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Sample records for acetaldehyde dehydrogenase aldh

  1. Pharmacological recruitment of aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1 (ALDH3A1) to assist ALDH2 in acetaldehyde and ethanol metabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Cruz, Leslie A.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Correcting a genetic mutation that leads to a loss of function has been a challenge. One such mutation is in aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), denoted ALDH2*2. This mutation is present in ∼0.6 billion East Asians and results in accumulation of toxic acetaldehyde after consumption of ethanol. To temporarily increase metabolism of acetaldehyde in vivo, we describe an approach in which a pharmacologic agent recruited another ALDH to metabolize acetaldehyde. We focused on ALDH3A1, which is enriched in the upper aerodigestive track, and identified Alda-89 as a small molecule that enables ALDH3A1 to metabolize acetaldehyde. When given together with the ALDH2-specific activator, Alda-1, Alda-89 reduced acetaldehyde-induced behavioral impairment by causing a rapid reduction in blood ethanol and acetaldehyde levels after acute ethanol intoxication in both wild-type and ALDH2-deficient, ALDH2*1/*2, heterozygotic knock-in mice. The use of a pharmacologic agent to recruit an enzyme to metabolize a substrate that it usually does not metabolize may represent a novel means to temporarily increase elimination of toxic agents in vivo. PMID:25713355

  2. Taraxerone enhances alcohol oxidation via increases of alcohol dehyderogenase (ADH) and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activities and gene expressions.

    PubMed

    Sung, Chang-Keun; Kim, Seung-Mi; Oh, Chang-Jin; Yang, Sun-A; Han, Byung-Hee; Mo, Eun-Kyoung

    2012-07-01

    The present study, taraxerone (d-friedoolean-14-en-3-one) was isolated from Sedum sarmentosum with purity 96.383%, and its enhancing effects on alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activities were determined: EC(50) values were 512.42 ± 3.12 and 500.16 ± 3.23 μM for ADH and ALDH, respectively. In order to obtain more information on taraxerone related with the alcohol metabolism, 40% ethanol (5 mL/kg body weight) with 0.5-1mM of taraxerone were administered to mice. The plasma alcohol and acetaldehyde concentrations of taraxerone-treated groups were significantly lowered than those of the control group (p<0.01): approximately 20-67% and 7-57% lowered for plasma alcohol and acetaldehyde, respectively. Compare to the control group, the ADH and ALDH expressions in the liver tissues were abruptly increased in the taraxerone-treated groups after ethanol exposure. In addition, taraxerone prevented catalase, superoxide dismutase, and reduced glutathione concentrations from the decrease induced by ethanol administration with the concentration dependent manner.

  3. Characteristics of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (Aldh2) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsu-Sheng; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Isse, Toyohi; Kitakawa, Kyoko; Ogawa, Masanori; Pham, Thi-Thu-Phuong; Kawamoto, Toshihiro

    2009-11-01

    Acetaldehyde is an intermediate of ethanol oxidation. It covalently binds to DNA, and is known as a carcinogen. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is an important enzyme that oxidizes acetaldehyde. Approximately 45% of Chinese and Japanese individuals have the inactive ALDH2 genotypes (ALDH2*2/*2 and ALDH2*1/*2), and Aldh2 knockout mice appear to be a valid animal model for humans with inactive ALDH2. This review gives an overview of published studies on Aldh2 knockout mice, which were treated with ethanol or acetaldehyde. According to these studies, it was found that Aldh2 -/- mice (Aldh2 knockout mice) are more susceptible to ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced toxicity than Aldh2 +/+ mice (wild type mice). When mice were fed with ethanol, the mortality was increased. When they were exposed to atmospheres containing acetaldehyde, the Aldh2 -/- mice showed more severe toxic symptoms, like weight loss and higher blood acetaldehyde levels, as compared with the Aldh2 +/+ mice. Thus, ethanol and acetaldehyde treatment affects Aldh2 knockout mice more than wild type mice. Based on these findings, it is suggested that ethanol consumption and acetaldehyde inhalation are inferred to pose a higher risk to ALDH2-inactive humans. These results also support that ALDH2-deficient humans who habitually consume alcohol have a higher rate of cancer than humans with functional ALDH2. PMID:19874182

  4. Increased frequencies of micronucleated reticulocytes and T-cell receptor mutation in Aldh2 knockout mice exposed to acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Kunugita, Naoki; Isse, Toyohi; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Ogawa, Masanori; Yamaguchi, Tetsunosuke; Kinaga, Tsuyoshi; Kawamoto, Toshihiro

    2008-02-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) metabolizes acetaldehyde produced from ethanol into acetate and plays a major role in the oxidation of acetaldehyde in vivo. About half of all Japanese people have inactive ALDH2. We generated homozygous Aldh2 null (Aldh2-/-) mice by gene targeting knockout as a model of ALDH2-deficient humans. To investigate the mutagenicity of acetaldehyde, a micronucleus assay and a T-cell receptor (TCR) gene mutation assay were performed in Aldh2-/- mice and wild-type (Aldh2 +/+) mice exposed to acetaldehyde. The mice were continuously exposed to 125 and 500 ppm of acetaldehyde vapor for 2 weeks. Another group was orally administered 100 mg/kg once a day for 2 weeks continuously. The mice were killed after 2 weeks of exposure to acetaldehyde, and the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes was measured by flow cytometry. We also observed the incidence of TCR gene mutations in T-lymphocytes by measuring the variant CD3(-CD4+) expression by flow cytometry. The frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes induced by acetaldehyde was significantly increased in Aldh2 -/- mice, but not in Aldh2 +/+ mice. TCR mutant frequency was also associated with acetaldehyde exposure in Aldh2-/ - mice, especially after oral administration; however, it was not associated with acetaldehyde exposure in Aldh2 +/+ mice. In conclusion, Aldh2 -/- mice showed high sensitivity in the micronuclei and TCR mutation assays compared with Aldh2 +/+ mice after exposure to acetaldehyde. PMID:18303182

  5. Protective role of ALDH2 against acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in oesophageal squamous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Amanuma, Yusuke; Ohashi, Shinya; Itatani, Yoshiro; Tsurumaki, Mihoko; Matsuda, Shun; Kikuchi, Osamu; Nakai, Yukie; Miyamoto, Shin'ichi; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Whelan, Kelly A; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Chiba, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Tomonari; Muto, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Acetaldehyde is an ethanol-derived definite carcinogen that causes oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a key enzyme that eliminates acetaldehyde, and impairment of ALDH2 increases the risk of ESCC. ALDH2 is produced in various tissues including the liver, heart, and kidney, but the generation and functional roles of ALDH2 in the oesophagus remain elusive. Here, we report that ethanol drinking increased ALDH2 production in the oesophagus of wild-type mice. Notably, levels of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage represented by N(2)-ethylidene-2'-deoxyguanosine were higher in the oesophagus of Aldh2-knockout mice than in wild-type mice upon ethanol consumption. In vitro experiments revealed that acetaldehyde induced ALDH2 production in both mouse and human oesophageal keratinocytes. Furthermore, the N(2)-ethylidene-2'-deoxyguanosine levels increased in both Aldh2-knockout mouse keratinocytes and ALDH2-knockdown human keratinocytes treated with acetaldehyde. Conversely, forced production of ALDH2 sharply diminished the N(2)-ethylidene-2'-deoxyguanosine levels. Our findings provide new insight into the preventive role of oesophageal ALDH2 against acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage. PMID:26374466

  6. Protective role of ALDH2 against acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in oesophageal squamous epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Amanuma, Yusuke; Ohashi, Shinya; Itatani, Yoshiro; Tsurumaki, Mihoko; Matsuda, Shun; Kikuchi, Osamu; Nakai, Yukie; Miyamoto, Shin’ichi; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Whelan, Kelly A.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Chiba, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Tomonari; Muto, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Acetaldehyde is an ethanol-derived definite carcinogen that causes oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a key enzyme that eliminates acetaldehyde, and impairment of ALDH2 increases the risk of ESCC. ALDH2 is produced in various tissues including the liver, heart, and kidney, but the generation and functional roles of ALDH2 in the oesophagus remain elusive. Here, we report that ethanol drinking increased ALDH2 production in the oesophagus of wild-type mice. Notably, levels of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage represented by N2-ethylidene-2′-deoxyguanosine were higher in the oesophagus of Aldh2-knockout mice than in wild-type mice upon ethanol consumption. In vitro experiments revealed that acetaldehyde induced ALDH2 production in both mouse and human oesophageal keratinocytes. Furthermore, the N2-ethylidene-2′-deoxyguanosine levels increased in both Aldh2-knockout mouse keratinocytes and ALDH2-knockdown human keratinocytes treated with acetaldehyde. Conversely, forced production of ALDH2 sharply diminished the N2-ethylidene-2′-deoxyguanosine levels. Our findings provide new insight into the preventive role of oesophageal ALDH2 against acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage. PMID:26374466

  7. ALDH2 modulates autophagy flux to regulate acetaldehyde-mediated toxicity thresholds.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koji; Whelan, Kelly A; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna M; Kagawa, Shingo; Rustgi, Sabrina L; Noguchi, Chiaki; Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Amanuma, Yusuke; Ohashi, Shinya; Muto, Manabu; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Noguchi, Eishi; Avadhani, Narayan G; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A polymorphic mutation in the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene has been epidemiologically linked to the high susceptibility to esophageal carcinogenesis for individuals with alcohol use disorders. Mice subjected to alcohol drinking show increased oxidative stress and DNA adduct formation in esophageal epithelia where Aldh2 loss augments alcohol-induced genotoxic effects; however, it remains elusive as to how esophageal epithelial cells with dysfunctional Aldh2 cope with oxidative stress related to alcohol metabolism. Here, we investigated the role of autophagy in murine esophageal epithelial cells (keratinocytes) exposed to ethanol and acetaldehyde. We find that ethanol and acetaldehyde trigger oxidative stress via mitochondrial superoxide in esophageal keratinocytes. Aldh2-deficient cells appeared to be highly susceptible to ethanol- or acetaldehyde-mediated toxicity. Alcohol dehydrogenase-mediated acetaldehyde production was implicated in ethanol-induced cell injury in Aldh2 deficient cells as ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death was partially inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole. Acetaldehyde activated autophagy flux in esophageal keratinocytes where Aldh2 deficiency increased dependence on autophagy to cope with ethanol-induced acetaldehyde-mediated oxidative stress. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy flux by chloroquine stabilized p62/SQSTM1, and increased basal and acetaldehyde-mediate oxidative stress in Aldh2 deficient cells as documented in monolayer culture as well as single-cell derived three-dimensional esophageal organoids, recapitulating a physiological esophageal epithelial proliferation-differentiation gradient. Our innovative approach indicates, for the first time, that autophagy may provide cytoprotection to esophageal epithelial cells responding to oxidative stress that is induced by ethanol and its major metabolite acetaldehyde. Defining autophagymediated cytoprotection against alcohol-induced genotoxicity in the context of

  8. ALDH2 modulates autophagy flux to regulate acetaldehyde-mediated toxicity thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Koji; Whelan, Kelly A; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna M; Kagawa, Shingo; Rustgi, Sabrina L; Noguchi, Chiaki; Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Amanuma, Yusuke; Ohashi, Shinya; Muto, Manabu; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Noguchi, Eishi; Avadhani, Narayan G; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A polymorphic mutation in the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene has been epidemiologically linked to the high susceptibility to esophageal carcinogenesis for individuals with alcohol use disorders. Mice subjected to alcohol drinking show increased oxidative stress and DNA adduct formation in esophageal epithelia where Aldh2 loss augments alcohol-induced genotoxic effects; however, it remains elusive as to how esophageal epithelial cells with dysfunctional Aldh2 cope with oxidative stress related to alcohol metabolism. Here, we investigated the role of autophagy in murine esophageal epithelial cells (keratinocytes) exposed to ethanol and acetaldehyde. We find that ethanol and acetaldehyde trigger oxidative stress via mitochondrial superoxide in esophageal keratinocytes. Aldh2-deficient cells appeared to be highly susceptible to ethanol- or acetaldehyde-mediated toxicity. Alcohol dehydrogenase-mediated acetaldehyde production was implicated in ethanol-induced cell injury in Aldh2 deficient cells as ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death was partially inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole. Acetaldehyde activated autophagy flux in esophageal keratinocytes where Aldh2 deficiency increased dependence on autophagy to cope with ethanol-induced acetaldehyde-mediated oxidative stress. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy flux by chloroquine stabilized p62/SQSTM1, and increased basal and acetaldehyde-mediate oxidative stress in Aldh2 deficient cells as documented in monolayer culture as well as single-cell derived three-dimensional esophageal organoids, recapitulating a physiological esophageal epithelial proliferation-differentiation gradient. Our innovative approach indicates, for the first time, that autophagy may provide cytoprotection to esophageal epithelial cells responding to oxidative stress that is induced by ethanol and its major metabolite acetaldehyde. Defining autophagymediated cytoprotection against alcohol-induced genotoxicity in the context of

  9. Multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase causing excessive acetaldehyde production from ethanol by oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Sylvia I; Jin, Ling; Gasparovich, Stephen R; Tao, Lin

    2013-07-01

    Ethanol consumption and poor oral hygiene are risk factors for oral and oesophageal cancers. Although oral streptococci have been found to produce excessive acetaldehyde from ethanol, little is known about the mechanism by which this carcinogen is produced. By screening 52 strains of diverse oral streptococcal species, we identified Streptococcus gordonii V2016 that produced the most acetaldehyde from ethanol. We then constructed gene deletion mutants in this strain and analysed them for alcohol and acetaldehyde dehydrogenases by zymograms. The results showed that S. gordonii V2016 expressed three primary alcohol dehydrogenases, AdhA, AdhB and AdhE, which all oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde, but their preferred substrates were 1-propanol, 1-butanol and ethanol, respectively. Two additional dehydrogenases, S-AdhA and TdhA, were identified with specificities to the secondary alcohol 2-propanol and threonine, respectively, but not to ethanol. S. gordonii V2016 did not show a detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase even though its adhE gene encodes a putative bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase. Mutants with adhE deletion showed greater tolerance to ethanol in comparison with the wild-type and mutant with adhA or adhB deletion, indicating that AdhE is the major alcohol dehydrogenase in S. gordonii. Analysis of 19 additional strains of S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. oralis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis showed expressions of up to three alcohol dehydrogenases, but none showed detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, except one strain that showed a novel ALDH. Therefore, expression of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase may contribute to excessive production of acetaldehyde from ethanol by certain oral streptococci.

  10. Susceptibility to inhalation toxicity of acetaldehyde in Aldh2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Tsunehiro; Isse, Toyohi; Ogawa, Masanori; Muto, Manabu; Uchiyama, Iwao; Kawamoto, Toshihiro

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the inhalation toxicity of acetaldehyde in Aldh2 KO (Aldh -/-) mice, using pathological method. Male C57BL/6 (Aldh2 +/+) mice and Aldh -/- mice were exposed to atmospheres containing acetaldehyde at levels of 0, 125, and 500 ppm for 24 h/day during 14 days. Although the average blood acetaldehyde concentration of Aldh -/- mice was higher than that of Aldh2 +/+ mice in the acetaldehyde exposure group, observable effects by the acetaldehyde exposure on the lung and liver were not different between wild type and ALDH2 null mice. In Aldh2 -/- mice, the levels of 1) erosion of respiratory epithelium and the subepithelial hemorrhage in nose, 2) hemorrhage in nasal cavity, 3) degeneration of respiratory epithelium in larynx, pharynx and trachea, and 4) degeneration of dorsal skin were higher compared with Aldh2 +/+ mice, indicating that Aldh2 -/- mice are more acetaldehyde-sensitive than Aldh2 +/+ mice. This is the first example for studying pathological effects of Aldh2 deficiency using Aldh -/- mice exposed to a low level of acetaldehyde. PMID:17127431

  11. Effects of ALDH2 Genotype, PPI Treatment and L-Cysteine on Carcinogenic Acetaldehyde in Gastric Juice and Saliva after Intragastric Alcohol Administration

    PubMed Central

    Maejima, Ryuhei; Iijima, Katsunori; Kaihovaara, Pertti; Hatta, Waku; Koike, Tomoyuki; Imatani, Akira; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Salaspuro, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    Acetaldehyde (ACH) associated with alcoholic beverages is Group 1 carcinogen to humans (IARC/WHO). Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2), a major ACH eliminating enzyme, is genetically deficient in 30–50% of Eastern Asians. In alcohol drinkers, ALDH2-deficiency is a well-known risk factor for upper aerodigestive tract cancers, i.e., head and neck cancer and esophageal cancer. However, there is only a limited evidence for stomach cancer. In this study we demonstrated for the first time that ALDH2 deficiency results in markedly increased exposure of the gastric mucosa to acetaldehyde after intragastric administration of alcohol. Our finding provides concrete evidence for a causal relationship between acetaldehyde and gastric carcinogenesis. A plausible explanation is the gastric first pass metabolism of ethanol. The gastric mucosa expresses alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzymes catalyzing the oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde, especially at the high ethanol concentrations prevailing in the stomach after the consumption of alcoholic beverages. The gastric mucosa also possesses the acetaldehyde-eliminating ALDH2 enzyme. Due to decreased mucosal ALDH2 activity, the elimination of ethanol-derived acetaldehyde is decreased, which results in its accumulation in the gastric juice. We also demonstrate that ALDH2 deficiency, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment, and L-cysteine cause independent changes in gastric juice and salivary acetaldehyde levels, indicating that intragastric acetaldehyde is locally regulated by gastric mucosal ADH and ALDH2 enzymes, and by oral microbes colonizing an achlorhydric stomach. Markedly elevated acetaldehyde levels were also found at low intragastric ethanol concentrations corresponding to the ethanol levels of many foodstuffs, beverages, and dairy products produced by fermentation. A capsule that slowly releases L-cysteine effectively eliminated acetaldehyde from the gastric juice of PPI-treated ALDH2-active and ALDH2-deficient subjects. These

  12. Acetaldehyde metabolism by liver mitochondrial ALDH from UChA and UChB rats: effect of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tampier, L; Sánchez, E; Quintanilla, M E

    1996-01-01

    We have observed that blood acetaldehyde (AcH) levels after an ethanol dose were significantly higher in disulfiram-pre-treated UChA (low ethanol consumer) than in UChB (high ethanol consumer) rats. In order to explore these results further, we studied the effect of disulfiram (300 mg/kg i.p.) and chlorpropamide (80) mg/kg i.p.) pre-treatment on blood AcH levels after oral ethanol (60 mmol/kg) and on AcH metabolism by liver mitochondrial aldehyde(s) dehydrogenase(s) from UChA and UChB rats. AcH metabolism by liver mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) was studied by following AcH disappearance rate and the formation of NADH at 340 nm in the incubation medium. The results showed that chlorpropamide, like disulfiram, produced a higher blood AcH level consistent with a greater inhibition of the low-Km mitochondrial ALDH in the UChA rats than in the UChB rats. These drugs did not inhibit the high Km mitochondrial ALDH. Kinetic studies of mitochondrial ALDH show that low-Km mitochondrial ALDH from UChB rats exhibits a higher affinity for NAD than UChA rats. This observation could explain the different inhibition of ALDH by both drugs, assuming that the inhibitors reduce NAD availability, the rate limiting step in the mitochondrial ALDH oxidation.

  13. Gene cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Issatchenkia terricola strain XJ-2.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhengying; Zhang, Chong; Lu, Fengxia; Bie, Xiaomei; Lu, Zhaoxin

    2012-03-01

    Acetaldehyde is a known mutagen and carcinogen. Active aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) represents an important mechanism for acetaldehyde detoxification. A yeast strain XJ-2 isolated from grape samples was found to produce acetaldehyde dehydrogenase with a high activity of 2.28 U/mg and identified as Issatchenkia terricola. The enzyme activity was validated by oxidizing acetaldehyde to acetate with NAD(+) as coenzyme based on the headspace gas chromatography analysis. A novel acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene (ist-ALD) was cloned by combining SiteFinding-PCR and self-formed adaptor PCR. The ist-ALD gene comprised an open reading frame of 1,578 bp and encoded a protein of 525 amino acids. The predicted protein of ist-ALD showed the highest identity (73%) to ALDH from Pichia angusta. The ist-ALD gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product (ist-ALDH) presented a productivity of 442.3 U/mL cells. The purified ist-ALDH was a homotetramer of 232 kDa consisting of 57 kDa-subunit according to the SDS-PAGE and native PAGE analysis. Ist-ALDH exhibited the optimal activity at pH 9.0 and 40°C, respectively. The activity of ist-ALDH was enhanced by K(+), NH4(+), dithiothreitol, and 2-mercaptoethanol but strongly inhibited by Ag(+), Hg(2+), Cu(2+), and phenylmethyl sulfonylfluoride. In the presence of NAD(+), ist-ALDH could oxidize many aliphatic, aromatic, and heterocyclic aldehydes, preferably acetaldehyde. Kinetic study revealed that ist-ALDH had a k (cat) value of 27.71/s and a k (cat)/K (m) value of 26.80 × 10(3)/(mol s) on acetaldehyde, demonstrating ist-ALDH, a catalytically active enzyme by comparing with other ALDHs. These studies indicated that ist-ALDH was a potential enzymatic product for acetaldehyde detoxification. PMID:21858493

  14. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1B1: Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a Novel Mitochondrial Acetaldehyde-Metabolizing Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Stagos, Dimitrios; Chen, Ying; Brocker, Chad; Donald, Elizabeth; Jackson, Brian C.; Orlicky, David J.; Thompson, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Ethanol-induced damage is largely attributed to its toxic metabolite, acetaldehyde. Clearance of acetaldehyde is achieved by its oxidation, primarily catalyzed by the mitochondrial class II aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2). ALDH1B1 is another mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) that shares 75% peptide sequence homology with ALDH2. Recent population studies in whites suggest a role for ALDH1B1 in ethanol metabolism. However, to date, no formal documentation of the biochemical properties of ALDH1B1 has been forthcoming. In this current study, we cloned and expressed human recombinant ALDH1B1 in Sf9 insect cells. The resultant enzyme was purified by affinity chromatography to homogeneity. The kinetic properties of purified human ALDH1B1 were assessed using a wide range of aldehyde substrates. Human ALDH1B1 had an exclusive preference for NAD+ as the cofactor and was catalytically active toward short- and medium-chain aliphatic aldehydes, aromatic aldehydes, and the products of lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxynonenal and malondialdehyde. Most importantly, human ALDH1B1 exhibited an apparent Km of 55 μM for acetaldehyde, making it the second low Km ALDH for metabolism of this substrate. The dehydrogenase activity of ALDH1B1 was sensitive to disulfiram inhibition, a feature also shared with ALDH2. The tissue distribution of ALDH1B1 in C57BL/6J mice and humans was examined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical analysis. The highest expression occurred in the liver, followed by the intestinal tract, implying a potential physiological role for ALDH1B1 in these tissues. The current study is the first report on the expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of human ALDH1B1 protein. PMID:20616185

  15. Combination of ADH1B*2/ALDH2*2 polymorphisms alters acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in the blood of Japanese alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Yoshiyuki; Muto, Manabu; Hori, Kimiko; Nagayoshi, Haruna; Yokoyama, Akira; Chiba, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Tomonari

    2012-09-01

    The acetaldehyde associated with alcoholic beverages is an evident carcinogen for the esophagus. Genetic polymorphisms of the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) genes are associated with the risk of esophageal cancer. However, the exact mechanism via which these genetic polymorphisms affect esophageal carcinogenesis has not been elucidated. ADH1B*2 is involved in overproduction of acetaldehyde due to increased ethanol metabolism into acetaldehyde, and ALDH2*2 is involved in accumulation of acetaldehyde due to the deficiency of acetaldehyde metabolism. Acetaldehyde can interact with DNA and form DNA adducts, resulting in DNA damage. N(2)-ethylidene-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-ethylidene-dG) is the most abundant DNA adduct derived from acetaldehyde. Therefore, we quantified N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels in blood samples from 66 Japanese alcoholic patients using liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, and investigated the relationship between N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels and ADH1B and ALDH2 genotypes. The median N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels (25th percentile, 75th percentile) in patients with ADH1B*1/*1 plus ALDH2*1/*1, ADH1B*2 carrier plus ALDH2*1/*1, ADH1B*1/*1 plus ALDH2*1/*2, and ADH1B*2 carrier plus ALDH2*1/*2 were 2.14 (0.97, 2.37)/10(7) bases, 2.38 (1.18, 2.98)/10(7) bases, 5.38 (3.19, 6.52)/10(7) bases, and 21.04 (12.75, 34.80)/10(7) bases, respectively. In the ALDH2*1/*2 group, N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels were significantly higher in ADH1B*2 carriers than in the ADH1B*1/*1 group (P < 0.01). N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels were significantly higher in the ALDH2*1/*2 group than in the ALDH2*1/*1 group, regardless of ADH1B genotype (ADH1B*1/*1, P < 0.05; ADH1B*2 carriers, P < 0.01) N(2)-ethylidene-dG levels in blood DNA of the alcoholics was remarkably higher in individuals with a combination of the ADH1B*2 and ALDH2*2 alleles. These results provide a new perspective on the carcinogenicity of the acetaldehyde associated with

  16. Impairment of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 increases accumulation of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in the esophagus after ethanol ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Yukawa, Yoshiyuki; Ohashi, Shinya; Amanuma, Yusuke; Nakai, Yukie; Tsurumaki, Mihoko; Kikuchi, Osamu; Miyamoto, Shin’ichi; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Chiba, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Tomonari; Muto, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol and its metabolite, acetaldehyde, are the definite carcinogens for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), and reduced catalytic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), which detoxifies acetaldehyde, increases the risk for ESCC. However, it remains unknown whether the ALDH2 genotype influences the level of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in the esophagus after ethanol ingestion. In the present study, we administered ethanol orally or intraperitoneally to Aldh2-knockout and control mice, and we quantified the level of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage, especially N2-ethylidene-2’-deoxyguanosine (N2-ethylidene-dG), in the esophagus. In the model of oral ethanol administration, the esophageal N2-ethylidene-dG level was significantly higher in Aldh2-knockout mice compared with control mice. Similarly, in the model of intraperitoneal ethanol administration, in which the esophagus is not exposed directly to the alcohol solution, the esophageal N2-ethylidene-dG level was also elevated in Aldh2-knockout mice. This result indicates that circulating ethanol-derived acetaldehyde causes esophageal DNA damage, and that the extent of damage is influenced by knockout of Aldh2. Taken together, our findings strongly suggest the importance of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage which is induced in the esophagus of individuals with ALDH2 gene impairment. This provides a physiological basis for understanding alcohol-related esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:24959382

  17. Impairment of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 increases accumulation of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in the esophagus after ethanol ingestion.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Yoshiyuki; Ohashi, Shinya; Amanuma, Yusuke; Nakai, Yukie; Tsurumaki, Mihoko; Kikuchi, Osamu; Miyamoto, Shin'ichi; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Chiba, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Tomonari; Muto, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol and its metabolite, acetaldehyde, are the definite carcinogens for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), and reduced catalytic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), which detoxifies acetaldehyde, increases the risk for ESCC. However, it remains unknown whether the ALDH2 genotype influences the level of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in the esophagus after ethanol ingestion. In the present study, we administered ethanol orally or intraperitoneally to Aldh2-knockout and control mice, and we quantified the level of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage, especially N(2) -ethylidene-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2) -ethylidene-dG), in the esophagus. In the model of oral ethanol administration, the esophageal N(2) -ethylidene-dG level was significantly higher in Aldh2-knockout mice compared with control mice. Similarly, in the model of intraperitoneal ethanol administration, in which the esophagus is not exposed directly to the alcohol solution, the esophageal N(2) -ethylidene-dG level was also elevated in Aldh2-knockout mice. This result indicates that circulating ethanol-derived acetaldehyde causes esophageal DNA damage, and that the extent of damage is influenced by knockout of Aldh2. Taken together, our findings strongly suggest the importance of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage which is induced in the esophagus of individuals with ALDH2 gene impairment. This provides a physiological basis for understanding alcohol-related esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:24959382

  18. The activity of class I, II, III and IV of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Laniewska-Dunaj, Magdalena; Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Kochanowicz, Jan; Rutkowski, Robert; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2013-07-01

    The brain being highly sensitive to the action of alcohol is potentially susceptible to its carcinogenic effects. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are the main enzymes involved in ethanol metabolism, which leads to the generation of carcinogenic acetaldehyde. Human brain tissue contains various ADH isoenzymes and possess also ALDH activity. The purpose of this study was to compare the capacity for ethanol metabolism measured by ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity in cancer tissues and healthy brain cells. The samples were taken from 62 brain cancer patients (36 glioblastoma, 26 meningioma). For the measurement of the activity of class I and II ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity, the fluorometric methods were used. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by the photometric method. The total activity of ADH, and activity of class I ADH were significantly higher in cancer cells than in healthy tissues. The other tested classes of ADH and ALDH did not show statistically significant differences of activity in cancer and in normal cells. Analysis of the enzymes activity did not show significant differences depending on the location of the tumor. The differences in the activity of total alcohol dehydrogenase, and class I isoenzyme between cancer tissues and healthy brain cells might be a factor for metabolic changes and disturbances in low mature cancer cells and additionally might be a reason for higher level of acetaldehyde which can intensify the carcinogenesis.

  19. Ethanol and acetaldehyde differentially alter extracellular dopamine and serotonin in Aldh2-knockout mouse dorsal striatum: A reverse microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Mostofa; Ameno, Kiyoshi; Miki, Takanori; Tanaka, Naoko; Ito, Asuka; Ono, Junichiro; Takakura, Ayaka; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) seem to be involved in several of the effects of ethanol (EtOH). Acetaldehyde (AcH), especially in the brain, induces effects that mimic those of EtOH. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of local perfusion of EtOH and AcH on extracellular DA and 5-HT in the dorsal striatum of Aldh2-knockout (Aldh2-KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Aldh2-KO mice were used as a model of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 deficiency in humans to examine the effects of AcH. Mice were perfused with Ringer's solution (control), EtOH (100, 200, or 500mM) and AcH (100, 200, or 500μM) into the dorsal striatum. Dialysate samples were collected every 5min, and then analyzed with HPLC coupled to an ECD. We found that local perfusion with 500mM EtOH increased extracellular levels of DA (p<0.05) in both Aldh2-KO and WT mice, while 5-HT levels remain unchanged. EtOH at a dose of 200mM also increased DA in WT mice, but this was limited to a 30-40-min time-point. In contrast, perfusion with 200 and 500μM AcH decreased both DA and 5-HT (p<0.05) in Aldh2-KO mice, but this decrease was not found in WT mice at any AcH dose, indicating an effect of AcH on DA and 5-HT levels. There were no genotype effects on the basal levels of DA and 5-HT. These results indicate that high EtOH can stimulate DA, whereas high AcH can depress both DA and 5-HT in the dorsal striatum of mice. PMID:26711020

  20. Mining distinct aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) isoenzymes in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guan-Wu; Huang, Yi-Teng; Wu, Hua-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) consists of a family of intracellular enzymes, highly expressed in stem cells populations of leukemia and some solid tumors. Up to now, 6 isoforms of ALDH1 have been reported. However, the expression patterns and the identity of ALDH1 isoenzymes contributing to ALDH1 activity, as well as the prognostic values of ALDH1 isoenzymes in cancers all remain to be elucidated. Here, we studied the expressions of ALDH1 transcripts in gastric cancer (GC) compared with the normal controls using the ONCOMINE database. Through the Kaplan-Meier plotter database, which contains updated gene expression data and survival information of 876 GC patients, we also investigated the prognostic values of ALDH1 isoenzymes in GC patients. It was found that when compared with normal tissues, ALDH1A1 mRNA expression was downregulated, whereas ALDH1A3 and ALDH1B1 were upregulated in GC patients. In survival analyses, high ALDH1A1 and ALDH1B1 expressions were associated with better overall survival (OS) in all GC patients. In addition, high transcription activity of ALDH1A1 predicted better OS in gastric intestinal type adenocarcinoma, but not in diffuse gastric adenocarcinoma. GC patients with high mRNA level of ALDH1B1 showed better OS in gastric intestinal type, and worse OS in diffuse type. Oppositely, high transcription activities of ALDH1A2, ALDH1A3 and ALDH1L1 predicted worsen overall survival in GC patients, suggesting that these isoenzymes might be responsible mainly for the ALDH1 activities in GC. These data provides ALDH1A2, ALDH1A3 and ALDH1L1 as excellent potential targets for individualized treatment of GC patients. PMID:27015121

  1. Genome-Wide Identification and Functional Classification of Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH) Gene Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Valverde, Francisco J.; Robles-Bolivar, Paula; Lima-Cabello, Elena; Gachomo, Emma W.; Kotchoni, Simeon O.

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) is a protein superfamily that catalyzes the oxidation of aldehyde molecules into their corresponding non-toxic carboxylic acids, and responding to different environmental stresses, offering promising genetic approaches for improving plant adaptation. The aim of the current study is the functional analysis for systematic identification of S. lycopersicum ALDH gene superfamily. We performed genome-based ALDH genes identification and functional classification, phylogenetic relationship, structure and catalytic domains analysis, and microarray based gene expression. Twenty nine unique tomato ALDH sequences encoding 11 ALDH families were identified, including a unique member of the family 19 ALDH. Phylogenetic analysis revealed 13 groups, with a conserved relationship among ALDH families. Functional structure analysis of ALDH2 showed a catalytic mechanism involving Cys-Glu couple. However, the analysis of ALDH3 showed no functional gene duplication or potential neo-functionalities. Gene expression analysis reveals that particular ALDH genes might respond to wounding stress increasing the expression as ALDH2B7. Overall, this study reveals the complexity of S. lycopersicum ALDH gene superfamily and offers new insights into the structure-functional features and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants. The functional characterization of ALDHs is valuable and promoting molecular breeding in tomato for the improvement of stress tolerance and signaling. PMID:27755582

  2. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 2 associates with oxidation of methoxyacetaldehyde; in vitro analysis with liver subcellular fraction derived from human and Aldh2 gene targeting mouse.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, K; Kawamoto, T; Kunugita, N; Tsukiyama, T; Okamoto, K; Yoshida, A; Nakayama, K; Nakayama, K

    2000-07-01

    A principal pathway of 2-methoxyethanol (ME) metabolism is to the toxic oxidative product, methoxyacetaldehyde (MALD). To assess the role of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in MALD metabolism, in vitro MALD oxidation was examined with liver subcellular fractions from Japanese subjects who carried three different ALDH2 genotypes and Aldh2 knockout mice, which were generated in this study. The activity was distributed in mitochondrial fractions of ALDH2*1/*1 and wild type (Aldh2+/+) mice but not ALDH2*1/*2, *2/*2 subjects or Aldh2 homozygous mutant (Aldh2-/-) mice. These data suggest that ALDH2 is a key enzyme for MALD oxidation and ME susceptibility may be influenced by the ALDH2 genotype. PMID:10913633

  3. Biochemical characterization of a bifunctional acetaldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase purified from a facultative anaerobic bacterium Citrobacter sp. S-77.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Kohsei; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    Acetaldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) is a bifunctional enzyme consisting of two domains of an N-terminal acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and a C-terminal alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The enzyme is known to be important in the cellular alcohol metabolism. However, the role of coenzyme A-acylating ADHE responsible for ethanol production from acetyl-CoA remains uncertain. Here, we present the purification and biochemical characterization of an ADHE from Citrobacter sp. S-77 (ADHE(S77)). Interestingly, the ADHE(S77) was unable to be solubilized from membrane with detergents either 1% Triton X-100 or 1% Sulfobetaine 3-12. However, the enzyme was easily dissociated from membrane by high-salt buffers containing either 1.0 M NaCl or (NH(4))(2)SO(4) without detergents. The molecular weight of a native protein was estimated as approximately 400 kDa, consisting of four identical subunits of 96.3 kDa. Based on the specific activity and kinetic analysis, the ADHES77 tended to have catalytic reaction towards acetaldehyde elimination rather than acetaldehyde formation. Our experimental observation suggests that the ADHES77 may play a pivotal role in modulating intracellular acetaldehyde concentration.

  4. Ethanol- and acetaldehyde-induced cholinergic imbalance in the hippocampus of Aldh2-knockout mice does not affect nerve growth factor or brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Mostofa; Ameno, Kiyoshi; Ruby, Mostofa; Miki, Takanori; Tanaka, Naoko; Nakamura, Yu; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2013-11-20

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), play an important role in the maintenance of cholinergic-neuron function. The objective of this study was to investigate whether ethanol (EtOH)- and acetaldehyde (AcH)- induced cholinergic effects would cause neurotrophic alterations in the hippocampus of mice. We used Aldh2 knockout (Aldh2-KO) mice, a model of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2)-deficiency in humans, to examine the effects of acute administration of EtOH and the role of AcH. Hippocampal slices were collected and the mRNA and protein levels of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), NGF and BDNF were analyzed 30 min after the i.p. administration of EtOH (0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 g/kg). We show that treatment with 2.0 g/kg of EtOH decreased ChAT mRNA and protein levels in Aldh2-KO mice but not in wild-type (WT) mice, which suggests a role for AcH in the mechanism of action of EtOH. The administration of 2.0 g/kg of EtOH increased AChE mRNA in both strains of mice. EtOH failed to change the levels of NGF or BDNF at any dose. Aldh2-KO mice exhibited a distinctly lower expression of ChAT and a higher expression of NGF both at mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus compared with WT mice. Our observations suggest that administration of EtOH and elevated AcH can alter cholinergic markers in the hippocampus of mice, and this effect did not change the levels of NGF or BDNF. PMID:24096209

  5. Dual transcriptional control of the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene ald of Corynebacterium glutamicum by RamA and RamB.

    PubMed

    Auchter, Marc; Arndt, Annette; Eikmanns, Bernhard J

    2009-03-10

    Corynebacterium glutamicum has been shown to grow with ethanol as the sole or as additional carbon and energy source and accordingly, to possess both alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activities, which are responsible for the two-step ethanol oxidation to acetate. Here we identify and functionally analyze the C. glutamicum ALDH gene (cg3096, ald), its expression and its regulation. Directed inactivation of the chromosomal ald gene led to the absence of detectable ALDH activity and to the inability to grow on or to utilize ethanol, indicating that the ald gene product is essential for ethanol metabolism and that no ALDH isoenzymes are present in C. glutamicum. Transcriptional analysis revealed that ald from C. glutamicum is monocistronic, that ald transcription is initiated 92 nucleotides upstream of the translational start codon ATG and that ald expression is much lower in the presence of glucose in the growth medium. Further analysis revealed that transcription of the ald gene is under control of the transcriptional regulators RamA and RamB. Both these proteins directly bind to the respective promoter region, RamA is essential for expression and RamB exerts a slightly negative effect on ald expression on all carbon sources tested.

  6. Expression pattern, ethanol-metabolizing activities, and cellular localization of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases in human large bowel: association of the functional polymorphisms of ADH and ALDH genes with hemorrhoids and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chien-Ping; Jao, Shu-Wen; Lee, Shiao-Pieng; Chen, Pei-Chi; Chung, Chia-Chi; Lee, Shou-Lun; Nieh, Shin; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2012-02-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol. Functional polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2 genes occur among racial populations. The goal of this study was to systematically determine the functional expressions and cellular localization of ADHs and ALDHs in human rectal mucosa, the lesions of adenocarcinoma and hemorrhoid, and the genetic association of allelic variations of ADH and ALDH with large bowel disorders. Twenty-one surgical specimens of rectal adenocarcinoma and the adjacent normal mucosa, including 16 paired tissues of rectal tumor, normal mucosae of rectum and sigmoid colon from the same individuals, and 18 surgical mixed hemorrhoid specimens and leukocyte DNA samples from 103 colorectal cancer patients, 67 hemorrhoid patients, and 545 control subjects recruited in previous study, were investigated. The isozyme/allozyme expression patterns of ADH and ALDH were identified by isoelectric focusing and the activities were assayed spectrophotometrically. The protein contents of ADH/ALDH isozymes were determined by immunoblotting using the corresponding purified class-specific antibodies; the cellular activity and protein localizations were detected by immunohistochemistry and histochemistry, respectively. Genotypes of ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2 were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms. At 33mM ethanol, pH 7.5, the activity of ADH1C*1/1 phenotypes exhibited 87% higher than that of the ADH1C*1/*2 phenotypes in normal rectal mucosa. The activity of ALDH2-active phenotypes of rectal mucosa was 33% greater than ALDH2-inactive phenotypes at 200μM acetaldehyde. The protein contents in normal rectal mucosa were in the following order: ADH1>ALDH2>ADH3≈ALDH1A1, whereas those of ADH2, ADH4, and ALDH3A1 were fairly low. Both activity and content of ADH1 were significantly decreased in rectal tumors, whereas the ALDH activity remained

  7. Ethanol and Acetaldehyde After Intraperitoneal Administration to Aldh2-Knockout Mice-Reflection in Blood and Brain Levels.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Mostofa; Ameno, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Naoko; Ito, Asuka; Takakura, Ayaka; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, on the analysis of ethanol (EtOH) and acetaldehyde (AcH) concentrations in the blood and brains of Aldh2-knockout (Aldh2-KO) and C57B6/6J (WT) mice. Animals were administrated EtOH (1.0, 2.0 or 4.0 g/kg) or 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP, 82 mg/kg) plus AcH (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. During the blood tests, samples from the orbital sinus of the eye were collected. During the brain tests, dialysates were collected every 5 min (equal to a 15 µl sample) from the striatum using in vivo brain microdialysis. Samples were collected at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 60 min intervals post-EtOH and -AcH injection, and then analyzed by head-space GC. In the EtOH groups, high AcH levels were found in the blood and brains of Aldh2-KO mice, while only small traces of AcH were seen in the blood and brains of WT mice. No significant differences in EtOH levels were observed between the WT and the Aldh2-KO mice for either the EtOH dose. EtOH concentrations in the brain were comparable to the EtOH concentrations in the blood, but the AcH concentrations in the brain were four to five times lower compared to the AcH concentrations in the blood. In the AcH groups, high AcH levels were found in both WT and Aldh2-KO mice. Levels reached a sharp peak at 5 min and then quickly declined for 60 min. Brain AcH concentrations were almost equal to the concentrations found in the blood, where the AcH concentrations were approximately two times higher in the Aldh2-KO mice than in the WT mice, both in the blood and the brain. Our results suggest that systemic EtOH and AcH administration can cause a greater increase in AcH accumulation in the blood and brains of Aldh2-KO mice, where EtOH concentrations in the Aldh2-KO mice were comparable to the EtOH concentrations in the WT mice. Furthermore, detection of EtOH and AcH in the blood and brain was found to be dose-dependent in both genotypes. PMID:26646001

  8. Ethanol Metabolism by HeLa Cells Transduced with Human Alcohol Dehydrogenase Isoenzymes: Control of the Pathway by Acetaldehyde Concentration†

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Michinaga; Cyganek, Izabela; Sanghani, Paresh C.; Cho, Won Kyoo; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Human class I alcohol dehydrogenase 2 isoenzymes (encoded by the ADH1B locus) have large differences in kinetic properties; however, individuals inheriting the alleles for the different isoenzymes exhibit only small differences in alcohol elimination rates. This suggests that other cellular factors must regulate the activity of the isoenzymes. Methods The activity of the isoenzymes expressed from ADH1B*1, ADH1B*2, and ADH1B*3 cDNAs was examined in stably transduced HeLa cell lines, including lines which expressed human low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2). The ability of the cells to metabolize ethanol was compared with that of HeLa cells expressing rat class I ADH (HeLa-rat ADH cells), rat hepatoma (H4IIEC3) cells, and rat hepatocytes. Results The isoenzymes had similar protein half-lives in the HeLa cells. Rat hepatocytes, H4IIEC3 cells, and HeLa-rat ADH cells oxidized ethanol much faster than the cells expressing the ADH1B isoenzymes. This was not explained by high cellular NADH levels or endogenous inhibitors; but rather because the activity of the β1 and β2 ADHs were constrained by the accumulation of acetaldehyde, as shown by the increased rate of ethanol oxidation by cell lines expressing β2 ADH plus ALDH2. Conclusion The activity of the human β2 ADH isoenzyme is sensitive to inhibition by acetaldehyde, which likely limits its activity in vivo. This study emphasizes the importance of maintaining a low steady–state acetaldehyde concentration in hepatocytes during ethanol metabolism. PMID:21166830

  9. The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in the sera of patients with brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Laniewska-Dunaj, Magdalena; Orywal, Karolina; Kochanowicz, Jan; Rutkowski, Robert; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2014-12-01

    Human brain tissue contains various alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and possess also aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. In our last experiments we have shown that ADH and ALDH are present also in the brain tumour cells. Moreover the activities of total ADH and class I isoenzymes were significantly higher in cancer tissue than healthy cells. It can suggests that these changes may be reflected by enzyme activity in the serum of patients with brain cancer. Serum samples were taken for routine biochemical investigation from 62 patients suffering from brain cancer (36 glioblastoma, 26 meningioma). For the measurement of the activity of class I and II ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity, the fluorometric methods were used. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by the photometric method. A statistically significant increase of class I alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes was found in the sera of patients with brain cancer. The median activity of this class isoenzyme in the patients group increased about 24 % in the comparison to the control level. The total alcohol dehydrogenase activity was also significantly higher (26 %) among patients with brain tumour than healthy ones. The activities of other tested ADH isoenzymes and total ALDH were unchanged. The increase of the activity of total ADH and class I alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme in the sera of patients with brain cancer seems to be caused by the release of this isoenzyme from tumour's cells.

  10. Cloning and molecular evolution of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene (Aldh2) in bats (Chiroptera).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Shen, Bin; Zhang, Junpeng; Jones, Gareth; He, Guimei

    2013-02-01

    Old World fruit bats (Pteropodidae) and New World fruit bats (Phyllostomidae) ingest significant quantities of ethanol while foraging. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2, encoded by the Aldh2 gene) plays an important role in ethanol metabolism. To test whether the Aldh2 gene has undergone adaptive evolution in frugivorous and nectarivorous bats in relation to ethanol elimination, we sequenced part of the coding region of the gene (1,143 bp, ~73 % coverage) in 14 bat species, including three Old World fruit bats and two New World fruit bats. Our results showed that the Aldh2 coding sequences are highly conserved across all bat species we examined, and no evidence of positive selection was detected in the ancestral branches leading to Old World fruit bats and New World fruit bats. Further research is needed to determine whether other genes involved in ethanol metabolism have been the targets of positive selection in frugivorous and nectarivorous bats.

  11. Tryptophan in Alcoholism Treatment I:  Kynurenine Metabolites Inhibit the Rat Liver Mitochondrial Low Km Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity, Elevate Blood Acetaldehyde Concentration and Induce Aversion to Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Abdulla A.-B.; Bano, Samina; Steptoe, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Aims: The aims were to provide proofs of mechanism and principle by establishing the ability of kynurenine metabolites to inhibit the liver mitochondrial low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity after administration and in vivo, and to induce aversion to alcohol. Methods: Kynurenic acid (KA), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HAA) were administered to normal male Wistar rats and ALDH activity was determined both in vitro in liver homogenates and in vivo (by measuring blood acetaldehyde following ethanol administration). Alcohol consumption was studied in an aversion model in rats and in alcohol-preferring C57 mice. Results: ALDH activity was significantly inhibited by all three metabolites by doses as small as 1 mg/kg body wt. Blood acetaldehyde accumulation after ethanol administration was strongly elevated by KA and 3-HK and to a lesser extent by 3-HAA. All three metabolites induced aversion to alcohol in rats and decreased alcohol preference in mice. Conclusions: The above kynurenine metabolites of tryptophan induce aversion to alcohol by inhibiting ALDH activity. An intellectual property covering the use of 3-HK and 3-HAA and derivatives thereof in the treatment of alcoholism by aversion awaits further development. PMID:21896552

  12. Impact of chronic low to moderate alcohol consumption on blood lipid and heart energy profile in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fan; Cao, Quan; Wang, Cong; Ma, Xin; Shen, Cheng; Liu, Xiang-wei; Bu, Li-ping; Zou, Yun-zeng; Hu, Kai; Sun, Ai-jun; Ge, Jun-bo

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the roles of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), the key enzyme of ethanol metabolism, in chronic low to moderate alcohol consumption-induced heart protective effects in mice. Methods: Twenty-one male wild-type (WT) or ALDH2-knockout (KO) mice were used in this study. In each genotype, 14 animals received alcohol (2.5%, 5% and 10% in week 1–3, respectively, and 18% in week 4–7), and 7 received water for 7 weeks. After the treatments, survival rate and general characteristics of the animals were evaluated. Serum ethanol and acetaldehyde levels and blood lipids were measured. Metabolomics was used to characterize the heart and serum metabolism profiles. Results: Chronic alcohol intake decreased the survival rate of KO mice by 50%, and significantly decreased their body weight, but did not affect those of WT mice. Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased the serum ethanol levels in both WT and KO mice, but KO mice had significantly higher serum acetaldehyde levels than WT mice. Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased the serum HDL cholesterol levels in WT mice, and did not change the serum HDL cholesterol levels in KO mice. After chronic alcohol intake, WT and KO mice showed differential heart and serum metabolism profiles, including the 3 main energy substrate types (lipids, glucose and amino acids) and three carboxylic acid cycles. Conclusion: Low to moderate alcohol consumption increases HDL cholesterol levels and improves heart energy metabolism profile in WT mice but not in ALDH2-KO mice. Thus, preserved ALDH2 function is essential for the protective effect of low to moderate alcohol on the cardiovascular system. PMID:24998256

  13. Assignment of ALDH3 to human chromosome 17p11.2 and ALDH5 to human chromosome 9p13

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraoka, L.R.; Hsu, L.; Hsieh, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases are a group of enzymes responsible for catalyzing the conversion of numerous aldehydes to their corresponding acids. These enzymes play a major role in the detoxification of alcohol-derived acetaldehydes and in the metabolism of corticosteroids, biogenic amines, neurotransmitters, and lipid peroxidation. ALDH activities are found in most tissues, with the highest activity in the liver. Five human liver ALDH isozymes, ALDH1, 2, 3, 4, and {gamma}-butyrylaldehyde dehydrogenase ({gamma}-ABDH), have been purified and characterized, and one isozyme, ALDH5, has been identified by using a 29-nucleotide probe that is conserved in ALDH1 and ALDH2 for cDNA library screening. Several other isozymes from other tissues have also been reported. Genes for ALDH3 and ALDH5 have been previously localized to chromosomes 17 and 9, respectively. Here we report the regional assignment of these two loci. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily in plants: gene nomenclature and comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Brocker, Chad; Vasiliou, Melpomene; Carpenter, Sarah; Carpenter, Christopher; Zhang, Yucheng; Wang, Xiping; Kotchoni, Simeon O; Wood, Andrew J; Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Kopečný, David; Nebert, Daniel W; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of completely sequenced plant genomes. The comparison of fully sequenced genomes allows for identification of new gene family members, as well as comprehensive analysis of gene family evolution. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily comprises a group of enzymes involved in the NAD(+)- or NADP(+)-dependent conversion of various aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. ALDH enzymes are involved in processing many aldehydes that serve as biogenic intermediates in a wide range of metabolic pathways. In addition, many of these enzymes function as 'aldehyde scavengers' by removing reactive aldehydes generated during the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. Plants and animals share many ALDH families, and many genes are highly conserved between these two evolutionarily distinct groups. Conversely, both plants and animals also contain unique ALDH genes and families. Herein we carried out genome-wide identification of ALDH genes in a number of plant species-including Arabidopsis thaliana (thale crest), Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (unicellular algae), Oryza sativa (rice), Physcomitrella patens (moss), Vitis vinifera (grapevine) and Zea mays (maize). These data were then combined with previous analysis of Populus trichocarpa (poplar tree), Selaginella moellindorffii (gemmiferous spikemoss), Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) and Volvox carteri (colonial algae) for a comprehensive evolutionary comparison of the plant ALDH superfamily. As a result, newly identified genes can be more easily analyzed and gene names can be assigned according to current nomenclature guidelines; our goal is to clarify previously confusing and conflicting names and classifications that might confound results and prevent accurate comparisons between studies. PMID:23007552

  15. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily in plants: gene nomenclature and comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Brocker, Chad; Vasiliou, Melpomene; Carpenter, Sarah; Carpenter, Christopher; Zhang, Yucheng; Wang, Xiping; Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Wood, Andrew J.; Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Kopečný, David; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of completely sequenced plant genomes. The comparison of fully sequenced genomes allows for identification of new gene family members, as well as comprehensive analysis of gene family evolution. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily comprises a group of enzymes involved in the NAD+- or NADP+-dependent conversion of various aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. ALDH enzymes are involved in processing many aldehydes that serve as biogenic intermediates in a wide range of metabolic pathways. In addition, many of these enzymes function as ‘aldehyde scavengers’ by removing reactive aldehydes generated during the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. Plants and animals share many ALDH families, and many genes are highly conserved between these two evolutionarily distinct groups. Conversely, both plants and animals also contain unique ALDH genes and families. Herein we carried outgenome-wide identification of ALDH genes in a number of plant species—including Arabidopsis thaliana (thale crest), Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (unicellular algae), Oryza sativa (rice), Physcomitrella patens (moss), Vitis vinifera (grapevine) and Zea mays (maize). These data were then combined with previous analysis of Populus trichocarpa (poplar tree), Selaginella moellindorffii (gemmiferous spikemoss), Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) and Volvox carteri (colonial algae) for a comprehensive evolutionary comparison of the plant ALDH superfamily. As a result, newly identified genes can be more easily analyzed and gene names can be assigned according to current nomenclature guidelines; our goal is to clarify previously confusing and conflicting names and classifications that might confound results and prevent accurate comparisons between studies. PMID:23007552

  16. Discovery of NCT-501, a Potent and Selective Theophylline-Based Inhibitor of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1).

    PubMed

    Yang, Shyh-Ming; Yasgar, Adam; Miller, Bettina; Lal-Nag, Madhu; Brimacombe, Kyle; Hu, Xin; Sun, Hongmao; Wang, Amy; Xu, Xin; Nguyen, Kimloan; Oppermann, Udo; Ferrer, Marc; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Maloney, David J

    2015-08-13

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize reactive aldehydes and possess important physiological and toxicological functions in areas such as CNS, metabolic disorders, and cancers. Increased ALDH (e.g., ALDH1A1) gene expression and catalytic activity are vital biomarkers in a number of malignancies and cancer stem cells, highlighting the need for the identification and development of small molecule ALDH inhibitors. A new series of theophylline-based analogs as potent ALDH1A1 inhibitors is described. The optimization of hits identified from a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) campaign led to analogs with improved potency and early ADME properties. This chemotype exhibits highly selective inhibition against ALDH1A1 over ALDH3A1, ALDH1B1, and ALDH2 isozymes as well as other dehydrogenases such as HPGD and HSD17β4. Moreover, the pharmacokinetic evaluation of selected analog 64 (NCT-501) is also highlighted. PMID:26207746

  17. Discovery of NCT-501, a Potent and Selective Theophylline-Based Inhibitor of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1).

    PubMed

    Yang, Shyh-Ming; Yasgar, Adam; Miller, Bettina; Lal-Nag, Madhu; Brimacombe, Kyle; Hu, Xin; Sun, Hongmao; Wang, Amy; Xu, Xin; Nguyen, Kimloan; Oppermann, Udo; Ferrer, Marc; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Maloney, David J

    2015-08-13

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize reactive aldehydes and possess important physiological and toxicological functions in areas such as CNS, metabolic disorders, and cancers. Increased ALDH (e.g., ALDH1A1) gene expression and catalytic activity are vital biomarkers in a number of malignancies and cancer stem cells, highlighting the need for the identification and development of small molecule ALDH inhibitors. A new series of theophylline-based analogs as potent ALDH1A1 inhibitors is described. The optimization of hits identified from a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) campaign led to analogs with improved potency and early ADME properties. This chemotype exhibits highly selective inhibition against ALDH1A1 over ALDH3A1, ALDH1B1, and ALDH2 isozymes as well as other dehydrogenases such as HPGD and HSD17β4. Moreover, the pharmacokinetic evaluation of selected analog 64 (NCT-501) is also highlighted.

  18. The diagnostic value of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) measurement in the sera of gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Laniewska, Magdalena; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2010-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are present in gastric cancer cells (GC). Moreover, the activity of total ADH and class IV isoenzymes is significantly higher in cancer tissue than in healthy mucosa. The activity of these enzymes in cancer cells is probably reflected in the sera and could thus be helpful for diagnostics of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential role of ADH and ALDH as tumor markers for gastric cancer. We defined diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, predictive value for positive and negative results, and receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve for tested enzymes. Serum samples were taken from 168 patients with gastric cancer before treatment and from 168 control subjects. Total ADH activity and class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by photometric but ALDH activity and ADH I and II by the fluorometric method, with class-specific fluorogenic substrates. There was significant increase in the activity of ADH IV isoenzyme and ADH total in the sera of gastric cancer patients compared to the control. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH IV was 73%, specificity 79%, positive and negative predictive values were 81 and 72% respectively. Area under ROC curve for ADH IV was 0.67. The results suggest a potential role for ADH IV as marker of gastric cancer.

  19. The polymorphism in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene, causing a substitution of Glu > Lys(504), is not associated with coronary atherosclerosis severity in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Chen, Yu-Guo; Geng, Yong-Jian; Zhang, He; Jiang, Chun-Xiao; Sun, Yi; Li, Rui-Jian; Sagar, Madi Bidya; Xue, Li; Zhang, Yun

    2007-11-01

    Alcohol consumption has an important effect on coronary atherosclerotic heart disease (CAD). Acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a key enzyme in alcohol metabolism. A G-to-A missense mutation of ALDH2 gene, which causes a Glu > Lys(504) substitution, was recently shown to be associated with carotid atherosclerosis; however, its relationship with coronary atherosclerosis has not been well studied. We, therefore, investigated this relationship in Han Chinese. There are two ALDH2 alleles (1 and 2) and their combination: 1/1 (GG, typical homozygote), 1/2 (GA, heterozygote) and 2/2 (AA, atypical homozygote) in the population. Successive Han Chinese, including 89 with myocardial infarction (MI) and 142 with unstable angina, were recruited, and underwent coronary angiography and gene sequencing. Coronary atherosclerosis severity was expressed by the number of lesioned coronary arteries (>or=50% diameter stenosis) and Gensini score, calculated based on the luminal narrowing degree and its geographic importance, as assessed by angiography. Based on their ALDH2 genotypes, the 231 patients were divided into wild-type (1/1, n = 145) and mutation groups (1/2 and 2/2, n = 86). There were no significant differences in basic clinical data between the two groups; however, the mutation group had significantly higher rates of diabetes mellitus and MI, and lower prevalence of alcohol consumption than wild-type group. Yet, the two groups were not significantly different in coronary atherosclerosis severity. Multiple regression analysis has shown that the ALDH2 genotype 1/2 or 2/2 is an independent risk factor for MI, but is not associated with coronary atherosclerosis severity in Han Chinese. PMID:17984618

  20. Acetaldehyde

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetaldehyde ; CASRN 75 - 07 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  1. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 7A1 (ALDH7A1) attenuates reactive aldehyde and oxidative stress induced cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Brocker, Chad; Cantore, Miriam; Failli, Paola; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian aldehyde dehydrogenase 7A1 (ALDH7A1) is homologous to plant ALDH7B1 which protects against various forms of stress such as increased salinity, dehydration and treatment with oxidants or pesticides. Deleterious mutations in human ALDH7A1 are responsible for pyridoxine-dependent and folinic acid-responsive seizures. In previous studies, we have shown that human ALDH7A1 protects against hyperosmotic stress presumably through the generation of betaine, an important cellular osmolyte, formed from betaine aldehyde. Hyperosmotic stress is coupled to an increase in oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation (LPO). In this study, cell viability assays revealed that stable expression of mitochondrial ALDH7A1 in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells provides significant protection against treatment with the LPO-derived aldehydes hexanal and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE) implicating a protective function for the enzyme during oxidative stress. A significant increase in cell survival was also observed in CHO cells expressing either mitochondrial or cytosolic ALDH7A1 treated with increasing concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or 4HNE, providing further evidence for anti-oxidant activity. In vitro enzyme activity assays indicate that human ALDH7A1 is sensitive to oxidation and that efficiency can be at least partially restored by incubating recombinant protein with the thiol reducing agent β-mercaptoethanol (BME). We also show that after reactivation with BME, recombinant ALDH7A1 is capable of metabolizing the reactive aldehyde 4HNE. In conclusion, ALDH7A1 mechanistically appears to provide cells protection through multiple pathways including the removal of toxic LPO-derived aldehydes in addition to osmolyte generation. PMID:21338592

  2. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) rescues myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury: role of autophagy paradox and toxic aldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Heng; Guo, Rui; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Yingmei; Ren, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Aims The present study was designed to examine the mechanism involved in mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2)-induced cardioprotection against ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury with a focus on autophagy. Methods Wild-type (WT), ALDH2 overexpression, and knockout (KO) mice (n = 4–6 for each index measured) were subjected to I/R, and myocardial function was assessed using echocardiographic, Langendroff, and edge-detection systems. Western blotting was used to evaluate AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK), Akt, autophagy, and the AMPK/Akt upstream signalling LKB1 and PTEN. Results ALDH2 overexpression and KO significantly attenuated and accentuated, respectively, infarct size, factional shortening, and recovery of post-ischaemic left ventricular function following I/R as well as hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction. Autophagy was induced during ischaemia and remained elevated during reperfusion. ALDH2 significantly promoted autophagy during ischaemia, which was accompanied by AMPK activation and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition. On the contrary, ALDH2 overtly inhibited autophagy during reperfusion accompanied by the activation of Akt and mTOR. Inhibition and induction of autophagy mitigated ALDH2-induced protection against cell death in hypoxia and reoxygenation, respectively. In addition, levels of the endogenous toxic aldehyde 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) were elevated by ischaemia and reperfusion, which was abrogated by ALDH2. Furthermore, ALDH2 ablated 4-HNE-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction and protein damage, whereas 4-HNE directly decreased pan and phosphorylated LKB1 and PTEN expression. Conclusion Our data suggest a myocardial protective effect of ALDH2 against I/R injury possibly through detoxification of toxic aldehyde and a differential regulation of autophagy through AMPK- and Akt-mTOR signalling during ischaemia and reperfusion, respectively. PMID:20705694

  3. Genome-wide identification and analysis of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily in apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqin; Guo, Rongrong; Li, Jun; Singer, Stacy D; Zhang, Yucheng; Yin, Xiangjing; Zheng, Yi; Fan, Chonghui; Wang, Xiping

    2013-10-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) represent a protein superfamily encoding NAD(P)(+)-dependent enzymes that oxidize a wide range of endogenous and exogenous aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes. In plants, they are involved in many biological processes and play a role in the response to environmental stress. In this study, a total of 39 ALDH genes from ten families were identified in the apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) genome. Synteny analysis of the apple ALDH (MdALDH) genes indicated that segmental and tandem duplications, as well as whole genome duplications, have likely contributed to the expansion and evolution of these gene families in apple. Moreover, synteny analysis between apple and Arabidopsis demonstrated that several MdALDH genes were found in the corresponding syntenic blocks of Arabidopsis, suggesting that these genes appeared before the divergence of lineages that led to apple and Arabidopsis. In addition, phylogenetic analysis, as well as comparisons of exon-intron and protein structures, provided further insight into both their evolutionary relationships and their putative functions. Tissue-specific expression analysis of the MdALDH genes demonstrated diverse spatiotemporal expression patterns, while their expression profiles under abiotic stress and various hormone treatments indicated that many MdALDH genes were responsive to high salinity and drought, as well as different plant hormones. This genome-wide identification, as well as characterization of evolutionary relationships and expression profiles, of the apple MdALDH genes will not only be useful for the further analysis of ALDH genes and their roles in stress response, but may also aid in the future improvement of apple stress tolerance.

  4. Eukaryotic aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes: human polymorphisms, and recommended nomenclature based on divergent evolution and chromosomal mapping.

    PubMed

    Vasiliou, V; Bairoch, A; Tipton, K F; Nebert, D W

    1999-08-01

    As currently being performed with an increasing number of superfamilies, a standardized gene nomenclature system is proposed here, based on divergent evolution, using multiple alignment analysis of all 86 eukaryotic aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) amino-acid sequences known at this time. The ALDHs represent a superfamily of NAD(P)(+)-dependent enzymes having similar primary structures that oxidize a wide spectrum of endogenous and exogenous aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes. To date, a total of 54 animal, 15 plant, 14 yeast, and three fungal ALDH genes or cDNAs have been sequenced. These ALDHs can be divided into a total of 18 families (comprising 37 subfamilies), and all nonhuman ALDH genes are named here after the established human ALDH genes, when possible. An ALDH protein from one gene family is defined as having approximately < or = 40% amino-acid identity to that from another family. Two members of the same subfamily exhibit approximately > or = 60% amino-acid identity and are expected to be located at the same subchromosomal site. For naming each gene, it is proposed that the root symbol 'ALDH' denoting 'aldehyde dehydrogenase' be followed by an Arabic number representing the family and, when needed, a letter designating the subfamily and an Arabic number denoting the individual gene within the subfamily; all letters are capitalized in all mammals except mouse and fruit fly, e.g. 'human ALDH3A1 (mouse, Drosophila Aldh3a1).' It is suggested that the Human Gene Nomenclature Guidelines (http://++www.gene.ucl.ac.uk/nomenclature/guidelines.h tml) be used for all species other than mouse and Drosophila. Following these guidelines, the gene is italicized, whereas the corresponding cDNA, mRNA, protein or enzyme activity is written with upper-case letters and without italics, e.g. 'human, mouse or Drosophila ALDH3A1 cDNA, mRNA, or activity'. If an orthologous gene between species cannot be identified with certainty, sequential naming of these genes will be carried out

  5. Contribution of ALDH2 polymorphism to alcoholism-associated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nan; Zhang, Yingmei; Nair, Sreejayan; Culver, Bruce W; Ren, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcohol intake is considered as an independent lifestyle factor that may influence the risk of a number of cardiovascular anomalies including hypertension. In healthy adults, binge drinking and chronic alcohol ingestion lead to the onset and development of hypertension although the precise mechanism(s) remains obscure. Although oxidative stress and endothelial injury have been postulated to play a major contributing role to alcoholism-induced hypertension, recent evidence depicted a rather unique role for the genotype of the acetaldehyde-metabolizing enzyme mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2), which is mainly responsible for detoxifying ethanol consumed, in alcoholism-induced elevation of blood pressure. Genetic polymorphism of ALDH2 in human results in altered ethanol pharmacokinetic properties and ethanol metabolism, leading to accumulation of the ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde following alcohol intake. The unfavorable consequence of the ALDH2 variants is believed to be governed by the accumulation of the ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde. Presence of the mutant or inactive ALDH2*2 gene often results in an increased risk of hypertension in human. Such association between blood pressure and ALDH2 enzymatic activity may be affected by the interplay between gene and environment, such as life style and ethnicity. The aim of this mini-review is to summarize the possible contribution of ALDH2 genetic polymorphism in the onset and development of alcoholism-related development of hypertension. Furthermore, the double-edged sword of ALDH2 gene and genetic polymorphism in alcoholism and alcoholic tissue damage and relevant patents will be discussed.

  6. Gene specific modifications unravel ethanol and acetaldehyde actions

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Yedy; Rivera-Meza, Mario; Karahanian, Eduardo; Quintanilla, María E.; Tampier, Lutske; Morales, Paola; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is metabolized into acetaldehyde mainly by the action of alcohol dehydrogenase in the liver, while mainly by the action of catalase in the brain. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 metabolizes acetaldehyde into acetate in both organs. Gene specific modifications reviewed here show that an increased liver generation of acetaldehyde (by transduction of a gene coding for a high-activity liver alcohol dehydrogenase ADH1*B2) leads to increased blood acetaldehyde levels and aversion to ethanol in animals. Similarly aversive is an increased acetaldehyde level resulting from the inhibition of liver aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) synthesis (by an antisense coding gene against aldh2 mRNA). The situation is diametrically different when acetaldehyde is generated in the brain. When the brain ventral tegmental area (VTA) is endowed with an increased ability to generate acetaldehyde (by transfection of liver rADH) the reinforcing effects of ethanol are increased, while a highly specific inhibition of catalase synthesis (by transduction of a shRNA anti catalase mRNA) virtually abolishes the reinforcing effects of ethanol as seen by a complete abolition of ethanol intake in rats bred for generations as high ethanol drinkers. Data shows two divergent effects of increases in acetaldehyde generation: aversive in the periphery but reinforcing in the brain. PMID:23847486

  7. Pepper aldehyde dehydrogenase CaALDH1 interacts with Xanthomonas effector AvrBsT and promotes effector-triggered cell death and defence responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas type III effector AvrBsT induces hypersensitive cell death and defence responses in pepper (Capsicum annuum) and Nicotiana benthamiana. Little is known about the host factors that interact with AvrBsT. Here, we identified pepper aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (CaALDH1) as an AvrBsT-interacting protein. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the interaction between CaALDH1 and AvrBsT in planta. CaALDH1:smGFP fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm. CaALDH1 expression in pepper was rapidly and strongly induced by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) Ds1 (avrBsT) infection. Transient co-expression of CaALDH1 with avrBsT significantly enhanced avrBsT-triggered cell death in N. benthamiana leaves. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity was higher in leaves transiently expressing CaALDH1, suggesting that CaALDH1 acts as a cell death enhancer, independently of AvrBsT. CaALDH1 silencing disrupted phenolic compound accumulation, H2O2 production, defence response gene expression, and cell death during avirulent Xcv Ds1 (avrBsT) infection. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana overexpressing CaALDH1 exhibited enhanced defence response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. These results indicate that cytoplasmic CaALDH1 interacts with AvrBsT and promotes plant cell death and defence responses. PMID:25873668

  8. High ethanol and acetaldehyde impair spatial memory in mouse models: opposite effects of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and apolipoprotein E on memory.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Mostofa; Ameno, Kiyoshi; Miki, Takanori; Tanaka, Naoko; Ono, Junichiro; Shirakami, Gotaro; Sultana, Ruby; Yu, Nakamura; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 deficiency may directly contribute to excess acetaldehyde (AcH) accumulation after ethanol (EtOH) drinking and AcH mediates some of the behavioral effects of EtOH. Apolipoprotein E has been suggested to be involved in the alteration of attention and memory. We have chosen Aldh2-knockout (Aldh2-KO), ApoE-KO, and their wild-type (WT) control mice to examine the effects of EtOH and AcH on spatial memory and to compare the possible relationship between genetic deficiency and memory using two behavioral assessments. Mice were trained for 4 days, with EtOH (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 g/kg) being given intraperitoneally on day 4. A probe trial was given on day 5 in the non-EtOH state in the Morris water maze (MWM). The results showed that 2.0 g/kg EtOH increased errors, indicating memory impairment on the eight-arm radial maze (RAM) for all the mice studied. One gram per kilogram EtOH impaired the performance of Aldh2-KO and ApoE-KO mice, but not WT mice. We found similar effects of EtOH on the MWM performance, with 2.0 g/kg EtOH increasing the latencies. One gram per kilogram EtOH increased the latencies of Aldh2-KO and WT mice, but not ApoE-KO mice. The 2.0 g/kg EtOH-induced memory impairment in Aldh2-KO mice was greater, suggesting an AcH effect. Furthermore, time spent on the probe trial was shorter in mice that had previously received 2.0 g/kg EtOH. ApoE-KO mice learned more slowly, while Aldh2-KO mice learned more quickly. Both the RAM and MWM results suggest that high EtOH and AcH impair spatial memory in mice, while lower doses do not have consistent memory effects. In addition, we conclude that genetic differences might underlie some of EtOH's effects on memory.

  9. Inactivation of cytosolic aldehyde dehydrogenase via-nitrosylation in ethanol-exposed rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2009-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) isozymes are critically important in the metabolism of acetaldehyde, thus preventing its accumulation after ethanol exposure. We previously reported that mitochondrial ALDH2 could be inactivated via -nitrosylation in ethanol-exposed rats. This study was aimed at investigating whether cytosolic ALDH1, with a relatively low- value (11–18 μM) for acetaldehyde, could be also inhibited in ethanol-exposed rats. Chronic or binge ethanol exposure significantly decreased ALDH1 activity, which was restored by addition of dithiothreitol. Immunoblot analysis with the anti--nitroso-Cys antibody showed one immunoreactive band in the immunoprecipiated ALDH1 only from ethanol-exposed rats, but not from pair-fed controls, suggesting -nitrosylation of ALDH1. Therefore inactivation of ALDH1 via -nitrosylation can result in accumulation of acetaldehyde upon ethanol exposure. PMID:17673211

  10. Development of Selective Inhibitors for Human Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 3A1 (ALDH3A1) for the Enhancement of Cyclophosphamide Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Bibek; Georgiadis, Taxiarchis M.; Fishel, Melissa L.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1 (ALDH3A1) plays an important role in many cellular oxidative processes, including cancer chemo-resistance by metabolizing activated forms of oxazaphosphorine drugs such as cyclophosphamide (CP) and its analogues such as mafosfamide (MF), ifosfamide (IFM), 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-HPCP). Compounds that can selectively target ALDH3A1 may permit delineation of its roles in these processes and could restore chemosensitivity in cancer cells that express this isoenzyme. Here we report the detailed kinetic and structural characterization of an ALDH3A1 selective inhibitor, CB29, previously identified in a high throughput screen. Kinetic and crystallographic studies demonstrate that CB29 binds within the aldehyde substrate-binding site of ALDH3A1. Cellular proliferation of ALDH3A1-expressing lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and glioblastoma (SF767) cell lines, as well as the ALDH3A1 non-expressing lung fibroblast cells, CCD-13Lu, is unaffected by treatment with CB29 and its analogues alone. However, the sensitivity toward the anti-proliferative effects of mafosfamide is enhanced by treatment with CB29 and its analogue in the tumour cells. In contrast, the sensitivity of CCD-13Lu cells toward mafosfamide was unaffected by the addition of these same compounds. CB29 is chemically distinct from the previously reported small molecule inhibitors of ALDH isoenzymes and does not inhibit ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, ALDH1A3, ALDH1B1 or ALDH2 isoenzymes at concentrations up to 250 μM. Thus, CB29 is a novel small molecule inhibitor of ALDH3A1, which may be useful as a chemical tool to delineate the role of ALDH3A1 in numerous metabolic pathways, including sensitizing ALDH3A1-positive cancer cells to oxazaphosphorines. PMID:24677340

  11. In vitro expression of Candida albicans alcohol dehydrogenase genes involved in acetaldehyde metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bakri, M M; Rich, A M; Cannon, R D; Holmes, A R

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol consumption is a risk factor for oral cancer, possibly via its conversion to acetaldehyde, a known carcinogen. The oral commensal yeast Candida albicans may be one of the agents responsible for this conversion intra-orally. The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) family of enzymes are involved in acetaldehyde metabolism in yeast but, for C. albicans it is not known which family member is responsible for the conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde. In this study we determined the expression of mRNAs from three C. albicans Adh genes (CaADH1, CaADH2 and CaCDH3) for cells grown in different culture media at different growth phases by Northern blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. CaADH1 was constitutively expressed under all growth conditions but there was differential expression of CaADH2. CaADH3 expression was not detected. To investigate whether CaAdh1p or CaAdh2p can contribute to alcohol catabolism in C. albicans, each gene from the reference strain C. albicans SC5314 was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cell extracts from an CaAdh1p-expressing S. cerevisiae recombinant, but not an CaAdh2p-expressing recombinant, or an empty vector control strain, possessed ethanol-utilizing Adh activity above endogenous S. cerevisiae activity. Furthermore, expression of C. albicans Adh1p in a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain in which the endogenous ScADH2 gene (known to convert ethanol to acetaldehyde in this yeast) had been deleted, conferred an NAD-dependent ethanol-utilizing, and so acetaldehyde-producing, Adh activity. We conclude that CaAdh1p is the enzyme responsible for ethanol use under in vitro growth conditions, and may contribute to the intra-oral production of acetaldehyde.

  12. Structural Studies of Yeast Δ1-Pyrroline-5-carboxylate Dehydrogenase (ALDH4A1): Active Site Flexibility and Oligomeric State

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The proline catabolic enzyme Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (ALDH4A1) catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of γ-glutamate semialdehyde to l-glutamate. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ALDH4A1 is encoded by the PUT2 gene and known as Put2p. Here we report the steady-state kinetic parameters of the purified recombinant enzyme, two crystal structures of Put2p, and the determination of the oligomeric state and quaternary structure from small-angle X-ray scattering and sedimentation velocity. Using Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate as the substrate, catalytic parameters kcat and Km were determined to be 1.5 s–1 and 104 μM, respectively, with a catalytic efficiency of 14000 M–1 s–1. Although Put2p exhibits the expected aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily fold, a large portion of the active site is disordered in the crystal structure. Electron density for the 23-residue aldehyde substrate-binding loop is absent, implying substantial conformational flexibility in solution. We furthermore report a new crystal form of human ALDH4A1 (42% identical to Put2p) that also shows disorder in this loop. The crystal structures provide evidence of multiple active site conformations in the substrate-free form of the enzyme, which is consistent with a conformational selection mechanism of substrate binding. We also show that Put2p forms a trimer-of-dimers hexamer in solution. This result is unexpected because human ALDH4A1 is dimeric, whereas some bacterial ALDH4A1s are hexameric. Thus, global sequence identity and domain of life are poor predictors of the oligomeric states of ALDH4A1. Mutation of a single Trp residue that forms knob-in-hole interactions across the dimer–dimer interface abrogates hexamer formation, suggesting that this residue is the center of a protein–protein association hot spot. PMID:24502590

  13. DNA repair mutant pso2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is sensitive to intracellular acetaldehyde accumulated by disulfiram-mediated inhibition of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Brendel, M; Marisco, G; Ganda, I; Wolter, R; Pungartnik, C

    2010-01-12

    Blocking aldehyde dehydrogenase with the drug disulfiram leads to an accumulation of intracellular acetaldehyde, which negatively affects the viability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutants of the yeast gene PSO2, which encodes a protein specific for repair of DNA interstrand cross-links, showed higher sensitivity to disulfiram compared to the wild type. This leads us to suggest that accumulated acetaldehyde induces DNA lesions, including highly deleterious interstrand cross-links. Acetaldehyde induced the expression of a PSO2-lacZ reporter construct that is specifically inducible by bi- or poly-functional mutagens, e.g., nitrogen mustard and photo-activated psoralens. Chronic exposure of yeast cells to disulfiram and acute exposure to acetaldehyde induced forward mutagenesis in the yeast CAN1 gene. Disulfiram-induced mutability of a pso2Delta mutant was significantly increased over that of the isogenic wild type; however, this was not found for acetaldehyde-induced mutagenesis. Spontaneous mutability at the CAN1 locus was elevated in pso2Delta, suggesting that growth of glucose-repressed yeast produces DNA lesions that, in the absence of Pso2p-mediated crosslink repair, are partially removed by an error-prone DNA repair mechanism. The use of disulfiram in the control of human alcohol abuse increases cellular acetaldehyde pools, which, based on our observations, enhances the risk of mutagenesis and of other genetic damage.

  14. Biochemical genetics of opossum aldehyde dehydrogenase 3: evidence for three ALDH3A-like genes and an ALDH3B-like gene.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Roger S

    2010-04-01

    Mammalian ALDH3 isozymes participate in peroxidic and fatty aldehyde metabolism, and in anterior eye tissue UV-filtration. BLAT analyses were undertaken of the opossum genome using rat ALDH3A1, ALDH3A2, ALDH3B1, and ALDH3B2 amino acid sequences. Two predicted opossum ALDH3A1-like genes and an ALDH3A2-like gene were observed on chromosome 2, as well as an ALDH3B-like gene, which showed similar intron-exon boundaries with other mammalian ALDH3-like genes. Opossum ALDH3 subunit sequences and structures were highly conserved, including residues previously shown to be involved in catalysis and coenzyme binding for rat ALDH3A1. Eleven glycine residues were conserved for all of the opossum ALDH3-like sequences examined, including two glycine residues previously located within the stem of the rat ALDH3A1 active site funnel. Phylogeny studies of human, rat, opossum, and chicken ALDH3-like sequences indicated that the common ancestor for ALDH3A- and ALDH3B-like genes predates the appearance of birds during vertebrate evolution.

  15. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) Polymorphism and the Risk of Alcoholic Liver Cirrhosis among East Asians: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Lei; Luo, Hesheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene has been implicated in the development of alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC) in East Asians. However, the results are inconsistent. In this study, a meta-analysis was performed to assess the associations between the ALDH2 polymorphism and the risk of ALC. Materials and Methods Relevant studies were retrieved by searching PubMed, Web of Science, CNKI, Wanfang and Veipu databases up to January 10, 2015. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using either the fixed- or random effects model. Results A total of twelve case-control studies included 1003 cases and 2011 controls were included. Overall, the ALDH2 polymorphism was associated with a decreased risk of ALC (*1/*2 vs. *1/*1: OR=0.78, 95% CI: 0.61–0.99). However, in stratification analysis by country, we failed to detect any association among Chinese, Korean or Japanese populations. Conclusion The pooled evidence suggests that ALDH2 polymorphism may be an important protective factor for ALC in East Asians. PMID:27189280

  16. ALDH2(E487K) mutation increases protein turnover and promotes murine hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shengfang; Chen, Jiang; Chen, Lizao; Histen, Gavin; Lin, Zhizhong; Gross, Stefan; Hixon, Jeffrey; Chen, Yue; Kung, Charles; Chen, Yiwei; Fu, Yufei; Lu, Yuxuan; Lin, Hui; Cai, Xiujun; Yang, Hua; Cairns, Rob A.; Dorsch, Marion; Su, Shinsan M.; Biller, Scott; Mak, Tak W.; Cang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) in the liver removes toxic aldehydes including acetaldehyde, an intermediate of ethanol metabolism. Nearly 40% of East Asians inherit an inactive ALDH2*2 variant, which has a lysine-for-glutamate substitution at position 487 (E487K), and show a characteristic alcohol flush reaction after drinking and a higher risk for gastrointestinal cancers. Here we report the characterization of knockin mice in which the ALDH2(E487K) mutation is inserted into the endogenous murine Aldh2 locus. These mutants recapitulate essentially all human phenotypes including impaired clearance of acetaldehyde, increased sensitivity to acute or chronic alcohol-induced toxicity, and reduced ALDH2 expression due to a dominant-negative effect of the mutation. When treated with a chemical carcinogen, these mutants exhibit increased DNA damage response in hepatocytes, pronounced liver injury, and accelerated development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Importantly, ALDH2 protein levels are also significantly lower in patient HCC than in peritumor or normal liver tissues. Our results reveal that ALDH2 functions as a tumor suppressor by maintaining genomic stability in the liver, and the common human ALDH2 variant would present a significant risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis. Our study suggests that the ALDH2*2 allele–alcohol interaction may be an even greater human public health hazard than previously appreciated. PMID:26150517

  17. ALDH2(E487K) mutation increases protein turnover and promotes murine hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shengfang; Chen, Jiang; Chen, Lizao; Histen, Gavin; Lin, Zhizhong; Gross, Stefan; Hixon, Jeffrey; Chen, Yue; Kung, Charles; Chen, Yiwei; Fu, Yufei; Lu, Yuxuan; Lin, Hui; Cai, Xiujun; Yang, Hua; Cairns, Rob A; Dorsch, Marion; Su, Shinsan M; Biller, Scott; Mak, Tak W; Cang, Yong

    2015-07-21

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) in the liver removes toxic aldehydes including acetaldehyde, an intermediate of ethanol metabolism. Nearly 40% of East Asians inherit an inactive ALDH2*2 variant, which has a lysine-for-glutamate substitution at position 487 (E487K), and show a characteristic alcohol flush reaction after drinking and a higher risk for gastrointestinal cancers. Here we report the characterization of knockin mice in which the ALDH2(E487K) mutation is inserted into the endogenous murine Aldh2 locus. These mutants recapitulate essentially all human phenotypes including impaired clearance of acetaldehyde, increased sensitivity to acute or chronic alcohol-induced toxicity, and reduced ALDH2 expression due to a dominant-negative effect of the mutation. When treated with a chemical carcinogen, these mutants exhibit increased DNA damage response in hepatocytes, pronounced liver injury, and accelerated development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Importantly, ALDH2 protein levels are also significantly lower in patient HCC than in peritumor or normal liver tissues. Our results reveal that ALDH2 functions as a tumor suppressor by maintaining genomic stability in the liver, and the common human ALDH2 variant would present a significant risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis. Our study suggests that the ALDH2*2 allele-alcohol interaction may be an even greater human public health hazard than previously appreciated. PMID:26150517

  18. The mechanism of discrimination between oxidized and reduced coenzyme in the aldehyde dehydrogenase domain of Aldh1l1.

    PubMed

    Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Malakhau, Yuryi; Strickland, Kyle C; Krupenko, Sergey A

    2013-02-25

    Aldh1l1, also known as 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (FDH), contains the carboxy-terminal domain (Ct-FDH), which is a structural and functional homolog of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs). This domain is capable of catalyzing the NADP(+)-dependent oxidation of short chain aldehydes to their corresponding acids, and similar to most ALDHs it has two conserved catalytic residues, Cys707 and Glu673. Previously, we demonstrated that in the Ct-FDH mechanism these residues define the conformation of the bound coenzyme and the affinity of its interaction with the protein. Specifically, the replacement of Cys707 with an alanine resulted in the enzyme lacking the ability to differentiate between the oxidized and reduced coenzyme. We suggested that this was due to the loss of a covalent bond between the cysteine and the C4N atom of nicotinamide ring of NADP(+) formed during Ct-FDH catalysis. To obtain further insight into the functional significance of the covalent bond between Cys707 and the coenzyme, and the overall role of the two catalytic residues in the coenzyme binding and positioning, we have now solved crystal structures of Ct-FDH in the complex with thio-NADP(+) and the complexes of the C707S mutant with NADP(+) and NADPH. This study has allowed us to trap the coenzyme in the contracted conformation, which provided a snapshot of the conformational processing of the coenzyme during the transition from oxidized to reduced form. Overall, the results of this study further support the previously proposed mechanism by which Cys707 helps to differentiate between the oxidized and reduced coenzyme during ALDH catalysis.

  19. Aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme ALDH3H1 from Arabidopsis thaliana: Identification of amino acid residues critical for cofactor specificity.

    PubMed

    Stiti, Naim; Podgórska, Karolina; Bartels, Dorothea

    2014-03-01

    The cofactor-binding site of the NAD(+)-dependent Arabidopsis thaliana aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH3H1 was analyzed to understand structural features determining cofactor-specificity. Homology modeling and mutant analysis elucidated important amino acid residues. Glu149 occupies a central position in the cofactor-binding cleft, and its carboxylate group coordinates the 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups of the adenosyl ribose ring of NAD(+) and repels the 2'-phosphate moiety of NADP(+). If Glu149 is mutated to Gln, Asp, Asn or Thr the binding of NAD(+) is altered and rendered the enzyme capable of using NADP(+). This change is attributed to a weaker steric hindrance and elimination of the electrostatic repulsion force of the 2'-phosphate of NADP(+). Simultaneous mutations of Glu149 and Ile200, which is situated opposite of the cofactor binding cleft, improved the enzyme efficiency with NADP(+). The double mutant ALDH3H1Glu149Thr/Ile200Val showed a good catalysis with NADP(+). Subsequently a triple mutation was generated by replacing Val178 by Arg in order to create a "closed" cofactor binding site. The cofactor specificity was shifted even further in favor of NADP(+), as the mutant ALDH3H1E149T/V178R/I200V uses NADP(+) with almost 7-fold higher catalytic efficiency compared to NAD(+). Our experiments suggest that residues occupying positions equivalent to 149, 178 and 200 constitute a group of amino acids in the ALDH3H1 protein determining cofactor affinity.

  20. Differential contribution of clinical amounts of acetaldehyde to skeletal and cardiac muscle dysfunction in alcoholic myopathy.

    PubMed

    Oba, Toshiharu; Maeno, Yoshitaka; Ishida, Kazuto

    2005-01-01

    Acute intoxication due to alcohol consumption has been known to elicit reversible skeletal and cardiac muscle dysfunction, or "alcoholic myopathy and cardiomyopathy". Sometimes, irreversible muscle damage can be induced after heavy alcohol drinking. Many researchers have proposed that acetaldehyde, the major oxidised product of alcohol, may be a primary factor underlying alcohol-induced muscle dysfunction. Because acetaldehyde is rapidly metabolised to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) mainly in the liver, blood concentration of acetaldehyde is maintained at a low level even after heavy alcohol intoxication. In alcoholics, blood acetaldehyde level is relatively high, probably due to hepatic inhibition of ALDH activity. Several mM of acetaldehyde have been used for studies of cardiac muscle contraction, the intracellular calcium transient, and the L-type calcium channel. In skeletal muscle, the calcium release channel/ryanodine receptor activity has been reported to be inhibited by exposure to 1 mM acetaldehyde. However, these observations were made using potentially lethal concentrations of acetaldehyde, so the hypothesis that acetaldehyde plays a crucial role on alcoholic myopathy is questionable. In this review, we will summarise the effect of alcohol and its major oxidised product, acetaldehyde, on skeletal and heart muscles and propose a toxic contribution of clinical concentrations of acetaldehyde to alcoholic myopathy. In addition, this review will include briefly the effect of acetaldehyde on diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  1. Ethanol metabolism in ALDH2 knockout mice--blood acetate levels.

    PubMed

    Kiyoshi, Ameno; Weihuan, Wang; Mostofa, Jamal; Mitsuru, Kumihashi; Toyoshi, Isse; Toshihiro, Kawamoto; Kyoko, Kitagawa; Keiichi, Nakayama; Iwao, Ijiri; Hiroshi, Kinoshita

    2009-04-01

    We described here blood acetate levels in aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 knockout (ALDH2 KO) male mice based on C57BL/6J strain after ethanol (EtOH) dosing (2 g/kg). Blood samples were collected at 30, 60, 90, 120 180, and 240 min after decapitation, and then EtOH, acetaldehyde (AcH) and acetate were determined by head-space gas chromatography. We found that blood acetate levels in ALDH2 KO mice were slightly lower than those in wild type (WT), whereas EtOH and AcH levels in ALDH2 KO were significantly higher than those in WT. These observations indicate that high EtOH, AcH and low acetate in the blood of ALDH2 KO are due to the deficient effect of ALDH2 enzyme activity. PMID:19356968

  2. Essential role of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A3 (ALDH1A3) for the maintenance of non-small cell lung cancer stem cells is associated with the STAT3 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chunli; Sullivan, James P.; Girard, Luc; Augustyn, Alexander; Yenerall, Paul; Rodriguez, Jaime; Liu, Hui; Behrens, Carmen; Shay, Jerry W.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Minna, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) with elevated aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity are self-renewing, clonogenic and tumorigenic. The purpose of our study is to elucidate the mechanisms by which lung CSCs are regulated. Experimental Design A genome-wide gene expression analysis was performed to identify genes differentially expressed in the ALDH+ vs. ALDH− cells. RT-PCR, western blot and Aldefluor assay were used to validate identified genes. To explore the function in CSCs we manipulated their expression followed by colony and tumor formation assays. Results We identified a subset of genes that were differentially expressed in common in ALDH+ cells, among which ALDH1A3 was the most upregulated gene in ALDH+ vs. ALDH− cells. ShRNA-mediated knockdown of ALDH1A3 in NSCLCs resulted in a dramatic reduction in ALDH activity, clonogenicity and tumorigenicity, indicating that ALDH1A3 is required for tumorigenic properties. By contrast, overexpression of ALDH1A3 by itself it was not sufficient to increase tumorigenicity. The ALDH+ cells also expressed more activated Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3 (STAT3) than ALDH− cells. Inhibition of STAT3 or its activator EZH2 genetically or pharmacologically diminished the level of ALDH+ cells and clonogenicity. Unexpectedly, ALDH1A3 was highly expressed in female, never smokers, well differentiated tumors, or adenocarcinoma. ALDH1A3 low expression was associated with poor overall survival. Conclusion Our data show that ALDH1A3 is the predominant ALDH isozyme responsible for ALDH activity and tumorigenicity in most NSCLCs, and that inhibiting either ALDH1A3 or the STAT3 pathway are potential therapeutic strategies to eliminate the ALDH+ subpopulation in NSCLCs. PMID:24907115

  3. Replacement of the initial steps of ethanol metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by ATP-independent acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Barbara U; van Rossum, Harmen M; Niemeijer, Matthijs S; van Dijk, Marlous; Benjamin, Kirsten; Wu, Liang; Daran, Jean-Marc G; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2016-03-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae ethanol dissimilation is initiated by its oxidation and activation to cytosolic acetyl-CoA. The associated consumption of ATP strongly limits yields of biomass and acetyl-CoA-derived products. Here, we explore the implementation of an ATP-independent pathway for acetyl-CoA synthesis from ethanol that, in theory, enables biomass yield on ethanol that is up to 40% higher. To this end, all native yeast acetaldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDs) were replaced by heterologous acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (A-ALD). Engineered Ald(-) strains expressing different A-ALDs did not immediately grow on ethanol, but serial transfer in ethanol-grown batch cultures yielded growth rates of up to 70% of the wild-type value. Mutations in ACS1 were identified in all independently evolved strains and deletion of ACS1 enabled slow growth of non-evolved Ald(-) A-ALD strains on ethanol. Acquired mutations in A-ALD genes improved affinity-Vmax/Km for acetaldehyde. One of five evolved strains showed a significant 5% increase of its biomass yield in ethanol-limited chemostat cultures. Increased production of acetaldehyde and other by-products was identified as possible cause for lower than theoretically predicted biomass yields. This study proves that the native yeast pathway for conversion of ethanol to acetyl-CoA can be replaced by an engineered pathway with the potential to improve biomass and product yields.

  4. ALDH2 in Alcoholic Heart Diseases: Molecular Mechanism and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingmei; Ren, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is manifested as cardiac hypertrophy, disrupted contractile function and myofibrillary architecture. An ample amount of clinical and experimental evidence has depicted a pivotal role for alcohol metabolism especially the main alcohol metabolic product acetaldehyde, in the pathogenesis of this myopathic state. Findings from our group and others have revealed that the mitochondrial isoform of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2), which metabolizes acetaldehyde, governs the detoxification of acetaldehyde formed following alcohol consumption and the ultimate elimination of alcohol from the body. The ALDH2 enzymatic cascade may evolve as a unique detoxification mechanism for environmental alcohols and aldehydes to alleviate the undesired cardiac anomalies in ischemia-reperfusion and alcoholism. Polymorphic variants of the ALDH2 gene encode enzymes with altered pharmacokinetic properties and a significantly higher prevalence of cardiovascular diseases associated with alcoholism. The pathophysiological effects of ALDH2 polymorphism may be mediated by accumulation of acetaldehyde and other reactive aldehydes. Inheritance of the inactive ALDH2*2 gene product is associated with a decreased risk of alcoholism but an increased risk of alcoholic complications. This association is influenced by gene-environment interactions such as those associated with religion and national origin. The purpose of this review is to recapitulate the pathogenesis of alcoholic cardiomyopathy with a special focus on ALDH2 enzymatic metabolism. It will be important to dissect the links between ALDH2 polymorphism and prevalence of alcoholic cardiomyopathy, in order to determine the mechanisms underlying such associations. The therapeutic value of ALDH2 as both target and tool in the management of alcoholic tissue damage will be discussed. PMID:21664374

  5. Human {gamma}-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH9): cDNA sequence, genomic organization, polymorphism, chromosomal localization, and tissue expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.W.; Chen, J.C.; Hsu, L.C.

    1996-06-15

    The cDNA and the gene (ALDH9) for a human aldehyde dehydrogenase isozyme, which has a high activity for oxidation of {gamma}-aminobutyraldehyde and other amino aldehydes, were cloned and characterized. The cDNA has an open reading frame of 1479 bp encoding 493 amino acid residues. The gene is about 45 kb and consists of 10 coding exons interrupted by nine introns. The gene was assigned to chromosome 1q22-q23, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Northern blot hybridization indicated that the size of the mRNA is about 2.4 kb and that the gene is expressed at high levels in adult liver, skeletal muscle, and kidney and low levels in heart, pancreas, lung, and brain. The gene is polymorphic, i.e., C or T at nt 327 and C or G at nt 344. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Lack of aldehyde dehydrogenase ameliorates oxidative stress induced by single-dose ethanol administration in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Akiko; Ichiba, Masayoshi; Horita, Mikako; Yamashita, Zenko; Takahashi, Tatsuya; Isse, Toyohi; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Tomokuni, Katsumaro

    2007-02-01

    Polymorphism of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), denoted ALDH2*2, is far more common in East Asian countries. Acetaldehyde, an intermediate metabolite of ethanol, is metabolized very slowly in people who have ALDH2*2, as the mutated ALDH2 lacks acetaldehyde metabolizing activity. On the other hand, it is well established that metabolism of ethanol causes oxidative stress in liver tissue. To examine the consequences of this polymorphism on ethanol-induced oxidative stress in liver tissue, we conducted a study using Aldh2 knockout mice. Aldh2+/+ and Aldh2-/- mice were orally administered ethanol at a dose of 5g/kg body weight. Levels of malondialdehyde, an indicator of oxidative stress, and glutathione, a key antioxidant, in liver tissue were analyzed 0-24h after administration. Levels of malondialdehyde were significantly lower in Aldh2-/- mice than in Aldh2+/+ mice at 12h after injection, while levels of glutathione were higher in Aldh2-/- mice than in Aldh2+/+ mice at 6 and 12h after injection. Our results suggest that a lack of ALDH ameliorates ethanol-induced oxidative stress in liver tissue. PMID:17452299

  7. Purification of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenases from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E and characterization of the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) as a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase--acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, D; Zeikus, J G

    1994-01-01

    The purification and characterization of three enzymes involved in ethanol formation from acetyl-CoA in Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E (formerly Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum 39E) is described. The secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 40 kDa subunits (SDS/PAGE) with a molecular mass of 160 kDa. The 2 degrees Adh had a lower catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of 1 degree alcohols, including ethanol, than for the oxidation of secondary (2 degrees) alcohols or the reduction of ketones or aldehydes. This enzyme possesses a significant acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase activity as determined by NADPH oxidation, thiol formation and ethanol production. The primary-alcohol dehydrogenase (1 degree Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 41.5 kDa (SDS/PAGE) subunits with a molecular mass of 170 kDa. The 1 degree Adh used both NAD(H) and NADP(H) and displayed higher catalytic efficiencies for NADP(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation and NADH-dependent acetaldehyde (identical to ethanal) reduction than for NADPH-dependent acetaldehyde reduction or NAD(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation. The NAD(H)-linked acetaldehyde dehydrogenase was a homotetramer (360 kDa) of identical subunits (100 kDa) that readily catalysed thioester cleavage and condensation. The 1 degree Adh was expressed at 5-20% of the level of the 2 degrees Adh throughout the growth cycle on glucose. The results suggest that the 2 degrees Adh primarily functions in ethanol production from acetyl-CoA and acetaldehyde, whereas the 1 degree Adh functions in ethanol consumption for nicotinamide-cofactor recycling. Images Figure 1 PMID:8068002

  8. Mutations in ALDH6A1 encoding methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase are associated with dysmyelination and transient methylmalonic aciduria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (MMSDH) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with varied metabolite abnormalities, including accumulation of 3-hydroxyisobutyric, 3-hydroxypropionic, 3-aminoisobutyric and methylmalonic acids, as well as β-alanine. Existing reports describe a highly variable clinical and biochemical phenotype, which can make diagnosis a challenge. To date, only three reported cases have been confirmed at the molecular level, through identification of homozygous mutations in ALDH6A1, the gene encoding MMSDH. Confirmation by enzyme assay has until now not been possible, due to the extreme instability of the enzyme substrate. Methods and results We report a child with severe developmental delays, abnormal myelination on brain MRI, and transient/variable elevations in lactate, methylmalonic acid, 3-hydroxyisobutyric and 3-aminoisobutyric acids. Compound heterozygous mutations were identified by exome sequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing within exon 6 (c.514 T > C; p. Tyr172His) and exon 12 (c.1603C > T; p. Arg535Cys) of ALDH6A1. The resulting amino acid changes, both occurring in residues conserved among mammals, are predicted to be damaging at the protein level. Subsequent MMSDH enzyme assay demonstrated reduced activity in patient fibroblasts, measuring 2.5 standard deviations below the mean. Conclusions We present the fourth reported case of MMSDH deficiency with confirmation at the molecular level, and expand on what is already an extremely variable clinical and biochemical phenotype. Furthermore, this is the first report to demonstrate a corresponding reduction in MMSDH enzyme activity. This report illustrates the emerging utilization of whole exome sequencing and variant data filtering using clinical data as an early tool in the diagnosis of rare and variable conditions. PMID:23835272

  9. Conserved catalytic residues of the ALDH1L1 aldehyde dehydrogenase domain control binding and discharging of the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Krupenko, Sergey A

    2011-07-01

    The C-terminal domain (C(t)-FDH) of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (FDH, ALDH1L1) is an NADP(+)-dependent oxidoreductase and a structural and functional homolog of aldehyde dehydrogenases. Here we report the crystal structures of several C(t)-FDH mutants in which two essential catalytic residues adjacent to the nicotinamide ring of bound NADP(+), Cys-707 and Glu-673, were replaced separately or simultaneously. The replacement of the glutamate with an alanine causes irreversible binding of the coenzyme without any noticeable conformational changes in the vicinity of the nicotinamide ring. Additional replacement of cysteine 707 with an alanine (E673A/C707A double mutant) did not affect this irreversible binding indicating that the lack of the glutamate is solely responsible for the enhanced interaction between the enzyme and the coenzyme. The substitution of the cysteine with an alanine did not affect binding of NADP(+) but resulted in the enzyme lacking the ability to differentiate between the oxidized and reduced coenzyme: unlike the wild-type C(t)-FDH/NADPH complex, in the C707A mutant the position of NADPH is identical to the position of NADP(+) with the nicotinamide ring well ordered within the catalytic center. Thus, whereas the glutamate restricts the affinity for the coenzyme, the cysteine is the sensor of the coenzyme redox state. These conclusions were confirmed by coenzyme binding experiments. Our study further suggests that the binding of the coenzyme is additionally controlled by a long-range communication between the catalytic center and the coenzyme-binding domain and points toward an α-helix involved in the adenine moiety binding as a participant of this communication.

  10. PKC-ALDH2 Pathway Plays a Novel Role in Adipocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yu-Hsiang; Liao, Pei-Ru; Guo, Chien-Jung; Chen, Che-Hong; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The ALDH2 gene encodes the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), a critical enzyme involved in ethanol clearance through acetaldehyde metabolism. ALDH2 also catalyzes the metabolism of other bioreactive aldehydes, including propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, and 4-hydroxykenals (4-HNE). Increased levels of 4-HNE in adipose tissue positively correlate with obesity and insulin resistance. However, it remains unclear whether ALDH2 is involved in regulation of adipocyte differentiation. Here, we found that ALDH2 protein levels were lower in white adipose tissue of high-fat diet-fed mice and ob/ob mice relative to lean mice. Knockdown of ALDH2 expression in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes caused an increase in intracellular 4-HNE, thereby attenuated adipocyte differentiation. By contrast, an ALDH2 activator, Alda-1, significantly accelerated adipogenesis, which was accompanied by an increase in adipogenic gene expression. Consistently, adipogenesis was reduced when protein kinase C ε (PKCε), an ALDH2 phosphorylating activator, was silenced in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, whereas treatment with a PKCε agonist in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes enhanced adipogenesis. Whole-genome microarray profiling of Alda-1-treated cells demonstrated several upregulated transcripts encoding proteins involved in metabolism and the majority of these transcripts are for proteins involved in PPAR signaling pathways. Furthermore, PKCε-ALDH2 interaction alleviates 4-HNE induced aberrant PPARγ regulation on adipogenesis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ALDH2 activation enhances adipogenesis and signaling pathways involving PPARγ. Thus, activation of PKCε-ALDH2 regulatory axis may be a therapeutic target for treating obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27575855

  11. PKC-ALDH2 Pathway Plays a Novel Role in Adipocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yu-Hsiang; Liao, Pei-Ru; Guo, Chien-Jung; Chen, Che-Hong; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The ALDH2 gene encodes the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), a critical enzyme involved in ethanol clearance through acetaldehyde metabolism. ALDH2 also catalyzes the metabolism of other bioreactive aldehydes, including propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, and 4-hydroxykenals (4-HNE). Increased levels of 4-HNE in adipose tissue positively correlate with obesity and insulin resistance. However, it remains unclear whether ALDH2 is involved in regulation of adipocyte differentiation. Here, we found that ALDH2 protein levels were lower in white adipose tissue of high-fat diet-fed mice and ob/ob mice relative to lean mice. Knockdown of ALDH2 expression in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes caused an increase in intracellular 4-HNE, thereby attenuated adipocyte differentiation. By contrast, an ALDH2 activator, Alda-1, significantly accelerated adipogenesis, which was accompanied by an increase in adipogenic gene expression. Consistently, adipogenesis was reduced when protein kinase C ε (PKCε), an ALDH2 phosphorylating activator, was silenced in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, whereas treatment with a PKCε agonist in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes enhanced adipogenesis. Whole-genome microarray profiling of Alda-1-treated cells demonstrated several upregulated transcripts encoding proteins involved in metabolism and the majority of these transcripts are for proteins involved in PPAR signaling pathways. Furthermore, PKCε-ALDH2 interaction alleviates 4-HNE induced aberrant PPARγ regulation on adipogenesis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ALDH2 activation enhances adipogenesis and signaling pathways involving PPARγ. Thus, activation of PKCε-ALDH2 regulatory axis may be a therapeutic target for treating obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27575855

  12. ALDH2 Deficiency Promotes Ethanol-Induced Gut Barrier Dysfunction and Fatty Liver in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Kamljit K.; Samak, Geetha; Shukla, Pradeep K.; Mir, Hina; Gangwar, Ruchika; Manda, Bhargavi; Isse, Toyohi; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Salaspuro, Mikko; Kaihovaara, Pertti; Dietrich, Paula; Dragatsis, Ioannis; Nagy, Laura E.; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2015-01-01

    Background Acetaldehyde, the toxic ethanol metabolite, disrupts intestinal epithelial barrier function. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) detoxifies acetaldehyde into acetate. Sub populations of Asians and Native Americans show polymorphism with loss of function mutations in ALDH2. We evaluated the effect of ALDH2 deficiency on ethanol-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions and adherens junctions, gut barrier dysfunction and liver injury. Methods Wild type and ALDH2 deficient mice were fed (1–6%) in Lieber-DeCarli diet for 4 weeks. Gut permeability in vivo measured by plasma-to-luminal flux of FITC-inulin, tight junction and adherens junction integrity analyzed by confocal microscopy and liver injury was assessed by analysis of plasma transaminase activity, histopathology and liver triglyceride. Results Ethanol feeding elevated colonic mucosal acetaldehyde, which was significantly greater in ALDH2 deficient mice. ALDH2−/− mice showed a drastic reduction in the ethanol diet intake. Therefore, this study was continued only in wild type and ALDH2+/− mice. Ethanol feeding elevated mucosal inulin permeability in distal colon, but not in proximal colon, ileum or jejunum of wild type mice. In ALDH2+/− mice, ethanol-induced inulin permeability in distal colon was not only higher than that in wild type mice, but inulin permeability was also elevated in the proximal colon, ileum and jejunum. Greater inulin permeability in distal colon of ALDH2+/− mice was associated with a more severe redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins from the intercellular junctions. In ALDH2+/− mice, but not in wild type mice, ethanol feeding caused a loss of junctional distribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins in the ileum. Histopathology, plasma transaminases and liver triglyceride analyses showed that ethanol-induced liver damage was significantly greater in ALDH2+/− mice compared to wild type mice. Conclusion These data

  13. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 regulates nociception in rodent models of acute inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Zambelli, Vanessa O.; Gross, Eric R.; Chen, Che-Hong; Gutierrez, Vanessa P.; Cury, Yara; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2014-01-01

    Exogenous aldehydes can cause pain in animal models, suggesting that aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), which metabolizes many aldehydes, may regulate nociception. To test this hypothesis, we generated a knock-in mouse with an inactivating point mutation in ALDH2 (ALDH2*2), which is also present in human ALDH2 of ~540 million East Asians. The ALDH2*1/*2 heterozygotic mice exhibited a larger response to painful stimuli than their wild-type littermates, and this heightened nociception was inhibited by an ALDH2-selective activator (Alda-1). No effect on inflammation per se was observed. Using a rat model, we then showed that nociception tightly correlated with ALDH activity (R2=0.90) and that reduced nociception was associated with less early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) in the spinal cord and less reactive aldehyde accumulation at the insult site (including acetaldehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal). Further, acetaldehyde and formalin-induced nociceptive behavior was greater in the ALDH2*1/*2 mice than wild-type mice. Finally, Alda-1 treatment was also beneficial when given even after the inflammatory agent was administered. Our data in rodent models suggest that the mitochondrial enzyme ALDH2 regulates nociception and could serve as a molecular target for pain control, with ALDH2 activators, such as Alda-1, as potential non-narcotic cardiac-safe analgesics. Furthermore, our results suggest a possible genetic basis for East Asians’ apparent lower pain tolerance. PMID:25163478

  14. Pueraria lobata (Kudzu root) hangover remedies and acetaldehyde-associated neoplasm risk.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Neil R

    2007-11-01

    Recent introduction of several commercial Kudzu root (Pueraria lobata) containing hangover remedies has occurred in western countries. The available data is reviewed to assess if there are any potential concerns in relationship to the development of neoplasm if these products are used chronically. The herb Pueraria has two components that are used as traditional therapies; Pueraria lobata, the root based herb and Pueraria flos, the flower based herb. Both of these herbal components have different traditional claims and constituents. Pueraria flos, which enhances acetaldehyde removal, is the traditional hangover remedy. Conversely, Pueraria lobata is a known inhibitor of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) and increases acetaldehyde. Pueraria lobata is being investigated for use as an aversion therapy for alcoholics due to these characteristics. Pueraria lobata is not a traditional hangover therapy yet has been accepted as the registered active component in many of these hangover products. The risk of development of acetaldehyde pathology, including neoplasms, is associated with genetic polymorphism with enhanced alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) or reduced ALDH activity leading to increased acetaldehyde levels in the tissues. The chronic usage of Pueraria lobata at times of high ethanol consumption, such as in hangover remedies, may predispose subjects to an increased risk of acetaldehyde-related neoplasm and pathology. The guidelines for Disulfiram, an ALDH2 inhibitor, provide a set of guidelines for use with the herb Pueraria lobata. Pueraria lobata appears to be an inappropriate herb for use in herbal hangover remedies as it is an inhibitor of ALDH2. The recommendations for its use should be similar to those for the ALDH2 inhibitor, Disulfiram.

  15. Structural shifts of aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes were instrumental for the early evolution of retinoid-dependent axial patterning in metazoans.

    PubMed

    Sobreira, Tiago J P; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Simões-Costa, Marcos; Schechtman, Deborah; Pereira, Alexandre C; Brunet, Frédéric; Sweeney, Sarah; Pani, Ariel; Aronowicz, Jochanan; Lowe, Christopher J; Davidson, Bradley; Laudet, Vincent; Bronner, Marianne; de Oliveira, Paulo S L; Schubert, Michael; Xavier-Neto, José

    2011-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) catabolize toxic aldehydes and process the vitamin A-derived retinaldehyde into retinoic acid (RA), a small diffusible molecule and a pivotal chordate morphogen. In this study, we combine phylogenetic, structural, genomic, and developmental gene expression analyses to examine the evolutionary origins of ALDH substrate preference. Structural modeling reveals that processing of small aldehydes, such as acetaldehyde, by ALDH2, versus large aldehydes, including retinaldehyde, by ALDH1A is associated with small versus large substrate entry channels (SECs), respectively. Moreover, we show that metazoan ALDH1s and ALDH2s are members of a single ALDH1/2 clade and that during evolution, eukaryote ALDH1/2s often switched between large and small SECs after gene duplication, transforming constricted channels into wide opened ones and vice versa. Ancestral sequence reconstructions suggest that during the evolutionary emergence of RA signaling, the ancestral, narrow-channeled metazoan ALDH1/2 gave rise to large ALDH1 channels capable of accommodating bulky aldehydes, such as retinaldehyde, supporting the view that retinoid-dependent signaling arose from ancestral cellular detoxification mechanisms. Our analyses also indicate that, on a more restricted evolutionary scale, ALDH1 duplicates from invertebrate chordates (amphioxus and ascidian tunicates) underwent switches to smaller and narrower SECs. When combined with alterations in gene expression, these switches led to neofunctionalization from ALDH1-like roles in embryonic patterning to systemic, ALDH2-like roles, suggesting functional shifts from signaling to detoxification.

  16. Exploring the evolutionary route of the acquisition of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by plant ALDH10 enzymes: implications for the synthesis of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant ALDH10 enzymes are aminoaldehyde dehydrogenases (AMADHs) that oxidize different ω-amino or trimethylammonium aldehydes, but only some of them have betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) activity and produce the osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB). The latter enzymes possess alanine or cysteine at position 441 (numbering of the spinach enzyme, SoBADH), while those ALDH10s that cannot oxidize betaine aldehyde (BAL) have isoleucine at this position. Only the plants that contain A441- or C441-type ALDH10 isoenzymes accumulate GB in response to osmotic stress. In this work we explored the evolutionary history of the acquisition of BAL specificity by plant ALDH10s. Results We performed extensive phylogenetic analyses and constructed and characterized, kinetically and structurally, four SoBADH variants that simulate the parsimonious intermediates in the evolutionary pathway from I441-type to A441- or C441-type enzymes. All mutants had a correct folding, average thermal stabilities and similar activity with aminopropionaldehyde, but whereas A441S and A441T exhibited significant activity with BAL, A441V and A441F did not. The kinetics of the mutants were consistent with their predicted structural features obtained by modeling, and confirmed the importance of position 441 for BAL specificity. The acquisition of BADH activity could have happened through any of these intermediates without detriment of the original function or protein stability. Phylogenetic studies showed that this event occurred independently several times during angiosperms evolution when an ALDH10 gene duplicate changed the critical Ile residue for Ala or Cys in two consecutive single mutations. ALDH10 isoenzymes frequently group in two clades within a plant family: one includes peroxisomal I441-type, the other peroxisomal and non-peroxisomal I441-, A441- or C441-type. Interestingly, high GB-accumulators plants have non-peroxisomal A441- or C441-type isoenzymes, while low-GB accumulators

  17. [Effect of pyruvate, threonine, and phosphoethanolamine on acetaldehyde metabolism in rats with toxic liver injury].

    PubMed

    Pron'ko, P S; Satanovskaia, V I; Gorenshteĭn, B I; Kuz'mich, A B; Pyzhik, T N

    2002-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase, threonine aldolase and phosphoethanolamine lyase can produce acetaldehyde during normal metabolism. We studied the effect of loading with the substrates of these enzymes (pyruvate, 500 mg/kg, i.p., threonine 500 mg/kg, i.p., and phosphoethanolamine, 230 mg/kg, i.p.) on the blood concentrations of endogenous acetaldehyde and ethanol and the activities of enzymes producing and oxidizing acetaldehyde in the liver of normal rats and rats with liver injury provoked by chronic carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) treatment (0.2 ml i.p. per rat, 2 times a week during 4 weeks). Blood was collected before the treatment and then 30 min and 1 h following the administration of the substrates to intact and CCl4-treated rats. Endogenous acetaldehyde and ethanol were determined by headspace GC. The CCl4 treatment resulted in decreased liver alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities and a significant elevation of liver endogenous ehtanol and a clear tendency to enhance blood acetaldehyde levels. Pyruvate increased blood endogenous acetaldehyde in CCl4-treated animals and endogenous ethanol--in the control group of animals. Threonine elevated endogenous acetaldehyde in normal rats. Phosphoethanolamine increased endogenous ethanol in the intact and CCl4 groups. At the same time, in CCl4-treated rats pyruvate administration increased the liver pyruvate dehydrogenase, threonine decreased threonine aldolase, whereas phosphoethanolamine decreased phosphoethanolamine lyase. Thus, the CCl4 effect on blood endogenous acetaldehyde and ethanol may be mediated through decreased liver ALDH and ADH activities. Liver injury promotes the accumulation of acetaldehyde, derived from physiological sources, including the degration of pyruvate and threonine by decreased acetaldehyde oxidation.

  18. Stem cell marker aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1)-expressing cells are enriched in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Huihui; Ma, Fei; Wang, Haijuan; Lin, Chen; Fan, Ying; Zhang, Xueyan; Qian, Haili; Xu, Binghe

    2013-12-17

    The stem cell marker ALDH1 has been of particular interest to scientists since it has been successfully used as a marker to isolate cancer stem cells from breast cancers. However, little is known, especially in Chinese breast cancer patients, on whether ALDH1 enrichment is prevalent in certain subtypes of breast cancer. In this study, we performed flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry to measure the expression of ALDH1 in 10 breast cancer cell lines and in a set of tissue microarrays consisting of 101 breast cancer tissues from the Chinese population. The 101 breast cancer tissues included 4 cancer subtypes defined on bases of their ER, PR, and HER2 statuses: triple-negative (25 cases), luminal A (33 cases), luminal B (16 cases) and HER2-overexpressing (HER2-OE, 27 cases). We found that ALDH1 was expressed in 25 of the 101 cases of breast cancer tissues. When the analysis was stratified, we found that the expression of ALDH1 varied significantly among the 4 subtypes, with a higher expression in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC, p=0.003) than in the other 3 subtypes. In a series of breast cancer cell lines, we also confirmed that ALDH1 activity was mainly found in TNBC cell lines compared with non-TNBC ones (15.6% ± 2.45% vs 5.5% ± 2.58%, p=0.026). These data support the concept that the expression of ALDH1 is higher in TNBC than non-TNBC, which may be clinically meaningful for a better understanding of the poor prognosis of TNBC patients.

  19. Coenzyme A-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase from Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B592.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, R T; Chen, J S

    1990-01-01

    Acetaldehyde and butyraldehyde are substrates for alcohol dehydrogenase in the production of ethanol and 1-butanol by solvent-producing clostridia. A coenzyme A (CoA)-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), which also converts acyl-CoA to aldehyde and CoA, has been purified under anaerobic conditions from Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B592. The ALDH showed a native molecular weight (Mr) of 100,000 and a subunit Mr of 55,000, suggesting that ALDH is dimeric. Purified ALDH contained no alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Activities measured with acetaldehyde and butyraldehyde as alternative substrates were copurified, indicating that the same ALDH can catalyze the formation of both aldehydes for ethanol and butanol production. Based on the Km and Vmax values for acetyl-CoA and butyryl-CoA, ALDH was more effective for the production of butyraldehyde than for acetaldehyde. ALDH could use either NAD(H) or NADP(H) as the coenzyme, but the Km for NAD(H) was much lower than that for NADP(H). Kinetic data suggest a ping-pong mechanism for the reaction. ALDH was more stable in Tris buffer than in phosphate buffer. The apparent optimum pH was between 6.5 and 7 for the forward reaction (the physiological direction; aldehyde forming), and it was 9.5 or higher for the reverse reaction (acyl-CoA forming). The ratio of NAD(H)/NADP(H)-linked activities increased with decreasing pH. ALDH was O2 sensitive, but it could be protected against O2 inactivation by dithiothreitol. The O2-inactivated enzyme could be reactivated by incubating the enzyme with CoA in the presence or absence of dithiothreitol prior to assay. Images PMID:2275527

  20. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase polymorphisms and a new strategy for prevention and screening for cancer in the upper aerodigestive tract in East Asians.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Akira; Omori, Tai; Yokoyama, Tetsuji

    2010-01-01

    The ethanol in alcoholic beverages and the acetaldehyde associated with alcohol consumption are Group 1 human carcinogens (WHO, International Agency for Research on Cancer). The combination of alcohol consumption, tobacco smoking, the inactive heterozygous aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 genotype (ALDH2*1/*2) and the less-active homozygous alcohol dehydrogenase-1B genotype (ADH1B*1/*1) increases the risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) in a multiplicative fashion in East Asians. In addition to being exposed to locally high levels of ethanol, the UADT is exposed to a very high concentration of acetaldehyde from a variety of sources, including that as an ingredient of alcoholic beverages per se and that found in tobacco smoke; acetaldehyde is also produced by salivary microorganisms and mucosal enzymes and is present as blood acetaldehyde. The inefficient degradation of acetaldehyde by weakly expressed ALDH2 in the UADT may be cri! tical to the local accumulation of acetaldehyde, especially in ALDH2*1/*2 carriers. ADH1B*1/*1 carriers tend to experience less intense alcohol flushing and are highly susceptible to heavy drinking and alcoholism. Heavy drinking by persons with the less-active ADH1B*1/*1 leads to longer exposure of the UADT to salivary ethanol and acetaldehyde. The ALDH2*1/*2 genotype is a very strong predictor of synchronous and metachronous multiple SCCs in the UADT. High red cell mean corpuscular volume (MCV), esophageal dysplasia, and melanosis in the UADT, all of which are frequently found in ALDH2*1/*2 drinkers, are useful for identifying high-risk individuals. We invented a simple flushing questionnaire that enables prediction of the ALDH2 phenotype. New health appraisal models that include ALDH2 genotype, the simple flushing questionnaire, or MCV are powerful tools for devising a new strategy for prevention and screening for UADT cancer in East Asians.

  1. A PBPK MODEL FOR EVALUATING THE IMPACT OF ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE POLYMORPHISMS ON COMPARATIVE RAT AND HUMAN NASAL TISSUE ACETALDEHYDE DOSIMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: Acetaldehyde is an important intermediate in chemical synthesis and a byproduct of normal oxidative metabolism of several industrially important compounds including ethanol, ethyl acetate and vinyl acetate. Chronic inhalation of acetaldehyde leads to degeneratio...

  2. A PBPK model for evaluating the impact of aldehyde dehydrogenase polymorphisms on comparative rat and human nasal tissue acetaldehyde dosimetry*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetaldehyde is an important intermediate in the chemical synthesis and normal oxidative metabolism of several industrially important compounds, including ethanol, ethyl acetate, and vinyl acetate. Chronic inhalation of acetaldehyde leads to degeneration of the olfactory and resp...

  3. The ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde induces water and salt intake via two distinct pathways in the central nervous system of rats.

    PubMed

    Ujihara, Izumi; Hitomi, Suzuro; Ono, Kentaro; Kakinoki, Yasuaki; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Ueta, Yoichi; Inenaga, Kiyotoshi

    2015-12-01

    The sensation of thirst experienced after heavy alcohol drinking is widely regarded as a consequence of ethanol (EtOH)-induced diuresis, but EtOH in high doses actually induces anti-diuresis. The present study was designed to investigate the introduction mechanism of water and salt intake after heavy alcohol drinking, focusing on action of acetaldehyde, a metabolite of EtOH and a toxic substance, using rats. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) inhibitor cyanamide was used to mimic the effect of prolonged acetaldehyde exposure because acetaldehyde is quickly degraded by ALDH. Systemic administration of a high-dose of EtOH at 2.5 g/kg induced water and salt intake with anti-diuresis. Cyanamide enhanced the fluid intake following EtOH and acetaldehyde administration. Systemic administration of acetaldehyde with cyanamide suppressed blood pressure and increased plasma renin activity. Blockade of central angiotensin receptor AT1R suppressed the acetaldehyde-induced fluid intake and c-Fos expression in the circumventricular organs (CVOs), which form part of dipsogenic mechanism in the brain. In addition, central administration of acetaldehyde together with cyanamide selectively induced water but not salt intake without changes in blood pressure. In electrophysiological recordings from slice preparations, acetaldehyde specifically excited angiotensin-sensitive neurons in the CVO. These results suggest that acetaldehyde evokes the thirst sensation following heavy alcohol drinking, by two distinct and previously unsuspected mechanisms, independent of diuresis. First acetaldehyde indirectly activates AT1R in the dipsogenic centers via the peripheral renin-angiotensin system following the depressor response and induces both water and salt intake. Secondly acetaldehyde directly activates neurons in the dipsogenic centers and induces only water intake.

  4. The thiocarbamate disulphide drug, disulfiram induces osteopenia in rats by inhibition of osteoblast function due to suppression of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Monika; Khan, Kainat; Pal, Subhashis; Porwal, Konica; China, Shyamsundar Pal; Barbhuyan, Tarun K; Baghel, Khemraj S; Rawat, Tara; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Bhadauria, Smrati; Sharma, Vishnu L; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2014-05-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTC), a sulfhydryl group containing compounds, are extensively used by humans that include metam and thiram due to their pesticide properties, and disulfiram (DSF) as an alcohol deterrent. We screened these DTC in an osteoblast viability assay. DSF exhibited the highest cytotoxicity (IC50 488nM). Loss in osteoblast viability and proliferation was due to induction of apoptosis via G1 arrest. DSF treatment to osteoblasts reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and exogenous addition of GSH prevented DSF-induced reactive oxygen species generation and osteoblast apoptosis. DSF also inhibited osteoblast differentiation in vitro and in vivo, and the effect was associated with inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. Out of various ALDH isozymes, osteoblasts expressed only ALDH2 and DSF downregulated its transcript as well as activity. Alda-1, a specific activator of ALDH2, stimulated osteoblast differentiation. Subcutaneous injection of DSF over the calvarium of new born rats reduced the differentiation phenotype of calvarial osteoblasts but increased the mRNA levels of Runx-2 and osteocalcin. DSF treatment at a human-equivalent dose of 30 mg/kg p.o. to adult Sprague Dawley rats caused trabecular osteopenia and suppressed the formation of mineralized nodule by bone marrow stromal cells. Moreover, DSF diminished bone regeneration at the fracture site. In growing rats, DSF diminished growth plate height, primary and secondary spongiosa, mineralized osteoid and trabecular strength. Substantial decreased bone formation was also observed in the cortical site of these rats. We conclude that DSF has a strong osteopenia inducing effect by impairing osteoblast survival and differentiation due to the inhibition of ALDH2 function. PMID:24496638

  5. Partial reversal of the acetaldehyde and butyraldehyde oxidation reactions catalysed by aldehyde dehydrogenases from sheep liver.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, G J; Dickinson, F M

    1978-01-01

    In the presence of acetic anhydride or butyric anhydride, liver aldehyde dehydrogenases catalyse the oxidation of NADH at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C. The maximum velocities and Michaelis constants for NADH at saturating anhydride concentrations are independent of which anhydride is used, the values being V'max. = 12 min-1 and Km for NADH = 9 micrometer for the mitochondrial enzyme and V'max = 25 min-1 and Km for NADH = 20 micrometer for the cytoplasmic enzyme. Substitution of [4A-2H]NADH for NADH resulted in 2-fold and 4-fold decreases in rate for the mitochondrial and cytoplasmic enzymes respectively. PMID:217349

  6. Polymorphism of ADH and ALDH genes among four ethnic groups in China and effects upon the risk for alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y C; Fan, J H; Edenberg, H J; Li, T K; Cui, Y H; Wang, Y F; Tian, C H; Zhou, C F; Zhou, R L; Wang, J; Zhao, Z L; Xia, G Y

    1997-10-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) that metabolize ethanol are polymorphic. Different alleles encode subunits of the enzymes that differ in their rate of metabolizing ethanol. These polymorphisms are distributed differently among populations and have been shown to influence the risk for alcoholism in some Asian populations. We have examined the allele frequencies at the ADH2, ADH3, and ALDH2 loci in four populations from China (Han, Mongolian, Korean, and Elunchun) and in alcoholics within each population. The four populations differ in allele frequencies, with the Elunchun having a much lower frequency of ADH2*2 alleles, and the Mongolian and Elunchun having a much lower frequency of ALDH2*2 alleles. Within each population, alleles at one or more of these three loci are protective against alcoholism, although the populations differ in which loci play significant roles. The protective allele at each locus (ALDH2*2, ADH2*2, and ADH3*1) encodes a subunit that either metabolizes ethanol to acetaldehyde more rapidly or slows the conversion of acetaldehyde to acetate. Taken as a whole, data demonstrate that genetic differences in the enzymes that metabolize alcohol can substantially affect the risk for alcoholism.

  7. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Knockout Accentuates Ethanol-Induced Cardiac Depression: Role of Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Heng; Byra, Emily A.; Yu, Lu; Hu, Nan; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol consumption leads to myocardial contractile dysfunction possibly due to the toxicity of ethanol and its major metabolite acetaldehyde. This study was designed to examine the influence of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) knockout (KO) on acute ethanol exposure-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Wild-type (WT) and ALDH2 KO mice were subjected to acute ethanol (3 g/kg, i.p.) challenge and cardiomyocyte contractile function was assessed 24 hrs later using an IonOptix® edge-detection system. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate ALDH2, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), phosphorylation of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). ALDH2 KO accentuated ethanol-induced elevation in cardiac acetaldehyde levels. Ethanol exposure depressed cardiomyocyte contractile function including decreased cell shortening amplitude and maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening as well as prolonged relengthening duration and a greater decline in peak shortening in response to increasing stimulus frequency, the effect of which was significantly exaggerated by ALDH2 KO. ALDH2 KO also unmasked an ethanol-induced prolongation of shortening duration. In addition, short-term in vitro incubation of ethanol-induced cardiomyocyte mechanical defects were exacerbated by the ALDH inhibitor cyanamide. Ethanol treatment dampened phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β associated with up-regulated PP2A, which was accentuated by ALDH2 KO. ALDH2 KO aggravated ethanol-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. These results suggested that ALDH2 deficiency led to worsened ethanol-induced cardiomyocyte function, possibly due to upregulated expression of protein phosphatase, depressed Akt activation and subsequently impaired mitochondrial function. These findings depict a critical role of ALDH2 in the pathogenesis of alcoholic cardiomyopathy. PMID:20362583

  8. Alda-1 is an agonist and chemical chaperone for the common human aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 variant

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Miller, Samantha; Younus, Hina; Vanam, Ram; Chen, Che-Hong; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    In approximately one billion people, a point mutation inactivates a key detoxifying enzyme, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2). This mitochondrial enzyme metabolizes toxic biogenic and environmental aldehydes, including the endogenously produced 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) and the environmental pollutant, acrolein. ALDH2 also bioactivates nitroglycerin, but it is best known for its role in ethanol metabolism. The accumulation of acetaldehyde following the consumption of even a single alcoholic beverage leads to the Asian Alcohol-induced Flushing Syndrome in ALDH2*2 homozygotes. The ALDH2*2 allele is semi-dominant and heterozygotic individuals exhibit a similar, but not as severe phenotype. We recently identified a small molecule, Alda-1, which activates wild-type ALDH2 and restores near wild-type activity to ALDH2*2. The structures of Alda-1 bound to ALDH2 and ALDH2*2 reveal how Alda-1 activates the wild-type enzyme and how it restores the activity of ALDH2*2 by acting as a structural chaperone. PMID:20062057

  9. Alda-1 is an agonist and chemical chaperone for the common human aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 variant

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Miller, Samantha; Younus, Hina; Vanam, Ram; Chen, Che-Hong; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2010-04-19

    In approximately one billion people, a point mutation inactivates a key detoxifying enzyme, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2). This mitochondrial enzyme metabolizes toxic biogenic and environmental aldehydes, including the endogenously produced 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) and the environmental pollutant acrolein, and also bioactivates nitroglycerin. ALDH2 is best known, however, for its role in ethanol metabolism. The accumulation of acetaldehyde following the consumption of even a single alcoholic beverage leads to the Asian alcohol-induced flushing syndrome in ALDH2*2 homozygotes. The ALDH2*2 allele is semidominant, and heterozygotic individuals show a similar but less severe phenotype. We recently identified a small molecule, Alda-1, that activates wild-type ALDH2 and restores near-wild-type activity to ALDH2*2. The structures of Alda-1 bound to ALDH2 and ALDH2*2 reveal how Alda-1 activates the wild-type enzyme and how it restores the activity of ALDH2*2 by acting as a structural chaperone.

  10. Phytophenols in whisky lower blood acetaldehyde level by depressing alcohol metabolism through inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (class I) in mice.

    PubMed

    Haseba, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Junichi; Sato, Shigeo; Abe, Yuko; Ohno, Youkichi

    2008-12-01

    We recently reported that the maturation of whisky prolongs the exposure of the body to a given dose of alcohol by reducing the rate of alcohol metabolism and thus lowers the blood acetaldehyde level (Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2007;31:77s-82s). In this study, administration of the nonvolatile fraction of whisky was found to lower the concentration of acetaldehyde in the blood of mice by depressing alcohol metabolism through the inhibition of liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Four of the 12 phenolic compounds detected in the nonvolatile fraction (caffeic acid, vanillin, syringaldehyde, ellagic acid), the amounts of which increase during the maturation of whisky, were found to strongly inhibit mouse ADH 1 (class I). Their inhibition constant values for ADH 1 were 0.08, 7.9, 15.6, and 22.0 mumol/L, respectively, whereas that for pyrazole, a well-known ADH inhibitor, was 5.1 mumol/L. The 2 phenolic aldehydes and ellagic acid exhibited a mixed type of inhibition, whereas caffeic acid showed the competitive type. When individually administered to mice together with ethanol, each of these phytophenols depressed the elimination of ethanol, thereby lowering the acetaldehyde concentration of blood. Thus, it was demonstrated that the enhanced inhibition of liver ADH 1 due to the increased amounts of these phytophenols in mature whisky caused the depression of alcohol metabolism and a consequent lowering of blood acetaldehyde level. These substances are commonly found in various food plants and act as antioxidants and/or anticarcinogens. Therefore, the intake of foods rich in them together with alcohol may not only diminish the metabolic toxicity of alcohol by reducing both the blood acetaldehyde level and oxidative stress, but also help limit the amount of alcohol a person drinks by depressing alcohol metabolism.

  11. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 deficiency ameliorates alcoholic fatty liver but worsens liver inflammation and fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyo-Jung; Won, Young-Suk; Park, Ogyi; Chang, Binxia; Duryee, Michael J.; Thiele, Geoffrey E.; Matsumoto, Akiko; Singh, Surendra; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Song, Byoung-Joon; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Gao, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is the major enzyme that metabolizes acetaldehyde produced from alcohol metabolism. Approximately 40~50% of East Asians carry an inactive ALDH2 gene and exhibit acetaldehyde accumulation after alcohol consumption. However, the role of ALDH2 deficiency in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury remains obscure. In the present study, wild-type and ALDH2−/− mice were subjected to ethanol feeding and/or carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) treatment, and liver injury was assessed. Compared with wild-type mice, ethanol-fed ALDH2−/− mice had higher levels of malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) adduct and greater hepatic inflammation, with higher hepatic IL-6 expression but surprisingly lower levels of steatosis and serum ALT. Higher IL-6 levels were also detected in ethanol-treated precision-cut-liver-slices from ALDH2−/− mice and in Kupffer cells isolated from ethanol-fed ALDH2−/− mice than those levels in wild-type mice. In vitro incubation with MAA enhanced the LPS-mediated stimulation of IL-6 production in Kupffer cells. In agreement with these findings, hepatic activation of the major IL-6 downstream signaling molecule signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was higher in ethanol-fed ALDH2−/− mice than in wild-type mice. An additional deletion of hepatic STAT3 increased steatosis and hepatocellular damage in ALDH2−/− mice. Finally, ethanol-fed ALDH2−/− mice were more prone to CCl4-induced liver inflammation and fibrosis than ethanol-fed wild-type mice. Conclusions: ALDH2−/− mice are resistant to ethanol-induced steatosis but prone to inflammation and fibrosis via MAA-mediated paracrine activation of IL-6 in Kupffer cells. These findings suggest that alcohol, via acetaldehyde and its associated adducts, stimulates hepatic inflammation and fibrosis independent from causing hepatocyte death, and that ALDH2-deficient individuals may be resistant to steatosis and blood ALT elevation, but are

  12. ADH and ALDH polymorphisms and alcohol dependence in Mexican and Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Cindy L.; Liang, Tiebing; Gizer, Ian R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethanol is primarily metabolized in the liver by 2 rate-limiting reactions: conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and subsequent conversion of acetaldehyde to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). ADH and ALDH exist in multiple isozymes that differ in their kinetic properties. Notably, polymorphisms within the genes that encode for these isozymes vary in their allele frequencies between ethnic groups, and thus, they have been considered as candidate genes that may differentially influence risk for the development of alcohol dependence across ethnic groups. Objectives and Methods Associations between alcohol dependence and polymorphisms in ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2, were compared in a community sample of Native Americans living on reservations (n=791) and Mexican Americans (n=391) living within the same county. Results Two Mexican Americans and no Native Americans possessed one ALDH2*2 allele. Presence of at least one ADH1B*2 allele was found in 7% of the Native Americans and 13% of the Mexican Americans, but was only associated with protection against alcohol dependence in the Mexican Americans. Presence of at least one ADH1B*3 allele was found in 4% if the Native Americans and 2% of the Mexican Americans, but was associated with protection against alcohol dependence only in the Native Americans. No associations between alcohol dependence and polymorphisms in ADH1C were found. Conclusions and Scientific Significance Polymorphisms in ADH1B are protective against alcoholism in these two populations; however, these findings do not explain the high prevalence of alcoholism in these populations. PMID:22931071

  13. ADH and ALDH polymorphisms and alcohol dependence in Mexican and Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Cindy L.; Liang, Tiebing; Gizer, Ian R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethanol is primarily metabolized in the liver by 2 rate-limiting reactions: conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and subsequent conversion of acetaldehyde to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). ADH and ALDH exist in multiple isozymes that differ in their kinetic properties. Notably, polymorphisms within the genes that encode for these isozymes vary in their allele frequencies between ethnic groups, and thus, they have been considered as candidate genes that may differentially influence risk for the development of alcohol dependence across ethnic groups. Objectives and Methods Associations between alcohol dependence and polymorphisms in ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2, were compared in a community sample of Native Americans living on reservations (n=791) and Mexican Americans (n=391) living within the same county. Results Two Mexican Americans and no Native Americans possessed one ALDH2*2 allele. Presence of at least one ADH1B*2 allele was found in 7% of the Native Americans and 13% of the Mexican Americans, but was only associated with protection against alcohol dependence in the Mexican Americans. Presence of at least one ADH1B*3 allele was found in 4% if the Native Americans and 2% of the Mexican Americans, but was associated with protection against alcohol dependence only in the Native Americans. No associations between alcohol dependence and polymorphisms in ADH1C were found. Conclusions and Scientific Significance Polymorphisms in ADH1B are protective against alcoholism in these two populations; however, these findings do not explain the high prevalence of alcoholism in these populations. PMID:22931071

  14. ALDH2 attenuates Dox-induced cardiotoxicity by inhibiting cardiac apoptosis and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yawen; Xu, Yan; Hua, Songwen; Zhou, Shenghua; Wang, Kangkai

    2015-01-01

    The anthracycline chemotherapy drug doxorubicin (DOX) is cardiotoxic. This study aimed to explore the effect of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), a detoxifying protein, on DOX-induced cardiotoxicity and unveil the underlying mechanisms. BALB/c mice were randomly divided in four groups: control group (no treatment), DOX group (DOX administration for myocardial damage induction), DOX + Daidzin group (DOX administration + Daidzin, an ALDH2 antagonist) and DOX + Alda-1 group (DOX administration + Alda-1, an ALDH2 agonist). Then, survival, haemodynamic parameters, expression of pro- and anti-apoptosis markers, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) levels, expression and localization of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and its cytoplasmic subunit p47PHOX, and ALDH2 expression and activity were assessed. Mortality rates of 0, 35, 5, and 70% were obtained in the control, DOX, DOX + Alda-1, and DOX + Daidzin groups, respectively, at the ninth weekend. Compared with control animals, DOX treatment resulted in significantly reduced left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and ± dp/dt, and overtly increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP); increased Bax expression and caspase-3/7 activity, and reduced Bcl-2 expression in the myocardium; increased ROS (about 2 fold) and 4-HNE adduct (3 fold) levels in the myocardium; increased NOX2 protein expression and membrane translocation of P47PHOX. These effects were aggravated in the DOX + Daidzin group, DOX + Alda-1 treated animals showed partial or complete alleviation. Finally, Daidzin further reduced the DOX-repressed ALDH2 activity, which was partially rescued by Alda-1. These results indicated that ALDH2 attenuates DOX-induced cardiotoxicity by inhibiting oxidative stress, NOX2 expression and activity, and reducing myocardial apoptosis. PMID:26221217

  15. Impaired Regulation of ALDH2 Protein Expression Revealing a Yet Unknown Epigenetic Impact of rs886205 on Specific Methylation of a Negative Regulatory Promoter Region in Alcohol-Dependent Patients.

    PubMed

    Haschemi Nassab, Mani; Rhein, Mathias; Hagemeier, Lars; Kaeser, Marius; Muschler, Marc; Glahn, Alexander; Pich, Andreas; Heberlein, Annemarie; Kornhuber, Johannes; Bleich, Stefan; Frieling, Helge; Hillemacher, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Acetaldehyde, the carcinogenic metabolite of ethanol known to provoke aversive symptoms of alcohol consumption, is predominantly eliminated by aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2). Reduced ALDH2 activity correlates with low alcohol tolerance and low risk for alcohol dependence. The ALDH2 promoter polymorphism rs886205 (A>G) is associated with decreased promoter activity, but a molecular mechanism and allele-dependent ALDH2 protein expression has not been described yet. On the basis of allele-dependent epigenetic effects, we analyzed the rs886205 genotype, methylation rates of cytosine-phosphatidyl-guanine (CpG)-sites within a regulatory promoter region and ALDH2 protein levels in 82 alcohol-dependent patients during a 2-week withdrawal and compared them to 34 matched controls. Patients without the G-allele of rs886205 showed higher methylation of the promoter region than controls and readily adapted epigenetically as well as on protein level during withdrawal, while patients with the G-allele displayed retarded methylation readjustment and no change in ALDH2 protein levels. Our data provide novel insights into an unknown genetic-epigenetic interaction, revealing impaired ALDH2 protein expression in patients with the G-allele of rs886205. Additionally, we checked for an association between rs886205 and protection against alcohol dependence and found a trend association between the G-allele and protection against alcohol dependence that needs replication in a larger Caucasian cohort. PMID:26339786

  16. Multiple and additive functions of ALDH3A1 and ALDH1A1: cataract phenotype and ocular oxidative damage in Aldh3a1(-/-)/Aldh1a1(-/-) knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Natalie; Bateman, J Bronwyn; Estey, Tia; Kuszak, Jer R; Nees, David W; Piatigorsky, Joram; Duester, Gregg; Day, Brian J; Huang, Jie; Hines, Lisa M; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2007-08-31

    ALDH3A1 (aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1) is abundant in the mouse cornea but undetectable in the lens, and ALDH1A1 is present at lower (catalytic) levels in the cornea and lens. To test the hypothesis that ALDH3A1 and ALDH1A1 protect the anterior segment of the eye against environmentally induced oxidative damage, Aldh1a1(-/-)/Aldh3a1(-/-) double knock-out and Aldh1a1(-/-) and Aldh3a1(-/-) single knock-out mice were evaluated for biochemical changes and cataract formation (lens opacification). The Aldh1a1/Aldh3a1- and Aldh3a1-null mice develop cataracts in the anterior and posterior subcapsular regions as well as punctate opacities in the cortex by 1 month of age. The Aldh1a1-null mice also develop cataracts later in life (6-9 months of age). One- to three-month-old Aldh-null mice exposed to UVB exhibited accelerated anterior lens subcapsular opacification, which was more pronounced in Aldh3a1(-/-) and Aldh3a1(-/-)/Aldh1a1(-/-) mice compared with Aldh1a1(-/-) and wild type animals. Cataract formation was associated with decreased proteasomal activity, increased protein oxidation, increased GSH levels, and increased levels of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal- and malondialdehyde-protein adducts. In conclusion, these findings support the hypothesis that corneal ALDH3A1 and lens ALDH1A1 protect the eye against cataract formation via nonenzymatic (light filtering) and enzymatic (detoxification) functions. PMID:17567582

  17. Glu504Lys Single Nucleotide Polymorphism of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Gene and the Risk of Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Wang, Chuancai

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 2 is a mitochondrial enzyme that is known for its important role in oxidation and detoxification of ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde. ALDH2 also metabolizes other reactive aldehydes such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and acrolein. The Glu504Lys single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of ALDH2 gene, which is found in approximately 40% of the East Asian populations, causes defect in the enzyme activity of ALDH2, leading to alterations in acetaldehyde metabolism and alcohol-induced “flushing” syndrome. Evidence suggests that ALDH2 Glu504Lys SNP is a potential candidate genetic risk factor for a variety of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and late-onset Alzheimer's disease. In addition, the association between ALDH2 Glu504Lys SNP and the development of these chronic diseases appears to be affected by the interaction between the SNP and lifestyle factors such as alcohol consumption as well as by the presence of other genetic variations. PMID:26491656

  18. Response to acetaldehyde stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a strain-dependent regulation of several ALD genes and is mediated by the general stress response pathway.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Agustín; del Olmo Ml, Marcel lí

    2003-06-01

    One of the stress conditions that yeast may encounter is the presence of acetaldehyde. In a previous study we identified that, in response to this stress, several HSP genes are induced that are also involved in the response to other forms of stress. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) play an important role in yeast acetaldehyde metabolism (e.g. when cells are growing in ethanol). In this work we analyse the expression of the genes encoding these enzymes (ALD) and also the corresponding enzymatic activities under several growth conditions. We investigate three kinds of yeast strains: laboratory strains, strains involved in the alcoholic fermentation stage of wine production and flor yeasts (responsible for the biological ageing of sherry wines). The latter are very important to consider because they grow in media containing high ethanol concentrations, and produce important amounts of acetaldehyde. Under several growth conditions, further addition of acetaldehyde or ethanol in flor yeasts induced the expression of some ALD genes and led to an increase in ALDH activity. This result is consistent with their need to obtain energy from ethanol during biological ageing processes. Our data also suggest that post-transcriptional and/or post-translational mechanisms are involved in regulating the activity of these enzymes. Finally, analyses indicate that the Msn2/4p and Hsf1p transcription factors are necessary for HSP26, ALD2/3 and ALD4 gene expression under acetaldehyde stress, while PKA represses the expression of these genes.

  19. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 in aplastic anemia, Fanconi anemia and hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Van Wassenhove, Lauren D; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Weinberg, Kenneth I

    2016-09-01

    Maintenance of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment depends on the ability to metabolize exogenously and endogenously generated toxins, and to repair cellular damage caused by such toxins. Reactive aldehydes have been demonstrated to cause specific genotoxic injury, namely DNA interstrand cross-links. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a member of a 19 isoenzyme ALDH family with different substrate specificities, subcellular localization, and patterns of expression. ALDH2 is localized in mitochondria and is essential for the metabolism of acetaldehyde, thereby placing it directly downstream of ethanol metabolism. Deficiency in ALDH2 expression and function are caused by a single nucleotide substitution and resulting amino acid change, called ALDH2*2. This genetic polymorphism affects 35-45% of East Asians (about ~560 million people), and causes the well-known Asian flushing syndrome, which results in disulfiram-like reactions after ethanol consumption. Recently, the ALDH2*2 genotype has been found to be associated with marrow failure, with both an increased risk of sporadic aplastic anemia and more rapid progression of Fanconi anemia. This review discusses the unexpected interrelationship between aldehydes, ALDH2 and hematopoietic stem cell biology, and in particular its relationship to Fanconi anemia. PMID:27650066

  20. Inhibition of human alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases by aspirin and salicylate: assessment of the effects on first-pass metabolism of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shou-Lun; Lee, Yung-Pin; Wu, Min-Li; Chi, Yu-Chou; Liu, Chiu-Ming; Lai, Ching-Long; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported that aspirin significantly reduced the first-pass metabolism (FPM) of ethanol in humans thereby increasing adverse effects of alcohol. The underlying causes, however, remain poorly understood. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol, are complex enzyme families that exhibit functional polymorphisms among ethnic groups and distinct tissue distributions. We investigated the inhibition profiles by aspirin and its major metabolite salicylate of ethanol oxidation by recombinant human ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, ADH1C2, ADH2, and ADH4, and acetaldehyde oxidation by ALDH1A1 and ALDH2, at pH 7.5 and 0.5 mM NAD(+). Competitive inhibition pattern was found to be a predominant type among the ADHs and ALDHs studied, although noncompetitive and uncompetitive inhibitions were also detected in a few cases. The inhibition constants of salicylate for the ADHs and ALDHs were considerably lower than that of aspirin with the exception of ADH1A that can be ascribed to a substitution of Ala-93 at the bottom of substrate pocket as revealed by molecular docking experiments. Kinetic inhibition equation-based simulations show at higher therapeutic levels of blood plasma salicylate (1.5 mM) that the decrease of activities at 2-10 mM ethanol for ADH1A/ADH2 and ADH1B2/ADH1B3 are predicted to be 75-86% and 31-52%, respectively, and that the activity decline for ALDH1A1 and ALDH2 at 10-50 μM acetaldehyde to be 62-73%. Our findings suggest that salicylate may substantially inhibit hepatic FPM of alcohol at both the ADH and ALDH steps when concurrent intaking aspirin. PMID:25772736

  1. Inhibition of human alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases by aspirin and salicylate: assessment of the effects on first-pass metabolism of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shou-Lun; Lee, Yung-Pin; Wu, Min-Li; Chi, Yu-Chou; Liu, Chiu-Ming; Lai, Ching-Long; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported that aspirin significantly reduced the first-pass metabolism (FPM) of ethanol in humans thereby increasing adverse effects of alcohol. The underlying causes, however, remain poorly understood. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol, are complex enzyme families that exhibit functional polymorphisms among ethnic groups and distinct tissue distributions. We investigated the inhibition profiles by aspirin and its major metabolite salicylate of ethanol oxidation by recombinant human ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, ADH1C2, ADH2, and ADH4, and acetaldehyde oxidation by ALDH1A1 and ALDH2, at pH 7.5 and 0.5 mM NAD(+). Competitive inhibition pattern was found to be a predominant type among the ADHs and ALDHs studied, although noncompetitive and uncompetitive inhibitions were also detected in a few cases. The inhibition constants of salicylate for the ADHs and ALDHs were considerably lower than that of aspirin with the exception of ADH1A that can be ascribed to a substitution of Ala-93 at the bottom of substrate pocket as revealed by molecular docking experiments. Kinetic inhibition equation-based simulations show at higher therapeutic levels of blood plasma salicylate (1.5 mM) that the decrease of activities at 2-10 mM ethanol for ADH1A/ADH2 and ADH1B2/ADH1B3 are predicted to be 75-86% and 31-52%, respectively, and that the activity decline for ALDH1A1 and ALDH2 at 10-50 μM acetaldehyde to be 62-73%. Our findings suggest that salicylate may substantially inhibit hepatic FPM of alcohol at both the ADH and ALDH steps when concurrent intaking aspirin.

  2. Novel dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative hydrolysis of carbon-nitrogen double bonds for hydrazone degradation.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Hideomi; Suzuta, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2008-02-29

    Hydrazines and their derivatives are versatile artificial and natural compounds that are metabolized by elusive biological systems. Here we identified microorganisms that assimilate hydrazones and isolated the yeast, Candida palmioleophila MK883. When cultured with adipic acid bis(ethylidene hydrazide) as the sole source of carbon, C. palmioleophila MK883 degraded hydrazones and accumulated adipic acid dihydrazide. Cytosolic NAD+- or NADP+-dependent hydrazone dehydrogenase (Hdh) activity was detectable under these conditions. The production of Hdh was inducible by adipic acid bis(ethylidene hydrazide) and the hydrazone, varelic acid ethylidene hydrazide, under the control of carbon catabolite repression. Purified Hdh oxidized and hydrated the C=N double bond of acetaldehyde hydrazones by reducing NAD+ or NADP+ to produce relevant hydrazides and acetate, the latter of which the yeast assimilated. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed that Hdh belongs to the aldehyde dehydrogenase (Aldh) superfamily. Kinetic and mutagenesis studies showed that Hdh formed a ternary complex with the substrates and that conserved Cys is essential for the activity. The mechanism of Hdh is similar to that of Aldh, except that it catalyzed oxidative hydrolysis of hydrazones that requires adding a water molecule to the reaction catalyzed by conventional Aldh. Surprisingly, both Hdh and Aldh from baker's yeast (Ald4p) catalyzed the Hdh reaction as well as aldehyde oxidation. Our findings are unique in that we discovered a biological mechanism for hydrazone utilization and a novel function of proteins in the Aldh family that act on C=N compounds. PMID:18096698

  3. Inhibition of human alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases by acetaminophen: Assessment of the effects on first-pass metabolism of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-Pin; Liao, Jian-Tong; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Wu, Ting-Lun; Lee, Shou-Lun; Liu, Jong-Kang; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2013-11-01

    Acetaminophen is one of the most widely used over-the-counter analgesic, antipyretic medications. Use of acetaminophen and alcohol are commonly associated. Previous studies showed that acetaminophen might affect bioavailability of ethanol by inhibiting gastric alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). However, potential inhibitions by acetaminophen of first-pass metabolism (FPM) of ethanol, catalyzed by the human ADH family and by relevant aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) isozymes, remain undefined. ADH and ALDH both exhibit racially distinct allozymes and tissue-specific distribution of isozymes, and are principal enzymes responsible for ethanol metabolism in humans. In this study, we investigated acetaminophen inhibition of ethanol oxidation with recombinant human ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, ADH1C2, ADH2, and ADH4, and inhibition of acetaldehyde oxidation with recombinant human ALDH1A1 and ALDH2. The investigations were done at near physiological pH 7.5 and with a cytoplasmic coenzyme concentration of 0.5 mM NAD(+). Acetaminophen acted as a noncompetitive inhibitor for ADH enzymes, with the slope inhibition constants (Kis) ranging from 0.90 mM (ADH2) to 20 mM (ADH1A), and the intercept inhibition constants (Kii) ranging from 1.4 mM (ADH1C allozymes) to 19 mM (ADH1A). Acetaminophen exhibited noncompetitive inhibition for ALDH2 (Kis = 3.0 mM and Kii = 2.2 mM), but competitive inhibition for ALDH1A1 (Kis = 0.96 mM). The metabolic interactions between acetaminophen and ethanol/acetaldehyde were assessed by computer simulation using inhibition equations and the determined kinetic constants. At therapeutic to subtoxic plasma levels of acetaminophen (i.e., 0.2-0.5 mM) and physiologically relevant concentrations of ethanol (10 mM) and acetaldehyde (10 μm) in target tissues, acetaminophen could inhibit ADH1C allozymes (12-26%) and ADH2 (14-28%) in the liver and small intestine, ADH4 (15-31%) in the stomach, and ALDH1A1 (16-33%) and ALDH2 (8.3-19%) in all 3 tissues. The

  4. Genetic-epidemiological evidence for the role of acetaldehyde in cancers related to alcohol drinking.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, C J Peter

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol drinking increases the risk for a number of cancers. Currently, the highest risk (Group 1) concerns oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, liver, colorectum, and female breast, as assessed by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Alcohol and other beverage constituents, their metabolic effects, and alcohol-related unhealthy lifestyles have been suggested as etiological factors. The aim of the present survey is to evaluate the carcinogenic role of acetaldehyde in alcohol-related cancers, with special emphasis on the genetic-epidemiological evidence. Acetaldehyde, as a constituent of alcoholic beverages, and microbial and endogenous alcohol oxidation well explain why alcohol-related cancers primarily occur in the digestive tracts and other tissues with active alcohol and acetaldehyde metabolism. Genetic-epidemiological research has brought compelling evidence for the causality of acetaldehyde in alcohol-related cancers. Thus, IARC recently categorized alcohol-drinking-related acetaldehyde to Group 1 for head and neck and esophageal cancers. This is probably just the tip of the iceberg, since more recent epidemiological studies have also shown significant positive associations between the aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH2 (rs671)*2 allele (encoding inactive enzyme causing high acetaldehyde elevations) and gastric, colorectal, lung, and hepatocellular cancers. However, a number of the current studies lack the appropriate matching or stratification of alcohol drinking in the case-control comparisons, which has led to erroneous interpretations of the data. Future studies should consider these aspects more thoroughly. The polymorphism phenotypes (flushing and nausea) may provide valuable tools for future successful health education in the prevention of alcohol-drinking-related cancers.

  5. Polymorphisms in Alcohol Metabolism Genes ADH1B and ALDH2, Alcohol Consumption and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crous-Bou, Marta; Rennert, Gad; Cuadras, Daniel; Salazar, Ramon; Cordero, David; Saltz Rennert, Hedy; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Kopelovich, Levy; Monroe Lipkin, Steven; Bernard Gruber, Stephen; Moreno, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Epidemiological risk factors for CRC included alcohol intake, which is mainly metabolized to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase and further oxidized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase; consequently, the role of genes in the alcohol metabolism pathways is of particular interest. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between SNPs in ADH1B and ALDH2 genes and CRC risk, and also the main effect of alcohol consumption on CRC risk in the study population. Methodology/Principal Findings SNPs from ADH1B and ALDH2 genes, included in alcohol metabolism pathway, were genotyped in 1694 CRC cases and 1851 matched controls from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study. Information on clinicopathological characteristics, lifestyle and dietary habits were also obtained. Logistic regression and association analysis were conducted. A positive association between alcohol consumption and CRC risk was observed in male participants from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study (MECC) study (OR = 1.47; 95%CI = 1.18-1.81). Moreover, the SNPs rs1229984 in ADH1B gene was found to be associated with CRC risk: under the recessive model, the OR was 1.75 for A/A genotype (95%CI = 1.21-2.52; p-value = 0.0025). A path analysis based on structural equation modeling showed a direct effect of ADH1B gene polymorphisms on colorectal carcinogenesis and also an indirect effect mediated through alcohol consumption. Conclusions/Significance Genetic polymorphisms in the alcohol metabolism pathways have a potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis, probably due to the differences in the ethanol metabolism and acetaldehyde oxidation of these enzyme variants. PMID:24282520

  6. Interaction between ALDH2*1*1 and DRD2/ANKK1 TaqI A1A1 genes may be associated with antisocial personality disorder not co-morbid with alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ru-Band; Lee, Jia-Fu; Huang, San-Yuan; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Lin, Wei-Wen; Wu, Pei-Lin; Ko, Huei-Chen

    2012-09-01

    Previous studies on acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) focused on drinking behavior or alcoholism because the ALDH2*2 allele protects against the risk of developing alcoholism. The mechanism provides that the ALDH2 gene's protective effect is also involved in dopamine metabolism. The interaction of the ALDH2 gene with neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, is suggested to be related to alcoholism. Because alcoholism is often co-morbid with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), previous association studies on antisocial alcoholism cannot differentiate whether those genes relate to ASPD with alcoholism or ASPD only. This study examined the influence of the interaction effect of the ALDH2*1*1, *1*2 or *2*2 polymorphisms with the dopamine 2 receptor (DRD2) Taq I polymorphism on ASPD. Our 541 Han Chinese male participants were classified into three groups: antisocial alcoholism (ASPD co-morbid with alcohol dependence, antisocial ALC; n = 133), ASPD without alcoholism (ASPD not co-morbid with alcohol dependence, antisocial non-ALC; n = 164) and community controls (healthy volunteers from the community; n = 244). Compared with healthy controls, individuals with the DRD2 A1/A1 and the ALDH2*1/*1 genotypes were at a 5.39 times greater risk for antisocial non-ALC than were those with other genotypes. Our results suggest that the DRD2/ANKK1 and ALDH2 genes interacted in the antisocial non-ALC group; a connection neglected in previous studies caused by not separating antisocial ALC from ASPD. Our study made this distinction and showed that these two genes may be associated ASPD without co-morbid alcoholism.

  7. Production of acetaldehyde by Zymomonas mobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Wecker, M.S.A.; Zall, R.R.

    1987-12-01

    Mutants of Zymomonas mobilis were selected for decreased alcohol dehydrogenase activity by using consecutively higher concentration of allyl alcohol. A mutant selected by using 100 mM allyl alcohol produced acetaldehyde at a level of 4.08 g/liter when the organism was grown in aerated batch cultures on a medium containing 4.0% (wt/wt) glucose. On the basis of the amount of glucose utilized, this level of acetaldehyde production represents nearly 40% of the maximum theoretical yield. Acetaldehyde produced during growth was continuously air stripped from the reactor. Acetaldehyde present in the exhaust stream was then trapped as the acetaldehyde-bisulfite addition product in an aqueous solution of sodium bisulfite and released by treatment with base. Acetaldehyde was found to inhibit growth of Z. mobilis at concentrations as low as 0.05% (wt/wt) acetaldehyde. An acetaldehyde-tolerant mutant of Z. mobilis was isolated after both mutagenesis with nitrosoguanidine and selection in the presence of vapor-phase acetaldehyde. The production of acetaldehyde has potential advantages over that of ethanol: lower energy requirements for production separation, efficient separation of product from dilute feed streams, continuous separation of product from the reactor, and a higher marketplace value.

  8. HEPATOCYTE EXPRESION OF TUMOR ASSOCIATED ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE (ALDH-3) AND P21 RAS FOLLOWING DIETHYLNITROSAMINE (DEN) INITIATION AND CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO DI(2-ETHYLHEXYL) PHTHALATE (DHEP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate esters such as di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP)either promote or inhibit rat liver tumorigenesis depending on the carcinogenesis protocol. In this study, we examined the expression of two histochemical markers, the tumor associated isozyme of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD...

  9. Acetaldehyde as an underestimated risk factor for cancer development: role of genetics in ethanol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Stickel, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption is a strong risk factor for the development of certain types of cancer including those of the upper aerodigestive tract, the liver, the large intestine and the female breast. Multiple mechanisms are involved in alcohol-mediated carcinogenesis. Among those the action of acetaldehyde (AA), the first metabolite of ethanol oxidation is of particular interest. AA is toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic in animal experiments. AA binds to DNA and forms carcinogenic adducts. Direct evidence of the role of AA in alcohol-associated carcinogenesis derived from genetic linkage studies in alcoholics. Polymorphisms or mutations of genes coding for AA generation or detoxifying enzymes resulting in elevated AA concentrations are associated with increased cancer risk. Approximately 40% of Japanese, Koreans or Chinese carry the AA dehydrogenase 2*2 (ALDH2*2) allele in its heterozygous form. This allele codes for an ALDH2 enzyme with little activity leading to high AA concentrations after the consumption of even small amounts of alcohol. When individuals with this allele consume ethanol chronically, a significant increased risk for upper alimentary tract and colorectal cancer is noted. In Caucasians, alcohol dehydrogenase 1C*1 (ADH1C*1) allele encodes for an ADH isoenzyme which produces 2.5 times more AA than the corresponding allele ADH1C*2. In studies with moderate to high alcohol intake, ADH1C*1 allele frequency and rate of homozygosity was found to be significantly associated with an increased risk for cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract, the liver, the colon and the female breast. These studies underline the important role of acetaldehyde in ethanol-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:19847467

  10. Importance of ALDH1A enzymes in determining human testicular retinoic acid concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Samuel L.; Kent, Travis; Hogarth, Cathryn A.; Schlatt, Stefan; Prasad, Bhagwat; Haenisch, Michael; Walsh, Thomas; Muller, Charles H.; Griswold, Michael D.; Amory, John K.; Isoherranen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the active metabolite of vitamin A, is required for spermatogenesis and many other biological processes. RA formation requires irreversible oxidation of retinal to RA by aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes of the 1A family (ALDH1A). While ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3 all form RA, the expression pattern and relative contribution of these enzymes to RA formation in the testis is unknown. In this study, novel methods to measure ALDH1A protein levels and intrinsic RA formation were used to accurately predict RA formation velocities in individual human testis samples and an association between RA formation and intratesticular RA concentrations was observed. The distinct localization of ALDH1A in the testis suggests a specific role for each enzyme in controlling RA formation. ALDH1A1 was found in Sertoli cells, while only ALDH1A2 was found in spermatogonia, spermatids, and spermatocytes. In the absence of cellular retinol binding protein (CRBP)1, ALDH1A1 was predicted to be the main contributor to intratesticular RA formation, but when CRBP1 was present, ALDH1A2 was predicted to be equally important in RA formation as ALDH1A1. This study provides a comprehensive novel methodology to evaluate RA homeostasis in human tissues and provides insight to how the individual ALDH1A enzymes mediate RA concentrations in specific cell types. PMID:25502770

  11. ALDH1 might influence the metastatic capability of HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Tingting; Lu, Rongbiao; Li, Yiqing; Peng, Yongpai; Ding, Miao; Xie, Xiaofei; Lin, Zhongqiu

    2015-09-01

    Recent data suggest that tumor persistence and recurrence could be caused by the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) has been implicated in cancer pathogenesis and used as a CSC marker. We previously reported that cervical carcinoma contains a small subpopulation of cells expressing ALDH1 [1]. In this study, we used small interfering RNA to suppress ALDH1 expression and introduced an ALDH1 reporting vector into HeLa cells followed by various in vitro assays. We showed that knockdown of ALDH1 expression reduced the cell migration ability of HeLa cells, whereas augmented expression of ALDH1 increased cell migration. However, there was no difference in the cellular proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, and invasion. These results indicate that ALDH1 is directly involved in HeLa migration.

  12. Genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogense-1B and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2, alcohol flushing, mean corpuscular volume, and aerodigestive tract neoplasia in Japanese drinkers.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Akira; Mizukami, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogenase-1B (ADH1B) and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) modulate exposure levels to ethanol/acetaldehyde. Endoscopic screening of 6,014 Japanese alcoholics yielded high detection rates of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; 4.1%) and head and neck SCC (1.0%). The risks of upper aerodigestive tract SCC/dysplasia, especially of multiple SCC/dysplasia, were increased in a multiplicative fashion by the presence of a combination of slow-metabolizing ADH1B*1/*1 and inactive heterozygous ALDH2*1/*2 because of prolonged exposure to higher concentrations of ethanol/acetaldehyde. A questionnaire asking about current and past facial flushing after drinking a glass (≈180 mL) of beer is a reliable tool for detecting the presence of inactive ALDH2. We invented a health-risk appraisal (HRA) model including the flushing questionnaire and drinking, smoking, and dietary habits. Esophageal SCC was detected at a high rate by endoscopic mass-screening in high HRA score persons. A total of 5.0% of 4,879 alcoholics had a history of (4.0%) or newly diagnosed (1.0%) gastric cancer. Their high frequency of a history of gastric cancer is partly explained by gastrectomy being a risk factor for alcoholism because of altered ethanol metabolism, e.g., by blood ethanol level overshooting. The combination of H. pylori-associated atrophic gastritis and ALDH2*1/*2 showed the greatest risk of gastric cancer in alcoholics. High detection rates of advanced colorectal adenoma/carcinoma were found in alcoholics, 15.7% of 744 immunochemical fecal occult blood test (IFOBT)-negative alcoholics and 31.5% of the 393 IFOBT-positive alcoholics. Macrocytosis with an MCV≥106 fl increased the risk of neoplasia in the entire aerodigestive tract of alcoholics, suggesting that poor nutrition as well as ethanol/acetaldehyde exposure plays an important role in neoplasia.

  13. Biotransformation of ethanol to acetaldehyde by wild and mutant strains of methylotrophic yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, O.M.; Sibirnyi, A.A.; Ksheminskaya, G.P. |

    1995-05-01

    The conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde by intact cells of wild and mutant strains of methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha was studied. It was established that mutations that lower the activity of aldehyde reductase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase stimulate acetaldehyde accumulation. The highest accumulation of acetaldehyde was found in a mutant that possessed increased alcohol oxidase activity in growth on a medium with glucose. A decrease in formaldehyde dehydrogenase did not stimulate acetaldehyde accumulation. Bioconversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde was most effective at lowered temperatures due to marked suppression of catabolic alcohol oxidase inactivation, but not to the activity of this enzyme under indicated conditions. 27 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase extended family.

    PubMed

    Perozich, J; Nicholas, H; Wang, B C; Lindahl, R; Hempel, J

    1999-01-01

    One hundred-forty-five full-length aldehyde dehydrogenase-related sequences were aligned to determine relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) extended family. The alignment reveals only four invariant residues: two glycines, a phenylalanine involved in NAD binding, and a glutamic acid that coordinates the nicotinamide ribose in certain E-NAD binary complex crystal structures, but which may also serve as a general base for the catalytic reaction. The cysteine that provides the catalytic thiol and its closest neighbor in space, an asparagine residue, are conserved in all ALDHs with demonstrated dehydrogenase activity. Sixteen residues are conserved in at least 95% of the sequences; 12 of these cluster into seven sequence motifs conserved in almost all ALDHs. These motifs cluster around the active site of the enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis of these ALDHs indicates at least 13 ALDH families, most of which have previously been identified but not grouped separately by alignment. ALDHs cluster into two main trunks of the phylogenetic tree. The largest, the "Class 3" trunk, contains mostly substrate-specific ALDH families, as well as the class 3 ALDH family itself. The other trunk, the "Class 1/2" trunk, contains mostly variable substrate ALDH families, including the class 1 and 2 ALDH families. Divergence of the substrate-specific ALDHs occurred earlier than the division between ALDHs with broad substrate specificities. A site on the World Wide Web has also been devoted to this alignment project.

  15. Recombinant human diamine oxidase activity is not inhibited by ethanol, acetaldehyde, disulfiram, diethyldithiocarbamate or cyanamide.

    PubMed

    Bartko, Johann; Gludovacz, Elisabeth; Petroczi, Karin; Borth, Nicole; Jilma, Bernd; Boehm, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Human diamine oxidase (hDAO, EC 1.4.3.22) is the key enzyme in the degradation of extracellular histamine. Consumption of alcohol is a known trigger of mast cell degranulation in patients with mast cell activation syndrome. Ethanol may also interfere with enzymatic histamine degradation, but reports on the effects on DAO activity are controversial. There are also conflicting reports whether disulfiram, an FDA-approved agent in the treatment of alcohol dependence, inhibits DAO. We therefore investigated the inhibitory potential of ethanol and disulfiram and their metabolites on recombinant human DAO (rhDAO) in three different assay systems. Relevant concentrations of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate did not inhibit rhDAO activity in an in vitro assay system using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) -mediated luminol oxidation. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH; EC 1.2.1.3) inhibitors cyanamide and its dimer dicyanamide also had no effect on DAO activity. In one assay system, the irreversible ALDH inhibitor disulfiram and its main metabolite diethyldithiocarbamate seemed to inhibit DAO activity. However, the decreased product formation was not due to a direct block of DAO activity but resulted from inhibition of peroxidase employed in the coupled system. Our in vitro data do not support a direct blocking effect of ethanol, disulfiram, and their metabolites on DAO activity in vivo. PMID:27401969

  16. Putative role of brain acetaldehyde in ethanol addiction

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xin-sheng; Deitrich, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    The putative contribution of brain acetaldehyde (AcH) to ethanol (EtOH) tolerance and dependence (addiction) is reviewed. Although the role of AcH in EtOH addiction has been controversial, there are data showing a relationship. AcH can be formed in the brain tissues through the peroxidatic activity of catalase and by oxidation via other oxidizing enzymes such as cytochrome P-4502E1. Significant formation of AcH occurs in vitro in brain tissue at concentrations of EtOH that can be achieved by voluntary consumption of EtOH by rodents. AcH itself possesses reinforcing properties, which suggests that some of the behavioral pharmacological effects attributed to EtOH may be a result of the formation of AcH, and supports the involvement of AcH in EtOH addiction. Modulation of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and brain catalase activity can change EtOH-related addictive behaviors presumably by changing AcH levels. Moreover, some condensation reaction products of AcH may promote some actions of EtOH and its consumption. On the basis of the findings, it can be concluded that AcH may mediate some of the CNS actions of EtOH including tolerance and dependence, although further exploration the involvement of AcH in EtOH addiction is warranted. PMID:19122804

  17. SAXS fingerprints of aldehyde dehydrogenase oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily catalyze the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids. ALDHs are important in detoxification of aldehydes, amino acid metabolism, embryogenesis and development, neurotransmission, oxidative stress, and cancer. Mutations in genes encoding ALDHs cause metabolic disorders, including alcohol flush reaction (ALDH2), Sjögren–Larsson syndrome (ALDH3A2), hyperprolinemia type II (ALDH4A1), γ-hydroxybutyric aciduria (ALDH5A1), methylmalonic aciduria (ALDH6A1), pyridoxine dependent epilepsy (ALDH7A1), and hyperammonemia (ALDH18A1). We previously reported crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses of ALDHs exhibiting dimeric, tetrameric, and hexameric oligomeric states (Luo et al., Biochemistry 54 (2015) 5513–5522; Luo et al., J. Mol. Biol. 425 (2013) 3106–3120). Herein I provide the SAXS curves, radii of gyration, and distance distribution functions for the three types of ALDH oligomer. The SAXS curves and associated analysis provide diagnostic fingerprints that allow rapid identification of the type of ALDH oligomer that is present in solution. The data sets provided here serve as a benchmark for characterizing oligomerization of ALDHs. PMID:26693506

  18. SAXS fingerprints of aldehyde dehydrogenase oligomers.

    PubMed

    Tanner, John J

    2015-12-01

    Enzymes of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily catalyze the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids. ALDHs are important in detoxification of aldehydes, amino acid metabolism, embryogenesis and development, neurotransmission, oxidative stress, and cancer. Mutations in genes encoding ALDHs cause metabolic disorders, including alcohol flush reaction (ALDH2), Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (ALDH3A2), hyperprolinemia type II (ALDH4A1), γ-hydroxybutyric aciduria (ALDH5A1), methylmalonic aciduria (ALDH6A1), pyridoxine dependent epilepsy (ALDH7A1), and hyperammonemia (ALDH18A1). We previously reported crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses of ALDHs exhibiting dimeric, tetrameric, and hexameric oligomeric states (Luo et al., Biochemistry 54 (2015) 5513-5522; Luo et al., J. Mol. Biol. 425 (2013) 3106-3120). Herein I provide the SAXS curves, radii of gyration, and distance distribution functions for the three types of ALDH oligomer. The SAXS curves and associated analysis provide diagnostic fingerprints that allow rapid identification of the type of ALDH oligomer that is present in solution. The data sets provided here serve as a benchmark for characterizing oligomerization of ALDHs. PMID:26693506

  19. Development of a high-throughput in vitro assay to identify selective inhibitors for human ALDH1A1.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Cynthia A; Hurley, Thomas D

    2015-06-01

    The human aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily consists of at least 19 enzymes that metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes. Currently, there are no commercially available inhibitors that target ALDH1A1 but have little to no effect on the structurally and functionally similar ALDH2. Here we present the first human ALDH1A1 structure, as the apo-enzyme and in complex with its cofactor NADH to a resolution of 1.75 and 2.1Å, respectfully. Structural comparisons of the cofactor binding sites in ALDH1A1 with other closely related ALDH enzymes illustrate a high degree of similarity. In order to minimize discovery of compounds that inhibit both isoenzymes by interfering with their conserved cofactor binding sites, this study reports the use of an in vitro, NAD(+)-independent, esterase-based high-throughput screen (HTS) of 64,000 compounds to discover novel, selective inhibitors of ALDH1A1. We describe 256 hits that alter the esterase activity of ALDH1A1. The effects on aldehyde oxidation of 67 compounds were further analyzed, with 30 selectively inhibiting ALDH1A1 compared to ALDH2 and ALDH3A1. One compound inhibited ALDH1A1 and ALDH2, while another inhibited ALDH1A1, ALDH2, and the more distantly related ALDH3A1. The results presented here indicate that this in vitro enzyme activity screening protocol successfully identified ALDH1A1 inhibitors with a high degree of isoenzyme selectivity. The compounds identified via this screen plus the screening methodology itself represent a starting point for the development of highly potent and selective inhibitors of ALDH1A1 that may be utilized to better understand the role of this enzyme in both normal and disease states.

  20. Development of a high-throughput in vitro assay to identify selective inhibitors for human ALDH1A1

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Cynthia A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    The human aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily consists of at least 19 enzymes that metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes. Currently, there are no commercially available inhibitors that target ALDH1A1 but have little to no effect on the structurally and functionally similar ALDH2. Here we present the first human ALDH1A1 structure, as the apoenzyme and in complex with its cofactor NADH to a resolution of 1.75 Å and 2.1 Å, respectfully. Structural comparisons of the cofactor binding sites in ALDH1A1 with other closely related ALDH enzymes illustrate a high degree of similarity. In order to minimize discovery of compounds that inhibit both isoenzymes by interfering with their conserved cofactor binding sites, this study reports the use of an in vitro, NAD+-independent, esterase-based high-throughput screen (HTS) of 64,000 compounds to discover novel, selective inhibitors of ALDH1A1. We describe 256 hits that alter the esterase activity of ALDH1A1. The effects on aldehyde oxidation of 67 compounds were further analyzed, with 30 selectively inhibiting ALDH1A1 compared to ALDH2 and ALDH3A1. One compound inhibited ALDH1A1 and ALDH2, while another inhibited ALDH1A1, ALDH2, and the more distantly related ALDH3A1. The results presented here indicate that this in vitro enzyme activity screening protocol successfully identified ALDH1A1 inhibitors with a high degree of isoenzyme selectivity. The compounds identified via this screen plus the screening methodology itself represent a starting point for the development of highly potent and selective inhibitors of ALDH1A1 that may be utilized to better understand the role of this enzyme in both normal and disease states. PMID:25450233

  1. NOX2 amplifies acetaldehyde-mediated cardiomyocyte mitochondrial dysfunction in alcoholic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Moritz; Garlapati, Venkata; Oelze, Matthias; Sotiriou, Efthymios; Knorr, Maike; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Kossmann, Sabine; Schönfelder, Tanja; Morawietz, Henning; Schulz, Eberhard; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Daiber, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas; Wenzel, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACM) resulting from excess alcohol consumption is an important cause of heart failure (HF). Although it is assumed that the cardiotoxicity of the ethanol (EtOH)-metabolite acetaldehyde (ACA) is central for its development and progression, the exact mechanisms remain obscure. Murine cardiomyocytes (CMs) exposed to ACA or EtOH showed increased superoxide (O2(•-)) levels and decreased mitochondrial polarization, both being normalized by NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibition. C57BL/6 mice and mice deficient for the ACA-degrading enzyme mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2(-/-)) were fed a 2% EtOH diet for 5 weeks creating an ACA-overload. 2% EtOH-fed ALDH-2(-/-) mice exhibited a decreased cardiac function, increased heart-to-body and lung-to-body weight ratios, increased cardiac levels of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as increased NOX activity and NOX2/glycoprotein 91(phox) (NOX2/gp91(phox)) subunit expression compared to 2% EtOH-fed C57BL/6 mice. Echocardiography revealed that ALDH-2(-/-)/gp91(phox-/-) mice were protected from ACA-overload-induced HF after 5 weeks of 2% EtOH-diet, demonstrating that NOX2-derived O2(•-) contributes to the development of ACM. Translated to human pathophysiology, we found increased gp91(phox) expression in endomyocardial biopsies of ACM patients. In conclusion, ACM is promoted by ACA-driven mitochondrial dysfunction and can be improved by ablation of NOX2/gp91(phox). NOX2/gp91(phox) therefore might be a potential pharmacological target to treat ACM. PMID:27624556

  2. NOX2 amplifies acetaldehyde-mediated cardiomyocyte mitochondrial dysfunction in alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Moritz; Garlapati, Venkata; Oelze, Matthias; Sotiriou, Efthymios; Knorr, Maike; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Kossmann, Sabine; Schönfelder, Tanja; Morawietz, Henning; Schulz, Eberhard; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Daiber, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas; Wenzel, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACM) resulting from excess alcohol consumption is an important cause of heart failure (HF). Although it is assumed that the cardiotoxicity of the ethanol (EtOH)-metabolite acetaldehyde (ACA) is central for its development and progression, the exact mechanisms remain obscure. Murine cardiomyocytes (CMs) exposed to ACA or EtOH showed increased superoxide (O2•−) levels and decreased mitochondrial polarization, both being normalized by NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibition. C57BL/6 mice and mice deficient for the ACA-degrading enzyme mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2−/−) were fed a 2% EtOH diet for 5 weeks creating an ACA-overload. 2% EtOH-fed ALDH-2−/− mice exhibited a decreased cardiac function, increased heart-to-body and lung-to-body weight ratios, increased cardiac levels of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as increased NOX activity and NOX2/glycoprotein 91phox (NOX2/gp91phox) subunit expression compared to 2% EtOH-fed C57BL/6 mice. Echocardiography revealed that ALDH-2−/−/gp91phox−/− mice were protected from ACA-overload-induced HF after 5 weeks of 2% EtOH-diet, demonstrating that NOX2-derived O2•− contributes to the development of ACM. Translated to human pathophysiology, we found increased gp91phox expression in endomyocardial biopsies of ACM patients. In conclusion, ACM is promoted by ACA-driven mitochondrial dysfunction and can be improved by ablation of NOX2/gp91phox. NOX2/gp91phox therefore might be a potential pharmacological target to treat ACM. PMID:27624556

  3. Biochemical basis of mitochondrial acetaldehyde dismutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thielen, J; Ciriacy, M

    1991-01-01

    As reported previously, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient in all four known genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH1 through ADH4) produce considerable amounts of ethanol during aerobic growth on glucose. It has been suggested that ethanol production in such adh0 cells is a corollary of acetaldehyde dismutation in mitochondria. This could be substantiated further by showing that mitochondrial ethanol formation requires functional electron transport, while the proton gradient or oxidative phosphorylation does not interfere with reduction of acetaldehyde in isolated mitochondria. This acetaldehyde-reducing activity is different from classical alcohol dehydrogenases in that it is associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane and also is unable to carry out ethanol oxidation. The putative cofactor is NADH + H+ generated by a soluble, matrix-located aldehyde dehydrogenase upon acetaldehyde oxidation to acetate. This enzyme has been purified from mitochondria of glucose-grown cells. It is clearly different from the known mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, which is absent in glucose-grown cells. Both acetaldehyde-reducing and acetaldehyde-oxidizing activities are also present in the mitochondrial fraction of fermentation-proficient (ADH+) cells. Mitochondrial acetaldehyde dismutation may have some significance in the removal of surplus acetaldehyde and in the formation of acetate in mitochondria during aerobic glucose fermentation. Images FIG. 4 PMID:1938903

  4. Meta-analysis of three diabetes population studies: association of inactive ALDH2 genotype with maternal inheritance of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Murata, C; Taniyama, M; Kuriyama, S; Muramatsu, T; Atsumi, Y; Matsuoka, K; Suzuki, Y

    2004-12-01

    To date, there have been three population studies that examined the association of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) genotype with inheritance of diabetes. Here, we summarize the results by meta-analysis. The study 1 consisted of 212 type 2 diabetics who did not have renal failure. The study 2 consisted of 73 type 2 diabetics who had renal failure. The study 3 consisted of 230 type 1 diabetics. In total, 515 subjects were examined for the association of ALDH2 genotype with inheritance of diabetes. Out of 515 subjects, 307 (60%) had active ALDH2 (ALDH2*1/ALDH2*1) and 208 (40%) had inactive ALDH2 (175 had ALDH2*1/ALDH2*2 and 33 had ALDH2*2/ALDH2*2). As for family history, 25 subjects (8.1%) in the active ALDH2 group had a diabetic mother, compared with 43 (20.6%) in the inactive ALDH2 group. Twenty-nine subjects (9.4%) in the active ALDH2 group had a diabetic father, compared with 14 (6.7%) in the inactive ALDH2 group. The percentage of diabetic mother was higher in the inactive ALDH2 group, the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.0001). We hence speculate that diabetic patients with inactive ALDH2 genotype may have underlying background of mitochondria etiology, thereby showing maternal trait of diabetes inheritance. In conclusion, meta-analysis using three diabetes population studies strongly confirmed the association between ALDH2 inactivity and maternal inheritance.

  5. Impaired ALDH2 activity decreases the mitochondrial respiration in H9C2 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Mali, Vishal R; Deshpande, Mandar; Pan, Guodong; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Palaniyandi, Suresh S

    2016-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated reactive aldehydes induce cellular stress. In cardiovascular diseases such as ischemia-reperfusion injury, lipid-peroxidation derived reactive aldehydes such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE) are known to contribute to the pathogenesis. 4HNE is involved in ROS formation, abnormal calcium handling and more importantly defective mitochondrial respiration. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily contains NAD(P)(+)-dependent isozymes which can detoxify endogenous and exogenous aldehydes into non-toxic carboxylic acids. Therefore we hypothesize that 4HNE afflicts mitochondrial respiration and leads to cell death by impairing ALDH2 activity in cultured H9C2 cardiomyocyte cell lines. H9C2 cardiomyocytes were treated with 25, 50 and 75 μM 4HNE and its vehicle, ethanol as well as 25, 50 and 75 μM disulfiram (DSF), an inhibitor of ALDH2 and its vehicle (DMSO) for 4 h. 4HNE significantly decreased ALDH2 activity, ALDH2 protein levels, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity, and increased 4HNE adduct formation and cell death in cultured H9C2 cardiomyocytes. ALDH2 inhibition by DSF and ALDH2 siRNA attenuated ALDH2 activity besides reducing ALDH2 levels, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity and increased cell death. Our results indicate that ALDH2 impairment can lead to poor mitochondrial respiration and increased cell death in cultured H9C2 cardiomyocytes.

  6. Heme oxygenase 1 protects ethanol-administered liver tissue in Aldh2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David; Chen, Ying; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Ichiba, Masayoshi

    2016-05-01

    A genetic polymorphism of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (​ALDH2) gene, ALDH2*2, encodes an enzymatically defective ALDH2 protein. Recent epidemiological studies suggest that possessing ALDH2*2 is a protective factor for liver tissue in healthy individuals, although these studies lack a mechanistic explanation. Our animal studies have shown the same trend: levels of serum alanine transaminase (ALT), hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA), and hepatic tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were lower in Aldh2 knockout (Aldh2(-/-)) mice than in wild-type (Aldh2(+/+)) mice after ethanol administration. To propose a mechanistic hypothesis, residual liver specimens from the previous experiment were analyzed. An anti-oxidative protein, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), and an oxidative stress-producing protein, cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), were detected at higher levels in Aldh2(-/-) mice than in Aldh2(+/+) mice, regardless of ethanol treatment. Other oxidative stress-related proteins and inflammatory cytokines did not show such a significant difference. To conclude, we propose a protective role of HO-1 in individuals with A​LDH2*2. Our continued studies support the epidemiological finding that possession of ALDH2*2 is a protective factor in the liver of the healthy individual. PMID:27139237

  7. The structure of retinal dehydrogenase type II at 2.7 A resolution: implications for retinal specificity.

    PubMed

    Lamb, A L; Newcomer, M E

    1999-05-11

    Retinoic acid, a hormonally active form of vitamin A, is produced in vivo in a two step process: retinol is oxidized to retinal and retinal is oxidized to retinoic acid. Retinal dehydrogenase type II (RalDH2) catalyzes this last step in the production of retinoic acid in the early embryo, possibly producing this putative morphogen to initiate pattern formation. The enzyme is also found in the adult animal, where it is expressed in the testis, lung, and brain among other tissues. The crystal structure of retinal dehydrogenase type II cocrystallized with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) has been determined at 2.7 A resolution. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the crystal structure of a mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) as a model. Unlike what has been described for the structures of two aldehyde dehydrogenases involved in the metabolism of acetaldehyde, the substrate access channel is not a preformed cavity into which acetaldehyde can readily diffuse. Retinal dehydrogenase appears to utilize a disordered loop in the substrate access channel to discriminate between retinaldehyde and short-chain aldehydes.

  8. ALDH1A3: A Marker of Mesenchymal Phenotype in Gliomas Associated with Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Huimin; Huang, Hua; Bao, Zhaoshi; Yang, Pei; Wang, Yinyan; You, Gan; Yan, Wei; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Jiangfei; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) is a family of enzymes including 19 members. For now, ALDH activity had been wildly used as a marker of cancer stem cells (CSCs). But biological functions of relevant isoforms and their clinical applications are still controversial. Here, we investigate the clinical significance and potential function of ALDH1A3 in gliomas. By whole-genome transcriptome microarray and mRNA sequencing analysis, we compared the expression of ALDH1A3 in high- and low- grade gliomas as well as different molecular subtypes. Microarray analysis was performed to identify the correlated genes of ALDH1A3. We further used Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways analysis to explore the biological function of ALDH1A3. Finally, by mRNA knockdown we revealed the relationship between ALDH1A3 and the ability of tumor invasion. ALDH1A3 overexpression was significantly associated with high grade as well as the higher mortality of gliomas in survival analysis. ALDH1A3 was characteristically highly expressed in Mesenchymal (Mes) subtype gliomas. Moreover, we found that ALDH1A3 was most relevant to extracellular matrix organization and cell adhesion biological process, and the ability of tumor invasion was suppressed after ALDH1A3 knockdown in vitro. In conclusion, ALDH1A3 can serve as a novel marker of Mes phenotype in gliomas with potential clinical prognostic value. The expression of ALDH1A3 is associated with tumor cell invasion. PMID:26575197

  9. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 in stem cells and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kaori; Tanaka, Takuji; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The human genome contains 19 putatively functional aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes, which encode enzymes critical for detoxification of endogenous and exogenous aldehyde substrates through NAD(P)+-dependent oxidation. ALDH1 has three main isotypes, ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3, and is a marker of normal tissue stem cells (SC) and cancer stem cells (CSC), where it is involved in self-renewal, differentiation and self-protection. Experiments with murine and human cells indicate that ALDH1 activity, predominantly attributed to isotype ALDH1A1, is tissue- and cancer-specific. High ALDH1 activity and ALDH1A1 overexpression are associated with poor cancer prognosis, though high ALDH1 and ALDH1A1 levels do not always correlate with highly malignant phenotypes and poor clinical outcome. In cancer therapy, ALDH1A1 provides a useful therapeutic CSC target in tissue types that normally do not express high levels of ALDH1A1, including breast, lung, esophagus, colon and stomach. Here we review the functions and mechanisms of ALDH1A1, the key ALDH isozyme linked to SC populations and an important contributor to CSC function in cancers, and we outline its potential in future anticancer strategies. PMID:26783961

  10. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase and cardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Sun, Lihan; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2010-01-01

    Numerous conditions promote oxidative stress, leading to the build-up of reactive aldehydes that cause cell damage and contribute to cardiac diseases. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are important enzymes that eliminate toxic aldehydes by catalysing their oxidation to non-reactive acids. The review will discuss evidence indicating a role for a specific ALDH enzyme, the mitochondrial ALDH2, in combating oxidative stress by reducing the cellular ‘aldehydic load’. Epidemiological studies in humans carrying an inactive ALDH2, genetic models in mice with altered ALDH2 levels, and small molecule activators of ALDH2 all highlight the role of ALDH2 in cardioprotection and suggest a promising new direction in cardiovascular research and the development of new treatments for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20558439

  11. NEK2 mediates ALDH1A1-dependent drug resistance in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jiliang; Gu, Zhimin; Wendlandt, Erik; Zhan, Xin; Janz, Siegfried; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2014-01-01

    We reported previously that increased expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) in multiple myeloma (MM) is a marker of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) that is further associated with chromosomal instability (CIN). Here we demonstrate that member A1 of the ALDH1 family of proteins, ALDH1A1, is most abundantly expressed in myeloma. Enforced expression of ALDH1A1 in myeloma cells led to increased clonogenicity, tumor formation in mice, and resistance to myeloma drugs in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism underlying these phenotypes included the ALDH1A1-dependent activation of drug-efflux pump, ABCB1, and survival proteins, AKT and BCL2. Over expression of ALDH1A1 in myeloma cells led to increased mRNA and protein levels of NIMA-related kinase 2 (NEK2), whereas shRNA-mediated knock down of NEK2 decreased drug efflux pump activity and drug resistance. The activation of NEK2 in myeloma cells relied on the ALDH1A1-dependent generation of the retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) ligand, 9-cis retinoic acid (9CRA) – not the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) ligand, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). These findings implicate the ALDH1A1-RXRα-NEK2 pathway in drug resistance and disease relapse in myeloma and suggest that specific inhibitors of ALDH1A1 are worthy of consideration for clinical development of new approaches to overcome drug resistance in myeloma. PMID:25230277

  12. Molecular and Catalytic Properties of the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, a Quinoheme Protein Containing Pyrroloquinoline Quinone, Cytochrome b, and Cytochrome c▿

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Manzo, S.; Chavez-Pacheco, J. L.; Contreras-Zentella, M.; Sosa-Torres, M. E.; Arreguín-Espinosa, R.; Pérez de la Mora, M.; Membrillo-Hernández, J.; Escamilla, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Several aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) complexes have been purified from the membranes of acetic acid bacteria. The enzyme structures and the chemical nature of the prosthetic groups associated with these enzymes remain a matter of debate. We report here on the molecular and catalytic properties of the membrane-bound ALDH complex of the diazotrophic bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus. The purified ALDH complex is a heterodimer comprising two subunits of 79.7 and 50 kDa, respectively. Reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy led us to demonstrate, for the first time, the unequivocal presence of a pyrroloquinoline quinone prosthetic group associated with an ALDH complex from acetic acid bacteria. In addition, heme b was detected by UV-visible light (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and confirmed by reversed-phase HPLC. The smaller subunit bears three cytochromes c. Aliphatic aldehydes, but not formaldehyde, were suitable substrates. Using ferricyanide as an electron acceptor, the enzyme showed an optimum pH of 3.5 that shifted to pH 7.0 when phenazine methosulfate plus 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol were the electron acceptors. Acetaldehyde did not reduce measurable levels of the cytochrome b and c centers; however, the dithionite-reduced hemes were conveniently oxidized by ubiquinone-1; this finding suggests that cytochrome b and the cytochromes c constitute an intramolecular redox sequence that delivers electrons to the membrane ubiquinone. PMID:20802042

  13. Variations in ADH and ALDH in Southwest California Indians

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2007-01-01

    Native Americans as a group have the highest rates of alcohol-related deaths of all ethnicities in the United States; however, it remains unclear how and why a greater proportion of individuals in some Native American communities develop alcohol-related problems and alcohol use disorders (AUDs). One potential factor that can influence responses to alcohol are variations in alcohol-metabolizing enzymes. Researchers have analyzed the frequencies of variants in the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in some Native American populations. So far the studies have yielded no evidence that an ALDH2 variant, which has shown protective effects in other populations, is found in either American Indians or Alaska Natives. A variant of the ALDH1 enzyme that is encoded by the ALDH1A1*2 allele, however, was found in a small proportion of a group of Southwest California Indians and had a protective effect against alcoholism in that population. Furthermore, a variant of the ADH1B enzyme that is encoded by the ADH1B*3 allele was found in a similar proportion of Southwest California Indians and also was associated with a protective effect. However, these findings do not explain the high prevalence of alcoholism in the tribes investigated. PMID:17718395

  14. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2: New Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Gross, Eric R.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2014-01-01

    A family of detoxifying enzymes called aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) has been a subject of recent interest, as its role in detoxifying aldehydes that accumulate through metabolism and to which we are exposed from the environment has been elucidated. Although the human genome has 19 ALDH genes, one ALDH emerges as a particularly important enzyme in a variety of human pathologies. This ALDH, ALDH2, is located in the mitochondrial matrix with much known about its role in ethanol metabolism. Less known is a new body of research to be discussed in this review, suggesting that ALDH2 dysfunction may contribute to a variety of human diseases including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and cancer. Recent studies suggest that ALDH2 dysfunction is also associated with Fanconi anemia, pain, osteoporosis, and the process of aging. Furthermore, an ALDH2 inactivating mutation (termed ALDH2*2) is the most common single point mutation in humans, and epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between this inactivating mutation and increased propensity for common human pathologies. These data together with studies in animal models and the use of new pharmacological tools that activate ALDH2 depict a new picture related to ALDH2 as a critical health-promoting enzyme. PMID:24382882

  15. NAD(P)-Dependent Aldehyde Dehydrogenases Induced during Growth of Ralstonia eutropha Strain Bo on Tetrahydrofurfuryl Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Schräder, Thomas; Zarnt, Grit; Andreesen, Jan R.

    2001-01-01

    Different aldehyde dehydrogenases (AlDHs) were formed during growth of Ralstonia eutropha Bo on tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). One of these enzymes, AlDH 4, was purified and characterized as a homodimer containing no prosthetic groups, showing a strong substrate inhibition, and having an N-terminal sequence similar to those of various NAD(P)-dependent AlDHs. The conversion rate of THFA by the quinohemoprotein THFA dehydrogenase was increased by AlDH 4. PMID:11717302

  16. ALDH Enzyme Expression Is Independent of the Spermatogenic Cycle, and Their Inhibition Causes Misregulation of Murine Spermatogenic Processes.

    PubMed

    Kent, Travis; Arnold, Samuel L; Fasnacht, Rachael; Rowsey, Ross; Mitchell, Debra; Hogarth, Cathryn A; Isoherranen, Nina; Griswold, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Perturbations in the vitamin A metabolism pathway could be a significant cause of male infertility, as well as a target toward the development of a male contraceptive, necessitating the need for a better understanding of how testicular retinoic acid (RA) concentrations are regulated. Quantitative analyses have recently demonstrated that RA is present in a pulsatile manner along testis tubules. However, it is unclear if the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes, which are responsible for RA synthesis, contribute to the regulation of these RA concentration gradients. Previous studies have alluded to fluctuations in ALDH enzymes across the spermatogenic cycle, but these inferences have been based primarily on qualitative transcript localization experiments. Here, we show via various quantitative methods that the three well-known ALDH enzymes (ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3), and an ALDH enzyme previously unreported in the murine testis (ALDH8A1), are not expressed in a stage-specific manner in the adult testis, but do fluctuate throughout juvenile development in perfect agreement with the first appearance of each advancing germ cell type. We also show, via treatments with a known ALDH inhibitor, that lowered testicular RA levels result in an increase in blood-testis barrier permeability, meiotic recombination, and meiotic defects. Taken together, these data further our understanding of the complex regulatory actions of RA on various spermatogenic events and, in contrast with previous studies, also suggest that the ALDH enzymes are not responsible for regulating the recently measured RA pulse.

  17. ALDH isozymes downregulation affects cell growth, cell motility and gene expression in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreb, Jan S; Baker, Henry V; Chang, Lung-Ji; Amaya, Maria; Lopez, M Cecilia; Ostmark, Blanca; Chou, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are highly expressed in non small cell lung cancer. Neither the mechanisms nor the biologic significance for such over expression have been studied. Methods We have employed oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze changes in gene profiles in A549 lung cancer cell line in which ALDH activity was reduced by up to 95% using lentiviral mediated expression of siRNA against both isozymes (Lenti 1+3). Stringent analysis methods were used to identify gene expression patterns that are specific to the knock down of ALDH activity and significantly different in comparison to wild type A549 cells (WT) or cells similarly transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA. Results We confirmed significant and specific down regulation of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 in Lenti 1+3 cells and in comparison to 12 other ALDH genes detected. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real time RT-PCR on RNA obtained from Lenti 1+3 or WT cells treated with ALDH activity inhibitors. Detailed functional analysis was performed on 101 genes that were significantly different (P < 0.001) and their expression changed by ≥ 2 folds in the Lenti 1+3 group versus the control groups. There were 75 down regulated and 26 up regulated genes. Protein binding, organ development, signal transduction, transcription, lipid metabolism, and cell migration and adhesion were among the most affected pathways. Conclusion These molecular effects of the ALDH knock-down are associated with in vitro functional changes in the proliferation and motility of these cells and demonstrate the significance of ALDH enzymes in cell homeostasis with a potentially significant impact on the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19025616

  18. ALDH-1 Expression Levels Predict Response or Resistance to Preoperative Chemoradiation in Resectable Esophageal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ajani, J. A.; Wang, X.; Song, S.; Suzuki, A.; Taketa, T.; Sudo, K.; Wadhwa, R.; Hofstetter, W. L.; Komaki, R.; Maru, D. M.; Lee, J. H.; Bhutani, M. S.; Weston, B.; Baladandayuthapani, V.; Yao, Y.; Honjo, S.; Scott, A. W.; Skinner, H. D.; Johnson, R. L.; Berry, D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Operable thoracic esophageal/gastroesophageal junction carcinoma (EC) is often treated with chemoradiation and surgery but tumor responses are unpredictable and heterogeneous. We hypothesized that aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 (ALDH-1) could be associated with response. Methods: The labeling indices (LIs) of ALDH-1 by immunohistochemistry in untreated tumor specimens were established in EC patients who had chemoradiation and surgery. Univariate logistic regression and 3-fold cross validation were carried out for the training (67% of patients) and validation (33%) sets. Non-clinical experiments in EC cells were performed to generate complimentary data. Results: Of 167 EC patients analyzed, 40 (24%) had a pathologic complete response (pathCR) and 27 (16%) had an extremely resistant (exCRTR) cancer. The median ALDH-1 LI was 0.2 (range, 0.01 to 0.85). There was a significant association between pathCR and low ALDH-1 LI (p=<0.001; odds-ratio [OR]=0.432). The 3-fold cross validation led to a concordance index (C-index) of 0.798 for the fitted model. There was a significant association between exCRTR and high ALDH-1 LI (p=<0.001; OR=3.782). The 3-fold cross validation led to the C-index of 0.960 for the fitted model. In several cell lines, higher ALDH-1 LIs correlated with resistant/aggressive phenotype. Cells with induced chemotherapy resistance upregulated ALDH-1 and resistance conferring genes (SOX9 and YAP1). Sorted ALDH-1+ cells were more resistant and had an aggressive phenotype in tumor spheres than ALDH-1− cells. Conclusions: Our clinical and non-clinical data demonstrate that ALDH-1 LIs are predictive of response to therapy and further research could lead to individualized therapeutic strategies and novel therapeutic targets for EC patients. PMID:24210755

  19. Overexpression of ALDH10A8 and ALDH10A9 Genes Provides Insight into Their Role in Glycine Betaine Synthesis and Affects Primary Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Missihoun, Tagnon D; Willée, Eva; Guegan, Jean-Paul; Berardocco, Solenne; Shafiq, Muhammad R; Bouchereau, Alain; Bartels, Dorothea

    2015-09-01

    Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenases oxidize betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine in species that accumulate glycine betaine as a compatible solute under stress conditions. In contrast, the physiological function of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase genes is at present unclear in species that do not accumulate glycine betaine, such as Arabidopsis thaliana. To address this question, we overexpressed the Arabidopsis ALDH10A8 and ALDH10A9 genes, which were identified to code for betaine aldehyde dehydrogenases, in wild-type A. thaliana. We analysed changes in metabolite contents of transgenic plants in comparison with the wild type. Using exogenous or endogenous choline, our results indicated that ALDH10A8 and ALDH10A9 are involved in the synthesis of glycine betaine in Arabidopsis. Choline availability seems to be a factor limiting glycine betaine synthesis. Moreover, the contents of diverse metabolites including sugars (glucose and fructose) and amino acids were altered in fully developed transgenic plants compared with the wild type. The plant metabolic response to salt and the salt stress tolerance were impaired only in young transgenic plants, which exhibited a delayed growth of the seedlings early after germination. Our results suggest that a balanced expression of the betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase genes is important for early growth of A. thaliana seedlings and for salt stress mitigation in young seedlings.

  20. Influence of ALDH2 genetic polymorphisms on aciclovir pharmacokinetics following oral administration of valaciclovir in Japanese end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Hara, Katsutoshi; Suyama, Kazuaki; Itoh, Hiroshi; Nagashima, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the pharmacokinetics of valaciclovir (VACV), aciclovir (ACV) and 9-(carboxymethoxy)methylguanine (CMMG) in Japanese chronic hemodialysis patients following a single oral administration of 1000 mg VACV and the influence of genetic polymorphisms of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) on their pharmacokinetics. A total of eighteen individuals genotyped as ALDH2*1/*1, ALDH2*1/*2 or ALDH2*2/*2 were enrolled in this study. Blood samples were obtained pre-dose and up to 48 hour post-dose. ACV t(1/2) was significantly affected by ALDH2 genotype and prolonged in the order of ALDH2*1/*1 (18.1 hr)<ALDH2*1/*2 (21.9 hr)<ALDH2*2/*2 (26.7 hr). ACV AUC from zero to infinity (AUC(0-infinity)) increased with prolonged ACV t(1/2). ACV C(max) was similar across the three ALDH2 genotype groups. There was no apparent relationship between ALDH2 genotype and VACV or CMMG pharmacokinetics. This is the first study to show an association between ALDH2 genetic polymorphisms and ACV elimination rate (t(1/2)) in Japanese end-stage renal disease patients.

  1. Site-directed mutagenesis of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 suggests three distinct pathways of nitroglycerin biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Wenzl, M Verena; Beretta, Matteo; Griesberger, Martina; Russwurm, Michael; Koesling, Doris; Schmidt, Kurt; Mayer, Bernd; Gorren, Antonius C F

    2011-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism underlying reduction of nitroglycerin (GTN) to nitric oxide (NO) by mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2), we generated mutants of the enzyme lacking the cysteines adjacent to reactive Cys302 (C301S and C303S), the glutamate that participates as a general base in aldehyde oxidation (E268Q) or combinations of these residues. The mutants were characterized regarding acetaldehyde dehydrogenation, GTN-triggered enzyme inactivation, GTN denitration, NO formation, and soluble guanylate cyclase activation. Lack of the cysteines did not affect dehydrogenase activity but impeded GTN denitration, aggravated GTN-induced enzyme inactivation, and increased NO formation. A triple mutant lacking the cysteines and Glu268 catalyzed sustained formation of superstoichiometric amounts of NO and exhibited slower rates of inactivation. These results suggest three alternative pathways for the reaction of ALDH2 with GTN, all involving formation of a thionitrate/sulfenyl nitrite intermediate at Cys302 as the initial step. In the first pathway, which predominates in the wild-type enzyme and reflects clearance-based GTN denitration, the thionitrate apparently reacts with one of the adjacent cysteine residues to yield nitrite and a protein disulfide. The predominant reaction catalyzed by the single and double cysteine mutants requires Glu268 and results in irreversible enzyme inactivation. Finally, combined lack of the cysteines and Glu268 shifts the reaction toward formation of the free NO radical, presumably through homolytic cleavage of the sulfenyl nitrite intermediate. Although the latter reaction accounts for less than 10% of total turnover of GTN metabolism catalyzed by wild-type ALDH2, it is most likely essential for vascular GTN bioactivation.

  2. [The PQQ-dehydrogenases. A novel example of bacterial quinoproteins].

    PubMed

    Flores-Encarnación, Marcos; Sánchez-Cuevas, Mariano; Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    The word "quinoprotein" describes four groups of different enzymes which have cofactors containing o-quinones. Pyrrolo-quinoline quinone (PQQ) is not covalently attached. PQQ is the cofactor of several quinoprotein bacterial dehydrogenases including glucose dehydrogenase (G-DH), alcohol dehydrogenase (A-DH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (AL-DH). These dehydrogenases are located in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria. This report summarises the structural properties of quinoprotein dehydrogenases, such as the biological functions and biotechnological aspects more important.

  3. Cloning and sequencing of the alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Conway, Tyrrell

    1992-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis has been cloned and sequenced. This gene can be expressed at high levels in other organisms to produce acetaldehyde or to convert acetaldehyde to ethanol.

  4. The oxidative fermentation of ethanol in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a two-step pathway catalyzed by a single enzyme: alcohol-aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ADHa).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Escamilla, José E; González-Valdez, Abigail; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Vanoye-Carlo, América; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; Garcia-Torres, Itzhel; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Contreras-Zentella, Martha Lucinda; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Kroneck, Peter M H; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena

    2015-01-07

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a N2-fixing bacterium endophyte from sugar cane. The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid of this organism takes place in the periplasmic space, and this reaction is catalyzed by two membrane-bound enzymes complexes: the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We present strong evidence showing that the well-known membrane-bound Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHa) of Ga. diazotrophicus is indeed a double function enzyme, which is able to use primary alcohols (C2-C6) and its respective aldehydes as alternate substrates. Moreover, the enzyme utilizes ethanol as a substrate in a reaction mechanism where this is subjected to a two-step oxidation process to produce acetic acid without releasing the acetaldehyde intermediary to the media. Moreover, we propose a mechanism that, under physiological conditions, might permit a massive conversion of ethanol to acetic acid, as usually occurs in the acetic acid bacteria, but without the transient accumulation of the highly toxic acetaldehyde.

  5. The Oxidative Fermentation of Ethanol in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Is a Two-Step Pathway Catalyzed by a Single Enzyme: Alcohol-Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ADHa)

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Escamilla, José E.; González-Valdez, Abigail; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Vanoye-Carlo, América; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; Garcia-Torres, Itzhel; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Contreras-Zentella, Martha Lucinda; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Kroneck, Peter M. H.; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena

    2015-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a N2-fixing bacterium endophyte from sugar cane. The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid of this organism takes place in the periplasmic space, and this reaction is catalyzed by two membrane-bound enzymes complexes: the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We present strong evidence showing that the well-known membrane-bound Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHa) of Ga. diazotrophicus is indeed a double function enzyme, which is able to use primary alcohols (C2–C6) and its respective aldehydes as alternate substrates. Moreover, the enzyme utilizes ethanol as a substrate in a reaction mechanism where this is subjected to a two-step oxidation process to produce acetic acid without releasing the acetaldehyde intermediary to the media. Moreover, we propose a mechanism that, under physiological conditions, might permit a massive conversion of ethanol to acetic acid, as usually occurs in the acetic acid bacteria, but without the transient accumulation of the highly toxic acetaldehyde. PMID:25574602

  6. The oxidative fermentation of ethanol in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a two-step pathway catalyzed by a single enzyme: alcohol-aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ADHa).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Escamilla, José E; González-Valdez, Abigail; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Vanoye-Carlo, América; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; Garcia-Torres, Itzhel; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Contreras-Zentella, Martha Lucinda; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Kroneck, Peter M H; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena

    2015-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a N2-fixing bacterium endophyte from sugar cane. The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid of this organism takes place in the periplasmic space, and this reaction is catalyzed by two membrane-bound enzymes complexes: the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We present strong evidence showing that the well-known membrane-bound Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHa) of Ga. diazotrophicus is indeed a double function enzyme, which is able to use primary alcohols (C2-C6) and its respective aldehydes as alternate substrates. Moreover, the enzyme utilizes ethanol as a substrate in a reaction mechanism where this is subjected to a two-step oxidation process to produce acetic acid without releasing the acetaldehyde intermediary to the media. Moreover, we propose a mechanism that, under physiological conditions, might permit a massive conversion of ethanol to acetic acid, as usually occurs in the acetic acid bacteria, but without the transient accumulation of the highly toxic acetaldehyde. PMID:25574602

  7. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity promotes survival of human muscle precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Elise; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Notarnicola, Cécile; Rouger, Karl; Serratrice, Nicolas; Bonnieu, Anne; Gay, Stéphanie; Bacou, Francis; Duret, Cédric; Carnac, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are a family of enzymes that efficiently detoxify aldehydic products generated by reactive oxygen species and might therefore participate in cell survival. Because ALDH activity has been used to identify normal and malignant cells with stem cell properties, we asked whether human myogenic precursor cells (myoblasts) could be identified and isolated based on their levels of ALDH activity. Human muscle explant-derived cells were incubated with ALDEFLUOR, a fluorescent substrate for ALDH, and we determined by flow cytometry the level of enzyme activity. We found that ALDH activity positively correlated with the myoblast-CD56+ fraction in those cells, but, we also observed heterogeneity of ALDH activity levels within CD56-purified myoblasts. Using lentiviral mediated expression of shRNA we demonstrated that ALDH activity was associated with expression of Aldh1a1 protein. Surprisingly, ALDH activity and Aldh1a1 expression levels were very low in mouse, rat, rabbit and non-human primate myoblasts. Using different approaches, from pharmacological inhibition of ALDH activity by diethylaminobenzaldehyde, an inhibitor of class I ALDH, to cell fractionation by flow cytometry using the ALDEFLUOR assay, we characterized human myoblasts expressing low or high levels of ALDH. We correlated high ALDH activity ex vivo to resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cytotoxic effect and in vivo to improved cell viability when human myoblasts were transplanted into host muscle of immune deficient scid mice. Therefore detection of ALDH activity, as a purification strategy, could allow non-toxic and efficient isolation of a fraction of human myoblasts resistant to cytotoxic damage. PMID:19840193

  8. Aldehyde dehydrogenases: From eye crystallins to metabolic disease and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Vasiliou, Vasilis; Thompson, David C.; Smith, Clay; Fujita, Mayumi; Chen, Ying

    2014-01-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily is composed of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)+)-dependent enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. To date, 24 ALDH gene families have been identified in the eukaryotic genome. In addition to aldehyde metabolizing capacity, ALDHs have additional catalytic (e.g. esterase and reductase) and non-catalytic activities. The latter include functioning as structural elements in the eye (crystallins) and as binding molecules to endobiotics and xenobiotics. Mutations in human ALDH genes and subsequent inborn errors in aldehyde metabolism are the molecular basis of several diseases. Most recently ALDH polymorphisms have been associated with gout and osteoporosis. Aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes also play important roles in embryogenesis and development, neurotransmission, oxidative stress and cancer. This article serves as a comprehensive review of the current state of knowledge regarding the ALDH superfamily and the contribution of ALDHs to various physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID:23159885

  9. NADH fluorescence lifetime analysis of the effect of magnesium ions on ALDH2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) catalyzes oxidation of toxic aldehydes to carboxylic acids. Physiologic levels of Mg2+ ions influence enzyme activity in part by increasing NADH binding affinity. Traditional fluorescence measurements monitor the blue shift of the NADH fluorescence spectrum to study ...

  10. Alcoholic myopathy and acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Preedy, Victor R; Crabb, David W; Farrés, Jaume; Emery, Peter W

    2007-01-01

    Alcoholic myopathy is characterized by biochemical and morphological lesions within muscle, ranging from impairment of muscle strength and loss of lean tissue to cellular disturbances and altered gene expression. The chronic form of the disease is five times more common than cirrhosis and is characterized by selective atrophy of type 11 (anaerobic) fibres: type I (aerobic) fibres are relatively protected. Although the causative agent is known (i.e. ethanol), the intervening steps between alcohol ingestion and the development of symptoms and lesions are poorly understood. However, acetaldehyde appears to have an important role in the aetiology of the disease. For example, alcohol is a potent perturbant of muscle protein synthesis in vivo, and this effect is exacerbated by cyanamide pre-dosage, which raises acetaldehyde concentrations. Acetaldehyde alone also reduces muscle protein synthesis in vivo and proteolytic activity in vitro. The formation of acetaldehyde protein adducts is another mechanism of putative importance in alcoholic myopathy. These adducts are formed within muscle in response to either acute or chronic alcohol exposure and the adducts are located preferentially within the sarcolemmal and sub-sarcolemmal regions. However, the significance of protein adduct formation is unclear since we do not currently know the identity of the adducted muscle proteins nor whether adduction alters the biochemical or functional properties of skeletal muscle proteins.

  11. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 protects gastric mucosa cells against DNA damage caused by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yantao; Gao, Yaohui; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Yinan; Jiang, Yannan; Ji, Jun; Zhang, Jianian; Chen, Xuehua; Yang, Qiumeng; Su, Liping; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Zhenggang; Wang, Lishun; Yu, Yingyan

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a member of the aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily and is involved with the metabolic processing of aldehydes. ALDH2 plays a cytoprotective role by removing aldehydes produced during normal metabolism. We examined the cytoprotective role of ALDH2 specifically in gastric mucosa cells. Overexpression of ALDH2 increased the viability of gastric mucosa cells treated with H2O2, while knockdown of ALDH2 had an opposite effect. Moreover, overexpression of ALDH2 protected gastric mucosa cells against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis as determined by flow cytometry, Hoechst 33342, and TUNEL assays. Consistently, ALDH2 knockdown had an opposite effect. Additionally, DNA damage was ameliorated in ALDH2-overexpressing gastric mucosa cells treated with H2O2. We further identified that this cytoprotective role of ALDH2 was mediated by metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Consistently, 4-HNE mimicked the oxidative stress induced by H2O2 in gastric mucosa cells. Treatment with 4-HNE increased levels of DNA damage in ALDH2-knockdown GES-1 cells, while overexpression of ALDH2 decreased 4-HNE-induced DNA damage. These findings suggest that ALDH2 can protect gastric mucosa cells against DNA damage caused by oxidative stress by reducing levels of 4-HNE.

  12. ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASES EXPRESSION DURING POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT: LIVER VS. LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment, and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Although the lung can be a major target for aldehyde toxicity, development of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), which detoxify aldehydes, in lung has be...

  13. Blood ALDH1 and GST activity in diabetes type 2 and its correlation with glycated hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Giebułtowicz, J; Sołobodowska, S; Bobilewicz, D; Wroczyński, P

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that oxidative stress (OS) plays a major role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the development of its complications. As one of the consequences of OS is increased lipid peroxidation (LP), the aim of our studies was to check, how the activity of 2 enzymes involved in the detoxification of aldehydes formed during LP, glutathione S-transferase (GST) and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH 1) is changed in patients suffering from DM.GST and ALDH1A1 activities were determined in whole blood samples of DM type 2 patients (n=64) and healthy controls (n=60) using spectrophotometer (for GST activity) and fluorometer (for ALDH1 activity) and they were found to be significantly increased in diabetics when compared with healthy control (p<0.05). Intriguingly, grouping the DM patients on the basis of the glucose level and HbA1c revealed unusually low ALDH activity in the group of patients (n=16) with a relatively high level of these 2 parameters.The increase of ALDH1A1 and GST activity in DM seems to be associated with the severity of the disease and might be a compensatory effect against oxidative stress. Surprisingly low ALDH activity in DM patients with relatively high glucose and HbA1c levels can be a factor predisposing to the development of diabetic complications.

  14. Reproductive toxicity of ethylene glycol monoethyl ether in Aldh2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Sheng; Ohtani, Katsumi; Suda, Megumi; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Nakayama, Keiichi; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Tamie

    2007-08-01

    Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGEE) can cause damage to testes and sperm, and its metabolites are believed to play an important role in its toxicity. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is involved in the metabolism of this chemical. To investigate whether and how the enzyme affects the toxicity of EGEE, we conducted experiments comparing Aldh2 knockout mice with wild-type mice. Administration of EGEE at 100 and 600 mg/kg/day for one week did not induce any significant change in the weight and body weight ratios of testes, prostate and epididymides in either Aldh2 knockout or wild-type mice. However, motion of sperm from the spermaduct, as analyzed with a Hamilton-Thorne Sperm analyzer, was slightly decreased in the low dose group, and significantly lower in the high dose group; and the percentage of progressive sperm was also reduced in the two EGEE groups. This effect of EGEE treatment was observed in the wild-type, but not in the Aldh2 knockout mice. Sperm motion from the cauda epididymides was not affected. On the other hand, the concentration of ethoxyacetic acid, a metabolite of EGEE, in 24 h pooled urine of EGEE-treated Aldh2 knockout mice was not significantly lower than that of the wild-type mice on most days of urine sampling. These results suggest that inactivation of the ALDH2 enzyme due to gene mutation may be linked to differences in the susceptibility to EGEE-induced sperm toxicity. PMID:17878629

  15. Purity Determination of Acetaldehyde in an Acetaldehyde Certified Reference Material.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Taichi; Watanabe, Takuro; Nakamura, Satoe; Kato, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Acetaldehyde is regulated as a toxic substance in various fields, and the method for monitoring or analysis of acetaldehyde is important. However, handling is difficult because of the high reactivity and low boiling point of acetaldehyde. Therefore, a reference material for high purity acetaldehyde with high accuracy was not available. Although the measuring method of acetaldehyde as a reagent is published in the Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) where the specification of acetaldehyde purity is more than 80%, the analytical method described in JIS is not enough for an accuracy purity determination method. In this research, the high precision purity determination method for development of a certified reference material (CRM) of acetaldehyde was examined. By controlling the volatility and reactivity of acetaldehyde, we established the purity determination method of acetaldehyde with a relative standard uncertainty of less than 0.3%. Furthermore, this method was applied to develop a high purity acetaldehyde CRM with an expanded uncertainty of 0.005 kg kg(-1) (k = 2). PMID:26063006

  16. ALDH1A1 induces resistance to CHOP in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma through activation of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jinqiong; Liu, Yiping; Tang, Youhong; Li, Li; Zeng, Ruolan; Zeng, Shan; Zhong, Meizuo

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a detoxifying enzyme, is responsible for chemoresistance in a variety of tumors. Although the majority of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) can be cured with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP), chemoresistance is a common cause of treatment failure. This study aims to investigate the significance of ALDH1A1 expression and the mechanism by which ALDH1A1 is involved in the chemoresistance of DLBCL cells. ALDH1A1 expression was assessed in 88 DLBCL tissues by immunohistochemistry. The association between ALDH1A1 expression and outcome was evaluated. We also investigated the effect of ALDH1A1 on CHOP resistance in DLBCL cells using functional analysis. ALDH1A1 expression levels were upregulated in patients with stable or progressive disease after CHOP and its expression positively correlated with expression of STAT3 and p-STAT3. In keeping with these observations, ALDH1A1 expression was significantly associated with short survival of DLBCL patients who received CHOP chemotherapy. In functional assays in Pfeiffer cells, overexpression of ALDH1A1 conferred resistance to CHOP, while silencing of ALDH1A1 using short hairpin RNA had the opposite effect. Furthermore, we also observed that ALDH1A1 could regulate the JAK2/STAT3 pathway, while inhibition of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway by WP1066 negated the effect of ALDH1A1 overexpression. These observations reveal that ALDH1A1 induces resistance to CHOP through activation of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway in DLBCL, and its targeting provides a potential strategic approach for reversing CHOP resistance.

  17. ALDH1A1 induces resistance to CHOP in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma through activation of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jinqiong; Liu, Yiping; Tang, Youhong; Li, Li; Zeng, Ruolan; Zeng, Shan; Zhong, Meizuo

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a detoxifying enzyme, is responsible for chemoresistance in a variety of tumors. Although the majority of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) can be cured with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP), chemoresistance is a common cause of treatment failure. This study aims to investigate the significance of ALDH1A1 expression and the mechanism by which ALDH1A1 is involved in the chemoresistance of DLBCL cells. ALDH1A1 expression was assessed in 88 DLBCL tissues by immunohistochemistry. The association between ALDH1A1 expression and outcome was evaluated. We also investigated the effect of ALDH1A1 on CHOP resistance in DLBCL cells using functional analysis. ALDH1A1 expression levels were upregulated in patients with stable or progressive disease after CHOP and its expression positively correlated with expression of STAT3 and p-STAT3. In keeping with these observations, ALDH1A1 expression was significantly associated with short survival of DLBCL patients who received CHOP chemotherapy. In functional assays in Pfeiffer cells, overexpression of ALDH1A1 conferred resistance to CHOP, while silencing of ALDH1A1 using short hairpin RNA had the opposite effect. Furthermore, we also observed that ALDH1A1 could regulate the JAK2/STAT3 pathway, while inhibition of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway by WP1066 negated the effect of ALDH1A1 overexpression. These observations reveal that ALDH1A1 induces resistance to CHOP through activation of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway in DLBCL, and its targeting provides a potential strategic approach for reversing CHOP resistance. PMID:27621650

  18. Effects of ALDH2∗2 on alcohol problem trajectories of Asian American college students.

    PubMed

    Luczak, Susan E; Yarnell, Lisa M; Prescott, Carol A; Myers, Mark G; Liang, Tiebing; Wall, Tamara L

    2014-02-01

    The variant aldehyde dehydrogenase allele, ALDH2∗2, consistently has been associated with protection against alcohol dependence, but the mechanism underlying this process is not known. This study examined growth trajectories of alcohol consumption (frequency, average quantity, binge drinking, maximum drinks) and problems over the college years and then tested whether the ALDH2 genotype mediated or moderated the relationship between alcohol consumption and problems. Asian American college students (N = 433) reported on their drinking behavior in their first year of college and then annually for 3 consecutive years. Alcohol consumption and problems increased over the college years for both those with and without ALDH2∗2, but having an ALDH2∗2 allele was associated with less of an increase in problems over time. A mediation model was supported, with ALDH2∗2 group differences in problems fully accounted for by differences in frequency of binge drinking. Findings also supported a moderation hypothesis: All four alcohol consumption variables were significant predictors of subsequent alcohol problems, but these relationships were not as strong in those with ALDH2∗2 as in those without ALDH2∗2. Our findings suggest that the interplay between ALDH2∗2 and drinking-related problems is complex, involving both mediation and moderation processes that reduce the likelihood of developing problems via reduction of heavy drinking as well as by altering the relationship between alcohol consumption and problems. Results of this longitudinal study provide evidence that what seems like a relatively straightforward effect of a diminished ability to metabolize alcohol on drinking behavior is actually dependent on behavior and developmental stage. PMID:24661165

  19. ALDH1A3 mutations cause recessive anophthalmia and microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Fares-Taie, Lucas; Gerber, Sylvie; Chassaing, Nicolas; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Hanein, Sylvain; Silva, Eduardo; Serey, Margaux; Serre, Valérie; Gérard, Xavier; Baumann, Clarisse; Plessis, Ghislaine; Demeer, Bénédicte; Brétillon, Lionel; Bole, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Munnich, Arnold; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Calvas, Patrick; Kaplan, Josseline; Ragge, Nicola; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2013-02-01

    Anophthalmia and microphthalmia (A/M) are early-eye-development anomalies resulting in absent or small ocular globes, respectively. A/M anomalies occur in syndromic or nonsyndromic forms. They are genetically heterogeneous, some mutations in some genes being responsible for both anophthalmia and microphthalmia. Using a combination of homozygosity mapping, exome sequencing, and Sanger sequencing, we identified homozygosity for one splice-site and two missense mutations in the gene encoding the A3 isoform of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1A3) in three consanguineous families segregating A/M with occasional orbital cystic, neurological, and cardiac anomalies. ALDH1A3 is a key enzyme in the formation of a retinoic acid gradient along the dorso-ventral axis during early eye development. Transitory expression of mutant ALDH1A3 open reading frames showed that both missense mutations reduce the accumulation of the enzyme, potentially leading to altered retinoic acid synthesis. Although the role of retinoic acid signaling in eye development is well established, our findings provide genetic evidence of a direct link between retinoic-acid-synthesis dysfunction and early-eye-development anomalies in humans.

  20. Identification of ALDH4 as a p53-inducible gene and its protective role in cellular stresses.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kyong-Ah; Nakamura, Yusuke; Arakawa, Hirofumi

    2004-01-01

    To identify additional targets of p53, we used a cDNA microarray system to examine gene-expression patterns in response to enforced expression of exogenous p53 in p53-deficient cancer cells, and identified the aldehyde dehydrogenase 4 ( ALDH4) gene as a direct target of p53. ALDH4 is a mitochondrial-matrix NAD+-dependent enzyme catalyzing the second step of the proline degradation pathway. Expression of ALDH4 mRNA was induced in HCT116 cells in response to DNA damage caused by adriamycin treatment, in a p53-dependent manner. ALDH4 contains a potential p53 binding sequence in intron1 and the interaction of p53 with the site was shown by EMSA and ChIP assays. We confirmed p53-dependent transcriptional activity of the binding site by means of a reporter assay. Inhibition of ALDH4 expression by antisense oligonucleotides was able to enhance cell death induced by infection with Ad-p53. H1299 cells transformed to over-express ALDH4 showed significantly lower intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels than parental or control cells after treatment with hydrogen peroxide or UV. Those cells were also resistant to cell damage caused by hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that p53 might play a protective role against cell damage induced by generation of intracellular ROS, through transcriptional activation of ALDH4.

  1. Distinct patterns of ALDH1A1 expression predict metastasis and poor outcome of colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sen-Lin; Zeng, Dong-Zu; Dong, Wei-Guo; Ding, Yan-Qing; Rao, Jun; Duan, Jiang-Jie; Liu, Qing; Yang, Jing; Zhan, Na; Liu, Ying; Hu, Qi-Ping; Zhang, Xia; Cui, You-Hong; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Yu, Shi-Cang; Bian, Xiu-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) has been proposed as a candidate biomarker for colorectal carcinoma (CRC). However, the heterogeneity of its expression makes it difficult to predict the outcome of CRC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of this molecule in CRC. Methods and Results: In this study, we examined ALDH1A1 expression by immunohistochemistry including 406 cases of primary CRC with corresponding adjacent mucosa, with confirmation of real-time PCR and Western blotting. We found that the expression patterns of ALDH1A1 were heterogeneous in the CRC and corresponding adjacent tissues. We defined the ratio of ALDH1A1 level in adjacent mucosa to that in tumor tissues as RA/C and found that the capabilities of tumor invasion and metastasis in the tumors with RA/C < 1 were significantly higher than those with RA/C ≥ 1. Follow-up data showed the worse prognoses in the CRC patients with RA/C < 1. For understanding the underlying mechanism, the localization of β-catenin was detected in the CRC tissues with different patterns of ALDH1A1 expression from 221 patients and β-catenin was found preferentially expressed in cell nuclei of the tumors with RA/C < 1 and ALDH1A1high expression of HT29 cell line, indicating that nuclear translocation of β-catenin might contribute to the increased potentials of invasion and metastasis. Conclusion: Our results indicate that RA/C is a novel biomarker to reflect the distinct expression patterns of ALDH1A1 for predicting metastasis and prognosis of CRC. PMID:25031716

  2. Role and structural characterization of plant aldehyde dehydrogenases from family 2 and family 7.

    PubMed

    Končitíková, Radka; Vigouroux, Armelle; Kopečná, Martina; Andree, Tomáš; Bartoš, Jan; Šebela, Marek; Moréra, Solange; Kopečný, David

    2015-05-15

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are responsible for oxidation of biogenic aldehyde intermediates as well as for cell detoxification of aldehydes generated during lipid peroxidation. So far, 13 ALDH families have been described in plants. In the present study, we provide a detailed biochemical characterization of plant ALDH2 and ALDH7 families by analysing maize and pea ALDH7 (ZmALDH7 and PsALDH7) and four maize cytosolic ALDH(cALDH)2 isoforms RF2C, RF2D, RF2E and RF2F [the first maize ALDH2 was discovered as a fertility restorer (RF2A)]. We report the crystal structures of ZmALDH7, RF2C and RF2F at high resolution. The ZmALDH7 structure shows that the three conserved residues Glu(120), Arg(300) and Thr(302) in the ALDH7 family are located in the substrate-binding site and are specific to this family. Our kinetic analysis demonstrates that α-aminoadipic semialdehyde, a lysine catabolism intermediate, is the preferred substrate for plant ALDH7. In contrast, aromatic aldehydes including benzaldehyde, anisaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde are the best substrates for cALDH2. In line with these results, the crystal structures of RF2C and RF2F reveal that their substrate-binding sites are similar and are formed by an aromatic cluster mainly composed of phenylalanine residues and several nonpolar residues. Gene expression studies indicate that the RF2C gene, which is strongly expressed in all organs, appears essential, suggesting that the crucial role of the enzyme would certainly be linked to the cell wall formation using aldehydes from phenylpropanoid pathway as substrates. Finally, plant ALDH7 may significantly contribute to osmoprotection because it oxidizes several aminoaldehydes leading to products known as osmolytes. PMID:25734422

  3. Aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibition blocks mucosal fibrosis in human and mouse ocular scarring

    PubMed Central

    Ahadome, Sarah D.; Abraham, David J.; Rayapureddi, Suryanarayana; Saw, Valerie P.; Saban, Daniel R.; Calder, Virginia L.; Norman, Jill T.; Ponticos, Markella; Daniels, Julie T.; Dart, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) is a systemic mucosal scarring disease, commonly causing blindness, for which there is no antifibrotic therapy. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 (ALDH1) is upregulated in both ocular MMP (OMMP) conjunctiva and cultured fibroblasts. Application of the ALDH metabolite, retinoic acid (RA), to normal human conjunctival fibroblasts in vitro induced a diseased phenotype. Conversely, application of ALDH inhibitors, including disulfiram, to OMMP fibroblasts in vitro restored their functionality to that of normal controls. ALDH1 is also upregulated in the mucosa of the mouse model of scarring allergic eye disease (AED), used here as a surrogate for OMMP, in which topical application of disulfiram decreased fibrosis in vivo. These data suggest that progressive scarring in OMMP results from ALDH/RA fibroblast autoregulation, that the ALDH1 subfamily has a central role in immune-mediated ocular mucosal scarring, and that ALDH inhibition with disulfiram is a potential and readily translatable antifibrotic therapy.

  4. Aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibition blocks mucosal fibrosis in human and mouse ocular scarring

    PubMed Central

    Ahadome, Sarah D.; Abraham, David J.; Rayapureddi, Suryanarayana; Saw, Valerie P.; Saban, Daniel R.; Calder, Virginia L.; Norman, Jill T.; Ponticos, Markella; Daniels, Julie T.; Dart, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) is a systemic mucosal scarring disease, commonly causing blindness, for which there is no antifibrotic therapy. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 (ALDH1) is upregulated in both ocular MMP (OMMP) conjunctiva and cultured fibroblasts. Application of the ALDH metabolite, retinoic acid (RA), to normal human conjunctival fibroblasts in vitro induced a diseased phenotype. Conversely, application of ALDH inhibitors, including disulfiram, to OMMP fibroblasts in vitro restored their functionality to that of normal controls. ALDH1 is also upregulated in the mucosa of the mouse model of scarring allergic eye disease (AED), used here as a surrogate for OMMP, in which topical application of disulfiram decreased fibrosis in vivo. These data suggest that progressive scarring in OMMP results from ALDH/RA fibroblast autoregulation, that the ALDH1 subfamily has a central role in immune-mediated ocular mucosal scarring, and that ALDH inhibition with disulfiram is a potential and readily translatable antifibrotic therapy. PMID:27699226

  5. ALDH1A2 (RALDH2) genetic variation in human congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Signaling by the vitamin A-derived morphogen retinoic acid (RA) is required at multiple steps of cardiac development. Since conversion of retinaldehyde to RA by retinaldehyde dehydrogenase type II (ALDH1A2, a.k.a RALDH2) is critical for cardiac development, we screened patients with congenital heart disease (CHDs) for genetic variation at the ALDH1A2 locus. Methods One-hundred and thirty-three CHD patients were screened for genetic variation at the ALDH1A2 locus through bi-directional sequencing. In addition, six SNPs (rs2704188, rs1441815, rs3784259, rs1530293, rs1899430) at the same locus were studied using a TDT-based association approach in 101 CHD trios. Observed mutations were modeled through molecular mechanics (MM) simulations using the AMBER 9 package, Sander and Pmemd programs. Sequence conservation of observed mutations was evaluated through phylogenetic tree construction from ungapped alignments containing ALDH8 s, ALDH1Ls, ALDH1 s and ALDH2 s. Trees were generated by the Neighbor Joining method. Variations potentially affecting splicing mechanisms were cloned and functional assays were designed to test splicing alterations using the pSPL3 splicing assay. Results We describe in Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) the mutations Ala151Ser and Ile157Thr that change non-polar to polar residues at exon 4. Exon 4 encodes part of the highly-conserved tetramerization domain, a structural motif required for ALDH oligomerization. Molecular mechanics simulation studies of the two mutations indicate that they hinder tetramerization. We determined that the SNP rs16939660, previously associated with spina bifida and observed in patients with TOF, does not affect splicing. Moreover, association studies performed with classical models and with the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) design using single marker genotype, or haplotype information do not show differences between cases and controls. Conclusion In summary, our screen indicates that ALDH1A2 genetic

  6. Acetaldehyde: A Chemical Whose Fortunes Have Changed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittcoff, Harold A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes industrial acetaldehyde synthesis/uses, explaining why acetaldehyde usage is declining in industry. Includes a discussion of the reaction chemistry, equations, and molecular structure diagrams. (JM)

  7. Decarboxylation of Pyruvate to Acetaldehyde for Ethanol Production by Hyperthermophiles

    PubMed Central

    Eram, Mohammad S.; Ma, Kesen

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC encoded by pdc) is a thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP)-containing enzyme responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to acetaldehyde in many mesophilic organisms. However, no pdc/PDC homolog has yet been found in fully sequenced genomes and proteomes of hyper/thermophiles. The only PDC activity reported in hyperthermophiles was a bifunctional, TPP- and CoA-dependent pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR)/PDC enzyme from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. Another enzyme known to be involved in catalysis of acetaldehyde production from pyruvate is CoA-acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (AcDH encoded by mhpF and adhE). Pyruvate is oxidized into acetyl-CoA by either POR or pyruvate formate lyase (PFL), and AcDH catalyzes the reduction of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde in mesophilic organisms. AcDH is present in some mesophilic (such as clostridia) and thermophilic bacteria (e.g., Geobacillus and Thermoanaerobacter). However, no AcDH gene or protein homologs could be found in the released genomes and proteomes of hyperthermophiles. Moreover, no such activity was detectable from the cell-free extracts of different hyperthermophiles under different assay conditions. In conclusion, no commonly-known PDCs was found in hyperthermophiles. Instead of the commonly-known PDC, it appears that at least one multifunctional enzyme is responsible for catalyzing the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde in hyperthermophiles. PMID:24970182

  8. The exchange of acetaldehyde between plants and the atmosphere: Stable carbon isotope and flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, Kolby Jeremiah

    The exchange of acetaldehyde between plant canopies and the atmosphere may significantly influence regional atmospheric chemistry and plant metabolism. While plants are known to both produce and consume acetaldehyde, the exchange of this compound with forested ecosystems is complicated by physical, biological, and chemical processes that range from being poorly understood to completely unknown. This precludes a quantitative understanding of acetaldehyde exchange rates between the atmosphere and the biosphere. In this study, the processes controlling the exchange of acetaldehyde with plant canopies was investigated using concentration, flux, and natural abundance 13C measurements of gas phase acetaldehyde from individual plants, soils, and entire ecosystems. Although previously only considered important in anoxic tissues, it was discovered that acetaldehyde is produced and consumed in leaves through ethanolic fermentation coupled to the pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass system under normal aerobic conditions. These coupled pathways determine the acetaldehyde compensation point, a major factor controlling its exchange with the atmosphere. Carbon isotope analysis suggests a new pathway for acetaldehyde production from plants under stress involving the peroxidation of membrane fatty acids. This pathway may be a major source of acetaldehyde to the atmosphere from plants under biotic and abiotic stresses. Plant stomata were found to be the dominant pathway for the exchange of acetaldehyde with the atmosphere with stomatal conductance influencing both emission and uptake fluxes. In addition, increasing temperature and solar radiation was found to increase the compensation point by increasing the rates of acetaldehyde production relative to consumption. Under ambient conditions, bare soil was neutral to the exchange of acetaldehyde while senescing and decaying leaves were found to be strong source of acetaldehyde to the atmosphere due to increased decomposition processes and

  9. The CD44+ALDH+ Population of Human Keratinocytes Is Enriched for Epidermal Stem Cells with Long-Term Repopulating Ability

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Akos Z.; Fong, Stephen; Yue, Lili; Zhang, Kai; Strachan, Lauren R.; Scalapino, Kenneth; Mancianti, Maria Laura; Ghadially, Ruby

    2014-01-01

    Like for other somatic tissues, isolation of a pure population of stem cells has been a primary goal in epidermal biology. We isolated discrete populations of freshly obtained human neonatal keratinocytes (HNKs) using previously untested candidate stem cell markers aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and CD44 as well as the previously studied combination of integrin α6 and CD71. An in vivo transplantation assay combined with limiting dilution analysis was used to quantify enrichment for long-term repopulating cells in the isolated populations. The ALDH+CD44+ population was enriched 12.6-fold for long-term repopulating epidermal stem cells (EpiSCs) and the integrin α6hiCD71lo population was enriched 5.6-fold, over unfractionated cells. In addition to long-term repopulation, CD44+ALDH+ keratinocytes exhibited other stem cell properties. CD44+ALDH+ keratinocytes had self-renewal ability, demonstrated by increased numbers of cells expressing nuclear Bmi-1, serial transplantation of CD44+ALDH+ cells, and holoclone formation in vitro. CD44+ALDH+ cells were multipotent, producing greater numbers of hair follicle-like structures than CD44−ALDH− cells. Furthermore, 58% ± 7% of CD44+ALDH+ cells exhibited label-retention. In vitro, CD44+ALDH+ cells showed enhanced colony formation, in both keratinocyte and embryonic stem cell growth media. In summary, the CD44+ALDH+ population exhibits stem cell properties including long-term epidermal regeneration, multipotency, label retention, and holoclone formation. This study shows that it is possible to quantify the relative number of EpiSCs in human keratinocyte populations using long-term repopulation as a functional test of stem cell nature. Future studies will combine isolation strategies as dictated by the results of quantitative transplantation assays, in order to achieve a nearly pure population of EpiSCs. PMID:23335266

  10. [Characterization of aldehyde dehydrogenase gene fragment from mung bean Vigna radiata using the polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, A G; Bubiakina, V V; Tatarinova, T D; Zelenin, S M

    1998-01-01

    Two degenerate oligonucleotide sequence primers and polymerase chain reactions on total DNA have been utilized to clone on 651--bp gene fragment coding the central part of amino acid sequence of an earlier unknown aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) from mung bean. The deduced partial amino acid sequence for this aldehyde dehydrogenase shows about 65% sequence identity to ALDHs of Vibrio cholerae Rhodococcus sp., Alcaligenes eutrophus and about 45% sequence identity to mammalian ALDHs 1 and 2, ALDHs of Aspergillus niger and A, nidulans, the betain aldehyde dehydrogenase from spinach. Alignment of the mung bean aldehyde dehydrogenase partial amino acid sequence with the sequence of 16 NAD(P)(+)-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenases has demonstrated that all strictly conserved amino acid residues and all three conservative regions are identical. PMID:9778740

  11. Mutations in ALDH1A3 represent a frequent cause of microphthalmia/anophthalmia in consanguineous families.

    PubMed

    Abouzeid, Hana; Favez, Tatiana; Schmid, Angélique; Agosti, Céline; Youssef, Mohammed; Marzouk, Iman; El Shakankiry, Nihal; Bayoumi, Nader; Munier, Francis L; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2014-08-01

    Anophthalmia or microphthalmia (A/M), characterized by absent or small eye, can be unilateral or bilateral and represent developmental anomalies due to the mutations in several genes. Recently, mutations in aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1, member A3 (ALDH1A3) also known as retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 3, have been reported to cause A/M. Here, we screened a cohort of 75 patients with A/M and showed that mutations in ALDH1A3 occurred in six families. Based on this series, we estimate that mutations in ALDH1A3 represent a major cause of A/M in consanguineous families, and may be responsible for approximately 10% of the cases. Screening of this gene should be performed in a first line of investigation, together with SOX2.

  12. Coproduction of Acetaldehyde and Hydrogen during Glucose Fermentation by Escherichia coli ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huilin; Gonzalez, Ramon; Bobik, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 strain MG1655 was engineered to coproduce acetaldehyde and hydrogen during glucose fermentation by the use of exogenous acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) reductase (for the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde) and the native formate hydrogen lyase. A putative acetaldehyde dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA reductase from Salmonella enterica (SeEutE) was cloned, produced at high levels, and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. In vitro assays showed that this enzyme had both acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (68.07 ± 1.63 μmol min−1 mg−1) and the desired acetyl-CoA reductase activity (49.23 ± 2.88 μmol min−1 mg−1). The eutE gene was engineered into an E. coli mutant lacking native glucose fermentation pathways (ΔadhE, ΔackA-pta, ΔldhA, and ΔfrdC). The engineered strain (ZH88) produced 4.91 ± 0.29 mM acetaldehyde while consuming 11.05 mM glucose but also produced 6.44 ± 0.26 mM ethanol. Studies showed that ethanol was produced by an unknown alcohol dehydrogenase(s) that converted the acetaldehyde produced by SeEutE to ethanol. Allyl alcohol was used to select for mutants with reduced alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Three allyl alcohol-resistant mutants were isolated; all produced more acetaldehyde and less ethanol than ZH88. It was also found that modifying the growth medium by adding 1 g of yeast extract/liter and lowering the pH to 6.0 further increased the coproduction of acetaldehyde and hydrogen. Under optimal conditions, strain ZH136 converted glucose to acetaldehyde and hydrogen in a 1:1 ratio with a specific acetaldehyde production rate of 0.68 ± 0.20 g h−1 g−1 dry cell weight and at 86% of the maximum theoretical yield. This specific production rate is the highest reported thus far and is promising for industrial application. The possibility of a more efficient “no-distill” ethanol fermentation procedure based on the coproduction of acetaldehyde and hydrogen is discussed. PMID:21803884

  13. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity selects for the holoclone phenotype in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, R.E.; Haywood-Small, S.L.; Sisley, K.; Cross, N.A.

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolated ALDH{sup Hi} PC3 cells preferentially form primitive holoclone-type colonies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Primitive holoclone colonies are predominantly ALDH{sup Lo} but contain rare ALDH{sup Hi} cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Holoclone-forming cells are not restricted to the ALDH{sup Hi} population. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ALDH phenotypic plasticity occurs in PC3 cells (ALDH{sup Lo} to ALDH{sup Hi} and vice versa). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ALDH{sup Hi} cells are observed but very rare in PC3 spheroids grown in stem cell medium. -- Abstract: Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH) activity is considered to be a marker of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in many tumour models, since these cells are more proliferative and tumourigenic than ALDH{sup Lo} cells in experimental models. However it is unclear whether all CSC-like cells are within the ALDH{sup Hi} population, or whether all ALDH{sup Hi} cells are highly proliferative and tumourigenic. The ability to establish a stem cell hierarchy in vitro, whereby sub-populations of cells have differing proliferative and differentiation capacities, is an alternate indication of the presence of stem cell-like populations within cell lines. In this study, we have examined the interaction between ALDH status and the ability to establish a stem cell hierarchy in PC3 prostate cancer cells. We demonstrate that PC3 cells contain a stem cell hierarchy, and isolation of ALDH{sup Hi} cells enriches for the most primitive holoclone population, however holoclone formation is not restricted to ALDH{sup Hi} cells. In addition, we show that ALDH activity undergoes phenotypic plasticity, since the ALDH{sup Lo} population can develop ALDH{sup Hi} populations comparable to parental cells within 2 weeks in culture. Furthermore, we show that the majority of ALDH{sup Hi} cells are found within the least primitive paraclone population, which is circumvented by culturing PC3 cells as spheroids in

  14. DEVELOPMENTAL EXPRESSION OF ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE IN RAT: A COMPARISON OF LIVER AND LUNG DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolism is one of the major determinants for age-related susceptibility changes to chemicals. Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are important in aldehyd...

  15. Ocular Aldehyde Dehydrogenases: Protection against Ultraviolet Damage and Maintenance of Transparency for Vision

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Thompson, David C.; Koppaka, Vindhya; Jester, James V.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes catalyze the NAD(P)+-dependent oxidation of a wide variety of endogenous and exogenous aldehydes to their corresponding acids. Some members of the ALDH superfamily of enzymes are abundantly expressed in the mammalian cornea and lens in a taxon-specific manner. Considered to be corneal and lens crystallins, they confer protective and transparent properties upon these ocular tissues. ALDH3A1 is highly expressed in the cornea of most mammals, with the exception of rabbit that expresses exclusively ALDH1A1 in the cornea. ALDH1A1 is present in both the cornea and lens of several animal species. As a result of their catalytic and non-catalytic functions, ALDH3A1 and ALDH1A1 proteins protect inner ocular tissues from ultraviolet radiation and reactive oxygen-induced damage. In addition, these corneal crystallins contribute to cellular transparency in corneal stromal keratocytes, supporting a structural role of these ALDH proteins. A putative regulatory function of ALDH3A1 on corneal cell proliferation has also been proposed. Finally, the three retinaldehye dehydrogenases cooperatively mediate retinoic acid signaling during the eye development. PMID:23098688

  16. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Has Cardioprotective Effects on Myocardial Ischaemia/Reperfusion Injury via Suppressing Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wenqing; Wei, Shujian; Hao, Panpan; Xing, Junhui; Yuan, Qiuhuan; Wang, Jiali; Xu, Feng; Chen, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Mitophagy, a selective form of autophagy, is excessively activated in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). The study investigated whether aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) exerted its cardioprotective effect by regulating mitophagy. Myocardial infarct size and apoptosis after I/R in rats were ameliorated by Alda-1, an ALDH2 activator, and aggravated by ALDH2 inhibition. Both in I/R rats and hypoxia/reoxygenation H9C2 cells, ALDH2 activation suppressed phosphatase and tensin homolog-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1)/Parkin expression, regulating mitophagy, by preventing 4-hydroxynonenal, reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial superoxide accumulation. Furthermore, the effect was enhanced by ALDH2 inhibition. Thus, ALDH2 may protect hearts against I/R injury by suppressing PINK1/Parkin–dependent mitophagy. PMID:27148058

  17. Acute ethanol preexposure promotes liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in mice by activating ALDH2.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiang; Beier, Juliane I; Baldauf, Keegan J; Jokinen, Jenny D; Zhong, Hai; Arteel, Gavin E

    2014-01-01

    It is known that chronic ethanol significantly impairs liver regeneration. However, the effect of acute ethanol exposure on liver regeneration remains largely unknown. To address this question, C57Bl6/J mice were exposed to acute ethanol (6 g/kg intragastrically) for 3 days, and partial hepatectomy (PHx) was performed 24 h after the last dose. Surprisingly, acute ethanol preexposure promoted liver regeneration. This effect of ethanol did not correlate with changes in expression of cell cycle regulatory genes (e.g., cyclin D1, p21, and p27) but did correlate with protection against the effect of PHx on indices of impaired lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Ethanol preexposure protected against inhibition of the oxidant-sensitive mitochondrial enzyme, aconitase. The activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) was significantly increased by ethanol preexposure. The effect of ethanol was blocked by inhibiting (Daidzin) and was mimicked by activating (Alda-1) ALDH2. Lipid peroxides are also substrates for ALDH2; indeed, alcohol preexposure blunted the increase in lipid peroxidation (4OH-nonenal adducts) caused by PHx. Taken together, these data suggest that acute preoperative ethanol exposure "preconditions" the liver to respond more rapidly to regenerate after PHx by activating mitochondrial ALDH2, which prevents oxidative stress in this compartment.

  18. Characterization of Two Distinct Structural Classes of Selective Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1A1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Cynthia A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) catalyze the irreversible oxidation of aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acid. Alterations in ALDH1A1 activity are associated with such diverse diseases as cancer, Parkinson’s disease, obesity, and cataracts. Inhibitors of ALDH1A1 could aid in illuminating the role of this enzyme in disease processes. However, there are no commercially available selective inhibitors for ALDH1A1. Here we characterize two distinct chemical classes of inhibitors that are selective for human ALDH1A1 compared to eight other ALDH isoenzymes. The prototypical members of each structural class, CM026 and CM037, exhibit sub-micromolar inhibition constants, but have different mechanisms of inhibition. The crystal structures of these compounds bound to ALDH1A1 demonstrate that they bind within the aldehyde binding pocket of ALDH1A1 and exploit the presence of a unique Glycine residue to achieve their selectivity. These two novel and selective ALDH1A1 inhibitors may serve as chemical tools to better understand the contributions of ALDH1A1 to normal biology and to disease states. PMID:25634381

  19. NOTCH-induced aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 deacetylation promotes breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Di; Mo, Yan; Li, Meng-Tian; Zou, Shao-Wu; Cheng, Zhou-Li; Sun, Yi-Ping; Xiong, Yue; Guan, Kun-Liang; Lei, Qun-Ying

    2014-01-01

    High aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity is a marker commonly used to isolate stem cells, particularly breast cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here, we determined that ALDH1A1 activity is inhibited by acetylation of lysine 353 (K353) and that acetyltransferase P300/CBP–associated factor (PCAF) and deacetylase sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) are responsible for regulating the acetylation state of ALDH1A1 K353. Evaluation of breast carcinoma tissues from patients revealed that cells with high ALDH1 activity have low ALDH1A1 acetylation and are capable of self-renewal. Acetylation of ALDH1A1 inhibited both the stem cell population and self-renewal properties in breast cancer. Moreover, NOTCH signaling activated ALDH1A1 through the induction of SIRT2, leading to ALDH1A1 deacetylation and enzymatic activation to promote breast CSCs. In breast cancer xenograft models, replacement of endogenous ALDH1A1 with an acetylation mimetic mutant inhibited tumorigenesis and tumor growth. Together, the results from our study reveal a function and mechanism of ALDH1A1 acetylation in regulating breast CSCs. PMID:25384215

  20. Roles of histamine on the expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Jiang, Yang; Ikeda, Jun-Ichiro; Tian, Tian; Sato, Atsushi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Morii, Eiichi

    2014-10-01

    Cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are a limited number of cells that are essential for maintenance, recurrence, and metastasis of tumors. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) has been recognized as a marker of CICs. We previously reported that ALDH1-high cases of uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma showed poor prognosis, and that ALDH1 high population was more tumorigenic, invasive, and resistant to apoptosis than ALDH1 low population. Histamine plays a critical role in cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Here, we examined the effect of histamine on ALDH1 expression in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line. The addition of histamine increased ALDH1 high population, which was consistent with the result that histamine enhanced the invasive ability and the resistance to anticancer drug. Among 4 types of histamine receptors, histamine H1 and H2 receptor (H1R and H2R) were expressed in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line. The addition of H1R agonist but not H2R agonist increased ALDH1. The antagonist H1R but not H2R inhibited the effect of histamine on ALDH1 expression. These results indicated that histamine increased the expression of ALDH1 via H1R but not H2R. These findings may provide the evidence for exploring a new strategy to suppress CICs by inhibiting ALDH1 expression with histamine.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime analysis and effect of magnesium ions on binding of NADH to human aldehyde dehydrogenase 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) catalyzes oxidation of toxic aldehydes to carboxylic acids. Physiologic levels of Mg2+ ions influence ALDH1 activity in part by increasing NADH binding affinity to the enzyme thus reducing activity. By using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, we have resolved t...

  2. Allelic variants of ADH, ALDH and the five factor model of personality in alcohol dependence syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salujha, S. K.; Chaudhury, S.; Menon, P. K.; Srivastava, K.; Gupta, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The etiology of alcohol dependence is a complex interplay of biopsychosocial factors. The genes for alcohol-metabolizing enzymes: Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2 and ADH3) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) exhibit functional polymorphisms. Vulnerability of alcohol dependence may also be in part due to heritable personality traits. Aim: To determine whether any association exists between polymorphisms of ADH2, ADH3 and ALDH2 and alcohol dependence syndrome in a group of Asian Indians. In addition, the personality of these patients was assessed to identify traits predisposing to alcoholism. Materials and Methods: In this study, 100 consecutive males with alcohol dependence syndrome attending the psychiatric outpatient department of a tertiary care service hospital and an equal number of matched healthy controls were included with their consent. Blood samples of all the study cases and controls were collected and genotyped for the ADH2, ADH3 and ALDH2 loci. Personality was evaluated using the neuroticism, extraversion, openness (NEO) personality inventory and sensation seeking scale. Results: Allele frequencies of ADH2*2 (0.50), ADH3*1 (0.67) and ALSH2*2 (0.09) were significantly low in the alcohol dependent subjects. Personality traits of NEO personality inventory and sensation seeking were significantly higher when compared to controls. Conclusions: The functional polymorphisms of genes coding for alcohol metabolizing enzymes and personality traits of NEO and sensation seeking may affect the propensity to develop dependence. PMID:25535445

  3. 27 CFR 21.93 - Acetaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.93 Acetaldehyde. (a) Aldehyde content (as acetaldehyde). Not less than 95.0 percent by weight. (b)...

  4. 27 CFR 21.93 - Acetaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.93 Acetaldehyde. (a) Aldehyde content (as acetaldehyde). Not less than 95.0 percent by weight. (b)...

  5. [Effect of pyrazole on the activity of acetaldehyde-producing enzymes in the liver].

    PubMed

    Gerashchenko, D Iu; Gorenshteĭn, B I; Pyzhik, T N; Ostrovskiĭ, Iu M

    1993-01-01

    Influence of pyrazole on the endogenous ethanol level and activities of acetaldehyde-producing enzymes was investigated. Drastic enhancement of the endogenous ethanol level in the blood and tissues was accompanied by an insignificant increase of phosphoethanolamine lyase activity, while activity of threonine aldolase and pyruvate dehydrogenase was unchanged.

  6. Association between ALDH1+/CD133+ stem-like cells and tumor angiogenesis in invasive ductal breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LV, XINQUAN; WANG, YINGZI; SONG, YIMIN; PANG, XIA; LI, HUIXIANG

    2016-01-01

    The growth and metastasis of tumors is dependent on angiogenesis; however, the association between tumor stem cells (TSCs) and tumor angiogenesis remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of the TSC markers aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) and cluster of differentiation 133 (CD133) in invasive ductal breast carcinoma, and identify their correlation with tumor angiogenesis. Stem-like cells from the breast tissue of 120 patients, who were diagnosed with invasive ductal breast carcinoma at The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University (Zhengzhou, Henan, China) between January 2009 and December 2010, were collected by surgical resection and analyzed using immunohistochemical double staining. The expression of the vascular markers CD34, CD105 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were determined using single staining. Overall, 25.83% (31/120) of the specimens contained a large number of ALDH1+/CD133+ stem-like cells (ALDH1+/CD133+ tumor). ALDH1+/CD133+ expression is associated with microvessel density, VEGF-positive rate and estrogen receptor expression (P<0.05); however, ALDH1+/CD133+ expression was not associated with age, tumor diameter, lymph node metastasis, histological classification, progesterone receptor expression or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression (P>0.05). The ALDH1+/CD133+ tumor phenotype and expression of VEGF were identified to be correlated in the present study (P=0.020). The present study revealed a close association between breast cancer TSC markers, including ALDH1 and CD133, and tumor angiogenesis. The results of the present study may provide a novel target and treatment strategy for future studies investigating tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:26998072

  7. 27 CFR 21.93 - Acetaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acetaldehyde. 21.93 Section 21.93 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Acetaldehyde. (a) Aldehyde content (as acetaldehyde). Not less than 95.0 percent by weight. (b)...

  8. 27 CFR 21.93 - Acetaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acetaldehyde. 21.93 Section 21.93 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Acetaldehyde. (a) Aldehyde content (as acetaldehyde). Not less than 95.0 percent by weight. (b)...

  9. Inhibition of ALDH1A1 activity decreases expression of drug transporters and reduces chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Januchowski, Radosław; Wojtowicz, Karolina; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Sosińska, Patrycja; Andrzejewska, Małgorzata; Zawierucha, Piotr; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The high mortality of ovarian cancer patients results from the failure of treatment caused by the inherent or acquired chemotherapy drug resistance. It was reported that overexpression of aldehyde dehydrogenase A1 (ALDH1A1) in cancer cells can be responsible for the development of drug resistance. To add the high expression of the drug transporter proteins the ALDHA1 is considered as a molecular target in cancer therapy. Therefore, we analysed drug-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines according to ALDHA1 expression and the association with drug resistance. The expression of ALDH1A1, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) was determined using a microarray and confirmed by Q-PCR, western blot and fluorescence analysis. ALDH1A1 activity was determined using an Aldefluor assay. The impact of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB) on chemotherapy resistance was assessed by the MTT chemosensitivity assay. The most abundant expression of ALDH1A1 was noted in paclitaxel- and topotecan-resistant cell lines where two populations of ALDH-positive and ALDH-negative cells could be observed. Those cell lines also revealed the overexpression of P-gp and BCRP respectively, and were able to form spheres in non-adherent conditions. Pre-treatment with ATRA and DEAB reduced chemotherapy resistance in both cell lines. ATRA treatment led to downregulation of the ALDH1A1, P-gp and BCRP proteins. DEAB treatment led to downregulation of the P-gp protein and BCRP transcript and protein. Our results indicate that ALDH1A1-positive cancer cells can be responsible for drug resistance development in ovarian cancer. Developing more specific ALDH1A1 inhibitors can increase chemotherapy effectiveness in ovarian cancer.

  10. Inhibition of ALDH1A1 activity decreases expression of drug transporters and reduces chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Januchowski, Radosław; Wojtowicz, Karolina; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Sosińska, Patrycja; Andrzejewska, Małgorzata; Zawierucha, Piotr; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The high mortality of ovarian cancer patients results from the failure of treatment caused by the inherent or acquired chemotherapy drug resistance. It was reported that overexpression of aldehyde dehydrogenase A1 (ALDH1A1) in cancer cells can be responsible for the development of drug resistance. To add the high expression of the drug transporter proteins the ALDHA1 is considered as a molecular target in cancer therapy. Therefore, we analysed drug-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines according to ALDHA1 expression and the association with drug resistance. The expression of ALDH1A1, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) was determined using a microarray and confirmed by Q-PCR, western blot and fluorescence analysis. ALDH1A1 activity was determined using an Aldefluor assay. The impact of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB) on chemotherapy resistance was assessed by the MTT chemosensitivity assay. The most abundant expression of ALDH1A1 was noted in paclitaxel- and topotecan-resistant cell lines where two populations of ALDH-positive and ALDH-negative cells could be observed. Those cell lines also revealed the overexpression of P-gp and BCRP respectively, and were able to form spheres in non-adherent conditions. Pre-treatment with ATRA and DEAB reduced chemotherapy resistance in both cell lines. ATRA treatment led to downregulation of the ALDH1A1, P-gp and BCRP proteins. DEAB treatment led to downregulation of the P-gp protein and BCRP transcript and protein. Our results indicate that ALDH1A1-positive cancer cells can be responsible for drug resistance development in ovarian cancer. Developing more specific ALDH1A1 inhibitors can increase chemotherapy effectiveness in ovarian cancer. PMID:27443528

  11. The Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily Resource Center

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The website http://www.aldh.org is a publicly available database for nomenclature and functional and molecular sequence information for members of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily for animals, plants, fungi and bacteria. The site has organised gene-specific records. It provides synopses of ALDH gene records, marries trivial terms to correct nomenclature and links global accession identifiers with source data. Server-side alignment software characterises the integrity of each sequence relative to the latest genomic assembly and provides identifier-specific detail reports, including a graphical presentation of the transcript's exon - intron structure, its size, coding sequence, genomic strand and locus. Also included are a summary of substrates, inhibitors and enzyme kinetics. The site provides reference lists and is designed to facilitate data mining by interested investigators. PMID:20038501

  12. An animal model of human aldehyde dehydrogenase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Mann, J.; Yoshida, A.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic deficiency of ALDH2, a major mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, is intimately related to alcohol sensitivity and the degree of predisposition to alcoholic diseases in humans. The ultimate biological role of ALDH2 can be exposed by knocking out the ALDH2 gene in an animal model. As the first step for this line of studies, we cloned and characterized the ALDH2 gene from mouse C57/6J strain which is associated with a high alcohol preference. The gene spans 26 kbp and is composed of 13 exons. Embryonic stem cells were transfected with a replacement vector which contains a partially deleted exon3, a positive selection cassette (pPgk Neo), exon 4 with an artificial stop codon, exons 5, 6, 7, and a negative selection cassette (pMCI-Tk). Genomic DNAs prepared from drug resistant clones were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and by Southern blot analysis to distinguish random integration from homologous recombination. Out of 132 clones examined, 8 had undergone homologous recombination at one of the ALDH2 alleles. The cloned transformed embryonic stem cells with a disrupted ALDH2 allele were injected into blastocysts. Transplantation of the blastocysts into surrogate mother mice yielded chimeric mice. The role of ALDH2 in alcohol preference, alcohol sensitivity and other biological and behavioral characteristics can be elucidated by examining the heterozygous and homozygous mutant strains produced by breeding of chimeric mice.

  13. Cloning and heterologous expression of two aryl-aldehyde dehydrogenases from the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tomofumi; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2010-04-09

    We identified two aryl-aldehyde dehydrogenase proteins (PcALDH1 and PcALDH2) from the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Both PcALDHs were translationally up-regulated in response to exogenous addition of vanillin, one of the key aromatic compounds in the pathway of lignin degradation by basidiomycetes. To clarify the catalytic functions of PcALDHs, we isolated full-length cDNAs encoding these proteins and heterologously expressed the recombinant enzymes using a pET/Escherichia coli system. The open reading frames of both PcALDH1 and PcALDH2 consisted of 1503 nucleotides. The deduced amino acid sequences of both proteins showed high homologies with aryl-aldehyde dehydrogenases from other organisms and contained ten conserved domains of ALDHs. Moreover, a novel glycine-rich motif 'GxGxxxG' was located at the NAD{sup +}-binding site. The recombinant PcALDHs catalyzed dehydrogenation reactions of several aryl-aldehyde compounds, including vanillin, to their corresponding aromatic acids. These results strongly suggested that PcALDHs metabolize aryl-aldehyde compounds generated during fungal degradation of lignin and various aromatic xenobiotics.

  14. Crystal structure of human aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A3 complexed with NAD+ and retinoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Andrea; Li, Jianfeng; Donini, Stefano; Sobol, Robert W.; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) catalyzes the oxidation of retinal to the pleiotropic factor retinoic acid using NAD+. The level of ALDHs enzymatic activity has been used as a cancer stem cell marker and seems to correlate with tumour aggressiveness. Elevated ALDH1A3 expression in mesenchymal glioma stem cells highlights the potential of this isozyme as a prognosis marker and drug target. Here we report the first crystal structure of human ALDH1A3 complexed with NAD+ and the product all-trans retinoic acid (REA). The tetrameric ALDH1A3 folds into a three domain-based architecture highly conserved along the ALDHs family. The structural analysis revealed two different and coupled conformations for NAD+ and REA that we propose to represent two snapshots along the catalytic cycle. Indeed, the isoprenic moiety of REA points either toward the active site cysteine, or moves away adopting the product release conformation. Although ALDH1A3 shares high sequence identity with other members of the ALDH1A family, our structural analysis revealed few peculiar residues in the 1A3 isozyme active site. Our data provide information into the ALDH1As catalytic process and can be used for the structure-based design of selective inhibitors of potential medical interest. PMID:27759097

  15. Aldehyde dehydrogenase variation enhances effect of pesticides associated with Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, Arthur G.; Rhodes, Shannon L.; Cockburn, Myles; Ritz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether environmental and genetic alterations of neuronal aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes were associated with increased Parkinson disease (PD) risk in an epidemiologic study. Methods: A novel ex vivo assay was developed to identify pesticides that can inhibit neuronal ALDH activity. These were investigated for PD associations in a population-based case-control study, the Parkinson's Environment & Genes (PEG) Study. Common variants in the mitochondrial ALDH2 gene were genotyped to assess effect measure modification (statistical interaction) of the pesticide effects by genetic variation. Results: All of the metal-coordinating dithiocarbamates tested (e.g., maneb, ziram), 2 imidazoles (benomyl, triflumizole), 2 dicarboxymides (captan, folpet), and 1 organochlorine (dieldrin) inhibited ALDH activity, potentially via metabolic byproducts (e.g., carbon disulfide, thiophosgene). Fifteen screened pesticides did not inhibit ALDH. Exposures to ALDH-inhibiting pesticides were associated with 2- to 6-fold increases in PD risk; genetic variation in ALDH2 exacerbated PD risk in subjects exposed to ALDH-inhibiting pesticides. Conclusion: ALDH inhibition appears to be an important mechanism through which environmental toxicants contribute to PD pathogenesis, especially in genetically vulnerable individuals, suggesting several potential interventions to reduce PD occurrence or slow or reverse its progression. PMID:24491970

  16. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 Deficiency Aggravates Cardiac Dysfunction Elicited by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Induction

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jianquan; Sun, Aijun; Xie, Yeqing; Isse, Toyoshi; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) has been characterized as an important mediator of endogenous cytoprotection in the heart. This study was designed to examine the role of ALDH2 knockout (KO) in the regulation of cardiac function after endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Wild-type (WT) and ALDH2 KO mice were subjected to a tunicamycin challenge, and the echocardiographic property was examined. Protein levels of six items—78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 subunit α (p-eIF2α), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), phosphorylation of Akt, p47phox nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and 4-hydroxynonenal—were determined by using Western blot analysis. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were estimated using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and caspase-3 activity, respectively. ALDH2 deficiency exacerbated cardiac contractile dysfunction and promoted ER stress after ER stress induction, manifested by the changes of ejection fraction and fractional shortening. In vitro study revealed that tunicamycin significantly upregulated the levels of GRP78, p-eIF2α, CHOP, p47phox NADPH oxidase and 4-hydroxynonenal, which was exacerbated by ALDH2 knockdown and abolished by ALDH2 overexpression, respectively. Overexpression of ALDH2 abrogated tunicamycin-induced dephosphorylation Akt. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase using LY294002 did not affect ALDH2-conferred protection against ER stress, although LY294002 reversed the antiapoptotic action of ALDH2 associated with p47phox NADPH oxidase. These results suggest a pivotal role of ALDH2 in the regulation of ER stress and ER stress–induced apoptosis. The protective role of ALDH2 against ER stress–induced cell death was probably mediated by Akt via a p47phox NADPH oxidase-dependent manner. These findings indicate the critical role of ALDH2 in the pathogenesis of ER stress

  17. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Feng-Xia; Zang, Jian-Lei; Wang, Tan; Xie, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) constitute a superfamily of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants. PMID:25909656

  18. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng-Xia; Zang, Jian-Lei; Wang, Tan; Xie, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) constitute a superfamily of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants.

  19. Association and ancestry analysis of sequence variants in ADH and ALDH using alcohol-related phenotypes in a Native American community sample

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Qian; Gizer, Ian R.; Libiger, Ondrej; Bizon, Chris; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2015-01-01

    Higher rates of alcohol use and other drug-dependence have been observed in some Native American populations relative to other ethnic groups in the U.S. Previous studies have shown that alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) genes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes may affect the risk of development of alcohol dependence, and that polymorphisms within these genes may differentially affect risk for the disorder depending on the ethnic group evaluated. We evaluated variations in the ADH and ALDH genes in a large study investigating risk factors for substance use in a Native American population. We assessed ancestry admixture and tested for associations between alcohol-related phenotypes in the genomic regions around the ADH1-7 and ALDH2 and ALDH1A1 genes. Seventy-two (72) ADH variants showed significant evidence of association with a severity level of alcohol drinking-related dependence symptoms phenotype. These significant variants spanned across the entire 7 ADH gene cluster regions. Two significant associations, one in ADH and one in ALDH2, were observed with alcohol dependence diagnosis. Seventeen (17) variants showed significant association with the largest number of alcohol drinks ingested during any 24-hour period. Variants in or near ADH7 were significantly negatively associated with alcohol-related phenotypes, suggesting a potential protective effect of this gene. In addition, our results suggested that a higher degree of Native American ancestry is associated with higher frequencies of potential risk variants and lower frequencies of potential protective variants for alcohol dependence phenotypes. PMID:25270064

  20. Association and ancestry analysis of sequence variants in ADH and ALDH using alcohol-related phenotypes in a Native American community sample.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qian; Gizer, Ian R; Libiger, Ondrej; Bizon, Chris; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C; Schork, Nicholas J; Ehlers, Cindy L

    2014-12-01

    Higher rates of alcohol use and other drug-dependence have been observed in some Native American (NA) populations relative to other ethnic groups in the US. Previous studies have shown that alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) genes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes may affect the risk of development of alcohol dependence, and that polymorphisms within these genes may differentially affect risk for the disorder depending on the ethnic group evaluated. We evaluated variations in the ADH and ALDH genes in a large study investigating risk factors for substance use in a NA population. We assessed ancestry admixture and tested for associations between alcohol-related phenotypes in the genomic regions around the ADH1-7 and ALDH2 and ALDH1A1 genes. Seventy-two ADH variants showed significant evidence of association with a severity level of alcohol drinking-related dependence symptoms phenotype. These significant variants spanned across the entire 7 ADH gene cluster regions. Two significant associations, one in ADH and one in ALDH2, were observed with alcohol dependence diagnosis. Seventeen variants showed significant association with the largest number of alcohol drinks ingested during any 24-hour period. Variants in or near ADH7 were significantly negatively associated with alcohol-related phenotypes, suggesting a potential protective effect of this gene. In addition, our results suggested that a higher degree of NA ancestry is associated with higher frequencies of potential risk variants and lower frequencies of potential protective variants for alcohol dependence phenotypes.

  1. Aldehyde Dehydrogenases in Cellular Responses to Oxidative/electrophilic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Ying, Chen; Jackson, Brian; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophilic stress in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. ALDHs are found throughout the evolutionary gamut, from single celled organisms to complex multicellular species. Not surprisingly, many ALDHs in evolutionarily distant, and seemingly unrelated, species perform similar functions, including protection against a variety of environmental stressors like dehydration and ultraviolet radiation. The ability to act as an ‘aldehyde scavenger’ during lipid peroxidation is another ostensibly universal ALDH function found across species. Up-regulation of ALDHs is a stress response in bacteria (environmental and chemical stress), plants (dehydration, salinity and oxidative stress), yeast (ethanol exposure and oxidative stress), Caenorhabditis elegans (lipid peroxidation) and mammals (oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation). Recent studies have also identified ALDH activity as an important feature of cancer stem cells. In these cells, ALDH expression helps abrogate oxidative stress and imparts resistance against chemotherapeutic agents such as oxazaphosphorine, taxane and platinum drugs. The ALDH superfamily represents a fundamentally important class of enzymes that significantly contributes to the management of electrophilic/oxidative stress within living systems. Mutations in various ALDHs are associated with a variety of pathological conditions in humans, underscoring the fundamental importance of these enzymes in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23195683

  2. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in cellular responses to oxidative/electrophilic stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Chen, Ying; Jackson, Brian C; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophilic stress in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. ALDHs are found throughout the evolutionary gamut, from single-celled organisms to complex multicellular species. Not surprisingly, many ALDHs in evolutionarily distant, and seemingly unrelated, species perform similar functions, including protection against a variety of environmental stressors such as dehydration and ultraviolet radiation. The ability to act as an "aldehyde scavenger" during lipid peroxidation is another ostensibly universal ALDH function found across species. Upregulation of ALDHs is a stress response in bacteria (environmental and chemical stress), plants (dehydration, salinity, and oxidative stress), yeast (ethanol exposure and oxidative stress), Caenorhabditis elegans (lipid peroxidation), and mammals (oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation). Recent studies have also identified ALDH activity as an important feature of cancer stem cells. In these cells, ALDH expression helps abrogate oxidative stress and imparts resistance against chemotherapeutic agents such as oxazaphosphorine, taxane, and platinum drugs. The ALDH superfamily represents a fundamentally important class of enzymes that contributes significantly to the management of electrophilic/oxidative stress within living systems. Mutations in various ALDHs are associated with a variety of pathological conditions in humans, highlighting the fundamental importance of these enzymes in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23195683

  3. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in cellular responses to oxidative/electrophilic stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Chen, Ying; Jackson, Brian C; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophilic stress in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. ALDHs are found throughout the evolutionary gamut, from single-celled organisms to complex multicellular species. Not surprisingly, many ALDHs in evolutionarily distant, and seemingly unrelated, species perform similar functions, including protection against a variety of environmental stressors such as dehydration and ultraviolet radiation. The ability to act as an "aldehyde scavenger" during lipid peroxidation is another ostensibly universal ALDH function found across species. Upregulation of ALDHs is a stress response in bacteria (environmental and chemical stress), plants (dehydration, salinity, and oxidative stress), yeast (ethanol exposure and oxidative stress), Caenorhabditis elegans (lipid peroxidation), and mammals (oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation). Recent studies have also identified ALDH activity as an important feature of cancer stem cells. In these cells, ALDH expression helps abrogate oxidative stress and imparts resistance against chemotherapeutic agents such as oxazaphosphorine, taxane, and platinum drugs. The ALDH superfamily represents a fundamentally important class of enzymes that contributes significantly to the management of electrophilic/oxidative stress within living systems. Mutations in various ALDHs are associated with a variety of pathological conditions in humans, highlighting the fundamental importance of these enzymes in physiological and pathological processes.

  4. Subchronic exposure to ethyl tertiary butyl ether resulting in genetic damage in Aldh2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Weng, Zuquan; Suda, Megumi; Ohtani, Katsumi; Mei, Nan; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Tamie; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2013-09-15

    Ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE) is biofuel additive recently used in Japan and some other countries. Limited evidence shows that ETBE has low toxicity. Acetaldehyde (AA), however, as one primary metabolite of ETBE, is clearly genotoxic and has been considered to be a potential carcinogen. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of ALDH2 gene on ETBE-induced genotoxicity and metabolism of its metabolites after inhalation exposure to ETBE. A group of wild-type (WT) and Aldh2 knockout (KO) C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 500ppm ETBE for 1-6h, and the blood concentrations of ETBE metabolites, including AA, tert-butyl alcohol and 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, were measured. Another group of mice of WT and KO were exposed to 0, 500, 1750, or 5000ppm ETBE for 6h/day with 5 days per weeks for 13 weeks. Genotoxic effects of ETBE in these mice were measured by the alkaline comet assay, 8-hydroxyguanine DNA-glycosylase modified comet assay and micronucleus test. With short-term exposure to ETBE, the blood concentrations of all the three metabolites in KO mice were significantly higher than the corresponding concentrations of those in WT mice of both sexes. After subchronic exposure to ETBE, there was significant increase in DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner in KO male mice, while only 5000ppm exposure significantly increased DNA damage in male WT mice. Overall, there was a significant sex difference in genetic damage in both genetic types of mice. These results showed that ALDH2 is involved in the detoxification of ETBE and lack of enzyme activity may greatly increase the sensitivity to the genotoxic effects of ETBE, and male mice were more sensitive than females. PMID:23810710

  5. Discovery of a novel class of covalent inhibitor for aldehyde dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, Mary; Chen, Che-Hong; Kimble-Hill, Ann; Parajuli, Bibek; Perez-Miller, Samantha; Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Kim, Jeewon; Dria, Karl; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2012-10-23

    Human aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) comprise a family of 17 homologous enzymes that metabolize different biogenic and exogenic aldehydes. To date, there are relatively few general ALDH inhibitors that can be used to probe the contribution of this class of enzymes to particular metabolic pathways. Here, we report the discovery of a general class of ALDH inhibitors with a common mechanism of action. The combined data from kinetic studies, mass spectrometric measurements, and crystallographic analyses demonstrate that these inhibitors undergo an enzyme-mediated {beta}-elimination reaction generating a vinyl ketone intermediate that covalently modifies the active site cysteine residue present in these enzymes. The studies described here can provide the basis for rational approach to design ALDH isoenzyme-specific inhibitors as research tools and perhaps as drugs, to address diseases such as cancer where increased ALDH activity is associated with a cellular phenotype.

  6. A Personalized Medicine Approach for Asian Americans with the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2*2 Variant

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Eric R.; Zambelli, Vanessa O.; Small, Bryce A.; Ferreira, Julio C.B.; Chen, Che-Hong; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Asian Americans are one of the fastest-growing populations in the United States. A relatively large subset of this population carries a unique loss-of-function point mutation in aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), ALDH2*2. Found in approximately 560 million people of East Asian descent, ALDH2*2 reduces enzymatic activity by approximately 60% to 80% in heterozygotes. Furthermore, this variant is associated with a higher risk for several diseases affecting many organ systems, including a particularly high incidence relative to the general population of esophageal cancer, myocardial infarction, and osteoporosis. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology associated with the ALDH2*2 variant, describe why this variant needs to be considered when selecting drug treatments, and suggest a personalized medicine approach for Asian American carriers of this variant. We also discuss future clinical and translational perspectives regarding ALDH2*2 research. PMID:25292432

  7. Blood and liver acetaldehyde concentration in rats following acetaldehyde inhalation and intravenous and intragastric ethanol administration

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, A.; Hobara, N.; Nagashima, H.

    1986-10-01

    Ethanol is metabolized to acetaldehyde, a highly reactive product of ethanol oxidation. Ethanol might be blended with gasoline and used as a fuel in the future; biohazard of acetaldehyde inhalation must be discussed. Recent improvements in our ability to measure acetaldehyde levels in blood and various tissues have made the assessment of acetaldehyde's role in alcoholic organ intoxication possible. Blood and liver acetaldehyde concentrations in rats were reported as being linearly correlated following intragastric ethanol administration. Acetaldehyde was administered by inhalation to study its toxicity. However, liver concentrations following the inhalation was not investigated. The present communication describes the relationship between blood and liver acetaldehyde concentrations in rats following acetaldehyde inhalation and different routes of ethanol administration.

  8. IN VITRO ORGANIC NITRATE BIOACTIVATION TO NITRIC OXIDE BY RECOMBINANT ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE 3A1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shunxin; Page, Nathaniel A.; Fung, Sun Mi; Fung, Ho-Leung

    2013-01-01

    Organic nitrates (ORNs) are commonly used anti-ischemic and anti-anginal agents, which serve as an exogenous source of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide (NO). Recently, both mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) and cytosolic aldehyde dehydrogenase-1a1 (ALDH1A1) have been shown to exhibit the ability to selectively bioactivate various ORNs in vitro. The objective of the present research was to examine the potential role of ALDH3A1, another major cytosolic isoform of ALDH, in the in vitro bioactivation of various ORNs, and to estimate the enzyme kinetic parameters toward ORNs through mechanistic modeling. The extent of bioactivation was assayed by exposing recombinant ALDH3A1 to various concentrations of ORNs, and measuring the concentration-time profiles of released NO via a NO-specific electrode. Metabolite formation kinetics was monitored for nitroglycerin (NTG) using LC/MS/MS. Our results showed that ALDH3A1 mRNA and protein were highly expressed in C57BL/6 mouse aortic, cardiac, and hepatic tissues, and it was able to release NO from several ORNs, including NTG, isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN), isosorbide-2-mononitrate (IS-2-MN), and nicorandil with similar Vmax (0.175 – 0.503 nmol/min/mg of ALDH3A1), and Km values of 4.01, 46.5, 818 and 5.75 × 103 μM respectively. However, activation of isosorbide-5-mononitrate (IS-5-MN) by ALDH3A1 was undetectable in vitro. ALDH3A1 was also shown to denitrate NTG, producing primarily glyceryl 1, 2-dinitrate (1, 2-GDN) in preference to glyceryl 1, 3-dinitrate (1, 3-GDN). Therefore, ALDH3A1 may contribute to the bioactivation of ORNs in vivo. PMID:24126018

  9. Association of a Missense ALDH2 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (Glu504Lys) With Benign Prostate Hyperplasia in a Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Hosik; Yoo, Koo Han; Kim, Young Ock

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a well-known gene involved in alcohol and aldehyde metabolism. Moreover, recent studies have reported associations between ALDH2 and age-related disorders. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related disorder and genetic factors may contribute to its onset. In this study, we investigated the association of a well-studied ALDH2 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs671, with the onset and clinical features of BPH. Methods A total of 222 BPH patients and 214 control subjects were genotyped. The clinical features of the BPH patients (prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen level, and International Prostatic Symptom Score) were analyzed. Results The results show that rs671 was only associated with the volume of BPH in genotype and allele frequencies (P<0.05). Conclusion We propose that rs671 is an Asian-specific SNP in ALDH2 that may affect the disease progression of BPH in the Korean population. PMID:24466463

  10. Proton transfer in acetaldehyde and acetaldehyde-water clusters: Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization experiment and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostko, Oleg; Troy, Tyler P.; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Ahmed, Musahid

    2015-03-01

    Acetaldehyde, a probable human carcinogen and of environmental importance, upon solvation provides a test bed for understanding proton transfer pathways and catalytic mechanisms. In this study, we report on single photon vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of small acetaldehyde and acetaldehyde-water clusters. Appearance energies of protonated clusters are extracted from the experimental photoionization efficiency curves and compared to electronic structure calculations. The comparison of experimental data to computational results provides mechanistic insight into the fragmentation mechanisms of the observed mass spectra. Using deuterated water for isotopic tagging, we observe that proton transfer is mediated via acetaldehyde and not water in protonated acetaldehyde-water clusters.

  11. Mitochondrial Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Plays Protective Roles in Heart Failure After Myocardial Infarction via Suppression of the Cytosolic JNK/p53 Pathway in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Aijun; Zou, Yunzeng; Wang, Ping; Xu, Danling; Gong, Hui; Wang, Shijun; Qin, Yingjie; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yunqin; Harada, Mutsuo; Isse, Toyoshi; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Fan, Huizhi; Yang, Pengyuan; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Nagai, Toshio; Takano, Hiroyuki; Ping, Peipei; Komuro, Issei; Ge, Junbo

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests a critical role for mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) in protection against cardiac injuries; however, the downstream cytosolic actions of this enzyme are largely undefined. Methods and Results Proteomic analysis identified a significant downregulation of mitochondrial ALDH2 in the heart of a rat heart failure model after myocardial infarction. The mechanistic insights underlying ALDH2 action were elucidated using murine models overexpressing ALDH2 or its mutant or with the ablation of the ALDH2 gene (ALDH2 knockout) and neonatal cardiomyocytes undergoing altered expression and activity of ALDH2. Left ventricle dilation and dysfunction and cardiomyocyte death after myocardial infarction were exacerbated in ALDH2‐knockout or ALDH2 mutant‐overexpressing mice but were significantly attenuated in ALDH2‐overexpressing mice. Using an anoxia model of cardiomyocytes with deficiency in ALDH2 activities, we observed prominent cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased accumulation of the reactive aldehyde 4‐hydroxy‐2‐nonenal (4‐HNE). We subsequently examined the impacts of mitochondrial ALDH2 and 4‐HNE on the relevant cytosolic protective pathways. Our data documented 4‐HNE‐stimulated p53 upregulation via the phosphorylation of JNK, accompanying increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis that was attenuated by inhibition of p53. Importantly, elevation of 4‐HNE also triggered a reduction of the cytosolic HSP70, further corroborating cytosolic action of the 4‐HNE instigated by downregulation of mitochondrial ALDH2. Conclusions Downregulation of ALDH2 in the mitochondria induced an elevation of 4‐HNE, leading to cardiomyocyte apoptosis by subsequent inhibition of HSP70, phosphorylation of JNK, and activation of p53. This chain of molecular events took place in both the mitochondria and the cytosol, contributing to the mechanism underlying heart failure. PMID:25237043

  12. 27 CFR 21.93 - Acetaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetaldehyde. 21.93 Section 21.93 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.93 Acetaldehyde. (a) Aldehyde content...

  13. Relative inhibitory potency of molinate and metabolites with aldehyde dehydrogenase2: implications for the mechanism of enzyme inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Erin M.G.; Anderson, David G.R.; Florang, Virginia R.; Khanna, May; Hurley, Thomas D.; Doorn, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    Molinate is a thiocarbamate herbicide used as a pre-emergent in rice patty fields. It has two predominant sulfoxidation metabolites, molinate sulfoxide and molinate sulfone. Previous work demonstrated an in vivo decrease in liver aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in rats treated with molinate and motor function deficits in dogs dosed chronically with this compound. ALDH is an enzyme important in the catabolism of many neurotransmitters, such as dopamine. Inhibition of this enzyme may lead to the accumulation of endogenous neurotoxic metabolites such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), a dopamine metabolite, which may account for the observed neurotoxicity. In this study, the relative reactivity of molinate and both of its sulfoxidation metabolites towards ALDH were investigated, as well as the mechanism of inhibition. ALDH activity was monitored in two different model systems, human recombinant ALDH (hALDH2) and mouse striatal synaptosomes. Molinate sulfone was found to be the most potent ALDH inhibitor, compared to molinate and molinate sulfoxide. The reactivity of these three compounds was also assessed, using N-acetyl Cys, model peptides, and hALDH2. It was determined that molinate sulfone is capable of covalently modifying Cys residues, including catalytic Cys302 of ALDH, accounting for the observed enzyme inhibition. PMID:20954713

  14. Relative inhibitory potency of molinate and metabolites with aldehyde dehydrogenase 2: implications for the mechanism of enzyme inhibition.

    PubMed

    Allen, Erin M G; Anderson, David G R; Florang, Virginia R; Khanna, May; Hurley, Thomas D; Doorn, Jonathan A

    2010-11-15

    Molinate is a thiocarbamate herbicide used as a pre-emergent in rice patty fields. It has two predominant sulfoxidation metabolites, molinate sulfoxide and molinate sulfone. Previous work demonstrated an in vivo decrease in liver aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in rats treated with molinate and motor function deficits in dogs dosed chronically with this compound. ALDH is an enzyme important in the catabolism of many neurotransmitters, such as dopamine. Inhibition of this enzyme may lead to the accumulation of endogenous neurotoxic metabolites such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, a dopamine metabolite, which may account for the observed neurotoxicity. In this study, the relative reactivity of molinate and both of its sulfoxidation metabolites toward ALDH was investigated, as well as the mechanism of inhibition. The ALDH activity was monitored in two different model systems, human recombinant ALDH (hALDH2) and mouse striatal synaptosomes. Molinate sulfone was found to be the most potent ALDH inhibitor, as compared to molinate and molinate sulfoxide. The reactivity of these three compounds was also assessed, using N-acetyl Cys, model peptides, and hALDH2. It was determined that molinate sulfone is capable of covalently modifying Cys residues, including catalytic Cys302 of ALDH, accounting for the observed enzyme inhibition.

  15. Significant improvement of stress tolerance in tobacco plants by overexpressing a stress-responsive aldehyde dehydrogenase gene from maize (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Huang, Weizao; Ma, Xinrong; Wang, Qilin; Gao, Yongfeng; Xue, Ying; Niu, Xiangli; Yu, Guirong; Liu, Yongsheng

    2008-11-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) play a central role in detoxification processes of aldehydes generated in plants when exposed to the stressed conditions. In order to identify genes required for the stresses responses in the grass crop Zea mays, an ALDH (ZmALDH22A1) gene was isolated and characterized. ZmALDH22A1 belongs to the family ALDH22 that is currently known only in plants. The ZmALDH22A1 encodes a protein of 593 amino acids that shares high identity with the orthologs from Saccharum officinarum (95%), Oryza sativa (89%), Triticum aestivum (87%) and Arabidopsis thaliana (77%), respectively. Real-time PCR analysis indicates that ZmALDH22A1 is expressed differentially in different tissues. Various elevated levels of ZmALDH22A1 expression have been detected when the seedling roots exposed to abiotic stresses including dehydration, high salinity and abscisic acid (ABA). Tomato stable transformation of construct expressing the ZmALDH22A1 signal peptide fused with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) driven by the CaMV35S-promoter reveals that the fusion protein is targeted to plastid. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing ZmALDH22A1 shows elevated stresses tolerance. Stresses tolerance in transgenic plants is accompanied by a reduction of malondialdehyde (MDA) derived from cellular lipid peroxidation.

  16. Prospective identification of tumorigenic osteosarcoma cancer stem cells in OS99-1 cells based on high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Park, Paul; Zhang, Huina; La Marca, Frank; Lin, Chia-Ying

    2011-01-15

    High aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity has recently been used to identify tumorigenic cell fractions in many cancer types. Herein we hypothesized that a subpopulation of cells with cancer stem cells (CSCs) properties could be identified in established human osteosarcoma cell lines based on high ALDH activity. We previously showed that a subpopulation of cells with high ALDH activity were present in 4 selected human osteosarcoma cell lines, of which a significantly higher ALDH activity was present in the OS99-1 cell line that was originally derived from a highly aggressive primary human osteosarcoma. Using a xenograft model in which OS99-1 cells were grown in NOD/SCID mice, we identified a highly tumorigenic subpopulation of osteosarcoma cells based on their high ALDH activity. Cells with high ALDH activity (ALDH(br) cells) from the OS99-1 xenografts were much less frequent, averaging 3% of the entire tumor population, compared to those isolated directly from the OS99-1 cell line. ALDH(br) cells from the xenograft were enriched with greater tumorigenicity compared to their counterparts with low ALDH activity (ALDH(lo) cells), generating new tumors with as few as 100 cells in vivo. The highly tumorigenic ALDH(br) cells illustrated the stem cell characteristics of self-renewal, the ability to produce differentiated progeny and increased expression of stem cell marker genes OCT3/4A, Nanog and Sox-2. The isolation of osteosarcoma CSCs by their high ALDH activity may provide new insight into the study of osteosarcoma-initiating cells and may potentially have therapeutic implications for human osteosarcoma.

  17. Genetic polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2 in Turkish alcoholics: lack of association with alcoholism and alcoholic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Vatansever, Sezgin; Tekin, Fatih; Salman, Esin; Altintoprak, Ender; Coskunol, Hakan; Akarca, Ulus Salih

    2015-05-17

    No data exists regarding the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene polymorphisms in Turkish alcoholic cirrhotics. We studied the polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2 genes in alcoholic cirrhotics and compared the results with non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers. Overall, 237 subjects were included for the study: 156 alcoholic patients (78 cirrhotics, 78 non-cirrhotic alcoholics) and 81 healthy volunteers. Three different single-nucleotide-polymorphism genotyping methods were used. ADH1C genotyping was performed using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The identified ADH1C genotypes were named according to the presence or absence of the enzyme restriction sites. ADH1B (Arg47Hys) genotyping was performed using the allele specific primer extension method, and ALDH2 (Glu487Lys) genotyping was performed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction using two allele-specific primer pairs. For ADH1B, the frequency of allele *1 in the cirrhotics, non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers was 97.4%, 94.9% and 99.4%, respectively. For ADH1C, the frequency of allele *1 in the cirrhotics, non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers was 47%, 36.3% and 45%, respectively. There was no statistical difference between the groups for ADH1B and ADH1C (p>0.05). All alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects (100%) had the allele *1 for ALDH2. The obtained results for ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH gene polymorphisms in the present study are similar to the results of Caucasian studies. ADH1B and ADH1C genetic variations are not related to the development of alcoholism or susceptibility to alcoholic cirrhosis. ALDH2 gene has no genetic variation in the Turkish population.

  18. Association of ADH and ALDH Genes With Alcohol Dependence in the Irish Affected Sib Pair Study of Alcohol Dependence (IASPSAD) Sample

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Kalsi, Gursharan; Prescott, Carol A.; Hodgkinson, Colin A.; Goldman, David; van den Oord, Edwin J.; Alexander, Jeffry; Jiang, Cizhong; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Patterson, Diana G.; Walsh, Dermot; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Riley, Brien P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The genes coding for ethanol metabolism enzymes [alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)] have been widely studied for their influence on the risk to develop alcohol dependence (AD). However, the relation between polymorphisms of these metabolism genes and AD in Caucasian subjects has not been clearly established. The present study examined evidence for the association of alcohol metabolism genes with AD in the Irish Affected Sib Pair Study of alcohol dependence. Methods: We conducted a case–control association study with 575 independent subjects who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, AD diagnosis and 530 controls. A total of 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the seven ADH (ADH1-7) and two ALDH genes (ALDH1A1 and ALDH2) were genotyped using the Illumina GoldenGate protocols. Several statistical procedures were implemented to control for false discoveries. Results: All markers with minor allele frequency greater than 0.01 were in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. Numerous SNPs in ADH genes showed association with AD, including one marker in the coding region of ADH1C (rs1693482 in exon6, Ile271Gln). Haplotypic association was observed in the ADH5 and ADH1C genes, and in a long haplotype block formed by the ADH1A and ADH1B loci. We detected two significant interactions between pairs of markers in intron 6 of ADH6 and intron 12 of ALDH2 (p = 5 × 10−5), and 5′ of both ADH4 and ADH1A (p = 2 × 10−4). Conclusion: We found evidence for the association of several ADH genes with AD in a sample of Western European origin. The significant interaction effects between markers in ADH and ALDH genes suggest possible epistatic roles between alcohol metabolic enzymes in the risk for AD. PMID:18331377

  19. Influence of pyruvate, threonine and phosphoethanolamine on activities of some acetaldehyde-producing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gerashchenko, D; Gorenshtein, B; Pyzhik, T; Ostrovsky, Y u

    1993-07-01

    Threonine (50 mg/100 g, i.p.) leads to increased hepatic threonine aldolase activity in rats, although endogenous ethanol concentrations remain stable. After pyruvate administration (50 mg/100 g, i.p.), endogenous blood ethanol levels are raised within 30 min, but return to normal at 60 min. The activity of threonine aldolase is decreased in the liver, whereas phosphoethanolamine lyase and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities remain unchanged. Phosphoethanolamine administration (23 mg/100 g, i.p.) did not change the endogenous ethanol concentration or pyruvate dehydrogenase, threonine aldolase and phosphoethanolamine lyase activities. Pyruvate appears to be a better precursor of acetaldehyde than threonine or phosphoethanolamine.

  20. A novel dithiocarbamate analogue with potentially decreased ALDH inhibition has copper-dependent proteasome-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing activity in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zhai, Shumei; Liu, Xiaojun; Li, Liwen; Wu, Shirley; Dou, Q. Ping; Yan, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates are a class of sulfur-based metal-chelating compounds with various applications in medicine. We reported previously that certain members of dithiocarbamates, such as diethyldithiocarbamate, disulfiram (DSF) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), were able to bind with tumor cellular copper to inhibit tumor growth through the inhibition of proteasome activity and induction of cancer cell apoptosis. Since the DSF is an irreversible inhibitor of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), its ALDH-inhibitory activity might potentially affect its usefulness as an anti-cancer drug. For the purpose of selecting potent anti-cancer compounds that are not ALDH inhibitors and mapping out preliminary structure–activity relationship trends for these novel compounds, we synthesized a series of PDTC analogues and chose three novel compounds to study their ALDH-inhibitory activity, proteasome-inhibitory activity as well as the cancer cell apoptosis-inducing activity. The results showed that compared to DSF, compound 9 has less ALDH inhibition activity, and the in vitro results also proved the positive effects of 9-Cu in proteasome inhibition and apoptosis induction in breast cancer cells, suggesting that 9 as a lead compound could be developed into a novel proteasome inhibitor anti-cancer drug. PMID:21035945

  1. Diplotype Trend Regression Analysis of the ADH Gene Cluster and the ALDH2 Gene: Multiple Significant Associations with Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xingguang; Kranzler, Henry R.; Zuo, Lingjun; Wang, Shuang; Schork, Nicholas J.; Gelernter, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The set of alcohol-metabolizing enzymes has considerable genetic and functional complexity. The relationships between some alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes and alcohol dependence (AD) have long been studied in many populations, but not comprehensively. In the present study, we genotyped 16 markers within the ADH gene cluster (including the ADH1A, ADH1B, ADH1C, ADH5, ADH6, and ADH7 genes), 4 markers within the ALDH2 gene, and 38 unlinked ancestry-informative markers in a case-control sample of 801 individuals. Associations between markers and disease were analyzed by a Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) test, a conventional case-control comparison, a structured association analysis, and a novel diplotype trend regression (DTR) analysis. Finally, the disease alleles were fine mapped by a Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium (HWD) measure (J). All markers were found to be in HWE in controls, but some markers showed HWD in cases. Genotypes of many markers were associated with AD. DTR analysis showed that ADH5 genotypes and diplotypes of ADH1A, ADH1B, ADH7, and ALDH2 were associated with AD in European Americans and/or African Americans. The risk-influencing alleles were fine mapped from among the markers studied and were found to coincide with some well-known functional variants. We demonstrated that DTR was more powerful than many other conventional association methods. We also found that several ADH genes and the ALDH2 gene were susceptibility loci for AD, and the associations were best explained by several independent risk genes. PMID:16685648

  2. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-derived omega-crystallins of squid and octopus. Specialization for lens expression.

    PubMed

    Zinovieva, R D; Tomarev, S I; Piatigorsky, J

    1993-05-25

    omega-Crystallin of the octopus lens is related to aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) of vertebrates (Tomarev, S. I., Zinovieva, R. D., and Piatigorsky, J. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 24226-24231) and ALDH1/eta-crystallin of elephant shrews (Wistow, G., and Kim, H. (1991) J. Mol. Evol. 32, 262-269). Only very low amounts of omega-crystallin are present in the squid lens. Here, we have cloned omega-crystallin cDNAs of the octopus (Octopus dofleini) and squid (Ommastrephes sloani pacificus) lenses. The deduced amino acid sequences of omega-crystallin from these species are 78% identical to each other, 56-58% identical to cytoplasmic ALDH1 and mitochondrial ALDH2 of vertebrates (which are 66-68% identical to each other), and 40% identical to Escherichia coli and spinach ALDHs. These data are consistent with the idea that the ALDH1/ALDH2 gene duplication in vertebrates occurred after divergence of cephalopods from the line giving rise to vertebrates, but before the separation of squid and octopus. Southern blot hybridization indicated that omega-crystallin is encoded by few genes (possibly just one) in octopus and squid. Northern blot hybridization revealed two bands (2.7 and 9.0 kilobases) of omega-crystallin RNA in the octopus lens and one band (4.2 kilobases) in the squid lens; omega-crystallin RNAs were undetectable in numerous non-lens tissues of octopus and squid, suggesting lens-specific expression of this gene(s). Finally, extracts of the octopus lens had no detectable ALDH activity using different substrates, consistent with omega-crystallin having no enzymatic activity. Taken together, our results suggest that omega-crystallin evolved by duplication of an ancestral gene encoding ALDH and subsequently specialized for refraction in the transparent lens while losing ALDH activity and expression in other tissues. PMID:7684383

  3. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 circumscribes high invasive glioma cells and predicts poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sen-Lin; Liu, Sha; Cui, Wei; Shi, Yu; Liu, Qin; Duan, Jiang-Jie; Yu, Shi-Cang; Zhang, Xia; Cui, You-Hong; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Bian, Xiu-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most aggressive brain tumor with high invasiveness and poor prognosis. More reliable, sensitive and practical biomarkers to reveal glioma high invasiveness remain to be explored for the guidance of therapy. We herein evaluated the diagnostic and prognostic value of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) in the glioma specimens from 237 patients, and found that ADLH1A1 was frequently overexpressed in the high-grade glioma (WHO grade III-IV) as compared to the low-grade glioma (WHO grade I-II) patients. The tumor cells with ALDH1A1 expression were more abundant in the region between tumor and the borderline of adjacent tissue as compared to the central part of the tumor. ALDH1A1 overexpression was associated with poor differentiation and dismal prognosis. Notably, the overall and disease-free survivals of the patients who had ALDH1A1+ tumor cells sparsely located in the adjacent tissue were much worse. Furthermore, ALDH1A1 expression was correlated with the “classical-like” (CL) subtype as we examined GBM specimens from 72 patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that ALDH1A1 was an independent marker for glioma patients’ outcome. Mechanistically, both in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that ALDH1A1+ cells isolated from either a glioblastoma cell line U251 or primary glioblastoma cells displayed significant invasiveness, clonogenicity, and proliferation as compared to ALDH1A1- cells, due to increased levels of mRNA and protein for matrix metalloproteinase 2, 7 and 9 (MMP2, MMP7 and MMP9). These results indicate that ALDH1A1+ cells contribute to the progression of glioma including invasion, proliferation and poor prognosis, and suggest that targeting ALDH1A1 may have important implications for the treatment of highly invasive glioma. PMID:26101711

  4. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 defines and protects a nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuron subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoxiang; Yu, Jia; Ding, Jinhui; Xie, Chengsong; Sun, Lixin; Rudenko, Iakov; Zheng, Wang; Sastry, Namratha; Luo, Jing; Rudow, Gay; Troncoso, Juan C.; Cai, Huaibin

    2014-01-01

    Subpopulations of dopaminergic (DA) neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) display a differential vulnerability to loss in Parkinson’s disease (PD); however, it is not clear why these subsets are preferentially selected in PD-associated neurodegeneration. In rodent SNpc, DA neurons can be divided into two subpopulations based on the expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1A1). Here, we have shown that, in α-synuclein transgenic mice, a murine model of PD-related disease, DA neurodegeneration occurs mainly in a dorsomedial ALDH1A1-negative subpopulation that is also prone to cytotoxic aggregation of α-synuclein. Notably, the topographic ALDH1A1 pattern observed in α-synuclein transgenic mice was conserved in human SNpc. Postmortem evaluation of brains of patients with PD revealed a severe reduction of ALDH1A1 expression and neurodegeneration in the ventral ALDH1A1-positive DA subpopulations. ALDH1A1 expression was also suppressed in α-synuclein transgenic mice. Deletion of Aldh1a1 exacerbated α-synuclein–mediated DA neurodegeneration and α-synuclein aggregation, whereas Aldh1a1-null and control DA neurons were comparably susceptible to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium–, glutamate-, or camptothecin-induced cell death. ALDH1A1 overexpression appeared to preferentially protect against α-synuclein–mediated DA neurodegeneration but did not rescue α-synuclein–induced loss of cortical neurons. Together, our findings suggest that ALDH1A1 protects subpopulations of SNpc DA neurons by preventing the accumulation of dopamine aldehyde intermediates and formation of cytotoxic α-synuclein oligomers. PMID:24865427

  5. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 ameliorates doxorubicin-induced myocardial dysfunction through detoxification of 4-HNE and suppression of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Aijun; Cheng, Yong; Zhang, Yingmei; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Shijun; Tian, Shan; Zou, Yunzeng; Hu, Kai; Ren, Jun; Ge, Junbo

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) protects against cardiac injury via reducing production of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and ROS. This study was designed to examine the impact of ALDH2 on doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiomyopathy and mechanisms involved with a focus on autophagy. 4-HNE and autophagic markers were detected by Western blotting in ventricular tissues from normal donors and patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac function, 4-HNE and levels of autophagic markers were detected in WT, ALDH2 knockout or ALDH2 transfected mice treated with or without DOX. Autophagy regulatory signaling including PI-3K, AMPK and Akt was examined in DOX-treated cardiomyocytes incubated with or without ALDH2 activator Alda-1. DOX-induced myocardial dysfunction, upregulation of 4-HNE and autophagic proteins were further aggravated in ALDH2 knockout mice while they were ameliorated in ALDH2 transfected mice. DOX downregulated Class I and upregulated Class III PI3-kinase, the effect of which was augmented by ALDH2 deletion. Accumulation of 4-HNE and autophagic protein markers in DOX-induced cardiomyocytes was significantly reduced by Alda-1. DOX depressed phosphorylated Akt but not AMPK, the effect was augmented by ALDH2 knockout. The autophagy inhibitor 3-MA attenuated, whereas autophagy inducer rapamycin mimicked DOX-induced cardiomyocyte contractile defects. In addition, rapamycin effectively mitigated Alda-1-offered protective action against DOX-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Our data further revealed downregulated ALDH2 and upregulated autophagy levels in the hearts from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Taken together, our findings suggest that inhibition of 4-HNE and autophagy may be a plausible mechanism underscoring ALDH2-offered protection against DOX-induced cardiac defect. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Protein Quality Control, the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, and Autophagy". PMID:24434637

  6. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 stabilizes transcription factor Gli2 and enhances the activity of Hedgehog signaling in hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhengwei; Xu, Liyao; Zhang, Junyan; Lu, Quqin; Luo, Shiwen; Xu, Linlin

    2016-03-18

    The Gli transcription factors are primary transcriptional regulators that mediate the activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Recent studies have revealed that Gli proteins are also regulated transcriptionally and post-translationally through noncanonical mechanisms, independent of Hh signaling. However, the precise mechanisms involved in the regulation of Gli proteins remain unclear. Using a differential mass-spectrometry approach, we found that aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) is associated with transcription factor Gli2. Overexpression of ALDH1A1 increased Gli2 protein levels; in contrast, ALDH1A1 depletion facilitated Gli2 degradation. In addition, Gli2 mRNA expression was not affected by ectopic expression of ALDH1A1, indicating the role of ALDH1A1 in the stabilization of Gli2. Further investigation showed that ALDH1A1 prolonged the stability of Gli2 protein in a catalytic-independent manner. Finally, we showed that overexpression of ALDH1A1 activated the Hh signaling pathway and promoted cell growth, migration and invasion in hepatocellular cancer cells. Together, these results illustrate regulatory roles of ALDH1A1 in the activation of the Hh signaling pathway and highlight a novel mechanism for the aberrant activation of the Hh signaling pathway in hepatocellular cancer cells. PMID:26896768

  7. Benomyl, Aldehyde Dehydrogenase, DOPAL, and the Catecholaldehyde Hypothesis for the Pathogenesis of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) is detoxified mainly by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We find that the fungicide benomyl potently and rapidly inhibits ALDH and builds up DOPAL in vivo in mouse striatum and in vitro in PC12 cells and human cultured fibroblasts and glial cells. The in vivo results resemble those noted previously with knockouts of the genes encoding ALDH1A1 and 2, a mouse model of aging-related Parkinson’s disease (PD). Exposure to pesticides that inhibit ALDH may therefore increase PD risk via DOPAL buildup. This study lends support to the “catecholaldehyde hypothesis” that the autotoxic dopamine metabolite DOPAL plays a pathogenic role in PD. PMID:25045800

  8. Biological Evaluation and 3D-QSAR Studies of Curcumin Analogues as Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Du, Zhiyun; Zhang, Changyuan; Tang, Zhikai; He, Yan; Zhang, Qiuyan; Zhao, Jun; Zheng, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) is reported as a biomarker for identifying some cancer stem cells, and down-regulation or inhibition of the enzyme can be effective in anti-drug resistance and a potent therapeutic for some tumours. In this paper, the inhibitory activity, mechanism mode, molecular docking and 3D-QSAR (three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship) of curcumin analogues (CAs) against ALDH1 were studied. Results demonstrated that curcumin and CAs possessed potent inhibitory activity against ALDH1, and the CAs compound with ortho di-hydroxyl groups showed the most potent inhibitory activity. This study indicates that CAs may represent a new class of ALDH1 inhibitor. PMID:24840575

  9. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 protects human umbilical vein endothelial cells against oxidative damage and increases endothelial nitric oxide production to reverse nitroglycerin tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hu, X Y; Fang, Q; Ma, D; Jiang, L; Yang, Y; Sun, J; Yang, C; Wang, J S

    2016-06-10

    Medical nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) use is limited principally by tolerance typified by a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) produced by biotransformation. Such tolerance may lead to endothelial dysfunction by inducing oxidative stress. In vivo studies have demonstrated that aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) plays important roles in GTN biotransformation and tolerance. Thus, modification of ALDH2 expression represents a potentially effective strategy to prevent and reverse GTN tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. In this study, a eukaryotic expression vector containing the ALDH2 gene was introduced into human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by liposome-mediated transfection. An indirect immunofluorescence assay showed that ALDH2 expression increased 24 h after transfection. Moreover, real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting revealed significantly higher ALDH2 mRNA and protein expression in the gene-transfected group than in the two control groups. GTN tolerance was induced by treating HUVECs with 10 mM GTN for 16 h + 10 min, which significantly decreased NO levels in control cells, but not in those transfected with ALDH2. Overexpression of ALDH2 increased cell survival against GTN-induced cytotoxicity and conferred protection from oxidative damage resulting from nitrate tolerance, accompanied by decreased production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and reduced expression of heme oxygenase 1. Furthermore, ALDH2 overexpression promoted Akt phosphorylation under GTN tolerance conditions. ALDH2 gene transfection can reverse and prevent tolerance to GTN through its bioactivation and protect against oxidative damage, preventing the development of endothelial dysfunction.

  10. Development of industrial brewing yeast with low acetaldehyde production and improved flavor stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinjing; Shen, Nan; Yin, Hua; Liu, Chunfeng; Li, Yongxian; Li, Qi

    2013-02-01

    Higher acetaldehyde concentration in beer is one of the main concerns of current beer industry in China. Acetaldehyde is always synthesized during beer brewing by the metabolism of yeast. Here, using ethanol as the sole carbon source and 4-methylpyrazole as the selection marker, we constructed a new mutant strain with lower acetaldehyde production and improved ethanol tolerance via traditional mutagenesis strategy. European Brewery Convention tube fermentation tests comparing the fermentation broths of mutant strain and industrial brewing strain showed that the acetaldehyde concentration of mutant strain was 81.67 % lower, whereas its resistant staling value was 1.0-fold higher. Owing to the mutation, the alcohol dehydrogenase activity of the mutant strain decreased to about 30 % of the wild-type strain. In the meantime, the fermentation performance of the newly screened strain has little difference compared with the wild-type strain, and there are no safety problems regarding the industrial usage of the mutant strain. Therefore, we suggest that the newly screened strain could be directly applied to brewing industry.

  11. Potent inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 by diphenyleneiodonium: focus on nitroglycerin bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Regina; Neubauer, Andrea; Wölkart, Gerald; Schwarzenegger, Christine; Lang, Barbara; Schmidt, Kurt; Russwurm, Michael; Koesling, Doris; Gorren, Antonius C F; Schrammel, Astrid; Mayer, Bernd

    2013-09-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) catalyzes vascular bioactivation of the antianginal drug nitroglycerin (GTN) to yield nitric oxide (NO) or a related species that activates soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), resulting in cGMP-mediated vasodilation. Accordingly, established ALDH2 inhibitors attenuate GTN-induced vasorelaxation in vitro and in vivo. However, the ALDH2 hypothesis has not been reconciled with early studies demonstrating potent inhibition of the GTN response by diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), a widely used inhibitor of flavoproteins, in particular NADPH oxidases. We addressed this issue and investigated the effects of DPI on GTN-induced relaxation of rat aortic rings and the function of purified ALDH2. DPI (0.3 µM) inhibited the high affinity component of aortic relaxation to GTN without affecting the response to NO, indicating that the drug interfered with GTN bioactivation. Denitration and bioactivation of 1-2 µM GTN, assayed as 1,2-glycerol dinitrate formation and activation of purified sGC, respectively, were inhibited by DPI with a half-maximally active concentration of about 0.2 µM in a GTN-competitive manner. Molecular modeling indicated that DPI binds to the catalytic site of ALDH2, and this was confirmed by experiments showing substrate-competitive inhibition of the dehydrogenase and esterase activities of the enzyme. Our data identify ALDH2 as highly sensitive target of DPI and explain inhibition of GTN-induced relaxation by this drug observed previously. In addition, the data provide new evidence for the essential role of ALDH2 in GTN bioactivation and may have implications to other fields of ALDH2 research, such as hepatic ethanol metabolism and cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  12. Amino Acid Residues Critical for the Specificity for Betaine Aldehyde of the Plant ALDH10 Isoenzyme Involved in the Synthesis of Glycine Betaine1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Sánchez, Ángel G.; González-Segura, Lilian; Mújica-Jiménez, Carlos; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Montiel, Carmina; Martínez-Castilla, León P.; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A.

    2012-01-01

    Plant Aldehyde Dehydrogenase10 (ALDH10) enzymes catalyze the oxidation of ω-primary or ω-quaternary aminoaldehydes, but, intriguingly, only some of them, such as the spinach (Spinacia oleracea) betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (SoBADH), efficiently oxidize betaine aldehyde (BAL) forming the osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB), which confers tolerance to osmotic stress. The crystal structure of SoBADH reported here shows tyrosine (Tyr)-160, tryptophan (Trp)-167, Trp-285, and Trp-456 in an arrangement suitable for cation-π interactions with the trimethylammonium group of BAL. Mutation of these residues to alanine (Ala) resulted in significant Km(BAL) increases and Vmax/Km(BAL) decreases, particularly in the Y160A mutant. Tyr-160 and Trp-456, strictly conserved in plant ALDH10s, form a pocket where the bulky trimethylammonium group binds. This space is reduced in ALDH10s with low BADH activity, because an isoleucine (Ile) pushes the Trp against the Tyr. Those with high BADH activity instead have Ala (Ala-441 in SoBADH) or cysteine, which allow enough room for binding of BAL. Accordingly, the mutation A441I decreased the Vmax/Km(BAL) of SoBADH approximately 200 times, while the mutation A441C had no effect. The kinetics with other ω-aminoaldehydes were not affected in the A441I or A441C mutant, demonstrating that the existence of an Ile in the second sphere of interaction of the aldehyde is critical for discriminating against BAL in some plant ALDH10s. A survey of the known sequences indicates that plants have two ALDH10 isoenzymes: those known to be GB accumulators have a high-BAL-affinity isoenzyme with Ala or cysteine in this critical position, while non GB accumulators have low-BAL-affinity isoenzymes containing Ile. Therefore, BADH activity appears to restrict GB synthesis in non-GB-accumulator plants. PMID:22345508

  13. Association of genetic polymorphisms in ADH and ALDH2 with risk of coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Hongguang; Wang, Huishan; Yin, Zongtao; Jiang, Hui; Fang, Minhua; Han, Jingsong

    2013-09-10

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are the major enzymes responsible for alcohol metabolism in humans. Emerging evidences have shown that functional polymorphisms in ADH and ALDH genes might play a critical role in increasing coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI) risks; however, individually published studies showed inconclusive results. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the associations between the genetic polymorphisms of ADH and ALDH genes with susceptibility to CAD and MI. A literature search was conducted on PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Chinese BioMedical databases from inception through December 1st, 2012. Crude relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Twelve case-control studies were included with a total of 9616 subjects, including 2053 CAD patients, 1436 MI patients, and 6127 healthy controls. Meta-analysis showed that mutant genotypes (GA+AA) of the rs671 polymorphism in the ALDH2 gene were associated with increased risk of both CAD and MI (CAD: RR=1.20, 95%CI: 1.03-1.40, P=0.021; MI: RR=1.32, 95%CI: 1.11-1.57, P=0.002). However, there were no significant associations of ADH genetic polymorphisms to CAD and MI risks (CAD: RR=0.92, 95%CI: 0.73-1.15, P=0.445; MI: RR=0.93, 95%CI: 0.84-1.03, P=0.148). In conclusion, this meta-analysis provides strong evidence that ALDH2 rs671 polymorphism may be associated with increased risks of CAD and MI. However, further studies are still needed to accurately determine whether ADH genetic polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to CAD and MI.

  14. Sjögren-Larsson syndrome: novel mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene in a French cohort.

    PubMed

    Sarret, Catherine; Rigal, Mélanie; Vaurs-Barrière, Catherine; Dorboz, Imen; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Combes, Patricia; Giraud, Geneviève; Wanders, Ronald J A; Afenjar, Alexandra; Francannet, Christine; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2012-01-15

    Sjogren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ichthyosis, spastic di- or tetraplegia and mental retardation due a defect of the fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH), related to mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene. In this study, we screened a French cohort of patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) for mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene. The five unrelated patients with typical SLS all present mutations in this gene. Three novel mutations were identified whereas three other ones were previously described. We also realized functional analyses at the mRNA level for two splice site mutations to study their deleterious consequences. Two of the previously described mutations had already been identified in the same region of Europe, suggesting a putative founder effect. We suggest that, (1) when clinical and MR features are present, direct sequencing of the ALDH3A2 gene in SLS is of particular interest without necessity of a skin biopsy for enzymatic assay in order to propose genetic counsel and (2) identification of mutations already described in the same population with putative founder effects may simplify genetic analysis in this context.

  15. Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy in Tunisia is caused by a founder missense mutation of the ALDH7A1 gene.

    PubMed

    Tlili, Abdelaziz; Hamida Hentati, Nadia; Chaabane, Rim; Gargouri, Abdellatif; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2013-04-15

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by seizures and therapeutic response to pharmacological dose of pyridoxine. Mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene, encoding α-aminoadipic semialdehyde (α-AASA) dehydrogenase (antiquitin), have been reported to cause PDE in most patients. In this study molecular analysis of seven PDE Tunisian patients revealed a common missense c.1364T>C mutation in the ALDH7A1 gene. The identification of a cluster of PDE pedigrees carrying the c.1364T>C mutation in a specific area raises the question of the origin of this mutation from a common ancestor. We carried out a genotype-based analysis by way of genotyping a new generated microsatellite marker within the ALDH7A1 gene. Genotype reconstruction of all affected pedigree members indicate that all c.1364T>C mutation carriers harbored the same allele, indicating a common ancestor. The finding of a founder effect in a rare disease is essential for the genetic diagnosis and the genetic counseling of affected PDE pedigrees in Tunisia.

  16. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially alters alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in the zebrafish liver.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol exposure paradigms have been successfully used in the past to induce behavioral and central nervous system related changes in zebrafish. However, it is currently unknown whether chronic ethanol exposure alters ethanol metabolism in adult zebrafish. In the current study we examine the effect of acute ethanol exposure on adult zebrafish behavioral responses, as well as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in the liver. We then examine how two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms (continuous and repeated ethanol exposure) alter behavioral responses and liver enzyme activity during a subsequent acute ethanol challenge. Acute ethanol exposure increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. ADH activity was shown to exhibit an inverted U-shaped curve and ALDH activity was decreased by ethanol exposure at all doses. During the acute ethanol challenge, animals that were continuously housed in ethanol exhibited a significantly reduced locomotor response and increased ADH activity, however, ALDH activity did not change. Zebrafish that were repeatedly exposed to ethanol demonstrated a small but significant attenuation of the locomotor response during the acute ethanol challenge but ADH and ALDH activity was similar to controls. Overall, we identified two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms that differentially alter behavioral and physiological responses in zebrafish. We speculate that these two paradigms may allow dissociation of central nervous system-related and liver enzyme-dependent ethanol induced changes in zebrafish.

  17. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-independent bioactivation of nitroglycerin in porcine and bovine blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Regina; Wölkart, Gerald; Opelt, Marissa; Schwarzenegger, Christine; Hofinger, Marielies; Neubauer, Andrea; Kollau, Alexander; Schmidt, Kurt; Schrammel, Astrid; Mayer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The vascular bioactivation of the antianginal drug nitroglycerin (GTN), yielding 1,2-glycerol dinitrate and nitric oxide or a related activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, is catalyzed by aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) in rodent and human blood vessels. The essential role of ALDH2 has been confirmed in many studies and is considered as general principle of GTN-induced vasodilation in mammals. However, this view is challenged by an early report showing that diphenyleneiodonium, which we recently characterized as potent ALDH2 inhibitor, has no effect on GTN-induced relaxation of bovine coronary arteries (De La Lande et al., 1996). We investigated this issue and found that inhibition of ALDH2 attenuates GTN-induced coronary vasodilation in isolated perfused rat hearts but has no effect on relaxation to GTN of bovine and porcine coronary arteries. This observation is explained by low levels of ALDH2 protein expression in bovine coronary arteries and several types of porcine blood vessels. ALDH2 mRNA expression and the rates of GTN denitration were similarly low, excluding a significant contribution of ALDH2 to the bioactivation of GTN in these vessels. Attempts to identify the responsible pathway with enzyme inhibitors did not provide conclusive evidence for the involvement of ALDH3A1, cytochrome P450, or GSH-S-transferase. Thus, the present manuscript describes a hitherto unrecognized pathway of GTN bioactivation in bovine and porcine blood vessels. If present in the human vasculature, this pathway might contribute to the therapeutic effects of organic nitrates that are not metabolized by ALDH2. PMID:25576686

  18. Structural Basis of Substrate Recognition by Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 7A1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 7A1 (ALDH7A1) is part of lysine catabolism and catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of α-aminoadipate semialdehyde to α-aminoadipate. Herein, we describe a structural study of human ALDH7A1 focused on substrate recognition. Five crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering data are reported, including the first crystal structure of any ALDH7 family member complexed with α-aminoadipate. The product binds with the ε-carboxylate in the oxyanion hole, the aliphatic chain packed into an aromatic box, and the distal end of the product anchored by electrostatic interactions with five conserved residues. This binding mode resembles that of glutamate bound to the proline catabolic enzyme ALDH4A1. Analysis of ALDH7A1 and ALDH4A1 structures suggests key interactions that underlie substrate discrimination. Structures of apo ALDH7A1 reveal dramatic conformational differences from the product complex. Product binding is associated with a 16 Å movement of the C-terminus into the active site, which stabilizes the active conformation of the aldehyde substrate anchor loop. The fact that the C-terminus is part of the active site was hitherto unknown. Interestingly, the C-terminus and aldehyde anchor loop are disordered in a new tetragonal crystal form of the apoenzyme, implying that these parts of the enzyme are highly flexible. Our results suggest that the active site of ALDH7A1 is disassembled when the aldehyde site is vacant, and the C-terminus is a mobile element that forms quaternary structural interactions that aid aldehyde binding. These results are relevant to the c.1512delG genetic deletion associated with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy, which alters the C-terminus of ALDH7A1. PMID:26260980

  19. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-independent bioactivation of nitroglycerin in porcine and bovine blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Regina; Wölkart, Gerald; Opelt, Marissa; Schwarzenegger, Christine; Hofinger, Marielies; Neubauer, Andrea; Kollau, Alexander; Schmidt, Kurt; Schrammel, Astrid; Mayer, Bernd

    2015-02-15

    The vascular bioactivation of the antianginal drug nitroglycerin (GTN), yielding 1,2-glycerol dinitrate and nitric oxide or a related activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, is catalyzed by aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) in rodent and human blood vessels. The essential role of ALDH2 has been confirmed in many studies and is considered as general principle of GTN-induced vasodilation in mammals. However, this view is challenged by an early report showing that diphenyleneiodonium, which we recently characterized as potent ALDH2 inhibitor, has no effect on GTN-induced relaxation of bovine coronary arteries (De La Lande et al., 1996). We investigated this issue and found that inhibition of ALDH2 attenuates GTN-induced coronary vasodilation in isolated perfused rat hearts but has no effect on relaxation to GTN of bovine and porcine coronary arteries. This observation is explained by low levels of ALDH2 protein expression in bovine coronary arteries and several types of porcine blood vessels. ALDH2 mRNA expression and the rates of GTN denitration were similarly low, excluding a significant contribution of ALDH2 to the bioactivation of GTN in these vessels. Attempts to identify the responsible pathway with enzyme inhibitors did not provide conclusive evidence for the involvement of ALDH3A1, cytochrome P450, or GSH-S-transferase. Thus, the present manuscript describes a hitherto unrecognized pathway of GTN bioactivation in bovine and porcine blood vessels. If present in the human vasculature, this pathway might contribute to the therapeutic effects of organic nitrates that are not metabolized by ALDH2.

  20. Heterogeneous Interactions of Acetaldehyde and Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Iraci, L. T.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of acetaldehyde [CH3CHO] by aqueous sulfuric acid has been studied via Knudsen cell experiments over ranges of temperature (210-250 K) and acid concentration (40-80 wt. %) representative of the upper troposphere. The Henry's law constants for acetaldehyde calculated from these data range from 6 x 10(exp 2) M/atm for 40 wt. % H2SO4 at 228 K to 2 x 10(exp 5) M/atm for 80 wt. % H2SO4 at 212 K. In some instances, acetaldehyde uptake exhibits apparent steady-state loss. The possible sources of this behavior, including polymerization, will be explored. Furthermore, the implications for heterogeneous reactions of aldehydes in sulfate aerosols in the upper troposphere will be discussed.

  1. Decomposition of acetaldehyde : experiment and detailed theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Gupte, K. S.; Kiefer, J. H.; Tranter, R. S.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.; Chemistry; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2007-01-01

    The classic pyrolytic decomposition of acetaldehyde has been examined to the higher temperatures used in combustion and also lower pressures with 85 laser-schlieren, shock-tube measurements of density gradient covering 40-500 torr and 1550-2400 K. This work is supplemented and modeled with a CASPT2 based variable reaction coordinate RRKM prediction of the dissociation kinetics. These RRKM predictions are then incorporated in good two-dimensional master equation fits of the strong falloff seen in the laser-schlieren experiments, and also that shown in some previous shock-tube results using UV absorption of the acetaldehyde as diagnostic. The laser-schlieren data provide not only unambiguous dissociation rates but also solid indications of the secondary chemistry. Modeling of the full density gradient profiles offers good estimates of rates for H-atom abstraction from both the acetaldehyde and the HCO radical, again at high temperatures.

  2. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activation in aged heart improves the autophagy by reducing the carbonyl modification on SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen; Yin, Yue; Yang, Jingrun; Wang, Zhifa; Zheng, Qiangsun; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac aging is characterized by accumulation of damaged proteins and decline of autophagic efficiency. Here, by forestalling SIRT1 carbonylated inactivation in aged heart, we determined the benefits of activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) on the autophagy. In this study, the ALDH2 KO mice progressively developed age-related heart dysfunction and showed reduction in the life span, which strongly suggests that ALDH2 ablation leads to cardiac aging. What's more, aged hearts displayed a significant decrease ALDH2 activity, resulting in accumulation of 4-HNE-protein adducts and protein carbonyls, impairment in the autophagy flux, and, consequently, deteriorated cardiac function after starvation. Sustained Alda-1 (selective ALDH2 activator) treatment increased cardiac ALDH2 activity and abrogated these effects. Using SIRT1 deficient heterozygous (Sirt1+/−) mice, we found that SIRT1 was necessary for ALDH2 activation-induced autophagy. We further demonstrated that ALDH2 activation attenuated SIRT1 carbonylation and improved SIRT1 activity, thereby increasing the deacetylation of nuclear LC3 and FoxO1. Sequentially, ALDH2 enhanced SIRT1 regulates LC3-Atg7 interaction and FoxO1 increased Rab7 expression, which were both necessary and sufficient for restoring autophagy flux. These results highlight that both accumulation of proteotoxic carbonyl stress linkage with autophagy decline contribute to heart senescence. ALDH2 activation is adequate to improve the autophagy flux by reducing the carbonyl modification on SIRT1, which in turn plays an important role in maintaining cardiac health during aging. PMID:26741505

  3. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Derived From a Reproductive Tissue Niche Under Oxidative Stress Have High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Kusuma, Gina D; Abumaree, Mohamed H; Pertile, Mark D; Perkins, Anthony V; Brennecke, Shaun P; Kalionis, Bill

    2016-06-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) in regenerative medicine often requires MSC to function in environments of high oxidative stress. Human pregnancy is a condition where the mother's tissues, and in particular her circulatory system, are exposed to increased levels of oxidative stress. MSC in the maternal decidua basalis (DMSC) are in a vascular niche, and thus would be exposed to oxidative stress products in the maternal circulation. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are a large family of enzymes which detoxify aldehydes and thereby protect stem cells against oxidative damage. A subpopulation of MSC express high levels of ALDH (ALDH(br)) and these are more potent in repairing and regenerating tissues. DMSC was compared with chorionic villous MSC (CMSC) derived from the human placenta. CMSC reside in vascular niche and are exposed to the fetal circulation, which is in lower oxidative state. We screened an ALDH isozyme cDNA array and determined that relative to CMSC, DMSC expressed high levels of ALDH1 family members, predominantly ALDH1A1. Immunocytochemistry gave qualitative confirmation at the protein level. Immunofluorescence detected ALDH1 immunoreactivity in the DMSC and CMSC vascular niche. The percentage of ALDH(br) cells was calculated by Aldefluor assay and DMSC showed a significantly higher percentage of ALDH(br) cells than CMSC. Finally, flow sorted ALDH(br) cells were functionally potent in colony forming unit assays. DMSC, which are derived from pregnancy tissues that are naturally exposed to high levels of oxidative stress, may be better candidates for regenerative therapies where MSC must function in high oxidative stress environments.

  4. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Derived From a Reproductive Tissue Niche Under Oxidative Stress Have High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Kusuma, Gina D; Abumaree, Mohamed H; Pertile, Mark D; Perkins, Anthony V; Brennecke, Shaun P; Kalionis, Bill

    2016-06-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) in regenerative medicine often requires MSC to function in environments of high oxidative stress. Human pregnancy is a condition where the mother's tissues, and in particular her circulatory system, are exposed to increased levels of oxidative stress. MSC in the maternal decidua basalis (DMSC) are in a vascular niche, and thus would be exposed to oxidative stress products in the maternal circulation. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are a large family of enzymes which detoxify aldehydes and thereby protect stem cells against oxidative damage. A subpopulation of MSC express high levels of ALDH (ALDH(br)) and these are more potent in repairing and regenerating tissues. DMSC was compared with chorionic villous MSC (CMSC) derived from the human placenta. CMSC reside in vascular niche and are exposed to the fetal circulation, which is in lower oxidative state. We screened an ALDH isozyme cDNA array and determined that relative to CMSC, DMSC expressed high levels of ALDH1 family members, predominantly ALDH1A1. Immunocytochemistry gave qualitative confirmation at the protein level. Immunofluorescence detected ALDH1 immunoreactivity in the DMSC and CMSC vascular niche. The percentage of ALDH(br) cells was calculated by Aldefluor assay and DMSC showed a significantly higher percentage of ALDH(br) cells than CMSC. Finally, flow sorted ALDH(br) cells were functionally potent in colony forming unit assays. DMSC, which are derived from pregnancy tissues that are naturally exposed to high levels of oxidative stress, may be better candidates for regenerative therapies where MSC must function in high oxidative stress environments. PMID:26880140

  5. Pharmacological treatments and strategies for reducing oral and intestinal acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Salaspuro, Ville

    2007-01-01

    Strong epidemiological, genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that local acetaldehyde exposure is a major factor behind gastrointestinal cancers especially associated with alcohol drinking and smoking. Thus, reducing the exposure to carcinogenic acetaldehyde either by decreasing the production or by eliminating acetaldehyde locally might offer a preventive strategy against acetaldehyde-induced gastrointestinal cancers. Thiol products, such as the amino acid cysteine, are known to be able to protect against acetaldehyde toxicity. Cysteine is able to bind acetaldehyde efficiently by forming a stable thiazolidine-carboxylic acid compound. Special cysteine preparations (such as lozenge and chewing gum) have already been developed to bind smoking and alcohol drinking derived acetaldehyde from the oral cavity. Most importantly, these type of drug formulations offer a novel method for intervention studies aimed to resolve the eventual role of acetaldehyde in the pathogenesis of upper digestive tract cancers. Acetaldehyde exposure could also be influenced by modifying the acetaldehyde producing microbiota. With regard to the upper digestive tract, acetaldehyde production from ingested ethanol could be significantly reduced by using an antiseptic mouthwash, chlorhexidine. In the large intestine acetaldehyde production could be markedly decreased either by reducing the Gram-negative microbes by ciprofloxacin antibiotic or by lowering the intraluminal pH by lactulose. PMID:17590993

  6. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 is associated with cognitive functions in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rwei-Ling; Tan, Chun-Hsiang; Lu, Ying-Che; Wu, Ruey-Meei

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter degradation has been proposed to cause the accumulation of neurotoxic metabolites. The metabolism of these metabolites involves aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2). The Asian-specific single nucleotide polymorphism rs671 causes reduced enzyme activity. This study aims to explore whether Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with reduced ALDH2 activity owing to the rs671 polymorphism are at risk for neuropsychological impairments. A total of 139 PD patients were recruited. Each participant was assessed for medical characteristics and their ALDH2 genotype. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale and the Frontal Behavioral Inventory were used to measure neuropsychological functions. We found that the MMSE scores were significantly lower in patients with inactive ALDH2 (U = 1873.5, p = 0.02). The presence of cognitive impairments was significantly more frequent in the inactive ALDH2 group (46.0%) than in the active ALDH2 group (26.3%) (χ2 = 5.886, p = 0.01). The inactive group showed significant deterioration in hobbies and exhibited more severe “disorganization” and “hyper-sexuality” behaviours. The additive effects of the allele on the development of cognitive impairments in PD patients may be an important finding that provides further insight into the pathogenic mechanism of cognitive dysfunction in PD. PMID:27453488

  7. Corneal aldehyde dehydrogenase and glutathione S-transferase activity after excimer laser keratectomy in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bilgihan, K.; Bilgihan, A.; Turkozkan, N.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The free radical balance of the eye may be changed by excimer laser keratectomy. Previous studies have demonstrated that excimer laser keratectomy increases the corneal temperature, decreases the superoxide dismutase activity of the aqueous, and induces lipid peroxidation in the superficial corneal stroma. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) are known to play an important role in corneal metabolism, particularly in detoxification of aldehydes, which are generated from free radical reactions.
METHODS—In three groups of guinea pigs mechanical corneal de-epithelialisation was performed in group I, superficial corneal photoablation in group II, and deep corneal photoablation in group III, and the corneal ALDH and GST activities measured after 48 hours.
RESULTS—The mean ALDH and GST activities of group I and II showed no differences compared with the controls (p>0.05). The corneal ALDH activities were found to be significantly decreased (p<0.05) and GST activities increased (p<0.05) in group III.
CONCLUSION—These results suggest that excimer laser treatment of high myopia may change the ALDH and GST activities, metabolism, and free radical balance of the cornea.

 Keywords: excimer laser keratectomy; aldehyde dehydrogenase; glutathione S-transferase PMID:9602629

  8. Mutations in ALDH1A3 cause microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Aldahmesh, M A; Khan, A O; Hijazi, H; Alkuraya, F S

    2013-08-01

    Microphthalmia is an important inborn error of eye development that can be associated with multisystem involvement. Anophthalmia is more severe and rarer. Single mutations in an expanding list of genes are known to cause this spectrum of anomaly. In one branch of a multiplex family with microphthalmia and anophthalmia, autozygome analysis excluded all known microphthalmia genes at the time of doing this study. Exome sequencing and autozygome filtration identified a novel homozygous variant in ALDH1A3. Subsequently, we identified another homozygous variant in 2 of the 10 probands with microphthalmia we specifically screened for mutations in ALDH1A3. Interestingly, the other branch of the original family was found to segregate anophthalmia/syndactyly with a novel homozygous SMOC1 variant. Our data support the very recent and independent identification of ALDH1A3 as a disease gene in microphthalmia. Locus heterogeneity should be considered in consanguineous families even for extremely rare phenotypes.

  9. Transport and intracellular accumulation of acetaldehyde in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, G.A.; Pamment, N.B. )

    1993-06-05

    The rate of acetaldehyde efflux from yeast cells and its intracellular concentration were studied in the light of recent suggestions that acetaldehyde inhibition may be an important factor in yeast ethanol fermentations. When the medium surrounding cells containing ethanol and acetaldehyde was suddenly diluted, the rate of efflux of acetaldehyde was slow relative to the rate of ethanol efflux, suggesting that acetaldehyde, unlike ethanol, may accumulate intracellularly. Intracellular acetaldehyde concentrations were measured during high cell density fermentations, using direct injection gas chromatography to avoid the need to concentrate or disrupt the cells. Intracellular acetaldehyde concentrations substantially exceeded the extracellular concentrations throughout fermentation and were generally much higher than the acetaldehyde concentrations normally recorded in the culture broth in ethanol fermentations. The technique used was sensitive to the time taken to cool and freeze the samples. Measured intracellular acetaldehyde concentrations fell rapidly as the time taken to freeze the suspensions was extended beyond 2 s. The results add weight to recent claims that acetaldehyde toxicity is responsible for some of the effects previously ascribed to ethanol in alcohol fermentations, especially Zymomonas fermentations. Further work is required to confirm the importance of acetaldehyde toxicity under other culture conditions.

  10. Malignant phyllodes tumors display mesenchymal stem cell features and aldehyde dehydrogenase/disialoganglioside identify their tumor stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although breast phyllodes tumors are rare, there is no effective therapy other than surgery. Little is known about their tumor biology. A malignant phyllodes tumor contains heterologous stromal elements, and can transform into rhabdomyosarcoma, liposarcoma and osteosarcoma. These versatile properties prompted us to explore their possible relationship to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and to search for the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in phyllodes tumors. Methods Paraffin sections of malignant phyllodes tumors were examined for various markers by immunohistochemical staining. Xenografts of human primary phyllodes tumors were established by injecting freshly isolated tumor cells into the mammary fat pad of non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice. To search for CSCs, xenografted tumor cells were sorted into various subpopulations by flow cytometry and examined for their in vitro mammosphere forming capacity, in vivo tumorigenicity in NOD-SCID mice and their ability to undergo differentiation. Results Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the expression of the following 10 markers: CD44, CD29, CD106, CD166, CD105, CD90, disialoganglioside (GD2), CD117, Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH), and Oct-4, and 7 clinically relevant markers (CD10, CD34, p53, p63, Ki-67, Bcl-2, vimentin, and Globo H) in all 51 malignant phyllodes tumors examined, albeit to different extents. Four xenografts were successfully established from human primary phyllodes tumors. In vitro, ALDH+ cells sorted from xenografts displayed approximately 10-fold greater mammosphere-forming capacity than ALDH- cells. GD2+ cells showed a 3.9-fold greater capacity than GD2- cells. ALDH+/GD2+cells displayed 12.8-fold greater mammosphere forming ability than ALDH-/GD2- cells. In vivo, the tumor-initiating frequency of ALDH+/GD2+ cells were up to 33-fold higher than that of ALDH+ cells, with as few as 50 ALDH+/GD2+ cells being sufficient for engraftment. Moreover, we

  11. Purification, characterization, and cDNA cloning of opine dehydrogenases from the polychaete rockworm Marphysa sanguinea.

    PubMed

    Endo, Noriyuki; Kan-no, Nobuhiro; Nagahisa, Eizoh

    2007-06-01

    Alanopine dehydrogenase (AlDH) and three isoforms of strombine/alanopine dehydrogenase (St/AlDH) were purified from muscle tissue of the polychaete rockworm Marphysa sanguinea. The four enzymes, which can be distinguished by the isoelectric point, are monomeric 42 kDa proteins, possess similar pH-activity profiles, and display specificity for pyruvate and NAD(H). The three isoforms of St/AlDH show equivalent Km and Vmax for glycine and L-alanine and for D-strombine and meso-alanopine. Free amino acid levels in the muscle and D-strombine accumulation in vivo during muscle activity suggest that St/AlDHs function physiologically as StDH. AlDH shows specificity for L-alanine and meso-alanopine, but not for glycine or D-strombine. The amino acid sequences of AlDH and one of the St/AlDH isoforms were determined by a combination of amino acid sequence analysis and cDNA cloning. St/AlDH cDNA consisted of 1586 bp nucleotides that encode a 399-residue protein (43,346.70 Da), and AlDH cDNA consisted of 1587 bp nucleotides that encode a 399-residue protein (43,886.68 Da). The two amino acid sequences deduced from the cDNA displayed 67% amino acid identity, with greatest similarity to that of tauropine dehydrogenase from the polychaete Arabella iricolor. PMID:17350870

  12. Isolated tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase can synthesize acetoin which inhibits pyruvate oxidation as well as other aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Baggetto, L G; Lehninger, A L

    1987-05-29

    Oxidation of 1 mM pyruvate by Ehrlich and AS30-D tumor mitochondria is inhibited by acetoin, an unusual and important metabolite of pyruvate utilization by cancer cells, by acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal and excess pyruvate. The respiratory inhibition is reversed by other substrates added to pyruvate and also by 0.5 mM ATP. Kinetic properties of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from these tumor mitochondria have been studied. This complex appears to be able to synthesize acetoin from acetaldehyde plus pyruvate and is competitively inhibited by acetoin. The role of a new regulatory pattern for tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase is presented.

  13. Prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde and histidine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Chun; Oro, J.; Yang, Lily; Miller, Stanley L.

    1987-01-01

    The prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde and imidazole-4-glycol from erythrose and formamidine has been demonstrated as well as the prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-ethanol and imidazole-4-glycol from erythrose, formaldehyde, and ammonia. The maximum yields of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde, imidazole-4-ethanol, and imidazole-4-glycol obtained in these reactions are 1.6, 5.4, and 6.8 percent respectively, based on the erythrose. Imidazole-4-acetaldehyde would have been converted to histidine on the primitive earth by a Strecker synthesis, and several prebiotic reactions would convert imidazole-4-glycol and imidazole-4-ethanol to imidazole-4-acetaldehyde.

  14. Human Salivary Aldehyde Dehydrogenase: Purification, Kinetic Characterization and Effect of Ethanol, Hydrogen Peroxide and Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate on the Activity of the Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Fazle; Laskar, Amaj Ahmed; Choudhary, Hadi Hasan; Younus, Hina

    2016-09-01

    Human salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase (hsALDH) enzyme appears to be the first line of defense in the body against exogenous toxic aldehydes. However till date much work has not been done on this important member of the ALDH family. In this study, we have purified hsALDH to homogeneity by diethylaminoethyl-cellulose (DEAE-cellulose) ion-exchange chromatography in a single step. The molecular mass of the homodimeric enzyme was determined to be approximately 108 kDa. Four aromatic substrates; benzaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, 2-naphthaldehyde and 6-methoxy-2-naphthaldehyde were used for determining the activity of pure hsALDH. K m values for these substrates were calculated to be 147.7, 5.31, 0.71 and 3.31 μM, respectively. The best substrates were found to be cinnamaldehyde and 2-naphthaldehyde since they exhibited high V max /K m values. 6-methoxy-2-naphthaldehyde substrate was used for further kinetic characterization of pure hsALDH. The pH and temperature optima of hsALDH were measured to be pH 8 and 45 °C, respectively. The pure enzyme is highly unstable at high temperatures. Ethanol, hydrogen peroxide and SDS activate hsALDH, therefore it is safe and beneficial to include them in mouthwashes and toothpastes in low concentrations. PMID:27324040

  15. Changes in the inducibility of a hepatic aldehyde dehydrogenase by various effectors.

    PubMed

    Vasiliou, V; Marselos, M

    1989-01-01

    A hepatic soluble aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), inducible by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, was studied in Wistar rats in connection with substances known to affect drug metabolism or aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, such as phenobarbital (PB), disulfiram (DS), beta-diethylaminoethyl diphenylpropylacetate (SKF 525A) and calcium cyanamide (CC). 3-Methylcholanthrene (MC) was given as a model inducer of ALDH (100 mg/kg, i.p., as a single dose) and the animals were killed after 3 days. Pretreatment with PB (1 g/l drinking water, for 2 weeks) enhanced the inducing effect of MC. On the contrary, pretreatment with DS (100 mg/kg, i.p., daily x 4) reduced by 70% the expected increase in ALDH activity. Neither SKF 525A (25 mg/kg, i.p., daily x 4), nor CC (5 mg/kg, i.p., daily x 4) could affect the action of the inducer. At the above doses, basal ALDH activity was inhibited by DS (30%) and CC (70%), but was not affected at all by PB or SKF 525A. The results were somewhat different when the various effectors tested were administered to animals already treated with MC (20 mg/kg, i.p., daily x 6). In this case, DS did not affect the already induced ALDH activity. On the contrary, CC was still an effective inhibitor. Unexpectedly, post-treatment with SKF 525A further enhanced the initial induction brought about by MC. Our findings show that substances affecting microsomal drug metabolism can interfere with the process of ALDH induction by MC. The additive result of PB pretreatment is probably due to the enhanced accumulation of an active metabolite of MC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase 10 family members confer salt tolerance through putrescine-derived 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) production

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Adel; Trobacher, Christopher P.; Shelp, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    Polyamines represent a potential source of 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) in plants exposed to abiotic stress. Terminal catabolism of putrescine in Arabidopsis thaliana involves amine oxidase and the production of 4-aminobutanal, which is a substrate for NAD+-dependent aminoaldehyde dehydrogenase (AMADH). Here, two AMADH homologs were chosen (AtALDH10A8 and AtALDH10A9) as candidates for encoding 4-aminobutanal dehydrogenase activity for GABA synthesis. The two genes were cloned and soluble recombinant proteins were produced in Escherichia coli. The pH optima for activity and catalytic efficiency of recombinant AtALDH10A8 with 3-aminopropanal as substrate was 10.5 and 8.5, respectively, whereas the optima for AtALDH10A9 were approximately 9.5. Maximal activity and catalytic efficiency were obtained with NAD+ and 3-aminopropanal, followed by 4-aminobutanal; negligible activity was obtained with betaine aldehyde. NAD+ reduction was accompanied by the production of GABA and β-alanine, respectively, with 4-aminobutanal and 3-aminopropanal as substrates. Transient co-expression systems using Arabidopsis cell suspension protoplasts or onion epidermal cells and several organelle markers revealed that AtALDH10A9 was peroxisomal, but AtALDH10A8 was cytosolic, although the N-terminal 140 amino acid sequence of AtALDH10A8 localized to the plastid. Root growth of single loss-of-function mutants was more sensitive to salinity than wild-type plants, and this was accompanied by reduced GABA accumulation. PMID:27725774

  17. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity Identifies a Population of Human Skeletal Muscle Cells With High Myogenic Capacities

    PubMed Central

    Vauchez, Karine; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Schmid, Michel; Khattar, Patricia; Chapel, Alain; Catelain, Cyril; Lecourt, Séverine; Larghéro, Jérôme; Fiszman, Marc; Vilquin, Jean-Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH) activity is one hallmark of human bone marrow (BM), umbilical cord blood (UCB), and peripheral blood (PB) primitive progenitors presenting high reconstitution capacities in vivo. In this study, we have identified ALDH+ cells within human skeletal muscles, and have analyzed their phenotypical and functional characteristics. Immunohistofluorescence analysis of human muscle tissue sections revealed rare endomysial cells. Flow cytometry analysis using the fluorescent substrate of ALDH, Aldefluor, identified brightly stained (ALDHbr) cells with low side scatter (SSClo), in enzymatically dissociated muscle biopsies, thereafter abbreviated as SMALD+ (for skeletal muscle ALDH+) cells. Phenotypical analysis discriminated two sub-populations according to CD34 expression: SMALD+/CD34− and SMALD+/CD34+ cells. These sub-populations did not initially express endothelial (CD31), hematopoietic (CD45), and myogenic (CD56) markers. Upon sorting, however, whereas SMALD+/CD34+ cells developed in vitro as a heterogeneous population of CD56− cells able to differentiate in adipoblasts, the SMALD+/CD34− fraction developed in vitro as a highly enriched population of CD56+ myoblasts able to form myotubes. Moreover, only the SMALD+/CD34− population maintained a strong myogenic potential in vivo upon intramuscular transplantation. Our results suggest that ALDH activity is a novel marker for a population of new human skeletal muscle progenitors presenting a potential for cell biology and cell therapy. PMID:19738599

  18. Incomplete penetrance of biallelic ALDH1A3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Plaisancié, Julie; Brémond-Gignac, Dominique; Demeer, Bénédicte; Gaston, Véronique; Verloes, Alain; Fares-Taie, Lucas; Gerber, Sylvie; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Calvas, Patrick; Chassaing, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    The formation of a properly shaped eye is a complex developmental event that requires the coordination of many induction processes and differentiation pathways. Microphthalmia and anophthalmia (MA) represent the most severe defects that can affect the ocular globe during embryonic development. When genetic, these ocular disorders exhibit large genetic heterogeneity and extreme variable expressivity. Around 20 monogenic diseases are known to be associated with MA as main phenotype and the penetrance of mutations is usually full in the patients. Some of these genes encode proteins involved in the vitamin A pathway, tightly regulated during eye development. One of those retinoic acid synthesis genes is ALDH1A3 and biallelic mutations in that gene have been recently found to lead to MA phenotype in patients. Interestingly, we report here the lack of ocular defect in a girl carrying the same homozygous mutation in the ALDH1A3 gene than the affected members of her family. Thus, this report brings new information for the phenotype-genotype correlation of ALDH1A3 mutations and raises important questions, especially in terms of genetic counselling given to the patients and their families. Furthermore, these data contribute to the more general understanding that we have for the complex genetic inheritance of these MA phenotypes. PMID:26873617

  19. Histidine 51 facilitates proton transfer in alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, R.M.; Plapp, B.V.

    1987-05-01

    Operating through a proton relay system, His-51 has been proposed to serve as a base during ethanol oxidation by alcohol dehydrogenase. This residue is highly conserved in alcohol dehydrogenases. They have used mutamer directed mutagenesis to change this residue to Gln-51. Diethyl pyrocarbonate treatment decreases the activity of the wild type enzyme 60-fold, whereas the Gln-51 enzyme is inactivated by only 5-fold. The rate of inactivation is also much slower with the mutant enzyme. They conclude that His-51 is the reactive residue in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. The mutation also alters the Km for acetaldehyde and the pH dependence of several kinetic constants. At pH 7.0 the Km for acetaldehyde is 18-fold higher in the Gln-51 enzyme, whereas Vmax for acetaldehyde reduction is the same as with the wild type enzyme. For ethanol oxidation the pH dependence of the log of Vmax and V/K shows a linear dependence with a slope of 0.5 and no discernible pK. They propose a mechanism that can explain these data. For the Gln-51 enzyme, after the ternary complex has formed in an Ordered Bi mechanism, a random component for proton release and hydride transfer occurs. With histidine at position 51, serving as a base, a more rapid proton release from the enzyme-NAD-ethanol complex precedes product formation.

  20. 40 CFR 721.10036 - Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10036 Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... based polymer (PMN P-02-406) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10036 - Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10036 Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... based polymer (PMN P-02-406) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10036 - Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10036 Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... based polymer (PMN P-02-406) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  3. Catalytic oxidation of ethanol and acetaldehyde in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, L.; Akgerman, A.

    1995-05-01

    Supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction has been receiving increasing attention for the remediation of environmental matrices contaminated with organic compounds. Catalytic oxidation of ethanol and acetaldehyde over a 4.45% Pt/TiO{sub 2} catalyst in supercritical carbon dioxide was studied in a 1/2 in. fixed bed reactor. Experiments for ethanol oxidation were performed at temperatures from 423 to 573 K and at a pressure of 8.96 MPa with a 5:1 molar ratio of oxygen to ethanol in the feed. Acetaldehyde oxidation was performed at temperatures from 423 to 548 K and at 8.96 MPa with an approximate 4.7:1 molar ratio of oxygen to acetaldehyde in the feed. In addition to CO{sub 2}, the complete oxidation product, acetaldehyde and trace amounts of CO were generated during ethanol oxidation, while a trace amount of CO was the only partial oxidation product during acetaldehyde oxidation. A parallel and consecutive reaction mechanism was postulated for ethanol oxidation, whereas dissociative adsorption of acetaldehyde on the catalyst surface and surface reaction rate control were postulated for acetaldehyde oxidation. The kinetic parameters in the rate expressions based on the mechanisms were obtained by fitting the experimental data with the results of the model calculation. The models were used to predict the conversion and yield for ethanol oxidation and acetaldehyde oxidation.

  4. 40 CFR 721.10036 - Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10036 Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... based polymer (PMN P-02-406) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10036 - Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10036 Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... based polymer (PMN P-02-406) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  6. Acetaldehyde photochemistry on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Zehr, Robert T.; Henderson, Michael A.

    2008-07-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) photon induced decomposition of acetaldehyde absorbed on the oxidized retile TIO2(110) surface was studied with photon stimulated desorption (PSD) and theral programmed desorption (TPD). Acetaldehyde desorbs molecularly from TiO2(110) with minor decomposition channels yielding butene on the reduced TiO2 surface and acetate on the oxidized TiO2 surface. Acetaldehyde absorbed on oxidized TiO2(110) undergoes a facile thermal reaction to form a photoactive acetaldehyde-oxygen complex. UV irradiation of the acetaldehyde-oxygen complex resulting in the ejection of methyl radical into gas phase and conversion of the surface bound fragment to formate.

  7. Acetaldehyde Photochemistry on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Zehr, Robert T.; Henderson, Michael A.

    2008-07-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) photon induced decomposition of acetaldehyde adsorbed on the oxidized rutile TiO2(110) surface was studied with photon stimulated desorption (PSD) and thermal programmed desorption (TPD). Acetaldehyde desorbs molecularly from TiO2(110) with minor decomposition channels yielding butene on the reduced TiO2 surface and acetate on the oxidized TiO2 surface. Acetaldehyde adsorbed on oxidized TiO2(110) undergoes a facile thermal reaction to form a photoactive acetaldehyde-oxygen complex. UV irradiation of the acetaldehyde-oxygen complex initiated photofragmentation of the complex resulting in the ejection of methyl radical into gas phase and conversion of the surface bound fragment to formate.

  8. XRCC1, CYP2E1 and ALDH2 genetic polymorphisms and sister chromatid exchange frequency alterations amongst vinyl chloride monomer-exposed polyvinyl chloride workers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ruey-Hong; Wang, Jung-Der; Hsieh, Ling-Ling; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2003-08-01

    Vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is a known human carcinogen, which may be metabolized by cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), and glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1). A DNA-repair gene, X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 ( XRCC1, exon 10), may also be implicated in the process of VCM-related carcinogenesis. Thus, VCM-exposed workers with inherited susceptible metabolic and DNA-repair genotypes may experience an increased risk of genotoxiciy. This study was designed to investigate whether metabolic and DNA-repair genotypes affected sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency in occupationally VCM-exposed workers from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) manufacturing plants. Study subjects comprised 61 male workers having experienced VCM exposure, and 29 male controls. Questionnaires were administered to obtain detailed histories of cigarette-smoking habits, alcohol consumption behavior, and occupation. The frequency of SCE in peripheral lymphocytes was determined using a standardized method, and genotypes of CYP2E1, ALDH2, GSTT1 and XRCC1 were identified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure. Our results demonstrated that smoking, age and VCM exposure and XRCC1 ( P=0.03), CYP2E1 ( P=0.04), and ALDH2 ( P=0.08) were significantly associated with an increased SCE frequency. Further analysis of gene combinations, including CYP2E1, ALDH2 and XRCC1, revealed an increased trend for these genotypes to influence SCE frequencies for the low VCM-exposure group ( P<0.01), but not so for the high VCM-exposure group ( P=0.29) or for controls ( P=0.49). These results suggest that workers with susceptible metabolic and DNA-repair genotypes, may experience an increased risk of DNA damage elicited by VCM exposure.

  9. Structural and functional consequences of coenzyme binding to the inactive asian variant of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase: roles of residues 475 and 487.

    PubMed

    Larson, Heather N; Zhou, Jianzhong; Chen, Zhiqiang; Stamler, Jonathan S; Weiner, Henry; Hurley, Thomas D

    2007-04-27

    The common mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) ALDH2(*)2 polymorphism is associated with impaired ethanol metabolism and decreased efficacy of nitroglycerin treatment. These physiological effects are due to the substitution of Lys for Glu-487 that reduces the k(cat) for these processes and increases the K(m) for NAD(+), as compared with ALDH2. In this study, we sought to understand the nature of the interactions that give rise to the loss of structural integrity and low activity in ALDH2(*)2 even when complexed with coenzyme. Consequently, we have solved the crystal structure of ALDH2(*)2 complexed with coenzyme to 2.5A(.) We have also solved the structures of a mutated form of ALDH2 where Arg-475 is replaced by Gln (R475Q). The structural and functional properties of the R475Q enzyme are intermediate between those of wild-type and the ALDH2(*)2 enzymes. In both cases, the binding of coenzyme restores most of the structural deficits observed in the apoenzyme structures. The binding of coenzyme to the R475Q enzyme restores its structure and catalytic properties to near wild-type levels. In contrast, the disordered helix within the coenzyme binding pocket of ALDH2(*)2 is reordered, but the active site is only partially reordered. Consistent with the structural data, ALDH2(*)2 showed a concentration-dependent increase in esterase activity and nitroglycerin reductase activity upon addition of coenzyme, but the levels of activity do not approach those of the wild-type enzyme or that of the R475Q enzyme. The data presented shows that Glu-487 maintains a critical function in linking the structure of the coenzyme-binding site to that of the active site through its interactions with Arg-264 and Arg-475, and in doing so, creates the stable structural scaffold conducive to catalysis.

  10. Retinoic Acid and GM-CSF Coordinately Induce Retinal Dehydrogenase 2 (RALDH2) Expression through Cooperation between the RAR/RXR Complex and Sp1 in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohoka, Yoshiharu; Yokota-Nakatsuma, Aya; Maeda, Naoko; Takeuchi, Hajime; Iwata, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA)-producing dendritic cells (DCs) play critical roles in gut immunity. Retinal dehydrogenase 2 (RALDH2) encoded by Aldh1a2 is a key enzyme for generating RA in DCs. Granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) potently induces RALDH2 expression in DCs in an RA-dependent manner, and RA alone weakly induces the expression. However, how GM-CSF and RA induce RALDH2 expression remains unclear. Here, we show that GM-CSF-induced activation of the transcription factor Sp1 and RA-dependent signaling via the RA receptor (RAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) complex contribute to Aldh1a2 expression. The RAR antagonist LE540 and the Sp1 inhibitor mithramycin A inhibited GM-CSF-induced Aldh1a2 expression in fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand-generated bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs). ERK and p38 MAPK inhibitors suppressed GM-CSF-induced nuclear translocation of Sp1 and Aldh1a2 expression. Sp1 and the RARα/RXRα complex bound to GC-rich Sp1-binding sites and an RA response element (RARE) half-site, respectively, near the TATA box in the mouse Aldh1a2 promoter. The DNA sequences around these sites were highly conserved among different species. In the presence of RA, ectopic expression of RARα/RXRα and Sp1 synergistically enhanced Aldh1a2 promoter-reporter activity. GM-CSF did not significantly induce Aldh1a2 expression in plasmacytoid DCs, peritoneal macrophages, or T cells, and the Aldh1a2 promoter in these cells was mostly unmethylated. These results suggest that GM-CSF/RA-induced RALDH2 expression in DCs requires cooperative binding of Sp1 and the RAR/RXR complex to the Aldh1a2 promoter, and can be regulated by a DNA methylation-independent mechanism. PMID:24788806

  11. Structural and Functional Consequences of Coenzyme Binding to the Inactive Asian Variant of Mitochondrial Aldehyde Dehydrogenase: Roles of Residues 475 and 487

    SciTech Connect

    Larson,H.; Zhou, J.; Chen, Z.; Stamler, J.; Weiner, H.; Hurley, T.

    2007-01-01

    The common mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) ALDH2*2 polymorphism is associated with impaired ethanol metabolism and decreased efficacy of nitroglycerin treatment. These physiological effects are due to the substitution of Lys for Glu-487 that reduces the k{sub cat} for these processes and increases the K{sub m} for NAD{sup +}, as compared with ALDH2. In this study, we sought to understand the nature of the interactions that give rise to the loss of structural integrity and low activity in ALDH2*2 even when complexed with coenzyme. Consequently, we have solved the crystal structure of ALDH2*2 complexed with coenzyme to 2.5 {angstrom}. We have also solved the structures of a mutated form of ALDH2 where Arg-475 is replaced by Gln (R475Q). The structural and functional properties of the R475Q enzyme are intermediate between those of wild-type and the ALDH2*2 enzymes. In both cases, the binding of coenzyme restores most of the structural deficits observed in the apoenzyme structures. The binding of coenzyme to the R475Q enzyme restores its structure and catalytic properties to near wild-type levels. In contrast, the disordered helix within the coenzyme binding pocket of ALDH2*2 is reordered, but the active site is only partially reordered. Consistent with the structural data, ALDH2*2 showed a concentration-dependent increase in esterase activity and nitroglycerin reductase activity upon addition of coenzyme, but the levels of activity do not approach those of the wild-type enzyme or that of the R475Q enzyme. The data presented shows that Glu-487 maintains a critical function in linking the structure of the coenzyme binding site to that of the active site through its interactions with Arg-264 and Arg-475, and in doing so, creates the stable structural scaffold conducive to catalysis.

  12. Complex oscillations in the combustion of acetaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, R.H.; Sevcikova, H.; Ross, J.

    1988-10-15

    Aperiodic dynamics are observed experimentally in the cool flame combustion region of acetaldehyde (ACH) in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). A gradual transition is seen, with variation of exit orifice size, from limit cycle oscillation to aperiodic variations in light emission, and then back to near periodic oscillations. We analyze this transition by calculating power spectra, autocorrelation functions, phase portraits, period distributions, and Poincare sections. The variation in peak amplitude and peak-to-peak period of the temporal variations of light emission increases during the transition. There are many initial indications of a transition to chaos. However, after an in-depth analysis, given in the following article, we ascribe the transition to the presence of a Hopf bifurcation and noise: the path traced out in the constraint space by the change in exit orifice size is nearly tangent to a Hopf bifurcation set but does not cross this set.

  13. Complex oscillations in the combustion of acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Robert H.; Sevčikova, Hana; Ross, John

    1988-10-01

    Aperiodic dynamics are observed experimentally in the cool flame combustion region of acetaldehyde (ACH) in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). A gradual transition is seen, with variation of exit orifice size, from limit cycle oscillation to aperiodic variations in light emission, and then back to near periodic oscillations. We analyze this transition by calculating power spectra, autocorrelation functions, phase portraits, period distributions, and Poincaré sections. The variation in peak amplitude and peak-to-peak period of the temporal variations of light emission increases during the transition. There are many initial indications of a transition to chaos. However, after an in-depth analysis, given in the following article, we ascribe the transition to the presence of a Hopf bifurcation and noise: the path traced out in the constraint space by the change in exit orifice size is nearly tangent to a Hopf bifurcation set but does not cross this set.

  14. Piecing together the puzzle of acetaldehyde as a neuroactive agent.

    PubMed

    Correa, Mercè; Salamone, John D; Segovia, Kristen N; Pardo, Marta; Longoni, Rosanna; Spina, Liliana; Peana, Alessandra T; Vinci, Stefania; Acquas, Elio

    2012-01-01

    Mainly known for its more famous parent compound, ethanol, acetaldehyde was first studied in the 1940s, but then research interest in this compound waned. However, in the last two decades, research on acetaldehyde has seen a revitalized and uninterrupted interest. Acetaldehyde, per se, and as a product of ethanol metabolism, is responsible for many pharmacological effects which are not clearly distinguishable from those of its parent compound, ethanol. Consequently, the most recent advances in acetaldehyde's psychopharmacology have been inspired by the experimental approach to test the hypothesis that some of the effects of ethanol are mediated by acetaldehyde and, in this regard, the characterization of metabolic pathways for ethanol and the localization within discrete brain regions of these effects have revitalized the interest on the role of acetaldehyde in ethanol's central effects. Here we present and discuss a wealth of experimental evidence that converges to suggest that acetaldehyde is an intrinsically active compound, is metabolically generated in the brain and, finally, mediates many of the psychopharmacological properties of ethanol.

  15. Ultraviolet radiation decreases expression and induces aggregation of corneal ALDH3A1.

    PubMed

    Manzer, Rizwan; Pappa, Aglaia; Estey, Tia; Sladek, Norman; Carpenter, John F; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2003-02-01

    Substantial reduction in corneal ALDH3A1 enzymatic activity associated with eye pathology was previously reported in C57BL/6J mice subjected to ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The aim of this study was to examine whether UVR diminishes corneal ALDH3A1 expression through modifications at the transcriptional, translational, or post-translational level. Adult C57BL/6J mice were subjected to UVR exposure (302 nm peak wavelength) for various periods of time, and corneal ALDH3A1 mRNA and protein levels were monitored by Northern and Western blot analysis, respectively. In addition, ALDH3A1 enzymatic activity was determined as a measure of post-translational modification. Mice exposed to 0.2 J/cm(2) UVB radiation demonstrated an extensive decrease, approximately 80%, in mRNA and protein levels, as well as enzymatic activity of corneal ALDH3A1. Significant reductions in corneal ALDH3A1 enzymatic activity were detected in mice 96 h after exposure to 0.05 and 0.1 J/cm(2) UVB radiation; no significant changes were observed in mRNA and protein levels. These data suggest that UVB down-regulates corneal ALDH3A1 expression at the transcriptional and/or post-translational level depending on the dose of UVB. Reduction in gene transcription requires UVB doses greater than or equal to 0.2 J/cm(2). In vitro experiments with human corneal epithelial cell lines stably transfected with human ALDH3A1 cDNA, and with purified recombinant human ALDH3A1 protein, indicated that ALDH3A1 undergoes post-translational modifications after UVR exposure. These modifications result in both covalent and non-covalent aggregation of the protein with no detectable precipitation. Such conformational changes may be associated with the function of ALDH3A1 as a chaperone-like molecule in the cornea. PMID:12604188

  16. Activator Protein-1 Regulation of Murine Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1a1

    PubMed Central

    Makia, N. L.; Amunom, I.; Falkner, K. C.; Conklin, D. J.; Surapureddi, S.; Goldstein, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 1a1 is the major ALDH expressed in mouse liver and is an effective catalyst in metabolism of lipid aldehydes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed a ≈2.5- to 3-fold induction of the hepatic ALDH1A1 mRNA in mice administered either acrolein (5 mg/kg acrolein p.o.) or butylated hydroxylanisole (BHA) (0.45% in the diet) and of cytosolic NAD+-dependent ALDH activity. We observed ≈2-fold increases in ALDH1A1 mRNA levels in both Nrf2(+/+) and Nrf2(−/−) mice treated with BHA compared with controls, suggesting that BHA-induced expression is independent of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The levels of activator protein-1 (AP-1) mRNA and protein, as well as the amount of phosphorylated c-Jun were significantly increased in mouse liver or Hepa1c1c7 cells treated with either BHA or acrolein. With use of luciferase reporters containing the 5′-flanking sequence of Aldh1a1 (−1963/+27), overexpression of c-Jun resulted in an ≈4-fold induction in luciferase activity, suggesting that c-Jun transactivates the Aldh1a1 promoter as a homodimer and not as a c-Jun/c-Fos heterodimer. Promoter deletion and mutagenesis analyses demonstrated that the AP-1 site at position −758 and possibly −1069 relative to the transcription start site was responsible for c-Jun-mediated transactivation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay analysis with antibodies against c-Jun and c-Fos showed that c-Jun binds to the proximal AP-1 site at position −758 but not at −1069. Recruitment of c-Jun to this proximal AP-1 site by BHA was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, indicating that recruitment of c-Jun to the mouse Aldh1a1 gene promoter results in increased transcription. This mode of regulation of an ALDH has not been described before. PMID:22740640

  17. Aldehyde dehydrogenase induction in arsenic-exposed rat bladder epithelium.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Chun; Yu, Hsin-Su; Chai, Chee-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is widely distributed in the environment. Many human cancers, including urothelial carcinoma (UC), show a dose-dependent relationship with arsenic exposure in the south-west coast of Taiwan (also known as the blackfoot disease (BFD) areas). However, the molecular mechanisms of arsenic-mediated UC carcinogenesis has not yet been defined. In vivo study, the rat bladder epithelium were exposed with arsenic for 48 h. The proteins were extracted from untreated and arsenic-treated rat bladder cells and utilized two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Selected peptides were extracted from the gel and identified by quadrupole-time of flight (Q-TOF) Ultima-Micromass spectra. The significantly difference expression of proteins in arsenic-treated groups as compared with untreated groups was confirmed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and western blotting. We found that thirteen proteins were down-regulated and nine proteins were up-regulated in arsenic-treated rat bladder cells when compared with untreated groups. The IHC and western blotting results confirmed that aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) protein was up-regulated in arsenic-treated rat bladder epithelium. Expression of ALDH protein was significantly higher in UC patients from BFD areas than those from non-BFD areas using IHC (p=0.018). In conclusion, the ALDH protein expression could be used as molecular markers for arsenic-induced transformation.

  18. Aldehyde dehydrogenase induction in arsenic-exposed rat bladder epithelium.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Chun; Yu, Hsin-Su; Chai, Chee-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is widely distributed in the environment. Many human cancers, including urothelial carcinoma (UC), show a dose-dependent relationship with arsenic exposure in the south-west coast of Taiwan (also known as the blackfoot disease (BFD) areas). However, the molecular mechanisms of arsenic-mediated UC carcinogenesis has not yet been defined. In vivo study, the rat bladder epithelium were exposed with arsenic for 48 h. The proteins were extracted from untreated and arsenic-treated rat bladder cells and utilized two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Selected peptides were extracted from the gel and identified by quadrupole-time of flight (Q-TOF) Ultima-Micromass spectra. The significantly difference expression of proteins in arsenic-treated groups as compared with untreated groups was confirmed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and western blotting. We found that thirteen proteins were down-regulated and nine proteins were up-regulated in arsenic-treated rat bladder cells when compared with untreated groups. The IHC and western blotting results confirmed that aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) protein was up-regulated in arsenic-treated rat bladder epithelium. Expression of ALDH protein was significantly higher in UC patients from BFD areas than those from non-BFD areas using IHC (p=0.018). In conclusion, the ALDH protein expression could be used as molecular markers for arsenic-induced transformation. PMID:26482281

  19. Alcohol Dehydrogenase-1B (rs1229984) and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 (rs671) Genotypes Are Strong Determinants of the Serum Triglyceride and Cholesterol Levels of Japanese Alcoholic Men

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Akira; Yokoyama, Tetsuji; Matsui, Toshifumi; Mizukami, Takeshi; Kimura, Mitsuru; Matsushita, Sachio; Higuchi, Susumu; Maruyama, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated serum triglyceride (TG) and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are common in drinkers. The fast-metabolizing alcohol dehydrogenase-1B encoded by the ADH1B*2 allele (vs. ADH1B*1/*1 genotype) and inactive aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 encoded by the ALDH2*2 allele (vs. ALDH2*1/*1 genotype) modify ethanol metabolism and are prevalent (≈90% and ≈40%, respectively) in East Asians. We attempted to evaluate the associations between the ADH1B and ALDH2 genotypes and lipid levels in alcoholics. Methods The population consisted of 1806 Japanese alcoholic men (≥40 years) who had undergone ADH1B and ALDH2 genotyping and whose serum TG, total cholesterol, and HDL-C levels in the fasting state had been measured within 3 days after admission. Results High serum levels of TG (≥150 mg/dl), HDL-C (>80 mg/dl), and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C calculated by the Friedewald formula ≥140 mg/dl) were observed in 24.3%, 16.8%, and 15.6%, respectively, of the subjects. Diabetes, cirrhosis, smoking, and body mass index (BMI) affected the serum lipid levels. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of the ADH1B*2 allele and the active ALDH2*1/*1 genotype increased the odds ratio (OR; 95% confidence interval) for a high TG level (2.22 [1.67–2.94] and 1.39 [0.99–1.96], respectively), and decreased the OR for a high HDL-C level (0.37 [0.28–0.49] and 0.51 [0.37–0.69], respectively). The presence of the ADH1B*2 allele decreased the OR for a high LDL-C level (0.60 [0.45–0.80]). The ADH1B*2 plus ALDH2*1/*1 combination yielded the highest ORs for high TG levels and lowest OR for a high HDL-C level. The genotype effects were more prominent in relation to the higher levels of TG (≥220 mg/dl) and HDL-C (≥100 mg/dl). Conclusions The fast-metabolizing ADH1B and active ALDH2, and especially a combination of the two were strongly associated with higher serum TG levels and lower serum HDL-C levels of alcoholics. The fast

  20. Ethanol formation in adh0 mutants reveals the existence of a novel acetaldehyde-reducing activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Drewke, C; Thielen, J; Ciriacy, M

    1990-01-01

    A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been constructed which is deficient in the four alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isozymes known at present. This strain (adh0), being irreversibly mutated in the genes ADH1, ADH3, and ADH4 and carrying a point mutation in the gene ADH2 coding for the glucose-repressible isozyme ADHII, still produces up to one third of the theoretical maximum yield of ethanol in a homofermentative conversion of glucose to ethanol. Analysis of the glucose metabolism of adh0 cells shows that the lack of all known ADH isozymes results in the formation of glycerol as a major fermentation product, accompanied by a significant production of acetaldehyde and acetate. Treatment of glucose-growing adh0 cells with the respiratory-chain inhibitor antimycin A leads to an immediate cessation of ethanol production, demonstrating that ethanol production in adh0 cells is dependent on mitochondrial electron transport. Reduction of acetaldehyde to ethanol in isolated mitochondria could also be demonstrated. This reduction is apparently linked to the oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetate. Preliminary data suggest that this novel type of ethanol formation in S. cerevisiae is associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane. Images PMID:2193925

  1. The effects of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases on disorders of hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clay; Gasparetto, Maura; Jordan, Craig; Pollyea, Daniel A; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoiesis involves the orderly production of millions of blood cells per second from a small number of essential bone marrow cells termed hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Ethanol suppresses normal hematopoiesis resulting in leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia and may also predispose to the development of diseases such as myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute leukemia. Currently the exact mechanisms by which ethanol perturbs hematopoiesis are unclear. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene family plays a major role in the metabolism of reactive aldehydes derived from ethanol in the liver and other organs. At least one of the ALDH isoforms, ALDH1A1, is expressed at high levels in HSCs in humans, mice, and other organisms. Recent data indicate that ALDH1A1 and possibly other ALDH isoforms may metabolize reactive aldehydes in HSCs and other hematopoietic cells as they do in the liver and elsewhere. In addition, loss of these ALDHs leads to perturbation of a variety of cell processes that may predispose HSCs to disorders in growth and leukemic transformation. From these findings, we suggest a hypothesis that the cytopenias and possible increased risk of MDS and acute leukemia in heavy alcohol users is due to polymorphisms in genes responsible for metabolism of alcohol derived reactive aldehydes and repair of their DNA adducts in HSCs and other hematopoietic cells. In the article, we will summarize the biological properties of hematopoietic cells and diseases related to ethanol consumption, discuss molecular characteristics of ethanol metabolism, and describe a model to explain how ethanol derived reactive aldehydes may promote HSC damage. PMID:25427917

  2. Vascular Bioactivation of Nitroglycerin by Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Barbara S.; Gorren, Antonius C. F.; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Wenzl, M. Verena; Furdui, Cristina M.; Poole, Leslie B.; Mayer, Bernd; Gruber, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) catalyzes the bioactivation of nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) in blood vessels, resulting in vasodilation by nitric oxide (NO) or a related species. Because the mechanism of this reaction is still unclear we determined the three-dimensional structures of wild-type (WT) ALDH2 and of a triple mutant of the protein that exhibits low denitration activity (E268Q/C301S/C303S) in complex with GTN. The structure of the triple mutant showed that GTN binds to the active site via polar contacts to the oxyanion hole and to residues 268 and 301 as well as by van der Waals interactions to hydrophobic residues of the catalytic pocket. The structure of the GTN-soaked wild-type protein revealed a thionitrate adduct to Cys-302 as the first reaction intermediate, which was also found by mass spectrometry (MS) experiments. In addition, the MS data identified sulfinic acid as the irreversibly inactivated enzyme species. Assuming that the structures of the triple mutant and wild-type ALDH2 reflect binding of GTN to the catalytic site and the first reaction step, respectively, superposition of the two structures indicates that denitration of GTN is initiated by nucleophilic attack of Cys-302 at one of the terminal nitrate groups, resulting in formation of the observed thionitrate intermediate and release of 1,2-glyceryl dinitrate. Our results shed light on the molecular mechanism of the GTN denitration reaction and provide useful information on the structural requirements for high affinity binding of organic nitrates to the catalytic site of ALDH2. PMID:22988236

  3. Residues that influence coenzyme preference in the aldehyde dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    González-Segura, Lilian; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Julián-Sánchez, Adriana; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A

    2015-06-01

    To find out the residues that influence the coenzyme preference of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), we reviewed, analyzed and correlated data from their known crystal structures and amino-acid sequences with their published kinetic parameters for NAD(P)(+). We found that the conformation of the Rossmann-fold loops participating in binding the adenosine ribose is very conserved among ALDHs, so that coenzyme specificity is mainly determined by the nature of the residue at position 195 (human ALDH2 numbering). Enzymes with glutamate or proline at 195 prefer NAD(+) because the side-chains of these residues electrostatically and/or sterically repel the 2'-phosphate group of NADP(+). But contrary to the conformational rigidity of proline, the conformational flexibility of glutamate may allow NADP(+)-binding in some enzymes by moving the carboxyl group away from the 2'-phosphate group, which is possible if a small neutral residue is located at position 224, and favored if the residue at position 53 interacts with Glu195 in a NADP(+)-compatible conformation. Of the residues found at position 195, only glutamate interacts with the NAD(+)-adenosine ribose; glutamine and histidine cannot since their side-chain points are opposite to the ribose, probably because the absence of the electrostatic attraction by the conserved nearby Lys192, or its electrostatic repulsion, respectively. The shorter side-chains of other residues-aspartate, serine, threonine, alanine, valine, leucine, or isoleucine-are distant from the ribose but leave room for binding the 2'-phosphate group. Generally, enzymes having a residue different from Glu bind NAD(+) with less affinity, but they can also bind NADP(+) even sometimes with higher affinity than NAD(+), as do enzymes containing Thr/Ser/Gln195. Coenzyme preference is a variable feature within many ALDH families, consistent with being mainly dependent on a single residue that apparently has no other structural or functional roles, and therefore can

  4. Functional Specialization of Maize Mitochondrial Aldehyde Dehydrogenases1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Schnable, Patrick S.

    2002-01-01

    The maize (Zea mays) rf2a and rf2b genes both encode homotetrameric aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs). The RF2A protein was shown previously to accumulate in the mitochondria. In vitro import experiments and ALDH assays on mitochondrial extracts from rf2a mutant plants established that the RF2B protein also accumulates in the mitochondria. RNA gel-blot analyses and immunohistolocation experiments revealed that these two proteins have only partially redundant expression patterns in organs and cell types. For example, RF2A, but not RF2B, accumulates to high levels in the tapetal cells of anthers. Kinetic analyses established that RF2A and RF2B have quite different substrate specificities; although RF2A can oxidize a broad range of aldehydes, including aliphatic aldehydes and aromatic aldehydes, RF2B can oxidize only short-chain aliphatic aldehydes. These two enzymes also have different pH optima and responses to changes in substrate concentration. In addition, RF2A, but not RF2B or any other natural ALDHs, exhibits positive cooperativity. These functional specializations may explain why many species have two mitochondrial ALDHs. This study provides data that serve as a basis for identifying the physiological pathway by which the rf2a gene participates in normal anther development and the restoration of Texas cytoplasm-based male sterility. For example, the observations that Texas cytoplasm anthers do not accumulate elevated levels of reactive oxygen species or lipid peroxidation and the kinetic features of RF2A make it unlikely that rf2a restores fertility by preventing premature programmed cell death. PMID:12481049

  5. Different effects of ascorbate deprivation and classical vascular nitrate tolerance on aldehyde dehydrogenase-catalysed bioactivation of nitroglycerin

    PubMed Central

    Wenzl, MV; Wölkart, G; Stessel, H; Beretta, M; Schmidt, K; Mayer, B

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Vascular tolerance to nitroglycerin (GTN) may be caused by impaired GTN bioactivation due to inactivation of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2). As relaxation to GTN is reduced but still sensitive to ALDH2 inhibitors in ascorbate deficiency, we compared the contribution of ALDH2 inactivation to GTN hyposensitivity in ascorbate deficiency and classical in vivo nitrate tolerance. Experimental approach: Guinea pigs were fed standard or ascorbate-free diet for 2 weeks. Reversibility was tested by feeding ascorbate-deficient animals standard diet for 1 week. Nitrate tolerance was induced by subcutaneous injection of 50 mg·kg−1 GTN 4 times daily for 3 days. Ascorbate levels were determined in plasma, blood vessels, heart and liver. GTN-induced relaxation was measured as isometric tension of aortic rings; vascular GTN biotransformation was assayed as formation of 1,2-and 1,3-glyceryl dinitrate (GDN). Key results: Two weeks of ascorbate deprivation had no effect on relaxation to nitric oxide but reduced the potency of GTN ∼10-fold in a fully reversible manner. GTN-induced relaxation was similarly reduced in nitrate tolerance but not further attenuated by ALDH inhibitors. Nitrate tolerance reduced ascorbate plasma levels without affecting ascorbate in blood vessels, liver and heart. GTN denitration was significantly diminished in nitrate-tolerant and ascorbate-deficient rings. However, while the ∼10-fold preferential 1,2-GDN formation, indicative for active ALDH2, had been retained in ascorbate deficiency, selectivity was largely lost in nitrate tolerance. Conclusions and implications: These results indicate that nitrate tolerance is associated with ALDH2 inactivation, whereas ascorbate deficiency possibly results in down-regulation of ALDH2 expression. PMID:19254277

  6. Aldehydic load and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 profile during the progression of post-myocardial infarction cardiomyopathy: benefits of Alda-1

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Katia M.S.; Bechara, Luiz R.G.; Lima, Vanessa M.; Ribeiro, Márcio A.C.; Campos, Juliane C.; Dourado, Paulo M.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Ferreira, Julio C.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives We previously demonstrated that reducing cardiac aldehydic load by aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for metabolizing the major lipid peroxidation product, protects against acute ischemia/reperfusion injury and chronic heart failure. However, time-dependent changes in ALDH2 profile, aldehydic load and mitochondrial bioenergetics during progression of post-myocardial infarction (post-MI) cardiomyopathy is unknown and should be established to determine the optimal time window for drug treatment. Methods Here we characterized cardiac ALDH2 activity and expression, lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) adduct formation, glutathione pool and mitochondrial energy metabolism and H2O2 release during the 4 weeks after permanent left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery occlusion in rats. Results We observed a sustained disruption of cardiac mitochondrial function during the progression of post-MI cardiomyopathy, characterized by >50% reduced mitochondrial respiratory control ratios and up to 2 fold increase in H2O2 release. Mitochondrial dysfunction was accompanied by accumulation of cardiac and circulating lipid peroxides and 4-HNE protein adducts and down-regulation of electron transport chain complexes I and V. Moreover, increased aldehydic load was associated with a 90% reduction in cardiac ALDH2 activity and increased glutathione pool. Further supporting an ALDH2 mechanism, sustained Alda-1 treatment (starting 24hrs after permanent LAD occlusion surgery) prevented aldehydic overload, mitochondrial dysfunction and improved ventricular function in post-MI cardiomyopathy rats. Conclusion Taken together, our findings demonstrate a disrupted mitochondrial metabolism along with an insufficient cardiac ALDH2-mediated aldehyde clearance during the progression of ventricular dysfunction, suggesting a potential therapeutic value of ALDH2 activators during the progression of post-myocardial infarction

  7. The Involvement of Acetaldehyde in Ethanol-Induced Cell Cycle Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, Marc A.; Schneider, Katrina J.; Finnigan, Rochelle L.; Maloney, Eamon P.; Wells, Mark A.; Clemens, Dahn L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatocytes metabolize the vast majority of ingested ethanol. This metabolic activity results in hepatic toxicity and impairs the ability of hepatocytes to replicate. Previous work by our group has shown that ethanol metabolism results in a G2/M cell cycle arrest. The intent of these studies was to discern the roles of acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen, two of the major by-products of ethanol metabolism, in the G2/M cell cycle arrest. Methods: To investigate the role of ethanol metabolites in the cell cycle arrest, VA-13 and VL-17A cells were used. These are recombinant Hep G2 cells that express alcohol dehydrogenase or alcohol dehydrogenase and cytochrome P450 2E1, respectively. Cells were cultured with or without ethanol, lacking or containing the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or trolox, for three days. Cellular accumulation was monitored by the DNA content of the cultures. The accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc2 in the inactive phosphorylated form (p-Cdc2) and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 were determined by immunoblot analysis. Results: Cultures maintained in the presence of ethanol demonstrated a G2/M cell cycle arrest that was associated with a reduction in DNA content and increased levels of p-Cdc2 and p21, compared with cells cultured in its absence. Inclusion of antioxidants in the ethanol containing media was unable to rescue the cells from the cell cycle arrest or these ethanol metabolism-mediated effects. Additionally, culturing the cells in the presence of acetaldehyde alone resulted in increased levels of p-Cdc2 and p21. Conclusions: Acetaldehyde produced during ethanol oxidation has a major role in the ethanol metabolism-mediated G2/M cell cycle arrest, and the concurrent accumulation of p21 and p-Cdc2. Although reactive oxygen species are thought to have a significant role in ethanol-induced hepatocellular damage, they may have a less important role in the inability of hepatocytes to replace dead or damaged

  8. Implication of an Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene and a Phosphinothricin N-Acetyltransferase Gene in the Diversity of Pseudomonas cichorii Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Wali, Ullah Md; Nakayashiki, Hitoshi; Fukuda, Tatsuya; Mizumoto, Hiroyuki; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Kiba, Akinori; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas cichorii harbors the hrp genes. hrp-mutants lose their virulence on eggplant but not on lettuce. A phosphinothricin N-acetyltransferase gene (pat) is located between hrpL and an aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (aldH) in the genome of P. cichorii. Comparison of nucleotide sequences and composition of the genes among pseudomonads suggests a common ancestor of hrp and pat between P. cichorii strains and P. viridiflava strains harboring the single hrp pathogenicity island. In contrast, phylogenetic diversification of aldH corresponded to species diversification amongst pseudomonads. In this study, the involvement of aldH and pat in P. cichorii virulence was analyzed. An aldH-deleted mutant (ΔaldH) and a pat-deleted mutant (Δpat) lost their virulence on eggplant but not on lettuce. P. cichorii expressed both genes in eggplant leaves, independent of HrpL, the transcriptional activator for the hrp. Inoculation into Asteraceae species susceptible to P. cichorii showed that the involvement of hrp, pat and aldH in P. cichorii virulence is independent of each other and has no relationship with the phylogeny of Asteraceae species based on the nucleotide sequences of ndhF and rbcL. It is thus thought that not only the hrp genes but also pat and aldH are implicated in the diversity of P. cichorii virulence on susceptible host plant species. PMID:24704843

  9. A specific affinity reagent to distinguish aldehyde dehydrogenases and oxidases. Enzymes catalyzing aldehyde oxidation in an adult moth

    SciTech Connect

    Tasayco, M.L.; Prestwich, G.D. )

    1990-02-25

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and oxidase (AO) enzymes from the tissue extracts of male and female tobacco budworm moth (Heliothis virescens) were identified after electrophoretic protein separation. AO activity was visualized using formazan- or horseradish peroxidase-mediated staining coupled to the AO-catalyzed oxidation of benzaldehyde. A set of six soluble AO enzymes with isoelectric points from pI 4.6 to 5.3 were detected primarily in the antennal extracts. Partially purified antennal AO enzymes also oxidized both (Z)-9-tetradecenal and (Z)-11-hexadecenal, the two major pheromone components of this moth. ALDH activity was detected using a tritium-labeled affinity reagent based on a known irreversible inhibitor of this enzyme. This labeled vinyl ketone, (3H)(Z)-1,11-hexadecadien-3-one, was synthesized and used to covalently modify the soluble ALDH enzymes from tissue extracts. Molecular subunits of potential ALDH enzymes were visualized in the fluorescence autoradiograms of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated proteins of the antenna, head, and leg tissues. Covalent modification of these protein subunits decreased specifically in the presence of excess pheromone aldehyde or benzaldehyde. Labeled vinyl ketones are thus novel tools for the identification of molecular subunits of ALDH enzymes.

  10. Association between Carotid Intima-media Thickness and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Glu504Lys Polymorphism in Chinese Han with Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao-Xiang; Zheng, Shu-Zhan; Shu, Yan; Wang, Yong; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is involved in the pathophysiological processes of cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies showed that mutant ALDH2 could increase oxidative stress and is a susceptible factor for hypertension. In addition, wild-type ALDH2 could improve the endothelial functions, therefore reducing the risk of developing atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to explore the frequency of the Glu504Lys polymorphism of the ALDH2 gene and its relation to carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in a group of patients with essential hypertension (EH) and to investigate the association between the Glu504Lys polymorphism and CIMT in Chinese Han patients with EH. Methods: In this study, 410 Chinese Han patients with EH who received physical examinations at the People's Hospital of Sichuan Province (China) were selected. DNA microarray chip was used for the genotyping of the Glu504Lys polymorphism of the ALDH2 gene. The differences in CIMT among patients with different Glu504Lys ALDH2 genotypes were analyzed. Results: The mean CIMT of the patients carrying AA/AG and GG genotypes was 1.02 ± 0.31 mm and 0.78 ± 0.28 mm, respectively. One-way ANOVA showed that the CIMT of the patients carrying the AA/AG genotype was significantly higher than in the ones carrying the GG genotype (P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression showed that the Glu504Lys AA/AG genotype of the ALDH2 gene was one of the major factors influencing the CIMT in patients with EH (odds ratio = 3.731, 95% confidence interval = 1.589–8.124, P = 0.001). Conclusions: The Glu504Lys polymorphism of the ALDH2 gene is associated with the CIMT of Chinese Han patients with EH in Sichuan, China. PMID:27270535

  11. The effect of ethanol on the formation of N2-ethylidene-dG adducts in mice: implications for alcohol-related carcinogenicity of the oral cavity and esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsu-Sheng; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Matsuda, Tomonari; Isse, Toyohi; Yamaguchi, Tetsunosuke; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tsuji, Mayumi; Kawamoto, Toshihiro

    2012-05-01

    The present study aimed to experimentally confirm that long-term alcohol drinking causes a high risk of oral and esophageal cancer in aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2)-deficient individuals. Aldh2 knockout mice, an animal model of ALDH2-deficiency, were treated with 8% ethanol for 14 months. Levels of acetaldehyde-derived DNA adducts were increased in esophagus, tongue and submandibular gland. Our finding that a lack of Aldh2 leads to more DNA damage after chronic ethanol treatment in mice supports epidemiological findings on the carcinogenicity of alcohol in ALDH2-deficient individuals who drink chronically. PMID:22416850

  12. ALDH2 polymorphism is associated with fasting blood glucose through alcohol consumption in Japanese men

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Guang; Naito, Mariko; Wakai, Kenji; Morita, Emi; Kawai, Sayo; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Sadao; Kita, Yoshikuni; Takezaki, Toshiro; Tanaka, Keitaro; Morita, Makiko; Uemura, Hirokazu; Ozaki, Etsuko; Hosono, Satoyo; Mikami, Haruo; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Associations between alcohol consumption and type 2 diabetes risk are inconsistent in epidemiologic studies. This study investigated the associations of ADH1B and ALDH2 polymorphisms with fasting blood glucose levels, and the impact of the associations of alcohol consumption with fasting blood glucose levels in Japanese individuals. This cross-sectional study included 907 men and 912 women, aged 35–69 years. The subjects were selected from among the Japan Multi-institutional Collaborative Cohort study across six areas of Japan. The ADH1B and ALDH2 polymorphisms were genotyped by Invader Assays. The ALDH2 Glu504Lys genotypes were associated with different levels of fasting blood glucose in men (P = 0.04). Mean fasting glucose level was positively associated with alcohol consumption in men with the ALDH2 504 Lys allele (Ptrend = 0.02), but not in men with the ALDH2 504Glu/Glu genotype (Ptrend = 0.45), resulting in no statistically significant interaction (P = 0.38). Alcohol consumption was associated with elevated fasting blood glucose levels compared with non-consumers in men (Ptrend = 0.002). The ADH1B Arg48His polymorphism was not associated with FBG levels overall or after stratification for alcohol consumption. These findings suggest that the ALDH2 polymorphism is associated with different levels of fasting blood glucose through alcohol consumption in Japanese men. The interaction of ALDH2 polymorphisms in the association between alcohol consumption and fasting blood glucose warrants further investigation. PMID:27303105

  13. Photocatalyzed oxidation of ethanol and acetaldehyde in humidified air

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, M.L.; Ollis, D.F.

    1996-02-01

    Photocatalysis is considered as a potential air treatment and purification technology. Photocatalyzed oxidation of ethanol and acetaldehyde in humidified air was carried out to establish a first complete kinetic model for a photocatalyzed multispecies network. Two photocatalysts were examined in a batch, recirculation reactor, near-UV illuminated TiO{sub 2} (anatase) coated (i) on the surface of a nonporous quartz glass plate and (ii) on a porous ceramic honeycomb monolith. The former contained only illuminated (active) surfaces, the latter consisted of substantial {open_quotes}dark{close_quotes} surfaces coated with a thin layer of illuminated (active) catalyst. Ethanol was photooxidized to acetaldehyde and formaldehyde intermediates, and eventually to carbon dioxide and water products. The catalyst and monolith surfaces adsorbed appreciable fractions of the trace ethanol, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, carbon dioxide and water present. Ethanol, acetaldehyde, and carbon dioxide adsorption isotherms were measured on both catalysts; the formaldehyde adsorption isotherms were assumed identical to those of acetaldehyde. On the fully illuminated glass plate reactor, all four species were accounted for, and closure of a transient carbon mass balance was demonstrated. Completion of a transient carbon mass balance on the monolith reactor required inclusion of additional reaction intermediates (acetic and formic acids), which appear to reversibly accumulate on only the dark surfaces. The ethanol and acetaldehyde photocatalyzed oxidation kinetic networks were modeled using Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate forms combined with adsorption isotherms for reactant, intermediates, and product CO{sub 2}. For both the quartz plate and monolith catalysts, satisfactory kinetic models were developed to predict the entire time course of ethanol and acetaldehyde multicomponent batch conversions. 43 refs., 16 figs.

  14. Acetaldehyde exchange above a managed temperate mountain grassland.

    PubMed

    Hörtnagl, L; Bamberger, I; Graus, M; Ruuskanen, T M; Schnitzhofer, R; Walser, M; Unterberger, A; Hansel, A; Wohlfahrt, G

    2013-10-01

    An overview of acetaldehyde exchange above a managed temperate mountain grassland in Austria over four growing seasons is presented. The meadow acted as a net source of acetaldehyde in all four years, emitting between 7 and 28 mg C m(-2) over the whole growing period. The cutting of the meadow resulted in huge acetaldehyde emission bursts on the day of harvesting or one day later. During undisturbed conditions, both uptake and emission fluxes were recorded. The bidirectional nature of acetaldehyde fluxes was also reflected by clear diurnal cycles during certain time periods, indicating strong deposition processes before the 1st cut and emission towards the end of the growing season. The analysis of acetaldehyde compensation points revealed a complex relationship between ambient acetaldehyde mixing ratios and respective fluxes, significantly influenced by multiple environmental parameters and variable throughout the year. As a major finding of this study, we identified both a positive and negative correlation between concentration and flux on a daily scale, where soil temperature and soil water content were the most significant factors in determining the direction of the slope. In turn, this bidirectional relationship on a daily scale resulted in compensation points between 0.40 ppbv and 0.54 ppbv, which could be well explained by collected ancillary data. We conclude that in order to model acetaldehyde fluxes at the site in Neustift on a daily scale over longer time periods, it is crucial to know the type of relationship, i.e. the direction of the slope, between mixing ratios and fluxes on a given day.

  15. Acetaldehyde exchange above a managed temperate mountain grassland

    PubMed Central

    Hörtnagl, L.; Bamberger, I.; Graus, M.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Walser, M.; Unterberger, A.; Hansel, A.; Wohlfahrt, G.

    2013-01-01

    An overview of acetaldehyde exchange above a managed temperate mountain grassland in Austria over four growing seasons is presented. The meadow acted as a net source of acetaldehyde in all four years, emitting between 7 and 28 mg C m−2 over the whole growing period. The cutting of the meadow resulted in huge acetaldehyde emission bursts on the day of harvesting or one day later. During undisturbed conditions, both uptake and emission fluxes were recorded. The bidirectional nature of acetaldehyde fluxes was also reflected by clear diurnal cycles during certain time periods, indicating strong deposition processes before the 1st cut and emission towards the end of the growing season. The analysis of acetaldehyde compensation points revealed a complex relationship between ambient acetaldehyde mixing ratios and respective fluxes, significantly influenced by multiple environmental parameters and variable throughout the year. As a major finding of this study, we identified both a positive and negative correlation between concentration and flux on a daily scale, where soil temperature and soil water content were the most significant factors in determining the direction of the slope. In turn, this bidirectional relationship on a daily scale resulted in compensation points between 0.40 ppbv and 0.54 ppbv, which could be well explained by collected ancillary data. We conclude that in order to model acetaldehyde fluxes at the site in Neustift on a daily scale over longer time periods, it is crucial to know the type of relationship, i.e. the direction of the slope, between mixing ratios and fluxes on a given day. PMID:24363666

  16. Evaluation of alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes as bi-enzymatic anodes in a membraneless ethanol microfluidic fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-de-la-Rosa, J.; Arjona, N.; Arriaga, L. G.; Ledesma-García, J.; Guerra-Balcázar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (AldH) enzymes were immobilized by covalent binding and used as the anode in a bi-enzymatic membraneless ethanol hybrid microfluidic fuel cell. The purpose of using both enzymes was to optimize the ethanol electro-oxidation reaction (EOR) by using ADH toward its direct oxidation and AldH for the oxidation of aldehydes as by-products of the EOR. For this reason, three enzymatic bioanode configurations were evaluated according with the location of enzymes: combined, vertical and horizontally separated. In the combined configuration, a current density of 16.3 mA cm-2, a voltage of 1.14 V and a power density of 7.02 mW cm-2 were obtained. When enzymes were separately placed in a horizontal and vertical position the ocp drops to 0.94 V and to 0.68 V, respectively. The current density also falls to values of 13.63 and 5.05 mA cm-2. The decrease of cell performance of bioanodes with separated enzymes compared with the combined bioanode was of 31.7% and 86.87% for the horizontal and the vertical array.

  17. Acetaldehyde metabolism by brain mitochondria from UChA and UChB rats.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla, M E; Tampier, L

    1995-01-01

    The acetaldehyde (AcH) oxidizing capacity of total brain homogenates from the genetically high-ethanol consumer (UChB) appeared to be greater than that of the low-ethanol consumer (UChA) rats. To gain further information about this strain difference, the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase (AIDH) in different subcellular fractions of whole brain homogenates from naive UChA and UChB rat strains of both sexes has been studied by measuring the rate of AcH disappearance and by following the reduction of NAD to NADH. The results demonstrated that the higher capacity of brain homogenates from UChB rats to oxidize AcH when compared to UChA ones was because the UChB mitochondrial low Km AIDH exhibits a much greater affinity for NAD than that of the UChA rats, as evidenced by four-to fivefold differences in the Km values for NAD. But the dehydrogenases from both strains exhibited a similar maximum rate at saturating NAD concentrations. Because intact brain mitochondria isolated from UChB rats oxidized AcH at a higher rate than did mitochondria from UChA rats only in state 4, but not in state 3, this strain difference in AIDH activity might be restricted in vivo to NAD disposition.

  18. An enzyme-amplified microtiter plate assay for ethanol: Its application to the detection of peanut ethanol and alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.Y.; Vercellotti, J.R.; Sanders, T.H.

    1995-12-01

    A calorimetric microliter plate assay for ethanol amplified by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) was developed. In the assay ethanol from a sample took part in a chain-reaction catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and amplified by ALDH in the presence of NAD{sup +}, diaphorase, and p-ibdonitrotetrazolium-violet (INT-violet)(a precursor of red product). The resultant reaction gave a red color, the intensity of which was proportional to the amount of ethanol present. Using the technique, the content of activity from peanuts of differing maturity and curing stages were determined respectively. Data showed that immature peanuts had a higher level of ethanol and a lower ADH activity than mature peanuts, and that the level of ethanol and ADH activity decreased with the curing time. This indicates that peanut maturity and curing have an effect on ethanol. Also, this implies that other peanut volatiles could be affected in the same way as ethanol, a major volatile in peanuts.

  19. Combination of Cancer Stem Cell Markers CD44 and CD24 Is Superior to ALDH1 as a Prognostic Indicator in Breast Cancer Patients with Distant Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Horimoto, Yoshiya; Arakawa, Atsushi; Sasahara, Noriko; Tanabe, Masahiko; Sai, Sei; Himuro, Takanori; Saito, Mitsue

    2016-01-01

    The combination of CD44 and CD24, or aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) alone, is a widely used cancer stem cell marker in breast cancer. However, no conclusion has yet been reached as to which marker is the best for characterizing cancer stemness. Immunohistochemical evaluation using cancer stem cell markers is clearly less common clinically than in basic experiments and how the expressions of these markers relate to patient outcomes remains controversial. To investigate whether combining these markers might improve the prediction of patient outcomes, we immunohistochemically examined clinical samples. Primary invasive breast cancer samples from 61 patients who eventually developed distant metastases after curative surgery were immunohistochemically examined. All patients were free of metastatic disease at the time of surgery and received standard adjuvant systemic treatments. CD44+/24- and ALDH1-positive rates in primary tumors differed according to intrinsic subtype. ER-positive patients with CD44+/24- tumors had significantly longer disease-free-survival than all other ER-positive patients (p = 0.0047). On the other hand, CD44+/24- tumors were associated with poor outcomes of ER-negative patients (p = 0.038). Finally, expression patterns of CD44 and ALDH1 in single tumors were strikingly different and there were virtually no individual double-stained cells. Thus, this combination does not allow evaluation of relationships with patient outcomes. Our results raise the possibility of CD44+/24- being a good prognostic marker, one which would allow treatment effects and outcomes to be predicted in patients with recurrent breast cancer. PMID:27768764

  20. Overexpression of recombinant human antiquitin in E. coli: partial enzyme activity in selected ALDH7A1 missense mutations associated with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Coulter-Mackie, Marion B; Tiebout, Sylvia; van Karnebeek, Clara; Stockler, Sylvia

    2014-04-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early onset seizures responsive to pyridoxine and caused by a defect in the α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (antiquitin) gene (ALDH7A1). We selected four PDE-associated missense ALDH7A1 mutations, p.V367F, p.F410L, p.Q425R, and p.C450S, generated them in a recombinant human antiquitin cDNA with expression in E. coli at either 30°C or 37°C. One mutation, p.C450S, demonstrated substantial activity after expression at both temperatures, potentially contributing to milder biochemical and clinical phenotypes. The p.Q425R mutation yielded no activity at either temperature. The other two mutations yielded significant enzymatic activity at 30°C and markedly reduced activity at 37°C. For these latter three mutations, the markedly reduced or absent enzymatic activity resulting from expression at 37°C may be consistent with pathogenicity.

  1. A missense mutation in ALDH1A3 causes isolated microphthalmia/anophthalmia in nine individuals from an inbred Muslim kindred.

    PubMed

    Mory, Adi; Ruiz, Francesc X; Dagan, Efrat; Yakovtseva, Evgenia A; Kurolap, Alina; Parés, Xavier; Farrés, Jaume; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth

    2014-03-01

    Nine affected individuals with isolated anophthalmia/microphthalmia from a large Muslim-inbred kindred were investigated. Assuming autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance, whole-genome linkage analysis, on DNA samples from four affected individuals, was undertaken. Homozygosity mapping techniques were employed and a 1.5-Mbp region, homozygous in all affected individuals, was delineated. The region contained nine genes, one of which, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1A3), was a clear candidate. This gene seems to encode a key enzyme in the formation of a retinoic-acid gradient along the dorsoventral axis during an early eye development and the development of the olfactory system. Sanger sequence analysis revealed a missense mutation, causing a substitution of valine (Val) to methionine (Met) at position 71. Analyzing the p.Val71Met missense mutation using standard open access software (MutationTaster online, PolyPhen, SIFT/PROVEAN) predicts this variant to be damaging. Enzymatic activity, studied in vitro, showed no changes between the mutated and the wild-type ALDH1A3 protein.

  2. Aldh2 knockout mice were more sensitive to DNA damage in leukocytes due to ethyl tertiary butyl ether exposure.

    PubMed

    Weng, Zuquan; Suda, Megumi; Ohtani, Katsumi; Mei, Nan; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Tamie; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    To clarify the genotoxicity of ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE), a gasoline additive, male and female C57BL/6 mice of Aldh2+/+ and Aldh2-/- genotypes, aged 8 wk, were exposed to 0, 500, 1,750, or 5,000 ppm ETBE for 6 h/day, 5 d per week for 13 wk. DNA damage in leukocytes was measured by the alkaline comet assay and expressed quantitatively as Tail Intensity (TI). For male mice, TI was significantly higher in all three groups exposed to ETBE than in those without exposure within Aldh2-/- mice, whereas within Aldh2+/+ mice, TI increased only in those exposed to 5,000 ppm of ETBE as compared with mice without exposure. For female mice, a significant increase in TI values was observed in the group exposed to 5,000 ppm of ETBE as compared with those without exposure within Aldh2-/- mice; TI in Aldh2-/- mice exposed to 1,750 and 5,000 ppm was significantly higher than in Aldh2+/+ mice without exposure. TI did not significantly increase in any of the groups exposed to ETBE within female Aldh2+/+ mice. Based on the results we suggest that Aldh2-/- mice are more sensitive to DNA damage caused by ETBE than Aldh2+/+ mice and that males seem more susceptible to this effect than females. PMID:21372431

  3. Ethanol-induced oxidative DNA damage and CYP2E1 expression in liver tissue of Aldh2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Dae; Eom, Sang-Yong; Ogawa, Masanori; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Isse, Toyohi; Kang, Jong-Won; Zhang, Yan Wei; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Kim, Heon

    2007-09-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with increased risks of many diseases including cancer. We evaluated oxidative DNA damage in Aldh2 +/+ and Aldh2 -/- mice after they had been subjected to acute ethanol exposure. Olive tail moment, which was measured using a comet assay, was not increased by ethanol treatment in both Aldh2 +/+ and Aldh2 -/- mice. However, after controlling for the effect of ethanol exposure, the Aldh2 genotype was a significant determinant for Olive tail moments. Although the ethanol treatment significantly increased the hepatic 8-OHdG generation in only Aldh2 +/+ mice, the level of 8-OHdG was the highest in Aldh2 -/- ethanol treated mice. The increase in the level of 8-OHdG was associated with hepatic expression of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1). The levels of Olive tail moment and the hepatic 8-OHdG in the Aldh2 -/- control group were significantly higher than those of the Aldh2 +/+ control group. The level of CYP2E1 in liver tissue showed a similar pattern to those of the oxidative DNA damage markers. This study shows that acute ethanol consumption increases oxidative DNA damage and that expression of CYP2E1 protein may play a pivotal role in the induction of oxidative DNA damage. The finding that oxidative DNA damage was more intense in Aldh2 -/- mice than in Aldh2 +/+ mice suggests that ALDH2-deficient individuals may be more susceptible than wild-type ALDH2 individuals to ethanol-mediated liver disease, including cancer. PMID:17951967

  4. Beta-Catenin Regulated ALDH1A1 is a Target in Ovarian Cancer Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Condello, Salvatore; Morgan, Cynthia A.; Nagdas, Sarbajeet; Cao, Liyun; Turek, John; Hurley, Thomas D.; Matei, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells form three dimensional (3D) multicellular aggregates (or spheroids) under non-adherent culture conditions. In ovarian cancer (OC), spheroids serve as a vehicle for cancer cell dissemination in the peritoneal cavity, protecting cells from environmental stress-induced anoikis. To identify new targetable molecules in OC spheroids, we investigated gene expression profiles and networks upregulated in three dimensional (3D) versus traditional monolayer culture conditions. We identified ALDH1A1, a cancer stem cell marker as being overexpressed in OC spheroids and directly connected to key elements of the β-catenin pathway. B-catenin function and ALDH1A1 expression were increased in OC spheroids vs. monolayers and in successive spheroid generations, suggesting that 3D aggregates are enriched in cells with stem cell characteristics. B-catenin knockdown decreased ALDH1A1 expression levels and β-catenin coimmunoprecipitated with the ALDH1A1 promoter, suggesting that ALDH1A1 is a direct β-catenin target. Both siRNA mediated β-catenin knockdown and A37, a novel ALDH1A1 small molecule enzymatic inhibitor described here for the first time, disrupted OC spheroid formation and cell viability (p<0.001). B-catenin knockdown blocked tumor growth and peritoneal metastasis in an OC xenograft model. These data strongly support the role of β-catenin regulated ALDH1A1 in the maintenance of OC spheroids and propose new ALDH1A1 inhibitors targeting this cell population. PMID:24954508

  5. Alcohol and Acetaldehyde in Public Health: From Marvel to Menace

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a serious medical and social problem. Although light to moderate alcohol consumption is beneficial to cardiovascular health, heavy drinking often results in organ damage and social problems. In addition, genetic susceptibility to the effect of alcohol on cancer and coronary heart disease differs across the population. A number of mechanisms including direct the toxicity of ethanol, its metabolites [e.g., acetaldehyde and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs)] and oxidative stress may mediate alcoholic complications. Acetaldehyde, the primary metabolic product of ethanol, is an important candidate toxin in developing alcoholic diseases. Meanwhile, free radicals produced during ethanol metabolism and FAEEs are also important triggers for alcoholic damages. PMID:20617031

  6. Variation of transition-state structure as a function of the nucleotide in reactions catalyzed by dehydrogenases. 1. Liver alcohol dehydrogenase with benzyl alcohol and yeast aldehyde dehydrogenase with benzaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Scharschmidt, M; Fisher, M A; Cleland, W W

    1984-11-01

    Primary intrinsic deuterium and 13C isotope effects have been determined for liver (LADH) and yeast (YADH) alcohol dehydrogenases with benzyl alcohol as substrate and for yeast aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) with benzaldehyde as substrate. These values have also been determined for LADH as a function of changing nucleotide substrate. As the redox potential of the nucleotide changes from -0.320 V with NAD to -0.258 V with acetylpyridine-NAD, the product of primary and secondary deuterium isotope effects rises from 4 toward 6.5, while the primary 13C isotope effect drops from 1.025 to 1.012, suggesting a trend from a late transition state with NAD to one that is more symmetrical. The values of Dk (again the product of primary and secondary isotope effects) and 13k for YADH with NAD are 7 and 1.023, suggesting for this very slow reaction a more stretched, and thus symmetrical, transition state. With ALDH and NAD, the primary 13C isotope effect on the hydride transfer step lies in the range 1.3-1.6%, and the alpha-secondary deuterium isotope effect on the same step is at least 1.22, but 13C isotope effects on formation of the thiohemiacetal intermediate and on the addition of water to the thio ester intermediate are less than 1%. On the basis of the relatively large 13C isotope effects, we conclude that carbon motion is involved in the hydride transfer steps of dehydrogenase reactions.

  7. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a type of ...

  8. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1a1 mediates a GABA synthesis pathway in midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Ick; Ganesan, Subhashree; Luo, Sarah X; Wu, Yu-Wei; Park, Esther; Huang, Eric J; Chen, Lu; Ding, Jun B

    2015-10-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons are an essential component of the basal ganglia circuitry, playing key roles in the control of fine movement and reward. Recently, it has been demonstrated that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the chief inhibitory neurotransmitter, is co-released by dopamine neurons. Here, we show that GABA co-release in dopamine neurons does not use the conventional GABA-synthesizing enzymes, glutamate decarboxylases GAD65 and GAD67. Our experiments reveal an evolutionarily conserved GABA synthesis pathway mediated by aldehyde dehydrogenase 1a1 (ALDH1a1). Moreover, GABA co-release is modulated by ethanol (EtOH) at concentrations seen in blood alcohol after binge drinking, and diminished ALDH1a1 leads to enhanced alcohol consumption and preference. These findings provide insights into the functional role of GABA co-release in midbrain dopamine neurons, which may be essential for reward-based behavior and addiction.

  9. The physiological role of liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Krebs, H A; Perkins, J R

    1970-07-01

    1. Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase was used to determine ethanol in the portal and hepatic veins and in the contents of the alimentary canal of rats given a diet free from ethanol. Measurable amounts of a substance behaving like ethanol were found. Its rate of interaction with yeast alcohol dehydrogenase and its volatility indicate that the substance measured was in fact ethanol. 2. The mean alcohol concentration in the portal blood of normal rats was 0.045mm. In the hepatic vein, inferior vena cava and aorta it was about 15 times lower. 3. The contents of all sections of the alimentary canal contained measurable amounts of ethanol. The highest values (average 3.7mm) were found in the stomach. 4. Infusion of pyrazole (an inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase) raised the alcohol concentration in the portal vein 10-fold and almost removed the difference between portal and hepatic venous blood. 5. Addition of antibiotics to the food diminished the ethanol concentration of the portal blood to less than one-quarter and that of the stomach contents to less than one-fortieth. 6. The concentration of alcohol in the alimentary canal and in the portal blood of germ-free rats was much decreased, to less than one-tenth in the alimentary canal and to one-third in the portal blood, but detectable quantities remained. These are likely to arise from acetaldehyde formed by the normal pathways of degradation of threonine, deoxyribose phosphate and beta-alanine. 7. The results indicate that significant amounts of alcohol are normally formed in the gastro-intestinal tract. The alcohol is absorbed into the circulation and almost quantitatively removed by the liver. Thus the function, or a major function, of liver alcohol dehydrogenase is the detoxication of ethanol normally present. 8. The alcohol concentration in the stomach of alloxan-diabetic rats was increased about 8-fold. 9. The activity of liver alcohol dehydrogenase is generally lower in carnivores than in herbivores and omnivores

  10. Aldehyde dehydrogenases inhibition eradicates leukemia stem cells while sparing normal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Venton, G; Pérez-Alea, M; Baier, C; Fournet, G; Quash, G; Labiad, Y; Martin, G; Sanderson, F; Poullin, P; Suchon, P; Farnault, L; Nguyen, C; Brunet, C; Ceylan, I; Costello, R T

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) achieve complete remission (CR) after standard induction chemotherapy. However, the majority subsequently relapse and die of the disease. A leukemia stem cell (LSC) paradigm has been invoked to explain this failure of CR to reliably translate into cure. Indeed, LSCs are highly enriched in CD34+CD38− leukemic cells that exhibit positive aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH+) on flow cytometry, these LSCs are resistant to currently existing treatments in AML such as cytarabine and anthracycline that, at the cost of great toxicity on normal cells, are highly active against the leukemic bulk, but spare the LSCs responsible for relapse. To try to combat the LSC population selectively, a well-characterized ALDH inhibitor by the trivial name of dimethyl ampal thiolester (DIMATE) was assessed on sorted CD34+CD38− subpopulations from AML patients and healthy patients. ALDH activity and cell viability were monitored by flow cytometry. From enzyme kinetic studies DIMATE is an active enzyme-dependent, competitive, irreversible inhibitor of ALDH1. On cells in culture, DIMATE is a powerful inhibitor of ALDHs 1 and 3, has a major cytotoxic activity on human AML cell lines. Moreover, DIMATE is highly active against leukemic populations enriched in LSCs, but, unlike conventional chemotherapy, DIMATE is not toxic for healthy hematopoietic stem cells which retained, after treatment, their self-renewing and multi-lineage differentiation capacity in immunodeficient mice, xenografted with human leukemic cells. DIMATE eradicates specifically human AML cells and spares healthy mouse hematologic cells. PMID:27611922

  11. Aldehyde dehydrogenases inhibition eradicates leukemia stem cells while sparing normal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Venton, G; Pérez-Alea, M; Baier, C; Fournet, G; Quash, G; Labiad, Y; Martin, G; Sanderson, F; Poullin, P; Suchon, P; Farnault, L; Nguyen, C; Brunet, C; Ceylan, I; Costello, R T

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) achieve complete remission (CR) after standard induction chemotherapy. However, the majority subsequently relapse and die of the disease. A leukemia stem cell (LSC) paradigm has been invoked to explain this failure of CR to reliably translate into cure. Indeed, LSCs are highly enriched in CD34+CD38- leukemic cells that exhibit positive aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH+) on flow cytometry, these LSCs are resistant to currently existing treatments in AML such as cytarabine and anthracycline that, at the cost of great toxicity on normal cells, are highly active against the leukemic bulk, but spare the LSCs responsible for relapse. To try to combat the LSC population selectively, a well-characterized ALDH inhibitor by the trivial name of dimethyl ampal thiolester (DIMATE) was assessed on sorted CD34+CD38- subpopulations from AML patients and healthy patients. ALDH activity and cell viability were monitored by flow cytometry. From enzyme kinetic studies DIMATE is an active enzyme-dependent, competitive, irreversible inhibitor of ALDH1. On cells in culture, DIMATE is a powerful inhibitor of ALDHs 1 and 3, has a major cytotoxic activity on human AML cell lines. Moreover, DIMATE is highly active against leukemic populations enriched in LSCs, but, unlike conventional chemotherapy, DIMATE is not toxic for healthy hematopoietic stem cells which retained, after treatment, their self-renewing and multi-lineage differentiation capacity in immunodeficient mice, xenografted with human leukemic cells. DIMATE eradicates specifically human AML cells and spares healthy mouse hematologic cells. PMID:27611922

  12. Effects on sister chromatid exchange frequency of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 genotype and smoking in vinyl chloride workers.

    PubMed

    Wong, R H; Wang, J D; Hsieh, L L; Du, C L; Cheng, T J

    1998-12-01

    Vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is a human carcinogen. However, the exact mechanism of carcinogenesis remains unclear. VCM may be metabolized by cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Thus workers with inherited variant metabolic enzyme activities may have an altered risk of genotoxicity. This study was designed to investigate which risk factors might affect sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) workers. Study subjects were 44 male workers from three PVC factories. Questionnaires were administered to obtain detailed histories of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, occupations, and medications. SCE frequency in peripheral lymphocytes was determined using a standardized method, and CYP2E1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and ALDH2 genotypes were identified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Analysis revealed that smoking status and exposure to VCM were significantly associated with increased SCE frequency. The presence of ALDH2 1-2/2-2 genotypes was also significantly associated with an elevation of SCE frequency (9. 5 vs. 8.1, p<0.01). However, CYP2E1, GSTM1 or GSTT1 genotypes were not significantly associated with SCE frequency. When various genotypes were considered together, combination of CYP2E1 c1c2/c2c2 with ALDH2 1-2/2-2 showed an additive effect on SCE frequency. Similar results were also found for the combination of smoking with CYP2E1, or smoking with ALDH2. These results suggest that VCM workers with ALDH2 1-2/2-2 genotypes, who also smoke, may have increased risk of DNA damage.

  13. BIOGENIC SOURCES FOR FORMALDEHYDE AND ACETALDEHYDE DURING SUMMER MONTHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photochemical modeling estimated contributions to ambient concentrations of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde from biogenic emissions over the continental United States during January 2001 (Eos Trans. AGU, 83(47), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract A52B-0117). Results showed that maximum co...

  14. Lung cancer tumorigenicity and drug resistance are maintained through ALDH(hi)CD44(hi) tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Xiao, Zhijie; Wong, Sunny Kit-Man; Tin, Vicky Pui-Chi; Ho, Ka-Yan; Wang, Junwen; Sham, Mai-Har; Wong, Maria Pik

    2013-10-01

    Limited improvement in long term survival of lung cancer patients has been achieved by conventional chemotherapy or targeted therapy. To explore the potentials of tumor initiating cells (TIC)-directed therapy, it is essential to identify the cell targets and understand their maintenance mechanisms. We have analyzed the performance of ALDH/CD44 co-expression as TIC markers and treatment targets of lung cancer using well-validated in vitro and in vivo analyses in multiple established and patient-derived lung cancer cells. The ALDH(hi)CD44(hi) subset showed the highest enhancement of stem cell phenotypic properties compared to ALDH(hi)CD44(lo), ALDH(lo)CD44(hi), ALDH(lo)CD44(lo) cells and unsorted controls. They showed higher invasion capacities, pluripotency genes and epithelial-mesenchymal transition transcription factors expression, lower intercellular adhesion protein expression and higher G2/M phase cell cycle fraction. In immunosuppressed mice, the ALDH(hi)CD44(hi)xenografts showed the highest tumor induction frequency, serial transplantability, shortest latency, largest volume and highest growth rates. Inhibition of sonic Hedgehog and Notch developmental pathways reduced ALDH+CD44+ compartment. Chemotherapy and targeted therapy resulted in higher AALDH(hi)CD44(hi) subset viability and ALDH(lo)CD44(lo) subset apoptosis fraction. ALDH inhibition and CD44 knockdown led to reduced stemness gene expression and sensitization to drug treatment. In accordance, clinical lung cancers containing a higher abundance of ALDH and CD44-coexpressing cells was associated with lower recurrence-free survival. Together, results suggested theALDH(hi)CD44(hi)compartment was the cellular mediator of tumorigenicity and drug resistance. Further investigation of the regulatory mechanisms underlying ALDH(hi)CD44(hi)TIC maintenance would be beneficial for the development of long term lung cancer control.

  15. Insight into the Structural Requirements of Theophylline-Based Aldehyde Dehydrogenase lAl (ALDHlAl) Inhibitors Through Multi-QSAR Modeling and Molecular Docking Approaches.

    PubMed

    Abdul Amin, Sk; Adhikari, Nilanjan; Gayen, Shovanlal; Jha, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Over expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH1A1) is one of the vital hallmarks of the self-renewal and differentiational cancer stem cells (CSCs). Till now, no selective ALDH1A1 inhibitor is commercially available in the market. So there is an urgent need to explore some novel molecules which can selectively inhibit ALDH1A1 to combat cancer. Presently, our work deals with the development of QSAR models of some theophylline-based molecules by conventional 2D-QSAR, hologram QSAR (HQSAR), and Bayesian classification modeling. The descriptors identified from these QSAR models give avenues to modulate the structure of theophylline-based compounds to a desirable biological end point. Molecular docking study reveals the selectivity of these molecules towards ALDH1A1 (PDB: 4WP7) and important binding residues (GLY 125, 458; THR 129; TRP 178; TYR 297; PHE 171, 466; VAL 174, 460; MET 175; HIS 293 etc.) for the interaction with the receptors. The current study may help to design novel compounds as selective ALDH1A1 inhibitors. PMID:27132720

  16. The frequency of the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase I2 (atypical) allele in Caucasian, Oriental and African black populations determined by the restriction profile of PCR-amplified DNA.

    PubMed

    Dandré, F; Cassaigne, A; Iron, A

    1995-06-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase I (ALDH I) gene codes for a mitochondrial enzyme which plays a major role in hepatic alcohol detoxication. It has been related to alcohol flushing in Orientals bearing the atypical ALDH I2 gene. The variant protein results from a lysine for glutamate substitution at position 487 (G-->A change in exon 12). A procedure for ALDH I2 detection consisting in a differentiation between the 'atypical' allele and the 'wild' allele has been improved through PCR and subsequent MboII digestion. Blood samples collected on anticoagulant or directly absorbed on blotting paper were used for DNA amplification in the presence of two specific oligonucleotidic primers, each one able to incorporate a restriction site in the amplimer. After MboII digestion, PCR products were separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then visualized with ethidium bromide. This technique permits a rapid and non-radioactive detection of atypical ALDH I2 on a PCR product without the use of allele specific oligonucleotides. It was applied to the study of ALDH I2 allele frequency in random population samples of three ethnic groups: Caucasians, Orientals and African blacks.

  17. ALDH2 polymorphism is associated with fasting blood glucose through alcohol consumption in Japanese men.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guang; Naito, Mariko; Wakai, Kenji; Morita, Emi; Kawai, Sayo; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Sadao; Kita, Yoshikuni; Takezaki, Toshiro; Tanaka, Keitaro; Morita, Makiko; Uemura, Hirokazu; Ozaki, Etsuko; Hosono, Satoyo; Mikami, Haruo; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    Associations between alcohol consumption and type 2 diabetes risk are inconsistent in epidemiologic studies. This study investigated the associations of ADH1B and ALDH2 polymorphisms with fasting blood glucose levels, and the impact of the associations of alcohol consumption with fasting blood glucose levels in Japanese individuals. This cross-sectional study included 907 men and 912 women, aged 35-69 years. The subjects were selected from among the Japan Multi-institutional Collaborative Cohort study across six areas of Japan. The ADH1B and ALDH2 polymorphisms were genotyped by Invader Assays. The ALDH2 Glu504Lys genotypes were associated with different levels of fasting blood glucose in men (P = 0.04). Mean fasting glucose level was positively associated with alcohol consumption in men with the ALDH2 504 Lys allele (P trend = 0.02), but not in men with the ALDH2 504Glu/Glu genotype (P trend = 0.45), resulting in no statistically significant interaction (P = 0.38). Alcohol consumption was associated with elevated fasting blood glucose levels compared with non-consumers in men (P trend = 0.002). The ADH1B Arg48His polymorphism was not associated with FBG levels overall or after stratification for alcohol consumption. These findings suggest that the ALDH2 polymorphism is associated with different levels of fasting blood glucose through alcohol consumption in Japanese men. The interaction of ALDH2 polymorphisms in the association between alcohol consumption and fasting blood glucose warrants further investigation. PMID:27303105

  18. The longitudinal effect of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2*2 allele on the risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Oniki, K; Morita, K; Watanabe, T; Kajiwara, A; Otake, K; Nakagawa, K; Sasaki, Y; Ogata, Y; Saruwatari, J

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) detoxifies toxic aldehydes and has a key role in protecting the liver. An elevated gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) level is related to oxidative stress and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We herein investigated the association between inactive ALDH2*2 allele (rs671) and the risk of NAFLD, including the relationship to the GGT level. A retrospective follow-up study (mean 5.4±1.1 years) was conducted among 341 Japanese health screening program participants. The receiver operating characteristic curve indicated that the GGT level predicted the development of NAFLD (area under the curve: 0.65, P<0.05) with a cutoff value of 25.5 IUl−1. The longitudinal risk of NAFLD was higher in the ALDH2*2 allele carriers than in the noncarriers (odds ratio (OR): 2.30, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.21–4.40), and the risk was further increased among the *2 allele carriers with GGT values ⩾25.5 IUl−1 (OR: 4.28, 95% CI: 1.80–10.19). On the other hand, there were no significant changes in the subjects' body weight and body mass index during observation period. The ALDH2*2 allele, in relation to the GGT level, may potentially be a novel risk factor for NAFLD. PMID:27214654

  19. The longitudinal effect of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2*2 allele on the risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Oniki, K; Morita, K; Watanabe, T; Kajiwara, A; Otake, K; Nakagawa, K; Sasaki, Y; Ogata, Y; Saruwatari, J

    2016-05-23

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) detoxifies toxic aldehydes and has a key role in protecting the liver. An elevated gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) level is related to oxidative stress and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We herein investigated the association between inactive ALDH2*2 allele (rs671) and the risk of NAFLD, including the relationship to the GGT level. A retrospective follow-up study (mean 5.4±1.1 years) was conducted among 341 Japanese health screening program participants. The receiver operating characteristic curve indicated that the GGT level predicted the development of NAFLD (area under the curve: 0.65, P<0.05) with a cutoff value of 25.5 IUl(-1). The longitudinal risk of NAFLD was higher in the ALDH2*2 allele carriers than in the noncarriers (odds ratio (OR): 2.30, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.21-4.40), and the risk was further increased among the *2 allele carriers with GGT values ⩾25.5 IUl(-1) (OR: 4.28, 95% CI: 1.80-10.19). On the other hand, there were no significant changes in the subjects' body weight and body mass index during observation period. The ALDH2*2 allele, in relation to the GGT level, may potentially be a novel risk factor for NAFLD.

  20. The Bifunctional Alcohol and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene, adhE, Is Necessary for Ethanol Production in Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Jonathan; Zheng, Tianyong; Hon, Shuen; Olson, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum and Clostridium thermocellum are anaerobic thermophilic bacteria being investigated for their ability to produce biofuels from plant biomass. The bifunctional alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase gene, adhE, is present in these bacteria and has been known to be important for ethanol formation in other anaerobic alcohol producers. This study explores the inactivation of the adhE gene in C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum. Deletion of adhE reduced ethanol production by >95% in both T. saccharolyticum and C. thermocellum, confirming that adhE is necessary for ethanol formation in both organisms. In both adhE deletion strains, fermentation products shifted from ethanol to lactate production and resulted in lower cell density and longer time to reach maximal cell density. In T. saccharolyticum, the adhE deletion strain lost >85% of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity did not appear to be affected, although ALDH activity was low in cell extracts. Adding ubiquinone-0 to the ALDH assay increased activity in the T. saccharolyticum parent strain but did not increase activity in the adhE deletion strain, suggesting that ALDH activity was inhibited. In C. thermocellum, the adhE deletion strain lost >90% of ALDH and ADH activity in cell extracts. The C. thermocellum adhE deletion strain contained a point mutation in the lactate dehydrogenase gene, which appears to deregulate its activation by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, leading to constitutive activation of lactate dehydrogenase. IMPORTANCE Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum and Clostridium thermocellum are bacteria that have been investigated for their ability to produce biofuels from plant biomass. They have been engineered to produce higher yields of ethanol, yet questions remain about the enzymes responsible for ethanol formation in these bacteria. The genomes of these bacteria encode multiple predicted aldehyde and alcohol

  1. Behavioral and biochemical evidence of the role of acetaldehyde in the motivational effects of ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Peana, Alessandra T.; Acquas, Elio

    2013-01-01

    Since Chevens' report, in the early 50's that his patients under treatment with the aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor, antabuse, could experience beneficial effects when drinking small volumes of alcoholic beverages, the role of acetaldehyde (ACD) in the effects of ethanol has been thoroughly investigated on pre-clinical grounds. Thus, after more than 25 years of intense research, a large number of studies have been published on the motivational properties of ACD itself as well as on the role that ethanol-derived ACD plays in the effects of ethanol. Accordingly, in particular with respect to the motivational properties of ethanol, these studies were developed following two main strategies: on one hand, were aimed to challenge the suggestion that also ACD may exert motivational properties on its own, while, on the other, with the aid of enzymatic manipulations or ACD inactivation, were aimed to test the hypothesis that ethanol-derived ACD might have a role in ethanol motivational effects. Furthermore, recent evidence significantly contributed to highlight, as possible mechanisms of action of ACD, its ability to commit either dopaminergic and opioidergic transmission as well as to activate the Extracellular signal Regulated Kinase cascade transduction pathway in reward-related brain structures. In conclusion, and despite the observation that ACD seems also to have inherited the elusive nature of its parent compound, the behavioral and biochemical evidence reviewed points to ACD as a neuroactive molecule able, on its own and as ethanol metabolite, to exert motivational effects. PMID:23874276

  2. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emissions from residential wood combustion in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerqueira, Mário; Gomes, Luís; Tarelho, Luís; Pio, Casimiro

    2013-06-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to characterize formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emissions from residential combustion of common wood species growing in Portugal. Five types of wood were investigated: maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus), cork oak (Quercus suber), holm oak (Quercus rotundifolia) and pyrenean oak (Quercus pyrenaica). Laboratory experiments were performed with a typical wood stove used for domestic heating in Portugal and operating under realistic home conditions. Aldehydes were sampled from diluted combustion flue gas using silica cartridges coated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The average formaldehyde to acetaldehyde concentration ratio (molar basis) in the stove flue gas was in the range of 2.1-2.9. Among the tested wood types, pyrenean oak produced the highest emissions for both formaldehyde and acetaldehyde: 1772 ± 649 and 1110 ± 454 mg kg-1 biomass burned (dry basis), respectively. By contrast, maritime pine produced the lowest emissions: 653 ± 151 and 371 ± 162 mg kg-1 biomass (dry basis) burned, respectively. Aldehydes were sampled separately during distinct periods of the holm oak wood combustion cycles. Significant variations in the flue gas concentrations were found, with higher values measured during the devolatilization stage than in the flaming and smoldering stages.

  3. Association of Genetically Determined Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Activity with Diabetic Complications in Relation to Alcohol Consumption in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Fukuoka Diabetes Registry

    PubMed Central

    Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Iwase, Masanori; Fujii, Hiroki; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ide, Hitoshi; Kaizu, Shinako; Jodai, Tamaki; Kikuchi, Yohei; Hirano, Atsushi; Nakamura, Udai; Kubo, Michiaki; Kitazono, Takanari

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) detoxifies aldehyde produced during ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress. A genetic defect in this enzyme is common in East Asians and determines alcohol consumption behaviors. We investigated the impact of genetically determined ALDH2 activity on diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications in relation to drinking habits in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An ALDH2 single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs671) was genotyped in 4,400 patients. Additionally, the relationship of clinical characteristics with ALDH2 activity (ALDH2 *1/*1 active enzyme activity vs. *1/*2 or *2/*2 inactive enzyme activity) and drinking habits (lifetime abstainers vs. former or current drinkers) was investigated cross-sectionally (n = 691 in *1/*1 abstainers, n = 1,315 in abstainers with *2, n = 1,711 in *1/*1 drinkers, n = 683 in drinkers with *2). The multiple logistic regression analysis for diabetic complications was adjusted for age, sex, current smoking habits, leisure-time physical activity, depressive symptoms, diabetes duration, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, insulin use, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors use. Albuminuria prevalence was significantly lower in the drinkers with *2 than that of other groups (odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI)]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 0.94 [0.76–1.16] in abstainers with *2, 1.00 [0.80–1.26] in *1/*1 drinkers, 0.71 [0.54–0.93] in drinkers with *2). Retinal photocoagulation prevalence was also lower in drinkers with ALDH2 *2 than that of other groups. In contrast, myocardial infarction was significantly increased in ALDH2 *2 carriers compared with that in ALDH2 *1/*1 abstainers (odds ratio [95% CI]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 2.63 [1.28–6.13] in abstainers with *2, 1.89 [0.89–4.51] in *1/*1 drinkers, 2.35 [1.06–5.79] in drinkers with *2). In summary, patients with type 2 diabetes and ALDH2 *2

  4. Association of Genetically Determined Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Activity with Diabetic Complications in Relation to Alcohol Consumption in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Fukuoka Diabetes Registry.

    PubMed

    Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Iwase, Masanori; Fujii, Hiroki; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ide, Hitoshi; Kaizu, Shinako; Jodai, Tamaki; Kikuchi, Yohei; Hirano, Atsushi; Nakamura, Udai; Kubo, Michiaki; Kitazono, Takanari

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) detoxifies aldehyde produced during ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress. A genetic defect in this enzyme is common in East Asians and determines alcohol consumption behaviors. We investigated the impact of genetically determined ALDH2 activity on diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications in relation to drinking habits in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An ALDH2 single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs671) was genotyped in 4,400 patients. Additionally, the relationship of clinical characteristics with ALDH2 activity (ALDH2 *1/*1 active enzyme activity vs. *1/*2 or *2/*2 inactive enzyme activity) and drinking habits (lifetime abstainers vs. former or current drinkers) was investigated cross-sectionally (n = 691 in *1/*1 abstainers, n = 1,315 in abstainers with *2, n = 1,711 in *1/*1 drinkers, n = 683 in drinkers with *2). The multiple logistic regression analysis for diabetic complications was adjusted for age, sex, current smoking habits, leisure-time physical activity, depressive symptoms, diabetes duration, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, insulin use, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors use. Albuminuria prevalence was significantly lower in the drinkers with *2 than that of other groups (odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI)]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 0.94 [0.76-1.16] in abstainers with *2, 1.00 [0.80-1.26] in *1/*1 drinkers, 0.71 [0.54-0.93] in drinkers with *2). Retinal photocoagulation prevalence was also lower in drinkers with ALDH2 *2 than that of other groups. In contrast, myocardial infarction was significantly increased in ALDH2 *2 carriers compared with that in ALDH2 *1/*1 abstainers (odds ratio [95% CI]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 2.63 [1.28-6.13] in abstainers with *2, 1.89 [0.89-4.51] in *1/*1 drinkers, 2.35 [1.06-5.79] in drinkers with *2). In summary, patients with type 2 diabetes and ALDH2 *2 displayed a

  5. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1a3 defines a subset of failing pancreatic β cells in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kim-Muller, Ja Young; Fan, Jason; Kim, Young Jung R; Lee, Seung-Ah; Ishida, Emi; Blaner, William S; Accili, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-producing β cells become dedifferentiated during diabetes progression. An impaired ability to select substrates for oxidative phosphorylation, or metabolic inflexibility, initiates progression from β-cell dysfunction to β-cell dedifferentiation. The identification of pathways involved in dedifferentiation may provide clues to its reversal. Here we isolate and functionally characterize failing β cells from various experimental models of diabetes and report a striking enrichment in the expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 isoform A3 (ALDH(+)) as β cells become dedifferentiated. Flow-sorted ALDH(+) islet cells demonstrate impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion, are depleted of Foxo1 and MafA, and include a Neurogenin3-positive subset. RNA sequencing analysis demonstrates that ALDH(+) cells are characterized by: (i) impaired oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial complex I, IV and V; (ii) activated RICTOR; and (iii) progenitor cell markers. We propose that impaired mitochondrial function marks the progression from metabolic inflexibility to dedifferentiation in the natural history of β-cell failure. PMID:27572106

  6. Alcohol and Aldehyde Dehydrogenases Contribute to Sex-Related Differences in Clearance of Zolpidem in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Cody J.; Strope, Jonathan D.; Beedie, Shaunna; Ley, Ariel M.; Holly, Alesia; Calis, Karim; Farkas, Ronald; Parepally, Jagan; Men, Angela; Fadiran, Emmanuel O.; Scott, Pamela; Jenkins, Marjorie; Theodore, William H.; Sissung, Tristan M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The recommended zolpidem starting dose was lowered in females (5 mg vs. 10 mg) since side effects were more frequent and severe than those of males; the mechanism underlying sex differences in pharmacokinetics (PK) is unknown. We hypothesized that such differences were caused by known sex-related variability in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) expression. Methods: Male, female, and castrated male rats were administered 2.6 mg/kg zolpidem, ± disulfiram (ADH/ALDH pathway inhibitor) to compare PK changes induced by sex and gonadal hormones. PK analyses were conducted in rat plasma and rat brain. Key findings: Sex differences in PK were evident: females had a higher CMAX (112.4 vs. 68.1 ug/L) and AUC (537.8 vs. 231.8 h∗ug/L) than uncastrated males. Castration induced an earlier TMAX (0.25 vs. 1 h), greater CMAX (109.1 vs. 68.1 ug/L), and a corresponding AUC increase (339.7 vs. 231.8 h∗ug/L). Administration of disulfiram caused more drastic CMAX and TMAX changes in male vs. female rats that mirrored the effects of castration on first-pass metabolism, suggesting that the observed PK differences may be caused by ADH/ALDH expression. Brain concentrations paralleled plasma concentrations. Conclusion: These findings indicate that sex differences in zolpidem PK are influenced by variation in the expression of ADH/ALDH due to gonadal androgens. PMID:27574509

  7. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1a3 defines a subset of failing pancreatic β cells in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim-Muller, Ja Young; Fan, Jason; Kim, Young Jung R.; Lee, Seung-Ah; Ishida, Emi; Blaner, William S.; Accili, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-producing β cells become dedifferentiated during diabetes progression. An impaired ability to select substrates for oxidative phosphorylation, or metabolic inflexibility, initiates progression from β-cell dysfunction to β-cell dedifferentiation. The identification of pathways involved in dedifferentiation may provide clues to its reversal. Here we isolate and functionally characterize failing β cells from various experimental models of diabetes and report a striking enrichment in the expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 isoform A3 (ALDH+) as β cells become dedifferentiated. Flow-sorted ALDH+ islet cells demonstrate impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion, are depleted of Foxo1 and MafA, and include a Neurogenin3-positive subset. RNA sequencing analysis demonstrates that ALDH+ cells are characterized by: (i) impaired oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial complex I, IV and V; (ii) activated RICTOR; and (iii) progenitor cell markers. We propose that impaired mitochondrial function marks the progression from metabolic inflexibility to dedifferentiation in the natural history of β-cell failure. PMID:27572106

  8. On the Reaction Mechanism of Acetaldehyde Decomposition on Mo(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Karim, Ayman M.; Wang, Yong

    2012-02-16

    The strong Mo-O bond strength provides promising reactivity of Mo-based catalysts for the deoxygenation of biomass-derived oxygenates. Combining the novel dimer saddle point searching method with periodic spin-polarized density functional theory calculations, we investigated the reaction pathways of a acetaldehyde decomposition on the clean Mo(110) surface. Two reaction pathways were identified, a selective deoxygenation and a nonselective fragmentation pathways. We found that acetaldehyde preferentially adsorbs at the pseudo 3-fold hollow site in the η2(C,O) configuration on Mo(110). Among four possible bond (β-C-H, γ-C-H, C-O and C-C) cleavages, the initial decomposition of the adsorbed acetaldehyde produces either ethylidene via the C-O bond scission or acetyl via the β-C-H bond scission while the C-C and the γ-C-H bond cleavages of acetaldehyde leading to the formation of methyl (and formyl) and formylmethyl are unlikely. Further dehydrogenations of ethylidene into either ethylidyne or vinyl are competing and very facile with low activation barriers of 0.24 and 0.31 eV, respectively. Concurrently, the formed acetyl would deoxygenate into ethylidyne via the C-O cleavage rather than breaking the C-C or the C-H bonds. The selective deoxygenation of acetaldehyde forming ethylene is inhibited by relatively weaker hydrogenation capability of the Mo(110) surface. Instead, the nonselective pathway via vinyl and vinylidene dehydrogenations to ethynyl as the final hydrocarbon fragment is kinetically favorable. On the other hand, the strong interaction between ethylene and the Mo(110) surface also leads to ethylene decomposition instead of desorption into the gas phase. This work was financially supported by the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC). Computing time was granted by a user project (emsl42292) at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). This work was financially supported

  9. Purification and properties of the inducible coenzyme A-linked butyraldehyde dehydrogenase from Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed Central

    Palosaari, N R; Rogers, P

    1988-01-01

    The coenzyme A (CoA)-linked butyraldehyde dehydrogenase (BAD) from Clostridium acetobutylicum was characterized and purified to homogeneity. The enzyme was induced over 200-fold, coincident with a shift from an acidogenic to a solventogenic fermentation, during batch culture growth. The increase in enzyme activity was found to require new protein synthesis since induction was blocked by the addition of rifampin and antibody against the purified enzyme showed the appearance of enzyme antigen beginning at the shift of the fermentation and increasing coordinately with the increase in enzyme specific activity. The CoA-linked acetaldehyde dehydrogenase was copurified with BAD during an 89-fold purification, indicating that one enzyme accounts for the synthesis of the two aldehyde intermediates for both butanol and ethanol production. Butanol dehydrogenase activity was clearly separate from the BAD enzyme activity on TEAE cellulose. A molecular weight of 115,000 was determined for the native enzyme, and the enzyme subunit had a molecular weight of 56,000 indicating that the active form is a homodimer. Kinetic constants were determined in both the forward and reverse directions. In the reverse direction both the Vmax and the apparent affinity for butyraldehyde and caproaldehyde were significantly greater than they were for acetaldehyde, while in the forward direction, the Vmax for butyryl-CoA was fivefold that for acetyl-CoA. These and other properties of BAD indicate that this enzyme is distinctly different from other reported CoA-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenases. Images PMID:3384801

  10. Effect of acetaldehyde on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis subjected to environmental shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, G.A.; Hobley, T.J.; Pamment, N.B.

    1997-01-05

    The lag phase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to a step increase in temperature or ethanol concentration was reduced by as much as 60% when acetaldehyde was added to the medium at concentrations less than 0.1 g/L. Maximum specific growth rates were also substantially increased. Even greater proportional reductions in lag time due to acetaldehyde addition were observed for ethanol-shocked cultures of Zymomonas mobilis. Acetaldehyde had no effect on S. cerevisiae cultures started from stationary phase inocula in the absence of environmental shock and its lag-reducing effects were greater in complex medium than in a defined synthetic medium. Acetaldehyde reacted strongly with the ingredients of complex culture media. It is proposed that the effect of added acetaldehyde may be to compensate for the inability of cells to maintain transmembrane acetaldehyde gradients following an environmental shock.

  11. Adsorption and Reaction of Acetaldehyde over CeOx(111) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    T Chen; D Mullins

    2011-12-31

    This study reports the interaction of acetaldehyde with well-ordered CeO{sub X}(111) thin film surfaces. The fully oxidized CeO{sub 2}(111) surface shows a weak interaction with acetaldehyde with the sole desorption product (TPD) being the parent molecule at 210 K. The chemisorbed molecule binds to the surface as the {eta}{sub 1}-acetaldehyde species rather than through a bridge-bonded dioxy configuration. Acetaldehyde chemisorbs strongly on reduced CeO{sub 2-X}(111) with nonrecombinative and recombinative acetaldehyde desorbing at 405 and 550-600 K, respectively. Deoxygenation and dehydration also occur, producing ethylene and acetylene at 580 and 620 K, respectively. Acetaldehyde initially adsorbs in the {eta}{sub 1} configuration and then converts to a carbanion species with both C {double_bond} C and C {double_bond} O bond character above 300 K.

  12. Adsorption and Reaction of Acetaldehyde over CeO(X)(111) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tsung-Liang; Mahurin, Shannon Mark

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the interaction of acetaldehyde with well-ordered CeO{sub X}(111) thin film surfaces. The fully oxidized CeO{sub 2}(111) surface shows a weak interaction with acetaldehyde with the sole desorption product (TPD) being the parent molecule at 210 K. The chemisorbed molecule binds to the surface as the {eta}{sub 1}-acetaldehyde species rather than through a bridge-bonded dioxy configuration. Acetaldehyde chemisorbs strongly on reduced CeO{sub 2-X}(111) with nonrecombinative and recombinative acetaldehyde desorbing at 405 and 550-600 K, respectively. Deoxygenation and dehydration also occur, producing ethylene and acetylene at 580 and 620 K, respectively. Acetaldehyde initially adsorbs in the {eta}{sub 1} configuration and then converts to a carbanion species with both C=C and C=O bond character above 300 K.

  13. Cardiac Mitochondrial Respiratory Dysfunction and Tissue Damage in Chronic Hyperglycemia Correlate with Reduced Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Mandar; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A.; Xu, Jiang; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Palaniyandi, Suresh S.

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 2 is a mitochondrial isozyme of the heart involved in the metabolism of toxic aldehydes produced from oxidative stress. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia-mediated decrease in ALDH2 activity may impair mitochondrial respiration and ultimately result in cardiac damage. A single dose (65 mg/kg; i.p.) streptozotocin injection to rats resulted in hyperglycemia with blood glucose levels of 443 ± 9 mg/dl versus 121 ± 7 mg/dl in control animals, p<0.0001, N = 7–11. After 6 months of diabetes mellitus (DM) induction, the rats were sacrificed after recording the functionality of their hearts. Increase in the cardiomyocyte cross sectional area (446 ± 32 μm2 Vs 221 ± 10 μm2; p<0.0001) indicated cardiac hypertrophy in DM rats. Both diastolic and systolic dysfunctions were observed with DM rats compared to controls. Most importantly, myocardial ALDH2 activity and levels were reduced, and immunostaining for 4HNE protein adducts was increased in DM hearts compared to controls. The mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR), an index of mitochondrial respiration, was decreased in mitochondria isolated from DM hearts compared to controls (p<0.0001). Furthermore, the rate of mitochondrial respiration and the increase in carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP)-induced maximal respiration were also decreased with chronic hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia reduced mitochondrial OXPHOS proteins. Reduced ALDH2 activity was correlated with mitochondrial dysfunction, pathological remodeling and cardiac dysfunction, respectively. Our results suggest that chronic hyperglycemia reduces ALDH2 activity, leading to mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction and consequently cardiac damage and dysfunction. PMID:27736868

  14. Increased superoxide production in nitrate tolerance is associated with NAD(P)H oxidase and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 downregulation.

    PubMed

    Szöcs, Katalin; Lassègue, Bernard; Wenzel, Philip; Wendt, Maria; Daiber, Andreas; Oelze, Matthias; Meinertz, Thomas; Münzel, Thomas; Baldus, Stephan

    2007-06-01

    Chronic administration of nitroglycerin (NTG) induces nitrate tolerance. Among possible underlying mechanisms, increased vascular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has emerged as a principal mechanism. Using cell culture and animal models of nitrate tolerance, we aimed to assess the impact of nitrates on NAD(P)H oxidases and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) expression. Rats and vascular smooth muscle cells were treated with NTG. Vascular reactivity was assessed by isometric tension studies. Superoxide was detected by dihydroethidium staining. Gene expression was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. NAD(P)H oxidase activity was measured using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence. ALDH activity was measured biochemically, and NO consumption electrochemically. Nitrate tolerance was induced in rats by treatment with NTG for 3 days, and detected as impaired endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation of aortic segments. Although superoxide production was increased in all aortic layers, expression of nox1, nox2 and nox4 was significantly decreased. Similarly, in vascular smooth muscle cells exposed to NTG for 6-24 h, NAD(P)H oxidase activity was increased, in spite of nox1 downregulation. In addition, expression and activity of ALDH-2 was decreased in nitrate-tolerant rings. Furthermore, exogenous addition of ALDH decreased superoxide generation in vitro and attenuated NO consumption in vascular smooth muscle cell homogenates. Our data suggest that in nitrate tolerance, activation of nox enzymes more than compensates for their downregulation, resulting in a net increase in superoxide and NO consumption. Furthermore, reduced ALDH-2 activity and expression leads to decreased NTG bioconversion. Therefore, both mechanisms reduce NO availability and impair vasorelaxation. PMID:17493633

  15. A coniferyl aldehyde dehydrogenase gene from Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 enhances the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Adeboye, Peter Temitope; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The conversion of coniferyl aldehyde to cinnamic acids by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic growth conditions was previously observed. Bacteria such as Pseudomonas have been shown to harbor specialized enzymes for converting coniferyl aldehyde but no comparable enzymes have been identified in S. cerevisiae. CALDH from Pseudomonas was expressed in S. cerevisiae. An acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Ald5) was also hypothesized to be actively involved in the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic growth conditions in S. cerevisiae. In a second S. cerevisiae strain, the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD5) was deleted. A prototrophic control strain was also engineered. The engineered S. cerevisiae strains were cultivated in the presence of 1.1mM coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic condition in bioreactors. The results confirmed that expression of CALDH increased endogenous conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae and ALD5 is actively involved with the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae. PMID:27070284

  16. ALDH16A1 is a novel non-catalytic enzyme that may be involved in the etiology of gout via protein–protein interactions with HPRT1

    PubMed Central

    Vasiliou, Vasilis; Sandoval, Monica; Backos, Donald S.; Jackson, Brian C.; Chen, Ying; Reigan, Philip; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Johnson, Richard J.; Koppaka, Vindhya; Thompson, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Gout, a common form of inflammatory arthritis, is strongly associated with elevated uric acid concentrations in the blood (hyperuricemia). A recent study in Icelanders identified a rare missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ALDH16A1 gene, ALDH16A1*2, to be associated with gout and serum uric acid levels. ALDH16A1 is a novel and rather unique member of the ALDH superfamily in relation to its gene and protein structures. ALDH16 genes are present in fish, amphibians, protista, bacteria but absent from archaea, fungi and plants. In most mammalian species, two ALDH16A1 spliced variants (ALDH16A1, long form and ALDH16A1_v2, short form) have been identified and both are expressed in HepG-2, HK-2 and HK-293 human cell lines. The ALDH16 proteins contain two ALDH domains (as opposed to one in the other members of the superfamily), four transmembrane and one coiled-coil domains. The active site of ALDH16 proteins from bacterial, frog and lower animals contain the catalytically important cysteine residue (Cys-302); this residue is absent from the mammalian and fish orthologs. Molecular modeling predicts that both the short and long forms of human ALDH16A1 protein would lack catalytic activity but may interact with the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT1) protein, a key enzyme involved in uric acid metabolism and gout. Interestingly, such protein-protein interactions with HPRT1 are predicted to be impaired for the long or short forms of ALDH16A1*2. These results lead to the intriguing possibility that association between ALDH16A1 and HPRT1 may be required for optimal HPRT activity with disruption of this interaction possibly contributing to the hyperuricemia seen in ALDH16A1*2 carriers. PMID:23348497

  17. Divergent pathways of acetaldehyde and ethanol decarbonylation on the Rh(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Houtman, C.J.; Barteau, M.A. )

    1991-08-01

    The decomposition reactions of acetaldehyde and ethanol on the Rh(111) surface were compared in temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) experiments. The decarbonylation of acetaldehyde produced methane at 267 K in TPD. For acetaldehyde coverages less than 0.05 monolayer, no methane was desorbed, but for a coverage that saturated the first layer, methane was produced with 50% selectivity. Coadsorbing deuterium with a low coverage of acetaldehyde resulted in the enhancement of methane production. This result indicates that the selectivity to methane was partially controlled by the availability of hydrogen atoms on the surface required to hydrogenate the hydrocarbon species produced by acetaldehyde decarbonylation. Monodeuterated methane was the primary methane product observed after these coadsorption experiments. Thus it was concluded that acetaldehyde decarbonylates via a methyl migration mechanism on the Rh(111) surface. Decarbonylation of ethanol did not produce methane. The absence of methane production indicated that the decomposition of ethanol on the Rh(111) surface did not proceed via dehydrogenation to adsorbed acetaldehyde, but instead, ethanol appeared to dehydrogenate by methyl hydrogen abstraction resulting in the formation of an oxametallacycle. Since this proposed intermediate rapidly dehydrogenated to carbon monoxide and surface carbon, it was difficult to characterize spectroscopically. The existence of an ethanol decomposition pathway that does not include acetaldehyde intermediates indicates that ethanol formation on supported Rh catalysts may not be the result of acetaldehyde hydrogenation.

  18. NADH fluorescence lifetime analysis of the effect of magnesium ions on ALDH2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ALDH2 catalyzes oxidation of toxic aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. Magnesium ions influence enzyme activity in part by increasing NADH binding affinity. Traditional fluorescence measurements have monitored the blue shift of the NADH fluorescence spectrum to elucidate the extent of...

  19. Meta-Analyses of ALDH2 and ADH1B with Alcohol Dependence in Asians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luczak, Susan E.; Glatt, Stephen J.; Wall, Tamara J.

    2006-01-01

    Meta-analyses were conducted to determine the magnitude of relationships between polymorphisms in 2 genes, ALDH2 and ADH1B, with alcohol dependence in Asians. For each gene, possession of 1 variant [asterisk]2 allele was protective against alcohol dependence, and possession of a 2nd [asterisk]2 allele did not offer significant additional…

  20. COMT and ALDH2 polymorphisms moderate associations of implicit drinking motives with alcohol use

    PubMed Central

    Hendershot, Christian S.; Lindgren, Kristen P.; Liang, Tiebing; Hutchison, Kent. E.

    2010-01-01

    Dual process models of addiction emphasize the importance of implicit (automatic) cognitive processes in the development and maintenance of substance use behavior. Although genetic influences are presumed to be relevant for dual process models, few studies have evaluated this possibility. The current study examined two polymorphsims with functional significance for alcohol use behavior (COMT Val158Met and ALDH2*2) in relation to automatic alcohol cognitions and tested additive and interactive effects of genotype and implicit cognitions on drinking behavior. Participants were college students (n = 69) who completed Implicit Association Tasks (IATs) designed to assess two classes of automatic drinking motives (enhancement motives and coping motives). Genetic factors did not show direct associations with IAT measures, however, COMT and ALDH2 moderated associations of implicit coping motives with drinking outcomes. Interaction effects indicated that associations of implicit motives with drinking outcomes were strongest in the context of genetic variants associated with relatively higher risk for alcohol use (COMT Met and ALDH2*1). Associations of genotype with drinking behavior were observed for ALDH2 but not COMT. These findings are consistent with the possibility that genetic risk or protective factors could potentiate or mitigate the influence of reflexive cognitive processes on drinking behavior, providing support for the evaluation of genetic influences in the context of dual process models of addiction. PMID:21309949

  1. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  2. Structural Determinants of Oligomerization of !1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Dehydrogenase: Identification of a Hexamerization Hot Spot

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Singh, Ranjan K.; Tanner, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily member !1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH) catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of glutamate semialdehyde to glutamate, which is the final step of proline catabolism. Defects in P5CDH activity lead to the metabolic disorder type II hyperprolinemia, P5CDH is essential for virulence of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, and bacterial P5CDHs have been targeted for vaccine development. Although the enzyme oligomeric state is known to be important for ALDH function, the oligomerization of P5CDH has remained relatively unstudied. Here we determine the oligomeric states and quaternary structures of four bacterial P5CDHs using a combination of small-angle X-ray scattering, X-ray crystallography, and dynamic light scattering. The P5CDHs from Thermus thermophilus and Deinococcus radiodurans form trimer-of-dimers hexamers in solution, which is the first observation of a hexameric ALDH in solution. In contrast, two Bacillus P5CDHs form dimers in solution but do not assemble into a higher order oligomer. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to identify a hexamerization hot spot that is centered on an arginine residue in the NAD+-binding domain. Mutation of this critical Arg residue to Ala in either of the hexameric enzymes prevents hexamer formation in solution. Paradoxically, the dimeric Arg-to-Ala T. thermophilus mutant enzyme packs as a hexamer in the crystal state, which illustrates the challenges associated with predicting the biological assembly in solution from crystal structures. The observation of different oligomeric states among P5CDHs suggests potential differences in cooperativity and protein-protein interactions. PMID:23747974

  3. Increasing Anaerobic Acetate Consumption and Ethanol Yields in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with NADPH-Specific Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Henningsen, Brooks M.; Hon, Shuen; Covalla, Sean F.; Sonu, Carolina; Argyros, D. Aaron; Barrett, Trisha F.; Wiswall, Erin; Froehlich, Allan C.

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been engineered to use acetate, a primary inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as a cosubstrate during anaerobic ethanolic fermentation. However, the original metabolic pathway devised to convert acetate to ethanol uses NADH-specific acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase and quickly becomes constrained by limited NADH availability, even when glycerol formation is abolished. We present alcohol dehydrogenase as a novel target for anaerobic redox engineering of S. cerevisiae. Introduction of an NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (NADPH-ADH) not only reduces the NADH demand of the acetate-to-ethanol pathway but also allows the cell to effectively exchange NADPH for NADH during sugar fermentation. Unlike NADH, NADPH can be freely generated under anoxic conditions, via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. We show that an industrial bioethanol strain engineered with the original pathway (expressing acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis and with deletions of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes GPD1 and GPD2) consumed 1.9 g liter−1 acetate during fermentation of 114 g liter−1 glucose. Combined with a decrease in glycerol production from 4.0 to 0.1 g liter−1, this increased the ethanol yield by 4% over that for the wild type. We provide evidence that acetate consumption in this strain is indeed limited by NADH availability. By introducing an NADPH-ADH from Entamoeba histolytica and with overexpression of ACS2 and ZWF1, we increased acetate consumption to 5.3 g liter−1 and raised the ethanol yield to 7% above the wild-type level. PMID:26386051

  4. Increasing anaerobic acetate consumption and ethanol yields in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Henningsen, Brooks M; Hon, Shuen; Covalla, Sean F; Sonu, Carolina; Argyros, D Aaron; Barrett, Trisha F; Wiswall, Erin; Froehlich, Allan C; Zelle, Rintze M

    2015-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been engineered to use acetate, a primary inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as a cosubstrate during anaerobic ethanolic fermentation. However, the original metabolic pathway devised to convert acetate to ethanol uses NADH-specific acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase and quickly becomes constrained by limited NADH availability, even when glycerol formation is abolished. We present alcohol dehydrogenase as a novel target for anaerobic redox engineering of S. cerevisiae. Introduction of an NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (NADPH-ADH) not only reduces the NADH demand of the acetate-to-ethanol pathway but also allows the cell to effectively exchange NADPH for NADH during sugar fermentation. Unlike NADH, NADPH can be freely generated under anoxic conditions, via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. We show that an industrial bioethanol strain engineered with the original pathway (expressing acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis and with deletions of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes GPD1 and GPD2) consumed 1.9 g liter(-1) acetate during fermentation of 114 g liter(-1) glucose. Combined with a decrease in glycerol production from 4.0 to 0.1 g liter(-1), this increased the ethanol yield by 4% over that for the wild type. We provide evidence that acetate consumption in this strain is indeed limited by NADH availability. By introducing an NADPH-ADH from Entamoeba histolytica and with overexpression of ACS2 and ZWF1, we increased acetate consumption to 5.3 g liter(-1) and raised the ethanol yield to 7% above the wild-type level.

  5. Genomic organization and expression of the human fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (FALDH)

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, G.R.; Markova, N.G.; Compton, J.G.

    1997-01-15

    Mutations in the fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH) gene cause Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) - a disease characterized by mental retardation, spasticity, and congenital ichthyosis. To facilitate mutation analysis in SLS and to study the pathogenesis of FALDH deficiency, we have determined the structural organization and characterized expression of the FALDH (proposed designation ALDH10) gene. The gene consists of 10 exons spanning about 30.5 kb. A TATA-less promoter is associated with the major transcription initiation site found to be 258 hp upstream of the ATG codon. The G4C-rich sequences surrounding the transcription initiation site encompassed regulatory elements that interacted with proteins in HeLa nuclear extracts and were able to promote transcription in vitro. FALDH is widely expressed as three transcripts of 2, 3.8, and 4.0 kb, which originate from multiple polyadenylation signals in the 3{prime} UTR. An alternatively spliced mRNA was detected that contains an extra exon and encodes an enzyme that is likely to have altered membrane-binding properties. The FALDH gene lies only 50-85 kb from ALDH3, an aldehyde dehydrogenase gene that has homologous sequence and intron/exon structure. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The detection of acetaldehyde in cold dust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, H. E.; Friber, P.; Irvine, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of the 1(01)-0(00) rotational transitions of A and E state acetaldehyde are reported. The transitions were detected, for the first time in interstellar space, in the cold dust clouds TMC-1 and L134N, and in Sgr B2. This is also the first time acetaldehyde has been found in a dust cloud and is the most complex oxygen-bearing molecule yet known in this environment. A column density of 6 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm in TMC-1, comparable to many other species detected there, and an approximately equal column density in L134N are formed. In the direction of Sgr B2, the CH3CHO profile appears to consist of broad emission features from the hot molecular cloud core, together with absorption features resulting from intervening colder material. The possible detection of HC9N toward IRC + 10 deg 216 through its J = 33-32 transition is also reported. Implications for cold dust cloud chemistry and excitation are discussed.

  7. Roaming radical kinetics in the decomposition of acetaldehyde.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L. B.; Georgievskii, Y.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-01-01

    A novel theoretical framework for predicting the branching between roaming and bond fission channels in molecular dissociations is described and applied to the decomposition of acetaldehyde. This reduced dimensional trajectory (RDT) approach, which is motivated by the long-range nature of the roaming, bond fission, and abstraction dynamical bottlenecks, involves the propagation of rigid-body trajectories on an analytic potential energy surface. The analytic potential is obtained from fits to large-scale multireference ab initio electronic structure calculations. The final potential includes one-dimensional corrections from higher-level electronic structure calculations and for the effect of conserved mode variations along both the addition and abstraction paths. The corrections along the abstraction path play a significant role in the predicted branching. Master equation simulations are used to transform the microcanonical branching ratios obtained from the RDT simulations to the temperature- and pressure-dependent branching ratios observed in thermal decomposition experiments. For completeness, a transition-state theory treatment of the contributions of the tight transition states for the molecular channels is included in the theoretical analyses. The theoretically predicted branching between molecules and radicals in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde is in reasonable agreement with the corresponding shock tube measurement described in the companion paper. The prediction for the ratio of the tight to roaming contributions to the molecular channel also agrees well with results extracted from recent experimental and experimental/theoretical photodissociation studies.

  8. The detection of acetaldehyde in cold dust clouds.

    PubMed

    Matthews, H E; Friberg, P; Irvine, W M

    1985-03-15

    Observations of the 1(01) --> 0(00) rotational transitions of A and E state acetaldehyde are reported. The transitions were detected, for the first time in interstellar space, in the cold dust clouds TMC-1 and L134N, and in Sgr B2. This is also the first time acetaldehyde has been found in a dust cloud and is the most complex oxygen-bearing molecule yet known in this environment. We find a column density of 6 x 10(12) cm-2 in TMC-1, comparable to many other species detected there, and an approximately equal column density in L134N. In the direction of Sgr B2, the CH3CHO profile appears to consist of broad emission features from the hot molecular cloud core, together with absorption features resulting from intervening colder material. We also report the possible detection of HC9N toward IRC +10 degrees 216 through its J = 33 --> 32 transition. Implications for cold dust cloud chemistry and excitation are discussed.

  9. Studies on the mechanism of acetaldehyde-mediated inhibition of rat liver transaminases.

    PubMed

    Solomon, L R

    1987-09-30

    Incubation of mitochondria-depleted rat liver homogenates with 5 mmol/l acetaldehyde at 37 degrees C for 1 h inhibited both aspartate and alanine aminotransferases by 30%. Inhibition was prevented by decreasing temperature to 4 degrees C or by preincubating homogenates with cyanate but was unaffected by cyanamide and methylpyrazole which block acetaldehyde oxidation and reduction respectively. Cyanate-sensitive acetaldehyde-mediated inhibition of purified porcine heart transaminases was also demonstrated in the presence of rat liver homogenate but not in Tris/sucrose medium. Moreover, porcine transaminases were inhibited by trichloroacetic acid extracts of rat liver homogenates previously incubated with acetaldehyde but not by extracts of homogenates incubated with both acetaldehyde and cyanate. These findings suggest that acetaldehyde-mediated transaminase inhibition requires further non-oxidative metabolism of acetaldehyde. Since transaminase activities were not restored by addition of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate to the assay systems, acetaldehyde-induced transaminase inhibition does not appear to be mediated by displacement or depletion of this B6 coenzyme. PMID:3677417

  10. The hydrogen-storing microporous silica 'Microcluster' reduces acetaldehyde contained in a distilled spirit.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinya; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Acetaldehyde is a detrimental substance produced in alcoholic liquor aging. We assessed an ability of hydrogen-storing microporous silica 'Microcluster' (MC+) to reduce acetaldehyde, as compared with autoclave-dehydrogenated MC+ (MC-). Acetaldehyde was quantified spectrophotometrically by an enzymatic method. Authentic acetaldehyde was treated by MC+ for 20min, and decreased from 43.4ppm to 10.9ppm, but maintained at 49.3ppm by MC-. On the other hand, acetaldehyde contained in a distilled spirit was decreased from 29.5ppm to 3.1ppm at 20min by MC+, but not decreased by MC-. Addition of MC+ or MC- to distilled water without acetaldehyde showed no seeming effect on the quantification used. Accordingly acetaldehyde in a distilled spirit is reduced to ethanol by hydrogen contained in MC+, but not by the silica moiety of MC+. Hydrogen gas of 1.2mL was released for 20min from MC+ of 0.59g in water, resulting in dissolved hydrogen of 1.09ppm and an oxidation- reduction potential of -687.0mV indicative of a marked reducing ability. Thus, MC+ has an ability to reduce acetaldehyde in a distilled spirit due to dissolved hydrogen released from MC+. PMID:27612695

  11. Removal of acetaldehyde and skatole in gas by a corona-discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Noriaki; Nagamoto, Toshiki; Hamon, Hajime; Suzuki, Tetsuo; Okazaki, Morio

    1997-09-01

    Recently, ultrahigh gas purification has been important in many cases, such as, for example, (1) removal of dioxin from incineration plants, (2) complete removal of radioactive iodine compounds from nuclear fuel recycling, (3) simultaneous removal of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} in exhaust gases from cogeneration plants, (4) removal or decomposition of chlorofluorocarbons, and (5) supply of purified gas for semiconductor industries. A corona-discharge reactor, called a deposition-type reactor, was applied to remove acetaldehyde and skatole from nitrogen and an oxygen-nitrogen mixture. In the removal from nitrogen, acetaldehyde and skatole are negatively ionized and removed by depositing at the anode surface. In simultaneous removals of acetaldehyde and skatole, it is found that skatole has a higher reactivity of electron attachment than acetaldehyde. In the removal of acetaldehyde from an oxygen-nitrogen mixture, 40 molecules of acetaldehyde were removed by one electron. The reason for the extremely high removal efficiency is considered to be based on the ozone reaction and the formation of negative-ion clusters. Stabilization energies of the negative-ion clusters were estimated by ab initio molecular orbital calculation. Skatole was removed from a nitrogen-oxygen mixture perfectly with extremely low discharge current by the ozone reaction. Simultaneous removals of acetaldehyde and skatole from a nitrogen-oxygen mixture suggest that coexisting skatole inhibits the removal of acetaldehyde.

  12. Dissociative electron attachments to ethanol and acetaldehyde: A combined experimental and simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu-Dong; Xuan, Chuan-Jin; Feng, Wen-Ling; Tian, Shan Xi

    2015-02-01

    Dissociation dynamics of the temporary negative ions of ethanol and acetaldehyde formed by the low-energy electron attachments is investigated by using the anion velocity map imaging technique and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The momentum images of the dominant fragments O-/OH- and CH3- are recorded, indicating the low kinetic energies of O-/OH- for ethanol while the low and high kinetic energy distributions of O- ions for acetaldehyde. The CH3- image for acetaldehyde also shows the low kinetic energy. With help of the dynamics simulations, the fragmentation processes are qualitatively clarified. A new cascade dissociation pathway to produce the slow O- ion via the dehydrogenated intermediate, CH3CHO- (acetaldehyde anion), is proposed for the dissociative electron attachment to ethanol. After the electron attachment to acetaldehyde molecule, the slow CH3- is produced quickly in the two-body dissociation with the internal energy redistributions in different aspects before bond cleavages.

  13. Accumulation of ALDH1-positive cells after neoadjuvant chemotherapy predicts treatment resistance and prognosticates poor outcome in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Debald, Manuel; Rostamzadeh, Babak; Thiesler, Thore; Schröder, Lars; Barchet, Winfried; Abramian, Alina; Kaiser, Christina; Kristiansen, Glen; Kuhn, Walther; Kübler, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Although ovarian cancer is a highly chemosensitive disease, it is only infrequently cured. One of the major reasons lies in the presence of drug-resistant cancer stem-like cells, sufficient to fuel recurrence. We phenotyped cancer stem-like cells by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry in 55 matched samples before and after taxane/platinum-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All used markers of stemness (ALDH1, CD24, CD117, CD133) isolated low frequencies of malignant cells. ALDH1 was the most valuable marker for tracking stemness in vivo. The enrichment of ALDH1 expression after treatment was associated with a poor response to chemotherapy, with platinum resistance and independently prognosticated unfavorable outcome. Our results suggest that increased ALDH1 expression after treatment identifies patients with aggressive tumor phenotypes. PMID:25999351

  14. Accumulation of ALDH1-positive cells after neoadjuvant chemotherapy predicts treatment resistance and prognosticates poor outcome in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ayub, Tiyasha H; Keyver-Paik, Mignon-Denise; Debald, Manuel; Rostamzadeh, Babak; Thiesler, Thore; Schröder, Lars; Barchet, Winfried; Abramian, Alina; Kaiser, Christina; Kristiansen, Glen; Kuhn, Walther; Kübler, Kirsten

    2015-06-30

    Although ovarian cancer is a highly chemosensitive disease, it is only infrequently cured. One of the major reasons lies in the presence of drug-resistant cancer stem-like cells, sufficient to fuel recurrence. We phenotyped cancer stem-like cells by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry in 55 matched samples before and after taxane/platinum-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All used markers of stemness (ALDH1, CD24, CD117, CD133) isolated low frequencies of malignant cells. ALDH1 was the most valuable marker for tracking stemness in vivo. The enrichment of ALDH1 expression after treatment was associated with a poor response to chemotherapy, with platinum resistance and independently prognosticated unfavorable outcome. Our results suggest that increased ALDH1 expression after treatment identifies patients with aggressive tumor phenotypes. PMID:25999351

  15. Resolving Some Paradoxes in the Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Raghu; Michael, Joe V; Harding, Lawrence B; Klippenstein, Stephen J

    2015-07-16

    The mechanism for the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde has been revisited with an analysis of literature kinetics experiments using theoretical kinetics. The present modeling study was motivated by recent observations, with very sensitive diagnostics, of some unexpected products in high temperature microtubular reactor experiments on the thermal decomposition of CH3CHO and its deuterated analogs, CH3CDO, CD3CHO, and CD3CDO. The observations of these products prompted the authors of these studies to suggest that the enol tautomer, CH2CHOH (vinyl alcohol), is a primary intermediate in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde. The present modeling efforts on acetaldehyde decomposition incorporate a master equation reanalysis of the CH3CHO potential energy surface (PES). The lowest-energy process on this PES is an isomerization of CH3CHO to CH2CHOH. However, the subsequent product channels for CH2CHOH are substantially higher in energy, and the only unimolecular process that can be thermally accessed is a reisomerization to CH3CHO. The incorporation of these new theoretical kinetics predictions into models for selected literature experiments on CH3CHO thermal decomposition confirms our earlier experiment and theory-based conclusions that the dominant decomposition process in CH3CHO at high temperatures is C-C bond fission with a minor contribution (∼10-20%) from the roaming mechanism to form CH4 and CO. The present modeling efforts also incorporate a master-equation analysis of the H + CH2CHOH potential energy surface. This bimolecular reaction is the primary mechanism for removal of CH2CHOH, which can accumulate to minor amounts at high temperatures, T > 1000 K, in most lab-scale experiments that use large initial concentrations of CH3CHO. Our modeling efforts indicate that the observation of ketene, water, and acetylene in the recent microtubular experiments are primarily due to bimolecular reactions of CH3CHO and CH2CHOH with H-atoms and have no bearing on

  16. ALDH1A1 provides a source of meiosis-inducing retinoic acid in mouse fetal ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Josephine; Feng, Chun-Wei; Miles, Kim; Ineson, Jessica; Spiller, Cassy; Koopman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Substantial evidence exists that during fetal ovarian development in mammals, retinoic acid (RA) induces germ cells to express the pre-meiotic marker Stra8 and enter meiosis, and that these effects are prevented in the fetal testis by the RA-degrading P450 enzyme CYP26B1. Nonetheless, the role of RA has been disputed principally because germ cells in embryos lacking two major RA-synthesizing enzymes, ALDH1A2 and ALDH1A3, remain able to enter meiosis. Here we show that a third RA-synthesizing enzyme, ALDH1A1, is expressed in fetal ovaries, providing a likely source of RA in the absence of ALDH1A2 and ALDH1A3. In ovaries lacking ALDH1A1, the onset of germ cell meiosis is delayed. Our data resolve the conundrum posed by conflicting published data sets and reconfirm the model that meiosis is triggered by endogenous RA in the developing ovary. PMID:26892828

  17. ALDH1A1 provides a source of meiosis-inducing retinoic acid in mouse fetal ovaries.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Josephine; Feng, Chun-Wei; Miles, Kim; Ineson, Jessica; Spiller, Cassy; Koopman, Peter

    2016-02-19

    Substantial evidence exists that during fetal ovarian development in mammals, retinoic acid (RA) induces germ cells to express the pre-meiotic marker Stra8 and enter meiosis, and that these effects are prevented in the fetal testis by the RA-degrading P450 enzyme CYP26B1. Nonetheless, the role of RA has been disputed principally because germ cells in embryos lacking two major RA-synthesizing enzymes, ALDH1A2 and ALDH1A3, remain able to enter meiosis. Here we show that a third RA-synthesizing enzyme, ALDH1A1, is expressed in fetal ovaries, providing a likely source of RA in the absence of ALDH1A2 and ALDH1A3. In ovaries lacking ALDH1A1, the onset of germ cell meiosis is delayed. Our data resolve the conundrum posed by conflicting published data sets and reconfirm the model that meiosis is triggered by endogenous RA in the developing ovary.

  18. The Crystal Structure of a Ternary Complex of Betaine Aldehyde Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Provides New Insight Into the Reaction Mechansim and Shows A Novel Binding Mode of the 2'-Phosphate of NADP+ and A Novel Cation Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Segura, L.; Rudino-Pinera, E; Munoz-Clares, R; Horjales, E

    2009-01-01

    In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the NAD(P)+-dependent betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (PaBADH) may play the dual role of assimilating carbon and nitrogen from choline or choline precursors-abundant at infection sites-and producing glycine betaine and NADPH, potentially protective against the high-osmolarity and oxidative stresses prevalent in the infected tissues. Disruption of the PaBADH gene negatively affects the growth of bacteria, suggesting that this enzyme could be a target for antibiotic design. PaBADH is one of the few ALDHs that efficiently use NADP+ and one of the even fewer that require K+ ions for stability. Crystals of PaBADH were obtained under aerobic conditions in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, glycerol, NADP+ and K+ ions. The three-dimensional structure was determined at 2.1-A resolution. The catalytic cysteine (C286, corresponding to C302 of ALDH2) is oxidized to sulfenic acid or forms a mixed disulfide with 2-mercaptoethanol. The glutamyl residue involved in the deacylation step (E252, corresponding to E268 of ALDH2) is in two conformations, suggesting a proton relay system formed by two well-conserved residues (E464 and K162, corresponding to E476 and K178, respectively, of ALDH2) that connects E252 with the bulk water. In some active sites, a bound glycerol molecule mimics the thiohemiacetal intermediate; its hydroxyl oxygen is hydrogen bonded to the nitrogen of the amide groups of the side chain of the conserved N153 (N169 of ALDH2) and those of the main chain of C286, which form the 'oxyanion hole.' The nicotinamide moiety of the nucleotide is not observed in the crystal, and the adenine moiety binds in the usual way. A salt bridge between E179 (E195 of ALDH2) and R40 (E53 of ALDH2) moves the carboxylate group of the former away from the 2?-phosphate of the NADP+, thus avoiding steric clashes and/or electrostatic repulsion between the two groups. Finally, the crystal shows two K+ binding sites per subunit. One is in an

  19. The crystal structure of a ternary complex of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Provides new insight into the reaction mechanism and shows a novel binding mode of the 2'-phosphate of NADP+ and a novel cation binding site.

    PubMed

    González-Segura, Lilian; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A; Horjales, Eduardo

    2009-01-16

    In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the NAD(P)(+)-dependent betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (PaBADH) may play the dual role of assimilating carbon and nitrogen from choline or choline precursors--abundant at infection sites--and producing glycine betaine and NADPH, potentially protective against the high-osmolarity and oxidative stresses prevalent in the infected tissues. Disruption of the PaBADH gene negatively affects the growth of bacteria, suggesting that this enzyme could be a target for antibiotic design. PaBADH is one of the few ALDHs that efficiently use NADP(+) and one of the even fewer that require K(+) ions for stability. Crystals of PaBADH were obtained under aerobic conditions in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, glycerol, NADP(+) and K(+) ions. The three-dimensional structure was determined at 2.1-A resolution. The catalytic cysteine (C286, corresponding to C302 of ALDH2) is oxidized to sulfenic acid or forms a mixed disulfide with 2-mercaptoethanol. The glutamyl residue involved in the deacylation step (E252, corresponding to E268 of ALDH2) is in two conformations, suggesting a proton relay system formed by two well-conserved residues (E464 and K162, corresponding to E476 and K178, respectively, of ALDH2) that connects E252 with the bulk water. In some active sites, a bound glycerol molecule mimics the thiohemiacetal intermediate; its hydroxyl oxygen is hydrogen bonded to the nitrogen of the amide groups of the side chain of the conserved N153 (N169 of ALDH2) and those of the main chain of C286, which form the "oxyanion hole." The nicotinamide moiety of the nucleotide is not observed in the crystal, and the adenine moiety binds in the usual way. A salt bridge between E179 (E195 of ALDH2) and R40 (E53 of ALDH2) moves the carboxylate group of the former away from the 2'-phosphate of the NADP(+), thus avoiding steric clashes and/or electrostatic repulsion between the two groups. Finally, the crystal shows two K(+) binding sites per subunit

  20. Velocity-map imaging study of the photodissociation of acetaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, H.A.; Softley, T.P.

    2005-03-22

    Velocity-map imaging studies are reported for the photodissociation of acetaldehyde over a range of photolysis wavelengths (317.5-282.5 nm). Images are obtained for both the HCO and CH{sub 3} fragments. The mean rotational energy of both fragments increases with photodissociation energy, with a lesser degree of excitation in the CH{sub 3} fragment. The CH{sub 3} images demonstrate that the CH{sub 3} fragments are rotationally aligned with respect to the recoil direction and this is interpreted, and well modeled, on the basis of a propensity for forming CH{sub 3} fragments with M{approx}K, where M is the projection of the rotational angular momentum along the recoil direction. The origin of the CH{sub 3} rotation is conserved motion from the torsional and methyl-rocking modes of the parent molecule. Nonstatistical vibrational distributions for the CH{sub 3} fragment are obtained at higher energies.

  1. Pyrolysis of Acetaldehyde: a Fleeting Glimpse of Vinylidene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilou, A. J.; Piech, K. M.; Ellison, G. B.; Golan, A.; Kostko, O.; Ahmed, M.; Osborn, D. L.; Daily, J. W.; Nimlos, M. R.; Stanton, J. F.

    2011-06-01

    The thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde has been studied in a heated silicon carbide ``microtubular reactor", with products monitored by both photoionization mass spectrometry and matrix-isolation Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A well-known, and observed, route of decomposition occurs when the weakest C-C bond is broken; this process leads to methyl and formyl radicals. In addition to this, we find evidence for two additional channels: CH_3CHO + Δ → H_2CCO (ketene) and CH_3CHO + Δ → C_2H_2 (acetylene), reactions that also generate molecular hydrogen and water, respectively. This talk focuses on the last pathway, which proceeds via vinyl alcohol. Evidence is presented that the high temperature unimolecular dehydration of vinyl alcohol proceeds by two mechanisms; one of these is a (1,2) elimination that directly yields acetylene, and the other is a (1,1) elimination that necessarily accesses the vinylidene isomer of C_2H_2 as an intermediate.

  2. Velocity-map imaging study of the photodissociation of acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruse, H. A.; Softley, T. P.

    2005-03-01

    Velocity-map imaging studies are reported for the photodissociation of acetaldehyde over a range of photolysis wavelengths (317.5-282.5 nm). Images are obtained for both the HCO and CH3 fragments. The mean rotational energy of both fragments increases with photodissociation energy, with a lesser degree of excitation in the CH3 fragment. The CH3 images demonstrate that the CH3 fragments are rotationally aligned with respect to the recoil direction and this is interpreted, and well modeled, on the basis of a propensity for forming CH3 fragments with M ˜K, where M is the projection of the rotational angular momentum along the recoil direction. The origin of the CH3 rotation is conserved motion from the torsional and methyl-rocking modes of the parent molecule. Nonstatistical vibrational distributions for the CH3 fragment are obtained at higher energies.

  3. Acetaldehyde involvement in ethanol's postabsortive effects during early ontogeny.

    PubMed

    March, Samanta M; Abate, P; Molina, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and biomedical studies sustains the notion that early ontogeny is a vulnerable window to the impact of alcohol. Experiences with the drug during these stages increase latter disposition to prefer, use or abuse ethanol. This period of enhanced sensitivity to ethanol is accompanied by a high rate of activity in the central catalase system, which metabolizes ethanol in the brain. Acetaldehyde (ACD), the first oxidation product of ethanol, has been found to share many neurobehavioral effects with the drug. Cumulative evidence supports this notion in models employing adults. Nevertheless very few studies have been conducted to analyze the role of ACD in ethanol postabsorptive effects, in newborns or infant rats. In this work we review recent experimental literature that syndicates ACD as a mediator agent of reinforcing aspects of ethanol, during early ontogenetic stages. We also show a meta-analytical correlational approach that proposes how differences in the activity of brain catalase across ontogeny, could be modulating patterns of ethanol consumption.

  4. Computer modeling of cool flames and ignition of acetaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, J.; Cox, R.A. ); Olson, G. )

    1990-10-01

    A detailed mechanism for the oxidation of acetaldehyde at temperatures between 500-1000 K has been assembled using 77 elementary reactions involving 32 reactant, product, and intermediate species. Rate coefficients were taken from recent critical evaluations of experimental data. Where experimental measurements were not available, the rate parameters were estimated from the body of currently available kinetics information. The mechanism was shown to predict correctly the rates and products observed in CH{sub 3}CHO oxidation studies in a low-pressure in a stirred flow reactor and at high pressure in a rapid compression machine. The oscillatory phenomena in the flow system and the two-stage ignition observed at high pressure were satisfactorily described by the mechanism. It is shown that cool flames are caused by degenerate branching mainly by peracetic acid and that hydrogen peroxide promotes hot ignition.

  5. Aldh1 Expression and Activity Increase During Tumor Evolution in Sarcoma Cancer Stem Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Cruzado, Lucia; Tornin, Juan; Santos, Laura; Rodriguez, Aida; García-Castro, Javier; Morís, Francisco; Rodriguez, Rene

    2016-01-01

    Tumors evolve from initial tumorigenic events into increasingly aggressive behaviors in a process usually driven by subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) may act as the cell-of-origin for sarcomas, and CSCs that present MSC features have been identified in sarcomas due to their ability to grow as self-renewed floating spheres (tumorspheres). Accordingly, we previously developed sarcoma models using human MSCs transformed with relevant oncogenic events. To study the evolution/emergence of CSC subpopulations during tumor progression, we compared the tumorigenic properties of bulk adherent cultures and tumorsphere-forming subpopulations both in the sarcoma cell-of-origin models (transformed MSCs) and in their corresponding tumor xenograft-derived cells. Tumor formation assays showed that the tumorsphere cultures from xenograft-derived cells, but not from the cell-of-origin models, were enriched in CSCs, providing evidence of the emergence of bona fide CSCs subpopulations during tumor progression. Relevant CSC-related factors, such as ALDH1 and SOX2, were increasingly upregulated in CSCs during tumor progression, and importantly, the increased levels and activity of ALDH1 in these subpopulations were associated with enhanced tumorigenicity. In addition to being a CSC marker, our findings indicate that ALDH1 could also be useful for tracking the malignant potential of CSC subpopulations during sarcoma evolution. PMID:27292183

  6. Aldh1 Expression and Activity Increase During Tumor Evolution in Sarcoma Cancer Stem Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Cruzado, Lucia; Tornin, Juan; Santos, Laura; Rodriguez, Aida; García-Castro, Javier; Morís, Francisco; Rodriguez, Rene

    2016-06-13

    Tumors evolve from initial tumorigenic events into increasingly aggressive behaviors in a process usually driven by subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) may act as the cell-of-origin for sarcomas, and CSCs that present MSC features have been identified in sarcomas due to their ability to grow as self-renewed floating spheres (tumorspheres). Accordingly, we previously developed sarcoma models using human MSCs transformed with relevant oncogenic events. To study the evolution/emergence of CSC subpopulations during tumor progression, we compared the tumorigenic properties of bulk adherent cultures and tumorsphere-forming subpopulations both in the sarcoma cell-of-origin models (transformed MSCs) and in their corresponding tumor xenograft-derived cells. Tumor formation assays showed that the tumorsphere cultures from xenograft-derived cells, but not from the cell-of-origin models, were enriched in CSCs, providing evidence of the emergence of bona fide CSCs subpopulations during tumor progression. Relevant CSC-related factors, such as ALDH1 and SOX2, were increasingly upregulated in CSCs during tumor progression, and importantly, the increased levels and activity of ALDH1 in these subpopulations were associated with enhanced tumorigenicity. In addition to being a CSC marker, our findings indicate that ALDH1 could also be useful for tracking the malignant potential of CSC subpopulations during sarcoma evolution.

  7. Elucidating the reaction mechanism of the benzoate oxidation pathway encoded aldehyde dehydrogenase from Burkholderia xenovorans LB400

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Jasleen; Leon, Rafael; Temke, Kevin G; Boulanger, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    Oxidation of cis-3,4-dehydroadipyl-CoA semialdehyde to cis-3,4-dehydroadipyl-CoA by the aldehyde dehydrogenase, ALDHC (EC.1.2.1.77), is an essential step in the metabolism of benzoate in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400. In a previous study, we established a structural blueprint for this novel group of ALDH enzymes. Here, we build significantly on this initial work and propose a detailed reaction mechanism for ALDHC based on comprehensive structural and functional investigations of active site residues. Kinetic analyses reveal essential roles for C296 as the nucleophile and E257 as the associated general base. Structural analyses of E257Q and C296A variants suggest a dynamic charge repulsion relationship between E257 and C296 that contributes to the inherent flexibility of E257 in the native enzyme, which is further regulated by E496 and E167. A proton relay network anchored by E496 and supported by E167 and K168 serves to reset E257 for the second catalytic step. We also propose that E167, which is unique to ALDHC and its homologs, serves a critical role in presenting the catalytic water to the newly reset E257 such that the enzyme can proceed with deacylation and product release. Collectively, the reaction mechanism proposed for ALDHC promotes a greater understanding of these novel ALDH enzymes, the ALDH super-family in general, and benzoate degradation in B. xenovorans LB400. PMID:21495107

  8. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase mediates vasodilator responses of glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitrite in the pulmonary vascular bed of the rat.

    PubMed

    Badejo, Adeleke M; Hodnette, Chris; Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S; Casey, David B; Pankey, Edward; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Nossaman, Bobby D; Hyman, Albert L; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2010-09-01

    It has been reported that mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) catalyzes the formation of glyceryl dinitrate and inorganic nitrite from glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), leading to an increase in cGMP and vasodilation in the coronary and systemic vascular beds. However, the role of nitric oxide (NO) formed from nitrite in mediating the response to GTN in the pulmonary vascular bed is uncertain. The purpose of the present study was to determine if nitrite plays a role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN. In this study, intravenous injections of GTN and sodium nitrite decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and increased cardiac output. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure under baseline and elevated tone conditions and decreases in systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and sodium nitrite were attenuated by cyanamide, an ALDH2 inhibitor, whereas responses to the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), were not altered. The decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and SNP were not altered by allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase, whereas responses to sodium nitrite were attenuated. GTN was approximately 1,000-fold more potent than sodium nitrite in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. These results suggest that ALDH2 plays an important role in the bioactivation of GTN and nitrite in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds and that the reduction of nitrite to vasoactive NO does not play an important role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN in the intact chest rat.

  9. Microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum via its carboxyl-terminal 35 amino acids

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Rat microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase (msALDH) has no amino-terminal signal sequence, but instead it has a characteristic hydrophobic domain at the carboxyl terminus (Miyauchi, K., R. Masaki, S. Taketani, A. Yamamoto, A. Akayama, and Y. Tashiro. 1991. J. Biol. Chem. 266:19536- 19542). This membrane-bound enzyme is a useful model protein for studying posttranslational localization to its final destination. When expressed from cDNA in COS-1 cells, wild-type msALDH is localized exclusively in the well-developed ER. The removal of the hydrophobic domain results in the cytosolic localization of truncated proteins, thus suggesting that the portion is responsible for membrane anchoring. The last 35 amino acids of msALDH, including the hydrophobic domain, are sufficient for targeting of E. coli beta-galactosidase to the ER membrane. Further studies using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase fusion proteins suggest that two hydrophilic sequences on either side of the hydrophobic domain play an important role in ER targeting. PMID:8089174

  10. Role of apoptotic hepatocytes in HCV dissemination: regulation by acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Murali; Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Zhang, Jinjin; Mott, Justin L; Poluektova, Larisa I; McVicker, Benita L; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Tuma, Dean J; Osna, Natalia A

    2016-06-01

    Alcohol consumption exacerbates hepatitis C virus (HCV) pathogenesis and promotes disease progression, although the mechanisms are not quite clear. We have previously observed that acetaldehyde (Ach) continuously produced by the acetaldehyde-generating system (AGS), temporarily enhanced HCV RNA levels, followed by a decrease to normal or lower levels, which corresponded to apoptosis induction. Here, we studied whether Ach-induced apoptosis caused depletion of HCV-infected cells and what role apoptotic bodies (AB) play in HCV-alcohol crosstalk. In liver cells exposed to AGS, we observed the induction of miR-122 and miR-34a. As miR-34a has been associated with apoptotic signaling and miR-122 with HCV replication, these findings may suggest that cells with intensive viral replication undergo apoptosis. Furthermore, when AGS-induced apoptosis was blocked by a pan-caspase inhibitor, the expression of HCV RNA was not changed. AB from HCV-infected cells contained HCV core protein and the assembled HCV particle that infect intact hepatocytes, thereby promoting the spread of infection. In addition, AB are captured by macrophages to switch their cytokine profile to the proinflammatory one. Macrophages exposed to HCV(+) AB expressed more IL-1β, IL-18, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNAs compared with those exposed to HCV(-) AB. The generation of AB from AGS-treated HCV-infected cells even enhanced the induction of aforementioned cytokines. We conclude that HCV and alcohol metabolites trigger the formation of AB containing HCV particles. The consequent spread of HCV to neighboring hepatocytes via infected AB, as well as the induction of liver inflammation by AB-mediated macrophage activation potentially exacerbate the HCV infection course by alcohol and worsen disease progression. PMID:27056722

  11. Effects and action mechanisms of Korean pear (Pyrus pyrifolia cv. Shingo) on alcohol detoxification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho-Sun; Isse, Toyoshi; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Woo, Hyun-Su; Kim, An Keun; Park, Jong Y; Yang, Mihi

    2012-11-01

    Korean pear (Pyrus pyrifolia cv. Shingo) has been used as a traditional medicine for alleviating alcohol hangover. However, scientific evidence for its effectiveness or mechanism is not clearly established. To investigate its mechanism of alcohol detoxification, both in vitro and in vivo studies were performed with an aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) alternated animal model. The pear extract (10 mL/kg bw) was administered to Aldh2 normal (C57BL/6) and deficient (Aldh2 -/-) male mice. After 30 min, ethanol (1 g or 2 g/kg bw) was administered to the mice via gavage. Levels of alcohol and acetaldehyde in blood were quantified by GC/MS. First, it was observed that the pears stimulated both alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and ALDH activities by 2∼3-  and 1.3-fold in in vitro studies, respectively. Second, mouse PK data (AUC(∞) and C(max) ) showed that the pear extract decreased the alcohol level in blood regardless of ALDH2 genotype. Third, the pear increased the acetaldehyde level in blood in Aldh2 deficient mice but not in Aldh2 normal mice. Therefore, the consistent in vitro and in vivo data suggest that Korean pears stimulate the two key alcohol-metabolizing enzymes. These stimulations could be the main mechanism of the Korean pear for alcohol detoxification. Finally, the results suggest that polymorphisms of human ALDH2 could bring out individual variations in the effects of Korean pear on alcohol detoxification.

  12. The effects of acetaldehyde and acrolein on muscle catabolism in C2 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Rom, Oren; Kaisari, Sharon; Aizenbud, Dror; Reznick, Abraham Z

    2013-12-01

    The toxic aldehydes acetaldehyde and acrolein were previously suggested to damage skeletal muscle. Several conditions in which exposure to acetaldehyde and acrolein is increased were associated with muscle wasting and dysfunction. These include alcoholic myopathy, renal failure, oxidative stress, and inflammation. A main exogenous source of both acetaldehyde and acrolein is cigarette smoking, which was previously associated with increased muscle catabolism. Recently, we have shown that exposure of skeletal myotubes to cigarette smoke stimulated muscle catabolism via increased oxidative stress, activation of p38 MAPK, and upregulation of muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of acetaldehyde and acrolein on catabolism of skeletal muscle. Skeletal myotubes differentiated from the C2 myoblast cell line were exposed to acetaldehyde or acrolein and their effects on signaling pathways related to muscle catabolism were studied. Exposure of myotubes to acetaldehyde did not promote muscle catabolism. However, exposure to acrolein caused increased generation of free radicals, activation of p38 MAPK, upregulation of the muscle-specific E3 ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF1, degradation of myosin heavy chain, and atrophy of myotubes. Inhibition of p38 MAPK by SB203580 abolished acrolein-induced muscle catabolism. Our findings demonstrate that acrolein but not acetaldehyde activates a signaling cascade resulting in muscle catabolism in skeletal myotubes. Although within the limitations of an in vitro study, these findings indicate that acrolein may promote muscle wasting in conditions of increased exposure to this aldehyde.

  13. Isolation of an Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Involved in the Oxidation of Fluoroacetaldehyde to Fluoroacetate in Streptomyces cattleya

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Cormac D.; Moss, Steven J.; O'Hagan, David

    2001-01-01

    Streptomyces cattleya is unusual in that it produces fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine as secondary metabolites. We now report the isolation of an NAD+-dependent fluoroacetaldehyde dehydrogenase from S. cattleya that mediates the oxidation of fluoroacetaldehyde to fluoroacetate. This is the first enzyme to be identified that is directly involved in fluorometabolite biosynthesis. Production of the enzyme begins in late exponential growth and continues into the stationary phase. Measurement of kinetic parameters shows that the enzyme has a high affinity for fluoroacetaldehyde and glycoaldehyde, but not acetaldehyde. PMID:11571203

  14. Inhibition of acetaminophen activation by ethanol and acetaldehyde in liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Chifumi Sato; Jian Liu; Happei Miyakawa; Toshihiko Nouchi; Yujiro Tanaka; Masakatsu Uchihara; Fumiaki Marumo Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. )

    1991-01-01

    Mechanisms of the inhibitory effect of ethanol on acetaminophen hepatotoxicity are controversial. The authors studied the effects of ethanol and acetaldehyde, and oxidative metabolite of ethanol, on NADHP-dependent acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate production in liver microsomes. Ethanol at concentrations as low as 2mM prevented the conjugate production noncompetitively. Acetaldehyde also inhibited acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate production at concentrations as low as 0.1 mM that is comparable with those observed in vivo after social drinking. Acetaldehyde may be involved in ethanol-induced inhibition of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

  15. Acetaldehyde stimulation of net gluconeogenic carbon movement from applied malic acid in tomato fruit pericarp tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Halinska, A.; Frenkel, C. )

    1991-03-01

    Applied acetaldehyde is known to lead to sugar accumulation in fruit including tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) presumably due to stimulation of gluconeogenesis. This conjecture was examined using tomato fruit pericarp discs as a test system and applied l-(U-{sup 14}C)malic acid as the source for gluconeogenic carbon mobilization. Results indicate that malic and perhaps other organic acids are carbon sources for gluconeogenesis occurring normally in ripening tomatoes. The process is stimulated by acetaldehyde apparently by attenuating the fructose-2,6-biphosphate levels. The mode of the acetaldehyde regulation of fructose-2,6-biphosphate metabolism awaits clarification.

  16. ALDH1A1 mRNA expression in association with prognosis of triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Baglia, Michelle; Zheng, Ying; Blot, William; Bao, Ping-Ping; Cai, Hui; Nechuta, Sarah; Zheng, Wei; Cai, Qiuyin; Shu, Xiao Ou

    2015-01-01

    ALDH1 is a crucial element in the retinoic acid signaling pathway regulating the self-renewal and differentiation of normal stem cells, and may play an important role in cancer progression. However, research on ALDH1 gene expressionand breast cancer prognosis has yielded conflicting results. We evaluated the association between tumor tissue ALDH1A1/ALDH1A3 mRNA expression and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) prognosis in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study (SBCSS, N=463), Nashville Breast Health Study (NBHS, N=86), and Southern Community Cohort Study (SCCS, N=47). Gene expression was measured in RNA isolated from breast cancer tissues. In the SBCSS, higher ALDH1A1 mRNA level was associated with improved disease-free (HR=0.87, 95% CI: 0.80-0.95, per log unit change) and overall survival (HR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.78-0.93 per log unit change) independent of age at diagnosis, TNM stage and treatment. We replicated the findings for overall survival in the NBHS and SCCS (HR = 0.27, 95% CI: 0.10-0.73) and for disease-free survival by a meta-analysis of four publicly-available gene expression datasets (HR = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.76-0.97). No significant association was found for ALDH1A3. Our study suggests high expression of ALDH1A1 mRNA in tumor tissues may be an independent predictor of a favorable TNBC outcome. PMID:26462023

  17. Acetaldehyde Adsorption and Reaction onCeO2(100) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R; Albrecht, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    This study reports and compares the adsorption and dissociation of acetaldehyde on oxidized and reduced CeOX(100) thin films. Acetaldehyde reacts and decomposes on fully oxidized CeO2(100) whereas it desorbs molecularly at low temperature on CeO2(111). The primary products are CO, CO2 and water along with trace amounts of crotonaldehyde and acetylene. The acetaldehyde adsorbs as the 2-acetaldehyde species, dioxyethylene. Decomposition proceeds by dehydrogenation through acetate and enolate intermediates. The reaction pathway is similar on the reduced CeO2-X(100) surface however the inability to react with surface O on the reduced surface results in H2 rather than H2O desorption and C is left on the surface rather than producing CO and CO2. C-O bond cleavage in the enolate intermediate followed by reaction with surface H results in ethylene desorption.

  18. Rosiglitazone protects human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells against acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Tae Woo; Lee, Ji Young; Shim, Wan Sub; Kang, Eun Seok; Kim, Soo Kyung; Ahn, Chul Woo; Lee, Hyun Chul; Cha, Bong Soo . E-mail: bscha@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr

    2006-02-03

    Acetaldehyde, an inhibitor of mitochondrial function, has been widely used as a neurotoxin because it elicits a severe Parkinson's disease-like syndrome with elevation of the intracellular reactive oxygen species level and apoptosis. Rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} agonist, has been known to show various non-hypoglycemic effects, including anti-inflammatory, anti-atherogenic, and anti-apoptotic. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of rosiglitazone on acetaldehyde-induced apoptosis in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and attempted to examine its mechanism. Acetaldehyde-induced apoptosis was moderately reversed by rosiglitazone treatment. Our results suggest that the protective effects of rosiglitazone on acetaldehyde-induced apoptosis may be ascribed to ability to induce the expression of anti-oxidant enzymes and to regulate Bcl-2 and Bax expression. These data indicate that rosiglitazone may provide a useful therapeutic strategy for the prevention of progressive neurodegenerative disease such as Parkinson's disease.

  19. Acetaldehyde: A Small Organic Molecule with Big Impact on Organocatalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Min; Kim, Young Sug; Kim, Dong Wan; Rios, Ramon; Yang, Jung Woon

    2016-02-12

    Stereocontrolled formation of carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds through asymmetric organocatalysis is a formidable challenge for modern synthetic chemistry. Among the most significant contributions to this field are the transformations involving the use of acetaldehyde or α-heteroatom-substituted acetaldehydes for constructing valuable synthons (e.g., amino acid derivatives and hydroxycarbonyl). In this Minireview, versatile (enantioselective) organocatalytic transformations are discussed.

  20. Effects of acetaldehyde on hepatocyte glycerol uptake and cell size: implication of Aquaporin 9

    PubMed Central

    Potter, James J.; Koteish, Ayman; Hamilton, James; Liu, Xiaopu; Liu, Kun; Agre, Peter; Mezey, Esteban

    2010-01-01

    Background The effects of ethanol and acetaldehyde on uptake of glycerol and on cell size of hepatocytes and a role Aquaporin 9 (AQP9), a glycerol transport channel, were evaluated. Methods The studies were done in primary rat and mouse hepatocytes. The uptake of [14C] glycerol was determined with hepatocytes in suspension. For determination of cell size, rat hepatocytes on coated dishes were incubated with a lipophilic fluorochrome that is incorporated into the cell membrane and examined by confocal microscopy. A three dimensional z scan of the cell was performed, and the middle slice of the z scan was used for area measurements. Results Acute exposure to acetaldehyde, but not to ethanol, causes a rapid increase in the uptake of glycerol and an increase in hepatocyte size, which was inhibited by HgCl2, an inhibitor of aquaporins. This was not observed in hepatocytes from AQP9 knockout mice, nor observed by direct application of acetaldehyde to AQP9 expressed in Xenopus Laevis oocytes. Prolonged 24 hours exposure to either acetaldehyde or ethanol did not result in an increase in glycerol uptake by rat hepatocytes. Acetaldehyde decreased AQP9 mRNA and AQP9 protein, while ethanol decreased AQP9 mRNA but not AQP9 protein. Ethanol, but not acetaldehyde, increased the activities of glycerol kinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Conclusions The acute effects of acetaldehyde, while mediated by AQP9, are probably influenced by binding of acetaldehyde to hepatocyte membranes and changes in cell permeability. The effects of ethanol in enhancing glucose kinase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase leading to increased formation of glycerol-3-phosphate most likely contribute to alcoholic fatty liver. PMID:21294757

  1. Biological production of acetaldehyde from ethanol using non-growing Pichia pastoris whole cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Heien-Kun; Foutch, G.L.; Fish, W.W.

    1991-12-31

    Acetaldehyde has been produced biologically using whole-cell Pichia Pass in a semibatch fermentor. Ethanol and air were fed continuously, and the product, acetaldehyde, was removed by the air stream. Operation of the reactor exceeded 100 h, maintaining high alcohol oxidase activity. Low cell-mass concentration (9.9 g/L) minimized product inhibition. Ethanol concentration in the broth, oxygen concentration in the air, and pH were evaluated for their effects on the fermentation process.

  2. Parallel Functional Changes in Independent Testis-Specific Duplicates of Aldehyde dehydrogenase in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mahul; Fry, James D.

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of duplicates, originating from ubiquitously expressed genes, acquire testis-biased expression. Identifying the underlying cause of this observation requires determining whether the duplicates have altered functions relative to the parental genes. Typically, statistical methods are used to test for positive selection, signature of which in protein sequence of duplicates implies functional divergence. When assumptions are violated, however, such tests can lead to false inference of positive selection. More convincing evidence for naturally selected functional changes would be the occurrence of structural changes with similar functional consequences in independent duplicates of the same gene. We investigated two testis-specific duplicates of the broadly expressed enzyme gene Aldehyde dehydrogenase (Aldh) that arose in different Drosophila lineages. The duplicates show a typical pattern of accelerated amino acid substitutions relative to their broadly expressed paralogs, with statistical evidence for positive selection in both cases. Importantly, in both duplicates, width of the entrance to the substrate binding site, known a priori to influence substrate specificity, and otherwise conserved throughout the genus Drosophila, has been reduced, resulting in narrowing of the entrance. Protein structure modeling suggests that the reduction of the size of the enzyme’s substrate entry channel, which is likely to shift substrate specificity toward smaller aldehydes, is accounted for by the positively selected parallel substitutions in one duplicate but not the other. Evolution of the testis-specific duplicates was accompanied by reduction in expression of the ancestral Aldh in males, supporting the hypothesis that the duplicates may have helped resolve intralocus sexual conflict over Aldh function. PMID:25564519

  3. Parallel functional changes in independent testis-specific duplicates of Aldehyde dehydrogenase in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Mahul; Fry, James D

    2015-04-01

    A large proportion of duplicates, originating from ubiquitously expressed genes, acquire testis-biased expression. Identifying the underlying cause of this observation requires determining whether the duplicates have altered functions relative to the parental genes. Typically, statistical methods are used to test for positive selection, signature of which in protein sequence of duplicates implies functional divergence. When assumptions are violated, however, such tests can lead to false inference of positive selection. More convincing evidence for naturally selected functional changes would be the occurrence of structural changes with similar functional consequences in independent duplicates of the same gene. We investigated two testis-specific duplicates of the broadly expressed enzyme gene Aldehyde dehydrogenase (Aldh) that arose in different Drosophila lineages. The duplicates show a typical pattern of accelerated amino acid substitutions relative to their broadly expressed paralogs, with statistical evidence for positive selection in both cases. Importantly, in both duplicates, width of the entrance to the substrate binding site, known a priori to influence substrate specificity, and otherwise conserved throughout the genus Drosophila, has been reduced, resulting in narrowing of the entrance. Protein structure modeling suggests that the reduction of the size of the enzyme's substrate entry channel, which is likely to shift substrate specificity toward smaller aldehydes, is accounted for by the positively selected parallel substitutions in one duplicate but not the other. Evolution of the testis-specific duplicates was accompanied by reduction in expression of the ancestral Aldh in males, supporting the hypothesis that the duplicates may have helped resolve intralocus sexual conflict over Aldh function.

  4. Expression, Purification, Crystallization And Preliminary X-Ray Studies of Histamine Dehydrogenase From Nocardioides Simplex

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, T.M.; Hirakawa, H.; Mure, M.; Scott, E.E.; Limburg, J.

    2009-05-21

    Histamine dehydrogenase (HADH) from Nocardioides simplex catalyzes the oxidative deamination of histamine to produce imidazole acetaldehyde and an ammonium ion. HADH is functionally related to trimethylamine dehydrogenase (TMADH), but HADH has strict substrate specificity towards histamine. HADH is a homodimer, with each 76 kDa subunit containing two redox cofactors: a [4Fe-4S] cluster and an unusual covalently bound flavin mononucleotide, 6-S-cysteinyl-FMN. In order to understand the substrate specificity of HADH, it was sought to determine its structure by X-ray crystallography. This enzyme has been expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and successfully crystallized in two forms. Diffraction data were collected to 2.7 {angstrom} resolution at the SSRL synchrotron with 99.7% completeness. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 101.14, b = 107.03, c = 153.35 {angstrom}.

  5. Atmospheric chemistry of toxic contaminants 2. Saturated aliphatics: Acetaldehyde, dioxane, ethylene glycol ethers, propylene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D. )

    1990-11-01

    Detailed mechanisms are outlined for the chemical reactions that contribute to in-situ formation and atmospheric removal of the saturated aliphatic contaminants acetaldehyde, dioxane, ethylene glycol ethers (methyl, ethyl, n-butyl) and propylene oxide. In-situ formation is of major importance for acetaldehyde. In-situ removal involves reaction with OH (all compounds) and, for acetaldehyde, photolysis and reaction with NO{sub 3}. Acetaldehyde, dioxane, and the ethers are rapidly removed (half-lives of less than one day), leading to PAN (acetaldehyde) and to 2-oxodioxane and formaldehyde (dioxane). Reaction products of the glycol ethers include a large number of hydroxyesters, hydroxyacids, and hydroxycarbonyls. Propylene oxide reacts only slowly with OH, with an atmospheric half-life of 3 - 10 days, to yeild formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and PAN. Uncertainties in the reaction mechanisms for dioxane, the glycol ethers, and propylene oxide are discussed and include C-C vs C-O bond scission in alkoxy radicals as well as alkoxy radical unimolecular decomposition vs reaction with oxygen.

  6. Protective Effect of Sodium Ferulate on Acetaldehyde-Treated Precision-Cut Rat Liver Slices

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Wu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Chun; Liao, Zhang-Xiu; Wu, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in hepatic fibrogenesis, and inhibition of HSC activation may prevent liver fibrosis. Acetaldehyde, the most deleterious metabolite of alcohol, triggers HSC activation in alcoholic liver injury. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of sodium ferulate (SF), a sodium salt of ferulic acid that is rich in fruits and vegetables, on acetaldehyde-stimulated HSC activation using precision-cut liver slices (PCLSs). Rat PCLSs were co-incubated with 350 μM acetaldehyde and different concentrations of SF. Hepatotoxicity was assessed by measuring enzyme leakage and malondialdehyde content in tissue. α-Smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor-β1, and hydroxyproline were determined to assess the activation of HSCs. In addition, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) were determined to evaluate collagen degradation. SF prominently prevented the enzyme leakage in acetaldehyde-treated slices and also inhibited HSC activation and collagen production stimulated by acetaldehyde. In addition, SF increased MMP-1 expression and decreased TIMP-1 expression. These results showed that SF protected PCLSs from acetaldehyde-stimulated HSC activation and liver injury, which may be associated with the attenuation of oxidative injury and acceleration of collagen degradation. PMID:22404575

  7. The total margin of exposure of ethanol and acetaldehyde for heavy drinkers consuming cider or vodka.

    PubMed

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Gill, Jan S; Chick, Jonathan; Rehm, Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    Heavy drinkers in Scotland may consume 1600 g ethanol per week. Due to its low price, cider may be preferred over other beverages. Anecdotal evidence has linked cider to specific health hazards beyond other alcoholic beverages. To examine this hypothesis, nine apple and pear cider samples were chemically analysed for constituents and contaminants. None of the products exceeded regulatory or toxicological thresholds, but the regular occurrence of acetaldehyde in cider was detected. To provide a quantitative risk assessment, two collectives of exclusive drinkers of cider and vodka were compared and the intake of acetaldehyde was estimated using probabilistic Monte-Carlo type analysis. The cider consumers were found to ingest more than 200-times the amount of acetaldehyde consumed by vodka consumers. The margins of exposure (MOE) of acetaldehyde were 224 for the cider and over 220,000 for vodka consumers. However, if the effects of ethanol were considered in a cumulative assessment of the combined MOE, the effect of acetaldehyde was minor and the combined MOE for both groups was 0.3. We suggest that alcohol policy priority should be given on reducing ethanol intake by measures such as minimum pricing, rather than to focus on acetaldehyde.

  8. Implications of acetaldehyde-derived DNA adducts for understanding alcohol-related carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Balbo, Silvia; Brooks, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Among various potential mechanisms that could explain alcohol carcinogenicity, the metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde represents an obvious possible mechanism, at least in some tissues. The fundamental principle of genotoxic carcinogenesis is the formation of mutagenic DNA adducts in proliferating cells. If not repaired, these adducts can result in mutations during DNA replication, which are passed on to cells during mitosis. Consistent with a genotoxic mechanism, acetaldehyde does react with DNA to form a variety of different types of DNA adducts. In this chapter we will focus more specifically on N2-ethylidene-deoxyguanosine (N2-ethylidene-dG), the major DNA adduct formed from the reaction of acetaldehyde with DNA and specifically highlight recent data on the measurement of this DNA adduct in the human body after alcohol exposure. Because results are of particular biological relevance for alcohol-related cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT), we will also discuss the histology and cytology of the UADT, with the goal of placing the adduct data in the relevant cellular context for mechanistic interpretation. Furthermore, we will discuss the sources and concentrations of acetaldehyde and ethanol in different cell types during alcohol consumption in humans. Finally, in the last part of the chapter, we will critically evaluate the concept of carcinogenic levels of acetaldehyde, which has been raised in the literature, and discuss how data from acetaldehyde genotoxicity are and can be utilized in physiologically based models to evaluate exposure risk. PMID:25427902

  9. Implications of acetaldehyde-derived DNA adducts for understanding alcohol-related carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Balbo, Silvia; Brooks, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Among various potential mechanisms that could explain alcohol carcinogenicity, the metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde represents an obvious possible mechanism, at least in some tissues. The fundamental principle of genotoxic carcinogenesis is the formation of mutagenic DNA adducts in proliferating cells. If not repaired, these adducts can result in mutations during DNA replication, which are passed on to cells during mitosis. Consistent with a genotoxic mechanism, acetaldehyde does react with DNA to form a variety of different types of DNA adducts. In this chapter we will focus more specifically on N2-ethylidene-deoxyguanosine (N2-ethylidene-dG), the major DNA adduct formed from the reaction of acetaldehyde with DNA and specifically highlight recent data on the measurement of this DNA adduct in the human body after alcohol exposure. Because results are of particular biological relevance for alcohol-related cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT), we will also discuss the histology and cytology of the UADT, with the goal of placing the adduct data in the relevant cellular context for mechanistic interpretation. Furthermore, we will discuss the sources and concentrations of acetaldehyde and ethanol in different cell types during alcohol consumption in humans. Finally, in the last part of the chapter, we will critically evaluate the concept of carcinogenic levels of acetaldehyde, which has been raised in the literature, and discuss how data from acetaldehyde genotoxicity are and can be utilized in physiologically based models to evaluate exposure risk.

  10. STAT3 signaling pathway is necessary for cell survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +} stem cell-like human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Li; Fuchs, James; Li, Chenglong; Olson, Veronica; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Lin, Jiayuh

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 inhibitor, FLLL32 inhibits P-STAT3 and STAT3 target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of STAT3 resulted in decreased cell viability and reduced numbers of tumorspheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 is required for survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting STAT3 in cancer stem-like cells may offer a novel treatment approach for colon cancer. -- Abstract: Persistent activation of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in colon cancer. Increasing evidence suggests the existence of a small population of colon cancer stem or cancer-initiating cells may be responsible for tumor initiation, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Whether STAT3 plays a role in colon cancer-initiating cells and the effect of STAT3 inhibition is still unknown. Flow cytometry was used to isolate colon cancer stem-like cells from three independent human colon cancer cell lines characterized by both aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-positive and CD133-positive subpopulation (ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +}). The effects of STAT3 inhibition in colon cancer stem-like cells were examined. The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells and was reduced by a STAT3-selective small molecular inhibitor, FLLL32. FLLL32 also inhibited the expression of potential STAT3 downstream target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells including survivin, Bcl-XL, as well as Notch-1, -3, and -4, which may be involved in stem cell function. Furthermore, FLLL32 inhibited cell viability and tumorsphere formation as well as induced cleaved caspase-3 in colon cancer stem-like cells. FLLL32 is more potent than curcumin as evidenced with lower

  11. Hairpin Ribozyme Genes Curtail Alcohol Drinking: from Rational Design to in vivo Effects in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Sapag, Amalia; Irrazábal, Thergiory; Lobos-González, Lorena; Muñoz-Brauning, Carlos R; Quintanilla, María Elena; Tampier, Lutske

    2016-01-01

    Ribozyme genes were designed to reduce voluntary alcohol drinking in a rat model of alcohol dependence. Acetaldehyde generated from alcohol in the liver is metabolized by the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) such that diminishing ALDH2 activity leads to the aversive effects of blood acetaldehyde upon alcohol intake. A stepwise approach was followed to design genes encoding ribozymes targeted to the rat ALDH2 mRNA. In vitro studies of accessibility to oligonucleotides identified suitable target sites in the mRNA, one of which fulfilled hammerhead and hairpin ribozyme requirements (CGGUC). Ribozyme genes delivered in plasmid constructs were tested in rat cells in culture. While the hairpin ribozyme reduced ALDH2 activity 56% by cleavage and blockade (P < 0.0001), the hammerhead ribozyme elicited minor effects by blockade. The hairpin ribozyme was tested in vivo by adenoviral gene delivery to UChB alcohol drinker rats. Ethanol intake was curtailed 47% for 34 days (P < 0.0001), while blood acetaldehyde more than doubled upon ethanol administration and ALDH2 activity dropped 25% in liver homogenates, not affecting other ALDH isoforms. Thus, hairpin ribozymes targeted to 16 nt in the ALDH2 mRNA provide durable and specific effects in vivo, representing an improvement on previous work and encouraging development of gene therapy for alcoholism. PMID:27404720

  12. Hairpin Ribozyme Genes Curtail Alcohol Drinking: from Rational Design to in vivo Effects in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Sapag, Amalia; Irrazábal, Thergiory; Lobos-González, Lorena; Muñoz-Brauning, Carlos R; Quintanilla, María Elena; Tampier, Lutske

    2016-07-12

    Ribozyme genes were designed to reduce voluntary alcohol drinking in a rat model of alcohol dependence. Acetaldehyde generated from alcohol in the liver is metabolized by the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) such that diminishing ALDH2 activity leads to the aversive effects of blood acetaldehyde upon alcohol intake. A stepwise approach was followed to design genes encoding ribozymes targeted to the rat ALDH2 mRNA. In vitro studies of accessibility to oligonucleotides identified suitable target sites in the mRNA, one of which fulfilled hammerhead and hairpin ribozyme requirements (CGGUC). Ribozyme genes delivered in plasmid constructs were tested in rat cells in culture. While the hairpin ribozyme reduced ALDH2 activity 56% by cleavage and blockade (P < 0.0001), the hammerhead ribozyme elicited minor effects by blockade. The hairpin ribozyme was tested in vivo by adenoviral gene delivery to UChB alcohol drinker rats. Ethanol intake was curtailed 47% for 34 days (P < 0.0001), while blood acetaldehyde more than doubled upon ethanol administration and ALDH2 activity dropped 25% in liver homogenates, not affecting other ALDH isoforms. Thus, hairpin ribozymes targeted to 16 nt in the ALDH2 mRNA provide durable and specific effects in vivo, representing an improvement on previous work and encouraging development of gene therapy for alcoholism.

  13. Alcohol alters skeletal muscle heat shock protein gene expression in rats: these effects are moderated by sex, raised endogenous acetaldehyde, and starvation.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Tatsuo; Hunter, Ross; Hirano, Makoto; Uchimura, Hideyuki; McArdle, Ann; Broome, Caroline S; Koll, Michael; Martin, Colin R; Preedy, Victor R

    2006-07-01

    Alcoholic myopathy is a common pathology characterized by wasting due to reduced protein synthesis, although the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Women are particularly sensitive and malnutrition exacerbates the myopathy. This study aimed to address (i) whether long-term alcohol feeding alters expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in male and female rats; (ii) the effect of immediate alcohol dosing with or without raised levels of endogenous acetaldehyde; and (iii) the effect of starvation. To address this, (i) male and female rats were fed alcohol in the long-term (6-7 weeks as 35% of energy in a liquid diet) and compared to controls fed the same diet with isoenergetic glucose; (ii) male rats given an immediate bolus (75 mmol ethanol per kilogram body weight intraperitoneally) 2.5 hours before sacrifice and compared to controls given a dose of saline (with or without pretreatment with cyanamide-an acetaldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor which raises endogenous acetaldehyde); (iii) male rats starved for 1 or 2 days then immediately dosed with alcohol. Protein levels of HSP 27, HSP 60, and HSP 70 were measured in muscles of male rats fed alcohol and pair-fed control rats by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting in study I. Levels of HSP 27, HSP 60, HSP 70, and HSP 90 mRNA were analyzed in hind limb skeletal muscle by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with an endogenous internal standard, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase. (i) Long-term alcohol dosage reduced HSP 27 in male rats but not in females, whereas HSP 90 mRNA increased in long-term alcohol-fed female rats but not in male rats. These changes were reflected by a similar trend in HSP protein content, although statistical significance was not achieved. (ii) There was no effect on any of the HSP mRNAs in rats dosed immediately with alcohol or in combination with cyanamide. (iii) Starvation per se for 2 days was associated with an increase in HSP 27 mRNA. Alcohol administration after 2 days

  14. Theoretical survey of the reaction between osmium and acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Guo-Liang; Wang, Chuan-Feng

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism of the reaction of osmium atom with acetaldehyde has been investigated with a DFT approach. All the stationary points are determined at the UB3LYP/ sdd/6-311++G** level of the theory. Both ground and excited state potential energy surfaces are investigated in detail. The present results show that the title reaction start with the formation of a CH3CHO-metal complex followed by C-C, aldehyde C-H, C-O, and methyl C-H activation. These reactions can lead to four different products (HOsCH3 + CO, OsCO + CH4, OsCOCH3 + H, and OsO + C2H4). The minimum energy reaction path is found to involve the spin inversion in the initial reaction step. This potential energy curve-crossing dramatically affects reaction exothermic. The present results may be helpful in understanding the mechanism of the title reaction and further experimental investigation of the reaction.

  15. Acetaldehyde involvement in ethanol's postabsortive effects during early ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    March, Samanta M.; Abate, P.; Molina, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and biomedical studies sustains the notion that early ontogeny is a vulnerable window to the impact of alcohol. Experiences with the drug during these stages increase latter disposition to prefer, use or abuse ethanol. This period of enhanced sensitivity to ethanol is accompanied by a high rate of activity in the central catalase system, which metabolizes ethanol in the brain. Acetaldehyde (ACD), the first oxidation product of ethanol, has been found to share many neurobehavioral effects with the drug. Cumulative evidence supports this notion in models employing adults. Nevertheless very few studies have been conducted to analyze the role of ACD in ethanol postabsorptive effects, in newborns or infant rats. In this work we review recent experimental literature that syndicates ACD as a mediator agent of reinforcing aspects of ethanol, during early ontogenetic stages. We also show a meta-analytical correlational approach that proposes how differences in the activity of brain catalase across ontogeny, could be modulating patterns of ethanol consumption. PMID:23801947

  16. Kinetic properties of aldehyde dehydrogenase from sheep liver mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, G J; Dickinson, F M

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics of the NAD+-dependent oxidation of aldehydes, catalysed by aldehyde dehydrogenase purified from sheep liver mitochondria, were studied in detail. Lag phases were observed in the assays, the length of which were dependent on the enzyme concentration. The measured rates after the lag phase was over were directly proportional to the enzyme concentration. If enzyme was preincubated with NAD+, the lag phase was eliminated. Double-reciprocal plots with aldehyde as the variable substrate were non-linear, showing marked substrate activation. With NAD+ as the variable substrate, double-reciprocal plots were linear, and apparently parallel. Double-reciprocal plots with enzyme modified with disulfiram (tetraethylthiuram disulphide) or iodoacetamide, such that at pH 8.0 the activity was decreased to 50% of the control value, showed no substrate activation, and the plots were linear. At pH 7.0, the kinetic parameters Vmax. and Km NAD+- for the oxidation of acetaldehyde and butyraldehyde by the native enzyme are almost identical. Formaldehyde and propionaldehyde show the same apparent maximum rate. Aldehyde dehydrogenase is able to catalyse the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl esters. This esterase activity was stimulated by both NAD+ and NADH, the maximum rate for the NAD+ stimulated esterase reaction being roughly equal to the maximum rate for the oxidation of aldehydes. The mechanistic implications of the above behaviour are discussed. PMID:217355

  17. ALDH/CD44 identifies uniquely tumorigenic cancer stem cells in salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Adams, April; Warner, Kristy; Pearson, Alexander T; Zhang, Zhaocheng; Kim, Hong Sun; Mochizuki, Daiki; Basura, Gregory; Helman, Joseph; Mantesso, Andrea; Castilho, Rogério M; Wicha, Max S; Nör, Jacques E

    2015-09-29

    A small sub-population of cells characterized by increased tumorigenic potential, ability to self-renew and to differentiate into cells that make up the tumor bulk, has been characterized in some (but not all) tumor types. These unique cells, namedcancer stem cells, are considered drivers of tumor progression in these tumors. The purpose of this work is to understand if cancer stem cells play a functional role in the tumorigenesis of salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas. Here, we investigated the expression of putative cancer stem cell markers (ALDH, CD10, CD24, CD44) in primary human mucoepidermoid carcinomas by immunofluorescence, in vitro salisphere assays, and in vivo tumorigenicity assays in immunodeficient mice. Human mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells (UM-HMC-1, UM-HMC-3A, UM-HMC-3B) sorted for high levels of ALDH activity and CD44 expression (ALDHhighCD44high) consistently formed primary and secondary salispheres in vitro, and showed enhanced tumorigenic potential in vivo (defined as time to tumor palpability, tumor growth after palpability), when compared to ALDHlowCD44low cells. Cells sorted for CD10/CD24, and CD10/CD44 showed varying trends of salisphere formation, but consistently low in vivo tumorigenic potential. And finally, cells sorted for CD44/CD24 showed inconsistent results in salisphere formation and tumorigenic potential assays when different cell lines were evaluated. Collectively, these data demonstrate that salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas contain a small population of cancer stem cells with enhanced tumorigenic potential and that are characterized by high ALDH activity and CD44 expression. These results suggest that patients with mucoepidermoid carcinoma might benefit from therapies that ablate these highly tumorigenic cells.

  18. ALDH/CD44 identifies uniquely tumorigenic cancer stem cells in salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Adams, April; Warner, Kristy; Pearson, Alexander T.; Zhang, Zhaocheng; Kim, Hong Sun; Mochizuki, Daiki; Basura, Gregory; Helman, Joseph; Mantesso, Andrea; Castilho, Rogério M.; Wicha, Max S.; Nör, Jacques E.

    2015-01-01

    A small sub-population of cells characterized by increased tumorigenic potential, ability to self-renew and to differentiate into cells that make up the tumor bulk, has been characterized in some (but not all) tumor types. These unique cells, namedcancer stem cells, are considered drivers of tumor progression in these tumors. The purpose of this work is to understand if cancer stem cells play a functional role in the tumorigenesis of salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas. Here, we investigated the expression of putative cancer stem cell markers (ALDH, CD10, CD24, CD44) in primary human mucoepidermoid carcinomas by immunofluorescence, in vitro salisphere assays, and in vivo tumorigenicity assays in immunodeficient mice. Human mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells (UM-HMC-1, UM-HMC-3A, UM-HMC-3B) sorted for high levels of ALDH activity and CD44 expression (ALDHhighCD44high) consistently formed primary and secondary salispheres in vitro, and showed enhanced tumorigenic potential in vivo (defined as time to tumor palpability, tumor growth after palpability), when compared to ALDHlowCD44low cells. Cells sorted for CD10/CD24, and CD10/CD44 showed varying trends of salisphere formation, but consistently low in vivo tumorigenic potential. And finally, cells sorted for CD44/CD24 showed inconsistent results in salisphere formation and tumorigenic potential assays when different cell lines were evaluated. Collectively, these data demonstrate that salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas contain a small population of cancer stem cells with enhanced tumorigenic potential and that are characterized by high ALDH activity and CD44 expression. These results suggest that patients with mucoepidermoid carcinoma might benefit from therapies that ablate these highly tumorigenic cells. PMID:26449187

  19. Genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (ALDH7A1 deficiency)

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Philippa B.; Footitt, Emma J.; Mills, Kevin A.; Tuschl, Karin; Aylett, Sarah; Varadkar, Sophia; Hemingway, Cheryl; Marlow, Neil; Rennie, Janet; Baxter, Peter; Dulac, Olivier; Nabbout, Rima; Craigen, William J.; Schmitt, Bernhard; Feillet, François; Christensen, Ernst; De Lonlay, Pascale; Pike, Mike G.; Hughes, M. Imelda; Struys, Eduard A.; Jakobs, Cornelis; Zuberi, Sameer M.

    2010-01-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy was recently shown to be due to mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene, which encodes antiquitin, an enzyme that catalyses the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent dehydrogenation of l-α-aminoadipic semialdehyde/l-Δ1-piperideine 6-carboxylate. However, whilst this is a highly treatable disorder, there is general uncertainty about when to consider this diagnosis and how to test for it. This study aimed to evaluate the use of measurement of urine l-α-aminoadipic semialdehyde/creatinine ratio and mutation analysis of ALDH7A1 (antiquitin) in investigation of patients with suspected or clinically proven pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy and to characterize further the phenotypic spectrum of antiquitin deficiency. Urinary l-α-aminoadipic semialdehyde concentration was determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. When this was above the normal range, DNA sequencing of the ALDH7A1 gene was performed. Clinicians were asked to complete questionnaires on clinical, biochemical, magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography features of patients. The clinical spectrum of antiquitin deficiency extended from ventriculomegaly detected on foetal ultrasound, through abnormal foetal movements and a multisystem neonatal disorder, to the onset of seizures and autistic features after the first year of life. Our relatively large series suggested that clinical diagnosis of pyridoxine dependent epilepsy can be challenging because: (i) there may be some response to antiepileptic drugs; (ii) in infants with multisystem pathology, the response to pyridoxine may not be instant and obvious; and (iii) structural brain abnormalities may co-exist and be considered sufficient cause of epilepsy, whereas the fits may be a consequence of antiquitin deficiency and are then responsive to pyridoxine. These findings support the use of biochemical and DNA tests for antiquitin deficiency and a clinical trial of pyridoxine in infants and children with

  20. Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase Structure and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) alcohol dehydrogenase I (ADH1) is the constitutive enzyme that reduces acetaldehyde to ethanol during the fermentation of glucose. ADH1 is a homotetramer of subunits with 347 amino acid residues. A structure for ADH1 was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.4 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains four different subunits, arranged as similar dimers named AB and CD. The unit cell contains two different tetramers made up of “back-to-back” dimers, AB:AB and CD:CD. The A and C subunits in each dimer are structurally similar, with a closed conformation, bound coenzyme, and the oxygen of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol ligated to the catalytic zinc in the classical tetrahedral coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, and His-66. In contrast, the B and D subunits have an open conformation with no bound coenzyme, and the catalytic zinc has an alternative, inverted coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, His-66, and the carboxylate of Glu-67. The asymmetry in the dimeric subunits of the tetramer provides two structures that appear to be relevant for the catalytic mechanism. The alternative coordination of the zinc may represent an intermediate in the mechanism of displacement of the zinc-bound water with alcohol or aldehyde substrates. Substitution of Glu-67 with Gln-67 decreases the catalytic efficiency by 100-fold. Previous studies of structural modeling, evolutionary relationships, substrate specificity, chemical modification, and site-directed mutagenesis are interpreted more fully with the three-dimensional structure. PMID:25157460

  1. Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency (SSADHD): Pathophysiological complexity and multifactorial trait associations in a rare monogenic disorder of GABA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Malaspina, P; Roullet, J-B; Pearl, P L; Ainslie, G R; Vogel, K R; Gibson, K M

    2016-10-01

    Discovered some 35 years ago, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency (SSADHD) represents a rare, autosomal recessively-inherited defect in the second step of the GABA degradative pathway. Some 200 patients have been reported, with broad phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity. SSADHD represents an unusual neurometabolic disorder in which two neuromodulatory agents, GABA (and the GABA analogue, 4-hydroxybutyrate), accumulate to supraphysiological levels. The unexpected occurrence of epilepsy in several patients is counterintuitive in view of the hyperGABAergic state, in which sedation might be expected. However, the epileptic status of some patients is most likely represented by broader imbalances of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission. Cumulative research encompassing decades of basic and clinical study of SSADHD reveal a monogenic disease with broad pathophysiological and clinical phenotypes. Numerous metabolic perturbations unmasked in SSADHD include alterations in oxidative stress parameters, dysregulation of autophagy and mitophagy, dysregulation of both inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters and gene expression, and unique subsets of SNP alterations of the SSADH gene (so-called ALDH5A1, or aldehyde dehydrogenase 5A1 gene) on the 6p22 chromosomal arm. While seemingly difficult to collate and interpret, these anomalies have continued to open novel pathways for pharmacotherapeutic considerations. Here, we present an update on selected aspects of SSADHD, the ALDH5A1 gene, and future avenues for research on this rare disorder of GABA metabolism. PMID:27311541

  2. The subcellular distribution and properties of aldehyde dehydrogenases in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Tottmar, S. O. C.; Pettersson, H.; Kiessling, K.-H.

    1973-01-01

    1. Kinetic experiments suggested the possible existence of at least two different NAD+-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenases in rat liver. Distribution studies showed that one enzyme, designated enzyme I, was exclusively localized in the mitochondria and that another enzyme, designated enzyme II, was localized in both the mitochondria and the microsomal fraction. 2. A NADP+-dependent enzyme was also found in the mitochondria and the microsomal fraction and it is suggested that this enzyme is identical with enzyme II. 3. The Km for acetaldehyde was apparently less than 10μm for enzyme I and 0.9–1.7mm for enzyme II. The Km for NAD+ was similar for both enzymes (20–30μm). The Km for NADP+ was 2–3mm and for acetaldehyde 0.5–0.7mm for the NADP+-dependent activity. 4. The NAD+-dependent enzymes show pH optima between 9 and 10. The highest activity was found in pyrophosphate buffer for both enzymes. In phosphate buffer there was a striking difference in activity between the two enzymes. Compared with the activity in pyrophosphate buffer, the activity of enzyme II was uninfluenced, whereas the activity of enzyme I was very low. 5. The results are compared with those of earlier investigations on the distribution of aldehyde dehydrogenase and with the results from purified enzymes from different sources. PMID:4149764

  3. Mechanism of protection against alcoholism by an alcohol dehydrogenase polymorphism: development of an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Meza, Mario; Quintanilla, María Elena; Tampier, Lutske; Mura, Casilda V.; Sapag, Amalia; Israel, Yedy

    2010-01-01

    Humans who carry a point mutation in the gene coding for alcohol dehydrogenase-1B (ADH1B*2; Arg47His) are markedly protected against alcoholism. Although this mutation results in a 100-fold increase in enzyme activity, it has not been reported to cause higher levels of acetaldehyde, a metabolite of ethanol known to deter alcohol intake. Hence, the mechanism by which this mutation confers protection against alcoholism is unknown. To study this protective effect, the wild-type rat cDNA encoding rADH-47Arg was mutated to encode rADH-47His, mimicking the human mutation. The mutated cDNA was incorporated into an adenoviral vector and administered to genetically selected alcohol-preferring rats. The Vmax of rADH-47His was 6-fold higher (P<0.001) than that of the wild-type rADH-47Arg. Animals transduced with rAdh-47His showed a 90% (P<0.01) increase in liver ADH activity and a 50% reduction (P<0.001) in voluntary ethanol intake. In animals transduced with rAdh-47His, administration of ethanol (1g/kg) produced a short-lived increase of arterial blood acetaldehyde concentration to levels that were 3.5- to 5-fold greater than those in animals transduced with the wild-type rAdh-47Arg vector or with a noncoding vector. This brief increase (burst) in arterial acetaldehyde concentration after ethanol ingestion may constitute the mechanism by which humans carrying the ADH1B*2 allele are protected against alcoholism.—Rivera-Meza, M., Quintanilla, M. E., Tampier, L., Mura, C. V., Sapag, A., Israel, Y. Mechanism of protection against alcoholism by an alcohol dehydrogenase polymorphism: development of an animal model. PMID:19710201

  4. Acetaldehyde self-administration by a two-bottle choice paradigm: consequences on emotional reactivity, spatial learning, and memory.

    PubMed

    Plescia, Fulvio; Brancato, Anna; Venniro, Marco; Maniaci, Giuseppe; Cannizzaro, Emanuele; Sutera, Flavia Maria; De Caro, Viviana; Giannola, Libero Italo; Cannizzaro, Carla

    2015-03-01

    Acetaldehyde, the first alcohol metabolite, is responsible for many pharmacological effects that are not clearly distinguishable from those exerted by its parent compound. It alters motor performance, induces reinforced learning and motivated behavior, and produces different reactions according to the route of administration and the relative accumulation in the brain or in the periphery. The effective activity of oral acetaldehyde represents an unresolved field of inquiry that deserves further investigation. Thus, this study explores the acquisition and maintenance of acetaldehyde drinking behavior in adult male rats, employing a two-bottle choice paradigm for water and acetaldehyde solution (from 0.9% to 3.2% v/v), over 8 weeks. The behavioral consequences exerted by chronic acetaldehyde intake are assessed by a set of different tests: trials in an open-field arena and elevated-plus maze provided information on both general motor and explorative activity, and anxiety-driven behavioral responses. The Morris water maze allowed the exploration of cognitive processes such as spatial learning and memory. Determination of acetaldehyde levels in the brain was carried out at the end of the drinking paradigm. Our results indicate that rats exposed for the first time to acetaldehyde at 0.9% displayed a regular and stable daily drinking pattern that reached higher values and a "peaks and drops" shaped-trend when acetaldehyde concentration was increased to 3.2%. Accordingly, an increase in acetaldehyde levels in the brain was determined compared to non-acetaldehyde drinking rats. Acetaldehyde intake during the free-choice paradigm exerted an anxiogenic response in the open-field arena and elevated-plus maze, which in turn correlates with an enhancement in cognitive flexibility and spatial orientation skills, when an adaptive response to a stressful environmental challenge was required. These findings further support the idea that acetaldehyde is indeed a centrally active and

  5. Cyanobacterial NADPH dehydrogenase complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Teruo; Mi, Hualing

    2007-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess functionally distinct multiple NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes that are essential to CO2 uptake, photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration. The unique nature of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes is the presence of subunits involved in CO2 uptake. Other than CO2 uptake, chloroplastic NDH-1 complex has similar role as cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes in photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration (chlororespiration). In this mini-review we focus on the structure and function of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes and their phylogeny. The function of chloroplastic NDH-1 complex and characteristics of plants defective in NDH-1 are also described forcomparison.

  6. Stability of acetaldehyde-derived DNA adduct in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hori, Kimiko; Miyamoto, Shin'ichi; Yukawa, Yoshiyuki; Muto, Manabu; Chiba, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Tomonari

    2012-07-13

    Acetaldehyde (AA) derived from alcoholic beverages is a confirmed carcinogen for esophageal and head and neck cancers. AA forms various DNA adducts and is thought to play a crucial role in carcinogenesis. Transient DNA adducts are usually repaired, but the stability of AA-derived DNA adducts has not been elucidated. We investigated the stability of N(2)-ethylidene-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-ethylidene-dG), a major AA-derived DNA adduct, in cultured cells. First, to determine the optimal concentration of AA for detecting N(2)-ethylidene-dG in cell culture, a dose-response study was performed using HL60 cells of the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line. An AA concentration ≥ 0.01% (1.8 mM) was required to detect N(2)-ethylidene-dG in vitro. We next examined the stability of N(2)-ethylidene-dG. After a 1 or 2h exposure to 0.01% of AA in a tightly sealed bottle, N(2)-ethylidene-dG content was measured by sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry immediately, 24h, and 48 h after exposure. After the 1h exposure, the mean (± SD) N(2)-ethylidene-dG contents were 12.1 ± 1.28, 8.20 ± 0.64, and 6.70 ± 0.52 adducts per 10(7) bases at each postexposure time. After the 2h exposure, N(2)-ethylidene-dG content increased to 21.4 ± 7.50, 10.5 ± 3.61, and 9.83 ± 3.90 adducts per 10(7) bases at each postexposure time. The half-life of this adduct was calculated as ∼35 h in independent experiments. These results indicate that AA exposure from daily alcohol consumption may cause DNA damage and may increase the risk of alcohol-related carcinogenesis. PMID:22683642

  7. Identification of rs671, a common variant of ALDH2, as a gout susceptibility locus

    PubMed Central

    Sakiyama, Masayuki; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Ken; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kawai, Sayo; Okada, Rieko; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Toru; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Gout is a common disease resulting from hyperuricemia. Recently, a genome-wide association study identified an association between gout and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2188380, located on an intergenic region between MYL2 and CUX2 on chromosome 12. However, other genes around rs2188380 could possibly be gout susceptibility genes. Therefore, we performed a fine-mapping study of the MYL2-CUX2 region. From 8,595 SNPs in the MYL2-CUX2 region, 9 tag SNPs were selected, and genotyping of 1,048 male gout patients and 1,334 male controls was performed by TaqMan method. Eight SNPs showed significant associations with gout after Bonferroni correction. rs671 (Glu504Lys) of ALDH2 had the most significant association with gout (P = 1.7 × 10−18, odds ratio = 0.53). After adjustment for rs671, the other 8 SNPs no longer showed a significant association with gout, while the significant association of rs671 remained. rs671 has been reportedly associated with alcohol drinking behavior, and it is well-known that alcohol drinking elevates serum uric acid levels. These data suggest that rs671, a common functional SNP of ALDH2, is a genuine gout-associated SNP in the MYL2-CUX2 locus and that “A” allele (Lys) of rs671 plays a protective role in the development of gout. PMID:27181629

  8. Reversible, partial inactivation of plant betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase by betaine aldehyde: mechanism and possible physiological implications.

    PubMed

    Zárate-Romero, Andrés; Murillo-Melo, Darío S; Mújica-Jiménez, Carlos; Montiel, Carmina; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A

    2016-04-01

    In plants, the last step in the biosynthesis of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB) is the NAD(+)-dependent oxidation of betaine aldehyde (BAL) catalysed by some aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 10 enzymes that exhibit betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) activity. Given the irreversibility of the reaction, the short-term regulation of these enzymes is of great physiological relevance to avoid adverse decreases in the NAD(+):NADH ratio. In the present study, we report that the Spinacia oleracea BADH (SoBADH) is reversibly and partially inactivated by BAL in the absence of NAD(+)in a time- and concentration-dependent mode. Crystallographic evidence indicates that the non-essential Cys(450)(SoBADH numbering) forms a thiohemiacetal with BAL, totally blocking the productive binding of the aldehyde. It is of interest that, in contrast to Cys(450), the catalytic cysteine (Cys(291)) did not react with BAL in the absence of NAD(+) The trimethylammonium group of BAL binds in the same position in the inactivating or productive modes. Accordingly, BAL does not inactivate the C(450)SSoBADH mutant and the degree of inactivation of the A(441)I and A(441)C mutants corresponds to their very different abilities to bind the trimethylammonium group. Cys(450)and the neighbouring residues that participate in stabilizing the thiohemiacetal are strictly conserved in plant ALDH10 enzymes with proven or predicted BADH activity, suggesting that inactivation by BAL is their common feature. Under osmotic stress conditions, this novel partial and reversible covalent regulatory mechanism may contribute to preventing NAD(+)exhaustion, while still permitting the synthesis of high amounts of GB and avoiding the accumulation of the toxic BAL.

  9. Mechanistic understanding of hydrogenation of acetaldehyde on Au(111): A DFT investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingsen; Shen, Yongli; Xu, Jing; Ma, Xinbin; Gong, Jinlong

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the reaction pathways for hydrogenation of acetaldehyde on atomic hydrogen pre-adsorbed Au(111) employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations. All the surface species involved in the reaction scheme have low diffusion barriers, suggesting that the rearrangement and movement of these species on the surface are facile under reaction condition. The hydroxyethyl is proposed to be the intermediate for the hydrogenation of acetaldehyde, and the activation energy for its formation is 0.37 eV. Additionally, the coupling reaction of hydroxyethyl and acetaldehyde - resulting in the formation of the ethylidene ethylene glycol (CH3C*HOCH(CH3)OH) species - also readily occurs at the reaction condition. Two-dimensional (2-D) polyacetaldehyde ((CH3CHO)2) can be easily hydrogenated to ethylidene ethylene glycol or ethoxy hemiacetal (CH3CH2OCH(CH3)O*); the latter can be converted to ethanol and acetaldehyde via further hydrogenation. As the hydrogenation products of ethylidene ethylene glycol and ethoxy hemiacetal, ethoxyethanol (CH3CH2OCH(CH3)OH) can be deeply hydrogenated to hydroxyethyl and ethanol. Our calculations also suggest that the formation of an ethoxyl intermediate is not likely, which agrees with the experimental observation that no deuterated acetaldehydes have been detected in isotopic measurements.

  10. Adsorption and Reaction of Acetaldehyde on Stoichiometric and Defective SrTiO₃(100) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li Q.; Ferris, Kim F.; Azad, Samina; Engelhard, Mark H.; Peden, Charles HF.

    2004-02-05

    The adsorption and reaction of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO), on stoichiometric (TiO{sub 2}-terminated) and reduced SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surfaces, have been investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Acetaldehyde adsorbs molecularly on the stoichiometric SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surface that contains predominantly Ti{sup 4+} cations. The Ti{sup 4+} sites on the stoichiometric SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surface are not sufficiently active for surface reactions such as aldol condensation, as opposed to the Ti{sup 4+} ions on the TiO{sub 2}(001) surface. However, decomposition and redox reactions of acetaldehyde occur in the presence of surface defects created by Ar{sup +} sputtering. The decomposition products following reactions of acetaldehyde on the defective surface include H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, CO, C{sub 4}H{sub 6}, and C{sub 4}H{sub 8}. Reductive coupling, to produce C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 4}H{sub 8} is the main reaction pathway for decomposition of acetaldehyde on the sputter reduced SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surface.

  11. Effect of chronic acetaldehyde intoxication on ethanol tolerance and membrane fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Latge, C; Lamboeuf, Y; Roumec, C; de Saint Blanquat, G

    1987-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that acetaldehyde participates directly in the pathogenesis of alcoholism. Its action has been attributed mainly to its physico-chemical properties. Results of direct intoxication of laboratory animals with acetaldehyde have been reported, but only for short periods of exposure and at high doses. These are probably not representative of the conditions found during alcohol intoxication. The pulmonary route of administration described here enables long term intoxication with acetaldehyde, at levels corresponding to values measured during chronic ethanol intoxication. Chronic administration of acetaldehyde during 3 weeks induced a metabolic tolerance to ethanol as tested by the sleeping time after a challenge dose of ethanol; behavioural tolerance (measured by blood alcohol levels on waking) was not observed. At the end of the intoxication, phospholipid fatty acids of erythrocyte and synaptosome membranes were also analysed. Small changes in levels of the shorter fatty acids were observed in the phosphatidyl-choline fraction. By comparison with the effects of ethanol on the same membrane preparations, only a small part of this effect can be attributed to acetaldehyde. The first metabolite of ethanol has, however, a sure effect on the pattern of fatty acid phospholipids.

  12. Dissociative electron attachments to ethanol and acetaldehyde: A combined experimental and simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xu-Dong; Xuan, Chuan-Jin; Feng, Wen-Ling; Tian, Shan Xi

    2015-02-14

    Dissociation dynamics of the temporary negative ions of ethanol and acetaldehyde formed by the low-energy electron attachments is investigated by using the anion velocity map imaging technique and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The momentum images of the dominant fragments O{sup −}/OH{sup −} and CH{sub 3}{sup −} are recorded, indicating the low kinetic energies of O{sup −}/OH{sup −} for ethanol while the low and high kinetic energy distributions of O{sup −} ions for acetaldehyde. The CH{sub 3}{sup −} image for acetaldehyde also shows the low kinetic energy. With help of the dynamics simulations, the fragmentation processes are qualitatively clarified. A new cascade dissociation pathway to produce the slow O{sup −} ion via the dehydrogenated intermediate, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup −} (acetaldehyde anion), is proposed for the dissociative electron attachment to ethanol. After the electron attachment to acetaldehyde molecule, the slow CH{sub 3}{sup −} is produced quickly in the two-body dissociation with the internal energy redistributions in different aspects before bond cleavages.

  13. 9-O-acetylated sialic acids differentiating normal haematopoietic precursors from leukemic stem cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Suchandra; Chandra, Sarmila; Mandal, Chitra

    2014-10-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) originates from mutations in haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). For high-risk patients, treated with intensified post-remission chemotherapy, haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is considered. Autologous HSC transplantation needs improvisation till date. Previous studies established enhanced disease-associated expression of 9-O-acetylated sialoglycoproteins (Neu5,9Ac2-GPs) on lymphoblasts of these patients at diagnosis, followed by its decrease with clinical remission and reappearance with relapse. Based on this differential expression of Neu5,9Ac2-GPs, identification of a normal HPC population was targeted from patients at diagnosis. This study identifies two distinct haematopoietic progenitor populations from bone marrow of diagnostic ALL patients, exploring the differential expression of Neu5,9Ac2-GPs with stem cell (CD34, CD90, CD117, CD133), haematopoietic (CD45), lineage-commitment (CD38) antigens and cytosolic aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Normal haematopoietic progenitor cells (ALDH(+)SSC(lo)CD45(hi)Neu5,9Ac2 -GPs(lo)CD34(+)CD38(-)CD90(+)CD117(+)CD133(+)) differentiated into morphologically different, lineage-specific colonies, being crucial for autologous HSC transplantation while leukemic stem cells (ALDH(+)SSC(lo)CD45(lo)Neu5,9Ac2 -GPs(hi)CD34(+)CD38(+)CD90(-)CD117(-)CD133(-)) lacking this ability can be potential targets for minimal residual disease detection and drug-targeted immunotherapy.

  14. A comparison of glucose oxidase and aldose dehydrogenase as mediated anodes in printed glucose/oxygen enzymatic fuel cells using ABTS/laccase cathodes.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Peter; Tuurala, Saara; Vaari, Anu; Valkiainen, Matti; Smolander, Maria; Leech, Dónal

    2012-10-01

    Current generation by mediated enzyme electron transfer at electrode surfaces can be harnessed to provide biosensors and redox reactions in enzymatic fuel cells. A glucose/oxygen enzymatic fuel cell can provide power for portable and implantable electronic devices. High volume production of enzymatic fuel cell prototypes will likely require printing of electrode and catalytic materials. Here we report on preparation and performance of, completely enzymatic, printed glucose/oxygen biofuel cells. The cells are based on filter paper coated with conducting carbon inks, enzyme and mediator. A comparison of cell performance using a range of mediators for either glucose oxidase (GOx) or aldose dehydrogenase (ALDH) oxidation of glucose at the anode and ABTS and a fungal laccase, for reduction of oxygen at the cathode, is reported. Highest power output, although of limited stability, is observed for ALDH anodes mediated by an osmium complex, providing a maximum power density of 3.5 μW cm(-2) at 0.34 V, when coupled to a laccase/ABTS cathode. The stability of cell voltage in a biobattery format, above a threshold of 200 mV under a moderate 75 kΩ load, is used to benchmark printed fuel cell performance. Highest stability is obtained for printed fuel cells using ALDH, providing cell voltages over the threshold for up to 74 h, compared to only 2 h for cells with anodes using GOx. These results provide promising directions for further development of mass-producible, completely enzymatic, printed biofuel cells.

  15. A comparison of glucose oxidase and aldose dehydrogenase as mediated anodes in printed glucose/oxygen enzymatic fuel cells using ABTS/laccase cathodes.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Peter; Tuurala, Saara; Vaari, Anu; Valkiainen, Matti; Smolander, Maria; Leech, Dónal

    2012-10-01

    Current generation by mediated enzyme electron transfer at electrode surfaces can be harnessed to provide biosensors and redox reactions in enzymatic fuel cells. A glucose/oxygen enzymatic fuel cell can provide power for portable and implantable electronic devices. High volume production of enzymatic fuel cell prototypes will likely require printing of electrode and catalytic materials. Here we report on preparation and performance of, completely enzymatic, printed glucose/oxygen biofuel cells. The cells are based on filter paper coated with conducting carbon inks, enzyme and mediator. A comparison of cell performance using a range of mediators for either glucose oxidase (GOx) or aldose dehydrogenase (ALDH) oxidation of glucose at the anode and ABTS and a fungal laccase, for reduction of oxygen at the cathode, is reported. Highest power output, although of limited stability, is observed for ALDH anodes mediated by an osmium complex, providing a maximum power density of 3.5 μW cm(-2) at 0.34 V, when coupled to a laccase/ABTS cathode. The stability of cell voltage in a biobattery format, above a threshold of 200 mV under a moderate 75 kΩ load, is used to benchmark printed fuel cell performance. Highest stability is obtained for printed fuel cells using ALDH, providing cell voltages over the threshold for up to 74 h, compared to only 2 h for cells with anodes using GOx. These results provide promising directions for further development of mass-producible, completely enzymatic, printed biofuel cells. PMID:22200380

  16. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... control the activity of the complex: pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase turns on (activates) the complex, while pyruvate dehydrogenase ... binding protein (the PDHX gene), and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase (the PDP1 gene) have been identified in people ...

  17. A homozygous mutation in a consanguineous family consolidates the role of ALDH1A3 in autosomal recessive microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Roos, L; Fang, M; Dali, C; Jensen, H; Christoffersen, N; Wu, B; Zhang, J; Xu, R; Harris, P; Xu, X; Grønskov, K; Tümer, Z

    2014-09-01

    Anomalies of eye development can lead to the rare eye malformations microphthalmia and anophthalmia (small or absent ocular globes), which are genetically very heterogeneous. Several genes have been associated with microphthalmia and anophthalmia, and exome sequencing has contributed to the identification of new genes. Very recently, homozygous variations within ALDH1A3 have been associated with autosomal recessive microphthalmia with or without cysts or coloboma, and with variable subphenotypes of developmental delay/autism spectrum disorder in eight families. In a consanguineous family where three of the five siblings were affected with microphthalmia/coloboma, we identified a novel homozygous missense mutation in ALDH1A3 using exome sequencing. Of the three affected siblings, one had intellectual disability and one had intellectual disability and autism, while the last one presented with normal development. This study contributes further to the description of the clinical spectrum associated with ALDH1A3 mutations, and illustrates the interfamilial clinical variation observed in individuals with ALDH1A3 mutations.

  18. Cofactor Specificity of the Bifunctional Alcohol and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (AdhE) in Wild-Type and Mutant Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; Tian, Liang; Bomble, Yannick J.; Himmel, Michael E.; Lo, Jonathan; Hon, Shuen; Shaw, A. Joe; van Dijken, Johannes P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum are thermophilic bacteria that have been engineered to produce ethanol from the cellulose and hemicellulose fractions of biomass, respectively. Although engineered strains of T. saccharolyticum produce ethanol with a yield of 90% of the theoretical maximum, engineered strains of C. thermocellum produce ethanol at lower yields (∼50% of the theoretical maximum). In the course of engineering these strains, a number of mutations have been discovered in their adhE genes, which encode both alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. To understand the effects of these mutations, the adhE genes from six strains of C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, the enzymes produced were purified by affinity chromatography, and enzyme activity was measured. In wild-type strains of both organisms, NADH was the preferred cofactor for both ALDH and ADH activities. In high-ethanol-producing (ethanologen) strains of T. saccharolyticum, both ALDH and ADH activities showed increased NADPH-linked activity. Interestingly, the AdhE protein of the ethanologenic strain of C. thermocellum has acquired high NADPH-linked ADH activity while maintaining NADH-linked ALDH and ADH activities at wild-type levels. When single amino acid mutations in AdhE that caused increased NADPH-linked ADH activity were introduced into C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum, ethanol production increased in both organisms. Structural analysis of the wild-type and mutant AdhE proteins was performed to provide explanations for the cofactor specificity change on a molecular level. IMPORTANCE This work describes the characterization of the AdhE enzyme from different strains of C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum. C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum are thermophilic anaerobes that have been engineered to make high yields of ethanol and can solubilize components of

  19. Impact of bioethanol fuel implementation in transport based on modelled acetaldehyde concentration in the urban environment.

    PubMed

    Sundvor, Ingrid; López-Aparicio, Susana

    2014-10-15

    This study shows the results obtained from emission and air dispersion modelling of acetaldehyde in the city of Oslo and associated with the circulation of bioethanol vehicles. Two scenarios of bioethanol implementation, both realistic and hypothetical, have been considered under winter conditions; 1) realistic baseline scenario, which corresponds to the current situation in Oslo where one bus line is running with bioethanol (E95; 95% ethanol-5% petrol) among petrol and diesel vehicles; and 2) a hypothetical scenario characterized by a full implementation of high-blend bioethanol (i.e. E85) as fuel for transportation, and thus an entire bioethanol fleet. The results indicate that a full implementation of bioethanol will have a certain impact on urban air quality due to direct emissions of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde emissions are estimated to increase by 233% and concentration levels increase up to 650% with regard to the baseline. PMID:25064718

  20. Feasibility studies of a fuel cell for cogeneration of homogeneously catalyzed acetaldehyde and electricity from ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, S.; Datta, R.

    1996-10-01

    The development and feasibility of a novel fuel cell for simultaneously generating electricity and homogeneously catalyzed acetaldehyde from ethanol are reported. The fuel cell is based on the supported molten-salt electrocatalysis technique that allows use of homogeneous (liquid-phase) catalysts in fuel cells for the first time. The electrocatalytic reaction combines the chemistry of the Wacker process conventionally used for acetaldehyde production from the partial oxidation of ethylene and that of the Veba-Chemie method. Nafion membranes impregnated with different electrolytic materials were used in the fuel cell as electrolytes to allow operation at reaction temperatures up to 165 C. Results obtained are comparable to those reported in the literature on partial oxidation of ethylene to acetaldehyde in a fuel cell based on conventional heterogeneous electrocatalysts.

  1. Redirection of the Reaction Specificity of a Thermophilic Acetolactate Synthase toward Acetaldehyde Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Maria; Yoshiyasu, Hayato; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao; Honda, Kohsuke

    2016-01-01

    Acetolactate synthase and pyruvate decarboxylase are thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes that convert pyruvate into acetolactate and acetaldehyde, respectively. Although the former are encoded in the genomes of many thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, the latter has been found only in mesophilic organisms. In this study, the reaction specificity of acetolactate synthase from Thermus thermophilus was redirected to catalyze acetaldehyde formation to develop a thermophilic pyruvate decarboxylase. Error-prone PCR and mutant library screening led to the identification of a quadruple mutant with 3.1-fold higher acetaldehyde-forming activity than the wild-type. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that the increased activity of the mutant was due to H474R amino acid substitution, which likely generated two new hydrogen bonds near the thiamine pyrophosphate-binding site. These hydrogen bonds might result in the better accessibility of H+ to the substrate-cofactor-enzyme intermediate and a shift in the reaction specificity of the enzyme. PMID:26731734

  2. One-pot microbial synthesis of 2'-deoxyribonucleoside from glucose, acetaldehyde, and a nucleobase.

    PubMed

    Horinouchi, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Jun; Kawano, Takako; Sakai, Takafumi; Saito, Kyota; Matsumoto, Seiichiro; Sasaki, Mie; Mikami, Yoichi; Shimizu, Sakayu

    2006-06-01

    A one-pot enzymatic synthesis of 2'-deoxyribonucleoside from glucose, acetaldehyde, and a nucleobase was established. Glycolysis by baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) generated ATP which was used to produce D: -glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate production from glucose via fructose 1,6-diphosphate. The D: -glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate produced was transformed to 2'-deoxyribonucleoside via 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate and then 2-deoxyribose 1-phosphate in the presence of acetaldehyde and a nucleobase by deoxyriboaldolase, phosphopentomutase expressed in Escherichia coli, and a commercial nucleoside phosphorylase. About 33 mM 2'-deoxyinosine was produced from 600 mM glucose, 333 mM acetaldehyde and 100 mM adenine in 24 h. 2'-Deoxyinosine was produced from adenine due to the adenosine deaminase activity of E. coli transformants.

  3. EPAC activation inhibits acetaldehyde-induced activation and proliferation of hepatic stellate cell via Rap1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Yang, Feng; Wu, Xiaojuan; Lv, Xiongwen; Li, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation represents an essential event during alcoholic liver fibrosis (ALF). Previous studies have demonstrated that the rat HSCs could be significantly activated after exposure to 200 μmol/L acetaldehyde for 48 h, and the cAMP/PKA signaling pathways were also dramatically upregulated in activated HSCs isolated from alcoholic fibrotic rat liver. Exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) is a family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for the small Ras-like GTPases Rap, and is being considered as a vital mediator of cAMP signaling in parallel with the principal cAMP target protein kinase A (PKA). Our data showed that both cAMP/PKA and cAMP/EPAC signaling pathways were involved in acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Acetaldehyde could reduce the expression of EPAC1 while enhancing the expression of EPAC2. The cAMP analog Me-cAMP, which stimulates the EPAC/Rap1 pathway, could significantly decrease the proliferation and collagen synthesis of acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Furthermore, depletion of EPAC2, but not EPAC1, prevented the activation of HSC measured as the production of α-SMA and collagen type I and III, indicating that EPAC1 appears to have protective effects on acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Curiously, activation of PKA or EPAC perhaps has opposite effects on the synthesis of collagen and α-SMA: EPAC activation by Me-cAMP increased the levels of GTP-bound (activated) Rap1 while PKA activation by Phe-cAMP had no significant effects on such binding. These results suggested that EPAC activation could inhibit the activation and proliferation of acetaldehyde-induced HSCs via Rap1. PMID:26854595

  4. Acetaldehyde Induces Cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y Cells via Inhibition of Akt Activation and Induction of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tingting; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction. It has been shown that heavy drinking is associated with an earlier onset of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Acetaldehyde, the most toxic metabolite of ethanol, is speculated to mediate the brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction induced by the chronic excessive consumption of alcohol. However, the exact mechanisms by which acetaldehyde induces neurotoxicity are not totally understood. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of acetaldehyde in SH-SY5Y cells and found that acetaldehyde induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells by downregulating the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and upregulating the expression of proapoptotic Bax. Acetaldehyde treatment led to a significant decrease in the levels of activated Akt and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). In addition, acetaldehyde induced the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) while inhibiting the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs, p44/p42MAPK). Meanwhile, acetaldehyde treatment caused an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and elevated the oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, acetaldehyde induces cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y cells via promotion of apoptotic signaling, inhibition of cell survival pathway, and induction of oxidative stress. PMID:26649137

  5. Acetaldehyde Induces Cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y Cells via Inhibition of Akt Activation and Induction of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tingting; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction. It has been shown that heavy drinking is associated with an earlier onset of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Acetaldehyde, the most toxic metabolite of ethanol, is speculated to mediate the brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction induced by the chronic excessive consumption of alcohol. However, the exact mechanisms by which acetaldehyde induces neurotoxicity are not totally understood. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of acetaldehyde in SH-SY5Y cells and found that acetaldehyde induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells by downregulating the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and upregulating the expression of proapoptotic Bax. Acetaldehyde treatment led to a significant decrease in the levels of activated Akt and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). In addition, acetaldehyde induced the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) while inhibiting the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs, p44/p42MAPK). Meanwhile, acetaldehyde treatment caused an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and elevated the oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, acetaldehyde induces cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y cells via promotion of apoptotic signaling, inhibition of cell survival pathway, and induction of oxidative stress.

  6. Effect of diet and disulfiram on acetaldehyde blood levels after ethanol in UChA and UChB rats.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla, M E; Sepúlveda, S; Tampier, L

    1993-01-01

    Acetaldehyde (AcH) levels in blood samples taken from different zones of the vascular system 2 h after a p.o. dose of ethanol (2.76 g/kg) were studied in UChA (low ethanol consumer) and UChB (high ethanol consumer) rats fed a diet devoid of animal products, diet 1 (D1), and a diet containing fish meal, diet 2 (D2), and in rats pretreated with disulfiram (600 mg/kg p.o.). The results showed that, while there is no significant difference between UChA and UChB rats fed D1 with respect to blood AcH levels and the basal activity of the hepatic mitochondrial high-affinity aldehyde dehydrogenase (AIDH), a significant strain difference was observed in rats fed D2, which induced high blood AcH levels in UChA rats but not in UChB ones. No strain differences were observed in blood ethanol levels in the two groups of rats. When rats fed D1 were pretreated with disulfiram, the raising of AcH blood levels induced by ethanol after disulfiram was significantly higher in UChA than in UChB rats in suprahepatic vein, femoral vein, and tail blood. This difference was concomitant with a greater inhibition of the hepatic mitochondrial high-affinity ADH activity in UChA rats than in UChB ones, whether disulfiram was administered in vivo or in vitro, which excluded the possibility that the strain difference would be caused by a different bioavailability of disulfiram.

  7. Flavor threshold for acetaldehyde in milk, chocolate milk, and spring water using solid phase microextraction gas chromatography for quantification.

    PubMed

    van Aardt, M; Duncan, S E; Bourne, D; Marcy, J E; Long, T E; Hackney, C R; Heisey, C

    2001-03-01

    The detection threshold of acetaldehyde was determined on whole, lowfat, and nonfat milks, chocolate-flavored milk, and spring water. Knowledge of the acetaldehyde threshold is important because acetaldehyde forms in milk during storage as a result of light oxidation. It is also a degradation product of poly(ethylene terephthalate) during melt processing, a relatively new packaging choice for milk and water. There was no significant difference in the acetaldehyde threshold in milk of various fat contents, with thresholds ranging from 3939 to 4040 ppb. Chocolate-flavored milk and spring water showed thresholds of 10048 and 167 ppb, respectively, which compares favorably with previous studies. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) was verified as an effective method for the recovery of acetaldehyde in all media with detection levels as low as 200 and 20 ppb in milk and water, respectively, when using a polydimethyl siloxane/Carboxen SPME fiber in static headspace at 45 degrees C for 15 min.

  8. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Thomas D.; Edenberg, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of beverage alcohol (ethanol) on the body are determined largely by the rate at which it and its main breakdown product, acetaldehyde, are metabolized after consumption. The main metabolic pathway for ethanol involves the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Seven different ADHs and three different ALDHs that metabolize ethanol have been identified. The genes encoding these enzymes exist in different variants (i.e., alleles), many of which differ by a single DNA building block (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]). Some of these SNPs result in enzymes with altered kinetic properties. For example, certain ADH1B and ADH1C variants that are commonly found in East Asian populations lead to more rapid ethanol breakdown and acetaldehyde accumulation in the body. Because acetaldehyde has harmful effects on the body, people carrying these alleles are less likely to drink and have a lower risk of alcohol dependence. Likewise, an ALDH2 variant with reduced activity results in acetaldehyde buildup and also has a protective effect against alcoholism. In addition to affecting drinking behaviors and risk for alcoholism, ADH and ALDH alleles impact the risk for esophageal cancer. PMID:23134050

  9. DOXIL when combined with Withaferin A (WFA) targets ALDH1 positive cancer stem cells in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kakar, Sham S.; Worth, Christopher A.; Wang, Zhenglong; Carter, Kelsey; Ratajczak, Mariusz; Gunjal, Pranesh

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a highly aggressive and deadly disease. Currently, the treatment for ovarian cancer entails cytoreductive surgery followed by chemotherapy, mainly cisplatin or carboplatin combined with paclitaxel. Although this regimen is initially effective in a high percentage of cases, unfortunately, after few months of initial treatment, tumor relapse occurs due to platinum-resistance. DOXIL (liposomal preparation of doxorubicin) is a choice of drug for recurrent ovarian cancer. However, its response rate is very low and is accompanied by myocardial toxicity. Resistance to chemotherapy and recurrence of cancer is primarily attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small population of cells present in cancer. Effect of DOXIL and withaferin A (WFA), both alone and in combination, was investigated on cell proliferation of ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and tumor growth in SCID mice bearing i.p. ovarian tumors. ALDH1 cells were isolated from A2780 using cell sorter, and effect of DOXIL and WFA both alone and in combination on tumorigenic function of ALDH1 was studied using spheroids formation assays in vitro. Western blots were performed to examine the expression of ALDH1 and Notch 1 genes. In our studies, we showed, for the first time, that DOXIL when combined with withaferin A (WFA) elicits synergistic effect on inhibition of cell proliferation of ovarian cancer cells and inhibits the expression of ALDH1 protein, a marker for ALDH1 positive cancer stem cells (CSCs), and Notch1, a signaling pathway gene required for self-renewal of CSCs. Inhibition of expression of both ALDH1 and Notch1 genes by WFA was found to be dose dependent, whereas DOXIL (200 nM) was found to be ineffective. SCID mice, bearing i.p. ovarian tumors, were treated with a small dose of DOXIL (2 mg/kg) in combination with a sub-optimal dose of WFA (2 mg/kg) which resulted in a highly significant (60% to 70%) reduction in tumor growth, and complete inhibition of metastasis

  10. DOXIL when combined with Withaferin A (WFA) targets ALDH1 positive cancer stem cells in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kakar, Sham S.; Worth, Christopher A.; Wang, Zhenglong; Carter, Kelsey; Ratajczak, Mariusz; Gunjal, Pranesh

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a highly aggressive and deadly disease. Currently, the treatment for ovarian cancer entails cytoreductive surgery followed by chemotherapy, mainly cisplatin or carboplatin combined with paclitaxel. Although this regimen is initially effective in a high percentage of cases, unfortunately, after few months of initial treatment, tumor relapse occurs due to platinum-resistance. DOXIL (liposomal preparation of doxorubicin) is a choice of drug for recurrent ovarian cancer. However, its response rate is very low and is accompanied by myocardial toxicity. Resistance to chemotherapy and recurrence of cancer is primarily attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small population of cells present in cancer. Effect of DOXIL and withaferin A (WFA), both alone and in combination, was investigated on cell proliferation of ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and tumor growth in SCID mice bearing i.p. ovarian tumors. ALDH1 cells were isolated from A2780 using cell sorter, and effect of DOXIL and WFA both alone and in combination on tumorigenic function of ALDH1 was studied using spheroids formation assays in vitro. Western blots were performed to examine the expression of ALDH1 and Notch 1 genes. In our studies, we showed, for the first time, that DOXIL when combined with withaferin A (WFA) elicits synergistic effect on inhibition of cell proliferation of ovarian cancer cells and inhibits the expression of ALDH1 protein, a marker for ALDH1 positive cancer stem cells (CSCs), and Notch1, a signaling pathway gene required for self-renewal of CSCs. Inhibition of expression of both ALDH1 and Notch1 genes by WFA was found to be dose dependent, whereas DOXIL (200 nM) was found to be ineffective. SCID mice, bearing i.p. ovarian tumors, were treated with a small dose of DOXIL (2 mg/kg) in combination with a sub-optimal dose of WFA (2 mg/kg) which resulted in a highly significant (60% to 70%) reduction in tumor growth, and complete inhibition of metastasis

  11. 40 CFR 80.56 - Measurement methods for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACN. Both the impinger and cartridge samples must be analyzed by HPLC without additional sample... liquid chromatograph (HPLC). Standards consisting of the hydrazone derivative of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde are used to determine the response, repeatability, and limit of quantitation of the HPLC...

  12. Modeling the IR Spectra of Acetaldehyde from a New Vibrational Configuration Interaction Method

    SciTech Connect

    Begue, Didier; Pouchan, Claude

    2007-12-26

    In this paper we present a new vibrational configuration interaction method known as a parallel vibrational multiple window configuration interaction P lowbar VMWCI which generates several VCI matrices and enables the variational treatment of medium size molecular systems. Application to acetaldehyde gives a new interpretation of the MIR experimental data.

  13. Regional Sources of Atmospheric Formaldehyde and Acetaldehyde, and Implications for Atmospheric Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations over the Eastern half of the United States are simulated with a 3-D air quality model to identify the most important chemical precursors under January and July conditions. We find that both aldehydes primarily result from photochemical...

  14. 40 CFR 80.56 - Measurement methods for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cartridges or impingers filled with solutions of DNPH in acetonitrile (ACN) as described in §§ 86.109 and 86... for impingers containing 20 ml of absorbing solution (using more absorbing solution in the impinger... chosen for acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. (e) Other sampling and analytical techniques will be allowed...

  15. 40 CFR 80.56 - Measurement methods for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... cartridges or impingers filled with solutions of DNPH in acetonitrile (ACN) as described in §§ 86.109 and 86... for impingers containing 20 ml of absorbing solution (using more absorbing solution in the impinger... chosen for acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. (e) Other sampling and analytical techniques will be allowed...

  16. [Effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on the positive reinforcement structures in rats].

    PubMed

    Burov, Iu V; Borisenko, S A

    1979-01-01

    An activating action of low doses of ethanol and depressant action of acetaldehyde on the hypothalamic and septal structures of positive reinforcement was established in rat experiments using the method of self-stimulation. The relationship between ethanol activating action on these structures and its increased consumption in the conditions of free choice between ethanol and water was demonstrated.

  17. 40 CFR 721.10662 - Acetaldehyde, substituted-, reaction products with 2-butyne-1, 4-diol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acetaldehyde, substituted-, reaction...-, reaction products with 2-butyne-1, 4-diol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...-, reaction products with 2-butyne-1, 4-diol (PMN P-11-204) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10662 - Acetaldehyde, substituted-, reaction products with 2-butyne-1, 4-diol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acetaldehyde, substituted-, reaction...-, reaction products with 2-butyne-1, 4-diol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...-, reaction products with 2-butyne-1, 4-diol (PMN P-11-204) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  19. 40 CFR 80.56 - Measurement methods for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACN. Both the impinger and cartridge samples must be analyzed by HPLC without additional sample... liquid chromatograph (HPLC). Standards consisting of the hydrazone derivative of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde are used to determine the response, repeatability, and limit of quantitation of the HPLC...

  20. BIOGENIC SOURCES OF FORMALDEHYDE AND ACETALDEHYDE DURING SUMMER AND WINTER CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photochemical modeling estimated contributions to ambient concentrations of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde from biogenic emissions over the continental United States during January 2001 (Eos Trans. AGU, 83(47), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract A52B-0117). Results showed that maximum co...

  1. Involvement of the endogenous opioid system in the psychopharmacological actions of ethanol: the role of acetaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Font, Laura; Luján, Miguel Á.; Pastor, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    Significant evidence implicates the endogenous opioid system (EOS) (opioid peptides and receptors) in the mechanisms underlying the psychopharmacological effects of ethanol. Ethanol modulates opioidergic signaling and function at different levels, including biosynthesis, release, and degradation of opioid peptides, as well as binding of endogenous ligands to opioid receptors. The role of β-endorphin and µ-opioid receptors (OR) have been suggested to be of particular importance in mediating some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, including psychomotor stimulation and sensitization, consumption and conditioned place preference (CPP). Ethanol increases the release of β-endorphin from the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (NArc), which can modulate activity of other neurotransmitter systems such as mesolimbic dopamine (DA). The precise mechanism by which ethanol induces a release of β-endorphin, thereby inducing behavioral responses, remains to be elucidated. The present review summarizes accumulative data suggesting that the first metabolite of ethanol, the psychoactive compound acetaldehyde, could participate in such mechanism. Two lines of research involving acetaldehyde are reviewed: (1) implications of the formation of acetaldehyde in brain areas such as the NArc, with high expression of ethanol metabolizing enzymes and presence of cell bodies of endorphinic neurons and (2) the formation of condensation products between DA and acetaldehyde such as salsolinol, which exerts its actions via OR. PMID:23914161

  2. Metadoxine prevents damage produced by ethanol and acetaldehyde in hepatocyte and hepatic stellate cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Ruiz, M C; Bucio, L; Correa, A; Souza, V; Hernández, E; Gómez-Quiroz, L E; Kershenobich, D

    2001-11-01

    Metadoxine (pyridoxine-pyrrolidone carboxylate) has been reported to improve liver function tests in alcoholic patients. In the present work we have investigated the effect of metadoxine on some parameters of cellular damage in hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells in culture treated with ethanol and acetaldehyde. HepG2 and CFSC-2G cells were treated with 50 mM ethanol or 175 microM acetaldehyde as initial concentration in the presence or absence of 10 microg ml(-1) of metadoxine. Twenty-four hours later reduced and oxidized glutathione content, lipid peroxidation damage, collagen secretion and IL-6, IL-8 and TNF- alpha secretion were determined. Our results suggest that metadoxine prevents glutathione depletion and the increase in lipid peroxidation damage caused by ethanol and acetaldehyde in HepG2 cells. In hepatic stellate cells, metadoxine prevents the increase in collagen and attenuated TNF- alpha secretion caused by acetaldehyde. Thus, metadoxine could be useful in preventing the damage produced in early stages of alcoholic liver disease as it prevents the redox imbalance of the hepatocytes and prevents TNF- alpha induction, one of the earliest events in hepatic damage. PMID:11712874

  3. Acetaldehyde formation in submerged cultures of non-film-forming species of Saccharomyces.

    PubMed

    OUGH, C S

    1961-07-01

    Three different yeasts of the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae ferment ethyl alcohol to acetaldehyde aerobically and produce "flor" character in a wine medium with submerged culture techniques. Three pounds per square inch gauge (psig) of oxygen instead of 15 psig of air permitted fermentations to proceed, though slightly slower in the series tested, and reaching slightly lower total aldehydes.

  4. Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and bifunctional aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase are essential for energy metabolism under oxidative stress in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Erika; Encalada, Rusely; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S; Olivos-García, Alfonso; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma

    2010-08-01

    The in vitro Entamoeba histolytica pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (EhPFOR) kinetic properties and the effect of oxidative stress on glycolytic pathway enzymes and fluxes in live trophozoites were evaluated. EhPFOR showed a strong preference for pyruvate as substrate over other oxoacids. The enzyme was irreversibly inactivated by a long period of saturating O(2) exposure (IC(50) 0.034 mm), whereas short-term exposure (< 30 min) leading to > 90% inhibition allowed for partial restoration by addition of Fe(2+). CoA and acetyl-CoA prevented, whereas pyruvate exacerbated, inactivation induced by short-term saturating O(2) exposure. Superoxide dismutase was more effective than catalase in preventing the inactivation, indicating that reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved. Hydrogen peroxide caused inactivation in an Fe(2+)-reversible fashion that was not prevented by the coenzymes, suggesting different mechanisms of enzyme inactivation by ROS. Structural analysis on an EhPFOR 3D model suggested that the protection against ROS provided by coenzymes could be attributable to their proximity to the Fe-S clusters. After O(2) exposure, live parasites displayed decreased enzyme activities only for PFOR (90%) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH; 68%) of the bifunctional aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (EhADH2), whereas acetyl-CoA synthetase remained unchanged, explaining the increased acetate and lowered ethanol fluxes. Remarkably, PFOR and ALDH activities were restored after return of the parasites to normoxic conditions, which correlated with higher ethanol and lower acetate fluxes. These results identified amebal PFOR and ALDH of EhADH2 activities as markers of oxidative stress, and outlined their relevance as significant controlling steps of energy metabolism in parasites subjected to oxidative stress. PMID:20629749

  5. Substrate specificity, substrate channeling, and allostery in BphJ: an acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase associated with the pyruvate aldolase BphI.

    PubMed

    Baker, Perrin; Carere, Jason; Seah, Stephen Y K

    2012-06-01

    BphJ, a nonphosphorylating acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase, catalyzes the conversion of aldehydes to form acyl-coenzyme A in the presence of NAD(+) and coenzyme A (CoA). The enzyme is structurally related to the nonacylating aldehyde dehydrogenases, aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase and phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Cys-131 was identified as the catalytic thiol in BphJ, and pH profiles together with site-specific mutagenesis data demonstrated that the catalytic thiol is not activated by an aspartate residue, as previously proposed. In contrast to the wild-type enzyme that had similar specificities for two- or three-carbon aldehydes, an I195A variant was observed to have a 20-fold higher catalytic efficiency for butyraldehyde and pentaldehyde compared to the catalytic efficiency of the wild type toward its natural substrate, acetaldehyde. BphJ forms a heterotetrameric complex with the class II aldolase BphI that channels aldehydes produced in the aldol cleavage reaction to the dehydrogenase via a molecular tunnel. Replacement of Ile-171 and Ile-195 with bulkier amino acid residues resulted in no more than a 35% reduction in acetaldehyde channeling efficiency, showing that these residues are not critical in gating the exit of the channel. Likewise, the replacement of Asn-170 in BphJ with alanine and aspartate did not substantially alter aldehyde channeling efficiencies. Levels of activation of BphI by BphJ N170A, N170D, and I171A were reduced by ≥3-fold in the presence of NADH and ≥4.5-fold when BphJ was undergoing turnover, indicating that allosteric activation of the aldolase has been compromised in these variants. The results demonstrate that the dehydrogenase coordinates the catalytic activity of BphI through allostery rather than through aldehyde channeling. PMID:22574886

  6. Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, H. J.; Hanson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum, a facultative methane-oxidizing bacterium, has been purified to homogeneity as indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. It has several properties in common with the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The active enzyme is a dimeric protein, both subunits having molecular weights of about 62,000. The enzyme exhibits broad substrate specificity for primary alcohols and catalyzes the two-step oxidation of methanol to formate. The apparent Michaelis constants of the enzyme are 2.9 × 10−5 M for methanol and 8.2 × 10−5 M for formaldehyde. Activity of the purified enzyme is dependent on phenazine methosulfate. Certain characteristics of this enzyme distinguish it from the other alcohol dehydrogenases of other methylotrophic bacteria. Ammonia is not required for, but stimulates the activity of newly purified enzyme. An absolute dependence on ammonia develops after storage of the purified enzyme. Activity is not inhibited by phosphate. The fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme indicates that it and the cofactor associated with it may be chemically different from the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The alcohol dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium WC-65, Pseudomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and several facultative methylotrophs are serologically related to the enzyme purified in this study. The enzymes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and of organisms of the Methylococcus group did not cross-react with the antiserum prepared against the alcohol dehydrogenase of M. organophilum. Images PMID:80974

  7. Purification, N-terminal sequence determination and enzymatic characterization of antiquitin from the liver of grass carp.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wing-Man; Tang, Wai-Kwan; Cheng, Christopher H K; Fong, Wing-Ping

    2003-11-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is a superfamily of enzymes catalyzing the conversion of various aldehydes to the corresponding acids using the coenzymes NAD+ or NADP+. While mammalian ALDHs have been studied extensively, the non-mammalian ALDHs, notably those of teleostean origin, remain relatively unexplored. In our previous study on grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) liver ALDH, a significant amount of the ALDH activity did not adsorb on the alpha-cyanocinnamate Sepharose column which binds ALDH2. The objective of the present study was to purify the ALDH which accounts for this unadsorbed activity. Further chromatography on Affi-gel Blue agarose, followed by size exclusion on Superdex 200 successfully isolated this aldehyde-oxidizing activity. The protein was a homo-tetramer with a subunit molecular mass of 58 kDa. N-terminal sequencing of the first 21 amino acid residues, followed by blastp analysis on the NCBI database revealed the protein as antiquitin. The optimal pH for the oxidation of acetaldehyde was 9.5. At this pH, the Vmax and the Km values for acetaldehyde were 1.95 U/mg and 2.00 mM, respectively. PMID:14602152

  8. Abundances of ethylene oxide and acetaldehyde in hot molecular cloud cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nummelin, A.; Dickens, J. E.; Bergman, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Irvine, W. M.; Ikeda, M.; Ohishi, M.

    1998-01-01

    We have searched for millimetre-wave line emission from ethylene oxide (c-C2H4O) and its structural isomer acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) in 11 molecular clouds using SEST. Ethylene oxide and acetaldehyde were detected through multiple lines in the hot cores NGC 6334F, G327.3-0.6, G31.41+0.31, and G34.3+0.2. Acetaldehyde was also detected towards G10.47+0.03, G322.2+0.6, and Orion 3'N, and one ethylene oxide line was tentatively detected in G10.47+0.03. Column densities and rotational excitation temperatures were derived using a procedure which fits the observed line intensifies by finding the minimum chi 2-value. The resulting rotational excitation temperatures of ethylene oxide and acetaldehyde are in the range 16-38 K, indicating that these species are excited in the outer, cooler parts of the hot cores or that the excitation is significantly subthermal. For an assumed source size of 20", the deduced column densities are (0.6-1)x10(14) cm-2 for ethylene oxide and (2-5)x10(14) cm-2 for acetaldehyde. The fractional abundances with respect to H2 are X[c-C2H4O]=(2-6)xl0(-10), and X[CH3CHO]=(0.8-3)x10(-9). The ratio X[CH3CHO]/X[c-C2H4O] varies between 2.6 (NGC 6334F) and 8.5 (G327.3-0.6). We also detected and analysed multiple transitions of CH3OH, CH3OCH3, C2H5OH, and HCOOH. The chemical, and possibly evolutionary, states of NGC 6334F, G327.3-0.6, G31.41+0.31, and G34.3+0.2 seem to be very similar.

  9. Abundances of ethylene oxide and acetaldehyde in hot molecular cloud cores.

    PubMed

    Nummelin, A; Dickens, J E; Bergman, P; Hjalmarson, A; Irvine, W M; Ikeda, M; Ohishi, M

    1998-09-01

    We have searched for millimetre-wave line emission from ethylene oxide (c-C2H4O) and its structural isomer acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) in 11 molecular clouds using SEST. Ethylene oxide and acetaldehyde were detected through multiple lines in the hot cores NGC 6334F, G327.3-0.6, G31.41+0.31, and G34.3+0.2. Acetaldehyde was also detected towards G10.47+0.03, G322.2+0.6, and Orion 3'N, and one ethylene oxide line was tentatively detected in G10.47+0.03. Column densities and rotational excitation temperatures were derived using a procedure which fits the observed line intensifies by finding the minimum chi 2-value. The resulting rotational excitation temperatures of ethylene oxide and acetaldehyde are in the range 16-38 K, indicating that these species are excited in the outer, cooler parts of the hot cores or that the excitation is significantly subthermal. For an assumed source size of 20", the deduced column densities are (0.6-1)x10(14) cm-2 for ethylene oxide and (2-5)x10(14) cm-2 for acetaldehyde. The fractional abundances with respect to H2 are X[c-C2H4O]=(2-6)xl0(-10), and X[CH3CHO]=(0.8-3)x10(-9). The ratio X[CH3CHO]/X[c-C2H4O] varies between 2.6 (NGC 6334F) and 8.5 (G327.3-0.6). We also detected and analysed multiple transitions of CH3OH, CH3OCH3, C2H5OH, and HCOOH. The chemical, and possibly evolutionary, states of NGC 6334F, G327.3-0.6, G31.41+0.31, and G34.3+0.2 seem to be very similar.

  10. Indoor formaldehyde and acetaldehyde levels in the province of Bari, South Italy, and estimated health risk.

    PubMed

    Lovreglio, Piero; Carrus, Antonio; Iavicoli, Sergio; Drago, Ignazio; Persechino, Benedetta; Soleo, Leonardo

    2009-05-01

    Indoor and outdoor formaldehyde and acetaldehyde levels were assessed to characterize pollution in dwellings in the city and the Province of Bari, also taking into account seasonal variability, and to investigate health effects of aldehyde exposure on the general population. In 2007, passive environmental monitoring was performed, for 24 hours, in the kitchen of 59 dwellings, as well as outdoors for 27 of them. A questionnaire probing personal and home characteristics was administered to all 182 subjects habitually resident in the homes. During the period January-June 2008, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde levels were monitored monthly in 20 of the investigated dwellings inhabited only by non smokers. Indoor formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations were significantly higher (16.0 +/- 8.0 and 10.7 +/- 8.8 microg m(-3)) than outdoor concentrations (4.4 +/- 1.7 and 3.4 +/- 2.0 microg m(-3)), showing a correlation between indoor levels of the two aldehydes (r = 0.41; p = 0.001). In dwellings inhabited only by non smokers, formaldehyde concentrations were higher in the presence of furniture bought new or restored less than one year before (p = 0.03). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde levels were significantly higher in winter months than in spring-summer months (F = 2.86, p = 0.02; F = 5.39, p < 0.001) and seemed to be influenced by the time that kitchen windows were kept open. As regards the effects on human health, a low prevalence of allergic disease and no association between any irritant or allergic complaints and indoor levels of the two aldehydes was observed. In conclusion, the results showed low indoor and outdoor concentrations of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, not generally posing a risk for human health.

  11. Salivary acetaldehyde increase due to alcohol-containing mouthwash use: a risk factor for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Gumbel-Mako, Szidönia; Sohnius, Eva-Maria; Keck-Wilhelm, Andrea; Kratz, Evamaria; Mildau, Gerd

    2009-08-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that acetaldehyde, the first and genotoxic metabolite of ethanol, mediates the carcinogenicity of alcoholic beverages. Ethanol is also contained in a number of ready-to-use mouthwashes typically between 5 and 27% vol. An increased risk of oral cancer has been discussed for users of such mouthwashes; however, epidemiological evidence had remained inconclusive. This study is the first to investigate acetaldehyde levels in saliva after use of alcohol-containing mouthwashes. Ready-to-use mouthwashes and mouthrinses (n = 13) were rinsed in the mouth by healthy, nonsmoking volunteers (n = 4) as intended by the manufacturers (20 ml for 30 sec). Saliva was collected at 0.5, 2, 5 and 10 min after mouthwash use and analyzed using headspace gas chromatography. The acetaldehyde content in the saliva was 41 +/- 15 microM, range 9-85 microM (0.5 min), 52 +/- 14 microM, range 11-105 microM (2 min), 32 +/- 7 microM, range 9-67 microM (5 min) and 15 +/- 7 microM, range 0-37 microM (10 min). The contents were significantly above endogenous levels and corresponding to concentrations normally found after alcoholic beverage consumption. A twice-daily use of alcohol-containing mouthwashes leads to a systemic acetaldehyde exposure of 0.26 microg/kg bodyweight/day on average, which corresponds to a lifetime cancer risk of 3E-6. The margin of exposure was calculated to be 217,604, which would be seen as a low public health concern. However, the local acetaldehyde contents in the saliva are reaching concentrations associated with DNA adduct formation and sister chromatid exchange in vitro, so that concerns for local carcinogenic effects in the oral cavity remain. PMID:19444911

  12. Whole-Exome Sequencing in a South American Cohort Links ALDH1A3, FOXN1 and Retinoic Acid Regulation Pathways to Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ramos, Oscar A; Olivares, Ana María; Haider, Neena B; de Autismo, Liga Colombiana; Lattig, María Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a range of complex neurodevelopmental conditions principally characterized by dysfunctions linked to mental development. Previous studies have shown that there are more than 1000 genes likely involved in ASD, expressed mainly in brain and highly interconnected among them. We applied whole exome sequencing in Colombian-South American trios. Two missense novel SNVs were found in the same child: ALDH1A3 (RefSeq NM_000693: c.1514T>C (p.I505T)) and FOXN1 (RefSeq NM_003593: c.146C>T (p.S49L)). Gene expression studies reveal that Aldh1a3 and Foxn1 are expressed in ~E13.5 mouse embryonic brain, as well as in adult piriform cortex (PC; ~P30). Conserved Retinoic Acid Response Elements (RAREs) upstream of human ALDH1A3 and FOXN1 and in mouse Aldh1a3 and Foxn1 genes were revealed using bioinformatic approximation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay using Retinoid Acid Receptor B (Rarb) as the immunoprecipitation target suggests RA regulation of Aldh1a3 and Foxn1 in mice. Our results frame a possible link of RA regulation in brain to ASD etiology, and a feasible non-additive effect of two apparently unrelated variants in ALDH1A3 and FOXN1 recognizing that every result given by next generation sequencing should be cautiously analyzed, as it might be an incidental finding.

  13. Whole-Exome Sequencing in a South American Cohort Links ALDH1A3, FOXN1 and Retinoic Acid Regulation Pathways to Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Ramos, Oscar A.; Olivares, Ana María; Haider, Neena B.; de Autismo, Liga Colombiana; Lattig, María Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a range of complex neurodevelopmental conditions principally characterized by dysfunctions linked to mental development. Previous studies have shown that there are more than 1000 genes likely involved in ASD, expressed mainly in brain and highly interconnected among them. We applied whole exome sequencing in Colombian—South American trios. Two missense novel SNVs were found in the same child: ALDH1A3 (RefSeq NM_000693: c.1514T>C (p.I505T)) and FOXN1 (RefSeq NM_003593: c.146C>T (p.S49L)). Gene expression studies reveal that Aldh1a3 and Foxn1 are expressed in ~E13.5 mouse embryonic brain, as well as in adult piriform cortex (PC; ~P30). Conserved Retinoic Acid Response Elements (RAREs) upstream of human ALDH1A3 and FOXN1 and in mouse Aldh1a3 and Foxn1 genes were revealed using bioinformatic approximation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay using Retinoid Acid Receptor B (Rarb) as the immunoprecipitation target suggests RA regulation of Aldh1a3 and Foxn1 in mice. Our results frame a possible link of RA regulation in brain to ASD etiology, and a feasible non-additive effect of two apparent