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Sample records for acetaminophen acetylsalicylic acid

  1. Identification and Quantitative Analysis of Acetaminophen, Acetylsalicylic Acid, and Caffeine in Commercial Analgesic Tablets by LC-MS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenk, Christopher J.; Hickman, Nicole M.; Fincke, Melissa A.; Motry, Douglas H.; Lavine, Barry

    2010-01-01

    An undergraduate LC-MS experiment is described for the identification and quantitative determination of acetaminophen, acetylsalicylic acid, and caffeine in commercial analgesic tablets. This inquiry-based experimental procedure requires minimal sample preparation and provides good analytical results. Students are provided sufficient background…

  2. Quantitative determination of acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen in tablets by FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Szostak, Roman; Mazurek, Sylwester

    2002-01-01

    A procedure for quantitative determination of acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen in pharmaceuticals by PLS (partial least squares) and PCR (principal component regression) treatment of FT (Fourier transform)-Raman spectroscopic data is proposed. The proposed method was tested on powdered samples. Three chemometric models were built: the first, for samples consisting of an active substance diluted by lactose, starch and talc; the second, in which a simple inorganic salt was applied as an internal standard and additions were not taken into account; and the third, in which a model was constructed for a commercial pharmaceutical, where all constituents of the tablet were known. By utilising selected spectral ranges and by changing the chemometric conditions it is possible to carry out fast and precise analysis of the active component content in medicines on the basis of the simplified chemometric models. The proposed method was tested on five commercial tablets. The results were compared with data obtained by intensity ratio and pharmacopoeial methods. To appraise the quality of the models, the relative standard error of predictions (RSEPs) were calculated for calibration and prediction data sets. These were 0.7-2.0% and 0.8-2.3%, respectively, for the different PLS models. Application of these models to the Raman spectra of commercial tablets containing acetylsalicylic acid gave RSEP values of 1.3-2.0% and a mean accuracy of 1.2-1.7% with a standard deviation of 0.6-1.2%. PMID:11827382

  3. [The forensic chemical investigation of acetylsalicylic acid].

    PubMed

    Shormanov, V K; Chupak, V V; Pobedonstseva, M N; Maslov, S V; Kibets, N A; Tikhopoeva, N N

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop the universal approach to the quantitative determination of acetylsalicylic acid in biological tissues and fluids to be applied in the practice of forensic chemical expertise with the use of thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, low-pressure column chromatography, and spectrophotometry. A system of solvents consisting of acetone and ethyl acetate (7:3) was proposed as a universal agent for extracting acetylsalicylic acid from the cadaveric tissues and blood. It was shown that acetylsalicylic acid and its principal metabolite, salicylic acid, can be purified from the endogenous admixtures present in the biological materials by column chromatography on silica gel L 40/100 mcm. Salicylic acid in extracts from biological materials was identified and quantified with the use of thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and electronic spectrophotometry. The method for forensic chemical investigation of acetylsalicylic acid has been developed and applied in the analysis of the material provided for expertise. PMID:26856059

  4. Serum albumin complexation of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Wiktor; Porebski, Grzegorz; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Roterman, Irena

    2009-06-01

    One possible origin of the type I hypersensitivity reaction is reaction of drugs such as acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolites being complexed with human serum albumin. Albumin, being transporting molecule abundant in blood plasma is able to bind large array of ligands varying from small single carbon particles to long hydrophobic tailed lipidic acids (e.g. myristic acid). This non specificity is possible because of multi domain scaffold and large flexibility of inter-domain loops, which results in serious reorientation of domains. Hypothesis that acetylsalicylic acid metabolites may play indirect role in activation of allergic reaction has been tested. Binding of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites in intra-domain space causes significant increase of liability of domains IIIA and IIIB. One of metabolites, salicyluric acid, once is bound causes distortion and partial unfolding of helices in domains IA, IIB and IIIB. Changed are both directions and amplitude of relative motions as well as intra-domain distances. In result albumin is able to cross-link of adjacent IgE receptors which subsequently starts allergic reaction. PMID:19689242

  5. Superiority of zinc complex of acetylsalicylic acid to acetylsalicylic acid in preventing postischemic myocardial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Sevil; Atmanli, Ayhan; Li, Shiliang; Radovits, Tamás; Hegedűs, Peter; Barnucz, Enikő; Hirschberg, Kristóf; Loganathan, Sivakkanan; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2015-09-01

    The pathophysiology of ischemic myocardial injury involves cellular events, reactive oxygen species, and an inflammatory reaction cascade. The zinc complex of acetylsalicylic acid (Zn(ASA)2) has been found to possess higher anti-inflammatory and lower ulcerogenic activities than acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Herein, we studied the effects of both ASA and Zn(ASA)2 against acute myocardial ischemia. Rats were pretreated with ASA (75 mg/kg) or Zn(ASA)2 (100 mg/kg) orally for five consecutive days. Isoproterenol (85 mg/kg, subcutaneously [s.c.]) was applied to produce myocardial infarction. After 17-22 h, animals were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]) and both electrical and mechanical parameters of cardiac function were evaluated in vivo. Myocardial histological and gene expression analyses were performed. In isoproterenol-treated rats, Zn(ASA)2 treatment normalized significantly impaired left-ventricular contractility index (Emax 2.6 ± 0.7 mmHg/µL vs. 4.6 ± 0.5 mmHg/µL, P < 0.05), increased stroke volume (30 ± 3 µL vs. 50 ± 6 µL, P < 0.05), decreased systemic vascular resistance (7.2 ± 0.7 mmHg/min/mL vs. 4.2 ± 0.5 mmHg/min/mL, P < 0.05) and reduced inflammatory infiltrate into the myocardial tissues. ECG revealed a restoration of elevated ST-segment (0.21 ± 0.03 mV vs. 0.09 ± 0.02 mV, P < 0.05) and prolonged QT-interval (79.2 ± 3.2 ms vs. 69.5 ± 2.5 ms, P < 0.05) by Zn(ASA)2. ASA treatment did not result in an improvement of these parameters. Additionally, Zn(ASA)2 significantly increased the mRNA-expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (+73 ± 15%), glutathione peroxidase 4 (+44 ± 12%), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 (+102 ± 22%). In conclusion, our data demonstrate that oral administration of zinc and ASA in the form of bis(aspirinato)zinc(II) complex is superior to ASA in preventing electrical

  6. Effects of microgravity on the binding of acetylsalicylic acid by Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, James E.; Gerren, Richard; Zoelle, Jeffery

    1995-07-01

    Bacteroids can be induced in vitro by treating growing Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii with succinic acid or succinic acid structural analogs like acetylsalicylic acid. Quantitating bacteroid induction by measuring acetylsalicylic binding under normal (1 g) conditions showed two forms of binding to occur. In one form of binding cells immediately bound comparatively high levels of acetylsalicylic acid, but the binding was quickly reversed. The second form of binding increased with time by first-order kinetics, and reached saturation in 40 s. Similar experiments performed in the microgravity environment aboard the NASA 930 aircraft showed only one form of binding and total acetylsalicylic acid bound was 32% higher than at 1 g.

  7. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury. PMID:26208104

  8. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury. PMID:26208104

  9. Acidosis, magnesium and acetylsalicylic acid: Effects on thrombin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, Nikolaj; Loznikova, Svetlana; Sukhodola, Aleksandr; Halets, Inessa; Bryszewska, Maria; Shcharbin, Dzmitry

    2013-03-01

    Thrombin, an enzyme from the hydrolase family, is the main component of the blood coagulation system. In ischemic stroke it acts as a serine protease that converts soluble fibrinogen into insoluble strands of fibrin forming blood clots in the brain. It has been found to phosphoresce at room temperature in the millisecond and microsecond ranges. The phosphorescence of thrombin was studied under physiological conditions, in acidosis (decrease of pH from 8.0 to 5.0) and on the addition of salts (magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride) and of acetylsalicylic acid, and its connection with thrombin function is discussed. Acidosis significantly increased the internal dynamics of thrombin. We propose that lactate-acidosis plays a protective role in stroke, preventing the formation of clots. The addition of NaCl and MgSO4 in different concentrations increased the internal dynamics of thrombin. Also, the addition of MgSO4 decreased thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. However, magnesium sulfate and acetylsalicylic acid in the therapeutic concentrations used for treatment of ischemic stroke had no effect on thrombin internal dynamics. The data obtained will help to elucidate the conformational stability of thrombin under conditions modulating lactate-acidosis and in the presence of magnesium sulfate.

  10. Acetylsalicylic Acid Daily vs Acetylsalicylic Acid Every 3 Days in Healthy Volunteers: Effect on Platelet Aggregation, Gastric Mucosa, and Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Plinio Minghin Freitas; Gagliano-Jucá, Thiago; Zaminelli, Tiago; Sampaio, Marinalva Ferreira; Blackler, Rory Willian; Trevisan, Miriam da Silva; Novaes Magalhães, Antônio Frederico; De Nucci, Gilberto

    2016-07-01

    Substantial platelet inhibition was observed 3 days after a single administration of acetylsalicylic acid 81 mg to healthy volunteers. Here we investigate prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) antrum concentrations and gastrointestinal symptoms in two treatment groups: one receiving losartan and acetylsalicylic acid every day and the other receiving losartan every day and acetylsalicylic acid every 3 days. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers from both sexes received either 50 mg losartan and acetylsalicylic acid 81 mg daily or 50 mg losartan and acetylsalicylic acid 81 every 3 days with placebo on the other days. Therapy was delivered for 30 days for both groups. Gastric endoscopy was performed before and after treatment period. Biopsies were collected for PGE2 quantification. Platelet function tests were carried out before and during treatment and TXB2 release on platelet rich plasma was measured. The every 3 day low-dose acetylsalicylic acid regimen produced complete inhibition of platelet aggregation compared to the daily treatment. Thromboxane B2 release was substantially abolished for both groups during treatment. There was no significant difference on the endoscopic score of both treatment groups after the 30-day treatment (P = .215). There was over 50% suppression of antrum PGE2 content on volunteers receiving acetylsalicylic acid daily (P = .0016), while for the every 3 day dose regimen there was no significant difference between pre and post-treatment antrum PGE2 dosages (P = .4193). Since PGE2 is involved in gastric healing, we understand that this new approach could be safer and as efficient as the standard daily therapy on a long-term basis. PMID:26634419

  11. Plasma levels of acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid after oral ingestion of plain and buffered acetylsalicylic acid in relation to bleeding time and thrombocyte function.

    PubMed

    Proost, J H; Van Imhoff, G W; Wesseling, H

    1983-02-25

    Buffered acetylsalicylic acid (Alka Seltzer, B-ASA) and plain aspirin (P-ASA) tablets were compared as to their effects on bleeding time and platelet function in eight healthy male volunteers. Two doses (500 and 1000 mg) of each preparation were investigated in a cross-over design, each volunteer being his own control in each dose group (n=4). Both preparations disturbed platelet aggregation to the same extent. Bleeding time increased after both preparations, though significantly more after the buffered preparation than after plain acetylsalicylic acid, irrespective of the dosage. The 1000 mg dose prolonged bleeding time significantly more than the 500 mg dose, irrespective of the preparation. Kinetic analysis showed that B-ASA gave higher peak plasma levels of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and accordingly salicylic acid peak levels were also higher after the buffered preparation. It is concluded that B-ASA in equi-analgesic doses prolongs bleeding time more than the plain preparation. Since it is less agressive on the gastro-intestinal mucosa, its use may be advantageous in situations where acetylsalicylic acid induced loss of platelet aggregation is desired. However, the risk of prolonged bleeding--e.g. after tooth extractions--is probably higher after the buffered preparation. PMID:6844122

  12. Acetylsalicylic acid treatment improves differentiation and immunomodulation of SHED.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Chen, C; Liu, S; Liu, D; Xu, X; Chen, X; Shi, S

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) possess multipotent differentiation and immunomodulatory properties. They have been used for orofacial bone regeneration and autoimmune disease treatment. In this study, we show that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) treatment is able to significantly improve SHED-mediated osteogenic differentiation and immunomodulation. Mechanistically, ASA treatment upregulates the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT)/Wnt/β-catenin cascade, leading to improvement of SHED-mediated bone regeneration, and also upregulates TERT/FASL signaling, leading to improvement of SHED-mediated T-cell apoptosis and ameliorating disease phenotypes in dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis mice. These data indicate that ASA treatment is a practical approach to improving SHED-based cell therapy. PMID:25394850

  13. High-pressure polymorphism of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin): Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, Ethan L.; Dreger, Zbigniew A.; Gupta, Yogendra M.

    2015-02-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to elucidate the high-pressure polymorphic behavior of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), an important pharmaceutical compound known as aspirin. Using a diamond anvil cell (DAC), single crystals of the two polymorphic phases of aspirin existing at ambient conditions (ASA-I and ASA-II) were compressed to 10 GPa. We found that ASA-I does not transform to ASA-II, but instead transforms to a new phase (ASA-III) above ∼2 GPa. It is demonstrated that this transformation primarily introduces structural changes in the bonding and arrangement of the acetyl groups and is reversible upon the release of pressure. In contrast, a less dense ASA-II shows no transition in the pressure range studied, though it appears to exhibit a disordered structure above 7 GPa. Our results suggest that ASA-III is the most stable polymorph of aspirin at high pressures.

  14. Central effects of acetylsalicylic acid on trigeminal-nociceptive stimuli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acetylsalicylic acid is one of the most used analgesics to treat an acute migraine attack. Next to the inhibitory effects on peripheral prostaglandin synthesis, central mechanisms of action have also been discussed. Methods Using a standardized model for trigeminal-nociceptive stimulation during fMRI scanning, we investigated the effect of acetylsalicylic acid on acute pain compared to saline in 22 healthy volunteers in a double-blind within-subject design. Painful stimulation was applied using gaseous ammonia and presented in a pseudo-randomized order with several control stimuli. All participants were instructed to rate the intensity and unpleasantness of every stimulus on a VAS scale. Based on previous results, we hypothesized to find an effect of ASA on central pain processing structures like the ACC, SI and SII as well as the trigeminal nuclei and the hypothalamus. Results Even though we did not find any differences in pain ratings between saline and ASA, we observed decreased BOLD signal changes in response to trigemino-nociceptive stimulation in the ACC and SII after administration of ASA compared to saline. This finding is in line with earlier imaging results investigating the effect of ASA on acute pain. Contrary to earlier findings from animal studies, we could not find an effect of ASA on the trigeminal nuclei in the brainstem or within the hypothalamic area. Conclusion Taken together our study replicates earlier findings of an attenuating effect of ASA on pain processing structures, which adds further evidence to a possibly central mechanism of action of ASA. PMID:25201152

  15. Effects of nocloprost clathrate on absorption of acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, W; Zschiesche, M; Franke, G; Amon, I

    1994-01-01

    The cytoprotective prostaglandin E2 analog nocloprost clathrate (NOCLO) is tested as a prophylactic for gastrointestinal lesions of NSAID. The effects of 400 micrograms NOCLO versus respective placebos with and without equivalent amounts of beta-cyclodextrin on the pharmacokinetic behavior of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), given 30 min after NOCLO, were studied in two single-blind, parallel-group trials. The trials were performed in 15 male healthy volunteers (age 21-25 years, body weight 62-94 kg, body height 172-187 cm) with known N-acetylation and debrisoquine type hydroxylation phenotype. ASA, salicylic acid (SA), and salicyluric acid (SU) in plasma and SA and SU in urine were measured by HPLC. NOCLO delayed the absorption of ASA (increased tmax, lower Cmax) significantly in comparison with both placebos. AUC and clearance values were not changed by NOCLO premedication. There were neither differences between the two placebo groups nor between the two groups pretreated with NOCLO with regard to any pharmacokinetic parameter. The changes in drug absorption are caused by the sum of those cytoprotective effects of prostaglandin which are also determinants of drug absorption. PMID:8199752

  16. Effects of acetylsalicylic acid and paracetamol alone and in combination on prostanoid synthesis in man.

    PubMed Central

    Bippi, H; Frölich, J C

    1990-01-01

    1. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of acetylsalicylic acid and paracetamol given separately and in combination on total body and renal PGE2 synthesis in healthy volunteers. 2. In a randomized four-way cross-over study eleven female volunteers received for two consecutive days 3 g day-1 acetylsalicylic acid or 3 g day-1 paracetamol or a combination of 1.5 g day-1 acetylsalicylic acid and 1.5 g day-1 paracetamol, or 1.5 g day-1 acetylsalicylic acid separated by washout phases of at least 5 days. Urinary excretion of the major urinary metabolite of PGE2 (PGE-MUM), PGE2 and creatinine clearance were measured before and on day 2 of each treatment period. Compliance was tested by measuring metabolites of the two drugs in urine. 3. Paracetamol did not reduce urinary excretion of PGE2 whereas both dosages of acetylsalicylic acid caused a significant reduction. 4. The combination of both drugs did not reduce PGE2 excretion more than acetylsalicylic acid alone. 5. All four drug schedules reduced urinary excretion of PGE-MUM significantly. PMID:2310655

  17. Acetylsalicylic acid as a potential pediatric health hazard: legislative aspects concerning accidental intoxications in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Mund, Menen E; Gyo, Christoph; Brüggmann, Dörthe; Quarcoo, David; Groneberg, David A

    2016-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid is a frequently used medication worldwide. It is not used in pediatrics due its association with Reye syndrome. However, in case of pediatric intoxication, children are more fragile to salicylate poisoning because of their reduced ability of buffer the acid stress. Intoxication leads to a decoupling of oxidative phosphorylation and subsequently to a loss in mitochondrial function. Symptoms of poisoning are diverse; eventually they can lead to the death of the patient. Governmental websites of various EU countries were searched for legal information on acetylsalicylic acid availability in pharmacies and non-pharmacy stores. Various EU countries permit prescription-free sales of acetylsalicylic acid in pharmacies and non-pharmacy stores. In Sweden acetylsalicylic acid 500 mg may be sold in a maximum package size of 20 tablets or effervescent tablets in a non-pharmacy. In the UK a maximum of 16 tablets of acetylsalicylic acid 325 mg is allowed to sell in non-pharmacies. In Ireland acetylsalicylic acid is classified as S2 medication. Subsequently, acetylsalicylic acid is allowed to be sold prescription-free in pharmacies and non-pharmacy stores. In the Netherlands acetylsalicylic acid may only be sold in drug stores or pharmacies. A maximum of 24 tablets of 500 mg is allowed to purchase in a drug store. Several countries in the European Union are permitted to offer acetylsalicylic acid prescription-free in pharmacies and non-pharmacy stores without legal guidance on the storage position within the store. Further research is needed to investigate whether acetylsalicylic acid is located directly accessible to young children within the stores in EU countries which permit prescription-free sales of acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:27418941

  18. Modified MCM-41 as a drug delivery system for acetylsalicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyskočilová, Eliška; Luštická, Ivana; Paterová, Iva; Machová, Libuše; Červený, Libor

    2014-12-01

    The modification of prepared MCM-41 by different groups (amino, chloro and oxo) was studied. Prepared materials were treated by acetylsalicylic acid and hybrid materials were characterized, compared from the point of view of immobilized amount of active substance. The highest amount of acetylsalicylic acid was detected using methyl-tert- butyl ether as a solvent and MCM-41 without modification after 1 h (0.35 g per 1 g of the support) or MCM modified by amino group after 5 h (0.37 g per 1 g of the support) as a support. Using amino modified MCM, the longer treatment by acetylsalicylic acid converged to the equilibrium and after 24 h the immobilized amount was 0.3 g per 1 g. A dissolution in vitro study was carried out, comparing the stability of formed interactions. The slowest dissolution was detected using non-modified MCM-41 and oxo modified material.

  19. Acetylsalicylic Acid and Eflornithine in Treating Patients at High Risk for Colorectal Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This phase II trial is studying how well giving acetylsalicylic acid together with eflornithine works in treating patients at high risk for colorectal cancer. Chemoprevention is the use of certain drugs to keep cancer from forming. The use of acetylsalicylic acid and eflornithine may prevent colorectal cancer. |

  20. Effect of transdermic acetylsalicylic acid on hemostasis in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Adriana B; Funosas, Esteban; Maestri, Lorella; Lucena, Perla Hermida

    2007-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) exerts an antiaggregatory effect on platelets by irreversible inhibition of the enzyme thrombocyte cyclooxigenase when it is administered orally at doses above 80 mg/day. For several years ASA has been available as a solution that can be topically applied on the skin. It is widely used by athletes and individuals with chronic rheumatic disorders. However, it has not been established to date whether the plasma levels that result from these doses of ASA affect hemostasis during odontological procedures that involve bleeding, causing platelet dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether topical application is capable of affecting hemostasis. Three studies were conducted: A, B y C. Each of the 3 groups included 12 healthy volunteers of both sexes. The aim of study A was to evaluate if the formulation for topical application resulted in plasma levels of ASA that resembled those observed for the oral formulation and affect hemostasis. In experiment A, plasma levels of salicylic acid (SA) were assessed for each volunteer at 30 minutes, 60 minutes, 6 hours, 12 hours and 24 hours after oral administration of a dose of 500 mg ASA. Experiment B was identical to experiment A except for the fact that ASA was topically applied employing a commercial preparation Aspirub in a predetermined area at a rate of 2 ml/day over a period of 15 days. Experiment C was designed in the same way as experiment B, for a higher dose and a longer period of time (4 ml/day over a period of 30 days). One of the volunteers exhibited detectable salicylemia that could affect hemostasis as occurs with the oral formulation. The following two studies (C1 and C2) employed doses of Aspirub of 8 and 16 ml/day respectively, over a period of 30 days. We measured biochemical parameters associated to platelet function. The dose of 8 ml/day induced moderate alterations in all the parameters related to platelet function and the daily dose of 16 ml inhibited platelet

  1. Use of acetylsalicylic acid by physicians and in the community.

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, J; Steel, K; Feagan, B G; Laupacis, A; Pederson, L L

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine physicians' attitudes toward prescribing acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), physicians' own use of ASA and the prevalence of ASA use in the community following the trials of ASA for primary prevention of coronary heart disease. DESIGN: Random sample surveys of physicians and the general public by mail and telephone respectively and a mail survey of a selected panel of expert cardiologists and neurologists. SETTING: London, Ont., and surrounding Middlesex County. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 210 physicians (77% of eligible subjects), including family practitioners and most types of specialists, with an active medical licence and 666 English-speaking people (75% of eligible subjects) aged 18 years or more living in a household with active, listed telephone service. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Long-term ASA use (at least 80 mg on alternate days for 4 or more consecutive weeks) for the treatment of atherosclerosis. MAIN RESULTS: Sampled physicians and experts agreed that long-term ASA therapy was indicated in patients with unstable angina, a transient ischemic episode or recent myocardial infarction but not for primary prevention in healthy middle-aged men and women at low risk for ischemic vascular disease. Both groups were uncertain about the role of ASA in primary prevention in asymptomatic people with risk factors for atherosclerosis. Nine (16%) of the 55 male physicians aged 50 years or more took ASA routinely for primary prevention. In the community survey almost all those who used ASA routinely were 50 years or older. The proportions of men and women in this age group who used ASA routinely for any reason were 19% (95% confidence limits [CLs] 11 and 28) and 14% (95% CLs 8 and 19) respectively; the proportions of men and women who used ASA routinely and apparently for primary prevention were 8% and 1% respectively. A total of 43% (95% CLs 30 and 57) of those with apparent ischemic vascular disease took ASA routinely. Medically unsupervised long-term ASA

  2. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ying; Naito, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-11-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with 70 µM polaprezinc for 24 h, and then stimulated with or without 15 mM acetylsalicylic acid for a further 15 h. Subsequent cellular viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced cell death was also qualified by fluorescent microscopy of Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide. Heat shock proteins 70 protein expression after adding polaprezinc or acetylsalicylic acid was assessed by western blotting. To investigate the role of Heat shock protein 70, Heat shock protein 70-specific small interfering RNA was applied. Cell viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining and apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that acetylsalicylic acid significantly induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Polaprezinc significantly suppressed acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells at its late phase. At the same time, polaprezinc increased Heat shock protein 70 expressions of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. However, in Heat shock protein 70-silenced rat intestinal epithelial cells, polaprezinc could not suppress acetylsalicylic acid -induced apoptosis at its late phase. We conclude that polaprezinc-increased Heat shock protein 70 expression might be an important mechanism by which polaprezinc suppresses acetylsalicylic

  3. Endoscopic evaluation of the comparative effects of acetylsalicylic acid and choline magnesium trisalicylate on human gastric and duodenal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kilander, A; Dotevall, G

    1983-02-01

    A new salicylate product, choline magnesium trisalicylate (Trilisate tablets), and acetylsalicylic acid were compared for their local effects in equipotent doses on the gastroduodenal mucosa in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study, using 10 healthy volunteers. After five-day periods of administration, gastroduodenoscopy was performed and photographs were obtained. All subjects given acetylsalicylic acid developed multiple mucosal lesions, but in only four subjects given choline magnesium trisalicylate were slight mucosal changes noted. Mean serum salicylate levels were similar in the two groups. Our data suggest that the risk of developing mucosal lesions is much less during treatment with choline magnesium trisalicylate than with acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:6337663

  4. Determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its major metabolites in bovine urine using ultra performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Castillo-García, M L; Aguilar-Caballos, M P; Gómez-Hens, A

    2015-03-15

    A new method based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with photometric and fluorometric detection for the determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its main metabolites, namely gentisic, salicylic and salicyluric acids, in bovine urine samples is reported. Photometric detection was used for acetylsalicylic acid determination, whereas the native fluorescence of the metabolites was monitored using fluorometric detection. The separation was performed under isocratic conditions, using acetonitrile-phosphate solution (3.5mM, pH 3.5) (26:74, v/v) as the mobile phase. The retention times of the four compounds were lower than 2min, which are shorter than those achieved using conventional HPLC. Under the optimum separation conditions, the dynamic ranges and detection limits (ngmL(-1)) were: 0.2-2500, 0.09 for gentisic acid; 0.2-2500, 0.08 for salicylic acid and 2.5-15,000, 1.1 for salicyluric acid, using fluorescence detection, and 10-25,000, 2.2 for acetylsalicylic acid, using UV detection. Intra-day and inter-day precision data were assessed at two levels of concentration of each analyte using both detection systems. The selectivity of the method was checked by assaying different drugs of veterinary use showing that most of them did not interfere with the determination of the analytes. The method has been applied to the analysis of bovine urine samples, which only required a simple clean up step of the samples prior to injection in the UPLC system. A recovery study was performed, which provided values in the range of 80-100%. This fact proves the practical usefulness of this method as an ultrafast analytical tool for the therapeutic control of acetylsalicylic acid administration in bovine animals intended for food production. PMID:25660719

  5. Acetylsalicylic Acid Compared to Placebo in Treating High-Risk Patients With Subsolid Lung Nodules | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase II trial studies acetylsalicylic acid compared to placebo in treating high-risk patients with subsolid lung nodules. A nodule is a growth or lump that may be malignant (cancer) or benign (not cancer). Chemoprevention is the use of drugs to keep cancer from forming or coming back. The use of acetylsalicylic acid may keep cancer from forming in patients with subsolid lung nodules. |

  6. Acetaminophen

    MedlinePlus

    ... headaches, muscle aches, menstrual periods, colds and sore throats, toothaches, backaches, and reactions to vaccinations (shots), and ... acetaminophen to a child who has a sore throat that is severe or does not go away, ...

  7. Acetaminophen

    MedlinePlus

    ... use the device that comes in the product packaging.To insert an acetaminophen suppository into the rectum, ... U.S. be shown to be both safe and effective prior to marketing. Please see the FDA website ...

  8. Voltammetric determination of salicylic acid in pharmaceuticals formulations of acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Torriero, Angel A J; Luco, Juan M; Sereno, Leonides; Raba, Julio

    2004-02-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of salicylic acid (SA) has been studied on a glassy carbon electrode using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) method. SA gives a single irreversible oxidation wave over the wide pH range studied. The irreversibility of the electrode process was verified by different criteria. The mechanism of oxidation is discussed. Using differential pulse voltammetry, SA yielded a well-defined voltammetric response in Britton-Robinson buffer solution, pH 2.37 at 1.088V (versus Ag/AgCl). The method was linear over the SA concentration range: 1-60mugml(-1). The method was successfully applied for the analysis of SA as a hydrolysis product, in solid pharmaceutical formulations containing acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). PMID:18969288

  9. [Acetylsalicylic acid desensitization in the new era of percutaneous coronary intervention].

    PubMed

    Fuertes Ferre, Georgina; Ferrer Gracia, Maria Cruz; Calvo Cebollero, Isabel

    2015-09-21

    Dual antiplatelet therapy is essential in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation. Hypersensitivity to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) limits treatment options. Desensitization to ASA has classically been studied in patients with respiratory tract disease. Over the last years, many protocols have been described about ASA desensitization in patients with ischemic heart disease, including acute coronary syndrome and the need for coronary stent implantation. It is important to know the efficacy and safety of ASA desensitization in these patients. PMID:25577589

  10. [Antithrombotic therapy after myocardial infarction: arguments for the use of acetylsalicylic acid and coumarin derivatives].

    PubMed

    Waskowsky, W M; Brouwer, A; Verheugt, F W A

    2005-01-01

    Patients who survived myocardial infarction and who are being treated with the current optimal therapy (antithrombotics, statins and beta-blockers), have a 10-20% chance of death, re-infarction and stroke within in the first year. A possible explanation for this could be an increased activation and generation ofthrombin for at least 6 months following the cardiovascular event preceding preventative therapy. Acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel do not affect activation by thrombin of the platelet aggregation and the clotting cascade. The additional use of cumarin derivatives could therefore reduce the chance of recurring thrombotic events, and subsequently improve prognosis. Since the nineteen-nineties several randomised trials have been conducted to study the clinical relevance ofcumarin derivatives both with and without acetylsalicylic acid, in patients who had had a myocardial infarction. The conclusions of these studies were not unambiguous. If the international normalized ratio (INR) was kept > 2 for a long period, by means of frequent check-ups and effective dosage adjustment, the chance of death, recurrent myocardial infarction or stroke was 30-50% lower than when acetylsalicylic acid only was used. The risk of bleeding was raised by 2-4 times, but there were no life-threatening episodes of bleeding. In view of the recent development of anticoagulant agents, for which monitoring seems to be becoming unnecessary, identification of patients who would benefit most from a combined antithrombotic strategy is warranted. PMID:15688836

  11. Determination of acetylsalicylic acid in commercial tablets by SERS using silver nanoparticle-coated filter paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallum, Loriz Francisco; Soares, Frederico Luis Felipe; Ardila, Jorge Armando; Carneiro, Renato Lajarim

    2014-12-01

    In this work, filter paper was used as a low cost substrate for silver nanoparticles in order to perform the detection and quantification of acetylsalicylic acid by SERS in a commercial tablet. The reaction conditions were 150 mM of ammonium hydroxide, 50 mM of silver nitrate, 500 mM of glucose, 12 min of the reaction time, 45 °C temperature, pretreatment with ammonium hydroxide and quantitative filter paper (1-2 μm). The average size of silver nanoparticles deposited on the paper substrate was 180 nm. Adsorption time of acetylsalicylic acid on the surface of the silver-coated filter paper was studied and an adsorption time of 80 min was used to build the analytical curve. It was possible to obtain a calibration curve with good precision with a coefficient of determination of 0.933. The method proposed in this work was capable to quantify acetylsalicylic acid in commercial tablets, at low concentration levels, with relative error of 2.06% compared to the HPLC. The preparation of filter paper coated with silver nanoparticles using Tollen's reagent presents several advantages such as low cost of synthesis, support and reagents; minimum amount of residuals, which are easily treated, despite the SERS spectroscopy presenting fast analysis, with low sample preparation and low amount of reactants as in HPLC analysis.

  12. DNA damage and oxidative stress induced by acetylsalicylic acid in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Islas-Flores, Hariz; García-Medina, Sandra; SanJuan-Reyes, Nely

    2014-08-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory widely used due to its low cost and high effectiveness. This compound has been found in water bodies worldwide and is toxic to aquatic organisms; nevertheless its capacity to induce oxidative stress in bioindicators like Daphnia magna remains unknown. This study aimed to evaluate toxicity in D. magna induced by acetylsalicylic acid in water, using oxidative stress and DNA damage biomarkers. An acute toxicity test was conducted in order to determine the median lethal concentration (48-h LC50) and the concentrations to be used in the subsequent subacute toxicity test in which the following biomarkers were evaluated: lipid peroxidation, oxidized protein content, activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, and level of DNA damage. Lipid peroxidation level and oxidized protein content were significantly increased (p<0.05), and antioxidant enzymes significantly altered with respect to controls; while the DNA damage were significantly increased (p<0.05) too. In conclusion, acetylsalicylic acid induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in D. magna. PMID:24747829

  13. Copper(II) interactions with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents. I. Salicylic acid and acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Brumas, V; Brumas, B; Berthon, G

    1995-02-15

    Recently a growing body of evidence has accumulated on the beneficial effects of copper compounds toward various models of inflammation, and copper complexes of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to be more effective in this respect than the parent agents. However, the origin of this activity remains unclear: The ability of NSAIDs to influence copper metabolism is still questionable, and apart from the claimed SOD-like activity of copper salts in vivo, relatively little is known about how copper-NSAID interactions may help regulate the inflammatory process. Before the potential role of copper-NSAID complexes versus inflammation can be elucidated, speciation studies are necessary (i) to analyze the overall influence of these drugs on copper metabolism and (ii) to discriminate the individual complexes likely to represent the active form of the drug in vivo. In this paper, copper(II) complex equilibria with salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids--and benzoic acid used as a reference--as well as the mixed-ligand complex equilibria generated by these binary systems and L-histidine [main low-molar-mass ligand of copper(II) in blood plasma] have been investigated under physiological conditions (37 degrees C; 0.15-M NaCl). Confirming previous observations by others, resulting simulated plasma copper distributions virtually rule out any quantitative influence of salicylate on copper tissue diffusion at therapeutic levels. Even though, as is presently shown, both salicylate and acetylsalicylate may favor the gastrointestinal absorption of copper, it seems unlikely that salicylate can exert its antinflammatory activity predominantly through copper complexation. The assertion that copper-NSAID complexes represent the active forms of NSAIDs therefore seems to be of limited significance for salicylate. PMID:7876837

  14. Study of an anaphylactoid reaction to acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chien-Ming; Chen, Wu-Charng; Lin, Ching-Yuang

    2002-01-01

    Generalized itching, urticaria and anaphylactic shock developed in a 9-year-old girl on two separate occasions after she ingested acetaminophen. She was admitted to our hospital for observation during oral challenge. Total eosinophil counts, total serum IgE, IgA, IgG, IgM, C3, and C4, specific IgE antibodies to six common allergens, and skin prick tests to purified acetaminophen and acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) were unremarkable. No reaction occurred on open challenge with acetylsalicylic acid and mefenamic acid. However, urticaria and itching sensation occurred 45 min after ingesting 50 mg of purified acetaminophen. Dizziness, shivering, tachycardia and fainting also developed later. These symptoms resolved after treatment with a diphenhydramine injection and intravenous infusion of normal saline. There was a marked increase in the blood histamine level after challenge. In vitro histamine release before oral challenge was also abnormally as high as 50%. In summary, she had an immediate allergic reaction to acetaminophen but was tolerant to acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:12148965

  15. DFT studies on the vibrational and electronic spectra of acetylsalicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yunfeng; Tang, Guodong; Han, Yonghong; Culnane, Lance F.; Zhao, Jianyin; Zhang, Yu

    2016-05-01

    The following is a theoretical and experimental study on the vibrational and electronic properties of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Vibrational information was obtained by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy which agree well with harmonic vibrational frequency calculations. The calculations were carried out using density functional theory B3LYP methods with 6-311G** and LANL2DZ basis sets. The vibrational assignments were calculated by Gaussview. Absorption UV-Vis experiments of ASA reveal three maximum peaks at 203, 224 and 277 nm, which are in agreement with calculated electronic transitions using TD-B3LYP/6-311G**.

  16. IR spectroscopic investigation of the inhibition of the glycation process by acetylsalicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero de Joshi, Virginia; Gil, Herminia; Contreras, Silvia; Velasquez, William; Joshi, Narahari V.

    2000-05-01

    An IR spectroscopic study was carried out at room temperature for Human Serum albumin (HSA) glycated with fructose and glucose and inhibited with acetylsalicylic acid. The glycation process was carried out in our laboratory by a conventional method to confirm earlier reported observation of the effect of glycation on the intensity variation of the IR spectra, particularly, in the range 1500 cm-1 to 1700 cm-1 and around 3300 cm-1. IR spectra reveal that the effects of glycation of HSA by fructose are more intense than with glucose, which is the expected. Bovine serum albumin was also glycated using Glucose-6-phosphate disodium salt, and gamma-globulin was glycate with glucose, As expected, the glycation process was more intense with glucose-t-phosphate disodium salt. Acetyl salicylic acid was also used and its inhibitor effects could be observed in both cases, with glucose and with glucose-6-phosphate disodium salt even though, to a smaller extent with the latter. This is consistent with the earlier data and is explained on the basis of the attachment of macromolecules to (epsilon) -NH2 groups of lysines. The experimental results confirm that acetylsalicylic acid, indeed, acts as an inhibitor by acetylation of the (epsilon) -NG2 group where the sugars are supposed to be attached.

  17. [Acetylsalicylic acid after iliac-femoro-popliteal interventions?].

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, G; Rossmann, E; Gruber, E; Pratschner, T; Schemper, M; Piza, F; Zekert, F; Polterauer, P

    1991-01-01

    To determine whether acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) in a daily dose of 1500 mg versus untreated controls is effective in patients with peripheral arterial disease a prospective randomized but not placebo-controlled one single centre trial was undertaken. Patients were assigned to one of two groups by means of multi-dimensional contingency tables whereas the risk factors age, sex, height, body weight, diabetic metabolic state, hypertension, history of myocardial infarction, smoking habits and preoperative clinical status according to the Fontaine classification where found in the state of balance. 298 patients with arterial occlusions in the iliaco-femoro-popliteal level were recruited during 1971-1974, the primary end points were probability of patency and probability of survival. In regard as well as to the probability of patency (p less than 0.56 Breslow, p less than 0.66 Mantel) as to the probability of survival (p less than 0.10 Breslow, p less than 0.70 Mantel) no statistical significant difference was detected. In conclusion ASA, in the doses administered here, was unable to improve patency or prolong patient survival, an outcome, which is at variance with results obtained by others. PMID:2050539

  18. Numerical simulation of the solvate structures of acetylsalicylic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide containing polar co-solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, V. E.; Antipova, M. L.; Gurina, D. L.; Odintsova, E. G.; Kumeev, R. S.; Golubev, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen-bonded complexes of acetylsalicylic acid with polar co-solvents in supercritical carbon dioxide, modified by methanol, ethanol, and acetone of 0.03 mole fraction concentration, are studied by numerical methods of classical molecular dynamics simulation and quantum chemical calculations. The structure, energy of formation, and lifetime of hydrogen-bonded complexes are determined, along with their temperature dependences (from 318 to 388 K at constant density of 0.7 g cm-3). It is shown that the hydrogen bonds between acetylsalicylic acid and methanol are most stable at 318 K and are characterized by the highest value of absolute energy. At higher supercritical temperatures, however, the longest lifetime is observed for acetylsalicylic acid-ethanol complexes. These results correlate with the known literature experimental data showing that the maximum solubility of acetylsalicylic acid at density values close to those considered in this work and at temperatures of 318 and 328 K is achieved when using methanol and ethanol as co-solvents, respectively.

  19. Quality and antioxidant properties on sweet cherries as affected by preharvest salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids treatments.

    PubMed

    Giménez, María José; Valverde, Juan Miguel; Valero, Daniel; Guillén, Fabián; Martínez-Romero, Domingo; Serrano, María; Castillo, Salvador

    2014-10-01

    The effects of salicylic acid (SA) or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) treatments during on-tree cherry growth and ripening on fruit quality attributes, especially those related with the content on bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity were analysed in this research. For this purpose, two sweet cherry cultivars, 'Sweet Heart' and 'Sweet Late', were used and SA or ASA treatments, at 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0mM concentrations, were applied at three key points of fruit development (pit hardening, initial colour changes and onset of ripening). These treatments increased fruit weight and ameliorated quality attributes at commercial harvest, and led to cherries with higher concentration in total phenolics and in total anthocyanins, as well as higher antioxidant activity, in both hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions. Thus, preharvest treatments with SA or ASA could be promising tools to improve sweet cherry quality and health beneficial effects for consumers. PMID:24799232

  20. Enteric coating can lead to reduced antiplatelet effect of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Haastrup, Peter Fentz; Grønlykke, Thor; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg

    2015-03-01

    Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is widely used as antithrombotic prophylaxis. Enteric-coated ASA has been developed to decrease the risk of gastrointestinal side effects. The consequences of enteric coating on pharmacokinetics and antiplatelet effect of ASA have not systematically been assessed. This MiniReview demonstrates that data from clinical trials indicate that enteric coating can reduce the antiplatelet effect of ASA compared to plain ASA. This is possibly due to decreased bioavailability of ASA caused by prolonged solvation and absorption of the enteric-coated formulations. Therefore, low-dose enteric-coated ASA might not be bioequivalent to plain ASA, entailing the risk of insufficient cardiovascular prophylaxis. PMID:25469781

  1. Acetylsalicylic-acid-containing drugs and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs available in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Brigden, M; Smith, R E

    1997-01-01

    A large number of drugs containing acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are available by prescription and over the counter in Canada. The possibility of serious side effects and drug interactions is therefore high. The authors have compiled a comprehensive list of products containing these drugs from information supplied by pharmaceutical databases, independent marketing researchers and Health Canada's Drug Directorate. Physicians should ensure that additional ASA-containing drugs or NSAIDs are not inadvertently taken by patients, especially those receiving oral anticoagulant therapy or those with a qualitative platelet defect. Patients at risk should be cautioned to check with their physician before taking any new medication, even over-the-counter products. PMID:9099173

  2. The absorption of acetylsalicylic acid from the stomach in relation to intragastric pH.

    PubMed

    Dotevall, G; Ekenved, G

    1976-01-01

    A comparative study on the effect of a buffered (pH 6.5) and an unbuffered (pH 2.9) solution of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on gastric pH, gastric emptying, and gastric absorption of ASA was performed in 10 healthy volunteers. Gastric pH was recorded using radiotelemetry. Gastric emptying and gastric absorption was studied with an aspiration technique and phenol red as nonabsorbable marker. Administration of the unbuffered solution to the fasting subjects resulted in a gastric pH of about 2 and absorption of ASA from the stomach was found to occur. The buffered solution of ASA increased gastric pH to above 5 and gastric absorption of ASA was found to be significantly less than after the unbuffered solution. The buffered solution was emptied from the stomach more rapidly than the unbuffered one. PMID:12558

  3. Controlled release of acetylsalicylic acid from polythiophene/carrageenan hydrogel via electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pairatwachapun, Sanita; Paradee, Nophawan; Sirivat, Anuvat

    2016-02-10

    Blends between polythiophene (PTh) and a carrageenan hydrogel were fabricated as the matrix for the electric field assisted drug release. The pristine carrageenan and the blend films were prepared by the solution casting using acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) as the anionic model drug and Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Ba(2+) as the crosslinking agents. The ASA was released by the Fickian diffusion mechanism. The diffusion coefficient decreased with increasing crosslinking ratio or decreasing crosslinking ionic radii. The diffusion coefficients were greater with the applied electrical potentials by an order of magnitude relative to those without electric field. Moreover, the diffusion coefficients with PTh as the drug carrier were higher than those without PTh. Thus, the presence of the conductive polymer in the hydrogel blend coupled with applied electric field is shown here to drastically enhance the drug delivery rate. PMID:26686123

  4. [Absolute bioavailability of a special sustained-release acetylsalicylic acid formulation].

    PubMed

    Lücker, P W; Swoboda, M; Wetzelsberger, N

    1989-03-01

    Absolute Bioavailability of a Special Acetylsalicylic Acid Sustained Release Formulation. The absolute bioavailability of an acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) sustained release formulation (Contrheuma retard), containing 300 mg ASA as initial dose and 350 mg in a retard formulation, was determined in comparison to a standard ASA solution for intravenous administration in a two-treatment, two-period cross-over trial with 6 healthy male volunteers by comparing the areas under the plasma-fluctuation-time curves of the primary metabolite. In addition, it was examined by comparison of the mean times after administration of both formulations, whether the test formulation meets the requirements of a sustained release formulation. The investigations led to the following results: The absolute bioavailability of the test formulation was 95%. The statistical comparison of the areas under the concentration-time courses allowed no decision (neither for equivalence nor difference). The maximal concentration of SA after intravenous administration of the standard formulation was reached after 0.4 h on an average and amounted to 62 micrograms/ml. After oral administration of the test formulation, a mean concentration maximum of 28 micrograms/ml was calculated, which had been reached after about 2 h. The differences are statistically significant. The mean time for SA was 6 h after the standard formulation, whereas after administration of the test compound, a mean of 11.5 h was calculated. 24 h following administration, the concentration of SA was 1.3 micrograms/ml after intravenous administration of the standard formulation and 5.5 micrograms/ml after administration of the test formulation. These differences, too, are statistically significant. From the comparison of the mean time for SA, a retard factor of 1.9 was calculated. PMID:2757664

  5. The healing effect of TGF-alpha on gastric ulcer induced by acetylsalicylic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Yetkin, G; Celebi, N; Ozer, C; Gönül, B; Ozoğul, C

    2004-06-11

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of microemulsion and aqueous solution containing transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) and/or aprotinin administered intragastrically (i.g.) on healing of acute gastric ulcers induced by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). The microemulsion was prepared by modification of the microemulsion formulation described in our previous study. Acute gastric lesions were induced by the application of ASA (150 mg/kg in 1.5 ml of 0.2N HCl i.g.). TGF-alpha in solution or microemulsion formulations were administered at a dose of 10 microg/kg per 24h i.g. for 2 days. The effects of TGF-alpha on the healing was evaluated with the measurement of ulcer score, basal gastric acid secretion, total protein content of gastric fluid, gastric mucus level and histological analysis. The results indicated that the highest decrease in ulcer area was observed in group treated with microemulsion containing TGF-alpha plus aprotinin (TA-ME). TGF-alpha in microemulsion formulation was more effective than TGF-alpha in solution formulation in the increase of gastric mucus secretion, in the decrease of gastric acid secretions and ulcer scores. Histological evaluation of the gastric mucosa samples revealed that, best recovery was obtained in the TA-ME treated group. PMID:15158979

  6. Effect of tocopherol and acetylsalicylic acid on the biochemical indices of blood in dioxin-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Rosińczuk, Joanna; Całkosiński, Ireneusz

    2015-07-01

    New sources of dioxins and increased dioxin concentrations in the environment, coupled with their increased bioavailability along the food chain and accumulation in adipose tissues, contribute to various adverse long-term biological effects. The purpose of the study was to determine whether tocopherol protects the CNS by decreasing the pro-inflammatory influence of free radicals generated by TCDD; whether acetylsalicylic acid inhibits the production of inflammatory mediators; and whether the combined administration of tocopherol and acetylsalicylic acid to TCDD-exposed rats has a potential CNS-protective effect. The study included 117 rats divided into 8 groups: 75 female and 12 male Buffalo rats aged 8-10 weeks, weighing 140-160 g; as well as 30 female rats aged 6 weeks and weighing 120 g, which were the offspring of females from each study group. In the experiment, the following substances were used: 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), dosed at 5 μg/kg BW and 12.5 μg/kg BW, diluted in a 1% DMSO solution at the concentration of 1 μg/ml; α-tocopherol acetate, dosed at 30 mg/kg BW, in 0.2 ml of oil solution; and acetylsalicylic acid, 50mg/kg BW, suspended in 0.5 ml of starch solution, administered orally using a feeding tube. Pleurisy was induced by an injection of 0.15 ml of 1% carrageenin solution. The use of tocopherol reduces the adverse effects of the inflammatory reaction induced by TCDD. Administering tocopherol improves protein metabolism by reducing protein catabolism, and raises γ-globulin fraction levels. Combined acetylsalicylic acid and tocopherol suppress catabolic processes accompanying inflammation. PMID:26056971

  7. [The blood anticoagulant system in rats perorally administered a heparin-acetylsalicylic acid complex].

    PubMed

    Kudriashov, B A; Liapina, L A; Pastorova, V E; Kondashevskaia, M V

    1991-01-01

    Heparin/acetylsalicylate complexes (1:9 and 10:1) were obtained in vitro. Single or chronic (7-8 days) per os administration to white rats of 0.1% solution of the heparin/acetylsalicylate complex (0.3 ml/200 g body weight) enhanced anticoagulative properties of blood plasma, increased the fibrinolytic activity in respect of stabilized fibrin, and diminished the thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. PMID:1787232

  8. Influence of cellulose powder structure on moisture-induced degradation of acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Mihranyan, A; Strømme, M; Ek, R

    2006-02-01

    The stability of crystalline acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) powder in binary mixtures with cellulose powders was investigated to reveal information about the influence of the cellulose structural properties on the moisture-induced ASA degradation. Different cellulose powder samples were manufactured and characterized by X-ray diffraction and N2 BET gas adsorption. The degradation patterns in ASA/cellulose mixtures were monitored as a function of salicylic acid increase versus time under various relative humidity conditions at 50 degrees C. The crystallinity index of cellulose samples varied between approximately 49 and 95%. The results indicated that cellulose powder with the lowest crystallinity index exhibited lower degradation rates than the samples with the higher crystallinity index. It should be noted that higher ASA degradation rates were observed in the samples with comparably lower moisture contents. This effect was most pronounced in the 1:3 (w/w), ASA/cellulose mixtures, whereas in 3:1 (w/w), ASA/cellulose mixtures the effect was less obvious. The findings emphasise the importance of cellulose structural organisation when governing the moisture's partition between cellulose and ASA during the hydrolytic degradation. PMID:16311024

  9. Acetylsalicylic Acid Inhibits IL-18-Induced Cardiac Fibroblast Migration Through the Induction of RECK

    PubMed Central

    SIDDESHA, JALAHALLI M.; VALENTE, ANTHONY J.; SAKAMURI, SIVA S.V.P.; GARDNER, JASON D.; DELAFONTAINE, PATRICE; NODA, MAKOTO; CHANDRASEKAR, BYSANI

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis and adverse remodeling is thought to involve the ROS-dependent induction of inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and the activation and migration of cardiac fibroblasts (CF). Here we investigated the role of RECK (reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs), a unique membrane-anchored MMP regulator, on IL-18 induced CF migration, and the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on this response. In a Matrigel invasion assay, IL-18 induced migration of primary mouse CF was dependent on both IKK/NF-κB- and JNK/AP-1-mediated MMP9 induction and Spl-mediated RECK suppression, mechanisms that required Nox4-dependent H2O2 generation. Notably, forced expression of RECK attenuated IL-18 induced MMP9 activation and CF migration. Further, therapeutic concentrations of ASA inhibited IL-18 induced H2O2 generation, MMP9 activation, RECK suppression, and CF migration. The salicylic acid moiety of ASA similarly attenuated IL-18 induced CF migration. Thus, ASA may exert potential beneficial effect in cardiac fibrosis through multiple protective mechanisms. PMID:24265116

  10. Synovial distribution of “systemically” administered acetylsalicylic acid in the isolated perfused equine distal limb

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated synovial concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and its metabolite salicylic acid (SA) in the equine fetlock joint following systemic administration of ASA. Salicylates were chosen because SA is the only nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug for which threshold levels exist for plasma and urine in equine sports. To avoid animal experiments, the study was conducted using an ex vivo model of the isolated perfused equine distal limb in combination with plasma concentrations obtained from literature. Salicylate concentrations in the joint were determined using microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Any anti-inflammatory effect of synovial ASA concentrations was assessed using an ASA EC50 (half maximal effective concentration) determined in equine whole blood. Results The ASA concentration in the synovial fluid (n = 6) reached a maximum of 4 μg/mL, the mean concentration over the entire perfusion period was 2 μg/mL. Maximum SA concentration was 17 μg/mL, the average was 14 μg/mL. ASA and SA concentration in the synovial fluid exceeded systemic concentrations 2 h and 3.5 h after “systemic” administration, respectively. Conclusions ASA and SA accumulated in the in the synovial fluid of the ex vivo model despite decreasing systemic concentrations. This suggests a prolonged anti-inflammatory effect within the joint that remains to be further elucidated. PMID:23531229

  11. Acetylsalicylic acid inhibits IL-18-induced cardiac fibroblast migration through the induction of RECK.

    PubMed

    Siddesha, Jalahalli M; Valente, Anthony J; Sakamuri, Siva S V P; Gardner, Jason D; Delafontaine, Patrice; Noda, Makoto; Chandrasekar, Bysani

    2014-07-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis and adverse remodeling is thought to involve the ROS-dependent induction of inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and the activation and migration of cardiac fibroblasts (CF). Here we investigated the role of RECK (reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs), a unique membrane-anchored MMP regulator, on IL-18-induced CF migration, and the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on this response. In a Matrigel invasion assay, IL-18-induced migration of primary mouse CF was dependent on both IKK/NF-κB- and JNK/AP-1-mediated MMP9 induction and Sp1-mediated RECK suppression, mechanisms that required Nox4-dependent H(2)O(2) generation. Notably, forced expression of RECK attenuated IL-18-induced MMP9 activation and CF migration. Further, therapeutic concentrations of ASA inhibited IL-18-induced H(2)O(2) generation, MMP9 activation, RECK suppression, and CF migration. The salicylic acid moiety of ASA similarly attenuated IL-18-induced CF migration. Thus, ASA may exert potential beneficial effect in cardiac fibrosis through multiple protective mechanisms. PMID:24265116

  12. [Acetlysalicylic acid, protective antacid effect and lesions of the gastric mucosa. Effect of acetylsalicylic acid and an antacid drug (Gastropulgit Tabs) on the transmural electric potential in the human stomach].

    PubMed

    Caspary, W F; Kausch, H

    1979-08-16

    Antacids are able to prevent acetylsalicylic acid-induced functional and morphological changes of the gastric mucosa. In order to test whether a new antacid in chewing-tablet form (Gastropulgit Tabs) might be able to protect the gastric mucosa from acetylsalicylic acid-induced functional changes similarly to liquid antacids the effect of this antacid on acetylsalicylic acid-induced changes of transmural gastric potential difference was measured in healthy volunteers. The decrease of transmural potential differences induced by 640 mg acetylsalicylic acid could be prevented by simultaneous addition of 2 tablets of Gastropulgit Tabs. Thus the antacid in tablet form is able-like liquid antacids-to protect the gastric mucosa against acetylsalicylic acid-induced functional changes. PMID:468096

  13. Simultaneous quantification of paracetamol, acetylsalicylic acid and papaverine with a validated HPLC method.

    PubMed

    Kalmár, Eva; Gyuricza, Anett; Kunos-Tóth, Erika; Szakonyi, Gerda; Dombi, György

    2014-01-01

    Combined drug products have the advantages of better patient compliance and possible synergic effects. The simultaneous application of several active ingredients at a time is therefore frequently chosen. However, the quantitative analysis of such medicines can be challenging. The aim of this study is to provide a validated method for the investigation of a multidose packed oral powder that contained acetylsalicylic acid, paracetamol and papaverine-HCl. Reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography was used. The Agilent Zorbax SB-C18 column was found to be the most suitable of the three different stationary phases tested for the separation of the components of this sample. The key parameters in the method development (apart from the nature of the column) were the pH of the aqueous phase (set to 3.4) and the ratio of the organic (acetonitrile) and the aqueous (25 mM phosphate buffer) phases, which was varied from 7:93 (v/v) to 25:75 (v/v) in a linear gradient, preceded by an initial hold. The method was validated: linearity, precision (repeatability and intermediate precision), accuracy, specificity and robustness were all tested, and the results met the ICH guidelines. PMID:24344050

  14. Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid and bleeding risks with ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement.

    PubMed

    Kamenova, Maria; Croci, Davide; Guzman, Raphael; Mariani, Luigi; Soleman, Jehuda

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement is a common procedure for the treatment of hydrocephalus following diverse neurosurgical conditions. Most of the patients present with other comorbidities and receive antiplatelet therapy, usually acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Despite its clinical relevance, the perioperative management of these patients has not been sufficiently investigated. The aim of this study was to compare the peri- and postoperative bleeding complication rates associated with ASA intake in patients undergoing VP shunt placement. METHODS Of 172 consecutive patients undergoing VP shunt placement between June 2009 and December 2015, 40 (23.3%) patients were receiving low-dose ASA treatment. The primary outcome measure was bleeding events in ASA users versus nonusers, whereas secondary outcome measures were postoperative cardiovascular events, hematological findings, morbidity, and mortality. A subgroup analysis was conducted in patients who discontinued ASA treatment for < 7 days (n = 4, ASA Group 1) and for ≥ 7 days (n = 36, ASA Group 2). RESULTS No statistically significant difference for bleeding events was observed between ASA users and nonusers (p = 0.30). Cardiovascular complications, surgical morbidity, and mortality did not differ significantly between the groups either. Moreover, there was no association between ASA discontinuation regimens (< 7 days and ≥ 7 days) and hemorrhagic events. CONCLUSIONS Given the lack of guidelines regarding perioperative management of neurosurgical patients with antiplatelet therapy, these findings elucidate one issue, showing comparable bleeding rates in ASA users and nonusers undergoing VP shunt placement. PMID:27581316

  15. Anti-MDR and antitumoral action of acetylsalicylic acid on leukaemic cells.

    PubMed

    Carrett-Dias, Michele; Votto, Ana Paula de Souza; Filgueira, Daza de Moraes Vaz Batista; Almeida, Daniela Volcan; Vallochi, Adriana Lima; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes; Marins, Luis Fernando; Trindade, Gilma Santos

    2011-10-01

    ASA (acetylsalicylic acid) is an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug). ASA has gained attention as a potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for several neoplasms. The aim of this study was to analyse the possible antitumoural effects of ASA in two erythroleukaemic cell lines, with or without the MDR (multidrug resistance) phenotype. The mechanism of action of different concentrations of ASA were compared in K562 (non-MDR) and Lucena (MDR) cells by analysing cell viability, apoptosis and necrosis, intracellular ROS (reactive oxygen species) formation and bcl-2, p53 and cox-2 gene expression. ASA inhibited the cellular proliferation or induced toxicity in K562 and Lucena cell lines, irrespective of the MDR phenotype. The ASA treatment provoked death by apoptosis and necrosis in K562 cells and only by necrosis in Lucena cells. ASA also showed antioxidant activity in both cell lines. The bcl-2, p53 and cox-2 genes in both cell lines treated with ASA seem to exhibit different patterns of expression. However, normal lymphocytes treated with the same ASA concentrations were more resistant than tumoral cells. The results of this work show that both cell lines responded to treatment with ASA, demonstrating a possible antitumoral and anti-MDR role for this drug. PMID:21361874

  16. Dual effects of acetylsalicylic acid on ERK signaling and Mitf transcription lead to inhibition of melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Takashi; Usami, Mai; Awaji, Mizuki; Shinohara, Sumire; Sato, Kazuomi

    2016-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is widely used as an analgesic/antipyretic drug. It exhibits a wide range of biological effects, including preventative effects against heart attack and stroke, and the induction of apoptosis in various cancer cells. We previously found that ASA inhibits melanogenesis in B16 melanoma cells. However, the mechanisms of how ASA down-regulates melanin synthesis remain unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of ASA on melanogenic pathways, such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) transcription. ASA significantly inhibited melanin synthesis in a dose-dependent manner without oxidative stress and cell death. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the inhibitory effect of ASA might be due to the inhibition of Mitf gene transcription. Interestingly, ASA also induced ERK phosphorylation. Additionally, treatment with PD98059, a specific ERK phosphorylation inhibitor, abolished the anti-melanogenic effect of ASA. These results suggest that the depigmenting effect of ASA results from down-regulation of Mitf, which is induced by both the induction of ERK phosphorylation and the inhibition of Mitf transcription. PMID:26699907

  17. Acacia-gelatin microencapsulated liposomes: preparation, stability, and release of acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Rogers, J A

    1993-01-01

    Liposomes of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) containing acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) have been microencapsulated by acacia-gelatin using the complex coacervation technique as a potential oral drug delivery system. The encapsulation efficiency of ASA was unaltered by the microencapsulation process. The stability of the microencapsulated liposomes in sodium cholate solutions at pH 5.6 was much greater than the corresponding liposomes. The optimum composition and conditions for stability and ASA release were 3.0% acacia-gelatin and a 1- to 2-hr formaldehyde hardening time. Approximately 25% ASA was released in the first 6 hr from microencapsulated liposomes at 23 degrees C and the kinetics followed matrix-controlled release (Q varies; is directly proportional to t1/2). At 37 degrees C, this increased to 75% released in 30 min followed by a slow constant release, likely due to lowering of the phase transition temperature of DPPC by the acacia-gelatin to near 37 degrees C. At both temperatures, the release from control liposomes was even more rapid. Hardening times of 4 hr and an acacia-gelatin concentration of 5% resulted in a lower stability of liposomes and a faster release of ASA. It is concluded that under appropriate conditions the microencapsulation of liposomes by acacia-gelatin may increase their potential as an oral drug delivery system. PMID:8430052

  18. Severe nose bleeding after intake of acetylsalicylic acid: von Willebrand disease type 2A. Case 9.

    PubMed

    von der Weid, N X; Mansouri Taleghani, B; Wuillemin, W A

    2003-08-01

    This case report of a school boy with a history of severe and repeated episodes of epistaxis presents a short overview of the clinical and laboratory findings which lead to confirm the suspected diagnosis of von Willebrand disease (vWD). Suspicion of defective primary haemostasis should arise when unusual (because of their number or duration) mucosal bleeds appear in an otherwise normal and healthy patient. Because of its definitive inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation, acetylsalicylic acid (more than other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs exerting unselective inhibition of cyclooxygenase) is a strong factor in triggering or sustaining the bleeding disorders in these patients. Among the congenital disorder of primary haemostasis, vWD is by far the most frequent one. The difficulties of laboratory diagnosis of vWD are stressed; the promises and pitfalls of new in vitro methods for measuring primary haemostasis (PFA-100 analyzer) are discussed. An accurate diagnosis of the specific type of vWD is of critical importance for correct patient management as well as for genetic counseling. PMID:12923584

  19. Effects of single oral doses of lysine clonixinate and acetylsalicylic acid on platelet functions in man.

    PubMed

    Pallapies, D; Muhs, A; Bertram, L; Rohleder, G; Nagyiványi, P; Peskar, B A

    1996-01-01

    Lysine clonixinate is an analgesic drug with a so far unknown mechanism of action. We have determined its effect on platelet cyclooxygenase in man. Biosynthesis of thromboxane (TX)B2 and prostaglandin (PG)F2 alpha in clotting whole blood ex vivo as well as collagen-induced platelet aggregation measured before and at various time points after oral administration of 125 mg lysine clonixinate were compared to results obtained with 500 mg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). While biosynthesis of both TXB2 and PGF2 alpha measured radioimmunologically was inhibited significantly 2.5 h, but not 6 h, after administration of lysine clonixinate, inhibition by ASA was much greater and still highly significant after 48 h. Similarly, collagen-induced aggregation of platelet-rich plasma was inhibited for a longer period and to a greater extent after administration of ASA than after lysine clonixinate. Our results indicate that lysine clonixinate is a cyclooxygenase inhibitor of moderate potency. It remains to be investigated whether mechanisms other than inhibition of cyclooxygenase contribute to the analgesic activity of lysine clonixinate. PMID:8866627

  20. Local sustained delivery of acetylsalicylic acid via hybrid stent with biodegradable nanofibers reduces adhesion of blood cells and promotes reendothelialization of the denuded artery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Hung; Lin, Yu-Huang; Chang, Shang-Hung; Tai, Chun-Der; Liu, Shih-Jung; Chu, Yen; Wang, Chao-Jan; Hsu, Ming-Yi; Chang, Hung; Chang, Gwo-Jyh; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Hsieh, Ming-Jer; Lin, Fen-Chiung; Hsieh, I-Chang; Wen, Ming-Shien; Huang, Yenlin

    2014-01-01

    Incomplete endothelialization, blood cell adhesion to vascular stents, and inflammation of arteries can result in acute stent thromboses. The systemic administration of acetylsalicylic acid decreases endothelial dysfunction, potentially reducing thrombus, enhancing vasodilatation, and inhibiting the progression of atherosclerosis; but, this is weakened by upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This study proposes a hybrid stent with biodegradable nanofibers, for the local, sustained delivery of acetylsalicylic acid to injured artery walls. Biodegradable nanofibers are prepared by first dissolving poly(D,L)-lactide-co-glycolide and acetylsalicylic acid in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol. The solution is then electrospun into nanofibrous tubes, which are then mounted onto commercially available bare-metal stents. In vitro release rates of pharmaceuticals from nanofibers are characterized using an elution method, and a highperformance liquid chromatography assay. The experimental results suggest that biodegradable nanofibers release high concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid for three weeks. The in vivo efficacy of local delivery of acetylsalicylic acid in reducing platelet and monocyte adhesion, and the minimum tissue inflammatory reaction caused by the hybrid stents in treating denuded rabbit arteries, are documented. The proposed hybrid stent, with biodegradable acetylsalicylic acid-loaded nanofibers, substantially contributed to local, sustained delivery of drugs to promote re-endothelialization and reduce thrombogenicity in the injured artery. The stents may have potential applications in the local delivery of cardiovascular drugs. Furthermore, the use of hybrid stents with acetylsalicylic acid-loaded nanofibers that have high drug loadings may provide insight into the treatment of patients with high risk of acute stent thromboses. PMID:24421640

  1. [Pharmacokinetics after oral and intravenous administration of d,l-monolysine acetylsalicylate and an oral dose of acetylsalicylic acid in healthy volunteers].

    PubMed

    Raschka, C; Koch, H J

    2001-01-01

    We studied the ASA pharmacokinetics of single doses of 500 mg and 1000 mg of D,L-lysine-monoacetylsalicylate (Lys-ASA) administered both orally (Delgesic) and 500 mg parenterally (Aspisol) as well as 500 mg acetylsalicylate (ASA, Aspirin) in 13 healthy volunteers. Blood samples were taken before and at defined times up to 48 h after application of Lys-ASA and ASA. Analysis for ASA and its metabolite salicylic acid were performed by HPLC. All concentration versus time data were presented descriptively. As far as ASA was concerned, differences were assessed by means of ANOVA according to Friedman including post hoc Wilcoxon tests for each time point. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated based on a one-compartment model. The concentration vs. time curves after oral intake of 500 mg of ASA and Lys-ASA differed significantly (p < 0.001). Peak serum ASA concentrations (Cmax) were 6.8 mg/l for oral Lys-ASA and 2.7 mg/l for ASA per os. The corresponding tmax-values were 14.2 and 38.0 min. Absolute bioavailabilities for 500 mg doses were 75.4 and 63.4 pour cent, respectively. After intake of 100 mg and 1000 mg oral doses of Lys-ASA Cmax was 2.7 mg/l and 15.9 mg/l, tmax being 14.2 min for the 1000 mg dose. The shortest half-life was found after i.v. injection with 7.5 min. Metabolism was fast with maximum rise of salicylic acid concentration after injection of Lys-ASS. We conclude that concerning time dimension oral administration of Lys-ASA is almost equivalent to i.v. Lys-ASA and may be an alternative for i.v. administration in cases of acute heart attacks. PMID:11878089

  2. Repercussion of acetylsalicylic acid during fetal development on later renal hemodynamics of rats.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Filho, Leucio D; Lucena-Júnior, José M; Barreto, Izabel S S; Angelim, José L C; Paixão, Ana D O

    2008-08-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) during pregnancy reaches the fetus. It seems important to know possible repercussions of ASA on later renal function of the offspring, as well as repercussions of this drug on factors that may influence fetal development, such as maternal plasma volume and placental oxidative stress. It was evaluated whether ASA changes maternal plasma volume and/or placental oxidative stress, fetal weight and renal function of the offspring at adult life. ASA (100 mg/kg/day, p.o., dissolved in ETOH 10%) or ETOH 10% was administered to Wistar rat dams, from the day 7 to day 20 of pregnancy/parturition. Plasma volume and the placental oxidative stress were evaluated on day 20 of pregnancy, using, respectively, the Evans blue dye and the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances methods. Mean arterial pressure, renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were evaluated in the anesthetized offspring, at the age of 90 days, using a blood pressure transducer, a flow probe and inulin clearance respectively. Plasma volume was 76% (P < 0.05) higher in ASA compared with that in control dams, but placental oxidative stress was the same for both groups. Fetal body weight, the number of nephrons, GFR, RBF and renal vascular resistance were similar for the same gender among the offspring of the two groups. However, reduced hematocrit (9.8%, P < 0.05), increased renal plasma flow (27%, P < 0.05) and reduced filtration fraction (32%, P < 0.05) were seen in the female offspring. In conclusion, although ASA had increased maternal plasma volume, it did not change nephrogenesis nor GFR in the adult offspring. The changes in renal plasma flow and filtration fraction seen in the ASA female offspring might partially be due to the reduced hematocrit. PMID:18705748

  3. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of acetylsalicylic acid after intravenous and oral administration to healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Nagelschmitz, J; Blunck, M; Kraetzschmar, J; Ludwig, M; Wensing, G; Hohlfeld, T

    2014-01-01

    Background The pharmacology of single doses of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administered intravenously (250 or 500 mg) or orally (100, 300, or 500 mg) was evaluated in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Methods Blood and urine samples were collected before and up to 24 hours after administration of ASA in 22 healthy volunteers. Pharmacokinetic parameters and measurements of platelet aggregation were determined using validated techniques. Results A comparison between administration routes showed that the geometric mean dose-corrected peak concentrations (Cmax/D) and the geometric mean dose-corrected area under the curve (AUC0–∞/D) were higher following intravenous administration of ASA 500 mg compared with oral administration (estimated ratios were 11.23 and 2.03, respectively). Complete inhibition of platelet aggregation was achieved within 5 minutes with both intravenous ASA doses, reflecting a rapid onset of inhibition that was not observed with oral dosing. At 5 minutes after administration, the mean reduction in arachidonic acid-induced thromboxane B2 synthesis ex vivo was 99.3% with ASA 250 mg intravenously and 99.7% with ASA 500 mg intravenously. In exploratory analyses, thromboxane B2 synthesis was significantly lower after intravenous versus oral ASA 500 mg (P<0.0001) at each observed time point up to the first hour after administration. Concentrations of 6-keto-prostaglandin1α at 5 and 20 minutes after dosing were also significantly lower with ASA 500 mg intravenously than with ASA 500 mg orally. Conclusion This study demonstrates that intravenous ASA provides more rapid and consistent platelet inhibition than oral ASA within the first hour after dosing. PMID:24672263

  4. Development and validation of a liquid chromatographic method for purity control of clopidogrel-acetylsalicylic acid in combined oral dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Kahsay, Getu; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2012-03-01

    A reversed phase liquid chromatographic method with UV detection for the simultaneous determination of clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid and their related substances in combined oral formulations was developed and validated. Good separation was achieved on a Luna C18 column (150 mm × 4.6 mm, 3 μm) using gradient elution at a flow rate of 1 mL/min and a column temperature of 35 °C. UV detection was performed at 220 nm. The validation was performed according to the ICH guidelines. The method proved to be specific, sensitive (LOQ=0.975 μg/mL and 0.0384 μg/mL for clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid, respectively), linear in the concentration range from LOQ to 325 μg/mL for clopidogrel and from LOQ to 650 μg/mL for acetylsalicylic acid, precise (RSD values for intermediate precision <1%) and accurate with mean recovery values of 100.7% and 100.2% for clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid, respectively. Moreover, the solution stability and method robustness were examined. The method gives satisfactory separation of impurities of clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid and so it is suitable for quantification of the related substances as well as for the assay of the actives. PMID:22226416

  5. [Acetylsalicylic acid for the prevention of primary myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Samorodskaya, I V; Bolotova, E V; Boytsov, S A

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is effective in preventing events in a number of cardiovascular diseases. However, there is a number of unresolved problems concerning the efficiency and suitability of its use as an agent for the prevention of cardiovascular events (CVEs) (myocardial infarction (Ml) and/or ischemic stroke (IS) and/or death) in subjects without any clinical manifestations and/or diagnosed coronary heart disease (primary prevention of CVEs). The aim of the review is to compare the current recommendations of, professional communities for the.use of ASA as an agent for the primary prevention of CVEs, to analyze cohort studies and meta-analyses that are not included in the above recommendations (2013-2014), and to consider particular issues on ASA administration (resistance to ASA; barriers to its preventive use). The analysis performed suggests that there is no convincing evidence that it is reasonable to use ASA as a population-wide prevention strategy. The studies and meta-analyses often show conflicting data, which is likely to be associated with the clinical features of population groups included in the studies, with the presence or absence of ASA resistance and motivation for therapy. According to the current clinical recommendations, the results of studies and meta-analysis, and expert's opinions, deciding whether it is expedient to use ASA as an agent for the prevention of primary MI and/or IS and death from atherosclerostic vascular events should be based on the assessment of an individual's risks for the above disorders, which are related to a risk for hemorrhages due to ASA intake. PMID:26591559

  6. Impact of Acetylsalicylic Acid on the Clinicopathological Characteristics and Prognosis of Patients with Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sendur, Mehmet A.N.; Aksoy, Sercan; Ozdemir, Nuriye Y.; Zengin, Nurullah; Altundag, Kadri

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The impact of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on the clinicopathological characteristics of breast cancer has not yet been elucidated in detail; we therefore aimed to investigate the effects of ASA on the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients diagnosed with breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Breast cancer patients who were taking ASA at the time of breast cancer diagnosis were enrolled as ASA users (n = 84); matching patients with the same age who were not taking ASA were included as control group (n = 890). Results The median age was 56 (range 34–82) years in both groups. ASA users had a significantly lower incidence of grade II–III tumors compared to non-users (P = 0.02). The other clinicopathological characteristics and treatment histories were similar in both groups. In patients using ASA, the disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 97.3%, 89.4%, and 79.9% and in non-users it was 94.1%, 81.8%, and 70.9% in the 1rst, 3rd, and 5th year, respectively (P = 0.01). In aspirin users, the overall survival rate was 95.0%, 90.6%, and 87.6% and in non-users it was 98.1%, 91.2%, and 85.5% in the 1rst, 3rd, and 5th year, respectively (P = 0.50). Conclusion Using ASA at the time of breast cancer diagnosis was associated with significantly improved DFS in breast cancer patients. PMID:25404885

  7. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis: A rare side effect of a common over-the-counter drug, Acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Bahuguna, Amit

    2013-07-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis is an uncommon cutaneous reaction characterized by sudden onset of generalized non-follicular aseptic pustules. It is most often secondary to drugs but causes as varied from viral infection to insect bites are reported. A case report of a 48-year-old male who developed pustular eruptions after taking acetylsalicylic acid is reported here. Clinicians need to be aware of this entity when dealing with pustular rash as this rare side effect of a very common drug is both, easy to miss and easy to manage. PMID:23984244

  8. Pharmacokinetics and plasma concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid after intravenous, rectal, and intragastric administration to horses.

    PubMed

    Broome, Ted A; Brown, Murray P; Gronwall, Ronald R; Casey, Matthew F; Meritt, Kelly A

    2003-10-01

    Six healthy adult horses (5 mares and 1 stallion) were given a single dose of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 20 mg/kg of body weight, by intravenous (IV), rectal, and intragastric (IG) routes. Serial blood samples were collected via jugular venipuncture over a 36-h period, and plasma ASA and salicylic acid (SA) concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. After IV administration, the mean elimination rate constant of ASA (+/- the standard error of the mean) was 1.32 +/- 0.09 h(-1), the mean elimination half-life was 0.53 +/- 0.04 h, the area under the plasma concentration-versus-time curve (AUC) was 2555 +/- 98 microg x min/mL, the plasma clearance was 472 +/- 18.9 mL/h/kg, and the volume of distribution at steady state was 0.22 +/- 0.01 L/kg. After rectal administration, the plasma concentration of ASA peaked at 5.05 +/- 0.80 microg/mL at 0.33 h, then decreased to undetectable levels by 4 h; the plasma concentration of SA peaked at 17.39 +/- 5.46 microg/mL at 2 h, then decreased to 1.92 +/- 0.25 microg/mL by 36 h. After rectal administration, the AUC for ASA was 439.4 +/- 94.55 microg x min/mL and the bioavailability was 0.17 +/- 0.037. After IG administration, the plasma concentration of ASA peaked at 1.26 +/- 0.10 microg/mL at 0.67 h, then declined to 0.37 +/- 0.37 microg/mL by 36 h; the plasma concentration of SA peaked at 23.90 +/- 4.94 microg/mL at 4 h and decreased to 0.85 +/- 0.31 microg/mL by 36 h. After IG administration, the AUC for ASA was 146.70 +/- 24.90 microg x min/mL and the bioavailability was 0.059 +/- 0.013. Administration of a single rectal dose of ASA of 20 mg/kg to horses results in higher peak plasma ASA concentrations and greater bioavailability than the same dose given IG. Plasma ASA concentrations after rectal administration should be sufficient to inhibit platelet thromboxane production, and doses lower than those suggested for IG administration may be adequate. PMID:14620867

  9. Effects of acetylsalicylic acid on fresh weight pigment and protein content of bean leaf discs (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Canakçi, S

    2003-01-01

    The effects of 100, 250, and 500 ppm acetylsalicylic acid solutions treatments on weight alteration, pigment and protein amounts in discs from the primary leaves of one month old bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seedlings produced tinder greenhouse conditions are presented. The experiments show that: 100 ppm ASA had no significant influence (P > 0.05) but 250 and 500 ppm ASA caused an increase on weight loss (P < 0.01); ASA at higher concentrations (250 and 500 ppm), generally, caused a decrease on pigment amounts (P < 0.05-P < 0.01) but 100 ppm ASA had no considerably significant influence on them (P > 0.05), none of the ASA treatments caused a statistically significant influence on carotenoid amount (P > 0.05); 100 and 250 ppm ASA treatments did not cause a significant influence on protein amount (P > 0.05). however 500 ppm ASA treatment caused an increase on protein injury (P < 0.05). Consequently, it is supposed that wet weight loss, pigment and protein injury have somewhat increased on leaf discs. depending on the toxic effect of high acetylsalicylic acid concentrations. PMID:14711042

  10. Promoting endothelial recovery and reducing neointimal hyperplasia using sequential-like release of acetylsalicylic acid and paclitaxel-loaded biodegradable stents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Hung; Yu, Chia-Ying; Chang, Shang-Hung; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Liu, Shih-Jung; Wang, Chao-Jan; Hsu, Ming-Yi; Hsieh, I-Chang; Chen, Wei-Jan; Ko, Yu-Shien; Wen, Ming-Shien

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This work reports on the development of a biodegradable dual-drug-eluting stent with sequential-like and sustainable drug-release of anti-platelet acetylsalicylic acid and anti-smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferative paclitaxel. Methods To fabricate the biodegradable stents, poly-L-lactide strips are first cut from a solvent-casted film. They are rolled onto the surface of a metal pin to form spiral stents. The stents are then consecutively covered by acetylsalicylic acid and paclitaxel-loaded polylactide-polyglycolide nanofibers via electrospinning. Results Biodegradable stents exhibit mechanical properties that are superior to those of metallic stents. Biodegradable stents sequentially release high concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid and paclitaxel for more than 30 and 60 days, respectively. In vitro, the eluted drugs promote endothelial cell numbers on days 3 and 7, and reduce the proliferation of SMCs in weeks 2, 4, and 8. The stents markedly inhibit the adhesion of platelets on days 3, 7, and 14 relative to a non-drug-eluting stent. In vivo, the implanted stent is intact, and no stent thrombosis is observed in the stent-implanted vessels without the administration of daily oral acetylsalicylic acid. Promotion of endothelial recovery and inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia are also observed on the stented vessels. Conclusion The work demonstrates the efficiency and safety of the biodegradable dual-drug-eluting stents with sequential and sustainable drug release to diseased arteries. PMID:25206303

  11. Comparison of single-dose ibuprofen lysine, acetylsalicylic acid, and placebo for moderate-to-severe postoperative dental pain.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S L; Brahim, J S; Korn, S H; Greene, S S; Suchower, L J

    1994-01-01

    In a single-dose, double-blind, parallel-group, single-site study, ibuprofen lysine 200 mg (IBL 200) was compared with acetylsalicylic acid 500 mg (ASA 500) and placebo in 183 patients with moderate-to-severe postoperative dental pain. The relative onset of analgesic response, duration and degree of analgesia, and safety were assessed over a 6-hour postdose period. Analgesic efficacy was assessed by patient self-rating of pain intensity, pain relief, time to meaningful pain relief, global evaluation, and requirement for additional analgesic medication; both IBL 200 and ASA 500 were significantly more effective than placebo. IBL 200 also had a significantly faster onset of action, greater peak and overall analgesic effect, and longer duration of analgesia than ASA 500. All treatments were generally well tolerated. PMID:7923312

  12. [Effect of acetylsalicylic acid on immunologically induced morphologic changes after experimental lung transplantation (light and electron microscopic study)].

    PubMed

    Hoyer, J; Garbe, L; Sicardi, F; Noirclerc, M

    1976-01-01

    In 3 comparing series the behavior of platelets after experimental lung transplantation was examined in 33 dogs. After allogenic transplantations (21 animals) the ultrastructural findings were pathologic changes of the platelets, such as hyperaggregability with irreversible aggregation prevailing, as well as capillary wall alterations. X-rays showed considerable reduction of functioning parenchyma. Since these findings were absent in animals which underwent merely pulmonary re-implantation (4 animals) and can be considered a controll group, the authors conclude that these alterations are caused by mainly immunologic reactions. Acetylsalicylic acid given to animals with grafted lungs significantly inhibited is specific and certainly immuneinduced pathologic development. Absolutely necessary, therefore, appears the application of such aggregation inhibitor as additional treatment in lung transplantations. PMID:793217

  13. Formation of molecular complexes of salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, and methyl salicylate in a mixture of supercritical carbon dioxide with a polar cosolvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, V. E.; Antipova, M. L.; Gurina, D. L.; Odintsova, E. G.

    2015-08-01

    The solvate structures formed by salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, and methyl salicylate in supercritical (SC) carbon dioxide with a polar cosolvent (methanol, 0.03 mole fractions) at a density of 0.7 g/cm3 and a temperature of 318 K were studied by the molecular dynamics method. Salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids were found to form highly stable hydrogen-bonded complexes with methanol via the hydrogen atom of the carboxyl group. For methyl salicylate in which the carboxyl hydrogen is substituted by a methyl radical, the formation of stable hydrogen bonds with methanol was not revealed. The contribution of other functional groups of the solute to the interactions with the cosolvent was much smaller. An analysis of correlations between the obtained data and the literature data on the cosolvent effect on the solubility of the compounds in SC CO2 showed that the dissolving ability of SC CO2 with respect to a polar organic substance in the presence of a cosolvent increased only when stable hydrogen-bonded complexes are formed between this substance and the cosolvent.

  14. Simultaneous quantitation of acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel along with their metabolites in human plasma using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chhonker, Yashpal S; Pandey, Chandra P; Chandasana, Hardik; Laxman, Tulsankar Sachin; Prasad, Yarra Durga; Narain, V S; Dikshit, Madhu; Bhatta, Rabi S

    2016-03-01

    The interest in therapeutic drug monitoring has increased over the last few years. Inter- and intra-patient variability in pharmacokinetics, plasma concentration related toxicity and success of therapy have stressed the need of frequent therapeutic drug monitoring of the drugs. A sensitive, selective and rapid liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the simultaneous quantification of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), salicylic acid, clopidogrel and carboxylic acid metabolite of clopidogrel in human plasma. The chromatographic separations were achieved on Waters Symmetry Shield(TM) C18 column (150 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) using 3.5 mm ammonium acetate (pH 3.5)-acetonitrile (10:90, v/v) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.75 mL/min. The present method was successfully applied for therapeutic drug monitoring of aspirin and clopidogrel in 67 patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:26230053

  15. Excitation of afferent fibres in the cardiac sympathetic nerves induced by coronary occlusion and injection of bradykinin. The influence of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyron.

    PubMed

    Vogt, A; Vetterlein, F; dal Ri, H; Schmidt, G

    1979-05-01

    Afferent impulse activity was recorded in single fibres of the inferior cardiac sympathetic nerve of the cat. When the descending branch of the left coronary artery was ligated for 60 sec an enhancement of afferent impulses was recorded. Elevations in discharge frequency were also induced by injecting bradykinin, epinephrine, and isoprenaline or by general hypoxia due to interruption of the artificial ventilation. When these procedures were after pretreatment with the analgesic agents, acetylsalicylic acid or dipyron a reduction in spike discharge was observed only with bradykinin after application of acetylsalicylic acid. No influence of these pretreatments on the effects of coronary occlusion, general hypoxia and injection of epinephrine and isoprenaline could be observed. These results suggest that bradykinin does not predominate as mediator substance in eliciting ischemic heart pain. PMID:485722

  16. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced changes in the chemical coding of extrinsic sensory neurons supplying the prepyloric area of the porcine stomach.

    PubMed

    Rytel, L; Calka, J

    2016-03-23

    Acetylsalicylic acid is a popular drug that is commonly used to treat fever and inflammation, but which can also negativity affect the mucosal layer of the stomach, although knowledge concerning its influence on gastric innervation is very scarce. Thus, the aim of the present study was to study the influence of prolonged acetylsalicylic acid supplementation on the extrinsic primary sensory neurons supplying the porcine stomach prepyloric region. Fast Blue (FB) was injected into the above-mentioned region of the stomach. Acetylsalicylic acid was then given orally to the experimental gilts from the seventh day after FB injection to the 27th day of the experiment. After euthanasia, the nodose ganglia (NG) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were collected. Sections of these ganglia were processed for routine double-labelling immunofluorescence technique for substance P (SP), calcitonine gene related peptide (CGRP), galanin (GAL), neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Under physiological conditions within the nodose ganglia, the percentage of the FB-labeled neurons immunoreactive to particular substances ranged between 17.9±2.7% (VIP-like immunoreactive (LI) neurons in the right NG) and 60.4±1.7% (SP-LI cells within the left NG). Acetylsalicylic acid supplementation caused a considerable increase in the expression of all active substances studied within both left and right NG and the percentage of neurons positive to particular substances fluctuated from 47.2±3.6% (GAL-LI neurons in the right NG) to 67.2±2.0% (cells immunoreactive to SP in the left NG). All studied substances were also observed in DRG neurons supplying the prepyloric region of the stomach, but the number of immunoreactive neurons was too small to conduct a statistical analysis. The obtained results show that ASA may influence chemical coding of the sensory neurons supplying the porcine stomach, but the exact mechanisms of this action still remain

  17. On the origin of surface imposed anisotropic growth of salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids crystals during droplet evaporation.

    PubMed

    Przybyłek, Maciej; Cysewski, Piotr; Pawelec, Maciej; Ziółkowska, Dorota; Kobierski, Mirosław

    2015-03-01

    In this paper droplet evaporative crystallization of salicylic acid (SA) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) crystals on different surfaces, such as glass, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and paraffin was studied. The obtained crystals were analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) technique. In order to better understand the effect of the surface on evaporative crystallization, crystals deposited on glass were scraped off. Moreover, evaporative crystallization of a large volume of solution was performed. As we found, paraffin which is non-polar surface promotes formation of crystals morphologically similar to those obtained via bulk evaporative crystallization. On the other hand, when crystallization is carried out on the polar surfaces (glass and PVA), there is a significant orientation effect. This phenomenon is manifested by the reduction of the number of peaks in PXRD spectrum recorded for deposited on the surface crystals. Noteworthy, reduction of PXRD signals is not observed for powder samples obtained after scraping crystals off the glass. In order to explain the mechanism of carboxylic crystals growth on the polar surfaces, quantum-chemical computations were performed. It has been found that crystal faces of the strongest orientation effect can be characterized by the highest surface densities of intermolecular interactions energy (IIE). In case of SA and ASA crystals formed on the polar surfaces the most dominant faces are characterized by the highest adhesive and cohesive properties. This suggests that the selection rules of the orientation effect comes directly from surface IIE densities. PMID:25690367

  18. Polysaccharide arabinogalactan from larch Larix sibirica as carrier for molecules of salicylic and acetylsalicylic acid: preparation, physicochemical and pharmacological study.

    PubMed

    Chistyachenko, Yulia S; Dushkin, Alexandr V; Polyakov, Nikolay E; Khvostov, Mikhail V; Tolstikova, Tatyana G; Tolstikov, Genrikh A; Lyakhov, Nikolay Z

    2015-05-01

    Inclusion complexes of salicylic acid (SA) and acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA) with polysaccharide arabinogalactan (AG) from larch wood Larix sibirica and Larix gmelinii were synthesized using mechanochemical technology. In the present study, we have investigated physicochemical properties of the synthesized complexes in solid state and in aqueous solutions as well as their anti-aggregation and ulcerogenic activity. The evidence of the complexes formation was obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation technique. It was shown that in aqueous solution the molecules of SA and ASA are in fast exchange between the complex with AG macromolecules and solution. The stability constant of aspirin complex was calculated. It was shown that mechanochemically synthesized complexes are more stable when compared to the complex obtained by mixing solutions of the components. Complexes of ASA show two-fold increase of anti-platelet effect. It allows to reduce the dose of the antithrombotic drug and its ulcerogenic activity. These results substantiate the possibility to design new preparations on the basis of ASA with increased activity and safety. PMID:24517849

  19. Influence of buffered and unbuffered acetylsalicylic acid on dental enamel and dentine in human teeth: an in vitro pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rogalla, K; Finger, W; Hannig, M

    1992-06-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to investigate the erosive effect of buffered and unbuffered acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on dental enamel and dentine in human teeth by scanning electron microscopy. In order to standardize the specimens and to improve comparability the dental enamel and dentine were superficially abraded. The enamel and dentine specimens were therefore particularly sensitive to the influences of acid agents. Concentrated solution of buffered chewable ASA tablets (500 mg ASA and 300 mg calcium carbonate in 5 ml water) showed no changes in the enamel surface structure after exposure times of 1 min, 5 min and 60 min. In contrast, minimal corrosive effects were already seen after exposure of the enamel surface to the unbuffered ASA solutions for 1 min. After exposure times of 5 min and 60 min erosion of the enamel was more pronounced. Immersion in the unbuffered ASA solution led to clearly visible micromorphological changes on the dentine surfaces even after exposure for 1 min. Exposure of the dentine specimens to the buffered ASA solutions led to only very slight changes in the surface morphology. Therefore, the scanning electron micrograph after exposure to buffered ASA is comparable to the picture of untreated dentine. PMID:1513188

  20. Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Oxidative Damage in the Lung Tissue: May Acetylsalicylic Acid Have a Positive Role?

    PubMed

    Demirel, Can; Kilciksiz, Sevil Cagiran; Gurgul, Serkan; Erdal, Nurten; Yigit, Seyran; Tamer, Lulufer; Ayaz, Lokman

    2016-02-01

    The lung is relatively sensitive to irradiation. It is shown that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) might reduce oxidative injury and that it has a place in protection from cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential radioprotective effects of ASA. Whole-body irradiation (6 Gy, single dose) was applied to the rats. Glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and nitric oxide (NO) levels in the lung tissue were measured. Control (C), Radiation (R), Radiation + ASA (R + ASA; received irradiation and 25 mg/kg of ASA intraperitoneally (i.p.)), and Radiation + Amifostine (R + WR-2721; received irradiation and 200 mg/kg of WR-2721 i.p.) groups were used. The MPO levels decreased statistically significantly in the group administered ASA. Histopathologically, a radioprotective effect of ASA was more evident in the R + ASA group. ASA is an agent which has not been used as a radioprotector in the clinic yet, and it is worth supporting with more advanced studies. PMID:26276129

  1. Prophylactic acetylsalicylic acid attenuates the inflammatory response but fails to protect exercise-induced liver damage in exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Chin; Chiu, Yi-Han; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Ke, Chun-Yen; Lee, Chung-Jen; Chao, Yann-Fen C; Lee, Ru-Ping

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the effects of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on exercise-induced inflammatory response, muscle damage, and liver injury in rats. Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were divided into six groups: control (C), exercise (E), C+20mg ASA, E+20mg ASA, C+100mg/kg ASA, and E+100mg ASA groups. ASA or a vehicle was orally administered through gavage 1h before a treadmill test. Upon trial completion, blood was drawn at 1, 12, and 24h for biochemical analysis, and livers were excised at 24h for a histological assessment. Our results revealed that 100mg/kg ASA significantly reduced interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels in the E groups; however, the IL-10 level was considerably increased. Moreover, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and histological hepatic damage increased significantly in the E+100mg ASA group compared with the corresponding changes in the E group. These results suggest that the prophylactic administration of particularly high-dose ASA alleviates exercise-induced inflammatory response but exacerbates liver injury. PMID:27262381

  2. Acetylsalicylic Acid Resistance in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Prediabetes & Non-Diabetic Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Mustafa; Kiziltunc, Emrullah; Cetin, Zehra Guven; Cicekcioglu, Hulya; Sahin, Muslum; Isik, Serhat; Kurtul, Alparslan; Ornek, Ender; Ulusoy, Feridun Vasfi

    2014-01-01

    Objective : Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial role of antiplatelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) at atherosclerotic vascular disease. Antiaggregant effect of ASA is not uniform in all patients. Purpose of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence of ASA resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), pre-diabetes and non-diabetic coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: Effect of ASA was assessed using the platelet function analyzer (PFA-100) system. Resistance to ASA was defined as a normal collagen/epinephrine induced closure time after one week of ASA therapy. Patients with non-diabetic CAD, pre-diabetes and T2DM were compared. Results: ASA resistance was found in 26 (37.1%), 6 (17.6%) and 41 (26.5%) patients in the groups, respectively (p=0.154). ASA resistance was found to be significantly higher in men, smokers and insulin users, besides this it was found to be significantly lower in beta blocker (BB) users, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) users with univariate analysis. However insulin usage was found to be the single effective parameter on ASA resistance in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: There was no difference with regard to ASA resistance between groups. While ASA resistance was higher in men, smokers and insulin users, it was lower in patients using BBs and ACEIs. PMID:24948975

  3. Acetylsalicylic acid does not alter thermo-effector responses during mild whole-body passive heat stress in young men.

    PubMed

    Carter, Stephen J; Herron, Robert L; Akers, S Zeb; Bishop, Phillip A

    2015-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), aspirin, exerts potent systemic effects that may interfere with normal thermo-effector responses. We investigated the influence of commonly ingested ASA doses on measures of skin blood flow (SkBF) and local sweat rate (SR) during whole-body, passive heat stress. Seven male participants completed counter-balanced trials to compare ASA treatments (single dose 325 mg or 4 consecutive days 81 mg (4-d 81 mg)) to control (no ASA). Laser-Doppler flowmetry provided an index of SkBF. A ventilated capsule measured local sweat rate via capacitance hygrometry. Mean body temperature ([Formula: see text]) was increased by 1 °C above baseline using a water-perfused suit. [Formula: see text] was similar at the onset of cutaneous vasodilation among trials. Cutaneous vascular conductance, expressed as a percentage change from baseline, was not different among trials. Additionally, [Formula: see text] at the onset of local SR and SR sensitivity did not differ among trials. While ASA has previously been shown to influence SkBF during heat stress, it is possible our cohort's relatively young age may have contributed to our dissimilar results. PMID:25697227

  4. [Comparative evaluation of antiplatelet efectiveness drugs of original and reproduced enteric forms of acetylsalicylic acid (clinical study ICAR))].

    PubMed

    Martsevich, S Iu; Tolpygina, S N; Lukina, Iu V; Voronina, V P; Kiseleva, N V; Boĭchenko, E S; Dubinskaia, R É; Khoseva, E N

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was a comparative study of antiplatelet activity of acetylsalicylic acid drugs, produced in gastro-resistant form trombopol 75 mg and aspirin cardio 100 mg in patients with high risk of cardiovascular events. Effect of trombopol 75 mg versus 100 mg aspirin cardio on platelet aggregation in 30 patients with high risk of cardiovascular events during 3 week treatment period was studied. Design method: blind, randomized, crossover method. Three weeks before the initial therapy, for those patients, who received antiplatelet platelet therapy at the time of inclusion in the study, this therapy was withdrew ("wash-out period"), after which patient was given one of the study drug (sequence of courses was s determined according to the scheme of randomization) with the recommendation of taking it daily in the morning at the same time. At each visit, before the next dose of the drug, blood samples for determination of ADP-induced platelet aggregation were taken, physical examination, measurement of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate were recorded, adverse events were recorded. Follow-up visit was performed 3 weeks later. 21 days after first study drug withdrawal, a second similar course of therapy with another drug was performed. Antiplatelet efficacy of aspirin was assessed by its effect on spontaneous and ADP- induced platelet aggregation. Aggregation activity was determined by turbidometric method by changing of translucent ability of the blood sample during the formation of aggregates after 2 minutes of exposure. As an inducer of aggregation ADP solutions of three concentrations (0.5, 1 and 2 mM) were used. No significant difference between compared drugs in influence on aggregation ability of platelets after 3 weeks of daily intake was found. No adverse events associated with taking of studied drugs were registered. It was concluded that, generic APD - trombopol 75 mg and aspirin cardio 100 mg were equivalent on antiplatelet efficacy and

  5. UV erythema reducing capacity of mizolastine compared to acetylsalicylic acid or both combined in comparison to indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Grundmann, J U; Böckelmann, R; Bonnekoh, B; Gollnick, H P

    2001-10-01

    UV light exerts hazardous effects such as induction of skin cancer and premature skin aging. In this study we evaluated an assumptive anti-inflammatory effect of the nonsedative histamine H1-receptor antagonist, mizolastine, on UV-induced acute sunburn reaction. Therefore, a clinical, randomized, double-blind, four-arm, crossover study was conducted in healthy young female volunteers (skin type II) comparing the UV sensitivity under mizolastine, acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA), indomethacin or a mizolastine/ASA combination. Moreover, HaCaT keratinocytes were incubated with mizolastine under various UV treatment modalities in vitro to study its effect on the release of inflammatory cytokines, i.e. interleukin (IL)-1 alpha, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). All three drugs were effective in suppressing the UVB-, UVA- and combined UVA/UVB-erythema. However, the strongest effects were observed using the combined treatment with both 250 mg ASA and 10 mg mizolastine. An inhibitory effect in vitro of 10 nM mizolastine upon UV-induced cytokine release from HaCaT keratinocytes was observed for IL-1 alpha at 24 h after 10 J/cm2 UVA1, for IL-6 at 48 h after 10 J/cm2 UVA1 and 30 mJ/cm2 UVB, and also for TNF-alpha at 4 h after 10 J/cm2 UVA, 10 J/cm2 UVA1 and 30 mJ/cm2 UVB, respectively. The combination of mizolastine and ASA can be strongly recommended as a protective measure against UV erythema development with a lower unwanted side effect profile than that of the hitherto treatment modality, i.e. indomethacin. PMID:11683039

  6. Next-generation re-sequencing of genes involved in increased platelet reactivity in diabetic patients on acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Postula, Marek; Janicki, Piotr K; Eyileten, Ceren; Rosiak, Marek; Kaplon-Cieslicka, Agnieszka; Sugino, Shigekazu; Wilimski, Radosław; Kosior, Dariusz A; Opolski, Grzegorz; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Mirowska-Guzel, Dagmara

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether rare missense genetic variants in several genes related to platelet functions and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) response are associated with the platelet reactivity in patients with diabetes type 2 (T2D) on ASA therapy. Fifty eight exons and corresponding introns of eight selected genes, including PTGS1, PTGS2, TXBAS1, PTGIS, ADRA2A, ADRA2B, TXBA2R, and P2RY1 were re-sequenced in 230 DNA samples from T2D patients by using a pooled PCR amplification and next-generation sequencing by Illumina HiSeq2000. The observed non-synonymous variants were confirmed by individual genotyping of 384 DNA samples comprising of the individuals from the original discovery pools and additional verification cohort of 154 ASA-treated T2DM patients. The association between investigated phenotypes (ASA induced changes in platelets reactivity by PFA-100, VerifyNow and serum thromboxane B2 level [sTxB2]), and accumulation of rare missense variants (genetic burden) in investigated genes was tested using statistical collapsing tests. We identified a total of 35 exonic variants, including 3 common missense variants, 15 rare missense variants, and 17 synonymous variants in 8 investigated genes. The rare missense variants exhibited statistically significant difference in the accumulation pattern between a group of patients with increased and normal platelet reactivity based on PFA-100 assay. Our study suggests that genetic burden of the rare functional variants in eight genes may contribute to differences in the platelet reactivity measured with the PFA-100 assay in the T2DM patients treated with ASA. PMID:26599574

  7. Efficacy of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) in skin B16-F0 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Vad, Nikhil M; Kudugunti, Shashi K; Wang, Hezhen; Bhat, G Jayarama; Moridani, Majid Y

    2014-05-01

    Several epidemiological studies show that aspirin can act as a chemopreventive agent and decrease the incidences of various cancers including melanoma. In this work, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) as an antimelanoma agent in B16-F0 cells and skin B16-F0 melanoma tumor mouse model. Our findings indicate that the IC50 (48 h) for ASA in B16-F0 melanoma cells was 100 μM and that ASA caused a dose- and time-dependent GSH depletion and increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in B16-F0 melanoma cells. Male C57BL/6 mice were inoculated s.c. with 1 × 10(6) B16-F0 melanoma cells. ASA (80, 100, and 150 mg/kg) was initiated on day 1 or day 7, or day 9 after cell inoculation and continued daily for 13, 7, and 5 days, respectively. Animals were weighed daily and sacrificed on day 13. The tumors were excised and weighed. The animals receiving 13 days of ASA therapy at 80, 100, and 150 mg/kg demonstrated tumor growth inhibition by 1 ± 12%, 19 ± 22%, and 50 ± 29%, respectively. Animals receiving 7 days of therapy at 80, 100, and 150 mg/kg demonstrated tumor growth inhibition by 12 ± 14%, 27 ± 14%, and 40 ± 14%, respectively. No significant tumor growth inhibition was observed with 5 days of therapy. ASA at 100 and 150 mg/kg caused significant tumor growth inhibition in C57BL/6 mice when administered for 13 and 7 days, respectively. The results obtained in this study are consistent with the recent epidemiologically based report that aspirin is associated with lower melanoma risk in humans. PMID:24492939

  8. Effects of nimesulide, acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen and nabumetone on cyclooxygenase-1- and cyclooxygenase-2-mediated prostanoid production in healthy volunteers ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Kerola, Markku; Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Kosonen, Outi; Kankaanranta, Hannu; Sarna, Seppo; Moilanen, Eeva

    2009-01-01

    : The beneficial actions of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), whereas some of their adverse effects are associated mainly with inhibition of COX-1. Selective COX-2 inhibitors reduce the risk of gastrointestinal adverse events, but increase the risk of thromboembolic events pointing to importance of optimal COX-1/COX-2 inhibition in drug safety. We compared the effects of acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen, nabumetone and nimesulide on COX-1 and COX-2 pathways in healthy volunteers in an ex vivo set-up using single oral doses commonly used to treat acute pain. In a randomized, double-blind four-phase cross-over study, 15 healthy volunteers were given orally a single dose of either acetylsalicylic acid 500 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, nabumetone 1 g or nimesulide 100 mg. Blood samples were drawn before and 1, 3, 6, 24 and 48 hr after the drug for the assessment of COX-1 and COX-2 activity. COX-1 activity was measured as thromboxane(2) production during blood clotting and COX-2 activity as endotoxin-induced prostaglandin E(2) synthesis in blood leucocytes. The data show that after a single oral dose these four NSAIDs have different profiles of action on COX-1 and COX-2. As expected, acetylsalicylic acid appeared to be COX-1-selective and ibuprofen effectively inhibited both COX-1 and COX-2. Nabumetone showed only a slight inhibitory effect on COX-1 and COX-2. Nimesulide caused almost complete suppression of COX-2 activity and a partial reduction of COX-1 activity. This confirms the relative COX-2 selectivity of nimesulide. PMID:19152549

  9. Comparison of the concentration-effect relationship of a local antiinflammatory agent and oral acetylsalicylic acid: the value of local application.

    PubMed

    Poisson, M; Ralambosoa, C; Blehaut, H; Astoin, J

    1985-01-01

    Using a pharmacological model, the comparison between acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), administered orally, and a solution combining two salicylate derivatives (ethyl 5-methoxy-salicylate and 3-phenyl-propyl-salicylate), applied locally, demonstrated the value of the local application. Indeed, the pharmacological activity was highly significant and directly related to the tissue concentration of salicyl ions, which was higher after local application of the solution than after oral administration of ASA. The local solution also resulted in a lower plasma concentration of salicylate ions, allowing high plasma salicylate concentrations to be avoided. PMID:4074414

  10. Inhibition of aberrant complement activation by a dimer of acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moonhee; Wathier, Matthew; Love, Jennifer A; McGeer, Edith; McGeer, Patrick L

    2015-10-01

    We here report synthesis for the first time of the acetyl salicylic acid dimer 5,5'-methylenebis(2-acetoxybenzoic acid) (DAS). DAS inhibits aberrant complement activation by selectively blocking factor D of the alternative complement pathway and C9 of the membrane attack complex. We have previously identified aurin tricarboxylic and its oligomers as promising agents in this regard. DAS is much more potent, inhibiting erythrocyte hemolysis by complement-activated serum with an IC50 in the 100-170 nanomolar range. There are numerous conditions where self-damage from the complement system has been implicated in the pathology, including such chronic degenerative diseases of aging as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and age-related macular degeneration. Consequently, there is a high priority for the discovery and development of agents that can successfully treat such conditions. DAS holds considerable promise for being such an agent. PMID:26248865

  11. Effects of paracetamol and propacetamol on gastric mucosal damage and gastric lipid peroxidation caused by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in rats.

    PubMed

    Galunska, B; Marazova, K; Tankova, T; Popov, A; Frangov, P; Krushkov, I; Di Massa, A

    2002-08-01

    We have studied the effect of paracetamol and its pro-drug propacetamol on gastric mucosal damage induced by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and its possible relation to changes in gastric lipid peroxidation status in rats. Paracetamol or propacetamol were administered intragastrically 1h before ASA (300 mg kg(-1)) in the following equivalent doses: 62.5, 125.0 and 250.0 mg kg(-1) or 125.0, 250.0 and 500.0 mg kg(-1), respectively. The effects of the tested agents were compared to that of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) 15, 30 and 60 mg kg(-1). Gastric ulcer formation was estimated morphometrically 4h after ASA administration. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (reduced, GSH, and oxidized, GSSG) and uric acid (UA) were determined in gastric mucosa and blood plasma and used as biochemical markers of the oxidative status. The results showed that paracetamol (250, 125, 62.5 mg kg(-1)) and propacetamol (500, 250, 125 mg kg(-1)) diminished the area of ASA-induced gastric lesions. The effect of propacetamol was more pronounced than that of paracetamol and similar to that of PGE2. Gastric MDA increased 3-fold in the ASA-group. The tested agents reduced it by a range of 30-70%. In all pretreated groups gastric glutathione and UA levels were found higher than that of control group and lower than that of ASA-group. Paracetamol and propacetamol, as well as PGE2, diminished the lipid peroxidation in plasma to a lesser extent than in gastric mucosa, but maintained elevated levels of the selective plasma antioxidant UA. These results show that the ASA-induced gastric mucosal damage is accompanied by the development of oxidative stress, evidenced by the accumulation of MDA, and concomitant initial activation of cell antioxidant defences. As paracetamol and propacetamol tend to decrease gastric lesions caused by ASA and alter gastric mucosal MDA, glutathione and UA values in a favorable manner, it could be suggested that their effects on the gastric mucosa could be related to interference with

  12. Attenuation of uremia by orally feeding alpha-lipoic acid on acetaminophen induced uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Shrabani; Mandal, Shreya; Roy, Suchismita; Mandal, Arpita; Das, Koushik; Nandi, Dilip K

    2013-04-01

    Uremia means excess nitrogenous waste products in the blood & their toxic effects. An acute acetaminophen (paracetamol, N-acetyl p-aminophenol; APAP) overdose may result into potentially fatal hepatic and renal necrosis in humans and experimental animals. The aims of this present study were to investigate the protective effect of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) on oxidative stress & uremia on male albino rats induced by acetaminophen. The study was performed by 24 albino male Wister strain rats which were randomly divided into four groups: Group I, control - receives normal food and water, Groups II, III & IV receive acetaminophen interperitoneally at the dose of 500 mg/kg/day for 10 days, from 11th day Groups III & IV were treated with ALA at the dose of 5 mg & 10 mg/100 g/day for 15 days, respectively. After 25 days of treatment, it was observed that there was a significant increase in plasma urea, creatinine, sodium and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (p < 0.05) but a significant decrease in super oxide dismutase (SOD) & catalase activity & potassium level in uremic group is compared with control group & there was a significant increase in SOD & catalase (p < 0.05) & a significant decrease in serum urea, creatinine & Na and MDA (p < 0.05) in Group III & Group IV is compared with Group II & significant changes were observed in high ALA dose group. In conclusion it was observed that the ALA has nephroprotective activities by biochemical observations against acetaminophen induced uremic rats. PMID:23960834

  13. Histamine H2 receptor antagonists for decreasing gastrointestinal harms in adults using acetylsalicylic acid: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tricco, Andrea C; Alateeq, Abdullah; Tashkandi, Mariam; Mamdani, Muhammad; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Straus, Sharon E

    2012-01-01

    Background It is unclear if histamine H2 receptor antagonists (H2 blockers) prevent a variety of gastrointestinal harms among patients taking acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) over long periods. Methods Electronic databases (e.g., MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; from inception to November 2010) and reference lists of retrieved articles were searched. Randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of H2 blockers in reducing gastrointestinal harms (bleeding, ulcers) among adults taking ASA for 2 weeks or longer were included. Two reviewers independently abstracted study and patient characteristics and appraised study quality using the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. Peto odds ratio (OR) meta-analysis was performed, 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated, and statistical heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 and χ2 statistics. Results Six RCTs (4 major publications and 2 companion reports) with a total of 498 participants (healthy volunteers or patients with arthritis, cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease, or diabetes mellitus) were included. One trial adequately reported allocation concealment and sequence generation, with the other 3 trials being judged as unclear for both aspects. In one RCT, no statistically significant differences for gastrointestinal hemorrhage requiring admission to hospital (p = 0.14) or blood transfusion (p = 0.29) were observed between the group receiving concomitant famotidine and ASA and the group receiving concomitant placebo and ASA. After a median of 8 weeks’ follow-up, H2 blockers were more effective than placebo in reducing gastrointestinal hemorrhage (2 RCTs, total of 447 patients, OR 0.07, 95% CI 0.02–0.23) and peptic ulcers (3 RCTs, total of 465 patients, OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.12–0.36) among patients taking ASA for 2 weeks or longer. Despite substantial clinical heterogeneity across the studies, including types of H2 blockers, dosing of ASA and underlying conditions, no

  14. [Acetylsalicylic acid and food additive intolerance in urticaria, bronchial asthma and rhinopathy].

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, B; Fabro, L

    1981-09-26

    Adverse reactions (urticaria, angio-edema, bronchoconstriction, purpura) to Aspirin (ASS) and food-and-drug additives such as the yellow dye tartrazine and the preservative benzoate are observed all over the world. Since the exact pathogenetic mechanisms of this condition is unknown, it is described as intolerance or pseudo-allergy and has been related to an imbalance of prostaglandin synthesis. Among 620 patients with urticaria, bronchial asthma or chronic rhinitis, oral provocation tests with ASS, tartrazine or benzoic acid revealed in 165 (26.6%) intolerance to ASS or additives. Frequency of intolerance to tartrazine varied between 6.1% in urticaria (n=308), 7.3% in asthma (n=96) and 14.5% in urticaria and asthma patients, while intolerance to benzoate varied from 2.5% in rhinitis (n=40) to 11.5% in asthma. More than two thirds of the intolerant patients were improved by an elimination diet and by the avoidance of "aspirin-like" drugs. More than one third of chronic urticaria patients became symptomfree. In Switzerland exact declaration of all food additives is urgently needed. Moreover, azo-dyes must no longer be used for colouring of drugs. PMID:7291963

  15. Food sensitivity reported by patients with asthma and hay fever. A relationship between food sensitivity and birch pollen-allergy and between food sensitivity and acetylsalicylic acid intolerance.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, N E

    1978-08-01

    Among adult patients with bronchial asthma and/or allergic rhinitis undergoing allergological investigation with skin test, nasal provocation test and RAST, 1129 answered a questionaire regarding food sensitivity (FS). 276 (24%) of the patients reported some kind of allergic symptoms on eating or handling various foods, of which hazel nut, apple and shell fish were the most often named. Females reported FS more often than males. A correlation was found between birch pollen allergy and FS with nuts, apple, peach, cherry, pear, plum, carrot and new potato. The higher the degree of birch pollen allergy, according to skin test, RAST or provocation test, the higher the frequency of FS. A correlation was found too between acetylsalicylic acid intolerance and FS with some foods, e.g. nuts, strawberry, almond, green pepper, hip, chocolate, egg, cabbage, milk and wine. The connection between birch pollen allergy and FS is probably explained by the structural relationship between birch pollen allergen and some allergens of the foodstuffs, whereas the high incidence of FS in acetylsalicylic acid-intolerant patients is probably explained by additives in foods as well as salicylates or benzoates naturally occurring in some food. PMID:717703

  16. Modulation of phenytoin teratogenicity and embryonic covalent binding by acetylsalicylic acid, caffeic acid, and alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone: implications for bioactivation by prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, P.G.; Zubovits, J.T.; Wong, S.T.; Molinari, L.M.; Ali, S.

    1989-02-01

    Teratogenicity of the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin is thought to involve its bioactivation by cytochromes P-450 to a reactive arene oxide intermediate. We hypothesized that phenytoin also may be bioactivated to a teratogenic free radical intermediate by another enzymatic system, prostaglandin synthetase. To evaluate the teratogenic contribution of this latter pathway, an irreversible inhibitor of prostaglandin synthetase, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally (ip), was administered to pregnant CD-1 mice at 9:00 AM on Gestational Days 12 and 13, 2 hr before phenytoin, 65 mg/kg ip. Other groups were pretreated 2 hr prior to phenytoin administration with either the antioxidant caffeic acid or the free radical spin trapping agent alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN). Caffeic acid and PBN were given ip in doses that respectively were up to 1.0 to 0.05 molar equivalents to the dose of phenytoin. Dams were killed on Day 19 and the fetuses were assessed for teratologic anomalies. A similar study evaluated the effect of ASA on the in vivo covalent binding of radiolabeled phenytoin administered on Day 12, in which case dams were killed 24 hr later on Day 13. ASA pretreatment produced a 50% reduction in the incidence of fetal cleft palates induced by phenytoin (p less than 0.05), without significantly altering the incidence of resorptions or mean fetal body weight. Pretreatment with either caffeic acid or PBN resulted in dose-related decreases in the incidence of fetal cleft palates produced by phenytoin, with maximal respective reductions of 71 and 82% at the highest doses of caffeic acid and PBN (p less than 0.05).

  17. Effects of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), ASA plus L-glutamine and L-glutamine on healing of chronic gastric ulcer in the rat.

    PubMed

    Okabe, S; Takeuchi, K; Honda, K; Takagi, K

    1976-01-01

    A chronic gastric ulcer model was produced in rats by the subserosal injection of 20% acetic acid solution (0.015 ml) in order to examine whether (1) acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) irritates the chronic gastric ulcer in active or healed or diminished stage, (2) L-glutamine, given together with ASA, inhibits the adverse effect of ASA. Oral ASA 200 mg/kg/day, given in two divided doses for 10 consecutive days, apparently delayed the healing of the gastric ulcer and irritated the healed ulcer to reulcerate. L-Glutamine, 1,500 mg/kg/day, which was given together with ASA in two divided doses, markedly protected the gastric ulcer both in active and healed stages from the deleterious activity of ASA. PMID:955326

  18. Effects of β-glucan pretreatment on acetylsalicylic acid-induced gastric damage: An experimental study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Orhan Veli; Ozturk, Oktay Hasan; Aydin, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Nigar; Yetim, Ibrahim; Nacar, Ahmet; Oktar, Suleyman; Sogut, Sadik

    2010-01-01

    Background: NSAIDs have been found to induce gastrointestinal tract damage. Recently, it has been suggested that this might be mediated by lipid peroxidation. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the potential protective effects of β-glucan against acetylsalicylic acid (ASA-induced gastric damage by means of its antioxidant capacity in an experimental rat model. Methods: Thirty-two male Wistar albino rats (200–250 g) were randomized into 4 groups consisting of 8 rats each. The β-glucan group received 50 mg/kg β-glucan once a day for 10 days and 30 minutes before anesthesia. The ASA group received saline once a day for 10 days and 300 mg/kg (20 mg/mL) ASA as a single dose, 4 hours before anesthesia. The ASA+β-glucan group was administered 50 mg/kg β-glucan once a day for 10 days and 30 minutes before anesthesia. Additionally, 300 mg/kg (20 mg/mL) ASA was administered as a single dose, 4 hours before anesthesia. The control group received saline once a day for 10 days and 30 minutes before anesthesia. All medications were administered by intragastric gavage. The stomach from each rat was dissected and divided into 2 parts for histologic and biochemical analysis. Gastric tissue malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) levels, catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were determined for oxidative parameter analysis. Results: The gastroprotective and antioxidant effects of β-glucan appeared to attenuate the ASA-induced gastric tissue damage. Compared with the control group, MDA and NO levels and CAT and GSH-Px activities were significantly increased in the stomachs of ASA-treated rats (MDA, 4.12 [0.44] to 13.41 [1.05] μmol/L; NO, 8.04 [7.25–9.10] vs 30.35 [22.34–37.95] μmol/g protein; CAT, 0.050 [0.004] to 0.083 [0.003] k/g protein; GSH-Px, 0.57 [0.42–0.66] to 1.55 [1.19–1.76] U/L; all, P < 0.001), whereas SOD activity was significantly decreased in the same group (291 [29] to 124 [6] U/mL; P

  19. Editorial on low-dose acetylsalicylic acid treatment and impact on short-term mortality in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection: a propensity score-matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Schoergenhofer, Christian; Schwameis, Michael; Lagler, Heimo; Jilma, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    The manuscript "Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid Treatment and Impact on Short-Term Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) Bloodstream Infection: A propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study" published in Critical Care Medicine by Osthoff et al. reported an association of aspirin intake with a reduced short-term mortality. Direct anti-microbial effects of aspirin and its metabolite salicylate were suggested in preclinical studies. Especially intriguing is the inclusion of a control group with Escherichia coli (E. coli) blood stream infections in this study, in which aspirin was not associated with an improved outcome. However, as other observational studies also reported benefits of aspirin in critically ill patients, randomized trials are needed to confirm the effects of low-dose aspirin. PMID:27294095

  20. Editorial on low-dose acetylsalicylic acid treatment and impact on short-term mortality in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection: a propensity score-matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Schoergenhofer, Christian; Schwameis, Michael; Lagler, Heimo

    2016-01-01

    The manuscript “Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid Treatment and Impact on Short-Term Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) Bloodstream Infection: A propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study” published in Critical Care Medicine by Osthoff et al. reported an association of aspirin intake with a reduced short-term mortality. Direct anti-microbial effects of aspirin and its metabolite salicylate were suggested in preclinical studies. Especially intriguing is the inclusion of a control group with Escherichia coli (E. coli) blood stream infections in this study, in which aspirin was not associated with an improved outcome. However, as other observational studies also reported benefits of aspirin in critically ill patients, randomized trials are needed to confirm the effects of low-dose aspirin. PMID:27294095

  1. The nitric oxide-donating derivative of acetylsalicylic acid, NCX 4016, stimulates glucose transport and glucose transporters translocation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kaddai, V; Gonzalez, T; Bolla, M; Le Marchand-Brustel, Y; Cormont, M

    2008-07-01

    NCX 4016 is a nitric oxide (NO)-donating derivative of acetylsalicylic acid. NO and salicylate, in vivo metabolites of NCX 4016, were shown to be potential actors in controlling glucose homeostasis. In this study, we evaluated the action of NCX 4016 on the capacity of 3T3-L1 adipocytes to transport glucose in basal and insulin-stimulated conditions. NCX 4016 induced a twofold increase in glucose uptake in parallel with the translocation of the glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4 to the plasma membrane, leaving unaffected their total expression levels. Importantly, NCX 4016 further increased glucose transport induced by a physiological concentration of insulin. The stimulatory effect of NCX 4016 on glucose uptake appears to be mediated by its NO moiety. Indeed, it is inhibited by a NO scavenger and treatment with acetylsalicylic or salicylic acid had no effect. Although NO is involved in the action of NCX 4016, it did not mainly depend on the soluble cGMP cyclase/protein kinase G pathway. Furthermore, NCX 4016-stimulated glucose transport did not involve the insulin-signaling cascade required to stimulate glucose transport. NCX 4016 induces a small activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase and no activation of other stress-activated signaling molecules, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase, inhibitory factor kappaB, or AMP-activated kinases. Interestingly, NCX 4016 modified the content of S-nitrosylated proteins in adipocytes. Taken together, our results indicate that NCX 4016 induced glucose transport in adipocytes through a novel mechanism possibly involving S-nitrosylation. NCX 4016 thus possesses interesting characteristics to be considered as a candidate molecule for the treatment of patients suffering from metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. PMID:18492771

  2. A rapid method for the simultaneous determination of L-ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid in aspirin C effervescent tablet by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; Alothman, Zeid Abdullah; Khan, Mohammad Rizwan

    2013-05-01

    In present study, a rapid and sensitive method using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of L-ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid in aspirin C effervescent tablet. The optimum chromatographic separation was carried out on a reversed phase Waters® Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column (1.7 μm particle size, 100 mm × 2.1 mm ID) with an isocratic elution profile and mobile phase consisting of 0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile (75:25, v/v, pH 3.5) at flow rate of 0.5 mL min-1. The influences of mobile phase composition, flow rate and pH on chromatographic resolution were investigated. The total chromatographic analysis time was as short as 2 min with excellent resolution. Detection and quantification of the target compounds were carried out with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer using negative electrospray ionization (ESI) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) modes. The performance of the method was evaluated and very low limits of detection less than 0.09 μg g-1, excellent coefficient correlation (r2 > 0.999) with liner range over a concentration range of 0.1-1.0 μg g-1 for both L-ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid, and good intraday and interday precisions (relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) <3%), were obtained. Comparison of system performance with traditional liquid chromatography-photo diode array detector (HPLC-PDA) was made with respect to analysis time, sensitivity, linearity and precisions. The proposed UPLC-MS/MS method was found to be reproducible and appropriate for quantitative analysis of L-ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid in aspirin C effervescent tablet.

  3. Acetylsalicylic Acid Reduces the Severity of Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colitis and Increases the Formation of Anti-Inflammatory Lipid Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Köhnke, Thomas; Bilal, Süleyman; Zhou, Xiangzhi; Rothe, Michael; Baumgart, Daniel C.; Weylandt, Karsten H.

    2013-01-01

    The role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in inflammatory bowel disease is controversial, as they have been implicated in disease aggravation. Different from other cyclooxygenase inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) enhances the formation of anti-inflammatory and proresolution lipoxins derived from arachidonic acid as well as resolvins from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). In this study, we examined the effect of ASA on murine dextran sodium sulfate colitis. A mouse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol and post mortem assessment were used to assess disease severity, and lipid metabolites were measured using liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry. Decreased colitis activity was demonstrated by phenotype and MRI assessment in mice treated with ASA, and confirmed in postmortem analysis. Analysis of lipid mediators showed sustained formation of lipoxin A4 and an increase of DHA-derived 17-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA) after treatment with ASA. Furthermore, in vitro experiments in RAW264.7 murine macrophages demonstrated significantly increased phagocytosis activity after incubation with 17-HDHA, supporting its proresolution effect. These results show a protective effect of ASA in a murine colitis model and could give a rationale for a careful reassessment of ASA therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and particularly ulcerative colitis, possibly combined with DHA supplementation. PMID:24083240

  4. Acetylsalicylic Acid reduces the severity of dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and increases the formation of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    Köhnke, Thomas; Gomolka, Beate; Bilal, Süleyman; Zhou, Xiangzhi; Sun, Yanping; Rothe, Michael; Baumgart, Daniel C; Weylandt, Karsten H

    2013-01-01

    The role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in inflammatory bowel disease is controversial, as they have been implicated in disease aggravation. Different from other cyclooxygenase inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) enhances the formation of anti-inflammatory and proresolution lipoxins derived from arachidonic acid as well as resolvins from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). In this study, we examined the effect of ASA on murine dextran sodium sulfate colitis. A mouse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol and post mortem assessment were used to assess disease severity, and lipid metabolites were measured using liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry. Decreased colitis activity was demonstrated by phenotype and MRI assessment in mice treated with ASA, and confirmed in postmortem analysis. Analysis of lipid mediators showed sustained formation of lipoxin A4 and an increase of DHA-derived 17-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA) after treatment with ASA. Furthermore, in vitro experiments in RAW264.7 murine macrophages demonstrated significantly increased phagocytosis activity after incubation with 17-HDHA, supporting its proresolution effect. These results show a protective effect of ASA in a murine colitis model and could give a rationale for a careful reassessment of ASA therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and particularly ulcerative colitis, possibly combined with DHA supplementation. PMID:24083240

  5. The effect of acetaminophen on the expression of BCRP in trophoblast cells impairs the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis

    SciTech Connect

    Blazquez, Alba G.; Briz, Oscar; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ester; Perez, Maria J.; Ghanem, Carolina I.; Marin, Jose J.G.

    2014-05-15

    Acetaminophen is used as first-choice drug for pain relief during pregnancy. Here we have investigated the effect of acetaminophen at subtoxic doses on the expression of ABC export pumps in trophoblast cells and its functional repercussion on the placental barrier during maternal cholestasis. The incubation of human choriocarcinoma cells (JAr, JEG-3 and BeWo) with acetaminophen for 48 h resulted in no significant changes in the expression and/or activity of MDR1 and MRPs. In contrast, in JEG-3 cells, BCRP mRNA, protein, and transport activity were reduced. In rat placenta, collected at term, acetaminophen administration for the last three days of pregnancy resulted in enhanced mRNA, but not protein, levels of Mrp1 and Bcrp. In fact, a decrease in Bcrp protein was found. Using in situ perfused rat placenta, a reduction in the Bcrp-dependent fetal-to-maternal bile acid transport after treating the dams with acetaminophen was found. Complete biliary obstruction in pregnant rats induced a significant bile acid accumulation in fetal serum and tissues, which was further enhanced when the mothers were treated with acetaminophen. This drug induced increased ROS production in JEG-3 cells and decreased the total glutathione content in rat placenta. Moreover, the NRF2 pathway was activated in JEG-3 cells as shown by an increase in nuclear NRF2 levels and an up-regulation of NRF2 target genes, NQO1 and HMOX-1, which was not observed in rat placenta. In conclusion, acetaminophen induces in placenta oxidative stress and a down-regulation of BCRP/Bcrp, which may impair the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis. - Highlights: • Acetaminophen induces changes in placental BCRP expression in vitro. • This drug reduces the ability of placental cells to export BCRP substrates. • Acetaminophen induces changes in Bcrp expression in rat placenta. • Placental barrier to bile acids is impaired in rats treated with this drug.

  6. Simultaneous determination of salicylic, 3-methyl salicylic, 4-methyl salicylic, acetylsalicylic and benzoic acids in fruit, vegetables and derived beverages by SPME-LC-UV/DAD.

    PubMed

    Aresta, Antonella; Zambonin, Carlo

    2016-03-20

    Salicylic and benzoic acid are phenolic acids occurring in plant cells, thus they can be present in fruit and vegetables at various levels. They possess anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties, however they may induce symptoms and health problems in a small percentage of the population. Therefore, a low phenolic acid diet may be of clinical benefit to such individuals. In order to achieve this goal, the concentration of these substances in different food and beverages should be assessed. The present work describes for the first time a new method, based on solid phase microextraction (polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene fiber) coupled to liquid chromatography with UV diode array detection, for the simultaneous determination of salicylic acid, 3-methyl salicylic acid, 4-methyl salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid and benzoic acid in selected fruit, vegetables and beverages. All the aspects influencing fiber adsorption (time, temperature, pH, salt addition) and desorption (desorption and injection time, desorption solvent mixture composition) of the analytes have been investigated. An isocratic separation was performed using an acetonitrile-phosphate buffer (pH 2.8; 2 mM) mixture (70:30, v/v) as the mobile phase. The estimated LOD and LOQ values (μg/mL) were in the range 0.002-0.028 and 0.007-0.095. The within-day and day-to-day precision values (RSD%) were between 4.7-6.1 and 6.6-9.4, respectively. The method has been successfully applied to the analysis of fava beans, blueberries, kiwi, tangerines, lemons, oranges and fruit juice (lemon and blueberry) samples. The major advantage of the method is that it only requires simple homogenization and/or centrifugation and dilution steps prior to SPME and injection in the LC system. PMID:26775020

  7. Glycodeoxycholic Acid Levels as Prognostic Biomarker in Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; McGill, Mitchell R.; Staggs, Vincent S.; Winefield, Robert D.; Gholami, Parviz; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Sharpe, Matthew R.; Curry, Steven C.; Lee, William M.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced acute liver failure (ALF) remains a major clinical problem. Although a majority of patients recovers after severe liver injury, a subpopulation of patients proceeds to ALF. Bile acids are generated in the liver and accumulate in blood during liver injury, and as such, have been proposed as biomarkers for liver injury and dysfunction. The goal of this study was to determine whether individual bile acid levels could determine outcome in patients with APAP-induced ALF (AALF). Serum bile acid levels were measured in AALF patients using mass spectrometry. Bile acid levels were elevated 5–80-fold above control values in injured patients on day 1 after the overdose and decreased over the course of hospital stay. Interestingly, glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) was significantly increased in non-surviving AALF patients compared with survivors. GDCA values obtained at peak alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and from day 1 of admission indicated GDCA could predict survival in these patients by receiver-operating characteristic analysis (AUC = 0.70 for day 1, AUC = 0.68 for peak ALT). Of note, AALF patients also had significantly higher levels of serum bile acids than patients with active cholestatic liver injury. These data suggest measurements of GDCA in this patient cohort modestly predicted outcome and may serve as a prognostic biomarker. Furthermore, accumulation of bile acids in serum or plasma may be a result of liver cell dysfunction and not cholestasis, suggesting elevation of circulating bile acid levels may be a consequence and not a cause of liver injury. PMID:25239633

  8. Au nanoparticles/poly(caffeic acid) composite modified glassy carbon electrode for voltammetric determination of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianbao; Xu, Juan; Zhao, Lei; Shen, Shaofei; Yuan, Maosen; Liu, Wenming; Tu, Qin; Yu, Ruijin; Wang, Jinyi

    2016-10-01

    An Au nanoparticles/poly(caffeic acid) (AuNPs/PCA) composite modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was prepared by successively potentiostatic technique in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solution containing 0.02mM caffeic acid and 1.0mM HAuCl4. Electrochemical characterization of the AuNPs/PCA-GC electrode was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical behavior of acetaminophen (AP) at the AuNPs/PCA-GC electrode was also studied by cyclic voltammetry. Compared with bare GC and poly(caffeic acid) modified GC electrode, the AuNPs/PCA-GC electrode was exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of AP. The plot of catalytic current versus AP concentration showed two linear segments in the concentration ranges 0.2-20µM and 50-1000µM. The detection limit of 14 nM was obtained by using the first range of the calibration plot. The AuNPs/PCA-GC electrode has been successfully applied and validated by analyzing AP in blood, urine and pharmaceutical samples. PMID:27474318

  9. Role of Bile Acids in Liver Injury and Regeneration following Acetaminophen Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Bharat; Borude, Prachi; Edwards, Genea; Walesky, Chad; Cleveland, Joshua; Li, Feng; Ma, Xiaochao; Apte, Udayan

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids play a critical role in liver injury and regeneration, but their role in acetaminophen (APAP)–induced liver injury is not known. We tested the effect of bile acid modulation on APAP hepatotoxicity using C57BL/6 mice, which were fed a normal diet, a 2% cholestyramine (CSA)–containing diet for bile acid depletion, or a 0.2% cholic acid (CA)–containing diet for 1 week before treatment with 400 mg/kg APAP. CSA-mediated bile acid depletion resulted in significantly higher liver injury and delayed regeneration after APAP treatment. In contrast, 0.2% CA supplementation in the diet resulted in a moderate delay in progression of liver injury and significantly higher liver regeneration after APAP treatment. Either CSA-mediated bile acid depletion or CA supplementation did not affect hepatic CYP2E1 levels or glutathione depletion after APAP treatment. CSA-fed mice exhibited significantly higher activation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinases and a significant decrease in intestinal fibroblast growth factor 15 mRNA after APAP treatment. In contrast, mice fed a 0.2% CA diet had significantly lower c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase activation and 12-fold higher fibroblast growth factor 15 mRNA in the intestines. Liver regeneration after APAP treatment was significantly faster in CA diet–fed mice after APAP administration secondary to rapid cyclin D1 induction. Taken together, these data indicate that bile acids play a critical role in both initiation and recovery of APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:24007882

  10. Role of bile acids in liver injury and regeneration following acetaminophen overdose.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Borude, Prachi; Edwards, Genea; Walesky, Chad; Cleveland, Joshua; Li, Feng; Ma, Xiaochao; Apte, Udayan

    2013-11-01

    Bile acids play a critical role in liver injury and regeneration, but their role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury is not known. We tested the effect of bile acid modulation on APAP hepatotoxicity using C57BL/6 mice, which were fed a normal diet, a 2% cholestyramine (CSA)-containing diet for bile acid depletion, or a 0.2% cholic acid (CA)-containing diet for 1 week before treatment with 400 mg/kg APAP. CSA-mediated bile acid depletion resulted in significantly higher liver injury and delayed regeneration after APAP treatment. In contrast, 0.2% CA supplementation in the diet resulted in a moderate delay in progression of liver injury and significantly higher liver regeneration after APAP treatment. Either CSA-mediated bile acid depletion or CA supplementation did not affect hepatic CYP2E1 levels or glutathione depletion after APAP treatment. CSA-fed mice exhibited significantly higher activation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinases and a significant decrease in intestinal fibroblast growth factor 15 mRNA after APAP treatment. In contrast, mice fed a 0.2% CA diet had significantly lower c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase activation and 12-fold higher fibroblast growth factor 15 mRNA in the intestines. Liver regeneration after APAP treatment was significantly faster in CA diet-fed mice after APAP administration secondary to rapid cyclin D1 induction. Taken together, these data indicate that bile acids play a critical role in both initiation and recovery of APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:24007882

  11. Non-enzymatic modifications of prostaglandin H synthase 1 affect bifunctional enzyme activity - Implications for the sensitivity of blood platelets to acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Kassassir, Hassan; Siewiera, Karolina; Talar, Marcin; Stec-Martyna, Emilia; Pawlowska, Zofia; Watala, Cezary

    2016-06-25

    Due to its ability to inhibit the blood platelet PGHS-1, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, Aspirin(®)) is widely used as a preventive agent in atherothrombotic diseases. However, its beneficial effects seem to be lower in diabetic patients, suggesting that protein glycation may impair effective ASA-mediated acetylation process. On the other hand, it is proposed that ASA can prevent some of the late complications of diabetes by lowering the extent of glycation at protein free amino groups. The aim of this work was to evaluate the extents of non-enzymatic N-glycosylation (glycation) and acetylation of blood platelet PGHS-1 (COX-1) and the competition between glycation and acetylation was investigated in order to demonstrate how these two reactions may compete against platelet PGHS-1. When PGHS-1 was incubated with glycating/acetylating agents (glucose, Glu; 1,6-bisphosphofructose, 1,6-BPF; methylglyoxal, MGO, acetylsalicylic acid, ASA), the enzyme was modified in 13.4 ± 1.6, 5.3 ± 0.5, 10.7 ± 1.2 and 6.4 ± 1.1 mol/mol protein, respectively, and its activity was significantly reduced. The prior glycation/carbonylation of PGHS-1 with Glu, 1,6-BPF or MGO decreased the extent of acetylation from 6.4 ± 1.1 down to 2.5 ± 0.2, 3.6 ± 0.3 and 5.2 ± 0.2 mol/mol protein, respectively, but the enzyme still remained susceptible to the subsequent inhibition of its activity with ASA. When PGHS-1 was first acetylated with ASA and then incubated with glycating/carbonylating agents, we observed the following reductions in the enzyme modifications: from 13.4 ± 1.6 to 8.7 ± 0.6 mol/mol protein for Glu, from 5.3 ± 0.5 to 3.9 ± 0.3 mol/mol protein for 1,6-BPF and from 10.7 ± 1.2 to 7.5 ± 0.5 mol/mol protein for MGO, however subsequent glycation/carbonylation did not significantly affect PGHS-1 function. Overall, our outcomes allow to better understand the structural aspects of the chemical competition between glycation and acetylation of PGHS-1

  12. Acetaminophen Toxicity and 5-Oxoproline (Pyroglutamic Acid): A Tale of Two Cycles, One an ATP-Depleting Futile Cycle and the Other a Useful Cycle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary The acquired form of 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid) metabolic acidosis was first described in 1989 and its relationship to chronic acetaminophen ingestion was proposed the next year. Since then, this cause of chronic anion gap metabolic acidosis has been increasingly recognized. Many cases go unrecognized because an assay for 5-oxoproline is not widely available. Most cases occur in malnourished, chronically ill women with a history of chronic acetaminophen ingestion. Acetaminophen levels are very rarely in the toxic range; rather, they are usually therapeutic or low. The disorder generally resolves with cessation of acetaminophen and administration of intravenous fluids. Methionine or N-acetyl cysteine may accelerate resolution and methionine is protective in a rodent model. The disorder has been attributed to glutathione depletion and activation of a key enzyme in the γ-glutamyl cycle. However, the specific metabolic derangements that cause the 5-oxoproline accumulation remain unclear. An ATP-depleting futile 5-oxoproline cycle can explain the accumulation of 5-oxoproline after chronic acetaminophen ingestion. This cycle is activated by the depletion of both glutathione and cysteine. This explanation contributes to our understanding of acetaminophen-induced 5-oxoproline metabolic acidosis and the beneficial role of N-acetyl cysteine therapy. The ATP-depleting futile 5-oxoproline cycle may also play a role in the energy depletions that occur in other acetaminophen-related toxic syndromes. PMID:24235282

  13. Ascorbic acid prevents acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice by ameliorating glutathione recovery and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Lee, Jaeyong; Nabeshima, Atsunori; Homma, Takujiro; Kang, Eun Sil; Saito, Yuka; Yamada, Sohsuke; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Ken-Ichi; Miyata, Satoshi; Fujii, Junichi

    2016-08-15

    Aldehyde reductase (AKR1A) plays a role in the biosynthesis of ascorbic acid (AsA), and AKR1A-deficient mice produce about 10-15% of the AsA that is produced by wild-type mice. We found that acetaminophen (AAP) hepatotoxicity was aggravated in AKR1A-deficient mice. The pre-administration of AsA in the drinking water markedly ameliorated the AAP hepatotoxicity in the AKR1A-deficient mice. Treatment of the mice with AAP decreased both glutathione and AsA levels in the liver in the early phase after AAP administration, and an AsA deficiency delayed the recovery of the glutathione content in the healing phase. While in cysteine supply systems; a neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1, a cystine transporter xCT, enzymes for the transsulfuration pathway, and autophagy markers, were all elevated in the liver as the result of the AAP treatment, the AsA deficiency suppressed their induction. Thus, AsA appeared to exert a protective effect against AAP hepatotoxicity by ameliorating the supply of cysteine that is available for glutathione synthesis as a whole. Because some drugs produce reactive oxygen species, resulting in the consumption of glutathione during the metabolic process, the intake of sufficient amounts of AsA would be beneficial for protecting against the hepatic damage caused by such drugs. PMID:27288086

  14. Topical application of a film-forming emulgel dressing that controls the release of stratifin and acetylsalicylic acid and improves/prevents hypertrophic scarring.

    PubMed

    Rahmani-Neishaboor, Elham; Jallili, Reza; Hartwell, Ryan; Leung, Victor; Carr, Nicholas; Ghahary, Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Here, we evaluate the efficacy of an emulgel dressing to control the release of an antifibrogenic factor, stratifin (SFN), along with an anti-inflammatory drug, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), to be used as a wound dressing with hypertrophic scar reducing features. Emulgel dressings were prepared by dispersing positively charged submicron vesicles in carboxymethyl cellulose gel. Release kinetics of SFN/ASA and toxicity for primary skin cells were assessed in vitro. Antifibrogenic efficacy of medicated emulgel dressings was tested on a rabbit ear fibrotic model. Following topical application on the wounds, emulgels formed an occlusive film and controlled the release of SFN and ASA for 7 and 24 hours, respectively. Wounds treated with SFN/ASA-containing emulgel dressings showed an 80% reduction in scar elevation compared with untreated controls. Topical formulations were nontoxic for cultured human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Inflammation was significantly controlled in treated wounds, as shown by a reduced number of infiltrated CD3(+) T cells (p < 0.001) and macrophages. SFN/ASA-treated wounds showed a significantly higher (p < 0.001) expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1, resulting in reduced collagen deposition and less scarring. Film-forming emulgel dressings that control the release of antifibrogenic and anti-inflammatory factors provide an excellent treatment option for postburn hypertrophic scar management. PMID:23126516

  15. Histopathological, Ultrastructural, and Immunohistochemical Assessment of Hippocampus Structures of Rats Exposed to TCDD and High Doses of Tocopherol and Acetylsalicylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Rosińczuk, Joanna; Całkosiński, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    The effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on central nervous system consists of changing expression of estrogen receptors, whereas the result of chronic inflammatory reaction caused by dioxin is occurrence of destructive changes in various organs connected with disturbed metabolism of connective tissue and damage of cells. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of dioxins on function, ultrastructure, and cytological and histological structure of hippocampus, particularly on expression of estrogen receptors in central nervous system as well as to define protective influence of tocopherol (TCP) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on the decrease in activity of proinflammatory effects in central nervous system. It was shown that TCDD contributes to destructive and inflammatory changes along with demyelization of myelin sheaths and atrophy of estrogen receptors in hippocampus. Dioxin contributes to atrophy of estrogen receptors in hippocampus, in which also destructive and inflammatory changes were found along with demyelination of myelin sheaths. Histopathological and ultrastructural image of hippocampus areas in rats, in which both TCP and ASA were used, is characterized by poorly expressed degenerative changes and smaller inflammatory reactivity. Using both TCP and ASA has a protective effect on functions of central nervous system. PMID:25879034

  16. The monitoring of antiaggregation effect of acetylsalicylic acid therapy by measuring serum thromboxane B2 in patients with coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Klasic, Anita; Lakusic, Nenad; Gaspar, Ludovit; Kruzliak, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular patients take acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) for preventing myocardial infarction and other thromboembolic complications. It is already known that in some patients this therapy is not effective. The aim of this study was to assess the percentage of ASA resistance on the sample of patients with coronary artery bypass grafting. Our study included 105 patients with coronary artery bypass grafting treated with ASA 150 mg/day or lesser. Platelet aggregation was measured by serum thromboxane B2 level as well as impedance aggregometry from whole blood to determine ASA antiaggregation effect. The percentage of ASA resistance was 41.9% with impedance aggregometry, and after determining the serum thromboxane B2 level this percentage was only 8.6%. The correlation between these two methods was weak (r = 0.443; P < 0.0001). Thromboembolic complications still occur in ASA-treated patients because some patients are resistant to ASA therapy. It would be useful to monitor the effectiveness of ASA therapy and give another antiaggregation drug to these patients to reduce adverse events. The problem is which test is ideal because different tests show different percentages of ASA resistance. PMID:26575493

  17. The effect of microcrystalline cellulose crystallinity on the hydrophilic property of tablets and the hydrolysis of acetylsalicylic acid as active pharmaceutical ingredient inside tablets.

    PubMed

    Awa, Kimie; Shinzawa, Hideyuki; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2015-08-01

    The crystal structures of active pharmaceutical ingredients and excipients should be strictly controlled because they influence pharmaceutical properties of products which cause the change in the quality or the bioavailability of the products. In this study, we investigated the effects of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) crystallinity on the hydrophilic properties of tablets and the hydrolysis of active pharmaceutical ingredient, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), inside tablets by using tablets containing 20% MCC as an excipient. Different levels of grinding were applied to MCC prior to tablet formulation, to intentionally cause structural variation in the MCC. The water penetration and moisture absorbability of the tablets increased with decreasing the crystallinity of MCC through higher level of grinding. More importantly, the hydrolysis of ASA inside tablets was also accelerated. These results indicate that the crystallinity of MCC has crucial effects on the pharmaceutical properties of tablets even when the tablets contain a relatively small amount of MCC. Therefore, controlling the crystal structure of excipients is important for controlling product qualities. PMID:25583304

  18. Effect of low dose acetylsalicylic acid on the frequency and hematologic activity of left ventricular thrombus in anterior wall acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Kuepper, A.J.V.; Verheugt, F.W.; Peels, C.H.; Galema, T.W.; den Hollander, W.; Roos, J.P.

    1989-04-15

    In this prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial the effect of 100 mg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) once daily on the incidence, hematologic activity and embolic potential of left ventricular (LV) thrombosis was studied in 100 consecutive patients with a first anterior wall acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Patients were randomized to ASA or placebo less than 12 hours after onset of symptoms. Heparin, 5,000 IU subcutaneously twice daily, was given to all patients during immobilization. Echocardiography was performed less than 24 hours, 48 to 72 hours and 1, 2, and 12 weeks after AMI. LV thrombosis was detected by echocardiography in 30 (33%) of the 92 evaluable patients (15 patients given ASA and 15 given placebo). Indium-111 platelet scintigraphy was done in 17 of the 22 patients with an LV thrombus at the second week echocardiogram. Among 7 ASA-treated patients, 4 had positive images; among 10 placebo patients, 5 had positive images. LV thrombus resolution was noted in 3 of 9 patients with a positive scan and in 5 of 8 patients with a negative platelet scan. In 7 of 10 ASA-treated patients and 5 of 12 placebo-treated patients thrombus resolution was observed (difference not significant). Systemic embolism occurred in 2 patients, both given ASA, during the first week after AMI. Thus, low dose ASA has no effect on the incidence, hematologic activity and embolic potential of LV thrombosis in anterior wall AMI.

  19. Epithelial MUC1 promotes cell migration, reduces apoptosis and affects levels of mucosal modulators during acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin)-induced gastropathy.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Debashish; Fernandez, Harvey Robert; Patil, Pradeep Bhatu; Premaratne, Pushpa; Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne; Lindén, Sara Katarina

    2015-02-01

    MUC1 is a transmembrane mucin highly expressed in the stomach. Although extensive research has uncovered many of its roles in cancer, knowledge about the functions of MUC1 in normal tissues is limited. In the present study, we showed that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; aspirin) up-regulated MUC1/Muc1 expression in the gastric mucosa of humans and wild-type (WT) mice. ASA induced mucosal injury in all mice to a similar extent; however, WT animals and those chimaeras with Muc1 on the epithelia recovered faster than Muc1-knockout (KO) mice and chimaeras carrying Muc1 on haemopoietic but not epithelial cells. MUC1 enhanced proliferation and migration of the human gastric cell line MKN-7 and increased resistance to apoptosis. The repeated treatment regime used caused a reduction in cyclo-oxygenase-1 (Cox-1) expression, though WT animals returned faster towards pre-treatment levels and had increased Cox-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels during recovery. Thus we found that epithelial Muc1 is more important for the healing process than haemopoietic Muc1 and Muc1/MUC1 facilitates wound healing by enhancing cell migration and proliferation, protecting against apoptosis and mediating expression of mucosal modulators. Thus MUC1 plays essential roles during wound healing and development of treatment modalities targeting enhanced expression of MUC1 may be beneficial to treat mucosal wounds. PMID:25387004

  20. Histopathological, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical assessment of hippocampus structures of rats exposed to TCDD and high doses of tocopherol and acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Rosińczuk, Joanna; Dymarek, Robert; Całkosiński, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    The effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on central nervous system consists of changing expression of estrogen receptors, whereas the result of chronic inflammatory reaction caused by dioxin is occurrence of destructive changes in various organs connected with disturbed metabolism of connective tissue and damage of cells. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of dioxins on function, ultrastructure, and cytological and histological structure of hippocampus, particularly on expression of estrogen receptors in central nervous system as well as to define protective influence of tocopherol (TCP) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on the decrease in activity of proinflammatory effects in central nervous system. It was shown that TCDD contributes to destructive and inflammatory changes along with demyelization of myelin sheaths and atrophy of estrogen receptors in hippocampus. Dioxin contributes to atrophy of estrogen receptors in hippocampus, in which also destructive and inflammatory changes were found along with demyelination of myelin sheaths. Histopathological and ultrastructural image of hippocampus areas in rats, in which both TCP and ASA were used, is characterized by poorly expressed degenerative changes and smaller inflammatory reactivity. Using both TCP and ASA has a protective effect on functions of central nervous system. PMID:25879034

  1. Binary mixtures of diclofenac with paracetamol, ibuprofen, naproxen, and acetylsalicylic acid and these pharmaceuticals in isolated form induce oxidative stress on Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Neri-Cruz, Nadia; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Islas-Flores, Hariz; García-Medina, Sandra

    2014-11-01

    Toxicity in natural ecosystems is usually not due to exposure to a single substance, but is rather the result of exposure to mixtures of toxic substances. Knowing the effects of contaminants as a mixture compared to their effects in isolated form is therefore important. This study aimed to evaluate the oxidative stress induced by binary mixtures of diclofenac with paracetamol, ibuprofen, naproxen, and acetylsalicylic acid and by these nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in isolated form, using Hyalella azteca as a bioindicator. The median lethal concentration (LC50) and the lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) of each NSAID were obtained. Amphipods were exposed for 72 h to the latter value in isolated form and as binary mixtures. The following biomarkers were evaluated: lipid peroxidation (LPX), protein carbonyl content (PCC), and activity of the antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Significant increases in LPX and PCC with respect to the control group (p ≤ 0.05) were induced by NSAIDs both in isolated form and as binary mixtures. Changes in SOD, CAT, and GPx activity likewise occurred with NSAIDs in isolated form and as binary mixtures. In conclusion, NSAIDs used in this study induce oxidative stress on H. azteca both in isolated form and as binary mixtures, and the interactions occurring between these pharmaceuticals are probably antagonistic in type. PMID:25004860

  2. Pharmacokinetic study of copper (II) acetylsalicylate.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mohammad S; Sher, Muhammad; Pervez, Humayun; Saeed, Maryiam

    2008-09-01

    This study was aimed at determination of pharmacokinetic parameters of copper (II) acetylsalicylate (CAS). Ten volunteers received a 60-mg dose of CAS. Blood samples were collected just before and after 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.5, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.5, 7.0, 10, and 12.0 h of administration of the drug. The plasma samples were analyzed for CAS and its metabolites by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method having a suitable lower limit of quantification. The dose of 60 mg was well tolerated without any adverse effect. The maximum plasma concentration of CAS was found to be 0.38 mg L(-1) with t (max) of 0.72 h. The plasma half-life, clearance, and volume of distribution of CAS were 8.67 h, 66.30 L h(-1) and 829 L kg(-1), respectively. The elimination of CAS, acetylsalicylic acid, copper salicylate, and salicylic acid follows the first order kinetics with r (2) 0.979, 0.880, 0.991, and 0.998, respectively. The study provided for the first time the pharmacokinetic data for CAS after oral administration of CAS. The data were found to be useful in understanding the claimed enhanced anti-inflammatory activity of the drug as compared with that of acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:18478192

  3. Protective role of acetylsalicylic acid in experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infection: evidence of a 15-epi-lipoxin A₄-mediated effect.

    PubMed

    Molina-Berríos, Alfredo; Campos-Estrada, Carolina; Henriquez, Natalia; Faúndez, Mario; Torres, Gloria; Castillo, Christian; Escanilla, Sebastián; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Morello, Antonio; López-Muñoz, Rodrigo A; Maya, Juan D

    2013-01-01

    Chagas' disease, produced by Trypanosoma cruzi, affects more than 8 million people, producing approximately 10,000 deaths each year in Latin America. Migration of people from endemic regions to developed countries has expanded the risk of infection, transforming this disease into a globally emerging problem. PGE₂ and other eicosanoids contribute to cardiac functional deficits after infection with T. cruzi. Thus, the inhibition of host cyclooxygenase (COX) enzyme emerges as a potential therapeutic target. In vivo studies about the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) upon T. cruzi infection are controversial, and always report the effect of ASA at a single dose. Therefore, we aimed to analyze the effect of ASA at different doses in an in vivo model of infection and correlate it with the production of arachidonic acid metabolites. ASA decreased mortality, parasitemia, and heart damage in T. cruzi (Dm28c) infected mice, at the low doses of 25 and 50 mg/Kg. However, this effect disappeared when the high ASA doses of 75 and 100 mg/Kg were used. We explored whether this observation was related to the metabolic shift toward the production of 5-lipoxygenase derivatives, and although we did not observe an increase in LTB4 production in infected RAW cells and mice infected, we did find an increase in 15-epi-LXA₄ (an ASA-triggered lipoxin). We also found high levels of 15-epi-LXA₄ in T. cruzi infected mice treated with the low doses of ASA, while the high ASA doses decreased 15-epi-LXA₄ levels. Importantly, 15-epi-LXA₄ prevented parasitemia, mortality, and cardiac changes in vivo and restored the protective role in the treatment with a high dose of ASA. This is the first report showing the production of ASA-triggered lipoxins in T. cruzi infected mice, which demonstrates the role of this lipid as an anti-inflammatory molecule in the acute phase of the disease. PMID:23638194

  4. Alleviative effects from boswellic acid on acetaminophen-induced hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lung-Che; Hu, Li-Hong; Yin, Mei-Chin

    2016-06-01

    Protective effects of boswellic acid (BA) against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in Balb/ cA mice were examined. BA, at 0.05 or 0.1%, was supplied for 4 weeks. Acute liver injury was induced by APAP treatment. Results showed that BA intake increased hepatic BA bioavailability. APAP treatment decreased glutathione (GSH) level, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) production; and lowered activity and protein expression of glutathione reductase (GR) and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in liver. BA intake at both doses alleviated subsequent APAP-induced oxidative stress by retaining GSH content, decreasing ROS and GSSG formations, reserving activity and expression of GR and HO-1 in liver, and lowering hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 activity and expression. APAP treatment enhanced hepatic levels of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. BA pre-intake diminished APAP-induced release of those inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. APAP upregulated hepatic protein expression of toll-like receptor (TLR)-3, TLR-4, MyD88, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p50, NF-κB p65 and JNK. BA pre-intake at both doses suppressed the expression of NF-κB p65 and p-JNK, and only at 0.1% down-regulated hepatic TLR-3, TLR-4 and MyD88 expression. APAP led to obvious foci of inflammatory cell infiltration in liver, determined by H&E stain. BA intake at both doses attenuated hepatic inflammatory infiltration. These findings support that boswellic acid is a potent hepatoprotective agent. PMID:27161000

  5. The effect of acetaminophen on the expression of BCRP in trophoblast cells impairs the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Blazquez, Alba G; Briz, Oscar; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ester; Perez, Maria J; Ghanem, Carolina I; Marin, Jose J G

    2014-05-15

    Acetaminophen is used as first-choice drug for pain relief during pregnancy. Here we have investigated the effect of acetaminophen at subtoxic doses on the expression of ABC export pumps in trophoblast cells and its functional repercussion on the placental barrier during maternal cholestasis. The incubation of human choriocarcinoma cells (JAr, JEG-3 and BeWo) with acetaminophen for 48h resulted in no significant changes in the expression and/or activity of MDR1 and MRPs. In contrast, in JEG-3 cells, BCRP mRNA, protein, and transport activity were reduced. In rat placenta, collected at term, acetaminophen administration for the last three days of pregnancy resulted in enhanced mRNA, but not protein, levels of Mrp1 and Bcrp. In fact, a decrease in Bcrp protein was found. Using in situ perfused rat placenta, a reduction in the Bcrp-dependent fetal-to-maternal bile acid transport after treating the dams with acetaminophen was found. Complete biliary obstruction in pregnant rats induced a significant bile acid accumulation in fetal serum and tissues, which was further enhanced when the mothers were treated with acetaminophen. This drug induced increased ROS production in JEG-3 cells and decreased the total glutathione content in rat placenta. Moreover, the NRF2 pathway was activated in JEG-3 cells as shown by an increase in nuclear NRF2 levels and an up-regulation of NRF2 target genes, NQO1 and HMOX-1, which was not observed in rat placenta. In conclusion, acetaminophen induces in placenta oxidative stress and a down-regulation of BCRP/Bcrp, which may impair the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis. PMID:24631341

  6. Reduced mucosal side-effects of acetylsalicylic acid after conjugation with tris-hydroxymethyl-aminomethane. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a new anti-inflammatory compound.

    PubMed

    Varga, Gabriella; Lajkó, Norbert; Ugocsai, Melinda; Érces, Dániel; Horváth, Gyöngyi; Tóth, Gábor; Boros, Mihály; Ghyczy, Miklós

    2016-06-15

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) causes adverse haemorrhagic reactions in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and previous results have suggested that combination therapy with 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (Tris) could provide protection in this scenario. Based on this hypothesis, our aim was to develop a new compound from ASA and Tris precursors and to characterize the biological effects of ASA-Tris and the derivatives ASA-bis- and mono-hydroxymethyl-aminomethane (ASA-Bis, ASA-Mono, respectively) using in vivo and in vitro test systems. ASA or ASA conjugates (0.55mmol/kg, each) were administered intragastrically to Sprague-Dawley rats. Changes in the mucosal structure and in the serosal microcirculation were detected by in vivo imaging techniques, the plasma TNF-alpha, tissue xanthine oxidoreductase and myeloperoxidase activities, and liver cytochrome c changes were also determined. In two separate series, platelet aggregation and carrageenan arthritis-induced inflammatory pain were measured in control, ASA and ASA-Tris-treated groups. Severe mucosal injury and a significant decrease in serosal red blood cell velocity developed in the ASA-treated group and an ~2-fold elevation in proinflammatory mediator levels evolved. ASA-Tris did not cause bleeding, microcirculatory dysfunction, mucosal injury or an elevation in proinflammatory markers. The ASA-Mono and ASA-Bis conjugates did not cause macroscopic bleeding, but the inflammatory activation was apparent. ASA-Tris did not influence the cyclooxygenase-induced platelet aggregation significantly, but the inflammatory pain was reduced as effectively as in the case of equimolar ASA doses. ASA-Tris conjugation is an effective approach through which the GI side-effects of ASA are controlled by decreasing the cytokine-mediated progression of pro-inflammatory events. PMID:27079640

  7. A comparative study between conventional pan coater and quasi-continuous small batch coater on the stability of tablets containing acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Cahyadi, Christine; Chan, Lai Wah; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2015-02-01

    The Supercell coater was developed as an in-line small batch tablet coater which uses air-fluidization for tablet coating. Coating time is very much reduced, with improved heat and mass transfer. It was hypothesized that the quasi-continuous Supercell coating process was more suitable for the aqueous coating of tablets containing moisture-sensitive drugs. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) was used as the model drug in this study. The extent of ASA degradation in Supercell coating was compared against that of tablets coated using the conventional pan coater. Less than 0.3% of ASA was degraded at the end of the coating process using either coater. The extent of ASA degradation was found to be more pronounced during storage. The Supercell coated tablets exhibited comparable or smaller percentage of ASA degradation than the pan coated tablets at the end of a storage period of 6 months under accelerated stability conditions (40°C/75% RH) and 3 years under ambient conditions (25°C/50% RH). The extent and rate of ASA degradation during storage were dependent on the processing conditions employed during Supercell coating. Increase in temperature generally led to a reduction in ASA degradation, while increase in spray rate and coating level caused more degradation. Greater extent of ASA degradation was observed on the surface of pan coated tablets compared with Supercell coated tablets due to greater moisture contact and the slower and wetter coating process. Changes to the processing conditions also influenced the residual moisture content (0.55-2.86%) of the tablets. However, no direct correlation between the residual moisture content of the tablets after coating and the extent of ASA degradation during storage was found. PMID:25448074

  8. A novel sensor based on electrochemical polymerization of diglycolic acid for determination of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fen; Ru, Hui-Ying; Sun, Li-Xian; Zou, Yong-Jin; Jiao, Cheng-Li; Wang, Tao-Yi; Zhang, Jia-Ming; Zheng, Qian; Zhou, Huai-Ying

    2012-01-01

    Diglycolic acid (DA) polymer was coated on glassy carbon (GC) electrode by cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique for the first time. The electrochemical performances of the modified electrode were investigated by CV and electrochemical impedance (EIS). The obtained electrode showed an excellent electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of acetaminophen (ACOP). A couple of well-defined reversible electrochemical redox peaks were observed on the ploy(DA)/GC electrode in ACOP solution. Compared with bare GC electrode, the oxidation peak potential of ACOP on ploy(DA)/GC electrode moved from 0.289 V to 0.220 V. Meanwhile, the oxidation peak current was much higher on the modified electrode than that on the bare GC electrode, indicating DA polymer modified electrode possessed excellent performance for the oxidation of ACOP. This kind of capability of the modified electrode can be enlisted for the highly sensitive and selective determination of ACOP. Under the optimized conditions, a wide linear range from 2 × 10(-8) to 5.0 × 10(-4)M with a correlation coefficient 0.9995 was obtained. The detection limit was 6.7 × 10(-9)M (at the ratio of signal to noise, S/N=3:1). The modified electrode also exhibited very good stability and reproducibility for the detection of ACOP. The established method was applied to the determination of ACOP in samples. An average recovery of 100.1% was achieved. These results indicated that this method was reliable for determining ACOP. PMID:22651969

  9. Organochlorines inhibit acetaminophen glucuronidation by redirecting UDP-glucuronic acid towards the D-glucuronate pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Tom S. Wilson, John X.; Selliah, Subajini; Bilodeau, Marc; Zwingmann, Claudia; Poon, Raymond; O'Brien, Peter J.

    2008-11-01

    Industry-derived organochlorines are persistent environmental pollutants that are a continuing health concern. The effects of these compounds on drug metabolism are not well understood. In the current study we present evidence that the inhibition of acetaminophen (APAP) glucuronidation by minute concentrations of organochlorines correlates well with their ability to stimulate the D-glucuronate pathway leading to ascorbate synthesis. A set of 6 arylated organochlorines, including 5 PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) congeners, were assessed for their effects on APAP glucuronidation in isolated hepatocytes from male Sprague-Dawley rats. The capacity of each organochlorine to inhibit APAP glucuronidation was found to be directly proportional to its capacity to stimulate ascorbate synthesis. PCB153, PCB28 and bis-(4-chlorophenyl sulfone) (BCPS) in increasing order were the most effective organochlorines for inhibiting APAP glucuronidation and stimulating the D-glucuronate pathway. None of the 3 inhibitors of APAP glucuronidation were able to alter the expression of UGT1A6, UGT1A7 and UGT1A8 (the major isoforms responsible for APAP glucuronidation in the rat), however, their efficacy at inhibiting APAP glucuronidation was proportional to their capacity to deplete UDP-glucuronic acid (UDPGA). BCPS-mediated inhibition of APAP glucuronidation in isolated hepatocytes had non-competitive characteristics and was insensitive to the inactivation of cytochrome P450. The effective organochlorines were also able to selectively stimulate the hydrolysis of UDPGA to UDP and glucuronate in isolated microsomes, but could not inhibit APAP glucuronidation in microsomes when UDPGA was in excess. We conclude that organochlorines are able to inhibit APAP glucuronidation in hepatocytes by depleting UDPGA via redirecting UDPGA towards the D-glucuronate pathway. Because the inhibition is non-competitive, low concentrations of these compounds could have long term inhibitory effects on the

  10. Aspirin, acetaminophen and proton transport through phospholipid bilayers and mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, J

    1992-09-01

    Mechanisms of proton transport were investigated in planar phospholipid bilayer membranes exposed to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), acetaminophen (4-acetamidophenol), benzoic acid and three aspirin metabolites (salicylic acid, gentisic acid and salicyluric acid). The objectives were to characterize the conductances and permeabilities of these weak acids in lipid bilayer membranes and then predict their effects on mitochondrial membranes. Of the compounds tested only aspirin, benzoate and salicylate caused significant increases in membrane conductance. The conductance was due mainly to proton current at low pH and to weak acid anion current at neutral pH. Analysis of the concentration and pH dependence suggests that these weak acids act as HA-2-type proton carriers when pH approximately pK and as lipid soluble anions at neutral pH. Salicylate is much more potent than aspirin and benzoate because salicylate contains an internal hydrogen bond which delocalizes the negative charge and increases the permeability of the anion. Model calculations for mitochondria suggest that salicylate causes net H+ uptake by a cyclic process of HA influx and A- efflux. This model can explain the salicylate-induced uncoupling and swelling observed in isolated mitochondria. Since ingested aspirin breaks down rapidly to form salicylate, these results may clarify the mechanisms of aspirin toxicity in humans. The results may also help to explain why the ingestion of aspirin but not acetaminophen is associated with Reye's syndrome, a disease characterized by impaired energy metabolism and mitochondrial swelling. PMID:1334228

  11. Dissolution difference between acidic and neutral media of acetaminophen tablets containing a super disintegrant and a soluble excipient. II.

    PubMed

    Chen, C R; Cho, S L; Lin, C K; Lin, Y H; Chiang, S T; Wu, H L

    1998-03-01

    The disintegration and dissolution of acetaminophen tablets containing sucrose and Ac-Di-Sol/Primojel was significantly different between acidic and neutral media. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of this phenomenon and to propose a way of reducing the dissolution difference between the two media. Tablets of different combinations of active ingredient, sucrose, and Ac-Di-Sol/Primojel were prepared and their dissolution in various media was evaluated. The dissolution differences were found to be largely related to the hydrophobicity of the active ingredient and pH difference of the two media. This difference was even more evident under the condition where acetaminophen, sucrose, and Primojel were combined. The dissolution difference was therefore attributed to the depressed function of Primojel in the acidic medium, the stronger binding of sucrose, the hydrophobicity of the active ingredient and pH difference of the two media. Increasing the concentration of Primojel or incorporating the surfactant in the tablet can thus greatly decrease the dissolution difference between acidic and neutral media. PMID:9549889

  12. Effect of acetaminophen on fetal acid-base balance in chorioamnionitis.

    PubMed

    Kirshon, B; Moise, K J; Wasserstrum, N

    1989-12-01

    The effect of antipyretic treatment with acetaminophen on fetal status was examined in eight laboring women febrile with chorioamnionitis. After a fetal heart rate tracing and scalp blood gas level were obtained near maximum maternal fever, a 650-mg acetaminophen suppository was administered. If the temperature remained greater than 101 degrees F, the dose was repeated in one to two hours. The fetal heart rate tracing was analyzed again after the mother's fever was reduced by acetaminophen. All patients delivered within four hours of the first dose. Umbilical artery blood gases were obtained at delivery. Significant improvements in the bicarbonate concentration and base deficit were noted at the time of delivery as compared to the scalp gas at the height of the maternal fever. The fetal heart rate tracings at the height of the maternal fever, characterized by tachycardia, poor variability and late decelerations, changed to a normal heart rate pattern without decelerations when the mother's fever was reduced. Hence, in the laboring gravida with chorioamnionitis, reducing maternal fever with acetaminophen improves fetal status and thereby may reduce the probability of cesarean section for fetal distress. PMID:2621737

  13. Homocysteine is a novel risk factor for suboptimal response of blood platelets to acetylsalicylic acid in coronary artery disease: a randomized multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Karolczak, Kamil; Kamysz, Wojciech; Karafova, Anna; Drzewoski, Jozef; Watala, Cezary

    2013-08-01

    The incomplete inhibition of platelet function by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), despite the patients are receiving therapeutic doses of the drug ('aspirin-resistance'), is caused by numbers of risk factors. In this study we verified the idea that plasma homocysteine (Hcy) contributes to 'aspirin-resistance' in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A cross-designed randomized controlled intervention study has been performed (126 CAD pts incl. 26 with T2DM) to determine whether increasing ASA dose from 75mg to 150mg daily may result in the increased antiplatelet effect, in the course of four-week treatment. Platelet response to collagen (coll) or arachidonic acid (AA) was monitored with whole blood aggregometry, plasma thromboxane (Tx), and Hcy levels were determined immunochemically. The ASA-mediated reductions in platelet response to coll (by 12±3%) or AA (by 10±3%) and in plasma Tx (by 20±9%; p<0.02 or less) were significantly greater for higher ASA dose and significantly correlated with plasma Hcy, which was significantly lower in "good" ASA responders compared to "poor" responders (p<0.001). Higher plasma Hcy appeared a significant risk factor for blood platelet refractoriness to low ASA dose (OR=1.11; ±95%CI: 1.02-1.20, p<0.02, adjusted to age, sex and CAD risk factors). Hcy diminished in vitro antiplatelet effect of low ASA concentration and augmented platelet aggregation (by up to 62% (p<0.005) for coll and up to 15% (p<0.005) for AA), whereas its acetyl derivative acted oppositely. Otherwise, Hcy intensified antiplatelet action of high ASA. Hyperhomocysteinaemia may be a novel risk factor for the suppressed blood platelet response to ASA, and homocysteine may act as a specific sensitizer of blood platelets to some agonists. While homocysteine per se acts as a proaggregatory agent to blood platelets, its acetylated form is able to reverse this effect. Thus, these findings reveal a possibly new

  14. Acetaminophen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is also used in combination with opioid (narcotic) medications to relieve moderate to severe pain. Acetaminophen is in a class of medications called analgesics (pain relievers) and antipyretics (fever reducers). It works by changing ...

  15. Acetaminophen overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... a variety of over-the-counter and prescription pain relievers. Tylenol is a brand name for acetaminophen. Other ... team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Medicines and Children Pain Relievers Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  16. Semi-physiologic model validation and bioequivalence trials simulation to select the best analyte for acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Gragera, Ana; Navarro-Fontestad, Carmen; Mangas-Sanjuan, Victor; González-Álvarez, Isabel; García-Arieta, Alfredo; Trocóniz, Iñaki F; Casabó, Vicente G; Bermejo, Marival

    2015-07-10

    The objective of this paper is to apply a previously developed semi-physiologic pharmacokinetic model implemented in NONMEM to simulate bioequivalence trials (BE) of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) in order to validate the model performance against ASA human experimental data. ASA is a drug with first-pass hepatic and intestinal metabolism following Michaelis-Menten kinetics that leads to the formation of two main metabolites in two generations (first and second generation metabolites). The first aim was to adapt the semi-physiological model for ASA in NOMMEN using ASA pharmacokinetic parameters from literature, showing its sequential metabolism. The second aim was to validate this model by comparing the results obtained in NONMEM simulations with published experimental data at a dose of 1000 mg. The validated model was used to simulate bioequivalence trials at 3 dose schemes (100, 1000 and 3000 mg) and with 6 test formulations with decreasing in vivo dissolution rate constants versus the reference formulation (kD 8-0.25 h (-1)). Finally, the third aim was to determine which analyte (parent drug, first generation or second generation metabolite) was more sensitive to changes in formulation performance. The validation results showed that the concentration-time curves obtained with the simulations reproduced closely the published experimental data, confirming model performance. The parent drug (ASA) was the analyte that showed to be more sensitive to the decrease in pharmaceutical quality, with the highest decrease in Cmax and AUC ratio between test and reference formulations. PMID:25869458

  17. Determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its major metabolite, salicylic acid, in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: application to pharmacokinetic study of Astrix in Korean healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Kyung; Seo, Kyung Ah; Jung, Eun Ji; Kim, Ho-Sook; Yeo, Chang-Woo; Shon, Ji-Hong; Park, Kyung-Mi; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Shin, Jae-Gook

    2008-06-01

    The first liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for determination of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA) and one of its major metabolites, salicylic acid (SA), in human plasma using simvastatin as an internal standard has been developed and validated. For ASA analysis, a plasma sample containing potassium fluoride was extracted using a mixture of ethyl acetate and diethyl ether in the presence of 0.5% formic acid. SA, a major metabolite of ASA, was extracted from plasma using protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The compounds were separated on a reversed-phase column with an isocratic mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and water containing 0.1% formic acid (8:2, v/v). The ion transitions recorded in multiple reaction monitoring mode were m/z 179 --> 137, 137 --> 93 and 435 --> 319 for ASA, SA and IS, respectively. The coefficient of variation of the assay precision was less than 9.3%, and the accuracy exceeded 86.5%. The lower limits of quantification for ASA and SA were 5 and 50 ng/mL, respectively. The developed assay method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of ASA and SA after single oral administration of Astrix (entero-coated pellet, 100 mg of aspirin) to 10 Korean healthy male volunteers. PMID:18254152

  18. Carnosic acid protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by potentiating Nrf2-mediated antioxidant capacity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qi; Shen, Zhiyang; Yu, Hongxia; Lu, Gaofeng; Yu, Yong; Liu, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is one of the most common causes of acute liver failure. The study aimed to investigate the protective effect of carnosic acid (CA) on APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity and its underlying mechanism in mice. To induce hepatotoxicity, APAP solution (400 mg/kg) was administered into mice by intraperitoneal injection. Histological analysis revealed that CA treatment significantly ameliorated APAP-induced hepatic necrosis. The levels of both alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) in serum were reduced by CA treatment. Moreover, CA treatment significantly inhibited APAP-induced hepatocytes necrosis and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) releasing. Western blot analysis showed that CA abrogated APAP-induced cleaved caspase-3, Bax and phosphorylated JNK protein expression. Further results showed that CA treatment markedly inhibited APAP-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and MCP-1 mRNA expression and the levels of phosphorylated IκBα and p65 protein in the liver. In addition, CA treatment reduced APAP- induced hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) contents and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Conversely, hepatic glutathione (GSH) level was increased by administration of CA in APAP-treated mice. Mechanistically, CA facilitated Nrf2 translocation into nuclear through blocking the interaction between Nrf2 and Keap1, which, in turn, upregulated anti-oxidant genes mRNA expression. Taken together, our results indicate that CA facilitates Nrf2 nuclear translocation, causing induction of Nrf2-dependent genes, which contributes to protection from acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. PMID:26807019

  19. Effect of 70-nm silica particles on the toxicity of acetaminophen, tetracycline, trazodone, and 5-aminosalicylic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Kondoh, M; Watari, A; Hasezaki, T; Isoda, K; Tsutsumi, Y; Yagi, K

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to nano-sized particles is increasing because they are used in a wide variety of industrial products, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. Some animal studies indicate that such nanomaterials may have some toxicity, but their synergistic actions on the adverse effects of drugs are not well understood. In this study, we investigated whether 70-nm silica particles (nSP70), which are widely used in cosmetics and drug delivery, affect the toxicity of a drug for inflammatory bowel disease (5-aminosalicylic acid), an antibiotic drug (tetracycline), an antidepressant drug (trazodone), and an antipyretic drug (acetaminophen) in mice. Co-administration of nSP70 with trazodone did not increase a biochemical marker of liver injury. In contrast, co-administration increased the hepatotoxicity of the other drugs. Co-administration of nSP70 and tetracycline was lethal. These findings indicate that evaluation of synergistic adverse effects is important for the application of nano-sized materials. PMID:21612156

  20. Lack of influence of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg daily) on platelet survival time, beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    SciTech Connect

    Minar, E.; Ehringer, H.; Jung, M.; Koppensteiner, R.; Stuempflen, A.

    1988-11-01

    In this study we investigated the influence of low-dose (100 mg daily) acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on In-platelet survival time (PST) and on plasma levels of beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) and platelet factor 4 (PF 4) in 30 patients (median age: 60 years) with arteriographically proven peripheral arterial occlusive disease in a chronic stable phase. We observed no significant changes of PST during therapy with ASA (weighted mean: 169.8----166 (median) hours; multiple hit: 168.3----170.6 hours), and also the plasma levels of beta-TG (median: 31.8----32.3 ng/ml) and of PF 4 (3.6----3.9 ng/ml) remained unchanged.

  1. An examination of binding motifs associated with inter-particle interactions between facetted nano-crystals of acetylsalicylic acid and ascorbic acid through the application of molecular grid-based search methods.

    PubMed

    Hammond, R B; Jeck, S; Ma, C Y; Pencheva, K; Roberts, K J; Auffret, T

    2009-12-01

    Grid-based intermolecular search methods using atom-atom force fields are used to assess the structural nature of potential crystal-crystal interfacial binding associated with the examination of representative pharmaceutical formulation components, viz acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C). Molecular models of nano-sized molecular clusters for these two compounds, shaped in accordance with an attachment energy model of the respective particle morphologies, are constructed and used together with a grid-based search method to model the likely inter-particle interactions. The most-stable, mutual alignments of the respective nano-clusters based on their interaction energies are identified in the expectation that these are indicative of the most likely inter-particle binding configurations. The stable inter-particle binding configurations identified reveal that the number of interfacial hydrogen bonds formed between the binding particles is, potentially, an important factor in terms of the stability of inter-particle cohesion. All preferred inter-particle alignments are found to involve either the (1 0 0) or the (1 1 0) face of aspirin crystals interacting with a number of the growth forms of ascorbic acid. Four main types of interfacial hydrogen bonds are found to be associated with inter-particle binding and involve acceptor-donor interactions between hydroxyl, carbonyl, ester and lactone acceptor groups and hydroxyl donor groups. This hydrogen bonding network is found to be consistent with the surface chemistry of the interacting habit faces with, in general, the number of hydrogen bonds increasing for the more stable alignments. The likely usefulness of this approach for predicting solid-state formulation properties is reviewed. PMID:19544525

  2. Au-Pd/reduced graphene oxide composite as a new sensing layer for electrochemical determination of ascorbic acid, acetaminophen and tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Tadayon, Fariba; Vahed, Saba; Bagheri, Hasan

    2016-11-01

    An Au-Pd/reduced graphene oxide composite was employed as a novel electrode material for the sensitive and simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, acetaminophen and tyrosine. The electrochemical response characteristics of the modified electrode toward the analytes were investigated by differential pulse voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry. The responses of the electrochemical sensor for the target analytes were found to be improved significantly in comparison with those obtained using a conventional carbon paste electrode (CPE) and reduced graphene oxide/CPE. The experimental conditions for simultaneous determination of these species have been established. Ternary mixtures of analytes can be determined in the ranges of 0.03-9.50μM. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection were 15.7, 7.6 and 11.1nM for ascorbic acid, acetaminophen, and tyrosine, respectively. The method was applied successfully to determine the analytes in urine, serum and pharmaceutical samples simultaneously. PMID:27524083

  3. Modification of carbon paste electrode with Fe(III)-clinoptilolite nano-particles for simultaneous voltammetric determination of acetaminophen and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Sharifian, Samira; Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    A novel carbon paste electrode (CPE) modified with Fe(III)-exchanged clinoptilolite nano-particles (Fe(III)-NClino/CPE) was constructed and used for simultaneous voltammetric (CV, SqW and chronoamperometry) determination of ascorbic acid and acetaminophen. Raw and modified zeolites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The square wave peak current was linearly increased in the concentration ranges of 1.0 × 10(-9)-1.0 × 10(-2) mol L(-1) for ascorbic acid and 1.0 × 10(-10-)1.0 × 10(-2) mol L(-1) for acetaminophen with detection limits of 1.8 × 10(-9) mol L(-1) and 9.9 × 10(-10) mol L(-1), respectively. The detection limits of 2.4 × 10(-10) mol L(-1) and 2.5 × 10(-11) mol L(-1) were also obtained for AA and AC in chronoamperometric measurements, respectively. The diffusion coefficients of 7.5 × 10(-5) cm(2) s(-1) and 2.4 × 10(-5) cm(2) s(-1) were respectively calculated for the oxidation of AC and AA by chronoamperometry. The proposed electrode exhibited high sensitivity and good stability, and would be valuable for the clinical assay of ascorbic acid and acetaminophen. PMID:26478339

  4. Simultaneous extraction of acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid from human plasma and simultaneous estimation by liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/tandem mass spectrometry detection. Application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Kandikere, Vishwottam; Mudigonda, Koteshwara; Ajjala, Devender; Suraneni, Ramakrishna; Thoddi, Parthasarathi

    2011-01-01

    A simple analytical method using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in atmospheric chemical ionization mode (APCI) for the simultaneous estimation of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, CAS 50-78-2) and its active metabolite salicylic acid (SA, CAS 69-72-7) in human plasma has been developed and validated. ASA and SA were analyzed simultaneously despite differences in plasma concentration ranges of ASA and SA after oral administration of ASA. In spite of having different chemical, ionization and chromatographic properties, ASA and SA were extracted simultaneously from the plasma sample using acetonitrile protein precipitation followed by liquid-liquid extraction. The analytes were separated on a reversed phase column with rapid gradient program using mobile phase consisting of ammonium acetate buffer and methanol. The structural analogue diclofenac was used as an internal standard. The multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions m/z 179 --> 137 for ASA, m/z 137 --> 65 for SA and m/z 294 --> 250 for IS were used. The assay exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.02-10 microg/mL for ASA and 0.1-50 microg/mL for SA. The between-batch precision (%CV) ranged from 2.1 to 7.9% for ASA and from 0.2 to 5.2% for SA. The between-batch accuracy ranged from 95.4 to 96.7% for ASA and from 94.6 to 111.3% for SA. The validated method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of ASA after single oral administration of 650 mg test formulation versus two 325 mg reference formulations of ASA in human subjects. PMID:21755814

  5. Toxicity of 50-nm polystyrene particles co-administered to mice with acetaminophen, 5-aminosalicylic acid or tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Isoda, K; Nozawa, T; Tezuka, M; Ishida, I

    2014-09-01

    We investigated whether nano-sized polystyrene particles affect drug-induced toxicity. The particles, which are widely used industrially, had diameters of 50 (NPP50), 200 (NPP200) or 1000 (NPP1000) nm. The toxic chemicals tested were acetaminophen (APAP), 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), tetracycline (TC), and sodium valproate (VPA). All treatments in the absence of the nanoparticles were non-lethal and did not result in severe toxicity. However, when mice were injected with APAP, 5-ASA or TC together with polystyrene particles, synergistic, enhanced toxicity was observed in mice injected with NPP50. These synergic effects were not observed in mice co-injected with NPP200 or NPP1000. On the other hand, co-administration of VPA and NPP50, NPP200 or NPP1000 did not elevate toxicity. The results show that NPP50 differs in hepatotoxicity depending on the drug co-administered. These findings suggest that further evaluation of the interactions between polystyrene nanoparticles and drugs is a critical prerequisite to the pharmaceutical application of nanotechnology. PMID:25272938

  6. Acetylsalicylic acid enhances the anti-inflammatory effect of fluoxetine through inhibition of NF-κB, p38-MAPK and ERK1/2 activation in lipopolysaccharide-induced BV-2 microglia cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, J M; Rui, B B; Chen, C; Chen, H; Xu, T J; Xu, W P; Wei, W

    2014-09-01

    The latest advancements in neurobiological research provide increasing evidence that inflammatory and neurodegenerative pathways play an important role in depression. According to the cytokine hypothesis, depression could be due to the increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by microglia activation. Thus, using the BV-2 microglial cell line, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether fluoxetine (FLX) or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) could inhibit this microglia activation and could achieve better results in combination. Our results showed that FLX could attenuate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), the expression of the indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme and the depletion of 5-HT. Moreover, FLX could inhibit phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and the combined use with ASA could enhance these effects. Notably, the adjunctive agent ASA could also inhibit phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Taken together, our results suggest that FLX may have some anti-inflammatory effects by modulating microglia activation and that ASA served as an effective adjunctive agent by enhancing these therapeutic effects. PMID:24952332

  7. Acetaminophen dosing for children

    MedlinePlus

    Taking acetaminophen (Tylenol) can help children with colds and fever feel better. As with all drugs, it is important to give children the correct dose. Acetaminophen is safe when taken as directed. But taking ...

  8. Acetaminophen, Butalbital, and Caffeine

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of acetaminophen, Butalbital, Caffeine comes as a capsule and tablet to take by mouth. It usually is taken every 4 hours ... explain any part you do not understand. Take acetaminophen, Butalbital, Caffeine exactly as directed. Do not take ...

  9. Acetaminophen and Codeine

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of acetaminophen and codeine comes as a tablet, capsule, and liquid to take by mouth. It usually is taken every 6 ... explain any part you do not understand. Take acetaminophen and codeine exactly as directed.Codeine can be ...

  10. Randomised comparison of zofenopril and ramipril plus acetylsalicylic acid in postmyocardial infarction patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction: a post hoc analysis of the SMILE-4 Study in patients according to levels of left ventricular ejection fraction at entry

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Claudio; Omboni, Stefano; Cicero, Arrigo FG; Bacchelli, Stefano; Degli Esposti, Daniela; Novo, Salvatore; Vinereanu, Dragos; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Ambrosioni, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    Objective Conflicting evidence exists on the benefits of treating patients with coronary artery disease and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) with an ACE inhibitor. This retrospective analysis of the SMILE-4 Study sought to compare the efficacy of zofenopril 60 mg plus acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) versus ramipril 10 mg plus ASA 100 mg in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and heart failure, according to an impaired or preserved LVEF. Methods The primary study end point was 1-year combined occurrence of death or hospitalisation for cardiovascular causes. A preserved LVEF was defined by a baseline LVEF >40% and an impaired one by an LVEF ≤40%. Results 448 patients (63%) had preserved and 262 (37%) had impaired LVEF. The primary end point occurred in 125 patients with preserved (28%) and 106 patients with impaired LVEF (41%, p=0.001). In the first group, the rate of major cardiovascular events was significantly lower under zofenopril than under ramipril (23% vs 33%; OR and 95% CI 0.60, 0.39 to 0.91; p=0.016). This was also the case for patients with impaired LVEF, though between-group difference was not statistically significant (38% zofenopril vs 44% ramipril; OR 0.77, 0.47 to 1.26; p=0.297). LVEF values significantly (p<0.0001) increased during the follow-up in both subsets with no between-treatment differences. However, improvement rates in LVEF (increase ≥5%) were higher in patients with impaired LVEF (72% vs 61%, p=0.006). Conclusions In the SMILE-4 Study, the cardiovascular outcome of patients with post-AMI with preserved LVEF was more favourable in the zofenopril than in the ramipril treatment group. Trial registration number EudraCT Number: 2004-001150-88 (http://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu); Italian Ministry of Health Code: GUIDOTT_III_2004_001 (https://oss-sper-clin.agenziafarmaco.it). PMID:26288740

  11. Acetaminophen by infusion.

    PubMed

    Turkoski, Beatrice B

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen is a nonsteroidal, nonsalicylate analgesic and antipyretic that is, today, the most common medication ingredient found in oral and rectal over-the-counter and prescription drugs. However, it was not until 2010 that Ofirmev (acetaminophen), an injection form of acetaminophen, was approved for treating mild to moderate pain, as an adjunct to opioids for severe pain, and reduction of fever in those younger than 2 years. Thus, intravenous acetaminophen may be appropriately used in a wide variety of settings and nurses who are knowledgeable and informed about the correct use of intravenous acetaminophen will be able to reduce the potential for medication misadventures. In this article, the uses and cautions for Ofirmev are discussed. PMID:25989127

  12. Acetaminophen and codeine overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 162. Doyon S. Opioids. In: Tintinalli ... FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2015. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2014:appendix VI. Hendrickson RG, McKeown NJ. Acetaminophen. ...

  13. Simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, acetaminophen and codeine based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified with magnetic nanoparticles paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Taei, M; Salavati, H; Hasanpour, F; Habibollahi, S; Baghlani, H

    2016-12-01

    Based on incorporating ZnCrFeO4 into multi-walled carbon nanotubes paste matrix (MWCNTs/ZnCrFeO4/CPE), a chemically modified electrode was prepared for the simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid (AA), acetaminophen (AC) and codeine (CO). The prepared electrode, MWCNTs/ZnCrFeO4/CPE, was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The MWCNTs/ZnCrFeO4/CPE showed an efficient electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of AA, AC, and CO. The separations of the oxidation peak potentials for AA-AC and AC-CO were about 250mV and 630mV, respectively. The calibration curves obtained for AA, AC, and CO were in the ranges of 0.4-730.0μmolL(-1), 0.1-368.0μmolL(-1), and 0.3-250.0μmolL(-1), respectively. The detection limits (S/N=3) were 0.03μmolL(-1), 0.009μmolL(-1), and 0.01μmolL(-1) for AA, AC, and CO, respectively. The method was also successfully employed as a selective, simple, and precise method to determinate AA, AC, and CO in pharmaceutical and biological samples. PMID:27612682

  14. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, a microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin, attenuates acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury through activation of Nrf-2.

    PubMed

    Xue, Huiting; Xie, Wenyan; Jiang, Zhihui; Wang, Meng; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Hongqiong; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-10-01

    1. Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose leads to severe hepatotoxicity. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) is a scarcely studied microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effect of DOPAC against APAP-induced liver injury. 2. Mice were treated intragastrically with DOPAC (10, 20 or 50 mg/kg) for 3 days before APAP (300 mg/kg) injection. APAP alone caused increase in serum aminotransferase levels and changes in hepatic histopathology. APAP also promoted oxidative stress by increasing lipid peroxidation and decreasing anti-oxidant enzyme activities. These events led to hepatocellular necrosis and reduced liver function. DOPAC increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) translocation to the nucleus and enhanced the expression of phase II enzymes and anti-oxidant enzymes, and thereby reduced APAP hepatotoxicity and enhanced anti-oxidant ability. 3. Our data provide evidence that DOPAC protected the liver against APAP-induced injury, which is involved in Nrf-2 activation, implying that DOPAC can be considered as a potential natural hepatoprotective agent. PMID:26931552

  15. Oxidation of plasma cysteine/cystine and GSH/GSSG redox potentials by acetaminophen and sulfur amino acid insufficiency in humans.

    PubMed

    Mannery, Yanci O; Ziegler, Thomas R; Park, Youngja; Jones, Dean P

    2010-06-01

    Variations in plasma sulfur amino acid (SAA) pools are associated with disease risks, but little information is available about the factors affecting plasma SAA pools. Drug metabolism by glutathione (GSH) and sulfate conjugation can, in principle, represent a quantitatively important burden on SAA supply. The present study was designed to determine whether therapeutic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) alter SAA metabolism in healthy human adults. A double-blind, crossover design incorporating four treatment periods with diets providing 100% of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for SAA without or with APAP (15 mg/kg) and 0% RDA for SAA without or with APAP, in randomized order. After a 3-day equilibration period, chemically defined diets with 100 or 0% RDA for SAA were given for 2 complete days. On day 3, APAP or placebo was given in two successive doses (6-h interval), and timed plasma samples were collected. With SAA intake at 100% RDA, APAP administration oxidized the plasma cysteine/cystine redox potential (E(h)CySS) but not the plasma GSH/GSSG redox potential (E(h)GSSG). The extent of oxidation caused by APAP was similar to that seen with 0% SAA and no APAP. However, APAP administration with 0% SAA did not cause further oxidation beyond APAP or 0% SAA alone. In contrast, an oxidation of the plasma E(h)GSSG was apparent for SAA insufficiency only with APAP. The results suggest a need to evaluate possible effects of APAP in association with SAA insufficiency as a contributing factor in disease risk. PMID:20207721

  16. Oxidation of Plasma Cysteine/Cystine and GSH/GSSG Redox Potentials by Acetaminophen and Sulfur Amino Acid Insufficiency in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Mannery, Yanci O.; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Park, Youngja

    2010-01-01

    Variations in plasma sulfur amino acid (SAA) pools are associated with disease risks, but little information is available about the factors affecting plasma SAA pools. Drug metabolism by glutathione (GSH) and sulfate conjugation can, in principle, represent a quantitatively important burden on SAA supply. The present study was designed to determine whether therapeutic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) alter SAA metabolism in healthy human adults. A double-blind, crossover design incorporating four treatment periods with diets providing 100% of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for SAA without or with APAP (15 mg/kg) and 0% RDA for SAA without or with APAP, in randomized order. After a 3-day equilibration period, chemically defined diets with 100 or 0% RDA for SAA were given for 2 complete days. On day 3, APAP or placebo was given in two successive doses (6-h interval), and timed plasma samples were collected. With SAA intake at 100% RDA, APAP administration oxidized the plasma cysteine/cystine redox potential (EhCySS) but not the plasma GSH/GSSG redox potential (EhGSSG). The extent of oxidation caused by APAP was similar to that seen with 0% SAA and no APAP. However, APAP administration with 0% SAA did not cause further oxidation beyond APAP or 0% SAA alone. In contrast, an oxidation of the plasma EhGSSG was apparent for SAA insufficiency only with APAP. The results suggest a need to evaluate possible effects of APAP in association with SAA insufficiency as a contributing factor in disease risk. PMID:20207721

  17. Au/ZnO hybrid nanocatalysts impregnated in N-doped graphene for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, acetaminophen and dopamine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianlan; Zhang, Guowei; Shi, Ling; Pan, Shanqing; Liu, Wei; Pan, Hiabo

    2016-08-01

    The formation of nitrogen-doped (N-doped) graphene uses hydrothermal method with urea as reducing agent and nitrogen source. The surface elemental composition of the catalyst was analyzed through XPS, which showed a high content of a total N species (7.12at.%), indicative of the effective N-doping, present in the form of pyridinic N, pyrrolic N and graphitic N groups. Moreover, Au nanoparticles deposited on ZnO nanocrystals surface, forming Au/ZnO hybrid nanocatalysts, undergo a super-hydrophobic to super-hydrophilic conversion. Herein, we present Au/ZnO hybrid nanocatalysts impregnated in N-doped graphene sheets through sonication technique of the Au/ZnO/N-doped graphene hybrid nanostructures. The as-prepared Au/ZnO/N-doped graphene hybrid nanostructure modified glassy carbon electrode (Au/ZnO/N-doped graphene/GCE) was first employed for the simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and acetaminophen (AC). The oxidation over-potentials of AA, DA and AC decreased dramatically, and their oxidation peak currents increased significantly at Au/ZnO/N-doped graphene/GCE compared to those obtained at the N-doped graphene/GCE and bare CCE. The peak separations between AA and DA, DA and AC, and AC and AA are large up to 195, 198 and 393mV, respectively. The calibration curves for AA, DA and AC were obtained in the range of 30.00-13.00×10(3), 2.00-0.18×10(3) and 5.00-3.10×10(3)μM, respectively. The detection limits (S/N=3) were 5.00, 0.40 and 0.80μM for AA, DA and AC, respectively. PMID:27157730

  18. Acetaminophen: old drug, new warnings.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Amy; Corey, Rebecca; Leonard, Mandy; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2010-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), concerned about the incidence of acute liver failure due to acetaminophen (Tylenol) overdose, has mandated new labeling on acetaminophen packaging. It is also considering (but has not enacted) reducing the maximum daily dose from 4 g (possibly to 3,250 mg), banning acetaminophen-narcotic combination products, and changing the current maximum single dose of 1 g to prescription status, making 650 mg the highest recommended nonprescription dose. We review the epidemiology, toxicology, and management of acetaminophen overdose and steps the FDA and physicians can take to prevent it. PMID:20048026

  19. A double signal amplification platform for ultrasensitive and simultaneous detection of ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid and acetaminophen based on a nanocomposite of ferrocene thiolate stabilized Fe₃O₄@Au nanoparticles with graphene sheet.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meiling; Chen, Qiong; Lai, Cailang; Zhang, Youyu; Deng, Jianhui; Li, Haitao; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2013-10-15

    A double signal amplification platform for ultrasensitive and simultaneous detection of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), uric acid (UA) and acetaminophen (AC) was fabricated by a nanocomposite of ferrocene thiolate stabilized Fe₃O₄@Au nanoparticles with graphene sheet. The platform was constructed by coating a newly synthesized phenylethynyl ferrocene thiolate (Fc-SAc) modified Fe₃O₄@Au NPs coupling with graphene sheet/chitosan (GS-chitosan) on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface. The Fe₃O₄@Au-S-Fc/GS-chitosan modified GCE exhibits a synergistic catalytic and amplification effect toward AA, DA, UA and AC oxidation. The oxidation peak currents of the four compounds on the electrode were linearly dependent on AA, DA, UA and AC concentrations in the ranges of 4-400 μM, 0.5-50 μM, 1-300 μM and 0.3-250 μM in the individual detection of each component, respectively. By simultaneously changing the concentrations of AA, DA, UA and AC, their electrochemical oxidation peaks appeared at -0.03, 0.15, 0.24 and 0.35 V, and good linear current responses were obtained in the concentration ranges of 6-350, 0.5-50, 1-90 and 0.4-32 μM with the detection limits of 1, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.05 μM (S/N=3), respectively. PMID:23651571

  20. [5-0xoproline (pyroglutamic acid) acidosis and acetaminophen- a differential diagnosis in high anion gap metabolic acidosis].

    PubMed

    Weiler, Stefan; Bellmann, Romuald; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A

    2015-12-01

    Rare cases of high anion gap metabolic acidosis during long-term paracetamol administration in therapeutic doses with causative 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid} accumulation have been reported. Other concomitant risk factors such as malnutrition, alcohol abuse, renal or hepatic dysfunction, comedication with flue/oxacillin, vigabatrin, netilmicin or sepsis have been described. The etiology seems to be a drug-induced reversible inhibition of glutathione synthetase or 5-oxoprolinase leading to elevated serum and urine levels of 5-oxoproline. Other more frequent differential diagnoses, such as intoxications, ketoacidosis or lactic acidosis should be excluded. Causative substances should be stopped. 5-oxoproline concentrations in urine can be quantified to establish the diagnosis. Adverse drug reactions, which are not listed or insufficiently described in the respective Swiss product information, should be reported to the regional pharmacovigilance centres for early signal detection. 5-0 xoproline acidosis will be integrated as a potential adverse drug reaction in the Swiss product information for paracetamol. PMID:26654818

  1. Intravenous acetaminophen use in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Shastri, Nirav

    2015-06-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used pediatric medication that has recently been approved for intravenous use in the United States. The purpose of this article was to review the pharmacodynamics, indications, contraindications, and precautions for the use of intravenous acetaminophen in pediatrics. PMID:26035501

  2. How to Safely Give Acetaminophen

    MedlinePlus

    ... up a dose of acetaminophen within the first 20 minutes, it's usually safe to give your child another ... holds the first dose down for longer than 20 minutes before spitting up, you should wait 4 hours ...

  3. Pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen in children.

    PubMed

    Peterson, R G; Rumack, B H

    1978-11-01

    Acetaminophen absorption may occur at a somewhat greater rate in children if the syrup form is utilized. The overall plasma elimination of acetaminophen is somewhat slow in the neonate, but is comparable to that of adults in both children and adolescents, as judged by half-life determinations. This would suggest that the frequency of acetaminophen administration in children should be similar to the schedule recommended for adults and that a dosing interval of four hours should not result in drug accumulation. The question of a toxic quantity of acetaminophen for young children must remain open until adequate metabolic or retrospective toxicologic data become known. Since the volumes of distribution appear to be the same in both adults and children, the same dose should apply in both groups; currently, 10 mg/kg is considered to be both safe and effective for antipyresis. PMID:364399

  4. Acetaminophen kinetics in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Divoll, M; Abernethy, D R; Ameer, B; Greenblatt, D J

    1982-02-01

    Thirty-two healthy men and women, 23 to 78 yr old, received single 650-mg intravenous doses of acetaminophen and the drug's kinetics were determined from multiple plasma samples drawn over the next 8 to 12 hr. Acetaminophen elimination half-life averaged 2.7 hr (range, 1.9 to 4.3 hr) and was not related to age or sex. Volume of distribution (corrected for weight) was larger in men than in women (0.99 and 0.86 l/kg) and declined with age in both sexes. This probably reflects increased fat per kilogram body weight in women and in the elderly, together with incomplete distribution of this nonlipophilic drug into body fat. Acetaminophen clearance tended to decline with age in both sexes, but differences were of borderline significance. On the basis of kinetics data alone, adjustment of acetaminophen dosage for the elderly is generally not necessary. PMID:7056022

  5. Effects of pregnancy on the toxicity and metabolism of acetaminophen in mice.

    PubMed

    Larrey, D; Letteron, P; Foliot, A; Descatoire, V; Degott, C; Geneve, J; Tinel, M; Pessayre, D

    1986-04-01

    Although acetaminophen is widely used in pregnant women, the effects of pregnancy on its hepatotoxicity remain unknown. We assessed these effects in pregnant mice (17-18 days of gestation). The hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen (300-400 mg X kg-1 i.p.) was increased markedly in pregnant mice, as judged by increased serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase activity, higher incidence of liver necrosis and greater mortality. In vitro, acetaminophen sulfotransferase activity was increased by 47% in pregnant mice, but acetaminophen glucuronosyltransferase activity was decreased by 54%; the metabolic activation of acetaminophen to covalently bound metabolites was unchanged. Glutathione S-transferase activities were decreased slightly. In vivo, after administration of acetaminophen (300 mg X kg-1 i.p.), the 24-hr urinary excretion of the sulfate conjugate was increased (from 12% of the recovered dose in nonpregnant mice to 21% in pregnant mice), that of the glucuronide was decreased (from 61 to 52%), whereas those of the cysteine and mercapturic acid conjugates and that of acetaminophen were unchanged. Finally, the plasma clearance and the apparent volume of distribution of acetaminophen (both expressed per body weight) remained unchanged. Similarly, in vivo covalent binding to hepatic proteins 4 hr after administration of acetaminophen (300 and 400 mg X kg-1 i.p.) remained unchanged as were in vivo indexes of lipid peroxidation. In contrast, liver glutathione concentration, albeit initially normal, fell to much lower levels after administration of acetaminophen (200-400 mg X kg-1 i.p.) or diethylmaleate (0.5 ml X kg-1 i.p.) in pregnant mice, and recovered more slowly thereafter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3083096

  6. Kids with Mild Asthma Can Take Acetaminophen

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160475.html Kids With Mild Asthma Can Take Acetaminophen: Study Finding counters past research ... 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Acetaminophen does not worsen asthma symptoms in young children, a new study finds. ...

  7. Know Concentration Before Giving Acetaminophen to Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... urging consumers to carefully read the labels of liquid acetaminophen marketed for infants to avoid giving the ... less concentrated version for all children. Until now, liquid acetaminophen marketed for infants has only been available ...

  8. [Determination of serum acetaminophen based on the diazo reaction and its application in the evaluation of gastric emptying].

    PubMed

    Li, Cai-na; Sun, Su-juan; Shen, Zhu-fang

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to establish a method to determine the serum acetaminophen concentration based on diazo reaction, and apply it in the gastric emptying evaluation. Theoretically, acetaminophen could take hydrolysis reaction in hydrochloric acid solution to produce p-aminophenol, which could then take diazo reaction resulting in a product with special absorption peak at 312 nm. Then the serum acetaminophen concentration and recovery rate were calculated according to the standard curve drawn with absorbance at 312 nm. ICR mice were given a dose of acetaminophen (500 mg x kg(-1)) by gavage and the serum acetaminophen was dynamically measured through the diazo reaction. Besides, ICR mice were subcutaneously injected with the long-acting GLP-1 analog GW002 before the gavage of acetaminophen, and serum acetaminophen concentration was measured as above to study how GW002 could influence the gastric emptying. The data showed acetaminophen ranging from 0 to 160 μg x mL(-1) could take diazo reaction with excellent linear relationship, and the regression equation was y = 0.0181 x +0.0104, R2 = 0.9997. The serum acetaminophen was also measured with good linear relationship (y = 0.0045 x + 0.0462, R = 0.9982) and the recovery rate was 97.4%-116.7%. The serum concentration of acetaminophen reached peak at about 0.5 h after gavage, and then gradually decreased. GW002 could significantly lower the serum acetaminophen concentration and make the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) decrease by 28.4%. In conclusion, a method for the determination of serum acetaminophen based on the diazo reaction was established with good accuracy and could be used in the evaluation of gastric emptying. PMID:26234136

  9. Acetaminophen: a practical pharmacologic overview.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, C H; MacDonald, N C; Cornett, J W

    1984-01-01

    Acetaminophen is an effective analgesic and antipyretic agent with few adverse effects when used in recommended dosages. The drug is metabolized mainly in the liver, and the several end products have no harmful effects. An intermediate compound in a minor metabolic pathway, however, is toxic; it is normally inactivated by glutathione. In the case of an acetaminophen overdose the hepatic stores of glutathione seem to become depleted, leaving the toxic intermediate free to damage liver tissue. Such damage is unlikely to occur unless the plasma concentration of acetaminophen peaks above 150 micrograms/mL--a level far in excess of the 5 to 20 micrograms/mL achieved with therapeutic doses of the drug. Long-term therapeutic use of acetaminophen does not appear to be associated with liver damage, although some case reports suggest the possibility. Acetaminophen poisoning follows an acute overdose and, if untreated, is manifested clinically by an initial phase of nonspecific signs and symptoms, a latent period in which the liver transaminase levels rise and then, 3 to 5 days after the ingestion, signs of more serious hepatic dysfunction. Most patients do not progress beyond the first or second phase. They and those who survive the third phase recover with no residual injury to the liver. Appropriate antidotal therapy markedly reduces the severity of the initial damage. PMID:6733646

  10. Multiple-dose acetaminophen pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Sahajwalla, C G; Ayres, J W

    1991-09-01

    Four different treatments of acetaminophen (Tylenol) were administered in multiple doses to eight healthy volunteers. Each treatment (325, 650, 825, and 1000 mg) was administered five times at 6-h intervals. Saliva acetaminophen concentration versus time profiles were determined. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and compared to determine whether acetaminophen exhibited linear or dose-dependent pharmacokinetics. For doses less than or equal to 18 mg/kg, area under the curve (AUC), half-life (t1/2), mean residence time (MRT), and ratio of AUC to dose for the first dose were compared with the last dose. No statistically significant differences were observed in dose-corrected AUC for the first or last dose among subjects or treatments. Half-lives and MRT were not significantly different among treatments for the first or the last dose. Statistically significant differences in t1/2 and MRT were noted (p less than 0.05) among subjects for the last dose. A plot of AUC versus dose for the first and the last doses exhibited a linear relationship. Dose-corrected saliva concentration versus time curves for the treatments were superimposable. Thus, acetaminophen exhibits linear pharmacokinetics for doses of 18 mg/kg or less. Plots of AUC versus dose for one subject who received doses higher than 18 mg/kg were curved, suggesting nonlinear behavior of acetaminophen in this subject. PMID:1800709

  11. Intravenous paracetamol (acetaminophen).

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sean T; Scott, Lesley J

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous paracetamol (rINN)/intravenous acetaminophen (USAN) is an analgesic and antipyretic agent, recommended worldwide as a first-line agent for the treatment of pain and fever in adults and children. In double-blind clinical trials, single or multiple doses of intravenous paracetamol 1 g generally provided significantly better analgesic efficacy than placebo treatment (as determined by primary efficacy endpoints) in adult patients who had undergone dental, orthopaedic or gynaecological surgery. Furthermore, where evaluated, intravenous paracetamol 1 g generally showed similar analgesic efficacy to a bioequivalent dose of propacetamol, and a reduced need for opioid rescue medication. In paediatric surgical patients, recommended doses of intravenous paracetamol 15 mg/kg were not significantly different from propacetamol 30 mg/kg for the treatment of pain, and showed equivocal analgesic efficacy compared with intramuscular pethidine 1 mg/kg in several randomized, active comparator-controlled studies. In a randomized, noninferiority study in paediatric patients with an infection-induced fever, intravenous paracetamol 15 mg/kg treatment was shown to be no less effective than propacetamol 30 mg/kg in terms of antipyretic efficacy. Intravenous paracetamol was well tolerated in clinical trials, having a tolerability profile similar to placebo. Additionally, adverse reactions emerging from the use of the intravenous formulation of paracetamol are extremely rare (<1/10 000). [table: see text]. PMID:19192939

  12. Acetaminophen injection: a review of clinical information.

    PubMed

    Jones, Virginia M

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen injection is an antipyretic and analgesic agent recently marketed in the United States as Ofirmev. Five published trials directly compare acetaminophen injection to drugs available in the United States. For management of pain in adults, acetaminophen injection was at least as effective as morphine injection in renal colic, oral ibuprofen after cesarean delivery, and oral acetaminophen after coronary artery bypass surgery. In children (3 to 16 years old), single-dose acetaminophen injection was similar to meperidine intramuscular (i.m.) for pain after tonsillectomy; readiness for discharge from the recovery room was shorter with acetaminophen injection (median 15 minutes) compared with meperidine i.m. (median 25 minutes), P = .005. In children (2 to 5 years old) postoperative adenotonsillectomy or adenoidectomy, the time to rescue analgesia was superior with high-dose acetaminophen rectal suppository (median 10 hours) compared with acetaminophen injection (median 7 hours), P = .01. One published trial demonstrated acetaminophen injection is noninferior to propacetamol injection for fever related to infection in pediatric patients. Dosing adjustments are not required when switching between oral and injectable acetaminophen formulations in adult and adolescent patients. Acetaminophen injection represents another agent for multimodal pain management. PMID:21936636

  13. The proper use of acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    James, Laura; Sullivan, Janice E; Roberts, Dean

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, paracetamol [APAP])-induced acute liver failure is the most common cause of acute liver failure in adults. In children, APAP accounts for 25% of all cases of acute liver failure. The high mortality rate associated with this preventable condition makes it vital that paediatricians are aware of the potential adverse effects associated with this widely used drug. While APAP is generally considered to be safe when used as directed, its inclusion in multiple over-the-counter medications, as well as in prescription drugs, mandates that physicians promote and educate the general public about the proper use of acetaminophen in children. PMID:23115492

  14. [Responses of isolated hepatic artery segments to barium in the presence of a flavonoid (4-methylesculetin), indomethacin and acetylsalicylate].

    PubMed

    Bettini, V; Gamba, G; Legrenzi, E; Mayellaro, F; Santoni, G

    1983-05-30

    The aim of this work is to study the mechanism by which 4-methylesculetin (4-Me) inhibits the Ba++ induced contraction in smooth muscle. The effect of 4-Me, alone or associated with ascorbic acid, on basal tone and Ba++ induced contraction of isolated hepatic artery strips have been studied. Experiments have been carried out in the presence of lysine acetylsalicylate (LAS) and indomethacin (IN), specific inhibitors of prostaglandin-synthetase. Both LAS and IN suppressed the depressive effect of 4-Me on the Ba++ dependent contraction. Therefore, it seems reasonable to conclude that the 4-Me influence could be mediated by prostaglandins release smooth muscle. PMID:6411101

  15. The Effect of Acetaminophen on Oxidative Modification of Low-Density Lipoproteins in Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Özsoy, Meral Baş; Pabuçcuoğlu, Aysun

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) contributes to the pathology of atherosclerosis. Antioxidants may protect LDL against oxidative modification. Acetaminophen, a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent, has significant antioxidant properties. However, there is little evidence to suggest that acetaminophen acts as an antioxidant for LDL oxidation in vivo. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effect of acetaminophen on LDL oxidation in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. The oxidative modification of LDL was identified by conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). In the cholesterol group which rabbits were fed a diet contained 1% g cholesterol for 8 weeks, TBARS contents and conjugated diene levels in the plasma and isolated LDL samples significantly increased compared with the control rabbits (p<0.05). However, in the cholesterol + acetaminophen group, the TBARS contents and conjugated diene levels were significantly lower than that of the cholesterol group (p<0.05). The results from in vitro studies also demonstrated that the LDL isolated from serum was oxidized by Cu++ ions and this oxidation reduced in the presence of acetaminophen. The reduced oxidative modification of LDL by acetaminophen may be of therapeutic value in preventing the development and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:18392104

  16. Absorption of acetylsalicylic acid from the rat nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Hussain, A A; Iseki, K; Kagoshima, M; Dittert, L W

    1992-04-01

    The fate of salicylate in the plasma of rats was followed after nasal, intravenous, and oral administration of 2.0-mg doses of aspirin. Aspirin was well absorbed following nasal administration of a neutralized, nonirritating solution containing triethanolamine. The rate of absorption was slower than that of other nasally administered drugs, such as propranolol or progesterone. The bioavailability of aspirin following nasal administration was 100%, whereas the oral bioavailability was only 58.8% at the dose studied. PMID:1501071

  17. [Chronic refractory pain in cancer patients. Value of the spinal injection of lysine acetylsalicylate. 60 cases].

    PubMed

    Pellerin, M; Hardy, F; Abergel, A; Boule, D; Palacci, J H; Babinet, P; Wingtin, L N; Glowinski, J; Amiot, J F; Mechali, D

    1987-09-19

    Several animal studies have demonstrated that pain is modulated by spinal mechanisms involving prostaglandins and that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administered intrathecally has an analgesic effect. We report our experience of this treatment in 60 patients with proven and advanced cancer. An isobaric solution of lysine acetylsalicylate was administered by lumbar puncture in doses ranging from 120 to 720 mg of ASA. The results were evaluated using the habitual criteria: scoring system, behaviour, consumption of analgesic drugs. In this trial the method proved astonishingly effective (78% of the cases). Analgesia was strong, almost immediate and without influence on motricity. No thermic or neurovegetative changes were noted. The effect of one injection lasted from 3 weeks to 1 month on average; it was reproduced and often more prolonged after a repeat injection. Pain associated with bone metastases seems to constitute the best indication, notably in breast and lung cancer and in myeloma. Visceral (pancreas) or neural pain requires higher doses to respond. Failures (22%) were due to such factors as insufficient dosage at the very beginning of our experience or severe depressive syndrome. The perineal and sphincteral pain of rectal cancer often resists treatment. This simple, inexpensive and very effective method with no other complication than a frequent tendency to fatigue should rank among other analgesic measures in cancer. The lack of respiratory depression is a major advantage over catheter spinal opiate analgesia. We consider that its main indications are pain associated with osteolytic metastases of adenocarcinomas, and myelomas. Owing to the absence of formal toxicological data, its use must be limited to cancer pain and to patients with a life expectancy of less than 2 years. PMID:2957675

  18. Direct Protection Against Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Propylthiouracil

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tadataka; Ludwig, Shelly; Kuhlenkamp, John; Kaplowitz, Neil

    1981-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity caused by acetaminophen can be prevented by enzyme-catalyzed conjugation of its reactive metabolite with glutathione (GSH). Since we have shown in previous studies that 6-N-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) can substitute for GSH as a substrate for the GSH S-transferases, we examined the possibility that PTU might also protect against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by direct chemical interaction with the reactive metabolite of acetaminophen. In an in vitro system consisting of [3H]acetaminophen, liver microsomes from phenobarbital-pretreated rats, and an NADPH-generating system, we found that PTU had a dose-dependent additive effect with GSH on inhibition of acetaminophen covalent binding. PTU administration also resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in both GSH depletion and covalent binding in vivo in acetaminophen-treated mice. To examine the possible mechanisms by which PTU exerts its protective effect, we studied the action of PTU on both acetaminophen conjugation and metabolic activation. PTU had no effect upon acetaminophen pharmacokinetics in phenobarbital-pretreated rats, as examined by measuring acetaminophen concentration in bile, urine, and blood after an intraperitoneal dose, nor did it alter the total amount of polar conjugates formed. Microsomes from PTU-treated rats were unaltered in cytochrome P-450 concentrations and p-nitroanisole-O-demethylase, benzo-α-pyrene hydroxylase, and cytochrome c-reductase activities. Furthermore PTU did not decrease acetaminophen-GSH adduct formation in vitro, suggesting that there was no reduction in drug activation. However, in bile from [35S]PTU and [3H]acetaminophen treated rats, as well as in incubates of the two drugs with liver microsomes, a new 35S- and 3H-containing product could be identified. By both thin layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography this new product, which co-eluted with [3H]acetaminophen, was separated from unreacted [35S]PTU. The formation of this product in vitro was

  19. Formulation and characterization of acetaminophen nanoparticles in orally disintegrating films.

    PubMed

    Al-Nemrawi, Nusaiba K; Dave, Rutesh H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare orally disintegrating films containing nanoparticles loaded with acetaminophen. Nanoparticles were prepared by the emulsion-solvent evaporation method where acetone phase containing acetaminophen and poly(lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) was added to water phase containing hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose, poly ethylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and aspartame in a rate of 1.5 drop s(-1) and agitated at 1200 rpm. The size, polydispersity index (PI) and drug entrapment (DE) were measured. The emulsions were cast to form films, which were evaluated physico-mechanically. The effect of different degrees of hydrolization of PVA and polymerization of PLGA and the effect of different ratios of PVA to PLGA was studied. Films with acceptable physico-mechanical properties were further studied. The size and PI of the nanoparticles was dependent on PVA hydrolization, PLGA polymerization and the ratio of PVA to PLGA. All films disintegrated in less than one minute, but acetaminophen was not free in the dissolution media even after six days. These results may indicate that although the nanoparticles released from the films immediately when impressed in solution the drug is sustained in the nanoparticles for longer time, which is to be clarified in future work. PMID:25013958

  20. TRPV1 in Brain Is Involved in Acetaminophen-Induced Antinociception

    PubMed Central

    Eschalier, Alain; Zygmunt, Peter M.; Högestätt, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acetaminophen, the major active metabolite of acetanilide in man, has become one of the most popular over-the-counter analgesic and antipyretic agents, consumed by millions of people daily. However, its mechanism of action is still a matter of debate. We have previously shown that acetaminophen is further metabolized to N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z -eicosatetraenamide (AM404) by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in the rat and mouse brain and that this metabolite is a potent activator of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in vitro. Pharmacological activation of TRPV1 in the midbrain periaqueductal gray elicits antinociception in rats. It is therefore possible that activation of TRPV1 in the brain contributes to the analgesic effect of acetaminophen. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that the antinociceptive effect of acetaminophen at an oral dose lacking hypolocomotor activity is absent in FAAH and TRPV1 knockout mice in the formalin, tail immersion and von Frey tests. This dose of acetaminophen did not affect the global brain contents of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and endocannabinoids. Intracerebroventricular injection of AM404 produced a TRPV1-mediated antinociceptive effect in the mouse formalin test. Pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 in the brain by intracerebroventricular capsazepine injection abolished the antinociceptive effect of oral acetaminophen in the same test. Conclusions This study shows that TRPV1 in brain is involved in the antinociceptive action of acetaminophen and provides a strategy for developing central nervous system active oral analgesics based on the coexpression of FAAH and TRPV1 in the brain. PMID:20862299

  1. Eucalyptus globulus extract protects upon acetaminophen-induced kidney damages in male rat

    PubMed Central

    Dhibi, Sabah; Mbarki, Sakhria; Elfeki, Abdelfettah; Hfaiedh, Najla

    2014-01-01

    Plants have historically been used in treating many diseases. Eucalyptus globules, a rich source of bioactive compounds, and have been shown to possess antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study, carried out on male Wistar rats, was to evaluate the beneficial effects of Eucalyptus globulus extract upon acetaminophen-induced damages in kidney. Our study is realized in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences of Sfax (Tunisia). 32 Wistar male rats; were divided into 4 batches: a control group (n=8), a group of rats treated with acetaminophen (goomg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection during 4 days (n=8), a group receiving Eucalyptus globulus extract (130 mg of dry leaves/kg/day) in drinking water during 42 days after 2 hours of acetaminophen administration (during 4 days) (n=8) and group received only Eucalyptus (n=8) during 42 days. After 6 weeks, animals from each group were rapidly sacrificed by decapitation. Blood serum was obtained by centrifugation. Under our experimental conditions, acetaminophen poisoning resulted in an oxidative stress evidenced by statistically significant losses in the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide-dismutase (SOD), glutathione-peroxidase (GPX) activities and an increase in lipids peroxidation level in renal tissue of acetaminophen-treated group compared with the control group. Acetaminophen also caused kidney damage as evident by statistically significant (p<0.05) increase in levels of creatinine and urea and decreased levels of uric acid and proteins in blood. Histological analysis demonstrated alteration of proximal tubules, atrophy of the glomerule and dilatation of urinary space. Previous administration of plant extract is found to alleviate this acetaminophen-induced damage. PMID:24856382

  2. Eucalyptus globulus extract protects upon acetaminophen-induced kidney damages in male rat.

    PubMed

    Dhibi, Sabah; Mbarki, Sakhria; Elfeki, Abdelfettah; Hfaiedh, Najla

    2014-05-01

    Plants have historically been used in treating many diseases. Eucalyptus globules, a rich source of bioactive compounds, and have been shown to possess antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study, carried out on male Wistar rats, was to evaluate the beneficial effects of Eucalyptus globulus extract upon acetaminophen-induced damages in kidney. Our study is realized in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences of Sfax (Tunisia). 32 Wistar male rats; were divided into 4 batches: a control group (n=8), a group of rats treated with acetaminophen (900 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection during 4 days (n=8), a group receiving Eucalyptus globulus extract (130 mg of dry leaves/kg/day) in drinking water during 42 days after 2 hours of acetaminophen administration (during 4 days) (n=8) and group received only Eucalyptus (n=8) during 42 days. After 6 weeks, animals from each group were rapidly sacrificed by decapitation. Blood serum was obtained by centrifugation. Under our experimental conditions, acetaminophen poisoning resulted in an oxidative stress evidenced by statistically significant losses in the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide-dismutase (SOD), glutathione-peroxidase (GPX) activities and an increase in lipids peroxidation level in renal tissue of acetaminophen-treated group compared with the control group. Acetaminophen also caused kidney damage as evident by statistically significant (p<0.05) increase in levels of creatinine and urea and decreased levels of uric acid and proteins in blood. Histological analysis demonstrated alteration of proximal tubules, atrophy of the glomerule and dilatation of urinary space. Previous administration of plant extract is found to alleviate this acetaminophen-induced damage. PMID:24856382

  3. Acetaminophen attenuates error evaluation in cortex.

    PubMed

    Randles, Daniel; Kam, Julia W Y; Heine, Steven J; Inzlicht, Michael; Handy, Todd C

    2016-06-01

    Acetaminophen has recently been recognized as having impacts that extend into the affective domain. In particular, double blind placebo controlled trials have revealed that acetaminophen reduces the magnitude of reactivity to social rejection, frustration, dissonance and to both negatively and positively valenced attitude objects. Given this diversity of consequences, it has been proposed that the psychological effects of acetaminophen may reflect a widespread blunting of evaluative processing. We tested this hypothesis using event-related potentials (ERPs). Sixty-two participants received acetaminophen or a placebo in a double-blind protocol and completed the Go/NoGo task. Participants' ERPs were observed following errors on the Go/NoGo task, in particular the error-related negativity (ERN; measured at FCz) and error-related positivity (Pe; measured at Pz and CPz). Results show that acetaminophen inhibits the Pe, but not the ERN, and the magnitude of an individual's Pe correlates positively with omission errors, partially mediating the effects of acetaminophen on the error rate. These results suggest that recently documented affective blunting caused by acetaminophen may best be described as an inhibition of evaluative processing. They also contribute to the growing work suggesting that the Pe is more strongly associated with conscious awareness of errors relative to the ERN. PMID:26892161

  4. Contribution of acetaminophen-cysteine to acetaminophen nephrotoxicity II. Possible involvement of the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Stephan T.; Bruno, Mary K.; Horton, Robert A.; Hill, Dennis W.; Roberts, Jeanette C.; Cohen, Steven D. . E-mail: scohen@mcp.edu

    2005-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) nephrotoxicity has been observed both in humans and research animals. Our recent investigations have focused on the possible involvement of glutathione-derived APAP metabolites in APAP nephrotoxicity and have demonstrated that administration of acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS) potentiated APAP-induced renal injury with no effects on APAP-induced liver injury. Additionally, APAP-CYS treatment alone resulted in a dose-responsive renal GSH depletion. This APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion could interfere with intrarenal detoxification of APAP or its toxic metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI) and may be the mechanism responsible for the potentiation of APAP nephrotoxicity. Renal-specific GSH depletion has been demonstrated in mice and rats following administration of amino acid {gamma}-glutamyl acceptor substrates for {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT). The present study sought to determine if APAP-CYS-induced renal glutathione depletion is the result of disruption of the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle through interaction with {gamma}-GT. The results confirmed that APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion was antagonized by the {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT) inhibitor acivicin. In vitro analysis demonstrated that APAP-CYS is a {gamma}-glutamyl acceptor for both murine and bovine renal {gamma}-GT. Analysis of urine from mice pretreated with acivicin and then treated with APAP, APAP-CYS, or acetaminophen-glutathione identified a {gamma}-glutamyl-cysteinyl-acetaminophen metabolite. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that APAP-CYS contributes to APAP nephrotoxicity by depletion of renal GSH stores through interaction with the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle.

  5. The Social Side Effects of Acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischkowski, Dominik

    About 23% of all adults in the US take acetaminophen during an average week (Kaufman, Kelly, Rosenberg, Anderson, & Mitchell, 2002) because acetaminophen is an effective physical painkiller and easily accessible over the counter. The physiological side effects of acetaminophen are well documented and generally mild when acetaminophen is consumed in the appropriate dosage. In contrast, the psychological and social side effects of acetaminophen are largely unknown. Recent functional neuroimaging research suggests that the experience of physical pain is fundamentally related to the experience of empathy for the pain of other people, indicating that pharmacologically reducing responsiveness to physical pain also reduces cognitive, affective, and behavioral responsiveness to the pain of others. I tested this hypothesis across three double-blind between-subjects drug intervention studies. Two experiments showed that acetaminophen had moderate effects on empathic affect, specifically personal distress and empathic concern, and a small effect on empathic cognition, specifically perceived pain, when facing physical and social pain of others. The same two experiments and a third experiment also showed that acetaminophen can increase the willingness to inflict pain on other people, i.e., actual aggressive behavior. This effect was especially pronounced among people low in dispositional empathic concern. Together, these findings suggest that the physical pain system is more involved in the regulation of social cognition, affect, and behavior than previously assumed and that the experience of physical pain and responsiveness to the pain of others share a common neurochemical basis. Furthermore, these findings suggest that acetaminophen has unappreciated but serious social side effects, and that these side effects may depend on psychological characteristics of the drug consumer. This idea is consistent with recent theory and research on the context-dependency of neurochemical

  6. Comparative study of the efficacy of lysine acetylsalicylate, indomethacin and pethidine in acute renal colic.

    PubMed

    al-Sahlawi, K S; Tawfik, O M

    1996-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of intravenous lysine acetylsalicylate 1.8 g, indomethacin 100 mg and pethidine 100 mg in acute renal colic in a randomized double-blind clinical trial. One hundred and fifty patients with acute renal colic were divided into three groups. The first group received lysine acetylsalicylate 1.8 g, the second group received indomethacin 100 mg and the third group received pethidine 100 mg. The degree of pain relief was recorded 5, 15, 30 and 60 min after intravenous administration of the drugs. There was no statistically significant difference between the degree of analgesia provided by pethidine and indomethacin. Lysine acetylsalicylate was less effective than indomethacin and pethidine. It is concluded that intravenous indomethacin is an effective alternative to intravenous pethidine in the treatment of acute renal colic. Intravenous lysine acetylsalicylate is inferior to intravenous indomethacin in treatment of acute renal colic. PMID:9023498

  7. Satkara (Citrus macroptera) Fruit Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatorenal Toxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sudip; Islam, Md Aminul; Tanvir, E M; Ahmed, Romana; Das, Sagarika; Rumpa, Nur-E-Noushin; Hossen, Md Sakib; Parvez, Mashud; Gan, Siew Hua; Khalil, Md Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Although Citrus macroptera (Rutaceae), an indigenous fruit in Bangladesh, has long been used in folk medicine, however, there is a lack of information concerning its protective effects against oxidative damage. The protective effects of an ethanol extract of Citrus macroptera (EECM) against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity were investigated in rats. Rats (treatment groups) were pretreated with EECM at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, respectively, orally for 30 days followed by acetaminophen administration. Silymarin (100 mg/kg) was administered as a standard drug over a similar treatment period. Our findings indicated that oral administration of acetaminophen induced severe hepatic and renal injuries associated with oxidative stress, as observed by 2-fold higher lipid peroxidation (TBARS) compared to control. Pretreatment with EECM prior to acetaminophen administration significantly improved all investigated biochemical parameters, that is, transaminase activities, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, γ-glutamyl transferase activities and total bilirubin, total cholesterol, triglyceride and creatinine, urea, uric acid, sodium, potassium and chloride ions, and TBARS levels. These findings were confirmed by histopathological examinations. The improvement was prominent in the group that received 1000 mg/kg EECM. These findings suggested that C. macroptera fruit could protect against acetaminophen-induced hepatonephrotoxicity, which might be via the inhibition of lipid peroxidation. PMID:27034701

  8. Satkara (Citrus macroptera) Fruit Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatorenal Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sudip; Islam, Md. Aminul; Tanvir, E. M.; Ahmed, Romana; Das, Sagarika; Rumpa, Nur-E-Noushin; Hossen, Md. Sakib; Parvez, Mashud; Gan, Siew Hua; Khalil, Md. Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Although Citrus macroptera (Rutaceae), an indigenous fruit in Bangladesh, has long been used in folk medicine, however, there is a lack of information concerning its protective effects against oxidative damage. The protective effects of an ethanol extract of Citrus macroptera (EECM) against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity were investigated in rats. Rats (treatment groups) were pretreated with EECM at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, respectively, orally for 30 days followed by acetaminophen administration. Silymarin (100 mg/kg) was administered as a standard drug over a similar treatment period. Our findings indicated that oral administration of acetaminophen induced severe hepatic and renal injuries associated with oxidative stress, as observed by 2-fold higher lipid peroxidation (TBARS) compared to control. Pretreatment with EECM prior to acetaminophen administration significantly improved all investigated biochemical parameters, that is, transaminase activities, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, γ-glutamyl transferase activities and total bilirubin, total cholesterol, triglyceride and creatinine, urea, uric acid, sodium, potassium and chloride ions, and TBARS levels. These findings were confirmed by histopathological examinations. The improvement was prominent in the group that received 1000 mg/kg EECM. These findings suggested that C. macroptera fruit could protect against acetaminophen-induced hepatonephrotoxicity, which might be via the inhibition of lipid peroxidation. PMID:27034701

  9. Don't Double Up on Acetaminophen

    MedlinePlus

    ... be sure to talk to your health care professional before you use a medicine containing acetaminophen. This article appears on FDA's Consumer Updates page , which features the latest on all FDA-regulated products. January ...

  10. Did acetaminophen provoke the autism epidemic?

    PubMed

    Good, Peter

    2009-12-01

    Schultz et al (2008) raised the question whether regression into autism is triggered, not by the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, but by acetaminophen (Tylenol) given for its fever and pain. Considerable evidence supports this contention, most notably the exponential rise in the incidence of autism since 1980, when acetaminophen began to replace aspirin for infants and young children. The impetus for this shift - a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warning that aspirin was associated with Reye's syndrome - has since been compellingly debunked. If aspirin is not to be feared as a cause of Reyes syndrome, and acetaminophen is to be feared as a cause of autism, can the autism epidemic be reversed by replacing acetaminophen with aspirin or other remedies? PMID:20030462

  11. Acetaminophen (paracetamol) oral absorption and clinical influences.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Taylor, Robert; Decker, John F; Patrick, Jeffrey T

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a widely used nonopioid, non-NSAID analgesic that is effective against a variety of pain types, but the consequences of overdose can be severe. Because acetaminophen is so widely available as a single agent and is increasingly being formulated in fixed-ratio combination analgesic products for the potential additive or synergistic analgesic effect and/or reduced adverse effects, accidental cumulative overdose is an emergent concern. This has rekindled interest in the sites, processes, and pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen oral absorption and the clinical factors that can influence these. The absorption of oral acetaminophen occurs primarily along the small intestine by passive diffusion. Therefore, the rate-limiting step is the rate of gastric emptying into the intestines. Several clinical factors can affect absorption per se or the rate of gastric emptying, such as diet, concomitant medication, surgery, pregnancy, and others. Although acetaminophen does not have the abuse potential of opioids or the gastrointestinal bleeding or organ adverse effects of NSAIDs, excess amounts can produce serious hepatic injury. Thus, an understanding of the sites and features of acetaminophen absorption--and how they might be influenced by factors encountered in clinical practice--is important for pain management using this agent. It can also provide insight for design of formulations that would be less susceptible to clinical variables. PMID:26013309

  12. Hydroxyapatite crystallization in the presence of acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangood, A.; Malkaj, P.; Dalas, E.

    2006-05-01

    The effect of acetaminophen; a widely used analgesic and fever reducing medicine; in supersaturated solutions of calcium phosphate was investigated under plethostatic conditions, at 37 °C, 0.15 M NaCl, pH 7.40. The rates of crystal growth measured in the presence of acetaminophen 1.654×10 -4 mol dm -3 to 6.616×10 -4 mol dm -3 were reduced by 43% to 79%, respectively. The inhibition effect on the crystal growth rate may be explained through adsorption onto the active growth sites. Kinetic analysis suggested Langmuir-type adsorption of acetaminophen on the HAP surface with a affinity value of 2.4×10 -4 dm 3 mol -1, for the substrate in the concentration range investigated. The electrophoretic mobility measurements showed that in the presence of acetaminophen the charge of the acetaminophen covered HAP particles was shifted to more negative values as compared to bare HAP. In the presence of acetaminophen no changes observed in the HAP overgrown morphology or in the apparent order of crystallization.

  13. Hepatoprotective activity of Tribulus terrestris extract against acetaminophen-induced toxicity in a freshwater fish (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    PubMed

    Kavitha, P; Ramesh, R; Bupesh, G; Stalin, A; Subramanian, P

    2011-12-01

    The potential protective role of Tribulus terrestris in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in Oreochromis mossambicus was investigated. The effect of oral exposure of acetaminophen (500 mg/kg) in O. mossambicus at 24-h duration was evaluated. The plant extract (250 mg/kg) showed a remarkable hepatoprotective activity against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. It was judged from the tissue-damaging level and antioxidant levels in liver, gill, muscle and kidney tissues. Further acetaminophen impact induced a significant rise in the tissue-damaging level, and the antioxidant level was discernible from the enzyme activity modulations such as glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamate pyruvic transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase, lipid peroxidase and reduced glutathione. The levels of all these enzymes have significantly (p < 0.05) increased in acetaminophen-treated fish tissues. The elevated levels of these enzymes were significantly controlled by the treatment of T. terrestris extract (250 kg/mg). Histopathological changes of liver, gill and muscle samples were compared with respective controls. The results of the present study specify the hepatoprotective and antioxidant properties of T. terrestris against acetaminophen-induced toxicity in freshwater fish, O. mossambicus. PMID:21975853

  14. Acetaminophen During Pregnancy May Up Risk of ADHD in Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Acetaminophen During Pregnancy May Up Risk of ADHD in Kids But only association found, and researchers ... their child will develop behavioral problems such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a new study suggests. Acetaminophen is generally ...

  15. Clinical and economic evidence for intravenous acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yu-Chen; Reddy, Prabashni

    2012-06-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen received United States Food and Drug Administration approval in November 2010 for the management of mild-to-moderate pain, management of moderate-to-severe pain with adjunctive opioid analgesics, and reduction of fever. Although intravenous acetaminophen generally improved pain relief and demonstrated opioid-sparing effects compared with placebo, it did not consistently reduce the frequency of opioid-related adverse events (e.g., postoperative nausea and vomiting). The safety and efficacy of intravenous acetaminophen as an antipyretic agent have been documented in adults and children; however, its cost is several-fold higher than that of the oral and rectal formulations. Although use of intravenous acetaminophen has reduced other postoperative resource utilization (e.g., hospital length of stay) in some studies outside the United States in patients undergoing abdominal surgery, a full economic evaluation in the United States has yet to be undertaken. In addition, its administration time (15-min infusion) and packaging (glass, single-use vial) have the potential to adversely affect patient flow in the postanesthesia care unit, create burden on patient care units, and lead to drug waste. Furthermore, 1 g of intravenous acetaminophen is formulated in 100 ml of solution, which may be an issue for patients with fluid restrictions. Given the clinical and economic evidence currently available, intravenous acetaminophen should not replace oral or rectal acetaminophen, but its use may be considered in a limited number of patients who cannot receive drugs orally and rectally and who cannot tolerate other parenteral nonopioid analgesic or antipyretic agents. PMID:22570116

  16. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I–III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  17. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Needleman, Steven M

    2013-07-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I-III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  18. [Acetaminophen (paracetamol) causing renal failure: report on 3 pediatric cases].

    PubMed

    Le Vaillant, J; Pellerin, L; Brouard, J; Eckart, P

    2013-06-01

    Renal failure secondary to acetaminophen poisoning is rare and occurs in approximately 1-2 % of patients with acetaminophen overdose. The pathophysiology is still being debated, and renal acetaminophen toxicity consists of acute tubular necrosis, without complication if treated promptly. Renal involvement can sometimes occur without prior liver disease, and early renal manifestations usually occur between the 2nd and 7th day after the acute acetaminophen poisoning. While therapy is exclusively symptomatic, sometimes serious metabolic complications can be observed. The monitoring of renal function should therefore be considered as an integral part of the management of children with acute, severe acetaminophen intoxication. We report 3 cases of adolescents who presented with acute renal failure as a result of voluntary drug intoxication with acetaminophen. One of these 3 girls developed severe renal injury without elevated hepatic transaminases. None of the 3 girls' renal function required hemodialysis, but one of the 3 patients had metabolic complications after her acetaminophen poisoning. PMID:23628119

  19. Herbal extracts as hepatoprotectants against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Hartmut; Williams, C David; McGill, Mitchell R; Farhood, Anwar

    2010-05-21

    Many plant-derived natural products have the potential to be hepatoprotective and therefore can be used to treat acute and chronic liver diseases. The challenge is to identify the most promising compounds and evaluate their protective mechanism. In a recently published article, Wang et al evaluated extracts of the plant Gentiana manshurica Kitagawa (GM) in a model of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. The authors concluded that GM is hepatoprotective against acetaminophen-induced liver injury due to its antioxidant properties and anti-apoptotic capacity. We would like to discuss the limitations of this experimental approach and question the conclusion based on the data presented in this manuscript and the published literature. PMID:20480535

  20. Herbal extracts as hepatoprotectants against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Jaeschke, Hartmut; Williams, C David; McGill, Mitchell R; Farhood, Anwar

    2010-01-01

    Many plant-derived natural products have the potential to be hepatoprotective and therefore can be used to treat acute and chronic liver diseases. The challenge is to identify the most promising compounds and evaluate their protective mechanism. In a recently published article, Wang et al evaluated extracts of the plant Gentiana manshurica Kitagawa (GM) in a model of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. The authors concluded that GM is hepatoprotective against acetaminophen-induced liver injury due to its antioxidant properties and anti-apoptotic capacity. We would like to discuss the limitations of this experimental approach and question the conclusion based on the data presented in this manuscript and the published literature. PMID:20480535

  1. [Use of acetaminophen in the community].

    PubMed

    Guberman, D

    1990-01-01

    Acetaminophen (Acamol) is one of the most widely used medications in children. The recommended dose is 10-15 mg/kg every 4 hours, and up to 5 doses a day. In a prospective study in an outpatient clinic, 101 parents of children 5 years old or younger were asked to describe their use of acetaminophen for their children, including dose, mode administration and maximal frequency of administration for fever. 2/3 used the syrup and 1/3 used suppositories. The average single dose was 13.8 +/- 5.5 mg/kg. Only 61% of the children received reasonable quantities of acetaminophen per dose. While 12% got an overdose of 20 mg/kg or more, 27% got an underdose of less than 10 mg/kg. Treatment was as often as every 2-3 hours in 13% of the children but only once every 8-24 hours in 22%. To overcome inadequate administration of acetaminophen, parents must be properly educated. PMID:2303194

  2. Effects of Acetaminophen on Left Atrial Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jun-Hei; Cheng, Pao-Yun; Hsu, Chih-Hsueng; Chen, Yao-Chang; Hong, Po-Da

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been observed that acetaminophen shows cardioprotective efficacy in mammals. In this study, we investigated the electromechanical effects of acetaminophen on the left atrium (LA). Methods Conventional microelectrodes were used to record the action potentials (AP) in rabbit LA preparations. The action potential duration (APD) at repolarization levels of 90%, 50% and 20% of the AP amplitude (APD90, APD50, and APD20, respectively), resting membrane potential, and contractile force were measured during 2 Hz electrical stimulation before and after sequential acetaminophen administration to the LA. Results Acetaminophen (0.1, 0.3, 1, and 3 mM) reduced APD20 from 9.4 ± 1.2 to 8.0 ± 1.1 (p < 0.05), 7.1 ± 0.8 (p < 0.05), 7.8 ± 1.1, and 6.8 ± 1.2 ms (p < 0.05), respectively, and APD50 from 20.2 ± 1.9 to 17.4 ± 2.0, 15.6 ± 1.8 (p < 0.05), 15.8 ± 2.2 (p < 0.05), and 14.1 ± 2.4 ms (p < 0.05), respectively, in a concentration-dependent manner. APD90 was reduced from 72.0 ± 3.6 to 64.7 ± 4.2, 61.9 ± 4.3, 60.5 ± 3.7, and 53.4 ± 4.4 ms (p < 0.05), respectively. Acetaminophen increased LA contractility from 45 ± 9 to 52 ± 10 (p < 0.05), 55 ± 9 (p < 0.01), 58 ± 9 (p < 0.01), and 60 ± 9 mg (p < 0.01), respectively, in a concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of the NOS inhibitor L-NAME or PKG-I inhibitor DT-2, additional acetaminophen treatment did not significantly increase LA contractility. Conclusions Acetaminophen modulated the electromechanical characteristics of LA by inhibiting the NOS and PKG I pathway, and then contributed to the positive inotropic effect. PMID:27471362

  3. Removal of acetaminophen and naproxen by combined coagulation and adsorption using biochar: influence of combined sewer overflow components.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chanil; Oh, Jeill; Yoon, Yeomin

    2015-07-01

    The combined coagulation and adsorption of targeted acetaminophen and naproxen using activated biochar and aluminum sulfate were studied under various synthetic "combined sewer overflow" (CSO) conditions. The biochar demonstrated better adsorption performance for both acetaminophen and naproxen (removal, 94.1 and 97.7%, respectively) than that of commercially available powdered activated carbon (removal, 81.6 and 94.1%, respectively) due to superior carbonaceous structure and surface properties examined by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The adsorption of naproxen was more favorable, occupying active adsorption sites on the adsorbents by naproxen due to its higher adsorption affinity compared to acetaminophen. Three classified CSO components (i.e., representing hydrophobic organics, hydrophilic organics, and inorganics) played different roles in the adsorption of both adsorbates, resulted in inhibition by humic acid complexation or metal ligands and negative electrostatic repulsion under adsorption and coagulation combined system. Adsorption alone with biochar was determined to be the most effective adsorptive condition for the removal of both acetaminophen and naproxen under various CSO conditions, while both coagulation alone and combined adsorption and coagulation failed to remove the acetaminophen and naproxen adequately due to an increase in ionic strength in the presence of spiked aluminum species derived from the coagulant. PMID:25680690

  4. [A Case of Acetaminophen Poisoning Associated with Tramcet Overdose].

    PubMed

    Urabe, Shigehiko; Terao, Yoshiaki; Tuji, Tikako; Egashira, Takashi; Goto, Shino; Fukusaki, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Tramcet is a mixture of tramadol and acetaminophen. Acetaminophen poisoning may be caused by excessive intake of Tramcet. A 17-year-old female took excessive quantity of Tramcet before noon. She reported it herself in the emergency room. Her main complaint was nausea and dizziness. Acetaminophen may cause liver damage with dose-dependent manner. Because there was a possibility of acetaminophen poisoning, we started oral acetylcysteine. She was discharged from hospital 5 days later without side effects of acetylecysteine and liver damage. PMID:27483669

  5. Acetaminophen overdose associated with double serum concentration peaks

    PubMed Central

    Papazoglu, Cristian; Ang, Jonathan R.; Mandel, Michael; Basak, Prasanta; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen is the most commonly used analgesic–antipyretic medication in the United States. Acetaminophen overdose, a frequent cause of drug toxicity, has been recognized as the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal hepatic necrosis. N-Acetylcysteine is the recommended antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Despite evidence on the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine for prevention of hepatic injury, controversy persists about the optimal duration of the therapy. Here, we describe the case of a 65-year-old male with acetaminophen overdose and opioid co-ingestion who developed a second peak in acetaminophen serum levels after completing the recommended 21-hour intravenous N-acetylcysteine protocol and when the standard criteria for monitoring drug levels was achieved. Prolongation of N-acetylcysteine infusion beyond the standard protocol, despite a significant gap in treatment, was critical for successful avoidance of hepatotoxicity. Delay in acetaminophen absorption may be associated with a second peak in serum concentration following an initial declining trend, especially in cases of concomitant ingestion of opioids. In patients with acetaminophen toxicity who co-ingest other medications that may potentially delay gastric emptying or in those with risk factors for delayed absorption of acetaminophen, we recommend close monitoring of aminotransferase enzyme levels, as well as trending acetaminophen concentrations until undetectable before discontinuing the antidote therapy. PMID:26653695

  6. N-acetylcysteine overdose after acetaminophen poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Ghafar Ali; Astaraki, Peyman; Mohtashami, Azita Zafar; Ahadi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is used widely and effectively in oral and intravenous forms as a specific antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Here we report a rare case of iatrogenic NAC overdose following an error in preparation of the solution, and describe its clinical symptoms. Laboratory results and are presented and examined. A 23-year-old alert female patient weighing 65 kg presented to the emergency ward with weakness, lethargy, extreme fatigue, nausea, and dizziness. She had normal arterial blood gas and vital signs. An excessive dosage of NAC over a short period of time can lead to hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure in patients with normal glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and finally to death. Considering the similarity between some of the clinical symptoms of acetaminophen overdose and NAC overdose, it is vitally important for the administration phases and checking of the patient's symptoms to be carried out attentively and cautiously. PMID:25767408

  7. Comparative study of flurbiprofen, zomepirac sodium, acetaminophen plus codeine, and acetaminophen for the relief of postsurgical dental pain.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, A; Marrero, I; Olson, N; McCormick, N; Laska, E M

    1986-03-24

    The relative analgesic efficacy and safety of single oral doses of 50 and 100 mg of flurbiprofen (Ansaid, Upjohn) were compared with 100 mg of zomepirac sodium, 650 mg of acetaminophen plus 60 mg of codeine, 650 mg of acetaminophen alone, and placebo in a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study. A total of 182 patients entered the study with moderate pain from a third molar extraction and were evaluated for six hours. For many efficacy variables, all active treatments were significantly (p less than or equal to 0.05) more effective than placebo. The two doses of flurbiprofen gave approximately similar results, suggesting a plateau effect above 50 mg. With the exception of relief at one hour, there were no significant differences between zomepirac and either dose of flurbiprofen. However, the mean response with zomepirac was greater than with either 50 or 100 mg of flurbiprofen during the first four hours and lower during the last two hours. The analgesic effects of acetaminophen alone were not significantly different from acetaminophen in combination with codeine. At the first hour, acetaminophen plus codeine led to significantly better pain relief than did 100 mg of flurbiprofen. After the first hour, flurbiprofen resulted in greater mean scores than acetaminophen alone or acetaminophen plus codeine, and these differences were significant at the fifth and sixth hours. Five patients had adverse reactions while receiving acetaminophen, acetaminophen plus codeine, or placebo. There were no adverse effects with flurbiprofen or zomepirac. PMID:3515924

  8. Optimization in development of acetaminophen syrup formulation.

    PubMed

    Worakul, Nimit; Wongpoowarak, Wibul; Boonme, Prapaporn

    2002-03-01

    Formulation of acetaminophen syrup could be developed by an optimization technique to reduce the time and cost of study. Cosolvents were used in the formulation because of the low solubility of acetaminophen in water. They were composed of polyethylene glycol 4000, propylene glycol, sorbitol solution, and glycerin. Their effects on the solubility of acetaminophen and the pH of formulations were investigated. Effects on taste and price were calculated based on their properties. Simulation study of the effect of cosolvents upon the formulation scores was performed, using an algorithm based upon a simulated annealing concept to achieve the global optima and heuristic optimization concept to accelerate convergence. The program written as a Visual Basic module within Microsoft Access 97 was used to simulate and assess the optimal cosolvent amounts to achieve the most desirable formulations automatically according to the specified criteria. Formulators could customize the optimal formulation according to their needs and cost constraints by redefining the desirable outcomes in the source code of the program. PMID:12026227

  9. Exacerbation of Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by the Anthelmentic Drug Fenbendazole

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Carol R.; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-01-01

    Fenbendazole is a broad-spectrum anthelmintic drug widely used to prevent or treat nematode infections in laboratory rodent colonies. Potential interactions between fenbendazole and hepatotoxicants such as acetaminophen are unknown, and this was investigated in this study. Mice were fed a control diet or a diet containing fenbendazole (8–12 mg/kg/day) for 7 days prior to treatment with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) or phosphate buffered saline. In mice fed a control diet, acetaminophen administration resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases, which were evident within 12 h. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was markedly increased in mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet, as measured histologically and by significant increases in serum transaminase levels. Moreover, in mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet, but not the control diet, 63% mortality was observed within 24 h of acetaminophen administration. Fenbendazole by itself had no effect on liver histology or serum transaminases. To determine if exaggerated hepatotoxicity was due to alterations in acetaminophen metabolism, we analyzed sera for the presence of free acetaminophen and acetaminophen-glucuronide. We found that there were no differences in acetaminophen turnover. We also measured cytochrome P450 (cyp) 2e1, cyp3a, and cyp1a2 activity. Whereas fenbendazole had no effect on the activity of cyp2e1 or cyp3a, cyp1a2 was suppressed. A prolonged suppression of hepatic glutathione (GSH) was also observed in acetaminophen-treated mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet when compared with the control diet. These data demonstrate that fenbendazole exacerbates the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen, an effect that is related to persistent GSH depletion. These findings are novel and suggest a potential drug-drug interaction that should be considered in experimental protocols evaluating mechanisms of hepatotoxicity in rodent colonies treated with fenbendazole. PMID

  10. Acetaminophen prevents oxidative burst and delays apoptosis in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Marisa; Costa, Vera M; Ribeiro, Daniela; Couto, Diana; Porto, Graça; Carvalho, Félix; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2013-05-23

    Acetaminophen is a frequently prescribed over-the-counter drug to reduce fever and pain in the event of inflammatory process. As neutrophils are relevant cells in inflammatory processes, the putative interaction of acetaminophen with these cells, if present, would be of paramount importance. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of acetaminophen in human neutrophils' oxidative burst and lifespan in vitro. The obtained results demonstrate that acetaminophen efficiently modulates neutrophils' oxidative burst in phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils, in a concentration-dependent manner, at in vivo relevant concentrations. It was clearly demonstrated that acetaminophen is a strong scavenger of HOCl and H2O2, which probably contributed to the effect observed in neutrophils. Acetaminophen also induced the depletion of glutathione in stimulated neutrophils, suggesting its transformation into a reactive intermediate. Obtained results further revealed that acetaminophen affects programmed cell death of human neutrophils, resulting in a delay of previously stimulated neutrophils-mediated apoptosis. Overall, our data suggested that acetaminophen has considerable potential to be included in anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies, by preventing biological damage induced by an excessive production of reactive species generated in activated neutrophils and by extending the lifespan of neutrophils, favoring the elimination of pathogens, thus contributing to tissue healing and resolution of inflammation. PMID:23518321

  11. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: studies on the mechanism of cysteamine protection

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.G.; Jollow, D.J.

    1986-03-30

    Inhibition of the cytochrome P-450-dependent formation of the acetaminophen-reactive metabolite was investigated as a possible mechanism for cysteamine protection against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Studies in isolated hamster hepatocytes indicated that cysteamine competitively inhibited the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system as represented by formation of the acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate. However, cysteamine was not a potent inhibitor of glutathione conjugate formation (Ki = 1.17 mM). Cysteamine also weakly inhibited the glucuronidation of acetaminophen (Ki = 2.44 mM). In vivo studies were in agreement with the results obtained in isolated hepatocytes; cysteamine moderately inhibited both glucuronidation and the cytochrome P-450-dependent formation of acetaminophen mercapturate. The overall elimination rate constant (beta) for acetaminophen was correspondingly decreased. Since cysteamine decreased both beta and the apparent rate constant for mercapturate formation (K'MA), the proportion of the dose of acetaminophen which is converted to the toxic metabolite (K'MA/beta) was not significantly decreased in the presence of cysteamine. Apparently, cysteamine does inhibit the cytochrome P-450-dependent formation of the acetaminophen-reactive metabolite, but this effect is not sufficient to explain antidotal protection.

  12. TRPM2 channels mediate acetaminophen-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Kheradpezhouh, Ehsan; Ma, Linlin; Morphett, Arthur; Barritt, Greg J; Rychkov, Grigori Y

    2014-02-25

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is the most frequently used analgesic and antipyretic drug available over the counter. At the same time, acetaminophen overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure and the leading cause of chronic liver damage requiring liver transplantation in developed countries. Acetaminophen overdose causes a multitude of interrelated biochemical reactions in hepatocytes including the formation of reactive oxygen species, deregulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis, covalent modification and oxidation of proteins, lipid peroxidation, and DNA fragmentation. Although an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in hepatocytes is a known consequence of acetaminophen overdose, its importance in acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity is not well understood, primarily due to lack of knowledge about the source of the Ca(2+) rise. Here we report that the channel responsible for Ca(2+) entry in hepatocytes in acetaminophen overdose is the Transient Receptor Potential Melanostatine 2 (TRPM2) cation channel. We show by whole-cell patch clamping that treatment of hepatocytes with acetaminophen results in activation of a cation current similar to that activated by H2O2 or the intracellular application of ADP ribose. siRNA-mediated knockdown of TRPM2 in hepatocytes inhibits activation of the current by either acetaminophen or H2O2. In TRPM2 knockout mice, acetaminophen-induced liver damage, assessed by the blood concentration of liver enzymes and liver histology, is significantly diminished compared with wild-type mice. The presented data strongly suggest that TRPM2 channels are essential in the mechanism of acetaminophen-induced hepatocellular death. PMID:24569808

  13. Contribution of acetaminophen-cysteine to acetaminophen nephrotoxicity in CD-1 mice: I. Enhancement of acetaminophen nephrotoxicity by acetaminophen-cysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Stephan T.; Bruno, Mary K.; Hennig, Gayle E.; Horton, Robert A.; Roberts, Jeanette C.; Cohen, Steven D. . E-mail: scohen@mcp.edu

    2005-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) nephrotoxicity has been observed both in humans and research animals. Recent studies suggest a contributory role for glutathione (GSH)-derived conjugates of APAP in the development of nephrotoxicity. Inhibitors of either {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT) or the probenecid-sensitive organic anion transporter ameliorate APAP-induced nephrotoxicity but not hepatotoxicity in mice and inhibition of {gamma}-GT similarly protected rats from APAP nephrotoxicity. Protection against APAP nephrotoxicity by disruption of these GSH conjugate transport and metabolism pathways suggests that GSH conjugates are involved. APAP-induced renal injury may involve the acetaminophen-glutathione (APAP-GSH) conjugate or a metabolite derived from APAP-GSH. Acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS) is a likely candidate for involvement in APAP nephrotoxicity because it is both a product of the {gamma}-GT pathway and a probable substrate for the organic anion transporter. The present experiments demonstrated that APAP-CYS treatment alone depleted renal but not hepatic glutathione (GSH) in a dose-responsive manner. This depletion of renal GSH may predispose the kidney to APAP nephrotoxicity by diminishing GSH-mediated detoxification mechanisms. Indeed, pretreatment of male CD-1 mice with APAP-CYS before challenge with a threshold toxic dose of APAP resulted in significant enhancement of APAP-induced nephrotoxicity. This was evidenced by histopathology and plasma blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels at 24 h after APAP challenge. APAP alone was minimally nephrotoxic and APAP-CYS alone produced no detectable injury. By contrast, APAP-CYS pretreatment did not alter the liver injury induced by APAP challenge. These data are consistent with there being a selective, contributory role for APAP-GSH-derived metabolites in APAP-induced renal injury that may involve renal-selective GSH depletion.

  14. Possible effects of repeated exposure to ibuprofen and acetaminophen on the intestinal immune response in young infants.

    PubMed

    Langhendries, J-P; Allegaert, K; Van Den Anker, J N; Veyckemans, F; Smets, F

    2016-02-01

    There has been an exponential increase in the frequency of immune deviations in young children. Consequently, research investigating environmental causes for this increase has become a Public Health priority. We have summarized the experimental observations and epidemiological data that could link repeated acetaminophen and ibuprofen exposure in early infancy to this increase. Recent observations on the maturational immunity of the intestinal sub-mucosal lamina propria underscore indeed the importance of prostaglandins (PGE2s). PGE2 appearing at this sub-mucosal level is a product of arachidonic acid metabolism mediated by type-2 cyclooxygenase (COX-2) situated on the membrane of many immune cells. Moreover, it seems that acetaminophen - like ibuprofen - also carries a non-selective inhibitory action on peripheral COXs, besides its central action. This inhibitory action of acetaminophen on COX2 only relates to physiological, low arachidonic acid concentrations. This explains the difference in anti-inflammatory effects. The impact of repeated inhibition of mucosal PGE2 synthesis due to COX-inhibitor exposure on maturational immunity has been demonstrated in animal experiments. Repeatedly exposed young animals do not develop tolerance to food antigens and exhibit autoimmune deviations. Several recent epidemiological studies have also reported on the magnitude of acetaminophen and ibuprofen exposure in children and the increase in immune deviations, it is important to better understand the potential negative impact of repeated inhibitions of prostaglandin synthesis by COX2s during infancy. Since acetaminophen and ibuprofen are commonly administered analgesics and antipyretics, a well-designed prospective strategy for pharmacovigilance and -epidemiology of COX-inhibitor exposure in infancy is urgently needed. PMID:26632201

  15. Nalbuphine, acetaminophen, and their combination in postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Forbes, J A; Kolodny, A L; Chachich, B M; Beaver, W T

    1984-06-01

    In a double-blind study with the use of subjective reports of patients as indices of analgesia, we compared the analgesic effect of oral nalbuphine and acetaminophen and determined the contribution of each to the efficacy of their combination. In this parallel 2 X 2 factorial study, 129 inpatients after surgery were randomly assigned to treatment with a single oral dose of nalbuphine hydrochloride (30 mg), acetaminophen (650 mg), the combination of nalbuphine (30 mg) and acetaminophen (650 mg), or placebo. In the factorial analysis, both the nalbuphine and acetaminophen effects were significant for virtually every measure of total and peak analgesia, whereas the interaction contrast was not significant for any measure of analgesic effect. This indicates that the analgesic effect of the combination represents the additive effect of its constituents and is consistent with the results of studies of combinations of codeine and other opioids with aspirin or acetaminophen. There were few adverse effects other than sedation, which occurred twice as frequently in patients treated with nalbuphine as in those receiving acetaminophen or placebo. Our data suggest that this combination should prove at least as effective as any currently marketed narcotic-containing combination. Since nalbuphine has less dependence liability than narcotics and exhibits a ceiling on respiratory depression, its combination with acetaminophen should also be safer than comparable narcotic combinations. PMID:6734037

  16. Potential role of caveolin-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Carol R.; Gray, Joshua P.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Cervelli, Jessica; Bremer, Nicole; Kim, Yunjung; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2010-05-15

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a membrane scaffolding protein, which functions to regulate intracellular compartmentalization of various signaling molecules. In the present studies, transgenic mice with a targeted disruption of the Cav-1 gene (Cav-1{sup -/-}) were used to assess the role of Cav-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Treatment of wild-type mice with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases. This was correlated with decreased expression of Cav-1 in the liver. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was significantly attenuated in Cav-1{sup -/-} mice, an effect that was independent of acetaminophen metabolism. Acetaminophen administration resulted in increased hepatic expression of the oxidative stress marker, lipocalin 24p3, as well as hemeoxygenase-1, but decreased glutathione and superoxide dismutase-1; no differences were noted between the genotypes suggesting that reduced toxicity in Cav-1{sup -/-} mice is not due to alterations in antioxidant defense. In wild-type mice, acetaminophen increased mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1beta, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), as well as cyclooxygenase-2, while 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX), which generates anti-inflammatory lipoxins, decreased. Acetaminophen-induced changes in MCP-1 and 15-LOX expression were greater in Cav-1{sup -/-} mice. Although expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, a potent hepatocyte mitogen, was up-regulated in the liver of Cav-1{sup -/-} mice after acetaminophen, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and survivin, markers of cellular proliferation, were delayed, which may reflect the reduced need for tissue repair. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Cav-1 plays a role in promoting inflammation and toxicity during the pathogenesis of acetaminophen-induced injury.

  17. Potential Role of Caveolin-1 in Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Carol R.; Gray, Joshua P.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Cervelli, Jessica; Bremer, Nicole; Kim, Yunjung; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2010-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a membrane scaffolding protein which functions to regulate intracellular compartmentalization of various signaling molecules. In the present studies, transgenic mice with a targeted disruption of the Cav-1 gene (Cav-1−/−) were used to assess the role of Cav-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Treatment of wild type mice with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases. This was correlated with decreased expression of Cav-1 in the liver. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was significantly attenuated in Cav-1−/− mice, an effect that was independent of acetaminophen metabolism. Acetaminophen administration resulted in increased hepatic expression of the oxidative stress marker, lipocalin 24p3, as well as hemeoxygenase-1, but decreased glutathione and superoxide dismutase-1; no differences were noted between the genotypes suggesting that reduced toxicity in Cav-1−/− mice is not due to alterations in anti-oxidant defense. In wild type mice, acetaminophen increased mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), as well as cyclooxygenase-2, while 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX), which generates anti-inflammatory lipoxins, decreased. Acetaminophen-induced changes in MCP-1 and 15-LOX expression were greater in Cav-1−/− mice. Although expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, a potent hepatocyte mitogen, was up-regulated in the liver of Cav-1−/− mice after acetaminophen, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and survivin, markers of cellular proliferation, were delayed which may reflect the reduced need for tissue repair. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Cav-1 plays a role in promoting inflammation and toxicity during the pathogenesis of acetaminophen-induced injury. PMID:20100502

  18. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Takeki; Kosyk, Oksana; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Bradford, Blair U.; Tech, Katherine; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Boorman, Gary A.; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Mason, Ronald P.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Tryndyak, Volodymyr P.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2013-01-15

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  19. Mechanisms of Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Dean W.; James, Laura P.

    2010-01-01

    Although considered safe at therapeutic doses, at higher doses, acetaminophen produces a centrilobular hepatic necrosis that can be fatal. Acetaminophen poisoning accounts for approximately one-half of all cases of acute liver failure in the United States and Great Britain today. The mechanism occurs by a complex sequence of events. These events include: (1) CYP metabolism to a reactive metabolite which depletes glutathione and covalently binds to proteins; (2) loss of glutathione with an increased formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in hepatocytes undergoing necrotic changes; (3) increased oxidative stress, associated with alterations in calcium homeostasis and initiation of signal transduction responses, causing mitochondrial permeability transition; (4) mitochondrial permeability transition occurring with additional oxidative stress, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and loss of the ability of the mitochondria to synthesize ATP; and (5) loss of ATP which leads to necrosis. Associated with these essential events there appear to be a number of inflammatory mediators such as certain cytokines and chemokines that can modify the toxicity. Some have been shown to alter oxidative stress, but the relationship of these modulators to other critical mechanistic events has not been well delineated. In addition, existing data support the involvement of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in the initiation of regenerative processes leading to the reestablishment of hepatic structure and function. PMID:20020268

  20. Evaluation of hepatoprotective effect of methanolic extract of Clitoria ternatea (Linn.) flower against acetaminophen-induced liver damage

    PubMed Central

    Nithianantham, Kuppan; Ping, Kwan Yuet; Latha, Lachimanan Yoga; Jothy, Subramanion L; Darah, Ibrahim; Chen, Yeng; Chew, Ai-Lan; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the hepatoprotective and antioxidant activity of Clitoria ternatea (C. ternatea) flower extract against acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity. Methods The antioxidant property of C. ternatea flower extract was investigated by employing established in vitro antioxidant assay. The C. ternatea flower extract was studied in this work for its hepatoprotective effect against acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in mice. Activity was measured by monitoring the levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, billirubin and glutathione with histopathological analysis. Results The amount of total phenolics and flavonoids were estimated to be 105.40±2.47 mg/g gallic acid equivalent and 72.21±0.05 mg/g catechin equivalent respectively. The antioxidant activity of C. ternatea flower extract was 68.9% at a concentration of 1 mg/mL and was also concentration dependant, with an IC50 value of 327.00 µg/mL. The results of acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity experiment showed that mice treated with the extract (200 mg/kg) showed a significant decrease in alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and bilirubin levels, which were all elevated in the paracetamol group (P<0.05). Meanwhile, the level of glutathione was found to be restored in extract treated animals compared to the groups treated with acetaminophen alone (P<0.05). Therapy of extract also showed its protective effect on histopathological alterations and supported the biochemical finding. Conclusion The present work confirmed the hepatoprotective effect of C. ternatea flower against model hepatotoxicant acetaminophen.

  1. Ketoprofen, acetaminophen plus oxycodone, and acetaminophen in the relief of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, A; Olson, N Z; Zighelboim, I; De Castro, A

    1993-11-01

    Ketoprofen (Orudis) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is currently approved in the United States for the management of mild to moderate pain. The objective of this trial was to determine the effectiveness of orally administered ketoprofen in the management of severe postoperative pain. This randomized, double-blind parallel study compared the efficacy and safety of single doses of 100 mg or 50 mg ketoprofen, the combination of 650 mg acetaminophen plus 10 mg oxycodone hydrochloride, 650 mg acetaminophen, or placebo in 240 patients with severe postoperative pain after cesarean section. Analgesia for the first dose was assessed over an 8-hour period. Multiple doses of 100 mg or 50 mg ketoprofen and the combination at half the dose (325 mg acetaminophen plus 5 mg oxycodone) were also assessed for up to 7 days. The 100 and 50 mg doses of ketoprofen and the combination were statistically superior to acetaminophen and placebo for many analgesic measures. A dose response was observed between the two doses of ketoprofen, with the 100 mg dose providing significantly greater analgesia over the lower dose. Ketoprofen, 100 mg, was at least as effective as the combination and its effects lasted longer, with the exception of hour 1 when the combination was superior. Remedication time for the group receiving 100 mg ketoprofen was significantly longer than for the other treatment groups. Significantly more patients who took repeated doses of the combination (84%) than those who took either dose of ketoprofen (70%) had adverse effects. Ketoprofen at both dose levels was shown to be effective, long-lasting, and well tolerated, and it should be considered as a viable option for the management of moderate to severe postoperative pain. PMID:8222498

  2. Biliary excretion of acetaminophen-glutathione as an index of toxic activation of acetaminophen: effect of chemicals that alter acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Madhu, C.; Gregus, Z.; Klaassen, C.D.

    1989-03-01

    Acetaminophen (AA) is converted, presumably by cytochrome P-450, to an electrophile which is conjugated with glutathione (GS). AA-GS is excreted into bile, therefore the biliary excretion rate of AA-GS may reflect the rate of activation of AA in vivo. In order to test this hypothesis, the effect of agents capable of altering the activation of AA including cytochrome P-450 inducers and inhibitors, cobaltous chloride which decreases the amount of P-450, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors (indomethacin and naproxen), antioxidants (butylated hydroxyanisole, alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid and ascorbic acid palmitate) and other chemicals known to decrease AA hepatotoxicity (dimethylsulfoxide and cysteamine), on the biliary excretion of AA-GS was studied in hamsters, the species most sensitive to AA-induced hepatotoxicity. The biliary excretion of AA-GS increased linearly up to 1 mmol/kg of AA i.v., but at higher dosages exhibited saturation kinetics. Dosages above 0.5 mmol/kg lowered hepatic GS concentration. Of the cytochrome P-450 inducers, 3-methylcholanthrene and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, increased the biliary excretion of AA-GS (2.9- and 3.2-fold, respectively) whereas ethanol and isoniazid did not affect it, and pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile tended to decrease it (43%). Phenobarbital tended to increase the biliary excretion of AA-GS, but not in a statistically significant manner. Several cytochrome P-450 inhibitors (metyrapone, 8-methoxypsoralen, 2-(4,6-dichloro-biphenyloxy) ethylamine, alpha-naphthoflavone and cimetidine) decreased the biliary excretion of AA-GS, although SKF 525-A and piperonyl butoxide did not. Cobaltous chloride decreased dramatically the biliary excretion of AA-GS.

  3. Possible fatal acetaminophen intoxication with atypical clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    De-Giorgio, Fabio; Lodise, Maria; Chiarotti, Marcello; d'Aloja, Ernesto; Carbone, Arnaldo; Valerio, Luca

    2013-09-01

    Acetaminophen or paracetamol, a commonly used over-the-counter analgesic, is known to elicit severe adverse reactions when taken in overdose, chronically at therapeutic dosage or, sporadically, following single assumptions of a therapeutic dose. Damage patterns including liver damage and, rarely, acute tubular necrosis or a fixed drug exanthema. We present a case of fatal acetaminophen toxicity with postmortem blood concentration 78 μg/mL and unusual clinical features, including a visually striking and massive epidermolysis and rhabdomyolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation and myocardial ischemia. This case is compared with the most similar previous reports in terms of organ damage, clinical presentation, and cause of death. We conclude that a number of severe patterns of adverse effects to acetaminophen are emerging that were previously greatly underestimated, thus questioning the adequacy of the clinical spectrum traditionally associated with acetaminophen intoxication and leading to the need to review this spectrum and the associated diagnostic criteria. PMID:23822653

  4. Careful: Acetaminophen in Pain Relief Medicines Can Cause Liver Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careful: Acetaminophen in pain relief medicines can cause liver damage Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... word or may have the abbreviation "APAP." Severe liver damage may occur and may lead to death ...

  5. Effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine acetylation in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tahir, I M; Iqbal, T; Saleem, S; Mehboob, H; Akhter, N; Riaz, M

    2016-03-01

    The effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine N-acetylation by human N-acetyltrasferase-2 (NAT2) was studied in 19 (n=19) healthy male volunteers in two different phases. In the first phase of the study the volunteers were given an oral dose of sulfamethazine 500 mg alone and blood and urine samples were collected. After the 10-day washout period the same selected volunteers were again administered sulfamethazine 500 mg along with 1000 mg acetaminophen. The acetylation of sulfamethazine by human NAT2 in both phases with and without acetaminophen was determined by HPLC to establish their respective phenotypes. In conclusion obtained statistics of present study revealed that acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) decreased sulfamethazine acetylation in plasma of both slow and fast acetylator male volunteers. A highly significant (P<0.0001) decrease in plasma-free and total sulfamethazine concentration was also observed when acetaminophen was co-administered. Urine acetylation status in both phases of the study was found not to be in complete concordance with that of plasma. Acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) increased the acetyl, free and total sulfamethazine concentration in urine of both slow and fast acetylators. Urine acetylation analysis has not been found to be a suitable approach for phenotypic studies. PMID:26519524

  6. Acute Liver Failure including Acetaminophen Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Acute liver failure (ALF) is a dramatic and highly unpredictable clinical syndrome defined by the sudden onset of coagulopathy and encephalopathy. Although many disease processes can cause ALF, acetaminophen overdose is the leading cause in the United States, and has a 66% chance of recovery with early N-acetylcysteine treatment and supportive care. Cerebral edema and infectious complications are notoriously difficult to detect and treat in ALF patients and may lead to irreversible brain damage and multi-organ failure. Emergency liver transplantation is associated with a 70% 1-year patient survival but 20% of listed patients die, highlighting the importance of early referral of ALF patients with a poor prognosis to a liver transplant center. PMID:18570942

  7. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Sensitizes To Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Impairing Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Baulies, Anna; Ribas, Vicent; Núñez, Susana; Torres, Sandra; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Martínez, Laura; Suda, Jo; Ybanez, Maria D.; Kaplowitz, Neil; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, Jose C.

    2015-01-01

    The role of lysosomes in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the impact of genetic and drug-induced lysosomal cholesterol (LC) accumulation in APAP hepatotoxicity. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)−/− mice exhibit LC accumulation and higher mortality after APAP overdose compared to ASMase+/+ littermates. ASMase−/− hepatocytes display lower threshold for APAP-induced cell death and defective fusion of mitochondria-containing autophagosomes with lysosomes, which decreased mitochondrial quality control. LC accumulation in ASMase+/+ hepatocytes caused by U18666A reproduces the susceptibility of ASMase−/− hepatocytes to APAP and the impairment in the formation of mitochondria-containing autolysosomes. LC extraction by 25-hydroxycholesterol increased APAP-mediated mitophagy and protected ASMase−/− mice and hepatocytes against APAP hepatotoxicity, effects that were reversed by chloroquine to disrupt autophagy. The regulation of LC by U18666A or 25-hydroxycholesterol did not affect total cellular sphingomyelin content or its lysosomal distribution. Of relevance, amitriptyline-induced ASMase inhibition in human hepatocytes caused LC accumulation, impaired mitophagy and increased susceptibility to APAP. Similar results were observed upon glucocerebrosidase inhibition by conduritol β-epoxide, a cellular model of Gaucher disease. These findings indicate that LC accumulation determines susceptibility to APAP hepatotoxicity by modulating mitophagy, and imply that genetic or drug-mediated ASMase disruption sensitizes to APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:26657973

  8. Age does not alter acetaminophen absorption.

    PubMed

    Divoll, M; Ameer, B; Abernethy, D R; Greenblatt, D J

    1982-04-01

    Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (age range, 22-78 years) received 650 mg of acetaminophen (AAP) on three separate occasions. The modes of administration were 1) intravenous, 5-minute infusion; 2) oral, with two 325-mg tablets; and 3) oral, with 650 mg as an elixir preparation. Plasma levels of AAP were determined in blood samples drawn up to 12 hours after the dose. The mean (+/- sd) kinetic variables for absorption of AAP from tablets in young and elderly were peak plasma concentration, 11.8 (+/- 4.2) vs 10.9 (+/- 4.1) micrograms/ml; peak time, 0.79 (+/- .54) vs 0.69 (+/- .40) hours after the dose; absorption half-life, 12.6 (+/- 9.8) vs. 8.2 (+/- 5.3) minutes; and absolute systemic availability, 79 (+/- 9) vs 72 (+/- 11) per cent. For AAP elixir, the corresponding values were 12.6 (+/- 5.4) vs 13.7 (+/- 6.0) micrograms/ml; 0.52 (+/- .24) vs 0.54 (+/- .51) hours; 8.6 (+/- 6.2) vs 6.1 (+/- 6.6) minutes; and 87 (+/- 9) vs 80 (+/- 9) per cent. Absolute bioavailability of both oral dosage forms was significantly less then 100 per cent in all groups. Elderly subjects tended to show lower availability of both oral preparations, but the difference was of borderline significance (P less than .50). Age did not influence any other measures of absorption. Since the absorption rate of acetaminophen may be indicative of the gastric emptying rate, age does not appear to alter this rate-limiting step in drug absorption. PMID:7069091

  9. Confusion: acetaminophen dosing changes based on NO evidence in adults.

    PubMed

    Krenzelok, Edward P; Royal, Mike A

    2012-06-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) plays a vital role in American health care, with in excess of 25 billion doses being used annually as a nonprescription medication. Over 200 million acetaminophen-containing prescriptions, usually in combination with an opioid, are dispensed annually. While acetaminophen is recognized as a safe and effective analgesic and antipyretic, it is also associated with significant morbidity and mortality (hepatotoxicity) if doses in excess of the therapeutic amount are ingested inappropriately. The maximum daily therapeutic dose of 3900-4000 mg was established in separate actions in 1977 and 1988, respectively, via the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) monograph process for nonprescription medications. The FDA has conducted multiple advisory committee meetings to evaluate acetaminophen and its safety profile, and has suggested (but not mandated) a reduction in the maximum daily dosage from 3900-4000 mg to 3000-3250 mg. In 2011, McNeil, the producer of the Tylenol® brand of acetaminophen, voluntarily reduced the maximum daily dose of its 500 mg tablet product to 3000 mg/day, and it has pledged to change the labeling of its 325 mg/tablet product to reflect a maximum of 3250 mg/day. Generic manufacturers have not changed their dosing regimens and they have remained consistent with the established monograph dose. Therefore, confusion will be inevitable as both consumers and health care professionals try to determine the proper therapeutic dose of acetaminophen. Which is the correct dose of acetaminophen: 3000 mg if 500 mg tablets are used, 3250 mg with 325 mg tablets, or 3900 mg when 650 mg arthritis-strength products are used? PMID:22530736

  10. Use of Arctium lappa Extract Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Kott, Attalla Farag; Bin-Meferij, Mashael Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe destructive hepatic injuries can be induced by acetaminophen overdose and may lead to acute hepatic failure. Objective To investigate the ameliorative effects of Arctium lappa root extract on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods Rats were divided into 4 groups: normal control group, Arctium lappa extract group, acetaminophen-injected group, and acetaminophen treated with Arctium lappa extract group. Results The treatment with Arctium lappa extract reduced serum alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase in the acetaminophen group when compared with the control group. DNA fragments in the acetaminophen-injected group were also significantly increased (P < 0.05). The comet assay revealed increased detaching tail length and DNA concentration during the hepatic toxicity in the acetaminophen group. The malondialdehyde content was inhibited by Arctium lappa treatment (12.97±0.89 nmol/mg) when compared with the acetaminophen-treated-only group (12.97±0.89 nmol/mg). Histopathologic examination revealed that acetaminophen administration produced hepatic cell necrosis, infiltrate of lymphocytes, and vacuolation that were associated with the acetaminophen-treated animal group, but the degree of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was mediated by treatment with Arctium lappa extract. Conclusions Arctium lappa can prevent most of the hepatic tissue damage caused by acetaminophen overdose in rats. PMID:26543508

  11. MODULATION OF ACETAMINOPHEN-INDUCED HEPATOTOXICITY BY THE XENOBIOTIC RECEPTOR CAR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have identified the xenobiotic receptor CAR (constitutive androstane receptor) as a key regulator of acetaminophen metabolism and hepatotoxicity. Known CAR activators as well as high doses of acetaminophen induced expression of three acetaminophen-metabolizing enzymes in wild-type but not in CAR-...

  12. 76 FR 2691 - Prescription Drug Products Containing Acetaminophen; Actions To Reduce Liver Injury From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... acetaminophen drugs (final rule, 74 FR 19385, April 29, 2009; and technical amendment, 74 FR 61512, November 25... is produced when acetaminophen is broken down by the body (Ref. 5). With low doses of acetaminophen... Syndrome, chronic alcoholism, acute excess alcohol use, and use of anticonvulsant or...

  13. 5-Lipoxygenase Deficiency Reduces Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity and Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Miriam S. N.; Cardoso, Renato D. R.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Crespigio, Jefferson; Cunha, Thiago M.; Alves-Filho, José C.; da Silva, Rosiane V.; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2013-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) converts arachidonic acid into leukotrienes (LTs) and is involved in inflammation. At present, the participation of 5-LO in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity and liver damage has not been addressed. 5-LO deficient (5-LO−/−) mice and background wild type mice were challenged with APAP (0.3–6 g/kg) or saline. The lethality, liver damage, neutrophil and macrophage recruitment, LTB4, cytokine production, and oxidative stress were assessed. APAP induced a dose-dependent mortality, and the dose of 3 g/kg was selected for next experiments. APAP induced LTB4 production in the liver, the primary target organ in APAP toxicity. Histopathological analysis revealed that 5-LO−/− mice presented reduced APAP-induced liver necrosis and inflammation compared with WT mice. APAP-induced lethality, increase of plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, liver cytokine (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-10), superoxide anion, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances production, myeloperoxidase and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activity, Nrf2 and gp91phox mRNA expression, and decrease of reduced glutathione and antioxidant capacity measured by 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline 6-sulfonate) assay were prevented in 5-LO−/− mice compared to WT mice. Therefore, 5-LO deficiency resulted in reduced mortality due to reduced liver inflammatory and oxidative damage, suggesting 5-LO is a promising target to reduce APAP-induced lethality and liver inflammatory/oxidative damage. PMID:24288682

  14. Tramadol and acetaminophen tablets for dental pain.

    PubMed Central

    Medve, R. A.; Wang, J.; Karim, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the efficacy and time to analgesia of a new tramadol/acetaminophen combination tablet to those of tramadol or acetaminophen (APAP) alone. A meta-analysis was performed of 3 separate single-dose, double-blind, parallel-group trials in patients with moderate or severe pain following extraction of 2 or more third molars. Patients in each study were evenly randomized to a single dose of tramadol/APAP (75 mg/650 mg), tramadol 75 mg, APAP 650 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, or placebo. Active control with ibuprofen was used to determine model sensitivity. Pain relief (scale, 0-4) and pain intensity (scale, 0-3) were reported at 30 minutes after the dose and then hourly for 8 hours. Total pain relief over 8 hours (TOTPAR8) and the sum of pain intensity differences (SPID8) were calculated from the hourly scores. Time to onset of pain relief was determined by the double-stopwatch technique, and patients were advised to wait at least 2 hours before taking supplemental analgesia. Patients assessed overall efficacy (scale, 1-5) upon completion. In all, 1197 patients (age range, 16-46 years) were evaluable for efficacy; treatment groups in each study were similar at baseline. Pain relief was superior to placebo (P < or = .0001) for all treatments. Pain relief provided by tramadol/ APAP was superior to that of tramadol or APAP alone, as shown by mean TOT-PAR8 (12.1 vs 6.7 and 8.6, respectively, P < or = .0001) and SPID8 (4.7 vs 0.9 and 2.7, respectively, P < or = .0001). Estimated onset of pain relief was 17 minutes (95% CI, 15-20 minutes) for tramadol/APAP compared with 51 minutes (95% CI, 40-70 minutes) for tramadol, 18 minutes (95% CI, 16-21 minutes) for APAP, and 34 minutes (95% CI, 28-44 minutes) for ibuprofen. Median time to supplemental analgesia and mean overall assessment of efficacy were greater (P < .05) for the tramadol/APAP group (302 minutes and 3.0, respectively) than for the tramadol (122 minutes and 2.0) or APAP (183 minutes and 2

  15. Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity: a Comprehensive Update.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Eric; Babar, Arooj; Choudhary, Moaz; Kutner, Matthew; Pyrsopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-06-28

    Hepatic injury and subsequent hepatic failure due to both intentional and non-intentional overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) has affected patients for decades, and involves the cornerstone metabolic pathways which take place in the microsomes within hepatocytes. APAP hepatotoxicity remains a global issue; in the United States, in particular, it accounts for more than 50% of overdose-related acute liver failure and approximately 20% of the liver transplant cases. The pathophysiology, disease course and management of acute liver failure secondary to APAP toxicity remain to be precisely elucidated, and adverse patient outcomes with increased morbidity and mortality continue to occur. Although APAP hepatotoxicity follows a predictable timeline of hepatic failure, its clinical presentation might vary. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) therapy is considered as the mainstay therapy, but liver transplantation might represent a life-saving procedure for selected patients. Future research focus in this field may benefit from shifting towards obtaining antidotal knowledge at the molecular level, with focus on the underlying molecular signaling pathways. PMID:27350943

  16. Acute renal dysfunction in acetaminophen poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mour, Girish; Feinfeld, Donald A; Caraccio, Thomas; McGuigan, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Although acetaminophen (APAP)-associated liver injury is well recognized, there are few reports describing APAP nephrotoxicity, and most of them are single cases. It has also been suggested that N-acetylcysteine (NAC), used to treat the hepatotoxicity, may be harmful to the kidneys. To examine this contention and to determine whether renal involvement in APAP poisoning is at all common, we analyzed the incidence and outcome of acute renal dysfunction in patients hospitalized for APAP overdose reported to our regional poison center over a year. Eleven APAP-poisoned patients had elevated liver function tests; nine of them had azotemia. Those with higher AST levels tended to be younger and to have lower APAP levels on admission. Two patients with acute renal injury died after admission. The other seven patients with renal dysfunction recovered in 2 to 7 days. Six of these received NAC; their mean serum creatinine fell from 3.2 +/- 2.0 versus 1.7 +/- 0.9 mg/dL (p < 0.05). We conclude that acute renal failure is not uncommon in APAP poisoning and appears to be unrelated to the degree of liver injury. NAC therapy did not seem to worsen nephrotoxicity. PMID:16060123

  17. Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity: a Comprehensive Update

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Eric; Babar, Arooj; Choudhary, Moaz; Kutner, Matthew; Pyrsopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatic injury and subsequent hepatic failure due to both intentional and non-intentional overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) has affected patients for decades, and involves the cornerstone metabolic pathways which take place in the microsomes within hepatocytes. APAP hepatotoxicity remains a global issue; in the United States, in particular, it accounts for more than 50% of overdose-related acute liver failure and approximately 20% of the liver transplant cases. The pathophysiology, disease course and management of acute liver failure secondary to APAP toxicity remain to be precisely elucidated, and adverse patient outcomes with increased morbidity and mortality continue to occur. Although APAP hepatotoxicity follows a predictable timeline of hepatic failure, its clinical presentation might vary. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) therapy is considered as the mainstay therapy, but liver transplantation might represent a life-saving procedure for selected patients. Future research focus in this field may benefit from shifting towards obtaining antidotal knowledge at the molecular level, with focus on the underlying molecular signaling pathways. PMID:27350943

  18. A rapid quantitative determination of acetaminophen in plasma.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, S E; Zurzola, F J

    1982-11-01

    A simple method is described for the rapid, quantitative analysis of acetaminophen in plasma. The nonconjugated acetaminophen present in the plasma following drug administration is determined after plasma protein precipitation by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) at a wavelength of 240 nm. Acetaminophen (I) is detectable at levels as low as 0.1 microgram/ml. Mean recoveries of 94% with a coefficient of variation of 3% were obtained for plasma standards whose concentrations ranged from 0 to 32 microgram/ml. Interassay variability of the slope of the standard curve had a coefficient of variation of 2.7%. Application and verification of this method by comparison with another procedure run simultaneously during several human bioavailability studies are described. PMID:7175728

  19. The hepatic inflammatory response after acetaminophen overdose: role of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lawson, J A; Farhood, A; Hopper, R D; Bajt, M L; Jaeschke, H

    2000-04-01

    Acetaminophen overdose induces severe liver injury and hepatic failure. There is evidence that inflammatory cells may be involved in the pathophysiology. Thus, the aim of this investigation was to characterize the neutrophilic inflammatory response after treatment of C3Heb/FeJ mice with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen. A time course study showed that neutrophils accumulate in the liver parallel to or slightly after the development of liver injury. The number of neutrophils in the liver was substantial (209 +/- 64 PMN/50 high-power fields at 12 h) compared to baseline levels (7 +/- 1). Serum levels of TNF-alpha and the C-X-C chemokines KC and MIP-2 increased by 28-, 14-, and 295-fold, respectively, over levels found in controls during the injury process. In addition, mRNA expression of MIP-2 and KC were upregulated in livers of acetaminophen-treated animals as determined by ribonuclease protection assay. However, none of these mediators were generated in large enough quantities to account for neutrophil sequestration in the liver. There was no upregulation of Mac-1 (CD11b/ CD18) or shedding of L-selectin on circulating neutrophils. Moreover, an anti-CD18 antibody had no protective effect against acetaminophen overdose during the first 24 h. These results indicate that there is a local inflammatory response after acetaminophen overdose, including a substantial accumulation of neutrophils in the liver. Because of the critical importance of beta2 integrins for neutrophil cytotoxicity, these results suggest that neutrophils do not contribute to the initiation or progression of AAP-induced liver. The inflammation observed after acetaminophen overdose may be characteristic for a response sufficient to recruit neutrophils for the purpose of removing necrotic cells but is not severe enough to cause additional damage. PMID:10774834

  20. Interaction between 2-ethoxybenzoic acid (EBA) and eugenol, and related changes in cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, S; Atsumi, T; Satoh, K; Sakagami, H

    2003-01-01

    The liquid of 2-ethoxybenzoic acid cements is composed of 2-ethoxybenzoic acid and eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol). Recently, eugenol was reported to produce radicals at a higher pH, which consequently directly damages cells. We examined here whether eugenol radicals are generated from the mixture of eugenol/calcium hydroxide, and also whether 2-ethoxybenzoic acid or acetylsalicylic acid scavenges radicals, using electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Radicals were generated from the mixture of eugenol/calcium hydroxide in 50% dimethylsulfoxide solution. The radical intensity of eugenol in 50% dimethylsulfoxide with 0.1 M sodium bicarbonate buffer (pH 9.5) was dose-dependently reduced by 2-ethoxybenzoic acid, whereas it was enhanced by acetylsalicylic acid. Next, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of eugenol on 2-ethoxybenzoic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, or calcium hydroxide on human pulp fibroblasts or a human submandibular gland cancer cell line. The cytotoxicity of EBA was decreased, whereas that of acetylsalicylic acid was increased by eugenol. In contrast, that of calcium hydroxide was not affected by eugenol. Human pulp fibroblast but not human submandibular gland cells showed a high resistance against calcium hydroxide. The generation of eugenol radicals in the liquid of 2-ethoxybenzoic acid cements caused by oxidation may be suppressed by 2-ethoxybenzoic acid. PMID:12508044

  1. Inhibitory effects of sodium salicylate and acetylsalicylic acid on UVB-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bair, Warner B; Hart, Nancy; Einspahr, Janine; Liu, Guangming; Dong, Zigang; Alberts, David; Bowden, G Tim

    2002-12-01

    We conducted an in vivo carcinogenesis experiment to determine the efficacy of topical aspirin and sodium salicylate (NAS) in preventing UVB-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer. Hairless SKH-1 mice were randomly divided into eight treatment groups. They were treated topically with either 40 or 10 micromol aspirin or NAS three times weekly before 9 kJ/m(2) UVB irradiation. The experiment was carried out over 25 weeks. Both dose levels of NAS significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) the rate of tumor formation when compared with vehicle control. The 40 micromol dose of aspirin significantly inhibited the rate of tumor formation (P < 0.05), whereas the 10 micromol dose had no inhibitory effect when compared with the vehicle control. To investigate the mechanism of this inhibition, we studied UVB-induced thymine dimer formation in the epidermis of the mouse skin. We found that NAS inhibited UVB-induced thymine dimer formation (P = 0.0001), whereas aspirin did not. Therefore, we conclude that NAS prevents UVB-induced tumor growth and formation through a sunscreen effect; whereas, the moderate inhibition of aspirin may be because of a molecular event, such as the inhibition of various UVB signaling pathways. PMID:12496056

  2. The analgesic efficacy of flurbiprofen compared to acetaminophen with codeine.

    PubMed

    Cooper, S A; Kupperman, A

    1991-01-01

    In a single-dose, parallel group, randomized block treatment allocation study, the relative analgesic efficacy of flurbiprofen, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, was compared to acetaminophen 650 mg with codeine 60 mg, zomepirac sodium 100 mg, and placebo. A total of 226 post-surgical dental patients (146 females and 80 males) participated in the study. Flurbiprofen in 50 mg and 100 mg dosages demonstrated effective analgesic activity with the 100 mg dosage being at least as effective as the acetaminophen/codeine combination. The results of this study support previous work on flurbiprofen. PMID:1930699

  3. Hepatoprotective and anti-oxidant activities of Glossogyne tenuifolia against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yu-Hsiu; Chen, Bing-Huei; Wang Hsu, Guoo-Shyng; Lin, Wan-Teng; Huang, Jui-Hua; Lu, Yi-Fa

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the anti-oxidative and hepatoprotective effects of Glossogyne tenuifolia (GT) Cassini, against acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in BALB/c mice. The extracts of GT by various solvents (hot water, 50% ethanol and 95% ethanol) were compared for their 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, reducing power, total phenolic content, and total anti-oxidant capacity. The results showed that hot water (HW) extracts of GT contained high levels of phenolics and exerted an excellent anti-oxidative capacity; thus, these were used in the animal experiment. The male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into control group, acetaminophen (APAP) group, positive control group and two GT groups at low (GT-L) and high (GT-H) dosages. The results showed that mice treated with GT had significantly decreased serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). GT-H increased glutathione levels and the ratios of reduced glutathione and oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) in the liver, and inhibited serum and lipid peroxidation. This experiment was the first to determine phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside in HW extract of GT. In conclusion, HW extract of GT may have potential anti-oxidant capacity and show hepatoprotective capacities in APAP-induced liver damaged mice. PMID:25384447

  4. Analgesic efficacy of acetaminophen for controlling postextraction dental pain

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Ashwini; Bhargava, Darpan; Gupta, Manas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the clinical safety of acetaminophen over other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, this clinical trial was formulated to assess the analgesic efficacy of acetaminophen for controlling postextraction dental pain when compared to commonly prescribed ibuprofen. Aim: The aim was to assess the analgesic efficacy of paracetamol/acetaminophen in postextraction dental pain. Settings and Design: Double-blind, randomized prospective clinical trial. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients requiring bilateral maxillary and mandibular premolar extraction for their orthodontic treatment were included in the study to evaluate the efficacy of acetaminophen in controlling postextraction dental pain. Statistical Analysis Used: Unpaired t-test. Results and Conclusions: Clinically, both the postoperative analgesics exerted similar pain control with minor variations of recorded visual analog scale scores by the patients in both the groups. It may be concluded from the findings of this study that paracetamol at a dosage of 500 mg thrice a day (1.5 g) is sufficient to achieve reliable pain control following exodontia provided the surgical trauma caused to the investing tissues is minimal. PMID:25593867

  5. Connexin32: a mediator of acetaminophen-induced liver injury?

    PubMed

    Maes, Michaël; McGill, Mitchell R; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Lebofsky, Margitta; Maria Monteiro de Araújo, Cintia; Tiburcio, Taynã; Veloso Alves Pereira, Isabel; Willebrords, Joost; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Farhood, Anwar; Zaidan Dagli, Maria Lucia; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Connexin32 is the building block of hepatocellular gap junctions, which control direct intercellular communication and thereby act as goalkeepers of liver homeostasis. This study was set up to investigate whether connexin32 is involved in hepatotoxicity induced by the analgesic and antipyretic drug acetaminophen. To this end, whole body connexin32 knock-out mice were overdosed with acetaminophen followed by sampling at different time points within a 24-h time frame. Evaluation was done based upon a series of clinically and mechanistically relevant read-outs, including protein adduct formation, histopathological examination, measurement of alanine aminotransferase activity, cytokine production, levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione and hepatic protein amounts of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In essence, it was found that genetic ablation of connexin32 has no influence on several key events in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity, including cell death, inflammation or oxidative stress, yet it does affect production of protein adducts as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen steady-state protein levels. This outcome is not in line with previous studies, which are contradicting on their own, as both amplification and alleviation of this toxicological process by connexin32 have been described. This could question the suitability of the currently available models and tools to investigate the role of connexin32 in acetaminophen-triggered hepatotoxicity. PMID:26739117

  6. 21 CFR 862.3030 - Acetaminophen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acetaminophen test system. 862.3030 Section 862.3030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  7. 21 CFR 862.3030 - Acetaminophen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetaminophen test system. 862.3030 Section 862.3030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  8. 21 CFR 862.3030 - Acetaminophen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetaminophen test system. 862.3030 Section 862.3030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  9. Augmentation of acetaminophen analgesia by the antihistamine phenyltoloxamine.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, A; Zighelboim, I; De Castro, A; Sorrentino, J V; Smith, D S; Bartizek, R D; Olson, N Z

    1989-07-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was performed to compare the analgesic activity of the combination of 650 mg acetaminophen plus 60 mg phenyltoloxamine citrate with that of 650 mg acetaminophen alone. Two hundred female inpatients who had severe pain associated with a recent episiotomy procedure were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of one of the two active treatments or a placebo. Analgesia was assessed over a 6-hour period. Treatments were compared on the basis of standard subjective scales for pain intensity and relief, a number of derived variables based on these data and two global measures. For essentially all measures, the two active treatments were significantly superior to the placebo control. The combination was significantly superior to acetaminophen alone for all analgesic measures including SPID, TOTAL, and global ratings. The results of this study demonstrate that 60 mg phenyltoloxamine produces significant augmentation of the analgesic activity of 650 mg acetaminophen in postepisiotomy pain. PMID:2569485

  10. 21 CFR 862.3030 - Acetaminophen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acetaminophen test system. 862.3030 Section 862.3030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  11. 21 CFR 862.3030 - Acetaminophen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acetaminophen test system. 862.3030 Section 862.3030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  12. Metabolism of AM404 From Acetaminophen at Human Therapeutic Dosages in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Shun; Shiraishi, Seiji; Miyano, Kanako; Sudo, Yuka; Toda, Akiko; Mogi, Masayuki; Hara, Mayumi; Yokoyama, Akinobu; Kawasaki, Yoshihiko; Taniguchi, Mikio; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acetaminophen, an analgesic and antipyretic drug, has been used clinically for more than a century. Previous studies showed that acetaminophen undergoes metabolic transformations to form an analgesic compound, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) arachidonamide (AM404), in the rodent brain. However, these studies were performed with higher concentrations of acetaminophen than are used in humans. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to examine the metabolism of AM404 from acetaminophen in the rat brain at a concentration of 20 mg/kg, which is used in therapeutic practice in humans, and to compare the pharmacokinetics between them. Materials and Methods: We used rat brains to investigate the metabolism of AM404 from acetaminophen at concentrations (20 mg/kg) used in humans. In addition, we determined the mean pharmacokinetic parameters for acetaminophen and its metabolites, including AM404. Results: The maximum plasma concentrations of acetaminophen and AM404 in the rat brain were 15.8 µg/g and 150 pg/g, respectively, with corresponding AUC0-2h values of 8.96 μg hour/g and 117 pg hour/g. The tmax for both acetaminophen and AM404 was 0.25 hour. Conclusions: These data suggest that AM404’s concentration-time profile in the brain is similar to those of acetaminophen and its other metabolites. Measurement of blood acetaminophen concentration seems to reflect the concentration of the prospective bioactive substance, AM404. PMID:27110534

  13. Comparison of the quantification of acetaminophen in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and dried blood spots using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Rachel R.; Hoffman, Keith L.; Schniedewind, Björn; Clavijo, Claudia; Galinkin, Jeffrey L.; Christians, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) acetamide) is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs for the management of pain in children. Quantification of acetaminophen in pre-term and term neonates and small children requires the availability of highly sensitive assays in small volume blood samples. We developed and validated an LC-MS/MS assay for the quantification of acetaminophen in human plasma, cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) and dried blood spots (DBS). Reconstitution in water (DBS only) and addition of a protein precipitation solution containing the deuterated internal standard were the only manual steps. Extracted samples were analyzed on a Kinetex 2.6 μm PFP column using an acetonitrile/formic acid gradient. The analytes were detected in the positive multiple reaction mode. Alternatively, DBS were automatically processed using direct desorption in a sample card and preparation (SCAP) robotic autosampler in combination with online extraction. The range of reliable response in plasma and CSF was 3.05-20,000 ng/ml (r2 > 0.99) and 27.4-20,000 ng/ml (r2 > 0.99) for DBS (manual extraction and automated direct desorption). Inter-day accuracy was always within 85-115% and inter-day precision for plasma, CSF and manually extracted DBS were less than 15%. Deming regression analysis comparing 167 matching pairs of plasma and DBS samples showed a correlation coefficient of 0.98. Bland Altman analysis indicated a 26.6% positive bias in DBS, most likely reflecting the blood: plasma distribution ratio of acetaminophen. DBS are a valid matrix for acetaminophen pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:23670126

  14. Acetaminophen injection: a review of clinical information including forms not available in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fox, Erin R; Jones, Virginia M; Beckwith, M Christina

    2012-06-01

    Acetaminophen injection is an antipyretic and analgesic agent recently marketed in the United States as Ofirmev. A recent review published in the Journal of Pain & Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy focused on the labeled uses of acetaminophen injection in the United States. A variety of studies were excluded that may be of interest to clinicians. This addendum provides these citations and further insight into the strategy used to develop the review. Acetaminophen injection represents another agent for multimodal pain management. PMID:22506845

  15. Misunderstanding and Potential Unintended Misuse of Acetaminophen among Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    King, Jennifer P.; Doane, Cindy; Wilson, Karen M.; Wolf, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Acetaminophen is highly accessible yet potentially dangerous when used incorrectly. In attempts to address concerns about acetaminophen, The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has identified gaps in evidence about unintentional misuse among adolescents. Therefore, our objectives were to assess: adolescents’: 1) health literacy; 2) knowledge about acetaminophen; 3) recent use of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines; 4) and use of medication dosing instructions to understand the medicine and how to use it (‘acetaminophen skills’). Methods Subjects and Setting: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of adolescents and young adults (ages 16–23 years) recruited from education settings and health care sites in Monroe County, New York, from 11/08–9/09. Measures: Using structured in-person interviews, we assessed acetaminophen knowledge and recent use of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines. We assessed participants’ ability to identify acetaminophen in OTC products and answer questions about instructions for acetaminophen use through role-plays of everyday health scenarios. We measured health literacy with the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) for participants >18, and the REALM-Teen for those <18. Results Confusion about acetaminophen and its use was common. Limited health literacy was an independent risk factor for poor knowledge, misunderstanding, and potential unsafe use of acetaminophen-containing medicines, however, most participants at all health literacy levels erred dangerously in ‘unsafe’ understanding of acetaminophen use from label instructions. Conclusions Individuals with limited health literacy may face disproportionate risk of unsafe use of acetaminophen due to confusion and misunderstanding of label information. Better labeling, public health programs, and educational efforts could facilitate safer use of acetaminophen. PMID:21951256

  16. [Acetaminophen-induced hypothermia, an AIDS related side-effect? About 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Denes, Eric; Amaniou, Monique; Rogez, Jean-Philippe; Weinbreck, Pierre; Merle, Louis

    2002-10-01

    Hypothermia is an uncommon side effect of acetaminophen. We report 4 cases of HIV-infected patients who developed hypothermia after intravenous injection of propacetamol (the parenteral formulation of acetaminophen). The mechanism of this hypothermia is unknown. AIDS-induced changes in the metabolism of acetaminophen, could be an explanation. AIDS-associated opportunistic diseases may account for part of the mechanism. These hypothermias occur within 6 hours after the injection, are well tolerated and regress spontaneously. PMID:12486392

  17. Drug Utilization, Dosing, and Costs After Implementation of Intravenous Acetaminophen Guidelines for Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Nicholas M.; Parbuoni, Kristine; Morgan, Jill A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The objectives of this evaluation of medication use were to characterize the use of intravenous acetaminophen at our institution and to determine if acetaminophen was prescribed at age-appropriate dosages per institutional guidelines, as well as to evaluate compliance with restrictions for use. Total acquisition costs associated with intravenous acetaminophen usage is described as well. METHODS This retrospective study evaluated the use of acetaminophen in pediatric patients younger than 18 years of age, admitted to a tertiary care hospital, who received at least 1 dose of intravenous acet-aminophen between August 1, 2011, and January 31, 2012. RESULTS A total of 52 doses of intravenous acetaminophen were administered to 31 patients during the 6-month study period. Most patients were admitted to the otorhinolaryngology service (55%), and the majority of doses were administered either in the operating room (46%) or in the intensive care unit (46%). Nineteen doses (37%) of intravenous acetaminophen were administered to patients who did not meet institutional guidelines' eligibility criteria. Three patients received single doses of intravenous acetaminophen that were greater than the dose recommended for their age. One patient during the study period received more than the recommended 24-hour maximum cumulative dose for acetaminophen. Total acquisition cost of intravenous acetaminophen therapy over the 6-month study period was $530.40. CONCLUSIONS Intravenous acetaminophen was used most frequently among pediatric patients admitted to the otorhinolaryngology service during the perioperative period. Nineteen doses (37%) were administered to patients who did not meet the institutional guidelines' eligibility criteria. Our data support reinforcing the availability of institutional guidelines to promote cost-effective use of intravenous acetaminophen while minimizing the prescription of inappropriate doses. PMID:24782690

  18. Interference by acetaminophen in the glucose oxidase-peroxidase method for blood glucose determination.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann-Raab, I; Jonen, H G; Jähnchen, E; Kahl, G F; Groth, U

    1976-10-01

    Acetaminophen, p-aminophenol, and oxyphenbutazone interfere with the glucose oxidase/peroxidase method for glucose. Structurally related compounds that lack a free phenolic hydroxyl group (acetanilide, aniline, and phenylbutazone) do not interfere. During the analytical procedure acetaminophen is consumed. One mole of acetaminophen leads to an apparent loss of four moles of glucose. The hexokinase/glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase method (Boehringer Hexokinase method) is not affected by these substances. PMID:975521

  19. Simultaneous high-pressure liquid chromatographic determination of acetaminophen, guaifenesin, and dextromethorphan hydrobromide in cough syrup.

    PubMed

    McSharry, W O; Savage, I V

    1980-02-01

    Acetaminophen (I), guaifenesin (II), and dextromethorphan hydrobromide (III) were separated and quantitated simultaneously in cough syrup by high-pressure liquid chromatography. A chemically bonded octadecylsilane stationary phase was used with a mobile phase of 48% (v/v) aqueous methanol. The mobile phase pH was stabilized to 4.2 by adding formic acid--ammonium formate buffer (approximately 0.4%). The internal standard was o-dinitrobenzene. Retention volumes were 4 ml for I, 6 ml for II, 11 ml for the internal standard, and 20 ml for III. Inactive syrup components did not interfere, permitting direct diluted sample injection. Results on active ingredients were essentially 100% of the claim, with standard deviations of +/- 1.5, 1.2, and 2.1% for I, II, and III, respectively. PMID:7359328

  20. Nephroprotective and antioxidant activities of Salacia oblonga on acetaminophen-induced toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Palani, S; Raja, S; Kumar, S Nirmal; Kumar, B Senthil

    2011-11-01

    Salacia oblonga, a woody climbing plant belonging to the family Celastaceae, is widely distributed in India and other southeast Asian countries. The genus Salacia have been used particularly for the treatment of diabetes, obesity, gonorrhoea, rheumatism, pruritus and asthma. Acetaminophen (APAP), used as an analgesic drug, produces liver and kidney necrosis in mammals at high doses. The aim of this study was to investigate the nephroprotective and antioxidant activities of the ethanol extract of Salacia oblonga (EESO) at the two dose levels of 250 and 500 mg/kg bw on APAP-induced toxicity in rats. The results showed that APAP significantly increases the levels of serum urea, creatinine, and reduces levels of uric acid concentration. The EESO reduces these by increasing anti-oxidative responses as assessed by biochemical and histopathological parameters. In conclusion, our results suggest that the EESO possesses nephroprotective and antioxidant effects against APAP-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. PMID:21848492

  1. Interaction of white and pink grapefruit juice with acetaminophen (paracetamol) in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Amitava; Reyes, Meredith A; Risin, Semyon A; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2008-12-01

    Grapefruit juice increases bioavailability of a number of drugs because of inhibition of the P-glycoprotein pump and inhibition of intestinal cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme. However, interaction between acetaminophen (also known as paracetamol in many parts of the world) and grapefruit juice has never been reported. The interaction of grapefruit juice with acetaminophen was examined in an in vivo mouse model. BALB/c mice were fed 200 microL of white grapefruit juice or pink grapefruit juice by oral gavage (three mice in each group) followed by oral delivery of 10, 50, or 100 mg/kg acetaminophen 1 hour later. Blood was withdrawn from the retro-orbital venous plexus at 1 hour and 2 hours after feeding with acetaminophen. The concentrations of acetaminophen in sera of mice were determined by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. White grapefruit juice increased concentrations of acetaminophen in mice both 1 hour and 2 hours after feeding compared to controls. In contrast, pink grapefruit juice increased acetaminophen concentrations 2 hours after feeding compared to controls. Because acetaminophen is almost completely absorbed these effects seems to be related to increased elimination half-life of acetaminophen because of interaction with grapefruit juice. PMID:19053875

  2. The effect of acetaminophen administration on its disposition and body stores of sulphate.

    PubMed

    Hendrix-Treacy, S; Wallace, S M; Hindmarsh, K W; Wyant, G M; Danilkewich, A

    1986-01-01

    This investigation was designed to investigate the effects of ingestion of multiple therapeutic doses of acetaminophen on the disposition of the drug and on the cosubstrate, sulfate. Nine healthy volunteers and nine outpatients receiving acetaminophen for chronic pain were involved in the study. Volunteers were given a single 650 mg oral dose of acetaminophen. One week later they were given 650 mg of acetaminophen every six hours for five doses. Patients were maintained on their normal treatment and dosage schedules (600 mg every 3 to 8 h) for the study. In healthy volunteers the half-life of acetaminophen after single and multiple dosing was not significantly different. However, the fraction of acetaminophen recovered in the urine as the sulfate conjugate was less and the glucuronide conjugate greater after multiple dosing than after a single of the drug. There was no difference in the percentage recovered as the parent compound between single and multiple dosing. Serum sulfate levels fluctuated over the 6-h period following administration of single and multiple doses of acetaminophen to volunteers. The mean serum sulfate concentration was less after administration of five sequential 650 mg doses of acetaminophen than after a single dose. The renal clearance of inorganic sulfate showed a corresponding decrease. Unexpectedly, patients on chronic acetaminophen therapy exhibited elevated serum sulfate levels (levels higher than the maximum sulfate concentration seen in volunteers). PMID:3732362

  3. Detection of Salicylic Acid in Willow Bark: An Addition to a Classic Series of Experiments in the Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Matthew D.; McLeod, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid and its derivative, acetylsalicylic acid, are often encountered in introductory organic chemistry experiments, and mention is often made that salicylic acid was originally isolated from the bark of the willow tree. This biological connection, however, is typically not further pursued, leaving students with an impression that biology…

  4. Co-administration of N-Acetylcysteine and Acetaminophen Efficiently Blocks Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Owumi, Solomon E; Andrus, James P; Herzenberg, Leonard A; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical Research Although acetaminophen (APAP) is an effective analgesic and anti-pyretic, APAP overdose is the most frequent cause of serious, often lethal, drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Administration of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) within 8 hours of APAP overdose effectively mitigates APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Thus, preventing APAP toxicity before it occurs by formulating APAP with NAC is logical and, as we show here in a mouse model, is effective in preventing APAP toxicity. Thus, toxic oral APAP doses sufficient to cause severe widespread liver damage do not cause significant damage when administered concurrently with equal amounts of NAC, that is, in the NAC-APAP treated animals, hepatic transaminases increase only marginally and liver architecture remains fully intact. Thus, we conclude that concomitant oral dosing with APAP and NAC can provide a convenient and effective way of preventing toxicity associated with large dosage of APAP. From a public health perspective, these findings support the concept that a co-formulation of APAP plus NAC is a viable over-the-counter (OTC) alternative to the current practice of providing APAP OTC and treating APAP toxicity if/when it occurs. In essence, our findings indicate that replacing the current OTC APAP with a safe and functional APAP/NAC formulation could prevent the accidental and intentional APAP toxicity that occurs today. PMID:26250417

  5. What's in a teaspoon? Underdosing with acetaminophen in family practice.

    PubMed

    Hyam, E; Brawer, M; Herman, J; Zvieli, S

    1989-09-01

    A study was made of 100 paediatric encounters in which an accompanying parent stated that the child had been given acetaminophen syrup during the preceding 24 hours. In 80% of cases a household teaspoon had been used to determine the amount of medication required. The volumes of these spoons were measured using a syringe. The range was from 1.5 to 5 cm3 with 79% containing 2 to 3 cm3. The mean volume was 2.95 cm3 (SD 0.79) and the median was 2.5 cm3. The mean dose administered was 62% of that recommended when the calculation was made according to age and 64% according to body weight. Much of the underdosing observed was due to parents' assumption that a household teaspoon contains 5 cm3 of acetaminophen syrup and also to a failure to correct for advancing age and increasing weight. PMID:2792624

  6. Toxic epidermal necrolysis caused by acetaminophen featuring almost 100% skin detachment: Acetaminophen is associated with a risk of severe cutaneous adverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hideaki; Kamiyama, Taisuke; Sasaki, Shun; Kobayashi, Kae; Fukuda, Kenichiro; Miyake, Yasufumi; Aruga, Tohru; Sueki, Hirohiko

    2016-03-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is an adverse reaction that can be induced by various drugs; the associated mortality rate is 20-25%. A previous report showed a weak association between TEN and acetaminophen. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration declared that acetaminophen is associated with a risk of serious skin reactions, including TEN. Here, we describe the case of a 43-year-old Japanese woman with TEN caused by acetaminophen. She had poorly controlled ulcerative colitis and was treated with high doses of prednisolone, infliximab, acetaminophen and lansoprazole. Nine days after administrating acetaminophen, targetoid erythematous and bullous lesions appeared on the patient's trunk, palms and the soles of her feet. The skin lesions expanded rapidly; within 3 weeks, skin detachment was detected across nearly 100% of the patient's body. However, no mucosal involvement of the eyes, oral cavity or genitalia was found. We performed lymphocyte transformation tests using various drugs; however, a high stimulation index was obtained only with acetaminophen. The patient recovered following treatment with plasmapheresis, i.v. immunoglobulin therapy, topical medication and supportive therapy. Acetaminophen is included in many prescription and over-the-counter products; thus, clinicians should monitor their patients for severe drug reactions, including TEN. PMID:26362011

  7. Role of nicotinamide (vitamin B3) in acetaminophen-induced changes in rat liver: Nicotinamide effect in acetaminophen-damged liver.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Yomna I; Mahmoud, Asmaa A

    2016-06-01

    Acetaminophen is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent, which is safe at therapeutic doses. However, overdoses of acetaminophen induce severe oxidative stress, which leads to acute liver failure. Nicotinamide has proven effective in ameliorating many pathological conditions that occur due to oxidative stress. This study verifies the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of nicotinamide against the hepatic pathophysiological and ultrastructural alterations induced by acetaminophen. Wistar rats intoxicated with an acute overdose of acetaminophen (5g/kg b.wt) were given a single dose of nicotinamide (500mg/kg b.wt) either before or after intoxication. Acetaminophen caused significant elevation in the liver functions and lipid peroxidation marker, and decline in the activities of the hepatic antioxidant enzymes. This oxidative injury was associated with hepatic centrilobular necrosis, hemorrage, vacuolar degeneration, lipid accumulation and mitochondrial alterations. Treating intoxicated rats with nicotinamide (500mg/kg) significantly ameliorated acetaminophen-induced biochemical changes and pathological injuries. However, administering the same dose of nicotinamide to healthy animals or prior to acetaminophen-intoxication induced hepatotoxicity. Caution should be taken when administering high doses of NAM because of its possible hepatotoxicity. Considering the wide use of nicotinamide, there is an important need for monitoring nicotinamide tolerance, safety and efficacy in healthy and diseased subjects. PMID:27211843

  8. In vitro clearance of intravenous acetaminophen in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Gillogly, A; Kilbourn, C; Waldvogel, J; Martin, J; Annich, G; Wagner, D

    2013-03-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life support system used as a bridge to transplantation in critically ill patients who suffer from acute respiratory or cardiac failure with resultant hypoxemia and tissue hypoxia. This is not amendable to conventional support intervention. Previous studies have shown significant drug losses in the components of an ECMO circuit, leading to decreased plasma drug levels. An in vitro study was conducted to determine: (1) changes in intravenous acetaminophen levels over time and (2) changes in concentration observed between different sites of the ECMO circuit. A single bolus dose of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen was injected into a standard blood-primed ECMO circuit. Plasma drug concentrations in the circuit were then measured at specific time points at three different locations to determine concentrations of the drug at time 0, 15, 30, 60, 240 and 360 minutes. The three samples were drawn pre- and post-membrane oxygenator and the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing. A second bolus dose was administered 24 hours after the first in order to compare "new" and "old" circuits. This entire process was repeated a total of three times. The results show that acetaminophen concentrations do not change significantly over time, with consistent levels seen in both new and old circuits (N=9). Average old circuit concentrations were approximately two times greater than the average new circuit concentrations after the circuit was re-dosed at 24 hours. Drug sequestration in the circuit was not significant in any of the three sites measured. It appears that, while acetaminophen levels remain relatively constant over a six hour period, dosing adjustments may be required for use in a circuit beyond the initial 24 hour period, depending on physiologic clearance of the drug. Assuming a six-hour dosing interval, levels should remain constant. PMID:23201817

  9. Acetaminophen Modulates the Transcriptional Response to Recombinant Interferon-β

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Aaron; Flaman, Anathea S.; Prasad, Shiv S.; Gravel, Caroline; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole L.; Li, Xuguang

    2010-01-01

    Background Recombinant interferon treatment can result in several common side effects including fever and injection-site pain. Patients are often advised to use acetaminophen or other over-the-counter pain medications as needed. Little is known regarding the transcriptional changes induced by such co-administration. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested whether the administration of acetaminophen causes a change in the response normally induced by interferon-β treatment. CD-1 mice were administered acetaminophen (APAP), interferon-β (IFN-β) or a combination of IFN-β+APAP and liver and serum samples were collected for analysis. Differential gene expression was determined using an Agilent 22 k whole mouse genome microarray. Data were analyzed by several methods including Gene Ontology term clustering and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. We observed a significant change in the transcription profile of hepatic cells when APAP was co-administered with IFN-β. These transcriptional changes included a marked up-regulation of genes involved in signal transduction and cell differentiation and down-regulation of genes involved in cellular metabolism, trafficking and the IκBK/NF-κB cascade. Additionally, we observed a large decrease in the expression of several IFN-induced genes including Ifit-3, Isg-15, Oasl1, Zbp1 and predicted gene EG634650 at both early and late time points. Conclusions/Significance A significant change in the transcriptional response was observed following co-administration of IFN-β+APAP relative to IFN-β treatment alone. These results suggest that administration of acetaminophen has the potential to modify the efficacy of IFN-β treatment. PMID:20544007

  10. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Mossanen, J C; Tacke, F

    2015-04-01

    The induction of acute hepatic damage by acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol [APAP]), also termed paracetamol, is one of the most commonly used experimental models of acute liver injury in mice. The specific values of this model are the highly reproducible, dose-dependent hepatotoxicity of APAP and its outstanding translational importance, because acetaminophen overdose is one of the most frequent reasons for acute liver failure (ALF) in humans. However, preparation of concentrated APAP working solutions, application routes, fasting period and variability due to sex, genetic background or barrier environment represent important considerations to be taken into account before implementing this model. This standard operating procedure (SOP) provides a detailed protocol for APAP preparation and application in mice, aimed at facilitating comparability between research groups as well as minimizing animal numbers and distress. The mouse model of acetaminophen poisoning therefore helps to unravel the pathogenesis of APAP-induced toxicity or subsequent immune responses in order to explore new therapeutic interventions for improving the prognosis of ALF in patients. PMID:25835736

  11. Aspirin and Acetaminophen Use and the Risk of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friel, Grace; Liu, Cici S.; Kolomeyevskaya, Nonna V.; Hampras, Shalaka S.; Kruszka, Bridget; Schmitt, Kristina; Cannioto, Rikki A.; Lele, Shashikant B.; Odunsi, Kunle O.; Moysich, Kirsten B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study, we investigated whether regular use of aspirin or acetaminophen was associated with risk of cervical cancer in women treated at an American cancer hospital. Methods This case-control study included 328 patients with cervical cancer and 1,312 controls matched on age and decade enrolled. Controls were women suspected of having but not ultimately diagnosed with a neoplasm. Analgesic use was defined as regular (at least once per week for ≥6 months), frequent (≥7 tablets/week), very long term (≥11 years), or frequent, long term (≥7 tablets per week for ≥5 years). Results Compared to nonusers, frequent aspirin use was associated with decreased odds of cervical cancer (odds ratio, 0.53; 95%confidence interval, 0.29–0.97). A slightly larger association was observed with frequent, long-term use of aspirin (odds ratio, 0.46; 95% confidence interval, 0.22–0.95). Acetaminophen use was not associated with the risk of cervical cancer. Conclusions Our findings suggest that frequent and frequent, long-term use of aspirin is associated with decreased odds of cervical cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first US-based study examining these associations. Given the widespread use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen worldwide, further investigations of the possible role of analgesics in cervical cancer, using a larger sample size with better-defined dosing regimens, are warranted. PMID:25856123

  12. [Analgesic/Antipyretic treatment: ibuprofen or acetaminophen? An update].

    PubMed

    Olive, Georges

    2006-01-01

    Because of the adverse effects associated with aspirin, especially Reye's syndrome in children, practitioners currently use as first line therapy drugs such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen. Their pharmacokinetic characteristics are not quite identical: both are absorbed rapidly and have high bioavailability, however, unlike acetaminophen, ibuprofen is characterized by high plasma protein binding and a limited distribution volume. Both drugs are metabolized essentially in the liver into inactive hydroxylated or glucoronidated metabolites by conjugation but acetaminophen is also transformed into an oxidation compound--normally reduced by glutathione--which, in the case of acute overdosing with depletion of endogenous glutathione stores, may lead to severe hepatotoxicity. Old age and light to moderate renal or hepatic failure do not significantly modify their pharmacokinetic parameters, and thus do not call for dose adjustment. Clinical trials have shown both drugs to have comparable efficacy on pain and fever, with perhaps a slight advantage for ibuprofen. In practice, the choice will depend on the prescription habits of the practitioner, patient's (or parents') preferences and, above all, the pathological context and possible contra-indications. PMID:16886709

  13. Validity of a two-point acetaminophen pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Scavone, J M; Greenblatt, D J; Blyden, G T; Luna, B G; Harmatz, J S

    1990-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a single 650-mg intravenous dose of acetaminophen were determined in 82 volunteers using multiple (13 or more) plasma acetaminophen concentrations measured by high pressure liquid chromatography during 24 h after dosage. Kinetic values from the complete study were compared with kinetic estimates based on only two data points: (a) the 2- and 6-h points only; and (b) the 3 and 6-h points only. For elimination half-life, values from the complete study (mean 2.42 h) were highly correlated (r = 0.87 and 0.84) with methods a and b (means 2.41 and 2.43 h), with regression slopes of 1.00 and 0.99, respectively. For clearance, the complete study values (mean 312 ml/min) were highly correlated (r = 0.97 and 0.97) with method a and b values, but both two-point methods significantly overestimated clearance (means 350 and 355 ml/min) by an average of 13 and 14%, respectively. Results for volume of distribution were similar to those for clearance. Although acetaminophen elimination half-life can be estimated with reasonable precision using a two-point blood-sampling procedure, clearance and volume of distribution values using the two-point method overestimate the actual values. PMID:2305419

  14. Absolute and relative bioavailability of oral acetaminophen preparations.

    PubMed

    Ameer, B; Divoll, M; Abernethy, D R; Greenblatt, D J; Shargel, L

    1983-08-01

    Eighteen healthy volunteers received single 650-mg doses of acetaminophen by 5-min intravenous infusion, in tablet form by mouth in the fasting state, and in elixir form orally in the fasting state in a three-way crossover study. An additional eight subjects received two 325-mg tablets from two commercial vendors in a randomized crossover fashion. Concentrations of acetaminophen in multiple plasma samples collected during the 12-hr period after each dose were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Following a lag time averaging 3-4 min, absorption of oral acetaminophen was first order, with apparent absorption half-life values averaging 8.4 (elixir) and 11.4 (tablet) min. The mean time-to-peak concentration was significantly longer after tablet (0.75 hr) than after elixir (0.48 hr) administration. Peak plasma concentrations and elimination half-lives were similar following both preparations. Absolute systemic availability of the elixir (87%) was significantly greater than for the tablets (79%). Two commercially available tablet formulations did not differ significantly in peak plasma concentrations, time-to-peak, or total area under the plasma concentration curve and therefore were judged to be bioequivalent. PMID:6688635

  15. Acetaminophen effects on behavioral thermoregulation in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Vitulli, W F; Kaiser, G A; Maranto, D L; Blake, S E; Storey, T M; McPherson, K P; Luper, S L

    1999-02-01

    Acetaminophen (N-Acetyl-p-aminophenol) was administered intraperitoneally to 15 Sprague-Dawley rats partitioned into 3 studies (5 rats per study) using a within subjects, repeated-measures reversal design. Behavioral thermoregulation was assessed in a cold Skinner Box using 5-sec. exposures of microwave radiation [Specific Absorption Rate = 0.34 Watts/kg/(mW/cm2)] as reinforcing stimuli under a fixed-interval 2-min. schedule of positive reinforcement. Doses of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mg/kg (in solutions of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, and 5%) acetaminophen showed stable rates of operant responding for heat compared with significant changes in rates for comparable doses of aspirin in a 1993 study by Vitulli, et al. Weight reductions and temperature increases varied significantly with before-session and after-session measures, respectively. 1994-95 biochemical data of Murphy, et al. from humans following aspirin or acetaminophen ingestion which affect thermoregulation and sleep patterns are discussed in conjunction with behavioral data from rats. PMID:10214655

  16. Developmental exposure to acetaminophen does not induce hyperactivity in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Isabel; Knaup, Sabine; Romanos, Marcel; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Drepper, Carsten; Lillesaar, Christina

    2016-08-01

    First line pain relief medication during pregnancy relies nearly entirely on the over-the-counter analgesic acetaminophen, which is generally considered safe to use during gestation. However, recent epidemiological studies suggest a risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-like symptoms in children if mothers use acetaminophen during pregnancy. Currently, there are no experimental proofs that prenatal acetaminophen exposure causes developmental brain alterations of progeny. Exposure to high acetaminophen concentrations causes liver toxicity, which is well investigated in different model organisms. However, sub-liver-toxic concentrations have not been experimentally investigated with respect to ADHD endophenotypes such as hyperactivity. We used zebrafish to investigate the potential impact of acetaminophen exposure on locomotor activity levels, and compared it to the established zebrafish Latrophilin 3 (Lphn3) ADHD-model. We determined the sub-liver-toxic concentration of acetaminophen in zebrafish larvae and treated wild-type and lphn3.1 knockdown larvae with increasing concentrations of acetaminophen. We were able to confirm that lphn3.1 knockdown alone causes hyperactivity, strengthening the implication of Lphn3 dysfunction as an ADHD risk factor. Neither acute nor chronic exposure to acetaminophen at sub-liver-toxic concentrations in wild-type or lphn3.1 knock-downs increases locomotor activity levels. Together our findings show that embryonic to larval exposure to acetaminophen does not cause hyperactivity in zebrafish larvae. Furthermore, there are no additive and/or synergistic effects of acetaminophen exposure in a susceptible background induced by knock-down of lphn3.1. Our experimental study suggests that there is, at least in zebrafish larvae, no direct link between embryonic acetaminophen exposure and hyperactivity. Further work is necessary to clarify this issue in humans. PMID:27116683

  17. Acetylsalicylate reduces endothelial and platelet-derived microparticles in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Daniel; Becker, Vanessa; Mügge, Andreas

    2011-04-01

    Previous studies suggest that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to vascular repair processes. In contrast, circulating microparticles (MPs) are reported to be part of a process that is damaging to vascular cells. Numerous studies suggest that the "balance" between EPCs and MPs is important for the integrity of vascular cells and preservation of endothelial function. In the present study, we assess the impact of acetylsalicylate (ASA) - which is, beside statins and physical exercise, a third basic column in the preventive therapy of coronary artery disease (CAD) - on EPCs and MPs in patients with CAD. We investigated the effect of treatment (8 weeks) with ASA (100 mg/d) on endothelial function (flow-mediated vasodilation, FMD), number of circulating EPCs, and endothelial- and platelet-derived microparticles (eMP, pMP) in 15 male patients (age 59.5 ± 12.3 years) with CAD but nonsignificant stenosis. The number of pMPs and eMPs decreased by 62.7% (p < 0.05) and 28.4% (p < 0.05), respectively. The number of circulating EPCs (VEGFR2(+)CD34(+)), expressed as ‰ of circulating polymorphonuclear leukocytes, remained unchanged. Despite the reduced number of pMPs and eMPs in response to the ASA therapy, the FMD responses and the maximal dilator effects of nitroglycerin were unaffected. In a control experiment, patients (n = 6) treated with the selective COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib (90 mg/day) for 8 weeks showed no changes in the number of pMPs, eMPs, and EPCs and in FMD. We report on a novel effect of ASA treatment on the number of circulating endothelial- and platelet-derived microparticles in patients with cardiovascular disease. The mechanism remains elusive, and appears not to be associated with the COX-2 pathway. PMID:21539467

  18. [Correlation between the output and composition of essential oil and the level of salicylic acid in mint plants at different ontogenetic stages].

    PubMed

    Shelepova, O V; Kondrat'eva, V V; Voronkova, T V; Olekhnovich, L S

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic changes in the content of acetylsalicylic acid and the output and qualitative composition of essential oil have been studied in mint plants (Mentha spicata L. and cultivar Medichka) during their ontogenesis with allowance for changes in weather conditions. Ontogenetic changes in the level of acetylsalicylic acid in leaf tissues are found to be similar in both cv. Medichka and M. spicata. In the case of cv. Medichka, this change is connected with the dynamics of the production and the qualitative composition of essential oil; in the case of M. spicata, this connection is less expressed. The role of acetylsalicylic acid and essential oil in plant adaptation to the environment is discussed. PMID:24171311

  19. Postoperative pain relief with pentazocine and acetaminophen: comparison with other analgesic combinations and placebo.

    PubMed

    Petti, A

    1985-01-01

    A single-blind, parallel-group study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an analgesic combining 650 mg of acetaminophen and 25 mg of pentazocine in 129 patients with moderate postoperative pain. Comparisons were made with a combination containing acetaminophen (300 mg) and codeine (30 mg), a combination containing acetaminophen (650 mg) and propoxyphene napsylate (100 mg), and a placebo. A nurse observer queried patients at regular intervals over a six-hour period concerning the intensity of pain and the degree of pain relief. The scores obtained were used in the calculation of standard measures of analgesic efficacy. Acetaminophen/pentazocine proved to be significantly superior to placebo and equivalent to the other active analgesic combinations. No side effects were reported with acetaminophen/pentazocine, acetaminophen/propoxyphene napsylate, or placebo. One mild side effect was questionably associated with acetaminophen/codeine. This study demonstrates that the combination of acetaminophen and pentazocine is as safe and effective in controlling postoperative pain of moderate severity as other commonly used analgesics. PMID:2870808

  20. Bromfenac sodium, acetaminophen/oxycodone, ibuprofen, and placebo for relief of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G H; Van Wagoner, J D; Brown, J; Cooper, S A

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this double-masked, parallel-group, multicenter, inpatient study was to compare bromfenac with an acetaminophen/oxycodone combination and ibuprofen in patients who had pain due to abdominal gynecologic surgery. In the 8-hour, single-dose phase, 238 patients received single oral doses of bromfenac (50 or 100 mg), acetaminophen 650 mg/oxycodone 10 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, or placebo. In the multiple-dose phase, 204 patients received bromfenac, acetaminophen/oxycodone, or ibuprofen for up to 5 days. In the single-dose phase, both bromfenac doses produced peak analgesic responses equivalent to acetaminophen/oxycodone, but the responses to bromfenac were longer lasting. Bromfenac produced significantly better overall (8-hour) analgesic summed scores than acetaminophen/oxycodone. Ibuprofen was less efficacious than the other analgesics. The remedication rate was lower in both bromfenac groups than in the other treatment groups. The acetaminophen/oxycodone group reported more somnolence and vomiting. Single doses of bromfenac provided analgesia at least equivalent to that of the acetaminophen/oxycodone combination, with a longer duration of action. Both doses of bromfenac and acetaminophen/oxycodone were superior to ibuprofen in this study. PMID:9220215

  1. Impact of Intraoperative Acetaminophen Administration on Postoperative Opioid Consumption in Patients Undergoing Hip or Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Cathy; McGee, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Opioid utilization for acute pain has been associated with numerous adverse events, potentially resulting in longer inpatient stays and increased costs. Objective: To examine the effect of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen administered intraoperatively on postoperative opioid consumption in adult subjects who underwent hip or knee replacement. Methods: This retrospective cohort study evaluated postoperative opioid consumption in 176 randomly selected adult subjects who underwent hip or knee replacement at Duke University Hospital (DUH). Eighty-eight subjects received a single, intraoperative, 1 g dose of IV acetaminophen. The other subjects did not receive any IV acetaminophen. This study evaluated mean opioid consumption (in oral morphine equivalents) during the 24-hour postoperative period in the 2 groups. Other endpoints included length of stay in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU), incidence of oversedation, need for acute opioid reversal, and adjunctive analgesic utilization. Results: Subjects who were given a single dose of intraoperative acetaminophen received an average of 149.3 mg of oral morphine equivalents during the 24 hours following surgery compared to 147.2 mg in participants who were not exposed to IV acetaminophen (P = .904). The difference in average length of PACU stay between the IV acetaminophen group (163 minutes) and those subjects not exposed to IV acetaminophen (169 minutes) was not statistically significant (P = .588). No subjects in the study experienced oversedation or required acute opioid reversal. Conclusion: There was not a statistically significant difference in postoperative opioid consumption between patients receiving and not receiving IV acetaminophen intraoperatively. PMID:25673891

  2. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and HIF-1{alpha} induction in acetaminophen toxicity in mice occurs without hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S.; Hennings, Leah; Letzig, Lynda; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hinson, Jack A.; James, Laura P.

    2011-05-01

    HIF-1{alpha} is a nuclear factor important in the transcription of genes controlling angiogenesis including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both hypoxia and oxidative stress are known mechanisms for the induction of HIF-1{alpha}. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are mechanistically important in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the mouse. MPT may occur as a result of oxidative stress and leads to a large increase in oxidative stress. We previously reported the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in mice with APAP toxicity and have shown that VEGF is important in hepatocyte regeneration following APAP toxicity. The following study was performed to examine the relative contribution of hypoxia versus oxidative stress to the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Time course studies using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole showed no staining for pimonidazole at 1 or 2 h in B6C3F1 mice treated with APAP. Staining for pimonidazole was present in the midzonal to periportal regions at 4, 8, 24 and 48 h and no staining was observed in centrilobular hepatocytes, the sites of the toxicity. Subsequent studies with the MPT inhibitor cyclosporine A showed that cyclosporine A (CYC; 10 mg/kg) reduced HIF-1{alpha} induction in APAP treated mice at 1 and 4 h and did not inhibit the metabolism of APAP (depletion of hepatic non-protein sulfhydryls and hepatic protein adduct levels). The data suggest that HIF-1{alpha} induction in the early stages of APAP toxicity is secondary to oxidative stress via a mechanism involving MPT. In addition, APAP toxicity is not mediated by a hypoxia mechanism.

  3. 'Omics analysis of low dose acetaminophen intake demonstrates novel response pathways in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Jetten, Marlon J.A.; Gaj, Stan; Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa; Kok, Theo M. de; Delft, Joost H.M. van; Lommen, Arjen; Someren, Eugene P. van; Jennen, Danyel G.J.; Claessen, Sandra M.; Peijnenburg, Ad A.C.M.; Stierum, Rob H.; Kleinjans, Jos C.S.

    2012-03-15

    Acetaminophen is the primary cause of acute liver toxicity in Europe/USA, which led the FDA to reconsider recommendations concerning safe acetaminophen dosage/use. Unfortunately, the current tests for liver toxicity are no ideal predictive markers for liver injury, i.e. they only measure acetaminophen exposure after profound liver toxicity has already occurred. Furthermore, these tests do not provide mechanistic information. Here, 'omics techniques (global analysis of metabolomic/gene-expression responses) may provide additional insight. To better understand acetaminophen-induced responses at low doses, we evaluated the effects of (sub-)therapeutic acetaminophen doses on metabolite formation and global gene-expression changes (including, for the first time, full-genome human miRNA expression changes) in blood/urine samples from healthy human volunteers. Many known and several new acetaminophen-metabolites were detected, in particular in relation to hepatotoxicity-linked, oxidative metabolism of acetaminophen. Transcriptomic changes indicated immune-modulating effects (2 g dose) and oxidative stress responses (4 g dose). For the first time, effects of acetaminophen on full-genome human miRNA expression have been considered and confirmed the findings on mRNA level. 'Omics techniques outperformed clinical chemistry tests and revealed novel response pathways to acetaminophen in humans. Although no definitive conclusion about potential immunotoxic effects of acetaminophen can be drawn from this study, there are clear indications that the immune system is triggered even after intake of low doses of acetaminophen. Also, oxidative stress-related gene responses, similar to those seen after high dose acetaminophen exposure, suggest the occurrence of possible pre-toxic effects of therapeutic acetaminophen doses. Possibly, these effects are related to dose-dependent increases in levels of hepatotoxicity-related metabolites. -- Highlights: ► 'Omics techniques outperformed

  4. Analgesic effect of acetaminophen, phenyltoloxamine and their combination in postoperative oral surgery pain.

    PubMed

    Forbes, J A; Barkaszi, B A; Ragland, R N; Hankle, J J

    1984-01-01

    In this factorial study, 148 outpatients with pain after oral surgery were randomly assigned, on a double-blind basis, a single oral dose of acetaminophen 650 mg, phenyltoloxamine 60 mg, a combination of acetaminophen 650 mg with phenyltoloxamine 60 mg, or placebo. Using a self-rating record, subjects rated their pain and its relief hourly for 6 hours after medication. Measures of total and peak analgesia were derived from these subjective reports. The acetaminophen effect was significant for every measure of total and peak analgesia. The phenyltoloxamine effect was not significant for any measure of analgesia. Although efficacy was lower for the acetaminophen-phenyltoloxamine combination than for acetaminophen alone, for every variable, the contrast for interaction was not statistically significant. The results of this study differ from those of previous studies in patients with headache and musculoskeletal pain. All adverse effects were transitory and consistent with the known pharmacologic profiles of the study medications or the backup analgesic. PMID:6483639

  5. Candidate Gene Polymorphisms in Patients with Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Inga; Hazarika, Suwagmani; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Greenblatt, David J.; Lee, William M.

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen is a leading cause of acute liver failure (ALF). Genetic differences might predispose some individuals to develop ALF. In this exploratory study, we evaluated genotype frequency differences among patients enrolled by the ALF Study Group who had developed ALF either intentionally from a single-time-point overdose of acetaminophen (n = 78), unintentionally after chronic high doses of acetaminophen (n = 79), or from causes other than acetaminophen (n = 103). The polymorphisms evaluated included those in genes encoding putative acetaminophen-metabolizing enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A6, UGT1A9, UGT2B15, SULT1A1, CYP2E1, and CYP3A5) as well as CD44 and BHMT1. Individuals carrying the CYP3A5 rs776746 A allele were overrepresented among ALF patients who had intentionally overdosed with acetaminophen, with an odds ratio of 2.3 (95% confidence interval, 1.1–4.9; P = 0.034) compared with all other ALF patients. This finding is consistent with the enhanced bioactivation of acetaminophen by the CYP3A5 enzyme. Persons homozygous for the CD44 rs1467558 A allele were also overrepresented among patients who had unintentionally developed ALF from chronic acetaminophen use, with an odds ratio of 4.0 (1.0–17.2, P = 0.045) compared with all other ALF subjects. This finding confirms a prior study that found elevated serum liver enzyme levels in healthy volunteers with the CD44 rs1467558 AA genotype who had consumed high doses of acetaminophen for up to 2 weeks. However, both genetic associations were considered relatively weak, and they were not statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons testing. Nevertheless, both CYP3A5 rs776746 and CD44 rs1467558 warrant further investigation as potential genomic markers of enhanced risk of acetaminophen-induced ALF. PMID:24104197

  6. Sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to acetaminophen reveals biological pathways that affect patient survival

    PubMed Central

    BUSH, STEPHEN H.; TOLLIN, SHARON; MARCHION, DOUGLAS C.; XIONG, YIN; ABBASI, FOROUGH; RAMIREZ, INGRID J.; ZGHEIB, NADIM BOU; BOAC, BERNADETTE; JUDSON, PATRICIA L.; CHON, HYE SOOK; WENHAM, ROBERT M.; APTE, SACHIN M.; CUBITT, CHRISTOPHER L.; BERGLUND, ANDERS E.; HAVRILESKY, LAURA J.; LANCASTER, JOHNATHAN M.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiological data support the potential activity of acetaminophen against ovarian cancer (OVCA). In this study, we sought to confirm the activity of acetaminophen in OVCA cell lines and to investigate the molecular basis of response. A total of 16 OVCA cell lines underwent pretreatment (baseline) genome-wide expression measurements and were then treated with and analyzed for acetaminophen sensitivity. Pearson's correlation analysis was performed to identify genes that were associated with OVCA acetaminophen response. The identified genes were subjected to pathway analysis, and the expression of each represented pathway was summarized using principal component analysis. OVCA acetaminophen response pathways were analyzed in 4 external clinico-genomic datasets from 820 women for associations with overall survival from OVCA. Acetaminophen exhibited antiproliferative activity against all tested OVCA cell lines, with half maximal inhibitory concentration values ranging from 63.2 to 403 µM. Pearson's correlation followed by biological pathway analysis identified 13 pathways to be associated with acetaminophen sensitivity (P<0.01). Associations were observed between patient survival from OVCA and expression of the following pathways: Development/angiotensin signaling via β-arrestin (P=0.04), protein folding and maturation/angiotensin system maturation (P=0.02), signal transduction/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway (P=0.03) and androstenedione and testosterone biosynthesis and metabolism (P=0.02). We confirmed that acetaminophen was active against OVCA cells in vitro. Furthermore, we identified 4 molecular signaling pathways associated with acetaminophen response that may also affect overall survival in women with OVCA, including the JNK pathway, which has been previously implicated in the mechanism of action of acetaminophen and is predictive of decreased survival in women with OVCA. PMID:26998291

  7. Perioperative Intravenous Acetaminophen Attenuates Lipid Peroxidation in Adults Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Billings IV, Frederic T.; Petracek, Michael R.; Roberts II, L. Jackson; Pretorius, Mias

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) lyses erythrocytes and induces lipid peroxidation, indicated by increasing plasma concentrations of free hemoglobin, F2-isoprostanes, and isofurans. Acetaminophen attenuates hemeprotein-mediated lipid peroxidation, reduces plasma and urine concentrations of F2-isoprostanes, and preserves kidney function in an animal model of rhabdomyolysis. Acetaminophen also attenuates plasma concentrations of isofurans in children undergoing CPB. The effect of acetaminophen on lipid peroxidation in adults has not been studied. This was a pilot study designed to test the hypothesis that acetaminophen attenuates lipid peroxidation in adults undergoing CPB and to generate data for a clinical trial aimed to reduce acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery. Methods and Results In a prospective double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, sixty adult patients were randomized to receive intravenous acetaminophen or placebo starting prior to initiation of CPB and for every 6 hours for 4 doses. Acetaminophen concentrations measured 30 min into CPB and post-CPB were 11.9±0.6 μg/mL (78.9±3.9 μM) and 8.7±0.3 μg/mL (57.6±2.0 μM), respectively. Plasma free hemoglobin increased more than 15-fold during CPB, and haptoglobin decreased 73%, indicating hemolysis. Plasma and urinary markers of lipid peroxidation also increased during CPB but returned to baseline by the first postoperative day. Acetaminophen reduced plasma isofuran concentrations over the duration of the study (P = 0.05), and the intraoperative plasma isofuran concentrations that corresponded to peak hemolysis were attenuated in those subjects randomized to acetaminophen (P = 0.03). Perioperative acetaminophen did not affect plasma concentrations of F2-isoprostanes or urinary markers of lipid peroxidation. Conclusions Intravenous acetaminophen attenuates the increase in intraoperative plasma isofuran concentrations that occurs during CPB, while urinary markers were unaffected

  8. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in mice: Effect of age, frailty and exposure type.

    PubMed

    Kane, Alice E; Mitchell, Sarah J; Mach, John; Huizer-Pajkos, Aniko; McKenzie, Catriona; Jones, Brett; Cogger, Victoria; Le Couteur, David G; de Cabo, Rafael; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used analgesic that can cause severe hepatotoxicity in overdose. Despite old age and frailty being associated with extensive and long-term utilization of acetaminophen and a high prevalence of adverse drug reactions, there is limited information on the risks of toxicity from acetaminophen in old age and frailty. This study aimed to assess changes in the risk and mechanisms of hepatotoxicity from acute, chronic and sub-acute acetaminophen exposure with old age and frailty in mice. Young and old male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either acute (300 mg/kg via oral gavage), chronic (100 mg/kg/day in diet for six weeks) or sub-acute (250 mg/kg, t.i.d., for three days) acetaminophen, or saline control. Pre-dosing mice were scored for the mouse clinical frailty index, and after dosing serum and liver tissue were collected for assessment of toxicity and mechanisms. There were no differences with old age or frailty in the degree of hepatotoxicity induced by acute, chronic or subacute acetaminophen exposure as assessed by serum liver enzymes and histology. Age-related changes in the acetaminophen toxicity pathways included increased liver GSH concentrations, increased NQO1 activity and an increased pro- and anti-inflammatory response to acetaminophen in old age. Frailty-related changes included a negative correlation between frailty index and serum protein, albumin and ALP concentrations for some mouse groups. In conclusion, although there were changes in some pathways that would be expected to influence susceptibility to acetaminophen toxicity, there was no overall increase in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity with old age or frailty in mice. PMID:26615879

  9. Membrane Stabilization and Detoxification of Acetaminophen-Mediated Oxidative Onslaughts in the Kidneys of Wistar Rats by Standardized Fraction of Zea mays L. (Poaceae), Stigma maydis.

    PubMed

    Sabiu, S; O'Neill, F H; Ashafa, A O T

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated membrane stabilization and detoxification potential of ethyl acetate fraction of Zea mays L., Stigma maydis in acetaminophen-induced oxidative onslaughts in the kidneys of Wistar rats. Nephrotoxic rats were orally pre- and posttreated with the fraction and vitamin C for 14 days. Kidney function, antioxidative and histological analyses were thereafter evaluated. The acetaminophen-mediated significant elevations in the serum concentrations of creatinine, urea, uric acid, sodium, potassium, and tissue levels of oxidized glutathione, protein-oxidized products, lipid peroxidized products, and fragmented DNA were dose-dependently assuaged in the fraction-treated animals. The fraction also markedly improved creatinine clearance rate, glutathione, and calcium concentrations as well as activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase in the nephrotoxic rats. These improvements may be attributed to the antioxidative and membrane stabilization activities of the fraction. The observed effects compared favorably with that of vitamin C and are informative of the fraction's ability to prevent progression of renal pathological conditions and preserve kidney functions as evidently supported by the histological analysis. Although the effects were prominently exhibited in the fraction-pretreated groups, the overall data from the present findings suggest that the fraction could prevent or extenuate acetaminophen-mediated oxidative renal damage via fortification of antioxidant defense mechanisms. PMID:27579048

  10. Membrane Stabilization and Detoxification of Acetaminophen-Mediated Oxidative Onslaughts in the Kidneys of Wistar Rats by Standardized Fraction of Zea mays L. (Poaceae), Stigma maydis

    PubMed Central

    Sabiu, S.; O'Neill, F. H.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated membrane stabilization and detoxification potential of ethyl acetate fraction of Zea mays L., Stigma maydis in acetaminophen-induced oxidative onslaughts in the kidneys of Wistar rats. Nephrotoxic rats were orally pre- and posttreated with the fraction and vitamin C for 14 days. Kidney function, antioxidative and histological analyses were thereafter evaluated. The acetaminophen-mediated significant elevations in the serum concentrations of creatinine, urea, uric acid, sodium, potassium, and tissue levels of oxidized glutathione, protein-oxidized products, lipid peroxidized products, and fragmented DNA were dose-dependently assuaged in the fraction-treated animals. The fraction also markedly improved creatinine clearance rate, glutathione, and calcium concentrations as well as activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase in the nephrotoxic rats. These improvements may be attributed to the antioxidative and membrane stabilization activities of the fraction. The observed effects compared favorably with that of vitamin C and are informative of the fraction's ability to prevent progression of renal pathological conditions and preserve kidney functions as evidently supported by the histological analysis. Although the effects were prominently exhibited in the fraction-pretreated groups, the overall data from the present findings suggest that the fraction could prevent or extenuate acetaminophen-mediated oxidative renal damage via fortification of antioxidant defense mechanisms. PMID:27579048

  11. Implications of Sensorineural Hearing Loss With Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Novac, Andrei; Iosif, Anamaria M.; Groysman, Regina; Bota, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is an infrequently recognized side effect of pain medication abuse. Chronic pain patients treated with opiates develop different degrees of tolerance to pain medications. In many cases, the tolerance becomes the gateway to a variety of cycles of overuse and unmasking of significant psychiatric morbidity and mortality. An individualized approach utilizing combined treatment modalities (including nonopiate pharmaceuticals) is expected to become the norm. Patients can now be provided with multidisciplinary care that addresses an individual’s psychiatric, social, and medical needs, which requires close cooperation between physicians of varying specialties. This report describes a patient who experienced hearing loss from hydrocodone/acetaminophen abuse. PMID:26835162

  12. Translational biomarkers of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury.

    PubMed

    Beger, Richard D; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Yang, Xi; Gill, Pritmohinder S; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Sun, Jinchun; James, Laura P

    2015-09-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a commonly used analgesic drug that can cause liver injury, liver necrosis and liver failure. APAP-induced liver injury is associated with glutathione depletion, the formation of APAP protein adducts, the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and mitochondrial injury. The systems biology omics technologies (transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) have been used to discover potential translational biomarkers of liver injury. The following review provides a summary of the systems biology discovery process, analytical validation of biomarkers and translation of omics biomarkers from the nonclinical to clinical setting in APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:25983262

  13. Drug interactions: inhibition of acetaminophen glucuronidation by drugs.

    PubMed

    Bolanowska, W; Gessner, T

    1978-07-01

    Glucuronidation of [3H]acetaminophen (APAP) was studied in rat liver preparations. Both Triton X-100 and UDP-N acetylglucosamine (UDPAG) activated 3- to 4-fold the glucuronidation of APAP by liver homogenates or microsomes. Prednisolone inhibited microsomal glucuronidation of APAP, yielding apparent noncompetitive kinetics in native and in UDPAG-activated microsomes. Studies with UDPAG-activated microsomal preparations show that many drugs can inhibit glucuronidation of APAP markedly; among the most poten inhibitors are: morphine, dicumarol, hydroxyzine, phenolphthalein, chloramphenicol and tetracycline. PMID:660554

  14. Implications of Sensorineural Hearing Loss With Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen Abuse.

    PubMed

    Novac, Andrei; Iosif, Anamaria M; Groysman, Regina; Bota, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is an infrequently recognized side effect of pain medication abuse. Chronic pain patients treated with opiates develop different degrees of tolerance to pain medications. In many cases, the tolerance becomes the gateway to a variety of cycles of overuse and unmasking of significant psychiatric morbidity and mortality. An individualized approach utilizing combined treatment modalities (including nonopiate pharmaceuticals) is expected to become the norm. Patients can now be provided with multidisciplinary care that addresses an individual's psychiatric, social, and medical needs, which requires close cooperation between physicians of varying specialties. This report describes a patient who experienced hearing loss from hydrocodone/acetaminophen abuse. PMID:26835162

  15. Comparing the Efficacy of Intravenous Acetaminophen and Intravenous Meperidine in Pain Relief After Outpatient Urological Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kolahdouzan, Khosro; Eydi, Mahmood; Mohammadipour Anvari, Hassan; Golzari, Samad EJ; Abri, Reyhaneh; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Ojaghihaghighi, Seyed Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain relief after surgery is an essential component of postoperative care. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of intravenous acetaminophen and intravenous meperidine in pain relief after outpatient urological surgery. Patients and Methods: In a prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial, 100 outpatients of urological surgery were studied in two groups of acetaminophen (A) and meperidine (M). Patients in group A received 1g of acetaminophen in 100 mL saline within 15 minutes and patients in group M received a single intravenous injection of meperidine 0.5 mg/kg, 15 minutes prior to the end of operation. Postoperative pain was recorded using visual analog scale (VAS). Vital signs, nausea, vomiting, dizziness and respiratory depressions were compared between the two groups. Results: Pain severity in patients treated with intravenous acetaminophen six hours after the operation within one-hour interval was significantly lower than meperidine group (P < 0.0001). Ninety patients in the meperidine group and five patients in the acetaminophen group required additional doses of analgesics. Nausea was significantly lower in acetaminophen group than meperidine group. Conclusions: Intravenous acetaminophen reduced pain following outpatient urological surgery more significantly than meperidine. PMID:25798377

  16. Acetaminophen for analgesia following pyloromyotomy: does the route of administration make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Arvid; Thung, Arlyne; Tobias, Joseph D

    2016-01-01

    Background During the perioperative care of infants with hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, an opioid-sparing technique is often advocated due to concerns such as postoperative hypoventilation and apnea. Although the rectal administration of acetaminophen is commonly employed, an intravenous (IV) preparation is also currently available, but only limited data are available regarding IV acetaminophen use for infants undergoing pyloromyotomy. The objective of the current study was to compare the efficacy of IV and rectal acetaminophen for postoperative analgesia in infants undergoing laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. Methods A retrospective review of the use of IV and rectal acetaminophen in infants undergoing laparoscopic pyloromyotomy was performed. The efficacy was assessed by evaluating the perioperative need for supplemental analgesic agents, postoperative pain scores, tracheal extubation time, time in the postanesthesia care unit, time to oral feeding, and time to hospital discharge. Results The study cohort included 68 patients, of whom 34 patients received IV acetaminophen and 34 received rectal acetaminophen. All patients also received local infiltration of the surgical site with 0.25% bupivacaine. No intraoperative opioids were administered. There was no difference between the two groups with regard to postoperative pain scores, need for supplemental analgesic agents, time in the postanesthesia care unit, or time in the hospital. There was no difference in the number of children who tolerated oral feeds on the day of surgery or in postoperative complications. Conclusion Our preliminary data suggest that there is no clinical difference or advantage with the use of IV versus rectal acetaminophen in infants undergoing laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. PMID:27022299

  17. Acetaminophen-induced microvascular injury in the rat liver: protection with misoprostol.

    PubMed

    Lim, S P; Andrews, F J; O'Brien, P E

    1995-12-01

    Studies into the mechanism of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity have focused mainly at the hepatocellular level. This study aimed to investigate the effect of acetaminophen on the hepatic microvasculature using a vascular casting technique. Acetaminophen was administered at a dose of 650 mg/kg body weight (intraperitoneally) to fasted male Long Evans rats. Microvascular casting was performed at various points after drug administration. Liver casts from control rats showed good patency with normal hepatic microvasculature. Thirty-six hours after overdose with acetaminophen, liver casts showed rounded centrilobular cavities of various sizes, representing regions in which cast-filled sinusoids were absent with relatively normal microvasculature within periportal regions. Evidence of microvascular injury occurred as early as 5 hours after acetaminophen overdose. This injury consisted of changes to centrilobular sinusoids including areas of incomplete filling and dilated centrilobular sinusoids. Misoprostol (a prostaglandin E1 analog) treatment (6 x 25 micrograms/kg) given before and after acetaminophen administration markedly reduced the extent of microvascular injury with only small focal unfilled areas in the casts and a generally intact microvasculature. In conclusion, this study shows that overdosage with APAP resulted in an extensive, characteristic pattern of hepatic microvascular injury in the centrilobular region. The results also suggest that microvascular injury is an early event in the pathogenesis of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Misoprostol was found to protect against injury occurring at the microvascular level. PMID:7489988

  18. BGP-15 inhibits caspase-independent programmed cell death in acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Gabor; Szarka, Andras; Lotz, Gabor; Doczi, Judit; Wunderlich, Livius; Kiss, Andras; Jemnitz, Katalin; Veres, Zsuzsa; Banhegyi, Gabor; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Suemegi, Balazs; Mandl, Jozsef

    2010-02-15

    It has been recently shown that acute acetaminophen toxicity results in endoplasmic reticulum redox stress and an increase in cells with apoptotic phenotype in liver. Since activation of effector caspases was absent, the relevance of caspase-independent mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death was investigated. BGP-15, a drug with known protective actions in conditions involving redox imbalance, has been co-administered with a single sublethal dose of acetaminophen. Proapoptotic events and outcome of the injury were investigated. ER redox alterations and early ER-stress-related signaling events induced by acetaminophen, such as ER glutathione depletion, phosphorylation of eIF2alpha and JNK and induction of the transcription factor GADD153, were not counteracted by co-treatment with BGP-15. However, BGP-15 prevented AIF mitochondria-to-nucleus translocation and mitochondrial depolarization. BGP-15 co-treatment attenuated the rate of acetaminophen-induced cell death as assessed by apoptotic index and enzyme serum release. These results reaffirm that acute acetaminophen toxicity involves oxidative stress-induced caspase-independent cell death. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of AIF translocation may effectively protect against or at least delay acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death.

  19. Variability in Acetaminophen Labeling Practices: a Missed Opportunity to Enhance Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    King, Jennifer P; McCarthy, Danielle M; Serper, Marina; Jacobson, Kara L; Mullen, Rebecca J; Parker, Ruth M; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Confusion regarding a drug's active ingredient may lead to simultaneous use of multiple acetaminophen-containing prescriptions and increase the risk of unintentional overdose. The objective of this study was to examine prescription labeling practices for commonly prescribed acetaminophen-containing analgesics, specifically focusing on how active ingredient information and concomitant use warnings were conveyed. Patients with new acetaminophen-containing prescriptions were recruited upon discharge from an emergency department in Chicago or at an outpatient, hospital-based pharmacy in Atlanta. Label information was transcribed from prescription bottles and patients' knowledge of active ingredient was assessed by in-person interviews. Among the 245 acetaminophen-containing prescriptions, hydrocodone was the most common second active ingredient (n = 208, 84.8 %) followed by oxycodone (n = 28, 11.4 %). Acetaminophen was identified by its full name on 6.9 % (n = 17) of labels; various abbreviations were used in 93.1 % of cases. One hundred forty-seven bottles used auxiliary warning labels with the majority of labels (n = 130, 88.4 %) warning about maximum dose and 11.5 % (n = 17) about concomitant use. Most of the study participants (n = 177, 72.2 %) were not able to identify acetaminophen as an active ingredient in their prescription. There was no significant association between the use of unabbreviated labels including warning information and patients' awareness of acetaminophen as an active ingredient (36.4 vs. 27.3 %, p = 0.50). We noted high variability in labeling practices and warning information conveyed to patients receiving acetaminophen-containing prescriptions. Missed opportunities to adequately convey risk information may contribute to the burden of acetaminophen-related liver injury. PMID:25697756

  20. Toxicity from repeated doses of acetaminophen in children: Assessment of causality and dose in reported cases

    PubMed Central

    Heard, Kennon; Bui, Alison; Mlynarchek, Sara L; Green, Jody L.; Bond, G. Randall; Clark, Richard F.; Kozer, Eran; Koff, Raymond S.; Dart, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Liver injury has been reported in children treated with repeated doses of acetaminophen. The objective of this study is to identify and validate reports of liver injury or death in children younger than 6 years of age following repeated therapeutic doses of acetaminophen. Methods We reviewed United States (US) Poison Center data, peer-reviewed literature, US FDA Adverse event reports and US Manufacturer safety reports describing adverse effects following acetaminophen administration. Reports that described hepatic abnormalities (description of liver injury or abnormal laboratory testing) or death following administration to children younger than 6 years of age were included. The identified reports were double abstracted and then reviewed by an expert panel to determine if the hepatic injury was related to acetaminophen, and whether the dose of acetaminophen was therapeutic (≤75 mg/kg) or supra-therapeutic. Results Our search yielded 2531 reports of adverse events associated with acetaminophen use. From these cases, we identified 76 cases of hepatic injury and 26 deaths associated with repeated acetaminophen administration. There were 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities and no deaths associated with what our panel determined to be therapeutic doses. A large proportion of cases could not be fully evaluated due to incomplete case reporting. Conclusions While we identified numerous examples of liver injury and death following repeated doses of acetaminophen, all of the deaths and all but 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities involved doses greater than 75 mg/kg/day. This study suggests that the doses of less than 75 mg/kg/day of acetaminophen are safe for children younger than 6 years of age. PMID:22407198

  1. Relationship between serum acetaminophen concentration and N-acetylcysteine-induced adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Awang, Rahmat; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Khan, Halilol Rahman Mohamed; Sawalha, Ansam F; Sweileh, Waleed M; Al-Jabi, Samah W

    2010-09-01

    Intravenous N-acetylcysteine is usually regarded as a safe antidote. However, during the infusion of the loading dose, different types of adverse drug reactions (ADR) may occur. The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between the incidence of different types of ADR and serum acetaminophen concentration in patients presenting to the hospital with acetaminophen overdose. This is a retrospective study of patients admitted to the hospital for acute acetaminophen overdose over a period of 5 years (1 January 2004 to 31 December 2008). Parametric and non-parametric tests were used to test differences between groups depending on the normality of the data. SPSS 15 was used for data analysis. Of 305 patients with acetaminophen overdose, 146 (47.9%) were treated with intravenous N-acetylcysteine and 139 (45.6%) were included in this study. Different types of ADR were observed in 94 (67.6%) patients. Low serum acetaminophen concentrations were significantly associated with cutaneous anaphylactoid reactions but not other types of ADR. Low serum acetaminophen concentration was significantly associated with flushing (p < 0.001), rash (p < 0.001) and pruritus (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences in serum acetaminophen concentrations between patients with and without the following ADR: gastrointestinal reactions (p = 0.77), respiratory reactions (p = 0.96), central nervous reactions (p = 0.82) and cardiovascular reactions (p = 0.37). In conclusion, low serum acetaminophen concentrations were associated with higher cutaneous anaphylactoid reactions. Such high serum acetaminophen concentrations may be protective against N-acetylcysteine-induced cutaneous ADR. PMID:20374238

  2. Study on the reaction mechanism and the static injection chemiluminescence method for detection of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongjun; Zhang, Huili; Yu, Songcheng; Yu, Fei; Li, Yanqiang; Zhang, Hongquan; Qu, Lingbo; Harrington, Peter de B

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen, also called paracetamol, is found in Tylenol, Excedrin and other products as over-the-counter medicines. In this study, acetaminophen as a luminol signal enhancer was used in the chemiluminescence (CL) substrate solution of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for the first time. The use of acetaminophen in the luminol-HRP-H2O2 system affected not only the intensity of the obtained signal, but also its kinetics. It was shown that acetaminophen was to be a potent enhancer of the luminol-HRP-H2O2 system. A putative enhancement mechanism for the luminol-H2O2-HRP-acetaminophen system is presented. The resonance of the nucleophilic amide group and the benzene ring of acetaminophen structure have a great effect on O-H bond dissociation energy of the phenol group and therefore on phenoxyl radical stabilization. These radicals act as mediators between HRP and luminol in an electron transfer reaction that generates luminol radicals and subsequently light emission, in which the intensity of CL is enhanced in the presence of acetaminophen. In addition, a simple method was developed to detect acetaminophen by static injection CL based on the enhanced CL system of luminol-H2O2-HRP by acetaminophen. Experimental conditions, such as pH and concentrations of substrates, have been examined and optimized. The proposed method exhibited good performance, the linear range was from 0.30 to 7.5 mM, the relative standard deviation was 1.86% (n = 10), limit of detection was 0.16 mM and recovery was 99 ± 4%. PMID:23408702

  3. Plasma concentrations after high-dose (45 mg.kg-1) rectal acetaminophen in children.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, C J; McCormack, J P; Reichert, C C; Marsland, C P

    1995-11-01

    Although the recommended dose of rectal acetaminophen (25-30 mg.kg-1) is twice that for oral administration (10-15 mg.kg-1), the literature justifies the use of a higher dose when acetaminophen is administered via the rectal route. We measured venous plasma acetaminophen concentrations resulting from 45 mg.kg-1 of rectal acetaminophen in ten ASA 1, 15 kg paediatric patients undergoing minor surgery with a standardized anaesthetic. After induction of anaesthesia, a single 650 mg suppository (Abenol, SmithKline Beecham Pharma Inc.) was administered rectally. Plasma was sampled at t = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240 min in the first five patients and at t = 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300, 420 min in the subsequent five. Acetaminophen plasma concentrations were determined using a TDxFLx fluorescence polarization immunoassay (Abbott Laboratories, Toronto, Ontario). The maximum plasma concentration was 88 +/- 39 mumol.L-1 (13 +/- 6 micrograms.ml-1) and the time of peak plasma concentration was 198 +/- 70 min (mean +/- SD). At 420 min, the mean plasma concentration was 46 +/- 18 mumol.L-1 (7.0 +/- 0.9 micrograms.ml-1). No plasma concentrations associated with toxicity (> 800 mumol.L-1) were identified. A 45 mg.kg-1 rectal dose of acetaminophen resulted in peak plasma concentrations comparable with those resulting from 10-15 mg.kg-1 of oral acetaminophen at three hours after suppository insertion. It is concluded that the delayed and erratic absorption of acetaminophen after rectal administration leads to unpredictable plasma concentrations. Rectal acetaminophen will not be consistently effective for providing rapid onset of analgesia in children. PMID:8590508

  4. Prenatal and infant acetaminophen exposure, antioxidant gene polymorphisms and childhood asthma

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Seif O; Newson, Roger B; Ring, Susan M; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J; Holloway, John W; Henderson, A John

    2016-01-01

    Background Prenatal and infant acetaminophen exposure has been associated with an increased risk of childhood asthma phenotypes. Demonstration of biologically plausible interactions between these exposures and maternal and child antioxidant gene polymorphisms would strengthen causal inference. Objective To explore potential interactions between prenatal and infant acetaminophen exposure and antioxidant genotypes on childhood asthma. Methods In the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) we typed a functional Nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) polymorphism and glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1, T1 and P1 polymorphisms. Effects of prenatal and infant acetaminophen exposure on asthma phenotypes at 7 years were stratified by genotype in >4,000 mothers and >5,000 children. Results Risk of asthma and wheezing associated with early gestation acetaminophen exposure was increased when maternal copies of the minor T allele of Nrf2 were present (P interaction 0.02 and 0.04, respectively). Risk of asthma associated with late gestation exposure was higher when maternal GSTT1 genotype was present, rather than absent (P interaction 0.006), and risk of wheezing was increased when maternal GSTM1 was present (P interaction 0.04). Whilst acetaminophen use in infancy was associated with an increased risk of atopy, child antioxidant genotype did not modify associations between infant acetaminophen use and asthma phenotypes. However, the increased risk of asthma and wheezing associated with late gestation acetaminophen exposure in the presence of maternal GSTM1 was further enhanced when GSTM1 was also present in the child. Conclusion Maternal antioxidant gene polymorphisms may modify the relation between prenatal acetaminophen exposure and childhood asthma, strengthening evidence for a causal association. In contrast, relations between infant acetaminophen use and asthma and atopy were not modified by child genotype, and may be confounded by pre

  5. Use of acetaminophen (paracetamol) during pregnancy and the risk of autism spectrum disorder in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-02-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is available over the counter in most countries and is widely considered to be safe for use during pregnancy; studies report gestational exposures to acetaminophen that lie in the 46%-65% range. Acetaminophen influences inflammatory and immunologic mechanisms and may predispose to oxidative stress; these and other effects are hypothesized to have the potential to compromise neurodevelopment in the fetal and infant brain. Two ecological studies suggested that population-level trends in the use of acetaminophen were associated with trends in the incidence/prevalence of autism; one of these studies specifically examined acetaminophen use during pregnancy. One large prospective observational cohort study found that gestational exposure to acetaminophen (especially when the duration of exposure was 28 days or more) was associated with motor milestone delay, gross and fine motor impairments, communication impairment, impairments in internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and hyperactivity, all at age 3 years; however, social and emotional developmental behaviors were mostly unaffected. A very recent large cohort study with a 12.7-year follow-up found that gestational exposure to acetaminophen was associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorder, but only when a hyperkinetic disorder was also present. In the light of existing data associating acetaminophen use during pregnancy and subsequent risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, this new finding suggests that the predisposition, if any, is toward the hyperkinetic syndrome rather than to autism. In summary, the empirical data are very limited, but whatever empirical data exist do not support the suggestion that the use of acetaminophen during pregnancy increases the risk of autism in the offspring. PMID:26930528

  6. Effect of Acetaminophen Ingestion on Thermoregulation of Normothermic, Non-febrile Humans

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Josh; Mauger, Alexis; Thomasson, Katie; White, Stephanie; Taylor, Lee

    2016-01-01

    In non-febrile mouse models, high dose acetaminophen administration causes profound hypothermia. However, this potentially hazardous side-effect has not been confirmed in non-febrile humans. Thus, we sought to ascertain whether an acute therapeutic dose (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) of acetaminophen would reduce non-febrile human core temperature in a sub-neutral environment. Ten apparently healthy (normal core temperature, no musculoskeletal injury, no evidence of acute illness) Caucasian males participated in a preliminary study (Study 1) to determine plasma acetaminophen concentration following oral ingestion of 20 mg⋅kg lean body mass acetaminophen. Plasma samples (every 20 min up to 2-hours post ingestion) were analyzed via enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Thirteen (eight recruited from Study 1) apparently healthy Caucasian males participated in Study 2, and were passively exposed to 20°C, 40% r.h. for 120 min on two occasions in a randomized, repeated measures, crossover design. In a double blind manner, participants ingested acetaminophen (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) or a placebo (dextrose) immediately prior to entering the environmental chamber. Rectal temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, and thermal sensation were monitored continuously and recorded every 10 min. In Study 1, the peak concentration of acetaminophen (14 ± 4 μg/ml) in plasma arose between 80 and 100 min following oral ingestion. In Study 2, acetaminophen ingestion reduced the core temperature of all participants, whereas there was no significant change in core temperature over time in the placebo trial. Mean core temperature was significantly lower in the acetaminophen trial compared with that of a placebo (p < 0.05). The peak reduction in core temperature in the acetaminophen trial was reached at 120 min in six of the thirteen participants, and ranged from 0.1 to 0.39°C (average peak reduction from baseline = 0.19 ± 0.09°C). There was no significant difference in skin

  7. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Associated with Acetaminophen Use during Viral Infections.

    PubMed

    Ban, Ga-Young; Ahn, Seun-Joo; Yoo, Hye-Soo; Park, Hae-Sim; Ye, Young-Min

    2016-08-01

    An association between drug treatment for viral infections and severe cutaneous adverse reactions has been noted. We investigated six patients diagnosed with Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) after being prescribed acetaminophen for suspected viral illnesses. Multiplex analysis was performed to measure cytokine levels in sera before and after treatment. IL-2Rα levels significantly decreased during the convalescence phase. Although acetaminophen is relatively safe, the drug can trigger SJS/TEN in patients with suspected viral infections. T-cells and monocytes may be key components of the link between viral infection and acetaminophen-induced SJS/TEN. PMID:27574505

  8. Stevens–Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Associated with Acetaminophen Use during Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Ga-Young; Ahn, Seun-Joo; Yoo, Hye-Soo; Park, Hae-Sim

    2016-01-01

    An association between drug treatment for viral infections and severe cutaneous adverse reactions has been noted. We investigated six patients diagnosed with Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) after being prescribed acetaminophen for suspected viral illnesses. Multiplex analysis was performed to measure cytokine levels in sera before and after treatment. IL-2Rα levels significantly decreased during the convalescence phase. Although acetaminophen is relatively safe, the drug can trigger SJS/TEN in patients with suspected viral infections. T-cells and monocytes may be key components of the link between viral infection and acetaminophen-induced SJS/TEN. PMID:27574505

  9. Effect of Acetaminophen Ingestion on Thermoregulation of Normothermic, Non-febrile Humans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Josh; Mauger, Alexis; Thomasson, Katie; White, Stephanie; Taylor, Lee

    2016-01-01

    In non-febrile mouse models, high dose acetaminophen administration causes profound hypothermia. However, this potentially hazardous side-effect has not been confirmed in non-febrile humans. Thus, we sought to ascertain whether an acute therapeutic dose (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) of acetaminophen would reduce non-febrile human core temperature in a sub-neutral environment. Ten apparently healthy (normal core temperature, no musculoskeletal injury, no evidence of acute illness) Caucasian males participated in a preliminary study (Study 1) to determine plasma acetaminophen concentration following oral ingestion of 20 mg⋅kg lean body mass acetaminophen. Plasma samples (every 20 min up to 2-hours post ingestion) were analyzed via enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Thirteen (eight recruited from Study 1) apparently healthy Caucasian males participated in Study 2, and were passively exposed to 20°C, 40% r.h. for 120 min on two occasions in a randomized, repeated measures, crossover design. In a double blind manner, participants ingested acetaminophen (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) or a placebo (dextrose) immediately prior to entering the environmental chamber. Rectal temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, and thermal sensation were monitored continuously and recorded every 10 min. In Study 1, the peak concentration of acetaminophen (14 ± 4 μg/ml) in plasma arose between 80 and 100 min following oral ingestion. In Study 2, acetaminophen ingestion reduced the core temperature of all participants, whereas there was no significant change in core temperature over time in the placebo trial. Mean core temperature was significantly lower in the acetaminophen trial compared with that of a placebo (p < 0.05). The peak reduction in core temperature in the acetaminophen trial was reached at 120 min in six of the thirteen participants, and ranged from 0.1 to 0.39°C (average peak reduction from baseline = 0.19 ± 0.09°C). There was no significant difference in skin

  10. Development of oral acetaminophen chewable tablets with inhibited bitter taste.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Onishi, Hiraku; Takahashi, Yuri; Iwata, Masanori; Machida, Yoshiharu

    2003-01-30

    Various formulations with some matrix bases and corrigents were examined for development of oral chewable tablets which suppressed the bitter taste of acetaminophen, often used as an antipyretic for infants. Corn starch/lactose, cacao butter and hard fat (Witepsol H-15) were used for matrix bases, and sucrose, cocoa powder and commercial bitter-masking powder mixture made from lecithin (Benecoat BMI-40) were used for corrigents against bitter taste. The bitter taste intensity was evaluated using volunteers by comparison of test samples with standard solutions containing quinine at various concentrations. For the tablets made of matrix base and drug, Witepsol H-15 best inhibited the bitter taste of the drug, and the bitter strength tended to be suppressed with increase in the Witepsol H-15 amount. When the inhibitory effect on the bitter taste of acetaminophen solution was compared among the corrigents, each tended to suppress the bitter taste; especially, Benecoat BMI-40 exhibited a more inhibitory effect. Further, chewable tablets were made of one matrix base and one corrigent, and of one matrix base and two kinds of corrigents, their bitter taste intensities after chewing were compared. As a result, the tablets made of Witepsol H-15/Benecoat BMI-40/sucrose, of Witepsol H-15/cocoa powder/sucrose and of Witepsol H-15/sucrose best masked the bitter taste so that they were tolerable enough to chew and swallow. The dosage forms best masking bitter taste showed good release of the drug, indicating little change in bioavailability by masking. PMID:12527182

  11. Formulation and Characterization of Acetaminophen Nanoparticles in Orally Disintegrating Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AI-Nemrawi, Nusaiba K.

    The purpose of this study is to prepare acetaminophen loaded nanoparticles to be cast directly, while still in the emulsion form, into Orally Disintegrating Films (ODF). By casting the nanoparticles in the films, we expected to keep the particles in a stable form where the nanoparticles would be away from each other to prevent their aggregation. Once the films are applied on the buccal mucosa, they are supposed to dissolve within seconds, releasing the nanoparticles. Then the nanoparticles could be directly absorbed through the mucosa to the blood stream and deliver acetaminophen there. The oral cavity mucosa is one of the most attractive sites for systemic drug delivery due to its high permeability and blood supply. Furthermore, it is robust and shows short recovery times after stress or damage, and the drug bypasses first pass effect and avoids presystemic elimination in the GI tract. Nanoencapsulation increases drug efficacy, specificity, tolerability and therapeutic index. These Nanocapsules have several advantages in the protection of premature degradation and interaction with the biological environment, enhancement of absorption into a selected tissue, bioavailability, retention time and improvement of intracellular penetration. The most important characteristics of nanoparticles are their size, encapsulation efficiency (EE), zeta potential (surface charge), and the drug release profiles. Unfortunately, nanoparticles tend to precipitate or aggregate into larger particles within a short time after preparation or during storage. Some solutions for this problem were mentioned in literature including lyophilization and spray drying. These methods are usually expensive and give partial solutions that might have secondary problems; such as low re-dispersion efficacy of the lyophilized NPs. Furthermore, most of the formulations of NPs are invasive or topical. Few formulas are available to be given orally. Fast disintegrating films (ODFs) are rapidly gaining interest

  12. The analgesic efficacy of intra-articular acetaminophen in an experimental model of carrageenan-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Oguzhan; Canbay, Ozgur; Celebi, Nalan; Sahin, Altan; Konan, Ali; Atilla, Pergin; Aypar, Ulku

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acetaminophen is one of the most common drugs used for the treatment of pain and fever. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of intra-articular (IA) acetaminophen on carrageenan-induced arthritic pain-related behaviour and spinal c-Fos expression in rats. METHODS: The present study was performed using 20 Sprague Dawley rats. Forty microlitres of IA 0.9% NaCl was injected in the control group, and 40 μL of IA carrageenan was injected in the carrageenan group. One hour after carrageenan injection, 400 μg of IA acetaminophen was injected in the IA acetaminophen group, and 400 μg of intraperitoneal (IP) acet-aminophen was injected in the IP acetaminophen group. One day before injection, and 4 h and 8 h after injection, diameters of both knee joints, motility of the rat, paw loading and joint mobility were assessed. After the rats were euthanized, L3 and L4 spinal segments were excised for c-Fos assessment. RESULTS: IA acetaminophen decreased both the severity and distribution of c-Fos expression. IP acetaminophen decreased only the distribution of c-Fos expression. IA acetaminophen decreased knee diameter at 8 h. IA and IP acetaminophen increased rat motility and paw loading scores. Joint mobility scores of IP acetaminophen were similar to saline at 8 h. CONCLUSIONS: Results of the present study indicate an analgesic and/or possible anti-inflammatory effect of IA acetaminophen and provide further evidence on the efficacy of systemic acetaminophen injection in reducing arthritic pain. PMID:24093120

  13. Pharmacokinetics of salicylic acid following administration of aspirin tablets and three different forms of soluble aspirin in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Gatti, G; Barzaghi, N; Attardo Parrinello, G; Vitiello, B; Perucca, E

    1989-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic profile of an innovative formulation of soluble aspirin (l-ornithine acetylsalicylate, ldB 1003) was compared with that of conventional tablets and two other soluble dosage forms (d, l-lysine acetylsalicylate and a buffered effervescent formulation of acetylsalicylic acid) after administration of single oral doses in six normal volunteers. All soluble forms showed a rapid absorption profile, peak plasma salicylic acid levels being attained after about 30 min on average and without statistically significant differences among the solutions tested. As compared to the soluble formulations, acetylsalicylic acid given as tablets resulted in slower absorption, with peak plasma salicylic acid levels being reached more than 1 h after dosing. Despite these differences in time course of plasma level profiles, the extent of absorption was similar for all formulations. Apart from the potential advantages in terms of improved gastric tolerability, the increased rate of absorption of aspirin solutions is therapeutically useful whenever a rapid onset of action is required. In this respect, the kinetic pattern of the innovative formulation compares favourably with that of other available soluble dosage forms. PMID:2517497

  14. A zeolite modified carbon paste electrode as useful sensor for voltammetric determination of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Ahmadpour-Mobarakeh, Leila; Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    The voltammetric behavior of a carbon paste electrode modified with Co(II)-exchanged zeolite A (Co(II)-A/ZMCPE) for determination of acetaminophen was studied. The proposed electrode showed a diffusion controlled reaction with the electron transfer rate constant (Ks) of 0.44s(-1) and charge transfer coefficient of 0.73 in the absence of acetaminophen. A linear voltammetric response was obtained in the range of 0.1 to 190μmolL(-1) of acetaminophen [r(2)=0.9979, r=0.9989 (n=10)] with a detection limit of 0.04μmolL(-1). The method was successfully applied to the analysis of acetaminophen in some drugs. PMID:25686976

  15. Sleep Disruption and Proprioceptive Delirium due to Acetaminophen in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Carnovale, Carla; Pozzi, Marco; Nisic, Andrea Angelo; Scrofani, Elisa; Perrone, Valentina; Antoniazzi, Stefania; Radice, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 7-year-old boy, who received acetaminophen for the treatment of hyperpyrexia, due to an infection of the superior airways. 13 mg/kg (260 mg) of acetaminophen was administered orally before bedtime, and together with the expected antipyretic effect, the boy experienced sleep disruption and proprioceptive delirium. The symptoms disappeared within one hour. In the following six months, acetaminophen was administered again twice, and the reaction reappeared with similar features. Potential alternative explanations were excluded, and analysis with the Naranjo algorithm indicated a “probable” relationship between acetaminophen and this adverse reaction. We discuss the potential mechanisms involved, comprising imbalances in prostaglandin levels, alterations of dopamine, and cannabinoid and serotonin signalings. PMID:23573447

  16. Acetaminophen Use: An Unusual Cause of Drug-Induced Pulmonary Eosinophilia

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Pierre, Mathieu D.; Moran-Mendoza, Onofre

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary eosinophilia (PE) can be found in very diverse pathological processes. Several medications have also been associated with this entity. Acetaminophen is a medication commonly used in multiple different drug formulations, many of which are available without a prescription. It has however been associated with pulmonary eosinophilia (eosinophilic pneumonia) in a few cases in Japan. We describe the case of a 68-year-old Caucasian female who presented with new persistent dry cough and dyspnea on exertion after she started using up to 4 grams of acetaminophen on a daily basis. Chest imaging revealed peripheral lower lung zone ground glass and reticular opacities, and increased eosinophils were present on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). The patient's symptoms markedly improved upon acetaminophen cessation, and significantly decreased eosinophils were seen on repeat BAL. To our knowledge, this is the first case of likely acetaminophen-induced pulmonary eosinophilia reported outside Japan. PMID:27445539

  17. Efficacy of charcoal cathartic versus ipecac in reducing serum acetaminophen in a simulated overdose.

    PubMed

    McNamara, R M; Aaron, C K; Gemborys, M; Davidheiser, S

    1989-09-01

    The traditional role of gastric emptying as the initial step in the management of the poisoned patient has recently been questioned; immediate activated charcoal administration has been recommended by some. In the setting of acetaminophen overdose, ipecac-induced emesis may interfere with subsequent oral antidotal therapy. Therefore, we conducted a study to compare the efficacy of initial therapy with ipecac with therapy with activated charcoal-cathartic in a simulated acetaminophen overdosage. Ten healthy volunteers participated in a randomized, crossover trial. Subjects ingested 3.0 g acetaminophen, followed by either no intervention, 30 mL syrup of ipecac, or 50 g activated charcoal-sorbitol solution at one hour. Serial acetaminophen levels were determined at intervals over eight hours. Both interventions significantly reduced the area under the curve compared with control (P less than .05). When comparing ipecac with activated charcoal-cathartic, no significant difference was noted among these groups. PMID:2569851

  18. Effects of prednisone, aspirin, and acetaminophen on an in vivo biologic response to interferon in humans.

    PubMed

    Witter, F R; Woods, A S; Griffin, M D; Smith, C R; Nadler, P; Lietman, P S

    1988-08-01

    In healthy volunteers receiving a single intramuscular dose of 18 X 10(6) U interferon alone or after 24 hours of an 8-day course of prednisone (40 mg/day), aspirin (650 mg every 4 hours), or acetaminophen (650 mg every 4 hours), the magnitude of the biologic response to interferon was quantified by measuring the time course of the induction of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase and resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus infection in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Prednisone decreased the AUC of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity (p less than 0.05), whereas administration of aspirin or acetaminophen did not affect this biologic response. No measurable effect was seen during administration of prednisone, aspirin, or acetaminophen on the duration or intensity of vesicular stomatitis virus yield reduction. The side effects seen with interferon administration at the dose tested were not altered in a clinically meaningful manner by prednisone, aspirin, or acetaminophen. PMID:2456175

  19. Reaction kinetics and oxidation product formation in the degradation of acetaminophen by ferrate (VI).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyu; Liu, Yibing; Jiang, Jia-Qian

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the degradation of acetaminophen (AAP) in aqueous solutions by ferrate (VI), aiming to propose the kinetics, pathways and the oxidation products' formation in the AAP degradation. A series of jar tests were undertaken over ferrate (VI) dosages (molar ratios of ferrate (VI):AAP, 5:1 to 25:1) and pH values (4-11). The effects of co-existing ions (0.2-5 mM) and humic acid (10-50 mg l(-1)) on the AAP removal were investigated. Ferrate (VI) can remove 99.6% AAP (from 1000 μg l(-1)) in 60 min under study conditions when majority of the AAP reduction occurred in the first 5 min. The treatment performance depended on the ferrate(VI) dosage, pH and the type and strength of co-existing ions and humic acid. Raising ferrate (VI) dosage with optimal pH 7 improved the AAP degradation. In the presence of humic acid, the AAP degradation by ferrate (VI) was promoted in a short period (<30 min) but then inhibited with increasing in humic acid contents. The presence of Al(3+), CO3(2-) and PO4(3-) ions declined but the existence of K(+), Na(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) ions can improve the AAP removal. The catalytic function of Al(3+) on the decomposition of ferrate (VI) in aqueous solution was found. The kinetics of the reaction between ferrate (VI) and AAP was pseudo first-order for ferrete (VI) and pseudo second-order for AAP. The pseudo rate constant of ferrate (VI) with AAP was 1.4 × 10(-5) L(2) mg(-2) min(-1). Three oxidation products (OPs) were identified and the AAP degradation pathways were proposed. PMID:27155474

  20. Simultaneous quantification of acetaminophen and five acetaminophen metabolites in human plasma and urine by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry: Method validation and application to a neonatal pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sarah F; King, Amber D; van den Anker, John N; Wilkins, Diana G

    2015-12-15

    Drug metabolism plays a key role in acetaminophen (paracetamol)-induced hepatotoxicity, and quantification of acetaminophen metabolites provides critical information about factors influencing susceptibility to acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in clinical and experimental settings. The aims of this study were to develop, validate, and apply high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) methods for simultaneous quantification of acetaminophen, acetaminophen-glucuronide, acetaminophen-sulfate, acetaminophen-glutathione, acetaminophen-cysteine, and acetaminophen-N-acetylcysteine in small volumes of human plasma and urine. In the reported procedures, acetaminophen-d4 and acetaminophen-d3-sulfate were utilized as internal standards (IS). Analytes and IS were recovered from human plasma (10μL) by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Human urine (10μL) was prepared by fortification with IS followed only by sample dilution. Calibration concentration ranges were tailored to literature values for each analyte in each biological matrix. Prepared samples from plasma and urine were analyzed under the same HPLC-ESI-MS/MS conditions, and chromatographic separation was achieved through use of an Agilent Poroshell 120 EC-C18 column with a 20-min run time per injected sample. The analytes could be accurately and precisely quantified over 2.0-3.5 orders of magnitude. Across both matrices, mean intra- and inter-assay accuracies ranged from 85% to 112%, and intra- and inter-assay imprecision did not exceed 15%. Validation experiments included tests for specificity, recovery and ionization efficiency, inter-individual variability in matrix effects, stock solution stability, and sample stability under a variety of storage and handling conditions (room temperature, freezer, freeze-thaw, and post-preparative). The utility and suitability of the reported procedures were illustrated by analysis of pharmacokinetic samples

  1. Liuweiwuling tablets protect against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: What is the protective mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Du, Kuo; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Study of the effects of natural products, including traditional Chinese Medicines, on acetaminophen hepatotoxicity has gained considerable popularity in recent years, and some of them showed positive results and even promising therapeutic potentials. A recent report suggested that Liuweiwuling tablets protect against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and promote liver regeneration in a rodent model through alleviating the inflammatory response. However, several concerns exist regarding the limitations of the experimental design and interpretation of the data presented in this manuscript. PMID:27004010

  2. Acetaminophen intake and risk of asthma, hay fever and eczema in early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Vlaski, Emilija; Stavric, Katerina; Isjanovska, Rozalinda; Seckova, Lidija; Kimovska, Milica

    2007-09-01

    A positive association between acetaminophen intake and allergic diseases has recently been reported in developed countries with impaired oxidant/antioxidant balance and promotion of atopy as proposed underlying mechanisms. The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between acetaminophen intake and asthma, hay fever, and eczema in The Republic of Macedonia as a country with acetaminophen intake not physician-controlled, high passive smoke exposure and dietary antioxidant intake, and moderately low prevalence of allergic diseases. Self-reported data obtained through the standardized International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase Three written questionnaires of 3026 adolescents aged 13/14 years from randomly selected schools in Skopje, the capital of Macedonia, were used. The frequency of current acetaminophen intake--both unadjusted and adjusted for confounding factors--was correlated to current and ever-diagnosed asthma, hay fever and eczema by odds ratios (OR, 95% CI) in binary logistic regression. Use of acetaminophen at least once monthly increased the risk of current wheeze (adjusted OR 2.04, 1.31-3.20 p = 0.002), asthma 'ever' (adjusted OR 2.77, 1.06-7.26 p=0.039), current allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (adjusted OR 2.95, 1.79-4.88 p=0.000) and hay fever 'ever' (adjusted OR 2.25, 1.36-3.70 p=0.002). A significant association between frequent acetaminophen intake and atopic eczema and also between infrequent acetaminophen intake and investigated allergic diseases was not established. The findings suggest an increased risk of asthma and hay fever, but not atopic eczema associated with frequent acetaminophen use in a developing country. PMID:17893435

  3. Probenecid impairment of acetaminophen and lorazepam clearance: direct inhibition of ether glucuronide formation.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, D R; Greenblatt, D J; Ameer, B; Shader, R I

    1985-08-01

    Eleven subjects received acetaminophen (650 mg i.v.) on two occasions in random sequence, with and without concurrent administration of probenecid (500 mg) every 6 hr. Nine subjects similarly received lorazepam (2 mg. i.v.) with and without concurrent probenecid. Acetaminophen half-life was prolonged during probenecid treatment (mean +/- S.E., 4.30 +/- 0.23 vs. 2.51 +/- 0.16 hr; P less than .001) due to markedly decreased clearance (178 +/- 13 vs. 329 +/- 24 ml/min; P less than .001) with no change in volume of distribution (65 +/- 4 vs. 69 +/- 3 l; NS). Urinary excretion of acetaminophen glucuronide during 24 hr was decreased (84 +/- 9 vs. 260 +/- 21 mg of acetaminophen as glucuronide; P less than .001) and acetaminophen sulfate excretion was increased (323 +/- 25 vs. 217 +/- 17 mg of acetaminophen as sulfate; P less than .005) during concurrent probenecid treatment. However, the sum of the two conjugated metabolites was not significantly different (407 +/- 28 vs. 476 +/- 20 mg of acetaminophen as glucuronide plus sulfate excreted per 24 hr; NS). Lorazepam half-life was also prolonged during probenecid treatment (33.0 +/- 3.9 vs. 14.3 +/- 1.08 hr; P less than .001) due to decreased clearance (44.7 +/- 5.4 vs. 80.3 +/- 13.2 ml/min; P less than .001) with no change in volume of distribution (111 +/- 5 vs. 111 +/- 7 l; NS). Formation of the ether glucuronides of acetaminophen and lorazepam is impaired markedly by therapeutic doses of probenecid. Sulfate conjugation is not affected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4020675

  4. Patient knowledge and use of acetaminophen in over-the-counter medications.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Jason; Sands, Shannon; Davis, Erica; Nielsen, Joel; Warholak, Terri

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate patient knowledge of over-the-counter (OTC) products containing acetaminophen and to determine patients' accuracy in dosing adult, child, and infant formulations. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING Six community pharmacies in Tucson, AZ, between February and May 2011. PARTICIPANTS 88 adults aged 19 to 89 years. INTERVENTION Investigator-administered, semistructured interviews. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patient knowledge of and ability to safely use OTC products containing acetaminophen, including understanding risks, identifying products, and dosing different formulations. RESULTS Although most (86%) participants heard of acetaminophen, only 68% understood at least one of its uses and only 9% knew the abbreviation APAP. Virtually all knew that consuming too much acetaminophen in 1 day could be harmful, but only 17% and 35% knew that overdoses could result in death or liver damage, respectively. On average, participants correctly identified 80% (range 27-100%) of products with and without acetaminophen from a lineup of 11 OTC products. Although 38% (n = 84) of participants correctly measured both the child and infant doses of acetaminophen, doses ranged from one-half to twice the amount of the labeled child dose and one-third of the labeled infant dose. Findings from the regression analysis suggested that on average, women and those with college degrees had higher overall scores, while participants' age or parent status were nonsignificant predictors. CONCLUSION Many patients remain confused about using acetaminophen safely, signaling the need for greater patient education to prevent unintentional harm. The results further specify common misunderstandings to address during patient contact, which also includes replacing "APAP" with "acetaminophen" on any prescription bottle labels or patient-directed information. PMID:24362497

  5. LC-MS/MS method development for quantitative analysis of acetaminophen uptake by the aquatic fungus Mucor hiemalis.

    PubMed

    Esterhuizen-Londt, Maranda; Schwartz, Katrin; Balsano, Evelyn; Kühn, Sandra; Pflugmacher, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Acetaminophen is a pharmaceutical, frequently found in surface water as a contaminant. Bioremediation, in particular, mycoremediation of acetaminophen is a method to remove this compound from waters. Owing to the lack of quantitative analytical method for acetaminophen in aquatic organisms, the present study aimed to develop a method for the determination of acetaminophen using LC-MS/MS in the aquatic fungus Mucor hiemalis. The method was then applied to evaluate the uptake of acetaminophen by M. hiemalis, cultured in pellet morphology. The method was robust, sensitive and reproducible with a lower limit of quantification of 5 pg acetaminophen on column. It was found that M. hiemalis internalize the pharmaceutical, and bioaccumulate it with time. Therefore, M. hiemalis was deemed a suitable candidate for further studies to elucidate its pharmaceutical tolerance and the longevity in mycoremediation applications. PMID:26950900

  6. Comparison of oral nalbuphine, acetaminophen, and their combination in postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Jain, A K; Ryan, J R; McMahon, F G; Smith, G

    1986-03-01

    This double-blind, randomized, parallel, placebo-controlled study evaluated the analgesic effects of single oral doses of 30 mg nalbuphine, 650 mg acetaminophen, and the contribution of each to the efficacy of their combination in 128 hospitalized patients with postoperative pain. Subjective reports of patients evaluated each hour for 6 hours were used as indices of analgesic response. Both nalbuphine and acetaminophen were significantly superior to placebo for most measures of total and peak analgesia. The interaction contrast between nalbuphine and acetaminophen was not significant for any analgesic measurements, indicating an additive effect of the components. The combination was the most effective treatment, followed by nalbuphine, acetaminophen, and placebo. Effects of the combination were significantly different from those of acetaminophen at 4, 5, and 6 hours and from those of placebo at 1 to 6 hours. There was no significant difference in the frequency or intensity of side effects among the groups. The combination of nalbuphine and acetaminophen appears to be a therapeutically useful combination. PMID:3512149

  7. Treatment of mild to moderate pain of acute soft tissue injury: diflunisal vs acetaminophen with codeine.

    PubMed

    Muncie, H L; King, D E; DeForge, B

    1986-08-01

    Acute soft tissue injuries create pain and limitation of function. Treatment requires analgesia and time for full recovery. Acetaminophen with codeine (650 mg plus 60 mg, respectively, every 4 to 6 hours) is used frequently as the analgesic of choice. Diflunisal (1,000 mg initially then 500 mg twice a day) vs acetaminophen with codeine was prospectively studied in the treatment of acute mild to moderate pain from soft tissue injuries. Thirty-five patients with acute strains, sprains, or low back pain were randomized to treatment (17 acetaminophen with codeine vs 18 diflunisal). Both groups were similar in the amount of pain and type of injury at initiation of therapy. Patient pain rating went from 3.3 +/- 0.6 to 1.6 +/- 1.5 for acetaminophen with codeine and from 3.3 +/- 0.6 to 1.3 +/- 1.1 for diflunisal. However, 65 percent of acetaminophen with codeine patients experienced side effects, with 35 percent of these patients stopping the medication because of intolerable side effects. In the diflunisal group, 28 percent of the patients experienced side effects and 5 percent had to stop the medication early. Diflunisal was found to be an effective analgesic in mild to moderate pain of acute soft tissue injuries, and caused fewer and more tolerable side effects than did acetaminophen with codeine. PMID:2942630

  8. Circadian rhythm of serum sulfate levels in man and acetaminophen pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, D A; Wallace, S M; Verbeeck, R K

    1990-01-01

    The circadian variation of serum inorganic sulfate levels was studied in healthy volunteers. The effect of subchronic acetaminophen administration (650 mg q.i.d. for 4 days) on serum inorganic sulfate levels was investigated and the possible role of fluctuating serum inorganic sulfate levels on the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen was evaluated. During a 24 h cycle, serum inorganic sulfate levels were lowest in the morning (11.00 h) and typically increased in the afternoon to reach a maximum in the early evening (19.00 h). Average 24 h serum concentrations were 360 microM and the difference between minimum and maximum levels was on average 25.8%. Subchronic administration of acetaminophen (650 mg q.i.d. for 4 days) significantly reduced serum inorganic sulfate levels to a 24 h average of 253 microM. The circadian rhythm, however, was not affected and the difference between minimum (12.00 h) and maximum (18.50 h) serum concentrations was 31.3%. Subchronic acetaminophen administration lead to a significant decrease in the renal excretion (-51%) and renal clearance (-33%) of inorganic sulfate. No significant differences were found in the disposition kinetics of acetaminophen and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates during two consecutive dosing intervals (08.00-14.00 h, 14.00-20.00 h) on Day 4 of the acetaminophen regimen. PMID:2253663

  9. Hepatoprotective Potential of Prosopis farcta Beans Extracts against Acetaminophen-induced Hepatotoxicity in Wister Rats

    PubMed Central

    Asadollahi, Akram; Sarir, Hadi; Omidi, Arash; Torbati, Mohammad Bagher Montazar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hepatotoxicity by acetaminophen is the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in many countries. Prosopis farcta beans extract (PFE) has some antioxidant property and may alleviate hepatotoxicity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate effects of PFE against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods: Thirty-six male Wistar albino rats weighing 220 ± 30 g were distributed into six groups. Two groups were pretreated with PFE (50 and 75 mg/kg) for 7 days before administration of acetaminophen (600 mg/kg). Two were given acetaminophen or PFE (50 and 75 mg/kg) alone, and the control received normal saline. One day after acetaminophen, administration blood samples were collected by cardiac puncture to determine liver function enzymes markers; aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase (AST and ALT), cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), high, low, and very low density lipoproteins (LDL and VLDL). Results: In acetaminophen-treated rat plasma AST (314 ± 18.54 vs. 126.37 ± 4.13), ALT (304 ± 49.24 vs. 187.33 ± 3.71), cholesterol, TG, LDL, and VLDL were increased by 149, 160, 37, 92, 60, and 94%, respectively. PFE at both doses significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated the above biochemical indices to near normal. Conclusions: Prosopis farcta beans extract (50 and 75 mg/kg) exhibited hepatoprotective activity against APAP. PMID:25400887

  10. Acute intoxication with aniline: detection of acetaminophen as aniline metabolite.

    PubMed

    Iwersen-Bergmann, S; Schmoldt, A

    2000-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman unwittingly ingested an unknown substance together with her breakfast coffee. She suffered effects such as strong headache, generalized cyanosis, and a burning sensation of the lips and collapsed some minutes later. After admission into hospital a methemoglobin level of 35% was determined in the blood. Treatment by administration of tolonium chloride (toluidine blue) resulted in complete recovery of the patient. The toxic agent was identified as aniline by GC with mass selective detection after organic solvent extraction and 11 h after ingestion the plasma aniline level was 0.13 mg/l. Acetanilide (0.79 mg/ml) and acetaminophen (2.3 mg/ml) were identified in plasma as metabolites of aniline. It was assumed that a high metabolic capacity for acetylation protected the victim from more severe reactions. Her husband confessed later that he had tried to poison her. PMID:10876991

  11. Evaluation of nephroprotective, diuretic, and antioxidant activities of plectranthus amboinicus on acetaminophen-induced nephrotoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Palani, S; Raja, S; Naresh, R; Kumar, B Senthil

    2010-05-01

    Plectranthus amboinicus (PA), commonly known as country borage, is a folkoric medicinal plant. Juice from its leaves is commonly used for illnesses including liver and renal conditions in the Asian sub-continent. Acetaminophen (APAP), used as an analgesic, produces liver and kidney necrosis in mammals at high doses. The aim of this study was to investigate the nephroprotective, diuretic, and antioxidant activities of the ethanol extract of PA at two doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg bw on APAP-induced toxicity in rats. This study shows that APAP significantly increases the levels of serum urea (UR), hemoglobin (Hb), total leukocyte count, creatinine, raised body weight, and reduced levels of neutrophils, granulocytes, uric acid, and platelet concentration. Ethanol extract of PA rescued these phenotypes by increasing anti-oxidative responses as assessed by biochemistry and histopathology. In addition, the ethanol extract of PA at two doses showed a significant diuretic activity by increased levels of total urine output and urinary elerolytes such as sodium and potassium. In conclusion, these data suggest that the ethanol extract of PA possess nephroprotective and antioxidant effects against APAP-induced nephrotoxicity and strong diuretics effect in rats. PMID:20367443

  12. Robust protein nitration contributes to acetaminophen-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and acute liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Jang, Sehwan; Banerjee, Atrayee; Hardwick, James P.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP), a widely-used analgesic agent, can cause liver injury through increased nitrative stress, leading to protein nitration. However, the identities of nitrated proteins and their roles in hepatotoxicity are poorly understood. Thus, we aimed at studying the mechanism of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity by systematic identification and characterization of nitrated proteins in the absence or presence of an anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). The levels of nitrated proteins markedly increased at 2 h in mice exposed to a single APAP dose (350 mg/kg ip), which caused severe liver necrosis at 24 h. Protein nitration and liver necrosis were minimal in mice exposed to nontoxic 3-hydroxyacetanilide or animals co-treated with APAP and NAC. Mass-spectral analysis of the affinity-purified nitrated proteins identified numerous mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins including mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, Mn-superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, ATP synthase, and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase involved in anti-oxidant defense, energy supply, and fatty acid metabolism, respectively. Immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblot with anti-3-NT antibody confirmed that the aforementioned proteins were nitrated in APAP-exposed mice but not in NAC-co-treated mice. Consistently, NAC co-treatment significantly restored the suppressed activities of these enzymes. Thus, we demonstrate a new mechanism by which many nitrated proteins with concomitantly suppressed activities promotes APAP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and hepatotoxicity. PMID:23454065

  13. Metabolomics evaluation of the effects of green tea extract on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yihong; Sun, Jinchun; Petrova, Katya; Yang, Xi; Greenhaw, James; Salminen, William F; Beger, Richard D; Schnackenberg, Laura K

    2013-12-01

    Green tea has been purported to have beneficial health effects including protective effects against oxidative stress. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic drug that can cause acute liver injury in overdose situations. These studies explored the effects of green tea extract (GTE) on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in liver tissue extracts using ultra performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mice were orally administered GTE, APAP or GTE and APAP under three scenarios. APAP alone caused a high degree of hepatocyte necrosis associated with increases in serum transaminases and alterations in multiple metabolic pathways. The time of GTE oral administration relative to APAP either protected against or potentiated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Dose dependent decreases in histopathology scores and serum transaminases were noted when GTE was administered prior to APAP; whereas, the opposite occurred when GTE was administered after APAP. Similarly, metabolites altered by APAP alone were less changed when GTE was given prior to APAP. Significantly altered pathways included fatty acid metabolism, glycerophospholipid metabolism, glutathione metabolism, and energy pathways. These studies demonstrate the complex interaction between GTE and APAP and the need to employ novel analytical strategies to understand the effects of dietary supplements on pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:24080264

  14. Effect of Acetaminophen Alone and in Combination with Morphine and Tramadol on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Isoflurane in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Julio R.; Ibancovichi, José A.; Sanchez-Aparicio, Pedro; Acevedo-Arcique, Carlos M.; Moran-Muñoz, Rafael; Recillas-Morales, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been observed that acetaminophen potentiates the analgesic effect of morphine and tramadol in postoperative pain management. Its capacity as an analgesic drug or in combinations thereof to reduce the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of inhalational anesthetics represents an objective measure of this effect during general anesthesia. In this study, the effect of acetaminophen with and without morphine or tramadol was evaluated on the isoflurane MAC. Methods Forty-eight male Wistar rats were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen. MACISO was determined from alveolar gas samples at the time of tail clamping without the drug, after administering acetaminophen (300 mg/kg), morphine (3 mg/kg), tramadol (10 mg/kg), acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + morphine (3 mg/kg), and acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + tramadol (10 mg/kg). Results The control and acetaminophen groups did not present statistically significant differences (p = 0.98). The values determined for MACISO after treatment with acetaminophen + morphine, acetaminophen + tramadol, morphine, and tramadol were 0.98% ± 0.04%, 0.99% ± 0.009%, 0.97% ± 0.02%, and 0.99% ± 0.01%, respectively. Conclusions The administration of acetaminophen did not reduce the MAC of isoflurane and did not potentiate the reduction in MACISO by morphine and tramadol in rats, and therefore does not present a sparing effect of morphine or tramadol in rats anesthetized with isoflurane. PMID:26605541

  15. Potentiation in the intact rat of the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen by 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Nakae, D; Oakes, J W; Farber, J L

    1988-12-01

    Studies of the killing of cultured hepatocytes by acetaminophen indicate that the cells are injured by an oxidative stress that accompanies the metabolism of the toxin (J. L. Farber et al. (1988) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 267, 640-650). The present report documents that the essential features of the killing of cultured hepatocytes by acetaminophen are reproduced in the intact animal. Male rats had no evidence of liver necrosis 24 h after administration of up to 1000 mg/kg of acetaminophen. Induction of mixed function oxidase activity by 3-methylcholanthrene increased the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen. Inhibition of glutathione reductase by 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) potentiated the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen in male rats induced with 3-methylcholanthrene. Whereas the pretreatment with BCNU reduced the GSH content by 40%, a comparable depletion of GSH by diethylmaleate did not potentiate the toxicity of acetaminophen. The antioxidant diphenylphenylenediamine (25 mg/kg) and the ferric iron chelator deferoxamine (1000 mg/kg) prevented the liver necrosis produced by 500 mg/kg acetaminophen in rats pretreated with BCNU. Neither protective agent prevented the fall in GSH produced by acetaminophen. It is concluded the conditions of the irreversible injury of cultured hepatocytes by acetaminophen previously reported are not necessarily different from those that obtain in the intact rat with this toxin. PMID:3214175

  16. Immune mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Krenkel, Oliver; Mossanen, Jana C; Tacke, Frank

    2014-12-01

    An overdose of acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP), also termed paracetamol, can cause severe liver damage, ultimately leading to acute liver failure (ALF) with the need of liver transplantation. APAP is rapidly taken up from the intestine and metabolized in hepatocytes. A small fraction of the metabolized APAP forms cytotoxic mitochondrial protein adducts, leading to hepatocyte necrosis. The course of disease is not only critically influenced by dose of APAP and the initial hepatocyte damage, but also by the inflammatory response following acetaminophen-induced liver injury (AILI). As revealed by mouse models of AILI and corresponding translational studies in ALF patients, necrotic hepatocytes release danger-associated-molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by resident hepatic macrophages, Kupffer cell (KC), and neutrophils, leading to the activation of these cells. Activated hepatic macrophages release various proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α or IL-1β, as well as chemokines (e.g., CCL2) thereby further enhancing inflammation and increasing the influx of immune cells, like bone-marrow derived monocytes and neutrophils. Monocytes are mainly recruited via their receptor CCR2 and aggravate inflammation. Infiltrating monocytes, however, can mature into monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMF), which are, in cooperation with neutrophils, also involved in the resolution of inflammation. Besides macrophages and neutrophils, distinct lymphocyte populations, especially γδ T cells, are also linked to the inflammatory response following an APAP overdose. Natural killer (NK), natural killer T (NKT) and T cells possibly further perpetuate inflammation in AILI. Understanding the complex interplay of immune cell subsets in experimental models and defining their functional involvement in disease progression is essential to identify novel therapeutic targets for human disease. PMID:25568858

  17. Acetaminophen Attenuates Lipid Peroxidation in Children Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Scott A.; Zaccagni, Hayden; Bichell, David P.; Christian, Karla G.; Mettler, Bret A.; Donahue, Brian S.; Roberts, L. Jackson; Pretorius, Mias

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hemolysis, occurring during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), is associated with lipid peroxidation and postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI). Acetaminophen (ApAP) inhibits lipid peroxidation catalyzed by hemeproteins and in an animal model attenuated rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI. This pilot study tests the hypothesis that ApAP attenuates lipid peroxidation in children undergoing CPB. Design Single center prospective randomized double blinded study. Setting University-affiliated pediatric hospital. Patients Thirty children undergoing elective surgical correction of a congenital heart defect. Interventions Patients were randomized to ApAP (OFIRMEV® (acetaminophen) injection, Cadence Pharmaceuticals, San Diego, CA) or placebo every 6 hours for 4 doses starting before the onset of CPB. Measurement and Main Results Markers of hemolysis, lipid peroxidation (isofurans and F2-isoprostanes) and AKI were measured throughout the perioperative period. CPB was associated with a significant increase in free hemoglobin (from a pre-bypass level of 9.8±6.2 mg/dl to a peak of 201.5±42.6 mg/dl post-bypass). Plasma and urine isofuran and F2-isoprostane concentrations increased significantly during surgery. The magnitude of increase in plasma isofurans was greater than the magnitude in increase in plasma F2-isoprostanes. ApAP attenuated the increase in plasma isofurans compared to placebo (P=0.02 for effect of study drug). There was no significant effect of ApAP on plasma F2-isoprostanes or urinary makers of lipid peroxidation. ApAP did not affect postoperative creatinine, urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin or prevalence of AKI. Conclusion CPB in children is associated with hemolysis and lipid peroxidation. ApAP attenuated the increase in plasma isofuran concentrations. Future studies are needed to establish whether other therapies that attenuate or prevent the effects of free hemoglobin result in more effective inhibition of lipid peroxidation in patients

  18. N-acetylcysteine amide, a promising antidote for acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Khayyat, Ahdab; Tobwala, Shakila; Hart, Marcia; Ercal, Nuran

    2016-01-22

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP) is one of the most widely used over the counter antipyretic and analgesic medications. It is safe at therapeutic doses, but its overdose can result in severe hepatotoxicity, a leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in the USA. Depletion of glutathione (GSH) is one of the initiating steps in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity; therefore, one strategy for restricting organ damage is to restore GSH levels by using GSH prodrugs. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a GSH precursor, is the only currently approved antidote for an acetaminophen overdose. Unfortunately, fairly high doses and longer treatment times are required due to its poor bioavailability. In addition, oral and I.V. administration of NAC in a hospital setting are laborious and costly. Therefore, we studied the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), a novel antioxidant with higher bioavailability, and compared it with NAC in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice. Our results showed that NACA is better than NAC at a low dose (106mg/kg) in preventing oxidative stress and protecting against APAP-induced damage. NACA significantly increased GSH levels and the GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver to 66.5% and 60.5% of the control, respectively; and it reduced the level of ALT by 30%. However, at the dose used, NAC was not effective in combating the oxidative stress induced by APAP. Thus, NACA appears to be better than NAC in reducing the oxidative stress induced by APAP. It would be of great value in the health care field to develop drugs like NACA as more effective and safer options for the prevention and therapeutic intervention in APAP-induced toxicity. PMID:26602168

  19. Effect of Intravenous Acetaminophen on Postoperative Opioid Use in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Saha, Ronik; Shah, Neal; Hanna, Adel; DeMuro, Jonas; Calixte, Rose; Brathwaite, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of opioids to achieve adequate pain relief following surgery is a common clinical practice. Opioids, however, are associated with serious adverse effects, such as respiratory depression, excessive sedation, and prolonged ileus, as well as increased mortality. The administration of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen to control postoperative pain has been effective in reducing opioid consumption in various surgical populations, but no studies have been conducted in bariatric surgery patients. This investigation was performed to determine whether IV acetaminophen reduces opioid requirements after bariatric surgery. Methods: IV acetaminophen was added to the Winthrop-University Hospital formulary in September 2012. We conducted a retrospective chart-review analysis of bariatric surgery patients who received at least four doses of IV acetaminophen (1 g every six hours) plus opioids from October 2012 to March 2013 (after IV acetaminophen was added to the hospital formulary), compared with bariatric surgery patients who received only opioids for postoperative pain control from January 2012 to June 2012 (before IV acetaminophen was added to the hospital formulary). The study’s primary endpoint was the difference between the two groups in opioid consumption, expressed in oral morphine equivalents (OMEs). Secondary endpoints included the reduction in the baseline pain score; the total amount of each opioid used; and the average hospital length of stay (LOS). Results: A total of 96 patients were identified for potential enrollment from January 2012 to March 2013. Eight patients, however, did not qualify for participation because they had received only one dose of IV acetaminophen. The remaining 88 patients comprised two study groups: IV acetaminophen plus opiates (n = 44) and IV opiates alone (n = 44). Paradoxically, the patients in the acetaminophen/opiates group required significantly more opiates (in OMEs) compared with the group that received opiates

  20. Formulation and Characterization of Acetaminophen Nanoparticles in Orally Disintegrating Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AI-Nemrawi, Nusaiba K.

    The purpose of this study is to prepare acetaminophen loaded nanoparticles to be cast directly, while still in the emulsion form, into Orally Disintegrating Films (ODF). By casting the nanoparticles in the films, we expected to keep the particles in a stable form where the nanoparticles would be away from each other to prevent their aggregation. Once the films are applied on the buccal mucosa, they are supposed to dissolve within seconds, releasing the nanoparticles. Then the nanoparticles could be directly absorbed through the mucosa to the blood stream and deliver acetaminophen there. The oral cavity mucosa is one of the most attractive sites for systemic drug delivery due to its high permeability and blood supply. Furthermore, it is robust and shows short recovery times after stress or damage, and the drug bypasses first pass effect and avoids presystemic elimination in the GI tract. Nanoencapsulation increases drug efficacy, specificity, tolerability and therapeutic index. These Nanocapsules have several advantages in the protection of premature degradation and interaction with the biological environment, enhancement of absorption into a selected tissue, bioavailability, retention time and improvement of intracellular penetration. The most important characteristics of nanoparticles are their size, encapsulation efficiency (EE), zeta potential (surface charge), and the drug release profiles. Unfortunately, nanoparticles tend to precipitate or aggregate into larger particles within a short time after preparation or during storage. Some solutions for this problem were mentioned in literature including lyophilization and spray drying. These methods are usually expensive and give partial solutions that might have secondary problems; such as low re-dispersion efficacy of the lyophilized NPs. Furthermore, most of the formulations of NPs are invasive or topical. Few formulas are available to be given orally. Fast disintegrating films (ODFs) are rapidly gaining interest

  1. Physical and Chemical Compatibility of Injectable Acetaminophen During Simulated Y-Site Administration

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Collin; Boehme, Sabrina; Ouellette, Jacquelyn; Stidham, Chanelle; MacKay, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The physical and chemical compatibility of intravenous acetaminophen with commonly administered injectable medications was evaluated. Methods: Simulated Y-site evaluation was accomplished by mixing 2 mL of acetaminophen (10 mg/mL) with 2 mL of an alternative intravenous medication and subsequently storing the mixture in a polypropylene syringe for 4 hours. The aliquot solutions were visually inspected and evaluated for crystal content at 4 hours by infusing 4 mL of the medication mixture through a 0.45-μm nitrocellulose filter disc. Medication mixtures that were selected for chemical stability testing were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography at 0, 1, and 4 hours using a Zorbax Eclipse Plus C18, 4.6 x 100 mm, 3.5-μm column for separation of analytes with subsequent diode-array detection. Medications were considered chemically compatible if the concentrations of all components were >90% of the original concentrations during the 4 hour simulated Y-site compatibility test. Results: U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) standards for physical particle counts were met for acetaminophen injection (10 mg/mL) when combined with cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, clindamycin, dexamethasone, diphenhydramine, dolasetron, fentanyl, granisetron, hydrocortisone, hydromorphone, ketorolac, meperidine, methylprednisolone, midazolam, morphine, nalbuphine, ondansetron, piperacillin/tazobactam, ranitidine, and vancomycin. Injectable acetaminophen is incompatible with acyclovir and diazepam and therefore should not be administered concomitantly with either of these products. Further testing confirmed the chemical compatibility of acetaminophen with ceftriaxone, diphenhydramine, granisetron, ketorolac, nalbuphine, ondansetron, piperacillin/tazobactam, and vancomycin. Conclusion: All medications tested with acetaminophen were physically compatible except for acyclovir and diazepam. All 8 medications tested for chemical compatibility with acetaminophen were stable over the 4

  2. Effect of antipyrine coadministration on the kinetics of acetaminophen and lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Blyden, G T; Greenblatt, D J; LeDuc, B W; Scavone, J M

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic interactions between antipyrine and acetaminophen were evaluated in 7 healthy volunteers. On 3 occasions subjects received: 1, antipyrine 1.0 g intravenously (i.v.); 2, acetaminophen 650 mg i.v.; 3, antipyrine 1.0 g and acetaminophen 650 mg i.v. simultaneously. Between Trials 1 and 3, antipyrine elimination t1/2 (17.2 vs 17.4 h), clearance (0.44 vs 0.43 ml.min-1.kg-1) and 24-h recovery of antipyrine and metabolites (313 vs 293 mg) did not differ significantly. Between Trials 2 and 3, acetaminophen VZ was reduced (1.14 vs 1.00 l.kg-1), t1/2 prolonged (2.7 vs 3.3 h), clearance reduced (4.8 vs 3.6 ml.min-1.kg-1), and fractional urinary recovery of acetaminophen glucuronide reduced. Eight additional subjects received 50 mg of lidocaine hydrochloride i.v. in the control state, and on a second occasion immediately after antipyrine 1.0 g given i.v. The two trials did not differ significantly in lidocaine VZ (2.6 vs 2.7 l.kg-1), t1/2 (2.0 vs 2.4 h) or clearance (15.0 vs 13.5 ml.min-1.kg-1). Although acetaminophen does not alter antipyrine kinetics, acute administration of antipyrine appears to impair acetaminophen clearance, possibly via inhibition of glucuronide formation. However, antipyrine has no significant effect on the kinetics of a single i.v. dose of lidocaine. PMID:3197750

  3. Supra-additive effects of tramadol and acetaminophen in a human pain model.

    PubMed

    Filitz, Jörg; Ihmsen, Harald; Günther, Werner; Tröster, Andreas; Schwilden, Helmut; Schüttler, Jürgen; Koppert, Wolfgang

    2008-06-01

    The combination of analgesic drugs with different pharmacological properties may show better efficacy with less side effects. Aim of this study was to examine the analgesic and antihyperalgesic properties of the weak opioid tramadol and the non-opioid acetaminophen, alone as well as in combination, in an experimental pain model in humans. After approval of the local Ethics Committee, 17 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this double-blind and placebo-controlled study in a cross-over design. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation at high current densities (29.6+/-16.2 mA) induced spontaneous acute pain (NRS=6 of 10) and distinct areas of hyperalgesia for painful mechanical stimuli (pinprick-hyperalgesia). Pain intensities as well as the extent of the areas of hyperalgesia were assessed before, during and 150 min after a 15 min lasting intravenous infusion of acetaminophen (650 mg), tramadol (75 mg), a combination of both (325 mg acetaminophen and 37.5mg tramadol), or saline 0.9%. Tramadol led to a maximum pain reduction of 11.7+/-4.2% with negligible antihyperalgesic properties. In contrast, acetaminophen led to a similar pain reduction (9.8+/-4.4%), but a sustained antihyperalgesic effect (34.5+/-14.0% reduction of hyperalgesic area). The combination of both analgesics at half doses led to a supra-additive pain reduction of 15.2+/-5.7% and an enhanced antihyperalgesic effect (41.1+/-14.3% reduction of hyperalgesic areas) as compared to single administration of acetaminophen. Our study provides first results on interactions of tramadol and acetaminophen on experimental pain and hyperalgesia in humans. Pharmacodynamic modeling combined with the isobolographic technique showed supra-additive effects of the combination of acetaminophen and tramadol concerning both, analgesia and antihyperalgesia. The results might act as a rationale for combining both analgesics. PMID:17709207

  4. Age-related decrease in cerebrovascular-derived neuroprotective proteins: effect of acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Debjani; Sanchez, Alma; Yin, Xiangling; Martinez, Joseph; Grammas, Paula

    2012-01-01

    As the population ages, the need for effective methods to maintain brain function in older adults is increasingly pressing. Vascular disease and neurodegenerative disorders commonly co-occur in older persons. Cerebrovascular products contribute to the neuronal milieu and have important consequences for neuronal viability. In this regard vascular derived neuroprotective proteins, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) are important for maintaining neuronal viability, especially in the face of injury and disease. The objective of this study is to measure and compare levels of VEGF, PEDF and PACAP released from isolated brain microvessels of Fischer 344 rats at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months of age. Addition of acetaminophen to isolated brain microvessels is employed to determine whether this drug affects vascular expression of these neuroprotective proteins. Experiments on cultured brain endothelial cells are performed to explore the mechanisms/mediators that regulate the effect of acetaminophen on endothelial cells. The data indicate cerebrovascular expression of VEGF, PEDF and PACAP significantly decreases with age. The age-associated decrease in VEGF and PEDF is ameliorated by addition of acetaminophen to isolated brain microvessels. Also, release of VEGF, PEDF, and PACAP from cultured brain endothelial cells decreases with exposure to the oxidant stressor menadione. Acetaminophen treatment upregulates VEGF, PEDF and PACAP in brain endothelial cells exposed to oxidative stress. The effect of acetaminophen on cultured endothelial cells is in part inhibited by the selective thrombin inhibitor hirudin. The results of this study suggest that acetaminophen may be a useful agent for preserving cerebrovascular function. If a low dose of acetaminophen can counteract the decrease in vascular-derived neurotrophic factors evoked by age and oxidative stress, this drug

  5. Cooperativity in CYP2E1 metabolism of acetaminophen and styrene mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Jessica H; Letzig, Lynda G; Roberts, Dean W; James, Laura P; Fifer, E Kim; Miller, Grover P

    2015-10-01

    Risk assessment for exposure to mixtures of drugs and pollutants relies heavily on in vitro characterization of their bioactivation and/or metabolism individually and extrapolation to mixtures assuming no interaction. Herein, we demonstrated that in vitro CYP2E1 metabolic activation of acetaminophen and styrene mixtures could not be explained through the Michaelis-Menten mechanism or any models relying on that premise. As a baseline for mixture studies with styrene, steady-state analysis of acetaminophen oxidation revealed a biphasic kinetic profile that was best described by negative cooperativity (Hill coefficient=0.72). The best-fit mechanism for this relationship involved two binding sites with differing affinities (Ks=830μM and Kss=32mM). Introduction of styrene inhibited that reaction less than predicted by simple competition and thus provided evidence for a cooperative mechanism within the mixture. Likewise, acetaminophen acted through a mixed-type inhibition mechanism to impact styrene epoxidation. In this case, acetaminophen competed with styrene for CYP2E1 (Ki=830μM and Ksi=180μM for catalytic and effector sites, respectively) and resulted in cooperative impacts on binding and catalysis. Based on modeling of in vivo clearance, cooperative interactions between acetaminophen and styrene resulted in profoundly increased styrene activation at low styrene exposure levels and therapeutic acetaminophen levels. Current Michaelis-Menten based toxicological models for mixtures such as styrene and acetaminophen would fail to detect this concentration-dependent relationship. Hence, future studies must assess the role of alternate CYP2E1 mechanisms in bioactivation of compounds to improve the accuracy of interpretations and predictions of toxicity. PMID:26225832

  6. Prediction of color changes in acetaminophen solution using the time-temperature superposition principle.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Koji; Takayama, Kozo

    2016-07-01

    A prediction method for color changes based on the time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP) was developed for acetaminophen solution. Color changes of acetaminophen solution are caused by the degradation of acetaminophen, such as hydrolysis and oxidation. In principle, the TTSP can be applied to only thermal aging. Therefore, the impact of oxidation on the color changes of acetaminophen solution was verified. The results of our experiment suggested that the oxidation products enhanced the color changes in acetaminophen solution. Next, the color changes of acetaminophen solution samples of the same head space volume after accelerated aging at various temperatures were investigated using the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) LAB color space (a*, b*, L* and ΔE*ab), following which the TTSP was adopted to kinetic analysis of the color changes. The apparent activation energies using the time-temperature shift factor of a*, b*, L* and ΔE*ab were calculated as 72.4, 69.2, 72.3 and 70.9 (kJ/mol), respectively, which are similar to the values for acetaminophen hydrolysis reported in the literature. The predicted values of a*, b*, L* and ΔE*ab at 40 °C were obtained by calculation using Arrhenius plots. A comparison between the experimental and predicted values for each color parameter revealed sufficiently high R(2) values (>0.98), suggesting the high reliability of the prediction. The kinetic analysis using TTSP was successfully applied to predicting the color changes under the controlled oxygen amount at any temperature and for any length of time. PMID:26559666

  7. Acetaminophen induces a caspase-dependent and Bcl-XL sensitive apoptosis in human hepatoma cells and lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Boulares, A Hamid; Zoltoski, Anna J; Stoica, Bogdan A; Cuvillier, Olivier; Smulson, Mark E

    2002-01-01

    Acetaminophen is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug that exhibits toxicity at high doses to the liver and kidneys. This toxicity has been attributed to cytochrome P-450-generated metabolites which covalently modify target proteins. Recently, acetaminophen, in its unmetabolized form, has been shown to affect a variety of cells and tissues, for instance, testicular and lymphoid tissues and lymphocyte cell lines. The effects on cell viability of acetaminophen at a concentration comparable to that achieved in plasma during acetaminophen toxicity have now been examined with a hepatoma cell line SK-Hep1, primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes and human Jurkat T cells. Acetaminophen reduced cell viability in a time-dependent manner. Staining of cells with annexin-V also revealed that acetaminophen induced, after 8 hr of treatment, a loss of the asymmetry of membrane phospholipids, which is an early event associated with apoptosis. Acetaminophen triggered the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol, activation of caspase-3, 8, and 9, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and degradation of lamin B1 and DNA. Whereas cleavage of DNA into internucleosomal fragments was apparent in acetaminophen treated SK-Hep1 and primary lymphocytes, DNA was only degraded to 50-kb fragments in treated Jurkat cells. Overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-XL prevented these various apoptotic events induced by acetaminophen in Jurkat cells. Caspase-8 activation was a postmictochondrial event and occurred in a Fas-independent manner. These results demonstrate that acetaminophen induces caspases-dependent apoptosis with mitochondria as a primary target. These results also reiterate the potential role of apoptosis in acetaminophen hepatic and extrahepatic toxicity. PMID:12005112

  8. Low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylate) prevents increases in brain PGE2, 15-epi-lipoxin A4 and 8-isoprostane concentrations in 9 month-old HIV-1 transgenic rats, a model for HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Helene C.; Taha, Ameer Y.; Rapoport, Stanley I; Yuan, Zhi-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background Older human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 transgenic rats are a model for HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). They show behavioral changes, neuroinflammation, neuronal loss, and increased brain arachidonic acid (AA) enzymes. Aspirin (acetylsalicylate, ASA) inhibits AA oxidation by cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2. Hypothesis Chronic low-dose ASA will downregulate brain AA metabolism in HIV-1 transgenic rats. Methods Nine month-old HIV-1 transgenic and wildtype rats were given 42 days of 10 mg/kg/day ASA or nothing in drinking water; eicosanoids were measured using ELISAs on microwaved brain extracts. Results Brain 15-epi-lipoxin A4 and 8-isoprostane concentrations were significantly higher in HIV-1 transgenic than wildtype rats; these differences were prevented by ASA. ASA reduced prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4 concentrations in HIV-1 Tg but not wildtype rats. Thromboxane B2, 15-HETE, lipoxin A4 and resolvin D1 concentrations were unaffected by genotype or treatment. Conclusion Chronic low-dose ASA reduces AA-metabolite markers of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in a rat model for HAND. PMID:25638779

  9. Release of a chitosan-hydroxyapatite composite loaded with ibuprofen and acetyl-salicylic acid submitted to different sterilization treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larena, A.; Cáceres, D. A.; Vicario, C.; Fuentes, A.

    2004-11-01

    It has been demonstrated that chitosan-hydroxyapatite composite induces osteoconductivity in osseous defects but also could act as drug vehicle. It is important be able to load these composites with short-time life and controlled action anti-inflammatories to reduce or eliminate undesirable inflammatory processes. The goal of the present study is to define the variation between surface properties that this composite experiments as consequence of several sterilization treatments, and application of several pharmaceutical products relating with physical properties. Morphological changes on surface, achieved by polarization and confocal microscopies, thermal and physical properties of chitosan composites and the NSAIDs release process kinetics so as the sterilization treatment effects observed by UV-vis spectroscopy were studied. In this article, it has been demonstrated that the kind of sterilization has no important influence in NSAIDs release in chitosan membranes or composites but differs a little with chitosan membranes no submitted to sterilization treatments.

  10. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  11. Metabolite kinetics: formation of acetaminophen from deuterated and nondeuterated phenacetin and acetanilide on acetaminophen sulfation kinetics in the perfused rat liver preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, K.S.; Waller, L.; Horning, M.G.; Chan, K.K.

    1982-07-01

    The role of hepatic intrinsic clearance for metabolite formation from various precursors on subsequent metabolite elimination was was investigated in the once-through perfused rat liver preparation. Two pairs of acetaminophen precursors: (/sup 14/C) phenacetin-d5 and (/sup 3/H) phenacetin-do, (/sup 14/C) acetanilide and (/sup 3/H) phenacetin were delivered by constant flow (10 ml/min/liver) either by normal or retrograde perfusion to the rat liver preparations. The extents of acetaminophen sulfation were compared within the same preparation. The data showed that the higher the hepatocellular activity (intrinsic clearance) for acetaminophen formation, the greater the extent of subsequent acetaminophen sulfation. The findings were explained on the basis of blood transit time and metabolite duration time. Because of blood having only a finite transit time in liver, the longer the drug requires for metabolite formation, the less time will remain for metabolite sulfation and the less will be the degree of subsequent sulfation. Conversely, when the drug forms the primary metabolite rapidly, a longer time will remain for the metabolite to be sulfated in liver to result in a greater degree of metabolite sulfation. Finally, the effects of hepatic intrinsic clearances for metabolite formation and zonal distribution of enzyme systems for metabolite formation and elimination in liver are discussed.

  12. Effect of Methylsulfonylmethane Pretreatment on Aceta-minophen Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bohlooli, Shahab; Mohammadi, Sadollah; Amirshahrokhi, Keyvan; Mirzanejad-asl, Hafez; Yosefi, Mohammad; Mohammadi-Nei, Amir; Chinifroush, Mir Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a sulfur-containing compound found in a wide range of human foods including fruits, vegetables, grains and beverages. In this study the effect of MSM pretreatment on acetaminophen induced liver damage was investigated. Materials and Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were pretreated with 100 mg/kg MSM for one week. On day seven rats were received acetaminophen (850 mg/kg, intraperitoneal). Twenty-four hours later, blood samples were taken to determine serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Tissue samples of liver were also taken for the determination of the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA); total glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity together with histopathological observations. Results: High dose of acetaminophen administration caused a significant decrease in the GSH level of the liver tissue, which was accompanied with a decrease in SOD activity and increases in tissue MDA level and MPO activity. Serum ALT, AST levels were also found elevated in the acetaminophen-treated group. Pretreatment with MSM for one week was significantly attenuated all of these biochemical indices. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that MSM pretreatment could alleviate hepatic injury induced by acetaminophen intoxication, may be through its sulfur donating and antioxidant effects. PMID:24106592

  13. Protective Effect of Acacia nilotica (L.) against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatocellular Damage in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Narayanan; Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2013-01-01

    The potential biological functions of A. nilotica have long been described in traditional system of medicine. However, the protective effect of A. nilotica on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity is still unknown. The present study attempted to investigate the protective effect of A. nilotica against acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in Wistar rats. The biochemical liver functional tests Alanine transaminase (ALT), Aspartate transaminase (AST), Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin, total protein, oxidative stress test (Lipid peroxidation), antioxidant parameter glutathione (GSH), and histopathological changes were examined. Our results show that the pretreatment with A. nilotica (250 mg/kg·bw) orally revealed attenuation of serum activities of ALT, AST, ALP, liver weight, and total bilirubin levels that were enhanced by administration of acetaminophen. Further, pretreatment with extract elevated the total protein and GSH level and decreased the level of LPO. Histopathological analysis confirmed the alleviation of liver damage and reduced lesions caused by acetaminophen. The present study undoubtedly provides a proof that hepatoprotective action of A. nilotica extract may rely on its effect on reducing the oxidative stress in acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in rat model. PMID:23864853

  14. Perioperative effects of oral ketorolac and acetaminophen in children undergoing bilateral myringotomy.

    PubMed

    Watcha, M F; Ramirez-Ruiz, M; White, P F; Jones, M B; Lagueruela, R G; Terkonda, R P

    1992-09-01

    Prophylactic administration of analgesics before surgery can decrease the intraoperative anaesthetic requirement and decrease pain during the early postoperative period. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving 90 healthy ASA physical status I or II children undergoing bilateral myringotomy, we compared the postoperative analgesic effects of oral acetaminophen and ketorolac, when administered 30 min before induction of anaesthesia. Patients were randomized to receive saline (0.1 ml.kg-1), acetaminophen (10 mg.kg-1) or ketorolac (1 mg.kg-1) diluted in cherry syrup to a total volume of 5 ml. Anaesthesia was induced and maintained with halothane and nitrous oxide via a face mask. Postoperative pain was assessed by a blinded observer using an objective pain scale. The three study groups were similar with respect to demographic data, duration of anaesthesia and surgery, induction behaviour, oxygen saturation, incidence of postoperative emesis and, recovery times. The ketorolac group had lower postoperative pain scores and required less frequent analgesic therapy in the early postoperative period compared with the acetaminophen and placebo groups. In contrast, there were no differences in pain scores or analgesic requirements between the acetaminophen and the placebo groups. We conclude that the preoperative administration of oral ketorolac, but not acetaminophen, provided better postoperative pain control than placebo in children undergoing bilateral myringotomy. PMID:1394752

  15. Rapid onset of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis after ingestion of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Jin; Lim, Hyun; Park, So Young; Kim, Sujeong; Yoon, Sun-Young; Bae, Yun-Jeong; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Cho, You Sook; Moon, Hee-Bom; Kim, Tae-Bum

    2014-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are rare, but life-threatening, severe cutaneous adverse reactions most frequently caused by exposure to drugs. Several reports have associated the use of acetaminophen with the risk of SJS or TEN. A typical interval from the beginning of drug therapy to the onset of an adverse reaction is 1-3 weeks. A 43-year-old woman and a 60-year-old man developed skin lesions within 3 days after administration of acetaminophen for a 3-day period. Rapid identification of the symptoms of SJS and TEN caused by ingestion of acetaminophen enabled prompt withdrawal of the culprit drug. After administration of intravenous immunoglobulin G, both patients recovered fully and were discharged. These two cases of rapidly developed SJS/TEN after ingestion of acetaminophen highlight the possibility that these complications can develop within only a few days following ingestion of over-the-counter medications such as acetaminophen. PMID:24527413

  16. Evaluation of ketorolac, aspirin, and an acetaminophen-codeine combination in postoperative oral surgery pain.

    PubMed

    Forbes, J A; Butterworth, G A; Burchfield, W H; Beaver, W T

    1990-01-01

    One-hundred twenty-eight outpatients with postoperative pain after the surgical removal of impacted third molars were randomly assigned, on a double-blind basis, to receive oral doses of ketorolac tromethamine 10 mg, aspirin 650 mg, a combination of acetaminophen 600 mg plus codeine 60 mg, or placebo. Using a self-rating record, subjects rated their pain and its relief hourly for 6 hours after medicating. All active medications were significantly superior to placebo. The acetaminophen-codeine combination was significantly superior to aspirin for peak analgesia. Ketorolac was significantly superior to aspirin for every measure of total and peak analgesia, and significantly superior to acetaminophen-codeine for measures of total effect. The analgesic effect of ketorolac was significant by hour 1 and persisted for 6 hours. Repeat-dose data also suggested that ketorolac 10 mg was superior to aspirin 650 mg and acetaminophen-codeine on the day of surgery. Differences among the active medications were trivial for the postoperative days 1-6 analyses. The frequency of adverse effects was over 4 times greater for acetaminophen-codeine than for ketorolac or aspirin. PMID:2082317

  17. Acetaminophen fails to inhibit ethanol-induced subjective effects in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Pickworth, W B; Klein, S A; George, F R; Henningfield, J E

    1992-01-01

    In animals, ethanol causes some of its CNS effects by releasing prostaglandins (PG); this is demonstrated by reports that prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors (PGSIs) diminish ethanol-induced effects. However, use of animals in these studies has precluded testing for subjective effects. We studied the interaction of ethanol and acetaminophen, a PGSI, in a double-blind crossover experiment. Six adult males were given no drug or acetaminophen (0, 325, 650, 1300 or 1950 mg) 75 min before ethanol (total dose = 0.625 g/kg; five divided doses). Physiologic, subjective and performance measures were collected. Compared to the no drug condition, ethanol significantly increased ratings of drug "liking," "drunk," "sluggish" and "drug strength" and decreased ratings of "sober." Ethanol increased heart rate and acetaminophen did not diminish or enhance this effect. The failure to antagonize ethanol-induced subjective and physiologic effects by acetaminophen in humans may be due to species differences or inadequate dosage of the PGSI. It is also possible that subjective and certain physiologic effects of ethanol in humans are not mediated by prostaglandin-dependent neural processes. Nevertheless, the finding that at greater than typical analgesic doses, acetaminophen failed to prevent subjective effects of ethanol is of clinical significance. PMID:1539069

  18. Differential effects of isoniazid and oral contraceptive steroids on antipyrine oxidation and acetaminophen conjugation.

    PubMed

    Ochs, H R; Greenblatt, D J; Verburg-Ochs, B; Abernethy, D R; Knüchel, M

    1984-01-01

    Factors influencing hepatic oxidation of antipyrine and conjugation of acetaminophen were evaluated in volunteers who received 1.0 g of antipyrine intravenously and on a different occasion a 650 mg intravenous dose of acetaminophen. In study one, subjects received both drugs in the control state and at another time during coadministration of isoniazid (INH), 180 mg daily. In control versus INH conditions, mean clearance of antipyrine was reduced from 0.67 to 0.60 ml/min/kg as was clearance of acetaminophen from 4.97 to 4.23 ml/min/kg, but these differences were not statistically significant. In study two, females on low-dose estrogen oral contraceptives (OC) and drug-free controls matched for age received both drugs. Compared to controls, OC users had reduced total clearance of antipyrine (0.71 vs. 0.50 ml/min/kg; p less than 0.005) and prolonged antipyrine t1/2 (9.6 vs. 13.3 h; p less than 0.005). For acetaminophen, however, OC users had higher clearance (5.2 vs. 6.1 ml/min/kg) and shorter t1/2 (2.2 vs. 1.9 h) although differences did not attain statistical significance. Clearance of antipyrine and acetaminophen across both studies was not statistically significantly correlated within individuals (r = 0.22). The capacities for drug oxidation and conjugation appear to be controlled by different mechanisms. PMID:6728897

  19. Reduced distribution and clearance of acetaminophen in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ochs, H R; Schuppan, U; Greenblatt, D J; Abernethy, D R

    1983-01-01

    Acetaminophen is a widely prescribed analgesic/antipyretic metabolized by hepatic glucuronide and sulfate conjugation. Twelve patients, 30-66 years of age, with stable Class III or IV congestive heart failure (CHF) and 12 healthy controls matched for age, sex, and weight received single 650-mg intravenous doses of acetaminophen. Pharmacokinetic variables were determined from multiple plasma acetaminophen concentrations measured by liquid chromatography during 12 h after the dose. Compared with controls, mean total clearance of acetaminophen was reduced in CHF patients (3.56 vs. 4.59 ml/min/kg, p less than 0.025), indicating reduced biotransformation capacity in this disease. Volume of distribution was also significantly reduced in CHF patients (0.85 vs. 1.02 L/kg, p less than 0.05). Since elimination half-life depends on both volume of distribution and clearance (both of which were reduced), the half-life was similar between groups (2.87 vs. 2.34 h, NS). Thus, hepatic conjugation of acetaminophen is impaired in CHF. The finding may also apply to other drugs biotransformed by conjugation. PMID:6193370

  20. Comparative study of the adsorption of acetaminophen on activated carbons in simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Rey-Mafull, Carlos A; Tacoronte, Juan E; Garcia, Raquel; Tobella, Jorge; Llópiz, Julio C; Iglesias, Alberto; Hotza, Dachamir

    2014-01-01

    Samples of commercial activated carbons (AC) obtained from different sources: Norit E Supra USP, Norit B Test EUR, and ML (Baracoa, Cuba) were investigated. The adsorption of acetaminophen, Co = 2500 mg/L, occured in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.2 in contact with activated carbon for 4 h at 310 K in water bath with stirring. Residual acetaminophen was monitored by UV visible. The results were converted to scale adsorption isotherms using alternative models: Langmuir TI and TII, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) and Temkin. Linearized forms of the characteristic parameters were obtained in each case. The models that best fit the experimental data were Langmuir TI and Temkin with R(2) ≥0.98. The regression best fits followed the sequence: Langmuir TI = Temkin > DR > LangmuirTII > Freundlich. The microporosity determined by adsorption of CO2 at 273 K with a single term DR regression presented R(2) > 0.98. The adsorption of acetaminophen may occur in specific sites and also in the basal region. It was determined that the adsorption process of acetaminophen on AC in SGF is spontaneous (ΔG <0) and exothermic (-ΔHads.). Moreover, the area occupied by the acetaminophen molecule was calculated with a relative error from 7.8 to 50%. PMID:24570846

  1. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine the course of aminotransferase elevation during prolonged acetaminophen administration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acetaminophen administration for more than 4 days causes aminotransferase elevation in some subjects. The objective of this randomized, placebo-controlled trial is to describe the course of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation in subjects administered 4 g/day of acetaminophen for at least 16 days. Methods A randomized, placebo controlled trial of acetaminophen (4 g/day) vs placebo. Subjects were healthy volunteers with normal liver enzymes. The primary outcome was the course of ALT during acetaminophen administration. All subjects were treated for a minimum of 16 days. Subjects with ALT elevation at day 16 were continued on treatment until these elevations resolved up to a maximum of 40 days. Subjects were also evaluated for elevation of INR or serum bilirubin as evidence of hepatic dysfunction. Results 157/205 (77%) completed acetaminophen subjects had no ALT elevation or transient elevations that resolved by day 16. Of the 48 subjects who had ALT elevations at study day 16, 47 continued on acetaminophen and had resolution by study day 40. One acetaminophen subject did not have resolution by study day 40, and the course of aminotransferase elevation suggests an alternative cause. One placebo subject had an ALT elevation at day 16 that resolved by day 22. The highest observed ALT among all acetaminophen subjects was 191 IU/L. The mean ALT at day 16 was 4.4 IU/L higher for the acetaminophen than for the placebo group. No subject developed liver dysfunction. Conclusions A minority of subjects treated with 4 g/day of acetaminophen for 16 days will have low-grade aminotransferase elevations that are not accompanied by liver dysfunction and resolve if administration is continued. Trials registration Clintrials.gov NCT00743093 registered August 26, 2008 PMID:25047090

  2. TRPA1 mediates the hypothermic action of acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Clive; Andersson, David A.; Bevan, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is an effective antipyretic and one of the most commonly used analgesic drugs. Unlike antipyretic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, APAP elicits hypothermia in addition to its antipyretic effect. Here we have examined the mechanisms responsible for the hypothermic activity of APAP. Subcutaneous, but not intrathecal, administration of APAP elicited a dose dependent decrease in body temperature in wildtype mice. Hypothermia was abolished in mice pre-treated with resiniferatoxin to destroy or defunctionalize peripheral TRPV1-expressing terminals, but resistant to inhibition of cyclo-oxygenases. The hypothermic activity was independent of TRPV1 since APAP evoked hypothermia was identical in wildtype and Trpv1−/− mice, and not reduced by administration of a maximally effective dose of a TRPV1 antagonist. In contrast, a TRPA1 antagonist inhibited APAP induced hypothermia and APAP was without effect on body temperature in Trpa1−/− mice. In a model of yeast induced pyrexia, administration of APAP evoked a marked hypothermia in wildtype and Trpv1−/− mice, but only restored normal body temperature in Trpa1−/− and Trpa1−/−/Trpv1−/− mice. We conclude that TRPA1 mediates APAP evoked hypothermia. PMID:26227887

  3. Chitohexaose protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Barman, P K; Mukherjee, R; Prusty, B K; Suklabaidya, S; Senapati, S; Ravindran, B

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-para-aminophenol (APAP)) toxicity causes acute liver failure by inducing centrilobular hepatic damage as a consequence of mitochondrial oxidative stress. Sterile inflammation, triggered by hepatic damage, facilitates gut bacterial translocation leading to systemic inflammation; TLR4-mediated activation by LPS has been shown to have a critical role in APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity. In this study, we demonstrate significant protection mediated by chitohexaose (Chtx) in mice challenged with a lethal dose of APAP (400 mg/kg b.w.). Decreased mortality by Chtx was associated with reduced hepatic damage, increased peritoneal migration of neutrophils, decreased mRNA expression of IL-1β as well as inhibition of inflammasome activation in liver. Further, an alternate mouse model of co-administration of a sublethal doses of APAP (200 mg/kg b.w.) and LPS (5 mg/kg b.w.) operating synergistically and mediating complete mortality was developed. Overwhelming inflammation, characterized by increased inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and so on) in liver as well as in circulation and mortality was demonstrable in this model. Also, Chtx administration mediated significant reversal of mortality in APAP+LPS co-administered mice, which was associated with reduced IL-1β in liver and plasma cytokines in this model. In conclusion, Chtx being a small molecular weight linear carbohydrate offers promise for clinical management of liver failure associated with APAP overdose. PMID:27171266

  4. Chitohexaose protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Barman, P K; Mukherjee, R; Prusty, B K; Suklabaidya, S; Senapati, S; Ravindran, B

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-para-aminophenol (APAP)) toxicity causes acute liver failure by inducing centrilobular hepatic damage as a consequence of mitochondrial oxidative stress. Sterile inflammation, triggered by hepatic damage, facilitates gut bacterial translocation leading to systemic inflammation; TLR4-mediated activation by LPS has been shown to have a critical role in APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity. In this study, we demonstrate significant protection mediated by chitohexaose (Chtx) in mice challenged with a lethal dose of APAP (400 mg/kg b.w.). Decreased mortality by Chtx was associated with reduced hepatic damage, increased peritoneal migration of neutrophils, decreased mRNA expression of IL-1β as well as inhibition of inflammasome activation in liver. Further, an alternate mouse model of co-administration of a sublethal doses of APAP (200 mg/kg b.w.) and LPS (5 mg/kg b.w.) operating synergistically and mediating complete mortality was developed. Overwhelming inflammation, characterized by increased inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and so on) in liver as well as in circulation and mortality was demonstrable in this model. Also, Chtx administration mediated significant reversal of mortality in APAP+LPS co-administered mice, which was associated with reduced IL-1β in liver and plasma cytokines in this model. In conclusion, Chtx being a small molecular weight linear carbohydrate offers promise for clinical management of liver failure associated with APAP overdose. PMID:27171266

  5. Acetaminophen inhibits hemoprotein-catalyzed lipid peroxidation and attenuates rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Boutaud, Olivier; Moore, Kevin P.; Reeder, Brandon J.; Harry, David; Howie, Alexander J.; Wang, Shuhe; Carney, Clare K.; Masterson, Tina S.; Amin, Taneem; Wright, David W.; Wilson, Michael T.; Oates, John A.; Roberts, L. Jackson

    2010-01-01

    Hemoproteins, hemoglobin and myoglobin, once released from cells can cause severe oxidative damage as a consequence of heme redox cycling between ferric and ferryl states that generates radical species that induce lipid peroxidation. We demonstrate in vitro that acetaminophen inhibits hemoprotein-induced lipid peroxidation by reducing ferryl heme to its ferric state and quenching globin radicals. Severe muscle injury (rhabdomyolysis) is accompanied by the release of myoglobin that becomes deposited in the kidney, causing renal injury. We previously showed in a rat model of rhabdomyolysis that redox cycling between ferric and ferryl myoglobin yields radical species that cause severe oxidative damage to the kidney. In this model, acetaminophen at therapeutic plasma concentrations significantly decreased oxidant injury in the kidney, improved renal function, and reduced renal damage. These findings also provide a hypothesis for potential therapeutic applications for acetaminophen in diseases involving hemoprotein-mediated oxidative injury. PMID:20133658

  6. Comparative study of ibuprofen lysine and acetaminophen in patients with postoperative dental pain.

    PubMed

    Mehlisch, D R; Jasper, R D; Brown, P; Korn, S H; McCarroll, K; Murakami, A A

    1995-01-01

    This single-dose, double-blind, parallel-group, single-site study compared ibuprofen lysine 400 mg with acetaminophen 1000 mg and placebo in 240 patients with moderate-to-severe postoperative dental pain. The relative onset of analgesic response, overall analgesic efficacy, duration of effect, and safety were assessed over a 6-hour postdose period. Analgesic efficacy was assessed by patient self-rating of pain intensity, pain relief, time to meaningful pain relief, need for additional analgesic medication, and patient global evaluation. Both ibuprofen lysine 400 mg and acetaminophen 1000 mg were significantly (P < or = 0.05) more effective than placebo. Ibuprofen lysine had a significantly (P < or = 0.05) faster onset of action with greater peak and overall analgesic effect than did effect than did acetaminophen. All treatments were generally well tolerated. PMID:8595637

  7. Electrochemical Synthesis and Kinetic Evaluation of Electrooxidation of Acetaminophen in the Presence of Antidepressant Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nematollahi, Davood; Feyzi Barnaji, Bahareh; Amani, Ameneh

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of obtaining information about drug-drug interaction (DDI) between acetaminophen and some of antidepressant drugs (fluoxetine, sertraline and nortriptyline), in the present work we studied the electrochemical oxidation of acetaminophen (paracetamol) in the presence of these drugs by means of cyclic voltammetry and Controlled-potential coulometry. The reaction between N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone-imine (NAPQI) produced from electrooxidation of acetaminophen and antidepressant drugs (see scheme 1) cause to reduce the concentration of NAPQI and decreases the effective concentration of antidepressants. The cyclic voltammetric data were analyzed by digital simulation to measure the homogeneous parameters for the suggesting electrode mechanism. The calculated observed homogeneous rate constants (kobs) for the reaction of electrochemically generated N-acetyl-para benzoquinn-imine with antidepressant drugs was found to vary in the order kobsnortriptyline > kobssertraline > kobsfluxetine at biological pH. PMID:26664378

  8. Evaluation of Hepatoprotective Activity of Adansonia digitata Extract on Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hanafy, Abeer; Aldawsari, Hibah M.; Badr, Jihan M.; Ibrahim, Amany K.; Abdel-Hady, Seham El-Sayed

    2016-01-01

    The methanol extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. (Malvaceae) was examined for its hepatoprotective activity against liver damage induced by acetaminophen in rats. The principle depends on the fact that administration of acetaminophen will be associated with development of oxidative stress. In addition, hepatospecific serum markers will be disturbed. Treatment of the rats with the methanol extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. prior to administration of acetaminophen significantly reduced the disturbance in liver function. Liver functions were measured by assessment of total protein, total bilirubin, ALP, ALT, and AST. Oxidative stress parameter and antioxidant markers were also evaluated. Moreover, histopathological evaluation was performed in order to assess liver case regarding inflammatory infiltration or necrosis. Animals were observed for any symptoms of toxicity after administration of extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. to ensure safety of the fruit extract. PMID:27118980

  9. Carbon Based Electrodes Modified with Horseradish Peroxidase Immobilized in Conducting Polymers for Acetaminophen Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tertis, Mihaela; Florea, Anca; Sandulescu, Robert; Cristea, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The development and optimization of new biosensors with horseradish peroxidase immobilized in carbon nanotubes-polyethyleneimine or polypyrrole nanocomposite film at the surface of two types of transducer is described. The amperometric detection of acetaminophen was carried out at −0.2 V versus Ag/AgCl using carbon based-screen printed electrodes (SPEs) and glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs) as transducers. The electroanalytical parameters of the biosensors are highly dependent on their configuration and on the dimensions of the carbon nanotubes. The best limit of detection obtained for acetaminophen was 1.36 ± 0.013 μM and the linear range 9.99–79.01 μM for the HRP-SWCNT/PEI in GCE configuration. The biosensors were successfully applied for the detection of acetaminophen in several drug formulations. PMID:23580052

  10. Evaluation of Hepatoprotective Activity of Adansonia digitata Extract on Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hanafy, Abeer; Aldawsari, Hibah M; Badr, Jihan M; Ibrahim, Amany K; Abdel-Hady, Seham El-Sayed

    2016-01-01

    The methanol extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. (Malvaceae) was examined for its hepatoprotective activity against liver damage induced by acetaminophen in rats. The principle depends on the fact that administration of acetaminophen will be associated with development of oxidative stress. In addition, hepatospecific serum markers will be disturbed. Treatment of the rats with the methanol extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. prior to administration of acetaminophen significantly reduced the disturbance in liver function. Liver functions were measured by assessment of total protein, total bilirubin, ALP, ALT, and AST. Oxidative stress parameter and antioxidant markers were also evaluated. Moreover, histopathological evaluation was performed in order to assess liver case regarding inflammatory infiltration or necrosis. Animals were observed for any symptoms of toxicity after administration of extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. to ensure safety of the fruit extract. PMID:27118980

  11. Effects of naloxone and flumazenil on antinociceptive action of acetaminophen in rats

    PubMed Central

    Madenoğlu, Halit; Kaçmaz, Mustafa; Aksu, Recep; Bicer, Cihangir; Yaba, Gülay; Yildiz, Karamehmet; Doğru, Kudret; Boyaci, Adem

    2010-01-01

    Background: Studies of acetaminophen suggest that multiple nociceptive pathways are involved in the drug's analgesic action. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether naloxone and flumazenil were able to modify or antagonize the antinociceptive effect of acetaminophen in rats. Methods: Adult albino Wistar rats were used in the study and randomly allocated to 1 of 4 groups. The acetaminophen group (A group) was administered IP saline and then 300 mg/kg IP acetaminophen 5 minutes thereafter. The acetaminophen + naloxone group (AN group) was pretreated with 1 mg/kg IP naloxone, followed by 300 mg/kg IP acetaminophen 5 minutes later. The acetaminophen + flumazenil group (AF group) was pretreated with 1 mg/kg IP flumazenil, followed by 300 mg/kg IP acetaminophen 5 minutes later. The control group received 2.5 mL IP saline, followed by an additional 2.5 mL IP injection of saline 5 minutes later. The paw-withdrawal latency period of the rats was assessed by an investigator blinded to treatment using the hot-plate test at 30, 45, 60, and 90 minutes after administration of acetaminophen. Results: Thirty-two rats were evenly randomized by envelope method into 4 groups of 8 rats each. Baseline values for the A, AN, AF, and control groups were not significantly different (9.1 [2.3], 10.5 [2.7], 9.8 [3.0], and 8.9 [1.4] sec, respectively). In the AF group, flumazenil appeared to antagonize the analgesic effect exerted by the acetaminophen in the hot-plate test (30 min, 10.3 [3.7] sec; 45 min, 11.7 [5.1] sec; 60 min, 12.1 [5.1] sec; and 90 min, 12.2 [4.9] sec) and values were not significantly different from those obtained in the control group (30 min, 9.8 [2.2] sec; 45 min, 9.0 [1.6] sec; 60 min, 9.2 [1.6] sec; and 90 min, 8.5 [2.0] sec). In the AN group, naloxone did not significantly affect the values observed in the hot-plate test (30 min, 18.0 [4.5] sec; 45 min, 21.5 [7.8] sec; 60 min, 20.5 [5.9] sec; and 90 min, 22.3 [7.4] sec) and values at all time

  12. Prevention of acetaminophen induced hepatorenal damage in mice with rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza glabra A histophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anjali; Rathore, H S

    2011-01-01

    Protective role of Gycyrrhiza glabra rhizomes (roots) at three dose levels (100, 75, & 50 mg/kg/bw) against sublethaldose (300 mg/kg/bw) of acetaminophen (paracetamol) induced hepatorenal damage has been assessed in mice. Parameters of study were glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), billirubin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as liver function tests, creatinine and urea as kidney function tests and histology for pathology. G.glabra could antagonize acetaminophen induced both,hepato and nephrotoxicity in dose dependent manner. No protection provided by a single dose of G.glabra (1.5 gm/kg/bw) against lethal dose of acetaminophen (1gm/kg/bw). Probable protective role is discussed. PMID:22557431

  13. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects of punicalagin and punicalin on acetaminophen-induced liver damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, C C; Hsu, Y F; Lin, T C; Hsu, H Y

    2001-05-01

    Punicalagin and punicalin were isolated from the leaves of Terminalia catappa L., a Combretaceous plant distributed throughout tropical and subtropical beaches, which is used for the treatment of dermatitis and hepatitis. Our previous studies showed that both of these compounds exert antioxidative activity. In this study, the antihepatotoxic activity of punicalagin and punicalin on acetaminophen-induced toxicity in the rat liver was evaluated. After evaluating the changes of several biochemical functions in serum, the levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were increased by acetaminophen administration and reduced by punicalagin and punicalin. Histological changes around the hepatic central vein and oxidative damage induced by acetaminophen were also recovered by both compounds. The data show that both punicalagin and punicalin exert antihepatotoxic activity, but treatment with larger doses enhanced liver damage. These results suggest that even if punicalagin and punicalin have antioxidant activity at small doses, treatment with larger doses will possibly induce some cell toxicities. PMID:11351354

  14. Possible Hepatotoxicity Associated With Intravenous Acetaminophen in a 36-Year-Old Female Patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Philip J.; Shen, Mark; Wang, Shan; Spiegler, Peter; Caraccio, Thomas; DeMuro, Jonas P.; Malone, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 36-year-old female who came into the emergency department with right-side abdominal pain. She went to the operating room for a diagnostic laparoscopy and appendectomy. She received intravenous (IV) acetaminophen every six hours both preoperatively and postoperatively for pain control. The patient’s aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels were elevated and peaked at 4,833 and 6,600 IU/L, respectively, from baselines of 14 and 15, respectively, while she was receiving 16 doses of IV acetaminophen. The patient was transferred to a regional liver transplant center for evaluation for a transplant. She was treated with IV N-acetylcysteine and discharged with a normal liver-function test without a transplant. This case report supports the possibility of hepatotoxicity associated with IV acetaminophen. PMID:25673962

  15. Human Ex-Vivo Liver Model for Acetaminophen-induced Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Schreiter, Thomas; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Schlattjan, Martin; Treckmann, Jürgen; Paul, Andreas; Strucksberg, Karl-Heinz; Baba, Hideo A.; Odenthal, Margarete; Gieseler, Robert K.; Gerken, Guido; Arteel, Gavin E.; Canbay, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Reliable test systems to identify hepatotoxicity are essential to predict unexpected drug-related liver injury. Here we present a human ex-vivo liver model to investigate acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Human liver tissue was perfused over a 30 hour period with hourly sampling from the perfusate for measurement of general metabolism and clinical parameters. Liver function was assessed by clearance of indocyanine green (ICG) at 4, 20 and 28 hours. Six pieces of untreated human liver specimen maintained stable liver function over the entire perfusion period. Three liver sections incubated with low-dose acetaminophen revealed strong damage, with ICG half-lives significantly higher than in non-treated livers. In addition, the release of microRNA-122 was significantly higher in acetaminophen-treated than in non-treated livers. Thus, this model allows for investigation of hepatotoxicity in human liver tissue upon applying drug concentrations relevant in patients. PMID:27550092

  16. Fulminate Hepatic Failure in a 5 Year Old Female after Inappropriate Acetaminophen Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kasmi, Irena; Sallabanda, Sashenka; Kasmi, Gentian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acetaminophen is a drug widely used in children because of its safety and efficacy. Although the risk of its toxicity is lower in children such reactions occur in pediatric patients from intentional overdoses and less frequently attributable to unintended inappropriate dosing. The aim of reporting this case is to attract the attention to the risk of the acetaminophen toxicity when administered in high doses. CASE PRESENTATION: We report here a 5 year old girl who developed fulminate liver failure with renal impairment and acute pancreatitis, as a result of acetaminophen toxicity caused from unintentional repeated supratherapeutic ingestion, with a total administered dose of 4800 mg in three consecutive days, 1600 mg/day, approximately 90 mg/kg/day. The blood level of acetaminophen after 10 hours of the last administered dose was 32 mg/l. The patient presented with high fever, jaundice, lethargic, agitating with abdominal pain accompanied by encephalopathy. The liver function test revealed with high level of alanine aminotransferase 5794 UI/l and aspartate aminotransferase 6000 UI/l. Early initiation of oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) after biochemical evidence of liver toxicity was beneficial with rapid improvement of liver enzymes, hepatic function and encephalopathy. During the course of the illness the child developed acute pancreatitis with hyperamylasemia 255 UI/L and hyperlypasemia 514 UI/L. Patient totally recovered within 29 days. CONCLUSION: Healthcare providers should considered probable acetaminophen toxicity in any child who has received the drug and presented with liver failure. When there is a high index of suspicion of acetaminophen toxicity NAC should be initiated and continued until there are no signs of hepatic dysfunction.

  17. Double-blind parallel comparison of ketoprofen (Orudis), acetaminophen plus codeine, and placebo in postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Turek, M D; Baird, W M

    1988-12-01

    One hundred sixty-one patients with postoperative pain were treated at a single center in a double-blind, randomized, parallel study designed to compare the efficacy and safety of single oral doses of ketoprofen (50 and 150 mg), an acetaminophen (650 mg) plus codeine (60 mg) combination, and placebo. From 1 through 4 hours after administration of the study drugs, the mean summed pain intensity difference (SPID) and time-weighted total pain relief (TOPAR) scores for the three active treatments generally were significantly (P less than 0.05) higher than those for placebo but not significantly different from each other. At the 6-hour evaluation, the ketoprofen groups, but not the acetaminophen-codeine group, had higher (P less than 0.05) mean SPID and TOPAR scores than the placebo group, as a result of a shorter duration of pain relief in the acetaminophen-codeine group. The 6-hour TOPAR scores were significantly (P less than 0.05) higher for both ketoprofen groups than for the acetaminophen-codeine group; the ketoprofen 150 mg group also had significantly (P less than 0.05) higher mean 6-hour SPID and global subjective assessment scores. As a result of a higher frequency of somnolence, there was a significantly (P less than 0.05) greater incidence of central nervous system adverse drug reactions among patients treated with acetaminophen plus codeine than among those treated with 150 mg of ketoprofen. These results indicate that the analgesic efficacy of both 50 and 150 mg doses of ketoprofen equals that of acetaminophen 650 mg plus codeine 60 mg and the duration of the analgesic effect of ketoprofen is significantly longer. PMID:3072354

  18. Evaluation of biochemical alterations produced by acetaminophen overdose in Bubalus bubalis

    PubMed Central

    Daundkar, Prashant Sudamrao; Sharma, Suresh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Evaluation of the effect of acetaminophen (APAP) overdose on biochemical parameters in buffalo calves. Materials and Methods: The experiment was conducted on six healthy male buffalo calves of 6-12 months age. The APAP was administered intramuscularly at the dose rate of 250 mg/kg body weight (B.W.) on day 0, followed by two subsequent doses at the dose rate of 50 mg/kg B.W. on day 2 and 4, respectively. Biochemical parameters including alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), amylase, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and total acid phosphate were estimated in the plasma samples collected on 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6th day from the start of treatment. Results: Significant increase in the plasma levels of ALT (446.0%), ALP (137%), BUN (216.8%) and creatinine (149.2%) was recorded on day 3, 4, 3, and 4, respectively, after the start of APAP dosing. However, a significant decrease was observed in amylase activity with a maximum decline of 48.3% on 6th day after the start of treatment. No significant alteration was observed in ACP activity after APAP overdose. Conclusion: Administration of APAP in overdose produced hepatic dysfunction as evidenced by a significant increase in the activities of ALT and ALP, whereas reduced amylase may indicate acute pancreatitis in buffalo calves. In addition, repeated dosing also resulted in renal impairment in these animals as seen by a significant elevation in BUN and creatinine levels, whereas negligible effect on prostatic function. PMID:27047122

  19. Rapid and Selective Crystallization of Acetaminophen using Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Muzaffer; Syed, Maleeha F; Bhatt, Mona J; Hoffman, Eugene J; Aslan, Kadir

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the application of Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization (MA-MAEC) technique to rapid and selective crystallization of a small drug compound. i.e. acetaminophen. Subsequent characterization of the crystals by optical microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and Raman spectroscopy showed quantitatively selective growth of different crystal forms at various experimental conditions. Acetaminophen crystals were grown predominantly as Form I (99%) on blank glass slides at room temperature. Form II crystals with 39% purity grown on SIFs using microwave energy. PMID:22485195

  20. Hemizygosity of transsulfuration genes confers increased vulnerability against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiya, Yoshifumi; Kamata, Shotaro; Mitsuoka, Saya; Okada, Norihiko; Yoshida, Saori; Yamamoto, Junya; Ohkubo, Rika; Abiko, Yumi; Yamada, Hidenori; Akahoshi, Noriyuki; Kasahara, Tadashi; Kumagai, Yoshito; Ishii, Isao

    2015-01-15

    The key mechanism for acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent formation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, a potent electrophile that forms protein adducts. Previous studies revealed the fundamental role of glutathione, which binds to and detoxifies N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. Glutathione is synthesized from cysteine in the liver, and N-acetylcysteine is used as a sole antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Here, we evaluated the potential roles of transsulfuration enzymes essential for cysteine biosynthesis, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CTH), in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity using hemizygous (Cbs{sup +/−} or Cth{sup +/−}) and homozygous (Cth{sup −/−}) knockout mice. At 4 h after intraperitoneal acetaminophen injection, serum alanine aminotransferase levels were highly elevated in Cth{sup −/−} mice at 150 mg/kg dose, and also in Cbs{sup +/−} or Cth{sup +/−} mice at 250 mg/kg dose, which was associated with characteristic centrilobular hepatocyte oncosis. Hepatic glutathione was depleted while serum malondialdehyde accumulated in acetaminophen-injected Cth{sup −/−} mice but not wild-type mice, although glutamate–cysteine ligase (composed of catalytic [GCLC] and modifier [GCLM] subunits) became more activated in the livers of Cth{sup −/−} mice with lower K{sub m} values for Cys and Glu. Proteome analysis using fluorescent two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis revealed 47 differentially expressed proteins after injection of 150 mg acetaminophen/kg into Cth{sup −/−} mice; the profiles were similar to 1000 mg acetaminophen/kg-treated wild-type mice. The prevalence of Cbs or Cth hemizygosity is estimated to be 1:200–300 population; therefore, the deletion or polymorphism of either transsulfuration gene may underlie idiosyncratic acetaminophen vulnerability along with the differences in Cyp, Gclc, and Gclm gene activities. - Highlights: • Cbs{sup +/−}, Cth{sup +/−}, and

  1. Acetaminophen inhibits intestinal p-glycoprotein transport activity.

    PubMed

    Novak, Analia; Carpini, Griselda Delli; Ruiz, María Laura; Luquita, Marcelo G; Rubio, Modesto C; Mottino, Aldo D; Ghanem, Carolina I

    2013-10-01

    Repeated acetaminophen (AP) administration modulates intestinal P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression. Whether AP can modulate P-gp activity in a short-term fashion is unknown. We investigated the acute effect of AP on rat intestinal P-gp activity in vivo and in vitro. In everted intestinal sacs, AP inhibited serosal-mucosal transport of rhodamine 123 (R123), a prototypical P-gp substrate. R123 efflux plotted against R123 concentration adjusted well to a sigmoidal curve. Vmax decreased 50% in the presence of AP, with no modification in EC50, or slope, ruling out the possibility of inhibition to be competitive. Inhibition by AP was absent at 0°C, consistent with interference of the active transport of R123 by AP. Additionally, AP showed no effect on normal localization of P-gp at the apical membrane of the enterocyte and neither affected paracellular permeability. Consistent with absence of a competitive inhibition, two further strategies strongly suggested that AP is not a P-gp substrate. First, serosal-mucosal transport of AP was not affected by the classical P-gp inhibitors verapamil or Psc 833. Second, AP accumulation was not different between P-gp knock-down and wild-type HepG2 cells. In vivo intestinal absorption of digoxin, another substrate of P-gp, was assessed in the presence or absence of AP (100 μM). Portal digoxin concentration was increased by 214%, in average, by AP, as compared with digoxin alone. In conclusion, AP inhibited P-gp activity, increasing intestinal absorption of digoxin, a prototypical substrate. These results suggest that therapeutic efficacy of P-gp substrates can be altered if coadministered with AP. PMID:23897240

  2. Acetaminophen Induces Human Neuroblastoma Cell Death through NFKB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; Santos, Pablo; Ceña, Valentín

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma resistance to apoptosis may contribute to the aggressive behavior of this tumor. Therefore, it would be relevant to activate endogenous cellular death mechanisms as a way to improve neuroblastoma therapy. We used the neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as a model to study the mechanisms involved in acetaminophen (AAP)-mediated toxicity by measuring CYP2E1 enzymatic activity, NFkB p65 subunit activation and translocation to the nucleus, Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase activation. AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. AAP metabolism is partially responsible for this activation, because blockade of the cytochrome CYP2E1 significantly reduced but did not totally prevent, AAP-induced SH-SY5Y cell death. AAP also induced NFkB p65 activation by phosphorylation and its translocation to the nucleus, where NFkB p65 increased IL-1β production. This increase contributed to neuroblastoma cell death through a mechanism involving Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase3 activation. Blockade of NFkB translocation to the nucleus by the peptide SN50 prevented AAP-mediated cell death and IL-1β production. Moreover, overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL did not decrease AAP-mediated IL-1β production, but prevented both AAP and IL-1β-mediated cell death. We also confirmed the AAP toxic actions on SK-N-MC neuroepithelioma and U87MG glioblastoma cell lines. The results presented here suggest that AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in neuroblastoma cells through a mechanism involving NFkB and IL-1β. PMID:23166834

  3. Mechanism of protection by metallothionein against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Saito, Chieko; Yan, Hui-Min; Artigues, Antonio; Villar, Maria T; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2010-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced liver failure in the US. Metallothionein (MT) expression attenuates APAP-induced liver injury. However, the mechanism of this protection remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, C57BL/6 mice were treated with 100 micromol/kg ZnCl2 for 3 days to induce MT. Twenty-four hours after the last dose of zinc, the animals received 300 mg/kg APAP. Liver injury (plasma ALT activities, area of necrosis), DNA fragmentation, peroxynitrite formation (nitrotyrosine staining), MT expression, hepatic glutathione (GSH), and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels were determined after 6 h. APAP alone caused severe liver injury with oxidant stress (increased GSSG levels), peroxynitrite formation, and DNA fragmentation, all of which were attenuated by zinc-induced MT expression. In contrast, MT knockout mice were not protected by zinc. Hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury in primary hepatocytes was dependent only on the intracellular GSH levels but not on MT expression. Thus, the protective effect of MT in vivo was not due to the direct scavenging of reactive oxygen species. Zinc treatment had no effect on the early GSH depletion kinetics after APAP administration, which is an indicator of the metabolic activation of APAP to its reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). However, MT was able to effectively trap NAPQI by covalent binding. We conclude that MT scavenges some of the excess NAPQI after GSH depletion and prevents covalent binding to cellular proteins, which is the trigger for the propagation of the cell injury mechanisms through mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear DNA damage. PMID:19835899

  4. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut . E-mail: jaeschke@email.arizona.edu

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-1{beta} and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose.

  5. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu, Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose. PMID:16781746

  6. MECHANISM OF PROTECTION BY METALLOTHIONEIN AGAINST ACETAMINOPHEN HEPATOTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Chieko; Yan, Hui-Min; Artigues, Antonio; Villar, Maria T.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced liver failure in the US. Metallothionein (MT) expression attenuates APAP-induced liver injury. However, the mechanism of this protection remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, C57BL/6 mice were treated with 100 µmol/kg ZnCl2 for 3 days to induce MT. Twenty-four hours after the last dose of zinc, the animals received 300 mg/kg APAP. Liver injury (plasma ALT activities, area of necrosis), DNA fragmentation, peroxynitrite formation (nitrotyrosine staining), MT expression, hepatic glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels were determined after 6 h. APAP alone caused severe liver injury with oxidant stress (increased GSSG levels), peroxynitrite formation and DNA fragmentation, all of which were attenuated by zinc-induced MT expression. In contrast, MT knockout mice were not protected by zinc. Hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury in primary hepatocytes was dependent only on the intracellular GSH levels but not on MT expression. Thus, the protective effect of MT in vivo was not due to the direct scavenging of reactive oxygen species. Zinc treatment had no effect on the early GSH depletion kinetics after APAP administration, which is an indicator of the metabolic activation of APAP to its reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI). However, MT was able to effectively trap NAPQI by covalent binding. We conclude that MT scavenges some of the excess NAPQI after GSH depletion and prevents covalent binding to cellular proteins, which is the trigger for the propagation of the cell injury mechanisms through mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear DNA damage. PMID:19835899

  7. Chronic Acetaminophen Exposure in Pediatric Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Estella M.; Im, Kelly; Belle, Steven H.; Squires, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol [APAP]) is a widely used medication that can cause hepatotoxicity. We examined characteristics and outcomes of children with chronic exposure (CE) to APAP in the multinational Pediatric Acute Liver Failure (PALF) Study. METHODS: A total of 895 children enrolled from 2002 to 2009 were grouped by APAP exposure history as: CE (received multiple doses \\x{2265}2 days; n = 83), single dose exposure (SE; n = 85), and no exposure (NE; n = 498). CE was the reference group for pairwise comparisons. Median values are shown. RESULTS: Patients with CE compared with those with SE were younger (3.5 vs 15.2 years, P < .0001), less likely to be female (46% vs 82%, P < .0001), and more likely to be Hispanic (25% vs 7%, P = .001), but they did not differ significantly from the NE group. At enrollment, total bilirubin was lower with CE than with NE (3.2 vs 13.1 mg/dL, P < .001). Alanine aminotransferase levels were higher with CE than with NE (2384 vs 855 IU/L, P < .0001), but lower than with SE (5140 IU/L, P < .0001). Survival without liver transplantation at 21 days was worse for CE than for SE (68% vs 92%, P = .0004) but better than for NE (49%, P = .008). CONCLUSIONS: Children in the PALF study with CE had lower bilirubin and higher alanine aminotransferase than those with NE. Outcomes with CE were worse than with SE but better than with NE. Potential reasons for this outcomes advantage over non–APAP-exposed subjects should be explored. PMID:23439908

  8. Mouse liver protein sulfhydryl depletion after acetaminophen exposure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Greenhaw, James; Shi, Qiang; Roberts, Dean W; Hinson, Jack A; Muskhelishvili, Levan; Davis, Kelly; Salminen, William F

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury is the leading cause of acute liver failure in many countries. This study determined the extent of liver protein sulfhydryl depletion not only in whole liver homogenate but also in the zonal pattern of sulfhydryl depletion within the liver lobule. A single oral gavage dose of 150 or 300 mg/kg APAP in B6C3F1 mice produced increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels, liver necrosis, and glutathione depletion in a dose-dependent manner. Free protein sulfhydryls were measured in liver protein homogenates by labeling with maleimide linked to a near infrared fluorescent dye followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Global protein sulfhydryl levels were decreased significantly (48.4%) starting at 1 hour after the APAP dose and maintained at this reduced level through 24 hours. To visualize the specific hepatocytes that had reduced protein sulfhydryl levels, frozen liver sections were labeled with maleimide linked to horseradish peroxidase. The centrilobular areas exhibited dramatic decreases in free protein sulfhydryls while the periportal regions were essentially spared. These protein sulfhydryl-depleted regions correlated with areas exhibiting histopathologic injury and APAP binding to protein. The majority of protein sulfhydryl depletion was due to reversible oxidation since the global- and lobule-specific effects were essentially reversed when the samples were reduced with tris(2-carboxyethy)phosphine before maleimide labeling. These temporal and zonal pattern changes in protein sulfhydryl oxidation shed new light on the importance that changes in protein redox status might play in the pathogenesis of APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:23093024

  9. Kinetic study of acetaminophen degradation by visible light photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Gotostos, Mary Jane N; Su, Chia-Chi; De Luna, Mark Daniel G; Lu, Ming-Chun

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a novel photocatalyst K3[Fe(CN)6]/TiO2 synthesized via a simple sol-gel method was utilized to degrade acetaminophen (ACT) under visible light with the use of blue and green LED lights. Parameters (medium pH, initial concentration of reactant, catalyst concentration, temperature, and number of blue LED lights) affecting photocatalytic degradation of ACT were also investigated. The experimental result showed that compared to commercially available Degussa P-25 (DP-25) photocatalyst, K3[Fe(CN)6]/TiO2 gave higher degradation efficiency and rate constant (kapp) of ACT. The degradation efficiency or kapp decreased with increasing initial ACT concentration and temperature, but increased with increased number of blue LED lamps. Additionally, kapp increased as initial pH was increased from 5.6 to 6.9, but decreased at a high alkaline condition (pH 8.3). Furthermore, the degradation efficiency and kapp of ACT increased as K3[Fe(CN)6]/TiO2 loading was increased to 1 g L(-1) but decreased and eventually leveled off at photocatalyst loading above this value. Photocatalytic degradation of ACT in K3[Fe(CN)6]/TiO2 catalyst system follows a pseudo-first-order kinetics. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood equation was also satisfactorily used to model the degradation of ACT in K3[Fe(CN)6]/TiO2 catalyst system indicated by a satisfactory linear correlation between 1/kapp and Co, with kini = 6.54 × 10(-4) mM/min and KACT = 17.27 mM(-1). PMID:24766590

  10. A Novel Resolvin-Based Strategy for Limiting Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Suraj J; Luther, Jay; Bohr, Stefan; Iracheta-Vellve, Arvin; Li, Matthew; King, Kevin R; Chung, Raymond T; Yarmush, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The current pharmacologic treatment for APAP hepatotoxicity, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), targets the initial metabolite-driven injury but does not directly affect the host inflammatory response. Because of this, NAC is less effective if given at later stages in the disease course. Resolvins, a novel group of lipid mediators shown to attenuate host inflammation, may be a therapeutic intervention for APAP hepatotoxicity. Methods: The temporal patterns of liver injury and neutrophil activation were investigated in a murine model of APAP hepatotoxicity. In addition, the effect of neutrophil depletion and resolvin administration on the severity of liver injury induced by APAP was studied. In vitro studies to investigate the mechanism of resolvin effect on hepatocyte injury and neutrophil adhesion were performed. Results: We demonstrate that hepatic neutrophil activation occurs secondary to the initial liver injury induced directly by APAP. We also show that neutrophil depletion attenuates APAP-induced liver injury, and administration of resolvins hours after APAP challenge not only attenuates liver injury, but also extends the therapeutic window eightfold compared to NAC. Mechanistic in vitro analysis highlights resolvins' ability to inhibit neutrophil attachment to endothelial cells in the presence of the reactive metabolite of APAP. Conclusions: This study highlights the ability of resolvins to protect against APAP-induced liver injury and extend the therapeutic window compared to NAC. Although the mechanism for resolvin-mediated hepatoprotection is likely multifactorial, inhibition of neutrophil infiltration and activation appears to play an important role. PMID:26986653

  11. Mechanism of protection by metallothionein against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Chieko; Yan, H.-M.; Artigues, Antonio; Villar, Maria T.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2010-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced liver failure in the US. Metallothionein (MT) expression attenuates APAP-induced liver injury. However, the mechanism of this protection remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, C57BL/6 mice were treated with 100 mumol/kg ZnCl{sub 2} for 3 days to induce MT. Twenty-four hours after the last dose of zinc, the animals received 300 mg/kg APAP. Liver injury (plasma ALT activities, area of necrosis), DNA fragmentation, peroxynitrite formation (nitrotyrosine staining), MT expression, hepatic glutathione (GSH), and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels were determined after 6 h. APAP alone caused severe liver injury with oxidant stress (increased GSSG levels), peroxynitrite formation, and DNA fragmentation, all of which were attenuated by zinc-induced MT expression. In contrast, MT knockout mice were not protected by zinc. Hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury in primary hepatocytes was dependent only on the intracellular GSH levels but not on MT expression. Thus, the protective effect of MT in vivo was not due to the direct scavenging of reactive oxygen species. Zinc treatment had no effect on the early GSH depletion kinetics after APAP administration, which is an indicator of the metabolic activation of APAP to its reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). However, MT was able to effectively trap NAPQI by covalent binding. We conclude that MT scavenges some of the excess NAPQI after GSH depletion and prevents covalent binding to cellular proteins, which is the trigger for the propagation of the cell injury mechanisms through mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear DNA damage.

  12. Acetaminophen increases the risk of arsenic-mediated development of hepatic damage in rats by enhancing redox-signaling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Majhi, Chhaya Rani; Khan, Saleem; Leo, Marie Dennis Marcus; Prawez, Shahid; Kumar, Amit; Sankar, Palanisamy; Telang, Avinash Gopal; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath

    2014-02-01

    We evaluated whether the commonly used analgesic-antipyretic drug acetaminophen can modify the arsenic-induced hepatic oxidative stress and also whether withdrawal of acetaminophen administration during the course of long-term arsenic exposure can increase susceptibility of liver to arsenic toxicity. Acetaminophen was co-administered orally to rats for 3 days following 28 days of arsenic pre-exposure (Phase-I) and thereafter, acetaminophen was withdrawn, but arsenic exposure was continued for another 28 days (Phase-II). Arsenic increased lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, depleted glutathione (GSH), and decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities. Acetaminophen caused exacerbation of arsenic-mediated lipid peroxidation and ROS generation and further enhancement of serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities. In Phase-I, acetaminophen caused further GSH depletion and reduction in SOD, catalase, GPx and GR activities, but in Phase-II, only GPx and GR activities were more affected. Arsenic did not alter basal and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-mediated NO production, but decreased constitutive NOS (cNOS)-mediated NO release. Arsenic reduced expression of endothelial NOS (eNOS) and iNOS genes. Acetaminophen up-regulated eNOS and iNOS expression and NO production in Phase-I, but reversed these effects in Phase-II. Results reveal that acetaminophen increased the risk of arsenic-mediated hepatic oxidative damage. Withdrawal of acetaminophen administration also increased susceptibility of liver to hepatotoxicity. Both ROS and NO appeared to mediate lipid peroxidation in Phase-I, whereas only ROS appeared responsible for peroxidative damage in Phase-II. PMID:22120977

  13. Effects of Acetaminophen on Oxidant and Irritant Respiratory Tract Responses to Environmental Tobacco Smoke in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gregory J.; Cichocki, Joseph A.; Doughty, Bennett J.; Manautou, Jose E.; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Morris, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although it is known that acetaminophen causes oxidative injury in the liver, it is not known whether it causes oxidative stress in the respiratory tract. If so, this widely used analgesic may potentiate the adverse effects of oxidant air pollutants. Objectives: The goal of this study was to determine if acetaminophen induces respiratory tract oxidative stress and/or potentiates the oxidative stress and irritant responses to an inhaled oxidant: environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Methods: Acetaminophen [100 mg/kg intraperitoneal (ip)] and/or sidestream tobacco smoke (as a surrogate for ETS, 5 mg/m3 for 10 min) were administered to female C57Bl/6J mice, and airway oxidative stress was assessed by loss of tissue antioxidants [estimated by nonprotein sulfhydryl (NPSH) levels] and/or induction of oxidant stress response genes. In addition, the effects of acetaminophen on airway irritation reflex responses to ETS were examined by plethysmography. Results: Acetaminophen diminished NPSH in nasal, thoracic extrapulmonary, and lung tissues; it also induced the oxidant stress response genes glutamate-cysteine ligase, catalytic subunit, and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, quinone 1, in these sites. ETS produced a similar response. The response to acetaminophen plus ETS was equal to or greater than the sum of the responses to either agent alone. Although it had no effect by itself, acetaminophen greatly increased the reflex irritant response to ETS. Conclusions: At supratherapeutic levels, acetaminophen induced oxidative stress throughout the respiratory tract and appeared to potentiate some responses to environmentally relevant ETS exposure in female C57Bl/6J mice. These results highlight the potential for this widely used drug to modulate responsiveness to oxidant air pollutants. Citation: Smith GJ, Cichocki JA, Doughty BJ, Manautou JE, Jordt SE, Morris JB. 2016. Effects of acetaminophen on oxidant and irritant respiratory tract responses to environmental tobacco smoke in

  14. Inhibition of prostacyclin and thromboxane biosynthesis in healthy volunteers by single and multiple doses of acetaminophen and indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jules I; Musser, Bret J; Tanaka, Wesley K; Taggart, William V; Mehta, Anish; Gottesdiener, Keith M; Greenberg, Howard E

    2015-09-01

    This double-blind, randomized crossover study assessed the effect of acetaminophen (1000 mg every 8 hours) versus indomethacin (50 mg every 8 hours) versus placebo on cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2). Urinary excretion of 2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGF1α, (prostacyclin metabolite, PGI-M; COX-2 inhibition) and 11-dehydro thromboxane B2 (thromboxane metabolite, Tx-M; COX-1 inhibition) were measured after 1 dose and 5 days of dosing. Peak inhibition of urinary metabolite excretion across 8 hours following dosing was the primary end point. Mean PGI-M excretion was 33.7%, 55.9%, and 64.6% on day 1 and 49.4%, 65.1%, and 80.3% on day 5 (placebo, acetaminophen, and indomethacin, respectively). Acetaminophen and indomethacin inhibited PGI-M excretion following single and multiple doses (P = .004 vs placebo). PGI-M excretion inhibition after 1 dose was similar for indomethacin and acetaminophen, but significantly greater with indomethacin after multiple doses (P = .006). Mean Tx-M excretion was 16.2%, 45.2%, and 86.6% on day 1 and 46.2%, 58.4%, and 92.6% on day 5 (placebo, acetaminophen, and indomethacin, respectively). Tx-M excretion inhibition following 1 dose was reduced by acetaminophen (P ≤ .003). Indomethacin reduced Tx-M excretion significantly more than acetaminophen and placebo after single and multiple doses (P ≤ .001). Acetaminophen and indomethacin inhibited COX-1 and COX-2 following a single dose, but acetaminophen was a less potent COX-1 inhibitor than indomethacin. PMID:27137142

  15. “Protective Premedication”: A Comparative Study of Acetaminophen, Gabapentin and Combination of Acetaminophen with Gabapentin for Post-Operative Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Syal, Kartik; Goma, Mandeep; Dogra, Ravi K; Ohri, Anil; Gupta, Ashok K; Goel, Ashok

    2010-01-01

    Background: We carried out a study to evaluate the effects of protective premedication with Acetaminophen, Gabapentin and combination of Acetaminophen with Gabapentin on post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing open cholecys-tectomy under general anesthesia. Patients & Methods: The study was conducted in a double-blind randomized and controlled manner in 120 consenting patients of either sex belonging to ASA physical status grade I and II, between the age groups of 20 to 50 years, weighing between 40 to 65 kg and undergoing elective surgery (open cholecystectomy) under general anesthesia. The patients were divided into 4 groups: 1: placebo, 2: Acetaminophen 1000 mg, 3: 1200 mg Gabapentin, 4: Acetaminphen 1000 mg plus 1200 mg Gabapentin. The drugs were given two hours before induction. Time, number and total amount of rescue analgesic (tramadol) and VAS score at rest and on movement. Side effects like any episode of nausea/vomiting and level of sedation were noted. Results: Premedication with antihyperalgesic and analgesic agents helps to decrease postoperative pain scores. Gabapentin premedication is effective for providing better postoperative pain relief with lower and delayed requirements of rescue analgesics, but causes more episodes of nausea and vomiting and higher levels of sedation. PMID:21547185

  16. Simultaneous determination of acetaminophen, guaifenesin, pseudoephedrine, pholcodine, and paraben preservatives in cough mixture by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, L

    1983-02-01

    The separation and simultaneous determination, by high-performance liquid chromatography, of acetaminophen (I), guaifenesin (II), pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (III), and pholcodine (IV), together with a series of parabens (methyl to butyl, V-VIII) in a cough mixture, has been demonstrated using a chemically bonded octadecylsilane stationary phase with a mobile phase of methanol-water-acetic acid (45:55:2) containing the ion-pairing agent octanesulfonic acid. Retention volumes for the active ingredients were 3.8 ml, 5.4 ml, 9.4 ml, and 15.6 ml for compounds I-IV, respectively. Corrected retention volumes for the parabens [5.4 ml for methyl (V), 9.6 ml for ethyl (VI), 18.5 ml for propyl (VII), and 37.9 ml for butyl (VIII)] showed an exponential relationship with chain length of the esterifying alcohols. Excipients did not interfere with the estimation of any of the compounds, hence pretreatment of the sample was unnecessary. Average recoveries of the active ingredients and of the parabens from laboratory prepared samples were essentially 100% of theoretical with standard deviations of 1.7, 0.3, 1.5, 0.3, 0.3, 3.3, 0.7, and 2.7% for I-VIII, respectively. PMID:6834261

  17. Age-related pharmacokinetic changes of acetaminophen, antipyrine, diazepam, diphenhydramine, and ofloxacin in male cynomolgus monkeys and beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Takashi; Yamaura, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Koji; Kim, Soonih; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen (marker of gastric emptying), antipyrine (marker of hepatic metabolic activity and total body water), diazepam (lipophilic and highly distributed), diphenhydramine (hepatic blood flow-limited and alpha-1 acid glycoprotein bound) and ofloxacin (renally eliminated) were evaluated in cynomolgus monkeys (3-18 years old) and beagle dogs (2-11 years old) as models in elderly persons. 2. Gastric pH fluctuated with aging in monkeys and dogs. The concentration of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein appeared to be increased by aging. There were no age-related differences in the absorption rates of the drugs under the conditions used in the study. Total body fat increased and water decreased in monkeys, but these parameters did not change in dogs. 3. Hepatic blood flow decreased in both species, but a significant decrease of hepatic clearance was only seen in monkeys. Renal clearance decreased significantly with age in monkeys and showed a tendency to decrease in dogs. 4. Age-related alterations of physiological parameters in monkeys are in agreement with clinical observations in humans, except for the lack of a change in the plasma albumin concentration. Therefore, this study suggests that monkey might be a suitable animal model for prediction of age-related changes in pharmacokinetics in humans. PMID:24650193

  18. Influence of acetaminophen consumption on perceived exertion at the lactate concentration threshold.

    PubMed

    Garcin, M; Mille-Hamard, L; Billat, V; Humbert, L; Lhermitte, M

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study effects of acetaminophen consumption on ratings of perceived exertion and estimated time limit responses at the lactate threshold. 98 young regional to national level athletes performed a graded exhausting exercise on an outdoor running track to estimate their maximal aerobic velocity and the velocity associated with their lactate concentration threshold. Urine (30 mL) was collected during this test and analysed for numerous substances. During urinary screening for doping substances, 9 acetaminophen consumers (9.2%) among the 98 included athletes were detected. These acetaminophen consumers have significantly lower perceived exertion at velocity corresponding to the lactate concentration threshold than nonconsumers (11.9 +/- 2.1 vs 13.6 +/- 2.1, respectively) although they were at the same relative exercise intensity. This result shows that acetaminophen consumption may have mediated the perceived exertion response at the lactate concentration threshold. This may then suggest that the pain induced by training load could be a factor in use of self-prescribed pain relievers. Such consumption must be taken into account by medical staff, trainers, or educators who have to give information on the use and adverse effects of this substance and to propose palliative methods to their athletes. PMID:16491671

  19. A Biomedical Application of Activated Carbon Adsorption: An Experiment Using Acetaminophen and N-Acetylcysteine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybolt, Thomas R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Illustrates an interesting biomedical application of adsorption from solution and demonstrates some of the factors that influence the in vivo adsorption of drug molecules onto activated charcoal. Uses acetaminophen and N-acetylcysteine for the determination. Suggests several related experiments. (MVL)

  20. Effect of pretreatment with acetaminophen-propoxyphene for oral surgery pain.

    PubMed

    Liashek, P; Desjardins, P J; Triplett, R G

    1987-02-01

    To determine the effect of pretreatment and multiple doses on postsurgical pain, a study of the relative analgesic efficacy of placebo, acetaminophen 650 mg, and propoxyphene napsylate 100 mg alone and in combination was conducted. Forty-five patients undergoing surgical removal of impacted third molar teeth under local anesthesia were randomly allocated to the four treatment regimens under double-blind conditions. The first oral dose was administered one hour preoperatively and the second dose when the pain became moderate or severe, following the dissipation of the local anesthesia. Pain intensity and pain relief were assessed using standard verbal descriptor scales at 30 minutes and hourly for four hours after the postoperative dose. Measures of total effect, peak effect and duration of their effect were derived from these descriptors. Acetaminophen was no better than placebo. For peak and total effects, propoxyphene alone and the propoxyphene-acetaminophen combination were substantially superior to both placebo and acetaminophen alone. Duration of analgesia was also significantly longer with both propoxyphene-containing treatments. No side effects were reported. The results suggest that pretreatment with a narcotic agonist markedly improves postoperative analgesia. PMID:3468226

  1. An Experiment in Physical Chemistry: Polymorphism and Phase Stability in Acetaminophen (Paracetamol)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myrick, Michael L.; Baranowski, Megan; Profeta, Luisa T. M.

    2010-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry analyses of two easily prepared polymorphs of acetaminophen (also known as paracetamol) are recorded. The density of the forms can be found in the literature. Rules for heats of transition, heats of fusion, and density, as well as methods for determining the solid-solid transition temperature between the forms,…

  2. Cats Have Nine Lives, but Only One Liver: The Effects of Acetaminophen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewprashad, Brahmadeo

    2009-01-01

    This case recounts the story of a student who gave her cat half of a Tylenol tablet not knowing its potential harmful effects. The cat survives, but the incident motivates the student to learn more about the reaction mechanism underlying the liver toxicity of acetaminophen. The case outlines three possible reaction schemes that would explain the…

  3. Differential effect of cigarette smoking on antipyrine oxidation versus acetaminophen conjugation.

    PubMed

    Scavone, J M; Greenblatt, D J; LeDuc, B W; Blyden, G T; Luna, B G; Harmatz, J S

    1990-01-01

    The effect of cigarette smoking on drug oxidation and conjugation was studied using antipyrine and acetaminophen as marker compounds. For the antipyrine study, healthy cigarette smokers (n = 30) and nonsmoking controls (n = 53) received a single 1.0-gram intravenous dose of antipyrine. For the acetaminophen study, 14 smokers and 15 nonsmokers received a 650-mg intravenous dose of acetaminophen. The clearance of antipyrine was significantly increased (0.93 vs. 0.60 ml/min/kg, p less than 0.0001) and elimination half-life was correspondingly reduced (8.9 vs. 13.0 h, p less than 0.0001) in smokers compared to nonsmoking controls. Total recovery of antipyrine and metabolites excreted in urine did not differ between groups, but there was a significantly increased fractional clearance of antipyrine via formation of 4-hydroxyantipyrine and 3-hydroxymethyl metabolites in smokers. Fractional clearance via formation of norantipyrine did not differ significantly between groups. Comparison of acetaminophen kinetics between smokers and nonsmokers indicated no significant differences in elimination half-life, clearance or volume of distribution. Thus, cigarette smoking is more likely to induce drug oxidation rather than drug conjugation. However, not all oxidative pathways are equally influenced; induction effects of smoking are highly substrate selective and pathway specific. PMID:2345775

  4. Effect of Tramadol/Acetaminophen on Motivation in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tetsunaga, Tomoko; Tetsunaga, Tomonori; Tanaka, Masato; Nishida, Keiichiro; Takei, Yoshitaka; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Background. The contribution of apathy, frequently recognized in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases, to chronic low back pain (LBP) remains unclear. Objectives. To investigate levels of apathy and clinical outcomes in patients with chronic LBP treated with tramadol-acetaminophen. Methods. A retrospective case-control study involving 73 patients with chronic LBP (23 male, 50 female; mean age 71 years) treated with tramadol-acetaminophen (n = 36) and celecoxib (n = 37) was performed. All patients were assessed using the self-reported questionnaires. A mediation model was constructed using a bootstrapping method to evaluate the mediating effects of pain relief after treatment. Results. A total of 35 (55.6%) patients met the criteria for apathy. A four-week treatment regimen in the tramadol group conferred significant improvements in the Apathy scale and numerical rating scale but not in the Rolland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, Pain Disability Assessment Scale, or Pain Catastrophizing Scale. The depression component of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was lower in the tramadol group than in the celecoxib group. The mediation analysis found that the impact of tramadol-acetaminophen on the change in apathy was not mediated by the pain relief. Conclusions. Tramadol-acetaminophen was effective at reducing chronic LBP and conferred a prophylactic motivational effect in patients with chronic LBP. PMID:27445626

  5. Manipulation of ionic liquid anion-solute-antisolvent interactions for the purification of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Weber, C C; Kunov-Kruse, A J; Rogers, R D; Myerson, A S

    2015-03-11

    Hydrogen bond donating cosolvents have been shown to significantly reduce the solubility of acetaminophen (AAP) in ionic liquids containing the acetate anion. Reduced solubility arises from competition for solvation by the acetate anion and can be used for the design of advanced separation techniques, illustrated by the crystallization of AAP. PMID:25673089

  6. A cellular model to study drug-induced liver injury in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Application to acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Michaut, Anaïs; Le Guillou, Dounia; Moreau, Caroline; Bucher, Simon; McGill, Mitchell R; Martinais, Sophie; Gicquel, Thomas; Morel, Isabelle; Robin, Marie-Anne; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Fromenty, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) can increase susceptibility to hepatotoxicity induced by some xenobiotics including drugs, but the involved mechanisms are poorly understood. For acetaminophen (APAP), a role of hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) is suspected since the activity of this enzyme is consistently enhanced during NAFLD. The first aim of our study was to set up a cellular model of NAFLD characterized not only by triglyceride accumulation but also by higher CYP2E1 activity. To this end, human HepaRG cells were incubated for one week with stearic acid or oleic acid, in the presence of different concentrations of insulin. Although cellular triglycerides and the expression of lipid-responsive genes were similar with both fatty acids, CYP2E1 activity was significantly increased only by stearic acid. CYP2E1 activity was reduced by insulin and this effect was reproduced in cultured primary human hepatocytes. Next, APAP cytotoxicity was assessed in HepaRG cells with or without lipid accretion and CYP2E1 induction. Experiments with a large range of APAP concentrations showed that the loss of ATP and glutathione was almost always greater in the presence of stearic acid. In cells pretreated with the CYP2E1 inhibitor chlormethiazole, recovery of ATP was significantly higher in the presence of stearate with low (2.5mM) or high (20mM) concentrations of APAP. Levels of APAP-glucuronide were significantly enhanced by insulin. Hence, HepaRG cells can be used as a valuable model of NAFLD to unveil important metabolic and hormonal factors which can increase susceptibility to drug-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26739624

  7. A new screening method to detect water-soluble antioxidants: acetaminophen (Tylenol) and other phenols react as antioxidants and destroy peroxynitrite-based luminol-dependent chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, K; Sacks, M; Qazi, N

    1998-01-01

    This study is based on a simple chemical interaction of peroxynitrite (O = N-O-O-) and luminol, which produces blue light upon oxidation. Since peroxynitrite has a half-life of about 1 s, a drug known as linsidomine (SIN-1) is used as a peroxynitrite generator. Peroxynitrite can oxidize lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Upon the stimulation of inflammation and/or infection, macrophages and neutrophils can be induced to produce large amounts of peroxynitrite, which can oxidize phenols and sulphhydryl-containing compounds. Therefore, phenols and sulphhydryls eliminate peroxynitrite. This is an example of the Yin-Yang hypothesis e.g. oxidation-reduction. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) can inhibit fever and some types of pain without being a particularly effective anti-inflammatory. Since it is a phenol, it could act as a nitration target for peroxynitrite. Then peroxynitrite, the possible cause of pain and elevated temperature, might be destroyed in the reaction. Acetaminophen is a phenolic compound which produces a clear inhibitory dose-response curve with peroxynitrite in its range of clinical effectiveness. Whether acetaminophen actually works as we suggest is to be proven. Three different types of reaction could decrease the amount of peroxynitrite: (a) interference with base-catalysed opening of the SIN-1 molecule; (b) destruction of one or both substances needed to form it--superoxide and/or nitric oxide; when the SIN-1 degrades to superoxide and nitric oxide, the former may be destroyed by superoxide dismutase (SOD); (c) peroxynitrite may react directly with phenols (mono-, di-, tri- and tetraphenols), possibly by nitration. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid and 2-hydroxyestradiol (catechol estrogen) are potent inhibitors of luminol light emission. Epineprine, isoproterenol, pyrogallol, catechol and ascorbic acid (a classic antioxidant) are all inhibitors of luminol chemiluminescence. Isoproterenol, norepinephrine/and epinephrine first inhibit light but overall stimulate

  8. Effects of acetaminophen on constitutive and inducible prostanoid biosynthesis in human blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Sciulli, Maria G; Seta, Francesca; Tacconelli, Stefania; Capone, Marta L; Ricciotti, Emanuela; Pistritto, Giuseppa; Patrignani, Paola

    2003-01-01

    Acetaminophen, an analgesic and antipyretic drug with weak antiinflammatory properties, has been suggested to act as a tissue-selective inhibitor of prostaglandin H synthases (PGHSs) (e.g. COX-1 and COX-2) through its reducing activity, that is influenced by the different cellular levels of peroxides. We have studied the effects of acetaminophen on inducible and constitutive prostanoid biosynthesis in monocytes and platelets in vitro. To discriminate between the inhibitory effect of the drug on PGHS-isozymes vs PGE-synthases (PGESs), parallel measurements of PGE2 and thromboxane (TX) B2 were carried out. Since antioxidant enzymes and cofactors, present in plasma, may affect acetaminophen-dependent inhibition of prostanoids, comparative experiments in whole blood vs isolated monocytes were performed. Acetaminophen inhibited LPS-induced whole blood PGE2 and TXB2 production, in a concentration-dependent fashion [IC50 μM (95% confidence intervals): 44 (27–70) and 94 (79–112), respectively]. Therapeutic plasma concentrations (100 and 300 μM) of the drug more profoundly reduced PGE2 than TXB2 (71±3 vs 54±4 and 95±0.8 vs 78±2%, respectively, mean±s.e.mean, n=6, P<0.01). Differently, in isolated monocytes stimulated with LPS, both PGE2 and TXB2 production was maximally reduced by only 60%. At 100 and 300 μM, the drug caused a similar and incomplete inhibition of platelet PGE2 and TXB2 production during whole blood clotting (45±4 vs 54±4 and 75±2 vs 75±1%, respectively, mean±s.e.mean, n=4). In conclusion, therapeutic concentrations of acetaminophen caused an incomplete inhibition of platelet COX-1 and monocyte COX-2 but in the presence of plasma, the drug almost completely suppressed inducible PGE2 biosynthesis through its inhibitory effects on both COX-2 and inducible PGES. PMID:12598417

  9. Dosing variability in prescriptions of acetaminophen to children: comparisons between pediatricians, family physicians and otolaryngologists

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To estimate the extents of dosing variability in prescriptions of acetaminophen to children among pediatricians, family physicians and otolaryngologists. Methods The acetaminophen prescriptions in the systematic sampling datasets from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan were analyzed. The distribution of dosages was measured and expressed in terms of coefficient of variation (CV). The analyses were stratified by patient’s age, prescriber’s specialty and preparation form. Results From 13,868 prescribed items of acetaminophen in 2009, liquids accounted only for 11.1% (n = 1544). More than half (56.9%) of liquids were prescribed by pediatricians. The median dose (83.3 mg, n = 1683) of acetaminophen prescriptions in infants is around half of that in preschool children (166.7 mg, n = 3921), one-third in children (250.0 mg, n = 4926) and one-sixth in adolescents (500.0 mg, n = 3338). In infants, the prescriptions by pediatricians had the highest CV (86.7%), followed by family physicians (82.3%) and otolaryngologists (70.3%). The patterns were similar in preschool children and children, but the difference of CV among specialties narrowed down with the patient’s age. Conclusions In acetaminophen prescriptions to children, pediatricians had a wider variability of dosages and a higher ratio of liquid preparations than family physicians and otolaryngologists. Further investigations can be undertaken to estimate the accuracy of dosing variability as an indicator of prescribing quality. Besides, child-suitable drug preparations should be promoted to ensure patient safety. PMID:23617266

  10. Acetaminophen structure-toxicity studies: In vivo covalent binding of a nonhepatotoxic analog, 3-hydroxyacetanilide

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S.A.; Price, V.F.; Jollow, D.J. )

    1990-09-01

    High doses of 3-hydroxyacetanilide (3HAA), a structural isomer of acetaminophen, do not produce hepatocellular necrosis in normal male hamsters or in those sensitized to acetaminophen-induced liver damage by pretreatment with a combination of 3-methylcholanthrene, borneol, and diethyl maleate. Although 3HAA was not hepatotoxic, the administration of acetyl-labeled (3H or 14C)3HAA (400 mg/kg, ip) produced levels of covalently bound radiolabel that were similar to those observed after an equimolar, hepatotoxic dose of (G-3H)acetaminophen. The covalent nature of 3HAA binding was demonstrated by retention of the binding after repetitive organic solvent extraction following protease digestion. Hepatic and renal covalent binding after 3HAA was approximately linear with both dose and time. In addition, 3HAA produced only a modest depletion of hepatic glutathione, suggesting the lack of a glutathione threshold. 3-Methylcholanthrene pretreatment increased and pretreatment with cobalt chloride and piperonyl butoxide decreased the hepatic covalent binding of 3HAA, indicating the involvement of cytochrome P450 in the formation of the 3HAA reactive metabolite. The administration of multiple doses or a single dose of (ring-3H)3HAA to hamsters pretreated with a combination of 3-methylcholanthrene, borneol, and diethyl maleate produced hepatic levels of 3HAA covalent binding that were in excess of those observed after a single, hepatotoxic acetaminophen dose. These data suggest that the nature and/or the intracellular processing of the reactive metabolites of acetaminophen and 3HAA are different. These data also demonstrate that absolute levels of covalently bound xenobiotic metabolites cannot be utilized as absolute predictors of cytotoxic potential.

  11. Effects of acetaminophen on cadmium metabolism in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, G.R.; Atkins, L.M.; Smith, A.B.; Walker, E.M. Jr.; Fody, E.P.

    1986-02-01

    Acetaminophen (ACM) administration to mice of the (C57BL/6 X DBA/2)F1 strain produced a typical hepatic centrilobular necrosis similar to that observed in rodents and humans. To determine the effects of this drug-induced necrosis on cadmium (Cd) metabolism, mice were given a sublethal dose of CdCl2 . 2.5 H2O containing 109CdCl2 and maintained for a period of time sufficient for Cd-metallothionein (Cd-MT) to be synthesized and distributed. Subsequent administration of ACM ip or po evoked a marked redistribution of Cd from livers to kidneys of mice, and increased the amount of Cd excreted in urine and feces. There were only minimal or no effects on Cd concentrations in other organs assessed. The effect of ACM on Cd redistribution was antagonized by administration of cysteine, a glutathione precursor, and was enhanced by pretreatment with phenobarbital, a potent inducer of the cytochrome P-450 mixed-function oxidase system. Pretreatment of mice with ACM 6 or 24 hr prior to Cd administration caused aberrations of the normal Cd distribution pattern, but no effect was noted when Cd administration was delayed for 48 hr after ACM injection, indicating recovery of the mechanisms of Cd-MT synthesis and sequestration. Sephadex G-75 gel filtration chromatography of serum from ACM-treated mice showed that most of the Cd was associated with high-molecular-weight proteins, and only a minor portion was present as Cd-MT. Cd excreted in urine was predominantly in a low-molecular-weight form, but there was evidence of two minor components of higher molecular weight, neither of which eluted as Cd-MT. Cd excreted in feces was insoluble following homogenization in 0.25 M sucrose solution. Cd in livers and kidneys of ACM-treated mice eluted as Cd-MT. Persons who have a moderately high Cd burden may be at risk of Cd nephrotoxicity if they incur hepatic necrosis subsequent to ACM abuse.

  12. Validation Thin Layer Chromatography for the Determination of Acetaminophen in Tablets and Comparison with a Pharmacopeial Method

    PubMed Central

    Pyka, Alina; Budzisz, Marika; Dołowy, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Adsorption thin layer chromatography (NP-TLC) with densitometry has been established for the identification and the quantification of acetaminophen in three leading commercial products of pharmaceutical tablets coded as brand: P1 (Product no. 1), P2 (Product no. 2), and P3 (Product no. 3). Applied chromatographic conditions have separated acetaminophen from its related substances, namely, 4-aminophenol and and 4′-chloroacetanilide. UV densitometry was performed in absorbance mode at 248 nm. The presented method was validated by specificity, range, linearity, accuracy, precision, detection limit, quantitative limit, and robustness. The TLC-densitometric method was also compared with a pharmacopeial UV-spectrophotometric method for the assay of acetaminophen, and the results confirmed statistically that the NP-TLC-densitometric method can be used as a substitute method. It could be said that the validated NP-TLC-densitometric method is suitable for the routine analysis of acetaminophen in quantity control laboratories. PMID:24063006

  13. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity: role of metabolic activation, reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, and mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Hinson, Jack A; Reid, Angela B; McCullough, Sandra S; James, Laura P

    2004-10-01

    Large doses of the analgesic acetaminophen cause centrilobular hepatic necrosis in man and in experimental animals. It has been previously shown that acetaminophen is metabolically activated by CYP enzymes to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. This species is normally detoxified by GSH, but following a toxic dose GSH is depleted and the metabolite covalently binds to a number of different proteins. Covalent binding occurs only to the cells developing necrosis. Recently we showed that these cells also contain nitrated tyrosine residues. Nitrotyrosine is mediated by peroxynitrite, a reactive nitrogen species formed by rapid reaction between nitric oxide and superoxide and is normally detoxified by GSH. Thus, acetaminophen toxicity occurs with increased oxygen/nitrogen stress. This manuscript will review current data on acetaminophen covalent binding, increased oxygen/nitrogen stress, and mitochondrial permeability transition, a toxic mechanism that is both mediated by and leads to increased oxygen/nitrogen stress. PMID:15554248

  14. Regulation of alternative macrophage activation in the liver following acetaminophen intoxication by stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Carol R.; Hankey, Pamela; Mishin, Vladimir; Francis, Mary; Yu, Shan; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-07-15

    Stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase (STK) is a transmembrane receptor reported to play a role in macrophage switching from a classically activated/proinflammatory phenotype to an alternatively activated/wound repair phenotype. In the present studies, STK{sup −/−} mice were used to assess the role of STK in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity as evidence suggests that the pathogenic process involves both of these macrophage subpopulations. In wild type mice, centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminase levels were observed within 6 h of acetaminophen administration (300 mg/kg, i.p.). Loss of STK resulted in a significant increase in sensitivity of mice to the hepatotoxic effects of acetaminophen and increased mortality, effects independent of its metabolism. This was associated with reduced levels of hepatic glutathione, rapid upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and prolonged induction of heme oxygenase-1, suggesting excessive oxidative stress in STK{sup −/−} mice. F4/80, a marker of mature macrophages, was highly expressed on subpopulations of Kupffer cells in livers of wild type, but not STK{sup −/−} mice. Whereas F4/80{sup +} macrophages rapidly declined in the livers of wild type mice following acetaminophen intoxication, they increased in STK{sup −/−} mice. In wild type mice hepatic expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-12, products of classically activated macrophages, increased after acetaminophen administration. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and its receptor, CCR2, as well as IL-10, mediators involved in recruiting and activating anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages, also increased in wild type mice after acetaminophen. Loss of STK blunted the effects of acetaminophen on expression of TNFα, IL-1β, IL-12, MCP-1 and CCR2, while expression of IL-10 increased. Hepatic expression of CX3CL1, and its receptor, CX3CR1 also increased in STK{sup −/−} mice

  15. Transformation of acetaminophen by chlorination produces the toxicants 1,4-benzoquinone and N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine.

    PubMed

    Bedner, Mary; MacCrehan, William A

    2006-01-15

    The reaction of the common pain reliever acetaminophen (paracetamol, 4-acetamidophenol) with hypochlorite was investigated over time under conditions that simulate wastewater disinfection. Initially, the reaction was studied in pure water at neutral pH (7.0), a range of reaction times (2-90 min), and a molar excess of hypochlorite (2-57 times) relative to the acetaminophen concentration. The reaction was monitored using reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) with ultraviolet absorbance, electrochemical, and mass spectrometric detection. At 1 micromol/L (150 ppb) and 10 micromol/L (1.5 ppm) levels, acetaminophen readily reacted to form at least 11 discernible products, all of which exhibited greater LC retention than the parent. Two of the products were unequivocally identified as the toxic compounds 1,4-benzoquinone and N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), which is the toxicant associated with lethality in acetaminophen overdoses. With a hypochlorite dose of 57 micromol/L (4 ppm as Cl2), 88% of the acetaminophen (10 micromol/L initial) was transformed in 1 h. The two quinoidal oxidation products 1,4-benzoquinone and NAPQI accounted for 25% and 1.5% of the initial acetaminophen concentration, respectively, at a 1 h reaction time. Other products that were identified included two ring chlorination products, chloro-4-acetamidophenol and dichloro-4-acetamidophenol, which combined were approximately 7% of the initial acetaminophen concentration at 1 h. The reaction was also studied in wastewater, where similar reactivity was noted. These results demonstrate that acetaminophen is likely to be transformed significantly during wastewater chlorination. The reactivity of the chlorine-transformation products was also studied with sulfite to simulate dechlorination, and 1,4-benzoquinone and NAPQI were completely reduced. PMID:16468397

  16. Pain-relief medication and risk of fractures.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Medications to treat pain are in widespread use and any change in the risk of fracture may consequently have a significant impact at a population level. Strong analgesics of the opiate and opiate-like group are associated with an increased risk of fractures probably from an increased risk of falls resulting from the dizziness induced by these drugs. However, not all strong analgesics are associated with an increased risk of fractures. The differences are not readily explained from variations in pharmacokinetic properties. Weak analgesics mainly interact with the prostaglandin system; these drugs include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen. Acetaminophen is associated with an increased risk of fractures while acetylsalicylic acid is not. Some but not all NSAIDs are associated with an increased fracture risk, and the differences are not explained by variations in pharmacokinetic properties. More research is needed to determine if some analgesics are safer than others with respect to fracture risk. PMID:18691002

  17. Plasma and liver acetaminophen-protein adduct levels in mice after acetaminophen treatment: Dose–response, mechanisms, and clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Norris, Hye-Ryun K.; Slawson, Matthew H.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Xie, Yuchao; Williams, C. David; Wilkins, Diana G.; Rollins, Douglas E.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-06-15

    At therapeutic doses, acetaminophen (APAP) is a safe and effective analgesic. However, overdose of APAP is the principal cause of acute liver failure in the West. Binding of the reactive metabolite of APAP (NAPQI) to proteins is thought to be the initiating event in the mechanism of hepatotoxicity. Early work suggested that APAP-protein binding could not occur without glutathione (GSH) depletion, and likely only at toxic doses. Moreover, it was found that protein-derived APAP-cysteine could only be detected in serum after the onset of liver injury. On this basis, it was recently proposed that serum APAP-cysteine could be used as diagnostic marker of APAP overdose. However, comprehensive dose–response and time course studies have not yet been done. Furthermore, the effects of co-morbidities on this parameter have not been investigated. We treated groups of mice with APAP at multiple doses and measured liver GSH and both liver and plasma APAP-protein adducts at various timepoints. Our results show that protein binding can occur without much loss of GSH. Importantly, the data confirm earlier work that showed that protein-derived APAP-cysteine can appear in plasma without liver injury. Experiments performed in vitro suggest that this may involve multiple mechanisms, including secretion of adducted proteins and diffusion of NAPQI directly into plasma. Induction of liver necrosis through ischemia–reperfusion significantly increased the plasma concentration of protein-derived APAP-cysteine after a subtoxic dose of APAP. While our data generally support the measurement of serum APAP-protein adducts in the clinic, caution is suggested in the interpretation of this parameter. - Highlights: • Extensive GSH depletion is not required for APAP-protein binding in the liver. • APAP-protein adducts appear in plasma at subtoxic doses. • Proteins are adducted in the cell and secreted out. • Coincidental liver injury increases plasma APAP-protein adducts at subtoxic doses

  18. Improvement of Physico-mechanical Properties of Partially Amorphous Acetaminophen Developed from Hydroalcoholic Solution Using Spray Drying Technique

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Torab, Mansour; Khattab, Mostafa; Homayouni, Alireza; Afrasiabi Garekani, Hadi

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): This study was performed aiming to investigate the effect of particle engineering via spray drying of hydroalcoholic solution on solid states and physico-mechanical properties of acetaminophen. Materials and Methods: Spray drying of hydroalcoholic solution (25% v/v ethanol/water) of acetaminophen (5% w/v) in the presence of small amounts of polyninylpyrrolidone K30 (PVP) (0, 1.25, 2.5 and 5% w/w based on acetaminophen weight) was carried out. The properties of spray dried particles namely morphology, surface characteristics, particle size, crystallinity, dissolution rate and compactibility were evaluated. Results: Spray drying process significantly changed the morphology of acetaminophen crystals from acicular (rod shape) to spherical microparticle. Differential scanning calorimetery (DSC) and x-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) studies ruled out any polymorphism in spray dried samples, however, a major reduction in crystallinity up to 65%, especially for those containing 5% w/w PVP was observed. Spray dried acetaminophen particles especially those obtained in the presence of PVP exhibited an obvious improvement of the dissolution and compaction properties. Tablets produced from spray dried samples exhibited excellent crushing strengths and no tendency to cap. Conclusions: The findings of this study revealed that spray drying of acetaminophen from hydroalcoholic solution in the presence of small amount of PVP produced partially amorphous particles with improved dissolution and excellent compaction properties. PMID:24379968

  19. Use of acetaminophen (paracetamol) during pregnancy and the risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-03-01

    Prenatal exposure to acetaminophen may result in compromised neurodevelopment through inflammatory and immunologic mechanisms, through predisposition to oxidative stress, and through endocrine, endogenous cannabinoid, and other mechanisms. Several small and large prospective studies have found an association between gestational acetaminophen exposure and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-like behaviors, use of ADHD medication, and ADHD diagnoses in offspring during childhood; the only negative study was a small investigation that examined only one aspect of attention as an outcome. Creditably, most of the studies adjusted analyses for many (but not all) confounds associated with ADHD risk. Importantly, one pivotal study also adjusted for pain, infection, inflammation, and fever to reduce confounding by indication; this study found a dose-dependent risk. In the light of the finding of a single study that infection and fever during pregnancy by themselves do not raise the ADHD risk, it appears possible that the use of acetaminophen during pregnancy is itself responsible for the increased risk of ADHD. This suggests that acetaminophen may not be as safe in pregnancy as is widely believed. However, since fever during pregnancy may itself be associated with adverse gestational outcomes, given the present level of uncertainty about the ADHD risk with acetaminophen, it is suggested that, until more data are available, the use of acetaminophen in pregnancy should not be denied in situations in which the need for the drug is clear. PMID:27046315

  20. Bazhen Decoction Protects against Acetaminophen Induced Acute Liver Injury by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and Apoptosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Erqun; Fu, Juanli; Xia, Xiaomin; Su, Chuanyang; Song, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Bazhen decoction is a widely used traditional Chinese medicinal decoction, but the scientific validation of its therapeutic potential is lacking. The objective of this study was to investigate corresponding anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis activities of Bazhen decoction, using acetaminophen-treated mice as a model system. A total of 48 mice were divided into four groups. Group I, negative control, treated with vehicle only. Group II, fed with 500 mg/kg/day Bazhen decoction for 10 continuous days. Group III, received a single dose of 900 mg/kg acetaminophen. Group IV, fed with 500 mg/kg/day Bazhen decoction for 10 continuous days and a single dose of 900 mg/kg acetaminophen 30 min before last Bazhen decoction administration. Bazhen decoction administration significantly decrease acetaminophen-induced serum ALT, AST, ALP, LDH, TNF-α, IL-1β, ROS, TBARS and protein carbonyl group levels, as well as GSH depletion and loss of MMP. Bazhen decoction restore SOD, CAT, GR and GPx activities and depress the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, such as iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, NF-κB, IL-1β and IL-6, respectively. Moreover, Bazhen decoction down-regulate acetaminophen-induced Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, caspase 3, caspase 8 and caspase 9. These results suggest the anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis properties of Bazhen decoction towards acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice. PMID:25222049

  1. A new electrochemical sensor for the simultaneous determination of acetaminophen and codeine based on porous silicon/palladium nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, Ali A; Ahmadi, Najmeh; Rezaei, Behzad; Abarghoui, Mehdi Mokhtari

    2015-03-01

    A porous silicon/palladium nanostructure was prepared and used as a new electrode material for the simultaneous determination of acetaminophen (ACT) and codeine (COD). Palladium nanoparticles were assembled on porous silicon (PSi) microparticles by a simple redox reaction between the Pd precursor and PSi in an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid. This novel nanostructure was characterized by different spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques including scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The high electrochemical activity, fast electron transfer rate, high surface area and good antifouling properties of this nanostructure enhanced the oxidation peak currents and reduced the peak potentials of ACT and COD at the surface of the proposed sensor. Simultaneous determination of ACT and COD was explored using differential pulse voltammetry. A linear range of 1.0-700.0 µmol L(-1) was achieved for ACT and COD with detection limits of 0.4 and 0.3 µmol L(-1), respectively. Finally, the proposed method was used for the determination of ACT and COD in blood serum, urine and pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:25618731

  2. Electrochemical preparation of nickel and copper oxides-decorated graphene composite for simultaneous determination of dopamine, acetaminophen and tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingdi; Ouyang, Xiaoqian; Ding, Yaping; Luo, Liqing; Xu, Duo; Ning, Yanqun

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, transition metal oxides decorated graphene (GR) have been fabricated for simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA), acetaminophen (AC) and tryptophan (Trp) using square wave voltammetry. Electro-deposition is a facile preparation strategy for the synthesis of nickel oxide (NiO) and copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles. GR can be modified by using citric acid to produce more functional groups, which is conducive to the deposition of dispersed metal particles. The morphologies and interface properties of the obtained NiO-CuO/GR nanocomposite were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, the electrochemical performances of the composite film were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The modified electrode exhibited that the linear response ranges for detecting DA, AC and Trp were 0.5-20 μM, 4-400 μM and 0.3-40 μM, respectively, and the detection limits were 0.17 μM, 1.33 μM and 0.1 μM (S/N=3). Under optimal conditions, the sensor displayed high sensitivity, excellent stability and satisfactory results in real samples analysis. PMID:26695242

  3. Application of CdS quantum dots modified carbon paste electrode for monitoring the process of acetaminophen preparation.

    PubMed

    Pasandideh-Nadamani, M; Omrani, A; Sadeghi-Maleki, M R; Samadi-Maybodi, A

    2016-06-01

    In this research article, a novel, selective, and sensitive modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) using CdS quantum dots (QDs) is presented. The highly stable CdS QDs were successfully synthesized in an in situ process using Na2S2O3 as a precursor and thioglycolic acid as a catalyst and capping agent. The synthesis of CdS QDs was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The synthesized CdS QDs were used for preparation of a modified carbon paste electrode (CdS/CPE). The electrochemical behavior of the electrode toward p-aminophenol (PAP) and acetaminophen (Ac) was studied, and the results demonstrated that the CdS/CPE exhibited good electrocatalytic performance toward PAP and Ac oxidation. The oxidation peak potential of each analyte in the mixture was well separated. As a result, a selective and reliable method was developed for the determination of PAP and Ac simultaneously without any chemical separations. Application of the fabricated electrode for monitoring the process of Ac preparation from PAP was investigated. The obtained results show that CdS/CPE has satisfactory analytical performance; it could be a kind of attractive and promising nanomaterial-based sensor for process monitoring via the electrochemical approach. PMID:26945834

  4. Efficacy of free glutathione and niosomal glutathione in the treatment of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in cats

    PubMed Central

    Vulcano, L.A. Denzoin; Confalonieri, O.; Franci, R.; Tapia, M.O.; Soraci, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) administration results in hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats. The response to three different treatments against APAP poisoning was evaluated. Free glutathione (GSH) (200mg/kg), niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg) and free amino acids (180 mg/kg of N-acetylcysteine and 280 mg/kg of methionine) were administered to cats that were intoxicated with APAP (a single dose of 150 mg/kg, p.o.). Serum concentration of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) along with serum, liver and erythrocyte concentration of GSH and methemoglobin percentage were measured before and 4, 24 and 72 hours after APAP administration. Free GSH (200 mg/kg) and niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg) were effective in reducing hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats intoxicated with a dose of 150 mg/kg APAP. We conclude that both types of treatments can protect the liver and haemoglobin against oxidative stress in APAP intoxicated cats. Furthermore, our results showed that treatment with niosomal GSH represents an effective therapeutic approach for APAP poisoning. PMID:26623313

  5. A Randomized Controlled Trial on Analgesic Effects of Intravenous Acetaminophen versus Dexamethasone after Pediatric Tonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Seyed Hamid Reza; Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Alebouyeh, Mahmoud Reza; Sedaghat, Minow

    2013-01-01

    Background A few studies are available actually comparing the clinical efficacy of intravenous acetaminophen with other medications such as dexamethasone to inhibit postoperative adverse events in children. Objectives This randomized blinded controlled trial was designed to compare controlling status of postoperative events in children after tonsillectomy randomized to receive either intravenous acetaminophen or dexamethasone. Patients and Methods Eighty four children aged between 4 to 13 undergoing tonsillectomy were randomized using a computer-generated schedule to double-blind treatment with intravenous acetaminophen (15 mg/kg) or intravenous dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg). Children were post-operatively assessed for swallowing pain, pain while opening mouth, ear pain, and postoperative sore throat in recovery room (within one hour after surgery), at the time of admission to the ward, as well as at 12 and 24 hours after surgery, assessed by the objective pain scoring system (OPS; minimum score: 0 = no pain, maximum score: 10 = extreme pain). Results There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to the severity of postoperative pain due to swallowing or opening mouth measured at the different study time points from postoperative recovery to 24 hours after the surgery. There was no difference in ear pain severity at the time of postoperative recovery, at the admission time to ward and also at 12 hours after surgery; however mean score of ear pain severity was significantly higher in those who administered acetaminophen 24 hours after operation. Also, the mean score severity of sore throat was significantly higher in the acetaminophen compared with the dexamethasone group within 12 hours of surgery. Postoperative vomiting and bleeding were similarly observed between the two study groups. The severity of swallowing pain, pain while opening mouth, ear pain, as well as postoperative sore throat as gradually assuaged within 24 hours of

  6. Pyridine and pyrimidine analogs of acetaminophen as inhibitors of lipid peroxidation and cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase catalysis†

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Tae-gyu; Nara, Susheel J.; Zagol-Ikapitte, Irène; Cooper, Thomas; Valgimigli, Luca; Oates, John A.; Porter, Ned A.; Boutaud, Olivier; Pratt, Derek A.

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report an investigation of the efficacy of pyridine and pyrimidine analogs of acetaminophen (ApAP) as peroxyl radical-trapping antioxidants and inhibitors of enzyme-catalyzed lipid peroxidation by cyclooxygenases (COX) and lipoxygenases (LOX). In inhibited autoxidations we find that ApAP, the common analgesic and antipyretic agent, is a very good antioxidant with a rate constant for reaction with peroxyl radicals (kinh = 5 × 105 M−1 s−1) that is higher than many widely-used phenolic antioxidants, such as the ubiquitous butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). This reactivity is reduced substantially upon incorporation of nitrogen into the phenolic ring, owing to an increase in the O–H bond dissociation enthalpy of pyridinols and pyrimidinols with respect to phenols. Incorporation of nitrogen into the phenolic ring of ApAP was also found to decrease its efficacy as an inhibitor of prostaglandin biosynthesis by ovine COX-1 (oCOX-1). This is explained on the basis of an increase in its oxidation potential and its reduced reactivity as a reducing co-substrate of the peroxidase protoporphyrin. In contrast, the efficacy of ApAP as an inhibitor of lipid hydroperoxide biosynthesis by soybean LOX-1 (sLOX-1) increased upon incorporation of nitrogen into the ring, suggesting a different mechanism of inhibition dependent on the acidity of the phenolic O–H which may involve chelation of the catalytic non-heme iron atom. The greater stability of the 3-pyridinols and 5-pyrimidinols to air oxidation as compared to phenols allowed us to evaluate some electron-rich pyridinols and pyrimidinols as inhibitors of oCOX-1 and sLOX-1. While the pyridinols had the best combination of activities as antioxidants and inhibitors of oCOX-1 and sLOX-1, they were found to be more toxic than ApAP in preliminary assays in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell culture. The pyrimidinols, however, were up to 17-fold more reactive to peroxyl radicals and up to 25-fold better inhibitors

  7. Single dose oral paracetamol (acetaminophen) for postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Toms, Laurence; McQuay, Henry J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 1, 2004 - this original review had been split from a previous title on ‘Single dose paracetamol (acetaminophen) with and without codeine for postoperative pain’. The last version of this review concluded that paracetamol is an effective analgesic for postoperative pain, but additional trials have since been published. This review sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of paracetamol using current data, and to compare the findings with other analgesics evaluated in the same way. Objectives To assess the efficacy of single dose oral paracetamol for the treatment of acute postoperative pain. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Oxford Pain Relief Database and reference lists of articles to update an existing version of the review in July 2008. Selection criteria Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of paracetamol for acute postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Area under the “pain relief versus time” curve was used to derive the proportion of participants with paracetamol or placebo experiencing at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours, using validated equations. Number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) was calculated, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). The proportion of participants using rescue analgesia over a specified time period, and time to use, were sought as measures of duration of analgesia. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was also collected. Main results Fifty-one studies, with 5762 participants, were included: 3277 participants were treated with a single oral dose of paracetamol and 2425 with placebo. About half of participants treated with paracetamol at standard doses achieved at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours, compared with about 20% treated with placebo. NNTs for at

  8. The UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A polymorphism c.2042C>G (rs8330) is associated with increased human liver acetaminophen glucuronidation, increased UGT1A exon 5a/5b splice variant mRNA ratio, and decreased risk of unintentional acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Court, Michael H; Freytsis, Marina; Wang, Xueding; Peter, Inga; Guillemette, Chantal; Hazarika, Suwagmani; Duan, Su X; Greenblatt, David J; Lee, William M

    2013-05-01

    Acetaminophen is cleared primarily by hepatic glucuronidation. Polymorphisms in genes encoding the acetaminophen UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes could explain interindividual variability in acetaminophen glucuronidation and variable risk for liver injury after acetaminophen overdose. In this study, human liver bank samples were phenotyped for acetaminophen glucuronidation activity and genotyped for the major acetaminophen-glucuronidating enzymes (UGTs 1A1, 1A6, 1A9, and 2B15). Of these, only three linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the shared UGT1A-3'UTR region (rs10929303, rs1042640, rs8330) were associated with acetaminophen glucuronidation activity, with rs8330 consistently showing higher acetaminophen glucuronidation at all the tested concentrations of acetaminophen. Mechanistic studies using luciferase-UGT1A-3'UTR reporters indicated that these SNPs do not alter mRNA stability or translation efficiency. However, there was evidence for allelic imbalance and a gene-dose proportional increase in the amount of exon 5a versus exon 5b containing UGT1A mRNA spliced transcripts in livers with the rs8330 variant allele. Cotransfection studies demonstrated an inhibitory effect of exon 5b containing cDNAs on acetaminophen glucuronidation by UGT1A1 and UGT1A6 cDNAs containing exon 5a. In silico analysis predicted that rs8330 creates an exon splice enhancer site that could favor exon 5a (over exon 5b) utilization during splicing. Finally, the prevalence of rs8330 was significantly lower (P = 0.027, χ(2) test) in patients who had acute liver failure from unintentional acetaminophen overdose compared with patients with acute liver failure from other causes or a race- or ethnicity-matched population. Together, these findings suggest that rs8330 is an important determinant of acetaminophen glucuronidation and could affect an individual's risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. PMID:23408116

  9. Liquid microjunction surface sampling of acetaminophen, terfenadine and their metabolites in thin tissue sections

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Paranthaman, Nithya; Moench, Paul; Catoire, Alexandre; Flarakos, Jimmy; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the analytical performance of a fully automated droplet-based surface-sampling system for determining the distribution of the drugs acetaminophen and terfenadine, and their metabolites, in rat thin tissue sections. The following are the results: The rank order of acetaminophen concentration observed in tissues was stomach > small intestine > liver, while the concentrations of its glucuronide and sulfate metabolites were greatest in the liver and small intestine. Terfenadine was most concentrated in the liver and kidney, while its major metabolite, fexofenadine, was found in the liver and small intestine. In conclusion, the spatial distributions of both drugs and their respective metabolites observed in this work were consistent with previous studies using radiolabeled drugs.

  10. Liquid microjunction surface sampling of acetaminophen, terfenadine and their metabolites in thin tissue sections

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Paranthaman, Nithya; Moench, Paul; Catoire, Alexandre; Flarakos, Jimmy; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the analytical performance of a fully automated droplet-based surface-sampling system for determining the distribution of the drugs acetaminophen and terfenadine, and their metabolites, in rat thin tissue sections. The following are the results: The rank order of acetaminophen concentration observed in tissues was stomach > small intestine > liver, while the concentrations of its glucuronide and sulfate metabolites were greatest in the liver and small intestine. Terfenadine was most concentrated in the liver and kidney, while its major metabolite, fexofenadine, was found in the liver and small intestine. In conclusion, the spatialmore » distributions of both drugs and their respective metabolites observed in this work were consistent with previous studies using radiolabeled drugs.« less

  11. Profile of extended-release oxycodone/acetaminophen for acute pain

    PubMed Central

    Bekhit, Mary Hanna

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a historical and pharmacological overview of a new opioid analgesic that boasts an extended-release (ER) formulation designed to provide both immediate and prolonged analgesia for up to 12 hours in patients who are experiencing acute pain. This novel medication, ER oxycodone/acetaminophen, competes with current US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved opioid formulations available on the market in that it offers two benefits concurrently: a prolonged duration of action, and multimodal analgesia through a combination of an opioid (oxycodone) with a nonopioid component. Current FDA-approved combination analgesics, such as Percocet (oxycodone/acetaminophen), are available solely in immediate-release (IR) formulations. PMID:26527898

  12. Influence of organic amendment on fate of acetaminophen and sulfamethoxazole in soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Juying; Ye, Qingfu; Gan, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Land application of biosolids or compost constitutes an important route of soil contamination by emerging contaminants such as acetaminophen and sulfamethoxazole. Using (14)C labeling, we evaluated the influence of biosolids and compost on individual fate processes of acetaminophen and sulfamethoxazole in soil. The amendment of biosolids or compost consistently inhibited the mineralization of both compounds but simultaneously enhanced the dissipation of their extractable residues or parent form. Immediately after treatment, the majority of (14)C-residue became non-extractable, reaching 80.3-92.3% of the applied amount at the end of 84-d incubation. Addition of biosolids or compost appreciably accelerated the formation of bound residue, likely due to the fact that the organic material provided additional sites for binding interactions or introduced exogenous microorganisms facilitating chemical transformations. This effect of biosolids or compost should be considered in risk assessment of these and other emerging contaminants. PMID:26301692

  13. [TESTING STABILITY OF TABLETED ACETAMINOPHEN AND FUROSEMIDE AFTER 6-MONTH STORAGE IN SPACE FLIGHT].

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, V V; Kondratenko, S N; Kovachevich, I V

    2015-01-01

    It was shown that multiple spaceflight factors (i.e., acceleration, overvibration, microgravity etc.) do not impact stability of acetaminophen and furosemide tablets stored onboard the International space station over 6 months. Acetaminophen dose in a tablet was 496.44 ± 6.88 mg (99.29 ± 1.38%) before spaceflight (SF) and 481.77 ± 1 2.40 mg (96.35 ± 0.48%) after 6 mos. of storage; furosemide dose in a tablet was 40.19 ± 0.28 mg (100.47 ± 0.71%) before and 39.24 ± 0.72 mg (98.105 ± 1.80%) after SF remaining within the established limits. PMID:26087581

  14. Ethanol and Acetaminophen Synergistically Induce Hepatic Aggregation and TCH346-Insensitive Nuclear Translocation of GAPDH

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Natasha T.; Portney, Daniel A.; Willcockson, Helen H.; Maitra, Dhiman; Martin, Hope C.; Greenson, Joel K.; Omary, M. Bishr

    2016-01-01

    The glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) signals during cellular stress via several post-translational modifications that change its folding properties, protein-protein interactions and sub-cellular localization. We examined GAPDH properties in acute mouse liver injury due to ethanol and/or acetaminophen (APAP) treatment. Synergistic robust and time-dependent nuclear accumulation and aggregation of GAPDH were observed only in combined, but not individual, ethanol/APAP treatments. The small molecule GAPDH-targeting compound TCH346 partially attenuated liver damage possibly via mitochondrial mechanisms, and independent of nuclear accumulation and aggregation of GAPDH. These findings provide a novel potential mechanism for hepatotoxicity caused by combined alcohol and acetaminophen exposure. PMID:27513663

  15. In vivo N-acetyl cysteine reduce hepatocyte death by induced acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Ju; Li, Feng-Chieh; Wang, Sheng-Shun; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2011-07-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is the famous drug in global, and taking overdose Acetaminophen will intake hepatic cell injure. Desptie substantial progress in our understanding of the mechanism of hepatocellular injury during the last 40 years, many aspects of the pathophysiology are still unknown or controversial.1 In this study, mice are injected APAP overdose to damage hepatocyte. APAP deplete glutathione and ATP of cell, N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) plays an important role to protect hepatocytes be injury. N-Acetyl Cysteine provides mitochondrial to produce glutathione to release drug effect hepatocyte. By 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (6-CFDA) metabolism in vivo, glutathione keep depleting to observe the hepatocyte morphology in time. Without NAC, cell necrosis increase to plasma membrane damage to release 6-CFDA, that's rupture. After 6-CFDA injection, fluorescence will be retained in hepatocyte. For cell retain with NAC and without NAC are almost the same. With NAC, the number of cell rupture decreases about 75%.

  16. Protective effects of Capparis sepiaria root extracts against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, V; Pandey, Ajay Shankar; Murali, Anita; Yoganarasimhan, S N

    2012-01-01

    Capparis sepiaria L. known as Himsra is an important drug in Ayurveda. In this study extracts of the root of C. sepiaria were evaluated for their hepatoprotective potential on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in albino Wistar rats. The extent of hepatoprotection was evaluated by estimating the serum levels of hepatic transaminases (SGPT and SGOT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total protein (TP), and bilirubin (total and direct). Aqueous and ethanol extracts of C. sepiaria significantly reduced the increased liver weight as well as serum levels of SGPT, SGOT, ALP, and bilirubin, and normalized the reduced serum protein levels in the treated rats. These observations were supported by the results of histopathology studies as well. The extracts were also subjected to preliminary organic analysis and chromatographic studies including HPTLC finger print studies. The results indicate that the roots of C. sepiaria show significant hepatoprotective effect on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity, thus substantiating its use as a potential hepatoprotective drug. PMID:22718675

  17. Warfarin and acetaminophen interaction: a summary of the evidence and biologic plausibility.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Renato D; Horowitz, John D; Garcia, David A; Crowther, Mark A; Hylek, Elaine M

    2011-12-01

    Ms TS is a 66-year-old woman who receives warfarin for prevention of systemic embolization in the setting of hypertension, diabetes, and atrial fibrillation. She had a transient ischemic attack about 4 years ago when she was receiving aspirin. Her INR control was excellent; however, over the past few months it has become erratic, and her average dose required to maintain an INR of 2.0 to 3.0 appears to have decreased. She has had back pain over this same period and has been taking acetaminophen at doses at large as 650 mg four times daily, with her dose varying based on her symptoms. You recall a potential interaction and wonder if (1) her acetaminophen use is contributing to her loss of INR control, and (2) does this interaction place her at increased risk of warfarin-related complications? PMID:21911832

  18. Role of neutrophils in hepatotoxicity induced by oral acetaminophen administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, G S; Nadig, D E; Kokoska, E R; Solomon, H; Tiniakos, D G; Miller, T A

    1998-12-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a common analgesic and antipyretic compound which, when administered in high doses, has been associated with significant morbidity and mortality, secondary to hepatic toxicity. To date, the mechanism(s) whereby APAP induces liver injury remains to be delineated. This study investigated the potential role of neutrophils as contributors to liver injury in rats administered sublethal doses of APAP. Oral APAP administration (650 mg/kg) was associated with increases in serum alanine transaminase (ALT) levels indicating biochemical evidence of significant liver damage. Furthermore, histological analyses verified significant hepatocellular necrosis as well as enhanced myeloperoxidase staining in these liver specimens. However, if animals were pretreated with antineutrophil sera prior to APAP administration, neutrophil counts remained depressed, ALT levels were significantly decreased, and the degree of liver injury was attenuated on a histological level. Taken together these data suggest that neutrophils mediate, at least in part, the hepatotoxic effects of oral acetaminophen administration in rats. PMID:9878321

  19. Hollow mesoporous TiO2 microspheres for enhanced photocatalytic degradation of acetaminophen in water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin Jung; Yang, Wen-Ta; Chou, Chen-Yi; Liou, Sofia Ya Hsuan

    2016-06-01

    Hollow core-shell mesoporous TiO2 microspheres were synthesized by a template-free solvothermal route for efficient photocatalytic degradation of acetaminophen. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda data revealed a micrometer-sized mesoporous anatase TiO2 hollow sphere with large surface area and efficient light harvesting. For the photocatalytic degradation of acetaminophen in 60 min, the conversion fraction of the drug increased from 88% over commercial Degussa P25 TiO2 to 94% over hollow spheres with about 25% increase in the initial reaction rate. Even after 10 repeated runs, the recycled hollow spheres showed good photodegradation activity. The intermediates generated in the photocatalytic reactions were eventually converted into molecules that are easier to handle. The simple fabrication route would facilitate the development of photocatalysts for the decomposition of environmental contaminants. PMID:27003371

  20. Comparison of the effects of acetaminophen to ketorolac when added to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Myoung Jin; Cheong, Soon Ho; Shin, Chee Mahn; Kim, Young Jae; Choe, Young Kyun; Lee, Kun Moo; Lim, Se Hun; Kim, Young Hwan; Cho, Kwang Rae; Lee, Sang Eun

    2010-01-01

    Background This study was done to evaluate the effect on pain relief when acetaminophen was added to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA). Methods Sixty patients undergoing hand or forearm surgery received IVRA were assigned to three groups: Group C received 0.5% lidocaine diluted with 0.9% normal saline to a total volume of 40 ml (n = 20), Group P received 0.5% lidocaine diluted with intravenous acetaminophen 300 mg to a total volume of 40 ml (n = 20) and Group K received 0.5% lidocaine diluted with 0.9% normal saline plus ketorolac 10 mg made up to a total volume of 40 ml (n = 20). Sensory block onset time, tourniquet pain onset time, which was defined as the time from tourniquet application to fentanyl administration for relieving tourniquet pain and amount of analgesic consumption during surgery were recorded. Following deflation of tourniquet sensory recovery time, postoperative pain and quantity of analgesic uses in post-anesthesia care unit were assessed. Results Sensory block onset time was shorter in Group P compared to Group C (P < 0.05). Tourniquet pain onset time was delayed in Group P when compared with group C (P < 0.05). Postoperative pain and analgesic consumption were reduced in Group P and Group K compared to Group C (P < 0.001). Conclusions The addition of acetaminophen to lidocaine for IVRA shortens the onset time of sensory block and delays tourniquet pain onset time, but not with ketorolac. Both acetaminophen and ketorolac reduce postoperative pain and analgesic consumption. PMID:20508792

  1. Hepatoprotective activity of Centaurium erythraea on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Mroueh, Mohamad; Saab, Yolande; Rizkallah, Raed

    2004-05-01

    The methanol extract of the leaves of Centaurium erythraea L. (Gentianaceae) was evaluated for hepatoprotective activity against acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in rats. An oral dose of 300 mg/kg/day for 6 days or a single dose of 900 mg/kg for 1 day exhibited a significant protective effect by lowering serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The activity of the extract was supported by histopathological examination of liver sections. PMID:15174008

  2. Equal antipyretic effectiveness of oral and rectal acetaminophen: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN11886401

    PubMed Central

    Nabulsi, Mona; Tamim, Hala; Sabra, Ramzi; Mahfoud, Ziyad; Malaeb, Shadi; Fakih, Hadi; Mikati, Mohammad

    2005-01-01

    Background The antipyretic effectiveness of rectal versus oral acetaminophen is not well established. This study is designed to compare the antipyretic effectiveness of two rectal acetaminophen doses (15 mg/kg) and (35 mg/kg), to the standard oral dose of 15 mg/kg. Methods This is a randomized, double-dummy, double-blind study of 51 febrile children, receiving one of three regimens of a single acetaminophen dose: 15 mg/kg orally, 15 mg/kg rectally, or 35 mg/kg rectally. Rectal temperature was monitored at baseline and hourly for a total of six hours. The primary outcome of the study, time to maximum antipyresis, and the secondary outcome of time to temperature reduction by at least 1°C were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures over time was used to compare the secondary outcome: change in temperature from baseline at times1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 hours among the three groups. Intent-to-treat analysis was planned. Results No significant differences were found among the three groups in the time to maximum antipyresis (overall mean = 3.6 hours; 95% CI: 3.2–4.0), time to fever reduction by 1°C or the mean hourly temperature from baseline to 6 hours following dose administration. Hypothermia (temperature < 36.5°C) occurred in 11(21.6%) subjects, with the highest proportion being in the rectal high-dose group. Conclusion Standard (15 mg/kg) oral, (15 mg/kg) rectal, and high-dose (35 mg/kg) rectal acetaminophen have similar antipyretic effectiveness. PMID:16143048

  3. Crystallisation of paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the presence of structurally related substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriksen, Barry A.; Grant, David J. W.; Meenan, Paul; Green, Daniel A.

    1998-02-01

    Paracetamol was crystallised from aqueous solutions containing various concentrations of structurally related compounds. Crystal shape was characterised by image analysis and the additive concentration incorporated into the crystals determined by HPLC. The crystal structure of pure acetaminophen displays a hydrogen bonded network, from which is derived a mechanistic interpretation of the abilities of additive molecules to influence crystal growth. This structural approach was used to explain the observed additive uptake, the morphological changes, and the previously reported inhibition of nucleation.

  4. Neutrophil activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair in mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Sharpe, Matthew R.; McGill, Mitchell R.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into the systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution are controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: > 800 U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for the determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed an increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91{sup phox}−/− mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate that neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. - Highlights: • Neutrophil (PMN) function increases during liver repair after acetaminophen overdose. • Liver repair after acetaminophen (APAP)-overdose is not dependent on NADPH oxidase. • Human PMNs do not appear

  5. Can intravenous acetaminophen reduce the needs to more opioids to control pain in intubated patients?

    PubMed Central

    Mahshidfar, Babak; Sameti, Azadeh; Abbasi, Saeed; Farsi, Davood; Mofidi, Mani; Hafezimoghadam, Peyman; Rahimzadeh, Popak; Rezai, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effect of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen on reducing the need for morphine sulfate in intubated patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Settings and Design: Current study was done as a clinical trial on the patients supported by mechanical ventilator. Subjects and Methods: Behavioral pain scale (BPS) scoring system was used to measure pain in the patients. All of the patients received 1 g, IV acetaminophen, every 6 h during the 1st and 3rd days of admission and placebo during the 2nd and 4th days. Total dose of morphine sulfate needed, its complications, and the BPS scores at the end of every 6 h interval were compared. Results: Totally forty patients were enrolled. The mean pain scores were significantly lower in the 2nd and 4th days (4.33 and 3.66, respectively; mean: 4.0) in which the patients had received just morphine sulfate compared to the 1st and 3rd days (7.36 and 3.93, respectively; mean: 5.65) in which the patients had received acetaminophen in addition to morphine sulfate too (P < 0.001). Cumulative dose of morphine sulfate used, was significantly higher in the 1st and 3rd days (8.92 and 3.15 mg, respectively; 12.07 mg in total) compared to the 2nd and 4th days (6.47 mg and 3.22 mg, respectively; 9.7 mg in total) (P = 0.035). Conclusion: In our study, IV acetaminophen had no effect on decreasing the BPSs and need of morphine sulfate in intubated patients admitted to ICU.

  6. Metabolic activation and toxicity of acetaminophen and related analogs. A theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Loew, G H; Goldblum, A

    1985-03-01

    Reaction thermodynamics have been calculated for an oxene model for cytochrome P-450 oxidations of four related arylamines: aniline, p-hydroxyaniline, acetanilide, and acetaminophen, by both radical and nonradical mechanisms, using a semiempirical molecular orbital method (modified neglect of differential overlap). The results indicate that for both p-hydroxyaniline and acetaminophen, a recently proposed peroxidase-like mechanism leading directly to p-benzoquinoneimines via radical intermediates is thermodynamically favored over N-hydroxylamine formation by H abstraction or addition rearrangement. These studies also provide a detailed characterization of three candidate species for the toxic reactive intermediate of acetaminophen: 1) p-benzoquinoneimines, 2) the radical intermediate formed by H abstraction from the nitrogen, and 3) the radical intermediate formed by H abstraction from the phenol. Calculated electron and spin densities indicate that the radical formed by H abstraction from the phenol oxygen does not remain localized on the oxygen, but is primarily a semiquinone aryl radical with significant unpaired spin density on the ring carbon atoms, particularly on C-3 and C-5. This result is consistent with the hyperfine splitting pattern observed for a transient radical species in a hydroxyl radical-mediated chemical oxidation of acetaminophen. The radical formed by H abstraction from the nitrogen also delocalizes on the ring carbons, but to a lesser extent and at the 2- and 4-positions. A closed shell mechanism of N oxidation of arylamines appears to lead directly to the hydroxylamines with less likelihood of precursor reactive intermediates. Toxic species could then be formed by loss of H2O from the hydroxylamines. PMID:2983185

  7. Antioxidant and Hepatoprotective Properties of Tofu (Curdle Soymilk) against Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yakubu, Ndatsu; Oboh, Ganiyu; Olalekan, Amuzat Aliyu

    2013-01-01

    The antioxidant and hepatoprotective properties of tofu using acetaminophen to induce liver damage in albino rats were evaluated. Tofus were prepared using calcium chloride, alum, and steep water as coagulants. The polyphenols of tofu were extracted and their antioxidant properties were determined. The weight gain and feed intake of the rats were measured. The analysis of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities and the concentrations of albumin, total protein, cholesterol, and bilirubin were analyzed. The result reveals that the antioxidant property of both soluble and bound polyphenolic extracts was significantly higher in all tofus, but the steep water coagulated tofu was recorded higher. Rats fed with various tofus and acetaminophen had their serum ALP, ALT, AST, and LDH activities; total cholesterol; and bilirubin levels significantly (P < 0.05) reduced, and total protein and albumin concentrations increased when compared with basal diet and acetaminophen administered group. Therefore, all tofus curdled with various coagulants could be used to prevent liver damage caused by oxidative stress. PMID:23533782

  8. Zirconyl acetaminophen phosphate: A nanoscaled analgetic with very high drug load.

    PubMed

    Heck, Joachim G; Feldmann, Claus

    2016-11-01

    Drug release belongs to the most challenging aspects of nanoparticles addressing molecular biology and medicine. Besides targeted delivery, obvious challenges are related to high drug load and continuous slow drug release. Based on our recently developed concept of inorganic-organic hybrid nanoparticles (IOH-NP), we here present [ZrO](2+)[AAP](2-) IOH-NPs containing the analgetic phosphate prodrug acetaminophen phosphate for drug release. [ZrO](2+)[AAP](2-) combines an uncomplex synthesis in water with a high prodrug load of 68wt.%. [ZrO](2+)[AAP](2-) nanoparticles exhibit a diameter of 37(11)nm and can be readily obtained as colloidally highly stable suspension in water. The chemical composition is studied in detail based on infrared spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, thermogravimetry and elemental analysis. Moreover, the release of acetaminophen from [ZrO](2+)[AAP](2-) is studied by means of model experiments indicating the carbon content of the nanoparticles and, in alternative, the fluorescence of labeled nanoparticles. Both data show a continuous release of 80wt.% of the analgetic acetaminophen on a time scale up to 48h. PMID:27451036

  9. Protective effect of allyl methyl disulfide on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongchun; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Kaiming; Liu, Guangpu; Yang, Min; Luan, Yuxia; Zhao, Zhongxi

    2016-04-01

    Multiple sulfur compounds of garlic have shown versatile medicinal activities in the prevention and treatment of various diseases. Allyl methyl disulfide (AMDS) was identified as one of the bioactive components in fresh garlic paste in our previous study. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of AMDS against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced acute liver damage in mice. Results reveal that AMDS significantly alleviates APAP-induced elevation of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels in mice. Furthermore, AMDS significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the maleic dialdehyde (MDA) level in liver tissues and restored the activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD, GSH-PX and GSH towards normal levels. IL-6 and TNF-alpha (TNF-α) levels in the serum and liver were clearly increased by acetaminophen-damage (p < 0.05) and AMDS intake significantly suppressed acetaminophen-induced increase of the two cytokines (p < 0.05). The immunohistochemical and pathological analyses showed that AMDS could ameliorate the liver injury through the strong attenuation of the CD45 expression and HNE formation. All the results indicate that AMDS had the ability to protect hepatocytes from APAP-induced liver damage. PMID:26969520

  10. Enhanced photoactivity of graphene/titanium dioxide nanotubes for removal of Acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Hong; Liang, Xiao; Zhang, Qian; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen is commonly used as an antipyretic or analgesics agent and poses threat to human health. In this research, TiO2 and graphite oxide were used as precursors of titanium dioxide nanotubes and graphene respectively. Titanium dioxide nanotube and graphene (GR-TNT) nanocomposites were synthesized through a hydrothermal method. FT-IR, UV-Vis, XRD, and TGA were used to characterize the catalysts. The acetaminophen degradation rate can reach up to 96% under UV light irradiation for 3 h and with the 5% GR-TNT dosage of 0.1 g L-1. Further experiments were done to probe the mechanism of the photocatalytic reaction catalyzed by the GR-TNT composite. EDTA (hole scavengers) and t-BuOH (radical scavengers) were used to detect the main active oxidative species in the system. The results showed that the holes are the main oxidation species in the photocatalytic process. This study provides a new prospect for acetaminophen degradation by using high efficiency catalysts.

  11. Effect of food on acetaminophen absorption in young and elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Divoll, M; Greenblatt, D J; Ameer, B; Abernethy, D R

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-four healthy volunteers aged 22 to 78 years received 650-mg doses of acetaminophen (AAP) on five separate occasions. The modes of administration were: intravenous AAP by 5-minute infusion; oral AAP as two 325-mg tablets in the fasting state; oral AAP 650 mg as an elixir preparation in the fasting state; tablets with food; and elixir with food. Plasma concentrations of AAP were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography for up to 12 hours after the dose. In both the young and the elderly groups, the four oral modes of administration were significantly different with respect to peak plasma concentration (P less than 0.001), time to peak plasma concentration (P less than 0.001), and systemic availability (P less than 0.01). Although food slowed the rate of absorption of both oral preparations, no significant difference in peak acetaminophen plasma concentration or time of peak concentration was observed as a function of age. Absolute systemic availability of elixir and tablets in the fasting state tended to be lower in the elderly subjects (P less than 0.05). However, when either preparation was coadministered with food, there were no differences between the two age groups. Thus, age as such does not appear to be a critical determinant in the design of oral acetaminophen dosage schedules. PMID:7161411

  12. Data on expression of lipoxygenases-5 and -12 in the normal and acetaminophen-damaged liver.

    PubMed

    Suciu, Maria; Gruia, Alexandra T; Nica, Dragos V; Azghadi, Seyed M R; Mic, Ani A; Mic, Felix A

    2016-06-01

    Here we present additional data on the expression of lipoxygenases -5 and -12 in the normal and acetaminophen-damaged liver, which are associated with our manuscript recently published in Chemico-Biological Interactions on lipid metabolism and eicosanoid signaling pathways involved in acetaminophen-induced liver damage in a mouse model (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbi.2015.10.019 [1]). It has been demonstrated that the expression of lipoxygenase-5 and leukotriene formation are increased in the livers of rats with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced cirrhosis (http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/gast.2000.17831 [2]). In addition, the lipoxygenase-12 is known to be expressed in the resident macrophage population of the liver (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0014-5793(99)00396-8 [3]). Mice were injected with acetaminophen, and at 48 h their livers were processed for immunohistochemistry with anti-mouse lipoxygenase-5 and -12 antibodies. At the same time point, the RNA was also extracted from the liver to assess the expression of lipoxygenase-5 and -12 genes via qPCR analysis. Our results show that lipoxygenase-5 expression, but not that of lipoxygenase-12, changes significantly in the acetominophen-damaged liver. PMID:27408922

  13. The Prescription Pattern of Acetaminophen and Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Patients with Liver Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Young Mi; Yoon, Ki Tae; Heo, Jeong; Woo, Hyun Young; Lim, Won; An, Dae Seong; Han, Jun Hee; Cho, Mong

    2016-10-01

    Analgesics, known to be hepatotoxic drugs, are frequently prescribed to patients with liver cirrhosis who are prone to drug-induced liver injury. No guidelines are available regarding the prescription of analgesics in these patients. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the prescription pattern of most frequently used analgesics in patients with cirrhosis. We assessed the prescription pattern of acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with liver cirrhosis registered in Health Insurance Review Assessment Service database between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012. A total of 125,505 patients with liver cirrhosis were registered from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Of that group, 50,798 (40.5%) patients claimed reimbursement for at least one prescription for acetaminophen or NSAIDs during the one year follow-up period. Overall, NSAIDs (82.7%) were more prescribed than acetaminophen (64.5%). NSAIDs were more prescribed than acetaminophen even in decompensated cirrhosis compared with compensated cirrhosis (71.5% vs. 68.8%, P value < 0.001). There was a marked difference in prescription preference between acetaminophen and NSAIDs among physicians. Internists more frequently prescribed acetaminophen than NSAIDs compared to other physicians (50.9% vs. 76.2%, P < 0.001). Gastroenterologists more frequently prescribed acetaminophen over NSAIDs compared to other internists (80.9% vs. 51.2%, P < 0.001). Analgesics were prescribed in 40.5% of patients with cirrhosis. NSAIDs were more frequently prescribed although they should be avoided. The prescription pattern of analgesics were different significantly among physicians in patients with liver cirrhosis. The harmful effects of NSAIDs in patients with cirrhosis should be reminded to all physicians prescribing analgesics. PMID:27550489

  14. Particle design using a 4-fluid-nozzle spray-drying technique for sustained release of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Richer; Okamoto, Hirokazu; Danjo, Kazumi

    2006-07-01

    We prepared matrix particles of acetaminophen (Act) with chitosan (Cht) as a carrier using a newly developed 4-fluid-nozzle spray dryer. Cht dissolves in acid solutions and forms a gel, but it does not dissolve in alkaline solutions. Therefore, we tested the preparation of controlled release matrix particles using the characteristics of this carrier. Act and Cht mixtures in prescribed ratios were dissolved in an acid solution. We evaluated the matrix particles by preparing a solid dispersion using a 4-fluid-nozzle spray dryer. Observation of the particle morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the particles from the spray drying process had atomized to several microns, and that they had become spherical. We investigated the physicochemical properties of the matrix particles by powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and dissolution rate analyses with a view to clarifying the effects of crystallinity on the dissolution rate. The powder X-ray diffraction peaks and the heat of the Act fusion in the spray-dried samples decreased with the increase of the carrier content, indicating that the drug was amorphous. These results indicate that the system formed a solid dispersion. Furthermore, we investigated the interaction between the drug and carrier using FT-IR analysis. The FT-IR spectroscopy for the Act solid dispersions suggested that the Act carboxyl group and the Cht amino group formed a hydrogen bond. In addition, the measurement results of the 13C CP/MAS solid-state NMR, indicated that a hydrogen bond had been formed between the Act carbonyl group and the Cht amino group. In the Act-Cht system, the 4-fluid-nozzle spray-dried preparation with a mixing ratio of 1 : 5 obtained a sustained release preparation in all pH test solutions. PMID:16819209

  15. Simultaneous analysis of acetaminophen, p-aminophenol and aspirin metabolites by hydrophilic interaction and strong anion exchange capillary liquid chromatography coupled to amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Minmin; Wu, Yimin; Lu, Lanxiang; Ding, Kang; Tang, Fengxiang; Lin, Zian; Wu, Xiaoping

    2011-08-01

    A simple and sensitive method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of polar nonsteroidal pharmaceuticals and metabolites, including acetaminophen, p-aminophenol and several aspirin metabolites (salicylic acid, gentisic acid, salicyluric acid and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid), by capillary liquid chromatography with amperometric detection. Using a capillary monolithic column with mixed mode stationary phases and a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile and Tris buffer, rapid separation of six polar analytes was achieved within 8 min, and a hydrophilic interaction and strong anion exchange separation mechanism were exhibited. Method detection limits of six analytes ranged from 10 to 50 ng/mL. In terms of precision, the intra- and interday relative standard deviation values in all analytes never exceeded 3.1% for migration time and 8.9% for peak areas, respectively. This method provided a simple, rapid and cost-effective approach for the analysis of polar pharmaceuticals. The applicability of the method in pharmacokinetics was verified by spiking human serum samples with the compounds and analyzing the recoveries. PMID:21644253

  16. Pharmacokinetics of hydrocodone/acetaminophen combination product in children ages 6-17 with moderate to moderately severe postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Dutta, Sandeep; Kearns, Greg; Awni, Walid; Neville, Kathleen A

    2015-02-01

    Lortab® Elixir, a proprietary combination product containing hydrocodone and acetaminophen, is approved in the US for the treatment of moderate to moderately severe pain in children. Despite this approval, pediatric pharmacokinetic data using this product have not been previously published. Using a single-dose open-label study approach, we evaluated the pharmacokinetics, tolerability, and safety of this product in 17 healthy children 6-17 years of age. Results showed that the body weight-normalized oral clearance (L/h/kg) of hydrocodone and acetaminophen were 42% and 27% higher, respectively when compared to data from healthy adults. This suggests that a higher mg/kg dose would be required in children to achieve exposures similar to adults. We found adjustment of hydrocodone and acetaminophen dose by body surface area to be more optimal than body weight-based dose adjustments for achieving similar systemic exposure in children and adults. However, body weight-based hydrocodone and acetaminophen dosing regimens provided close approximation of adult exposures in pediatric patients with approximately 22% to 24% lower hydrocodone and acetaminophen dose/BW-normalized AUC in pediatric patients compared to adults. Finally, the adverse event profile in our pediatric cohort was consistent with that expected of opioid-naive subjects receiving opioid-combination therapy. PMID:25196888

  17. Over-the-Counter Relief From Pains and Pleasures Alike: Acetaminophen Blunts Evaluation Sensitivity to Both Negative and Positive Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Durso, Geoffrey R O; Luttrell, Andrew; Way, Baldwin M

    2015-06-01

    Acetaminophen, an effective and popular over-the-counter pain reliever (e.g., the active ingredient in Tylenol), has recently been shown to blunt individuals' reactivity to a range of negative stimuli in addition to physical pain. Because accumulating research has shown that individuals' reactivity to both negative and positive stimuli can be influenced by a single factor (an idea known as differential susceptibility), we conducted two experiments testing whether acetaminophen blunted individuals' evaluations of and emotional reactions to both negative and positive images from the International Affective Picture System. Participants who took acetaminophen evaluated unpleasant stimuli less negatively and pleasant stimuli less positively, compared with participants who took a placebo. Participants in the acetaminophen condition also rated both negative and positive stimuli as less emotionally arousing than did participants in the placebo condition (Studies 1 and 2), whereas nonevaluative ratings (extent of color saturation in each image; Study 2) were not affected by drug condition. These findings suggest that acetaminophen has a general blunting effect on individuals' evaluative and emotional processing, irrespective of negative or positive valence. PMID:25862546

  18. Effects of a single low-dose acetaminophen on body temperature and running performance in the heat: a pilot project

    PubMed Central

    Burtscher, Martin; Gatterer, Hannes; Philippe, Marc; Krüsmann, Philipp; Kernbeiss, Stefanie; Frontull, Veronica; Kofler, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of a single low-dose (500 mg) acetaminophen on body temperature and running performance in the heat (30 °C). Methods: This is a randomized, cross-over pilot study performed in a climatic chamber at the Department of Sport Science of the University of Innsbruck. Seven male sport students (age, 25.9 ± 2.3 years; VO2max, 67.3 ± 7.1 mL/min/kg) participated in the study. Each participant performed two prolonged exercise tests at a constant intensity on a treadmill at a temperature of 30 °C at an individual intensity corresponding to 70 % VO2max. Two hours before exercising participants were randomly assigned to receive acetaminophen (500 mg) or placebo and performed the same test 2 weeks later with reverse pre-treatment. Results: After 20 min of running in the heat core temperature increase was less under acetaminophen (P = 0.004) and heart rates were higher (P = 0.02) compared to placebo. At the end of exercise neither running time nor body temperature nor ratings of perceived exertion differed between groups. Conclusion: Although the increase in core temperature was slightly reduced by acetaminophen after 20 minutes of running in the heat running performance remained unaffected after pre-treatment with a single low-dose of acetaminophen. PMID:24044039

  19. Synergistic effect of NADH on NADPH-dependent acetaminophen activation in liver microsomes and its inhibition by cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Chifumi; Marumo, Fumiaki )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of NADH and cyanide on NADPH-dependent acetaminophen activation in rat and mouse liver microsomes were studied. In both rat and mouse microsomes, NADPH-dependent acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate production was synergistically enhanced by the addition of NADH, whereas NADH alone did not initiate this reaction. The data suggest that the second electron in this reaction may be transferred from NADH. The present findings are different from a previous report in a reconstituted system that NADH decreases covalent binding of acetaminophen to proteins. This reaction was inhibited by low concentrations of sodium cyanide. The role of the cyanide sensitive factor in this reaction in liver microsomes remains to be further clarified.

  20. [Good use and knowledge of paracetamol (acetaminophen) among self-medicated patients: Prospective study in community pharmacies].

    PubMed

    Severin, Anne-Elise; Petitpain, Nadine; Scala-Bertola, Julien; Latarche, Clotilde; Yelehe-Okouma, Melissa; Di Patrizio, Paolo; Gillet, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol), the highest over-the-counter (OTC) selling drug in France, is also the first cause of acute hepatic failure. We aimed to assess the good use and the knowledge of acetaminophen in a setting of urban self-medicated patients. We conducted a prospective observational study in randomly selected community pharmacies of Metz (France) agglomeration. Patients coming to buy OTC acetaminophen for themselves or their family had to answer to an anonymous autoquestionnaire. Responses were individually and concomitantly analyzed through 3 scores: good use, knowledge and overdosage. Twenty-four community pharmacies participated and 302 patients were interviewed by mean of a dedicated questionnaire. Most of patients (84.4%) could be considered as "good users" and independent factors of good use were (i) a good knowledge of acetaminophen (OR=5.3; P<0.0001) and more surprisingly; (ii) the fact of having no children (parentality: OR=0.1; P=0.006). Responses corresponding to involuntary overdosage were mostly due to a too short interval between drug intakes (3hours). Only 30.8% of patients were aware of liver toxicity of acetaminophen and only 40.7% knew the risk of the association with alcohol. Both good use and knowledge were significantly higher in patients looking for information from their pharmacist, physician and package leaflet. Patients should definitely be better informed about acetaminophen to warrant a better safety of its consumption. Pharmacists and physicians have to remind patients the risk factors of unintentional overdose and liver toxicity. Package leaflets have also to be more informative. PMID:27235652

  1. Ginkgolide A contributes to the potentiation of acetaminophen toxicity by Ginkgo biloba extract in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rajaraman, Ganesh; Chen, Jie; Chang, Thomas K.H. . E-mail: tchang@interchange.ubc.ca

    2006-12-01

    The present cell culture study investigated the effect of Ginkgo biloba extract pretreatment on acetaminophen toxicity and assessed the role of ginkgolide A and cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) in hepatocytes isolated from adult male Long-Evans rats provided ad libitum with a standard diet. Acetaminophen (7.5-25 mM for 24 h) conferred hepatocyte toxicity, as determined by the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. G. biloba extract alone increased LDH leakage in hepatocytes at concentrations {>=} 75 {mu}g/ml and {>=} 750 {mu}g/ml after a 72 h and 24 h treatment period, respectively. G. biloba extract (25 or 50 {mu}g/ml once every 24 h for 72 h) potentiated LDH leakage by acetaminophen (10 mM for 24 h; added at 48 h after initiation of extract pretreatment). The effect was confirmed by a decrease in [{sup 14}C]-leucine incorporation. At the level present in a modulating concentration (50 {mu}g/ml) of the extract, ginkgolide A (0.55 {mu}g/ml), which increased CYP3A23 mRNA levels and CYP3A-mediated enzyme activity, accounted for part but not all of the potentiating effect of the extract on acetaminophen toxicity. This occurred as a result of CYP3A induction by ginkgolide A because triacetyloleandomycin (TAO), a specific inhibitor of CYP3A catalytic activity, completely blocked the effect of ginkgolide A. Ginkgolide B, ginkgolide C, ginkgolide J, quercetin, kaempferol, isorhamnetin, and isorhamnetin-3-O-rutinoside did not alter the extent of LDH leakage by acetaminophen. In summary, G. biloba pretreatment potentiated acetaminophen toxicity in cultured rat hepatocytes and ginkgolide A contributed to this novel effect of the extract by inducing CYP3A.

  2. Safety and Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Intravenous Acetaminophen in Neonates, Infants, Children, and Adolescents With Pain or Fever

    PubMed Central

    Zuppa, Athena F.; Hammer, Gregory B.; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Kenney, Brian F.; Kassir, Nastya; Mouksassi, Samer; Royal, Mike A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The administration of acetaminophen via the oral and rectal routes may be contraindicated in specific clinical settings. Intravenous administration provides an alternative route for fever reduction and analgesia. This phase 1 study of intravenous acetaminophen (Ofirmev, Cadence Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, CA) in inpatient pediatric patients with pain or fever requiring intravenous therapy was designed to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics of repeated doses over 48 hours. METHODS Neonates (full-term to 28 days) received either 12.5 mg/kg every 6 hours or 15 mg/kg every 8 hours. Infants (29 days to <2 years), children (2 to <12 years) and adolescents (≥12 years) received either 12.5 mg/kg every 4 hours or 15 mg/kg every 6 hours. Both noncompartmental and population nonlinear mixed-effects modeling approaches were used. Urinary metabolite data were analyzed, and safety and tolerability were assessed. RESULTS Pharmacokinetic parameters of acetaminophen were estimated using a two-compartment disposition model with weight allometrically expressed on clearances and central and peripheral volumes of distribution (Vds). Postnatal age, with a maturation function, was a significant covariate on clearance. Total systemic normalized clearance was 18.4 L/hr per 70 kg, with a plateau reached at approximately 2 years. Total central and peripheral Vds of acetaminophen were 16 and 59.5 L/70 kg, respectively. The drug was well tolerated based on the incidence of adverse events. The primary and minor pathways of elimination were acetaminophen glucuronidation, sulfation, and glutathione conjugate metabolites across all age groups. CONCLUSIONS Intravenous acetaminophen in infants, children, and adolescents was well tolerated and achieved plasma concentrations similar to those achieved with labeled 15 mg/kg body weight doses by oral or rectal administration. PMID:22768009

  3. Effect of over-the-counter dosages of naproxen sodium and acetaminophen on plasma lithium concentrations in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Levin, G M; Grum, C; Eisele, G

    1998-06-01

    Prescription doses of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown to decrease clearance and increase plasma concentrations of lithium. This study was designed to evaluate whether over-the-counter (OTC) doses of naproxen sodium or acetaminophen have the same potential to affect lithium concentration. This was a prospective, crossover, 3-phase study conducted at the Clinical Pharmacology Studies Unit of the Albany Medical Center Hospital during July and August of 1995. The 3-phase study comprised the following: phase 1, lithium carbonate (300 mg every 12 hours) alone for 7 days; phase 2, lithium and either naproxen sodium (220 mg every 8 hours) or acetaminophen (650 mg every 6 hours) for 5 days; and phase 3, a 2-day washout period followed by a crossover to lithium with the alternate drug (acetaminophen or naproxen sodium) for 5 days. Twelve healthy male volunteers were recruited, nine of whom completed the study and were included in the statistical analysis. Mean (+/-SD) plasma lithium concentrations for subjects in treatment group 1 (lithium in phase 1, lithium and naproxen sodium in phase 2, lithium and acetaminophen in phase 3) were 0.38 (+/-0.11), 0.40 (+/-0.07), and 0.36 (+/-0.11) mEq/L, respectively. Mean plasma lithium concentrations for subjects in treatment group 2 (lithium in phase 1, lithium and acetaminophen in phase 2, lithium and naproxen sodium in phase 3) were 0.43 (+/-0.05), 0.48 (+/-0.10), and 0.48 (+/-0.05) mEq/L, respectively. One-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired t-test showed no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) in plasma lithium concentrations during any phase of the study. The results of this study demonstrated that OTC doses of naproxen sodium and acetaminophen did not increase plasma lithium concentrations in these volunteers when taken for short periods of time. PMID:9617983

  4. Preparation and pharmaceutical evaluation of acetaminophen nano-fiber tablets: Application of a solvent-based electrospinning method for tableting.

    PubMed

    Hamori, Mami; Nagano, Kana; Kakimoto, Sayaka; Naruhashi, Kazumasa; Kiriyama, Akiko; Nishimura, Asako; Shibata, Nobuhito

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we developed nano-fiber-based tablets with acetaminophen (AAP; LogPow=0.51) for controlled-release delivery systems and evaluated in vitro drug dissolution and in vivo pharmacokinetics in rats. Nano-fibers made from methacrylic acid copolymer S (MAC; EUDRAGIT(®) S100) and containing AAP were prepared using a solvent-based electrospinning (ES) method. In vitro dissolution rate profiles of AAP showed tableting pressure-dependent decreases and pH-dependent increases. The results of tablet tracking by X-ray irradiation showed tablets based on MAC nano-fibers did not disintegrate in the upper intestinal lumen and had the properties of a long-term-acting tablet. In addition, the in vitro release profiles of AAP from nano-fiber tablets prepared by dissolving MAC with AAP (NFT), nano-fiber tablets prepared by adsorbing AAP to drug-free MAC nano-fibers (NFTadso), and tablets prepared by adsorbing half the amount of AAP to MAC nano-fibers containing the remaining amount of AAP (NFThalf) showed independent controlled-release aspects of AAP compared with physical mixture tablets (PMT). In vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rats after intraduodenal administration of 14mg/rat AAP in NFT, NFTadso, and NFThalf demonstrated that all these tablets based on MAC nano-fibers showed sustained-release profiles compared with PMT, and showed ultra-sustained release properties for AAP. These new tablets based on MAC nano-fibers did not disintegrate in the intestine in the lower pH region, and the tablets could regulate the release of AAP in a pH-dependent manner. The ES method is a useful technique to prepare nano-fibers and showed promising results as an oral delivery system for sustained-release regulation. PMID:26898420

  5. Glycyrrhizin Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Injury via Alleviating Tumor Necrosis Factor α–Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tingting; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Min; Yagai, Tomoki; Chai, Yingying; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Xie, Cen; Cheng, Xuefang; Zhang, Jun; Che, Yuan; Li, Feiyan; Wu, Yuzheng; Brocker, Chad N.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in Western countries. Glycyrrhizin (GL), a potent hepatoprotective constituent extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine liquorice, has potential clinical use in treating APAP-induced liver failure. The present study determined the hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanisms of action of GL and its active metabolite glycyrrhetinic acid (GA). Various administration routes and pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics analyses were used to differentiate the effects of GL and GA on APAP toxicity in mice. Mice deficient in cytochrome P450 2E1 enzyme (CYP2E1) or receptor interacting protein 3 (RIPK3) and their relative wild-type littermates were subjected to histologic and biochemical analyses to determine the potential mechanisms. Hepatocyte death mediated by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)/caspase was analyzed by use of human liver-derived LO2 cells. The pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics analysis using various administration routes revealed that GL but not GA potently attenuated APAP-induced liver injury. The protective effect of GL was found only with intraperitoneal and intravenous administration and not with gastric administration. CYP2E1-mediated metabolic activation and RIPK3-mediated necroptosis were unrelated to GL’s protective effect. However, GL inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis via interference with TNFα-induced apoptotic hepatocyte death. These results demonstrate that GL rapidly attenuates APAP-induced liver injury by directly inhibiting TNFα-induced hepatocyte apoptosis. The protective effect against APAP-induced liver toxicity by GL in mice suggests the therapeutic potential of GL for the treatment of APAP overdose. PMID:26965985

  6. A composite material based on nanoparticles of yttrium (III) oxide for the selective and sensitive electrochemical determination of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Baytak, Aysegul Kutluay; Teker, Tugce; Duzmen, Sehriban; Aslanoglu, Mehmet

    2016-09-01

    An electrochemical sensor was prepared by modifying a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with a composite of yttrium (III) oxide nanoparticles (Y2O3NPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the determination of acetaminophen (ACT). Compared with a bare GCE and CNTs/GCE, the Y2O3NPs/CNTs/GCE exhibited a well-defined redox couple for ACT and highly enhanced the current response. The separations in the anodic and cathodic peak potentials (ΔEp) for ACT were 552mV, 24mV and 10mV at ba4re GCE, CNTs/GCE and Y2O3NPs/CNTs/GCE, respectively. The observation of only 10mV of ΔEp for ACT at Y2O3NPs/CNTs/GCE was a clear indication of a great acceleration of the electrode process compared to bare GCE and GCE modified with CNTs. Also, l-ascorbic acid (l-AA) and l-tyrosine (l-TRY) did not interfere with the selective determination of ACT. Square wave voltammetry (SWV) was performed for the quantification of ACT. A linear plot was obtained for current responses versus the concentrations of ACT over the range from 1.0×10(-10) to 1.8×10(-8)M with a detection limit of 3.0×10(-11)M (based on 3Sb/m). The proposed composite material provided high electrocatalytic activity, improved voltammetric behavior, good selectivity and good reproducibility. The accurate quantification of ACT makes the proposed electrode of great interest for the public health. PMID:27207064

  7. Glycyrrhizin Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Injury via Alleviating Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Mediated Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tingting; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Min; Yagai, Tomoki; Chai, Yingying; Krausz, Kristopher W; Xie, Cen; Cheng, Xuefang; Zhang, Jun; Che, Yuan; Li, Feiyan; Wu, Yuzheng; Brocker, Chad N; Gonzalez, Frank J; Wang, Guangji; Hao, Haiping

    2016-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in Western countries. Glycyrrhizin (GL), a potent hepatoprotective constituent extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine liquorice, has potential clinical use in treating APAP-induced liver failure. The present study determined the hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanisms of action of GL and its active metabolite glycyrrhetinic acid (GA). Various administration routes and pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics analyses were used to differentiate the effects of GL and GA on APAP toxicity in mice. Mice deficient in cytochrome P450 2E1 enzyme (CYP2E1) or receptor interacting protein 3 (RIPK3) and their relative wild-type littermates were subjected to histologic and biochemical analyses to determine the potential mechanisms. Hepatocyte death mediated by tumor necrosis factorα(TNFα)/caspase was analyzed by use of human liver-derived LO2 cells. The pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics analysis using various administration routes revealed that GL but not GA potently attenuated APAP-induced liver injury. The protective effect of GL was found only with intraperitoneal and intravenous administration and not with gastric administration. CYP2E1-mediated metabolic activation and RIPK3-mediated necroptosis were unrelated to GL's protective effect. However, GL inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis via interference with TNFα-induced apoptotic hepatocyte death. These results demonstrate that GL rapidly attenuates APAP-induced liver injury by directly inhibiting TNFα-induced hepatocyte apoptosis. The protective effect against APAP-induced liver toxicity by GL in mice suggests the therapeutic potential of GL for the treatment of APAP overdose. PMID:26965985

  8. Non-Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Are Better than Acetaminophen on Fever Control at Acute Stage of Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Kuang-Ting; Wu, Wen-Tien; Subeq, Yi-Maun; Niu, Chi-Chien; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Chen, Ing-Ho; Wang, Jen-Hung; Lee, Ru-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In addition to adequate surgical fixation and an aggressive rehabilitation program, pain relief is one of the most critical factors in the acute stage of fracture treatment. The most common analgesics are nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs and Acetaminophen, both of which relieve pain and reduce body temperature. In clinical experiences, they exhibit effective pain control; however, their influence on body temperature remains controversial. This study is aimed at determining the effects of analgesics at the acute stage of traumatic fracture by performing a clinical retrospective study of patients with fractures and a fracture animal model. The retrospective study revealed that, in the acetaminophen group, the mean value of postmedication body temperature (BT) was significantly higher than that of the premedication BT. The change in BT was highly related with the medication rather than other risk factors. Forty eight 12-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups: a control group, fracture group, fracture-Acetaminophen group, Acetaminophen group, fracture-Arcoxia group, and Arcoxia group. Fracture rats were prepared by breaking their unilateral tibia and fibula. Their inflammation conditions were evaluated by measuring their serum cytokine level and their physiological status was evaluated by estimating their central temperature, heart rate, and mean blood pressure. The hepatic adverse effects were assessed by measuring the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (sGOT) and alanine aminotransferase (sGPT). The central temperature in the fracture-Acetaminophen group exceeded that in the groups fed normal saline water or Arcoxia. Accumulated hepatic injury was presented as steadily ascending curves of sGOT and sGPT. Inflammation-related cytokine levels were not higher in the Acetaminophen fracture group and were significantly lower in the fracture-Arcoxia group. Fever appeared to be aggravated by acetaminophen and more related to the elevation of hepatic

  9. Efficacy and Safety of a Fixed Combination of Tramadol and Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) as Pain Therapy Within Palliative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Husic, Samir; Izic, Senad; Matic, Srecko; Sukalo, Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Goal: The goal of the research was to determine the efficacy of a fixed combination of tramadol and paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the treatment of pain of patients with the advanced stage of cancer. Material and methods: A prospective study was conducted at the Center for Palliative Care, University Clinical Center Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina, from January 1st to December 31st 2013. A total of 353 patients who were treated with a fixed combination of tramadol and acetaminophen (37.5 mg and 325 mg) at the initial dosage 3x1 tablet (112.5 mg tramadol and 975 mg acetaminophen) for pain intensity 4, up to 4x2 tablets (300 mg of tramadol and 2600 mg paracetamol) for pain intensity 7 and 8. If the patient during previous day has two or more pain episodes that required a “rescue dose” of tramadol, increased was the dose of fixed combination tramadol and acetaminophen to a maximum of 8 tablets daily (300 mg of tramadol and 2600 mg paracetamol). Statistical analysis was performed by biomedical software MedCalc for Windows version 9.4.2.0. The difference was considered significant for P<0.05. Results: The average duration of treatment with a fixed combination tramadol and acetaminophen was 57 days (13-330 days). Already after 24 hours of treatment the average pain score was significantly lower (p<0.0001) compared to the admission day [5.00 (4:00 to 8:00) during the first days versus 2.00 (1:00 to 7:00) during the second day of treatment]. The average dose of the fixed combination tramadol and acetaminophen tablets was 4.8 ± 1.8 (180 mg of tramadol and 1560 mg paracetamol). Side effects, in the treatment of pain with a fixed combination tramadol and acetaminophen, were found in 29.18% of patients, with a predominance of nausea and vomiting. Conclusion: Fixed combination of tramadol and acetaminophen can be used as an effective combination in the treatment of chronic cancer pain, with frequent dose evaluation and mild side effects. PMID:25870531

  10. Effects of Suppository Acetaminophen, Bupivacaine Wound Infiltration, and Caudal Block With Bupivacaine on Postoperative Pain in Pediatric Inguinal Herniorrhaphy

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini Jahromi, Seyed Abbas; Sadeghi poor, Sadegh; Hosseini Valami, Seyedeh Masoumeh; Javadi, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Background: The control of postoperative pain is important in children, and poor pain control leads to organ dysfunction and behavioral problems. Objectives: We compared the analgesic effects of suppository acetaminophen, bupivacaine wound infiltration, and caudal block with bupivacaine on postoperative pain in pediatric inguinal herniorrhaphy. Patients and Methods: In this double-blinded, randomized controlled clinical trial, 90 children of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade I-II, aged between 3 months and 7 years, and scheduled for elective unilateral inguinal herniorrhaphy under general anesthesia were assigned to three equal groups. Patients in the first group received 20 mg/kg of suppository acetaminophen. In the second group, 2 mg/kg of 0.5% bupivacaine was infiltrated in the incisional site, and in the third group, a caudal block was performed with 0.75 mL/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine. The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) pain scale was applied 30 minutes after operation. Thereafter, the FLACC score was obtained every hour during the next 6 hours. If the FLACC score was 4 or over, we administered 0.5 mg/kg of intravenous meperidine. The data was transferred to SPSS-10 software and analyzed statistically with chi-square and analysis of variance tests. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The mean analgesic duration in the acetaminophen, bupivacaine infiltration, and caudal block groups was 4.07, 5.40, and 5.37 hours, respectively. Significant differences were not observed between the bupivacaine infiltration and caudal block groups (P = 0.9), but the differences between the bupivacaine infiltration and acetaminophen groups (P = 0.034) and the caudal block and acetaminophen groups (P = 0.039) were significant. With regard to meperidine administration, significant differences were not observed between the bupivacaine infiltration and caudal block groups (P = 0.848), but significant differences were observed between these two

  11. Hypothermic activity of acetaminophen; involvement of GABAA receptor, theoretical and experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Ahangar, Nematollah; Esam, Zohreh; Bekhradnia, Ahmadreza; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The mechanism of hypothermia action of acetaminophen (APAP) remains unclear even 125 years after its synthesis. Acetaminophen produces hypothermia. The mechanism of this reduction in core body temperature is not clear but evidence shows that it is not dependent on opioid and cannabinoid receptors. Because of strong documents about the roles of GABA and benzodiazepine receptors in hypothemic activity of some drugs such as diazepam, we determined if these receptors also contributes to the hypothermic effect of APAP. Materials and Methods: Diazepam (5 mg/kg, IP) was used for induction of hypothermia. Flumazenil (10 mg/kg, IP) or picrotoxin (2 mg/kg, IP) used for reversal of this effect. Rats injected with APAP (100, 200 or 300 mg/kg, IP). Baseline temperature measurements were taken with a digital thermometer via rectum. To evaluate the structural correlation between APAP and benzodiazepine receptor ligands, numerous models are selected and studied at HF/6-31G* level of theory. Relative energies, enthalpies and Gibbs free energies were calculated for all selected drugs. Results Diazepam induced hypothermia was reversed by flumazenil or picrotoxin. Rats injected with APAP displayed dose- and time-related hypothermia. For combined administration, the hypothermic effect of APAP (200 mg/kg) was strongly reduced by pretreatment with picrotoxin or flumazenil P<0.0001and P<0.01, respectively. Selective structural data, bond length, dihedral angles, and related distance in pharmacophore of APAP and BZDR models were the same. Some significant structural analogues were obtained between these drugs. Conclusion: Results suggest hypothermic action of acetaminophen may be mediate by its effect at GABAA benzodiazepine receptor. PMID:27403252

  12. Protective effects of Parinari curatellifolia flavonoids against acetaminophen-induced hepatic necrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Olaleye, Mary Tolulope; Amobonye, Ayodeji Emmannuel; Komolafe, Kayode; Akinmoladun, Afolabi Clement

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the hepatoprotective potential of Parinari curatellifolia Planch (Chrysobalanaceae) in experimental rats in order to ascertain the validity of folkloric claims of its effectiveness in the treatment of hepatic-related disorders. Flavonoid extract of P. curatellifolia seed, PCF (10-, 20- or 30 mg/kg body weight) or silymarin (25 mg/kg), dissolved in corn oil, was administered by gavage to experimental animals once daily for 14 consecutive days before liver damage was chemically induced through the administration of acetaminophen (2 g/kg p.o.) on the 14th day. Hepatoprotection was assessed by analyzing liver homogenate and serum for markers of hepatotoxicity – alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities as well as prothrombin time (PT). Evaluation of biochemical indices of oxidative stress – level of lipid peroxides (LPO), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, along with histological assessment of hepatic tissue sections were also carried out. Results revealed that all doses of PCF significantly (P < 0.001) and dose dependently prevented acetaminophen-induced increase in serum activities of hepatic enzymes (ALT, AST, GGT, LDH) and PT. Furthermore, PCF (10- and 20 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.001) reduced lipid peroxidation in liver tissue and restored the activities of the antioxidant enzymes SOD and catalase toward normal levels. Histopathology of the liver tissue showed that PCF mitigated the toxicant-induced hepatocellular necrosis, reduced inflammatory cell infiltration and enhanced hepatocyte regeneration. The results indicated that P. curatellifolia flavonoids demonstrated remarkable hepatoprotective activity in acute liver injury caused by acetaminophen. PMID:25313285

  13. Acetaminophen potentiates staurosporine-induced death in a human neuroblastoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, I; Vellecco, V; Santos, P; Prieto-Lloret, J; Ceña, V

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumour in infants characterized by a high resistance to apoptosis. Recently, the cyclo-oxygenase pathway has been considered a potential target in the treatment of different kinds of tumours. The aim of the present work was to investigate a possible relationship between cyclo-oxygenase pathway and stauroporine-induced apoptosis in the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Experimental approach: Cellular viability was measured by release of LDH. DNA fragmentation was visualized by electrophoresis on agarose gel containing ethidium bromide. Cyclo-oxygenase activity was measured in microsomal fractions obtained from cells by quantification of its final product PGE2 by RIA. Caspase-3 activity was measured fluorimetrically and Western blot analysis was performed to assess cytochrome c expression. Key results: We have found that staurosporine (500 nM) induced cellular death in a time-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Cyclo-oxygenase enzymatic activity was present in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells under basal conditions and pharmacological experiments using COX inhibitors indicate that cyclo-oxygenase-1 and cyclo-oxygenase-3 are the active isoforms in these cells. Co-incubation of SH-SY5Y cells with staurosporine (500 nM) and acetaminophen for 24 h potentiated staurosporine-mediated cellular death in a concentration-dependent manner. This process is mediated by an increase in cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activation and is prevented by N-acetylcysteine or the superoxide dismutase mimetic, MnTBAP. Conclusions and implications: Acetaminophen potentiates staurosporine-mediated neuroblastoma cell death. The mechanism of action of acetaminophen seems to be related to production of reactive oxygen species and decreased intracellular glutathione levels. PMID:17245372

  14. Acetaminophen-NAPQI Hepatotoxicity: A Cell Line Model System Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Ann M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Jenkins, Gregory D.; Batzler, Anthony J.; Pelleymounter, Linda L.; Kalari, Krishna R.; Ji, Yuan; Chai, Yubo; Nordgren, Kendra K. S.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen is the leading cause of acute hepatic failure in many developed nations. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is mediated by the reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinonimine (NAPQI). We performed a “discovery” genome-wide association study using a cell line–based model system to study the possible contribution of genomics to NAPQI-induced cytotoxicity. A total of 176 lymphoblastoid cell lines from healthy subjects were treated with increasing concentrations of NAPQI. Inhibiting concentration 50 values were determined and were associated with “glutathione pathway” gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genome-wide basal messenger RNA expression, as well as with 1.3 million genome-wide SNPs. A group of SNPs in linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 3 was highly associated with NAPQI toxicity. The p value for rs2880961, the SNP with the lowest p value, was 1.88 × 10−7. This group of SNPs mapped to a “gene desert,” but chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated binding of several transcription factor proteins including heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and HSF2, at or near rs2880961. These chromosome 3 SNPs were not significantly associated with variation in basal expression for any of the genome-wide genes represented on the Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChip. We have used a cell line–based model system to identify a SNP signal associated with NAPQI cytotoxicity. If these observations are validated in future clinical studies, this SNP signal might represent a potential biomarker for risk of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear. PMID:21177773

  15. Transformation of acetaminophen during water chlorination treatment: kinetics and transformation products identification.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fei; Zhang, Mengtao; Yuan, Shoujun; Feng, Jingwei; Wang, Qiquan; Wang, Wei; Hu, Zhenhu

    2016-06-01

    As a high-consumption drug in the world, acetaminophen (AAP) has been widely detected in natural waters and wastewaters. Its reactivity and the transformation products formed during chlorination may greatly threaten the safety of drinking water. The reaction kinetics of AAP during chlorination was investigated in this study. The results showed that the reaction kinetics could be well described with a kinetics model of -d[AAP]/dt = k app[AAP]t (0.63)[Cl2]t (1.37). The values of apparent rate constant (k app) were dependent on reaction temperature, ammonium, and pH. With the increase in reaction temperature from 5.0 ± 1.0 to 40.0 ± 1.0 °C, the removal efficiency of AAP increased from 60 to 100 %. When ammonium was present in the solution at 2.0 mg/L, the transformation of AAP was inhibited due to the rapid formation of chloramines. The maximum of k app was 0.58 × 10(2) M(-1) · min(-1) at pH 9.0, and the minimum was 0.27 M(-1) · min(-1) at pH 11.0. A low mineralization of AAP (about 7.2 %) with chlorination was observed through TOC analysis, implying the formation of plenty of transformation products during chlorination. The main transformation products, hydroquinone and two kinds of chlorinated compounds, monochlorinated acetaminophen and dichlorinated acetaminophen, were detected in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:26983813

  16. Bactrian ("double hump") acetaminophen pharmacokinetics: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Robert G; McKeown, Nathanael J; West, Patrick L; Burke, Christopher R

    2010-09-01

    After acute ingestion, acetaminophen (APAP) is generally absorbed within 4 h and the APAP concentration ([APAP]) slowly decreases with a predictable half-life. Alterations in these pharmacokinetic principles have been rarely reported. We report here three cases of an unusual double hump, or Bactrian, pattern of [APAP]. We review the literature to describe the case characteristics of these rare cases. A 38-year-old woman ingested 2 g hydrocodone/65 g acetaminophen. Her [APAP] peaked at 289 mcg/mL (8 h), decreased to 167 mcg/mL (31 h), then increased to 240 mcg/mL (39 h). She developed liver injury (peak AST 1603 IU/L; INR1.6). A 25-year-old man ingested 2 g diphenhydramine/26 g APAP. His [APAP] peaked at 211 mcg/mL (15 h), decreased to 185 mcg/mL (20 h), and increased again to 313 mcg/mL (37 h). He developed liver injury (peak AST 1153; INR 2.1). A 16-year-old boy ingested 5 g diphenhydramine and 100 g APAP. His [APAP] peaked at 470 mcg/mL (25 h), decreased to 313 mcg/mL (36 h), then increased to 354 mcg/mL (42 h). He developed liver injury (peak AST 8,686 IU/L; peak INR 5.9). We report three cases of Bactrian ("double hump") pharmacokinetics after massive APAP overdoses. Cases with double hump pharmacokinetics may be associated with large ingestions (26-100 g APAP) and are often coingested with antimuscarinics or opioids. Several factors may contribute to these altered kinetics including the insolubility of acetaminophen, APAP-induced delays in gastric emptying, opioid or antimuscarinic effects, or enterohepatic circulation. Patients with double hump APAP concentrations may be at risk for liver injury, with AST elevations and peaks occurring later than what is typical for acute APAP overdoses. PMID:20446076

  17. CDDO-Im protects from acetaminophen hepatotoxicity through induction of Nrf2-dependent genes

    SciTech Connect

    Reisman, Scott A.; Buckley, David B.; Tanaka, Yuji; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2009-04-01

    CDDO-Im is a synthetic triterpenoid recently shown to induce cytoprotective genes through the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway, an important mechanism for the induction of cytoprotective genes in response to oxidative stress. Upon oxidative or electrophilic insult, the transcription factor Nrf2 translocates to the nucleus, heterodimerizes with small Maf proteins, and binds to antioxidant response elements (AREs) in the upstream promoter regions of various cytoprotective genes. To further elucidate the hepatoprotective effects of CDDO-Im, wild-type and Nrf2-null mice were pretreated with CDDO-Im (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle (DMSO), and then administered acetaminophen (500 mg/kg, i.p.). Pretreatment of wild-type mice with CDDO-Im reduced liver injury caused by acetaminophen. In contrast, hepatoprotection by CDDO-Im was not observed in Nrf2-null mice. CDDO-Im increased Nrf2 protein expression and Nrf2-ARE binding in wild-type, but not Nrf2-null mice. Furthermore, CDDO-Im increased the mRNA expression of the Nrf2 target genes NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase-1 (Nqo1); glutamate-cysteine ligase, catalytic subunit (Gclc); and heme-oxygenase-1 (Ho-1), in both a dose- and time-dependent manner. Conversely, CDDO-Im did not induce Nqo1, Gclc, and Ho-1 mRNA expression in Nrf2-null mice. Collectively, the present study shows that CDDO-Im pretreatment induces Nrf2-dependent cytoprotective genes and protects the liver from acetaminophen-induced hepatic injury.

  18. Serum acetaminophen assay using activated charcoal adsorption and gas chromatography without derivatization.

    PubMed

    Jeevanandam, M; Novic, B; Savich, R; Wagman, E

    1980-01-01

    A quantitative assay of acetaminophen in serum has been developed. The drug, together with an internal standard 2-acetamidophenol, is adsorbed on activated charcoal and then extracted into a mixture of ethyl acetate and isopropanol. This extract is then analyzed, without any derivatization, by gas chromatography. The isothermal analysis yielded a good, highly reproducible separation. The drug peak was symmetrical and without any tailing. The peak height response ratio was found to be linear with concentrations ranging from 25-500 ng/L. No interference was observed with the various drugs or metabolites which are commonly encountered in human serum. PMID:7421146

  19. Alternating ibuprofen and acetaminophen in the treatment of febrile children: a pilot study [ISRCTN30487061

    PubMed Central

    Nabulsi, Mona M; Tamim, Hala; Mahfoud, Ziyad; Itani, Mohammad; Sabra, Ramzi; Chamseddine, Fadi; Mikati, Mohammad

    2006-01-01

    Background Alternating ibuprofen and acetaminophen for the treatment of febrile children is a prevalent practice among physicians and parents, despite the lack of evidence on effectiveness or safety. This randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical trial aims at comparing the antipyretic effectiveness and safety of a single administration of alternating ibuprofen and acetaminophen doses to that of ibuprofen mono-therapy in febrile children. Methods Seventy febrile children were randomly allocated to receive either a single oral dose of 10 mg/kg ibuprofen and 15 mg/kg oral acetaminophen after 4 hours, or a similar dose of ibuprofen and placebo at 4 hours. Rectal temperature was measured at baseline, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 hours later. Endpoints included proportions of afebrile children at 6, 7 and 8 hours, maximum decline in temperature, time to recurrence of fever, and change in temperature from baseline at each time point. Intent-to-treat analysis was planned with statistical significance set at P < 0.05. Results A higher proportion of subjects in the intervention group (83.3%) became afebrile at 6 hours than in the control group (57.6%); P = 0.018. This difference was accentuated at 7 and 8 hours (P < 0.001) with a significantly longer time to recurrence of fever in the intervention group (mean ± SD of 7.4 ± 1.3 versus 5.7 ± 2.2 hours), P < 0.001. Odds ratios (95%CI) for defervescence were 5.6 (1.3; 23.8), 19.5 (3.5; 108.9) and 15.3 (3.4; 68.3) at 6, 7 and 8 hours respectively. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures over time reve