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Sample records for acesulfame-k alitame aspartame

  1. In vivo cytogenetic studies on blends of aspartame and acesulfame-K.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, M; Mukherjee, A; Chakrabarti, J

    2000-01-01

    Aspartame and acesulfame-K, non-nutritive sweeteners, are permitted individually in diets and beverages. These sweeteners of different classes, used in combination, have been found to possess a synergistic sweetening effect. Whether they also have a synergistic genotoxic effect is unknown. Swiss Albino male mice were exposed to blends of aspartame (3.5, 35, 350mg/kg body weight) and acesulfame-K (1.5, 15 and 150mg/kg body weight) by gavage. Bone marrow cells isolated from femora were analysed for chromosome aberrations. Statistical analysis of the results show that aspartame in combination with acesulfame-K is not significantly genotoxic.

  2. FTIR determination of Aspartame and Acesulfame-K in tabletop sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Armenta, Sergio; Garrigues, Salvador; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2004-12-29

    Two different strategies for sweeteners determination in tabletop samples by Fourier transform middle-infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, an off-line and a fully mechanized extraction of Aspartame and Acesulfame-K with different mixtures of chloroform and methanol, have been developed. The off-line method involves the extraction of both active principles by sonication of samples with 25:75 v/v CHCl3/CH3OH and direct measurement of the peak height values at 1751 cm(-1), corrected using a baseline defined at 1850 cm(-1) for Aspartame, and measurement of the peak height at 1170 cm(-1) in the first-order derivative spectra, corrected by using a horizontal baseline established at 1850 cm(-1), for Acesulfame-K. Limit of detection values of 0.10 and 0.9% w/w and relative standard deviations of 0.17 and 0.5% were found for Aspartame and Acesulfame-K, respectively. The time needed for the sweeteners determination is reduced from 35 min for the HPLC method to 7 min by FTIR. On the other hand, the fully mechanized on-line extraction avoids the contact of the operator with toxic solvents and differentiates between samples that contain Aspartame and Acesulfame-K and those that include only Aspartame, reducing the time needed for the analysis of the last kind of samples to 5 min.

  3. Assessment of stability of binary sweetener blend (aspartame x acesulfame-K) during storage in whey lemon beverage.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sumit; Shendurse, Ashish M; Sharma, Vivek; Wadhwa, Balbir K; Singh, Ashish K

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, artificial sweeteners-aspartame, acesulfame-K and binary sweetener blend of aspartame x acesulfame-K were assessed for stability during storage in whey lemon beverage. A solid phase extraction method using C18 cartridges was standardized for the isolation of aspartame, acesulfame-K and their degradation products in whey lemon beverage. HPLC analytical conditions were standardized over C18 column for simultaneous separation of multiple sweeteners and their degradation products in sample isolates. Storage studies revealed that increase in acidity and viscosity and decrease in pH and ascorbic acid content of artificially sweetened whey lemon beverage samples were similar to the changes occurring in control samples during storage. Analysis using HPLC showed that aspartame (added either singly or in a blend) and acesulfame-K (added in a blend) were stable in whey lemon beverage under refrigerated condition for 15 days.

  4. [Use of HPLC technique for determination of aspartame and acesulfam-K in processed fruit products].

    PubMed

    Szymczyk, K; Czerwiecki, L

    1995-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic method for the determination of the intense sweeteners--aspartame and acesulfam-K in fruit and vegetable nectars was described. Samples were extracted with water, then clarified with Carrez solutions. An aliquot of the extract was analyzed on C-18 reverse-phase column with UV detection. Mean recoveries ranged from 95.9 to 101.8%. The method is suitable for routine determinations of both sweeteners.

  5. Intake of saccharin, aspartame, acesulfame K and cyclamate in Italian teenagers: present levels and projections.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, C; Berardi, D; Sorbillo, M R; Lambe, J

    1999-03-01

    The intake of saccharin, aspartame, acesulfame K and cyclamate was assessed in 212 Italian teenagers aged 13-19 in 1996. Total daily intake of intense sweeteners was assessed on the basis of dietary records (14 consecutive days). The sweetener content of sugar-free products (soft drinks, candies, chewing gums, yoghurts, jam and table-top sweeteners) was provided by manufacturers. Sugar-free products were consumed by 77% of the subjects. Mean daily intake among consumers was 0.24 mg/kg body weight (bw) for cyclamate (13 subjects), 0.21 mg/kg bw for saccharin (9 subjects), 0.03 mg/kg bw for aspartame (162 subjects), and 0.02 mg/kg bw for acesulfame K (56 subjects). No subject exceeded the ADI (Acceptable Daily Intake) of an intense sweetener. Projections based on the present levels of use of intense sweeteners in sugar-free products and on the dietary pattern observed in the sample suggest that approaching the ADI could be possible only if subjects with high intakes of both soft drinks and table-top sugar substituted these items with respectively sugar-free beverages and table-top sweeteners containing either saccharin or cyclamate.

  6. Genotoxicity testing of low-calorie sweeteners: aspartame, acesulfame-K, and saccharin.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Atrayee; Ghoshal, Sarbani; Mukherjee, Anita

    2008-01-01

    Low-calorie sweeteners are chemicals that offer the sweetness of sugar without the calories. Consumers are increasingly concerned about the quality and safety of many products present in the diet, in particular, the use of low-calorie sweeteners, flavorings, colorings, preservatives, and dietary supplements. In the present study, we evaluated the mutagenicity of the three low-calorie sweeteners in the Ames/Salmonella/microsome test and their genotoxic potential by comet assay in the bone marrow cells of mice. Swiss albino mice, Mus musculus, were orally administered with different concentrations of aspartame (ASP; 7, 14, 28, and 35 mg/kg body weight), acesulfame-K (ASK; 150, 300, and 600 mg/kg body weight), and saccharin (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg body weight) individually. Concurrently negative and positive control sets were maintained. The animals were sacrificed and the bone marrow cells were processed for comet assay. The standard plate-incorporation assay was carried with the three sweeteners in Salmonella typhimurium TA 97a and TA 100 strains both in the absence and presence of the S9 mix. The comet parameters of DNA were increased in the bone marrow cells due to the sweetener-induced DNA strand breaks, as revealed by increased comet-tail extent and percent DNA in the tail. ASK and saccharin were found to induce greater DNA damage than ASP. However, none could act as a potential mutagen in the Ames/Salmonella /microsome test. These findings are important, since they represent a potential health risk associated with the exposure to these agents.

  7. Estimated intake of the sweeteners, acesulfame-K and aspartame, from soft drinks, soft drinks based on mineral waters and nectars for a group of Portuguese teenage students.

    PubMed

    Lino, C M; Costa, I M; Pena, A; Ferreira, R; Cardoso, S M

    2008-11-01

    In a survey of levels of acesulfame-K and aspartame in soft drinks and in light nectars, the intake of these intense sweeteners was estimated for a group of teenage students. Acesulfame-K was detected in 72% of the soft drinks, with a mean concentration of 72 mg l(-1) and aspartame was found in 92% of the samples with a mean concentration of 89 mg l(-1). When data on the content of these sweeteners in soft drinks were analysed according to flavour, cola drinks had the highest mean levels for both sweeteners with 98 and 103 mg l(-1) for acesulfame-K and aspartame, respectively. For soft drinks based on mineral water, aspartame was found in 62% of the samples, with a mean concentration of 82 mg l(-1) and acesulfame-K was found in 77%, with a mean level of 48 mg l(-1). All samples of nectars contained acesulfame-K, with a mean concentration of 128 mg l(-1) and aspartame was detected in 80% of the samples with a mean concentration of 73 mg l(-1). A frequency questionnaire, designed to identify adolescents having high consumption of these drinks, was completed by a randomly selected sample of teenagers (n = 65) living in the city of Coimbra, in 2007. The estimated daily intakes (EDI) of acesulfame-K and aspartame for the average consumer were below the acceptable daily intakes (ADIs). For acesulfame-K, the EDI was 0.7 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for soft drinks, 0.2 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for soft drinks based on mineral waters, and 0.5 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for nectars, representing 8.0%, 2.2%, and 5.8% of the ADI, respectively. A similar situation was observed for aspartame. In this way, the EDI for soft drinks was 1.1 mg kg(-1) day(-1), representing only 2.9% of the ADI. In respect of nectars, the EDI was 0.2 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1), representing 0.5% of the ADI. Soft drinks based on mineral waters showed the lowest EDI values of 0.3 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1), accounting for 0.7% of the ADI.

  8. Estimated intake of the artificial sweeteners acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate and saccharin in a group of Swedish diabetics.

    PubMed

    Ilbäck, N-G; Alzin, M; Jahrl, S; Enghardt-Barbieri, H; Busk, L

    2003-02-01

    Few sweetener intake studies have been performed on the general population and only one study has been specifically designed to investigate diabetics and children. This report describes a Swedish study on the estimated intake of the artificial sweeteners acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate and saccharin by children (0-15 years) and adult male and female diabetics (types I and II) of various ages (16-90 years). Altogether, 1120 participants were asked to complete a questionnaire about their sweetener intake. The response rate (71%, range 59-78%) was comparable across age and gender groups. The most consumed 'light' foodstuffs were diet soda, cider, fruit syrup, table powder, table tablets, table drops, ice cream, chewing gum, throat lozenges, sweets, yoghurt and vitamin C. The major sources of sweetener intake were beverages and table powder. About 70% of the participants, equally distributed across all age groups, read the manufacturer's specifications of the food products' content. The estimated intakes showed that neither men nor women exceeded the ADI for acesulfame-K; however, using worst-case calculations, high intakes were found in young children (169% of ADI). In general, the aspartame intake was low. Children had the highest estimated (worst case) intake of cyclamate (317% of ADI). Children's estimated intake of saccharin only slightly exceeded the ADI at the 5% level for fruit syrup. Children had an unexpected high intake of tabletop sweeteners, which, in Sweden, is normally based on cyclamate. The study was performed during two winter months when it can be assumed that the intake of sweeteners was lower as compared with during warm, summer months. Thus, the present study probably underestimates the average intake on a yearly basis. However, our worst-case calculations based on maximum permitted levels were performed on each individual sweetener, although exposure is probably relatively evenly distributed among all sweeteners, except for cyclamate

  9. An Equiratio Mixture Model for non-additive components: a case study for aspartame/acesulfame-K mixtures.

    PubMed

    Schifferstein, H N

    1996-02-01

    The Equiratio Mixture Model predicts the psychophysical function for an equiratio mixture type on the basis of the psychophysical functions for the unmixed components. The model reliably estimates the sweetness of mixtures of sugars and sugar-alcohols, but is unable to predict intensity for aspartame/sucrose mixtures. In this paper, the sweetness of aspartame/acesulfame-K mixtures in aqueous and acidic solutions is investigated. These two intensive sweeteners probably do not comply with the model's original assumption of sensory dependency among components. However, they reveal how the Equiratio Mixture Model could be modified to describe and predict mixture functions for non-additive substances. To predict equiratio functions for all similar tasting substances, a new Equiratio Mixture Model should yield accurate predictions for components eliciting similar intensities at widely differing concentration levels, and for substances exhibiting hypo- or hyperadditivity. In addition, it should be able to correct violations of Stevens's power law. These three problems are resolved in a model that uses equi-intense units as the measure of physical concentration. An interaction index in the formula for the constant accounts for the degree of interaction between mixture components. Deviations from the power law are corrected by a nonlinear response output transformation, assuming a two-stage model of psychophysical judgment.

  10. Sub-minute method for simultaneous determination of aspartame, cyclamate, acesulfame-K and saccharin in food and pharmaceutical samples by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Vistuba, Jacqueline Pereira; Dolzan, Maressa Danielli; Vitali, Luciano; de Oliveira, Marcone Augusto Leal; Micke, Gustavo Amadeu

    2015-05-29

    This paper reports the development of a sub-minute separation method by capillary zone electrophoresis for the determination of aspartame, cyclamate, acesulfame-K and saccharin in food products and pharmaceutical samples. Separations were performed in a fused uncoated silica capillary with UV detection at 220nm. Samples and standards were injected hydrodynamically using the short-end injection procedure. The electrophoretic system was operated under constant voltage of -30kV. The background electrolyte was composed of 45mmolL(-1) 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol and 15mmolL(-1) benzoic acid at pH 8.4. The separation time for all analytes was less than 1min. Evaluation of analytical parameters of the method showed good linearity (r(2)>0.9972), limit of detection of 3.3-6.4mgL(-1), intermediate precision better than 9.75% (peak area of sample) and recovery in the range of 91-117%. PMID:25895731

  11. Sub-minute method for simultaneous determination of aspartame, cyclamate, acesulfame-K and saccharin in food and pharmaceutical samples by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Vistuba, Jacqueline Pereira; Dolzan, Maressa Danielli; Vitali, Luciano; de Oliveira, Marcone Augusto Leal; Micke, Gustavo Amadeu

    2015-05-29

    This paper reports the development of a sub-minute separation method by capillary zone electrophoresis for the determination of aspartame, cyclamate, acesulfame-K and saccharin in food products and pharmaceutical samples. Separations were performed in a fused uncoated silica capillary with UV detection at 220nm. Samples and standards were injected hydrodynamically using the short-end injection procedure. The electrophoretic system was operated under constant voltage of -30kV. The background electrolyte was composed of 45mmolL(-1) 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol and 15mmolL(-1) benzoic acid at pH 8.4. The separation time for all analytes was less than 1min. Evaluation of analytical parameters of the method showed good linearity (r(2)>0.9972), limit of detection of 3.3-6.4mgL(-1), intermediate precision better than 9.75% (peak area of sample) and recovery in the range of 91-117%.

  12. [Simultaneous determination of neotame, alitame and aspartame in foods by HPLC].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hiroko; Hirata, Keiko; Sakamaki, Narue; Hagino, Kayo; Ushiyama, Hirofumi

    2008-02-01

    Simultaneous determination of three artificial sweeteners, neotame (NE), alitame (AL) and aspartame (APM) in various foods by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed. Chopped or homogenized samples were packed into cellulose tubing with 0.01 mol/L hydrochloric acid containing 10% sodium chloride, and dialyzed against 0.01 mol/L hydrochloric acid for 24-48 hours. The dialyzate was passed through an Oasis MCX cartridge, and the cartridge was washed with water and methanol. Then the three sweeteners were eluted from the cartridge with a mixture of 0.5 mol/L ammonium chloride-acetonitrile (3 : 2). The sweeteners were separated on a Cosmosil 5C18-AR column using a gradient mode with a mobile phase of 0.01 mol/L phosphate buffer (pH 4.0)-acetonitrile and were detected at 210 nm. The recoveries of NE, AL and APM from 8 kinds of foods spiked with 10 and 100 microg/g were 86-100% and 89-104%, respectively. The detection limits of NE, AL and APM were 1 microg/g in samples. Furthermore, the three sweeteners were successfully identified by using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

  13. Title: Elucidation of Environmental Fate of Artificial Sweeteners (Aspartame, Acesulfame K and Saccharin) by Determining Bimolecular Rate Constants with Hydroxyl Radical at Various pH and Temperature Conditions and Possible Reaction By-Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teraji, T.; Arakaki, T.; Suzuka, T.

    2012-12-01

    Use of artificial sweeteners in beverages and food has been rapidly increasing because of their non-calorie nature. In Japan, aspartame, acesulfame K and sucralose are among the most widely used artificial sweeteners. Because the artificial sweeteners are not metabolized in human bodies, they are directly excreted into the environment without chemical transformations. We initiated a study to better understand the fate of artificial sweeteners in the marine environment. The hydroxyl radical (OH), the most potent reactive oxygen species, reacts with various compounds and determines the environmental oxidation capacity and the life-time of many compounds. The steady-state OH concentration and the reaction rate constants between the compound and OH are used to estimate the life-time of the compound. In this study, we determine the bimolecular rate constants between aspartame, acefulfame K and saccharin and OH at various pH and temperature conditions using a competition kinetics technique. We use hydrogen peroxide as a photochemical source of OH. Bimolecular rate constant we obtained so far for aspartame was (2.6±1.2)×109 M-1 s-1 at pH = 3.0 and (4.9±2.3)×109 M-1 s-1 at pH = 5.5. Little effect was seen by changing the temperatures between 15 and 40 oC. Activation energy (Ea) was calculated to be -1.0 kJ mol-1 at pH = 3.0, +8.5 kJ mol-1 at pH = 5.5, which could be regarded as zero. We will report bimolecular rate constants at different pHs and temperatures for acesulfame K and saccharin, as well. Possible reaction by-products for aspartame will be also reported. We will further discuss the fate of aspartame in the coastal environment.

  14. Evolution of the sweetness receptor in primates. I. Why does alitame taste sweet in all prosimians and simians, and aspartame only in Old World simians?

    PubMed

    Glaser, D; Tinti, J M; Nofre, C

    1995-10-01

    In the order Primates the responses to sucrose, alitame and aspartame were ascertained. All primates tested to date like sucrose and prefer this sweet substance to tap water. The artificial dipeptide aspartame was found to be not sweet in Prosimii and Platyrrhini (New World monkeys). Only the Cercopithecoidea (Old World monkeys) and Hominoidea (apes and humans) show the same response to aspartame and to sucrose. In contrast, all primates tested so far prefer alitame, another artificial dipeptide sweetener, which is structurally closely related to aspartame. This phylogenetic difference is consistent with the existence in catarrhine primates of a sweetness receptor containing two differently located hydrophobic recognition sites, one for the hydrophobic binding site of alitame, the other for the hydrophobic binding site of aspartame. On the basis of these results, it is suggested that the alitame-related hydrophobic recognition site, which is found in the sweetness receptor of all primates, could be a requisite for the interaction of the receptor with sucrose, while the aspartame-related hydrophobic recognition site, which is found exclusively in the sweetness receptor of Old World simians, could have been a crucial factor in the improvement in detection or selection of sucrose in foods, so favouring the mental development of these simians and maybe the emergence of humans.

  15. Selective continuous monitoring and analysis of mixtures of acesulfame-K, cyclamate, and saccharin in artificial sweetener tablets, diet soft drinks, yogurts, and wines using filter-supported bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Nikolelis, D P; Pantoulias, S

    2001-12-15

    This work describes a technique for the rapid and sensitive electrochemical flow injection monitoring and analysis of mixtures of the artificial sweeteners acesulfame-K, cyclamate, and saccharin using stabilized systems of filter-supported bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs). Injections of artificial sweeteners were made into flowing streams of a carrier electrolyte solution, and a transient current signal with duration of seconds reproducibly appeared in less than < 1 min after exposure of the lipid membranes to the artificial sweeteners. The magnitude of this signal was linearly related to the concentration of artificial sweeteners, which could be determined at micromolar levels. Repetitive cycles of injection of artificial sweeteners have shown no signal degradation during each cycle (30 sequential injections). The time of appearance of the transient response was different for each artificial sweetener and increased in the order of cyclamic acid, acesulfame-K, and saccharin. The difference in time of response has allowed selective detection and analysis of these artificial sweeteners in mixtures. The effect of potent interferences, including a wide range of compounds usually found in foods, proteins, and lipids was investigated. The results showed no interferences from these constituents of real food samples. The major interference from proteins (most common in lipid-film-based biosensors) can be eliminated by modulation of the carrier solution that does not allow adsorption of these compounds in BLMs. The technique was applied in real food samples, that is, in artificial sweetener tablets, diet soft drinks, wines, and yogurts that contain mixtures of these artificial sweeteners with aspartame and other compounds. A comparison of results using the present method and that of an Official Method of Analysis showed good agreement between the two methods.

  16. Rebaudioside A and Rebaudioside D bitterness do not covary with Acesulfame K bitterness or polymorphisms in TAS2R9 and TAS2R31

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Alissa L.; McGeary, John E.; Hayes, John E.

    2013-01-01

    In order to reduce calories in foods and beverages, the food industry routinely uses non-nutritive sweeteners. Unfortunately, many are synthetically derived, and many consumers have a strong preference for natural sweeteners, irrespective of the safety data on synthetic non-nutritive sweeteners. Additionally, many non-nutritive sweeteners elicit aversive side tastes such as bitter and metallic in addition to sweetness. Bitterness thresholds of acesulfame-K (AceK) and saccharin are known to vary across bitter taste receptors polymorphisms in TAS2R31. RebA has shown to activate hTAS2R4 and hTAS2R14 in vitro. Here we examined bitterness and sweetness perception of natural and synthetic non-nutritive sweeteners. In a follow-up to a previous gene-association study, participants (n=122) who had been genotyped previously rated sweet, bitter and metallic sensations from rebaudioside A (RebA), rebaudioside D (RebD), aspartame, sucrose and gentiobiose in duplicate in a single session. For comparison, we also present sweet and bitter ratings of AceK collected in the original experiment for the same participants. At similar sweetness levels, aspartame elicited less bitterness than RebD, which was significantly less bitter than RebA. The bitterness of RebA and RebD showed wide variability across individuals, and bitterness ratings for these compounds were correlated. However, RebA and RebD bitterness did not covary with AceK bitterness. Likewise, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) shown previously to explain variation in the suprathreshold bitterness of AceK (rs3741845 in TAS2R9 and rs10772423 in TAS2R31) did not explain variation in RebA and RebD bitterness. Because RebA activates hT2R4 and hT2R14, a SNP in TAS2R4 previously associated with variation in bitterness perception was included here; there are no known functional SNPs for TAS2R14. In present data, a putatively functional SNP (rs2234001) in TAS2R4 did not explain variation in RebA or RebD bitterness. Collectively

  17. Rebaudioside A and Rebaudioside D bitterness do not covary with Acesulfame K bitterness or polymorphisms in TAS2R9 and TAS2R31.

    PubMed

    Allen, Alissa L; McGeary, John E; Hayes, John E

    2013-09-01

    In order to reduce calories in foods and beverages, the food industry routinely uses non-nutritive sweeteners. Unfortunately, many are synthetically derived, and many consumers have a strong preference for natural sweeteners, irrespective of the safety data on synthetic non-nutritive sweeteners. Additionally, many non-nutritive sweeteners elicit aversive side tastes such as bitter and metallic in addition to sweetness. Bitterness thresholds of acesulfame-K (AceK) and saccharin are known to vary across bitter taste receptors polymorphisms in TAS2R31. RebA has shown to activate hTAS2R4 and hTAS2R14 in vitro. Here we examined bitterness and sweetness perception of natural and synthetic non-nutritive sweeteners. In a follow-up to a previous gene-association study, participants (n=122) who had been genotyped previously rated sweet, bitter and metallic sensations from rebaudioside A (RebA), rebaudioside D (RebD), aspartame, sucrose and gentiobiose in duplicate in a single session. For comparison, we also present sweet and bitter ratings of AceK collected in the original experiment for the same participants. At similar sweetness levels, aspartame elicited less bitterness than RebD, which was significantly less bitter than RebA. The bitterness of RebA and RebD showed wide variability across individuals, and bitterness ratings for these compounds were correlated. However, RebA and RebD bitterness did not covary with AceK bitterness. Likewise, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) shown previously to explain variation in the suprathreshold bitterness of AceK (rs3741845 in TAS2R9 and rs10772423 in TAS2R31) did not explain variation in RebA and RebD bitterness. Because RebA activates hT2R4 and hT2R14, a SNP in TAS2R4 previously associated with variation in bitterness perception was included here; there are no known functional SNPs for TAS2R14. In present data, a putatively functional SNP (rs2234001) in TAS2R4 did not explain variation in RebA or RebD bitterness. Collectively

  18. Determination of aspartame by ion chromatography with electrochemical integrated amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Qu, F; Qi, Z H; Liu, K N; Mou, S F

    1999-07-30

    In this paper, the separation and determination of the sweetener aspartame by ion chromatography coupled with electrochemical amperometric detection is reported. Sodium saccharin, acesulfame-K and aspartame were separated using 27.5 mmol/l NaOH isocratic elution on a Dionex IonPac AS4A-SC separation column. Aspartame can be determined by integrated amperometric detection without interference from the other two sweeteners. The method can be applied to the determination of aspartame in powered tabletop, fruit juice and carbonated beverage samples, and the results obtained by integrated amperometry were in agreement with those obtained using a UV detection method. A method for determining analytes with an NH2 group by ion chromatography with integrated amperometry was developed.

  19. Aspartame intolerance.

    PubMed

    Garriga, M M; Metcalfe, D D

    1988-12-01

    Aspartame is a food additive marketed under the brand name Nutrasweet. Aspartame is a white, odorless, crystalline powder and consists of two amino acids, L-aspartic acid and L-phenylalanine. It is 180 times as sweet as sugar. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) first allowed its use in dry foods in July 1981 and then approved its use in carbonated beverages in July 1983. It has subsequently been approved for use in a number of materials including multivitamins, fruit juices, stick-type confections, breath mints, and iced tea. The FDA requires the statement "phenylketonurics: contains phenylalanine" on labels of food products containing aspartame because individuals with phenylketonuria (PKU) must restrict their intake of phenylalanine. Aspartame is judged to be free of long-term cancer risks. Aspartame is not stable under certain conditions including baking and cooking, and prolonged exposure to acid conditions. In such situations it loses its sweetness. Products formed from aspartame include its component amino acids (phenylalanine and aspartic acid), methanol, and diketopiperazine (DKP). Animal studies show DKP to be nontoxic. Methanol occurs in small amounts and does not exceed that formed during consumption of many foods including fresh fruits and vegetables. FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) monitors aspartame's safety in part through reports of adverse reactions. After aspartame was approved for use in carbonated beverages, the FDA received an increased number of reports concerning adverse reactions related to aspartame. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reviewed these reports, which included complaints of neurologic, gastrointestinal, andallergic reactions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Determination of aspartame and its major decomposition products in foods.

    PubMed

    Prodolliet, J; Bruelhart, M

    1993-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic procedure already evaluated in a preceding study for the analysis of acesulfam-K is also suitable for the determination of the intense sweetener aspartame in tabletop sweetener, candy, fruit beverage, fruit pulp, soft drink, yogurt, cream, cheese, and chocolate preparations. The method also allows the determination of aspartame's major decomposition products: diketopiperazine, aspartyl-phenylalanine, and phenylalanine. Samples are extracted or diluted with water and filtered. Complex matrixes are centrifuged or clarified with Carrez solutions. An aliquot of the extract is analyzed on a reversed-phase muBondapak C18 column using 0.0125M KH2PO4 (pH 3.5)-acetonitrile ([85 + 15] or [98 + 2]) as mobile phase. Detection is performed by UV absorbance at 214 nm. Recoveries ranged from 96.1 to 105.0%. Decomposition of the sweetener was observed in most food samples. However, the total aspartame values (measured aspartame + breakdown products) were within -10% and +5% of the declared levels. The repeatabilities and the repeatability coefficients of variation were, respectively, 1.00 mg/100 g and 1.34% for products containing less than 45 mg/100 g aspartame and 4.11 mg/100 g and 0.91% for other products. The technique is precise and sensitive. It enables the detection of many food additives or natural constituents, such as other intense sweeteners, organic acids, and alkaloids, in the same run without interfering with aspartame or its decomposition products. The method is consequently suitable for quality control or monitoring.

  1. Behavioral study in the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) using compounds considered sweet by humans.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Alain; Danilova, Vicktoria; Hellekant, Goran

    2004-01-01

    This study presents the results from two-bottle preference (TBP) tests performed on the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), a small Malagasy primate. We found that of 18 compounds considered sweet by humans, M. murinus preferred only six: D-tryptophan, dulcin, fructose, sucrose, SC45647, and xylitol. The animals neither preferred nor rejected acesulfame-K, alitame, aspartame, N-4-cyanophenyl-N'-cyanoguanidineacetate (CCGA), cyanosuosan, cyclamate, monellin, saccharin, suosan, super-aspartame, N-trifluoroacetyl-L-glutamyl-4-aminophenylcarbonitrile (TGC), and thaumatin. Together with previously recorded taste-nerve responses in M. murinus to acesulfame-K, alitame, aspartame, cyclamate, monellin, saccharin, and suosan [Hellekant et al., Chem Senses 18:307-320, 1993b], the current results suggest that these compounds either do not taste sweet to M. murinus or they have an aversive taste component. In this work we also relate these findings to phylogeny.

  2. Bitterness of sweeteners as a function of concentration.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Booth, B J; Losee, M L; Pecore, S D; Warwick, Z S

    1995-01-01

    Sixteen trained tasters provided sweetness and bitterness intensity ratings for 19 compounds including: acesulfame-K, alitame, aspartame, fructose, glucose, glycine, lactitol, maltitol, monoammonium glycyrrhizinate, neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, neosugar (fructo-oligosaccharide), palatinit (isomalt), rebaudioside-A, sodium cyclamate, sodium saccharin, stevioside, sucralose, sucrose, and thaumatin. With increasing concentration, high-potency sweeteners including acesulfame-K, neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, sodium saccharin, rebaudioside-A, and stevioside tended to become more bitter. Low-potency sweeteners including fructose, sucrose, and lactitol tended to become less bitter with increasing concentration.

  3. [The psychophysics of sweet taste. 7. New determination of sweet taste parameters of acesulfame, aspartame, cyclamate, saccharin, glucose and sorbitol].

    PubMed

    Hoppe, K

    1995-01-01

    By means of a new method (double staircase) concentration pairs of equal intensity for the sweet compounds acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate-Na, saccharine-Na, dextrose and glucitol were determined with sucrose on 6 or 7 equidistant scaled levels, respectively, with 4 repetitions. The parameters maximal intensity Rm, the concentration coefficient b and the mean Rm/b, respectively, are calculated for each substance from the known parameters for sucrose using the exponential function R = Rm(1-e-bS/Rm), which describes the sweetness intensity R in dependence of the concentration S. For exact determination of the maximal intensity the upper concentration level was fixed at very high degree. Additionally, the relative sweetness of each concentration level of each substance is calculated. In all cases the exponential function is valid without limitation. The statistical parameters are homogenous and are laying within the applied staircase method. Systematical deviations could not be found.

  4. Aspartame: clinical update.

    PubMed

    Potenza, D P; el-Mallakh, R S

    1989-07-01

    Since the introduction of aspartame into the American food supply in 1981, it has grown to become the most widely used and accepted artificial sweetener. However, recent published and unpublished reports of headaches, seizures, blindness, and cognitive and behavioral changes with long-term, high-dose aspartame may be cause for concern. Physician awareness of the present clinical and research status of aspartame is important.

  5. Clinical safety of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Yost, D A

    1989-02-01

    Aspartame is a synthetic sweetener commonly used in soft drinks and many foods. Even with high doses, the metabolites of this sweetener do not accumulate in toxic amounts. To date, no definite symptom complex has been connected with aspartame, and it is considered safe for use in all populations, including diabetics, phenylketonuric heterozygotes and pregnant women.

  6. Modified high-density lipoproteins by artificial sweetener, aspartame, and saccharin, showed loss of anti-atherosclerotic activity and toxicity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Yong; Park, Ki-Hoon; Kim, Jihoe; Choi, Inho; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Safety concerns have been raised regarding the association of chronic consumption of artificial sweeteners (ASs) with metabolic disorders, especially in the heart and brain. There has been no information on the in vivo physiological effects of AS consumption in lipoprotein metabolism. High-dosage treatment (final 25, 50, and 100 mM) with AS (aspartame, acesulfame K, and saccharin) to human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) induced loss of antioxidant ability along with elevated atherogenic effects. Aspartame-treated HDL3 (final 100 mM) almost all disappeared due to putative proteolytic degradation. Aspartame- and saccharin-treated HDL3 showed more enhanced cholesteryl ester transfer activity, while their antioxidant ability was disappeared. Microinjection of the modified HDL3 exacerbated the inflammatory death in zebrafish embryos in the presence of oxLDL. These results show that AS treatment impaired the beneficial functions of HDL, resulting in loss of antioxidant and anti-atherogenic activities. These results suggest that aspartame and saccharin could be toxic to the human circulation system as well as embryonic development via impairment of lipoprotein function. PMID:25142179

  7. Modified high-density lipoproteins by artificial sweetener, aspartame, and saccharin, showed loss of anti-atherosclerotic activity and toxicity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Yong; Park, Ki-Hoon; Kim, Jihoe; Choi, Inho; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Safety concerns have been raised regarding the association of chronic consumption of artificial sweeteners (ASs) with metabolic disorders, especially in the heart and brain. There has been no information on the in vivo physiological effects of AS consumption in lipoprotein metabolism. High-dosage treatment (final 25, 50, and 100 mM) with AS (aspartame, acesulfame K, and saccharin) to human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) induced loss of antioxidant ability along with elevated atherogenic effects. Aspartame-treated HDL3 (final 100 mM) almost all disappeared due to putative proteolytic degradation. Aspartame- and saccharin-treated HDL3 showed more enhanced cholesteryl ester transfer activity, while their antioxidant ability was disappeared. Microinjection of the modified HDL3 exacerbated the inflammatory death in zebrafish embryos in the presence of oxLDL. These results show that AS treatment impaired the beneficial functions of HDL, resulting in loss of antioxidant and anti-atherogenic activities. These results suggest that aspartame and saccharin could be toxic to the human circulation system as well as embryonic development via impairment of lipoprotein function.

  8. Aspartame: review of safety.

    PubMed

    Butchko, Harriett H; Stargel, W Wayne; Comer, C Phil; Mayhew, Dale A; Benninger, Christian; Blackburn, George L; de Sonneville, Leo M J; Geha, Raif S; Hertelendy, Zsolt; Koestner, Adalbert; Leon, Arthur S; Liepa, George U; McMartin, Kenneth E; Mendenhall, Charles L; Munro, Ian C; Novotny, Edward J; Renwick, Andrew G; Schiffman, Susan S; Schomer, Donald L; Shaywitz, Bennett A; Spiers, Paul A; Tephly, Thomas R; Thomas, John A; Trefz, Friedrich K

    2002-04-01

    Over 20 years have elapsed since aspartame was approved by regulatory agencies as a sweetener and flavor enhancer. The safety of aspartame and its metabolic constituents was established through extensive toxicology studies in laboratory animals, using much greater doses than people could possibly consume. Its safety was further confirmed through studies in several human subpopulations, including healthy infants, children, adolescents, and adults; obese individuals; diabetics; lactating women; and individuals heterozygous (PKUH) for the genetic disease phenylketonuria (PKU) who have a decreased ability to metabolize the essential amino acid, phenylalanine. Several scientific issues continued to be raised after approval, largely as a concern for theoretical toxicity from its metabolic components--the amino acids, aspartate and phenylalanine, and methanol--even though dietary exposure to these components is much greater than from aspartame. Nonetheless, additional research, including evaluations of possible associations between aspartame and headaches, seizures, behavior, cognition, and mood as well as allergic-type reactions and use by potentially sensitive subpopulations, has continued after approval. These findings are reviewed here. The safety testing of aspartame has gone well beyond that required to evaluate the safety of a food additive. When all the research on aspartame, including evaluations in both the premarketing and postmarketing periods, is examined as a whole, it is clear that aspartame is safe, and there are no unresolved questions regarding its safety under conditions of intended use.

  9. Aspartame and seizures.

    PubMed

    Jobe, P C; Dailey, J W

    1993-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that the dietary sweetener aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) might promote seizures and this hypothesis has been argued in the published literature. The current manuscript reviews the biochemical, neurochemical and behavioral experiments that have been carried out in order to assess the hypothesis linking aspartame with seizure promotion. We conclude that convulsive seizures are not caused by orally administered aspartame in rodents or in primates, including humans. Early reports of seizure facilitation by aspartame in several rodent models were not confirmed by later and more careful experimentation. Proconvulsive effects were absent in humans and other mammals with epilepsy and those without epilepsy. Lack of convulsive liability was evident, even when doses many fold higher than those consumed in the human diet, were used in experimental paradigms. Studies of aspartame in absence seizures are not as complete as those in convulsive seizures, but available evidence in humans does not document an association between absence seizure incidence and aspartame usage.

  10. Simultaneous determination of nonnutritive sweeteners in foods by HPLC/ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Da-jin; Chen, Bo

    2009-04-22

    Nonnutritive sweeteners are the low calorie substances used to replace sugar and other caloric ones. Determination of these sweeteners in foods is important to ensure consistency in product quality. In this study, seven artificial (aspartame, saccharin, acesulfame-K, neotame, sucralose, cyclamate, and alitame) and one natural sweetener (stevioside) were simultaneously determined in different foods using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection (ESI-MS). The target compounds were quantified using a selective ionization recording (SIR) at m/z 178, 397, 377, 293, 641, 312, 162, and 182 to cyclamate, sucralose, neotame, aspartame, stevioside, alitame, acesulfame-K, and saccharin, respectively, with warfarin sodium (SIR m/z 307) being used as an internal standard. The correlation coefficient of the calibration curve was better than 0.998 (n = 6), in the range of 0.05 to 5.00 microg/mL for cyclamate, 0.30 to 30.0 microg/mL for sucralose, 0.10 to 10.0 microg/mL for neotame, 0.20 to 20.0 microg/mL for aspartame, 0.50 to 15.0 microg/mL for stevioside, 0.08 to 8.00 microg/mL for alitame, 0.10 to 15.0 microg/mL for acesulfame-K, and 0.05 to 5.00 microg/mL for saccharin. The limits of detection (LODs) were below 0.10 microg/mL, whereas the limits of quantification (LOQs) were below 0.30 microg/mL. It is concluded that the method has merits such as high sensitivity, specificity, and simplicity versus the those of the other methods reported in the literature.

  11. Aspartame use in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Karstaedt, P J; Pincus, J H

    1993-03-01

    The artificial sweetener aspartame (NutraSweet) is hydrolyzed in the gut as phenylalanine (PA), a large neutral amino acid (LNAA). LNAAs compete with levodopa for uptake into the brain. To determine the effect of aspartame on levodopa-treated Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, we studied 18 PD patients with protein-sensitive motor fluctuations by administering in a double-blind and single-crossover design, on alternate days, aspartame (600 or 1,200 mg) and placebo. Every hour, we performed a motor examination and drew blood to estimate plasma LNAA, PA, and levodopa levels. Six-hundred mg of aspartame had no effect on plasma PA or motor status. Although 1,200 mg of aspartame significantly increased plasma PA, motor performance did not deteriorate. Aspartame consumption in amounts well in excess of what would be consumed by heavy users of aspartame-sweetened products has no adverse effect on PD patients.

  12. Review of present and future use of nonnutritive sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Bertorelli, A M; Czarnowski-Hill, J V

    1990-01-01

    In response to growing consumer demand for better tasting, low-calorie, sugar-free food products, the number of food items containing nonnutritive sweeteners has grown markedly in recent years. In this paper, present sweetener consumption is reviewed; the history, properties, uses, advantages, and safety of approved sweeteners such as saccharin, aspartame, and acesulfame-K are presented, as well as those of sweeteners such as cyclamate, sucralose, and alitame that are awaiting FDA approval; the role of sweeteners in the dietary management of persons with diabetes is discussed; and counseling guidelines for safe consumption are given.

  13. The content of high-intensity sweeteners in different categories of foods available on the Polish market.

    PubMed

    Zygler, Agata; Wasik, Andrzej; Kot-Wasik, Agata; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the concentrations of nine high-intensity sweeteners (acesulfame-K, aspartame, alitame, cyclamate, dulcin, neohesperidin DC, neotame, saccharin and sucralose) in different categories of food available on the Polish market. Over 170 samples of different brands of beverages, yoghurts, fruit preparations, vegetable preserves and fish products were analysed using an analytical procedure based on SPE and LC/MS. The results indicated that foodstuffs under the study generally comply with European Union legislation in terms of sweetener content. However, a few cases of food product mislabelling were detected, i.e. the use of cyclamate for non-approved applications.

  14. [The antimutagenic activity of aspartame].

    PubMed

    Kulakova, A V; Belogolovskaia, E G; Oreshchenko, A V; Durnev, A D; Seredenin, S B

    1999-01-01

    The method of chromosome aberration count in the bone marrow cells of C57B1/6 mice was used to study the influence of aspartame on the cytogenetic effects of dioxydin and cyclophosphan. Aspartame (0.4-40 mg/kg) was found to possess antimutagenic properties in relation to the listed mutagens. The discovered antimutagenic activity of aspartame was manifested more when it was injected for 5 days before the administration of a mutagen, whereas in joint administration of aspartame with the mutagens, the substitute for sugar did not change the clastogenic effect of dioxydin and cyclophosphan.

  15. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016. PMID:27038223

  16. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016.

  17. Aspartame and Its Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, L. A.; Komarova, T. V.; Davidovich, Yurii A.; Rogozhin, S. V.

    1981-04-01

    The results of studies on the biochemistry of the sweet taste are briefly reviewed. The methods of synthesis of "aspartame" — a sweet dipeptide — are considered, its structural analogues are described, and quantitative estimates are made of the degree of sweetness relative to sucrose. Attention is concentrated mainly on problems of the relation between the structure of the substance and its taste in the series of aspartyl derivatives. The bibliography includes 118 references.

  18. Can aspartame meet our expectations?

    PubMed

    Horwitz, D L; Bauer-Nehrling, J K

    1983-08-01

    Aspartame is a dipeptide containing aspartic acid and phenylalanine methyl ester. It is a nutritive sweetener with a caloric value equivalent to that of other proteins and with sweetness approximately 180 times that of sucrose. Thus, for equivalent sweetening power, it contributes only 0.5% of the kilocalories of sugar. Numerous studies have shown no potential toxicity of amounts of aspartame likely to be ingested, or even of abuse doses. Although aspartame cannot fully replace sugar, it appears to be a safe and acceptable sweetener for those who must, or desire to, reduce their intake of sucrose.

  19. Neurobehavioral effects of aspartame consumption.

    PubMed

    Lindseth, Glenda N; Coolahan, Sonya E; Petros, Thomas V; Lindseth, Paul D

    2014-06-01

    Despite its widespread use, the artificial sweetener aspartame remains one of the most controversial food additives, due to mixed evidence on its neurobehavioral effects. Healthy adults who consumed a study-prepared high-aspartame diet (25 mg/kg body weight/day) for 8 days and a low-aspartame diet (10 mg/kg body weight/day) for 8 days, with a 2-week washout between the diets, were examined for within-subject differences in cognition, depression, mood, and headache. Measures included weight of foods consumed containing aspartame, mood and depression scales, and cognitive tests for working memory and spatial orientation. When consuming high-aspartame diets, participants had more irritable mood, exhibited more depression, and performed worse on spatial orientation tests. Aspartame consumption did not influence working memory. Given that the higher intake level tested here was well below the maximum acceptable daily intake level of 40-50 mg/kg body weight/day, careful consideration is warranted when consuming food products that may affect neurobehavioral health.

  20. Genotoxicity of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Rencüzoğullari, Eyyüp; Tüylü, Berrin Ayaz; Topaktaş, Mehmet; Ila, Hasan Basri; Kayraldiz, Ahmet; Arslan, Mehmet; Diler, Songül Budak

    2004-08-01

    In the present study, the genotoxic effects of the low-calorie sweetener aspartame (ASP), which is a dipeptide derivative, was investigated using chromosome aberration (CA) test, sister chromatid exchange (SCE) test, micronucleus test in human lymphocytes and also Ames/Salmonella/ microsome test. ASP induced CAs at all concentrations (500, 1000 and 2000 microg/ml) and treatment periods (24 and 48 h) dose-dependently, while it did not induce SCEs. On the other hand, ASP decreased the replication index (RI) only at the highest concentration for 48 h treatment period. However, ASP decreased the mitotic index (MI) at all concentrations and treatment periods dose-dependently. In addition, ASP induced micronuclei at the highest concentrations only. This induction was also dose-dependent for 48 hours treatment period. ASP was not mutagenic for Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains in the absence and presence of S9 mix.

  1. Aspartame and dental caries in the rat.

    PubMed

    Das, S; Das, A K; Murphy, R A; Worawongvasu, R

    1991-01-01

    Aspartame (NutraSweet--The NutraSweet Co., Deerfield, IL) an artificial intense sweetener, was tested for its cariogenicity alone and in the presence of sucrose. Sprague-Dawley rat pups (Charles River Laboratories, Bloomington, MA) inoculated with Streptococcus mutans were fed basal diet 2000 with one of the following added: 50% sucrose; 30% sucrose; 30% sucrose + 0.15% aspartame; 0.30% aspartame; 0.15% aspartame and no addition. The animals were sacrificed after eight weeks. Caries was evaluated using Keyes' technique. It was found that the addition of 0.15% aspartame to 30% sucrose diet significantly reduced caries in comparison to rats fed only 30% sucrose diet. In animals fed aspartame only, there was no caries. The S. mutans counts were high in the animals receiving sucrose diets with and without aspartame. The animals receiving only aspartame had very low S. mutans counts.

  2. Formaldehyde, aspartame, and migraines: a possible connection.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sharon E; Stechschulte, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Aspartame is a widely used artificial sweetener that has been linked to pediatric and adolescent migraines. Upon ingestion, aspartame is broken, converted, and oxidized into formaldehyde in various tissues. We present the first case series of aspartame-associated migraines related to clinically relevant positive reactions to formaldehyde on patch testing.

  3. Aspartame and susceptibility to headache.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Buckley, C E; Sampson, H A; Massey, E W; Baraniuk, J N; Follett, J V; Warwick, Z S

    1987-11-01

    We performed a double-blind crossover trial of challenges with 30 mg of aspartame per kilogram of body weight or placebo in 40 subjects who reported having headaches repeatedly after consuming products containing aspartame. The incidence rate of headache after aspartame (35 percent) was not significantly different from that after placebo (45 percent) (P less than 0.50). No serious reactions were observed, and the incidence of symptoms other than headache following aspartame was also equivalent to that after placebo. No treatment-related effects were detected in vital signs, blood pressure, or plasma concentrations of cortisol, insulin, glucagon, histamine, epinephrine, or norepinephrine. Most of the subjects were well educated and overweight and had a family or personal history of allergic reactions. The subjects who had headaches had lower plasma concentrations of norepinephrine (P less than 0.0002) and epinephrine (P less than 0.02) just before the development of headache. We conclude that in this population, aspartame is no more likely to produce headache than placebo.

  4. Aspartame bioassay findings portend human cancer hazards.

    PubMed

    Huff, James; LaDou, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) should reevaluate its position on aspartame as being safe under all conditions. Animal bioassay results predict human cancer risks, and a recent animal study confirms that there is a potential aspartame risk to humans. Aspartame is produced and packaged in China for domestic use and global distribution. Japan, France, and the United States are also major producers. No study of long-term adverse occupational health effects on aspartame workers have been conducted. The FDA should consider sponsoring a prospective epidemiologic study of aspartame workers.

  5. Aspartame: safety and stability in kalakand.

    PubMed

    Gawande, H M; Arora, Sumit; Sharma, Vivek; Wadhwa, B K

    2015-04-01

    Aspartame was used in the manufacture of kalakand instead of sucrose. Sensory evaluation revealed that aspartame when used in the preparation of kalakand at a level of 0.065 % scored the highest in terms of sweetness perception and resembled control. Aspartame sweetened kalakand possessed the same desirable sweetness, colour, body and texture/consistency and mouthfeel even after 7 days of storage at 6-8 °C. Significant increase in titratable acidity of control as well as aspartame sweetened kalakand was observed during storage. However, only a slight drop in pH was observed in all samples on storage. The titratable acidity was higher in aspartame sweetened products than the corresponding control samples. Lightness (L*) was less in control samples with sucrose than the aspartame sweetened kalakand during storage. Total plate counts were higher in aspartame sweetened kalakand than its corresponding control throughout the storage period. Total plate counts increased linearly for both aspartame sweetened kalakand and control. A solid phase extraction method was standardized for the isolation of aspartame in kalakand. HPLC analytical conditions were standardized for separation of aspartame and its degradation products diketopiperazine and L-phenylalanine. HPLC analysis revealed that aspartame did not degrade in kalakand during storage establishing its stability in these products. PMID:25829622

  6. Aspartame: safety and stability in kalakand.

    PubMed

    Gawande, H M; Arora, Sumit; Sharma, Vivek; Wadhwa, B K

    2015-04-01

    Aspartame was used in the manufacture of kalakand instead of sucrose. Sensory evaluation revealed that aspartame when used in the preparation of kalakand at a level of 0.065 % scored the highest in terms of sweetness perception and resembled control. Aspartame sweetened kalakand possessed the same desirable sweetness, colour, body and texture/consistency and mouthfeel even after 7 days of storage at 6-8 °C. Significant increase in titratable acidity of control as well as aspartame sweetened kalakand was observed during storage. However, only a slight drop in pH was observed in all samples on storage. The titratable acidity was higher in aspartame sweetened products than the corresponding control samples. Lightness (L*) was less in control samples with sucrose than the aspartame sweetened kalakand during storage. Total plate counts were higher in aspartame sweetened kalakand than its corresponding control throughout the storage period. Total plate counts increased linearly for both aspartame sweetened kalakand and control. A solid phase extraction method was standardized for the isolation of aspartame in kalakand. HPLC analytical conditions were standardized for separation of aspartame and its degradation products diketopiperazine and L-phenylalanine. HPLC analysis revealed that aspartame did not degrade in kalakand during storage establishing its stability in these products.

  7. Behavioral assessment of the toxicity of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Holder, M D; Yirmiya, R

    1989-01-01

    Six experiments with rats assessed the toxicity of aspartame with behavioral measures. The first three experiments used a conditioned taste aversion procedure since taste aversions are typically observed after a taste is followed by a toxin. Thirty min after thirsty rats drank a sweet solution they were intraperitoneally injected (Experiment 1) or intragastrically intubated (Experiment 2) with saline or 176, 352, or 704 mg/kg of aspartame. Relative to rats given saline, rats injected with 704 and 352 mg/kg aspartame showed strong and mild aversions, respectively. Rats injected with 176 mg/kg of aspartame or intubated with any dose of aspartame did not show taste aversions. In Experiment 3, rats voluntarily consumed an aspartame solution sweetened with saccharin for 7 hr each day. Consumption of the taste paired with aspartame was not reduced. When 352 mg/kg aspartame was injected (Experiment 4), but not when intubated (Experiment 5), 5 min prior to access to a running wheel, running was reduced. Wheel running was not affected by the voluntary consumption of aspartame (Experiment 6). The route of administration effect (intraperitoneal vs. intragastric) on behavior corresponded with the amino acid levels in blood plasma (Experiment 7). Aspartate, phenylalanine, tyrosine and glutamate levels increased more after the injection, than the intubation, of aspartame (176 mg/kg). Overall, the results suggest that aspartame may have adverse effects when intraperitoneally injected but not when the route of administration is oral.

  8. Use of aspartame in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sturtevant, F M

    1985-01-01

    The low-calorie sweetening agent, aspartame, is broken down in the small intestine into three moieties: aspartic acid, methanol and phenylalanine. Acute loading studies have been performed in human beings who received up to six times the 99th percentile of the projected daily intake (6 X 34 = 200 mg/kg). No evidence of risk to the fetus was developed. Aspartate does not readily cross the placenta. Small elevations of blood methanol following such abuse doses of aspartame did not lead to measurable increases of blood formic acid, which is the product responsible for the acidosis and ocular toxicity in methanol poisoning. Phenylalanine is concentrated on the fetal side of the placenta. Aspartame in abuse doses up to 200 mg/kg in normal subjects, or to 100 mg/kg in PKU heterozygotes, did not raise blood phenylalanine levels to the range generally accepted to be associated with mental retardation in the offspring. It is concluded that, under foreseeable conditions of use, aspartame poses no risk for use in pregnancy.

  9. In vivo cytogenetic studies on aspartame.

    PubMed

    Alsuhaibani, Entissar S

    2010-01-01

    Aspartame (a-Laspartyl-L-phenylalanine 1-methylester) is a dipeptide low-calorie artificial sweetener that is widely used as a nonnutritive sweetener in foods and drinks. The safety of aspartame and its metabolic breakdown products (phenylalanine, aspartic acid and methanol) was investigated in vivo using chromosomal aberration (CA) test and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) test in the bone marrow cells of mice. Swiss Albino male mice were exposed to aspartame (3.5, 35, 350 mg/kg body weight). Bone marrow cells isolated from femora were analyzed for chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges. Treatment with aspartame induced dose dependently chromosome aberrations at all concentrations while it did not induce sister chromatid exchanges. On the other hand, aspartame did not decrease the mitotic index (MI). However, statistical analysis of the results show that aspartame is not significantly genotoxic at low concentration.

  10. Aspartame use by persons with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nehrling, J K; Kobe, P; McLane, M P; Olson, R E; Kamath, S; Horwitz, D L

    1985-01-01

    Sixty-two subjects having either insulin-dependent or non-insulin-dependent diabetes completed a randomized, double-blind study comparing effects of aspartame or a placebo on blood glucose control. Twenty-nine subjects consumed 2.7 g aspartame per day for 18 wk, given as aspartame-containing capsules with meals, while 33 subjects took identical appearing placebo capsules. After 18 wk, no changes were seen in fasting or 2-h postprandial blood glucose levels or glycohemoglobin levels in either the aspartame- or placebo-treated groups. Adverse reactions were no more common in the group taking aspartame. We conclude that use of aspartame as a low-calorie sweetener does not adversely affect glycemic control of persons with diabetes.

  11. Aspartame and aspartame derivatives effect human thrombin catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Julie E; Berliner, Lawrence J

    2004-12-20

    The study of small Asp-Phe analogs was undertaken since this dipeptide sequence is critical in fibrinogen recognition and catalysis. The inhibition of clotting activity by Asp-Phe-methyl ester (aspartame), formyl-Asp-Phe-methyl ester and acetyl-Asp-Phe was biphasic in all cases, indicating the presence of at least two binding sites. The N-terminally blocked derivatives are stronger inhibitors than aspartame. In contrast, tosyl-Gly-Pro-Arg-p'-nitroanilide hydrolysis was inhibited minimally by Asp-Phe-methyl, ester [Ki(app)=98 mM]. Acetyl-Asp-Phe inhibition of thrombin amidase activity was biphasic, tenfold stronger and appeared to be strongly cooperative. These results are discussed with respect to the inhibition of alpha-thrombin by ATP.

  12. Conformation and hydration of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y K

    1991-07-01

    Conformational free energy calculations using an empirical potential (ECEPP/2) and the hydration shell model were carried out on the neutral, acidic, zwitterionic, and basic forms of aspartame in the hydrated state. The results indicate that as the molecule becomes more charged, the number of low energy conformations becomes smaller and the molecule becomes less flexible. The calculated free energies of hydration of charged aspartames show that hydration has a significant effect on the conformation in solution. Only two feasible conformations were found for the zwitterionic form, and these are consistent with the conformations deduced from NMR and X-ray diffraction experiments. The calculated free energy difference between these two conformations was 1.25 kcal/mol. The less favored of the two solvated conformations can be expected to be stabilized by hydrophobic interaction of the phenyl groups in the crystal.

  13. Amperometric bienzymic sensor for aspartame.

    PubMed

    Compagnone, D; O'Sullivan, D; Guilbault, G G

    1997-05-01

    An amperometric enzyme electrode for the determination of aspartame was developed by covalent immobilization of alcohol oxidase and alpha-chymotrypsin. A platinum based hydrogen peroxide electrode was used as the detector. Excellent sensitivity was obtained using batch, flow-through and flow injection methods with detection limits of 2 x 10(-7), 4 x 10(-7) and 10(-6) mol l-1, respectively. Different strategies for eliminating interfering compounds, including the introduction of an additional alcohol oxidase-catalase membrane and signal subtraction using an alcohol electrode, were employed. A recovery study on seven food samples was carried out and the results were satisfactory.

  14. Aspartame as a dietary trigger of headache.

    PubMed

    Lipton, R B; Newman, L C; Cohen, J S; Solomon, S

    1989-02-01

    Many dietary factors have been implicated as possible precipitants of headache. There have been recent differences of opinion with regard to the effect of the artificial sweetener aspartame as a precipitant of headache. To assess the importance of aspartame as a dietary factor in headache, 190 consecutive patients of the Montefiore Medical Center Headache Unit were questioned about the effect of alcohol, carbohydrates and aspartame in triggering their headaches. Of the 171 patients who fully completed the survey, 49.7 percent reported alcohol as a precipitating factor, compared to 8.2 percent reporting aspartame and 2.3 percent reporting carbohydrates. Patients with migraine were significantly more likely to report alcohol as a triggering factor and also reported aspartame as a precipitant three times more often than those having other types of headache. The conflicting results of two recent placebo-control studies of aspartame and headache are discussed. We conclude that aspartame may be an important dietary trigger of headache in some people.

  15. Artificial sweeteners - a review.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sanchari; Raychaudhuri, Utpal; Chakraborty, Runu

    2014-04-01

    Now a days sugar free food are very much popular because of their less calorie content. So food industry uses various artificial sweeteners which are low in calorie content instead of high calorie sugar. U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved aspartame, acesulfame-k, neotame, cyclamate and alitame for use as per acceptable daily intake (ADI) value. But till date, breakdown products of these sweeteners have controversial health and metabolic effects. On the other hand, rare sugars are monosaccharides and have no known health effects because it does not metabolize in our body, but shows same sweet taste and bulk property as sugar. Rare sugars have no such ADI value and are mainly produced by using bioreactor and so inspite of high demand, rare sugars cannot be produced in the desired quantities. PMID:24741154

  16. [Simultaneous determination of six synthetic sweeteners in food by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Ding, Li; Liu, Jinxia; Zhang, Ying; Huang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Libing; Chen, Bo

    2010-11-01

    A simple and sensitive method for the determination of six synthetic sweeteners (sodium cyclamate, saccharin sodium, acesulfame-K, aspartame, alitame and neotame) in food was developed. The synthetic sweeteners were extracted by methanol-water (1 : 1, v/v). The extract was separated on a C18 column using 0.1% (v/v) formic acid-5 mmol/L ammonium formate/acetonitrile as mobile phase, and then detected by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The good linearities (r > 0.998) were achieved for all the analytes over the range of 20-500 microg/L. The recoveries obtained ranged from 81.3% to 106.0% at three spiked concentrations, with the relative standard deviations lower than 11%. The established method has been successfully applied to the determination of synthetic sweeteners in food.

  17. Artificial sweeteners - a review.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sanchari; Raychaudhuri, Utpal; Chakraborty, Runu

    2014-04-01

    Now a days sugar free food are very much popular because of their less calorie content. So food industry uses various artificial sweeteners which are low in calorie content instead of high calorie sugar. U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved aspartame, acesulfame-k, neotame, cyclamate and alitame for use as per acceptable daily intake (ADI) value. But till date, breakdown products of these sweeteners have controversial health and metabolic effects. On the other hand, rare sugars are monosaccharides and have no known health effects because it does not metabolize in our body, but shows same sweet taste and bulk property as sugar. Rare sugars have no such ADI value and are mainly produced by using bioreactor and so inspite of high demand, rare sugars cannot be produced in the desired quantities.

  18. The intake of intense sweeteners - an update review.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Andrew G

    2006-04-01

    Studies on the intakes of intense sweeteners in different countries published since the author's previous review in 1999 indicate that the average and 95th percentile intakes of acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate and saccharin by adults are below the relevant acceptable daily intake (ADI) values. Fewer data are available for the newer sweeteners, sucralose and alitame, and because they are recent introductions to the market very low intakes were reported in those countries where they were available at the time of the intake study. Overall there has not been a significant change in the intakes of sweeteners in recent years. The only data indicating that the intake of an intense sweetener could exceed its ADI value were the 95th percentile intakes of cyclamate in children, particularly those with diabetes. This sub-group was identified as having high intakes of cyclamate in 1999, and recent studies have not generated reliable intake data to address this possibility.

  19. Determination of seven artificial sweeteners in diet food preparations by reverse-phase liquid chromatography with absorbance detection.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J F; Charbonneau, C F

    1988-01-01

    The artificial sweeteners aspartame, saccharin, cyclamate, alitame, acesulfam-K, sucralose, and dulcin are determined in diet soft drinks and tabletop sweetener preparations. Samples are diluted, filtered, and analyzed directly by liquid chromatography on a C-18 reverse-phase column with a mobile phase gradient ranging from 3% acetonitrile in 0.02M KH2PO4 (pH 5) to 20% acetonitrile in 0.02M KH2PO4 (pH 3.5). Diet puddings and dessert toppings are extracted with ethanol, filtered, and diluted with mobile phase for analysis. The sweeteners, except sucralose and cyclamate, were detected by UV absorbance at either 200 or 210 nm. Sucralose was determined at 200 nm or by refractive index. Cyclamate was determined after post-column ion-pair extraction. The sweeteners stevioside and talin were not detected. Additives such as caffeine, sorbic acid, and benzoic acid did not interfere.

  20. Oral stimulation with aspartame increases hunger.

    PubMed

    Tordoff, M G; Alleva, A M

    1990-03-01

    We evaluated whether "sweetness" increases hunger. Groups of 10 male and 10 female subjects chewed a gum base containing one of four concentrations of aspartame (0.05%, 0.3%, 0.5%, or 1.0%) for 15 min. Relative to groups given nothing or unsweetened gum base to chew, groups given the sweetened gum bases increased hunger ratings, but not in a manner monotonically related to aspartame concentration. The most effective aspartame concentration to increase hunger was 0.3% for females and 0.5% for males. The highest aspartame concentrations had a time-dependent, biphasic effect on appetite, producing a transient decrease followed by a sustained increase in hunger ratings. Thus, the concentration of the sweetener, the sex of the subject and the time after chewing, were all important determinants of whether "sweetness" increased hunger.

  1. Adaptation of sweeteners in water and in tannic acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Pecore, S D; Booth, B J; Losee, M L; Carr, B T; Sattely-Miller, E; Graham, B G; Warwick, Z S

    1994-03-01

    Repeated exposure to a tastant often leads to a decrease in magnitude of the perceived intensity; this phenomenon is termed adaptation. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of adaptation of the sweet response for a variety of sweeteners in water and in the presence of two levels of tannic acid. Sweetness intensity ratings were given by a trained panel for 14 sweeteners: three sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose), two polyhydric alcohols (mannitol, sorbitol), two terpenoid glycosides (rebaudioside-A, stevioside), two dipeptide derivatives (alitame, aspartame), one sulfamate (sodium cyclamate), one protein (thaumatin), two N-sulfonyl amides (acesulfame-K, sodium saccharin), and one dihydrochalcone (neohesperidin dihydrochalcone). Panelists were given four isointense concentrations of each sweetener by itself and in the presence of two concentrations of tannic acid. Each sweetener concentration was tasted and rated four consecutive times with a 30 s interval between each taste and a 2 min interval between each concentration. Within a taste session, a series of concentrations of a given sweetener was presented in ascending order of magnitude. Adaptation was calculated as the decrease in intensity from the first to the fourth sample. The greatest adaptation in water solutions was found for acesulfame-K, Na saccharin, rebaudioside-A, and stevioside. This was followed by the dipeptide sweeteners, alitame and aspartame. The least adaptation occurred with the sugars, polyhydric alcohols, and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Adaptation was greater in tannic acid solutions than in water for six sweeteners. Adaptation of sweet taste may result from the desensitization of sweetener receptors analogous to the homologous desensitization found in the beta adrenergic system.

  2. Physiological mechanisms mediating aspartame-induced satiety.

    PubMed

    Hall, W L; Millward, D J; Rogers, P J; Morgan, L M

    2003-04-01

    Aspartame has been previously shown to increase satiety. This study aimed to investigate a possible role for the satiety hormones cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in this effect. The effects of the constituents of aspartame, phenylalanine and aspartic acid, were also examined. Six subjects consumed an encapsulated preload consisting of either 400 mg aspartame, 176 mg aspartic acid+224 mg phenylalanine, or 400 mg corn flour (control), with 1.5 g paracetamol dissolved in 450 ml water to measure gastric emptying. A 1983-kJ liquid meal was consumed 60 min later. Plasma CCK, GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucose, and insulin were measured over 0-120 min. Gastric emptying was measured from 0 to 60 min. Plasma GLP-1 concentrations decreased following the liquid meal (60-120 min) after both the aspartame and amino acids preloads (control, 2096.9 pmol/l min; aspartame, 536.6 pmol/l min; amino acids, 861.8 pmol/l min; incremental area under the curve [AUC] 60-120 min, P<.05). Desire to eat was reduced from 60 to 120 min following the amino acids preload (control, -337.1 mm min; aspartame, -505.4 mm min; amino acids, -1497.1 mm min; incremental AUC 60-120 min, P<.05). However, gastric emptying rates, plasma CCK, GIP, insulin, and glucose concentrations were unaffected. There was a correlation between the increase in plasma phenylalanine and decrease in desire to eat after the liquid meal following the constituent amino acids (r=-.9774, P=.004). In conclusion, it is unlikely that aspartame increases satiety via CCK- or GLP-1-mediated mechanisms, but small changes in circulating phenylalanine concentrations may influence appetite.

  3. Retention behaviour of some high-intensity sweeteners on different SPE sorbents.

    PubMed

    Zygler, Agata; Wasik, Andrzej; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2010-10-15

    The objective of this paper is to provide information about application of solid-phase extraction (SPE) for isolation of nine high-intensity sweeteners (acesulfame-K, alitame, aspartame, cyclamate, dulcin, neotame, saccharin, sucralose and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone) from aqueous solutions. The influence of several types of LC-MS compatible buffers (different pH values and compositions) on their recovery has been studied and discussed. A number of commercially available SPE cartridges, such as Chromabond C18ec, Strata-X RP, Bakerbond Octadecyl, Bakerbond SDB-1, Bakerbond SPE Phenyl, Oasis HLB, LiChrolut RP-18, Supelclean LC-18, Discovery DSC-18 and Zorbax C18 were tested in order to evaluate their applicability for the isolation of analytes. Very high recoveries (better than 92%) of all studied compounds were obtained using formic acid-N,N-diisopropylethylamine buffer adjusted to pH 4.5 and C(18)-bonded silica sorbents. Behaviour of polymeric sorbents strongly depends on their structure. Strata-X RP behaves much like a C(18)-bonded silica sorbent. Recoveries obtained using Oasis HLB were comparable with those observed for silica-based sorbents. The only compound less efficiently (83%) retained by this sorbent was cyclamate. Bakerbond SDB-1 shows unusual selectivity towards aspartame and alitame. Recoveries of these two sweeteners were very low (26 and 42%, respectively). It was also found that aspartame and alitame can be selectively separated from the mixture of sweeteners using formic acid-triethylamine buffer at pH 3.5. PMID:20875571

  4. Retention behaviour of some high-intensity sweeteners on different SPE sorbents.

    PubMed

    Zygler, Agata; Wasik, Andrzej; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2010-10-15

    The objective of this paper is to provide information about application of solid-phase extraction (SPE) for isolation of nine high-intensity sweeteners (acesulfame-K, alitame, aspartame, cyclamate, dulcin, neotame, saccharin, sucralose and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone) from aqueous solutions. The influence of several types of LC-MS compatible buffers (different pH values and compositions) on their recovery has been studied and discussed. A number of commercially available SPE cartridges, such as Chromabond C18ec, Strata-X RP, Bakerbond Octadecyl, Bakerbond SDB-1, Bakerbond SPE Phenyl, Oasis HLB, LiChrolut RP-18, Supelclean LC-18, Discovery DSC-18 and Zorbax C18 were tested in order to evaluate their applicability for the isolation of analytes. Very high recoveries (better than 92%) of all studied compounds were obtained using formic acid-N,N-diisopropylethylamine buffer adjusted to pH 4.5 and C(18)-bonded silica sorbents. Behaviour of polymeric sorbents strongly depends on their structure. Strata-X RP behaves much like a C(18)-bonded silica sorbent. Recoveries obtained using Oasis HLB were comparable with those observed for silica-based sorbents. The only compound less efficiently (83%) retained by this sorbent was cyclamate. Bakerbond SDB-1 shows unusual selectivity towards aspartame and alitame. Recoveries of these two sweeteners were very low (26 and 42%, respectively). It was also found that aspartame and alitame can be selectively separated from the mixture of sweeteners using formic acid-triethylamine buffer at pH 3.5.

  5. Elucidation of Environmental Fate of Artificial Sweetener, Aspartame by Determining Bimolecular Rate Constants with Hydroxyl Radical at Various pH and Temperature Conditions and Reaction By-Products Presentation type:Poster Section:Ocean Sciences Session:General Contribution Authors:Takashi Teraji (1) Takemitsu Arakaki (2) AGU# 10173629 (1) Graduate School of Engineering and Science, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru Nishihara-cho, Okinawa, 903-0123, Japan (a4269bj@yahoo.co.jp), (2) Department of Chemistry, Biology and Marine Science, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru Nishihara-cho, Okinawa, 903-0123, Japan (arakakit@sci.u-ryukyu.ac.jp)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teraji, T.; Arakaki, T.

    2011-12-01

    Use of artificial sweeteners in drinks and food has been rapidly increasing because of their non-calorie nature. In Japan, aspartame, acesulfame K and sucralose are among the most widely used artificial sweeteners. Because the artificial sweeteners are not metabolized in human bodies, they are directly excreted into the environment without chemical transformations. We initiated a study to better understand the fate of artificial sweeteners in the marine environment. In particular, we focused on the fate of aspartame by determining its bimolecular rate constants with hydroxyl radicals at various pH and temperature conditions and reaction by-products. The hydroxyl radical (OH), the most potent reactive oxygen species, reacts with various compounds and determines the environmental oxidation capacity and the life-time of many compounds. The steady-state OH concentration and the reaction rate constants between the compound and OH are used to estimate the life-time of the compound. In this study, we determine the bimolecular rate constants between aspartame and OH at various pH and temperature conditions using a competition kinetics technique. We use hydrogen peroxide as a photochemical source of OH. Bimolecular rate constant we obtained so far was (2.6±1.2)×109 M-1 s-1 at pH = 3.0. Little effect was seen by changing the temperatures between 15 and 40 °C. Activation energy (Ea) was calculated to be -1.0 kJ mol-1 at pH = 3.0, which could be regarded as zero. We will report reaction rate constants at different pHs and reaction by-products which will be analyzed by GC-MS. We will further discuss the fate of aspartame in the coastal environment.

  6. Postingestive inhibition of food intake by aspartame: importance of interval between aspartame administration and subsequent eating.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P J; Burley, V J; Alikhanizadeh, L A; Blundell, J E

    1995-03-01

    Aspartame administered in capsules (i.e., without tasting) 1 h before a meal significantly reduces the amount eaten in that meal. In the present study 36 young men and women were divided into 3 groups of 12 to receive aspartame (400 mg) or placebo (400 mg starch) on separate occasions either 5 min (Group A), 30 min (Group B) or 60 min (Group C) before beginning an ad lib test meal. Compared with placebo, aspartame reduced food intake in Group C (by 18.5%, p < 0.01), but did not reliably affect intake in Groups A or B. There were, in contrast, no significant effects of aspartame on premeal ratings of hunger, desire to eat or fullness for any of the groups. These results confirm a postingestive inhibitory action of aspartame on appetite, which may involve the amplification of the satiating effects of food. The lack of effect of aspartame administered at the shorter intervals before eating suggests a postgastric or even postabsorptive mechanism of action. This observation is also important in its implications for the possible therapeutic exploitation of the anorexic effect of capsulated aspartame.

  7. "Aspartame: A review of genotoxicity data".

    PubMed

    Kirkland, David; Gatehouse, David

    2015-10-01

    Aspartame is a methyl ester of a dipeptide of aspartic acid and phenylalanine. It is 200× sweeter than sucrose and is approved for use in food products in more than 90 countries around the world. Aspartame has been evaluated for genotoxic effects in microbial, cell culture and animal models, and has been subjected to a number of carcinogenicity studies. The in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity data available on aspartame are considered sufficient for a thorough evaluation. There is no evidence of induction of gene mutations in a series of bacterial mutation tests. There is some evidence of induction of chromosomal damage in vitro, but this may be an indirect consequence of cytotoxicity. The weight of evidence from in vivo bone marrow micronucleus, chromosomal aberration and Comet assays is that aspartame is not genotoxic in somatic cells in vivo. The results of germ cell assays are difficult to evaluate considering limited data available and deviations from standard protocols. The available data therefore support the conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) that aspartame is non-genotoxic. PMID:26321723

  8. "Aspartame: A review of genotoxicity data".

    PubMed

    Kirkland, David; Gatehouse, David

    2015-10-01

    Aspartame is a methyl ester of a dipeptide of aspartic acid and phenylalanine. It is 200× sweeter than sucrose and is approved for use in food products in more than 90 countries around the world. Aspartame has been evaluated for genotoxic effects in microbial, cell culture and animal models, and has been subjected to a number of carcinogenicity studies. The in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity data available on aspartame are considered sufficient for a thorough evaluation. There is no evidence of induction of gene mutations in a series of bacterial mutation tests. There is some evidence of induction of chromosomal damage in vitro, but this may be an indirect consequence of cytotoxicity. The weight of evidence from in vivo bone marrow micronucleus, chromosomal aberration and Comet assays is that aspartame is not genotoxic in somatic cells in vivo. The results of germ cell assays are difficult to evaluate considering limited data available and deviations from standard protocols. The available data therefore support the conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) that aspartame is non-genotoxic.

  9. Aspartame: effects on learning, behavior, and mood.

    PubMed

    Saravis, S; Schachar, R; Zlotkin, S; Leiter, L A; Anderson, G H

    1990-07-01

    The effect of aspartame on the learning, behavior, and mood of children was evaluated in two experiments. After an overnight fast and a standard breakfast, 20 healthy 9- to 10-year-old children were given the treatments in a double-blind crossover design at 10:30 AM. Lunch was served at 12:00 noon. In experiment 1, the treatment consisted of an ice slurry of strawberry Kool-Aid containing 1.75 g/kg of carbohydrate (polycose) plus either aspartame (34 mg/kg) or the equivalent sweetness as sodium cyclamate and amino acids as alanine. In experiment 2, the treatment consisted of a drink of cold unsweetened strawberry Kool-Aid, containing either 1.75 g/kg of sucrose or 9.7 mg/kg of aspartame. Measures of associative learning, arithmetic calculation, activity level, social interaction, and mood were unaffected by treatment in experiment 1. In experiment 2, the only significant treatment effect was that on the frequency of minor and gross motor behaviors, which were less frequent after the consumption of sucrose than after aspartame. Thus, the effect of aspartame on the short-term behavior of healthy 9- to 10-year-old children appears to be related to its absence of metabolic consequences rather than to its amino acid composition and putative neurochemical impact.

  10. Aspartame: scientific evaluation in the postmarketing period.

    PubMed

    Butchko, H H; Stargel, W W

    2001-12-01

    Prior to marketing, the safety of the high-intensity sweetener aspartame for its intended uses as a sweetener and flavor enhancer was demonstrated by the results of over 100 scientific studies in animals and humans. In the postmarketing period, the safety of aspartame was further evaluated through extensive monitoring of intake, postmarketing surveillance of anecdotal reports of alleged health effects, and additional research to evaluate these anecdotal reports and other scientific issues. The results of the extensive intake evaluation in the United States, which was done over an 8-year period, and the results of studies done in other countries demonstrated intakes which were well below the acceptable daily intakes set by the FDA and regulatory bodies in other countries, as well as the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives. Evaluation of the anecdotal reports of adverse health effects, the first such system for a food additive, revealed that the reported effects were generally mild and also common in the general population and that there was no consistent or unique pattern of symptoms that could be causally linked to consumption of aspartame. Finally, the results of the extensive scientific research done to evaluate these allegations did not show a causal relationship between aspartame and adverse effects. Thus, the weight of scientific evidence confirms that, even in amounts many times what people typically consume, aspartame is safe for its intended uses as a sweetener and flavor enhancer.

  11. Aspartame. Review of safety issues. Council on Scientific Affairs.

    PubMed

    1985-07-19

    This report examines the safety issues related to the nutritive sweetener aspartame, including possible toxic effects of aspartame's component amino acids, aspartic acid and phenylalanine, and its major decomposition products, methanol and diketopiperazine, and the potential synergistic effect of aspartame and dietary carbohydrate on brain neurochemicals. Available evidence suggests that consumption of aspartame by normal humans is safe and is not associated with serious adverse health effects. Individuals who need to control their phenylalanine intake should handle aspartame like any other source of phenylalanine.

  12. The effects of aspartame on mast cells and basophils.

    PubMed

    Szucs, E F; Barrett, K E; Metcalfe, D D

    1986-02-01

    The artificial sweetener aspartame was studied to determine whether it had any direct effects on mast cells and basophils. Aspartame was not shown to be a direct mast cell or basophil secretagogue in vitro, or in vivo as assessed by skin testing. During an acute incubation, aspartame did not affect IgE-mediated histamine release from mast cells. However, mast cells cultured in aspartame for periods of up to 9 days showed enhanced rates of proliferation and decreased responsiveness to releasing stimuli. The effect of aspartame on proliferation of cells in culture could be ascribed to a non-specific enhancing effect of its constituent amino acids.

  13. Modified DNA aptamers against sweet agent aspartame.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Akiko; Kuwahara, Masayasu; Ozaki, Hiroaki; Sawai, Hiroaki

    2002-01-01

    We obtained a modified DNA aptamer against sweetener, aspartame, by in vitro selection method. The modified DNA was prepared from dATP, dGTP, dCTP and a modified dTTP bearing a terminal amino group at C-5 position in place of thymidine by PCR using a hyper thermophilic DNA polymerase, KOD Dash DNA polymerase. The synthetic 102-mer DNA with a 60-mer random region was used as an initial template for the PCR. The PCR-amplified modified DNA library was applied to an aspartame-agarose column, and then the bound modified DNA was eluted from the column for the affinity chromatography selection. Repeating the procedure, we selected the modified DNA aptamer against aspartame.

  14. Effect of sucrose on the metabolic disposition of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Brummel, M C; Persoon, T J; Filer, L J; Bell, E F; Ziegler, E E

    1990-08-01

    Twelve normal adult subjects ingested a beverage providing 0.136 mmol aspartame/kg body wt on 2 different days. On 1 study day the beverage provided only aspartame, on the other the beverage provided both aspartame and 3.51 mmol sucrose/kg body wt. The high mean plasma phenylalanine concentrations were similar after administration of aspartame alone (158 +/- 28.9 mumol/L, mean +/- SD) and administration of aspartame plus sucrose (134 +/- 44.1 mumol/L). Evaluation of the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) for phenylalanine also showed no significant difference between groups (197 +/- 49.1 vs 182 +/- 28.3 mumol.L-1.h for aspartame alone and aspartame plus sucrose, respectively). Similarly, the high mean ratio of phenylalanine to large neutral amino acids (Phe:LNAA) in plasma did not differ significantly (0.265 +/- 0.046 for aspartame alone, 0.275 +/- 0.107 for aspartame plus sucrose). However, there was a small but significant difference between groups for the 4-h AUC values for plasma Phe:LNAA. The simultaneous ingestion of sucrose with aspartame had only minor effects on aspartame's metabolic disposition.

  15. Aspartame-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Horio, Yukari; Sun, Yongkun; Liu, Chuang; Saito, Takeshi; Kurasaki, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetner added to many low-calorie foods. The safety of aspartame remains controversial even though there are many studies on its risks. In this study, to understand the physiological effects of trace amounts of artificial sweetners on cells, the effects of aspartame on apoptosis were investigated using a PC12 cell system. In addition, the mechanism of apoptosis induced by aspartame in PC12 cells and effects on apoptotic factors such as cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor, and caspase family proteins were studied by Western blotting and RT-PCR. Aspartame-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, aspartame exposure increased the expressions of caspases 8 and 9, and cytochrome c. These results indicate that aspartame induces apoptosis mainly via mitochondrial pathway involved in apoptosis due to oxigen toxicity.

  16. Characterization of aspartame-cyclodextrin complexation.

    PubMed

    Sohajda, Tamás; Béni, Szabolcs; Varga, Erzsébet; Iványi, Róbert; Rácz, Akos; Szente, Lajos; Noszál, Béla

    2009-12-01

    The inclusion complex formation of aspartame (guest) and various cyclodextrins (host) were examined using 1H NMR titration and capillary electrophoresis. Initially the protonation constants of aspartame were determined by NMR-pH titration with in situ pH measurement to yield log K1=7.83 and log K2=2.96. Based on these values the stability of the complexes formed by aspartame and 21 different cyclodextrins (CDs) were studied at pH 2.5, pH 5.2 and pH 9.0 values where aspartame exists predominantly in monocationic, zwitterionic and monoanionic form, respectively. The host cyclodextrin derivatives differed in various sidechains, degree of substitution, charge and purity so that the effect of these properties could be examined systematically. Concerning size, the seven-membered beta-cyclodextrin and its derivatives have been found to be the most suitable host molecules for complexation. Highest stability was observed for the acetylated derivative with a degree of substitution of 7. The purity of the CD enhanced the complexation while the degree of substitution did not provide obvious consequences. Finally, geometric aspects of the inclusion complex were assessed by 2D ROESY NMR and molecular modelling which proved that the guest's aromatic ring enters the wider end of the host cavity. PMID:19586735

  17. Characterization of aspartame-cyclodextrin complexation.

    PubMed

    Sohajda, Tamás; Béni, Szabolcs; Varga, Erzsébet; Iványi, Róbert; Rácz, Akos; Szente, Lajos; Noszál, Béla

    2009-12-01

    The inclusion complex formation of aspartame (guest) and various cyclodextrins (host) were examined using 1H NMR titration and capillary electrophoresis. Initially the protonation constants of aspartame were determined by NMR-pH titration with in situ pH measurement to yield log K1=7.83 and log K2=2.96. Based on these values the stability of the complexes formed by aspartame and 21 different cyclodextrins (CDs) were studied at pH 2.5, pH 5.2 and pH 9.0 values where aspartame exists predominantly in monocationic, zwitterionic and monoanionic form, respectively. The host cyclodextrin derivatives differed in various sidechains, degree of substitution, charge and purity so that the effect of these properties could be examined systematically. Concerning size, the seven-membered beta-cyclodextrin and its derivatives have been found to be the most suitable host molecules for complexation. Highest stability was observed for the acetylated derivative with a degree of substitution of 7. The purity of the CD enhanced the complexation while the degree of substitution did not provide obvious consequences. Finally, geometric aspects of the inclusion complex were assessed by 2D ROESY NMR and molecular modelling which proved that the guest's aromatic ring enters the wider end of the host cavity.

  18. 21 CFR 172.804 - Aspartame.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from the United States Pharmacopeial Convention, 12601.../federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations.html. (c)(1) When aspartame is used as a sugar substitute tablet for..., see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed...

  19. 21 CFR 172.804 - Aspartame.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... this chapter. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 172.804, see the List of CFR... conditions: (a) Aspartame is the chemical 1-methyl N- l-α-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine (C14H18N2O5). (b) The... PHENYLALANINE The statement shall appear in the labeling prominently and conspicuously as compared to...

  20. 21 CFR 172.804 - Aspartame.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... this chapter. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 172.804, see the List of CFR... conditions: (a) Aspartame is the chemical 1-methyl N- l-α-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine (C14H18N2O5). (b) The... PHENYLALANINE The statement shall appear in the labeling prominently and conspicuously as compared to...

  1. 21 CFR 172.804 - Aspartame.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... this chapter. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 172.804, see the List of CFR... conditions: (a) Aspartame is the chemical 1-methyl N- l-α-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine (C14H18N2O5). (b) The... PHENYLALANINE The statement shall appear in the labeling prominently and conspicuously as compared to...

  2. 21 CFR 172.804 - Aspartame.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... this chapter. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 172.804, see the List of CFR... conditions: (a) Aspartame is the chemical 1-methyl N- l-α-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine (C14H18N2O5). (b) The... PHENYLALANINE The statement shall appear in the labeling prominently and conspicuously as compared to...

  3. Aspartame pharmacokinetics - the effect of ageing.

    PubMed

    Puthrasingam, S; Heybroek, W M; Johnston, A; Maskrey, V; Swift, C G; Turner, P; Abrams, S M; Jackson, S H

    1996-05-01

    Aspartame is an intense sweetener which is increasingly used in the UK. It is registered at an acceptable daily intake (ADI) of 40 mg/kg, although there are no previous data relating to the metabolism of aspartame in older people. Twelve young and 12 elderly volunteers each received a single dose of approximately 40 mg/kg of aspartame. Baseline concentrations of phenylalanine (the main metabolite of aspartame) rose after ingestion with a significantly higher maximum concentration (Cmax) (81.3 vs. 63.3 micromol/1, p<0.01) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve extrapolated to infinity AUC 9(0-infinity)(518.7 vs. 353.5 micromol . h/l, p<0.01) in the elderly group. The higher concentrations reflected a significant fall in volume of distribution (V) from 2.03 to 1.59 1/kg (p <0.05) and clearance (CL) from 7.3 to 4.9 ml/min/kg (p <0.005) in the elderly group. The greater effect on CL than on V resulted in a small but non-significant rise in elimination half life (3.5 to 3.9 hours). The sizes of the differences were modest implying that there is no need on pharmacokinetic grounds for a change in the ADI for older people.

  4. Aspartame downregulates 3T3-L1 differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Park, Jeongeun; Kim, Eunjung

    2014-10-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetener used as an alternate for sugar in several foods and beverages. Since aspartame is 200 times sweeter than traditional sugar, it can give the same level of sweetness with less substance, which leads to lower-calorie food intake. There are reports that consumption of aspartame-containing products can help obese people lose weight. However, the potential role of aspartame in obesity is not clear. The present study investigated whether aspartame suppresses 3T3-L1 differentiation, by downregulating phosphorylated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (p-PPARγ), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), which are critical for adipogenesis. The 3T3-L1 adipocytes were cultured and differentiated for 6 d in the absence and presence of 10 μg/ml of aspartame. Aspartame reduced lipid accumulation in differentiated adipocytes as evidenced by Oil Red O staining. qRT-PCR analysis showed that the PPARγ, FABP4, and C/EBPα mRNA expression was significantly reduced in the aspartame-treated adipocytes. Western blot analysis showed that the induction of p-PPARγ, PPARγ, SREBP1, and adipsin was markedly reduced in the aspartame-treated adipocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that aspartame may be a potent substance to alter adipocyte differentiation and control obesity. PMID:24961835

  5. Aspartame downregulates 3T3-L1 differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Park, Jeongeun; Kim, Eunjung

    2014-10-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetener used as an alternate for sugar in several foods and beverages. Since aspartame is 200 times sweeter than traditional sugar, it can give the same level of sweetness with less substance, which leads to lower-calorie food intake. There are reports that consumption of aspartame-containing products can help obese people lose weight. However, the potential role of aspartame in obesity is not clear. The present study investigated whether aspartame suppresses 3T3-L1 differentiation, by downregulating phosphorylated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (p-PPARγ), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), which are critical for adipogenesis. The 3T3-L1 adipocytes were cultured and differentiated for 6 d in the absence and presence of 10 μg/ml of aspartame. Aspartame reduced lipid accumulation in differentiated adipocytes as evidenced by Oil Red O staining. qRT-PCR analysis showed that the PPARγ, FABP4, and C/EBPα mRNA expression was significantly reduced in the aspartame-treated adipocytes. Western blot analysis showed that the induction of p-PPARγ, PPARγ, SREBP1, and adipsin was markedly reduced in the aspartame-treated adipocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that aspartame may be a potent substance to alter adipocyte differentiation and control obesity.

  6. Aspartame stability in commercially sterilized flavored dairy beverages.

    PubMed

    Bell, L N; Labuza, T P

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the stability of aspartame in commercially sterilized skim milk beverages that contained different buffer salts, buffer concentrations, and flavor. The effects of pH and temperature on aspartame stability in these dairy beverages were also studied. The pH and storage temperature appeared to be the two most important factors for a successful dairy beverage sweetened with aspartame. The half-lives were 1 to 4 d at 30 degrees C and 24 to 58 d at 4 degrees C. Decreasing the pH from 6.7 to 6.4 doubled the stability of aspartame. The type and concentration of buffer had only a minor influence on the aspartame stability. The addition of vanilla did not enhance the degradation of aspartame in dairy beverages.

  7. Monosodium glutamate and aspartame in perceived pain in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Vellisca, María Y; Latorre, José I

    2014-07-01

    Our aim was to assess the effect of dietary elimination of monosodium glutamate (MSG) and aspartame on perceived pain in fibromyalgia. A total of 72 female patients with fibromyalgia were randomized to discontinuation of dietary MSG and aspartame (n = 36) or waiting list (n = 36). Patients were requested to rate their pain using a seven-point scale. Comparisons between both groups showed no significant differences on pain referred during the baseline or after the elimination of dietary MSG and aspartame. The discontinuation of dietary MSG and aspartame did not improve the symptoms of fibromyalgia.

  8. Aspartame ingested without tasting inhibits hunger and food intake.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P J; Pleming, H C; Blundell, J E

    1990-06-01

    The effects on motivation to eat and food intake of administering small amounts of aspartame (234 to 470 mg: lower dose equivalent to the amount of aspartame contained in 1-2 cans of some soft drinks) in capsules to human volunteers were examined in two separate experiments (the second was a replication of the first). The results provided clear evidence of a prominent postingestive inhibitory action of aspartame on appetite: consumed in capsules, aspartame reduced subsequent food intake and, to a lesser extent, motivation to eat. The mechanism underlying this effect has yet to be elucidated. A possibility is that the release of cholecystokinin by phenylalanine, a constituent of aspartame, is involved. A further result was that drinking aspartame-sweetened water did not reliably reduce motivational ratings or food intake (in the first experiment aspartame ingested in capsules significantly reduced food intake compared with the same amount ingested as a sweet drink). One interpretation of these together with previous findings is that the response to consuming aspartame is determined by at least two interacting influences: an inhibitory postingestive effect and a stimulatory effect of its sweet taste. In turn, the relative potency of these influences may be modified by certain other features of the aspartame-sweetened food or drink (e.g., its nutrient content). Another implication of these results is that it cannot be assumed that intense sweeteners will all have equivalent effects on appetite.

  9. Enzymic method for the spectrophotometric determination of aspartame in beverages.

    PubMed

    Hamano, T; Mitsuhashi, Y; Aoki, N; Yamamoto, S; Tsuji, S; Ito, Y; Oji, Y

    1990-04-01

    A sensitive spectrophotometric method for the determination of aspartame in beverages is described. The method involves the enzymic conversion of aspartame into formaldehyde by the alpha-chymotrypsin-alcohol oxidase system, followed by the formation of a chromophore with 4-aminopent-3-en-2-one. The calibration graph was linear in the range 2.0-30.0 micrograms ml-1 of aspartame. Many common ingredients of beverages do not interfere with the proposed method. The method was applied to the determination of the aspartame content of various real samples, and the results obtained were compared with those given by high-performance liquid chromatography.

  10. Phosphorous-containing analogues of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Nelson, V; Mastalerz, P

    1984-12-01

    Four analogues of aspartame (aspartylphenylalanine methyl ester) were prepared in which one of the carboxylate groups was replaced by a phosphonate group. None of the peptides so obtained was sweet, in contrast with the parent compound which is over 100 times sweeter than sucrose. These results contrast with several published reports of phosphonate analogues of amino acids and peptides which are potent inhibitors of enzymes containing acceptor sites for the parent compound.

  11. Aspartame: review of recent experimental and observational data.

    PubMed

    Janssen, P J; van der Heijden, C A

    1988-06-01

    In this report the neurotoxicity of aspartame and its constituent amino acids aspartic acid and phenylalanine is reviewed. The adverse reactions ascribed to the consumption of aspartame-containing products, as reported in the U.S.A., are discussed and placed in perspective with the results of recent behavioural studies in humans and animals. The issue of common intake levels associated with proposed uses of aspartame is addressed. In brief, the following conclusions can be drawn: When aspartame is consumed at levels within the ADI-limit of 40 mg/kg body wt, there is no significant risk for an aspartate-induced neurotoxic effect in the brain. When aspartame is consumed at levels within the ADI-limit by normal subjects or persons heterozygous for phenylketonuria (PKU) the resultant plasma phenylalanine concentrations are practically always within the normal postprandial range; elevation to plasma concentrations commonly associated with adverse effects has not been observed. Persons suffering from phenylketonuria (PKU-homozygotes) on a phenylalanine-restricted diet should avoid consumption of aspartame. PKU-homozygotes on the (less strict) phenylalanine-liberalized diet should be made aware of the phenylalanine content of aspartame. In the available behavioural studies in humans with acute dosing, no adverse effects were observed. Long-term studies on behaviour and cognitive function in (sensitive) humans are lacking. Analyses of adverse reaction reports made by consumers in the U.S.A. have not yielded a specific constellation of symptoms clearly related to aspartame that would suggest a widespread public health hazard associated with aspartame use. Focussed clinical studies are now being carried out in the U.S.A.; the results should provide additional evidence concerning the interpretation of the reports on adverse reactions ascribed to aspartame. In the regulation of admitted uses for aspartame the possibility of intake levels exceeding the ADI-limit in some groups

  12. Safety of long-term large doses of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Leon, A S; Hunninghake, D B; Bell, C; Rassin, D K; Tephly, T R

    1989-10-01

    Safety of long-term administration of 75 mg/kg of aspartame per day was evaluated with the use of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group design in 108 male and female volunteers aged 18 to 62 years. Subjects received either aspartame or placebo in capsule form three times daily for 24 weeks. No persistent changes over time were noted in either group in vital signs; body weight; results of standard laboratory tests; fasting blood levels of aspartame's constituent amino acids (aspartic acid and phenylalanine), other amino acids, and methanol; or blood formate levels and 24-hour urinary excretion of formate. There also were no statistically significant differences between groups in the number of subjects experiencing symptoms or in the number of symptoms per subject. These results further document the safety of the long-term consumption of aspartame at doses equivalent to the amount of aspartame in approximately 10 L of beverage per day.

  13. Anxiety in mice following acute aspartame and ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    LaBuda, C J; Hale, R L

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to look at the effect of aspartame on the anxiolytic actions of ethanol. Previous research has shown that ethanol reliably produces an anxiolytic effect on rodent's plus-maze performance. There have been anecdotal reports that aspartame increases anxiety. CD-1 male mice were given i.p. aspartame doses of vehicle, 1000, or 2000 mg/kg, followed 30 min later by i.p. ethanol doses of 1.6 g/kg or vehicle. Animals were then placed in an open field, then tested in the plus-maze. Results determined that the aspartame condition had no significant effect on anxiety-related behavior, nor did it alter the anxiolytic actions of ethanol. Thus, acute high dose exposure to aspartame does not appear to affect anxiety-related behaviors.

  14. Acute effects of aspartame on aggression and neurochemistry of rats.

    PubMed

    Goerss, A L; Wagner, G C; Hill, W L

    2000-08-01

    The inverse relationship between serotonin and aggression was investigated in rats treated with aspartame, a sweetener thought to interfere with the synthesis of this neurotransmitter. Eleven adult, male Long-Evans rats received either aspartame (200-800 mg/kg, IP) or the vehicle prior to testing in a standard resident-intruder paradigm. Contrary to our hypothesis, aspartame significantly decreased aggression as shown by increased latencies to the first attack and decreased number of bites per session. Corresponding with the effects on aggression, aspartame significantly increased striatal levels of serotonin. It was concluded that high doses of aspartame reduced aggressive attack via a serotonergic mechanism while the lower dose was without effect on either variable.

  15. Aspartame ingestion and headaches: a randomized crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Van den Eeden, S K; Koepsell, T D; Longstreth, W T; van Belle, G; Daling, J R; McKnight, B

    1994-10-01

    To examine whether ingestion of aspartame is associated with headaches, we conducted a double-blind crossover study using volunteers with self-identified headaches after using aspartame. Of the 32 subjects randomized to receive aspartame (approximately 30 mg/kg/d) and placebo in a two-treatment, four-period crossover design, 18 completed the full protocol, seven completed part of the protocol before withdrawing due to adverse effects, three withdrew for other reasons, two were lost to follow-up, one was withdrawn due to noncompliance, and one withdrew and gave no reason. Each experimental period was 7 days long. Subjects reported headaches on 33% of the days during aspartame treatment, compared with 24% on placebo treatment (p = 0.04). Subjects who were "very sure" prior to the study that aspartame triggered some of their headaches reported larger treatment differences (aspartame = 0.37 headache-days, placebo = 0.18 headache-days; p < 0.001) than subjects who were "somewhat sure" (aspartame = 0.29 headache-days, placebo = 0.22 headache-days; p = 0.51) or "not sure" (aspartame = 0.33 headache-days, placebo = 0.39 headache-days; p = 0.51). There was no significant treatment difference in the length or intensity of headaches or in the occurrence of side effects associated with the headaches. This experiment provides evidence that, among individuals with self-reported headaches after ingestion of aspartame, a subset of this group report more headaches when tested under controlled conditions. It appears that some people are particularly susceptible to headaches caused by aspartame and may want to limit their consumption.

  16. Aspartame intake is associated with greater glucose intolerance in individuals with obesity.

    PubMed

    Kuk, Jennifer L; Brown, Ruth E

    2016-07-01

    This study examined whether sucrose, fructose, aspartame, and saccharin influences the association between obesity and glucose tolerance in 2856 adults from the NHANES III survey. Aspartame intake significantly influenced the association between body mass index (BMI) and glucose tolerance (interaction: P = 0.004), wherein only those reporting aspartame intake had a steeper positive association between BMI and glucose tolerance than those reporting no aspartame intake. Therefore, consumption of aspartame is associated with greater obesity-related impairments in glucose tolerance. PMID:27216413

  17. Aspartame intake is associated with greater glucose intolerance in individuals with obesity.

    PubMed

    Kuk, Jennifer L; Brown, Ruth E

    2016-07-01

    This study examined whether sucrose, fructose, aspartame, and saccharin influences the association between obesity and glucose tolerance in 2856 adults from the NHANES III survey. Aspartame intake significantly influenced the association between body mass index (BMI) and glucose tolerance (interaction: P = 0.004), wherein only those reporting aspartame intake had a steeper positive association between BMI and glucose tolerance than those reporting no aspartame intake. Therefore, consumption of aspartame is associated with greater obesity-related impairments in glucose tolerance.

  18. Aspartame and the rat brain monoaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Perego, C; De Simoni, M G; Fodritto, F; Raimondi, L; Diomede, L; Salmona, M; Algeri, S; Garattini, S

    1988-12-01

    A high dose of aspartame (APM) was administered to rats to study possible effects on brain monoaminergic systems. APM and its metabolite phenylalanine (Phe) were given orally at doses of 1000 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. Significant increases were seen in brain Phe and tyrosine (Tyr) levels. Two different approaches were used to study monoaminergic systems: whole tissue measurements by HPLC-ED and in vivo voltammetry in freely moving rats. Dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites were taken as indexes of neuronal activity. In spite of the high dose used, no modification was found in monoamines or their metabolites in striatum, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens.

  19. Sweetening ruthenium and osmium: organometallic arene complexes containing aspartame.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jennifer C; Habtemariam, Abraha; Winnig, Marcel; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Sadler, Peter J

    2008-09-01

    The novel organometallic sandwich complexes [(eta(6)-p-cymene)Ru(eta(6)-aspartame)](OTf)(2) (1) (OTf = trifluoromethanesulfonate) and [(eta(6)-p-cymene)Os(eta(6)-aspartame)](OTf)(2) (2) incorporating the artificial sweetener aspartame have been synthesised and characterised. A number of properties of aspartame were found to be altered on binding to either metal. The pK(a) values of both the carboxyl and the amino groups of aspartame are lowered by between 0.35 and 0.57 pH units, causing partial deprotonation of the amino group at pH 7.4 (physiological pH). The rate of degradation of aspartame to 3,6-dioxo-5-phenylmethylpiperazine acetic acid (diketopiperazine) increased over threefold from 0.12 to 0.36 h(-1) for 1, and to 0.43 h(-1) for 2. Furthermore, the reduction potential of the ligand shifted from -1.133 to -0.619 V for 2. For the ruthenium complex 1 the process occurred in two steps, the first (at -0.38 V) within a biologically accessible range. This facilitates reactions with biological reductants such as ascorbate. Binding to and activation of the sweet taste receptor was not observed for these metal complexes up to concentrations of 1 mM. The factors which affect the ability of metal-bound aspartame to interact with the receptor site are discussed.

  20. Aspartame induces angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo models.

    PubMed

    Yesildal, F; Aydin, F N; Deveci, S; Tekin, S; Aydin, I; Mammadov, R; Fermanli, O; Avcu, F; Acikel, C H; Ozgurtas, T

    2015-03-01

    Angiogenesis is the process of generating new blood vessels from preexisting vessels and is considered essential in many pathological conditions. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of aspartame on angiogenesis in vivo chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and wound-healing models as well as in vitro 2,3-bis-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) and tube formation assays. In CAM assay, aspartame increased angiogenesis in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared with the control group, aspartame has significantly increased vessel proliferation (p < 0.001). In addition, in vivo rat model of skin wound-healing study showed that aspartame group had better healing than control group, and this was statistically significant at p < 0.05. There was a slight proliferative effect of aspartame on human umbilical vein endothelial cells on XTT assay in vitro, but it was not statistically significant; and there was no antiangiogenic effect of aspartame on tube formation assay in vitro. These results provide evidence that aspartame induces angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo; so regular use may have undesirable effect on susceptible cases.

  1. Oral administration of aspartame is not proconvulsant in rats.

    PubMed

    Tilson, H A; Thai, L; Zhao, D; Sobotka, T J; Hong, J S

    1989-01-01

    These experiments examined the potential for single or repeated doses of aspartame to exacerbate or facilitate the production of seizures in Fischer-344 rats. In adult animals, 1,000 mg/kg of aspartame given by gavage acutely or over a 14 day period had no significant effect on the rate of kindling induced by stimulation of the prepyriform cortex. A single dose of 1,000 mg/kg of aspartame had no effect on the number of animals developing tonic seizures after electroconvulsive shock, nor did aspartame affect the frequency or duration of seizure activity after pentylenetetrazol. In a second series of studies, young male and female rats were dosed with 1,000 mg/kg of aspartame on day 3-13 or 21-35 of age. Prior exposure to aspartame had no significant effect on the rate of kindling at 90 days of age. These experiments indicate that aspartame does not act a pro-convulsant in rats.

  2. The neuropsychiatric effects of aspartame in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, K A; Greenblatt, D J; Goddard, J E; Harmatz, J S; Shader, R I

    1990-05-01

    Ten healthy volunteers with no history of aspartame intolerance (6 men and 4 women, aged 21-36 years) received a single dose of aspartame (15 mg/kg body weight in capsules) or matching placebo in a randomized, double-blind crossover study. Eleven blood samples collected over 24 hours were analyzed for plasma glucose and amino acid concentrations. The following variables were evaluated at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours post-dosage: changes in mood measured on visual analog scales, cognitive function determined by digit-symbol substitution test (DSST) and arithmetic test scores, and reaction time measured with a brake-pedal reaction timer. Memory was tested at 2 and 24 hours after dosage based on recall of standardized 16-item word lists. No significant differences between aspartame and placebo were found in measures of sedation, hunger, headache, reaction-time, cognition, or memory at any time during the study. Plasma phenylalanine levels were significantly higher following aspartame (P less than .01) than with placebo between 1 and 6 hours postdosage, reaching a maximum difference of +3.36 mumols/dl at 2 hours. Plasma glucose concentrations were not significantly different between aspartame and placebo. The results of this study suggest that following a single 15 mg/kg dose of aspartame, no detectable effects are observed in a group of healthy volunteers with no history of aspartame intolerance, despite significant increases in plasma phenylalanine concentrations.

  3. Effects of perinatal exposure to aspartame on rat pups.

    PubMed

    Holder, M D

    1989-01-01

    Possible effects of perinatal exposure to L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (aspartame) on rat pups were investigated. Adult female rats, and later their pups, were exposed, via their drinking water, to aspartame (0.007%, 0.036%, 0.18% or 0.9% w/v) or phenylalanine (0.45% w/v) for 12 days prior to conception until the pups were 38 days old. Control rats were given plain water. The adults exposed to aspartame consumed an average of 14, 68, 347 and 1614 mg/kg/day of aspartame and those exposed to phenylalanine consumed an average of 835 mg/kg/day of phenylalanine. After weaning the pups given aspartame consumed an average of 32, 154, 836, and 3566 mg/kg/day of aspartame and those given phenylalanine consumed an average of 1795 mg/kg/day of phenylalanine. No effect of aspartame or phenylalanine was detected on either two measures of morphological development (i.e., latencies to pinnae detachment and eye opening) or two tests of reflex development (i.e., latencies for surface righting at 7 days of age and negative geotaxis at 8 days of age). All groups were similar in spatial memory as assessed with two different mazes with pups 30-36 days old. The number of arms before reentry in an 8-arm radial-arm maze and the acquisition curves from a milk maze did not differ between groups. Furthermore, the latencies of mothers to retrieve their litters was also unaffected by the aspartame and phenylalanine. These results indicate that perinatal exposure to aspartame, when voluntarily consumed by mothers (14-1614 mg/kg/day) and later directly by the rat pups (32 to 3566 mg/kg/day) does not affect reflex development, morphological development or spatial memory.

  4. Aspartame metabolism in normal adults, phenylketonuric heterozygotes, and diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Filer, L J; Stegink, L D

    1989-01-01

    This study reviews clinical studies testing the effects of various doses of aspartame on blood levels of phenylalanine, aspartate, and methanol in normal subjects and known phenylketonuric heterozygotes. The effect of aspartame on the phenylalanine-to-large neutral amino acid ratio under various feeding situations is shown. The clinical studies of aspartame in diabetic subjects are limited to observations of its effects on blood levels of glucose, lipids, insulin, and glucagon. These studies clearly demonstrate the safety of this high-intensity sweetener for use by humans.

  5. Hydration and dehydration behavior of aspartame hemihydrate.

    PubMed

    Leung, S S; Padden, B E; Munson, E J; Grant, D J

    1998-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that aspartame in the solid state can exist as a hemihydrate which occurs in two different polymorphic forms (I and II). The present work shows that equilibration of either hemihydrate at 25 degrees C with water vapor at relative humidities > or = 58% or with liquid water produces a 2.5-hydrate. Upon subjecting each of these crystalline hydrates to increasing temperature, the same crystalline anhydrate is formed which thermally cyclizes at a higher temperature to form the known compound 3-(carboxymethyl)-6-benzyl-2,5-dioxopiperazine. The activation energy of the cyclization reaction appears to depend on the degree of crystallinity of the anhydrate that is formed at a lower temperature. On increasing the temperature of the 2.5-hydrate, a hemihydrate intervenes before the anhydrate is formed. This intervening hemihydrate is similar to the commercial form (II) of aspartame hemihydrate but exhibits greater amorphous character. The techniques employed were Karl Fischer titrimetry, powder X-ray diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy.

  6. The hydration/dehydration behavior of aspartame revisited.

    PubMed

    Guguta, C; Meekes, H; de Gelder, R

    2008-03-13

    Aspartame, l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine methyl ester, has two hydrates (IA and IB), a hemi-hydrate (IIA) and an anhydrate (IIB). The hydration/dehydration behavior of aspartame was investigated using hot-humidity stage X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and molecular mechanics modeling in combination with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results of this study are compared to earlier studies on aspartame as described in literature. It is shown that earlier transition studies were hampered by incomplete conversions and wrong assignment of the forms. The combination of the techniques applied in this study now shows consistent results for aspartame and yields a clear conversion scheme for the hydration/dehydration behavior of the four forms.

  7. Saccharin and aspartame. Are they safe to consume during pregnancy?

    PubMed

    London, R S

    1988-01-01

    Saccharin and aspartame are commonly used artificial sweeteners. Some of the currently available information on their safety in pregnancy was reviewed, with recommendations formulated on their use in the periconceptional period and pregnancy.

  8. Cariogenicity of frequent aspartame and sorbitol rinsing in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Lout, R K; Messer, L B; Soberay, A; Kajander, K; Rudney, J

    1988-01-01

    The cariogenicity of frequent rinsings with aspartame and sorbitol was studied in the rat caries model with animals randomly assigned to four oral rinse groups (16 rats/group): 0.05% aspartame, 20% sorbitol, deionized distilled water, and 20% sucrose; all solutions at pH 3.0. After rinsing five times daily for 21 days, mandibular molars were scored for caries. Smooth surface, proximal and morsal caries scores did not differ significantly between groups. Moderate dentinal sulcal caries for the sucrose group was significantly greater than in the aspartame, sorbitol, and water groups (p less than 0.05). Rinsing with 0.05% aspartame (similar in pH and concentration to that found in carbonated beverages) or sorbitol did not potentiate caries activity.

  9. [Relationship between chemical structure and sweetness. XIV. Analogs of aspartame].

    PubMed

    De Nardo, M

    1977-07-01

    Several analogs structurally related to aspartame were prepared in order to establish if chemical modifications of the molecule might improve sweetness. None of these analogs exhibited any sweet taste; on the contrary in most cases they were bitter.

  10. A metabolite of aspartame inhibits angiotensin converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Grobelny, D; Galardy, R E

    1985-04-30

    Aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, is a widely used artificIal sweetener. In humans and other animals aspartame is initially hydrolyzed to L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine by intestinal esterases. L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine inhibits angiotensin converting enzyme purified from rabbit lungs with a Ki of 11 +/- 2 microM, equipotent to the IC50 of 12 microM for 2-D-methyl-succinyl-L-proline which has been reported to be an orally active antihypertensive agent in rats. Thus the possibility exists that L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine inhibits angiotensin converting enzyme in humans consuming large quantities of aspartame. Both aspartame itself and the diketopiperazine formed from it, 3-carboxymethyl-6-benzyl-2,5-diketopiperazine, are weak inhibitors with Ki's greater than 1 mM.

  11. Increasing brain tumor rates: is there a link to aspartame?

    PubMed

    Olney, J W; Farber, N B; Spitznagel, E; Robins, L N

    1996-11-01

    In the past two decades brain tumor rates have risen in several industrialized countries, including the United States. During this time, brain tumor data have been gathered by the National Cancer Institute from catchment areas representing 10% of the United States population. In the present study, we analyzed these data from 1975 to 1992 and found that the brain tumor increases in the United States occurred in two distinct phases, an early modest increase that may primarily reflect improved diagnostic technology, and a more recent sustained increase in the incidence and shift toward greater malignancy that must be explained by some other factor(s). Compared to other environmental factors putatively linked to brain tumors, the artificial sweetener aspartame is a promising candidate to explain the recent increase in incidence and degree of malignancy of brain tumors. Evidence potentially implicating aspartame includes an early animal study revealing an exceedingly high incidence of brain tumors in aspartame-fed rats compared to no brain tumors in concurrent controls, the recent finding that the aspartame molecule has mutagenic potential, and the close temporal association (aspartame was introduced into US food and beverage markets several years prior to the sharp increase in brain tumor incidence and malignancy). We conclude that there is need for reassessing the carcinogenic potential of aspartame.

  12. Administration of aspartame in non-insulin-dependent diabetics.

    PubMed

    Stern, S B; Bleicher, S J; Flores, A; Gombos, G; Recitas, D; Shu, J

    1976-11-01

    A study was designed to determine the effect of the consumption of the nutritive sweetener aspartame on non-insulin-dependent diabetics. Forty-three adult diabetics between the ages of 21 and 70 completed a 90-day study; all were diabetics whose conditions were managed by diet and/or hypoglycemic agents. Participants in the blind study were instructed to continue their usual diet and to take two capsules of an assigned preparation three times daily with meals, either the aspartame or the placebo. The 1.8 g of aspartame administered is approximately three times the expected daily consumption of aspartame if used as a sweetener to replace sugar. Throughout the study subjects were examined for (1) symptoms of intolerance, (2) fasting plasma phenylalanine levels exceeding 4 mg/100 ml, and (3) deterioration of diabetic control. At the conclusion of the study subjects exhibited no symptoms that could be traced to the administration of aspartame or the placebo, and diabetic control was unaffected by the chronic administration of these substances. Aspartame seems to be well tolerated by non-insulin-dependent diabetics.

  13. Failure of aspartame to affect seizure susceptibility in kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Cain, D P; Boon, F; Bevan, M

    1989-04-01

    The effect of aspartame administered by gavage to rats on amygdala and hippocampal kindled seizures was assessed. Despite the administration of a wide range of doses (25-2000 mg/kg) no evidence for an effect of aspartame on afterdischarge threshold or seizure strength was obtained when testing was done at a time when serum and brain levels of neutral amino acids are known to be significantly elevated as a result of this treatment. There is controversy whether dietary aspartame (N-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine 1-methyl ester), a food additive sweetner, can lead to seizures in susceptible humans and in laboratory animals. A proseizure effect of high consumption of aspartame has been alleged (Wurtman, 1985; Walton, 1986) and denied (Gaull, 1985). Recent studies using mice have yielded mixed results. Thus, Kim and Kim (1986) and Pinto and Maher (1988) observed potentiating effects of high loads of aspartame on chemically induced seizures, but Nevins, Arnolde and Haigler (1986) observed no effect on chemical and ECS seizures. We used the electrical kindling model of epilepsy to assess whether aspartame can alter seizure threshold or strength in rats. The kindled response is highly repeatable and stable and has been shown to be sensitive to a large variety of pharmacological treatments (Racine, 1978) and to dietary manipulation (McCann, Cain and Philbrick, 1983).

  14. Effects of aspartame in young persons during weight reduction.

    PubMed

    Knopp, R H; Brandt, K; Arky, R A

    1976-11-01

    Given the potential use of a low-calorie sweetener during weight reduction, a toxicity study of chronic aspartame ingestion was conducted. Particular attention was given to possible long-term effects of aspartame on the fuel hormonal alterations characteristically caused by weight reduction. As a group mean age was 19.3 yr, body weight was 164.6 lb, and mean height was 65.4 in. Subjects were an average of 33% in excess of ideal body weight. The aspartame dose was 2.7 g/day and was compared on a double-blind randomized basis with a lactose placebo. Both materials were given in gelatin capsules. An average of 6.9 +/- 1.5 lb was lost by the aspartame group during the 13-wk study on a calculated 1,000-calorie diet. The placebo group lost 4.5 +/- 1.2 lb (no significant difference between the two groups). After an overnight fast, reductions in glucose and immunoreactive insulin were seen in both groups, while rising trends in immunoreactive glucagon were observed. These changes are all characteristic of calorie restriction. In no instance was there a detectable effect of the ingested aspartame. No meaningful effect of weight reduction or aspartame was seen on plasma triglyceride and cholesterol, nor on any other parameter of hematologic, hepatic, or renal function that was measured. Similarly, side effects were equally distributed between asparatame and placebo.

  15. Effects of aspartame on diabetic rats and diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, H; Yoshida, T; Nakai, M; Mori, H; Kano, Y; Nishioka, H; Kajiyama, S; Kitagawa, Y; Kanatsuna, T; Kondo, M

    1985-10-01

    The effects of aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) on plasma glucose and insulin levels were investigated in diabetic rats and patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The oral administration of 0.45 mg aspartame per 100g body weight, which is equivalent to 150 mg of glucose in sweetness, to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats had no effect on the plasma glucose or insulin levels. Also, 225 mg oral aspartame loading, which is equivalent to 75 g of glucose in sweetness, to patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus did not increase plasma glucose or insulin levels, although 75 g of oral glucose loading increased plasma glucose and insulin levels in diabetic patients as expected. Aspartame ingestion for three days at a dose of 24-48 mg per day and the intake of snacks flavored with 240 mg of aspartame also did not increase fasting plasma glucose levels. These results suggest that acute administration of aspartame has no influence on plasma glucose or insulin levels in diabetic rats and patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  16. Possible neurologic effects of aspartame, a widely used food additive.

    PubMed

    Maher, T J; Wurtman, R J

    1987-11-01

    The artificial sweetener aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanyl-methyl ester), is consumed, primarily in beverages, by a very large number of Americans, causing significant elevations in plasma and, probably, brain phenylalanine levels. Anecdotal reports suggest that some people suffer neurologic or behavioral reactions in association with aspartame consumption. Since phenylalanine can be neurotoxic and can affect the synthesis of inhibitory monoamine neurotransmitters, the phenylalanine in aspartame could conceiveably mediate neurologic effects. If mice are given aspartame in doses that elevate plasma phenylalanine levels more than those of tyrosine (which probably occurs after any aspartame dose in humans), the frequency of seizures following the administration of an epileptogenic drug, pentylenetetrazole, is enhanced. This effect is simulated by equimolar phenylalanine and blocked by concurrent administration of valine, which blocks phenylalanine's entry into the brain. Aspartame also potentiates the induction of seizures by inhaled fluorothyl or by electroconvulsive shock. Perhaps regulations concerning the sale of food additives should be modified to require the reporting of adverse reactions and the continuing conduct of mandated safety research.

  17. Cariostatic effect of aspartame in rats.

    PubMed

    Das, S; Das, A K; Murphy, R A; Warty, S

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the effects of aspartame (APM) on caries and the Streptococcus sobrinus population. Six groups of rats (20 in each group) colonized with S. sobrinus were fed varying amounts of sucrose (SU) and APM in their diets as follows: 1-0.15% APM, 2-0.30% APM, 3-30% SU, 4-30% SU + 0.15% APM, 5-50% SU and 6-50% + 0.15% APM. Ten from each group were sacrificed at 6 weeks and 10 at 12 weeks. S. sobrinus populations at both intervals were negligible in groups 1 and 2 and had no differences between groups 3, 4, 5 and 6. No caries were found in groups 1 and 2 Animals fed SU plus APM had significantly lower caries than animals fed the same amounts of SU (p = 0.001-0.0002). We conclude that APM is noncariogenic and anticariogenic.

  18. Responses of Single Chorda Tympani Taste Fibers of the Calf (Bos taurus)

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Thomas; Elmer, Donald; Cragin, Tiffany; Danilova, Vicktoria

    2010-01-01

    In spite of a wealth of information on feed and nutrition in cattle, there little is published of what they actually can taste. Here, we attempt to remedy some of this deficiency by presenting recordings of the chorda tympani proper nerve of young Holstein calves during stimulation of approximately 30 compounds. Hierarchical cluster analysis of 46 single taste fibers separated 4 fiber clusters: N (salt best), H (sour best), and 2 clusters, which could not be related to any human taste quality. The N fibers responded best to LiCl, NaCl, urea, monosodium glutamate, and KCl, whereas the H fibers responded strongly to citric and ascorbic acid. Interestingly, propionic and butyric acid stimulated best the 3rd cluster, whereas the 4th cluster responded best to denatonium benzoate and only to a small extent to quinine hydrochloride. Sweeteners stimulated moderately all clusters. Beginning with the largest response to sweet, the order between the responses was: acesulfame-K, saccharin, D-phenylalanine, glycine, sucrose, fructose, erythritol, cyclamate, and lactose. Alitame, aspartame, and super-aspartame evoked no or little responses. Three and 5 M ethanol stimulated all clusters. Comparison with taste fibers in other species suggests that the taste world of cattle is quite different from other species’. PMID:20212013

  19. Artificial sweeteners--do they bear a carcinogenic risk?

    PubMed

    Weihrauch, M R; Diehl, V

    2004-10-01

    Artificial sweeteners are added to a wide variety of food, drinks, drugs and hygiene products. Since their introduction, the mass media have reported about potential cancer risks, which has contributed to undermine the public's sense of security. It can be assumed that every citizen of Western countries uses artificial sweeteners, knowingly or not. A cancer-inducing activity of one of these substances would mean a health risk to an entire population. We performed several PubMed searches of the National Library of Medicine for articles in English about artificial sweeteners. These articles included 'first generation' sweeteners such as saccharin, cyclamate and aspartame, as well as 'new generation' sweeteners such as acesulfame-K, sucralose, alitame and neotame. Epidemiological studies in humans did not find the bladder cancer-inducing effects of saccharin and cyclamate that had been reported from animal studies in rats. Despite some rather unscientific assumptions, there is no evidence that aspartame is carcinogenic. Case-control studies showed an elevated relative risk of 1.3 for heavy artificial sweetener use (no specific substances specified) of >1.7 g/day. For new generation sweeteners, it is too early to establish any epidemiological evidence about possible carcinogenic risks. As many artificial sweeteners are combined in today's products, the carcinogenic risk of a single substance is difficult to assess. However, according to the current literature, the possible risk of artificial sweeteners to induce cancer seems to be negligible.

  20. Responses of single chorda tympani taste fibers of the calf (Bos taurus).

    PubMed

    Hellekant, Göran; Roberts, Thomas; Elmer, Donald; Cragin, Tiffany; Danilova, Vicktoria

    2010-06-01

    In spite of a wealth of information on feed and nutrition in cattle, there little is published of what they actually can taste. Here, we attempt to remedy some of this deficiency by presenting recordings of the chorda tympani proper nerve of young Holstein calves during stimulation of approximately 30 compounds. Hierarchical cluster analysis of 46 single taste fibers separated 4 fiber clusters: N (salt best), H (sour best), and 2 clusters, which could not be related to any human taste quality. The N fibers responded best to LiCl, NaCl, urea, monosodium glutamate, and KCl, whereas the H fibers responded strongly to citric and ascorbic acid. Interestingly, propionic and butyric acid stimulated best the 3rd cluster, whereas the 4th cluster responded best to denatonium benzoate and only to a small extent to quinine hydrochloride. Sweeteners stimulated moderately all clusters. Beginning with the largest response to sweet, the order between the responses was: acesulfame-K, saccharin, D-phenylalanine, glycine, sucrose, fructose, erythritol, cyclamate, and lactose. Alitame, aspartame, and super-aspartame evoked no or little responses. Three and 5 M ethanol stimulated all clusters. Comparison with taste fibers in other species suggests that the taste world of cattle is quite different from other species'.

  1. Rats show only a weak preference for the artificial sweetener aspartame.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, A; Abrams, M

    1986-01-01

    The preference of adult female rats for aspartame (L-asparty L-phenylalamine methyl ester) was measured using 24 hr/day and 30 min/day two bottle preference tests. At aspartame concentrations that humans find sweet (0.0125% to 0.05%) the rats failed to prefer aspartame to water. At higher concentrations (0.1% to 1.0%) half (n = 11) of the rats tested displayed mild (64%) to moderate (83%) aspartame preferences. The other half of the rats were indifferent or avoided the aspartame. Even at the most preferred concentration (1.0%) the rats' aspartame preference was much less than their preference for saccharin or sucrose, and they showed little increase in total fluid intake when given the aspartame solution. The results indicate that aspartame is not very palatable to rats, and suggest that it has little or no sweet, i.e., sucrose-like, taste to rats as it does to humans.

  2. Ultrastructural changes to rabbit fibrin and platelets due to aspartame.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, E; Humphries, P

    2007-01-01

    The coagulation process, including thrombin, fibrin, as well as platelets, plays an important role in hemostasis, contributing to the general well-being of humans. Fibrin formation and platelet activation are delicate processes that are under the control of many small physiological events. Any one of these many processes may be influenced or changed by external factors, including pharmaceutical or nutritional products, e.g., the sweetener aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester). It is known that phenylalanine is present at position P(9) and aspartate at position P(10) of the alpha-chain of human fibrinogen, and plays an important role in the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin by the catalyst alpha-thrombin. The authors investigate the effect of aspartame on platelet and fibrin ultrastructure, by using the rabbit animal model and the scanning electron microscope. Animals were exposed to 34 mg/kg of aspartame 26x during a 2-month period. Aspartame-exposed fibrin networks appeared denser, with a thick matted fine fiber network covering thick major fibers. Also, the platelet aggregates appeared more granular than the globular control platelet aggregates. The authors conclude by suggesting that aspartame usage may interfere with the coagulation process and might cause delayed fibrin breakup after clot formation. They suggest this, as the fibrin networks from aspartame-exposed rabbits are more complex and dense, due to the netlike appearance of the minor, thin fibers. Aspartame usage should possibly be limited by people on anti-clotting medicine or those with prone to clot formation.

  3. Migraine MLT-down: an unusual presentation of migraine in patients with aspartame-triggered headaches.

    PubMed

    Newman, L C; Lipton, R B

    2001-10-01

    Aspartame, an artificial sweetener added to many foods and beverages, may trigger headaches in susceptible individuals. We report two patients with aspartame-triggered attacks in whom the use of an aspartame-containing acute medication (Maxalt-MLT) worsened an ongoing attack of migraine.

  4. Direct and indirect cellular effects of aspartame on the brain.

    PubMed

    Humphries, P; Pretorius, E; Naudé, H

    2008-04-01

    The use of the artificial sweetener, aspartame, has long been contemplated and studied by various researchers, and people are concerned about its negative effects. Aspartame is composed of phenylalanine (50%), aspartic acid (40%) and methanol (10%). Phenylalanine plays an important role in neurotransmitter regulation, whereas aspartic acid is also thought to play a role as an excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Glutamate, asparagines and glutamine are formed from their precursor, aspartic acid. Methanol, which forms 10% of the broken down product, is converted in the body to formate, which can either be excreted or can give rise to formaldehyde, diketopiperazine (a carcinogen) and a number of other highly toxic derivatives. Previously, it has been reported that consumption of aspartame could cause neurological and behavioural disturbances in sensitive individuals. Headaches, insomnia and seizures are also some of the neurological effects that have been encountered, and these may be accredited to changes in regional brain concentrations of catecholamines, which include norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine. The aim of this study was to discuss the direct and indirect cellular effects of aspartame on the brain, and we propose that excessive aspartame ingestion might be involved in the pathogenesis of certain mental disorders (DSM-IV-TR 2000) and also in compromised learning and emotional functioning.

  5. Aspartame: a safety evaluation based on current use levels, regulations, and toxicological and epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, B A; Burdock, G A; Doull, J; Kroes, R M; Marsh, G M; Pariza, M W; Spencer, P S; Waddell, W J; Walker, R; Williams, G M

    2007-01-01

    Aspartame is a methyl ester of a dipeptide used as a synthetic nonnutritive sweetener in over 90 countries worldwide in over 6000 products. The purpose of this investigation was to review the scientific literature on the absorption and metabolism, the current consumption levels worldwide, the toxicology, and recent epidemiological studies on aspartame. Current use levels of aspartame, even by high users in special subgroups, remains well below the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Food Safety Authority established acceptable daily intake levels of 50 and 40 mg/kg bw/day, respectively. Consumption of large doses of aspartame in a single bolus dose will have an effect on some biochemical parameters, including plasma amino acid levels and brain neurotransmitter levels. The rise in plasma levels of phenylalanine and aspartic acid following administration of aspartame at doses less than or equal to 50 mg/kg bw do not exceed those observed postprandially. Acute, subacute and chronic toxicity studies with aspartame, and its decomposition products, conducted in mice, rats, hamsters and dogs have consistently found no adverse effect of aspartame with doses up to at least 4000 mg/kg bw/day. Critical review of all carcinogenicity studies conducted on aspartame found no credible evidence that aspartame is carcinogenic. The data from the extensive investigations into the possibility of neurotoxic effects of aspartame, in general, do not support the hypothesis that aspartame in the human diet will affect nervous system function, learning or behavior. Epidemiological studies on aspartame include several case-control studies and one well-conducted prospective epidemiological study with a large cohort, in which the consumption of aspartame was measured. The studies provide no evidence to support an association between aspartame and cancer in any tissue. The weight of existing evidence is that aspartame is safe at current levels of consumption as a nonnutritive

  6. Heterogeneous nucleation of aspartame from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Noriaki; Kinno, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Kenji

    1990-03-01

    Waiting times, the time from the instant of quenching needed for a first nucleus to appear, were measured at constant supercoolings for primary nucleation of aspartame (α-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methylester) from aqueous solutions, which were sealed into glass ampoules (solution volume = 3.16 cm 3). Since the waiting time became shorter by filtering the solution prior to quenching, the nucleation was concluded to be heterogeneously induced. The measured waiting time consisted of two parts: time needed for the nucleus to grow to a detactable size (growth time) and stochastic time needed for nucleation (true waiting time). The distribution of the true waiting time, is well explained by a stochastic model, in which nucleation is regarded to occur heterogeneously and in a stochastic manner by two kinds of active sites. The active sites are estimated to be located on foreign particles in which such elements as Si, Al and Mg were contained. The amount of each element is very small in the order of magnitude of ppb (mass basis) of the whole solution. The growth time was correlated with the degree of supercooling.

  7. Comparison of thermochemistry of aspartame (artificial sweetener) and glucose.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Mohammad; Fattahi, Alireza

    2009-01-01

    We have compared the gas phase thermochemical properties of aspartame (artificial sweetener) and alpha- and beta-glucose. These parameters include metal ion affinities with Li(+)-, Na(+)-, K(+)-, Mg(+2)-, Ca(+2)-, Fe(+2)-, Zn(+2)-ions, and chloride ion affinity by using DFT calculations. For example, for aspartame, the affinity values for the above described metal ions are, respectively, 86.5, 63.2, 44.2, 255.4, 178.4, 235.4, and 300.4, and for beta-glucose are 65.2, 47.3 32.9, 212.9, 140.2, 190.1, and 250.0 kcal mol(-1), respectively. The study shows differences between the intrinsic chemistry of aspartame and glucose.

  8. Evaluation of reactions to food additives: the aspartame experience.

    PubMed

    Bradstock, M K; Serdula, M K; Marks, J S; Barnard, R J; Crane, N T; Remington, P L; Trowbridge, F L

    1986-03-01

    Despite the widespread use of chemical food additives, few criteria exist to evaluate consumer reports of adverse reactions. We analyzed 231 consumer complaints associated with the food additive aspartame. We developed a methodologic approach to evaluate all complaints by adapting general criteria used to investigate adverse reactions to medications. Complaints were ranked according to the effects of cessation and rechallenge. Using this method, we found no clear symptom complex that suggests a widespread public health hazard associated with aspartame use; however, we identified some case reports in which the symptoms may be attributable to aspartame in commonly-consumed amounts. The systematic application of pre-defined review criteria, such as those described here, to monitor consumer complaints related to food additives will help identify products that warrant more focused clinical studies.

  9. Flow injection spectrophotometric determination of aspartame in dietary products.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, J de A; Fatibello-Filho, O; Vieira, I da C

    1994-09-01

    A flow injection spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of aspartame in dietary products using ninhydrin as a colorimetric reagent. The reaction was conducted in a 1 + 1 v/v methanol-isopropanol medium also containing potassium hydroxide. The absorbance measurements were made at 603 nm. The results obtained for the determination of aspartame in table sweetener, pudding, gelatin, and refreshment (i.e., a powder dissolved in water for drinking) are in good agreement with the results obtained using a conventional manual procedure (correlation coefficient, r = 0.9984). Thirty-six results were obtained per hour, and the relative standard deviation was less than 3.5% (n = 6) for all samples. The detection limit (three times the signal blank/slope) was 3.8 x 10(-5) mol l-1 of aspartame.

  10. Acceptable daily intake vs actual intake: the aspartame example.

    PubMed

    Butchko, H H; Kotsonis, F N

    1991-06-01

    This article discusses the acceptable daily intake (ADI) and the postmarketing surveillance of consumption levels for a food additive, using the widely used food additive aspartame (APM, L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) as an example. The safety implications of the ADI and consumption levels are also discussed. Aspartame has been assigned an ADI of 40 mg/kg/day by the World Health Organization and regulatory authorities in Europe and Canada, and of 50 mg/kg/day by the US Food and Drug Administration. A number of different methods have been used to measure consumption levels of food additives. Consumption estimations for aspartame from one such method, the food intake survey, have been done in the United States, Canada, Germany, and Finland. APM consumption in all age groups and selected subpopulations, even at the 90th percentile, is approximately 2-10 mg/kg/day and is thus well below the ADI.

  11. Effects of aspartame metabolites on astrocytes and neurons.

    PubMed

    Rycerz, Karol; Jaworska-Adamu, Jadwiga Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    Aspartame, a widespread sweetener used in many food products, is considered as a highly hazardous compound. Aspartame was discovered in 1965 and raises a lot of controversy up to date. Astrocytes are glial cells, the presence and functions of which are closely connected with the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of this article is to demonstrate the direct and indirect role of astrocytes participating in the harmful effects of aspartame metabolites on neurons. The artificial sweetener is broken down into phenylalanine (50%), aspartic acid (40%) and methanol (10%) during metabolism in the body. The excess of phenylalanine blocks the transport of important amino acids to the brain contributing to reduced levels of dopamine and serotonin. Astrocytes directly affect the transport of this amino acid and also indirectly by modulation of carriers in the endothelium. Aspartic acid at high concentrations is a toxin that causes hyperexcitability of neurons and is also a precursor of other excitatory amino acid - glutamates. Their excess in quantity and lack of astrocytic uptake induces excitotoxicity and leads to the degeneration of astrocytes and neurons. The methanol metabolites cause CNS depression, vision disorders and other symptoms leading ultimately to metabolic acidosis and coma. Astrocytes do not play a significant role in methanol poisoning due to a permanent consumption of large amounts of aspartame. Despite intense speculations about the carcinogenicity of aspartame, the latest studies show that its metabolite - diketopiperazine - is cancirogenic in the CNS. It contributes to the formation of tumors in the CNS such as gliomas, medulloblastomas and meningiomas. Glial cells are the main source of tumors, which can be caused inter alia by the sweetener in the brain. On the one hand the action of astrocytes during aspartame poisoning may be advantageous for neuro-protection while on the other it may intensify the destruction of neurons. The role of the glia in

  12. Administration of aspartame potentiates pentylenetetrazole- and fluorothyl-induced seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Pinto, J M; Maher, T J

    1988-01-01

    An association has recently been proposed between the incidence of seizures and prolonged consumption of the phenylalanine-containing artificial sweetener, aspartame. Since consumption of aspartame, unlike dietary protein, can elevate phenylalanine in brain, and thereby inhibit the synthesis and release of neurotransmitters known to protect against seizure activity, the effect of oral doses of aspartame on the sensitivity of mice to the proconvulsant agents, pentylenetetrazole and fluorothyl was studied. Doses of aspartame were used which increased phenylalanine more than tyrosine in brain, as occurs in humans after the consumption of any dose of aspartame. Pretreatment with aspartame significantly increased the percentage of animals convulsing after administration of pentylenetetrazole and significantly lowered the CD50 for this convulsant. The average time to onset of seizures induced by fluorothyl in control mice was 510 sec; pretreatment with oral doses of 1000, 1500 and 2000 mg/kg of aspartame 1 hr earlier significantly reduced the time required to elicit seizures (394, 381 and 339 sec, respectively). The seizure-promoting effect of aspartame could be demonstrated 30, 60 or 120 min after the 1000 mg/kg dose. The seizures induced by either convulsant were potentiated by equimolar amounts of phenylalanine, a major endogenous metabolite of aspartame, while the other metabolites, aspartic acid and methanol, were without effect. Administration together with aspartame of the large neutral amino acid valine, which competes with phenylalanine for entry into the brain, completely abolished the seizure-promoting effect of aspartame.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Chronic Effect of Aspartame on Ionic Homeostasis and Monoamine Neurotransmitters in the Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, M; Alex, Manju; Mathews, Varghese V; Nair, R Harikumaran

    2014-05-28

    Aspartame is one of the most widely used artificial sweeteners globally. Data concerning acute neurotoxicity of aspartame is controversial, and knowledge on its chronic effect is limited. In the current study, we investigated the chronic effects of aspartame on ionic homeostasis and regional monoamine neurotransmitter concentrations in the brain. Our results showed that aspartame at high dose caused a disturbance in ionic homeostasis and induced apoptosis in the brain. We also investigated the effects of aspartame on brain regional monoamine synthesis, and the results revealed that there was a significant decrease of dopamine in corpus striatum and cerebral cortex and of serotonin in corpus striatum. Moreover, aspartame treatment significantly alters the tyrosine hydroxylase activity and amino acids levels in the brain. Our data suggest that chronic use of aspartame may affect electrolyte homeostasis and monoamine neurotransmitter synthesis dose dependently, and this might have a possible effect on cognitive functions.

  14. Effect of aspartame and sucrose loading in glutamate-susceptible subjects.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1981-09-01

    It has been postulated that individuals reporting an idiosyncratic symptom response after glutamate ingestion might also experience such symptoms after aspartame ingestion. Such sensitive subjects might have been missed in earlier studies of aspartame. In the present study, six subjects reporting various symptoms after glutamate ingestion, but not after placebo, were administered aspartame (34 mg/kg body weight) or sucrose (1 g/kg body weight) dissolved in orange juice in a randomized, cross-over, double-blind study. No subject reported symptoms typical of a glutamate response after either sucrose or aspartame loading. One subject reported slight nausea approximately 1.5 h after aspartame ingestion, but indicated that the symptoms were not those of a glutamate response. Plasma phenylalanine and aspartate levels were similar to those noted in normal subjects administered identical doses of aspartame. The data indicate no effect of aspartame loading in glutamate-susceptible subjects.

  15. Aspartame consumption in rats selectively bred for high versus low saccharin intake.

    PubMed

    De Francisco, J C; Dess, N K

    1998-11-15

    Whereas humans use aspartame as a sugar substitute, evidence to date from rats suggests that aspartame does not taste sweet or, more generally, hedonically positive to them. The present study provided a strong test of the appetitive properties of aspartame in rats by examining consumption of aspartame and, for comparison, several sugars by two lines of rats selectively bred for high (HiS) versus low (LoS) saccharin consumption. The HiS and LoS lines differed in consumption of fructose, glucose, sucrose, maltose, and saccharin solutions. Overall, the rats showed a weak but significant preference for aspartame. However, no line differences in aspartame consumption were observed. Thus, even among rats specifically bred on the basis of their responsiveness to sweet tastes, aspartame tastes minimally sweet or good.

  16. Does sucrose or aspartame cause hyperactivity in children?

    PubMed

    Kanarek, R B

    1994-05-01

    Anecdotal evidence has led to the hypothesis that there is a relationship between sugar intake and hyperactive behavior. To assess this hypothesis, a recent study using a range of behavioral and cognitive measures evaluated the effects of diets high in sucrose, aspartame, and saccharin on the performance of school-aged children believed to be sensitive to sugar, and preschool children. Although intakes exceeded average dietary levels, neither sucrose nor aspartame negatively affected behavior. Taken together with previous work, these results indicate that sugar is not a major cause of hyperactivity.

  17. On the sweetness of N-(trifluoroacetyl)aspartame.

    PubMed

    Frank, M; Aitken, D J

    2000-09-01

    A panel of tasters has found that the N-trifluoroacetyl derivative of aspartame is five times less sweet than the parent compound, contrary to the tenet in the literature, but consistent with sweet receptor models which require this nitrogen to exist in protonated form.

  18. Sweet taste receptor gene variation and aspartame taste in primates and other species.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Bachmanov, Alexander A; Maehashi, Kenji; Li, Weihua; Lim, Raymond; Brand, Joseph G; Beauchamp, Gary K; Reed, Danielle R; Thai, Chloe; Floriano, Wely B

    2011-06-01

    Aspartame is a sweetener added to foods and beverages as a low-calorie sugar replacement. Unlike sugars, which are apparently perceived as sweet and desirable by a range of mammals, the ability to taste aspartame varies, with humans, apes, and Old World monkeys perceiving aspartame as sweet but not other primate species. To investigate whether the ability to perceive the sweetness of aspartame correlates with variations in the DNA sequence of the genes encoding sweet taste receptor proteins, T1R2 and T1R3, we sequenced these genes in 9 aspartame taster and nontaster primate species. We then compared these sequences with sequences of their orthologs in 4 other nontasters species. We identified 9 variant sites in the gene encoding T1R2 and 32 variant sites in the gene encoding T1R3 that distinguish aspartame tasters and nontasters. Molecular docking of aspartame to computer-generated models of the T1R2 + T1R3 receptor dimer suggests that species variation at a secondary, allosteric binding site in the T1R2 protein is the most likely origin of differences in perception of the sweetness of aspartame. These results identified a previously unknown site of aspartame interaction with the sweet receptor and suggest that the ability to taste aspartame might have developed during evolution to exploit a specialized food niche.

  19. Sweet Taste Receptor Gene Variation and Aspartame Taste in Primates and Other Species

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Maehashi, Kenji; Li, Weihua; Lim, Raymond; Brand, Joseph G.; Beauchamp, Gary K.; Reed, Danielle R.; Thai, Chloe

    2011-01-01

    Aspartame is a sweetener added to foods and beverages as a low-calorie sugar replacement. Unlike sugars, which are apparently perceived as sweet and desirable by a range of mammals, the ability to taste aspartame varies, with humans, apes, and Old World monkeys perceiving aspartame as sweet but not other primate species. To investigate whether the ability to perceive the sweetness of aspartame correlates with variations in the DNA sequence of the genes encoding sweet taste receptor proteins, T1R2 and T1R3, we sequenced these genes in 9 aspartame taster and nontaster primate species. We then compared these sequences with sequences of their orthologs in 4 other nontasters species. We identified 9 variant sites in the gene encoding T1R2 and 32 variant sites in the gene encoding T1R3 that distinguish aspartame tasters and nontasters. Molecular docking of aspartame to computer-generated models of the T1R2 + T1R3 receptor dimer suggests that species variation at a secondary, allosteric binding site in the T1R2 protein is the most likely origin of differences in perception of the sweetness of aspartame. These results identified a previously unknown site of aspartame interaction with the sweet receptor and suggest that the ability to taste aspartame might have developed during evolution to exploit a specialized food niche. PMID:21414996

  20. Metabolism of aspartame by human and pig intestinal microvillar peptidases.

    PubMed

    Hooper, N M; Hesp, R J; Tieku, S

    1994-03-15

    The artificial sweetener aspartame (N-L-alpha-aspartyl-L-phenyl-alanine-1-methyl ester; Nutrasweet), its decomposition product alpha Asp-Phe and the related peptide alpha Asp-PheNH2 were rapidly hydrolysed by microvillar membranes prepared from human duodenum, jejunum and ileum, and from pig duodenum and kidney. The metabolism of aspartame by the human and pig intestinal microvillar membrane preparations was inhibited significantly (> 78%) by amastatin or 1,10-phenanthroline, and partially (> 38%) by actinonin or bestatin, and was activated 2.9-4.5-fold by CaCl2. The inhibition by amastatin and 1,10-phenanthroline, and the activation by CaCl2 are characteristic of the cell-surface ectoenzyme aminopeptidase A (EC 3.4.11.7) and a purified preparation of this enzyme hydrolysed aspartame with a Km of 0.25 mM and a Vmax of 126 mumol/min per mg. A purified preparation of aminopeptidase W (EC 3.4.11.16) also hydrolysed aspartame but with a Km of 4.96 mM and a Vmax of 110 mumol/min per mg. However, rentiapril, an inhibitor of aminopeptidase W, caused only slight inhibition (maximally 19%) of the hydrolysis of aspartame by the microvillar membrane preparations. Similar patterns of inhibition and kinetic parameters were observed for alpha Asp-Phe and alpha Asp-PheNH2. Two other decomposition products of aspartame, beta Asp-PheMe and cyclo-Asp-Phe, were essentially resistant to hydrolysis by both the human and pig intestinal microvillar membrane preparations and the purified preparations of aminopeptidases A and W. Although the relatively selective inhibitor of aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2), actinonin, partially inhibited the metabolism of aspartame, alpha Asp-Phe and alpha Asp-PheNH2 by the human and pig intestinal microvillar membrane preparations, these peptides were not hydrolysed by a purified preparation of aminopeptidase N. Membrane dipeptidase (EC 3.4.13.19) only hydrolysed the unblocked dipeptide, alpha Asp-Phe, but the selective inhibitor of this enzyme, cilastatin

  1. Similarity assessment and attribute scaling of sucrose and aspartame in grape drink.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L; Archer, S

    1990-02-01

    The present study investigated the perception of sweetness of aspartame in comparison to various concentrations of sucrose. Twenty-seven subjects were randomly assigned to taste a chilled or room temperature Kool-Aid beverage sweetened with either aspartame or five different concentrations of sucrose. Subjects assessed the perceived similarity in sweetness of an aspartame-aspartame pair and five different aspartame-sucrose pairings and rated each beverage on five bipolar adjectives. Analysis of the similarity ratings revealed that subjects did not perceive the pairs of beverages to differ in perceived sweetness. Analysis of the adjective ratings revealed that aspartame and the lower sucrose concentrations were perceived as being less sweet and more sour than the higher sucrose concentrations.

  2. Aspartame and dizziness: preliminary results of a prospective, nonblinded, prevalence and attempted cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Gulya, A J; Sessions, R B; Troost, T R

    1992-09-01

    Aspartame is a low-calorie food sweetener recently approved by the FDA for general human consumption. One of us (AJG) treated a patient whose symptoms of episodic vertigo and continuous unsteadiness resolved upon ceasing aspartame intake. A literature review revealed that although dizziness has been associated with aspartame intake, no systematic study of the problem exists. As an initial attempt to ascertain the prevalence of aspartame-related dizziness in an otolaryngologic clinic, we elected to study prospectively all patients entering with the complaint of vertigo by means of a standardized questionnaire. Those patients determined to consume aspartame were further studied in a nonblinded manner to see if aspartame intake could be correlated to symptomatology. A cross-over limb was also attempted, but no patient would participate. This presentation details the case history of the propositus patient and the preliminary results of the currently ongoing prospective study.

  3. A review of the genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of aspartame: does it safe or not?

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Serkan; Uçar, Aslı

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this article is to review genotoxicologic and carcinogenic profile of the artificial sweetener aspartame. Aspartame is a synthetic dipeptide, nearly 180-200 times sweeter than sucrose. It is the most widely used artificial sweetener especially in carbonated and powdered soft drinks, beverages, drugs and hygiene products. There is a discussion ongoing for many years whether aspartame posses genotoxic and carcinogenic risk for humans. This question led to many studies to specify the adverse effects of aspartame. Therefore, we aimed to review the oldest to latest works published in major indices to gather information within this article. With respect to published data, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of aspartame is still confusing. So, consumers should be aware of the potential side effects of aspartame before they consume it.

  4. Glutamatergic receptor kinetics are not altered by perinatal exposure to aspartame.

    PubMed

    Reilly, M A; Lajtha, A

    1995-03-01

    Observation of reduced levels of glutamic acid and aspartic acid in brain of weanling rats exposed perinatally to aspartame prompted a study of the effect of this food additive on glutamatergic receptor kinetics. Aspartame 500 mg/kg/day in drinking water was administered to Sprague-Dawley rats throughout gestation and lactation. Brain was excised from weanlings 20-22 days old, and kinetics of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and total glutamatergic binding in cerebral cortex and hippocampus were found to be unaffected by perinatal exposure to high levels of aspartame. Glutamic acid was decreased in both brain regions studied, and aspartic acid was decreased in hippocampus following perinatal aspartame exposure. These changes were reversible when aspartame administration was terminated. It is concluded that perinatal exposure to high doses of aspartame does not alter glutamatergic neurotransmission in cerebral cortex or hippocampus from weanling rats.

  5. Effects of oral aspartame on plasma phenylalanine in humans and experimental rodents. Short note.

    PubMed

    Wurtman, R J; Maher, T J

    1987-01-01

    All aspartame does given to humans cause greater elevations in plasma (and, presumably, brain) phenylalanine than in plasma tyrosine. In contrast, doses of aspartame usually used in experiments on rodents preferentially elevate tyrosine. Since phenylalanine can inhibit brain catecholamine synthesis while tyrosine is the antidote for this effect, we determined the aspartame dose that would be needed to elevate phenylalanine more than tyrosine in rodents, using published data. In general rodents need 60 times as much aspartame, on a mg/kg basis, as humans to obtain comparable elevations in phenylalanine with respect to tyrosine.

  6. The effect of aspartame on the activity of rat liver xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tutelyan, V A; Kravchenko, L V; Kuzmina, E E

    1990-01-01

    Male, Wistar rats were administered aspartame (40 or 4000 mg/kg body weight) in their diet for 90 days. By 45 days, the activities of three microsomal enzymes, epoxide hydrolase, carboxylesterase, and p-nitrophenyl-UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, were significantly increased in rats consuming 4000 mg/kg of aspartame. By 90 days, however, the activity of the xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes of the rats given aspartame did not differ significantly from the activity of control animals. From these results, we conclude that the consumption of aspartame does not substantially alter the function of the hepatic microsomal enzymes which protect the organism from foreign compounds found in its environment and food.

  7. Effects of sugar and aspartame on aggression and activity in children.

    PubMed

    Kruesi, M J; Rapoport, J L; Cummings, E M; Berg, C J; Ismond, D R; Flament, M; Yarrow, M; Zahn-Waxler, C

    1987-11-01

    Habitual sugar consumption and behavior following challenge by sugar and aspartame were studied in 30 preschool boys. The 18 subjects whose parents considered them sugar reactive had more disruptive behavior problems at baseline than the other 12 subjects. Habitual sugar consumption correlated only with duration of aggression against property in alleged responders. Double-blind crossover challenges with aspartame, saccharin, sucrose, and glucose produced no significant effect on aggression or observers' ratings of behavior. Lower actometer counts followed the trials of aspartame, but the difference was not apparent to observers. It is unlikely that sugar and aspartame are clinically significant causes of disruptive behavior.

  8. Determination of eight artificial sweeteners and common Stevia rebaudiana glycosides in non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages by reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kubica, Paweł; Namieśnik, Jacek; Wasik, Andrzej

    2015-02-01

    The method for the determination of acesulfame-K, saccharine, cyclamate, aspartame, sucralose, alitame, neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, neotame and five common steviol glycosides (rebaudioside A, rebaudioside C, steviol, steviolbioside and stevioside) in soft and alcoholic beverages was developed using high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionisation (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that presents an HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method which allows for the simultaneous determination of all EU-authorised high-potency sweeteners (thaumatin being the only exception) in one analytical run. The minimalistic sample preparation procedure consisted of only two operations; dilution and centrifugation. Linearity, limits of detection and quantitation, repeatability, and trueness of the method were evaluated. The obtained recoveries at three tested concentration levels varied from 97.0 to 105.7%, with relative standard deviations lower than 4.1%. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of sweeteners in 24 samples of different soft and alcoholic drinks. PMID:25471292

  9. Determination of eight artificial sweeteners and common Stevia rebaudiana glycosides in non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages by reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kubica, Paweł; Namieśnik, Jacek; Wasik, Andrzej

    2015-02-01

    The method for the determination of acesulfame-K, saccharine, cyclamate, aspartame, sucralose, alitame, neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, neotame and five common steviol glycosides (rebaudioside A, rebaudioside C, steviol, steviolbioside and stevioside) in soft and alcoholic beverages was developed using high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionisation (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that presents an HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method which allows for the simultaneous determination of all EU-authorised high-potency sweeteners (thaumatin being the only exception) in one analytical run. The minimalistic sample preparation procedure consisted of only two operations; dilution and centrifugation. Linearity, limits of detection and quantitation, repeatability, and trueness of the method were evaluated. The obtained recoveries at three tested concentration levels varied from 97.0 to 105.7%, with relative standard deviations lower than 4.1%. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of sweeteners in 24 samples of different soft and alcoholic drinks.

  10. Determination of nine intense sweeteners in foodstuffs by high-performance liquid chromatography and evaporative light-scattering detection: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Buchgraber, Manuela; Wasik, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    An interlaboratory trial was conducted to validate an analytical method based on high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis with evaporative light-scattering detection for the simultaneous determination of 9 intense sweeteners, i.e., acesulfame-K, alitame, aspartame, cyclamic acid, dulcin, neotame, neohesperidine dihydrochalcone, saccharin, and sucralose in carbonated and noncarbonated soft drinks and canned or bottled fruits. Seven laboratories participated in the validation study. The majority of the samples fortified with levels close to the limit of quantification had relative standard deviation for reproducibility (RSDR) values <15%. In most cases, the recovery rates ranged between 90 and 105%, demonstrating satisfactory performance of the method. For samples fortified at levels comparable to the prescribed legal limits stipulated in the current European Union legislation, the method produces acceptably accurate, repeatable, and reproducible results. Trueness, expressed in terms of recovery rates, was demonstrated in most cases by values ranging from 90 to 108%. Comparability of results obtained by individual testing laboratories was good (RSDR values <10%) for the majority of results. Moreover, HorRat values of <1.1 suggested good performance of the method for all sweeteners and matrixes tested.

  11. Micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatographic determination of artificial sweeteners in low-Joule soft drinks and other foods.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C O; Trenerry, V C; Kemmery, B

    1995-03-10

    A rapid method for the determination of artificial sweeteners in low-Joule soft drinks and other foods by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MEKC) is described. Caffeine, benzoic acid and sorbic acid, which are often added to soft drinks, can also be determined with this procedure. The artificial sweeteners, aspartame, saccharin, acesulfame-K, alitame and dulcin, and the other food additives are well separated in less than 12 min using an uncoated fused-silica capillary column with a buffer consisting of 0.05 M sodium deoxycholate, 0.01 M potassium dihydrogenorthophosphate, 0.01 M sodium borate operating at 20 kV. Dehydroacetic acid was used as the internal standard for the determinations. The levels of artificial sweeteners, preservatives and caffeine were in good agreement with those determined by the high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) procedure currently used in our Laboratory. The MEKC procedure has the same order of repeatability, is faster and less costly to operate than the HPLC method.

  12. Investigation of synergism in binary mixtures of sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Booth, B J; Carr, B T; Losee, M L; Sattely-Miller, E A; Graham, B G

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the presence and degree of synergism among all binary mixtures of 14 sweeteners varying in chemical structure. A trained panel evaluated binary combinations of the following sweeteners: three sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose), two polyhydric alcohols (mannitol, sorbitol), two diterpenoid glycosides (rebaudioside-A, stevioside), two dipeptide derivatives (alitame, aspartame), one sulfamate (sodium cyclamate), one protein (thaumatin), two N-sulfonyl amides (acesulfame-K, sodium saccharin), and one dihydrochalcone (neohesperidin dihydrochalcone). Each sweetener was tested at three concentrations that were isosweet with 3%, 5%, and 7% sucrose. Two methods of analysis were performed to determine synergistic effects. In Method I, an ANOVA was performed for each intensity level to determine if the mean sweetness intensity ratings of each binary mixture were equal to nominal sweetness (i.e., additivity) or not equal to nominal sweetness (i.e., synergism or suppression). In Method II, an additional ANOVA was performed to determine if the sweetness intensity ratings of any given mixture were equal to or greater than the average of the sweetness ratings of the two pure components in that blend.

  13. Effect of temperature, pH, and ions on sweet taste.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Sattely-Miller, E A; Graham, B G; Bennett, J L; Booth, B J; Desai, N; Bishay, I

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effects of temperature (50 degrees C and 6 degrees C), pH (pH 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, 6. 0, and 7.0) and the addition of monovalent and divalent cations (5 mM Na(+), 5 mM K(+), and 5 mM Ca(2)+ ) on the sweetness intensity ratings of sweeteners ranging widely in chemical structure. A trained panel provided intensity evaluations for prototypical tastes (sweet, bitter, sour, and salty) as well as aromatic and mouth-feel attributes. The following sweeteners were included in this experiment: three sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose), three terpenoid glycosides (monoammonium glycyrrhizinate, rebaudioside-A, stevioside), two polyhydric alcohols (mannitol, sorbitol), two dipeptide derivatives (alitame, aspartame), two N-sulfonylamides (acesulfame-K, sodium saccharin), one sulfamate (sodium cyclamate), one protein (thaumatin), one dihydrochalcone (neohesperidin dihydrochalcone), and one chlorodeoxysugar (sucralose). Two to five levels of each sweetener reflecting a range of sweetness intensities were tested, using formulae developed by DuBois et al. The main finding from this three-part study was that temperature, pH, and ions had little effect on perceived sweetness intensity. Even when significant differences were found in the temperature study, the effects were very small.

  14. Simultaneous determination of nine intense sweeteners in foodstuffs by high performance liquid chromatography and evaporative light scattering detection--development and single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Wasik, Andrzej; McCourt, Josephine; Buchgraber, Manuela

    2007-07-20

    A high performance liquid chromatographic method with evaporative light scattering detection (HPLC-ELSD) has been developed for the simultaneous determination of multiple sweeteners, i.e., acesulfame-K, alitame, aspartame, cyclamic acid, dulcin, neotame, neohesperidine dihydrochalcone, saccharin and sucralose in carbonated and non-carbonated soft drinks, canned or bottled fruits and yoghurt. The procedure involves an extraction of the nine sweeteners with a buffer solution, sample clean-up using solid-phase extraction cartridges followed by an HPLC-ELSD analysis. The trueness of the method was satisfactory with recoveries ranging from 93 to 109% for concentration levels around the maximum usable dosages for authorised sweeteners and from 100 to 112% for unauthorised compounds at concentration levels close to the limit of quantification (LOQs). Precision measures showed mean repeatability values of <4% (expressed as relative standard deviation) for highly concentrated samples and <5% at concentration levels close to the LOQs. Intermediate precision was in most cases <8%. The limits of detection (LODs) were below 15 microg g(-1) and the LOQs below 30 microg g(-1) in all three matrices. Only dulcin showed slightly higher values, i.e., LODs around 30 microg g(-1) and LOQs around 50 microg g(-1)

  15. Use of aspartame by apparently healthy children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Frey, G H

    1976-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects and the differences, if any, resulting from the ingestion of aspartame (sweetener) versus sucrose. A 13-wk, double-blind study was conducted using 126 apparently healthy children and adolescents as panelists. Individuals were randomly assigned in a double-blind design to aspartame or sucrose in each of five age groups; dosage levels were assigned according to age and weight groups. Physical examinations and special eye examinations were performed at the beginning and end of the study. Other parameters determined including laboratory tests of liver and renal function, hematologic status, and plasma levels of phenylalanine and tyrosine. Clinically significant differences in laboratory parameters measured could not be demonstrated; all mean values were within normal limits. No unusual findings were observed in phenylalanine or tyrosine levels. All phenylpyruvic acid and methanol determinations were negative. No important physical changes occurred, and no product-related side effects were reported.

  16. Comparative metabolism of aspartame in experimental animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Ranney, R E; Oppermann, J A; Muldoon, E; McMahon, F G

    1976-11-01

    Aspartame [SC-18862; 3-amino-N-(alpha-carboxyphenethyl) succinamic acid, methyl ester, the methyl ester of aspartylphenylalanine] is a sweetening agent that organoleptically has about 180 times the sweetness of sugar. The metabolism of aspartame has been studied in mice, rats, rabbits, dogs, monkeys, and humans. The compound was digested in all species in the same way as are natural constituents of the diet. Hydrolysis of the methyl group by intestinal esterases yielded methanol, which was oxidized in the one-carbon metabolic pool to CO2. The resultant dipeptide was split at the mucosal surface by dipeptidases and the free amino acids were absorbed. The aspartic acid moiety was transformed in large part to CO2 through its entry into the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Phenylalanine was primarily incorporated into body protein either unchanged or as its major metabolite, tyrosine.

  17. Aspartame's effects on behavioral thermoregulation in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Vitulli, W F; McAleer, J E; Rockwell, A C; Granade, C R; Parman, D L; Benoit, C; Quinn, J M

    1996-08-01

    Aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) was administered intraperitoneally to 9 Sprague-Dawley rats partitioned into 2 studies (4 in Study 1 and 5 for a replication in Study 2) over a two-year period using a within-subjects, repeated-measures reversal design. Behavioral thermoregulation was assessed in a cold Skinner Box using 5-sec. exposures of microwave radiation [Specific Absorption Rate = 0.34 Watts/kg/(mW/cm2)] as reinforcing stimuli under a fixed-interval 2-min. schedule of positive reinforcement. Two factorial analyses of variance [5 (doses) x 8 (hours)] indicated that the main effect for the doses of aspartame (2, 4, 8, 16 mg/kg, and saline control) was not significant; yet, the interaction (dose x hours) was significant (p < .05). Tentatively, aspartame should not cause an uncomfortable rise in body temperature (as sugar can do) when consumed in common substances such as soft drinks, yogurt, tea, coffee, etc., in doses commensurate with "hedonic" sweetness.

  18. Solid-state characterization of two polymorphs of aspartame hemihydrate.

    PubMed

    Leung, S S; Padden, B E; Munson, E J; Grant, D J

    1998-04-01

    From the known crystal structure of aspartame hemihydrate, designated form 1, the theoretical powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) pattern was calculated. This PXRD pattern differs significantly from that of the commercially available aspartame hemihydrate, which is therefore a different polymorph, designated form II. Form II transforms to form I during ball-milling or on heating for 30 min at 160 degrees C in the presence of steam. The two polymorphs were compared by PXRD, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Karl Fischer titrimetry, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopy, 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, particle size analysis, and measurements of true density and intrinsic dissolution rate. Comparison of the 13C SSNMR and FTIR spectra of the two polymorphs suggests that the crystal structure of form II is less symmetric, with the side chains located in multiple environments. Although both hemihydrate polymorphs on heating in the absence of moisture dehydrate to a crystalline anhydrate, form I does so at a lower temperature, suggesting weaker interactions of water with aspartame molecules. At higher temperatures the anhydrate from both hemihydrate polymorphs yields 3-(carboxymethyl)-6-benzyl-2,5-dioxopiperazine (DKP) by a cyclization reaction for which the temperature, reaction enthalpy, and activation energy are very similar. Both hemihydrate forms, when in contact with liquid water, yield the 2.5-hydrate.

  19. An evaluation of the effect of aspartame on weight loss.

    PubMed

    Kanders, B S; Lavin, P T; Kowalchuk, M B; Greenberg, I; Blackburn, G L

    1988-01-01

    This study explores whether the addition of aspartame-sweetened foods and beverages to a low fat, hypocaloric diet enhances compliance and resulting weight loss. Fifty-nine obese (130-225% of ideal body weight), free living men and women were randomly assigned to either a Balanced Deficit Diet (BDD) or a BDD supplemented with aspartame. Over a 12-week weight loss period, volunteers attended weekly support group meetings including behavior modification training and exercise instruction. Males achieved a clinically significant weight loss (greater than 23 lb) in both study groups, while females lost an average of 12.8 lb in the control group vs. 16.5 lb in the experimental group. In both treatment groups, sleep, general energy level, level of physical activity, and feeling of well-being showed clinically meaningful improvement. This study suggests possible advantages to supplementing a BDD with aspartame-sweetened foods as part of a multidisciplinary weight loss program. The small sample size prohibits definitive conclusions but does provide the protocol for a larger, outpatient clinical trial.

  20. Aspartame ingestion increases urinary calcium, but not oxalate excretion, in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, U N; Dumoulin, G; Henriet, M T; Regnard, J

    1998-01-01

    Aspartame is the artificial sweetener most extensively used as a substitute for glucose or sucrose in the food industry, particularly in soft drinks. As glucose ingestion increases calciuria and oxaluria, the two main determinants of urinary calcium-oxalate saturation, we considered it worthwhile to determine whether aspartame ingestion also affects calcium-oxalate metabolism. Our study compares the effects of the ingestion of similarly sweet doses of aspartame (250 mg) and glucose (75 g) on calcium and oxalate metabolisms of seven healthy subjects. Urinary calcium excretion increased after the intake of both aspartame (+86%; P < 0.01) and glucose (+124%; P < 0.01). This may be due to the rise in calcemia observed after both aspartame (+2.2%; P < 0.05) and glucose ingestion (+1.8%; P < 0.05). The increased calcemia may be linked to the decrease in phosphatemia that occurred after both aspartame (P < 0.01) and glucose (P < 0.01) load. Aspartame did not alter glycemia or insulinemia, whereas glucose intake caused striking increases in both glycemia (+59%; P < 0.001) and insulinemia (+869%; P < 0.01). Although insulin was considered the main calciuria-induced factor after glucose load, it is unlikely that this mechanism played a role with aspartame. Urinary oxalate excretion did not change after aspartame, whereas it increased (+27%; P < 0.05) after glucose load. Thus, as aspartame induced a similar increase in calciuria as did glucose but, conversely, no change in oxaluria, substituting glucose by aspartame in soft drinks may appear to be of some potential benefit.

  1. Sensory evaluation of soft drinks with various sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Crofton, V A; Beeker, T G

    1985-03-01

    Forty subjects participated in each of two experiments in which both lemon-line and cola-flavored beverages containing one of six sweeteners--sucrose, sodium saccharin, aspartame, acesulfam-K, and two calcium cyclamate/sodium saccharin blends (10:1 and 3.5:1)--were evaluated on similarity and adjective scales. The similarity data suggest that drinks containing sucrose and aspartame cannot be discriminated from one another in either a lemon-line or cola medium in this experimental design. Sucrose and aspartame were also statistically equivalent on every adjective scale for both lemon-line and cola drinks. On both similarity judgments and adjective scales, acesulfam-K and sodium saccharin were most different from sucrose. The calcium cyclamate/sodium saccharin blends tended to be less similar than aspartame but not as different from sucrose as the acesulfam-K or sodium saccharin sweetened beverages.

  2. Investigation of role of aspartame on apoptosis process in HeLa cells -->.

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Enkhtaivan, Gansukh; Mistry, Bhupendra; Chandrasekaran, Murugesan; Noorzai, Rafi; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2016-07-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetener used as an alternate for sugar in several foods and beverages. The study reports that consumption of aspartame containing product could lead to cancer. However, the effect of aspartame on apoptosis process in cancer is not yet understood clearly. HeLa cells were exposed to different concentrations (0.01-0.05 mg/ml) of aspartame for 48 h. Cytotoxicity of aspartame on cancer cells was determined by SRB assay. The result indicates no significant changes on cell viability. Aspartame suppresses apoptosis process in cancer cells by down-regulation of mRNA expression of tumor suppressor gene p53, and pro-apoptotic gene bax. It up-regulates anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 mRNA expression. In addition, Ki 67 and PCNA mRNA, and protein expressions were determined. Taking all these together, we conclude that aspartame may be a potent substance to slow-down the apoptosis process in HeLa cells. Further works are ongoing to understand the biochemical and molecular mechanism of aspartame in cancer cells. PMID:27298583

  3. Investigation of role of aspartame on apoptosis process in HeLa cells -->.

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Enkhtaivan, Gansukh; Mistry, Bhupendra; Chandrasekaran, Murugesan; Noorzai, Rafi; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2016-07-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetener used as an alternate for sugar in several foods and beverages. The study reports that consumption of aspartame containing product could lead to cancer. However, the effect of aspartame on apoptosis process in cancer is not yet understood clearly. HeLa cells were exposed to different concentrations (0.01-0.05 mg/ml) of aspartame for 48 h. Cytotoxicity of aspartame on cancer cells was determined by SRB assay. The result indicates no significant changes on cell viability. Aspartame suppresses apoptosis process in cancer cells by down-regulation of mRNA expression of tumor suppressor gene p53, and pro-apoptotic gene bax. It up-regulates anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 mRNA expression. In addition, Ki 67 and PCNA mRNA, and protein expressions were determined. Taking all these together, we conclude that aspartame may be a potent substance to slow-down the apoptosis process in HeLa cells. Further works are ongoing to understand the biochemical and molecular mechanism of aspartame in cancer cells.

  4. Aspartame optical biosensor with bienzyme-immobilized eggshell membrane and oxygen-sensitive optode membrane.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Choi, Martin M F

    2002-02-15

    An aspartame optical biosensor has been fabricated by employing a bienzyme system composed of alpha-chymotrypsin and alcohol oxidase immobilized onto an eggshell membrane and an oxygen-sensitive optode membrane as the transducer. The detection schemes involve the enzymatic reactions of aspartame leading to the depletion of the oxygen level of the medium with a concomitant enhancement of the fluorescence intensity of the oxygen-sensitive membrane. The scanning electron and transmission electron micrographs show the microstructure of the eggshell membrane which is successfully immobilized with bienzyme. Using this novel immobilization technique, the aspartame biosensor shows extremely good stability with a shelf life of at least 8 months. The rate change of the fluorescence intensity in 4 min is found to be linearly related to the concentration of aspartame. The useful analytical working range of the biosensor is from 0.056 to 3.07 mM aspartame. The effects of temperature, pH, and ionic strength on the response of the aspartame biosensor are investigated in detail. Citric acid, cyclamic acid, D-fructose, D-galactose, D-glucose, hydrogen peroxide, DL-malic acid, L-phenylalanine, saccharin, sodium benzoate, and sucrose show no interferences but ethanol interferes strongly. The aspartame biosensor has been applied to determine aspartame contents in some commercial products.

  5. Results of loading doses of aspartame by two phenylketonuric (PKU) children compared with two normal children.

    PubMed

    Koch, R; Schaeffler, G; Shaw, N F

    1976-11-01

    Separate tolerance tests with aspartame at 34 mg/kg-day and phenylalanine at 19 mg/kg-day were compared. The results reveal that slight serum elevation of phenylalanine and tyrosine occurred in the two PKU and the normal healthy adolescents. It would appear that the phenylalanine in the sweetener aspartame is small enough to be of little clinical significance.

  6. Acute effects of aspartame on systolic blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kiritsy, P J; Maher, T J

    1986-01-01

    Exogenous tyrosine lowers blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The artificial sweetener aspartame also elevates blood and brain tyrosine levels in rats by being hydrolyzed to phenylalanine, which is then rapidly hydroxylated to tyrosine in the liver. Hence we tested the ability of aspartame; its hydrolytic products phenylalanine, aspartic acid and methanol; and of tyrosine itself to lower blood pressure in SHR. For one week prior to experimentation rats were acclimated to the indirect blood pressure measurement technique; on the day of an experiment they received I.P. injections (mg/kg) of aspartame (12.5-200), tyrosine (25-200) or phenylalanine (100-200), or of aspartic acid or methanol in the doses theoretically contained within 200 mg/kg aspartame. Animals receiving 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg of aspartame exhibited maximum falls in blood pressure of 17.3, 24.2 and 19.3 mmHg, respectively. All changes were significant, as determined by ANOVA and the Newman-Keuls test (p less than 0.05). Tyrosine or phenylalanine also lowered blood pressure, but aspartic acid or methanol produced no significant effects. Co-administration of aspartame with valine, a large neutral amino acid that competes with phenylalanine or tyrosine for brain uptake, attenuated aspartame's hypotensive effect. These observations suggest that the neurochemical changes produced by aspartame lead to predicted tyrosine-induced changes in blood pressure.

  7. Structure, dynamics, and stability of beta-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes of aspartame and neotame.

    PubMed

    Garbow, J R; Likos, J J; Schroeder, S A

    2001-04-01

    Studies of the high-intensity sweetener aspartame show that its stability is significantly enhanced in the presence of beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CyD). At a 5:1 beta-CyD/aspartame molar ratio, the stability of aspartame is 42% greater in 4 mM phosphate buffer (pH 3.1) compared to solutions prepared without beta-CyD. Solution-state (1)H NMR experiments demonstrate the formation of 1:1 beta-CyD/aspartame complexes, stabilized by the interaction of the phenyl-ring protons of aspartame with the H3 and H5 protons of beta-CyD. Inclusion complex formation clearly accounts for the observed stability enhancement of aspartame in solution. The formation of inclusion complexes in solution is also demonstrated for beta-CyD and neotame, a structural derivative of aspartame containing an N-substituted 3,3-dimethylbutyl group. These complexes are stabilized by the interaction of beta-CyD with both phenyl-ring and dimethylbutyl protons. Solid-state NMR experiments provide additional characterization, clearly demonstrating the formation of inclusion complexes in lyophilized solids prepared from solutions of beta-CyD and either aspartame or neotame.

  8. Ion-pair high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of aspartame and related products.

    PubMed

    Verzella, G; Bagnasco, G; Mangia, A

    1985-12-01

    A simple and accurate quantitative determination of aspartame (L-alpha-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester), a new artificial sweetener, is described. The method, which is based on ion-pair high-performance liquid chromatography, allows the determination of aspartame in finished bulk and dosage forms, and the detection of a few related products at levels down to 0.1%.

  9. Absence of developmental effects in CF-1 mice exposed to aspartame in utero.

    PubMed

    McAnulty, P A; Collier, M J; Enticott, J; Tesh, J M; Mayhew, D A; Comer, C P; Hjelle, J J; Kotsonis, F N

    1989-08-01

    Aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) is a widely used high potency dipeptide sweetener. Developmental toxicology studies have been performed in several species documenting no effects of high doses of aspartame. Recently, a study by Mahalik and Gautieri [1984) Res. Commun. Psychol. Psychiatry Behav. 9, 385-403) reported a delay in the achievement age for the visual placing response in mice pups after maternal administration of high dosages of aspartame during late gestation. In the present study developmental parameters were determined in offspring of CF-1 mice after maternal administration of aspartame at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 mg/kg body wt by oral gavage. Aspartame was administered on Days 15 through 18 of gestation. Maternal body weight, food consumption, gestation length, reproductive indices, and litter size were not affected by aspartame treatment. In the pups, body weights, negative geotaxis, and surface and midair righting reflexes were not altered by treatment. There was no delay in the development of the visual placing response regardless of the method employed for assessment (grid or rope) or the manner by which the data were analyzed. There were also no changes in time of eye opening, reflex pupil closure, and ophthalmoscopic examination in the offspring. Thus, neither physical nor functional development was altered in mice after in utero exposure to extremely large dosages of aspartame. More specifically, in utero exposure to aspartame did not affect the development of the visual system in mice.

  10. Carbon-deuterium rotational-echo double-resonance NMR spectroscopy of lyophilized aspartame formulations.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Suman A; Utz, Marcel; Gorman, Eric M; Pikal, Michael J; Munson, Eric J; Lubach, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    In this study, changes in the local conformation of aspartame were observed in annealed lyophilized glasses by monitoring changes in the distance between two labeled sites using C-(2)H rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Confirmation that the REDOR experiments were producing accurate distance measurement was ensured by measuring the (13)C-(15)N distance in glycine. The experiment was further verified by measuring the REDOR dephasing curve on (13)C-(2)H methionine. (13)C-(2)H REDOR dephasing curves were then measured on lyophilized aspartame-disaccharide formulations. In aspartame-sucrose formulation, the internuclear distances increased upon annealing, which correlated with decreased chemical reactivity. By contrast, annealing had only a minimal effect on the dephasing curve in aspartame-trehalose formulation. The results show that stability is a function of both mobility and local structure (conformation), even in a small molecule system such as lyophilized aspartame-sucrose. PMID:21935954

  11. Carbon-deuterium rotational-echo double-resonance NMR spectroscopy of lyophilized aspartame formulations.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Suman A; Utz, Marcel; Gorman, Eric M; Pikal, Michael J; Munson, Eric J; Lubach, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    In this study, changes in the local conformation of aspartame were observed in annealed lyophilized glasses by monitoring changes in the distance between two labeled sites using C-(2)H rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Confirmation that the REDOR experiments were producing accurate distance measurement was ensured by measuring the (13)C-(15)N distance in glycine. The experiment was further verified by measuring the REDOR dephasing curve on (13)C-(2)H methionine. (13)C-(2)H REDOR dephasing curves were then measured on lyophilized aspartame-disaccharide formulations. In aspartame-sucrose formulation, the internuclear distances increased upon annealing, which correlated with decreased chemical reactivity. By contrast, annealing had only a minimal effect on the dephasing curve in aspartame-trehalose formulation. The results show that stability is a function of both mobility and local structure (conformation), even in a small molecule system such as lyophilized aspartame-sucrose.

  12. Stability of aspartame in water: organic solvent mixtures with different dielectric constants.

    PubMed

    Sanyude, S; Locock, R A; Pagliaro, L A

    1991-07-01

    In order to examine the influence of solvent composition on the stability of aspartame (N-alpha-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine-1-methyl ester) in solution (5 mg/mL), the degradation of aspartame was carried out in water:methanol, water:ethanol, and water:glycerine mixtures with dielectric constant values of 45, 55, and 65, respectively. The rate of disappearance of aspartame was measured by a sensitive HPLC assay. The degradation rate of aspartame increased as the dielectric constant of the solvent mixture decreased in all three solvents systems. For example, at 60 degrees C, the degradation rate constants were 4.1, 5.9, and 8.4 x 10(-3) h-1 at dielectric constant of 65, 55, and 45, respectively. From these results, it can be concluded that the stability of aspartame in aqueous solutions cannot be enhanced by the replacement of water by solvents of lower dielectric constant.

  13. Immunoreactive beta-endorphin increases after an aspartame chocolate drink in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Melchior, J C; Rigaud, D; Colas-Linhart, N; Petiet, A; Girard, A; Apfelbaum, M

    1991-11-01

    It has been claimed that sucrose intake induces a rise in beta-endorphins. In an attempt to discriminate between the sensorial and metabolic effects of sucrose intake in this process, the effects of two chocolate drinks were compared: one sweetened with 50 g of sucrose, the other with 80 mg of aspartame. Plasma beta-endorphin concentrations were more elevated after the aspartame drink than after sucrose or fasting, while insulin increased after drinking as much with aspartame as with sucrose. We suggest that the increase in beta-endorphin after aspartame edulcorated chocolate is related with insulin secretion in the absence of marked changes in blood glucose or with a direct effect of aspartame itself on beta-endorphin liberation.

  14. Reverse phase liquid chromatographic determination of aspartame in beverages and beverage mixes.

    PubMed

    Webb, N G; Beckman, D D

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for determining the artificial sweetener aspartame in beverages and beverage mixes by liquid chromatography. Aspartame is separated on a microC18 column, using a mobile phase of acetic acid, water, and isopropyl alcohol at pH 3.0 and UV detection at 254 nm. Beverages are filtered through 0.45 micron filters and injected directly into the chromatograph. Aspartame is eluted in approximately 7 min. Detection of aspartame is confirmed by a UV scan of the trapped peak. Aspartame is quantitated in the presence of other beverage additives such as saccharin, caffeine, sodium benzoate, artificial colors, and artificial flavors. Results are presented for spiked soda beverages, beverages from fruit-flavored mixes, instant tea, reconstituted presweetened drink mixes, and a powdered tabletop sweetener.

  15. Gender dimorphism in aspartame-induced impairment of spatial cognition and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Collison, Kate S; Makhoul, Nadine J; Zaidi, Marya Z; Saleh, Soad M; Andres, Bernard; Inglis, Angela; Al-Rabiah, Rana; Al-Mohanna, Futwan A

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have linked aspartame consumption to impaired retention of learned behavior in rodents. Prenatal exposure to aspartame has also been shown to impair odor-associative learning in guinea pigs; and recently, aspartame-fed hyperlipidemic zebrafish exhibited weight gain, hyperglycemia and acute swimming defects. We therefore investigated the effects of chronic lifetime exposure to aspartame, commencing in utero, on changes in blood glucose parameters, spatial learning and memory in C57BL/6J mice. Morris Water Maze (MWM) testing was used to assess learning and memory, and a random-fed insulin tolerance test was performed to assess glucose homeostasis. Pearson correlation analysis was used to investigate the associations between body characteristics and MWM performance outcome variables. At 17 weeks of age, male aspartame-fed mice exhibited weight gain, elevated fasting glucose levels and decreased insulin sensitivity compared to controls (P<0.05). Females were less affected, but had significantly raised fasting glucose levels. During spatial learning trials in the MWM (acquisition training), the escape latencies of male aspartame-fed mice were consistently higher than controls, indicative of learning impairment. Thigmotactic behavior and time spent floating directionless was increased in aspartame mice, who also spent less time searching in the target quadrant of the maze (P<0.05). Spatial learning of female aspartame-fed mice was not significantly different from controls. Reference memory during a probe test was affected in both genders, with the aspartame-fed mice spending significantly less time searching for the former location of the platform. Interestingly, the extent of visceral fat deposition correlated positively with non-spatial search strategies such as floating and thigmotaxis, and negatively with time spent in the target quadrant and swimming across the location of the escape platform. These data suggest that lifetime exposure to aspartame

  16. Gender Dimorphism in Aspartame-Induced Impairment of Spatial Cognition and Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Collison, Kate S.; Makhoul, Nadine J.; Zaidi, Marya Z.; Saleh, Soad M.; Andres, Bernard; Inglis, Angela; Al-Rabiah, Rana; Al-Mohanna, Futwan A.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have linked aspartame consumption to impaired retention of learned behavior in rodents. Prenatal exposure to aspartame has also been shown to impair odor-associative learning in guinea pigs; and recently, aspartame-fed hyperlipidemic zebrafish exhibited weight gain, hyperglycemia and acute swimming defects. We therefore investigated the effects of chronic lifetime exposure to aspartame, commencing in utero, on changes in blood glucose parameters, spatial learning and memory in C57BL/6J mice. Morris Water Maze (MWM) testing was used to assess learning and memory, and a random-fed insulin tolerance test was performed to assess glucose homeostasis. Pearson correlation analysis was used to investigate the associations between body characteristics and MWM performance outcome variables. At 17 weeks of age, male aspartame-fed mice exhibited weight gain, elevated fasting glucose levels and decreased insulin sensitivity compared to controls (P<0.05). Females were less affected, but had significantly raised fasting glucose levels. During spatial learning trials in the MWM (acquisition training), the escape latencies of male aspartame-fed mice were consistently higher than controls, indicative of learning impairment. Thigmotactic behavior and time spent floating directionless was increased in aspartame mice, who also spent less time searching in the target quadrant of the maze (P<0.05). Spatial learning of female aspartame-fed mice was not significantly different from controls. Reference memory during a probe test was affected in both genders, with the aspartame-fed mice spending significantly less time searching for the former location of the platform. Interestingly, the extent of visceral fat deposition correlated positively with non-spatial search strategies such as floating and thigmotaxis, and negatively with time spent in the target quadrant and swimming across the location of the escape platform. These data suggest that lifetime exposure to aspartame

  17. Aspartame and Risk of Cancer: A Meta-analytic Review.

    PubMed

    Mallikarjun, Sreekanth; Sieburth, Rebecca McNeill

    2015-01-01

    Aspartame (APM) is the most commonly used artificial sweetener and flavor enhancer in the world. There is a rise in concern that APM is carcinogenic due to a variation in the findings of the previous APM carcinogenic bioassays. This article conducts a meta-analytic review of all previous APM carcinogenic bioassays on rodents that were conducted before 31 December 2012. The search yielded 10 original APM carcinogenic bioassays on rodents. The aggregate effect sizes suggest that APM consumption has no significant carcinogenic effect in rodents.

  18. Prediction of sweetness intensity for equiratio aspartame/sucrose mixtures.

    PubMed

    Schifferstein, H N

    1995-04-01

    The Equiratio Mixture Model predicts the responses to a series of equiratio mixtures on the basis of the psychophysical functions for the unmixed components. The model predicts the sweetness of mixtures of sugars and sugar-alcohols successfully, but is unable to predict mixture intensity for substances with different dynamic ranges. In this paper, the equi-intensity concept is introduced in the Equiratio Mixture Model by transforming the physical concentrations expressed in molarity into units that produce approximately equi-intense sensations. An empirical test using aspartame/sucrose mixtures shows that the modified Equiratio Mixture Model yields good predictions of mixture intensities.

  19. Aspartame degradation study using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pattanaargson, S; Sanchavanakit, C

    2000-01-01

    Electrospray mass spectrometry was used to simultaneously determine aspartame (APM) and five of its degradation products; aspartic acid, aspartylphenylalanine, 5-benzyl-3,6-dioxo-2-piperazieacetic acid (diketopiperazine), phenylalanine, and phenylalanine methyl ester. Under the ionization conditions used, there was no interfering fragmentation for any of the six compounds, i.e., no fragmentation of the compound being tested into other species also being monitored. A study of APM degradation in solution at various pH's and at various temperatures using this method was performed.

  20. Incidence of brain tumors in rats fed aspartame.

    PubMed

    Ishii, H

    1981-03-01

    The brain tumorigenicity of aspartame (APM) and of its diketopiperazine (DKP) was studied in 860 SCL Wistar rats. APM at dietary levels of 1 g/kg, 2 gK/, 4 g/kg or APM + DKP (3:1) 4 g/kg was fed for 104 weeks. One atypical astrocytoma was found in a control rat and 2 astrocytomas, 2 oligodendrogliomas and 1 ependymoma were scattered among the 4 test groups. There was no significant difference in the incidence of brain tumors between control and test groups. It is concluded that neither AMP nor DKP caused brain tumors in rats in this study.

  1. Stability of aspartame and neotame in pasteurized and in-bottle sterilized flavoured milk.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Anuradha; Choudhary, Sonika; Arora, Sumit; Sharma, Vivek

    2016-04-01

    Analytical high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) conditions were standardized along with the isolation procedure for separation of aspartame and neotame in flavoured milk (pasteurized and in-bottle sterilized flavoured milk). The recovery of the method was approximately 98% for both aspartame and neotame. The proposed HPLC method can be successfully used for the routine determination of aspartame and neotame in flavoured milk. Pasteurization (90 °C/20 min) resulted in approximately 40% loss of aspartame and only 8% of neotame was degraded. On storage (4-7°C/7 days) aspartame and neotame content decreased significantly (P<0.05) from 59.70% to 44.61% and 91.78% to 87.18%, respectively. Sterilization (121 °C/15 min) resulted in complete degradation of aspartame; however, 50.50% of neotame remained intact. During storage (30 °C/60 days) neotame content decreased significantly (P<0.05) from 50.36% to 8.67%. Results indicated that neotame exhibited better stability than aspartame in both pasteurized and in-bottle sterilized flavoured milk. PMID:26593524

  2. Stability of aspartame and neotame in pasteurized and in-bottle sterilized flavoured milk.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Anuradha; Choudhary, Sonika; Arora, Sumit; Sharma, Vivek

    2016-04-01

    Analytical high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) conditions were standardized along with the isolation procedure for separation of aspartame and neotame in flavoured milk (pasteurized and in-bottle sterilized flavoured milk). The recovery of the method was approximately 98% for both aspartame and neotame. The proposed HPLC method can be successfully used for the routine determination of aspartame and neotame in flavoured milk. Pasteurization (90 °C/20 min) resulted in approximately 40% loss of aspartame and only 8% of neotame was degraded. On storage (4-7°C/7 days) aspartame and neotame content decreased significantly (P<0.05) from 59.70% to 44.61% and 91.78% to 87.18%, respectively. Sterilization (121 °C/15 min) resulted in complete degradation of aspartame; however, 50.50% of neotame remained intact. During storage (30 °C/60 days) neotame content decreased significantly (P<0.05) from 50.36% to 8.67%. Results indicated that neotame exhibited better stability than aspartame in both pasteurized and in-bottle sterilized flavoured milk.

  3. Long-term consumption of aspartame and brain antioxidant defense status.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, M; Sauganth Paul, M V; Varghese, Mathews V; Nair, R Harikumaran

    2013-04-01

    The present study investigated the effect of long-term intake of aspartame, a widely used artificial sweetener, on antioxidant defense status in the rat brain. Male Wistar rats weighing 150-175 g were randomly divided into three groups as follows: The first group was given aspartame at a dose of 500 mg/kg body weight (b.w.); the second group was given aspartame at dose of 1,000 mg/kg b.w., respectively, in a total volume of 3 mL of water; and the control rats received 3 mL of distilled water. Oral intubations were done in the morning, daily for 180 days. The concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activity of glutathione reductase (GR) were significantly reduced in the brain of rats that had received the dose of 1,000 mg/kg b.w. of aspartame, whereas only a significant reduction in GSH concentration was observed in the 500-mg/kg b.w. aspartame-treated group. Histopathological examination revealed mild vascular congestion in the 1,000 mg/kg b.w. group of aspartame-treated rats. The results of this experiment indicate that long-term consumption of aspartame leads to an imbalance in the antioxidant/pro-oxidant status in the brain, mainly through the mechanism involving the glutathione-dependent system.

  4. Aspartame and seizure susceptibility: results of a clinical study in reportedly sensitive individuals.

    PubMed

    Rowan, A J; Shaywitz, B A; Tuchman, L; French, J A; Luciano, D; Sullivan, C M

    1995-03-01

    The high intensity sweetener aspartame has been implicated anecdotally in seizure provocation. This possibility was investigated with a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. After an extensive search, 18 individuals (16 adults and 2 children) who had seizures allegedly related to aspartame consumption were admitted to adult or pediatric epilepsy monitoring units where their EEG was monitored continuously for 5 days. Aspartame (50 mg/kg) or identically enpackaged placebo was administered in divided doses at 0800, 1000, and 1200 h on study days 2 and 4. All meals were uniformly standardized on treatment days. No clinical seizures or other adverse experiences were observed after aspartame ingestion. Mean plasma phenylalanine (Phe) concentrations increased significantly after aspartame ingestion (83.6 microM) as compared with placebo (52.3 microM). Results suggest that aspartame, in acute dosage of approximately 50 mg/kg, is no more likely than placebo to cause seizures in individuals who reported that their seizures were provoked by aspartame consumption.

  5. Aspartame-induced fibromyalgia, an unusual but curable cause of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Ciappuccini, R; Ansemant, T; Maillefert, J-F; Tavernier, C; Ornetti, P

    2010-01-01

    We report for the first time an unusual musculoskeletal adverse effect of aspartame in two patients. A 50-year-old woman had been suffering from widespread pain and fatigue for more than 10 years leading to the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. During a vacation in a foreign country, she did not suffer from painful symptoms since she had forgotten to take her aspartame. All of the symptoms reappeared in the days following her return when she reintroduced aspartame into her daily diet. Thus, aspartame was definitively excluded from her diet, resulting in a complete regression of the fibromyalgia symptoms. A 43-year-old man consulted for a 3-year history of bilateral forearm, wrist, and hand and cervical pain with various unsuccessful treatments. A detailed questioning allowed to find out that he had been taking aspartame for three years. The removal of aspartame was followed by a complete regression of pain, without recurrence. We believe that these patients' chronic pain was due to the ingestion of aspartame, a potent flavouring agent, widely used in food as a calorie-saver. The benefit/ risk ratio of considering the diagnosis of aspartame-induced chronic pain is obvious: the potential benefit is to cure a disabling chronic disease, to spare numerous laboratory and imaging investigations, and to avoid potentially harmful therapies; the potential risk is to temporarily change the patient's diet. Thus, practitioners should ask patients suffering from fibromyalgia about their intake of aspartame. In some cases, this simple question might lead to the resolution of a disabling chronic disease.

  6. Determination of aspartame and its degradation and epimerization products by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sabah, S; Scriba, G K

    1998-02-01

    Two capillary zone electrophoretic assays using run buffers of pH 9.35 and pH 2.70 have been developed for the determination of aspartame (alpha-L-Asp-L-PheOMe) and its potential degradation products including Phe, PheOMe, 5-benzyl-3,6-dioxo-2-piperazineacetic acid (DKP), the dipeptides Asp-Phe and Phe-Asp, as well as the isomeric beta-aspartame (beta-L-Asp-L-PheOMe). As an uncharged species at pH 2.7 DKP could not be determined. Between pH 2.0 and 3.5 the resolution of the diastereomers of aspartame and beta-aspartame was investigated. While the resolution of the epimeric beta-isomers exhibited a plateau between pH 2.3 and 2.7, resolution of the aspartame diastereomers peaked at pH 3.0. Using salicylic acid and Phe-Gly as internal standards at pH 9.35 and 2.70, respectively, linear calibration curves were obtained for a concentration range between 5 micrograms ml-1 and 1 mg ml-1. The R.S.D. for intraday and interday analysis ranged from 1.0 to 3.6% and 1.5% to 9.1%, respectively. The capillary electrophoresis assays were applied to analyze aspartame solutions heated to 70 degrees C. In agreement with the literature data aspartame was found to be less stable at pH 7 compared to pH 3. In contrast to aspartame itself, an approximate 20% epimerization of beta-aspartame was observed in the incubation mixtures.

  7. The Sweetness of Aspartame: A Biochemistry Lab for Health Science Chemistry Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Paul J.

    1997-09-01

    A laboratory exercise for Health Science Biochemistry students to study the effect of aspartame concentration on sweetness has been developed. The concentration dependence of the absorbance of aspartame at 257 nm is also studied. Data from all members of the class are averaged and plotted on the same graph as absorbance and taste rating vs. [aspartame]. The absorbance plot follows Beer's law while the taste rating plot displays the typical hyperbolic response of protein-ligand binding plots. This laboratory exercise illustrates the concept of binding saturation to students.

  8. An analysis of FDA passive surveillance reports of seizures associated with consumption of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Tollefson, L; Barnard, R J

    1992-05-01

    Aspartame, the methyl ester of the dipeptide formed from combining phenylalanine and aspartic acid, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 1981. FDA monitors complaints from consumers and health professionals through the Adverse Reaction Monitoring System, a passive surveillance program FDA has received 251 reports of seizures that have been linked to ingestion of aspartame by consumers. In most cases, information obtained from the complainants' medical records as well as data on consumption patterns, temporal relationships, and challenge tests did not support the claim that the occurrences of the seizures were linked to consumption of aspartame.

  9. A biosensor based on graphite epoxy composite electrode for aspartame and ethanol detection.

    PubMed

    Kirgöz, Ulkü Anik; Odaci, Dilek; Timur, Suna; Merkoçi, Arben; Alegret, Salvador; Beşün, Nurgün; Telefoncu, Azmi

    2006-06-16

    A gelatin membrane with carboxyl esterase and alcohol oxidase was subsequently integrated onto the surface of a graphite epoxy composite electrode (GECE). The developed biosensors showed linearity in the range of 2.5-400 microM for aspartame and 2.5-25 microM for ethanol with response times of 170 and 70s for each analyte, respectively. The resulting bienzyme biosensor was used for aspartame detection in diet coke samples and ethanol detection in beer and wine samples. From the obtained results, it can be concluded that the developed biosensor is a selective, practical and economic tool for aspartame and ethanol detection in real samples.

  10. The effect of oral aspartame administration on the balance of magnesium in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kovatsi, L; Tsouggas, M

    2001-09-01

    The aim of the present work was to determine the effect of aspartame administration on the excretion of magnesium and its distribution in the various rat tissues and organs. The present results have shown that aspartame administration influences the balance of magnesium in the organism, since in some organs and tissues (heart, lungs, kidneys, adrenals, jejunum, hair and blood) it is accumulated, while other organs (liver and testes) are deprived of it. Aspartame administration also affects the excretion of magnesium from the organism, since it decreases the concentration of magnesium in both urine and feces.

  11. The aspartame story: a model for the clinical testing of a food additive.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D

    1987-07-01

    Toxicology is based on the premise that all compounds are toxic at some dose. Thus, it is not surprising that very large doses of aspartame (or its components--aspartate, phenylalanine, and methanol) produce deleterious effects in sensitive animal species. The critical question is whether aspartame ingestion is potentially harmful to humans at normal use and potential abuse levels. This paper reviews clinical studies testing the effects of various doses of aspartame upon blood levels of aspartate, phenylalanine, and methanol. These studies demonstrate that blood levels of these compounds are well below levels associated with adverse effects in sensitive animal species.

  12. Synthesis, spectroscopic and thermal studies of the copper(II) aspartame chloride complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakır, S.; Coşkun, E.; Naumov, P.; Biçer, E.; Bulut, İ.; İçbudak, H.; Çakır, O.

    2002-08-01

    Aspartame adduct of copper(II) chloride Cu(Asp) 2Cl 2·2H 2O (Asp=aspartame) is synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT IR, UV/vis, ESR spectroscopies, TG, DTG, DTA measurements and molecular mechanics calculations. Aqueous solution of the green solid absorbs strongly at 774 and 367 nm. According to the FT IR spectra, the aspartame moiety coordinates to the copper(II) ion via its carboxylate ends, whereas the ammonium terminal groups give rise to hydrogen bonding network with the water, the chloride ions or neighboring carboxylate groups. The results suggest tetragonally distorted octahedral environment of the copper ions.

  13. Effect of aspartame on circadian oscillations of calcium and inorganic phosphorus in rats.

    PubMed

    Rajasekar, P; Manivasagam, T; Subramanian, P

    2004-08-01

    The effect of aspartame on circadian rhythms of calcium and inorganic phosphorus levels was studied in rats. Acrophase delays in calcium rhythms and advances in inorganic phosphorus rhythms and alteration in mesor values in both rhythms were observed in aspartame-treated rats. However, no change in amplitude values was observed. Oral administration of aspartame leads to increased levels of aspartate in the brain, which could alter the characteristics of calcium and inorganic phosphorus rhythms, possibly by modulating transmission in several areas/nuclei in brain, including retinohypothalamic tract (RHT) and suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN).

  14. Intestinal hydrolysis of aspartylphenylalanine--the metabolic product of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Tobey, N A; Heizer, W D

    1986-10-01

    Aspartame [Nutrasweet, Equal (Searle Consumer Products, Chicago, Ill.)] is the methyl ester of the dipeptide aspartylphenylalanine (Asp-Phe). After hydrolysis of the ester bond in the intestinal lumen, the dipeptide is apparently absorbed and digested in the same manner as dipeptides derived from protein digestion. We observed that Asp-Phe is hydrolyzed approximately equally well by three previously reported brush border dipeptidases. However, these enzymes have very low affinity for Asp-Phe, and a substantial amount of the dipeptide may be transported intact and hydrolyzed in the cytosol. Starch gel electrophoresis and ion-exchange chromatography of the cytosol of intestinal mucosa and of red blood cell lysate revealed only one peak with Asp-Phe hydrolase activity. This activity was distinct from the seven cytosolic peptidases that have been described previously. The reduction in Asp-Phe hydrolase activity in the brush border and cytosol of diseased intestinal mucosa was similar to the reduction in levels of other brush border and cytosol enzyme activities. If double-blind studies confirm that some people have symptoms caused by aspartame ingestion, it would be appropriate to test such individuals for deficiency of cytosolic Asp-Phe hydrolase activity.

  15. Aspartame degradation as a function of "water activity".

    PubMed

    Bell, L N; Labuza, T P

    1991-01-01

    The incorporation of aspartame into an increasing number of foods necessitates evaluation of its degradation kinetics as a function of "water activity" (aw). The kinetics of degradation were followed in model systems as a function of initial pH, temperature, and aw. An increase in aw, for each 0.1 units in the 0.3 to 0.7 range, resulted in about a 30-80% increase in degradation rate, which then decreased only slowly up to dilute solution. The presence of oil increased the degradation rate at high aw, but glucose had no effect on the rate of aspartame loss. The activation energies for loss ranged from 25 to 20 kcal/mole, decreasing as aw increased, as expected. The rates as a function of pH showed that the actual pH of the water in the condensed phase, based on the Bronsted relationship, may be very different than the initial pH. This caused a shift in the pH at which the fastest rate of degradation occurred, as aw increased.

  16. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aspartame and their catalytic activity for p-nitrophenol reduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shufen; Yan, Songjing; Qi, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Cui, Jing; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a facile and environmental-friendly approach to form gold nanoparticles through the reduction of HAuCl4 by aspartame. The single-crystalline structure was illustrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results indicated that aspartame played a pivotal role in the reduction and stabilization of the gold crystals. The crystals were stabilized through the successive hydrogen-bonding network constructed between the water and aspartame molecules. Additionally, gold nanoparticles synthesized through aspartame were shown to have good catalytic activity for the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH4. PMID:25991916

  17. Assessment of Korean consumer exposure to sodium saccharin, aspartame and stevioside.

    PubMed

    Ha, Mi-Sun; Ha, Sang-Do; Choi, Sung-Hee; Bae, Dong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    The dietary intakes of sodium saccharin, aspartame and stevioside were estimated on the basis of food consumption data of the Korean consumer and the concentration of sweeteners in processed foods. Results were compared with the acceptable daily intake (ADI) of sweeteners. Among the 28 food categories for which the application of sodium saccharin, aspartame and stevioside is permitted in Korea, they were detected in 5, 12 and 13 categories, respectively. The estimated daily intake (EDI) of sodium saccharin and aspartame were high in infants and children, whereas the EDI of stevioside was high in adolescents and adults. The most highly consumed sweetener was aspartame, and the highest EDI/ADI ratio was found for sodium saccharin. The main food categories contributing to sweetener consumption were beverages, including alcoholic beverages. For most Korean consumers, the EDIs were no greater than 20% of their corresponding ADI; however, the EDI of sodium saccharin for conservative consumers aged 1-2 years reached 60% of their ADI.

  18. Microencapsulation of aspartame by double emulsion followed by complex coacervation to provide protection and prolong sweetness.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Selmi, Glaucia A; Bozza, Fernanda T; Thomazini, Marcelo; Bolini, Helena M A; Fávaro-Trindade, Carmen S

    2013-08-15

    The objective of this work was to microencapsulate aspartame by double emulsion followed by complex coacervation, aiming to protect it and control its release. Six treatments were prepared using sunflower oil to prepare the primary emulsion and gelatin and gum Arabic as the wall materials. The microcapsules were evaluated structurally with respect to their sorption isotherms and release into water (36°C and 80°C). The microcapsules were multinucleated, not very water-soluble or hygroscopic and showed reduced rates of equilibrium moisture content and release at both temperatures. FTIR confirmed complexation between the wall materials and the intact nature of aspartame. The results indicated it was possible to encapsulate aspartame with the techniques employed and that these protected the sweetener even at 80°C. The reduced solubility and low release rates indicated the enormous potential of the vehicle developed in controlling the release of the aspartame into the food, thus prolonging its sweetness.

  19. The Sweetness of Aspartame: A Biochemistry Lab for Health Science Chemistry Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Paul J.

    1997-01-01

    Explains the procedures used in an experiment that reinforces the universality of the concepts of saturation using the binding of the ligand aspartame to the protein receptor that determines taste. Illustrates the hyperbolic nature of protein binding. (DDR)

  20. Effects of alcohol and chronic aspartame ingestion upon performance in aviation relevant cognitive tasks.

    PubMed

    Stokes, A F; Belger, A; Banich, M T; Bernadine, E

    1994-01-01

    Acute dosing studies of aspartame, known commercially as "NutraSweet," have failed to demonstrate any neuropsychological changes that would imply performance decrements in flight operations. Such studies may be criticized on the grounds that the administration of a single, if large, dose of aspartame is not ecologically valid. Accordingly, a double-blind chronic dosing study of aspartame was conducted using ethanol (at 0.1% BAL) as the positive control. No detectable cognitive performance decrements were associated with the aspartame condition. However, the alcohol results exhibited a pattern of asymmetric lateral brain impairment that closely resembles that observed in studies of depressive patients. These results have operational implications as well as theoretical importance.

  1. [New data on the metabolism and physiologic mechanisms of aspartame action].

    PubMed

    Tutel'ian, V A; Gapparov, M M; Virovets, O A; Kravchenko, L V; Vasil'ev, A V

    1989-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the physiological action of aspartame was conducted in 11 volunteers (healthy subjects, aged 18-37 years, with normal bw), and in experiments on 90 male Wistar rats, that were given aspartame in doses of 40 and 4000 mg/kg during 90 days, and in 3 dogs with gastric fistulas according to Basov. The study of microsomal and lysosomal activities in the liver, the turnover rate of liver proteins and blood plasma in rats revealed changes in the activity of liver cathepsins and in blood plasma albumin life time. The reaction of food thermogenesis after aspartame intake was recorded in experiments on dogs, that received sham feeding, and in the volunteers. As a whole, in the experiments including aspartame intake in a permissible daily dose for humans (40 mg/kg) no unfavourable action of the agent on the metabolic parameters studied was recorded.

  2. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aspartame and their catalytic activity for p-nitrophenol reduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shufen; Yan, Songjing; Qi, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Cui, Jing; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a facile and environmental-friendly approach to form gold nanoparticles through the reduction of HAuCl4 by aspartame. The single-crystalline structure was illustrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results indicated that aspartame played a pivotal role in the reduction and stabilization of the gold crystals. The crystals were stabilized through the successive hydrogen-bonding network constructed between the water and aspartame molecules. Additionally, gold nanoparticles synthesized through aspartame were shown to have good catalytic activity for the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH4.

  3. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aspartame and their catalytic activity for p-nitrophenol reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shufen; Yan, Songjing; Qi, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Cui, Jing; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrated a facile and environmental-friendly approach to form gold nanoparticles through the reduction of HAuCl4 by aspartame. The single-crystalline structure was illustrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results indicated that aspartame played a pivotal role in the reduction and stabilization of the gold crystals. The crystals were stabilized through the successive hydrogen-bonding network constructed between the water and aspartame molecules. Additionally, gold nanoparticles synthesized through aspartame were shown to have good catalytic activity for the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH4.

  4. Demethylation kinetics of aspartame and L-phenylalanine methyl ester in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Skwierczynski, R D; Connors, K A

    1993-08-01

    The kinetics of demethylation of aspartame and L-phenylalanine methyl ester were studied in aqueous solution at 25 degrees C over the pH range 0.27-11.5. The pseudo-first-order rate constant for aspartame was resolved into individual contributions from methyl ester hydrolysis and diketopiperazine formation. pH-rate profiles were quantitatively described by chemically reasonable kinetic schemes. Aspartame is maximally stable at pH 4 (t90 = 53 days at 25 degrees C); phenylalanine methyl ester, at pH 3. The potentiometrically measured pKa values were pKa1 3.19 and pKa2 7.87 for aspartame and pKa 7.11 for phenylalanine methyl ester.

  5. Biological properties of aspartame. I. Evaluation of central nervous system effects.

    PubMed

    Potts, W J; Bloss, J L; Nutting, E F

    1980-01-01

    Aspartame was administered intragastrically to rodents at doses between 10 and 550 times the expected daily human intake to evaluate the effects on central nervous system function. No biologically meaningful effects were observed in either rats or mice following acute administration by the intragastric route. Aspartame administered as 9% of the diet (about 11 g/kg/day) for thirteen weeks to weanling rats altered the learning behavior of male rats. This effect of impaired learning behavior was nearly identical to that observed for an approximately equimolar amount of L-phenylalanine. The learning behavior of the female rats was not altered by either L-phenylalanine or aspartame at these extremely large doses. It was concluded that prolonged dietary ingestion of aspartame at levels approximately 550 times that expected for normal human daily ingestion was necessary to elicit a behavioral deficit.

  6. Determination of aspartame in beverages using an alcohol oxidase enzyme electrode.

    PubMed

    Smith, V J; Green, R A; Hopkins, T R

    1989-01-01

    A new method for the determination of the artificial sweetener aspartame is described. alpha-Chymotrypsin is used to cleave the methyl ester group of aspartame, producing methanol hydrolytically. The methanol is detected using an electrode which is constructed by physically trapping yeast alcohol oxidase enzyme at the tip of a dissolved oxygen electrode. The decrease in oxygen concentration, which occurs as methanol is enzymatically oxidized to formaldehyde, is measured amperometrically. Aspartame levels in diet soft drinks as determined by the proposed method and by liquid chromatography are in excellent agreement. The relative standard deviation of the measurements is 0.83%. The methanol present in diet cola as a result of aspartame degradation can also be measured by using the electrode without alpha-chymotrypsin.

  7. Racemization of aspartic acid and phenylalanine in the sweetener aspartame at 100 degrees C.

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, M F; Bada, J L

    1984-01-01

    The racemization half-lives (i.e., the time required to reach a D/L = 0.33) at pH 6.8 for aspartic acid and phenylalanine in the sweetener aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) were determined to be 13 and 23 hours, respectively, at 100 degrees C. Racemization at this pH does not occur in aspartame but rather in its diketopiperazine decomposition product. Our results indicate that the use of aspartame to sweeten neutral pH foods and beverages that are then heated at elevated temperature could generate D-aspartic acid and D-phenylalanine. The nutritive consequences of these D-amino acids in the human diet are not well established, and thus aspartame should probably not be used as a sweetener when the exposure of neutral pH foods and beverages to elevated temperatures is required. At pH 4, a typical pH of most foods and beverages that might be sweetened with aspartame, the half-lives are 47 hours for aspartic acid and 1200 hours for phenylalanine at 100 degrees C. Racemization at pH 4 takes place in aspartame itself. Although the racemization rates at pH 4 are slow and no appreciable racemization of aspartic acid and phenylalanine should occur during the normal use of aspartame, some food and beverage components could conceivably act as catalysts. Additional studies are required to evaluate whether the use of aspartame as a sugar substitute might not in turn result in an increased human consumption of D-aspartic acid and D-phenylalanine. PMID:6591191

  8. Racemization of aspartic acid and phenylalanine in the sweetener aspartame at 100 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Boehm, M F; Bada, J L

    1984-08-01

    The racemization half-lives (i.e., the time required to reach a D/L = 0.33) at pH 6.8 for aspartic acid and phenylalanine in the sweetener aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) were determined to be 13 and 23 hours, respectively, at 100 degrees C. Racemization at this pH does not occur in aspartame but rather in its diketopiperazine decomposition product. Our results indicate that the use of aspartame to sweeten neutral pH foods and beverages that are then heated at elevated temperature could generate D-aspartic acid and D-phenylalanine. The nutritive consequences of these D-amino acids in the human diet are not well established, and thus aspartame should probably not be used as a sweetener when the exposure of neutral pH foods and beverages to elevated temperatures is required. At pH 4, a typical pH of most foods and beverages that might be sweetened with aspartame, the half-lives are 47 hours for aspartic acid and 1200 hours for phenylalanine at 100 degrees C. Racemization at pH 4 takes place in aspartame itself. Although the racemization rates at pH 4 are slow and no appreciable racemization of aspartic acid and phenylalanine should occur during the normal use of aspartame, some food and beverage components could conceivably act as catalysts. Additional studies are required to evaluate whether the use of aspartame as a sugar substitute might not in turn result in an increased human consumption of D-aspartic acid and D-phenylalanine.

  9. Aspartame and phenylalanine do not enhance theophylline-induced seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhi, J Q; Levy, G

    1989-10-01

    Oral administration of the artificial sweetener aspartame, 1 g/kg, or of an equimolar dose of its metabolite phenylalanine, to fasted rats 1 hour before slow i.v. infusion of theophylline until the onset of maximal seizures had no significant effect on the total dose and the serum and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of theophylline at the pharmacologic endpoint. These findings indicate that consumption of aspartame is not a potential risk factor for theophylline-induced neurotoxicity.

  10. Effects of aspartame and phenylalanine on meal-time food intake of humans.

    PubMed

    Anderson, G H; Leiter, L A

    1988-01-01

    This article reviews data relevant to the hypothesis that aspartame may have a unique effect on meal-time food intake regulation due to its amino acid composition and in addition to its effects as a high intensity sweetener. It is concluded that future studies involving aspartame should be directed towards developing a fundamental understanding of the effects of high intensity sweeteners on food intake, and not give undue attention to putative actions based on its amino acid constituents.

  11. Liquid chromatographic determination of aspartame in dry beverage bases and sweetener tablets with confirmation by thin layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Daniels, D H; Joe, F L; Warner, C R; Fazio, T

    1984-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic method is described for the determination of aspartame in dry beverage bases and sweetener tablets. The sample was mixed with the mobile phase, the pH was adjusted to within +/- 0.1 pH unit of the mobile phase, and the sample was diluted to volume with the mobile phase. The solution was filtered and a 10 microL aliquot was injected onto a C18 reverse phase column. Aspartame was quantitated with an ultraviolet detector. Recoveries of aspartame ranged from 94 to 111%. The dry beverage bases contained 5-13% aspartame and the sweetener tablets contained 19% aspartame. The presence of aspartame was confirmed by using thin layer chromatography.

  12. Acute effect of aspartame-induced oxidative stress in Wistar albino rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Iyaswamy; Sheeladevi, Rathinasamy; Wankhar, Dapkupar

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the acute effect of aspartame on oxidative stress in the Wistar albino rat brain. We sought to investigate whether acute administration of aspartame (75 mg/kg) could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain 24 hours after administration. To mimic human methanol metabolism, methotrexate treated rats were used to study aspartame effects. Wistar strain male albino rats were administered with aspartame orally as a single dose and studied along with controls and methotrexate treated controls. Blood methanol and formate level were estimated after 24 hours and rats were sacrificed and free radical changes were observed in discrete regions by assessing the scavenging enzymes, reduce dglutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation and protein thiol levels. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation levels, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), glutathione peroxidase levels (GPx), and catalase activity (CAT) with a significant decrease in GSH and protein thiol. Aspartame exposure resulted in detectable methanol even after 24 hours. Methanol and its metabolites may be responsible for the generation of oxidative stress in brain regions. The observed alteration in aspartame fed animals may be due to its metabolite methanol and elevated formate. The elevated free radicals due to methanol induced oxidative stress. PMID:26445572

  13. Examination of the potential for adaptive chirality of the nitrogen chiral center in aza-aspartame.

    PubMed

    Bouayad-Gervais, Samir H; Lubell, William D

    2013-01-01

    The potential for dynamic chirality of an azapeptide nitrogen was examined by substitution of nitrogen for the α-carbon of the aspartate residue in the sweetener S,S-aspartame. Considering that S,S- and R,S-aspartame possess sweet and bitter tastes, respectively, a bitter-sweet taste of aza-aspartame 9 could be indicative of a low isomerization barrier for nitrogen chirality inter-conversion. Aza-aspartame 9 was synthesized by a combination of hydrazine and peptide chemistry. Crystallization of 9 indicated a R,S-configuration in the solid state; however, the aza-residue chiral center was considerably flattened relative to its natural amino acid counterpart. On tasting, the authors considered aza-aspartame 9 to be slightly bitter or tasteless. The lack of bitter sweet taste of aza-aspartame 9 may be due to flattening from sp2 hybridization in the urea as well as a high barrier for sp3 nitrogen inter-conversion, both of which may interfere with recognition by taste receptors. PMID:24288001

  14. Possible analgesic and anti-inflammatory interactions of aspartame with opioids and NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sameer; Jain, N K; Kulkarni, S K

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of aspartame, an artificial sweetner and its combination with various opioids and NSAIDs for a possible synergistic response. The oral administration of aspartame (2-16mg/kg, po) significantly increased the pain threshold against acetic acid-induced writhes in mice. Co-administration of aspartame (2mg/kg, po) with nimesulide (2 mg/kg, po) and naproxen (5 mg/kg, po) significantly reduced acetic acid-induced writhes as compared to effects per se of individual drugs. Similarly when morphine (1 mg/kg, po) or pentazocine (1 mg/kg, po) was co-administered with aspartame it reduced the number of writhes as compared to their effects per se. Aspartame (4,8,16 mg/kg, po) significantly decreased carrageenan-induced increase in paw volume and also reversed the hyperalgesic effects in rats in combination with nimesulide (2 mg/kg, po). The study indicated that aspartame exerted analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects on its own and have a synergistic analgesic response with conventional analgesics of opioid and non-opioid type, respectively.

  15. Effect of long term intake of aspartame on antioxidant defense status in liver.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, M; Paul, M V Sauganth; Varghese, Mathews V; Nair, R Harikumaran

    2011-06-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of long term intake of aspartame, the artificial sweetener, on liver antioxidant system and hepatocellular injury in animal model. Eighteen adult male Wistar rats, weighing 150-175 g, were randomly divided into three groups as follows: first group was given aspartame dissolved in water in a dose of 500 mg/kg b.wt.; the second group was given a dose of 1000 mg/kg b.wt.; and controls were given water freely. Rats that had received aspartame (1000 mg/kg b.wt.) in the drinking water for 180 days showed a significant increase in activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT). The concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) were significantly reduced in the liver of rats that had received aspartame (1000 mg/kg b.wt.). Glutathione was significantly decreased in both the experimental groups. Histopathological examination revealed leukocyte infiltration in aspartame-treated rats (1000 mg/kg b.wt.). It can be concluded from these observations that long term consumption of aspartame leads to hepatocellular injury and alterations in liver antioxidant status mainly through glutathione dependent system.

  16. Acute effect of aspartame-induced oxidative stress in Wistar albino rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Iyaswamy; Sheeladevi, Rathinasamy; Wankhar, Dapkupar

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the acute effect of aspartame on oxidative stress in the Wistar albino rat brain. We sought to investigate whether acute administration of aspartame (75 mg/kg) could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain 24 hours after administration. To mimic human methanol metabolism, methotrexate treated rats were used to study aspartame effects. Wistar strain male albino rats were administered with aspartame orally as a single dose and studied along with controls and methotrexate treated controls. Blood methanol and formate level were estimated after 24 hours and rats were sacrificed and free radical changes were observed in discrete regions by assessing the scavenging enzymes, reduce dglutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation and protein thiol levels. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation levels, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), glutathione peroxidase levels (GPx), and catalase activity (CAT) with a significant decrease in GSH and protein thiol. Aspartame exposure resulted in detectable methanol even after 24 hours. Methanol and its metabolites may be responsible for the generation of oxidative stress in brain regions. The observed alteration in aspartame fed animals may be due to its metabolite methanol and elevated formate. The elevated free radicals due to methanol induced oxidative stress.

  17. Examination of the potential for adaptive chirality of the nitrogen chiral center in aza-aspartame.

    PubMed

    Bouayad-Gervais, Samir H; Lubell, William D

    2013-11-28

    The potential for dynamic chirality of an azapeptide nitrogen was examined by substitution of nitrogen for the α-carbon of the aspartate residue in the sweetener S,S-aspartame. Considering that S,S- and R,S-aspartame possess sweet and bitter tastes, respectively, a bitter-sweet taste of aza-aspartame 9 could be indicative of a low isomerization barrier for nitrogen chirality inter-conversion. Aza-aspartame 9 was synthesized by a combination of hydrazine and peptide chemistry. Crystallization of 9 indicated a R,S-configuration in the solid state; however, the aza-residue chiral center was considerably flattened relative to its natural amino acid counterpart. On tasting, the authors considered aza-aspartame 9 to be slightly bitter or tasteless. The lack of bitter sweet taste of aza-aspartame 9 may be due to flattening from sp2 hybridization in the urea as well as a high barrier for sp3 nitrogen inter-conversion, both of which may interfere with recognition by taste receptors.

  18. Effect of chronic exposure to aspartame on oxidative stress in the brain of albino rats.

    PubMed

    Iyyaswamy, Ashok; Rathinasamy, Sheeladevi

    2012-09-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the chronic effect of the artificial sweetener aspartame on oxidative stress in brain regions of Wistar strain albino rats. Many controversial reports are available on the use of aspartame as it releases methanol as one of its metabolite during metabolism. The present study proposed to investigate whether chronic aspartame (75 mg/kg) administration could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain. To mimic the human methanol metabolism, methotrexate (MTX)-treated rats were included to study the aspartame effects. Wistar strain male albino rats were administered with aspartame orally and studied along with controls and MTX-treated controls. The blood methanol level was estimated, the animal was sacrificed and the free radical changes were observed in brain discrete regions by assessing the scavenging enzymes, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein thiol levels. It was observed that there was a significant increase in LPO levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, GPx levels and CAT activity with a significant decrease in GSH and protein thiol. Moreover, the increases in some of these enzymes were region specific. Chronic exposure of aspartame resulted in detectable methanol in blood. Methanol per se and its metabolites may be responsible for the generation of oxidative stress in brain regions.

  19. Amino acids, monoamines and audiogenic seizures in genetically epilepsy-prone rats: effects of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Dailey, J W; Lasley, S M; Burger, R L; Bettendorf, A F; Mishra, P K; Jobe, P C

    1991-03-01

    It has been suggested that aspartame facilitates seizures in man and animals because phenylalanine, one of its major metabolites, interferes with brain transport of neurotransmitter precursors and alters the synthesis of monoamine neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine, dopamine and/or serotonin. This facilitation is purportedly more likely in subjects predisposed to seizures. One test of this hypothesis would be to administer a wide range of aspartame doses to subjects whose seizure predisposition is dependent on abnormalities in monoaminergic function. Genetically epilepsy-prone rats (GEPRs) have a broadly based seizure predisposition that is based, in part, on widespread central nervous system noradrenergic and serotonergic deficits. Further reductions in the functional state of these neurotransmitters increases seizure severity in GEPRs. Thus, GEPRs appear ideally suited for testing the hypothesis that aspartame facilitates seizures by interfering with central nervous system monoamines. Oral administration of acute (50-2000 mg/kg) or sub-chronic (up to 863 mg/kg/day for 28 days) doses of aspartame did not alter seizure severity in either of two types of GEPRs. Not surprisingly, acute aspartame doses produced dramatic changes in plasma and brain amino acid concentrations. Hypothesized alterations in monoamine neurotransmitter systems were largely absent. Indeed, increases in norepinephrine concentration, rather than the hypothesized decreases, were the most evident alterations in these neurotransmitter systems. We conclude that aspartame does not facilitate seizures in GEPRs and that convincing evidence of seizure facilitation in any species is lacking.

  20. Sensory evaluation of mixtures of maltitol or aspartame, sucrose and an orange aroma.

    PubMed

    Nahon, D F; Roozen, J P; de Graaf, C

    1998-02-01

    The suitability of Beidler's mixture equation for mixtures of sucrose and maltitol as well as for mixtures of sucrose and aspartame was examined in the presence of an orange aroma. The mean scores for the attribute sweet remained constant for each combination of sucrose and maltitol and for each combination of sucrose and aspartame. Therefore, Beidler's mixture equation can be used to choose combinations of sucrose and maltitol and of sucrose and aspartame giving the same sweetness. Quantitative descriptive analysis of different solutions indicated that the flavour profiles of sucrose and maltitol did not differ significantly at a constant concentration of orange aroma. However, flavour profiles of solutions with increasing aspartame concentrations (but constant aroma levels) showed significantly higher scores for the attributes sour, chemical and aftertaste. Addition of orange aroma provided the different solutions with a more distinct flavour. The mean scores for the attributes orange, sour, fruity and aftertaste increased significantly for most of the sucrose-maltitol mixtures. This effect of orange aroma was even more pronounced in solutions containing combinations of sucrose and aspartame. Further comments on the attribute aftertaste showed similar terms for the different solutions, the most often mentioned being orange, sour, fruity and chemical for solutions containing the orange aroma. The aftertaste of solutions containing relatively more aspartame was mainly described as sweet and chemical.

  1. Aspartame fails to facilitate pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsions in CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Dailey, J W; Lasley, S M; Mishra, P K; Bettendorf, A F; Burger, R L; Jobe, P C

    1989-05-01

    Concentrations of plasma amino acids and brain monoamines as well as pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures were monitored in CD-1 mice treated with aspartame in acute oral doses from 0 to 2500 mg/kg. One hour after administration aspartame produced increases in plasma concentrations of phenylalanine and tyrosine and modest reductions in concentrations of brain serotonin and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid. However, these effects of the sweetener had no influence on the convulsive dose fifty (CD50) of pentylenetetrazol. Moreover, aspartame failed to alter the percentage of mice exhibiting seizures when exposed to an approximate CD50 of pentylenetetrazol. Finally, aspartame had no effect on brain norepinephrine or dopamine concentrations. In sharp contrast to previously reported studies, these observations suggest that aspartame, given in heroic doses, does not alter the propensity to seizure activity in CD-1 mice. We conclude that changes in plasma amino acids and brain serotonin produced by large oral bolus doses of aspartame are insufficient to result in functional deficits which might have the capacity to facilitate pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures.

  2. How aspartame prevents the toxicity of ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Creppy, E E; Baudrimont, I; Anne-Marie

    1998-07-01

    the toxin is ingested. For this purpose several compound have been studied including some therapeutic agents such as piroxicam which cannot be proposed for a large scale use in humans for preventive purpose. Among other compounds, Aspartame, already used as sweetener has shown a real effectiveness in vivo confirmed largely in vitro. When rats exposed to OTA (289 micrograms/kg) by oral route every two days are given 25 mg/kg similarly for several weeks, all the toxic effects including genotoxicity are very efficiently prevented as shown for example by the disappearance of DNA- adducts in tissues excised from treated animals. Aspartame is also effective in washing out the toxin when given afterwards to animals intoxicated by the same oTA doses for several weeks. In vitro, provided that it is added in cell culture medium before OTA it prevent significantly the inhibition of protein synthesis and lipid peroxidation induced by the toxin. Obviously the molecular mechanism mediating the preventive effect of Aspartame is the delivery of phenylalanine by cleavage of the peptide but also the direct effect of the peptide on the bending capacity and transport of the toxin in vivo and in vitro. As a matter of fact when Aspartame is given to animals or added in culture medium the amount of peptide found unchanged (10-15%) may account for a preventive effect as entire peptide.

  3. Aspartame and sucrose produce a similar increase in the plasma phenylalanine to large neutral amino acid ratio in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Burns, T S; Stargel, W W; Tschanz, C; Kotsonis, F N; Hurwitz, A

    1991-01-01

    Aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) consumption has been postulated to increase brain phenylalanine levels by increasing the molar ratio of the plasma phenylalanine concentration to the sum of the plasma concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids (Phe/LNAA). Dietary manipulations with carbohydrate or protein can also produce changes in the Phe/LNAA value. To compare the effects of aspartame and carbohydrate on Phe/LNAA, beverages sweetened with aspartame, sucrose, and aspartame plus sucrose, and unsweetened beverage were ingested by 8 healthy, fasted subjects in a randomized, four-way crossover design. The beverages were sweetened with an amount of aspartame (500 mg) and/or sucrose (100 g) approximately equivalent to that used to sweeten 1 liter of soft drink. The baseline-corrected plasma Phe/LNAA values did not differ significantly following ingestion of aspartame or sucrose. Following aspartame alone, the high mean ratio increased 26% over baseline 1 h after ingestion. Following sucrose alone, the high mean ratio increased 19% at 2.5 h. Sucrose increased the Phe/LNAA value due to an insulin-mediated decrease in the plasma LNAA, while aspartame increased the ratio by increasing the plasma Phe concentration. These findings indicate that similar increases in plasma Phe/LNAA occur when healthy, fasting subjects ingest amounts of equivalent sweetness of sucrose or aspartame.

  4. Neuropsychological and biochemical investigations in heterozygotes for phenylketonuria during ingestion of high dose aspartame (a sweetener containing phenylalanine).

    PubMed

    Trefz, F; de Sonneville, L; Matthis, P; Benninger, C; Lanz-Englert, B; Bickel, H

    1994-04-01

    Aspartame, a high intensity sweetener, is used extensively worldwide in over 5,000 products. Upon ingestion, aspartame is completely metabolized to two amino acids and methanol (approximately 50% phenylalanine, 40% aspartic acid, and 10% methanol). The effects of aspartame on cognitive function, electroencephalograms (EEGs) and biochemical parameters were evaluated in 48 adult (21 men, 27 women) heterozygotes for phenylketonuria (PKUH), PKUH subjects whose carrier status had been proven by DNA analysis ingested aspartame (either 15 or 45 mg/kg/day) and placebo for 12 weeks on each treatment using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. A computerized battery of neuropsychological tests was administered at baseline weeks -2 and -1, and during treatment at weeks 6, 12, 18, and 24. Samples for plasma amino acids and urinary organic acids were also collected during these visits. EEGs were evaluated by conventional and spectral analysis at baseline week -1 and treatment weeks 12 and 24. The results of the neuropsychological tests demonstrated that aspartame had no effect on cognitive function. Plasma phenylalanine significantly increased, within the normal range for PKUH, at 1 and 3 h following the morning dose of aspartame in the group receiving the 45 mg/kg per day dose only. There were no significant differences in the conventional or spectral EEG analyses, urinary organic acid concentrations, and adverse experiences when aspartame was compared with placebo. This study reaffirms the safety of aspartame in PKUH and refutes the speculation that aspartame affects cognitive performance, EEGs, and urinary organic acids.

  5. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to smooth surfaces in the presence of artificial sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Linke, H A

    1983-01-01

    The adherence of Streptococcus mutans to smooth glass surfaces was studied in the presence of the artificial sweeteners, saccharin, acesulfame K and aspartame. The cells were grown aerobically in 2% yeast extract, 1% sucrose medium with artificial sweetener added in concentrations from 0.02 to 20.00 mg/ml. The artificial sweeteners tested reduced overall growth (adherent plus suspended cells), but observed growth was in favour of the adherent cells. As compared to the control optimum adherence was obtained using 2 mg/ml sodium saccharin, 2 to 20 mg/ml acesulfame K and 4 mg/ml aspartame.

  6. N-acetylcysteine protects the rat kidney against aspartame-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Finamor, Isabela; Pavanato, Maria Amália; Pês, Tanise; Ourique, Giovana; Saccol, Etiane; Schiefelbein, Sun; Llesuy, Susana; Partata, Wania

    2014-10-01

    Long-term intake of aspartame at the acceptable daily ingestion dose causes oxidative stress in the rat kidney through the dysregulation of glutathione homeostasis. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) provides the cystein required for the production of GSH, being effective in treating disorders associated with oxidative stress. The aim of this research was to investigate the effects of NAC on the aspartame-induced oxidative stress in the rat kidney. The animals received aspartame by gavage for six weeks (40mg/kg). From the 5th week, NAC (1mmol/kg, via intraperitoneal) was injected for two weeks. Then, they were anaesthetized for blood sample and euthanized for the kidney collection. The blood was centrifuged at 1800g for 15min and the serum was separated for creatinine measurement. The tissue was homogenized in 1.15% KCl buffer and centrifuged at 700g for 10min at 4°C. The supernatant fraction obtained was used to the measurements of oxidative stress biomarkers. The creatinine levels were enhanced in the serum of aspartame-treated rats. NAC caused a reduction in the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid hydroperoxides, carbonyl protein and hydrogen peroxide levels, which were increased in the kidney of aspartame-treated animals. Additionally, NAC caused an elevation in the glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities, total glutathione, ascorbic acid, and total reactive antioxidant potential levels, which were decreased in the kidney of aspartame-treated rats. In conclusion, NAC may be useful for the protection of the rat kidney against aspartame-induced oxidative stress. PMID:26461335

  7. Effect of aspartame on seizures in various models of experimental epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Guiso, G; Caccia, S; Vezzani, A; Stasi, M A; Salmona, M; Romano, M; Garattini, S

    1988-12-01

    We investigated in rats whether aspartame intake affected the susceptibility to seizures induced chemically (metrazol, quinolinic acid) or electrically (electroshock). Aspartame (0.75-1.0 g/kg), given orally as a single bolus to 16-hr fasted animals 60 min before metrazol, significantly increased the number of animals showing clonic-tonic seizures. At 1.0 g/kg the ED50 for clonic-tonic convulsions was lowered by 23%. A similar increase in seizure susceptibility was observed with 0.25-0.5 g/kg of the aspartame's metabolite phenylalanine. When aspartame was administered to fasted rats in three divided doses (0.33 g/kg) over 120 min or to fed animals after a meal, or overnight with the diet, no significant changes in the incidence of animals showing seizures was observed. One gram per kilogram aspartame and 0.5 g/kg phenylalanine did not modify the CC50 (mA) for tonic hindlimb extension induced by electroshock and the electroencephalographic seizures caused by intrahippocampal injection of 120 nmol quinolinic acid. Plasma and brain levels of phenylalanine and tyrosine significantly raised after both 1 g/kg aspartame as a single bolus (plasma: Phe 285%, Tyr 288%; brain: Phe 146%, Tyr 192%; above controls) or in three divided doses (plasma: Phe 207%, Tyr 315%; brain Phe 103%, Tyr 211%; above controls) and 0.5 g/kg phenylalanine (plasma: Phe 339%, Tyr 410%; brain: Phe 219%, Tyr 192%; above controls), but the ratio Phe/Tyr was not modified. Our data indicate that aspartame cannot be regarded as a general proconvulsant agent. The mechanisms of potentiation of seizures induced by metrazol after the administration of the sweetner in a single rapid intake will be discussed.

  8. N-acetylcysteine protects the rat kidney against aspartame-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Finamor, Isabela; Pavanato, Maria Amália; Pês, Tanise; Ourique, Giovana; Saccol, Etiane; Schiefelbein, Sun; Llesuy, Susana; Partata, Wania

    2014-10-01

    Long-term intake of aspartame at the acceptable daily ingestion dose causes oxidative stress in the rat kidney through the dysregulation of glutathione homeostasis. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) provides the cystein required for the production of GSH, being effective in treating disorders associated with oxidative stress. The aim of this research was to investigate the effects of NAC on the aspartame-induced oxidative stress in the rat kidney. The animals received aspartame by gavage for six weeks (40mg/kg). From the 5th week, NAC (1mmol/kg, via intraperitoneal) was injected for two weeks. Then, they were anaesthetized for blood sample and euthanized for the kidney collection. The blood was centrifuged at 1800g for 15min and the serum was separated for creatinine measurement. The tissue was homogenized in 1.15% KCl buffer and centrifuged at 700g for 10min at 4°C. The supernatant fraction obtained was used to the measurements of oxidative stress biomarkers. The creatinine levels were enhanced in the serum of aspartame-treated rats. NAC caused a reduction in the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid hydroperoxides, carbonyl protein and hydrogen peroxide levels, which were increased in the kidney of aspartame-treated animals. Additionally, NAC caused an elevation in the glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities, total glutathione, ascorbic acid, and total reactive antioxidant potential levels, which were decreased in the kidney of aspartame-treated rats. In conclusion, NAC may be useful for the protection of the rat kidney against aspartame-induced oxidative stress.

  9. Low-dose aspartame consumption differentially affects gut microbiota-host metabolic interactions in the diet-induced obese rat.

    PubMed

    Palmnäs, Marie S A; Cowan, Theresa E; Bomhof, Marc R; Su, Juliet; Reimer, Raylene A; Vogel, Hans J; Hittel, Dustin S; Shearer, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame consumption is implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic disease despite the intention of limiting caloric intake. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear, but may involve circulating metabolites and the gut microbiota. Aims were to examine the impact of chronic low-dose aspartame consumption on anthropometric, metabolic and microbial parameters in a diet-induced obese model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into a standard chow diet (CH, 12% kcal fat) or high fat (HF, 60% kcal fat) and further into ad libitum water control (W) or low-dose aspartame (A, 5-7 mg/kg/d in drinking water) treatments for 8 week (n = 10-12 animals/treatment). Animals on aspartame consumed fewer calories, gained less weight and had a more favorable body composition when challenged with HF compared to animals consuming water. Despite this, aspartame elevated fasting glucose levels and an insulin tolerance test showed aspartame to impair insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in both CH and HF, independently of body composition. Fecal analysis of gut bacterial composition showed aspartame to increase total bacteria, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium leptum. An interaction between HF and aspartame was also observed for Roseburia ssp wherein HF-A was higher than HF-W (P<0.05). Within HF, aspartame attenuated the typical HF-induced increase in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio. Serum metabolomics analysis revealed aspartame to be rapidly metabolized and to be associated with elevations in the short chain fatty acid propionate, a bacterial end product and highly gluconeogenic substrate, potentially explaining its negative affects on insulin tolerance. How aspartame influences gut microbial composition and the implications of these changes on the development of metabolic disease require further investigation. PMID:25313461

  10. Low-Dose Aspartame Consumption Differentially Affects Gut Microbiota-Host Metabolic Interactions in the Diet-Induced Obese Rat

    PubMed Central

    Palmnäs, Marie S. A.; Cowan, Theresa E.; Bomhof, Marc R.; Su, Juliet; Reimer, Raylene A.; Vogel, Hans J.; Hittel, Dustin S.; Shearer, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame consumption is implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic disease despite the intention of limiting caloric intake. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear, but may involve circulating metabolites and the gut microbiota. Aims were to examine the impact of chronic low-dose aspartame consumption on anthropometric, metabolic and microbial parameters in a diet-induced obese model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into a standard chow diet (CH, 12% kcal fat) or high fat (HF, 60% kcal fat) and further into ad libitum water control (W) or low-dose aspartame (A, 5–7 mg/kg/d in drinking water) treatments for 8 week (n = 10–12 animals/treatment). Animals on aspartame consumed fewer calories, gained less weight and had a more favorable body composition when challenged with HF compared to animals consuming water. Despite this, aspartame elevated fasting glucose levels and an insulin tolerance test showed aspartame to impair insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in both CH and HF, independently of body composition. Fecal analysis of gut bacterial composition showed aspartame to increase total bacteria, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium leptum. An interaction between HF and aspartame was also observed for Roseburia ssp wherein HF-A was higher than HF-W (P<0.05). Within HF, aspartame attenuated the typical HF-induced increase in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio. Serum metabolomics analysis revealed aspartame to be rapidly metabolized and to be associated with elevations in the short chain fatty acid propionate, a bacterial end product and highly gluconeogenic substrate, potentially explaining its negative affects on insulin tolerance. How aspartame influences gut microbial composition and the implications of these changes on the development of metabolic disease require further investigation. PMID:25313461

  11. Low-dose aspartame consumption differentially affects gut microbiota-host metabolic interactions in the diet-induced obese rat.

    PubMed

    Palmnäs, Marie S A; Cowan, Theresa E; Bomhof, Marc R; Su, Juliet; Reimer, Raylene A; Vogel, Hans J; Hittel, Dustin S; Shearer, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame consumption is implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic disease despite the intention of limiting caloric intake. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear, but may involve circulating metabolites and the gut microbiota. Aims were to examine the impact of chronic low-dose aspartame consumption on anthropometric, metabolic and microbial parameters in a diet-induced obese model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into a standard chow diet (CH, 12% kcal fat) or high fat (HF, 60% kcal fat) and further into ad libitum water control (W) or low-dose aspartame (A, 5-7 mg/kg/d in drinking water) treatments for 8 week (n = 10-12 animals/treatment). Animals on aspartame consumed fewer calories, gained less weight and had a more favorable body composition when challenged with HF compared to animals consuming water. Despite this, aspartame elevated fasting glucose levels and an insulin tolerance test showed aspartame to impair insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in both CH and HF, independently of body composition. Fecal analysis of gut bacterial composition showed aspartame to increase total bacteria, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium leptum. An interaction between HF and aspartame was also observed for Roseburia ssp wherein HF-A was higher than HF-W (P<0.05). Within HF, aspartame attenuated the typical HF-induced increase in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio. Serum metabolomics analysis revealed aspartame to be rapidly metabolized and to be associated with elevations in the short chain fatty acid propionate, a bacterial end product and highly gluconeogenic substrate, potentially explaining its negative affects on insulin tolerance. How aspartame influences gut microbial composition and the implications of these changes on the development of metabolic disease require further investigation.

  12. Aspartame demand in rhesus monkeys: effects of volume and concentration manipulations.

    PubMed

    Wade-Galuska, Tammy; Galuska, Chad M; Winger, Gail; Woods, James H

    2007-01-10

    Three rhesus monkeys' lever presses produced aspartame-sweetened water according to a fixed-ratio schedule. The response requirement was increased across sessions and a demand-function analysis was used to assess the reinforcing effectiveness of different magnitudes of aspartame by manipulating reinforcer duration (1 and 3s) in Phase 1 and concentration (0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 1.0mg/ml) in Phase 2. When duration was manipulated, the number of aspartame deliveries was mainly a function of the response requirement rather than unit price (responses/duration), suggesting that changes in duration did not significantly affect the reinforcing effectiveness of aspartame. When concentration was manipulated and the lowest concentration excluded, consumption was best described by unit price (responses/concentration) in two monkeys and by the response requirement in the third. Although results from the concentration manipulation provide some evidence that consumption was modulated by unit price, the results overall suggest that scalar equivalence does not exist between the components of unit price; specifically, the response requirement exerted a larger influence than duration or concentration on total consumption. Finally, a normalized demand analysis revealed that aspartame is a more elastic commodity than food and drug reinforcers.

  13. First European conference on aspartame: putting safety and benefits into perspective. Synopsis of presentations and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Renwick, A G; Nordmann, H

    2007-07-01

    A Conference was held in Paris in 2006 to review the safety and benefits arising from the replacement of sucrose with the intense sweetener aspartame. The intakes of aspartame are only about 10% of the acceptable daily intake, even by high consumers, so that the safety margin is about 3 orders of magnitude. The safety of aspartame was confirmed in the EFSA Opinion of a recent controversial rodent cancer bioassay. There is increasing evidence that even modest reductions in the intake of calories can reduce the risk factors associated with a number of diseases, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A key issue addressed at the conference was whether the replacement of sucrose with aspartame could result in a prolonged decrease in calorie intake that was of similar magnitude to that necessary to produce a health benefit. A recent meta-analysis of published data showed that an adequate, prolonged weight reduction could be achieved with aspartame. It was recognised that risk assessment alone gave an unbalanced impression to regulators and consumers, and that in the future quantitative risk-benefit analyses should be able to provide more comprehensive advice.

  14. Effects of acute aspartame and acute alcohol ingestion upon the cognitive performance of pilots.

    PubMed

    Stokes, A F; Belger, A; Banich, M T; Taylor, H

    1991-07-01

    Anecdotal evidence has associated the artificial sweetener aspartame with a number of symptoms of central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction. There are, however, little scientific data concerning the effect of aspartame upon complex mental operations such as those necessary for flying an aircraft. Thirteen pilots were tested in a double-blind study using the SPARTANS cognitive test battery of aviation-relevant information-processing tasks. These tasks relate to perceptual-motor abilities, spatial abilities, working memory, attentional performance, risk taking, processing flexibility, planning and sequencing ability. Subjects were tested over five sessions consisting of pretest and posttest controls and three randomly ordered treatment sessions. The treatment conditions involved an aspartame dose of 50 mg/kg body weight, a placebo condition, and an ethyl alcohol (0.1% BAL) condition as the positive control. No detectable performance decrements were associated with the aspartame condition, although decrements in psychomotor and spatial abilities were detected in the ethanol condition. Results were found to be consistent with prior flight-simulator studies of alcohol, but do not appear to support the concerns expressed in anecdotal testimony regarding the deleterious effects of aspartame upon cognitive performance.

  15. Effect of aspartame on plasma amino acid profiles of diabetic patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V; Cochran, C; Parker, T F; Long, D L; Ashby, J; Gorman, M A; Liepa, G U

    1989-06-01

    A randomized, double-blind study was conducted to determine the possible effects of aspartame on the plasma amino acid profiles of 23 diabetic patients with renal failure who were undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Subjects were given a single dose of 10 mg aspartame/kg (approximately equivalent to 25 packets of Equal [NutraSweet Consumer Products, Inc, Chicago, IL] or the amount of phenylalanine in a 300-mL glass of milk) or a placebo in a crossover study design. Three postdialysis blood samples were drawn just before and 1 and 2 h after aspartame or placebo consumption. After aspartame consumption statistically significant increases in only two amino acids, phenylalanine and tyrosine, were noted at 1 and 2 h when compared with placebo values. The increases in phenylalanine were within the normal postprandial range for healthy subjects; no other increases in essential or nonessential amino acids, except for tyrosine, were detected. This study supports the view that aspartame is safe for diabetic subjects with chronic renal failure.

  16. Formaldehyde adduct to human serum albumin with reference to aspartame intake.

    PubMed

    Gilli, Giorgio; Schilirò, Tiziana; Traversi, Deborah; Pignata, Cristina; Cordara, Sara; Carraro, Elisabetta

    2008-01-01

    A preliminary study was performed to evaluate the role of formaldehyde (F) deriving from aspartame intake in the production of the adduct F-human serum albumin (F-HSA) by mean of a sera-epidemiological investigation. A blood-donors population (68 subjects) was analysed for the presence of anti-F-HSA IgG by an indirect competitive immunoenzymatic assay (displacement assay). Only the 41% of the subjects were aspartame consumer and with a low daily intake (0.96mg/(kgday)). A 50% sera-prevalence of IgG anti-F-HSA was observed in the population, but no association between this biomarker and aspartame intake was pointed out. A significant association was found between the IgG anti-F-HSA presence and exogenous F exposure sources (cigarette active smoke and occupational exposure). Considering the low number of the investigated subjects and the low doses of aspartame consumption, the results of this preliminary study seems to suggest that aspartame low intake does not influence the formation of F adducts.

  17. Blood methanol concentrations in one-year-old infants administered graded doses of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Brummel, M C; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1983-08-01

    Blood methanol concentrations were measured in 24 1-year-old infants administered aspartame, a dipeptide methyl ester sweetener. The doses studied included a dose projected to be the 99th percentile of daily ingestion for adults (34 mg/kg body weight), a very high use dose (50 mg/kg body weight) and a dose considered to be in the abuse range (100 mg/kg body weight). Blood methanol values in infants were compared to values observed previously in adults administered equivalent doses of aspartame. Methanol concentrations were below the level of detection (0.35 mg/dl) in the blood of 10 infants administered aspartame at 34 mg/kg body weight, but were significantly elevated (P less than or equal to 0.05) after ingestion of aspartame at 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight. At the latter doses, mean peak blood methanol concentrations and the area under the blood methanol concentration-time curve increased in proportion to dose. Mean (+/- SEM) peak blood methanol concentration was 0.30 +/- 0.10 mg/100 ml at a 50 mg/kg body weight aspartame dose (n = 6) and 1.02 +/- 0.28 mg/ml at the 100 mg/kg body weight dose (n = 8). Blood methanol values in infants were similar to those observed in normal adults.

  18. Biochemical and clinical effects of aspartame in patients with chronic, stable alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Hertelendy, Z I; Mendenhall, C L; Rouster, S D; Marshall, L; Weesner, R

    1993-05-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetener completely metabolized in the gut and absorbed as aspartate, phenylalanine, and methanol. Phenylalanine is thought to mediate or exacerbate hepatic encephalopathy, and an impaired liver may not be able to cope with the ammoniagenic properties of the amino acid constituents, or adequately metabolize methanol. Thus, we compared the clinical and biochemical effects of a single ingestion of aspartame (15 mg/kg) to skim milk (phenylalanine content equimolar to aspartame) and placebo in patients with chronic, alcoholic liver disease in a randomized, crossover study. Aspartame produced an elevation of plasma phenylalanine significantly greater than milk and placebo (Cmax 14.55 +/- 7.38, 10.95 +/- 4.95, 8.84 +/- 4.55 mumol/dl, respectively; p < 0.01). However, quantified encephalopathic changes were observed only with milk (p < 0.05). Plasma aspartate, methanol, formate, and ammonia levels remained unchanged after all treatments. The lack of clinical derangements in encephalopathic indices, methanol accumulation, or biochemical changes in liver status suggests that a single large dose of aspartame (representing 5 times the average daily intake of adults) may be used safely by patients with chronic, stable liver disease.

  19. Crystallization from microemulsions ? a novel method for the preparation of new crystal forms of aspartame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füredi-Milhofer, Helga; Garti, N.; Kamyshny, A.

    1999-03-01

    Solubilization and crystallization of the artificial sweetener aspartame (APM), in water/isooctane microemulsions stabilized with sodium diisooctyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) has been investigated. The amount of aspartame that could be solubilized depended primarily on the amount of surfactant and on the temperature. The maximum AOT/aspartame molar ratio at the w/o interface is shown to be 6.2 at 25°C. It was concluded that the dipeptide is located at the w/o interface interspersed between surfactant molecules and that it acts as a cosurfactant. A new crystal form, APM III, was obtained by cooling of hot w/isooctane/AOT microemulsions containing solubilized aspartame. The new crystal form exhibits a distinct X-ray diffraction powder pattern, as well as changes in the FTIR spectra, thermogravimetric and DSC patterns. H-NMR spectra of APM III dissolved in D 2O were identical to the spectrum of commercial aspartame recorded under the same conditions. The new crystal form has greatly improved dissolution kinetics.

  20. Acute effects of oral or parenteral aspartame on catecholamine metabolism in various regions of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Yokogoshi, H; Wurtman, R J

    1986-03-01

    Hypertensive (SHR) and nonhypertensive [Wistar-Kyoto (WKY); Sprague-Dawley (SD)] strains of rats received the dipeptide sweetener aspartame (200 mg/kg) or, as a positive control, tyrosine (200 mg/kg) by gavage or parenterally, after a brief (2-h) fast. Two hours later, compared with those of saline controls brain levels of the norepinephrine metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylethyleneglycol (MHPG) sulfate were significantly higher in the hypothalamus (WKY), locus coeruleus (SD and SHR) and brain stem (SHR) in tyrosine-treated animals, and in the locus coeruleus (SD) of those given aspartame. Brain norepinephrine levels were also higher, compared with those of saline-treated control rats, in the cerebral cortex (SD and SHR), amygdala (SD) and locus coeruleus (WKY) after tyrosine administration, and in the amygdala (SD) and cerebral cortex (SHR) after aspartame administration. In another study, oral aspartame was found to be at least as effective as the parenterally administered sweetener in raising regional brain levels of tyrosine or MHPG sulfate (i.e., compared with corresponding levels in saline-treated rats). Animals receiving oral aspartame also exhibited higher plasma tyrosine and phenylalanine ratios (i.e., the ratios of their plasma concentrations to the summed concentrations of other large neutral amino acids that compete with them for uptake into the brain), than animals receiving saline.

  1. Water-compatible 'aspartame'-imprinted polymer grafted on silica surface for selective recognition in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Singh, Meenakshi; Kumar, Abhishek; Tarannum, Nazia

    2013-05-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers selective for aspartame have been prepared using N-[2-ammonium-ethyl-piperazinium) maleimidopropane sulfonate copolymer bearing zwitterionic centres along the backbone via a surface-confined grafting procedure. Aspartame, a dipeptide, is commonly used as an artificial sweetener. Polymerisation on the surface was propagated by means of Michael addition reaction on amino-grafted silica surface. Electrostatic interactions along with complementary H-bonding and other hydrophobic interactions inducing additional synergetic effect between the template (aspartame) and the imprinted surface led to the formation of imprinted sites. The MIP was able to selectively and specifically take up aspartame from aqueous solution and certain pharmaceutical samples quantitatively. Hence, a facile, specific and selective technique using surface-grafted specific molecular contours developed for specific and selective uptake of aspartame in the presence of various interferrants, in different kinds of matrices is presented.

  2. Metabolic effects of adding sucrose and aspartame to the diet of subjects with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Colagiuri, S; Miller, J J; Edwards, R A

    1989-09-01

    This study compared the effects of adding sucrose and aspartame to the usual diet of individuals with well-controlled noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). A double-blind, cross-over design was used with each 6-wk study period. During the sucrose period, 45 g sucrose (9% of total daily energy) was added, 10 g with each main meal and 5 g with each between-meal beverage. An equivalent sweetening quantity of aspartame (162 mg) was ingested during the aspartame period. The addition of sucrose did not have a deleterious effect on glycemic control, lipids, glucose tolerance, or insulin action. No differences were observed between sucrose and aspartame. Sucrose added as an integral part of the diabetic diet does not adversely affect metabolic control in well-controlled NIDDM subjects. Aspartame is an acceptable sugar substitute for diabetic individuals but no specific advantage over sucrose was demonstrated.

  3. Absence of an effect of aspartame on seizures induced by electroshock in epileptic and non-epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Jobe, P C; Lasley, S M; Burger, R L; Bettendorf, A F; Mishra, P K; Dailey, J W

    1992-06-01

    Seizure facilitation has been proposed as a possible adverse effect of dietary consumption of aspartame. The conversion of this sweetener to phenylalanine and aspartate in the gastrointestinal tract, and subsequent absorption, elevates plasma levels of these two amino acids. Absorbed phenylalanine competes with other large neutral amino acids, including tyrosine and tryptophan, for transport into brain. Theoretically, this competition might reduce brain tyrosine and tryptophan which could decrease synthesis of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin. Diminished synaptic release of these monoaminergic neurotransmitters facilitates seizures in many seizure models. Our present study evaluates effects of oral aspartame on amino acids and electroshock seizures in normal and seizure predisposed rats. Heroic doses of aspartame produced predićtable changes in plasma amino acids. However, none of the aspartame doses altered seizure indices. We conclude that aspartame does not alter maximal electroshock seizures in normal rats or in rats predisposed to seizures.

  4. Development of low calorie snack food based on intense sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Patil, Swapna; Ravi, R; Saraswathi, G; Prakash, Maya

    2014-12-01

    Intense sweeteners namely Aspartame, Acesulfame K and Sucralose were used in the preparation of sugar substitute sprinklers and these were used in snack food, replacing sugar. Study was conducted with an objective to develop low calorie snack food. The psychometric study showed that the threshold values for Acesulfame K, Aspartame and Sucralose were 0.012, 0.030 and 0.005 g respectively. The time intensity study revealed that among three sweeteners Aspartame had more lingering sweetness (at 60 s). The sensory evaluation of Shankarpoli prepared using refined wheat flour revealed that there was no significant difference in typical attributes of the snack; Aspartame and Acesulfame K had same sweetness intensity where as Sucralose had higher intensity of sweetness. Consumer acceptance study revealed that 53 % of the consumers liked the snack with Sucralose, which is highest compared to other two sweeteners namely Aspartame and Acesulfame K (47 %). Thus sweeteners can be used as sweetening agents in traditional food preparations. PMID:25477687

  5. Development of low calorie snack food based on intense sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Patil, Swapna; Ravi, R; Saraswathi, G; Prakash, Maya

    2014-12-01

    Intense sweeteners namely Aspartame, Acesulfame K and Sucralose were used in the preparation of sugar substitute sprinklers and these were used in snack food, replacing sugar. Study was conducted with an objective to develop low calorie snack food. The psychometric study showed that the threshold values for Acesulfame K, Aspartame and Sucralose were 0.012, 0.030 and 0.005 g respectively. The time intensity study revealed that among three sweeteners Aspartame had more lingering sweetness (at 60 s). The sensory evaluation of Shankarpoli prepared using refined wheat flour revealed that there was no significant difference in typical attributes of the snack; Aspartame and Acesulfame K had same sweetness intensity where as Sucralose had higher intensity of sweetness. Consumer acceptance study revealed that 53 % of the consumers liked the snack with Sucralose, which is highest compared to other two sweeteners namely Aspartame and Acesulfame K (47 %). Thus sweeteners can be used as sweetening agents in traditional food preparations.

  6. In vitro DNA binding studies of Aspartame, an artificial sweetener.

    PubMed

    Kashanian, Soheila; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh

    2013-03-01

    A number of small molecules bind directly and selectively to DNA, by inhibiting replication, transcription or topoisomerase activity. In this work the interaction of native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with Aspartame (APM), an artificial sweeteners was studied at physiological pH. DNA binding study of APM is useful to understand APM-DNA interaction mechanism and to provide guidance for the application and design of new and safer artificial sweeteners. The interaction was investigated using spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric competition experiment and circular dichroism (CD). Hypochromism and red shift are shown in UV absorption band of APM. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of DNA to APM was observed and the binding constants (Kf) of DNA with APM and corresponding number of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy changes (ΔH) and entropy changes (ΔS) were calculated to be +181kJmol(-1) and +681Jmol(-1)K(-1) according to Van't Hoff equation, which indicated that reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Moreover, spectrofluorometric competition experiment and circular dichroism (CD) results are indicative of non-intercalative DNA binding nature of APM. We suggest that APM interacts with calf thymus DNA via groove binding mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 5×10(+4)M(-1). PMID:23375483

  7. In vitro DNA binding studies of Aspartame, an artificial sweetener.

    PubMed

    Kashanian, Soheila; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh

    2013-03-01

    A number of small molecules bind directly and selectively to DNA, by inhibiting replication, transcription or topoisomerase activity. In this work the interaction of native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with Aspartame (APM), an artificial sweeteners was studied at physiological pH. DNA binding study of APM is useful to understand APM-DNA interaction mechanism and to provide guidance for the application and design of new and safer artificial sweeteners. The interaction was investigated using spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric competition experiment and circular dichroism (CD). Hypochromism and red shift are shown in UV absorption band of APM. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of DNA to APM was observed and the binding constants (Kf) of DNA with APM and corresponding number of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy changes (ΔH) and entropy changes (ΔS) were calculated to be +181kJmol(-1) and +681Jmol(-1)K(-1) according to Van't Hoff equation, which indicated that reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Moreover, spectrofluorometric competition experiment and circular dichroism (CD) results are indicative of non-intercalative DNA binding nature of APM. We suggest that APM interacts with calf thymus DNA via groove binding mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 5×10(+4)M(-1).

  8. In vitro effect of aspartame in angiogenesis induction.

    PubMed

    Alleva, Renata; Borghi, Battista; Santarelli, Lory; Strafella, Elisabetta; Carbonari, Damiano; Bracci, Massimo; Tomasetti, Marco

    2011-02-01

    Aspartame (APM) is the most widely used artificial sweetener and is added to a wide variety of foods, beverages, drugs, and hygiene products. In vitro and in vivo tests have reported contradictory data about APM genotoxicity. We evaluated the angiogenic effect of APM in an in vitro model using blood vessel development assay (Angio-Kit), cultured endothelial cells and fibroblasts. The release of IL-6, VEGF-A, and their soluble receptors sIL-R6 and sVEGFR-2 were determined over time in the conditioned medium of the Angio-Kit system, endothelial cells and cell lines with fibroblast properties after APM treatment. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, cell viability, and stimulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (erk1/2) and protein p38 were also evaluated. Exposure to APM induced blood vessel formation. ROS production was observed in endothelial cells after APM treatment, which was associated with a slight cell cytotoxicity. Neither intracellular ROS formation nor cell death was observed in fibroblasts. APM increases the levels of inflammatory mediator IL-6, VEGF and their soluble receptors released from endothelial cells into the medium. APM treatment induces VEGF-pathway activation by erk1/2 and p38 phosphorylation. APM at low doses is an angiogenic agent that induces regenerative cytokine production leading to the activation of MAPKs and resulting in the formation of new blood vessels.

  9. Solid state stability studies of model dipeptides: aspartame and aspartylphenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Leung, S S; Grant, D J

    1997-01-01

    Some solid-state pharmaceutical properties and the solid-state thermal stability of the model dipeptides aspartame (APM) and aspartylphenylalanine (AP), have been investigated. Studies by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), high-performance liquid chromatography, powder X-ray diffraction, and optical microscopy have shown that the dipeptides undergo solid state intramolecular aminolysis of the type, solid --> solid + gas. This reaction was observed for APM at 167-180 degrees C with the liberation of methanol and for AP at 186-202 degrees C with the liberation of water. The exclusive solid product of the degradation reaction of both dipeptides is the cyclic compound 3-(carboxymethyl)-6-benzyl-2,5-dioxopiperazine. The rates of the degradation reactions were monitored by isothermal TGA and by temperature-ramp DSC and were found to follow kinetics based on nucleation control with activation energies of about 266 kJ mol(-1) for APM and 234 kJ mol(-1) for AP.

  10. Aspartame exposure and in vitro hippocampal slice excitability and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Fountain, S B; Hennes, S K; Teyler, T J

    1988-08-01

    Aspartame (APM) is a low-calorie sweetener recently approved and released for widespread use in the United States. However, concerns still exist that APM consumption may be responsible for adverse neurological and psychological effects in some people. In addition, recent reports indicate that APM exposure may alter regional brain neurotransmitter levels. The present study assessed the effects of APM and its amino acid moieties on rat hippocampal slice excitability and plasticity. Specifically, tests of excitatory systems, inhibitory systems, and synaptic plasticity (induction of long-term potentiation--LTP) were administered postexposure. Exposures of 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 mM APM potentiated the response of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells, but had no apparent effect on local inhibitory systems. APM exposure did not block the establishment of LTP at any dose despite the potentiation of pyramidal cell response observed postexposure. In addition, 0.1 mM phenylalanine (PHE) produced a greater increase in excitability than that produced by an equivalent dose of APM, 0.1 mM aspartic acid (ASP) and 0.1 mM phenylalanine methyl ester (PM) produced effects comparable to those produced a smaller, but reliable, change in hippocampal CA1 excitability relative to baseline. Like APM, none of the amino acids produced detectable changes in inhibitory systems or neuronal plasticity.

  11. Intestinal absorption of aspartame decomposition products in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lipton, W E; Li, Y N; Younoszai, M K; Stegink, L D

    1991-12-01

    The dipeptide sweetener aspartame (N-L-alpha-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine, 1-methyl ester; alpha-APM) is relatively stable in dry powder form. However, when exposed to elevated temperature, extremes of pH and/or moisture, alpha-APM is converted into a variety of products. In aqueous solution alpha-APM decomposes to yield methanol, two isomeric forms of L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine (Asp-Phe) [alpha-Asp-Phe and beta-Asp-Phe], and APM's diketopiperazine cyclo-Asp-Phe. Depending on beverage storage conditions, individuals drinking alpha-APM-sweetened beverages may consume small quantities of these three compounds. Relatively little has been published about the metabolism of beta-Asp-Phe and cyclo-Asp-Phe. We compared the absorption and metabolism of alpha-Asp-Phe, beta-Asp-Phe, and cyclo-Asp-Phe with that of L-phenylalanine (Phe) in adult rats. Steady-state perfusion studies of rat jejunum indicated rapid carrier-assisted uptake of Phe and alpha-Asp-Phe, but only slow passive diffusion of beta-Asp-Phe and cyclo-Asp-Phe from the lumen. Homogenates of rat intestinal mucosa, liver, and cecal contents, as well as homogenates of pure cultures of Escherichia coli B, catalyzed the hydrolysis of alpha-Asp-Phe, but not cyclo-Asp-Phe. Homogenates of E coli and rat cecal contents, but not homogenates of rat liver or intestinal mucosa catalyzed the hydrolysis of beta-Asp-Phe.

  12. Bienzymatic biosensor for rapid detection of aspartame by flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Radulescu, Maria-Cristina; Bucur, Bogdan; Bucur, Madalina-Petruta; Radu, Gabriel Lucian

    2014-01-09

    A rapid, simple and stable biosensor for aspartame detection was developed. Alcohol oxidase (AOX), carboxyl esterase (CaE) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were immobilised with glutaraldehyde (GA) onto screen-printed electrodes modified with cobalt-phthalocyanine (CoPC). The biosensor response was fast. The sample throughput using a flow injection analysis (FIA) system was 40 h⁻¹ with an RSD of 2.7%. The detection limits for both batch and FIA measurements were 0.1 µM for methanol and 0.2 µM for aspartame, respectively. The enzymatic biosensor was successfully applied for aspartame determination in different sample matrices/commercial products (liquid and solid samples) without any pre-treatment step prior to measurement.

  13. Bienzymatic Biosensor for Rapid Detection of Aspartame by Flow Injection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Radulescu, Maria-Cristina; Bucur, Bogdan; Bucur, Madalina-Petruta; Radu, Gabriel Lucian

    2014-01-01

    A rapid, simple and stable biosensor for aspartame detection was developed. Alcohol oxidase (AOX), carboxyl esterase (CaE) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were immobilised with glutaraldehyde (GA) onto screen-printed electrodes modified with cobalt-phthalocyanine (CoPC). The biosensor response was fast. The sample throughput using a flow injection analysis (FIA) system was 40 h−1 with an RSD of 2.7%. The detection limits for both batch and FIA measurements were 0.1 μM for methanol and 0.2 μM for aspartame, respectively. The enzymatic biosensor was successfully applied for aspartame determination in different sample matrices/commercial products (liquid and solid samples) without any pre-treatment step prior to measurement. PMID:24412899

  14. Aspartame as a source of essential phenylalanine for the growth of oral anaerobes.

    PubMed

    Wyss, C

    1993-04-15

    Phenylalanine and aspartic acid requirements were determined for 13 species of oral bacteria using the chemically defined medium OMIZ-W1. None of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides forsythus, Eikenella corrodens, Selenomonas sputigena, Treponema pectinovorum, T. socranskii, or Wolinella recta required either of these amino acid constituents of aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methylester). Phenylalanine was essential for the growth of Capnocytophaga gingivalis, Eubacterium timidum, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. vincentii, while aspartic acid was not required. With the exception of E. timidum, all phenylalanine-dependent strains could grow when the free amino acid was replaced by aspartame at concentrations at least 10-fold lower than those used for aspartame as an artificial sweetener.

  15. Effects of aspartame and sucrose on hunger and energy intake in humans.

    PubMed

    Mattes, R

    1990-06-01

    Physiological and behavioral responses to high intensity sweeteners have been poorly characterized, leading to questions regarding their utility in weight management regimens. To address this issue, studies must independently control attributes such as the taste properties, chemical composition and energy contribution of a given sweetener, as well as subject expectations of its effects. In the present study, 24 adults of normal weight consumed breakfasts including unsweetened or sweetened (sucrose or aspartame) cereal for 5 days, during which hunger and energy intake were monitored. The cereals were rated as equally sweet and pleasant and were equicaloric. Half of the subjects were aware of the cereal composition. Neither sweet taste nor aspartame alone significantly affected reported hunger, daily energy intake or subsequent selection of foods with varying taste qualities. Energy intake tended to be more strongly influenced by perceptions of the energy value of the experimental breakfast. Thus, this study failed to find an appetite stimulating effect of either sweetness or sweetener (aspartame or sucrose).

  16. The biological properties of aspartame. III. Examination for endocrine-like activities.

    PubMed

    Saunders, F J; Pautsch, W F; Nutting, E F

    1980-01-01

    A series of studies with aspartame were run in mice, rats and rabbits using standard procedures to characterize possible estrogenic, androgenic, progestational and glucocorticoid activities. Aspartame was administered orally at levels (ca 300 mg/kg/day) substantially in excess of expected maximal human intake when used as a sweetening agent. No significant hormone-mimetic response was observed in the endocrine target organs evaluated. In similar studies, when administered simultaneously with the steroid hormones, it did not reduce the response expected with the steroid. Thus, it was concluded that ingestion of aspartame should not produce any estrogenic, androgenic, progestational or glucocorticoid-like effects. Further, it should not alter the actions of the endogeneous steroid hormones.

  17. Impaired performance on odor-aversion testing following prenatal aspartame exposure in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Dow-Edwards, D L; Scribani, L A; Riley, E P

    1989-01-01

    Pregnant guinea pigs were administered aspartame (500 mg/kg) in sesame oil by gavage or sesame oil alone between the day of conception and parturition. A nontreated control group was also maintained. There were no statistically significant effects of the treatment on maternal weight gain, litter size, or birth weight of the pups. Newborn pups were weighed daily and on day 15 were injected with either LiCl or saline and placed in a cage with vanilla odor for 30 min. Twenty-four hr later the pups were permitted to choose between vanilla and lemon odors in a preference test. While both the vehicle-treated control and nontreated control groups injected with LiCl showed a conditioned aversion to vanilla, the aspartame-treated pups injected with LiCl did not. These data indicate that aspartame exposure at 500 mg/kg throughout gestation disrupts odor-associative learning in 15-day-old guinea pigs.

  18. Adverse reactions to aspartame: double-blind challenge in patients from a vulnerable population.

    PubMed

    Walton, R G; Hudak, R; Green-Waite, R J

    This study was designed to ascertain whether individuals with mood disorders are particularly vulnerable to adverse effects of aspartame. Although the protocol required the recruitment of 40 patients with unipolar depression and a similar number of individuals without a psychiatric history, the project was halted by the Institutional Review Board after a total of 13 individuals had completed the study because of the severity of reactions within the group of patients with a history of depression. In a crossover design, subjects received aspartame 30 mg/kg/day or placebo for 7 days. Despite the small n, there was a significant difference between aspartame and placebo in number and severity of symptoms for patients with a history of depression, whereas for individuals without such a history there was not. We conclude that individuals with mood disorders are particularly sensitive to this artificial sweetener and its use in this population should be discouraged.

  19. Crystal structure of the low-humidity form of aspartame sweetener.

    PubMed

    Meguro, T; Kashiwagi, T; Satow, Y

    2000-08-01

    The low-humidity IB crystal form of aspartame (L-alphaaspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) is prepared via humidity-induced transition from the highly hydrated IA crystal form and is used widely as a sweetener. The crystal structure of the low-humidity IB form is determined at 1.05 A resolution (0.476 A(-1) in maximum sintheta/lambda) from an extremely fine fibrous crystal using synchrotron radiation. There are three aspartame molecules and two water molecules in the asymmetric unit of the monoclinic space group P2(1). Each aspartame molecule adopts an almost identical extended conformation which is commonly observed in other crystal forms of aspartame. Three aspartame molecules are assembled into a triangular trimer, and trimer units are stacked along the b-axis via hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interactions in the main chains and also via hydrophobic contacts in the phenyl side-chains. Six trimer units are related by pseudo 6(1)-screw axis symmetry and form a hydrophilic channel at their center. The hydrophilic channel in the IB form contains only four water molecules in the unit cell, compared with 16 in the IA form. Although the IB form exhibits a trimer structure similar to that of the IA form, one aspartame molecule is rotated by approximately equals 20 degrees from the orientation in the IA form. This arrangement of the molecule implies that the humidity-induced transition is accompanied by a flapping motion of its methyl ester group. These structural differences may imply the stepwise transition from the IA to the IB forms. PMID:10961544

  20. Effects of stevia, aspartame, and sucrose on food intake, satiety, and postprandial glucose and insulin levels

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Stephen D.; Martin, Corby K.; Han, Hongmei; Coulon, Sandra; Cefalu, William T.; Geiselman, Paula; Williamson, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages may be one of the dietary causes of metabolic disorders, such as obesity. Therefore, substituting sugar with low-calorie sweeteners may be an efficacious weight management strategy. We tested the effect of preloads containing stevia, aspartame, or sucrose on food intake, satiety, and postprandial glucose and insulin levels. Design: 19 healthy lean (BMI = 20.0 – 24.9) and 12 obese (BMI = 30.0 – 39.9) individuals 18 to 50 years old completed three separate food test days during which they received preloads containing stevia (290 kcal), aspartame (290 kcal), or sucrose (493 kcal) before the lunch and dinner meal. The preload order was balanced, and food intake (kcal) was directly calculated. Hunger and satiety levels were reported before and after meals, and every hour throughout the afternoon. Participants provided blood samples immediately before and 20 minutes after the lunch preload. Despite the caloric difference in preloads (290 vs. 493 kcals), participants did not compensate by eating more at their lunch and dinner meals when they consumed stevia and aspartame versus sucrose in preloads (mean differences in food intake over entire day between sucrose and stevia = 301 kcal, p < .01; aspartame = 330 kcal, p < .01). Self-reported hunger and satiety levels did not differ by condition. Stevia preloads significantly lowered postprandial glucose levels compared to sucrose preloads (p < .01), and postprandial insulin levels compared to both aspartame and sucrose preloads (p < .05). When consuming stevia and aspartame preloads, participants did not compensate by eating more at either their lunch or dinner meal and reported similar levels of satiety compared to when they consumed the higher calorie sucrose preload. PMID:20303371

  1. Formaldehyde derived from dietary aspartame binds to tissue components in vivo.

    PubMed

    Trocho, C; Pardo, R; Rafecas, I; Virgili, J; Remesar, X; Fernández-López, J A; Alemany, M

    1998-01-01

    Adult male rats were given an oral dose of 10 mg/kg aspartame 14C-labelled in the methanol carbon. At timed intervals of up to 6 hours, the radioactivity in plasma and several organs was investigated. Most of the radioactivity found (>98% in plasma, >75% in liver) was bound to protein. Label present in liver, plasma and kidney was in the range of 1-2% of total radioactivity administered per g or mL, changing little with time. Other organs (brown and white adipose tissues, muscle, brain, cornea and retina) contained levels of label in the range of 1/12 to 1/10th of that of liver. In all, the rat retained, 6 hours after administration about 5% of the label, half of it in the liver. The specific radioactivity of tissue protein, RNA and DNA was quite uniform. The protein label was concentrated in amino acids, different from methionine, and largely coincident with the result of protein exposure to labelled formaldehyde. DNA radioactivity was essentially in a single different adduct base, different from the normal bases present in DNA. The nature of the tissue label accumulated was, thus, a direct consequence of formaldehyde binding to tissue structures. The administration of labelled aspartame to a group of cirrhotic rats resulted in comparable label retention by tissue components, which suggests that liver function (or its defect) has little effect on formaldehyde formation from aspartame and binding to biological components. The chronic treatment of a series of rats with 200 mg/kg of non-labelled aspartame during 10 days resulted in the accumulation of even more label when given the radioactive bolus, suggesting that the amount of formaldehyde adducts coming from aspartame in tissue proteins and nucleic acids may be cumulative. It is concluded that aspartame consumption may constitute a hazard because of its contribution to the formation of formaldehyde adducts.

  2. Blood methanol concentrations in normal adult subjects administered abuse doses of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Brummel, M C; McMartin, K; Martin-Amat, G; Filer, L J; Baker, G L; Tephly, T R

    1981-02-01

    Blood methanol concentrations were measured in 30 normal adult subjects administered aspartame, a dipeptide methyl ester. The doses studied included the 99th percentile of projected daily ingestion (34 mg/kg body weight) and three doses considered to be in the abuse range (100, 150, and 200 mg/kg body weight). Methanol concentrations were below the level of detection (0.4 mg/dl) in the blood of the 12 normal subjects who ingested aspartame at 34 mg/kg. They were significantly elevated (p less than or equal to 0 .001) after ingestion of each abuse dose, with the mean peak blood methanol concentrations and the areas under the blood methanol concentration-time curve increasing in proportion to dose. Mean (+/- SD) peak blood methanol concentrations were 1.27 +/- 0.48 mg/dl at the 100 mg/kg dose, 2.14 +/- 0.35 mg/dl at the 150 mg/kg dose, and 2.58 +/- 0.78 mg/dl at the 200 mg/kg dose. Blood methanol concentrations returned to predosing levels by 8 h after administration of the 100 mg/kg dose. Methanol was still detected in the blood 8 h after the subjects had ingested aspartame at 150 or 200 mg/kg. Blood formate analyses were carried out in the 6 subjects who ingested aspartame at 200 mg/kg, since recent studies indicate that the toxic effects of methanol are due to formate accumulation. No significant increase in blood formate concentrations over predosing concentrations was noted. No changes were noted in any of the blood chemistry profile parameters measured 24 h after aspartame ingestion, compared to values noted before administration. Similarly, no differences were noted in ophthalmologic examinations carried out before and after aspartame loading.

  3. Crystal structure of the low-humidity form of aspartame sweetener.

    PubMed

    Meguro, T; Kashiwagi, T; Satow, Y

    2000-08-01

    The low-humidity IB crystal form of aspartame (L-alphaaspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) is prepared via humidity-induced transition from the highly hydrated IA crystal form and is used widely as a sweetener. The crystal structure of the low-humidity IB form is determined at 1.05 A resolution (0.476 A(-1) in maximum sintheta/lambda) from an extremely fine fibrous crystal using synchrotron radiation. There are three aspartame molecules and two water molecules in the asymmetric unit of the monoclinic space group P2(1). Each aspartame molecule adopts an almost identical extended conformation which is commonly observed in other crystal forms of aspartame. Three aspartame molecules are assembled into a triangular trimer, and trimer units are stacked along the b-axis via hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interactions in the main chains and also via hydrophobic contacts in the phenyl side-chains. Six trimer units are related by pseudo 6(1)-screw axis symmetry and form a hydrophilic channel at their center. The hydrophilic channel in the IB form contains only four water molecules in the unit cell, compared with 16 in the IA form. Although the IB form exhibits a trimer structure similar to that of the IA form, one aspartame molecule is rotated by approximately equals 20 degrees from the orientation in the IA form. This arrangement of the molecule implies that the humidity-induced transition is accompanied by a flapping motion of its methyl ester group. These structural differences may imply the stepwise transition from the IA to the IB forms.

  4. Effect of aspartame on oxidative stress and monoamine neurotransmitter levels in lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Salem, Neveen A; Hussein, Jihan Seid

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of the sweetener aspartame on oxidative stress and brain monoamines in normal circumstances and after intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg) in mice. Aspartame (0.625-45 mg/kg) was given via subcutaneous route at the time of endotoxin administration. Mice were euthanized 4 h later. Reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances; TBARS), and nitrite concentrations were measured in brain and liver. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and glucose were determined in brain. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were measured in liver. The administration of only aspartame (22.5 and 45 mg/kg) increased brain TBARS by 17.7-32.8%, decreased GSH by 25.6-31.6%, and increased TNF-α by 16.7-44%. Aspartame caused dose-dependent inhibition of brain serotonin, noradrenaline, and dopamine. Aspartame did not alter liver TBARS, nitrite, GSH, AST, ALT, or ALP. The administration of LPS increased nitrite in brain and liver by 26.8 and 37.1%, respectively; decreased GSH in brain and liver by 21.6 and 31.1%, respectively; increased brain TNF-α by 340.4%, and glucose by 39.9%, and caused marked increase in brain monoamines. LPS increased AST, ALT, and ALP in liver tissue by 84.4, 173.7, and 258.9%, respectively. Aspartame given to LPS-treated mice at 11.25 and 22.5 mg/kg increased brain TBARS by 15.5-16.9%, nitrite by 12.6-20.1%, and mitigated the increase in monoamines. Aspartame did not alter liver TBARS, nitrite, GSH, ALT, AST, or ALP. Thus, the administration of aspartame alone or in the presence of mild systemic inflammatory response increases oxidative stress and inflammation in the brain, but not in the liver.

  5. Hunger and negative alliesthesia to aspartame and sucrose in patients treated with antipsychotic drugs and controls.

    PubMed

    Khazaal, Y; Chatton, A; Claeys, F; Ribordy, F; Khan, R; Zullino, D

    2009-12-01

    The present study explores sweet stimuli effects on hunger and negative alliesthesia in patients treated with antipsychotic drugs and controls. Those phenomena were examined in relation to previous weight gain, eating and weight-related cognitions and type of sweet stimuli: aspartame or sucrose. Alliesthesia is delayed in participants who gained weight regardless of cross group differences. A similar reduction of hunger was observed after the intake of two kinds of sweet stimuli (aspartame or sucrose) whereas alliesthesia measures were not affected. Whereas atypical antipsychotic drug-induced weight gain is linked to delayed satiety, the phenomenon is similar in magnitude in non-psychiatric controls who gained weight.

  6. Comments on the purported generation of formaldehyde and adduct formation from the sweetener aspartame.

    PubMed

    Tephly, T R

    1999-01-01

    A recent paper by Trocho et al. (1) describes experiments meant to show that formaldehyde adducts are formed when rats are administered the sweetener aspartame. These authors assume that the methanol carbon of aspartame generates formaldehyde which then forms adducts with protein, DNA, and RNA. Doses employed range widely. In this letter, studies which have been published previously and which were not cited by these authors are reviewed in order to put into perspective the disposition of methanol and formaldehyde in monkeys and humans, species relevant to the toxicity of methanol and its toxic metabolite, formic acid.

  7. Aspartame- or sugar-sweetened beverages: effects on mood in young women.

    PubMed

    Pivonka, E E; Grunewald, K K

    1990-02-01

    Young college women (no. = 120) received, on three different occasions, 12 oz water, aspartame-sweetened beverage, and sugar-sweetened beverage, separated by weekly intervals. Changes in mood were assessed by administering test questionnaires before and 1 hour after the beverages were drunk. Mood tests employed were the Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS), the Visual Analogue Mood Scale (VAMS), and the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Changes in mood were similar following consumption of water or the aspartame-sweetened beverage. However, the ingestion of the sugar-sweetened beverage was followed by increased sleepiness during the last half of the one-hour observation period (p less than .002).

  8. Development of an HPLC Method with an ODS Column to Determine Low Levels of Aspartame Diastereomers in Aspartame.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Nakamura, Ryoichiro; Kubo, Satoru; Otabe, Akira; Oobayashi, Yoko; Suzuki, Shoko; Yoshida, Mika; Yoshida, Mitsuya; Tatebe, Chiye; Sato, Kyoko; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    α-L-Aspartyl-D-phenylalanine methyl ester (L, D-APM) and α-D-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (D, L-APM) are diastereomers of aspartame (N-L-α-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine-1-methyl ester, L, L-APM). The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives has set 0.04 wt% as the maximum permitted level of the sum of L, D-APM and D, L-APM in commercially available L, L-APM. In this study, we developed and validated a simple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method using an ODS column to determine L, D-APM and D, L-APM in L, L-APM. The limits of detection and quantification, respectively, of L, D-APM and D, L-APM were found to be 0.0012 wt% and 0.004 wt%. This method gave excellent accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility in a recovery test performed on five different days. Moreover, the method was successfully applied to the determination of these diastereomers in commercial L, L-APM samples. Thus, the developed method is a simple, useful, and practical tool for determining L, D-APM and D, L-APM levels in L, L-APM.

  9. Development of an HPLC Method with an ODS Column to Determine Low Levels of Aspartame Diastereomers in Aspartame.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Nakamura, Ryoichiro; Kubo, Satoru; Otabe, Akira; Oobayashi, Yoko; Suzuki, Shoko; Yoshida, Mika; Yoshida, Mitsuya; Tatebe, Chiye; Sato, Kyoko; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    α-L-Aspartyl-D-phenylalanine methyl ester (L, D-APM) and α-D-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (D, L-APM) are diastereomers of aspartame (N-L-α-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine-1-methyl ester, L, L-APM). The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives has set 0.04 wt% as the maximum permitted level of the sum of L, D-APM and D, L-APM in commercially available L, L-APM. In this study, we developed and validated a simple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method using an ODS column to determine L, D-APM and D, L-APM in L, L-APM. The limits of detection and quantification, respectively, of L, D-APM and D, L-APM were found to be 0.0012 wt% and 0.004 wt%. This method gave excellent accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility in a recovery test performed on five different days. Moreover, the method was successfully applied to the determination of these diastereomers in commercial L, L-APM samples. Thus, the developed method is a simple, useful, and practical tool for determining L, D-APM and D, L-APM levels in L, L-APM. PMID:27015640

  10. Development of an HPLC Method with an ODS Column to Determine Low Levels of Aspartame Diastereomers in Aspartame

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Nakamura, Ryoichiro; Kubo, Satoru; Otabe, Akira; Oobayashi, Yoko; Suzuki, Shoko; Yoshida, Mika; Yoshida, Mitsuya; Tatebe, Chiye; Sato, Kyoko; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    α-L-Aspartyl-D-phenylalanine methyl ester (L, D-APM) and α-D-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (D, L-APM) are diastereomers of aspartame (N-L-α-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine-1-methyl ester, L, L-APM). The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives has set 0.04 wt% as the maximum permitted level of the sum of L, D-APM and D, L-APM in commercially available L, L-APM. In this study, we developed and validated a simple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method using an ODS column to determine L, D-APM and D, L-APM in L, L-APM. The limits of detection and quantification, respectively, of L, D-APM and D, L-APM were found to be 0.0012 wt% and 0.004 wt%. This method gave excellent accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility in a recovery test performed on five different days. Moreover, the method was successfully applied to the determination of these diastereomers in commercial L, L-APM samples. Thus, the developed method is a simple, useful, and practical tool for determining L, D-APM and D, L-APM levels in L, L-APM. PMID:27015640

  11. Non-nutritive sweeteners: no class effect on the glycaemic or appetite responses to ingested glucose.

    PubMed

    Bryant, C E; Wasse, L K; Astbury, N; Nandra, G; McLaughlin, J T

    2014-05-01

    There is considerable interest in whether non-nutritive sweeteners are sensed in the gastrointestinal tract to modulate appetitive or absorptive responses to ingested carbohydrate. We determined the effect of a panel of non-nutritive sweeteners, aspartame, saccharin and acesulfame-K, delivered in doses that would be consumed in normal usage. Each was given in combination with glucose, assessing their effect on glycemic responses and appetite in 10 healthy human subjects. There was no additional effect of aspartame or saccharin on the blood glucose response to oral glucose at any time point, although acesulfame-K exerted a small effect. However, none had an effect on perceptions of hunger or fullness. We conclude that there is no consistent evidence that non-nutrient sweeteners, when acutely consumed with glucose in dietetically relevant doses, have a class effect in modulating blood glucose in healthy human subjects. However, acesulfame-K may require further exploration.

  12. Simultaneous square-wave voltammetric determination of aspartame and cyclamate using a boron-doped diamond electrode.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Roberta Antigo; de Carvalho, Adriana Evaristo; Rocha-Filho, Romeu C; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2008-07-30

    A simple and highly selective electrochemical method was developed for the simultaneous determination of aspartame and cyclamate in dietary products at a boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode. In square-wave voltammetric (SWV) measurements, the BDD electrode was able to separate the oxidation peak potentials of aspartame and cyclamate present in binary mixtures by about 400 mV. The detection limit for aspartame in the presence of 3.0x10(-4) mol L(-1) cyclamate was 4.7x10(-7) mol L(-1), and the detection limit for cyclamate in the presence of 1.0x10(-4) mol L(-1) aspartame was 4.2x10(-6) mol L(-1). When simultaneously changing the concentration of both aspartame and cyclamate in a 0.5 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution, the corresponding detection limits were 3.5x10(-7) and 4.5x10(-6) mol L(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) obtained was 1.3% for the 1.0x10(-4) mol L(-1) aspartame solution (n=5) and 1.1% for the 3.0x10(-3) mol L(-1) cyclamate solution. The proposed method was successfully applied in the determination of aspartame in several dietary products with results similar to those obtained using an HPLC method at 95% confidence level.

  13. Plasma amino acid concentrations in normal adults fed meals with added monosodium L-glutamate and aspartame.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1983-09-01

    Aspartame is a dipeptide sweetener containing aspartate. It has been suggested that aspartame addition to meals containing large amounts of monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) would result in a rapid rise in plasma glutamate and/or aspartate concentrations and increase the potential for dicarboxylic amino acid--induced toxicity. Sic normal adult subjects were fed three hamburger and milk shake meals providing protein at 1 g/kg body weight in a Latin square design. One meal had no additions, the second provided MSG at 150 mg/kg body weight, and the third provided MSG at 150 mg/kg body weight and aspartame at 23 mg/kg body weight. The addition of MSG alone significantly increased plasma glutamate + aspartate concentration above values noted after ingestion of the meal alone. Aspartame addition to meals already containing MSG did not further significantly increase plasma glutamate + aspartate concentration above values noted when only MSG was added. However, aspartame addition did significantly increase the mean plasma phenylalanine concentration above values noted after ingestion of the meal alone or the meal with added MSG, reflecting aspartame's phenylalanine content. The data do not support the suggestion that aspartame addition to high protein meals already containing large amounts of MSG, will promote a rapid and dangerous rise in plasma glutamate and aspartate concentrations.

  14. Effects of aspartame on hsp70, bcl-2 and bax expression in immune organs of Wistar albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Arbind Kumar; Devi, Rathinasamy Sheela

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aspartame, a “first generation sweetener”, is widely used in a variety of foods, beverages, and medicine. The FDA has determined the acceptable daily intake (ADI) value of aspartame to be 50 mg/kg·day, while the JECFA (Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives) has set this value at 40 mg/kg of body weight/day. Safety issues have been raised about aspartame due to its metabolites, specifically toxicity from methanol and/or its systemic metabolites formaldehyde and formic acid. The immune system is now recognized as a target organ for many xenobiotics, such as drugs and chemicals, which are able to trigger unwanted apoptosis or to alter the regulation of apoptosis. Our previous studies has shown that oral administration of aspartame [40 mg/(kg·day)] or its metabolites for 90 days increased oxidative stress in immune organs of Wistar albino rats. In this present study, we aimed to clarify whether aspartame consumption over a longer period (90-days) has any effect on the expression of hsp70, bcl-2 and bax at both mRNA transcript and protein expression levels in immune organs. We observed that oral administration of aspartame for 90 days did not cause any apparent DNA fragmentation in immune organs of aspartame treated animals; however, there was a significant increase in hsp70 expression, apart from significant alteration in bcl-2 and bax at both mRNA transcript and protein expression level in the immune organs of aspartame treated animals compared to controls. Hence, the results indicated that hsp70 levels increased in response to oxidative injury induced by aspartame metabolites; however, these metabolites did not induce apoptosis in the immune organs. Furthermore, detailed analyses are needed to elucidate the precise molecular mechanisms involved in these changes.

  15. Effects of aspartame and glucose administration on brain and plasma levels of large neutral amino acids and brain 5-hydroxyindoles.

    PubMed

    Yokogoshi, H; Roberts, C H; Caballero, B; Wurtman, R J

    1984-07-01

    Administration of the artificial sweetener aspartame (L-aspartylphenylalanylmethyl ester; 200 mg/kg) by gavage to rats caused large increments in brain and plasma levels of phenylalanine and its product tyrosine. Glucose administration (3 g/kg, by gavage, a dose sufficient to cause insulin-mediated reductions in plasma levels of the large neutral amino acids leucine, isoleucine, and valine) also elevated brain phenylalanine and tyrosine, and enhanced the increments caused by the aspartame, nearly doubling the rise in brain phenylalanine. Each animal's brain phenylalanine or tyrosine levels were highly correlated (r = 0.97 and 0.99, respectively) with its plasma phenylalanine or tyrosine ratios, affirming that aspartame's effects on the brain amino acids result from the changes it produces in plasma composition. As described previously, glucose consumption increased brain tryptophan levels, and consequently, brain levels of the 5-hydroxyindoles serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. Aspartame alone had no effect on these compounds but completely blocked the changes in 5-hydroxyindoles caused by glucose. Each animal's brain level of tryptophan (r = 0.89) and 5-hydroxyindoles (r = 0.74) was also significantly correlated with its plasma tryptophan ratio, affirming that the effects of glucose or aspartame on these brain constituents also result from the changes they produce in plasma composition. The aspartame-glucose combination also reduced brain levels of leucine, isoleucine, and valine to a significantly greater extent than aspartame or glucose alone. These observations indicate that high aspartame doses can generate major neurochemical changes in rats, especially when consumed along with carbohydrate-containing foods. However, they should not in any way be interpreted as demonstrating that aspartame significantly affects the human brain.

  16. Development of a Sweetness Sensor for Aspartame, a Positively Charged High-Potency Sweetener

    PubMed Central

    Yasuura, Masato; Tahara, Yusuke; Ikezaki, Hidekazu; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Taste evaluation technology has been developed by several methods, such as sensory tests, electronic tongues and a taste sensor based on lipid/polymer membranes. In particular, the taste sensor can individually quantify five basic tastes without multivariate analysis. However, it has proven difficult to develop a sweetness sensor, because sweeteners are classified into three types according to the electric charges in an aqueous solution; that is, no charge, negative charge and positive charge. Using membrane potential measurements, the taste-sensing system needs three types of sensor membrane for each electric charge type of sweetener. Since the commercially available sweetness sensor was only intended for uncharged sweeteners, a sweetness sensor for positively charged high-potency sweeteners such as aspartame was developed in this study. Using a lipid and plasticizers, we fabricated various lipid/polymer membranes for the sweetness sensor to identify the suitable components of the sensor membranes. As a result, one of the developed sensors showed responses of more than 20 mV to 10 mM aspartame and less than 5 mV to any other taste. The responses of the sensor depended on the concentration of aspartame. These results suggested that the developed sweetness sensor had high sensitivity to and high selectivity for aspartame. PMID:24763213

  17. Characterization of the Binding Site of Aspartame in the Human Sweet Taste Receptor.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Emeline L; Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Mezei, Mihaly; Hecht, Elizabeth; Quijada, Jeniffer; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman; Max, Marianna

    2015-10-01

    The sweet taste receptor, a heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptor comprised of T1R2 and T1R3, binds sugars, small molecule sweeteners, and sweet proteins to multiple binding sites. The dipeptide sweetener, aspartame binds in the Venus Flytrap Module (VFTM) of T1R2. We developed homology models of the open and closed forms of human T1R2 and human T1R3 VFTMs and their dimers and then docked aspartame into the closed form of T1R2's VFTM. To test and refine the predictions of our model, we mutated various T1R2 VFTM residues, assayed activity of the mutants and identified 11 critical residues (S40, Y103, D142, S144, S165, S168, Y215, D278, E302, D307, and R383) in and proximal to the binding pocket of the sweet taste receptor that are important for ligand recognition and activity of aspartame. Furthermore, we propose that binding is dependent on 2 water molecules situated in the ligand pocket that bridge 2 carbonyl groups of aspartame to residues D142 and L279. These results shed light on the activation mechanism and how signal transmission arising from the extracellular domain of the T1R2 monomer of the sweet receptor leads to the perception of sweet taste. PMID:26377607

  18. Characterization of the Binding Site of Aspartame in the Human Sweet Taste Receptor.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Emeline L; Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Mezei, Mihaly; Hecht, Elizabeth; Quijada, Jeniffer; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman; Max, Marianna

    2015-10-01

    The sweet taste receptor, a heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptor comprised of T1R2 and T1R3, binds sugars, small molecule sweeteners, and sweet proteins to multiple binding sites. The dipeptide sweetener, aspartame binds in the Venus Flytrap Module (VFTM) of T1R2. We developed homology models of the open and closed forms of human T1R2 and human T1R3 VFTMs and their dimers and then docked aspartame into the closed form of T1R2's VFTM. To test and refine the predictions of our model, we mutated various T1R2 VFTM residues, assayed activity of the mutants and identified 11 critical residues (S40, Y103, D142, S144, S165, S168, Y215, D278, E302, D307, and R383) in and proximal to the binding pocket of the sweet taste receptor that are important for ligand recognition and activity of aspartame. Furthermore, we propose that binding is dependent on 2 water molecules situated in the ligand pocket that bridge 2 carbonyl groups of aspartame to residues D142 and L279. These results shed light on the activation mechanism and how signal transmission arising from the extracellular domain of the T1R2 monomer of the sweet receptor leads to the perception of sweet taste.

  19. Use of aspartame-based sweetener tablets in emergency dosimetry using EPR.

    PubMed

    Maghraby, A; Salama, E

    2010-06-01

    Accident dosimetry aims to evaluate the unplanned radiation doses delivered to individuals through one of the objects exist in the area of the accident. The gamma dose response of free radicals generated in irradiated aspartame tablets and its usability for emergency dosimetry was studied. EPR spectra of unirradiated and irradiated aspartame-based sweetener were recorded. Two signals arise after irradiating, S(1) at g (S(1)) = 2.00229 +/- 0.00097 and S(2) at g (S(2)) = 2.00262 +/- 0.00088. Some EPR parameters were studied for radiation-induced radicals in aspartame sweeteners tablets, such as the microwave saturation behaviour, the effect of magnetic field modulation amplitude on the peak-to-peak height and peak-to-peak line width for both of S(1) and S(2). Responses of S(1) and S(2) to different radiation doses were studied and resulted in linear relationships, radicals persistence curves were plotted over a 49-d storage period. It was found that Aspartame sweeteners tablets are useful in the range from 0.96 to 39.96 Gy. Radiation-induced radicals possess reasonable stability.

  20. A Laboratory Preparation of Aspartame Analogs Using Simultaneous Multiple Parallel Synthesis Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qvit, Nir; Barda, Yaniv; Gilon, Chaim; Shalev, Deborah E.

    2007-01-01

    This laboratory experiment provides a unique opportunity for students to synthesize three analogues of aspartame, a commonly used artificial sweetener. The students are introduced to the powerful and useful method of parallel synthesis while synthesizing three dipeptides in parallel using solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) and simultaneous…

  1. Development of a sweetness sensor for aspartame, a positively charged high-potency sweetener.

    PubMed

    Yasuura, Masato; Tahara, Yusuke; Ikezaki, Hidekazu; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-23

    Taste evaluation technology has been developed by several methods, such as sensory tests, electronic tongues and a taste sensor based on lipid/polymer membranes. In particular, the taste sensor can individually quantify five basic tastes without multivariate analysis. However, it has proven difficult to develop a sweetness sensor, because sweeteners are classified into three types according to the electric charges in an aqueous solution; that is, no charge, negative charge and positive charge. Using membrane potential measurements, the taste-sensing system needs three types of sensor membrane for each electric charge type of sweetener. Since the commercially available sweetness sensor was only intended for uncharged sweeteners, a sweetness sensor for positively charged high-potency sweeteners such as aspartame was developed in this study. Using a lipid and plasticizers, we fabricated various lipid/polymer membranes for the sweetness sensor to identify the suitable components of the sensor membranes. As a result, one of the developed sensors showed responses of more than 20 mV to 10 mM aspartame and less than 5 mV to any other taste. The responses of the sensor depended on the concentration of aspartame. These results suggested that the developed sweetness sensor had high sensitivity to and high selectivity for aspartame.

  2. Characterization of the Binding Site of Aspartame in the Human Sweet Taste Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Maillet, Emeline L.; Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Mezei, Mihaly; Hecht, Elizabeth; Quijada, Jeniffer; Osman, Roman; Max, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor, a heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptor comprised of T1R2 and T1R3, binds sugars, small molecule sweeteners, and sweet proteins to multiple binding sites. The dipeptide sweetener, aspartame binds in the Venus Flytrap Module (VFTM) of T1R2. We developed homology models of the open and closed forms of human T1R2 and human T1R3 VFTMs and their dimers and then docked aspartame into the closed form of T1R2’s VFTM. To test and refine the predictions of our model, we mutated various T1R2 VFTM residues, assayed activity of the mutants and identified 11 critical residues (S40, Y103, D142, S144, S165, S168, Y215, D278, E302, D307, and R383) in and proximal to the binding pocket of the sweet taste receptor that are important for ligand recognition and activity of aspartame. Furthermore, we propose that binding is dependent on 2 water molecules situated in the ligand pocket that bridge 2 carbonyl groups of aspartame to residues D142 and L279. These results shed light on the activation mechanism and how signal transmission arising from the extracellular domain of the T1R2 monomer of the sweet receptor leads to the perception of sweet taste. PMID:26377607

  3. An improved FIA biosensor for the determination of aspartame in dietary food products.

    PubMed

    Male, K B; Luong, J H; Gibbs, B; Konishi, Y

    1993-03-01

    A flow injection analysis (FIA) biosensor system was developed for the determination of the artificial sweetener aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester). The system consisted of an enzyme column of pronase immobilized on activated arylamine glass beads and a L-amino acid oxidase electrode connected in series. The dipeptide bond of aspartame was cleaved by immobilized pronase to release phenylalanine, which was in turn monitored by the enzyme electrode that used L-amino acid oxidase immobilized on a preactivated nylon membrane in combination with an amperometric electrode (platinum vs silver/silver chloride, 700 mV). The response of the FIA biosensor was linear up to 1 mM aspartame with a lower detection limit of 25 microM and had good reproducibility (rsd 0.3%). The FIA biosensor was stable for at least 30 h of continuous use at Tr. Each assay takes 4 min giving a sample throughput of 15 h-1. When applied to aspartame in dietary food products the results obtained agreed well with those reported by the product manufacturers.

  4. Children's food intake following drinks sweetened with sucrose or aspartame: time course effects.

    PubMed

    Birch, L L; McPhee, L; Sullivan, S

    1989-02-01

    In two experiments, 2-5-year-old children's responsiveness to caloric density cues was examined. In a preloading protocol, consumption of fixed volumes of drinks (205 ml in Experiment 1; 150 ml in Experiment 2), sweetened with sucrose, aspartame, aspartame plus low glucose maltodextrin, or a water control, was followed by ad lib consumption from among a variety of foods. Caloric drinks had about 90 kcal in Experiment 1, 65 kcal in Experiment 2. The delay interval between the preload and the ad lib consumption was 0, 30 or 60 minutes. In Experiment 1, 24 4- and 5-year-old children participated in only one delay interval, while in Experiment 2, all 20 2- and 3-year-old children were seen in all conditions. Results revealed evidence of caloric compensation, but no evidence of preload x time delay interaction. In both experiments, aspartame also produced a significant suppression of intake relative to water, primarily due to the pattern at 30 min following the preload. Across conditions, the suppression following aspartame was usually significantly less than that produced by the caloric sweet drinks, providing evidence for postingestive effects. In Experiment 1, suppression of intake was related to the children's preferences for the foods, not to macronutrient content; consumption of nonpreferred foods was most suppressed. Consumption of sweetened drinks as long as 1 hour prior to eating suppressed food intake, and this common feeding practice may also reduce dietary variety.

  5. Cytotoxic effects of methanol, formaldehyde, and formate on dissociated rat thymocytes: a possibility of aspartame toxicity.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Y; Sakai, H; Arata, T; Okano, Y; Akaike, N; Sakai, K; Noda, K

    2002-01-01

    Aspartame is a widely used artificial sweetener added to many soft beverages and its usage is increasing in health-conscious societies. Upon ingestion, this artificial sweetener produces methanol as a metabolite. In order to examine the possibility of aspartame toxicity, the effects of methanol and its metabolites (formaldehyde and formate) on dissociated rat thymocytes were studied by flow cytometry. While methanol and formate did not affect cell viability in the physiological pH range, formaldehyde at 1-3 mmol/L started to induce cell death. Further increase in formaldehyde concentration produced a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability. Formaldehyde at 1 mmol/L or more greatly reduced cellular content of glutathione, possibly increasing cell vulnerability to oxidative stress. Furthermore, formaldehyde at 3 mmol/L or more significantly increased intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in a dose-dependent manner. Threshold concentrations of formaldehyde, a metabolite of methanol, that affected the [Ca2+]i and cellular glutathione content were slightly higher than the blood concentrations of methanol previously reported in subjects administered abuse doses of aspartame. It is suggested that aspartame at abuse doses is harmless to humans.

  6. Response to single dose of aspartame or saccharin by NIDDM patients.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, D L; McLane, M; Kobe, P

    1988-03-01

    Twelve normal subjects and 10 subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus were given, in random order at intervals of greater than or equal to 1 wk, three drinks of the same beverage: one unsweetened, one sweetened with 400 mg aspartame, and one sweetened with 135 mg saccharin. The amount of sweetener approximated that in 1 L of sugar-free soft drink. Plasma glucose, insulin, and glucagon were measured for 3 h after ingestion of the test beverage. Plasma glucose declined slightly throughout the test period, probably due to fasting, with no differences between the three treatments. Neither sweetener affected peak insulin levels in subjects with or without diabetes. Analysis of area under the curve showed that mean insulin levels were statistically significantly higher after aspartame than after saccharin or unsweetened beverage in normal subjects only, but the magnitude of the difference was small and unlikely to be of physiological importance in the absence of differences in glucose levels. Furthermore, the differences could largely be accounted for by a decrease in insulin values after both unsweetened beverage and saccharin, with no change from baseline after aspartame. Glucagon levels showed time-to-time variation but no overall differences. We conclude that ingestion of aspartame- or saccharin-sweetened beverages by fasting subjects, with or without diabetes, did not affect blood glucose homeostasis.

  7. [Simultaneous determination of aspartame and amino acids in fermented milk beverages by HPLC].

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Sun, X; She, Q; Zhang, X

    1998-11-01

    An RP-HPLC method for the simultaneous determination of aspartame and amino acids in fermented milk beverages were established. Samples were prepared by mixing with methanol at a ratio of 1:1 and centrifuged at 4,000 r/min for 15 min. Ten microL supernatant was moved into a sample tube, dried and derivatized according to PICO-TAG procedure developed by Waters. A Novapak C18 column (3.9 mm x 150 mm) was used instead of PICO TAG column and the gradient elution program was modified correspondingly. Column temperature was maintained at 38 degrees C and the components were detected at 254 nm. Linearity for aspartame at the range in 1-100 mg/L is A = 333 C + 20 with r = 0.9996 where A is the integrated area of chromatographic peak of aspartame and C is the corresponding mass concentration. Repeatability for 8 injections was tested and the RSD of 3.2% was obtained. The recovery of aspartame for 5 samples with the method ranged from 94.2% to 98.7%.

  8. Evaluation of a possible proximity effect of aspartame and vitamin C on muscular strength.

    PubMed

    Keating, Tedd M; Kendler, Barry S; Merriman, William

    2004-02-01

    Inconsistent findings of a proximity effect on muscular strength, using a neutral control substance, prompted the current study. Double-blind, counterbalanced assessments of grip strength were performed, with subjects holding either an envelope of ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) or aspartame. No proximity effects were found despite the use of two substances believed by some applied kinesiologists to yield positive and negative results, respectively.

  9. No change in spontaneous behavior of rats after acute oral doses of aspartame, phenylalanine, and tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Mullenix, P J; Tassinari, M S; Schunior, A; Kernan, W J

    1991-04-01

    Spontaneous behavior subsequent to acute oral administration of high doses of aspartame, phenylalanine, or tyrosine was analyzed using a computer pattern recognition system. Sprague-Dawley male rats (250-300 g) were dosed orally with aspartame (500 or 1000 mg/kg), phenylalanine (281 or 562 mg/kg), or tyrosine (309 or 618 mg/kg), and their behavior was analyzed 1 hr after dosing. The computer pattern recognition system recorded and classified 13 different behavioral acts performed by the animals during the first 15-min exploration of a novel environment. Three measures that provide independent information concerning motor output from the central nervous system were taken: the number of behavioral initiations, total time, and time structure. These results were compared with the effects induced by d-amphetamine. Plasma concentrations of phenylalanine and tyrosine were determined from blood samples taken immediately after behavioral examination. Data analysis revealed that these doses of aspartame, phenylalanine, and tyrosine did not induce any significant changes in spontaneous behavior. Unlike low doses of amphetamine and despite high plasma concentrations of phenylalanine and tyrosine, no behavioral alteration was detected by the computer pattern recognition system. Absence of behavioral changes in this study using an objective analysis of behavior raises questions concerning the relationship between amino acid precursor loading and purported anecdotal changes in behavior following aspartame administration.

  10. High doses of aspartame have no effects on sensorimotor function or learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Tilson, H A; Hong, J S; Sobotka, T J

    1991-01-01

    Acute or repeated (14 days) intragastric administration of L-d-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (aspartame) suspended in saline and Tween-80 in doses of up to 1,000 mg/kg had no significant effect in male Fischer-344 rats on routine measures of sensorimotor function, including spontaneous motor activity, acoustic startle reflex and prepulse inhibition. Other experiments found that aspartame (500 or 1,000 mg/kg) had no significant effect on acquisition of passive or active avoidance or a spatial, reference memory task in the Morris water maze. A series of separate studies found that aspartame had no effects in rats fasted 24 hours prior to testing, or if it was suspended in carboxymethylcellulose or administered by the intraperitoneal route. Under the conditions of these experiments, large doses of aspartame have no significant neurobiological effects in adult rats as measured by procedures known to be sensitive to the neurobiological effects of neurotoxicants, including convulsants, organochlorine insecticides and heavy metals.

  11. [Simultaneous determination of twelve sweeteners and nine preservatives in foods by solid-phase extraction and LC-MS/MS].

    PubMed

    Tsuruda, Sayuri; Sakamoto, Tomonori; Akaki, Kouichi

    2013-01-01

    A rapid and simple method for the simultaneous determination of twelve sweeteners and nine preservatives in various foods by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed. The sweeteners and preservatives were extracted from solid samples with 80% and 50% methanol and from liquid samples with 80% methanol, followed by Oasis WAX cartridge cleanup. The LC separation was performed on a XSelect CSH Phenyl-Hexyl column (5 μm, 2.1 mm ×150 mm) with a mobile phase of 10 mmol/L acetate buffer (pH 4.0)-acetonitrile and MS detection with negative ion electrospray ionization. The quantification limits of acesulfame K (AK), alitame (AL), aspartame (ASP), cyclamic acid (CYC), neotame (NEO), saccharin Na (SAC), p-hydroxybenzoic acid methyl (PHBA-Me), p-hydroxybenzoic acid ethyl (PHBA-Et), p-hydroxybenzoic acid isopropyl (PHBA-iPr), p-hydroxybenzoic acid propyl (PHBA-Pr), p-hydroxybenzoic acid isobutyl (PHBA-iBu) and p-hydroxybenzoic acid butyl (PHBA-Bu) were 0.001 g/kg, those of dulcin (DU), glycyrrhizic acid (GLY), neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC), rebaudioside A (REB), stevioside (STV), sucralose (SUC) and benzoic acid (BA) were 0.005 g/kg, and those of sorbic acid (SOA) and dehydroacetic acid (DHA) were 0.02 g/kg. The mean recoveries from ten kinds of foods fortified at the levels of 0.02 and 0.2 g/kg were 70.9-119.0%, and their relative standard deviations were 0.1-11.7%.

  12. Selective inhibition of sweetness by the sodium salt of +/-2-(4-methoxyphenoxy)propanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Booth, B J; Sattely-Miller, E A; Graham, B G; Gibes, K M

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which the sodium salt of +/-2-(4-methoxyphenoxy)propanoic acid (Na-PMP) reduced sweet intensity ratings of 15 sweeteners in mixtures. Na-PMP has been approved for use in confectionary/frostings, soft candy and snack products in the USA at concentrations up to 150 p.p.m. A trained panel evaluated the effect of Na-PMP on the intensity of the following 15 sweeteners: three sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose), three terpenoid glycosides (monoammonium glycyrrhizinate, rebaudioside-A, stevioside), two dipeptide derivatives (alitame, aspartame), two N-sulfonylamides (acesulfame-K, sodium saccharin), two polyhydric alcohols (mannitol, sorbitol), 1 dihydrochalcone (neohesperidin dihydrochalcone), one protein (thaumatin) and one sulfamate (sodium cyclamate). Sweeteners were tested at concentrations isosweet with 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10% sucrose in mixtures with two levels of Na-PMP: 250 and 500 p.p.m. In addition, the 15 sweeteners were tested either immediately or 30 s after a pre-rinse with 500 p.p.m. Na-PMP. In mixtures, Na-PMP at both the 250 and 500 p.p.m. levels significantly blocked sweetness intensity for 12 of the 15 sweeteners. However, when Na-PMP was mixed with three of the 15 sweeteners (monoammonium glycyrrhizinate, neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and thaumatin), there was little reduction in sweetness intensity. Pre-rinsing with Na-PMP both inhibited and enhanced sweetness with the greatest enhancements found for monoammonium glycyrrhizinate, neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and thaumatin, which were not suppressed by Na-PMP in mixtures. The mixture data suggest that Na-PMP is a selective competitive inhibitor of sweet taste. The finding that pre-treatment can produce enhancement may be due to sensitization of sweetener receptors by Na-PMP.

  13. Further analysis of the short-term inhibition of food intake in humans by the dipeptide L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (aspartame).

    PubMed

    Rogers, P J; Keedwell, P; Blundell, J E

    1991-04-01

    It was reported previously that the dipeptide sweetener aspartame suppresses food intake in humans by a postingestive action. The present study examined the hypothesis that this is due to an effect of phenylalanine, one of the primary breakdown products of aspartame (phenylalanine is a potent releaser of the so-called satiety hormone cholecystokinin, CCK). Capsulated aspartame (400 mg) administered to human volunteers reduced food intake by 15% (253 kcal) in a lunchtime test meal begun 1 hour later. However, neither phenylalanine (200 mg) nor the other constituent amino acid of aspartame, aspartic acid (200 mg), altered intake compared with placebo. Despite the large effect on food intake there were no treatment differences in pre- or postmeal ratings of motivation to eat. This suggests that aspartame may act to intensify the satiating effects of ingested food. Although high doses of phenylalanine reduce food intake, an individual action of phenylalanine cannot account for the potent anorexic effect of aspartame. In discussing alternative mechanisms it is noted that the amino acid sequence of aspartame (Asp-Phe) is the same as the C-terminal dipeptide of CCK. A direct action of aspartame at CCK receptors appears to be unlikely; however, aspartame might act as CCK releaser. Further studies are required to elucidate the mechanism of aspartame's anorexic action and perhaps to evaluate its therapeutic potential as an antiobesity agent.

  14. 15 CFR 2011.202 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRADE REPRESENTATIVE ALLOCATION OF TARIFF-RATE QUOTA ON IMPORTED SUGARS, SYRUPS AND MOLASSES Specialty... glucose), ti light sugar (99.2% sugar with the residual comprised of the artificial sweeteners aspartame and acesulfame K), caster sugar, golden syrup, ferdiana granella grossa, golden granulated...

  15. Lack of DNA-damaging activity of five non-nutritive sweeteners in the rat hepatocyte/DNA repair assay.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, A M; Williams, G M

    2000-04-01

    The non-nutritive sweeteners acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate, saccharin and sucralose were tested for DNA damaging activity in the rat hepatocyte/DNA repair assay. Using hepatocytes from F344 and Sprague-Dawley male rats, all were inactive despite strong responses for the positive control, 2-aminofluorene.

  16. Increase of methanol in exhaled breath quantified by SIFT-MS following aspartame ingestion.

    PubMed

    Španěl, Patrik; Dryahina, Kseniya; Vicherková, Petra; Smith, David

    2015-12-01

    Aspartame, methyl-L-α-aspartyl-L-phenylalaninate, is used worldwide as a sweetener in foods and drinks and is considered to be safe at an acceptable daily intake (ADI) of 40 mg per kg of body weight. This compound is completely hydrolyzed in the gastrointestinal tract to aspartic acid, phenylalanine and methanol, each being toxic at high levels. The objective of the present study was to quantify the volatile methanol component in the exhaled breath of ten healthy volunteers following the ingestion of a single ADI dose of aspartame. Direct on-line measurements of methanol concentration were made in the mouth and nose breath exhalations using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, several times before aspartame ingestion in order to establish individual pre-dose (baseline) levels and then during two hours post-ingestion to track their initial increase and subsequent decrease. The results show that breath methanol concentrations increased in all volunteers by 1082   ±   205 parts-per-billion by volume (ppbv) from their pre-ingestion values, which ranged from 193 to 436 ppbv to peak values ranging from 981-1622 ppbv, from which they slowly decreased. These observations agree quantitatively with a predicted increase of 1030 ppbv estimated using a one-compartment model of uniform dilution of the methanol generated from a known amount of aspartame throughout the total body water (including blood). In summary, an ADI dose of aspartame leads to a 3-6 fold increase of blood methanol concentration above the individual baseline values. PMID:26582819

  17. Increase of methanol in exhaled breath quantified by SIFT-MS following aspartame ingestion.

    PubMed

    Španěl, Patrik; Dryahina, Kseniya; Vicherková, Petra; Smith, David

    2015-11-19

    Aspartame, methyl-L-α-aspartyl-L-phenylalaninate, is used worldwide as a sweetener in foods and drinks and is considered to be safe at an acceptable daily intake (ADI) of 40 mg per kg of body weight. This compound is completely hydrolyzed in the gastrointestinal tract to aspartic acid, phenylalanine and methanol, each being toxic at high levels. The objective of the present study was to quantify the volatile methanol component in the exhaled breath of ten healthy volunteers following the ingestion of a single ADI dose of aspartame. Direct on-line measurements of methanol concentration were made in the mouth and nose breath exhalations using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, several times before aspartame ingestion in order to establish individual pre-dose (baseline) levels and then during two hours post-ingestion to track their initial increase and subsequent decrease. The results show that breath methanol concentrations increased in all volunteers by 1082   ±   205 parts-per-billion by volume (ppbv) from their pre-ingestion values, which ranged from 193 to 436 ppbv to peak values ranging from 981-1622 ppbv, from which they slowly decreased. These observations agree quantitatively with a predicted increase of 1030 ppbv estimated using a one-compartment model of uniform dilution of the methanol generated from a known amount of aspartame throughout the total body water (including blood). In summary, an ADI dose of aspartame leads to a 3-6 fold increase of blood methanol concentration above the individual baseline values.

  18. Mutagenic activity of peptides and the artificial sweetener aspartame after nitrosation.

    PubMed

    Shephard, S E; Wakabayashi, K; Nagao, M

    1993-05-01

    Naturally occurring dipeptides, cholecystokinine (CCK, a tetrapeptide hormone) and the artificial sweetener aspartame were nitrosated for 10-30 min with 40 mM-nitrite (pH 3.5, 37 degrees C), and the resultant products examined for mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium TA100. Specific mutagenicities (net revertants per mumol precursor) spanned four orders of magnitude, with CCK being the most potent precursor (4700 revertants/mumol) followed by tryptophyl-tryptophan (Trp-Trp; 1000 revertants/mumol). Aspartame and glycyl-Trp (Gly-Trp) had intermediate activity (300 revertants/mumol), while Gly-Gly and methionyl-methionine were only weakly mutagenic (20 and 12 revertants/mumol, respectively). The dipeptides of aspartic acid, phenylalanine and tyrosine had no detectable mutagenicity (limits of detection 0.5, 40 and 5 revertants/mumol, respectively). Kinetic studies with aspartame and Gly-Trp suggested that the mutagenic products arose primarily from nitrosation of the primary amine rather than the amide or indole group. The mutagenicities of nitrosated aspartame and Gly-Trp were higher in TA100 than in TA98, and higher without than with enzymatic activation (S-9 mix) in both strains. The time-course study of Trp-Trp nitrosation showed the production of at least two mutagens: a potent but unstable mutagenicity was seen at very short nitrosation times and a more stable but weaker effect was obtained after more than 60 min of nitrosation. Not only the absolute specific mutagenicity but also the nitrite dependence of the nitrosation reaction and the stability of the nitroso product must be taken into account in determining the risk posed by endogenous nitrosation of foods in the human stomach. Under stomach conditions, nitrosation of the side-chains of certain Trp peptides would be expected to contribute more to the endogenous burden of nitrosated products than nitrosation of aspartame or Gly peptides.

  19. Plasma amino acid concentrations in normal adults administered aspartame in capsules or solution: lack of bioequivalence.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Bell, E F; Ziegler, E E

    1987-05-01

    Some clinical studies require administration of test compounds in capsules to assure that the compound cannot be distinguished from a placebo. This raises the question of whether the pharmacokinetic responses produced by capsule administration are similar to values obtained when test compounds are ingested in solution. To test this, plasma phenylalanine and aspartate concentrations were compared in ten normal subjects ingesting 3 g aspartame in solution and in capsules in a balanced Latin square design. Peak plasma phenylalanine levels were significantly higher (191 +/- 65.4 v 117 +/- 39.5 mumol/L, mean +/- SD) and were reached significantly earlier (32 +/- 15 v 123 +/- 74 minutes) when aspartame was administered in solution than when it was administered in capsules. The area under the four-hour plasma phenylalanine concentration-time curve was significantly higher (15,340 +/- 4,820 v 8,465 +/- 3,356 mumol/L X min) when aspartame was ingested in solution. Administration in solution also produced a significantly higher ratio of plasma phenylalanine concentration to the sum of the plasma concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids (0.36 +/- 0.12 v 0.23 +/- 0.06). Similarly, peak plasma aspartate concentrations were significantly higher 26.2 +/- 16.3 v 10.4 +/- 5.0 mumol/L) and were reached significantly earlier (30 +/- 14 v 106 +/- 61.3 min) when aspartame was administered in solution. The data indicate different plasma phenylalanine and aspartate pharmacokinetics between solution and capsule administration of aspartame.

  20. Aspartame and its constituent amino acids: effects on prolactin, cortisol, growth hormone, insulin, and glucose in normal humans.

    PubMed

    Carlson, H E; Shah, J H

    1989-03-01

    Because large doses of phenylalanine stimulate prolactin secretion in man, we studied the acute effects of oral doses of aspartame (0.534 g, equivalent to the amount of aspartame in approximately 1 L beverage), aspartic acid (0.242 g), and phenylalanine (0.3 and 1.0 g) on serum prolactin and other hormones in normal humans. Prolactin was not stimulated by any of the aspartame meals, aspartic acid, or 0.3 g phenylalanine; a small rise in serum prolactin, similar to that produced by a high-protein mixed meal, followed ingestion of 1.0 g phenylalanine. Serum growth hormone showed no statistically significant changes in response to any of the experimental meals whereas cortisol and insulin fell slightly and glucose rose slightly during each of the meals. We conclude that these doses of aspartame do not alter secretion of prolactin, cortisol, growth hormone, or insulin in normal individuals.

  1. Effects of aspartame ingestion on the carbohydrate-induced rise in tryptophan hydroxylation rate in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Fernstrom, J D; Fernstrom, M H; Grubb, P E

    1986-08-01

    Effects of aspartame (aspartyl-phenylalanine-methylester) on increases in brain-tryptophan level and hydroxylation rate following a high-carbohydrate, protein-free meal were tested. After an overnight fast, rats consumed a protein-free meal containing one of several levels of aspartame. Blood and brain amino acid levels and the in vivo rate of tryptophan hydroxylation in brain were estimated at intervals thereafter. Ingestion of the meal alone increased brain-tryptophan level and hydroxylation rate. Aspartame did not modify these effects, except at doses of 530 mg/kg body weight or more. Results suggest a threshold dose of aspartame can be identified for the rat in single-meal studies above which suppression of carbohydrate-induced increases in brain-tryptophan level and serotonin synthesis occurs. This dose, however, is large and, when corrected for species differences in metabolic rate, is unlikely to be ingested by a human subject as a single load.

  2. Hypothalamic morphology following ingestion of aspartame or MSG in the neonatal rodent and primate: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, W A; Butler, V; Lemkey-Johnston, N

    1976-11-01

    Neonatal mice received oral doses of monosodium glutamate (MSG) at levels of 0.25, 0.5m 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 g/kg or aspartame at levels of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 g/kg. Hypothalamic lesions were encountered at dose levels equal to or exceeding 0.5 g/kg (MSG) and 1.0 g/kg (aspartame). Aspartame administration resulted in a much smaller hypothalamic lesion than did equal dosages of MSG. Infant monkeys received MSG (1-4 g/kg) or aspartame (2 g/kg) by stomach tube. Hypothalamic morphology remained normal at both the microscopic and ultrastructural level. Thus, in contrast to the neonatal rodent, the neonatal primate is able to cope either metabolically or at the level of the blood-brain barrier with excessive amino acid loads.

  3. Effect of aspartame and aspartate loading upon plasma and erythrocyte free amino acid levels in normal adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1977-10-01

    Aspartame is a dipeptide (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanyl-methyl ester) with a sweeting potential 180 to 200 times that of sucrose. Questions have been raised about potential toxic effects of its constituent amino acids, aspartate and phenylalanine when the compound is ingested in large amounts. Plasma and erythrocyte amino acid levels were measured in 12 normal subjects after administration of either Aspartame (34 mg/kg) or equimolar quantities of aspartate (13 mg/kg) in a crossover design. No changes in either plasma or erythrocyte aspartate levels were noted at any time after either Aspartame or aspartate ingestion. Plasma phenylalanine levels decrease slightly after aspartate loading, and increased from fasting levels (4.9 +/- 1 mumoles/100 ml) to 10.7 +/- 1.9 mumoles/100 ml about 45 to 60 minutes after Aspartame loading. Phenylalanine levels returned to baseline by 4 hours. Erythrocyte phenylalanine levels showed similar changes.

  4. A novel strategy for selection of allosteric ribozymes yields RiboReporter sensors for caffeine and aspartame.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Alicia; Boomer, Ryan M; Kurz, Markus; Keene, Sara C; Diener, John L; Keefe, Anthony D; Wilson, Charles; Cload, Sharon T

    2004-01-01

    We have utilized in vitro selection technology to develop allosteric ribozyme sensors that are specific for the small molecule analytes caffeine or aspartame. Caffeine- or aspartame-responsive ribozymes were converted into fluorescence-based RiboReporter trade mark sensor systems that were able to detect caffeine or aspartame in solution over a concentration range from 0.5 to 5 mM. With read-times as short as 5 min, these caffeine- or aspartame-dependent ribozymes function as highly specific and facile molecular sensors. Interestingly, successful isolation of allosteric ribozymes for the analytes described here was enabled by a novel selection strategy that incorporated elements of both modular design and activity-based selection methods typically used for generation of catalytic nucleic acids.

  5. Aspartame Attenuates 2, 4-Dinitrofluorobenzene-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Clinical Symptoms in NC/Nga Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun-Dong; Park, Yong Seek; Ahn, Hyun-Jong; Cho, Jeong-Je; Park, Cheung-Seog

    2015-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common multifactorial chronic skin disease that has a multiple and complex pathogenesis. AD is gradually increasing in prevalence globally. In NC/Nga mice, repetitive applications of 2, 4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) evoke AD-like clinical symptoms similar to human AD. Aspartame (N-L-α-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine 1-methyl ester) is a methyl ester of a dipeptide, which is used as an artificial non-nutritive sweetener. Aspartame has analgesic and anti-inflammatory functions that are similar to the function of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin. We investigated whether aspartame can relieve AD-like clinical symptoms induced by DNFB treatment in NC/Nga mice. Sucrose did not relieve AD-like symptoms, whereas aspartame at doses of 0.5 μg kg(-1) and 0.5 mg kg(-1) inhibited ear swelling and relieved AD-like clinical symptoms. Aspartame inhibited infiltration of inflammatory cells including eosinophils, mast cells, and CD4(+) T cells, and suppressed the expression of cytokines including IL-4 and IFN-γ, and total serum IgE levels. Aspartame may have therapeutic value in the treatment of AD. PMID:26099025

  6. Aspartame exacerbates EEG spike-wave discharge in children with generalized absence epilepsy: a double-blind controlled study.

    PubMed

    Camfield, P R; Camfield, C S; Dooley, J M; Gordon, K; Jollymore, S; Weaver, D F

    1992-05-01

    There are anecdotal reports of increased seizures in humans after ingestion of aspartame. We studied 10 children with newly diagnosed but untreated generalized absence seizures. Ambulatory cassette recording of EEG allowed quantification of numbers and length of spike-wave discharges in a double-blind study on two consecutive days. On one day the children received 40 mg/kg aspartame and on the other day, a sucrose-sweetened drink. Baseline EEG was the same before aspartame and sucrose. Following aspartame compared with sucrose, the number of spike-wave discharges per hour and mean length of spike-wave discharges increased but not to a statistically significant degree. However, the total duration of spike-wave discharge per hour was significantly increased after aspartame (p = 0.028), with a 40% +/- 17% (SEM) increase in the number of seconds per hour of EEG recording that the children spent in spike-wave discharge. Aspartame appears to exacerbate the amount of EEG spike wave in children with absence seizures. Further studies are needed to establish if this effect occurs at lower doses and in other seizure types.

  7. Aspartame Attenuates 2, 4-Dinitrofluorobenzene-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Clinical Symptoms in NC/Nga Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun-Dong; Park, Yong Seek; Ahn, Hyun-Jong; Cho, Jeong-Je; Park, Cheung-Seog

    2015-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common multifactorial chronic skin disease that has a multiple and complex pathogenesis. AD is gradually increasing in prevalence globally. In NC/Nga mice, repetitive applications of 2, 4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) evoke AD-like clinical symptoms similar to human AD. Aspartame (N-L-α-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine 1-methyl ester) is a methyl ester of a dipeptide, which is used as an artificial non-nutritive sweetener. Aspartame has analgesic and anti-inflammatory functions that are similar to the function of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin. We investigated whether aspartame can relieve AD-like clinical symptoms induced by DNFB treatment in NC/Nga mice. Sucrose did not relieve AD-like symptoms, whereas aspartame at doses of 0.5 μg kg(-1) and 0.5 mg kg(-1) inhibited ear swelling and relieved AD-like clinical symptoms. Aspartame inhibited infiltration of inflammatory cells including eosinophils, mast cells, and CD4(+) T cells, and suppressed the expression of cytokines including IL-4 and IFN-γ, and total serum IgE levels. Aspartame may have therapeutic value in the treatment of AD.

  8. Application of multibounce attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics for determination of aspartame in soft drinks.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Harpreet Kaur; Cho, Il Kyu; Shim, Jae Yong; Li, Qing X; Jun, Soojin

    2008-02-13

    Aspartame is a low-calorie sweetener commonly used in soft drinks; however, the maximum usage dose is limited by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance sampling accessory and partial least-squares regression (PLS) was used for rapid determination of aspartame in soft drinks. On the basis of spectral characterization, the highest R2 value, and lowest PRESS value, the spectral region between 1600 and 1900 cm(-1) was selected for quantitative estimation of aspartame. The potential of FTIR spectroscopy for aspartame quantification was examined and validated by the conventional HPLC method. Using the FTIR method, aspartame contents in four selected carbonated diet soft drinks were found to average from 0.43 to 0.50 mg/mL with prediction errors ranging from 2.4 to 5.7% when compared with HPLC measurements. The developed method also showed a high degree of accuracy because real samples were used for calibration, thus minimizing potential interference errors. The FTIR method developed can be suitably used for routine quality control analysis of aspartame in the beverage-manufacturing sector.

  9. Chronic aspartame affects T-maze performance, brain cholinergic receptors and Na+,K+-ATPase in rats.

    PubMed

    Christian, Brandon; McConnaughey, Kenneth; Bethea, Elena; Brantley, Scott; Coffey, Amy; Hammond, Leigha; Harrell, Shelly; Metcalf, Kasee; Muehlenbein, Danielle; Spruill, Willie; Brinson, Leslie; McConnaughey, Mona

    2004-05-01

    This study demonstrated that chronic aspartame consumption in rats can lead to altered T-maze performance and increased muscarinic cholinergic receptor densities in certain brain regions. Control and treated rats were trained in a T-maze to a particular side and then periodically tested to see how well they retained the learned response. Rats that had received aspartame (250 mg/kg/day) in the drinking water for 3 or 4 months showed a significant increase in time to reach the reward in the T-maze, suggesting a possible effect on memory due to the artificial sweetener. Using [(3)H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) (1 nM) to label muscarinic cholinergic receptors and atropine (10(-6) M) to determine nonspecific binding in whole-brain preparations, aspartame-treated rats showed a 31% increase in receptor numbers when compared to controls. In aspartame-treated rats, there was a significant increase in muscarinic receptor densities in the frontal cortex, midcortex, posterior cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebellum of 80%, 60%, 61%, 65%, 66% and 60%, respectively. The midbrain was the only area where preparations from aspartame-treated rats showed a significant increase in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. It can be concluded from these data that long-term consumption of aspartame can affect T-maze performance in rats and alter receptor densities or enzymes in brain.

  10. Potentiation by nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and calcium channel blocker of aspartame-induced antinociception in the mouse formalin test.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, M; Nikfar, S; Abdoli, N

    2001-04-01

    By applying a 12 day regimen of the non-calorific sweetener, aspartame, in combination with representative compounds of the calcium channel blocker and nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, we tried to investigate using a formalin-test in mice the relative role of aspartame on pain and its mechanism of action. Verapamil (2, 3.5, 5, 7.5 mg/kg) induced significant (P < 0.01) antinociception in both phases of the formalin test. L-Nitro-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME) at the doses used, induced significant (P < 0.01) antinociception in early phase (1, 2, 5, 10 mg/kg) and late phase (5, 10 mg/kg). Twelve days of treatment in animals by aspartame (0.16% w/v) significantly induced antinociception in both phases of the formalin test. Both verapamil (5 mg/kg) and L-NAME (10 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.01) potentiated aspartame-induced antinociception in both phases of formalin test. The present findings support the hypothesis that the activation of NMDA receptors by aspartame modulates pain-related behaviour via a nitric oxide/cGMP/glutamate release cascade. It is concluded that aspartame would be a good analgesic agent if it would be used in combination with a calcium channel blocker or NOS inhibitor.

  11. Daily intake assessment of saccharin, stevioside, D-sorbitol and aspartame from various processed foods in Korea.

    PubMed

    Chung, M-S; Suh, H-J; Yoo, W; Choi, S-H; Cho, Y-J; Cho, Y-H; Kim, C-J

    2005-11-01

    This study was carried out to estimate the daily intakes (EDIs) of artificial sweeteners such as saccharin, stevioside, D-sorbitol and aspartame in order to evaluate the safety of the artificial sweeteners in Korea. A total of 274 food samples were selected from the foods considered to be representative sources of artificial sweeteners in the Korean diet and analysed by using HPLC with evaporative light scattering and ultraviolet detectors. In case of aspartame, the reference values were used without instrumental analysis. The EDIs of saccharin, stevioside, D-sorbitol and aspartame for average consumers were 0.028, 0.008, 4.9 and 0.14 mg kg-1 body weight day-1, respectively, and as a proportion of the acceptable daily intake (ADI) were not higher than 1% of ADI of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). For 90th percentile consumers, the EDIs of saccharin, stevioside, D-sorbitol and aspartame were 2.0, 0.20, 141 and 4.6 mg kg-1 body weight day-1, respectively, and as a proportion of the ADI, the EDIs of saccharin and aspartame were 40.7% and 11.4% of the ADI set by the JECFA, respectively. Because JECFA did not assign ADIs for stevioside and D-sorbitol, the values for these sweeteners were not compared. According to these results, the EDIs of artificial sweeteners such as saccharin and aspartame in Korea are significantly lower than ADI set by the JECFA.

  12. Effect of aspartame and protein, administered in phenylalanine-equivalent doses, on plasma neutral amino acids, aspartate, insulin and glucose in man.

    PubMed

    Møller, S E

    1991-05-01

    Six human males each received 0.56 g phenylalanine (Phe) in the form of 1.0 g aspartame or 12.2 g bovine albumin in 200 ml water or water alone. Venous blood samples collected before consumption and during the following 4 hr were assayed for plasma levels of large, neutral amino acids (LNAA), aspartate, insulin and glucose. The area under the curve for plasma Phe was 40% greater, although not significant, after aspartame compared with albumin intake. The indicated increased clearance rate of plasma Phe after albumin may be caused by the significant increase of insulin, on which aspartame had no effect. There was a significant main effect of aspartame for plasma tyrosine but not for tryptophan, valine, isoleucine or leucine. Plasma aspartate was significantly increased at 0.25 hr after the aspartame intake. The percentage Phe/LNAA decreased slightly in response to albumin but increased 55% after aspartame and remained significantly increased for 2 hr. Tyrosine/LNAA increased and tryptophan/LNAA decreased modestly after aspartame intake. The study showed that the intake of aspartame in a not unrealistically high dose produced a marked and persistent increase of the availability of Phe to the brain, which was not observed after protein intake. The study indicated, furthermore, that Phe was cleared faster from the plasma after consumption of protein compared with aspartame.

  13. Exploring the biological consequences of conformational changes in aspartame models containing constrained analogues of phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Adriano; Mirzaie, Sako; Costante, Roberto; Carradori, Simone; Macedonio, Giorgia; Stefanucci, Azzurra; Dvoracsko, Szabolcs; Novellino, Ettore

    2016-12-01

    The dipeptide aspartame (Asp-Phe-OMe) is a sweetener widely used in replacement of sucrose by food industry. 2',6'-Dimethyltyrosine (DMT) and 2',6'-dimethylphenylalanine (DMP) are two synthetic phenylalanine-constrained analogues, with a limited freedom in χ-space due to the presence of methyl groups in position 2',6' of the aromatic ring. These residues have shown to increase the activity of opioid peptides, such as endomorphins improving the binding to the opioid receptors. In this work, DMT and DMP have been synthesized following a diketopiperazine-mediated route and the corresponding aspartame derivatives (Asp-DMT-OMe and Asp-DMP-OMe) have been evaluated in vivo and in silico for their activity as synthetic sweeteners. PMID:26308194

  14. Influence of carboxymethyl cellulose and sodium alginate on sweetness intensity of Aspartame.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; Xu, Shu-Zhen; Dong, Wen-Rui; Wu, Zhai; Wang, Ren-Hai; Chen, Zhong-Xiu

    2014-12-01

    Sensory evaluation of Aspartame in the presence of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-L) and sodium alginate (SA) revealed that only CMC-L showed a suppression effect, while SA did not. By using an artificial taste receptor model, we found that the presence of SA or CMC-L resulted in a decrease in association constants. Further investigation of CMC-L solution revealed that the decrease in water mobility and diffusion also contribute to the suppression effect. In the case of SA, the decreased viscosity and comparatively higher amount of free water facilitated the diffusion of sweetener, which might compensate for the decreased binding constant between Aspartame and receptor. This may suppress the impact of SA on sweetness intensity. The results suggest that exploring the binding affinity of taste molecules with the receptor, along with water mobility and diffusion in hydrocolloidal structures, provide sufficient information for understanding the mechanism behind the effect of macromolecular hydrocolloids on taste. PMID:24996335

  15. Influence of carboxymethyl cellulose and sodium alginate on sweetness intensity of Aspartame.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; Xu, Shu-Zhen; Dong, Wen-Rui; Wu, Zhai; Wang, Ren-Hai; Chen, Zhong-Xiu

    2014-12-01

    Sensory evaluation of Aspartame in the presence of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-L) and sodium alginate (SA) revealed that only CMC-L showed a suppression effect, while SA did not. By using an artificial taste receptor model, we found that the presence of SA or CMC-L resulted in a decrease in association constants. Further investigation of CMC-L solution revealed that the decrease in water mobility and diffusion also contribute to the suppression effect. In the case of SA, the decreased viscosity and comparatively higher amount of free water facilitated the diffusion of sweetener, which might compensate for the decreased binding constant between Aspartame and receptor. This may suppress the impact of SA on sweetness intensity. The results suggest that exploring the binding affinity of taste molecules with the receptor, along with water mobility and diffusion in hydrocolloidal structures, provide sufficient information for understanding the mechanism behind the effect of macromolecular hydrocolloids on taste.

  16. Synthesis of Aspartame by Thermolysin: An X-ray Structural Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Protease mediated peptide synthesis (PMPS) was first described in the 1930s but remains underexploited today. In most PMPS, the reaction equilibrium is shifted toward synthesis by the aqueous insolubility of product generated. Substrates and proteases are selected by trial and error, yields are modest, and reaction times are slow. Once implemented, however, PMPS reactions can be simple, environmentally benign, and readily scalable to a commercial level. We examined the PMPS of a precursor of the artificial sweetener aspartame, a multiton peptide synthesis catalyzed by the enzyme thermolysin. X-ray structures of thermolysin in complex with aspartame substrates separately, and after PMPS in a crystal, rationalize the reaction’s substrate preferences and reveal an unexpected form of substrate inhibition that explains its sluggishness. Structure guided optimization of this and other PMPS reactions could expand the economic viability of commercial peptides beyond current high-potency, low-volume therapeutics, with substantial green chemistry advantages. PMID:24944748

  17. Synthesis and characteristics of an aspartame analogue, L-asparaginyl L-3-phenyllactic acid methyl ester.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hu; Cui, Da-Fu; Zhang, You-Shang

    2004-06-01

    An aspartame analogue, L-asparaginyl L-3-phenyllactic acid methyl ester was synthesized with aspartic acid replaced by asparagine and peptide bond replaced by ester bond. The aspartic acid of aspartame could be replaced by asparagine as reported in the literature. In this analogue, the hydrogen of amide group could still form a hydrogen bond with the oxygen of ester bond and the ester bond was isosteric with peptide bond. However, the product was not sweet, showing that the peptide bond could not be replaced by ester bond. The peptide C-N bond behaves as a double bond that is not free to rotate and the C, O, N and H atoms are in the same plane. The replacement of peptide bond by ester bond destroyed the unique conformation of peptide bond, resulting in the loss of sweet taste.

  18. Exploring the biological consequences of conformational changes in aspartame models containing constrained analogues of phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Adriano; Mirzaie, Sako; Costante, Roberto; Carradori, Simone; Macedonio, Giorgia; Stefanucci, Azzurra; Dvoracsko, Szabolcs; Novellino, Ettore

    2016-12-01

    The dipeptide aspartame (Asp-Phe-OMe) is a sweetener widely used in replacement of sucrose by food industry. 2',6'-Dimethyltyrosine (DMT) and 2',6'-dimethylphenylalanine (DMP) are two synthetic phenylalanine-constrained analogues, with a limited freedom in χ-space due to the presence of methyl groups in position 2',6' of the aromatic ring. These residues have shown to increase the activity of opioid peptides, such as endomorphins improving the binding to the opioid receptors. In this work, DMT and DMP have been synthesized following a diketopiperazine-mediated route and the corresponding aspartame derivatives (Asp-DMT-OMe and Asp-DMP-OMe) have been evaluated in vivo and in silico for their activity as synthetic sweeteners.

  19. Synthesis of Aspartame by Thermolysin: An X-ray Structural Study.

    PubMed

    Birrane, Gabriel; Bhyravbhatla, Balaji; Navia, Manuel A

    2014-06-12

    Protease mediated peptide synthesis (PMPS) was first described in the 1930s but remains underexploited today. In most PMPS, the reaction equilibrium is shifted toward synthesis by the aqueous insolubility of product generated. Substrates and proteases are selected by trial and error, yields are modest, and reaction times are slow. Once implemented, however, PMPS reactions can be simple, environmentally benign, and readily scalable to a commercial level. We examined the PMPS of a precursor of the artificial sweetener aspartame, a multiton peptide synthesis catalyzed by the enzyme thermolysin. X-ray structures of thermolysin in complex with aspartame substrates separately, and after PMPS in a crystal, rationalize the reaction's substrate preferences and reveal an unexpected form of substrate inhibition that explains its sluggishness. Structure guided optimization of this and other PMPS reactions could expand the economic viability of commercial peptides beyond current high-potency, low-volume therapeutics, with substantial green chemistry advantages.

  20. Plasma and urine diketopiperazine concentrations in normal adults ingesting large quantities of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Cho, E S; Coon, J D; Stegink, L D

    1987-07-01

    In aqueous solution, aspartame can cyclicize to form its corresponding diketopiperazine (3-carboxymethyl-6-benzyl-2,5-diketopiperazine; DKP) and methanol. We measured plasma and urinary concentrations of DKP in samples obtained from six normal adult subjects ingesting 2.2 mg DKP/kg body weight. The DKP was administered as part of a dose of 200 mg aspartame/kg body weight. DKP concentrations in plasma were below the detection limit (less than 1 microgram/ml) of the high-pressure liquid chromatographic method at each time interval after ingestion at which they were measured. Mean (+/- SD) total urinary DKP excreted during the first 24-hr period after dosing was 6.68 +/- 1.30 mg (4.83 +/- 0.23% of the ingested DKP dose). Approximately 44% of the total DKP excreted was excreted in the first 4 hr after dosing.

  1. Reanalysis of the effects of phenylalanine, alanine, and aspartame on food intake in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P J; Blundell, J E

    1994-08-01

    In 1987 Ryan-Harshman et al. reported finding no effects on food intake after administering high doses (up to 10.08 g) of phenylalanine and aspartame in capsules to human volunteers. However, this is contrary to the results of other studies, and trends in their tabulated data suggest that certain effects may have been overlooked. This is confirmed by a reanalysis of the raw data (available from a Ph.D. thesis: Ryan-Harshman, 1987) that can be interpreted as showing a dose-related suppression of food intake by phenylalanine. Furthermore, the data are consistent with an anorexic action of aspartame and perhaps also of alanine (which was designated as the placebo treatment by Ryan-Harshman et al.). These, together with other findings, suggest that the appetite effects of amino acids and small peptides should be investigated further. In addition to its theoretical importance, such work may have potential for therapeutic applications.

  2. Comparative effects of fructose, aspartame, glucose, and water preloads on calorie and macronutrient intake.

    PubMed

    Rodin, J

    1990-03-01

    Using a within-subjects design, we gave over-weight and normal-weight subjects a 500-mL drink of fructose, glucose, or aspartame diluted in lemon-flavored water or plain water in a randomized fashion at about weekly intervals. Food intake was assessed at a buffet lunch that began 38 min after the preload was completed. Blood was drawn throughout and assayed for concentrations of glucose, insulin, glucagon, and free fatty acid. When subjects drank the fructose preload, they subsequently ate fewer overall calories and fewer grams of fat than when they drank any of the other preloads. The aspartame load did not stimulate intake beyond the plain-water control. The effects of the oxidation of fructose as a possible mechanism for the reduction in food intake is discussed. The effects of insulin in stimulating intake are also discussed.

  3. Serum methanol concentrations in rats and in men after a single dose of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Davoli, E; Cappellini, L; Airoldi, L; Fanelli, R

    1986-03-01

    Serum methanol concentrations were measured in rats and in humans given oral aspartame. The dose given to rats was the FDA's projected 99th percentile daily intake for humans, assuming aspartame were to replace all sucrose sweeteners in the diet (34 mg/kg). Four male adult volunteers each received 500 mg, equivalent to 6-8.7 mg/kg, which is approximately the FDA's estimate of mean daily human consumption. Both treatments caused a rise in serum methanol. In rats the mean peak value was 3.1 mg/litre 1 hr after administration; serum methanol returned to endogenous values 4 hr after treatment. In the men, the mean rise over endogenous values was 1.06 mg/litre after 45 min. Two hours after treatment, serum methanol had returned to basal levels. The temporary serum methanol increase showed peak values within the range of individual basal levels.

  4. Solvent effects on chemical processes. 8. Demethylation kinetics of aspartame in binary aqueous-organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Skwierczynski, R D; Connors, K A

    1994-12-01

    The kinetics of demethylation of aspartame were studied in binary aqueous-organic solvent mixtures at 25 degrees C under two solution conditions, namely 1.0 M HCl (pH 0.28 in water) and carbonate buffer (pH 10.1 in water). Under these conditions solvent effects on the acid dissociation constants of aspartame do not complicate the interpretation of the kinetics. The organic cosolvents were acetone, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, dioxane, tetrahydrofuran, and methanol. The observed kinetic solvent effects were modest in magnitude, not exceeding a factor of 3 in rate constant, relative to the fully aqueous solution. The rate changes included both increases and decreases, and in some solvent mixtures extrema were observed. It is concluded that at least two contributory factors, identified as an electrostatic (dielectric constant) effect and a solvation effect, must be operating to produce the observed kinetic solvent effects.

  5. Impact of aspartame and saccharin on the rat liver: Biochemical, molecular, and histological approach.

    PubMed

    Alkafafy, Mohamed El-Sayed; Ibrahim, Zein Shaban; Ahmed, Mohamed Mohamed; El-Shazly, Samir Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    The current work was undertaken to settle the debate about the toxicity of artificial sweeteners (AS), particularly aspartame and saccharin. Twenty-five, 7-week-old male Wistar albino rats with an average body weight of 101 ± 4.8 g were divided into a control group and four experimental groups (n = 5 rats). The first and second experimental groups received daily doses equivalent to the acceptable daily intake (ADI) of aspartame (250 mg/Kg BW) and four-fold ADI of aspartame (1000 mg/Kg BW). The third and fourth experimental groups received daily doses equivalent to ADI of saccharin (25 mg/Kg BW) and four-fold ADI of saccharin (100 mg/Kg BW). The experimental groups received the corresponding sweetener dissolved in water by oral route for 8 weeks. The activities of enzymes relevant to liver functions and antioxidants were measured in the blood plasma. Histological studies were used for the evaluation of the changes in the hepatic tissues. The gene expression levels of the key oncogene (h-Ras) and the tumor suppressor gene (P27) were also evaluated. In addition to a significant reduction in the body weight, the AS-treated groups displayed elevated enzymes activities, lowered antioxidants values, and histological changes reflecting the hepatotoxic effect of aspartame and saccharin. Moreover, the overexpression of the key oncogene (h-Ras) and the downregulation of the tumor suppressor gene (P27) in all treated rat groups may indicate a potential risk of liver carcinogenesis, particularly on long-term exposure. PMID:26015492

  6. Conformation-activity relationship of sweet molecules. Comparison of aspartame and naphthimidazolesulfonic acids.

    PubMed

    Castiglione-Morelli, M A; Lelj, F; Naider, F; Tallon, M; Tancredi, T; Temussi, P A

    1990-02-01

    The shape of the active site of the receptor for sweet molecules was previously defined on the basis of a combination of both rigid (saccharins) and flexible (aspartame) molds. In this paper, the sweetness receptor is refined with use of the shapes of 3-anilino-2-styryl-3H-naphtho[1,2-d]imidazolesulfonate (sweet) and of 3-anilino-2-phenyl-3H-naphtho[1,2-d]imidazolesulfonate (tasteless), two large and almost completely rigid tastants. The minimum-energy conformations of the flexible portions of these tastants have been determined by using a detailed conformational analysis based on ab initio calculations. The refined receptor site is still consistent with all previously examined sweet molecules. In order to unequivocally assign the prochiral beta-CH2 protons of the Phe moiety of aspartame, (2S,3S)-[2H]-alpha-L-Asp-L-PheOMe was synthesized and examined by 500-MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy. The results indicate that the minimum-energy conformation for aspartame in water, DMSO-d6, and CDCl3 (as a crown ether complex) is different from that originally proposed (FIIDII instead of FIDII, according to a notation referred to the side chains). Although this conformation is not directly consistent with the shape of the sweet receptor, the interconversion of FIIDII to FIDII was found to require only 1 kcal/mol. Furthermore, a 120-ps molecular dynamics simulation in vacuo confirms the high flexibility of aspartame and the accessibility of the FIDII conformer whose topology is fully consistent with our model. PMID:2299622

  7. Conformation-activity relationship of sweet molecules. Comparison of aspartame and naphthimidazolesulfonic acids.

    PubMed

    Castiglione-Morelli, M A; Lelj, F; Naider, F; Tallon, M; Tancredi, T; Temussi, P A

    1990-02-01

    The shape of the active site of the receptor for sweet molecules was previously defined on the basis of a combination of both rigid (saccharins) and flexible (aspartame) molds. In this paper, the sweetness receptor is refined with use of the shapes of 3-anilino-2-styryl-3H-naphtho[1,2-d]imidazolesulfonate (sweet) and of 3-anilino-2-phenyl-3H-naphtho[1,2-d]imidazolesulfonate (tasteless), two large and almost completely rigid tastants. The minimum-energy conformations of the flexible portions of these tastants have been determined by using a detailed conformational analysis based on ab initio calculations. The refined receptor site is still consistent with all previously examined sweet molecules. In order to unequivocally assign the prochiral beta-CH2 protons of the Phe moiety of aspartame, (2S,3S)-[2H]-alpha-L-Asp-L-PheOMe was synthesized and examined by 500-MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy. The results indicate that the minimum-energy conformation for aspartame in water, DMSO-d6, and CDCl3 (as a crown ether complex) is different from that originally proposed (FIIDII instead of FIDII, according to a notation referred to the side chains). Although this conformation is not directly consistent with the shape of the sweet receptor, the interconversion of FIIDII to FIDII was found to require only 1 kcal/mol. Furthermore, a 120-ps molecular dynamics simulation in vacuo confirms the high flexibility of aspartame and the accessibility of the FIDII conformer whose topology is fully consistent with our model.

  8. Impact of aspartame and saccharin on the rat liver: Biochemical, molecular, and histological approach.

    PubMed

    Alkafafy, Mohamed El-Sayed; Ibrahim, Zein Shaban; Ahmed, Mohamed Mohamed; El-Shazly, Samir Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    The current work was undertaken to settle the debate about the toxicity of artificial sweeteners (AS), particularly aspartame and saccharin. Twenty-five, 7-week-old male Wistar albino rats with an average body weight of 101 ± 4.8 g were divided into a control group and four experimental groups (n = 5 rats). The first and second experimental groups received daily doses equivalent to the acceptable daily intake (ADI) of aspartame (250 mg/Kg BW) and four-fold ADI of aspartame (1000 mg/Kg BW). The third and fourth experimental groups received daily doses equivalent to ADI of saccharin (25 mg/Kg BW) and four-fold ADI of saccharin (100 mg/Kg BW). The experimental groups received the corresponding sweetener dissolved in water by oral route for 8 weeks. The activities of enzymes relevant to liver functions and antioxidants were measured in the blood plasma. Histological studies were used for the evaluation of the changes in the hepatic tissues. The gene expression levels of the key oncogene (h-Ras) and the tumor suppressor gene (P27) were also evaluated. In addition to a significant reduction in the body weight, the AS-treated groups displayed elevated enzymes activities, lowered antioxidants values, and histological changes reflecting the hepatotoxic effect of aspartame and saccharin. Moreover, the overexpression of the key oncogene (h-Ras) and the downregulation of the tumor suppressor gene (P27) in all treated rat groups may indicate a potential risk of liver carcinogenesis, particularly on long-term exposure.

  9. Liquid chromatographic determination of sodium saccharin, caffeine, aspartame, and sodium benzoate in cola beverages.

    PubMed

    Tyler, T A

    1984-01-01

    A rapid method has been developed for the determination of sodium saccharin, caffeine, aspartame, and sodium benzoate in cola beverages. The sample is degassed, diluted in water, and injected onto a C18 column. The mobile phase consists of 15% acetonitrile in triethylammonium phosphate buffer adjusted to pH 4.3 with NaOH. The total run time is less than 10 min and the active compounds are determined using absorbance detection at 214 nm.

  10. Effects of beta-carotene and aspartame on clustogenic activity of cyclophosphamide and dioxidine in mice.

    PubMed

    Belogolovskaya, E G; Oreshchenko, A V; Durnev, A D; Seredenin, S B; Litvinova, E V; Zubtsov, Y N

    2000-11-01

    Antimutagenic effects of combination of aspartame (0.4 and 4 mg/kg) and beta-carotene (0.15-15 mg/kg) were studied by estimation of chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells of C57Bl/6 mice. Single and 5-day treatment with this combination decreased the clastogenic effects of dioxidine and cyclophosphamide and produced a more potent and universal antimutagenic effect than its constituents.

  11. Crystal and molecular structure of aspartame X HCl X 2H2O.

    PubMed

    Görbitz, C H

    1987-02-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of the hydrochloride salt of the peptide sweetener aspartame (alpha-L-Asp-L-Phe methyl ester) has been determined at 120 K using 3877 reflections with I greater than 2.5 sigma I. Space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), cell dimensions a = 6.768(1), b = 9.796(1) and c = 26.520(3) A; final R factor 0.033. While the N-terminal L-Asp group in the structure of aspartame itself forms a six-membered ring with an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the carboxylate and the protonated amino terminus, the corresponding group in the hydrochloride adopts a completely different conformation with a weak intramolecular hydrogen bond between the carboxyl group and the N atom of the L-Phe residue. The L-Phe methyl ester moiety is rather similar in the two structures. Of the many possible conformations of aspartame, only one may be expected to function as a substrate at the receptor site for sweet taste, and a proposal is made for this active conformation. PMID:3604519

  12. Aspartame, low-calorie sweeteners and disease: regulatory safety and epidemiological issues.

    PubMed

    Marinovich, Marina; Galli, Corrado L; Bosetti, Cristina; Gallus, Silvano; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    Aspartame is a synthetic sweetener that has been used safely in food for more than 30 years. Its safety has been evaluated by various regulatory agencies in accordance with procedures internationally recognized, and decisions have been revised and updated regularly. The present review summarizes the most relevant conclusions of epidemiological studies concerning the use of low-calorie sweeteners (mainly aspartame), published between January 1990 and November 2012. In the Nurses' Health study and the Health Professionals Followup study some excess risk of Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma was found in men but not in women; no association was found with leukemia. In the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, there was no association between aspartame and haematopoietic neoplasms. US case-control studies of brain and haematopoietic neoplasms also showed no association. The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study and case-control studies from California showed no association with pancreatic cancer, and a case-control study from Denmark found no relation with breast cancer risk. Italian case-control studies conducted in 1991-2008 reported no consistent association for cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract, digestive tract, breast, endometrium, ovary, prostate, and kidney. Low calorie sweeteners were not consistently related to vascular events and preterm deliveries.

  13. Aspartame prevents the karyomegaly induced by ochratoxin A in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Baudrimont, I; Sostaric, B; Yenot, C; Betbeder, A M; Dano-Djedje, S; Sanni, A; Steyn, P S; Creppy, E E

    2001-05-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus ochraceus as well as other moulds. This mycotoxin contaminates animal feed and food. OTA is immunosuppressive, genotoxic, teratogenic, carcinogenic and is nephrotoxic in all animal species studied so far. OTA inhibits protein synthesis and induces lipid peroxidation. Since it seems impossible to avoid completely contamination of foodstuffs by toxigenic fungi, it is necessary to investigate the possible ways of limiting such toxicity. An attempt to prevent OTA-induced nephrotoxic and genotoxic effects, mainly the karyomegaly, has been made in vivo using aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester), a structural analogue of both OTA and phenylalanine. Aspartame (25 mg/kg body weight) prevented most of the nephrotoxic effects induced by OTA (289 microg/kg body weight). It also showed some utility in preventing morphological and histological damage, mainly the karyomegaly. The protective effects of aspartame on OTA-induced nephrotoxicity could be based on several mechanisms related to competitive binding to plasma proteins, to transport or tissue distribution in the kidney or to the elimination of the toxin in the urine.

  14. Renewable stationary phase liquid magnetochromatography: determining aspartame and its hydrolysis products in diet soft drinks.

    PubMed

    Barrado, E; Rodríguez, J A; Castrillejo, Y

    2006-08-01

    A new chromatographic modality that does not require high pressures and also allows renewal of the stationary phase as desired is reported. The technique is based on a thin layer paramagnetic stationary phase (Fe3O4-SiO2) retained on the inner wall of a minicolumn through the action of an external magnetic field, which also plays an important role in separating the analytes. Accordingly, the name "renewable stationary phase liquid magnetochromatography", or RSP-LMC, has been proposed for it. The technique was used to separate and quantify the sugar substitute alpha-aspartame and its constituent amino acids (hydrolysis products), L-aspartic acid and L-phenylalanine, in diet fizzy soft drinks. When the results obtained for alpha-aspartame were compared with those obtained using HPLC as a reference method, no significant differences were observed. The system proposed is fully automated, making it an economic, competitive alternative to conventional methods of determining alpha-aspartame and its amino acid components.

  15. Bioavailability of phenylalanine and aspartate from aspartame (20 mg/kg) in capsules and solution.

    PubMed

    Burns, T S; Stargel, W W; Hurwitz, A

    1990-11-01

    Aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) was given in capsules or solution to compare the bioavailability of its constituent amino acids, aspartate and phenylalanine. Twenty healthy subjects received a single 20 mg/kg dose of aspartame in capsules or solution in a randomized, crossover design. Plasma amino acid concentrations and the phenylalanine to large neutral amino acid ratios (Phe/LNAA) were determined. Plasma aspartate concentrations did not increase with either treatment. For plasma phenylalanine following capsule ingestion, there was a smaller peak plasma concentration (Cmax; 103.3 v 126.6 mumol/L), a longer time to peak concentration (tmax; 108.6 v 36.6 minutes), but no significant difference in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) (7,656 v 7,200 mumol.min/L) when compared with solution ingestion. The maximum plasma Phe/LNAA ratio was smaller (0.16 v 0.19) with capsules. The changes for plasma tyrosine were similar to those seen with phenylalanine. There were no significant differences in the plasma concentrations of the other LNAAs between capsule and solution ingestion. Thus, given the small effect on phenylalanine Cmax and Phe/LNAA and no effect on the extent of absorption of phenylalanine, aspartame ingested in capsules at doses up to 20 mg/kg is a suitable dosage form for blinded clinical studies, provided that the slower rate of absorption of phenylalanine from capsules is taken into account.

  16. Aspartame: effect on lunch-time food intake, appetite and hedonic response in children.

    PubMed

    Anderson, G H; Saravis, S; Schacher, R; Zlotkin, S; Leiter, L A

    1989-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted, each with 20 healthy 9-10-year-old children. After an overnight fast, subjects were given a standardized breakfast at 0830 hrs, the treatments at 1030 hrs, and a lunch containing an excess of foods at 1200 hrs. Visual analog scales of hunger, fullness, and desire to eat were administered 5 min before and 20 and 85 min after treatment. Lunch-time food intake was measured. In experiment 1, either aspartame (34 mg/kg), or the equivalent sweetness of sodium cyclamate, was given in an ice slurry (300 ml) of unsweetened strawberry Kool-Aid with carbohydrate (1.75 g/kg polycose). In experiment 2, drinks (300 ml) contained either sucrose (1.75 g/kg) or aspartame (9.7 mg/kg). In both experiments, significant meal- and time-dependent effects were observed for subjective feelings of hunger, fullness and desire to eat. Treatments, however, did not affect either subjective feelings of appetite or lunch-time food intake. Thus, aspartame consumed without or with carbohydrate, did not affect either hunger or food intake of children when compared with the sweeteners sodium cyclamate and sucrose, respectively.

  17. [Rapid determination of aspartame in compound sweetening by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Zhang, R; Jiang, M

    1997-11-01

    A method for rapid determination of Aspartame in compound sweetening by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography is presented. Aspartame in compound sweetening was separated in a short column (Ultrasphere XL-ODS, 3 microm, 4.6 mm x 70 mm) by using CH3OH-0.02 mol/L NH4Ac as mobile phase. The flow rate was 0.8 mL/min. Detection was performed with UV detector at 220 nm. The injection volume was 20 microL. It was qualitatively analysed by UV scanning at a wavelength range of 200-350 nm under no-stop flow according to their retention time. Quantitative analysis was carried out by measuring peak height and comparing it with external standard. The minimum detectable amount was 5 microg/L. The linear range of the calibration curve was 40-200 mg/L. The average recovery of Aspartame was 92%. The relative standard deviation was 2.9%. This method is simple, rapid and sensitive.

  18. Plasma and erythrocyte concentrations of free amino acids in adult humans administered abuse doses of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1981-02-01

    Plasma and erythrocyte concentrations of amino acids were measured in 18 fasting adult subjects (9 male, 9 female) administered abuse doses of aspartame (100, 150, and 200 mg/kg body weight) dissolved in 500 ml orange juice. Six subjects were studied at each dose. Plasma aspartate concentrations increased significantly (p less than or equal to 0.05) over baseline values after ingestion of each dose. However, the increase was small in each case, and maximal levels observed were below those noted postprandially in formula-fed infants. No significant changes (p greater than 0.05) were noted in erythrocyte glutamate, or erythrocyte aspartate concentrations after any dose. Plasma phenylalanine concentrations increased significantly over fasting concentrations (p less than 0.01) from 15 min to 6 h after each dose, and the increase was proportional to dose. Mean (+/- SD) peak plasma phenylalanine concentrations were 20.3 +/- 2.03, 35.1 +/- 11.3, and 48.7 +/- 15.5 mumol/dl, respectively, after aspartame doses of 100, 150, and 200 mg/kg. Erythrocyte phenylalanine concentrations showed similar changes. Although these phenylalanine concentrations are considerably above the normal postprandial range (12 +/- 3 mumol/dl), they are below values associated with toxic findings. These data indicate little risk to normal subjects from excessive aspartate or phenylalanine levels after ingestion of single abuse loads of aspartame.

  19. Regional tongue sensitivity for sweetness and pungency of ethanol-aspartame mixtures.

    PubMed

    Calviño, A M

    1998-02-01

    Binary mixtures of aspartame prepared at three levels of concentration and dissolved in four ethanolic dilutions were perceptually evaluated. Sweet-pungent combinations were presented in solution or in disks of filter paper (paper) soaked in the solutions. Variations in sweetness and pungency were examined at two oral loci including the tip and the back plus the front of the tongue in the liquid condition or the tip and the back of the tongue in the paper condition. A similar behavior was observed in liquid and paper conditions; as the concentration of aspartame and ethanol increased so did the intensity for sweet and pungent qualities. Whereas sweetness was not influenced by ethanol addition (2-8% V/V), a suppressive effect of aspartame (1-4 mM) on pungency was noted for liquid but not for the paper condition. Sweetness was enhanced when the back plus the front of the tongue was stimulated by solutions. Finally, there was a complex pattern of regional effects on the perceived pungency of alcoholic-sweet solutions that was not replicated in the paper condition.

  20. Effects of drinks sweetened with sucrose or aspartame on hunger, thirst and food intake in men.

    PubMed

    Rolls, B J; Kim, S; Fedoroff, I C

    1990-07-01

    Forty-two nondieting adult males were given 8 or 16 oz of lemonade, sweetened to equal intensity with either aspartame or sucrose, or the same volumes of water, or no drink. Subjects were separated into three groups receiving the drinks at different times: with a self-selection lunch, or 30, or 60 min before lunch. Food intakes did not differ when subjects received the drinks with lunch; however, when the calories from the drinks were included, intake was significantly greater with the sucrose-sweetened lemonades than in the other conditions. When subjects received the drinks 30 or 60 min before lunch, food intakes were not significantly different. Appetite ratings were not different among the conditions. When the drinks were consumed with the meal, the 8-oz sucrose-sweetened lemonade differed from the other drinks in that it did not significantly reduce thirst. The results indicate that in nondieting males, aspartame in concentrations similar to those in commercially available drinks did not increase hunger ratings or food intake. However, caloric drinks taken with lunch increased total energy intake in that meal. Also, sucrose-sweetened drinks may decrease thirst less than water or aspartame-sweetened drinks when taken with a meal.

  1. A review of the metabolism of the aspartyl moiety of aspartame in experimental animals and man.

    PubMed

    Ranney, R E; Oppermann, J A

    1979-01-01

    Aspartame (3-amino-N-(alpha-carboxyphenethyl) succinamic acid, methyl ester; the methyl ester of aspartylphenylalanine, SC-18862) is hydrolyzed in the gut to yield aspartic acid, phenylalanine, and methanol. This review of the literature describes the metabolic paths followed by aspartate in its conversion to CO2 or its incorporation into body constituents. About 70 percent of 14C from [asp-14C]-aspartame is converted in the monkey to 14CO2. Some of the aspartate is converted at the intestinal mucosal level to alanine by decarboxylation. This amino acid may be oxidized to CO2 by entering the tricarboxylic acid cycle via pyruvate and acetyl CoA. In addition, transamination of aspartate to oxaloacetate permits this product also to enter the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Aspartate may also be incorporated into body constitutents such as other amino acids, proteins, pyrimidines, asparagine, and N-acetylaspartic acid. It is concluded that the aspartate moiety of aspartame is metabolized in a manner similar to that of dietary aspartic acid.

  2. Crystal and molecular structure of aspartame X HCl X 2H2O.

    PubMed

    Görbitz, C H

    1987-02-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of the hydrochloride salt of the peptide sweetener aspartame (alpha-L-Asp-L-Phe methyl ester) has been determined at 120 K using 3877 reflections with I greater than 2.5 sigma I. Space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), cell dimensions a = 6.768(1), b = 9.796(1) and c = 26.520(3) A; final R factor 0.033. While the N-terminal L-Asp group in the structure of aspartame itself forms a six-membered ring with an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the carboxylate and the protonated amino terminus, the corresponding group in the hydrochloride adopts a completely different conformation with a weak intramolecular hydrogen bond between the carboxyl group and the N atom of the L-Phe residue. The L-Phe methyl ester moiety is rather similar in the two structures. Of the many possible conformations of aspartame, only one may be expected to function as a substrate at the receptor site for sweet taste, and a proposal is made for this active conformation.

  3. [Organoleptic properties of a new sweetening agent formulation based on aspartame and xylitol].

    PubMed

    Dumas, P; Sauvageot, F

    1980-01-01

    In orderto find a new sweetner, different products such as xylitol, aspartame, saccharin, lactose and sucrose are tested by a panel of trained subjects. To determine sweetness intensity, we use the multiple paired comparison technique: each judge tested 9 pairs of samples, in each pair one sample is a sucrose solution at a fixed concentration (20 g/l or 60 g/l) and the other solution is made with a sweetner at a variable concentration, but near the reference. The results are in accordance with the data in the literature. The taste quality is determined with solutions or powders. Experiments are performed with either 10 solutions to identify or 2 unknown powders at the same granulometry. In each case sucrose is compared to a sweetner. The statistical analysis shows that xylitol, levulose and the aspartame-xylitol mixture (25.10(-3) g; 1 g) is tasted identical with sucrose. Studies about stability of the mixture are carried out in sealed ampoules with products at pH between 3 and 7 and temperatures between +4 and +120 degrees C. The results show that the aspartame-xylitol mixture with sweetness intensity equal to 5.0 is a good synthetic sweetner to substitute sucrose.

  4. Biochemical responses and mitochondrial mediated activation of apoptosis on long-term effect of aspartame in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Iyaswamy; Sheeladevi, Rathinasamy

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame, an artificial sweetener, is very widely used in many foods and beverages. But there are controversies about its metabolite which is marked for its toxicity. Hence it is believed to be unsafe for human use. Previous studies have reported on methanol exposure with involvements of free radicals on excitotoxicity of neuronal apoptosis. Hence, this present study is proposed to investigate whether or not chronic aspartame (FDA approved Daily Acceptable Intake (ADI),40 mg/kg bwt) administration could release methanol, and whether or not it can induce changes in brain oxidative stress status and gene and protein expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic Bax and caspase-3 in the rat brain region. To mimic the human methanol metabolism, Methotrexate (MTX)-treated Wistar strain male albino rats were used and after the oral administration of aspartame, the effects were studied along with controls and MTX-treated controls. Aspartame exposure resulted with a significant increase in the enzymatic activity in protein carbonyl, lipid peroxidation levels, superoxide dismutase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity in (aspartame MTX)-treated animals and with a significant decrease in reduced glutathione, glutathione reductase and protein thiol, pointing out the generation of free radicals. The gene and protein expression of pro apoptotic marker Bax showed a marked increase whereas the anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2 decreased markedly indicating the aspartame is harmful at cellular level. It is clear that long term aspartame exposure could alter the brain antioxidant status, and can induce apoptotic changes in brain.

  5. A comparison of chronic aspartame exposure to aspirin on inflammation, hyperalgesia and open field activity following carrageenan-induced monoarthritis.

    PubMed

    LaBuda, C J; Fuchs, P N

    2001-06-15

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether chronic aspartame exposure possesses analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions in the carrageenan-induced monoarthritis model similar to those properties of aspirin. Prior research demonstrated that aspartame can reduce second phase formalin pain and increase motor activity in arthritic patients. Fifty-eight male Sprague-Dawly rats were treated with aspartame (25, 50, 100 mg/kg) or saline for six days. An additional group of animals received daily injections of saline and on the sixth treatment day, received a 150-mg/kg dose of aspirin 30-minutes prior to behavioral testing. On Day 6, animals received an intra-articular (i.a.) injection of 2% lambda carrageenan (CARR) or an equal volume of saline and were tested four hours later on threshold to mechanical and thermal stimuli, open field activity, and knee joint diameter. Aspirin-treated arthritic animals exhibited significantly less mechanical hyperalgesia and knee joint inflammation compared with vehicle treated arthritic animals. However, aspirin did not reverse thermal hyperalgesia or increase motor activity to control levels. Aspartame did not reduce inflammation, increase motor activity, or attenuate thermal allodynia, but at 50 mg/kg did attenuate mechanical allodynia compared with vehicle treated arthritic animals. The anti-hyperalgesic effect on mechanical hyperalgesia was not seen at 25 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg aspartame. These results suggest that a certain amount of aspartame may provide relief of arthritic pain to a similar degree as aspirin in some individuals. The specific effect of aspartame and aspirin on mechanical hyperalgesia should be considered when these agents are used for the therapeutic treatment of arthritic conditions.

  6. A combined single-blind, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to determine the reproducibility of hypersensitivity reactions to aspartame.

    PubMed

    Garriga, M M; Berkebile, C; Metcalfe, D D

    1991-04-01

    Aspartame is an O-methyl ester composed of phenylalanine and aspartic acid. After its final approval as a sweetener in 1981, a number of reports of adverse reactions to aspartame appeared in the literature. To explore the pathogenesis of such reactions, we initiated a study in July 1986 to identify subjects with hypersensitivity reactions to aspartame with blinded challenge procedures. The study was closed after 32 months. During that time, we advertised in local newspapers and worked closely with the local community of allergists and dermatologists in an attempt to recruit subjects with hypersensitivity reactions to aspartame. A total of 61 self-referrals and physician referrals were screened, with 20 referrals evaluated in clinic. After this evaluation, 12 patients underwent single- and double-blind challenge with up to 2000 mg of aspartame. No subject with a clearly reproducible adverse reaction to aspartame was identified. In summary, we found that it is difficult to recruit study subjects with a history of hypersensitivity reactions to aspartame and that subjects who believed themselves allergic to aspartame did not have reproducible reactions.

  7. Intermediate state during the crystal transition in aspartame, studied with thermal analysis, solid-state NMR, and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Ebisawa, K; Nagashima, N; Fukuhara, K; Kumon, S; Kishimoto, S; Suzuki, E; Yoneda, S; Umeyama, H

    2000-05-01

    Aspartame (L-alpha-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) is a dipeptide sweetener about 200 times as sweet as sugar. It exists in crystal forms such as IA, IB, IIA, and IIB, which differ in crystal structure and in the degree of hydration. Among these, IIA is the most stable crystal form, and its crystal structure has been well determined (Hatada et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 107, 4279-4282 (1985)). To elucidate the structural factors of thermal stability in the IIA form of aspartame and to examine the physical process in the crystal transformation between the IIA and IIB forms, we performed a thermal analysis and solid-state NMR measurements. We found that a quasi-stable intermediate state exists in the transformation, and it has the same crystal lattice as the usual IIA form, despite the dehydration from 1/2 mol to 1/3 mol per 1 mol of aspartame. The results of the energy component analysis and the molecular dynamics simulation suggest that the entropic effect promotes the generation of the intermediate state, which is presumably caused by the evaporation of the water of crystallization and the increase of molecular motion in aspartame. Thus, the thermal stability of the IIA form is attributable to a structural property, i.e., the crystal lattice itself is retained during the above dehydration. Moreover, the molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the aspartame molecules have two kinds of conformational flexibility in the intermediate state. PMID:10823710

  8. Glucose tolerance, blood lipid, insulin and glucagon concentration after single or continuous administration of aspartame in diabetics.

    PubMed

    Okuno, G; Kawakami, F; Tako, H; Kashihara, T; Shibamoto, S; Yamazaki, T; Yamamoto, K; Saeki, M

    1986-04-01

    A nutritive sweetener, aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methylester) was administered orally to normal controls and diabetic patients in order to evaluate effects on blood glucose, lipids and pancreatic hormone secretion. An oral glucose tolerance test was also performed in the same subjects as a control study of aspartame administration. In 7 normal controls and 22 untreated diabetics, a single dose of 500 mg aspartame, equivalent to 100 g glucose in sweetness, induced no increase in blood glucose concentration. Rather, a small but significant decrease in blood glucose was noticed 2 or 3 h after administration. The decrease in blood glucose was found to be smallest in the control and became greater as the diabetes increased in severity. No significant change in blood insulin or glucagon concentration during a 3-h period was observed in either the controls or the diabetics. The second study was designed to determine the effects of 2 weeks' continuous administration of 125 mg aspartame, equal in sweetness to the mean daily consumption of sugar (20-30 g) in Japan, to 9 hospitalized diabetics with steady-state glycemic control. The glucose tolerance showed no significant change after 2 weeks' administration. Fasting, 1 h and 2 h postprandial blood glucose, blood cholesterol, triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol were also unaffected. From these and other published results, aspartame would seem to be a useful alternative nutrient sweetener for patients with diabetes mellitus.

  9. Soft drinks with aspartame: effect on subjective hunger, food selection, and food intake of young adult males.

    PubMed

    Black, R M; Tanaka, P; Leiter, L A; Anderson, G H

    1991-04-01

    Ingestion of aspartame-sweetened beverages has been reported to increase subjective measures of appetite. This study examined the effects of familiar carbonated soft drinks sweetened with aspartame on subjective hunger, energy intake and macronutrient selection at a lunch-time meal. Subjects were 20 normal weight young adult males, classified as either restrained or nonrestrained eaters. Four treatments of carbonated beverages included 280 ml of mineral water, one can of a soft drink (280 ml) consumed in either 2 or 10 minutes, or two cans of a soft drink (560 ml) consumed in 10 minutes, administered at 11:00 a.m. Subjective hunger and food appeal were measured from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and food intake data were obtained from a buffet lunch given at 12:00 noon. There were no treatment effects on energy intake, macronutrient selection or food choice at the lunch-time meal, or food appeal, though restrained eaters consumed more than nonrestrained eaters in all four treatment conditions. Consumption of two soft drinks (560 ml, 320 mg aspartame) significantly reduced subjective hunger from 11:05 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. compared to one soft drink (280 ml, 160 mg aspartame) or 280 ml of mineral water. Thus ingestion of soft drinks containing aspartame did not increase short-term subjective hunger or food intake.

  10. Intermediate state during the crystal transition in aspartame, studied with thermal analysis, solid-state NMR, and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Ebisawa, K; Nagashima, N; Fukuhara, K; Kumon, S; Kishimoto, S; Suzuki, E; Yoneda, S; Umeyama, H

    2000-05-01

    Aspartame (L-alpha-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) is a dipeptide sweetener about 200 times as sweet as sugar. It exists in crystal forms such as IA, IB, IIA, and IIB, which differ in crystal structure and in the degree of hydration. Among these, IIA is the most stable crystal form, and its crystal structure has been well determined (Hatada et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 107, 4279-4282 (1985)). To elucidate the structural factors of thermal stability in the IIA form of aspartame and to examine the physical process in the crystal transformation between the IIA and IIB forms, we performed a thermal analysis and solid-state NMR measurements. We found that a quasi-stable intermediate state exists in the transformation, and it has the same crystal lattice as the usual IIA form, despite the dehydration from 1/2 mol to 1/3 mol per 1 mol of aspartame. The results of the energy component analysis and the molecular dynamics simulation suggest that the entropic effect promotes the generation of the intermediate state, which is presumably caused by the evaporation of the water of crystallization and the increase of molecular motion in aspartame. Thus, the thermal stability of the IIA form is attributable to a structural property, i.e., the crystal lattice itself is retained during the above dehydration. Moreover, the molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the aspartame molecules have two kinds of conformational flexibility in the intermediate state.

  11. Effect of aspartame on N-methyl-D-aspartate-sensitive L-[3H]glutamate binding sites in rat brain synaptic membranes.

    PubMed

    Pan-Hou, H; Suda, Y; Ohe, Y; Sumi, M; Yoshioka, M

    1990-06-18

    Aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester), an artificial low-calorie sweetener, was shown to dose-dependently inhibit L-[3H]glutamate binding to its N-methyl-D-aspartate-specific receptors. L-Aspartic acid, a major endogenous metabolite of aspartame, inhibited the binding more stronger than aspartame, while the other metabolites, L-phenylalanine and methanol, had no effect at the same concentration. Aspartame caused a significant change in the affinities of L-[3H]glutamate binding without altering the Vmax values of the binding, suggesting the inhibition is competitive. These in vitro findings suggested that aspartame may act directly on the N-methyl-D-aspartate-sensitive glutamate recognition sites in the brain synaptic membranes.

  12. [Aspartame--the sweet-tasting dipeptide--does not affect the pancreatic insulin-secreting function].

    PubMed

    Sadovnikova, N V; Fedotov, V P; Aleshina, L V; Shvachkin, Iu P; Girin, S K

    1984-01-01

    The action of a synthetic dipeptide aspartam (150 to 180 times as sweet as glucose) on pancreatic insulin-secretory function of rats was studied in vivo and in vitro. The drug was given orally while drinking (300 mg/kg body weight) or was added to the incubation medium of cultivated pancreatic cells (20 mM). It was shown that insulin content in the rat blood serum remained unchanged 10 and 35 minutes after aspartam administration. The drug did not exert any stimulating effect upon insulin secretion following the addition to the pancreatic cell culture medium. It is concluded that aspartam exhibits no direct or mediated action on pancreatic insulin-secretory function.

  13. Lack of effect of aspartame or of L-phenylalanine on photically induced myoclonus in the baboon, Papio papio.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, B S; Nanji, N; Cornell, R G

    1989-01-01

    The effects of large doses of L-phenylalanine and of aspartame on seizure susceptibility and severity have been assessed in baboons Papio papio from Senegal which show photosensitive epileptic responses similar to primary generalised epilepsy in man. L-Phenylalanine, 50, 150 or 450 mg/kg, or aspartame, 300 or 1000 mg/kg, were administered orally. Peak plasma L-phenylalanine concentrations of approximately 2000 mumoles/l occurred 1-4 h after the highest dose of L-phenylalanine or aspartame. The plasma L-phenylalanine to large neutral amino acid ratio increased approximately 30-fold at this time. Compared with water administration there were no changes in epileptic responses 1-5 h after either treatment. In this primate model of epilepsy acute increases in plasma phenylalanine concentration are neither pro- nor anticonvulsant.

  14. Ethanol, nicotine, amphetamine, and aspartame consumption and preferences in C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice.

    PubMed

    Meliska, C J; Bartke, A; McGlacken, G; Jensen, R A

    1995-04-01

    Using a two-bottle choice paradigm, adult C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice (11 males an 10 females per strain) were given access to tapwater and an ascending series of concentrations of ethanol, nicotine, amphetamine, and th artificial sweetener, aspartame. The C57 mice consumed more ethanol, nicotine, and amphetamine, and showed greater preferences for these substances, than did the DBA/2 mice. In contrast, DBAs consumed more and showed greater preference for aspartame than C57s. However, measures of drug and aspartame consumption and preference were moderately intercorrelated when the effects of gender and strain were controlled for. This pattern of results suggests that factors modulating differences between C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice in ethanol consumption and preference also modulate differences in consumption of nicotine and amphetamine.

  15. Effect of aspartame loading on plasma and erythrocyte free amino acid concentrations in one-year-old infants.

    PubMed

    Filer, L J; Baker, G L; Stegink, L D

    1983-08-01

    Aspartame is a new dipeptide sweetener. It has been suggested that infants metabolize its constituent amino acids (aspartate and phenylalanine) less well than adults. To test this hypothesis, 24 1-year-old infants were administered 34, 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight aspartame in cherry-flavored beverage mix. Plasma amino acid concentrations and the areas under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUC) were determined and were compared with values in adults administered equivalent doses. The doses studied include the 99th percentile of projected ingestion for adults (34 mg/kg), a very high use dose (50 mg/kg body weight), and a potentially abusive dose (100 mg/kg body weight). Plasma aspartate concentrations did not change significantly (P greater than 0.05) at aspartame doses of 34 and 50 mg/kg body weight, but did increase significantly at the 100 mg/kg body weight dose. The change over base line was similar in infants and adults. Aspartame dosing significantly increased both the mean peak plasma phenylalanine concentration and the plasma phenylalanine AUC value in proportion to dose. Mean (+/- SD) peak plasma phenylalanine concentrations in infants were 9.37 +/- 1.44, 11.6 +/- 4.44 and 22.3 +/- 11.5 mumol/100 ml at aspartame doses of 34, 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight, respectively. Values in infants were similar to those noted in adults. The data do not support the suggestion that infants metabolize the amino acids of aspartame less well than adults.

  16. Comparison of aspartame- and fructose-sweetened layer cakes: importance of panels of users for evaluation of alternative sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Hess, D A; Setser, C S

    1986-07-01

    Panelists with and without known carbohydrate metabolic diseases evaluated layer cakes sweetened with aspartame, alone or in combination with low levels of fructose, for texture and flavor. Panelists used a 5-point, descriptive rating scale to evaluate flavor and texture of lemon, orange, spice, and chocolate layer cakes baked in conventional and microwave ovens. Panelists judged that aspartame alone was not suitable in layer cakes. In general, healthy panelists evaluated the cakes as sweeter, crust bitterness as greater, and overall eating quality as higher than the panel members with carbohydrate metabolic disorders. Panelists did not differ in their evaluation of textural qualities.

  17. Oral aspartame and plasma phenylalanine: pharmacokinetic difference between rodents and man, and relevance to CNS effects of phenylalanine. Short note.

    PubMed

    Fernstrom, J D

    1989-01-01

    The ingestion of aspartame, a phenylalanine-containing dipeptide, raises plasma phenylalanine levels. These increments are much greater in humans than rats, because the rat hydroxylates phenylalanine five times faster than man. Accordingly, dose comparisons of aspartame (or phenylalanine) between humans and rats have usually been corrected by a factor of five. Recently, a correction factor of sixty has been proposed (Wurtman and Maher, 1987); the rationale is based on a novel calculation of competitive phenylalanine transport into brain. An analysis of the logic behind this postulation reveals there to be no basis for accepting the higher dose conversion of 60 between rat and man.

  18. The protective effect of N-acetylcysteine on oxidative stress in the brain caused by the long-term intake of aspartame by rats.

    PubMed

    Finamor, Isabela A; Ourique, Giovana M; Pês, Tanise S; Saccol, Etiane M H; Bressan, Caroline A; Scheid, Taína; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Llesuy, Susana F; Partata, Wânia A; Pavanato, Maria A

    2014-09-01

    Long-term intake of aspartame at the acceptable daily dose causes oxidative stress in rodent brain mainly due to the dysregulation of glutathione (GSH) homeostasis. N-Acetylcysteine provides the cysteine that is required for the production of GSH, being effective in treating disorders associated with oxidative stress. We investigated the effects of N-acetylcysteine treatment (150 mg kg(-1), i.p.) on oxidative stress biomarkers in rat brain after chronic aspartame administration by gavage (40 mg kg(-1)). N-Acetylcysteine led to a reduction in the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid hydroperoxides, and carbonyl protein levels, which were increased due to aspartame administration. N-Acetylcysteine also resulted in an elevation of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase activities, as well as non-protein thiols, and total reactive antioxidant potential levels, which were decreased after aspartame exposure. However, N-acetylcysteine was unable to reduce serum glucose levels, which were increased as a result of aspartame administration. Furthermore, catalase and glutathione S-transferase, whose activities were reduced due to aspartame treatment, remained decreased even after N-acetylcysteine exposure. In conclusion, N-acetylcysteine treatment may exert a protective effect against the oxidative damage in the brain, which was caused by the long-term consumption of the acceptable daily dose of aspartame by rats.

  19. The effect of aspartame as part of a multidisciplinary weight-control program on short- and long-term control of body weight.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, G L; Kanders, B S; Lavin, P T; Keller, S D; Whatley, J

    1997-02-01

    This study investigated whether the addition of the high-intensity sweetener aspartame to a multidisciplinary weight-control program would improve weight loss and long-term control of body weight. One hundred sixty-three obese women were randomly assigned to consume or to abstain from aspartame-sweetened foods and beverages during 16 wk of a 19-wk weight-reduction program (active weight loss), a 1-y maintenance program, and a 2-y follow-up period. Women in both treatment groups lost approximately 10% of initial body weight (10 kg) during active weight loss. Among women assigned to the aspartame-treatment group, aspartame intake was positively correlated with percentage weight loss during active weight loss (r = 0.32, P < 0.01). During maintenance and follow-up, participants in the aspartame group experienced a 2.6% (2.6 kg) and 4.6% (4.6 kg) regain of initial body weight after 71 and 175 wk, respectively, whereas those in the no-aspartame group gained an average of 5.4% (5.4 kg) and 9.4% (9.4 kg), respectively. The aspartame group lost significantly more weight overall (P = 0.028) and regained significantly less weight during maintenance and follow-up (P = 0.046) than did the no-aspartame group. Percentage weight losses at 71 and 175 wk were also positively correlated with exercise (r = 0.32, P < 0.001; and r = 0.34, P < 0.01, respectively) and self-reported eating control (r = 0.37, P < 0.001; and r = 0.33, P < 0.01, respectively). These data suggest that participation in a multidisciplinary weight-control program that includes aspartame may facilitate the long-term maintenance of reduced body weight.

  20. Interaction of a copper (II) complex containing an artificial sweetener (aspartame) with calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kashanian, Soheila; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh

    2014-01-01

    A copper (II) complex containing aspartame (APM) as ligand, Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O, was synthesized and characterized. In vitro binding interaction of this complex with native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was studied at physiological pH. The interaction was studied using different methods: spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, competition experiment, circular dichroism (CD) and viscosimetric techniques. Hyperchromicity was observed in UV absorption band of Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of DNA to Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O was observed and the binding constants (Kf) and corresponding numbers of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) were calculated to be+89.3 kJ mol(-1) and+379.3 J mol(-1) K(-1) according to Van't Hoff equation which indicated that reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Experimental results from spectroscopic methods were comparable and further supported by viscosity measurements. We suggest that Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O interacts with calf thymus DNA via a groove interaction mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 8×10+4 M(-1). Binding of this copper complex to DNA was found to be stronger compared to aspartame which was studied recently.

  1. Enhancement of the aspartame precursor synthetic activity of an organic solvent-stable protease.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hiroyasu; Tsuchiyama, Shotaro; Yasuda, Masahiro; Doukyu, Noriyuki

    2010-03-01

    The PST-01 protease is highly stable and catalyzes the synthesis of the aspartame precursor with high reaction yields in the presence of organic solvents. However, the synthesis rate using the PST-01 protease was slower than that observed when thermolysin was used. Structural comparison of both enzymes showed particular amino acid differences near the active center. These few residue differences in the PST-01 protease were mutated to match those amino acid types found in thermolysin. The mutated PST-01 proteases at the 114th residue from tyrosine to phenylalanine showed enhancement of synthetic activity. This activity was found to be similar to thermolysin. In addition, mutating the residue in the PST-01 protease with arginine and serine showed more improvement of the activity. The mutant PST-01 protease should be more useful than thermolysin for the synthesis of the aspartame precursor, because this enzyme has higher stability and activity in the presence of organic solvents. The results show the potential of organic solvent-stable enzymes as industrial catalysts.

  2. Phenylalanine and aspartame fail to alter feeding behavior, mood and arousal in men.

    PubMed

    Ryan-Harshman, M; Leiter, L A; Anderson, G H

    1987-01-01

    Two experiments were designed to investigate the neurobehavioral effects of phenylalanine (PHE; 0.84, 2.52, 5.04, and 10.08 g) and aspartame (APM; 5.04 and 10.08 g) on energy and macronutrient selection and on subjective feelings of hunger, mood and arousal in normal weight adult males. Neither phenylalanine nor aspartame altered mean energy intakes or macronutrient selection at a lunch begun 60 to 105 min after the amino acids were consumed. During this time, increased (p less than 0.05) visual analog scale (VAS) scores for emptiness, rumbling, weakness, degree of hunger and urge to eat were found in both experiments, but no treatment effects or interactions were seen for any variable in either experiment. Plasma PHE levels and ratios to other large neutral amino acids (NAA) rose significantly (p less than 0.05) after all treatments except 0.84 g PHE; plasma tyrosine (TYR) levels increased (p less than 0.05) only when greater than or equal to 2.52 g PHE was given. TYR/NAA ratios were higher (p less than 0.05) after 2.52 and 5.04 g PHE, and 10.08 g APM. No relationships were found between food intake and plasma amino acid levels. We conclude that, in normal weight men, PHE and APM, in doses up to 10 g, do not affect short-term energy and macronutrient intakes, or subjective feelings of hunger, mood and arousal.

  3. Neurobiochemical alterations induced by the artificial sweetener aspartame (NutraSweet).

    PubMed

    Coulombe, R A; Sharma, R P

    1986-03-30

    The dipeptide aspartame (NutraSweet) is a newly approved and widely used artificial sweetener in foods and beverages. Consumption of aspartame (ASM) has been reported to be responsible for neurologic and behavioral disturbances in sensitive individuals. Unfasted male CD-1 mice were dosed orally with 13, 130, or 650 mg/kg ASM in corn oil, while control animals received corn oil alone. Three hours after dosing, the animals were killed, and the concentrations of the catecholamines norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA), catecholamine metabolites 3-methoxy-4-hydroxymandelic acid (VMA), homovanillic acid (HVA), and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), the indoleamine serotonin (5-HT), and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were determined by electrochemical high-performance liquid chromatography in six brain regions. ASM exerted its primary effect on adrenergic neurotransmitters in various brain regions. In the hypothalamus, the region richest in NE, increases in NE concentrations of 12, 49, and 47% were found in the low, medium, and high dose groups, respectively, relative to control. Significant increases of NE in the medulla oblongata and corpus striatum were also observed. Increases of the catecholamine DA and catecholamine metabolites VMA, HVA, and DOPAC were seen in various regions. The indoleamine serotonin and its metabolite 5-HIAA were unaffected by ASM treatment. These findings are consistent with ASM-induced increases in the brain catecholamine precursor amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine, as reported earlier. Such observed alterations in brain neurotransmitter concentrations may be responsible for the reported clinical and behavioral effects associated with ASM ingestion.

  4. Determination of Aspartame and Caffeine in Carbonated Beverages Utilizing Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergen, H. Robert, III; Benson, Linda M.; Naylor, Stephen

    2000-10-01

    Mass spectrometry has undergone considerable changes in the past decade. The advent of "soft ionization" techniques such as electrospray ionization (ESI) affords the direct analysis of very polar molecules without need for the complex inefficient derivatization procedures often required in GC-MS. These ionization techniques make possible the direct mass spectral analysis of polar nonvolatile molecules such as DNA and proteins, which previously were difficult or impossible to analyze by MS. Compounds that readily take on a charge (acids and bases) lend themselves to ESI-MS analysis, whereas compounds that do not readily accept a charge (e.g. sugars) are often not seen or are seen only as inefficient adducts (e.g., M+Na+). To gain exposure to this state-of-the-art analytical procedure, high school students utilize ESI-MS in an analysis of aspartame and caffeine. They dilute a beverage sample and inject the diluted sample into the ESI-MS. The lab is procedurally simple and the results clearly demonstrate the potential and limitations of ESI-coupled mass spectrometry. Depending upon the instructional goals, the outlined procedures can be used to quantify the content of caffeine and aspartame in beverages or to understand the capabilities of electrospray ionization.

  5. Metabolism of aspartame and its L-phenylalanine methyl ester decomposition product by the porcine gut.

    PubMed

    Burgert, S L; Andersen, D W; Stegink, L D; Takeuchi, H; Schedl, H P

    1991-06-01

    The intestinal metabolism of aspartame (N-L-alpha-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester; APM) and its L-phenylalanine methyl ester (PME) decomposition product was evaluated in six young pigs. Equimolar doses (2.5 mmol/kg body weight) of APM, PME, and L-phenylalanine (PHE) administered to the proximal jejunum produced similar increases in portal blood PHE concentrations. Methanol, nondetectable in portal blood after PHE ingestion, increased markedly after administration of either APM or PME. Portal blood aspartate concentrations were unchanged after PME and PHE administration, but increased significantly after APM administration. Increases in portal blood PHE concentrations were significantly greater than were increases in aspartate concentrations following APM administration. Neither APM, PME, nor aspartyl-phenylalanine (AspPhe) were detected in portal or vena caval blood following administration of any test compound. Steady-state perfusion of the small intestine with APM showed a net intraluminal appearance rate of AspPhe at 36% of the disappearance rate of APM. During steady-state PME perfusion, PHE had a significantly greater net appearance rate than during APM perfusion. Methanol appearance rates were slightly, but not significantly, higher during PME than during APM perfusions. The data suggest that (1) APM is hydrolyzed to AspPhe and both APM and PME are hydrolyzed to their constituent amino acids and and methanol prior to entering the portal circulation; (2) AspPhe is an important intraluminal intermediate in aspartame metabolism; and (3) aspartate is rapidly metabolized by the enterocyte.

  6. Evaluation of an aspartame loading test for the detection of heterozygotes for classical phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Silva, L C; Pires, R F; Coelho, J C; Jardim, L B; Giugliani, R

    1997-04-01

    Classical phenylketonuria (PKU) is an inborn error of metabolism of autosomal recessive inheritance characterized by the accumulation of phenylalanine (Phe) in tissues due to Phe-4-hydroxylase deficiency. Several methods have been developed for the detection of PKU heterozygotes based on the determination of plasma Phe and tyrosine (Tyr) levels, on the analysis of the Phe/Tyr and Phe2/Tyr ratios and on the use of discriminant functions. The objective of the present study was to test the value of loading with aspartame (a sweetener consisting of Phe, aspartate and methanol) for the identification of PKU carriers. The study was conducted on 22 obligate heterozygotes and 27 controls. Two blood samples were collected (under fasting conditions and 30 min after the loading) for fluorometric determination of Phe and Tyr. Phe, Phe/Tyr and Phe2/Tyr values were higher in heterozygotes, whereas Tyr was higher in controls in both situations investigated. Linear discriminant function was considered to be the best parameter for differentiation of the individuals in the two groups. Under the conditions employed in the present study, aspartame loading did not show any advantages in discriminating between PKU carriers and normal individuals when compared to the same analysis performed under fasting conditions.

  7. Aspartame-stabilized gold-silver bimetallic biocompatible nanostructures with plasmonic photothermal properties, antibacterial activity, and long-term stability.

    PubMed

    Fasciani, Chiara; Silvero, M Jazmin; Anghel, Maria Alexandra; Argüello, Gerardo A; Becerra, Maria Cecilia; Scaiano, Juan C

    2014-12-17

    Gold-silver core-shell nanoparticles stabilized with a common sweetener, aspartame (AuNP@Ag@Asm), combine the antimicrobial properties of silver with the photoinduced plasmon-mediated photothermal effects of gold. The particles were tested with several bacterial strains, while biocompatibility was verified with human dermal fibroblasts. PMID:25487127

  8. Saccharin and aspartame, compared with sucrose, induce greater weight gain in adult Wistar rats, at similar total caloric intake levels.

    PubMed

    Feijó, Fernanda de Matos; Ballard, Cíntia Reis; Foletto, Kelly Carraro; Batista, Bruna Aparecida Melo; Neves, Alice Magagnin; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia Marques; Bertoluci, Marcello Casaccia

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the use of nonnutritive sweeteners (NNSs) can lead to weight gain, but evidence regarding their real effect in body weight and satiety is still inconclusive. Using a rat model, the present study compares the effect of saccharin and aspartame to sucrose in body weight gain and in caloric intake. Twenty-nine male Wistar rats received plain yogurt sweetened with 20% sucrose, 0.3% sodium saccharin or 0.4% aspartame, in addition to chow and water ad libitum, while physical activity was restrained. Measurements of cumulative body weight gain, total caloric intake, caloric intake of chow and caloric intake of sweetened yogurt were performed weekly for 12 weeks. Results showed that addition of either saccharin or aspartame to yogurt resulted in increased weight gain compared to addition of sucrose, however total caloric intake was similar among groups. In conclusion, greater weight gain was promoted by the use of saccharin or aspartame, compared with sucrose, and this weight gain was unrelated to caloric intake. We speculate that a decrease in energy expenditure or increase in fluid retention might be involved.

  9. Aspartame-stabilized gold-silver bimetallic biocompatible nanostructures with plasmonic photothermal properties, antibacterial activity, and long-term stability.

    PubMed

    Fasciani, Chiara; Silvero, M Jazmin; Anghel, Maria Alexandra; Argüello, Gerardo A; Becerra, Maria Cecilia; Scaiano, Juan C

    2014-12-17

    Gold-silver core-shell nanoparticles stabilized with a common sweetener, aspartame (AuNP@Ag@Asm), combine the antimicrobial properties of silver with the photoinduced plasmon-mediated photothermal effects of gold. The particles were tested with several bacterial strains, while biocompatibility was verified with human dermal fibroblasts.

  10. Effect of aspartame plus monosodium L-glutamate ingestion on plasma and erythrocyte amino acid levels in normal adult subjects fed a high protein meal.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1982-12-01

    It has been suggested that aspartame addition to meals already containing large amounts of monosodium L-glutamate would result in an early rapid rise in plasma glutamate and/or aspartate concentrations and increase the potential for dicarboxylic amino acid-induced toxicity. Six normal adult subjects were fed hamburger and milk shake meals providing protein at 1 g/kg body weight in a randomized cross-over design. One meal had no additions while the other contained added monosodium L-glutamate and aspartame (each present at 34 mg/kg body weight). The addition of aspartame plus glutamate had little effect on either plasma or erythrocyte concentrations of glutamate or aspartate beyond those arising from the meal itself. Plasma phenylalanine concentrations were significantly higher (p less than 0.05, paired t test) after ingestion of meals containing aspartame plus glutamate reflecting the increased phenylalanine load.

  11. Reduction of the ochratoxin A-induced cytotoxicity in Vero cells by aspartame.

    PubMed

    Baudrimont, I; Betbeder, A M; Creppy, E E

    1997-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus ochraceus as well as other moulds. This mycotoxin contaminates animal feed and human food and is nephrotoxic for all animal species studied so far. OTA is immunosuppressive, genotoxic, teratogenic and carcinogenic. Recently lipid peroxidation induced by OTA has been reported. OTA, a structural analogue of phenylalanine, inhibits protein synthesis by competition with phenylalanine in the phenylalanine-tRNA aminoacylation reaction, constituting the main mechanism of OTA-induced cytotoxicity. Since it seems impossible to avoid contamination of foodstuffs by toxigenic fungi, investigation is required for preventing the toxicity of OTA. An attempt to prevent its toxic effect, mainly the inhibition of protein synthesis, has been made using aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) a structural analogue of both OTA and phenylalanine. Protein synthesis was assayed in monkey kidney cells (Vero cells) treated by increasing concentrations of OTA (10-100 microM). After 24 h incubation, protein synthesis was inhibited by OTA in a concentration dependent manner (the 50% inhibitory concentration, IC50, was c. 14.5 microM). Aspartame (A19), at tenfold higher concentrations than OTA (100-1000 microM), was found to partially protect against the OTA-induced inhibition of protein synthesis in Vero cells, and more efficiently when added 24 h prior to the toxin (IC50 34 microM) than together (IC50 22 microM). As expected A19(250 microM) prevented the OTA-induced leakage of certain enzymes, including lactate dehydrogenase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, alkaline phosphatase, into the culture medium, and the concomitant decrease of their intracellular activity in OTA (25 microM)-treated cells. In order to investigate the effect of aspartame (A19) on OTA-protein binding as explanation of the above results, the mycotoxin time- and concentration-dependent binding to human samples was studied in static diffusion cells with two

  12. Electrochemical study of the complexes of aspartame with Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) ions in the aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Semiha; Coskun, Emine; Biçer, Ender; Cakir, Osman

    2003-05-23

    The voltammetric behaviours of aspartame in the presence of some metal ions (Cu(II), Ni(II), Zn(II)) were investigated. In the presence of aspartame, copper ions reduced at two stages with quasi-reversible one-electron and, with increasing the aspartame (L) concentration, Cu(II)L(2) complex reduces at one-stage with irreversible two-electron reaction (-0.322 V). Zn(II)-aspartame complex (logbeta=3.70) was recognized by a cathodic peak at -1.320 V. Ni(II)-aspartame complex (logbeta=6.52) is reduced at the more positive potential (-0.87 V) than that of the hydrated Ni(II) ions (-1.088 V). In the case of the reduction of Ni(II) ions, aspartame serves as a catalyst. From electronic spectra data of the complexes, their stoichiometries of 1:2 (metal-ligand) in aqueous medium are determined. The greatness of these logarithmic values is agreement with Irwing-Williams series (NiZn). PMID:12747864

  13. Aspartame-fed zebrafish exhibit acute deaths with swimming defects and saccharin-fed zebrafish have elevation of cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity in hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Yong; Seo, Juyi; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2011-11-01

    Although many artificial sweeteners (AS) have safety issues, the AS have been widely used in industry. To determine the physiologic effect of AS in the presence of hyperlipidemia, zebrafish were fed aspartame or saccharin with a high-cholesterol diet (HCD). After 12 days, 30% of zebrafish, which consumed aspartame and HCD, died with exhibiting swimming defects. The aspartame group had 65% survivability, while the control and saccharin groups had 100% survivability. Under HCD, the saccharin-fed groups had the highest increase in the serum cholesterol level (599 mg/dL). Aspartame-fed group showed a remarkable increase in serum glucose (up to 125 mg/dL), which was 58% greater than the increase in the HCD alone group. The saccharin and HCD groups had the highest cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity (52% CE-transfer), while the HCD alone group had 42% CE-transfer. Histologic analysis revealed that the aspartame and HCD groups showed more infiltration of inflammatory cells in the brain and liver sections. Conclusively, under presence of hyperlipidemia, aspartame-fed zebrafish exhibited acute swimming defects with an increase in brain inflammation. Saccharin-fed zebrafish had an increased atherogenic serum lipid profile with elevation of CETP activity.

  14. Electrochemical study of the complexes of aspartame with Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) ions in the aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Semiha; Coskun, Emine; Biçer, Ender; Cakir, Osman

    2003-05-23

    The voltammetric behaviours of aspartame in the presence of some metal ions (Cu(II), Ni(II), Zn(II)) were investigated. In the presence of aspartame, copper ions reduced at two stages with quasi-reversible one-electron and, with increasing the aspartame (L) concentration, Cu(II)L(2) complex reduces at one-stage with irreversible two-electron reaction (-0.322 V). Zn(II)-aspartame complex (logbeta=3.70) was recognized by a cathodic peak at -1.320 V. Ni(II)-aspartame complex (logbeta=6.52) is reduced at the more positive potential (-0.87 V) than that of the hydrated Ni(II) ions (-1.088 V). In the case of the reduction of Ni(II) ions, aspartame serves as a catalyst. From electronic spectra data of the complexes, their stoichiometries of 1:2 (metal-ligand) in aqueous medium are determined. The greatness of these logarithmic values is agreement with Irwing-Williams series (NiZn).

  15. Effects of aspartame and carbohydrate administration on human and rat plasma large neutral amino acid levels and rat brain amino acid and monoamine levels.

    PubMed

    Romano, M; Casacci, F; De Marchi, F; Pacei, T; Esteve, A; Lomuscio, G; Mennini, T; Salmona, M

    1989-01-01

    Thirty fasted human volunteers were given 0.83 and 8.3 mg aspartame/kg body weight alone, as part of a basal low carbohydrate meal (648 kcal, 10% carbohydrate) or as part of a high energy carbohydrate-rich meal (1290 kcal, 34% carbohydrate). Amino acid concentrations in plasma were determined before and 30, 60 and 180 min after the consumption of aspartame. Under these conditions, which mimic realistic aspartame consumption, aspartame had no significant effect on plasma concentration of any amino acid. In addition, the effect of aspartame alone or with carbohydrates on plasma and brain amino acid levels was studied in rats after acute or subacute (14 d) oral treatment. In subacute dosing experiments aspartame was included in the diet. Brain monoamine concentrations were also measured in the same animals. Plasma concentrations of large neutral amino acids were modified under acute conditions. In contrast, after subacute treatment no significant differences in plasma or brain amino acid concentrations or in brain monoamine concentrations were observed.

  16. Effects of intense sweeteners on hunger, food intake, and body weight: a review.

    PubMed

    Rolls, B J

    1991-04-01

    The sweet taste of aspartame, saccharin, and acesulfame-K has been reported to increase ratings of hunger and, after saccharin consumption, to increase food intake. However, most investigators have found that aspartame consumption is associated with decreased or unchanged ratings of hunger. Even if aspartame consumption increases ratings of hunger in some situations, it apparently has little impact on the controls of food intake and body weight. Aspartame has not been found to increase food intake; indeed, both short-term and long-term studies have shown that consumption of aspartame-sweetened foods or drinks is associated with either no change or a reduction in food intake. Preliminary clinical trials suggest that aspartame may be useful aid in a complete diet-and-exercise program or in weight maintenance. Intense sweeteners have never been found to cause weight gain in humans.

  17. Spherulitic crystallization of aspartame from aqueous solution in a two-dimensional cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Tetsushi; Kubota, Noriaki; Abe, Sou; Kishimoto, Shin'ichi; Kumon, Satoshi; Naruse, Masayoshi

    1993-10-01

    An artificial sweetener, aspartame (α-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl aster) was crystallized as spherulites in the order of magnitude of centimeters in radius. With increasing relative supersaturation σ, the number of nucleation sites increased, but the radius of the largest spherulite in the cell decreased. The growth rate G of the spherulite was 1-2 mm/min and is given as a function of σ by the experimental equation: G= 8.45 x 10 -2 σ 1.95. Individual fiber crystals of the spherulite grew slowly in the diameter direction until a critical diameter (10 μm or so) was attained. Longitudinally, however, they grew fast. They repeatedly split and branched during growth, spreading radially to form spherulites.

  18. Dynamic response characteristics of the potentiometric carbon dioxide sensor for the determination of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Nikolelis, D P; Krull, U J

    1990-07-01

    The dynamic response characteristics of a carbon dioxide gas sensor were studied to determine the potential for application of the device to the kinetic assay of substrate(s) under pseudo first-order kinetics. The dependence of the time constant on the concentration of carbon dioxide was determined by using convolution mathematics to analyse potentiometric changes caused by abrupt alterations of gas concentration. The operational conditions of the CO2 sensor were optimised for the development of enzyme electrodes, so that the mass-transport phenomena occurring during the course of the enzymic reactions were enhanced. As a result, the kinetic analysis of substrate(s) was performed more rapidly (2-6 min), with greater sensitivity and with an improved detection limit (10-5 M). A kinetic reaction-rate method for the determination of aspartame in dietary foodstuffs is proposed as a rapid and inexpensive alternative to a classical high-performance liquid chromatographic method.

  19. The biological properties of aspartame. IV. Effects on reproduction and lactation.

    PubMed

    Lennon, H D; Metcalf, L E; Mares, S E; Smith, J H; Nutting, E F; Saunders, F J

    1980-01-01

    Intragastric administration of approximately 300 mg/kg/day of aspartame (APM) to female rats for seven days and to female hamsters for five days after mating did not affect postcoital fertility as measured by the number of implantation sites and normal appearing fetuses. In additional studies, the effect of APM fed at 1 to 14% in the diet to lactating rats and their litters of suckling young was studied using a pair-feeding experimental design. Levels of APM up to 4% in the diet (about 7 g/kg/day) did not affect food consumption, body weights, serum prolactin, serum gonadotropins, the mammary gland histology of the dams or the growth and survival rates of their pups. However, higher levels of 7.5 and 14% APM (about 9 g/kg/day) caused reduced food consumption due to diet palatability and resulted in body weight loss in dams and retarded growth rates in the young.

  20. Long-term continuous synthesis of aspartame precursor in a column reactor with an immobilized thermolysin.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, K; Takeuchi, A; Matsuno, R

    1990-03-01

    N-(Benzyloxycarbonyl)-L-asparty-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, the precursor of the synthetic sweetener aspartame, was continuously synthesized in an immobilized thermolysin plug-flow type reactor at 25 degrees C with the substrates (N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-aspartic acid and L-phenylalanine methyl ester) dissolved in ethyl acetate. The immobilized enzyme was quite stable in ethyl acetate containing 2.5% 0.01 M 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulphonic acid-NaOH buffer, pH 6.0, and 20 mM CaCl2 with or without the substrate at 25 degrees C. By periodically washing the column, we could conduct a continuous reaction for over 500 h with an average yield of 95% and a space velocity of 1.85 h-1.

  1. Synthesis of aspartame precursor with an immobilized thermolysin in mixed organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, M; Tanaka, T; Sakiyama, T; Nakanishi, K

    1995-06-20

    N-(benzyloxycarbonyl)-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, a precursor of the synthetic sweetener, aspartame, was synthesized from N-(benzyloxycarbonyl)-L-aspartic acid and L-phenylalanine methyl ester with an immobilized thermolysin (EC 3.4.24.4) in the mixed organic solvent system of tert-amyl alcohol and ethyl acetate. A mixed solvent consisting of tert-amyl alcohol and ethyl acetate at a ratio of 33:67 (v/v) was found to be the most suitable with respect to synthetic rate and stability of the immobilized enzyme. The reaction continued to proceed quite successfully in a column reactor at 40 degrees C and at a space velocity of 3.6 h(-1) with a yield of 99%, using 40 mM Z-Asp and 200 mM PheOMe dissolved in the mixed solvent as the substrate. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Comparison of the effects of aspartame and sucrose on appetite and food intake.

    PubMed

    Rolls, B J; Hetherington, M; Laster, L J

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the effects of consumption of foods sweetened with either sucrose or aspartame on appetite ratings and food intake. Normal weight, non-dieting subjects ate the same amount of high- and low-calorie versions of pudding or jello and despite the resulting difference in caloric intake, showed only a non-significant trend towards compensation in a lunch one or two hours later. There were no significant differences between rated hunger, fullness, desire to eat, the amount subjects wanted to eat, or sensory-specific satiety following the high- and low-calorie foods. Knowing the caloric values of the foods did not influence intake or appetite ratings in that both informed and uninformed subjects responded similarly. Thus in the short term subjects tended to eat a constant amount of a particular food and this volume had a greater effect on appetite ratings and subsequent intake than the calories consumed.

  3. Plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetics of phenylalanine in rats and mice administered aspartame.

    PubMed

    Hjelle, J J; Dudley, R E; Marietta, M P; Sanders, P G; Dickie, B C; Brisson, J; Kotsonis, F N

    1992-01-01

    Aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) is an esterified, dipeptide sweetener that is rapidly and completely metabolized in the gastrointestinal tract to phenylalanine, aspartic acid and methanol. The pharmacokinetics of phenylalanine (PHE) and tyrosine (TYR) were examined following the administration of oral doses of aspartame (APM) to fasted male Sprague-Dawley rats (0, 50, 100, 200, 500 and 1,000 mg/kg) and CD-1 mice (0, 100, 200, 500, 1,000 and 2,000 mg/kg). Peak plasma PHE/large neutral amino acid (LNAA) ratios were calculated. Maximal plasma PHE and TYR concentrations were observed within 1 h after dosing and returned to baseline within 4-8 h in both species regardless of the dose of APM. Mean PHE Cmaxs ranged from 73.6 to 1,161 nmol/ml in the rat, and from 78.6 to 1,967 nmol/ml in the mouse. TYR Cmaxs ranged from 91.6 to 502 nmol/ml and from 89.2 to 792 nmol/ml in the rat and mouse, respectively. AUCs and Cmaxs were linear with dose in both species. Peak plasma PHE/LNAA ratios ranged from 0.112 to 1.117 in rats and from 0.121 to 1.769 in mice. Comparison of these ratios with those observed previously in humans indicates that rodents require a 2-6 times higher dose of APM than humans to produce similar increases in plasma PHE/LNAA ratios.

  4. Low-calorie sweeteners in food and food supplements on the Italian market.

    PubMed

    Janvier, Steven; Goscinny, Séverine; Le Donne, Cinzia; Van Loco, Joris

    2015-01-01

    This study determines the occurrence and concentration levels of artificial low-calorie sweeteners (LCSs) in food and food supplements on the Italian market. The analysed sample set (290 samples) was representative of the Italian market and comprised of beverages, jams, ketchups, confectionery, dairy products, table-top sweeteners and food supplements. All samples were analysed via UPLC-MS/MS. The method was in-house validated for the analysis of seven LCSs (aspartame, acesulfame-K, saccharin, sucralose, cyclamate, neotame and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone) in food and for five LCSs (aspartame, acesulfame-K, saccharin, cyclamate and sucralose) in food supplements. Except for cyclamate in one beverage which exceeded the maximum level (ML) with 13%, all concentrations measured in food were around or below the ML. In food supplements, 40 of the 52 samples (77%) were found to be above the ML, with exceedances of up to 200% of the ML. PMID:26406785

  5. Low-calorie sweeteners in food and food supplements on the Italian market.

    PubMed

    Janvier, Steven; Goscinny, Séverine; Le Donne, Cinzia; Van Loco, Joris

    2015-01-01

    This study determines the occurrence and concentration levels of artificial low-calorie sweeteners (LCSs) in food and food supplements on the Italian market. The analysed sample set (290 samples) was representative of the Italian market and comprised of beverages, jams, ketchups, confectionery, dairy products, table-top sweeteners and food supplements. All samples were analysed via UPLC-MS/MS. The method was in-house validated for the analysis of seven LCSs (aspartame, acesulfame-K, saccharin, sucralose, cyclamate, neotame and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone) in food and for five LCSs (aspartame, acesulfame-K, saccharin, cyclamate and sucralose) in food supplements. Except for cyclamate in one beverage which exceeded the maximum level (ML) with 13%, all concentrations measured in food were around or below the ML. In food supplements, 40 of the 52 samples (77%) were found to be above the ML, with exceedances of up to 200% of the ML.

  6. Synthesis, characterization and antimycobacterial activity of Ag(I)-aspartame, Ag(I)-saccharin and Ag(I)-cyclamate complexes.

    PubMed

    Cavicchioli, Maurício; Leite, Clarice Q F; Sato, Daisy N; Massabni, Antonio C

    2007-10-01

    The present work describes the synthesis and antimycobacterial activity of three Ag(I)-complexes with the sweeteners aspartame, saccharin, and cyclamate as ligands, with the aim of finding new candidate substances for fighting tuberculosis and other mycobacterial infections. The minimal inhibitory concentration of these three complexes was investigated in order to determine their in-vitro antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, Mycobacterium malmoense, and Mycobacterium kansasii. The MIC values were determined using the Microplate Alamar Blue Assay. The best MIC values found for the complexes were 9.75 microM for Ag(I)-aspartame against M. kansasii and 15.7 microM for Ag(I)-cyclamate against M. tuberculosis.

  7. Comparing the effects of aspartame and sucrose on motivational ratings, taste preferences, and energy intakes in humans.

    PubMed

    Drewnowski, A; Massien, C; Louis-Sylvestre, J; Fricker, J; Chapelot, D; Apfelbaum, M

    1994-02-01

    This study compared the effects of four breakfast preloads on motivational ratings, taste preferences, and energy intakes of 24 normal-weight nondieting young men and women. The preloads, composed of creamy white cheese (fromage blanc), were either plain or sweetened with aspartame or sucrose. Their energy value was either 1255 or 2929 kJ (300 or 700 kcal). Taste preferences were measured before and 150 min after breakfast. Motivational ratings were obtained at 30-min intervals. The subjects ate lunch, snack, and dinner meals in the laboratory. The consumption of low-energy as opposed to high-energy breakfasts, regardless of sweetness, led to elevated motivational ratings and increased energy intakes at lunch. However, intakes at subsequent meals were the same for all preloads, and no overall compensation in energy was observed. Aspartame did not promote hunger or lead to increased energy intakes in normal-weight subjects.

  8. Effects of repeated doses of aspartame on serotonin and its metabolite in various regions of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R P; Coulombe, R A

    1987-08-01

    Following a finding that single doses (approximating to average intakes and to potential 'over-use') of aspartame administered orally to mice caused significant increases in norepinephrine and dopamine concentrations in various brain regions, the effect of repeated exposure to aspartame was studied. Male CD-1 mice were given a daily oral dose of 0, 13, 133 or 650 mg/kg for 30 days and 1 day after the last dose the animals were decapitated and their brain regions were quickly isolated. Analyses of the different regions for catecholamine and indoleamine neurotransmitters and their major metabolites indicated that the increases in adrenergic chemicals observed shortly after a single exposure were not apparent after repeated dosing. In contrast, concentrations of serotonin and its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, were decreased in several regions. An increased supply of phenylalanine may be responsible for a decrease in tryptophan uptake by the brain tissue or for a depression in tryptophan conversion to serotonin.

  9. Flow-through spectrophotometric sensor for the determination of aspartame in low-calorie and dietary products.

    PubMed

    Capitán-Vallvey, L F; Valencia, M C; Nicolás, E Arana

    2004-10-01

    A very simple flow-through sensor is presented for the determination of the intense sweetener aspartame in low-calorie and dietary products. The sensor is implemented in a monochannel flow-injection system with UV spectrophotometric detection using a Sephadex CM-C25 cationic exchanger packed 20 mm high in a flow cell. This method is based on the transient retention of a cationic species of the sweetener on the solid phase when a pH 5.0 acetic acid sodium acetate buffer (0.01 M) is used as a carrier (2.6 mL(-1) min). The carrier itself elutes the analyte from the solid support, regenerating a sensing zone. Aspartame was determined by measuring its intrinsic absorbance at 219 nm at its residence time without any derivatization. Calibration graphs were linear over the range of 5.0 - 600.0 microg mL(-1) with an RSD of 0.55% (peak height). This sweetener was determined in several samples by measuring the height or peak area, obtaining recoveries ranging between 95 - 101% and 97.5 - 101%, respectively. The procedure was validated for its use in the determination of aspartame in low-calorie and dietary products, giving reproducible and accurate results.

  10. Effect of aspartame-derived phenylalanine on neutral amino acid uptake in human brain: a positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Koeppe, R A; Shulkin, B L; Rosenspire, K C; Shaw, L A; Betz, A L; Mangner, T; Price, J C; Agranoff, B W

    1991-05-01

    The possible effects of elevation of the plasma phenylalanine level secondary to the ingestion of aspartame on brain amino acid uptake in human subjects have been investigated by means of positron emission tomography (PET). 1-[11C]Aminocyclohexanecarboxylate [( 11C]ACHC) is a poorly metabolized synthetic amino acid that crosses the blood-brain barrier by the same carrier that transports naturally occurring large neutral amino acids. Quantitative test-retest PET studies were performed on 15 individuals. Seven received two identical baseline scans, whereas eight received a baseline scan followed by a scan performed approximately 40-45 min following ingestion of an orange-flavored beverage containing 34 mg/kg of body weight of the low-calorie sweetener aspartame, a dose equivalent to the amount in 5 L of diet soft drink consumed all at once by the study subjects, weighing an average of 76 kg. The 40-45-min interval was selected to maximize the detection of possible decreases in ACHC uptake resulting from increased competition for the carrier, because the plasma phenylalanine level is known to peak at this time. We observed an 11.5% decrease in the amino acid transport rate constant K1 and a smaller decrease in the tissue distribution volume of ACHC (6%). Under conditions of normal dietary use, aspartame is thus unlikely to cause changes in brain amino acid uptake that are measurable by PET.

  11. Caffeine intensifies taste of certain sweeteners: role of adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Diaz, C; Beeker, T G

    1986-03-01

    Caffeine, a potent antagonist of adenosine receptors, potentiates the taste of some but not all sweeteners. It significantly enhances the taste of acesulfam-K, neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, d-tryptophan, thaumatin, stevioside, and sodium saccharin. Adenosine reverses the enhancement. Caffeine has no effect on aspartame, sucrose, fructose, and calcium cyclamate. These results suggest that the inhibitory A1 adenosine receptor plays an important local role in modulating the taste intensity of certain sweeteners and that several transduction mechanisms mediate sweet taste.

  12. Dietary intake of artificial sweeteners by the Belgian population.

    PubMed

    Huvaere, Kevin; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Hasni, Moez; Vinkx, Christine; Van Loco, Joris

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether the Belgian population older than 15 years is at risk of exceeding ADI levels for acesulfame-K, saccharin, cyclamate, aspartame and sucralose through an assessment of usual dietary intake of artificial sweeteners and specific consumption of table-top sweeteners. A conservative Tier 2 approach, for which an extensive label survey was performed, showed that mean usual intake was significantly lower than the respective ADIs for all sweeteners. Even consumers with high intakes were not exposed to excessive levels, as relative intakes at the 95th percentile (p95) were 31% for acesulfame-K, 13% for aspartame, 30% for cyclamate, 17% for saccharin, and 16% for sucralose of the respective ADIs. Assessment of intake using a Tier 3 approach was preceded by optimisation and validation of an analytical method based on liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. Concentrations of sweeteners in various food matrices and table-top sweeteners were determined and mean positive concentration values were included in the Tier 3 approach, leading to relative intakes at p95 of 17% for acesulfame-K, 5% for aspartame, 25% for cyclamate, 11% for saccharin, and 7% for sucralose of the corresponding ADIs. The contribution of table-top sweeteners to the total usual intake (<1% of ADI) was negligible. A comparison of observed intake for the total population with intake for diabetics (acesulfame-K: 3.55 versus 3.75; aspartame: 6.77 versus 6.53; cyclamate: 1.97 versus 2.06; saccharine: 1.14 versus 0.97; sucralose: 3.08 versus 3.03, expressed as mg kg(-1) bodyweight day(-1) at p95) showed that the latter group was not exposed to higher levels. It was concluded that the Belgian population is not at risk of exceeding the established ADIs for sweeteners.

  13. Simultaneous determination of some artificial sweeteners in ternary formulations by FT-IR and EI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosa, Nicoleta; Moldovan, Zaharie; Bratu, Ioan

    2012-02-01

    Artificial sweeteners are widely used in food, beverage and pharmaceutical industries all over the world. In this study some non-nutritive sweeteners such as aspartame, acesulfame-K, sodium cyclamate and sodium saccharin were simultaneously determined in ternary mixtures using FT-IR and EI-MS measurements. FT-IR method is based on direct measurements of the peak height values and area centered on 1736 cm-1, 836 cm-1, 2854 cm-1 and 1050 cm-1 for aspartame, acesulfame-K, sodium cyclamate and sodium saccharin, respectively. Mass spectrometry determinations show the characteristic peaks at m/z 91 and 262 for aspartame,m/z 43 and 163 acesulfame-K,m/z 83 and 97 for sodium cyclamate andm/z 104 and 183 for sodium saccharin. The results obtained by EI-MS in different formulations are in agreement with the FT-IR ones and provide also essential data concerning the purity grade of the components. It is concluded that FT-IR and EI-MS procedures developed in this work represent a fast, sensitive and low cost alternative in the quality control of such sweeteners in different ternary formulations.

  14. Risk assessment of additives through soft drinks and nectars consumption on Portuguese population: a 2010 survey.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Janina S G; Silva, Liliana S O; Pena, Angelina; Lino, Celeste M

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated whether the Portuguese population is at risk of exceeding ADI levels for acesulfame-K, saccharin, aspartame, caffeine, benzoic and sorbic acid through an assessment of dietary intake of additives and specific consumption of four types of beverages, traditional soft drinks and soft drinks based on mineral waters, energetic drinks, and nectars. The highest mean levels of additives were found for caffeine in energetic drinks, 293.5mg/L, for saccharin in traditional soft drinks, 18.4 mg/L, for acesulfame-K and aspartame in nectars, with 88.2 and 97.8 mg/L, respectively, for benzoic acid in traditional soft drinks, 125.7 mg/L, and for sorbic acid in soft drinks based on mineral water, 166.5 mg/L. Traditional soft drinks presented the highest acceptable daily intake percentages (ADIs%) for acesulfame-K, aspartame, benzoic and sorbic acid and similar value for saccharin (0.5%) when compared with soft drinks based on mineral water, 0.7%, 0.08%, 7.3%, and 1.92% versus 0.2%, 0.053%, 0.6%, and 0.28%, respectively. However for saccharin the highest percentage of ADI was obtained for nectars, 0.9%, in comparison with both types of soft drinks, 0.5%. Therefore, it is concluded that the Portuguese population is not at risk of exceeding the established ADIs for the studied additives.

  15. Sweetener/sweetness-induced changes in flavor perception and flavor release of fruity and green character in beverages.

    PubMed

    King, Bonnie M; Arents, Paul; Bouter, N; Duineveld, C A A; Meyners, M; Schroff, S I; Soekhai, S T

    2006-04-01

    Green leaf volatile (GLV) mixtures, commercial orange flavors, and commercial strawberry flavors were applied to beverage bases in which concentrations of citric acid as well as a sweetener (sucrose or aspartame/acesulfame-K) were varied. Sensory profiling showed that flavor-specific fruity character increased as perceptible sweetness increased, independent of whether the sweetness resulted from sucrose (a change from 9 to 12 Brix) or aspartame/acesulfame-K (a change from 0.2 to 0.4 Brix). Sweetness was affected only by the tastants in the base and not by the flavors, although flavor-specific interactions between sweetener type and sweetener level occurred. Flavor release from the sucrose bases was compared to flavor release from bases containing aspartame/acesulfame-K by static headspace measurements and by MS-Nose measurements using an artificial throat. These measurements showed greater flavor volatility from bases having low Brix (fewer soluble solids). This negative Brix effect was also evident in the sensory data for perception of some GLV green notes. The headspace data could not support a positive Brix effect, the typical salting out, which would correspond to the observed perceptual enhancement of fruity notes.

  16. Determination of nine high-intensity sweeteners in various foods by high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Zygler, Agata; Wasik, Andrzej; Kot-Wasik, Agata; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2011-06-01

    An analytical procedure involving solid-phase extraction (SPE) and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry has been developed for the determination of nine high-intensity sweeteners authorised in the EU; acesulfame-K (ACS-K), aspartame (ASP), alitame (ALI), cyclamate (CYC), dulcin (DUL), neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC), neotame (NEO), saccharin (SAC) and sucralose (SCL) in a variety of food samples (i.e. beverages, dairy and fish products). After extraction with a buffer composed of formic acid and N,N-diisopropylethylamine at pH 4.5 in ultrasonic bath, extracts were cleaned up using Strata-X 33 μm Polymeric SPE column. The analytes were separated in gradient elution mode on C(18) column and detected by mass spectrometer working with an electrospray source in negative ion mode. To confirm that analytical method is suitable for its intended use, several validation parameters, such as linearity, limits of detection and quantification, trueness and repeatibilty were evaluated. Calibration curves were linear within a studied range of concentrations (r(2) ≥ 0.999) for six investigated sweeteners (CYC, ASP, ALI, DUL, NHDC, NEO). Three compounds (ACS-K, SAC, SCL) gave non-linear response in the investigated concentration range. The method detection limits (corresponding to signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 3) were below 0.25 μg mL(-1) (μg g(-1)), whereas the method quantitation limits (corresponding to S/N ratio of 10) were below 2.5 μg mL(-1) (μg g(-1)). The recoveries at the tested concentrations (50%, 100% and 125% of maximum usable dose) for all sweeteners were in the range of 84.2 ÷ 106.7%, with relative standard deviations <10% regardless of the type of sample matrix (i.e. beverage, yoghurt, fish product) and the spiking level. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of the nine sweeteners in drinks, yoghurts and fish products. The procedure described here is simple, accurate and precise and is

  17. Metabolic and feeding behavior alterations provoked by prenatal exposure to aspartame.

    PubMed

    von Poser Toigo, E; Huffell, A P; Mota, C S; Bertolini, D; Pettenuzzo, L F; Dalmaz, C

    2015-04-01

    The use of artificial sweeteners has increased together with the epidemic growth of obesity. In addition to their widespread use in sodas, artificial sweeteners are added to nearly 6000 other products sold in the US, including baby foods, frozen dinners and even yogurts. It has been suggested that the use of nonnutritive sweeteners can lead to body weight gain and an altered metabolic profile. However, very few studies have evaluated the effects of maternal consumption of artificial non-caloric sweeteners on body weight, feeding behavior or the metabolism of offspring in adult life. In this study, we found that animals exposed to aspartame during the prenatal period presented a higher consumption of sweet foods during adulthood and a greater susceptibility to alterations in metabolic parameters, such as increased glucose, LDL and triglycerides. These effects were observed in both males and females, although they were more pronounced in males. Despite the preliminary nature of this study, and the need for further confirmation of these effects, our data suggest that the consumption of sweeteners during gestation may have deleterious long-term effects and should be used with caution. PMID:25543075

  18. Prooxidative effects of aspartame on antioxidant defense status in erythrocytes of rats.

    PubMed

    Prokic, Marko D; Paunovic, Milica G; Matic, Milos M; Djordjevic, Natasa Z; Ognjanovic, Branka I; Stajn, Andras S; Saicic, Zorica S

    2014-12-01

    Since aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, ASP) is one of the most widely used artificial sweeteners, the aim of the present study was to investigate its effects on serum glucose and lipid levels as well as its effects on oxidative/antioxidative status in erythrocytes of rats. The experiment included two groups of animals: the control group was administered with water only, while the experimental group was orally administered with ASP (40 mg/kg b.w.) daily, for a period of six weeks. When compared with the control group, the group administrated with ASP indicated higher values of serum glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides. Significantly increased concentrations of superoxide anion (O2 .-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), peroxynitrite (?N??-) and lipid peroxides (LPO) were recorded in the erythrocytes of ASP treated group in comparison to the control group. In the course of chronic ASP administration, the following was observed: the concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activity of catalase (CAT) increased. Thus, these findings suggest that long-term consumption of ASP leads to hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, as well as to oxidative stress in erythrocytes. PMID:25431414

  19. A hydro/organo/hybrid gelator: a peptide lipid with turning aspartame head groups.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Masaru; Minamikawa, Hiroyuki; Aoyagi, Masaru; Asakawa, Masumi; Shimizu, Toshimi; Kogiso, Masaki

    2013-04-01

    This work presents a novel bola-type peptide lipid which can gelate water, organic solvents, and water/organic-solvent mixtures. In its molecular structure, an amphiphilic dipeptide aspartame (L-α-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) is connected at both ends of an alkylene linker. The different morphologies in the hydrogel (helical nanotapes) and the organogel (tape-like nanostructures) were visualized by energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EF-TEM) and energy-filtering scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and the molecular arrangement was examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Possessing a hydrophilic aspartic acid group and a (relatively) hydrophobic phenylalanine methyl ester group, the dipeptide head group can turn about in response to solvent polarity. As a consequence, the solvent condition changed the molecular packing of the gelator and affected the overall supramolecular structure of the gel. It is noted that the peptide lipid gelated mixed solvents of water and organic solvents such as dichloromethane, liquid-paraffin, olive-oil, silicone-oils, and so on. The present hybrid gel can simultaneously hold hydrophilic and hydrophobic functional materials. PMID:23394806

  20. The carcinogenic effects of aspartame: The urgent need for regulatory re-evaluation.

    PubMed

    Soffritti, Morando; Padovani, Michela; Tibaldi, Eva; Falcioni, Laura; Manservisi, Fabiana; Belpoggi, Fiorella

    2014-04-01

    Aspartame (APM) is an artificial sweetener used since the 1980s, now present in >6,000 products, including over 500 pharmaceuticals. Since its discovery in 1965, and its first approval by the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) in 1981, the safety of APM, and in particular its carcinogenicity potential, has been controversial. The present commentary reviews the adequacy of the design and conduct of carcinogenicity bioassays on rodents submitted by G.D. Searle, in the 1970s, to the FDA for market approval. We also review how experimental and epidemiological data on the carcinogenic risks of APM, that became available in 2005 motivated the European Commission (EC) to call the European Food and Safety Authority (EFSA) for urgent re-examination of the available scientific documentation (including the Searle studies). The EC has further requested that, if the results of the evaluation should suggest carcinogenicity, major changes must be made to the current APM specific regulations. Taken together, the studies performed by G.D. Searle in the 1970s and other chronic bioassays do not provide adequate scientific support for APM safety. In contrast, recent results of life-span carcinogenicity bioassays on rats and mice published in peer-reviewed journals, and a prospective epidemiological study, provide consistent evidence of APM's carcinogenic potential. On the basis of the evidence of the potential carcinogenic effects of APM herein reported, a re-evaluation of the current position of international regulatory agencies must be considered an urgent matter of public health.

  1. Metabolic and feeding behavior alterations provoked by prenatal exposure to aspartame.

    PubMed

    von Poser Toigo, E; Huffell, A P; Mota, C S; Bertolini, D; Pettenuzzo, L F; Dalmaz, C

    2015-04-01

    The use of artificial sweeteners has increased together with the epidemic growth of obesity. In addition to their widespread use in sodas, artificial sweeteners are added to nearly 6000 other products sold in the US, including baby foods, frozen dinners and even yogurts. It has been suggested that the use of nonnutritive sweeteners can lead to body weight gain and an altered metabolic profile. However, very few studies have evaluated the effects of maternal consumption of artificial non-caloric sweeteners on body weight, feeding behavior or the metabolism of offspring in adult life. In this study, we found that animals exposed to aspartame during the prenatal period presented a higher consumption of sweet foods during adulthood and a greater susceptibility to alterations in metabolic parameters, such as increased glucose, LDL and triglycerides. These effects were observed in both males and females, although they were more pronounced in males. Despite the preliminary nature of this study, and the need for further confirmation of these effects, our data suggest that the consumption of sweeteners during gestation may have deleterious long-term effects and should be used with caution.

  2. Prooxidative effects of aspartame on antioxidant defense status in erythrocytes of rats.

    PubMed

    Prokic, Marko D; Paunovic, Milica G; Matic, Milos M; Djordjevic, Natasa Z; Ognjanovic, Branka I; Stajn, Andras S; Saicic, Zorica S

    2014-12-01

    Since aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, ASP) is one of the most widely used artificial sweeteners, the aim of the present study was to investigate its effects on serum glucose and lipid levels as well as its effects on oxidative/antioxidative status in erythrocytes of rats. The experiment included two groups of animals: the control group was administered with water only, while the experimental group was orally administered with ASP (40 mg/kg b.w.) daily, for a period of six weeks. When compared with the control group, the group administrated with ASP indicated higher values of serum glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides. Significantly increased concentrations of superoxide anion (O2 .-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), peroxynitrite (?N??-) and lipid peroxides (LPO) were recorded in the erythrocytes of ASP treated group in comparison to the control group. In the course of chronic ASP administration, the following was observed: the concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activity of catalase (CAT) increased. Thus, these findings suggest that long-term consumption of ASP leads to hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, as well as to oxidative stress in erythrocytes.

  3. A hydro/organo/hybrid gelator: a peptide lipid with turning aspartame head groups.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Masaru; Minamikawa, Hiroyuki; Aoyagi, Masaru; Asakawa, Masumi; Shimizu, Toshimi; Kogiso, Masaki

    2013-04-01

    This work presents a novel bola-type peptide lipid which can gelate water, organic solvents, and water/organic-solvent mixtures. In its molecular structure, an amphiphilic dipeptide aspartame (L-α-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) is connected at both ends of an alkylene linker. The different morphologies in the hydrogel (helical nanotapes) and the organogel (tape-like nanostructures) were visualized by energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EF-TEM) and energy-filtering scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and the molecular arrangement was examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Possessing a hydrophilic aspartic acid group and a (relatively) hydrophobic phenylalanine methyl ester group, the dipeptide head group can turn about in response to solvent polarity. As a consequence, the solvent condition changed the molecular packing of the gelator and affected the overall supramolecular structure of the gel. It is noted that the peptide lipid gelated mixed solvents of water and organic solvents such as dichloromethane, liquid-paraffin, olive-oil, silicone-oils, and so on. The present hybrid gel can simultaneously hold hydrophilic and hydrophobic functional materials.

  4. Effects of aspartame on 45Ca influx and LDH leakage from nerve cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Sonnewald, U; Müller, T; Unsgård, G; Petersen, S B

    1995-01-26

    Aspartame (ASM), an artificial sweetener, was shown to dose dependently increase 45Ca-influx into and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage from murine brain cell cultures. Astrocytes were more resistant than neurones to the effects of ASM. In cerebellar granule neurones, a 20% increase in calcium was found after an incubation time of 22 h in the presence of 0.1 mM ASM; at 0.5 mM concentration, calcium influx increased 40% compared with control cultures. At a concentration of 10 mM, influx was increased 13-fold after 5 h. Morphological appearance as judged by phase contrast microscopy was first visibly affected after exposure to 1 mM ASM for 22 h. Citrate, another food additive, was included in the study to demonstrate that cerebellar granule neurones could tolerate 10 mM additions to the medium and citrate did not cause 45Ca influx or morphological changes in neurones after 22 h. LDH leakage, a sign of severe cell damage, was observed at 1 mM concentrations of ASM after 22 h. Cerebral astrocytes on the other hand were more resistant and showed morphological changes, increased calcium influx and LDH leakage first at 5 mM concentrations of ASM.

  5. The effect of age on the recognition thresholds of three sweeteners: sucrose, saccharin and aspartame.

    PubMed

    Easterby-Smith, V; Besford, J; Heath, M R

    1994-07-01

    It is believed that people's sensitivity to taste declines with age but the evidence is inconclusive. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that taste recognition thresholds (TRTs) for sweetness are higher in older than in younger individuals, using groups of 16 younger subjects (18-30) and 16 older subjects (60-85). Three test substances were used: sucrose, aspartame and saccharin. A questionnaire recorded variables which might have affected TRTs, but data failed to show any trend that might have biased the principle variate-age. There was a significant alteration with age of recognition thresholds, at least for sucrose and saccharin. The differences between the groups for the three sweeteners were due to the fact that all the very sensitive subjects were young. None of the older subjects had particularly poor discrimination: all but one had TRTs within the range of younger subjects. Although there are age-related taste changes, they are much less dramatic than commonly occurs with other senses, such as sight and hearing. The findings of this study have implications for institutional catering and the dietary management of older people using non-sugar sweeteners.

  6. Acute effects of aspartame on large neutral amino acids and monoamines in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Fernstrom, J D; Fernstrom, M H; Gillis, M A

    1983-04-01

    The dipeptide aspartame (APM; aspartylphenylalanine methylester), an artificial sweetener, was studied in vivo for its ability to influence brain levels of the large neutral amino acids and the rates of hydroxylation of the aromatic amino acids. The administration by gavage of APM (200 mg/kg) caused large increments in blood and brain levels of phenylalanine and tyrosine by 60 minutes. Brain tryptophan level was occasionally reduced significantly, but the brain levels of the branched-chain amino acids were always unaffected. Smaller doses (50, 100 mg/kg) also raised blood and brain tyrosine and phenylalanine, but did not reduce brain tryptophan levels. At the highest dose (200 mg/kg), APM gavage caused an insignificant increase in dopa accumulation (after NSD-1015), and a modest reduction in 5-hydroxytryptophan accumulation. No changes in the brain levels of serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, dopamine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid, or norepinephrine were produced by APM administration (200 mg/kg). These results thus indicate that APM, even when administered in amounts that cause large increments in brain tyrosine and phenylalanine, produce minimal effects on the rates of formation of monoamine transmitters.

  7. Repeated ingestion of aspartame-sweetened beverages: further observations in individuals heterozygous for phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Bell, E F; Ziegler, E E; Tephly, T R; Krause, W L

    1990-10-01

    Six adults heterozygous for phenylketonuria (PKU) ingested eight successive servings of unsweetened and aspartame (APM)-sweetened beverage at 1-hour intervals in a randomized, balanced, crossover design. In one part, the eight beverage servings were not sweetened. In the other, each of the eight beverage servings provided 600 mg of APM, a dose equivalent to the amount provided by 36 oz of an APM-sweetened diet beverage. Plasma aspartate concentration was not significantly increased after ingestion of unsweetened or APM-sweetened beverage. Similarly, ingestion of the unsweetened beverage had no significant effect on plasma phenylalanine concentration. However, ingestion of APM-sweetened beverage significantly increased plasma phenylalanine concentrations 2.35 to 4.03 mumol/dL above baseline 30 minutes after ingestion. Plasma phenylalanine values reached a steady-state after administration of five servings of APM-sweetened beverage and were slightly, but significantly higher than usual postprandial values for adults heterozygous for PKU. Similarly, the ratio of the plasma phenylalanine concentration to the sum of the concentration of the large neutral amino acids was significantly higher than usual postprandial values. Blood methanol and formate concentrations remained within normal limits. These data indicate that a fasting adult heterozygous for PKU could consume the equivalent of 24 12-oz servings of APM-sweetened beverage over an 8-hour period and only increase plasma phenylalanine concentration to a modest degree.

  8. Toxicity of aspartame and its diketopiperazine for Wistar rats by dietary administration for 104 weeks.

    PubMed

    Ishii, H; Koshimizu, T; Usami, S; Fujimoto, T

    1981-01-01

    Aspartame (APM) or L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine, and a 3 : 1 combination of APM with its decomposition product, 5-benzyl-3,6-dioxo-2-piperazine acetic acid (DKP), were incorporated at levels of up to 4 g/kg in the diet of male and female Wistar rats from 6 weeks to 104 weeks of age. There was a dose-dependent depression of body weight gain at 2 and 4 g/kg AMP and at 4 g/kg APM + DKP in males, and at all dose levels in females, correlated with decreased food consumption and attributed to liberation of amino acids from hydrolysis of APM. Increases in urinary specific gravity and pH, with increase of relative kidney weight, were attributed to the urinary excretion DKP and acidic metabolites of APM. A dose-related increase in urinary calcium probably reflected increased calcium absorption, as from high protein diets. A slight decrease in serum cholesterol and an increase in relative spleen weight appeared to be without adverse effect. It is concluded that the treatments were without toxic effect.

  9. Aspartame decreases evoked extracellular dopamine levels in the rat brain: an in vivo voltammetry study.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, Brian P; Cummings, Deirdre R; Skaggs, Tricia A

    2007-12-01

    Conflicting reports exist concerning the effect aspartame (APM, l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine methyl ester) has upon brain biogenic amines. In the following study, in vivo voltammetry was utilized to measure evoked extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the striatum of rats in order to assess APM's effect. Time-course experiments revealed a significant decline in evoked extracellular DA levels within 1h of a single systemic dose (500mg/kg i.p.) when compared to vehicle-injected controls. The effect was frequency dependent and showed a significant decrease utilizing high frequency stimulation parameters (50 and 60Hz). In order to further determine APM's potential to alter evoked extracellular DA levels, extended stimulation periods were employed to deplete releasable stores both before and after APM administration in intact and 6-OHDA partially lesioned animals. The extended stimulation periods were applied at 60Hz for 2,5,10 and 20s durations. APM decreased DA levels under these conditions in both intact and 6-OHDA partially lesioned animals by an average of 34% and 51%, respectively. Kinetic analysis performed on frequency series indicated that the diminished DA levels corresponded to a significant reduction in DA release. These findings suggest that APM has a relatively potent effect of decreasing evoked extracellular DA levels when administered systemically under the conditions specified.

  10. Repeated ingestion of aspartame-sweetened beverage: effect on plasma amino acid concentrations in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1988-03-01

    Aspartame (APM) is a dipeptide sweetener (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester). It has been suggested that excessive use of the product might elevate plasma aspartate and phenylalanine concentrations. Eight normal adults (four male, four female) ingested three successive 12-oz servings of APM-sweetened beverage at two-hour intervals. The study was carried out in two parts in a randomized cross-over design. In one study the beverage was not sweetened. In the other, the beverage provided 10 mg APM/kg body weight per serving. Plasma amino acid concentrations were measured throughout the six-hour study period. The addition of APM to the beverage had no significant effect on plasma aspartate concentration. APM addition did increase plasma phenylalanine levels 1.64 to 2.05 mumol/dL above baseline values (5.09 +/- 0.82 mumol/dL) 30 to 45 minutes after each dose. However, plasma phenylalanine levels did not exceed normal postprandial values at any time. The data indicate ready metabolism of APM's amino acid content when administered at levels likely to be ingested by individuals who are heavy users of such beverages.

  11. Aspartame administration to the infant monkey: hypothalamic morphology and plasma amino acid levels.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, W A; Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Renn, E

    1980-09-01

    Infant monkeys received 2 gm/kg body weight of aspartame (APM) or 2 gm/kg body weight APM plus 1 gm/kg body weight monosodium glutamate (MSG) by gastric tube. Blood samples were obtained at intervals over the ensuing 4 hours and analyzed for amino acid levels. At this time, each infant was perfused with glutaraldehyde. The hypothalamus was embedded in plastic and then serially sectioned at 1 mu. Hypothalamic morphology was normal in all eight infants given 2 gm/kg body weight APM and in the six infants given 2 gm/kg body weight APM plus 1 gm/kg body weight MSG. By light microscopy, no pycnotic nuclei, neuronal degeneration, or dendritic swelling was noted. In both experimental and control brains, localized areas of poor perfusion exhibited abnormal morphology. Elevated plasma levels of aspartate, glutamate, and phenylalanine indicated that the test compounds were administered and absorbed. Variable rates of absorption were evident, probably due to the necessity of administering APM as a slurry, due to its low solubility. On the basis of blood absorption curves, it appears that infant monkeys metabolize aspartate and glutamate and phenylalanine somewhat more rapidly than man. It is concluded that APM given alone or with MSG, in large acute doses, does not result in hypothalamic damage in the newborn monkey.

  12. Aspartame has no effect on seizures or epileptiform discharges in epileptic children.

    PubMed

    Shaywitz, B A; Anderson, G M; Novotny, E J; Ebersole, J S; Sullivan, C M; Gillespie, S M

    1994-01-01

    The effects of aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester; APM) on the neurological status of children with well-documented seizures were examined in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. We report on 10 children (5 boys, 5 girls, ages 5-13 yr) who were tested for 2 weeks each on APM and placebo (single morning dose, 34 mg/kg). Seven children had generalized convulsions with 4 also having absence episodes. One child had absence seizures and 2 had complex partial seizures only. On each arm of the study, children were admitted to the hospital for a standard 21-lead electroencephalogram (EEG), continuous 24-hour cassette EEG, and determination of biochemical variables in plasma and urine. Subjects completed the Subjects Treatment Emergent Symptoms Scale (STESS) and parents the Conners Behavior Rating Scale. There were no significant differences between APM and placebo in the standard EEG or 24-hour EEG. No differences were noted for the STESS or the Conners ratings, and no differences were noted for any of the biochemical measures (except for expected increases in phenylalanine and tyrosine after APM). Our findings indicate that, in this group of vulnerable children, APM does not provoke seizures.

  13. The biological properties of aspartame. II. Actions involving the gastrointestinal system.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, R G; Muir, E T; Cook, D L; Nutting, E F

    1980-01-01

    Aspartame (APM) was investigated in several pharmacological tests to delineate any effects on the gastrointestinal system. The compound did not affect food consumption at one hour following a single intragastric dose of 200 mg/kg in rats. There was no evidence of inhibition or stimulation of the gastric juice secretion rate, the concentration of gastric acid, acid output or proteolytic activity following an intragastric dose of 250 mg/kg in five-hour pylorus-ligated rats. Likewise, APM at the same dosage did not significantly affect gastric ulceration induced by nineteen hours of pylorus-ligation. In several in vitro tests it was demonstrated that APM did not affect the proteolytic activity of pepsin or the lipolytic activity of pancreatic lipase at concentrations of 143 microgram and 1.25 mg/ml, respectively. Its anticholinergic activity was found to be insignificant, less than 0.001 times the potency of atropine sulfate, when measured against acetylcholine-induced contraction of isolated rabbit ileum. These data indicate that APM may be devoid of undesirable side effects on the gastrointestinal tract when used as a food sweetening agent.

  14. Viability of human-derived probiotic lactobacilli in ice cream produced with sucrose and aspartame.

    PubMed

    Başyiğit, Gülden; Kuleaşan, Hakan; Karahan, Aynur G

    2006-09-01

    A mixture of human-derived probiotic strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. agilis and L. rhamnosus was used as a probiotic culture in ice cream manufacture. Viability and survival of these probiotic cultures were investigated in two different ice cream formulations. Ice cream with sucrose and ice cream with aspartame were prepared and each of these was divided into two subgroups: one with direct addition of the probiotic culture and one with milk fermented by the same probiotic culture. Ice cream samples were stored at -20 degrees C for 6 months and the survival rate of cultures were determined monthly. Probiotic cultures underwent tests for resistance to bile salts, antibiotics, acidic conditions; they were found to be highly resistant to such challenges. Chemical analysis of ice cream samples, such as determination of acidity, pH and solid matter, was also performed. The probiotic cultures remained unchanged in ice cream stored for up to 6 months regardless of the sweeteners used. Using probiotic cultures in ice cream mixes did not alter the characteristics of the product.

  15. Dietary aspartame with protein on plasma and brain amino acids, brain monoamines and behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Torii, K; Mimura, T; Takasaki, Y; Ichimura, M

    1986-01-01

    Aspartame (APM; L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester), was investigated for its ability to alter levels of the large neutral amino acids and monoamines in overnight fasted rats allowed to consume meals with or without protein for two hours. Additionally, the possible long term behavioral consequences of APM in 25% casein diets with or without 10% sucrose were determined. Acute APM ingestion increased both plasma and brain phenylalanine and tyrosine levels, but brain tryptophan levels were not altered regardless of dietary protein. Brain norepinephrine and dopamine levels were unaltered by any of the diet while serotonin levels were slightly increased when a protein-free diet was consumed. But APM and/or protein ingestion minimized this increase of brain serotonin levels as much as controls. Chronic APM ingestion failed to influence diurnal feeding patterns, meal size distributions, or diurnal patterns of spontaneous motor activity. The chronic ingestion of abuse doses of APM produced no significant chemical changes in brain capable of altering behavioral parameters believed to be controlled by monoamines in rats.

  16. Cytotoxic effect of aspartame (diet sweet) on the histological and genetic structures of female albino rats and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Abd Elfatah, Azza A M; Ghaly, Inas S; Hanafy, Safaa M

    2012-10-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of aspartame intake on the histological and genetic structures of mother albino rats and their offspring. Sixty adult female albino rats and 180 of their offspring were equally divided into two groups (control and treated), each group divided into three subgroups. Each subgroup consisted of 10 pregnant rats and 30 of their offspring. The experimental design divided into three periods: (1) the gestation period (subgroup one), (2) the gestation period and three weeks after delivery (subgroup two) and (3) animals in the third subgroup treated as subgroup two then left till the end of the ninth week after delivery. Each pregnant rat in the treated subgroups was given a single daily dose of 1 mL aspartame solution (50.4 mg) by gastric gavage throughout the time intervals of experimental design. At the end of each experimental period for control and treated subgroups, the liver of half of both control and treated groups were subjected for histological study while the liver and bone marrow of the other halves were subjected for cytogenetic studies. Body weight of both groups were recorded individually twice weekly in the morning before offering the diet. The results revealed that the rats and their offspring in the subgroups of control animals showed increases in body weight, normal histological sections, low chromosomal aberration and low DNA fragmentation. The treated animals in the three subgroups rats and their offspring revealed decreases in body weight, high histological lesions, increases in the chromosomal aberration and DNA fragmentation compared with control groups. In conclusion, the consumption of aspartame leads to histopathological lesions in the liver and alterations of the genetic system in the liver and bone marrow of mother albino rats and their offspring. These toxicological changes were directly proportional to the duration of its administration and improved after its withdrawal.

  17. The effects of aspartame versus sucrose on motivational ratings, taste preferences, and energy intakes in obese and lean women.

    PubMed

    Drewnowski, A; Massien, C; Louis-Sylvestre, J; Fricker, J; Chapelot, D; Apfelbaum, M

    1994-08-01

    This study examined the effects of four breakfast preloads of different sweetness and energy content on motivational ratings, taste preferences, and energy intakes of 12 obese and 12 lean women. The preloads consisted of creamy white cheese (fromage blanc) and were either plain, sweetened with sucrose or aspartame, or sweetened with aspartame and supplemented with maltodextrin. Their energy content was either 300 kcal (1,255 kJ) or 700 kcal (2,929 kJ). Motivational ratings of hunger and the desire to eat were obtained prior to and at 30 min intervals after breakfast. Taste preferences were measured prior to and 150 min after breakfast. The subjects ate buffet-style lunch, snack, and dinner meals in the laboratory. Obese women consumed significantly more energy at meals (2,596 kcal or 10,862 kJ) than did lean women (1,484 kcal or 6,209 kJ); derived a greater proportion of energy from fat (39.9% vs. 35.5%), and had lower dietary carbohydrate-to-fat ratios. Consumption of low-energy as opposed to high-energy breakfast preloads was associated with elevated motivational ratings by noon. However, energy intakes at lunch, snack, or dinner did not vary as a function of preload type, and no compensation was observed for the energy consumed at breakfast. Taste preferences were not affected by preload ingestion or by preload type. The study provided no evidence that aspartame promotes hunger or results in increased energy intakes in obese or in lean women.

  18. The effect of aspartame metabolites on human erythrocyte membrane acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Tsakiris, Stylianos; Giannoulia-Karantana, Aglaia; Simintzi, Irene; Schulpis, Kleopatra H

    2006-01-01

    Studies have implicated aspartame (ASP) with neurological problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in human erythrocyte membranes after incubation with the sum of ASP metabolites, phenylalanine (Phe), methanol (met) and aspartic acid (aspt), or with each one separately. Erythrocyte membranes were obtained from 12 healthy individuals and were incubated with ASP hydrolysis products for 1 h at 37 degrees C. AChE was measured spectrophotometrically. Incubation of membranes with ASP metabolites corresponding with 34 mg/kg, 150 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg of ASP consumption resulted in an enzyme activity reduction by -33%, -41%, and -57%, respectively. Met concentrations 0.14 mM, 0.60 mM, and 0.80 mM decreased the enzyme activity by -20%, -32% or -40%, respectively. Aspt concentrations 2.80 mM, 7.60 mM or 10.0 mM inhibited membrane AChE activity by -20%, -35%, and -47%, respectively. Phe concentrations 0.14 mM, 0.35 mM or 0.50mM reduced the enzyme activity by -11%, -33%, and -35%, respectively. Aspt or Phe concentrations 0.82 mM or 0.07 mM, respectively, did not alter the membrane AChE activity. It is concluded that low concentrations of ASP metabolites had no effect on the membrane enzyme activity, whereas high or toxic concentrations partially or remarkably decreased the membrane AChE activity, respectively. Additionally, neurological symptoms, including learning and memory processes, may be related to the high or toxic concentrations of the sweetener metabolites.

  19. The effect of aspartame on rat brain xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Vences-Mejía, A; Labra-Ruíz, N; Hernández-Martínez, N; Dorado-González, V; Gómez-Garduño, J; Pérez-López, I; Nosti-Palacios, R; Camacho Carranza, R; Espinosa-Aguirre, J J

    2006-08-01

    This study demonstrates that chronic aspartame (ASP) consumption leads to an increase of phase I metabolizing enzymes (cytochrome P450 (CYP)) in rat brain. Wistar rats were treated by gavage with ASP at daily doses of 75 and 125 mg/kg body weight for 30 days. Cerebrum and cerebellum were used to obtain microsomal fractions to analyse activity and protein levels of seven cytochrome P450 enzymes. Increases in activity were consistently found with the 75 mg/kg dose both in cerebrum and cerebellum for all seven enzymes, although not at the same levels: CYP 2E1-associated 4-nitrophenol hydroxylase (4-NPH) activity was increased 1.5-fold in cerebrum and 25-fold in cerebellum; likewise, CYP2B1-associated penthoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (PROD) activity increased 2.9- and 1.7-fold respectively, CYP2B2-associated benzyloxyresorufin O-dealkylase (BROD) 4.5- and 1.1-fold, CYP3A-associated erythromycin N-demethylase (END) 1.4- and 3.3-fold, CYP1A1-associated ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) 5.5- and 2.8-fold, and CYP1A2-associated methoxyresorufin O-demethylase (MROD) 3.7- and 1.3-fold. Furthermore, the pattern of induction of CYP immunoreactive proteins by ASP paralleled that of 4-NHP-, PROD-, BROD-, END-, EROD- and MROD-related activities only in the cerebellum. Conversely, no differences in CYP concentration and activity were detected in hepatic microsomes of treated animals with respect to the controls, suggesting a brain-specific response to ASP treatment.

  20. Study on the interaction of a copper(II) complex containing the artificial sweetener aspartame with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kashanian, Soheila; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh; Filli, Soraya Moradi

    2014-05-01

    A copper(II) complex containing aspartame (APM) as ligand, Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O, was synthesized and characterized. In vitro binding interaction of this complex with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied at physiological pH. Binding studies of this complex with HSA are useful for understanding the Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O-HSA interaction mechanism and providing guidance for the application and design of new and more efficient artificial sweeteners drive. The interaction was investigated by spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, competition experiment and circular dichroism. Hyperchromicity observed in UV absorption band of Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of HSA to Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O was observed and the binding constant (Kf) and corresponding numbers of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (∆H) and entropy change (∆S) were calculated to be -458.67 kJ mol(-1) and -1,339 J mol(-1 )K(-1) respectively. According to the van't Hoff equation, the reaction is predominantly enthalpically driven. In conformity with experimental results, we suggest that Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O interacts with HSA. In comparison with previous study, it is found that the Cu(II) complex binds stronger than aspartame. PMID:24481880

  1. Study on the interaction of a copper(II) complex containing the artificial sweetener aspartame with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kashanian, Soheila; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh; Filli, Soraya Moradi

    2014-05-01

    A copper(II) complex containing aspartame (APM) as ligand, Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O, was synthesized and characterized. In vitro binding interaction of this complex with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied at physiological pH. Binding studies of this complex with HSA are useful for understanding the Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O-HSA interaction mechanism and providing guidance for the application and design of new and more efficient artificial sweeteners drive. The interaction was investigated by spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, competition experiment and circular dichroism. Hyperchromicity observed in UV absorption band of Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of HSA to Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O was observed and the binding constant (Kf) and corresponding numbers of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (∆H) and entropy change (∆S) were calculated to be -458.67 kJ mol(-1) and -1,339 J mol(-1 )K(-1) respectively. According to the van't Hoff equation, the reaction is predominantly enthalpically driven. In conformity with experimental results, we suggest that Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O interacts with HSA. In comparison with previous study, it is found that the Cu(II) complex binds stronger than aspartame.

  2. A material-sparing method for simultaneous determination of true density and powder compaction properties--aspartame as an example.

    PubMed

    Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2006-12-01

    True density results for a batch of commercial aspartame are highly variable when helium pycnometry is used. Alternatively, the true density of the problematic aspartame lot was obtained by fitting tablet density versus pressure data. The fitted true density was in excellent agreement with that predicted from single crystal structure. Tablet porosity was calculated from the true density and tablet apparent density. After making the necessary measurements for calculating tablet apparent density, the breaking force of each intact tablet was measured and tensile strength was calculated. With the knowledge of compaction pressure, tablet porosity and tensile strength, powder compaction properties were characterized using tabletability (tensile strength versus pressure), compactibility (tensile strength versus porosity), compressibility (porosity versus pressure) and Heckel analysis. Thus, a wealth of additional information on the compaction properties of the powder was obtained through little added work. A total of approximately 4 g of powder was used in this study. Depending on the size of tablet tooling, tablet thickness and true density, 2-10 g of powder would be sufficient for characterizing most pharmaceutical powders.

  3. Plasma phenylalanine levels in phenylketonuric heterozygous and normal adults administered aspartame at 34 mg/kg body weight.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Koch, R; Blaskovics, M E; Filer, L J; Baker, G L; McDonnell, J E

    1981-01-01

    Following administration of aspartame (34 mg/kg body wt) in orange juice, plasma concentrations of free amino acids were measured in 12 female subjects known to be heterozygous for phenylketonuria and 22 normal subjects (12 male, 10 female). No change in fasting plasma aspartate concentrations were noted after aspartame loading in either group. In normal male subjects, the mean (+/-S.D.) plasma phenylalanine concentration increased from a fasting value of 5.86 +/- 1.25 mumol/dl. Plasma phenylalanine levels in normal female subjects increased from a mean fasting concentration of 4.83 +/- 0.84 mumol/dl to a men peak value of 8.95 +/- 1.49 mumol/dl suggesting a more rapid absorption, metabolism, and/or clearance of phenylalanine by females. In female heterozygous subjects, the mean peak plasma phenylalanine concentration was significantly higher than in normal females. Plasma phenylalanine values increased from a mean fasting value of 5.92 +/- 1.51 mumol/dl to a mean peak value of 15.1 +/- 4.76 mumol/dl. Similarly, the area under the plasma phenylalanine concentration-time curve was significantly greater in heterozygous female subjects (21.36 +/- 5.10 IU) than in normal female subjects (10.84 +/- 2.32 IU). However, peak plasma phenylalanine levels were well below those associated with toxic effects in all cases.

  4. Kinetics of an acid-base catalyzed reaction (aspartame degradation) as affected by polyol-induced changes in buffer pH and pK values.

    PubMed

    Chuy, S; Bell, L N

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of an acid-base catalyzed reaction, aspartame degradation, were examined as affected by the changes in pH and pK(a) values caused by adding polyols (sucrose, glycerol) to phosphate buffer. Sucrose-containing phosphate buffer solutions had a lower pH than that of phosphate buffer alone, which contributed, in part, to reduced aspartame reactivity. A kinetic model was introduced for aspartame degradation that encompassed pH and buffer salt concentrations, both of which change with a shift in the apparent pK(a) value. Aspartame degradation rate constants in sucrose-containing solutions were successfully predicted using this model when corrections (that is, lower pH, lower apparent pK(a) value, buffer dilution from the polyol) were applied. The change in buffer properties (pH, pK(a)) from adding sucrose to phosphate buffer does impact food chemical stability. These effects can be successfully incorporated into predictive kinetic models. Therefore, pH and pK(a) changes from adding polyols to buffer should be considered during food product development.

  5. Acute effects of aspartame on concentrations of brain amines and their metabolites in selected brain regions of Fischer 344 and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Freeman, G; Sobotka, T; Hattan, D

    1990-01-01

    This study is the first in a series to define a rodent model to document the effects of amino acid-modulating compounds on central neurotransmitter function. A time-response curve for a single dose of orally intubated aspartame was determined in male Fischer 344 and Sprague-Dawley rats. Regional brain concentrations of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites were analyzed in the hypothalamus, cerebellum, pons/medulla, hippocampus, striatum, cortex, and midbrain/thalamus at 30, 60, 120, or 240 min after oral aspartame (1000 mg/kg) administration. Without consideration for time and group variables, levels of most compounds were higher in the brain regions of Fischer than Sprague-Dawley rats. Aspartame in Fischer 344 or Sprague-Dawley rats had no significant effect on levels of the catecholamines or indoleamines at any of the time points monitored following its acute administration. From the results of this study, large oral loads of aspartame do not appear to lead to regional alterations in brain biogenic amine levels.

  6. Aspartame Administration and Insulin Treatment Altered Brain Levels of CYP2E1 and CYP3A2 in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Nosti-Palacios, Rosario; Gómez-Garduño, Josefina; Molina-Ortiz, Dora; Calzada-León, Raúl; Dorado-González, Víctor Manuel; Vences-Mejía, Araceli

    2014-07-17

    This study demonstrates that aspartame consumption and insulin treatment in a juvenile diabetic rat model leads to increase in cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 and CYP3A2 isozymes in brain. Diabetes mellitus was induced in postweaned 21-day-old Wistar male rat by streptozotocin. Animals were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: untreated control, diabetic (D), D-insulin, D-aspartame, or the D-insulin + aspartame-treated group. Brain and liver tissue samples were used to analyze the activity of CYP2E1 and CYP3A2 and protein levels. Our results indicate that combined treatment with insulin and aspartame in juvenile diabetic rats significantly induced CYP2E1 in the cerebrum and cerebellum without modifying it in the liver, while CYP3A2 protein activity increased both in the brain and in the liver. The induction of CYP2E1 in the brain could have important in situ toxicological effects, given that this CYP isoform is capable of bioactivating various toxic substances. Additionally, CYP3A2 induction in the liver and brain could be considered a decisive factor in the variation of drug response and toxicity.

  7. Blood glucose and meal patterns in time-blinded males, after aspartame, carbohydrate, and fat consumption, in relation to sweetness perception.

    PubMed

    Melanson, K J; Westerterp-Plantenga, M S; Campfield, L A; Saris, W H

    1999-12-01

    In a study of the impact of aspartame, fat, and carbohydrate on appetite, we monitored blood glucose continuously for 431 (SE 16) min. Ten healthy males (19-31 years) participated in three time-blinded visits. As blood glucose was monitored, appetite ratings were scored at randomized times. On the first meal initiation, volunteers consumed one of three isovolumetric drinks (aspartame, 1 MJ simple carbohydrate, and 1 MJ high-fat; randomized order). High-fat and high-carbohydrate foods were available ad libitum subsequently. Blood glucose patterns following the carbohydrate drink (+1.78 (SE 0.28) mmol/l in 38 (SE 3) min) and high-fat drink (+0.83 (SE 0.28) mmol/l in 49 (SE 6) min) were predictive of the next intermeal interval (R 0.64 and R 0.97 respectively). Aspartame ingestion was followed by blood glucose declines (40% of subjects), increases (20%), or stability (40%). These patterns were related to the volunteers' perception of sweetness of the drink (R 0.81, P = 0.014), and were predictive of subsequent intakes (R -0.71, P = 0.048). For all drinks combined, declines in blood glucose and meal initiation were significantly associated (chi 2 16.8, P < 0.001), the duration of blood glucose responses and intermeal intervals correlated significantly (R 0.715, P = 0.0001), and sweetness perception correlated negatively with hunger suppression (R -0.471, P = 0.015). Effects of fat, carbohydrate, and aspartame on meal initiation, meal size, and intermeal interval relate to blood glucose patterns. Varied blood glucose responses after aspartame support the controversy over its effects, and may relate to sweetness perception.

  8. Interference of rheumatoid factor activity by aspartame, a dipeptide methyl ester.

    PubMed

    Ramsland, P A; Movafagh, B F; Reichlin, M; Edmundson, A B

    1999-01-01

    Circulating autoimmune complexes of IgM rheumatoid factors (RF) bound to the Fc portions of normal, polyclonal IgG antibodies are frequently present in humans with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The sweet tasting methyl ester of L-Asp-L-Phe (aspartame or APM) was found to relieve pain and improve joint mobility in subjects with osteo- and mixed osteo/rheumatoid arthritis [Edmundson, A. B. and Manion, C. V. (1998). Clin. Pharmac. Ther. 63, 580-593]. These clinical observations prompted the testing of the inhibition by APM of the binding interactions of human IgM RFs with IgG Fc regions. The propensity of APM to inhibit IgM RF binding was assessed by competitive enzyme immunoassays with solid-phase human IgG. Ten RA serum samples and three purified monoclonal cryoglobulins, all of which had RF activity, were tested in this system. We found that the presence of APM significantly reduced the binding of IgM RFs. The inhibitory propensity of APM with monoclonal RF cryoglobulins was increased by the addition of CaCl(2) to the binding buffer. Similar inhibition of the binding of RA derived RFs to IgG was observed for Asp-Phe and its amidated derivative, indicating that the methyl ester is not required for APM's interaction with IgM antibodies. A human (Mez) IgM known to bind octameric peptides derived from the Fc portion of a human IgG(1) antibody was tested for binding of dipeptides by the Pepscan method of combinatorial chemistry. The relative binding constants of Asp-Phe and Phe-Asp were ranked among the highest values for 400 possible combinations of the 20 most common amino acids. Possible blocking interactions of APM were explored by computer-assisted docking studies with the model of a complex of an RF Fab with the Fc of a human IgG(4) antibody. Modeling of ternary immune complexes revealed a few key residues, which could act as molecular recognition sites for APM. A structural hypothesis is presented to explain the observed interference with RF reactivity by APM

  9. Subchronic effects of ochratoxin A on young adult rat brain and partial prevention by aspartame, a sweetener.

    PubMed

    Belmadani, A; Tramu, G; Betbeder, A M; Creppy, E E

    1998-07-01

    1. Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin produced by several fungi, especially Aspergillus and Penicillium species. Many food and foodstuffs can be contaminated by ochratoxin A, which is consequently found in blood of animals and humans. 2. The distribution into the brain of young adult rats fed OTA for 1 to 6 weeks and some consequences have been investigated in the present study. 3. Our results on rats given OTA (289 microg/kg/48 h) indicated that OTA accumulated in the whole brain as function of time according to a regression curve, Y=-8.723 a+16.72 with a correlation coefficient of r=0.989, where Y-axis is the OTA concentration in ng/g of brain and X-axis is the duration of the treatment in weeks. The brain OTA contents was 11.95 +/- 2.2, 23.89 +/- 4.4, 39.9 +/- 4.5, 50.3 +/- 7.3, 78.8 +/- 6.3, 94 +/- 16 ng/g of brain in the mycotoxin-treated animals for respectively 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6-weeks treatment. OTA induced modifications of free amino-acid concentrations in the brain, mainly, Tyrosine (Tyr) and phenylalanine (Phe). Tyr decreased significantly as compared to control (p < 0.05). Phe increased significantly as compared to control (p < 0.05). 4. Aspartame, (25 mg/kg/48 h) a structural analogue of OTA largely modified the distribution and prevented the accumulation of OTA in the brain since the respective brain OTA contents decreased respectively to 9.6 +/- 7.9, 19.2 +/- 3.0, 26.8 +/- 4.2, 19.7 +/- 1.9, 13.7 /- 5.6 and 11.0 +/- 6.0 ng/g of tissue, for the same duration of treatment. It also prevented the modifications of Tyr and Phe levels. 5. The histological investigations showed several necrotic cells with pyknotic nucleus, detected in OTA treated animals with higher frequency as compared to the controls and Aspartame treated ones. Aspartame appeared to significantly prevent this nuclear effect as well, the meaning of which is discussed.

  10. Plasma and brain kinetics of large neutral amino acids and of striatum monoamines in rats given aspartame.

    PubMed

    Romano, M; Diomede, L; Guiso, G; Caccia, S; Perego, C; Salmona, M

    1990-05-01

    Two doses (250 and 1000 mg/kg body weight) of aspartame were administered orally to male rats, and plasma and brain phenylalanine and tyrosine kinetic profiles were studied. In both plasma and brain the maximum increase in phenylalanine and tyrosine levels was reached 60 min after treatment. The changes in brain levels of phenylalanine or tyrosine 0, 60, 120 or 180 min after treatment with 1000 mg AMP/kg were directly correlated with the ratio of the plasma concentration of phenylalanine or tyrosine to the overall plasma concentration of the other large neutral amino acids. The time course of monoamine and metabolite concentrations, in the corpora striatum of the brain, was studied after an oral dose of 500 mg phenylalanine/kg. No significant modifications of monoamine levels were found at any of the times studied, up to 5 hr after dosing.

  11. The biological properties of aspartame. V. Effects on a variety of physiological parameters related to inflammation and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Aspinall, R L; Saunders, R N; Pautsch, W F; Nutting, E F

    1980-01-01

    Aspartame (APM), L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, is a low calorie sweetening agent 180 times sweeter than sucrose. As part of a series of studies designed to determine the potential effects of ingestion of excesses of APM on a wide spectrum of physiological processes, experiments were conducted in which high multiples (mg/kg basis) of the projected maximum daily human intake (20 mg/kg) were administered intragastrically to laboratory rats. Doses up to 16 times the maximum intake had no effect on inflammation parameters including carrageenin-induced paw edema, connective tissue formation and adjuvant arthritis. APM, likewise, showed no antihistamine activity in vitro. Even higher multiples (up to 103 times) of the maximum intake had no effect on various parameters of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. These results indicate that APM ingested in great excess would not be expected to significantly impair inflammatory processes nor influence carbohydrate and lipid metabolism.

  12. Effect of drinking soda sweetened with aspartame or high-fructose corn syrup on food intake and body weight.

    PubMed

    Tordoff, M G; Alleva, A M

    1990-06-01

    To examine whether artificial sweeteners aid in the control of long-term food intake and body weight, we gave free-living, normal-weight subjects 1150 g soda sweetened with aspartame (APM) or high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) per day. Relative to when no soda was given, drinking APM-sweetened soda for 3 wk significantly reduced calorie intake of both females (n = 9) and males (n = 21) and decreased the body weight of males but not of females. However, drinking HFCS-sweetened soda for 3 wk significantly increased the calorie intake and body weight of both sexes. Ingesting either type of soda reduced intake of sugar from the diet without affecting intake of other nutrients. Drinking large volumes of APM-sweetened soda, in contrast to drinking HFCS-sweetened soda, reduces sugar intake and thus may facilitate the control of calorie intake and body weight.

  13. Enzymatic catalysis of formation of Z-aspartame in ionic liquid - An alternative to enzymatic catalysis in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Erbeldinger, M; Mesiano, A J; Russell, A J

    2000-01-01

    We present the first report of enzymatic catalysis in an ionic liquid. The virtually nonexistent vapor pressure makes ionic liquids an exciting new alternative for enzyme-catalyzed syntheses in environmentally friendly environments. Z-aspartame was synthesized in a thermolysin-catalyzed reaction of carbobenzoxy-L-aspartate and L-phenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BP6). Ionic liquids such as BP6 are thermally stable and have a remarkable range of temperatures over which they remain liquid (300 degrees C). With an initial rate of 1.2 +/- 0.1 nmol min(-)(1) mg(-)(1), we observed a competitive rate in comparison to that of enzymatic synthesis in organic solvent. Additionally, the enzyme exhibits outstanding stability, which would normally require immobilization.

  14. Simultaneous determination of saccharin and aspartame in commercial noncaloric sweeteners using the PLS-2 multivariate calibration method and validation by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Cantarelli, Miguel A; Pellerano, Roberto G; Marchevsky, Eduardo J; Camiña, José M

    2008-10-22

    A new method to determine a mixture for sweetener sodium saccharin and aspartame in commercial noncaloric sweeteners is proposed. A classical full factorial design for standards was used in the calibration step to build the partial least-squares (PLS-2) model. Instrumental data were obtained by means of UV-visible spectrophotometry. Salicylic acid was used as an internal standard to evaluate the adjustment of the real samples to the PLS model. The concentration of analytes in the commercial samples was evaluated using the obtained model by UV spectral data. The PLS-2 method was validated by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), finding in all cases a relative error of less than 11% between the PLS-2 and the CZE methods. The proposed procedure was applied successfully to the determination of saccharin and aspartame in noncaloric commercial sweeteners.

  15. Erythrocyte L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine hydrolase activity and plasma phenylalanine and aspartate concentrations in children consuming diets high in aspartame.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Lindgren, S D; Brummel, M C; Stumbo, P J; Wolraich, M L

    1995-12-01

    A deficit of alpha-aspartyl-phenylalanine (alpha-Asp-Phe) hydrolase activity has been suggested as a cause of possible adverse effects of aspartame ingestion. Twenty-five normal preschool children and 23 school-age children described by their parents as sensitive to sugar were fed diets high in sucrose, aspartame, or saccharin for three successive 3-wk periods. Blood samples were obtained at baseline (fasting) and within the last 3 d of each dietary period (postprandial). alpha-Asp-Phe concentrations were below detection limits (0.5 mumol/L) in all plasma samples and Phe and Asp concentrations remained within normal limits, alpha-Asp-Phe hydrolase activities in baseline hemolysate samples did not differ between groups. One subject had a plasma alpha-Asp-Phe hydrolase activity > 2 SD below the mean. Despite this low activity, this subject did not show consistent cognitive or behavioral anomalies that could be linked to low hydrolase activity.

  16. Safety and efficacy of aspartame-based liquid versus sucrose-based liquids used for dilution in oral sodium phosphate solutions for colonoscopy preparations.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Sherman M; Balart, J Carter; Sideridis, Kostas; Salek, Jefrey; Sridhar, Subbaramiah; Thompson, William O

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether an oral sodium phosphate solution (OSPS) mixed with aspartame-based clear liquids as the diluent would yield improved colon cleansing results compared to an OSPS mixed with sucrose-based liquids as the diluent. Fifty-one patients undergoing colonoscopy were prospectively randomized into two groups to receive different OSPS colonoscopy preparations, with sucrose-based or aspartame-based liquids used as diluents. The primary end point was the quality of the colonoscopy preparation and secondary end points were serum electrolytes before and after preparations. No significant difference in colonoscopy preparation quality was seen between the two OSPS diluent groups (Mantel-Haenzel chi (2) = 0.795, P = 0.484). There were no significant differences in mean electrolyte shifts of sodium, potassium, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), or BUN/Cr ratios between the two groups. There was a statistically significant increase in serum phosphorous in the aspartame-based group compared to the sucrose-based diluent group (P = 0.021). In conclusion, there was no clinically detectable difference in colonoscopy preparation quality between the two OSPS diluent groups. This study suggests that passive fluid transport by aquaporins may well be the major mediator of fluid shifts in the study subjects. This result suggests the potential importance of aquaporins and minimizes the importance of sodium glucose cotransporter SGLT1 in fluid and electrolyte transport in the human gastrointestinal tract. Aspartame or its constituent amino acids may enhance phosphate absorption across the human small intestine.

  17. Effect of an abuse dose of aspartame upon plasma and erythrocyte levels of amino acids in phenylketonuric heterozygous and normal adults.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L; McDonnell, J E

    1980-11-01

    Plasma and erythrocyte levels of free amino acids were measured in five female subjects known to be heterozygous for phenylketonuria and six subjects assumed to be normal (three male, three female) who were administered an abuse dose of aspartame (100 mg/kg) in orange juice. Small increases in plasma aspartate levels were noted 30 minutes after aspartame loading in both groups, with mean (+/- SD) levels increasing from 0.15 +/- 0.05 mumoles/100 ml to 0.43 +/- 0.23 mumoles/100 ml in normal subjects (P = 0.02), and from 0.49 +/- 0.23 mumoles/100 ml to 0.80 +/- 0.56 mumoles/100 ml in heterozygous subjects (P > 0.05). However, plasma aspartate levels remained within normal postprandial levels in each case. Erythrocyte aspartate levels were unchanged in both groups. In normal subjects, plasma phenylalanine levels (mean +/- SD) increased from fasting levels (5.40 +/- 1.05 mumoles/100 ml) to mean peak values of 20.2 +/- 6.77 mumoles/100 ml. In heterozygous subjects, mean peak plasma phenylalanine levels were approximately twice as high (41.7 +/- 2.33 mumoles/100 ml), and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve twice as large. Peak plasma phenylalanine levels, however, were below those associated with toxic effects. The data indicate slower, but adequate metabolism and clearance of an abuse dose of aspartame by the phenylketonuric heterozygote.

  18. Ameliorative effect of Pimpinella anisum oil on immunohistochemical and ultrastuctural changes of cerebellum of albino rats induced by aspartame.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Hamid, Manal; Gallaly, Sanaa Rida

    2014-05-01

    The study aims to investigate the protective effect of Pimpinella anisum oil on aspartame (ASP) which resulted in cerebellar changes. The rats were divided into four equal groups: Group 1: (control group): served as control animals. Group 2: control P. anisum oil received .5 mL/kg/d/b wt. once daily. Group 3 (ASP group): received daily 250 mg/kg/b wt. of ASP dissolved in distilled water and given orally to the animals by intra-gastric tube for 2 months. Group 4: received .5 mL/kg/b wt. of prophylactic P. anisum oil once daily, followed by ASP after 2 h for 2 months. The histopathological approach revealed marked changes in the Purkinje cells, myleinated nerve fibers and granular cells of ASP-treated animals. Some of these cells appeared with deeply stained cytoplasm. Ultrastructural examination showed Purkinje cells with dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum and condensed mitochondria. Granular cells appeared with less c nuclei and surrounded by dissolution of most Mossy rosettes structures. Most myelinated nerve fibers showed thickening of myelinated sheath and others showed splitting of their myelin sheath. The histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural alterations were much less observed in concomitant use of P. anisum oil with ASP. Cerebellar cortex is considered target areas of ASP neurotoxicity, while P. anisum oil, when used in combination with ASP displays a protective action against neurotoxicity.

  19. Effects of long-term ingestion of aspartame on hypothalamic neuropeptide Y, plasma leptin and body weight gain and composition.

    PubMed

    Beck, Bernard; Burlet, Arlette; Max, Jean Pierre; Stricker-Krongrad, Alain

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of the chronic ingestion of aspartame (ASP) on brain neuropeptide Y (NPY) concentrations, plasma hormones, food intake and body fat. Two groups of male Long-Evans rats, fed on a control (C) well-balanced diet, had to drink either a 0.1% ASP solution or water for a period of 14 weeks starting at weaning. Food intake and body weight were weekly recorded. At the end of the experiment, fat pads were sampled, leptin and insulin were measured in the plasma and NPY in several microdissected brain areas. Substituting ASP for water led to lower body weight (-8%; P<.004) and lower fat depot weight (-20%; P<.01) with no differences in energy intake or plasma insulin concentrations. Plasma leptin was significantly reduced by 34% (P<.05). Leptin concentrations were well-correlated with final body weight (r=.47; P<.025) and fat pad mass (r=.53; P<.01). NPY concentrations were 23% lower (P<.03) in the arcuate nucleus of ASP rats with no differences in other brain areas. The beneficial effects on body composition could be related to the decreased effects of NPY on lipid and energy metabolism, independently of insulin. The reasons for the NPY decrease (regulatory or toxicological) are not obvious. The constitutive amino acids of the ASP molecule might participate in the NPY regulation.

  20. Effect of tyrosine on the potentiation by aspartame and phenylalanine of metrazol-induced convulsions in rats.

    PubMed

    Guiso, G; Diomede, L; Romano, M; Caccia, S; Sarati, S; Salmona, M

    1991-12-01

    Male rats were treated by oral intubation with tyrosine (Tyr), at doses of 0.5 and 1.0 g/kg body weight, alone or together with 1 g aspartame (APM)/kg body weight, or an equivalent dose of phenylalanine (Phe; 0.5 g/kg body weight); the effects on seizures induced by an effective dose of metrazol (ED50) were observed. Tyr (0.5 g/kg body weight) had a protective effect against the Phe-potentiation of metrazol-induced clonic-tonic convulsions. At the same dose Tyr had no effect on the seizure-promoting activity of APM, but at 1 g/kg it reduced the proconvulsant potential of the sweetener. Analysis of the brain and plasma amino acid concentrations indicated that the Tyr to Phe ratio tended to be enhanced in Tyr-Phe treated rats compared with those treated with Phe alone. This ratio remained essentially constant in the brain of APM-treated rats, compared with those treated with APM plus 1 g Tyr/kg body weight, whereas an increase in this ratio in the plasma was observed. These results confirm that Tyr antagonizes the proconvulsant effect of Phe and APM and they further suggest that no simple relationship exists between the relative brain concentrations of the two amino acids and the response to metrazol convulsions.

  1. L-Cysteine and glutathione restore the reduction of rat hippocampal Na+, K+-ATPase activity induced by aspartame metabolites.

    PubMed

    Simintzi, Irene; Schulpis, Kleopatra H; Angelogianni, Panagoula; Liapi, Charis; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2007-07-31

    Studies have implicated aspartame (ASP) ingestion in neurological problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate hippocampal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase activities after incubation with ASP or each of ASP metabolites, phenylalanine (Phe), methanol (MeOH) and aspartic acid (asp) separately. Suckling rat hippocampal homogenates or pure Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were incubated with ASP metabolites. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase activities were measured spectrophotometrically. Incubation of hippocampal or pure Na(+),K(+)-ATPase with ASP concentrations (expected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)) after ASP consumption of 34, 150 or 200mg/kg resulted in hippocampal enzyme activity reduction of 26%, 50% or 59%, respectively, whereas pure enzyme was remarkably stimulated. Moreover, incubation with hippocampal homogenate of each one of the corresponding in the CSF ASP metabolites related to the intake of common, high/abuse doses of the sweetener, inhibited Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, while pure enzyme was activated. Hippocampal Mg(2+)-ATPase remained unaltered. Addition of l-cysteine (cys) or reduced glutathione (GSH) in ASP mixtures, related with high/toxic doses of the sweetener, completely or partially restored the inactivated membrane Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, whereas the activated pure enzyme activity returned to normal. CSF concentrations of ASP metabolites related to common, abuse/toxic doses of the additive significantly reduced rat hippocampal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, whereas pure enzyme was activated. Cys or GSH completely or partially restored both enzyme activities.

  2. In vivo tyrosine hydroxylation in rat retina: effect of aspartame ingestion in rats pretreated with p-chlorophenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Fernstrom, J D; Fernstrom, M H; Massoudi, M S

    1991-04-01

    Rats were pretreated with p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) to inhibit hepatic phenylalanine hydroxylase. Two days later, oral aspartame (APM; aspartylphenylalanine methylester) administration substantially increased serum phenylalanine (Phe) concentrations and the ratio, in serum, of Phe to the sum of its competitors for transport into brain and retina (the other large neutral amino acids). Smaller changes occurred in serum tyrosine (Tyr) concentrations and in the ratio, in serum, of Tyr to the sum of its competitors. P-chlorophenylalanine-pretreated rats showed normal increases in retinal Tyr hydroxylation rate after Tyr injection, indicating that the enzyme was functionally normal. APM (0, 500, 1000, 1500 mg/kg body wt) intubation of PCPA-pretreated rats produced a dose-related increment in retinal Phe concentrations (up to six times normal values), no changes in retinal Tyr concentration, and no changes in retinal Tyr hydroxylation rate. The results thus indicate that very large increments in retinal Phe concentrations produced by enormous doses of APM do not modify Tyr hydroxylation in vivo.

  3. Aspartame-sweetened beverage: effect on plasma amino acid concentrations in normal adults and adults heterozygous for phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Wolf-Novak, L C; Filer, L J; Bell, E F; Ziegler, E E; Krause, W L; Brummel, M C

    1987-11-01

    Twelve normal subjects ingested either unsweetened beverage (n = 6) or beverage providing 4 mg/kg body weight as aspartame (APM) (n = 6). Neither beverage had any significant effect on plasma aspartate or phenylalanine concentrations. After this study, eight normal and six obligate phenylketonuric (PKU) heterozygous adults each ingested a 354-mL (12-oz) beverage serving on two occasions in a randomized cross-over design. On one occasion the beverage was not sweetened; on the other occasion, the beverage provided 10 mg APM/kg body weight. Plasma amino acid concentrations were measured throughout the 2-h study period. The addition of 10 mg APM/kg body weight to the beverage had no significant effect on plasma aspartate concentration. APM ingestion increased plasma phenylalanine levels of normal subjects from a mean +/- SD baseline value of 5.09 +/- 0.82 mumol/dL to a high mean value of 6.73 +/- 0.75 mumol/dL. In PKU heterozygous subjects the plasma phenylalanine level increased from a mean +/- SD of 9.04 +/- 1.71 to a high mean value of 12.1 +/- 2.08 mumol/dL. The data indicate ready metabolism of the aspartate and phenylalanine portion of APM when administered at levels likely to be ingested by individuals who drink diet beverages.

  4. Simple and rapid high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of aspartame and its metabolites in foods.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, B F; Alli, I; Mulligan, C N

    1996-02-23

    A method for the determination of aspartame (N-L-alpha-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) and its metabolites, applicable on a routine quality assurance basis, is described. Liquid samples (diet Coke, 7-Up, Pepsi, etc.) were injected directly onto a mini-cartridge reversed-phase column on a high-performance liquid chromatographic system, whereas solid samples (Equal, hot chocolate powder, pudding, etc.) were extracted with water. Optimising chromatographic conditions resulted in resolved components of interest within 12 min. The by-products were confirmed by mass spectrometry. Although the method was developed on a two-pump HPLC system fitted with a diode-array detector, it is straightforward and can be transformed to the simplest HPLC configuration. Using a single-piston pump (with damper), a fixed-wavelength detector and a recorder/integrator, the degradation of products can be monitored as they decompose. The results obtained were in harmony with previously reported tedious methods. The method is simple, rapid, quantitative and does not involve complex, hazardous or toxic chemistry.

  5. Effect of dietary aspartame on plasma concentrations of phenylalanine and tyrosine in normal and homozygous phenylketonuric patients.

    PubMed

    Mackey, S A; Berlin, C M

    1992-07-01

    Six normal subjects each ingested a single 12-oz can of a diet cola (Diet Coke) providing 184 mg aspartame (APM), of which 104 mg is phenylalanine (Phe), and, on another occasion, a single 12-oz can of regular cola (Coke Classic). Neither cola significantly affected plasma concentrations of Phe or tyrosine over the three-hour postingestion study period. Each of five homozygous phenylketonuric (PKU) subjects (ages 11, 16, 17, 21, and 23 years) ingested a single 12-oz can of the same diet cola. In these five subjects (three with classic PKU and two with hyperphenylalinemia), the increase in plasma Phe concentrations varied from 0.26 mg/dL to 1.77 mg/dL two or three hours after ingestion (baseline levels, 5.04 to 17.2 mg/dL). Tyrosine concentrations did not differ significantly from baseline levels. The data indicate that ingestion of dietary Phe, as supplied in a single can of diet cola, is readily handled in both normal and PKU subjects. The small increases in plasma Phe concentrations in the homozygous PKU patients are not considered clinically significant.

  6. Repeated ingestion of aspartame-sweetened beverage: effect on plasma amino acid concentrations in individuals heterozygous for phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L; Bell, E F; Ziegler, E E; Brummel, M C; Krause, W L

    1989-01-01

    It has been suggested that excessive use of aspartame (APM) (N-L-alpha-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) might grossly elevate plasma aspartate and phenylalanine concentrations in individuals heterozygous for phenylketonuria (PKUH). In study 1 six adult PKUH (three males; three females) ingested three successive 12-oz servings of beverage at 2-h intervals. The study was carried out in two parts in a randomized crossover design. In one arm the beverage was not sweetened. In the other the beverage provided 10 mg APM/kg body weight per serving. The addition of APM to the beverage did not significantly increase plasma aspartate concentration but did increase plasma phenylalanine levels 2.3 to 4.1 mumol/dL above baseline values 30 to 45 min after each dose. The high mean plasma phenylalanine level after repeated APM dosing (13.9 +/- 2.15 mumol/dL) was slightly, but not significantly, above the normal postprandial range for PKUH (12.6 +/- 2.11 mumol/dL). In study 2 six different adult PKUH ingested beverage providing 30 mg APM/kg body weight as a single bolus. The high mean plasma phenylalanine concentration and the phenylalanine to large neutral amino acid ratio were significantly higher when APM was ingested as a single bolus than when ingested as a divided dose.

  7. Peptide synthesis of aspartame precursor using organic-solvent-stable PST-01 protease in monophasic aqueous-organic solvent systems.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiyama, Shotaro; Doukyu, Noriyuki; Yasuda, Masahiro; Ishimi, Kosaku; Ogino, Hiroyasu

    2007-01-01

    The PST-01 protease is a metalloprotease that has zinc ion at the active center and is very stable in the presence of water-soluble organic solvents. The reaction rates and the equilibrium yields of the aspartame precursor N-carbobenzoxy-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (Cbz-Asp-Phe-OMe) synthesis from N-carbobenzoxy-L-aspartic acid (Cbz-Asp) and L-phenylalanine methyl ester (Phe-OMe) in the presence of water-soluble organic solvents were investigated under various conditions. Higher reaction rate and yield of Cbz-Asp-Phe-OMe were attained by the PST-01 protease when 30 mM Cbz-Asp and 500 mM Phe-OMe were used. The maximum reaction rate was obtained pH 8.0 and 37 degrees C. In the presence of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), glycerol, methanol, and ethylene glycol, higher reaction rates were obtained. The equilibrium yield was the highest in the presence of DMSO. The equilibrium yield of Cbz-Asp-Phe-OMe using the PST-01 protease attained 83% in the presence of 50% (v/v) DMSO.

  8. Effect of mealing on plasma and brain amino acid, and brain monoamine in rats after oral aspartame.

    PubMed

    Torii, K; Mimura, T; Takasaki, Y; Ichimura, M

    1986-01-01

    Aspartame (APM; L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) was investigated for its ability to alter brain amino acids and monoamines in overnight fasted rats allowed to consume commercial diets for 60 minutes. In addition, the effects of mealing on the changes in plasma and brain amino acids and brain monoamines induced by glucose and/or insulin, and known pharmacologically active compounds, were studied. The consumption of the commercial chow largely prevented changes in blood glucose and amino acids, and brain amino acids and the monoamines dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin that might be expected to occur following glucose with or without insulin. Feeding failed to prevent changes in the above parameters when 5-hydroxy-tryptophan, p-chlorophenylalanine and reserpine were administered. The oral administration of up to 250 mg/kg BW APM with water or glucose followed by free feeding failed to alter brain monoamines. These studies demonstrate the potent ability of food to normalize biochemical parameters in blood and brain that otherwise might occur, and clearly show the lack of effect on brain monoamine levels of abuse doses of APM when administered with food.

  9. Enhancement of sweetness ratings of aspartame by a vanilla odor presented either by orthonasal or retronasal routes.

    PubMed

    Sakai, N; Kobayakawa, T; Gotow, N; Saito, S; Imada, S

    2001-06-01

    When taste stimuli are presented with specific odor stimuli, the perceived intensity of taste is enhanced, a phenomenon called odor-induced taste enhancement. There is a possibility, however, that the odor substances might have stimulated the taste receptors in the oral cavity as well as odor receptors in the nasal cavity because the odor substances were dissolved in the taste solutions in some preceding studies. Schifferstein and Verlegh (1996) found that the odor-induced taste enhancement effect was not found when the subjects wore a nose clip to prevent the olfactory perception. Thus, it was suggested that the odor-induced taste enhancement did not result from the stimulation of receptors in the oral cavity. To confirm and extend their study, we presented the odor stimuli simultaneously with, but not dissolved in, the taste stimuli with a more advanced approach to stimulus presentation. The participants reported enhancement of sweetness ratings for aspartame when the taste stimuli were presented with a vanilla odor. This odor induced taste enhancement was found when the gaseous odor stimuli were presented either by the retronasal route or by the orthonasal route. There was little possibility that the vanilla odor stimulated the taste receptors during the orthonasal stimulation because the odor stimuli were presented directly into the nasal cavity. Thus, we could show that the odor-induced taste enlancement is elicited by olfactory perception. These results also suggested that there is little functional difference between retronasal and orthonasal olfaction.

  10. Consuming aspartame with and without taste: differential effects on appetite and food intake of young adult males.

    PubMed

    Black, R M; Leiter, L A; Anderson, G H

    1993-03-01

    Despite some reports that aspartame (APM)-sweetened beverages may increase subjective appetite, previously we demonstrated that drinking 280 ml of an APM-sweetened soft drink (170 mg APM) had no effect on appetite, and 560 ml of the same soft drink (340 mg APM) reduced appetite. The present study examined this appetite reduction to determine its cause. Eighteen normal weight young adult males received five treatments (beverage preloads) at 1100 h in a randomized order, one per week: 280 ml of carbonated mineral water (CMW) (control), 560 ml of CMW, 280 ml of CMW with 340 mg of encapsulated APM, 280 ml of CMW sweetened with 340 mg APM, 560 ml of an APM-sweetened soft drink (340 mg APM). Subjective hunger and food appeal were measured from 0930 a.m. to 1230 h, and food intake from a buffet lunch offered at 1205 h was measured. Treatment had no effect on food intake or macronutrient selection. Both 560 ml of CMW or soft drink suppressed appetite, although 280 ml of APM-sweetened mineral water significantly increased subjective appetite relative to the control. Encapsulated APM had no effect on appetite. Therefore, appetite reduction following consumption of an APM-sweetened drink is likely due to drink volume and not the APM content. In addition, consuming APM-sweetened CMW produces a short-term increase in subjective appetite.

  11. Estimated intake of intense sweeteners from non-alcoholic beverages in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Leth, T; Fabricius, N; Fagt, S

    2007-03-01

    In 1999, 116 samples of non-alcoholic beverages were analysed for the intense sweeteners cyclamate, acesulfame-K, aspartame and saccharin. High contents of cyclamate close to the maximum permitted level in 1999 of 400 mg l(-1) were found in many soft drinks. The estimated intake of the sweeteners was calculated using the Danish Dietary Survey based on 3098 persons aged 1-80 years. The estimated intake with 90th percentiles of 0.7, 4.0 and 0.2 mg kg(-1) body weight (bw) day(-1) for acesulfame-K, aspartame and saccharin, respectively, was much lower than the acceptable daily intake (ADI) values of 15, 40 and 2.5 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for acesulfame-K, aspartame and saccharin, respectively. However, the 90th percentile of the estimated cyclamate intake in 1-3 year olds was close to the ADI value of 7 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1); and the 99th percentile in the 1-10 year olds far exceeded the ADI value. Boys aged 7-10 years had a significantly higher estimated intake of cyclamate than girls. The 90th percentile for the whole population was 1.8 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1). After the reduction in the maximum permitted level in the European Union in 2004 from 400 to 250 mg cyclamate l-1, the exposure in Denmark can also be expected to be reduced. A new investigation in 2007 should demonstrate whether the problem with high cyclamate intake is now solved.

  12. Estimated intake of intense sweeteners from non-alcoholic beverages in Denmark, 2005.

    PubMed

    Leth, T; Jensen, U; Fagt, S; Andersen, R

    2008-06-01

    In 2005, 76 out of 177 analysed samples of non-alcoholic beverages were found to contain the intense sweeteners cyclamate, acesulfame-K, aspartame, and saccharin. The content of cyclamate did not exceed the now permitted maximum level in the European Union of 250 mg l(-1) in soft drinks. The estimated intake of the sweeteners was calculated using the Danish Dietary Survey based on 3098 persons aged 1-80 years. The estimated intake with 90th percentiles of 0.7, 0.8 and 0.2 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for acesulfame-K, aspartame, and saccharin, respectively, was much lower than the acceptable daily intake values of 15, 40, 7, and 2.5 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for acesulfame-K, aspartame, and saccharin, respectively, and on the same level as in the similar investigation from 1999. In contrast to the 1999 investigation, the 90th percentile of the estimated cyclamate intake in 1-3 year olds with 3.7 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) was in 2005 lower than the acceptable daily intake of 7 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1). However, the 99th percentile for 1-3 year olds with 7.4 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) still exceeded the acceptable daily intake slightly. The 90th percentile for the whole population with 0.9 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) was halved compared with 1999. The reduction in the European Union of the maximum permitted level for cyclamate from 400 to 250 mg l(-1) has brought the intake of cyclamate in small children down to well below the acceptable daily intake value.

  13. Advantame sweetener preference in C57BL/6J mice and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Ackroff, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Advantame is a new ultrahigh-intensity noncaloric sweetener derived from aspartame and approved for human use. Rats and mice are not attracted to the taste of aspartame and this study determined their preference for advantame. In 24-h choice tests with water, C57BL/6J mice and Sprague-Dawley rats were indifferent to advantame at concentrations of 0.01, 0.03, and 0.1mM but significantly preferred 0.3 and 1mM advantame to water. Both species also preferred 1mM advantame to 1mM saccharin in direct choice tests, but preferred 10mM saccharin to 1mM advantame, which is near the solubility limit for this sweetener. Mice also preferred 1mM advantame to 1mM sucralose or acesulfame K, but preferred both sweeteners at 10mM to 1mM advantame. In addition, mice preferred 1mM advantame to 1 and 10mM aspartame. Thus, advantame is a potent sweetener for rodents but, because of limited solubility, is not an effective alternative to saccharin, sucralose, or acesulfame K at higher concentrations. PMID:25560795

  14. Sweet taste in the calf: III. Behavioral responses to sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Hellekant, G; Hård af Segerstad, C; Roberts, T W

    1994-09-01

    The hedonic response to the sweeteners acesulfame-K, aspartame, fructose, galactose, glucose, glycine, lactose, maltose, Na-saccharine, sucrose, and xylitol was recorded in five groups of 4-16-week-old calves. The compounds were presented to the calves for 12 or 24 h in two-bottle preference tests with tap water as one choice. Glycine (10 mM and higher), sucrose (20 mM and higher), and fructose concentrations were most preferred. Sodium-saccharine was highly preferred at and above 4 mM concentration, fructose and lactose were preferred above 40 mM, galactose was preferred moderately, acesulfame-K and maltose were preferred inconsistently, and aspartame and xylitol were not preferred at any concentration. The change of preference during the tests was also studied. Three types of consumption changes were observed. 1) Increased preference of the tastant during consumption, seen during sucrose and, to lesser a extent, fructose consumption. 2) Initial high preference for the tastants, diminishing during the test period, observed with fructose, galactose, glucose, glycine, lactose, and maltose. 3) Initial large fluctuations in consumption from the two bottles, but no change in overall preference. This pattern was seen with xylitol and aspartame. This technique seems to offer a method to assess the long-term preference for a compound within one relatively short two-bottle preference session.

  15. Advantame sweetener preference in C57BL/6J mice and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Ackroff, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Advantame is a new ultrahigh-intensity noncaloric sweetener derived from aspartame and approved for human use. Rats and mice are not attracted to the taste of aspartame and this study determined their preference for advantame. In 24-h choice tests with water, C57BL/6J mice and Sprague-Dawley rats were indifferent to advantame at concentrations of 0.01, 0.03, and 0.1mM but significantly preferred 0.3 and 1mM advantame to water. Both species also preferred 1mM advantame to 1mM saccharin in direct choice tests, but preferred 10mM saccharin to 1mM advantame, which is near the solubility limit for this sweetener. Mice also preferred 1mM advantame to 1mM sucralose or acesulfame K, but preferred both sweeteners at 10mM to 1mM advantame. In addition, mice preferred 1mM advantame to 1 and 10mM aspartame. Thus, advantame is a potent sweetener for rodents but, because of limited solubility, is not an effective alternative to saccharin, sucralose, or acesulfame K at higher concentrations.

  16. Analysis of multiple sweeteners and their degradation products in lassi by HPLC and HPTLC plates.

    PubMed

    George, V; Arora, S; Wadhwa, B K; Singh, A K

    2010-08-01

    A solid phase extraction method using C18 cartridges was standardized for the isolation of multiple sweeteners (aspartame, acesulfame-K and saccharin) and their degradation products (diketopiperazine, Lphenylalanine, acetoacetamide and 2-sulfobenzoic acid) from lassi. Analytical conditions for HPLC were standardized over C18 column using UV detector for the simultaneous separation and estimation of multiple sweeteners and their degradation products in lassi sample isolates. A simple cartridge free method was developed for the isolation of sucralose from lassi. Method was also standardized for qualitative detection and quantitative estimation of sucralose over amino and silica gel plates of HPTLC.

  17. Cognitive and biochemical effects of monosodium glutamate and aspartame, administered individually and in combination in male albino mice.

    PubMed

    Abu-Taweel, Gasem M; A, Zyadah M; Ajarem, Jamaan S; Ahmad, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the in vivo effects of monosodium glutamate (MSG) and aspartame (ASM) individually and in combination on the cognitive behavior and biochemical parameters like neurotransmitters and oxidative stress indices in the brain tissue of mice. Forty male Swiss albino mice were randomly divided into four groups of ten each and were exposed to MSG and ASM through drinking water for one month. Group I was the control and was given normal tap water. Groups II and III received MSG (8 mg/kg) and ASM (32 mg/kg) respectively dissolved in tap water. Group IV received MSG and ASM together in the same doses. After the exposure period, the animals were subjected to cognitive behavioral tests in a shuttle box and a water maze. Thereafter, the animals were sacrificed and the neurotransmitters and oxidative stress indices were estimated in their forebrain tissue. Both MSG and ASM individually as well as in combination had significant disruptive effects on the cognitive responses, memory retention and learning capabilities of the mice in the order (MSG+ASM)>ASM>MSG. Furthermore, while MSG and ASM individually were unable to alter the brain neurotransmitters and the oxidative stress indices, their combination dose (MSG+ASM) decreased significantly the levels of neurotransmitters (dopamine and serotonin) and it also caused oxidative stress by increasing the lipid peroxides measured in the form of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and decreasing the level of total glutathione (GSH). Further studies are required to evaluate the synergistic effects of MSG and ASM on the neurotransmitters and oxidative stress indices and their involvement in cognitive dysfunctions.

  18. Life-Span Exposure to Low Doses of Aspartame Beginning during Prenatal Life Increases Cancer Effects in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Soffritti, Morando; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Tibaldi, Eva; Esposti, Davide Degli; Lauriola, Michelina

    2007-01-01

    Background In a previous study conducted at the Cesare Maltoni Cancer Research Center of the European Ramazzini Foundation (CMCRC/ERF), we demonstrated for the first time that aspartame (APM) is a multipotent carcinogenic agent when various doses are administered with feed to Sprague-Dawley rats from 8 weeks of age throughout the life span. Objective The aim of this second study is to better quantify the carcinogenic risk of APM, beginning treatment during fetal life. Methods We studied groups of 70–95 male and female Sprague-Dawley rats administered APM (2,000, 400, or 0 ppm) with feed from the 12th day of fetal life until natural death. Results Our results show a) a significant dose-related increase of malignant tumor–bearing animals in males (p < 0.01), particularly in the group treated with 2,000 ppm APM (p < 0.01); b) a significant increase in incidence of lymphomas/leukemias in males treated with 2,000 ppm (p < 0.05) and a significant dose-related increase in incidence of lymphomas/leukemias in females (p < 0.01), particularly in the 2,000-ppm group (p < 0.01); and c) a significant dose-related increase in incidence of mammary cancer in females (p < 0.05), particularly in the 2,000-ppm group (p < 0.05). Conclusions The results of this carcinogenicity bioassay confirm and reinforce the first experimental demonstration of APM’s multipotential carcinogenicity at a dose level close to the acceptable daily intake for humans. Furthermore, the study demonstrates that when life-span exposure to APM begins during fetal life, its carcinogenic effects are increased. PMID:17805418

  19. Effect of high-protein meal plus aspartame ingestion on plasma phenylalanine concentrations in obligate heterozygotes for phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Curtius, H C; Endres, W; Blau, N

    1994-04-01

    The effect of a protein-rich meal alone or in combination with 85 mumol/kg body weight aspartame (APM) on plasma phenylalanine and large neutral amino acids (LNAA) was evaluated in obligate heterozygotes for phenylketonuria (PKU) and normal subjects (controls). Thirteen PKU heterozygotes (seven women, six men) and 13 controls (five women, eight men) ingested a 12-noon meal providing approximately 303 mumol/kg Phe. In addition, 10 PKU heterozygotes (five women, five men) and 10 controls (five women, five men) ingested the same meal with 85 mumol/kg APM (providing 75 mumol/kg Phe). Plasma amino acids were analyzed at baseline (-4 and 0 hours) and at 1, 3, and 20 hours after the meal or meal plus APM. Compared with the meal alone, ingestion of the meal plus APM significantly increased plasma Phe concentrations in both controls and PKU heterozygotes. Mean plasma Phe values were higher for controls at 1 hour (95 +/- 7 mumol/L) and for PKU heterozygotes at 3 hours (153 +/- 21 mumol/L). After the addition of APM to the meal, the highest mean plasma Phe concentration was only slightly greater than the usual postprandial range for both controls and PKU heterozygotes. Ingestion of the meal did not increase the plasma Phe/LNAA ratio in either controls or PKU heterozygotes. Compared with baseline, the plasma Phe/LNAA ratio increased significantly 1 hour after combined ingestion of the meal plus APM in both groups (P = .020 and P = .008, respectively); however, the ratios were well below the range of Phe/LNAA values in individuals with mild hyperphenylalaninemia, who are clinically normal and do not require a Phe-restricted diet.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Isothermal Fourier transform infrared microspectrosopic studies on the stability kinetics of solid-state intramolecular cyclization of aspartame sweetener.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y D; Lin, S Y

    2000-03-01

    A novel Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrophotometer equipped with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to investigate the kinetics of intramolecular cyclization of aspartame (APM) sweetener in the solid state under isothermal conditions. The thermal-dependent changes in the peak intensity of IR spectra at 1543, 1283, and 1259 cm(-1) were examined to explore the reaction. The results support that the intramolecular cyclization process in APM proceeded in three steps: the methoxyl group of ester was first thermolyzed to release methanol, then an acyl cation was attacked by the lone pair of electrons available on nitrogen by an S(N)1 pathway, and finally ring-closure occurred. The intramolecular cyclization of APM determined by this microscopic FT-IR/DSC system was found to follow zero-order kinetics after a brief induction period. The bond cleavage energy (259.38 kJ/mol) of thermolysis for the leaving group of -OCH(3), the bond conversion energy (328.88 kJ/mol) for the amide II NH band to DKP NH band, and the CN bond formation energy (326.93 kJ/mol) of cyclization for the DKP in the APM molecule were also calculated from the Arrhenius equation. The total activation energy of the DKP formation via intramolecular cyclization was 261.33 kJ/mol, calculated by the above summation of the bond energy of cleavage, conversion, and formation, which was near to the value determined by the DSC or TGA method. This indicates that the microscopic FT-IR/DSC system is useful as a potential tool not only to investigate the degradation mechanism of drugs in the solid state but also to directly predict the bond energy of the reaction.

  1. Simultaneous analysis of aspartame and its hydrolysis products of Coca-Cola Zero by on-line postcolumn derivation fluorescence detection and ultraviolet detection coupled two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheanyeh; Wu, Shing-Chen

    2011-05-20

    An innovative two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography system was developed for the simultaneous analysis of aspartame and its hydrolysis products of Coca-Cola Zero. A C8 reversed-phase chromatographic column with ultraviolet detection was used as the first dimension for the determination of aspartame, and a ligand-exchange chromatographic column with on-line postcolumn derivation fluorescence detection was employed as the second dimension for the analysis of amino acid enantiomers. The fluorimetric derivative reagent of amino acid enantiomers was o-phthaldialdehyde. The hydrolysis of aspartame in Coca-Cola Zero was induced by electric-heating or microwave heating. Aspartame was quantified by the matrix matched external standard calibration curve with a linear concentration range of 0-50 μg mL(-1) (r(2)=0.9984). The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) were 1.3 μg mL(-1) and 4.3 μg mL(-1), respectively. The amino acid enantiomers was analyzed by the matrix matched internal standard calibration method (D-leucine as the internal standard) with a linear concentration range of 0-10 μg mL(-1) (r(2)=0.9988-0.9997). The LODs and LOQs for L- and D-aspartic acid and L- and D-phenylalanine were 0.16-0.17 μg mL(-1) and 0.52-0.55 μg mL(-1), respectively, that was 12-13 times more sensitive than ultraviolet detection. The overall analysis accuracy for aspartame and amino acid enantiomers was 90.2-99.2% and 90.4-96.2%, respectively. The overall analysis precision for aspartame and amino acid enantiomers was 0.1-1.7% and 0.5-6.7%, respectively. Generally, the extent of aspartame hydrolysis increases with the increase of electro-thermal temperature, microwave power, and the duration of hydrolysis time. D-aspartic acid and D-phenylalanine can be observed with the electro-thermal racemization at the hydrolysis temperature 120°C for 1 day and only D-aspartic acid can be observed at the hydrolysis temperature 90°C for 2 and 3 days. For

  2. Conformation analysis of aspartame-based sweeteners by NMR spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and X-ray diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    De Capua, Antonia; Goodman, Murray; Amino, Yusuke; Saviano, Michele; Benedetti, Ettore

    2006-02-01

    We report here the synthesis and the conformation analysis by 1H NMR spectroscopy and computer simulations of six potent sweet molecules, N-[3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-3-methylbutyl]-alpha-L-aspartyl-S-tert-butyl-L-cysteine 1-methylester (1; 70 000 times more potent than sucrose), N-[3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-3-methylbutyl]-alpha-L-aspartyl-beta-cyclohexyl-L-alanine 1-methylester (2; 50 000 times more potent than sucrose), N-[3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-3-methylbutyl]-alpha-L-aspartyl-4-cyan-L-phenylalanine 1-methylester (3; 2 000 times more potent than sucrose), N-[3,3-dimethylbutyl]-alpha-L-aspartyl-(1R,2S,4S)-1-methyl-2-hydroxy-4-phenylhexylamide (4; 5500 times more potent than sucrose), N-[3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)propyl]-alpha-L-aspartyl-(1R,2S,4S)-1-methyl-2-hydroxy-4-phenylhexylamide (5; 15 000 times more potent than sucrose), and N-[3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-3-methylbutyl]-alpha-L-aspartyl-(1R,2S,4S)-1-methyl-2-hydroxy-4-phenylhexylamide (6; 15 000 times more potent than sucrose). The "L-shaped" structure, which we believe to be responsible for sweet taste, is accessible to all six molecules in solution. This structure is characterized by a zwitterionic ring formed by the AH- and B-containing moieties located along the +y axis and by the hydrophobic group X pointing into the +x axis. Extended conformations with the AH- and B-containing moieties along the +y axis and the hydrophobic group X pointing into the -y axis were observed for all six sweeteners. For compound 5, the crystal-state conformation was also determined by an X-ray diffraction study. The result indicates that compound 5 adopts an L-shaped structure even in the crystalline state. The extraordinary potency of the N-arylalkylated or N-alkylated compounds 1-6, as compared with that of the unsubstituted aspartame-based sweet taste ligands, can be explained by the effect of a second hydrophobic binding domain in addition to interactions arising from the L-shaped structure. In our

  3. Conformation analysis of aspartame-based sweeteners by NMR spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and X-ray diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    De Capua, Antonia; Goodman, Murray; Amino, Yusuke; Saviano, Michele; Benedetti, Ettore

    2006-02-01

    We report here the synthesis and the conformation analysis by 1H NMR spectroscopy and computer simulations of six potent sweet molecules, N-[3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-3-methylbutyl]-alpha-L-aspartyl-S-tert-butyl-L-cysteine 1-methylester (1; 70 000 times more potent than sucrose), N-[3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-3-methylbutyl]-alpha-L-aspartyl-beta-cyclohexyl-L-alanine 1-methylester (2; 50 000 times more potent than sucrose), N-[3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-3-methylbutyl]-alpha-L-aspartyl-4-cyan-L-phenylalanine 1-methylester (3; 2 000 times more potent than sucrose), N-[3,3-dimethylbutyl]-alpha-L-aspartyl-(1R,2S,4S)-1-methyl-2-hydroxy-4-phenylhexylamide (4; 5500 times more potent than sucrose), N-[3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)propyl]-alpha-L-aspartyl-(1R,2S,4S)-1-methyl-2-hydroxy-4-phenylhexylamide (5; 15 000 times more potent than sucrose), and N-[3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-3-methylbutyl]-alpha-L-aspartyl-(1R,2S,4S)-1-methyl-2-hydroxy-4-phenylhexylamide (6; 15 000 times more potent than sucrose). The "L-shaped" structure, which we believe to be responsible for sweet taste, is accessible to all six molecules in solution. This structure is characterized by a zwitterionic ring formed by the AH- and B-containing moieties located along the +y axis and by the hydrophobic group X pointing into the +x axis. Extended conformations with the AH- and B-containing moieties along the +y axis and the hydrophobic group X pointing into the -y axis were observed for all six sweeteners. For compound 5, the crystal-state conformation was also determined by an X-ray diffraction study. The result indicates that compound 5 adopts an L-shaped structure even in the crystalline state. The extraordinary potency of the N-arylalkylated or N-alkylated compounds 1-6, as compared with that of the unsubstituted aspartame-based sweet taste ligands, can be explained by the effect of a second hydrophobic binding domain in addition to interactions arising from the L-shaped structure. In our

  4. First experimental demonstration of the multipotential carcinogenic effects of aspartame administered in the feed to Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Soffritti, Morando; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Degli Esposti, Davide; Lambertini, Luca; Tibaldi, Eva; Rigano, Anna

    2006-03-01

    The Cesare Maltoni Cancer Research Center of the European Ramazzini Foundation has conducted a long-term bioassay on aspartame (APM), a widely used artificial sweetener. APM was administered with feed to 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats (100-150/sex/group), at concentrations of 100,000, 50,000, 10,000, 2,000, 400, 80, or 0 ppm. The treatment lasted until natural death, at which time all deceased animals underwent complete necropsy. Histopathologic evaluation of all pathologic lesions and of all organs and tissues collected was routinely performed on each animal of all experimental groups. The results of the study show for the first time that APM, in our experimental conditions, causes a) an increased incidence of malignant-tumor-bearing animals with a positive significant trend in males (p < or = 0.05) and in females (p < or = 0.01), in particular those females treated at 50,000 ppm (p < or = 0.01); b) an increase in lymphomas and leukemias with a positive significant trend in both males (p < or = 0.05) and females (p < or = 0.01), in particular in females treated at doses of 100,000 (p < or = 0.01), 50,000 (p < or = 0.01), 10,000 (p < or = 0.05), 2,000 (p < or = 0.05), or 400 ppm (p < or = 0.01); c) a statistically significant increased incidence, with a positive significant trend (p < or = 0.01), of transitional cell carcinomas of the renal pelvis and ureter and their precursors (dysplasias) in females treated at 100,000 (p < or = 0.01), 50,000 (p < or = 0.01), 10,000 (p < or = 0.01), 2,000 (p < or = 0.05), or 400 ppm (p < or = 0.05); and d) an increased incidence of malignant schwannomas of peripheral nerves with a positive trend (p < or = 0.05) in males. The results of this mega-experiment indicate that APM is a multipotential carcinogenic agent, even at a daily dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, much less than the current acceptable daily intake. On the basis of these results, a reevaluation of the present guidelines on the use and consumption of APM is urgent and

  5. Results of long-term carcinogenicity bioassay on Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to aspartame administered in feed.

    PubMed

    Belpoggi, Fiorella; Soffritti, Morando; Padovani, Michela; Degli Esposti, Davide; Lauriola, Michelina; Minardi, Franco

    2006-09-01

    Aspartame (APM) is one of the most widely used artificial sweeteners in the world. Its ever-growing use in more than 6000 products, such as soft drinks, chewing gum, candy, desserts, etc., has been accompanied by rising consumer concerns regarding its safety, in particular its potential long-term carcinogenic effects. In light of the inadequacy of the carcinogenicity bioassays performed in the 1970s and 1980s, a long-term mega-experiment on APM was undertaken at the Cesare Maltoni Cancer Research Center of the European Ramazzini Foundation on groups of male and female Sprague-Dawley rats (100-150/sex/group), 8 weeks old at the start of the experiment. APM was administered in feed at concentrations of 100,000, 50,000, 10,000, 2,000, 400, 80, or 0 ppm. Treatment lasted until spontaneous death of the animals. The results of the study demonstrate that APM causes: (a) an increased incidence of malignant tumor-bearing animals, with a positive significant trend in both sexes, and in particular in females treated at 50,000 ppm (P < or = 0.01) when compared to controls; (b) an increase in lymphomas-leukemias, with a positive significant trend in both sexes, and in particular in females treated at doses of 100,000 (P < or = 0.01), 50,000 (P < or = 0.01), 10,000 (P < or = 0.05), 2000 (P < or = 0.05), and 400 ppm (P < or = 0.01); (c) a statistically significant increased incidence, with a positive significant trend, of transitional cell carcinomas of the renal pelvis and ureter in females and particularly in those treated at 100,000 ppm (P < or = 0.05); and (d) an increased incidence of malignant schwannomas of the peripheral nerves, with a positive trend in males (P < or = 0.05). The results of this mega-experiment indicate that APM, in the tested experimental conditions, is a multipotential carcinogenic agent.

  6. Interspecies and interstrain studies on the increased susceptibility to metrazol-induced convulsions in animals given aspartame.

    PubMed

    Diomede, L; Romano, M; Guiso, G; Caccia, S; Nava, S; Salmona, M

    1991-02-01

    The ability of aspartame (APM) to increase the susceptibility to metrazol-induced convulsions was studied in two strains of mice (CD1 and DBA/2J) and in guinea-pigs. Rats were included as known positive controls. Plasma and brain levels of phenylalanine (Phe) and tyrosine (Tyr) were measured in CD1 mice and guinea-pigs at various intervals after a dose of 1 g APM/kg body weight (administered orally to mice and ip to guinea-pigs). In mice, peak levels of Phe and Tyr were observed in plasma after 30 min and in brain after 60 min. In guinea-pigs peak plasma levels of Phe and Tyr occurred 30 min after treatment. Phe was at a maximum in guinea-pig brain after 30 min, while Tyr levels reached a peak at 120 min. In further experiments Phe and Tyr levels were measured 1 hr after APM doses of 0.5, 0.75 or 1 g/kg. In CD1 mice, plasma Phe and Tyr levels were increased significantly only at the highest dose, whereas in brain, Tyr concentrations were significantly increased by 0.75 or 1 g APM/kg and Phe was significantly increased by all three doses. In the guinea-pig, plasma Phe and Tyr were increased significantly only by 1 g APM/kg and in brain this dose significantly raised only the Phe levels. Monoamine and metabolite levels were determined in the brain striata of CD1 and DBA/2J mice 1 hr after the oral administration of 1 or 2 g APM/kg body weight; no differences from control values were found in either strain. The studies of potentiation of metrazol-induced convulsions showed that APM, at doses of up to 2 g/kg body weight, had no such effect in mice or guinea-pigs. In contrast, as expected, the potentiation was significant in the rat at 1 g/kg.

  7. Stability considerations of aspartame in the direct analysis of artificial sweeteners in water samples using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Berset, Jean-Daniel; Ochsenbein, Nicole

    2012-07-01

    A HPLC-MS/MS method is presented for the simultaneous determination of frequently used artificial sweeteners (ASs) and the main metabolite of aspartame (ASP), diketopiperazine (DKP), in environmental water samples using the direct-injection (DI) technique, thereby achieving limits of quantification (LOQ) of 10 ng L(-1). For a reliable quantification of ASP pH should be adjusted to 4.3 to prevent formation of the metabolite. Acesulfame (ACE), saccharin (SAC), cyclamate (CYC) and sucralose (SUC) were ubiquitously found in water samples. Highest concentrations up to 61 μg L(-1) of ACE were found in wastewater effluents, followed by surface water with concentrations up to 7 μg L(-1), lakes up to 600 ng L(-1) and groundwater and tap water up to 70 ng L(-1). The metabolite DKP was only detected in wastewater up to 200 ng L(-1) and at low detection frequencies.

  8. Simultaneous formation and detection of the reaction product of solid-state aspartame sweetener by FT-IR/DSC microscopic system.

    PubMed

    Lin, S Y; Cheng, Y D

    2000-10-01

    The solid-state stability of aspartame hemihydrate (APM) sweetener during thermal treatment is important information for the food industry. The present study uses the novel technique of Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy equipped with differential scanning calorimetry (FT-IR/DSC microscopic system) to accelerate and determine simultaneously the thermal-dependent impurity formation of solid-state APM. The results indicate a dramatic change in IR spectra from 50, 110 or 153 degrees C, which was respectively attributed to the onset temperature of water evaporation, dehydration and cyclization processes. It is suggested that the processes of dehydration and intramolecular cyclization occurred in the solid-state APM during the heating process. As an impurity, 3-carboxymethyl-6-benzyl-2,5-diketopiperazine (DKP) degraded from solid state APM via intramolecular cyclization and liberation of methanol. This was evidenced by this novel FT-IR/DSC microscopic system in a one-step procedure.

  9. Direct stereochemical resolution of aspartame stereoisomers and their degradation products by high-performance liquid chromatography on a chiral crown ether based stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Motellier, S; Wainer, I W

    1990-09-21

    The direct stereochemical resolution of the four stereoisomers of aspartame (N-DL-alpha-aspartyl-DL-phenylalanine methyl ester) and their degradation products was achieved on a high-performance liquid chromatography chiral stationary phase based upon a chiral crown ether. The chromatographic conditions included a mobile phase composed of aqueous perchloric acid adjusted to a pH of 2.8 and modified with 1.5% of 2-propanol and a temperature gradient. The active L,L-isomer (sold under the brand name NutraSweet) was measured in a diet cola and coffee sweetened with NutraSweet. Degradation products of NutraSweet were also detected but no racemization of stereochemical contamination was observed.

  10. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of the stereoisomers of some sweetener peptides with a helical nickel(II) chelate in the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Bazylak, G

    1994-05-13

    The use of a chiral mobile phase additive in the form of the helically distorted, square-planar, chiral nickel(II) chelate dl-[4,4'-(1-methyl-2-propylethane-1,2-diyldiimino)bis(pent-3 -en-2- onato)]nickel(II) was investigated for the resolution of optical isomers of dipeptide-type sweeteners, viz., aspartame, alitame and antiaspartame, and some of their decomposition products, e.g., diketopiperazines. The chiral discrimination mechanism for the solutes was elucidated. The proposed chiral RP-HPLC system was applied to the stereoselective determination of aspartame impurities in samples of its commercial dietetic and pharmaceutical formulations.

  11. Nitrosation of aspartic acid, aspartame, and glycine ethylester. Alkylation of 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP) in vitro and binding to DNA in the rat.

    PubMed

    Meier, I; Shephard, S E; Lutz, W K

    1990-05-01

    In a colorimetric assay using 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP) as a nucleophilic scavenger of alkylating agents, the nitrosation and alkylation reactions were investigated for a number of amino acids and derivatives. The alkylating activity increased with the square of the nitrite concentration. The nitrosation rate constants for aspartic acid, aspartame, and glycine ethylester (= precursors C) were 0.08, 1.4 and less than or equal to 0.2, respectively, expressed in terms of the pH-dependent k2 rate constant of the equation dNOC/dt = k2.[C].[nitrite]2. The rates correlated inversely with the basicity of the amino group. The stability of the alkylating activity was astonishingly high, both in acid and at neutral pH. Half-lives of 500, 200, and 30 min were determined for aspartic acid (pH 3.5), aspartame (pH 2.5), and glycine ethylester (pH 2.5). Values of 60, 15, and 2 min, respectively, were found at pH 7. It is concluded that rearrangement of the primary N-nitroso product to the ultimate alkylating agent could be rate-limiting. The potential of nitrosated alpha-amino acids to bind to DNA in vivo was investigated by oral gavage of radiolabelled glycine ethylester to rats, followed immediately by sodium nitrite. DNA was isolated from stomach and liver and analysed for radioactivity and modified nucleotides. No indication of DNA adduct formation was obtained. Based on an estimation of the dose fraction converted from glycine ethylester to the nitroso product under the given experimental conditions, the maximum possible DNA-binding potency of nitroso glycine ethylester is about one order of magnitude below the methylating potency of N-nitrosomethylurea in rat stomach. The apparent discrepancy to the in vitro data could be due to efficient detoxification processes in mammalian cells.

  12. Plasma amino acid concentrations in normal adults ingesting aspartame and monosodium L-glutamate as part of a soup/beverage meal.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1987-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that ingestion of monosodium L-glutamate with aspartame produces a marked increase in plasma glutamate and aspartate concentrations. Twelve normal adults (6 males, 6 females) ingested three different soup/beverage meals in a balanced Latin square design. One meal (A) provided no aspartame (APM) or monosodium L-glutamate (MSG); a second (B) provided 50 mg MSG/kg body weight; while the third (C) provided 50 mg MSG and 34 mg APM per kg body weight. Plasma glutamate (Glu) concentrations were not significantly affected by meal A but increased significantly after meals B and C (no significant difference between B and C). Plasma aspartate (Asp) concentrations were not significantly affected by meal A but increased significantly after meals B and C (values significantly higher after meal C than meal B). Plasma Glu + Asp concentrations were not significantly affected by meal A but increased significantly from a mean (+/- SD) baseline value of 5.64 +/- 2.62 mumol/dL to high mean values of 23.1 +/- 7.29 and 26.8 +/- 9.74 mumol/dL after ingestion of meals B and C, respectively (no significant difference between meals B and C). Similarly, the area under the plasma Glu + Asp concentration-time curve did not differ significantly between meals B and C (624 +/- 197 v 763 +/- 277 mumol/dL x min, respectively). Peak plasma Glu + Asp concentrations for each subject (ignoring time) were also examined. The mean peak plasma Glu + Asp concentrations were 7.39 +/- 2.77, 23.0 +/- 6.61, and 27.3 +/- 9.07 mumol/dL, respectively after meals A, B, and C.

  13. Assessment of bitterness intensity and suppression effects using an Electronic Tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legin, A.; Rudnitskaya, A.; Kirsanov, D.; Frolova, Yu.; Clapham, D.; Caricofe, R.

    2009-05-01

    Quantification of bitterness intensity and effectivness of bitterness suppression of a novel active pharmacological ingredient (API) being developed by GSK was performed using an Electronic Tongue (ET) based on potentiometric chemical sensors. Calibration of the ET was performed with solutions of quinine hydrochloride in the concentration range 0.4-360 mgL-1. An MLR calibration model was developed for predicting bitterness intensity expressed as "equivalent quinine concentration" of a series of solutions of quinine, bittrex and the API. Additionally the effectiveness of sucralose, mixture of aspartame and acesulfame K, and grape juice in masking the bitter taste of the API was assessed using two approaches. PCA models were produced and distances between compound containing solutions and corresponding placebos were calculated. The other approach consisted in calculating "equivalent quinine concentration" using a calibration model with respect to quinine concentration. According to both methods, the most effective taste masking was produced by grape juice, followed by the mixture of aspartame and acesulfame K.

  14. The capsaicin receptor participates in artificial sweetener aversion.

    PubMed

    Riera, Céline E; Vogel, Horst; Simon, Sidney A; Damak, Sami; le Coutre, Johannes

    2008-11-28

    Artificial sweeteners such as saccharin, aspartame, acesulfame-K, and cyclamate produce at high concentrations an unpleasant after-taste that is generally attributed to bitter and metallic taste sensations. To identify receptors involved with the complex perception of the above compounds, preference tests were performed in wild-type mice and mice lacking the TRPV1 channel or the T1R3 receptor, the latter being necessary for the perception of sweet taste. The sweeteners, including cyclamate, displayed a biphasic response profile, with the T1R3 mediated component implicated in preference. At high concentrations imparting off-taste, omission of TRPV1 reduced aversion. In a heterologous expression system the Y511A point mutation in the vanilloid pocket of TRPV1 did not affect saccharin and aspartame responses but abolished cyclamate and acesulfame-K activities. The results rationalize artificial sweetener tastes and off-tastes by showing that at low concentrations, these molecules stimulate the gustatory system through the hedonically positive T1R3 pathway, and at higher concentrations, their aversion is partly mediated by TRPV1.

  15. Determination of artificial sweeteners by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection optimized by hydrodynamic pumping.

    PubMed

    Stojkovic, Marko; Mai, Thanh Duc; Hauser, Peter C

    2013-07-17

    The common sweeteners aspartame, cyclamate, saccharin and acesulfame K were determined by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection. In order to obtain the best compromise between separation efficiency and analysis time hydrodynamic pumping was imposed during the electrophoresis run employing a sequential injection manifold based on a syringe pump. Band broadening was avoided by using capillaries of a narrow 10 μm internal diameter. The analyses were carried out in an aqueous running buffer consisting of 150 mM 2-(cyclohexylamino)ethanesulfonic acid and 400 mM tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane at pH 9.1 in order to render all analytes in the fully deprotonated anionic form. The use of surface modification to eliminate or reverse the electroosmotic flow was not necessary due to the superimposed bulk flow. The use of hydrodynamic pumping allowed easy optimization, either for fast separations (80s) or low detection limits (6.5 μmol L(-1), 5.0 μmol L(-1), 4.0 μmol L(-1) and 3.8 μmol L(-1) for aspartame, cyclamate, saccharin and acesulfame K respectively, at a separation time of 190 s). The conditions for fast separations not only led to higher limits of detection but also to a narrower dynamic range. However, the settings can be changed readily between separations if needed. The four compounds were determined successfully in food samples.

  16. Qualitative and quantitative control of carbonated cola beverages using ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maes, Pauline; Monakhova, Yulia B; Kuballa, Thomas; Reusch, Helmut; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2012-03-21

    ¹H Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (400 MHz) was used in the context of food surveillance to develop a reliable analytical tool to differentiate brands of cola beverages and to quantify selected constituents of the soft drinks. The preparation of the samples required only degassing and addition of 0.1% of TSP in D₂O for locking and referencing followed by adjustment of pH to 4.5. The NMR spectra obtained can be considered as "fingerprints" and were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). Clusters from colas of the same brand were observed, and significant differences between premium and discount brands were found. The quantification of caffeine, acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate, benzoate, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), sulfite ammonia caramel (E 150D), and vanillin was simultaneously possible using external calibration curves and applying TSP as internal standard. Limits of detection for caffeine, aspartame, acesulfame-K, and benzoate were 1.7, 3.5, 0.8, and 1.0 mg/L, respectively. Hence, NMR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics is an efficient tool for simultaneous identification of soft drinks and quantification of selected constituents.

  17. Separation and simultaneous determination of four artificial sweeteners in food and beverages by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Guo, Yingying; Ye, Mingli; James, Frits S

    2005-08-26

    In this paper, the separation and determination of four artificial sweeteners (aspartame, sodium cyclamate, acesulfame-K and sodium saccharin) by ion chromatography coupled with suppressed conductivity detector is reported. The four artificial sweeteners were separated using KOH eluent generator. Due to the use of eluent generator, very low conductance background conductivity can be obtained and sensitivity of sweeteners has been greatly improved. Under the experimental condition, several inorganic anions, such as F-, Cl-, NO3-, NO2-, Br-, SO4(2)-, PO4(3)- and some organic acid such as formate, acetate, benzoate, and citrate did not interfere with the determination. With this method, good linear relationship, sensitivity and reproducibility were obtained. Detection limits of aspartame, sodium cyclamate, acesulfame-K, sodium saccharin were 0.87, 0.032, 0.019, 0.045 mg/L, respectively. Rate of recovery were between 98.23 and 105.42%, 99.48 and 103.57%, 97.96 and 103.23%, 98.46 and 102.40%, respectively. The method has successfully applied to the determination of the four sweeteners in drinks and preserved fruits.

  18. [Simultaneous determination of five synthetic sweeteners in food by solid phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detection].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yuhong; Zhou, Junyi; Yan, Chao

    2012-03-01

    A high performance liquid chromatographic method with evaporative light scattering detection (HPLC-ELSD) was developed for the simultaneous determination of five synthetic sweeteners (acesulfame-K, saccharin sodium, sodium cyclamate, sucralose and aspartame) in food. The sweeteners were extracted by 0.1% (v/v) formic acid buffer solution. The extract of sample was cleaned up and concentrated with solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. Then the sweeteners were separated on a C18 column (3 microm) using 0.1% (v/v) formic acid buffer (adjusted to pH = 3.5 with aqueous ammonia solution)-methanol (61: 39, v/v) as mobile phase, and finally detected by ELSD. The results showed that the reasonable linearity was achieved for all the analytes over the range of 30 - 1000 mg/L with the correlation coefficients (r) greater than 0.997. The recoveries for the five sweeteners ranged from 85.6% to 109.0% at three spiked concentrations with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 4.0%. The limits of detection (LODs, S/N = 3) were 2.5 mg/L for both acesulfame-K and sucralose, 3 mg/L for saccharin sodium, 10 mg/L for sodium cyclamate, and 5 mg/L for aspartame. The method is simple, sensitive and low cost, and has been successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of the five synthetic sweeteners in food.

  19. Separation of alpha-hydroxy acid enantiomers by high performance capillary electrophoresis using copper(II)-L-amino acid and copper(II)-aspartame complexes as chiral selectors in the background electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Desiderio, C; Aturki, Z; Fanali, S

    1994-06-01

    Optical isomers of some alpha-hydroxy acids, namely 2-, 3-phenyllactic acid, mandelic, p-hydroxy-, m-hydroxy and 3,4-di-hydroxymandelic acid, were separated by means of capillary zone electrophoresis in free solution, using copper (II) complexes with L-amino acid or aspartame ligands in the background electrolyte. The concentration and the pH dependence of the enantiomer separations have been studied in the cases of different chiral ligands and/or analytes. With the use of L-proline as ligand only the optical isomers of 3-phenyllactic acid were resolvable, whereas using L-hydroxyproline the D and L forms of all compounds, except for 2-phenyllactic acid, were separated. Better results were obtained with aspartame as chiral ligand. PMID:7982412

  20. Separation of alpha-hydroxy acid enantiomers by high performance capillary electrophoresis using copper(II)-L-amino acid and copper(II)-aspartame complexes as chiral selectors in the background electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Desiderio, C; Aturki, Z; Fanali, S

    1994-06-01

    Optical isomers of some alpha-hydroxy acids, namely 2-, 3-phenyllactic acid, mandelic, p-hydroxy-, m-hydroxy and 3,4-di-hydroxymandelic acid, were separated by means of capillary zone electrophoresis in free solution, using copper (II) complexes with L-amino acid or aspartame ligands in the background electrolyte. The concentration and the pH dependence of the enantiomer separations have been studied in the cases of different chiral ligands and/or analytes. With the use of L-proline as ligand only the optical isomers of 3-phenyllactic acid were resolvable, whereas using L-hydroxyproline the D and L forms of all compounds, except for 2-phenyllactic acid, were separated. Better results were obtained with aspartame as chiral ligand.

  1. The safety and regulatory process for low calorie sweeteners in the United States.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ashley

    2016-10-01

    Low calorie sweeteners are some of the most thoroughly tested and evaluated of all food additives. Products including aspartame and saccharin, have undergone several rounds of risk assessment by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), in relation to a number of potential safety concerns, including carcinogenicity and more recently, effects on body weight gain, glycemic control and effects on the gut microbiome. The majority of the modern day sweeteners; acesulfame K, advantame, aspartame, neotame and sucralose have been approved in the United States through the food additive process, whereas the most recent sweetener approvals for steviol glycosides and lo han guo have occurred through the Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) system, based on scientific procedures. While the regulatory process and review time of these two types of sweetener evaluations by the FDA differ, the same level of scientific evidence is required to support safety, so as to ensure a reasonable certainty of no harm.

  2. [The use of low-calorie sweeteners].

    PubMed

    Jeznach-Steinhagen, Anna; Kurzawa, Joanna; Czerwonogrodzka-Senczyna, Aneta

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the type of sweeteners and their impact on the human body. There have been described in details the sweeteners such as aspartame, acesulfame K, sugar alcohols, fructose, D-tagatose, steviol glycosides and maple syrup which are present in currently available food products. According to The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), aspartame and steviol glycosides were found to be safe for consumption. Whereas fructose, a component representing a large number of component products, according to the Polish Diabetes Association from 2012, should not be consumed by diabetics. The increase of popularity of products containing sweeteners causes that the search for new resources is constantly current and is the subject of research.

  3. The sweet taste in the calf. II. Glossopharyngeal nerve responses to taste stimulation of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Hård af Segerstad, C H; Hellekant, G

    1989-05-01

    Recordings were obtained from the glossopharyngeal nerve in 1-5-week-old calves during stimulation of the circumvallate tongue area with NaCl, quinine hydrochloride, citric acid, and the sweet compounds: acesulfam-K, aspartame, fructose, galactose, glucose, glycine, lactose, maltose, monellin, Na-saccharin, sucrose, thaumatin, and xylitol. All compounds except aspartame, monellin and thaumatin gave a nerve response. Glycine, followed by Na-saccharin, elicited the largest responses. Sucrose gave the largest response among the disaccharides, while there was no significant difference between the monosaccharides. Expressed as percent of the NaCl responses, the responses to glycine, sucrose, xylitol, fructose, galactose, glucose, lactose and maltose were considerably larger in the glossopharyngeal nerve than in the chorda tympani nerve. This can be taken as an indication that the posterior region of the tongue serves as the major receptive area for sweet in cattle.

  4. Enhancement of rat bladder contraction by artificial sweeteners via increased extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, Jaydip; Elliott, Ruth A. . E-mail: rae5@leicester.ac.uk; Doshani, Angie; Tincello, Douglas G.

    2006-12-01

    Introduction: Consumption of carbonated soft drinks has been shown to be independently associated with the development of overactive bladder symptoms (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.18, 2.22) [Dallosso, H.M., McGrother, C.W., Matthews, R.J., Donaldson, M.M.K., 2003. The association of diet and other lifestyle factors with overactive bladder and stress incontinence: a longitudinal study in women. BJU Int. 92, 69-77]. We evaluated the effects of three artificial sweeteners, acesulfame K, aspartame and sodium saccharin, on the contractile response of isolated rat detrusor muscle strips. Methods: Strips of detrusor muscle were placed in an organ bath and stimulated with electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the absence and presence of atropine, and with {alpha},{beta} methylene ATP, potassium, calcium and carbachol. Results: Sweeteners 10{sup -7} M to 10{sup -2} M enhanced the contractile response to 10 Hz EFS compared to control (p < 0.01). The atropine-resistant response to EFS was marginally increased by acesulfame K 10{sup -6} M, aspartame 10{sup -7} M and sodium saccharin 10{sup -7} M. Acesulfame K 10{sup -6} M increased the maximum contractile response to {alpha},{beta} methylene ATP by 35% ({+-} 9.6%) (p < 0.05) and to KCl by 12% ({+-} 3.1%) (p < 0.01). Sodium saccharin also increased the response to KCl by 37% ({+-} 15.2%) (p < 0.05). These sweeteners shifted the calcium concentration-response curves to the left. Acesulfame K 10{sup -6} M increased the log EC{sub 5} from -2.79 ({+-} 0.037) to -3.03 ({+-} 0.048, p < 0.01) and sodium saccharin 10{sup -7} M from -2.74 ({+-} 0.03) to 2.86 ({+-} 0.031, p < 0.05). The sweeteners had no significant effect on the contractile response to carbachol but they did increase the amplitude of spontaneous bladder contractions. Discussion: These results suggest that low concentrations of artificial sweeteners enhanced detrusor muscle contraction via modulation of L-type Ca{sup +2} channels.

  5. Carbohydrate ingestion and brain serotonin synthesis: relevance to a putative control loop for regulating carbohydrate ingestion, and effects of aspartame consumption.

    PubMed

    Fernstrom, J D

    1988-01-01

    The ingestion of a meal of carbohydrates by fasting rats rapidly increases brain tryptophan level and serotonin (5-HT) synthesis. The rise in brain tryptophan level follows from an increase in tryptophan transport into brain, the consequence of an insulin-induced reduction in the blood levels of several amino acids that compete with tryptophan for brain uptake. In contrast, ingesting protein with carbohydrate does not stimulate brain tryptophan uptake or 5-HT synthesis, because the blood levels of tryptophan's transport competitors are increased, not reduced. These observations form the biochemical basis of a current proposal for a regulatory loop governing meal-to-meal appetite for carbohydrates. This review briefly analyzes the experimental basis for the carbohydrate appetite regulatory loop, and finds it wanting. It also considers the proposal that the ingestion of the artificial sweetener aspartame might disrupt the putative regulatory loop for carbohydrate intake regulation, and thus promote rather than help to limit carbohydrate appetite, and finds this hypothesis unrealistic as well. In general, the conclusion is that while single meals do readily influence brain tryptophan uptake and 5-HT synthesis, it is presently unclear what role such neurochemical effects of food ingestion have in the control of specific appetites.

  6. Construction of hybrid peptide synthetases for the production of alpha-l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine, a precursor for the high-intensity sweetener aspartame.

    PubMed

    Duerfahrt, Thomas; Doekel, Sascha; Sonke, Theo; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2003-11-01

    Microorganisms produce a large number of pharmacologically and biotechnologically important peptides by using nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Due to their modular arrangement and their domain organization NRPSs are particularly suitable for engineering recombinant proteins for the production of novel peptides with interesting properties. In order to compare different strategies of domain assembling and module fusions we focused on the selective construction of a set of peptide synthetases that catalyze the formation of the dipeptide alpha-l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine (Asp-Phe), the precursor of the high-intensity sweetener alpha-l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine methyl ester (aspartame). The de novo design of six different Asp-Phe synthetases was achieved by fusion of Asp and Phe activating modules comprising adenylation, peptidyl carrier protein and condensation domains. Product release was ensured by a C-terminally fused thioesterase domains and quantified by HPLC/MS analysis. Significant differences of enzyme activity caused by the fusion strategies were observed. Two forms of the Asp-Phe dipeptide were detected, the expected alpha-Asp-Phe and the by-product beta-Asp-Phe. Dependent on the turnover rates ranging from 0.01-0.7 min-1, the amount of alpha-Asp-Phe was between 75 and 100% of overall product, indicating a direct correlation between the turnover numbers and the ratios of alpha-Asp-Phe to beta-Asp-Phe. Taken together these results provide useful guidelines for the rational construction of hybrid peptide synthetases.

  7. Measurement of the relative sweetness of stevia extract, aspartame and cyclamate/saccharin blend as compared to sucrose at different concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cardello, H M; Da Silva, M A; Damasio, M H

    1999-01-01

    Special diets are used to mitigate many human diseases. When these diets require changes in carbohydrate content, then sweetness becomes an important characteristic. The range of low-calorie sweeteners available to the food industry is expanding. It is essential to have an exact knowledge of the relative sweetness of various sweeteners in relation to different sucrose concentrations. The objective of this study was to determine the variation on the relative sweetness of aspartame (APM), stevia [Stevia rebaudiana (Bert.) Bertoni] leaf extract (SrB) and the mixture cyclamate/saccharin--two parts of cyclamate and one part of saccharin--(C/S) with the increase in their concentrations, and in neutral and acid pH in equisweet concentration to 10% sucrose, using magnitude estimation. Sweetness equivalence of SrB in relation to sucrose concentrations of 20% or higher and of APM and C/S to sucrose concentrations of 40% or higher could not be determined, because a bitter taste predominated. The potency of all sweeteners decreased as the level of sweetner increased. In equi-sweet concentration of sucrose at 10%, with pH 7.0 and pH 3.0, the potency was practically the same for all sweeteners evaluated.

  8. Effect of repeated ingestion of aspartame-sweetened beverage on plasma amino acid, blood methanol, and blood formate concentrations in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Bell, E F; Ziegler, E E; Tephly, T R

    1989-04-01

    Aspartame (APM) is a widely used dipeptide sweetener (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester). It has been suggested that excessive use of APM might elevate plasma aspartate, phenylalanine, and/or methanol concentrations to levels that are potentially harmful. Six normal young adults ingested eight successive servings of unsweetened and APM-sweetened beverage at one-hour intervals in a balanced crossover design. In one part, the beverage was not sweetened. In the other, each serving of beverage provided 600 mg APM, a dose equivalent to the amount provided by 36 oz of APM-sweetened diet beverage. Plasma aspartate concentration was not significantly increased after ingestion of unsweetened or APM-sweetened beverage. Similarly, ingestion of the unsweetened beverage had no significant effect on plasma phenylalanine concentration. However, ingestion of APM-sweetened beverage significantly increased plasma phenylalanine levels 1.41 to 2.35 mumol/dL above baseline 30 minutes after ingestion. Plasma phenylalanine values reached a steady state after administration of four to five servings and did not exceed normal postprandial values at any time. Blood methanol and formate concentrations remained within normal limits. The data indicate ready metabolism of APM when administered at levels that may be ingested by normal individuals who are heavy users of diet beverages.

  9. Aspartame ingestion with and without carbohydrate in phenylketonuric and normal subjects: effect on plasma concentrations of amino acids, glucose, and insulin.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Novak, L C; Stegink, L D; Brummel, M C; Persoon, T J; Filer, L J; Bell, E F; Ziegler, E E; Krause, W L

    1990-04-01

    Seven subjects homozygous for phenylketonuria (PKU) and seven normal subjects were administered four beverage regimens after an overnight fast: unsweetened beverage, beverage providing carbohydrate (CHO), beverage providing aspartame (APM), and beverage providing APM plus CHO. The APM dose (200 mg) was the amount provided in 12 oz of diet beverage; the CHO was partially hydrolyzed starch (60 g). Plasma amino acid concentrations were determined after dosing and the molar plasma phenylalanine (Phe) to large neutral amino acid (LNAA) ratio calculated. APM administration without CHO did not increase plasma Phe concentrations over baseline values in either normal or PKU subjects (5.48 +/- 0.85 and 150 +/- 23.0 mumols/dL, respectively). Similarly, the Phe/LNAA did not increase significantly. Ingestion of beverage providing APM and CHO did not significantly increase plasma Phe concentrations over baseline values in either normal or PKU subjects. However, ingestion of beverage providing CHO (with or without APM) significantly decreased plasma levels of valine, isoleucine, and leucine 1.5 to 4 hours after dosing in both normal and PKU subjects, thereby increasing the Phe/LNAA ratio significantly. These data indicate that changes noted in Phe/LNAA values after ingestion of beverage providing APM plus CHO were due to CHO. The plasma insulin response to beverage providing CHO (with or without APM) was significantly higher in PKU subjects than in normals.

  10. A facile HPLC method for optical purity and quantitative measurements of phenylalanine from the hydrolyzed aspartame under different pH and temperature after its derivatization with a fluorescent reagent.

    PubMed

    Hsien, T-J; Chen, S

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, the artificial sweetener aspartame is deliberately hydrolyzed under different pH and temperature in the matrix, and time period for the hydrolysis. The HPLC analysis is then performed to quantitatively measure the amount and the optical purity of phenylalanine produced as a result of hydrolysis in the matrix after its functionalization with a fluorescent reagent. The results show that the amount of phenylalanine in the matrix is affected by the pH variation during the hydrolysis and found increased in low pH conditions. High temperature or long time periods for the decomposition also increases the amount, which indicates that beverages and foods containing aspartame as a sweetener may not be safe for phenylketonuria patients to consume if they are stored under these conditions. Conversely, the optical purity of phenylalanine, expressed as the percentage of D: -enantiomer, is not affected by pH variations. However, it decreases as the length of time elapsed is increased or surrounding temperature is elevated during the decomposition.

  11. Dietary intake of non-nutritive sweeteners in type 1 diabetes mellitus children.

    PubMed

    Dewinter, Louise; Casteels, Kristina; Corthouts, Karen; Van de Kerckhove, Kristel; Van der Vaerent, Katrien; Vanmeerbeeck, Kelly; Matthys, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the current cross-sectional study were (1) to assess the intake of aspartame, cyclamate, acesulfame-k, neohesperidine dihydrochalcone, sucralose, saccharin, steviol glycosides and neotame among children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D); (2) to compare the obtained intakes with the respective acceptable daily intake (ADI) values; and (3) to conduct a scenario analysis to obtain practical guidelines for a safe consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners (NNS) among children with T1D. T1D patients of the Paediatrics Department of the University Hospitals Leuven were invited to complete a food frequency questionnaire designed to assess NNS intake using a tier 2 and tier 3 exposure assessment approach. A scenario analysis was conducted by reducing the P95 consumption of the most contributing food categories in order to reach a total sweetener intake lower than or equal to the ADI. Estimated total intakes higher than ADIs were only found for the P95 consumers only of acesulfame-k, cyclamate and steviol glycosides (tier 2 and tier 3 approach). Scenario analysis created dietary guidelines for each age category for diet soda, bread spreads and dairy drinks. There is little chance for T1D children to exceed the ADI of the different NNS, however diabetes educators and dieticians need to pay attention regarding the use of NNS. PMID:26523968

  12. Dietary intake of non-nutritive sweeteners in type 1 diabetes mellitus children.

    PubMed

    Dewinter, Louise; Casteels, Kristina; Corthouts, Karen; Van de Kerckhove, Kristel; Van der Vaerent, Katrien; Vanmeerbeeck, Kelly; Matthys, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the current cross-sectional study were (1) to assess the intake of aspartame, cyclamate, acesulfame-k, neohesperidine dihydrochalcone, sucralose, saccharin, steviol glycosides and neotame among children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D); (2) to compare the obtained intakes with the respective acceptable daily intake (ADI) values; and (3) to conduct a scenario analysis to obtain practical guidelines for a safe consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners (NNS) among children with T1D. T1D patients of the Paediatrics Department of the University Hospitals Leuven were invited to complete a food frequency questionnaire designed to assess NNS intake using a tier 2 and tier 3 exposure assessment approach. A scenario analysis was conducted by reducing the P95 consumption of the most contributing food categories in order to reach a total sweetener intake lower than or equal to the ADI. Estimated total intakes higher than ADIs were only found for the P95 consumers only of acesulfame-k, cyclamate and steviol glycosides (tier 2 and tier 3 approach). Scenario analysis created dietary guidelines for each age category for diet soda, bread spreads and dairy drinks. There is little chance for T1D children to exceed the ADI of the different NNS, however diabetes educators and dieticians need to pay attention regarding the use of NNS.

  13. Effects of artificial sweeteners on insulin release and cationic fluxes in rat pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Malaisse, W J; Vanonderbergen, A; Louchami, K; Jijakli, H; Malaisse-Lagae, F

    1998-11-01

    Beta-L-glucose pentaacetate, but not alpha-D-galactose pentaacetate, was recently reported to taste bitter and to stimulate insulin release. This finding led, in the present study, to the investigation of the effects of both bitter and non-bitter artificial sweeteners on insulin release and cationic fluxes in isolated rat pancreatic islets. Sodium saccharin (1.0-10.0 mM), sodium cyclamate (5.0-10.0 mM), stevioside (1.0 mM) and acesulfame-K (1.0-15.0 mM), all of which display a bitter taste, augmented insulin release from islets incubated in the presence of 7.0 mM D-glucose. In contrast, aspartame (1.0-10.0 mM), which is devoid of bitter taste, failed to affect insulin secretion. A positive secretory response to acesulfame-K was still observed when the extracellular K+ concentration was adjusted to the same value as that in control media. No major changes in 86Rb and 45Ca outflow from pre-labelled perifused islets could be attributed to the saccharin, cyclamic or acesulfame anions. It is proposed that the insulinotropic action of some artificial sweeteners and, possibly, that of selected hexose pentaacetate esters may require G-protein-coupled receptors similar to those operative in the recognition of bitter compounds by taste buds.

  14. Prediabetic changes in gene expression induced by aspartame and monosodium glutamate in Trans fat-fed C57Bl/6 J mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The human diet has altered markedly during the past four decades, with the introduction of Trans hydrogenated fat, which extended the shelf-life of dietary oils and promoted a dramatic increase in elaidic acid (Trans-18.1) consumption. Food additives such as monosodium glutamate (MSG) and aspartame (ASP) were introduced to increase food palatability and reduce caloric intake. Nutrigenomics studies in small-animal models are an established platform for analyzing the interactions between various macro- and micronutrients. We therefore investigated the effects of changes in hepatic and adipose tissue gene expression induced by the food additives ASP, MSG or a combination of both additives in C57Bl/6 J mice fed a Trans fat-enriched diet. Methods Hepatic and adipose tissue gene expression profiles, together with body characteristics, glucose parameters, serum hormone and lipid profiles were examined in C57Bl/6 J mice consuming one of the following four dietary regimens, commencing in utero via the mother’s diet: [A] Trans fat (TFA) diet; [B] MSG + TFA diet; [C] ASP + TFA diet; [D] ASP + MSG + TFA diet. Results Whilst dietary MSG significantly increased hepatic triglyceride and serum leptin levels in TFA-fed mice, the combination of ASP + MSG promoted the highest increase in visceral adipose tissue deposition, serum free fatty acids, fasting blood glucose, HOMA-IR, total cholesterol and TNFα levels. Microarray analysis of significant differentially expressed genes (DEGs) showed a reduction in hepatic and adipose tissue PPARGC1a expression concomitant with changes in PPARGC1a-related functional networks including PPARα, δ and γ. We identified 73 DEGs common to both adipose and liver which were upregulated by ASP + MSG in Trans fat-fed mice; and an additional 51 common DEGs which were downregulated. Conclusion The combination of ASP and MSG may significantly alter adiposity, glucose homeostasis, hepatic and adipose tissue gene

  15. Resolution of an intense sweetener mixture by use of a flow injection sensor with on-line solid-phase extraction. Application to saccharin and aspartame in sweets and drinks.

    PubMed

    Capitán-Vallvey, L F; Valencia, M C; Arana Nicolás, E; García-Jiménez, J F

    2006-05-01

    An integrated solid-phase spectrophotometry-FIA method is proposed for simultaneous determination of the mixture of saccharin (1,2-benzisothiazol-3(2H)-one-1,1-dioxide; E-954) (SA) and aspartame (N-L-alpha-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine-1-methyl ester; E-951) (AS). The procedure is based on on-line preconcentration of AS on a C18 silica gel minicolumn and separation from SA, followed by measurement, at lambda = 210 nm, of the absorbance of SA which is transiently retained on the adsorbent Sephadex G-25 placed in the flow-through cell of a monochannel FIA setup using pH 3.0 orthophosphoric acid-dihydrogen phosphate buffer, 3.75x10(-3) mol L(-1), as carrier. Subsequent desorption of AS with methanol enables its determination at lambda = 205 nm. With a sampling frequency of 10 h(-1), the applicable concentration range, the detection limit, and the relative standard deviation were from 1.0 to 200.0 microg mL(-1), 0.30 microg mL(-1), and 1.0% (80 microg mL(-1), n = 10), respectively, for SA and from 10.0 to 200.0 microg mL(-1), 1.4 microg mL(-1), and 1.6% (100 microg mL(-1), n = 10) for AS. The method was used to determine the amounts of aspartame and saccharin in sweets and drinks. Recovery was always between 99 and 101%. The method enabled satisfactory determination of blends of SA and AS in low-calorie and dietary products and the results were compared with those from an HPLC reference method.

  16. Detection of food additives by voltammetry at the liquid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Grégoire; Kam, Victor; Berduque, Alfonso; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2008-06-25

    Electrochemistry at the liquid-liquid interface enables the detection of nonredoxactive species with electroanalytical techniques. In this work, the electrochemical behavior of two food additives, aspartame and acesulfame K, was investigated. Both ions were found to undergo ion-transfer voltammetry at the liquid-liquid interface. Differential pulse voltammetry was used for the preparation of calibration curves over the concentration range of 30-350 microM with a detection limit of 30 microM. The standard addition method was applied to the determination of their concentrations in food and beverage samples such as sweeteners and sugar-free beverages. Selective electrochemically modulated liquid-liquid extraction of these species in both laboratory solutions and in beverage samples was also demonstrated. These results indicate the suitability of liquid-liquid electrochemistry as an analytical approach in food analysis.

  17. Simultaneous determination of antioxidants, preservatives and sweeteners permitted as additives in food by mixed micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Boyce, M C

    1999-06-25

    A micellar electrokinetic chromatography method was developed to simultaneously analyse commonly used food additives. The additive mixture, comprising propyl gallate, octyl gallate, dodecyl gallate, butylated hydroxyanisole, butylated hydroxytoluene, tertiary butylhydroquinone, p-hydroxybenzoic acid methyl ester, p-hydroxybenzoic acid ethyl ester, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, saccharin, aspartame and acesulfame-K, was not resolved using single surfactant micellar systems consisting of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium cholate (SC) or sodium deoxycholate (SDC). The separation of these additives using mixed micellar systems, involving SDS/SC, SDS/SDC and SC/SDC, was investigated. Organic solvents were added to the mixed micellar phases to optimise the separation. The mixture was successfully separated using a 20 mM borate buffer with 35 mM SC, 15 mM SDS and 10% methanol added at pH 9.3. Additives in cola beverages and low-joule jam were investigated and quantified using this method.

  18. Effects of artificial sweeteners on body weight, food and drink intake.

    PubMed

    Polyák, Eva; Gombos, K; Hajnal, B; Bonyár-Müller, K; Szabó, Sz; Gubicskó-Kisbenedek, A; Marton, K; Ember, I

    2010-12-01

    Artificial sweeteners are widely used all over the world. They may assist in weight management, prevention of dental caries, control of blood glucose of diabetics, and also can be used to replace sugar in foods. In the animal experimentation mice were given oral doses of water solutions of table top artificial sweeteners (saccharin, cyclamate based, acesulfame-K based, and aspartame) the amount of maximum Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) ad libitum. The controls received only tap water with the same drinking conditions as the treated groups. The mice were fed chow ad libitum.We measured food intake and body weight once a week, water and solutions of artificial sweeteners intake twice a week. The data were analysed by statistical methods (T-probe, regression analysis).Consumption of sweeteners resulted in significantly increased body weight; however, the food intake did not change.These results question the effect of non-caloric artificial sweeteners on weight-maintenance or body weight decrease.

  19. The metabolism of intense sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Renwick, A G

    1986-01-01

    Three organic acids (saccharin, acesulfame-K and cyclamate) are used or have been used extensively as intense sweeteners. Once absorbed from the gut they are eliminated, largely in the urine, without undergoing metabolism. Early studies using radiolabelled saccharin indicated the existence of limited metabolism, but this was not confirmed by later more extensive studies using highly purified compound. Metabolism could not be induced by a variety of pretreatments. Following an initial report of the presence of traces of cyclohexylamine in the urines of subjects given cyclamate, it was shown that chronic administration of the sweetener caused the induction of extensive metabolism. The metabolism, which showed wide inter- and intra-individual variability was performed the gut microflora. The peptide sweeteners (aspartame and thaumatin) are metabolized to their constituent amino acids in the gastro intestinal tract, prior to absorption. As such they are incorporated into normal intermediary metabolism and their low-calorie applications derive from their intense sweetness.

  20. Acceptable daily intake and the regulation of intense sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Renwick, A G

    1990-01-01

    At the present time there are four intense sweeteners that are available in a number of countries: acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate and saccharin. Extensive toxicity databases are available on each sweetener and these have been assessed by both national and international regulatory authorities. This review considers briefly the critical toxicity of each sweetener that is the basis for establishing the no adverse effect level in animal studies. The calculation of an acceptable daily intake (ADI) for human intake employs a large safety factor applied to the no-effect level. The magnitude of the safety factor for each sweetener is discussed in relation to the ADI values recommended by the Scientific Committee for Food in 1985.