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Sample records for acetabular component loosening

  1. Development of a non-invasive diagnostic technique for acetabular component loosening in total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Alshuhri, Abdullah A; Holsgrove, Timothy P; Miles, Anthony W; Cunningham, James L

    2015-08-01

    Current techniques for diagnosing early loosening of a total hip replacement (THR) are ineffective, especially for the acetabular component. Accordingly, new, accurate, and quantifiable methods are required. The aim of this study was to investigate the viability of vibrational analysis for accurately detecting acetabular component loosening. A simplified acetabular model was constructed using a Sawbones(®) foam block. By placing a thin silicone layer between the acetabular component and the Sawbones block, 2- and 4-mm soft tissue membranes were simulated representing different loosening scenarios. A constant amplitude sinusoidal excitation with a sweep range of 100-1500 Hz was used. Output vibration from the model was measured using an accelerometer and an ultrasound probe. Loosening was determined from output signal features such as the number and relative strength of observed harmonic frequencies. Both measurement methods were sufficient to measure the output vibration. Vibrational analysis reliably detected loosening corresponding to both 2 and 4 mm tissue membranes at driving frequencies between 100 and 1000 Hz (p < 0.01) using the accelerometer. In contrast, ultrasound detected 2-mm loosening at a frequency range of 850-1050 Hz (p < 0.01) and 4-mm loosening at 500-950 Hz (p < 0.01). PMID:26054805

  2. Outcome of porous tantalum acetabular components for Paprosky type 3 and 4 acetabular defects.

    PubMed

    Batuyong, Eldridge D; Brock, Hugh S; Thiruvengadam, Nikhil; Maloney, William J; Goodman, Stuart B; Huddleston, James I

    2014-06-01

    Porous tantalum acetabular implants provide a potential solution for dealing with significant acetabular bone loss. This study reviews 24 acetabular revisions using tantalum implants for Paprosky type 3 and 4 defects. The mean Harris Hip Score improved from 35 ± 19 (range, 4-71) to 88 ± 14 (range, 41-100), p < 0.0001. Postoperative radiographs showed radiolucent lines in 14 hips with a mean width of 1.3 ± 1.0 mm (range, 0.27-4.37 mm). No gaps enlarged and 71% of them disappeared at a mean of 13 ± 10 months (range, 3-29 months). At a mean follow-up of 37 ± 14 months (range, 24-66 months), 22 reconstructions showed radiograpic evidence of osseointegration (92%). The two failures were secondary to septic loosening. When dealing with severe acetabular bone loss, porous tantalum acetabular components show promising short-term results.

  3. Debonding of porous coating of a threaded acetabular component: retrieval analysis.

    PubMed

    Łapaj, Łukasz; Markuszewski, Jacek; Rybak, Tomasz; Wierusz-Kozłowska, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a case of debonding of plasma sprayed porous titanium coating from a threaded acetabular component which caused aseptic loosening of the implant. Weight bearing after delamination caused abrasive damage of the acetabular shell, and particles of the coating embedded in the acetabular liner. Microscopic examination of periprosthetic tissues showed presence of metal particles and macrophage infiltration. Despite microscopic examination of the retrieved component the cause of debonding remains unclear. PMID:23127634

  4. The jumbo acetabular component for acetabular revision: Curtain Calls and Caveats.

    PubMed

    Lachiewicz, P F; Watters, T S

    2016-01-01

    The 'jumbo' acetabular component is now commonly used in acetabular revision surgery where there is extensive bone loss. It offers high surface contact, permits weight bearing over a large area of the pelvis, the need for bone grafting is reduced and it is usually possible to restore centre of rotation of the hip. Disadvantages of its use include a technique in which bone structure may not be restored, a risk of excessive posterior bone loss during reaming, an obligation to employ screw fixation, limited bone ingrowth with late failure and high hip centre, leading to increased risk of dislocation. Contraindications include unaddressed pelvic dissociation, inability to implant the component with a rim fit, and an inability to achieve screw fixation. Use in acetabulae with < 50% bone stock has also been questioned. Published results have been encouraging in the first decade, with late failures predominantly because of polyethylene wear and aseptic loosening. Dislocation is the most common complication of jumbo acetabular revisions, with an incidence of approximately 10%, and often mandates revision. Based on published results, a hemispherical component with an enhanced porous coating, highly cross-linked polyethylene, and a large femoral head appears to represent the optimum tribology for jumbo acetabular revisions. PMID:26733644

  5. Optimization of acetabular component orientation using DOE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krepelka, Mircea; Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela

    2012-09-01

    Stress shielding is increasingly recognized as an important cause of acetabular component failure. Several studies have been focused on improving the acetabular component placement to reduce the risk of dislocation, impingement and range of motion but little is known of its influence on implant-bone interface pressures. This study employs experimental design, 3D reconstruction and FE simulation to identify the most significant factors for acetabular component behavior and predict the best configuration of acetabular spatial orientation angles within the constraints of the Lewinnek's safe zone in order to minimize peak contact pressures. Data analysis by response surface method revealed that the magnitude of periacetabular pressures was significantly reduced by the anteversion angle at its lowest value as well as the abduction angle located at the central point value, which corresponded to a 40° abduction and 5° anteversion of cup orientation.

  6. The concentric all-polyethylene Exeter acetabular component in primary total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Veitch, S W; Whitehouse, S L; Howell, J R; Hubble, M J W; Gie, G A; Timperley, A J

    2010-10-01

    We report the outcome of the flangeless, cemented all-polyethylene Exeter acetabular component at a mean of 14.6 years (10 to 17) after operation. Of the 263 hips in 243 patients, 122 prostheses are still in situ; 112 patients (119 hips) have died, 18 hips have been revised, and three patients (four hips) were lost to follow-up. Radiographs at the final review were available for 110 of the 122 surviving hips. There were acetabular radiolucent lines in 54 hips (49%). Two acetabular components had migrated but neither patient required revision. The Kaplan-Meier survivorship at 15 years with 61 hips at risk with revision for any cause as the endpoint was 89.9% (95% confidence interval (CI) 84.6 to 95.2) and for aseptic loosening of the acetabular component or lysis 91.7% (95% CI 86.6 to 96.8). In 210 hips with a diagnosis of primary osteoarthritis, survivorship with revision for any cause as the endpoint was 93.2% (95% CI 88.1 to 98.3), and for aseptic loosening of the acetabular component 95.0% (95% CI 90.3 to 99.7). The cemented all-polyethylene Exeter acetabular component has an excellent long-term survivorship.

  7. Late fiber metal shedding of the first and second-generation Harris Galante acetabular component. A report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Mayman, David J; González Della Valle, Alejandro; Lambert, Edward; Anderson, John; Wright, Timothy; Nestor, Bryan; Sculco, Thomas P; Salvati, Eduardo A

    2007-06-01

    Five patients presented with fiber metal mesh shedding of a Harris Galante II acetabular cup detected between 11 and 15 years after implantation. All patients presented with hip pain and 4 demonstrated gross acetabular loosening and fiber metal separation on preoperative radiographs. The remaining patient underwent revision surgery because of a liner dislodgment and had a radiographically well fixed shell. Loosening and fiber metal separation were detected intraoperatively. Scanning electron microscopy of the retrieved shells demonstrated isolated diffusion bonding marks in the areas where the mesh separated from the substrate and no evidence of corrosion. Progressive osteolysis in the iliac bone was evident in 4 of our cases. Progressive iliac osteolysis may lead to loss of bone support in well-fixed cups and excessive stresses transferred to the interface between the fiber metal mesh and the titanium substrate leading to the separation of the 2 layers. Fiber metal separation may contribute to long-term loosening in the Harris Galante acetabular component.

  8. Wear of highly crosslinked polyethylene acetabular components

    PubMed Central

    Callary, Stuart A; Solomon, Lucian B; Holubowycz, Oksana T; Campbell, David G; Munn, Zachary; Howie, Donald W

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Wear rates of highly crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) acetabular components have varied considerably between different published studies. This variation is in part due to the different techniques used to measure wear and to the errors inherent in measuring the relatively low amounts of wear in XLPE bearings. We undertook a scoping review of studies that have examined the in vivo wear of XLPE acetabular components using the most sensitive method available, radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Methods A systematic search of the PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane databases was performed to identify published studies in which RSA was used to measure wear of XLPE components in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Results 18 publications examined 12 primary THA cohorts, comprising only 260 THAs at 2–10 years of follow-up. The mean or median proximal wear rate reported ranged from 0.00 to 0.06 mm/year. However, differences in the manner in which wear was determined made it difficult to compare some studies. Furthermore, differences in RSA methodology between studies, such as the use of supine or standing radiographs and the use of beaded or unbeaded reference segments, may limit future meta-analyses examining the effect of patient and implant variables on wear rates. Interpretation This scoping review confirmed the low wear rates of XLPE in THA, as measured by RSA. We make recommendations to enhance the standardization of reporting of RSA wear results, which will facilitate early identification of poorly performing implants and enable a better understanding of the effects of surgical and patient factors on wear. PMID:25301435

  9. Uncemented porous tantalum acetabular components: early follow-up and failures in 613 primary total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Noiseux, Nicolas O; Long, William J; Mabry, Tad M; Hanssen, Arlen D; Lewallen, David G

    2014-03-01

    Uncemented tantalum acetabular components were introduced in 1997. The purpose was to determine the 2- to 10-year results with this implant material in primary total hip arthroplasty. Our registry identified all primary total hip cases with porous tantalum cups implanted from 1997 to 2004. Clinical outcomes and radiographs were studied. 613 cases were identified. Seventeen percent of patients were lost to follow-up. Twenty-five reoperations were performed (4.4%). Acetabular cup removal occurred in 6 cases (1.2%). No cups were revised for aseptic loosening. Incomplete radiolucent lines were found on 9.3% of initial postoperative radiographs. At 2 years, 67% had resolved. Zero new radiolucent lines were detected. Two- to 10-year results of porous tantalum acetabular components for primary total hip arthroplasty demonstrate high rates of initial stability and apparent ingrowth.

  10. The influence of acetabular inclination angle on the penetration of polyethylene and migration of the acetabular component: a prospective, radiostereometric study on cemented acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Kadar, T; Furnes, O; Aamodt, A; Indrekvam, K; Havelin, L I; Haugan, K; Espehaug, B; Hallan, G

    2012-03-01

    In this prospective study we studied the effect of the inclination angle of the acetabular component on polyethylene wear and component migration in cemented acetabular sockets using radiostereometric analysis. A total of 120 patients received either a cemented Reflection All-Poly ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene or a cemented Reflection All-Poly highly cross-linked polyethylene acetabular component, combined with either cobalt-chrome or Oxinium femoral heads. Femoral head penetration and migration of the acetabular component were assessed with repeated radiostereometric analysis for two years. The inclination angle was measured on a standard post-operative anteroposterior pelvic radiograph. Linear regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between the inclination angle and femoral head penetration and migration of the acetabular component. We found no relationship between the inclination angle and penetration of the femoral head at two years' follow-up (p = 0.9). Similarly, our data failed to reveal any statistically significant correlation between inclination angle and migration of these cemented acetabular components (p = 0.07 to p = 0.9).

  11. Polyethylene sterilized without irradiation in a polished uncemented acetabular component-a clinical and radiographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Crockarell, John R

    2008-09-01

    Clinical and radiographic analysis of the Reflection uncemented acetabular component was performed. Features of this component include a polished inner shell and ethylene oxide sterilization. Clinical information was available for 158 hips (mean, 4.6 years follow-up). A total of 19 hips have undergone or were recommended revision, 8 for aseptic loosening or wear (5%). Wear analysis was performed for 38 hips with more than 5 years of follow-up (mean, 6.7 years). Osteolysis was present in 20 of these patients. Penetration rate averaged 0.15 mm/y. Patients with uncemented femoral fixation (vs cemented) had a significantly higher penetration rate. Increased volumetric wear was seen with uncemented femoral fixation, thin liners, and ceramic heads. This component demonstrated relatively high penetration and osteolysis rates. Continued surveillance is recommended, particularly for active patients with thin liners. PMID:18534518

  12. Uncemented acetabular components with femoral head autograft for acetabular reconstruction in developmental dysplasia of the hip: a concise follow-up report at a mean of twenty years.

    PubMed

    Abdel, Matthew P; Stryker, Louis S; Trousdale, Robert T; Berry, Daniel J; Cabanela, Miguel E

    2014-11-19

    We previously reported the five to twelve-year results of total hip arthroplasty with an uncemented acetabular component and an autogenous femoral head graft in forty-four consecutive hips with developmental dysplasia. The goal of the present study was to report the implant survival rate, status of bone grafts, and clinical outcomes in thirty-five of these hips (in twenty-nine patients) followed for a mean of 21.3 years. Functional, radiographic, and survivorship results were examined. Radiographic analysis revealed an average cup inclination angle of 43° and a mean arc of cup coverage by the graft of 30°. The twenty-year survivorship free from acetabular revision was 66% (twelve acetabular revisions; eight since our previous report). Of the twelve revisions, nine were for liner wear and/or osteolysis, one was for a liner fracture, one was for aseptic loosening, and one was for instability. All bone grafts healed to the pelvis. The graft facilitated revision cup placement as no additional structural grafts or metal augments were required. We concluded that an uncemented porous-coated socket used in conjunction with a bulk femoral head autograft provides good long-term fixation and restores bone stock. PMID:25410505

  13. Acetabular Reconstruction in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shon, Won Yong; Santhanam, Siva Swaminathan; Choi, Jung Woo

    2016-03-01

    The difficulties encountered in dealing with the bone deficient acetabulum are amongst the greatest challenges in hip surgery. Acetabular reconstruction in revision total hip arthroplasty can successfully be achieved with hemispherical components featuring a porous or roughened ingrowth surface and options for placement of multiple screws for minor acetabular defect. Acetabular component selection is mostly based on the amount of bone loss present. In the presence of combined cavitary and segmental defects without superior acetabular coverage, reconstructions with a structural acetabular allograft protected by a cage or a custom-made triflange cage have been one of preferred surgical options. The use of a cage or ring over structural allograft bone for massive uncontained defects in acetabular revision can restore host bone stock and facilitate subsequent rerevision surgery to a certain extent. But high complication rates have been reported including aseptic loosening, infection, dislocation and metal failure. On the other hand, recent literature is reporting satisfactory outcomes with the use of modular augments combined with a hemispherical shell for major acetabular defect. Highly porous metals have been introduced for clinical use in arthroplasty surgery over the last decade. Their higher porosity and surface friction are ideal for acetabular revision, optimizing biological fixation. The use of trabecular metal cups in acetabular revision has yielded excellent clinical results. This article summarizes author's experience regarding revision acetabular reconstruction options following failed hip surgery including arthroplasty. PMID:27536638

  14. Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Modular Trabecular Metal Acetabular Components for Failed Treatment of Acetabular Fractures: A Mid-term Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, De-Yong; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Yi-Xin; Zhang, Chun-Yu; Xu, Hui; Huang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Porous-coated cups have been widely used in acetabular reconstruction after failed treatment of acetabular fractures, and good results have been reported with the use of these cups; however, the durability and functionality of modular trabecular metal (TM) acetabular components in acetabular reconstruction after failed treatment of acetabular fractures remain unclear. This study aimed to examine the radiographic and clinical outcomes associated with the use of modular TM acetabular components for failed treatment of acetabular fractures to assess the durability and functionality of these components in acetabular reconstruction after failed treatment of acetabular fractures. Methods: A total of 41 patients (41 hips) underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA) using modular TM acetabular components for failed treatment of acetabular fractures at our hospital between January 2007 and December 2012. Among these patients, two were lost to follow-up. Therefore, 39 patients (39 hips) were finally included in this study. The Harris hip score before and after the surgery, satisfaction level of the patients, and radiographic results were assessed. Results: The mean Harris hip score increased from 34 (range, 8–52) before surgery to 91 (range, 22–100) at the latest follow-up examination (P < 0.001). The results were excellent for 28 hips, good for six, fair for three, and poor for two. Among the 39 patients, 25 (64%) and 10 (26%) were very satisfied and somewhat satisfied, respectively. All cups were found to be fully incorporated, and no evidence of cup migration or periacetabular osteolysis was noted. Conclusions: Despite the technically demanding nature of the procedure, THA using modular TM acetabular components showed good durability and functionality and may be an effective reconstruction option for failed treatment of acetabular fractures. PMID:27064033

  15. The use of cementless acetabular component in revision surgery without pelvic discontinuity.

    PubMed

    Cherubino, Paolo; D'Angelo, Fabio; Surace, Michele Francesco; Murena, Luigi; Vulcano, Ettore

    2010-10-01

    Reconstruction of the failed acetabular component in total hip arthroplasty (THA) can be challenging. Although there are multiple reconstructive options available, a cementless acetabular component inserted with screws has been shown to have good intermediate-term results and is the reconstructive method of choice for the majority of acetabular revisions This reconstruction is feasible provided at least 50% of the implant contacts host bone. When such contact is not possible, and there is adequate medial and peripheral bone, techniques using alternative uncemented implants can be used for acetabular reconstruction. An uncemented cup can be placed at a "high hip center." Alternatively, the acetabular cavity can be progressively reamed to accommodate extra-large cups. Oblong cups, which take advantage of the oval-shaped cavity resulting from many failed acetabular components, can also be used. The success of these cementless techniques depends on the degree and location of bone loss. The correct indication to revision and the choice of the correct implant is the keystone for the success of this type of surgery and follows an accurate preoperative planning in order to understand the specific pathologic scenario. The aim of this paper is to review some technical options for the revision of the acetabular component also taking into account our personal experiences and series. PMID:21082580

  16. Acetabular revision with impaction bone grafting and a cemented polyethylene acetabular component: comparison of the Kaplan-Meier analysis to the competing risk analysis in 62 revisions with 25 to 30 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Te Stroet, M A J; Keurentjes, J C; Rijnen, W H C; Gardeniers, J W M; Verdonschot, N; Slooff, T J J H; Schreurs, B W

    2015-10-01

    We present the results of 62 consecutive acetabular revisions using impaction bone grafting and a cemented polyethylene acetabular component in 58 patients (13 men and 45 women) after a mean follow-up of 27 years (25 to 30). All patients were prospectively followed. The mean age at revision was 59.2 years (23 to 82). We performed Kaplan-Meier (KM) analysis and also a Competing Risk (CR) analysis because with long-term follow-up, the presence of a competing event (i.e. death) prevents the occurrence of the endpoint of re-revision. A total of 48 patients (52 hips) had died or had been re-revised at final review in March 2011. None of the deaths were related to the surgery. The mean Harris hip score of the ten surviving hips in ten patients was 76 points (45 to 99). The KM survivorship at 25 years for the endpoint 're-revision for any reason' was 58.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) 38 to 73) and for 're-revision for aseptic loosening' 72.1% (95% CI 51 to 85). With the CR analysis we calculated the KM analysis overestimates the failure rate with respectively 74% and 93% for these endpoints. The current study shows that acetabular impaction bone grafting revisions provide good clinical results at over 25 years.

  17. Uncemented Porous Tantalum Acetabular Components: Early Follow-Up and Failures in 599 Revision Total Hip Arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Long, William J.; Noiseux, Nicolas O.; Mabry, Tad M.; Hanssen, Arlen D.; Lewallen, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the early outcomes of 599 cases of revision THA performed using a porous tantalum cup. Methods Clinical and radiographic data was sought in all patients at a minimum two years follow-up, after acetabular revision performed with a porous tantalum cup. Results Of the 599 cases identified, there were 51 re-operations in 47 patients (7.8 percent). Cup removal was required in 14 of these cases (2.3 percent). The most common cause for cup removal was a septic joint (12). No cups were revised for aseptic loosening during the study period. There was one case of early cup migration. There were 17 incomplete lucencies not initially seen on post-operative films, but identified later, all were non-progressive on subsequent x-rays. Conclusions Early results of porous tantalum acetabular components in the revision setting demonstrate good initial stability and low re-operation rates at two years follow-up. Level of Evidence Level 4: Case series PMID:26361451

  18. Loosening of the femoral component of total hip replacement after plugging the femoral canal.

    PubMed

    Harris, W H; McCarthy, J C; O'Neill, D A

    1982-01-01

    A roentgen follow-up study was done of 171 total hip replacements at an average of 3.3 years (range 2 to 5 years) after insertion to assess the loosening rate in older adult patients (average age 60 years) in whom the medullary canal was plugged. The cement (Simplex P) was introduced using a cement gun. The femoral components used were CAD and HD-2 in design, made of chrome cobalt alloy. Evaluation was made according to three categories of loosening: definite (requiring evidence of migration of the component or the cement), probable (requiring a continuous radiolucent zone around the cement mantle in one or more radiographic views), or possible (requiring a radiolucent zone that occupied 50% or more of the cement-bone interface in one or more views but was not continuous). One hip was revised for a loose femoral component. Another patient has asymptomatic subsidence of the femoral component. Thus the total incidence of definitely loose femoral components was 1.1%. No hip was classified as probably loose. Seven hips (4%) were rated as possibly loose. Compared to four other reported series of similar groups of patients followed for like duration, this incidence of definitely loose components is statistically significantly less than in nonplugged canals. The other differences among the series compared, such as stem design, type of cement introduction, modulus of elasticity of the metal used, presence or absence of a collar, and dates during which the surgery was done, are also discussed. Plugging the femoral canal; introducing the cement with a cement gun; using a femoral stem that largely fills the medullary canal, has a collar, and has a rounded rectangular cross section with no medial stress risers made of a superalloy with a modulus of elasticity of about 200 GPa--all these factors were associated with a low (1.1%) incidence of femoral component loosening at 3 years. PMID:7166501

  19. Radiological evaluation of the metal-bone interface of a porous tantalum monoblock acetabular component.

    PubMed

    Macheras, G A; Papagelopoulos, P J; Kateros, K; Kostakos, A T; Baltas, D; Karachalios, T S

    2006-03-01

    Between January 1998 and December 1998, 82 consecutive patients (86 hips) underwent total hip arthroplasty using a trabecular metal monoblock acetabular component. All patients had a clinical and radiological follow-up evaluation at six, 12 and 24 weeks, 12 months, and then annually thereafter. On the initial post-operative radiograph 25 hips had a gap between the outer surface of the component and the acetabular host bed which ranged from 1 to 5 mm. All patients were followed up clinically and radiologically for a mean of 7.3 years (7 to 7.5). The 25 hips with the 1 to 5 mm gaps were studied for component migration at two years using the Einzel-Bild-Roentgen-Analyse (EBRA) digital measurement method. At 24 weeks all the post-operative gaps were filled with bone and no acetabular component had migrated. The radiographic outcome of all 86 components showed no radiolucent lines and no evidence of lysis. No acetabular implant was revised. There were no dislocations or other complications. The bridging of the interface gaps (up to 5 mm) by the trabecular metal monoblock acetabular component indicates the strong osteoconductive, and possibly osteoinductive, properties of trabecular metal.

  20. Early Experience with a New Porous Hemispheric Acetabular Component.

    PubMed

    Berend, Keith R; Adams, Joanne B; Morris, Michael J; Lombardi, Adolph V

    2015-11-01

    A third-generation cementless acetabular system has been designed, building on the successes of a second-generation system that featured good congruity between the liner and hemispheric shell, and proven porous plasma-sprayed coating on titanium alloy substrate, by designing a ringless barb and groove locking mechanism and optimizing range of motion. These design features are amenable to modern, highly crosslinked polyethylenes. A retrospective review was performed to assess early outcomes. A query of our practice registry revealed 534 patients (576 hips) who underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty performed by three surgeons with the G7™ Acetabular System (Biomet, Warsaw, Indiana) between April 2013 and March 2014. All liners were vitamin E infused, highly crosslinked polyethylene with a neutral face. Heads used were 463 BIOLOX® delta (81%; CeramTec AG, Plochingen, Germany) and 112 cobalt-chromium (19%), with diameters of 32 mm in 238 (41%), 36 mm in 331 (58%), and 40 mm in 6. Minimum one-year follow-up was available for 400 hips. Mean follow-up was 15 months (range 10-24, SD 3.0). Harris hip scores improved from 50.7 preoperatively to 86.5 most recently. UCLA activity scale improved from 4.5 preoperatively to 5.4 most recently. Two patients required cup revision secondary to failure of biological fixation at 8.4 and 15.1 months respectively. Radiographic findings in all cases were satisfactory position and alignment with no radiolucencies observed. In this group, with very early follow-up, good results with a low rate of acetabular revision and no dislocations were achieved using a new hemispheric porous shell with ringless barb and groove locking mechanism and geometry. PMID:26680408

  1. Does high-flexion total knee arthroplasty promote early loosening of the femoral component?

    PubMed

    Zelle, Jorrit; Janssen, Dennis; Van Eijden, Jolanda; De Waal Malefijt, Maarten; Verdonschot, Nico

    2011-07-01

    High-flexion knee replacements have been developed to accommodate a large range of motion (RoM > 120°). Knee implants that allow for higher flexion may be more sensitive to femoral loosening as the knee load is relatively high during deep knee flexion, which could result in an increased failure potential at the implant-cement interface of the femoral component. A 3D finite element knee model was developed including a posterior-stabilized high-flexion knee replacement to analyze the stress state at the femoral implant-cement interface during a full squatting movement (RoM ≤ 155°). During deep flexion (RoM > 120°), tensile and shear stress concentrations were found at the implant-cement interface beneath the proximal part of the anterior flange. Particularly, the shear stresses at this interface location increased during high flexion, from a peak stress of 4.03 MPa at 90° to 6.89 MPa at 140° of flexion. Tensile stresses were substantially lower, having a peak stress of 0.72 MPa at 100° of flexion. Using data from earlier interface strength experiments, none of the interface beneath the anterior flange was predicted to fail in the normal flexion range (RoM ≤ 120°), whereas the prediction increased to 2.2% of the interface during deeper knee flexion. Thigh-calf contact reduced the knee forces, interface load, and failure risk beyond 140-145° of flexion. Based on the more critical stresses at the femoral fixation site between 120° and 145° of flexion, we conclude that the femoral component has a higher risk of loosening at high-flexion angles.

  2. Aseptic loosening of the patellar component at the cement-implant interface.

    PubMed

    Rath, N K; Dudhniwala, A G; White, S P; Forster, M C

    2012-12-01

    We present four cases of aseptic loosening at the implant-cement interface following patellar resurfacing. All patients initially had good results, but then presented with onset of a new anterior knee pain. The radiographs including flexed lateral and skyline view of the knee were normal in all the cases. After carefully ruling out infection, aseptic loosening at the cement-implant interface was diagnosed on further investigation. Aseptic loosening of the patellar button at the implant-cement interface can be difficult to diagnose with standard knee radiographs. During flexed lateral radiograph of the knee and the skyline view radiograph of the patellofemoral joint, the patella is compressed on the femur and thereby reducing the loose patellar button. This phenomenon has not been previously described. Patients presenting with new onset of knee pain after an initial good results following patellar resurfacing require further investigation to exclude loosening at the cement-implant interface as plain radiographs can be misleading.

  3. [A simulative biomechanical experiment on different position of none-cement acetabular components influencing the load distribution around acetabulum].

    PubMed

    Li, Dongsong; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Shuqiang; Fan, Honghui; Guan, Jikui

    2008-02-01

    In the present study, a three dimensional finite-element model of the human pelvic was reconstructed, and then, under different acetabular component position (the abduction angle ranges from 30 degrees to 70 degrees and the anteversion ranges from 5 degrees to 30degrees) the load distribution around the acetabular was evaluated by the computer biomechanical analysis program (Solidworks). Through the obtained load distribution results, the most even and reasonable range of the distribution was selected; therefore the safe range of the acetabular component implantation can be validated from the biomechanics aspect.

  4. Revisions of Extensive Acetabular Defects with Impaction Grafting and a Cement Cup

    PubMed Central

    van Egmond, Nienke; De Kam, Daniel C. J.; Gardeniers, Jean W. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Loosening of acetabular components often leads to bony defects. Management of extensive acetabular bone loss in hip revision arthroplasty can be a tremendous challenge. Questions/purposes We asked whether a reconstruction with impacted bone grafts will provide a durable and pain-free function in extensive acetabular defects. We specifically determined the (1) survival rates with the end point of revision for any reason, aseptic revision, and radiographic loosening; (2) visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, Harris hip score (HHS), and the Oxford Hip Questionnaire score (OHQS); (3) number of repeat revisions; (4) complications; and (5) radiographic loosening, wear, and radiolucencies. Patients and Methods We retrospectively followed 25 patients (27 hips) with extensive acetabular defects. No patient was lost to followup. Two patients died during followup. Minimum followup was 3 years (mean, 8.8 years; range, 3–14.1 years). Results Three patients (three hips) underwent repeat revision surgery and another two patients (two hips) had radiographically loose hips. The 10-year survival rate was 88% (95% confidence interval, 74.2%–100%) with the end point acetabular revision for any reason and 95% (95% confidence interval, 86.0%–100%) with the end point acetabular revision for aseptic loosening. The mean HHSs were 55 points before surgery and 72 points postoperatively. Conclusions Acetabular reconstruction with impaction bone grafting and a cemented cup is a reliable technique with a 10-year survival rate of 88% in patients with extensive acetabular deficiencies. Level of Evidence Level IV, case series. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:20931308

  5. Options for acetabular fixation surfaces.

    PubMed

    Klika, Alison K; Murray, Trevor G; Darwiche, Hussein; Barsoum, Wael K

    2007-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is the most common cause for revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). Due to poor long-term results with cemented acetabular components, cementless implants that rely on biologic fixation became popular in the United States for both primary and revision procedures in the early 1980s. Cementless acetabular components used in THA have been reported to have superior radiographic performance compared with cemented fixation, although the optimal method of acetabular fixation remains controversial. Cementless acetabular components require initial implant stability to allow for bone ingrowth and remodeling into the acetabular shell, providing long-term durability of the prosthesis. Many improved implant materials are available to facilitate bone growth and remodeling, including the 3 most common surface treatments; fibermesh, sintered beads, and plasma spray coatings. Recently added to these are porous metal surfaces, which have increased porosity and optimal pore sizes when compared with titanium fibermesh. The most studied of these materials is the titanium fibermesh fixation surface, which has demonstrated a mechanical failure rate of 1% at 10 to 15 years. This technology utilizes the diffusion bonding process to attach fiber metal pads to a titanium substrate using heat and pressure. The sintered bead fixation surface offers a porous coating of various sizes of spherical beads, achieved by the sintering process, and has been shown to provide long-term fixation. While there are less long-term published data regarding the titanium plasma spray surface, its early results have provided evidence of its durability, even in the face of significant osteolysis. The most recently added alternative fixation surface is porous tantalum metal, which offers potentially greater bone ingrowth and bone graft incorporation due to its high porosity (80%) and low modulus of elasticity (3 MPa). Porous tantalum implants have shown early favorable clinical results and have

  6. Assessment of failure of cemented polyethylene acetabular component due to bone remodeling: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajesh

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study is to determine failure of the cemented polyethylene acetabular component, which might occur due to excessive bone resorption, cement-bone interface debonding and fatigue failure of the cement mantle. Three-dimensional finite element models of intact and implanted pelvic bone were developed and bone remodeling algorithm was implemented for present analysis. Soderberg fatigue failure diagram was used for fatigue assessment of the cement mantle. Hoffman failure criterion was considered for prediction of cement-bone interface debonding. Results indicate fatigue failure of the cement mantle and implant-bone interface debonding might not occur due to bone remodeling.

  7. The results of acetabular impaction grafting in 129 primary cemented total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Matthew J; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Howell, Jonathan R; Hubble, Matthew J W; Timperley, A John; Gie, Graham A

    2013-09-01

    Between 1995 and 2003, 129 cemented primary THAs were performed using full acetabular impaction grafting to reconstruct acetabular deficiencies. These were classified as cavitary in 74 and segmental in 55 hips. Eighty-one patients were reviewed at mean 9.1 (6.2-14.3) years post-operatively. There were seven acetabular component revisions due to aseptic loosening, and a further 11 cases that had migrated >5mm or tilted >5° on radiological review - ten of which reported no symptoms. Kaplan-Meier analysis of revisions for aseptic loosening demonstrates 100% survival at nine years for cavitary defects compared to 82.6% for segmental defects. Our results suggest that the medium-term survival of this technique is excellent when used for purely cavitary defects but less predictable when used with large rim meshes in segmental defects. PMID:23523217

  8. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented...

  18. Cross-sectional Anatomy of Ilium for Guiding Acetabular Component Placement Using High Hip Center Technique in Asian Population

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jian-Lin; Zuo, Jian-Lin; Liu, Peng; Qin, Yan-Guo; Li, Xue-Zhou; Liu, Tong; Gao, Zhong-Li

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many clinical studies have been published involving the use of a high hip center (HHC), achieved good follow-up. However, there is a little anatomic guidance in the literature regarding the amount of bone stock available for initial implant coverage in this area of the ilium. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the thickness and width of the human ilium and related acetabular cup coverage for guiding acetabular component placement in HHC. Methods: A total of 120 normal hips in 60 cases of adult patients from lower extremities computer tomographic angiography Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine data were chosen for the study. After importing the data to the mimics software, we chose the cross sections every 5-mm increments from the rotational center of the hip to the cephalic of the ilium according the body sagittal axis, then we measured the thickness and width of the ilium for each cross section in axial plane, calculated the cup coverage at each chosen section. Results: At the acetabular dome, the mean thickness and width of the ilium were 49.71 ± 4.88 mm and 38.92 ± 3.67 mm, respectively, whereas at 1 cm above the dome, decreased to 41.35 ± 5.13 and 31.13 ± 3.37 respectively, and 2 cm above the dome, decreased to 31.25 ± 4.04 and 26.65 ± 3.43, respectively. Acetabular cup averaged coverage for 40-, 50-, and 60-mm hemispheric shells, was 100%, 89%, and 44% at the acetabular dome, 100%, 43.7%, and 27.5% for 1 cm above the dome, and 37.5%, 21.9%, and 14.2% for 2 cm above the dome. Conclusions: HHC reconstructions within 1 cm above the acetabular dome will be an acceptable and smaller diameter prosthesis would be better. PMID:26063357

  19. Accuracy of navigation-assisted acetabular component positioning studied by computed tomography measurements: methods and results.

    PubMed

    Ybinger, Thomas; Kumpan, W; Hoffart, H E; Muschalik, B; Bullmann, W; Zweymüller, K

    2007-09-01

    The postoperative position of the acetabular component is key for the outcome of total hip arthroplasty. Various aids have been developed to support the surgeon during implant placement. In a prospective study involving 4 centers, the computer-recorded cup alignment of 37 hip systems at the end of navigation-assisted surgery was compared with the cup angles measured on postoperative computerized tomograms. This comparison showed an average difference of 3.5 degrees (SD, 4.4 degrees ) for inclination and 6.5 degrees (SD, 7.3 degrees ) for anteversion angles. The differences in inclination correlated with the thickness of the soft tissue overlying the anterior superior iliac spine (r = 0.44; P = .007), whereas the differences in anteversion showed a correlation with the thickness of the soft tissue overlying the pubic tubercles (r = 0.52; P = .001). In centers experienced in the use of navigational tools, deviations were smaller than in units with little experience in their use. PMID:17826270

  20. Stem–Cement Porosity May Explain Early Loosening of Cemented Femoral Hip Components: Experimental-Computational In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Kenneth A.; Damron, Leatha A.; Miller, Mark A.; Race, Amos; Clarke, Michael T.; Cleary, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    A combination of laboratory experiment and computational simulation was performed to assess the role of interface porosity on stem migration. The early motion of in vitro prepared cemented femoral components was measured during application of cyclic stair climbing loads. Following testing, transverse sections were obtained and the distribution of pores at the stem–cement interface was determined. Finite element models of cemented stem constructs were developed and a scheme was implemented to randomly assign pores to the stem–cement interface. For a series of 14 in vitro prepared components, pore fractions at the stem–cement interface ranged from 23% to 67%. The majority of pores at the stem–cement interface were less than 1 mm in length with a mean length of 1.27 ± 2.7 mm and thickness of 0.12 ± 0.11 mm. For stems with large pore fractions, pores tended to coalesce in longer extended gaps over the stem surface. Finite element and experimental models both revealed strong positive correlations (r2 = 0.55–0.72; p < 0.0001) between stem–cement pore fraction and stem internal rotation, suggesting that the presence and extent of pores could explain the early motion of the stems. There was an increased volume of cement at risk of fatigue failure with increasing stem migration. Pore fractions greater than 30% resulted in large increases in stem internal rotation, suggesting that attempts to maintain surface porosity at or below this level may be desirable to minimize the risk of clinical loosening. PMID:17149748

  1. A CT scan protocol for the detection of radiographic loosening of the glenoid component after total shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose It is difficult to evaluate glenoid component periprosthetic radiolucencies in total shoulder arthroplasties (TSAs) using plain radiographs. This study was performed to evaluate whether computed tomography (CT) using a specific patient position in the CT scanner provides a better method for assessing radiolucencies in TSA. Methods Following TSA, 11 patients were CT scanned in a lateral decubitus position with maximum forward flexion, which aligns the glenoid orientation with the axis of the CT scanner. Follow-up CT scanning is part of our routine patient care. Glenoid component periprosthetic lucency was assessed according to the Molé score and it was compared to routine plain radiographs by 5 observers. Results The protocol almost completely eliminated metal artifacts in the CT images and allowed accurate assessment of periprosthetic lucency of the glenoid fixation. Positioning of the patient within the CT scanner as described was possible for all 11 patients. A radiolucent line was identified in 54 of the 55 observed CT scans and osteolysis was identified in 25 observations. The average radiolucent line Molé score was 3.4 (SD 2.7) points with plain radiographs and 9.5 (SD 0.8) points with CT scans (p = 0.001). The mean intra-observer variance was lower in the CT scan group than in the plain radiograph group (p = 0.001). Interpretation The CT scan protocol we used is of clinical value in routine assessment of glenoid periprosthetic lucency after TSA. The technique improves the ability to detect and monitor radiolucent lines and, therefore, possibly implant loosening also. PMID:24286563

  2. Multiple Acetabular Revisions in THA - Poor Outcome Despite Maximum Effort

    PubMed Central

    Bischel, O; Seeger, JB; Krüge, M; Bitsch, BG

    2012-01-01

    A consecutive series of 52 acetabular revisions was evaluated retrospectively. Inclusion criteria for all patients were at least one former exchange of the acetabular component. Reconstruction was performed with reliable techniques and implants other than extensively porous coated device (e.g. tantalum). The mean follow up was 5.63 (0.01-14.05) years. Cumulative survival at 14.05 years with removal of the acetabular component due to aseptic loosening or the worst case criterion (removal of the acetabular component for any cause and/or lost to follow-up) as the end point was 66.38 (95 % C.-I.: 47.80-84.96) % and 58.42 (95 % C.-I.: 41.01-75.83) %, respectively. The cumulative survival rate with mechanical failure of the acetabular reconstruction as the endpoint was significantly lower in patients with two or more previous revisions in comparison to those with only one former procedure (log rank test: p=0,0112 respectively). The mean Merle d’Aubignée-score improved from 7.3 (0-14) preoperatively to 10.6 (0-17) points at latest follow up examination. Survival of acetabular reconstructions with common techniques and implants is decreasing with the number of previous revisions. This may cause major concerns with regard to the rising number of patients needing repeated revisions. Maximizing durability of primary THA, precise preoperative planning as well as improved techniques and implants for revision may decrease this problem in the long term. PMID:23193432

  3. Strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate/ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene composites: A new class of artificial joint components with enhanced biological efficacy to aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhipeng; Huang, Bingxue; Li, Yiwen; Tian, Meng; Li, Li; Yu, Xixun

    2016-04-01

    To enhance implant stability and prolong the service life of artificial joint component, a new approach was proposed to improve the wear resistance of artificial joint component and endow artificial joint component with the biological efficacy of resistance to aseptic loosening. Strontium calcium polyphosphate (SCPP) were interfused in ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) by a combination of liquid nitrogen ball-milling and flat-panel curing process to prepare the SCPP/UHMWPE composites. The micro-structure, mechanical characterization, tribological characterization and bioactivities of various SCPP/UHMWPE composites were investigated. The results suggested that this method could statistically improve the wear resistance of UHMWPE resulting from a good SCPP particle dispersion. Moreover, it is also observed that the SCPP/UHMWPE composites-wear particles could promote the production of OPG by osteoblasts and decrease the production of RANKL by osteoblasts, and then increase the OPG/RANKL ratio. This indicated that the SCPP/UHMWPE composites had potential efficacy to prevent and treat aseptic loosening. Above all, the SCPP/UHMWPE composites with a suitable SCPP content would be the promising materials for fabricating artificial joint component with ability to resist aseptic loosening. PMID:26838880

  4. Strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate/ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene composites: A new class of artificial joint components with enhanced biological efficacy to aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhipeng; Huang, Bingxue; Li, Yiwen; Tian, Meng; Li, Li; Yu, Xixun

    2016-04-01

    To enhance implant stability and prolong the service life of artificial joint component, a new approach was proposed to improve the wear resistance of artificial joint component and endow artificial joint component with the biological efficacy of resistance to aseptic loosening. Strontium calcium polyphosphate (SCPP) were interfused in ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) by a combination of liquid nitrogen ball-milling and flat-panel curing process to prepare the SCPP/UHMWPE composites. The micro-structure, mechanical characterization, tribological characterization and bioactivities of various SCPP/UHMWPE composites were investigated. The results suggested that this method could statistically improve the wear resistance of UHMWPE resulting from a good SCPP particle dispersion. Moreover, it is also observed that the SCPP/UHMWPE composites-wear particles could promote the production of OPG by osteoblasts and decrease the production of RANKL by osteoblasts, and then increase the OPG/RANKL ratio. This indicated that the SCPP/UHMWPE composites had potential efficacy to prevent and treat aseptic loosening. Above all, the SCPP/UHMWPE composites with a suitable SCPP content would be the promising materials for fabricating artificial joint component with ability to resist aseptic loosening.

  5. Post-deformation shape-recovery behavior of vitamin E-diffused, radiation crosslinked polyethylene acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Shishido, Takaaki; Masaoka, Toshinori; Kubo, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2016-10-01

    The in-vivo progression of creep and wear in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) acetabular liners has been clinically evaluated by measuring radiographic penetration of femoral heads. In such clinical assessments, however, viscoelastic strain relaxation has been rarely considered after a removal of hip joint loading, potentially leading to an underestimation of the penetrated thickness. The objective of this study was to investigate shape-recovery behavior of pre-compressed, radiation crosslinked and antioxidant vitamin E-diffused UHMWPE acetabular liners, and also to characterize the effects of varying their internal diameter (ID) and wall thickness (WT). We applied uniaxial compression to the UHMWPE specimens of various ID (28, 32, 36mm) and WT (4.8, 6.8, 8.9mm) for 4320min under the constant load of 3000N, and subsequently monitored the strain-relaxation behavior as a function of time after unloading. It was observed that there was a considerable shape recovery of the components after removal of the external static load. Reducing ID and WT significantly accelerated the rate of creep strain recovery, and varying WT was more sensitive to the recovery behavior than ID. Creep deformation of the tested liners recovered mostly within the first 300min after unloading. Note that approximately half of the total recovery amount proceeded just within 5min after unloading. These results suggest a remarkably high capability of shape recovery of vitamin E-diffused highly crosslinked UHMWPE. In conclusion, the time-dependent shape recovering and the diameter-thickness effect on its behavior should be carefully considered when the postoperative penetration is quantified in highly crosslinked UHMWPE acetabular liners (especially on the non-weight bearing radiographs). PMID:27454526

  6. A HIERARCHY OF COMPUTATIONALLY DERIVED SURGICAL AND PATIENT INFLUENCES ON METAL ON METAL PRESS-FIT ACETABULAR CUP FAILURE

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, S G; Phillips, A T M; Bull, A M J; Cobb, J P

    2014-01-01

    The impact of anatomical variation and surgical error on excessive wear and loosening of the acetabular component of large diameter metal on metal hip arthroplasties was measured using a multi-factorial analysis through 112 different simulations. Each surgical scenario was subject to eight different daily loading activities using finite element analysis. Excessive wear appears to be predominantly dependent on cup orientation, with inclination error having a higher influence than version error, according to the study findings. Acetabular cup loosening, as inferred from initial implant stability, appears to depend predominantly on factors concerning the area of cup-bone contact, specifically the level of cup seating achieved and the individual patient’s anatomy. The extent of press fit obtained at time of surgery did not appear to influence either mechanism of failure in this study. PMID:22513086

  7. To Compare Time-Weighted Graphs to Evaluate the Inclination of the Acetabular Component of Patients Who Had Total Hip Replacement Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tomak, Leman; Bek, Yuksel; Tomak, Yılmaz

    2015-01-01

    Time-weighted graphs are used to detect small shifts in statistical process control. The aim of this study is to evaluate the inclination of the acetabular component with CUmulative SUM (CUSUM) chart, Moving Average (MA) chart, and Exponentially Weighted Moving Average (EWMA) chart. The data were obtained directly from thirty patients who had undergone total hip replacement surgery at Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine. The inclination of the acetabular component of these people, after total hip replacement, was evaluated. CUSUM chart, Moving Average chart, and Exponentially Weighted Moving Average were used to evaluate the quality control process of acetabular component inclination. MINITAB Statistical Software 15.0 was used to generate these control charts. The assessment done with time-weighted charts revealed that the acetabular inclination angles were settled within control limits and the process was under control. It was determined that the change within the control limits had a random pattern. As a result of this study it has been obtained that time-weighted quality control charts which are used mostly in the field of industry can also be used in the field of medicine. It has provided us with a faster visual decision. PMID:26413501

  8. Deformation of the Durom Acetabular Component and Its Impact on Tribology in a Cadaveric Model—A Simulator Study

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yanqing; Wang, Qing; Cui, Weiding; Fan, Weimin

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that the acetabular component frequently becomes deformed during press-fit insertion. The aim of this study was to explore the deformation of the Durom cup after implantation and to clarify the impact of deformation on wear and ion release of the Durom large head metal-on-metal (MOM) total hips in simulators. Methods Six Durom cups impacted into reamed acetabula of fresh cadavers were used as the experimental group and another 6 size-paired intact Durom cups constituted the control group. All 12 Durom MOM total hips were put through a 3 million cycle (MC) wear test in simulators. Results The 6 cups in the experimental group were all deformed, with a mean deformation of 41.78±8.86 µm. The average volumetric wear rate in the experimental group and in the control group in the first million cycle was 6.65±0.29 mm3/MC and 0.89±0.04 mm3/MC (t = 48.43, p = 0.000). The ion levels of Cr and Co in the experimental group were also higher than those in the control group before 2.0 MC. However there was no difference in the ion levels between 2.0 and 3.0 MC. Conclusions This finding implies that the non-modular acetabular component of Durom total hip prosthesis is likely to become deformed during press-fit insertion, and that the deformation will result in increased volumetric wear and increased ion release. Clinical Relevance This study was determined to explore the deformation of the Durom cup after implantation and to clarify the impact of deformation on wear and ion release of the prosthesis. Deformation of the cup after implantation increases the wear of MOM bearings and the resulting ion levels. The clinical use of the Durom large head prosthesis should be with great care. PMID:23144694

  9. The binding, synergistic and structural characteristics of BsEXLX1 for loosening the main components of lignocellulose: Lignin, xylan, and cellulose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qun; Chen, Liang; Lin, Hui; Yu, Daobing; Shen, Qi; Wan, Li; Zhao, Yuhua

    2016-10-01

    The bacterial expansin, BsEXLX1, has been studied as a model to understand the synergistic effect of expansins on lignocellulose degradation and the structure-function relationships of expansins. However, the specific mechanism is still poorly understood. In this study, the binding, synergistic and structural characteristics of BsEXLX1 for loosening the main components of lignocellulose: lignin, xylan, and cellulose, were further characterized. Results showed that BsEXLX1 preferentially binds to xylan over lignin or cellulose under various conditions. The binding of BsEXLX1 to all substrates increased linearly with the initial concentration of BsEXLX1. But the changing rate of binding (i.e., slope of the line; k value) varied with the incubation temperature. Interestingly, the binding of BsEXLX1 to substrates did not saturate. Mutating residue-125, 126 or 171 indicated their importance for binding, but they were less important for binding to xylan. Through binding assays and homologous modeling, it was concluded that residue-125 and 171 play more important roles in the structural maintenance of BsEXLX1. By comparing the synergistic activity of BsEXLX1 or its mutants, it was found that synergistic activity is not correlated with specific binding. All these results can lead deeper understand about the mechanism of wall loosening by expansins, and further promote the application of expansins in lignocellulose degradation. PMID:27542746

  10. Cup loosening after cemented Metasul® total hip replacement: a retrieval analysis.

    PubMed

    Nich, Christophe; Hamadouche, Moussa

    2011-07-01

    Small-diameter cemented Metasul® cups have been previously identified to be at high risk of early loosening. We asked whether this particular mode of failure was associated with a specific histological feature. Periprosthetic tissues were obtained at the time of revision of two aseptically loose cemented Metasul® cups. Each tissue sample was processed for routine histological analysis. A slight metallosis was visible microscopically in all tissue samples. Metallic wear-debris particles were present both extracellularly and within the cytoplasm of macrophages. We noted a perivascular infiltration of lymphocytes accompanied by mature plasma cells. Our observations are compatible with the hypersensitivity-like reaction previously reported, described as an aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesion (ALVAL). Although wear was within normal reported range limits, this tissue reaction appeared as a consequence of continuous release of metallic ions from the prosthetic articulation. We hypothesise that ALVAL was involved in acetabular component failure, although acetabular loosening may have been initiated by high mechanical stress.

  11. Acetabular protrusio: surgical technique of dealing with a problem in depth.

    PubMed

    Mullaji, A B; Shetty, G M

    2013-11-01

    There are few reports describing the technique of managing acetabular protrusio in primary total hip replacement. Most are small series with different methods of addressing the challenges of significant medial and proximal migration of the joint centre, deficient medial bone and reduced peripheral bony support to the acetabular component. We describe our technique and the clinical and radiological outcome of using impacted morsellised autograft with a porous-coated cementless cup in 30 primary THRs with mild (n = 8), moderate (n = 10) and severe (n = 12) grades of acetabular protrusio. The mean Harris hip score had improved from 52 pre-operatively to 85 at a mean follow-up of 4.2 years (2 to 10). At final follow-up, 27 hips (90%) had a good or excellent result, two (7%) had a fair result and one (3%) had a poor result. All bone grafts had united by the sixth post-operative month and none of the hips showed any radiological evidence of recurrence of protrusio, osteolysis or loosening. By using impacted morsellised autograft and cementless acetabular components it was possible to achieve restoration of hip mechanics, provide a biological solution to bone deficiency and ensure long-term fixation without recurrence in arthritic hips with protrusio undergoing THR. PMID:24187349

  12. Excellent long-term results of the Müller acetabular reinforcement ring in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sirka, Aurimas; Clauss, Martin; Tarasevicius, Sarunas; Wingstrand, Hans; Stucinskas, Justinas; Robertsson, Otto; Emil Ochsner, Peter; Ilchmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — The original Müller acetabular reinforcement ring (ARR) shows favorable medium-term results for acetabular reconstruction in total hip arthroplasty, where it is used when the acetabular bone stock is deficient. However, there are no data regarding long-term survival of the device. We therefore investigated long-term survival and analyzed radiological modes of failure. Patients and methods — Between 1984 and 2002, 321 consecutive primary arthroplasties using an ARR were performed in 291 patients. The mean follow-up time was 11 (0–25) years, and 24 hips were lost to follow-up. For survival analysis, we investigated 321 hips and the end of the follow-up was the date of revision, date of death, or the last patient contact date with implant still in situ. Radiological assessment was performed for 160 hips with a minimum of 10 years of follow-up and with radiographs of sufficient quality. It included evaluation of osteolysis, migration, and loosening. Results — 12 ARR THAs were revised: 1 isolated ARR revision for aseptic loosening, 4 revisions of the ARR and the stem for aseptic loosening, 6 for infection, and 1 for recurrent dislocation. The cumulative revision rate for all components, for any reason, at 20 years was 15% (95% CI: 10–22), while for the ARR only it was 7% (95% CI: 4–12) for any reason and 3.4% (95% CI: 1–9) for aseptic loosening. 21 (13%) of 160 ARR THAs examined had radiological changes: 7 had osteolysis but were not loose, and 14 were radiologically loose but were not painful and not revised. Interpretation — Our data suggest that the long-term survival of the ARR is excellent. PMID:26471881

  13. Management of peri-prosthetic fracture of the humerus with severe bone loss and loosening of the humeral component after total shoulder replacement.

    PubMed

    Sewell, M D; Kang, S N; Al-Hadithy, N; Higgs, D S; Bayley, I; Falworth, M; Lambert, S M

    2012-10-01

    There is little information about the management of peri-prosthetic fracture of the humerus after total shoulder replacement (TSR). This is a retrospective review of 22 patients who underwent a revision of their original shoulder replacement for peri-prosthetic fracture of the humerus with bone loss and/or loose components. There were 20 women and two men with a mean age of 75 years (61 to 90) and a mean follow-up 42 months (12 to 91): 16 of these had undergone a previous revision TSR. Of the 22 patients, 12 were treated with a long-stemmed humeral component that bypassed the fracture. All their fractures united after a mean of 27 weeks (13 to 94). Eight patients underwent resection of the proximal humerus with endoprosthetic replacement to the level of the fracture. Two patients were managed with a clam-shell prosthesis that retained the original components. The mean Oxford shoulder score (OSS) of the original TSRs before peri-prosthetic fracture was 33 (14 to 48). The mean OSS after revision for fracture was 25 (9 to 31). Kaplan-Meier survival using re-intervention for any reason as the endpoint was 91% (95% confidence interval (CI) 68 to 98) and 60% (95% CI 30 to 80) at one and five years, respectively. There were two revisions for dislocation of the humeral head, one open reduction for modular humeral component dissociation, one internal fixation for nonunion, one trimming of a prominent screw and one re-cementation for aseptic loosening complicated by infection, ultimately requiring excision arthroplasty. Two patients sustained nerve palsies. Revision TSR after a peri-prosthetic humeral fracture associated with bone loss and/or loose components is a salvage procedure that can provide a stable platform for elbow and hand function. Good rates of union can be achieved using a stem that bypasses the fracture. There is a high rate of complications and function is not as good as with the original replacement.

  14. A Stereophotogrammetric System For The Detection Of Prosthesis Loosening In Total Hip Arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumrind, Sheldon; Genant, Harry K.; Hunter, John; Miller, David; Moffitt, Francis; Murray, William R.; Ross, Steven E.

    1980-07-01

    Loosening of the prosthetic device occurs in about 5% of cases following placement of total hip prostheses (THP). Early detection of loosening is much desired but is difficult to achieve using conventional methods. Due to errors of projection, it is quite possible to fail to detect mobility of even as much as 5 mm on single x-ray films. We are attempting to develop a simplified photogrammetric system suitable for general hospital use which could detect loosening of 0.8 mm at the 95 % level of confidence without use of complex stereoplotting equipment. Metal reference markers are placed in the shaft of the femur and in the acetabular region of the pelvis at the time of surgery. The distances between these reference markers and certain unambiguous points on the prostheses are computed analytically using an X-Y acoustical digitizer (accuracy ± 0.1 mm) and software developed previously for craniofacial measurement. Separate stereopairs of the joint region are taken under weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing conditions. Differences in the measured distances between the bo-ne markers and the prosthetic components on the two stereopairs are taken as indicators of prosthesis loosening. Measurements on a phantom using ten different x-ray stereopairs taken from as many different perspectives have established that true linear distances between reference points and prostheses can be measured at the desired reliability with the present low precision system. Preliminary in vivo measurements indicate that the main unresolved problem is the movement of the subject between the two exposures of each single stereopair. Two possible solutions to this problem are discussed.

  15. [Wear and periprosthetic osteolysis of modular, hemispheric acetabular cups].

    PubMed

    Blacha, Jan; Bogacz, Alina

    2006-01-01

    Osteolysis associated with polyethylene wear has become one of the most prevalent complications associated with uncemented modular, hemispherical cups. Sixty-five consecutive total hip arthroplasties (ABG i, Howmedica, Stryker) were followed 6-12 years. Cumulative survivorship for the cup was 55.7% after 10 years. There were 20 cups revisions because of polyethylene wear and periprosthetic osteolysis (14 cups) or cup loosening (6 cups). Stability was assessed intraoperatively, 14 cups were revised, whereas 6 new polyethylene cups were cemented into stable metal-back of acetabular component. The average annual wear of revised cups was 0.32 mm. The annual wear of not revised cups was 0.12 mm. The differences were statistically significant (p = 0.002). The mean area of osteolysis was 472 mm2 (SD 257 mm2). There was no significant correlation between wear and area of osteolysis. There was significant correlation R = 0.54, p = 0.014) between time to revision and area of osteolysis. There were no significant differences of wear of polyethylene inlay or area of osteolysis between stable and unstable acetabular cups.

  16. Importance of maintaining the basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome during acetabular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Pei, Fuxing; Shen, Bin; Kang, Pengde; Li, Zongming

    2016-01-01

    The basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome is important for the maintenance of implant stability in press-fit acetabular reconstruction of total hip arthroplasty. However, information on the basic stress pathway and its impact factors remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the orientations and positions of the acetabular component on the basic stress pathway. The basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome was defined as two parts: 3D basic trabecular bone stress distribution and quantified basic cortical bone stress level, using two subject-specific finite element normal hip models. The effects were then analysed by generating 32 reconstructed acetabular cases with different cup abduction and anteversion angles within a range of 35-50° and 10-25°, respectively, and 12 cases with different hip centre heights within a range of 0-15 mm above the acetabular dome. The 3D trabecular stress distribution decreased remarkably in all cases, while the 80% of the basic cortical bone stress level was maintained in cases when the acetabular component was positioned at 10° or 15° anteversion and 40° or 45° abduction angles. The basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome was disturbed when the superior displacement of the hip centre exceeded 5 mm above the anatomical hip centre. Positioning the acetabular component correctly contributes to maintain the stress balance between the acetabular cup and the bone during acetabular reconstruction, thus helping restore the normal hip biomechanics and preserve the stability of the implants.

  17. Evaluation of the wear performance of a polycarbonate-urethane acetabular component in a hip joint simulator and comparison with UHMWPE and cross-linked UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    St John, Kenneth; Gupta, Minakshi

    2012-07-01

    Acetabular hip joint components manufactured from gamma-sterilized ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), gamma cross-linked UHMWPE, or polycarbonate-urethane (PCU) polymers were evaluated in a hip joint simulator, using cobalt alloy femoral components, for at least 5 million cycles. The volume of material losses due to wear was calculated for each type of sample, based upon mass loss measurements, every 500,000 cycles. The loss of material for the conventional UHMWPE was much higher than for the cross-linked UHMWPE, showing about a 70% reduction in wear due to cross-linking. The material loss for the PCU samples appears to have been at least 24% lower than for the cross-linked UHMWPE. Based upon these results, the PCU material seems to have potential for use as an alternative bearing material to UHMWPE for total hip replacement surgeries.

  18. Constrained captive acetabular cup for recurrent dislocation of hemiarthroplasty in elderly: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Aysha; Banaszkiewicz, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hemiarthroplasty of the hip is one of the commonest procedures done for intracapsular fractures of the neck of femur in elderly. Dislocation of the hemiarthroplasty is a recognised and significant complication. This is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The treatment options include closed manipulation, skin and skeletal traction, conversion to total hip replacement, exploration and open reduction and leaving it out of the acetabulum. Presentation of case A retrospective review of ten patients with recurrent and failed closed manipulative reduction of hemiarthroplasty who underwent revision using a cemented captive acetabular cup and cement to cement revision of femoral component with Exeter CDH stem was carried out. The follow up period was two years and the functional outcomes were assessed using Harris hip scores. Discussion The management of recurrent dislocations of hemiarthroplasty in elderly patient are very challenging. Even though various treatment options are described most of them are associated with increased morbidity and mortality and prevent these patients from early mobilisation. The use of captive acetabular avoid repeated dislocations, prolonged bed rest, wearing of a brace and all the complications associated with sustained immobilization. The drawbacks of using constrained cups are hip pain, limited hip movements and loosening. Conclusion We describe a new method of treatment of this difficult condition with a cemented constrained acetabular captive cup and cement to cement revision using a CDH femoral stem. This method prevents further dislocations and will give good functional outcomes thus reducing the high morbidity and mortality. PMID:27129135

  19. Wear of polyethylene acetabular components in total hip arthroplasty. An analysis of one hundred and twenty-eight components retrieved at autopsy or revision operations.

    PubMed

    Jasty, M; Goetz, D D; Bragdon, C R; Lee, K R; Hanson, A E; Elder, J R; Harris, W H

    1997-03-01

    We evaluated the rates of volumetric wear and the patterns of wear of 128 acetabular components retrieved during an autopsy or a revision operation between one and twenty-one years after total hip arthroplasty. Twenty-two all-polyethylene components were retrieved at autopsy from hips that had been functioning well at the time of death (Group A). The remaining 106 components--eighty-four all-polyethylene components (Group B) and twenty-two metal-backed components (Group C)--were retrieved during revision operations. All 128 components had been inserted with cement. The mean rate of volumetric wear, determined directly with a fluid-displacement method, was thirty-five cubic millimeters per year (range, eight to 116 cubic millimeters per year) for Group A, sixty-two cubic millimeters per year (range, eight to 256 cubic millimeters per year) for Group B, and ninety-four cubic millimeters per year (range, twelve to 284 cubic millimeters per year) for Group C. Multivariate regression analysis showed a significant relationship (p < 0.05) between the size of the femoral head and the calculated mean annual rate of volumetric wear. The rate of volumetric wear was highest in association with thirty-two-millimeter femoral heads and lowest in association with twenty-two-millimeter heads; according to linear regression analysis, this represented a 7.5 per cent increase (Group A) or a 10 per cent increase (Group B) in the rate of wear for every one-millimeter increase in the size of the head. Linear regression analysis also showed a significant relationship between the duration that the implant had been in situ and the rate of wear (p < 0.05), with the rate being highest initially after the operation and decreasing with an increasing duration in situ. With the numbers available, the patient's age and gender and the side of the arthroplasty did not have a significant relationship to the annual rate of volumetric wear. Increased thickness of the polyethylene was related to a

  20. A randomised controlled trial comparing highly cross-linked and contemporary annealed polyethylene after a minimal eight-year follow-up in total hip arthroplasty using cemented acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Langlois, J; Atlan, F; Scemama, C; Courpied, J P; Hamadouche, M

    2015-11-01

    Most published randomised controlled trials which compare the rates of wear of conventional and cross-linked (XL) polyethylene (PE) in total hip arthroplasty (THA) have described their use with a cementless acetabular component. We conducted a prospective randomised study to assess the rates of penetration of two distinct types of PE in otherwise identical cemented all-PE acetabular components. A total of 100 consecutive patients for THA were randomised to receive an acetabular component which had been either highly XL then remelted or moderately XL then annealed. After a minimum of eight years follow-up, 38 hips in the XL group and 30 hips in the annealed group had complete data (mean follow-up of 9.1 years (7.6 to 10.7) and 8.7 years (7.2 to 10.2), respectively). In the XL group, the steady state rate of penetration from one year onwards was -0.0002 mm/year (sd 0.108): in the annealed group it was 0.1382 mm/year (sd 0.129) (Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.001). No complication specific to either material was recorded. These results show that the yearly linear rate of femoral head penetration can be significantly reduced by using a highly XLPE cemented acetabular component.

  1. Outcomes of polyethylene liner cementation into a fixed metal acetabular shell with minimum follow-up of 7 years.

    PubMed

    Park, Myung-Sik; Yoon, Sun-Jung; Lee, Ju Rang

    2015-01-01

    Cementation of a polyethylene liner into the well-fixed shell is a convenient option for revision total hip arthroplasty. We retrospectively reviewed 45 patients who had liner cementation to investigate the risk factors which gave rise to major complications and reoperation. Patients were observed for a minimum of 7 years (range 7.8-14 years). Relevant risk factors (age, BMI, surgical approach, previous cup size and position, types of coated surface) were assessed with Cox regression analysis. The mean Harris Hip Score was improved from 62.5 (range 57-68) preoperatively to 87.1 (range 70-97). A total of 7 hips (15.5%) had acetabular component loosening that was treated with reoperation. Prevalence of acetabular component loosening was statistically significantly higher in hydroxyapatite-coated group (5 of 13) than in the Ti-coated group (2 of 32, p = 0.015). All recurrent dislocations occurred in patients treated with a posterior approach. Diameter of the previous metal shell of below 54 mm showed a lower 10-year survival rate than those greater than 54 mm in diameter. PE liner cementation in stable metal cup is a useful alternative option for carefully selected patients. Pre-existing HA-coated cups as well as small sized cups were indicative of poor outcomes.

  2. Implication of acetabular width on the anteroposterior pelvic radiograph of patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Pei, Fuxing; Shen, Bin; Kang, Pengde; Li, Zongming

    2015-03-01

    Radiographic parameters that can help acetabular reconstruction during total hip arthroplasty (THA) for patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) are few. The radiographs of 138 dysplastic hips that had undergone cementless THA were evaluated regarding the acetabular width above the acetabular component and the coverage of the component by native bone. The acetabular reconstruction process was simulated using 3D models from CT data, and the acetabular component coverage was calculated in 3D space based on the measurement and algorithm we proposed. Significant positive correlation between the acetabular width and the acetabular component coverage was found. Our study introduced a useful parameter, which can mark the superior reference position of the acetabular component for acetabular reconstruction in DDH patients. PMID:25311162

  3. Navigated Acetabular Cup Fixation for Acetabular Deformity or Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Ro; Yu, Jung Jin; Seo, Hyo-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the usefulness of navigated acetabular cup fixation for total hip arthroplasty in patients with acetabular deformity or revision total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods This study enrolled 28 patients with at least 12 months' follow-up. The safe zone of the acetabular cup was defined as 40°±10°in inclination and 15°±10°in anteversion. The authors used the navigation and radiographic data to determine whether the acetabular cup was located within the safe zone or not. To evaluate the clinical outcomes, preoperative and last follow-up Harris hip scores were checked, and the occurrence of complications was evaluated. Results According to the navigation data, the mean inclination and anteversion were 38.5°±4.7°(range, 32°-50°) and 16.6°±4.0°(range, 8°-23°), respectively. According to the radiographic data the mean inclination and anteversion were 40.5°±4.6°(range, 32°-50°) and 19.4°±4.2°(range, 8°-25°), respectively. In both cases, all values were within the safe zone. Harris hip score was improved in all patients from preoperative 52.3±14.4 points (range, 29-87 points) to 88.0±9.0 points (range, 65-99 points) at the last follow-up. There was no dislocation or loosening of both cases. Conclusion Navigated acetabular cup fixation is a useful technique for total hip arthroplasty in patients with acetabular deformity or revision total hip arthroplasty because it prevents the malposition and related complications. PMID:27536573

  4. Natural acetabular orientation in arthritic hips

    PubMed Central

    Goudie, S. T.; Deakin, A. H.; Deep, K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Acetabular component orientation in total hip arthroplasty (THA) influences results. Intra-operatively, the natural arthritic acetabulum is often used as a reference to position the acetabular component. Detailed information regarding its orientation is therefore essential. The aim of this study was to identify the acetabular inclination and anteversion in arthritic hips. Methods Acetabular inclination and anteversion in 65 symptomatic arthritic hips requiring THA were measured using a computer navigation system. All patients were Caucasian with primary osteoarthritis (29 men, 36 women). The mean age was 68 years (SD 8). Mean inclination was 50.5° (SD 7.8) in men and 52.1° (SD 6.7) in women. Mean anteversion was 8.3° (SD 8.7) in men and 14.4° (SD 11.6) in women. Results The difference between men and women in terms of anteversion was significant (p = 0.022). In 75% of hips, the natural orientation was outside the safe zone described by Lewinnek et al (anteversion 15° ± 10°; inclination 40° ± 10°). Conclusion When using the natural acetabular orientation to guide component placement, it is important to be aware of the differences between men and women, and that in up to 75% of hips natural orientation may be out of what many consider to be a safe zone. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:6–10. PMID:25628463

  5. Failure of dual radius hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular cups

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Fabio; Molina, Mauro; Riva, Giacomo; Zatti, Giovanni; Cherubino, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Many kind of hydroxyapatite-coated cups were used, with favorable results in short term studies; it was supposed that its use could improve osteointegration of the cup, enhancing thus stability and survivorship. The purpose of this study is to analyze the long term behavior of the hemispheric HA coated, Dual Radius Osteonics cup and to discuss the way of failure through the exam of the revised components and of both periacetabular and osteolysis tissue. Materials and Methods Between 1994 and 1997, at the Department of Orthopedic Sciences of the Insubria University, using the posterolateral approach, were implanted 276 Dual Radius Osteonics® in 256 patients, with mean age of 63 years. Results At a mean follow-up of 10 years (range 8–12 years), 183 cups in 165 patients, were available for clinical and radiographical evaluation. 22 Cups among the 183 were revised (11%). The cause of revision was aseptic loosening in 17 cases, septic loosening in one case, periprosthetic fracture in another case, osteolysis and polyethylene wear in two cases and, finally, recurrent dislocations in the last one. In the remaining patients, mean HHS increased from a preoperative value of 50,15 to a postoperative value of 92,69. The mean polyethylene wear was 1,25 mm (min. 0,08, max. 3,9 mm), with a mean annual wear of 0,17 mm. The mean acetabular migration on the two axis was 1,6 mm and 1,8 mm. Peri-acetabular osteolysis were recorded in 89% of the implants (163 cases). The cumulative survivorship (revision as endpoint) at the time was 88,9%. Conclusion Our study confirms the bad behavior of this type of cup probably related to the design, to the method of HA fixation. The observations carried out on the revised cup confirm these hypotheses but did not clarify if the third body wear could be a further problem. Another interesting aspect is the high incidence of osteolysis, which are often asymptomatic becoming a problem for the surgeon as the patient refuses the

  6. Effect of acetabular cup abduction angle on wear of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene in hip simulator testing.

    PubMed

    Korduba, Laryssa A; Essner, Aaron; Pivec, Robert; Lancin, Perry; Mont, Michael A; Wang, Aiguo; Delanois, Ronald E

    2014-10-01

    The effect of acetabular component positioning on the wear rates of metal-on-polyethylene articulations has not been extensively studied. Placement of acetabular cups at abduction angles of more than 40° has been noted as a possible reason for early failure caused by increased wear. We conducted a study to evaluate the effects of different acetabular cup abduction angles on polyethylene wear rate, wear area, contact pressure, and contact area. Our in vitro study used a hip joint simulator and finite element analysis to assess the effects of cup orientation at 4 angles (0°, 40°, 50°, 70°) on wear and contact properties. Polyethylene bearings with 28-mm cobalt-chrome femoral heads were cycled in an environment mimicking in vivo joint fluid to determine the volumetric wear rate after 10 million cycles. Contact pressure and contact area for each cup abduction angle were assessed using finite element analysis. Results were correlated with cup abduction angles to determine if there were any differences among the 4 groups. The inverse relationship between volumetric wear rate and acetabular cup inclination angle demonstrated less wear with steeper cup angles. The largest abduction angle (70°) had the lowest contact area, largest contact pressure, and smallest head coverage. Conversely, the smallest abduction angle (0°) had the most wear and most head coverage. Polyethylene wear after total hip arthroplasty is a major cause of osteolysis and aseptic loosening, which may lead to premature implant failure. Several studies have found that high wear rates for cups oriented at steep angles contributed to their failure. Our data demonstrated that larger cup abduction angles were associated with lower, not higher, wear. However, this potentially "protective" effect is likely counteracted by other complications of steep cup angles, including impingement, instability, and edge loading. These factors may be more relevant in explaining why implants fail at a higher rate if

  7. Effect of acetabular cup abduction angle on wear of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene in hip simulator testing.

    PubMed

    Korduba, Laryssa A; Essner, Aaron; Pivec, Robert; Lancin, Perry; Mont, Michael A; Wang, Aiguo; Delanois, Ronald E

    2014-10-01

    The effect of acetabular component positioning on the wear rates of metal-on-polyethylene articulations has not been extensively studied. Placement of acetabular cups at abduction angles of more than 40° has been noted as a possible reason for early failure caused by increased wear. We conducted a study to evaluate the effects of different acetabular cup abduction angles on polyethylene wear rate, wear area, contact pressure, and contact area. Our in vitro study used a hip joint simulator and finite element analysis to assess the effects of cup orientation at 4 angles (0°, 40°, 50°, 70°) on wear and contact properties. Polyethylene bearings with 28-mm cobalt-chrome femoral heads were cycled in an environment mimicking in vivo joint fluid to determine the volumetric wear rate after 10 million cycles. Contact pressure and contact area for each cup abduction angle were assessed using finite element analysis. Results were correlated with cup abduction angles to determine if there were any differences among the 4 groups. The inverse relationship between volumetric wear rate and acetabular cup inclination angle demonstrated less wear with steeper cup angles. The largest abduction angle (70°) had the lowest contact area, largest contact pressure, and smallest head coverage. Conversely, the smallest abduction angle (0°) had the most wear and most head coverage. Polyethylene wear after total hip arthroplasty is a major cause of osteolysis and aseptic loosening, which may lead to premature implant failure. Several studies have found that high wear rates for cups oriented at steep angles contributed to their failure. Our data demonstrated that larger cup abduction angles were associated with lower, not higher, wear. However, this potentially "protective" effect is likely counteracted by other complications of steep cup angles, including impingement, instability, and edge loading. These factors may be more relevant in explaining why implants fail at a higher rate if

  8. Clinical and radiographic outcomes of acetabular impaction grafting without cage reinforcement for revision hip replacement: a minimum ten-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Gilbody, J; Taylor, C; Bartlett, G E; Whitehouse, S L; Hubble, M J W; Timperley, A J; Howell, J R; Wilson, M J

    2014-02-01

    Impaction bone grafting for the reconstitution of bone stock in revision hip surgery has been used for nearly 30 years. Between 1995 and 2001 we used this technique in acetabular reconstruction, in combination with a cemented component, in 304 hips in 292 patients revised for aseptic loosening. The only additional supports used were stainless steel meshes placed against the medial wall or laterally around the acetabular rim to contain the graft. All Paprosky grades of defect were included. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were collected in surviving patients at a minimum of ten years after the index operation. Mean follow-up was 12.4 years (sd 1.5) (10.0 to 16.0). Kaplan-Meier survival with revision for aseptic loosening as the endpoint was 85.9% (95% CI 81.0 to 90.8) at 13.5 years. Clinical scores for pain relief remained satisfactory, and there was no difference in clinical scores between cups that appeared stable and those that appeared radiologically loose. PMID:24493183

  9. Total arthroplasty in displaced dysplastic hips with acetabular reconstruction and femoral shortening - technical note.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paulo; de Oliveira, Leandro Alves; Coelho, Danilo Lopes; do Amaral, Rogério Andrade; Rebello, Percival Rosa; de Moraes, Frederico Barra

    2014-01-01

    To describe a new procedure of total hip replacement in patient with severe developmental dysplasia of the left hip, using technique of acetabular reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts and subtrochanteric shortening femoral osteotomy. Total hip replacement done in January of 2003. The Eftekhar's classification was used and included type D, neglected dislocations. Bone graft incorporated in acetabular shelf and femoral osteotomy. Our contribution is the use of an Allis plate to better fix acetabular grafts, avoiding loosening, and cerclage around bone graft in femoral osteotomy site, which diminish pseudoarthrosis risk. This technique shows efficiency, allowing immediately resolution for this case with pain and range of motion of hip improvement. It also allows the acetabular dysplasia reconstruction, equalization of the limb length (without elevated risk of neurovascular lesion) and repairs the normal hip biomechanics due to the correction of the hip's center of rotation.

  10. Extremely high fracture rate of a modular acetabular component with a sandwich polyethylene ceramic insertion for THA: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kircher, Jörn; Bader, Rainer; Schroeder, Bettina; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2009-09-01

    Improvements of ceramic components and design changes have reduced failure rates over the past 30 years in total hip arthroplasty. We present a series of n = 11 cases with ceramic failure out of n = 113 implantations, from which n = 66 were ceramic-on-ceramic (n = 50 with ceramic insert with sandwich in polyethylene and n = 16 with directly fixed ceramic inlay) and n = 47 ceramic on polyethylene bearings, between 1999 and 2001 after introduction of a new implantation system to the market. The overall fracture rate of ceramic for the whole series (n = 113) was 9.7%. For the combination ceramic head with UHMW-PE (n = 47) the fracture rate was 2.1%. For the combination ceramic with ceramic (n = 66) the fracture rate was 15.2%. For the combination ceramic with ceramic sandwich in PE (n = 50) the failure rate was 18%. Only three patients experienced a trauma. Demography of patients (age, gender, body weight and BMI) was not statistically different between patients with failed ceramics and the rest of the patients making patient-specific risk factors unlikely to be an explanation for the failures. Retrospective X-ray analysis of the cup positioning did not show significant difference between failed and non-failed implants in terms of mean cup inclination and version making also operation-specific factors unlikely to be the only reason of this high failure rate. Therefore, manufacturer-specific factors such as design features may have contributed to this high failure rate. Further analysis of the whole series with biomechanical testing of the retrieved material needs to be performed. PMID:18568354

  11. Porous surface replacement of the hip with chamfered-cylinder component.

    PubMed

    Amstutz, H; Kilgus, D; Kabo, M; Dorey, F

    1988-01-01

    One hundred porous surface replacements (PSR) were performed in 92 patients (63 men and 29 women) with a mean age of 53 (range 17-76). Follow-up times range from 1 to 4 years, with 48 patients having a follow-up of at least 2 years. Preoperative diagnoses were osteoarthritis (OA) 63, osteonecrosis (ON) 13, dysplasia 9, rheumatoid-ankylosing spondylitis 6, and other 9. Seventeen hips had metal-backed acrylic-fixed THARIES acetabular sockets, nine hips had a porous cobalt chrome hemispheric beaded acetabular component with adjuvant fixation screws and externally protruding screw hubs, and 74 hips had a porous chamfered cylinder-design acetabulum. Pain relief had been immediate and more complete than with acrylic-fixed or biologic-ingrowth stem-type replacement with comparable walking and function improvements. There have been no major systemic complications, sepsis, or loosening. There have been two transient peroneal nerve palsies and three trochanteric fibrous unions. There have been three reoperations, one for subluxation, one for "metalosis" due to mesh pad loosening, and one femoral neck fracture. Examination of one removed femoral surface component which has been histologically sectioned revealed excellent (90%) bone in-growth. Circumferential progressive radiolucencies developed at the bone-cement interface by 1 year in all of the 17 acrylic-fixed acetabular components. Reaming or seating defects were noted in 25% of the ingrowth components on postoperative radiographs. Radiographic analysis of immediate postoperative films of the chamfered cylinder design acetabular components frequently demonstrated bone-component interface radiolucencies which represented component seating defects. These initial interface radiolucencies became progressively more narrow over the first six months postoperatively suggesting "healing" of the reamed bone-component interface with trabecular bone around the chamfered cylinder acetabular components. Partial healing of initial

  12. Porous Tantalum Buttress Augments for Severe Acetabular Posterior Column Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, R Michael; Hull, Jason R; Russo, Glenn S; Lieberman, Jay R; Jiranek, William A

    2015-11-01

    In revision total hip arthroplasty (THA), consensus is lacking regarding the optimal method for reconstruction of the most severe acetabular defects. Porous tantalum (TM) buttress augments were designed for the most severe postero-superior defects. The purpose of this study was to report the results of a consecutive series of acetabular reconstructions utilizing TM buttress augments. Eight complex acetabular reconstructions utilizing a TM buttress augment were performed at two centers. All were Paprosky 3A or Paprosky 3B bone loss classification, with severe superior and posterior column deficiency where wedge augments were insufficient for mechanical support. The acetabular cup sizes ranged from 64-78, and a buttress shim was used in 7 of 8 cases. Clinical and radiographic follow-up averaged 16.5 months (range, 10-28) and no cases were lost to follow-up. There were no cases of clinical or radiographic loosening, and no case had required reoperation or revision. All patients except one were ambulating with either no assist device or a single cane at final follow-up. There was one complication of an iliac wing fracture noted incidentally on postoperative x-rays in the lone patient in whom a buttress shim was not used. At short-term follow-up, TM acetabular buttress augments appear to effectively substitute for the use of structural allografts or cages, which would otherwise be used in this challenging setting. The potential for biologic fixation is promising for the durability of these reconstructions; however, longer-term follow-up is required for full evaluation.

  13. A double mobility acetabular implant for primary hip arthroplasty in patients at high risk of dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, RG; Young, P; Uzoigwe, C; Barkham, B; Yusoff, S; Minhas, THA

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Dislocation following total hip replacement continues to be a problem for which no completely satisfactory solution has been found. Several methods have been proposed to reduce the incidence of hip dislocations with varying degrees of success, including elevated rim liners, constrained liners and large diameter bearings. We present our experience with the double mobility acetabular component in patients at high risk of instability. Methods This was a retrospective review of 65 primary total hip arthroplasties in 55 patients (15 men, 40 women), performed between October 2005 and November 2009. The majority (80%) of patients had at least two and 26% had at least three risk factors for instability. The mean age was 76 years (range: 44–92 years). The patients were followed up for a mean duration of 60 months (range: 36–85 months). Results Fourteen patients died and one was lost to follow-up, leaving fifty hips for final assessment. Until the final follow-up appointment, no patients had dislocation and none required revision surgery. The mean Oxford hip score improved from 45.0 to 26.5 (p<0.0001). The mean Merle d’Aubigné pain score improved from 1.4 to 4.9 (p<0.0001), the walking score from 2.3 to 3.1 (p<0.07) and the absolute hip function score from 5.4 to 10.8 (p<0.0001). There were no clinical or radiographic signs of loosening. Conclusions The double mobility acetabular component was successful at preventing dislocation during early to medium-term follow-up. However, as data are still lacking with regard to polyethylene wear rates at the additional bearing surface, it would be prudent to restrict the use of this implant to selected patients at high risk of instability. PMID:25350182

  14. Accuracy of the modified Hardinge approach in acetabular positioning

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Prateek; Lau, Adrian; McCalden, Richard; Teeter, Matthew G.; Howard, James L.; Lanting, Brent A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The surgical approach chosen for total hip arthroplasty (THA) may affect the positioning of the acetabular component. The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy in orienting the acetabular component using the modified Hardinge approach. Methods We used our institutional arthroplasty database to identify patients with primary, press-fit, hemispherical acetabular components of a metal-on-polyethylene THA performed between 2003 and 2011. Patients with radiographs obtained 1–3 years after the index procedure were included for measurement of anteversion and inclination angles. Acceptable values of anteversion and abduction angles were defined as 15° ± 10° and 40° ± 10°, respectively. Results We identified 1241 patients from the database, and the modified Hardinge approach was used in 1010 of the patients included in our analysis. The acetabular component was anteverted in the acceptable zone in 54.1% of patients. The abduction angle was within the defined range in 79.2% of patients. Combined anteversion and abduction angles within the defined zone were present in 43.6% of patients. Conclusion Consistent with studies examining accuracy from other approaches, our study reveals that the modified Hardinge approach was only moderately accurate in positioning the acetabular component in the acceptable zone. PMID:27240130

  15. [Mecring threaded cup in total arthroplasty of the hip with acetabular protrusion].

    PubMed

    Bednarek, A; Blacha, J; Gagała, J

    1998-01-01

    Results of total arthroplasty of the hip with acetabular protrusion with the use of Mecring cup in 21 patients (25 hips) aged 25-75 years (mean 62) are reported. Morsalised impacted autografts were used to fill acetabular defect in all cases. There were 14 rheumatoid arthritis patients, 4 cases of osteoarthritis and 3 cases of Otto-Chrobak disease. Mean follow-up was 2.5 years (range 6 months-5 years). All autografts were incorporated after 6-9 months. Only one loosening and migration of the cup occurred. One patient died because of pulmonary embolism. Harris Hip Score increased from 37 points (22-49) preoperatively to 81 points (65-89) at the latest follow-up. Incorporation of autografts reinforced acetabular bottom and prevented recurrence of protrusion. Bone remodeling indicates restoring normal biomechanics of the hip.

  16. Reconstruction of massive uncontained acetabular defects using allograft with cage or ring reinforcement: an assessment of the graft's ability to restore bone stock and its impact on the outcome of re-revision.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemian, M; Sadeghi Naini, M; Tangsataporn, S; Lee, P; Backstein, D; Safir, O; Kuzyk, P; Gross, A E

    2014-03-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 44 consecutive patients (50 hips) who underwent acetabular re-revision after a failed previous revision that had been performed using structural or morcellised allograft bone, with a cage or ring for uncontained defects. Of the 50 previous revisions, 41 cages and nine rings were used with allografts for 14 minor-column and 36 major-column defects. We routinely assessed the size of the acetabular bone defect at the time of revision and re-revision surgery. This allowed us to assess whether host bone stock was restored. We also assessed the outcome of re-revision surgery in these circumstances by means of radiological characteristics, rates of failure and modes of failure. We subsequently investigated the factors that may affect the potential for the restoration of bone stock and the durability of the re-revision reconstruction using multivariate analysis. At the time of re-revision, there were ten host acetabula with no significant defects, 14 with contained defects, nine with minor-column, seven with major-column defects and ten with pelvic discontinuity. When bone defects at re-revision were compared with those at the previous revision, there was restoration of bone stock in 31 hips, deterioration of bone stock in nine and remained unchanged in ten. This was a significant improvement (p < 0.001). Morselised allografting at the index revision was not associated with the restoration of bone stock. In 17 hips (34%), re-revision was possible using a simple acetabular component without allograft, augments, rings or cages. There were 47 patients with a mean follow-up of 70 months (6 to 146) available for survival analysis. Within this group, the successful cases had a minimum follow-up of two years after re-revision. There were 22 clinical or radiological failures (46.7%), 18 of which were due to aseptic loosening. The five and ten year Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 75% (95% CI, 60 to 86) and 56% (95% CI, 40 to 70) respectively with aseptic

  17. Cathepsin G and alpha 1-antichymotrypsin in the local host reaction to loosening of total hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Takagi, M; Konttinen, Y T; Santavirta, S; Kangaspunta, P; Suda, A; Rokkanen, P

    1995-01-01

    The tissue localization and content of the proteolytic enzyme cathepsin G and its inhibitor alpha 1-antichymotrypsin were studied in the local host reaction to loosening of total hip-replacement prostheses in eleven patients and were compared with those in samples of non-inflammatory tissue from the synovial capsule obtained during arthroscopies of the knee. Immunostaining demonstrated cellular localization of cathepsin G in 71 per cent of monocyte or macrophage-like cells and in 46 per cent of fibroblast-like cells in the samples of interface tissue between the bone and the loose acetabular component obtained at the time of the total hip replacements, and in 59 and 42 per cent, respectively, in the samples of pseudocapsular tissue obtained at the same time, whereas the synovial lining cells in the samples of non-inflammatory tissue from the synovial capsule revealed only a slight immunoreactivity to cathepsin G. Cathepsin-G activity was also measured with synthetic succinyl-alanine-alanine-proline-phenylalanine-paranitroanilide as a substrate, the degradation of which was monitored spectrophotometrically. In accordance with results from immunohistochemical studies, cathepsin-G activity was found in the samples of interface tissue (31.6 international units per liter) and the samples of pseudocapsular tissue (15.5 international units per liter) obtained during the total hip replacements, whereas the level of cathepsin-G was low in the samples of non-inflammatory synovial capsular tissue (2.5 international units per liter). Cathepsin-G activity in the samples of pseudosynovial fluid obtained at the time of the total hip replacements was low (2.4 international units per liter), although immunoblot analysis showed marked immunoreactive cathepsin G in the samples of pseudosynovial fluid. This low activity of cathepsin G might be explained by the presence of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, which was detected by laser nephlometric immunoassay and immunoblot analysis. These

  18. The potential for bone loss in acetabular structures following THA.

    PubMed

    Manley, Michael T; Ong, Kevin L; Kurtz, Steven M

    2006-12-01

    Attempts to preserve periacetabular bone stock following total hip replacement have largely ignored the potential for stress shielding in the acetabulum. We sought to quantify the change in stress distribution in acetabular bone with components of varying material stiffness by developing a high-resolution 3-D finite element model from CT scans of a young female donor. Periprosthetic bone stresses and strains on the left pelvis were compared with hemispherical cups of various material properties and with a horseshoe shaped polymeric design described in the recent literature. We observed unphysiologic periacetabular bone stress and strain fields for all designs tested. For hemispherical components, reduction of the acetabular shell material modulus caused modest changes in bone stress compared to the changes in implant geometry. The horseshoe shaped cup more effectively loaded the acetabular structures than the hemispherical design. Our results suggest stress and strain fields in pelvic structures after introduction of hemispherical acetabular components predict inevitable bone adaptation that can not be resolved by changes in implant material properties alone. Radical changes in implant design may be necessary for long-term maintenance of supporting structures in the reconstructed acetabulum.

  19. Long Term Results of Liner Polyethylene Cementation Technique in Revision for Peri-acetabular Osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Rivkin, Gurion; Kandel, Leonid; Qutteineh, Bilal; Liebergall, Meir; Mattan, Yoav

    2015-06-01

    Patients with peri-acetabular osteolysis around a well fixed cementless acetabular component may be treated with liner exchange. When the locking mechanism is unreliable or unavailable, cementing the liner into the fixed acetabular component is a feasible option. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic long term results of this technique. Forty hip revisions with liner cementation in 37 patients were performed. The minimum follow up was 10 years. Modified Harris Hip Score and recent x rays were reviewed. Four hips were re-revised. Two patients were diagnosed with exacerbation of osteolysis but refused revision. Dislocation rate was relatively high (16%). Liner cementation technique in revision hip surgery is useful in patients with a well fixed metal backed acetabular component.

  20. Do abnormal hemipelvic bone stresses contribute to loosening and migration of screw-threaded cups?

    PubMed

    Learmonth, I D; Spirakis, A

    1994-03-01

    Excellent long-term results have been reported with the Charnley low-friction arthroplasty. Failure of the cemented acetabular component has been identified as a problem in the longer term, while cemented hip replacements in active young patients have exhibited a disconcerting incidence of early clinical or radiological failure. This resulted in the development of the cementless arthroplasty. Bone responds favourably to an optimal stress window and reacts dynamically to metal implants that have a greatly differing modulus of elasticity. This study represents a comparative qualitative analysis of the peri-acetabular hemipelvic stresses after loading two cementless (press-fit and screw-threaded) acetabular components inserted into identical bone models. A simplified model of the artificial hip joint was constructed and the very sensitive stress analysis technique of holographic interferometry was used for the investigation. Peri-acetabular stress concentrations were noted with the screw-threaded cup. This may predispose to bone resorption and it is suggested that these could be implicated in the migration of these cups described in published reports.

  1. Photoelastic analysis of stresses produced by different acetabular cups.

    PubMed

    Ries, M D; Salehi, A; Shea, J

    1999-12-01

    Porous-coated acetabular components can provide long-term biologic fixation to bone. However, the periacetabular stress patterns and mechanisms by which different types of cementless acetabular cups obtain initial stability is not clear. In the current study, periacetabular stresses produced by different cementless acetabular cup geometries were quantitated using a three-dimensional photoelastic model. The cup geometries consisted of trispiked, finned, hemispherical, and nonhemispherical (wider than a hemisphere at the periphery) geometries. The cup models were loaded incrementally in the photoelastic material to simulate periacetabular stress distributions at the time of implantation during surgery rather than under physiologic weightbearing loads. The peripheral stress distributions and their magnitudes induced by the trispiked and oversized hemispherical cups were similar, but the trispiked cup induced localized high stress regions where the spikes penetrate the bone model. The fins separated the periacetabular material into quadrants, which was associated with decreased peripheral stresses. A nonhemispherical geometry with a wider diameter at the rim than a hemisphere increased peripheral stresses more than an oversized hemispherical geometry and required less force to seat the implant. Although various cementless acetabular cups can perform well clinically, they produce different periacetabular stresses and appear to obtain initial fixation by different mechanisms. PMID:10611871

  2. Imaging of the acetabular labrum.

    PubMed

    Thomas, James D; Li, Zhi; Agur, Anne M; Robinson, Philip

    2013-07-01

    The evaluation and proposed relevance of acetabular labral tears has rapidly evolved over the last decade due to the recognition of femoroacetabular impingement, an increase in the number of surgical options, and improved imaging of the hip with MR arthrography and 3-T MR protocols. The acetabular labrum, stabilizing the hip joint, provides a seal, enhancing fluid lubrication, maintains synovial pressure, and prevents direct contact of the articular surfaces. The labrum takes on a weightbearing role at the extremes of motion with excessive forces seen in a great number of athletic activities thought to contribute to tearing. Approximately 25% of labral tears are not associated with any specific injury or traumatic event with the underlying etiology thought to be repetitive microtrauma. This article reviews the anatomy of the acetabular labrum and discusses the five most commonly occurring etiologies of labral tears: trauma, femoroacetabular impingement, hip hypermobility, dysplasia, and degeneration. We also review the surgical and MR classification of labral tears and describe potential pitfalls in image interpretation. PMID:23787979

  3. Catalysts of plant cell wall loosening

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The growing cell wall in plants has conflicting requirements to be strong enough to withstand the high tensile forces generated by cell turgor pressure while selectively yielding to those forces to induce wall stress relaxation, leading to water uptake and polymer movements underlying cell wall expansion. In this article, I review emerging concepts of plant primary cell wall structure, the nature of wall extensibility and the action of expansins, family-9 and -12 endoglucanases, family-16 xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH), and pectin methylesterases, and offer a critical assessment of their wall-loosening activity PMID:26918182

  4. Acetabular liner fixation by cement.

    PubMed

    Jiranek, William A

    2003-12-01

    Many situations in revision THA require the exchange of a PE liner in the setting of a well-fixed cementless acetabular shell. Unfortunately, a replacement liner is not always available, the locking mechanism of the metal shell may be damaged or incompatible with the desired liner, or the shell is malpositioned. Revision of a well-fixed cementless acetabular shell has been associated with considerable morbidity. This raises several questions: can a new PE liner be fixed in the existing shell using bone cement, and if so, which techniques can improve the end result, and in which patients should they be used? Biomechanical testing of cemented PE liners has shown initial fixation strengths that exceed conventional locking mechanisms. It is not known during what period this initial fixation will fail, but clinical reports with followup of as many as 6 years have shown survival in approximately 90% of cases. These studies have shown the importance of proper patient selection, accurate sizing of the PE liner, careful preparation of the substrate of the liner and the shell, and good cement technique. The potential advantages of this technique are less surgical morbidity, more rapid surgery and patient recovery, the ability to incorporate antibiotics in the cement, and more liner options.

  5. A technique to remove a well-fixed titanium-coated RM acetabular cup in revision hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Judas, Fernando M J; Dias, Rui F; Lucas, Francisco M

    2011-01-01

    A major concern during revision hip arthroplasty is acetabular bone loss and bleeding during the extraction of well-fixed cementless acetabular cup, because no interface exists between the host bone and the cup. Forceful removal of such component using curved gouges and osteotomes often leads to extended bone loss and compromises reimplantation of a new socket. In the following case report, we removed a well-fixed polyethylene titanium-coated RM acetabular cup with 20 years of follow-up, by significant wear of the polyethylene layer. The isoelastic femoral stem was also removed by mechanical failure. We report a technique for removal of the cementless acetabular cup using powered acetabular reamers. The RM cup was sequentially reamed and when the polyethylene layer was thin enough, the remaining cup was removed easily by hand tools. The acetabular bone stock is preserved and the risks of bone fractures and bleeding are minimized. To our knowledge, these principles were applied only in cemented cups. We have used this technique in 10 cases with excellent results and no complications were noted. This is a simple, reproducible, non-costly, non-timing consuming, safe and successful technique to remove well-fixed titanium-coated RM acetabular cups.

  6. The effect of polyethylene creep on tibial insert locking screw loosening and back-out in prosthetic knee joints.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Anthony P; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2014-10-01

    A prosthetic knee joint typically comprises a cobalt-chromium femoral component that articulates with a polyethylene tibial insert. A locking screw may be used to prevent micromotion and dislodgement of the tibial insert from the tibial tray. Screw loosening and back-out have been reported, but the mechanism that causes screw loosening is currently not well understood. In this paper, we experimentally evaluate the effect of polyethylene creep on the preload of the locking screw. We find that the preload decreases significantly as a result of polyethylene creep, which reduces the torque required to loosen the locking screw. The torque applied to the tibial insert due to internal/external rotation within the knee joint during gait could thus drive locking screw loosening and back-out. The results are very similar for different types of polyethylene.

  7. Use of porous tantalum for acetabular reconstruction in revision hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Issack, Paul S

    2013-11-01

    ➤ Over the past decade, porous tantalum has emerged as a powerful tool for reconstruction of the failed acetabular component.➤ The increased porosity, high coefficient of friction, and favorable elastic modulus of porous tantalum compared with traditional titanium mesh or cobalt chromium acetabular components allow for greater bone ingrowth potential, implant stability, and host bone preservation, respectively, in porous tantalum shells.➤ Several studies have confirmed the excellent early and midterm results of porous tantalum reconstruction for revision hip arthroplasty.➤ Depending on the degree of bone loss, excellent results have been achieved with modular or revision porous tantalum shells, tantalum shells with tantalum augments, and cup-cage constructs.➤ These implants and techniques are greatly changing the approach to acetabular revision surgery and are providing constructs with greater stability and more physiologic biomechanical properties than those achieved through the use of traditional reconstructive methods.

  8. Oxidation and other property changes of retrieved sequentially annealed UHMWPE acetabular and tibial bearings.

    PubMed

    Reinitz, Steven D; Currier, Barbara H; Van Citters, Douglas W; Levine, Rayna A; Collier, John P

    2015-04-01

    This investigation analyzed retrieved sequentially crosslinked and annealed (SXL) ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene bearings to determine whether the material is chemically stable in vivo. A series of retrieved tibial and acetabular components were analyzed for changes in ketone oxidation, crosslink density, and free radical concentration. Oxidation was observed to increase with in vivo duration, and the rate of oxidation in tibial inserts was significantly greater than in acetabular liners. SXL acetabular bearings oxidized at a rate comparable to gamma-sterilized liners, while SXL tibial inserts oxidized at a significantly faster rate than their gamma-sterilized counterparts. A significant decrease in crosslink density with increased mean ketone oxidation index was observed, suggesting that in vivo oxidation may be causing material degradation. Furthermore, a subsurface whitened damage region was also found in a subset of the bearings, indicating the possibility of a clinically relevant decrease in mechanical properties of these components.

  9. An in vivo comparison of the orientation of the transverse acetabular ligament and the acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Andrew R; Perriman, Diana M; Bolton, Claire J; Smith, Paul N

    2014-03-01

    Aligning the acetabular component with the Transverse Acetabular Ligament (TAL) to ensure optimal anteversion has been reported to reduce dislocation rates. However, to our knowledge in vivo measurement of the TAL angle has not yet been reported in a large cohort of normal hips. CT scans of 218 normal hips were analyzed. The TAL and four acetabular rim anteversion angles were measured (superiorly to inferiorly) relative to the anterior pelvic plane. The mean TAL anteversion angle was 20.5° ± 7.0°, and the acetabular rim angles from superior to inferior were 11.0° ± 12.9°, 19.9° ± 8.8°, 20.9° ± 6.2° and 25.1° ± 6.2° respectively. Both the TAL and the acetabular rim were significantly more anteverted in females than in males. The TAL anteversion angle was comparable to the predominant orientation (central rim section) of the native acetabulum while the superior acetabulum was comparatively retroverted and the inferior was relatively more anteverted.

  10. WILLIAM SEAL USING A HAMMER TO LOOSEN A BEARDSLEY AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WILLIAM SEAL USING A HAMMER TO LOOSEN A BEARDSLEY AND PIPER ROTOMOLD CORMATIC CORE FROM ITS CORE BOX. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Core Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  11. [Classification of prosthetic loosening and determination of wear particles].

    PubMed

    Otto, M

    2008-11-01

    Nowaday, loosening of orthopaedic implants implies important medical and socioeconomic problems. Implant loosening is caused by implant infections as well as aseptic loosening, due to particle disease and mechanical alterations. Clinically we divide the implant infection into early and late infections. Morphologically it is possible to reliably detect the infection by quantification of neutrophil granulocytes. Additionally molecular methods are suitable to detect micro-organisms which are responsible for the prosthetic joint infection including their resistance to antibiotics. Particle disease may be reproducibly classified by the detection of different types of wear particles, particularly polyethylene, metal, ceramic and cement. The aetiology of the indeterminate type of the periprosthetic membrane is obscure, but may be associated with osteopathies. This classification of the periprosthetic membrane morphology provides clinically significant information concerning clinical management of implant loosening.

  12. Soil loosening and drainage of structurally unstable silty soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twomlow, Stephen J.; Parkinson, Robert J.; Reid, Ian

    1990-12-01

    Secondary drainage treatments are carried out with the objective of enhancing the performance of permanent piped schemes. In this study, a drainage experiment was designed to investigate the effect of soil loosening on storm water redistribution in a structurally unstable silt soil following the installation of underdrainage. Results show that even though loosening reduced dry bulk density between 0.2 and 0.4 m depth by 15%, with a 270% increase in transmission pores (> 60 μm equivalent diameter) at the interface of what was the cultivated and undisturbed soil, drainage efficiency was not enhanced, as might have been expected from the 10- to 20-fold increase in hydraulic conductivity. Loosening not only lengthens the median time of concentration by 0.42 and 0.33 h for simple and secondary winter storms, respectively, but also caused lower peak discharges when compared with unloosened soil. Measurements of soil water energetics reveal that a greater proportion of rainfall is diverted into the loosened zone below the plough layer and detained there, reducing the 24 h drainage efficiency. On a seasonal timescale, the greater storage between 0.2 and 0.4 m depth causes a 6.3% increase in the winter mean water content, and means that the rooting environment of the loosened soil is wetter prior to a rainstorm. Consequently, in wet autumns and springs, loosened soils will be more susceptible to structural damage by animal poaching or the traffic of farm machinery.

  13. [Acetabular fractures in the elderly. Outcome of open reduction and internal fixation].

    PubMed

    Tosounidis, G; Culemann, U; Bauer, M; Holstein, J H; Garcia, P; Kurowski, R; Pizanis, A; Aghayev, E; Pohlemann, T

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome and incidence of hip arthritis in elderly patients with acetabular fractures. Because of poor bone quality in the elderly, even a low-energy trauma may lead to an acetabular fracture. An anatomical reconstruction of the acetabulum is necessary to achieve sufficient stability also for a potential hip arthroplasty. So far, there is very limited information on the outcome of acetabular fractures in the elderly. During a period of 6 years (2001-2006), 48 patients older than 60 years were admitted to our department with an acetabular fracture. Thirty-nine patients were treated operatively and nine patients non-operatively. Twenty-nine operatively treated patients were followed up. Nineteen of them were assessed using EQ-5D, SF-12 and Merle d'Aubigné questionnaires in addition to their clinical examination. Ten other surgical patients were only examined using the questionnaires. Of the 29 patients that were followed up, 5 underwent total hip arthroplasty due to secondary post-traumatic hip arthritis after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). The range of motion of the operated hip was comparable to that of the non-operated contralateral side. However, the internal rotation was found to be slightly decreased at the operated side when compared to the non-operated contralateral side. Merle d'Aubigné score and physical and mental SF-12 score components as well as quality of life were better in patients treated with ORIF compared to those patients that were treated by secondary hip arthroplasty. Regarding the different treatment strategies (ORIF vs primary hip arthroplasty vs non-operative treatment) of acetabular fractures in the elderly, data from the literature are conflicting. Our results indicate that ORIF represents a good treatment option for acetabular fractures in the elderly. In patients that did not develop secondary hip arthritis, a good clinical outcome and quality of life was documented. PMID

  14. Acetabular reconstruction with impaction bone-grafting and a cemented cup in patients younger than fifty years old: a concise follow-up, at twenty to twenty-eight years, of a previous report.

    PubMed

    Busch, Vincent J J F; Gardeniers, Jean W M; Verdonschot, Nico; Slooff, Tom J J H; Schreurs, B Willem

    2011-02-16

    In a previous report, we presented our results of forty-two acetabular reconstructions, performed with use of impaction bone-grafting and a cemented polyethylene cup, in thirty-seven patients who were younger than fifty years and had a minimum of fifteen years of follow-up. The present update study shows the results after twenty to twenty-eight years. Eight additional cups had to be revised--four because of aseptic loosening, three because of wear, and one during a revision of the stem. Three additional cups were considered loose on radiographs. Survivorship of the acetabular reconstructions, with an end point of revision for any reason, was 73% after twenty years and 52% after twenty-five years. With revision for aseptic loosening as the end point, survival was 85% after twenty years and 77% after twenty-five years; for signs of loosening on radiographs, survival was 71% at twenty years and 62% at twenty-five years. In conclusion, our previous results have declined but the technique of using impacted morselized bone graft and a cemented cup is useful for the purpose of restoring bone stock in young patients whose acetabular defects require primary or revision total hip arthroplasty.

  15. Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Tantalum Augment in Patients with Paprosky III or IV Acetabular Bone Defects: A Minimum 2-year Follow Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Min; Kim, Hyung-Joo; Lim, Seung-Jae; Moon, Young-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to report the short-term outcomes of revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) using tantalum augments in patients with severe acetabular bone defects. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 15 revision THAs performed in 15 patients using tantalum augments between June 2010 and December 2013. Acetabular bone defects were Paprosky type IIIA in 7 hips, type IIIB in 7, and type IV in 1. The causes of revision surgery were aseptic loosening in 12 hips and deep infection in 3. Revisions were first in 1 hip, second in 3, and third in 11. Six patients were male and 9 female with a mean age of 59 years (range, 48-75 years). Mean follow-up was 29 months (range, 24-48 months). Results Mean Harris hip score was improved from 34 points (range, 12-54 points) preoperatively to 84 points (range, 38-90 points) at final follow-up. On the final follow-up radiographs, there were 12 hips (80.0%) with stable fixation of the acetabular cup, 2 (13.3%) with secondary stability after mild acetabular protrusion, and 1 (6.7%) with radiolucency around the acetabular cup without mechanical symptoms. Complications included one patient with acute hematogenous infection managed by surgical debridement and long-term antibiotic therapy. There were no cases with nerve palsy or dislocation during the follow-up period. Conclusion The present study showed satisfactory clinical and radiographic outcomes of revision THA using tantalum augments due to severe acetabular bone defects of Paprosky type III or IV at a minimum follow-up of 2 years. PMID:27536651

  16. Osteopathic diagnosis of an acetabular injury.

    PubMed

    Morthland, Tim; Cote, Nicholas S; Humphrey, Jon; Fulk, Doug

    2010-05-01

    Physical findings demarking pathologic somatovisceral reflex activity and fascial strain patterns may lead the osteopathic physician to diagnoses that are masked within the initial presentation of a patient. The authors present a case report that demonstrates the use of osteopathic principles in the diagnosis of a chronic acetabular fracture and acetabular labral tear in a 19-year-old man. The injuries resulted from a posterior hip dislocation sustained during a basketball game more than 1 year before presentation. Osteopathic manipulative treatment and diagnostic techniques also relieved the patient's persistent thoracic pain, nausea, and vomiting. Subsequent orthopedic repair had the potential to avert or delay degenerative hip disease in the patient.

  17. Early polyethylene wear and osteolysis with ABG acetabular cups (7- to 12-year follow-up)

    PubMed Central

    Livesley, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We reviewed 81 consecutive ABG I primary total hip replacements implanted in 72 patients between January 1993 and December 1998. The mean follow-up was 8.2 (range 7–12) years. There was significant polyethylene wear and osteolysis associated with the acetabular cup .The cumulative survival of the cup with revision being the end point at 8.2 years was 95.1% (95% CI: 92–97.6%). However, the cumulative survival of the cup with revision and aseptic loosening together was 72% (95% CI: 61–78%) and survival of the acetabular liner for wear was 62% (95% CI: 48–74%). Stem survival with revision being the end point was 100%. In spite of significant radiological failures of the cups, most patients remained asymptomatic. Though results of the ABG stems in this series were good, we advocate a regular follow-up of all these hips in view of the poor outcome of the cups. PMID:16283307

  18. The acetabular point: a morphological and ontogenetic study

    PubMed Central

    RISSECH, C.; SAÑUDO, J. R.; MALGOSA, A.

    2001-01-01

    The acetabular point was analysed by studying human pelvic bones from 326 individuals ranging from newborns to age 97 y. The bones were categorised into 3 groups according to the degree of fusion for the 3 elements of the pelvis: nonfused (59), semifused (5) and fused (262). The acetabular point in immature pelvic bones is clearly represented by the point of the fusion lines for each bony element at the level of the acetabular fossa. In adult pelvic bones the acetabular fossa has an irregular clover-leaf shape, the superior lobe being smaller than the anterior and posterior lobes. Cross-sectional analysis of acetabular morphology suggested that the acetabular point in adult pelvic bones is always represented by the indentation between the superior and the anterior lobes of the acetabular fossa. PMID:11465866

  19. Medium-term results of cementation of a highly cross-linked polyethylene liner into a well-fixed acetabular shell in revision hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seung-Jae; Lee, Keun-Ho; Park, Shin-Hyung; Park, Youn-Soo

    2014-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to document outcomes of cementation of a highly cross-linked polyethylene (PE) liner into a well-fixed acetabular metal shell in 36 hips. All operations were performed by a single surgeon using only one type of liner. Patients were followed for a mean of 6.1 years (range, 3-8 years). Mean Harris hip score improved from 58 points preoperatively to 91 points postoperatively. There were no cases of PE liner dislodgement or progressive osteolysis. 1 hip (2.8%) required revision surgery for acetabular cup loosening with greater trochanteric fracture. Complications included 1 peroneal nerve palsy and 1 dislocation. The results of this study and previous reports demonstrated that cementation of highly cross-linked PE liner into well-fixed metal shell could provide good midterm durability.

  20. Improving the detection of acetabular osteolysis using oblique radiographs.

    PubMed

    Southwell, D G; Bechtold, J E; Lew, W D; Schmidt, A H

    1999-03-01

    Visualisation of periacetabular osteolysis by standard anteroposterior (AP) radiographs underestimates the extent of bone loss around a metal-backed acetabular component. We have assessed the effectiveness of standard radiological views in depicting periacetabular osteolysis, and recommend additional projections which make these lesions more visible. This was accomplished using a computerised simulation of radiological views and a radiological analysis of simulated defects placed at regular intervals around the perimeter of a cadaver acetabulum. The AP view alone showed only 38% of the defects over all of the surface of the cup and failed to depict a 3 mm lesion over 83% of the cup. When combined with the AP view, additional 45 degree obturator-oblique and iliac-oblique projections increased the depiction, showing 81% of the defects. The addition of the 60 degree obturator-oblique view further improved the visualisation of posterior defects, increasing the rate of detection to 94%. Based on this analysis, we recommend using at least three radiographic views when assessing the presence and extent of acetabular osteolysis. PMID:10204936

  1. Cell Wall Loosening in the Fungus, Phycomyces blakesleeanus

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Joseph K. E.; Truong, Jason T.; Munoz, Cindy M.; Ramirez, David G.

    2015-01-01

    A considerable amount of research has been conducted to determine how cell walls are loosened to produce irreversible wall deformation and expansive growth in plant and algal cells. The same cannot be said about fungal cells. Almost nothing is known about how fungal cells loosen their walls to produce irreversible wall deformation and expansive growth. In this study, anoxia is used to chemically isolate the wall from the protoplasm of the sporangiophores of Phycomyces blakesleeanus. The experimental results provide direct evidence of the existence of chemistry within the fungal wall that is responsible for wall loosening, irreversible wall deformation and elongation growth. In addition, constant-tension extension experiments are conducted on frozen-thawed sporangiophore walls to obtain insight into the wall chemistry and wall loosening mechanism. It is found that a decrease in pH to 4.6 produces creep extension in the frozen-thawed sporangiophore wall that is similar, but not identical, to that found in frozen-thawed higher plant cell walls. Experimental results from frozen-thawed and boiled sporangiophore walls suggest that protein activity may be involved in the creep extension. PMID:27135318

  2. Meralgia Paresthetica and Femoral Acetabular Impingement: A Possible Association

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aiesha

    2010-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica consists of pain and dysesthesia in the anterolateral thigh. Etiology is divided into spontaneous and iatrogenic causes. To my knowledge this has never been attributed to femoral acetabular impingement. This case highlights the presence of lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy in the setting of femoral acetabular impingement syndrome thus raising the possibility of an association. Keywords Femoral acetabular impingement; Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; Dysesthesia; Nerve conduction studies PMID:22043261

  3. Failure analysis of retrieved PE-UHMW acetabular liners.

    PubMed

    Laska, Anna; Archodoulaki, Vasiliki-Maria; Duscher, Bernadette

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (PE-UHMW) acetabular liners have a limited lifespan in a patient's body. There are many factors affecting the performance of the implant and furthermore the properties of the polymeric material are changing after implantation. In this work material changes according to structure and morphology and their implication on mechanical properties are in focus. The physical and mechanical properties of ten crosslinked (xL) PE-UHMW and nine conventional (conv) gamma-sterilized PE-UHMW hip components, used as sliding surface in total hip joint replacement, with different in-vivo times are compared. The evaluation of the retrieved acetabular liners is performed in view of crosslinking and conventional gamma-sterilization but also in terms of the influence of gender concerning alteration in properties. The oxidative degradation in the PE-UHMW is investigated by means of Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The characterization of the morphology is carried out via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A depth profile of the micro-hardness and elastic modulus is taken over the cross-section of the components in order to find the influence of chemical constitution and morphology on the micro-mechanical properties. It could be shown that crosslinking and oxidative degradation influence the degree of crystallinity of the polymer. Oxidation occurs for both types of the material due to in-vivo time. Higher degree of crystallinity can be correlated to higher hardness and indentation modulus. No unequivocal superiority of crosslinked over conventional liners can be observed. The influence of sex concerning alteration of the evaluated properties matters but need to be further investigated. PMID:26849029

  4. Failure analysis of retrieved PE-UHMW acetabular liners.

    PubMed

    Laska, Anna; Archodoulaki, Vasiliki-Maria; Duscher, Bernadette

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (PE-UHMW) acetabular liners have a limited lifespan in a patient's body. There are many factors affecting the performance of the implant and furthermore the properties of the polymeric material are changing after implantation. In this work material changes according to structure and morphology and their implication on mechanical properties are in focus. The physical and mechanical properties of ten crosslinked (xL) PE-UHMW and nine conventional (conv) gamma-sterilized PE-UHMW hip components, used as sliding surface in total hip joint replacement, with different in-vivo times are compared. The evaluation of the retrieved acetabular liners is performed in view of crosslinking and conventional gamma-sterilization but also in terms of the influence of gender concerning alteration in properties. The oxidative degradation in the PE-UHMW is investigated by means of Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The characterization of the morphology is carried out via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A depth profile of the micro-hardness and elastic modulus is taken over the cross-section of the components in order to find the influence of chemical constitution and morphology on the micro-mechanical properties. It could be shown that crosslinking and oxidative degradation influence the degree of crystallinity of the polymer. Oxidation occurs for both types of the material due to in-vivo time. Higher degree of crystallinity can be correlated to higher hardness and indentation modulus. No unequivocal superiority of crosslinked over conventional liners can be observed. The influence of sex concerning alteration of the evaluated properties matters but need to be further investigated.

  5. Development of Anti-Loosening Performance of Hyper Lock Nut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shuji; Migita, Hiroaki; Kataoka, Mitumasa; Nakasaki, Nobuyuki; Murano, Kohshi

    Bolted joints are widely used in mechanical structures as they allow easy disassembly for maintenance without high cost. However, vibration-induced loosening due to dynamic loading remains a long-unresolved issue. We have developed a new type of nut named the hyper lock nut (HLN) that offers anti-loosening performance without a complicated tightening process and tools. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of joints bolted with the HLN, and tightening behavior was analyzed using the three-dimensional finite element method. The analytical results were compared with the experimental results for the HLN, and close qualitative agreement was observed between the two with respect to displacement, tightening force and tightening torque. We found a number of new aspects and plus points for joints bolted with the HLN in comparison to those fastened with JIS standard nuts. It was found that the tightening torque of the HLN is higher than that of JIS standard nuts, and that satisfactory anti-loosening performance can be realized through the thread contact force at the slit region and the angular face of the bearing surface.

  6. Unusual Cause of Hip Pain: Intrusion of the Acetabular Labrum

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Se-Ang; Byun, Young-Soo; Jeong, Dae-Geun; Han, In-Ho; Kim, Min-Guek

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement and dysplatic hip joint is well known cause of osteoarthritis. In these diseases, labral tear and subsequent cartilage damage is thought to be main pathophysiology of development of osteoarthritis. If there are no known bony abnormalities, we called it as idiopathic osteoarthritis. Normal appearance of acetabular labrum is a continuous, usually triangular structure that attaches to the bony rim of the acetabulum and is completed at the inferior portion by the transverse acetabular ligament over the acetabular notch. A few authors reported intra-articular labrum and its relation to the development of osteoarthritis. But they didn't comment the primary bony abnormality especially acetabulum. We'd like to report x-ray, computed tomogram, magnetic resonance arthrogram and arthroscopic findings of a case had double contour sign of acetabular dome combined with intrusion of acetabular labrum. PMID:27536602

  7. An increase in cranial acetabular version with age: implications for femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Kopydlowski, Nathan J; Tannenbaum, Eric P; Bedi, Asheesh; Smith, Matthew V; Sekiya, Jon K

    2014-09-01

    This cadaveric study aimed to determine if acetabular retroversion demonstrates predictable changes with age that could inform understanding of factors that may contribute to the pathophysiology of femoroacetabular impingement. Two-hundred forty pelves were divided into young and old groups. Version was measured at the cranial (5mm below superior rim), central (transverse of acetabulum), and caudal (5mm above inferior rim) locations. The data showed a significant difference between young (10±10°) and old (13±9°) cranial version (P=.02). Cranial retroversion increases with age and may reflect a developmental component in the etiology of the focal rim impingement lesion or ossification of the damaged labrum. Global acetabular retroversion does not appear to change with age and may reflect a congenital etiology.

  8. Traumatic Periprosthetic Acetabular Fracture Treated with One-Stage Exchange and Bone Reconstruction Using a Synthetic Bone Graft Substitute

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A case of a traumatic periprosthetic acetabular fracture in an elderly patient, which was treated by one-stage hip exchange with implantation of an antiprotrusio cage and reconstruction of the acetabular bone loss with an injectable calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite bone graft substitute, is reported. The paste-like bone graft substitute was injected through the holes of the antiprotrusio cage. After a setting time of 15 minutes, a low-profile cup was cemented onto the cage using polymethylmethacrylate and a new stem was inserted. The patient was encouraged to ambulate three days postoperatively weight-bearing as tolerated. At the one-year follow-up visit the patient was ambulatory and full weight-bearing without any walking aids. The follow-up radiographs demonstrated stable position and articulation of the revision hip arthroplasty with no signs of loosening of the antiprotrusio cage. However, the most interesting finding was that the bone graft substitute had remodelled to a great extent into bone. This calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite composite shows high osteoconductive potential and can be used to regenerate bone stock in revision arthroplasty. PMID:27446621

  9. [Analysis of the Basic Stress Pathway Above Acetabular Dome].

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Ma, Jun; Haung, Qiang; Hu, Qinsheng; Shi, Xiaojun; Pei, Fuxing

    2015-08-01

    The basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome is important for the maintenance of implant stability in acetabular reconstruction of total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this study was to describe the basic stress pathway to provide evidence for clinical acetabular reconstruction guidance of THA. A subject-specific finite element (FE) model was developed from CT data to generate 3 normal hip models and a convergence study was conducted to determine the number of pelvic trabecular bone material properties using 5 material assignment plans. In addition, in the range of 0 to 20 mm above the acetabular dome, the models were sectioned and the stress pathway was defined as two parts, i.e., 3D, trabecular bone stress distribution and quantified cortical bone stress level. The results showed that using 100 materials to define the material property of pelvic trabecular bone could assure both the accuracy and efficiency of the FE model. Under the same body weight condition, the 3D trabecular bone stress distributions above the acetabular dome were consistent, and especially the quantified cortical bone stress levels were all above 20 MPa and showed no statistically significant difference (P>0.05). Therefore, defining the basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome under certain body weight condition contributes to design accurate preoperative plan for acetabular reconstruction, thus helping restore the normal hip biomechanics and preserve the stability of the implants. PMID:26710451

  10. Is Gelsolin a Biomarker for Aseptic Loosening After Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Bettin, Clayton C; Sisson, William B; Kerkhof, Anita L; Mihalko, William M

    2015-01-01

    Gelsolin (GSN) has been implicated in inflammatory reactions in asthmatic patients and may be a marker for acute or chronic reactions in synovial tissue. Detection of increased levels of GSN in synovial fluid could differentiate between aseptic loosening (low GSN) and hypersensitivity reaction (high GSN). Synovial fluid from both knees of 7 cadaver specimens with unilateral TKA was analyzed using ELISA for GSN levels. Components were explanted after spiral CT scans to determine wear patterns and loosening. Results were compared to synovial fluid from 7 consecutive TKA revisions for aseptic failure. Average GSN levels for cadaver native and well-functioning TKA knees were 24,534±10,437 ng/mL and 38,430±30,907 ng/mL, respectively (p=0.314). Average GSN level for revision patients was 53,294±19,868 ng/mL, significantly higher than cadaver well-functioning TKAs (p=0.006). The patient with the highest level of GSN at time of revision surgery showed significant metallosis at the time of surgery. PMID:26852641

  11. Experimental evidence of impingement induced strains at the interface and the periphery of an embedded acetabular cup implant.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Christoph; Voigt, Christian; Steinke, Hanno; Salis-Soglio, Georg V; Scholz, Roger

    2012-01-01

    After total hip arthroplasty, impingement of implant components may occur during every-day patient activities causing increased shear stresses at the acetabular implant-bone interface. In the literature, impingement related lever-out moments were noted for a number of acetabular components. But there is little information about pelvic load transfer. The aim of the current study was to measure the three-dimensional strain distribution at the macrostructured hemispherical interface and in the periphery of a standard acetabular press-fit cup in an experimental implant-bone substitute model. An experimental setup was developed to simulate impingement loading via a lever arm representing the femoral component and the lower limb. In one experimental setup 12 strain gauges were embedded at predefined positions in the periphery of the acetabular cup implant inside a tray, using polyurethane composite resin as a bone substitute material. By incremental rotation of the implant tray in steps of 10 and 30 deg, respectively, the strains were measured at evenly distributed positions. With the described method 288 genuine strain values were measured in the periphery of an embedded acetabular cup implant in one experimental setup. In two additional setups the strains were evaluated at different distances from the implant interface. Both in radial and meridional interface directions strain magnitudes reach their peak near the rim of the cup below the impingement site. Values of equatorial strains vary near zero and reach their peaks near the rim of the cup on either side and in some distance from the impingement site. Interestingly, the maximum of averaged radial strains does not occur, as expected, close to the interface but at an interface offset of 5.6 mm. With the described experimental setup it is now possible to measure and display the three-dimensional strain distribution in the interface and the periphery of an embedded acetabular cup implant. The current study provides the

  12. Coronal Acetabular Fractures: The Anterior Approach in Computed Tomography-Navigated Minimally Invasive Percutaneous Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig; Suhm, Norbert; Kaim, Achim; Regazzoni, Pietro; Steinbrich, Wolfgang; Messmer, Peter

    2000-09-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technical feasibility of the anterior approach to the coronal roof component of carefully selected acetabular fractures in computed tomography (CT)-navigated closed reduction and percutaneous fixation (CRPF).Methods: Four patients with nondisplaced or slightly displaced coronal fractures of the acetabular roof were treated with percutaneous screw fixation. Screws were implanted over guidepins placed under CT navigation. Mean clinical and radiological follow-up was 16 months.Results: All screws could be placed as intended. There were no peri- or postoperative complications. Radiological follow-up showed primary osseous union. Clinical results were excellent according to a median Merle-d'Aubigne score of 18.Conclusion: Nondisplaced or slightly displaced coronally oriented fractures of the acetabular roof can be treated by minimally invasive percutaneous CT-navigated fixation through an anterior approach that does not endanger the sciatic nerve. Early clinical results are encouraging. Close cooperation between trauma surgeons and radiologists and careful selection of cases is mandatory.

  13. The influence of the strength of bone on the deformation of acetabular shells: a laboratory experiment in cadavers.

    PubMed

    Bone, M C; Dold, P; Flohr, M; Preuss, R; Joyce, T J; Aspden, R M; Holland, J; Deehan, D

    2015-04-01

    Concerns have been raised that deformation of acetabular shells may disrupt the assembly process of modular prostheses. In this study we aimed to examine the effect that the strength of bone has on the amount of deformation of the acetabular shell. The hypothesis was that stronger bone would result in greater deformation. A total of 17 acetabular shells were inserted into the acetabula of eight cadavers, and deformation was measured using an optical measuring system. Cores of bone from the femoral head were taken from each cadaver and compressed using a materials testing machine. The highest peak modulus and yield stress for each cadaver were used to represent the strength of the bone and compared with the values for the deformation and the surgeon's subjective assessment of the hardness of the bone. The mean deformation of the shell was 129 µm (3 to 340). No correlation was found between deformation and either the maximum peak modulus (r² = 0.011, t = 0.426, p = 0.676) or the yield stress (r² = 0.024, t = 0.614, p = 0.549) of the bone. Although no correlation was found between the strength of the bone and deformation, the values for the deformation observed could be sufficient to disrupt the assembly process of modular acetabular components.

  14. Total hip arthroplasty after rotational acetabular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideya; Takatori, Yoshio; Moro, Toru; Oshima, Hirofumi; Oka, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine whether the outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) after rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) are equal to those of primary THA, and to elucidate the characteristics of THA after RAO. The clinical and radiographic findings of THA after RAO (44 hips), with minimum 24 months of follow-up, were compared with a matched control group of 58 hips without prior RAO. We found that the outcomes in terms of functional scores and complication rates did not differ between THA after RAO and THA without previous pelvic osteotomy, indicating that the results of THA after RAO are equivalent to those of primary THA. Although THA after RAO requires technical considerations, similar clinical outcomes to primary THA can be expected. PMID:25456635

  15. Evaluation of Loosening Resistance Performance of Conical Spring Washer by Three-dimensional Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Takashi; Oishi, Kunio; Kimura, Masatake; Izumi, Satoshi; Sakai, Shinsuke

    The conical spring washer (CSW) has been considered to prevent the loosening of a bolted joint and has thus been widely employed. However, experimental results obtained in studies focusing on loosening due to transverse loading conducted by Yamamoto et al. and Sakai have shown that a CSW did not prevent loosening in any context. In the present paper, we performed three-dimensional finite element analyses of an M10 bolted joint using a CSW subjected to transverse loading and investigated its loosening resistance performance. Two kinds of axial force were applied: one was low axial force (10kN) under which a CSW is not fully compressed, and the other was high axial force (20kN) under which a CSW is fully compressed. In the case of high axial force, the CSW showed no vivid effect on preventing loosening. On the other hand, in the case of low axial force, the CSW showed two opposite effects. The negative effect was an increase in the loosening rotation angle, while the positive one was the prevention of a decrease in axial force. When complete bearing-surface slip occurs, a CSW can prevent loosening because the positive effect is larger than the negative. However, when small bearing-surface slip occurs, a CSW cannot prevent loosening because the negative effect cancels the positive one. It is supposed that the small stuck region as well as the small equivalent diameter of friction torque leads to large loosening rotation.

  16. Precision of robotic guided instrumentation for acetabular component positioning.

    PubMed

    Kanawade, Vaibhav; Dorr, Lawrence D; Banks, Scott A; Zhang, Zenan; Wan, Zhinian

    2015-03-01

    Robotic computerized instrumentation that guides bone preparation and cup implantation in total hip arthroplasty was studied. In 38 patients (43 hips) intraoperative cup inclination and anteversion were validated by postoperative CT scans. Planned inclination was 39.9°±0.8° and with robotic instrumentation was 38. 0°±1.6° with no outliers of 5°; on the postoperative CT scan there were 5 outliers (12%). Planned anteversion was 21.2°±2.4° and intraoperatively was 20.7°±2.4° with no outlier of 5°; on the CT there were 7 outliers (16%). The center of rotation (COR) was superior by a mean 0.9±4.2 mm and medial by 2.7±2.9 mm. This robotic instrumentation achieved precision of inclination in 88%, anteversion in 84% and COR in 81.5%.

  17. An uncemented iso-elastic monoblock acetabular component: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Halma, Jelle J; Eshuis, Rienk; Vogely, H Charles; van Gaalen, Steven M; de Gast, Arthur

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about the clinical application of highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) blended with vitamin E. This study evaluates an uncemented iso-elastic monoblock cup with vitamin E blended HXLPE. 112 patients were followed up for 2years. 95.5% completed the follow-up. The mean VAS score for patient satisfaction was 8.8 and the mean Harris Hip Score was 94.2. In 7 cases initial gaps behind the cup were observed, which disappeared completely during follow-up in 6 cases. The mean femoral head penetration rate was 0.055mm/year. No adverse reactions or abnormal mechanical behavior was observed with the short term use of vitamin E blended HXLPE. This study shows the promising performance of this cup and confirms the potential of vitamin E blended HXLPE.

  18. Arthroscopic Reduction and Transportal Screw Fixation of Acetabular Posterior Wall Fracture: Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Young; Chung, Woo Chull; Kim, Che Keun; Huh, Soon Ho; Kim, Se Jin; Jung, Bo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Acetabular fractures can be treated with variable method. In this study, acetabular posterior wall fracture was treated with arthroscopic reduction and fixation using cannulated screw. The patient recovered immediately and had a satisfactory outcome. In some case of acetabular fracture could be good indication with additional advantages of joint debridement and loose body removal. So, we report our case with technical note. PMID:27536654

  19. Arthroscopic Reduction and Transportal Screw Fixation of Acetabular Posterior Wall Fracture: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin young; Kim, Che Keun; Huh, Soon Ho; Kim, Se Jin; Jung, Bo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Acetabular fractures can be treated with variable method. In this study, acetabular posterior wall fracture was treated with arthroscopic reduction and fixation using cannulated screw. The patient recovered immediately and had a satisfactory outcome. In some case of acetabular fracture could be good indication with additional advantages of joint debridement and loose body removal. So, we report our case with technical note. PMID:27536654

  20. A Novel Approach for Treatment of Acetabular Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zichao; Qin, Hui; Ding, Haoliang; An, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    Background There is no single approach that provides adequate exposure for treatment of all types of acetabular fractures. We describe our experience with an easier, relatively less invasive pubic symphysis approach (PSA) for the treatment of acetabular fractures. Material/Methods Between March 2011 and March 2012, fifteen patients with acetabular fracture underwent surgery using the PSA technique. Fracture reduction and treatment outcomes were assessed by clinical and radiological examination. Operation time, intraoperative blood loss and postoperative complications were documented. Results Mean operative time was 222±78 minutes. Average blood loss was 993±361 mL. Anatomical reduction was achieved in all patients. Minimum follow-up period was 31 months. Postoperative hypoesthesia in the area of innervation of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was reported in one patient, with spontaneous recovery at one month after surgery. No complications were reported during the follow-up period. At the most recent follow up, clinical outcomes were graded as “excellent” in six patients, “good” in eight patients and “fair” in one patient based on the modified Merle d’Aubigné-Postel score. Conclusions PSA appears to be a timesaving and safe approach for treatment of acetabular fractures that affords good visual access and allows for excellent fracture reduction. Our preliminary results revealed a much lower incidence of complications than traditional approaches, suggesting PSA is an alternative for treatment of acetabular fractures. PMID:27734825

  1. Open-configuration MRI study of femoro-acetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Mitsuyoshi; Miki, Hidenobu; Nakamura, Nobuo; Murai, Masakazu; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2007-12-01

    Femoro-acetabular impingement has been proposed as a causative factor of primary hip osteoarthritis. However, primary osteoarthritis of the hip is infrequent in Japan and other Asian countries, even though the hips of Asians frequently sustain impingement, since the Asian lifestyle commonly requires a larger range of hip motion than the Western lifestyle. Therefore, using open-configuration MRI, we investigated whether impingement actually occurs during some traditional Japanese hip positions. The hips of 5 healthy Japanese females were examined in 5 sitting postures: 1) sitting straight; 2) bowing while sitting straight; 3) sitting cross-legged; 4) W-sitting; and 5) squatting. The impingement point was detected by multiple plane reconstructed (MPR) views along with the acetabular rim depicted circumferentially. Impingement was considered to have occurred when, on MRI, the anterior femoral head-neck junction approached the acetabular rim and the femoral head was seen to float from the bottom of the acetabulum with the acetabular rim acting as a fulcrum. Impingement was observed in all volunteers in the W-sitting position, and in 2 of 5 volunteers during squatting. These findings show that impingement occurs frequently during daily Japanese activities. Thus, depending on race, femoro-acetabular impingement might not always cause primary osteoarthritis of the hip. (c) 2007 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 25:1582-1588, 2007. PMID:17600811

  2. Preliminary analysis on the MD-4® plasma-sprayed titanium acetabular component☆

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo Loures, Elmano; Simoni, Leandro Furtado; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves; Loures, Daniel Naya; Loures, Clarice Naya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the short-term performance of a type of implant manufactured in Brazil. Methods This study analyzed a cohort of 60 patients who underwent implantation of MD-4® acetabular components during primary hip arthroplasty procedures performed between January 1, 2010, and August 1, 2012. The patients were studied retrospectively with regard to clinical behavior, stability and radiological osseointegration. The patients were followed up for a minimum of 12 months and a maximum of 42 months (mean: 27) and were evaluated by means of the Harris Hip Score, SF-36 questionnaire and serial conventional radiographs. Results All the components were radiologically stable, without evidence of migration or progressive radiolucency lines. On average, the Harris Hip Score evolved from 36.1 to 92.1 (p < 0.001) and the SF-36 showed significant increases in all its domains (p < 0.001). No differences were observed among patients with osteoarthrosis, osteonecrosis, hip dysplasia or other conditions. Conclusions The short-term results showed clinical and radiological signs of stability and osseointegration of the implants, which may represent a predictive factor regarding medium-term survival of this acetabular component. PMID:26229918

  3. Computer-Assisted Rotational Acetabular Osteotomy for Patients with Acetabular Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naomi; Ike, Hiroyuki; Kubota, So; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) is a well-established surgical procedure for patients with acetabular dysplasia, and excellent long-term results have been reported. However, RAO is technically demanding and precise execution of this procedure requires experience with this surgery. The usefulness of computer navigation in RAO includes its ability to perform three-dimensional (3D) preoperative planning, enable safe osteotomy even with a poor visual field, reduce exposure to radiation from intraoperative fluoroscopy, and display the tip position of the chisel in real time, which is educationally useful as it allows staff other than the operator to follow the progress of the surgery. In our results comparing 23 hips that underwent RAO with navigation and 23 hips operated on without navigation, no significant difference in radiological assessment was observed. However, no perioperative complications were observed in the navigation group whereas one case of transient femoral nerve palsy was observed in non-navigation group. A more accurate and safer RAO can be performed using 3D preoperative planning and intraoperative assistance with a computed tomography-based navigation system. PMID:26929806

  4. Computer-Assisted Rotational Acetabular Osteotomy for Patients with Acetabular Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Naomi; Ike, Hiroyuki; Kubota, So; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2016-03-01

    Rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) is a well-established surgical procedure for patients with acetabular dysplasia, and excellent long-term results have been reported. However, RAO is technically demanding and precise execution of this procedure requires experience with this surgery. The usefulness of computer navigation in RAO includes its ability to perform three-dimensional (3D) preoperative planning, enable safe osteotomy even with a poor visual field, reduce exposure to radiation from intraoperative fluoroscopy, and display the tip position of the chisel in real time, which is educationally useful as it allows staff other than the operator to follow the progress of the surgery. In our results comparing 23 hips that underwent RAO with navigation and 23 hips operated on without navigation, no significant difference in radiological assessment was observed. However, no perioperative complications were observed in the navigation group whereas one case of transient femoral nerve palsy was observed in non-navigation group. A more accurate and safer RAO can be performed using 3D preoperative planning and intraoperative assistance with a computed tomography-based navigation system.

  5. Total hip arthroplasty for acute acetabular fractures: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Julio J; Clayton, Adrian; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Issa, Kimona; Mont, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    There have been many advances in the treatment of acetabular fractures; however, the role of total hip arthroplasty (THA) as part of acute fracture management is not well-defined. The indications to acutely manage an acetabular fracture with THA include patients who were older than 65 years of age, who had extensive intra-articular comminution, impaction of the acetabular dome, a displaced-impacted femoral neck fracture, presented with severe osteopenia or osteoporosis, or preexisting osteoarthritis. Implant survivorship and clinical outcomes were favorable with low complications when managing an acetabular fracture with THA. THA may be an effective option for treating acetabular fractures in appropriately selected patients.

  6. Assessment of Accuracy and Reliability in Acetabular Cup Placement Using an iPhone/iPad System.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, Kenji; Fukunishi, Shigeo; Fukui, Tomokazu; Nishio, Shoji; Fujihara, Yuki; Okahisa, Shohei; Takeda, Yu; Daimon, Takashi; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2016-07-01

    Implant positioning is one of the critical factors that influences postoperative outcome of total hip arthroplasty (THA). Malpositioning of the implant may lead to an increased risk of postoperative complications such as prosthetic impingement, dislocation, restricted range of motion, polyethylene wear, and loosening. In 2012, the intraoperative use of smartphone technology in THA for improved accuracy of acetabular cup placement was reported. The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of an iPhone/iPad-guided technique in positioning the acetabular cup in THA compared with the reference values obtained from the image-free navigation system in a cadaveric experiment. Five hips of 5 embalmed whole-body cadavers were used in the study. Seven orthopedic surgeons (4 residents and 3 senior hip surgeons) participated in the study. All of the surgeons examined each of the 5 hips 3 times. The target angle was 38°/19° for operative inclination/anteversion angles, which corresponded to radiographic inclination/anteversion angles of 40°/15°. The simultaneous assessment using the navigation system showed mean±SD radiographic alignment angles of 39.4°±2.6° and 16.4°±2.6° for inclination and anteversion, respectively. Assessment of cup positioning based on Lewinnek's safe zone criteria showed all of the procedures (n=105) achieved acceptable alignment within the safe zone. A comparison of the performances by resident and senior hip surgeons showed no significant difference between the groups (P=.74 for inclination and P=.81 for anteversion). The iPhone/iPad technique examined in this study could achieve acceptable performance in determining cup alignment in THA regardless of the surgeon's expertise. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e621-e626.]. PMID:27322169

  7. Assessment of Accuracy and Reliability in Acetabular Cup Placement Using an iPhone/iPad System.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, Kenji; Fukunishi, Shigeo; Fukui, Tomokazu; Nishio, Shoji; Fujihara, Yuki; Okahisa, Shohei; Takeda, Yu; Daimon, Takashi; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2016-07-01

    Implant positioning is one of the critical factors that influences postoperative outcome of total hip arthroplasty (THA). Malpositioning of the implant may lead to an increased risk of postoperative complications such as prosthetic impingement, dislocation, restricted range of motion, polyethylene wear, and loosening. In 2012, the intraoperative use of smartphone technology in THA for improved accuracy of acetabular cup placement was reported. The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of an iPhone/iPad-guided technique in positioning the acetabular cup in THA compared with the reference values obtained from the image-free navigation system in a cadaveric experiment. Five hips of 5 embalmed whole-body cadavers were used in the study. Seven orthopedic surgeons (4 residents and 3 senior hip surgeons) participated in the study. All of the surgeons examined each of the 5 hips 3 times. The target angle was 38°/19° for operative inclination/anteversion angles, which corresponded to radiographic inclination/anteversion angles of 40°/15°. The simultaneous assessment using the navigation system showed mean±SD radiographic alignment angles of 39.4°±2.6° and 16.4°±2.6° for inclination and anteversion, respectively. Assessment of cup positioning based on Lewinnek's safe zone criteria showed all of the procedures (n=105) achieved acceptable alignment within the safe zone. A comparison of the performances by resident and senior hip surgeons showed no significant difference between the groups (P=.74 for inclination and P=.81 for anteversion). The iPhone/iPad technique examined in this study could achieve acceptable performance in determining cup alignment in THA regardless of the surgeon's expertise. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e621-e626.].

  8. Investigation of the Actual Causes of Hip Joint Implant Loosening Classified as Aseptic--Analysis of Microbiological Culture Results and Levels of Inflammatory Markers.

    PubMed

    Strzelec-Nowak, Dagmara; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria; Niedźwiadek, Justyna; Bogut, Agnieszka; Blacha, Jan; Mazurkiewicz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Loosening of the hip joint prosthesis is considered as one of the most significant postoperative complications in recent years. The laboratory diagnostic procedure used to differentiate periprosthetic infection from aseptic loosening is very difficult because of the biofilm which microorganisms form on the implant surface. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the level of concordance between clinical classification of implant loosening among 50 patients subjected to reimplantation procedure and laboratory investigation of PJI including microbiological culture results and the levels of inflammatory markers assessed in the patients' synovial fluid samples, serum, and full blood. The synovial fluid was collected for leukocyte count, differential cell count, and culture on standard media. The levels of systemic inflammation markers such as the ESR and CRP concentration were determined in serum and full blood. Tissue samples were collected for microbiological studies. Components from endoprostheses were exposed to ultrasound in a process called sonication. Among the parameters measured in serum and full blood the levels of ESR and CRP were higher in the septic group of patients. Cytologic analysis of synovial fluid was in correlation with microbiologic identification. The most frequent isolated bacteria was Staphylococcus epidermidis. Culture results from materials such as synovial fluid, sonicate and tissues are crucial to establish the infectious aetiology of the loosening. Microscopic analysis of synovial fluid represents a simple, rapid and accurate method for differentiating PJI from aseptic failure. Sonication increases detection of the infectious process, and culture results are in correlation with the cytologic analysis of synovial fluid.

  9. Investigation of the Actual Causes of Hip Joint Implant Loosening Classified as Aseptic--Analysis of Microbiological Culture Results and Levels of Inflammatory Markers.

    PubMed

    Strzelec-Nowak, Dagmara; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria; Niedźwiadek, Justyna; Bogut, Agnieszka; Blacha, Jan; Mazurkiewicz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Loosening of the hip joint prosthesis is considered as one of the most significant postoperative complications in recent years. The laboratory diagnostic procedure used to differentiate periprosthetic infection from aseptic loosening is very difficult because of the biofilm which microorganisms form on the implant surface. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the level of concordance between clinical classification of implant loosening among 50 patients subjected to reimplantation procedure and laboratory investigation of PJI including microbiological culture results and the levels of inflammatory markers assessed in the patients' synovial fluid samples, serum, and full blood. The synovial fluid was collected for leukocyte count, differential cell count, and culture on standard media. The levels of systemic inflammation markers such as the ESR and CRP concentration were determined in serum and full blood. Tissue samples were collected for microbiological studies. Components from endoprostheses were exposed to ultrasound in a process called sonication. Among the parameters measured in serum and full blood the levels of ESR and CRP were higher in the septic group of patients. Cytologic analysis of synovial fluid was in correlation with microbiologic identification. The most frequent isolated bacteria was Staphylococcus epidermidis. Culture results from materials such as synovial fluid, sonicate and tissues are crucial to establish the infectious aetiology of the loosening. Microscopic analysis of synovial fluid represents a simple, rapid and accurate method for differentiating PJI from aseptic failure. Sonication increases detection of the infectious process, and culture results are in correlation with the cytologic analysis of synovial fluid. PMID:26373172

  10. Arthroscopic Technique for Acetabular Labral Reconstruction Using Iliotibial Band Autograft.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Soares, Eduardo; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Mitchell, Justin J; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic function of the acetabular labrum makes it an important structure for both hip stability and motion. Because of this, injuries to the labrum can cause significant dysfunction, leading to altered hip kinematics. Labral repair is the gold standard for symptomatic labral tears to keep as much labral tissue as possible; however, in cases where the labrum has been injured to such a degree that it is either deficient or repair is not possible, arthroscopic labral reconstruction is preferred. This article describes our preferred approach for reconstruction of the acetabular labrum using iliotibial band autograft.

  11. Arthroscopic Technique for Acetabular Labral Reconstruction Using Iliotibial Band Autograft.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Soares, Eduardo; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Mitchell, Justin J; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic function of the acetabular labrum makes it an important structure for both hip stability and motion. Because of this, injuries to the labrum can cause significant dysfunction, leading to altered hip kinematics. Labral repair is the gold standard for symptomatic labral tears to keep as much labral tissue as possible; however, in cases where the labrum has been injured to such a degree that it is either deficient or repair is not possible, arthroscopic labral reconstruction is preferred. This article describes our preferred approach for reconstruction of the acetabular labrum using iliotibial band autograft. PMID:27656395

  12. Acetabular Labral Tears in Patients with Sports Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chan; Cha, Soo-Min

    2009-01-01

    Background We wanted to investigate acetabular labral tears and their correlation with femoroacetabular impingement in patients with sports injury. Methods Among 111 patients who were diagnosed with the acetabular labral tears after arthroscopic treatment from January 2004 to December 2007, we selected 41 patients with sports injury. There were 12 cases of Taekwondo injury, 5 of golf injury, 4 of soccer injury, 3 of gymnastics injury, 2 of Hapkido injury, 2 of aerobics injury, 2 of rock-climbing injury, 2 of fitness training injury and 9 of other sports injuries. We checked the subtypes of acetabular labral tears and the accompanying femoroacetabular impingement. For the cases with accompanying femoroacetabular impingement, we investigated the subtypes according to the types of sports, gender and age. At last follow-up, we checked the Harris Hip Score (HHS), the Hip Outcome Score (HOS) sports scale and the percentage of patients who returned to their sports activity. Results The average age of symptomatic onset was 26 years (range, 12 to 65 years). The ratio of males to females was 29 : 12. An average duration of the hip pain was 17 months (range, 1 to 60 months). The degenerative type of acetabular labral tears was the most prevalent with 32 cases (78%), and there were 9 cases (22%) of the partial tear type. Thirty cases (73%) were accompanied by femoroacetabular impingement. The average age of the 23 cases (56%) of the cam-type was 23 years (range, 12 to 48 years), and it was more likely to occur in men (87%) and for people practicing martial arts such as Taekwondo or Hapkido. An average age of the 5 cases (12%) of the pincer-type was 26 (range, 16 to 43 years), it usually occurred in women (60%) and for non-martial arts such as golf and gymnastics. There were 2 cases of the mixed type (cam + pincer-type). At 27 months follow-up, the HHS was 61 to 92 points, the HOS sports scale increased 43 to 75%, and the rate of returning to sports was 71%. Conclusions In

  13. Wear versus Thickness and Other Features of 5-Mrad Crosslinked UHMWPE Acetabular Liners

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Fu-Wen; Lu, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    Background The low wear rates of crosslinked polyethylenes provide the potential to use larger diameters to resist dislocation. However, this requires the use of thinner liners in the acetabular component, with concern that higher contact stresses will increase wear, offsetting the benefits of the crosslinking. Questions/purposes We asked the following questions: Is the wear of conventional and crosslinked polyethylene liners affected by ball diameter, rigidity of backing, and liner thickness? Are the stresses in the liner affected by thickness? Methods Wear rates were measured in a hip simulator and stresses were calculated using finite element modeling. Results Without crosslinking, the wear rate was 4% to 10% greater with a 36-mm diameter than a 28-mm diameter. With crosslinking, wear was 9% lower with a 36-mm diameter without metal backing and 4% greater with metal backing. Reducing the thickness from 6 mm to 3 mm increased the contact stress by 46%, but the wear rate decreased by 19%. Conclusions The reduction in wear with 5 Mrad of crosslinking was not offset by increasing the diameter from 28 mm to 36 mm or by using a liner as thin as 3 mm. Clinical Relevance The results indicate, for a properly positioned 5-Mrad crosslinked acetabular component and within the range of dimensions evaluated, neither wear nor stresses in the polyethylene are limiting factors in the use of larger-diameter, thinner cups to resist dislocation. PMID:20848244

  14. Acetabular Reconstruction with Human and Bovine Freeze- Dried Bone Grafts and a Reinforcement Device

    PubMed Central

    Rosito, Ricardo; Galia, Carlos Roberto; Macedo, Carlos Alberto Souza; Moreira, Luis Fernando; Quaresma, Lourdes Maria Araújo C.; Palma, Humberto Moreira

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND This is a cohort trial (1997–2005) of 49 patients submitted to an acetabular component revision of a total hip arthroplasty, using impacted human and bovine freeze-dried cancellous bone grafts (H&FDBG) and a reinforcement device. OBJECTIVE To compare clinical/radiographic graft incorporation capability between cancellous bone grafts. PATIENTS/METHODS There were two groups: I (n=26) receiving human grafts and II (n=25) receiving bovine grafts. The average follow-up times were 55 and 49 months, respectively. Clinical analysis was based on the Merle d’Aubigné and Postel score, and the radiographic analysis involved an established score based on Conn’s et al. criteria for radiographic bone incorporation. RESULTS No clinical/radiographic differences were found between the groups and both showed an overall rate of 88.5% and 76% of graft incorporation (p=0.424). CONCLUSION The results presented here are comparable to those in the literature with the use of deep-FG. Therefore, cancellous bone grafts can be safely and adequately used in acetabular component revision in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:18719763

  15. Anatomy, histologic features, and vascularity of the adult acetabular labrum.

    PubMed

    Seldes, R M; Tan, V; Hunt, J; Katz, M; Winiarsky, R; Fitzgerald, R H

    2001-01-01

    Acetabular labrum tears have been implicated as a cause of hip pain in adult patients. Few studies describe the anatomy, histologic features, and microvasculature of the acetabular labrum and labral tears. Fifty-five embalmed and 12 fresh-frozen adult hips with a mean age of 78 years (range, 61-98 years) were studied. Of these, 96 % (53 of 55) of the hips had labral tears, with 74% of the tears located in the anterosuperior quadrant. Histologically, the fibrocartilaginous labrum was contiguous with the acetabular articular cartilage through a 1- to 2-mm zone of transition. A consistent projection of bone extends from the bony acetabulum into the substance of the labrum that is attached via a zone of calcified cartilage with a well-defined tidemark. Two distinct types of tears of the labrum were identified histologically. The first consisted of a detachment of the fibrocartilaginous labrum from the articular hyaline cartilage at the transition zone. The second consisted of one or more cleavage planes of variable depth within the substance of the labrum. Both types of labral tears were associated with increased microvessel formation seen within the tear. The acetabular labrum tear appears to be an acquired condition that is highly prevalent in aging adult hips. Labral tears occur early in the arthritic process of the hip and may be one of the causes of degenerative hip disease.

  16. Pharmacological treatment of heterotopic ossification following hip and acetabular surgery.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, Robert J; Ng, Boon Han; Gamie, Zakareya; El Masry, Mohamed A; Velonis, Stylianos; Schizas, Constantin; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2008-04-01

    Heterotopic ossification is a common complication following total hip arthroplasty and surgery following acetabular trauma. It is associated with pain and a decreased range of movement. Prophylaxis is achieved by either non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment or localised irradiation therapy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the evidence for pharmacological agents used for the prophylaxis of heterotopic ossification following hip and acetabular surgery. The study used a comprehensive literature search to identify all major clinical studies investigating the pharmacological agents used in the prophylaxis of heterotopic ossification following hip and acetabular surgery. It was concluded that indometacin remains the 'gold standard' for heterotopic ossification prophylaxis following total hip arthroplasty and is the only drug proven to be effective against heterotopic ossification following acetabular surgery. Following total hip arthroplasty, other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, including naproxen and diclofenac, are equally as effective as indometacin and can be considered as alternative first-line treatments. Celecoxib is also of equal efficacy to indometacin and is associated with significantly fewer gastrointestinal side effects. However, serious concerns were raised over the safety of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors for the cardiovascular system and these should be used cautiously.

  17. Temporal and spatial distributions of directional counterface motion at the acetabular bearing surface in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, D. R.; Brown, T. D.; Maxian, T. A.; Callaghan, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    The motions of counterface articulation against the bearing surface of the acetabular liner strongly influence polyethylene wear debris production in contemporary total hip arthroplasty. However, the available body of relevant articular force and motion information is largely confined to resultant load excursions measured relative to instrumented femoral components, and/or to global angular motions (flexion, adduction, endorotation) of the joint. Analytical frameworks are here developed to transform such information into temporal and spatial variations of the resultant load and of the local counterface sliding velocity relative to an ordered set of discrete locations (e.g., finite element nodes) on the acetabular bearing surface. Whole-duty-cycle time histories of acetabular resultant load and counterface velocity distributions are presented for two important practical situations: human level walking gait, and a 23 degrees biaxial rocking hip simulation machine. The local counterface motions occurring in the simulator are characterized by higher velocities, smoother motion patterns, and wider directional variation than those occurring in human gait. PMID:9807707

  18. Tritanium acetabular wedge augments: short-term results

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Camilo; Heller, Snir

    2016-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of acetabular defects in total hip arthroplasty (THA) presents a great challenge to orthopaedic surgeons. Previous studies have reported on the use and outcomes of trabecular metal acetabular augments for the reconstruction of acetabular defects. However, no study has been conducted evaluating the short-term results of tritanium acetabular wedge augments for the reconstruction of acetabular defects in THA. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using a prospective database at a single institution including primary and revision THA patients from January 2013 to December 2014. Patients were included if they received a tritanium acetabular wedge augment system and had a minimum of 2-year follow-up (average 2.2 years ±0.3, range, 2–2.6 years). Demographic data and outcomes data [Harris Hip Score—HHS and Short Form (SF)-36] was collected. Radiographic data was also collected on THA revision cases (Paprosky classification), developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) cases (Crowe classification), and radiographic follow-up using DeLee and Charnley’s classification system. Results There were 4 revision THA patients, 3 DDH patients, and 1 patient with posttraumatic arthritis. At the latest radiographic follow-up, there were no lucent lines in DeLee and Charnley Zones I, II or III. During the follow-up period, there was no open revision surgery. The SF-36 physical score significantly improved from preoperative measurement (29.6±2.2) to postoperative measurement (52.2±8.7, P=0.003), and the SF-36 mental score also significantly improved from preoperative assessment (34.5±4.5) to postoperative assessment (52.2±7.5, P=0.003). Total HHS scores also significantly improved postoperatively (P=0.02), with significant improvements in both the pain score (P=0.01) and function score (P=0.02). Conclusions Tritanium acetabular wedge augments in this short follow-up case series exhibit high clinical outcome scores, no radiographic lucency, and no

  19. Validation of neck axis distance as a radiographic measure for acetabular anteversion

    PubMed Central

    Nitschke, Ashley; Petersen, Brian; Lambert, Jeffery R.; Glueck, Deborah H.; Jesse, Mary Kristen; Strickland, Colin; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Excessive acetabular anteversion is an important treatment consideration in hip preservation surgery. There is currently no reliable quantitative method for determining acetabular anteversion utilizing radiographs alone. The three main purposes of this study were to: (i) define and validate the neck axis distance (NAD) as a new visual and reproducible semi-quantitative radiographic parameter used to measure acetabular anteversion; (ii) determine the degree of correlation between NAD and computed tomography (CT)-measured acetabular anteversion; (iii) establish a sensitive and specific threshold value for NAD to identify excessive acetabular anteversion. This retrospective cohort study included all patients presenting to a single institution over a 14-month period who had undergone a dedicated musculoskeletal CT pelvis along with a standardized anteroposterior (AP) pelvis radiograph. Trained observers measured the NAD on the AP pelvis radiograph and equatorial acetabular anteversion on CT for all hips. Mixed model analysis was used to find prediction equations, and ROC analysis was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of NAD. NAD is a valid semi-quantitative predictor of acetabular anteversion and strongly correlates with CT-measured equatorial acetabular anteversion (P  <  0.0001). A NAD measurement of greater than 14 mm predicts excessive acetabular anteversion with 76% sensitivity and 78% specificity. NAD is an accurate radiographic predictor of acetabular anteversion, which may be readily used as an effective screening tool during the evaluation of patients with hip pain. PMID:27026824

  20. Lateral acetabular labral length is inversely related to acetabular coverage as measured by lateral center edge angle of Wiberg

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Brian D.; Wolf, Bryan; Lambert, Jeffrey R.; Clayton, Carolyn W.; Glueck, Deborah H.; Jesse, Mary Kristen; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip often have compensatory labral hypertrophy, which presumably lends stability to an unstable joint. Conversely, patients with acetabular overcoverage may have small or ossified labra. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction of labral length with the degree of acetabular hip coverage. A retrospective cohort of patients with hip pain presenting to a hip preservation center, who had undergone hip magnetic resonance imaging and AP pelvis radiographs were studied. General linear multivariate models were used to assess the association between three measures of labral length (lateral, anterior and anterior inferior locations along the acetabular rim) and the X-ray derived lateral center edge angle (LCEA) of Wiberg. Of the three acetabular labral locations measured, only the lateral labrum was associated with LCEA Wiberg (P = 0.0008). Lateral labral length increases as LCEA of Wiberg decreases. The anterior and anterior inferior labral locations did not show a predictable increase in labral length as LCEA Wiberg decreased. PMID:27583157

  1. Lateral acetabular labral length is inversely related to acetabular coverage as measured by lateral center edge angle of Wiberg.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Brian D; Wolf, Bryan; Lambert, Jeffrey R; Clayton, Carolyn W; Glueck, Deborah H; Jesse, Mary Kristen; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2016-08-01

    Patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip often have compensatory labral hypertrophy, which presumably lends stability to an unstable joint. Conversely, patients with acetabular overcoverage may have small or ossified labra. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction of labral length with the degree of acetabular hip coverage. A retrospective cohort of patients with hip pain presenting to a hip preservation center, who had undergone hip magnetic resonance imaging and AP pelvis radiographs were studied. General linear multivariate models were used to assess the association between three measures of labral length (lateral, anterior and anterior inferior locations along the acetabular rim) and the X-ray derived lateral center edge angle (LCEA) of Wiberg. Of the three acetabular labral locations measured, only the lateral labrum was associated with LCEA Wiberg (P = 0.0008). Lateral labral length increases as LCEA of Wiberg decreases. The anterior and anterior inferior labral locations did not show a predictable increase in labral length as LCEA Wiberg decreased. PMID:27583157

  2. Initial Results of an Acetabular Center Axis Registration Technique in Navigated Hip Arthroplasty with Deformed Acetabular Rims

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Hiroshi; Mishima, Hajime; Yoshizawa, Tomohiro; Sugaya, Hisashi; Nishino, Tomofumi; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Background In cementless total hip arthroplasty, imageless computer-assisted navigation is usually used to register the anterior pelvic plane (APP). The accuracy of this method is influenced by the subcutaneous tissues overlying the registration landmarks. On the other hand, the acetabular center axis (ACA) is determined from the acetabular rim. Precise registration of the ACA is possible because of direct palpation using a pointer. Imageless navigation using the ACA usually targets patients with normal acetabular morphology. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of imageless navigation using the ACA instead of the APP in patients with normal or deformed acetabular rims. Methods The intraoperative cup position was compared with that obtained from the postoperative computed tomography (CT) images in 18 cases. Results The inclination angle derived from the navigation system was 3.4 ± 5.3 degrees smaller and the anteversion angle was 1.4 ± 3.1 degrees larger than those derived from the CT images. Conclusion The inclination cup angle of the navigation system was significantly inferior to the true value, particularly in cases with large anterior osteophytes. PMID:27073586

  3. Aseptic stem loosening in primary THA: migration analysis of cemented and cementless fixation

    PubMed Central

    Kroell, Artur; Beaulé, Paul; Krismer, Martin; Behensky, Hannes; Stoeckl, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Early migration has reportedly been predictive for later implant failure. Using four different migration patterns, this study aimed to analyse migration behaviour of the two types of implant fixation—cemented and cementless—throughout the process of loosening. Migrational behaviour of 69 revised stems (49 cemented, 20 uncemented) was analysed retrospectively with EBRA-FCA (Einzel-Bild-Röntgen-Analyse, Femoral Component Analysis). Uncemented stems failed after early and late onset migration alike, while late migration was the predominant pattern in cemented stems. Mean prosthetic failure after early migration occurred 5.8 (±4.4) years postoperatively due to insufficient primary stability. Initially stable stems with late onset migration were revised after 12.4 (±4.5) years. Measurement of early migration was found to be a valuable tool to screen short-term and mid-term failure. In the long run the method’s sensitivity decreased. Late onset migration, however, preceded long-term failure by a mean of three years. PMID:19066889

  4. Wear patterns of, and wear volume formulae for, cylindrically elongated acetabular cup liners.

    PubMed

    Wu, James Shih-Shyn; Hsu, Shu-Ling; Chen, Jian-Horng

    2010-07-01

    This study analyzed the wear patterns of, and wear volume formulae for, cylindrically elongated acetabular cup liners. The geometric patterns of the wear surface were first classified, then wear volume formulae were derived by integral calculus. SolidWorks((R)) software or published formulae were used to verify the accuracy of the proposed formulae. The analytical results showed that the wear shape of the liner can be categorized into seven wear patterns, including the special case of wear at 90 degrees , and the seven corresponding wear formulae were derived. In addition, wear of the cylindrical elongation might add considerably to the volume loss of the liner, depending on the height and shape of the elongation and the depth and direction of the linear penetration, being maximally 21% in the investigated model. The proposed wear formulae and patterns will be useful for more accurate performance evaluation of existing hip components implanted in patients and for the designing of new hip components.

  5. The Effects of Spinopelvic Parameters and Paraspinal Muscle Degeneration on S1 Screw Loosening

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Bum; Lee, Young-Seok; Nam, Taek-Kyun; Park, Yong-Sook; Kim, Young-Baeg

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate risk factors for S1 screw loosening after lumbosacral fusion, including spinopelvic parameters and paraspinal muscles. Methods We studied with 156 patients with degenerative lumbar disease who underwent lumbosacral interbody fusion and pedicle screw fixation including the level of L5-S1 between 2005 and 2012. The patients were divided into loosening and non-loosening groups. Screw loosening was defined as a halo sign larger than 1 mm around a screw. We checked cross sectional area of paraspinal muscles, mean signal intensity of the muscles on T2 weight MRI as a degree of fatty degeneration, spinopelvic parameters, bone mineral density, number of fusion level, and the characteristic of S1 screw. Results Twenty seven patients showed S1 screw loosening, which is 24.4% of total. The mean duration for S1 screw loosening was 7.3±4.1 months after surgery. Statistically significant risk factors were increased age, poor BMD, 3 or more fusion levels (p<0.05). Among spinopelvic parameters, a high pelvic incidence (p<0.01), a greater difference between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordotic angle preoperatively (p<0.01) and postoperatively (p<0.05). Smaller cross-sectional area and high T2 signal intensity in both multifidus and erector spinae muscles were also significant muscular risk factors (p<0.05). Small converging angle (p<0.001) and short intraosseous length (p<0.05) of S1 screw were significant screw related risk factors (p<0.05). Conclusion In addition to well known risk factors, spinopelvic parameters and the degeneration of paraspinal muscles also showed significant effects on the S1 screw loosening. PMID:26587190

  6. Difference in the acetabular cup orientation in standing and supine radiographs.

    PubMed

    Khan, Munir; Beckingsale, Tom; Marsh, Martin; Holland, Jim

    2016-09-01

    Acetabular orientation changes with that of the pelvis during lying and standing. This study was designed to measure these changes. We assessed 17 BHR replacements using EBRA software. The mean acetabular anteversion was more (p = 0.02) on erect than supine radiographs. Linear regression analysis showed that anteversion and inclination increased in some while decreased in others, and Bland and Altman analysis showed wide limits of agreement. The changes in acetabular orientation are thus subject to significant variations between the patients. We suggest studying the factors affecting acetabular orientation in standing to help reduce joint reaction forces and improve outcomes. PMID:27408490

  7. Numerical Studies on Time-Varying Stiffness of Disk-Drum Type Rotor with Bolt Loosening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhaoye; Chu, Fulei

    2015-07-01

    Disk-drum type rotors are widely used in industry for their high stiffness and low weight properties. In disk-drum type rotors, the adjacent disks and drums are commonly connected by bolted joints. Those rotating joint interfaces are subjected to numerous combinations of loads during normal operation, where loosening of the connecting bolts might occur. The bolt loosening will change the local stiffness of the rotor, which in turn affect the rotor dynamics and even result in structural failures. In this paper, the local stiffness of a disk- drum rotor with bolt loosening is investigated numerically. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model for the bolted disk-drum joint is established in ANSYS, where the bolt loosening is simulated by reducing the preloads of certain bolts, and removing those bolts as the limiting case. Simulations are performed on the FE model to evaluate the joint behaviour under static loads. Periodic variations of the joint deflections with respect to the rotation angle of the shaft are obtained, which implies the appearance of the time-varying local stiffness in the rotor system. The studies in this paper help accurate prediction of the rotor dynamics and early detection of bolt loosening.

  8. Late sciatic nerve axonotmesis following acetabular reconstruction plate.

    PubMed

    Moreta, J; Foruria, X; Labayru, F

    2016-01-01

    Sciatic nerve injuries associated with acetabular fractures can be post-traumatic, perioperative or postoperative. Late postoperative injury is very uncommon and can be due to heterotopic ossifications, muscular scarring, or implant migration. A case is presented of a patient with a previous transverse acetabular fracture treated with a reconstruction plate for the posterior column. After 17 years, she presented with progressive pain and motor deficit in the sciatic territory. Radiological and neurophysiological assessments were performed and the patient underwent surgical decompression of the sciatic nerve. A transection of the nerve was observed that was due to extended compression of one of the screws. At 4 years postoperatively, her pain had substantially diminished and the paresthesias in her leg had resolved. However, her motor symptoms did not improve. This case report could be relevant due to this uncommon delayed sciatic nerve injury due to prolonged hardware impingement.

  9. Acetabular Paralabral Cyst: An Unusual Cause of Femoral Vein Compression

    PubMed Central

    Kullar, Raj S.; Kapron, Ashley L.; Ihnat, Daniel; Aoki, Stephen K.; Maak, Travis G.

    2015-01-01

    Acetabular labral tears are a known cause of hip pain in the young, active patient. Labral tears can be due to trauma, femoroacetabular impingement, capsular laxity, dysplasia, and degenerative pathology. Paralabral cysts are relatively common in association with labral tears of the hip, with cysts seen on magnetic resonance imaging studies in as many as 50% to 70% of patients with labral tears. In some cases the cysts can become sizeable and cause neurovascular compression. Nonoperative interventions for the management of paralabral cysts in the shoulder and knee have shown high recurrence rates. In the shoulder and knee, arthroscopic debridement of paralabral cysts has shown good results with lower recurrence rates and resolution of neurovascular function. In the hip there is limited literature regarding surgical management of paralabral cysts. We present a surgical technique for arthroscopic decompression of acetabular paralabral cysts combined with labral repair. PMID:25973371

  10. Nonunion of acetabular fractures: evaluation with interactive multiplanar CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlman, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.; Ney, D.R.; Brooker, A.F. Jr.; Magid, D.

    1989-01-01

    Nonunions involving fractures of the acetabulum are reportedly rare, with few citings and little discussion in the literature. It is possible that acetabular nonunions go undetected because imaging of the acetabulum is difficult by conventional radiography. We report two cases of fracture nonunion involving the weight-bearing surface of the acetabulum diagnosed with the aid of computed tomography (CT) and a newly developed interactive 2D/3D orthotool that uniquely processes and reformats routine CT data. The interactive 2D/3D orthotool is a sophisticated computer program that allows dynamic viewing of standard multiplanar reconstructions in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes as well as multiple oblique projections. The 2D/3D orthotool provides on screen correlation of two-dimensional multiplanar images with three-dimensional reconstructions of the pelvis. The authors found this capability ideally suited for studying fractures with off-axis orientation such as those through the acetabular dome, greatly facilitating the diagnosis of nonunion.

  11. Early failure of a polyethylene acetabular liner cemented into a metal cup.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David A J; Corkum, Joseph P; Teeter, Matthew G; Holdsworth, David W; Dunbar, Michael J

    2012-05-01

    In 2002, a patient underwent revision total hip arthroplasty for polyethylene wear. The acetabular cup was well fixed, and it was decided to cement a new polyethylene liner into the existing cup. In 2006, the patient presented with inability to weight bear and easy subluxation of the hip. Revision surgery was performed, and all components were examined postoperatively. Investigation with microcomputed tomography revealed that the liner had plastically deformed at the superior pole resulting in the hip instability. The reasons for this are suspected to be related to the abducted nature of the original cup and an uneven cement mantle. This report suggests that cementation of polyethylene liners into metal cups has limitations and is not appropriate in all circumstances.

  12. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  17. Improving acetabular cup orientation in total hip arthroplasty by using smartphone technology.

    PubMed

    Peters, Frank M; Greeff, Richard; Goldstein, Neal; Frey, Chris T

    2012-08-01

    Acetabular cup placement in total hip arthroplasty is often difficult to assess, especially in the lateral position and using the posterior approach. Conventional techniques and computer-assisted surgery are the 2 most popular methods for proper placement of the acetabular cup in Lewinnek's safe zone of orientation (anteversion 15° ± 10° and lateral inclination 40° ± 10°). We developed a system that uses the accelerometer and camera function of the iPhone. A level indicator application and protractor application were downloaded to the iPhone and used to improve acetabular cup placement. This system has proven to be accurate and quick. Our series of 50 prospective cases showed good results with all our acetabular cups being placed within a narrow range in the safe zone and with less than 5% difference between the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative acetabular inclinations. PMID:22245126

  18. Stress Reduction Effect and Anti-Loosening Performance of Outer Cap Nut by Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Nao-Aki; Kuhara, Masahiro; Xiao, Yang; Noma, Shunsuke; Saito, Kinjiro; Nagawa, Masato; Yumoto, Atsushi; Ogasawara, Ayako

    Previously several kinds of anti-loosening bolts and nuts were invented. However, they usually need a certain amount of prevailing torque even before the nut touches a clamped member. A new outer cap nut named “Super loose proof (SPR)” has been developed to overcome such inconvenience. At first this outer cap nut can be rotated smoothly by hand until the nut touching the clamped member. After fastening the outer cap nut, anti-loosening performance can be realized by deforming the outer cap and producing thread contact force at the outer cap region. In this study, stress concentration and tightening-loosening behavior are analyzed by axi-symmetric and three-dimensional finite element methods. Under a certain bolt-axial force, the load distribution of the first thread decreases more than 12% with increasing initial clearance of outer cap nut. Stress concentration appearing at the first thread of the bolt is about 10% smaller than that of conventional nut, reflecting the increase of the thread contact force at the outer cap region. On the other hands, it is found that anti-loosening performance of SPR can be realized when the outer cap has high yield stress.

  19. Bolt-loosening identification of bolt connections by vision image-based technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tuan-Cuong; Huynh, Thanh-Canh; Ryu, Joo-Young; Park, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Jeong-Tae

    2016-04-01

    In this study, an algorithm using image processing techniques is proposed to identify bolt-loosening in bolted connections of steel structures. Its basic concept is to identify rotation angles of nuts from a pictured image, and is mainly consisted of the following 3 steps: (1) taking a picture for a bolt joint, (2) segmenting the images for each nut by image processing techniques, and (3) identifying rotation angle of each nut and detecting bolt-loosening. By using the concept, an algorithm is designed for continuous monitoring and inspection of the bolt connections. As a key imageprocessing technique, Hough transform is used to identify rotation angles of nuts, and then bolt-loosening is detected by comparing the angles before and after bolt-loosening. Then the applicability of the proposed algorithm is evaluated by experimental tests for two lab-scaled models. A bolted joint model which consists of a splice plate and 8 sets of bolts and nuts with 2×4 array is used to simulate inspection of bridge connections, and a model which is consisted of a ring flange and 32 sets of bolt and nut is used to simulate continuous monitoring of bolted connections in wind turbine towers.

  20. Dynamic ultrasonography: a cadaveric model for evaluating aseptic loosening of total ankle arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Paul M; Downey, Michael W; Fortenbaugh, David; Kirchner, John

    2013-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is the primary method of failure in total ankle replacements. Currently, loosening is defined by morphologic changes in osseous architecture determined by plain radiography. The loss of bone noted at diagnosis presents difficulties in future ankle revisions. A method by which early aseptic loosening could be detected before bony deformation or reaction could lead to improved patient outcomes. A cadaveric fresh frozen ankle specimen (mid-tibia to include the foot) was used in the present study. An anterior approach to the ankle was performed. A total ankle prosthesis was implanted in the standard fashion (Salto Talaris, Tornier). The initial cuts were made for a size 1 ankle, and a size 1 ankle was implanted. Dynamic ultrasonography was used to evaluate the bone-implant interface. The prosthesis was removed, and sequential removal of bone was performed at the interface of the medial tibial tray until visible motion was seen with flexion and extension. The reimplanted prosthesis was then re-evaluated using dynamic ultrasonography and dynamic and static fluoroscopy. In the loose prosthesis model, dynamic ultrasonography was able to determine the motion at the bone-prosthesis interface. Dynamic ultrasonography might be a useful tool in the evaluation of early loosening in a total ankle arthroplasty model.

  1. The effect of real-time aging on the oxidation and wear of highly cross-linked UHMWPE acetabular liners.

    PubMed

    Wannomae, Keith K; Christensen, Steven D; Freiberg, Andrew A; Bhattacharyya, Shayan; Harris, William H; Muratoglu, Orhun Kamil

    2006-03-01

    Irradiation decreases the wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) but generates residual free radicals, precursors to long-term oxidation. Melting or annealing is used in quenching free radicals. We hypothesized that irradiated and once-annealed UHMWPE would oxidize while irradiated and melted UHMWPE would not, and that the oxidation in the former would increase wear. Acetabular liners were real-time aged by immersion in an aqueous environment that closely mimicked the temperature and oxygen concentration of synovial fluid. After 95 weeks of real-time aging, once-annealed components were oxidized; the melted components were not. The wear rate of the real-time aged irradiated and once-annealed components was higher than the literature reported values of other contemporary highly cross-linked UHMWPEs. Single annealing after irradiation used with terminal gamma sterilization may adversely affect the long-term oxidative stability of UHMWPE components.

  2. Is labral hypotrophy correlated with increased acetabular depth?

    PubMed Central

    Toft, Felix; Anliker, Elmar; Beck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Labral hypertrophy is a distinct feature in hip dysplasia. Occasionally, very small, hypotrophic labra are observed. However, there is no literature concerning this pathology. We investigated if the size of the labrum correlated with any radiologic parameters reflecting the amount of acetabular coverage. It was hypothezised that there is a negative correlation between labrum size and acetabular coverage. Labra were categorized into three groups depending on the relation between length of the articular sided surface and height of bony attachment. Labra with a height:length ratio of 2 were classified as hypotrophic, with a height:length ratio of 1 as normal and with a ratio of 0.5 as hypertrophic. Labral cross-sectional areas (CSA) were measured on radial magnetic resonance imaging-arthrography slices using the measuring tool of the PACS system of 20 hips with hypotrophic labra (group 1), 20 hips with normal labral appearance (group 2) and 10 hips with hypertrophic labra (group 3). These values were then analyzed against following parameters: neck-shaft-angle (NSA), lateral center-edge angle (LCE), acetabular index (AI), femoral extrusion index (FEI) and acetabular retroversion index (ARI). Analyses of variance were used to determine differences in mean values between the three groups. Mean labral CSA differed significantly between all groups (group 1: 12.1 ± 2.9 mm2; group 2: 25.2 ± 6.2 mm2; group 3: 41.1 ± 12.3 mm2; P < 0.001). NSA, LCE, AI and FEI all showed a significant difference between group 3 and 1 or 2. The ARI showed no difference between groups. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed a significant correlation between LCE angle and labral CSA with a corrected R2-value of 0.301. Labral CSA correlates with the LCE. No statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 2 concerning the LCE, AI or FEI could be identified. Nevertheless, group 1 had the highest mean coverage of all groups, hips with hypertrophic labra

  3. Deep reclamation loosening of soils: State of the problem, results of research, prospects of application, and degradation changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidel'man, F. R.

    2016-09-01

    The efficiency of deep reclamation loosening used for soils of different types on the main parent rocks in the Nonchernozemic zone (mantle and moraine loams, Permian and varved loamy clays, and clays) is assessed basing on the results of long-term stationary and analytical investigations. The long-term aftereffect of the deep loosening on the density, porosity, water permeability, and the main elements of the soil water regime and factors limiting the use of deep loosening are considered. Over 6-12 years after the deep loosening, in the area, where active and passive loosening by a plough was made, a zone of elevated water permeability is preserved at the depth of 40-75 cm. Based on this phenomenon, a new technology of deep reclamation loosening, which restores the hydraulic connection between the arable and deeper soil layers, is proposed. The data on active deep rippers that provide soil loosening to the depth of 0.9-1.0 m are presented. Some agroecological aspects related to the duration of deep loosening effects on the soils and their productivity are discussed. Recommendations on the application of passive and active loosening and moling of heavy-textured gleyed soils are suggested for the European part of the Nonchernozemic zone in the Russian Federation. Field and laboratory works on estimating the efficiency of deep loosening continued for 15 years (1976-1990) for heavy-textured soils on the loess-like, fine-stratified varved clays, as well as on acid moraine and calcareous Permian clays and loamy clays in Moscow, Vologda, Novgorod, and Kirov oblasts.

  4. Role of the Acetabular Labrum in Load Support Across the Hip Joint

    PubMed Central

    Henak, Corinne R.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Harris, Michael D.; Anderson, Andrew E.; Peters, Christopher L.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    The relatively high incidence of labral tears among patients presenting with hip pain suggests that the acetabular labrum is often subjected to injurious loading in vivo. However, it is unclear whether the labrum participates in load transfer across the joint during activities of daily living. This study examined the role of the acetabular labrum in load transfer for hips with normal acetabular geometry and acetabular dysplasia using subject-specific finite element analysis. Models were generated from volumetric CT data and analyzed with and without the labrum during activities of daily living. The labrum in the dysplastic model supported 4-11% of the total load transferred across the joint, while the labrum in the normal model supported only 1-2% of the total load. Despite the increased load transferred to the acetabular cartilage in simulations without the labrum, there were minimal differences in cartilage contact stresses. This was because the load supported by the cartilage correlated to the cartilage contact area. A higher percentage of load was transferred to the labrum in the dysplastic model because the femoral head achieved equilibrium near the lateral edge of the acetabulum. The results of this study suggest that the labrum plays a larger role in load transfer and joint stability in hips with acetabular dysplasia than in hips with normal acetabular geometry. PMID:21757198

  5. Decreased Lumbar Lordosis and Deficient Acetabular Coverage Are Risk Factors for Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF) of the femoral head occurs in the elderly and recipients of organ transplantation. Osteoporosis and deficient lateral coverage of the acetabulum are known risk factors for SIF. There has been no study about relation between spinopelvic alignment and anterior acetabular coverage with SIF. We therefore asked whether a decrease of lumbar lordosis and a deficiency in the anterior acetabular coverage are risk factors. We investigated 37 patients with SIF. There were 33 women and 4 men, and their mean age was 71.5 years (59-85 years). These 37 patients were matched with 37 controls for gender, age, height, weight, body mass index and bone mineral density. We compared the lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, acetabular index, acetabular roof angle, acetabular head index, anterior center-edge angle and lateral center-edge angle. Lumbar lordosis, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, lateral center edge angle, anterior center edge angle, acetabular index and acetabular head index were significantly different between SIF group and control group. Lumbar lordosis (OR = 1.11), lateral center edge angle (OR = 1.30) and anterior center edge angle (OR = 1.27) had significant associations in multivariate analysis. Decreased lumbar lordosis and deficient anterior coverage of the acetabulum are risk factors for SIF as well as decreased lateral coverage of the acetabulum. PMID:27550496

  6. Automated measurement of anterior and posterior acetabular sector angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a segmentation algorithm by which anatomical landmarks on the pelvis are extracted from computed tomography (CT) images. The landmarks are used to automatically define the anterior (AASA) and posterior acetabular sector angles (PASA) describing the degree of hip misalignment. The center of each femoral head is obtained by searching for the point at which most intensity gradient vectors defined at edge points intersect. The radius of each femoral head is computed by finding the sphere, positioned at the center of the femoral head, for which the normalized sum of gradient vector magnitudes on the sphere surface is maximal. The anterior and posterior corners of each acetabulum are searched for on a curve representing the acetabulum and defined by dynamic programming. The femoral head centers and anterior and posterior corners are used to calculate the AASA and PASA. The algorithm was applied to CT images of 120 normal subjects and the results were compared to ground truth values obtained by manual segmentation. The mean absolute difference (+/- standard deviation) between the obtained and ground truth values was 1.3 +/- 0.3 mm for the femoral head centers and 2.1 +/- 1.3 degrees for the acetabular angles.

  7. Comparison of flanged and unflanged acetabular cup design

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Adequate depth of cement penetration and cement mantle thickness is important for the durability of cemented cups. A flanged cup, as opposed to unflanged, has been suggested to give a more uniform cement mantle and superior cement pressurization, thus improving the depth of cement penetration. This hypothesis was tested experimentally. Materials and methods The same cup design with and without flange (both without cement spacers) was investigated regarding intraacetabular pressure, cement mantle thickness, and depth of cement penetration. With machine control, the cups were inserted into open-pore ceramic acetabular models (10 flanged, 10 unflanged) and into paired cadaver acetabuli (10 flanged, 10 unflanged) with prior pressurization of the cement. Results No differences in intraacetabular pressures during cup insertion were found, but unflanged cups tended to migrate more towards the acetabular pole. Flanged cups resulted in thicker cement mantles because of less bottoming out, whereas no differences in cement penetration into the bone were observed. Interpretation Flanged cups do not generate higher cementation pressure or better cement penetration than unflanged cups. A possible advantage of the flange, however, may be to protect the cup from bottoming out, and there is possibly better closure of the periphery around the cup, sealing off the cement-bone interface. PMID:20860522

  8. Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture of the Femoral Head Caused by Excessive Lateralization of the Acetabular Rim

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Goto, Tomohiro; Hamada, Daisuke; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Wada, Keizo; Fukuta, Shoji; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 53-year-old woman with subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF) of the femoral head without history of severe osteoporosis or overexertion. Plain radiographs showed acetabular overcoverage with excessive lateralization of the acetabular rim. A diagnosis of SIF was made by typical MRI findings of SIF. The lesion occurred at the antipodes of the extended rim. Increased mechanical stress over the femoral head due to impingement against the excess bone was suspected as a cause of SIF. The distinct femoral head deformity is consistent with this hypothesis. This is the first report of SIF associated with acetabular overcoverage. PMID:27293935

  9. Small Loosening of Bolt-nut Fastener Due to Micro Bearing-Surface Slip: A Finite Element Method Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Satoshi; Kimura, Masatake; Sakai, Shinsuke

    Bolt-nut fasteners are widely used in mechanical structures due to the systems' ease of disassembly for maintenance and their relatively low cost. However, vibration-induced loosening has remained problematic. In this paper, we investigated the mechanisms of the loosening process due to micro bearing-surface slip within the framework of the three-dimensional finite element method (FEM). The results show close agreement with Kasei's experimental results. It is found that the early-stage nut rotation observed experimentally originates from simultaneous bolt-nut rotation induced by the tightening torsion of the bolt and does not correspond to loosening rotation. Therefore, loosening rotation should be defined by the relative rotation angle of the nut with respect to the bolt. It is also found that small loosening is initiated when the vibration force reaches about 50 to 60% of the critical loading necessary for bearing-surface slip. Attention should be paid to the contact state of both bearing and thread surfaces when considering the loosening of bolt-nut tightening systems. Contact states can be classified into three types: complete slip involving no sticking region, micro slip involving no constant-sticking region over a vibration cycle, and localized slip involving a constant-sticking region over a vibration cycle. It is also found that loosening rotation can proceed when either micro slip or complete slip occurs at both the thread and bearing contact surfaces.

  10. Influence of the implant abutment types and the dynamic loading on initial screw loosening

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Sook

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study examined the effects of the abutment types and dynamic loading on the stability of implant prostheses with three types of implant abutments prepared using different fabrication methods by measuring removal torque both before and after dynamic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three groups of abutments were produced using different types of fabrication methods; stock abutment, gold cast abutment, and CAD/CAM custom abutment. A customized jig was fabricated to apply the load at 30° to the long axis. The implant fixtures were fixed to the jig, and connected to the abutments with a 30 Ncm tightening torque. A sine curved dynamic load was applied for 105 cycles between 25 and 250 N at 14 Hz. Removal torque before loading and after loading were evaluated. The SPSS was used for statistical analysis of the results. A Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to compare screw loosening between the abutment systems. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was performed to compare screw loosening between before and after loading in each group (α=0.05). RESULTS Removal torque value before loading and after loading was the highest in stock abutment, which was then followed by gold cast abutment and CAD/CAM custom abutment, but there were no significant differences. CONCLUSION The abutment types did not have a significant influence on short term screw loosening. On the other hand, after 105 cycles dynamic loading, CAD/CAM custom abutment affected the initial screw loosening, but stock abutment and gold cast abutment did not. PMID:23509006

  11. Risk factors for aseptic loosening of Müller-type straight stems

    PubMed Central

    Gersbach, Silke; Butscher, Andre; Ilchmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Even small differences in design variables for the femoral stem may influence the outcome of a hip arthroplasty. We performed a risk factor analysis for aseptic loosening of 4 different versions of cemented Müller-type straight stems with special emphasis on design modifications (2 shapes, MSS or SL, and 2 materials, CoNiCrMo (Co) or Ti-6Al-7Nb (Ti)). Methods We investigated 828 total hip replacements, which were followed prospectively in our in-house register. All stems were operated in the same setup, using Sulfix-6 bone cement and a second-generation cementing technique. Demographic and design-specific risk factors were analyzed using an adjusted Cox regression model. Results The 4 versions showed marked differences in 15-year stem survival with aseptic loosening as the endpoint: 94% (95% CI: 89–99) for MSS Co, 83% (CI: 75–91) for SL Co, 81% (CI: 76–87) for MSS Ti and 63% (CI: 56–71) for SL Ti. Cox regression analysis showed a relative risk (RR) for aseptic loosening of 3 (CI: 2–5) for stems made of Ti and of 2 (CI: 1–2) for the SL design. The RR for aseptic stem loosening increased to 8 (CI: 4–15) when comparing the most and the least successful designs (MSS Co and SL Ti). Interpretation Cemented Müller-type straight stems should be MSS-shaped and made of a material with high flexural strength (e.g. cobalt-chrome). The surface finish should be polished (Ra < 0.4 µm). These technical aspects combined with modern cementing techniques would improve the survival of Müller-type straight stems. This may be true for all types of cemented stems. PMID:23799347

  12. Potential of incorporated accelerometers for the in vivo assessment of hip stem loosening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowet, G.; Van der Perre, G.

    1994-09-01

    The detection of prosthesis loosening in total hip replacement remains a problematic issue. Common techniques such as radiography and arthrography have not been shown to be very effective. Although originally developed for the assessment of fracture healing, vibration analysis was proposed as a method for the detection of loose prostheses [1,2]. In this paper, we will discuss the principles used in the vibration analysis in relation with the detection of loose prothesis and discuss the potential and limitations.

  13. The effect of dynamic hip motion on the micromotion of press-fit acetabular cups in six degrees of freedom.

    PubMed

    Crosnier, Emilie A; Keogh, Patrick S; Miles, Anthony W

    2016-08-01

    The hip joint is subjected to cyclic loading and motion during activities of daily living and this can induce micromotions at the bone-implant interface of cementless total hip replacements. Initial stability has been identified as a crucial factor to achieve osseointegration and long-term survival. Whilst fixation of femoral stems achieves good clinical results, the fixation of acetabular components remains a challenge. In vitro methods assessing cup stability keep the hip joint in a fixed position, overlooking the effect of hip motion. The effect of hip motion on cup micromotion using a hip motion simulator replicating hip flexion-extension and a six degrees of freedom measurement system was investigated. The results show an increase in cup micromotion under dynamic hip motion compared to Static Flexion. This highlights the need to incorporate hip motion and measure all degrees of freedom when assessing cup micromotion. In addition, comparison of two press-fit acetabular cups with different surface coatings suggested similar stability between the two cups. This new method provides a basis for a more representative protocol for future pre-clinical evaluation of different cup designs.

  14. The effect of dynamic hip motion on the micromotion of press-fit acetabular cups in six degrees of freedom.

    PubMed

    Crosnier, Emilie A; Keogh, Patrick S; Miles, Anthony W

    2016-08-01

    The hip joint is subjected to cyclic loading and motion during activities of daily living and this can induce micromotions at the bone-implant interface of cementless total hip replacements. Initial stability has been identified as a crucial factor to achieve osseointegration and long-term survival. Whilst fixation of femoral stems achieves good clinical results, the fixation of acetabular components remains a challenge. In vitro methods assessing cup stability keep the hip joint in a fixed position, overlooking the effect of hip motion. The effect of hip motion on cup micromotion using a hip motion simulator replicating hip flexion-extension and a six degrees of freedom measurement system was investigated. The results show an increase in cup micromotion under dynamic hip motion compared to Static Flexion. This highlights the need to incorporate hip motion and measure all degrees of freedom when assessing cup micromotion. In addition, comparison of two press-fit acetabular cups with different surface coatings suggested similar stability between the two cups. This new method provides a basis for a more representative protocol for future pre-clinical evaluation of different cup designs. PMID:27210567

  15. Correlation between microleakage and screw loosening at implant-abutment connection

    PubMed Central

    Ayyildiz, Simel

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between microleakage and screw loosening at different types of implant-abutment connections and/or geometries measuring the torque values before and after the leakage tests. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three different abutment types (Intenal hex titanium, internal hex zirconium, morse tapered titaniuım) with different geometries were connected to its own implant fixture. All the abutments were tightened with a standard torque value then the composition was connected to the modified fluid filtration system. After the measurements of leakage removal torque values were re-measured. Kruskal-wallis test was performed for non-parametric and one-way ANOVA was performed for parametric data. The correlation was evaluated using Spearman Correlation Test (α=0.05). RESULTS Significantly higher microleakage was found at the connection of implant-internal hex zirconium abutment. Observed mean torque value loss was also significantly higher than other connection geometries. Spearman tests revealed a significant correlation between microleakage and screw loosening. CONCLUSION Microleakage may provoke screw loosening. Removing torque values rationally decrease with the increase of microleakage. PMID:24605204

  16. Investigation of a passive sensor array for diagnosis of loosening of endoprosthetic implants.

    PubMed

    Ruther, Cathérine; Schulze, Christian; Boehme, Andrea; Nierath, Hannes; Ewald, Hartmut; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer; Kluess, Daniel

    2012-12-20

    Currently, imaging methods are used to diagnose loosening of endoprosthetic implants, but fail to achieve 100% accuracy. In this study, a passive sensor array which is based on the interaction between magnetic oscillators inside the implant and an excitation coil outside the patient was investigated. The excited oscillators produce sound in the audible range, which varies according to the extent of loosening. By performing several experimental tests, the sensor array was optimized to guarantee reproducible and selective excitation of the sound emission. Variation in the distance between the oscillators demonstrated a definite influence on the quality of the generated sound signal. Furthermore, a numerical design analysis using the boundary element method was generated for consideration of the magnetic field and the selectivity of the oscillators during excitation. The numerical simulation of the coil showed the higher selectivity of a coil with a C-shape compared to a cylindrical coil. Based on these investigations, the passive sensor system reveals the potential for detection of implant loosening. Future aims include the further miniaturization of the oscillators and measurements to determine the sensitivity of the proposed sensor system.

  17. Retrieval study of uncemented metal-metal hip prostheses revised for early loosening.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, Georg; Judmann, Kurt P; Lhotka, Christian; Lintner, Felix; Zweymüller, Karl A

    2003-03-01

    A tribologic assessment was performed on 22 metal-metal hip prostheses from a single manufacturer, following removal for early aseptic loosening after a mean service life of 32 months (range, 12-59 months). The mean linear wear rate was 7.6 microm/year (range, 2.9-12.8 microm/year). This was below the rates previously observed in other modern metal-metal combinations. A novel contour analysis technique using a coordinate measuring machine showed the mean volumetric wear rate to be 2.02 mm(3)/year (range, 0.55-3.74 mm(3)/year), which corresponds to a mean gravimetric wear rate of 16.9 mg/year (range, 4.6-31.4 mg/year). The mean clearance of 39.8 microm (range, 30-50 microm) was within the optimal range for hard-hard bearing combinations. Evidence of abrasive, adhesive, and third-body wear was found on all bearing surfaces. The tribologic assessment did not indicate manufacturing defects as a cause of early loosening. Equally, third-body wear was too low to be considered a causative factor for early loosening. PMID:12504531

  18. Loosening and Sliding Behaviour of Bolt-Nut Fastener under Transverse Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, T.; Yamashita, M.; Mizuno, H.; Naruse, T.

    2010-06-01

    The thread joint has been frequently used for the efficient productivity and maintainability as a machine element. However, many troubles such as loosening of bolted joints or fatigue failure of bolt were often experienced. Many attentions must be paid on the improvement of the strength and the reliability of the thread joints [1, 2]. It is generally said that the fastening axial force rapidly decreases by the rotation loosening of nuts if the relative slippage on the interfaces between nuts and fastened body goes beyond a certain critical limit [3]. This critical relative slippage (Scr) that prescribes the upper limit for preventing the loosening behaviour has been estimated according to the theoretically obtained equation considering the bending deformation of bolt and the geometrical constraint condition. In this paper, firstly we present the equation for estimating the Scr based on the fundamental cantilever deformation model. Then we present the investigated results of the deformation behaviour of bolt-nut joint under transverse loading condition considering the reaction moment by nut (Mn). Finaly we can confirmed that these estimated results of critical relative slippage coincided well with the experimental results [4, 5].

  19. A Novel RFID-Based Sensing Method for Low-Cost Bolt Loosening Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Cui, Xingmei; Xu, Yunpeng

    2016-01-01

    In coal mines, bolt loosening in the cage guide is affected by the harsh environmental factors and cage hoist vibration, leading to significant threats to work safety. It is crucial, to this effect, to successfully detect the status of multipoint bolts of guide structures. This paper proposes a system to monitor bolt status in harsh environments established based on the RFID technique. A proof-of-concept model was demonstrated consisting of a bolt gearing system, passive UHF RFID tags, a reader, and monitoring software. A tinfoil metal film is fixed on the retaining plate and an RFID tag bonded to a large gear, with the bolt to be detected fixed in the center of a smaller gear. The radio-frequency signal cannot be received by the reader if the tag is completely obscured by the tinfoil, and if the bolt is loose, the tag’s antenna is exposed when the gear revolves. A radio-frequency signal that carries corresponding bolt’s information is transmitted by the RFID tag to the RFID reader due to coil coupling, identifying loose bolt location and reporting them in the software. Confirmatory test results revealed that the system indeed successfully detects bolt loosening and comparative test results (based on a reed switch multipoint bolt loosening monitor system) provided valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed system. PMID:26828498

  20. Loosening torque of Universal Abutment screws after cyclic loading: influence of tightening technique and screw coating

    PubMed Central

    Regalin, Alexandre; Bhering, Claudia Lopes Brilhante; Alessandretti, Rodrigo; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of tightening technique and the screw coating on the loosening torque of screws used for Universal Abutment fixation after cyclic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty implants (Titamax Ti Cortical, HE, Neodent) (n=10) were submerged in acrylic resin and four tightening techniques for Universal Abutment fixation were evaluated: A - torque with 32 Ncm (control); B - torque with 32 Ncm holding the torque meter for 20 seconds; C - torque with 32 Ncm and retorque after 10 minutes; D - torque (32 Ncm) holding the torque meter for 20 seconds and retorque after 10 minutes as initially. Samples were divided into subgroups according to the screw used: conventional titanium screw or diamond like carbon-coated (DLC) screw. Metallic crowns were fabricated for each abutment. Samples were submitted to cyclic loading at 106 cycles and 130 N of force. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). RESULTS The tightening technique did not show significant influence on the loosening torque of screws (P=.509). Conventional titanium screws showed significant higher loosening torque values than DLC (P=.000). CONCLUSION The use of conventional titanium screw is more important than the tightening techniques employed in this study to provide long-term stability to Universal Abutment screws. PMID:26576253

  1. A Novel RFID-Based Sensing Method for Low-Cost Bolt Loosening Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Cui, Xingmei; Xu, Yunpeng

    2016-01-01

    In coal mines, bolt loosening in the cage guide is affected by the harsh environmental factors and cage hoist vibration, leading to significant threats to work safety. It is crucial, to this effect, to successfully detect the status of multipoint bolts of guide structures. This paper proposes a system to monitor bolt status in harsh environments established based on the RFID technique. A proof-of-concept model was demonstrated consisting of a bolt gearing system, passive UHF RFID tags, a reader, and monitoring software. A tinfoil metal film is fixed on the retaining plate and an RFID tag bonded to a large gear, with the bolt to be detected fixed in the center of a smaller gear. The radio-frequency signal cannot be received by the reader if the tag is completely obscured by the tinfoil, and if the bolt is loose, the tag's antenna is exposed when the gear revolves. A radio-frequency signal that carries corresponding bolt's information is transmitted by the RFID tag to the RFID reader due to coil coupling, identifying loose bolt location and reporting them in the software. Confirmatory test results revealed that the system indeed successfully detects bolt loosening and comparative test results (based on a reed switch multipoint bolt loosening monitor system) provided valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed system. PMID:26828498

  2. Investigation of a Passive Sensor Array for Diagnosis of Loosening of Endoprosthetic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Ruther, Cathérine; Schulze, Christian; Boehme, Andrea; Nierath, Hannes; Ewald, Hartmut; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer; Kluess, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Currently, imaging methods are used to diagnose loosening of endoprosthetic implants, but fail to achieve 100% accuracy. In this study, a passive sensor array which is based on the interaction between magnetic oscillators inside the implant and an excitation coil outside the patient was investigated. The excited oscillators produce sound in the audible range, which varies according to the extent of loosening. By performing several experimental tests, the sensor array was optimized to guarantee reproducible and selective excitation of the sound emission. Variation in the distance between the oscillators demonstrated a definite influence on the quality of the generated sound signal. Furthermore, a numerical design analysis using the boundary element method was generated for consideration of the magnetic field and the selectivity of the oscillators during excitation. The numerical simulation of the coil showed the higher selectivity of a coil with a C-shape compared to a cylindrical coil. Based on these investigations, the passive sensor system reveals the potential for detection of implant loosening. Future aims include the further miniaturization of the oscillators and measurements to determine the sensitivity of the proposed sensor system. PMID:23344370

  3. Backside Wear Analysis of Retrieved Acetabular Liners with a Press-Fit Locking Mechanism in Comparison to Wear Simulation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Marcus; Floerkemeier, Thilo; Frecher, Sven; Delank, Karl-Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Backside wear due to micromotion and poor conformity between the liner and its titanium alloy shell may contribute to the high rates of retroacetabular osteolysis and consequent aseptic loosening. The purpose of our study was to understand the wear process on the backside of polyethylene liners from two acetabular cup systems, whose locking mechanism is based on a press-fit cone in combination with a rough titanium conical inner surface on the fixation area. A direct comparison between in vitro wear simulator tests (equivalent to 3 years of use) and retrieved liners (average 13.1 months in situ) was done in order to evaluate the backside wear characteristics and behavior of these systems. Similar wear scores between in vitro tested and retrieved liners were observed. The results showed that this locking mechanism did not significantly produce wear marks at the backside of the polyethylene liners due to micromotion. In all the analyzed liners, the most common wear modes observed were small scratches at the cranial fixation zone directly below the rough titanium inner surface of the shell. It was concluded that most of the wear marks were produced during the insertion and removal of the liner, rather than during its time in situ. PMID:27722174

  4. Early Polyethylene Wear and Excessive Acetabular Granuloma in an Uncemented HA-Coated Total Hip Arthroplasty—Midterm Results of a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jack; Maus, Uwe; Saklak, Muharrem; Weisskopf, Markus; Wirtz, Dieter Christian

    2006-01-01

    This is a prospective review of 135 HA-coated ABG I total hip arthroplasty (THA) systems with a mean clinical and radiographic follow-up of 8.5 years. The 5-year survival rate was 85%, but 22% of the patients were dissatisfied. Revision THA was already indicated in 28% of the patients, with 26% indicated for cup loosening. PE wear was detected by x-ray in 42%. Disproportionate substantial wear with an average linear loss of 2.6 mm at the inner rim of the insert was observed in 23% of the cases. The mean annual wear rate was calculated 0.1–0.25 mm/year. Laboratory examination of the retrieved PE revealed polishing, cracks, and subsurface delamination. Radiographic evidence of acetabular cysts were found to be excessive granuloma during surgery. Polarization microscopy revealed debris particles phagocytized by reticuloendothelial cells. Results confirm the general opinion that aseptic osteolysis is a cell-mediated process driven by the presence of particles generated from wear debris. The findings also suggest that the main reasons for the failure of the first-generation ABG hip system were an insufficient locking mechanism and poor PE congruency, and not solely poor PE quality. PMID:18751822

  5. The inhibitory effect of strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate particles on cytokines from macrophages and osteoblasts leading to aseptic loosening in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chengcheng; Li, Li; Yu, Xixun; Gu, Zhipeng; Zhang, Xu

    2014-04-01

    Aseptic loosening is a common cause of joint implant failure in humans. In order to enhance implant stability, we need to develop a new material that not only promotes the wear resistance of components of an artificial joint, but also possesses the pharmaceutical efficacy of protecting patients against aseptic loosening. Strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate (SCPP) has been found to have this potential ability. The goal of this study is to respectively quantify the levels of TNF-α (for macrophages), receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) (for osteoblasts) when osteoblasts and macrophages are challenged with various particles (including SCPP). In this study, the osteoblasts ROS 17/2.8 and macrophages RAW 264.7 were challenged with various wear particles (8% SCPP, the molar percentage of Sr in SCPP is 8%, UHMWPE, hydroxyapatite (HA) and CPP). The secretion of TNF-α (from RAW 264.7), OPG and RANKL protein (from ROS 17/2.8) was analyzed by ELISA. The OPG and RANKL mRNA from ROS 17/2.8 was detected by RT-PCR. The data of ELISA indicated that the amount of TNF-α challenged with 8% SCPP particles was more than three-fold lower than that of all other test groups. The ratio of OPG/RANKL in the 8% SCPP group was significantly increased compared to that of all other test groups. The results of OPG and RANKL mRNA expression showed the same tendency as the ELISA results. In general, this study showed that 8% SCPP particles can inhibit the expression of TNF-α and RANKL, promote the expression of OPG so that SCPP can inhibit bone resorption and promote bone formation, and then inhibit aseptic loosening. Thus SCPP could be a promising material for the construction of artificial joints. PMID:24518283

  6. Minimal backside surface changes observed in retrieved acetabular liners.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Abtin; Roy, Marcel E; Whiteside, Leo A; Katerberg, Brian J; Schnettgoecke, Daniel J

    2011-08-01

    Modular polyethylene liners offer versatility in total hip arthroplasty, but the locking mechanism may allow micromotion and backside wear. We evaluated the backside surface of 56 retrieved acetabular liners (mean 5.54 years in vivo, range 0.003-13.1 years) to determine whether damage correlated with liner age in vivo, patient factors associated with higher activity, and polyethylene quality. Half of the liners exhibited minimal damage, half exhibited no damage and none exhibited severe damage. Backside damage significantly correlated only to liner age in vivo. Ten of the 28 liners revised for osteolysis exhibited no backside damage, but the osteolytic cysts were peripheral and did not originate from screw holes. The results suggest that modular polyethylene liners in a porous titanium-coated shell with screw holes can be designed such that clinically significant backside wear is minimal. PMID:20875939

  7. Clinical and radiological results of hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular cups.

    PubMed

    Blacha, J; Gagała, J

    2004-12-01

    We prospectively studied a consecutive series of 60 primary total hip arthroplasties in 52 patients. All patients had a hydroxyapatite-coated hemispherical acetabular cup (OCTOFIT). Mean patient age was 52.5 (34-73) years. In 38 hips, a 28-mm and in 22 hips a 32-mm diameter cobalt-chrome femoral head was used. We could follow 53 hips for a mean of 81 (28-125) months. Four cups were revised because of osteolysis, and in another six cups, slight osteolysis without migration was seen. The average annual linear wear rate was 0.05 mm (+/-0.05) for 28-mm heads and 0.16 mm (+/-0.09) for 32-mm heads (p<0.0001). Survivorship analysis predicted a survival rate of 86+/-6.7% at 10 years.

  8. Hip Arthroscopy in the Presence of Acetabular Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jayasekera, Narlaka; Aprato, Alessandro; Villar, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : Hip arthroscopy is a well established therapeutic intervention for an increasing number of painful hip conditions. Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is commonly associated with intra-articular hip pathology. However, some surgeons perceive patients with hip dysplasia as poor candidates for hip arthroscopy. Our aim was to describe early outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for patients with DDH, who also had femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) treated when necessary, and to compare these outcomes against a control group of patients without DDH. Methods : Prospective case-control study of 68 consecutive hip arthroscopy patients assessed with a modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) preoperatively and at six weeks, six months, and one year after surgery. Presence of DDH was determined using a standard anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiograph to measure the centre-edge angle (CEA) of Wiberg, with a CEA < 20º used as threshold for diagnosis of DDH. Results : 12 patients (eight female and four male) with acetabular dysplasia and mean CEA of 15.4º (9º to 19º). The control, nondysplastic group comprised 54 patients (23 females and 31 males) with a mean CEA of 33.1º (22º to 45º). All patients in the dysplastic group had a labral tear and 11 (91.7%) had associated femoral cam impingement lesion addressed at arthroscopy. Our study demonstrates a significant (p=0.02) improvement in outcome in the dysplastic group at one year using the mHHS. Conclusion : Hip arthroscopy in the presence of DDH is effective in relieving pain for at least one year after surgery although does not address underlying acetabular abnormality. PMID:26069512

  9. Metal debris concentrations in soft tissues adjacent to loosened femoral stems is higher in uncemented than cemented implants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are still many questions related to aseptic femoral stem loosening. Systemic and local immune responses to the implanted “foreign body” is one of the reasons for loosening. The purpose of the study was to measure metal ion concentration (Ti, Co, Cr, Mo, Ni, Al) around loosened femoral stems and compare their levels around uncemented and cemented implants. Methods This paper reports 50 hips operated for isolated stem loosening, in 50 patients at the mean age of 57 years (from 21 to 87). There were 25 cemented (Co,Cr29,Mo,Ni) and 25 uncemented (Ti, Al) stems. The mean follow-up from primary hip replacement to revision was 10.1 years (from 0.5 to 17). During the procedure, scar tissue around the stem was taken for analysis of metal ions. Results The concentrations of titanium and aluminium in soft tissues around uncemented loosened stems were higher than cemented ones (p < 0.001, p < 0.001 respectively). However, no statistically significant differences were observed between both types of stems in terms of ions of the metal of which cemented implants had been made of (Co, Cr, Mo, Ni). Conclusions In soft tissue around a loosened stem, the concentrations of metal ions from implants are much higher in case of uncemented stems than of cemented ones. Metal ions from vitalium femoral heads were found around uncemented stems in similar values to cemented streams. PMID:25098913

  10. Structural and mechanical characterisation of the peri-prosthetic tissue surrounding loosened hip prostheses. An explorative study.

    PubMed

    Moerman, Astrid; Zadpoor, Amir A; Oostlander, Angela; Schoeman, Monique; Rahnamay Moshtagh, Parisa; Pouran, Behdad; Valstar, Edward

    2016-09-01

    Very little is known about the structure and properties of peri-prosthetic fibrous tissue that is found around loose orthopaedic implants. We describe a method for characterizing the structural organisation (histology, confocal microscopy) as well as the nano- and micro-scale mechanical behaviour (atomic force microscopy, nanoindentation) of peri-prosthetic fibrous tissue. The tissue was collected from 11 patients undergoing revision surgery due to aseptic loosening. Sirius Red and Movat histological staining procedures indicated that the tissue mainly consists of collagen fibres and ground substance. However, large inter- and intra-patient variations in the relative proportions of these tissue components were found, as well as in collagen fibre orientation and possibly also maturation. The nano-scale Young׳s moduli ranged from 0-950kPa, but showed large inter-patient variability. When the results per sample were presented in a probability density function, we could roughly discriminate one peak in the 0-100kPa range and/or one peak in the 100-500Pa range. These nano-scale moduli seem to respectively present the mechanical properties of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen molecules. The majority of the micro-scale Young׳s moduli ranged between 0.5 and 2.0kPa for all samples. This explorative study provides new insights in (the variations of) structural organisation and mechanical properties of peri-prosthetic tissue. PMID:27281163

  11. Regulation of Extracellular Matrix Remodeling Proteins by Osteoblasts in Titanium Nanoparticle-Induced Aseptic Loosening Model.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing; Hou, Yanhua; Fu, Na; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Li, Guo; Peng, Qiang; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-10-01

    Titanium (Ti)-wear particles, formed at the bone-implant interface, are responsible for aseptic loosening, which is a main cause of total joint replacement failure. There have been many studies on Ti particle-induced function changes in mono-cultured osteoblasts and synovial cells. However, little is known on extracellular matrix remodeling displayed by osteoblasts when in coexistence with Synovial cells. To further mimic the bone-implant interface environment, we firstly established a nanoscaled-Ti particle-induced aseptic loosening system by co-culturing osteoblasts and Synovial cells. We then explored the impact of the Synovial cells on Ti particle-engulfed osteoblasts in the mimicked flamed niche. The matrix metalloproteinases and lysyl oxidases expression levels, two protein families which are critical in osseointegration, were examined under induction by tumor necrosis factor-alpha. It was found that the co-culture between the osteoblasts and Synovial cells markedly increased the migration and proliferation of the osteoblasts, even in the Ti-particle engulfed osteoblasts. Importantly, the Ti-particle engulfed osteoblasts, induced by TNF-alpha after the co-culture, enhanced the release of the matrix metalloproteinases and reduced the expressions of lysyl oxidases. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling at the protein level was further assessed by investigations on gene expression of the matrix metalloproteinases and lysyl oxidases, which also suggested that the regulation started at the genetic level. Our research work has therefore revealed the critical role of multi cell-type interactions in the extracellular matrix remodeling within the peri-prosthetic tissues, which provides new insights on aseptic loosening and brings new clues about incomplete osseointegration between the implantation materials and their surrounding bones. PMID:26502645

  12. Human beta-defensin-3 producing cells in septic implant loosening.

    PubMed

    Levón, Jaakko; Al-Samadi, Ahmed; Mackiewicz, Zygmunt; Coer, Andrej; Trebse, Rihard; Waris, Eero; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2015-02-01

    Human β-defensin-3 (hBD-3) has been found in synovial fluid and later in periprosthetic tissues in septic joint implant loosening. The aim of the present study was to identify its cellular sources. Tissue samples from 12 patients were analyzed. A fully automatic Leica BOND MAX staining robot was used. Affinity-purified rabbit anti-human hBD-3 IgG was applied in a two-layer horse radish peroxidase/anti-rabbit-labeled polymer method. Double immunofluorescence of hBD3 together with CD68, CD31, heat shock protein 47 (HSP47) and mast cell tryptase (MCT) staining was done. Human BD-3 was found in monocyte/macrophage-like cells, vascular endothelial cells and fibroblasts-like cells, but was weakly expressed in foreign body giant cells and negative in neutrophils. Human BD-3 was found in CD68 and CD31 immunoreactive cells, whereas HSP47 and MCT positive cells were hBD-3 negative. Immunostaining of hBD-3 was strong in some tissue areas but weak or absent in others. Monocyte/macrophages and endothelial cells were established in this study as the major cellular sources of hBD-3 in septic loosening, but fibroblasts and foreign body giant cells can also contribute to its production. The heterogeneous topological staining of hBD-3 suggests local regulation, possibly by bacterial products, damage-associated molecular patterns and cytokines. The results explain the increased synovial fluid/tissue concentrations of hBD-3 in septic loosening. PMID:25655501

  13. Surface-gradient cross-linked polyethylene acetabular cups: oxidation resistance and wear against smooth and rough femoral balls.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fu-Wen; McKellop, Harry

    2005-01-01

    Two methods were developed and evaluated for cross-linking the bearing surface of a polyethylene acetabular cup to a limited depth, in order to improve its resistance to wear without degrading the mechanical properties of the bulk of the component. In the first method, low-energy electron beams were used to cross-link only the bearing surface of the cups to a maximum depth of about 2 mm. The cups then were annealed at 100 degrees C in vacuum for 3 or 6 days to reduce the residual free radicals, and the resultant resistance to oxidation was compared by artificially aging the cups at 80 degrees C in air. Chemically cross-linked surface layers were produced by coating the bearing surfaces of the cups with a thin layer of polyethylene powder mixed with 1% weight peroxide, and compressing them at 6.9 MPa (1000 psi) and 170 degrees C. This resulted in a cross-linked surface layer that extended about 3 mm deep, with a gradual transition to conventional (noncross-linked) polyethylene in the bulk of the implant. In hip simulator wear tests with highly polished (implant quality) femoral balls, both types of surface cross-linking were found to improve markedly the wear resistance of the acetabular cups. In tests with roughened femoral balls, the wear rates were much higher and were comparable to those obtained with similarly roughened balls against noncross-linked polyethylene cups in a previous study, indicating that the full benefit of cross-linking may not be realized under conditions of severe third-body abrasion. Nevertheless, these results show a promising approach for optimizing the wear resistance and the bulk mechanical properties of polyethylene components in total joint arthroplasty.

  14. Sonication as a diagnostic approach used to investigate the infectious etiology of prosthetic hip joint loosening.

    PubMed

    Bogut, Agnieszka; Niedźwiadek, Justyna; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria; Strzelec-Nowak, Dagmara; Blacha, Jan; Mazurkiewicz, Tomasz; Macias, Julia; Marczyński, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of sonication for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) by its comparison with periprosthetic tissues (PTs) and synovial fluid (SV-F) cultures. The study groups included 54 patients undergoing exchange of total hip prostheses for so called "aseptic" loosening occurring without clinical manifestations of an accompanying PJI and 22 patients who developed a sinus tract communicating with the prosthesis which was indicative of an ongoing infectious process. Significant positive culture results were obtained among 10 (18.5%) patients with "aseptic" implant failure and in 18 (81.8%) patients who developed a sinus tract. Sonicate-fluid (S-F) yielded bacterial growth in all culture-positive patients with "aseptic" loosening vs. 15 patients with presumed PJIs. There was a concordance in terms of bacterial species isolated from S-F and conventional cultures from individual patients. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated most frequently. Sensitivity of sonication (75%) exceeded that estimated for PTs (69%) and SV-F (45%) cultures. We conclude that identification of causative agents of PJIs which is critical to further therapeutic decisions is aided by the combination of sonication and conventional culture. PMID:25546940

  15. Does the immune system play a role in loosening and osteolysis of total joint replacements?

    PubMed

    Goodman, S B

    1996-01-01

    Total joint replacement is a highly successful surgical procedure with an excellent outcome over many years. However, because this procedure is now being performed in younger patients, and because the average age of our population continues to increase, greater expectations have been placed on joint implants in the hope that they will last forever. Aseptic loosening and osteolysis of total joint replacements are the main processes limiting long-term implant survival. This paper focuses on the possible role of immunological mechanisms in the processes of loosening and osteolysis of joint replacements, with special emphasis on polymeric materials. This topic is very controversial: In vitro experiments and in vivo studies in animals and humans are reviewed and provide evidence for both sides of the debate. In some patients, immunological processes appear to be activated after a total joint replacement has been implanted. Specific materials or their by-products might function as haptens and elicit a T-lymphocyte-mediated, delayed hypersensitivity reaction. Many factors probably are important, including the genetic makeup and immune competence of the patient, prior exposure to the same or similar materials, degree of exposure (rate of generation of particles and the efficacy of clearance mechanisms), and characteristics of the particles themselves. PMID:10163512

  16. Ibandronate and periprosthetic bone mass: new therapeutic approach in periprosthetic loosening prevention.

    PubMed

    Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Quarta, Laura; Grimaldi, Antonella; Orgiani, Antonio; Marsilio, Antonio; Rollo, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    A prosthetic implant modifies the physiological transmission of loads to the bone, initiating a remodeling process.Studies of the mechanisms responsible for periprosthetic bone loss contributed to the definition of new pharmacological strategies that may prevent aseptic implant loosening. Bisphosphonates are a class of drugs useful to this purpose, and have been shown to be effective in reducing periprosthetic resorption during the first year after the implant. We aimed to assess the inhibitory effect on periprosthetic osteolysis of ibandronate, a highly potent aminobisphosphonate, administered orally and IV with an extended interval between doses and optimal treatment adherence. In view of the fact that periprosthetic remodeling takes place during the first 6-12 months after surgery and is ultimately responsible for prosthesis longevity, we may conclude that the administration of high dosage ibandronate postsurgery by IV bolus and subsequently as cyclic oral treatment reduced cortical osteopenia in the metaphyseal region, and in the calcar region of the proximal femur. This therapy might therefore be used as preventive measure against postsurgical osteopenia and probably also against aseptic loosening.

  17. Sonication as a diagnostic approach used to investigate the infectious etiology of prosthetic hip joint loosening.

    PubMed

    Bogut, Agnieszka; Niedźwiadek, Justyna; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria; Strzelec-Nowak, Dagmara; Blacha, Jan; Mazurkiewicz, Tomasz; Macias, Julia; Marczyński, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of sonication for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) by its comparison with periprosthetic tissues (PTs) and synovial fluid (SV-F) cultures. The study groups included 54 patients undergoing exchange of total hip prostheses for so called "aseptic" loosening occurring without clinical manifestations of an accompanying PJI and 22 patients who developed a sinus tract communicating with the prosthesis which was indicative of an ongoing infectious process. Significant positive culture results were obtained among 10 (18.5%) patients with "aseptic" implant failure and in 18 (81.8%) patients who developed a sinus tract. Sonicate-fluid (S-F) yielded bacterial growth in all culture-positive patients with "aseptic" loosening vs. 15 patients with presumed PJIs. There was a concordance in terms of bacterial species isolated from S-F and conventional cultures from individual patients. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated most frequently. Sensitivity of sonication (75%) exceeded that estimated for PTs (69%) and SV-F (45%) cultures. We conclude that identification of causative agents of PJIs which is critical to further therapeutic decisions is aided by the combination of sonication and conventional culture.

  18. Total hip replacement through a posterior approach using a 22 mm diameter femoral head : the role of the transverse acetabular ligament and capsular repair in reducing the rate of dislocation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Sharma, S; James, J; Hodgkinson, J P; Hemmady, M V

    2014-09-01

    Despite a lack of long-term follow-up, there is an increasing trend towards using femoral heads of large diameter in total hip replacement (THR), partly because of the perceived advantage of lower rates of dislocation. However, increasing the size of the femoral head is not the only way to reduce the rate of dislocation; optimal alignment of the components and repair of the posterior capsule could achieve a similar effect. In this prospective study of 512 cemented unilateral THRs (Male:Female 230:282) performed between 2004 and 2011, we aimed to determine the rate of dislocation in patients who received a 22 mm head on a 9/10 Morse taper through a posterior approach with capsular repair and using the transverse acetabular ligament (TAL) as a guide for the alignment of the acetabular component. The mean age of the patients at operation was 67 years (35 to 89). The mean follow-up was 2.8 years (0.5 to 6.6). Pre- and post-operative assessment included Oxford hip, Short Form-12 and modified University of California Los Angeles and Merle D'Aubigne scores. The angles of inclination and anteversion of the acetabular components were measured using radiological software. There were four dislocations (0.78%), all of which were anterior. In conclusion, THR with a 22 mm diameter head performed through a posterior approach with capsular repair and using the TAL as a guide for the alignment of the acetabular component was associated with a low rate of dislocation. PMID:25183591

  19. The BCL2 -938C>A Promoter Polymorphism Is Associated with Risk for and Time to Aseptic Loosening of Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stelmach, Patrick; Wedemeyer, Christian; Fuest, Lena; Kurscheid, Gina; Gehrke, Thorsten; Klenke, Stefanie; Jäger, Marcus; Kauther, Max D; Bachmann, Hagen S

    2016-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is a major cause of revision surgery of total hip arthroplasty (THA). Only few host factors affecting aseptic loosening have been identified until now, although they are urgently needed to identify and possibly treat those patients at higher risk for aseptic loosening. To determine whether the functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.-938C>A (rs2279115), located in the promoter region of the BCL2 gene has an impact on aseptic loosening of THA we genotyped and analyzed 234 patients suffering from aseptic loosening and 231 patients after primary THA. The polymorphism is associated with risk for aseptic loosening with the CC genotype at highest risk for aseptic loosening, Odds Ratio CC vs. AA 1.93, 95%CI 1.15-3.25, p = 0.013. In contrast, low risk AA genotype carriers that still developed aseptic loosening showed a significantly shorter time to aseptic loosening than patients carrying the C allele (p = 0.004). These results indicate that the BCL2 -938C>A polymorphism influences the occurrence and course of aseptic loosening and suggests this polymorphism as an interesting candidate for prospective studies and analyses in THA registers.

  20. Acetabular rim and surface segmentation for hip surgery planning and dysplasia evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Sovira; Yao, Jianhua; Yao, Lawrence; Summers, Ronald M.; Ward, Michael M.

    2008-03-01

    Knowledge of the acetabular rim and surface can be invaluable for hip surgery planning and dysplasia evaluation. The acetabular rim can also be used as a landmark for registration purposes. At the present time acetabular features are mostly extracted manually at great cost of time and human labor. Using a recent level set algorithm that can evolve on the surface of a 3D object represented by a triangular mesh we automatically extracted rims and surfaces of acetabulae. The level set is guided by curvature features on the mesh. It can segment portions of a surface that are bounded by a line of extremal curvature (ridgeline or crestline). The rim of the acetabulum is such an extremal curvature line. Our material consists of eight hemi-pelvis surfaces. The algorithm is initiated by putting a small circle (level set seed) at the center of the acetabular surface. Because this surface distinctively has the form of a cup we were able to use the Shape Index feature to automatically extract an approximate center. The circle then expands and deforms so as to take the shape of the acetabular rim. The results were visually inspected. Only minor errors were detected. The algorithm also proved to be robust. Seed placement was satisfactory for the eight hemi-pelvis surfaces without changing any parameters. For the level set evolution we were able to use a single set of parameters for seven out of eight surfaces.

  1. Early acetabular cartilage degeneration in a rabbit model of developmental dysplasia of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangxin; Meng, Qingxia; Ma, Ruixue; Chen, Guangxiang; Cheng, Liang; Shen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mild developmental dysplasia of hip (DDH) causes high morbidity of osteoarthritis (OA) on adult. It is thought that change of collagen and proteoglycans in cartilage may be the direct reasons for osteoarthritis. Objective: To detect the changes of the expressions of type II collagen of acetabular cartilage in early DDH and to investigate the relevance between type II collagen and the degeneration mechanism of the acetabular cartilage. Methods: The rabbit model of DDH was successfully established by applying the method of knee extending and fixing with cylinder cast in which left lower extremity as experimental group and right one as control group, checking with X-ray after 5 weeks. The stains of H&E and toluidine blue were applied on the samples of acetabular cartilage to observe the morphological changes of chondrocytes and extracellular matrix (ECM). The immunohistochemical staining and Western-blot were employed to respectively qualify and quantitate the expression of type II collagen. Results: Pathohistology observing indicated the signs of retrogressive changes of acetabular cartilage in experimental group. Also, the positive stained cells in type II collagen in experimental group was higher based on immunohistochemiscal staining. The quantitative amounts of type II collagen by Western-blot in experimental group was higher significant difference existed between two groups (t = 2.18, P < 0.05). Conclusions: The expression of type II collagen is correlated to a degeneration of acetabular cartilage and increase obviously in early DDH. PMID:26550441

  2. Pelvic Incidence: A Predictive Factor for Three-Dimensional Acetabular Orientation—A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Bollini, Gérard; Legaye, Jean; Tardieu, Christine; Prat-Pradal, Dominique; Chabrol, Brigitte; Jouve, Jean-Luc; Duval-Beaupère, Ginette; Pélissier, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Acetabular cup orientation (inclination and anteversion) is a fundamental topic in orthopaedics and depends on pelvis tilt (positional parameter) emphasising the notion of a safe range of pelvis tilt. The hypothesis was that pelvic incidence (morphologic parameter) could yield a more accurate and reliable assessment than pelvis tilt. The aim was to find out a predictive equation of acetabular 3D orientation parameters which were determined by pelvic incidence to include in the model. The second aim was to consider the asymmetry between the right and left acetabulae. Twelve pelvic anatomic specimens were measured with an electromagnetic Fastrak system (Polhemus Society) providing 3D position of anatomical landmarks to allow measurement of acetabular and pelvic parameters. Acetabulum and pelvis data were correlated by a Spearman matrix. A robust linear regression analysis provided prediction of acetabulum axes. The orientation of each acetabulum could be predicted by the incidence. The incidence is correlated with the morphology of acetabula. The asymmetry of the acetabular roof was correlated with pelvic incidence. This study allowed analysis of relationships of acetabular orientation and pelvic incidence. Pelvic incidence (morphologic parameter) could determine the safe range of pelvis tilt (positional parameter) for an individual and not a group. PMID:25006461

  3. Magnetic resonance evaluation of acetabular residual dysplasia in developmental dysplasia of the hip: a preliminary study of 27 patients.

    PubMed

    Douira-Khomsi, Wièm; Smida, Mahmoud; Louati, Hela; Hassine, Lilia Ben; Bouchoucha, Sami; Saied, Walid; Ladeb, Mohamed-Fethi; Ghachem, Maher Ben; Bellagha, Ibtissem

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-one hips in 27 young girls, treated for developmental dysplasia of the hip in the authors' institute since 2003, showed persistent radiographic evidence of residual acetabular dysplasia. These hips were registered as candidates for pelvic osteotomy. A prospective study was conducted and these hips were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); the average age of the patients was 5 years. MRI measurement of acetabular angle and acetabular head index in 2 different landmarks (bone and cartilage) was performed. The results were correlated with plain radiographic film evolution. MRI studies revealed sufficient cartilaginous acetabular coverage in 27 hips, cartilaginous acetabular dysplasia in 2 hips, and short acetabulum in 2 others. The 27 hips with thick cartilage of the acetabular roof were subsequently followed up by plain radiographs. The average follow-up period was 2.1 years. The authors observed a spontaneous progressive ossification of the cartilaginous acetabular roof in all the 27 cases. In 4 cases, the correction of the acetabular angle was complete. They concluded that MRI promotes more accurate selection of patients for pelvic osteotomy and aids in the choice of the most appropriate type of osteotomy. Clinical imaging examples are presented and need to be further evaluated.

  4. Wear of a sequentially annealed polyethylene acetabular liner

    PubMed Central

    Gascoyne, Trevor C; Petrak, Martin J; Turgeon, Thomas R; Bohm, Eric R

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose We previously reported on a randomized controlled trial (RCT) that examined the effect of adding tobramycin to bone cement after femoral stem migration. The present study examined femoral head penetration into both conventional and highly crosslinked polyethylene acetabular liners in the same group of RCT patients, with a minimum of 5 years of postoperative follow-up. Patients and methods Linear penetration of the femoral head into an X3 (Stryker) crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) liner was measured in 18 patients (19 hips) using radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Femoral head penetration was also measured in 6 patients (6 hips) with a conventional polyethylene liner (CPE), which served as a control group. Results The median proximal femoral head penetration in the XLPE group after 5.5 years was 0.025 mm with a steady-state penetration rate of 0.001 mm/year between year 1 and year 5. The CPE liner showed a median proximal head penetration of 0.274 mm after 7.2 years, at a rate of 0.037 mm/year. Interpretation The Trident X3 sequentially annealed XLPE liner shows excellent in vivo wear resistance compared to non-crosslinked CPE liners at medium-term implantation. The rate of linear head penetration in the XLPE liners after > 5 years of follow-up was 0.001 mm/year, which is in close agreement with the results of previous studies. PMID:25140986

  5. Fluid-sorption phenomena in sterilized polyethylene acetabular prostheses.

    PubMed

    Clarke, I C; Starkebaum, W; Hosseinian, A; McGuire, P; Okuda, R; Salovey, R; Young, R

    1985-05-01

    The weight changes due to fluid-sorption were measured in 62 radiation-sterilized acetabular sockets and 10 unsterilized discs. The materials included two types of ultra-high molecular weight (UHMW) polyethylene (RCH 1000; Hi-Fax 1900) and a carbon-fibre-reinforced polyethylene (CFPE). The fluid absorption curve was consistently biphasic. In the first 30 d soak-period (Phase 1), the initial rate of fluid absorption averaged 153 micrograms/d for conventional UHMW polyethylene and 278 micrograms/d for carbon-fibre-reinforced polyethylene. In Phase 2, beyond 30 d and up to 400 d, fluid absorption reduced to linear rates of 27 micrograms/d for UHMW polyethylene and 43 micrograms/d for CFPE. The latter soak-weight-gain values corresponded to only 0.00016%/d and 0.00034%/d respectively. There was little difference in absorption rates between sterilized and unsterilized samples. However soak rates were generally higher in water compared to serum.

  6. Quantification of clearance and creep in acetabular wear measurements

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Thomas; Vandenbussche, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to measure femoral head penetration before occurrence of real wear, and to quantify the portions attributable respectively to clearance and plastic deformations in various acetabular designs. Methods We analyzed CT scans from 15 patients at ‘day five’ after total hip arthroplasty (THA). All patients received Exafit® femoral stems and 28 mm heads: 5 patients had cemented Durasul® all-PE cups, 5 patients had un-cemented Allofit® metal-backed cups, and 5 patients had un-cemented Stafit® dual-mobility cups. We also analyzed CT scans of samples of the three head-cup combinations to compare in vivo and in vitro measurements. Results The mean femoral head penetration measured on ‘day five’ was lower for all-PE cups (0.196 mm) than for metal-backed cups (0.551 mm) and dual-mobility cups (0.634 mm). Conclusions The present study indicates that isolated measurements of femoral head penetration include 0.15–0.46 mm of radial clearance and 0.05–0.27 mm of creep, and confirms that the majority of so-called bedding-in observed in the first post-operative months is not entirely due to wear. PMID:27162781

  7. The effect of acetabular cup size on the short-term stability of revision hip arthroplasty: a finite element investigation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, A T M; Pankaj; Usmani, A S; Howie, C R

    2004-01-01

    The study uses idealized two-dimensional finite element models to examine the behaviour of the acetabular construct following revision hip arthroplasty, carried out using the Slooff-Ling impaction grafting technique. The behaviour of bone graft was considered in detail, with non-linear elasticity and non-associated plasticity being adopted. Load was applied to the acetabular construct through a femoral head using smooth sliding surfaces. In particular, four models were subjected to two idealized cyclic load cases to investigate the effect of acetabular cup size on the short-term stability of the acetabular construct. The study suggests that benefits may be gained by using the largest practical size of acetabular cup. PMID:15376726

  8. The effect of acetabular cup size on the short-term stability of revision hip arthroplasty: a finite element investigation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, A T M; Pankaj; Usmani, A S; Howie, C R

    2004-01-01

    The study uses idealized two-dimensional finite element models to examine the behaviour of the acetabular construct following revision hip arthroplasty, carried out using the Slooff-Ling impaction grafting technique. The behaviour of bone graft was considered in detail, with non-linear elasticity and non-associated plasticity being adopted. Load was applied to the acetabular construct through a femoral head using smooth sliding surfaces. In particular, four models were subjected to two idealized cyclic load cases to investigate the effect of acetabular cup size on the short-term stability of the acetabular construct. The study suggests that benefits may be gained by using the largest practical size of acetabular cup.

  9. Central acetabular fracture with dislocation treated by minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    Central acetabular fractures with dislocation are usually the result of high-energy trauma, resulting in joint incongruity, and are frequently associated with other injuries. Open reduction and internal fixation has been the standard treatment for acetabular fractures, but it is associated with extensive surgical trauma, and complications such as haematoma formation, iatrogenic nerve injury, and heterotopic ossification. We present the case of a 63-year-old female who sustained a central acetabular fracture of the hip with dislocation as a result of an automobile collision. Closed reduction of the dislocation was performed, and the fracture was managed by minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis using a specially prepared plate. At 01 year postoperatively, radiographs showed the fracture to have been well-healed with good congruity of the joint. However, heterotopic ossification of the joint was noted. The technique allowed reduction of the fracture with minimal surgical trauma.

  10. Biomechanical Analysis of the Fixation System for T-Shaped Acetabular Fracture.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanping; Lei, Jianyin; Zhu, Feng; Li, Zhiqiang; Chen, Weiyi; Liu, Ximing

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the biomechanical mechanism of fixation systems in the most frequent T-shaped acetabular fracture using finite element method. The treatment of acetabular fractures was based on extensive clinical experience. Three commonly accepted rigid fixation methods (double column reconstruction plates (P × 2), anterior column plate combined with posterior column screws (P + PS), and anterior column plate combined with quadrilateral area screws (P + QS)) were chosen for evaluation. On the basis of the finite element model, the biomechanics of these fixation systems were assessed through effective stiffness levels, stress distributions, force transfers, and displacements along the fracture lines. All three fixation systems can be used to obtain effective functional outcomes. The third fixation system (P + QS) was the optimal method for T-shaped acetabular fracture. This fixation system may reduce many of the risks and limitations associated with other fixation systems.

  11. Central acetabular fracture with dislocation treated by minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    Central acetabular fractures with dislocation are usually the result of high-energy trauma, resulting in joint incongruity, and are frequently associated with other injuries. Open reduction and internal fixation has been the standard treatment for acetabular fractures, but it is associated with extensive surgical trauma, and complications such as haematoma formation, iatrogenic nerve injury, and heterotopic ossification. We present the case of a 63-year-old female who sustained a central acetabular fracture of the hip with dislocation as a result of an automobile collision. Closed reduction of the dislocation was performed, and the fracture was managed by minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis using a specially prepared plate. At 01 year postoperatively, radiographs showed the fracture to have been well-healed with good congruity of the joint. However, heterotopic ossification of the joint was noted. The technique allowed reduction of the fracture with minimal surgical trauma. PMID:26060171

  12. [Progressive intra-acetabular dislocation of bipolar hip prostheses: four cases].

    PubMed

    Tabutin, J; Damotte, A

    2004-02-01

    Certain complications, such as acetabular erosion or cup dissociation, are specific to bipolar prostheses. Progressive intra-acetabular dislocation has not been reported to date. We report 4 cases. Four elderly women developed progressive intra-acetabular dislocation after implantation of a bipolar prosthesis for femoral neck fractures. The metal-backed cup verticalized progressively and the ball gradually dislocated into the acetabulum, eroding it. Revision was undertaken with a hemispheric bone ingrowth cup and partial grafting. Follow-up was then uneventful. This phenomenon is different from the acute intra-acetabular dislocation that may occur after rupture of the anti-dissociation mechanism (polyethylene ring) incorporated in the design of new implant models, or after dissociation between the ball and the cup during closed reduction of a dislocation, the cup catching on the acetabular rim. It is not due to a variation in the neck-head angles (we observed varus, valgus, and neutral angles) nor to a problem between the modular head and the neck (at the morse cone taper). For us, the cause of this progressive intra-acetabular dislocation is poor cup design associated with a weak retention system. If the centers of the inner and outer spheres are superimposed, the cup has a natural tendency to drop into varus because of its weight. This becomes even worse if the center of the outer sphere is medial to the ball center. The cup should be designed so that the center of the outer sphere (bipolar cup) lies lateral to the center of the inner sphere (ball) creating a valgus torque for the cup. Designing a bipolar cup is not as a simple matter as it may seem. We emphasize the importance of the position of the rotation centers.

  13. Impaction grafted bone chip size effect on initial stability in an acetabular model: Mechanical evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Holton, Colin; Bobak, Peter; Wilcox, Ruth; Jin, Zhongmin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Acetabular bone defect reconstruction is an increasing problem for surgeons with patients undergoing complex primary or revision total hip replacement surgery. Impaction bone grafting is one technique that has favourable long-term clinical outcome results for patients who undergo this reconstruction method for acetabular bone defects. Creating initial mechanical stability of the impaction bone graft in this technique is known to be the key factor in achieving a favourable implant survival rate. Different sizes of bone chips were used in this technique to investigate if the size of bone chips used affected initial mechanical stability of a reconstructed acetabulum. Methodology Twenty acetabular models were created in total. Five control models were created with a cemented cup in a normal acetabulum. Then five models in three different groups of bone chip size were constructed. The three groups had an acetabular protrusion defect reconstructed using either; 2–4 mm3, 10 mm3 or 20 mm3 bone chip size for impaction grafting reconstruction. The models underwent compression loading up to 9500 N and displacement within the acetabular model was measured indicating the initial mechanical stability. Results This study reveals that, although not statistically significant, the largest (20 mm3) bone chip size grafted models have an inferior maximum stiffness compared to the medium (10 mm3) bone chip size. Interpretations Our study suggests that 10 mm3 size of bone chips provide better initial mechanical stability compared to smaller or larger bone chips. We dismissed the previously held opinion that the biggest practically possible graft is best for acetabular bone graft impaction. PMID:24396238

  14. Methods and Guidelines for Venous Thromboembolism Prevention in Polytrauma Patients with Pelvic and Acetabular Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chana-Rodríguez, Francisco; Mañanes, Rubén Pérez; Rojo-Manaute, José; Haro, José Antonio Calvo; Vaquero-Martín, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Sequential compression devices and chemical prophylaxis are the standard venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention for trauma patients with acetabular and pelvic fractures. Current chemical pharmacological contemplates the use of heparins or fondaparinux. Other anticoagulants include coumarins and aspirin, however these oral agents can be challenging to administer and may need monitoring. When contraindications to anticoagulation in high-risk patients are present, prophylactic inferior vena cava filters can be an option to prevent pulmonary emboli. Unfortunately strong evidence about the most effective method, and the timing of their commencement, in patients with pelvic and acetabular fractures remains controversial. PMID:26312115

  15. Acetabular labral tears: focused review of anatomy, diagnosis, and current management.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ronald; Diaz, Claudio; Parvizi, Javad

    2012-05-01

    Acetabular labral tears have become an increasingly common diagnosis with the advancement of imaging techniques and hip arthroscopy. Therefore, understanding the anatomic significance, healing potential, and associated pathologies of labral tears is helpful. Furthermore, recognizing the clinical picture and understanding appropriate imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance arthrography, are essential to making a correct diagnosis. This article reviews the relevant anatomy, diagnosis, and management of acetabular labral tears for physicians of all specialties who may be involved in the care of patients with labral tears. Short-term results of labral repair have been promising, but further studies are needed to clarify appropriate indications and long-term results of treatment. PMID:22759609

  16. Heterotopic ossification prophylaxis following operative treatment of acetabular fracture.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E E; Kay, R M; Dorey, F J

    1994-08-01

    Eighty seven patients with 88 fractures were retrospectively reviewed to assess the effect of postoperative prophylaxis on the formation of heterotopic ossification (HO). Sixty eight patients with 69 acetabular fractures were followed for an average of 21 months (range, 3-98 months). The grade of HO was assessed using the Brooker classification system. Thirty four fractures had no prophylactic treatment, 30 were treated prophylactically with indomethacin, two with radiation therapy, and three with both indomethacin and radiation. Twenty (59%) of 34 untreated fractures developed HO, of which nine (26%) were Grade III or IV. Thirteen (43%) of 30 fractures treated with indomethacin developed HO, of which 5 (16%) were Grade III and none were Grade IV. Twenty one of 24 fractures were stabilized through the extended iliofemoral approach; 13 of these had no prophylaxis. Eleven of the 13 developed HO; eight were Grade III or IV (62%). Seven of eight fractures treated with indomethacin following the extended iliofemoral approach developed HO; one was Grade III (13%) and non Grade IV. There was no significant difference between 13 patients who were not treated prophylactically and 18 indomethacin treated patients stabilized through the Kocher-Langenbeck approach. Only one of 11 patients had HO (Grade I) following an ilioinguinal approach. Postoperative radiation therapy, with or without indomethacin, resulted in three patients with Grade 0 HO (all radiated 1-4 days post surgery), one with Grade II (radiated postoperative Day 8), and one with Grade III HO (significant delay in surgery with preoperative Grade III HO of the hip).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Biomechanical Study of Acetabular Tridimensional Memoryalloy Fixation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin-Wei; Xu, Shuo-Gui; Zhang, Yun-Tong; Zhang, Chun-Cai

    2011-07-01

    We developed the acetabular tridimensional memoryalloy fixation system (ATMFS), which is made of NiTi shape memory alloy, according to the specific mechanical properties of biological memory material, NiTi shape memory alloy and measured distribution of contact area and pressure between the acetabulum and the femoral head of cadaveric pelvis. Seven formalin-preserved cadaveric pelves were used for this investigation. Pressure-sensitive film was used to measure contact area and pressure within the anterior, superior, and posterior regions of the acetabulum. The pelves were loaded under the following four conditions: (1) intact; (2) following a creation posterior wall fracture defect; (3) following reduction and standard internal fixation with reconstruction plate; and (4) following reduction and internal fixation with a new shape memory alloy device named ATMFS. A posterior wall fracture was created along an arc of 40° to 90° about the acetabulur rim. Creation of a posterior wall defect resulted in increased load in the superior acetabulum (1485 N) as compared to the intact condition (748 N, P = 0.009). Following reduction and internal fixation, the load distributed to the superior acetabulum (1545 N) was not statistically different from the defect condition. Following the fixation with ATMFS, the load seen at the superior region of the actabulum (964 N) was familiar with fixation with reconstruction plate and was not different from intact state ( P = 0.45). These data indicate that the use of ATMFS as a fracture internal fixation device resulted a partial restoration of joint loading parameters toward the intact state. ATMFS fixation may result in a clinical benefit.

  18. Protrusio of a ceramic femoral head through the acetabular metallic shell, extensive metallosis and 'bubble sign'.

    PubMed

    Malizos, Konstantinos; Roidis, Nikolaos T; Poultsides, Lazaros; Basdekis, George; Moraitis, Theofanis; Xenakis, Theodoros

    2009-02-01

    A 24-year-old patient with a history of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis underwent a primary cementless left total hip arthroplasty (THA). The original THA consisted of an Optifix 54 cup with a 3-mm thick polyethylene liner, an Optifix size 4 stem (Smith & Nephew Richards, Memphis, Tennessee) and a Biolox aluminum 32-mm femoral head. Fourteen years later, radiographs demonstrated extensive wear of the polyethylene liner resulting in direct articulation and abrasion wear of the ceramic femoral head on the cup and a bubble sign. This article presents a case of a catastrophic failure of a ceramic/polyethylene bearing with destruction of the polyethylene liner and the metallic shell and protrusio of the nonfractured ceramic head through the metallic shell. To our knowledge this is the first description of extensive metallosis and subsequent radiograph bubble sign not presenting as a result of wear of a metal-on-metal articulation. At the time of revision surgery-Hydrocel TNT Monoblock 58 cup (Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana), Wagner 265/14 stem (Zimmer), and a Co/Cr 28-mm head-copious metallic debris was seen both macroscopically and histologically, with the ceramic head protruding behind the metallic shell. Multiple factors may have been responsible for this failure including a thin polyethylene shell, a suboptimal locking mechanism, gamma in air sterilization for polyethylene, multiple screw-holes that reduce the contact surface between shell and polyethylene, the rough surface on the inside of the shell and non-articular wear at the metal polyethylene interface within the acetabular component and the high demands of this active young patient. PMID:19301791

  19. Resin-bonded cast splints for loosened abutment teeth to anchor a removable partial denture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Tsue, Fumitake; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2009-03-01

    This case report describes a technique to stabilize loosened abutment teeth by seating resin-bonded cast splints with rest seats and surveyed guide planes to anchor a removable partial denture. This technique can achieve sufficient stability of the abutment teeth and proper support and bracing of the removable partial denture with minimal intervention.

  20. Long-term effects of deep soil loosening on root distribution and soil physical parameters in compacted lignite mine soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badorreck, Annika; Krümmelbein, Julia; Raab, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Soil compaction is a major problem of soils on dumped mining substrates in Lusatia, Germany. Deep ripping and cultivation of deep rooting plant species are considered to be effective ways of agricultural recultivation. Six years after experiment start, we studied the effect of initial deep soil loosening (i.e. down to 65 cm) on root systems of rye (Secale cereale) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and on soil physical parameters. We conducted a soil monolith sampling for each treatment (deep loosened and unloosened) and for each plant species (in three replicates, respectively) to determine root diameter, length density and dry mass as well as soil bulk density. Further soil physical analysis comprised water retention, hydraulic conductivity and texture in three depths. The results showed different reactions of the root systems of rye and alfalfa six years after deep ripping. In the loosened soil the root biomass of the rye was lower in depths of 20-40 cm and the root biomass of alfalfa was also decreased in depths of 20-50 cm together with a lower root diameter for both plant species. Moreover, total and fine root length density was higher for alfalfa and vice versa for rye. The soil physical parameters such as bulk density showed fewer differences, despite a higher bulk density in 30-40cm for the deep loosened rye plot which indicates a more pronounced plough pan.

  1. Relationship Between Developmental Dislocation of the Hip in Infant and Acetabular Dysplasia at Skeletal Maturity

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Kunihiko; Yamaguchi, Kazumasa; Ninomiya, Yoshikazu; Matsubayashi, Shohei; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Osaki, Makoto; Enomoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Katsuro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous reports demonstrated 8–60% patients treated for developmental dislocation of hip (DDH) in infancy have residual acetabular dysplasia (AD) at skeletal maturity. AD patients reportedly exhibit abnormal morphology of the pelvis, high rates of comorbid spinal congenital anomalies and high bone mineral density. These physical findings suggest that AD patients have genetic background. We examined the percentage of AD patients with hip pain at skeletal maturity having a history of DDH in infancy and the correlation between the severity of AD at skeletal maturity and history of DDH treatment to investigate the relationship between AD and DDH. A total of 245 patients were radiographically examined for any history of DDH treatment in infancy. The study included 226 women and 19 men with a mean age at examination of 40.7 years (range 17–59 years). Eighty-eight patients (36%) had a history of DDH treatment (DDH group) and the remaining 157 patients (64%) had no history of DDH treatment (non-DDH group). The average age was lower and acetabular angle was larger in the DDH group. There was a significant increasing trend of the percentage of DDH patients associated with the severity of AD classified with CE, acetabular angle, and acetabular roof angle. Our data suggest that there are several AD patients without a history of DDH in Japan, and AD in patients without a history of DDH has different characteristics from AD in patients with a history of DDH. PMID:25569642

  2. Relationship between developmental dislocation of the hip in infant and acetabular dysplasia at skeletal maturity.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kunihiko; Yamaguchi, Kazumasa; Ninomiya, Yoshikazu; Matsubayashi, Shohei; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Osaki, Makoto; Enomoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Katsuro

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports demonstrated 8-60% patients treated for developmental dislocation of hip (DDH) in infancy have residual acetabular dysplasia (AD) at skeletal maturity. AD patients reportedly exhibit abnormal morphology of the pelvis, high rates of comorbid spinal congenital anomalies and high bone mineral density. These physical findings suggest that AD patients have genetic background. We examined the percentage of AD patients with hip pain at skeletal maturity having a history of DDH in infancy and the correlation between the severity of AD at skeletal maturity and history of DDH treatment to investigate the relationship between AD and DDH.A total of 245 patients were radiographically examined for any history of DDH treatment in infancy. The study included 226 women and 19 men with a mean age at examination of 40.7 years (range 17-59 years).Eighty-eight patients (36%) had a history of DDH treatment (DDH group) and the remaining 157 patients (64%) had no history of DDH treatment (non-DDH group). The average age was lower and acetabular angle was larger in the DDH group. There was a significant increasing trend of the percentage of DDH patients associated with the severity of AD classified with CE, acetabular angle, and acetabular roof angle.Our data suggest that there are several AD patients without a history of DDH in Japan, and AD in patients without a history of DDH has different characteristics from AD in patients with a history of DDH. PMID:25569642

  3. A novel classification to guide total hip arthroplasty for adult acetabular dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, CHEN; CHENG, MENG-QI; CHENG, TAO; MA, RUI-XIANG; KONG, RONG; GUO, YONG-YUAN; QIN, HUI; SHI, SI FENG; ZHANG, XIAN-LONG

    2013-01-01

    In the field of hip arthroplasties, the secondary fixation of the implants depends directly on the quality of the primary stability. A good acetabular fit and metaphyseal filling between the prostheses and implants improve the initial stabilization, and optimize the transmission of forces to the bone. A precise knowledge of the three-dimensional acetabular or femoral shape is essential to the selection of adapted implants. A total of 63 patients diagnosed with developmental dysplasia were analyzed by three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT), and the preoperative radiographic and 3DCT images were used to assess the acetabular/femoral deformities and variations of the hips. All joints were classified as Crowe type I, and bilateral measurements were taken for 10 patients. The acetabular abnormalities were classified according to the type of deficiency and the section angles of the acetabulum, with 26 hips (36%) classified as an anterior deficiency, 13 hips (18%) as a posterior deficiency and 34 hips (46%) as a lateral deficiency. The femoral side deformities were divided into three types according to the anteversion angle of the femur. A gradual increase in anteversion angle led to secondary rotational anomalies, and a narrowing of the canal at the isthmus. A total of 35 hips (48%) were classified as an F1 type deficiency, femur anteversion angle (FAVA) <30°; 32 hips (44%) as F2-type, 30°≤ FAVA ≤40°, with mild abnormalities of the femoral canal rotation and the diameter of the isthmus; and 6 hips (8%) as F3 type, FAVA >40°, with significant abnormalities of the femoral canal rotation and the diameter of the isthmus. This novel classification for adult acetabular dysplasia may provide a useful guide for surgery, and enable an improved selection of a suitable prosthesis. PMID:23935749

  4. Tantalum acetabular augments in one-stage exchange of infected total hip arthroplasty: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Klatte, Till Orla; Kendoff, Daniel; Sabihi, Reza; Kamath, Atul F; Rueger, Johannes M; Gehrke, Thorsten

    2014-07-01

    During the one-stage exchange procedure for periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA), acetabular defects challenge reconstructive options. Porous tantalum augments are an established tool for addressing acetabular destruction in aseptic cases, but their utility in septic exchange is unknown. This retrospective case-control study presents the initial results of tantalum augmentation during one-stage exchange for PJI. Primary endpoints were rates of re-infection and short-term complications associated with this technique. Study patients had no higher risk of re-infection with equivalent durability at early follow-up with a re-infection rate in both groups of 4%. In conclusion, tantalum augments are a viable option for addressing acetabular defects in one-stage exchange for septic THA. Further study is necessary to assess long-term durability when compared to traditional techniques for acetabular reconstruction.

  5. [Aseptic, simultaneous and bilateral mobilisation due to an acetabular shell fracture in a 43 year-old patient].

    PubMed

    Ceretti, M; Fanelli, M; Pappalardo, S

    2014-01-01

    The acetabular shell mobilization is the main long-term complication in total hip replacement. Metal-back fracture has also to be considered among the possible causes of shell mobilization. A case is presented of bilateral acetabular shell mobilization due to the trabecular covering de-soldering from the metal-back in a 43 year-old patient, 13-14 years after the first surgery. PMID:24360788

  6. [Aseptic, simultaneous and bilateral mobilisation due to an acetabular shell fracture in a 43 year-old patient].

    PubMed

    Ceretti, M; Fanelli, M; Pappalardo, S

    2014-01-01

    The acetabular shell mobilization is the main long-term complication in total hip replacement. Metal-back fracture has also to be considered among the possible causes of shell mobilization. A case is presented of bilateral acetabular shell mobilization due to the trabecular covering de-soldering from the metal-back in a 43 year-old patient, 13-14 years after the first surgery.

  7. Comparison of the roles of IL-1, IL-6, and TNFalpha in cell culture and murine models of aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Taki, Naoya; Tatro, Joscelyn M; Lowe, Robert; Goldberg, Victor M; Greenfield, Edward M

    2007-05-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNF, are considered to be major mediators of osteolysis and ultimately aseptic loosening. This study demonstrated that synergistic interactions among these cytokines are required for the in vitro stimulation of osteoclast differentiation by titanium particles. In contrast, genetic knock out of these cytokines or their receptors does not protect murine calvaria from osteolysis induced by titanium particles. Thus, the extent of osteolysis was not substantially altered in single knock out mice lacking either the IL-1 receptor or IL-6. Osteolysis also was not substantially altered in double knock out mice lacking both the IL-1 receptor and IL-6 or in double knock out mice lacking both TNF receptor-1 and TNF receptor-2. The differences between the in vivo and the cell culture results make it difficult to conclude whether the pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to aseptic loosening. One alternative is that in vivo experiments are more physiological and that therefore the current results do not support a role for the pro-inflammatory cytokines in aseptic loosening. We however favor the alternative that, in this case, the cell culture experiments can be more informative. We favor this alternative because the role of the pro-inflammatory cytokines may be obscured in vivo by compensation by other cytokines or by the low signal to noise ratio found in measurements of particle-induced osteolysis.

  8. Intraoperative Fluoroscopy Improves Component Position During Anterior Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jennings, John D; Iorio, Justin; Kleiner, Matthew T; Gaughan, John P; Star, Andrew M

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this retrospective review was to determine whether fluoroscopic guidance improves acetabular cup abduction and anteversion alignment during anterior total hip arthroplasty. The authors retrospectively reviewed 199 patients (fluoroscopy group, 98; nonfluoroscopy group, 101) who underwent anterior total hip arthroplasty at a single center with and without C-arm fluoroscopy guidance. Included in the study were patients of any age who underwent primary anterior approach total hip arthroplasty performed by a single surgeon, with 6-month postoperative anteroposterior pelvis radiographs. Acetabular cup abduction and anteversion angles were measured and compared between groups. Mean acetabular cup abduction and anteversion angles were 43.4° (range, 26.0°-57.4°) and 23.1° (range, 17°-28°), respectively, in the fluoroscopy group. Mean abduction and anteversion angles were 45.9° (range, 29.7°-61.3°) and 23.1° (range, 17°-28°), respectively, after anterior total hip arthroplasty without the use of C-arm guidance (nonfluoroscopy group). The use of fluoroscopy was associated with a statistically significant difference in cup abduction (P=.002) but no statistically significant difference in anteversion angles. In the fluoroscopy group, 80% of implants were within the combined safe zone compared with 63% in the nonfluoroscopy group. A significantly higher percentage of both acetabular cup abduction angles and combined anteversion and abduction angles were in the safe zone in the fluoroscopy group. Fluoroscopy is not required for proper anteversion placement of acetabular components, but it may increase ideal safe zone placement of components.

  9. Augmentation of the transverse acetabular ligament in canine caudoventral hip luxation.

    PubMed

    Venzin, C; Montavon, P M

    2007-01-01

    Open surgical fixation was performed on four hip joints in three dogs who were suffering from caudoventral hip luxations for which closed reduction had previously failed. Stabilization of the joint was achieved with a ventral coxofemoral approach, which augmented the function of the transverse acetabular ligament using a sling implant through a bone tunnel (n = 1), a sling implant around two pelvic screws (n = 1), or an internal fixator plate (n = 2). Transverse acetabular ligament augmentation resulted in successful joint stabilization in all cases, and should be considered for the surgical reduction of caudoventral hip luxations in dogs. The use of an internal fixator plate, while preserving soft-tissue blood supply and resulting in minimal to no long-term arthritic changes, may provide an optimal outcome. PMID:18038012

  10. Advanced material modelling in numerical simulation of primary acetabular press-fit cup stability.

    PubMed

    Souffrant, R; Zietz, C; Fritsche, A; Kluess, D; Mittelmeier, W; Bader, R

    2012-01-01

    Primary stability of artificial acetabular cups, used for total hip arthroplasty, is required for the subsequent osteointegration and good long-term clinical results of the implant. Although closed-cell polymer foams represent an adequate bone substitute in experimental studies investigating primary stability, correct numerical modelling of this material depends on the parameter selection. Material parameters necessary for crushable foam plasticity behaviour were originated from numerical simulations matched with experimental tests of the polymethacrylimide raw material. Experimental primary stability tests of acetabular press-fit cups consisting of static shell assembly with consecutively pull-out and lever-out testing were subsequently simulated using finite element analysis. Identified and optimised parameters allowed the accurate numerical reproduction of the raw material tests. Correlation between experimental tests and the numerical simulation of primary implant stability depended on the value of interference fit. However, the validated material model provides the opportunity for subsequent parametric numerical studies.

  11. Corrosion on the acetabular liner taper from retrieved modular metal-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Gascoyne, Trevor C; Dyrkacz, Richard M; Turgeon, Thomas R; Burnell, Colin D; Wyss, Urs P; Brandt, Jan-M

    2014-10-01

    Eight retrieved metal-on-metal total hip replacements displayed corrosion damage along the cobalt-chromium alloy liner taper junction with the Ti alloy acetabular shell. Scanning electron microscopy indicated the primary mechanism of corrosion to be grain boundary and associated crevice corrosion, which was likely accelerated through mechanical micromotion and galvanic corrosion resulting from dissimilar alloys. Coordinate measurements revealed up to 4.3mm(3) of the cobalt-chromium alloy taper surface was removed due to corrosion, which is comparable to previous reports of corrosion damage on head-neck tapers. The acetabular liner-shell taper appears to be an additional source of metal corrosion products in modular total hip replacements. Patients with these prostheses should be closely monitored for signs of adverse reaction towards corrosion by-products.

  12. Pelvic, acetabular and hip fractures: What the surgeon should expect from the radiologist.

    PubMed

    Molière, S; Dosch, J-C; Bierry, G

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic ring fractures when caused by trauma, either violent or in demineralized bone, generally consist of injuries in both the anterior (pubic symphysis and rami) and posterior (iliac wing, sacrum, sacroiliac joint) portions. Injury classifications are based on injury mechanism and pelvic stability, and are used to determine treatment. Acetabular fractures, associated or not to pelvic ring disruption, are classified on the basis of fracture line, into elementary fractures of the acetabular walls, columns and roof, and into complex fractures. Fractures of the proximal end of the femur occur often on demineralized bone following low-energy trauma. The fractures are categorized by anatomic location (neck, trochanter and subtrochanteric region) and degree of displacement. These variables determine the risk of osteonecrosis of the femoral head, which is the main complication of such fractures.

  13. Retrograde Transpubic Approach for Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation and Cementoplasty of Acetabular Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bauones, Salem; Freire, Veronique; Moser, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of painful and disabling anterior acetabular bone metastasis treated with bipolar radiofrequency ablation and cementoplasty. Due to the high risk of complications related to the proximity of the femoral neurovascular structures with a direct approach, we successfully performed a retrograde transpubic approach under combined CT and fluoroscopic guidance. In the present report, we describe this approach detailing its indications, advantages, and the technical tips to achieve a safe and satisfactory procedure. PMID:26491595

  14. Osteonecrosis and femoro-acetabular impingement: sequelae of developmental dysplasia of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Chow, Wang; To, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl with developmental dysplasia of the right hip underwent open reduction and capsulorrhaphy via the anterior approach with hip spica casting in an internally rotated position. During her 26 years of follow-up, she was found to have osteonecrosis and subsequently cam-type femoro-acetabular impingement at 28 years of age. She was treated with surgical dislocation of the hip and osteochondroplasty to recreate the normal contour of the head and neck offset. PMID:22605717

  15. Discrepancies in measuring acetabular coverage: revisiting the anterior and lateral center edge angles

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Joey A.; Kapron, Ashley L.; Swenson, Kathryn M.; Maak, Travis G.; Peters, Christopher L.; Aoki, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    The lateral center edge angle (LCEA) and the anterior center edge angle (ACEA) are commonly used to assess acetabular coverage of the femoral head. There are two distinct methods found in the literature to obtain these angles, specifically, measuring to the most lateral bone edge versus the sclerotic lateral sourcil edge. A difference between these two methods may contribute to inconsistent estimates of acetabular coverage, and potentially lead to clinical misdiagnosis and treatment mismanagement. The objectives of this study were to quantify the difference between bone edge and sourcil edge measurements and to determine how the difference influences the classification of acetabular coverage in adult patients with suspected hip pathomorphology. Two observers completed the measurements independently using preoperative anteroposterior and false profile radiographs. Bland–Altman plots and paired t-tests were used to compare measurement methods. Bone and sourcil measurements of the LCEA and ACEA were significantly different (both P < 0.001). On average, the bone LCEA was 4° (95% limits of agreement = −2° to 10°) greater than the sourcil LCEA. The bone ACEA was, on average, 10° (95% limit of agreement = −2° to 22°) greater than the sourcil ACEA. The differences often led to different clinical classifications for the same hip. With a statistically and clinically significant difference in the quantification of acetabular coverage using bone edge versus sourcil edge methods for measuring the LCEA and ACEA in adult patients, it should be mandatory to clearly identify which method was used in each study. PMID:27011850

  16. Modified Kocher-Langenbeck approach in combined surgical exposures for acetabular fractures management

    PubMed Central

    Magu, Narender Kumar; Rohilla, Rajesh; Singh, Amanpreet; Wadhwani, Jitendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Displaced fractures of the acetabulum are best treated with anatomical reduction and rigid internal fixation. Adequate visualization of some acetabular fracture types may necessitate extensile or combined anterior and posterior approaches. Simultaneous anterior iliofemoral and posterior Kocher-Langenbeck (K-L) exposures with two surgical teams have also been described. To assess whether modified Kocher-Langenbeck (K-L) approach can substitute standard K-L approach in the management of elementary acetabular fractures other than the anterior wall and anterior column fractures and complement anterior surgical approaches in the management of complex acetabular fractures. Materials and Methods: 20 patients with transverse and associated acetabular fractures requiring posterior exposure were included in this prospective study. In 9 cases (7 transverse, 1 transverse with posterior wall, and 1 posterior column with posterior wall), stabilization was done through modified K-L approach. In 11 cases (3 transverse and 8 associated fractures), initial stabilization through iliofemoral approach was followed by modified K-L approach. Results: The average operative time was 183 min for combined approach and 84 min for modified K-L approach. The postoperative reduction was anatomical in 17 patients and imperfect in 3 patients. The radiological outcome was excellent in 15, good in 4, and poor in one patient. The clinical outcome was excellent in 15, good in 3 and fair and poor in 1 each according to modified Merle d’Aubigne and Postel scoring system. Conclusion: We believe that modified K-L approach may be a good alternative for the standard K-L approach in the management of elementary fractures and associated fractures of the acetabulum when combined with an anterior surgical approach. It makes the procedure less invasive, shortens the operative time, minimizes blood loss and overcomes the exhaustion and fatigue of the surgical team. PMID:27053812

  17. Postural correction reduces hip pain in adult with acetabular dysplasia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cara L.; Khuu, Anne; Marinko, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip is often diagnosed in infancy, but less severe cases of acetabular dysplasia are being detected in young active adults. The purpose of this case report is to present a non-surgical intervention for a 31-year-old female with mild acetabular dysplasia and an anterior acetabular labral tear. The patient presented with right anterior hip and groin pain, and she stood with the trunk swayed posterior to the pelvis (swayback posture). The hip pain was reproduced with the anterior impingement test. During gait, the patient maintained the swayback posture and reported 6/10 hip pain. Following correction of the patient’s posture, the patient’s pain rating was reduced to a 2/10 while walking. The patient was instructed to maintain the improved posture. At the 1 year follow-up, she demonstrated significantly improved posture in standing and walking. She had returned to recreational running and was generally pain-free. The patient demonstrated improvement on self-reported questionnaires for pain, function and activity. These findings suggest that alteration of posture can have an immediate and lasting effect on hip pain in persons with structural abnormality and labral pathology. PMID:25731688

  18. The Retroacetabular Angle Determines the Safe Angle for Screw Placement in Posterior Acetabular Fracture Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, Ayman M. A.; Oxland, Thomas R.; O'Brien, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. A method for the determination of safe angles for screws placed in the posterior acetabular wall based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) is described. It defines a retroacetabular angle and determines its variation in the population. Methods. The retroacetabular angle is the angle between the retroacetabular surface and the tangent to the posterior acetabular articular surface. Screws placed through the marginal posterior wall at an angle equal to the retroacetabular angle are extraarticular. Medial screws can be placed at larger angles whose difference from the retroacetabular angle is defined as the allowance angles. CT scans of all patients with acetabular fractures treated in our institute between September 2002 to July 2007 were used to measure the retroacetabular angle and tangent. Results. Two hundred thirty one patients were included. The average (range) age was 42 (15–74) years. The average (range) retroacetabular angle was 39 (30–47) degrees. The average (range) retroacetabular tangent was 36 (30–45) mm. Conclusions. Placing the screws at an average (range) angle of 39 (33–47) degrees of anterior inclination with the retroacetabular surface makes them extraarticular. Angles for medial screws are larger. Safe angles can be calculated preoperatively with a computer program. PMID:24959359

  19. ANALYSIS OF THE SEGMENTAL IMPACTION OF FEMORAL HEAD FOLLOWING AN ACETABULAR FRACTURE SURGICALLY MANAGED

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Rodrigo Pereira; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Carina; Daniachi, Daniel; Keiske Ono, Nelson; Honda, Emerson Kiyoshi; Polesello, Giancarlo Cavalli; Riccioli, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Correlate the postoperative radiographic evaluation with variables accompanying acetabular fractures in order to determine the predictive factors for segmental impaction of femoral head. Methods: Retrospective analysis of medial files of patients submitted to open reduction surgery with internal acetabular fixation. Within approximately 35 years, 596 patients were treated for acetabular fractures; 267 were followed up for at least two years. The others were excluded either because their follow up was shorter than the minimum time, or as a result of the lack of sufficient data reported on files, or because they had been submitted to non-surgical treatment. The patients were followed up by one of three surgeons of the group using the Merle d'Aubigné and Postel clinical scales as well as radiological studies. Results: Only tow studied variables-age and amount of postoperative reductionshowed statistically significant correlation with femoral head impaction. Conclusions: The quality of reduction-anatomical or with up to 2mm residual deviation-presents a good radiographic evolution, reducing the potential for segmental impaction of the femoral head, a statistically significant finding. PMID:27004191

  20. Articular cartilage friction increases in hip joints after the removal of acetabular labrum.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongnam; Ito, Hiroshi; Kourtis, Lampros; Safran, Marc R; Carter, Dennis R; Giori, Nicholas J

    2012-02-01

    The acetabular labrum is believed to have a sealing function. However, a torn labrum may not effectively prevent joint fluid from escaping a compressed joint, resulting in impaired lubrication. We aimed to understand the role of the acetabular labrum in maintaining a low friction environment in the hip joint. We did this by measuring the resistance to rotation (RTR) of the hip, which reflects the friction of the articular cartilage surface, following focal and complete labrectomy. Five cadaveric hips without evidence of osteoarthritis and impingement were tested. We measured resistance to rotation of the hip joint during 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 times body weight (BW) cyclic loading in the intact hip, and after focal and complete labrectomy. Resistance to rotation, which reflects articular cartilage friction in an intact hip was significantly increased following focal labrectomy at 1-3 BW loading, and following complete labrectomy at all load levels. The acetabular labrum appears to maintain a low friction environment, possibly by sealing the joint from fluid exudation. Even focal labrectomy may result in increased joint friction, a condition that may be detrimental to articular cartilage and lead to osteoarthritis.

  1. The biological approach in acetabular revision surgery: impaction bone grafting and a cemented cup.

    PubMed

    Colo, Ena; Rijnen, Wim H C; Schreurs, Berend Willem

    2015-01-01

    Acetabular impaction bone grafting (IBG) in combination with a cemented cup in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a proven and well-recognised technique which has been used in clinical practice for more than 35 years. Nowadays, with cemented prostheses tending to lose a larger part of the THA market every year in primary and revision cases, and many young surgeons being only trained in implanting uncemented prostheses, this technique is considered by many as technically demanding and time consuming, making its use less appealing. Despite this image and many new innovative techniques using uncemented implants in acetabular revisions over the last 25 years, IBG with a cemented cup is still one of the few techniques that really can reconstitute bone and respects human biology. In this era of many biologically-based breakthroughs in medicine, it is hard to explain that the solution of most orthopaedic surgeons for the extensive bone defects as frequently seen during acetabular revision surgery, consists of implanting bigger and larger metal implants. This review aims to put the IBG method into a historical perspective, to describe the surgical technique and present the clinical results.

  2. Temporary Balloon Occlusion of the Abdominal Aorta in Treatment of Complex Acetabular Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Zhenhai; Zhou, Dongsheng; Wang, Fu; Li, Lianxin; He, Jiliang

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the efficacy of temporary balloon occlusion of the abdominal aorta assisting open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) in the treatment of complex acetabular fracture. Material/Methods From August 2000 to October 2011, a total of 48 patients with complex acetabular fracture were enrolled in this study. Average operative time, intraoperative blood loss volume, blood transfusion volume, satisfactory reduction, and postoperative functional recovery rate were recorded and compared between the 2 groups. Results A significant difference was observed between the 2 groups in operative time (P=0.003). For intraoperative blood loss and blood transfusion, ORIF combined with temporary balloon occlusion of abdominal aorta techniques appeared to be superior to normal ORIF (blood loss: P=0.007; and blood transfusion: P=0.019, respectively). However, no differences were observed in postoperative blood loss or transfusion (P>0.05). Patients in group A showed better hip function than those in group B (group A: a good-to-excellent rate of 77.8%; group B: a good-to-excellent rate of 78.3%; P>0.05). With regard to the incidence of postoperative complications, there were no significant differences between the 2 groups (group A: 9/18; group B: 11/23; P=0.890). Conclusions In the treatment of complex acetabular fracture, temporary balloon occlusion of the abdominal aorta is a reliable technique to assist ORIF surgery to staunch the flow of blood. PMID:27367975

  3. Evaluation and treatment of young adults with femoro-acetabular impingement secondary to Perthes' disease.

    PubMed

    Eijer, H; Podeszwa, D A; Ganz, R; Leunig, M

    2006-01-01

    Hip pain and loss of motion in young adults with previous Legg-Calve-Perthes-Disease may be caused by anterior femoro-acetabular impingement. Eleven patients (12 hips) with the chief complaint of groin pain and significant proximal femoral deformity were treated. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance arthrography in ten patients indicated labral injury and adjacent acetabular cartilage lesions in nine hips. A surgical dislocation of each hip confirmed that there was impingement induced intra-articular injury consistent with the pathology indicated on the MRI. Reshaping of the femoral head, with correction of the femoral head/neck offset, and treatment of the acetabular rim pathology was performed for each hip in conjunction with other procedures for the proximal femur. Correction of the impingement and increased range of motion could be visualized intra-operatively. At a mean follow-up of 33 months, half of all patients were pain-free and all had improvement in pain compared with preoperatively. Ten patients had an improved range of motion and two a slight decrease. No additional necrosis following the dislocation of the femoral head was seen.; PMID:19219805

  4. The Burch-Schneider antiprotrusio cage in revision hip arthroplasty with acetabular bone defect.

    PubMed

    Blacha, Jan; Gagała, Jacek

    2004-10-30

    Background. This article presents early outcome of revision hip arthroplasties with massive defects of acetabular bone stock using the Burch-Schneider (B-S) antiprotrusio cage. Materials and methods. We prospectively followed 28 hips in 27 patients (17 women and 10 men). The average age of the patients was 68 years (range 40-82). Follow-up ranged from 12 to 53 months (ave. 25 months). Combined bone loss (type III according to the AAOS classification) was the most common (75% of the patients). Bone grafts (morselized and solid) were used to reconstruct deficient acetabula in 25 hips. Results. The patients were satisfied with the surgical result. The mean Harris Hip Score increased 36 points one year after operation and reached 80 points (range 56-93). The antiprotrusio cages were stable in all hips, even in 4 cases of inferior flange malposition. We found no measurable implant migration or graft resorption in any patient. Postoperative dislocation occurred in 3 hips (11%), two of them developed recurrent dislocations. There were no deep infections. Conclusions. Acetabular reconstruction using the Burch-Schneider antiprotrusio cage can be successfully used in managing massive acetabular defects in revision hip arthroplasty. The cage provides the basis for bone repair and protects grafts from excessive stress. Postoperative dislocation is the most common complication.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of acetabular orientation in normal Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Li, YiQiang; Liu, YuanZhong; Zhou, QingHe; Chen, WeiDong; Li, JingChun; Yu, LingJia; Xu, HongWen; Xie, DengHui

    2016-09-01

    There are no data regarding the acetabular orientation on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); this study investigates the changes of acetabular orientation with age in normal Chinese children.We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of children who underwent hip MRI examination at our hospital from January 2009 to December 2015. A total of 180 patients with normal MRI reading of the hip joints were included and were divided into 14 groups according to age: from 6 months of age and then for each year from 1 to 16 years. The bony and cartilage acetabular anteversion angle (AAA), acetabular inclination angle (AIA), and acetabular index (AI) were measured. Total bony and cartilage femoral head coverage angles were measured on axial section total femoral head coverage angle (a-TCA) and coronal section total femoral head coverage angle (c-TCA).The mean bony AAA and AIA were 12.2 ± 2.5° and 50.9 ± 2.5°, respectively; both of them stayed constant from the age of 6 months to 16 years. Similar results were found in cartilage AAA (12.1 ± 2.5°) and AIA (41.2 ± 3.0°). There was no difference between bony and cartilage AAA, but bony AIA was significantly larger than cartilage AIA. Bony AI was 24.1 ± 2.4° at the age of 6 months, decreasing to 12.5 ± 2.3° by 12 to 13 years of age; cartilage AI (5.9 ± 1.7°) maintained a steady value with age. The mean bony a-TCA and c-TCA at 6 months were 117.0 ± 5.8° and 127.5 ± 5.1°, increasing to 144.5 ± 4.6° and 140.7 ± 2.5° at the age of 16 years. However, the cartilage a-TCA (145.2 ± 7.2°) and c-TCA (154.1 ± 5.7°) did not change significantly with age.Both bony and cartilage AAA and AIA remain constant up to the age of 16 years in normal Chinese pediatric population. Although the cartilage coverage of femoral head by the acetabulum remains unchanged with age, the bony coverage of femoral head increases. PMID:27631258

  6. Characterization of Human Anterosuperior Acetabular Depression in Correlation With Labral Tears

    PubMed Central

    Kopydlowski, Nathan J.; Tannenbaum, Eric P.; Smith, Matthew V.; Sekiya, Jon K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Labral tears often occur in the same quadrant of the acetabulum at a small depression previously referred to as the psoas valley. Understanding the anatomic variations of this depression could help us understand the etiology of labral tears. Purpose: To describe the location and dimensions of the depression located in the anterosuperior acetabular rim. The hypothesis was that the location of this depression would be consistent with the common location of acetabular labral tears described in the literature. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A total of 240 pelvic specimens were divided into 2 groups (n = 120 for each) according to age (younger age group: 21.36 ± 3.12 years [range, 14-24 years]; older age group: 42.30 ± 10.27 years, [range, 25-60 years]).Specimens were also categorized based on sex (mean age: 31.93 ± 12.31 years [male]; 32.08 ± 13.66 years [female]) and race (mean age: 31.45 ± 13.16 years [black]; 32.57 ± 12.82 years [white]). The depth and width of the acetabular depression were measured using a digital caliper, and the location was measured using a goniometer. Results: The psoas valley was observed in every specimen and was located in the anterosuperior quadrant of the acetabulum. Its depth was significantly greater (P < .001) in males (5.35 ± 1.60 mm) than in females (3.95 ± 1.31 mm). The width of the psoas valley was also greater (P < .001) in males (29.39 ± 3.98 mm) than in females (24.49 ± 4.80 mm). There were no differences in size or location of the depression between races or age groups. The psoas valley was located between 3.92 ± 0.42 o’clock anteriorly and 2.12 ± 0.77 o’clock posteriorly. Conclusion: The differences observed in the study data are believed to be a result of the different anatomic morphologies of the pelvis in males and females. This loss of bony support, caused by the depression, could be the underlying cause of weakening of the acetabular labrum as people age. Clinical Relevance

  7. Metallosis after Exchange of the Femoral Head and Liner following Ceramic Acetabular Liner Dissociation in Total Hip Arthroplasty with a Modular Layered Acetabular Component.

    PubMed

    Takasago, Tomoya; Goto, Tomohiro; Wada, Keizo; Hamada, Daisuke; Iwame, Toshiyuki; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The type of bearing material that should be used in revision surgery after the failure of ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains controversial. In the case of ceramic fracture, the residual ceramic particles can cause consequent metallosis when metal implants are used for revision THA. On the other hand, in the case of THA failure without ceramic fracture, revision THA with a metal femoral head provides satisfactory results. We report an unusual case of progressive osteolysis due to metallosis that developed after revision THA for ceramic liner dissociation without a liner fracture performed using a metal femoral head and polyethylene liner. The residual metal debris and abnormal pumping motion of the polyethylene liner due to the breakage of the locking system or the aspherical metal shell being abraded by the ceramic head seemed to be the cause of the progressive osteolysis. PMID:27648325

  8. Metallosis after Exchange of the Femoral Head and Liner following Ceramic Acetabular Liner Dissociation in Total Hip Arthroplasty with a Modular Layered Acetabular Component

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Daisuke; Iwame, Toshiyuki; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The type of bearing material that should be used in revision surgery after the failure of ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains controversial. In the case of ceramic fracture, the residual ceramic particles can cause consequent metallosis when metal implants are used for revision THA. On the other hand, in the case of THA failure without ceramic fracture, revision THA with a metal femoral head provides satisfactory results. We report an unusual case of progressive osteolysis due to metallosis that developed after revision THA for ceramic liner dissociation without a liner fracture performed using a metal femoral head and polyethylene liner. The residual metal debris and abnormal pumping motion of the polyethylene liner due to the breakage of the locking system or the aspherical metal shell being abraded by the ceramic head seemed to be the cause of the progressive osteolysis. PMID:27648325

  9. Metallosis after Exchange of the Femoral Head and Liner following Ceramic Acetabular Liner Dissociation in Total Hip Arthroplasty with a Modular Layered Acetabular Component

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Daisuke; Iwame, Toshiyuki; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The type of bearing material that should be used in revision surgery after the failure of ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains controversial. In the case of ceramic fracture, the residual ceramic particles can cause consequent metallosis when metal implants are used for revision THA. On the other hand, in the case of THA failure without ceramic fracture, revision THA with a metal femoral head provides satisfactory results. We report an unusual case of progressive osteolysis due to metallosis that developed after revision THA for ceramic liner dissociation without a liner fracture performed using a metal femoral head and polyethylene liner. The residual metal debris and abnormal pumping motion of the polyethylene liner due to the breakage of the locking system or the aspherical metal shell being abraded by the ceramic head seemed to be the cause of the progressive osteolysis.

  10. Targeting a New Safe Zone: A Step in the Development of Patient-Specific Component Positioning for Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    McLawhorn, Alexander S; Sculco, Peter K; Weeks, K Durham; Nam, Denis; Mayman, David J

    2015-06-01

    Surgeons often target the Lewinnek zone, with its mean (SD) inclination of 40° (10°) and mean (SD) anteversion of 15° (10°), for acetabular orientation during total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, matching native anteversion (20°-25°) may achieve optimal stability. We conducted a study in a large single-surgeon patient cohort to determine the incidence of early postoperative dislocation with increased acetabular anteversion and the accuracy of imageless navigation in achieving target acetabular position. Soft-tissue repair through a posterolateral approach was performed in 553 THAs that met the inclusion criteria. Mean (SD) target acetabular orientation was 40° (10°) of inclination and 25° (10°) of anteversion. Software was used to measure acetabular positioning on postoperative radiographs. Incidence of dislocation within 6 months after surgery was determined. Mean (SD) inclination was 42.2° (4.9°), and mean (SD) anteversion was 23.9° (6.5°). Approximately 82% of cups were placed in the target zone. Variation in anteversion accounted for 67.3% of outliers. Only body mass index was associated with inclination outside the target range (P = .017), and only female sex was associated with anteversion outside the target range (P = .030). Six THAs (1.1%) experienced early dislocation, and 3 (0.54%) of these were revised for multiple dislocations. There was no relationship between dislocation and component placement in either the Lewinnek zone (P = .224) or the target zone (P = .287). PMID:26046997

  11. The Results of Long-term Follow-up of Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Hydroxyapatite-coated Cups

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chang-Dong; Shin, Keun-Young; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Park, Kwan-Kyu; Yang, Ick-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to report the long-term outcome and the failure mechanism of cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) using hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated acetabular cup. Materials and Methods From January 1992 to May 1994, a total of 123 consecutive cementless primary THAs were performed using a HA-coated acetabular cup with metal-on-polyethylene articulation. We retrospectively evaluated 66 hips available for follow-up at a mean 18.3 years (range, 10.4-23.6 years). The survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method. We defined end point as any failure that required a reoperation of acetabular component. Results Thirty-nine of 66 hips (59.1%) were defined as a failure for progressive acetabular osteolysis or aseptic loosening of the cup. Acetabular osteolysis was observed in 47 hips (71.2%) and 33 hips (50.0%) were revised because of cup loosening. The Kaplan-Meier method showed the survival rate of the acetabular cup to be 46.3% at 15 years and 34.8% at 20 years for any failure that required a reoperation of acetabular component. Conclusion The long-term survival rate of THA using HA-coated acetabular cup was unsatisfactory, and it was attributed to vulnerable property of HA coating and progressive osteolysis. PMID:27536628

  12. Isolation and characterization of beta-glucan synthase: A potential biochemical regulator of gravistimulated differential cell wall loosening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmanoff, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    In plants, gravity stimulates differential growth in the upper and lower halves of horizontally oriented organs. Auxin regulation of cell wall loosening and elongation is the basis for most models of this phenomenon. Auxin treatment of pea stem tissue rapidly increases the activity of Golgi-localized Beta-1,4-glucan synthase, an enzyme involved in biosynthesis of wall xyloglucan which apparently constitutes the substrate for the wall loosening process. The primary objective is to determine if auxin induces de novo formation of Golgi glucan synthase and increases the level of this glucan synthase mRNA. This shall be accomplished by (a) preparation of a monoclonal antibody to the synthase, (b) isolation, and characterization of the glucan synthase, and (c) examination for cross reactivity between the antibody and translation products of auxin induced mRNAs in pea tissue. The antibody will also be used to localize the glucan synthase in upper and lower halves of pea stem tissue before, during and after the response to gravity.

  13. Development of Thread Rolled Anti-Loosening Bolts Based on the Double Thread Mechanism and a Performance Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemasu, Teruie; Miyahara, Hiroshi

    It has already been proven that bolt fasteners based on the double thread mechanism have an excellent anti-loosening performance. The purpose of this study is to establish a mass production method for these double thread bolts (DTBs) by thread rolling. The pitch ratio of the coarse thread and the fine thread of the target DTB is set as 2 to 1. A two-die roller with a plunge feed is employed as the rolling method due to its fine processing precision. The roller dies used in the experiments have special grooves on the external surface which follow the same outline as the thread profiles of the DTB. Using these special dies, the DTB can be successfully formed in the same process as single thread bolts. The deformation of a workpiece during rolling is examined, and the examination shows that the formed material smoothly fills the die grooves in each cross section. The rolled DTBs completely pass the loosening test with extremely severe vibration and impact, as specified in NAS3354. The tensile fatigue strength of the rolled DTB is about 100% greater than that of the cutting DTB.

  14. Toll-like receptors and aseptic loosening of hip endoprosthesis-a potential to respond against danger signals?

    PubMed

    Lähdeoja, Tuomas; Pajarinen, Jukka; Kouri, Vesa-Petteri; Sillat, Tarvo; Salo, Jari; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2010-02-01

    Bacterial remnants and subclinical biofilms residing on prosthesis surfaces have been speculated to play a role in hip implant loosening by opsonizing otherwise relatively inert wear particles. The innate immune system recognizes these microbial pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) using Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Our objective was to evaluate the possible presence of TLRs in aseptic synovial membrane-like interface tissue. Bacterial culture-negative, aseptic (n = 4) periprosthetic synovial membrane-like tissue was compared to osteoarthritis synovial membrane (n = 5) for the presence of cells positive for all known human functional TLRs, stained using specific antibodies by immunohistochemistry, and evaluated using morphometry. In comparison to osteoarthtritic synovium, the number of TLR-positive cells was found to be increased in the aseptic setting, reflecting the considerable macrophage infiltration to the tissues investigated. Thus aseptic periprosthetic tissue seems to be very reactive to PAMPs. It has been recently recognized that TLR do not only respond to traditional PAMPs, but also to endogenous alarmings or danger signals released from necrotic and activated cells. Alarming-TLR interaction in the periprosthetic tissue might be a novel mechanism of aseptic loosening of endoprosthesis.

  15. Examination and treatment of a professional ballet dancer with a suspected acetabular labral tear: A case report.

    PubMed

    Khoo-Summers, Lynnette; Bloom, Nancy J

    2015-08-01

    Dancers are at risk for developing groin pain that is due to acetabular labral tears. Although surgical management of labral tears has been reported extensively, conservative management has been poorly described. This case report describes the examination, diagnosis, and treatment of groin pain in a professional ballet dancer with a suspected acetabular labral tear. Treatment focused on decreasing anterior hip joint stresses and improving the precision of hip motion through correction of alignment and movement impairments noted during functional activities and dance. Successful outcomes included a reduction in pain and return to professional ballet dancing. PMID:25725589

  16. Occult internal iliac arterial injury identified during open reduction internal fixation of an acetabular fracture: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Chaus, George W; Heng, Marilyn; Smith, Raymond M

    2015-07-01

    We present two cases of occult internal iliac arterial injury identified during operative reduction of a widely displaced posterior column posterior wall acetabular fracture. This complication was not recognised until reduction of the column fracture. There were no preoperative signs or symptoms indicative of a vascular injury. These cases emphasise the heightened awareness one must have when treating widely displaced posterior column fractures of the acetabulum, especially those fractures with extension into the greater sciatic notch, as previously formed clot can become dislodged and hemostasis lost. We also present management options when this complication occurs. We believe any surgeon treating acetabular fractures should be aware of this serious and potentially fatal complication.

  17. Modified ilioinguinal approach in combined surgical exposures for displaced acetabular fractures involving two columns.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zhu, Xiaodong; Xu, Peng; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Lubo; Liu, Xiangyan; Mu, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the advantages of modified ilioinguinal approach in combined surgical exposures for displaced acetabular fractures involving two columns management. 73 patients with displaced acetabular fractures involving two columns underwent open reduction and internal fixation through combined surgical approaches between 2006 and 2014 in our hospital. The modified ilioinguinal approach combined with Kocher-Langenbeck approach group (group A) included 46 patients. The standard ilioinguinal approach combined with Kocher-Langenbeck approach group (group B) included 27 patients. Outcome was assessed in operative time, blood loss, function outcomes and complications. In group A, the average operative time was 123.2 min, and the average blood loss was 586.2 ml. Anatomic reduction was achieved in 39 patients (84.8 %). The functional recovery was good in 37 patients (80.4 %). Complications related to the approach were observed in 10 patients (21.7 %). In group B, the average operative time was 161.5 min, and the average blood loss was 830 ml. Anatomic reduction was achieved in 24 patients (88.9 %). The functional recovery was good in 22 patients (81.5 %). Complications related to the approach were observed in 9 patients (33.3 %). This study demonstrates that both combined approaches permits good postoperative function results for treatment of acetabular fractures involving two columns. However, the modified ilioinguinal approach combined with Kocher-Langenbeck approach provides less operative time, blood loss and complications. PMID:27652175

  18. Current concept in dysplastic hip arthroplasty: Techniques for acetabular and femoral reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bicanic, Goran; Barbaric, Katarina; Bohacek, Ivan; Aljinovic, Ana; Delimar, Domagoj

    2014-09-18

    Adult patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip develop secondary osteoarthritis and eventually end up with total hip arthroplasty (THA) at younger age. Because of altered anatomy of dysplastic hips, THA in these patients represents technically demanding procedure. Distorted anatomy of the acetabulum and proximal femur together with conjoined leg length discrepancy present major challenges during performing THA in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip. In addition, most patients are at younger age, therefore, soft tissue balance is of great importance (especially the need to preserve the continuity of abductors) to maximise postoperative functional result. In this paper we present a variety of surgical techniques available for THA in dysplastic hips, their advantages and disadvantages. For acetabular reconstruction following techniques are described: Standard metal augments (prefabricated), Custom made acetabular augments (3D printing), Roof reconstruction with vascularized fibula, Roof reconstruction with pedicled iliac graft, Roof reconstruction with autologous bone graft, Roof reconstruction with homologous bone graft, Roof reconstruction with auto/homologous spongious bone, Reinforcement ring with the hook in combination with autologous graft augmentation, Cranial positioning of the acetabulum, Medial protrusion technique (cotyloplasty) with chisel, Medial protrusion technique (cotyloplasty) with reaming, Cotyloplasty without spongioplasty. For femoral reconstruction following techniques were described: Distraction with external fixator, Femoral shortening through a modified lateral approach, Transtrochanteric osteotomies, Paavilainen osteotomy, Lesser trochanter osteotomy, Double-chevron osteotomy, Subtrochanteric osteotomies, Diaphyseal osteotomies, Distal femoral osteotomies. At the end we present author's treatment method of choice: for acetabulum we perform cotyloplasty leaving only paper-thin medial wall, which we break during acetabular

  19. Analysis of spinal alignment and pelvic parameters on upright radiographs: implications for acetabular development

    PubMed Central

    Pytiak, Andrew; Bomar, James D.; Peterson, Jonathan B.; Schmitz, Matthew R.; Pennock, Andrew T.; Wenger, Dennis R.; Upasani, Vidyadhar V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate measures of sagittal spinopelvic alignment [lumbar lordosis (LL), sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT) and pelvic incidence (PI)] and measures of acetabular coverage [lateral center edge angle (LCEA) and Tonnis angle] in asymptomatic adolescents on standing biplanar radiographs. We hypothesized that subjects with increased pelvic incidence and LL would have increased anterior PT and increased measures of acetabular coverage. Upright anteroposterior and lateral spinopelvic radiographs were obtained using EOS imaging technique. LCEA and Tonnis angle were calculated on the anteroposterior images and the lateral images were analyzed for LL, PI, PT and SS. LL was found to have a strong correlation with SS (rs = 0.786, P  <  0.001), moderate correlation with PI (rs  =  0.529, P  <  0.001), and a poor inverse correlation with PT (rs  = −0.167, P  =  0.018). However, LCEA was not found to be significantly correlated with PT (rs  =  0.084, P  =  0.238) and Tonnis angle was not found to be correlated with any of the sagittal spinopelvic measures. Healthy, asymptomatic adolescents with increased pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis did not have increased anterior PT or increased measures of acetabular coverage. The correlations identified in previous cadaveric studies or clinical studies evaluating changes between supine and standing radiographs are not supported in this healthy adolescent population. Our findings may suggest that an individual’s acetabulum develops as a dynamic adaptation to one's particular sagittal spinopelvic alignment to optimize femoral head coverage. Level III. Diagnostic – Investigating a diagnostic test. PMID:27583160

  20. Evaluating the accuracy of wear formulae for acetabular cup liners.

    PubMed

    Wu, James Shih-Shyn; Hsu, Shu-Ling; Chen, Jian-Horng

    2010-02-01

    This study proposes two methods for exploring the wear volume of a worn liner. The first method is a numerical method, in which SolidWorks software is used to create models of the worn out regions of liners at various wear directions and depths. The second method is an experimental one, in which a machining center is used to mill polyoxymethylene to manufacture worn and unworn liner models, then the volumes of the models are measured. The results show that the SolidWorks software is a good tool for presenting the wear pattern and volume of a worn liner. The formula provided by Ilchmann is the most suitable for computing liner volume loss, but is not accurate enough. This study suggests that a more accurate wear formula is required. This is crucial for accurate evaluation of the performance of hip components implanted in patients, as well as for designing new hip components.

  1. Differences in Acetabular Rim Thickness in Patients with Unilateral Symptomatic Pincer-Type Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Alexander E.; Kuhns, Benjamin; Cvetanovich, Gregory; Inoue, Nozomu; Nho, Shane Jay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the location and magnitude of difference in acetabular rim morphology between the symptomatic and asymptomatic acetabula in a cohort of patients with symptomatic unilateral pincer-type FAI. Methods: After IRB approval, computed tomography (CT) scans of 43 patients (22 males, 21 females) diagnosed with unilateral pincer-type FAI were obtained. CT images of both hips were imported in DICOM format and segmented into 3-dimensional (3D) hemi-pelvises using 3D reconstruction software (Mimics, Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). The point-cloud data of the asymptomatic hemi-pelvis was mirrored onto the symptomatic side. Protrusion of the symptomatic side was recorded as a positive value and appeared as red on the color map (Figure 1). Data was collected in 3° intervals and analyzed by quadrant using the clock face method; reflecting the 12-3, 3-6, 6-9, and 9-12 o’clock positions. Results: The symptomatic acetabular rim was on average 0.39 ± 0.36 mm thicker than the corresponding location on the asymptomatic rim. When the acetabular clock face was broken up into quadrants, reflecting the 12-3, 3-6, 6-9, and 9-12 o’clock positions, the 12-3 o’clock position demonstrated the greatest difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic sides (Table 1). The 12-3 o’clock quadrant demonstrated significantly greater difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic sides (0.53±0.22 mm) as compared to the 3-6 o’clock position (0.39±0.27 mm; p=0.006), the 6-9 o’clock position (0.34±0.05 mm; p<0.001), and the 9-12 o’clock position (0.33±0.03; p<0.001). There was no correlation between gender and magnitude of difference at any location. Conclusion: Small changes in acetabular rim morphology, on the order of 0.5 mm or less can be the difference between symptomatic pincer-type FAI and the asymptomatic state. Knowledge of the healthy, unaffected side in unilateral FAI may provide a better template for rim recession rather

  2. New tool for applying traction during open reduction and internal fixation of acetabular fractures.

    PubMed

    Lien, Fang-Chieh

    2012-04-01

    Open reduction and internal fixation is used to treat complex acetabular fractures. Traction on the femur is necessary to reduce the acetabulum and is accomplished by surgical assistants or with mechanical devices. To overcome the disadvantages of various traction methods, the author designed a simple, novel traction device that can be used on an ordinary orthopedic or radiolucent operating table and has advantages over manual traction and commercial traction tables. The device consists of a horizontal cross-bar supported over the patient by 2 free-standing legs and is constructed from commercially available parts.

  3. Hip Arthroscopy for Incarcerated Acetabular Labrum following Reduction of Traumatic Hip Dislocation: Three Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung-Mo; Lee, Woo-Yong; Noh, Chang-Kyun; Zheng, Long

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic hip fracture-dislocations are associated with chondral and labral pathology as well as loose bodies that can be incarcerated in the hip joint. Incarceration, such as interposed labrum between acetabulum and femoral head that is not readily visualized preoperatively, is a rare but important cause of pain and can potentially be a source for early degeneration and progression to osteoarthritis. We present three cases, arthroscopic surgery of incarcerated acetabular osseo-labral fragment following reduction of traumatic hip fracture-dislocation. PMID:27777919

  4. Bone ingrowth in well-fixed retrieved porous tantalum implants.

    PubMed

    Hanzlik, Josa A; Day, Judd S

    2013-06-01

    While first generation porous coatings have had clinical success, aseptic loosening remains a leading cause of revision. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reasons for revision and to assess the amount of bone ingrowth in retrieved porous tantalum components. In a prospective multicenter retrieval program, 76 porous tantalum acetabular shells, 5 femoral stems, 7 patellas and 36 tibial trays were collected from revision surgeries. A subset of the implants was analyzed for bone ingrowth. The main reason for revision was infection for acetabular shells (1.4 years implantation time) and instability for tibial trays (1.8 years implantation time). Two of the thirty primary surgery acetabular shells and one of the thirty-six primary surgery tibial trays were revised for implant loosening. We observed full depth penetration of bone into the porous tantalum layer for the acetabular shells and femoral stems.

  5. Biomechanical analysis of the acetabular buttress-plate: are complex acetabular fractures in the quadrilateral area stable after treatment with anterior construct plate-1/3 tube buttress plate fixation?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong-De; Cai, Xian-Hua; Liu, Xi-Ming; Zhang, Hong-Xi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The acetabular buttress-plate has been widely used in treating difficult cases with satisfying clinical results. However, the biomechanical properties of a postoperative acetabular fracture fixed by the buttress-plate are not clear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of stability after the anterior tube buttress-plate fixation of complex acetabular fractures in the quadrilateral area. METHODS: A construct was proposed based on anterior construct plate - 1/3 tube buttress plate fixation for acetabular both-column fractures. Two groups of six formalin-preserved cadaveric pelvises were analyzed: (1) group A, the normal pelvis and (2) group B, anterior construct plate-1/3 tube buttress plate with quadrilateral area fixation. The displacements were measured, and cyclical loads were applied in both standing and sitting simulations. RESULTS: As the load was added, the displacements were A

  6. Reproducibility of Acetabular Landmarks and a Standardized Coordinate System Obtained from 3D Hip Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Mabee, Myles; Dulai, Sukhdeep; Thompson, Richard B; Jaremko, Jacob L

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound detection of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is limited by variation in acetabular appearance and alpha angle measurements, which change with position of the ultrasound probe. Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound captures the entire acetabular shape, and a reproducible "standard central plane" may be generated, from two landmarks located on opposite ends of the acetabulum, for measurement of alpha angle and other indices. Two users identified landmarks on 51 3D ultrasounds, with ranging severity of disease, and inter- and intra-observer reproducibility of landmark and "standard plane" locations was compared; landmarks were chosen within 2 mm, and the "standard plane" rotation was reproducible within 10° between observers. We observed no difference in variability between alpha angles measured on the "standard plane" in comparison with 2D ultrasound. Applications of the standardized 3D ultrasound central plane will be to fuse serial ultrasounds for follow-up and development of new indices of 3D deformity. PMID:25394808

  7. Validation of an optical system to measure acetabular shell deformation in cadavers.

    PubMed

    Dold, Philipp; Bone, Martin C; Flohr, Markus; Preuss, Roman; Joyce, Tom J; Deehan, David; Holland, James

    2014-08-01

    Deformation of the acetabular shell at the time of surgery can result in poor performance and early failure of the hip replacement. The study aim was to validate an ATOS III Triple Scan optical measurement system against a co-ordinate measuring machine using in vitro testing and to check repeatability under cadaver laboratory conditions. Two sizes of custom-made acetabular shells were deformed using a uniaxial/two-point loading frame and measured at different loads. Roundness measurements were performed using both the ATOS III Triple Scan optical system and a co-ordinate measuring machine and then compared. The repeatability was also tested by measuring shells pre- and post-insertion in a cadaver laboratory multiple times. The in vitro comparison with the co-ordinate measuring machine demonstrated a maximum difference of 5 µm at the rim and 9 µm at the measurement closest to the pole of the shell. Maximum repeatability was below 1 µm for the co-ordinate measuring machine and 3 µm for the ATOS III Triple Scan optical system. Repeatability was comparable between the pre-insertion (below 2 µm) and post-insertion (below 3 µm) measurements in the cadaver laboratory. This study supports the view that the ATOS III Triple Scan optical system fulfils the necessary requirements to accurately measure shell deformation in cadavers.

  8. The role of acetabular and femoral osteotomies in reconstructive surgery of the hip: 2005 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, Thomas R; Phillips, William; Kantor, Stephen R; Santore, Richard F

    2005-12-01

    Femoral and acetabular osteotomies have enduring and useful roles in the ongoing surgical treatment of patients with various hip conditions. The classic indication for intertrochanteric valgus osteotomy is to induce healing of femoral neck nonunions. Additional indications include posttraumatic deformity, limb-length inequality, certain cases of osteonecrosis, and adult sequelae of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, and slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Isolated intertrochanteric osteotomy is only occasionally indicated for the treatment of arthritis secondary to dysplasia. Rotational osteotomies of the pelvis have overtaken the role once historically played by intertrochanteric osteotomy in the treatment of dysplasia-related hip anomalies. Ideal candidates have prearthritic, activity-related pain associated with radiographic dysplasia. It is imperative that the hip joint be congruous, free of fixed subluxation, and located in the natural acetabulum. Surgical treatment of associated acetabular labral tears and/or detachments and impingement lesions can be done at the same time through antecedent hip arthroscopy (same anesthetic) or open arthrotomy. The direction and magnitude of correction need to be customized to fit the nature of the dysplasia. A standard method of correction likely is to result in unwanted iatrogenic retroversion in some cases. Intertrochanteric osteotomy now is used as a complement to rotational osteotomy for the indications outlined above. PMID:16331002

  9. Metal is not inert: role of metal ions released by biocorrosion in aseptic loosening--current concepts.

    PubMed

    Cadosch, Dieter; Chan, Erwin; Gautschi, Oliver P; Filgueira, Luis

    2009-12-15

    Metal implants are essential therapeutic tools for the treatment of bone fractures and joint replacements. The metals and metal alloys used in contemporary orthopedic and trauma surgery are well tolerated by the majority of patients. However, complications resulting from inflammatory and immune reactions to metal implants have been well documented. This review briefly discusses the different mechanisms of metal implant corrosion in the human body, which lead to the release of significant levels of metal ions into the peri-implant tissues and the systemic blood circulation. Additionally, this article reviews the effects of the released ions on bone metabolism and the immune system and discusses their involvement in the pathophysiological mechanisms of aseptic loosening and metal hypersensitivity in patients with metal implants.

  10. The Association of Femoral Neck Stress Fractures with Femoral Acetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Safran, Marc R.; Goldin, Michael; Anderson, Christian; Fredericson, Michael; Stevens, Kathryn J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if there is an increased incidence of femoral acetabular impingement (FAI) in patients presenting with stress fractures of the femoral neck. Methods: After IRB approval, the imaging studies of 25 athletes (22 females, 3 males, mean age 26, range 19 - 39 years) with femoral neck stress injuries were assessed for the presence of features suggesting FAI, including acetabular retroversion, coxa profunda, abnormal femoral head-neck junction, fibrocystic change, os acetabulae, labral tear and chondral injury. All subjects had to have an adequate AP Pelvis radiograph, a lateral radiograph of the affected hip, and an MRI of the affected hip. The alpha angle, anterior offset ratio, and center to edge (CE) angle were measured on radiographs. The grade of stress injury was determined on MR images. All images and measurements were made by a musculoskeletal fellowship trained radiologist, a fellowship trained orthopaedic surgeon, an orthopaedic sports medicine fellow and a physical medicine and rehabilitation resident. Charts were reviewed to determine treatment of the stress fracture, outcome and final follow up, as well as to determine if the patient had any further treatment for their hip. Results: Of the 25 hips (18 right, 7 left) with femoral neck stress reactions, 9 were grade 2 (bone marrow edema), 5 were grade 3 (high T2 and low T1 marrow signal), and 11 were grade 4 (stress fracture). Twenty patients (80%) had coxa profunda - where the floor of the cotyloid fossa touches or extends beyond the ilioischial line (incidence in general population is 15.2% of males, and 19.4% of females). Coxa profunda, defined by the floor of the cotyloid fossa touching or extending beyond the ilioischial line and a center edge angle of more than 35o, was present in 28% of subjects. Acetabular retroversion as assessed by the crossover sign was present in 42% (normal incidence is 5% of population). Center edge angle was greater than 35o in 20% and greater than 40 o

  11. Femoroacetabular impingement with chronic acetabular rim fracture - 3D computed tomography, 3D magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Nordeck, Shaun; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Madhavapeddi, Sai; Robertson, William J

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement is uncommonly associated with a large rim fragment of bone along the superolateral acetabulum. We report an unusual case of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) with chronic acetabular rim fracture. Radiographic, 3D computed tomography, 3D magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy correlation is presented with discussion of relative advantages and disadvantages of various modalities in the context of FAI. PMID:26191497

  12. Custom 3D-printed acetabular implants in hip surgery--innovative breakthrough or expensive bespoke upgrade?

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Custom 3D-printed triflange acetabular cages are a new option in the armamentarium of the revision hip surgeon. This review article defines this technology, its indications, surgical method, advantages, disadvantages, use, current published literature and future applications. PMID:26351112

  13. Serum Metal Ion Levels Following Total Hip Arthroplasty With Modular Dual Mobility Components.

    PubMed

    Matsen Ko, Laura J; Pollag, Kimberley E; Yoo, Joanne Y; Sharkey, Peter F

    2016-01-01

    Dual mobility acetabular components can reduce the incidence of total hip arthroplasty (THA) instability. Modular dual mobility (MDM) components facilitate acetabular component implantation. However, corrosion can occur at modular junctions. Serum cobalt and chromium levels and Oxford scores were obtained at minimum two year follow-up for 100 consecutive patients who had THA with MDM components. Average Oxford score was 43 (range 13-48). Average serum cobalt and chromium values were 0.7 mcg/L (range, 0.0 to 7.0) and 0.6 mcg/L (range, 0.1 to 2.7), respectively. MARS MRI was performed for four patients with pain and elevated serum cobalt levels. Two of these studies were consistent with adverse local tissue reaction. We recommend use of MDM implants in only patients at high risk for dislocation following THA.

  14. Long-term Radiographic Assessment of Cemented Polyethylene Acetabular Cups

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Graham; Porter, Neil; Fisher, John; Older, John

    2008-01-01

    In vitro studies demonstrating excessive wear in polyethylene cups sterilized using gamma irradiation and stored in air led to the abandonment of this sterilization technique. We evaluated the clinical wear performance of a metal femoral component on a polyethylene cup in a hip prosthesis from a selected subset of implants in a group of patients followed for at least 20 years and assessed the time dependency of variation in penetration rates. We measured penetration in 33 polyethylene cups in 25 patients who had a Charnley low-friction arthroplasty between 1982 and 1984. All patients had Charnley Ogee® cups implanted for more than 20 years and sterilized using the gamma irradiation in air technique. If degradation occurred over time in vivo, it was not reflected by an increased penetration rate with increasing time in vivo; even after 20 years of implantation, the degree of wear remained low. This suggests gamma irradiation affects wear on ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene by reducing wear secondary to the crosslinking, by increasing wear as shown through in vitro studies of heavily oxidized samples, or by oxidation resulting from prolonged shelf life. The effect of progressive oxidation in vivo does not appear to affect wear in vivo. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18196419

  15. Femoral Component Survival in Hybrid Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clayton R; Perry, Kevin I

    2016-05-01

    Although the majority of North American surgeons perform total knee arthroplasty by cementing both the femoral and the tibial components, hybrid fixation with a press-fit femur and cemented tibia is an alternative form of total knee arthroplasty performed by some. Currently, there is a paucity of literature evaluating long-term outcomes after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. As such, the purpose of the current study was to describe the long-term results of total knee arthroplasty performed using the hybrid technique. The authors retrospectively reviewed a total of 77 hybrid total knee arthroplasties with at least 12 years of follow-up. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed to determine patient function and the incidence of femoral component failure after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. At the time of last follow-up, 76 of 77 (99%) of the femoral components remained in place without evidence of loosening. One femoral component failed due to aseptic loosening and was ultimately revised to a cemented femoral component without further complication. In addition, 1 tibial component and 2 patellar components failed due to aseptic loosening. Four tibial polyethylene liners were revised for polyethylene wear. In conclusion, press-fit fixation of the femoral component is a reliable and durable alternative to cemented fixation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):181-186.].

  16. Femoral Component Survival in Hybrid Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clayton R; Perry, Kevin I

    2016-05-01

    Although the majority of North American surgeons perform total knee arthroplasty by cementing both the femoral and the tibial components, hybrid fixation with a press-fit femur and cemented tibia is an alternative form of total knee arthroplasty performed by some. Currently, there is a paucity of literature evaluating long-term outcomes after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. As such, the purpose of the current study was to describe the long-term results of total knee arthroplasty performed using the hybrid technique. The authors retrospectively reviewed a total of 77 hybrid total knee arthroplasties with at least 12 years of follow-up. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed to determine patient function and the incidence of femoral component failure after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. At the time of last follow-up, 76 of 77 (99%) of the femoral components remained in place without evidence of loosening. One femoral component failed due to aseptic loosening and was ultimately revised to a cemented femoral component without further complication. In addition, 1 tibial component and 2 patellar components failed due to aseptic loosening. Four tibial polyethylene liners were revised for polyethylene wear. In conclusion, press-fit fixation of the femoral component is a reliable and durable alternative to cemented fixation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):181-186.]. PMID:27135453

  17. Usefulness of Arthroscopic Treatment of Painful Hip after Acetabular Fracture or Hip Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung-Taek; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kang, Chan; Kim, Dong-Yeol; Zheng, Long

    2015-01-01

    Background Painful hip following hip dislocation or acetabular fracture can be an important signal for early degeneration and progression to osteoarthritis due to intraarticular pathology. However, there is limited literature discussing the use of arthroscopy for the treatment of painful hip. The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the effectiveness and benefit of arthroscopic treatment for patients with a painful hip after major trauma. Methods From July 2003 to February 2013, we reviewed 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment after acetabular fracture or hip dislocation and were followed up for a minimum of 2 postoperative years. The degree of osteoarthritis based on the Tonnis classification pre- and postoperatively at final follow-up was determined. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using visual analogue scale for pain (VAS) and modified Harris hip score (MHHS), and range of motion (ROM) of the hip pre- and postoperatively at final follow-up. Results There were nine male and four female patients with a mean age at surgery of 28 years (range, 20 to 50 years). The mean follow-up period of the patients was 59.8 months (range, 24 to 115 months), and the mean interval between initial trauma and arthroscopic treatment was 40.8 months (range, 1 to 144 months). At the final follow-up, VAS and MHHS improved significantly from 6.3 and 53.4 to 3.0 and 88.3, respectively (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in hip flexion, abduction, adduction, external rotation, and internal rotation as minor improvements from 113.1°, 38.5°, 28.5°, 36.5°, and 22.7° to 118.5°, 39.0°, 29.2°, 38.9°, and 26.5° were observed, respectively (p = 0.070, p = 0.414, p = 0.317, p = 0.084, and p = 0.136, respectively). None of the patients exhibited progression of osteoarthritis of the hip at the final follow-up. Conclusions Arthroscopic treatment after acetabular fracture or hip dislocation is effective and delays

  18. Does Robotic-Assisted Computer Navigation Affect Acetabular Cup Positioning in Total Hip Arthroplasty in the Obese Patient? A Comparison Study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Asheesh; Redmond, John M; Hammarstedt, Jon E; Petrakos, Alexandra E; Vemula, S Pavan; Domb, Benjamin G

    2015-12-01

    Obese populations present challenges for acetabular cup placement during total hip arthroplasty (THA). This study examines the accuracy of acetabular cup inclination and version in the obese patient with robotic-assisted computer navigation. A total of 105 patients underwent robotic-assisted computer navigation THA with a posterior approach. Groups were divided on body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) of <30, 30-35, and >35. There was no statistical difference between the BMI <30 (n=59), BMI 30-35 (n=34) and BMI >35 (n=12) groups for acetabular inclination (P=0.43) or version (P=0.95). Robotic-assisted computer navigation provided accurate and reproducible placement of the acetabular cup within safe zones for inclination and version in the obese patient.

  19. A comprehensive microbiological evaluation of fifty-four patients undergoing revision surgery due to prosthetic joint loosening.

    PubMed

    Bjerkan, Geir; Witsø, Eivind; Nor, Anne; Viset, Trond; Løseth, Kirsti; Lydersen, Stian; Persen, Leif; Bergh, Kåre

    2012-04-01

    The diagnosis of a chronic prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is challenging, and no consensus exists regarding how best to define the criteria required for microbiological identification. A general view is that culture of periprosthetic biopsies suffers from inadequate sensitivity. Recently, molecular analyses have been employed in some studies but the specificity of molecular analyses has been questioned, mainly due to contamination issues. In a prospective study of 54 patients undergoing revision surgery due to prosthetic joint loosening, we focused on two aspects of microbiological diagnosis of chronic PJI. First, by collecting diagnostic specimens in a highly standardized manner, we aimed at investigating the adequacy of various specimens by performing quantitative bacteriological culture. Second, we designed and performed real-time 16S rRNA gene PCR analysis with particular emphasis on minimizing the risk of false-positive PCR results. The specimens analysed included synovial fluid, periprosthetic biopsies from the joint capsule and the interface membrane, and specimens from the surface of the explanted prosthesis rendered accessible by scraping and sonication. No antibiotics were given prior to specimen collection. Based on five diagnostic criteria recently suggested, we identified 18 PJIs, all of which fulfilled the criterion of ≥2 positive cultures of periprosthetic specimens. The rate of culture-positive biopsies from the interface membrane was higher compared to specimens from the joint capsule and synovial fluid, and the interface membrane contained a higher bacterial load. Interpretational criteria were applied to differentiate a true-positive PCR from potential bacterial DNA contamination derived from the reagents used for DNA extraction and amplification. The strategy to minimize the risk of false-positive PCR results was successful as only two PCR results were false-positive out of 216 negative periprosthetic specimens. Although the PCR assays

  20. Displacement and Stress Analysis around the Artificial Acetabular Cup in a Total Hip Replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakunai, Satoshi; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Tohru; Abo, Masayoshi; Ikeda, Daisaku; Fujiwara, Hiroo

    In order to improve the service life of the artificial acetabular cup in a total hip replacement, it is important to determine the best material and design, and to assess the mechanical behavior around the cup. In this study, electronic speckle interferometry (ESPI) and the two-dimensional finite element method (FEM) are employed to investigate the mechanical behavior. The influence of the cancellous bone and cup thickness on mechanical behavior around the cup was investigated. Good agreement of the cup model was found between the ESPI measurements and FEM predictions. The following results were obtained. (1) Cancellous bone with a porous structure can be measured by the ESPI method. (2) There are discontinuities of the displacement distribution in the transverse direction in each boundary region of the cup, bone cement and cancellous bone. (3) The maximum shear stress exists in the boundary region of the cup and bone cement.

  1. A feasibility study into the use of three-dimensional printer modelling in acetabular fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Yu, A W; Duncan, J M; Daurka, J S; Lewis, A; Cobb, J

    2015-01-01

    There are a number of challenges associated with the operative treatment of acetabular fractures. The approach used is often extensive, while operative time and perioperative blood loss can also be significant. With the proliferation of 3D printer technology, we present a fast and economical way to aid the operative planning of complex fractures. We used augmented stereoscopic 3D CT reconstructions to allow for an appreciation of the normal 3D anatomy of the pelvis on the fractured side and to use the models for subsequent intraoperative contouring of pelvic reconstruction plates. This leads to a reduction in the associated soft tissue trauma, reduced intraoperative time and blood loss, minimal handling of the plate, and reduced fluoroscopic screening times. We feel that the use of this technology to customize implants, plates, and the operative procedure to a patient's unique anatomy can only lead to improved outcomes.

  2. Association of oestrogen receptor gene polymorphism with the long-term results of rotational acetabular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Makoto; Ishijima, Muneaki; Tokita, Akifumi; Sakamoto, Yuko; Kaneko, Haruka; Maezawa, Katsuhiko; Nozawa, Masahiko; Kurosawa, Hisashi

    2009-08-01

    Acetabular dysplasia (AD) contributes to the development of osteoarthritis of the hip. A rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) is one of the methods of pelvic osteotomy to prevent or treat secondary osteoarthritis of the hip. Although most of the patients that undergo RAO show satisfactory results, some have poor results. This study investigated whether gene polymorphisms of both the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and oestrogen receptor (ER) are involved in both AD and the postoperative results following RAOs. Sixty-four Japanese patients with AD who were treated by an RAO were enrolled in this study (59 women and 5 men, aged 13-59, with an average age of 40.3). Gene polymorphisms of the VDR [ApaI and TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs)] and ER (PvuII and XbaI RFLPs) were determined in these patients. The relationship between both the AD and radiographic postoperative changes of the hip joint after an RAO with these gene polymorphisms were examined. The frequencies of ER gene polymorphism coded as pp (RFLP/PvuII) in patients with AD were statistically significantly different (p = .011) from those coded as both PP and Pp. The joint space width narrowed even after RAO in 90% of the patients with the pp gene polymorphism, while it narrowed in only 35% of the patients with either PP or Pp seven years or longer after an RAO. The PvuII polymorphism in the ER gene was associated with the postoperative result of an RAO, while no association was observed between the AD with VDR and ER gene polymorphisms.

  3. Acetabular shell deformation as a function of shell stiffness and bone strength.

    PubMed

    Dold, Philipp; Pandorf, Thomas; Flohr, Markus; Preuss, Roman; Bone, Martin C; Joyce, Tom J; Holland, James; Deehan, David

    2016-04-01

    Press-fit acetabular shells used for hip replacement rely upon an interference fit with the bone to provide initial stability. This process may result in deformation of the shell. This study aimed to model shell deformation as a process of shell stiffness and bone strength. A cohort of 32 shells with two different wall thicknesses (3 and 4 mm) and 10 different shell sizes (44- to 62-mm outer diameter) were implanted into eight cadavers. Shell deformation was then measured in the cadavers using a previously validated ATOS Triple Scan III optical system. The shell-bone interface was then considered as a spring system according to Hooke's law and from this the force exerted on the shell by the bone was calculated using a combined stiffness consisting of the measured shell stiffness and a calculated bone stiffness. The median radial stiffness for the 3-mm wall thickness was 4192 N/mm (range, 2920-6257 N/mm), while for the 4-mm wall thickness the median was 9633 N/mm (range, 6875-14,341 N/mm). The median deformation was 48 µm (range, 3-187 µm), while the median force was 256 N (range, 26-916 N). No statistically significant correlation was found between shell stiffness and deformation. Deformation was also found to be not fully symmetric (centres 180° apart), with a median angle discrepancy of 11.5° between the two maximum positive points of deformation. Further work is still required to understand how the bone influences acetabular shell deformation.

  4. Indomethacin versus radiation therapy for prophylaxis against heterotopic ossification in acetabular fractures: a randomised, prospective study.

    PubMed

    Moore, K D; Goss, K; Anglen, J O

    1998-03-01

    We report a prospective, randomised, blinded clinical comparison of the use of indomethacin or radiation therapy for the prevention of heterotopic ossification (HO) in 75 adults who had open reduction and internal fixation of acetabular fractures through either a Kocher-Langenbeck, a combined ilioinguinal and Kocher-Langenbeck, or an extended iliofemoral approach. Indomethacin, 25 mg, was given three times daily for six weeks. Radiation with 800 cGy was delivered within three days of operation. Plain radiographs were reviewed and given Brooker classification scores by three independent observers who were unaware of the method of prophylaxis. One patient died from unrelated causes and two were lost to follow-up, leaving 72, 33 in the radiation group and 39 in the indomethacin group, available for evaluation at a mean of 12 months (6 to 48). There was no significant difference in the two groups in terms of age, gender, injury severity score, estimated blood loss, delay to surgery, head injury, presence of femoral head dislocation, or operating time, and no complications due to either method of treatment. The final extent of HO was already present by six weeks in all patients who were followed up. Three patients in the radiation group and five who received indomethacin developed HO of Brooker grade III. Two patients in the indomethacin group developed Brooker IV changes; both had failed to receive proper doses of the drug. Cochran-Armitage analysis showed no significant difference between the two treatment groups as regards the formation of HO. Indomethacin and single-dose radiation therapy are both safe and effective for the prevention of HO after operation for acetabular fractures. Radiation therapy is, however, approximately 200 times more expensive than indomethacin therapy at our institution and has other risks.

  5. Prophylactic radiotherapy against heterotopic ossification following internal fixation of acetabular fractures: a comparative estimate of risk

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, P; Yip, G; Scaife, J E; House, T; Thomas, S J; Harris, F; Owen, P J; Hull, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Radiotherapy (RT) is effective in preventing heterotopic ossification (HO) around acetabular fractures requiring surgical reconstruction. We audited outcomes and estimated risks from RT prophylaxis, and alternatives of indometacin or no prophylaxis. Methods: 34 patients underwent reconstruction of acetabular fractures through a posterior approach, followed by a 8-Gy single fraction. The mean age was 44 years. The mean time from surgery to RT was 1.1 days. The major RT risk is radiation-induced fatal cancer. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) method was used to estimate risk, and compared with a method (Trott and Kemprad) specifically for estimating RT risk for benign disease. These were compared with risks associated with indometacin and no prophylaxis. Results: 28 patients (82%) developed no HO; 6 developed Brooker Class I; and none developed Class II–IV HO. The ICRP method suggests a risk of fatal cancer in the range of 1 in 1000 to 1 in 10,000; the Trott and Kemprad method suggests 1 in 3000. For younger patients, this may rise to 1 in 2000; and for elderly patients, it may fall to 1 in 6000. The risk of death from gastric bleeding or perforation from indometacin is 1 in 180 to 1 in 900 in older patients. Without prophylaxis risk of death from reoperation to remove HO is 1 in 4000 to 1 in 30,000. Conclusion: These results are encouraging, consistent with much larger series and endorse our multidisciplinary management. Risk estimates can be used in discussion with patients. Advances in knowledge: The risk from RT prophylaxis is small, it is safer than indometacin and substantially overlaps with the range for no prophylaxis. PMID:25089852

  6. Measurement of lateral acetabular coverage: a comparison between CT and plain radiography

    PubMed Central

    Chadayammuri, Vivek; Garabekyan, Tigran; Jesse, Mary-Kristen; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Strickland, Colin; Milligan, Kenneth; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2015-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated the degree of absolute agreement between measurements of lateral center-edge angle (LCEA) on plain radiography (XR) and computed tomography (CT) in a consecutive cohort of 205 patients (410 hips) undergoing hip arthroscopy. Preoperative measurements of the LCEA were performed bilaterally utilizing standardized anteroposterior radiographs and coronal reformatted CT scans. Demographic variables including age, gender, height, weight, BMI and clinical diagnosis were recorded for all patients. Overall, measured values of the LCEA were 2.1° larger on CT compared with XR (32.9° versus 30.8°, P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis revealed the highest mean difference in hips with acetabular dysplasia and concomitant cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) [mean difference (CT–XR) 5.5°, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.7°–7.3°, P = 0.011], followed by hips with isolated acetabular dysplasia (mean difference [CT–XR] 4.9°, 95% CI 2.7°–7.0°, P < 0.001). In contrast, 119 (29.0%) of the hips demonstrated larger measurements of the LCEA on 25 XR relative to CT. Of these hips, 20 (16.8%) had pincer-FAI and 25 had cam-FAI (21.0%), representing a significantly higher proportion compared with all other clinical subgroups (P = 0.045 and 0.036, respectively). Our study demonstrates measured values of the LCEA are consistently inflated on CT relative to XR for a wide variety of hip pathologies, highlighting the need for standardization and validation of CT-based measurements to improve the quality of clinical decision making. Level of Evidence: Diagnostic Level II. PMID:27011864

  7. Structural health monitoring for bolt loosening via a non-invasive vibro-haptics human-machine cooperative interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekedis, Mahmut; Mascerañas, David; Turan, Gursoy; Ercan, Emre; Farrar, Charles R.; Yildiz, Hasan

    2015-08-01

    For the last two decades, developments in damage detection algorithms have greatly increased the potential for autonomous decisions about structural health. However, we are still struggling to build autonomous tools that can match the ability of a human to detect and localize the quantity of damage in structures. Therefore, there is a growing interest in merging the computational and cognitive concepts to improve the solution of structural health monitoring (SHM). The main object of this research is to apply the human-machine cooperative approach on a tower structure to detect damage. The cooperation approach includes haptic tools to create an appropriate collaboration between SHM sensor networks, statistical compression techniques and humans. Damage simulation in the structure is conducted by releasing some of the bolt loads. Accelerometers are bonded to various locations of the tower members to acquire the dynamic response of the structure. The obtained accelerometer results are encoded in three different ways to represent them as a haptic stimulus for the human subjects. Then, the participants are subjected to each of these stimuli to detect the bolt loosened damage in the tower. Results obtained from the human-machine cooperation demonstrate that the human subjects were able to recognize the damage with an accuracy of 88 ± 20.21% and response time of 5.87 ± 2.33 s. As a result, it is concluded that the currently developed human-machine cooperation SHM may provide a useful framework to interact with abstract entities such as data from a sensor network.

  8. RNA chaperone StpA loosens interactions of the tertiary structure in the td group I intron in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Waldsich, Christina; Grossberger, Rupert; Schroeder, Renée

    2002-01-01

    Efficient splicing of the td group I intron in vivo is dependent on the ribosome. In the absence of translation, the pre-mRNA is trapped in nonnative-splicing-incompetent conformations. Alternatively, folding of the pre-mRNA can be promoted by the RNA chaperone StpA or by the group I intron-specific splicing factor Cyt-18. To understand the mechanism of action of RNA chaperones, we probed the impact of StpA on the structure of the td intron in vivo. Our data suggest that StpA loosens tertiary interactions. The most prominent structural change was the opening of the base triples, which are involved in the correct orientation of the two major intron core domains. In line with the destabilizing activity of StpA, splicing of mutant introns with a reduced structural stability is sensitive to StpA. In contrast, Cyt-18 strengthens tertiary contacts, thereby rescuing splicing of structurally compromised td mutants in vivo. Our data provide direct evidence for protein-induced conformational changes within catalytic RNA in vivo. Whereas StpA resolves tertiary contacts enabling the RNA to refold, Cyt-18 contributes to the overall compactness of the td intron in vivo. PMID:12208852

  9. Thoracic Fracture through a Prior Instrumented Arthrodesis in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis without Hardware Loosening: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Saldua, Nelson S; Harrop, James S

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this article is to report a case of a patient with ankylosing spondylitis who sustained a fracture through a prior solid arthrodesis without loosening or changing posterior instrumentation. There have been few cases reported of a patient with ankylosing spondylitis suffering a fracture through a prior instrumented arthrodesis. None have noted the instrumentation remaining intact with the fracture through the middle of the construct. The surgeon must be aware of this possibility to avoid spinal instability that may lead to a neurological deficit. We retrospectively reviewed the case. A review of the literature was performed through a PubMed search. A patient was found to have a fracture within a prior construct despite the presence of a posterior instrumentation. The mechanism of failure was a three-column spine fracture with "bending" of the rods. This patient was treated with a revision posterior/anterior instrumentation and fusion with placement of larger-diameter rods for added stiffness. Fractures through a prior instrumented arthrodesis are rare but still can occur in the ankylosing spondylitis patient. Given the higher risk of epidural hematoma and neurological compromise in this patient population, the surgeon must keep this on the differential diagnosis when treating patients with a prior instrumented arthrodesis.

  10. Loosening of the total knee arthroplasty: detection by radionuclide bone scanning. [/sup 99m/Tc-methylene diphosphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J.C.; Hattner, R.S.; Murray, W.R.; Genant, H.K.

    1980-07-01

    Pain after total knee arthroplasty is a common clinical problem in orthopedics, and prosthetic loosening, often requiring surgical revision, is usually the etiology. Since standard clinical and radiographic diagnostic measures have not proven totally satisfactory, a study of the utility of bone scintigraphy to assess stability of the knee prosthesis was done. Thirty-five patients with 39 prostheses were studied. Seventeen patients with 21 total knee arthroplasties served as controls and were asymptomatic, were stable at surgery, or improved with conservative management. Eighteen knees in 18 symptomatic patients composed the experimental group. Of these, 11 knees were loose at surgery and seven have had surgery recommended. Scintigrams of the knees were obtained using /sup 99m/Tc-MDP, and ranked 0-3 corresponding to increasingly abnormal localization by three observers. Highly significant differences were observed between the abnormal and control groups (p<0.001). Reciprocal changes in sensitivity and specificity with increasingly stringent criteria were shown. While it is apparent that the bone scan cannot be used as the sole diagnostic method for evaluation of prosthetic stability, it does seem to be a useful adjunct along with clinical criteria and radiographic studies.

  11. Compliant layer acetabular cups: friction testing of a range of materials and designs for a new generation of prosthesis that mimics the natural joint.

    PubMed

    Scholes, S C; Burgess, I C; Marsden, H R; Unsworth, A; Jones, E; Smith, N

    2006-07-01

    Total joint replacements (TJRs) have a limited lifetime, but the introduction of components that exhibit good lubricating properties with low friction and low wear could extend the life of TJRs. A novel acetabular cup design using polyurethane (PU) as a compliant layer (to mimic the natural joint) has been developed. This study describes a series of friction tests that have been used to select the most appropriate material, optimize the design parameters, and fine-tune the manufacturing processes of these joints. To determine accurately the mode of lubrication under which these joints operate, a synthetic lubricant was used in all these tests. Friction tests were carried out to assess the lubrication of four PU bearing materials. Corethane 80A was the preferred material and was subjected to subsequent testing. Friction tests conducted on acetabular cups, manufactured using Corethane 80A articulating against standard, commercially available femoral heads, demonstrated friction factors approaching those for full-fluid-film lubrication with only approximately 1 per cent asperity contact. As the joint produces these low friction factors within less than half a walking cycle after prolonged periods of loading, start-up friction was not considered to be a critical factor. Cups performed well across the full range of femoral head sizes, but a number of samples manufactured with reduced radial clearances performed with higher than expected friction. This was caused by the femoral head being gripped around the equator by the low clearance cup. To avoid this, the cup design was modified by increasing the flare at the rim. In addition to this the radial clearance was increased. As the material is incompressible, a radial clearance of 0.08 mm was too small for a cup diameter of 32 mm. A clearance of between 0.10 and 0.25 mm produced a performance approaching full-fluid-film lubrication. This series of tests acted as a step towards the optimization of the design of these joints

  12. Treatment of postoperative sciatic nerve palsy after total hip arthroplasty for postoperative acetabular fracture: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Akio; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu; Mogami, Atsuhiko; Morohashi, Itaru

    2016-11-01

    Acetabular fracture is usually treated with osteosynthesis. However, in the case of an intra-articular fracture, osteosynthesis can result in arthropathy of the hip joint and poor long-term results, hence, total hip arthroplasty is required. However, in total hip arthroplasty for postoperative acetabular fracture, sciatic nerve palsy tends to develop more commonly than after primary total hip arthroplasty. This is a case report of a 57-year-old Japanese male who had internal skeletal fixation for a left acetabular fracture that had occurred 2 years earlier. One year later, he developed coxarthrosis and severe pain of the hip joint and total hip arthroplasty was performed. After the second surgery, he experienced pain along the distribution of the sciatic nerve and weakness of the muscles innervated by the peroneal nerve, indicating sciatic nerve palsy. We performed a third operation, and divided adhesions around the sciatic nerve. Postoperatively, the anterior hip joint pain and the buttocks pain when the hip was flexed were improved. Abduction of the fifth toe was also improved. However, the footdrop and sensory disturbance were not improved. A year after the third operation, sensory disturbance was slightly improved but the footdrop was not improved. We believe the sciatic nerve palsy developed when we dislocated the hip joint as the sciatic nerve was excessively extended as the hip joint flexed and internally rotated. Sciatic nerve adhesion can occur easily in total hip replacement for postoperative acetabular fracture; hence, adhesiotomy should be conducted before performing hip dislocation to prevent injury caused by nerve tension. The patient agreed that the details of this case could be submitted for publication. The work has been reported in line with the CARE criteria and cite. PMID:27672438

  13. Study of the three-dimensional orientation of the labrum: its relations with the osseous acetabular rim

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Noémie; Bouhallier, July; Baylac, Michel; Tardieu, Christine; Gagey, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the three-dimensional orientation of the coxo-femoral joint remains a challenge as an accurate three-dimensional orientation ensure an efficient bipedal gait and posture. The quantification of the orientation of the acetabulum can be performed using the three-dimensional axis perpendicular to the plane that passes along the edge of the acetabular rim. However, the acetabular rim is not regular as an important indentation in the anterior rim was observed. An innovative cadaver study of the labrum was developed to shed light on the proper quantification of the three-dimensional orientation of the acetabulum. Dissections on 17 non-embalmed corpses were performed. Our results suggest that the acetabular rim is better represented by an anterior plane and a posterior plane rather than a single plane along the entire rim as it is currently assumed. The development of the socket from the Y-shaped cartilage was suggested to explain the different orientations in these anterior and posterior planes. The labrum forms a plane that takes an orientation in between the anterior and posterior parts of the acetabular rim, filling up inequalities of the bony rim. The vectors VL, VA2 and VP, representing the three-dimensional orientation of the labrum, the anterior rim and the posterior rim, are situated in a unique plane that appears biomechanically dependent. The three-dimensional orientation of the acetabulum is a fundamental parameter to understand the hip joint mechanism. Important applications for hip surgery and rehabilitation, as well as for physical anthropology, were discussed. PMID:22360458

  14. An Effective and Feasible Method, “Hammering Technique,” for Percutaneous Fixation of Anterior Column Acetabular Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihai; Zhang, Wei; Li, Tongtong; Li, Jiantao; Chen, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and advantages of percutaneous fixation of anterior column acetabular fracture with “hammering technique.” Materials and Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 16 patients with percutaneous fixation of anterior column acetabular fracture with “hammering technique.” There were 11 males and 5 females with an average age of 38.88 years (range: 24–54 years) in our study. Our study included 7 nondisplaced fractures, 6 mild displaced fractures (<2 mm), and 5 displaced fractures (>2 mm). The mean time from injury to surgery was 4.5 days (range: 2–7 days). Results. The average of operation time was 27.56 minutes (range: 15–45 minutes), and the mean blood loss was 55.28 mL (range: 15–100 mL). The mean fluoroscopic time was 54.78 seconds (range: 40–77 seconds). The first pass of the guide wire was acceptable without cortical perforation or intra-articular perforation in 88.89% (16/18) of the procedures, and the second attempt was in 11.11% (2/18). Conclusion. Our study suggested that percutaneous fixation of anterior column acetabular fracture with “hammering technique” acquired satisfying surgical and clinical outcomes. It may be an alternative satisfying treatment for percutaneous fixation of anterior column acetabular fracture by 2D fluoroscopy using a C-arm with less fluoroscopic time. PMID:27493962

  15. Loosening torque of prosthetic screws in metal-ceramic or metal-acrylic resin implant-supported dentures with different misfit levels.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Ataís; Paludo, Litiane; Ferraz Mesquita, Marcelo; Schuh, Christian; Federizzi, Leonardo; Oro Spazzin, Aloísio

    2013-04-26

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the prosthesis material (metal-acrylic resin or metal-ceramic) on loosening torque of the prosthetic screws in an implant-supported mandibular denture under two levels of vertical misfit. Ten frameworks were fabricated with commercially pure titanium, and five of them received acrylic resin and acrylic artificial teeth as veneering material and the other five were veneered with porcelain. Two levels of vertical fit were also created by fabricating 20 cast models to obtain four experimental groups according to the prosthesis material and misfit: Group 1 (metal-acrylic resin prosthesis with a passive fit); Group 2 (metal-acrylic resin prosthesis with a non-passive fit); Group 3 (metal-ceramic prosthesis with a passive fit); and Group 4 (metal-ceramic prosthesis with a non-passive fit). Two hundred prosthetic titanium-alloy screws were divided in 40 sets (five screws per set, n=10). After 24h, the loosening torque of the screws was evaluated using a digital torque meter. The results were submitted to two-way ANOVA analysis of variance followed by a Tukey's test (α=0.05). The mean values and standard deviations for each group were G1=7.05 (1.64), G2=5.52 (0.90), G3=6.46 (1.34), and G4=4.35 (0.99). Overall, the prosthesis material and misfit factors showed a statistically significant influence on the loosening torque (p<0.05). Metal-ceramic prosthesis and misfits decreased the loosening of the torque of the prosthetic screws.

  16. Extracellular Matrix Degradation and Tissue Remodeling in Periprosthetic Loosening and Osteolysis: Focus on Matrix Metalloproteinases, Their Endogenous Tissue Inhibitors, and the Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Syggelos, Spyros A.; Aletras, Alexios J.; Smirlaki, Ioanna; Skandalis, Spyros S.

    2013-01-01

    The leading complication of total joint replacement is periprosthetic osteolysis, which often results in aseptic loosening of the implant, leading to revision surgery. Extracellular matrix degradation and connective tissue remodeling around implants have been considered as major biological events in the periprosthetic loosening. Critical mediators of wear particle-induced inflammatory osteolysis released by periprosthetic synovial cells (mainly macrophages) are inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and proteolytic enzymes, mainly matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Numerous studies reveal a strong interdependence of MMP expression and activity with the molecular mechanisms that control the composition and turnover of periprosthetic matrices. MMPs can either actively modulate or be modulated by the molecular mechanisms that determine the debris-induced remodeling of the periprosthetic microenvironment. In the present study, the molecular mechanisms that control the composition, turnover, and activity of matrix macromolecules within the periprosthetic microenvironment exposed to wear debris are summarized and presented. Special emphasis is given to MMPs and their endogenous tissue inhibitors (TIMPs), as well as to the proteasome pathway, which appears to be an elegant molecular regulator of specific matrix macromolecules (including specific MMPs and TIMPs). Furthermore, strong rationale for potential clinical applications of the described molecular mechanisms to the treatment of periprosthetic loosening and osteolysis is provided. PMID:23862137

  17. Comparison of the roles of IL-1, IL-6, and TNFα in cell culture and murine models of aseptic loosening1

    PubMed Central

    Taki, Naoya; Tatro, Joscelyn M.; Lowe, Robert; Goldberg, Victor M.; Greenfield, Edward M.

    2007-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNF, are considered to be major mediators of osteolysis and ultimately aseptic loosening. This study demonstrated that synergistic interactions among these cytokines are required for the in vitro stimulation of osteoclast differentiation by titanium particles. In contrast, genetic knock out of these cytokines or their receptors does not protect murine calvaria from osteolysis induced by titanium particles. Thus, the extent of osteolysis was not substantially altered in single knock out mice lacking either the IL-1 receptor or IL-6. Osteolysis also was not substantially altered in double knock out mice lacking both the IL-1 receptor and IL-6 or in double knock out mice lacking both TNF receptor-1 and TNF receptor-2. The differences between the in vivo and the cell culture results make it difficult to conclude whether the pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to aseptic loosening. One alternative is that in vivo experiments are more physiological and that therefore the current results do not support a role for the pro-inflammatory cytokines in aseptic loosening. We however favor the alternative that, in this case, the cell culture experiments can be more informative. We favor this alternative because the role of the pro-inflammatory cytokines may be obscured in vivo by compensation by other cytokines or by the low signal to noise ratio found in measurements of particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:17236833

  18. Dilemmas in imaging for peri-acetabular osteotomy: the influence of patient position and imaging technique on the radiological features of hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kosuge, D; Cordier, T; Solomon, L B; Howie, D W

    2014-09-01

    Peri-acetabular osteotomy is an established surgical treatment for symptomatic acetabular dysplasia in young adults. An anteroposterior radiograph of the pelvis is commonly used to assess the extent of dysplasia as well as to assess post-operative correction. Radiological prognostic factors include the lateral centre-edge angle, acetabular index, extrusion index and the acetabular version. Standing causes a change in the pelvis tilt which can alter certain radiological measurements relative to the supine position. This article discusses the radiological indices used to assess dysplasia and reviews the effects of patient positioning on these indices with a focus on assessment for a peri-acetabular osteotomy. Intra-operatively, fluoroscopy is commonly used and the implications of using fluoroscopy as a modality to assess the various radiological indices along with the effects of using an anteroposterior or posteroanterior fluoroscopic view are examined. Each of these techniques gives rise to a slightly different image of the pelvis as the final image is sensitive to the position of the pelvis and the projection of the x-ray beam. PMID:25183583

  19. The capsular ligaments provide more hip rotational restraint than the acetabular labrum and the ligamentum teres

    PubMed Central

    van Arkel, R. J.; Amis, A. A.; Cobb, J. P.; Jeffers, J. R. T.

    2015-01-01

    In this in vitro study of the hip joint we examined which soft tissues act as primary and secondary passive rotational restraints when the hip joint is functionally loaded. A total of nine cadaveric left hips were mounted in a testing rig that allowed the application of forces, torques and rotations in all six degrees of freedom. The hip was rotated throughout a complete range of movement (ROM) and the contributions of the iliofemoral (medial and lateral arms), pubofemoral and ischiofemoral ligaments and the ligamentum teres to rotational restraint was determined by resecting a ligament and measuring the reduced torque required to achieve the same angular position as before resection. The contribution from the acetabular labrum was also measured. Each of the capsular ligaments acted as the primary hip rotation restraint somewhere within the complete ROM, and the ligamentum teres acted as a secondary restraint in high flexion, adduction and external rotation. The iliofemoral lateral arm and the ischiofemoral ligaments were primary restraints in two-thirds of the positions tested. Appreciation of the importance of these structures in preventing excessive hip rotation and subsequent impingement/instability may be relevant for surgeons undertaking both hip joint preserving surgery and hip arthroplasty. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015; 97-B:484–91. PMID:25820886

  20. Direct reduction technique for superomedial dome impaction in geriatric acetabular fractures.

    PubMed

    Laflamme, G-Yves; Hebert-Davies, Jonah

    2014-02-01

    The treatment of acetabular fractures in the elderly patients remains challenging. The "Gull Sign," which was recently described, was 100% predictive of failure of reduction and/or fixation. However, we believe that adequate reduction can be achieved and lead to good functional outcomes. Our technique differs from classic methods because it uses an anterior intrapelvic approach (the modified Stoppa) to obtain direct reduction of the impacted fragments. Access to the impacted superomedial dome is achieved by mobilizing the quadrilateral fragment, thus allowing direct visualization of the impacted articular surface. After reduction, definitive fixation is obtained with 3.5-mm cortical screws positioned in the subchondral bone directly over the Gull fragment. Our technique was performed in 9 patients, with a mean follow-up of 2.8 years. The quality of reduction was within 3 mm in 7 patients (78%). The overall conversion rate to total hip arthroplasty was 33%. All patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty either had initial malreduction or suffered an early loss of reduction. Other complications included 1 case of heterotopic ossification (Brooker type II) and 1 case of deep vein thrombosis. There were no infections. The average Harris Hip Score was 81. Good reduction of superior medial dome impaction can be obtained and maintained in the well-selected geriatric patient. We believe that, appropriately used, this direct reduction technique can be an important adjunct to surgeons dealing with this troublesome fracture.

  1. Untreated acetabular dysplasia of the hip in the Navajo. A 34 year case series followup.

    PubMed

    Schwend, R M; Pratt, W B; Fultz, J

    1999-07-01

    Patients born in the Many Farms District of the Navajo Indian Reservation from 1955 to 1961 were studied. Five hundred forty-eight of the 628 infants born (87%) received clinical examinations and pelvic radiographs at some time during the first 4 years of their lives. Eighteen (3.3%) of the 548 infants examined had acetabular dysplasia. Because of traditional cultural beliefs, none of these children received medical treatment. Followup evaluations and radiographs were obtained in these 18 patients during early adolescence. In 10 of the original 18 patients followup evaluations and radiographs were obtained at an average age of 35 years. None of the dysplastic hips progressed to frank dislocation. The mean center edge angle improved from 7 degrees when the patients were 1 year of age, to 29 degrees when the patients were 12 years of age, to 30 degrees when the patients were 35 years of age. Despite overall improvement of hip measurements with maturity, eight hips in five of the 10 patients who were in their fourth decade of life and who were available for examination, had radiographic evidence of residual abnormalities. The hips in patients with subluxation during infancy were less likely to be normal as adults. The results of this 34-year followup study of untreated developmental hip dysplasia showed marked radiographic improvement in all patients during childhood; however, subtle abnormalities persisted in the radiographs of 40% of the hips. PMID:10416399

  2. The Relationship of Acetabular Dysplasia and Femoroacetabular Impingement to Hip Osteoarthritis: A Focused Review

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Nathaniel K.

    2012-01-01

    Hip osteoarthritis (OA) leads to significant functional limitations and economic burden. If modifiable risk factors for hip OA are identified, it may be possible to implement preventative measures. Bony abnormalities associated with acetabular dysplasia (AD) and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) have been recently implicated as risk factors for hip osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this focused review is to summarize the available evidence describing the relationship between bony abnormalities and hip OA. A librarian-assisted database search using PubMed, Embase and Central was performed. Relevant articles were identified and assessed for inclusion criteria. The authors reviewed cohort and case control studies that reported on the association between abnormal hip morphology and hip OA. The available literature suggests that an association exists between bony abnormalities found in AD and FAI and hip OA and preliminary evidence suggests that AD is a risk factor for OA, however these conclusions are based on limited evidence. Prospective, longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the causal relationship between abnormal hip morphology and the future development of hip OA. PMID:22108232

  3. Tranexamic acid reduces the blood loss and blood transfusion requirements following peri-acetabular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Wassilew, G I; Perka, C; Janz, V; Krämer, M; Renner, L

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the effect of using tranexamic acid (TXA) during peri-acetabular osteotomy (PAO) on peri-operative blood loss and blood transfusion requirements. In addition we analysed whether the use of TXA was associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) following this procedure. A consecutive series of 96 PAOs, performed by a single surgeon, were reviewed. A total of 48 patients received TXA and 48 did not. The TXA group received a continuous infusion of TXA at a rate of 10 mg/kg/h. The primary outcome measure was the requirement for blood transfusion. Secondary outcomes included total blood loss, the decrease in the level of haemoglobin in the blood, the length of hospital stay, and the complications of this treatment. The mean rate of transfusion was significantly lower in the TXA group (62.5% vs 12.5%, p < 0.001). The mean blood loss was also significantly reduced in the TXA group (1.9 L (standard deviation (SD) 0.9) vs 1.5 L (SD 0.7), p < 0.01). No post-operative episodes of VTE were identified in either group. The use of TXA reduced the blood loss and the rate of transfusion after PAO significantly, without adverse effects such as an increased rate of VTE.

  4. Retrieval analysis of a failed TriboFit polycarbonate urethane acetabular buffer.

    PubMed

    Biant, Leela C; Gascoyne, Trevor C; Bohm, Eric R; Moran, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the failure mechanisms and damage features of a TriboFit acetabular buffer implanted directly against a native, prepared acetabulum which was revised after 11months. Retrieval analyses were carried out via light microscopy, gravimetric wear assessment, and observer scoring of visible damage features on the buffer. The volume of material abraded from the backside of the buffer was estimated via three-dimensional reconstruction using a laser scanner. Scanning electron microscopy was used to confirm damage features and mechanisms. Severe abrasion to the backside of the buffer was the primary damage feature, while stippling damage was seen on the articular surface of the buffer. Material loss due to backside abrasion was approximated to be between 0.13360.085 g (gravimetric analyses) and 0.19360.053 g (three-dimensional reconstruction). Implantation of the TriboFit buffer against the patient's native acetabulum without a metal backing allowed for significant movement of the buffer against the bone, resulting in the abrasion seen on this implant. The stippling damage on the articular surface indicates an adhesive wear mechanism which exacerbates movement of the buffer against the acetabulum, thereby increasing backside abrasion.

  5. Stabilisation of crosslinked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE)-acetabular components with alpha-tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Wolf, C; Maninger, J; Lederer, K; Frühwirth-Smounig, H; Gamse, T; Marr, R

    2006-12-01

    A stabilisation of crosslinked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) with alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) used for endoprostheses can increase its resistance against oxidative degradation remarkably. However, the method used for conventional UHMW-PE of adding alpha-tocopherol to the UHMW-PE powder before processing can not be applied for crosslinked UHMW-PE, since the alpha-tocopherol hinders the crosslinking process, which would be accompanied by a heavy degradation of this vitamin. The alpha-tocopherol has therefore to be added after the crosslinking process. This paper presents two methods for a stabilisation of finished products with alpha-tocopherol. In method 1, UHMW-PE-cubes (20 x 20 x 20 mm3) were stored in pure alpha-tocopherol under inert atmosphere at temperatures from 100 degrees C to 150 degrees C resulting in a high mass fraction of alpha-tocopherol in the edge zones. For further homogenisation, the cubes were stored in inert atmosphere at temperatures from 160 degrees C to 200 degrees C. In method 2, supercritical CO2 was used to incorporate the vitamin into the UHMW-PE. In an autoclave vessel, the cubes were treated with alpha-tocopherol dissolved in supercritical CO2 for several hours at temperatures from 100 degrees C to 170 degrees C. In both cases, the mass fraction of alpha-tocopherol was detected with the help of a FTIR-microscope. Both methods are well suited to stabilise crosslinked UHMW-PE with alpha-tocopherol. A stabilisation of the sensitive edge layer as well as a nearly homogenous distribution with varying alpha-tocopherol content may be realised by varying the process parameters. Using method 2, standard hip cups were stabilized nearly homogeneously with varying mass fraction of alpha-tocopherol. No oxidation of the UHMW-PE could be detected by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and HPLC studies showed a very low degradation of the alpha-tocopherol for both processes. PMID:17143764

  6. Etiology and severity of impingement injuries of the acetabular labrum: what is the role of femoral morphology?

    PubMed

    Dy, Christopher J; Schroder, Steven J; Thompson, Matthew T; Alexander, Jerry W; Noble, Philip C

    2012-06-01

    Injuries to the acetabular labrum have been seen in association with femoroacetabular impingement, but recent studies have reported labral pathology in patients with normal hip morphology. The hypothesis of the current study was that labral lesions could occur without femoroacetabular impingement but that labral pathology would occur more commonly and more severely in hip joints that exhibit reduced head-neck offset. The presence, location, and severity of labral injury were recorded in 22 cadaveric specimens. Computed tomography was used to define the anatomic parameters of proximal femoral morphology. Three-dimensional modeling was used to simulate hip positions that typically cause labral impingement, including high flexion and internal rotation. Femoral morphology was compared between specimens with and without labral pathology using descriptive statistics. Labral pathology was seen in 15 of 22 specimens and was located in the anterosuperior portion of the labrum. No difference existed in age, femoral neck shaft angle, anteversion, acetabular depth, head diameter, alpha angle, or beta angle between specimens with and without labral pathology. The severity of labral pathology correlated with the alpha angle of the proximal femur. This study demonstrates that damage to the labrum may occur in hips with normal proximal femur morphology. However, the findings also indicate that the presence of morphologic features that increase the risk of impingement may predispose the hip joint to a characteristic pattern or severity of labral pathology. The results confirm the importance of considering both femoral morphology and athletic-type activities of the hip when determining the mechanism responsible for injury of the acetabular labrum.

  7. Computed tomography arthrography with traction in the human hip for three-dimensional reconstruction of cartilage and the acetabular labrum

    PubMed Central

    Henak, C.R.; Abraham, C.L.; Peters, C.L.; Sanders, R.K.; Weiss, J.A.; Anderson, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    AIM To develop and demonstrate the efficacy of a computed tomography arthrography (CTA) protocol for the hip that enables accurate three-dimensional reconstructions of cartilage and excellent visualization of the acetabular labrum. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ninety-three subjects were imaged (104 scans); 68 subjects with abnormal anatomy, 11 patients after periacetabular osteotomy surgery, and 25 subjects with normal anatomy. Fifteen to 25 ml of contrast agent diluted with lidocaine was injected using a lateral oblique approach. A Hare traction splint applied traction during CT. The association between traction force and intra-articular joint space was assessed qualitatively under fluoroscopy. Cartilage geometry was reconstructed from the CTA images for 30 subjects; the maximum joint space under traction was measured. RESULTS Using the Hare traction splint, the intra-articular space and boundaries of cartilage could be clearly delineated throughout the joint; the acetabular labrum was also visible. Dysplastic hips required less traction (~5 kg) than normal and retroverted hips required (>10 kg) to separate the cartilage. An increase in traction force produced a corresponding widening of the intra-articular joint space. Under traction, the maximum width of the intra-articular joint space during CT ranged from 0.98–6.7 mm (2.46 ± 1.16 mm). CONCLUSIONS When applied to subjects with normal and abnormal hip anatomy, the CTA protocol presented yields clear delineation of the cartilage and the acetabular labrum. Use of a Hare traction splint provides a simple, cost-effective method to widen the intra-articular joint space during CT, and provides flexibility to vary the traction as required. PMID:25070373

  8. Acute Failure of a Glenoid Component in Anatomic Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, III, Norman D.

    2016-01-01

    Glenoid loosening is the most common cause of failure in primary total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and often occurs years after the initial surgery. It is rare for a glenoid component to fail acutely. Several case reports of complete glenoid dissociation appear in the literature. It is important to report these failures to identify technical errors or component design flaws to improve outcomes in TSA. In this case report, we present an unrecognized acute failure of a cemented hybrid glenoid component at the time of surgery. PMID:27555976

  9. Acute Failure of a Glenoid Component in Anatomic Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Daner Iii, William E; Boardman Iii, Norman D

    2016-01-01

    Glenoid loosening is the most common cause of failure in primary total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and often occurs years after the initial surgery. It is rare for a glenoid component to fail acutely. Several case reports of complete glenoid dissociation appear in the literature. It is important to report these failures to identify technical errors or component design flaws to improve outcomes in TSA. In this case report, we present an unrecognized acute failure of a cemented hybrid glenoid component at the time of surgery. PMID:27555976

  10. Radiological evaluation of the femoral component fixed with interface bioactive bone cement in revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hiroshi; Oonishi, Hironobu; Ito, Shigeru; Kim, Seok Cheol; Doukawa, Hirofumi

    2008-08-01

    Thirty cases whose femoral side was operated with interface bioactive bone cement technique in revision total hip arthroplasty for aseptic loosening and followed for more than 6 years were evaluated. The present study includes 2 men and 28 women with an average age at operation of 60 years. Mean postoperative follow-up period was 9 years. Rerevision of femoral component was not found. Possible loosening was observed in 1 case, using the criteria of Harris. Among 21 cases whose cementing grade was assessed as B or C in postoperative x-ray, radiolucent line at bone-cement interface has disappeared before last follow-up in 11 cases. The present study revealed that the good result was obtained using the interface bioactive bone cement technique for reconstruction of aseptic femoral loosening.

  11. [Acetabular Osteolysis in Total Hip Replacement - When to Retain the Cup?].

    PubMed

    Lutz, B; Faschingbauer, M; Bieger, R; Reichel, H; Kappe, T

    2016-08-01

    Periacetabular osteolysis is a frequent long-term complication of cementless total hip arthroplasty. The decision whether to retain or to revise a cup in the presence of osteolysis remains a challenge. The options are regular clinical and radiological check-ups, isolated liner exchange with and without bone grafting, and complete cup revision. Thorough preoperative diagnostics, including a medical history, examination and imaging, are mandatory for correct decision making. In most patients, computed tomography is useful to assess periacetabular osteolysis. If the cup is well-fixed and positioned in an asymptomatic patient without progressive osteolysis and no implant defect or higher grade polyethylene wear and no signs of infection, continuous clinical and radiological monitoring is preferred. If imaging reveals cup loosening, malposition, osteolysis localised in a weight-bearing area, imminent or present periprosthetic fractures, rapid progressive osteolysis, implant defects or massive inlay wear, surgical treatment may be preferred. Cup revision is usually performed in such patients. If the cup is well-positioned and well-fixed in the X-ray, the procedure has to be discussed with the patient individually. Apart from patient-specific risk factors, the risk of further progression has to be assessed. Isolated liner exchange can be performed if the patient is asymptomatic and the cup proves to be stable intraoperatively. It is still unclear whether filling osteolyses through screw holes or osseous windows is of long-term benefit. PMID:27249047

  12. Trabecular metal tibial knee component still stable at 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, Anders; Nilsson, Kjell G

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total knee replacement (TKR) in younger patients using cemented components has shown inferior results, mainly due to aseptic loosening. Excellent clinical results have been reported with components made of trabecular metal (TM). In a previous report, we have shown stabilization of the TM tibial implants for up to 5 years. In this study, we compared the clinical and RSA results of these uncemented implants with those of cemented implants. Patients and methods 41 patients (47 knees) aged ≤ 60 years underwent TKR. 22 patients (26 knees) received an uncemented monoblock cruciate-retaining (CR) tibial component (TM) and 19 patients (21 knees) received a cemented NexGen Option CR tibial component. Follow-up examination was done at 10 years, and 16 patients (19 knees) with TM tibial components and 17 patients (18 knees) with cemented tibial components remained for analysis. Results 1 of 19 TM implants was revised for infection, 2 of 18 cemented components were revised for knee instability, and no revisions were done for loosening. Both types of tibial components migrated in the first 3 months, the TM group to a greater extent than the cemented group. After 3 months, both groups were stable during the next 10 years. Interpretation The patterns of migration for uncemented TM implants and cemented tibial implants over the first 10 years indicate that they have a good long-term prognosis regarding fixation PMID:27357222

  13. Trabecular metal tibial knee component still stable at 10 years.

    PubMed

    Henricson, Anders; Nilsson, Kjell G

    2016-10-01

    Background and purpose - Total knee replacement (TKR) in younger patients using cemented components has shown inferior results, mainly due to aseptic loosening. Excellent clinical results have been reported with components made of trabecular metal (TM). In a previous report, we have shown stabilization of the TM tibial implants for up to 5 years. In this study, we compared the clinical and RSA results of these uncemented implants with those of cemented implants. Patients and methods - 41 patients (47 knees) aged ≤ 60 years underwent TKR. 22 patients (26 knees) received an uncemented monoblock cruciate-retaining (CR) tibial component (TM) and 19 patients (21 knees) received a cemented NexGen Option CR tibial component. Follow-up examination was done at 10 years, and 16 patients (19 knees) with TM tibial components and 17 patients (18 knees) with cemented tibial components remained for analysis. Results - 1 of 19 TM implants was revised for infection, 2 of 18 cemented components were revised for knee instability, and no revisions were done for loosening. Both types of tibial components migrated in the first 3 months, the TM group to a greater extent than the cemented group. After 3 months, both groups were stable during the next 10 years. Interpretation - The patterns of migration for uncemented TM implants and cemented tibial implants over the first 10 years indicate that they have a good long-term prognosis regarding fixation. PMID:27357222

  14. Supra-acetabular fixation and sacroiliac screws for treating unstable pelvic ring injuries: preliminary results from 20 patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Rodrigo Pereira; de Góes Ribeiro, Arthur; Ulson, Oliver; de Ávila, Ricardo Bertozzi; Ono, Nelson Keiske; Polesello, Giancarlo Cavalli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the treatment results from 20 patients who underwent an alternative osteosynthesis method as definitive treatment for pelvic ring fractures. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted on a series of 20 patients with pelvic ring fractures (Tile type C) and a high risk of postoperative infection, who were treated at Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo between August 2004 and December 2012. The patients underwent percutaneous supra-acetabular external fixation in association with cannulated 7.0 mm iliosacral screws. Results The patients’ mean age was 40 years (range 22–77 years) and the mean length of follow-up was 18.5 months (range 3–69 months). At the end of the treatment, ten patients (50%) were classified as having good results, nine patients (45%) had fair results and one patient (5%) did not have any improvement. Six patients presented complications, and paresthesia of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was the most frequent of these (two patients). Conclusion Supra-acetabular external fixation in association with iliosacral percutaneous osteosynthesis is a good definitive treatment method for patients with a high risk of postoperative infection. PMID:27069879

  15. Hip flexor muscle size, strength and recruitment pattern in patients with acetabular labral tears compared to healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Mendis, M Dilani; Wilson, Stephen J; Hayes, David A; Watts, Mark C; Hides, Julie A

    2014-10-01

    Acetabular labral tears are a source of hip pain and are considered to be a precursor to hip osteoarthritis. Hip flexor muscles contribute to hip joint stability and function but it is unknown if their size and function is altered in the presence of labral pathology. This study aimed to investigate hip flexor muscle size, strength and recruitment pattern in patients with hip labral pathology compared to control subjects. 12 subjects diagnosed with an unilateral acetabular labral tear were compared to 12 control subjects matched for age and gender. All subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of their lumbo-pelvic region. Average muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) of the iliacus, psoas, iliopsoas, sartorius, tensor fascia latae and rectus femoris muscles were measured. Hip flexion strength was measured by an externally fixed dynamometer. Individual muscle recruitment pattern during a resisted hip flexion exercise task was measured by muscle functional MRI. Hip flexor muscle strength was found to be decreased in patients with labral pathology compared to control subjects (p < 0.01). No difference between groups or sides was found for hip flexor muscle size (all p > 0.17) and recruitment pattern (all p > 0.53). Decreased hip flexor muscle strength may affect physical function in patients with hip labral pathology by contributing to altered gait patterns and functional tasks. Clinical rehabilitation of these patients may need to include strengthening exercises for the hip flexor muscles.

  16. Presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated reactions in periprosthetic tissue after aseptic loosening of total hip replacements with metal bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huber, Monika; Reinisch, Georg; Trettenhahn, Günter; Zweymüller, Karl; Lintner, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Aseptic loosening of articular implants is frequently associated with tissue reactions to wear particles. Some patients, who had received metal-on-metal articulations, present early symptoms including persistent pain and implant failure. These symptoms raise the suspicion about the development of an immunological response. Furthermore, the generation of rare corrosion products in association with metallic implants has been observed. Corrosion products are known to enhance third-body wear and contribute to the loss of the implant. The purpose of this study was to investigate periprosthetic tissue containing solid corrosion products after aseptic loosening of second-generation metal-on-metal total hip replacements made of low-carbon cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy for the presence of immunologically determined tissue changes. Periprosthetic tissue of 11 cases containing uncommon solid deposits was investigated by light microscopy. In order to confirm the presence of corrosion products, additional methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR) analysis were used. All investigated cases revealed solid chromium orthophosphate corrosion products as well as metallic wear particles to a various extent. Moreover, various intense tissue reactions characteristic of immune response were observed in all cases. The simultaneous presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated tissue reaction indicates that a relationship between corrosion development and implant-related hypersensitivity may exist. PMID:18725188

  17. Effect of cement washout on loosening of abutment screws and vice versa in screw- and cement- retained implant-supported dental prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Gyu; Son, Mee-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to examine the abutment screw stability of screw- and cement-retained implant-supported dental prosthesis (SCP) after simulated cement washout as well as the stability of SCP cements after complete loosening of abutment screws. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-six titanium CAD/CAM-made implant prostheses were fabricated on two implants placed in the resin models. Each prosthesis is a two-unit SCP: one screw-retained and the other cemented. After evaluating the passive fit of each prosthesis, all implant prostheses were randomly divided into 3 groups: screwed and cemented SCP (Control), screwed and noncemented SCP (Group 1), unscrewed and cemented SCP (Group 2). Each prosthesis in Control and Group 1 was screwed and/or cemented, and the preloading reverse torque value (RTV) was evaluated. SCP in Group 2 was screwed and cemented, and then unscrewed (RTV=0) after the cement was set. After cyclic loading was applied, the postloading RTV was measured. RTV loss and decementation ratios were calculated for statistical analysis. RESULTS There was no significant difference in RTV loss ratio between Control and Group 1 (P=.16). No decemented prosthesis was found among Control and Group 2. CONCLUSION Within the limits of this in vitro study, the stabilities of SCP abutment screws and cement were not significantly changed after simulated cement washout or screw loosening. PMID:26140172

  18. Dual-mobility cup and cemented femoral component: 6 year follow-up results.

    PubMed

    Prudhon, Jean Louis

    2011-01-01

    Use of a dual-mobility acetabular cup is associated with a lower risk of dislocation compared with conventional hip implants. The seleXys® DS acetabular cup combines the advantages of Charnley low-friction arthroplasty with those of dual mobility. We performed a non-randomised, prospective study of patients receiving primary hip arthroplasty, including an uncemented seleXys® DS dual-mobility acetabular cup with hydroxyapatite coating (Mathys AG, Bettlach, Switzerland) and a cemented femoral component (Stallion femoral stem Groupe Lepine, Lyon, France). The objective of the study was to evaluate longevity of the implant and the risk of dislocation. All operations were performed by a single surgeon using a posterior approach, with patients lying in the lateral decubitus position. The stem had a modular head diameter of 22.2 mm and was cemented in all patients. A total of 53 patients were studied, and the median duration of follow-up was 78.9 months. Implant survival 6 years after surgery was 98.4% (n=47; 95% CI: 89.3-99.8). There was one revision for sepsis 29 months after surgery, and one dislocation. The results of this study appear to demonstrate excellent implant survival and a low rate of dislocation using the chosen implants.

  19. Acetabular Liner Dissociation following Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Rare but Serious Complication That May Be Easily Misinterpreted in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Christopher K. J.; Napier, Richard J.; Diamond, Owen J.; O'Brien, Seamus; Beverland, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Acetabular liner dissociation is a rare complication of Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) which requires urgent revision surgery. A case is presented in which the correct diagnosis was not appreciated on two separate Emergency Department attendances. The typical symptoms, signs, and radiological features are outlined and the importance of considering a rare complication following a commonly performed procedure is highlighted. PMID:26543652

  20. Influence of clearance on the time-dependent performance of the hip following hemiarthroplasty: A finite element study with biphasic acetabular cartilage properties

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junyan; Hua, Xijin; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John; Wilcox, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    Hip hemiarthroplasty is a common treatment for femoral neck fracture. However, the acetabular cartilage may degenerate after hemiarthroplasty leading to postoperative failure and the need for revision surgery. The clearance between the acetabular cartilage and head of the prosthesis is one of the potential reasons for this failure. In this study, the influence of joint clearance on the biomechanical function of a generic hip model in hemiarthroplasty was investigated using biphasic numerical simulation. Both a prolonged loading period of 4000 s and dynamic gait load of 10 cycles were considered. It was found that a larger clearance led to a higher stress level, a faster reduction in load supported by the fluid and a faster cartilage consolidation process. Additionally, the mechanical performance of the acetabular cartilage in the natural model was similar to that in the hemiarthroplasty model with no clearance but different from the hemiarthroplasty models with clearances of 0.5 mm and larger. The results demonstrated that a larger clearance in hip hemiarthroplasty is more harmful to the acetabular cartilage and prosthesis heads with more available dimensions (i.e. smaller increments in diameter) could be manufactured for surgeons to achieve a lower clearance, and reduced contact stress in hemiarthroplasty surgeries. PMID:24957488

  1. Early predictors of acetabular growth after closed reduction in late detected developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Li, YiQiang; Xu, HongWen; Li, JingChun; Yu, LingJia; Liu, YuanZhong; Southern, Edward; Liu, HongSheng

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates improvement of the acetabular index (AI) in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip at 4 years after closed reduction, and determines the association between the final AI and a set of factors. Sixty-two patients (74 hips) treated with closed reduction were categorized into three groups according to age: group A (0-12 months, 18 hips), group B (13-18 months, 24 hips), and group C (>18 months, 32 hips). There was no difference in AI among the three groups before reduction (P=0.293). In groups A and C, the AI decreased significantly over time until 3 years after reduction and no differences were observed between the time points of 3 and 4 years. At 4 years after reduction, the AI of group C was significantly higher than that of groups A (P<0.001) and B (P=0.012). The overall AI improvement rate was 28.63%. The AI improvement rate of group A was significantly higher than that of group C (P=0.005). Pearson correlation analysis indicated no correlation between center-head distance discrepancy and the final AI (P=0.811). Linear regression suggested that age and initial AI correlated significantly with the final AI (R=0.617, F=15.031, P<0.001). Other factors, such as sex, center-edge angle of Wiberg, bilaterally involved, and avascular necrosis of the femoral head, showed no correlations with the final AI (P>0.05). According to the coefficients, initial AI (β1=0.432, P<0.001) had greater effect than age (β2=0.197, P=0.023) on the final AI. In conclusion, the AI decreases in all patients after reduction and stabilizes at 3 years after reduction. The AI improvement rate is correlated negatively with age. Age and initial AI are early predictors of the progress of AI after closed reduction in developmental dysplasia of the hip patients. PMID:25305044

  2. Effects of rotational acetabular osteotomy on the mechanical stress within the hip joint in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip: a subject-specific finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Ike, H; Inaba, Y; Kobayashi, N; Yukizawa, Y; Hirata, Y; Tomioka, M; Saito, T

    2015-04-01

    In this study we used subject-specific finite element analysis to investigate the mechanical effects of rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) on the hip joint and analysed the correlation between various radiological measurements and mechanical stress in the hip joint. We evaluated 13 hips in 12 patients (two men and ten women, mean age at surgery 32.0 years; 19 to 46) with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) who were treated by RAO. Subject-specific finite element models were constructed from CT data. The centre-edge (CE) angle, acetabular head index (AHI), acetabular angle and acetabular roof angle (ARA) were measured on anteroposterior pelvic radiographs taken before and after RAO. The relationship between equivalent stress in the hip joint and radiological measurements was analysed. The equivalent stress in the acetabulum decreased from 4.1 MPa (2.7 to 6.5) pre-operatively to 2.8 MPa (1.8 to 3.6) post-operatively (p < 0.01). There was a moderate correlation between equivalent stress in the acetabulum and the radiological measurements: CE angle (R = -0.645, p < 0.01); AHI (R = -0.603, p < 0.01); acetabular angle (R = 0.484, p = 0.02); and ARA (R = 0.572, p < 0.01). The equivalent stress in the acetabulum of patients with DDH decreased after RAO. Correction of the CE angle, AHI and ARA was considered to be important in reducing the mechanical stress in the hip joint. PMID:25820887

  3. Effects of rotational acetabular osteotomy on the mechanical stress within the hip joint in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip: a subject-specific finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Ike, H; Inaba, Y; Kobayashi, N; Yukizawa, Y; Hirata, Y; Tomioka, M; Saito, T

    2015-04-01

    In this study we used subject-specific finite element analysis to investigate the mechanical effects of rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) on the hip joint and analysed the correlation between various radiological measurements and mechanical stress in the hip joint. We evaluated 13 hips in 12 patients (two men and ten women, mean age at surgery 32.0 years; 19 to 46) with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) who were treated by RAO. Subject-specific finite element models were constructed from CT data. The centre-edge (CE) angle, acetabular head index (AHI), acetabular angle and acetabular roof angle (ARA) were measured on anteroposterior pelvic radiographs taken before and after RAO. The relationship between equivalent stress in the hip joint and radiological measurements was analysed. The equivalent stress in the acetabulum decreased from 4.1 MPa (2.7 to 6.5) pre-operatively to 2.8 MPa (1.8 to 3.6) post-operatively (p < 0.01). There was a moderate correlation between equivalent stress in the acetabulum and the radiological measurements: CE angle (R = -0.645, p < 0.01); AHI (R = -0.603, p < 0.01); acetabular angle (R = 0.484, p = 0.02); and ARA (R = 0.572, p < 0.01). The equivalent stress in the acetabulum of patients with DDH decreased after RAO. Correction of the CE angle, AHI and ARA was considered to be important in reducing the mechanical stress in the hip joint.

  4. Prospective study of sequential technetium-99m phosphate and gallium imaging in painful hip prostheses (comparison of diagnostic modalities)

    SciTech Connect

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Gubernick, I.; Blaha, D.

    1988-04-01

    Twenty-two painful hip prostheses were studied prospectively with plain radiography, aspiration and arthrography, Tc-99m phosphate bone imaging, and gallium imaging to evaluate loosening, infection, or both and to compare the accuracy of these modalities. Fifteen prostheses were revised yielding 14 loose femoral and eight loose acetabular components. Five proved to have infected prostheses. Arthrograms, plain radiographs, and bone scans are highly sensitive in detecting loosening of the femoral component. This study confirmed a previous retrospective study in demonstrating that accuracy of diagnosis of an abnormal acetabular component using all four modalities is less than that for the femoral component. In infected prostheses, phosphate bone imaging showed high sensitivity of a pattern that accurately diagnosed all the infected cases, whereas gallium imaging missed one case.

  5. Comparison of 3.0-T MR vs 3.0-T MR arthrography of the hip for detection of acetabular labral tears and chondral defects in the same patient population

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We report our experience in diagnostic sensitivity of 3.0-T conventional MR vs 3.0-T MR arthrography of the hip for detection of acetabular labral tears and chondral defects in the same patient population. Methods: 43 consecutive patients had both conventional hip MR and MR arthrography examinations performed. These examinations were reviewed retrospectively by independent reading of two musculoskeletal radiologists who read the MR and MR arthrogram examinations in a randomized fashion (i.e. MR and MR arthrogram examinations were read at separate sittings and in a randomized fashion so as not to bias reviewers). Scans were assessed for acetabular labral tears and chondral defects. All patients went on to arthroscopy. Results: Of these 43 patients, 40 had acetabular labral tears read by Reader 1 and 39 had acetabular labral tears read by Reader 2 on MR arthrogram, 39 had acetabular labral tears read by Reader 1 and 38 had acetabular labral tears read by Reader 2 on conventional MR examination. There were 42 labral tears in 43 patients at arthroscopy. There were four false-negative labral tears compared with arthroscopy on MR and three false negatives on MR arthrography for Reader 1 and five false negatives on MR and four false negatives on MR arthrography for Reader 2. Each reader had one false-positive labral tear compared with arthroscopy on both MR and MR arthrography. There were 32 acetabular chondral defects at arthroscopy. Reader 1 saw 21 acetabular chondral defects on conventional MR and 27 chondral defects at MR arthrography. Reader 2 saw 19 acetabular chondral defects at conventional MR and 25 acetabular chondral defects on MR arthrography. There were no false-positive readings of chondral defects compared with arthroscopy on MR and one false positive for Reader 1 and two false positives for Reader 2 on MR arthrography as compared with arthroscopy. On conventional MR examination, sensitivities and specificities as compared with arthroscopy were

  6. Cemented total hip prosthesis: Radiographic and scintigraphic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Aliabadi, P.; Tumeh, S.S.; Weissman, B.N.; McNeil, B.J. )

    1989-10-01

    Conventional radiographs, technetium-99m bone scans, and gallium-67 scans were reviewed in 44 patients who had undergone cemented total hip joint replacement and were imaged because of suspicion of prosthesis loosening or infection. A complete radiolucent line of 2 mm or wider along the bone-cement interface or metal-cement lucency on conventional radiographs was used as the criterion for prosthetic loosening with or without infection and proved to be 54% sensitive and 96% specific. Scintigraphic criteria for prosthetic loosening were increased focal uptake of the radiopharmaceutical for the femoral component and increased focal or diffuse uptake for the acetabular component. For bone scintigraphy, sensitivity was 73% and specificity was 96%. Combining the results of conventional radiographs and bone scans increased sensitivity to 84% and decreased specificity to 92% for the diagnosis of loosening, infection, or both. The study also showed that Ga-67 scintigraphy has a low sensitivity for the detection of infection.

  7. Open reduction and internal fixation of osteoporotic acetabular fractures through the ilio-inguinal approach: use of buttress plates to control medial displacement of the quadrilateral surface.

    PubMed

    Peter, Robin E

    2015-01-01

    The number of acetabular fractures in the geriatric population requiring open reduction and internal fixation is increasing. Fractures with medial or anterior displacement are the most frequent types, and via the ilio-inguinal approach buttress plates have proved helpful to maintain the quadrilateral surface or medial acetabular wall. Seven to ten hole 3.5 mm reconstruction plates may be used as buttress plates, placed underneath the usual pelvic brim plate. This retrospective study presents our results with this technique in 13 patients at a minimum follow-up of 12 months (average, 31 months). 85% of the patients had a good result. The early onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis necessitated total hip arthroplasty in two patients (15%) at 12 and 18 months follow-up, respectively. This treatment option should be considered in the surgeon's armamentarium when fixing these challenging cases.

  8. Oxidation in ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene and cross-linked polyethylene acetabular cups tested against roughened femoral heads in a hip joint simulator.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Paola; Affatato, Saverio; Fagnano, Concezio; Toni, Aldo

    2006-06-01

    This study was aimed at comparing the oxidative degradation of commercial acetabular cups made of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) and conventional ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). After testing against deliberately scratched CoCrMo femoral heads in a hip joint simulator, the cups, microtomed parallel to the articulating surface, were analyzed by IR spectroscopy. Due to the potential for artifacts caused by absorbed contaminants, the IR spectra were compared only after hexane extraction; actually, XLPE was found to absorb more serum than UHMWPE. The two sets of unworn acetabular cups showed different oxidation patterns with consequently different distributions of carbonyl species; unworn XLPE was characterized by lower contents of carbonyl species and hydrogen-bonded alcohols and higher contents of trans-vinylene species than unworn UHMWPE. Upon simulator testing, UHMWPE showed more significant changes in oxidation indexes and distribution of carbonyl compounds than XLPE, confirming a better wear behavior for XLPE under the adopted testing conditions.

  9. The Divergence of Wear Propagation and Stress at Steep Acetabular Cup Positions Using Ceramic Heads and Sequentially Cross-Linked Polyethylene Liners.

    PubMed

    Zietz, Carmen; Fabry, Christian; Baum, Felix; Bader, Rainer; Kluess, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present wear simulator study was to assess the effect of steep acetabular cup positions on the wear propagation of highly cross-linked-PE (HX-PE) liners. Furthermore, a finite element analysis (FEA) was performed in order to calculate the stress within the HX-PE material in case of steep cup positions under physiological loadings. The higher stress in the HX-PE at a steep acetabular cup position did not result in increased wear in the present wear simulator study. The gravimetrical wear rates at normal (45°) and steep cup inclinations (75°) showed wear amounts of 3.15±0.27mg and 2.18±0.31mg per million cycles (p=0.028), respectively. However, FEA revealed clear increase in stress at the HX-PE liners with respect to steep cup positions.

  10. Influence of cementless cup surface on stability and bone fixation 2 years after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Urbański, Wiktor; Krawczyk, Artur; Dragan, Szymon Ł; Kulej, Mirosław; Dragan, Szymon F

    2012-01-01

    Loss of fixation between bone and implant surface is one of the main treatment problems in total hip arthroplasty. It might lead to implant instability, bone loss and treatment failure resulting in revision surgery. Surface modification is a method for improving bone response to implant and increasing implant osseointegration. However, the currently applied modifications such as hydroxyapatite coatings do not meet expectation and do not provide good clinical result. The object of the study was to evaluate the influence of acetabular cup surface modification on fixation and bone remodelling in total hip arthroplasty. Clinical and radiological outcomes were evaluated in patients two years after cementless total hip replacement. Two groups were compared: patients with acetabular component with uncoated titanium surface and patients with hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular surface. Hips X-rays were analysed for early signs of losing stability of acetabular cups. Two years after surgery the analysis of X-rays did not reveal any statistical differences in stability, migration of acetabular components of endoprosthesis between both groups. No differences were also observed in bone remodelling around implants. Particularly high percentage of cups, i.e. 17.64%, were classified into the group with high risk of early implant loosening, i.e., the group with HA coatings. Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium cementless acetabular cups implanted by press-fit technique have no influence on their stability, bone-implant fixation and the remodelling of bone surrounding an implant two years after surgery.

  11. Ibandronate and cementless total hip arthroplasty: densitometric measurement of periprosthetic bone mass and new therapeutic approach to the prevention of aseptic loosening

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Quarta, Laura; Calcagnile, Fabio; Grimaldi, Antonella; Orgiani, M. Antonio; Marsilio, Antonio; Rollo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Summary Studies of the mechanisms of periprosthetic bone loss have led to the development of pharmacologic strategies intended to enhance bone mass recovery after surgery and consequently prevent aseptic loosening and prolong the implant survival. Bisphosphonates, potent anti-resorptive drugs widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and other disorders of bone metabolism, were shown to be particularly effective in reducing periprosthetic bone resorption in the first year after hip and knee arthroplasty, both cemented and cementless. Based on these results, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ibandronate on periprosthetic bone loss in a 2-year study of postmenopausal women that underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty. In the first 6 months both groups (A, treated with ibandronate 3 mg i.v. within five days after surgery and then with oral ibandronate 150 mg/month, plus calcium and vitamin D supplementation; and B, treated with calcium and vitamin D supplementation only) experienced bone loss, though to a lesser extent in group A. After 12 months, group A showed a remarkable BMD recovery, that was statistically significant versus baseline values (about +1, 74% of global BMD) and most evident in region R1 (+3, 81%) and R2 (+4, 12%); in group B, on the contrary, BMD values were unchanged compared with those at 6 months post-surgery. Quality of life scores also showed a greater improvement in group A, both at 6 and 12 months after surgery, likely because of the pain-reducing effects of ibandronate treatment. PMID:22783337

  12. Ibandronate and cementless total hip arthroplasty: densitometric measurement of periprosthetic bone mass and new therapeutic approach to the prevention of aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Quarta, Laura; Calcagnile, Fabio; Grimaldi, Antonella; Orgiani, M Antonio; Marsilio, Antonio; Rollo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the mechanisms of periprosthetic bone loss have led to the development of pharmacologic strategies intended to enhance bone mass recovery after surgery and consequently prevent aseptic loosening and prolong the implant survival. Bisphosphonates, potent anti-resorptive drugs widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and other disorders of bone metabolism, were shown to be particularly effective in reducing periprosthetic bone resorption in the first year after hip and knee arthroplasty, both cemented and cementless. Based on these results, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ibandronate on periprosthetic bone loss in a 2-year study of postmenopausal women that underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty. In the first 6 months both groups (A, treated with ibandronate 3 mg i.v. within five days after surgery and then with oral ibandronate 150 mg/month, plus calcium and vitamin D supplementation; and B, treated with calcium and vitamin D supplementation only) experienced bone loss, though to a lesser extent in group A. After 12 months, group A showed a remarkable BMD recovery, that was statistically significant versus baseline values (about +1, 74% of global BMD) and most evident in region R1 (+3, 81%) and R2 (+4, 12%); in group B, on the contrary, BMD values were unchanged compared with those at 6 months post-surgery. Quality of life scores also showed a greater improvement in group A, both at 6 and 12 months after surgery, likely because of the pain-reducing effects of ibandronate treatment.

  13. Infectious prosthetic hip joint loosening: bacterial species involved in its aetiology and their antibiotic resistance profiles against antibiotics recommended for the therapy of implant-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Bogut, Agnieszka; Niedźwiadek, Justyna; Strzelec-Nowak, Dagmara; Blacha, Jan; Mazurkiewicz, Tomasz; Marczyński, Wojciech; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria

    2014-04-01

    Reliable microbiological diagnosis along with surgery and prolonged antibiotic therapy are key elements in the management of prosthetic-joint infections (PJIs). The purpose of this study was to characterize antibiotic resistance profiles of bacteria involved in the aetiology of PJIs. A total of 33 bacterial isolates cultured from 31 patients undergoing exchange of total hip prostheses were analyzed. The diagnostic approach toward isolation of prosthesis- associated microorganisms included sonication of retrieved implants and conventional cultures of periprosthetic tissues and synovial fluid. The in vitro resistance profiles of bacterial isolates were determined in relation to antibiotics recommended for the therapy of PJIs using the disc diffusion method, E-tests(®) and broth microdilution system. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were predominant microorganisms followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter cloacae, Streptococcus mitis, and Propionibacterium acnes. Twenty out of 30 and 12 out of 30 staphylococcal isolates were methicillin- and multi-drug resistant, respectively. Only two isolates were rifampicinresistant. All staphylococci were susceptible to glycopeptides and linezolid. This paper stresses the pathogenic role of staphylococci in patients suffering from implant loosening and reports high methicillin- and multidrug-resistance rates in these bacteria. Hence, antimicrobial susceptibility tests of individual bacterial isolates must always be performed to guide selection of the optimal therapeutic option.

  14. Comparison of conforming and nonconforming retrieved glenoid components.

    PubMed

    Nho, Shane J; Ala, Owen L; Dodson, Christopher C; Figgie, Mark P; Wright, Timothy M; Craig, Edward V; Warren, Russell F

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare differences in wear performance of conforming and nonconforming glenoid designs, using clinical, radiographic, and retrieved polyethylene glenoid component outcome Sixty-three glenoids met the study criteria, and each glenoid was assigned to the conforming group (if the radii of curvature of the humeral and glenoid components were identical) or the nonconforming group (if a mismatch existed between the radii of curvature). The mean length of implantation was 5.6 +/- 5.5 years in the conforming group and 3.1 +/- 3.1 years for the nonconforming group (P < .05). The loosening score was 3.2 +/- 2.0 in the conforming group and 2.4 +/- 1.2 in the nonconforming one (P < .05). The nonconforming group had a significantly greater burnishing score (P < .01), while the conforming group had greater abrasion and delamination scores (P < .05). Articular conformity contributes to differences observed from retrieved polyethylene glenoid components, which are consistent with differences in performance that may influence loosening.

  15. Minimum Ten-Year Follow-Up of Cemented Total Hip Replacement in Patients with Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Fyda, Thomas M; Callaghan, John J; Olejniczak, Jason; Johnston, Richard C

    2002-01-01

    Between November 1970 and September 1984 the senior author performed fifty-three consecutive total hip arthroplasties with cement in forty-one patients with the diagnosis of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Five hips in three patients with failed renal transplants requiring chronic hemodialysis were excluded. At the time of final review, a minimum of ten years after the procedure, twenty-one patients (twenty-eight hips) were living, fifteen patients (eighteen hips) had died, and two patients (two hips) were lost to followup. A minimum ten-year follow-up radiograph was obtained on twenty-two (79%) of the hips in surviving patients. During the follow-up period 17.4% of hips (eight hips) required revision: 3.0% (six hips) for aseptic loosening, 2.2% (one hip) for sepsis, and 2.2% (one hip) for recurrent dislocation. All eight revisions occurred in patients living at time of final review, giving a revision prevalence of 22.9% (17.1% for aseptic loosening, 2.9% for sepsis, and 2.9% for recurrent dislocation) in patients surviving ten years. The prevalence of revision of the femoral component for aseptic loosening was 6.5% (three hips) for all hips and 9.1% (three hips) in patients surviving at least ten years. The prevalence of femoral aseptic loosening, defined as those components revised for aseptic loosening and those that demonstrated definite or probable radiographic loosening, was 13.0% (six hips) for all hips and 28.6% (six hips) for hips with at least ten-year radiographic follow-up. The prevalence of revision of the acetabular component for aseptic loosening was 13.0% (six hips) for all hips and 18.2% (six hips) in patients surviving at least ten years. The prevalence of acetabular aseptic loosening was 15.2% (seven hips) for all hips and 29.2% (seven hips) for hips with at least ten-year radiographic follow-up. In patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head survivorship was significantly inferior to that in the senior author's overall patient population

  16. Comparison of wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups against surface-engineered femoral heads.

    PubMed

    Galvin, A; Brockett, C; Williams, S; Hatto, P; Burton, A; Isaac, G; Stone, M; Ingham, E; Fisher, J

    2008-10-01

    Alumina ceramic heads have been previously shown to reduce polyethylene wear in comparison to cobalt chrome (CoCr) heads in artificial hip joints. However, there are concerns about the brittle nature of ceramics. It is therefore of interest to investigate ceramic-like coatings on metallic heads. The aim of this study was to compare the friction and wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) against alumina ceramic, CoCr, and surface-engineered ceramic-like coatings in a friction simulator and a hip joint simulator. All femoral heads tested were 28 mm diameter and included: Biolox Forte alumina, CoCr, arc evaporative physical vapour deposition (AEPVD) chromium nitride (CrN) coated CoCr, plasma-assisted chemical vapour deposition (PACVD) amorphous diamond-like carbon (aDLC) coated CoCr, sputter CrN coated CoCr, reactive gas controlled arc (RGCA) AEPVD titanium nitride (TiN) coated CoCr, and Graphit-iC coated CoCr. These were articulated against UHMWPE acetabular cups in a friction simulator and a hip joint simulator. Alumina and CoCr gave the lowest wear volumes whereas the sputter coated CrN gave the highest. Alumina also had the lowest friction factor. There was an association between surface parameters and wear. This study indicates that surface topography of surface-engineered femoral heads is more important than friction and wettability in controlling UHMWPE wear.

  17. Modern dual-mobility cup implanted with an uncemented stem: about 100 cases with 12-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Philippot, Remi; Meucci, Jean Francois; Boyer, Bertrand; Farizon, Frederic

    2013-09-01

    We report the results of a 12-year follow-up retrospective series of 100 total hip arthroplasties using cementless, press-fit, dual-mobility acetabular cups. The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic results of this acetabular cup at last follow-up. This continuous and homogeneous series included 100 primary total hip arthroplasties performed during the year 2000. The THA combined a Corail® stem (Corail®, Depuy, Warsaw, IN) with a stainless steel Novae Sunfit® (Serf, Decines, France) acetabular cup. Fifteen patients died and 2 were lost to follow-up. Two cases of early dislocation were observed, and 3 cases of aseptic loosening of the acetabular component were reported. The mean stem subsidence was 0.71 mm, the mean craniopodal acetabular migration was 1.37 mm, and the mean medio-lateral acetabular migration was 1.52 mm. The 12-year survivorship is comparable to the data from the literature. The low dislocation rate at 12 years confirms the long-term, high stability of dual mobility, which should be recommended in primary THA for patients at risk for postoperative instability. The absence of true intraprosthetic dislocation events at 12-year follow-up provides evidence of the good quality of the latest generation of polyethylene liners and the necessity of combining thin-mirror, polished femoral necks with dual-mobility cups.

  18. Spontaneous Dissociation of Anatomic Medullary Locking A Plus (AML A Plus) Femoral Component at the Head-Neck Interface

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Ketan; Leong, Juzaily Fekry; Lo, Ngai Nung

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Innovations in the design of total hip arthroplasty components have been developed to address certain limitations with the use of standard monoblock prosthesis. With increasing use and long-term follow up, certain complications particularly related to fretting, corrosion and fatigue have been recognized. Case Report: A 31 year old active male patient presented with spontaneous dissociation of the Anatomic Medullary Locking A Plus (AML A Plus) Femoral Component at head and neck interface 10 years after surgery. At revision surgery, wear of the acetabular liner and head and neck taper was noted. Definitive treatment required complete revision of the femoral component and change of acetabular liner. Conclusion: While modularity allows change of worn out components, this case highlights the importance of various factors in avoiding this complication and the need for surgeon to be prepared to use ‘taper sleeves’ or revise the components if taper exchange fails particularly in cases with dissociation of head-neck interface which is usually associated with taper damage. PMID:27299068

  19. Loosening up the Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke

    2016-03-01

    We consider the Skyrme model with the addition of extra scalar potentials that decrease the classical binding energies of the Skyrmions to about the 3% level—without altering the pion mass—if we insist on keeping platonic symmetries that are usually possessed by Skyrmions. A side effect of the potentials under consideration is the smaller size of the 1-Skyrmion resulting in a smaller moment of inertia and in turn a larger spin contribution to the energy upon semiclassical quantization. After taking into account the quantum contributions we find total binding energies at the 6% level.

  20. Adjacent-Level Hypermobility and Instrumented-Level Fatigue Loosening With Titanium and PEEK Rods for a Pedicle Screw System: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Aakas; Ingels, Marcel; Kodigudla, Manoj; Momeni, Narjes; Goel, Vijay; Agarwal, Anand K

    2016-05-01

    Adjacent-level disease is a common iatrogenic complication seen among patients undergoing spinal fusion for low back pain. This is attributed to the postsurgical differences in stiffness between the spinal levels, which result in abnormal forces, stress shielding, and hypermobility at the adjacent levels. In addition, as most patients undergoing these surgeries are osteoporotic, screw loosening at the index level is a complication that commonly accompanies adjacent-level disease. Recent studies indicate that a rod with lower rigidity than that of titanium may help to overcome these detrimental effects at the adjacent level. The present study was conducted in vitro using 12 L1-S1 specimens divided into groups of six, with each group instrumented with either titanium rods or PEEK (polyetheretherketone) rods. The test protocol included subjecting intact specimens to pure moments of 10 Nm in extension and flexion using an FS20 Biomechanical Spine Test System (Applied Test Systems) followed by hybrid moments on the instrumented specimens to achieve the same L1-S1 motion as that of the intact specimens. During the protocol's later phase, the L4-L5 units from each specimen were segmented for cyclic loading followed by postfatigue kinematic analysis to highlight the differences in motion pre- and postfatigue. The objectives included the in vitro comparison of (1) the adjacent-level motion before and after instrumentation with PEEK and titanium rods and (2) the pre- and postfatigue motion at the instrumented level with PEEK and titanium rods. The results showed that the adjacent levels above the instrumentation caused increased flexion and extension with both PEEK and titanium rods. The postfatigue kinematic data showed that the motion at the instrumented level (L4-L5) increased significantly in both flexion and extension compared to prefatigue motion in titanium groups. However, there was no significant difference in motion between the pre- and postfatigue data in the PEEK

  1. Orientation and depth estimation for femoral components using image sensor, magnetometer and inertial sensors in THR surgeries.

    PubMed

    Jiyang Gao; Shaojie Su; Hong Chen; Zhihua Wang

    2015-08-01

    Malposition of the acetabular and femoral component has long been recognized as an important cause of dislocation after total hip replacement (THR) surgeries. In order to help surgeons improve the positioning accuracy of the components, a visual-aided system for THR surgeries that could estimate orientation and depth of femoral component is proposed. The sensors are fixed inside the femoral prosthesis trial and checkerboard patterns are printed on the internal surface of the acetabular prosthesis trial. An extended Kalman filter is designed to fuse the data from inertial sensors and the magnetometer orientation estimation. A novel image processing algorithm for depth estimation is developed. The algorithms have been evaluated under the simulation with rotation quaternion and translation vector and the experimental results shows that the root mean square error (RMSE) of the orientation estimation is less then 0.05 degree and the RMSE for depth estimation is 1mm. Finally, the femoral head is displayed in 3D graphics in real time to help surgeons with the component positioning. PMID:26736858

  2. Orientation and depth estimation for femoral components using image sensor, magnetometer and inertial sensors in THR surgeries.

    PubMed

    Jiyang Gao; Shaojie Su; Hong Chen; Zhihua Wang

    2015-08-01

    Malposition of the acetabular and femoral component has long been recognized as an important cause of dislocation after total hip replacement (THR) surgeries. In order to help surgeons improve the positioning accuracy of the components, a visual-aided system for THR surgeries that could estimate orientation and depth of femoral component is proposed. The sensors are fixed inside the femoral prosthesis trial and checkerboard patterns are printed on the internal surface of the acetabular prosthesis trial. An extended Kalman filter is designed to fuse the data from inertial sensors and the magnetometer orientation estimation. A novel image processing algorithm for depth estimation is developed. The algorithms have been evaluated under the simulation with rotation quaternion and translation vector and the experimental results shows that the root mean square error (RMSE) of the orientation estimation is less then 0.05 degree and the RMSE for depth estimation is 1mm. Finally, the femoral head is displayed in 3D graphics in real time to help surgeons with the component positioning.

  3. A Comparison of the Contact Force Distributions on the Acetabular Surface Due to Orthopedic Treatments for Developmental Hip Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Flórez, Kalenia M; Silva, Octavio; Narváez-Tovar, Carlos A; Garzón-Alvarado, Diego A

    2016-07-01

    We used a three-dimensional rigid body spring model (RBSM) to compare the contact force distributions on the acetabular surface of the infant hip joint that are produced by three orthopedic treatments for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). We analyzed treatments using a Pavlik harness, a generic rigid splint, and a spica cast. The joint geometry was modeled from tomography images of a 1-year-old female. The articular cartilage was modeled as linear springs connecting the surfaces of the acetabulum and the femoral head, whereas the femur and the hip bone were considered as rigid bodies. The hip muscles were modeled as tensile-only preloaded springs. The treatments with the Pavlik harness and the generic rigid splint were modeled for an infant in supine position with a hip flexion angle of 90 deg. Also, since rigid splints are often recommended when children are initiating their gait phase, we modeled the treatment with the infant in standing position. For the spica cast, we only considered the infant in standing position with a flexion angle of 0 deg, and the fixation bar at two heights: at the ankle and at the knee. In order to analyze the effect of the hip abduction angle over the contact force distribution, different abduction angles were used for all the treatments modeled. We have found that the treatments with the infant in supine position, with a flexion angle of 90 deg and abduction angles between 60 deg and 80 deg, produce a more homogenous contact force distribution compared to those obtained for the treatments with the infant in standing position. PMID:27150210

  4. Accuracy and Precision of Three-Dimensional Low Dose CT Compared to Standard RSA in Acetabular Cups: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Olivecrona, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q.; Noz, Marilyn E.; Zeleznik, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The gold standard for detection of implant wear and migration is currently radiostereometry (RSA). The purpose of this study is to compare a three-dimensional computed tomography technique (3D CT) to standard RSA as an alternative technique for measuring migration of acetabular cups in total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. With tantalum beads, we marked one cemented and one uncemented cup and mounted these on a similarly marked pelvic model. A comparison was made between 3D CT and standard RSA for measuring migration. Twelve repeated stereoradiographs and CT scans with double examinations in each position and gradual migration of the implants were made. Precision and accuracy of the 3D CT were calculated. Results. The accuracy of the 3D CT ranged between 0.07 and 0.32 mm for translations and 0.21 and 0.82° for rotation. The precision ranged between 0.01 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.06 and 0.29° for rotations, respectively. For standard RSA, the precision ranged between 0.04 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.08 and 0.32° for rotations, respectively. There was no significant difference in precision between 3D CT and standard RSA. The effective radiation dose of the 3D CT method, comparable to RSA, was estimated to be 0.33 mSv. Interpretation. Low dose 3D CT is a comparable method to standard RSA in an experimental setting. PMID:27478832

  5. The efficacy of a "double-D-shaped" wire marker for radiographic measurement of acetabular cup orientation and wear.

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, Brian; Raut, Videshnandan V

    2013-01-01

    Historically, wire markers were attached to cemented all-plastic acetabular cups to demarcate the periphery and to measure socket wear. The wire shape was either a semi-circle passing over the pole of the cup, or a circle around the cup equator. More recently, "double-D" shaped markers were introduced with a part-circular aspect passing over the pole and a semi-circular aspect parallel to the equatorial plane. This configuration enabled cup retroversion to be distinguished from anteversion. In this study, the accuracy of radiographic measurement of cup orientation and wear was assessed for cups with "double-D" and circular markers. Each cup was attached to a measurement jig which could vary the anteversion/retroversion and internal/external rotation of the cup. A metal femoral head was fixed within the socket and radiographic images were created for all combinations of cup orientation settings. The images were measured using software with automatic edge detection, and cup orientation and zero-wear accuracies were determined for each setting. The median error for cup version measurements was similar for both types of wire marker (0.2° double-D marker, -0.24° circular marker), but measurements of the circular marker were more repeatable. The median inclination errors were 2.05° (double-D marker) and 0.23° (circular marker). The median overall "zero wear" errors were 0.19 mm (double-D marker) and 0.03 mm (circular marker). Measurements of the circular wire marker were much more repeatable.

  6. Accuracy and Precision of Three-Dimensional Low Dose CT Compared to Standard RSA in Acetabular Cups: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Brodén, Cyrus; Olivecrona, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q; Noz, Marilyn E; Zeleznik, Michael P; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The gold standard for detection of implant wear and migration is currently radiostereometry (RSA). The purpose of this study is to compare a three-dimensional computed tomography technique (3D CT) to standard RSA as an alternative technique for measuring migration of acetabular cups in total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. With tantalum beads, we marked one cemented and one uncemented cup and mounted these on a similarly marked pelvic model. A comparison was made between 3D CT and standard RSA for measuring migration. Twelve repeated stereoradiographs and CT scans with double examinations in each position and gradual migration of the implants were made. Precision and accuracy of the 3D CT were calculated. Results. The accuracy of the 3D CT ranged between 0.07 and 0.32 mm for translations and 0.21 and 0.82° for rotation. The precision ranged between 0.01 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.06 and 0.29° for rotations, respectively. For standard RSA, the precision ranged between 0.04 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.08 and 0.32° for rotations, respectively. There was no significant difference in precision between 3D CT and standard RSA. The effective radiation dose of the 3D CT method, comparable to RSA, was estimated to be 0.33 mSv. Interpretation. Low dose 3D CT is a comparable method to standard RSA in an experimental setting. PMID:27478832

  7. A Comparison of the Contact Force Distributions on the Acetabular Surface Due to Orthopedic Treatments for Developmental Hip Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Flórez, Kalenia M; Silva, Octavio; Narváez-Tovar, Carlos A; Garzón-Alvarado, Diego A

    2016-07-01

    We used a three-dimensional rigid body spring model (RBSM) to compare the contact force distributions on the acetabular surface of the infant hip joint that are produced by three orthopedic treatments for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). We analyzed treatments using a Pavlik harness, a generic rigid splint, and a spica cast. The joint geometry was modeled from tomography images of a 1-year-old female. The articular cartilage was modeled as linear springs connecting the surfaces of the acetabulum and the femoral head, whereas the femur and the hip bone were considered as rigid bodies. The hip muscles were modeled as tensile-only preloaded springs. The treatments with the Pavlik harness and the generic rigid splint were modeled for an infant in supine position with a hip flexion angle of 90 deg. Also, since rigid splints are often recommended when children are initiating their gait phase, we modeled the treatment with the infant in standing position. For the spica cast, we only considered the infant in standing position with a flexion angle of 0 deg, and the fixation bar at two heights: at the ankle and at the knee. In order to analyze the effect of the hip abduction angle over the contact force distribution, different abduction angles were used for all the treatments modeled. We have found that the treatments with the infant in supine position, with a flexion angle of 90 deg and abduction angles between 60 deg and 80 deg, produce a more homogenous contact force distribution compared to those obtained for the treatments with the infant in standing position.

  8. Revision hip arthroplasty using impacted cancellous bone and cement: a long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Gowthaman; Nanjayan, Shashi Kumar; Quah, Conal; Wraighte, Philip; Howard, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Acetabular bone deficiency is one of the many challenging problems encountered in revision hip arthroplasty. A variety of surgical options and techniques are available including impaction bone grafting. We present our long-term experience of 68 consecutive cups in 64 patients, using impacted cancellous bone grafting with bone cement. With a mean follow-up of 10.5 year (IQR 7.5-12.9) after revision surgery, three implants had undergone further revision. Three patients had subsequent femoral peri-prosthetic fractures, and none of these three required further acetabular revision. Survival of the acetabular components was 95.5 % for all causes and 100 % for aseptic loosening as the end point, with a further four patients showing radiographic, but asymptomatic loosening. A significant correlation was found between previous revision and re-revision (early failure) (p = 0.01) as well as progression of lytic lesion and re-revision (p = 0.01). The median Harris hip score at final follow-up was 79.5 (IQR 67.9-80.4). The use of impacted morcellised allograft bone with a cemented cup is an effective technique to achieve longevity and restoration of bone stock in acetabular revision arthroplasty. Our series has shown good clinical and radiological outcome with survivorship of the prosthesis exceeding 95 % at 10 years.

  9. Immunolocalization of Anti-Hsf1 to the Acetabular Glands of Infectious Schistosomes Suggests a Non-Transcriptional Function for This Transcriptional Activator

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Giselle M.; Jolly, Emmitt R.

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronically debilitating disease caused by parasitic worms of the genus Schistosoma, and it is a global problem affecting over 240 million people. Little is known about the regulatory proteins and mechanisms that control schistosome host invasion, gene expression, and development. Schistosome larvae, cercariae, are transiently free-swimming organisms and infectious to man. Cercariae penetrate human host skin directly using proteases that degrade skin connective tissue. These proteases are secreted from anucleate acetabular glands that contain many proteins, including heat shock proteins. Heat shock transcription factors are strongly conserved activators that play crucial roles in the maintenance of cell homeostasis by transcriptionally regulating heat shock protein expression. In this study, we clone and characterize the schistosome Heat shock factor 1 gene (SmHSF1). We verify its ability to activate transcription using a modified yeast one-hybrid system, and we show that it can bind to the heat shock binding element (HSE) consensus DNA sequence. Our quantitative RT-PCR analysis shows that SmHSF1 is expressed throughout several life-cycle stages from sporocyst to adult worm. Interestingly, using immunohistochemistry, a polyclonal antibody raised against an Hsf1-peptide demonstrates a novel localization for this conserved, stress-modulating activator. Our analysis suggests that schistosome Heat shock factor 1 may be localized to the acetabular glands of infective cercariae. PMID:25078989

  10. Sustained five-year benefit of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis for femoral acetabular impingement-induced chondral lesions compared with microfracture treatment.

    PubMed

    Fontana, A; de Girolamo, L

    2015-05-01

    The repair of chondral lesions associated with femoroacetabular impingement requires specific treatment in addition to that of the impingement. In this single-centre retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of patients we compared treatment with microfracture (MFx) with a technique of enhanced microfracture autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC). Acetabular grade III and IV chondral lesions measuring between 2 cm(2) and 8 cm(2) in 147 patients were treated by MFx in 77 and AMIC in 70. The outcome was assessed using the modified Harris hip score at six months and one, two, three, four and five years post-operatively. The outcome in both groups was significantly improved at six months and one year post-operatively. During the subsequent four years the outcome in the MFx group slowly deteriorated, whereas that in the AMIC group remained stable. Six patients in the MFx group subsequently required total hip arthroplasty, compared with none in the AMIC group We conclude that the short-term clinical outcome improves in patients with acetabular chondral damage following both MFx and AMIC. However, the AMIC group had better and more durable improvement, particularly in patients with large (≥ 4 cm(2)) lesions.

  11. Early migration of tibial components is associated with late revision

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We performed two parallel systematic reviews and meta-analyses to determine the association between early migration of tibial components and late aseptic revision. Methods One review comprised early migration data from radiostereometric analysis (RSA) studies, while the other focused on revision rates for aseptic loosening from long-term survival studies. Thresholds for acceptable and unacceptable migration were determined according to that of several national joint registries: < 5% revision at 10 years. Results Following an elaborate literature search, 50 studies (involving 847 total knee prostheses (TKPs)) were included in the RSA review and 56 studies (20,599 TKPs) were included in the survival review. The results showed that for every mm increase in migration there was an 8% increase in revision rate, which remained after correction for age, sex, diagnosis, hospital type, continent, and study quality. Consequently, migration up to 0.5 mm was considered acceptable during the first postoperative year, while migration of 1.6 mm or more was unacceptable. TKPs with migration of between 0.5 and 1.6 mm were considered to be at risk of having revision rates higher than 5% at 10 years. Interpretation There was a clinically relevant association between early migration of TKPs and late revision for loosening. The proposed migration thresholds can be implemented in a phased, evidence-based introduction of new types of knee prostheses, since they allow early detection of high-risk TKPs while exposing only a small number of patients. PMID:23140091

  12. Brain components

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The cerebrum is divided into left and right hemispheres, each ... gray matter) is the outside portion of the cerebrum and provides us with functions associated with conscious ...

  13. Clinical and radiographic results and wear performance in different generations of a cementless porous-coated acetabular cup

    PubMed Central

    García-Cimbrelo, E.

    2007-01-01

    We compared clinical results and wear performance in two different generations of a cementless porous-coated cup, analysing the long-term results of 83 uncemented Harris-Galante I cups (32-mm femoral head) and 93 uncemented Harris-Galante II cups (28-mm femoral head). All polyethylene liners were gamma irradiated in air. Polyethylene linear wear was estimated using a software package. The minimum follow-up was 10 years. Nine Harris-Galante I cups and two Harris-Galante II cups were revised due to aseptic loosening or polyethylene problems. The mean femoral head penetration at 6 weeks after surgery was 0.15 ± 0.05 mm for the Harris-Galante I cups and 0.12 ± 0.03 for the Harris-Galante II cups (p < 0.001);but mean wear was 0.13 ± 0.23 mm per year for the Harris-Galante I cups and 0.11 ± 0.10 for the Harris-Galante II cups (p = 0.740). Most of the metallic shells in both groups showed stable fixation. The so-called second-generation cups had lower initial polyethylene wear that resulted in less polyethylene wear at the latest the follow-up, but the overall wear rate was similar in both groups despite the different femoral head sizes and the improved locking mechanism. PMID:17265157

  14. Intraoperative measurement of rotational stability of femoral components of total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Harris, W H; Mulroy, R D; Maloney, W J; Burke, D W; Chandler, H P; Zalenski, E B

    1991-05-01

    High out-of-plane forces acting on the hip joint can produce important rotational micromotion of the femoral component. This micromotion at the prosthesis interface may be detrimental to the stability of the implant. In cementless femoral implants this could prevent bone ingrowth, and in the cemented component this could cause generation of particulate debris, lysis, and loosening. The introduction of the torque wrench micrometer for assessment of intraoperative femoral component stability can quantify the initial stability of primary cementless femoral components and critically evaluate the stability (at either the initial or revision arthroplasty) of both cemented and cementless femoral components. It allows the surgeon to produce a known torque in the direction and magnitude of the out-of-plane forces that load the hip in vivo. PMID:2019039

  15. All-poly tibial component better than metal-backed: a randomized RSA study.

    PubMed

    Norgren, B; Dalén, T; Nilsson, K G

    2004-06-01

    The quality of the fixation of the tibial component in 21 patients (23 knees) undergoing a cemented total-knee arthroplasty of the Profix design was investigated using radiostereometric analysis during 24 months. The patients were randomized to either an all-polyethylene (AP) or a metal-backed (MB) tibial component. The articulating geometry and the stem design of the implants were identical, as were the operative technique and the postoperative regimen. The results showed no negative consequences as regards fixation using AP tibial components. In all aspects, the AP components displayed magnitudes of migration on par with, or sometimes even lower than their MB counterparts. Five of 11 MB components displayed continuous migration between 1 and 2 years, compared to none of the AP implants, a finding known to be of positive prognostic significance when predicting future aseptic loosening. PMID:15194094

  16. Hyperfrequency components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-09-01

    The document has a collection of 19 papers (11 on technologies, 8 on applications) by 26 authors and coauthors. Technological topics include: evolution from conventional HEMT's double heterojunction and planar types of pseudomorphic HEMT's; MMIC R&D and production aspects for very-low-noise, low-power, and very-low-noise, high-power applications; hyperfrequency CAD tools; parametric measurements of hyperfrequency components on plug-in cards for design and in-process testing uses; design of Class B power amplifiers and millimetric-wave, bigrid-transistor mixers, exemplifying combined use of three major types of physical simulation in electrical modeling of microwave components; FET's for power amplification at up to 110 GHz; production, characterization, and nonlinear applications of resonant tunnel diodes. Applications topics include: development of active modules for major European programs; tubes versus solid-state components in hyperfrequency applications; status and potentialities of national and international cooperative R&D on MMIC's and CAD of hyperfrequency circuitry; attainable performance levels in multifunction MMIC applications; state of the art relative of MESFET power amplifiers (Bands S, C, X, Ku); creating a hyperfrequency functions library, of parametrizable reference cells or macrocells; and design of a single-stage, low-noise, band-W amplifier toward development of a three-stage amplifier.

  17. Component separations.

    PubMed

    Heller, Lior; McNichols, Colton H; Ramirez, Oscar M

    2012-02-01

    Component separation is a technique used to provide adequate coverage for midline abdominal wall defects such as a large ventral hernia. This surgical technique is based on subcutaneous lateral dissection, fasciotomy lateral to the rectus abdominis muscle, and dissection on the plane between external and internal oblique muscles with medial advancement of the block that includes the rectus muscle and its fascia. This release allows for medial advancement of the fascia and closure of up to 20-cm wide defects in the midline area. Since its original description, components separation technique underwent multiple modifications with the ultimate goal to decrease the morbidity associated with the traditional procedure. The extensive subcutaneous lateral dissection had been associated with ischemia of the midline skin edges, wound dehiscence, infection, and seroma. Although the current trend is to proceed with minimally invasive component separation and to reinforce the fascia with mesh, the basic principles of the techniques as described by Ramirez et al in 1990 have not changed over the years. Surgeons who deal with the management of abdominal wall defects are highly encouraged to include this technique in their collection of treatment options.

  18. Short-term survival of the trabecular metal cup is similar to that of standard cups used in acetabular revision surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mohaddes, Maziar; Rolfson, Ola; Kärrholm, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose The use of trabecular metal (TM) cups in revision surgery has increased worldwide during the last decade. Since the introduction of the TM cup in Sweden in 2006, this design has gradually replaced other uncemented designs used in Sweden. According to data from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register (SHAR) in 2012, one-third of all uncemented first-time cup revisions were performed using a TM cup. We compared the risk of reoperation and re-revision for TM cups and the 2 other most frequently used cup designs in acetabular revisions reported to the SHAR. The hypothesis was that the performance of TM cups is as good as that of established designs in the short term. Patients and methods The study population consisted of 2,384 patients who underwent 2,460 revisions during the period 2006 through 2012. The most commonly used cup designs were the press-fit porous-coated cup (n = 870), the trabecular metal cup (n = 805), and the cemented all-polyethylene cup (n = 785). 54% of the patients were female, and the median age at index revision was 72 (19–95) years. Reoperation was defined as a second surgical intervention, and re-revision—meaning exchange or removal of the cup—was used as endpoint. The mean follow-up time was 3.3 (0–7) years. Results There were 215 reoperations, 132 of which were re-revisions. The unadjusted and adjusted risk of reoperation or re-revision was not significantly different for the TM cup and the other 2 cup designs. Interpretation Our data support continued use of TM cups in acetabular revisions. Further follow-up is necessary to determine whether trabecular metal cups can reduce the re-revision rate in the long term, compared to the less costly porous press-fit and cemented designs. PMID:25399966

  19. Midterm Follow-Up of Metal-Backed Glenoid Components in Anatomical Total Shoulder Arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Obermeyer, Thomas; Cagle, Paul J; Parsons, Bradford O; Flatow, Evan L

    2015-09-01

    Loosening of the glenoid remains one of the most common complications of total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and is the most cited reason for performing revision arthroplasty. Ingrowth metal-backed glenoid components offer the theoretical advantage of bone growth directly into the prosthesis with a single host-prosthesis interface. In the study reported here, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of patients who had TSAs performed by 2 fellowship-trained shoulder surgeons using glenoid components with porous tantalum anchors. Standard radiographs were analyzed for lucency surrounding the anchors. Before and after surgery, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores and active forward elevation (AFE) and active external rotation (AER) measurements were recorded. Twelve shoulders (11 patients) were examined. Mean follow-up was 20 months. In all cases, radiographs showed no glenoid lucency. Mean AFE and mean AER both increased significantly (P < .01), as did postoperative ASES scores (P < .01). Porous tantalum ingrowth glenoid components show no radiographic or clinical evidence of loosening at midterm follow-up. Long-term studies are needed to determine if these midterm outcomes are maintained and provide benefit over conventional cemented polyethylene designs. PMID:26372761

  20. Catastrophic failure of ceramic-polyethylene bearing total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Needham, Justin; Burns, Travis; Gerlinger, Tad

    2008-06-01

    Complications of ceramic-polyethylene bearing total hip arthroplasty (THA) include osteolysis, loosening, dislocation, and component failure. Catastrophic acetabular component failure involves severe damage to both the polyethylene liner and metal shell. This case study presents the first reported complete wear-through of the acetabular portion of a ceramic-polyethylene arthroplasty presenting as a dislocation and a review of the literature. In this study, a patient's alumina ceramic femoral head penetrated the polyethylene liner and titanium shell and presented as a dislocated THA. The contributing factors for this catastrophic failure include young patient age, high activity level, thin polyethylene liner, backside wear, component positioning, polyethylene sterilization with gamma irradiation in air, and lack of appropriate follow-up. Revision THA was performed without complications. PMID:18514888

  1. Long-term results of the threaded Weill cup in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Clarius, Michael; Jung, Alexander W.; Raiss, Patric; Streit, Marcus R.; Merle, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Uncemented, threaded acetabular components with smooth surface treatment were widely used in continental Europe in the 1970s and 1980s for primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Previously published studies showed high failure rates in the mid-term. In a consecutive series of 116 patients, 127 threaded cups with smooth surface treatment (Weill cup; Zimmer, Winterthur, Switzerland) were implanted in combination with one type of uncemented stem. Patients were followed up clinically and radiographically. Mean time of follow-up was 17 years (range 15–20). At the time of follow-up, the acetabular component had been revised or was awaiting revision in 30 hips (24%). Two hips were revised for infection and 23 for aseptic loosening. Four polyethylene liners were exchanged because of excessive wear. One hip was awaiting revision. The survival rate for all acetabular revisions including one hip awaiting revision was 75% (95%CI: 65–85%) at 17 years. These results support the view that smooth, threaded acetabular components do not provide satisfactory long-term fixation and should be abandoned. It is important to closely monitor patients with these components as the failure rate remains high in the long-term. PMID:19629480

  2. Long-term results of the threaded Mecron cup in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Clarius, Michael; Jung, Alexander W.; Streit, Marcus R.; Merle, Christian; Raiss, Patric

    2009-01-01

    In the 1970s, high failure rates of cemented acetabular components, especially in young patients, in the middle- and long-term prompted a search for alternatives. The Mecring was one of the most popular first generation uncemented, threaded cups widely used in the 1980s for arthroplasty of the hip. First generation threaded cups commonly had smooth surface treatment and showed unacceptably high failure rates in the mid-term. In a consecutive series of 209 patients, 221 threaded uncemented acetabular cups with smooth surface treatment (Mecring) had been implanted in combination with one type of uncemented stem. Patients were followed up clinically and radiographically. The mean time of follow-up was 17 (range 15–20) years. In 91 (41%) hips the acetabular component had been revised or was awaiting revision: two hips for infection and 84 (38%) for aseptic loosening. Five hips were awaiting revision. The survival rate for all revisions including hips awaiting revision was 49% (95% CI: 41–57%) at 17 years. These results support the view that smooth, threaded acetabular components do not provide satisfactory long-term fixation and should be abandoned. Patients with these components must be closely monitored as the failure rate remains high in the long-term. PMID:19629481

  3. Hip range-of-motion (ROM) is less than normal after rotational acetabular osteotomy for developmental dysplasia of the hip: A simulated ROM analysis.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hidetoshi; Takao, Masaki; Nakahara, Ichiro; Sakai, Takashi; Nishii, Takashi; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2016-02-01

    The optimal reorientation of the acetabulum for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is unknown in terms of hip range-of-motion (ROM). The simulated ROMs of 52 DDHs after rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) with several patterns of femoral head coverage and those of 73 normal hips were analyzed using computer models reconstructed from CT images. After RAO with a lateral center edge angle (LCEA) of 30° and an anterior center edge angle (ACEA) of 55° producing coverage similar to that of normal hips, the maximal flexion and maximal internal rotation at 110° flexion with 20° adduction were significantly smaller than those of the normal group. To achieve ROMs after RAO similar to those of the normal group, an LCEA of 30° with an ACEA of 45°, an LCEA of 25° with an ACEA of 45° to 50°, and an LCEA of 20° with an ACEA of 50° could be preferred angles to target, even though they provided smaller coverage than that of normal hips. After RAO producing femoral head coverage similar to that of normal hips, the maximal flexion and the maximal internal rotation at 110° flexion with 20° adduction were significantly smaller than those of the normal group. PMID:26264454

  4. Hip range-of-motion (ROM) is less than normal after rotational acetabular osteotomy for developmental dysplasia of the hip: A simulated ROM analysis.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hidetoshi; Takao, Masaki; Nakahara, Ichiro; Sakai, Takashi; Nishii, Takashi; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2016-02-01

    The optimal reorientation of the acetabulum for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is unknown in terms of hip range-of-motion (ROM). The simulated ROMs of 52 DDHs after rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) with several patterns of femoral head coverage and those of 73 normal hips were analyzed using computer models reconstructed from CT images. After RAO with a lateral center edge angle (LCEA) of 30° and an anterior center edge angle (ACEA) of 55° producing coverage similar to that of normal hips, the maximal flexion and maximal internal rotation at 110° flexion with 20° adduction were significantly smaller than those of the normal group. To achieve ROMs after RAO similar to those of the normal group, an LCEA of 30° with an ACEA of 45°, an LCEA of 25° with an ACEA of 45° to 50°, and an LCEA of 20° with an ACEA of 50° could be preferred angles to target, even though they provided smaller coverage than that of normal hips. After RAO producing femoral head coverage similar to that of normal hips, the maximal flexion and the maximal internal rotation at 110° flexion with 20° adduction were significantly smaller than those of the normal group.

  5. Phosphocalcium ceramics are efficient in the management of severe acetabular loss in revision hip arthroplasties. A 22 cases long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, C; Vautrin, M

    2015-02-01

    Management of bone loss in revision total hip replacement remains a challenge. To eliminate any immunological or infectious problem and so to try to improve the long-term results obtained with allografts, the authors used synthetic ceramics as bone substitutes since 1995. We reviewed 13 of the patients of our study, we previously reported in 2005 (Schwartz and Bordei in Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol 15: 191 2005), which was a prospective cohort of thirty-two cases of acetabular revision reconstruction, with a mean follow-up of 14.4 years yet (from 9 to 16 years). Clinical results were assessed according to Oxford scale and Postel and Merle d'Aubigne (PMA) scale. Since 2005, no specific complications were noted. The average PMA functional hip score was 14.9 (vs. 9.2 before revision) at follow-up over 9 years. Nine patients still alive in 2013 were seen again by a surgeon, which was not the operator, with a mean follow-up of 15.3 years: Their Oxford average score was 40.3. Radiological assessment affirmed a good integration of the substitutes in bone without any edging in all cases. A progressive invasion of the ceramics by bone can be seen on the X-ray. We conclude that about 15 years of average delay, which is a significant follow-up in orthopedic surgery, the outcomes without specific complications are satisfactory and allow one to go with these materials in total hip revision surgery.

  6. Long-term outcome of a metal-on-polyethylene cementless hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Timothy L; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Campbell, Patricia A; Al-Hamad, Mariam; Amstutz, Harlan C

    2014-04-01

    Due to the well-documented problems surrounding metal-on-metal bearings, the use of hip resurfacing has declined. Since the potential benefits of hip resurfacing remain desirable, it may be beneficial to investigate the long-term outcome of hip resurfacings using metal-on-polyethylene in the 1980's. We report the long-term survivorship and modes of failure of a cementless metal-on-polyethylene resurfacing (n = 178) with different porous ingrowth surfaces. While acetabular loosening was absent, a high incidence of femoral failures (femoral loosening = 18.1%, osteolytic neck fracture = 21%) occurred despite using the same ingrowth surface for both components. Ongoing developments using the lessons learned from these previous generation components and utilizing modern low wear materials, e.g., cross-linked polyethylene, may lead to improved implants for future hip resurfacings. PMID:24090660

  7. Trabecular Metal Augments for the Management of Paprosky Type III Defects Without Pelvic Discontinuity.

    PubMed

    Grappiolo, Guido; Loppini, Mattia; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Traverso, Francesco; Mazziotta, Giuseppe; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2015-06-01

    Fifty-five hips undergoing acetabular reconstruction with trabecular metal (TM)-coated cup and TM augments were reviewed at an average follow up of 53.7 months (36-91). Bony defects were Paprosky type IIIA in 42 and type IIIB without pelvic discontinuity in 13 hips. The average HHS increased from 40 (27-52) preoperatively to 90.5 (61-100) postoperatively (P<0.0001). Four (7.3%) of 55 hips underwent acetabular components revision: three cases of loosening (5.4%), and one of recurrent instability (1.8%) were reported. Survival rate at 2 and 5 years was 96.4% and 92.8%. In conclusion, the use of TM-coated cups and augments could be considered an effective management of Paprosky type III defects without pelvic discontinuity providing good clinical and radiographic outcomes in the mid term.

  8. Prospective five-year subsidence analysis of a cementless fully hydroxyapatite-coated femoral hip arthroplasty component.

    PubMed

    Clauss, Martin; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; Goossens, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Early subsidence >1.5 mm is considered to be a predictive factor for later aseptic loosening of the femoral component following total hip arthroplasty (THA). The aim of this study was to assess five-year subsidence rates of the cementless hydroxyapatite-coated twinSys stem (Mathys Ltd., Bettlach, Switzerland).This prospective single-surgeon series examined consecutive patients receiving a twinSys stem at Maria Middelares Hospital, Belgium. Patients aged >85 years or unable to come to follow-up were excluded. Subsidence was assessed using Ein Bild Roentgen Analyse--Femoral Component Analysis (EBRA-FCA). Additional clinical and radiographic assessments were performed. Follow-ups were prospectively scheduled at two, five, 12, 24, and 60 months.In total, 218 THA (211 patients) were included. At five years, mean subsidence was 0.66 mm (95% CI: 0.43-0.90). Of the 211 patients, 95.2% had an excellent or good Harris Hip Score. There were few radiological changes. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated five-year stem survival to be 98.4% (95% CI: 97.6-100%).Subsidence levels of the twinSys femoral stem throughout the five years of follow-up were substantially lower than the 1.5 mm level predictive of aseptic loosening. This was reflected in the high five-year survival rate.

  9. Examination of rotational fixation of the femoral component in total hip arthroplasty. A mechanical study of micromovement and acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, H; Whiteside, L A; Kaiser, A D

    1989-12-01

    Rotational loosening has recently emerged as an important cause of failure of the femoral component of total hip arthroplasties. This study was designed to investigate the role played by torsional loads in loosening of cementless femoral components and to evaluate three cementing techniques involving a combination of canal irrigation, manual insertion, and vacuum mixing combined with pressure injection of the cement for their ability to improve rotational fixation. Rotational micromotion and subsidence were measured in 24 preserved human anatomic specimen femora. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was applied as a non-destructive method for evaluating material failure during loading. From the micromovement data, torque to 50 mu subsidence and torque to failure were surprisingly low with cementless fixation and with poor cement technique but were markedly improved with pulsed irrigation. Further improvement was achieved by pressure injection and vacuum mixing of the cement. However, AE was detected even in the most carefully performed cement specimens under torsional-loading conditions commonly occurring in daily activities. These signs of microfailure of the cement mantle at relatively low torsional loads suggest that the mode of failure of deeply penetrated cement is by microfracture of the cement mantle. The poor performance suggests that cementless fixation of intramedullary stems provides unsatisfactory fixation against torsional loading. There is need for major improvements in fixation mechanisms and techniques. The signs of failure of the cement mantle at normally occurring torsional loads suggest that even the best cement technique is prone to failure in torsion when exposed to normal daily use. PMID:2582663

  10. NMR-monitored titration of acid-stress bacterial chaperone HdeA reveals that Asp and Glu charge neutralization produces a loosened dimer structure in preparation for protein unfolding and chaperone activation.

    PubMed

    Garrison, McKinzie A; Crowhurst, Karin A

    2014-02-01

    HdeA is a periplasmic chaperone found in several gram-negative pathogenic bacteria that are linked to millions of cases of dysentery per year worldwide. After the protein becomes activated at low pH, it can bind to other periplasmic proteins, protecting them from aggregation when the bacteria travel through the stomach on their way to colonize the intestines. It has been argued that one of the major driving forces for HdeA activation is the protonation of aspartate and glutamate side chains. The goal for this study, therefore, was to investigate, at the atomic level, the structural impact of this charge neutralization on HdeA during the transition from near-neutral conditions to pH 3.0, in preparation for unfolding and activation of its chaperone capabilities. NMR spectroscopy was used to measure pKa values of Asp and Glu residues and monitor chemical shift changes. Measurements of R2/R1 ratios from relaxation experiments confirm that the protein maintains its dimer structure between pH 6.0 and 3.0. However, calculated correlation times and changes in amide protection from hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments provide evidence for a loosening of the tertiary and quaternary structures of HdeA; in particular, the data indicate that the dimer structure becomes progressively weakened as the pH decreases. Taken together, these results provide insight into the process by which HdeA is primed to unfold and carry out its chaperone duties below pH 3.0, and it also demonstrates that neutralization of aspartate and glutamate residues is not likely to be the sole trigger for HdeA dissociation and unfolding.

  11. The long-term results of Charnley low-friction arthroplasty in young patients who have congenital dislocation, degenerative osteoarthrosis, or rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sochart, D H; Porter, M L

    1997-11-01

    We present the long-term results of 226 Charnley low-friction arthroplasties that were performed with use of cement in 161 patients between 1966 and 1978. Forty-four patients (sixty hips) had congenital dislocation of the hip, fifty-four patients (sixty-six hips) had degenerative osteoarthrosis, and sixty-three patients (100 hips) had rheumatoid arthritis. There were 114 female patients and forty-seven male patients. The average age of the patients at the time of the operation was 31.7 years (range, seventeen to thirty-nine years). Sixty-five patients (40 per cent) had a bilateral hip replacement. Thirty-eight patients (24 per cent; fifty-five hips), twenty-seven of whom had juvenile-onset chronic rheumatoid arthritis, died during the follow-up period. The average duration of follow-up for the entire series until the time of death, revision of both components, or the latest evaluation was 236 months (19.7 years; range, twenty-four to 361 months). Survivorship analysis was performed with the Kaplan-Meier method. At twenty-five years, the survival of the femoral component (with 95 per cent confidence intervals) was 89 per cent (80 to 98 per cent) in the patients who had congenital dislocation of the hip, 85 per cent (77 to 93 per cent) in the patients who had rheumatoid arthritis, and 74 per cent (61 to 87 per cent) in the patients who had degenerative osteoarthrosis. The rate of survival of the acetabular component was lower: at twenty-five years, it was 58 per cent (42 to 74 per cent) in the patients who had congenital dislocation, 79 per cent (70 to 88 per cent) in the patients who had rheumatoid arthritis, and 59 per cent (41 to 77 per cent) in the patients who had degenerative osteoarthrosis. The forty-four patients (sixty hips) who had congenital dislocation had the highest rates of aseptic loosening (twenty-two hips; 37 per cent), migration (seventeen hips; 28 per cent), and revision (twenty-two hips; 37 per cent) of the acetabular component. The fifty

  12. The effect of cup outer sizes on the contact mechanics and cement fixation of cemented total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-10-01

    One important loosening mechanism of the cemented total hip arthroplasty is the mechanical overload at the bone-cement interface and consequent failure of the cement fixation. Clinical studies have revealed that the outer diameter of the acetabular component is a key factor in influencing aseptic loosening of the hip arthroplasty. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the cup outer diameter on the contact mechanics and cement fixation of a cemented total hip replacement (THR) with different wear penetration depths and under different cup inclination angles using finite element (FE) method. A three-dimensional FE model was developed based on a typical Charnley hip prosthesis. Two acetabular cup designs with outer diameters of 40 and 43 mm were modelled and the effect of cup outer diameter, penetration depth and cup inclination angle on the contact mechanics and cement fixation stresses in the cemented THR were studied. The results showed that for all penetration depths and cup inclination angles considered, the contact mechanics in terms of peak von Mises stress in the acetabular cup and peak contact pressure at the bearing surface for the two cup designs were similar (within 5%). However, the peak von Mises stress, the peak maximum principal stress and peak shear stress in the cement mantle at the bone-cement interface for the 43 mm diameter cup design were predicted to be lower compared to those for the 40 mm diameter cup design. The differences were predicted to be 15-19%, 15-22% and 18-20% respectively for different cup penetration depths and inclination angles, which compares to the clinical difference of aseptic loosening incidence of about 20% between the two cup designs.

  13. The effect of cup outer sizes on the contact mechanics and cement fixation of cemented total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-10-01

    One important loosening mechanism of the cemented total hip arthroplasty is the mechanical overload at the bone-cement interface and consequent failure of the cement fixation. Clinical studies have revealed that the outer diameter of the acetabular component is a key factor in influencing aseptic loosening of the hip arthroplasty. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the cup outer diameter on the contact mechanics and cement fixation of a cemented total hip replacement (THR) with different wear penetration depths and under different cup inclination angles using finite element (FE) method. A three-dimensional FE model was developed based on a typical Charnley hip prosthesis. Two acetabular cup designs with outer diameters of 40 and 43 mm were modelled and the effect of cup outer diameter, penetration depth and cup inclination angle on the contact mechanics and cement fixation stresses in the cemented THR were studied. The results showed that for all penetration depths and cup inclination angles considered, the contact mechanics in terms of peak von Mises stress in the acetabular cup and peak contact pressure at the bearing surface for the two cup designs were similar (within 5%). However, the peak von Mises stress, the peak maximum principal stress and peak shear stress in the cement mantle at the bone-cement interface for the 43 mm diameter cup design were predicted to be lower compared to those for the 40 mm diameter cup design. The differences were predicted to be 15-19%, 15-22% and 18-20% respectively for different cup penetration depths and inclination angles, which compares to the clinical difference of aseptic loosening incidence of about 20% between the two cup designs. PMID:26343226

  14. Mechanisms of plastic deformation in highly cross-linked UHMWPE for total hip components--the molecular physics viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Shishido, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Kengo; Masaoka, Toshinori; Kubo, Kosuke; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    Plastic deformation is an unavoidable event in biomedical polymeric implants for load-bearing application during long-term in-vivo service life, which involves a mass transfer process, irreversible chain motion, and molecular reorganization. Deformation-induced microstructural alterations greatly affect mechanical properties and durability of implant devices. The present research focused on evaluating, from a molecular physics viewpoint, the impact of externally applied strain (or stress) in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) prostheses, subjected to radiation cross-linking and subsequent remelting for application in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Two different types of commercial acetabular liners, which belong to the first-generation highly cross-linked UHMWPE (HXLPE), were investigated by means of confocal/polarized Raman microprobe spectroscopy. The amount of crystalline region and the spatial distribution of molecular chain orientation were quantitatively analyzed according to a combined theory including Raman selection rules for the polyethylene orthorhombic structure and the orientation distribution function (ODF) statistical approach. The structurally important finding was that pronounced recrystallization and molecular reorientation increasingly appeared in the near-surface regions of HXLPE liners with increasing the amount of plastic (compressive) deformation stored in the microstructure. Such molecular rearrangements, occurred in response to external strains, locally increase surface cross-shear (CS) stresses, which in turn trigger microscopic wear processes in HXLPE acetabular liners. Thus, on the basis of the results obtained at the molecular scale, we emphasize here the importance of minimizing the development of irrecoverable deformation strain in order to retain the pristine and intrinsically high wear performance of HXLPE components. PMID:25460925

  15. Mechanisms of plastic deformation in highly cross-linked UHMWPE for total hip components--the molecular physics viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Shishido, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Kengo; Masaoka, Toshinori; Kubo, Kosuke; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    Plastic deformation is an unavoidable event in biomedical polymeric implants for load-bearing application during long-term in-vivo service life, which involves a mass transfer process, irreversible chain motion, and molecular reorganization. Deformation-induced microstructural alterations greatly affect mechanical properties and durability of implant devices. The present research focused on evaluating, from a molecular physics viewpoint, the impact of externally applied strain (or stress) in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) prostheses, subjected to radiation cross-linking and subsequent remelting for application in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Two different types of commercial acetabular liners, which belong to the first-generation highly cross-linked UHMWPE (HXLPE), were investigated by means of confocal/polarized Raman microprobe spectroscopy. The amount of crystalline region and the spatial distribution of molecular chain orientation were quantitatively analyzed according to a combined theory including Raman selection rules for the polyethylene orthorhombic structure and the orientation distribution function (ODF) statistical approach. The structurally important finding was that pronounced recrystallization and molecular reorientation increasingly appeared in the near-surface regions of HXLPE liners with increasing the amount of plastic (compressive) deformation stored in the microstructure. Such molecular rearrangements, occurred in response to external strains, locally increase surface cross-shear (CS) stresses, which in turn trigger microscopic wear processes in HXLPE acetabular liners. Thus, on the basis of the results obtained at the molecular scale, we emphasize here the importance of minimizing the development of irrecoverable deformation strain in order to retain the pristine and intrinsically high wear performance of HXLPE components.

  16. Cementless fixation of the tibial component for the ICLH knee.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, M A; Bradley, G W; Blaha, J D; Insler, H P

    1982-01-01

    The use of polymethylmethacrylate bone cement in joint replacement surgery is not without drawbacks. Certain hazards have been appreciated and the bone cement interface may not be as stable in the long run as was once felt. This paper reports the results in 52 knees which were replaced using the uncemented ICLH (Imperial College/London Hospital) tibial component; the average follow up was two years (range six months to four years). The results were compiled with regard to pain as well as clinical examination and X-ray evaluation. The results were comparable to those achieved in knees replaced using bone cement. Roentgenographic evaluation revealed no evidence of loosening nor sinkage of any of these prostheses. Considerations in the development of a knee prosthesis to be utilized without bone cement and the operative technique employed to implant such a prosthesis are presented. The merits of such a system are discussed. Images Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 4. C Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 5. C PMID:7086790

  17. New polyethylenes in total hip replacement: A ten- to 12-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    García-Rey, E; García-Cimbrelo, E; Cruz-Pardos, A

    2013-03-01

    Between 1999 and 2001, 90 patients underwent total hip replacement using the same uncemented acetabular and femoral components with a 28 mm metallic femoral head but with prospective randomisation of the acetabular liner to either Durasul highly cross-linked polyethylene or nitrogen-sterilised Sulene polyethylene. We assessed 83 patients at a minimum follow-up of ten years. Linear penetration of the femoral head was estimated at six weeks, six and 12 months and annually thereafter, using the Dorr method, given the non-spherical shape of the acetabular component. There was no loosening of any component; only one hip in the Sulene group showed proximal femoral osteolysis. The mean penetration of the femoral head at six weeks was 0.08 mm (0.02 to 0.15) for the Durasul group and 0.16 mm (0.05 to 0.28) for the Sulene group (p = 0.001). The mean yearly linear penetration was 64.8% lower for the Durasul group at 0.05 mm/year (sd 0.035) for the Sulene group and 0.02 mm/year (sd 0.016) for the Durasul (p < 0.001). Mean linear femoral head penetration at ten years was 61% less in the Durasul than Sulene group. Highly cross-linked polyethylene gives excellent results at ten years.

  18. Component Publications and Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Naijun; Kang, Eun Young; Liu, Zhiming

    One of the major issues in component-based design is how to use a component correctly in different applications according to the given interface specification, called the publication, of the component. In this paper we formulate this as the problem of component publication composition and refinement. We define the notion of publications of components that describes how a component can be used by a third party in building their own components or in writing their applications without access to the design or the code of the component. It is desirable that different users of the components can be given different publications according to their need. The first contribution of this paper is to provide a procedure, which calculates a weakest contract of the required interface of a component from the contract of its provided interface and its code. The other contribution, that is more significant from a component-based designer's point of view, is to define composition on publications so that the publication of a composite component can be calculated from those of its subcomponents. For this we define a set of primitive composition operators over components, including renaming, hiding, internalizing, plugging and feedback. This theory is presented based on the sematic model of rCOS, a refinement calculus of component and object systems.

  19. Robotic component preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Dokos, J.R.

    1986-04-01

    This report provides information on the preparation of robotic components. Component preparation includes pretinning or solder dipping, preforming, and pretrimming of component leads. Since about 70% of all components are axial-leaded resistor-type components, it was decided to begin with them and then later develop capabilities to handle other types. The first workcell is the first phase of an overall system to pretin, preform, and pretrim all components and to feed them to an automatic insertion system. Before use of the robot, a Unimation PUMA Modal 260, pretinning and preforming was done by first hand with a shield and vented booth.

  20. The Exeter™ Universal Hip in Patients 50 Years or Younger at 10–17 Years’ Followup

    PubMed Central

    Squires, Ben; Gie, Graham A.; Timperley, Andrew J.; Ling, Robin S. M.

    2008-01-01

    The Exeter™ Universal hip (Stryker Inc., Newbury, UK) has reported survival rates of 91.74% at 12 years in all patients with reoperation as an endpoint. However, its performance in younger patients has not been fully established. We reviewed survivorship and the clinical and radiographic outcomes of this hip system implanted in 107 patients (130 hips) 50 years old or younger at the time of surgery. The mean age at surgery was 42 years. The minimum followup was 10 years (mean, 12.5 years; range, 10–17 years) with no patients lost to followup. Twelve hips had been revised. Of these, nine had aseptic loosening of the acetabular component and one cup was revised for focal lysis and pain. One hip was revised for recurrent dislocation and one joint underwent revision for infection. Radiographs demonstrated 14 (12.8%) of the remaining acetabular prostheses were loose but no femoral components were loose. Survivorship of both stem and cup from all causes was 92.6% at an average of 12.5 years. Survivorship of the stem from all causes was 99% and no stem was revised for aseptic loosening. The Exeter™ Universal stem performed well, even in the young, high-demand patient. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18196413

  1. Uncemented custom femoral components in hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose We have developed an individually designed, uncemented femoral component for achievement of improved strain distribution and fixation to the bone, to make uncemented stems more applicable in femurs of abnormal size and shape, and to improve the joint mechanics. Here we describe the design of the implant and present the results of a prospective clinical study with at least 7 years of follow-up. Patients and methods The prostheses are produced by CAD-CAM technique. The design of the stem is based on CT information, and the neck design is based on the surgeon's planning of the center of rotation, femoral head offset, and leg length correction. The first-generation stem produced before 2001 had a proximal HA coating and a sand-blasted distal part that was down-scaled to avoid contact with compact bone. The second-generation stem had a porous coating beneath the HA layer and the distal part of the stem was polished. The implant was used in 762 hips (614 patients) from 1995 until 2009. 191 of these hips were followed for 7 years and 83 others were followed for 10 years, and these hips are included in the present study. Mean age at surgery was 48 (20–65) years. Congenital dysplasia of the hip was the reason for osteoarthritis in 46% and 57% of the hips in respective groups. Merle d'Aubigné score was recorded in 152 and 75 hips in the two groups. Prostheses followed for 10 years, and almost all in the 7-year group, were first-generation stems. Results The 7- and 10-year cumulative revision rates were 1.1% and 2.4%, respectively, with stem revision for any reason as endpoint. The clinical results were similar at 7 and 10 years, with Merle d'Aubigné scores of 17. Intraoperative trochanteric fissures occurred in 2 of the 191 operations (1.0%); both healed after wiring. In hips followed for 7 years, 2 periprosthetic fractures occurred; exchange of the stem was necessary in both. One additional fracture occurred between 7 and 10 years, and it was

  2. Reactor component automatic grapple

    SciTech Connect

    Greenaway, P.R.

    1982-12-07

    A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

  3. Reactor component automatic grapple

    DOEpatents

    Greenaway, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

  4. Medium-term follow-up of 92 femoral component revisions using a third-generation cementing technique

    PubMed Central

    Te Stroet, Martijn A J; Rijnen, Wim H C; Gardeniers, Jean W M; Van Kampen, Albert; Schreurs, B Willem

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Very little has been published on the outcome of femoral cemented revisions using a third-generation cementing technique. We report the medium-term outcome of a consecutive series of patients treated in this way. Patients and methods — This study included 92 consecutive cemented femoral revisions performed in our department with a third-generation cementing technique and without instrumented bone impaction grafting between 1996 and 2007. The average age of the patients at revision was 66 (25–92) years. None of the patients were lost to follow-up. At review in December 2013, 55 patients were still alive and had a non-re-revised femoral revision component in situ after a mean follow-up of 11 (5–17) years. Results — The mean preoperative Harris hip score was 50, and improved to 73 at final follow-up. 2 patients died shortly after the revision surgery. 1 stem was re-revised for aseptic loosening; this was also the only case with radiolucent lines in all 7 Gruen zones. A femoral reoperation was performed in 19 hips during follow-up, and in 14 of these 19 reoperations the femoral component was re-revised. Survivorship at 10 years, with femoral re-revision for any reason as the endpoint, was 86% (95% CI: 77–92). However, excluding 8 patients with reinfections after septic index revisions and 1 with hematogenous spread of infection from the survival analysis, the adjusted survival for re-revision for any reason at 10 years was 92% (95% CI: 83–96). With re-revision for aseptic loosening as endpoint, the survival at 10 years was 99% (CI: 90–100). Interpretation — Femoral component revision with a third-generation cemented stem results in acceptable survival after medium-term follow-up. We recommend the use of this technique in femoral revisions with limited loss of bone stock. PMID:26569495

  5. Retrieval analysis of 240 metal-on-metal hip components, comparing modular total hip replacement with hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Matthies, A; Underwood, R; Cann, P; Ilo, K; Nawaz, Z; Skinner, J; Hart, A J

    2011-03-01

    This study compared component wear rates and pre-revision blood metal ions levels in two groups of failed metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties: hip resurfacing and modular total hip replacement (THR). There was no significant difference in the median rate of linear wear between the groups for both acetabular (p = 0.4633) and femoral (p = 0.0872) components. There was also no significant difference in the median linear wear rates when failed hip resurfacing and modular THR hips of the same type (ASR and Birmingham hip resurfacing (BHR)) were compared. Unlike other studies of well-functioning hips, there was no significant difference in pre-revision blood metal ion levels between hip resurfacing and modular THR. Edge loading was common in both groups, but more common in the resurfacing group (67%) than in the modular group (57%). However, this was not significant (p = 0.3479). We attribute this difference to retention of the neck in resurfacing of the hip, leading to impingement-type edge loading. This was supported by visual evidence of impingement on the femur. These findings show that failed metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and modular THRs have similar component wear rates and are both associated with raised pre-revision blood levels of metal ions. PMID:21357950

  6. Components of Sexual Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Michael G.; DeCecco, John P.

    1977-01-01

    This paper examines the four components of sexual identity: biological sex, gender identity, social sex-role, and sexual orientation. Theories about the development of each component and how they combine and conflict to form the individual's sexual identity are discussed. (Author)

  7. Electronic Component Obsolescence

    SciTech Connect

    Sohns, Carl William; Ward, Christina D

    2010-01-01

    Electronic component obsolescence occurs when parts are no longer available to support the manufacture and/or repair of equipment still in service. Future instrumentation containing complex components WILL face obsolescence issues as technology advances. This paper describes hardware and software obsolescence as well as factors to consider when designing new instrumentation.

  8. Research Component - Natural Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Donald

    The research component in the natural sciences does not have to be changed. Ninety-three percent of the students surveyed by Ann Heiss for her book "The Challenge to the Graduate Schools" felt that the research component of the natural sciences contributed to their scientific development, and 85 percent felt that it was intellectually stimulating.…

  9. Design of Critical Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2001-01-01

    Critical component design is based on minimizing product failures that results in loss of life. Potential catastrophic failures are reduced to secondary failures where components removed for cause or operating time in the system. Issues of liability and cost of component removal become of paramount importance. Deterministic design with factors of safety and probabilistic design address but lack the essential characteristics for the design of critical components. In deterministic design and fabrication there are heuristic rules and safety factors developed over time for large sets of structural/material components. These factors did not come without cost. Many designs failed and many rules (codes) have standing committees to oversee their proper usage and enforcement. In probabilistic design, not only are failures a given, the failures are calculated; an element of risk is assumed based on empirical failure data for large classes of component operations. Failure of a class of components can be predicted, yet one can not predict when a specific component will fail. The analogy is to the life insurance industry where very careful statistics are book-kept on classes of individuals. For a specific class, life span can be predicted within statistical limits, yet life-span of a specific element of that class can not be predicted.

  10. The stability of the femoral component in the Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement: a comparison of single and twin peg designs.

    PubMed

    Reiner, T; Jaeger, S; Schwarze, M; Klotz, M C; Beckmann, N A; Bitsch, R G

    2014-07-01

    Aseptic loosening of the femoral component is an important indication for revision surgery in unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR). A new design of femoral component with an additional peg was introduced for the cemented Oxford UKR to increase its stability. The purpose of this study was to compare the primary stability of the two designs of component. Medial Oxford UKR was performed in 12 pairs of human cadaver knees. In each pair, one knee received the single peg and one received the twin peg design. Three dimensional micromotion and subsidence of the component in relation to the bone was measured under cyclical loading at flexion of 40° and 70° using an optical measuring system. Wilcoxon matched pairs signed-rank test was performed to detect differences between the two groups. There was no significant difference in the relative micromotion (p = 0.791 and 0.380, respectively) and subsidence (p = 0.301 and 0.176, respectively) of the component between the two groups at both angles of flexion. Both designs of component offered good strength of fixation in this cadaver study.

  11. Complications in primary total hip arthroplasty: avoidance and management: wear.

    PubMed

    Ries, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Many factors, including polyethylene processing, sterilization method, counterface material, femoral head size, femoral offset, acetabular component position, implant design, and patient activity level, affect the rate of wear in total hip arthroplasty. For patients with life expectancy that exceeds the longevity of the conventional implant materials, an alternative bearing surface (highly cross-linked polyethylene, metal-on-metal, or ceramic-on-ceramic) may be considered. Although laboratory wear tests with these materials are very favorable, clinical outcomes have not been clearly established. When osteolysis does develop in response to particulate debris, the location and progression of the lesions may be quite variable. Asymptomatic stable lesions can be followed clinically and radiographically while symptomatic or enlarging lesions or those that may compromise the integrity of the periprosthetic bone stock require surgery. If acetabular component revision is necessary and an adequate rim of host bone is maintained to support a revision acetabular component, defects can be filled with particulate bone graft. Large segmental defects generally require structural allografts. If the acetabular shell is well fixed in good position and the osteolytic defects are accessible, treatment with curettage and bone grafting of the lesions with liner revision is appropriate to avoid use of a structural allograft. Proximal femoral defects around a well-fixed stem can be managed in a similar manner with curettage and bone grafting. Distal lesions associated with risk of periprosthetic femur fracture or implant loosening require stem revision. Osteoclastic resportion of bone in response to particulate debris can be impaired with use of some drugs such as alendronate. However, the safety and efficacy of alendronate in the clinical management of osteolysis associated with total hip arthroplasty has not been established. PMID:12690853

  12. Discriminant Incoherent Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Georgakis, Christos; Panagakis, Yannis; Pantic, Maja

    2016-05-01

    Face images convey rich information which can be perceived as a superposition of low-complexity components associated with attributes, such as facial identity, expressions, and activation of facial action units (AUs). For instance, low-rank components characterizing neutral facial images are associated with identity, while sparse components capturing non-rigid deformations occurring in certain face regions reveal expressions and AU activations. In this paper, the discriminant incoherent component analysis (DICA) is proposed in order to extract low-complexity components, corresponding to facial attributes, which are mutually incoherent among different classes (e.g., identity, expression, and AU activation) from training data, even in the presence of gross sparse errors. To this end, a suitable optimization problem, involving the minimization of nuclear-and l1 -norm, is solved. Having found an ensemble of class-specific incoherent components by the DICA, an unseen (test) image is expressed as a group-sparse linear combination of these components, where the non-zero coefficients reveal the class(es) of the respective facial attribute(s) that it belongs to. The performance of the DICA is experimentally assessed on both synthetic and real-world data. Emphasis is placed on face analysis tasks, namely, joint face and expression recognition, face recognition under varying percentages of training data corruption, subject-independent expression recognition, and AU detection by conducting experiments on four data sets. The proposed method outperforms all the methods that are compared with all the tasks and experimental settings. PMID:27008268

  13. Discriminant Incoherent Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Georgakis, Christos; Panagakis, Yannis; Pantic, Maja

    2016-05-01

    Face images convey rich information which can be perceived as a superposition of low-complexity components associated with attributes, such as facial identity, expressions, and activation of facial action units (AUs). For instance, low-rank components characterizing neutral facial images are associated with identity, while sparse components capturing non-rigid deformations occurring in certain face regions reveal expressions and AU activations. In this paper, the discriminant incoherent component analysis (DICA) is proposed in order to extract low-complexity components, corresponding to facial attributes, which are mutually incoherent among different classes (e.g., identity, expression, and AU activation) from training data, even in the presence of gross sparse errors. To this end, a suitable optimization problem, involving the minimization of nuclear-and l1 -norm, is solved. Having found an ensemble of class-specific incoherent components by the DICA, an unseen (test) image is expressed as a group-sparse linear combination of these components, where the non-zero coefficients reveal the class(es) of the respective facial attribute(s) that it belongs to. The performance of the DICA is experimentally assessed on both synthetic and real-world data. Emphasis is placed on face analysis tasks, namely, joint face and expression recognition, face recognition under varying percentages of training data corruption, subject-independent expression recognition, and AU detection by conducting experiments on four data sets. The proposed method outperforms all the methods that are compared with all the tasks and experimental settings.

  14. GCS component development cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Jose A.; Macias, Rosa; Molgo, Jordi; Guerra, Dailos; Pi, Marti

    2012-09-01

    The GTC1 is an optical-infrared 10-meter segmented mirror telescope at the ORM observatory in Canary Islands (Spain). First light was at 13/07/2007 and since them it is in the operation phase. The GTC control system (GCS) is a distributed object & component oriented system based on RT-CORBA8 and it is responsible for the management and operation of the telescope, including its instrumentation. GCS has used the Rational Unified process (RUP9) in its development. RUP is an iterative software development process framework. After analysing (use cases) and designing (UML10) any of GCS subsystems, an initial component description of its interface is obtained and from that information a component specification is written. In order to improve the code productivity, GCS has adopted the code generation to transform this component specification into the skeleton of component classes based on a software framework, called Device Component Framework. Using the GCS development tools, based on javadoc and gcc, in only one step, the component is generated, compiled and deployed to be tested for the first time through our GUI inspector. The main advantages of this approach are the following: It reduces the learning curve of new developers and the development error rate, allows a systematic use of design patterns in the development and software reuse, speeds up the deliverables of the software product and massively increase the timescale, design consistency and design quality, and eliminates the future refactoring process required for the code.

  15. Scientific Software Component Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Dykman, N.; Kumfert, G.; Smolinski, B.

    2000-02-16

    We are developing new software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address issues of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology enables cross-project code re-use, reduces software development costs, and provides additional simulation capabilities for massively parallel laboratory application codes. The success of our approach will be measured by its impact on DOE mathematical and scientific software efforts. Thus, we are collaborating closely with library developers and application scientists in the Common Component Architecture forum, the Equation Solver Interface forum, and other DOE mathematical software groups to gather requirements, write and adopt a variety of design specifications, and develop demonstration projects to validate our approach. Numerical simulation is essential to the science mission at the laboratory. However, it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage the complexity of modern simulation software. Computational scientists develop complex, three-dimensional, massively parallel, full-physics simulations that require the integration of diverse software packages written by outside development teams. Currently, the integration of a new software package, such as a new linear solver library, can require several months of effort. Current industry component technologies such as CORBA, JavaBeans, and COM have all been used successfully in the business domain to reduce software development costs and increase software quality. However, these existing industry component infrastructures will not scale to support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. In particular, they do not address issues related to high-performance parallel computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections between components, language interoperability for scientific languages such as Fortran, parallel data redistribution between components, and massively

  16. Component-specific modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the second year effort of a 3-year program to develop methodology for component specific modeling of aircraft engine hot section components (turbine blades, turbine vanes, and burner liners). These accomplishments include: (1) engine thermodynamic and mission models; (2) geometry model generators; (3) remeshing; (4) specialty 3-D inelastic stuctural analysis; (5) computationally efficient solvers, (6) adaptive solution strategies; (7) engine performance parameters/component response variables decomposition and synthesis; (8) integrated software architecture and development, and (9) validation cases for software developed.

  17. Evaluating Performance of Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Daniel; Tisdale, Edwin; Norton, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Parallel Component Performance Benchmarks is a computer program developed to aid the evaluation of the Common Component Architecture (CCA) - a software architecture, based on a component model, that was conceived to foster high-performance computing, including parallel computing. More specifically, this program compares the performances (principally by measuring computing times) of componentized versus conventional versions of the Parallel Pyramid 2D Adaptive Mesh Refinement library - a software library that is used to generate computational meshes for solving physical problems and that is typical of software libraries in use at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  18. Ceramic component for electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.

    1979-01-01

    A ceramic component suitable for preparing MHD generator electrodes consists of HfO.sub.2 and sufficient Tb.sub.4 O.sub.7 to stabilize at least 60 volume percent of the HfO.sub.2 into the cubic structure. The ceramic component may also contain a small amount of PrO.sub.2, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 or a mixture of both to improve stability and electronic conductivity of the electrode. The component is highly resistant to corrosion by molten potassium seed and molten coal slag in the MHD fluid and exhibits both ionic and electronic conductivity.

  19. Component Fixturing Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kling, Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An end-configuration of components to be moved or positioned is first obtained. This end-configuration determines the relative positioning and orientation of the components with respect to each other when in a final, desired configuration. A folding pattern is then obtained that is formed by interior vertices defining corresponding tessellation facets. The folding pattern can be induced to transition from a first folded configuration to a second folded configuration. When in the second folded configuration mounting facets, which are a subset of the tessellation facets, are arranged by the geometry of the folding pattern into positions and orientations with respect to each other that correspond to the end-configuration of the components. A foldable structure is then obtained that folds in accordance with the folding pattern, and the components are affixed to their respective mounting facets.

  20. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons and methods for making such materials. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  1. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  2. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  3. Develop a Model Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensey, Tyler S.

    2013-01-01

    During my internship at NASA, I was a model developer for Ground Support Equipment (GSE). The purpose of a model developer is to develop and unit test model component libraries (fluid, electrical, gas, etc.). The models are designed to simulate software for GSE (Ground Special Power, Crew Access Arm, Cryo, Fire and Leak Detection System, Environmental Control System (ECS), etc. .) before they are implemented into hardware. These models support verifying local control and remote software for End-Item Software Under Test (SUT). The model simulates the physical behavior (function, state, limits and 110) of each end-item and it's dependencies as defined in the Subsystem Interface Table, Software Requirements & Design Specification (SRDS), Ground Integrated Schematic (GIS), and System Mechanical Schematic.(SMS). The software of each specific model component is simulated through MATLAB's Simulink program. The intensiv model development life cycle is a.s follows: Identify source documents; identify model scope; update schedule; preliminary design review; develop model requirements; update model.. scope; update schedule; detailed design review; create/modify library component; implement library components reference; implement subsystem components; develop a test script; run the test script; develop users guide; send model out for peer review; the model is sent out for verifictionlvalidation; if there is empirical data, a validation data package is generated; if there is not empirical data, a verification package is generated; the test results are then reviewed; and finally, the user. requests accreditation, and a statement of accreditation is prepared. Once each component model is reviewed and approved, they are intertwined together into one integrated model. This integrated model is then tested itself, through a test script and autotest, so that it can be concluded that all models work conjointly, for a single purpose. The component I was assigned, specifically, was a

  4. Component fragility research program

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, N.C.; Mochizuki, G.L.; Holman, G.S.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1989-11-01

    To demonstrate how high-level'' qualification test data can be used to estimate the ultimate seismic capacity of nuclear power plant equipment, we assessed in detail various electrical components tested by the Pacific Gas Electric Company for its Diablo Canyon plant. As part of our Phase I Component Fragility Research Program, we evaluated seismic fragility for five Diablo Canyon components: medium-voltage (4kV) switchgear; safeguard relay board; emergency light battery pack; potential transformer; and station battery and racks. This report discusses our Phase II fragility evaluation of a single Westinghouse Type W motor control center column, a fan cooler motor controller, and three local starters at the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant. These components were seismically qualified by means of biaxial random motion tests on a shaker table, and the test response spectra formed the basis for the estimate of the seismic capacity of the components. The seismic capacity of each component is referenced to the zero period acceleration (ZPA) and, in our Phase II study only, to the average spectral acceleration (ASA) of the motion at its base. For the motor control center, the seismic capacity was compared to the capacity of a Westinghouse Five-Star MCC subjected to actual fragility tests by LLNL during the Phase I Component Fragility Research Program, and to generic capacities developed by the Brookhaven National Laboratory for motor control center. Except for the medium-voltage switchgear, all of the components considered in both our Phase I and Phase II evaluations were qualified in their standard commercial configurations or with only relatively minor modifications such as top bracing of cabinets. 8 refs., 67 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Elmallah, Randa K; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Jauregui, Julio J; Padden, David A; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    Complications following total hip arthroplasty (THA), such as dislocation, component loosening and wear, continue to be common indications for revision surgery. Multiple studies have attributed some of these problems to poor acetabular cup alignment and placement outside of the purported radiographic safe zone. In addition, it has been shown that conventional manually performed acetabular cup placement may not lead to optimal alignment, regardless of surgical experience. Additionally, incorrect leg length and offset can lead to dissatisfaction and instability. Therefore, robotic-arm assisted surgery has been introduced to improve accuracy of cup placement and leg length, and to offset with the aim of reducing the risk of hip instability and improving satisfaction after primary THA. Our aim was to prospectively review the use of robotic-arm assisted surgery in 224 patients and to assess whether the pre-operatively determined radiographic targets were achieved post-operatively and the proportion of acetabular cups outside of the safe zone. Pre-determined anteversion and inclination were 15 and 40 degrees, respectively. Our results have shown that the use of robotic-arm assisted surgery resulted in a post-operative mean inclination of 40 degrees (range, 34 to 51 degrees) and a mean anteversion of 16 degrees (range, 9 to 25 degrees). Ninety-nine percent of the patients remained within the pre-designated safe zone. Evidence has shown that robotic-arm assisted surgery may have improved accuracy in cup placement when compared to conventional surgery and possibly to computer-assisted surgery. When compared to the literature on robotic-arm assisted surgery, our results were comparable. We believe that this surgical technique may aid in reducing post-operative THA complications, such as aseptic loosening and dislocations, but further prospective studies are needed to evaluate clinical outcomes and long-term results. PMID:26055021

  6. Scientific Component Technology Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S; Bosl, B; Dahlgren, T; Kumfert, G; Smith, S

    2003-02-07

    The laboratory has invested a significant amount of resources towards the development of high-performance scientific simulation software, including numerical libraries, visualization, steering, software frameworks, and physics packages. Unfortunately, because this software was not designed for interoperability and re-use, it is often difficult to share these sophisticated software packages among applications due to differences in implementation language, programming style, or calling interfaces. This LDRD Strategic Initiative investigated and developed software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address problems of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology is an extension of scripting and object-oriented software development techniques that specifically focuses on the needs of software interoperability. Component approaches based on CORBA, COM, and Java technologies are widely used in industry; however, they do not support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. Our research focused on the unique requirements of scientific computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections among components, language interoperability for scientific languages, and data distribution support for massively parallel SPMD components.

  7. Encyclopedia of software components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanwarren, Lloyd (Inventor); Beckman, Brian C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Intelligent browsing through a collection of reusable software components is facilitated with a computer having a video monitor and a user input interface such as a keyboard or a mouse for transmitting user selections, by presenting a picture of encyclopedia volumes with respective visible labels referring to types of software, in accordance with a metaphor in which each volume includes a page having a list of general topics under the software type of the volume and pages having lists of software components for each one of the generic topics, altering the picture to open one of the volumes in response to an initial user selection specifying the one volume to display on the monitor a picture of the page thereof having the list of general topics and altering the picture to display the page thereof having a list of software components under one of the general topics in response to a next user selection specifying the one general topic, and then presenting a picture of a set of different informative plates depicting different types of information about one of the software components in response to a further user selection specifying the one component.

  8. Encyclopedia of Software Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Lloyd V. (Inventor); Beckman, Brian C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Intelligent browsing through a collection of reusable software components is facilitated with a computer having a video monitor and a user input interface such as a keyboard or a mouse for transmitting user selections, by presenting a picture of encyclopedia volumes with respective visible labels referring to types of software, in accordance with a metaphor in which each volume includes a page having a list of general topics under the software type of the volume and pages having lists of software components for each one of the generic topics, altering the picture to open one of the volumes in response to an initial user selection specifying the one volume to display on the monitor a picture of the page thereof having the list of general topics and altering the picture to display the page thereof having a list of software components under one of the general topics in response to a next user selection specifying the one general topic, and then presenting a picture of a set of different informative plates depicting different types of information about one of the software components in response to a further user selection specifying the one component.

  9. On the anomalous component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potgieter, M. S.; Fisk, L. A.; Lee, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    The so-called anomalous cosmic ray component, which occurs at energies of about 10 MeV/nucleon and consists only of He, N, O, and Ne, has been a subject of interest for more than a decade. The origin of this component is generally considered to be interstellar neutral gas that is ionized and accelerated in the solar wind. The mechanism and the location for the acceleration, however, remains an unsolved problem. A model is used which includes the effects of gradient and curvature drifts and considers the implications of observed spatial gradients of the anomalous component for the location of the acceleration region. It is concluded that if drifts are important the acceleration region cannot lie at the solar poles. It is also concluded that there is no single region for the acceleration which can account for both the observed intensities and gradients in models which include drift effects.

  10. Blood Component Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kelton, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Human blood has been transfused for about 60-70 years. Over this time, the practice of blood transfusion has changed dramatically. One major change is the separation of blood into its various components. As a result, the patient can receive only the blood component in which he is deficient. In this way, the risk of side effects—particularly hepatitis—is lessened. This article briefly reviews the various blood products, the indications for their use, and some associated risks. These products include oxygen-carrying products, plasma products, blood products used to correct hemostatic defects, and immune globulin. PMID:21279096

  11. Ceramic component for electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.; Bates, J. Lambert

    1980-01-01

    A ceramic component suitable for preparing MHD generator electrodes having the compositional formula: Y.sub.x (Mg.sub.y Cr.sub.z).sub.w Al.sub.(1-w) O.sub.3 where x=0.9 to 1.05, y=0.02 to 0.2, z=0.8 to 1.05 and w=1.0 to 0.5. The component is resistant to the formation of hydration products in an MHD environment, has good electrical conductivity and exhibits a lower electrochemical corrosion rate than do comparable compositions of lanthanum chromite.

  12. A component simulator architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégin, M.-E.; Walsh, T.

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes the current state of our new component simulator architecture. This design is being developed at VEGA GmbH, by the Technology Group, within the Space Business Unit. This paper describes our overall component architecture and attempts to explain how it can be used by model developers and end-users. At the time of writing, it appears clear that a certain level of automation is required to increase the usability of the system. This automation is only briefly discussed here.

  13. Flight service evaluation of composite components on the Bell helicopter model 206L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Henry

    1993-01-01

    This is the final report on the advanced composite components which were placed in service on the 206L LongRanger helicopters in the continental United States, Canada, and Alaska. This report covers all test data which was gathered, as well as maintenance histories of the parts. The previous reports describe the fabrication, service experiences, and test data through 1986. This report contains information from these references, as well as data gathered after 1986. The status of the 40 sets of components is discussed. Each set consisted of a vertical fin, forward fairing, litter door, and baggage door. Almost 500,000 flight hours were accumulated on the 160 parts, with the high-time part accumulating 14,687 flight hours. Over 60 percent of the parts were destructively tested to measure strength and stiffness retention over the course of the program. The vertical fins had the greatest strength retention followed by the litter doors. The baggage doors had the poorest retention of strength. There was very little difference in property retention between the four primary operating regions: Northwest U.S., Southwest U.S., Gulf of Mexico Coastal Region, and the Northeast U.S. and Eastern Canada Region. The field problems have ranged from two lightning-struck fins to significant delaminations in the baggage doors. There was only one environmentally related field incident, in which the glass windows on the litter doors were found to loosen due to high temperatures experienced in the southwest region.

  14. Molecular Models Candy Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, William F.

    2007-01-01

    An explanation of various principles of chemistry in a paper by Fanny Ennever by the use of candy is described. The paper explains components of sucrose and the invert sugar that results from the hydrolysis of sucrose and will help students in determining whether the products are indeed hydrates of carbon.

  15. Revealing Optical Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Optical Vector Analyzer (OVA) 1550 significantly reduces the time and cost of testing sophisticated optical components. The technology grew from the research Luna Technologies' Dr. Mark Froggatt conducted on optical fiber strain measurement while working at Langley Research Center. Dr. Froggatt originally developed the technology for non- destructive evaluation testing at Langley. The new technique can provide 10,000 independent strain measurements while adding less than 10 grams to the weight of the vehicle. The OVA is capable of complete linear characterization of single-mode optical components used in high- bit-rate applications. The device can test most components over their full range in less than 30 seconds, compared to the more than 20 minutes required by other testing methods. The dramatically shortened measurement time results in increased efficiency in final acceptance tests of optical devices, and the comprehensive data produced by the instrument adds considerable value for component consumers. The device eliminates manufacturing bottlenecks, while reducing labor costs and wasted materials during production.

  16. Liquid rocket valve components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A monograph on valves for use with liquid rocket propellant engines is presented. The configurations of the various types of valves are described and illustrated. Design criteria and recommended practices for the various valves are explained. Tables of data are included to show the chief features of valve components in use on operational vehicles.

  17. Informed Test Component Weighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies and evaluates alternative methods for weighting tests. Presents formulas for composite reliability and validity as a function of component weights and suggests a rational process that identifies and considers trade-offs in determining weights. Discusses drawbacks to implicit weighting and explicit weighting and the difficulty of…

  18. Stability assessment of a moderately conforming all-polyethylene tibial component in total knee arthroplasty: a prospective RSA study with 2 years of follow-up of the Kinemax Plus design.

    PubMed

    Adalberth, G; Nilsson, K G; Byström, S; Kolstad, K; Mallmin, H; Milbrink, J

    1999-01-01

    The magnitude and pattern of the migration of an all-polyethylene tibial component with moderately conforming articular surfaces in total knee arthroplasty was analyzed in 20 patients > or =60 years during a 2-year follow-up using radiostereometry (RSA). Most of the migration occurred during the initial 4 months, whereafter the migration diminished, reaching a mean maximum migration of 0.75 mm at 2 years. Similar patterns were found for rotation of the implant. Maximum subsidence at 2 years was 0.7 mm and was most commonly located at the posteromedial part of the tibial component. These results indicate that an all-polyethylene tibial component with moderately conforming articular geometry and with a thickness of 10-12 mm demonstrated migration patterns compatible with a favorable prognosis in regard to future aseptic loosening.

  19. Developing a Model Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) Simulation Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI) is,. responsible for providing simulations to support test and verification of SCCS hardware and software. The Universal Coolant Transporter System (UCTS) is a Space Shuttle Orbiter support piece of the Ground Servicing Equipment (GSE). The purpose of the UCTS is to provide two support services to the Space Shuttle Orbiter immediately after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The Simulation uses GSE Models to stand in for the actual systems to support testing of SCCS systems s:luring their development. As an intern at KSC, my assignment was to develop a model component for the UCTS. I was given a fluid component (drier) to model in Matlab. The drier was a Catch All replaceable core type filter-drier. The filter-drier provides maximum protection for the thermostatic expansion valve and solenoid valve from dirt that may be in the system. The filter-drier also protects the valves from freezing up. I researched fluid dynamics to understand the function of my component. I completed training for UNIX and Simulink to help aid in my assignment. The filter-drier was modeled by determining affects it has on the pressure, velocity and temperature of the system. I used Bernoulli's Equation to calculate the pressure and velocity differential through the dryer. I created my model filter-drier in Simulink and wrote the test script to test the component. I completed component testing and captured test data. The finalized model was sent for peer review for any improvements.

  20. Developing a Model Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) Simulation Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI) is responsible for providing simulations to support test and verification of SCCS hardware and software. The Universal Coolant Transporter System (UCTS) was a Space Shuttle Orbiter support piece of the Ground Servicing Equipment (GSE). The initial purpose of the UCTS was to provide two support services to the Space Shuttle Orbiter immediately after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The UCTS is designed with the capability of servicing future space vehicles; including all Space Station Requirements necessary for the MPLM Modules. The Simulation uses GSE Models to stand in for the actual systems to support testing of SCCS systems during their development. As an intern at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), my assignment was to develop a model component for the UCTS. I was given a fluid component (dryer) to model in Simulink. I completed training for UNIX and Simulink. The dryer is a Catch All replaceable core type filter-dryer. The filter-dryer provides maximum protection for the thermostatic expansion valve and solenoid valve from dirt that may be in the system. The filter-dryer also protects the valves from freezing up. I researched fluid dynamics to understand the function of my component. The filter-dryer was modeled by determining affects it has on the pressure and velocity of the system. I used Bernoulli's Equation to calculate the pressure and velocity differential through the dryer. I created my filter-dryer model in Simulink and wrote the test script to test the component. I completed component testing and captured test data. The finalized model was sent for peer review for any improvements. I participated in Simulation meetings and was involved in the subsystem design process and team collaborations. I gained valuable work experience and insight into a career path as an engineer.

  1. Evaluating Component Migration: Comparing Two Generations of the INBONE(®) Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Brigido, Stephen A; Wobst, Garrett M; Galli, Melissa M; Protzman, Nicole M

    2015-01-01

    Although total ankle replacement (TAR) designs have radically evolved, the compressive forces at the ankle can cause aseptic loosening, talar subsidence, and implant failure. The purpose of the present report was to compare the implant migration associated with the INBONE(®) I, a TAR system with a stemmed talar component, and the newer generation INBONE(®) II, a TAR system without a stemmed talar component (Wright Medical Technology, Inc., Arlington, TN). Because core decompression could weaken the integrity of the talus, we hypothesized that the stemmed component would result in greater implant migration. A total of 35 consecutive patients (age 58.2 ± 12.1 years; 23 men) were included. Of these 35 patients, 20 (57.1%) had been treated with the INBONE(®) I and 15 (42.9%) with the INBONE(®) II. To assess implant migration, using anteroposterior radiographs, the distance from the apex of the tibial component to the most distal aspect of the talar stem or to the mid-saddle of the nonstemmed component was measured. The measurements were recorded from the immediate postoperative radiographs and the 12-month postoperative radiographs. Implant migration was quantified as the difference between the 12-month and the immediate postoperative measurements. Despite our hypothesis, no significant difference was found in implant migration between the INBONE(®) I (0.7 ± 1.2 mm) and INBONE(®) II (0.6 ± 1.3 mm, p = .981). However, previously published data have suggested that implant migration can continue for ≥2 years after surgery. Therefore, additional investigations with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up periods are needed to draw definitive conclusions.

  2. Component-specific modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A series of interdisciplinary modeling and analysis techniques that were specialized to address three specific hot section components are presented. These techniques will incorporate data as well as theoretical methods from many diverse areas including cycle and performance analysis, heat transfer analysis, linear and nonlinear stress analysis, and mission analysis. Building on the proven techniques already available in these fields, the new methods developed will be integrated into computer codes to provide an accurate, efficient and unified approach to analyzing combustor burner liners, hollow air-cooled turbine blades and air-cooled turbine vanes. For these components, the methods developed will predict temperature, deformation, stress and strain histories throughout a complete flight mission.

  3. Bacterial Cell Wall Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Cynthia; Brown, Stephanie; Walker, Suzanne

    Bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides cells are surrounded by a variety of cell-surface structures that allow them to thrive in extreme environments. Components of the cell envelope and extracellular matrix are responsible for providing the cells with structural support, mediating intercellular communication, allowing the cells to move or to adhere to surfaces, protecting the cells from attack by antibiotics or the immune system, and facilitating the uptake of nutrients. Some of the most important cell wall components are polysaccharide structures. This review discusses the occurrence, structure, function, and biosynthesis of the most prevalent bacterial cell surface polysaccharides: peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, arabinogalactan, and lipoarabinomannan, and capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. The roles of these polysaccharides in medicine, both as drug targets and as therapeutic agents, are also described.

  4. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  5. Solid state lighting component

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Thomas; Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald

    2010-10-26

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  6. Solid state lighting component

    DOEpatents

    Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald; Yuan, Thomas

    2012-07-10

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  7. Component for thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Purdy, David L.

    1977-01-01

    In a thermoelectric generator, a component comprises a ceramic insulator, having over limited areas thereof, each area corresponding to a terminal end of thermoelectric wires, a coating of a first metal which adheres to the insulator, and an electrical thermoelectric junction including a second metal which wets said first metal and adheres to said terminal ends but does not wet said insulator, and a cloth composed of electrically insulating threads interlaced with thermoelectric wires.

  8. Injection molded component

    SciTech Connect

    James, Allister W; Arrell, Douglas J

    2014-09-30

    An intermediate component includes a first wall member, a leachable material layer, and a precursor wall member. The first wall member has an outer surface and first connecting structure. The leachable material layer is provided on the first wall member outer surface. The precursor wall member is formed adjacent to the leachable material layer from a metal powder mixed with a binder material, and includes second connecting structure.

  9. Inkjet deposited circuit components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidoki, S. M.; Nouri, J.; Heidari, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    All-printed electronics as a means of achieving ultra-low-cost electronic circuits has attracted great interest in recent years. Inkjet printing is one of the most promising techniques by which the circuit components can be ultimately drawn (i.e. printed) onto the substrate in one step. Here, the inkjet printing technique was used to chemically deposit silver nanoparticles (10-200 nm) simply by ejection of silver nitrate and reducing solutions onto different substrates such as paper, PET plastic film and textile fabrics. The silver patterns were tested for their functionality to work as circuit components like conductor, resistor, capacitor and inductor. Different levels of conductivity were achieved simply by changing the printing sequence, inks ratio and concentration. The highest level of conductivity achieved by an office thermal inkjet printer (300 dpi) was 5.54 × 105 S m-1 on paper. Inkjet deposited capacitors could exhibit a capacitance of more than 1.5 nF (parallel plate 45 × 45 mm2) and induction coils displayed an inductance of around 400 µH (planar coil 10 cm in diameter). Comparison of electronic performance of inkjet deposited components to the performance of conventionally etched items makes the technique highly promising for fabricating different printed electronic devices.

  10. Chondrites and Their Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Krot, A. N.

    Chondrites are extraordinary mixtures of materials with diverse origins that formed around other stars, in the solar nebula, and in their parent asteroids. Most chondrites were so severely altered by aqueous fluids, thermal metamorphism, and impacts that the original characteristics of their components have been largely erased. But a few pristine chondrites have preserved an exquisite mineralogical, chemical, isotopic, and chronological record of the first few million years of solar system history. The properties of diverse types of carbonaceous, ordinary, and enstatite chondrites focusing on the most pristine samples are reviewed to establish the chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical properties and origins of their components and to elucidate the asteroidal processes that modified them. Refractory inclusions - amoeboid olivine aggregates and Ca-Al-rich inclusions - were the first solids to form in the solar nebula near to the protosun. Chondrules and associated metallic Fe-Ni grains were still forming several million years later when the earliest planetesimals, which melted due to heat from 26Al decay, were colliding. In the least-altered chondrites, matrix material, which coats chondrules and other components, is largely composed of micrometer-sized silicates and amorphous materials, which formed at high temperatures, plus small amounts (up to 200 ppm) of presolar oxides and silicates.

  11. Surface mount component jig

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1990-08-07

    A device for bending and trimming the pins of a dual-inline-package component and the like for surface mounting rather than through mounting to a circuit board comprises, in a first part, in pin cutter astride a holder having a recess for holding the component, a first spring therebetween, and, in a second part, two flat members pivotally interconnected by a hinge and urged to an upward peaked position from a downward peaked position by a second spring. As a downward force is applied to the pin cutter it urges the holder downward, assisted by the first spring and a pair of ridges riding on shoulders of the holder, to carry the component against the upward peaked flat members which guide the pins outwardly. As the holder continues downwardly, the flat members pivot to the downward peaked position bending the pins upwardly against the sides of the holder. When the downward movement is met with sufficient resistance, the ridges of the pin cutter ride over the holder's shoulders to continue downward to cut any excess length of pin.

  12. Energetic component treatability study

    SciTech Connect

    Gildea, P.D.; Brandon, S.L.; Brown, B.G.

    1997-11-01

    The effectiveness of three environmentally sound processes for small energetic component disposal was examined experimentally in this study. The three destruction methods, batch reactor supercritical water oxidation, sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff were selected based on their potential for producing a clean solid residue and minimum release of toxic gases after component detonation. The explosive hazard was destroyed by all three processes. Batch supercritical water oxidation destroyed both the energetics and organics. Further development is desired to optimize process parameters. Sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff results indicated the potential for scrubbing gaseous detonation products. Further study and testing are needed to quantify the effectiveness of these later two processes for full-scale munition destruction. The preliminary experiments completed in this study have demonstrated the promise of these three processes as environmentally sound technologies for energetic component destruction. Continuation of these experimental programs is strongly recommended to optimize batch supercritical water oxidation processing, and to fully develop the sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff technologies.

  13. Artificial polarization components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cescato, L.; Gluch, Ekkehard; Stork, Wilhelm; Streibl, Norbert

    1990-07-01

    High frequency surface relief structures are optically anisotropic and show interesting polarisation properties 1 . These properties can be used to produce polarizations components such as wave plates polarizers. polarizing beamsplitters etc. Our experimental results show that even gratings with relatively low spatial frequency ( periods A ) exhibit a strong phase retardation and can be used as quarter-wave plates. k INTRODUC11ON The artificial birefringence exhibited by ultrahigh frequency gratings of dielectric materials can be used to produce various polarization components2 . Such components have applications in integrated optics as well as in free space optics. In order to produce the high spatial frequencies complex processes such as electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching are needed. We show in this paper that sinusoidal holographic gratings in photoresist exhibit also a strong phase ret even at relatively long periods. L EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS To obtain the phase retardation of a lower frequency ( period A ) grating a simple setup as used by Enger and 2 can be applied. In our case however there are three measurements necessary to obtain the phase retardation because transmission of the two perpendicularly polarized beams is different from each other. I GRATING PRODUCTION grating 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 period (pmj 0. 74 0. 74 0. 61 0. 54 0. 46 0. 32 0. 54 0. 54 0. 54 ne (sec) 60

  14. Variance Components: Partialled vs. Common.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Ervin W.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach to partialling components is used. Like conventional partialling, this approach orthogonalizes variables by partitioning the scores or observations. Unlike conventional partialling, it yields a common component and two unique components. (Author/GDC)

  15. Structural modifications induced by compressive plastic deformation in single-step and sequentially irradiated UHMWPE for hip joint components.

    PubMed

    Puppulin, Leonardo; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Zhu, Wenliang; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Structural modifications were studied at the molecular scale in two highly crosslinked UHMWPE materials for hip-joint acetabular components, as induced upon application of (uniaxial) compressive strain to the as-manufactured microstructures. The two materials, quite different in their starting resins and belonging to different manufacturing generations, were a single-step irradiated and a sequentially irradiated polyethylene. The latter material represents the most recently launched gamma-ray-irradiated polyethylene material in the global hip implant market. Confocal/polarized Raman spectroscopy was systematically applied to characterize the initial microstructures and the microstructural response of the materials to plastic deformation. Crystallinity fractions and preferential orientation of molecular chains have been followed up during in vitro deformation tests on unused cups and correlated to plastic strain magnitude and to the recovery capacity of the material. Moreover, analyses of the in vivo deformation behavior of two short-term retrieved hip cups are also presented. Trends of preferential orientation of molecular chains as a function of residual strain were similar for both materials, but distinctly different in their extents. The sequentially irradiated material was more resistant to plastic deformation and, for the same magnitude of residual plastic strain, possessed a higher capacity of recovery as compared to the single-step irradiated one.

  16. Advanced Power Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will give a description and status of the Advanced Power Electronics Materials and Components Technology program being conducted by the NASA Glenn Research Center for future aerospace power applications. The focus of this research program is on the following: 1) New and/or significantly improved dielectric materials for the development of power capacitors with increased volumetric efficiency, energy density, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and composite ceramic dielectrics and diamond-like carbon films; 2) New and/or significantly improved high frequency, high temperature, low loss soft magnetic materials for the development of transformers/inductors with increased power/energy density, electrical efficiency, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and nanocomposite soft magnetic materials; 3) Packaged high temperature, high power density, high voltage, and low loss SiC diodes and switches. Development of high quality 4H- and 6H- SiC atomically smooth substrates to significantly improve device performance is a major emphasis of the SiC materials program; 4) Demonstration of high temperature (> 200 C) circuits using the components developed above.

  17. Lifing of Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The successful development of advanced aerospace engines depends greatly on the capabilities of high performance materials and structures. Advanced materials, such as nickel based single crystal alloys, metal foam, advanced copper alloys, and ceramics matrix composites, have been engineered to provide higher engine temperature and stress capabilities. Thermal barrier coatings have been developed to improve component durability and fuel efficiency, by reducing the substrate hot wall metal temperature and protecting against oxidation and blanching. However, these coatings are prone to oxidation and delamination failures. In order to implement the use of these materials in advanced engines, it is necessary to understand and model the evolution of damage of the metal substrate as well as the coating under actual engine conditions. The models and the understanding of material behavior are utilized in the development of a life prediction methodology for hot section components. The research activities were focused on determining the stress and strain fields in an engine environment under combined thermo-mechanical loads to develop life prediction methodologies consistent with the observed damage formation of the coating and the substrates.

  18. Prognostics for Microgrid Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav

    2012-01-01

    Prognostics is the science of predicting future performance and potential failures based on targeted condition monitoring. Moving away from the traditional reliability centric view, prognostics aims at detecting and quantifying the time to impending failures. This advance warning provides the opportunity to take actions that can preserve uptime, reduce cost of damage, or extend the life of the component. The talk will focus on the concepts and basics of prognostics from the viewpoint of condition-based systems health management. Differences with other techniques used in systems health management and philosophies of prognostics used in other domains will be shown. Examples relevant to micro grid systems and subsystems will be used to illustrate various types of prediction scenarios and the resources it take to set up a desired prognostic system. Specifically, the implementation results for power storage and power semiconductor components will demonstrate specific solution approaches of prognostics. The role of constituent elements of prognostics, such as model, prediction algorithms, failure threshold, run-to-failure data, requirements and specifications, and post-prognostic reasoning will be explained. A discussion on performance evaluation and performance metrics will conclude the technical discussion followed by general comments on open research problems and challenges in prognostics.

  19. Laser generating metallic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.

    1997-04-01

    Recent developments in rapid prototyping have led to the concept of laser generating, the first additive manufacturing technology. This paper presents an innovative process of depositing multi-layer tracks, by fusing successive powder tracks, to generate three dimensional components, thereby offering an alternative to casting for small metal component manufacture. A coaxial nozzle assembly has been designed and manufactured enabling consistent omni-directional multi-layer deposition. In conjunction with this the software route from a CAD drawing to machine code generation has been established. The part is manufactured on a six axes machining center incorporating a 1.8 kW carbon-dioxide laser, providing an integrated opto-mechanical workstation. The part build-up program is controlled by a P150 host computer, linked directly to the DNC machining center. The direct manufacturing route is shown, including initial examples of simple objects (primitives -- cube, cylinder, cone) leading to more complex turbine blade generation, incorporating build-up techniques and the associated mechanical properties.

  20. Interactions between photodegradation components

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The interactions of p-cresol photocatalytic degradation components were studied by response surface methodology. The study was designed by central composite design using the irradiation time, pH, the amount of photocatalyst and the p-cresol concentration as variables. The design was performed to obtain photodegradation % as actual responses. The actual responses were fitted with linear, two factor interactions, cubic and quadratic model to select an appropriate model. The selected model was validated by analysis of variance which provided evidences such as high F-value (845.09), very low P-value (<.0.0001), non-significant lack of fit, the coefficient of R-squared (R2 = 0.999), adjusted R-squared (Radj2 = 0.998), predicted R-squared (Rpred2 = 0.994) and the adequate precision (95.94). Results From the validated model demonstrated that the component had interaction with irradiation time under 180 min of the time while the interaction with pH was above pH 9. Moreover, photocatalyst and p-cresol had interaction at minimal amount of photocatalyst (< 0.8 g/L) and 100 mg/L p-cresol. Conclusion These variables are interdependent and should be simultaneously considered during the photodegradation process, which is one of the advantages of the response surface methodology over the traditional laboratory method. PMID:22967885

  1. One-component nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Su, Hao; Koo, Jin Mo; Cui, Honggang

    2015-12-10

    One-component nanomedicine (OCN) represents an emerging class of therapeutic nanostructures that contain only one type of chemical substance. This one-component feature allows for fine-tuning and optimization of the drug loading and physicochemical properties of nanomedicine in a precise manner through molecular engineering of the underlying building blocks. Using a precipitation procedure or effective molecular assembly strategies, molecularly crafted therapeutic agents (e.g. polymer-drug conjugates, small molecule prodrugs, or drug amphiphiles) could involuntarily aggregate, or self-assemble into nanoscale objects of well-defined sizes and shapes. Unlike traditional carrier-based nanomedicines that are inherently multicomponent systems, an OCN does not require the use of additional carriers and could itself possess desired physicochemical features for preferential accumulation at target sites. We review here recent progress in the molecular design, conjugation methods, and fabrication strategies of OCN, and analyze the opportunities that this emerging platform could open for the new and improved treatment of devastating diseases such as cancer.

  2. Cementless total hip replacement without femoral osteotomy in patients with severe developmental dysplasia of the hip: minimum 15-year clinical and radiological results.

    PubMed

    Imbuldeniya, A M; Walter, W L; Zicat, B A; Walter, W K

    2014-11-01

    We describe the clinical and radiological results of cementless primary total hip replacement (THR) in 25 patients (18 women and seven men; 30 THRs) with severe developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Their mean age at surgery was 47 years (23 to 89). In all, 21 hips had Crowe type III dysplasia and nine had Crowe type IV. Cementless acetabular components with standard polyethylene liners were introduced as close to the level of the true acetabulum as possible. The modular cementless S-ROM femoral component was used with a low resection of the femoral neck. A total of 21 patients (25 THRs) were available for review at a mean follow-up of 18.7 years (15.8 to 21.8). The mean modified Harris hip score improved from 46 points pre-operatively to 90 at final follow up (p < 0.001). A total of 15 patients (17 THRs; 57%) underwent revision of the acetabular component at a mean of 14.6 years (7 to 20.8), all for osteolysis. Two patients (two THRs) had symptomatic loosening. No patient underwent femoral revision. Survival with revision of either component for any indication was 81% at 15 years (95% CI 60.1 to 92.3), with 21 patients at risk. This technique may reduce the need for femoral osteotomy in severe DDH, while providing a good long-term functional result. PMID:25371455

  3. Component failure data handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Gentillon, C.D.

    1991-04-01

    This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

  4. Sprayed skin turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Allen, David B

    2013-06-04

    Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

  5. [Donation of blood components].

    PubMed

    Ladrón Llorente, Yolanda; Rández Alvero, Mónica; Carrascosa Ridruejo, Ana Isabel; Bregua García, Judith; Blanco Sotés, Carmelo; Calavia Lacarra, Jesús

    2004-06-01

    The donation of blood by means of aphaeresis by means of a cellular separator is a procedure through which one obtains blood components in the most efficient manner, yielding the best quality in the final product although this procedure requires special characteristics on behalf of the donor and consequently has a higher cost. The authors have analyzed the characteristics of 81 donors who used this procedure and who voluntarily came to our blood bank over a 17 month period from January 2002 until May 2003; 287 such procedures were carried out. The quality of the product obtained, as a benefit for the possible receptor, compensates the greater dedication by the donor and the high cost of this technique.

  6. Xyloglucan and its interactions with other components of the growing cell wall.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Bum; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2015-02-01

    The discovery of xyloglucan and its ability to bind tightly to cellulose has dominated our thinking about primary cell wall structure and its connection to the mechanism of cell enlargement for 40 years. Gene discovery has advanced our understanding of the synthesis of xyloglucan in the past decade, and at the same time new and unexpected results indicate that xyloglucan's role in wall structure and wall extensibility is more subtle than commonly believed. Genetic deletion of xyloglucan synthesis does not greatly disable cell wall functions. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies indicate that pectins, rather than xyloglucans, make the majority of contacts with cellulose surfaces. Xyloglucan binding may be selective for specific (hydrophobic) surfaces on the cellulose microfibril, whose structure is more complex than is commonly portrayed in cell wall cartoons. Biomechanical assessments of endoglucanase actions challenge the concept of xyloglucan tethering. The mechanically important xyloglucan is restricted to a minor component that appears to be closely intertwined with cellulose at limited sites ('biomechanical hotspots') of direct microfibril contact; these may be the selective sites of cell wall loosening by expansins. These discoveries indicate that wall extensibility is less a matter of bulk viscoelasticity of the matrix polymers and more a matter of selective control of slippage and separation of microfibrils at specific and limited sites in the wall. PMID:25613914

  7. Cup-cage construct for acute fractures of the acetabulum, re-defining indications.

    PubMed

    Chana-Rodríguez, Francisco; Villanueva-Martínez, Manuel; Rojo-Manaute, Jose; Sanz-Ruíz, Pablo; Vaquero-Martín, Javier

    2012-12-01

    Acetabular fractures in the elderly are challenging injuries. The use of a trabecular metal acetabular cage was investigated as the treatment option in a series of elderly patients with acetabular fractures. At a 2-year follow up, 6 elderly patients were found to have mimimum pain, increased function, and increased scores using the Merle d'Aubigné and Postel system modified by Charnley. Radiographically, the areas of morsellised autograft that surrounded the cups were seen to have incorporated uniformly well, and the acetabular fractures were healed within six months after surgery. No mechanical failure, screw breakage, loosening, or migration was noticed. This novel indication of the cup-cage construction that uses revision techniques, for selected patients and fractures, to achieve an acute stable reconstruction, should be considered as an alternative reconstruction option in elderly patients presenting with acetabular fractures.

  8. CO component estimation based on the independent component analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kaji, Ryohei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA) is a component separation algorithm based on the levels of non-Gaussianity. Here we apply FastICA to the component separation problem of the microwave background, including carbon monoxide (CO) line emissions that are found to contaminate the PLANCK High Frequency Instrument (HFI) data. Specifically, we prepare 100 GHz, 143 GHz, and 217 GHz mock microwave sky maps, which include galactic thermal dust, NANTEN CO line, and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) emissions, and then estimate the independent components based on the kurtosis. We find that FastICA can successfully estimate the CO component as the first independent component in our deflection algorithm because its distribution has the largest degree of non-Gaussianity among the components. Thus, FastICA can be a promising technique to extract CO-like components without prior assumptions about their distributions and frequency dependences.

  9. Combined multi-body and finite element investigation of the effect of the seat height on acetabular implant stability during the activity of getting up.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Mario; Schaller, Andreas; Steinke, Hanno; Scholz, Roger; Voigt, Christian

    2012-02-01

    An important question in assessing the stability of a total hip arthroplasty is the effect of daily physical activities of patients. The aim of this study is to examine these effects when standing up from three different seat heights. A musculoskeletal body model has been modified to simulate the three different seat heights. The calculated muscle forces have been transferred to a finite element model of a pelvis. The pelvis model was created from a hemipelvis CT dataset. As an implant component, a metal socket with a polyethylene insert was used. A primary implantation situation was modelled. For the analysed patient activities the highest hip contact forces and the highest micromotions occur at the beginning of the motion. The results of this study show that standing up from a certain seat height can have a significant influence on the micromotions in the implant-bone interface.

  10. Filter Component Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Diaz, E.S.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced particulate filtration systems are currently being developed at Westinghouse for use in both coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems. To date, Westinghouse has demonstrated 5855 hours of successful operation of first generation monolithic filter elements in PFBC applications when ash bridging or process thermal transient excursions are avoided. Alternate advanced monolithic and second generation fiber reinforced, filament wound and vacuum infiltrated filters are also being developed which are considered to have enhanced high temperature creep resistance, improved fracture toughness, or enhanced thermal shock characteristics, respectively. Mechanical and component fabrication improvements, as well as degradation mechanisms for each filter element have been identified by Westinghouse during exposure to simulated PFBC operating conditions and alkali-containing steam/air environments. Additional effort is currently being focused on determining the stability of the advanced monolithic high temperature creep resistant clay bonded silicon carbide (SiC) materials, alumina/mullite, and chemically vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC materials during operation in the Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filtration (W-APF) system at Foster Wheeler`s pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion (PCFBC) test facility in Karhula, Finland. Select advanced filter materials are being defined for additional long-term exposure in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) gas streams. The results of these efforts are summarized in this paper. 6 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. Finite Element Analysis of Mobile-bearing Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: The Influence of Tibial Component Coronal Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guang-Duo; Guo, Wan-Shou; Zhang, Qi-Dong; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Cheng, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background: Controversies about the rational positioning of the tibial component in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) still exist. Previous finite element (FE) studies were rare, and the results varied. This FE study aimed to analyze the influence of the tibial component coronal alignment on knee biomechanics in mobile-bearing UKA and find a ration range of inclination angles. Methods: A three-dimensional FE model of the intact knee was constructed from image data of one normal subject. A 1000 N compressive load was applied to the intact knee model for validating. Then a set of eleven UKA FE models was developed with the coronal inclination angles of the tibial tray ranging from 10° valgus to 10° varus. Tibial bone stresses and strains, contact pressures and load distribution in all UKA models were calculated and analyzed under the unified loading and boundary conditions. Results: Load distribution, contact pressures, and contact areas in intact knee model were validated. In UKA models, von Mises stress and compressive strain at proximal medial cortical bone increased significantly as the tibial tray was in valgus inclination >4°, which may increase the risk of residual pain. Compressive strains at tibial keel slot were above the high threshold with varus inclination >4°, which may result in greater risk of component migration. Tibial bone resection corner acted as a strain-raiser regardless of the inclination angles. Compressive strains at the resected surface slightly changed with the varying inclinations and were not supposed to induce bone resorption and component loosening. Contact pressures and load percentage in lateral compartment increased with the more varus inclination, which may lead to osteoarthritis progression. Conclusions: Static knee biomechanics after UKA can be greatly affected by tibial component coronal alignment. A range from 4° valgus to 4° varus inclination of tibial component can be recommended in mobile-bearing UKA. PMID

  12. Notch Signaling Components

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Yan; Wu, Tao; Li, Qing; Wang, Min-Cong; Jing, Li; Ruan, Zhi-Ping; Yao, Yu; Nan, Ke-Jun; Guo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a lethal and aggressive malignancy. Currently, the identities of prognostic and predictive makers of NSCLC have not been fully established. Dysregulated Notch signaling has been implicated in many human malignancies, including NSCLC. However, the prognostic value of measuring Notch signaling and the utility of developing Notch-targeted therapies in NSCLC remain inconclusive. The present study investigated the association of individual Notch receptor and ligand levels with lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) prognosis using the Kaplan-Meier plotte database. This online database encompasses 2437 lung cancer samples. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. The results showed that higher Notch1, Notch2, JAG1, and DLL1 mRNA expression predicted better overall survival (OS) in lung ADC, but showed no significance in SCC patients. Elevated Notch3, JAG2, and DLL3 mRNA expression was associated with poor OS of ADC patients, but not in SCC patients. There was no association between Notch4 and OS in either lung ADC or SCC patients. In conclusion, the set of Notch1, Notch2, JAG1, DLL1 and that of Notch3, JAG2, DLL3 played opposing prognostic roles in lung ADC patients. Neither set of Notch receptors and ligands was indicative of lung SCC prognosis. Notch signaling could serve as promising marker to predict outcomes in lung ADC patients. The distinct features of lung cancer subtypes and Notch components should be considered when developing future Notch-targeted therapies. PMID:27196489

  13. GOATS - Orbitology Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haber, Benjamin M.; Green, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    The GOATS Orbitology Component software was developed to specifically address the concerns presented by orbit analysis tools that are often written as stand-alone applications. These applications do not easily interface with standard JPL first-principles analysis tools, and have a steep learning curve due to their complicated nature. This toolset is written as a series of MATLAB functions, allowing seamless integration into existing JPL optical systems engineering modeling and analysis modules. The functions are completely open, and allow for advanced users to delve into and modify the underlying physics being modeled. Additionally, this software module fills an analysis gap, allowing for quick, high-level mission analysis trades without the need for detailed and complicated orbit analysis using commercial stand-alone tools. This software consists of a series of MATLAB functions to provide for geometric orbit-related analysis. This includes propagation of orbits to varying levels of generalization. In the simplest case, geosynchronous orbits can be modeled by specifying a subset of three orbit elements. The next case is a circular orbit, which can be specified by a subset of four orbit elements. The most general case is an arbitrary elliptical orbit specified by all six orbit elements. These orbits are all solved geometrically, under the basic problem of an object in circular (or elliptical) orbit around a rotating spheroid. The orbit functions output time series ground tracks, which serve as the basis for more detailed orbit analysis. This software module also includes functions to track the positions of the Sun, Moon, and arbitrary celestial bodies specified by right ascension and declination. Also included are functions to calculate line-of-sight geometries to ground-based targets, angular rotations and decompositions, and other line-of-site calculations. The toolset allows for the rapid execution of orbit trade studies at the level of detail required for the

  14. Definition of Contravariant Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-moa; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we have reviewed the basics of tensor analysis in an attempt to clarify some misconceptions regarding contravariant and covariant vector components as used in fluid dynamics. We have indicated that contravariant components are components of a given vector expressed as a unique combination of the covariant base vector system and, vice versa, that the covariant components are components of a vector expressed with the contravariant base vector system. Mathematically, expressing a vector with a combination of base vector is a decomposition process for a specific base vector system. Hence, the contravariant velocity components are decomposed components of velocity vector along the directions of coordinate lines, with respect to the covariant base vector system. However, the contravariant (and covariant) components are not physical quantities. Their magnitudes and dimensions are controlled by their corresponding covariant (and contravariant) base vectors.

  15. Cooling system for electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2016-05-17

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  16. Cooling system for electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2015-12-15

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  17. Action Of Cement Hardening On Artificial Hip Joint Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roder, U.; Niess, N.; Plitz, W.

    1981-05-01

    Artificial acetabular cups loose their original shape and undergo deformations during implantation, caused by the polymerization shrinkage of the bone cement. In laboratory experiments, two acetabula of different material - both common in clinical use - were studied by holographic real-time interferometry during cement hardening. This method picks up characteristic features in the transient behaviour of the form changes. It is shown, that temperature, porosity and shrinkage of the cement has a large influence on the form of a polyethylene acetabulum, whereas there is only little effect on an acetabulum, made of alumina ceramic.

  18. Component-specific modeling. [jet engine hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Tipton, M. T.; Weber, G.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for a 3 year program to develop methodology for component-specific modeling of aircraft hot section components (turbine blades, turbine vanes, and burner liners). These accomplishments include: (1) engine thermodynamic and mission models, (2) geometry model generators, (3) remeshing, (4) specialty three-dimensional inelastic structural analysis, (5) computationally efficient solvers, (6) adaptive solution strategies, (7) engine performance parameters/component response variables decomposition and synthesis, (8) integrated software architecture and development, and (9) validation cases for software developed.

  19. Mid-term clinical results of total hip arthroplasty using a Wagner standard cup for dysplastic hip

    PubMed Central

    Maezawa, Katsuhiko; Nozawa, Masahiko; Yuasa, Takahito; Aritomi, Kentaro; Ogawa, Seiki; Maruyama, Yuichiro; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Background The outcome of cementless total hip arthroplasty depends on many factors. We must not forget fundamental things those are design of outer surface of the component, that leads bone ingrowth into the prosthesis, better initial stability, and better insertional techniques. The purpose of this study was to review our experience with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty with a Wagner standard cup for patients who had acetabular dysplasia. Patients and methods Fifty-four patients with 55 hips underwent primary metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (Metasul prosthesis) with a Wagner standard cup (44–48 mm in outer diameter) and were followed for a minimum of 10 years. All patients received the same type of cementless femoral component (Natural hip stem) and femoral head (28 mm in diameter). Results Seventeen of the 55 Wagner standard cups (30.9%) showed aseptic loosening over a mean period of 3.6 years after surgery, and there were no bone anchors on the outer surface of the 16 retrieved cups. Conclusion From our experience, the small Wagner standard cup does not achieve sufficient osteointegration and we do not recommend the use of this cup, especially for patients with acetabular dysplasia and/or those with a small stature. PMID:25561751

  20. Effect of component mal-rotation on knee loading in total knee arthroplasty using multi-body dynamics modeling under a simulated walking gait.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenxian; Wang, Ling; Liu, Yaxiong; He, Jiankang; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-09-01

    Mal-rotation of the components in total knee arthorplasty (TKA) is a major cause of postoperative complications, with an increased propensity for implant loosening or wear leading to revision. A musculoskeletal multi-body dynamics model was used to perform a parametric study of the effects of the rotational mal-alignments in TKA on the knee loading under a simulated walking gait. The knee contact forces were found to be more sensitive to variations in the varus-valgus rotation of both the tibial and the femoral components and the internal-external rotation of the femoral component in TKA. The varus-valgus mal-rotation of the tibial or femoral component and the internal-external mal-rotation of the femoral component with a 5° variation were found to affect the peak medial contact force by 17.8-53.1%, the peak lateral contact force by 35.0-88.4% and the peak total contact force by 5.2-18.7%. Our findings support the clinical observations that a greater than 3° internal mal-rotation of the femoral component may lead to unsatisfactory pain levels and a greater than 3° varus mal-rotation of the tibial component may lead to medial bone collapse. These findings determined the quantitative effects of the mal-rotation of the components in TKA on the contact load. The effect of such mal-rotation of the components of TKA on the kinematics would be further addressed in future studies.

  1. Multi-component assembly casting

    SciTech Connect

    James, Allister W.

    2015-10-13

    Multi-component vane segment and method for forming the same. Assembly includes: positioning a pre-formed airfoil component (12) and a preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) in a mold, wherein the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18) each comprises an interlocking feature (24); preheating the mold; introducing molten structural material (46) into the mold; and solidifying the molten structural material such that it interlocks the pre-formed airfoil component (12) with respect to the preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) and is effective to provide structural support for the shroud heat resistant material (18). Surfaces between the airfoil component (12) and the structural material (46), between the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18), and between the shroud heat resistant material (18) and the structural material (46) are free of metallurgical bonds.

  2. Scalar self-interactions loosen constraints from fifth force searches

    SciTech Connect

    Gubser, Steven S.; Khoury, Justin

    2004-11-15

    The mass of a scalar field mediating a fifth force is tightly constrained by experiments. We show, however, that adding a quartic self-interaction for such a scalar makes most tests much less constraining: the nonlinear equation of motion masks the coupling of the scalar to matter through the chameleon mechanism. We discuss consequences for fifth force experiments. In particular, we find that, with quartic coupling of order unity, a gravitational strength interaction with matter is allowed by current constraints. We show that our chameleon scalar field results in experimental signatures that could be detected through modest improvements of current laboratory set-ups.

  3. APS beamline standard components handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    It is clear that most Advanced Photon Source (APS) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) members would like to concentrate on designing specialized equipment related to their scientific programs rather than on routine or standard beamline components. Thus, an effort is in progress at the APS to identify standard and modular components of APS beamlines. Identifying standard components is a nontrivial task because these components should support diverse beamline objectives. To assist with this effort, the APS has obtained advice and help from a Beamline Standardization and Modularization Committee consisting of experts in beamline design, construction, and operation. The staff of the Experimental Facilities Division identified various components thought to be standard items for beamlines, regardless of the specific scientific objective of a particular beamline. A generic beamline layout formed the basis for this identification. This layout is based on a double-crystal monochromator as the first optical element, with the possibility of other elements to follow. Pre-engineering designs were then made of the identified standard components. The Beamline Standardization and Modularization Committee has reviewed these designs and provided very useful input regarding the specifications of these components. We realize that there will be other configurations that may require special or modified components. This Handbook in its current version (1.1) contains descriptions, specifications, and pre-engineering design drawings of these standard components. In the future, the APS plans to add engineering drawings of identified standard beamline components. Use of standard components should result in major cost reductions for CATs in the areas of beamline design and construction.

  4. Clinical Biomechanics of Wear in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, John J; Pedersen, Douglas R; Johnston, Richard C; Brown, Thomas D

    2003-01-01

    Complementary clinical and laboratory studies were performed to identify variables associated with polyethylene wear following total hip replacement, and to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for accelerated wear in the total hip arthroplasty construct. Observational cohort studies were performed using a prospective clinical database of more than 4000 consecutive primary total hip arthroplasties performed by a single surgeon, to identify wear-related variables. These variables included head size, acetabular/femoral component impingement, and third body debris. Novel digital edge detection techniques were developed and employed to accurately measure wear, and to determine the relationships of head size and third body debris to acceleration of wear. A novel slidingdistance-coupled finite element model was formulated and employed to examine the mechanisms responsible for wear. The long-term cohort studies demonstrated smaller head sizes to be associated with less wear. Third body debris generated from cable fretting was associated with an increase in wear, osteolysis, and acetabular loosening, especially with larger head sizes. The sliding-distance-coupled finite element model replicated the wear rates occurring in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating the importance of sliding distance on polyethylene wear following total hip arthroplasty. It also demonstrated substantial increases in wear associated with femoral head scratching from third body debris. Further extension of the finite element formulation demonstrated the potential for acetabular component rim damage from impingement wear, and the enhanced potential for third body ingress to the bearing surface with larger head sizes. Edge detection wear measurement techniques demonstrated that early wear rates were predictive of long-term wear rates. These complementary clinical and laboratory investigations have provided insight into 1) the significance of sliding distance and physiologic loci of motion as contributing

  5. Multi-Velocity Component LDV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A laser doppler velocimeter uses frequency shifting of a laser beam to provide signal information for each velocity component. A composite electrical signal generated by a light detector is digitized and a processor produces a discrete Fourier transform based on the digitized electrical signal. The transform includes two peak frequencies corresponding to the two velocity components.

  6. RTI Essential Components Integrity Worksheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Response to Intervention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Response to Intervention (RTI) Essential Components Integrity Rubric and the RTI Essential Components Integrity Worksheet are for use by individuals responsible for monitoring the school-level fidelity of Response to Intervention (RTI) implementation. They may also be used by schools for self-appraisal; however, they were not designed for…

  7. Nonnutrient Components of Fish Diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though the various dietary nutrients are the primary concerns of nutritionists when formulating feeds for intensively cultured tilapia, the inclusion of dietary components that do not have nutritional value can have profound effects on the performance of fish fed these diets. These components may be...

  8. Heat treating of manufactured components

    SciTech Connect

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2012-05-22

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material is disclosed. The system typically includes an insulating vessel placed within a microwave applicator chamber. A moderating material is positioned inside the insulating vessel so that a substantial portion of the exterior surface of each component for heat treating is in contact with the moderating material.

  9. Nickel-hydrogen component development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charleston, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Light weight energy storage systems for future space missions are investigated. One of the systems being studied is the nickel hydrogen battery. This battery is designed to achieve longer life, improve performance, and higher energy densities for space applications. The nickel hydrogen component development is discussed. Test data from polarization measurements of the hydrogen electrode component is presented.

  10. Semantic Annotation of Computational Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, Peter; Mehrotra, Piyush

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology to specify machine-processable semantic descriptions of computational components to enable them to be shared and reused. A particular focus of this scheme is to enable automatic compositon of such components into simple work-flows.

  11. Regularized Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun

    2009-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) has been proposed as a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, GSCA may suffer from multi-collinearity, i.e., high correlations among exogenous variables. GSCA has yet no remedy for this problem. Thus, a regularized extension of GSCA is proposed that integrates a ridge…

  12. RTI Essential Components Integrity Rubric

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Response to Intervention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Response to Intervention (RTI) Essential Components Integrity Rubric is for use by individuals who are responsible for monitoring school-level fidelity of RTI implementation. The rubric is aligned with "Essential Components of RTI: A Closer Look at Response to Intervention" (National Center on Response to Intervention, 2010). Subjects covered…

  13. Multi-Component Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2008-11-01

    We explore multi-component dark matter models where the dark sector consists of multiple stable states with different mass scales, and dark forces coupling these states further enrich the dynamics. The multi-component nature of the dark matter naturally arises in supersymmetric models, where both R parity and an additional symmetry, such as a Z{sub 2}, is preserved. We focus on a particular model where the heavier component of dark matter carries lepton number and annihilates mostly to leptons. The heavier component, which is essentially a sterile neutrino, naturally explains the PAMELA, ATIC and synchrotron signals, without an excess in antiprotons which typically mars other models of weak scale dark matter. The lighter component, which may have a mass from a GeV to a TeV, may explain the DAMA signal, and may be visible in low threshold runs of CDMS and XENON, which search for light dark matter.

  14. Pantaloon Hernia: Obstructed Indirect Component and Direct Component with Cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Kariappa, Mohan Kumar; Harihar, Vivek; Kothudum, Ashwini Rajareddy; Hiremath, Vivekanand Kedarlingayya

    2016-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition in which one or both testes have not passed down into the scrotal sac. It is categorized as true undescended testis in which testes are present in the normal path of descent, and as ectopic testis, in which testes are present at abnormal site. Common complications of cryptorchidism are testicular torsion, subfertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer. Here we present a rare case of pantaloon hernia of obstructed indirect component and direct component with cryptorchidism. PMID:27579208

  15. Pantaloon Hernia: Obstructed Indirect Component and Direct Component with Cryptorchidism

    PubMed Central

    Kariappa, Mohan Kumar; Hiremath, Vivekanand Kedarlingayya

    2016-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition in which one or both testes have not passed down into the scrotal sac. It is categorized as true undescended testis in which testes are present in the normal path of descent, and as ectopic testis, in which testes are present at abnormal site. Common complications of cryptorchidism are testicular torsion, subfertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer. Here we present a rare case of pantaloon hernia of obstructed indirect component and direct component with cryptorchidism. PMID:27579208

  16. Apparatus for remotely handling components

    DOEpatents

    Szkrybalo, Gregory A.; Griffin, Donald L.

    1994-01-01

    The inventive apparatus for remotely handling bar-like components which define a longitudinal direction includes a gripper mechanism for gripping the component including first and second gripper members longitudinally fixedly spaced from each other and oriented parallel to each other in planes transverse to the longitudinal direction. Each gripper member includes a jaw having at least one V-groove with opposing surfaces intersecting at a base and extending radially relative to the longitudinal direction for receiving the component in an open end between the opposing surfaces. The V-grooves on the jaw plate of the first and second gripper members are aligned in the longitudinal direction to support the component in the first and second gripper members. A jaw is rotatably mounted on and a part of each of the first and second gripper members for selectively assuming a retracted mode in which the open end of the V-groove is unobstructed and active mode in which the jaw spans the open end of the V-groove in the first and second gripper members. The jaw has a locking surface for contacting the component in the active mode to secure the component between the locking surface of the jaw and the opposing surfaces of the V-groove. The locking surface has a plurality of stepped portions, each defining a progressively decreasing radial distance between the base of the V-groove and the stepped portion opposing the base to accommodate varying sizes of components.

  17. Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajvir; Pant, K. K.; Lal, Shankar; Yadav, D. P.; Garg, S. R.; Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Mundra, G.

    2012-11-01

    Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

  18. Component Fragility Research Program: Phase 1 component prioritization

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.

    1987-06-01

    Current probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods for nuclear power plants utilize seismic ''fragilities'' - probabilities of failure conditioned on the severity of seismic input motion - that are based largely on limited test data and on engineering judgment. Under the NRC Component Fragility Research Program (CFRP), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed and demonstrated procedures for using test data to derive probabilistic fragility descriptions for mechanical and electrical components. As part of its CFRP activities, LLNL systematically identified and categorized components influencing plant safety in order to identify ''candidate'' components for future NRC testing. Plant systems relevant to safety were first identified; within each system components were then ranked according to their importance to overall system function and their anticipated seismic capacity. Highest priority for future testing was assigned to those ''very important'' components having ''low'' seismic capacity. This report describes the LLNL prioritization effort, which also included application of ''high-level'' qualification data as an alternate means of developing probabilistic fragility descriptions for PRA applications.

  19. Alumina-on-Alumina in THA

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rey, Eduardo; Murcia-Mazón, Antonio; Blanco-Pozo, Agustín; Martí, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    Different bearing surfaces, including alumina-on-alumina, have been used to avoid osteolysis. We prospectively followed 288 patients (319 hips) in which an alumina-on-alumina cup was used with a hydroxyapatite stem. The patients’ mean age was 52.7 (range, 14–70 years), and the minimum followup was 3 years (mean, 4.7 years; range, 3–8 years). At final followup, five cups (including one with an alumina liner fracture) and two stems underwent revision. The cumulative probability of not having a revision of one or both components for any cause was 97% (95% confidence interval, 94.7%–99.1%). No patient spontaneously reported any noises from the hip and none reported noises when specifically questioned. All patients who had not undergone revision had good clinical results, but five of these patients had radiographic cup loosening at last followup. These data suggest alumina-on-alumina prostheses had reasonable outcomes after 5 years. One acetabular component fractured from trauma. We observed no linear femoral head penetration. Continued followup will be required to determine if reduction in wear between the alumina-on-alumina bearings results in less osteolysis and loosening. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18196411

  20. Custom stems for femoral deformity in patients less than 40 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Michael; Aldinger, Guenther; Krahmer, Knut; Bruckner, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Femoral deformity associated with osteoarthritis is a challenge for both the surgeon and the implant. Many of the patients with these deformities are young. Standard implants can be difficult to fit into these femurs. We prospectively evaluated the outcome of custom uncemented femoral stems in young patients. Methods 61 consecutive patients (72 hips) underwent surgery for osteoarthritis because of femoral deformity at a mean age of 35 (22–40) years. The patients received a CT3D-A custom-made femoral stem and an uncemented cup. The mean follow-up time was 14 (10–16) years. 2 patients died at 7 and 8 years after surgery, otherwise, none of the patients were lost to follow-up. Results At follow-up, the femoral prosthesis had not been revised in 59 patients (70 hips). 3 patients (3 hips) had required revision surgery due to loosening of the acetabular component; 2 hips were awaiting revision surgery for loosening of the acetabular cup. There were no cases of dislocation or infection. At review, all stems were considered stable according to the radiographic criteria. No migration or subsidence was observed on plain radiographs. Interpretation Our results are comparable to published results of custom stems regarding survival and outcome. Considering the young age and the deformities in this series of uncemented custom femoral stems, and the fact that there was follow-up of up to 16 years, the survival is remarkable. This technique appears to be a reasonable alternative in younger patients with femoral deformities. PMID:19513891

  1. Ceramic components for MHD electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, D.D.

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf/sub x/In/sub y/A/sub z/O/sub 2/ where x = 0.1 to 0.4, y = 0.3 to 0.6, z = 0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.

  2. Ceramic component for MHD electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.; Bates, Junior L.

    1981-01-01

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf.sub.x In.sub.y A.sub.z O.sub.2 where x=0.1 to 0.4, y=0.3 to 0.6, z=0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.

  3. Estimation of appropriate lubricating film thickness in ceramic-on-ceramic hip prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauviqirrahman, M.; Muchammad, Bayuseno, A. P.; Ismail, R.; Saputra, E.; Jamari, J.

    2016-04-01

    Artificial hip prostheses, consisting of femoral head and acetabular cup are widely used and have affected the lives of many people.However, the primary issue associated with the long term performance of hip prostheses is loosening induced by excessive wear during daily activity. Therefore, an effective lubrication is necessary to significantly decrease the wear. To help understand the lubricating performance of such typical hip joint prostheses, in the present paper a hydrodynamic lubrication model based on Reynolds equationwas introduced. The material pairs of ceramic acetabular cup against ceramic femoral head was investegated.The main aim of this study is to investigate of the effect of loading on the formation of lubricating film thickness.The model of a ball-in-socket configuration was considered assuming that the cup was stationary while the ball was to rotate at a steady angular velocityvarying loads.Based on simulation result, it was found that to promote fluid film lubrication and prevent the contacting components leading to wear, the film thickness of lubricant should be determined carefully based on the load applied. This finding may have useful implication in predicting the failure of lubricating synovial fluid film and wear generation in hip prostheses.

  4. Electronic Components Subsystems and Equipment: a Compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Developments in electronic components, subsystems, and equipment are summarized. Topics discussed include integrated circuit components and techniques, circuit components and techniques, and cables and connectors.

  5. Microsection analysis of cortical form-fit of a custom femoral component in total hip arthroplasty: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Leichtle, Ulf Gunther; Leichtle, Carmen Ina; Martini, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Custom femoral components have been developed for total hip arthroplasty to maximize cortical form-fit and thereby to reduce the problems of stress shielding and aseptic loosening. Limited information is available about how much endosteal cortical contact can actually be achieved with these expensive implants. The aim of this study was therefore to verify the exact cortical contact of a custom made stem using microsections and comparing it to a standard stem with similar design. In 8 human femurs (3 matched pairs and 2 separate specimens), custom femoral prostheses (Adaptiva; 5 femurs: 3 matched and 2 separate) and conventional femoral prostheses (Alloclassic; 3 matched femurs) were implanted. Endosteal cortical contact was determined from CAD planning drafts and microsections cut from the specimens with a diamond saw. Microsection analysis of the paired femurs showed that contact between prosthesis and bone varied clearly along the length of the femoral stem. Total cortical contact was considerably greater in custom prostheses than conventional prostheses (custom, 47%; conventional, 32%), but markedly less than the total contact predicted by the manufacturer (84% to 90%). The custom prosthesis had more lateral cortical contact on CAD planning drafts (cortical contact: medial, 60%; lateral, 53%) than on specimen microsections after implantation (medial, 64%; lateral, 24%). In summary, the philosophy of anchorage of both prostheses types could be confirmed. However, areas of cortical contact of the custom made prosthesis were considerably smaller compared to the pre-operative planning. PMID:23066498

  6. Three-component homeostasis control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin; Hong, Hyunsuk; Jo, Junghyo

    2014-03-01

    Two reciprocal components seem to be sufficient to maintain a control variable constant. However, pancreatic islets adapt three components to control glucose homeostasis. They are α (secreting glucagon), β (insulin), and δ (somatostatin) cells. Glucagon and insulin are the reciprocal hormones for increasing and decreasing blood glucose levels, while the role of somatostatin is unknown. However, it has been known how each hormone affects other cell types. Based on the pulsatile hormone secretion and the cellular interactions, this system can be described as coupled oscillators. In particular, we used the Landau-Stuart model to consider both amplitudes and phases of hormone oscillations. We found that the presence of the third component, δ cell, was effective to resist under glucose perturbations, and to quickly return to the normal glucose level once perturbed. Our analysis suggested that three components are necessary for advanced homeostasis control.

  7. Advanced Component Research Facility (ACRES)

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, M.

    1980-07-01

    A detailed description of the SERI Advanced Component Research Facility (ACRES) is given. Background information explicates the facility's history, developed around the two Omnium-G parabolic dish concentrators. The Omnium-G concentrators and electrical power plant are described. The purpose and a detailed descripttion of ACRES is also given. Included is a description of the measurement capabilities, the controls, and each component of the facility.

  8. Definition of Contravariant Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Mao; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This is an old issue in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). What is the so-called contravariant velocity or contravariant velocity component? In the article, we review the basics of tensor analysis and give the contravariant velocity component a rigorous explanation. For a given coordinate system, there exist two uniquely determined sets of base vector systems - one is the covariant and another is the contravariant base vector system. The two base vector systems are reciprocal. The so-called contravariant velocity component is really the contravariant component of a velocity vector for a time-independent coordinate system, or the contravariant component of a relative velocity between fluid and coordinates, for a time-dependent coordinate system. The contravariant velocity components are not physical quantities of the velocity vector. Their magnitudes, dimensions, and associated directions are controlled by their corresponding covariant base vectors. Several 2-D (two-dimensional) linear examples and 2-D mass-conservation equation are used to illustrate the details of expressing a vector with respect to the covariant and contravariant base vector systems, respectively.

  9. Component protection based automatic control

    SciTech Connect

    Otaduy, P J

    1992-03-01

    Control and safety systems as well as operation procedures are designed on the basis of critical process parameters limits. The expectation is that short and long term mechanical damage and process failures will be avoided by operating the plant within the specified constraints envelopes. In this paper, one of the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) design duty cycles events is discussed to corroborate that the time has come to explicitly make component protection part of the control system. Component stress assessment and aging data should be an integral part of the control system. Then transient trajectory planning and operating limits could be aimed at minimizing component specific and overall plant component damage cost functions. The impact of transients on critical components could then be managed according to plant lifetime design goals. The need for developing methodologies for online transient trajectory planning and assessment of operating limits in order to facilitate the explicit incorporation of damage assessment capabilities to the plant control and protection systems is discussed. 12 refs.

  10. Failure Analysis of Ceramic Components

    SciTech Connect

    B.W. Morris

    2000-06-29

    Ceramics are being considered for a wide range of structural applications due to their low density and their ability to retain strength at high temperatures. The inherent brittleness of monolithic ceramics requires a departure from the deterministic design philosophy utilized to analyze metallic structural components. The design program ''Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life'' (CARES/LIFE) developed by NASA Lewis Research Center uses a probabilistic approach to predict the reliability of monolithic components under operational loading. The objective of this study was to develop an understanding of the theories used by CARES/LIFE to predict the reliability of ceramic components and to assess the ability of CARES/LIFE to accurately predict the fast fracture behavior of monolithic ceramic components. A finite element analysis was performed to determine the temperature and stress distribution of a silicon carbide O-ring under diametral compression. The results of the finite element analysis were supplied as input into CARES/LIFE to determine the fast fracture reliability of the O-ring. Statistical material strength parameters were calculated from four-point flexure bar test data. The predicted reliability showed excellent correlation with O-ring compression test data indicating that the CARES/LIFE program can be used to predict the reliability of ceramic components subjected to complicated stress states using material properties determined from simple uniaxial tensile tests.

  11. Automated cleaning of electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.; Meirans, L.; Wapman, W.; Hwang, Y.; Koenig, L.; Petterson, B.

    1994-07-01

    Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene and chlorofluorocarbon solvents in cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates from electronic components. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

  12. Additive manufacturing of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Andreas; Rank, Manuel; Maillard, Philippe; Suckow, Anne; Bauckhage, Yannick; Rößler, Patrick; Lang, Johannes; Shariff, Fatin; Pekrul, Sven

    2016-08-01

    The development of additive manufacturing methods has enlarged rapidly in recent years. Thereby, the work mainly focuses on the realization of mechanical components, but the additive manufacturing technology offers a high potential in the field of optics as well. Owing to new design possibilities, completely new solutions are possible. This article briefly reviews and compares the most important additive manufacturing methods for polymer optics. Additionally, it points out the characteristics of additive manufactured polymer optics. Thereby, surface quality is of crucial importance. In order to improve it, appropriate post-processing steps are necessary (e.g. robot polishing or coating), which will be discussed. An essential part of this paper deals with various additive manufactured optical components and their use, especially in optical systems for shape metrology (e.g. borehole sensor, tilt sensor, freeform surface sensor, fisheye lens). The examples should demonstrate the potentials and limitations of optical components produced by additive manufacturing.

  13. Towards Prognostics for Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Bhaskar; Celaya, Jose R.; Wysocki, Philip F.; Goebel, Kai F.

    2013-01-01

    Electronics components have an increasingly critical role in avionics systems and in the development of future aircraft systems. Prognostics of such components is becoming a very important research field as a result of the need to provide aircraft systems with system level health management information. This paper focuses on a prognostics application for electronics components within avionics systems, and in particular its application to an Isolated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT). This application utilizes the remaining useful life prediction, accomplished by employing the particle filter framework, leveraging data from accelerated aging tests on IGBTs. These tests induced thermal-electrical overstresses by applying thermal cycling to the IGBT devices. In-situ state monitoring, including measurements of steady-state voltages and currents, electrical transients, and thermal transients are recorded and used as potential precursors of failure.

  14. Spacecraft component heater control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachtel, Frederick D. (Inventor); Owen, James W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A heater control circuit is disclosed as being constructed in a single integrated circuit, with the integrated circuit conveniently mounted proximate to a spacecraft component requiring temperature control. Redundant heater controllers control power applied to strip heaters disposed to provide heat to a component responsive to sensed temperature from temperature sensors. Signals from these sensors are digitized and compared with a dead band temperature and set point temperature stored in memory to generate an error signal if the sensed temperature is outside the parameter stored in the memory. This error signal is utilized by a microprocessor to selectively instruct the heater controllers to apply power to the strip heaters. If necessary, the spacecraft central processor may access or interrogate the microprocessor in order to alter the set point temperature and dead band temperature range to obtain operational data relating to the operation of an integrated circuit for relaying to the ground control, or to switch off faulty components.

  15. Space storable propulsion components development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagler, R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The current development status of components to control the flow of propellants (liquid fluorine and hydrazine) in a demonstration space storable propulsion system is discussed. The criteria which determined the designs for the pressure regulator, explosive-actuated valves, propellant shutoff valve, latching solenoid-actuated valve and propellant filter are presented. The test philosophy that was followed during component development is outlined. The results from compatibility demonstrations for reusable connectors, flange seals, and CRES/Ti-6Al4V transition tubes and the evaluations of processes for welding (hand-held TIG, automated TIG, and EB), cleaning for fluorine service, and decontamination after fluorine exposure are described.

  16. Transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R; Fox, Joe R

    2006-05-30

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. The transmission element may include an annular housing forming a trough, an electrical conductor disposed within the trough, and an MCEI material disposed between the annular housing and the electrical conductor.

  17. Modeling the electron strahl component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa

    The electron velocity distribution functions in the solar wind consist of three different populations: core, halo and strahl. The core and halo are mainly responsible for the temperature and density. However, it has been suggested that the field-aligned strahl component could play an important role in the anisotropy, heat flux and fluctuating fluid velocity. In this work we have the following goals: a) develop a method to distinguish the strahl from the core and halo populations of the electron velocity distribution function; and, b) describe this component by modeling and fitting. To accomplish this, we use the high angular and energy resolution data of the Cluster/PEACE electron spectrometer.

  18. Independent Component Analysis of Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduchi, Roberto; Portilla, Javier

    2000-01-01

    A common method for texture representation is to use the marginal probability densities over the outputs of a set of multi-orientation, multi-scale filters as a description of the texture. We propose a technique, based on Independent Components Analysis, for choosing the set of filters that yield the most informative marginals, meaning that the product over the marginals most closely approximates the joint probability density function of the filter outputs. The algorithm is implemented using a steerable filter space. Experiments involving both texture classification and synthesis show that compared to Principal Components Analysis, ICA provides superior performance for modeling of natural and synthetic textures.

  19. Clinical outcome study and radiological findings of Zweymuller metal on metal total hip arthroplasty. a follow-up of 6 to 15 years.

    PubMed

    Paleochorlidis, Ilias S; Badras, Leonidas S; Skretas, Efstathios F; Georgaklis, Vasilios A; Karachalios, Theofilos S; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2009-01-01

    We report the clinical and radiological outcome of 99 Zweymuller metal on metal total hip arthroplasties in 84 patients followed up prospectively for a mean period of 9.5 (range, 6-15) years. There were 29 (34.5%) male and 55 (65.5%) female patients with a mean age of 62.85 years (range, 50-70 years) at the time of surgery. All patients had osteoarthritis. One acetabular component and one stem were revised due to aseptic loosening. One femoral stem was revised due to a periprosthetic fracture. HHS score improved from a preoperative mean of 62.56 points (SD 8.87) to a final postoperative follow-up mean of 93.48 (SD 7.7). Cumulative success rate for both implants at 13 years, with aseptic loosening as the end point, was 97.05%, while for both implants at 13 years, with revision for any reason as the end point, it was 91.17%. Satisfactory results were observed with the use of this prosthesis. PMID:20041375

  20. Large Component Removal/Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, D. M.

    2002-02-27

    This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.