investigations. For the ecological viewpoint the trend of decreasing of soil organic matter in European agricultural land is a major problem. Society is faced with the task to find possibilities to stabilize or increase soil organic matter content in soil and quality. The availability of different functional groups (e.g. carboxylic, phenolic, acidic, alcoholic, amine, amide) allows soil organic matter to buffer over a wide range of soil pH values (Krull et al. 2004). Therefore the loss of soil organic matter also reduces cation exchange capacity resulting in lower nutrient retention (Kimetu et al. 2008). Biochar can retain elements in soil directly through the negative charge that develops on its surfaces, and this negative charge can buffer acidity in the soil. There are lack of investigations about the effect of biochar to soil pH buffering properties, The aim of our investigation was to investigate the changes in soil pH buffer capacity in a result of addition of carbonizated material to temperate region soils. In the experiment different kind of softwood biochars, activated carbon and different soil types with various organic matter and pH were used. The study soils were Albeluvisols, Leptosols, Cambisols, Regosols and Histosols . In the experiment the series of the soil: biochar mixtures with the biochar content 0 to 100% were used. The times of equiliberation between solid and liquid phase were from 1 to 168 hours. The suspension of soil: biochar mixtures was titrated with HCl solution. The titration curves were established and pH buffer capacities were calculated for the pH interval from 3.0 to 10.0. The results demonstrate the dependence of pH buffer capacity from soil type

  15. Reconstructing Ocean pH with Boron Isotopes in Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Gavin L.; Rae, James W. B.

    2016-06-01

    In order to better understand the effect of CO2 on the Earth system in the future, geologists may look to CO2-induced environmental change in Earth's past. Here we describe how CO2 can be reconstructed using the boron isotopic composition (δ11B) of marine calcium carbonate. We review the chemical principles that underlie the proxy, summarize the available calibration data, and detail how boron isotopes can be used to estimate ocean pH and ultimately atmospheric CO2 in the past. δ11B in a variety of marine carbonates shows a coherent relationship with seawater pH, in broad agreement with simple models for this proxy. Offsets between measured and predicted δ11B may in part be explained by physiological influences, though the exact mechanisms of boron incorporation into carbonate remain unknown. Despite these uncertainties, we demonstrate that δ11B may provide crucial constraints on past ocean acidification and atmospheric CO2.

  16. Hot Ductility of the 17-4 PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Lara, V.; Guerra Fuentes, L.; Covarrubias Alvarado, O.; Salinas Rodriguez, A.; Garcia Sanchez, E.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms of loss of hot ductility and the mechanical behavior of 17-4 PH alloys were investigated using hot tensile testing at temperatures between 700 and 1100 °C and strain rates of 10-4, 10-2, and 10-1 s-1. Scanning electron microscopy was used in conjunction with the results of the tensile tests to find the temperature region of loss of ductility and correlate it with cracking observed during processing by hot upsetting prior to ring rolling. It is reported that 17-4 PH alloys lose ductility in a temperature range around 900 °C near to the duplex austenite + ferrite phase field. Furthermore, it is found that niobium carbides precipitated at austenite/ferrite interfaces and grain boundaries have a pronounced effect on the mechanical behavior of the alloy during high-temperature deformation.

  17. SAMPLING DEVICE FOR pH MEASUREMENT IN PROCESS STREAMS

    DOEpatents

    Michelson, C.E.; Carson, W.N. Jr.

    1958-11-01

    A pH cell is presented for monitoring the hydrogen ion concentration of a fluid in a process stream. The cell is made of glass with a side entry arm just above a reservoir in which the ends of a glass electrode and a reference electrode are situated. The glass electrode contains the usual internal solution which is connected to a lead. The reference electrode is formed of saturated calomel having a salt bridge in its bottom portion fabricated of a porous glass to insure low electrolyte flow. A flush tube leads into the cell through which buffer and flush solutions are introduced. A ground wire twists about both electrode ends to insure constant electrical grounding of the sample. The electrode leads are electrically connected to a pH meter of aay standard type.

  18. Flexible high-temperature pH probe

    DOEpatents

    Bielawski, John C.; Outwater, John O.; Halbfinger, George P.

    2003-04-22

    A flexible pH probe device is provided for use in hot water and other high temperature environments up to about 590.degree. F. The pH probe includes a flexible, inert tubular probe member, an oxygen anion conducting, solid state electrolyte plug located at the distal end of the tubular member, oxide powder disposed at the distal end of the tubular member; a metal wire extending along the tubular member and having a distal end in contact with the oxide powder so as to form therewith an internal reference electrode; and a compression fitting forming a pressure boundary seal around a portion of the tubular member remote from the distal end thereof. Preferably, the tubular member is made of polytetrafluoroethylene, and the solid state electrolyte plug is made of stabilized zirconia. The flexibility of the probe member enables placement of the electrode into the area of interest, including around corners, into confined areas and the like.

  19. Factors affecting intra-oral pH - a review.

    PubMed

    Loke, C; Lee, J; Sander, S; Mei, L; Farella, M

    2016-10-01

    One of the greatest challenges to modern dentistry is the progressive destruction of tooth material due to chemical erosion. Dental erosion is the loss of dental hard tissue, without the action of bacteria, in which demineralisation of enamel and dentine results due to a decrease in intra-oral pH. The aim of this review was to appraise the scientific literature on the factors that can affect intra-oral pH. The review will examine (i) the protective role of human saliva, in terms of its mineral composition, flow rates and buffering systems and (ii) sources of in-mouth acids such as extrinsic acids, which are derived from the diet and environment, as well as intrinsic acids, which are related to disorders of the gastro-oesophageal tract. This review may assist clinicians to identify the risk factors for tooth wear and to recommend adequate preventive measures to patients. PMID:27573678

  20. Iranian PhD student wins human-rights prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Jon

    2013-11-01

    A physicist imprisoned in Iran while on a break from his PhD studies in the US has been awarded a human-rights prize. Omid Kokabee, who had been based at the University of Texas in Austin, has been given the Andrei Sakharov Prize from the American Physical Society (APS) for "his courage in refusing to use his physics knowledge to work on projects that he deemed harmful to humanity, in the face of extreme physical and psychological pressure".

  1. Young Kim, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Young S Kim, PhD, joined the Division of Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute in 1998 as a Program Director who oversees and monitors NCI grants in the area of Nutrition and Cancer. She serves as an expert in nutrition, molecular biology, and genomics as they relate to cancer prevention. Dr. Kim assists with research initiatives that will advance nutritional science and lead to human health benefits. |

  2. Urinary pH, cigarette smoking and bladder cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Alguacil, Juan; Kogevinas, Manolis; Silverman, Debra T.; Malats, Núria; Real, Francisco X.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Tardón, Adonina; Rivas, Manuel; Torà, Montserrat; García-Closas, Reina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Fortuny, Joan; Samanic, Claudine; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    Glucuronide conjugates of 4-aminobiphenyl and its N-hydroxy metabolite can be rapidly hydrolyzed in acidic urine to undergo further metabolic activation and form DNA adducts in the urothelium. We conducted a large multicenter case–control study in Spain to explore the etiology of bladder cancer and evaluated the association between urine pH and bladder cancer risk, alone and in combination with cigarette smoking. In total, 712 incident urothelial cell carcinoma cases and 611 hospital controls directly measured their urine pH with dipsticks twice a day (first void in the morning and early in the evening) during four consecutive days 2 weeks after hospital discharge. We found that a consistently acidic urine pH ≤6.0 was associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer [odds ratio (OR) = 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2–1.9] compared with all other subjects. Furthermore, risk estimates for smoking intensity and risk of bladder cancer among current smokers tended to be higher for those with a consistently acidic urine (OR = 8.8, 11.5 and 23.8) compared with those without (OR = 4.3, 7.7 and 5.8, respectively, for 1–19, 20–29 and 30+ cigarettes per day; Pinteraction for 30+ cigarettes per day = 0.024). These results suggest that urine pH, which is determined primarily by diet and body surface area, may be an important modifier of smoking and risk of bladder cancer. PMID:21402590

  3. Vernon Steele, PhD, MPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Vernon Steele is a Program Director and Group Leader for the Chemoprevention Agent Development Research Group in the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention. He earned his MS and PhD degrees in Radiation Biology at the University of Rochester in 1975 studying radiation effects on cell differentiation. He recently received his Masters of Public Health degree from Johns Hopkins University focusing on environmental toxicology. |

  4. Hala Azzam, PhD, MPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Hala Azzam is a Cancer Epidemiologist in the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) in the Division of Cancer Prevention within the National Cancer Institute. She received her Bachelor's degree in molecular biology from Kings College London University, her PhD in anatomy and cell biology from Georgetown University Lombardi Cancer Center, and her MPH in epidemiology from Johns Hopkins University. She is also a CPFP alumna. |

  5. Testing the pH of Soft Drinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christmann, Edwin P.; Holy, Adam J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how to use a TI-73/83/84 graphing calculator and Vernier's LabPro/CBL2 probe system to take pH readings. This is not an endorsement of these products, but simply the authors' attempt to give readers an idea of what is involved in using this technology in the classroom. This activity can be accomplished using a…

  6. Application of CGEAN's Research Priorities: PhD, DNP Scholarship.

    PubMed

    Warshawsky, Nora E; Scott, Elaine S; Murphy, Lyn Stankiewicz

    2016-05-01

    The Accountable Care Act of 2010 is stimulating rapid transformations of healthcare systems. The shift from a focus on providing healthcare in a closed system to improving the health of communities demands rapid innovation by nurse leaders. Nurse leaders prepared at the doctorate of nursing practice level and PhD-prepared nursing health services researchers are needed to develop and evaluate best practices as they emerge. This column expands on the findings from CGEAN's Delphi study. PMID:27093178

  7. [Definition of a normal tracing in pH monitoring].

    PubMed

    Mattioli, S; Felice, V; Pilotti, V; Bacchi, M L; Di Simone, M P; Pàstina, M; Gozzetti, G

    1991-04-15

    The adoption of specific criteria for the reading of tracings, together with a comparison of the results obtained during the course of patient tests with the thresholds of normality calculated in groups of healthy volunteers, are required to determine the normality or abnormality of pH monitoring. From such comparisons performed among groups of healthy volunteers, selected especially on the basis of age or nationality, it was found that age bears no significant influence in calculating the parameters pertinent to pH monitoring. On the other hand, different dietary and life habits could be responsible for a few, albeit limited, discrepancies, such as, for instance, the number of recorded occurrences of gastro-esophageal acid reflux. Use of esophago-gastric pH monitoring, which makes it possible to identify both acid and non-acid gastro-esophageal reflux (mixed and alkaline), authorizes the diagnosis of that limited number of patients in whom this latter component of reflux only exceeds normal limits (3.3%) and an improved definition of the clinical picture in a larger share of patients (20%). Use of different statistical methods to calculate the thresholds of normalcy does not substantially improve the sensitivity of the examination, changing the thresholds by a few tenths of a unit and the fact that the examination is slightly over, or slightly under, the threshold being of ineffectual clinical significance. The study of the correlation between symptoms and pH monitoring events seems a valid interpretative criterion of these tests and capable of improving the diagnostic efficiency of the examination (0.88) when combined with mathematical evaluation.

  8. Wetland treatment at extremes of pH: a review.

    PubMed

    Mayes, W M; Batty, L C; Younger, P L; Jarvis, A P; Kõiv, M; Vohla, C; Mander, U

    2009-06-15

    Constructed wetlands are an established treatment technology for a diverse range of polluted effluents. There is a long history of using wetlands as a unit process in treating acid mine drainage, while recent research has highlighted the potential for wetlands to buffer highly alkaline (pH>12) drainage. This paper reviews recent evidence on this topic, looking at wetlands treating acidic mine drainage, and highly alkaline leachates associated with drainage from lime-rich industrial by-products or where such residues are used as filter media in constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment. The limiting factors to the success of wetlands treating highly acidic waters are discussed with regard to design practice for the emerging application of wetlands to treat highly alkaline industrial discharges. While empirically derived guidelines (with area-adjusted contaminant removal rates typically quoted at 10 g Fe m(2)/day for influent waters pH>5.5; and 3.5-7 g acidity/m(2)/day for pH>4 to <5.5) for informing sizing of mine drainage treatment wetlands have generally been proved robust (probably due to conservatism), such data exhibit large variability within and between sites. Key areas highlighted for future research efforts include: (1) wider collation of mine drainage wetland performance data in regionalised datasets to improve empirically-derived design guidelines and (2) obtaining an improved understanding of nature of the extremophile microbial communities, microbially-mediated pollutant attenuation and rhizospheral processes in wetlands at extremes of pH. An enhanced knowledge of these (through multi-scale laboratory and field studies), will inform engineering design of treatment wetlands and assist in the move from the empirically-derived conservative sizing estimates that currently prevail to process-based optimal design guidance that could reduce costs and enhance the performance and longevity of wetlands for treating acidic and highly alkaline drainage waters

  9. Lynn Sorbara, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Lynn Sorbara earned her PhD from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 1986. Her thesis research was in the areas of the mechanism of action of the drug, Taxol, and of multidrug resistance. After postdoctoral fellowships at the Rockefeller University and the Mount Sinai College of Medicine in Manhattan, she came to the NIH as a Senior Staff Fellow in the Diabetes Branch of NIDDK. |

  10. Extracellular pH regulates excitability of vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Cichy, Annika; Ackels, Tobias; Tsitoura, Chryssanthi; Kahan, Anat; Gronloh, Nina; Söchtig, Melanie; Engelhardt, Corinna H; Ben-Shaul, Yoram; Müller, Frank; Spehr, Jennifer; Spehr, Marc

    2015-03-01

    The mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO) plays a critical role in semiochemical detection and social communication. Vomeronasal stimuli are typically secreted in various body fluids. Following direct contact with urine deposits or other secretions, a peristaltic vascular pump mediates fluid entry into the recipient's VNO. Therefore, while vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) sample various stimulatory semiochemicals dissolved in the intraluminal mucus, they might also be affected by the general physicochemical properties of the "solvent." Here, we report cycle stage-correlated variations in urinary pH among female mice. Estrus-specific pH decline is observed exclusively in urine samples from sexually experienced females. Moreover, patch-clamp recordings in acute VNO slices reveal that mouse VSNs reliably detect extracellular acidosis. Acid-evoked responses share the biophysical and pharmacological hallmarks of the hyperpolarization-activated current Ih. Mechanistically, VSN acid sensitivity depends on a pH-induced shift in the voltage-dependence of Ih activation that causes the opening of HCN channels at rest, thereby increasing VSN excitability. Together, our results identify extracellular acidification as a potent activator of vomeronasal Ih and suggest HCN channel-dependent vomeronasal gain control of social chemosignaling. Our data thus reveal a potential mechanistic basis for stimulus pH detection in rodent chemosensory communication. PMID:25740530

  11. Advanced Biotelemetry Systems for Space Life Sciences: PH Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, John W.; Somps, Chris; Ricks, Robert; Kim, Lynn; Connolly, John P. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The SENSORS 2000! (S2K!) program at NASA's Ames Research Center is currently developing a biotelemetry system for monitoring pH and temperature in unrestrained subjects. This activity is part of a broader scope effort to provide an Advanced Biotelemetry System (ABTS) for use in future space life sciences research. Many anticipated research endeavors will require biomedical and biochemical sensors and related instrumentation to make continuous inflight measurements in a variable-gravity environment. Since crew time is limited, automated data acquisition, data processing, data storage, and subject health monitoring are required. An automated biochemical and physiological data acquisition system based on non invasive or implantable biotelemetry technology will meet these requirements. The ABTS will ultimately acquire a variety of physiological measurands including temperature, biopotentials (e.g. ECG, EEG, EMG, EOG), blood pressure, flow and dimensions, as well as chemical and biological parameters including pH. Development activities are planned in evolutionary, leveraged steps. Near-term activities include 1) development of a dual channel pH/temperature telemetry system, and 2) development of a low bandwidth, 4-channel telemetry system, that measures temperature, heart rate, pressure, and pH. This abstract describes the pH/temperature telemeter.

  12. Modeling pH variation in reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Nir, Oded; Bishop, Noga Fridman; Lahav, Ori; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2015-12-15

    The transport of hydronium and hydroxide ions through reverse osmosis membranes constitutes a unique case of ionic species characterized by uncommonly high permeabilities. Combined with electromigration, this leads to complex behavior of permeate pH, e.g., negative rejection, as often observed for monovalent ions in nanofiltration of salt mixtures. In this work we employed a rigorous phenomenological approach combined with chemical equilibrium to describe the trans-membrane transport of hydronium and hydroxide ions along with salt transport and calculate the resulting permeate pH. Starting from the Nernst-Planck equation, a full non-linear transport equation was derived, for which an approximate solution was proposed based on the analytical solution previously developed for trace ions in a dominant salt. Using the developed approximate equation, transport coefficients were deduced from experimental results obtained using a spiral wound reverse osmosis module operated under varying permeate flux (2-11 μm/s), NaCl feed concentrations (0.04-0.18 M) and feed pH values (5.5-9.0). The approximate equation agreed well with the experimental results, corroborating the finding that diffusion and electromigration, rather than a priori neglected convection, were the major contributors to the transport of hydronium and hydroxide. The approach presented here has the potential to improve the predictive capacity of reverse osmosis transport models for acid-base species, thereby improving process design/control.

  13. No nitrification in lakes below pH 3.

    PubMed

    Jeschke, Christina; Falagán, Carmen; Knöller, Kay; Schultze, Martin; Koschorreck, Matthias

    2013-12-17

    Lakes affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) or acid rain often contain elevated concentrations of ammonium, which threatens water quality. It is commonly assumed that this is due to the inhibition of microbial nitrification in acidic water, but nitrification was never directly measured in mine pit lakes. For the first time, we measured nitrification by (15)NH4Cl isotope tracer addition in acidic as well as neutral mine pit lakes in Spain and Germany. Nitrification activity was only detected in neutral lakes. In acidic lakes no conversion of (15)NH4(+) to (15)NO3(-) was observed. This was true both for the water column as well as for biofilms on the surface of macrophytes or dead wood and the oxic surface layer of the sediment. Stable isotope analysis of nitrate showed (18)O values typical for nitrification only in neutral lakes. In a comparison of NH4(+) concentrations in 297 surface waters with different pH, ammonium concentrations higher 10 mg NH4-N L(-1) were only observed in lakes below pH 3. On the basis of the results from stable isotope investigations and the examination of a metadata set we conclude that the lower limit for nitrification in lakes is around pH 3.

  14. Modeling pH variation in reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Nir, Oded; Bishop, Noga Fridman; Lahav, Ori; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2015-12-15

    The transport of hydronium and hydroxide ions through reverse osmosis membranes constitutes a unique case of ionic species characterized by uncommonly high permeabilities. Combined with electromigration, this leads to complex behavior of permeate pH, e.g., negative rejection, as often observed for monovalent ions in nanofiltration of salt mixtures. In this work we employed a rigorous phenomenological approach combined with chemical equilibrium to describe the trans-membrane transport of hydronium and hydroxide ions along with salt transport and calculate the resulting permeate pH. Starting from the Nernst-Planck equation, a full non-linear transport equation was derived, for which an approximate solution was proposed based on the analytical solution previously developed for trace ions in a dominant salt. Using the developed approximate equation, transport coefficients were deduced from experimental results obtained using a spiral wound reverse osmosis module operated under varying permeate flux (2-11 μm/s), NaCl feed concentrations (0.04-0.18 M) and feed pH values (5.5-9.0). The approximate equation agreed well with the experimental results, corroborating the finding that diffusion and electromigration, rather than a priori neglected convection, were the major contributors to the transport of hydronium and hydroxide. The approach presented here has the potential to improve the predictive capacity of reverse osmosis transport models for acid-base species, thereby improving process design/control. PMID:26447944

  15. Preparation and pH stability of ferrous glycinate liposomes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Baomiao; Xia, Shuqin; Hayat, Khizar; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2009-04-01

    Ferrous glycinate liposomes were prepared by reverse phase evaporation method. The effects of cholesterol, Tween 80, ferrous glycinate concentration, hydrating medium, pH of hydrating medium, and sonication strength on the encapsulation efficiency of liposomes were investigated. Encapsulation efficiency was significantly influenced by the different technique parameters. Ferrous glycinate liposomes might be obtained with high encapsulation efficiency of 84.80% under the conditions of optimized technique parameters. The zeta potential and average particle size of liposomes in the hydrating medium of pH 7.0 were 9.6 mV and 559.2 nm, respectively. The release property of ferrous glycinate liposomes in vitro was investigated in simulated gastrointestinal juice. A small amount of ferrous glycinate was released from liposomes in the first 4 h in simulated gastrointestinal juice. The mean diameters of liposomes increased from 559.2 to 692.9, 677.8, and 599.3 nm after incubation in simulated gastrointestinal juice of pH 1.3, 7.5, and 7.5 in the presence of bile salts, respectively. Results showed that the stability of ferrous glycinate in strong acid environment was greatly improved by encapsulation in liposomes, which protected ferrous glycinate from disrupting the extracapsular environment by lipid bilayer. The bioavailability of ferrous glycinate, as the iron source for biological activity including hemoglobin formation, may be increased. The ferrous glycinate liposomes may be a kind of promising iron fortifier. PMID:19253959

  16. pH optrode for the complete working range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnoi, Gargi; Goel, Tara C.; Pillai, P. K. C.

    1999-01-01

    We report a fast response and inexpensive optical sensor capable of measuring pH in the range of 0.5 to 13.5 units with good resolution. Three indicator dyes viz. Bromocresol Green, Bromothymol Blue and Nile Blue were used to fabricate the sensor head. ion-exchange resin, Amberlite IRA 400, was powdered and immobilized by these dye solutions. In order to prepare sensing membranes, Polyvinyl chloride was dissolved in Tetrahydrofuran and the solution was poured on to a glass plate. Before the membrane was completely dry, the immobilized resin powder was uniformly sprinkled so that the granules are properly glued to it. A bundle of fibers was attached to the membrane mechanically to carry the light from the source to the membrane and collect the reflected optical signal. He-He laser was used as a light source. The experimental results show a linear dependence of pH value on reflected optical signal for the pH range of 0.5 to 13.5 with the resolution of 0.02 unit. The optrode was also characterized by studying the effect of ionic strength and temperature of the solution on the probe response.

  17. Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Melody M.; Pellis, Neal; Jeevarajan, Anthony S.; Taylor, Thomas D.

    2004-01-01

    An optoelectronic instrument monitors the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium in a perfused rotating-wall-vessel bioreactor. The instrument is designed to satisfy the following requirements: It should be able to measure the pH of the medium continuously with an accuracy of 0.1 in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. It should be noninvasive. Any material in contact with the culture medium should be sterilizable as well as nontoxic to the cells to be grown in the medium. The biofilm that inevitably grows on any surface in contact with the medium should not affect the accuracy of the pH measurement. It should be possible to obtain accurate measurements after only one calibration performed prior to a bioreactor cell run. The instrument should be small and lightweight. The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the culture medium flows as it is circulated through the bioreactor. The cuvette is sandwiched between light source on one side and a photodetector on the other side. The light source comprises a red and a green light-emitting diode (LED) that are repeatedly flashed in alternation with a cycle time of 5 s. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red LEDs are processed electronically to obtain a quantity proportional to the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium.

  18. Segregation of metals-containing wastewater by pH

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.; McTaggart, D.R.

    1990-10-01

    A pH-based sampling system has shown that there is a high correlation between low pH and metals contamination for the wastewater from the 4500 area (manhole 190) and the 2000 area (pump station). Wastewater from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has not shown any metals concentrations above the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit limits for the Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP). It is recommended that pH be used as the diversion criteria for wastewater from manhole 190 and the pump station to be sent to the metals tank of the NRWTP. Any wastewater with a pH less than 6.0 or greater than 10.0 should be sent to the metals tank. Based on the results of 29 weeks of sampling, it is expected that on the order of 36m{sup 3}/wk (9500 gal/wk) of wastewater will be diverted to the metals tank of the NRWTP. Wastewater from REDC and HFIR can be sent to the nonmetals tank, but it should be sampled periodically and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) spectrophotometer to confirm that the metals concentration is not increasing. 1 ref., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Internal pH and ATP-ADP pools in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. during exposure to growth-inhibiting low pH.

    PubMed Central

    Kallas, T; Castenholz, R W

    1982-01-01

    Y-7c-s Synechococcus thermophilic strain grew at its maximum rate at pH 8 and above. The growth rate of this strain was inhibited at pH 7.0 and below, and at pH 6.0 there was no sustained growth. At a suboptimal pH, high light intensity further depressed the growth rate. The inhibition of growth resulted neither from pheophytinization nor from a low chlorophyll content. At pH 5.0 a loss of viability preceded the appearance of pheophytin. Cells exposed to low, growth-inhibiting external pH levels continued to maintain a high internal pH (pH 7.1 to 7.3, as determined at moderate light intensities by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy). Even during exposure to pH 4.8, cells retained a relatively high internal pH. Thus, it appeared that the inhibition of growth at low pH was not caused by acidification of the cytoplasm. Darkened cells maintained a slightly lower internal pH than irradiated cells. The ATP/(ATP + ADP) ratio decreased from 0.80 to 0.82 at pH 8.0 to about 0.6 when growth was limited by exposure to pH 6.0 or by low light intensity. It is possible, but not likely, that a limitation of the energy supply may slow or stop growth when the external pH is lowered. PMID:6798019

  20. Variation in pH optima of hydrolytic enzyme activities in tropical rain forest soils.

    PubMed

    Turner, Benjamin L

    2010-10-01

    Extracellular enzymes synthesized by soil microbes play a central role in the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients in the environment. The pH optima of eight hydrolytic enzymes involved in the cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur, were assessed in a series of tropical forest soils of contrasting pH values from the Republic of Panama. Assays were conducted using 4-methylumbelliferone-linked fluorogenic substrates in modified universal buffer. Optimum pH values differed markedly among enzymes and soils. Enzymes were grouped into three classes based on their pH optima: (i) enzymes with acidic pH optima that were consistent among soils (cellobiohydrolase, β-xylanase, and arylsulfatase), (ii) enzymes with acidic pH optima that varied systematically with soil pH, with the most acidic pH optima in the most acidic soils (α-glucosidase, β-glucosidase, and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase), and (iii) enzymes with an optimum pH in either the acid range or the alkaline range depending on soil pH (phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase). The optimum pH values of phosphomonoesterase were consistent among soils, being 4 to 5 for acid phosphomonoesterase and 10 to 11 for alkaline phosphomonoesterase. In contrast, the optimum pH for phosphodiesterase activity varied systematically with soil pH, with the most acidic pH optima (3.0) in the most acidic soils and the most alkaline pH optima (pH 10) in near-neutral soils. Arylsulfatase activity had a very acidic optimum pH in all soils (pH ≤3.0) irrespective of soil pH. The differences in pH optima may be linked to the origins of the enzymes and/or the degree of stabilization on solid surfaces. The results have important implications for the interpretation of hydrolytic enzyme assays using fluorogenic substrates.

  1. Variation in pH Optima of Hydrolytic Enzyme Activities in Tropical Rain Forest Soils ▿

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Benjamin L.

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular enzymes synthesized by soil microbes play a central role in the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients in the environment. The pH optima of eight hydrolytic enzymes involved in the cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur, were assessed in a series of tropical forest soils of contrasting pH values from the Republic of Panama. Assays were conducted using 4-methylumbelliferone-linked fluorogenic substrates in modified universal buffer. Optimum pH values differed markedly among enzymes and soils. Enzymes were grouped into three classes based on their pH optima: (i) enzymes with acidic pH optima that were consistent among soils (cellobiohydrolase, β-xylanase, and arylsulfatase), (ii) enzymes with acidic pH optima that varied systematically with soil pH, with the most acidic pH optima in the most acidic soils (α-glucosidase, β-glucosidase, and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase), and (iii) enzymes with an optimum pH in either the acid range or the alkaline range depending on soil pH (phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase). The optimum pH values of phosphomonoesterase were consistent among soils, being 4 to 5 for acid phosphomonoesterase and 10 to 11 for alkaline phosphomonoesterase. In contrast, the optimum pH for phosphodiesterase activity varied systematically with soil pH, with the most acidic pH optima (3.0) in the most acidic soils and the most alkaline pH optima (pH 10) in near-neutral soils. Arylsulfatase activity had a very acidic optimum pH in all soils (pH ≤3.0) irrespective of soil pH. The differences in pH optima may be linked to the origins of the enzymes and/or the degree of stabilization on solid surfaces. The results have important implications for the interpretation of hydrolytic enzyme assays using fluorogenic substrates. PMID:20709838

  2. A Two-Level Structural Equation Model for Evaluating the External Effectiveness of PhD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiandotto, Bruno; Masserini, Lucio

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the number of PhDs in Italy has significantly grown and purposes of PhD courses have expanded from the traditional ones. The analysis of the contribution of PhD title for job placement and employment condition of PhDs is an important tool for evaluating the quality and the effectiveness of PhD courses. For this reason, knowledge of…

  3. 21 CFR 862.1550 - Urinary pH (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urinary pH (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1550... Systems § 862.1550 Urinary pH (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A urinary pH (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to estimate the pH of urine. Estimations of pH are used...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1550 - Urinary pH (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Urinary pH (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1550... Systems § 862.1550 Urinary pH (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A urinary pH (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to estimate the pH of urine. Estimations of pH are used...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1550 - Urinary pH (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Urinary pH (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1550... Systems § 862.1550 Urinary pH (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A urinary pH (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to estimate the pH of urine. Estimations of pH are used...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1550 - Urinary pH (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urinary pH (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1550... Systems § 862.1550 Urinary pH (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A urinary pH (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to estimate the pH of urine. Estimations of pH are used...

  7. pH- and concentration-programmable electrodialytic buffer generator.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongjing; Edwards, Brian L; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Srinivasan, Kannan

    2012-01-01

    We have presented in a companion paper a suppressor-based electrodialytic buffer generator (EBG) that can produce programmable pH gradients. Here we demonstrate a three-electrode EBG. In this three-compartment flow-through device, the central compartment is separated from the outer compartments with a cation-exchange membrane (CEM) and an anion-exchange membrane (AEM), respectively. One platinum electrode is disposed in each compartment. The flows through each compartment are independent. With appropriate solutions in each compartment, independent potentials are applied to the CEM and AEM electrodes with respect to the grounded central electrode. The CEM current and the AEM current can be independently manipulated to generate buffers with variable concentration and pH in the central compartment. Both the CEM and AEM currents can be positive or negative. For the CEM, a positive current (i(cat)(in)) indicates that cations are coming in from the CEM channel to the center. A negative current (i(cat)(out)) takes cations out of the center to the CEM channel. Similarly for the AEM, currents governing anion transport into the center channel from the AEM channel (AEM electrode negative) or the reverse (AEM electrode positive) are respectively denoted by i(an)(in) or i(an)(out). Most examples herein involve inward ion transport, referred to as the additive mode. Depending on whether i(cat)(in) i(an)(in), H(+)/O(2) and OH(-)/H(2) are respectively produced at the central electrode to maintain electroneutrality. Any gas formed is subsequently removed by a gas removal device. The pH of the central channel effluent is related to the ratio of the currents through the two membranes, while the generated concentration is controlled by the absolute value of the currents. The buffer concentration and pH can be varied in a controlled predictable manner. A pH span of 3-12 was attained and a phosphate buffer concentration up to 140 mM was generated. We

  8. Preference and avoidance pH of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta exposed to different holding pH.

    PubMed

    Fost, B A; Ferreri, C P

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if short-term exposure of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta to a lower pH than found in their source stream results in a shift in preference or avoidance pH. The lack of a shift in preference or avoidance pH of adult S. fontinalis and S. trutta suggests that these species can be held at a pH different from the source waterbody for a short period of time without altering preference or avoidance pH behaviour.

  9. Influence of pH on transungual passive and iontophoretic transport.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kelly A; Hao, Jinsong; Li, S Kevin

    2010-04-01

    The present study investigated the effects of pH on nail permeability and the transport of ions such as sodium (Na) and chloride (Cl) ions endogenous to nail and hydronium and hydroxide ions present at low and high pH, which might compete with drug transport across hydrated nail plate during iontophoresis. Nail hydration and passive transport of water across the nail at pH 1-13 were assessed. Subsequently, passive and iontophoretic transport experiments were conducted using (22)Na and (36)Cl ions under various pH conditions. Nail hydration was independent of pH under moderate pH conditions and increased significantly under extreme pH conditions (pH >11). Likewise, nail permeability for water was pH independent at pH 1-10 and an order of magnitude higher at pH 13. The results of passive and iontophoretic transport of Na and Cl ions are consistent with the permselective property of nail. Interestingly, extremely acidic conditions (e.g., pH 1) altered nail permselectivity with the effect lasting several days at the higher pH conditions. Hydronium and hydroxide ion competition in iontophoretic transport was generally negligible at pH 3-11 was significant at the extreme pH conditions studied. PMID:19904826

  10. Influence of pH on transungual passive and iontophoretic transport.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kelly A; Hao, Jinsong; Li, S Kevin

    2010-04-01

    The present study investigated the effects of pH on nail permeability and the transport of ions such as sodium (Na) and chloride (Cl) ions endogenous to nail and hydronium and hydroxide ions present at low and high pH, which might compete with drug transport across hydrated nail plate during iontophoresis. Nail hydration and passive transport of water across the nail at pH 1-13 were assessed. Subsequently, passive and iontophoretic transport experiments were conducted using (22)Na and (36)Cl ions under various pH conditions. Nail hydration was independent of pH under moderate pH conditions and increased significantly under extreme pH conditions (pH >11). Likewise, nail permeability for water was pH independent at pH 1-10 and an order of magnitude higher at pH 13. The results of passive and iontophoretic transport of Na and Cl ions are consistent with the permselective property of nail. Interestingly, extremely acidic conditions (e.g., pH 1) altered nail permselectivity with the effect lasting several days at the higher pH conditions. Hydronium and hydroxide ion competition in iontophoretic transport was generally negligible at pH 3-11 was significant at the extreme pH conditions studied.

  11. Carbon dots with strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards pH. Application as nanosensors for a broad range of pH.

    PubMed

    Barati, Ali; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2016-08-10

    In this study, preparation of novel pH-sensitive N-doped carbon dots (NCDs) using glucose and urea is reported. The prepared NCDs present strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards the pH that is a new behavior from these nanomaterials. By taking advantage of this unique behavior, two separated ratiometric pH sensors using emission spectra of the NCDs for both acidic (pH 2.0 to 8.0) and basic (pH 7.0 to 14.0) ranges of pH are constructed. Additionally, by considering the entire Excitation-Emission Matrix (EEM) of NCDs as analytical signal and using a suitable multivariate calibration method, a broad range of pH from 2.0 to 14.0 was well calibrated. The multivariate calibration method was independent from the concentration of NCDs and resulted in a very low average prediction error of 0.067 pH units. No changes in the predicted pH under UV irradiation (for 3 h) and at high ionic strength (up to 2 M NaCl) indicated the high stability of this pH nanosensor. The practicality of this pH nanosensor for pH determination in real water samples was validated with good accuracy and repeatability.

  12. Submillimeterwave spectrum of CH 2PH and equilibrium structures of CH 2PH and CH 2NH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Demaison, J.; Sreeja, P. B.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2006-08-01

    The rotational spectrum of phosphaethene (CH 2PH) was reinvestigated. One hundred and nineteen new lines were measured in the submillimeter range from 500 to 650 GHz. The determination of the centrifugal distortion constants is significantly improved. As the molecule is close to symmetric prolate top, both reduction A and S were compared. The equilibrium structure has been derived from experimental ground state rotational constants and ab initio rovibrational interaction parameters. This semi-experimental structure is in excellent agreement with the ab initio structure calculated at the CCSD(T) level of theory using a basis set of quintuple-zeta quality and a core correlation correction. The structure of CH 2PH was compared to that of CH 2NH which was also determined for this goal. It is found that the semi-experimental structure of CH 2NH is less accurate than the ab initio structure. It is also found that the methylene group is much more asymmetric in CH 2NH than in CH 2PH.

  13. Unified pH values of liquid chromatography mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Suu, Agnes; Jalukse, Lauri; Liigand, Jaanus; Kruve, Anneli; Himmel, Daniel; Krossing, Ingo; Rosés, Martí; Leito, Ivo

    2015-03-01

    This work introduces a conceptually new approach of measuring pH of mixed-solvent liquid chromatography (LC) mobile phases. Mobile phase pH is very important in LC, but its correct measurement is not straightforward, and all commonly used approaches have deficiencies. The new approach is based on the recently introduced unified pH (pH(abs)) scale, which enables direct comparison of acidities of solutions made in different solvents based on chemical potential of the proton in the solutions. This work represents the first experimental realization of the pH(abs) concept using differential potentiometric measurement for comparison of the chemical potentials of the proton in different solutions (connected by a salt bridge), together with earlier published reference points for obtaining the pH(abs) values (referenced to the gas phase) or pH(abs)(H₂O) values (referenced to the aqueous solution). The liquid junction potentials were estimated in the framework of Izutsu's three-component method. pH(abs) values for a number of common LC and LC-MS mobile phases have been determined. The pH(abs) scale enables for the first time direct comparison of acidities of any LC mobile phases, with different organic additives, different buffer components, etc. A possible experimental protocol of putting this new approach into chromatographic practice has been envisaged and its applicability tested. It has been demonstrated that the ionization behavior of bases (cationic acids) in the mobile phases can be better predicted by using the pH(abs)(H₂O) values and aqueous pKa values than by using the alternative means of expressing mobile phase acidity. Description of the ionization behavior of acids on the basis of pH(abs)(H₂O) values is possible if the change of their pKa values with solvent composition change is taken into account. PMID:25664372

  14. A revision of the genus Atelecrinus PH Carpenter (Echinodermata: Crinoidea).

    PubMed

    Messing, Charles G

    2013-01-01

    The unusual bathyal comatulid crinoid genus Atelecrinus is widespread in the Atlantic and tropical Pacific Oceans and currently includes three recognized species. A re-assessment based on examination of new and existing specimens requires establishment of two new genera and five new species, and returns three junior synonyms to species-level status. Paratelecrinus is erected to accommodate Atelecrinus wyvilli PH Carpenter, A. conifer AH Clark, A. cubensis PH Carpenter, P. orthotriremis, new species, P. amenouzume new species, P. laticonulus new species and P. telo new species. Adelatelecrinus is erected to accommodate Atelecrinus sulcatus AH Clark and Adelatelecrinus vallatus new species. Atelecrinus retains A. balanoides PH Carpenter and A. helgae AH Clark, which restricts the genus to the Atlantic. In both Paratelecrinus and Adelatelecrinus, the basals articulate with the centrodorsal via ligament bundles anchored in deep ringlike interradial pits that project into the centrodorsal cavity, whereas in Atelecrinus the centrodorsal rim has shallow interradial concavities and attaches to the basals via a tight junction with no obvious ligament bundles. The spoon-shaped aboral fossa in the basals of Paratelecrinus appears to be unique among articulate crinoids and differs from the smooth fossa found in both Atelecrinus and Adelatelecrinus. New material extends the range of the family to the Indian Ocean. A few species are now known from enough specimens to identify some ontogenetic and distributional variations. Proximal ray morphology varies substantially with size in P. cubensis and P. orthotriremis. A. balanoides generally occurs in deeper water in the Lesser Antilles than in the Bahamas and Strait of Florida, while P. orthotriremis occurs in shallower water in the Lesser Antilles and deeper in the Bahamas.

  15. Fluoride concentration and pH of iced tea products.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Annekathrin; Oberste, Volker; Wetzel, Willi Eckhard

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the fluoride concentration and pH of 44 iced tea samples and hence to assess the possible role of these beverages as systemic fluoride source as well as their potential cariogenic and erosive character. Ten tea samples were available as a granular instant powder, and 34 as ready-to-drink liquid products. The iced teas contained different types of sugar alone or in combination with maltodextrin, glucose syrup and noncaloric sweeteners. In one product, only acesulfame and aspartame were established. All samples contained lemon juice or citric acid as an additive. The pH ranged from 4.04 to 2.63 and the titrated amount of base to pH 7.0 from 0.75 to 2.39 mmol NaOH/50 ml. The fluoride concentrations measured were <0.6 ppm in 14 products, 0.6-1.0 ppm in 10 products, 1.1-1.5 ppm in 16 products, 1.6-2.0 ppm in 2, and >2.0 ppm in another 2 products. In conclusion, most of the iced teas studied contained considerable fluoride concentrations. If infants ingest larger amounts of them because of their sweet taste, there is a risk of uncontrolled overdosing as a result of additional fluoride intake from other sources at the same time. Furthermore, the majority of the products revealed a highly cariogenic character and finally, all the iced teas appear to be acidic enough to cause dental erosion if these refreshments were excessively consumed from nursing bottles.

  16. Peptide hydrogelation triggered by enzymatic induced pH switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei; Li, Ying

    2016-07-01

    It remains challenging to develop methods that can precisely control the self-assembling kinetics and thermodynamics of peptide hydrogelators to achieve hydrogels with optimal properties. Here we report the hydrogelation of peptide hydrogelators by an enzymatically induced pH switch, which involves the combination of glucose oxidase and catalase with D-glucose as the substrate, in which both the gelation kinetics and thermodynamics can be controlled by the concentrations of D-glucose. This novel hydrogelation method could result in hydrogels with higher mechanical stability and lower hydrogelation concentrations. We further illustrate the application of this hydrogelation method to differentiate different D-glucose levels.

  17. Plaque pH modulations of children's favourite snacks.

    PubMed

    Gauba, K; Goyal, A; Tewari, A

    1991-03-01

    Cariogenic potential of a few children's favourite snacks, assessed by evaluation of pH modulations on their respective consumption after 2,5,10,20,30 and 40 minutes compared to 10 percent sucrose control using pooled plaque method, in 8-12 years old children revealed lollipop (hard sucking candy) to be the most cariogenic and samosa without chutney to be the least cariogenic. The cariogenic potential of ice creams were similar, however, low as compared to sucrose solution of 10 percent.

  18. Irene E. Loewenfeld, PhD Physiologist of the pupil.

    PubMed

    Thompson, H Stanley; Kardon, Randy H

    2006-06-01

    Irene E. Loewenfeld, PhD has devoted a long and vigorous professional life to understanding the workings of the pupil of the human eye. Her interest in the pupil began in 1940 when she went to work as a technician in the pupillography laboratory of Professor Otto Lowenstein at New York University. It culminated in her widely admired textbook The Pupil, published in 1993. Among her many contributions, Loewenfeld provided rigorous observations about Adie tonic pupil, anisocoria in optic tract lesions, Argyll Robertson pupil, oculomotor paresis with cyclic spasms, and innovations in electronic recordings of pupil movement. PMID:16845317

  19. Pork Quality Traits According to Postmortem pH and Temperature in Berkshire

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Wan; Kim, Chul Wook; Yang, Mi Ra; No, Gun Ryoung; Kim, Il-Suk

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the role of pH and temperature postmortem, and to demonstrate the importance of these factors in determining meat quality. Postmortem pH45min (pH at 45 min postmortem or initial pH) via analysis of Pearson’s correlation showed high positive correlation with pH change pHc24 (pH change from pH45min to pH24h postmortem). However, postmortem pH after 24 h (pH24h or ultimate pH) had a high negative correlation with pH change, pHc24, CIE L*, and protein content. Initial temperature postmortem (T1h ) was positively associated with a change in temperature from 45 min to 24 h postmortem (Tc24) and cooking loss, but negatively correlated with water holding capacity. Temperature at 24 h postmortem (T24h) was negatively associated with Tc24. Collectively, these results indicate that higher initial pH was associated with higher pHc24, T1h, and Tc24. However, higher initial pH was associated with a reduction in carcass weight, backfat thickness, CIE a* and b*, water holding capacity, collagen and fat content, drip loss, and cooking loss as well as decreased shear force. In contrast, CIE a* and b*, drip loss, cooking loss, and shear force in higher ultimate pH was showed by a similar pattern to higher initial pH, whereas pHc24, carcass weight, backfat thickness, water holding capacity, fat content, moisture content, protein content, T1h, T24h, and Tc24 were exhibited by completely differential patterns (p<0.05). Therefore, we suggest that initial pH, ultimate pH, and temperatures postmortem are important factors in determining the meat quality of pork. PMID:27499661

  20. pH Shifting alters solubility characteristics and thermal stability of soy protein isolate and its globulin fractions in different pH, salt concentration, and temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiang; Xiong, Youling L; Chen, Jie

    2010-07-14

    Soy protein isolate (SPI), beta-conglycinin (7S), and glycinin (11S) were subjected to pH-shifting treatments, that is, unfolding at pH 1.5 or 12.0 followed by refolding at pH 7.0, to induce molten globule structures. Treated samples were analyzed for protein solubility, thermal stability, and aggregation in 0, 0.1, and 0.6 M NaCl solutions at pH 2.0-8.0. The pH(12) shifting resulted in drastic increases (up to 2.5-fold) in SPI solubility in the pH 6.0-7.0 range, especially at 0 M NaCl. The pH(1.5) shifting had a generally lesser effect on solubility. 11S exhibited a solubility pattern similar to that of SPI, but the solubility of 7S was unaffected by pH shifting except at 0.6 M NaCl. The pH shifting, notably at pH 12.0, produced soluble, disulfide-linked polymers from 11S and reduced (P < 0.05) its enthalpy but not its temperature of denaturation. Soy proteins structurally altered by pH shifting had a reduced sensitivity to thermal aggregation.

  1. Pb and Cd binding to natural freshwater biofilms developed at different pH: the important role of culture pH.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xiuyi; Dong, Deming; Ding, Xiaoou; Yang, Fan; Jiang, Xu; Guo, Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    The effects of solution pH on adsorption of trace metals to different types of natural aquatic solid materials have been studied extensively, but few studies have been carried out to investigate the effect of pH at which the solid materials were formed on the adsorption. The purpose of present study is to examine this effect of culture pH on metal adsorption to natural freshwater biofilms. The adsorption of Pb and Cd to biofilms which were developed at different culture pH values (ranging from 6.5 to 9.0) was measured at the same adsorption pH value (6.5). The culture pH had considerable effects on both composition and metal adsorption ability of the biofilms. Higher culture pH usually promoted the accumulation of organic material and Fe oxides in the biofilms. The culture pH also affected the quantity and species of algae in the biofilms. The adsorption of Pb and Cd to the biofilms generally increased with the increase of culture pH. This increase was minor at lower pH range and significant at higher pH range and was more remarkable for Cd adsorption than for Pb adsorption. The notable contribution of organic material to the adsorption at higher culture pH values was also observed. The profound impacts of culture pH on adsorption behavior of biofilms mainly resulted from the variation of total contents of the biofilm components and were also affected by the alteration of composition and properties of the components. PMID:22562344

  2. Interacting effects of pH acclimation, and pH and heavy metals on acute and chronic toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia (Cladocera)

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, S.E.; Cherry, D.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Understanding the factors that modify the sensitivity of the zooplankton Ceriodaphnia dubia to toxicants is important to the interpretation of chronic toxicity data generated for granting industrial permits. Early reports of high sensitivity of Ceriodaphnia to brief pH excursions led toxicologists to question the use of C. dubia as a test organism. Acute and chronic toxicity of pH and heavy metals, pH acclimation to acidic and alkaline conditions and the role of pH in modifying heavy metal (copper and zinc) toxicities were investigated. Ceriodaphnia dubia acclimated near neutral pH had acute (48-hr) lethal concentrations of 4.6 and 10.3 SU. Reproduction and mortality were not impaired between pH 6.14-8.99 regardless of pH acclimation history. Reproduction was significantly impaired beyond these extremes. Acute exposures to both heavy metals at pH 6, 8 and 9 and in water hardness of 180, 110 and 100 mg/L showed C dubia was consistently most sensitive in low pH and low hardness waters. Reproduction and mortality were not so affected by pH in chronic exposures. Similar concentrations of metals at all pH levels resulted in equivalent reductions in offspring per female. The results strongly suggest that effluent guidelines for pH at 6-9 are sound, and that toxicant activity in chronic time frames is directed primarily by concentration and water hardness, not by pH. 34 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Re-designing the PhEDEx Security Model

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.-H.; Wildish, T.; Zhang, X.

    2014-01-01

    PhEDEx, the data-placement tool used by the CMS experiment at the LHC, was conceived in a more trusting time. The security model provided a safe environment for site agents and operators, but offerred little more protection than that. Data was not sufficiently protected against loss caused by operator error or software bugs or by deliberate manipulation of the database. Operators were given high levels of access to the database, beyond what was actually needed to accomplish their tasks. This exposed them to the risk of suspicion should an incident occur. Multiple implementations of the security model led to difficulties maintaining code, which can lead to degredation of security over time. In order to meet the simultaneous goals of protecting CMS data, protecting the operators from undue exposure to risk, increasing monitoring capabilities and improving maintainability of the security model, the PhEDEx security model was redesigned and re-implemented. Security was moved from the application layer into the database itself, fine-grained access roles were established, and tools and procedures created to control the evolution of the security model over time. In this paper we describe this work, we describe the deployment of the new security model, and we show how these enhancements improve security on several fronts simultaneously.

  4. Effect of pH on the structure of lipoplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracciolo, Giulio; Pozzi, Daniela; Caminiti, Ruggero; Marchini, Cristina; Montani, Maura; Amenitsch, Heinz

    2008-07-01

    Recently, it has been postulated that a primary importance of the pH is for accomplishing efficient lipid-mediated translocation of nucleic acids across the endosomal membrane into the cytosol for transport to the nucleus. With the aim of providing insight into the postulated correlation between transfection efficiency, phase evolution of lipoplexes upon acidification, and DNA release, we investigated the pH dependence of the structure of low efficiency 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane-dioleoylphosphocholine/DNA and high efficiency 3β-[N-(N', ,N'-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl]-cholesterol-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine/DNA lipoplexes by high-resolution synchrotron small-angle x-ray diffraction, while the extent of DNA release was estimated by means of electrophoresis on agarose gels. Here we show that upon acidification from physiological to acidic values (as those characteristic of endosomes), (i) the lamellar structure of lipoplexes was preserved with a decrease in the one-dimensional DNA packing density, reflecting a pH-induced contraction of interfacial area of lipid head groups and (ii) DNA was not released from lipoplexes. Distinct levels of transfection between lipoplexes were interpreted in terms of the different DNA-binding capacities of cationic liposomes.

  5. Management of adult Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chiaretti, Sabina; Foà, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL) has been regarded for decades as the ALL subgroup with the worse outcome. It represents the most frequent genetic subtype of adult ALL, and increases progressively with age. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has enabled to obtain complete hematologic remissions (CHRs) in virtually all patients, including the elderly, to improve disease-free survival and overall survival, as well as to increase the percentage of patients who can undergo an allogeneic stem cell transplant (allo-SCT).The current management of adult Ph+ ALL patients relies on the use of a TKI with or without chemotherapy followed by an allo-SCT, which still remains the only curative option. Minimal residual disease screening is permitting not only a better stratification of patients, but has also allowed to reconsider the role of autologous stem cell transplant for a set of patients who do not have a donor or are not eligible for an allo-SCT. At present, clinical challenges are represented by the emergence of resistant mutations, particularly the gatekeeper T315I, for which alternative approaches, comprising novel TKIs or therapies based on the combination of TKI with immunotherapeutic strategies, are being considered in order to overcome resistance.

  6. Force-compensated hydrogel-based pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Kangfa; Gerlach, Gerald; Guenther, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the design, simulation, assembly and testing of a force-compensated hydrogel-based pH sensor. In the conventional deflection method, a piezoresistive pressure sensor is used as a chemical-mechanical-electronic transducer to measure the volume change of a pH-sensitive hydrogel. In this compensation method, the pH-sensitive hydrogel keeps its volume constant during the whole measuring process, independent of applied pH value. In order to maintain a balanced state, an additional thermal actuator is integrated into the close-loop sensor system with higher precision and faster dynamic response. Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) with 5 mol% monomer 3-acrylamido propionic acid (AAmPA) is used as the temperature-sensitive hydrogel, while poly (vinyl alcohol) with poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) serves as the pH-sensitive hydrogel. A thermal simulation is introduced to assess the temperature distribution of the whole microsystem, especially the temperature influence on both hydrogels. Following tests are detailed to verify the working functions of a sensor based on pH-sensitive hydrogel and an actuator based on temperature-sensitive hydrogel. A miniaturized prototype is assembled and investigated in deionized water: the response time amounts to about 25 min, just half of that one of a sensor based on the conventional deflection method. The results confirm the applicability of t he compensation method to the hydrogel-based sensors.

  7. Near-Neutral pH SCC Crack Initiation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiebert, John

    4-Point bend studies on X-52 linepipe steel with ''natural'' surfaces (sigmamax = 95% SMYS, f = 0.001 Hz, R = 0.6) in synthetic soil solutions indicate that crack initiation and transgranular crack formation occurs more readily in C2 solutions than in C4 solutions. This increase is associated with solution compositions that increase general corrosion rates and that reduce the precipitation of carbonates. When it is assumed that relative differences in bulk solution properties are manifested at the crack tip, then these differences may promote a more favourable environment for crack tip dissolution, ion transport, and microplastic deformation. Although the results are not definitive, in these studies the development of longer and transgranular cracks appear to be associated more with differences in solution composition than with differences in surface finish. Increased corrosion and hydrogen permeation rates are associated with increased proton, carbonic acid, and bicarbonate ion concentrations and not explicitly with lower pH. Calculations show, at open circuit corrosion conditions, that FeCO3 precipitation can limit pH increases.

  8. Effects of ph, carbonate, orthophosphate, and redox potential on cuprosolvency

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, M.R.; Lytle, D.A.; Clement, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    A comprehensive solubility model for copper in drinking water has been developed, that is consistent with available data for copper dissolution and passivation in drinking water systems. Copper solubility (cuprosolvency) is greatly affected by the redox conditions of the systems. The concentration of Cu(I) is dominated by Cu{sub 2}O(s) or CuOH(s) solid phases, plus soluble aqueous ammonia and chloride complexes. In new piping, the concentration of Cu(II) is mainly governed by Cu(OH){sub 2}(s) (cupric hydroxide), rather than CuO(s) (tenorite) or Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(s)(malachite). Complexation of Cu(II) by DIC and hydroxide ion is extremely important. Increases in DIC are predicted to cause significant increases in copper solubility in the pH range of 7.5--10. Utilities may trade off increasing cuprosolvency by DIC addition for ensuring adequate buffering intensity in the finished water. Sufficient dosages of orthophosphate in the pH range of 6.5 to 7.5 may reduce cuprosolvency under oxidizing conditions. Sulfate may decrease cuprosolvency under some conditions, or may interfere with the formation of cupric hydroxide films under mildly alkaline conditions. Dissolved oxygen and chlorine residual play complicated roles in determining copper concentrations after various standing times. Frequently, 48--72 hours are necessary to reach equilibrium levels of copper in disinfected systems.

  9. Do Decapod Crustaceans Have Nociceptors for Extreme pH?

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Sakshi; Faulkes, Zen

    2010-01-01

    Background Nociception is the physiological detection of noxious stimuli. Because of its obvious importance, nociception is expected to be widespread across animal taxa and to trigger robust behaviours reliably. Nociception in invertebrates, such as crustaceans, is poorly studied. Methodology/Principal Findings Three decapod crustacean species were tested for nociceptive behaviour: Louisiana red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), white shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus), and grass shrimp (Palaemonetes sp.). Applying sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid, or benzocaine to the antennae caused no change in behaviour in the three species compared to controls. Animals did not groom the stimulated antenna, and there was no difference in movement of treated individuals and controls. Extracellular recordings of antennal nerves in P. clarkii revealed continual spontaneous activity, but no neurons that were reliably excited by the application of concentrated sodium hydroxide or hydrochloric acid. Conclusions/Significance Previously reported responses to extreme pH are either not consistently evoked across species or were mischaracterized as nociception. There was no behavioural or physiological evidence that the antennae contained specialized nociceptors that responded to pH. PMID:20422026

  10. Proton transport across charged membrane and pH oscillations.

    PubMed Central

    Chay, T R

    1980-01-01

    Based on Eyring's multibarrier activation process, a mathematical model and equation is developed to account for proton diffusion through an immobilized protein and enzyme membrane perfused with an electrolyte, substrate, and a buffer. With this model we find that, in the presence of a buffer, our solution approaches the continuum case very rapidly. We apply our model to membranes composed of papain and bovine serum albumin and find that our theory closely stimulates the experimental observations on the effect of salt and buffer on proton diffusion. Our theory shows that the pH oscillations observed in the diffusion controlled papain-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester (BAEE) reaction may be the result of CO2 dissolved in the bath at high pH. In our theory, under certain conditions and in agreement with experimental observation, the buffer penetration depth oscillates near the boundary of a papain membrane in a solution containing BAEE and borate. We also find that at low ionic strength small ions as well as a buffer are seen to oscillate if a membrane is highly charged. PMID:7260272

  11. Induction and characterization of Ph1 wheat mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, M A; Reader, S M; Dalgliesh, C; Miller, T E; Foote, T N; Fish, L J; Snape, J W; Moore, G

    1999-01-01

    The cloning of genes for complex traits in polyploid plants that possess large genomes, such as hexaploid wheat, requires an efficient strategy. We present here one such strategy focusing on the homologous pairing suppressor (Ph1) locus of wheat. This locus has been shown to affect both premeiotic and meiotic processes, possibly suggesting a complex control. The strategy combined the identification of lines carrying specific deletions using multiplex PCR screening of fast-neutron irradiated wheat populations with the approach of physically mapping the region in the rice genome equivalent to the deletion to reveal its gene content. As a result, we have located the Ph1 factor controlling the euploid-like level of homologous chromosome pairing to the region between two loci (Xrgc846 and Xpsr150A). These loci are located within 400 kb of each other in the rice genome. By sequencing this region of the rice genome, it should now be possible to define the nature of this factor. PMID:10581295

  12. The PhIX High Intensity Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Peng, Y.-K. M.; Rapp, J.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Biewer, T. M.; Canik, J. M.; Chen, G.; Diem, S. J.; Meitner, S. J.; Owen, L. W.

    2012-10-01

    The Physics Integration eXperiment (PhIX) is a linear high-intensity rf plasma source presently being constructed at ORNL that combines a high density helicon plasma generator with an electron heating section. It will be used to explore the physics related to heating an overdense, streaming plasma in a linear geometry by whistler waves and Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW), including optimization of heating efficiency and maximization of particle flux. Interactions between the plasma production and heating regions, and the source and a downstream target, will also be investigated. Experiments using the device will provide data for the design of an rf powered high particle flux (˜10^24/m^2- s), high heat flux(˜10 MW /m^2) steady-state linear plasma-materials test station (PMTS). In preparatory experiments, the helicon device has operated at power levels up to 90 kW, producing high plasma densities in He (6 x10^19 m-3) and D (> 4 x10^19 m-3), and has also operated at high magnetic field strength up to 0.5 T. Separate ECH experiments have demonstrated both whistler and EBW coupling at 6 GHz to an overdense plasma. A review of these experiments will be presented, as well as an overview of PhIX and its status.

  13. Apiaceous Vegetable Consumption Decreases PhIP-Induced DNA Adducts and Increases Methylated PhIP Metabolites in the Urine Metabolome in Rats123

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Kyeom; Gallaher, Daniel D; Chen, Chi; Yao, Dan; Trudo, Sabrina P

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heterocyclic aromatic amines, such as 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), are carcinogenic compounds produced during heating of protein-containing foods. Apiaceous vegetables inhibit PhIP-activating enzymes, whereas cruciferous vegetables induce both PhIP-activating and -detoxifying enzymes. Objective: We investigated the effects of these vegetables, either alone or combined, on PhIP metabolism and colonic DNA adduct formation in rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats were fed cruciferous vegetables (21%, wt:wt), apiaceous vegetables (21%, wt:wt), or a combination of both vegetables (10.5% wt:wt of each). Negative and positive control groups were fed an AIN-93G diet. After 6 d, all groups received an intraperitoneal injection of PhIP (10 mg · kg body weight−1) except for the negative control group, which received only vehicle. Urine was collected for 24 h after the injection for LC–tandem mass spectrometry metabolomic analyses. On day 7, rats were killed and tissues processed. Results: Compared with the positive control, cruciferous vegetables increased the activity of hepatic PhIP-activating enzymes [39.5% and 45.1% for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 (P = 0.0006) and CYP1A2 (P < 0.0001), respectively] and of uridine 5′-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 1A (PhIP-detoxifying) by 24.5% (P = 0.0267). Apiaceous vegetables did not inhibit PhIP-activating enzymes, yet reduced colonic PhIP-DNA adducts by 20.4% (P = 0.0496). Metabolomic analyses indicated that apiaceous vegetables increased the relative abundance of urinary methylated PhIP metabolites. The sum of these methylated metabolites inversely correlated with colonic PhIP-DNA adducts (r = −0.43, P = 0.01). We detected a novel methylated urinary PhIP metabolite and demonstrated that methylated metabolites are produced in the human liver S9 fraction. Conclusions: Apiaceous vegetables did not inhibit the activity of PhIP-activating enzymes in rats, suggesting that the reduction in Ph

  14. Seawater pH at the advent of metazoan calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, Justin; Gonzalez-Roubaud, Cécile; Douville, Eric; Montagna, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    The boron isotopic composition (δ11B) of bulk limestones provides a potentially powerful tool for reconstructing seawater pH deep into the geologic past (Kasemann et al., 2005; Paris et al., 2010; Ohnemueller et al., 2014). Here, we present δ11B of 35 calcitic limestones derived from a ca. 9 m.y. interval of the terminal Proterozoic Nama Group of southern Namibia. These units immediately precede the so-called Cambrian Radiation - the greatest diversification of metazoans in Earth history marked by the near-simultaneous advent of calcification across most animal phyla. The Nama Group represents one of the best preserved (average [Sr] = 1805 ppm; Mn/Sr < 2; δ18O > -10‰) and most continuous terminal Proterozoic limestone sequences known in the world. The carbonate units investigated here were deposited between ca. 552 and 543 Ma in a semi-divided foreland basin of the Kalahari Craton (Grotzinger and Miller, 2008). Depositional environments were shore-associated and ranged from upper shoreline/tidal flats to below-wave-base lower shoreface, and comprise calcisiltites, calcarenites, heterolithic interbeds, grainstones, and microbialites (Saylor et al., 1998; Grotzinger and Miller, 2008). The δ11B of the 35 sampled Nama Group carbonates were obtained via MC-ICP-MS. Samples were screened for contamination of the δ11B signal by clays (using [Al] as a proxy for clay content) (Paris et al., 2010) and by open-system meteoric diagenesis (δ11B-δ18O correlation). The δ11B values of the limestones ranged from 0.5 to 10.8‰ (avg. = 5.3‰), which is consistent with the previously observed increasing trend in carbonate δ11B (Paris et al., 2010) from the -6.2 to 2.7‰ values reported for Neoproterozoic cap carbonate dolostones (Kasemann et al., 2005) to the ca. 25‰ value reported for most modern marine carbonates. B/Ca ratios for the sampled limestones ranged from 3.4 to 24.0 ppm (avg. = 11.0). Assuming a seawater temperature of 25° C, a salinity of 35, a depth of 10

  15. Influence of pH Regulation Mode in Glucose Fermentation on Product Selection and Process Stability.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Zaki, Zuhaida; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan R; Lu, Yang; Hoelzle, Robert; Pratt, Steven; Slater, Fran R; Batstone, Damien J

    2016-01-01

    Mixed culture anaerobic fermentation generates a wide range of products from simple sugars, and is potentially an effective process for producing renewable commodity chemicals. However it is difficult to predict product spectrum, and to control the process. One of the key control handles is pH, but the response is commonly dependent on culture history. In this work, we assess the impact of pH regulation mode on the product spectrum. Two regulation modes were applied: in the first, pH was adjusted from 4.5 to 8.5 in progressive steps of 0.5 and in the second, covered the same pH range, but the pH was reset to 5.5 before each change. Acetate, butyrate, and ethanol were produced throughout all pH ranges, but there was a shift from butyrate at pH < 6.5 to ethanol at pH > 6.5, as well as a strong and consistent shift from hydrogen to formate as pH increased. Microbial analysis indicated that progressive pH resulted in dominance by Klebsiella, while reset pH resulted in a bias towards Clostridium spp., particularly at low pH, with higher variance in community between different pH levels. Reset pH was more responsive to changes in pH, and analysis of Gibbs free energy indicated that the reset pH experiments operated closer to thermodynamic equilibrium, particularly with respect to the formate/hydrogen balance. This may indicate that periodically resetting pH conforms better to thermodynamic expectations. PMID:27681895

  16. Influence of pH Regulation Mode in Glucose Fermentation on Product Selection and Process Stability

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Zaki, Zuhaida; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan R.; Lu, Yang; Hoelzle, Robert; Pratt, Steven; Slater, Fran R.; Batstone, Damien J.

    2016-01-01

    Mixed culture anaerobic fermentation generates a wide range of products from simple sugars, and is potentially an effective process for producing renewable commodity chemicals. However it is difficult to predict product spectrum, and to control the process. One of the key control handles is pH, but the response is commonly dependent on culture history. In this work, we assess the impact of pH regulation mode on the product spectrum. Two regulation modes were applied: in the first, pH was adjusted from 4.5 to 8.5 in progressive steps of 0.5 and in the second, covered the same pH range, but the pH was reset to 5.5 before each change. Acetate, butyrate, and ethanol were produced throughout all pH ranges, but there was a shift from butyrate at pH < 6.5 to ethanol at pH > 6.5, as well as a strong and consistent shift from hydrogen to formate as pH increased. Microbial analysis indicated that progressive pH resulted in dominance by Klebsiella, while reset pH resulted in a bias towards Clostridium spp., particularly at low pH, with higher variance in community between different pH levels. Reset pH was more responsive to changes in pH, and analysis of Gibbs free energy indicated that the reset pH experiments operated closer to thermodynamic equilibrium, particularly with respect to the formate/hydrogen balance. This may indicate that periodically resetting pH conforms better to thermodynamic expectations. PMID:27681895

  17. Influence of pH Regulation Mode in Glucose Fermentation on Product Selection and Process Stability

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Zaki, Zuhaida; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan R.; Lu, Yang; Hoelzle, Robert; Pratt, Steven; Slater, Fran R.; Batstone, Damien J.

    2016-01-01

    Mixed culture anaerobic fermentation generates a wide range of products from simple sugars, and is potentially an effective process for producing renewable commodity chemicals. However it is difficult to predict product spectrum, and to control the process. One of the key control handles is pH, but the response is commonly dependent on culture history. In this work, we assess the impact of pH regulation mode on the product spectrum. Two regulation modes were applied: in the first, pH was adjusted from 4.5 to 8.5 in progressive steps of 0.5 and in the second, covered the same pH range, but the pH was reset to 5.5 before each change. Acetate, butyrate, and ethanol were produced throughout all pH ranges, but there was a shift from butyrate at pH < 6.5 to ethanol at pH > 6.5, as well as a strong and consistent shift from hydrogen to formate as pH increased. Microbial analysis indicated that progressive pH resulted in dominance by Klebsiella, while reset pH resulted in a bias towards Clostridium spp., particularly at low pH, with higher variance in community between different pH levels. Reset pH was more responsive to changes in pH, and analysis of Gibbs free energy indicated that the reset pH experiments operated closer to thermodynamic equilibrium, particularly with respect to the formate/hydrogen balance. This may indicate that periodically resetting pH conforms better to thermodynamic expectations.

  18. Effects of pH, Chloride, and Bicarbonate on Cu(I) Oxidation Kinetics at Circumneutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, X.; Pham, A.; Waite, T.; Xing, G.; Rose, A.

    2012-12-01

    The redox chemistry of copper species in the upper water column plays a significant role in its speciation, transport and bioavailability. Most previous studies have focused primarily on Cu(II), principally because Cu(I) is easily oxidized to Cu(II) by oxygen or other oxidants. However, a growing body of evidence indicates that a number of potentially important reactions may lead to Cu(I) formation and result in a significant steady-state concentration of Cu(I) in natural waters. Redox reactions of Cu(I) could result in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide and hydroxyl radical, that may subsequently induce a cascade of radical-promoted reactions with other constituents in natural waters. As such, a better understanding of copper-catalysed processes that produce and consume O2- is important in furthering our insight into factors contributing to global biogeochemical cycles. In this study, the oxidation kinetics of nanomolar concentrations of Cu(I) in NaCl solutions have been investigated over the pH range 6.5-8.0.The overall apparent oxidation rate constant was strongly affected by chloride, moderately by bicarbonate and, and to a lesser extent, by pH. In the absence of bicarbonate, an equilibrium-based speciation model indicated that Cu+ and CuClOH- were the most kinetically reactive species, while the contribution of other Cu(I) species to the overall oxidation rate was minor. A kinetic model based on recognized key redox reactions for these two species further indicated that oxidation of Cu(I) by oxygen and superoxide were important reactions at all pH values and [Cl-] considered, but back reduction of Cu(II) by superoxide only became important at relatively low chloride concentrations. Bicarbonate concentrations from 2-5 mM substantially accelerated Cu(I) oxidation. Kinetic analysis over a range of bicarbonate concentrations revealed that this was due to the formation of CuCO3-, which reacts relatively rapidly with oxygen, and not

  19. Detrimental effects of reduced seawater pH on the early development of the Pacific abalone.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaqi; Jiang, Zengjie; Zhang, Jihong; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Du, Meirong; Bian, Dapeng; Fang, Jianguang

    2013-09-15

    The hatching process of the Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai was prolonged at a pH of 7.6 and pH 7.3, and the embryonic developmental success was reduced. The hatching rate at pH 7.3 was significantly (10.8%) lower than that of the control (pH 8.2). The malformation rates at pH 7.9 and pH 8.2 were less than 20% but were 53.8% and 77.3% at pH 7.6 and pH 7.3, respectively. When newly hatched larvae were incubated for 48 h at pH 7.3, only 2.7% of the larvae settled, while more than 70% of the larvae completed settlement in the other three pH treatments. However, most 24 h old larvae could complete metamorphosis in all four pH treatments. Overall, a 0.3-unit reduction in water pH will produce no negative effect on the early development of the Pacific abalone, but further reduction in pH to the values predicted for seawater by the end of this century will have strong detrimental effects.

  20. Responses of Rat Root ( Raf.) Plants to Salinity and pH Conditions.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Polanco, Monica; Alejandra Equiza, María; Señorans, Jorge; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2014-03-01

    Growth and physiological parameters were examined in rat root ( Raf.) plants grown under controlled environment conditions in hydroponics and subjected to different pH and salinity treatments to determine whether these environmental factors may contribute to poor establishment of in oil sands constructed wetlands. When plants were subjected to a root zone pH ranging from 6.0 to 9.5, the plants that were growing at pH 7.0 showed the highest relative growth rates and chlorophyll concentrations compared with lower and higher pH levels. The greatest inhibition of growth occurred at pH ranging from 8.0 to 9.5. High pH also triggered significant reductions in tissue concentrations of N, P, and microelements, whereas the concentrations of Mg increased at pH >8. When NaCl (25, 50, and 100 mmol L) was added to the nutrient solution at pH 7.0 and 8.5, higher mortality and greater tissue concentrations of Na and Cl were measured in plants growing at pH 8.5 compared with pH 7.0. The results show that plants growing at the optimum pH of 7.0 can better tolerate salinity compared with plants exposed to high root zone pH. Both pH and salinity may present important environmental constraints to growth and establishment of plants in oil sands constructed wetlands. PMID:25602659