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Sample records for acetaminophen apap hepatotoxicity

  1. Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity-Isn't it time for APAP to go away?

    PubMed

    Lee, William M

    2017-07-20

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is the most commonly used drug for the treatment of pain and fever around the world. At the same time, APAP can cause dose-related hepatocellular necrosis, responsible for nearly 500 deaths annually in the United States (US) alone, as well as 100,000 calls to US Poison Control Centers, 50,000 emergency room visits and 10,000 hospitalisations per year. As an over-the-counter and prescription product (with opioids), APAP toxicity dwarfs all other prescription drugs as a cause of acute liver failure in the US and Europe, but it is not regulated in any significant way. In this review the ongoing controversy surrounding the proper role for this ubiquitous pain reliever: its history, pathogenesis, clinical challenges in recognition and management, and current regulatory status are highlighted. A new solution to a 50-year-old problem is proposed. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevention of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity by leflunomide via inhibition of APAP biotransformation to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine.

    PubMed

    Tan, Su Ching; New, Lee Sun; Chan, Eric C Y

    2008-08-28

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is safe at therapeutic levels but causes liver injury via N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI)-induced oxidative stress when overdose. Recent studies indicated that mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) plays a key role in APAP-induced toxicity and leflunomide (LEF) protects against the toxicity through inhibition of c-jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK)-mediated pathway of mPT. It is not clearly understood if LEF also exerts its protective effect through inhibition of APAP bioactivation to the toxic NAPQI. The present work was undertaken to study the effect of LEF on the bioactivation of APAP to NAPQI. Mechanism-based inhibition incubations performed in mouse and human liver microsomes (MLM and HLM) indicated that inhibition of APAP bioactivation to NAPQI was observed in MLM but not in HLM. Furthermore, LEF but not its active metabolite, A77-1726, was shown to be the main inhibitor. When APAP and LEF were incubated with human recombinant P450 enzymes, CYP1A2 was found to be the isozyme responsible for the inhibition of APAP bioactivation. Species variation in CYP1A2 enzymes probably accounted for the different observations in our MLM and HLM studies. We concluded that inhibition of NAPQI formation is not a probable pathway that LEF protects APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in human.

  3. Susceptibility to acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity unexpectedly is decreased during acute viral hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Getachew, Yonas; James, Laura; Lee, William M; Thiele, Dwain L; Miller, Bonnie C

    2010-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity results from cytochrome P450 metabolism of APAP to the toxic metabolite, n-acetyl-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), which reacts with cysteinyl residues to form APAP adducts and initiates cell injury. As APAP is commonly used during viral illnesses there has been concern that APAP injury may be additive to that of viral hepatitis, leading physicians to advise against its use in such patients; this has not been investigated experimentally. We infected C57BL/6 male mice with replication-deficient adenovirus to produce moderately severe acute viral hepatitis and observed that APAP doses that were hepatotoxic or lethal in control mice produced neither death nor additional increase in serum ALT when administered to infected mice at the peak of virus-induced liver injury. Moreover, the concentration of hepatic APAP-protein adducts formed in these mice was only 10% that in control mice. Protection from APAP hepatotoxicity also was observed earlier in the course of infection, prior to the peak virus-induced ALT rise. Hepatic glutathione limits APAP-protein adduct formation but glutathione levels were similar in control and infected mice. Cyp1a2 (E.C. 1.14.14.1) and Cyp2e1 (E.C. 1.14.13.n7) mRNA expression decreased by 3 days post-infection and hepatic Cyp2e1 protein levels were reduced almost 90% at 7 days, when adduct formation was maximally inhibited. In vitro, hepatocytes from virally infected mice also were resistant to APAP-induced injury but sensitive to NAPQI. Rather than potentiating APAP-induced liver injury, acute viral hepatitis in this model resulted in selective down-regulation of APAP metabolizing P450s in liver and decreased the risk of APAP hepatotoxicity. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sulforaphane protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jung-Ran; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Oh, Won-Keun; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress is closely associated with acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxicity. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant defense enzyme, has been shown to protect against oxidant-induced tissue injury. This study investigated whether sulforaphane (SFN), as a HO-1 inducer, plays a protective role against APAP hepatotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment of primary hepatocyte with SFN induced nuclear factor E2-factor related factor (Nrf2) target gene expression, especially HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, and suppressed APAP-induced glutathione (GSH) depletion and lipid peroxidation, which eventually leads to hepatocyte cell death. A comparable effect was observed in mice treated with APAP. Mice were treated with 300 mg/kg APAP 30 min after SFN (5 mg/kg) administration and were then sacrificed after 6 h. APAP alone caused severe liver injuries as characterized by increased plasma AST and ALT levels, GSH depletion, apoptosis, and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) formations. This APAP-induced liver damage was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with SFN. Furthermore, while hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased by APAP exposure, pretreatment with SFN completely blocked ROS formation. These results suggest that SFN plays a protective role against APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity through antioxidant effects mediated by HO-1 induction. SFN has preventive action in oxidative stress-mediated liver injury.

  5. Predicting acute acetaminophen hepatotoxicity with acetaminophen-aminotransferase multiplication product and the Psi parameter.

    PubMed

    Chomchai, S; Chomchai, C

    2014-06-01

    Prediction of potential hepatotoxicity is important for individualizing therapy with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in patients with acute acetaminophen overdose. Acetaminophen-aminotransferase multiplication product (APAP × AT) and the Psi Parameter (Psi) have been reported to be the predictors of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. To determine the validity of APAP × AT and Psi in predicting hepatotoxicity secondary to acute acetaminophen overdose. We retrospectively reviewed acute acetaminophen overdose cases who were treated with NAC at Siriraj Hospital, Thailand during January 2004-June 2012. The patients' ages were 12 years or more. Initial acetaminophen concentration (mg/L) and aminotransferase (IU/L) were multiplied to obtain APAP × AT. Psi were derived from initial acetaminophen concentrations (mg/L) and lag time (hours) to NAC therapy. The cut-off values for APAP × AT and Psi were 1500 mg∙IU/L(2) and 5 mM∙h, respectively. Hepatotoxicity (defined as aspartate or alanine aminotransferase (ALT) greater than 1000 IU/L) was the outcome of interest. A total of 255 patients were included, 32 of whom developed hepatotoxicity. APAP × AT had sensitivity, specificity, and negative likelihood ratio of 90.6%, 62.8%, and 0.2, respectively. The sensitivity of Psi, specificity, and negative likelihood ratio were 96.9%, 91.5%, and 0.0, respectively. The areas under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for APAP × AT and Psi were 0.82 and 0.96, respectively, with a statistically significant difference between the two methods (p = 0.002). APAP × AT showed higher specificity (92.5%) in patients who presented 8-24 h after the overdose. Psi and APAP × AT are valid clinical tools in predicting hepatotoxicity secondary to acute acetaminophen overdose in adults. APAP × AT is useful in predicting a low likelihood of hepatotoxicity after standard NAC therapy among late-presenting patients.

  6. Increased hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen in Hsp70i knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tolson, J. Keith; Dix, David J.; Voellmy, Richard W.; Roberts, Stephen M. . E-mail: smr@ufl.edu

    2006-01-15

    The effect of the inducible forms of 70 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70i) on acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity was assessed in an Hsp70i knockout mouse model. Absence of the Hsp70i protein in liver was verified by monitoring Hsp levels in knockout and control mice after heat stress (41.5 {sup o}C water bath immersion for 30 min). Hsp70i knockout mice were more susceptible to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity than controls, as indicated by elevated serum alanine aminotransferase activities 24 and 48 h after the APAP dose. Increased APAP hepatotoxicity in knockout mice was verified by morphological evaluation of liver sections. The difference in toxic response to APAP between knockout and control strain mice could not be attributed to differences in APAP bioactivation, assessed by measurement of CYP2E1 and glutathione S-transferase activities, hepatic nonprotein sulfhydryl content, or covalent binding of reactive APAP metabolites to proteins. Pretreatment with transient hyperthermia to produce a general upregulation of Hsps resulted in decreased APAP hepatotoxicity in both the knockout and control strains. Among thermally-pretreated mice, hepatotoxicity of APAP was greater in the knockouts compared with the control strain. These observations suggest that increased Hsp70i expression in response to APAP acts to limit the extent of tissue injury. Results further suggest that other factors related to heat stress can also contribute to protection against APAP toxicity.

  7. Protective effect of hyperoside against acetaminophen (APAP) induced liver injury through enhancement of APAP clearance.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenyan; Jiang, Zhihui; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiaoying; Melzig, Matthias F

    2016-02-25

    Acetaminphen (APAP) overdose leads to severe hepatotoxicity. Apocynum venetum L. (A. venetum) possess potent hepatoprotective effect. Hyperoside is one of the major compounds exist in Apocynum venetum L. and might be a potential agent to protect against APAP-induce liver injury. In this study, we investigated the effect of hyperoside on APAP hepatotoxicity in mice. Mice were treated intragastrically with hyperoside (10, 50 or 100 mg/kg) for 3 days before APAP (300 mg/kg) injection. APAP alone caused severe liver injury characterized by significantly increased serum aminotransferase levels, hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) formation, as well as liver superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione (GSH) depletions. Hyperoside significantly attenuated APAP-induced liver damages in a dose dependent manner, and 100 mg/kg was the most effective dose. Further study confirmed that hyperoside was able to increase activities and mRNA expressions of uridine diphoshate glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) and sulfotransferases (SULTs), as well as to inhibit CYP2E1 activities, and thereby suppressed toxic intermediate formation and promoted APAP hepatic detoxification. Nrf-2 activation might be involved in hyperoside induced up-regulation of phase II enzymes. Collectively, our data provide evidence that hyperoside protected the liver against APAP induced injury mainly by accelerating APAP harmless metabolism, implying that hyperoside can be considered as a potential natural hepatoprotective agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Arjunolic acid, a triterpenoid saponin, prevents acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver and hepatocyte injury via the inhibition of APAP bioactivation and JNK-mediated mitochondrial protection.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Jyotirmoy; Das, Joydeep; Manna, Prasenjit; Sil, Parames C

    2010-02-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug and is safe at therapeutic doses but its overdose frequently causes liver injury. In earlier studies, we demonstrated that arjunolic acid (AA) has a protective effect against chemically induced hepatotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to explore whether AA plays any protective role against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity and, if so, what molecular pathways it utilizes for the mechanism of its protective action. Exposure of rats to a hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (700 mg/kg, ip) altered a number of biomarkers (related to hepatic oxidative stress), increased reactive oxygen species production, reduced cellular adenosine triphosphate level, and induced necrotic cell death. Arjunolic acid pretreatment (80 mg/kg, orally), on the other hand, afforded significant protection against liver injury. Arjunolic acid also prevented acetaminophen-induced hepatic glutathione depletion and APAP metabolite formation although arjunolic acid itself did not affect hepatic glutathione levels. The results suggest that this preventive action of arjunolic acid is due to the metabolic inhibition of specific forms of cytochrome P450 that activate acetaminophen to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. In addition, administration of arjunolic acid 4 h after acetaminophen intoxication reduced acetaminophen-induced JNK and downstream Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL phosphorylation, thus protecting against mitochondrial permeabilization, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and cytochrome c release. In conclusion, the data suggest that arjunolic acid affords protection against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity through inhibition of P450-mediated APAP bioactivation and inhibition of JNK-mediated activation of mitochondrial permeabilization. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Sensitizes To Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Impairing Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Baulies, Anna; Ribas, Vicent; Núñez, Susana; Torres, Sandra; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Martínez, Laura; Suda, Jo; Ybanez, Maria D; Kaplowitz, Neil; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, Jose C

    2015-12-11

    The role of lysosomes in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the impact of genetic and drug-induced lysosomal cholesterol (LC) accumulation in APAP hepatotoxicity. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)(-/-) mice exhibit LC accumulation and higher mortality after APAP overdose compared to ASMase(+/+) littermates. ASMase(-/-) hepatocytes display lower threshold for APAP-induced cell death and defective fusion of mitochondria-containing autophagosomes with lysosomes, which decreased mitochondrial quality control. LC accumulation in ASMase(+/+) hepatocytes caused by U18666A reproduces the susceptibility of ASMase(-/-) hepatocytes to APAP and the impairment in the formation of mitochondria-containing autolysosomes. LC extraction by 25-hydroxycholesterol increased APAP-mediated mitophagy and protected ASMase(-/-) mice and hepatocytes against APAP hepatotoxicity, effects that were reversed by chloroquine to disrupt autophagy. The regulation of LC by U18666A or 25-hydroxycholesterol did not affect total cellular sphingomyelin content or its lysosomal distribution. Of relevance, amitriptyline-induced ASMase inhibition in human hepatocytes caused LC accumulation, impaired mitophagy and increased susceptibility to APAP. Similar results were observed upon glucocerebrosidase inhibition by conduritol β-epoxide, a cellular model of Gaucher disease. These findings indicate that LC accumulation determines susceptibility to APAP hepatotoxicity by modulating mitophagy, and imply that genetic or drug-mediated ASMase disruption sensitizes to APAP-induced liver injury.

  10. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Sensitizes To Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Impairing Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Baulies, Anna; Ribas, Vicent; Núñez, Susana; Torres, Sandra; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Martínez, Laura; Suda, Jo; Ybanez, Maria D.; Kaplowitz, Neil; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, Jose C.

    2015-01-01

    The role of lysosomes in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the impact of genetic and drug-induced lysosomal cholesterol (LC) accumulation in APAP hepatotoxicity. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)−/− mice exhibit LC accumulation and higher mortality after APAP overdose compared to ASMase+/+ littermates. ASMase−/− hepatocytes display lower threshold for APAP-induced cell death and defective fusion of mitochondria-containing autophagosomes with lysosomes, which decreased mitochondrial quality control. LC accumulation in ASMase+/+ hepatocytes caused by U18666A reproduces the susceptibility of ASMase−/− hepatocytes to APAP and the impairment in the formation of mitochondria-containing autolysosomes. LC extraction by 25-hydroxycholesterol increased APAP-mediated mitophagy and protected ASMase−/− mice and hepatocytes against APAP hepatotoxicity, effects that were reversed by chloroquine to disrupt autophagy. The regulation of LC by U18666A or 25-hydroxycholesterol did not affect total cellular sphingomyelin content or its lysosomal distribution. Of relevance, amitriptyline-induced ASMase inhibition in human hepatocytes caused LC accumulation, impaired mitophagy and increased susceptibility to APAP. Similar results were observed upon glucocerebrosidase inhibition by conduritol β-epoxide, a cellular model of Gaucher disease. These findings indicate that LC accumulation determines susceptibility to APAP hepatotoxicity by modulating mitophagy, and imply that genetic or drug-mediated ASMase disruption sensitizes to APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:26657973

  11. A Novel Resolvin-Based Strategy for Limiting Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Suraj J; Luther, Jay; Bohr, Stefan; Iracheta-Vellve, Arvin; Li, Matthew; King, Kevin R; Chung, Raymond T; Yarmush, Martin L

    2016-03-17

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The current pharmacologic treatment for APAP hepatotoxicity, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), targets the initial metabolite-driven injury but does not directly affect the host inflammatory response. Because of this, NAC is less effective if given at later stages in the disease course. Resolvins, a novel group of lipid mediators shown to attenuate host inflammation, may be a therapeutic intervention for APAP hepatotoxicity. The temporal patterns of liver injury and neutrophil activation were investigated in a murine model of APAP hepatotoxicity. In addition, the effect of neutrophil depletion and resolvin administration on the severity of liver injury induced by APAP was studied. In vitro studies to investigate the mechanism of resolvin effect on hepatocyte injury and neutrophil adhesion were performed. We demonstrate that hepatic neutrophil activation occurs secondary to the initial liver injury induced directly by APAP. We also show that neutrophil depletion attenuates APAP-induced liver injury, and administration of resolvins hours after APAP challenge not only attenuates liver injury, but also extends the therapeutic window eightfold compared to NAC. Mechanistic in vitro analysis highlights resolvins' ability to inhibit neutrophil attachment to endothelial cells in the presence of the reactive metabolite of APAP. This study highlights the ability of resolvins to protect against APAP-induced liver injury and extend the therapeutic window compared to NAC. Although the mechanism for resolvin-mediated hepatoprotection is likely multifactorial, inhibition of neutrophil infiltration and activation appears to play an important role.

  12. Establishment of a model of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in different weekly-aged ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, K; Tokuno, M; Yamasaki, K; Kadowaki, D; Seo, H; Otagiri, M

    2015-10-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP), a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug, has the potential to cause lethal hepatotoxicity. Mice are widely used for developing murine models of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, and many researchers have used these models for APAP-related studies including the fields of biology, pharmacology and toxicology. Although drug-induced hepatotoxicity is dependent on a number of factors (species, gender and age), very few studies have investigated the effect of aging on APAP hepatotoxicity. In this study, we evaluated the effect of age on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in different weekly-aged mice to establish a model of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity that is an accurate reflection of general experimental conditions. Male ICR mice 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 weeks old were given APAP intraperitoneally, and mortality, hepatic damage and the plasma concentration of APAP metabolites were evaluated. It was found that younger male ICR mice were relatively resistant to hepatotoxicity induced by intraperitoneal APAP administration. In addition, the APAP-glucuronide concentration in plasma remained essentially the same among the differently-aged mice, while APAP-sulfate levels were dramatically decreased in an age-dependent manner. Thus, it is recommended that mice of the same ages be used in studies related to APAP-induced hepatotoxixity. These results provide evidence in support of not only the age-related changes in susceptibility to APAP-derived hepatotoxicity in mice but also in developing mouse models for APAP-related studies.

  13. Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity: a Comprehensive Update

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Eric; Babar, Arooj; Choudhary, Moaz; Kutner, Matthew; Pyrsopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatic injury and subsequent hepatic failure due to both intentional and non-intentional overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) has affected patients for decades, and involves the cornerstone metabolic pathways which take place in the microsomes within hepatocytes. APAP hepatotoxicity remains a global issue; in the United States, in particular, it accounts for more than 50% of overdose-related acute liver failure and approximately 20% of the liver transplant cases. The pathophysiology, disease course and management of acute liver failure secondary to APAP toxicity remain to be precisely elucidated, and adverse patient outcomes with increased morbidity and mortality continue to occur. Although APAP hepatotoxicity follows a predictable timeline of hepatic failure, its clinical presentation might vary. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) therapy is considered as the mainstay therapy, but liver transplantation might represent a life-saving procedure for selected patients. Future research focus in this field may benefit from shifting towards obtaining antidotal knowledge at the molecular level, with focus on the underlying molecular signaling pathways. PMID:27350943

  14. Acute hepatotoxicity associated with therapeutic doses of intravenous acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Steven A; Kovnat, Daniel; Anderson, Victoria E; Green, Jody L; Dart, Richard C; Heard, Kennon J

    2016-03-01

    IV acetaminophen at 4 g per day is considered safe, producing no hepatic failure in more than 1400 cases. Oxidation of acetaminophen forms a reactive intermediate that binds to cellular proteins resulting in acetaminophen-protein adducts (APAP-CYS). Serum concentrations of APAP-CYS have been found to correlate with acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. We report a case of hepatotoxicity associated with therapeutic doses of IV acetaminophen, with elevated serum APAP-CYS. The patient was a 92-year-old, 68 kg woman without known hepatic disease or ethanol abuse. On hospital day 3 she underwent laparoscopic reduction of internal hernias under general anesthesia. Surgery was uncomplicated and postoperatively she was treated with subcutaneous heparin and IV acetaminophen, 1 g every 6 h for almost 4 days (total dose = 13 g). At the start of therapy, transaminases were normal. On hospital day 5, she was noted to have marked transaminase elevations (AST: 4698 IU/L; ALT: 3914 IU/L) with increases in INR (1.68), ammonia (60 mcg/dL), and total bilirubin (1.8 mg/dL). Serum acetaminophen concentration was 15.3 mcg/mL 26 h after her last dose. Acetaminophen was discontinued and IV acetylcysteine was given and continued at the second maintenance dose rate for a second 16-hour infusion, at which time transaminases, INR, ammonia and total bilirubin were all improving. The patient was discharged 2 days later. Serum APAP-CYS concentrations in serum samples obtained during her hospitalization were elevated (peak = 4.81 μM on hospital day 5; expected range for therapeutic dosing <1.1 μM). We have identified a case of acute liver injury associated with therapeutic dosing of IV acetaminophen. The serum APAP-CYS concentrations are consistent with that seen in cases of hepatotoxicity following repeated supratherapeutic acetaminophen ingestion. Several factors that likely contributed to her susceptibility included advanced age, post-operative status, a

  15. A Novel Resolvin-Based Strategy for Limiting Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Suraj J; Luther, Jay; Bohr, Stefan; Iracheta-Vellve, Arvin; Li, Matthew; King, Kevin R; Chung, Raymond T; Yarmush, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The current pharmacologic treatment for APAP hepatotoxicity, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), targets the initial metabolite-driven injury but does not directly affect the host inflammatory response. Because of this, NAC is less effective if given at later stages in the disease course. Resolvins, a novel group of lipid mediators shown to attenuate host inflammation, may be a therapeutic intervention for APAP hepatotoxicity. Methods: The temporal patterns of liver injury and neutrophil activation were investigated in a murine model of APAP hepatotoxicity. In addition, the effect of neutrophil depletion and resolvin administration on the severity of liver injury induced by APAP was studied. In vitro studies to investigate the mechanism of resolvin effect on hepatocyte injury and neutrophil adhesion were performed. Results: We demonstrate that hepatic neutrophil activation occurs secondary to the initial liver injury induced directly by APAP. We also show that neutrophil depletion attenuates APAP-induced liver injury, and administration of resolvins hours after APAP challenge not only attenuates liver injury, but also extends the therapeutic window eightfold compared to NAC. Mechanistic in vitro analysis highlights resolvins' ability to inhibit neutrophil attachment to endothelial cells in the presence of the reactive metabolite of APAP. Conclusions: This study highlights the ability of resolvins to protect against APAP-induced liver injury and extend the therapeutic window compared to NAC. Although the mechanism for resolvin-mediated hepatoprotection is likely multifactorial, inhibition of neutrophil infiltration and activation appears to play an important role. PMID:26986653

  16. Effects of erdosteine on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Kuvandik, Guven; Duru, Mehmet; Nacar, Ahmet; Yonden, Zafer; Helvaci, Rami; Koc, Ahmet; Kozlu, Tolunay; Kaya, Hasan; Sogüt, Sadik

    2008-07-01

    We investigated the effects of erdosteine on acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), AST (aspartate aminotransferase), and ALT (alanine transaminase) activities, and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide levels as oxidant/antioxidant biochemical parameters were investigated with light microscopic evaluation in adult female Wistar Albino rats. APAP administration produced a decrease in hepatic SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px activities, and coadministration of erdosteine (150 and 300 mg/kg) resulted in increases in the activities. MDA and NO levels increased in the APAP group, and erdosteine treatments prevented these increases. Significant elevations in serum AST and ALT levels were observed in the APAP group, and when erdosteine and APAP were coadministered, their serum levels were close to those in the control group. Light microscopic evaluation of livers showed that there were remarkable centrilobular (zone III) hepatic necrosis and mild to moderate sinusoidal congestion in the APAP group, whereas in the erdosteine group, cellular necrosis was minimal and the hepatocytes maintained a better morphology when compared to the APAP group. Erdosteine prevented APAP-induced liver injury and toxic side effects probably through the antioxidant and radical scavenging effects of erdosteine.

  17. [Investigation of Predisposition Biomarkers to Identify Risk Factors for Drug-induced Liver Injury in Humans: Analyses of Endogenous Metabolites in an Animal Model Mimicking Human Responders to APAP-induced Hepatotoxicity].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Akio; Kondo, Kazuma; Sugai, Shoichiro

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is a main reason of regulatory action pertaining to drugs, including restrictions to clinical indications and withdrawal from the marketplace. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a commonly used and effective analgesic/antipyretic agent and relatively safe drug even in long-term treatment. However, it is known that APAP at therapeutic doses may cause hepatotoxicity in some individuals. Hence great efforts have been made to identify risk factors for APAP-induced chronic hepatotoxicity. We investigated the contribution of undernourishment to susceptibility to APAP-induced chronic hepatotoxicity using an animal model. We employed daytime restricted fed (RF) rats as a modified-nutritional state model for human APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. RF and ad libitum fed (ALF) rats were given APAP at 0, 300, and 500 mg/kg for 3 months. Plasma and urinary glutathione-related metabolomes and liver function parameters were measured during the dosing period. Endogenous metabolites forming at different levels between the RF and ALF rats could be potential predisposition biomarkers for APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. In addition, RF rats were considered a useful model to estimate the contribution of nutritional state of patients to APAP-induced chronic hepatotoxicity. In this article we report our current research focusing on nutritional state as risk factor for APAP-induced chronic hepatotoxicity and our findings of hepatotoxicity biomarkers.

  18. Enhancement of acetaminophen-induced chronic hepatotoxicity in restricted fed rats: a nonclinical approach to acetaminophen-induced chronic hepatotoxicity in susceptible patients.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Kazuma; Yamada, Naohito; Suzuki, Yusuke; Toyoda, Kaoru; Hashimoto, Tatsuji; Takahashi, Akemi; Kobayashi, Akio; Shoda, Toshiyuki; Kuno, Hideyuki; Sugai, Shoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a commonly used and effective analgesic and antipyretic agent. However, some patients encounter hepatotoxicity after repeated APAP dosing at therapeutic doses. In the present study, we focused on the nutritional state as one of the risk factors of APAP-induced chronic hepatotoxicity in humans and investigated the contribution of undernourishment to susceptibility to APAP-induced chronic hepatotoxicity using an animal model mimicking undernourished patients. Rats were divided into 2 groups: the ad libitum fed (ALF) and the restricted fed (RF) rats and were assigned to 3 groups (n = 8/group) for each feeding condition. The animals were given APAP at 0, 300 and 500mg/kg for 99 days under each feeding condition. Plasma and urinary glutathione-related metabolites and liver function parameters were measured during the dosing period and hepatic glutathione levels were measured at the end of the dosing period. In the APAP-treated ALF rats hepatic glutathione levels were increased and hepatic function parameters were not changed, but in the APAP-treated RF rats hepatic glutathione levels were decreased at 500mg/kg and hepatic function parameters were increased at 300 and 500mg/kg. Moreover the urinary endogenous metabolite profile after long-term treatment with APAP in the ALF and RF rats was similar to that in human non-responders and responders to APAP-induced chronic hepatotoxicity, respectively. In conclusion, the RF rats were more sensitive to APAP-induced chronic hepatotoxicity than the ALF rats and were considered to be a useful model to estimate the contribution of the nutritional state of patients to APAP-induced chronic hepatotoxicity.

  19. Metabolomics evaluation of the effects of green tea extract on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yihong; Sun, Jinchun; Petrova, Katya; Yang, Xi; Greenhaw, James; Salminen, William F; Beger, Richard D; Schnackenberg, Laura K

    2013-12-01

    Green tea has been purported to have beneficial health effects including protective effects against oxidative stress. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic drug that can cause acute liver injury in overdose situations. These studies explored the effects of green tea extract (GTE) on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in liver tissue extracts using ultra performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mice were orally administered GTE, APAP or GTE and APAP under three scenarios. APAP alone caused a high degree of hepatocyte necrosis associated with increases in serum transaminases and alterations in multiple metabolic pathways. The time of GTE oral administration relative to APAP either protected against or potentiated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Dose dependent decreases in histopathology scores and serum transaminases were noted when GTE was administered prior to APAP; whereas, the opposite occurred when GTE was administered after APAP. Similarly, metabolites altered by APAP alone were less changed when GTE was given prior to APAP. Significantly altered pathways included fatty acid metabolism, glycerophospholipid metabolism, glutathione metabolism, and energy pathways. These studies demonstrate the complex interaction between GTE and APAP and the need to employ novel analytical strategies to understand the effects of dietary supplements on pharmaceutical compounds. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Tolerance to Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity in the Mouse Model of Autoprotection is Associated with Induction of Flavin-containing Monooxygenase-3 (FMO3) in Hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetaminophen (APAP) pretreatment with a low hepatotoxic dose in mice results in resistance to a second, higher dose of APAP (APAP autoprotection). Recent microarray work by our group showed a drastic induction of liver flavin containing monooxygenase-3 (Fmo3) mRNA expression in...

  1. Tolerance to Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity in the Mouse Model of Autoprotection is Associated with Induction of Flavin-containing Monooxygenase-3 (FMO3) in Hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetaminophen (APAP) pretreatment with a low hepatotoxic dose in mice results in resistance to a second, higher dose of APAP (APAP autoprotection). Recent microarray work by our group showed a drastic induction of liver flavin containing monooxygenase-3 (Fmo3) mRNA expression in...

  2. LYSOSOMAL INSTABILITY AND CATHEPSIN B RELEASE DURING ACETAMINOPHEN HEPATOTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Ramachandran, Anup; McGill, Mitchell R.; Yan, Hui-min; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Sharpe, Matthew R.; Lemasters, John J.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is currently the most frequent cause of drug-induced liver failure in the United States. Recently, it was shown that lysosomal iron translocates to mitochondria where it contributes to collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate if cathepsin B, a lysosomal protease, is involved in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Cathepsin B activity was measured in subcellular liver fractions of C57Bl/6 mice 3 hr after 300 mg/kg APAP treatment. There was a significant increase in cytoplasmic cathepsin activity, concurrent with a decrease in microsomal activity, indicative of lysosomal cathepsin B release. To investigate the effect of cathepsin B on hepatotoxicity, the cathepsin inhibitor AC-LVK-CHO was given 1 hr prior to 300 mg/kg APAP treatment along with vehicle control. There was no difference between groups in serum ALT values, or by histological evaluation of necrosis, although cathepsin B activity was inhibited by 70–80% compared to controls. These findings were confirmed with a different inhibitor (z-FA-fmk) in vivo and in vitro. Hepatocytes were exposed to 5 mM acetaminophen. Lysotracker staining confirmed lysosomal instability, and cathepsin B release, but there was no reduction in cell death after treatment with cathepsin B inhibitors. Finally, cathepsin B release was measured in clinical samples from patients with APAP-induced liver injury. Low levels of cathepsin B were released into plasma from overdose patients. Conclusion APAP overdose causes lysosomal instability and release of cathepsin B into the cytosol but does not contribute to liver injury under these conditions. PMID:22900545

  3. Chitohexaose protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Barman, P K; Mukherjee, R; Prusty, B K; Suklabaidya, S; Senapati, S; Ravindran, B

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-para-aminophenol (APAP)) toxicity causes acute liver failure by inducing centrilobular hepatic damage as a consequence of mitochondrial oxidative stress. Sterile inflammation, triggered by hepatic damage, facilitates gut bacterial translocation leading to systemic inflammation; TLR4-mediated activation by LPS has been shown to have a critical role in APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity. In this study, we demonstrate significant protection mediated by chitohexaose (Chtx) in mice challenged with a lethal dose of APAP (400 mg/kg b.w.). Decreased mortality by Chtx was associated with reduced hepatic damage, increased peritoneal migration of neutrophils, decreased mRNA expression of IL-1β as well as inhibition of inflammasome activation in liver. Further, an alternate mouse model of co-administration of a sublethal doses of APAP (200 mg/kg b.w.) and LPS (5 mg/kg b.w.) operating synergistically and mediating complete mortality was developed. Overwhelming inflammation, characterized by increased inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and so on) in liver as well as in circulation and mortality was demonstrable in this model. Also, Chtx administration mediated significant reversal of mortality in APAP+LPS co-administered mice, which was associated with reduced IL-1β in liver and plasma cytokines in this model. In conclusion, Chtx being a small molecular weight linear carbohydrate offers promise for clinical management of liver failure associated with APAP overdose. PMID:27171266

  4. Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Accelerated Liver Regeneration after Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Poudel, Samikshya; Manley, Michael W; Roy, Nairita; Apte, Udayan

    2017-03-01

    Overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) is the leading cause of acute liver failure (ALF) in the United States. Timely initiation of compensatory liver regeneration after APAP hepatotoxicity is critical for final recovery, but the mechanisms of liver regeneration after APAP-induced ALF have not been extensively explored yet. Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that activation of β-catenin signaling after APAP overdose is associated with timely liver regeneration. Herein, we investigated the role of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) in liver regeneration after APAP hepatotoxicity using a pharmacological inhibition strategy in mice. Treatment with specific GSK3 inhibitor (L803-mts), starting from 4 hours after 600 mg/kg dose of APAP, resulted in early initiation of liver regeneration in a dose-dependent manner, without modifying the peak regenerative response. Acceleration of liver regeneration was not secondary to alteration of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, which remained unchanged after GSK3 inhibition. Early cell cycle initiation in hepatocytes after GSK3 inhibition was because of rapid induction of cyclin D1 and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. This was associated with increased activation of β-catenin signaling after GSK3 inhibition. Taken together, our study has revealed a novel role of GSK3 in liver regeneration after APAP overdose and identified GSK3 as a potential therapeutic target to improve liver regeneration after APAP-induced ALF. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Altered Protein S-Glutathionylation Identifies a Potential Mechanism of Resistance to Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    McGarry, David J.; Chakravarty, Probir; Wolf, C. Roland

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is the most commonly used over-the-counter analgesic. However, hepatotoxicity induced by APAP is a major clinical issue, and the factors that define sensitivity to APAP remain unclear. We have previously demonstrated that mice nulled for glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP) are resistant to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. This study aims to exploit this difference to delineate pathways of importance in APAP toxicity. We used mice nulled for GSTP and heme oxygenase-1 oxidative stress reporter mice, together with a novel nanoflow liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry methodology to investigate the role of oxidative stress, cell signaling, and protein S-glutathionylation in APAP hepatotoxicity. We provide evidence that the sensitivity difference between wild-type and Gstp1/2−/− mice is unrelated to the ability of APAP to induce oxidative stress, despite observing significant increases in c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in wild-type mice. The major difference in response to APAP was in the levels of protein S-glutathionylation: Gstp1/2−/− mice exhibited a significant increase in the number of S-glutathionylated proteins compared with wild-type animals. Remarkably, these S-glutathionylated proteins are involved in oxidative phosphorylation, respiratory complexes, drug metabolism, and mitochondrial apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that S-glutathionylation of the rate-limiting glutathione-synthesizing enzyme, glutamate cysteine ligase, was markedly increased in Gstp1/2−/− mice in response to APAP. The data demonstrate that S-glutathionylation provides an adaptive response to APAP and, as a consequence, suggest that this is an important determinant in APAP hepatotoxicity. This work identifies potential novel avenues associated with cell survival for the treatment of chemical-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26311813

  6. Investigating acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in multi-cellular organotypic liver models.

    PubMed

    Orbach, Sophia M; Cassin, Margaret E; Ehrich, Marion F; Rajagopalan, Padmavathy

    2017-08-01

    In vivo studies clearly demonstrate the participation and subsequent death of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPCs) with corresponding hepatocyte effects. This results in a critical need to investigate how major liver cell types function cohesively during hepatotoxicity. However, virtually no studies replicate these phenomena in vitro. We report the design of multi-cellular three-dimensional (3D) organotypic liver models of primary rat hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and Kupffer cells (KCs). LSECs and KCs were separated from hepatocytes by a detachable membrane that emulates the physical and chemical properties of the Space of Disse. Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced changes to cellular function and phenotype were investigated. LSECs exhibited approximately 40% cell death at 20mM APAP. KCs exhibited decreased interleukin-10 and increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma secretion. The secretion of these proteins altered hepatocyte function and signaling. Both LSECs and KCs maintained phenotypic markers. At 20mM APAP, the 3D models exhibited aspartate aminotransferase to alanine aminotransferase ratios from 2.1-2.5 and 45% glutathione depletion, corresponding to what is seen in vivo. At 10 and 20mM APAP, the 3D models exhibited cell death, primarily through necrosis. Therefore, the 3D cultures described in this report demonstrate significant potential as realistic models for hepatotoxicity studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biochemical mechanism of acetaminophen (APAP) induced toxicity in melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vad, Nikhil M; Yount, Garret; Moore, Dan; Weidanz, Jon; Moridani, Majid Y

    2009-04-01

    In this work, we investigated the biochemical mechanism of acetaminophen (APAP) induced toxicity in SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells using tyrosinase enzyme as a molecular cancer therapeutic target. Our results showed that APAP was metabolized 87% by tyrosinase at 2 h incubation. AA and NADH, quinone reducing agents, were significantly depleted during APAP oxidation by tyrosinase. The IC(50) (48 h) of APAP towards SK-MEL-28, MeWo, SK-MEL-5, B16-F0, and B16-F10 melanoma cells was 100 microM whereas it showed no significant toxicity towards BJ, Saos-2, SW-620, and PC-3 nonmelanoma cells, demonstrating selective toxicity towards melanoma cells. Dicoumarol, a diaphorase inhibitor, and 1-bromoheptane, a GSH depleting agent, enhanced APAP toxicity towards SK-MEL-28 cells. AA and GSH were effective in preventing APAP induced melanoma cell toxicity. Trifluoperazine and cyclosporin A, inhibitors of permeability transition pore in mitochondria, significantly prevented APAP melanoma cell toxicity. APAP caused time and dose-dependent decline in intracellular GSH content in SK-MEL-28, which preceded cell toxicity. APAP led to ROS formation in SK-MEL-28 cells which was exacerbated by dicoumarol and 1-bromoheptane whereas cyslosporin A and trifluoperazine prevented it. Our investigation suggests that APAP is a tyrosinase substrate, and that intracellular GSH depletion, ROS formation and induced mitochondrial toxicity contributed towards APAP's selective toxicity in SK-MEL-28 cells.

  8. Recent Updates on Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity: The Role of Nrf2 in Hepatoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Gum, Sang Il

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) known as paracetamol is the main ingredient in Tylenol, which has analgesic and anti-pyretic properties. Inappropriate use of APAP causes major morbidity and mortality secondary to hepatic failure. Overdose of APAP depletes the hepatic glutathione (GSH) rapidly, and the metabolic intermediate leads to hepatocellular death. This article reviews the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity and provides an overview of current research studies. Pharmacokinetics including metabolism (activation and detoxification), subsequent transport (efflux)-facilitating excretion, and some other aspects related to toxicity are discussed. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated gene battery plays a critical role in the multiple steps associated with the mitigation of APAP toxicity. The role of Nrf2 as a protective target is described, and potential natural products inhibiting APAP toxicity are outlined. This review provides an update on the mechanism of APAP toxicity and highlights the beneficial role of Nrf2 and specific natural products in hepatoprotection. PMID:24386516

  9. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, a microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin, attenuates acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury through activation of Nrf-2.

    PubMed

    Xue, Huiting; Xie, Wenyan; Jiang, Zhihui; Wang, Meng; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Hongqiong; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-10-01

    1. Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose leads to severe hepatotoxicity. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) is a scarcely studied microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effect of DOPAC against APAP-induced liver injury. 2. Mice were treated intragastrically with DOPAC (10, 20 or 50 mg/kg) for 3 days before APAP (300 mg/kg) injection. APAP alone caused increase in serum aminotransferase levels and changes in hepatic histopathology. APAP also promoted oxidative stress by increasing lipid peroxidation and decreasing anti-oxidant enzyme activities. These events led to hepatocellular necrosis and reduced liver function. DOPAC increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) translocation to the nucleus and enhanced the expression of phase II enzymes and anti-oxidant enzymes, and thereby reduced APAP hepatotoxicity and enhanced anti-oxidant ability. 3. Our data provide evidence that DOPAC protected the liver against APAP-induced injury, which is involved in Nrf-2 activation, implying that DOPAC can be considered as a potential natural hepatoprotective agent.

  10. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity: Preventive effect of trans anethole.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Bruno Ambrósio; Ritter, Alessandra M Versuti; Ames, Franciele Queiroz; Gonçalves, Odinei Hess; Leimann, Fernanda Vitória; Bracht, Lívia; Natali, Maria Raquel Marçal; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Ap

    2017-02-01

    The hepatotoxicity induced by APAP is caused by the excessive production of N-acetyl-para-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), which, when reacting with hepatic proteins proved to cause irreversible lesions. Associated with this process, an intense inflammatory process is also evidenced, characterized by the increased cell influx and production/release of inflammatory mediators. Trans anethole, an aromatic compounds has been showed anti-inflammatory efficacy by inhibit the cellular recruitment and synthesis/releases of many proinflammatory mediators such as prostaglandin (PGE2), cytokines (TNF, IL-1) and nitrico oxide (NO). The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of trans anethole on some inflammatory parameters that are involved in hepatotoxicity induced by high doses of acetaminophen. Our results demonstrate that treatment with AN at doses 125 and 250mg/kg once a day for seven days prevented the changes caused by the APAP overdose, showing less intensity in the histological changes (necrosis, size of hepatocyte area and inflammatory infiltration), and corroborating the findings of serum activities of transaminases and phosphatases and the activity of the enzyme myeloperoxidase. In addition, the treatment prevented the up-regulation of proinflammatory mediators such as NO, TNF, IL-1α, MIP-1α and MCP-1 and induced the up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Thus, our results demonstrate a possible protective effect of trans anethole on the hepatotoxicity induced by APAP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolic phenotyping applied to pre-clinical and clinical studies of acetaminophen metabolism and hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Coen, Muireann

    2015-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) is a widely used analgesic that is safe at therapeutic doses but is a major cause of acute liver failure (ALF) following overdose. APAP-induced hepatotoxicity is related to the formation of an electrophilic reactive metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), which is detoxified through conjugation with reduced glutathione (GSH). One method that has been applied to study APAP metabolism and hepatotoxicity is that of metabolic phenotyping, which involves the study of the small molecule complement of complex biological samples. This approach involves the use of high-resolution analytical platforms such as NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to generate information-rich metabolic profiles that reflect both genetic and environmental influences and capture both endogenous and xenobiotic metabolites. Data modeling and mining and the subsequent identification of panels of candidate biomarkers are typically approached with multivariate statistical tools. We review the application of multi-platform metabolic profiling for the study of APAP metabolism in both in vivo models and humans. We also review the application of metabolic profiling for the study of endogenous metabolic pathway perturbations in response to APAP hepatotoxicity, with a particular focus on metabolites involved in the biosynthesis of GSH and those that reflect mitochondrial function such as long-chain acylcarnitines. Taken together, this body of work sheds much light on the mechanism of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity and provides candidate biomarkers that may prove of translational relevance for improved stratification of APAP-induced ALF.

  12. BLT1 signalling protects the liver against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by preventing excessive accumulation of hepatic neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Kojo, Ken; Ito, Yoshiya; Eshima, Koji; Nishizawa, Nobuyuki; Ohkubo, Hirotoki; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Shimizu, Takao; Watanabe, Masahiko; Majima, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a potent chemoattractant for neutrophils. Signalling of LTB4 receptor type 1 (BLT1) has pro-inflammatory functions through neutrophil recruitment. In this study, we investigated whether BLT1 signalling plays a role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury by affecting inflammatory responses including the accumulation of hepatic neutrophils. BLT1-knockout (BLT1−/−) mice and their wild-type (WT) counterparts were subjected to a single APAP overdose (300 mg/kg), and various parameters compared within 24 h after treatment. Compared with WT mice, BLT1−/− mice exhibited exacerbation of APAP-induced liver injury as evidenced by enhancement of alanine aminotransferase level, necrotic area, hepatic neutrophil accumulation, and expression of cytokines and chemokines. WT mice co-treated with APAP and ONO-0457, a specific antagonist for BLT1, displayed amplification of the injury, and similar results to those observed in BLT1−/− mice. Hepatic neutrophils in BLT1−/− mice during APAP hepatotoxicity showed increases in the production of reactive oxygen species and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Administration of isolated BLT1-deficient neutrophils into WT mice aggravated the liver injury elicited by APAP. These results demonstrate that BLT1 signalling dampens the progression of APAP hepatotoxicity through inhibiting an excessive accumulation of activated neutrophils. The development of a specific agonist for BLT1 could be useful for the prevention of APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:27404729

  13. A monkey model of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity; phenotypic similarity to human.

    PubMed

    Tamai, Satoshi; Iguchi, Takuma; Niino, Noriyo; Mikamoto, Kei; Sakurai, Ken; Sayama, Ayako; Shimoda, Hitomi; Takasaki, Wataru; Mori, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Species-specific differences in the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen (APAP) have been shown. To establish a monkey model of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, which has not been previously reported, APAP at doses up to 2,000 mg/kg was administered orally to fasting male and female cynomolgus monkeys (n = 3-5/group) pretreated intravenously with or without 300 mg/kg of the glutathione biosynthesis inhibitor, L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO). In all the animals, APAP at 2,000 mg/kg with BSO but not without BSO induced hepatotoxicity, which was characterized histopathologically by centrilobular necrosis and vacuolation of hepatocytes. Plasma levels of APAP and its reactive metabolite N-acethyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI) increased 4 to 7 hr after the APAP treatment. The mean Cmax level of APAP at 2,000 mg/kg with BSO was approximately 200 µg/mL, which was comparable to high-risk cutoff value of the Rumack-Matthew nomogram. Interestingly, plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) did not change until 7 hr and increased 24 hr or later after the APAP treatment, indicating that this phenotypic outcome was similar to that in humans. In addition, circulating liver-specific miR-122 and miR-192 levels also increased 24 hr or later compared with ALT, suggesting that circulating miR-122 and miR-192 may serve as potential biomarkers to detect hepatotoxicity in cynomolgus monkeys. These results suggest that the hepatotoxicity induced by APAP in the monkey model shown here was translatable to humans in terms of toxicokinetics and its toxic nature, and this model would be useful to investigate mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury and also potential translational biomarkers in humans.

  14. Attenuating Oxidative Stress by Paeonol Protected against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Li, Qing; Xu, Yuan; Chen, Yuning; Deng, Yue; Zhi, Feng; Qian, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether paeonol protected against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Mice treated with paeonol (25, 50, 100 mg/kg) received 400 mg/kg acetaminophen intraperitoneally (i.p.) and hepatotoxicity was assessed. Pre-treatment with paeonol for 6 and 24 h ameliorated APAP-induced hepatic necrosis and significantly reduced the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels in a dose-dependent manner. Post-treatment with 100 mg/kg paeonol ameliorated APAP-induced hepatic necrosis and reduced AST and ALT levels in the serum after APAP administration for 24 h. Western blot revealed that paeonol inhibited APAP-induced phosphorylated JNK protein expression but not p38 and Erk1/2. Moreover, paeonol showed anti-oxidant activities with reducing hepatic MDA contents and increasing hepatic SOD, GSH-PX and GSH levels. Paeonol dose-dependently prevented against H2O2 or APAP-induced LDH releasing and ROS production in primary mouse hepatocytes. In addition, the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory genes such as TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-1β and IL-6 in the liver were dose-dependently reduced by paeonol pre-treatment. Pre-treatment with paeonol significantly inhibited IKKα/β, IκBα and p65 phosphorylation which contributed to ameliorating APAP-induced hepatic inflammation. Collectively, the present study demonstrates paeonol has a protective ability against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity and might be an effective candidate compound against drug-induced acute liver failure.

  15. Liver-specific Deletion of Integrin-Linked Kinase in Mice Attenuates Hepatotoxicity and Improves Liver Regeneration after Acetaminophen Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Bharat; Edwards, Genea; Desai, Aishwarya; Michalopoulos, George K.; Apte, Udayan

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the major cause of acute liver failure in the US. Prompt liver regeneration is critical for recovery after APAP hepatotoxicity, but mechanisms remain elusive. Extracellular-matrix (ECM) mediated signaling via integrin-linked kinase (ILK) regulates liver regeneration after surgical resection. However, role of ECM-signaling via ILK in APAP-toxicity and compensatory regeneration is unknown, which was investigated in this study using liver-specific ILK-knock out (KO) mice. ILK-KO and wild-type (WT) mice were treated with 300 mg/kg APAP and injury and regeneration were studied at 6 and 24hr after APAP treatment. ILK-KO mice developed lower liver injury after APAP overdose, which was associated with decreased JNK-activation (a key mediator of APAP-toxicity). Further, higher glutathione levels after APAP treatment and lower APAP-protein adducts levels, along with lower levels of CYP2E1 suggest decreased metabolic activation of APAP in ILK-KO mice. Interestingly, despite lower injury ILK-KO mice had rapid and higher liver regeneration after APAP overdose accompanied with increased β-catenin signaling. In conclusion, liver-specific deletion of ILK improved regeneration, attenuated toxicity after APAP overdose, and decreased metabolic-activation of APAP. Our study also indicates that ILK-mediated ECM-signaling plays a role in regulation of CYP2E1 and may affect toxicity of several centrilobular hepatotoxicants including APAP. PMID:27125733

  16. PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF C-JUN N-TERMINAL KINASE IN ACETAMINOPHEN HEPATOTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Du, Kuo; Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. Although substantial progress regarding the mechanisms of APAP hepatotoxicity has been made in the past several decades, therapeutic options are still limited and novel treatments are clearly needed. c-jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in recent years. Areas covered Early studies established the critical role of JNK activation and mitochondrial translocation in APAP hepatotoxicity. However, this concept has also been challenged. Initial studies failed to reproduce the protection of JNK deficiency in APAP toxicity and concerns over off-target effects of JNK inhibitors and even in knock-out mice are increasing. Interestingly, recent studies have even shown that liver injury can be altered with or without effects on JNK activation. The current review addresses these discrepancies and tries to explain or reconcile some of the conflicting results. Expert opinion JNK is a potential therapeutic target for APAP poisoning. However, controversies still exist regarding its actual role in APAP hepatotoxicity. Future studies are warranted for more in-depth testing of specific inhibitors in well-defined preclinical models and human hepatocytes before JNK can be considered a relevant therapeutic target for APAP poisoning. PMID:26190663

  17. Evaluation of three-dimensional cultured HepG2 cells in a nano culture plate system: an in vitro human model of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Aritomi, Kohei; Ishitsuka, Yoichi; Tomishima, Yoshiro; Shimizu, Daisuke; Abe, Nazuki; Shuto, Tsuyoshi; Irikura, Mitsuru; Kai, Hirofumi; Irie, Tetsumi

    2014-01-01

    Overdoses of acetaminophen (paracetamol, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol; APAP) cause severe liver injury, yet there is no common or high throughput in vitro human APAP model. This study examined the characteristics and usefulness of HepG2 cells grown in a nano culture plate (NCP) system, a three-dimensional culture method, as an in vitro human model for APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. The NCP-cultured HepG2 cells showed higher expression of mRNA and protein levels of cytochrome P450 2E1, which metabolizes APAP to a toxic metabolite, APAP-cysteine adduct formation, and higher sensitivity against APAP-induced cell injury compared with conventionally cultured cells. We demonstrated that treatment of APAP in NCP-cultured HepG2 cells shows key mechanistic features of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, such as decreases in intracellular glutathione and mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of JNK, and cellular injury; and pharmacological agents, such as Cyclosporine A (a mitochondrial permeability transition inhibitor) and SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor), prevented cell injury induced by APAP exposure. In addition, the antidote of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, N-acetylcysteine, could attenuate cellular injury induced by APAP in NCP-cultured HepG2 cells. We suggest that cellular injury induced by APAP treatment using an NCP-HepG2 system is a useful human model to study mechanisms and screen drug candidates of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity.

  18. Protective effects of hydrogen sulfide anions against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Isao; Kamata, Shotaro; Hagiya, Yoshifumi; Abiko, Yumi; Kasahara, Tadashi; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2015-12-01

    The key mechanism for hepatotoxicity resulting from acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is cytochrome P450-dependent formation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), a potent electrophilic metabolite that forms protein adducts. The fundamental roles of glutathione in the effective conjugation/clearance of NAPQI have been established, giving a molecular basis for the clinical use of N-acetylcysteine as a sole antidote. Recent evidence from in vitro experiments suggested that sulfide anions (S(2-)) to yield hydrogen sulfide anions (HS(-)) under physiological pH could effectively react with NAPQI. This study evaluated the protective roles of HS(-) against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. We utilized cystathionine γ-lyase-deficient (Cth(-/-)) mice that are highly sensitive to acetaminophen toxicity. Intraperitoneal injection of acetaminophen (150 mg/kg) into Cth(-/-) mice resulted in highly elevated levels of serum alanine/aspartate aminotransferases and lactate dehydrogenase associated with marked increases in oncotic hepatocytes; all of which were significantly inhibited by intraperitoneal preadministration of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). NaHS preadministration significantly suppressed APAP-induced serum malondialdehyde level increases without abrogating APAP-induced rapid depletion of hepatic glutathione. These results suggest that exogenous HS(-) protects hepatocytes by directly scavenging reactive NAPQI rather than by increasing cystine uptake and thereby elevating intracellular glutathione levels, which provides a novel therapeutic approach against acute APAP poisoning.

  19. Toll Like Receptor 3 Plays a Critical Role in the Progression and Severity of Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Cavassani, Karen A.; Moreira, Ana Paula; Habiel, David; Ito, Toshihiro; Coelho, Ana Lucia; Allen, Ron M.; Hu, Bin; Raphelson, Janna; Carson, William F.; Schaller, Matthew A.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Omary, M. Bishr; Hogaboam, Cory M.; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation has been implicated in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Herein, we hypothesize that TLR3 activation significantly contributed to APAP-induced liver injury. In fasted wildtype (WT) mice, APAP caused significant cellular necrosis, edema, and inflammation in the liver, and the de novo expression and activation of TLR3 was found to be necessary for APAP-induced liver failure. Specifically, liver tissues from similarly fasted TLR3-deficient (tlr3−/−) mice exhibited significantly less histological and biochemical evidence of injury after APAP challenge. Similar protective effects were observed in WT mice in which TLR3 was targeted through immunoneutralization at 3 h post-APAP challenge. Among three important death ligands (i.e. TNFα, TRAIL, and FASL) known to promote hepatocyte death after APAP challenge, TNFα was the only ligand that was significantly reduced in APAP-challenged tlr3−/− mice compared with APAP-challenged WT controls. In vivo studies demonstrated that TLR3 activation contributed to TNFα production in the liver presumably via F4/80+ and CD11c+ immune cells. In vitro studies indicated that there was cooperation between TNFα and TLR3 in the activation of JNK signaling in isolated and cultured liver epithelial cells (i.e. nMuLi). Moreover, TLR3 activation enhanced the expression of phosphorylated JNK in APAP injured livers. Thus, the current study demonstrates that TLR3 activation contributes to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:23762449

  20. Induction of Mrp3 and Mrp4 transporters during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is dependent on Nrf2

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksunes, Lauren M. Slitt, Angela L. Maher, Jonathan M. Augustine, Lisa M. Goedken, Michael J. Chan, Jefferson Y. Cherrington, Nathan J. Klaassen, Curtis D. Manautou, Jose E.

    2008-01-01

    The transcription factor NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mediates detoxification and antioxidant gene transcription following electrophile exposure and oxidative stress. Mice deficient in Nrf2 (Nrf2-null) are highly susceptible to acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity and exhibit lower basal and inducible expression of cytoprotective genes, including NADPH quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1) and glutamate cysteine ligase (catalytic subunit, or Gclc). Administration of toxic APAP doses to C57BL/6J mice generates electrophilic stress and subsequently increases levels of hepatic Nqo1, Gclc and the efflux multidrug resistance-associated protein transporters 1-4 (Mrp1-4). It was hypothesized that induction of hepatic Mrp1-4 expression following APAP is Nrf2 dependent. Plasma and livers from wild-type (WT) and Nrf2-null mice were collected 4, 24 and 48 h after APAP. As expected, hepatotoxicity was greater in Nrf2-null compared to WT mice. Gene and protein expression of Mrp1-4 and the Nrf2 targets, Nqo1 and Gclc, was measured. Induction of Nqo1 and Gclc mRNA and protein after APAP was dependent on Nrf2 expression. Similarly, APAP treatment increased hepatic Mrp3 and Mrp4 mRNA and protein in WT, but not Nrf2-null mice. Mrp1 was induced in both genotypes after APAP, suggesting that elevated expression of this transporter was independent of Nrf2. Mrp2 was not induced in either genotype at the mRNA or protein levels. These results show that Nrf2 mediates induction of Mrp3 and Mrp4 after APAP but does not affect Mrp1 or Mrp2. Thus coordinated regulation of detoxification enzymes and transporters by Nrf2 during APAP hepatotoxicity is a mechanism by which hepatocytes may limit intracellular accumulation of potentially toxic chemicals.

  1. Korean red ginseng extract prevents APAP-induced hepatotoxicity through metabolic enzyme regulation: the role of ginsenoside Rg3, a protopanaxadiol.

    PubMed

    Gum, Sang Il; Cho, Min Kyung

    2013-08-01

    Inappropriate use of acetaminophen (APAP) can lead to morbidity and mortality secondary to hepatic necrosis. We evaluated the beneficial effect and molecular mechanism of Korean red ginseng (KRG) on the APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity and identified a major component of KRG for hepatoprotection. Survival test, liver function test, histopathological study, APAP-metabolic profiling and gene expression were examined in mice. We determined the enzyme expression and upstream signalling in H4IIE cells analysed by RT-PCR, immunoblotting, siRNA gene knockdown and promoter-luciferase assay. High doses of KRG reduced mortality at the LD50 of APAP. APAP increased AST and ALT activities, which were abrogated by low doses of KRG. These protective effects were consistent with the results from histopathological examinations. KRG altered APAP metabolic profiles through inhibition of cytochrome P450 2E1 and induction of glutathione S-transferase A2 (GSTA2). Knockdown of GSTA2 catalyses the conjugation of glutathione reversed KRG-mediated protection against N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine in H4IIE cells. The nuclear Nrf2 and C/EBPβ, which are essential transcriptional factors for GSTA2 were increased by KRG. These effects were downstream of multiple signalling, including PI3K, JNK or PKA. Ginsenoside Rg3 but not Rb1, Rc and Rg1 significantly increased GSTA2 protein expression. Rg3 resulted in the transcriptional activation of GSTA2 downstream of the multiple cellular signalling. These results demonstrate that KRG is efficacious in protection against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity and mortality through metabolic regulation and that Rg3 is a major component of KRG for the GST induction, implying that Rg3 should be considered to be a potential hepatoprotective agent. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Detecting mRNA Predictors of Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mouse Blood Using Quantitative Real-Time PCR.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Syu-ichi; Tomizawa, Ayako; Yomogida, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug. Drug-induced liver injury from agents such as APAP is known to vary between individuals within a species. To avoid liver injury and ensure the proper use of pharmaceutical products, it is important to be able to predict such risks using genetic information. This study evaluated the use of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) to identify mRNAs (carried in the blood of male ddY mice) capable of predicting susceptibility to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Screening was performed on samples obtained at 18 h after treatment from mice that had been orally treated with 500 mg/kg APAP. APAP-induced hepatotoxicity was seen in 60% of the mice, and the mortality rate was 12%. Blood APAP concentration did not differ significantly between mice with and without APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. We compared blood mRNA expression levels between mice with (positive, serious or lethal injury) and without hepatotoxicity in the APAP-treated group. The transcript levels of interleukin-encoding loci Il1β, Il10, and tumor necrosis factor (Tnf) were increased in the lethal injury group. Transcripts of the loci encoding transthyretin (Ttr) and metallothionein 1 (Mt1) showed increases in the liver injury group, while those of the glutathione peroxidase 3-encoding locus (Gpx3) were decreased. APAP hepatotoxicity was potentiated in fasted animals, although fasting did not appear to affect the level of expression of these genes. These results indicate that mRNA expression of Il1β, Il10, Tnf, Ttr, Mt1, and Gpx3 in mouse blood may provide useful surrogate markers of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity.

  3. Vα14iNKT cell deficiency prevents acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure by enhancing hepatic glutathione and altering APAP metabolism.

    PubMed

    Downs, Isaac; Aw, Tak Yee; Liu, Jianfeng; Adegboyega, Patrick; Ajuebor, Maureen N

    2012-11-16

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is widely regarded as a major cause of acute liver failure in the United States. Intentional or accidental overdose of APAP in man or rodent elicits direct hepatocellular injury that is accompanied by hepatic depletion of the antioxidant, glutathione (GSH). In recent years, the innate immune response has also been shown to promote the development of APAP hepatotoxicity via indirect liver damage. In the present study, we demonstrate that Jα18(-/-) mice, which are selectively deficient in the innate immune T cell, Vα14iNKT cells, were resistant to APAP hepatotoxicity relative to WT mice as reflected by biochemical and histological liver injury markers. In parallel, improvement in the biochemical and histological parameters of liver injury in Jα18(-/-) mice was associated with a significant increase in hepatic levels of GSH, which detoxified APAP metabolites to attenuate hepatic oxidative stress, liver injury and necrosis. Notably, the protective effect of hepatic GSH during Vα14iNKT cells deficiency was demonstrated by its depletion in Jα18(-/-) mice using dl-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine which exacerbated hepatic oxidative and nitrosative stress as well as liver necrosis and caused mice mortality. Extraordinarily, APAP metabolism in Jα18(-/-) mice was altered in favor of hepatic GSH conjugates and decreased glucuronide conjugates. In summary, we reveal a novel finding establishing a unique association between hepatic innate immunity and GSH levels in altering APAP metabolism to suppress liver injury and necrosis during Vα14iNKT cells deficiency in Jα18(-/-) mice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Potential Role of Activated Nonparenchymal Cells in Acetaminophen-Induced Potentiation of Hepatotoxicity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-14

    Roberts, R. W. Benson, and J. A. Hinson. 1990. Immunochemical Quantitation of 3-(Cystein-S-yl)Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Subcellular Fractions...These proteins were located in the plasma membrane and mitochondrial fraction (Pumford et al., 1990 A,B). Immunochemical localization has shown...APAP- protein adducts have been found in the mitochondrial fraction of liver isolated from hepatotoxic mice (Pumford, et al., 1990 A,B). Biochemically

  5. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitic (NASH) mice are protected from higher hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen upon induction of PPAR{alpha} with clofibrate

    SciTech Connect

    Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Bhave, Vishakha S.; Mitra, Mayurranjan S.; Latendresse, John R.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2008-08-01

    The objective was to investigate if the hepatotoxic sensitivity in nonalcoholic steatohepatitic mice to acetaminophen (APAP) is due to downregulation of nuclear receptor PPAR{alpha} via lower cell division and tissue repair. Male Swiss Webster mice fed methionine and choline deficient diet for 31 days exhibited NASH. On the 32nd day, a marginally toxic dose of APAP (360 mg/kg, ip) yielded 70% mortality in steatohepatitic mice, while all non steatohepatitic mice receiving the same dose survived. {sup 14}C-APAP covalent binding, CYP2E1 protein, and enzyme activity did not differ from the controls, obviating increased APAP bioactivation as the cause of amplified APAP hepatotoxicity. Liver injury progressed only in steatohepatitic livers between 6 and 24 h. Cell division and tissue repair assessed by {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation and PCNA were inhibited only in the steatohepatitic mice given APAP suggesting that higher sensitivity of NASH liver to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity was due to lower tissue repair. The hypothesis that impeded liver tissue repair in steatohepatitic mice was due to downregulation of PPAR{alpha} was tested. PPAR{alpha} was downregulated in NASH. To investigate whether downregulation of PPAR{alpha} in NASH is the critical mechanism of compromised liver tissue repair, PPAR{alpha} was induced in steatohepatitic mice with clofibrate (250 mg/kg for 3 days, ip) before injecting APAP. All clofibrate pretreated steatohepatitic mice receiving APAP exhibited lower liver injury, which did not progress and the mice survived. The protection was not due to lower bioactivation of APAP but due to higher liver tissue repair. These findings suggest that inadequate PPAR{alpha} expression in steatohepatitic mice sensitizes them to APAP hepatotoxicity.

  6. Protective Properties of 2-Acetylcyclopentanone in a Mouse Model of Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihai; Gavin, Terrence; Geohagen, Brian C.; Liu, Qiang; Downey, Katherine J.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous research showed that enolates formed from 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds, such as 2-acetylcyclopentanone (2-ACP), could provide protection in cell culture models from electrophile- or oxidative stress-induced toxicity. In the present study, we evaluated the protective abilities of 2-ACP in a mouse model of acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. Results show that oral APAP overdose (500 mg/kg) was nearly 90% lethal within 72 hours and that the resulting hepatotoxicity was associated with substantial changes in plasma liver enzyme activities, histopathological indices, and markers of hepatocyte oxidative stress. 2-ACP administered intraperitoneally 20 minutes before APAP completely prevented lethality over a 7-day observation period. This effect was dose-dependent (0.80–2.40 mmol/kg) and was correlated with normalization of measured parameters. Nearly complete protection was afforded when 2-ACP was administered 20 minutes post-APAP, but not 60 minutes after intoxication. Although intraperitoneal administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was not effective over a broad dose range (2.40–7.20 mmol/kg), temporal studies indicated that intraperitoneal NAC was hepatoprotective when injected 60 minutes after APAP intoxication. Because of a loss of function in stomach acid, oral administration of 2-ACP was associated with modest APAP protection. In contrast, NAC administered orally provided dose-dependent (0.80–2.40 mmol/kg) protection against APAP hepatotoxicity. In chemico studies and quantum mechanical calculations indicated that 2-ACP acted as a surrogate nucleophilic target for the reactive electrophilic APAP metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. Our findings suggest that 2-ACP or a derivative might be useful in treating acquired toxicities associated with electrophilic drugs and metabolites or environmental toxicants. PMID:23759509

  7. Protein kinase C (PKC) participates in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity through JNK dependent and independent signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Heather S.; Gaarde, William A.; Han, Derick; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the role of protein kinase C (PKC) and AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. Treatment of primary mouse hepatocytes with broad-spectrum PKC inhibitors (Ro-31-8245, Go6983), protected against APAP cytotoxicity despite sustained JNK activation. Broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor treatment enhanced p-AMPK levels and AMPK regulated survival-energy pathways including autophagy. AMPK inhibition by compound C or activation using an AMPK activator oppositely modulated APAP cytotoxicity, suggesting p-AMPK and AMPK regulated energy survival pathways particularly autophagy play a critical role in APAP cytotoxicity. Ro-31-8245 treatment in mice upregulated p-AMPK levels, increased autophagy (i.e. increased LC3-II formation, p62 degradation) and protected against APAP-induced liver injury, even in the presence of sustained JNK activation and translocation to mitochondria. In contrast, treatment of hepatocytes with classical PKC inhibitor (Go6976) protected against APAP by inhibiting JNK activation. Knockdown of PKC-α using antisense (ASO) in mice also protected against APAP-induced liver injury by inhibiting JNK activation. APAP treatment resulted in PKC-α translocation to mitochondria and phosphorylation of mitochondrial PKC substrates. JNK 1 and 2 silencing in vivo decreased APAP-induced PKC-α translocation to mitochondria, suggesting PKC-α and JNK interplay in a feed-forward mechanism to mediate APAP-induced liver injury. Conclusion: PKC-α and other PKC(s) regulate death (JNK) and survival (AMPK) proteins, to modulate APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:23873604

  8. SIRT3-dependent deacetylation exacerbates acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhongping; Bourdi, Mohammed; Li, Jian H; Aponte, Angel M; Chen, Yong; Lombard, David B; Gucek, Marjan; Pohl, Lance R; Sack, Michael N

    2011-07-01

    Acetaminophen/paracetamol-induced liver failure--which is induced by the binding of reactive metabolites to mitochondrial proteins and their disruption--is exacerbated by fasting. As fasting promotes SIRT3-mediated mitochondrial-protein deacetylation and acetaminophen metabolites bind to lysine residues, we investigated whether deacetylation predisposes mice to toxic metabolite-mediated disruption of mitochondrial proteins. We show that mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3(-/-) mice are protected from acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, that mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 is a direct SIRT3 substrate, and that its deacetylation increases acetaminophen toxic-metabolite binding and enzyme inactivation. Thus, protein deacetylation enhances xenobiotic liver injury by modulating the binding of a toxic metabolite to mitochondrial proteins.

  9. Hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects of Cuscuta chinensis against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Yen, Feng-Lin; Wu, Tzu-Hui; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2007-04-20

    Tu-Si-Zi, the seeds of Cuscuta chinensis Lam. (Convolvulaceae), is a traditional Chinese medicine that is commonly used to nourish and improve the liver and kidney conditions in China and other Asian countries. As oxidative stress promotes the development of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity, the aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the hepatoprotective effect and antioxidant activities of the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of C chinensis on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. The C chinensis ethanolic extract at an oral dose of both 125 and 250mg/kg showed a significant hepatoprotective effect relatively to the same extent (P<0.05) by reducing levels of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). In addition, the same ethanolic extract prevented the hepatotoxicity induced by APAP-intoxicated treatment as observed when assessing the liver histopathology. Regarding the antioxidant activity, C chinensis ethanolic extract exhibited a significant effect (P<0.05) by increasing levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and by reducing malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. In contrast, the same doses of the aqueous extract of C chinensis did not present any hepatoprotective effect as seen in the ethanolic extract, and resulted in further liver deterioration. In conclusion, these data suggest that the ethanolic extract of Cuscuta chinensis can prevent hepatic injuries from APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in rats and this is likely mediated through its antioxidant activities.

  10. Saponins (Ginsenosides) from the Leaves of Panax quinquefolius Ameliorated Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing-Yue; Hu, Jun-Nan; Liu, Zhi; Zhang, Rui; He, Yu-Fang; Hou, Wei; Wang, Zhi-Qing; Yang, Ge; Li, Wei

    2017-05-10

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is one of the most common inducements of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in the world. The main purpose of this paper was to investigate the liver protection activity of saponins (ginsenosides) from the leaves of Panax quinquefolius (PQS) against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, and the involved mechanisms were demonstrated for the first time. Mice were pretreated with PQS (150 and 300 mg/kg) by oral gavage for 7 days before being treated with 250 mg/kg APAP. Severe liver injury was exerted at 24 h post-APAP, and hepatotoxicity was assessed. Our results showed that pretreatment with PQS significantly decreased the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels in a dose-dependent manner as compared to the APAP administration. Meanwhile, compared with that in the APAP group, PQS decreased hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) contents and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) expression and restored reduced glutathione (GSH) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in livers of mice. PQS inhibited the overexpression of pro-inflammatory factors cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the liver tissues. Furthermore, Western blotting analysis revealed that PQS pretreatment inhibited the activation of apoptotic signaling pathways via increase of Bcl-2 and decrease of Bax and caspase-3 protein expression levels. Liver histopathological observation provided further evidence that PQS pretreatment significantly inhibited APAP-induced hepatocyte necrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, and congestion. Biological indicators of nitrative stress such as 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) were inhibited after PQS pretreatment, compared to the APAP group. The present study clearly demonstrates that PQS exerts a protective effect against APAP-induced hepatic injury because of its antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory activities. The findings from

  11. BENZYL ALCOHOL PROTECTS AGAINST ACETAMINOPHEN HEPATOTOXICITY BY INHIBITING CYTOCHROME P450 ENZYMES BUT CAUSES MITOCHONDRIAL DYSFUNCTION AND CELL DEATH AT HIGHER DOSES

    PubMed Central

    Du, Kuo; McGill, Mitchell R.; Xie, Yuchao; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is a serious public health problem in western countries. Current treatment options for APAP poisoning are limited and novel therapeutic intervention strategies are needed. A recent publication suggested that benzyl alcohol (BA) protects against APAP hepatotoxicity and could serve as a promising antidote for APAP poisoning. To assess the protective mechanisms of BA, C56Bl/6J mice were treated with 400mg/kg APAP and/or 270mg/kg BA. APAP alone caused extensive liver injury at 6h and 24h post-APAP. This injury was attenuated by BA co-treatment. Assessment of protein adduct formation demonstrated that BA inhibits APAP metabolic activation. In support of this, in vitro experiments also showed that BA dose-dependently inhibits cytochrome P450 activities. Correlating with the hepatoprotection of BA, APAP-induced oxidant stress and mitochondrial dysfunction were reduced. Similar results were obtained in primary mouse hepatocytes. Interestingly, BA alone caused mitochondrial membrane potential loss and cell toxicity at high doses, and its protective effect could not be reproduced in primary human hepatocytes (PHH). We conclude that BA protects against APAP hepatotoxicity mainly by inhibiting cytochrome P450 enzymes in mice. Considering its toxic effect and the loss of protection in PHH, BA is not a clinically useful treatment option for APAP overdose patient. PMID:26522885

  12. Benzyl alcohol protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by inhibiting cytochrome P450 enzymes but causes mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death at higher doses.

    PubMed

    Du, Kuo; McGill, Mitchell R; Xie, Yuchao; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-12-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is a serious public health problem in western countries. Current treatment options for APAP poisoning are limited and novel therapeutic intervention strategies are needed. A recent publication suggested that benzyl alcohol (BA) protects against APAP hepatotoxicity and could serve as a promising antidote for APAP poisoning. To assess the protective mechanisms of BA, C56Bl/6J mice were treated with 400 mg/kg APAP and/or 270 mg/kg BA. APAP alone caused extensive liver injury at 6 h and 24 h post-APAP. This injury was attenuated by BA co-treatment. Assessment of protein adduct formation demonstrated that BA inhibits APAP metabolic activation. In support of this, in vitro experiments also showed that BA dose-dependently inhibits cytochrome P450 activities. Correlating with the hepatoprotection of BA, APAP-induced oxidant stress and mitochondrial dysfunction were reduced. Similar results were obtained in primary mouse hepatocytes. Interestingly, BA alone caused mitochondrial membrane potential loss and cell toxicity at high doses, and its protective effect could not be reproduced in primary human hepatocytes (PHH). We conclude that BA protects against APAP hepatotoxicity mainly by inhibiting cytochrome P450 enzymes in mice. Considering its toxic effect and the loss of protection in PHH, BA is not a clinically useful treatment option for APAP overdose patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The protection of glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) towards acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxicity partially through fatty acids metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Jiang, Tingshu; Li, Ping; Mao, Qishan

    2015-09-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver toxicity remains the key factor limiting the clinical application of APAP, and herbs are the important sources for isolation of compounds preventing APAP-induced toxicity. To investigate the protection mechanism of glycyrrhetinic acid towards APAP-induced liver damage using metabolomics method. APAP-induced liver toxicity model was made through intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) of APAP (400 mg/kg). Glycyrrhetinic acid was dissolved in corn oil, and intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) of glycyrrhetinic acid (500 mg/kg body weight) was performed for 20 days before the injection of APAP. UPLC-ESI-QTOF MS was employed to analyze the metabolomic profile of serum samples. The pre-treatment of glycyrrhetinic acid significantly protected APAP-induced toxicity, indicated by the histology of liver, the activity of ALT and AST. Metabolomics showed that the level of palmtioylcarnitine and oleoylcarnitine significantly increased in serum of APAP-treated mice, and the pre-treatment with GA can prevent this elevation of these two fatty acid-carnitines. Reversing the metabolism pathway of fatty acid is an important mechanism for the protection of glycyrrhetinic acid towards acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity.

  14. Hepatoprotective Potential of Prosopis farcta Beans Extracts against Acetaminophen-induced Hepatotoxicity in Wister Rats.

    PubMed

    Asadollahi, Akram; Sarir, Hadi; Omidi, Arash; Torbati, Mohammad Bagher Montazar

    2014-10-01

    Hepatotoxicity by acetaminophen is the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in many countries. Prosopis farcta beans extract (PFE) has some antioxidant property and may alleviate hepatotoxicity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate effects of PFE against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Thirty-six male Wistar albino rats weighing 220 ± 30 g were distributed into six groups. Two groups were pretreated with PFE (50 and 75 mg/kg) for 7 days before administration of acetaminophen (600 mg/kg). Two were given acetaminophen or PFE (50 and 75 mg/kg) alone, and the control received normal saline. One day after acetaminophen, administration blood samples were collected by cardiac puncture to determine liver function enzymes markers; aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase (AST and ALT), cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), high, low, and very low density lipoproteins (LDL and VLDL). In acetaminophen-treated rat plasma AST (314 ± 18.54 vs. 126.37 ± 4.13), ALT (304 ± 49.24 vs. 187.33 ± 3.71), cholesterol, TG, LDL, and VLDL were increased by 149, 160, 37, 92, 60, and 94%, respectively. PFE at both doses significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated the above biochemical indices to near normal. Prosopis farcta beans extract (50 and 75 mg/kg) exhibited hepatoprotective activity against APAP.

  15. Novel Protective Mechanisms for S-Adenosyl-L-methionine against Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity: Improvement of Key Antioxidant Enzymatic Function

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Michael; Ball, John G.; Wright, Michael Scott; Van Meter, Stephanie; Valentovic, Monica A.

    2012-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose leads to severe hepatotoxicity, increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) protects against APAP toxicity at a mmol/kg equivalent dose to N-acetylcysteine (NAC). SAMe acts as a principle biological methyl donor and participates in polyamine synthesis which increase cell growth and has a role in mitochondrial protection. The purpose of the current study tested the hypothesis that SAMe protects against APAP toxicity by maintaining critical antioxidant enzymes and markers of oxidative stress. Male C57Bl/6 mice were treated with vehicle (Veh; water 15 ml/kg, ip), SAMe (1.25 mmol/kg, ip), APAP (250 mg/kg, ip), and SAMe + APAP (SAMe given 1 h following APAP). Liver was collected 2 and 4 h following APAP administration; mitochondrial swelling as well as hepatic catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase, and both Mn- and Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme activity were evaluated. Mitochondrial protein carbonyl, 3-nitrotyrosine cytochrome c leakage were analyzed by Western blot. SAMe significantly increased SOD, GPx, and glutathione reductase activity at 4 h following APAP overdose. SAMe greatly reduced markers of oxidative stress and cytochrome C leakage following APAP overdose. Our studies also demonstrate that a 1.25 mmol/kg dose of SAMe does not inhibit CYP 2E1 enzyme activity. The current study identifies a plausible mechanism for the decreased oxidative stress observed when SAMe is given following APAP. PMID:22683606

  16. Hemizygosity of transsulfuration genes confers increased vulnerability against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiya, Yoshifumi; Kamata, Shotaro; Mitsuoka, Saya; Okada, Norihiko; Yoshida, Saori; Yamamoto, Junya; Ohkubo, Rika; Abiko, Yumi; Yamada, Hidenori; Akahoshi, Noriyuki; Kasahara, Tadashi; Kumagai, Yoshito; Ishii, Isao

    2015-01-15

    The key mechanism for acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent formation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, a potent electrophile that forms protein adducts. Previous studies revealed the fundamental role of glutathione, which binds to and detoxifies N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. Glutathione is synthesized from cysteine in the liver, and N-acetylcysteine is used as a sole antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Here, we evaluated the potential roles of transsulfuration enzymes essential for cysteine biosynthesis, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CTH), in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity using hemizygous (Cbs{sup +/−} or Cth{sup +/−}) and homozygous (Cth{sup −/−}) knockout mice. At 4 h after intraperitoneal acetaminophen injection, serum alanine aminotransferase levels were highly elevated in Cth{sup −/−} mice at 150 mg/kg dose, and also in Cbs{sup +/−} or Cth{sup +/−} mice at 250 mg/kg dose, which was associated with characteristic centrilobular hepatocyte oncosis. Hepatic glutathione was depleted while serum malondialdehyde accumulated in acetaminophen-injected Cth{sup −/−} mice but not wild-type mice, although glutamate–cysteine ligase (composed of catalytic [GCLC] and modifier [GCLM] subunits) became more activated in the livers of Cth{sup −/−} mice with lower K{sub m} values for Cys and Glu. Proteome analysis using fluorescent two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis revealed 47 differentially expressed proteins after injection of 150 mg acetaminophen/kg into Cth{sup −/−} mice; the profiles were similar to 1000 mg acetaminophen/kg-treated wild-type mice. The prevalence of Cbs or Cth hemizygosity is estimated to be 1:200–300 population; therefore, the deletion or polymorphism of either transsulfuration gene may underlie idiosyncratic acetaminophen vulnerability along with the differences in Cyp, Gclc, and Gclm gene activities. - Highlights: • Cbs{sup +/−}, Cth{sup +/−}, and

  17. Tolerance to Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity in the Mouse Model of Autoprotection Is Associated with Induction of Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase-3 (FMO3) in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rudraiah, Swetha; Rohrer, Philip R.; Gurevich, Igor; Goedken, Michael J.; Rasmussen, Theodore; Hines, Ronald N.; Manautou, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) pretreatment with a hepatotoxic dose (400 mg/kg) in mice results in resistance to a second, higher dose (600 mg/kg) of APAP (APAP autoprotection). Recent microarray work by our group showed a drastic induction of liver flavin containing monooxygenase-3 (Fmo3) mRNA expression in our mouse model of APAP autoprotection. The role of liver Fmo3, which detoxifies xenobiotics, in APAP autoprotection is unknown. The purpose of this study was to characterize the gene regulation and protein expression of liver Fmo3 during APAP hepatotoxicity. The functional consequences of Fmo3 induction were also investigated. Plasma and livers were collected from male C57BL/6J mice over a period of 72 h following a single dose of APAP (400 mg/kg) to measure Fmo3 mRNA and protein expression. Although Fmo3 mRNA levels increased significantly following APAP treatment, protein expression changed marginally. In contrast, both Fmo3 mRNA and protein expression were significantly higher in APAP autoprotected livers. Unlike male C57BL/6J mice, female mice have ∼80-times higher constitutive Fmo3 mRNA levels and are highly resistant to APAP hepatotoxicity. Coadministration of APAP with the FMO inhibitor methimazole rendered female mice susceptible to APAP hepatotoxicity, with no changes in susceptibility detected in male mice. Furthermore, a human hepatocyte cell line (HC-04) clone over-expressing human FMO3 showed enhanced resistance to APAP cytotoxicity. Taken together, these findings establish for the first time induction of Fmo3 protein expression and function by xenobiotic treatment. Our results also indicate that Fmo3 expression and function plays a role in protecting the liver from APAP-induced toxicity. Although the mechanism(s) of this protection remains to be elucidated, this work describes a novel protective function for this enzyme. PMID:24973094

  18. Protective effects of silymarin against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Bektur, Nuriye Ezgi; Sahin, Erhan; Baycu, Cengiz; Unver, Gonul

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to estimate protective effects of silymarin on acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, paracetamol; APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in mice. Treatment of mice with overdose of APAP resulted in the elevation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and serum creatinine (SCr) levels in serum, liver, and kidney nitric oxide (NO) levels and significant histological changes including decreased body weight, swelling of hepatocytes, cell infiltration, dilatation and congestion, necrosis and apoptosis in liver, and dilatation of Bowman's capsular space and glomerular capillaries, pale-stained tubules epithelium, cell infiltration, and apoptosis in kidney. Posttreatment with silymarin 1 h after APAP injection for 7 days, however, significantly normalized the body weight, histological damage, serum ALT, AST, BUN, SCr, and tissue NO levels. Our observation suggested that silymarin ameliorated the toxic effects of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in mice. The protective role of silymarin against APAP-induced damages might result from its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects.

  19. Therapeutic potential of carfilzomib, an irreversible proteasome inhibitor, against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Abdulrazaq; Algfeley, Saleh G; Al-Hosaini, Khaled A; Korashy, Hesham M; Imam, Faisal; Nagi, Mahmoud N

    2017-04-01

    Overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) is often associated with hepatotoxicity. Carfilzomib (CFZ) shows multiple pharmacological activities including anti-inflammatory potential. Therefore, this study was undertaken to evaluate the possible therapeutic effects of CFZ against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Hepatotoxicity was induced by administration of APAP (350 mg/kg, intraperitoneal). Mice were given CFZ (0.125, 0.25, or 0.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) 1.5 h after APAP administration. Animals were sacrificed on 6 h and blood and liver tissue samples were collected for analysis. In CFZ-post-treated group, there was significant and dose-dependent decrease in serum alanine aminotransferase levels. The level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), reactive oxygen species, and NO decreased, whereas glutathione increased significantly by CFZ post-treatment. Upregulated mRNA expression of COX-II and iNOS were significantly downregulated by CFZ post-treatment. CFZ may exert its hepatoprotective action by alleviating inflammatory, oxidative, and nitrosative stress via inhibition of TNF-α, COX-II, and iNOS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Taurine protects acetaminophen-induced oxidative damage in mice kidney through APAP urinary excretion and CYP2E1 inactivation.

    PubMed

    Das, Joydeep; Ghosh, Jyotirmoy; Manna, Prasenjit; Sil, Parames C

    2010-02-28

    Acute exposure of acetaminophen (APAP), a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug, causes severe renal damage and no specific agent has been reported so far that plays any beneficial role in this organ pathophysiology. In the present study, the protective role of taurine on APAP-induced nephrotoxicity was investigated in mice. In order to induce acute nephrotoxicity, APAP was administered at a single dose of 2g/kg body weight orally to male adult albino mice of Swiss strain. APAP exposure for 24h significantly increased plasma level of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, uric acid, TNF-alpha, NO production, urinary gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT) activity, total urinary protein and urinary glucose level accompanied by a decrease in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity. Moreover, APAP administration significantly increased MDA, protein carbonylation, GSSG level, intracellular ROS production and cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYPP450) activity. The same exposure decreased GSH level, ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) as well as the activities of antioxidant enzymes indicating that APAP-induced renal damage was mediated through oxidative stress. Besides, APAP exposure significantly reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and induced up-regulation of CYP2E1 in renal tissues although JNK did not play any significant role in this APAP-induced renal pathophysiology. Caspase 9/3 immunoblot and DNA fragmentation analyses showed that APAP-induced renal cell damage was mostly necrotic in nature, although some apoptosis also occurred simultaneously. Taurine treatment both pre and post (150 mg/kg body weight for 3 days, orally) to APAP exposure, however, significantly reduced APAP-induced nephrotoxicity through its antioxidant properties, urinary excretion of APAP and suppression of CYP2E1. Results suggest that taurine might be a potential therapeutic candidate against APAP-induced acute nephrotoxicity. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of Wuzhi tablet (Schisandra sphenanthera Extract) on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity through a mechanism distinct from N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaomei; Chen, Pan; Jiang, Yiming; Wang, Ying; Tan, Huasen; Zeng, Hang; Wang, Yongtao; Qu, Aijuan; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2015-03-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the most common cause of drug-induced liver injury and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is the primary antidote of APAP poisoning. Wuzhi tablet (WZ), the active constituents well identified and quantified, is a preparation of an ethanol extract of Schisandra sphenanthera and exerts a protective effect toward APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. However, the clinical use of WZ to rescue APAP-induced acute liver injury and the mechanisms involved in the therapeutic effect of WZ remain unclear. Therefore, the effect of WZ on APAP hepatotoxicity was compared with NAC in mice, and molecular pathways contributing to its therapeutic action were investigated. Administration of WZ 4 hours after APAP treatment significantly attenuated APAP hepatotoxicity and exerted much better therapeutic effect than NAC, as revealed by morphologic, histologic, and biochemical assessments. Both WZ and NAC prevented APAP-induced c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase activation and mitochondrial glutathione depletion in livers. The protein expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 target genes including Gclc, Gclm, Ho-1, and Nqo1 was increased by WZ administration. Furthermore, p53 and p21 levels were upregulated upon APAP exposure, which were completely reversed by postdosing of WZ 4 hours after APAP treatment over 48 hours. In comparison with NAC, WZ significantly increased the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D-dependent kinase 4, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and augmenter of liver regeneration in APAP-injured livers. This study demonstrated that WZ possessed a therapeutic efficacy against APAP-induced liver injury by inhibiting oxidative stress and stimulating a regenerative response after liver injury. Thus WZ may represent a new therapy for APAP-induced acute liver injury.

  2. Repression of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by a combination of celastrol and brilliant blue G.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Heba A; Shaker, Mohamed E; Hamed, Mohamed F; Gameil, Nariman M

    2017-06-05

    The sterile inflammatory response is an eminent contributor to acetaminophen (APAP)-hepatotoxicity in humans. Recent advances unraveled an axial role of the NLRP3-inflammasome in APAP-post injury inflammation. Nevertheless, the role of signaling events preceded the NLRP3-inflammasome activation, like the transcription factor NF-κB and the purinergic receptor P2X7, is still unclear and needs further elucidation. Here, we investigated the pharmacological inhibition of these upstream signaling molecules by celastrol and brilliant blue G (BBG) (separately or simultaneously) in APAP-hepatotoxicity in mice. The results indicated that both celastrol and BBG pretreatments, especially when combined together, curbed APAP-induced hepatocellular injury (ALT, AST and LDH) and death (necrosis and apoptosis). The underlying mechanisms of protection of such combination against APAP-challenge were attributed to their efficient cooperation in: i) preventing the consumption of hepatic antioxidants (reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase); ii) limiting the overproduction of lipid peroxidation aldehydes (malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal) and total nitrate/nitrite products; iii) attenuating the inflammatory cells accumulation in the liver, as evidenced by reducing the number of F4/80 positive cells/field in immunostaining and myeloperoxidase activity; iv) reversing the dysregulation in production of pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-17A and IL-23) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines; and v) enhancing the reparative capacity of injured hepatocytes, as demonstrated by increasing the percentage of PCNA positive hepatocytes per field of immunostaining. In conclusion, this murine study elicits a potential clinical applicability and therapeutic utility of celastrol and BBG combination in human cases of APAP-overdose hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant Mito-Tempo protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Du, Kuo; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2017-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is characterized by an extensive mitochondrial oxidant stress. However, its importance as a drug target has not been clarified. To investigate this, fasted C57BL/6J mice were treated with 300 mg/kg APAP and the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant Mito-Tempo (MT) was given 1.5 h later. APAP caused severe liver injury in mice, as indicated by the increase in plasma ALT activities and centrilobular necrosis. MT dose-dependently reduced the injury. Importantly, MT did not affect APAP-protein adducts formation, glutathione depletion or c-jun N-terminal kinase activation and its mitochondrial translocation. In contrast, hepatic glutathione disulfide and peroxynitrite formation were dose-dependently reduced by MT, indicating its effective mitochondrial oxidant stress scavenging capacity. Consequently, mitochondrial translocation of Bax and release of mitochondrial intermembrane proteins such as apoptosis-inducing factor were prevented, and nuclear DNA fragmentation was eliminated. To demonstrate the importance of mitochondria-specific antioxidant property of MT, we compared its efficacy with Tempo, which has the same pharmacological mode of action as MT but lacks the mitochondria targeting moiety. In contrast to the dramatic protection by MT, the same molar dose of Tempo did not significantly reduce APAP hepatotoxicity. In contrast, even a 3 h post-treatment with MT reduced 70 % of the injury, and the combination of MT with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) provided superior protection than NAC alone. We conclude that MT protects against APAP overdose in mice by attenuating the mitochondrial oxidant stress and preventing peroxynitrite formation and the subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. MT is a promising therapeutic agent for APAP overdose patients.

  4. Diet Restriction Inhibits Apoptosis and HMGB1 Oxidation and Promotes Inflammatory Cell Recruitment during Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, Daniel James; Williams, Dominic P; Kipar, Anja; Laverty, Hugh; Park, B Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a major cause of acute liver failure and serves as a paradigm to elucidate mechanisms, predisposing factors and therapeutic interventions. The roles of apoptosis and inflammation during APAP hepatotoxicity remain controversial. We investigated whether fasting of mice for 24 h can inhibit APAP-induced caspase activation and apoptosis through the depletion of basal ATP. We also investigated in fasted mice the critical role played by inhibition of caspase-dependent cysteine 106 oxidation within high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) released by ATP depletion in dying cells as a mechanism of immune activation. In fed mice treated with APAP, necrosis was the dominant form of hepatocyte death. However, apoptosis was also observed, indicated by K18 cleavage, DNA laddering and procaspase-3 processing. In fasted mice treated with APAP, only necrosis was observed. Inflammatory cell recruitment as a consequence of hepatocyte death was observed only in fasted mice treated with APAP or fed mice cotreated with a caspase inhibitor. Hepatic inflammation was also associated with loss in detection of serum oxidized-HMGB1. A significant role of HMGB1 in the induction of inflammation was confirmed with an HMGB1-neutralizing antibody. The differential response between fasted and fed mice was a consequence of a significant reduction in basal hepatic ATP, which prevented caspase processing, rather than glutathione depletion or altered APAP metabolism. Thus, the inhibition of caspase-driven apoptosis and HMGB1 oxidation by ATP depletion from fasting promotes an inflammatory response during drug-induced hepatotoxicity/liver pathology. PMID:20811657

  5. Comparison of a novel fast-dissolving acetaminophen tablet formulation (FD-APAP) and standard acetaminophen tablets using gamma scintigraphy and pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C G; Clarke, Cyril P; Starkey, Yan Yan L; Clarke, Geoffrey D

    2011-07-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol, APAP) is widely used to relieve mild-to-moderate pain and reduce fever. Absorption of the drug can be impacted by dosage form; this may have implications for pain relief in some individuals, potentially accounting for suboptimal efficacy in analgesia. To assess the disintegration and dissolution of a new fast-dissolving acetaminophen tablet formulation (FD-APAP) and the impact on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters. Two randomized, single-center, open-label, single-dose, two-way crossover studies in healthy subjects to compare FD-APAP (2 × 500 mg tablets) with standard acetaminophen (2 × 500 mg tablets). Gamma scintigraphy was used to assess tablet disintegration (Study 1, N = 24), and plasma profiles were evaluated in the fasted state (Study 2, N = 40). In Study 1, the mean time to complete disintegration (12.9 vs. 69.6 min, P < 0.0001) and onset of disintegration were both significantly faster with FD-APAP than with standard acetaminophen (P < 0.0001). For Study 2, median T(max) was significantly faster for FD-APAP (0.50 vs. 0.67 h, P < 0.01) and AUC(0-30 min) was significantly greater (4.51 vs. 2.74, P < 0.05). AUC(0-t) and AUC(0-inf) were comparable between the two study treatments. Despite the absence of comparative clinical data, the FD-APAP formulation may be expected to overcome some of the issues associated with the slow and variable absorption of standard acetaminophen tablet formulations, improving therapeutic outcome and avoiding the need to switch to alternative therapeutic options. Compared with standard acetaminophen, the FD-APAP formulation results in significantly faster onset of disintegration and more rapid absorption.

  6. Efficacy of free glutathione and niosomal glutathione in the treatment of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in cats

    PubMed Central

    Vulcano, L.A. Denzoin; Confalonieri, O.; Franci, R.; Tapia, M.O.; Soraci, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) administration results in hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats. The response to three different treatments against APAP poisoning was evaluated. Free glutathione (GSH) (200mg/kg), niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg) and free amino acids (180 mg/kg of N-acetylcysteine and 280 mg/kg of methionine) were administered to cats that were intoxicated with APAP (a single dose of 150 mg/kg, p.o.). Serum concentration of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) along with serum, liver and erythrocyte concentration of GSH and methemoglobin percentage were measured before and 4, 24 and 72 hours after APAP administration. Free GSH (200 mg/kg) and niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg) were effective in reducing hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats intoxicated with a dose of 150 mg/kg APAP. We conclude that both types of treatments can protect the liver and haemoglobin against oxidative stress in APAP intoxicated cats. Furthermore, our results showed that treatment with niosomal GSH represents an effective therapeutic approach for APAP poisoning. PMID:26623313

  7. Efficacy of free glutathione and niosomal glutathione in the treatment of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in cats.

    PubMed

    Vulcano, L A Denzoin; Confalonieri, O; Franci, R; Tapia, M O; Soraci, A L

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) administration results in hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats. The response to three different treatments against APAP poisoning was evaluated. Free glutathione (GSH) (200mg/kg), niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg) and free amino acids (180 mg/kg of N-acetylcysteine and 280 mg/kg of methionine) were administered to cats that were intoxicated with APAP (a single dose of 150 mg/kg, p.o.). Serum concentration of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) along with serum, liver and erythrocyte concentration of GSH and methemoglobin percentage were measured before and 4, 24 and 72 hours after APAP administration. Free GSH (200 mg/kg) and niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg) were effective in reducing hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats intoxicated with a dose of 150 mg/kg APAP. We conclude that both types of treatments can protect the liver and haemoglobin against oxidative stress in APAP intoxicated cats. Furthermore, our results showed that treatment with niosomal GSH represents an effective therapeutic approach for APAP poisoning.

  8. Tanshinone IIA protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity via activating the Nrf2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenwen; Guan, Cuiwen; Sun, Xiaozhe; Zhao, Zhongxiang; Li, Jia; Fu, Xinlu; Qiu, Yuwen; Huang, Min; Jin, Jing; Huang, Zhiying

    2016-06-01

    Tanshinone IIA (Tan), the main active component of Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been demonstrated to have antioxidant activity. Acetaminophen (APAP), a widely used antipyretic and analgesic, can cause severe hepatotoxicity and liver failure when taken overdose. Oxidative stress has been reported to be involved in APAP-induced liver failure. This study aimed to investigate the effect of Tan on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity and the underlying mechanisms involved. C57BL/6J mice were divided into six groups: (1) control, (2) APAP group, (3) APAP+Tan (30mg/kg) group, (4) Tan (30mg/kg) group, (5) APAP+Tan (10mg/kg) group, (6) Tan (10mg/kg) group. Mice in group 3 and 5 were pre-treated with specified dose of Tan by gavage and subsequently injected with an overdose of APAP intraperitoneally (i.p., 300mg/kg). The effect of Tan on Nrf2 pathway was investigated in HepG2 cells and mice. Plasma aspartate transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), liver glutathione (GSH), glutathione transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) levels were determined after mice were sacrificed. Lipid peroxidation and histological examination were performed. The effect of Tan on the Nrf2 pathway was detected by western blotting and qRT-PCR. Tan pretreatment reduced APAP-induced liver injury. Tan was able to activate Nrf2 and increase the expression levels of Nrf2 target genes, including glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), NAD(P)H:quinine oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1), in a dose-dependent manner in HepG2 cells. Consistent with our observations in HepG2 cells, Tan increased nuclear Nrf2 accumulation and upregulated mRNA and protein levels of the Nrf2 target genes GCLC, NQO1 and HO-1 in C57BL/6J mice compared with mice treated with APAP alone. Our results demonstrate that Tan pretreatment could protect the liver from APAP-induced hepatic injury by activating the Nrf2 pathway. Tan may

  9. Formononetin protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity through enhanced NRF2 activity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fen; Wan, Chunpeng; Li, Weifang; Yao, Liangliang; Zhao, Hongqian; Zou, Yuan; Peng, Dewei; Huang, Weifeng

    2017-01-01

    To examine the effects of formononetin (FMN) on Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury in vitro and in vivo. Human non-tumor hepatic cells LO2 were pretreated with either vehicle or FMN (20, 40 μM), for 6 h, followed by incubation with or without APAP (10 mM) for 24 h. In an in vivo assay, male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups: (1) control group; (2) APAP group; (3) APAP + FMN (50 mg/Kg); (4) APAP + FMN (100 mg/Kg). The mice in the control and APAP groups were pre-treated with vehicle; the other two groups were pretreated daily with FMN (50, 100 mg/Kg) orally for 7 consecutive days. After the final treatment, acute liver injury was induced in all groups, except the control group, by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 300 mg/Kg APAP. In LO2 cells, APAP exposure decreased the cell viability and glutathione (GSH) content, which were both greatly restored by FMN pretreatment. Overdose of APAP increased hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) content, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity in experimental mice. Supplementation with 100 mg/Kg FMN significantly reduced APAP-induced elevated levels of MDA (1.97 ± 0.27 vs 0.55 ± 0.14 nmol/mg protein, p < 0.001), ALT (955.80 ± 209.40 vs 46.90 ± 20.40 IU/L, p < 0.001) and AST (1533.80 ± 244.80 vs 56.70 ± 28.80 IU/L, p < 0.001), and hepatic GSH level (5.54 ± 0.93 vs 8.91 ± 1.11 μmol/mg protein, p < 0.001) was significantly increased. These results were further validated by histopathology and TdT-mediated biotin-dUTP nick-endlabeling (TUNEL) staining, pretreatment with 100 mg/Kg FMN significant decreased APAP-induced hepatocellular damage and cell apoptosis (36.55 ± 3.82 vs 2.58 ± 1.80%, p < 0.001). Concomitantly, FMN stimulated the expression of Nrf2 and antioxidant gene expression in the presence of APAP. These data provide an experimental basis for the use of FMN in the treatment of patients with APAP-induced hepatotoxicity.

  10. Formononetin protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity through enhanced NRF2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weifang; Yao, Liangliang; Zhao, Hongqian; Zou, Yuan; Peng, Dewei; Huang, Weifeng

    2017-01-01

    To examine the effects of formononetin (FMN) on Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury in vitro and in vivo. Human non-tumor hepatic cells LO2 were pretreated with either vehicle or FMN (20, 40 μM), for 6 h, followed by incubation with or without APAP (10 mM) for 24 h. In an in vivo assay, male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups: (1) control group; (2) APAP group; (3) APAP + FMN (50 mg/Kg); (4) APAP + FMN (100 mg/Kg). The mice in the control and APAP groups were pre-treated with vehicle; the other two groups were pretreated daily with FMN (50, 100 mg/Kg) orally for 7 consecutive days. After the final treatment, acute liver injury was induced in all groups, except the control group, by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 300 mg/Kg APAP. In LO2 cells, APAP exposure decreased the cell viability and glutathione (GSH) content, which were both greatly restored by FMN pretreatment. Overdose of APAP increased hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) content, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity in experimental mice. Supplementation with 100 mg/Kg FMN significantly reduced APAP-induced elevated levels of MDA (1.97 ± 0.27 vs 0.55 ± 0.14 nmol/mg protein, p < 0.001), ALT (955.80 ± 209.40 vs 46.90 ± 20.40 IU/L, p < 0.001) and AST (1533.80 ± 244.80 vs 56.70 ± 28.80 IU/L, p < 0.001), and hepatic GSH level (5.54 ± 0.93 vs 8.91 ± 1.11 μmol/mg protein, p < 0.001) was significantly increased. These results were further validated by histopathology and TdT-mediated biotin-dUTP nick-endlabeling (TUNEL) staining, pretreatment with 100 mg/Kg FMN significant decreased APAP-induced hepatocellular damage and cell apoptosis (36.55 ± 3.82 vs 2.58 ± 1.80%, p < 0.001). Concomitantly, FMN stimulated the expression of Nrf2 and antioxidant gene expression in the presence of APAP. These data provide an experimental basis for the use of FMN in the treatment of patients with APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:28234915

  11. Dynamic and accurate assessment of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by integrated photoacoustic imaging and mechanistic biomarkers in vivo.

    PubMed

    Brillant, Nathalie; Elmasry, Mohamed; Burton, Neal C; Rodriguez, Josep Monne; Sharkey, Jack W; Fenwick, Stephen; Poptani, Harish; Kitteringham, Neil R; Goldring, Christopher E; Kipar, Anja; Park, B Kevin; Antoine, Daniel J

    2017-10-01

    The prediction and understanding of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury (APAP-ILI) and the response to therapeutic interventions is complex. This is due in part to sensitivity and specificity limitations of currently used assessment techniques. Here we sought to determine the utility of integrating translational non-invasive photoacoustic imaging of liver function with mechanistic circulating biomarkers of hepatotoxicity with histological assessment to facilitate the more accurate and precise characterization of APAP-ILI and the efficacy of therapeutic intervention. Perturbation of liver function and cellular viability was assessed in C57BL/6J male mice by Indocyanine green (ICG) clearance (Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT)) and by measurement of mechanistic (miR-122, HMGB1) and established (ALT, bilirubin) circulating biomarkers in response to the acetaminophen and its treatment with acetylcysteine (NAC) in vivo. We utilised a 60% partial hepatectomy model as a situation of defined hepatic functional mass loss to compared acetaminophen-induced changes to. Integration of these mechanistic markers correlated with histological features of APAP hepatotoxicity in a time-dependent manner. They accurately reflected the onset and recovery from hepatotoxicity compared to traditional biomarkers and also reported the efficacy of NAC with high sensitivity. ICG clearance kinetics correlated with histological scores for acute liver damage for APAP (i.e. 3h timepoint; r=0.90, P<0.0001) and elevations in both of the mechanistic biomarkers, miR-122 (e.g. 6h timepoint; r=0.70, P=0.005) and HMGB1 (e.g. 6h timepoint; r=0.56, P=0.04). For the first time we report the utility of this non-invasive longitudinal imaging approach to provide direct visualisation of the liver function coupled with mechanistic biomarkers, in the same animal, allowing the investigation of the toxicological and pharmacological aspects of APAP-ILI and hepatic regeneration. Copyright © 2017

  12. Analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in a murine model of tolerance to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (autoprotection)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Meeghan A.; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E.; Lawton, Michael P.; Manautou, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400 mg/kg) and then challenged 48 h later with 600 mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24 h later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430{sub 2} GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. - Highlights: • Differential expression of genes in mice resistant to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. • Increased gene expression of Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 and Galectin-3. • Decrease in MAT1A expression and compensatory hepatocellular regeneration. • Two distinct gene

  13. Effect of S-methylisothiourea in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rat.

    PubMed

    More, Amar S; Kumari, Rashmi R; Gupta, Gaurav; Kathirvel, Kandasamy; Lonare, Milindmitra K; Dhayagude, Rohini S; Kumar, Dhirendra; Kumar, Dinesh; Sharma, Anil K; Tandan, Surendra K

    2012-11-01

    Nitric oxide synthesized from inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver damage. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of iNOS inhibitor S-methylisothiourea (SMT) in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in rats (1 g/kg, i.p.). SMT was (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg; i.p.) given 30 min before and 3 h after APAP administration. At 6 and 24 h, blood was collected to measure alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and nitrate plus nitrite (NOx) levels in serum. At 48 h, animals were sacrificed, and blood and liver tissues were collected for biochemical estimation. SMT reduced significantly the serum ALT, AST, and NOx levels at 24 and 48 h and liver NOx levels at 48 h as compared with APAP-treated control. The amount of peroxynitrite measured by rhodamine assay was significantly reduced by SMT, as compared with APAP-treated control group. SMT treatment (30 mg/kg) has significantly reduced the lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl levels, increased SOD and catalase, and reduced glutathione and total thiol levels significantly as compared with APAP-treated control. SMT 30 mg/kg dose has protected animals from APAP-induced hypotension and reduced iNOS gene expression. Hepatocytes were isolated from animals, and effect of SMT on apoptosis, MTP, and ROS generation was studied, and their increased value in APAP intoxicated group was found to be significantly decreased by SMT (30 mg/kg) at 24 and 48 h. In conclusion, nitric oxide produced from iNOS plays important role in toxicity at late hours (24 to 48 h), and SMT inhibits iNOS and reduces oxidative and nitrosative stress.

  14. Caffeic acid attenuated acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibiting ERK1/2-mediated early growth response-1 transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chun; Shi, Liang; Sheng, Yuchen; Zheng, Zhiyong; Wei, Hai; Wang, Zhengtao; Ji, Lili

    2016-12-25

    Caffeic acid (CA) is a natural compound abundant in fruits, coffee and plants. This study aims to investigate the involved mechanism of the therapeutic detoxification of CA against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. CA (10, 30 mg/kg) was orally given to mice at 1 h after mice were pre-administrated with APAP (300 mg/kg). The therapeutic detoxification of CA against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity was observed by detecting serum aminotransferases, liver malondialdehyde (MDA) amount and liver histological evaluation in vivo. CA reduced APAP-induced increase in the mRNA expression of early growth response 1 (Egr1) in hepatocytes, and inhibited APAP-induced Egr1 transcriptional activation in vitro and in vivo. CA reduced the increased expression of growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein (Gadd45)α induced by APAP in hepatocytes. Moreover, Egr1 siRNA reduced Gadd45α expression and reversed APAP-induced cytotoxicity in hepatocytes. Further results showed that CA blocked APAP-induced activation of extracellular-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) signaling cascade in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the application of ERK1/2 inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) abrogated the nuclear translocation of Egr1 induced by APAP in hepatocytes. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the therapeutic detoxification of CA against APAP-induced liver injury, and the inhibition of CA on ERK1/2-mediated Egr1 transcriptional activation was involved in this process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in a murine model of tolerance to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (autoprotection).

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Meeghan A; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E; Lawton, Michael P; Manautou, José E

    2014-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400mg/kg) and then challenged 48h later with 600mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24h later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430_2 GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection.

  16. Analysis of Changes in Hepatic Gene Expression in a Murine Model of Tolerance to Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity (Autoprotection)

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Meeghan A; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E.; Lawton, Michael P; Manautou, José E

    2013-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400 mg/kg) and then challenged 48 hr later with 600 mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24 hr later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430_2 GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. PMID:24126418

  17. Sirtuin 1 modulation in rat model of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wojnarová, L; Kutinová Canová, N; Farghali, H; Kučera, T

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is involved in important biological processes such as energy metabolism and regulatory functions of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and inflammation. Our previous studies have shown hepatoprotective effect of polyphenolic compound resveratrol, which is also an activator of SIRT1. Therefore, the aim of our present study was to clarify the role of SIRT1 in process of hepatoprotection in animal model of drug-induced liver damage. Male Wistar rats were used for both in vivo and in vitro studies. Hepatotoxicity was induced by single dose of acetaminophen (APAP). Some rats and hepatocytes were treated by resveratrol or synthetic selective activator of sirtuin 1 (CAY10591). The degree of hepatotoxicity, the activity and expression of the SIRT1 were determined by biochemical, histological and molecular-biological assessments of gained samples (plasma, liver tissue, culture media and hepatocytes). Resveratrol and CAY attenuated APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, both drugs enhanced APAP-reduced SIRT1 activity. Our results show that modulation of the SIRT1 activity plays a role in hepatoprotection. Synthetic activators of SIRT1 would help in understanding the role of SIRT1 and are therefore a major boost towards the search for specific treatment of liver disease.

  18. Role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in regulating tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) mediated increase of acetaminophen (APAP) and chlorpromazine (CPZ) toxicity in murine hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Adarsh; Guo, Tao; Ghose, Romi

    2010-04-01

    Drug induced liver injury (DILI) accounts for more than 50% of the cases of acute liver failure in this country, and is the major cause of drug withdrawal from the market. DILI has been associated with the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Pro-inflammatory cytokines activate the mitogen activated protein kinase, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) in the liver. Recent studies have shown that JNK can regulate the hepatotoxicity of the analgesic, acetaminophen (APAP). Several reports have shown that inflammation induced by the endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) augments the toxic response to hepatotoxicants in vivo. However, the mechanism by which inflammation alters drug-induced hepatotoxicity is not known. This study investigated the role of inflammatory mediators in regulating the toxicity of the hepatotoxic drugs, APAP or chlorpromazine (CPZ) in primary mouse hepatocytes. We found that, pre-treatment with TNF-alpha resulted in approximately 50 to 60% increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels by APAP or CPZ, while interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) or IL6 treatments showed only 15-20% increase in ALT release. The bacterial components, LPS or lipoteichoic acid (LTA) increased ALT release by approximately 35 to 38% upon drug treatment of the hepatocytes. The JNK inhibitor, SP600125 significantly diminished APAP and CPZ toxicity with or without TNF-alpha. Pre-treatment with TNF-alpha resulted in prolonged activation of JNK (upto 2 hr) in the presence of APAP or CPZ. These results show that TNF-alpha is the major cytokine involved in sensitizing hepatocytes to APAP- or CPZ-induced hepatotoxicity, likely by a mechanism involving sustained activation of JNK.

  19. Different effects of selective β1-adrenoceptor antagonists, nebivolol or atenolol in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity of rats.

    PubMed

    Rofaeil, Remon R; Kamel, Maha Y; Abdelzaher, Walaa Y

    2017-04-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a common cause of acute liver failure, and beta-blockers are commonly used drugs in clinical practice. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of two different beta-blocker agents as nebivolol and atenolol against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Male Wistar rats were treated with APAP (2 g/kg/day, p.o.) to induce hepatotoxicity. Our results showed that nebivolol and atenolol reduced heart rate and blood pressure. Nebivolol (5 mg/kg/day, p.o.) for 14 days has a hepatoprotective effect shown by significant decrease in hepatic injury parameters (serum AST and ALT) with significant suppression of hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) which were elevated with APAP administration. Also, nebivolol increased reduced glutathione (GSH) which was reduced with APAP administration. Moreover, immunohistochemical examination revealed that nebivolol treatment markedly reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, while expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was markedly enhanced, as compared to APAP group. The protective effects of nebivolol were also verified histopathologically. On the other hand, as compared to APAP group, oral administration of atenolol (50 mg/kg) increased hepatic injury parameters but did not change hepatic NO, MDA, and GSH. In conclusion, this study revealed that nebivolol not atenolol is protective against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity possibly, in part, through its antioxidant activity, inhibition of iNOS expression, and induction of eNOS expression. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  20. Saikosaponin d protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibiting NFκB and STAT3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Aiming; Tanaka, Naoki; Sun, Lu; Guo, Bin; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Jiang, Changtao; Yang, Julin; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    Overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) can cause acute liver injury that is sometimes fatal, requiring efficient pharmacological intervention. The traditional Chinese herb Bupleurum falcatum has been widely used for the treatment of several liver diseases in eastern Asian countries, and saikosaponin d (SSd) is one of its major pharmacologically-active components. However, the efficacy of Bupleurum falcatum or SSd on APAP toxicity remains unclear. C57BL/6 mice were administered SSd intraperitoneally once daily for five days, followed by APAP challenge. Biochemical and pathological analysis revealed that mice treated with SSd were protected against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. SSd markedly suppressed phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and reversed the APAP-induced increases in the target genes of NF-kB, such as pro-inflammatory cytokine Il6 and Ccl2, and those of STAT3, such as Socs3, Fga, Fgb and Fgg. SSd also enhanced the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine Il10 mRNA. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SSd protects mice from APAP-induced hepatotoxicity mainly through down-regulating NF-kB- and STAT3-mediated inflammatory signaling. This study unveils one of the possible mechanisms of hepatoprotection caused by Bupleurum falcatum and/or SSd. PMID:25265579

  1. Acetaminophen: Dose-Dependent Drug Hepatotoxicity and Acute Liver Failure in Patients.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is a rare but serious clinical problem. A number of drugs can cause severe liver injury and acute liver failure at therapeutic doses in a very limited number of patients (<1:10,000). This idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury, which is currently not predictable in preclinical safety studies, appears to depend on individual susceptibility and the inability to adapt to the cellular stress caused by a particular drug. In striking contrast to idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury, drugs with dose-dependent hepatotoxicity are mostly detected during preclinical studies and do not reach the market. One notable exception is acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol), which is a safe drug at therapeutic doses but can cause severe liver injury and acute liver failure after intentional and unintentional overdoses. Key Messages: APAP overdose is responsible for more acute liver failure cases in the USA or UK than all other etiologies combined. Since APAP overdose in the mouse represents a model for the human pathophysiology, substantial progress has been made during the last decade in understanding the mechanisms of cell death, liver injury and recovery. More recently, emerging evidence based on mechanistic biomarker analysis in patients and studies of cell death in human hepatocytes suggests that most of the mechanisms discovered in mice also apply to patients. The rapid development of N-acetylcysteine as an antidote against APAP overdose was based on the early understanding of APAP toxicity in mice. However, despite the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine in patients who present early after APAP overdose, there is a need to develop intervention strategies for late-presenting patients. The challenges related to APAP toxicity are to better understand the mechanisms of cell death in order to limit liver injury and prevent acute liver failure, and also to develop biomarkers that better predict as early as possible who is at risk for developing acute liver failure

  2. Necrostatin-1 protects against reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced hepatotoxicity in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Kenji; Hatano, Etsuro; Iwaisako, Keiko; Takeiri, Masatoshi; Noma, Naruto; Ohmae, Saori; Toriguchi, Kan; Tanabe, Kazutaka; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Seo, Satoru; Taura, Kojiro; Machida, Keigo; Takeda, Norihiko; Saji, Shigehira; Uemoto, Shinji; Asagiri, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Excessive acetaminophen (APAP) use is one of the most common causes of acute liver failure. Various types of cell death in the damaged liver are linked to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, and, of these, necrotic cell death of hepatocytes has been shown to be involved in disease pathogenesis. Until recently, necrosis was commonly considered to be a random and unregulated form of cell death; however, recent studies have identified a previously unknown form of programmed necrosis called receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIPK)-dependent necrosis (or necroptosis), which is controlled by the kinases RIPK1 and RIPK3. Although RIPK-dependent necrosis has been implicated in a variety of disease states, including atherosclerosis, myocardial organ damage, stroke, ischemia–reperfusion injury, pancreatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. However its involvement in APAP-induced hepatocyte necrosis remains elusive. Here, we showed that RIPK1 phosphorylation, which is a hallmark of RIPK-dependent necrosis, was induced by APAP, and the expression pattern of RIPK1 and RIPK3 in the liver overlapped with that of CYP2E1, whose activity around the central vein area has been demonstrated to be critical for the development of APAP-induced hepatic injury. Moreover, a RIPK1 inhibitor ameliorated APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in an animal model, which was underscored by significant suppression of the release of hepatic enzymes and cytokine expression levels. RIPK1 inhibition decreased reactive oxygen species levels produced in APAP-injured hepatocytes, whereas CYP2E1 expression and the depletion rate of total glutathione were unaffected. Of note, RIPK1 inhibition also conferred resistance to oxidative stress in hepatocytes. These data collectively demonstrated a RIPK-dependent necrotic mechanism operates in the APAP-injured liver and inhibition of this pathway may be beneficial for APAP-induced fulminant hepatic failure. PMID:25349782

  3. Protein-Derived Acetaminophen-Cysteine Can Be Detected After Repeated Supratherapeutic Ingestion of Acetaminophen in the Absence of Hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, G F; Mizrahi, F; Giraldo, P; O'Malley, R N; Rollins, D; Wilkins, D

    2015-09-01

    Generation of protein-derived acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS) is reported after ingestion of large and therapeutic dosages of acetaminophen in healthy and in liver-damaged patients. The incidence of protein-derived APAP-CYS adducts in repeated supratherapeutic dosages of APAP is not known. for 12 months, a standardized and comprehensive questionnaire was used to interview every consecutive patient at a pain management clinic. Patients found to ingest more than 4 g of APAP per day for a minimum of 14 consecutive days at the time of the encounter were invited to have blood drawn for hepatic transaminases and APAP-CYS adduct levels. Twelve subjects out of 990 interviewees met inclusion criteria. Ten of the 12 had measurable protein-derived APAP-CYS, none had evidence of liver injury. Patients that ingest repeated supratherapeutic amounts of APAP over several weeks may generate APAP-CYS protein adducts in the absence of hepatic injury.

  4. IRE1α activation protects mice against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Kyu Yeon; So, Jae-Seon; Ruda, Vera; Frank-Kamenetsky, Maria; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Koteliansky, Victor; Iwawaki, Takao

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian stress sensor IRE1α plays a central role in the unfolded protein, or endoplasmic reticulum (ER), stress response by activating its downstream transcription factor XBP1 via an unconventional splicing mechanism. IRE1α can also induce the degradation of a subset of mRNAs in a process termed regulated IRE1-dependent decay (RIDD). Although diverse mRNA species can be degraded by IRE1α in vitro, the pathophysiological functions of RIDD are only beginning to be explored. Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in young adults in the United States and is primarily caused by CYP1A2-, CYP2E1-, and CYP3A4-driven conversion of APAP into hepatotoxic metabolites. We demonstrate here that genetic ablation of XBP1 results in constitutive IRE1α activation in the liver, leading to RIDD of Cyp1a2 and Cyp2e1 mRNAs, reduced JNK activation, and protection of mice from APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. A pharmacological ER stress inducer that activated IRE1α suppressed the expression of Cyp1a2 and Cyp2e1 in WT, but not IRE1α-deficient mouse liver, indicating the essential role of IRE1α in the down-regulation of these mRNAs upon ER stress. Our study reveals an unexpected function of RIDD in drug metabolism. PMID:22291093

  5. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair: the role of sterile inflammation and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jaeschke, Hartmut; Williams, C. David; Ramachandran, Anup; Bajt, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity because of overdose is the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in the western world. Metabolic activation of APAP and protein adduct formation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidant stress, peroxynitrite formation and nuclear DNA fragmentation are critical intracellular events in hepatocytes. However, the early cell necrosis causes the release of a number of mediators such as high-mobility group box 1 protein, DNA fragments, heat shock proteins (HSPs) and others (collectively named damage-associated molecular patterns), which can be recognized by toll-like receptors on macrophages, and leads to their activation with cytokine and chemokine formation. Although pro-inflammatory mediators recruit inflammatory cells (neutrophils, monocytes) into the liver, neither the infiltrating cells nor the activated resident macrophages cause any direct cytotoxicity. In contrast, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines can directly promote intracellular injury mechanisms by inducing nitric oxide synthase or inhibit cell death mechanisms by the expression of acute-phase proteins (HSPs, heme oxygenase-1) and promote hepatocyte proliferation. In addition, the newly recruited macrophages (M2) and potentially neutrophils are involved in the removal of necrotic cell debris in preparation for tissue repair and resolution of the inflammatory response. Thus, as discussed in detail in this review, the preponderance of experimental evidence suggests that the extensive sterile inflammatory response during APAP hepatotoxicity is predominantly beneficial by limiting the formation and the impact of pro-inflammatory mediators and by promoting tissue repair. PMID:21745276

  6. Flavokawains a and B in kava, not dihydromethysticin, potentiate acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Narayanapillai, Sreekanth C; Leitzman, Pablo; O'Sullivan, M Gerard; Xing, Chengguo

    2014-10-20

    Anxiolytic kava products have been associated with rare but severe hepatotoxicity in humans. This adverse potential has never been captured in animal models, and the responsible compound(s) remains to be determined. The lack of such knowledge greatly hinders the preparation of a safer kava product and limits its beneficial applications. In this study we evaluated the toxicity of kava as a single entity or in combination with acetaminophen (APAP) in C57BL/6 mice. Kava alone revealed no adverse effects for long-term usage even at a dose of 500 mg/kg bodyweight. On the contrary a three-day kava pretreatment potentiated APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, resulted in an increase in serum ALT and AST, and increased severity of liver lesions. Chalcone-based flavokawains A (FKA) and B (FKB) in kava recapitulated its hepatotoxic synergism with APAP while dihydromethysticin (DHM, a representative kavalactone and a potential lung cancer chemopreventive agent) had no such effect. These results, for the first time, demonstrate the hepatotoxic risk of kava and its chalcone-based FKA and FKB in vivo and suggest that herb-drug interaction may account for the rare hepatotoxicity associated with anxiolytic kava usage in humans.

  7. Exacerbation of Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by the Anthelmentic Drug Fenbendazole

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Carol R.; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-01-01

    Fenbendazole is a broad-spectrum anthelmintic drug widely used to prevent or treat nematode infections in laboratory rodent colonies. Potential interactions between fenbendazole and hepatotoxicants such as acetaminophen are unknown, and this was investigated in this study. Mice were fed a control diet or a diet containing fenbendazole (8–12 mg/kg/day) for 7 days prior to treatment with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) or phosphate buffered saline. In mice fed a control diet, acetaminophen administration resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases, which were evident within 12 h. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was markedly increased in mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet, as measured histologically and by significant increases in serum transaminase levels. Moreover, in mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet, but not the control diet, 63% mortality was observed within 24 h of acetaminophen administration. Fenbendazole by itself had no effect on liver histology or serum transaminases. To determine if exaggerated hepatotoxicity was due to alterations in acetaminophen metabolism, we analyzed sera for the presence of free acetaminophen and acetaminophen-glucuronide. We found that there were no differences in acetaminophen turnover. We also measured cytochrome P450 (cyp) 2e1, cyp3a, and cyp1a2 activity. Whereas fenbendazole had no effect on the activity of cyp2e1 or cyp3a, cyp1a2 was suppressed. A prolonged suppression of hepatic glutathione (GSH) was also observed in acetaminophen-treated mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet when compared with the control diet. These data demonstrate that fenbendazole exacerbates the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen, an effect that is related to persistent GSH depletion. These findings are novel and suggest a potential drug-drug interaction that should be considered in experimental protocols evaluating mechanisms of hepatotoxicity in rodent colonies treated with fenbendazole. PMID

  8. Exacerbation of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by the anthelmentic drug fenbendazole.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Carol R; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2012-02-01

    Fenbendazole is a broad-spectrum anthelmintic drug widely used to prevent or treat nematode infections in laboratory rodent colonies. Potential interactions between fenbendazole and hepatotoxicants such as acetaminophen are unknown, and this was investigated in this study. Mice were fed a control diet or a diet containing fenbendazole (8-12 mg/kg/day) for 7 days prior to treatment with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) or phosphate buffered saline. In mice fed a control diet, acetaminophen administration resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases, which were evident within 12 h. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was markedly increased in mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet, as measured histologically and by significant increases in serum transaminase levels. Moreover, in mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet, but not the control diet, 63% mortality was observed within 24 h of acetaminophen administration. Fenbendazole by itself had no effect on liver histology or serum transaminases. To determine if exaggerated hepatotoxicity was due to alterations in acetaminophen metabolism, we analyzed sera for the presence of free acetaminophen and acetaminophen-glucuronide. We found that there were no differences in acetaminophen turnover. We also measured cytochrome P450 (cyp) 2e1, cyp3a, and cyp1a2 activity. Whereas fenbendazole had no effect on the activity of cyp2e1 or cyp3a, cyp1a2 was suppressed. A prolonged suppression of hepatic glutathione (GSH) was also observed in acetaminophen-treated mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet when compared with the control diet. These data demonstrate that fenbendazole exacerbates the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen, an effect that is related to persistent GSH depletion. These findings are novel and suggest a potential drug-drug interaction that should be considered in experimental protocols evaluating mechanisms of hepatotoxicity in rodent colonies treated with fenbendazole.

  9. Expression Levels of GABA-A Receptor Subunit Alpha 3, Gabra3 and Lipoprotein Lipase, Lpl Are Associated with the Susceptibility to Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minjeong; Yun, Jun-Won; Shin, Kyeho; Cho, Yejin; Yang, Mijeong; Nam, Ki Taek; Lim, Kyung-Min

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the serious and fatal drug-associated adverse effect, but its incidence is very low and individual variation in severity is substantial. Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury accounts for >50% of reported DILI cases but little is known for the cause of individual variations in the severity. Intrinsic genetic variation is considered a key element but the identity of the genes was not well-established. Here, pre-biopsy method and microarray technique was applied to uncover the key genes for APAP-induced liver injury in mice, and a cause and effect experiment employing quantitative real-time PCR was conducted to confirm the correlation between the uncovered genes and APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. We identified the innately and differentially expressed genes of mice susceptible to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in the pre-biopsied liver tissue before APAP treatment through microarray analysis of the global gene expression profiles (Affymetrix GeneChip® Mouse Gene 1.0 ST for 28,853 genes). Expression of 16 genes including Gdap10, Lpl, Gabra3 and Ccrn4l were significantly different (t-test: FDR <10%) more than 1.5 fold in the susceptible animals than resistant. To confirm the association with the susceptibility to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, another set of animals were measured for the expression level of selected 4 genes (higher two and lower two genes) in the liver pre-biopsy and their sensitivity to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity was evaluated by post hoc. Notably, the expressions of Gabra3 and Lpl were significantly correlated with the severity of liver injury (p<0.05) demonstrating that these genes may be linked to the susceptibility to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:27530116

  10. Protective role of p53 in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yazhen; Yin, Shutao; Yan, Mingzhu; Win, Sanda; Aung Than, Tin; Aghajan, Mariam; Hu, Hongbo; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2017-05-01

    p53 is a tumor suppressor with a pro-death role in many conditions. However, in some contexts, evidence supports a pro-survival function. p53 has been shown to be activated in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity but the impact of this on toxicity is uncertain. In the present study, we have found that p53 plays a protective role in APAP-induced liver injury. We inhibited p53 using three different approaches in mice, pifithrin-α (PFTα), knockdown of p53 expression with antisense oligonucleotide, and p53 knockout. Mice were treated with APAP (300mg/kg) i.p. and after 24h in all three conditions, the liver injury was more severe as reflected in higher ALT levels and great area of necrosis in histology of the liver. Conversely, a p53 activator, nutlin-3a, decreased the liver injury induced by APAP. In the p53 inhibition models, enhanced sustained JNK activation was seen in the early time course, while the JNK was suppressed with the p53 activator. In conclusion, p53 plays a novel protective role in APAP induced liver injury through inhibiting the activation of JNK, a key mediator in APAP-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tolerance to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in the mouse model of autoprotection is associated with induction of flavin-containing monooxygenase-3 (FMO3) in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rudraiah, Swetha; Rohrer, Philip R; Gurevich, Igor; Goedken, Michael J; Rasmussen, Theodore; Hines, Ronald N; Manautou, José E

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) pretreatment with a hepatotoxic dose (400 mg/kg) in mice results in resistance to a second, higher dose (600 mg/kg) of APAP (APAP autoprotection). Recent microarray work by our group showed a drastic induction of liver flavin containing monooxygenase-3 (Fmo3) mRNA expression in our mouse model of APAP autoprotection. The role of liver Fmo3, which detoxifies xenobiotics, in APAP autoprotection is unknown. The purpose of this study was to characterize the gene regulation and protein expression of liver Fmo3 during APAP hepatotoxicity. The functional consequences of Fmo3 induction were also investigated. Plasma and livers were collected from male C57BL/6J mice over a period of 72 h following a single dose of APAP (400 mg/kg) to measure Fmo3 mRNA and protein expression. Although Fmo3 mRNA levels increased significantly following APAP treatment, protein expression changed marginally. In contrast, both Fmo3 mRNA and protein expression were significantly higher in APAP autoprotected livers. Unlike male C57BL/6J mice, female mice have ∼80-times higher constitutive Fmo3 mRNA levels and are highly resistant to APAP hepatotoxicity. Coadministration of APAP with the FMO inhibitor methimazole rendered female mice susceptible to APAP hepatotoxicity, with no changes in susceptibility detected in male mice. Furthermore, a human hepatocyte cell line (HC-04) clone over-expressing human FMO3 showed enhanced resistance to APAP cytotoxicity. Taken together, these findings establish for the first time induction of Fmo3 protein expression and function by xenobiotic treatment. Our results also indicate that Fmo3 expression and function plays a role in protecting the liver from APAP-induced toxicity. Although the mechanism(s) of this protection remains to be elucidated, this work describes a novel protective function for this enzyme. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions

  12. Temporal study of acetaminophen (APAP) and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) effects on subcellular hepatic SAMe levels and methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Brown, J Michael; Ball, John G; Hogsett, Amy; Williams, Tierra; Valentovic, Monica

    2010-08-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is the leading cause of drug induced liver failure in the United States. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that S-adenosyl methionine (SAMe) is protective for APAP hepatic toxicity. SAMe is critical for glutathione synthesis and transmethylation of nucleic acids, proteins and phospholipids which would facilitate recovery from APAP toxicity. SAMe is synthesized in cells through the action of methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT). This study tested the hypothesis that total hepatic and subcellular SAMe levels are decreased by APAP toxicity. Studies further examined MAT expression and activity in response to APAP toxicity. Male C57BL/6 mice (16-22 g) were treated with vehicle (Veh; water 15 ml/kg ip injections), 250 mg/kg APAP (15 ml/kg, ip), SAMe (1.25 mmol/kg) or SAMe administered 1h after APAP injection (SAMe and SAMe+APAP). Hepatic tissue was collected 2, 4, and 6h after APAP administration. Levels of SAMe and its metabolite S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) were determined by HPLC analysis. MAT expression was examined by Western blot. MAT activity was determined by fluorescence assay. Total liver SAMe levels were depressed at 4h by APAP overdose, but not at 2 or 6h. APAP depressed mitochondrial SAMe levels at 4 and 6h relative to the Veh group. In the nucleus, levels of SAMe were depressed below detectable limits 4h following APAP administration. SAMe administration following APAP (SAMe+APAP) prevented APAP associated decline in mitochondrial and nuclear SAMe levels. In conclusion, the maintenance of SAMe may provide benefit in preventing damage associated with APAP toxicity. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Temporal study of acetaminophen (APAP) and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) effects on subcellular hepatic SAMe levels and methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) expression and activity

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. Michael; Ball, John G.; Hogsett, Amy; Williams, Tierra; Valentovic, Monica

    2010-08-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is the leading cause of drug induced liver failure in the United States. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that S-adenosyl methionine (SAMe) is protective for APAP hepatic toxicity. SAMe is critical for glutathione synthesis and transmethylation of nucleic acids, proteins and phospholipids which would facilitate recovery from APAP toxicity. SAMe is synthesized in cells through the action of methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT). This study tested the hypothesis that total hepatic and subcellular SAMe levels are decreased by APAP toxicity. Studies further examined MAT expression and activity in response to APAP toxicity. Male C57BL/6 mice (16-22 g) were treated with vehicle (Veh; water 15 ml/kg ip injections), 250 mg/kg APAP (15 ml/kg, ip), SAMe (1.25 mmol/kg) or SAMe administered 1 h after APAP injection (SAMe and SAMe + APAP). Hepatic tissue was collected 2, 4, and 6 h after APAP administration. Levels of SAMe and its metabolite S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) were determined by HPLC analysis. MAT expression was examined by Western blot. MAT activity was determined by fluorescence assay. Total liver SAMe levels were depressed at 4 h by APAP overdose, but not at 2 or 6 h. APAP depressed mitochondrial SAMe levels at 4 and 6 h relative to the Veh group. In the nucleus, levels of SAMe were depressed below detectable limits 4 h following APAP administration. SAMe administration following APAP (SAMe + APAP) prevented APAP associated decline in mitochondrial and nuclear SAMe levels. In conclusion, the maintenance of SAMe may provide benefit in preventing damage associated with APAP toxicity.

  14. Temporal Study of Acetaminophen (APAP) and S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) Effects on Subcellular Hepatic SAMe Levels and Methionine Adenosyltransferase (MAT) Expression and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Michael; Ball, John G.; Hogsett, Amy; Williams, Tierra; Valentovic, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is the leading cause of drug induced liver failure in the United States. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that S-adenosyl methionine (SAMe) is protective for APAP hepatic toxicity. SAMe is critical for glutathione synthesis and transmethylation of nucleic acids, proteins and phospholipids which would facilitate recovery from APAP toxicity. SAMe is synthesized in cells through the action of methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT). This study tested the hypothesis that total hepatic and subcellular SAMe levels are decreased by APAP toxicity. Studies further examined MAT expression and activity in response to APAP toxicity. Male C57BL/6 mice (16-22 grams) were treated with vehicle (Veh; water 15ml/kg ip injections). 250 mg/kg APAP (15 ml/kg, ip), SAMe (1.25 mmol/kg) or SAMe administered one h after APAP injection (SAMe and SAMe+APAP). Hepatic tissue was collected 2, 4, and 6 h after APAP administration. Levels of SAMe and its metabolite S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) were determined by HPLC analysis. MAT expression was examined by Western blot. MAT activity was determined by fluorescence assay. Total liver SAMe levels were depressed at 4 h by APAP overdose, but not at 2 or 6 h. APAP depressed mitochondrial SAMe levels at 4 and 6 h relative to the Veh group. In the nucleus, levels of SAMe were depressed below detectable limits 4 h following APAP administration. SAMe administration following APAP (SAMe+APAP) prevented APAP associated decline in mitochondrial and nuclear SAMe levels. In conclusion, the maintenance of SAMe may provide benefit in preventing damage associated with APAP toxicity. PMID:20450926

  15. Comparative evaluation of N-acetylcysteine and N-acetylcysteineamide in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in human hepatoma HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Tobwala, Shakila; Khayyat, Ahdab; Fan, Weili; Ercal, Nuran

    2015-02-01

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP) is one of the most widely used over-the-counter antipyretic analgesic medications. Despite being safe at therapeutic doses, an accidental or intentional overdose can result in severe hepatotoxicity; a leading cause of drug-induced liver failure in the U.S. Depletion of glutathione (GSH) is implicated as an initiating event in APAP-induced toxicity. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a GSH precursor, is the only currently approved antidote for an APAP overdose. Unfortunately, fairly high doses and longer treatment times are required due to its poor bioavailability. In addition, oral and intravenous administration of NAC in a hospital setting are laborious and costly. Therefore, we studied the protective effects of N-acetylcysteineamide (NACA), a novel antioxidant, with higher bioavailability and compared it with NAC in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in a human-relevant in vitro system, HepaRG. Our results indicated that exposure of HepaRG cells to APAP resulted in GSH depletion, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, increased lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial dysfunction (assessed by JC-1 fluorescence), and lactate dehydrogenase release. Both NAC and NACA protected against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity by restoring GSH levels, scavenging ROS, inhibiting lipid peroxidation, and preserving mitochondrial membrane potential. However, NACA was better than NAC at combating oxidative stress and protecting against APAP-induced damage. The higher efficiency of NACA in protecting cells against APAP-induced toxicity suggests that NACA can be developed into a promising therapeutic option for treatment of an APAP overdose. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  16. Comparative evaluation of N-acetylcysteine and N-acetylcysteineamide in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in human hepatoma HepaRG cells

    PubMed Central

    Tobwala, Shakila; Khayyat, Ahdab; Fan, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP) is one of the most widely used over-the-counter antipyretic analgesic medications. Despite being safe at therapeutic doses, an accidental or intentional overdose can result in severe hepatotoxicity; a leading cause of drug-induced liver failure in the U.S. Depletion of glutathione (GSH) is implicated as an initiating event in APAP-induced toxicity. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a GSH precursor, is the only currently approved antidote for an APAP overdose. Unfortunately, fairly high doses and longer treatment times are required due to its poor bioavailability. In addition, oral and intravenous administration of NAC in a hospital setting are laborious and costly. Therefore, we studied the protective effects of N-acetylcysteineamide (NACA), a novel antioxidant, with higher bioavailability and compared it with NAC in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in a human-relevant in vitro system, HepaRG. Our results indicated that exposure of HepaRG cells to APAP resulted in GSH depletion, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, increased lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial dysfunction (assessed by JC-1 fluorescence), and lactate dehydrogenase release. Both NAC and NACA protected against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity by restoring GSH levels, scavenging ROS, inhibiting lipid peroxidation, and preserving mitochondrial membrane potential. However, NACA was better than NAC at combating oxidative stress and protecting against APAP-induced damage. The higher efficiency of NACA in protecting cells against APAP-induced toxicity suggests that NACA can be developed into a promising therapeutic option for treatment of an APAP overdose. PMID:25245075

  17. Schisandrol B protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibition of CYP-mediated bioactivation and regulation of liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiming; Fan, Xiaomei; Wang, Ying; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Tan, Huasen; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. Schisandra sphenanthera is a traditional hepato-protective Chinese medicine and Schisandrol B (SolB) is one of its major active constituents. In this study, the protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice and the involved mechanisms were investigated. Morphological and biochemical assessments clearly demonstrated a protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced liver injury. SolB pretreatment significantly attenuated the increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity, and prevented elevated hepatic malondialdehyde formation and the depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) in a dose-dependent manner. SolB also dramatically altered APAP metabolic activation by inhibiting the activities of CYP2E1 and CYP3A11, which was evidenced by significant inhibition of the formation of the oxidized APAP metabolite NAPQI-GSH. A molecular docking model also predicted that SolB had potential to interact with the CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 active sites. In addition, SolB abrogated APAP-induced activation of p53 and p21, and increased expression of liver regeneration and antiapoptotic-related proteins such as cyclin D1 (CCND1), PCNA, and BCL-2. This study demonstrated that SolB exhibited a significant protective effect toward APAP-induced liver injury, potentially through inhibition of CYP-mediated APAP bioactivation and regulation of the p53, p21, CCND1, PCNA, and BCL-2 to promote liver regeneration.

  18. Schisandrol B Protects Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity by Inhibition of CYP-Mediated Bioactivation and Regulation of Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yiming; Fan, Xiaomei; Wang, Ying; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Tan, Huasen; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Bi, Huichang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. Schisandra sphenanthera is a traditional hepato-protective Chinese medicine and Schisandrol B (SolB) is one of its major active constituents. In this study, the protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice and the involved mechanisms were investigated. Morphological and biochemical assessments clearly demonstrated a protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced liver injury. SolB pretreatment significantly attenuated the increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity, and prevented elevated hepatic malondialdehyde formation and the depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) in a dose-dependent manner. SolB also dramatically altered APAP metabolic activation by inhibiting the activities of CYP2E1 and CYP3A11, which was evidenced by significant inhibition of the formation of the oxidized APAP metabolite NAPQI–GSH. A molecular docking model also predicted that SolB had potential to interact with the CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 active sites. In addition, SolB abrogated APAP-induced activation of p53 and p21, and increased expression of liver regeneration and antiapoptotic-related proteins such as cyclin D1 (CCND1), PCNA, and BCL-2. This study demonstrated that SolB exhibited a significant protective effect toward APAP-induced liver injury, potentially through inhibition of CYP-mediated APAP bioactivation and regulation of the p53, p21, CCND1, PCNA, and BCL-2 to promote liver regeneration. PMID:25319358

  19. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and HIF-1{alpha} induction in acetaminophen toxicity in mice occurs without hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S.; Hennings, Leah; Letzig, Lynda; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hinson, Jack A.; James, Laura P.

    2011-05-01

    HIF-1{alpha} is a nuclear factor important in the transcription of genes controlling angiogenesis including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both hypoxia and oxidative stress are known mechanisms for the induction of HIF-1{alpha}. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are mechanistically important in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the mouse. MPT may occur as a result of oxidative stress and leads to a large increase in oxidative stress. We previously reported the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in mice with APAP toxicity and have shown that VEGF is important in hepatocyte regeneration following APAP toxicity. The following study was performed to examine the relative contribution of hypoxia versus oxidative stress to the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Time course studies using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole showed no staining for pimonidazole at 1 or 2 h in B6C3F1 mice treated with APAP. Staining for pimonidazole was present in the midzonal to periportal regions at 4, 8, 24 and 48 h and no staining was observed in centrilobular hepatocytes, the sites of the toxicity. Subsequent studies with the MPT inhibitor cyclosporine A showed that cyclosporine A (CYC; 10 mg/kg) reduced HIF-1{alpha} induction in APAP treated mice at 1 and 4 h and did not inhibit the metabolism of APAP (depletion of hepatic non-protein sulfhydryls and hepatic protein adduct levels). The data suggest that HIF-1{alpha} induction in the early stages of APAP toxicity is secondary to oxidative stress via a mechanism involving MPT. In addition, APAP toxicity is not mediated by a hypoxia mechanism.

  20. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and HIF-1α induction in acetaminophen toxicity in mice occurs without hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S; Hennings, Leah; Letzig, Lynda; Simpson, Pippa M; Hinson, Jack A; James, Laura P

    2011-05-01

    HIF-1α is a nuclear factor important in the transcription of genes controlling angiogenesis including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both hypoxia and oxidative stress are known mechanisms for the induction of HIF-1α. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are mechanistically important in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the mouse. MPT may occur as a result of oxidative stress and leads to a large increase in oxidative stress. We previously reported the induction of HIF-1α in mice with APAP toxicity and have shown that VEGF is important in hepatocyte regeneration following APAP toxicity. The following study was performed to examine the relative contribution of hypoxia versus oxidative stress to the induction of HIF-1α in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Time course studies using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole showed no staining for pimonidazole at 1 or 2h in B6C3F1 mice treated with APAP. Staining for pimonidazole was present in the midzonal to periportal regions at 4, 8, 24 and 48h and no staining was observed in centrilobular hepatocytes, the sites of the toxicity. Subsequent studies with the MPT inhibitor cyclosporine A showed that cyclosporine A (CYC; 10mg/kg) reduced HIF-1α induction in APAP treated mice at 1 and 4h and did not inhibit the metabolism of APAP (depletion of hepatic non-protein sulfhydryls and hepatic protein adduct levels). The data suggest that HIF-1α induction in the early stages of APAP toxicity is secondary to oxidative stress via a mechanism involving MPT. In addition, APAP toxicity is not mediated by a hypoxia mechanism.

  1. Silencing Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β Inhibits Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity and Attenuates JNK Activation and Loss of Glutamate Cysteine Ligase and Myeloid Cell Leukemia Sequence 1*

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Mie; Ybanez, Maria D.; Win, Sanda; Than, Tin Aung; Jain, Shilpa; Gaarde, William A.; Han, Derick; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) plays a central role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury. In the current work, we examined other possible signaling pathways that may also contribute to APAP hepatotoxicity. APAP treatment to mice caused glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activation and translocation to mitochondria during the initial phase of APAP-induced liver injury (∼1 h). The silencing of GSK-3β, but not Akt-2 (protein kinase B) or glycogen synthase kinase-3α (GSK-3α), using antisense significantly protected mice from APAP-induced liver injury. The silencing of GSK-3β affected several key pathways important in conferring protection against APAP-induced liver injury. APAP treatment was observed to promote the loss of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL, rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis) in liver. The silencing of GSK-3β decreased the loss of hepatic GCL, and promoted greater GSH recovery in liver following APAP treatment. Silencing JNK1 and -2 also prevented the loss of GCL. APAP treatment also resulted in GSK-3β translocation to mitochondria and the degradation of myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1) in mitochondrial membranes in liver. The silencing of GSK-3β reduced Mcl-1 degradation caused by APAP treatment. The silencing of GSK-3β also resulted in an inhibition of the early phase (0–2 h), and blunted the late phase (after 4 h) of JNK activation and translocation to mitochondria in liver following APAP treatment. Taken together our results suggest that activation of GSK-3β is a key mediator of the initial phase of APAP-induced liver injury through modulating GCL and Mcl-1 degradation, as well as JNK activation in liver. PMID:20061376

  2. The biochemistry of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and rescue: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shachar, Rotem; Chen, Yifei; Luo, Shishi; Hartman, Catherine; Reed, Michael; Nijhout, H Frederik

    2012-12-19

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-para-aminophenol) is the most widely used over-the-counter or prescription painkiller in the world. Acetaminophen is metabolized in the liver where a toxic byproduct is produced that can be removed by conjugation with glutathione. Acetaminophen overdoses, either accidental or intentional, are the leading cause of acute liver failure in the United States, accounting for 56,000 emergency room visits per year. The standard treatment for overdose is N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), which is given to stimulate the production of glutathione. We have created a mathematical model for acetaminophen transport and metabolism including the following compartments: gut, plasma, liver, tissue, urine. In the liver compartment the metabolism of acetaminophen includes sulfation, glucoronidation, conjugation with glutathione, production of the toxic metabolite, and liver damage, taking biochemical parameters from the literature whenever possible. This model is then connected to a previously constructed model of glutathione metabolism. We show that our model accurately reproduces published clinical and experimental data on the dose-dependent time course of acetaminophen in the plasma, the accumulation of acetaminophen and its metabolites in the urine, and the depletion of glutathione caused by conjugation with the toxic product. We use the model to study the extent of liver damage caused by overdoses or by chronic use of therapeutic doses, and the effects of polymorphisms in glucoronidation enzymes. We use the model to study the depletion of glutathione and the effect of the size and timing of N-acetyl-cysteine doses given as an antidote. Our model accurately predicts patient death or recovery depending on size of APAP overdose and time of treatment. The mathematical model provides a new tool for studying the effects of various doses of acetaminophen on the liver metabolism of acetaminophen and glutathione. It can be used to study how the metabolism of acetaminophen

  3. Potential Role of Caveolin-1 in Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Carol R.; Gray, Joshua P.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Cervelli, Jessica; Bremer, Nicole; Kim, Yunjung; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2010-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a membrane scaffolding protein which functions to regulate intracellular compartmentalization of various signaling molecules. In the present studies, transgenic mice with a targeted disruption of the Cav-1 gene (Cav-1−/−) were used to assess the role of Cav-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Treatment of wild type mice with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases. This was correlated with decreased expression of Cav-1 in the liver. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was significantly attenuated in Cav-1−/− mice, an effect that was independent of acetaminophen metabolism. Acetaminophen administration resulted in increased hepatic expression of the oxidative stress marker, lipocalin 24p3, as well as hemeoxygenase-1, but decreased glutathione and superoxide dismutase-1; no differences were noted between the genotypes suggesting that reduced toxicity in Cav-1−/− mice is not due to alterations in anti-oxidant defense. In wild type mice, acetaminophen increased mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), as well as cyclooxygenase-2, while 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX), which generates anti-inflammatory lipoxins, decreased. Acetaminophen-induced changes in MCP-1 and 15-LOX expression were greater in Cav-1−/− mice. Although expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, a potent hepatocyte mitogen, was up-regulated in the liver of Cav-1−/− mice after acetaminophen, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and survivin, markers of cellular proliferation, were delayed which may reflect the reduced need for tissue repair. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Cav-1 plays a role in promoting inflammation and toxicity during the pathogenesis of acetaminophen-induced injury. PMID:20100502

  4. Potential role of caveolin-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Carol R.; Gray, Joshua P.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Cervelli, Jessica; Bremer, Nicole; Kim, Yunjung; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2010-05-15

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a membrane scaffolding protein, which functions to regulate intracellular compartmentalization of various signaling molecules. In the present studies, transgenic mice with a targeted disruption of the Cav-1 gene (Cav-1{sup -/-}) were used to assess the role of Cav-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Treatment of wild-type mice with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases. This was correlated with decreased expression of Cav-1 in the liver. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was significantly attenuated in Cav-1{sup -/-} mice, an effect that was independent of acetaminophen metabolism. Acetaminophen administration resulted in increased hepatic expression of the oxidative stress marker, lipocalin 24p3, as well as hemeoxygenase-1, but decreased glutathione and superoxide dismutase-1; no differences were noted between the genotypes suggesting that reduced toxicity in Cav-1{sup -/-} mice is not due to alterations in antioxidant defense. In wild-type mice, acetaminophen increased mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1beta, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), as well as cyclooxygenase-2, while 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX), which generates anti-inflammatory lipoxins, decreased. Acetaminophen-induced changes in MCP-1 and 15-LOX expression were greater in Cav-1{sup -/-} mice. Although expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, a potent hepatocyte mitogen, was up-regulated in the liver of Cav-1{sup -/-} mice after acetaminophen, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and survivin, markers of cellular proliferation, were delayed, which may reflect the reduced need for tissue repair. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Cav-1 plays a role in promoting inflammation and toxicity during the pathogenesis of acetaminophen-induced injury.

  5. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: studies on the mechanism of cysteamine protection

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.G.; Jollow, D.J.

    1986-03-30

    Inhibition of the cytochrome P-450-dependent formation of the acetaminophen-reactive metabolite was investigated as a possible mechanism for cysteamine protection against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Studies in isolated hamster hepatocytes indicated that cysteamine competitively inhibited the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system as represented by formation of the acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate. However, cysteamine was not a potent inhibitor of glutathione conjugate formation (Ki = 1.17 mM). Cysteamine also weakly inhibited the glucuronidation of acetaminophen (Ki = 2.44 mM). In vivo studies were in agreement with the results obtained in isolated hepatocytes; cysteamine moderately inhibited both glucuronidation and the cytochrome P-450-dependent formation of acetaminophen mercapturate. The overall elimination rate constant (beta) for acetaminophen was correspondingly decreased. Since cysteamine decreased both beta and the apparent rate constant for mercapturate formation (K'MA), the proportion of the dose of acetaminophen which is converted to the toxic metabolite (K'MA/beta) was not significantly decreased in the presence of cysteamine. Apparently, cysteamine does inhibit the cytochrome P-450-dependent formation of the acetaminophen-reactive metabolite, but this effect is not sufficient to explain antidotal protection.

  6. Mechanism of protection by metallothionein against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Chieko; Yan, H.-M.; Artigues, Antonio; Villar, Maria T.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2010-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced liver failure in the US. Metallothionein (MT) expression attenuates APAP-induced liver injury. However, the mechanism of this protection remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, C57BL/6 mice were treated with 100 mumol/kg ZnCl{sub 2} for 3 days to induce MT. Twenty-four hours after the last dose of zinc, the animals received 300 mg/kg APAP. Liver injury (plasma ALT activities, area of necrosis), DNA fragmentation, peroxynitrite formation (nitrotyrosine staining), MT expression, hepatic glutathione (GSH), and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels were determined after 6 h. APAP alone caused severe liver injury with oxidant stress (increased GSSG levels), peroxynitrite formation, and DNA fragmentation, all of which were attenuated by zinc-induced MT expression. In contrast, MT knockout mice were not protected by zinc. Hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury in primary hepatocytes was dependent only on the intracellular GSH levels but not on MT expression. Thus, the protective effect of MT in vivo was not due to the direct scavenging of reactive oxygen species. Zinc treatment had no effect on the early GSH depletion kinetics after APAP administration, which is an indicator of the metabolic activation of APAP to its reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). However, MT was able to effectively trap NAPQI by covalent binding. We conclude that MT scavenges some of the excess NAPQI after GSH depletion and prevents covalent binding to cellular proteins, which is the trigger for the propagation of the cell injury mechanisms through mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear DNA damage.

  7. Protein kinase C (PKC) participates in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity through c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK)-dependent and -independent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Behnam; Ybanez, Maria D; Johnson, Heather S; Gaarde, William A; Han, Derick; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2014-04-01

    This study examines the role of protein kinase C (PKC) and AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. Treatment of primary mouse hepatocytes with broad-spectrum PKC inhibitors (Ro-31-8245, Go6983), protected against APAP cytotoxicity despite sustained c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor treatment enhanced p-AMPK levels and AMPK regulated survival-energy pathways including autophagy. AMPK inhibition by compound C or activation using an AMPK activator oppositely modulated APAP cytotoxicity, suggesting that p-AMPK and AMPK regulated energy survival pathways, particularly autophagy, play a critical role in APAP cytotoxicity. Ro-31-8245 treatment in mice up-regulated p-AMPK levels, increased autophagy (i.e., increased LC3-II formation, p62 degradation), and protected against APAP-induced liver injury, even in the presence of sustained JNK activation and translocation to mitochondria. In contrast, treatment of hepatocytes with a classical PKC inhibitor (Go6976) protected against APAP by inhibiting JNK activation. Knockdown of PKC-α using antisense (ASO) in mice also protected against APAP-induced liver injury by inhibiting JNK activation. APAP treatment resulted in PKC-α translocation to mitochondria and phosphorylation of mitochondrial PKC substrates. JNK 1 and 2 silencing in vivo decreased APAP-induced PKC-α translocation to mitochondria, suggesting PKC-α and JNK interplay in a feed-forward mechanism to mediate APAP-induced liver injury. PKC-α and other PKC(s) regulate death (JNK) and survival (AMPK) proteins, to modulate APAP-induced liver injury. Copyright © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  8. Contribution of acetaminophen-cysteine to acetaminophen nephrotoxicity in CD-1 mice: I. Enhancement of acetaminophen nephrotoxicity by acetaminophen-cysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Stephan T.; Bruno, Mary K.; Hennig, Gayle E.; Horton, Robert A.; Roberts, Jeanette C.; Cohen, Steven D. . E-mail: scohen@mcp.edu

    2005-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) nephrotoxicity has been observed both in humans and research animals. Recent studies suggest a contributory role for glutathione (GSH)-derived conjugates of APAP in the development of nephrotoxicity. Inhibitors of either {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT) or the probenecid-sensitive organic anion transporter ameliorate APAP-induced nephrotoxicity but not hepatotoxicity in mice and inhibition of {gamma}-GT similarly protected rats from APAP nephrotoxicity. Protection against APAP nephrotoxicity by disruption of these GSH conjugate transport and metabolism pathways suggests that GSH conjugates are involved. APAP-induced renal injury may involve the acetaminophen-glutathione (APAP-GSH) conjugate or a metabolite derived from APAP-GSH. Acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS) is a likely candidate for involvement in APAP nephrotoxicity because it is both a product of the {gamma}-GT pathway and a probable substrate for the organic anion transporter. The present experiments demonstrated that APAP-CYS treatment alone depleted renal but not hepatic glutathione (GSH) in a dose-responsive manner. This depletion of renal GSH may predispose the kidney to APAP nephrotoxicity by diminishing GSH-mediated detoxification mechanisms. Indeed, pretreatment of male CD-1 mice with APAP-CYS before challenge with a threshold toxic dose of APAP resulted in significant enhancement of APAP-induced nephrotoxicity. This was evidenced by histopathology and plasma blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels at 24 h after APAP challenge. APAP alone was minimally nephrotoxic and APAP-CYS alone produced no detectable injury. By contrast, APAP-CYS pretreatment did not alter the liver injury induced by APAP challenge. These data are consistent with there being a selective, contributory role for APAP-GSH-derived metabolites in APAP-induced renal injury that may involve renal-selective GSH depletion.

  9. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B modulates GSK3β/Nrf2 and IGFIR signaling pathways in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mobasher, M A; González-Rodriguez, Á; Santamaría, B; Ramos, S; Martín, M Á; Goya, L; Rada, P; Letzig, L; James, L P; Cuadrado, A; Martín-Pérez, J; Simpson, K J; Muntané, J; Valverde, A M

    2013-01-01

    Acute hepatic failure secondary to acetaminophen (APAP) poisoning is associated with high mortality. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a negative regulator of tyrosine kinase growth factor signaling. In the liver, this pathway confers protection against injury. However, the involvement of PTP1B in the intracellular networks activated by APAP is unknown. We have assessed PTP1B expression in APAP-induced liver failure in humans and its role in the molecular mechanisms that regulate the balance between cell death and survival in human and mouse hepatocytes, as well as in a mouse model of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PTP1B expression was increased in human liver tissue removed during liver transplant from patients for APAP overdose. PTP1B was upregulated by APAP in primary human and mouse hepatocytes together with the activation of c-jun (NH2) terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), resulting in cell death. Conversely, Akt phosphorylation and the antiapoptotic Bcl2 family members BclxL and Mcl1 were decreased. PTP1B deficiency in mouse protects hepatocytes against APAP-induced cell death, preventing glutathione depletion, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and activation of JNK and p38 MAPK. APAP-treated PTP1B−/− hepatocytes showed enhanced antioxidant defense through the glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3)β/Src kinase family (SKF) axis, delaying tyrosine phosphorylation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and its nuclear exclusion, ubiquitination and degradation. Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor-mediated signaling decreased in APAP-treated wild-type hepatocytes, but was maintained in PTP1B−/− cells or in wild-type hepatocytes with reduced PTP1B levels by RNA interference. Likewise, both signaling cascades were modulated in mice, resulting in less severe APAP hepatotoxicity in PTP1B−/− mice. Our results demonstrated that PTP1B is a central player of the mechanisms

  10. Lycopene pretreatment improves hepatotoxicity induced by acetaminophen in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Bandeira, Ana Carla Balthar; da Silva, Rafaella Cecília; Rossoni, Joamyr Victor; Figueiredo, Vivian Paulino; Talvani, André; Cangussú, Silvia Dantas; Bezerra, Frank Silva; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2017-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is an antipyretic and analgesic drug that, in high doses, leads to severe liver injury and potentially death. Oxidative stress is an important event in APAP overdose. Researchers are looking for natural antioxidants with the potential to mitigate the harmful effects of reactive oxygen species in different models. Lycopene has been widely studied for its antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant potential of lycopene pretreatment in APAP-induced liver injury in C57BL/6 mice. C57BL/6 male mice were divided into the following groups: control (C); sunflower oil (CO); acetaminophen 500mg/kg (APAP); acetaminophen 500mg/kg+lycopene 10mg/kg (APAP+L10), and acetaminophen 500mg/kg+lycopene 100mg/kg (APAP+L100). Mice were pretreated with lycopene for 14 consecutive days prior to APAP overdose. Analyses of blood serum and livers were performed. Lycopene was able to improve redox imbalance, decrease thiobarbituric acid reactive species level, and increase CAT and GSH levels. In addition, it decreased the IL-1β expression and the activity of MMP-2. This study revealed that preventive lycopene consumption in C57BL/6 mice can attenuate the effects of APAP-induced liver injury. Furthermore, by improving the redox state, and thus indicating its potential antioxidant effect, lycopene was also shown to have an influence on inflammatory events.

  11. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION OF ACETAMINOPHEN: RECENT ADVANCES IN RELATION TO HEPATOTOXICITY AND DIAGNOSIS

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is one of the most widely used drugs. Though safe at therapeutic doses, overdose causes mitochondrial dysfunction and centrilobular necrosis in the liver. The first studies of APAP metabolism and activation were published more than forty years ago. Most of the drug is eliminated by glucuronidation and sulfation. These reactions are catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT1A1 and 1A6) and sulfotransferases (SULT1A1, 1A3/4, and 1E1), respectively. However, some is converted by CYP2E1 and other cytochrome P450 enzymes to a reactive intermediate that can bind to sulfhydryl groups. The metabolite can deplete liver glutathione (GSH) and modify cellular proteins. GSH binding occurs spontaneously, but may also involve GSH-S-transferases. Protein binding leads to oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. The glucuronide, sulfate, and GSH conjugates are excreted by transporters in the canalicular (Mrp2 and Bcrp) and basolateral (Mrp3 and Mrp4) hepatocyte membranes. Conditions that interfere with metabolism and metabolic activation can alter the hepatotoxicity of the drug. Recent data providing novel insights into these processes, particularly in humans, are reviewed in the context of earlier work, and the effects of altered metabolism and reactive metabolite formation are discussed. Recent advances in the diagnostic use of serum adducts are covered. PMID:23462933

  12. Metabolism and disposition of acetaminophen: recent advances in relation to hepatotoxicity and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    McGill, Mitchell R; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-09-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is one of the most widely used drugs. Though safe at therapeutic doses, overdose causes mitochondrial dysfunction and centrilobular necrosis in the liver. The first studies of APAP metabolism and activation were published more than 40 years ago. Most of the drug is eliminated by glucuronidation and sulfation. These reactions are catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT1A1 and 1A6) and sulfotransferases (SULT1A1, 1A3/4, and 1E1), respectively. However, some is converted by CYP2E1 and other cytochrome P450 enzymes to a reactive intermediate that can bind to sulfhydryl groups. The metabolite can deplete liver glutathione (GSH) and modify cellular proteins. GSH binding occurs spontaneously, but may also involve GSH-S-transferases. Protein binding leads to oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. The glucuronide, sulfate, and GSH conjugates are excreted by transporters in the canalicular (Mrp2 and Bcrp) and basolateral (Mrp3 and Mrp4) hepatocyte membranes. Conditions that interfere with metabolism and metabolic activation can alter the hepatotoxicity of the drug. Recent data providing novel insights into these processes, particularly in humans, are reviewed in the context of earlier work, and the effects of altered metabolism and reactive metabolite formation are discussed. Recent advances in the diagnostic use of serum adducts are covered.

  13. Inhibitory effects of Schisandra chinensis on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun-Peng; Bai, Yu; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Jin-Zhen

    2014-05-01

    Schisandra chinensis is a well-known traditional medicinal herb. Acetaminophen is a commonly used over-the-counter analgesic and overdose of acetaminophen was the most frequent cause of acute liver failure. However, no studies have demonstrated the role of Schisandra chinensis in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure to the best of our knowledge. In this study, an acute liver injury model was established in mice using acetaminophen. The protective role of Schisandra chinensis was detected by histopathological analysis, and measurement of the serum transaminase levels and hepatic Cyp activity levels in the mouse model. Subsequently, hepatocytes were isolated from the livers of the mouse model. The cell cycle, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species were determined using flow cytometry. Cell proliferation and 26S proteasome activity were determined using spectrophotometry. Schisandra chinensis was found to resist acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by protecting mitochondria and lysosomes and inhibiting the phosphor-c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway. These findings provide a novel application of Schisandra chinensis against acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

  14. Co-administration of N-Acetylcysteine and Acetaminophen Efficiently Blocks Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Owumi, Solomon E; Andrus, James P; Herzenberg, Leonard A; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical Research Although acetaminophen (APAP) is an effective analgesic and anti-pyretic, APAP overdose is the most frequent cause of serious, often lethal, drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Administration of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) within 8 hours of APAP overdose effectively mitigates APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Thus, preventing APAP toxicity before it occurs by formulating APAP with NAC is logical and, as we show here in a mouse model, is effective in preventing APAP toxicity. Thus, toxic oral APAP doses sufficient to cause severe widespread liver damage do not cause significant damage when administered concurrently with equal amounts of NAC, that is, in the NAC-APAP treated animals, hepatic transaminases increase only marginally and liver architecture remains fully intact. Thus, we conclude that concomitant oral dosing with APAP and NAC can provide a convenient and effective way of preventing toxicity associated with large dosage of APAP. From a public health perspective, these findings support the concept that a co-formulation of APAP plus NAC is a viable over-the-counter (OTC) alternative to the current practice of providing APAP OTC and treating APAP toxicity if/when it occurs. In essence, our findings indicate that replacing the current OTC APAP with a safe and functional APAP/NAC formulation could prevent the accidental and intentional APAP toxicity that occurs today.

  15. Fas receptor-deficient lpr mice are protected against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity due to higher glutathione synthesis and enhanced detoxification of oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Williams, C David; McGill, Mitchell R; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-08-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a classical model of hepatocellular necrosis; however, the involvement of the Fas receptor in the pathophysiology remains controversial. Fas receptor-deficient (lpr) and C57BL/6 mice were treated with APAP to compare the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. Lpr mice were partially protected against APAP hepatotoxicity as indicated by reduced plasma ALT and GDH levels and liver necrosis. Hepatic Cyp2e1 protein, adduct formation and hepatic glutathione (GSH) depletion were similar, demonstrating equivalent reactive metabolite generation. There was no difference in cytokine formation or hepatic neutrophil recruitment. Interestingly, hepatic GSH recovered faster in lpr mice than in wild type animals resulting in enhanced detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Driving the increased GSH levels, mRNA induction and protein expression of glutamate-cysteine ligase (gclc) were higher in lpr mice. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein levels at 6h were significantly lower in lpr mice, which correlated with reduced nitrotyrosine staining. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) mRNA levels were substantially higher in lpr mice after APAP. Our data suggest that the faster recovery of hepatic GSH levels during oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation, reduced iNOS expression and enhanced induction of Hsp70 attenuated the susceptibility to APAP-induced cell death in lpr mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fas Receptor-deficient lpr Mice are protected against Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity due to Higher Glutathione Synthesis and Enhanced Detoxification of Oxidant Stress

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a classical model of hepatocellular necrosis; however, the involvement of the Fas receptor in the pathophysiology remains controversial. Fas receptor-deficient (lpr) and C57BL/6 mice were treated with APAP to compare the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. Lpr mice were partially protected against APAP hepatotoxicity as indicated by reduced plasma ALT and GDH levels and liver necrosis. Hepatic Cyp2e1 protein, adduct formation and hepatic glutathione (GSH) depletion were similar, demonstrating equivalent reactive metabolite generation. There was no difference in cytokine formation or hepatic neutrophil recruitment. Interestingly, hepatic GSH recovered faster in lpr mice than in wild type animals resulting in enhanced detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Driving the increased GSH levels, mRNA induction and protein expression of glutamate-cysteine ligase (gclc) were higher in lpr mice. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein levels at 6h were significantly lower in lpr mice, which correlated with reduced nitrotyrosine staining. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) mRNA levels were substantially higher in lpr mice after APAP. Conclusion: Our data suggest that the faster recovery of hepatic GSH levels during oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation, reduced iNOS expression and enhanced induction of Hsp70 attenuated the susceptibility to APAP-induced cell death in lpr mice. PMID:23628456

  17. Neutrophil activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair in mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Sharpe, Matthew R.; McGill, Mitchell R.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into the systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution are controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: > 800 U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for the determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed an increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91{sup phox}−/− mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate that neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. - Highlights: • Neutrophil (PMN) function increases during liver repair after acetaminophen overdose. • Liver repair after acetaminophen (APAP)-overdose is not dependent on NADPH oxidase. • Human PMNs do not appear

  18. Activation of GR but not PXR by dexamethasone attenuated acetaminophen hepatotoxicities via Fgf21 induction.

    PubMed

    Vispute, Saurabh G; Bu, Pengli; Le, Yuan; Cheng, Xingguo

    2017-03-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling is indispensable for cell growth and development, and plays important roles in drug metabolism. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 21, an important regulator of glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism, plays a cytoprotective role by attenuating toxicities induced by chemicals such as dioxins, acetaminophen (APAP), and alcohols. The present study investigates the impact of dexamethasone (DEX)-activated GR on Fgf21 expression and how it affects the progression of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Our results showed that DEX dose/concentration- and time-dependently increased Fgf21 mRNA and protein expression in mouse liver as well as cultured mouse and human hepatoma cells. By using PXR-null mouse model, we demonstrated that DEX induced Fgf21 expression by a PXR-independent mechanism. In cultured mouse and human hepatoma cells, inhibition of GR signaling, by RU486 (Mifepristone) or GR silencing using GR-specific siRNA, attenuated DEX-induced Fgf21 expression. In addition, DEX increased luciferase reporter activity driven by the 3.0-kb mouse and human Fgf21/FGF21 gene promoter. Further, ChIP-qPCR assays demonstrated that DEX increased the binding of GR to the specific cis-regulatory elements located in the 3.0-kb mouse and human Fgf21/FGF21 gene promoter. Pretreatment of 2mg/kg DEX ameliorated APAP-induced liver injury in wild-type but not Fgf21-null mice. In conclusion, via GR activation, DEX induced Fgf21 expression in mouse liver and human hepatoma cells.

  19. Distinct roles of NF-{kappa}B p50 in the regulation of acetaminophen-induced inflammatory mediator production and hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Dambach, Donna M.; Durham, Stephen K.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L. . E-mail: laskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu

    2006-03-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. In addition to inducing direct cellular damage, oxidants can activate transcription factors including NF-{kappa}B, which regulate the production of inflammatory mediators implicated in hepatotoxicity. Here, we investigated the role of APAP-induced oxidative stress and NF-{kappa}B in inflammatory mediator production. Treatment of mice with APAP (300 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increased serum aminotransferase levels. This was correlated with depletion of hepatic glutathione and CuZn superoxide dismutase (SOD). APAP administration also increased expression of the proinflammatory mediators, interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF{alpha}), macrophage chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and KC/gro, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10). Pretreatment of mice with the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prevented APAP-induced depletion of glutathione and CuZnSOD, as well as hepatotoxicity. NAC also abrogated APAP-induced increases in TNF{alpha}, KC/gro, and IL-10, but augmented expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-4 (IL-4) and transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF{beta}). No effects were observed on IL-1{beta} or MCP-1 expression. To determine if NF-{kappa}B plays a role in regulating mediator production, we used transgenic mice with a targeted disruption of the gene for NF-{kappa}B p50. As observed with NAC pretreatment, the loss of NF-{kappa}B p50 was associated with decreased ability of APAP to upregulate TNF{alpha}, KC/gro, and IL-10 expression and increased expression of IL-4 and TGF{beta}. However, in contrast to NAC pretreatment, the loss of p50 had no effect on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. These data demonstrate that APAP-induced cytokine expression in the liver is influenced by oxidative stress and that this is dependent, in part, on NF-{kappa}B. However, NF-{kappa}B p50

  20. Wuzhi tablet (Schisandra Sphenanthera extract) protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibition of CYP-mediated bioactivation and regulation of NRF2-ARE and p53/p21 pathways.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaomei; Jiang, Yiming; Wang, Ying; Tan, Huasen; Zeng, Hang; Wang, Yongtao; Chen, Pan; Qu, Aijuan; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2014-12-01

    Schisandra sphenanthera is widely used as a tonic and restorative in many countries to enhance the function of liver and other organs. Wuzhi tablet (WZ) is a preparation of an ethanol extract of Schisandra sphenanthera. Our previous study demonstrated that WZ exerted a protective effect toward acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the molecular mechanisms of this protection remain unclear. This study aimed to determine what molecular pathways contributed to the hepatoprotective effects of WZ against APAP toxicity. Administration of WZ 3 days before APAP treatment significantly attenuated APAP hepatotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner and reduced APAP-induced JNK activation. Treatment with WZ resulted in potent inhibition of CYP2E1, CYP3A11, and CYP1A2 activities and then caused significant inhibition of the formation of the oxidized APAP metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine-reduced glutathione. The expression of NRF2 was increased after APAP and/or WZ treatment, whereas KEAP1 levels were decreased. The protein expression of NRF2 target genes including Gclc, Gclm, Ho-1, and Nqo1 was significantly increased by WZ treatment. Furthermore, APAP increased the levels of p53 and its downstream gene p21 to trigger cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, whereas WZ pretreatment could inhibit p53/p21 signaling to induce cell proliferation-associated proteins including cyclin D1, CDK4, PCNA, and ALR to promote hepatocyte proliferation. This study demonstrated that WZ prevented APAP-induced liver injury by inhibition of cytochrome P450-mediated APAP bioactivation, activation of the NRF2-antioxidant response element pathway to induce detoxification and antioxidation, and regulation of the p53, p21, cyclin D1, CDK4, PCNA, and ALR to facilitate liver regeneration after APAP-induced liver injury.

  1. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and sterile inflammation: The mechanism of protection of Chlorogenic acid.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-05

    Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is characterized by extensive necrotic cell death and a sterile inflammatory response. A recent report suggested that a therapeutic intervention with chlorogenic acid, a dietary polyphenolic compound, protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury by inhibiting the inflammatory injury. The purpose of this letter is to discuss a number of reasons why the protective mechanism of chlorogenic acid against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity does not involve an anti-inflammatory effect and provides an alternative explanation for the observed protection.

  2. Schisandrol B protects against acetaminophen-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice via activation of the NRF2/ARE signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yi-ming; Wang, Ying; Tan, Hua-sen; Yu, Tao; Fan, Xiao-mei; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Huang, Min; Bi, Hui-chang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) acts through the antioxidant response element (ARE) to regulate the expression of many detoxifying and antioxidant genes responsible for cytoprotective processes. We previously reported that Schisandrol B (SolB) isolated from Schisandra sphenanthera produced a protective effect against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury. In this study we investigated whether the NRF2/ARE signaling pathway was involved in this hepato-protective effect. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with SolB (200 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 3 d before injection of APAP (400 mg/kg, ip). Serum and liver tissue samples were collected 6 h later. The mRNA and protein expression were measured using qRT-PCR and Western blot assay, respectively. The activation of NRF2 was examined in HepG2 cells using luciferase reporter gene assay. Results: SolB pretreatment significantly alleviated the hepatic injury (large patchy necrosis and hyperemia of the hepatic sinus), the increase of serum AST, ALT levels and hepatic MDA contents, and the decrease of liver and mitochondrial glutathione levels in APAP-treated mice. Furthermore, SolB pretreatment significantly increased nuclear accumulation of NRF2 and increased hepatic expression of NRF2 downstream proteins, including GCLC, GSR, NQO1, GSTs, MRP2, MRP3 and MRP4 in APAP-treated mice. Moreover, treatment with SolB (2.5–20 μmol/L) dose-dependently increased the activity of NRF2 reporter gene in HepG2 cells. Conclusion: SolB exhibits a remarkable protective effect against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, partially via activation of the NRF2/ARE pathway and regulation of NRF2 target genes, which induce detoxification and increase antioxidant capacity. PMID:26806302

  3. Hydrogen-rich water protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Yao; Song, Si-Dong; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Rui-Yao; Wan, Yong; Yuan, Da-Wei; Wu, Qi-Fei; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the hepatoprotective effects and mechanisms of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury in mice. METHODS: Male mice were randomly divided into the following four groups: normal saline (NS) control group, mice received equivalent volumes of NS intraperitoneally (ip); HRW control group, mice were given HRW (same volume as the NS group); APAP + NS group, mice received NS ip for 3 d (5 mL/kg body weight, twice a day at 8 am and 5 pm) after APAP injection; APAP + HRW group, mice received HRW for 3 d (same as NS treatment) after APAP challenge. In the first experiment, mice were injected ip with a lethal dose of 750 mg/kg APAP to determine the 5-d survival rates. In the second experiment, mice were injected ip with a sub-lethal dose of 500 mg/kg. Blood and liver samples were collected at 24, 48, and 72 h after APAP injection to determine the degree of liver injury. RESULTS: Treatment with HRW resulted in a significant increase in the 5-d survival rate compared with the APAP + NS treatment group (60% vs 26.67%, P < 0.05). HRW could significantly decrease the serum alanine aminotransferase level (24 h: 4442 ± 714.3 U/L vs 6909 ± 304.8 U/L, P < 0.01; 48 h: 3782 ± 557.5 U/L vs 5111 ± 404 U/L, P < 0.01; and 3255 ± 337.4 U/L vs 3814 ± 250.2 U/L, P < 0.05, respectively) and aspartate aminotransferase level (24 h: 4683 ± 443.4 U/L vs 5307 ± 408.4 U/L, P < 0.05; 48 h: 3392 ± 377.6 U/L vs 4458 ± 423.6 U/L, P < 0.01; and 3354 ± 399.4 U/L vs 3778 ± 358 U/L, respectively) compared with the APAP treatment group. The alkaline phosphatase, total bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase levels had the same result. Seventy-two hours after APAP administration, liver samples were collected for pathological examination and serum was collected to detect the cytokine levels. The liver index (5.16% ± 0.26% vs 5.88% ± 0.073%, P < 0.05) and percentage of liver necrosis area (27.73% ± 0.58% vs 36.87% ± 0.49%, P < 0.01) were significantly

  4. Moringa oleifera hydroethanolic extracts effectively alleviate acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in experimental rats through their antioxidant nature.

    PubMed

    Fakurazi, Sharida; Sharifudin, Syazana Akmal; Arulselvan, Palanisamy

    2012-07-10

    The aim of the study was to investigate the in vitro antioxidant properties Moringa oleifera Lam. (MO) extracts and its curative role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxic liver injury in rats caused by oxidative damage. The total phenolic content and antioxidant properties of hydroethanolic extracts of different MO edible parts were investigated by employing an established in vitro biological assay. In the antihepatotoxic study, either flowers or leaves extract (200 mg/kg or 400 mg/kg, i.p) were administered an hour after APAP administration, respectively. N-Acetylcysteine was used as the positive control against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. The levels of liver markers such as alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and the levels of oxidative damage markers including malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein adduct, reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were analysed and compared between experimental groups. Among MO edible parts the flower extracts contain the highest total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity, followed by leaves extract. The oxidative marker MDA, as well as 4-HNE protein adduct levels were elevated and GSH, SOD and CAT were significantly decreased in groups treated with hepatotoxin. The biochemical liver tissue oxidative markers measured in the rats treated with MO flowers and leaves hydroethanolic extracts showed a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in the severity of the liver damage. The results of this study strongly indicate the therapeutic properties of MO hydroethanolic extracts against acute liver injury and thereby scientifically support its traditional use.

  5. Redox Nanoparticle Therapeutics for Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boonruamkaew, Phetcharat; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of an antioxidative nanoparticle (RNPN) recently developed against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. The effects of oral administration of RNPN to APAP-treated mice were assessed for various biochemical liver function parameters: alanine transaminase (ALT) activity, aspartate transaminase (AST) activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, prothrombin time, and serum albumin (ALB) level. The treatment effects were assessed in terms of free radical parameters: malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, % inhibition of superoxide anion (O2−∙), and histopathological examination. The N-acetylcysteine (NAC)-treated group exhibited an enhanced prothrombin time relative to the control group, while RNPN did not prolong prothrombin time. The RNPN-treated animals exhibited lower levels of ALT, AST, and ALP, while increased ALB levels were measured in these animals compared to those in the other groups. The RNPN-treated animals furthermore exhibited improved MDA levels, GPx activity, and % inhibition of O2−∙, which relate to oxidative damage. Histological staining of liver tissues from RNPN-treated animals did not reveal any microscopic changes relative to the other groups. The findings of this study suggest that RNPN possesses effective hepatoprotective properties and does not exhibit the notable adverse effects associated with NAC treatment. PMID:27073589

  6. c-Jun N-terminal kinase modulates oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation independent of inducible nitric oxide synthase in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Chieko; Lemasters, John J.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2010-07-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose, which causes liver injury in animals and humans, activates c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Although it was shown that the JNK inhibitor SP600125 effectively reduced APAP hepatotoxicity, the mechanisms of protection remain unclear. C57Bl/6 mice were treated with 10 mg/kg SP600125 or vehicle (8% dimethylsulfoxide) 1 h before 600 mg/kg APAP administration. APAP time-dependently induced JNK activation (detected by JNK phosphorylation). SP600125, but not the vehicle, reduced JNK activation, attenuated mitochondrial Bax translocation and prevented the mitochondrial release of apoptosis-inducing factor at 4-12 h. Nuclear DNA fragmentation, nitrotyrosine staining, tissue GSSG levels and liver injury (plasma ALT release and necrosis) were partially attenuated by the vehicle (- 65%) and completely eliminated by SP600125 (- 98%) at 6 and 12 h. Furthermore, SP600125 attenuated the increase of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein. However, APAP did not enhance plasma nitrite + nitrate levels (NO formation); SP600125 had no effect on this parameter. The iNOS inhibitor L-NIL did not reduce NO formation or injury after APAP but prevented NO formation caused by endotoxin. Since SP600125 completely eliminated the increase in hepatic GSSG levels, an indicator of mitochondrial oxidant stress, it is concluded that the inhibition of peroxynitrite was mainly caused by reduced superoxide formation. Our data suggest that the JNK inhibitor SP600125 protects against APAP-induced liver injury in part by attenuation of mitochondrial Bax translocation but mainly by preventing mitochondrial oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation and thereby preventing the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, a key event in APAP-induced cell necrosis.

  7. Secretory phospholipase A{sub 2}-mediated progression of hepatotoxicity initiated by acetaminophen is exacerbated in the absence of hepatic COX-2

    SciTech Connect

    Bhave, Vishakha S.; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Latendresse, John R.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2011-03-15

    We have previously reported that among the other death proteins, hepatic secretory phospholipase A{sub 2} (sPLA{sub 2}) is a leading mediator of progression of liver injury initiated by CCl{sub 4} in rats. The aim of our present study was to test the hypothesis that increased hepatic sPLA{sub 2} released after acetaminophen (APAP) challenge mediates progression of liver injury in wild type (WT) and COX-2 knockout (KO) mice. COX-2 WT and KO mice were administered a normally non lethal dose (400 mg/kg) of acetaminophen. The COX-2 KO mice suffered 60% mortality compared to 100% survival of the WT mice, suggesting higher susceptibility of COX-2 KO mice to sPLA{sub 2}-mediated progression of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Liver injury was significantly higher at later time points in the KO mice compared to the WT mice indicating that the abatement of progression of injury requires the presence of COX-2. This difference in hepatotoxicity was not due to increased bioactivation of acetaminophen as indicated by unchanged cyp2E1 protein and covalently bound {sup 14}C-APAP in the livers of KO mice. Hepatic sPLA{sub 2} activity and plasma TNF-{alpha} were significantly higher after APAP administration in the KO mice. This was accompanied by a corresponding fall in hepatic PGE{sub 2} and lower compensatory liver regeneration and repair ({sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation) in the KO mice. These results suggest that hindered compensatory tissue repair and poor resolution of inflammation for want of beneficial prostaglandins render the liver very vulnerable to sPLA{sub 2}-mediated progression of liver injury. These findings are consistent with the destructive role of sPLA{sub 2} in the progression and expansion of tissue injury as a result of continued hydrolytic breakdown of plasma membrane phospholipids of perinecrotic hepatocytes unless mitigated by sufficient co-induction of COX-2.

  8. Sodium 4-phenylbutyric acid prevents murine acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by minimizing endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Kusama, Hiromi; Kon, Kazuyoshi; Ikejima, Kenichi; Arai, Kumiko; Aoyama, Tomonori; Uchiyama, Akira; Yamashina, Shunhei; Watanabe, Sumio

    2017-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose induces severe oxidative stress followed by hepatocyte apoptosis/necrosis. Previous studies have indicated that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in the cell death process. Therefore, we investigated the effect of the chemical chaperone 4-phenyl butyric acid (PBA) on APAP-induced liver injury in mice. Eight-week-old male C57Bl6/J mice were given a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of APAP (450 mg/kg body weight), following which some were repeatedly injected with PBA (120 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) every 3 h starting at 0.5 h after the APAP challenge. All mice were then serially euthanized up to 12 h later. PBA treatment dramatically ameliorated the massive hepatocyte apoptosis/necrosis that was observed 6 h after APAP administration. PBA also significantly prevented the APAP-induced increases in cleaved activating transcription factor 6 and phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase and significantly blunted the increases in mRNA levels for binding immunoglobulin protein, spliced X-box binding protein-1, and C/EBP homologous protein. Moreover, PBA significantly prevented APAP-induced Bax translocation to the mitochondria, and the expression of heme oxygenase-1 mRNA and 4-hydroxynonenal. By contrast, PBA did not affect hepatic glutathione depletion following APAP administration, reflecting APAP metabolism. PBA prevents APAP-induced liver injury even when an APAP challenge precedes its administration. The underlying mechanism of action most likely involves the prevention of ER stress-induced apoptosis/necrosis in the hepatocytes during APAP intoxication.

  9. Acetaminophen Induced Hepatotoxicity in Wistar Rats--A Proteomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Ilavenil, Soundharrajan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Srigopalram, Srisesharam; Ock Kim, Young; Agastian, Paul; Baru, Rajasekhar; Choi, Ki Choon; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas

    2016-01-28

    Understanding the mechanism of chemical toxicity, which is essential for cross-species and dose extrapolations, is a major challenge for toxicologists. Standard mechanistic studies in animals for examining the toxic and pathological changes associated with the chemical exposure have often been limited to the single end point or pathways. Toxicoproteomics represents a potential aid to the toxicologist to understand the multiple pathways involved in the mechanism of toxicity and also determine the biomarkers that are possible to predictive the toxicological response. We performed an acute toxicity study in Wistar rats with the prototype liver toxin; the acetaminophen (APAP) effects on protein profiles in the liver and its correlation with the plasma biochemical markers for liver injury were analyzed. Three separate groups--control, nontoxic (150 mg/kg) and toxic dose (1500 mg/kg) of APAP--were studied. The proteins extracted from the liver were separated by 2-DE and analyzed by MALDI-TOF. The differential proteins in the gels were analyzed by BIORAD's PDQuest software and identified by feeding the peptide mass fingerprint data to various public domain programs like Mascot and MS-Fit. The identified proteins in toxicity-induced rats were classified based on their putative protein functions, which are oxidative stress (31%), immunity (14%), neurological related (12%) and transporter proteins (2%), whereas in non-toxic dose-induced rats they were oxidative stress (9%), immunity (6%), neurological (14%) and transporter proteins (9%). It is evident that the percentages of oxidative stress and immunity-related proteins were up-regulated in toxicity-induced rats as compared with nontoxic and control rats. Some of the liver drug metabolizing and detoxifying enzymes were depleted under toxic conditions compared with non-toxic rats. Several other proteins were identified as a first step in developing an in-house rodent liver toxicoproteomics database.

  10. Liuweiwuling tablets protect against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: What is the protective mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Du, Kuo; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Study of the effects of natural products, including traditional Chinese Medicines, on acetaminophen hepatotoxicity has gained considerable popularity in recent years, and some of them showed positive results and even promising therapeutic potentials. A recent report suggested that Liuweiwuling tablets protect against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and promote liver regeneration in a rodent model through alleviating the inflammatory response. However, several concerns exist regarding the limitations of the experimental design and interpretation of the data presented in this manuscript. PMID:27004010

  11. Use of Arctium lappa Extract Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    El-Kott, Attalla Farag; Bin-Meferij, Mashael Mohammed

    2015-12-01

    Severe destructive hepatic injuries can be induced by acetaminophen overdose and may lead to acute hepatic failure. To investigate the ameliorative effects of Arctium lappa root extract on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Rats were divided into 4 groups: normal control group, Arctium lappa extract group, acetaminophen-injected group, and acetaminophen treated with Arctium lappa extract group. The treatment with Arctium lappa extract reduced serum alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase in the acetaminophen group when compared with the control group. DNA fragments in the acetaminophen-injected group were also significantly increased (P < 0.05). The comet assay revealed increased detaching tail length and DNA concentration during the hepatic toxicity in the acetaminophen group. The malondialdehyde content was inhibited by Arctium lappa treatment (12.97±0.89 nmol/mg) when compared with the acetaminophen-treated-only group (12.97±0.89 nmol/mg). Histopathologic examination revealed that acetaminophen administration produced hepatic cell necrosis, infiltrate of lymphocytes, and vacuolation that were associated with the acetaminophen-treated animal group, but the degree of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was mediated by treatment with Arctium lappa extract. Arctium lappa can prevent most of the hepatic tissue damage caused by acetaminophen overdose in rats.

  12. Use of Arctium lappa Extract Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Kott, Attalla Farag; Bin-Meferij, Mashael Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe destructive hepatic injuries can be induced by acetaminophen overdose and may lead to acute hepatic failure. Objective To investigate the ameliorative effects of Arctium lappa root extract on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods Rats were divided into 4 groups: normal control group, Arctium lappa extract group, acetaminophen-injected group, and acetaminophen treated with Arctium lappa extract group. Results The treatment with Arctium lappa extract reduced serum alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase in the acetaminophen group when compared with the control group. DNA fragments in the acetaminophen-injected group were also significantly increased (P < 0.05). The comet assay revealed increased detaching tail length and DNA concentration during the hepatic toxicity in the acetaminophen group. The malondialdehyde content was inhibited by Arctium lappa treatment (12.97±0.89 nmol/mg) when compared with the acetaminophen-treated-only group (12.97±0.89 nmol/mg). Histopathologic examination revealed that acetaminophen administration produced hepatic cell necrosis, infiltrate of lymphocytes, and vacuolation that were associated with the acetaminophen-treated animal group, but the degree of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was mediated by treatment with Arctium lappa extract. Conclusions Arctium lappa can prevent most of the hepatic tissue damage caused by acetaminophen overdose in rats. PMID:26543508

  13. An Analysis of Viral Testing in non-Acetaminophen (non-APAP) Pediatric Acute Liver Failure (PALF)

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Kathleen B.; Olio, Dominic Dell; Lobritto, Steven J.; Lopez, M James; Rodriguez-Baez, Norberto; Yazigi, Nada A.; Belle, Steven H.; Zhang, Song; Squires, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Viral infections are often suspected to cause pediatric acute liver failure (PALF) but large-scale studies have not been performed. We analyzed results of viral testing among non-acetaminophen (non APAP) PALF study participants. Methods Participants were enrolled in the PALF registry. Diagnostic evaluation and final diagnosis were determined by the site investigator and methods for viral testing by local standard of care. Viruses were classified as either Causative Viruses (CV) or Associated Viruses (AV). Supplemental testing for CV was performed if not done clinically and serum was available. Final diagnoses included “Viral”, “Indeterminate” and “Other”. Results Of 860 participants, 820 had at least one test result for a CV or AV. A positive viral test was found in 166/820 (20.2%) participants and distributed among “Viral” [66/80 (82.5%)], “Indeterminate” [52/420 (12.4%)] and “Other” [48/320 (15.0%)] diagnoses. CV accounted for 81/166 (48.8%) positive tests. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) was positive in 39/335 (11.6%) who were tested: 26/103 (25.2%) and 13/232 (5.6%) among infants 0 - 6 months and over 6 months, respectively. HSV was not tested in 61.0% and 53% of the over-all cohort and those 0 - 6 months, respectively. Supplemental testing yielded 17 positive, including 5 HSV. Conclusions Viral testing in PALF occurs frequently but is often incomplete. Evidence for acute viral infection was found in 20.2% of those tested for viruses. HSV is an important viral cause for PALF in all age groups. The etiopathogenic role of CV and AV in PALF requires further investigation. PMID:25079486

  14. Protective effects of Baccharis dracunculifolia leaves extract against carbon tetrachloride- and acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Túlio P; do A Corrêa, José Otávio; Aarestrup, Beatriz J V; Aarestrup, Fernando M; de Sousa, Orlando V; da Silva Filho, Ademar A

    2014-07-02

    In this work we investigated the in vivo protective effects of Baccharis dracunculifolia leaves extract (BdE) against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)- and acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Total phenolic content, total flavonoid content, antioxidant DPPH radical scavenging activity, and HPLC analysis were performed. Our results showed that pretreatment with BdE significantly reduced the damage caused by CCl4 and APAP on the serum markers of hepatic injury, AST, ALT, and ALP. Results were confirmed by histopathological analysis. Phytochemical analysis, performed by HPLC, showed that BdE was rich in p-coumaric acid derivatives, caffeoylquinic acids and flavonoids. BdE also showed DPPH antioxidant activity (EC50 of 15.75±0.43 μg/mL), and high total phenolic (142.90±0.77 mg GAE/g) and flavonoid (51.47±0.60 mg RE/g) contents. This study indicated that B. dracunculifolia leaves extract has relevant in vivo hepatoprotective properties.

  15. Salvianolic acid B protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by inducing Nrf2 and phase II detoxification gene expression via activation of the PI3K and PKC signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Musen; Zhai, Xiaohan; Wang, Guangzhi; Tian, Xiaofeng; Gao, Dongyan; Shi, Lei; Wu, Hang; Fan, Qing; Peng, Jinyong; Liu, Kexin; Yao, Jihong

    2015-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is used drugs worldwide for treating pain and fever. However, APAP overdose is the principal cause of acute liver failure in Western countries. Salvianolic acid B (SalB), a major water-soluble compound extracted from Radix Salvia miltiorrhiza, has well-known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions. We aimed to evaluate the ability of SalB to protect against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity by inducing nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) expression. SalB pretreatment ameliorated acute liver injury caused by APAP, as indicated by blood aspartate transaminase levels and histological findings. Moreover, SalB pretreatment increased the expression of Nrf2, Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and glutamate-l-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC). Furthermore, the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin and the GCLC inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine reversed the protective effect of SalB. Additionally, siRNA-mediated depletion of Nrf2 reduced the induction of HO-1 and GCLC by SalB, and SalB pretreatment activated the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways. Both inhibitors (PI3K and PKC) blocked the protective effect of SalB against APAP-induced cell death, abolishing the SalB-induced Nrf2 activation and decreasing HO-1 and GCLC expression. These results indicated that SalB induces Nrf2, HO-1 and GCLC expression via activation of the PI3K and PKC pathways, thereby protecting against APAP-induced liver injury.

  16. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in mice: Effect of age, frailty and exposure type.

    PubMed

    Kane, Alice E; Mitchell, Sarah J; Mach, John; Huizer-Pajkos, Aniko; McKenzie, Catriona; Jones, Brett; Cogger, Victoria; Le Couteur, David G; de Cabo, Rafael; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used analgesic that can cause severe hepatotoxicity in overdose. Despite old age and frailty being associated with extensive and long-term utilization of acetaminophen and a high prevalence of adverse drug reactions, there is limited information on the risks of toxicity from acetaminophen in old age and frailty. This study aimed to assess changes in the risk and mechanisms of hepatotoxicity from acute, chronic and sub-acute acetaminophen exposure with old age and frailty in mice. Young and old male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either acute (300 mg/kg via oral gavage), chronic (100 mg/kg/day in diet for six weeks) or sub-acute (250 mg/kg, t.i.d., for three days) acetaminophen, or saline control. Pre-dosing mice were scored for the mouse clinical frailty index, and after dosing serum and liver tissue were collected for assessment of toxicity and mechanisms. There were no differences with old age or frailty in the degree of hepatotoxicity induced by acute, chronic or subacute acetaminophen exposure as assessed by serum liver enzymes and histology. Age-related changes in the acetaminophen toxicity pathways included increased liver GSH concentrations, increased NQO1 activity and an increased pro- and anti-inflammatory response to acetaminophen in old age. Frailty-related changes included a negative correlation between frailty index and serum protein, albumin and ALP concentrations for some mouse groups. In conclusion, although there were changes in some pathways that would be expected to influence susceptibility to acetaminophen toxicity, there was no overall increase in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity with old age or frailty in mice.

  17. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and HIF-1α induction in mice occurs without hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S.; Hennings, Leah; Letzig, Lynda; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hinson, Jack A.; James, Laura P.

    2011-01-01

    HIF-1α is a nuclear factor important in the transcription of genes controlling angiogenesis including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both hypoxia and oxidative stress are known mechanisms for the induction of HIF-1α. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are mechanistically important in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the mouse. MPT may occur as a result of oxidative stress and leads to a large increase in oxidative stress. We previously reported the induction of HIF-1α in mice with APAP toxicity and have shown that VEGF is important in hepatocyte regeneration following APAP toxicity. The following study was performed to examine the relative contribution of hypoxia versus oxidative stress to the induction of HIF-1α in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Time course studies using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole showed no staining for pimonidazole at 1 or 2 h in B6C3F1 mice treated with APAP. Staining for pimonidazole was present in the midzonal to periportal regions at 4, 8, 24 and 48 h and no staining was observed in centrilobular hepatocytes, the site of the toxicity. Subsequent studies with the MPT inhibitor cyclosporine A showed that cyclosporine A (CYC; 10 mg/kg) reduced HIF-1α induction in APAP treated mice at 1 and 4 h and did not inhibit the metabolism of APAP (depletion of hepatic non-protein sulfhydryls and hepatic protein adduct levels). The data suggest that HIF-1α induction in the early stages of APAP toxicity is secondary to oxidative stress via a mechanism involving MPT. In addition, APAP toxicity is not mediated by a hypoxia mechanism. PMID:21316383

  18. The role of prostaglandin E2 in acute acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Cavar, Ivan; Kelava, Tomislav; Vukojević, Katarina; Saraga-Babić, Mirna; Culo, Filip

    2010-07-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which is synthesized by many cell types, has a cytoprotective effect in the gastrointestinal tract and in several other tissues and cells. On the other hand, overdose or chronic use of a high dose of acetaminophen (Paracetamol, APAP) is a major cause of acute liver failure in the western world. These observations prompted us to investigate whether PGE2 plays a role in host defence to toxic effect of APAP. (CBAT6T6xC57Bl/6)F1 hybrid mice of both sexes were intoxicated with a single lethal or high sublethal dose of APAP, which was administered to animals by oral gavage. Stabile analogue of PGE2, 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 (dmPGE2), or inhibitor of its production, CAY10526, were given intraperitoneally (i.p.) 30 minutes before or 2 hours after APAP administration. The toxicity of APAP was determined by observing the survival of mice during 48 hours, by measuring concentration of alanine-aminotransferase (ALT) in plasma 20-22 hours after APAP administration and by liver histology. The results have shown that PGE2 exhibits a strong hepatoprotective effect when it is given to mice either before or after APAP, while CAY10526 demonstrated mainly the opposite effect. Immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent examinations in the liver tissue generally support these findings, suggesting that PGE2 inhibited APAP-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB). Similarly, PGE2 down regulated the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which was up regulated by APAP. Thus, by these and perhaps by other mechanisms, PGE2 contributes to the defence of the organism to noxious effects of xenobiotics on the liver.

  19. Biochemical changes associated with the potentiation of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by brief anesthesia with diethyl ether.

    PubMed

    To, E C; Wells, P G

    1986-12-01

    Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in male CD-1 mice was enhanced markedly by brief anesthesia with diethyl ether (ether), and particularly so if acetaminophen was given several hours after ether. The present study was conducted to examine the possible biochemical mechanisms behind this delayed toxicologic synergism. In vitro biochemical studies indicated that ether anesthesia produced a delayed reduction in the activities of glucuronyl transferase and glutathione (GSH) S-transferase, and in the hepatic content of GSH. The hepatic content but not activity of the cytochromes P-450 was initially reduced by ether but recovered by the time of maximal toxicologic enhancement. In vivo studies showed that ether produced a small decrease in the plasma concentrations of glucuronide and sulfate conjugates of acetaminophen, with a concomitant, minor increase in the half-life of acetaminophen, and a major increase in the bioactivation of acetaminophen, as determined by an early, 2-fold increase in the plasma GSH and cysteine conjugates of acetaminophen, and a 3-fold increase in the covalent binding of acetaminophen to hepatocellular protein. Decreases produced by ether in the in vivo production of acetaminophen glucuronide correlated with increasing plasma concentrations of unmetabolised acetaminophen, decreasing hepatic GSH content and increasing covalent binding of acetaminophen to hepatocellular protein when these measurements were performed in the same animals. The biochemical mechanisms underlying the potentiation of acetaminophen hepatoxicity as measured by plasma glutamic pyruvic transaminase concentrations appeared to be due to delayed, complex effects of ether upon multiple enzymatic pathways of acetaminophen elimination and detoxification.

  20. Hospitalization Costs for Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery Treated With Intravenous Acetaminophen (IV-APAP) Plus Other IV Analgesics or IV Opioid Monotherapy for Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Maiese, Brett A; Pham, An T; Shah, Manasee V; Eaddy, Michael T; Lunacsek, Orsolya E; Wan, George J

    2017-02-01

    To assess the impact on hospitalization costs of multimodal analgesia (MMA), including intravenous acetaminophen (IV-APAP), versus IV opioid monotherapy for postoperative pain management in patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. Utilizing the Truven Health MarketScan(®) Hospital Drug Database (HDD), patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA), total hip arthroplasty (THA), or surgical repair of hip fracture between 1/1/2011 and 8/31/2014 were separated into postoperative pain management groups: MMA with IV-APAP plus other IV analgesics (IV-APAP group) or an IV opioid monotherapy group. All patients could have received oral analgesics. Baseline characteristics and total hospitalization costs were compared. Additionally, an inverse probability treatment weighting [IPTW] with propensity scores analysis further assessed hospitalization cost differences. The IV-APAP group (n = 33,954) and IV opioid monotherapy group (n = 110,300) differed significantly (P < 0.0001) across baseline characteristics, though the differences may not have been clinically meaningful. Total hospitalization costs (mean ± standard deviation) were significantly lower for the IV-APAP group than the IV opioid monotherapy group (US$12,540 ± $9564 vs. $13,242 ± $35,825; P < 0.0001). Medical costs accounted for $701 of the $702 between-group difference. Pharmacy costs were similar between groups. Results of the IPTW-adjusted analysis further supported the statistically significant cost difference. Patients undergoing orthopedic surgery who received MMA for postoperative pain management, including IV-APAP, had significantly lower total costs than patients who received IV opioid monotherapy. This difference was driven by medical costs; importantly, there was no difference in pharmacy costs. Generalizability of the results may be limited to patients admitted to hospitals similar to those included in HDD. Dosing could not be determined, so it was not possible to quantify

  1. MicroRNA-561 promotes acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes through downregulation of the nuclear receptor corepressor dosage-sensitive sex-reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on the X chromosome, gene 1 (DAX-1).

    PubMed

    Li, Minghua; Yang, Yinxue; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Tianxin; Guo, Peixuan; Zhang, Xueji; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    One of the major mechanisms involved in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity is hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α)-mediated activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). In the present study, we investigated the role of miR-561 and its target gene DAX-1 encoding a corepressor of HNF4α in the process of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. We used both human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cells and primary human hepatocytes in this study and monitored the levels of reactive oxygen species, lactate dehydrogenase, and glutathione. Our bioinformatics study suggests an association between miR-561 and DAX-1, but not HNF4α. Treatment of HepG2 cells with APAP significantly reduced the expression of DAX-1 in a concentration-dependent manner. miR-561 was induced by APAP treatment in HepG2 cells. Transfection of HepG2 cells with an miR-561 mimic exacerbated APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. HNF4α is physically associated with DAX-1 in HepG2 cells. A decreased protein level of DAX-1 by APAP treatment was also enhanced by miR-561 mimic transfection in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes. The basal and APAP-induced expression of PXR and CAR was enhanced by miR-561 mimic transfection; however, transfection of HepG2 cells or primary human hepatocytes with a miR-561 inhibitor or DAX-1 small interfering RNA reversed these effects. Additionally, the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that recruitment of DAX-1 onto the PXR promoter was inversely correlated with the recruitment of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α coactivator-1α and HNF4α on APAP treatment. These results indicate that miR-561 worsens APAP-induced hepatotoxicity via inhibition of DAX-1 and consequent transactivation of nuclear receptors.

  2. The gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by inhibiting cytochrome P450 enzymes and c-jun N-terminal kinase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Kuo; Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Xie, Yuchao; Farhood, Anwar; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-12-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. Although many aspects of the mechanism are known, recent publications suggest that gap junctions composed of connexin32 function as critical intercellular communication channels which transfer cytotoxic mediators into neighboring hepatocytes and aggravate liver injury. However, these studies did not consider off-target effects of reagents used in these experiments, especially the gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate (2-APB). In order to assess the mechanisms of protection of 2-APB in vivo, male C56Bl/6 mice were treated with 400 mg/kg APAP to cause extensive liver injury. This injury was prevented when animals were co-treated with 20 mg/kg 2-APB and was attenuated when 2-APB was administered 1.5 h after APAP. However, the protection was completely lost when 2-APB was given 4–6 h after APAP. Measurement of protein adducts and c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation indicated that 2-APB reduced both protein binding and JNK activation, which correlated with hepatoprotection. Although some of the protection was due to the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), in vitro experiments clearly demonstrated that 2-APB directly inhibits cytochrome P450 activities. In addition, JNK activation induced by phorone and tert-butylhydroperoxide in vivo was inhibited by 2-APB. The effects against APAP toxicity in vivo were reproduced in primary cultured hepatocytes without use of DMSO and in the absence of functional gap junctions. We conclude that the protective effect of 2-APB was caused by inhibition of metabolic activation of APAP and inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway and not by blocking connexin32-based gap junctions. - Highlights: • 2-APB protected against APAP-induced liver injury in mice in vivo and in vitro • 2-APB protected by inhibiting APAP metabolic activation and JNK signaling pathway • DMSO inhibited APAP metabolic activation as the solvent of 2-APB

  3. Hepatoprotective Effect of Silymarin (Silybum marianum) on Hepatotoxicity Induced by Acetaminophen in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cardia, Gabriel Fernando Esteves; da Rocha, Bruno Ambrósio; Aguiar, Rafael Pazzinatto; Spironello, Ricardo Alexandre; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of Silymarin (SLM) on the hypertension state and the liver function changes induced by acetaminophen (APAP) in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Animals normotensive (N) or hypertensive (SHR) were treated or not with APAP (3 g/kg, oral) or previously treated with SLM. Twelve hours after APAP administration, plasmatic levels of liver function markers: alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), glucose (GLU), gamma glutamyl transferase (γ-GT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) of all groups, were determined. Liver injury was assessed using histological studies. Samples of their livers were then used to determine the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and nitric oxide (NO) production and were also sectioned for histological analysis. No differences were observed for ALT, γ-GT, and GLU levels between SHR and normotensive rats groups. However, AST and ALP levels were increased in hypertensive animals. APAP treatment promoted an increase in ALT and AST in both SHR and N. However, only for SHR, γ-GT levels were increased. The inflammatory response evaluated by MPO activity and NO production showed that SHR was more susceptible to APAP effect, by increasing leucocyte infiltration. Silymarin treatment (Legalon) restored the hepatocyte functional and histopathological alterations induced by APAP in normotensive and hypertensive animals. PMID:25821491

  4. Hepatoprotective Effect of Silymarin (Silybum marianum) on Hepatotoxicity Induced by Acetaminophen in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Abel Felipe; Cardia, Gabriel Fernando Esteves; da Rocha, Bruno Ambrósio; Aguiar, Rafael Pazzinatto; Silva-Comar, Francielli Maria de Souza; Spironello, Ricardo Alexandre; Grespan, Renata; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of Silymarin (SLM) on the hypertension state and the liver function changes induced by acetaminophen (APAP) in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Animals normotensive (N) or hypertensive (SHR) were treated or not with APAP (3 g/kg, oral) or previously treated with SLM. Twelve hours after APAP administration, plasmatic levels of liver function markers: alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), glucose (GLU), gamma glutamyl transferase (γ-GT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) of all groups, were determined. Liver injury was assessed using histological studies. Samples of their livers were then used to determine the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and nitric oxide (NO) production and were also sectioned for histological analysis. No differences were observed for ALT, γ-GT, and GLU levels between SHR and normotensive rats groups. However, AST and ALP levels were increased in hypertensive animals. APAP treatment promoted an increase in ALT and AST in both SHR and N. However, only for SHR, γ-GT levels were increased. The inflammatory response evaluated by MPO activity and NO production showed that SHR was more susceptible to APAP effect, by increasing leucocyte infiltration. Silymarin treatment (Legalon) restored the hepatocyte functional and histopathological alterations induced by APAP in normotensive and hypertensive animals.

  5. Protective effect of pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Gaurav; Krishna, Gopala; Chellappan, Dinesh Kumar; Gubbiyappa, Kumar Shiva; Candasamy, Mayuren; Dua, Kamal

    2014-08-01

    Acetaminophen has a reasonable safety profile when consumed in therapeutic doses. However, it could induce hepatotoxicity and even acute liver failure when taken at an overdose. Pioglitazone, PPARγ ligand, is clinically tested and used in treatment of diabetes. PPARγ is a key nuclear hormone receptor of lipid metabolisms and regulates several gene transcriptions associated with differentiation, growth arrest, and apoptosis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective activity of pioglitazone on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and to understand the relationship between the PPARγ and acetaminophen-induced hepato injury. For the experiment, Sprague-Dawley rats (160-180 g) were used and divided into four groups. Groups I and II were normal and experimental controls, respectively. Groups III and IV received the pioglitazone 20 mg/kg for 10 days. Hepatotoxicity was induced in Groups II and III on the eighth day with acetaminophen (i.p. 350 mg/kg body weight). The hepatoprotective effect was evaluated by performing an assay of the total protein, total bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and α-fetoprotein as well as glutathione peroxidase, lipid peroxidation, catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione transferase and liver histopathology. The assay results were presented as mean and standard error of mean for each group. The study group was compared with the control group by one-way ANOVA test. A p value of <0.05 was considered significant. Pioglitazone significantly reduced the elevated level of above serum marker enzymes and also inhibits the free radical formation by scavenging hydroxyl ions. It also restored the level of LPO and significantly elevated the levels of endogenous antioxidant enzymes in acetaminophen-challenged hepatotoxicity. Liver histopathological examination showed that pioglitazone administration antagonized acetaminophen -induced liver pathological damage. Various

  6. Protective effects of diallyl sulfide on acetaminophen-induced toxicities.

    PubMed

    Hu, J J; Yoo, J S; Lin, M; Wang, E J; Yang, C S

    1996-10-01

    Diallyl sulfide (DAS), a major flavour component of garlic, is known to modulate drug metabolism and may protect animals from chemically induced toxicity and carcinogenesis. In this study the effects of DAS on the oxidative metabolism and hepatotoxicity induced by acetaminophen (APAP) in rats were investigated. In the hepatotoxicity evaluation of Fischer 344 rats there was a dose-dependent increase in the odds of mortality rate by APAP (P = 0.009); DAS treatment significantly protected rats from APAP-related mortality (P = 0.026). Liver toxicity determined by lactate dehydrogenase activity was significantly increased by APAP treatment (0.75 g/kg). Pretreatment with DAS protected animals from APAP-induced liver toxicity in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Treatment of DAS (50 mg/kg) 3 hr after APAP dosing significantly (P < 0.05) protected rats from APAP-induced liver toxicity. The metabolism of APAP (50 microM) in vitro was significantly inhibited by DAS (0.3-1 mM) in liver microsomes isolated from F344 rats. As the effect of DAS on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in vivo was observed only when DAS was administered before or shortly after (< 3 hr) APAP dosing, data suggested that the protective effect of DAS is mainly at the metabolic activation step of APAP. However, the possibility that DAS may also have effects on other drug metabolism systems, such as glutathione (GSH) and glutathione S-transferases, cannot be ruled out.

  7. Protective effect of allyl methyl disulfide on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongchun; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Kaiming; Liu, Guangpu; Yang, Min; Luan, Yuxia; Zhao, Zhongxi

    2016-04-05

    Multiple sulfur compounds of garlic have shown versatile medicinal activities in the prevention and treatment of various diseases. Allyl methyl disulfide (AMDS) was identified as one of the bioactive components in fresh garlic paste in our previous study. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of AMDS against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced acute liver damage in mice. Results reveal that AMDS significantly alleviates APAP-induced elevation of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels in mice. Furthermore, AMDS significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the maleic dialdehyde (MDA) level in liver tissues and restored the activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD, GSH-PX and GSH towards normal levels. IL-6 and TNF-alpha (TNF-α) levels in the serum and liver were clearly increased by acetaminophen-damage (p < 0.05) and AMDS intake significantly suppressed acetaminophen-induced increase of the two cytokines (p < 0.05). The immunohistochemical and pathological analyses showed that AMDS could ameliorate the liver injury through the strong attenuation of the CD45 expression and HNE formation. All the results indicate that AMDS had the ability to protect hepatocytes from APAP-induced liver damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of Prothrombin Time and Aspartate Aminotransferase in Predicting Hepatotoxicity After Acetaminophen Overdose.

    PubMed

    Levine, Michael; O'Connor, Ayrn D; Padilla-Jones, Angela; Gerkin, Richard D

    2016-03-01

    Despite decades of experience with acetaminophen (APAP) overdoses, it remains unclear whether elevated hepatic transaminases or coagulopathy develop first. Furthermore, comparison of the predictive value of these two variables in determining hepatic toxicity following APAP overdoses has been poorly elucidated. The primary objective of this study is to determine the test characteristics of the aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and the prothrombin time (PT) in patients with APAP toxicity. A retrospective chart review of APAP overdoses treated with IV N-acetylcysteine at a tertiary care referral center was performed. Of the 304 subjects included in the study, 246 with an initial AST less than 1000 were analyzed to determine predictors of hepatic injury, defined as an AST exceeding 1000 IU/L. The initial AST >50 was 79.5 % sensitive and 82.6 % specific for predicting hepatic injury. The corresponding negative and positive predictive values were 95.5 and 46.3 %, respectively. In contrast, an initial abnormal PT had a sensitivity of 82.1 % and a specificity of 63.6 %. The negative and positive predictive values for initial PT were 94.9 and 30.2 %, respectively. Although the two tests performed similarly for predicting a composite endpoint of death or liver transplant, neither was a useful predictor. Initial AST performed better than the initial PT for predicting hepatic injury in this series of patients with APAP overdose.

  9. Molecular forms of HMGB1 and Keratin-18 as mechanistic biomarkers for mode of cell death and prognosis during clinical acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, Daniel J; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Dear, James W; Williams, Dominic P; McGill, Mitchell R; Sharpe, Matthew R; Craig, Darren G; Simpson, Kenneth J; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Park, B. Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Full length keratin-18 (FL-K18) and High Mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB1) represent circulating indicators of necrosis during acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity in vivo. In addition, the caspase-cleaved fragment of K18 (cK18) and hyper-acetylated HMGB1 represent serum indicators of apoptosis and immune cell activation respectively. The study aim was to assess their mechanistic utility to establish the balance between apoptosis, necrosis and immune cell activation throughout the time course of clinical APAP hepatotoxicity. Methods HMGB1 (total, acetylated) and K18 (apoptotic, necrotic) were identified and quantified by novel LC-MS/MS assays in APAP overdose patients (n=78). Results HMGB1 (total; 15.4±1.9ng/ml, p<0.01, acetylated; 5.4±2.6ng/ml, p<0.001), cK18 (5649.8±721.0U/l, p<0.01) and FL-K18 (54770.2±6717.0U/l, p<0.005) were elevated in the sera of APAP overdose patients with liver injury compared to overdose patients without liver injury and healthy volunteers. HMGB1 and FL-K18 correlated with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity (R2=0.60 and 0.58 respectively, p<0.0001) and prothrombin time (R2=0.62 and 0.71 respectively, p<0.0001). Increased total and acetylated HMGB1 and FL-K18 were associated with worse prognosis (King’s College Criteria) or patients that died/required liver transplant compared to spontaneous survivors (all p<0.05-0.001), a finding not reflected by ALT and supported by ROC analysis. Acetylated HMGB1 was a better predictor of outcome than the other markers of cell death. Conclusion K18 and HMGB1 represent blood-based tools to investigate the cell death balance clinical APAP hepatotoxicity. Activation of the immune response was seen later in the time course as shown by the distinct profile of acetylated HMGB1 and was associated with worse outcome. PMID:22266604

  10. Therapeutic potential of alpha-ketoglutarate against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Lalita; Hasija, Yasha; Mittal, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Alpha-ketoglutarate (α-KG) is a cellular intermediary metabolite of Krebs cycle, involved in energy metabolism, amino acid synthesis, and nitrogen transport. It is available over-the-counter and marketed as a nutritional supplement. There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that dietary α-KG has the potential to maintain cellular redox status and thus can protect various oxidative stress induced disease states. The aim of the present study was to investigate the hepatoprotective role of α-KG in acetaminophen (APAP) induced toxicity in rats. Materials and Methods: Animals were divided into three groups of six animals each. Group I (Vehicle control): Normal Saline, Group II (APAP): A single intraperitoneal injection of 0.6 g/kg, Group III (APAP + α-KG): APAP as in Group II with α-KG treatment at a dose of 2 g/kg, orally for 5 days. Then the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) with oxidative stress markers including malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and histopathology were analyzed. Results: The results indicate that APAP caused significant elevations in ALT, AST, ALP, and MDA levels, while GSH, SOD, and CAT were significantly depleted while co-administration of α-KG showed a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in the severity of these damages. Histologically, the liver showed inflammation and necrosis after APAP treatment, which were significantly restored with co-administration of α-KG. Conclusion: These results indicate the possible therapeutic potential of α-KG in protecting liver damage by APAP in rats. PMID:28216953

  11. S-adenosylmethionine protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in two mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bray, G P; Tredger, J M; Williams, R

    1992-02-01

    Because S-adenosylmethionine promotes synthesis of hepatic glutathione in chronic liver disease and is well tolerated in man, we investigated its use as an antidote to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in two mouse models. In C57Bl6 mice, deaths were abolished by S-adenosylmethionine given within 1 hr of 3.3 mmol/kg body wt acetaminophen (0 of 32 vs. 13 of 49, p less than 0.005) and reduced if given 2 to 5 hours after acetaminophen administration (4 of 42 vs. 13 of 49, p less than 0.01). Mixed disulfate/tosylate salt of S-adenosylmethionine abolished mortality in C3H mice given 2 mmol/kg body wt acetaminophen (0 of 24 vs. 4 of 18; p less than 0.05). In both mouse models, S-adenosylmethionine reduced depletion of plasma (median = 20.8 mumol/L vs. 14.6 mumol/L) and liver glutathione (198% vs. 100%; p less than 0.05), liver damage and release of AST after acetaminophen administration. Pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine, which inhibits glutathione synthesis, abolished the beneficial effect of S-adenosylmethionine on survival and plasma glutathione level. S-adenosylmethionine reduces acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by metabolism of the active moiety to glutathione. This benefit may last as long as 5 hr after acetaminophen ingestion.

  12. Evaluation of prophylactic and therapeutic effects of silymarin and N-acetylcysteine in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in cats.

    PubMed

    Avizeh, R; Najafzadeh, H; Razijalali, M; Shirali, S

    2010-02-01

    Cats most commonly receive toxic amounts of acetaminophen (APAP) because owners medicate them without consulting a veterinarian. The aim of this study was to compare the hepatoprotective action of silymarin and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) against APAP poisoning. Twenty healthy cats were randomly allotted to five equal groups. Animals in group A were given APAP (single dose 150 mg/kg, p.o.); groups B and C consisted of cats that received NAC (100 mg/kg, p.o.) or silymarin (30 mg/kg, p.o.) concurrent with APAP administration respectively; groups D and E were treated like groups B and C, respectively, but 4 h after APAP administration. The serum concentrations of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), methemoglobin, and total and direct bilirubin were measured before APAP administration and 4, 24, and 72 h later. A single oral administration of APAP significantly elevated serum concentrations of ALT, AST, ALP, LDH, methemoglobin, and total and direct bilirubin. In both the groups receiving APAP plus NAC or silymarin, levels of serum enzyme activities, methemoglobin, and total and direct bilirubin remained within the normal values. It was concluded that silymarin as well as NAC can protect liver tissue against oxidative stress in cats with an APAP intoxication.

  13. Protective Activity of Total Polyphenols from Genista quadriflora Munby and Teucrium polium geyrii Maire in Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Baali, Nacera; Belloum, Zahia; Baali, Samiya; Chabi, Beatrice; Pessemesse, Laurence; Fouret, Gilles; Ameddah, Souad; Benayache, Fadila; Benayache, Samir; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Cabello, Gérard; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of drug-induced hepatic diseases and several studies have demonstrated that diet supplementation with plants rich in antioxidant compounds provides a variety of health benefits in these circumstances. Genista quadriflora Munby (Gq) and Teucrium polium geyrii Maire (Tp) are known to possess antioxidant and numerous biological properties and these endemic plants are often used for dietary or medicinal applications. Herein, we evaluated the beneficial effect of rich-polyphenol fractions of Gq and Tp to prevent Acetaminophen-induced liver injury and investigated the mechanisms involved in this protective action. Rats were orally administered polyphenolic extracts from Gq or Tp (300 mg/kg) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC: 200 mg/kg) once daily for ten days prior to the single oral administration of Acetaminophen (APAP: 1 g/kg). The results show that preventive administration of polyphenolic extracts from Gq or Tp exerts a hepatoprotective influence during APAP treatment by improving transaminases leakage and liver histology and stimulating antioxidant defenses. Besides, suppression of liver CYP2E1, GSTpi and TNF-α mRNA levels, with enhancement of mitochondrial bioenergetics may contribute to the observed hepatoprotection induced by Gq and Tp extracts. The effect of Tp extract is significantly higher (1.5-2 fold) than that of Gq extract and NAC regarding the enhancement of mitochondrial functionality. Overall, this study brings the first evidence that pretreatment with these natural extracts display in vivo protective activity against APAP hepatotoxicity through improving mitochondrial bioenergetics, oxidant status, phase I and II enzymes expression and inflammatory processes probably by virtue of their high total polyphenols content.

  14. Protective Activity of Total Polyphenols from Genista quadriflora Munby and Teucrium polium geyrii Maire in Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Baali, Nacera; Belloum, Zahia; Baali, Samiya; Chabi, Beatrice; Pessemesse, Laurence; Fouret, Gilles; Ameddah, Souad; Benayache, Fadila; Benayache, Samir; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Cabello, Gérard; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of drug-induced hepatic diseases and several studies have demonstrated that diet supplementation with plants rich in antioxidant compounds provides a variety of health benefits in these circumstances. Genista quadriflora Munby (Gq) and Teucrium polium geyrii Maire (Tp) are known to possess antioxidant and numerous biological properties and these endemic plants are often used for dietary or medicinal applications. Herein, we evaluated the beneficial effect of rich-polyphenol fractions of Gq and Tp to prevent Acetaminophen-induced liver injury and investigated the mechanisms involved in this protective action. Rats were orally administered polyphenolic extracts from Gq or Tp (300 mg/kg) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC: 200 mg/kg) once daily for ten days prior to the single oral administration of Acetaminophen (APAP: 1 g/kg). The results show that preventive administration of polyphenolic extracts from Gq or Tp exerts a hepatoprotective influence during APAP treatment by improving transaminases leakage and liver histology and stimulating antioxidant defenses. Besides, suppression of liver CYP2E1, GSTpi and TNF-α mRNA levels, with enhancement of mitochondrial bioenergetics may contribute to the observed hepatoprotection induced by Gq and Tp extracts. The effect of Tp extract is significantly higher (1.5–2 fold) than that of Gq extract and NAC regarding the enhancement of mitochondrial functionality. Overall, this study brings the first evidence that pretreatment with these natural extracts display in vivo protective activity against APAP hepatotoxicity through improving mitochondrial bioenergetics, oxidant status, phase I and II enzymes expression and inflammatory processes probably by virtue of their high total polyphenols content. PMID:27043622

  15. The impact of partial manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2)-deficiency on mitochondrial oxidant stress, DNA fragmentation and liver injury during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, Anup; Lebofsky, Margitta; Weinman, Steven A.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-03-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in many countries. The mechanism of cell death is initiated by formation of a reactive metabolite that binds to mitochondrial proteins and promotes mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidant stress. Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) is a critical defense enzyme located in the mitochondrial matrix. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the functional consequences of partial SOD2-deficiency (SOD2+/-) on intracellular signaling mechanisms of necrotic cell death after APAP overdose. Treatment of C57Bl/6J wild type animals with 200 mg/kg APAP resulted in liver injury as indicated by elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase activities (2870 {+-} 180 U/L) and centrilobular necrosis at 6 h. In addition, increased tissue glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels and GSSG-to-GSH ratios, delayed mitochondrial GSH recovery, and increased mitochondrial protein carbonyls and nitrotyrosine protein adducts indicated mitochondrial oxidant stress. In addition, nuclear DNA fragmentation (TUNEL assay) correlated with translocation of Bax to the mitochondria and release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). Furthermore, activation of c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) was documented by the mitochondrial translocation of phospho-JNK. SOD2+/- mice showed 4-fold higher ALT activities and necrosis, an enhancement of all parameters of the mitochondrial oxidant stress, more AIF release and more extensive DNA fragmentation and more prolonged JNK activation. Conclusions: the impaired defense against mitochondrial superoxide formation in SOD2+/- mice prolongs JNK activation after APAP overdose and consequently further enhances the mitochondrial oxidant stress leading to exaggerated mitochondrial dysfunction, release of intermembrane proteins with nuclear DNA fragmentation and more necrosis.

  16. Lower susceptibility of female mice to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: Role of mitochondrial glutathione, oxidant stress and c-jun N-terminal kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Kuo; Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-11-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes severe hepatotoxicity in animals and humans. However, the mechanisms underlying the gender differences in susceptibility to APAP overdose in mice have not been clarified. In our study, APAP (300 mg/kg) caused severe liver injury in male mice but 69–77% lower injury in females. No gender difference in metabolic activation of APAP was found. Hepatic glutathione (GSH) was rapidly depleted in both genders, while GSH recovery in female mice was 2.6 fold higher in the mitochondria at 4 h, and 2.5 and 3.3 fold higher in the total liver at 4 h and 6 h, respectively. This faster recovery of GSH, which correlated with greater induction of glutamate-cysteine ligase, attenuated mitochondrial oxidative stress in female mice, as suggested by a lower GSSG/GSH ratio at 6 h (3.8% in males vs. 1.4% in females) and minimal centrilobular nitrotyrosine staining. While c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was similar at 2 and 4 h post-APAP, it was 3.1 fold lower at 6 h in female mice. However, female mice were still protected by the JNK inhibitor SP600125. 17β-Estradiol pretreatment moderately decreased liver injury and oxidative stress in male mice without affecting GSH recovery. Conclusion: The lower susceptibility of female mice is achieved by the improved detoxification of reactive oxygen due to accelerated recovery of mitochondrial GSH levels, which attenuates late JNK activation and liver injury. However, even the reduced injury in female mice was still dependent on JNK. While 17β-estradiol partially protects male mice, it does not affect hepatic GSH recovery. - Highlights: • Female mice are less susceptible to acetaminophen overdose than males. • GSH depletion and protein adduct formation are similar in both genders. • Recovery of hepatic GSH levels is faster in females and correlates with Gclc. • Reduced oxidant stress in females leads to reduced JNK activation. • JNK activation and mitochondrial translocation are critical

  17. Prophylactic and Therapeutic Potential of Acetyl-L-carnitine against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Salman A; Alanazi, Abdulrazaq; Bakheet, Saleh A; Alharbi, Naif O; Nagi, Mahmoud N

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic effects of acetylcarnitine against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity were studied in mice. To evaluate the prophylactic effects of acetylcarnitine, mice were supplemented with acetylcarnitine (2 mmol/kg/day per oral (p.o.) for 5 days) before a single dose of acetaminophen (350 mg/kg intraperitoneal (i.p.)). Animals were sacrificed 6 h after acetaminophen injection. Acetaminophen significantly increased the markers of liver injury, hepatic reactive oxygen species, and nitrate/nitrite, and decreased hepatic glutathione (GSH) and the antioxidant enzymes. Acetylcarnitine supplementation resulted in reversal of all biochemical parameters toward the control values. To explore the therapeutic effects of acetylcarnitine, mice were given a single dose of acetylcarnitine (0.5, 1, and 2 mmol/kg p.o.) 1.5 h after acetaminophen. Animals were sacrificed 6 h after acetaminophen. Acetylcarnitine administration resulted in partial reversal of liver injury only at 2 mmol/kg p.o. At equimolar doses, N-acetylcystiene was superior as therapeutic agent to acetylcarnitine. However, acetylcarnitine potentiated the effect of N-acetylcystiene in the treatment of acetaminophen toxicity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Gene Expression in Rat Hearts Following Oral Administration of a Single Hepatotoxic Dose of Acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Kil, Hong Ryang; Park, Kwangsik; Noh, Chung Il

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Toxicity caused by acetaminophen and its toxic mechanisms in the liver have been widely studied, including effects involving metabolism and oxidative stress. However, its adverse effects on heart have not been sufficiently investigated. This study evaluated the cardiac influence and molecular events occurring within the myocardium in rats treated with a dose of acetaminophen large enough to induce conventional liver damage. Materials and Methods Male rats were orally administered a single dose of acetaminophen at 1,000 mg/kg-body weight, and subsequently examined for conventional toxicological parameters and for gene expression alterations to both the heart and liver 24 hours after administration. Results Following treatment, serum biochemical parameters including aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase were elevated. Histopathological alterations of necrosis were observed in the liver, but not in the heart. However, alterations in gene expression were observed in both the liver and heart 24 hours after dosing. Transcriptional profiling revealed that acetaminophen changed the expression of genes implicated in oxidative stress, inflammatory processes, and apoptosis in the heart as well as in the liver. The numbers of up-regulated and down-regulated genes in the heart were 271 and 81, respectively, based on a two-fold criterion. Conclusion The induced expression of genes implicated in oxidative stress and inflammatory processes in the myocardium reflects molecular levels of injury caused by acetaminophen (APAP), which could not be identified by conventional histopathology. PMID:22187249

  19. Comparison of S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) and N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) Protective Effects on Hepatic Damage when Administered After Acetaminophen Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Terneus, Marcus V.; Brown, J. Michael; Carpenter, A. Betts; Valentovic, Monica A.

    2008-01-01

    In the clinical setting, antidotes are generally administered after the occurrence of a drug overdose. Therefore, the most pertinent evaluation of any new agent should model human exposure. This study tested whether acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity was reversed when S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) was administered after APAP exposure, similar to what occurs in clinical situations. Comparisons were made for potency between SAMe and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), the current treatment for APAP toxicity. Male C57BL/6 mice were fasted overnight and divided into groups: control (VEH), SAMe treated (SAMe), APAP treated (APAP), N-acetylcysteine treated (NAC), SAMe or NAC administered 1 h after APAP (SAMe+APAP) and (NAC+APAP), respectively. Mice were injected Intraperitoneal (ip) with water (VEH) or 250 mg/kg APAP (15 ml/kg). One 1h later, mice were injected (ip) with 1.25 mmol/kg SAMe (SAMe+APAP) or NAC (NAC+APAP). Hepatotoxicity was evaluated 4 h after APAP or VEH treatment. APAP induced centrilobular necrosis, increased liver weight and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels, depressed total hepatic glutathione (GSH), increased protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) adducted proteins. Treatment with SAMe 1 hr after APAP overdose (SAMe+APAP) was hepatoprotective and was comparable to NAC+APAP. Treatment with SAMe or NAC 1 h after APAP was sufficient to return total hepatic glutathione (GSH) to levels comparable to the VEH group. Western blot showed reversal of APAP mediated effects in the SAMe+APAP and NAC+APAP groups. In summary, SAMe was protective when given 1 h after APAP and was comparable to NAC. PMID:18068290

  20. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice is dependent on Tlr9 and the Nalp3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Imaeda, Avlin B.; Watanabe, Azuma; Sohail, Muhammad A.; Mahmood, Shamail; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.; Flavell, Richard A.; Mehal, Wajahat Z.

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocyte death results in a sterile inflammatory response that amplifies the initial insult and increases overall tissue injury. One important example of this type of injury is acetaminophen-induced liver injury, in which the initial toxic injury is followed by innate immune activation. Using mice deficient in Tlr9 and the inflammasome components Nalp3 (NACHT, LRR, and pyrin domain–containing protein 3), ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD), and caspase-1, we have identified a nonredundant role for Tlr9 and the Nalp3 inflammasome in acetaminophen-induced liver injury. We have shown that acetaminophen treatment results in hepatocyte death and that free DNA released from apoptotic hepatocytes activates Tlr9. This triggers a signaling cascade that increases transcription of the genes encoding pro–IL-1β and pro–IL-18 in sinusoidal endothelial cells. By activating caspase-1, the enzyme responsible for generating mature IL-1β and IL-18 from pro–IL-1β and pro–IL-18, respectively, the Nalp3 inflammasome plays a crucial role in the second step of proinflammatory cytokine activation following acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Tlr9 antagonists and aspirin reduced mortality from acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. The protective effect of aspirin on acetaminophen-induced liver injury was due to downregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, rather than inhibition of platelet degranulation or COX-1 inhibition. In summary, we have identified a 2-signal requirement (Tlr9 and the Nalp3 inflammasome) for acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and some potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:19164858

  1. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice is dependent on Tlr9 and the Nalp3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Imaeda, Avlin B; Watanabe, Azuma; Sohail, Muhammad A; Mahmood, Shamail; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S; Flavell, Richard A; Mehal, Wajahat Z

    2009-02-01

    Hepatocyte death results in a sterile inflammatory response that amplifies the initial insult and increases overall tissue injury. One important example of this type of injury is acetaminophen-induced liver injury, in which the initial toxic injury is followed by innate immune activation. Using mice deficient in Tlr9 and the inflammasome components Nalp3 (NACHT, LRR, and pyrin domain-containing protein 3), ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD), and caspase-1, we have identified a nonredundant role for Tlr9 and the Nalp3 inflammasome in acetaminophen-induced liver injury. We have shown that acetaminophen treatment results in hepatocyte death and that free DNA released from apoptotic hepatocytes activates Tlr9. This triggers a signaling cascade that increases transcription of the genes encoding pro-IL-1beta and pro-IL-18 in sinusoidal endothelial cells. By activating caspase-1, the enzyme responsible for generating mature IL-1beta and IL-18 from pro-IL-1beta and pro-IL-18, respectively, the Nalp3 inflammasome plays a crucial role in the second step of proinflammatory cytokine activation following acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Tlr9 antagonists and aspirin reduced mortality from acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. The protective effect of aspirin on acetaminophen-induced liver injury was due to downregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, rather than inhibition of platelet degranulation or COX-1 inhibition. In summary, we have identified a 2-signal requirement (Tlr9 and the Nalp3 inflammasome) for acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and some potential therapeutic approaches.

  2. Hesperidin alleviates acetaminophen induced toxicity in Wistar rats by abrogation of oxidative stress, apoptosis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shiekh Tanveer; Arjumand, Wani; Nafees, Sana; Seth, Amlesh; Ali, Nemat; Rashid, Summya; Sultana, Sarwat

    2012-01-25

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug, but at high dose it leads to undesirable side effects, such as hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. The present study demonstrates the comparative hepatoprotective and nephroprotective activity of hesperidin (HD), a naturally occurring bioflavonoid against APAP induced toxicity. APAP induces hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity as was evident by abnormal deviation in the levels of antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, APAP induced renal damage by inducing apoptotic death and inflammation in renal tubular cells, manifested by an increase in the expression of caspase-3, caspase-9, NFkB, iNOS, Kim-1 and decrease in Bcl-2 expression. These results were further supported by the histopathological examination of kidney. All these features of APAP toxicity were reversed by the co-administration of HD. Therefore, our study favors the view that HD may be a useful modulator in alleviating APAP induced oxidative stress and toxicity.

  3. Protective effects of Capparis sepiaria root extracts against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, V; Pandey, Ajay Shankar; Murali, Anita; Yoganarasimhan, S N

    2012-01-09

    Capparis sepiaria L. known as Himsra is an important drug in Ayurveda. In this study extracts of the root of C. sepiaria were evaluated for their hepatoprotective potential on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in albino Wistar rats. The extent of hepatoprotection was evaluated by estimating the serum levels of hepatic transaminases (SGPT and SGOT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total protein (TP), and bilirubin (total and direct). Aqueous and ethanol extracts of C. sepiaria significantly reduced the increased liver weight as well as serum levels of SGPT, SGOT, ALP, and bilirubin, and normalized the reduced serum protein levels in the treated rats. These observations were supported by the results of histopathology studies as well. The extracts were also subjected to preliminary organic analysis and chromatographic studies including HPTLC finger print studies. The results indicate that the roots of C. sepiaria show significant hepatoprotective effect on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity, thus substantiating its use as a potential hepatoprotective drug.

  4. Complement Activation in Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Rohit; Ganey, Patricia E.

    2012-01-01

    Overdose with acetaminophen (APAP) results in acute liver failure in humans and experimental animals. Complement comprises more than 30 proteins that can participate in tissue injury and/or repair, but the role of complement activation in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity has not been evaluated. Treatment of male, C57BL6J mice with APAP (200–400 mg/kg) resulted in liver injury as evidenced by increased activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in plasma and hepatocellular necrosis. Plasma concentration of the complement component C3 was significantly reduced 6 h after treatment with APAP, indicating complement activation, and C3b (detected by immunostaining) accumulated in the centrilobular areas of liver lobules. Pretreatment with cobra venom factor (CVF; 15 U/mouse) to deplete complement components abolished APAP-mediated C3b accumulation, and this was accompanied by reductions in plasma ALT activity, hepatocellular necrosis, hepatic neutrophil accumulation, and expression of inflammatory genes (interleukin-6, interleukin-10, and plasminogen activation inhibitor-1) at 24 h after APAP treatment. Loss of hepatocellular GSH was similar in APAP-treated mice pretreated with either saline or CVF, suggesting that CVF pretreatment did not affect APAP bioactivation. Mice with a genetic deficiency in C3 had reduced ALT activity 6 and 12 h after APAP administration compared with wild-type animals. These results reveal a key role for complement activation in hepatic inflammation and progression of injury during the pathogenesis of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:22319198

  5. Ferulic acid attenuated acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity though down-regulating the cytochrome P 2E1 and inhibiting toll-like receptor 4 signaling-mediated inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Junhui; Ge, Kuang; Mu, Junhuan; Rong, Jiang; Zhang, Li; Wang, Bin; Wan, Jingyuan; Xia, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic acid which is abundant in vegetables and fruits, has been reported to exert anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, the pharmacological effects and the underlying mechanisms of FA in mice with acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity were investigated. Our results revealed that FA pretreatment inhibited the augments of serum aminotransferases in a dose-dependent manner and attenuated the hepatic histopathological abnormalities and hepatocellular apoptosis in acetaminophen (APAP) exposed mice. Moreover, FA inhibited the expression of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) as well as the contents of glutathione (GSH). Furthermore, FA markedly attenuated acetaminophen-induced serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β production, suppressed Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 expression and dampened p38 mitogen-activated (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activation. These data suggested that FA could effectively protect against APAP-induced liver injury by down-regulated expression of CYP 2E1 and the suppression of TLR4-mediated inflammatory responses. PMID:27830004

  6. Acetaminophen from liver to brain: New insights into drug pharmacological action and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Carolina I; Pérez, María J; Manautou, José E; Mottino, Aldo D

    2016-07-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a well-known analgesic and antipyretic drug. It is considered to be safe when administered within its therapeutic range, but in cases of acute intoxication, hepatotoxicity can occur. APAP overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the northern hemisphere. Historically, studies on APAP toxicity have been focused on liver, with alterations in brain function attributed to secondary effects of acute liver failure. However, in the last decade the pharmacological mechanism of APAP as a cannabinoid system modulator has been documented and some articles have reported "in situ" toxicity by APAP in brain tissue at high doses. Paradoxically, low doses of APAP have been reported to produce the opposite, neuroprotective effects. In this paper we present a comprehensive, up-to-date overview of hepatic toxicity as well as a thorough review of both toxic and beneficial effects of APAP in brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biochemical and Histological Effects of Thiamine Pyrophosphate against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Hilal Bektas; Dağlı, Bekir; Yılmaz, Mustafa; Kahyaoğlu, Fadime; Gökçimen, Alparslan; Ömürlü, İmran Kurt; Demirci, Buket

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) has biochemical and histological preventive effects on oxidative liver damage induced by paracetamol (APAP). Rats were divided into the following groups: healthy control (HG), APAP (AG, 1500 mg/kg, orally), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPPG, 100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), APAP+NAC (ANAC, 100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), APAP+TPP (ATPG) and APAP+NAC+TPP (ANTG). Oxidant, antioxidant parameters, liver function tests and histological assessment were performed between groups. Malondialdehyde levels in the AG, HG, TPPG, ANAC, ATPG and ANTG groups were 0.470 ± 0.210, 0.213 ± 0.004, 0.194 ± 0.001, 0.197 ± 0.06, 0.199 ± 0.008 and 0.173 ± 0.010 μmol/g protein, respectively. Total glutathione levels were 7.787 ± 0.395, 14.925 ± 0.932, 13.200 ± 0.984, 13.162 ± 0.486, 13.287 ± 0.787 and 13.500 ± 0.891 μm/g protein, respectively. In the AG group, marked liver damage occurred with the elevation of liver function tests and oxidative stress markers, such as malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide (p < 0.05). Biochemical results were congruent with the histological changes of oxidative damage. Compared to the AG group (p < 0.05), TPP significantly reduced oxidant parameter levels in the ATPG group and simultaneously increased the antioxidant parameter levels of catalase and glutathione. The histological changes were improved to almost normal hepatic structure. Moreover, TPP had nearly the same hepatoprotective effect as NAC, and there was statistically no additional benefit with NAC co-treatment. There was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) among the ANAC, ANTG and ATPG groups in terms of oxidant/antioxidant levels. TPP proved to be as efficacious as standard therapy and may be beneficial in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity.

  8. Mouse strain-dependent caspase activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity does not result in apoptosis or modulation of inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Koerner, Michael R.; Lampe, Jed N.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-12-15

    The mechanisms of acetaminophen (APAP)-mediated hepatic oncotic necrosis have been extensively characterized. However, it was recently demonstrated that fed CD-1 mice have a transient caspase activation which initiates apoptosis. To evaluate these findings in more detail, outbred (Swiss Webster, SW) and inbred (C57BL/6) mice were treated with APAP with or without pan-caspase inhibitor and compared to the apoptosis model of galactosamine (GalN)/endotoxin (ET). Fasted or fed APAP-treated C57BL/6 mice showed no evidence of caspase-3 processing or activity. Interestingly, a minor, temporary increase in caspase-3 processing and activity (150% above baseline) was observed after APAP treatment only in fed SW mice. The degree of caspase-3 activation in SW mice after APAP was minor compared to that observed in GalN/ET-treated mice (1600% above baseline). The pancaspase inhibitor attenuated caspase activation and resulted in increased APAP-induced injury (plasma ALT, necrosis scoring). The caspase inhibitor did not affect apoptosis because regardless of treatment only < 0.5% of hepatocytes showed consistent apoptotic morphology after APAP. In contrast, > 20% apoptotic cells were observed in GalN/ET-treated mice. Presence of the caspase inhibitor altered hepatic glutathione levels in SW mice, which could explain the exacerbation of injury. Additionally, the infiltration of hepatic neutrophils was not altered by the fed state of either mouse strain. Conclusion: Minor caspase-3 activation without apoptotic cell death can be observed only in fed mice of some outbred strains. These findings suggest that although the severity of APAP-induced liver injury varies between fed and fasted animals, the mechanism of cell death does not fundamentally change. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer During acetaminophen overdose caspase-3 can be activated in fed mice of certain outbred strains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hepatic ATP levels are not the determining factor for caspase

  9. S-adenosyl-L-methionine protection of acetaminophen mediated oxidative stress and identification of hepatic 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, James Mike; Kuhlman, Christopher; Terneus, Marcus V.; Labenski, Matthew T.; Lamyaithong, Andre Benja; Ball, John G.; Lau, Serrine S.; Valentovic, Monica A.

    2014-12-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is protected by S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) treatment 1 hour (h) after APAP in C57/Bl6 mice. This study examined protein carbonylation as well as mitochondrial and cytosolic protein adduction by 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) using mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Additional studies investigated the leakage of mitochondrial proteins and 4-HNE adduction of these proteins. Male C57/Bl6 mice (n = 5/group) were divided into the following groups and treated as indicated: Veh (15 ml/kg water, ip), SAMe (1.25 mmol/kg, ip), APAP (250 mg/kg), and SAMe given 1 h after APAP (S + A). APAP toxicity was confirmed by an increase (p < 0.05) in plasma ALT (U/l) and liver weight/10 g body weight relative to the Veh, SAMe and S + A groups 4 h following APAP treatment. SAMe administered 1 h post-APAP partially corrected APAP hepatotoxicity as ALT and liver weight/10 g body weights were lower in the S + A group compared the APAP group. APAP induced leakage of the mitochondrial protein, carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS-1) into the cytosol and which was reduced in the S + A group. SAMe further reduced the extent of APAP mediated 4-HNE adduction of CPS-1. MS analysis of hepatic and mitochondrial subcellular fractions identified proteins from APAP treated mice. Site specific 4-HNE adducts were identified on mitochondrial proteins sarcosine dehydrogenase and carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS-1). In summary, APAP is associated with 4-HNE adduction of proteins as identified by MS analysis and that CPS-1 leakage was greater in APAP treated mice. SAMe reduced the extent of 4-HNE adduction of proteins as well as leakage of CPS-1. - Highlights: • Acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity protected by S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) • 4-Hydroxynonenal adducted to sarcosine dehydrogenase • 4-Hydroxynonenal adducted to carbamoyl phosphate synthetase-1 • SAMe reduced APAP mediated CPS-1 mitochondrial leakage.

  10. Protective effects of pterostilbene against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, El-Sayed M; Mansour, Ahmed M; Nady, Mohamed E

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the protective effect of pterostilbene against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Silymarin was used as a standard hepatoprotective agent. A single dose of acetaminophen (800 mg/kg i.p.), injected to male rats, caused significant increases in serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and hepatic contents of malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, caspase-3, hydroxyproline, with significant decreases in serum HDL-cholesterol, total proteins, albumin, and hepatic activities of reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase as compared with the control group. On the other hand, administration of each of pterostilbene (50 mg/kg, p.o.) and silymarin (100 mg/kg, p.o.) for 15 days before acetaminophen ameliorated liver function and oxidative stress parameters. Histopathological evidence confirmed the protection offered by pterostilbene from the tissue damage caused by acetaminophen. In conclusion, pterostilbene possesses multimechanistic hepatoprotective activity that can be attributed to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic actions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Role of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the transcriptional regulation of brain ABC transporters during acute acetaminophen (APAP) intoxication in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Carolina I; Rudraiah, Swetha; Bataille, Amy M; Vigo, María B; Goedken, Michael J; Manautou, José E

    2015-04-01

    Changes in expression of liver ABC transporters have been described during acute APAP intoxication. However, the effect of APAP on brain ABC transporters is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of APAP on brain ABC transporters expression and the role of the oxidative stress sensor Nrf2. Male C57BL/6J mice were administered APAP (400mg/kg) for analysis of brain mRNA and protein expression of Mrp1-6, Bcrp and P-gp. The results show induction of P-gp, Mrp2 and Mrp4 proteins, with no changes in Bcrp, Mrp1 or Mrp5-6. The protein values were accompanied by corresponding changes in mRNA levels. Additionally, brain Nrf2 nuclear translocation and expression of two Nrf2 target genes, quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1) and Hemoxygenase 1 (Ho-1), was evaluated at 6, 12 and 24h after APAP treatment. Nrf2 nuclear content increased by 58% at 12h after APAP along with significant increments in mRNA and protein expression of Nqo1 and Ho-1. Furthermore, APAP treated Nrf2 knockout mice did not increase mRNA or protein expression of Mrp2 and Mrp4 as observed in wildtypes. In contrast, P-gp induction by APAP was observed in both genotypes. In conclusion, acute APAP intoxication induces protein expression of brain P-gp, Mrp2 and Mrp4. This study also suggests that brain changes in Mrp2 and Mrp4 expression may be due to in situ Nrf2 activation by APAP, while P-gp induction is independent of Nrf2 function. The functional consequences of these changes in brain ABC transporters by APAP deserve further attention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunohistochemical localization and quantification of the 3-(cystein-S-yl)-acetaminophen protein adduct in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D W; Bucci, T J; Benson, R W; Warbritton, A R; McRae, T A; Pumford, N R; Hinson, J A

    1991-02-01

    Acetaminophen overdose causes severe hepatotoxicity in humans and laboratory animals, presumably by metabolism to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine: and binding to cysteine groups as 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen-protein adduct. Antiserum specific for the adduct was used immunohistochemically to demonstrate the formation, distribution, and concentration of this specific adduct in livers of treated mice and was correlated with cell injury as a function of dose and time. Within the liver lobule, immunohistochemically demonstrable adduct occurred in a temporally progressive, central-to-peripheral pattern. There was concordance between immunohistochemical staining and quantification of the adduct in hepatic 10,000g supernate, using a quantitative particle concentration fluorescence immunoassay. Findings include: 1) immunochemically detectable adduct before the appearance of centrilobular necrosis, 2) distinctive lobular zones of adduct localization with subsequent depletion during the progression of toxicity, 3) drug-protein binding in hepatocytes at subhepatotoxic doses and before depletion of total hepatic glutathione, 4) immunohistochemical evidence of drug binding in the nucleus, and 5) adduct in metabolically active and dividing hepatocytes and in macrophagelike cells in the regenerating liver.

  13. Hepatoprotective, antioxidant, and ameliorative effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and vitamin E in acetaminophen treated rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Azeem, Amal S; Hegazy, Amany M; Ibrahim, Khadiga S; Farrag, Abdel-Razik H; El-Sayed, Eman M

    2013-09-01

    Ginger is a remedy known to possess a number of pharmacological properties. This study investigated efficacy of ginger pretreatment in alleviating acetaminophen-induced acute hepatotoxicity in rats. Rats were divided into six groups; negative control, acetaminophen (APAP) (600 mg/kg single intraperitoneal injection); vitamin E (75 mg/kg), ginger (100 mg/kg), vitamin E + APAP, and ginger + APAP. Administration of APAP elicited significant liver injury that was manifested by remarkable increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), arginase activities, and total bilirubin concentration. Meanwhile, APAP significantly decreased plasma total proteins and albumin levels. APAP administration resulted in substantial increase in each of plasma triacylglycerols (TAGs), malondialdhyde (MDA) levels, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). However, ginger or vitamin E treatment prior to APAP showed significant hepatoprotective effect by lowering the hepatic marker enzymes (AST, ALT, ALP, and arginase) and total bilirubin in plasma. In addition, they remarkably ameliorated the APAP-induced oxidative stress by inhibiting lipid peroxidation (MDA). Pretreatment by ginger or vitamin E significantly restored TAGs, and total protein levels. Histopathological examination of APAP treated rats showed alterations in normal hepatic histoarchitecture, with necrosis and vacuolization of cells. These alterations were substantially decreased by ginger or vitamin E. Our results demonstrated that ginger can prevent hepatic injuries, alleviating oxidative stress in a manner comparable to that of vitamin E. Combination therapy of ginger and APAP is recommended especially in cases with hepatic disorders or when high doses of APAP are required.

  14. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury in rats and mice: comparison of protein adducts, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the mechanism of toxicity.

    PubMed

    McGill, Mitchell R; Williams, C David; Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the West. In mice, APAP hepatotoxicity can be rapidly induced with a single dose. Because it is both clinically relevant and experimentally convenient, APAP intoxication has become a popular model of liver injury. Early data demonstrated that rats are resistant to APAP toxicity. As a result, mice are the preferred species for mechanistic studies. Furthermore, recent work has shown that the mechanisms of APAP toxicity in humans are similar to mice. Nevertheless, some investigators still use rats. New mechanistic information from the last forty years invites a reevaluation of the differences between these species. Comparison may provide interesting insights and confirm or exclude the rat as an option for APAP studies. To this end, we treated rats and mice with APAP and measured parameters of liver injury, APAP metabolism, oxidative stress, and activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Consistent with earlier data, we found that rats were highly resistant to APAP toxicity. Although overall APAP metabolism was similar in both species, mitochondrial protein adducts were significantly lower in rats. Accordingly, rats also had less oxidative stress. Finally, while mice showed extensive activation and mitochondrial translocation of JNK, this could not be detected in rat livers. These data support the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is critical for the development of necrosis after APAP treatment. Because mitochondrial damage also occurs in humans, rats are not a clinically relevant species for studies of APAP hepatotoxicity.

  15. Alteration in metabolism and toxicity of acetaminophen upon repeated administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun J; Lee, Min Y; Kwon, Do Y; Kim, Sung Y; Kim, Young C

    2009-10-01

    Our previous studies showed that administration of a subtoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) to female rats increased generation of carbon monoxide from dichloromethane, a metabolic reaction catalyzed mainly by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1. In this study we examined the changes in metabolism and toxicity of APAP upon repeated administration. An intraperitoneal dose of APAP (500 mg/kg) alone did not increase aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, or sorbitol dehydrogenase activity in serum, but was significantly hepatotoxic when the rats had been pretreated with an identical dose of APAP 18 h earlier. The concentrations and disappearance of APAP and its metabolites in plasma were monitored for 8 h after the treatment. APAP pretreatment reduced the elevation of APAP-sulfate, but increased APAP-cysteine concentrations in plasma. APAP or APAP-glucuronide concentrations were not altered. Administration of a single dose of APAP 18 h before sacrifice increased microsomal CYP activities measured with p-nitrophenol, p-nitroanisole, and aminopyrine as probes. Expression of CYP2E1, CYP3A, and CYP1A proteins in the liver was also elevated significantly. The results suggest that administration of APAP at a subtoxic dose may result in an induction of hepatic CYP enzymes, thereby altering metabolism and toxicological consequences of various chemical substances that are substrates for the same enzyme system.

  16. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate blocks acetaminophen toxicity by increasing ubiquitination-mediated ASK1 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qi; Xu, Xi; Kong, Yi; Zhang, Jianfa

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced liver failure in the world. Hepatic c-jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation is thought to be a consequence of oxidative stress produced during APAP metabolism. Activation of JNK signals causes hepatocellular damage with necrotic and apoptotic cell death. Here we found that APAP caused a feedback increase in plasma adenosine 5′-monophsphate (5′-AMP). We demonstrated that co-administration of APAP and 5′-AMP significantly ameliorated APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice, without influences on APAP metabolism and its analgesic function. The mechanism of protection by 5′-AMP was through inhibiting APAP-induced activation of JNK, and attenuating downstream c-jun and c-fos gene expression. This was triggered by attenuating apoptosis signal-regulated kinase 1(ASK1) methylation and increasing ubiquitination-mediated ASK1 protein degradation. Our findings indicate that replacing the current APAP with a safe and functional APAP/5′-AMP formulation could prevent APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:28031524

  17. Immunochemical quantitation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts in subcellular liver fractions following a hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Pumford, N R; Roberts, D W; Benson, R W; Hinson, J A

    1990-08-01

    The hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen correlates with the formation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts. Using a sensitive and specific immunochemical assay, we quantitated the formation of these protein adducts in liver fractions and serum after administration of a hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (400 mg/kg) to B6C3F1 mice. Adducts in the cytosolic fraction increased to 3.6 nmol/mg protein at 2 hr and then decreased to 1.1 nmol/mg protein by 8 hr. Concomitant with the decrease in adducts in the cytosol, 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts appeared in serum and their levels paralleled increases in serum alanine aminotransferase. Microsomal protein adducts peaked at 1 hr (0.7 nmol/mg protein) and subsequently decreased to 0.2 nmol/mg at 8 hr. The 4000 g pellet (nuclei, plasma membranes, and cell debris) had the highest level of adducts (3.5 nmol/mg protein), which remained constant from 1 to 8 hr. Evaluation of fractions purified from a 960 g pellet indicated that the highest concentration of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts was located in plasma membranes and mitochondria; peak levels were 10.3 and 5.1 nmol/mg respectively. 3-(Cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts were detected in nuclei only after enzymatic hydrolysis of the proteins. The localization of high levels of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts in plasma membranes and mitochondria may play a critical role in acetaminophen toxicity.

  18. Tigernut (Cyperus esculentus L.) “milk” as a potent “nutri-drink” for the prevention of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Onuoha, Nnenna Ola; Ogbusua, Nneoma Oleh; Okorie, Augustine N.; Ejike, Chukwunonso E. C. C.

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Background: Given the prevalence of toxicants in foods, beauty products, etc., and the increasing demand for “green” products, there is a need for the development of “nutri-drinks” with hepatoprotective properties. The usefulness of tigernut milk (TNM) in preventing acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury was, therefore, investigated. Materials and Methods: A total of 25 rats were randomized into five equal groups. Four groups were treated with 0, 500, 1000, and 2000 kg/mg body weight (bw) TNM, respectively, per os for 2 weeks before they were challenged with 2500 mg/kg bw APAP. Biochemical markers of hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress were determined in the sera of the rats at the end of the study. Results: Serum alanine aminotransferase concentrations decreased significantly (P < 0.001) and dose-dependently from 334.3 ± 16.1 in the negative control group to 65.4 ± 8.3 in the 2000 mg/kg bw TNM group. Other studied liver enzymes were similarly dose-dependently reduced. These data are corroborated by histological findings. Superoxide dismutase activity (U/mg protein) was increased significantly (P < 0.001) from 108.0 ± 7.4 in the negative control group to 291.0 ± 11.3 in the 2000 mg/kg bw TNM group, and indeed all the test groups. The malondialdehyde concentrations in the test rats were slightly lower than that of the negative control group. Conclusion: TNM at the tested concentrations significantly prevented liver injury. Phytochemicals in TNM, working directly as antioxidants or indirectly by inducing the synthesis of glutathione, may be responsible for the observed effect.

  19. Ascorbic acid prevents acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice by ameliorating glutathione recovery and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Lee, Jaeyong; Nabeshima, Atsunori; Homma, Takujiro; Kang, Eun Sil; Saito, Yuka; Yamada, Sohsuke; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Ken-Ichi; Miyata, Satoshi; Fujii, Junichi

    2016-08-15

    Aldehyde reductase (AKR1A) plays a role in the biosynthesis of ascorbic acid (AsA), and AKR1A-deficient mice produce about 10-15% of the AsA that is produced by wild-type mice. We found that acetaminophen (AAP) hepatotoxicity was aggravated in AKR1A-deficient mice. The pre-administration of AsA in the drinking water markedly ameliorated the AAP hepatotoxicity in the AKR1A-deficient mice. Treatment of the mice with AAP decreased both glutathione and AsA levels in the liver in the early phase after AAP administration, and an AsA deficiency delayed the recovery of the glutathione content in the healing phase. While in cysteine supply systems; a neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1, a cystine transporter xCT, enzymes for the transsulfuration pathway, and autophagy markers, were all elevated in the liver as the result of the AAP treatment, the AsA deficiency suppressed their induction. Thus, AsA appeared to exert a protective effect against AAP hepatotoxicity by ameliorating the supply of cysteine that is available for glutathione synthesis as a whole. Because some drugs produce reactive oxygen species, resulting in the consumption of glutathione during the metabolic process, the intake of sufficient amounts of AsA would be beneficial for protecting against the hepatic damage caused by such drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Protection afforded by pre- or post-treatment with 4-phenylbutyrate against liver injury induced by acetaminophen overdose in mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Daisuke; Ishitsuka, Yoichi; Miyata, Keishi; Tomishima, Yoshiro; Kondo, Yuki; Irikura, Mitsuru; Iwawaki, Takao; Oike, Yuichi; Irie, Tetsumi

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol; APAP) is a widely used analgesic/antipyretic drug with few adverse effects at therapeutic doses; suicidal or unintentional overdose of APAP frequently induces severe hepatotoxicity. To explore a new and effective antidote for APAP hepatotoxicity, this study examined the effects of sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA) on liver injury induced by APAP overdose in mice. Liver injury was induced in C57BL/6 male mice by intraperitoneal injection of APAP (400mg/kg). The effects of 4-PBA (100-200mg/kg) treatment at 1h before the APAP injection were evaluated with serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and blood ammonia levels, hepatic pathological changes, including histopathology, DNA damage, nitrotyrosine formation, and mRNA or protein expression involved in the development of hepatotoxicity, such as X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and B-cell lymphoma 2 interacting mediator of cell death (Bim). In addition, glutathione depletion and CYP2E1 protein expression, which are measures of the metabolic conversion of APAP to a toxic metabolite, were examined. Furthermore, we examined the effects of post-treatment with 4-PBA against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. When administered at 1h before APAP injection, 4-PBA significantly prevented the increase in serum ALT and blood ammonia levels, centrilobular necrosis of hepatocytes, DNA fragmentation, and nitrotyrosine formation induced by APAP in mice. 4-PBA also inhibited hepatic Xbp1 mRNA splicing and JNK phosphorylation induced by APAP, but did not suppress CHOP and Bim mRNA and protein expression. In addition, 4-PBA had little effect on hepatic glutathione depletion and CYP2E1 expression, parameters of toxic APAP metabolite production. Post-treatment with 4-PBA administration at 1 or 2h after APAP injection also attenuated the increase in serum ALT and blood ammonia levels and hepatic pathological changes in APAP

  1. Acute acetaminophen toxicity in transgenic mice with elevated hepatic glutathione.

    PubMed

    Rzucidlo, S J; Bounous, D I; Jones, D P; Brackett, B G

    2000-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that elevation of hepatic glutathione (GSH) concentrations protect against acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity in mice. Employing transgenic mice overexpressing glutathione synthetase, this study was conducted to determine if sustained elevation of hepatic GSH concentrations could ameliorate or prevent APAP toxicity. International Cancer Research transgenic mouse males and matched (ie same strain, sex, and age) control nontransgenic mice were pretreated ip with GSH synthetase substrate gamma-glutamylcysteinyl ethyl ester (gamma-GCE) or with saline. After a 16-h fast, mice received a single dose of 500 mg APAP/kg bw in saline ip and were sacrificed 4 h later. Other mice similarly pretreated were killed without APAP challenge. The elevated GSH concentrations in transgenic mice livers did not lessen APAP hepatotoxicity. Instead higher degrees of hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity were observed in transgenic mice than in controls as indicated by higher serum alanine aminotransferase activity and more severe histopathological lesions in transgenic mice livers and kidneys. Pretreatment with gamma-GCE did not affect either initial or post-APAP treatment tissue GSH concentrations or observed degrees of toxicity. Detection of a higher level of serum APAP in transgenic mice and the histopathological lesions found in transgenic mice kidneys together with no observable nephrotoxicity in control mice indicated early kidney damage in transgenic mice. Our findings suggest that high levels of GSH-APAP conjugates resulting from increased GSH concentrations in the livers of transgenic mice caused rapid kidney damage. Compromised excretory ability may have caused retention of APAP, which, in effect, elicited higher hepatotoxicity than that observed in nontransgenic mice.

  2. Competing Mechanistic Hypotheses of Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity Challenged by Virtual Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew K.; Ropella, Glen E. P.; Kennedy, Ryan C.; Kaplowitz, Neil; Ookhtens, Murad

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice is a model for drug-induced liver injury in humans. A precondition for improved strategies to disrupt and/or reverse the damage is a credible explanatory mechanism for how toxicity phenomena emerge and converge to cause hepatic necrosis. The Target Phenomenon in mice is that necrosis begins adjacent to the lobule’s central vein (CV) and progresses outward. An explanatory mechanism remains elusive. Evidence supports that location dependent differences in NAPQI (the reactive metabolite) formation within hepatic lobules (NAPQI zonation) are necessary and sufficient prerequisites to account for that phenomenon. We call that the NZ-mechanism hypothesis. Challenging that hypothesis in mice is infeasible because 1) influential variables cannot be controlled, and 2) it would require sequential intracellular measurements at different lobular locations within the same mouse. Virtual hepatocytes use independently configured periportal-to-CV gradients to exhibit lobule-location dependent behaviors. Employing NZ-mechanism achieved quantitative validation targets for acetaminophen clearance and metabolism but failed to achieve the Target Phenomenon. We posited that, in order to do so, at least one additional feature must exhibit zonation by decreasing in the CV direction. We instantiated and explored two alternatives: 1) a glutathione depletion threshold diminishes in the CV direction; and 2) ability to repair mitochondrial damage diminishes in the CV direction. Inclusion of one or the other feature into NZ-mechanism failed to achieve the Target Phenomenon. However, inclusion of both features enabled successfully achieving the Target Phenomenon. The merged mechanism provides a multilevel, multiscale causal explanation of key temporal features of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in mice. We discovered that variants of the merged mechanism provide plausible quantitative explanations for the considerable variation in 24-hour necrosis scores

  3. Competing Mechanistic Hypotheses of Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity Challenged by Virtual Experiments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew K; Petersen, Brenden K; Ropella, Glen E P; Kennedy, Ryan C; Kaplowitz, Neil; Ookhtens, Murad; Hunt, C Anthony

    2016-12-01

    Acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice is a model for drug-induced liver injury in humans. A precondition for improved strategies to disrupt and/or reverse the damage is a credible explanatory mechanism for how toxicity phenomena emerge and converge to cause hepatic necrosis. The Target Phenomenon in mice is that necrosis begins adjacent to the lobule's central vein (CV) and progresses outward. An explanatory mechanism remains elusive. Evidence supports that location dependent differences in NAPQI (the reactive metabolite) formation within hepatic lobules (NAPQI zonation) are necessary and sufficient prerequisites to account for that phenomenon. We call that the NZ-mechanism hypothesis. Challenging that hypothesis in mice is infeasible because 1) influential variables cannot be controlled, and 2) it would require sequential intracellular measurements at different lobular locations within the same mouse. Virtual hepatocytes use independently configured periportal-to-CV gradients to exhibit lobule-location dependent behaviors. Employing NZ-mechanism achieved quantitative validation targets for acetaminophen clearance and metabolism but failed to achieve the Target Phenomenon. We posited that, in order to do so, at least one additional feature must exhibit zonation by decreasing in the CV direction. We instantiated and explored two alternatives: 1) a glutathione depletion threshold diminishes in the CV direction; and 2) ability to repair mitochondrial damage diminishes in the CV direction. Inclusion of one or the other feature into NZ-mechanism failed to achieve the Target Phenomenon. However, inclusion of both features enabled successfully achieving the Target Phenomenon. The merged mechanism provides a multilevel, multiscale causal explanation of key temporal features of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in mice. We discovered that variants of the merged mechanism provide plausible quantitative explanations for the considerable variation in 24-hour necrosis scores

  4. Rifampicin-Activated Human Pregnane X Receptor and CYP3A4 Induction Enhance Acetaminophen-Induced ToxicityS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jie; Ma, Xiaochao; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Idle, Jeffrey R.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is safe at therapeutic levels but causes hepatotoxicity via N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine-induced oxidative stress upon overdose. To determine the effect of human (h) pregnane X receptor (PXR) activation and CYP3A4 induction on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, mice humanized for PXR and CYP3A4 (TgCYP3A4/hPXR) were treated with APAP and rifampicin. Human PXR activation and CYP3A4 induction enhanced APAP-induced hepatotoxicity as revealed by hepatic alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities elevated in serum, and hepatic necrosis after coadministration of rifampicin and APAP, compared with APAP administration alone. In contrast, hPXR mice, wild-type mice, and Pxr-null mice exhibited significantly lower ALT/AST levels compared with TgCYP3A4/hPXR mice after APAP administration. Toxicity was coincident with depletion of hepatic glutathione and increased production of hydrogen peroxide, suggesting increased oxidative stress upon hPXR activation. Moreover, mRNA analysis demonstrated that CYP3A4 and other PXR target genes were significantly induced by rifampicin treatment. Urinary metabolomic analysis indicated that cysteine-APAP and its metabolite S-(5-acetylamino-2-hydroxyphenyl)mercaptopyruvic acid were the major contributors to the toxic phenotype. Quantification of plasma APAP metabolites indicated that the APAP dimer formed coincident with increased oxidative stress. In addition, serum metabolomics revealed reduction of lysophosphatidylcholine in the APAP-treated groups. These findings demonstrated that human PXR is involved in regulation of APAP-induced toxicity through CYP3A4-mediated hepatic metabolism of APAP in the presence of PXR ligands. PMID:19460945

  5. Rifampicin-activated human pregnane X receptor and CYP3A4 induction enhance acetaminophen-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie; Ma, Xiaochao; Krausz, Kristopher W; Idle, Jeffrey R; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2009-08-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is safe at therapeutic levels but causes hepatotoxicity via N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine-induced oxidative stress upon overdose. To determine the effect of human (h) pregnane X receptor (PXR) activation and CYP3A4 induction on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, mice humanized for PXR and CYP3A4 (TgCYP3A4/hPXR) were treated with APAP and rifampicin. Human PXR activation and CYP3A4 induction enhanced APAP-induced hepatotoxicity as revealed by hepatic alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities elevated in serum, and hepatic necrosis after coadministration of rifampicin and APAP, compared with APAP administration alone. In contrast, hPXR mice, wild-type mice, and Pxr-null mice exhibited significantly lower ALT/AST levels compared with TgCYP3A4/hPXR mice after APAP administration. Toxicity was coincident with depletion of hepatic glutathione and increased production of hydrogen peroxide, suggesting increased oxidative stress upon hPXR activation. Moreover, mRNA analysis demonstrated that CYP3A4 and other PXR target genes were significantly induced by rifampicin treatment. Urinary metabolomic analysis indicated that cysteine-APAP and its metabolite S-(5-acetylamino-2-hydroxyphenyl)mercaptopyruvic acid were the major contributors to the toxic phenotype. Quantification of plasma APAP metabolites indicated that the APAP dimer formed coincident with increased oxidative stress. In addition, serum metabolomics revealed reduction of lysophosphatidylcholine in the APAP-treated groups. These findings demonstrated that human PXR is involved in regulation of APAP-induced toxicity through CYP3A4-mediated hepatic metabolism of APAP in the presence of PXR ligands.

  6. Plasma and liver acetaminophen-protein adduct levels in mice after acetaminophen treatment: dose-response, mechanisms, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    McGill, Mitchell R; Lebofsky, Margitta; Norris, Hye-Ryun K; Slawson, Matthew H; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Xie, Yuchao; Williams, C David; Wilkins, Diana G; Rollins, Douglas E; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-06-15

    At therapeutic doses, acetaminophen (APAP) is a safe and effective analgesic. However, overdose of APAP is the principal cause of acute liver failure in the West. Binding of the reactive metabolite of APAP (NAPQI) to proteins is thought to be the initiating event in the mechanism of hepatotoxicity. Early work suggested that APAP-protein binding could not occur without glutathione (GSH) depletion, and likely only at toxic doses. Moreover, it was found that protein-derived APAP-cysteine could only be detected in serum after the onset of liver injury. On this basis, it was recently proposed that serum APAP-cysteine could be used as diagnostic marker of APAP overdose. However, comprehensive dose-response and time course studies have not yet been done. Furthermore, the effects of co-morbidities on this parameter have not been investigated. We treated groups of mice with APAP at multiple doses and measured liver GSH and both liver and plasma APAP-protein adducts at various timepoints. Our results show that protein binding can occur without much loss of GSH. Importantly, the data confirm earlier work that showed that protein-derived APAP-cysteine can appear in plasma without liver injury. Experiments performed in vitro suggest that this may involve multiple mechanisms, including secretion of adducted proteins and diffusion of NAPQI directly into plasma. Induction of liver necrosis through ischemia-reperfusion significantly increased the plasma concentration of protein-derived APAP-cysteine after a subtoxic dose of APAP. While our data generally support the measurement of serum APAP-protein adducts in the clinic, caution is suggested in the interpretation of this parameter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute Liver Failure Due to Acetaminophen Poisoning in Patients With Prior Weight Loss Surgery: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Holt, Edward W; DeMartini, Sara; Davern, Timothy J

    2015-10-01

    To identify an association between prior weight loss surgery (WLS) and acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure (ALF). WLS, which has increased in proportion to the global rise of obesity, alters the absorption and metabolism of many drugs including acetaminophen (APAP) and may predispose to toxicity. No study has identified an association between prior WLS and APAP-ALF. We retrospectively reviewed a cohort of patients who presented to our center with ALF. We identified 101 patients who presented to our center with ALF between January 2009 and December 2011. All patients were prospectively enrolled into a database using consensus criteria. A history of WLS was obtained through a retrospective chart review. Fifty-four patients (53.5%) had APAP-ALF and 47 (46.5%) had ALF caused by other etiologies. A prior history of WLS was present in 9 of the 54 patients with APAP-ALF versus 0 of the 47 with non-APAP-ALF (P=0.003). Patients with APAP-ALF and prior WLS did not have higher rates of factors commonly associated with APAP overdose, including depression, alcohol abuse, intent to cause self-harm, or use of APAP-narcotic combination drugs. A history of WLS may predispose to hepatotoxicity and ALF caused by acetaminophen.

  8. Protective effect and mechanism of action of diallyl disulfide against acetaminophen-induced acute hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ko, Je-Won; Park, Sung-Hyeuk; Shin, Na-Rae; Shin, Jin-Young; Kim, Jeong-Won; Shin, In-Sik; Moon, Changjong; Heo, Jeong-Doo; Kim, Jong-Choon; Lee, In-Chul

    2017-08-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential protective effects of diallyl disulfide (DADS) against acetaminophen (AAP)-induced acute hepatotoxicity and elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying these protective effects in rats. Treatment with AAP caused acute hepatotoxicity manifested by elevated levels of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase with corresponding histopathological changes and high levels of oxidative stress in the livers. AAP treatment also caused hepatocellular apoptosis with phosphorylation of c-Jun-N-terminal protein kinase (JNK). In addition, AAP caused activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) concurrent with induction of inflammatory mediators. In contrast, pretreatment with DADS effectively attenuated acute liver injury and oxidative stress caused by AAP. DADS pretreatment suppressed cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) levels in a dose-dependent manner and inhibited elevation of CYP2E1 activity induced by AAP. DADS pretreatment suppressed the phosphorylation of JNK and attenuated hepatocellular apoptotic changes. In addition, DADS inhibited the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and subsequent induction of inflammatory mediators. Overall, these results indicate that DADS confers a protective effect against oxidative stress-mediated JNK activation and apoptotic changes caused by AAP in the rat livers. This may be due to its ability to inhibit CYP2E1, enhance antioxidant enzymes activities, and suppress NF-κB activation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury in rats and mice: Comparison of protein adducts, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the mechanism of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Williams, C. David; Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the West. In mice, APAP hepatotoxicity can be rapidly induced with a single dose. Because it is both clinically relevant and experimentally convenient, APAP intoxication has become a popular model of liver injury. Early data demonstrated that rats are resistant to APAP toxicity. As a result, mice are the preferred species for mechanistic studies. Furthermore, recent work has shown that the mechanisms of APAP toxicity in humans are similar to mice. Nevertheless, some investigators still use rats. New mechanistic information from the last forty years invites a reevaluation of the differences between these species. Comparison may provide interesting insights and confirm or exclude the rat as an option for APAP studies. To this end, we treated rats and mice with APAP and measured parameters of liver injury, APAP metabolism, oxidative stress, and activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Consistent with earlier data, we found that rats were highly resistant to APAP toxicity. Although overall APAP metabolism was similar in both species, mitochondrial protein adducts were significantly lower in rats. Accordingly, rats also had less oxidative stress. Finally, while mice showed extensive activation and mitochondrial translocation of JNK, this could not be detected in rat livers. These data support the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is critical for the development of necrosis after APAP treatment. Because mitochondrial damage also occurs in humans, rats are not a clinically relevant species for studies of APAP hepatotoxicity. Highlights: ► Acetaminophen overdose causes severe liver injury only in mice but not in rats. ► APAP causes hepatic GSH depletion and protein adduct formation in rats and mice. ► Less protein adducts were measured in rat liver mitochondria compared to mouse. ► No oxidant stress, peroxynitrite formation or JNK activation was present in rats. ► The

  10. Antioxidant properties of Taraxacum officinale leaf extract are involved in the protective effect against hepatoxicity induced by acetaminophen in mice.

    PubMed

    Colle, Dirleise; Arantes, Leticia Priscilla; Gubert, Priscila; da Luz, Sônia Cristina Almeida; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Teixeira Rocha, João Batista; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes

    2012-06-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity has been related to several cases of hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatic transplant. As APAP hepatotoxicity is related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and excessive oxidative stress, natural antioxidant compounds have been tested as an alternative therapy to diminish the hepatic dysfunction induced by APAP. Taraxacum officinale Weber (Family Asteraceae), commonly known as dandelion, is used for medicinal purposes because of its choleretic, diuretic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and hepatoprotective properties. This study evaluated the hepatoprotective activity of T. officinale leaf extract against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. T. officinale was able to decrease thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels induced by 200 mg/kg APAP (p.o.), as well as prevent the decrease in sulfhydryl levels caused by APAP treatment. Furthermore, histopathological alterations, as well as the increased levels of serum aspartate and alanine aminotransferases caused by APAP, were prevented by T. officinale (0.1 and 0.5 mg/mL). In addition, T. officinale extract also demonstrated antioxidant activity in vitro, as well as scavenger activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and nitric oxide radicals. Our results clearly demonstrate the hepatoprotective effect of T. officinale against the toxicity induced by APAP. The possible mechanisms involved include its scavenger activities against ROS and reactive nitrogen species, which are attributed to the content of phenolic compounds in the extract.

  11. Changes in pharmacokinetic profiles of acetaminophen and its glucuronide after pretreatment with combinations of N-acetylcysteine and either glycyrrhizin, silibinin or spironolactone in rat.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruijuan; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Jing; Zang, Min; Liu, Xiaoquan; Yang, Jin

    2014-06-01

    1. The present study was to investigate the effects of giving N-acetylcysteine (NAC) alone and in combination with either glycyrrhizin (GL), silibinin (SIB) or spironolactone (SL) on the plasma pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles, hepatic exposure, biliary excretion and urinary excretion of acetaminophen (APAP) and its major metabolite, acetaminophen glucuronide (AG). 2. Groups of rats (n = 5) were pretreated with oral doses of either NAC, NAC + GL, NAC + SIB or NAC + SL on five occasions every 12 h. At 1 h, after the last dose, they received APAP (200 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection. Blood, bile, liver and urine samples were collected at various times after APAP injection and analyzed for APAP and AG by HPLC. NAC alone and NAC + SIB did not significantly change the PK profiles of APAP and AG. In contrast, NAC + GL decreased the biliary excretion of APAP and AG leading to accumulation of APAP in the liver and systemic circulation whereas NAC + SL [multidrug resistance associated 2 (Mrp2) inducer] increased the biliary excretion of AG and decreased the hepatic exposure to APAP and AG. 3. Our results suggest that Mrp2 inhibitor GL should be discouraged with NAC to treat APAP hepatotoxicity. Such PK drug-drug interactions should be considered in the treatment of APAP-induced liver injury.

  12. Biliary excretion of acetaminophen-glutathione as an index of toxic activation of acetaminophen: effect of chemicals that alter acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Madhu, C.; Gregus, Z.; Klaassen, C.D.

    1989-03-01

    Acetaminophen (AA) is converted, presumably by cytochrome P-450, to an electrophile which is conjugated with glutathione (GS). AA-GS is excreted into bile, therefore the biliary excretion rate of AA-GS may reflect the rate of activation of AA in vivo. In order to test this hypothesis, the effect of agents capable of altering the activation of AA including cytochrome P-450 inducers and inhibitors, cobaltous chloride which decreases the amount of P-450, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors (indomethacin and naproxen), antioxidants (butylated hydroxyanisole, alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid and ascorbic acid palmitate) and other chemicals known to decrease AA hepatotoxicity (dimethylsulfoxide and cysteamine), on the biliary excretion of AA-GS was studied in hamsters, the species most sensitive to AA-induced hepatotoxicity. The biliary excretion of AA-GS increased linearly up to 1 mmol/kg of AA i.v., but at higher dosages exhibited saturation kinetics. Dosages above 0.5 mmol/kg lowered hepatic GS concentration. Of the cytochrome P-450 inducers, 3-methylcholanthrene and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, increased the biliary excretion of AA-GS (2.9- and 3.2-fold, respectively) whereas ethanol and isoniazid did not affect it, and pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile tended to decrease it (43%). Phenobarbital tended to increase the biliary excretion of AA-GS, but not in a statistically significant manner. Several cytochrome P-450 inhibitors (metyrapone, 8-methoxypsoralen, 2-(4,6-dichloro-biphenyloxy) ethylamine, alpha-naphthoflavone and cimetidine) decreased the biliary excretion of AA-GS, although SKF 525-A and piperonyl butoxide did not. Cobaltous chloride decreased dramatically the biliary excretion of AA-GS.

  13. Toll-like receptor 4 blocker as potential therapy for acetaminophen-induced organ failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    SALAMA, MOHAMED; ELGAMAL, MOHAMED; ABDELAZIZ, AZZA; ELLITHY, MOATAZ; MAGDY, DINA; ALI, LINA; FEKRY, EMAD; MOHSEN, ZINAB; MOSTAFA, MARIAM; ELGAMAL, HODA; SHEASHAA, HUSSEIN; SOBH, MOHAMED

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP, 4-hydroxyacetanilide) is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the United States. In addition to exhibiting hepatotoxicity, APAP exerts a nephrotoxic effect may be independent of the induced liver damage. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been suggested as a potential class of novel therapeutic targets. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of the TLR-4 blocker TAK-242 in the prevention of APAP-induced hepato-renal failure. Four groups of C57BL mice were studied: Vehicle-treated/control (VEH), APAP-treated (APAP), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC)-pretreated plus APAP (APAP + NAC) and TAK-242-pretreated plus APAP (APAP + TAK) groups. Mice were clinically assessed then perfused 4 h later. Liver and kidney tissues were collected and examined histologically using basic hematoxylin and eosin staining to detect signs of necrosis and inflammation. Plasma samples were collected to measure the levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase and serum creatinine. In addition, liver and kidney tissues were assayed to determine the levels of reduced glutathione. The results of the present study indicate the potential role of TLR-4 in APAP-induced organ toxicity. In the APAP + TAK and APAP + NAC groups, histopathological examination indicated that pretreatment with TAK-242 or NAC afforded protection against APAP-induced injury. However, this protective effect was more clinically evident in the APAP + TAK group compared with the APAP + NAC group. The various biochemical parameters (serum enzymes and reduced glutathione) revealed no significant protection in either of the pretreated groups. Therefore, the present study indicated that the TLR-4 blocker had protective effects against acute APAP toxicity in liver and kidney tissues. These effects were identified clinically, histologically and biochemically. Furthermore, the TLR-4 blocker TAK-242 exhibited antioxidant properties in addition to anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:26170942

  14. Toll-like receptor 4 blocker as potential therapy for acetaminophen-induced organ failure in mice.

    PubMed

    Salama, Mohamed; Elgamal, Mohamed; Abdelaziz, Azza; Ellithy, Moataz; Magdy, Dina; Ali, Lina; Fekry, Emad; Mohsen, Zinab; Mostafa, Mariam; Elgamal, Hoda; Sheashaa, Hussein; Sobh, Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP, 4-hydroxyacetanilide) is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the United States. In addition to exhibiting hepatotoxicity, APAP exerts a nephrotoxic effect may be independent of the induced liver damage. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been suggested as a potential class of novel therapeutic targets. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of the TLR-4 blocker TAK-242 in the prevention of APAP-induced hepato-renal failure. Four groups of C57BL mice were studied: Vehicle-treated/control (VEH), APAP-treated (APAP), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC)-pretreated plus APAP (APAP + NAC) and TAK-242-pretreated plus APAP (APAP + TAK) groups. Mice were clinically assessed then perfused 4 h later. Liver and kidney tissues were collected and examined histologically using basic hematoxylin and eosin staining to detect signs of necrosis and inflammation. Plasma samples were collected to measure the levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase and serum creatinine. In addition, liver and kidney tissues were assayed to determine the levels of reduced glutathione. The results of the present study indicate the potential role of TLR-4 in APAP-induced organ toxicity. In the APAP + TAK and APAP + NAC groups, histopathological examination indicated that pretreatment with TAK-242 or NAC afforded protection against APAP-induced injury. However, this protective effect was more clinically evident in the APAP + TAK group compared with the APAP + NAC group. The various biochemical parameters (serum enzymes and reduced glutathione) revealed no significant protection in either of the pretreated groups. Therefore, the present study indicated that the TLR-4 blocker had protective effects against acute APAP toxicity in liver and kidney tissues. These effects were identified clinically, histologically and biochemically. Furthermore, the TLR-4 blocker TAK-242 exhibited antioxidant properties in addition to anti-inflammatory effects.

  15. Acetaminophen induces JNK/p38 signaling and activates the caspase-9-3-dependent cell death pathway in human mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    YIANG, GIOU-TENG; YU, YUNG-LUNG; LIN, KO-TING; CHEN, JEN-NI; CHANG, WEI-JUNG; WEI, CHYOU-WEI

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug. Generally, the therapeutic dose of APAP is clinically safe, however, high doses of APAP can cause acute liver and kidney injury. Therefore, the majority of previous studies have focussed on elucidating the mechanisms of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity, in addition to examining ways to treat these conditions in clinical cases. However, few studies have reported APAP-induced intoxication in human stem cells. Stem cells are important in cell proliferation, differentiation and repair during human development, particularly during fetal and child development. At present, whether APAP causes cytotoxic effects in human stem cells remains to be elucidated, therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the cellular effects of APAP treatment in human stem cells. The results of the present study revealed that high-dose APAP induced more marked cytotoxic effects in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) than in renal tubular cells. In addition, increased levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38, and activation of caspase-9/-3 cascade were observed in the APAP-treated hMSCs. By contrast, antioxidants, including vitamin C reduced APAP-induced augmentations in H2O2 levels, but did not inhibit the APAP-induced cytotoxic effects in the hMSCs. These results suggested that high doses of APAP may cause serious damage towards hMSCs. PMID:26096646

  16. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-10-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose.

  17. Targeted liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis of serum acylcarnitines in acetaminophen toxicity in children

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa M; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda G; Beger, Richard D; Sullivan, Janice E; Kearns, Gregory L; Reed, Michael D; Marshall, James D; Van Den Anker, John N; James, Laura P

    2014-01-01

    Aim Long-chain acylcarnitines have been postulated to be sensitive biomarkers of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in mouse models. In the following study, the relationship of acylcarnitines with other known indicators of APAP toxicity was examined in children receiving low-dose (therapeutic) and high-dose (‘overdose’ or toxic ingestion) exposure to APAP. Materials & methods The study included three subject groups: group A (therapeutic dose, n = 187); group B (healthy controls, n = 23); and group C (overdose, n = 62). Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected for each subject. Serum samples were used for measurement of APAP protein adducts, a biomarker of the oxidative metabolism of APAP and for targeted metabolomics analysis of serum acylcarnitines using ultra performance liquid chromatography–triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry. Results Significant increases in oleoyl- and palmitoyl-carnitines were observed with APAP exposure (low dose and overdose) compared with controls. Significant increases in serum ALT, APAP protein adducts and acylcarnitines were observed in overdose children that received delayed treatment (time to treatment from overdose >24 h) with the antidote N-acetylcysteine. Time to peak APAP protein adducts in serum was shorter than that of the acylcarnitines and serum ALT. Conclusion Perturbations in long-chain acylcarnitines in children with APAP toxicity suggest that mitochrondrial injury and associated impairment in the β-oxidation of fatty acids are clinically relevant as biomarkers of APAP toxicity. PMID:24521011

  18. Deficiency of Interleukin-15 Enhances Susceptibility to Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hsein-San; Liao, Ching-Len; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Liao, Nan-Shih; Huang, Tien-Yu; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan; Chu, Heng-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocytes have a direct necrotic role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury (AILI), prolonged secondary inflammatory response through innate immune cells and cytokines also significantly contributes to APAP hepatotoxicity. Interleukin 15 (IL-15), a multifunction cytokine, regulates the adaptive immune system and influences development and function of innate immune cells. To better understand the role of IL-15 in liver injury, we treated wild-type (WT) and IL-15-knockout (Il15−/−) mice with a hepatotoxic dose of APAP to induce AILI and evaluated animal survival, liver damage, APAP metabolism in livers and the inflammatory response. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines was greater in Il15−/− than WT mice. Subanalysis of hepatic infiltrated monocytes revealed greater neutrophil influx, along with greater hepatic induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), in Il15−/− than WT mice. In addition, the level of hepatic hemeoxygenase 1 (HO-1) was partially suppressed in Il15−/− mice, but not in WT mice. Interestingly, elimination of Kupffer cells and neutrophils did not alter the vulnerability to excess APAP in Il15−/− mice. However, injection of galactosamine, a hepatic transcription inhibitor, significantly reduced the increased APAP sensitivity in Il15−/− mice but had minor effect on WT mice. We demonstrated that deficiency of IL-15 increased mouse susceptibility to AILI. Moreover, Kupffer cell might affect APAP hepatotoxicity through IL-15. PMID:23028657

  19. N-acetylcysteine amide, a promising antidote for acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Khayyat, Ahdab; Tobwala, Shakila; Hart, Marcia; Ercal, Nuran

    2016-01-22

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP) is one of the most widely used over the counter antipyretic and analgesic medications. It is safe at therapeutic doses, but its overdose can result in severe hepatotoxicity, a leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in the USA. Depletion of glutathione (GSH) is one of the initiating steps in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity; therefore, one strategy for restricting organ damage is to restore GSH levels by using GSH prodrugs. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a GSH precursor, is the only currently approved antidote for an acetaminophen overdose. Unfortunately, fairly high doses and longer treatment times are required due to its poor bioavailability. In addition, oral and I.V. administration of NAC in a hospital setting are laborious and costly. Therefore, we studied the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), a novel antioxidant with higher bioavailability, and compared it with NAC in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice. Our results showed that NACA is better than NAC at a low dose (106mg/kg) in preventing oxidative stress and protecting against APAP-induced damage. NACA significantly increased GSH levels and the GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver to 66.5% and 60.5% of the control, respectively; and it reduced the level of ALT by 30%. However, at the dose used, NAC was not effective in combating the oxidative stress induced by APAP. Thus, NACA appears to be better than NAC in reducing the oxidative stress induced by APAP. It would be of great value in the health care field to develop drugs like NACA as more effective and safer options for the prevention and therapeutic intervention in APAP-induced toxicity.

  20. Chitosan and blueberry treatment induces arginase activity and inhibits nitric oxide production during acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ozcelik, Eda; Uslu, Sema; Burukoglu, Dilek; Musmul, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Background: Liver diseases have become a major problem of the worldwide. More than 50% of all cases of liver failure can be attributed to drugs. Among these, acetaminophen is the most common cause. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the the hepatoprotective effects of blueberry and chitosan on tissue arginase activity, ornithine and nitric oxide levels during the acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Acetaminophen (250 mg/kg body weight per day), blueberry (60 mg/kg body weight per day) and, chitosan (200 mg/kg body weight per day) were administered to the rats by oral gavage during the experimental period. Results: Blueberry and chitosan significantly decreased liver arginase activity and ornithine levelsand and increased nitric oxide levels. Glutathione levels were remarkably increased by chitosan and blueberry treatments. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that blueberry and chitosan effectively protected against the acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. The hepatoprotective effect afforded by blueberry and chitosan can be attributed to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:24991095

  1. Serotonin Deficiency Exacerbates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Toxicity In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingyao; Song, Sidong; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Ruiyao; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Sushun; Meng, Fandi; Wu, Qifei; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a major cause of acute liver failure. Peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) is a cytoprotective neurotransmitter which is also involved in the hepatic physiological and pathological process. This study seeks to investigate the mechanisms involved in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, as well as the role of 5-HT in the liver's response to APAP toxicity. We induced APAP hepatotoxicity in mice either sufficient of serotonin (wild-type mice and TPH1-/- plus 5- Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)) or lacking peripheral serotonin (Tph1-/- and wild-type mice plus p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA)).Mice with sufficient 5-HT exposed to acetaminophen have a significantly lower mortality rate and a better outcome compared with mice deficient of 5-HT. This difference is at least partially attributable to a decreased level of inflammation, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, Glutathione (GSH) depletion, peroxynitrite formation, hepatocyte apoptosis, elevated hepatocyte proliferation, activation of 5-HT2B receptor, less activated c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in the mice sufficient of 5-HT versus mice deficient of 5-HT. We thus propose a physiological function of serotonin that serotonin could ameliorate APAP-induced liver injury mainly through inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis ER stress and promoting liver regeneration. PMID:25631548

  2. Serotonin deficiency exacerbates acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyao; Song, Sidong; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Ruiyao; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Sushun; Meng, Fandi; Wu, Qifei; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-29

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a major cause of acute liver failure. Peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) is a cytoprotective neurotransmitter which is also involved in the hepatic physiological and pathological process. This study seeks to investigate the mechanisms involved in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, as well as the role of 5-HT in the liver's response to APAP toxicity. We induced APAP hepatotoxicity in mice either sufficient of serotonin (wild-type mice and TPH1-/- plus 5- Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)) or lacking peripheral serotonin (Tph1-/- and wild-type mice plus p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA)). Mice with sufficient 5-HT exposed to acetaminophen have a significantly lower mortality rate and a better outcome compared with mice deficient of 5-HT. This difference is at least partially attributable to a decreased level of inflammation, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, Glutathione (GSH) depletion, peroxynitrite formation, hepatocyte apoptosis, elevated hepatocyte proliferation, activation of 5-HT2B receptor, less activated c-Jun NH₂-terminal kinase (JNK) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in the mice sufficient of 5-HT versus mice deficient of 5-HT. We thus propose a physiological function of serotonin that serotonin could ameliorate APAP-induced liver injury mainly through inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis ER stress and promoting liver regeneration.

  3. Platelets and protease-activated receptor-4 contribute to acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Kazuhisa; Joshi, Nikita; Sullivan, Bradley P.; Albee, Ryan; Brandenberger, Christina; Jaeschke, Hartmut; McGill, Mitchell R.; Scott, Michael A.; Ganey, Patricia E.; Luyendyk, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury in humans is associated with robust coagulation cascade activation and thrombocytopenia. However, it is not known whether coagulation-driven platelet activation participates in APAP hepatotoxicity. Here, we found that APAP overdose in mice caused liver damage accompanied by significant thrombocytopenia and accumulation of platelets in the liver. These changes were attenuated by administration of the direct thrombin inhibitor lepirudin. Platelet depletion with an anti-CD41 antibody also significantly reduced APAP-mediated liver injury and thrombin generation, indicated by the concentration of thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complexes in plasma. Compared with APAP-treated wild-type mice, biomarkers of hepatocellular and endothelial damage, plasma TAT concentration, and hepatic platelet accumulation were reduced in mice lacking protease-activated receptor (PAR)-4, which mediates thrombin signaling in mouse platelets. However, selective hematopoietic cell PAR-4 deficiency did not affect APAP-induced liver injury or plasma TAT levels. These results suggest that interconnections between coagulation and hepatic platelet accumulation promote APAP-induced liver injury, independent of platelet PAR-4 signaling. Moreover, the results highlight a potential contribution of nonhematopoietic cell PAR-4 signaling to APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:26179083

  4. Chemical composition and hepatoprotective activity of ethanolic root extract of Taraxacum Syriacum Boiss against acetaminophen intoxication in rats.

    PubMed

    Nazari, A; Fanaei, H; Dehpour, A R; Hassanzadeh, G; Jafari, M; Salehi, M; Mohammadi, M

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the role of ethanol extract of root of Taraxacum Syriacum Boiss (TSBE) against hepatotoxicity caused by acetaminophen (APAP) was studied. The chemical composition of roots of Taraxacum Syriacum Boiss was analyzed by SPME-GC/MS method. Hepatocellular injuries induced by acetaminophen (APAP) were assessed by liver histology, serum aminotransferase activities, antioxidant enzymes activity and lipid peroxidation in liver tissue. TSBE was observed to exhibit hepatoprotective effect as demonstrated by significant decrease in serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) concentration, and by preventing liver histopathologic changes in rats with APAP hepatotoxicity. Administration of APAP, significantly increased, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and catalase (CAT) activity in liver tissue and pretreatment with TSBE returned these parameters to control group, moreover TSBE reduces APAP-induced hepatic Glutathione (GSH) depletion. Carvacrol (6.7 %) was the main polyphenolic compound of plant sample. Our results demonstrated hepatoprotective activity of TSBE in rat in vivo. We believe that the mechanism by which the extract was able to protect the liver from the oxidative stress generated by APAP is due to its antioxidant activity. These phenolic compounds of the extract act as antioxidants and free radical scavengers and reduce or inhibit the oxidative stress induced by APAP administration (Tab. 3, Fig. 3, Ref. 39).

  5. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Mossanen, J C; Tacke, F

    2015-04-01

    The induction of acute hepatic damage by acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol [APAP]), also termed paracetamol, is one of the most commonly used experimental models of acute liver injury in mice. The specific values of this model are the highly reproducible, dose-dependent hepatotoxicity of APAP and its outstanding translational importance, because acetaminophen overdose is one of the most frequent reasons for acute liver failure (ALF) in humans. However, preparation of concentrated APAP working solutions, application routes, fasting period and variability due to sex, genetic background or barrier environment represent important considerations to be taken into account before implementing this model. This standard operating procedure (SOP) provides a detailed protocol for APAP preparation and application in mice, aimed at facilitating comparability between research groups as well as minimizing animal numbers and distress. The mouse model of acetaminophen poisoning therefore helps to unravel the pathogenesis of APAP-induced toxicity or subsequent immune responses in order to explore new therapeutic interventions for improving the prognosis of ALF in patients. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. Effect of repeated administration with subtoxic doses of acetaminophen to rats on enterohepatic recirculation of a subsequent toxic dose.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Carolina I; Ruiz, María L; Villanueva, Silvina S M; Luquita, Marcelo; Llesuy, Susana; Catania, Viviana A; Bengochea, Laura A; Mottino, Aldo D

    2009-05-15

    Development of resistance to toxic effects of acetaminophen (APAP) was reported in rodents and humans, though the mechanism is only partially understood. We examined in rats the effect of administration with subtoxic daily doses (0.2, 0.3, and 0.6g/kg, i.p.) of APAP on enterohepatic recirculation and liver toxicity of a subsequent i.p. toxic dose of 1g/kg, given 24h after APAP pre-treatment. APAP and its major metabolite APAP-glucuronide (APAP-Glu) were determined in bile, urine, serum and liver homogenate. APAP pre-treatment was not toxic, as determined by serum markers of liver damage and neither induced oxidative stress as demonstrated by assessment of ROS generation in liver or glutathione species in liver and bile. APAP pre-treatment induced a partial shift from biliary to urinary elimination of APAP-Glu after administration with the toxic dose, and decreased hepatic content and increased serum content of this conjugate, consistent with a marked up-regulation of its basolateral transporter Mrp3 relative to apical Mrp2. Preferential secretion of APAP-glu into blood decreased enterohepatic recirculation of APAP, thus attenuating liver exposition to the intact drug, as demonstrated 6h after administration with the toxic dose. The beneficial effect of interfering the enterohepatic recirculation was alternatively tested in animals receiving activated charcoal by gavage to adsorb APAP of biliary origin. The data indicated decreased liver APAP content and glutathione consumption. We conclude that selective up-regulation of Mrp3 expression by APAP pre-treatment may contribute to development of resistance to APAP hepatotoxicity, at least in part by decreasing its enterohepatic recirculation.

  7. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury in obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Michaut, Anaïs; Moreau, Caroline; Robin, Marie-Anne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2014-08-01

    Although acetaminophen (APAP) is usually considered as a safe drug, this painkiller can lead to acute liver failure after overdoses. Moreover, there is evidence that the maximum recommended dosage can induce hepatic cytolysis in some individuals. Several predisposing factors appear to enhance the risk and severity of APAP-induced liver injury including chronic alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which refers to a large spectrum of hepatic lesions linked to obesity. In contrast, obesity by itself does not seem to be associated with a higher risk of APAP-induced liver injury. Since 1987, seven studies dealt with APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in rodent models of NAFLD and five of them found that this liver disease was associated with higher APAP toxicity. Unfortunately, these studies did not unequivocally established the mechanism(s) whereby NAFLD could favour APAP hepatotoxicity, although some investigations suggested that pre-existent induction of hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) could play a significant role by increasing the generation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), the toxic metabolite of APAP. Moreover, pre-existent mitochondrial dysfunction associated with NAFLD could also be involved. In contrast, some investigations suggested that factors that could reduce the risk and severity of APAP hepatotoxicity in obesity and NAFLD include higher hepatic APAP glucuronidation, reduced CYP3A4 activity and increased volume of body distribution. Thus, the occurrence and the outcome of APAP-induced liver injury in an obese individual with NAFLD might depend on a delicate balance between metabolic factors that can be protective and others that favour large hepatic levels of NAPQI. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Nanoparticles formulation of Cuscuta chinensis prevents acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Yen, Feng-Lin; Wu, Tzu-Hui; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Cham, Thau-Ming; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2008-05-01

    Cuscuta chinensis is a commonly used traditional Chinese medicine to nourish the liver and kidney. Due to the poor water solubility of its major constituents such as flavonoids and lignans, its absorption upon oral administration could be limited. The purpose of the present study was to use the nanosuspension method to prepare C. chinensis nanoparticles (CN), and to compare the hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects of C. chinensis ethanolic extract (CE) and CN on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. An oral dose of CE at 125 and 250 mg/kg and CN at 25 and 50mg/kg showed a significant hepatoprotective effect relatively to the same extent (P<0.05) by reducing levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase. These biochemical assessments were supported by rat hepatic biopsy examinations. In addition, the antioxidant activities of CE and CN both significantly increased superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and reduced malondialdehyde (P<0.05). Moreover, the results also indicated that the hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects of 50 mg/kg CN was effectively better than 125 mg/kg CE (P<0.05), and an oral dose of CN that is five times as less as CE could exhibit similar levels of outcomes. In conclusion, we suggest that the nanoparticles system can be applied to overcome other water poorly soluble herbal medicines and furthermore to decrease the treatment dosage.

  9. Patient perception and knowledge of acetaminophen in a large family medicine service.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Christopher M; Dankenbring, Dawn M

    2014-06-01

    The use of acetaminophen is currently under increased scrutiny by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) due to the risk of intentional and more concerning, unintentional overdose-related hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen is responsible for an estimated 48% of all acute liver failure diagnoses. The purpose of this study is to evaluate patient perception and knowledge of the safe use and potential toxicity of acetaminophen-containing products. The authors conducted a descriptive, 2-week study using a convenience sample from a large family medicine clinic waiting room. Survey questions assessed ability to identify acetaminophen, knowledge of the current recommended maximum daily dose, respondent acetaminophen use patterns, common adverse effects associated with acetaminophen, and respondent self-reported alcohol consumption. Acetaminophen safety information was provided to all persons regardless of participation in the study. Of the 102 patients who chose to participate, 79% recognized acetaminophen as a synonym of Tylenol, whereas only 9% identified APAP as a frequently used abbreviation. One third of respondents thought acetaminophen was synonymous with ibuprofen and naproxen. Approximately one fourth of patients correctly identified the then maximum recommended daily acetaminophen dose of 4 g. Seventy-eight percent of patients correctly identified hepatotoxicity as the most common serious adverse effect. We conclude that patient deficiencies in knowledge of acetaminophen recognition, dosing, and toxicity warrant public education by health professionals at all levels of interaction. Current initiatives are promising; however, further efforts are required.

  10. Plasma and liver acetaminophen-protein adduct levels in mice after acetaminophen treatment: Dose–response, mechanisms, and clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Norris, Hye-Ryun K.; Slawson, Matthew H.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Xie, Yuchao; Williams, C. David; Wilkins, Diana G.; Rollins, Douglas E.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-06-15

    At therapeutic doses, acetaminophen (APAP) is a safe and effective analgesic. However, overdose of APAP is the principal cause of acute liver failure in the West. Binding of the reactive metabolite of APAP (NAPQI) to proteins is thought to be the initiating event in the mechanism of hepatotoxicity. Early work suggested that APAP-protein binding could not occur without glutathione (GSH) depletion, and likely only at toxic doses. Moreover, it was found that protein-derived APAP-cysteine could only be detected in serum after the onset of liver injury. On this basis, it was recently proposed that serum APAP-cysteine could be used as diagnostic marker of APAP overdose. However, comprehensive dose–response and time course studies have not yet been done. Furthermore, the effects of co-morbidities on this parameter have not been investigated. We treated groups of mice with APAP at multiple doses and measured liver GSH and both liver and plasma APAP-protein adducts at various timepoints. Our results show that protein binding can occur without much loss of GSH. Importantly, the data confirm earlier work that showed that protein-derived APAP-cysteine can appear in plasma without liver injury. Experiments performed in vitro suggest that this may involve multiple mechanisms, including secretion of adducted proteins and diffusion of NAPQI directly into plasma. Induction of liver necrosis through ischemia–reperfusion significantly increased the plasma concentration of protein-derived APAP-cysteine after a subtoxic dose of APAP. While our data generally support the measurement of serum APAP-protein adducts in the clinic, caution is suggested in the interpretation of this parameter. - Highlights: • Extensive GSH depletion is not required for APAP-protein binding in the liver. • APAP-protein adducts appear in plasma at subtoxic doses. • Proteins are adducted in the cell and secreted out. • Coincidental liver injury increases plasma APAP-protein adducts at subtoxic doses

  11. Dual role of acetaminophen in promoting hepatoma cell apoptosis and kidney fibroblast proliferation

    PubMed Central

    YU, YUNG-LUEN; YIANG, GIOU-TENG; CHOU, PEI-LUN; TSENG, HSU-HUNG; WU, TSAI-KUN; HUNG, YU-TING; LIN, PEI-SHIUAN; LIN, SHU-YU; LIU, HSIAO-CHUN; CHANG, WEI-JUNG; WEI, CHYOU-WEI

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP), is a safe analgesic and antipyretic drug at therapeutic dose, and is widely used in the clinic. However, high doses of APAP can induce hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Most studies have focused on high-dose APAP-induced acute liver and kidney injury. So far, few studies have investigated the effects of the therapeutic dose (1/10 of the high dose) or of the low dose (1/100 of the high dose) of APAP on the cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular effects of therapeutic- or low-dose APAP treatment on hepatoma cells and kidney fibroblasts. As expected, high-dose APAP treatment inhibited while therapeutic and low-dose treatment did not inhibit cell survival of kidney tubular epithelial cells. In addition, therapeutic-dose treatment induced an increase in the H2O2 level, activated the caspase-9/-3 cascade, and induced cell apoptosis of hepatoma cells. Notably, APAP promoted fibroblast proliferation, even at low doses. This study demonstrates that different cellular effects are exerted upon treatment with different APAP concentrations. Our results indicate that treatment with the therapeutic dose of APAP may exert an antitumor activity on hepatoma, while low-dose treatment may be harmful for patients with fibrosis, since it may cause proliferation of fibroblasts. PMID:24682227

  12. Mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced cell death in primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R; Dorko, Kenneth; Kumer, Sean C; Schmitt, Timothy M; Forster, Jameson; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-09-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most prevalent cause of drug-induced liver injury in western countries. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of injury after APAP overdose in various animal models; however, the importance of these mechanisms for humans remains unclear. Here we investigated APAP hepatotoxicity using freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from either donor livers or liver resections. PHH were exposed to 5mM, 10mM or 20mM APAP over a period of 48 h and multiple parameters were assessed. APAP dose-dependently induced significant hepatocyte necrosis starting from 24h, which correlated with the clinical onset of human liver injury after APAP overdose. Interestingly, cellular glutathione was depleted rapidly during the first 3h. APAP also resulted in early formation of APAP-protein adducts (measured in whole cell lysate and in mitochondria) and mitochondrial dysfunction, indicated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential after 12h. Furthermore, APAP time-dependently triggered c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol and translocation of phospho-JNK to the mitochondria. Both co-treatment and post-treatment (3h) with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reduced JNK activation and significantly attenuated cell death at 24h and 48h after APAP. The clinical antidote N-acetylcysteine offered almost complete protection even if administered 6h after APAP and a partial protection when given at 15 h. These data highlight important mechanistic events in APAP toxicity in PHH and indicate a critical role of JNK in the progression of injury after APAP in humans. The JNK pathway may represent a therapeutic target in the clinic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Cytochrome P450-Independent Mechanism of Acetaminophen-Induced Injury in Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, Kazuhisa; Albee, Ryan; Letzig, Lynda G; Lehner, Andreas F; Scott, Michael A; Buchweitz, John P; James, Laura P; Ganey, Patricia E; Roth, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    Mouse hepatic parenchymal cells (HPCs) have become the most frequently used in vitro model to study mechanisms of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. It is universally accepted that APAP hepatocellular injury requires bioactivation by cytochromes P450 (P450s), but this remains unproven in primary mouse HPCs in vitro, especially over the wide range of concentrations that have been employed in published reports. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that APAP-induced hepatocellular death in vitro depends solely on P450s. We evaluated APAP cytotoxicity and APAP-protein adducts (a biomarker of metabolic bioactivation by P450) using primary mouse HPCs in the presence and absence of a broad-spectrum inhibitor of P450s, 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT). 1-ABT abolished formation of APAP-protein adducts at all concentrations of APAP (0-14 mM), but eliminated cytotoxicity only at small concentrations (≦5 mM), indicating the presence of a P450-independent mechanism at larger APAP concentrations. P450-independent cell death was delayed in onset relative to toxicity observed at smaller concentrations. p-Aminophenol was detected in primary mouse HPCs exposed to large concentrations of APAP, and a deacetylase inhibitor [bis (4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP)] significantly reduced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, APAP hepatocellular injury in vitro occurs by at least two mechanisms, a P450-dependent mechanism that operates at concentrations of APAP ≦ 5 mM and a P450-independent mechanism that predominates at larger concentrations and is slower in onset. p-Aminophenol most likely contributes to the latter mechanism. These findings should be considered in interpreting results from APAP cytotoxicity studies in vitro and in selecting APAP concentrations for use in such studies.

  14. Quantitative Method for Simultaneous Analysis of Acetaminophen and 6 Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Laureen A; Achterbergh, Roos; Pistorius, Marcel C M; Romijn, Johannes A; Mathôt, Ron A A

    2017-04-01

    Hepatotoxicity after ingestion of high-dose acetaminophen [N-acetyl-para-aminophenol (APAP)] is caused by the metabolites of the drug. To gain more insight into factors influencing susceptibility to APAP hepatotoxicity, quantification of APAP and metabolites is important. A few methods have been developed to simultaneously quantify APAP and its most important metabolites. However, these methods require a comprehensive sample preparation and long run times. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a simplified, but sensitive method for the simultaneous quantification of acetaminophen, the main metabolites acetaminophen glucuronide and acetaminophen sulfate, and 4 Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolites by using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric (LC-MS) detection. The method was developed and validated for the human plasma, and it entailed a single method for sample preparation, enabling quick processing of the samples followed by an LC-MS method with a chromatographic run time of 9 minutes. The method was validated for selectivity, linearity, accuracy, imprecision, dilution integrity, recovery, process efficiency, ionization efficiency, and carryover effect. The method showed good selectivity without matrix interferences. For all analytes, the mean process efficiency was >86%, and the mean ionization efficiency was >94%. Furthermore, the accuracy was between 90.3% and 112% for all analytes, and the within- and between-run imprecision were <20% for the lower limit of quantification and <14.3% for the middle level and upper limit of quantification. The method presented here enables the simultaneous quantification of APAP and 6 of its metabolites. It is less time consuming than previously reported methods because it requires only a single and simple method for the sample preparation followed by an LC-MS method with a short run time. Therefore, this analytical method provides a useful method for both clinical and research purposes.

  15. The protective role of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 on acetaminophen-induced liver injury is associated with prevention of adenosine triphosphate depletion and improvement of mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Gang, Gil-Tae; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Chung, Hyo Kyun; Tadi, Surendar; Yim, Yong-Hyeon; Shong, Minho; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-11-01

    An overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) causes hepatotoxicity due to its metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) is an important enzyme for detoxification, because it catabolizes endogenous/exogenous quinone to hydroquinone. Although various studies have suggested the possible involvement of NQO1 in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, its precise role in this remains unclear. We investigated the role of NQO1 against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity using a genetically modified rodent model. NQO1 wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice were treated with different doses of APAP, and we evaluated the mortality and toxicity markers for cell death caused by APAP. NQO1 KO mice showed high sensitivity to APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity (as indicated by a large necrotic region) as well as increased levels of nitrotyrosine adducts and reactive oxygen species. APAP-induced cell death in the livers and primary hepatocytes of NQO1 KO mice, which was accompanied by an extensive reduction in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels. In accordance with this ATP depletion, cytosolic increases in mitochondrial proteins such as apoptosis-inducing factor, second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases/DIABLO, endonuclease G, and cytochrome c, which indicate severe mitochondrial dysfunction, were observed in NQO1 KO mice but not in WT mice after APAP exposure. Severe mitochondrial depolarization was also greater in hepatocytes isolated from NQO1 KO mice. Collectively, our data suggest that NQO1 plays a critical role in protection against energy depletion caused by APAP, and NQO1 may be useful in the development of therapeutic approaches to effectively diminish the hepatotoxicity caused by an APAP overdose.

  16. Thearubigins protect against acetaminophen-induced hepatic and renal injury in mice: biochemical, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and flow cytometry study.

    PubMed

    Murad, Hussam A S; Habib, H; Kamel, Y; Alsayed, S; Shakweer, M; Elshal, M

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen toxicity is used as a model for studying chemical toxicity. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is used for the treatment of hepatotoxicity; however, there is no specific therapy for nephrotoxicity. This study was designed to investigate the potential protective effect of black tea extract (BTE) and its main phenolic pigment, thearubigins (TRs), against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatic and renal injury in mice. Besides control groups, six groups (n = 8) were given intraperitoneally APAP (300 mg/kg) and then after 1.5 hours were treated intraperitoneally as follows: NAC (318 mg/kg), BTE (3%, 4.5%), and TRs (50, 60, and 70 mg/kg). Six hours post-APAP injection, blood was collected for biochemical measurements. Later, liver and kidneys were removed for histopathological, immunohistochemical, and flow cytometry studies. APAP increased alanine aminotransferase and malondialdehyde and decreased glutathione levels in blood. Treatments significantly reversed these changes mostly with NAC and TRs70. TRs showed dose-dependent significant differences. The APAP-induced central lobular hepatic necrosis and increased TUNEL positivity were mild with co-administration of NAC and TRs (60, 70) while moderate with co-administration of BTE (3, 4.5) and TRs50. The APAP-increased serum creatinine level was significantly reversed by treatments (mostly TRs60, 70). The APAP-induced renal tubular epithelial degeneration and necrosis were mild with co-administration of TRs (60, 70) while moderate with co-administration of NAC, BTE (3, 4.5), and TRs50. The APAP-accumulated apoptotic cells in sub-G1 phase were significantly decreased by treatments, mostly by NAC and TRs70 in the liver and TRs (60, 70) in kidneys. Thearubigins protected against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in mice possibly through their antioxidant activity.

  17. Silent acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in febrile children: does this entity exist?

    PubMed

    Shaoul, R; Novikov, J; Maor, I; Jaffe, M

    2004-05-01

    Several descriptions of acetaminophen-associated liver injury caused by therapeutic or a dosage slightly above the recommended dosage have been described. Our hypothesis is that in sick febrile infants and children, who may also be calorie depleted, there might be an increased hepatic vulnerability to acetaminophen. (1) To correlate serum acetaminophen levels in febrile infants and children with the following parameters: aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, fever, vomiting and/or decreased caloric intake; and (2) to assess parental knowledge regarding the medication dosage and hazards of acetaminophen. Healthy children with an acute febrile illness, who had received acetaminophen, were eligible to participate in the study. AST and acetaminophen levels were drawn, and a detailed questionnaire was completed for every child. 107 children participated in the study; 50 girls and 57 boys with ages ranging from 1 mo to 16 y (mean 33 mo). All serum acetaminophen levels were within the safety range. Although 32% of parents administered a single acetaminophen dose above 15 mg/kg and 46% gave a daily dose above 60 mg/kg/d, no significant differences were observed in the serum acetaminophen and AST levels compared to those who received the appropriate dose. In about 60% of cases, the high doses were recommended by a physician. Young age and high fever were associated with significantly higher acetaminophen levels. We could not find an association between acetaminophen levels and vomiting, decreased caloric intake and AST levels. Only 24 parents (22%) were aware of the possible toxicity of acetaminophen. No evidence of increased hepatic vulnerability to acetaminophen was noted in a cohort of febrile infants and children. Furthermore, significant numbers of parents and physicians were unaware of acetaminophen dangers.

  18. Effects of fructose-induced hypertriglyceridemia on hepatorenal toxicity of acetaminophen in rats. II. Role of enhancement of fructose metabolism and overproduction of triglyceride in the liver and kidney on hepatorenal toxicity of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Ishida, K; Sakazume, M; Hirai, N; Ikegami, H; Sakai, T; Doi, K

    1997-02-01

    Fructose-induced hypertriglyceridemic rats are resistant to hepatoxicity and susceptible to nephrotoxicity of acetaminophen (APAP) as compared with normal ones. The present studied were designed to evaluate how fructose-treatment affects the developmental mode of hepatorenal toxicity of APAP. First, following fructose-pretreatment for various durations (1 day, 1 week or 3 weeks), 1-day-fructose-pretreatment induced hypertriglyceridemia and enhancement of APAP-nephrectoxicity simultaneously. However, it took at least 3 weeks for fructose-pretreatment to reduce APAP-hepatotoxicity. Second, following fructose, sucrose or glucose-pretreatment for 3 weeks, fructose-pretreated rats showed marked hypertriglyceridemia and modification of APAP-hepatorenal toxicity. Sucrose-pretreated rats showed less effects than fructose-pretreated rats. Glucose-pretreated rats showed no changes in plasma triglyceride and APAP-hepatorenal toxicity. Third, rats with hypertriglyceridemia induced by olive oil or Triton WR-1339 which did not produce enhanced metabolism and triglyceride-overproduction in the liver and kidney showed no modification of APAP-hepatorenal toxicity. Pretreatment of glycerol which was metabolized in liver and kidney and induced an overproduction of triglyceride resulted in an enhancement of APAP-nephrotoxicity. These results indicate that an enhancement of fructose metabolism and an overproduction of triglyceride in liver and kidney are responsible for the modification of APAP-hepatorenal toxicity in fructose-induced hypertriglyceridemic rats.

  19. Long-term acetaminophen treatment induced liver fibrosis in mice and the involvement of Egr-1.

    PubMed

    Bai, Qingyun; Yan, Hongyu; Sheng, Yuchen; Jin, Yao; Shi, Liang; Ji, Lili; Wang, Zhengtao

    2017-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced acute liver injury has already been well studied. However, whether long-term administration of APAP will cause liver fibrosis is still not very clear. This study aims to investigate the liver fibrosis in mice induced by long-term APAP treatment and the involvement of early growth response 1 (Egr-1). C57BL/6 mice were orally given with APAP (200, 300mg/kg) for 2, 6 or 10 weeks, respectively. Liver hydroxyproline content, collagen deposition and inflammatory cells infiltration were increased in mice treated with APAP (200, 300mg/kg) for 6 or 10 weeks. Liver mRNA expression of collagen (COL)1a1, Col3a1, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and serum contents of COL1, COL3, TGF-β were all increased in APAP-treated mice. Liver expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and phosphorylated ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 were all increased in APAP-treated mice. Furthermore, increased liver mRNA expression of Egr-1 and its subsequent nuclear translocation were found in APAP-treated mice. Egr-1 knock-out mice were further applied. APAP-induced liver fibrosis was found to be more serious in Egr-1 knock-out mice. N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI), the APAP hepatotoxic metabolite, increased cellular mRNA expression of α-SMA, Col1a1, Col3a1, TGF-β, induced ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 phosphorylation and Egr-1 nuclear translocation in hepatic stellate LX2 cells. In conclusion, long-term administration of APAP induced liver fibrosis in mice, and Egr-1 was critically involved in this process. This study points out a warning and reference for patients with long-term APAP ingestion in clinic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Liver delivery of NO by NCX-1000 protects against acute liver failure and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by APAP in mice.

    PubMed

    Fiorucci, Stefano; Antonelli, Elisabetta; Distrutti, Eleonora; Mencarelli, Andrea; Farneti, Silvana; Del Soldato, Piero; Morelli, Antonio

    2004-09-01

    1. NCX-1000, (3alpha, 5beta, 7beta)-3,7-dihydroxycholan-24oic acid[2-methoxy-4-[3-[4-(nitroxy)butoxy]-3-oxo-1-propenyl]phenyl ester, is a nitric oxide (NO)-derivative of ursodeoxyxholic acid (UDCA) that selectively release NO in the liver. 2. Here, we demonstrated that administering mice with 40 micromol kg(-1) NCX-1000, but not UDCA, improves liver histopathology and reduces mortality caused by 330 micromol kg(-1) APAP from 60 to 25% (P<0.01). Administration of NCX-1000, in a therapeutic manner, that is, 2 h after acetaminophen (APAP) intoxication reduced mortality, improved liver histopathology and prevented liver IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, Fas/Fas ligand and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA accumulation caused by APAP. 3. In vitro exposure of primary cultures of mouse hepatocytes to APAP, 6.6 mm, resulted in apoptosis followed by necrosis. Loss of cell viability correlates with early mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsi(m)) hyperpolarization followed by depolarization and cytochrome c translocation from mitochondria to cytosol. APAP-induced apoptosis associated with procaspase-3 and -9 cleavage, appearance of truncated Bid and activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). 4. Treating primary culture of hepatocytes with 5 microm cyclosporine and 10 microm trifluoperazine for eight resulted in significant reduction of apoptosis induced by APAP suggesting that loss of Deltapsim was mechanistically involved in apoptosis induced by APAP in vitro. 5. NCX-1000, but not UDCA, concentration-dependently (ED(50)=16 microm) protected against Deltapsi(m) depolarization and reduced transition from apoptosis to necrosis caused by 6.6 mm APAP. 6. Treating primary cultures of hepatocytes with the NO-donor DETA-NO, 100 microm, reduced apoptosis induced by APAP and prevented caspase activation. 7. In conclusion, NCX-1000 is effective in protecting against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity when administered in a therapeutic manner. This protection may involve the

  1. Activation of liver X receptor increases acetaminophen clearance and prevents its toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Saini, Simrat P S; Zhang, Bin; Niu, Yongdong; Jiang, Mengxi; Gao, Jie; Zhai, Yonggong; Hoon Lee, Jung; Uppal, Hirdesh; Tian, Hui; Tortorici, Michael A; Poloyac, Samuel M; Qin, Wenxin; Venkataramanan, Raman; Xie, Wen

    2011-12-01

    Overdose of acetaminophen (APAP), the active ingredient of Tylenol, is the leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in the United States. As such, it is necessary to develop novel strategies to prevent or manage APAP toxicity. In this report, we reveal a novel function of the liver X receptor (LXR) in preventing APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Activation of LXR in transgenic (Tg) mice or by an LXR agonist conferred resistance to the hepatotoxicity of APAP, whereas the effect of LXR agonist on APAP toxicity was abolished in LXR-deficient mice. The increased APAP resistance in LXR Tg mice was associated with increased APAP clearance, increased APAP sulfation, and decreased formation of toxic APAP metabolites. The hepatoprotective effect of LXR may have resulted from the induction of antitoxic phase II conjugating enzymes, such as Gst and Sult2a1, as well as the suppression of protoxic phase I P450 enzymes, such as Cyp3a11 and Cyp2e1. Promoter analysis suggested the mouse Gst isoforms as novel transcriptional targets of LXR. The suppression of Cyp3a11 may be accounted for by the inhibitory effect of LXR on the PXR-responsive transactivation of Cyp3a11. The protective effect of LXR in preventing APAP toxicity is opposite to the sensitizing effect of pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and retinoid X receptor alpha. We conclude that LXR represents a potential therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of Tylenol toxicity. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  2. Oxidant stress, mitochondria, and cell death mechanisms in drug-induced liver injury: lessons learned from acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Hartmut; McGill, Mitchell R; Ramachandran, Anup

    2012-02-01

    Hepatotoxicity is a serious problem during drug development and for the use of many established drugs. For example, acetaminophen overdose is currently the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in the United States and Great Britain. Evaluation of the mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury indicates that mitochondria are critical targets for drug toxicity, either directly or indirectly through the formation of reactive metabolites. The consequence of these modifications is generally a mitochondrial oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation, which leads to structural alterations of proteins and mitochondrial DNA and, eventually, to the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT) pores. MPT pore formation results in a collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and cessation of adenosine triphosphate synthesis. In addition, the release of intermembrane proteins, such as apoptosis-inducing factor and endonuclease G, and their translocation to the nucleus, leads to nuclear DNA fragmentation. Together, these events trigger necrotic cell death. Alternatively, the release of cytochrome c and other proapoptotic factors from mitochondria can promote caspase activation and apoptotic cell death. Drug toxicity can also induce an inflammatory response with the formation of reactive oxygen species by Kupffer cells and neutrophils. If not properly detoxified, these extracellularly generated oxidants can diffuse into hepatocytes and trigger mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidant stress, which then induces MPT and necrotic cell death. This review addresses the formation of oxidants and the defense mechanisms available for cells and applies this knowledge to better understand mechanisms of drug hepatotoxicity, especially acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

  3. OXIDANT STRESS, MITOCHONDRIA AND CELL DEATH MECHANISMS IN DRUG-INDUCED LIVER INJURY: LESSONS LEARNED FROM ACETAMINOPHEN HEPATOTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Jaeschke, Hartmut; McGill, Mitchell R.; Ramachandran, Anup

    2017-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity is a serious problem during drug development and for the use of many established drugs. For example, acetaminophen overdose is currently the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in the United States and Great Britain. Evaluation of the mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury indicates that mitochondria are critical targets for drug toxicity, either directly or indirectly through formation of reactive metabolites. The consequence of these modifications is generally a mitochondrial oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation, which leads to structural alterations of proteins and mitochondrial DNA and eventually to the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT) pores. MPT pore formation results in collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential and cessation of ATP synthesis. In addition, the release of intermembrane proteins such as apoptosis-inducing factor and endonuclease G and their translocation to the nucleus leads to nuclear DNA fragmentation. Together these events trigger necrotic cell death. Alternatively, release of cytochrome c and other pro-apoptotic factors from mitochondria can promote caspase activation and apoptotic cell death. Drug toxicity can also induce an inflammatory response with formation of reactive oxygen species by Kupffer cells and neutrophils. If not properly detoxified, these extracellularly generated oxidants can diffuse into hepatocytes and trigger mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidant stress, which then induces the MPT and necrotic cell death. This review addresses the formation of oxidants and the defense mechanisms available for the cells and applies this knowledge to better understand mechanisms of drug hepatotoxicity, especially acetaminophen-induced liver injury. PMID:22229890

  4. A Cytochrome P450–Independent Mechanism of Acetaminophen-Induced Injury in Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Kazuhisa; Albee, Ryan; Letzig, Lynda G.; Lehner, Andreas F.; Scott, Michael A.; Buchweitz, John P.; James, Laura P.; Ganey, Patricia E.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse hepatic parenchymal cells (HPCs) have become the most frequently used in vitro model to study mechanisms of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. It is universally accepted that APAP hepatocellular injury requires bioactivation by cytochromes P450 (P450s), but this remains unproven in primary mouse HPCs in vitro, especially over the wide range of concentrations that have been employed in published reports. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that APAP-induced hepatocellular death in vitro depends solely on P450s. We evaluated APAP cytotoxicity and APAP-protein adducts (a biomarker of metabolic bioactivation by P450) using primary mouse HPCs in the presence and absence of a broad-spectrum inhibitor of P450s, 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT). 1-ABT abolished formation of APAP-protein adducts at all concentrations of APAP (0–14 mM), but eliminated cytotoxicity only at small concentrations (≦5 mM), indicating the presence of a P450-independent mechanism at larger APAP concentrations. P450-independent cell death was delayed in onset relative to toxicity observed at smaller concentrations. p-Aminophenol was detected in primary mouse HPCs exposed to large concentrations of APAP, and a deacetylase inhibitor [bis (4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP)] significantly reduced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, APAP hepatocellular injury in vitro occurs by at least two mechanisms, a P450-dependent mechanism that operates at concentrations of APAP ≦ 5 mM and a P450-independent mechanism that predominates at larger concentrations and is slower in onset. p-Aminophenol most likely contributes to the latter mechanism. These findings should be considered in interpreting results from APAP cytotoxicity studies in vitro and in selecting APAP concentrations for use in such studies. PMID:26065700

  5. Circulating acylcarnitines as biomarkers of mitochondrial dysfunction after acetaminophen overdose in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    McGill, Mitchell R; Li, Feng; Sharpe, Matthew R; Williams, C David; Curry, Steven C; Ma, Xiaochao; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic. However, APAP overdose is hepatotoxic and is the primary cause of acute liver failure in the developed world. The mechanism of APAP-induced liver injury begins with protein binding and involves mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Recent efforts to discover blood biomarkers of mitochondrial damage have identified increased plasma glutamate dehydrogenase activity and mitochondrial DNA concentration in APAP overdose patients. However, a problem with these markers is that they are too large to be released from cells without cell death or loss of membrane integrity. Metabolomic studies are more likely to reveal biomarkers that are useful at early time points, before injury begins. Similar to earlier work, our metabolomic studies revealed that acylcarnitines are elevated in serum from mice after treatment with toxic doses of APAP. Importantly, a comparison with furosemide demonstrated that increased serum acylcarnitines are specific for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, when we measured these compounds in plasma from humans with liver injury after APAP overdose, we could not detect any significant differences from control groups. Further experiments with mice showed that N-acetylcysteine, the antidote for APAP overdose in humans, can reduce acylcarnitine levels in serum. Altogether, our data do not support the clinical measurement of acylcarnitines in blood after APAP overdose due to the standard N-acetylcysteine treatment in patients, but strongly suggest that acylcarnitines would be useful mechanistic biomarkers in other forms of liver injury involving mitochondrial dysfunction.

  6. Fluorometric assessment of acetaminophen-induced toxicity in rat hepatocyte spheroids seeded on micro-space cell culture plates.

    PubMed

    Sanoh, Seigo; Santoh, Masataka; Takagi, Masashi; Kanayama, Tatsuya; Sugihara, Kazumi; Kotake, Yaichiro; Ejiri, Yoko; Horie, Toru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Ohta, Shigeru

    2014-09-01

    Hepatotoxicity induced by the metabolic activation of drugs is a major concern in drug discovery and development. Three-dimensional (3-D) cultures of hepatocyte spheroids may be superior to monolayer cultures for evaluating drug metabolism and toxicity because hepatocytes in spheroids maintain the expression of various metabolizing enzymes and transporters, such as cytochrome P450 (CYP). In this study, we examined the hepatotoxicity due to metabolic activation of acetaminophen (APAP) using fluorescent indicators of cell viability and intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH) in rat hepatocyte spheroids grown on micro-space cell culture plates. The mRNA expression levels of some drug-metabolizing enzymes were maintained during culture. Additionally, this culture system was compatible with microfluorometric imaging under confocal laser scanning microscopy. APAP induced a decrease in intracellular ATP at 10mM, which was blocked by the CYP inhibitor 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT). APAP (10mM, 24h) decreased the levels of both intracellular ATP and GSH, and GSH-conjugated APAP (APAP-GSH) were formed. All three effects were blocked by ABT, confirming a contribution of APAP metabolic activation by CYP to spheroid toxicity. Fluorometric imaging of hepatocyte spheroids on micro-space cell culture plates may allow the screening of drug-induced hepatotoxicity during pharmaceutical development.

  7. Risk Factors, Clinical Presentation, and Outcomes in Overdose With Acetaminophen Alone or With Combination Products: Results From the Acute Liver Failure Study Group.

    PubMed

    Serper, Marina; Wolf, Michael S; Parikh, Nikhil A; Tillman, Holly; Lee, William M; Ganger, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is the most common cause of acute liver failure (ALF) in the west. It is unknown if APAP overdose in combination with diphenhydramine or opioids confers a different clinical presentation or prognosis. Study objectives were to compare (1) baseline patient characteristics; (2) initial clinical presentation; and (3) clinical outcomes among patients with ALF due to APAP alone or in combination with diphenhydramine or opioids. We analyzed 666 cases of APAP-related liver failure using the Acute Liver Failure Study Group database from 1998 to 2012. The database contains detailed demographic, laboratory, and clinical outcome data, including hemodialysis, transplantation, and death and in-hospital complications such as arrhythmia and infection. The final sample included 666 patients with APAP liver injury. A total 30.3% of patients were overdosed with APAP alone, 14.1% with APAP/diphenhydramine, and 56.6% with APAP/opioids. Patients taking APAP with opioids were older, had more comorbidities, and were more likely to have unintentional overdose (all P<0.0001). On presentation, 58% in the APAP/opioid group had advanced encephalopathy as compared with 43% with APAP alone (P=0.001) The APAP/diphenhydramine group presented with the highest serum aminotransferase levels, no differences in laboratory values were noted at 3 days postenrollment. No significant differences were observed in clinical outcomes among the groups. Most patients with APAP-induced ALF were taking APAP combination products. There were significant differences in patient characteristics and clinical presentation based on the type of product ingested, however, there were no differences noted in delayed hepatotoxicity or clinical outcomes.

  8. Maintenance of high quality rat precision cut liver slices during culture to study hepatotoxic responses: Acetaminophen as a model compound.

    PubMed

    Granitzny, Anne; Knebel, Jan; Schaudien, Dirk; Braun, Armin; Steinberg, Pablo; Dasenbrock, Clemens; Hansen, Tanja

    2017-08-01

    Precision cut liver slices (PCLiS) represent a promising tool in reflecting hepatotoxic responses. However, the culture of PCLiS varies considerably between laboratories, which can affect the performance of the liver slices and thus the experimental outcome. In this study, we describe an easily accessible culture method, which ensures optimal slice viability and functionality, in order to set the basis for reproducible and comparable PCLiS studies. The quality of the incubated rat PCLiS was assessed during a 24h culture period using ten readouts, which covered viability (lactate dehydrogenase-, aspartate transaminase- and glutamate dehydrogenase-leakage, ATP content) and functionality parameters (urea, albumin production) as well as histomorphology and other descriptive characteristics (protein content, wet weight, slice thickness). The present culture method resulted in high quality liver slices for 24h. Finally, PCLiS were exposed to increasing concentrations of acetaminophen to assess the suitability of the model for the detection of hepatotoxic responses. Six out of ten readouts revealed a toxic effect and showed an excellent mutual correlation. ATP, albumin and histomorphology measurements were identified as the most sensitive readouts. In conclusion, our results indicate that rat PCLiS are a valuable liver model for hepatotoxicity studies, particularly if they are cultured under optimal standardized conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Tropisetron Protects Against Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury via Suppressing Hepatic Oxidative Stress and Modulating the Activation of JNK/ERK MAPK Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hung-Chen; Liao, Chia-Chih; Li, Allen H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the protective effects of tropisetron on acetaminophen- (APAP-) induced liver injury in a mice model. Methods. C57BL/6 male mice were given tropisetron (0.3 to 10 mg/kg) 30 minutes before a hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. Twenty hours after APAP intoxication, sera alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, hepatic myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, and liver histopathological changes were examined. The MAP kinases were also detected by western blotting. Results. Our results showed that tropisetron pretreatment significantly attenuated the acute elevations of the liver enzyme ALT level, hepatic MPO activity, and hepatocytes necrosis in a dose-dependent manner (0.3–10 mg/kg) in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity mice. Tropisetron (1 and 3 mg/kg) suppressed APAP-induced hepatic lipid peroxidation expression and alleviated GSH and SOD depletion. Administration of tropisetron also attenuated the phosphorylation of c-Jun-NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) caused by APAP. Conclusion. Our data demonstrated that tropisetron's hepatoprotective effect was in part correlated with the antioxidant, which were mediated via JNK and ERK pathways on acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice. PMID:27891510

  10. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NANT blocks acetaminophen toxicity and protein nitration in freshly isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sudip; Melnyk, Stepan B; Krager, Kimberly J; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Letzig, Lynda G; James, Laura P; Hinson, Jack A

    2015-12-01

    3-Nitrotyrosine (3NT) in liver proteins of mice treated with hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) has been postulated to be causative in toxicity. Nitration is by a reactive nitrogen species formed from nitric oxide (NO). The source of the NO is unclear. iNOS knockout mice were previously found to be equally susceptible to APAP toxicity as wildtype mice and iNOS inhibitors did not decrease toxicity in mice or in hepatocytes. In this work we examined the potential role of nNOS in APAP toxicity in hepatocytes using the specific nNOS inhibitor NANT (10 µM)(N-[(4S)-4-amino-5-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]pentyl]-N'-nitroguanidinetris (trifluoroacetate)). Primary hepatocytes (1 million/ml) from male B6C3F1 mice were incubated with APAP (1mM). Cells were removed and assayed spectrofluorometrically for reactive nitrogen and oxygen species using diaminofluorescein (DAF) and Mitosox red, respectively. Cytotoxicity was determined by LDH release into media. Glutathione (GSH, GSSG), 3NT, GSNO, acetaminophen-cysteine adducts, NAD, and NADH were measured by HPLC. APAP significantly increased cytotoxicity at 1.5-3.0 h. The increase was blocked by NANT. NANT did not alter APAP mediated GSH depletion or acetaminophen-cysteine adducts in proteins which indicated that NANT did not inhibit metabolism. APAP significantly increased spectroflurometric evidence of reactive nitrogen and oxygen formation at 0.5 and 1.0 h, respectively, and increased 3NT and GSNO at 1.5-3.0 h. These increases were blocked by NANT. APAP dramatically increased NADH from 0.5-3.0 h and this increase was blocked by NANT. Also, APAP decreased the Oxygen Consumption Rate (OCR), decreased ATP production, and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which were all blocked by NANT.

  11. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment Ameliorate Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury in Mice via Central Cholinergic System Regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqiao; Zhang, Leiming; Sun, Xue; Yang, Yanting; Kong, Liang; Lu, Chengwen; Lv, Guangyao; Wang, Tian; Wang, Hongbo; Fu, Fenghua

    2016-11-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is widely used as an analgesic and antipyretic agent, but it may induce acute liver injury at high doses. Alzheimer's disease patients, while treated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI), may take APAP when they suffer from cold or pain. It is generally recognized that inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity may also result in liver injury. To clarify whether AChEI could deteriorate or attenuate APAP hepatotoxicity, the effects of AChEI on APAP hepatotoxicity were investigated. Male C57BL/6J mice were administrated with the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) blocker atropine (Atr), or classic α7 nicotine acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) 1 hour before administration of AChEIs-donepezil (4 mg/kg), rivastigmine (2 mg/kg), huperzine A (0.2 mg/kg), or neostigmine (0.15 mg/kg)-followed by APAP (300 mg/kg). Eight hours later, the mice were euthanized for histopathologic examination and biochemical assay. The results demonstrated that the tested AChEIs, excluding neostigmine, could attenuate APAP-induced liver injury, accompanied by reduced reactive oxygen species formation, adenosine triphosphate and cytochrome C loss, c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) phosphorylation, and cytokines. However, Atr or MLA significantly weakened the protective effect of AChEI by affecting mitochondrial function or JNK2 phosphorylation and inflammation response. These results suggest that central mAChR and α7nAChR, which are activated by accumulated acetylcholine resulting from AChEI, were responsible for the protective effect of AChEIs on APAP-induced liver injury. This indicates that Alzheimer's patients treated with AChEI could take APAP, as AChEI is unlikely to deteriorate the hepatotoxicity of APAP. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. Role of connexin 32 in acetaminophen toxicity in a knockout mice model.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Isao; Maejima, Takanori; Kai, Kiyonori; Arakawa, Shingo; Teranishi, Munehiro; Sanbuissho, Atsushi

    2014-03-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), by which glutathione (GSH) and inorganic ions are transmitted to neighboring cells, is recognized as being largely involved in toxic processes of chemicals. We examined acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity clinicopathologically using male wild-type mice and mice lacking the gene for connexin32, a major gap junction protein in the liver [knockout (Cx32KO) mice]. When APAP was intraperitoneally administered at doses of 100, 200, or 300mg/kg, hepatic centrilobular necrosis with elevated plasma aminotransferase activities was observed in wild-type mice receiving 300mg/kg, and in Cx32KO mice given 100mg/kg or more. At 200mg/kg or more, hepatic GSH and GSSG contents decreased significantly and the effect was more severe in wild-type mice than in Cx32KO mice. On the other hand, markedly decreased GSH staining was observed in the hepatic centrilobular zones of Cx32KO mice compared to that of wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that Cx32KO mice are more susceptible to APAP hepatotoxicity than wild-type mice, and indicate that the distribution of GSH of the centrilobular zones in the hepatic lobules, rather than GSH and GSSG contents in the liver, is important in APAP hepatotoxicity. In conclusion, Cx32 protects against APAP-induced hepatic centrilobular necrosis in mice, which may be through the GSH transmission to neighboring hepatocytes by GJIC.

  13. Antioxidant and Hepatoprotective Efficiency of Selenium Nanoparticles Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatic Damage.

    PubMed

    Amin, Kamal Adel; Hashem, Khalid Shaban; Alshehri, Fawziah Saleh; Awad, Said T; Hassan, Mohammed S

    2017-01-01

    Overdoses of acetaminophen (APAP), a famous and widely used drug, may have hepatotoxic effects. Nanoscience is a novel scientific discipline that provides specific tools for medical science problems including using nano trace elements in hepatic diseases. Our study aimed to assess the hepatoprotective role of selenium nanoparticles (Nano-Se) against APAP-induced hepatic injury. Twenty-four male rats were classified into three equal groups: a control group that received 0.9 % NaCl, an APAP-treated group (oral administration), and a group treated with Nano-Se (10-20 nm, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection) and APAP (oral administration). APAP overdose induced significant elevations in liver function biomarkers, hepatic lipid peroxidation, hepatic catalase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), decreased the reduced glutathione (GSH) content and glutathione reductase (GR) activity, and stimulated significant DNA damage in hepatocytes, compared to control rats. Nano-Se administration improved the hepatic antioxidant protection mechanism and decreased cellular sensitivity to DNA fragmentation. Nano-Se exhibits a protective effect against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity through improved liver function and oxidative stress mediated by catalase, SOD, and GSH and decreases hepatic DNA fragmentation, a hepatic biomarker of cell death. Nano-Se could be a novel hepatoprotective strategy to inhibit oxidative stress.

  14. Hepatoprotective effect of isoquercitrin against acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenyan; Wang, Meng; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Xiaoying; Melzig, Matthias F

    2016-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose leads to severe hepatotoxicity. Isoquercitrin exhibited potential hepatoprotective effect in our previous study. The present investigation aimed to evaluate the effect of isoquercitrin against APAP induced liver injury and to explore its possible mechanism. Mice were treated intragastrically with isoquercitrin (10, 20, or 50mg/kg) for 3days before APAP (300mg/kg) injection. After 24h from APAP treatment, the levels of serum aminotransferase, hepatic oxidative stress and nitrosative stress biomarkers were determined by commercial kits or western bolt. Activities of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), sulfotransferases (SULTs) and cytochrome 2E1 (CYP2E1) were evaluated using ELISA methods and standard biochemical procedures. Subsequently, the protein and mRNA levels of inflammatory factors including TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and iNOS were determined using ELISA methods, western blot or real-time PCR. The effect of isoquercitrin on APAP activated NFκB/MAPK pathway was assessed by western bolt. Isoquercitrin pretreatments markedly attenuated APAP induced hepatic oxidative stress, nitrosative stress and centrilobular necrosis. In addition to potent antioxidant activity, isoquercitrin was able to regulate the activities of SULTs and CYP2E1, therefore promoted APAP hepatic detoxification. The anti-inflammatory activity of isoquercitrin which involved in the amelioration of iNOS, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production via the blockade of NF-κB and MAPK pathways also responsible for its hepatoprotective effect. Our data evidenced that isoquercitrin protected liver from APAP induced injury though inhibition of oxidative stress, nitrosative stress and inflammation, as well as regulation of APAP metabolism, suggesting that isoquercitrin could be a potential hepatoprotective agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced cell death in primary human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Dorko, Kenneth; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-09-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most prevalent cause of drug-induced liver injury in western countries. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of injury after APAP overdose in various animal models; however, the importance of these mechanisms for humans remains unclear. Here we investigated APAP hepatotoxicity using freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from either donor livers or liver resections. PHH were exposed to 5 mM, 10 mM or 20 mM APAP over a period of 48 h and multiple parameters were assessed. APAP dose-dependently induced significant hepatocyte necrosis starting from 24 h, which correlated with the clinical onset of human liver injury after APAP overdose. Interestingly, cellular glutathione was depleted rapidly during the first 3 h. APAP also resulted in early formation of APAP-protein adducts (measured in whole cell lysate and in mitochondria) and mitochondrial dysfunction, indicated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential after 12 h. Furthermore, APAP time-dependently triggered c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol and translocation of phospho-JNK to the mitochondria. Both co-treatment and post-treatment (3 h) with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reduced JNK activation and significantly attenuated cell death at 24 h and 48 h after APAP. The clinical antidote N-acetylcysteine offered almost complete protection even if administered 6 h after APAP and a partial protection when given at 15 h. Conclusion: These data highlight important mechanistic events in APAP toxicity in PHH and indicate a critical role of JNK in the progression of injury after APAP in humans. The JNK pathway may represent a therapeutic target in the clinic. - Highlights: • APAP reproducibly causes cell death in freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes. • APAP induces adduct formation, JNK activation and mitochondrial dysfunction in PHH. • Mitochondrial adducts and JNK translocation are delayed in PHH compared to

  16. New Therapeutic Approach: Diphenyl Diselenide Reduces Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Nélson R.; da Rosa, Edovando F.; da Silva, Michele H.; Tassi, Cintia C.; Dalla Corte, Cristiane L.; Carbajo-Pescador, Sara; Mauriz, Jose L.; González-Gallego, Javier; Soares, Félix A.

    2013-01-01

    The acute liver failure (ALF) induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to oxidative damage and depletion of hepatic glutathione, consequently changes in cell energy metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction have been observed after APAP overdose. Diphenyl diselenide [(PhSe)2], a simple organoselenium compound with antioxidant properties, previously demonstrated to confer hepatoprotection. However, little is known about the protective mechanism on mitochondria. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects (PhSe)2 to reduce mitochondrial dysfunction and, secondly, compare in the liver homogenate the hepatoprotective effects of the (PhSe)2 to the N-acetylcysteine (NAC) during APAP-induced ALF to validate our model. Mice were injected intraperitoneal with APAP (600 mg/kg), (PhSe)2 (15.6 mg/kg), NAC (1200 mg/kg), APAP+(PhSe)2 or APAP+NAC, where the (PhSe)2 or NAC treatment were given 1 h following APAP. The liver was collected 4 h after overdose. The plasma alanine and aspartate aminotransferase activities increased after APAP administration. APAP caused a remarkable increase of oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxidation, reactive species and protein carbonylation) and decrease of the antioxidant defense in the liver homogenate and mitochondria. APAP caused a marked loss in the mitochondrial membrane potential, the mitochondrial ATPase activity, and the rate of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and increased the mitochondrial swelling. All these effects were significantly prevented by (PhSe)2. The effectiveness of (PhSe)2 was similar at a lower dose than NAC. In summary, (PhSe)2 provided a significant improvement to the mitochondrial redox homeostasis and the mitochondrial bioenergetics dysfunction caused by membrane permeability transition in the hepatotoxicity APAP-induced. PMID:24349162

  17. Comparative metabonomic analysis of hepatotoxicity induced by acetaminophen and its less toxic meta-isomer.

    PubMed

    Kyriakides, Michael; Maitre, Lea; Stamper, Brendan D; Mohar, Isaac; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Foster, John; Wilson, Ian D; Holmes, Elaine; Nelson, Sidney D; Coen, Muireann

    2016-12-01

    The leading cause of drug-induced liver injury in the developed world is overdose with N-acetyl-p-aminophenol (APAP). A comparative metabonomic approach was applied to the study of both xenobiotic and endogenous metabolic profiles reflective of in vivo exposure to APAP (300 mg/kg) and its structural isomer N-acetyl-m-aminophenol (AMAP; 300 mg/kg) in C57BL/6J mice, which was anchored with histopathology. Liver and urine samples were collected at 1 h, 3 h and 6 h post-treatment and analyzed by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (liver only). Histopathology revealed the presence of centrilobular necrosis from 3 h post-APAP treatment, while an AMAP-mediated necrotic endpoint was not observed within the timescale of this study, yet two of five treated mice showed minimal centrilobular eosinophilia. The (1)H-NMR xenobiotic metabolic profile of APAP-treated animals comprised of mercapturate (urine and liver) and glutathionyl (liver) conjugates detected at 1 h post-treatment. This finding corroborated the hepatic endogenous metabolic profile which showed depletion of glutathione from 1 h onwards. In contrast, AMAP glutathionyl conjugates were not detected, nor was AMAP-induced depletion of hepatic glutathione observed. APAP administration induced significant endogenous hepatic metabolic perturbations, primarily linked to oxidative and energetic stress, and perturbation of amino acid metabolism. Early depletion of glutathione was followed by depletion of additional sulfur-containing metabolites, while altered levels of mitochondrial and glycolytic metabolites indicated a disruption of energy homeostasis. In contrast, AMAP administration caused minimal, transient, distinct metabolic perturbations and by 6 h the metabolic profiles of AMAP-treated mice were indistinguishable from those of controls.

  18. Comparative Toxicity and Metabolism of N-Acyl Homologues of Acetaminophen and Its Isomer 3'-Hydroxyacetanilide.

    PubMed

    Koen, Yakov M; Liu, Ke; Shinogle, Heather; Williams, Todd D; Hanzlik, Robert P

    2016-11-21

    The hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen (APAP) is generally attributed to the formation of a reactive quinoneimine metabolite (NAPQI) that depletes glutathione and covalently binds to hepatocellular proteins. To explore the importance of the N-acyl group in APAP metabolism and toxicity, we synthesized 12 acyl side chain homologues of acetaminophen (APAP) and its 3'-regioisomer (AMAP), including the respective N-(4-pentynoyl) analogues PYPAP and PYMAP. Rat hepatocytes converted APAP, AMAP, PYPAP, and PYMAP extensively to O-glucuronide and O-sulfate conjugates in varying proportions, whereas glutathione or cysteine conjugates were observed only for APAP and PYPAP. PYPAP and PYMAP also underwent N-deacylation followed by O-sulfation and/or N-acetylation to a modest extent. The overall rates of metabolism in hepatocytes varied approximately 2-fold in the order APAP < AMAP ≈ PYPAP < PYMAP. Rat liver microsomes supplemented with NADPH and GSH converted APAP and PYPAP to their respective glutathione conjugates (formed via a reactive quinoneimine intermediate). With PYPAP only, a hydroxylated GSH conjugate was also observed. Thus, differences in biotransformation among these analogues were modest and mostly quantitative in nature. Cytotoxicity was evaluated in cultured hepatocytes by monitoring cell death using time-lapse photomicrography coupled with Hoechst 33342 and CellTox Green dyes to facilitate counting live cells vs dead cells, respectively. Progress curves for cell death and the areas under those curves showed that toxicity was markedly dependent on compound, concentration, and time. AMAP was essentially equipotent with APAP. Homologating the acyl side chain from C-2 to C-5 led to progressive increases in toxicity up to 80-fold in the para series. In conclusion, whereas N- or ring-substitution on APAP decrease metabolism and toxicity, homologating the N-acyl side chain increases metabolism about 2-fold, preserves the chemical reactivity of quinoneimine metabolites

  19. Curative Effects of Thiacremonone against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Hepatic Failure via Inhibition of Proinflammatory Cytokines Production and Infiltration of Cytotoxic Immune Cells and Kupffer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Ri; Ban, Jung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Lee, Yong Moon; Yoon, Yeo Pyo; Eum, So Young; Jeong, Heon Sang; Yoon, Do-young; Han, Sang Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2013-01-01

    High doses of acetaminophen (APAP; N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) cause severe hepatotoxicity after metabolic activation by cytochrome P450 2E1. This study was undertaken to examine the preventive effects of thiacremonone, a compound extracted from garlic, on APAP-induced acute hepatic failure in male C57BL/6J. Mice received with 500 mg/kg APAP after a 7-day pretreatment with thiacremonone (10–50 mg/kg). Thiacremonone inhibited the APAP-induced serum ALT and AST levels in a dose-dependent manner, and markedly reduced the restricted area of necrosis and inflammation by administration of APAP. Thiacremonone also inhibited the APAP-induced depletion of intracellular GSH, induction of nitric oxide, and lipid peroxidation as well as expression of P450 2E1. After APAP injection, the numbers of Kupffer cells, natural killer cells, and cytotoxic T cells were elevated, but the elevated cell numbers in the liver were reduced in thiacremonone pretreated mice. The expression levels of I-309, M-CSF, MIG, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, IL-7, and IL-17 were increased by APAP treatment, which were inhibited in thiacremonone pretreated mice. These data indicate that thiacremonone could be a useful agent for the treatment of drug-induced hepatic failure and that the reduction of cytotoxic immune cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine production may be critical for the prevention of APAP-induced acute liver toxicity. PMID:23935693

  20. Retinoid X receptor alpha Regulates the expression of glutathione s-transferase genes and modulates acetaminophen-glutathione conjugation in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Dai, Guoli; Chou, Nathan; He, Lin; Gyamfi, Maxwell A; Mendy, Alphonse J; Slitt, Angela L; Klaassen, Curtis D; Wan, Yu-Jui Y

    2005-12-01

    Nuclear receptors, including constitutive androstane receptor, pregnane X receptor, and retinoid X receptor (RXR), modulate acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity by regulating the expression of phase I cytochrome P450 (P450) genes. It has not been fully resolved, however, whether they regulate APAP detoxification at the phase II level. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the role of RXRalpha in phase II enzyme-mediated detoxification of APAP. Wild-type and hepatocyte-specific RXRalpha knockout mice were treated with a toxic dose of APAP (500 mg/kg i.p.). Mutant mice were protected from APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, even though basal liver glutathione (GSH) levels were significantly lower in mutant mice compared with those of wild-type mice. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of APAP metabolites revealed significantly greater levels of APAP-GSH conjugates in livers and bile of mutant mice compared with those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, hepatocyte RXRalpha deficiency altered the gene expression profile of the glutathione S-transferase (Gst) family. Basal expression of 13 of 15 Gst genes studied was altered in hepatocyte-specific RXRalpha-deficient mice. This probably led to enhanced APAP-GSH conjugation and reduced accumulation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, a toxic electrophile that is produced by biotransformation of APAP by phase I P450 enzymes. In conclusion, the data presented in this study define an RXRalpha-Gst regulatory network that controls APAP-GSH conjugation. This report reveals a potential novel strategy to enhance the detoxification of APAP or other xenobiotics by manipulating Gst activity through RXRalpha-mediated pathways.

  1. Hepato-protective effects of six schisandra lignans on acetaminophen-induced liver injury are partially associated with the inhibition of CYP-mediated bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiming; Fan, Xiaomei; Wang, Ying; Tan, Huasen; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2015-04-25

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. Schisandra fructus is widely-used traditional Chinese medicine which possesses hepato-protective potential. Schisandrin A (SinA), Schisandrin B (SinB), Schisandrin C (SinC), Schisandrol A (SolA), Schisandrol B (SolB), and Schisantherin A (SthA) are the major bioactive lignans. Most recently, we found SolB exerts significant hepato-protection against APAP-induced liver injury. In this study, the protective effects of the other five schisandra lignans against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice were investigated and compared with that of SolB. The results of morphological and biochemical assessment clearly demonstrated significant protective effects of SinA, SinB, SinC, SolA, SolB, and SthA against APAP-induced liver injury. Among these schisandra lignans, SinC and SolB exerted the strongest hepato-protective effects against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Six lignans pretreatment before APAP dosing could prevent the depletions of total liver glutathione (GSH) and mitochondrial GSH caused by APAP. Additionally, the lignans treatment inhibited the enzymatic activities of three CYP450 isoforms (CYP2E1, CYP1A2, and CYP3A11) related to APAP bioactivation, and further decreased the formation of APAP toxic intermediate N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI) in mouse microsomal incubation system. This study demonstrated that SinA, SinB, SinC, SolA, SolB and SthA exhibited significant protective actions toward APAP-induced liver injury, which was partially associated with the inhibition of CYP-mediated APAP bioactivation.

  2. Protective Effect of Baccharis trimera Extract on Acute Hepatic Injury in a Model of Inflammation Induced by Acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Pádua, Bruno da Cruz; Rossoni Júnior, Joamyr Victor; de Brito Magalhães, Cíntia Lopes; Chaves, Míriam Martins; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia; de Souza, Gustavo Henrique Bianco; Brandão, Geraldo Célio; Rodrigues, Ivanildes Vasconcelos; Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a commonly used analgesic and antipyretic. When administered in high doses, APAP is a clinical problem in the US and Europe, often resulting in severe liver injury and potentially acute liver failure. Studies have demonstrated that antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents effectively protect against the acute hepatotoxicity induced by APAP overdose. Methods. The present study attempted to investigate the protective effect of B. trimera against APAP-induced hepatic damage in rats. The liver-function markers ALT and AST, biomarkers of oxidative stress, antioxidant parameters, and histopathological changes were examined. Results. The pretreatment with B. trimera attenuated serum activities of ALT and AST that were enhanced by administration of APAP. Furthermore, pretreatment with the extract decreases the activity of the enzyme SOD and increases the activity of catalase and the concentration of total glutathione. Histopathological analysis confirmed the alleviation of liver damage and reduced lesions caused by APAP. Conclusions. The hepatoprotective action of B. trimera extract may rely on its effect on reducing the oxidative stress caused by APAP-induced hepatic damage in a rat model. General Significance. These results make the extract of B. trimera a potential candidate drug capable of protecting the liver against damage caused by APAP overdose. PMID:25435714

  3. Effect of Methylsulfonylmethane Pretreatment on Aceta-minophen Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bohlooli, Shahab; Mohammadi, Sadollah; Amirshahrokhi, Keyvan; Mirzanejad-asl, Hafez; Yosefi, Mohammad; Mohammadi-Nei, Amir; Chinifroush, Mir Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a sulfur-containing compound found in a wide range of human foods including fruits, vegetables, grains and beverages. In this study the effect of MSM pretreatment on acetaminophen induced liver damage was investigated. Materials and Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were pretreated with 100 mg/kg MSM for one week. On day seven rats were received acetaminophen (850 mg/kg, intraperitoneal). Twenty-four hours later, blood samples were taken to determine serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Tissue samples of liver were also taken for the determination of the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA); total glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity together with histopathological observations. Results: High dose of acetaminophen administration caused a significant decrease in the GSH level of the liver tissue, which was accompanied with a decrease in SOD activity and increases in tissue MDA level and MPO activity. Serum ALT, AST levels were also found elevated in the acetaminophen-treated group. Pretreatment with MSM for one week was significantly attenuated all of these biochemical indices. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that MSM pretreatment could alleviate hepatic injury induced by acetaminophen intoxication, may be through its sulfur donating and antioxidant effects. PMID:24106592

  4. Predictive toxicology using systemic biology and liver microfluidic “on chip” approaches: Application to acetaminophen injury

    SciTech Connect

    Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Bunescu, Andrei; Elena-Herrmann, Bénédicte; Snouber, Leila Choucha; Griscom, Laurent; Razan, Florence; Bois, Frederic Y.; Legallais, Cécile; and others

    2012-03-15

    We have analyzed transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic profiles of hepatoma cells cultivated inside a microfluidic biochip with or without acetaminophen (APAP). Without APAP, the results show an adaptive cellular response to the microfluidic environment, leading to the induction of anti-oxidative stress and cytoprotective pathways. In presence of APAP, calcium homeostasis perturbation, lipid peroxidation and cell death are observed. These effects can be attributed to APAP metabolism into its highly reactive metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). That toxicity pathway was confirmed by the detection of GSH-APAP, the large production of 2-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxybutyrate, and methionine, cystine, and histidine consumption in the treated biochips. Those metabolites have been reported as specific biomarkers of hepatotoxicity and glutathione depletion in the literature. In addition, the integration of the metabolomic, transcriptomic and proteomic collected profiles allowed a more complete reconstruction of the APAP injury pathways. To our knowledge, this work is the first example of a global integration of microfluidic biochip data in toxicity assessment. Our results demonstrate the potential of that new approach to predictive toxicology. -- Highlights: ► We cultivated liver cells in microfluidic biochips ► We integrated transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomics profiles ► Pathways reconstructions were proposed in control and acetaminophen treated cultures ► Biomarkers were identified ► Comparisons with in vivo studies were proposed.

  5. Evaluation of Hepatoprotective Activity of Adansonia digitata Extract on Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hanafy, Abeer; Aldawsari, Hibah M.; Badr, Jihan M.; Ibrahim, Amany K.; Abdel-Hady, Seham El-Sayed

    2016-01-01

    The methanol extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. (Malvaceae) was examined for its hepatoprotective activity against liver damage induced by acetaminophen in rats. The principle depends on the fact that administration of acetaminophen will be associated with development of oxidative stress. In addition, hepatospecific serum markers will be disturbed. Treatment of the rats with the methanol extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. prior to administration of acetaminophen significantly reduced the disturbance in liver function. Liver functions were measured by assessment of total protein, total bilirubin, ALP, ALT, and AST. Oxidative stress parameter and antioxidant markers were also evaluated. Moreover, histopathological evaluation was performed in order to assess liver case regarding inflammatory infiltration or necrosis. Animals were observed for any symptoms of toxicity after administration of extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. to ensure safety of the fruit extract. PMID:27118980

  6. Free cholesterol accumulation in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells exacerbates acetaminophen hepatotoxicity via TLR9 signaling.

    PubMed

    Teratani, Toshiaki; Tomita, Kengo; Suzuki, Takahiro; Furuhashi, Hirotaka; Irie, Rie; Hida, Shigeaki; Okada, Yoshikiyo; Kurihara, Chie; Ebinuma, Hirotoshi; Nakamoto, Nobuhiro; Saito, Hidetsugu; Hibi, Toshifumi; Miura, Soichiro; Hokari, Ryota; Kanai, Takanori

    2017-10-01

    Although obesity is a risk factor for acute liver failure, the pathogenic mechanisms are not yet fully understood. High cholesterol (HC) intake, which often underlies obesity, is suggested to play a role in the mechanism. We aimed to elucidate the effect of a HC diet on acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in the USA. C57BL/6 Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) knockout (Tlr9(-/-)) mice and their Tlr9(+/+) littermates were fed an HC diet for fourweeks and then treated with acetaminophen. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) were isolated from the mice for in vivo and in vitro analyses. The HC diet exacerbated acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in a TLR9/inflammasome pathway-dependent manner. LSECs played a major role in the cholesterol loading-induced exacerbation. The accumulation of free cholesterol in the endolysosomes in LSECs enhanced TLR9-mediated signaling, thereby exacerbating the pathology of acetaminophen-induced liver injury through the activation of the TLR9/inflammasome pathway. The accumulation of free cholesterol in LSEC endolysosomes induced a dysfunction of the Rab7 membrane trafficking recycling mechanism, thus disrupting the transport of TLR9 from late endosomes to the lysosomes. Consequently, the level of active TLR9 in the late endosomes increased, thereby enhancing TLR9 signaling in LSECs. HC intake exaggerated acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury via free cholesterol accumulation in LSECs, demonstrating a novel role of free cholesterol as a metabolic factor in TLR9 signal regulation and pathologies of acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Therapeutic approaches may target this pathway. Lay summary: High cholesterol intake exacerbated acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury via the accumulation of free cholesterol in the endolysosomes of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. This accumulation enhanced Toll-like receptor 9 signaling via impairment of its membrane trafficking mechanism

  7. Role of caspase-1 and interleukin-1{beta} in acetaminophen-induced hepatic inflammation and liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2010-09-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose can result in serious liver injury and potentially death. Toxicity is dependent on metabolism of APAP to a reactive metabolite initiating a cascade of intracellular events resulting in hepatocellular necrosis. This early injury triggers a sterile inflammatory response with formation of cytokines and innate immune cell infiltration in the liver. Recently, IL-1{beta} signaling has been implicated in the potentiation of APAP-induced liver injury. To test if IL-1{beta} formation through caspase-1 is critical for the pathophysiology, C57Bl/6 mice were treated with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VD-fmk to block the inflammasome-mediated maturation of IL-1{beta} during APAP overdose (300 mg/kg APAP). This intervention did not affect IL-1{beta} gene transcription but prevented the increase in IL-1{beta} plasma levels. However, APAP-induced liver injury and neutrophil infiltration were not affected. Similarly, liver injury and the hepatic neutrophilic inflammation were not attenuated in IL-1-receptor-1 deficient mice compared to wild-type animals. To evaluate the potential of IL-1{beta} to increase injury, mice were given pharmacological doses of IL-1{beta} after APAP overdose. Despite increased systemic activation of neutrophils and recruitment into the liver, there was no alteration in injury. We conclude that endogenous IL-1{beta} formation after APAP overdose is insufficient to activate and recruit neutrophils into the liver or cause liver injury. Even high pharmacological doses of IL-1{beta}, which induce hepatic neutrophil accumulation and activation, do not enhance APAP-induced liver injury. Thus, IL-1 signaling is irrelevant for APAP hepatotoxicity. The inflammatory cascade is a less important therapeutic target than intracellular signaling pathways to attenuate APAP-induced liver injury.

  8. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A protects hepatocytes against acetaminophen-induced toxicity via regulation of thioredoxin reductase 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mahendra Pratap; Kwak, Geun-Hee; Kim, Ki Young; Kim, Hwa-Young

    2017-06-03

    Thioredoxin reductase 1 (TXNRD1) is associated with susceptibility to acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver damage. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) is an antioxidant and protein repair enzyme that specifically catalyzes the reduction of methionine S-sulfoxide residues. We have previously shown that MsrA deficiency exacerbates acute liver injury induced by APAP. In this study, we used primary hepatocytes to investigate the underlying mechanism of the protective effect of MsrA against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. MsrA gene-deleted (MsrA(-/-)) hepatocytes showed higher susceptibility to APAP-induced cytotoxicity than wild-type (MsrA(+/+)) cells, consistent with our previous in vivo results. MsrA deficiency increased APAP-induced glutathione depletion and reactive oxygen species production. APAP treatment increased Nrf2 activation more profoundly in MsrA(-/-) than in MsrA(+/+) hepatocytes. Basal TXNRD1 levels were significantly higher in MsrA(-/-) than in MsrA(+/+) hepatocytes, while TXNRD1 depletion in both MsrA(-/-) and MsrA(+/+) cells resulted in increased resistance to APAP-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, APAP treatment significantly increased TXNRD1 expression in MsrA(-/-) hepatocytes, while no significant change was observed in MsrA(+/+) cells. Overexpression of MsrA reduced APAP-induced cytotoxicity and TXNRD1 expression levels in APAP-treated MsrA(-/-) hepatocytes. Collectively, our results suggest that MsrA protects hepatocytes from APAP-induced cytotoxicity through the modulation of TXNRD1 expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ameliorative Effects and Possible Molecular Mechanism of Action of Black Ginseng (Panax ginseng) on Acetaminophen-Mediated Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun-Nan; Liu, Zhi; Wang, Zi; Li, Xin-Dian; Zhang, Lian-Xue; Li, Wei; Wang, Ying-Ping

    2017-04-21

    Background: Frequent overdosing of acetaminophen (APAP) has become the major cause of acute liver injury (ALI). The present study aimed to evaluate the potential hepatoprotective effects of black ginseng (BG) on APAP-induced mice liver injuries and the underlying mechanisms of action were further investigated for the first time. Methods: Mice were treated with BG (300, 600 mg/kg) by oral gavage once a day for seven days. On the 7th day, all mice were treated with 250 mg/kg APAP which caused severe liver injury after 24 h and hepatotoxicity was assessed. Results: Our results showed that pretreatment with BG significantly decreased the levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) compared with the APAP group. Meanwhile, hepatic antioxidant including glutathione (GSH) was elevated compared with the APAP group. In contrast, a significant decrease of the levels of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) was observed in the BG-treated groups compared with the APAP group. These effects were associated with significant increases of cytochrome P450 E1 (CYP2E1) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) levels in liver tissues. Moreover, BG supplementation suppressed activation of apoptotic pathways through increasing Bcl-2 and decreasing Bax protein expression levels according to western blotting analysis. Histopathological examination revealed that BG pretreatment significantly inhibited APAP-induced necrosis and inflammatory infiltration in liver tissues. Biological indicators of nitrative stress like 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) were also inhibited after pretreatment with BG, compared with the APAP group. Conclusions: The results clearly suggest that the underlying molecular mechanisms of action of BG-mediated alleviation of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity may involve its anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-nitrative effects.

  10. ERK Signaling Pathway Plays a Key Role in Baicalin Protection Against Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chia-Chih; Day, Yuan-Ji; Lee, Hung-Chen; Liou, Jiin-Tarng; Chou, An-Hsun; Liu, Fu-Chao

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes hepatocytes necrosis and acute liver failure. Baicalin (BA), a major flavonoid of Scutellariae radix, has potent hepatoprotective properties in traditional medicine. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of BA on a APAP-induced liver injury in a mouse model. The mice received an intraperitoneal hepatotoxic dose of APAP (300[Formula: see text]mg/kg) and after 30[Formula: see text]min, were treated with BA at concentrations of 0, 15, 30, or 60[Formula: see text]mg/kg. After 16[Formula: see text]h of treatment, the mice were sacrificed for further analysis. APAP administration significantly elevated the serum alanine transferase (ALT) enzyme levels and hepatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity when compared with control animals. Baicalin treatment significantly attenuated the elevation of liver ALT levels, as well as hepatic MPO activity in a dose- dependent manner (15-60[Formula: see text]mg/kg) in APAP-treated mice. The strongest beneficial effects of BA were seen at a dose of 30[Formula: see text]mg/kg. BA treatment at 30[Formula: see text]mg/kg after APAP overdose reduced elevated hepatic cytokine (TNF-[Formula: see text] and IL-6) levels, and macrophage recruitment around the area of hepatotoxicity in immunohistochemical staining. Significantly, BA treatment can also decrease hepatic phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) expression, which is induced by APAP overdose. Our data suggests that baicalin treatment can effectively attenuate APAP-induced liver injury by down-regulating the ERK signaling pathway and its downstream effectors of inflammatory responses. These results support that baicalin is a potential hepatoprotective agent.

  11. Acute acetaminophen intoxication leads to hepatic iron loading by decreased hepcidin synthesis.

    PubMed

    van Swelm, Rachel P L; Laarakkers, Coby M M; Blous, Linda; Peters, Janny G P; Blaney Davidson, Esmeralda N; van der Kraan, Peter M; Swinkels, Dorine W; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Russel, Frans G M

    2012-09-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP), a major cause of acute liver injury in the Western world, is mediated by metabolism and oxidative stress. Recent studies have suggested a role for iron in potentiating APAP-induced liver injury although its regulatory mechanism is not completely understood. The current study was designed to unravel the iron-regulating pathways in mice after APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Mice with severe injury showed a significant increase in liver iron concentration and oxidative stress. Concurrently, the plasma concentration of hepcidin, the key regulator in iron metabolism, and hepatic hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (Hamp) mRNA expression levels were significantly reduced. We showed that hepcidin transcription was inhibited via several hepcidin-regulating factors, including the bone morphogenetic protein/small mother against decapentaplegic (BMP/SMAD) pathway, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), and possibly also via erythropoietin (EPO). Downregulation of the BMP/SMAD signaling pathway was most likely caused by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), which was increased in mice with severe APAP-induced liver injury. HIF-1α stimulates cleaving of hemojuvelin, the cofactor of the BMP receptor, thereby blocking BMP-induced signaling. In addition, gene expression levels of C/ebpα were significantly reduced, and Epo mRNA expression levels were significantly increased after APAP intoxication. These factors are regulated through HIF-1α during oxidative stress and suggest that HIF-1α is a key modulator in reduced hepcidin transcription after APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. In conclusion, acute APAP-induced liver injury leads to activation of HIF-1α, which results in a downregulation in hepcidin expression through a BMP/SMAD signaling pathway and through C/EBPα inhibition. Eventually, this leads to hepatic iron loading associated with APAP cytotoxicity.

  12. Comparison of acetaminophen toxicity in primary hepatocytes isolated from transgenic mice with different appolipoprotein E alleles.

    PubMed

    Mezera, V; Kucera, O; Moravcova, A; Peterova, E; Rousar, T; Rychtrmoc, D; Sobotka, O; Cervinkova, Z

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor, important for combating electrophilic and oxidative stress in the liver and other organs. This encompasses detoxification of hepatotoxic drugs, including acetaminophen (APAP). Recently, an association between apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype and Nrf2 expression was described. We compared the toxicity of APAP on primary culture hepatocytes isolated from transgenic mice carrying two different human ApoE alleles and wild-type controls. The cells were exposed to APAP in concentrations from 0.5 to 4 mM for up to 24 hours. APAP led to a dose-dependent hepatotoxicity from 1 mM after 16 h exposure in all mice tested. The toxicity was higher in hepatocytes isolated from both transgenic strains than in wild-type controls and most pronounced in ApoE3 mice. Concurrently, there was a decline in mitochondrial membrane potential, especially in ApoE3 hepatocytes. The formation of reactive oxygen species was increased after 24 hours with 2.5 mM APAP in hepatocytes of all strains tested, with the highest increase being in the ApoE3 genotype. The activity of caspases 3 and 7 did not differ among groups and was minimal after 24 hour incubation with 4 mM APAP. We observed higher lipid accumulation in hepatocytes isolated from both transgenic strains than in wild-type controls. The expression of Nrf2-dependent genes was higher in ApoE3 than in ApoE4 hepatocytes and some of these genes were induced by APAP treatment. In conclusion, transgenic mice with ApoE4 and ApoE3 alleles displayed higher susceptibility to acute APAP toxicity in vitro than wild-type mice. Of the two transgenic genotypes tested, ApoE3 allele carriers were more prone to injury.

  13. Multiscale modeling reveals inhibitory and stimulatory effects of caffeine on acetaminophen-induced toxicity in humans.

    PubMed

    Thiel, C; Cordes, H; Baier, V; Blank, L M; Kuepfer, L

    2017-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic drug that is frequently co-administered with caffeine (CAF) in the treatment of pain. It is well known that APAP may cause severe liver injury after an acute overdose. However, the understanding of whether and to what extent CAF inhibits or stimulates APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in humans is still lacking. Here, a multiscale analysis is presented that quantitatively models the pharmacodynamic (PD) response of APAP during co-medication with CAF. Therefore, drug-drug interaction (DDI) processes were integrated into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models at the organism level, whereas drug-specific PD response data were contextualized at the cellular level. The results provide new insights into the inhibitory and stimulatory effects of CAF on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity for crucially affected key cellular processes and individual genes at the patient level. This study might facilitate the risk assessment of drug combination therapies in humans and thus may improve patient safety in clinical practice. © 2017 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  14. Hepatic mitochondrial DNA/Toll-like receptor 9/MicroRNA-223 forms a negative feedback loop to limit neutrophil overactivation and acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    He, Yong; Feng, Dechun; Li, Man; Gao, Yanhang; Ramirez, Teresa; Cao, Haixia; Kim, Seung-Jin; Yang, Yang; Cai, Yan; Ju, Cynthia; Wang, Hua; Li, Jun; Gao, Bin

    2017-07-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a leading cause of acute liver failure worldwide, in which mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) released by damaged hepatocytes activates neutrophils through binding of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), further aggravating liver injury. Here, we demonstrated that mtDNA/TLR9 also activates a negative feedback pathway through induction of microRNA-223 (miR-223) to limit neutrophil overactivation and liver injury. After injection of APAP in mice, levels of miR-223, the most abundant miRNAs in neutrophils, were highly elevated in neutrophils. Disruption of the miR-223 gene exacerbated APAP-induced hepatic neutrophil infiltration, oxidative stress, and injury and enhanced TLR9 ligand-mediated activation of proinflammatory mediators in neutrophils. An additional deletion of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) gene ameliorated APAP-induced neutrophil infiltration and liver injury in miR-223 knockout mice. In vitro experiments revealed that miR-223-deficient neutrophils were more susceptible to TLR9 agonist-mediated induction of proinflammatory mediators and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling, whereas overexpression of miR-223 attenuated these effects in neutrophils. Moreover, inhibition of TLR9 signaling by either treatment with a TLR9 inhibitor or by disruption of TLR9 gene partially, but significantly, suppressed miR-223 expression in neutrophils post-APAP injection. In contrast, activation of TLR9 up-regulated miR-223 expression in neutrophils in vivo and in vitro. Mechanistically, activation of TLR9 up-regulated miR-223 by enhancing NF-κB binding on miR-223 promoter, whereas miR-223 attenuated TLR9/NF-κB-mediated inflammation by targeting IκB kinase α expression. Collectively, up-regulation of miR-223 plays a key role in terminating the acute neutrophilic response and is a therapeutic target for treatment of APAP-induced liver failure. (Hepatology 2017;66:220-234). © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver

  15. FDA proposals to limit the hepatotoxicity of paracetamol (acetaminophen): are they reasonable?

    PubMed

    Graham, Garry G; Day, Richard O; Graudins, Andis; Mohamudally, Anthoulla

    2010-04-01

    Hepatotoxicity from paracetamol is of great concern because of the considerable number of patients who develop severe toxicity from this drug. A group of senior medical practitioners, academics and scientists were brought together on June 29 and 30, 2009 by the Food and Drug Administration of USA (FDA) with the aim of providing advice on how to limit the number of cases of hepatotoxicity due to paracetamol in USA. The most contentious recommendations were the reduction in the dose of paracetamol to 650 mg and the elimination of prescription combination products of paracetamol and opiates. The first recommendation indicates that many members of the committee consider, despite much evidence to the contrary, that therapeutic doses of paracetamol (up to 4 g daily) are associated with a significant incidence of hepatotoxicity. The second recommendation, if accepted by FDA, will require major changes in the therapeutic use of paracetamol and opiates. Adoption of these two recommendations may lead to the increased use of NSAIDs with the potential of increasing incidence of NSAIDs-related adverse reactions.

  16. Inhibitor of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Breckenridge, David G.; Liles, John T.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic activation and oxidant stress are key events in the pathophysiology of acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. The initial mitochondrial oxidative stress triggered by protein adduct formation is amplified by c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and ultimately cell necrosis. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is considered the link between oxidant stress and JNK activation. The objective of the current study was to assess the efficacy and mechanism of action of the small-molecule ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 in a murine model of APAP hepatotoxicity. APAP (300 mg/kg) caused extensive glutathione depletion, JNK activation and translocation to the mitochondria, oxidant stress and liver injury as indicated by plasma ALT activities and area of necrosis over a 24 h observation period. Pretreatment with 30 mg/kg of GS-459679 almost completely prevented JNK activation, oxidant stress and injury without affecting the metabolic activation of APAP. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of GS-459679, mice were treated with APAP and then with the inhibitor. Given 1.5 h after APAP, GS-459679 was still protective, which was paralleled by reduced JNK activation and p-JNK translocation to mitochondria. However, GS-459679 treatment was not more effective than N-acetylcysteine, and the combination of GS-459679 and N-acetylcysteine exhibited similar efficacy as N-acetylcysteine monotherapy, suggesting that GS-459769 and N-acetylcysteine affect the same pathway. Importantly, inhibition of ASK1 did not impair liver regeneration as indicated by PCNA staining. In conclusion, the ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 protected against APAP toxicity by attenuating JNK activation and oxidant stress in mice and may have therapeutic potential for APAP overdose patients. - Highlights: • Two ASK1 inhibitors protected against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • The ASK1 inhibitors protect when used as pre- or post-treatment. • Protection by ASK1 inhibitor is

  17. Hepatoprotective action of celery (Apium graveolens) leaves in acetaminophen-fed freshwater fish (Pangasius sutchi).

    PubMed

    Shivashri, C; Rajarajeshwari, T; Rajasekar, P

    2013-10-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver damage is one of the most common problems among the population. Therefore, the study was aimed to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of celery leaves on APAP-induced toxicity in a freshwater fish, Pangasius sutchi. Fish were divided into four experimental groups of 6 fish each. Group 1 served as control. Group 2 fish were exposed to APAP (500 mg/kg) for 24 h. Groups 3 and 4 fish were exposed to APAP + celery leaf powder (CE) (500 mg/kg) and CE for 24 h, respectively. The severity of liver damage, hepatic lipid, glycogen, ions status and histological alterations was examined. The characterization of CE extract was also performed. APAP-exposed fish showed elevated levels of both circulating and tissue hepatotoxic markers (AST, ALT and ALP), reduced hepatic glycogen and lipid contents (TG and cholesterol), increased tissue lipid peroxidation markers (TBARS, LHP and PCO), altered tissue levels of enzymatic (SOD, CAT, GPx and GST) and non-enzymatic (GSH) antioxidants and cellular thiol levels (T-SH, P-SH and NP-SH), and reduced hepatic ions (Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+)) and abnormal liver histology. The abnormalities associated with APAP exposure were reversed on treatment with CE. The TLC separation and HPLC quantification of petroleum ether/acetone extract of CE showed the peaks for highly efficient flavonoids such as rutein, quercetin and luteolin. The observed hepatoprotective effect of CE might be due to its rich flavonoids.

  18. Acute Exposure to Ozone Exacerbates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim Aibo, Daher; Birmingham, Neil P.; Lewandowski, Ryan; Maddox, Jane F.; Roth, Robert A.; Ganey, Patricia E.; Wagner, James G.; Harkema, Jack R.

    2010-01-01

    Ozone (O3), an oxidant air pollutant in photochemical smog, principally targets epithelial cells lining the respiratory tract. However, changes in gene expression have also been reported in livers of O3-exposed mice. The principal aim of the present study was to determine if acute exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of O3 could cause exacerbation of drug-induced liver injury in mice. Overdose with acetaminophen (APAP) is the most common cause of drug-induced liver injury in developed countries. In the present study, we examined the hepatic effects of acute O3 exposure in mice pretreated with a hepatotoxic dose of APAP. C57BL/6 male mice were fasted overnight and then given APAP (300 mg/kg ip) or saline vehicle (0 mg/kg APAP). Two hours later, mice were exposed to 0, 0.25, or 0.5 ppm O3 for 6 h and then sacrificed 9 or 32 h after APAP administration (1 or 24 h after O3 exposure, respectively). Animals euthanized at 32 h were given 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine 2 h before sacrifice to identify hepatocytes undergoing reparative DNA synthesis. Saline-treated mice exposed to either air or O3 had no liver injury. All APAP-treated mice developed marked centrilobular hepatocellular necrosis that increased in severity with time after APAP exposure. O3 exposure increased the severity of APAP-induced liver injury as indicated by an increase in necrotic hepatic tissue and plasma alanine aminotransferase activity. O3 also caused an increase in neutrophil accumulation in livers of APAP-treated animals. APAP induced a 10-fold increase in the number of bromodeoxyuridine-labeled hepatocytes that was markedly attenuated by O3 exposure. Gene expression analysis 9 h after APAP revealed differential expression of genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress, and cellular regeneration in mice treated with APAP and O3 compared to APAP or O3 alone, providing some indications of the mechanisms behind the APAP and O3 potentiation. These results suggest that acute exposure to

  19. Role of the Nalp3 inflammasome in acetaminophen-induced sterile inflammation and liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Antoine, Daniel J.; Shaw, Patrick J.; Benson, Craig; Farhood, Anwar; Williams, Dominic P.; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Park, B. Kevin; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US and UK. Recent studies implied that APAP-induced injury is partially mediated by interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), which can activate and recruit neutrophils, exacerbating injury. Mature IL-1{beta} is formed by caspase-1, dependent on inflammasome activation. The objective of this invetstigation was to evaluate the role of the Nalp3 inflammasome on release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), hepatic neutrophil accumulation and liver injury (ALT, necrosis) after APAP overdose. Mice deficient for each component of the Nalp3 inflammasome (caspase-1, ASC and Nalp3) were treated with 300 mg/kg APAP for 24 h; these mice had similar neutrophil recruitment and liver injury as APAP-treated C57Bl/6 wildtype animals. In addition, plasma levels of DAMPs (DNA fragments, keratin-18, hypo- and hyper-acetylated forms of high mobility group box-1 protein) were similarly elevated with no significant difference between wildtype and gene knockout mice. In addition, aspirin treatment, which has been postulated to attenuate cytokine formation and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome after APAP, had no effect on release of DAMPs, hepatic neutrophil accumulation or liver injury. Together, these data confirm the release of DAMPs and a sterile inflammatory response after APAP overdose. However, as previously reported minor endogenous formation of IL-1{beta} and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome have little impact on APAP hepatotoxicity. It appears that the Nalp3 inflammasome is not a promising therapeutic target to treat APAP overdose.

  20. 'Omics analysis of low dose acetaminophen intake demonstrates novel response pathways in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Jetten, Marlon J.A.; Gaj, Stan; Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa; Kok, Theo M. de; Delft, Joost H.M. van; Lommen, Arjen; Someren, Eugene P. van; Jennen, Danyel G.J.; Claessen, Sandra M.; Peijnenburg, Ad A.C.M.; Stierum, Rob H.; Kleinjans, Jos C.S.

    2012-03-15

    Acetaminophen is the primary cause of acute liver toxicity in Europe/USA, which led the FDA to reconsider recommendations concerning safe acetaminophen dosage/use. Unfortunately, the current tests for liver toxicity are no ideal predictive markers for liver injury, i.e. they only measure acetaminophen exposure after profound liver toxicity has already occurred. Furthermore, these tests do not provide mechanistic information. Here, 'omics techniques (global analysis of metabolomic/gene-expression responses) may provide additional insight. To better understand acetaminophen-induced responses at low doses, we evaluated the effects of (sub-)therapeutic acetaminophen doses on metabolite formation and global gene-expression changes (including, for the first time, full-genome human miRNA expression changes) in blood/urine samples from healthy human volunteers. Many known and several new acetaminophen-metabolites were detected, in particular in relation to hepatotoxicity-linked, oxidative metabolism of acetaminophen. Transcriptomic changes indicated immune-modulating effects (2 g dose) and oxidative stress responses (4 g dose). For the first time, effects of acetaminophen on full-genome human miRNA expression have been considered and confirmed the findings on mRNA level. 'Omics techniques outperformed clinical chemistry tests and revealed novel response pathways to acetaminophen in humans. Although no definitive conclusion about potential immunotoxic effects of acetaminophen can be drawn from this study, there are clear indications that the immune system is triggered even after intake of low doses of acetaminophen. Also, oxidative stress-related gene responses, similar to those seen after high dose acetaminophen exposure, suggest the occurrence of possible pre-toxic effects of therapeutic acetaminophen doses. Possibly, these effects are related to dose-dependent increases in levels of hepatotoxicity-related metabolites. -- Highlights: ► 'Omics techniques outperformed

  1. CDDO-Im protects from acetaminophen hepatotoxicity through induction of Nrf2-dependent genes

    SciTech Connect

    Reisman, Scott A.; Buckley, David B.; Tanaka, Yuji; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2009-04-01

    CDDO-Im is a synthetic triterpenoid recently shown to induce cytoprotective genes through the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway, an important mechanism for the induction of cytoprotective genes in response to oxidative stress. Upon oxidative or electrophilic insult, the transcription factor Nrf2 translocates to the nucleus, heterodimerizes with small Maf proteins, and binds to antioxidant response elements (AREs) in the upstream promoter regions of various cytoprotective genes. To further elucidate the hepatoprotective effects of CDDO-Im, wild-type and Nrf2-null mice were pretreated with CDDO-Im (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle (DMSO), and then administered acetaminophen (500 mg/kg, i.p.). Pretreatment of wild-type mice with CDDO-Im reduced liver injury caused by acetaminophen. In contrast, hepatoprotection by CDDO-Im was not observed in Nrf2-null mice. CDDO-Im increased Nrf2 protein expression and Nrf2-ARE binding in wild-type, but not Nrf2-null mice. Furthermore, CDDO-Im increased the mRNA expression of the Nrf2 target genes NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase-1 (Nqo1); glutamate-cysteine ligase, catalytic subunit (Gclc); and heme-oxygenase-1 (Ho-1), in both a dose- and time-dependent manner. Conversely, CDDO-Im did not induce Nqo1, Gclc, and Ho-1 mRNA expression in Nrf2-null mice. Collectively, the present study shows that CDDO-Im pretreatment induces Nrf2-dependent cytoprotective genes and protects the liver from acetaminophen-induced hepatic injury.

  2. Astaxanthin pretreatment attenuates acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyao; Zhang, Simin; Bi, Jianbin; Gu, Jingxian; Deng, Yan; Liu, Chang

    2017-04-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a conventional drug widely used in the clinic because of its antipyretic-analgesic effects. However, accidental or intentional APAP overdoses induce liver injury and even acute liver failure (ALF). Astaxanthin (ASX) is the strongest antioxidant in nature that shows preventive and therapeutic properties, such as ocular protection, anti-tumor, anti-diabetes, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory effects. The aim of present study was to determine whether ASX pretreatment provides protection against APAP-induced liver failure. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into 7 groups, including control, oil, ASX (30mg/kg or 60mg/kg), APAP and APAP+ASX (30mg/kg or 60mg/kg) groups. Saline, olive oil and ASX were administered for 14days. The APAP and APAP+ASX groups were given a peritoneal injection of 700mg/kg or 300mg/kg APAP to determine the 5-day survival rate and for further observation, respectively. Blood and liver samples were collected to detect alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), inflammation, oxidative stress and antioxidant systems, and to observe histopathologic changes and key proteins in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family. ASX pretreatment before APAP increased the 5-day survival rate in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the ALT, AST, hepatic necrosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, lipid peroxidation (LPO), oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory factors. ASX protected against APAP toxicity by inhibiting the depletion of glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Administration of ASX did not change the expression of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and P38. However, phosphorylation of JNK, ERK and P38 was reduced, consistent with the level of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2). ASX provided protection for the liver against APAP hepatotoxicity by alleviating hepatocyte necrosis, blocking ROS

  3. Increased mitochondrial ROS formation by acetaminophen in human hepatic cells is associated with gene expression changes suggesting disruption of the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian; Briedé, Jacob J; Jennen, Danyel G J; Van Summeren, Anke; Saritas-Brauers, Karen; Schaart, Gert; Kleinjans, Jos C S; de Kok, Theo M C M

    2015-04-16

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdosage results in hepatotoxicity, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still not completely understood. In the current study, we focused on mitochondrial-specific oxidative liver injury induced by APAP exposure. Owning to genetic polymorphisms in the CYP2E1 gene or varying inducibility by xenobiotics, the CYP2E1 mRNA level and protein activity vary extensively among individuals. As CYP2E1 is a known ROS generating enzyme, we chose HepG2 to minimize CYP2E1-induced ROS formation, which will help us better understand the APAP induced mitochondrial-specific hepatotoxicity in a subpopulation with low CYP2E1 activity. HepG2 cells were exposed to a low and toxic dose (0.5 and 10mM) of APAP and analyzed at four time points for genome-wide gene expression. Mitochondria were isolated and electron spin resonance spectroscopy was performed to measure the formation of mitochondrial ROS. The yield of ATP was measured to confirm the impact of the toxic dose of APAP on cellular energy production. Our results indicate that 10mM APAP significantly influences the expression of mitochondrial protein-encoding genes in association with an increase in mitochondrial ROS formation. Additionally, 10mM APAP affects the expression of genes encoding the subunits of electron transport chain (ETC) complexes, which may alter normal mitochondrial functions by disrupting the assembly, stability, and structural integrity of ETC complexes, leading to a measurable depletion of ATP, and cell death. The expression of mitochondrium-specific antioxidant enzyme, SOD2, is reduced which may limit the ROS scavenging ability and cause imbalance of the mitochondrial ROS homeostasis. Overall, transcriptome analysis reveals the molecular processes involved in the observed APAP-induced increase of mitochondrial ROS formation and the associated APAP-induced oxidative stress.

  4. Immunochemical analysis of acetaminophen covalent binding to proteins. Partial characterization of the major acetaminophen-binding liver proteins.

    PubMed

    Bartolone, J B; Birge, R B; Sparks, K; Cohen, S D; Khairallah, E A

    1988-12-15

    A sensitive immunoassay for detecting acetaminophen (APAP) bound to proteins was developed using an affinity purified antibody directed against the N-acetylated end of the APAP molecule. Western blots of electrophoretically resolved liver proteins taken from mice given an hepatotoxic dose of APAP demonstrated that nearly 85% of the total detectable protein-bound APAP was covalently associated with proteins of 44 and 58 kD. Pretreatment of liver extracts with the sulfhydryl-specific reagent, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), prior to derivatization with the reactive metabolite of APAP, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), greatly reduced immunochemically detectable APAP-protein adducts and indicated that the antibody detects protein-thiol conjugates of APAP. To investigate the basis of the binding selectivity in vivo, a variety of systems which yielded APAP-protein adducts were analyzed. Systems which activate APAP enzymatically, as in hepatocyte suspensions or in post-mitochondrial (S9) fractions fortified with an NADPH-regenerating system, resulted in a protein binding profile similar to that produced in vivo. Conversely, when extracts or cells were treated with chemically synthesized NAPQI, an alternative protein binding profile was obtained. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of the reduced protein thiol (PSH) content of liver proteins using [3H]NEM labeling revealed that the 58 kD APAP-binding proteins were rich in PSH, whereas the major 44 kD binding protein had virtually no detectable PSH. Many PSH-rich proteins that were not arylated in vivo did bind NAPQI in vitro. However, the 44 kD proteins were not arylated when chemically synthesized NAPQI was added to homogenates or cell suspensions. The present data further suggest that, in addition to the amount and reactivity of free protein sulfhydryls, the cellular localization with respect to the cytochrome P-450 activation site may influence the susceptibility of proteins to NAPQI binding. These findings signal

  5. Metabolism by conjugation appears to confer resistance to paracetamol (acetaminophen) hepatotoxicity in the cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Barrass, Nigel; Gales, Sonya; Lenz, Eva; Parry, Tony; Powell, Helen; Thurman, Dale; Hutchison, Michael; Wilson, Ian D; Bi, Luke; Qiao, Junwen; Qin, Qiuping; Ren, Jin

    2015-03-01

    1. Paracetamol overdose remains the leading cause of acute liver failure in humans. This study was undertaken in cynomolgus monkeys to study the pharmacokinetics, metabolism and the potential for hepatotoxic insult from paracetamol administration as a possible model for human toxicity. 2. No adverse effects were observed for doses of up to 900 mg/kg/d for 14 d. Only minor sporadic increases in alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase in a number of animals were observed, with no clear dose response. 3. Toxicokinetic analysis showed good plasma exposure, albeit with less than proportional rises in Cmax and AUC, with increasing dose. The Cmax values in monkey were up to 3.5 times those associated with human liver toxicity and the AUC approx. 1000 times those associated with liver enzyme changes in 31-44% of human subjects. 4. Metabolite profiling of urine by (1)H NMR spectroscopy revealed paracetamol and its glucuronide and sulphate metabolites. Glutathione-derived metabolites, e.g. the cysteinyl conjugate, were only present in very low concentrations whilst the mercapturate was not detected. 5. These in vivo observations demonstrated that the cynomolgus monkey is remarkably resistant to paracetamol-induced toxicity and a poor model for investigating paracetamol-related hepatotoxicity in humans.

  6. Metabolic interactions between acetaminophen (paracetamol) and two flavonoids, luteolin and quercetin, through in-vitro inhibition studies.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lei; Kwara, Awewura; Greenblatt, David J

    2017-09-05

    Excessive exposure to acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol) can cause liver injury through formation of a reactive metabolite that depletes hepatic glutathione and causes hepatocellular oxidative stress and damage. Generation of this metabolite is mediated by Cytochrome-P450 (CYP) isoforms, mainly CYP2E1. A number of naturally occurring flavonoids can mitigate APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in experimental animal models. Our objective was to determine the mechanism of these protective effects and to evaluate possible human applicability. Two flavonoids, luteolin and quercetin, were evaluated as potential inhibitors of eight human CYP isoforms, of six UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms and of APAP glucuronidation and sulfation. The experimental model was based on in-vitro metabolism by human liver microsomes, using isoform-specific substrates. Luteolin and quercetin inhibited human CYP isoforms to varying degrees, with greatest potency towards CYP1A2 and CYP2C8. However, 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50 values) were generally in the micromolar range. UGT isoforms were minimally inhibited. Both luteolin and quercetin inhibited APAP sulfation but not glucuronidation. Inhibition of human CYP activity by luteolin and quercetin occurred with IC50 values exceeding customary in-vivo human exposure with tolerable supplemental doses of these compounds. The findings indicate that luteolin and quercetin are not likely to be of clinical value for preventing or treating APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  7. Quantification of a biomarker of acetaminophen protein adducts in human serum by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry: clinical and animal model applications.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sarah F; King, Amber D; Chang, Yan; Murray, Gordon J; Norris, Hye-Ryun K; Dart, Richard C; Green, Jody L; Curry, Steven C; Rollins, Douglas E; Wilkins, Diana G

    2015-03-15

    The aims of this study were to develop, validate, and apply a high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) method for quantification of protein-derived 3-(cystein-S-yl)-acetaminophen (APAP-Cys) in human serum. Formation of acetaminophen (APAP) protein adducts is thought to be a critical, early event in the development of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, and quantification of these protein adducts in human serum represents a valuable tool for assessment of APAP exposure, metabolism, and toxicity. In the reported procedure, serum samples were first dialyzed or passed through gel filtration columns to remove APAP-Cys not covalently bound to proteins. Serum eluates were then subjected to enzymatic protease digestion to liberate protein-bound APAP-Cys. Norbuprenorphine-D3 was utilized as an internal standard (IS). APAP-Cys and IS were recovered from digested serum by protein precipitation with acetonitrile, and sample extracts were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The method was validated by assessment of intra- and inter-assay accuracy and imprecision on two different analytical instrument platforms. APAP-Cys could be accurately quantified from 0.010 to 10μM, and intra- and inter-assay imprecision were <15% on both analytical instruments. APAP-Cys was stable in human serum for three freeze-thaw cycles and for 24h at ambient temperature. Extracted samples were stable when stored in refrigerated autosamplers for the typical duration of analysis or when stored at -20°C for six days. Results from process efficiency and matrix effect experiments indicated adequate recovery from human serum and insignificant ion suppression or enhancement. The utility and sensitivity of the reported procedure were illustrated by analysis of clinical samples collected from subjects taking chronic, therapeutic doses of APAP. Applicability to other biological matrices was also demonstrated by measurement of protein-derived APAP-Cys in plasma

  8. [Hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen in a patient treated with capecitabine due to breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Karczmarek-Borowska, Bozenna; Drzymała, Małgorzata; Golon, Kamila

    2014-05-01

    Toxic liver injury is among the major side effects of paracetamol. It is a direct effect of the drug metabolite on the liver cells and is dependent on the dose. Unintentional overdose is often the result of several days of taking excessive doses of the drug for medical use. It is fostered by patients' self-treatment, the availability of non-prescription drugs and lack of awareness of the actual composition of the medication taken. The authors of this study reported a case of hepatotoxicity in a patient treated with capecitabine for breast cancer. Capecitabine therapy was completed several days before the use of paracetamol. The detailed interview with the patient revealed that the cause of hepatic dysfunction was the fact that she took paracetamol for 3 days in a daily dose of 5.5 grams (the permissible safe dose is 4 grams) due to the viral infection. After symptomatic treatment over several days improved took place.

  9. Diets with corn oil and/or low protein increase acute acetaminophen hepatotoxicity compared to diets with beef tallow in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jinah

    2009-01-01

    It has been reported that dietary polyunsaturated fats (PUFA) increase liver injury in response to ethanol feeding. We tested the hypothesis that diets rich in linoleic acid (18:2n-6) would affect acute liver injury after acetaminophen injection and that protein restriction might exacerbate the liver injury. We examined effects of feeding diets with either 15% (wt/wt) corn oil or 14% beef tallow and 1% corn oil for six weeks with either 6 or 20 g/100 g protein on acute hepatotoxicity. After the feeding period, liver injury was induced by injecting either with 600 mg/kg body weight acetaminophen suspended in gum arabic-based vehicle, or with vehicle alone during fasting status. Samples of liver and plasma were taken for analyses of hepatic glutathione (GSH) levels and liver-specific enzymes [(Glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT)], respectively. Whereas GSH level was significantly lower in only group fed 15% corn oil with 6 g/100 g protein among acetaminophen-treated groups, activities of GPT and GOT were significantly elevated in all groups except the one fed beef tallow with 20 g/100 g protein, suggesting low protein might exacerbate drug-induced hepatotoxicity. The feeding regimens changed the ratio of 18:2n-6 to oleic acid (18:1n-9) in total liver lipids approximately five-fold, and produced modest changes in arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). We conclude that diets with high 18:2n-6 promote acetaminophen-induced liver injury compared to diets with more saturated fatty acids (SFA). In addition, protein restriction appeared to exacerbate the liver injury.

  10. Hepatotoxicity due to Clindamycin in Combination with Acetaminophen in a 62-Year-Old African American Female: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Anusim, Nwabundo

    2016-01-01

    Clindamycin is a bacteriostatic lincosamide antibiotic with a broad spectrum. Side effects include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and metallic taste; however, hepatotoxicity is rare. The incidence is unknown. It is characterized by increases in aspartate and alanine transaminases. There may be no symptoms and the treatment is to stop the administration of clindamycin. We have described a 62-year-old African American female medicated with acetaminophen and clindamycin who had initially presented to the dental clinic for the evaluation of gum pain following tooth extraction. She had significantly increased levels of liver transaminases, which trended downwards on quitting the medication. PMID:27462474

  11. Aminotriazole Alleviates Acetaminophen Poisoning via Downregulating P450 2E1 and Suppressing Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Qing; Ge, Pu; Dai, Jie; Jiang, Rong; Zhou, Dan; Che, Qian; Wan, Jingyuan; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Aminotriazole (ATZ) is commonly used as a catalase (CAT) inhibitor. We previously found ATZ attenuated oxidative liver injury, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose frequently induces life-threatening oxidative hepatitis. In the present study, the potential hepatoprotective effects of ATZ on oxidative liver injury and the underlying mechanisms were further investigated in a mouse model with APAP poisoning. The experimental data indicated that pretreatment with ATZ dose- and time-dependently suppressed the elevation of plasma aminotransferases in APAP exposed mice, these effects were accompanied with alleviated histological abnormality and improved survival rate of APAP-challenged mice. In mice exposed to APAP, ATZ pretreatment decreased the CAT activities, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels, malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in liver and reduced TNF-α levels in plasma. Pretreatment with ATZ also downregulated APAP-induced cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) expression and JNK phosphorylation. In addition, posttreatment with ATZ after APAP challenge decreased the levels of plasma aminotransferases and increased the survival rate of experimental animals. Posttreatment with ATZ had no effects on CYP2E1 expression or JNK phosphorylation, but it significantly decreased the levels of plasma TNF-α. Our data indicated that the LD50 of ATZ in mice was 5367.4 mg/kg body weight, which is much higher than the therapeutic dose of ATZ in the present study. These data suggested that ATZ might be effective and safe in protect mice against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, the beneficial effects might resulted from downregulation of CYP2E1 and inhibiton of inflammation. PMID:25884831

  12. Aminotriazole alleviates acetaminophen poisoning via downregulating P450 2E1 and suppressing inflammation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yuping; Wu, Kunwei; Liu, Jiashuo; Ai, Qing; Ge, Pu; Dai, Jie; Jiang, Rong; Zhou, Dan; Che, Qian; Wan, Jingyuan; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Aminotriazole (ATZ) is commonly used as a catalase (CAT) inhibitor. We previously found ATZ attenuated oxidative liver injury, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose frequently induces life-threatening oxidative hepatitis. In the present study, the potential hepatoprotective effects of ATZ on oxidative liver injury and the underlying mechanisms were further investigated in a mouse model with APAP poisoning. The experimental data indicated that pretreatment with ATZ dose- and time-dependently suppressed the elevation of plasma aminotransferases in APAP exposed mice, these effects were accompanied with alleviated histological abnormality and improved survival rate of APAP-challenged mice. In mice exposed to APAP, ATZ pretreatment decreased the CAT activities, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels, malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in liver and reduced TNF-α levels in plasma. Pretreatment with ATZ also downregulated APAP-induced cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) expression and JNK phosphorylation. In addition, posttreatment with ATZ after APAP challenge decreased the levels of plasma aminotransferases and increased the survival rate of experimental animals. Posttreatment with ATZ had no effects on CYP2E1 expression or JNK phosphorylation, but it significantly decreased the levels of plasma TNF-α. Our data indicated that the LD50 of ATZ in mice was 5367.4 mg/kg body weight, which is much higher than the therapeutic dose of ATZ in the present study. These data suggested that ATZ might be effective and safe in protect mice against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, the beneficial effects might resulted from downregulation of CYP2E1 and inhibiton of inflammation.

  13. Hepatoprotective effect of Crocus sativus (saffron) petals extract against acetaminophen toxicity in male Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Omidi, Arash; Riahinia, Narges; Montazer Torbati, Mohammad Bagher; Behdani, Mohammad-Ali

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity is known to be common and potentially fatal. This study aims to investigate the protective effects of hydroalcoholic extract, remaining from Crocus sativus petals (CSP) against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity by measuring the blood parameters and studying the histopathology of liver in male rats. Materials and Methods: Wister rats (24) were randomly assigned into four groups including: I) healthy, receiving normal saline; II) Intoxicated, receiving only APAP (600 mg/kg); III) pre-treated with low dose of CSP (10 mg /kg) and receiving APAP (600 mg/kg); IV) pre-treated with high dose of CSP (20 mg/kg) and receiving APAP (600 mg/kg). Results: The APAP treatment resulted in higher levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and bilirubin, along with lower total protein and albumin concentration than the control group. The administration of CSP with a dose of 20 mg/kg was found to result in lower levels of AST, ALT and bilirubin, with a significant higher concentration of total protein and albumin. The histopathological results regarding liver pathology, revealed sever conditions including cell swelling, severe inflammation and necrosis in APAP-exposed rats, which was quiet contrasting compared to the control group. The pre-treated rats with low doses of ‍CSP showed hydropic degeneration with mild necrosis in centrilobular areas of the liver, while the same subjects with high doses of ‍CSP appeared to have only mild hepatocyte degeneration. Conclusions: Doses of 20 mg/kg of CSP ameliorates APAP–induced acute liver injury in rats. It was concluded that the antioxidant property of CSP resulted in reducing the oxidative stress complications of toxic levels of APAP in intoxicated rats. PMID:25386395

  14. Activation of the Farnesoid X Receptor Provides Protection against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatic Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Florence Ying; de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Quad; Chong, Hansook Kim; Zhang, Yanqiao; Liu, Yaping; Jones, Stacey A.; Osborne, Timothy F.; Edwards, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR, NR1H4), is known to regulate cholesterol, bile acid, lipoprotein, and glucose metabolism. In the current study, we provide evidence to support a role for FXR in hepatoprotection from acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxicity. Pharmacological activation of FXR induces the expression of several genes involved in phase II and phase III xenobiotic metabolism in wild-type, but not Fxr−/− mice. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation-based genome-wide response element analyses coupled with luciferase reporter assays to identify functional FXR response elements within promoters, introns, or intragenic regions of these genes. Consistent with the observed transcriptional changes, FXR gene dosage is positively correlated with the degree of protection from APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in vivo. Further, we demonstrate that pretreatment of wild-type mice with an FXR-specific agonist provides significant protection from APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Based on these findings, we propose that FXR plays a role in hepatic xenobiotic metabolism and, when activated, provides hepatoprotection against toxins such as APAP. PMID:20573685

  15. Parents: Acetaminophen in Pain Relief Medicines Can Cause Liver Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents: Acetaminophen in pain relief medicines can cause liver damage Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... whole word or may have the abbreviation "APAP." Liver damage: Giving your child more acetaminophen than directed ...

  16. Mitochondrial protein adducts formation and mitochondrial dysfunction during N-acetyl-m-aminophenol (AMAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Du, Kuo; Dorko, Kenneth; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Ding, Wen-Xing; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    3′-Hydroxyacetanilide or N-acetyl-meta-aminophenol (AMAP) is generally regarded as a non-hepatotoxic analog of acetaminophen (APAP). Previous studies demonstrated absence of toxicity after AMAP in mice, hamsters, primary mouse hepatocytes and several cell lines. In contrast, experiments with liver slices suggested that it may be toxic to human hepatocytes; however, the mechanism of toxicity is unclear. To explore this, we treated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) with AMAP or APAP for up to 48 h and measured several parameters to assess metabolism and injury. Although less toxic than APAP, AMAP dose-dependently triggered cell death in PHH as indicated by alanine aminotransferase (ALT) release and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Similar to APAP, AMAP also significantly depleted glutathione (GSH) in PHH and caused mitochondrial damage as indicated by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) release and the JC-1 assay. However, unlike APAP, AMAP treatment did not cause relevant c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol or phospho-JNK translocation to mitochondria. To compare, AMAP toxicity was assessed in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). No cytotoxicity was observed as indicated by the lack of lactate dehydrogenase release and no PI staining. Furthermore, there was no GSH depletion or mitochondrial dysfunction after AMAP treatment in PMH. Immunoblotting for arylated proteins suggested that AMAP treatment caused extensive mitochondrial protein adducts formation in PHH but not in PMH. In conclusion, AMAP is hepatotoxic in PHH and the mechanism involves formation of mitochondrial protein adducts and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26431796

  17. Caffeic acid prevents acetaminophen-induced liver injury by activating the Keap1-Nrf2 antioxidative defense system.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chun; Zheng, Zhiyong; Shi, Liang; Sheng, Yuchen; Wei, Hai; Wang, Zhengtao; Ji, Lili

    2016-02-01

    Acute liver failure induced by acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the main cause of drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Caffeic acid (CA) is a phenolic compound from many natural products. This study aims to investigate the protective mechanism of CA in APAP-induced liver injury. The results of serum alanine/aspartate aminotransferases (ALT/AST), liver myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, liver glutathione (GSH) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels demonstrated the protection of CA against APAP-induced liver injury. Liver histological observation provided further evidences of CA-induced protection. CA was found to reverse the APAP-induced decreased cell viability in human normal liver L-02 cells and HepG2 cells. CA also reduced the increased cellular ROS level induced by APAP in hepatocytes. The results of luciferase assay and Western-blot analysis showed that CA increased the transcriptional activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the presence of APAP. Nrf2 siRNA reduced the protection of CA against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. CA also reversed the APAP-induced decreased mRNA and protein expression of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1). In addition, HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and NQO1 inhibitor diminutol (Dim) reduced the protection of CA against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. CA also decreased the expression of kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1(Keap1). Molecular docking indicated the potential interacting of CA with Nrf2 binding site in the Keap1 protein. CA had little effect on the enzymatic activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 and CYP2E1 in vitro. In conclusion, we demonstrated that CA prevented APAP-induced hepatotoxicity by decreasing Keap1 expression, inhibiting binding of Keap1 to Nrf2, and thus activating Nrf2 and leading to increased expression of antioxidative signals including HO-1 and NQO1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased acetaminophen related calls to Finnish PIC better reflect acetaminophen sales than serious poisonings.

    PubMed

    Parry, Mikko J; Isoniemi, Helena; Koivusalo, Anna-Maria; Hoppu, Kalle

    2017-08-16

    Acetaminophen (APAP) or paracetamol is a commonly encountered medicine in poisonings. We studied the changes in APAP related calls to the Finnish poison information centre (FPIC), and serious intoxications, involving hepatotoxicity or death in 2001-2014. These data were compared with paracetamol sales in Finland. This is a retrospective analysis of the FPIC database calls, national cause of death registry, registries of liver transplantations and molecular adsorbent recycling system (MARS)-treated patients from Helsinki University Hospital together with the National Institute of Health and Welfare registry of patients hospitalized. Data on APAP sales were obtained from the Finnish Medicines Agency. Between 2001 and 2014, the number of calls/year related to human APAP exposures to the FPIC increased from 227 to 1058. No change in the age distribution of enquiries was seen. Most calls involved minors: 58% (range 52-64%) for children under 6 years old, and 9% (range 6-14%) for children of 6-15 years. In Finland, APAP related fatalities have gradually increased from an average of 7/year (range 4-10) in 2000-2005 to an average of 11/year (range 6-17) in 2010-2013, whereas the number of liver transplantations remained low, average 0.6/year (range 0-2). For patients in need of MARS-treatment, a slight decrease was seen. Total APAP sales increased from 5.6 (47% prescription, 53% OTC) to 29.7 (81% prescription, 19% OTC). DDD/1000 inhabitants/day from 2001 to 2014 is recorded. Best linear relationship (R(2) = 0.97; p < .001) was observed between total FPIC calls and total sales of APAP in 2001-2014. Fatalities show a weaker relationship with sales (R(2) = 0.317; p = .045). During the study period, we see an increase in FPIC exposure calls accompanied by an increase in APAP sales. Changes in the chosen indicators for serious poisonings show only a weak association. Despite an evident trend between sales and fatalities, the correlation with fatality remains

  19. Screening for drug-induced hepatotoxicity in primary mouse hepatocytes using acetaminophen, amiodarone, and cyclosporin a as model compounds: an omics-guided approach.

    PubMed

    Van Summeren, Anke; Renes, Johan; Lizarraga, Daneida; Bouwman, Freek G; Noben, Jean-Paul; van Delft, Joost H M; Kleinjans, Jos C S; Mariman, Edwin C M

    2013-02-01

    Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition for candidate pharmaceuticals in development. New preclinical screening methods are crucial to predict drug toxicity prior to human studies. Of all in vitro hepatotoxicity models, primary human hepatocytes are considered as 'the gold standard.' However, their use is hindered by limited availability and inter-individual variation. These barriers may be overcome by using primary mouse hepatocytes. We used differential in gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to study large-scale protein expression of primary mouse hepatocytes. These hepatocytes were exposed to three well-defined hepatotoxicants: acetaminophen, amiodarone, and cyclosporin A. Each hepatotoxicant induces a different hepatotoxic phenotype. Based on the DIGE results, the mRNA expression levels of deregulated proteins from cyclosporin A-treated cells were also analyzed. We were able to distinguish cyclosporin A from controls, as well as acetaminophen and amiodarone-treated samples. Cyclosporin A induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and altered the ER-Golgi transport. Moreover, liver carboxylesterase and bile salt sulfotransferase were differentially expressed. These proteins were associated with a protective adaptive response against cyclosporin A-induced cholestasis. The results of this study are comparable with effects in HepG2 cells. Therefore, we suggest both models can be used to analyze the cholestatic properties of cyclosporin A. Furthermore, this study showed a conserved response between primary mouse hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. These findings collectively lend support for use of omics strategies in preclinical toxicology, and might inform future efforts to better link preclinical and clinical research in rational drug development.

  20. Screening for Drug-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Primary Mouse Hepatocytes Using Acetaminophen, Amiodarone, and Cyclosporin A as Model Compounds: An Omics-Guided Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van Summeren, Anke; Renes, Johan; Lizarraga, Daneida; Bouwman, Freek G.; Noben, Jean-Paul; van Delft, Joost H. M.; Kleinjans, Jos C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition for candidate pharmaceuticals in development. New preclinical screening methods are crucial to predict drug toxicity prior to human studies. Of all in vitro hepatotoxicity models, primary human hepatocytes are considered as ‘the gold standard.’ However, their use is hindered by limited availability and inter-individual variation. These barriers may be overcome by using primary mouse hepatocytes. We used differential in gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to study large-scale protein expression of primary mouse hepatocytes. These hepatocytes were exposed to three well-defined hepatotoxicants: acetaminophen, amiodarone, and cyclosporin A. Each hepatotoxicant induces a different hepatotoxic phenotype. Based on the DIGE results, the mRNA expression levels of deregulated proteins from cyclosporin A-treated cells were also analyzed. We were able to distinguish cyclosporin A from controls, as well as acetaminophen and amiodarone-treated samples. Cyclosporin A induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and altered the ER-Golgi transport. Moreover, liver carboxylesterase and bile salt sulfotransferase were differentially expressed. These proteins were associated with a protective adaptive response against cyclosporin A-induced cholestasis. The results of this study are comparable with effects in HepG2 cells. Therefore, we suggest both models can be used to analyze the cholestatic properties of cyclosporin A. Furthermore, this study showed a conserved response between primary mouse hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. These findings collectively lend support for use of omics strategies in preclinical toxicology, and might inform future efforts to better link preclinical and clinical research in rational drug development. PMID:23308384

  1. Hepatoprotective effects of ethanol extracts from Folium Syringae against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen-Xi; Lin, Yue-Xia; Liu, Fang-Ping; Chang, Yi-Cong; Li, Rui; Li, Chang-Wen; Li, Ying; He, Jing-Shan; Ma, Xin; Li, Zhi

    2017-10-01

    The leaves of Folium Syringae (FS) have been long used as a traditional Chinese folk medicine for their anti-inflammatory effect, utilized as an antibacterial and antiviral treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential hepatoprotective effects of FS on acetaminophen-induced hepatic injury in primary hepatocytes and mice. Hepatocytes obtained by the inverse perfusion method were divided randomly into five groups. Prior to acetaminophen exposure, 3 different doses of FS ethanol extracts were given to hepatocytes and mice, respectively. Thereafter, transaminases, glutathione S-transferase A1 (GSTA1) and some hepatic indices were determined. FS ethanol extracts (200 μg/mL) pretreatment prevented all of the alterations, returning their levels to nearly those levels observed in the control group in vitro. Treatment with FS ethanol extracts (200 mg/kg) significantly reduced the toxicity induced by acetaminophen in vivo, which manifested as a decrease in transaminases, and the hepatoprotective effects of FS were similar to Silymarin (positive group). GSTA1 represented the same change trend as transaminases and hepatic indices, and at a dose of 100 μg/mL FS ethanol extracts in vitro and 100 mg/kg in vivo, GSTA1 content changed significantly (p < 0.01), but transaminases were insignificant (p > 0.05). The results of our investigation suggested that FS ethanol extracts possess significant protective effects against hepatotoxicity induced by acetaminophen both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, GSTA1 could be used as an indicator assessing the extents of hepatic injury, which is more sensitive than transaminases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  2. Low Dose Acetaminophen Induces Reversible Mitochondrial Dysfunction Associated with Transient c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Activation in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiangting; Ramshesh, Venkat K; McGill, Mitchell R; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Lemasters, John J

    2016-03-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes hepatotoxicity involving mitochondrial dysfunction and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Because the safe limit of APAP dosing is controversial, our aim was to evaluate the role of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) and JNK in mitochondrial dysfunction after APAP dosing considered nontoxic by criteria of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) release and histological necrosis in vivo. C57BL/6 mice were given APAP with and without the MPT inhibitor, N-methyl-4-isoleucine cyclosporin (NIM811), or the JNK inhibitor, SP600125. Fat droplet formation, cell viability, and mitochondrial function in vivo were monitored by intravital multiphoton microscopy. Serum ALT, liver histology, total JNK, and activated phospho(p)JNK were also assessed. High APAP (300 mg/kg) caused ALT release, necrosis, irreversible mitochondrial dysfunction, and hepatocellular death. By contrast, lower APAP (150 mg/kg) caused reversible mitochondrial dysfunction and fat droplet formation in hepatocytes without ALT release or necrosis. Mitochondrial protein N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine adducts correlated with early JNK activation, but irreversible mitochondrial depolarization and necrosis at high dose were associated with sustained JNK activation and translocation to mitochondria. NIM811 prevented cell death and/or mitochondrial depolarization after both high and low dose APAP. After low dose, SP600125 decreased mitochondrial depolarization. In conclusion, low dose APAP produces reversible MPT-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and steatosis in hepatocytes without causing ALT release or necrosis, whereas high dose leads to irreversible mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death associated with sustained JNK activation. Thus, nontoxic APAP has the potential to cause transient mitochondrial dysfunction that may synergize with other stresses to promote liver damage and steatosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on

  3. Low Dose Acetaminophen Induces Reversible Mitochondrial Dysfunction Associated with Transient c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Activation in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiangting; Ramshesh, Venkat K.; McGill, Mitchell R.; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Lemasters, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes hepatotoxicity involving mitochondrial dysfunction and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Because the safe limit of APAP dosing is controversial, our aim was to evaluate the role of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) and JNK in mitochondrial dysfunction after APAP dosing considered nontoxic by criteria of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) release and histological necrosis in vivo. C57BL/6 mice were given APAP with and without the MPT inhibitor, N-methyl-4-isoleucine cyclosporin (NIM811), or the JNK inhibitor, SP600125. Fat droplet formation, cell viability, and mitochondrial function in vivo were monitored by intravital multiphoton microscopy. Serum ALT, liver histology, total JNK, and activated phospho(p)JNK were also assessed. High APAP (300 mg/kg) caused ALT release, necrosis, irreversible mitochondrial dysfunction, and hepatocellular death. By contrast, lower APAP (150 mg/kg) caused reversible mitochondrial dysfunction and fat droplet formation in hepatocytes without ALT release or necrosis. Mitochondrial protein N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine adducts correlated with early JNK activation, but irreversible mitochondrial depolarization and necrosis at high dose were associated with sustained JNK activation and translocation to mitochondria. NIM811 prevented cell death and/or mitochondrial depolarization after both high and low dose APAP. After low dose, SP600125 decreased mitochondrial depolarization. In conclusion, low dose APAP produces reversible MPT-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and steatosis in hepatocytes without causing ALT release or necrosis, whereas high dose leads to irreversible mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death associated with sustained JNK activation. Thus, nontoxic APAP has the potential to cause transient mitochondrial dysfunction that may synergize with other stresses to promote liver damage and steatosis. PMID:26721299

  4. Protective effects of an ethanol extract of Angelica keiskei against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in HepG2 and HepaRG cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon-Hee; Lee, Hyun Sook; Chung, Cha-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE Although Angelica keiskei (AK) has widely been utilized for the purpose of general health improvement among Asian, its functionality and mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effect of ethanol extract of AK (AK-Ex) on acute hepatotoxicity induced by acetaminophen (AAP) in HepG2 human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells and HepaRG human hepatic progenitor cells. MATERIALS/METHODS AK-Ex was prepared HepG2 and HepaRG cells were cultured with various concentrations and 30 mM AAP. The protective effects of AK-Ex against AAP-induced hepatotoxicity in HepG2 and HepaRG cells were evaluated using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, flow cytometry, and Western blotting. RESULTS AK-Ex, when administered prior to AAP, increased cell growth and decreased leakage of LDH in a dose-dependent manner in HepG2 and HepaRG cells against AAP-induced hepatotoxicity. AK-Ex increased the level of Bcl-2 and decreased the levels of Bax, Bok and Bik decreased the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane in HepG2 cells intoxicated with AAP. AK-Ex decreased the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and the activation of caspase-9, -7, and -3. CONCLUSIONS These results demonstrate that AK-Ex downregulates apoptosis via intrinsic and extrinsic pathways against AAP-induced hepatotoxicity. We suggest that AK could be a useful preventive agent against AAP-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. PMID:28386382

  5. Baicalin Attenuates IL-17-Mediated Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chia-Chih; Day, Yuan-Ji; Lee, Hung-Chen; Liou, Jiin-Tarng; Chou, An-Hsun; Liu, Fu-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background IL-17 has been shown to be involved in liver inflammatory disorders in both mice and humans. Baicalin (BA), a major compound extracted from traditional herb medicine (Scutellariae radix), has potent hepatoprotective properties. Previous study showed that BA inhibits IL-17-mediated lymphocyte adhesion and downregulates joint inflammation. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of IL-17 in the hepatoprotective effects of BA in an acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury mouse model. Methods Eight weeks male C57BL/6 (B6) mice were used for this study. Mice received intraperitoneal hepatotoxic injection of APAP (300 mg/kg) and after 30 min of injection, the mice were treated with BA at a concentration of 30 mg/kg. After 16 h of treatment, mice were killed. Blood samples and liver tissues were harvested for analysis of liver injury parameters. Results APAP overdose significantly increased the serum alanine transferase (ALT) levels, hepatic activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO), expression of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-17), and malondialdehyde (MDA) activity when compared with the control animals. BA treatment after APAP administration significantly attenuated the elevation of these parameters in APAP-induced liver injury mice. Furthermore, BA treatment could also decrease hepatic IL-17-producing γδT cells recruitment, which was induced after APAP overdose. Conclusion Our data suggested that baicalin treatment could effectively decrease APAP-induced liver injury in part through attenuation of hepatic IL-17 expression. These results indicate that baicalin is a potential hepatoprotective agent. PMID:27855209

  6. Protective effect of rutin in comparison to silymarin against induced hepatotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, M. Kasi; Reddy, A. Gopala; Kumar, B. Kala; Madhuri, D.; Boobalan, G.; Reddy, M. Anudeep

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of rutin (RTN) in comparison to silymarin (SLM) against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar albino rats (n=24) of 3 months age were equally divided into four groups. Group 1 served as normal control. Hepatotoxicity was induced in the remaining three groups with administration of 500 mg/kg po APAP from day 1-3. Groups 2, 3, and 4 were subsequently administered orally with distilled water, 25 mg/kg of SLM, and 20 mg/kg of RTN, respectively, for 11 days. The mean body weights and biomarkers of hepatotoxicity were estimated on day 0, 4 (confirmation of toxicity), and 15 (at the end of treatment). Hematological parameters were evaluated on day 4 and 15. Antioxidant profile and adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases) were assessed at the end of the experiment. Liver tissues were subjected to histopathology and transmission electron microscopy after the sacrifice on day 15. Results: Antioxidant profile, ATPases, and hematological and sero-biochemical parameters were significantly altered, and histopathological changes were noticed in the liver of toxic control group. These changes were reversed in groups 3 and 4 that were administered with SLM and RTN, respectively. Conclusion: The results of the present investigation enunciated that SLM has potent hepatoprotective activity though the RTN was found superior in restoring the pathological alterations in paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar albino rats. PMID:28246450

  7. Contribution of acetaminophen-cysteine to acetaminophen nephrotoxicity II. Possible involvement of the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Stephan T.; Bruno, Mary K.; Horton, Robert A.; Hill, Dennis W.; Roberts, Jeanette C.; Cohen, Steven D. . E-mail: scohen@mcp.edu

    2005-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) nephrotoxicity has been observed both in humans and research animals. Our recent investigations have focused on the possible involvement of glutathione-derived APAP metabolites in APAP nephrotoxicity and have demonstrated that administration of acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS) potentiated APAP-induced renal injury with no effects on APAP-induced liver injury. Additionally, APAP-CYS treatment alone resulted in a dose-responsive renal GSH depletion. This APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion could interfere with intrarenal detoxification of APAP or its toxic metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI) and may be the mechanism responsible for the potentiation of APAP nephrotoxicity. Renal-specific GSH depletion has been demonstrated in mice and rats following administration of amino acid {gamma}-glutamyl acceptor substrates for {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT). The present study sought to determine if APAP-CYS-induced renal glutathione depletion is the result of disruption of the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle through interaction with {gamma}-GT. The results confirmed that APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion was antagonized by the {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT) inhibitor acivicin. In vitro analysis demonstrated that APAP-CYS is a {gamma}-glutamyl acceptor for both murine and bovine renal {gamma}-GT. Analysis of urine from mice pretreated with acivicin and then treated with APAP, APAP-CYS, or acetaminophen-glutathione identified a {gamma}-glutamyl-cysteinyl-acetaminophen metabolite. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that APAP-CYS contributes to APAP nephrotoxicity by depletion of renal GSH stores through interaction with the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle.

  8. Contribution of acetaminophen-cysteine to acetaminophen nephrotoxicity II. Possible involvement of the gamma-glutamyl cycle.

    PubMed

    Stern, Stephan T; Bruno, Mary K; Horton, Robert A; Hill, Dennis W; Roberts, Jeanette C; Cohen, Steven D

    2005-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) nephrotoxicity has been observed both in humans and research animals. Our recent investigations have focused on the possible involvement of glutathione-derived APAP metabolites in APAP nephrotoxicity and have demonstrated that administration of acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS) potentiated APAP-induced renal injury with no effects on APAP-induced liver injury. Additionally, APAP-CYS treatment alone resulted in a dose-responsive renal GSH depletion. This APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion could interfere with intrarenal detoxification of APAP or its toxic metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI) and may be the mechanism responsible for the potentiation of APAP nephrotoxicity. Renal-specific GSH depletion has been demonstrated in mice and rats following administration of amino acid gamma-glutamyl acceptor substrates for gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT). The present study sought to determine if APAP-CYS-induced renal glutathione depletion is the result of disruption of the gamma-glutamyl cycle through interaction with gamma-GT. The results confirmed that APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion was antagonized by the gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT) inhibitor acivicin. In vitro analysis demonstrated that APAP-CYS is a gamma-glutamyl acceptor for both murine and bovine renal gamma-GT. Analysis of urine from mice pretreated with acivicin and then treated with APAP, APAP-CYS, or acetaminophen-glutathione identified a gamma-glutamyl-cysteinyl-acetaminophen metabolite. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that APAP-CYS contributes to APAP nephrotoxicity by depletion of renal GSH stores through interaction with the gamma-glutamyl cycle.

  9. Serum Acetaminophen Protein Adduct Concentrations in Pediatric Emergency Department Patients.

    PubMed

    Heard, Kennon; Anderson, Victoria; Dart, Richard C; Kile, Deidre; Lavonas, Eric J; Green, Jody L

    2017-04-01

    Acetaminophen toxicity is a common cause of pediatric liver failure. The diagnosis may be limited by the short window of detection of acetaminophen in serum. Recently acetaminophen protein adducts (APAP-CYS) have been used as a biomarker with a longer duration of detection. The objective of this study was to describe the serum concentrations of APAP-CYS in pediatric patients with and without reported therapeutic acetaminophen exposure. A cross-sectional study of children age 1 to <12 years presenting to a pediatric emergency department. Subjects were stratified by recent acetaminophen use and had serum APAP-CYS measured using LC/MS. One hundred patients were enrolled. All of the patients whose caregivers denied acetaminophen exposure had nondetectable APAP-CYS. Fifty-two percent of subjects who were reported to have taken acetaminophen in the preceding 2 weeks had detectable serum APAP-CYS. The APAP-CYS concentrations were positively correlated with higher overall dose and more recent ingestion. APAP-CYS is detectable in the majority of children taking acetaminophen and not detected in the majority of children who are not exposed to acetaminophen.

  10. Mouse Liver Protein Sulfhydryl Depletion after Acetaminophen Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xi; Greenhaw, James; Shi, Qiang; Roberts, Dean W.; Hinson, Jack A.; Muskhelishvili, Levan; Davis, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury is the leading cause of acute liver failure in many countries. This study determined the extent of liver protein sulfhydryl depletion not only in whole liver homogenate but also in the zonal pattern of sulfhydryl depletion within the liver lobule. A single oral gavage dose of 150 or 300 mg/kg APAP in B6C3F1 mice produced increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels, liver necrosis, and glutathione depletion in a dose-dependent manner. Free protein sulfhydryls were measured in liver protein homogenates by labeling with maleimide linked to a near infrared fluorescent dye followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Global protein sulfhydryl levels were decreased significantly (48.4%) starting at 1 hour after the APAP dose and maintained at this reduced level through 24 hours. To visualize the specific hepatocytes that had reduced protein sulfhydryl levels, frozen liver sections were labeled with maleimide linked to horseradish peroxidase. The centrilobular areas exhibited dramatic decreases in free protein sulfhydryls while the periportal regions were essentially spared. These protein sulfhydryl-depleted regions correlated with areas exhibiting histopathologic injury and APAP binding to protein. The majority of protein sulfhydryl depletion was due to reversible oxidation since the global- and lobule-specific effects were essentially reversed when the samples were reduced with tris(2-carboxyethy)phosphine before maleimide labeling. These temporal and zonal pattern changes in protein sulfhydryl oxidation shed new light on the importance that changes in protein redox status might play in the pathogenesis of APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:23093024

  11. Protective activity of the stem bark aqueous extract of Musanga cecropioides in carbon tetrachloride- and acetaminophen-induced acute hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Adeneye, Adejuwon Adewale

    2009-03-07

    The hepatoprotective activities and the mechanisms of actions of Musanga cecropioides stem bark aqueous extract (MCW) were investigated on acute hepatocellular injuries induced by intraperitoneal (IP) carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) (20% CCl(4)/olive oil, 1.5 mL/kg) and 800 mg/kg/IP of acetaminophen (APAP) in normal saline, in male Wistar rats. Among the Yorubas (South-West Nigeria), cold decoction of MCW is used as a natural antidote for oral gastric poisonings, infective hepatitis and other liver diseases. Its hepatoprotective activities were monitored by assaying for the serum aminotransferases, ornithine carbamoyl transferase and the toxicant-induced histopathological lesions in rat livers 24 hours post-induction. These enzymes are markers of acute hepatic injuries and their elevations are indications of acute liver injuries. Pretreatment of rats with graded doses (125 - 500 mg/kg) of MCW significantly attenuated the acute elevation of the liver enzymes and the hepatotoxin-induced histopathological lesions in the rat livers. The presence of two active natural antioxidants (flavonoids and alkaloids) in high concentrations in MCW may account for the hepatoprotective activities observed in this study. These results, thus, support the folkloric use of MCW for treatment of hepatic injuries resulting from acute gastric poisonings, infective hepatitis or other liver diseases.

  12. Effects of luteolin and quercetin 3-β-d-glucoside identified from Passiflora subpeltata leaves against acetaminophen induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Saravanan; Thangaraj, Parimelazhagan; Lima, Bruno Dos Santos; Chandran, Rahul; de Souza Araújo, Adriano Antunes; Narain, Narendra; Serafini, Mairim Russo; Júnior, Lucindo José Quintans

    2016-10-01

    Passiflora subpeltata has many beneficial effects in the treatment of various diseases including inflammation, pain and fever. This study was aimed to analyze the phytochemical compounds present in acetone extract of P. subpeltata leaves and to evaluate their performance against paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity activity. HPLC-DAD method was used to identify and quantify the phytochemical compounds. Hepatoprotective activity of acetone extract in the treatment of rat liver functions was monitored by the measurement of blood parameters and serum biochemical parameters such as SGOT, SGPT, ALP and in vivo antioxidant parameters viz. SOD, CAT and LPO. Further, liver tissues were also subjected to histopathological analysis. The HPLC-DAD results showed the luteolin and quercetin 3-β-d-glucoside as newly identified compounds in P. subpeltata species. Pre-treatment with acetone extract of P. subpeltata leaves at 200 and 400mg/kg doses significantly elevated the WBC, RBC and HB counts and retained the serum biochemical and enzymatic antioxidants levels to normal level. Based on this detailed study we conclude that acetone extract of P. subpeltata leaves offered better protection against hepatotoxicity induced by the acetaminophen.

  13. Erdosteine against acetaminophen induced renal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Isik, Bunyamin; Bayrak, Reyhan; Akcay, Ali; Sogut, Sadik

    2006-07-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) induced toxicities have been a major problem in clinical practice. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate a possible protective role of erdosteine, a mucolytic agent having antioxidant properties via its active metabolites, on APAP induced renal damage in rats. Female Wistar Albino rats were divided into groups including control, erdosteine (150 mg/kg, oral), APAP (1 g/kg, oral) APAP+erdosteine (150 mg/kg, oral) and APAP+erdosteine (300 mg/kg, oral). APAP treatment caused lipid peroxidation as well as high NO level in renal tissue. Also, APAP treated rats had decreased activities of CAT and GSH-Px, but not SOD. In addition, tubular epithelial degeneration, vacuolization and cell desquamation were clearly observed in the APAP treated rats. The cellular debris in the proximal tubules and cortical interstitial congestions were prominent in the kidneys of APAP treated rats. BUN and creatinine levels were increased after APAP administration. All these pathological changes were reversed after erdosteine treatments. Erdosteine treated APAP groups showed milder tubular degeneration, epithelial vacuolization in the proximal tubules, lesser cellular desquamation and better morphology when compared with APAP groups. In conclusion, erdosteine may be a choice of preventive treatment against APAP induced nephrotoxicity.

  14. Zea mays, Stigma maydis prevents and extenuates acetaminophen-perturbed oxidative onslaughts in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Saheed, Sabiu; Frans Hendrik, O'Neill; Tom, Ashafa Anofi Omotayo

    2016-11-01

    Zea mays L. (Poaceae) Stigma maydis is an underutilized product of corn cultivation finding therapeutic applications in oxidative stress-related disorders. This study investigated its aqueous extract against acetaminophen (APAP)-perturbed oxidative insults in rat hepatocytes. Hepatotoxic rats were orally pre- and post-treated with the extract (at 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight) and vitamin C (200 mg/kg body weight), respectively, for 14 days. Liver function, antioxidative and histological analyses were thereafter evaluated. The APAP-induced marked (p < 0.05) increases in the activities of alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma glutamyl transferase and the concentrations of bilirubin, oxidized glutathione, protein carbonyls, malondialdehyde, conjugated dienes, lipid hydroperoxides and fragmented DNA were dose-dependently extenuated in the extract-treated animals. The extract also significantly (p < 0.05) improved the reduced activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase as well as total protein, albumin and glutathione concentrations in the hepatotoxic rats. These improvements may be attributed to the bioactive constituents as revealed by the gas chromatography-mass spectrometric chromatogram of the extract. The observed effects compared favourably with vitamin C and are informative of hepatoprotective and antioxidative attributes of the extract and were further supported by the histological analysis. The data from the present findings suggest that Stigma maydis aqueous extract is capable of preventing and ameliorating APAP-mediated oxidative hepatic damage via enhancement of antioxidant defence systems.

  15. Acetaminophen cytotoxicity is ameliorated in a human liver organotypic co-culture model

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Leonard J.; Navarro, Maria; Treskes, Philipp; Samuel, Kay; Tura-Ceide, Olga; Morley, Steven D.; Hayes, Peter C.; Plevris, John N.

    2015-01-01

    Organotypic liver culture models for hepatotoxicity studies that mimic in vivo hepatic functionality could help facilitate improved strategies for early safety risk assessment during drug development. Interspecies differences in drug sensitivity and mechanistic profiles, low predictive capacity, and limitations of conventional monocultures of human hepatocytes, with high attrition rates remain major challenges. Herein, we show stable, cell-type specific phenotype/cellular polarity with differentiated functionality in human hepatocyte-like C3A cells (enhanced CYP3A4 activity/albumin synthesis) when in co-culture with human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs), thus demonstrating biocompatibility and relevance for evaluating drug metabolism and toxicity. In agreement with in vivo studies, acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity was most profound in HUVEC mono-cultures; whilst in C3A:HUVEC co-culture, cells were less susceptible to the toxic effects of APAP, including parameters of oxidative stress and ATP depletion, altered redox homeostasis, and impaired respiration. This resistance to APAP is also observed in a primary human hepatocyte (PHH) based co-culture model, suggesting bidirectional communication/stabilization between different cell types. This simple and easy-to-implement human co-culture model may represent a sustainable and physiologically-relevant alternative cell system to PHHs, complementary to animal testing, for initial hepatotoxicity screening or mechanistic studies of candidate compounds differentially targeting hepatocytes and endothelial cells. PMID:26632255

  16. The role of intrahepatic CD3+/CD4-/CD8- double negative T (DN T) cells in enhanced acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Getachew, Yonas; Cusimano, Frank A; James, Laura P; Thiele, Dwain L

    2014-10-15

    The role of the immune system, specifically NK, NKT and CD3 cells, in acetaminophen (APAP) induced liver injury remains inconsistently defined. In the present study, wild type (C57BL/6J) mice and granzyme B deficient (GrB -/-) mice were treated with acetaminophen to assess the role of the immune system in acute liver injury. Doses of acetaminophen that induced sub lethal liver injury in wild type mice unexpectedly produced fatal hepatotoxicity in granzyme B deficient (GrB -/-) mice. Analysis revealed that GrB -/- mice had an increased population of intrahepatic CD3 (+), CD4 (-), and CD8 (-) lymphocytes expressing the CD69 activation marker and Fas ligand. Depletion of these cells in the GrB -/- and wild type mice made them less susceptible to APAP injury, while depletion of NK1.1 (+) cells or both CD4 (+) and CD8 (+) T cells failed to provide the same hepatoprotection. Transfer of the GrB -/- IHLs further exacerbated liver injury and increased mortality in wild type mice but not in LRP/LPR mice, lacking fas expression. Acetaminophen toxicity is enhanced by the presence of activated, FasL expressing intrahepatic CD3 (+), CD4 (-), CD8 (-), NK1.1 (-) T cells. Depletion of these cells from GrB -/- mice and wild type mice greatly reduces mortality and improves the course of liver injury recovery. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Ozagrel hydrochloride, a selective thromboxane A2 synthase inhibitor, alleviates liver injury induced by acetaminophen overdose in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Overdosed acetaminophen (paracetamol, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol; APAP) causes severe liver injury. We examined the effects of ozagrel, a selective thromboxane A2 (TXA2) synthase inhibitor, on liver injury induced by APAP overdose in mice. Methods Hepatotoxicity was induced to ICR male mice by an intraperitoneal injection with APAP (330 mg/kg). The effects of ozagrel (200 mg/kg) treatment 30 min after the APAP injection were evaluated with mortality, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and hepatic changes, including histopathology, DNA fragmentation, mRNA expression and total glutathione contents. The impact of ozagrel (0.001-1 mg/mL) on cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) activity in mouse hepatic microsome was examined. RLC-16 cells, a rat hepatocytes cell line, were exposed to 0.25 mM N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), a hepatotoxic metabolite of APAP. In this model, the cytoprotective effects of ozagrel (1–100 muM) were evaluated by the WST-1 cell viability assay. Results Ozagel treatment significantly attenuated higher mortality, elevated serum alanine aminotransferase levels, excessive hepatic centrilobular necrosis, hemorrhaging and DNA fragmentation, as well as increase in plasma 2,3-dinor thromboxane B2 levels induced by APAP injection. Ozagrel also inhibited the hepatic expression of cell death-related mRNAs induced by APAP, such as jun oncogene, FBJ osteosarcoma oncogene (fos) and C/EBP homologous protein (chop), but did not suppress B-cell lymphoma 2-like protein11 (bim) expression and hepatic total glutathione depletion. These results show ozagrel can inhibit not all hepatic changes but can reduce the hepatic necrosis. Ozagrel had little impact on CYP2E1 activity involving the NAPQI production. In addition, ozagrel significantly attenuated cell injury induced by NAPQI in RLC-16. Conclusions We demonstrate that the TXA2 synthase inhibitor, ozagrel, dramatically alleviates liver injury induced by APAP in mice, and suggest that it is a

  18. Is montelukast as effective as N-acetylcysteine in hepatic injury due to acetaminophen intoxication in rats?

    PubMed

    İçer, Mustafa; Zengin, Yilmaz; Gunduz, Ercan; Dursun, Recep; Durgun, Hasan Mansur; Turkcu, Gul; Yuksel, Hatice; Üstündağ, Mehmet; Guloglu, Cahfer

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the acute protective effect of montelukast sodium in hepatic injury secondary to acetaminophen (APAP) intoxication. This study used 60 rats. The rats were grouped into 6 groups. The control group was administered oral distilled water 10 ml/kg, the APAP group oral APAP 1 g/kg, the montelukast sodium (MK) group oral MK 30 mg/kg, the acetaminophen+N-acetylcysteine (APAP+NAC) group oral APAP 1 g/kg, followed by a single dose of intraperitoneal NAC 1.5 g/kg three hours later, the acetaminophen+montelukast sodium (APAP+MK) group oral APAP 1 g/kg, followed by oral MK 30 mg/kg 3 h later, the acetaminophen+N-acetylcysteine+montelukast sodium (APAP+NAC+MK) group oral APAP 1 g/kg, followed by a single intraperitoneal NAC 1.5 g/kg plus oral MK 30 mg/kg 3 h later. Blood and liver tissue samples were taken 24h after drug administration. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and total bilirubin were studied from the blood samples. Liver tissue samples were used for histopathological examination. Compared with the control group, serum AST and ALT activities were higher in the APAP and APAP+NAC groups. APAP+NAC, APAP+MK, and APAP+NAC+MK groups had reduced serum ALT and AST activities than the group administered APAP alone. APAP+MK and APAP+NAC+MK groups had a lower serum ALP activity than the control group. Histopathologically, there was a difference between the group administered APAP alone and the APAP+MK and APAP+NAC+MK groups. MK is as protective as NAC in liver tissue in APAP intoxication in rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Acetaminophen-cysteine adducts during therapeutic dosing and following overdose

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acetaminophen-cysteine adducts (APAP-CYS) are a specific biomarker of acetaminophen exposure. APAP-CYS concentrations have been described in the setting of acute overdose, and a concentration >1.1 nmol/ml has been suggested as a marker of hepatic injury from acetaminophen overdose in patients with an ALT >1000 IU/L. However, the concentrations of APAP-CYS during therapeutic dosing, in cases of acetaminophen toxicity from repeated dosing and in cases of hepatic injury from non-acetaminophen hepatotoxins have not been well characterized. The objective of this study is to describe APAP-CYS concentrations in these clinical settings as well as to further characterize the concentrations observed following acetaminophen overdose. Methods Samples were collected during three clinical trials in which subjects received 4 g/day of acetaminophen and during an observational study of acetaminophen overdose patients. Trial 1 consisted of non-drinkers who received APAP for 10 days, Trial 2 consisted of moderate drinkers dosed for 10 days and Trial 3 included subjects who chronically abuse alcohol dosed for 5 days. Patients in the observational study were categorized by type of acetaminophen exposure (single or repeated). Serum APAP-CYS was measured using high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Results Trial 1 included 144 samples from 24 subjects; Trial 2 included 182 samples from 91 subjects and Trial 3 included 200 samples from 40 subjects. In addition, we collected samples from 19 subjects with acute acetaminophen ingestion, 7 subjects with repeated acetaminophen exposure and 4 subjects who ingested another hepatotoxin. The mean (SD) peak APAP-CYS concentrations for the Trials were: Trial 1- 0.4 (0.20) nmol/ml, Trial 2- 0.1 (0.09) nmol/ml and Trial 3- 0.3 (0.12) nmol/ml. APAP-CYS concentrations varied substantially among the patients with acetaminophen toxicity (0.10 to 27.3 nmol/ml). No subject had detectable APAP-CYS following exposure to

  20. Alleviative effects from boswellic acid on acetaminophen-induced hepatic injury - Corrected and republished from: Biomedicine (Taipei). 2016 Jun; 6 (2): 9. doi: 10.7603/s40681-016-0009-1PMCID: PMC4864770.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lung-Che; Hu, Li-Hong; Yin, Mei-Chin

    2017-06-01

    Protective effects of boswellic acid (BA) against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in Balb/ cA mice were examined. BA, at 0.05 or 0.1%, was supplied for 4 weeks. Acute liver injury was induced by APAP treatment. Results showed that BA intake increased hepatic BA bioavailability. APAP treatment decreased glutathione (GSH) level, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) production; and lowered activity and protein expression of glutathione reductase (GR) and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in liver. BA intake at both doses alleviated subsequent APAP-induced oxidative stress by retaining GSH content, decreasing ROS and GSSG formations, reserving activity and expression of GR and HO-1 in liver, and lowering hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 activity and expression. APAP treatment enhanced hepatic levels of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. BA pre-intake diminished APAP-induced release of those inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. APAP up-regulated hepatic protein expression of toll-like receptor (TLR)-3, TLR-4, MyD88, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p50, NF-κB p65 and JNK. BA pre-intake at both doses suppressed the expression of NF-κB p65 and p-JNK, and only at 0.1% down-regulated hepatic TLR-3, TLR-4 and MyD88 expression. APAP led to obvious foci of inflammatory cell infiltration in liver, determined by H&E stain. BA intake at both doses attenuated hepatic inflammatory infiltration. These findings support that boswellic acid is a potent hepato-protective agent. © Author(s) 2017. This article is published with open access by China Medical University.

  1. TAMH: A Useful In Vitro Model for Assessing Hepatotoxic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In vitro models for hepatotoxicity can be useful tools to predict in vivo responses. In this review, we discuss the use of the transforming growth factor-α transgenic mouse hepatocyte (TAMH) cell line, which is an attractive model to study drug-induced liver injury due to its ability to retain a stable phenotype and express drug-metabolizing enzymes. Hepatotoxicity involves damage to the liver and is often associated with chemical exposure. Since the liver is a major site for drug metabolism, drug-induced liver injury is a serious health concern for certain agents. At the molecular level, various mechanisms may protect or harm the liver during drug-induced hepatocellular injury including signaling pathways and endogenous factors (e.g., Bcl-2, GSH, Nrf2, or MAPK). The interplay between these and other pathways in the hepatocyte can change upon drug or drug metabolite exposure leading to intracellular stress and eventually cell death and liver injury. This review focuses on mechanistic studies investigating drug-induced toxicity in the TAMH line and how alterations to hepatotoxic mechanisms in this model relate to the in vivo situation. The agents discussed herein include acetaminophen (APAP), tetrafluoroethylcysteine (TFEC), flutamide, PD0325901, lapatinib, and flupirtine. PMID:28074186

  2. Acetaminophen metabolism, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity in rat primary hepatocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Milam, K.M.; Byard, J.L.

    1985-06-30

    Acetaminophen (APAP) metabolism, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity were measured in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. Although 3 mM APAP caused a slight increase in cellular release of lactate dehydrogenase into the culture medium, cellular glutathione concentration (an index of APAP metabolism) was reduced by 50%. APAP at 7 mM was significantly more toxic to these hepatocytes and had a similar but more marked effect on glutathione concentrations. In spite of its cytotoxicity, neither dose of APAP stimulated DNA repair synthesis when monitored by the rate of incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA following exposure to APAP. Thus, although APAP has been shown to be both hepato- and nephrotoxic in several in vivo and in vitro systems, the reactive toxic metabolite of APAP is not genotoxic in rat primary hepatocyte cultures.

  3. Withaferin-A Reduces Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N; Urrunaga, Nathalie H; Dash, Suchismita; Khurana, Sandeep; Saxena, Neeraj Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Withaferin-A (WA) has anti-oxidant activities however, its therapeutic potential in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is unknown. We performed a proof-of-concept study to assess the therapeutic potential of WA in a mouse model that mimics APAP-induced liver injury (AILI) in humans. Overnight fasted C57BL/6NTac (5-6 wk. old) male mice received 200 mg/kg APAP intraperitoneally (i.p.). After 1 h mice were treated with 40 mg/kg WA or vehicle i.p., and euthanized 4 and 16 h later; their livers were harvested and serum collected for analysis. At 4 h, compared to vehicle-treated mice, WA-treated mice had reduced serum ALT levels, hepatocyte necrosis and intrahepatic hemorrhage. All APAP-treated mice had reduced hepatic glutathione (GSH) levels however, reduction in GSH was lower in WA-treated when compared to vehicle-treated mice. Compared to vehicle-treated mice, livers from WA-treated mice had reduced APAP-induced JNK activation, mitochondrial Bax translocation, and nitrotyrosine generation. Compared to vehicle-treated mice, WA-treated mice had increased hepatic up-regulation of Nrf2, Gclc and Nqo1, and down-regulation of Il-6 and Il-1β. The hepatoprotective effect of WA persisted at 16 h. Compared to vehicle-treated mice, WA-treated mice had reduced hepatocyte necrosis and hepatic expression of Il-6, Tnf-α and Il-1β, increased hepatic Gclc and Nqo1 expression and GSH levels, and reduced lipid peroxidation. Finally, in AML12 hepatocytes, WA reduced H₂O₂-induced oxidative stress and necrosis by preventing GSH depletion. Collectively, these data show mechanisms whereby WA reduces necrotic hepatocyte injury, and demonstrate that WA has therapeutic potential in AILI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Morin mitigates acetaminophen-induced liver injury by potentiating Nrf2 regulated survival mechanism through molecular intervention in PHLPP2-Akt-Gsk3β axis.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Fatima; Mathur, Alpana; Kakkar, Poonam

    2015-10-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is frequently taken to relieve pain. Staggered APAP overdoses have been reported to cause acetaminophen-induced liver injury (AILI). Identification of efficacious therapeutic modalities to address complications imposed by accidental/intentional long-term APAP ingestion is needed. Morin, a plant-derived phytochemical, possesses a multitude of pharmacological properties including hepatoprotective action; however, the underlying mechanisms have been inadequately explored. Our present report demonstrates significant attenuation of APAP-mediated liver injury by morin supplementation in vivo as indicated by reduction in histological and serum markers of hepatotoxicity. Morin not only limited necroinflammation as revealed by reduced HMGB1 release, NALP3 and caspase-1 maturation, but also suppressed oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. This suggests that morin may have exerted its cytoprotective role by way of early intervention in the pathway leading to perpetuation of AILI. Morin reinforced cellular defenses by suppressing Nrf2 ubiquitination and promoting nuclear Nrf2 retention as well as ARE-Nrf2 binding affinity. The effects were observed to be a result of molecular intervention in the activity of PHLPP2, a phosphatase previously reported by us to subdue cellular Nrf2 responses via Fyn kinase activation. Morin was observed to inhibit APAP-induced increase in PHLPP2 activity ex vivo as well as its association with cellular target Akt1. As a result, morin prevented oxidative stress induced deactivation of Akt (Ser473) leading to suppression in GSK3β and Fyn kinase activation. The study supports the inhibitory action of morin against PHLPP2-regulated Nrf2-suppression and hence indentifies Nrf2-potentiating property of morin that may be exploited in developing novel therapeutic strategy to address AILI.

  5. Polyphenols reported to shift APAP-induced changes in MAPK signaling and toxicity outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc Uy; Stamper, Brendan David

    2017-09-13

    Due to its widespread availability, acetaminophen (APAP) is the leading cause for drug-induced liver injury in many countries including United States and United Kingdom. When used as recommended, APAP is relatively safe. However, in overdose cases, increased metabolism of APAP to N-acetyl-para-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI), a reactive metabolite, leads to glutathione (GSH) depletion, oxidative stress, and cellular injury. Throughout this process, a variety of factors play important roles in propagating toxicity, including c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family. Because of its involvement in multiple cellular processes, biomarkers associated with MAPK signaling have generated interest as a mechanistic target for protecting against APAP-induced liver injury and hepatocellular injury, in general. This review summarizes mechanistic details by which natural products, specifically those containing polyphenolic moieties, are capable of attenuating APAP-induced toxicity, at least in part through an ability to modulate MAPKs. These compounds include carnosic acid, chlorogenic acid, davallialactone, extracts from Hibiscus sabdariffa, quercetin-based compounds, and resveratrol. Despite variations in the experimental designs across these studies, common pathways and biomarkers were implicated in cytoprotection when polyphenolic compounds were given with APAP, such as enhanced antioxidant gene expression and reversal of APAP-induced changes in oxidative stress markers and MAPK signaling. Overall, an emphasis should be placed on method standardization for future studies if we are to gain a more in-depth understanding of how polyphenolic moieties contribute to cytoprotection during an APAP overdose event. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Metabolomics analysis of the toxicity pathways of triphenyl phosphate in HepaRG cells and comparison to oxidative stress mechanisms caused by acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Van den Eede, Nele; Cuykx, Matthias; Rodrigues, Robim M; Laukens, Kris; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian; Vanhaecke, Tamara

    2015-12-01

    Since the publication of REACH guidelines, the need for in vitro tools for toxicity testing has increased. We present here the development of a hepatotoxicity testing tool using human HepaRG cell cultures and metabolomics. HepaRG cells were exposed to either 4mM acetaminophen (APAP) as reference toxicant for oxidative stress or 50 μM triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) as toxicant with unknown toxicity pathways (TPs). After 72 h exposure, cells were subjected to quenching and liquid-liquid extraction which resulted in a polar and an apolar fraction. Analysis of fractions was performed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF-MS). Significantly up or down regulated metabolites were selected by univariate statistics prior to identification. In order to obtain robust and specific TP biomarkers, the experiment was also repeated using a different culture medium composition to assess which metabolites show consistent changes. Potential biomarkers belonging to different TPs were found for APAP and TPHP. For APAP, the biomarkers were related to a decrease in unsaturated phospholipids, and for TPHP to an accumulation of phosphoglycerolipids and increase of palmitoyl lysophosphatidylcholine. This first proof-of-concept opens new perspectives for the analysis of other (reference) toxicants with different TPs and it can be used to expand the in vitro tool for hepatotoxicity screening of various compounds.

  7. Protective Effect of Cymbopogon citratus Essential Oil in Experimental Model of Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Nancy Sayuri; Silva-Filho, Saulo Euclides; Aguiar, Rafael Pazinatto; Wiirzler, Luiz Alexandre Marques; Cardia, Gabriel Fernando Esteves; Cavalcante, Heitor Augusto Otaviano; Silva-Comar, Francielli Maria de Souza; Becker, Tânia Cristina Alexandrino; Silva, Expedito Leite; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the hepatoprotective effect of Cymbopogon citratus or lemongrass essential oil (LGO), it was used in an animal model of acute liver injury induced by acetaminophen (APAP). Swiss mice were pretreated with LGO (125, 250 and 500[Formula: see text]mg/kg) and SLM (standard drug, 200[Formula: see text]mg/kg) for a duration of seven days, followed by the induction of hepatotoxicity of APAP (single dose, 250[Formula: see text]mg/kg). The liver function markers alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma-glutamyl transferase were determined to evaluate the hepatoprotective effects of the LGO. The livers were used to determine myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, nitric oxide (NO) production and histological analysis. The effect of LGO on leukocyte migration was evaluated in vitro. Anti-oxidant activity was performed by assessing the free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) in vitro. LGO pretreatment decreased significantly the levels of ALT, AST and ALP compared with APAP group. MPO activity and NO production were decreased. The histopathological analysis showed an improved of hepatic lesions in mice after LGO pretreatment. LGO inhibited neutrophil migration and exhibited anti-oxidant activity. Our results suggest that LGO has protective activity against liver toxicity induced by paracetamol.

  8. Bee venom phospholipase A2 protects against acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury by modulating regulatory T cells and IL-10 in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunseong; Keum, Dong June; Kwak, Jung won; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Bae, Hyunsu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) from bee venom against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity through CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells (Treg) in mice. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used antipyretic and analgesic, but an acute or cumulative overdose of acetaminophen can cause severe hepatic failure. Tregs have been reported to possess protective effects in various liver diseases and kidney toxicity. We previously found that bee venom strongly increased the Treg population in splenocytes and subsequently suppressed immune disorders. More recently, we found that the effective component of bee venom is PLA2. Thus, we hypothesized that PLA2 could protect against liver injury induced by acetaminophen. To evaluate the hepatoprotective effects of PLA2, C57BL/6 mice or interleukin-10-deficient (IL-10-/-) mice were injected with PLA2 once a day for five days and sacrificed 24 h (h) after acetaminophen injection. The blood sera were collected 0, 6, and 24 h after acetaminophen injection for the analysis of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). PLA2-injected mice showed reduced levels of serum AST, ALT, proinflammatory cytokines, and nitric oxide (NO) compared with the PBS-injected control mice. However, IL-10 was significantly increased in the PLA2-injected mice. These hepatic protective effects were abolished in Treg-depleted mice by antibody treatment and in IL-10-/- mice. Based on these findings, it can be concluded that the protective effects of PLA2 against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity can be mediated by modulating the Treg and IL-10 production.

  9. Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Injury by Modulating Regulatory T Cells and IL-10 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunseong; Keum, Dong June; Kwak, Jung won; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Bae, Hyunsu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) from bee venom against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity through CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells (Treg) in mice. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used antipyretic and analgesic, but an acute or cumulative overdose of acetaminophen can cause severe hepatic failure. Tregs have been reported to possess protective effects in various liver diseases and kidney toxicity. We previously found that bee venom strongly increased the Treg population in splenocytes and subsequently suppressed immune disorders. More recently, we found that the effective component of bee venom is PLA2. Thus, we hypothesized that PLA2 could protect against liver injury induced by acetaminophen. To evaluate the hepatoprotective effects of PLA2, C57BL/6 mice or interleukin-10-deficient (IL-10−/−) mice were injected with PLA2 once a day for five days and sacrificed 24 h (h) after acetaminophen injection. The blood sera were collected 0, 6, and 24 h after acetaminophen injection for the analysis of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). PLA2-injected mice showed reduced levels of serum AST, ALT, proinflammatory cytokines, and nitric oxide (NO) compared with the PBS-injected control mice. However, IL-10 was significantly increased in the PLA2-injected mice. These hepatic protective effects were abolished in Treg-depleted mice by antibody treatment and in IL-10−/− mice. Based on these findings, it can be concluded that the protective effects of PLA2 against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity can be mediated by modulating the Treg and IL-10 production. PMID:25478691

  10. The modulatory effect of Moringa oleifera leaf extract on endogenous antioxidant systems and inflammatory markers in an acetaminophen-induced nephrotoxic mice model.

    PubMed

    Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Kura, Aminu Umar; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Md Isa, Norhaszalina; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2016-01-01

    N-Acetyl-p-Aminophenol (APAP), also known as acetaminophen, is the most commonly used over-the counter analgesic and antipyretic medication. However, its overdose leads to both liver and kidney damage. APAP-induced toxicity is considered as one of the primary causes of acute liver failure; numerous scientific reports have focused majorly on APAP hepatotoxicity. Alternatively, not many works approach APAP nephrotoxicity focusing on both its mechanisms of action and therapeutic exploration. Moringa oleifera (MO) is pervasive in nature, is reported to possess a surplus amount of nutrients, and is enriched with several bioactive candidates including trace elements that act as curatives for various clinical conditions. In this study, we evaluated the nephro-protective potential of MO leaf extract against APAP nephrotoxicity in male Balb/c mice. A single-dose acute oral toxicity design was implemented in this study. Group 2, 3, 4 and 5 received a toxic dose of APAP (400 mg/kg of bw, i.p) and after an hour, these groups were administered with saline (10 mL/kg), silymarin-positive control (100 mg/kg of bw, i.p), MO leaf extract (100 mg/kg of bw, i.p), and MO leaf extract (200 mg/kg bw, i.p) respectively. Group 1 was administered saline (10 mL/kg) during both the sessions. APAP-treated mice exhibited a significant elevation of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, sodium, potassium and chloride levels. A remarkable depletion of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD, CAT and GSH-Px with elevated MDA levels has been observed in APAP treated kidney tissues. They also exhibited a significant rise in pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) and decreased anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokine level in the kidney tissues. Disorganized glomerulus and dilated tubules with inflammatory cell infiltration were clearly observed in the histology of APAP treated mice kidneys. All these pathological changes were reversed in a dose-dependent manner after MO leaf extract treatment

  11. The modulatory effect of Moringa oleifera leaf extract on endogenous antioxidant systems and inflammatory markers in an acetaminophen-induced nephrotoxic mice model

    PubMed Central

    Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Kura, Aminu Umar; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Md. Isa, Norhaszalina

    2016-01-01

    N-Acetyl-p-Aminophenol (APAP), also known as acetaminophen, is the most commonly used over-the counter analgesic and antipyretic medication. However, its overdose leads to both liver and kidney damage. APAP-induced toxicity is considered as one of the primary causes of acute liver failure; numerous scientific reports have focused majorly on APAP hepatotoxicity. Alternatively, not many works approach APAP nephrotoxicity focusing on both its mechanisms of action and therapeutic exploration. Moringa oleifera (MO) is pervasive in nature, is reported to possess a surplus amount of nutrients, and is enriched with several bioactive candidates including trace elements that act as curatives for various clinical conditions. In this study, we evaluated the nephro-protective potential of MO leaf extract against APAP nephrotoxicity in male Balb/c mice. A single-dose acute oral toxicity design was implemented in this study. Group 2, 3, 4 and 5 received a toxic dose of APAP (400 mg/kg of bw, i.p) and after an hour, these groups were administered with saline (10 mL/kg), silymarin—positive control (100 mg/kg of bw, i.p), MO leaf extract (100 mg/kg of bw, i.p), and MO leaf extract (200 mg/kg bw, i.p) respectively. Group 1 was administered saline (10 mL/kg) during both the sessions. APAP-treated mice exhibited a significant elevation of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, sodium, potassium and chloride levels. A remarkable depletion of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD, CAT and GSH-Px with elevated MDA levels has been observed in APAP treated kidney tissues. They also exhibited a significant rise in pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) and decreased anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokine level in the kidney tissues. Disorganized glomerulus and dilated tubules with inflammatory cell infiltration were clearly observed in the histology of APAP treated mice kidneys. All these pathological changes were reversed in a dose-dependent manner after MO leaf extract treatment

  12. APAP and Alternative Titration Methods

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Omer; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Positive airway pressure therapy (PAP) is commonly prescribed treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Traditionally, the determination of the optimal pressure for treatment of sleep-disordered breathing was made by manual titration of the device by a sleep technician in attendance during polysomnography. However, the advent of alternative methods for determination of optimal PAP – such as auto-titrating PAP (APAP) – has seen tremendous growth over the past decade. The purpose of this review is to improve our understanding of the currently available alternative methods for titration of PAP in patients with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) with special emphasis on obstructive sleep apnea. Recent Findings Recent prospective-randomized studies of alternative methods of titration suggest that pressure determinations made by such devices are comparable to traditional manual titrations made in the sleep laboratory. Obstacles to the adoption of such alternative modes of titration into day-to-day practice may be attributable to issues surrounding appropriate patient selection, differences between devices, re-imbursement policies of third party payors, consensus amongst sleep experts, and individual physicians’ practice patterns and volumes. While newer generations and types of auto-titrating PAP devices are entering the sleep field constantly, providers’ knowledge and time availability remain limiting factors. Summary There is tremendous growth in the technology and scientific evidence in support of alternative modes of PAP titration for sleep-disordered breathing, but barriers to implementation remain. PMID:20806054

  13. Synthetic Biomarker Design by Using Analyte-Responsive Acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Tatsuya; Inoue, Joe; Tabata, Sho; Murakami, Shinnosuke; Ishikawa, Takamasa; Saito, Natsumi; Fukuda, Shinji; Tomita, Masaru; Soga, Tomoyoshi

    2017-05-18

    The use of synthetic biomarkers is an emerging technique to improve disease diagnosis. Here, we report a novel design strategy that uses analyte-responsive acetaminophen (APAP) to expand the catalogue of analytes available for synthetic biomarker development. As proof-of-concept, we designed hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 )-responsive APAP (HR-APAP) and succeeded in H2 O2 detection with cellular and animal experiments. In fact, for blood samples following HR-APAP injection, we demonstrated that the plasma concentration ratio [APAP+APAP conjugates]/[HR-APAP] accurately reflects in vivo differences in H2 O2 levels. We anticipate that our practical methodology will be broadly useful for the preparation of various synthetic biomarkers. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Effect of sesame oil against acetaminophen-induced acute oxidative hepatic damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Victor Raj Mohan; Wan, Chang-Hsin; Liu, Li-Lian; Hsu, Dur-Zong; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2008-08-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes acute liver injury or even death in both humans and experimental animals. We investigated the effect of sesame oil on APAP-induced acute liver injury. Male Wistar rats were given APAP (1,000 mg/kg; orally) to induce acute liver injury. Acetaminophen significantly increased aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, lipid peroxidation, and superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical generation levels; it also induced glutathione depletion. Sesame oil (8 mL/kg; orally) did not alter the gastric absorption of APAP, but it inhibited all the parameters altered by APAP and protected the rats against APAP-induced acute liver injury. We hypothesize that sesame oil maintained the intracellular glutathione levels, reduced reactive oxygen species levels, and inhibited lipid peroxidation in rats with APAP-induced acute liver injury.

  15. The effect of acetaminophen on ubiquitin homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Huseinovic, Angelina; van Leeuwen, Jolanda S; van Welsem, Tibor; Stulemeijer, Iris; van Leeuwen, Fred; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Kooter, Jan M; Vos, J Chris

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP), although considered a safe drug, is one of the major causes of acute liver failure by overdose, and therapeutic chronic use can cause serious health problems. Although the reactive APAP metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI) is clearly linked to liver toxicity, toxicity of APAP is also found without drug metabolism of APAP to NAPQI. To get more insight into mechanisms of APAP toxicity, a genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for APAP-resistant deletion strains was performed. In this screen we identified genes related to the DNA damage response. Next, we investigated the link between genotype and APAP-induced toxicity or resistance by performing a more detailed screen with a library containing mutants of 1522 genes related to nuclear processes, like DNA repair and chromatin remodelling. We identified 233 strains that had an altered growth rate relative to wild type, of which 107 showed increased resistance to APAP and 126 showed increased sensitivity. Gene Ontology analysis identified ubiquitin homeostasis, regulation of transcription of RNA polymerase II genes, and the mitochondria-to-nucleus signalling pathway to be associated with APAP resistance, while histone exchange and modification, and vesicular transport were connected to APAP sensitivity. Indeed, we observed a link between ubiquitin levels and APAP resistance, whereby ubiquitin deficiency conferred resistance to APAP toxicity while ubiquitin overexpression resulted in sensitivity. The toxicity profile of various chemicals, APAP, and its positional isomer AMAP on a series of deletion strains with ubiquitin deficiency showed a unique resistance pattern for APAP. Furthermore, exposure to APAP increased the level of free ubiquitin and influenced the ubiquitination of proteins. Together, these results uncover a role for ubiquitin homeostasis in APAP-induced toxicity.

  16. The effect of acetaminophen on ubiquitin homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Huseinovic, Angelina; van Leeuwen, Jolanda S.; van Welsem, Tibor; Stulemeijer, Iris; van Leeuwen, Fred; Vermeulen, Nico P. E.; Kooter, Jan M.; Vos, J. Chris

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP), although considered a safe drug, is one of the major causes of acute liver failure by overdose, and therapeutic chronic use can cause serious health problems. Although the reactive APAP metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI) is clearly linked to liver toxicity, toxicity of APAP is also found without drug metabolism of APAP to NAPQI. To get more insight into mechanisms of APAP toxicity, a genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for APAP-resistant deletion strains was performed. In this screen we identified genes related to the DNA damage response. Next, we investigated the link between genotype and APAP-induced toxicity or resistance by performing a more detailed screen with a library containing mutants of 1522 genes related to nuclear processes, like DNA repair and chromatin remodelling. We identified 233 strains that had an altered growth rate relative to wild type, of which 107 showed increased resistance to APAP and 126 showed increased sensitivity. Gene Ontology analysis identified ubiquitin homeostasis, regulation of transcription of RNA polymerase II genes, and the mitochondria-to-nucleus signalling pathway to be associated with APAP resistance, while histone exchange and modification, and vesicular transport were connected to APAP sensitivity. Indeed, we observed a link between ubiquitin levels and APAP resistance, whereby ubiquitin deficiency conferred resistance to APAP toxicity while ubiquitin overexpression resulted in sensitivity. The toxicity profile of various chemicals, APAP, and its positional isomer AMAP on a series of deletion strains with ubiquitin deficiency showed a unique resistance pattern for APAP. Furthermore, exposure to APAP increased the level of free ubiquitin and influenced the ubiquitination of proteins. Together, these results uncover a role for ubiquitin homeostasis in APAP-induced toxicity. PMID:28291796

  17. Transcriptomic studies on liver toxicity of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Toska, Endrit; Zagorsky, Robert; Figler, Bryan; Cheng, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen is widely used as a pain reliever and to reduce fever. At high doses, it can cause severe hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen overdose has become the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. The mechanisms for acetaminophen-induced liver injury are unclear. Transcriptomic studies can identify the changes in expression of thousands of genes when exposed to supratherapeutic doses of acetaminophen. These studies elucidated the mechanism of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and also provide insight into future development of diagnosis and treatment options for acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure. The following is a brief overview of some recent transcriptomic studies and gene-expression-based prediction models on liver toxicity induced by acetaminophen.

  18. The role of intrahepatic CD3 +/CD4 −/CD8 − double negative T (DN T) cells in enhanced acetaminophen toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Getachew, Yonas; Cusimano, Frank A.; James, Laura P.; Thiele, Dwain L.

    2014-10-15

    The role of the immune system, specifically NK, NKT and CD3 cells, in acetaminophen (APAP) induced liver injury remains inconsistently defined. In the present study, wild type (C57BL/6J) mice and granzyme B deficient (GrB −/−) mice were treated with acetaminophen to assess the role of the immune system in acute liver injury. Doses of acetaminophen that induced sub lethal liver injury in wild type mice unexpectedly produced fatal hepatotoxicity in granzyme B deficient (GrB −/−) mice. Analysis revealed that GrB −/− mice had an increased population of intrahepatic CD3 (+), CD4 (−), and CD8 (−) lymphocytes expressing the CD69 activation marker and Fas ligand. Depletion of these cells in the GrB −/− and wild type mice made them less susceptible to APAP injury, while depletion of NK1.1 (+) cells or both CD4 (+) and CD8 (+) T cells failed to provide the same hepatoprotection. Transfer of the GrB −/− IHLs further exacerbated liver injury and increased mortality in wild type mice but not in LRP/LPR mice, lacking fas expression. Conclusions: Acetaminophen toxicity is enhanced by the presence of activated, FasL expressing intrahepatic CD3 (+), CD4 (−), CD8 (−), NK1.1 (−) T cells. Depletion of these cells from GrB −/− mice and wild type mice greatly reduces mortality and improves the course of liver injury recovery. - Highlights: • Intrahepatic lymphocytes (IHLs) from GrB −/− mice harbor activated DNT cells. • IHLs from GrB −/− mice exhibit enhanced Fas ligand expression. • Acetaminophen toxicity is enhanced by activated, FasL expressing DNT cells.

  19. The use of thymoquinone in nephrotoxicity related to acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Aycan, İlker Öngüç; Tokgöz, Orhan; Tüfek, Adnan; Alabalık, Ulaş; Evliyaoğlu, Osman; Turgut, Hüseyin; Çelik, Feyzi; Güzel, Abdulmenap

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate efficacy of intraperitoneally administered Thymoquinone (TQ) in acetaminophen (APAP) induced renal toxicity. Forty Wistar Albino rats were randomly divided into 4 groups of ten rats each. Control group was untreated group while rats in TQ group were treated with single dose TQ. In APAP group rats were treated with single dose acetaminophen. In TQ + APAP group TQ and APAP were administered respectively. Rats were sacrificed at 24th hour; urea, creatinine and nitric oxide levels were measured also malondialdehyde activity were assessed in renal tissue specimens. Tissue damage scores were recorded in histopathological assessment. Urea and creatinine levels were found significantly higher in APAP group than control group (p < 0.003). Urea and creatinine levels in APAP + TQ treated group were significantly lower than APAP treated group (p < 0.01). Serum NO activity and tissue MDA levels were higher in APAP group than control group (p ≤ 0.002). In contrast to APAP treated group serum NO activity and tissue MDA levels were found significantly lower in TQ + APAP group (p ≤ 0.03). In APAP group significant histopathological change was found compared with control group (p ≤ 0.001) where there was no significant change between control and TQ treated groups (p > 0.05). In APAP group we found significantly higher tissue damage scores than control group (p ≤ 0.001). In APAP + TQ group lower tissue damage scores were found compared with APAP group (p ≤ 0.001) while higher scores were found compared with control group (p ≤ 0.001). We can conclude that TQ treatment has therapeutical effect in APAP induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Acetaminophen protein adduct formation following low-dose acetaminophen exposure: comparison of immediate-release vs extended-release formulations.

    PubMed

    James, Laura P; Chiew, Angela; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M; Letzig, Lynda; Graudins, Andis; Day, Peter; Roberts, Dean

    2013-04-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) protein adducts are a biomarker of APAP metabolism, reflecting oxidation of APAP and generation of the reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. High levels of adducts correspond to liver toxicity in patients with APAP-related acute liver failure. Adduct formation following low-dose exposure to APAP has not been well studied. APAP protein adducts were measured in blood samples collected from fasted individuals who participated in a crossover study of APAP (80 mg/kg) comparing extended release (ER) and immediate release (IR) formulations. Adducts were quantified in all postdose blood samples using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC) assay. Comparison of pharmacokinetic parameters for adducts did not reveal significant differences between ER and IR formulations, with one exception. Formation rates for adducts were faster for IR than the ER formulation (0.420 ± 0.157 vs. 0.203 ± 0.080 1/h), respectively. Maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) of adducts for IR and ER were 0.108 (±0.020) and 0.100 (±0.028) nmol/ml serum, respectively, and were two orders of magnitude lower than adduct levels previously reported in adults with acute liver failure secondary to APAP. APAP protein adducts are rapidly formed following nontoxic ingestion of APAP at levels significantly lower than those associated with acute liver failure.

  1. Acetaminophen protein adduct formation following low dose acetaminophen exposure: comparison of immediate release vs. extended release formulations

    PubMed Central

    James, Laura P.; Chiew, Angela; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M.; Letzig, Lynda; Graudins, Andis; Day, Peter; Roberts, Dean

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Acetaminophen (APAP) protein adducts are a biomarker of APAP metabolism, reflecting oxidation of APAP and generation of the reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. High levels of adducts correspond to liver toxicity in patients with APAP related acute liver failure. Adduct formation following low dose exposure to APAP has not been well studied. APAP protein adducts were measured in blood samples collected from fasted subjects that participated in a cross-over study of APAP (80 mg/kg) comparing extended release (ER) and immediate release (IR) formulations. Methods Adducts were quantified in all post-dose blood samples using a validated HPLC-EC assay. Results Comparison of pharmacokinetic parameters for adducts did not reveal significant differences between the ER and IR formulations, with one exception. Formation rates for adducts were faster for the IR than the ER formulation (0.420 ± 0.157 vs. 0.203 ± 0.080 1/hr), respectively. The Cmax of adducts for IR and ER were 0.108 (±0.020) and 0.100 (±0.028) nmol/mL serum, respectively, and were two orders of magnitude lower than adduct levels previously reported in adults with acute liver failure secondary to APAP. Conclusions APAP protein adducts are rapidly formed following non-toxic ingestion of APAP at levels significantly lower than those associated with acute liver failure. PMID:23052410

  2. Lycopene inhibits reactive oxygen species production in SK-Hep-1 cells and attenuates acetaminophen-induced liver injury in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Bandeira, Ana Carla Balthar; da Silva, Talita Prato; de Araujo, Glaucy Rodrigues; Araujo, Carolina Morais; da Silva, Rafaella Cecília; Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Bezerra, Frank Silva; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2017-02-01

    Our aim was to investigate the antioxidant potential of lycopene in different experimental liver models: in vitro, to evaluate the influence of lycopene on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production mediated by the PKC pathway and in vivo, to evaluate the protective effects of lycopene in an experimental model of hepatotoxicity. The in vitro study assessed the lycopene antioxidant potential by the quantification of ROS production in SK-Hep-1 cells unstimulated or stimulated by an activator of the PKC pathway. The role of NADPH oxidase was evaluated by measuring its inhibition potential using an inhibitor of this enzyme. In the in vivo study, male C57BL/6 mice received lycopene (10 or 100 mg/kg by oral gavage) and 1 h later, acetaminophen (APAP) (500 mg/kg) was administrated. Lycopene decreased ROS production in SK-Hep-1 cells through inhibition of NADPH oxidase, brought about in the PKC pathway. Lycopene improved hepatotoxicity acting as an antioxidant, reduced GSSG and regulated tGSH and CAT levels, reduced oxidative damage primarily by decreasing protein carbonylation, promoted the downregulation of MMP-2 and reduced areas of necrosis improving the general appearance of the lesion in C57BL/6 mice. Lycopene is a natural compound that was able to inhibit the production of ROS in vitro and mitigate the damage caused by APAP overdose in vivo.

  3. Effect of homopterocarpin, an isoflavonoid from Pterocarpus erinaceus, on indices of liver injury and oxidative stress in acetaminophen-provoked hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Akinmoladun, Afolabi C; Olaleye, M Tolulope; Komolafe, Kayode; Adetuyi, Abayomi O; Akindahunsi, Afolabi A

    2015-11-01

    Novel hepatoprotectives are needed to address the increasing cases of liver problems worldwide. Pterocarpus erinaceus Poir (Fabaceae) ethanol stem bark extract (PE) and its constituent flavonoid, homopterocarpin (HP), were investigated for their protective property in acetaminophen-induced oxidative stress and liver damage. Adult male albino rats were divided into nine groups. Seven groups were pretreated with PE (50-, 100-, and 150 mg/kg), HP (25-, 50-, and 75 mg/kg) or silymarin (25 mg/kg), respectively, once daily for 5 consecutive days and then administered acetaminophen (2 g/kg) on the 5th day. The control and acetaminophen-intoxicated groups received normal saline throughout the experimental period, with the latter group additionally receiving 2 g/kg acetaminophen on the 5th day. Administrations were performed po. In the acetaminophen-intoxicated group, there were significant increases (p<0.05) in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (31.72±3.3 vs. 22.1±1.2 U/I), aspartate aminotransferase (185.1±10.1 vs. 103.83±13.3 U/I), bilirubin level and hepatic malondialdehyde (2.32±0.3 vs. 1.42±0.1 units/mg protein), accompanied with significant decreases (p<0.05) in hepatic reduced glutathione level (0.10±0.01 vs. 0.23±0.03 units/mg protein) and glutathione peroxidase activity (2.51±0.2 vs. 3.25±0.2 μmol H2O2 consumed/min/mg protein) compared with the control. PE and HP ameliorated most of the observed biochemical alterations with HP appearing to show more potency. The results suggest that the flavonoid, homopterocarpin contributes to the hepatoprotective and antioxidant potentials of P. erinaceus extract.

  4. Sestrin2 protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Jung; Kim, Kyu Min; Yang, Ji Hye; Cho, Sam Seok; Kim, Ji Young; Park, Su Jung; Lee, Sang Kyu; Ku, Sae Kwang; Cho, Il Je; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2017-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose accounts for half of the cases of acute liver failure worldwide. We previously reported that Sestrin2 (Sesn2) protects against d-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced acute fulminant liver failure. In this study, we demonstrated that Sesn2 protects APAP-induced liver injury in mice, using a recombinant adenovirus encoding Sesn2 (Ad-Sesn2). First, we found that treatment of mice with toxic levels of APAP significantly reduced Sesn2 expression. Tail-vein injection with Ad-Sesn2 inhibited APAP-induced serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels and markedly reduced hepatocyte degeneration and inflammatory cell infiltration. Additionally, APAP-induced glutathione depletion and reactive oxygen species generation were inhibited by Ad-Sesn2 treatment. Consistently, hepatic inflammatory gene expression and proinflammatory cytokine levels were also inhibited in Sesn2-infected mice, and we observed reduced APAP-mediated apoptotic signaling by terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling staining of the hepatic tissue. At a high dose of APAP, the mortality rate of Ad-Sesn2-infected mice was significantly lower than that of control mice. Furthermore, Sesn2 prevented APAP-induced damage through suppression of downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation. Therefore, Sesn2 exerted a protective effect against APAP-induced acute liver damage by inhibiting oxidative stress and proinflammatory signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Time course of acetaminophen-protein adducts and acetaminophen metabolites in circulation of overdose patients and in HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R; Cook, Sarah F; Sharpe, Matthew R; Winefield, Robert D; Wilkins, Diana G; Rollins, Douglas E; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    1. It has been suggested that acetaminophen (APAP)-protein adducts can be measured in circulation to diagnose APAP-induced liver injury. However, the full-time course of plasma adducts has not been studied specifically in early-presenting overdose patients. In fact, surprisingly little work has been done on the metabolism of APAP after overdose in general. 2. We measured APAP, five APAP metabolites and APAP-protein adducts in plasma samples from early- and late-presenting overdose patients, and APAP-protein adducts in culture medium from HepaRG cells. 3. In contrast to earlier rodents studies, we found that APAP-protein adducts were lower at early time points and peaked around the time of peak liver injury, suggesting that these adduct levels may take longer to become elevated or remain elevated than previously thought. 4. APAP and its major metabolites were elevated in plasma at early time points and rapidly decreased. 5. Although clinical measurement of APAP-protein adducts holds promise as a diagnostic tool, we suggest caution in its interpretation in very early-presenting patients. Our data also support the idea that sulfation is saturated even at low doses but glucuronidation has a much higher capacity, highlighting the importance of glucuronidation in APAP metabolism.

  6. Time course of acetaminophen-protein adducts and acetaminophen metabolites in circulation of overdose patients and in HepaRG cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Cook, Sarah F.; Sharpe, Matthew R.; Winefield, Robert D.; Wilkins, Diana G.; Rollins, Douglas E.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that acetaminophen (APAP)-protein adducts can be measured in circulation to diagnose APAP-induced liver injury. However, the full time course of plasma adducts has not been studied specifically in early-presenting overdose patients. In fact, surprisingly little work has been done on the metabolism of APAP after overdose in general.We measured APAP, five APAP metabolites and APAP-protein adducts in plasma samples from early and late-presenting overdose patients, and APAP-protein adducts in culture medium from HepaRG cells.In contrast to earlier rodents studies, we found that APAP-protein adducts were lower at early time points and peaked around the time of peak liver injury, suggesting that these adduct levels may take longer to become elevated or remain elevated than previously thought.APAP and its major metabolites were elevated in plasma at early time points and rapidly decreased.Although clinical measurement of APAP-protein adducts holds promise as a diagnostic tool, we suggest caution in its interpretation in very early-presenting patients. Our data also support the idea that sulfation is saturated even at low doses but glucuronidation has a much higher capacity, highlighting the importance of glucuronidation in APAP metabolism. PMID:25869248

  7. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Drives Thioacetamide-Mediated Heteroprotection Against Acetaminophen-Induced Lethal Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dadhania, Vivekkumar P.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2017-01-01

    Preplacement of compensatory tissue repair (CTR) by exposure to a nonlethal dose of a toxicant protects animals against a lethal dose of another toxicant. Although CTR is known to heteroprotect, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not completely known. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of heteroprotection using thioacetamide (TA): acetaminophen (APAP) heteroprotection model. Male Swiss Webster mice received a low dose of TA or distilled water (DW) vehicle 24 hours prior to a lethal dose of APAP. Liver injury, tissue repair, and promitogenic signaling were studied over a time course of 24 hours after APAP overdose to the TA- and DW-primed mice (TA + APAP and DW + APAP, respectively). Thioacetamide pretreatment afforded 100% protection against APAP overdose compared to 100% lethality in the DW + APAP-treated mice. Although hepatic Cyp2e1 was similar at the time of APAP administration, immediate activation of hepatic c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) was observed in the TA + APAP-treated mice compared to its delayed activation in the DW + APAP group. In contrast to the DW + APAP group, the TA + APAP-treated mice exhibited extensive CTR, which was secondary to the timely activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Our data indicate that rapid activation and appropriate termination of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and modulation of JNK activity underlie TA + APAP heteroprotection. PMID:28210203

  8. Assessment of protein modifications in liver of rats under chronic treatment with paracetamol (acetaminophen) using two complementary mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Mast, Carole; Lyan, Bernard; Joly, Charlotte; Centeno, Delphine; Giacomoni, Franck; Martin, Jean-François; Mosoni, Laurent; Dardevet, Dominique; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; Papet, Isabelle

    2015-04-29

    Liver protein can be altered under paracetamol (APAP) treatment. APAP-protein adducts and other protein modifications (oxidation/nitration, expression) play a role in hepatotoxicity induced by acute overdoses, but it is unknown whether liver protein modifications occur during long-term treatment with non-toxic doses of APAP. We quantified APAP-protein adducts and assessed other protein modifications in the liver from rats under chronic (17 days) treatment with two APAP doses (0.5% or 1% of APAP in the diet w/w). A targeted metabolomic method was validated and used to quantify APAP-protein adducts as APAP-cysteine adducts following proteolytic hydrolysis. The limit of detection was found to be 7ng APAP-cysteine/mL hydrolysate i.e. an APAP-Cys to tyrosine ratio of 0.016‰. Other protein modifications were assessed on the same protein hydrolysate by untargeted metabolomics including a new strategy to process the data and identify discriminant molecules. These two complementary mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolic approaches enabled the assessment of a wide range of protein modifications induced by chronic treatment with APAP. APAP-protein adducts were detected even in the absence of glutathione depletion and hepatotoxicity, i.e. in the 0.5% APAP group, and increased by 218% in the 1% APAP group compared to the 0.5% APAP group. At the same time, the untargeted metabolomic method revealed a decrease in the binding of cysteine, cysteinyl-glycine and GSH to thiol groups of protein cysteine residues, an increase in the oxidation of tryptophan and proline residues and a modification in protein expression. This wide range of modifications in liver proteins occurred in rats under chronic treatment with APAP that did not induce hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Melatonin prevents acetaminophen-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Ilbey, Yusuf Ozlem; Ozbek, Emin; Cekmen, Mustafa; Somay, Adnan; Ozcan, Levent; Otünctemur, Alper; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Mete, Fatih

    2009-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a major complication of acetaminophen (APAP), a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug, and there is no specific treatment for APAP-induced renal damage. It has been reported that reactive oxygen metabolites or free radicals are important mediators of APAP toxicity. In this study, the protective role of melatonin (MLT) on APAP-induced nephrotoxicity was investigated in rats. For this purpose, nephrotoxicity was induced in male Wistar albino rats by intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of a single dose of 1,000 mg/kg APAP. Some of these rats also received i.p. melatonin (10 mg/kg) 20 min after administration of APAP. The rats were sacrificed 24 h after administration of APAP. Urea and creatinine levels were measured in the blood, and levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were determined in renal tissue. Serum urea and creatinine levels increased significantly as a result of APAP nephrotoxicity. A significant increase in MDA and decreases in GSH level and GSH-Px, CAT, and SOD activity indicated that APAP-induced renal damage was mediated through oxidative stress. Significant beneficial changes were noted in serum and tissue oxidative stress indicators in rats treated with MLT. These biochemical observations were supplemented by histopathological examination of kidney sections, which revealed that MLT also reduced the severity of APAP-induced histological alterations in the kidney. These results indicate that administration of APAP causes oxidative stress to renal tissue and that MLT protects against the oxidative damage associated with APAP.

  10. Toxicity of 50-nm polystyrene particles co-administered to mice with acetaminophen, 5-aminosalicylic acid or tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Isoda, K; Nozawa, T; Tezuka, M; Ishida, I

    2014-09-01

    We investigated whether nano-sized polystyrene particles affect drug-induced toxicity. The particles, which are widely used industrially, had diameters of 50 (NPP50), 200 (NPP200) or 1000 (NPP1000) nm. The toxic chemicals tested were acetaminophen (APAP), 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), tetracycline (TC), and sodium valproate (VPA). All treatments in the absence of the nanoparticles were non-lethal and did not result in severe toxicity. However, when mice were injected with APAP, 5-ASA or TC together with polystyrene particles, synergistic, enhanced toxicity was observed in mice injected with NPP50. These synergic effects were not observed in mice co-injected with NPP200 or NPP1000. On the other hand, co-administration of VPA and NPP50, NPP200 or NPP1000 did not elevate toxicity. The results show that NPP50 differs in hepatotoxicity depending on the drug co-administered. These findings suggest that further evaluation of the interactions between polystyrene nanoparticles and drugs is a critical prerequisite to the pharmaceutical application of nanotechnology.

  11. Mechanism for the primary transformation of acetaminophen in a soil/water system.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chuanzhou; Lan, Zhonghui; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Yingbao

    2016-07-01

    The transformation of acetaminophen (APAP) in a soil/water system was systematically investigated by a combination of kinetic studies and a quantitative analysis of the reaction intermediates. Biotransformation was the predominant pathway for the elimination of APAP, whereas hydrolysis or other chemical transformation, and adsorption processes made almost no contribution to the transformation under a dark incubation. Bacillus aryabhattai strain 1-Sj-5-2-5-M, Klebsiella pneumoniae strain S001, and Bacillus subtilis strain HJ5 were the main bacteria identified in the biotransformation of APAP. The soil-to-water ratio and soil preincubation were able to alter the transformation kinetic pattern. Light irradiation promoted the overall transformation kinetics through enhanced biotransformation and extra photosensitized chemical reactions. The transformation pathways were strongly dependent on the initial concentration of APAP. The main primary transformation products were APAP oligomers and p-aminophenol, with the initial addition of 26.5 and 530 μM APAP, respectively. APAP oligomers accounted for more than 95% of transformed APAP, indicating that almost no bound residues were generated through the transformation of APAP in the soil/water system. The potential environmental risks of APAP could increase following the transformation of APAP in the soil/water system because of the higher toxicity of the transformation intermediates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Acetaminophen and pregnancy: short- and long-term consequences for mother and child.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Kristin; Kessler, Timo; Arck, Petra; Erhardt, Annette; Tiegs, Gisa

    2013-03-01

    Counter-intuitively, over-the-counter medication is commonly taken by pregnant women. In this context, acetaminophen (APAP, e.g. Paracetamol, Tylenol) is generally recommended by physicians to treat fever and pain during pregnancy. Thus, APAP ranks at the top of the list of medications taken prenatally. Insights on an increased risk for pregnancy complications such as miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm birth or fetal malformations upon APAP exposure are rather ambiguous. However, emerging evidence arising from human trials clearly reveals a significant correlation between APAP use during pregnancy and an increased risk for the development of asthma in children later in life. Pathways through which APAP increases this risk are still elusive. APAP can be liver toxic and since APAP appears to freely cross the placenta, therapeutic and certainly toxic doses could not only affect maternal, but also fetal hepatocytes. It is noteworthy that during fetal development, the liver transiently functions as the main hematopoietic organ. We here review the effect of APAP on metabolic and immunological parameters in pregnant women and on fetal development and immune ontogeny in order to delineate novel, putative and to date underrated pathways through which APAP use during pregnancy can impair maternal, fetal and long term children's health. We conclude that future studies are urgently needed to reconsider the safety and dosage of APAP during pregnancy and - based on the advances made in the field of reproduction as well as APAP metabolism - we propose pathways, which should be addressed in future research and clinical endeavors.

  13. Purified acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate is able to induce oxidative stress in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Roušar, T; Nýdlová, E; Česla, P; Staňková, P; Kučera, O; Pařík, P; Červinková, Z

    2012-01-01

    Acetaminophen overdose is the most often cause of acute liver injury. The toxic mechanism is linked to formation of an active metabolite that reacts with glutathione generating acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate (APAP-SG). This compound has been recognized to be non-toxic generally. Our preliminary results showed, however, that APAP-SG could possess a toxic effect too. Therefore, the aim of our study was to prepare, purify and to test possible toxicity of APAP-SG. We prepared APAP-SG using organic synthesis. The conjugate was purified by preparative HPLC and its structure was confirmed using mass spectrometry. Final purity of APAP-SG was >98 %. We estimated a toxic effect of APAP-SG in isolated rat liver mitochondria using a fluorescent ROS probe. We assessed ROS production in presence of complex I or complex II substrates. The increase of ROS-dependent fluorescence in presence of glutamate/malate was 104 ± 13 % and 130 ± 10 % in 1 mM and 5 mM APAP-SG, respectively, in comparison with controls. ROS production related to presence of complex II substrate was enhanced 4-times in APAP-SG (5 mM) treated mitochondria (compared to controls). We conclude, we proved our hypothesis that APAP-SG conjugate is able to induce a mitochondrial impairment leading to enhanced ROS production.

  14. Indocyanine Green Clearance Varies as a Function of N-Acetylcysteine Treatment in a Murine Model of Acetaminophen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Milesi-Hallé, Alessandra; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M.; Brown, Aliza; McCullough, Sandra S.; Letzig, Lynda; Hinson, Jack A.; James, Laura P.

    2011-01-01

    Standard assays to assess acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in animal models include determination of ALT (alanine aminotransferase) levels and examination of histopathology of liver sections. However, these assays do not reflect the functional capacity of the injured liver. To examine a functional marker of liver injury, the pharmacokinetics of indocyanine green (ICG) were examined in mice treated with APAP, saline, or APAP followed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment. Male B6C3F1 mice were administered APAP (200 mg/kg IP) or saline. Two additional groups of mice received APAP followed by NAC at 1 or 4 h after APAP. At 24 h, mice were injected with ICG (10 mg/kg IV) and serial blood samples (0, 2, 10, 30, 50 and 75 min) were obtained for determination of serum ICG concentrations and ALT. Mouse livers were removed for measurement of APAP protein adducts and examination of histopathology. Toxicity (ALT values and histology) was significantly increased above saline treated mice in the APAP and APAP/NAC 4 h mice. Mice treated with APAP/NAC 1 h had complete protection from toxicity. APAP protein adducts were increased in all APAP treated groups and were highest in the APAP/NAC 1 h group. Pharmacokinetic analysis of ICG demonstrated that the total body clearance (ClT) of ICG was significantly decreased and the mean residence time (MRT) was significantly increased in the APAP mice compared to the saline mice. Mice treated with NAC at 1 h had ClT and MRT values similar to those of saline treated mice. Conversely, mice that received NAC at 4 h had a similar ICG pharmacokinetic profile to that of the APAP only mice. Prompt treatment with NAC prevented loss of functional activity while late treatment with NAC offered no improvement in ICG clearance at 24 h. ICG clearance in mice with APAP toxicity can be utilized in future studies testing the effects of novel treatments for APAP toxicity. PMID:21145883

  15. Indocyanine green clearance varies as a function of N-acetylcysteine treatment in a murine model of acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Milesi-Hallé, Alessandra; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M; Brown, Aliza; McCullough, Sandra S; Letzig, Lynda; Hinson, Jack A; James, Laura P

    2011-02-01

    Standard assays to assess acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in animal models include determination of ALT (alanine aminotransferase) levels and examination of histopathology of liver sections. However, these assays do not reflect the functional capacity of the injured liver. To examine a functional marker of liver injury, the pharmacokinetics of indocyanine green (ICG) were examined in mice treated with APAP, saline, or APAP followed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment.Male B6C3F1 mice were administered APAP (200 mg/kg IP) or saline. Two additional groups of mice received APAP followed by NAC at 1 or 4 h after APAP. At 24 h, mice were injected with ICG (10 mg/kg IV) and serial blood samples (0, 2, 10, 30, 50 and 75 min) were obtained for determination of serum ICG concentrations and ALT. Mouse livers were removed for measurement of APAP protein adducts and examination of histopathology. Toxicity (ALT values and histology) was significantly increased above saline treated mice in the APAP and APAP/NAC 4 h mice. Mice treated with APAP/NAC 1 h had complete protection from toxicity. APAP protein adducts were increased in all APAP treated groups and were highest in the APAP/NAC 1 h group. Pharmacokinetic analysis of ICG demonstrated that the total body clearance (Cl(T)) of ICG was significantly decreased and the mean residence time (MRT) was significantly increased in the APAP mice compared to the saline mice. Mice treated with NAC at 1 h had Cl(T) and MRT values similar to those of saline treated mice. Conversely, mice that received NAC at 4 h had a similar ICG pharmacokinetic profile to that of the APAP only mice. Prompt treatment with NAC prevented loss of functional activity while late treatment with NAC offered no improvement in ICG clearance at 24 h. ICG clearance in mice with APAP toxicity can be utilized in future studies testing the effects of novel treatments for APAP toxicity.

  16. Protective effect of Premna tomentosa (L. Verbenaceae) extract on membrane-bound phosphatases and inorganic cations transport in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity rats.

    PubMed

    Devi, K Pandima; Sreepriya, M; Balakrishna, K; Devaki, T

    2004-08-01

    Hepatic injury elicits intracellular stress that leads to peroxidation of membrane lipids accompanied by alteration of structural and functional characteristics of membrane, which affect the activities of membrane-bound ATPases. The present study appraised the membrane protective effect of Premna tomentosa, a hepatoprotective drug used in Indian traditional medicine. Wistar strain rats were pre-treated with Premna tomentosa extract (750 mg/kg, orally) for 15 days, 24 h prior to administration of acetaminophen (640 mg/kg, orally). During acetaminophen intoxication, the levels of membrane-bound enzymes were significantly decreased, total ATPase (1.63-fold), Mg(2+)ATPase (1.9-fold), Ca(2+)ATPase (1.33-fold) and Na(+)K(+)ATPase (1.73-fold) which was accompanied by changes in the levels of inorganic cations N+, K+ and Ca2+. These alterations were prevented by Premna tomentosa extract pre-treatment, which shows that Premna tomentosa supplementation could exert a beneficial effect against liver injury-induced membrane damage. The potential of the plant might be credited to the presence of antioxidant compound limonene in the plant.

  17. A sensitive immunochemical assay for acetaminophen-protein adducts.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D W; Pumford, N R; Potter, D W; Benson, R W; Hinson, J A

    1987-05-01

    The hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen may be mediated by the reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine which binds covalently to protein primarily as 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen. We have developed an avidin biotin-amplified competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect protein-bound acetaminophen. This assay utilizes antisera from rabbits immunized with 3-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen coupled via the carboxyl group to primary amino groups on the protein keyhole-limpet hemocyanin. The competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay utilizes metallothionein derivatized with N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (acetaminophen-bound metallothionein) and quantitation was obtained by competition of acetaminophen-derivatives for a limited amount of antibody in the presence of excess solid phase acetaminophen-bound metallothionein. Synthetic 3-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen, acetaminophen bound to mouse 9,000 X g supernatant, 100,000 X g supernatant, microsomes, as well as acetaminophen-bound metallothionein were inhibitory. The 50% inhibition for 3-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen was 110 fmol/well. In contrast, free acetaminophen was 6200 times less efficient as an inhibitor. The mean 50% inhibition for protein-bound acetaminophen was 2.89 pmol/well. The utility of the method to detect acetaminophen-protein adducts in biological samples was confirmed by detection of NADPH-dependent binding of acetaminophen to microsomal proteins.

  18. Analgesic efficacy of acetaminophen 1000 mg, acetaminophen 2000 mg, and the combination of acetaminophen 1000 mg and codeine phosphate 60 mg versus placebo in acute postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Skoglund, L A; Skjelbred, P; Fyllingen, G

    1991-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) 1000 mg, APAP 2000 mg, the combination of APAP 1000 mg plus codeine phosphate 60 mg (APAPCOD), and placebo (PBO) were compared in a 6-hour, randomized, single-dose, double-blind, parallel-group analgesic trial. All active treatments were statistically superior (p less than 0.05) to placebo for 4 hours after medication with respect to pain intensity (PI) and pain intensity difference (PID), and up to 3 hours regarding pain relief (PAR). The combination scored better than all other treatments on the summary analgesic efficacy measures sum PI (SUMPI), sum PID (SPID), and total PAR (TOTPAR). The combination was statistically superior to APAP 1000 mg on SUMPI, TOTPAR and maximum PAR (MAXPAR). Acetaminophen 2000 mg showed marginal numerical superiority over 1000 mg for SUMPI, but was not statistically superior for any summary efficacy measure. The 2000-mg dose was numerically inferior to APAPCOD for every summary efficacy measure and statistically inferior regarding SPID and MAXPAR. We concluded that codeine 60 mg added to acetaminophen 1000 mg offers analgesic advantages, and acetaminophen reaches an analgesic ceiling effect at 1000 mg using the dental pain model.

  19. Acetaminophen attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced cognitive impairment through antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Xing; Zhang, Jun-Han; Cao, Jiang-Bei; Wang, Wei; Wang, Dong-Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Yong-Yi; Zhang, You-Zhi; Mi, Wei-Dong

    2017-01-21

    Considerable evidence has shown that neuroinflammation and oxidative stress play an important role in the pathophysiology of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) and other progressive neurodegenerative disorders. Increasing evidence suggests that acetaminophen (APAP) has unappreciated antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the impact of APAP on the cognitive sequelae of inflammatory and oxidative stress is unknown. The objective of this study is to explore whether APAP could have neuroprotective effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cognitive impairment in mice. A mouse model of LPS-induced cognitive impairment was established to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of APAP against LPS-induced cognitive impairment. Adult C57BL/6 mice were treated with APAP half an hour prior to intracerebroventricular microinjection of LPS and every day thereafter, until the end of the study period. The Morris water maze was used to assess cognitive function from postinjection days 1 to 3. Animal behavioural tests as well as pathological and biochemical assays were performed to evaluate LPS-induced hippocampal damage and the neuroprotective effect of APAP. Mice treated with LPS exhibited impaired performance in the Morris water maze without changing spontaneous locomotor activity, which was ameliorated by treatment with APAP. APAP suppressed the accumulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and microglial activation induced by LPS in the hippocampus. In addition, APAP increased SOD activity, reduced MDA levels, modulated glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activity and elevated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the hippocampus. Moreover, APAP significantly decreased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and neuron apoptosis in the hippocampus of LPS-treated mice. Our results suggest that APAP may possess a neuroprotective effect against LPS-induced cognitive impairment and inflammatory and oxidative stress via mechanisms involving its antioxidant and

  20. Methanol extract of Dicranopteris linearis L. leaves impedes acetaminophen-induced liver intoxication partly by enhancing the endogenous antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Kamisan, Farah Hidayah; Omar, Maizatul Hasyima; Mahmood, Nur Diyana; Othman, Fezah; Abdul Hamid, Siti Selina; Abdullah, Muhammad Nazrul Hakim

    2017-05-18

    The present study investigated the potential of methanolic extract of Dicranopteris linearis (MEDL) leaves to attenuate liver intoxication induced by acetaminophen (APAP) in rats. A group of mice (n = 5) treated orally with a single dose (5000 mg/kg) of MEDL was first subjected to the acute toxicity study using the OECD 420 model. In the hepatoprotective study, six groups of rats (n = 6) were used and each received as follows: Group 1 (normal control; pretreated with 10% DMSO (extract's vehicle) followed by treatment with 10% DMSO (hepatotoxin's vehicle) (10% DMSO +10% DMSO)), Group 2 (hepatotoxic control; 10% DMSO +3 g/kg APAP (hepatotoxin)), Group 3 (positive control; 200 mg/kg silymarin +3 g/kg APAP), Group 4 (50 mg/kg MEDL +3 g/kg APAP), Group 5 (250 mg/kg MEDL +3 g/kg APAP) or Group 6 (500 mg/kg MEDL +3 g/kg APAP). The test solutions pre-treatment were made orally once daily for 7 consecutive days, and 1 h after the last test solutions administration (on Day 7th), the rats were treated with vehicle or APAP. Blood were collected from those treated rats for biochemical analyses, which were then euthanized to collect their liver for endogenous antioxidant enzymes determination and histopathological examination. The extract was also subjected to in vitro anti-inflammatory investigation and, HPLC and GCMS analyses. Pre-treatment of rats (Group 2) with 10% DMSO failed to attenuate the toxic effect of APAP on the liver as seen under the microscopic examination. This observation was supported by the significant (p < 0.05) increased in the level of serum liver enzymes of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and significant (p < 0.05) decreased in the activity of endogenous antioxidant enzymes of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in comparison to Group 1. Pre-treatment with MEDL, at all doses, significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the level of ALT and AST while the levels of CAT and SOD was

  1. Effect of trifluoperazine on toxicity, HIF-1α induction and hepatocyte regeneration in acetaminophen toxicity in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S.; Hennings, Leah; Brown, Aliza T.; Li, Shun-Hwa; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hinson, Jack A.; James, Laura P.

    2012-10-15

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are important mechanisms in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity. The MPT inhibitor trifluoperazine (TFP) reduced MPT, oxidative stress, and toxicity in freshly isolated hepatocytes treated with APAP. Since hypoxia inducible factor-one alpha (HIF-1α) is induced very early in APAP toxicity, a role for oxidative stress in the induction has been postulated. In the present study, the effect of TFP on toxicity and HIF-1α induction in B6C3F1 male mice treated with APAP was examined. Mice received TFP (10 mg/kg, oral gavage) prior to APAP (200 mg/kg IP) and at 7 and 36 h after APAP. Measures of metabolism (hepatic glutathione and APAP protein adducts) were comparable in the two groups of mice. Toxicity was decreased in the APAP/TFP mice at 2, 4, and 8 h, compared to the APAP mice. At 24 and 48 h, there were no significant differences in toxicity between the two groups. TFP lowered HIF-1α induction but also reduced the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker of hepatocyte regeneration. TFP can also inhibit phospholipase A{sub 2}, and cytosolic and secretory PLA{sub 2} activity levels were reduced in the APAP/TFP mice compared to the APAP mice. TFP also lowered prostaglandin E{sub 2} expression, a known mechanism of cytoprotection. In summary, the MPT inhibitor TFP delayed the onset of toxicity and lowered HIF-1α induction in APAP treated mice. TFP also reduced PGE{sub 2} expression and hepatocyte regeneration, likely through a mechanism involving PLA{sub 2}. -- Highlights: ► Trifluoperazine reduced acetaminophen toxicity and lowered HIF-1α induction. ► Trifluoperazine had no effect on the metabolism of acetaminophen. ► Trifluoperazine reduced hepatocyte regeneration. ► Trifluoperazine reduced phospholipase A{sub 2} activity and prostaglandin E{sub 2} levels.

  2. Identification of novel toxicity-associated metabolites by metabolomics and mass isotopomer analysis of acetaminophen metabolism in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi; Krausz, Kristopher W; Idle, Jeffrey R; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2008-02-22

    CYP2E1 is recognized as the most important enzyme for initiation of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxicity. In this study, the resistance of Cyp2e1-null mice to APAP treatment was confirmed by comparing serum aminotransferase activities and blood urea nitrogen levels in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice. However, unexpectedly, profiling of major known APAP metabolites in urine and serum revealed that the contribution of CYP2E1 to APAP metabolism decreased with increasing APAP doses administered. Measurement of hepatic glutathione and hydrogen peroxide levels exposed the importance of oxidative stress in determining the consequence of APAP overdose. Subsequent metabolomic analysis was capable of constructing a principal components analysis (PCA) model that delineated a relationship between urinary metabolomes and the responses to APAP treatment. Urinary ions high in wild-type mice treated with 400 mg/kg APAP were elucidated as 3-methoxy-APAP glucuronide (VII) and three novel APAP metabolites, including S-(5-acetylamino-2-hydroxyphenyl)mercaptopyruvic acid (VI, formed by a Cys-APAP transamination reaction in kidney), 3,3'-biacetaminophen (VIII, an APAP dimer), and a benzothiazine compound (IX, originated from deacetylated APAP), through mass isotopomer analysis, accurate mass measurement, tandem mass spectrometry fragmentation, in vitro reactions, and chemical treatments. Dose-, time-, and genotype-dependent appearance of these minor APAP metabolites implied their association with the APAP-induced toxicity and potential biomarker application. Overall, the oxidative stress elicited by CYP2E1-mediated APAP metabolism might significantly contribute to APAP-induced toxicity. The combination of genetically modified animal models, mass isotopomer analysis, and metabolomics provides a powerful and efficient technical platform to characterize APAP-induced toxicity through identifying novel biomarkers and unraveling novel mechanisms.

  3. Characterization of acetaminophen toxicity in human kidney HK-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Vrbová, M; Roušarová, E; Brůčková, L; Česla, P; Roušar, T

    2016-11-08

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes liver injury, but in some cases it is associated also with renal impairment. While several studies exist in relation to acetaminophen nephrotoxicity, no reports have been published describing intracellular changes related to APAP nephrotoxicity in vitro. Because proximal tubular cells are considered to constitute a secondary site of drug-induced injury after hepatocytes, our study's aim was to estimate the toxicity in the human HK-2 cell line. We used a range of APAP concentrations (1-10 mM) to examine toxicity in the cells (1-48 h). We evaluated cell viability using the WST-1 and LDH tests. Cells impairment was also determined by monitoring ROS production, glutathione levels. We proved that HK-2 cells are able to metabolize acetaminophen. We observed moderate impairment of cells already after 1 h of treatment based on a finding of increased ROS production and decreased cell viability. After 24 h, the results showed significant cellular impairment at all tested concentrations except for 1 mM APAP, but no glutathione depletion was found. We conclude that HK-2 cells are susceptible to acetaminophen toxicity but, unlike hepatocytes, it might be not linked to glutathione depletion.

  4. Comparison of inhibitory effects between acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione in human glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Nýdlová, Erika; Vrbová, Martina; Cesla, Petr; Jankovičová, Barbora; Ventura, Karel; Roušar, Tomáš

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen overdose is the most frequent cause of acute liver injury. The main mechanism of acetaminophen toxicity has been attributed to oxidation of acetaminophen. The oxidation product is very reactive and reacts with glutathione generating acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate (APAP-SG). Although this conjugate has been recognized to be generally nontoxic, we have found recently that APAP-SG could produce a toxic effect. Therefore, the aim of our study was to estimate the toxicity of purified APAP-SG by characterizing the inhibitory effect in human glutathione reductase (GR) and comparing that to the inhibitory effect of the natural inhibitor reduced glutathione. We used two types of human GR: recombinant and freshly purified from red blood cells. Our results show that GR was significantly inhibited in the presence of both APAP-SG and reduced glutathione. For example, the enzyme activity of recombinant and purified GR was reduced in the presence of 4 mm APAP-SG (with 0.5 mm glutathione disulfide) by 28% and 22%, respectively. The type of enzyme inhibition was observed to be competitive in the cases of both APAP-SG and glutathione. As glutathione inhibits GR activity in cells under physiological conditions, the rate of enzyme inhibition ought to be weaker in the case of glutathione depletion that is typical of acetaminophen overdose. Notably, however, enzyme activity likely remains inhibited due to the presence of APAP-SG, which might enhance the pro-oxidative status in the cell. We conclude that our finding could reflect some other pathological mechanism that may contribute to the toxicity of acetaminophen.

  5. Immature mice are more susceptible than adult mice to acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose induces acute liver injury. The aim of the present study was to analyze the difference of susceptibility between immature and adult mice to APAP-induced acute liver injury. Weanling immature and adult mice were injected with APAP (300 mg/kg). As expected, immature mice were more susceptible than adult mice to APAP-induced acute liver injury. APAP-evoked hepatic c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation was stronger in immature mice than in adult mice. Hepatic receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1 was obviously activated at APAP-exposed immature and adult mice. Interestingly, hepatic RIP3 activation was more obvious in APAP-treated immature mice than adult mice. Although there was no difference on hepatic GSH metabolic enzymes between immature and adult mice, immature mice were more susceptible than adult mice to APAP-induced hepatic GSH depletion. Of interest, immature mice expressed a much higher level of hepatic Cyp2e1 and Cyp3a11 mRNAs than adult mice. Correspondingly, immature mice expressed a higher level of hepatic CYP2E1, the key drug metabolic enzyme that metabolized APAP into the reactive metabolite NAPQI. These results suggest that a higher level of hepatic drug metabolic enzymes in immature mice than adult mice might contribute to the difference of susceptibility to APAP-induced acute liver injury. PMID:28205631

  6. Correlation of MRI findings to histology of acetaminophen toxicity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Brown, Aliza T; Ou, Xiawei; James, Laura P; Jambhekar, Kedar; Pandey, Tarun; McCullough, Sandra; Chaudhuri, Shubhra; Borrelli, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity is responsible for approximately half of all cases of acute liver failure in the United States. The mouse model of APAP toxicity is widely used to examine mechanisms of APAP toxicity. Noninvasive approaches would allow for serial measurements in a single animal to study the effects of experimental interventions on the development and resolution of hepatocellular necrosis. The following study examined the time course of hepatic necrosis using small animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following the administration of 200 mg/kg ip APAP given to B6C3F1 male mice. Mice treated with saline served as controls (CON). Other mice received treatment with the clinical antidote N-acetylcysteine (APAP+NAC). Mouse liver pathology was characterized using T1- and T2-weighted sequences at 2, 4, 8 and 24 h following APAP administration. Standard assays for APAP toxicity [serum alanine aminotransaminase (ALT) levels and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of liver sections] were examined relative to MRI findings. Overall, T2 sequences had a greater sensitivity for necrosis and hemorrhage than T1 (FLASH) images. Liver injury severity scoring of MR images demonstrated increased scores in the APAP mice at 4, 8 and 24 h compared to the CON mice. APAP+NAC mice had MRI scores similar to the CON mice. Semiquantitative analysis of hepatic hemorrhage strongly correlated with serum ALT. Small animal MRI can be used to monitor the evolution of APAP toxicity over time and to evaluate the response to therapy.

  7. Unexpected late rise in plasma acetaminophen concentrations with change in risk stratification in acute acetaminophen overdoses.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Patrick P; Klein-Schwartz, Wendy

    2012-07-01

    The acetaminophen risk analysis nomogram is used to predict hepatotoxicity risk in acute acetaminophen overdose based on a single plasma acetaminophen concentration (PAC) measured between 4 and 24 h after ingestion. There are case reports of patients with acute overdoses of acetaminophen combination products in whom a toxic PAC occurred later after an initial non-toxic PAC at approximately 4 h. The objective was to describe patients who had an initial non-toxic PAC and a subsequent toxic PAC. A poison center's database was searched for records in which patients were administered N-acetylcysteine. Cases were included if they involved an acute overdose of an acetaminophen-containing product with at least 2 plottable PACs, the first of which was obtained at least 4 h after ingestion and was below the treatment line on the nomogram with a subsequent toxic PAC. Data were analyzed for doses, timed PACs, specific acetaminophen preparation, coingestants, activated charcoal administration, and clinical effects. Twenty patients were included. Thirteen patients ingested combination products. All patients experienced vomiting, neurologic, or cardiovascular effects at presentation or before obtaining the second PAC. Two patients developed hepatotoxicity, one of which died from the complications of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. The nomogram fails to predict toxicity based on a single PAC in a small subset of patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Modulatory potentials of aqueous leaf and unripe fruit extracts of Carica papaya Linn. (Caricaceae) against carbon tetrachloride and acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Awodele, Olufunsho; Yemitan, Omoniyi; Ise, Peter Uduak; Ikumawoyi, Victor Olabowale

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Carica papaya Linn is used in a traditional medicine for hepatobiliary disorders. This study investigated the hepatomodulatory effects of aqueous extracts of C. papaya leaf (CPL) and unripe fruit (CPF) at doses of 100 and 300 mg/kg on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and acetaminophen (ACM)-induced liver toxicities in rats. Materials and Methods: Rats were administered CCl4 (3 ml/kg in olive oil, i.p.) followed by oral administration of CPL and CPF at 2, 6 and 10 h intervals. The ACM model proceeded with the same method but inclusive of animals treated with N-acetyl cysteine (3 ml/kg i.p). At the end of the study, serum levels of liver biomarkers and antioxidant enzymes were assessed and histology of the liver tissues determined. Results: There was a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in CCl4 and ACM-induced increases in serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and direct bilirubin at 100 and 300 mg/kg, respectively. The levels of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase and reduced GSH were decreased in both models with corresponding significantly (P < 0.05) elevated level of malondialdehyde. However, these antioxidant enzymes were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in CPL and CPF-treated rats. Histopathological assessment of the liver confirmed the protective effects of CPL and CPF on CCl4 and ACM-induced hepatic damage evidenced by the normal presentation of liver tissue architecture. Conclusion: These results indicate that aqueous extracts of C. papaya may be useful in preventing CCl4 and ACM-induced liver toxicities. PMID:27069723

  9. Evaluation of the tamper-resistant properties of biphasic immediate-release/extended-release oxycodone/acetaminophen tablets.

    PubMed

    Eisenhauer, Tiffani D; Matchett, Mike; Heasley, Ralph; Morton, Terri; Devarakonda, Krishna; Giuliani, Michael; Young, Jim L; Barrett, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abuse potential of extended-release (ER) opioid tablets increases if tampering causes rapid opioid release. To evaluate the susceptibility to tampering of biphasic immediate-release (IR)/ER oxycodone (OC)/acetaminophen (APAP) tablets compared with IR OC/APAP tablets. IR/ER OC/APAP and IR OC/APAP tablets were tested at room temperature and after heating, freezing and microwaving. Resistance to crushing was tested using manual and powered tools (e.g. spoons, mortar and pestle, blender, coffee grinder). Tampered tablets were tested for suitability for snorting, OC extraction in solvents and ease of drawing into a syringe. Dissolution of IR/ER OC/APAP in gastric fluid with and without ethanol was tested to determine the potential for facilitating precipitous release of opioid from the tablet. IR/ER OC/APAP tablets were more crush resistant than IR OC/APAP tablets. Heating, freezing and microwaving had no effect on crush resistance of IR/ER OC/APAP tablets. Although a mortar and pestle pulverized IR/ER OC/APAP tablets, upon contact with solvent, the powder formed a thick gel judged unsuitable for absorption through the nasal mucosa and could not be drawn into a syringe. In contrast, powder from crushed IR OC/APAP tablets dissolved readily, was judged suitable for snorting, and was easily drawn into a syringe. Dissolution of IR/ER OC/APAP tablets in gastric fluid was slowed by the addition of ethanol. IR/ER OC/APAP tablets are resistant to crushing and dissolution compared with IR OC/APAP tablets. IR/ER OC/APAP tablets may have less potential for abuse involving tampering compared with IR OC/APAP tablets.

  10. Characterization of acetaminophen-induced cytotoxicity in target tissues

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chao; Xie, Guojie; Su, Min; Wu, Xinmou; Lu, Xiuli; Wu, Ka; Wei, Chaohe

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP), commonly used in clinical prescription, has time- and dose-dependent side effects. Thus, further animal study warrants to be investigated to assess possible adverse effect of APAP application. Here, we conducted pre-clinical research to elucidate the molecular mechanism regarding APAP-mediated toxicological action. Our data showed that serous/urinary and hepatic/renal APAP concentrations were significantly increased when compared with normal control, which the liver tissue showed the highest level. As an acute liver damage model induced by APAP, absolute liver weight, serum enzyme (ALT), urine protein content were notably elevated. Representatively, APAP-damaged liver resulted in increased pro-apoptotic Bax and compensatory Ki-67 positive cells, while the number of anti-apoptotic Bcl2 positive cells was reduced. In addition, the immunoactivity markers for NF-κB, TRL4, TNF-α in the kidney were increased, respectively. Furthermore, intracellular TRL4 and TNF-α mRNAs in the liver and kidney showed significant up-regulation. In summary, our current findings demonstrate that APAP-mediated the specific cytotoxicity is linked to the molecular mechanisms of facilitating apoptosis and inflammatory stress in the liver and kidney. PMID:27830028

  11. Prolonged Acetaminophen-Protein Adduct Elimination During Renal Failure, Lack of Adduct Removal by Hemodiafiltration, and Urinary Adduct Concentrations After Acetaminophen Overdose.

    PubMed

    Curry, Steven C; Padilla-Jones, Angela; O'Connor, Ayrn D; Ruha, Anne-Michelle; Bikin, Dale S; Wilkins, Diana G; Rollins, Douglas E; Slawson, Matthew H; Gerkin, Richard D

    2015-06-01

    Elevated concentrations of serum acetaminophen-protein adducts, measured as protein-derived acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS), have been used to support a diagnosis of APAP-induced liver injury when histories and APAP levels are unhelpful. Adducts have been reported to undergo first-order elimination, with a terminal half-life of about 1.6 days. We wondered whether renal failure would affect APAP-CYS elimination half-life and whether continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF), commonly used in liver failure patients, would remove adducts to lower their serum concentrations. Terminal elimination half-lives of serum APAP-CYS were compared between subjects with and without renal failure in a prospective cohort study of 168 adults who had ingested excessive doses of APAP. APAP-CYS concentrations were measured in plasma ultrafiltrate during CVVHDF at times of elevated serum adduct concentrations. Paired samples of urine and serum APAP-CYS concentrations were examined to help understand the potential importance of urinary elimination of serum adducts. APAP-CYS elimination half-life was longer in 15 renal failure subjects than in 28 subjects with normal renal function (41.3 ± 2.2 h versus 26.8 ± 1.1 h [mean ± SEM], respectively, p < 0.001). CVVHDF failed to remove detectable amounts of APAP-CYS in any of the nine subjects studied. Sixty-eight percent of 557 urine samples from 168 subjects contained no detectable APAP-CYS, despite levels in serum up to 16.99 μM. Terminal elimination half-life of serum APAP-CYS was prolonged in patients with renal failure for reasons unrelated to renal urinary adduct elimination, and consideration of prolonged elimination needs to be considered if attempting back-extrapolation of adduct concentrations. CVVHDF did not remove detectable APAP-CYS, suggesting approximate APAP-protein adduct molecular weights ≥ 50,000 Da. The presence of urinary APAP-CYS in the minority of instances was most compatible with renal

  12. Protective effects of luteolin against acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure in mouse.

    PubMed

    Tai, Minghui; Zhang, Jingyao; Song, Sidong; Miao, RunChen; Liu, Sushun; Pang, Qing; Wu, Qifei; Liu, Chang

    2015-07-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is widely used as a safety analgesic and antipyretic agent. Although considered safe at therapeutic doses, overdose of APAP can cause acute liver injury that is sometimes fatal, requiring efficient pharmacological intervention. Luteolin is a naturally occurring flavonoid which is abundant in plants. The objective of this study was to investigate corresponding anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities of luteolin, using acetaminophen-treated mice as a model system. Male C57BL/C mice were randomly divided into three groups (n=6 each). The control group was given phosphate buffered saline (PBS) orally. The APAP group was given APAP by intraperitoneal injection (i.p) at 300 mg/kg suspended in PBS. The luteolin-treated group was given APAP and luteolin (0-100 mg/kg/day, 1 or 3 days before APAP administration) suspended in PBS orally. 16 h after APAP administration, the liver and serum were collected to determine the liver injury. Luteolin administration significantly decreased acetaminophen-induced serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, as well as glutathione (GSH) depletion and decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD). Luteolin restored SOD, GSH and GSH-px activities and depressed the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (i-NOS), TNF-α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and IL-6, respectively. Moreover, luteolin down-regulated acetaminophen-induced nitrotyrosine (NT) formation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. These results suggest the presence of anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-ER stress properties of luteolin in response to acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Acetaminophen induces accumulation of functional rat CYP3A via polyubiquitination dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Santoh, Masataka; Sanoh, Seigo; Takagi, Masashi; Ejiri, Yoko; Kotake, Yaichiro; Ohta, Shigeru

    2016-02-22

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is extensively used as an analgesic and antipyretic drug. APAP is partly metabolized to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, a reactive metabolite, by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 2E1 and 3A4. Some reports have indicated that CYP3A protein production and its metabolic activity are induced by APAP in rats in vivo. The CYP3A subfamily is believed to be transcriptionally regulated by chemical compounds. However, the mechanism underlying these responses is not completely understood. To clarify these mechanisms, we assessed the effects of APAP on CYP3A1/23 protein levels according to mRNA synthesis and protein degradation in rat hepatocyte spheroids, a model of liver tissue, in vivo. APAP induced CYP3A1/23 protein levels and metabolic activity. However, no change in CYP3A1/23 mRNA levels was observed. Moreover, APAP prolonged the half-life of CYP3A1/23 protein. CYP3A is known to be degraded via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. APAP significantly was found to decrease levels of polyubiquitinated CYP3A1/23 and glycoprotein 78, an E3 ligase of CYP3A1/23. These findings demonstrate that APAP induces accumulation of functional CYP3A protein via inhibition of protein degradation. Our findings may lead to the determination of novel drug-drug interactions with APAP.

  14. Gold nanoparticles ameliorate acetaminophen induced hepato-renal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Reshi, Mohd Salim; Shrivastava, Sadhana; Jaswal, Amita; Sinha, Neelu; Uthra, Chhavi; Shukla, Sangeeta

    2017-04-04

    Valuable effects of gold particles have been reported and used in complementary medicine for decades. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) against acetaminophen (APAP) induced toxicity. Albino rats were administered APAP at a dose of 2g/kg p.o. once only. After 24h of APAP intoxication, animals were treated with three different doses of AuNPs (50μg/kg, 100μg/kg, 150μg/kg) orally or silymarin at a dose of 50mg/kg p.o., once only. Animals of all the groups were sacrificed after 24h of last treatment. APAP administered group showed a significant rise in the AST, ALT, SALP, LDH, cholesterol, bilirubin, albumin, urea and creatinine in serum which indicated the hepato-renal damage. A significantly enhanced LPO and a depleted level of GSH were observed in APAP intoxicated rats. Declined activities of SOD and Catalase, after acetaminophen exposure indicated oxidative stress in liver and kidney. The activities of ATPase and glucose-6-Phosphatase were significantly inhibited after APAP administration. AuNPs treatment reversed all variables significantly towards normal level and was found nontoxic. Thus it is concluded that gold nanoparticles played a beneficial role in reducing acetaminophen induced toxicity and can be used in the development of drug against hepatic as well as renal diseases, after further preclinical and clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. [3D evaluation model for drug hepatotoxicity testing on HepG2 cells and its application in drug safety evaluation].

    PubMed

    Li, Dan-Dan; Tang, Xiang-Lin; Tan, Hong-Ling; Liang, Qian-de; Wang, Yu-Guang; Ma, Zeng-Chun; Xiao, Cheng-Rong; Gao, Yue

    2016-04-01

    3D in vitro toxicity testing model was developed by magnetic levitation method for culture of the human hepatoma cell line HepG2 and applied to evaluate the drug hepatotoxicity. After formation of stable 3D structure for HepG2 cells, their glycogen storage capacity under 2D and 3D culture conditions were detected by immunohistochemistry technology, and the mRNA expression levels of phase Ⅰ and Ⅱ drug metabolism enzymes, drug transporters, nuclear receptors and liver-specific marker albumin(ALB) were compared between 2D and 3D culture conditions by using RT-PCR method. Immunohistochemistry results showed that HepG2 cells had abundant glycogen storage capacity under 3D culture conditions, which was similar to human liver tissues. The mRNA expression levels of major drug metabolism enzymes, drug transporters, nuclear receptors and ALB in HepG2 cells under 3D culture conditions were up-regulated as compared with 2D culture conditions. For drug hepatotoxicity evaluation, the typical hepatotoxic drug acetaminophen(APAP), and most reported drugs Polygonum multiflorum Thunb.(Chinese name He-shou-wu) and Psoraleae corylifolia L.(Chinese name Bu-gu-zhi) were selected for single dose and repeated dose(7 d) exposure. In the repeated dose exposure test, 3D HepG2 cells showed higher sensitivity. This established 3D HepG2 cells model with magnetic levitation 3D culture techniques was more close to the human liver tissues both in morphology and functions, so it was a better 3D hepatotoxicity evaluation model. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  16. Short-term acetaminophen consumption enhances the exercise-induced increase in Achilles peritendinous IL-6 in humans.

    PubMed

    Gump, Brian S; McMullan, David R; Cauthon, David J; Whitt, Jamie A; Del Mundo, Jonathon D; Letham, Tanya; Kim, Paul J; Friedlander, Gary N; Pingel, Jessica; Langberg, Henning; Carroll, Chad C

    2013-09-01

    Through an unknown mechanism, the cyclooxygenase inhibitor and antipyretic acetaminophen (APAP) alters tendon mechanical properties in humans when consumed during exercise. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is produced by tendon during exercise and is a potent stimulator of collagen synthesis. In nontendon tissue, IL-6 is upregulated in the presence of cyclooxygenase inhibitors and may contribute to alterations in extracellular matrix turnover, possibly due to inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). We evaluated the effects of APAP on IL-6 and PGE2 in human Achilles peritendinous tissue after 1 h of treadmill exercise. Subjects were randomly assigned to a placebo (n = 8, 26 ± 1 yr) or APAP (n = 8, 25 ± 1 yr) group. Each subject completed a nonexercise and exercise experiment consisting of 6 h of microdialysis. Drug (APAP, 1,000 mg) or placebo was administered in a double-blind manner during both experiments. PGE2 and IL-6 were determined via enzyme immunoassay and APAP via high-performance liquid chromatography. In subjects given APAP, peritendinous APAP levels increased to 4.08 ± 0.65 μg/ml (P < 0.05). PGE2 did not increase with exercise in either group (P > 0.05), nor was PGE2 significantly reduced in the APAP group. IL-6 levels increased with exercise in both groups (P < 0.05), but this increase was greater in the APAP group (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that APAP enhances tendon IL-6 production after exercise. Peak levels of APAP obtained in the peritendinous space were twofold lower than values reported in plasma or skeletal muscle. These findings provide insight into the effects of APAP on tendon and provide novel information on the kinetics of APAP in tendon tissue after oral APAP consumption.

  17. Potential of extracellular microRNAs as biomarkers of acetaminophen toxicity in children.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Salminen, William F; Shi, Qiang; Greenhaw, James; Gill, Pritmohinder S; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Beger, Richard D; Mendrick, Donna L; Mattes, William B; James, Laura P

    2015-04-15

    Developing biomarkers for detecting acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity has been widely investigated. Recent studies of adults with APAP-induced liver injury have reported human serum microRNA-122 (miR-122) as a novel biomarker of APAP-induced liver injury. The goal of this study was to examine extracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) as potential biomarkers for APAP liver injury in children. Global levels of serum and urine miRNAs were examined in three pediatric subgroups: 1) healthy children (n=10), 2) hospitalized children receiving therapeutic doses of APAP (n=10) and 3) children hospitalized for APAP overdose (n=8). Out of 147 miRNAs detected in the APAP overdose group, eight showed significantly increased median levels in serum (miR-122, -375, -423-5p, -30d-5p, -125b-5p, -4732-5p, -204-5p, and -574-3p), compared to the other groups. Analysis of urine samples from the same patients had significantly increased median levels of four miRNAs (miR-375, -940, -9-3p and -302a) compared to the other groups. Importantly, correlation of peak serum APAP protein adduct levels (an indicator of the oxidation of APAP to the reactive metabolite N-acetyl-para-quinone imine) with peak miRNA levels showed that the highest correlation was observed for serum miR-122 (R=0.94; p<0.01) followed by miR-375 (R=0.70; p=0.05). Our findings demonstrate that miRNAs are increased in children with APAP toxicity and correlate with APAP protein adducts, suggesting a potential role as biomarkers of APAP toxicity. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Interindividual variation in gene expression responses and metabolite formation in acetaminophen-exposed primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Jetten, Marlon J A; Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa; Coonen, Maarten L J; Claessen, Sandra M; van Herwijnen, Marcel H M; Lommen, Arjen; van Delft, Joost H M; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Kleinjans, Jos C S

    2016-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a readily available over-the-counter drug and is one of the most commonly used analgesics/antipyretics worldwide. Large interindividual variation in susceptibility toward APAP-induced liver failure has been reported. However, the exact underlying factors causing this variability in susceptibility are still largely unknown. The aim of this study was to better understand this variability in response to APAP by evaluating interindividual differences in gene expression changes and APAP metabolite formation in primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from several donors (n = 5) exposed in vitro to a non-toxic to toxic APAP dose range. To evaluate interindividual variation, gene expression data/levels of metabolites were plotted against APAP dose/donor. The correlation in APAP dose response between donors was calculated by comparing data points from one donor to the data points of all other donors using a Pearson-based correlation analysis. From that, a correlation score/donor for each gene/metabolite was defined, representing the similarity of the omics response to APAP in PHH of a particular donor to all other donors. The top 1 % highest variable genes were selected for further evaluation using gene set overrepresentation analysis. The biological processes in which the genes with high interindividual variation in expression were involved include liver regeneration, inflammatory responses, mitochondrial stress responses, hepatocarcinogenesis, cell cycle, and drug efficacy. Additionally, the interindividual variation in the expression of these genes could be associated with the variability in expression levels of hydroxyl/methoxy-APAP and C8H13O5N-APAP-glucuronide. The before-mentioned metabolites or their derivatives have also been reported in blood of humans exposed to therapeutic APAP doses. Possibly these findings can contribute to elucidating the causative factors of interindividual susceptibility toward APAP.

  19. Potential of Extracellular MicroRNAs as Biomarkers of Acetaminophen Toxicity in Children

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xi; Salminen, William F; Shi, Qiang; Greenhaw, James; Gill, Pritmohinder S; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Beger, Richard D; Mendrick, Donna L; Mattes, William B.; James, Laura P

    2015-01-01

    Developing biomarkers for detecting acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity has been widely investigated. Recent studies of adults with APAP-induced liver injury have reported human serum microRNA-122 (miR-122) as a novel biomarker of APAP-induced liver injury. The goal of this study was to examine extracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) as potential biomarkers for APAP liver injury in children. Global levels of serum and urine miRNAs were examined in three pediatric subgroups: 1) healthy children (n=10), 2) hospitalized children receiving therapeutic doses of APAP (n=10) and 3) children hospitalized for APAP overdose (n=8). Out of 147 miRNAs detected in the APAP overdose group, eight showed significantly increased median levels in serum (miR-122, −375, −423-5p, −30d-5p, −125b-5p, −4732-5p, −204-5p, and −574-3p), compared to the other groups. Analysis of urine samples from the same patients had significantly increased median levels of four miRNAs (miR-375, −940, −9-3p and −302a) compared to the other groups. Importantly, correlation of peak serum APAP protein adduct levels (an indicator of the oxidation of APAP to the reactive metabolite N-acetylpara-quinone imine) with peak miRNA levels showed that the highest correlation was observed for serum miR-122 (R=0.94; p<0.01) followed by miR-375 (R=0.70; p=0.05). Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate that miRNAs are increased in children with APAP toxicity and correlate with APAP protein adducts, suggesting a potential role as biomarkers of APAP toxicity. PMID:25708609

  20. Selective acetaminophen metabolite binding to hepatic and extrahepatic proteins: an in vivo and in vitro analysis.

    PubMed

    Bartolone, J B; Beierschmitt, W P; Birge, R B; Hart, S G; Wyand, S; Cohen, S D; Khairallah, E A

    1989-06-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) administration (600 mg/kg, po) to fasted male CD-1 mice resulted in cellular damage to liver, lung, and kidney. An affinity purified antibody against covalently bound APAP was used to identify APAP-protein adducts in microsomal and cytosolic extracts from these target organs. The proteins were resolved on SDS-PAGE, transblotted to nitrocellulose membranes, and analyzed immunochemically. Covalent binding of APAP to intracellular proteins was only observed in those organs which exhibited cellular damage; no APAP adducts were detected in tissues which did not undergo necrosis. In all target tissues the arylation of proteins was not random but highly selective with two adducts of 44 and 58 kDa accounting for the majority of the total APAP-bound proteins which were detected immunochemically. In addition, a third major APAP-protein adduct of 33 kDa was also observed in kidney cytosol. The severity of tissue damage and the amount of adducts present in these tissues could be significantly reduced when mice were pretreated with the mixed function oxidase inhibitor, piperonyl butoxide, prior to APAP dosing. Immunochemical analysis of plasma from APAP-treated animals indicated the presence of several protein adducts by 4 hr following drug administration. These adducts did not appear to be of plasma origin. Incubation of cytosolic proteins from liver, lung, kidney, spleen, brain, and heart with an APAP metabolite generating liver microsomal system demonstrated that the cytosolic 58-kDa protein target was native to all tissues tested. By contrast, the 58-kDa protein target did not appear to be endogenous to plasma since it was not detected when plasma was incubated in vitro with the liver microsomal system. These studies indicate that, although the 58-kDa proteins appear to be endogenous to both target and nontarget tissues, the 58-kDa APAP-protein adducts are detectable only in tissues which become damaged by APAP.

  1. Acetaminophen Attenuates Lipid Peroxidation in Children Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Scott A.; Zaccagni, Hayden; Bichell, David P.; Christian, Karla G.; Mettler, Bret A.; Donahue, Brian S.; Roberts, L. Jackson; Pretorius, Mias

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hemolysis, occurring during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), is associated with lipid peroxidation and postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI). Acetaminophen (ApAP) inhibits lipid peroxidation catalyzed by hemeproteins and in an animal model attenuated rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI. This pilot study tests the hypothesis that ApAP attenuates lipid peroxidation in children undergoing CPB. Design Single center prospective randomized double blinded study. Setting University-affiliated pediatric hospital. Patients Thirty children undergoing elective surgical correction of a congenital heart defect. Interventions Patients were randomized to ApAP (OFIRMEV® (acetaminophen) injection, Cadence Pharmaceuticals, San Diego, CA) or placebo every 6 hours for 4 doses starting before the onset of CPB. Measurement and Main Results Markers of hemolysis, lipid peroxidation (isofurans and F2-isoprostanes) and AKI were measured throughout the perioperative period. CPB was associated with a significant increase in free hemoglobin (from a pre-bypass level of 9.8±6.2 mg/dl to a peak of 201.5±42.6 mg/dl post-bypass). Plasma and urine isofuran and F2-isoprostane concentrations increased significantly during surgery. The magnitude of increase in plasma isofurans was greater than the magnitude in increase in plasma F2-isoprostanes. ApAP attenuated the increase in plasma isofurans compared to placebo (P=0.02 for effect of study drug). There was no significant effect of ApAP on plasma F2-isoprostanes or urinary makers of lipid peroxidation. ApAP did not affect postoperative creatinine, urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin or prevalence of AKI. Conclusion CPB in children is associated with hemolysis and lipid peroxidation. ApAP attenuated the increase in plasma isofuran concentrations. Future studies are needed to establish whether other therapies that attenuate or prevent the effects of free hemoglobin result in more effective inhibition of lipid peroxidation in patients

  2. Ferroptosis is Involved in Acetaminophen Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, Tamás; Jemnitz, Katalin; Kardon, Tamás; Mandl, József; Szarka, András

    2015-09-01

    The recently described form of programmed cell death, ferroptosis can be induced by agents causing GSH depletion or the inhibition of GPX4. Ferroptosis clearly shows distinct morphologic, biochemical and genetic features from apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. Since NAPQI the highly reactive metabolite of the widely applied analgesic and antipyretic, acetaminophen induces a cell death which can be characterized by GSH depletion, GPX inhibition and caspase independency the involvement of ferroptosis in acetaminophen induced cell death has been investigated. The specific ferroptosis inhibitor ferrostatin-1 failed to elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated HepG2 cells. It should be noticed that these cells do not form NAPQI due to the lack of phase I enzyme expression therefore GSH depletion cannot be observed. However in the case of acetaminophen treated primary mouse hepatocytes the significant elevation of cell viability could be observed upon ferrostatin-1 treatment. Similar to ferrostatin-1 treatment, the addition of the RIP1 kinase inhibitor necrostatin-1 could also elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated primary hepatocytes. Ferrostatin-1 has no influence on the expression of CYP2E1 or on the cellular GSH level which suggest that the protective effect of ferrostatin-1 in APAP induced cell death is not based on the reduced metabolism of APAP to NAPQI or on altered NAPQI conjugation by cellular GSH. Our results suggest that beyond necroptosis and apoptosis a third programmed cell death, ferroptosis is also involved in acetaminophen induced cell death in primary hepatocytes.

  3. A Novel Defensive Mechanism against Acetaminophen Toxicity in the Mouse Lateral Nasal Gland: Role of CYP2A5-Mediated Regulation of Testosterone Homeostasis and Salivary Androgen-Binding Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Wei, Yuan; Xie, Fang; Laukaitis, Christina M.; Karn, Robert C.; Kluetzman, Kerri; Gu, Jun; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Roberts, Dean W.

    2011-01-01

    To identify novel factors or mechanisms that are important for the resistance of tissues to chemical toxicity, we have determined the mechanisms underlying the previously observed increases in resistance to acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the lateral nasal gland (LNG) of the male Cyp2g1-null/Cyp2a5-low mouse. Initial studies established that Cyp2a5-null mice, but not a newly generated strain of Cyp2g1-null mice, were resistant to APAP toxicity in the LNG; therefore, subsequent studies were focused on the Cyp2a5-null mice. Compared with the wild-type (WT) male mouse, the Cyp2a5-null male mouse had intact capability to metabolize APAP to reactive intermediates in the LNG, as well as unaltered circulating levels of APAP, APAP-GSH, APAP-glucuronide, and APAP-sulfate. However, it displayed reduced tissue levels of APAP and APAP-GSH and increased tissue levels of testosterone and salivary androgen-binding protein (ABP) in the LNG. Furthermore, we found that ABP was able to compete with GSH and cellular proteins for adduction with reactive metabolites of APAP in vitro. The amounts of APAP-ABP adducts formed in vivo were greater, whereas the amounts of APAP adducts formed with other cellular proteins were substantially lower, in the LNG of APAP-treated male Cyp2a5-null mice compared with the LNG of APAP-treated male WT mice. We propose that through its critical role in testosterone metabolism, CYP2A5 regulates 1) the bioavailability of APAP and APAP-GSH (presumably through modulation of the rates of xenobiotic excretion from the LNG) and 2) the expression of ABP, which can quench reactive APAP metabolites and thereby spare critical cellular proteins from inactivation. PMID:21252290

  4. Effect of Intravenous Acetaminophen on Post-Anesthesia Care Unit Length of Stay, Opioid Consumption, Pain, and Analgesic Drug Costs After Ambulatory Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Khobrani, Moteb A.; Camamo, James M.; Patanwala, Asad E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The primary objective was to assess whether the use of intravenous acetaminophen (APAP) in the ambulatory surgery setting is associated with a decreased length of stay in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). The secondary outcomes evaluated were pain scores, opioid consumption, and total cost of analgesics used in the PACU. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study conducted in adult patients (18 years of age or older) who received an eye, ear, nose, or throat (EENT) procedure at an outpatient surgery center between January 2014 and January 2015. Patients were consecutively included until the desired sample was reached during two six-month time periods: 1) intravenous APAP available on the formulary (APAP group) and 2) intravenous APAP not available on the formulary (non-APAP group). Results The cohort included 174 patients who received an EENT procedure (87 patients in the APAP group and 87 patients in the non-APAP group). The median PACU length of stay was 66 minutes (interquartile range [IQR], 48–92) in the APAP group and 71 minutes (IQR, 52–89) in the non-APAP group (P = 0.269). Mean pain score categories in the APAP versus non-APAP group were mild (85% versus 53%, respectively; P < 0.001), moderate (13% versus 33%, respectively; P = 0.002), and severe (2% versus 14%, respectively; P = 0.005). The median opioid consumption in morphine equivalents was 9 mg (IQR, 5–13) in the APAP group and 8 mg (IQR, 5–12) in the non-APAP group (P = 0.081). The total cost of analgesics used in the PACU was significantly greater in the APAP group ($15 versus $1; P < 0.001). Conclusions Intravenous APAP use in EENT ambulatory surgery is not associated with decreased PACU length of stay. However, it may decrease postoperative pain following EENT procedures. PMID:28163558

  5. Pharmacologic cholinesterase inhibition improves survival in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Steinebrunner, Niels; Mogler, Carolin; Vittas, Spiros; Hoyler, Birgit; Sandig, Catharina; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Eisenbach, Christoph

    2014-08-19

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is one of the most widely used analgesic and antipyretic pharmaceutical substances in the world and accounts for most cases of drug induced liver injury resulting in acute liver failure. Acute liver failure initiates a sterile inflammatory response with release of cytokines and innate immune cell infiltration in the liver. This study investigates, whether pharmacologic acetylcholinesterase inhibition with neostigmine diminishes liver damage in acute liver failure via the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Acute liver failure was induced in BALB/c mice by a toxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP). Neostigmine and/or N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) were applied therapeutically at set time points and the survival was investigated. Liver damage was assessed by serum parameters, histopathology and serum cytokine assays 12 h after initiation of acute liver failure. Serum parameters, histopathology and serum cytokine assays showed pronounced features of acute liver failure 12 h after application of acetaminophen (APAP). Neostigmine treatment led to significant reduction of serum liver enzymes (LDH (47,147 ± 12,726 IU/l vs. 15,822 ± 10,629 IU/l, p = 0.0014) and ALT (18,048 ± 4,287 IU/l vs. 7,585 ± 5,336 IU/l, p = 0.0013), APAP-alone-treated mice vs. APAP + neostigmine-treated mice), inflammatory cytokine levels (IL-1β (147 ± 19 vs. 110 ± 25, p = 0.0138) and TNF-α (184 ± 23 vs. 130 ± 33, p = 0.0086), APAP-alone-treated mice vs. APAP + neostigmine-treated mice) and histopathological signs of damage.Animals treated with NAC in combination with the peripheral cholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine showed prolonged survival and improved outcome. Neostigmine is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor that ameliorates the effects of APAP-induced acute liver failure in the mouse and therefore may provide new treatment options for affected patients.

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Acetaminophen-Induced Changes in Mitochondrial Protein Expression Using Spectral Counting

    PubMed Central

    Stamper, Brendan D.; Mohar, Isaac; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Nelson, Sidney D.

    2011-01-01

    Comparative proteomic analysis following treatment with acetaminophen (APAP) was performed on two different models of APAP-mediated hepatocellular injury in order to both identify common targets for adduct formation and track drug-induced changes in protein expression. Male C57BL/6 mice were used as a model for APAP-mediated liver injury in vivo and TAMH cells were used as a model for APAP-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. SEQUEST was unable to identify the precise location of sites of adduction following treatment with APAP in either system. However, semiquantitative analysis of the proteomic datasets using spectral counting revealed a downregulation of P450 isoforms associated with APAP bioactivation, and an upregulation of proteins related to the electron transport chain by APAP compared to control. Both mechanisms are likely compensatory in nature as decreased P450 expression is likely to attenuate toxicity associated with N-acetyl-p-quinoneimine (NAPQI) formation, whereas APAP-induced electron transport chain component upregulation may be an attempt to promote cellular bioenergetics. PMID:21329376

  7. The effect of propylene glycol on the P450-dependent metabolism of acetaminophen and other chemicals in subcellular fractions of mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Snawder, J.E.; Benson, R.W.; Leakey, J.E.A.; Roberts, D.W. )

    1993-01-01

    Propylene glycol (PG) decreases the hepatotoxicity of acetominophen (APAP). To elucidate the mechanism for this response, the authors measured the effect of PG on the in vitro metabolism of APAP by subcellular liver fractions from 6-10 week-old male B6C3F1 mice. The fractions were assayed for their ability to bioactivate APAP to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, which was trapped as APAP-glutathione conjugates or APAP-protein adducts, and for dimethyl-nitrosamine-N-demethylase (DMN), 4-nitrophenol hydroxylase (4-NPOH), and phenacetin-O-deethylase (PAD) activities. Activity in the crude mitochondrial-rich (10,000 [times] g pellet) fraction was low and PG had no effect. PG inhibited DMN and 4-NPOH, indicators of IIE1-dependent activity, and the formation of APAP-glutathione conjugates and APAP-protein adducts in both heavy (15,000 [times] g pellet) and light (100,000 [times] g pellet) microsomes. PAD, a measure of IA2-dependent activity, was not inhibited. These data demonstrate that PG selectively inhibits IIE1 activity, including the bioactivation of APAP, and implicates this as the mechanism for PG-mediated protection of APAP hepatotoxicity in mice. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Altered Regulation of Hepatic Efflux Transporters Disrupts Acetaminophen Disposition in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Canet, Mark J.; Merrell, Matthew D.; Hardwick, Rhiannon N.; Bataille, Amy M.; Campion, Sarah N.; Ferreira, Daniel W.; Xanthakos, Stavra A.; Manautou, Jose E.; Hesham A-Kader, H.; Erickson, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease, representing a spectrum of liver pathologies that include simple hepatic steatosis and the more advanced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The current study was conducted to determine whether pediatric NASH also results in altered disposition of acetaminophen (APAP) and its two primary metabolites, APAP-sulfate and APAP-glucuronide. Pediatric patients with hepatic steatosis (n = 9) or NASH (n = 3) and healthy patients (n = 12) were recruited in a small pilot study design. All patients received a single 1000-mg dose of APAP. Blood and urine samples were collected at 1, 2, and 4 hours postdose, and APAP and APAP metabolites were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Moreover, human liver tissues from patients diagnosed with various stages of NAFLD were acquired from the Liver Tissue Cell Distribution System to investigate the regulation of the membrane transporters, multidrug resistance–associated protein 2 and 3 (MRP2 and MRP3, respectively). Patients with the more severe disease (i.e., NASH) had increased serum and urinary levels of APAP-glucuronide along with decreased serum levels of APAP-sulfate. Moreover, an induction of hepatic MRP3 and altered canalicular localization of the biliary efflux transporter, MRP2, describes the likely mechanism for the observed increase in plasma retention of APAP-glucuronide, whereas altered regulation of sulfur activation genes may explain decreased sulfonation activity in NASH. APAP-glucuronide and APAP-sulfate disposition is altered in NASH and is likely due to hepatic membrane transporter dysregulation as well as altered intracellular sulfur activation. PMID:25788542

  9. Altered regulation of hepatic efflux transporters disrupts acetaminophen disposition in pediatric nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Canet, Mark J; Merrell, Matthew D; Hardwick, Rhiannon N; Bataille, Amy M; Campion, Sarah N; Ferreira, Daniel W; Xanthakos, Stavra A; Manautou, Jose E; A-Kader, H Hesham; Erickson, Robert P; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2015-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease, representing a spectrum of liver pathologies that include simple hepatic steatosis and the more advanced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The current study was conducted to determine whether pediatric NASH also results in altered disposition of acetaminophen (APAP) and its two primary metabolites, APAP-sulfate and APAP-glucuronide. Pediatric patients with hepatic steatosis (n = 9) or NASH (n = 3) and healthy patients (n = 12) were recruited in a small pilot study design. All patients received a single 1000-mg dose of APAP. Blood and urine samples were collected at 1, 2, and 4 hours postdose, and APAP and APAP metabolites were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Moreover, human liver tissues from patients diagnosed with various stages of NAFLD were acquired from the Liver Tissue Cell Distribution System to investigate the regulation of the membrane transporters, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 and 3 (MRP2 and MRP3, respectively). Patients with the more severe disease (i.e., NASH) had increased serum and urinary levels of APAP-glucuronide along with decreased serum levels of APAP-sulfate. Moreover, an induction of hepatic MRP3 and altered canalicular localization of the biliary efflux transporter, MRP2, describes the likely mechanism for the observed increase in plasma retention of APAP-glucuronide, whereas altered regulation of sulfur activation genes may explain decreased sulfonation activity in NASH. APAP-glucuronide and APAP-sulfate disposition is altered in NASH and is likely due to hepatic membrane transporter dysregulation as well as altered intracellular sulfur activation. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. Acute toxicity of mixture of acetaminophen and ibuprofen to Green Neon Shrimp, Neocaridina denticulate.

    PubMed

    Sung, Hung-Hung; Chiu, Yuh-Wen; Wang, Shu-Yin; Chen, Chien-Min; Huang, Da-Ji

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, numerous studies have indicated that various long-term use drugs, such as antibiotics or analgesics, not only cannot be completely decomposed via sewage treatment but also exhibit biological toxicity if they enter the environment; thus, the release of these drugs into the environment can damage ecological systems. This study sought to investigate the acute toxicity of two commonly utilized analgesics, ibuprofen (IBU) and acetaminophen (APAP), to aquatic organisms after these drugs have entered the water. To address this objective, the acute toxicity (median lethal concentration, LC₅₀, for a 96-h exposure) of IBU alone, APAP alone, and mixtures containing different ratios of IBU and APAP in green neon shrimp (Neocaridina denticulata) were measured. The results of four tests revealed that the 96-h LC₅₀ values for IBU and APAP alone were 6.07 mg/L and 6.60 mg/L, respectively. The 96-h LC₅₀ for a 1:1 mixture of IBU and APAP was 6.23 mg/L, and the toxicity of this mixture did not significantly differ from the toxicity of either drug alone (p<0.05). The experimental results for mixtures containing unequal ratios of IBU and APAP indicated that mixtures with high APAP concentrations and low IBU concentrations exhibited markedly greater toxicity in N. denticulata (LC₅₀=4.78 mg/L) than APAP or IBU alone. However, mixtures with high IBU concentrations and low APAP concentrations exhibited lower toxicity in N. denticulata (LC₅₀=6.78 mg/L) than IBU or APAP alone. This study demonstrated that different mixtures of IBU and APAP were associated with different toxic effects in green neon shrimp.

  11. Immunochemical quantitation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in serum and liver proteins of acetaminophen-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Pumford, N R; Hinson, J A; Potter, D W; Rowland, K L; Benson, R W; Roberts, D W

    1989-01-01

    Using a recently developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts we have quantitated the formation of these specific adducts in liver and serum protein of B6C3F1 male mice dosed with acetaminophen. Administration of acetaminophen at doses of 50, 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg to mice resulted in evidence of hepatotoxicity (increase in serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase) at 4 hr in the 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg treatment groups only. The formation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in liver protein was not observed in the groups receiving 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg doses, but was observed in the groups receiving doses above 300 mg/kg of acetaminophen. Greater levels of adduct formation were observed at the higher doses. 3-(Cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts were also observed in serum of mice receiving hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen. After a 400 mg/kg dose of acetaminophen, 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in the liver protein reached peak levels 2 hr after dosing. By 12 hr the levels decreased to approximately 10% of the peak level. In contrast, 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in serum protein were delayed, reaching a sustained peak 6 to 12 hr after dosing. The dose-response correlation between the appearance of serum aminotransferases and 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in serum protein and the temporal correlation between the decrease in 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in liver protein and the appearance of adducts in serum protein are consistent with a hepatic origin of the adducts detected in serum protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Prenatal acetaminophen affects maternal immune and endocrine adaptation to pregnancy, induces placental damage, and impairs fetal development in mice.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Kristin; Solano, M Emilia; Huber, Samuel; Flavell, Richard A; Kessler, Timo; Barikbin, Roja; Jung, Roman; Karimi, Khalil; Tiegs, Gisa; Arck, Petra C

    2015-10-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP; ie, Paracetamol or Tylenol) is generally self-medicated to treat fever or pain and recommended to pregnant women by their physicians. Recent epidemiological studies reveal an association between prenatal APAP use and an increased risk for asthma. Our aim was to identify the effects of APAP in pregnancy using a mouse model. Allogeneically mated C57Bl/6J females were injected i.p. with 50 or 250 mg/kg APAP or phosphate-buffered saline on gestation day 12.5; nonpregnant females served as controls. Tissue samples were obtained 1 or 4 days after injection. APAP-induced liver toxicity was mirrored by significantly increased plasma alanine aminotransferase levels. In uterus-draining lymph nodes of pregnant dams, the frequencies of mature dendritic cells and regulatory T cells significantly increased on 250 mg/kg APAP. Plasma progesterone levels significantly decreased in dams injected with APAP, accompanied by a morphologically altered placenta. Although overall litter sizes and number of fetal loss remained unaltered, a reduced fetal weight and a lower frequency of hematopoietic stem cells in the fetal liver were observed on APAP treatment. Our data provide strong evidence that prenatal APAP interferes with maternal immune and endocrine adaptation to pregnancy, affects placental function, and impairs fetal maturation and immune development. The latter may have long-lasting consequences on children's immunity and account for the increased risk for asthma observed in humans. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of sesame oil against after the onset of acetaminophen-induced acute hepatic injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Victor Raj Mohan; Chien, Se-Ping; Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chang, Yu-Chung; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2010-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a safe and effective analgesic and antipyretic when used at therapeutic levels. However, an acute or cumulative overdose can cause severe liver injury with the potential to progress to liver failure in humans and experimental animals. Much attention has been paid to the development of an antioxidant that protects against APAP-induced acute hepatic injury. Hence, we aimed to investigate the effect of sesame oil against after the onset of acute hepatic injury in APAP-overdosed rats. Male Wistar rats were first given 2 oral doses (1,000 mg/kg each) of APAP (at 0 and 24 hours) and then 1 oral dose of sesame oil (8 mL/kg at 24 hours). After 48 hours, APAP increased aspartate and alanine aminotransferase levels in the rats' serum and centrilobular necrosis in liver tissue. In addition, APAP significantly decreased the rats' glutathione levels and mitochondrial aconitase activity, but increased superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, and lipid peroxidation levels. Oral sesame oil (8 mL/kg, given at 24 hours) reversed all APAP-altered parameters and protected the rats against APAP-induced acute liver injury. We hypothesize that sesame oil acts as a useful agent that maintains intracellular glutathione levels and inhibits reactive oxygen species, thereby protecting rats against after the onset of APAP-induced acute oxidative liver injury.

  14. Pharmacological screening of glycine amino acid prodrug of acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Parashar, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To develop an amino acid prodrug of acetaminophen with comparable therapeutic profile and less hepatotoxicity than acetaminophen. Materials and Methods: Acetaminophen prodrug was synthesized by esterification between the carboxyl group of amino acid glycine and hydroxyl group of acetaminophen. Analgesic, antipyretic, ulcer healing, and hepatotoxic activities were performed on Wistar rats in this study. Results: Prodrug showed a 44% inhibition in writhings as compared to 53.3% of acetaminophen. Acetaminophen also offered highest antipyretic activity. Prodrug showed gastroprotective and hepatoprotective effects as it reduced the gastric lesions by 32.1% (P < 0.01) and significantly prevented the rise in liver enzymes (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase and bilirubin). The most notable effect of prodrug was in preventing the depletion of hepatic glutathione (GSH), which is reduced by acetaminophen. Conclusion: Prodrug showed hepatoprotective and gastroprotective effects, although the therapeutic efficacy was compromised. Prodrug was successful in preventing a decrease in GSH, thereby exhibiting promising results in the field of prodrug designing to avoid the toxic effects of acetaminophen. PMID:25878383

  15. Pharmacological screening of glycine amino acid prodrug of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Arun

    2015-01-01

    To develop an amino acid prodrug of acetaminophen with comparable therapeutic profile and less hepatotoxicity than acetaminophen. Acetaminophen prodrug was synthesized by esterification between the carboxyl group of amino acid glycine and hydroxyl group of acetaminophen. Analgesic, antipyretic, ulcer healing, and hepatotoxic activities were performed on Wistar rats in this study. Prodrug showed a 44% inhibition in writhings as compared to 53.3% of acetaminophen. Acetaminophen also offered highest antipyretic activity. Prodrug showed gastroprotective and hepatoprotective effects as it reduced the gastric lesions by 32.1% (P < 0.01) and significantly prevented the rise in liver enzymes (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase and bilirubin). The most notable effect of prodrug was in preventing the depletion of hepatic glutathione (GSH), which is reduced by acetaminophen. Prodrug showed hepatoprotective and gastroprotective effects, although the therapeutic efficacy was compromised. Prodrug was successful in preventing a decrease in GSH, thereby exhibiting promising results in the field of prodrug designing to avoid the toxic effects of acetaminophen.

  16. A perspective on the epidemiology of acetaminophen exposure and toxicity in the United States.

    PubMed

    Blieden, Marissa; Paramore, L Clark; Shah, Dhvani; Ben-Joseph, Rami

    2014-05-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly-used analgesic in the US and, at doses of more than 4 g/day, can lead to serious hepatotoxicity. Recent FDA and CMS decisions serve to limit and monitor exposure to high-dose acetaminophen. This literature review aims to describe the exposure to and consequences of high-dose acetaminophen among chronic pain patients in the US. Each year in the US, approximately 6% of adults are prescribed acetaminophen doses of more than 4 g/day and 30,000 patients are hospitalized for acetaminophen toxicity. Up to half of acetaminophen overdoses are unintentional, largely related to opioid-acetaminophen combinations and attempts to achieve better symptom relief. Liver injury occurs in 17% of adults with unintentional acetaminophen overdose.

  17. Hepatoprotective effects of rice-derived peptides against acetaminophen-induced damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Kayoko; Moritani, Chie; Uraji, Misugi; Fujita, Akiko; Kawakami, Koji; Hatanaka, Tadashi; Suzaki, Etsuko; Tsuboi, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Glutathione, the most abundant intracellular antioxidant, protects cells against reactive oxygen species induced oxidative stress and regulates intracellular redox status. We found that rice peptides increased intracellular glutathione levels in human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells. Acetaminophen is a commonly used analgesic. However, an overdose of acetaminophen causes severe hepatotoxicity via depletion of hepatic glutathione. Here, we investigated the protective effects of rice peptides on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. ICR mice were orally administered rice peptides (0, 100 or 500 mg/kg) for seven days, followed by the induction of hepatotoxicity via intraperitoneal injection of acetaminophen (700 mg/kg). Pretreatment with rice peptides significantly prevented increases in serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase levels and protected against hepatic glutathione depletion. The expression of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, a key regulatory enzyme in the synthesis of glutathione, was decreased by treatment with acetaminophen, albeit rice peptides treatment recovered its expression compared to that achieved treatment with acetaminophen. In addition, histopathological evaluation of the livers also revealed that rice peptides prevented acetaminophen-induced centrilobular necrosis. These results suggest that rice peptides increased intracellular glutathione levels and could protect against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

  18. Acetaminophen Modulates the Transcriptional Response to Recombinant Interferon-β

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Aaron; Flaman, Anathea S.; Prasad, Shiv S.; Gravel, Caroline; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole L.; Li, Xuguang

    2010-01-01

    Background Recombinant interferon treatment can result in several common side effects including fever and injection-site pain. Patients are often advised to use acetaminophen or other over-the-counter pain medications as needed. Little is known regarding the transcriptional changes induced by such co-administration. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested whether the administration of acetaminophen causes a change in the response normally induced by interferon-β treatment. CD-1 mice were administered acetaminophen (APAP), interferon-β (IFN-β) or a combination of IFN-β+APAP and liver and serum samples were collected for analysis. Differential gene expression was determined using an Agilent 22 k whole mouse genome microarray. Data were analyzed by several methods including Gene Ontology term clustering and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. We observed a significant change in the transcription profile of hepatic cells when APAP was co-administered with IFN-β. These transcriptional changes included a marked up-regulation of genes involved in signal transduction and cell differentiation and down-regulation of genes involved in cellular metabolism, trafficking and the IκBK/NF-κB cascade. Additionally, we observed a large decrease in the expression of several IFN-induced genes including Ifit-3, Isg-15, Oasl1, Zbp1 and predicted gene EG634650 at both early and late time points. Conclusions/Significance A significant change in the transcriptional response was observed following co-administration of IFN-β+APAP relative to IFN-β treatment alone. These results suggest that administration of acetaminophen has the potential to modify the efficacy of IFN-β treatment. PMID:20544007

  19. In vivo N-acetyl cysteine reduce hepatocyte death by induced acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Ju; Li, Feng-Chieh; Wang, Sheng-Shun; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2011-07-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is the famous drug in global, and taking overdose Acetaminophen will intake hepatic cell injure. Desptie substantial progress in our understanding of the mechanism of hepatocellular injury during the last 40 years, many aspects of the pathophysiology are still unknown or controversial.1 In this study, mice are injected APAP overdose to damage hepatocyte. APAP deplete glutathione and ATP of cell, N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) plays an important role to protect hepatocytes be injury. N-Acetyl Cysteine provides mitochondrial to produce glutathione to release drug effect hepatocyte. By 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (6-CFDA) metabolism in vivo, glutathione keep depleting to observe the hepatocyte morphology in time. Without NAC, cell necrosis increase to plasma membrane damage to release 6-CFDA, that's rupture. After 6-CFDA injection, fluorescence will be retained in hepatocyte. For cell retain with NAC and without NAC are almost the same. With NAC, the number of cell rupture decreases about 75%.

  20. Studies of acetaminophen and metabolites in urine and their correlations with toxicity using metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinchun; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Beger, Richard D

    2009-08-01

    A LC/MS-based metabolomic assay was utilized to investigate a drug's excretion kinetic profile in urine so that the drug toxicity information could be obtained. Groups of 10 male Sprague-Dawley rats per dose were orally gavaged with a single dose of 0.2% carboxymethylcellulose, 400 mg acetaminophen (APAP)/kg body weight or 1600 mg APAP/kg. UPLC/MS and NMR were used to evaluate the excretion kinetics of major drug metabolites. N-acetyl-L-cysteine acetaminophen (APAP-NAC) had statistically significant correlations with clinical chemistry data, endogenous metabolite concentrations and histopathology data. The potential toxicity of a drug can be assessed through the study of the drug's metabolite profiles.

  1. Effects of administration of subtoxic doses of acetaminophen on liver and blood levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Durgul; Aksu, Ilkay; Baykara, Basak; Ates, Mehmet; Sisman, Ali Riza; Kiray, Muge; Buyuk, Arzu; Uysal, Nazan

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is widely used in the treatment of pain. Toxic doses of APAP cause acute liver failure, but therapeutic doses are believed to be safe. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of administration of subtoxic doses of APAP on liver and blood levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in rats. Low dose (100 mg/kg) and high dose (250 mg/kg) of APAP were intraperitoneally injected into Wistar albino rats. Following administration of therapeutic doses of APAP, there were no significant changes in serum transaminases and liver glutathione levels. Both doses of APAP induced a decrease in liver and blood levels of IGF-1 when compared with the controls. There was no significant difference in liver IGF-1 levels between the high-dose and low-dose APAP groups; however, there was a significant difference in blood IGF-1 levels between both the groups. The histological examination showed that low dose of APAP induced mild degree of structural change, while high dose of APAP induced severe structural damage. In conclusion, these results suggest that blood IGF-1 levels may have a value in predicting hepatic damage resulting from therapeutic doses of APAP. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. Crystallization of poly(ethylene oxide) with acetaminophen--a study on solubility, spherulitic growth, and morphology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Gogos, Costas

    2013-11-01

    A simple, sensitive, efficient, and novel method analyzing the number of spherulitic nuclei was proposed to estimate the solubility of a model drug acetaminophen (APAP) in poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). At high crystallization temperature (323 K), 10% APAP-PEO had the same low number of spherulitic nuclei as pure PEO, indicating that APAP and PEO were fully miscible. At low crystallization temperature (303 K), the number of nuclei for 10% APAP-PEO was significantly higher, suggesting that APAP was oversaturated and therefore recrystallized and acted as a nucleating agent. Based on the results obtained, the solubility of APAP in PEO is possibly between the concentration of 0.1% and 1% at 303 K. The spherulitic growth rate G of PEO was found to decrease with increasing APAP concentration, suggesting that APAP is most likely functioning as a chemical defect and is either rejected from or included in the PEO crystals during chain folding. APAP could possibly locate in the inter-spherulitic, inter-fibrillar, inter-lamellar, or intra-lamellar regions of PEO. At 323 K, the morphology of 10% APA