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Sample records for acetaminophen apap-induced hepatotoxicity

  1. Biochemical mechanism of Acetaminophen (APAP) induced toxicity in melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Vad, Nikhil M.; Yount, Garret; Moore, Dan; Weidanz, Jon; Moridani, Majid Y.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the biochemical mechanism of acetaminophen (APAP) induced toxicity in SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells using tyrosinase enzyme as a molecular cancer therapeutic target. Our results showed that APAP was metabolized 87% by tyrosinase at 2h incubation. AA and NADH, quinone reducing agents, were significantly depleted during APAP oxidation by tyrosinase. The IC50 (48h) of APAP towards SK-MEL-28, MeWo, SK-MEL-5, B16-F0 and B16-F10 melanoma cells was 100μM whereas it showed no significant toxicity towards BJ, Saos-2, SW-620, and PC-3 non-melanoma cells, demonstrating selective toxicity towards melanoma cells. Dicoumarol, a diaphorase inhibitor, and 1-bromoheptane, a GSH depleting agent, enhanced APAP toxicity towards SK-MEL-28 cells. AA and GSH were effective in preventing APAP induced melanoma cell toxicity. Trifluoperazine and cyclosporin A, inhibitors of permeability transition pore in mitochondria, significantly prevented APAP melanoma cell toxicity. APAP caused time and dose-dependent decline in intracellular GSH content in SK-MEL-28, which preceded cell toxicity. APAP led to ROS formation in SK-MEL-28 cells which was exacerbated by dicoumarol and 1-bromoheptane whereas cyslosporin A and trifluoperazine prevented it. Our investigation suggests that APAP is a tyrosinase substrate, and that intracellular GSH depletion, ROS formation and induced mitochondrial toxicity contributed towards APAP's selective toxicity in SK-MEL-28 cells. PMID:18759348

  2. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, a microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin, attenuates acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury through activation of Nrf-2.

    PubMed

    Xue, Huiting; Xie, Wenyan; Jiang, Zhihui; Wang, Meng; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Hongqiong; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-10-01

    1. Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose leads to severe hepatotoxicity. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) is a scarcely studied microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effect of DOPAC against APAP-induced liver injury. 2. Mice were treated intragastrically with DOPAC (10, 20 or 50 mg/kg) for 3 days before APAP (300 mg/kg) injection. APAP alone caused increase in serum aminotransferase levels and changes in hepatic histopathology. APAP also promoted oxidative stress by increasing lipid peroxidation and decreasing anti-oxidant enzyme activities. These events led to hepatocellular necrosis and reduced liver function. DOPAC increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) translocation to the nucleus and enhanced the expression of phase II enzymes and anti-oxidant enzymes, and thereby reduced APAP hepatotoxicity and enhanced anti-oxidant ability. 3. Our data provide evidence that DOPAC protected the liver against APAP-induced injury, which is involved in Nrf-2 activation, implying that DOPAC can be considered as a potential natural hepatoprotective agent. PMID:26931552

  3. 5-Lipoxygenase Deficiency Reduces Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity and Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Miriam S. N.; Cardoso, Renato D. R.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Crespigio, Jefferson; Cunha, Thiago M.; Alves-Filho, José C.; da Silva, Rosiane V.; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2013-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) converts arachidonic acid into leukotrienes (LTs) and is involved in inflammation. At present, the participation of 5-LO in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity and liver damage has not been addressed. 5-LO deficient (5-LO−/−) mice and background wild type mice were challenged with APAP (0.3–6 g/kg) or saline. The lethality, liver damage, neutrophil and macrophage recruitment, LTB4, cytokine production, and oxidative stress were assessed. APAP induced a dose-dependent mortality, and the dose of 3 g/kg was selected for next experiments. APAP induced LTB4 production in the liver, the primary target organ in APAP toxicity. Histopathological analysis revealed that 5-LO−/− mice presented reduced APAP-induced liver necrosis and inflammation compared with WT mice. APAP-induced lethality, increase of plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, liver cytokine (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-10), superoxide anion, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances production, myeloperoxidase and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activity, Nrf2 and gp91phox mRNA expression, and decrease of reduced glutathione and antioxidant capacity measured by 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline 6-sulfonate) assay were prevented in 5-LO−/− mice compared to WT mice. Therefore, 5-LO deficiency resulted in reduced mortality due to reduced liver inflammatory and oxidative damage, suggesting 5-LO is a promising target to reduce APAP-induced lethality and liver inflammatory/oxidative damage. PMID:24288682

  4. Attenuating Oxidative Stress by Paeonol Protected against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuning; Deng, Yue; Zhi, Feng; Qian, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether paeonol protected against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Mice treated with paeonol (25, 50, 100 mg/kg) received 400 mg/kg acetaminophen intraperitoneally (i.p.) and hepatotoxicity was assessed. Pre-treatment with paeonol for 6 and 24 h ameliorated APAP-induced hepatic necrosis and significantly reduced the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels in a dose-dependent manner. Post-treatment with 100 mg/kg paeonol ameliorated APAP-induced hepatic necrosis and reduced AST and ALT levels in the serum after APAP administration for 24 h. Western blot revealed that paeonol inhibited APAP-induced phosphorylated JNK protein expression but not p38 and Erk1/2. Moreover, paeonol showed anti-oxidant activities with reducing hepatic MDA contents and increasing hepatic SOD, GSH-PX and GSH levels. Paeonol dose-dependently prevented against H2O2 or APAP-induced LDH releasing and ROS production in primary mouse hepatocytes. In addition, the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory genes such as TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-1β and IL-6 in the liver were dose-dependently reduced by paeonol pre-treatment. Pre-treatment with paeonol significantly inhibited IKKα/β, IκBα and p65 phosphorylation which contributed to ameliorating APAP-induced hepatic inflammation. Collectively, the present study demonstrates paeonol has a protective ability against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity and might be an effective candidate compound against drug-induced acute liver failure. PMID:27144271

  5. Carnosic acid protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by potentiating Nrf2-mediated antioxidant capacity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qi; Shen, Zhiyang; Yu, Hongxia; Lu, Gaofeng; Yu, Yong; Liu, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is one of the most common causes of acute liver failure. The study aimed to investigate the protective effect of carnosic acid (CA) on APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity and its underlying mechanism in mice. To induce hepatotoxicity, APAP solution (400 mg/kg) was administered into mice by intraperitoneal injection. Histological analysis revealed that CA treatment significantly ameliorated APAP-induced hepatic necrosis. The levels of both alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) in serum were reduced by CA treatment. Moreover, CA treatment significantly inhibited APAP-induced hepatocytes necrosis and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) releasing. Western blot analysis showed that CA abrogated APAP-induced cleaved caspase-3, Bax and phosphorylated JNK protein expression. Further results showed that CA treatment markedly inhibited APAP-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and MCP-1 mRNA expression and the levels of phosphorylated IκBα and p65 protein in the liver. In addition, CA treatment reduced APAP- induced hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) contents and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Conversely, hepatic glutathione (GSH) level was increased by administration of CA in APAP-treated mice. Mechanistically, CA facilitated Nrf2 translocation into nuclear through blocking the interaction between Nrf2 and Keap1, which, in turn, upregulated anti-oxidant genes mRNA expression. Taken together, our results indicate that CA facilitates Nrf2 nuclear translocation, causing induction of Nrf2-dependent genes, which contributes to protection from acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. PMID:26807019

  6. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Sensitizes To Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Impairing Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Baulies, Anna; Ribas, Vicent; Núñez, Susana; Torres, Sandra; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Martínez, Laura; Suda, Jo; Ybanez, Maria D.; Kaplowitz, Neil; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, Jose C.

    2015-01-01

    The role of lysosomes in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the impact of genetic and drug-induced lysosomal cholesterol (LC) accumulation in APAP hepatotoxicity. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)−/− mice exhibit LC accumulation and higher mortality after APAP overdose compared to ASMase+/+ littermates. ASMase−/− hepatocytes display lower threshold for APAP-induced cell death and defective fusion of mitochondria-containing autophagosomes with lysosomes, which decreased mitochondrial quality control. LC accumulation in ASMase+/+ hepatocytes caused by U18666A reproduces the susceptibility of ASMase−/− hepatocytes to APAP and the impairment in the formation of mitochondria-containing autolysosomes. LC extraction by 25-hydroxycholesterol increased APAP-mediated mitophagy and protected ASMase−/− mice and hepatocytes against APAP hepatotoxicity, effects that were reversed by chloroquine to disrupt autophagy. The regulation of LC by U18666A or 25-hydroxycholesterol did not affect total cellular sphingomyelin content or its lysosomal distribution. Of relevance, amitriptyline-induced ASMase inhibition in human hepatocytes caused LC accumulation, impaired mitophagy and increased susceptibility to APAP. Similar results were observed upon glucocerebrosidase inhibition by conduritol β-epoxide, a cellular model of Gaucher disease. These findings indicate that LC accumulation determines susceptibility to APAP hepatotoxicity by modulating mitophagy, and imply that genetic or drug-mediated ASMase disruption sensitizes to APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:26657973

  7. A Novel Resolvin-Based Strategy for Limiting Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Suraj J; Luther, Jay; Bohr, Stefan; Iracheta-Vellve, Arvin; Li, Matthew; King, Kevin R; Chung, Raymond T; Yarmush, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The current pharmacologic treatment for APAP hepatotoxicity, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), targets the initial metabolite-driven injury but does not directly affect the host inflammatory response. Because of this, NAC is less effective if given at later stages in the disease course. Resolvins, a novel group of lipid mediators shown to attenuate host inflammation, may be a therapeutic intervention for APAP hepatotoxicity. Methods: The temporal patterns of liver injury and neutrophil activation were investigated in a murine model of APAP hepatotoxicity. In addition, the effect of neutrophil depletion and resolvin administration on the severity of liver injury induced by APAP was studied. In vitro studies to investigate the mechanism of resolvin effect on hepatocyte injury and neutrophil adhesion were performed. Results: We demonstrate that hepatic neutrophil activation occurs secondary to the initial liver injury induced directly by APAP. We also show that neutrophil depletion attenuates APAP-induced liver injury, and administration of resolvins hours after APAP challenge not only attenuates liver injury, but also extends the therapeutic window eightfold compared to NAC. Mechanistic in vitro analysis highlights resolvins' ability to inhibit neutrophil attachment to endothelial cells in the presence of the reactive metabolite of APAP. Conclusions: This study highlights the ability of resolvins to protect against APAP-induced liver injury and extend the therapeutic window compared to NAC. Although the mechanism for resolvin-mediated hepatoprotection is likely multifactorial, inhibition of neutrophil infiltration and activation appears to play an important role. PMID:26986653

  8. Protective effects of 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    He, Yue-Ying; Zhang, Bao-Xu; Jia, Feng-Lan

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone (BP-1), a benzophenone derivative used as an ultraviolet light absorbent, on acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6J mice. METHODS: Mice were administered orally with BP-1 at doses of 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg body weight respectively every morning for 4 d before a hepatotoxic dose of APAP (350 mg/kg body weight) was given subcutaneously. Twenty four hours after APAP intoxication, the serum enzyme including serum alaine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured and liver histopathologic changes were examined. RESULTS: BP-1 administration dramatically reduced serum ALT, AST and LDH levels. Liver histopathological examination showed that BP-1 administration antagonized APAP-induced liver pathological damage in a dose-dependent manner. Further tests showed that APAP-induced hepatic lipid peroxidation was reduced significantly by BP-1 pretreatment, and glutathione depletion was ameliorated obviously. CONCLUSION: BP-1 can effectively protect C57BL/6J mice from APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, and reduction of oxidative stress might be part of the protection mechanism. PMID:21677837

  9. Protective effects of silymarin against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Bektur, Nuriye Ezgi; Sahin, Erhan; Baycu, Cengiz; Unver, Gonul

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to estimate protective effects of silymarin on acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, paracetamol; APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in mice. Treatment of mice with overdose of APAP resulted in the elevation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and serum creatinine (SCr) levels in serum, liver, and kidney nitric oxide (NO) levels and significant histological changes including decreased body weight, swelling of hepatocytes, cell infiltration, dilatation and congestion, necrosis and apoptosis in liver, and dilatation of Bowman's capsular space and glomerular capillaries, pale-stained tubules epithelium, cell infiltration, and apoptosis in kidney. Posttreatment with silymarin 1 h after APAP injectionfor 7 days, however, significantly normalized the body weight, histological damage, serum ALT, AST, BUN, SCr, and tissue NO levels. Our observation suggested that silymarin ameliorated the toxic effects of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in mice. The protective role of silymarin against APAP-induced damages might result from its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:24193058

  10. BLT1 signalling protects the liver against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by preventing excessive accumulation of hepatic neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Kojo, Ken; Ito, Yoshiya; Eshima, Koji; Nishizawa, Nobuyuki; Ohkubo, Hirotoki; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Shimizu, Takao; Watanabe, Masahiko; Majima, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a potent chemoattractant for neutrophils. Signalling of LTB4 receptor type 1 (BLT1) has pro-inflammatory functions through neutrophil recruitment. In this study, we investigated whether BLT1 signalling plays a role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury by affecting inflammatory responses including the accumulation of hepatic neutrophils. BLT1-knockout (BLT1−/−) mice and their wild-type (WT) counterparts were subjected to a single APAP overdose (300 mg/kg), and various parameters compared within 24 h after treatment. Compared with WT mice, BLT1−/− mice exhibited exacerbation of APAP-induced liver injury as evidenced by enhancement of alanine aminotransferase level, necrotic area, hepatic neutrophil accumulation, and expression of cytokines and chemokines. WT mice co-treated with APAP and ONO-0457, a specific antagonist for BLT1, displayed amplification of the injury, and similar results to those observed in BLT1−/− mice. Hepatic neutrophils in BLT1−/− mice during APAP hepatotoxicity showed increases in the production of reactive oxygen species and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Administration of isolated BLT1-deficient neutrophils into WT mice aggravated the liver injury elicited by APAP. These results demonstrate that BLT1 signalling dampens the progression of APAP hepatotoxicity through inhibiting an excessive accumulation of activated neutrophils. The development of a specific agonist for BLT1 could be useful for the prevention of APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:27404729

  11. BLT1 signalling protects the liver against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by preventing excessive accumulation of hepatic neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kojo, Ken; Ito, Yoshiya; Eshima, Koji; Nishizawa, Nobuyuki; Ohkubo, Hirotoki; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Shimizu, Takao; Watanabe, Masahiko; Majima, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a potent chemoattractant for neutrophils. Signalling of LTB4 receptor type 1 (BLT1) has pro-inflammatory functions through neutrophil recruitment. In this study, we investigated whether BLT1 signalling plays a role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury by affecting inflammatory responses including the accumulation of hepatic neutrophils. BLT1-knockout (BLT1(-/-)) mice and their wild-type (WT) counterparts were subjected to a single APAP overdose (300 mg/kg), and various parameters compared within 24 h after treatment. Compared with WT mice, BLT1(-/-) mice exhibited exacerbation of APAP-induced liver injury as evidenced by enhancement of alanine aminotransferase level, necrotic area, hepatic neutrophil accumulation, and expression of cytokines and chemokines. WT mice co-treated with APAP and ONO-0457, a specific antagonist for BLT1, displayed amplification of the injury, and similar results to those observed in BLT1(-/-) mice. Hepatic neutrophils in BLT1(-/-) mice during APAP hepatotoxicity showed increases in the production of reactive oxygen species and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Administration of isolated BLT1-deficient neutrophils into WT mice aggravated the liver injury elicited by APAP. These results demonstrate that BLT1 signalling dampens the progression of APAP hepatotoxicity through inhibiting an excessive accumulation of activated neutrophils. The development of a specific agonist for BLT1 could be useful for the prevention of APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:27404729

  12. Role of neutrophils in hepatotoxicity induced by oral acetaminophen administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, G S; Nadig, D E; Kokoska, E R; Solomon, H; Tiniakos, D G; Miller, T A

    1998-12-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a common analgesic and antipyretic compound which, when administered in high doses, has been associated with significant morbidity and mortality, secondary to hepatic toxicity. To date, the mechanism(s) whereby APAP induces liver injury remains to be delineated. This study investigated the potential role of neutrophils as contributors to liver injury in rats administered sublethal doses of APAP. Oral APAP administration (650 mg/kg) was associated with increases in serum alanine transaminase (ALT) levels indicating biochemical evidence of significant liver damage. Furthermore, histological analyses verified significant hepatocellular necrosis as well as enhanced myeloperoxidase staining in these liver specimens. However, if animals were pretreated with antineutrophil sera prior to APAP administration, neutrophil counts remained depressed, ALT levels were significantly decreased, and the degree of liver injury was attenuated on a histological level. Taken together these data suggest that neutrophils mediate, at least in part, the hepatotoxic effects of oral acetaminophen administration in rats. PMID:9878321

  13. Aconitum carmichaelii protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity via B-cell lymphoma-2 protein-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Park, Gunhyuk; Kim, Ki Mo; Choi, Songie; Oh, Dal-Seok

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported the clinical profile of processed Aconitum carmichaelii (AC, Aconibal(®)), which included inhibition of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 activity in healthy male adults. CYP2E1 is recognized as the enzyme that initiates the cascade of events leading to acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxicity. However, no studies have characterized its role in APAP-induced hepatic injury. Here, we investigated the protective effects of AC on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity via mitochondrial dysfunction. AC (5-500μg/mL) significantly inhibited APAP-induced reduction of glutathione. In addition, AC decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein levels (% change 46.63) in mitochondria. Moreover, it increased Bcl-2 (% change 55.39) and cytochrome C levels (% change 38.33) in mitochondria, measured using immunofluorescence or a commercial kit. Furthermore, cell membrane integrity was preserved and nuclear fragmentation inhibited by AC. These results demonstrate that AC protects hepatocytes against APAP-induced toxicity by inhibiting mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26895385

  14. Metabolomics evaluation of the effects of green tea extract on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yihong; Sun, Jinchun; Petrova, Katya; Yang, Xi; Greenhaw, James; Salminen, William F; Beger, Richard D; Schnackenberg, Laura K

    2013-12-01

    Green tea has been purported to have beneficial health effects including protective effects against oxidative stress. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic drug that can cause acute liver injury in overdose situations. These studies explored the effects of green tea extract (GTE) on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in liver tissue extracts using ultra performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mice were orally administered GTE, APAP or GTE and APAP under three scenarios. APAP alone caused a high degree of hepatocyte necrosis associated with increases in serum transaminases and alterations in multiple metabolic pathways. The time of GTE oral administration relative to APAP either protected against or potentiated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Dose dependent decreases in histopathology scores and serum transaminases were noted when GTE was administered prior to APAP; whereas, the opposite occurred when GTE was administered after APAP. Similarly, metabolites altered by APAP alone were less changed when GTE was given prior to APAP. Significantly altered pathways included fatty acid metabolism, glycerophospholipid metabolism, glutathione metabolism, and energy pathways. These studies demonstrate the complex interaction between GTE and APAP and the need to employ novel analytical strategies to understand the effects of dietary supplements on pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:24080264

  15. Therapeutic efficacy of Wuzhi tablet (Schisandra sphenanthera Extract) on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity through a mechanism distinct from N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaomei; Chen, Pan; Jiang, Yiming; Wang, Ying; Tan, Huasen; Zeng, Hang; Wang, Yongtao; Qu, Aijuan; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2015-03-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the most common cause of drug-induced liver injury and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is the primary antidote of APAP poisoning. Wuzhi tablet (WZ), the active constituents well identified and quantified, is a preparation of an ethanol extract of Schisandra sphenanthera and exerts a protective effect toward APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. However, the clinical use of WZ to rescue APAP-induced acute liver injury and the mechanisms involved in the therapeutic effect of WZ remain unclear. Therefore, the effect of WZ on APAP hepatotoxicity was compared with NAC in mice, and molecular pathways contributing to its therapeutic action were investigated. Administration of WZ 4 hours after APAP treatment significantly attenuated APAP hepatotoxicity and exerted much better therapeutic effect than NAC, as revealed by morphologic, histologic, and biochemical assessments. Both WZ and NAC prevented APAP-induced c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase activation and mitochondrial glutathione depletion in livers. The protein expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 target genes including Gclc, Gclm, Ho-1, and Nqo1 was increased by WZ administration. Furthermore, p53 and p21 levels were upregulated upon APAP exposure, which were completely reversed by postdosing of WZ 4 hours after APAP treatment over 48 hours. In comparison with NAC, WZ significantly increased the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D-dependent kinase 4, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and augmenter of liver regeneration in APAP-injured livers. This study demonstrated that WZ possessed a therapeutic efficacy against APAP-induced liver injury by inhibiting oxidative stress and stimulating a regenerative response after liver injury. Thus WZ may represent a new therapy for APAP-induced acute liver injury. PMID:25534769

  16. Direct Protection Against Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Propylthiouracil

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tadataka; Ludwig, Shelly; Kuhlenkamp, John; Kaplowitz, Neil

    1981-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity caused by acetaminophen can be prevented by enzyme-catalyzed conjugation of its reactive metabolite with glutathione (GSH). Since we have shown in previous studies that 6-N-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) can substitute for GSH as a substrate for the GSH S-transferases, we examined the possibility that PTU might also protect against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by direct chemical interaction with the reactive metabolite of acetaminophen. In an in vitro system consisting of [3H]acetaminophen, liver microsomes from phenobarbital-pretreated rats, and an NADPH-generating system, we found that PTU had a dose-dependent additive effect with GSH on inhibition of acetaminophen covalent binding. PTU administration also resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in both GSH depletion and covalent binding in vivo in acetaminophen-treated mice. To examine the possible mechanisms by which PTU exerts its protective effect, we studied the action of PTU on both acetaminophen conjugation and metabolic activation. PTU had no effect upon acetaminophen pharmacokinetics in phenobarbital-pretreated rats, as examined by measuring acetaminophen concentration in bile, urine, and blood after an intraperitoneal dose, nor did it alter the total amount of polar conjugates formed. Microsomes from PTU-treated rats were unaltered in cytochrome P-450 concentrations and p-nitroanisole-O-demethylase, benzo-α-pyrene hydroxylase, and cytochrome c-reductase activities. Furthermore PTU did not decrease acetaminophen-GSH adduct formation in vitro, suggesting that there was no reduction in drug activation. However, in bile from [35S]PTU and [3H]acetaminophen treated rats, as well as in incubates of the two drugs with liver microsomes, a new 35S- and 3H-containing product could be identified. By both thin layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography this new product, which co-eluted with [3H]acetaminophen, was separated from unreacted [35S]PTU. The formation of this product in vitro was

  17. Comparative evaluation of N-acetylcysteine and N-acetylcysteineamide in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in human hepatoma HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Tobwala, Shakila; Khayyat, Ahdab; Fan, Weili; Ercal, Nuran

    2015-02-01

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP) is one of the most widely used over-the-counter antipyretic analgesic medications. Despite being safe at therapeutic doses, an accidental or intentional overdose can result in severe hepatotoxicity; a leading cause of drug-induced liver failure in the U.S. Depletion of glutathione (GSH) is implicated as an initiating event in APAP-induced toxicity. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a GSH precursor, is the only currently approved antidote for an APAP overdose. Unfortunately, fairly high doses and longer treatment times are required due to its poor bioavailability. In addition, oral and intravenous administration of NAC in a hospital setting are laborious and costly. Therefore, we studied the protective effects of N-acetylcysteineamide (NACA), a novel antioxidant, with higher bioavailability and compared it with NAC in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in a human-relevant in vitro system, HepaRG. Our results indicated that exposure of HepaRG cells to APAP resulted in GSH depletion, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, increased lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial dysfunction (assessed by JC-1 fluorescence), and lactate dehydrogenase release. Both NAC and NACA protected against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity by restoring GSH levels, scavenging ROS, inhibiting lipid peroxidation, and preserving mitochondrial membrane potential. However, NACA was better than NAC at combating oxidative stress and protecting against APAP-induced damage. The higher efficiency of NACA in protecting cells against APAP-induced toxicity suggests that NACA can be developed into a promising therapeutic option for treatment of an APAP overdose. PMID:25245075

  18. Effect of S-methylisothiourea in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rat.

    PubMed

    More, Amar S; Kumari, Rashmi R; Gupta, Gaurav; Kathirvel, Kandasamy; Lonare, Milindmitra K; Dhayagude, Rohini S; Kumar, Dhirendra; Kumar, Dinesh; Sharma, Anil K; Tandan, Surendra K

    2012-11-01

    Nitric oxide synthesized from inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver damage. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of iNOS inhibitor S-methylisothiourea (SMT) in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in rats (1 g/kg, i.p.). SMT was (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg; i.p.) given 30 min before and 3 h after APAP administration. At 6 and 24 h, blood was collected to measure alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and nitrate plus nitrite (NOx) levels in serum. At 48 h, animals were sacrificed, and blood and liver tissues were collected for biochemical estimation. SMT reduced significantly the serum ALT, AST, and NOx levels at 24 and 48 h and liver NOx levels at 48 h as compared with APAP-treated control. The amount of peroxynitrite measured by rhodamine assay was significantly reduced by SMT, as compared with APAP-treated control group. SMT treatment (30 mg/kg) has significantly reduced the lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl levels, increased SOD and catalase, and reduced glutathione and total thiol levels significantly as compared with APAP-treated control. SMT 30 mg/kg dose has protected animals from APAP-induced hypotension and reduced iNOS gene expression. Hepatocytes were isolated from animals, and effect of SMT on apoptosis, MTP, and ROS generation was studied, and their increased value in APAP intoxicated group was found to be significantly decreased by SMT (30 mg/kg) at 24 and 48 h. In conclusion, nitric oxide produced from iNOS plays important role in toxicity at late hours (24 to 48 h), and SMT inhibits iNOS and reduces oxidative and nitrosative stress. PMID:22885820

  19. Herbal extracts as hepatoprotectants against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Hartmut; Williams, C David; McGill, Mitchell R; Farhood, Anwar

    2010-05-21

    Many plant-derived natural products have the potential to be hepatoprotective and therefore can be used to treat acute and chronic liver diseases. The challenge is to identify the most promising compounds and evaluate their protective mechanism. In a recently published article, Wang et al evaluated extracts of the plant Gentiana manshurica Kitagawa (GM) in a model of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. The authors concluded that GM is hepatoprotective against acetaminophen-induced liver injury due to its antioxidant properties and anti-apoptotic capacity. We would like to discuss the limitations of this experimental approach and question the conclusion based on the data presented in this manuscript and the published literature. PMID:20480535

  20. Herbal extracts as hepatoprotectants against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Jaeschke, Hartmut; Williams, C David; McGill, Mitchell R; Farhood, Anwar

    2010-01-01

    Many plant-derived natural products have the potential to be hepatoprotective and therefore can be used to treat acute and chronic liver diseases. The challenge is to identify the most promising compounds and evaluate their protective mechanism. In a recently published article, Wang et al evaluated extracts of the plant Gentiana manshurica Kitagawa (GM) in a model of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. The authors concluded that GM is hepatoprotective against acetaminophen-induced liver injury due to its antioxidant properties and anti-apoptotic capacity. We would like to discuss the limitations of this experimental approach and question the conclusion based on the data presented in this manuscript and the published literature. PMID:20480535

  1. Schisandrol B protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibition of CYP-mediated bioactivation and regulation of liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiming; Fan, Xiaomei; Wang, Ying; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Tan, Huasen; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. Schisandra sphenanthera is a traditional hepato-protective Chinese medicine and Schisandrol B (SolB) is one of its major active constituents. In this study, the protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice and the involved mechanisms were investigated. Morphological and biochemical assessments clearly demonstrated a protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced liver injury. SolB pretreatment significantly attenuated the increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity, and prevented elevated hepatic malondialdehyde formation and the depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) in a dose-dependent manner. SolB also dramatically altered APAP metabolic activation by inhibiting the activities of CYP2E1 and CYP3A11, which was evidenced by significant inhibition of the formation of the oxidized APAP metabolite NAPQI-GSH. A molecular docking model also predicted that SolB had potential to interact with the CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 active sites. In addition, SolB abrogated APAP-induced activation of p53 and p21, and increased expression of liver regeneration and antiapoptotic-related proteins such as cyclin D1 (CCND1), PCNA, and BCL-2. This study demonstrated that SolB exhibited a significant protective effect toward APAP-induced liver injury, potentially through inhibition of CYP-mediated APAP bioactivation and regulation of the p53, p21, CCND1, PCNA, and BCL-2 to promote liver regeneration. PMID:25319358

  2. Schisandrol B Protects Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity by Inhibition of CYP-Mediated Bioactivation and Regulation of Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yiming; Fan, Xiaomei; Wang, Ying; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Tan, Huasen; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Bi, Huichang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. Schisandra sphenanthera is a traditional hepato-protective Chinese medicine and Schisandrol B (SolB) is one of its major active constituents. In this study, the protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice and the involved mechanisms were investigated. Morphological and biochemical assessments clearly demonstrated a protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced liver injury. SolB pretreatment significantly attenuated the increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity, and prevented elevated hepatic malondialdehyde formation and the depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) in a dose-dependent manner. SolB also dramatically altered APAP metabolic activation by inhibiting the activities of CYP2E1 and CYP3A11, which was evidenced by significant inhibition of the formation of the oxidized APAP metabolite NAPQI–GSH. A molecular docking model also predicted that SolB had potential to interact with the CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 active sites. In addition, SolB abrogated APAP-induced activation of p53 and p21, and increased expression of liver regeneration and antiapoptotic-related proteins such as cyclin D1 (CCND1), PCNA, and BCL-2. This study demonstrated that SolB exhibited a significant protective effect toward APAP-induced liver injury, potentially through inhibition of CYP-mediated APAP bioactivation and regulation of the p53, p21, CCND1, PCNA, and BCL-2 to promote liver regeneration. PMID:25319358

  3. Distinct roles of NF-{kappa}B p50 in the regulation of acetaminophen-induced inflammatory mediator production and hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Dambach, Donna M.; Durham, Stephen K.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L. . E-mail: laskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu

    2006-03-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. In addition to inducing direct cellular damage, oxidants can activate transcription factors including NF-{kappa}B, which regulate the production of inflammatory mediators implicated in hepatotoxicity. Here, we investigated the role of APAP-induced oxidative stress and NF-{kappa}B in inflammatory mediator production. Treatment of mice with APAP (300 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increased serum aminotransferase levels. This was correlated with depletion of hepatic glutathione and CuZn superoxide dismutase (SOD). APAP administration also increased expression of the proinflammatory mediators, interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF{alpha}), macrophage chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and KC/gro, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10). Pretreatment of mice with the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prevented APAP-induced depletion of glutathione and CuZnSOD, as well as hepatotoxicity. NAC also abrogated APAP-induced increases in TNF{alpha}, KC/gro, and IL-10, but augmented expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-4 (IL-4) and transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF{beta}). No effects were observed on IL-1{beta} or MCP-1 expression. To determine if NF-{kappa}B plays a role in regulating mediator production, we used transgenic mice with a targeted disruption of the gene for NF-{kappa}B p50. As observed with NAC pretreatment, the loss of NF-{kappa}B p50 was associated with decreased ability of APAP to upregulate TNF{alpha}, KC/gro, and IL-10 expression and increased expression of IL-4 and TGF{beta}. However, in contrast to NAC pretreatment, the loss of p50 had no effect on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. These data demonstrate that APAP-induced cytokine expression in the liver is influenced by oxidative stress and that this is dependent, in part, on NF-{kappa}B. However, NF-{kappa}B p50

  4. Differences in early acetaminophen hepatotoxicity between obese ob/ob and db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Jacinthe; Begriche, Karima; Delannoy, Matthieu; Morel, Isabelle; Pajaud, Julie; Ribault, Catherine; Lepage, Sylvie; McGill, Mitchell R; Lucas-Clerc, Catherine; Turlin, Bruno; Robin, Marie-Anne; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Fromenty, Bernard

    2012-09-01

    Clinical investigations suggest that hepatotoxicity after acetaminophen (APAP) overdose could be more severe in the context of obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The pre-existence of fat accumulation and CYP2E1 induction could be major mechanisms accounting for such hepatic susceptibility. To explore this issue, experiments were performed in obese diabetic ob/ob and db/db mice. Preliminary investigations performed in male and female wild-type, ob/ob, and db/db mice showed a selective increase in hepatic CYP2E1 activity in female db/db mice. However, liver triglycerides in these animals were significantly lower compared with ob/ob mice. Next, APAP (500 mg/kg) was administered in female wild-type, ob/ob, and db/db mice, and investigations were carried out 0.5, 2, 4, and 8 h after APAP intoxication. Liver injury 8 h after APAP intoxication was higher in db/db mice, as assessed by plasma transaminases, liver histology, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay. In db/db mice, however, the extent of hepatic glutathione depletion, levels of APAP-protein adducts, c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation, changes in gene expression, and mitochondrial DNA levels were not greater compared with the other genotypes. Furthermore, in the db/db genotype plasma lactate and β-hydroxybutyrate were not specifically altered, whereas the plasma levels of APAP-glucuronide were intermediary between wild-type and ob/ob mice. Thus, early APAP-induced hepatotoxicity was greater in db/db than ob/ob mice, despite less severe fatty liver and similar basal levels of transaminases. Hepatic CYP2E1 induction could have an important pathogenic role when APAP-induced liver injury occurs in the context of obesity and related metabolic disorders. PMID:22647274

  5. Silencing Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β Inhibits Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity and Attenuates JNK Activation and Loss of Glutamate Cysteine Ligase and Myeloid Cell Leukemia Sequence 1*

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Mie; Ybanez, Maria D.; Win, Sanda; Than, Tin Aung; Jain, Shilpa; Gaarde, William A.; Han, Derick; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) plays a central role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury. In the current work, we examined other possible signaling pathways that may also contribute to APAP hepatotoxicity. APAP treatment to mice caused glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activation and translocation to mitochondria during the initial phase of APAP-induced liver injury (∼1 h). The silencing of GSK-3β, but not Akt-2 (protein kinase B) or glycogen synthase kinase-3α (GSK-3α), using antisense significantly protected mice from APAP-induced liver injury. The silencing of GSK-3β affected several key pathways important in conferring protection against APAP-induced liver injury. APAP treatment was observed to promote the loss of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL, rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis) in liver. The silencing of GSK-3β decreased the loss of hepatic GCL, and promoted greater GSH recovery in liver following APAP treatment. Silencing JNK1 and -2 also prevented the loss of GCL. APAP treatment also resulted in GSK-3β translocation to mitochondria and the degradation of myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1) in mitochondrial membranes in liver. The silencing of GSK-3β reduced Mcl-1 degradation caused by APAP treatment. The silencing of GSK-3β also resulted in an inhibition of the early phase (0–2 h), and blunted the late phase (after 4 h) of JNK activation and translocation to mitochondria in liver following APAP treatment. Taken together our results suggest that activation of GSK-3β is a key mediator of the initial phase of APAP-induced liver injury through modulating GCL and Mcl-1 degradation, as well as JNK activation in liver. PMID:20061376

  6. Altered Protein S-Glutathionylation Identifies a Potential Mechanism of Resistance to Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    McGarry, David J.; Chakravarty, Probir; Wolf, C. Roland

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is the most commonly used over-the-counter analgesic. However, hepatotoxicity induced by APAP is a major clinical issue, and the factors that define sensitivity to APAP remain unclear. We have previously demonstrated that mice nulled for glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP) are resistant to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. This study aims to exploit this difference to delineate pathways of importance in APAP toxicity. We used mice nulled for GSTP and heme oxygenase-1 oxidative stress reporter mice, together with a novel nanoflow liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry methodology to investigate the role of oxidative stress, cell signaling, and protein S-glutathionylation in APAP hepatotoxicity. We provide evidence that the sensitivity difference between wild-type and Gstp1/2−/− mice is unrelated to the ability of APAP to induce oxidative stress, despite observing significant increases in c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in wild-type mice. The major difference in response to APAP was in the levels of protein S-glutathionylation: Gstp1/2−/− mice exhibited a significant increase in the number of S-glutathionylated proteins compared with wild-type animals. Remarkably, these S-glutathionylated proteins are involved in oxidative phosphorylation, respiratory complexes, drug metabolism, and mitochondrial apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that S-glutathionylation of the rate-limiting glutathione-synthesizing enzyme, glutamate cysteine ligase, was markedly increased in Gstp1/2−/− mice in response to APAP. The data demonstrate that S-glutathionylation provides an adaptive response to APAP and, as a consequence, suggest that this is an important determinant in APAP hepatotoxicity. This work identifies potential novel avenues associated with cell survival for the treatment of chemical-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26311813

  7. Apoptosis-Inducing Factor Modulates Mitochondrial Oxidant Stress in Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bajt, Mary Lynn; Ramachandran, Anup; Yan, Hui-Min; Lebofsky, Margitta; Farhood, Anwar; Lemasters, John J.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes liver injury in humans and mice. DNA fragmentation is a hallmark of APAP-induced cell death, and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) correlates with DNA fragmentation after APAP overdose. To test the hypothesis that AIF may be a critical mediator of APAP-induced cell death, fasted male AIF-deficient Harlequin (Hq) mice and respective wild-type (WT) animals were treated with 200 mg/kg APAP. At 6 h after APAP, WT animals developed severe liver injury as indicated by the increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities (8600 ± 1870 U/l) and 61 ± 8% necrosis. This injury was accompanied by massive DNA strand breaks in centrilobular hepatocytes (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling [TUNEL] assay) and release of DNA fragments into the cytosol (anti-histone ELISA). In addition, there was formation of reactive oxygen (increase in liver glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels and mitochondrial protein carbonyls) and peroxynitrite (nitrotyrosine [NT] staining) together with mitochondrial translocation of activated c-jun-N-terminal kinase (P-JNK) and release of AIF from the mitochondria. In contrast, Hq mice had significantly less liver injury (ALT: 330 ± 130 U/l; necrosis: 4 ± 2%), minimal nuclear DNA damage, and drastically reduced oxidant stress (based on all parameters) at 6 h. WT and Hq mice had the same baseline levels of cyp2E1 and of glutathione. The initial depletion of glutathione (20 min after APAP) was the same in both groups suggesting that there was no relevant difference in metabolic activation of APAP. Thus, AIF has a critical function in APAP hepatotoxicity by facilitating generation of reactive oxygen in mitochondria and, after nuclear translocation, AIF can be involved in DNA fragmentation. PMID:21572097

  8. Apoptosis-inducing factor modulates mitochondrial oxidant stress in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bajt, Mary Lynn; Ramachandran, Anup; Yan, Hui-Min; Lebofsky, Margitta; Farhood, Anwar; Lemasters, John J; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-08-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes liver injury in humans and mice. DNA fragmentation is a hallmark of APAP-induced cell death, and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) correlates with DNA fragmentation after APAP overdose. To test the hypothesis that AIF may be a critical mediator of APAP-induced cell death, fasted male AIF-deficient Harlequin (Hq) mice and respective wild-type (WT) animals were treated with 200 mg/kg APAP. At 6 h after APAP, WT animals developed severe liver injury as indicated by the increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities (8600 ± 1870 U/l) and 61 ± 8% necrosis. This injury was accompanied by massive DNA strand breaks in centrilobular hepatocytes (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling [TUNEL] assay) and release of DNA fragments into the cytosol (anti-histone ELISA). In addition, there was formation of reactive oxygen (increase in liver glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels and mitochondrial protein carbonyls) and peroxynitrite (nitrotyrosine [NT] staining) together with mitochondrial translocation of activated c-jun-N-terminal kinase (P-JNK) and release of AIF from the mitochondria. In contrast, Hq mice had significantly less liver injury (ALT: 330 ± 130 U/l; necrosis: 4 ± 2%), minimal nuclear DNA damage, and drastically reduced oxidant stress (based on all parameters) at 6 h. WT and Hq mice had the same baseline levels of cyp2E1 and of glutathione. The initial depletion of glutathione (20 min after APAP) was the same in both groups suggesting that there was no relevant difference in metabolic activation of APAP. Thus, AIF has a critical function in APAP hepatotoxicity by facilitating generation of reactive oxygen in mitochondria and, after nuclear translocation, AIF can be involved in DNA fragmentation. PMID:21572097

  9. Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity: a Comprehensive Update.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Eric; Babar, Arooj; Choudhary, Moaz; Kutner, Matthew; Pyrsopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-06-28

    Hepatic injury and subsequent hepatic failure due to both intentional and non-intentional overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) has affected patients for decades, and involves the cornerstone metabolic pathways which take place in the microsomes within hepatocytes. APAP hepatotoxicity remains a global issue; in the United States, in particular, it accounts for more than 50% of overdose-related acute liver failure and approximately 20% of the liver transplant cases. The pathophysiology, disease course and management of acute liver failure secondary to APAP toxicity remain to be precisely elucidated, and adverse patient outcomes with increased morbidity and mortality continue to occur. Although APAP hepatotoxicity follows a predictable timeline of hepatic failure, its clinical presentation might vary. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) therapy is considered as the mainstay therapy, but liver transplantation might represent a life-saving procedure for selected patients. Future research focus in this field may benefit from shifting towards obtaining antidotal knowledge at the molecular level, with focus on the underlying molecular signaling pathways. PMID:27350943

  10. Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity: a Comprehensive Update

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Eric; Babar, Arooj; Choudhary, Moaz; Kutner, Matthew; Pyrsopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatic injury and subsequent hepatic failure due to both intentional and non-intentional overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) has affected patients for decades, and involves the cornerstone metabolic pathways which take place in the microsomes within hepatocytes. APAP hepatotoxicity remains a global issue; in the United States, in particular, it accounts for more than 50% of overdose-related acute liver failure and approximately 20% of the liver transplant cases. The pathophysiology, disease course and management of acute liver failure secondary to APAP toxicity remain to be precisely elucidated, and adverse patient outcomes with increased morbidity and mortality continue to occur. Although APAP hepatotoxicity follows a predictable timeline of hepatic failure, its clinical presentation might vary. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) therapy is considered as the mainstay therapy, but liver transplantation might represent a life-saving procedure for selected patients. Future research focus in this field may benefit from shifting towards obtaining antidotal knowledge at the molecular level, with focus on the underlying molecular signaling pathways. PMID:27350943

  11. Exacerbation of Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by the Anthelmentic Drug Fenbendazole

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Carol R.; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-01-01

    Fenbendazole is a broad-spectrum anthelmintic drug widely used to prevent or treat nematode infections in laboratory rodent colonies. Potential interactions between fenbendazole and hepatotoxicants such as acetaminophen are unknown, and this was investigated in this study. Mice were fed a control diet or a diet containing fenbendazole (8–12 mg/kg/day) for 7 days prior to treatment with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) or phosphate buffered saline. In mice fed a control diet, acetaminophen administration resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases, which were evident within 12 h. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was markedly increased in mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet, as measured histologically and by significant increases in serum transaminase levels. Moreover, in mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet, but not the control diet, 63% mortality was observed within 24 h of acetaminophen administration. Fenbendazole by itself had no effect on liver histology or serum transaminases. To determine if exaggerated hepatotoxicity was due to alterations in acetaminophen metabolism, we analyzed sera for the presence of free acetaminophen and acetaminophen-glucuronide. We found that there were no differences in acetaminophen turnover. We also measured cytochrome P450 (cyp) 2e1, cyp3a, and cyp1a2 activity. Whereas fenbendazole had no effect on the activity of cyp2e1 or cyp3a, cyp1a2 was suppressed. A prolonged suppression of hepatic glutathione (GSH) was also observed in acetaminophen-treated mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet when compared with the control diet. These data demonstrate that fenbendazole exacerbates the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen, an effect that is related to persistent GSH depletion. These findings are novel and suggest a potential drug-drug interaction that should be considered in experimental protocols evaluating mechanisms of hepatotoxicity in rodent colonies treated with fenbendazole. PMID

  12. MicroRNA-561 promotes acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes through downregulation of the nuclear receptor corepressor dosage-sensitive sex-reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on the X chromosome, gene 1 (DAX-1).

    PubMed

    Li, Minghua; Yang, Yinxue; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Tianxin; Guo, Peixuan; Zhang, Xueji; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    One of the major mechanisms involved in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity is hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α)-mediated activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). In the present study, we investigated the role of miR-561 and its target gene DAX-1 encoding a corepressor of HNF4α in the process of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. We used both human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cells and primary human hepatocytes in this study and monitored the levels of reactive oxygen species, lactate dehydrogenase, and glutathione. Our bioinformatics study suggests an association between miR-561 and DAX-1, but not HNF4α. Treatment of HepG2 cells with APAP significantly reduced the expression of DAX-1 in a concentration-dependent manner. miR-561 was induced by APAP treatment in HepG2 cells. Transfection of HepG2 cells with an miR-561 mimic exacerbated APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. HNF4α is physically associated with DAX-1 in HepG2 cells. A decreased protein level of DAX-1 by APAP treatment was also enhanced by miR-561 mimic transfection in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes. The basal and APAP-induced expression of PXR and CAR was enhanced by miR-561 mimic transfection; however, transfection of HepG2 cells or primary human hepatocytes with a miR-561 inhibitor or DAX-1 small interfering RNA reversed these effects. Additionally, the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that recruitment of DAX-1 onto the PXR promoter was inversely correlated with the recruitment of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α coactivator-1α and HNF4α on APAP treatment. These results indicate that miR-561 worsens APAP-induced hepatotoxicity via inhibition of DAX-1 and consequent transactivation of nuclear receptors. PMID:24104199

  13. Cholestasis induced by model organic anions protects from acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in male CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vanessa M; Hennig, Gayle E; Manautou, José E

    2006-01-25

    Administration of the non-metabolizable organic anion indocyanine green (ICG) prior to a toxic dose of acetaminophen (4-acetamidophenol; APAP) reduces liver injury 24h after dosing. ICG also produces a dose-dependent decrease in bile flow in mice and rats. Studies in bile duct-cannulated rats suggest that cholestasis can play a role in this protection. This study was conducted to determine if the ability of model organic anions to produce cholestasis is relevant to the protection against APAP hepatotoxicity afforded by ICG. In these studies, overnight fasted male CD-1 mice were dosed (i.v.) with the cholestatic dyes bromcresol green (BCG, 30 micromol/kg) and rose bengal (RB, 60 micromol/kg) immediately prior APAP administration (500 mg/kg, i.p.). Other groups of mice received the non-cholestatic dyes dibromosulphthalein (DBSP, 150 micromol/kg) and amaranth (AM, 300 micromol/kg) prior to APAP. Controls were given vehicle only. Hepatocellular necrosis was evident at 24 h in control mice receiving APAP. Pretreatment with the cholestatic dyes BCG and RB decreased the severity of hepatocellular necrosis induced by APAP. However, administration of the non-cholestatic dyes DBSP and AM did not alter APAP-induced liver damage. Glutathione replenishment was not altered by pretreatment with any of these dyes. Furthermore, ICG protected mice against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) hepatotoxicity. Since CCl4 undergoes minimal biliary excretion and does not compete for biliary transport function, this finding supports the notion that cholestasis itself rather than competition for canalicular transporters is central to the hepatoprotection by ICG and other cholephilic dyes. PMID:16140478

  14. Diet Restriction Inhibits Apoptosis and HMGB1 Oxidation and Promotes Inflammatory Cell Recruitment during Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, Daniel James; Williams, Dominic P; Kipar, Anja; Laverty, Hugh; Park, B Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a major cause of acute liver failure and serves as a paradigm to elucidate mechanisms, predisposing factors and therapeutic interventions. The roles of apoptosis and inflammation during APAP hepatotoxicity remain controversial. We investigated whether fasting of mice for 24 h can inhibit APAP-induced caspase activation and apoptosis through the depletion of basal ATP. We also investigated in fasted mice the critical role played by inhibition of caspase-dependent cysteine 106 oxidation within high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) released by ATP depletion in dying cells as a mechanism of immune activation. In fed mice treated with APAP, necrosis was the dominant form of hepatocyte death. However, apoptosis was also observed, indicated by K18 cleavage, DNA laddering and procaspase-3 processing. In fasted mice treated with APAP, only necrosis was observed. Inflammatory cell recruitment as a consequence of hepatocyte death was observed only in fasted mice treated with APAP or fed mice cotreated with a caspase inhibitor. Hepatic inflammation was also associated with loss in detection of serum oxidized-HMGB1. A significant role of HMGB1 in the induction of inflammation was confirmed with an HMGB1-neutralizing antibody. The differential response between fasted and fed mice was a consequence of a significant reduction in basal hepatic ATP, which prevented caspase processing, rather than glutathione depletion or altered APAP metabolism. Thus, the inhibition of caspase-driven apoptosis and HMGB1 oxidation by ATP depletion from fasting promotes an inflammatory response during drug-induced hepatotoxicity/liver pathology. PMID:20811657

  15. Diet restriction inhibits apoptosis and HMGB1 oxidation and promotes inflammatory cell recruitment during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Daniel James; Williams, Dominic P; Kipar, Anja; Laverty, Hugh; Park, B Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a major cause of acute liver failure and serves as a paradigm to elucidate mechanisms, predisposing factors and therapeutic interventions. The roles of apoptosis and inflammation during APAP hepatotoxicity remain controversial. We investigated whether fasting of mice for 24 h can inhibit APAP-induced caspase activation and apoptosis through the depletion of basal ATP. We also investigated in fasted mice the critical role played by inhibition of caspase-dependent cysteine 106 oxidation within high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) released by ATP depletion in dying cells as a mechanism of immune activation. In fed mice treated with APAP, necrosis was the dominant form of hepatocyte death. However, apoptosis was also observed, indicated by K18 cleavage, DNA laddering and procaspase-3 processing. In fasted mice treated with APAP, only necrosis was observed. Inflammatory cell recruitment as a consequence of hepatocyte death was observed only in fasted mice treated with APAP or fed mice cotreated with a caspase inhibitor. Hepatic inflammation was also associated with loss in detection of serum oxidized-HMGB1. A significant role of HMGB1 in the induction of inflammation was confirmed with an HMGB1-neutralizing antibody. The differential response between fasted and fed mice was a consequence of a significant reduction in basal hepatic ATP, which prevented caspase processing, rather than glutathione depletion or altered APAP metabolism. Thus, the inhibition of caspase-driven apoptosis and HMGB1 oxidation by ATP depletion from fasting promotes an inflammatory response during drug-induced hepatotoxicity/liver pathology. PMID:20811657

  16. Potential role of caveolin-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Carol R.; Gray, Joshua P.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Cervelli, Jessica; Bremer, Nicole; Kim, Yunjung; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2010-05-15

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a membrane scaffolding protein, which functions to regulate intracellular compartmentalization of various signaling molecules. In the present studies, transgenic mice with a targeted disruption of the Cav-1 gene (Cav-1{sup -/-}) were used to assess the role of Cav-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Treatment of wild-type mice with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases. This was correlated with decreased expression of Cav-1 in the liver. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was significantly attenuated in Cav-1{sup -/-} mice, an effect that was independent of acetaminophen metabolism. Acetaminophen administration resulted in increased hepatic expression of the oxidative stress marker, lipocalin 24p3, as well as hemeoxygenase-1, but decreased glutathione and superoxide dismutase-1; no differences were noted between the genotypes suggesting that reduced toxicity in Cav-1{sup -/-} mice is not due to alterations in antioxidant defense. In wild-type mice, acetaminophen increased mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1beta, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), as well as cyclooxygenase-2, while 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX), which generates anti-inflammatory lipoxins, decreased. Acetaminophen-induced changes in MCP-1 and 15-LOX expression were greater in Cav-1{sup -/-} mice. Although expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, a potent hepatocyte mitogen, was up-regulated in the liver of Cav-1{sup -/-} mice after acetaminophen, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and survivin, markers of cellular proliferation, were delayed, which may reflect the reduced need for tissue repair. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Cav-1 plays a role in promoting inflammation and toxicity during the pathogenesis of acetaminophen-induced injury.

  17. Potential Role of Caveolin-1 in Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Carol R.; Gray, Joshua P.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Cervelli, Jessica; Bremer, Nicole; Kim, Yunjung; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2010-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a membrane scaffolding protein which functions to regulate intracellular compartmentalization of various signaling molecules. In the present studies, transgenic mice with a targeted disruption of the Cav-1 gene (Cav-1−/−) were used to assess the role of Cav-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Treatment of wild type mice with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases. This was correlated with decreased expression of Cav-1 in the liver. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was significantly attenuated in Cav-1−/− mice, an effect that was independent of acetaminophen metabolism. Acetaminophen administration resulted in increased hepatic expression of the oxidative stress marker, lipocalin 24p3, as well as hemeoxygenase-1, but decreased glutathione and superoxide dismutase-1; no differences were noted between the genotypes suggesting that reduced toxicity in Cav-1−/− mice is not due to alterations in anti-oxidant defense. In wild type mice, acetaminophen increased mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), as well as cyclooxygenase-2, while 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX), which generates anti-inflammatory lipoxins, decreased. Acetaminophen-induced changes in MCP-1 and 15-LOX expression were greater in Cav-1−/− mice. Although expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, a potent hepatocyte mitogen, was up-regulated in the liver of Cav-1−/− mice after acetaminophen, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and survivin, markers of cellular proliferation, were delayed which may reflect the reduced need for tissue repair. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Cav-1 plays a role in promoting inflammation and toxicity during the pathogenesis of acetaminophen-induced injury. PMID:20100502

  18. Protective effect of allyl methyl disulfide on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongchun; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Kaiming; Liu, Guangpu; Yang, Min; Luan, Yuxia; Zhao, Zhongxi

    2016-04-01

    Multiple sulfur compounds of garlic have shown versatile medicinal activities in the prevention and treatment of various diseases. Allyl methyl disulfide (AMDS) was identified as one of the bioactive components in fresh garlic paste in our previous study. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of AMDS against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced acute liver damage in mice. Results reveal that AMDS significantly alleviates APAP-induced elevation of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels in mice. Furthermore, AMDS significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the maleic dialdehyde (MDA) level in liver tissues and restored the activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD, GSH-PX and GSH towards normal levels. IL-6 and TNF-alpha (TNF-α) levels in the serum and liver were clearly increased by acetaminophen-damage (p < 0.05) and AMDS intake significantly suppressed acetaminophen-induced increase of the two cytokines (p < 0.05). The immunohistochemical and pathological analyses showed that AMDS could ameliorate the liver injury through the strong attenuation of the CD45 expression and HNE formation. All the results indicate that AMDS had the ability to protect hepatocytes from APAP-induced liver damage. PMID:26969520

  19. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: studies on the mechanism of cysteamine protection

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.G.; Jollow, D.J.

    1986-03-30

    Inhibition of the cytochrome P-450-dependent formation of the acetaminophen-reactive metabolite was investigated as a possible mechanism for cysteamine protection against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Studies in isolated hamster hepatocytes indicated that cysteamine competitively inhibited the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system as represented by formation of the acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate. However, cysteamine was not a potent inhibitor of glutathione conjugate formation (Ki = 1.17 mM). Cysteamine also weakly inhibited the glucuronidation of acetaminophen (Ki = 2.44 mM). In vivo studies were in agreement with the results obtained in isolated hepatocytes; cysteamine moderately inhibited both glucuronidation and the cytochrome P-450-dependent formation of acetaminophen mercapturate. The overall elimination rate constant (beta) for acetaminophen was correspondingly decreased. Since cysteamine decreased both beta and the apparent rate constant for mercapturate formation (K'MA), the proportion of the dose of acetaminophen which is converted to the toxic metabolite (K'MA/beta) was not significantly decreased in the presence of cysteamine. Apparently, cysteamine does inhibit the cytochrome P-450-dependent formation of the acetaminophen-reactive metabolite, but this effect is not sufficient to explain antidotal protection.

  20. Schisandrol B protects against acetaminophen-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice via activation of the NRF2/ARE signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yi-ming; Wang, Ying; Tan, Hua-sen; Yu, Tao; Fan, Xiao-mei; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Huang, Min; Bi, Hui-chang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) acts through the antioxidant response element (ARE) to regulate the expression of many detoxifying and antioxidant genes responsible for cytoprotective processes. We previously reported that Schisandrol B (SolB) isolated from Schisandra sphenanthera produced a protective effect against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury. In this study we investigated whether the NRF2/ARE signaling pathway was involved in this hepato-protective effect. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with SolB (200 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 3 d before injection of APAP (400 mg/kg, ip). Serum and liver tissue samples were collected 6 h later. The mRNA and protein expression were measured using qRT-PCR and Western blot assay, respectively. The activation of NRF2 was examined in HepG2 cells using luciferase reporter gene assay. Results: SolB pretreatment significantly alleviated the hepatic injury (large patchy necrosis and hyperemia of the hepatic sinus), the increase of serum AST, ALT levels and hepatic MDA contents, and the decrease of liver and mitochondrial glutathione levels in APAP-treated mice. Furthermore, SolB pretreatment significantly increased nuclear accumulation of NRF2 and increased hepatic expression of NRF2 downstream proteins, including GCLC, GSR, NQO1, GSTs, MRP2, MRP3 and MRP4 in APAP-treated mice. Moreover, treatment with SolB (2.5–20 μmol/L) dose-dependently increased the activity of NRF2 reporter gene in HepG2 cells. Conclusion: SolB exhibits a remarkable protective effect against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, partially via activation of the NRF2/ARE pathway and regulation of NRF2 target genes, which induce detoxification and increase antioxidant capacity. PMID:26806302

  1. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitic (NASH) mice are protected from higher hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen upon induction of PPAR{alpha} with clofibrate

    SciTech Connect

    Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Bhave, Vishakha S.; Mitra, Mayurranjan S.; Latendresse, John R.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2008-08-01

    The objective was to investigate if the hepatotoxic sensitivity in nonalcoholic steatohepatitic mice to acetaminophen (APAP) is due to downregulation of nuclear receptor PPAR{alpha} via lower cell division and tissue repair. Male Swiss Webster mice fed methionine and choline deficient diet for 31 days exhibited NASH. On the 32nd day, a marginally toxic dose of APAP (360 mg/kg, ip) yielded 70% mortality in steatohepatitic mice, while all non steatohepatitic mice receiving the same dose survived. {sup 14}C-APAP covalent binding, CYP2E1 protein, and enzyme activity did not differ from the controls, obviating increased APAP bioactivation as the cause of amplified APAP hepatotoxicity. Liver injury progressed only in steatohepatitic livers between 6 and 24 h. Cell division and tissue repair assessed by {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation and PCNA were inhibited only in the steatohepatitic mice given APAP suggesting that higher sensitivity of NASH liver to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity was due to lower tissue repair. The hypothesis that impeded liver tissue repair in steatohepatitic mice was due to downregulation of PPAR{alpha} was tested. PPAR{alpha} was downregulated in NASH. To investigate whether downregulation of PPAR{alpha} in NASH is the critical mechanism of compromised liver tissue repair, PPAR{alpha} was induced in steatohepatitic mice with clofibrate (250 mg/kg for 3 days, ip) before injecting APAP. All clofibrate pretreated steatohepatitic mice receiving APAP exhibited lower liver injury, which did not progress and the mice survived. The protection was not due to lower bioactivation of APAP but due to higher liver tissue repair. These findings suggest that inadequate PPAR{alpha} expression in steatohepatitic mice sensitizes them to APAP hepatotoxicity.

  2. Redox Nanoparticle Therapeutics for Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boonruamkaew, Phetcharat; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of an antioxidative nanoparticle (RNPN) recently developed against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. The effects of oral administration of RNPN to APAP-treated mice were assessed for various biochemical liver function parameters: alanine transaminase (ALT) activity, aspartate transaminase (AST) activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, prothrombin time, and serum albumin (ALB) level. The treatment effects were assessed in terms of free radical parameters: malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, % inhibition of superoxide anion (O2−∙), and histopathological examination. The N-acetylcysteine (NAC)-treated group exhibited an enhanced prothrombin time relative to the control group, while RNPN did not prolong prothrombin time. The RNPN-treated animals exhibited lower levels of ALT, AST, and ALP, while increased ALB levels were measured in these animals compared to those in the other groups. The RNPN-treated animals furthermore exhibited improved MDA levels, GPx activity, and % inhibition of O2−∙, which relate to oxidative damage. Histological staining of liver tissues from RNPN-treated animals did not reveal any microscopic changes relative to the other groups. The findings of this study suggest that RNPN possesses effective hepatoprotective properties and does not exhibit the notable adverse effects associated with NAC treatment. PMID:27073589

  3. Neutrophil activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair in mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Sharpe, Matthew R.; McGill, Mitchell R.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into the systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution are controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: > 800 U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for the determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed an increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91{sup phox}−/− mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate that neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. - Highlights: • Neutrophil (PMN) function increases during liver repair after acetaminophen overdose. • Liver repair after acetaminophen (APAP)-overdose is not dependent on NADPH oxidase. • Human PMNs do not appear

  4. Mechanism of protection by metallothionein against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Saito, Chieko; Yan, Hui-Min; Artigues, Antonio; Villar, Maria T; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2010-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced liver failure in the US. Metallothionein (MT) expression attenuates APAP-induced liver injury. However, the mechanism of this protection remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, C57BL/6 mice were treated with 100 micromol/kg ZnCl2 for 3 days to induce MT. Twenty-four hours after the last dose of zinc, the animals received 300 mg/kg APAP. Liver injury (plasma ALT activities, area of necrosis), DNA fragmentation, peroxynitrite formation (nitrotyrosine staining), MT expression, hepatic glutathione (GSH), and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels were determined after 6 h. APAP alone caused severe liver injury with oxidant stress (increased GSSG levels), peroxynitrite formation, and DNA fragmentation, all of which were attenuated by zinc-induced MT expression. In contrast, MT knockout mice were not protected by zinc. Hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury in primary hepatocytes was dependent only on the intracellular GSH levels but not on MT expression. Thus, the protective effect of MT in vivo was not due to the direct scavenging of reactive oxygen species. Zinc treatment had no effect on the early GSH depletion kinetics after APAP administration, which is an indicator of the metabolic activation of APAP to its reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). However, MT was able to effectively trap NAPQI by covalent binding. We conclude that MT scavenges some of the excess NAPQI after GSH depletion and prevents covalent binding to cellular proteins, which is the trigger for the propagation of the cell injury mechanisms through mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear DNA damage. PMID:19835899

  5. MECHANISM OF PROTECTION BY METALLOTHIONEIN AGAINST ACETAMINOPHEN HEPATOTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Chieko; Yan, Hui-Min; Artigues, Antonio; Villar, Maria T.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced liver failure in the US. Metallothionein (MT) expression attenuates APAP-induced liver injury. However, the mechanism of this protection remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, C57BL/6 mice were treated with 100 µmol/kg ZnCl2 for 3 days to induce MT. Twenty-four hours after the last dose of zinc, the animals received 300 mg/kg APAP. Liver injury (plasma ALT activities, area of necrosis), DNA fragmentation, peroxynitrite formation (nitrotyrosine staining), MT expression, hepatic glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels were determined after 6 h. APAP alone caused severe liver injury with oxidant stress (increased GSSG levels), peroxynitrite formation and DNA fragmentation, all of which were attenuated by zinc-induced MT expression. In contrast, MT knockout mice were not protected by zinc. Hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury in primary hepatocytes was dependent only on the intracellular GSH levels but not on MT expression. Thus, the protective effect of MT in vivo was not due to the direct scavenging of reactive oxygen species. Zinc treatment had no effect on the early GSH depletion kinetics after APAP administration, which is an indicator of the metabolic activation of APAP to its reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI). However, MT was able to effectively trap NAPQI by covalent binding. We conclude that MT scavenges some of the excess NAPQI after GSH depletion and prevents covalent binding to cellular proteins, which is the trigger for the propagation of the cell injury mechanisms through mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear DNA damage. PMID:19835899

  6. Mechanism of protection by metallothionein against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Chieko; Yan, H.-M.; Artigues, Antonio; Villar, Maria T.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2010-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced liver failure in the US. Metallothionein (MT) expression attenuates APAP-induced liver injury. However, the mechanism of this protection remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, C57BL/6 mice were treated with 100 mumol/kg ZnCl{sub 2} for 3 days to induce MT. Twenty-four hours after the last dose of zinc, the animals received 300 mg/kg APAP. Liver injury (plasma ALT activities, area of necrosis), DNA fragmentation, peroxynitrite formation (nitrotyrosine staining), MT expression, hepatic glutathione (GSH), and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels were determined after 6 h. APAP alone caused severe liver injury with oxidant stress (increased GSSG levels), peroxynitrite formation, and DNA fragmentation, all of which were attenuated by zinc-induced MT expression. In contrast, MT knockout mice were not protected by zinc. Hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury in primary hepatocytes was dependent only on the intracellular GSH levels but not on MT expression. Thus, the protective effect of MT in vivo was not due to the direct scavenging of reactive oxygen species. Zinc treatment had no effect on the early GSH depletion kinetics after APAP administration, which is an indicator of the metabolic activation of APAP to its reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). However, MT was able to effectively trap NAPQI by covalent binding. We conclude that MT scavenges some of the excess NAPQI after GSH depletion and prevents covalent binding to cellular proteins, which is the trigger for the propagation of the cell injury mechanisms through mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear DNA damage.

  7. Overexpression of Aldose Reductase Render Mouse Hepatocytes More Sensitive to Acetaminophen Induced Oxidative Stress and Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Munzir M E; Al-Obosi, J A S; Osman, H M; Shayoub, M E

    2016-04-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) a commonly used drug for decrease the fever and pain but is capable to induced hepatotoxicity at over dose. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of APAP on the expression of anti-apoptotic and antioxidative defense genes, and whether aldose reductase over-expressing plasmid capable to protect against APAP-induced oxidative stress and cell death. APAP treatment induced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity, and significantly increased aldose reductase mRNA and protein expression in mouse hepatocyte (AML-12). Unexpectedly, AML-12 cells over-expressing aldose reductase augmented APAP-induced reduction in cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) depletion and glutathione S-transferase A2 expression. Moreover, over-expression of aldose reductase potentiated APAP induced reduction on proliferating cell nuclear antigen, B cell lymphoma-extra large (bcl-xL), catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1) and abolished APAP-induced B-cell lymphoma 2 (bcl-2) inductions. Further, over-expression of aldose reductase significantly abolished AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in APAP-treated cells and induced p53 expression. This results demonstrate that APAP induced toxicity in AML-12, increased aldose reductase expression, and over-expression of aldose reductase render this cell more susceptible to APAP induced oxidative stress and cell death, this probably due to inhibition AMPK or bcl-2 activity, or may due to competition between aldose reductase and glutathione reductase for NADPH. PMID:27069324

  8. MODULATION OF ACETAMINOPHEN-INDUCED HEPATOTOXICITY BY THE XENOBIOTIC RECEPTOR CAR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have identified the xenobiotic receptor CAR (constitutive androstane receptor) as a key regulator of acetaminophen metabolism and hepatotoxicity. Known CAR activators as well as high doses of acetaminophen induced expression of three acetaminophen-metabolizing enzymes in wild-type but not in CAR-...

  9. Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice Occurs with Inhibition of Activity and Nitration of Mitochondrial Manganese Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rakhee; MacMillan-Crow, Lee Ann; Rafferty, Tonya M.; Saba, Hamida; Roberts, Dean W.; Fifer, E. Kim; James, Laura P.

    2011-01-01

    In overdose the analgesic/antipyretic acetaminophen (APAP) is hepatotoxic. Toxicity is mediated by initial hepatic metabolism to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). After low doses NAPQI is efficiently detoxified by GSH. However, in overdose GSH is depleted, NAPQI covalently binds to proteins as APAP adducts, and oxygen/nitrogen stress occurs. Toxicity is believed to occur by mitochondrial dysfunction. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) inactivation by protein nitration has been reported to occur during other oxidant stress-mediated diseases. MnSOD is a critical mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme that prevents peroxynitrite formation within the mitochondria. To examine the role of MnSOD in APAP toxicity, mice were treated with 300 mg/kg APAP. GSH was significantly reduced by 65% at 0.5 h and remained reduced from 1 to 4 h. Serum alanine aminotransferase did not significantly increase until 4 h and was 2290 IU/liter at 6 h. MnSOD activity was significantly reduced by 50% at 1 and 2 h. At 1 h, GSH was significantly depleted by 62 and 80% at nontoxic doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg, respectively. No further GSH depletion occurred with hepatotoxic doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg APAP. A dose response decrease in MnSOD activity was observed for APAP at 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg. Immunoprecipitation of MnSOD from livers of APAP-treated mice followed by Western blot analysis revealed nitrated MnSOD. APAP-MnSOD adducts were not detected. Treatment of recombinant MnSOD with NAPQI did not produce APAP protein adducts. The data indicate that MnSOD inactivation by nitration is an early event in APAP-induced hepatic toxicity. PMID:21205919

  10. Fas Receptor-deficient lpr Mice are protected against Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity due to Higher Glutathione Synthesis and Enhanced Detoxification of Oxidant Stress

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a classical model of hepatocellular necrosis; however, the involvement of the Fas receptor in the pathophysiology remains controversial. Fas receptor-deficient (lpr) and C57BL/6 mice were treated with APAP to compare the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. Lpr mice were partially protected against APAP hepatotoxicity as indicated by reduced plasma ALT and GDH levels and liver necrosis. Hepatic Cyp2e1 protein, adduct formation and hepatic glutathione (GSH) depletion were similar, demonstrating equivalent reactive metabolite generation. There was no difference in cytokine formation or hepatic neutrophil recruitment. Interestingly, hepatic GSH recovered faster in lpr mice than in wild type animals resulting in enhanced detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Driving the increased GSH levels, mRNA induction and protein expression of glutamate-cysteine ligase (gclc) were higher in lpr mice. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein levels at 6h were significantly lower in lpr mice, which correlated with reduced nitrotyrosine staining. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) mRNA levels were substantially higher in lpr mice after APAP. Conclusion: Our data suggest that the faster recovery of hepatic GSH levels during oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation, reduced iNOS expression and enhanced induction of Hsp70 attenuated the susceptibility to APAP-induced cell death in lpr mice. PMID:23628456

  11. c-Jun N-terminal kinase modulates oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation independent of inducible nitric oxide synthase in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Chieko; Lemasters, John J.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2010-07-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose, which causes liver injury in animals and humans, activates c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Although it was shown that the JNK inhibitor SP600125 effectively reduced APAP hepatotoxicity, the mechanisms of protection remain unclear. C57Bl/6 mice were treated with 10 mg/kg SP600125 or vehicle (8% dimethylsulfoxide) 1 h before 600 mg/kg APAP administration. APAP time-dependently induced JNK activation (detected by JNK phosphorylation). SP600125, but not the vehicle, reduced JNK activation, attenuated mitochondrial Bax translocation and prevented the mitochondrial release of apoptosis-inducing factor at 4-12 h. Nuclear DNA fragmentation, nitrotyrosine staining, tissue GSSG levels and liver injury (plasma ALT release and necrosis) were partially attenuated by the vehicle (- 65%) and completely eliminated by SP600125 (- 98%) at 6 and 12 h. Furthermore, SP600125 attenuated the increase of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein. However, APAP did not enhance plasma nitrite + nitrate levels (NO formation); SP600125 had no effect on this parameter. The iNOS inhibitor L-NIL did not reduce NO formation or injury after APAP but prevented NO formation caused by endotoxin. Since SP600125 completely eliminated the increase in hepatic GSSG levels, an indicator of mitochondrial oxidant stress, it is concluded that the inhibition of peroxynitrite was mainly caused by reduced superoxide formation. Our data suggest that the JNK inhibitor SP600125 protects against APAP-induced liver injury in part by attenuation of mitochondrial Bax translocation but mainly by preventing mitochondrial oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation and thereby preventing the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, a key event in APAP-induced cell necrosis.

  12. Liuweiwuling tablets protect against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: What is the protective mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Du, Kuo; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Study of the effects of natural products, including traditional Chinese Medicines, on acetaminophen hepatotoxicity has gained considerable popularity in recent years, and some of them showed positive results and even promising therapeutic potentials. A recent report suggested that Liuweiwuling tablets protect against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and promote liver regeneration in a rodent model through alleviating the inflammatory response. However, several concerns exist regarding the limitations of the experimental design and interpretation of the data presented in this manuscript. PMID:27004010

  13. Use of Arctium lappa Extract Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Kott, Attalla Farag; Bin-Meferij, Mashael Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe destructive hepatic injuries can be induced by acetaminophen overdose and may lead to acute hepatic failure. Objective To investigate the ameliorative effects of Arctium lappa root extract on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods Rats were divided into 4 groups: normal control group, Arctium lappa extract group, acetaminophen-injected group, and acetaminophen treated with Arctium lappa extract group. Results The treatment with Arctium lappa extract reduced serum alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase in the acetaminophen group when compared with the control group. DNA fragments in the acetaminophen-injected group were also significantly increased (P < 0.05). The comet assay revealed increased detaching tail length and DNA concentration during the hepatic toxicity in the acetaminophen group. The malondialdehyde content was inhibited by Arctium lappa treatment (12.97±0.89 nmol/mg) when compared with the acetaminophen-treated-only group (12.97±0.89 nmol/mg). Histopathologic examination revealed that acetaminophen administration produced hepatic cell necrosis, infiltrate of lymphocytes, and vacuolation that were associated with the acetaminophen-treated animal group, but the degree of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was mediated by treatment with Arctium lappa extract. Conclusions Arctium lappa can prevent most of the hepatic tissue damage caused by acetaminophen overdose in rats. PMID:26543508

  14. Tolerance to Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity in the Mouse Model of Autoprotection Is Associated with Induction of Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase-3 (FMO3) in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rudraiah, Swetha; Rohrer, Philip R.; Gurevich, Igor; Goedken, Michael J.; Rasmussen, Theodore; Hines, Ronald N.; Manautou, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) pretreatment with a hepatotoxic dose (400 mg/kg) in mice results in resistance to a second, higher dose (600 mg/kg) of APAP (APAP autoprotection). Recent microarray work by our group showed a drastic induction of liver flavin containing monooxygenase-3 (Fmo3) mRNA expression in our mouse model of APAP autoprotection. The role of liver Fmo3, which detoxifies xenobiotics, in APAP autoprotection is unknown. The purpose of this study was to characterize the gene regulation and protein expression of liver Fmo3 during APAP hepatotoxicity. The functional consequences of Fmo3 induction were also investigated. Plasma and livers were collected from male C57BL/6J mice over a period of 72 h following a single dose of APAP (400 mg/kg) to measure Fmo3 mRNA and protein expression. Although Fmo3 mRNA levels increased significantly following APAP treatment, protein expression changed marginally. In contrast, both Fmo3 mRNA and protein expression were significantly higher in APAP autoprotected livers. Unlike male C57BL/6J mice, female mice have ∼80-times higher constitutive Fmo3 mRNA levels and are highly resistant to APAP hepatotoxicity. Coadministration of APAP with the FMO inhibitor methimazole rendered female mice susceptible to APAP hepatotoxicity, with no changes in susceptibility detected in male mice. Furthermore, a human hepatocyte cell line (HC-04) clone over-expressing human FMO3 showed enhanced resistance to APAP cytotoxicity. Taken together, these findings establish for the first time induction of Fmo3 protein expression and function by xenobiotic treatment. Our results also indicate that Fmo3 expression and function plays a role in protecting the liver from APAP-induced toxicity. Although the mechanism(s) of this protection remains to be elucidated, this work describes a novel protective function for this enzyme. PMID:24973094

  15. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in mice: Effect of age, frailty and exposure type.

    PubMed

    Kane, Alice E; Mitchell, Sarah J; Mach, John; Huizer-Pajkos, Aniko; McKenzie, Catriona; Jones, Brett; Cogger, Victoria; Le Couteur, David G; de Cabo, Rafael; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used analgesic that can cause severe hepatotoxicity in overdose. Despite old age and frailty being associated with extensive and long-term utilization of acetaminophen and a high prevalence of adverse drug reactions, there is limited information on the risks of toxicity from acetaminophen in old age and frailty. This study aimed to assess changes in the risk and mechanisms of hepatotoxicity from acute, chronic and sub-acute acetaminophen exposure with old age and frailty in mice. Young and old male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either acute (300 mg/kg via oral gavage), chronic (100 mg/kg/day in diet for six weeks) or sub-acute (250 mg/kg, t.i.d., for three days) acetaminophen, or saline control. Pre-dosing mice were scored for the mouse clinical frailty index, and after dosing serum and liver tissue were collected for assessment of toxicity and mechanisms. There were no differences with old age or frailty in the degree of hepatotoxicity induced by acute, chronic or subacute acetaminophen exposure as assessed by serum liver enzymes and histology. Age-related changes in the acetaminophen toxicity pathways included increased liver GSH concentrations, increased NQO1 activity and an increased pro- and anti-inflammatory response to acetaminophen in old age. Frailty-related changes included a negative correlation between frailty index and serum protein, albumin and ALP concentrations for some mouse groups. In conclusion, although there were changes in some pathways that would be expected to influence susceptibility to acetaminophen toxicity, there was no overall increase in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity with old age or frailty in mice. PMID:26615879

  16. Chitohexaose protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Barman, P K; Mukherjee, R; Prusty, B K; Suklabaidya, S; Senapati, S; Ravindran, B

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-para-aminophenol (APAP)) toxicity causes acute liver failure by inducing centrilobular hepatic damage as a consequence of mitochondrial oxidative stress. Sterile inflammation, triggered by hepatic damage, facilitates gut bacterial translocation leading to systemic inflammation; TLR4-mediated activation by LPS has been shown to have a critical role in APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity. In this study, we demonstrate significant protection mediated by chitohexaose (Chtx) in mice challenged with a lethal dose of APAP (400 mg/kg b.w.). Decreased mortality by Chtx was associated with reduced hepatic damage, increased peritoneal migration of neutrophils, decreased mRNA expression of IL-1β as well as inhibition of inflammasome activation in liver. Further, an alternate mouse model of co-administration of a sublethal doses of APAP (200 mg/kg b.w.) and LPS (5 mg/kg b.w.) operating synergistically and mediating complete mortality was developed. Overwhelming inflammation, characterized by increased inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and so on) in liver as well as in circulation and mortality was demonstrable in this model. Also, Chtx administration mediated significant reversal of mortality in APAP+LPS co-administered mice, which was associated with reduced IL-1β in liver and plasma cytokines in this model. In conclusion, Chtx being a small molecular weight linear carbohydrate offers promise for clinical management of liver failure associated with APAP overdose. PMID:27171266

  17. Chitohexaose protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Barman, P K; Mukherjee, R; Prusty, B K; Suklabaidya, S; Senapati, S; Ravindran, B

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-para-aminophenol (APAP)) toxicity causes acute liver failure by inducing centrilobular hepatic damage as a consequence of mitochondrial oxidative stress. Sterile inflammation, triggered by hepatic damage, facilitates gut bacterial translocation leading to systemic inflammation; TLR4-mediated activation by LPS has been shown to have a critical role in APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity. In this study, we demonstrate significant protection mediated by chitohexaose (Chtx) in mice challenged with a lethal dose of APAP (400 mg/kg b.w.). Decreased mortality by Chtx was associated with reduced hepatic damage, increased peritoneal migration of neutrophils, decreased mRNA expression of IL-1β as well as inhibition of inflammasome activation in liver. Further, an alternate mouse model of co-administration of a sublethal doses of APAP (200 mg/kg b.w.) and LPS (5 mg/kg b.w.) operating synergistically and mediating complete mortality was developed. Overwhelming inflammation, characterized by increased inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and so on) in liver as well as in circulation and mortality was demonstrable in this model. Also, Chtx administration mediated significant reversal of mortality in APAP+LPS co-administered mice, which was associated with reduced IL-1β in liver and plasma cytokines in this model. In conclusion, Chtx being a small molecular weight linear carbohydrate offers promise for clinical management of liver failure associated with APAP overdose. PMID:27171266

  18. Contribution of acetaminophen-cysteine to acetaminophen nephrotoxicity in CD-1 mice: I. Enhancement of acetaminophen nephrotoxicity by acetaminophen-cysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Stephan T.; Bruno, Mary K.; Hennig, Gayle E.; Horton, Robert A.; Roberts, Jeanette C.; Cohen, Steven D. . E-mail: scohen@mcp.edu

    2005-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) nephrotoxicity has been observed both in humans and research animals. Recent studies suggest a contributory role for glutathione (GSH)-derived conjugates of APAP in the development of nephrotoxicity. Inhibitors of either {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT) or the probenecid-sensitive organic anion transporter ameliorate APAP-induced nephrotoxicity but not hepatotoxicity in mice and inhibition of {gamma}-GT similarly protected rats from APAP nephrotoxicity. Protection against APAP nephrotoxicity by disruption of these GSH conjugate transport and metabolism pathways suggests that GSH conjugates are involved. APAP-induced renal injury may involve the acetaminophen-glutathione (APAP-GSH) conjugate or a metabolite derived from APAP-GSH. Acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS) is a likely candidate for involvement in APAP nephrotoxicity because it is both a product of the {gamma}-GT pathway and a probable substrate for the organic anion transporter. The present experiments demonstrated that APAP-CYS treatment alone depleted renal but not hepatic glutathione (GSH) in a dose-responsive manner. This depletion of renal GSH may predispose the kidney to APAP nephrotoxicity by diminishing GSH-mediated detoxification mechanisms. Indeed, pretreatment of male CD-1 mice with APAP-CYS before challenge with a threshold toxic dose of APAP resulted in significant enhancement of APAP-induced nephrotoxicity. This was evidenced by histopathology and plasma blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels at 24 h after APAP challenge. APAP alone was minimally nephrotoxic and APAP-CYS alone produced no detectable injury. By contrast, APAP-CYS pretreatment did not alter the liver injury induced by APAP challenge. These data are consistent with there being a selective, contributory role for APAP-GSH-derived metabolites in APAP-induced renal injury that may involve renal-selective GSH depletion.

  19. N-acetylcysteine amide, a promising antidote for acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Khayyat, Ahdab; Tobwala, Shakila; Hart, Marcia; Ercal, Nuran

    2016-01-22

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP) is one of the most widely used over the counter antipyretic and analgesic medications. It is safe at therapeutic doses, but its overdose can result in severe hepatotoxicity, a leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in the USA. Depletion of glutathione (GSH) is one of the initiating steps in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity; therefore, one strategy for restricting organ damage is to restore GSH levels by using GSH prodrugs. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a GSH precursor, is the only currently approved antidote for an acetaminophen overdose. Unfortunately, fairly high doses and longer treatment times are required due to its poor bioavailability. In addition, oral and I.V. administration of NAC in a hospital setting are laborious and costly. Therefore, we studied the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), a novel antioxidant with higher bioavailability, and compared it with NAC in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice. Our results showed that NACA is better than NAC at a low dose (106mg/kg) in preventing oxidative stress and protecting against APAP-induced damage. NACA significantly increased GSH levels and the GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver to 66.5% and 60.5% of the control, respectively; and it reduced the level of ALT by 30%. However, at the dose used, NAC was not effective in combating the oxidative stress induced by APAP. Thus, NACA appears to be better than NAC in reducing the oxidative stress induced by APAP. It would be of great value in the health care field to develop drugs like NACA as more effective and safer options for the prevention and therapeutic intervention in APAP-induced toxicity. PMID:26602168

  20. Hydrogen-rich water protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Yao; Song, Si-Dong; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Rui-Yao; Wan, Yong; Yuan, Da-Wei; Wu, Qi-Fei; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the hepatoprotective effects and mechanisms of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury in mice. METHODS: Male mice were randomly divided into the following four groups: normal saline (NS) control group, mice received equivalent volumes of NS intraperitoneally (ip); HRW control group, mice were given HRW (same volume as the NS group); APAP + NS group, mice received NS ip for 3 d (5 mL/kg body weight, twice a day at 8 am and 5 pm) after APAP injection; APAP + HRW group, mice received HRW for 3 d (same as NS treatment) after APAP challenge. In the first experiment, mice were injected ip with a lethal dose of 750 mg/kg APAP to determine the 5-d survival rates. In the second experiment, mice were injected ip with a sub-lethal dose of 500 mg/kg. Blood and liver samples were collected at 24, 48, and 72 h after APAP injection to determine the degree of liver injury. RESULTS: Treatment with HRW resulted in a significant increase in the 5-d survival rate compared with the APAP + NS treatment group (60% vs 26.67%, P < 0.05). HRW could significantly decrease the serum alanine aminotransferase level (24 h: 4442 ± 714.3 U/L vs 6909 ± 304.8 U/L, P < 0.01; 48 h: 3782 ± 557.5 U/L vs 5111 ± 404 U/L, P < 0.01; and 3255 ± 337.4 U/L vs 3814 ± 250.2 U/L, P < 0.05, respectively) and aspartate aminotransferase level (24 h: 4683 ± 443.4 U/L vs 5307 ± 408.4 U/L, P < 0.05; 48 h: 3392 ± 377.6 U/L vs 4458 ± 423.6 U/L, P < 0.01; and 3354 ± 399.4 U/L vs 3778 ± 358 U/L, respectively) compared with the APAP treatment group. The alkaline phosphatase, total bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase levels had the same result. Seventy-two hours after APAP administration, liver samples were collected for pathological examination and serum was collected to detect the cytokine levels. The liver index (5.16% ± 0.26% vs 5.88% ± 0.073%, P < 0.05) and percentage of liver necrosis area (27.73% ± 0.58% vs 36.87% ± 0.49%, P < 0.01) were significantly

  1. Hepatoprotective Potential of Prosopis farcta Beans Extracts against Acetaminophen-induced Hepatotoxicity in Wister Rats

    PubMed Central

    Asadollahi, Akram; Sarir, Hadi; Omidi, Arash; Torbati, Mohammad Bagher Montazar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hepatotoxicity by acetaminophen is the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in many countries. Prosopis farcta beans extract (PFE) has some antioxidant property and may alleviate hepatotoxicity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate effects of PFE against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods: Thirty-six male Wistar albino rats weighing 220 ± 30 g were distributed into six groups. Two groups were pretreated with PFE (50 and 75 mg/kg) for 7 days before administration of acetaminophen (600 mg/kg). Two were given acetaminophen or PFE (50 and 75 mg/kg) alone, and the control received normal saline. One day after acetaminophen, administration blood samples were collected by cardiac puncture to determine liver function enzymes markers; aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase (AST and ALT), cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), high, low, and very low density lipoproteins (LDL and VLDL). Results: In acetaminophen-treated rat plasma AST (314 ± 18.54 vs. 126.37 ± 4.13), ALT (304 ± 49.24 vs. 187.33 ± 3.71), cholesterol, TG, LDL, and VLDL were increased by 149, 160, 37, 92, 60, and 94%, respectively. PFE at both doses significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated the above biochemical indices to near normal. Conclusions: Prosopis farcta beans extract (50 and 75 mg/kg) exhibited hepatoprotective activity against APAP. PMID:25400887

  2. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut . E-mail: jaeschke@email.arizona.edu

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-1{beta} and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose.

  3. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu, Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose. PMID:16781746

  4. Neutrophil activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Williams, C David; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Sharpe, Matthew R; McGill, Mitchell R; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into the systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution are controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: >800 U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for the determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed an increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91(phox)⁻/⁻ mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate that neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. PMID:24440789

  5. Neutrophil Activation During Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity and Repair in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Sharpe, Matthew R.; McGill, Mitchell R.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution is controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: >800U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91phox-/- mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. PMID:24440789

  6. Hepatoprotective and anti-oxidant activities of Glossogyne tenuifolia against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yu-Hsiu; Chen, Bing-Huei; Wang Hsu, Guoo-Shyng; Lin, Wan-Teng; Huang, Jui-Hua; Lu, Yi-Fa

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the anti-oxidative and hepatoprotective effects of Glossogyne tenuifolia (GT) Cassini, against acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in BALB/c mice. The extracts of GT by various solvents (hot water, 50% ethanol and 95% ethanol) were compared for their 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, reducing power, total phenolic content, and total anti-oxidant capacity. The results showed that hot water (HW) extracts of GT contained high levels of phenolics and exerted an excellent anti-oxidative capacity; thus, these were used in the animal experiment. The male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into control group, acetaminophen (APAP) group, positive control group and two GT groups at low (GT-L) and high (GT-H) dosages. The results showed that mice treated with GT had significantly decreased serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). GT-H increased glutathione levels and the ratios of reduced glutathione and oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) in the liver, and inhibited serum and lipid peroxidation. This experiment was the first to determine phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside in HW extract of GT. In conclusion, HW extract of GT may have potential anti-oxidant capacity and show hepatoprotective capacities in APAP-induced liver damaged mice. PMID:25384447

  7. Acetaminophen induces JNK/p38 signaling and activates the caspase-9-3-dependent cell death pathway in human mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    YIANG, GIOU-TENG; YU, YUNG-LUNG; LIN, KO-TING; CHEN, JEN-NI; CHANG, WEI-JUNG; WEI, CHYOU-WEI

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug. Generally, the therapeutic dose of APAP is clinically safe, however, high doses of APAP can cause acute liver and kidney injury. Therefore, the majority of previous studies have focussed on elucidating the mechanisms of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity, in addition to examining ways to treat these conditions in clinical cases. However, few studies have reported APAP-induced intoxication in human stem cells. Stem cells are important in cell proliferation, differentiation and repair during human development, particularly during fetal and child development. At present, whether APAP causes cytotoxic effects in human stem cells remains to be elucidated, therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the cellular effects of APAP treatment in human stem cells. The results of the present study revealed that high-dose APAP induced more marked cytotoxic effects in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) than in renal tubular cells. In addition, increased levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38, and activation of caspase-9/-3 cascade were observed in the APAP-treated hMSCs. By contrast, antioxidants, including vitamin C reduced APAP-induced augmentations in H2O2 levels, but did not inhibit the APAP-induced cytotoxic effects in the hMSCs. These results suggested that high doses of APAP may cause serious damage towards hMSCs. PMID:26096646

  8. Protective effects of Capparis sepiaria root extracts against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, V; Pandey, Ajay Shankar; Murali, Anita; Yoganarasimhan, S N

    2012-01-01

    Capparis sepiaria L. known as Himsra is an important drug in Ayurveda. In this study extracts of the root of C. sepiaria were evaluated for their hepatoprotective potential on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in albino Wistar rats. The extent of hepatoprotection was evaluated by estimating the serum levels of hepatic transaminases (SGPT and SGOT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total protein (TP), and bilirubin (total and direct). Aqueous and ethanol extracts of C. sepiaria significantly reduced the increased liver weight as well as serum levels of SGPT, SGOT, ALP, and bilirubin, and normalized the reduced serum protein levels in the treated rats. These observations were supported by the results of histopathology studies as well. The extracts were also subjected to preliminary organic analysis and chromatographic studies including HPTLC finger print studies. The results indicate that the roots of C. sepiaria show significant hepatoprotective effect on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity, thus substantiating its use as a potential hepatoprotective drug. PMID:22718675

  9. Possible Hepatotoxicity Associated With Intravenous Acetaminophen in a 36-Year-Old Female Patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Philip J.; Shen, Mark; Wang, Shan; Spiegler, Peter; Caraccio, Thomas; DeMuro, Jonas P.; Malone, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 36-year-old female who came into the emergency department with right-side abdominal pain. She went to the operating room for a diagnostic laparoscopy and appendectomy. She received intravenous (IV) acetaminophen every six hours both preoperatively and postoperatively for pain control. The patient’s aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels were elevated and peaked at 4,833 and 6,600 IU/L, respectively, from baselines of 14 and 15, respectively, while she was receiving 16 doses of IV acetaminophen. The patient was transferred to a regional liver transplant center for evaluation for a transplant. She was treated with IV N-acetylcysteine and discharged with a normal liver-function test without a transplant. This case report supports the possibility of hepatotoxicity associated with IV acetaminophen. PMID:25673962

  10. Potentiation in the intact rat of the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen by 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Nakae, D; Oakes, J W; Farber, J L

    1988-12-01

    Studies of the killing of cultured hepatocytes by acetaminophen indicate that the cells are injured by an oxidative stress that accompanies the metabolism of the toxin (J. L. Farber et al. (1988) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 267, 640-650). The present report documents that the essential features of the killing of cultured hepatocytes by acetaminophen are reproduced in the intact animal. Male rats had no evidence of liver necrosis 24 h after administration of up to 1000 mg/kg of acetaminophen. Induction of mixed function oxidase activity by 3-methylcholanthrene increased the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen. Inhibition of glutathione reductase by 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) potentiated the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen in male rats induced with 3-methylcholanthrene. Whereas the pretreatment with BCNU reduced the GSH content by 40%, a comparable depletion of GSH by diethylmaleate did not potentiate the toxicity of acetaminophen. The antioxidant diphenylphenylenediamine (25 mg/kg) and the ferric iron chelator deferoxamine (1000 mg/kg) prevented the liver necrosis produced by 500 mg/kg acetaminophen in rats pretreated with BCNU. Neither protective agent prevented the fall in GSH produced by acetaminophen. It is concluded the conditions of the irreversible injury of cultured hepatocytes by acetaminophen previously reported are not necessarily different from those that obtain in the intact rat with this toxin. PMID:3214175

  11. Hemizygosity of transsulfuration genes confers increased vulnerability against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiya, Yoshifumi; Kamata, Shotaro; Mitsuoka, Saya; Okada, Norihiko; Yoshida, Saori; Yamamoto, Junya; Ohkubo, Rika; Abiko, Yumi; Yamada, Hidenori; Akahoshi, Noriyuki; Kasahara, Tadashi; Kumagai, Yoshito; Ishii, Isao

    2015-01-15

    The key mechanism for acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent formation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, a potent electrophile that forms protein adducts. Previous studies revealed the fundamental role of glutathione, which binds to and detoxifies N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. Glutathione is synthesized from cysteine in the liver, and N-acetylcysteine is used as a sole antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Here, we evaluated the potential roles of transsulfuration enzymes essential for cysteine biosynthesis, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CTH), in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity using hemizygous (Cbs{sup +/−} or Cth{sup +/−}) and homozygous (Cth{sup −/−}) knockout mice. At 4 h after intraperitoneal acetaminophen injection, serum alanine aminotransferase levels were highly elevated in Cth{sup −/−} mice at 150 mg/kg dose, and also in Cbs{sup +/−} or Cth{sup +/−} mice at 250 mg/kg dose, which was associated with characteristic centrilobular hepatocyte oncosis. Hepatic glutathione was depleted while serum malondialdehyde accumulated in acetaminophen-injected Cth{sup −/−} mice but not wild-type mice, although glutamate–cysteine ligase (composed of catalytic [GCLC] and modifier [GCLM] subunits) became more activated in the livers of Cth{sup −/−} mice with lower K{sub m} values for Cys and Glu. Proteome analysis using fluorescent two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis revealed 47 differentially expressed proteins after injection of 150 mg acetaminophen/kg into Cth{sup −/−} mice; the profiles were similar to 1000 mg acetaminophen/kg-treated wild-type mice. The prevalence of Cbs or Cth hemizygosity is estimated to be 1:200–300 population; therefore, the deletion or polymorphism of either transsulfuration gene may underlie idiosyncratic acetaminophen vulnerability along with the differences in Cyp, Gclc, and Gclm gene activities. - Highlights: • Cbs{sup +/−}, Cth{sup +/−}, and

  12. Mouse strain-dependent caspase activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity does not result in apoptosis or modulation of inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Koerner, Michael R.; Lampe, Jed N.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-12-15

    The mechanisms of acetaminophen (APAP)-mediated hepatic oncotic necrosis have been extensively characterized. However, it was recently demonstrated that fed CD-1 mice have a transient caspase activation which initiates apoptosis. To evaluate these findings in more detail, outbred (Swiss Webster, SW) and inbred (C57BL/6) mice were treated with APAP with or without pan-caspase inhibitor and compared to the apoptosis model of galactosamine (GalN)/endotoxin (ET). Fasted or fed APAP-treated C57BL/6 mice showed no evidence of caspase-3 processing or activity. Interestingly, a minor, temporary increase in caspase-3 processing and activity (150% above baseline) was observed after APAP treatment only in fed SW mice. The degree of caspase-3 activation in SW mice after APAP was minor compared to that observed in GalN/ET-treated mice (1600% above baseline). The pancaspase inhibitor attenuated caspase activation and resulted in increased APAP-induced injury (plasma ALT, necrosis scoring). The caspase inhibitor did not affect apoptosis because regardless of treatment only < 0.5% of hepatocytes showed consistent apoptotic morphology after APAP. In contrast, > 20% apoptotic cells were observed in GalN/ET-treated mice. Presence of the caspase inhibitor altered hepatic glutathione levels in SW mice, which could explain the exacerbation of injury. Additionally, the infiltration of hepatic neutrophils was not altered by the fed state of either mouse strain. Conclusion: Minor caspase-3 activation without apoptotic cell death can be observed only in fed mice of some outbred strains. These findings suggest that although the severity of APAP-induced liver injury varies between fed and fasted animals, the mechanism of cell death does not fundamentally change. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer During acetaminophen overdose caspase-3 can be activated in fed mice of certain outbred strains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hepatic ATP levels are not the determining factor for caspase

  13. Curative Effects of Thiacremonone against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Hepatic Failure via Inhibition of Proinflammatory Cytokines Production and Infiltration of Cytotoxic Immune Cells and Kupffer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Ri; Ban, Jung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Lee, Yong Moon; Yoon, Yeo Pyo; Eum, So Young; Jeong, Heon Sang; Yoon, Do-young; Han, Sang Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2013-01-01

    High doses of acetaminophen (APAP; N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) cause severe hepatotoxicity after metabolic activation by cytochrome P450 2E1. This study was undertaken to examine the preventive effects of thiacremonone, a compound extracted from garlic, on APAP-induced acute hepatic failure in male C57BL/6J. Mice received with 500 mg/kg APAP after a 7-day pretreatment with thiacremonone (10–50 mg/kg). Thiacremonone inhibited the APAP-induced serum ALT and AST levels in a dose-dependent manner, and markedly reduced the restricted area of necrosis and inflammation by administration of APAP. Thiacremonone also inhibited the APAP-induced depletion of intracellular GSH, induction of nitric oxide, and lipid peroxidation as well as expression of P450 2E1. After APAP injection, the numbers of Kupffer cells, natural killer cells, and cytotoxic T cells were elevated, but the elevated cell numbers in the liver were reduced in thiacremonone pretreated mice. The expression levels of I-309, M-CSF, MIG, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, IL-7, and IL-17 were increased by APAP treatment, which were inhibited in thiacremonone pretreated mice. These data indicate that thiacremonone could be a useful agent for the treatment of drug-induced hepatic failure and that the reduction of cytotoxic immune cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine production may be critical for the prevention of APAP-induced acute liver toxicity. PMID:23935693

  14. MOUSE STRAIN-DEPENDENT CASPASE ACTIVATION DURING ACETAMINOPHEN HEPATOTOXICITY DOES NOT RESULT IN APOPTOSIS OR MODULATION OF INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. David; Koerner, Michael R.; Lampe, Jed N.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of acetaminophen (APAP)-mediated hepatic oncotic necrosis have been extensively characterized. However, it was recently demonstrated that fed CD-1 mice have a transient caspase activation which initiates apoptosis. To evaluate these findings in more detail, outbred (Swiss Webster, SW) and inbred (C57BL/6) mice were treated with APAP with or without pan-caspase inhibitor and compared to the apoptosis model of galactosamine (GalN)/endotoxin (ET). Fasted or fed APAP-treated C57BL/6 mice showed no evidence of caspase-3 processing or activity. Interestingly, a minor, temporary increase in caspase-3 processing and activity (150% above baseline) was observed after APAP treatment only in fed SW mice. The degree of caspase-3 activation in SW mice after APAP was minor compared to that observed in GalN/ET-treated mice (1600% above baseline). The pancaspase inhibitor attenuated caspase activation and resulted in increased APAP-induced injury (plasma ALT, necrosis scoring). The caspase inhibitor did not affect apoptosis because regardless of treatment only <0.5% of hepatocytes showed consistent apoptotic morphology after APAP. In contrast, >20% apoptotic cells were observed in GalN/ET-treated mice. Presence of the caspase inhibitor altered hepatic glutathione levels in SW mice, which could explain the exacerbation of injury. Additionally, the infiltration of hepatic neutrophils was not altered by the fed state of either mouse strain. Conclusion: Minor caspase-3 activation without apoptotic cell death can be observed only in fed mice of some outbred strains. These findings suggest that although the severity of APAP-induced liver injury varies between fed and fasted animals, the mechanism of cell death does not fundamentally change. PMID:22023962

  15. The gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by inhibiting cytochrome P450 enzymes and c-jun N-terminal kinase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Kuo; Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Xie, Yuchao; Farhood, Anwar; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-12-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. Although many aspects of the mechanism are known, recent publications suggest that gap junctions composed of connexin32 function as critical intercellular communication channels which transfer cytotoxic mediators into neighboring hepatocytes and aggravate liver injury. However, these studies did not consider off-target effects of reagents used in these experiments, especially the gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate (2-APB). In order to assess the mechanisms of protection of 2-APB in vivo, male C56Bl/6 mice were treated with 400 mg/kg APAP to cause extensive liver injury. This injury was prevented when animals were co-treated with 20 mg/kg 2-APB and was attenuated when 2-APB was administered 1.5 h after APAP. However, the protection was completely lost when 2-APB was given 4–6 h after APAP. Measurement of protein adducts and c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation indicated that 2-APB reduced both protein binding and JNK activation, which correlated with hepatoprotection. Although some of the protection was due to the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), in vitro experiments clearly demonstrated that 2-APB directly inhibits cytochrome P450 activities. In addition, JNK activation induced by phorone and tert-butylhydroperoxide in vivo was inhibited by 2-APB. The effects against APAP toxicity in vivo were reproduced in primary cultured hepatocytes without use of DMSO and in the absence of functional gap junctions. We conclude that the protective effect of 2-APB was caused by inhibition of metabolic activation of APAP and inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway and not by blocking connexin32-based gap junctions. - Highlights: • 2-APB protected against APAP-induced liver injury in mice in vivo and in vitro • 2-APB protected by inhibiting APAP metabolic activation and JNK signaling pathway • DMSO inhibited APAP metabolic activation as the solvent of 2-APB

  16. Acetaminophen-NAPQI Hepatotoxicity: A Cell Line Model System Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Ann M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Jenkins, Gregory D.; Batzler, Anthony J.; Pelleymounter, Linda L.; Kalari, Krishna R.; Ji, Yuan; Chai, Yubo; Nordgren, Kendra K. S.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen is the leading cause of acute hepatic failure in many developed nations. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is mediated by the reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinonimine (NAPQI). We performed a “discovery” genome-wide association study using a cell line–based model system to study the possible contribution of genomics to NAPQI-induced cytotoxicity. A total of 176 lymphoblastoid cell lines from healthy subjects were treated with increasing concentrations of NAPQI. Inhibiting concentration 50 values were determined and were associated with “glutathione pathway” gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genome-wide basal messenger RNA expression, as well as with 1.3 million genome-wide SNPs. A group of SNPs in linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 3 was highly associated with NAPQI toxicity. The p value for rs2880961, the SNP with the lowest p value, was 1.88 × 10−7. This group of SNPs mapped to a “gene desert,” but chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated binding of several transcription factor proteins including heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and HSF2, at or near rs2880961. These chromosome 3 SNPs were not significantly associated with variation in basal expression for any of the genome-wide genes represented on the Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChip. We have used a cell line–based model system to identify a SNP signal associated with NAPQI cytotoxicity. If these observations are validated in future clinical studies, this SNP signal might represent a potential biomarker for risk of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear. PMID:21177773

  17. Acetaminophen-induced microvascular injury in the rat liver: protection with misoprostol.

    PubMed

    Lim, S P; Andrews, F J; O'Brien, P E

    1995-12-01

    Studies into the mechanism of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity have focused mainly at the hepatocellular level. This study aimed to investigate the effect of acetaminophen on the hepatic microvasculature using a vascular casting technique. Acetaminophen was administered at a dose of 650 mg/kg body weight (intraperitoneally) to fasted male Long Evans rats. Microvascular casting was performed at various points after drug administration. Liver casts from control rats showed good patency with normal hepatic microvasculature. Thirty-six hours after overdose with acetaminophen, liver casts showed rounded centrilobular cavities of various sizes, representing regions in which cast-filled sinusoids were absent with relatively normal microvasculature within periportal regions. Evidence of microvascular injury occurred as early as 5 hours after acetaminophen overdose. This injury consisted of changes to centrilobular sinusoids including areas of incomplete filling and dilated centrilobular sinusoids. Misoprostol (a prostaglandin E1 analog) treatment (6 x 25 micrograms/kg) given before and after acetaminophen administration markedly reduced the extent of microvascular injury with only small focal unfilled areas in the casts and a generally intact microvasculature. In conclusion, this study shows that overdosage with APAP resulted in an extensive, characteristic pattern of hepatic microvascular injury in the centrilobular region. The results also suggest that microvascular injury is an early event in the pathogenesis of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Misoprostol was found to protect against injury occurring at the microvascular level. PMID:7489988

  18. Ascorbic acid prevents acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice by ameliorating glutathione recovery and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Lee, Jaeyong; Nabeshima, Atsunori; Homma, Takujiro; Kang, Eun Sil; Saito, Yuka; Yamada, Sohsuke; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Ken-Ichi; Miyata, Satoshi; Fujii, Junichi

    2016-08-15

    Aldehyde reductase (AKR1A) plays a role in the biosynthesis of ascorbic acid (AsA), and AKR1A-deficient mice produce about 10-15% of the AsA that is produced by wild-type mice. We found that acetaminophen (AAP) hepatotoxicity was aggravated in AKR1A-deficient mice. The pre-administration of AsA in the drinking water markedly ameliorated the AAP hepatotoxicity in the AKR1A-deficient mice. Treatment of the mice with AAP decreased both glutathione and AsA levels in the liver in the early phase after AAP administration, and an AsA deficiency delayed the recovery of the glutathione content in the healing phase. While in cysteine supply systems; a neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1, a cystine transporter xCT, enzymes for the transsulfuration pathway, and autophagy markers, were all elevated in the liver as the result of the AAP treatment, the AsA deficiency suppressed their induction. Thus, AsA appeared to exert a protective effect against AAP hepatotoxicity by ameliorating the supply of cysteine that is available for glutathione synthesis as a whole. Because some drugs produce reactive oxygen species, resulting in the consumption of glutathione during the metabolic process, the intake of sufficient amounts of AsA would be beneficial for protecting against the hepatic damage caused by such drugs. PMID:27288086

  19. Recent Updates on Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity: The Role of Nrf2 in Hepatoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Gum, Sang Il

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) known as paracetamol is the main ingredient in Tylenol, which has analgesic and anti-pyretic properties. Inappropriate use of APAP causes major morbidity and mortality secondary to hepatic failure. Overdose of APAP depletes the hepatic glutathione (GSH) rapidly, and the metabolic intermediate leads to hepatocellular death. This article reviews the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity and provides an overview of current research studies. Pharmacokinetics including metabolism (activation and detoxification), subsequent transport (efflux)-facilitating excretion, and some other aspects related to toxicity are discussed. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated gene battery plays a critical role in the multiple steps associated with the mitigation of APAP toxicity. The role of Nrf2 as a protective target is described, and potential natural products inhibiting APAP toxicity are outlined. This review provides an update on the mechanism of APAP toxicity and highlights the beneficial role of Nrf2 and specific natural products in hepatoprotection. PMID:24386516

  20. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and HIF-1{alpha} induction in acetaminophen toxicity in mice occurs without hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S.; Hennings, Leah; Letzig, Lynda; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hinson, Jack A.; James, Laura P.

    2011-05-01

    HIF-1{alpha} is a nuclear factor important in the transcription of genes controlling angiogenesis including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both hypoxia and oxidative stress are known mechanisms for the induction of HIF-1{alpha}. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are mechanistically important in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the mouse. MPT may occur as a result of oxidative stress and leads to a large increase in oxidative stress. We previously reported the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in mice with APAP toxicity and have shown that VEGF is important in hepatocyte regeneration following APAP toxicity. The following study was performed to examine the relative contribution of hypoxia versus oxidative stress to the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Time course studies using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole showed no staining for pimonidazole at 1 or 2 h in B6C3F1 mice treated with APAP. Staining for pimonidazole was present in the midzonal to periportal regions at 4, 8, 24 and 48 h and no staining was observed in centrilobular hepatocytes, the sites of the toxicity. Subsequent studies with the MPT inhibitor cyclosporine A showed that cyclosporine A (CYC; 10 mg/kg) reduced HIF-1{alpha} induction in APAP treated mice at 1 and 4 h and did not inhibit the metabolism of APAP (depletion of hepatic non-protein sulfhydryls and hepatic protein adduct levels). The data suggest that HIF-1{alpha} induction in the early stages of APAP toxicity is secondary to oxidative stress via a mechanism involving MPT. In addition, APAP toxicity is not mediated by a hypoxia mechanism.

  1. Parallelogram approach using rat-human in vitro and rat in vivo toxicogenomics predicts acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in humans.

    PubMed

    Kienhuis, Anne S; van de Poll, Marcel C G; Wortelboer, Heleen; van Herwijnen, Marcel; Gottschalk, Ralph; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Boorsma, André; Paules, Richard S; Kleinjans, Jos C S; Stierum, Rob H; van Delft, Joost H M

    2009-02-01

    The frequent use of rodent hepatic in vitro systems in pharmacological and toxicological investigations challenges extrapolation of in vitro results to the situation in vivo and interspecies extrapolation from rodents to humans. The toxicogenomics approach may aid in evaluating relevance of these model systems for human risk assessment by direct comparison of toxicant-induced gene expression profiles and infers mechanisms between several systems. In the present study, acetaminophen (APAP) was used as a model compound to compare gene expression responses between rat and human using in vitro cellular models, hepatocytes, and between rat in vitro and in vivo. Comparison at the level of modulated biochemical pathways and biological processes rather than at that of individual genes appears preferable as it increases the overlap between various systems. Pathway analysis by T-profiler revealed similar biochemical pathways and biological processes repressed in rat and human hepatocytes in vitro, as well as in rat liver in vitro and in vivo. Repressed pathways comprised energy-consuming biochemical pathways, mitochondrial function, and oxidoreductase activity. The present study is the first that used a toxicogenomics-based parallelogram approach, extrapolating in vitro to in vivo and interspecies, to reveal relevant mechanisms indicative of APAP-induced liver toxicity in humans in vivo. PMID:19008212

  2. Induction of Mrp3 and Mrp4 transporters during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is dependent on Nrf2

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksunes, Lauren M. Slitt, Angela L. Maher, Jonathan M. Augustine, Lisa M. Goedken, Michael J. Chan, Jefferson Y. Cherrington, Nathan J. Klaassen, Curtis D. Manautou, Jose E.

    2008-01-01

    The transcription factor NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mediates detoxification and antioxidant gene transcription following electrophile exposure and oxidative stress. Mice deficient in Nrf2 (Nrf2-null) are highly susceptible to acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity and exhibit lower basal and inducible expression of cytoprotective genes, including NADPH quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1) and glutamate cysteine ligase (catalytic subunit, or Gclc). Administration of toxic APAP doses to C57BL/6J mice generates electrophilic stress and subsequently increases levels of hepatic Nqo1, Gclc and the efflux multidrug resistance-associated protein transporters 1-4 (Mrp1-4). It was hypothesized that induction of hepatic Mrp1-4 expression following APAP is Nrf2 dependent. Plasma and livers from wild-type (WT) and Nrf2-null mice were collected 4, 24 and 48 h after APAP. As expected, hepatotoxicity was greater in Nrf2-null compared to WT mice. Gene and protein expression of Mrp1-4 and the Nrf2 targets, Nqo1 and Gclc, was measured. Induction of Nqo1 and Gclc mRNA and protein after APAP was dependent on Nrf2 expression. Similarly, APAP treatment increased hepatic Mrp3 and Mrp4 mRNA and protein in WT, but not Nrf2-null mice. Mrp1 was induced in both genotypes after APAP, suggesting that elevated expression of this transporter was independent of Nrf2. Mrp2 was not induced in either genotype at the mRNA or protein levels. These results show that Nrf2 mediates induction of Mrp3 and Mrp4 after APAP but does not affect Mrp1 or Mrp2. Thus coordinated regulation of detoxification enzymes and transporters by Nrf2 during APAP hepatotoxicity is a mechanism by which hepatocytes may limit intracellular accumulation of potentially toxic chemicals.

  3. Biliary excretion of acetaminophen-glutathione as an index of toxic activation of acetaminophen: effect of chemicals that alter acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Madhu, C.; Gregus, Z.; Klaassen, C.D.

    1989-03-01

    Acetaminophen (AA) is converted, presumably by cytochrome P-450, to an electrophile which is conjugated with glutathione (GS). AA-GS is excreted into bile, therefore the biliary excretion rate of AA-GS may reflect the rate of activation of AA in vivo. In order to test this hypothesis, the effect of agents capable of altering the activation of AA including cytochrome P-450 inducers and inhibitors, cobaltous chloride which decreases the amount of P-450, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors (indomethacin and naproxen), antioxidants (butylated hydroxyanisole, alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid and ascorbic acid palmitate) and other chemicals known to decrease AA hepatotoxicity (dimethylsulfoxide and cysteamine), on the biliary excretion of AA-GS was studied in hamsters, the species most sensitive to AA-induced hepatotoxicity. The biliary excretion of AA-GS increased linearly up to 1 mmol/kg of AA i.v., but at higher dosages exhibited saturation kinetics. Dosages above 0.5 mmol/kg lowered hepatic GS concentration. Of the cytochrome P-450 inducers, 3-methylcholanthrene and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, increased the biliary excretion of AA-GS (2.9- and 3.2-fold, respectively) whereas ethanol and isoniazid did not affect it, and pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile tended to decrease it (43%). Phenobarbital tended to increase the biliary excretion of AA-GS, but not in a statistically significant manner. Several cytochrome P-450 inhibitors (metyrapone, 8-methoxypsoralen, 2-(4,6-dichloro-biphenyloxy) ethylamine, alpha-naphthoflavone and cimetidine) decreased the biliary excretion of AA-GS, although SKF 525-A and piperonyl butoxide did not. Cobaltous chloride decreased dramatically the biliary excretion of AA-GS.

  4. Robust protein nitration contributes to acetaminophen-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and acute liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Jang, Sehwan; Banerjee, Atrayee; Hardwick, James P.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP), a widely-used analgesic agent, can cause liver injury through increased nitrative stress, leading to protein nitration. However, the identities of nitrated proteins and their roles in hepatotoxicity are poorly understood. Thus, we aimed at studying the mechanism of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity by systematic identification and characterization of nitrated proteins in the absence or presence of an anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). The levels of nitrated proteins markedly increased at 2 h in mice exposed to a single APAP dose (350 mg/kg ip), which caused severe liver necrosis at 24 h. Protein nitration and liver necrosis were minimal in mice exposed to nontoxic 3-hydroxyacetanilide or animals co-treated with APAP and NAC. Mass-spectral analysis of the affinity-purified nitrated proteins identified numerous mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins including mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, Mn-superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, ATP synthase, and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase involved in anti-oxidant defense, energy supply, and fatty acid metabolism, respectively. Immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblot with anti-3-NT antibody confirmed that the aforementioned proteins were nitrated in APAP-exposed mice but not in NAC-co-treated mice. Consistently, NAC co-treatment significantly restored the suppressed activities of these enzymes. Thus, we demonstrate a new mechanism by which many nitrated proteins with concomitantly suppressed activities promotes APAP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and hepatotoxicity. PMID:23454065

  5. Chitosan and blueberry treatment induces arginase activity and inhibits nitric oxide production during acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ozcelik, Eda; Uslu, Sema; Burukoglu, Dilek; Musmul, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Background: Liver diseases have become a major problem of the worldwide. More than 50% of all cases of liver failure can be attributed to drugs. Among these, acetaminophen is the most common cause. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the the hepatoprotective effects of blueberry and chitosan on tissue arginase activity, ornithine and nitric oxide levels during the acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Acetaminophen (250 mg/kg body weight per day), blueberry (60 mg/kg body weight per day) and, chitosan (200 mg/kg body weight per day) were administered to the rats by oral gavage during the experimental period. Results: Blueberry and chitosan significantly decreased liver arginase activity and ornithine levelsand and increased nitric oxide levels. Glutathione levels were remarkably increased by chitosan and blueberry treatments. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that blueberry and chitosan effectively protected against the acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. The hepatoprotective effect afforded by blueberry and chitosan can be attributed to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:24991095

  6. The spleen as an extramedullary source of inflammatory cells responding to acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Mili; Gardner, Carol R; Sun, Richard; Choi, Hyejeong; Lad, Sonali; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2016-08-01

    Macrophages have been shown to play a role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity, contributing to both pro- and anti-inflammatory processes. In these studies, we analyzed the role of the spleen as an extramedullary source of hepatic macrophages. APAP administration (300mg/kg, i.p.) to control mice resulted in an increase in CD11b(+) infiltrating Ly6G(+) granulocytic and Ly6G(-) monocytic cells in the spleen and the liver. The majority of the Ly6G(+) cells were also positive for the monocyte/macrophage activation marker, Ly6C, suggesting a myeloid derived suppressor cell (MDSC) phenotype. By comparison, Ly6G(-) cells consisted of 3 subpopulations expressing high, intermediate, and low levels of Ly6C. Splenectomy was associated with increases in mature (F4/80(+)) and immature (F4/80(-)) pro-inflammatory Ly6C(hi) macrophages and mature anti-inflammatory (Ly6C(lo)) macrophages in the liver after APAP; increases in MDSCs were also noted in the livers of splenectomized (SPX) mice after APAP. This was associated with increases in APAP-induced expression of chemokine receptors regulating pro-inflammatory (CCR2) and anti-inflammatory (CX3CR1) macrophage trafficking. In contrast, APAP-induced increases in pro-inflammatory galectin-3(+) macrophages were blunted in livers of SPX mice relative to control mice, along with hepatic expression of TNF-α, as well as the anti-inflammatory macrophage markers, FIZZ-1 and YM-1. These data demonstrate that multiple subpopulations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cells respond to APAP-induced injury, and that these cells originate from distinct hematopoietic reservoirs. PMID:27163765

  7. Toxicogenomics-based prediction of acetaminophen-induced liver injury using human hepatic cell systems.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Robim M; Heymans, Anja; De Boe, Veerle; Sachinidis, Agapios; Chaudhari, Umesh; Govaere, Olivier; Roskams, Tania; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera; De Kock, Joery

    2016-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (hHEP), human HepaRG and HepG2 cell lines are the most used human liver-based in vitro models for hepatotoxicity testing, including screening of drug-induced liver injury (DILI)-inducing compounds. hHEP are the reference hepatic in vitro system, but their availability is limited and the cells available for toxicology studies are often of poor quality. Hepatic cell lines on the other hand are highly proliferative and represent an inexhaustible hepatic cell source. However, these hepatoma-derived cells do not represent the population diversity and display reduced hepatic metabolism. Alternatively, stem cell-derived hepatic cells, which can be produced in high numbers and can differentiate into multiple cell lineages, are also being evaluated as a cell source for in vitro hepatotoxicity studies. Human skin-derived precursors (hSKP) are post-natal stem cells that, after conversion towards hepatic cells (hSKP-HPC), respond to hepatotoxic compounds in a comparable way as hHEP. In the current study, four different human hepatic cell systems (hSKP-HPC, hHEP, HepaRG and HepG2) are evaluated for their capacity to predict hepatic toxicity. Their hepatotoxic response to acetaminophen (APAP) exposure is compared to data obtained from patients suffering from APAP-induced acute liver failure (ALF). The results indicate that hHEP, HepaRG and hSKP-HPC identify comparable APAP-induced hepatotoxic functions and that HepG2 cells show the slightest hepatotoxic response. Pathway analyses further points out that HepaRG cells show the highest predicted activation of the functional genes related to 'damage of liver', followed by hSKP-HPC and hHEP cells that generated similar results. HepG2 did not show any activation of this function. PMID:26497421

  8. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-10-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose. PMID:26434492

  9. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose. PMID:26434492

  10. ROLE OF CASPASE-1 AND INTERLEUKIN-1β IN ACETAMINOPHEN-INDUCED HEPATIC INFLAMMATION AND LIVER INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. David; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose can result in serious liver injury and potentially death. Toxicity is dependent on metabolism of APAP to a reactive metabolite initiating a cascade of intracellular events resulting in hepatocellular necrosis. This early injury triggers a sterile inflammatory response with formation of cytokines and innate immune cell infiltration in the liver. Recently, IL-1β signaling has been implicated in the potentiating of APAP-induced liver injury. To test if IL-1β formation through caspase-1 is critical for the pathophysiology, C57Bl/6 mice were treated with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VD-fmk to block the inflammasome-mediated maturation of IL-1β during APAP overdose (300 mg/kg APAP). This intervention did not affect IL-1β gene transcription but prevented the increase in IL-1β plasma levels. However, APAP-induced liver injury and neutrophil infiltration was not affected. Similarly, liver injury and the hepatic neutrophilic inflammation were not attenuated in IL-1-receptor-1 deficient mice compared to wild type animals. To evaluate the potential of IL-1β to increase injury, mice were given pharmacological doses of IL-1β after APAP overdose. Despite increased systemic activation of neutrophils and recruitment into the liver, there was no alteration in injury. We conclude that endogenous IL-1β formation after APAP overdose is insufficient to activate and recruit neutrophils into the liver or cause liver injury. Even high pharmacological doses of IL-1β, which induce hepatic neutrophil accumulation and activation, do not enhance APAP-induced liver injury. Thus, IL-1 signaling is irrelevant for APAP hepatotoxicity. The inflammatory cascade is a less important therapeutic target than intracellular signaling pathways to attenuate APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:20637792

  11. Role of caspase-1 and interleukin-1beta in acetaminophen-induced hepatic inflammation and liver injury.

    PubMed

    Williams, C David; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2010-09-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose can result in serious liver injury and potentially death. Toxicity is dependent on metabolism of APAP to a reactive metabolite initiating a cascade of intracellular events resulting in hepatocellular necrosis. This early injury triggers a sterile inflammatory response with formation of cytokines and innate immune cell infiltration in the liver. Recently, IL-1beta signaling has been implicated in the potentiation of APAP-induced liver injury. To test if IL-1beta formation through caspase-1 is critical for the pathophysiology, C57Bl/6 mice were treated with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VD-fmk to block the inflammasome-mediated maturation of IL-1beta during APAP overdose (300 mg/kg APAP). This intervention did not affect IL-1beta gene transcription but prevented the increase in IL-1beta plasma levels. However, APAP-induced liver injury and neutrophil infiltration were not affected. Similarly, liver injury and the hepatic neutrophilic inflammation were not attenuated in IL-1-receptor-1 deficient mice compared to wild-type animals. To evaluate the potential of IL-1beta to increase injury, mice were given pharmacological doses of IL-1beta after APAP overdose. Despite increased systemic activation of neutrophils and recruitment into the liver, there was no alteration in injury. We conclude that endogenous IL-1beta formation after APAP overdose is insufficient to activate and recruit neutrophils into the liver or cause liver injury. Even high pharmacological doses of IL-1beta, which induce hepatic neutrophil accumulation and activation, do not enhance APAP-induced liver injury. Thus, IL-1 signaling is irrelevant for APAP hepatotoxicity. The inflammatory cascade is a less important therapeutic target than intracellular signaling pathways to attenuate APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:20637792

  12. Role of caspase-1 and interleukin-1{beta} in acetaminophen-induced hepatic inflammation and liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2010-09-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose can result in serious liver injury and potentially death. Toxicity is dependent on metabolism of APAP to a reactive metabolite initiating a cascade of intracellular events resulting in hepatocellular necrosis. This early injury triggers a sterile inflammatory response with formation of cytokines and innate immune cell infiltration in the liver. Recently, IL-1{beta} signaling has been implicated in the potentiation of APAP-induced liver injury. To test if IL-1{beta} formation through caspase-1 is critical for the pathophysiology, C57Bl/6 mice were treated with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VD-fmk to block the inflammasome-mediated maturation of IL-1{beta} during APAP overdose (300 mg/kg APAP). This intervention did not affect IL-1{beta} gene transcription but prevented the increase in IL-1{beta} plasma levels. However, APAP-induced liver injury and neutrophil infiltration were not affected. Similarly, liver injury and the hepatic neutrophilic inflammation were not attenuated in IL-1-receptor-1 deficient mice compared to wild-type animals. To evaluate the potential of IL-1{beta} to increase injury, mice were given pharmacological doses of IL-1{beta} after APAP overdose. Despite increased systemic activation of neutrophils and recruitment into the liver, there was no alteration in injury. We conclude that endogenous IL-1{beta} formation after APAP overdose is insufficient to activate and recruit neutrophils into the liver or cause liver injury. Even high pharmacological doses of IL-1{beta}, which induce hepatic neutrophil accumulation and activation, do not enhance APAP-induced liver injury. Thus, IL-1 signaling is irrelevant for APAP hepatotoxicity. The inflammatory cascade is a less important therapeutic target than intracellular signaling pathways to attenuate APAP-induced liver injury.

  13. Removal of opioid/acetaminophen combination prescription pain medications: assessing the evidence for hepatotoxicity and consequences of removal of these medications.

    PubMed

    Michna, Edward; Duh, Mei Sheng; Korves, Caroline; Dahl, June L

    2010-03-01

    Opioid/acetaminophen combination products are widely prescribed for the management of moderate to moderately severe pain. Acetaminophen, when improperly used, can lead to liver damage and even acute liver failure. In June 2009, an FDA advisory committee recommended elimination of prescription acetaminophen combination products because of the risk of hepatotoxicity associated with use of these medications. The FDA advisory committee reviewed numerous observational studies and adverse event reporting data. The aims of this article are to: 1) provide a summary and epidemiologic critique of the studies and evidence the FDA advisory committee reviewed; 2) examine the potential consequences, such as poorly managed pain or a shift to treatment with other medications with greater potential toxicity and/or restricted availability, if the FDA follows the advisory committee vote; and 3) outline alternate strategies the FDA should consider for reducing hepatotoxicity associated with opioid/acetaminophen combination products. PMID:20447306

  14. Mitochondrial bax translocation accelerates DNA fragmentation and cell necrosis in a murine model of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bajt, Mary Lynn; Farhood, Anwar; Lemasters, John J; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria generate reactive oxygen and peroxynitrite and release endonucleases during acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. Because mitochondrial translocation of Bax can initiate these events, we investigated the potential role of Bax in the pathophysiology of hepatic necrosis after 300 mg/kg APAP in fasted C57BL/6 mice. APAP overdose induced Bax translocation from the cytosol to the mitochondria as early as 1 h after APAP injection. At 6 h, there was extensive centrilobular nitrotyrosine staining (indicator for peroxynitrite formation) and nuclear DNA fragmentation. In addition, mitochondrial intermembrane proteins were released into the cytosol. Plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities of 5610 +/- 600 U/l indicated extensive necrotic cell death. Conversely, Bax gene knockout (Bax(-/-)) mice had 80% lower ALT activities, less DNA fragmentation, and less intermembrane protein release at 6 h. However, immunohistochemical staining for nitrotyrosine or APAP protein adducts did not show differences between wild-type and Bax(-/-) mice. In contrast to the early hepatoprotection in Bax(-/-) mice, plasma ALT activities (7605 +/- 480 U/l) and area of necrosis (53 +/- 6% hepatocytes) in wild-type animals was similar to values in Bax(-/-) mice at 12 h. In addition, there was no difference in DNA fragmentation or nitrotyrosine immunostaining. We concluded that the rapid mitochondrial Bax translocation after APAP overdose has no effect on peroxynitrite formation but that it contributes to the mitochondrial release of proteins, which cause nuclear DNA fragmentation. However, the persistent oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation in mitochondria may eventually trigger the permeability transition pore opening and release intermembrane proteins independently of Bax. PMID:17906064

  15. Tolerance to Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity in the Mouse Model of Autoprotection is Associated with Induction of Flavin-containing Monooxygenase-3 (FMO3) in Hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetaminophen (APAP) pretreatment with a low hepatotoxic dose in mice results in resistance to a second, higher dose of APAP (APAP autoprotection). Recent microarray work by our group showed a drastic induction of liver flavin containing monooxygenase-3 (Fmo3) mRNA expression in...

  16. 'Omics analysis of low dose acetaminophen intake demonstrates novel response pathways in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Jetten, Marlon J.A.; Gaj, Stan; Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa; Kok, Theo M. de; Delft, Joost H.M. van; Lommen, Arjen; Someren, Eugene P. van; Jennen, Danyel G.J.; Claessen, Sandra M.; Peijnenburg, Ad A.C.M.; Stierum, Rob H.; Kleinjans, Jos C.S.

    2012-03-15

    classic clinical chemistry tests. ► Metabolomic analyses led to the detection of five new acetaminophen metabolites. ► Low dose APAP changed immune and oxidative stress related gene expression in blood. ► APAP-induced full-genome human blood miRNA profiles were assessed for the first time.

  17. Identification of Identical Transcript Changes in Liver and Whole Blood during Acetaminophen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liwen; Bushel, Pierre R.; Chou, Jeff; Zhou, Tong; Watkins, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to identify mechanisms underlying drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in man has been hampered by the difficulty in obtaining liver tissue from patients. It has recently been proposed that whole blood toxicogenomics may provide a non-invasive means for mechanistic studies of human DILI. However, it remains unclear to what extent changes in whole blood transcriptome mirror those in liver mechanistically linked to hepatotoxicity. To address this question, we applied the program Extracting Patterns and Identifying co-expressed Genes (EPIG) to publically available toxicogenomic data obtained from rats treated with both toxic and subtoxic doses of acetaminophen (APAP). In a training set of animals, we identified genes (760 at 6 h and 185 at 24 h post dose) with similar patterns of expression in blood and liver during APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. The pathways represented in the coordinately regulated genes largely involved mitochondrial and immune functions. The identified expression signatures were then evaluated in a separate set of animals for discernment of APAP exposure level or APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. At 6 h, the gene sets from liver and blood had equally sufficient classification of APAP exposure levels. At 24 h when toxicity was evident, the gene sets did not perform well in evaluating APAP exposure doses, but provided accurate classification of dose-independent liver injury that was evaluated by serum ALT elevation in the blood. Only 38 genes were common to both the 6 and 24-h gene sets, but these genes had the same capability as the parent gene sets to discern the exposure level and degree of liver injury. Some of the parallel transcript changes reflect pathways that are relevant to APAP hepatotoxicity, including mitochondria and immune functions. However, the extent to which these changes reflect similar mechanisms of action in both tissues remains to be determined. PMID:22973295

  18. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Mossanen, J C; Tacke, F

    2015-04-01

    The induction of acute hepatic damage by acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol [APAP]), also termed paracetamol, is one of the most commonly used experimental models of acute liver injury in mice. The specific values of this model are the highly reproducible, dose-dependent hepatotoxicity of APAP and its outstanding translational importance, because acetaminophen overdose is one of the most frequent reasons for acute liver failure (ALF) in humans. However, preparation of concentrated APAP working solutions, application routes, fasting period and variability due to sex, genetic background or barrier environment represent important considerations to be taken into account before implementing this model. This standard operating procedure (SOP) provides a detailed protocol for APAP preparation and application in mice, aimed at facilitating comparability between research groups as well as minimizing animal numbers and distress. The mouse model of acetaminophen poisoning therefore helps to unravel the pathogenesis of APAP-induced toxicity or subsequent immune responses in order to explore new therapeutic interventions for improving the prognosis of ALF in patients. PMID:25835736

  19. Analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in a murine model of tolerance to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (autoprotection)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Meeghan A.; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E.; Lawton, Michael P.; Manautou, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400 mg/kg) and then challenged 48 h later with 600 mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24 h later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430{sub 2} GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. - Highlights: • Differential expression of genes in mice resistant to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. • Increased gene expression of Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 and Galectin-3. • Decrease in MAT1A expression and compensatory hepatocellular regeneration. • Two distinct gene

  20. Protection afforded by pre- or post-treatment with 4-phenylbutyrate against liver injury induced by acetaminophen overdose in mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Daisuke; Ishitsuka, Yoichi; Miyata, Keishi; Tomishima, Yoshiro; Kondo, Yuki; Irikura, Mitsuru; Iwawaki, Takao; Oike, Yuichi; Irie, Tetsumi

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol; APAP) is a widely used analgesic/antipyretic drug with few adverse effects at therapeutic doses; suicidal or unintentional overdose of APAP frequently induces severe hepatotoxicity. To explore a new and effective antidote for APAP hepatotoxicity, this study examined the effects of sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA) on liver injury induced by APAP overdose in mice. Liver injury was induced in C57BL/6 male mice by intraperitoneal injection of APAP (400mg/kg). The effects of 4-PBA (100-200mg/kg) treatment at 1h before the APAP injection were evaluated with serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and blood ammonia levels, hepatic pathological changes, including histopathology, DNA damage, nitrotyrosine formation, and mRNA or protein expression involved in the development of hepatotoxicity, such as X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and B-cell lymphoma 2 interacting mediator of cell death (Bim). In addition, glutathione depletion and CYP2E1 protein expression, which are measures of the metabolic conversion of APAP to a toxic metabolite, were examined. Furthermore, we examined the effects of post-treatment with 4-PBA against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. When administered at 1h before APAP injection, 4-PBA significantly prevented the increase in serum ALT and blood ammonia levels, centrilobular necrosis of hepatocytes, DNA fragmentation, and nitrotyrosine formation induced by APAP in mice. 4-PBA also inhibited hepatic Xbp1 mRNA splicing and JNK phosphorylation induced by APAP, but did not suppress CHOP and Bim mRNA and protein expression. In addition, 4-PBA had little effect on hepatic glutathione depletion and CYP2E1 expression, parameters of toxic APAP metabolite production. Post-treatment with 4-PBA administration at 1 or 2h after APAP injection also attenuated the increase in serum ALT and blood ammonia levels and hepatic pathological changes in APAP-induced

  1. Alleviative effects from boswellic acid on acetaminophen-induced hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lung-Che; Hu, Li-Hong; Yin, Mei-Chin

    2016-06-01

    Protective effects of boswellic acid (BA) against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in Balb/ cA mice were examined. BA, at 0.05 or 0.1%, was supplied for 4 weeks. Acute liver injury was induced by APAP treatment. Results showed that BA intake increased hepatic BA bioavailability. APAP treatment decreased glutathione (GSH) level, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) production; and lowered activity and protein expression of glutathione reductase (GR) and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in liver. BA intake at both doses alleviated subsequent APAP-induced oxidative stress by retaining GSH content, decreasing ROS and GSSG formations, reserving activity and expression of GR and HO-1 in liver, and lowering hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 activity and expression. APAP treatment enhanced hepatic levels of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. BA pre-intake diminished APAP-induced release of those inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. APAP upregulated hepatic protein expression of toll-like receptor (TLR)-3, TLR-4, MyD88, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p50, NF-κB p65 and JNK. BA pre-intake at both doses suppressed the expression of NF-κB p65 and p-JNK, and only at 0.1% down-regulated hepatic TLR-3, TLR-4 and MyD88 expression. APAP led to obvious foci of inflammatory cell infiltration in liver, determined by H&E stain. BA intake at both doses attenuated hepatic inflammatory infiltration. These findings support that boswellic acid is a potent hepatoprotective agent. PMID:27161000

  2. Co-administration of N-Acetylcysteine and Acetaminophen Efficiently Blocks Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Owumi, Solomon E; Andrus, James P; Herzenberg, Leonard A; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical Research Although acetaminophen (APAP) is an effective analgesic and anti-pyretic, APAP overdose is the most frequent cause of serious, often lethal, drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Administration of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) within 8 hours of APAP overdose effectively mitigates APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Thus, preventing APAP toxicity before it occurs by formulating APAP with NAC is logical and, as we show here in a mouse model, is effective in preventing APAP toxicity. Thus, toxic oral APAP doses sufficient to cause severe widespread liver damage do not cause significant damage when administered concurrently with equal amounts of NAC, that is, in the NAC-APAP treated animals, hepatic transaminases increase only marginally and liver architecture remains fully intact. Thus, we conclude that concomitant oral dosing with APAP and NAC can provide a convenient and effective way of preventing toxicity associated with large dosage of APAP. From a public health perspective, these findings support the concept that a co-formulation of APAP plus NAC is a viable over-the-counter (OTC) alternative to the current practice of providing APAP OTC and treating APAP toxicity if/when it occurs. In essence, our findings indicate that replacing the current OTC APAP with a safe and functional APAP/NAC formulation could prevent the accidental and intentional APAP toxicity that occurs today. PMID:26250417

  3. Acetaminophen

    MedlinePlus

    ... headaches, muscle aches, menstrual periods, colds and sore throats, toothaches, backaches, and reactions to vaccinations (shots), and ... acetaminophen to a child who has a sore throat that is severe or does not go away, ...

  4. Acetaminophen

    MedlinePlus

    ... use the device that comes in the product packaging.To insert an acetaminophen suppository into the rectum, ... U.S. be shown to be both safe and effective prior to marketing. Please see the FDA website ...

  5. Efficacy of free glutathione and niosomal glutathione in the treatment of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in cats

    PubMed Central

    Vulcano, L.A. Denzoin; Confalonieri, O.; Franci, R.; Tapia, M.O.; Soraci, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) administration results in hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats. The response to three different treatments against APAP poisoning was evaluated. Free glutathione (GSH) (200mg/kg), niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg) and free amino acids (180 mg/kg of N-acetylcysteine and 280 mg/kg of methionine) were administered to cats that were intoxicated with APAP (a single dose of 150 mg/kg, p.o.). Serum concentration of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) along with serum, liver and erythrocyte concentration of GSH and methemoglobin percentage were measured before and 4, 24 and 72 hours after APAP administration. Free GSH (200 mg/kg) and niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg) were effective in reducing hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats intoxicated with a dose of 150 mg/kg APAP. We conclude that both types of treatments can protect the liver and haemoglobin against oxidative stress in APAP intoxicated cats. Furthermore, our results showed that treatment with niosomal GSH represents an effective therapeutic approach for APAP poisoning. PMID:26623313

  6. Quantitative Liver-Specific Protein Fingerprint in Blood: A Signature for Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiyuan; Lausted, Christopher; Yoo, Hyuntae; Yan, Xiaowei; Brightman, Amy; Chen, Jiankui; Wang, Weizhi; Bu, Xiangli; Hood, Leroy

    2014-01-01

    We discuss here a new approach to detecting hepatotoxicity by employing concentration changes of liver-specific blood proteins during disease progression. These proteins are capable of assessing the behaviors of their cognate liver biological networks for toxicity or disease perturbations. Blood biomarkers are highly desirable diagnostics as blood is easily accessible and baths virtually all organs. Fifteen liver-specific blood proteins were identified as markers of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity using three proteomic technologies: label-free antibody microarrays, quantitative immunoblotting, and targeted iTRAQ mass spectrometry. Liver-specific blood proteins produced a toxicity signature of eleven elevated and four attenuated blood protein levels. These blood protein perturbations begin to provide a systems view of key mechanistic features of APAP-induced liver injury relating to glutathione and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) depletion, mitochondrial dysfunction, and liver responses to the stress. Two markers, elevated membrane-bound catechol-O-methyltransferase (MB-COMT) and attenuated retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), report hepatic injury significantly earlier than the current gold standard liver biomarker, alanine transaminase (ALT). These biomarkers were perturbed prior to onset of irreversible liver injury. Ideal markers should be applicable for both rodent model studies and human clinical trials. Five of these mouse liver-specific blood markers had human orthologs that were also found to be responsive to human hepatotoxicity. This panel of liver-specific proteins has the potential to effectively identify the early toxicity onset, the nature and extent of liver injury and report on some of the APAP-perturbed liver networks. PMID:24465277

  7. Effect of Methylsulfonylmethane Pretreatment on Aceta-minophen Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bohlooli, Shahab; Mohammadi, Sadollah; Amirshahrokhi, Keyvan; Mirzanejad-asl, Hafez; Yosefi, Mohammad; Mohammadi-Nei, Amir; Chinifroush, Mir Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a sulfur-containing compound found in a wide range of human foods including fruits, vegetables, grains and beverages. In this study the effect of MSM pretreatment on acetaminophen induced liver damage was investigated. Materials and Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were pretreated with 100 mg/kg MSM for one week. On day seven rats were received acetaminophen (850 mg/kg, intraperitoneal). Twenty-four hours later, blood samples were taken to determine serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Tissue samples of liver were also taken for the determination of the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA); total glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity together with histopathological observations. Results: High dose of acetaminophen administration caused a significant decrease in the GSH level of the liver tissue, which was accompanied with a decrease in SOD activity and increases in tissue MDA level and MPO activity. Serum ALT, AST levels were also found elevated in the acetaminophen-treated group. Pretreatment with MSM for one week was significantly attenuated all of these biochemical indices. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that MSM pretreatment could alleviate hepatic injury induced by acetaminophen intoxication, may be through its sulfur donating and antioxidant effects. PMID:24106592

  8. Evaluation of Hepatoprotective Activity of Adansonia digitata Extract on Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hanafy, Abeer; Aldawsari, Hibah M.; Badr, Jihan M.; Ibrahim, Amany K.; Abdel-Hady, Seham El-Sayed

    2016-01-01

    The methanol extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. (Malvaceae) was examined for its hepatoprotective activity against liver damage induced by acetaminophen in rats. The principle depends on the fact that administration of acetaminophen will be associated with development of oxidative stress. In addition, hepatospecific serum markers will be disturbed. Treatment of the rats with the methanol extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. prior to administration of acetaminophen significantly reduced the disturbance in liver function. Liver functions were measured by assessment of total protein, total bilirubin, ALP, ALT, and AST. Oxidative stress parameter and antioxidant markers were also evaluated. Moreover, histopathological evaluation was performed in order to assess liver case regarding inflammatory infiltration or necrosis. Animals were observed for any symptoms of toxicity after administration of extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. to ensure safety of the fruit extract. PMID:27118980

  9. Evaluation of Hepatoprotective Activity of Adansonia digitata Extract on Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hanafy, Abeer; Aldawsari, Hibah M; Badr, Jihan M; Ibrahim, Amany K; Abdel-Hady, Seham El-Sayed

    2016-01-01

    The methanol extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. (Malvaceae) was examined for its hepatoprotective activity against liver damage induced by acetaminophen in rats. The principle depends on the fact that administration of acetaminophen will be associated with development of oxidative stress. In addition, hepatospecific serum markers will be disturbed. Treatment of the rats with the methanol extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. prior to administration of acetaminophen significantly reduced the disturbance in liver function. Liver functions were measured by assessment of total protein, total bilirubin, ALP, ALT, and AST. Oxidative stress parameter and antioxidant markers were also evaluated. Moreover, histopathological evaluation was performed in order to assess liver case regarding inflammatory infiltration or necrosis. Animals were observed for any symptoms of toxicity after administration of extract of the fruit pulp of Adansonia digitata L. to ensure safety of the fruit extract. PMID:27118980

  10. Protective Effect of Baccharis trimera Extract on Acute Hepatic Injury in a Model of Inflammation Induced by Acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Pádua, Bruno da Cruz; Rossoni Júnior, Joamyr Victor; de Brito Magalhães, Cíntia Lopes; Chaves, Míriam Martins; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia; de Souza, Gustavo Henrique Bianco; Brandão, Geraldo Célio; Rodrigues, Ivanildes Vasconcelos; Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a commonly used analgesic and antipyretic. When administered in high doses, APAP is a clinical problem in the US and Europe, often resulting in severe liver injury and potentially acute liver failure. Studies have demonstrated that antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents effectively protect against the acute hepatotoxicity induced by APAP overdose. Methods. The present study attempted to investigate the protective effect of B. trimera against APAP-induced hepatic damage in rats. The liver-function markers ALT and AST, biomarkers of oxidative stress, antioxidant parameters, and histopathological changes were examined. Results. The pretreatment with B. trimera attenuated serum activities of ALT and AST that were enhanced by administration of APAP. Furthermore, pretreatment with the extract decreases the activity of the enzyme SOD and increases the activity of catalase and the concentration of total glutathione. Histopathological analysis confirmed the alleviation of liver damage and reduced lesions caused by APAP. Conclusions. The hepatoprotective action of B. trimera extract may rely on its effect on reducing the oxidative stress caused by APAP-induced hepatic damage in a rat model. General Significance. These results make the extract of B. trimera a potential candidate drug capable of protecting the liver against damage caused by APAP overdose. PMID:25435714

  11. Hepatoprotective activity of Centaurium erythraea on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Mroueh, Mohamad; Saab, Yolande; Rizkallah, Raed

    2004-05-01

    The methanol extract of the leaves of Centaurium erythraea L. (Gentianaceae) was evaluated for hepatoprotective activity against acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in rats. An oral dose of 300 mg/kg/day for 6 days or a single dose of 900 mg/kg for 1 day exhibited a significant protective effect by lowering serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The activity of the extract was supported by histopathological examination of liver sections. PMID:15174008

  12. Analysis of Changes in Hepatic Gene Expression in a Murine Model of Tolerance to Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity (Autoprotection)

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Meeghan A; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E.; Lawton, Michael P; Manautou, José E

    2013-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400 mg/kg) and then challenged 48 hr later with 600 mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24 hr later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430_2 GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. PMID:24126418

  13. FDA proposals to limit the hepatotoxicity of paracetamol (acetaminophen): are they reasonable?

    PubMed

    Graham, Garry G; Day, Richard O; Graudins, Andis; Mohamudally, Anthoulla

    2010-04-01

    Hepatotoxicity from paracetamol is of great concern because of the considerable number of patients who develop severe toxicity from this drug. A group of senior medical practitioners, academics and scientists were brought together on June 29 and 30, 2009 by the Food and Drug Administration of USA (FDA) with the aim of providing advice on how to limit the number of cases of hepatotoxicity due to paracetamol in USA. The most contentious recommendations were the reduction in the dose of paracetamol to 650 mg and the elimination of prescription combination products of paracetamol and opiates. The first recommendation indicates that many members of the committee consider, despite much evidence to the contrary, that therapeutic doses of paracetamol (up to 4 g daily) are associated with a significant incidence of hepatotoxicity. The second recommendation, if accepted by FDA, will require major changes in the therapeutic use of paracetamol and opiates. Adoption of these two recommendations may lead to the increased use of NSAIDs with the potential of increasing incidence of NSAIDs-related adverse reactions. PMID:20213329

  14. Novel Protective Mechanisms for S-Adenosyl-L-methionine against Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity: Improvement of Key Antioxidant Enzymatic Function

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Michael; Ball, John G.; Wright, Michael Scott; Van Meter, Stephanie; Valentovic, Monica A.

    2012-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose leads to severe hepatotoxicity, increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) protects against APAP toxicity at a mmol/kg equivalent dose to N-acetylcysteine (NAC). SAMe acts as a principle biological methyl donor and participates in polyamine synthesis which increase cell growth and has a role in mitochondrial protection. The purpose of the current study tested the hypothesis that SAMe protects against APAP toxicity by maintaining critical antioxidant enzymes and markers of oxidative stress. Male C57Bl/6 mice were treated with vehicle (Veh; water 15 ml/kg, ip), SAMe (1.25 mmol/kg, ip), APAP (250 mg/kg, ip), and SAMe + APAP (SAMe given 1 h following APAP). Liver was collected 2 and 4 h following APAP administration; mitochondrial swelling as well as hepatic catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase, and both Mn- and Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme activity were evaluated. Mitochondrial protein carbonyl, 3-nitrotyrosine cytochrome c leakage were analyzed by Western blot. SAMe significantly increased SOD, GPx, and glutathione reductase activity at 4 h following APAP overdose. SAMe greatly reduced markers of oxidative stress and cytochrome C leakage following APAP overdose. Our studies also demonstrate that a 1.25 mmol/kg dose of SAMe does not inhibit CYP 2E1 enzyme activity. The current study identifies a plausible mechanism for the decreased oxidative stress observed when SAMe is given following APAP. PMID:22683606

  15. Novel protective mechanisms for S-adenosyl-L-methionine against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: improvement of key antioxidant enzymatic function.

    PubMed

    Michael Brown, James; Ball, John G; Wright, Michael Scott; Van Meter, Stephanie; Valentovic, Monica A

    2012-08-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose leads to severe hepatotoxicity, increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) protects against APAP toxicity at a mmol/kg equivalent dose to N-acetylcysteine (NAC). SAMe acts as a principle biological methyl donor and participates in polyamine synthesis which increase cell growth and has a role in mitochondrial protection. The purpose of the current study tested the hypothesis that SAMe protects against APAP toxicity by maintaining critical antioxidant enzymes and markers of oxidative stress. Male C57Bl/6 mice were treated with vehicle (Veh; water 15 ml/kg, ip), SAMe (1.25 mmol/kg, ip), APAP (250 mg/kg, ip), and SAMe+APAP (SAMe given 1 h following APAP). Liver was collected 2 and 4 h following APAP administration; mitochondrial swelling as well as hepatic catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase, and both Mn- and Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme activity were evaluated. Mitochondrial protein carbonyl, 3-nitrotyrosine cytochrome c leakage were analyzed by Western blot. SAMe significantly increased SOD, GPx, and glutathione reductase activity at 4 h following APAP overdose. SAMe greatly reduced markers of oxidative stress and cytochrome C leakage following APAP overdose. Our studies also demonstrate that a 1.25 mmol/kg dose of SAMe does not inhibit CYP 2E1 enzyme activity. The current study identifies a plausible mechanism for the decreased oxidative stress observed when SAMe is given following APAP. PMID:22683606

  16. CDDO-Im protects from acetaminophen hepatotoxicity through induction of Nrf2-dependent genes

    SciTech Connect

    Reisman, Scott A.; Buckley, David B.; Tanaka, Yuji; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2009-04-01

    CDDO-Im is a synthetic triterpenoid recently shown to induce cytoprotective genes through the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway, an important mechanism for the induction of cytoprotective genes in response to oxidative stress. Upon oxidative or electrophilic insult, the transcription factor Nrf2 translocates to the nucleus, heterodimerizes with small Maf proteins, and binds to antioxidant response elements (AREs) in the upstream promoter regions of various cytoprotective genes. To further elucidate the hepatoprotective effects of CDDO-Im, wild-type and Nrf2-null mice were pretreated with CDDO-Im (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle (DMSO), and then administered acetaminophen (500 mg/kg, i.p.). Pretreatment of wild-type mice with CDDO-Im reduced liver injury caused by acetaminophen. In contrast, hepatoprotection by CDDO-Im was not observed in Nrf2-null mice. CDDO-Im increased Nrf2 protein expression and Nrf2-ARE binding in wild-type, but not Nrf2-null mice. Furthermore, CDDO-Im increased the mRNA expression of the Nrf2 target genes NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase-1 (Nqo1); glutamate-cysteine ligase, catalytic subunit (Gclc); and heme-oxygenase-1 (Ho-1), in both a dose- and time-dependent manner. Conversely, CDDO-Im did not induce Nqo1, Gclc, and Ho-1 mRNA expression in Nrf2-null mice. Collectively, the present study shows that CDDO-Im pretreatment induces Nrf2-dependent cytoprotective genes and protects the liver from acetaminophen-induced hepatic injury.

  17. Deficiency of interleukin-15 enhances susceptibility to acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hsein-San; Liao, Ching-Len; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Liao, Nan-Shih; Huang, Tien-Yu; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan; Chu, Heng-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocytes have a direct necrotic role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury (AILI), prolonged secondary inflammatory response through innate immune cells and cytokines also significantly contributes to APAP hepatotoxicity. Interleukin 15 (IL-15), a multifunction cytokine, regulates the adaptive immune system and influences development and function of innate immune cells. To better understand the role of IL-15 in liver injury, we treated wild-type (WT) and IL-15-knockout (Il15⁻/⁻) mice with a hepatotoxic dose of APAP to induce AILI and evaluated animal survival, liver damage, APAP metabolism in livers and the inflammatory response. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines was greater in Il15⁻/⁻ than WT mice. Subanalysis of hepatic infiltrated monocytes revealed greater neutrophil influx, along with greater hepatic induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), in Il15⁻/⁻ than WT mice. In addition, the level of hepatic hemeoxygenase 1 (HO-1) was partially suppressed in Il15⁻/⁻ mice, but not in WT mice. Interestingly, elimination of Kupffer cells and neutrophils did not alter the vulnerability to excess APAP in Il15⁻/⁻ mice. However, injection of galactosamine, a hepatic transcription inhibitor, significantly reduced the increased APAP sensitivity in Il15⁻/⁻ mice but had minor effect on WT mice. We demonstrated that deficiency of IL-15 increased mouse susceptibility to AILI. Moreover, Kupffer cell might affect APAP hepatotoxicity through IL-15. PMID:23028657

  18. The proper use of acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    James, Laura; Sullivan, Janice E; Roberts, Dean

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, paracetamol [APAP])-induced acute liver failure is the most common cause of acute liver failure in adults. In children, APAP accounts for 25% of all cases of acute liver failure. The high mortality rate associated with this preventable condition makes it vital that paediatricians are aware of the potential adverse effects associated with this widely used drug. While APAP is generally considered to be safe when used as directed, its inclusion in multiple over-the-counter medications, as well as in prescription drugs, mandates that physicians promote and educate the general public about the proper use of acetaminophen in children. PMID:23115492

  19. Hepatotoxicity due to Clindamycin in Combination with Acetaminophen in a 62-Year-Old African American Female: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Anusim, Nwabundo

    2016-01-01

    Clindamycin is a bacteriostatic lincosamide antibiotic with a broad spectrum. Side effects include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and metallic taste; however, hepatotoxicity is rare. The incidence is unknown. It is characterized by increases in aspartate and alanine transaminases. There may be no symptoms and the treatment is to stop the administration of clindamycin. We have described a 62-year-old African American female medicated with acetaminophen and clindamycin who had initially presented to the dental clinic for the evaluation of gum pain following tooth extraction. She had significantly increased levels of liver transaminases, which trended downwards on quitting the medication. PMID:27462474

  20. Hepatotoxicity due to Clindamycin in Combination with Acetaminophen in a 62-Year-Old African American Female: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Okudo, Jerome; Anusim, Nwabundo

    2016-01-01

    Clindamycin is a bacteriostatic lincosamide antibiotic with a broad spectrum. Side effects include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and metallic taste; however, hepatotoxicity is rare. The incidence is unknown. It is characterized by increases in aspartate and alanine transaminases. There may be no symptoms and the treatment is to stop the administration of clindamycin. We have described a 62-year-old African American female medicated with acetaminophen and clindamycin who had initially presented to the dental clinic for the evaluation of gum pain following tooth extraction. She had significantly increased levels of liver transaminases, which trended downwards on quitting the medication. PMID:27462474

  1. Secretory phospholipase A{sub 2}-mediated progression of hepatotoxicity initiated by acetaminophen is exacerbated in the absence of hepatic COX-2

    SciTech Connect

    Bhave, Vishakha S.; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Latendresse, John R.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2011-03-15

    We have previously reported that among the other death proteins, hepatic secretory phospholipase A{sub 2} (sPLA{sub 2}) is a leading mediator of progression of liver injury initiated by CCl{sub 4} in rats. The aim of our present study was to test the hypothesis that increased hepatic sPLA{sub 2} released after acetaminophen (APAP) challenge mediates progression of liver injury in wild type (WT) and COX-2 knockout (KO) mice. COX-2 WT and KO mice were administered a normally non lethal dose (400 mg/kg) of acetaminophen. The COX-2 KO mice suffered 60% mortality compared to 100% survival of the WT mice, suggesting higher susceptibility of COX-2 KO mice to sPLA{sub 2}-mediated progression of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Liver injury was significantly higher at later time points in the KO mice compared to the WT mice indicating that the abatement of progression of injury requires the presence of COX-2. This difference in hepatotoxicity was not due to increased bioactivation of acetaminophen as indicated by unchanged cyp2E1 protein and covalently bound {sup 14}C-APAP in the livers of KO mice. Hepatic sPLA{sub 2} activity and plasma TNF-{alpha} were significantly higher after APAP administration in the KO mice. This was accompanied by a corresponding fall in hepatic PGE{sub 2} and lower compensatory liver regeneration and repair ({sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation) in the KO mice. These results suggest that hindered compensatory tissue repair and poor resolution of inflammation for want of beneficial prostaglandins render the liver very vulnerable to sPLA{sub 2}-mediated progression of liver injury. These findings are consistent with the destructive role of sPLA{sub 2} in the progression and expansion of tissue injury as a result of continued hydrolytic breakdown of plasma membrane phospholipids of perinecrotic hepatocytes unless mitigated by sufficient co-induction of COX-2.

  2. A transcriptomics-based hepatotoxicity comparison between the zebrafish embryo and established human and rodent in vitro and in vivo models using cyclosporine A, amiodarone and acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Marja; Vitins, Alexa P; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Kienhuis, Anne S; Water, Bob van de; van der Ven, Leo T M

    2015-01-22

    The zebrafish embryo (ZFE) is a promising alternative, non-rodent model in toxicology, which has an advantage over the traditionally used models as it contains complete biological complexity and provides a medium to high-throughput setting. Here, we assess how the ZFE compares to the traditionally used models for liver toxicity testing, i.e., in vivo mouse and rat liver, in vitro mouse and rat hepatocytes, and primary human hepatocytes. For this comparison, we analyzed gene expression changes induced by three model compounds for cholestasis, steatosis, and necrosis. The three compounds, cyclosporine A, amiodarone, and acetaminophen, were chosen because of their relevance to human toxicity and these compounds displayed hepatotoxic-specific changes in the mouse in vivo data. Compound induced expression changes in the ZFE model shared similarity with both in vivo and in vitro. Comparison on single gene level revealed the presence of model specific changes and no clear concordance across models. However, concordance was identified on the pathway level. Specifically, the pathway "regulation of metabolism - bile acids regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism via FXR" was affected across all models and compounds. In conclusion, our study with three hepatotoxic model compounds shows that the ZFE model is at least as comparable to traditional models in identifying hepatotoxic activity and has the potential for use as a pre-screen to determine the hepatotoxic potential of compounds. PMID:25448281

  3. Comparison of Prothrombin Time and Aspartate Aminotransferase in Predicting Hepatotoxicity After Acetaminophen Overdose.

    PubMed

    Levine, Michael; O'Connor, Ayrn D; Padilla-Jones, Angela; Gerkin, Richard D

    2016-03-01

    Despite decades of experience with acetaminophen (APAP) overdoses, it remains unclear whether elevated hepatic transaminases or coagulopathy develop first. Furthermore, comparison of the predictive value of these two variables in determining hepatic toxicity following APAP overdoses has been poorly elucidated. The primary objective of this study is to determine the test characteristics of the aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and the prothrombin time (PT) in patients with APAP toxicity. A retrospective chart review of APAP overdoses treated with IV N-acetylcysteine at a tertiary care referral center was performed. Of the 304 subjects included in the study, 246 with an initial AST less than 1000 were analyzed to determine predictors of hepatic injury, defined as an AST exceeding 1000 IU/L. The initial AST >50 was 79.5 % sensitive and 82.6 % specific for predicting hepatic injury. The corresponding negative and positive predictive values were 95.5 and 46.3 %, respectively. In contrast, an initial abnormal PT had a sensitivity of 82.1 % and a specificity of 63.6 %. The negative and positive predictive values for initial PT were 94.9 and 30.2 %, respectively. Although the two tests performed similarly for predicting a composite endpoint of death or liver transplant, neither was a useful predictor. Initial AST performed better than the initial PT for predicting hepatic injury in this series of patients with APAP overdose. PMID:26341088

  4. Hepatoprotective Effect of Silymarin (Silybum marianum) on Hepatotoxicity Induced by Acetaminophen in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cardia, Gabriel Fernando Esteves; da Rocha, Bruno Ambrósio; Aguiar, Rafael Pazzinatto; Spironello, Ricardo Alexandre; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of Silymarin (SLM) on the hypertension state and the liver function changes induced by acetaminophen (APAP) in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Animals normotensive (N) or hypertensive (SHR) were treated or not with APAP (3 g/kg, oral) or previously treated with SLM. Twelve hours after APAP administration, plasmatic levels of liver function markers: alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), glucose (GLU), gamma glutamyl transferase (γ-GT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) of all groups, were determined. Liver injury was assessed using histological studies. Samples of their livers were then used to determine the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and nitric oxide (NO) production and were also sectioned for histological analysis. No differences were observed for ALT, γ-GT, and GLU levels between SHR and normotensive rats groups. However, AST and ALP levels were increased in hypertensive animals. APAP treatment promoted an increase in ALT and AST in both SHR and N. However, only for SHR, γ-GT levels were increased. The inflammatory response evaluated by MPO activity and NO production showed that SHR was more susceptible to APAP effect, by increasing leucocyte infiltration. Silymarin treatment (Legalon) restored the hepatocyte functional and histopathological alterations induced by APAP in normotensive and hypertensive animals. PMID:25821491

  5. Assessment of hepatic function, oxidant/antioxidant status, and histopathological changes in rats treated with atorvastatin: Effect of dose and acute intoxication with acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Farag, M M; Mohamed, M B; Youssef, E A

    2015-08-01

    A major disadvantage that may occur in association with atorvastatin (ATV) therapy is elevation of serum transaminases. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of treatment of rats with various doses of ATV (2, 5, and 10 mg/kg/day) on liver function, oxidative stress, and histology and on the severity of acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. ATV administration for 21 days resulted in a dose-dependent significant rise in serum activities of alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase. Only ATV at 10 mg/kg/day decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and elicited histopathological changes in the liver. In rats challenged with APAP (500 mg/kg), the livers showed centrilobular necrosis with evident oxidative stress and liver dysfunction after 24 h. Rats challenged with APAP after pretreatment with ATV 2 or 5 mg/kg/day showed significantly lower activities of serum enzymes, higher hepatic GSH levels and SOD activities, lower MDA levels and milder histopathological changes compared with rats challenged with APAP after pretreatment with ATV 10 mg/kg/day or without drug pretreatment. In conclusion, the effect of ATV on the liver is dose dependent. Our results showed that ATV, at the highest dose used, induced hepatic lipid peroxidation and injury, suggesting a role for oxidative stress in ATV-induced hepatotoxicity. However, lower doses of ATV attenuated APAP-induced hepatotoxicity via a mechanism related, at least in part, to a reduction of APAP-induced hepatic oxidative stress. These results are of practical interest as both drugs may be used concurrently in clinical practice. PMID:25425547

  6. Peroxynitrite is a critical mediator of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in murine livers: protection by glutathione.

    PubMed

    Knight, Tamara R; Ho, Ye-Shih; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2002-11-01

    Acetaminophen (AAP) overdose causes formation of nitrotyrosine, a footprint of peroxynitrite, in centrilobular hepatocytes. The importance of peroxynitrite for the pathophysiology, however, is unclear. C3Heb/FeJ mice were treated with 300 mg/kg AAP. To accelerate the restoration of hepatic glutathione (GSH) levels as potential endogenous scavengers of peroxynitrite, some groups of animals received 200 mg of GSH/kg i.v. at different time points after AAP. AAP induced severe liver cell damage at 6 h. Total liver and mitochondrial glutathione levels decreased by >90% at 1 h but recovered to 75 and 45%, respectively, of untreated values at 6 h after AAP. In addition, the hepatic and mitochondrial glutathione disulfide (GSSG) content was significantly increased over baseline, suggesting a mitochondrial oxidant stress. Moreover, centrilobular hepatocytes stained for nitrotyrosine. Treatment with GSH at t = 0 restored hepatic GSH levels and completely prevented the mitochondrial oxidant stress, peroxynitrite formation, and liver cell injury. In contrast, treatment at 1.5 and 2.25 h restored hepatic and mitochondrial GSH levels but did not prevent the increase in GSSG formation. Nitrotyrosine adduct formation and liver injury, however, was substantially reduced. GSH treatment at 3 h after AAP was ineffective. Similar results were obtained when these experiments were repeated with glutathione peroxidase-deficient animals. Our data suggest that early GSH treatment (t = 0) prevented cell injury by improving the detoxification of the reactive metabolite of AAP. Delayed GSH treatment enhanced hepatic GSH levels, which scavenged peroxynitrite in a spontaneous reaction. Thus, peroxynitrite is an important mediator of AAP-induced liver cell necrosis. PMID:12388625

  7. Fluorometric assessment of acetaminophen-induced toxicity in rat hepatocyte spheroids seeded on micro-space cell culture plates.

    PubMed

    Sanoh, Seigo; Santoh, Masataka; Takagi, Masashi; Kanayama, Tatsuya; Sugihara, Kazumi; Kotake, Yaichiro; Ejiri, Yoko; Horie, Toru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Ohta, Shigeru

    2014-09-01

    Hepatotoxicity induced by the metabolic activation of drugs is a major concern in drug discovery and development. Three-dimensional (3-D) cultures of hepatocyte spheroids may be superior to monolayer cultures for evaluating drug metabolism and toxicity because hepatocytes in spheroids maintain the expression of various metabolizing enzymes and transporters, such as cytochrome P450 (CYP). In this study, we examined the hepatotoxicity due to metabolic activation of acetaminophen (APAP) using fluorescent indicators of cell viability and intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH) in rat hepatocyte spheroids grown on micro-space cell culture plates. The mRNA expression levels of some drug-metabolizing enzymes were maintained during culture. Additionally, this culture system was compatible with microfluorometric imaging under confocal laser scanning microscopy. APAP induced a decrease in intracellular ATP at 10mM, which was blocked by the CYP inhibitor 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT). APAP (10mM, 24h) decreased the levels of both intracellular ATP and GSH, and GSH-conjugated APAP (APAP-GSH) were formed. All three effects were blocked by ABT, confirming a contribution of APAP metabolic activation by CYP to spheroid toxicity. Fluorometric imaging of hepatocyte spheroids on micro-space cell culture plates may allow the screening of drug-induced hepatotoxicity during pharmaceutical development. PMID:24878114

  8. Translational biomarkers of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury.

    PubMed

    Beger, Richard D; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Yang, Xi; Gill, Pritmohinder S; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Sun, Jinchun; James, Laura P

    2015-09-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a commonly used analgesic drug that can cause liver injury, liver necrosis and liver failure. APAP-induced liver injury is associated with glutathione depletion, the formation of APAP protein adducts, the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and mitochondrial injury. The systems biology omics technologies (transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) have been used to discover potential translational biomarkers of liver injury. The following review provides a summary of the systems biology discovery process, analytical validation of biomarkers and translation of omics biomarkers from the nonclinical to clinical setting in APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:25983262

  9. Screening for Drug-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Primary Mouse Hepatocytes Using Acetaminophen, Amiodarone, and Cyclosporin A as Model Compounds: An Omics-Guided Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van Summeren, Anke; Renes, Johan; Lizarraga, Daneida; Bouwman, Freek G.; Noben, Jean-Paul; van Delft, Joost H. M.; Kleinjans, Jos C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition for candidate pharmaceuticals in development. New preclinical screening methods are crucial to predict drug toxicity prior to human studies. Of all in vitro hepatotoxicity models, primary human hepatocytes are considered as ‘the gold standard.’ However, their use is hindered by limited availability and inter-individual variation. These barriers may be overcome by using primary mouse hepatocytes. We used differential in gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to study large-scale protein expression of primary mouse hepatocytes. These hepatocytes were exposed to three well-defined hepatotoxicants: acetaminophen, amiodarone, and cyclosporin A. Each hepatotoxicant induces a different hepatotoxic phenotype. Based on the DIGE results, the mRNA expression levels of deregulated proteins from cyclosporin A-treated cells were also analyzed. We were able to distinguish cyclosporin A from controls, as well as acetaminophen and amiodarone-treated samples. Cyclosporin A induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and altered the ER-Golgi transport. Moreover, liver carboxylesterase and bile salt sulfotransferase were differentially expressed. These proteins were associated with a protective adaptive response against cyclosporin A-induced cholestasis. The results of this study are comparable with effects in HepG2 cells. Therefore, we suggest both models can be used to analyze the cholestatic properties of cyclosporin A. Furthermore, this study showed a conserved response between primary mouse hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. These findings collectively lend support for use of omics strategies in preclinical toxicology, and might inform future efforts to better link preclinical and clinical research in rational drug development. PMID:23308384

  10. New therapeutic approach: diphenyl diselenide reduces mitochondrial dysfunction in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Nélson R; da Rosa, Edovando F; da Silva, Michele H; Tassi, Cintia C; Dalla Corte, Cristiane L; Carbajo-Pescador, Sara; Mauriz, Jose L; González-Gallego, Javier; Soares, Félix A

    2013-01-01

    The acute liver failure (ALF) induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to oxidative damage and depletion of hepatic glutathione, consequently changes in cell energy metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction have been observed after APAP overdose. Diphenyl diselenide [(PhSe)2], a simple organoselenium compound with antioxidant properties, previously demonstrated to confer hepatoprotection. However, little is known about the protective mechanism on mitochondria. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects (PhSe)2 to reduce mitochondrial dysfunction and, secondly, compare in the liver homogenate the hepatoprotective effects of the (PhSe)2 to the N-acetylcysteine (NAC) during APAP-induced ALF to validate our model. Mice were injected intraperitoneal with APAP (600 mg/kg), (PhSe)2 (15.6 mg/kg), NAC (1200 mg/kg), APAP+(PhSe)2 or APAP+NAC, where the (PhSe)2 or NAC treatment were given 1 h following APAP. The liver was collected 4 h after overdose. The plasma alanine and aspartate aminotransferase activities increased after APAP administration. APAP caused a remarkable increase of oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxidation, reactive species and protein carbonylation) and decrease of the antioxidant defense in the liver homogenate and mitochondria. APAP caused a marked loss in the mitochondrial membrane potential, the mitochondrial ATPase activity, and the rate of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and increased the mitochondrial swelling. All these effects were significantly prevented by (PhSe)2. The effectiveness of (PhSe)2 was similar at a lower dose than NAC. In summary, (PhSe)2 provided a significant improvement to the mitochondrial redox homeostasis and the mitochondrial bioenergetics dysfunction caused by membrane permeability transition in the hepatotoxicity APAP-induced. PMID:24349162

  11. Withaferin-A Reduces Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N; Urrunaga, Nathalie H; Dash, Suchismita; Khurana, Sandeep; Saxena, Neeraj Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Withaferin-A (WA) has anti-oxidant activities however, its therapeutic potential in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is unknown. We performed a proof-of-concept study to assess the therapeutic potential of WA in a mouse model that mimics APAP-induced liver injury (AILI) in humans. Overnight fasted C57BL/6NTac (5-6 wk. old) male mice received 200 mg/kg APAP intraperitoneally (i.p.). After 1 h mice were treated with 40 mg/kg WA or vehicle i.p., and euthanized 4 and 16 h later; their livers were harvested and serum collected for analysis. At 4 h, compared to vehicle-treated mice, WA-treated mice had reduced serum ALT levels, hepatocyte necrosis and intrahepatic hemorrhage. All APAP-treated mice had reduced hepatic glutathione (GSH) levels however, reduction in GSH was lower in WA-treated when compared to vehicle-treated mice. Compared to vehicle-treated mice, livers from WA-treated mice had reduced APAP-induced JNK activation, mitochondrial Bax translocation, and nitrotyrosine generation. Compared to vehicle-treated mice, WA-treated mice had increased hepatic up-regulation of Nrf2, Gclc and Nqo1, and down-regulation of Il-6 and Il-1β. The hepatoprotective effect of WA persisted at 16 h. Compared to vehicle-treated mice, WA-treated mice had reduced hepatocyte necrosis and hepatic expression of Il-6, Tnf-α and Il-1β, increased hepatic Gclc and Nqo1 expression and GSH levels, and reduced lipid peroxidation. Finally, in AML12 hepatocytes, WA reduced H₂O₂-induced oxidative stress and necrosis by preventing GSH depletion. Collectively, these data show mechanisms whereby WA reduces necrotic hepatocyte injury, and demonstrate that WA has therapeutic potential in AILI. PMID:26212553

  12. New Therapeutic Approach: Diphenyl Diselenide Reduces Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Nélson R.; da Rosa, Edovando F.; da Silva, Michele H.; Tassi, Cintia C.; Dalla Corte, Cristiane L.; Carbajo-Pescador, Sara; Mauriz, Jose L.; González-Gallego, Javier; Soares, Félix A.

    2013-01-01

    The acute liver failure (ALF) induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to oxidative damage and depletion of hepatic glutathione, consequently changes in cell energy metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction have been observed after APAP overdose. Diphenyl diselenide [(PhSe)2], a simple organoselenium compound with antioxidant properties, previously demonstrated to confer hepatoprotection. However, little is known about the protective mechanism on mitochondria. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects (PhSe)2 to reduce mitochondrial dysfunction and, secondly, compare in the liver homogenate the hepatoprotective effects of the (PhSe)2 to the N-acetylcysteine (NAC) during APAP-induced ALF to validate our model. Mice were injected intraperitoneal with APAP (600 mg/kg), (PhSe)2 (15.6 mg/kg), NAC (1200 mg/kg), APAP+(PhSe)2 or APAP+NAC, where the (PhSe)2 or NAC treatment were given 1 h following APAP. The liver was collected 4 h after overdose. The plasma alanine and aspartate aminotransferase activities increased after APAP administration. APAP caused a remarkable increase of oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxidation, reactive species and protein carbonylation) and decrease of the antioxidant defense in the liver homogenate and mitochondria. APAP caused a marked loss in the mitochondrial membrane potential, the mitochondrial ATPase activity, and the rate of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and increased the mitochondrial swelling. All these effects were significantly prevented by (PhSe)2. The effectiveness of (PhSe)2 was similar at a lower dose than NAC. In summary, (PhSe)2 provided a significant improvement to the mitochondrial redox homeostasis and the mitochondrial bioenergetics dysfunction caused by membrane permeability transition in the hepatotoxicity APAP-induced. PMID:24349162

  13. Role of bile acids in liver injury and regeneration following acetaminophen overdose.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Borude, Prachi; Edwards, Genea; Walesky, Chad; Cleveland, Joshua; Li, Feng; Ma, Xiaochao; Apte, Udayan

    2013-11-01

    Bile acids play a critical role in liver injury and regeneration, but their role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury is not known. We tested the effect of bile acid modulation on APAP hepatotoxicity using C57BL/6 mice, which were fed a normal diet, a 2% cholestyramine (CSA)-containing diet for bile acid depletion, or a 0.2% cholic acid (CA)-containing diet for 1 week before treatment with 400 mg/kg APAP. CSA-mediated bile acid depletion resulted in significantly higher liver injury and delayed regeneration after APAP treatment. In contrast, 0.2% CA supplementation in the diet resulted in a moderate delay in progression of liver injury and significantly higher liver regeneration after APAP treatment. Either CSA-mediated bile acid depletion or CA supplementation did not affect hepatic CYP2E1 levels or glutathione depletion after APAP treatment. CSA-fed mice exhibited significantly higher activation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinases and a significant decrease in intestinal fibroblast growth factor 15 mRNA after APAP treatment. In contrast, mice fed a 0.2% CA diet had significantly lower c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase activation and 12-fold higher fibroblast growth factor 15 mRNA in the intestines. Liver regeneration after APAP treatment was significantly faster in CA diet-fed mice after APAP administration secondary to rapid cyclin D1 induction. Taken together, these data indicate that bile acids play a critical role in both initiation and recovery of APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:24007882

  14. Aminotriazole alleviates acetaminophen poisoning via downregulating P450 2E1 and suppressing inflammation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yuping; Wu, Kunwei; Liu, Jiashuo; Ai, Qing; Ge, Pu; Dai, Jie; Jiang, Rong; Zhou, Dan; Che, Qian; Wan, Jingyuan; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Aminotriazole (ATZ) is commonly used as a catalase (CAT) inhibitor. We previously found ATZ attenuated oxidative liver injury, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose frequently induces life-threatening oxidative hepatitis. In the present study, the potential hepatoprotective effects of ATZ on oxidative liver injury and the underlying mechanisms were further investigated in a mouse model with APAP poisoning. The experimental data indicated that pretreatment with ATZ dose- and time-dependently suppressed the elevation of plasma aminotransferases in APAP exposed mice, these effects were accompanied with alleviated histological abnormality and improved survival rate of APAP-challenged mice. In mice exposed to APAP, ATZ pretreatment decreased the CAT activities, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels, malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in liver and reduced TNF-α levels in plasma. Pretreatment with ATZ also downregulated APAP-induced cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) expression and JNK phosphorylation. In addition, posttreatment with ATZ after APAP challenge decreased the levels of plasma aminotransferases and increased the survival rate of experimental animals. Posttreatment with ATZ had no effects on CYP2E1 expression or JNK phosphorylation, but it significantly decreased the levels of plasma TNF-α. Our data indicated that the LD50 of ATZ in mice was 5367.4 mg/kg body weight, which is much higher than the therapeutic dose of ATZ in the present study. These data suggested that ATZ might be effective and safe in protect mice against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, the beneficial effects might resulted from downregulation of CYP2E1 and inhibiton of inflammation. PMID:25884831

  15. A Cytochrome P450-Independent Mechanism of Acetaminophen-Induced Injury in Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, Kazuhisa; Albee, Ryan; Letzig, Lynda G; Lehner, Andreas F; Scott, Michael A; Buchweitz, John P; James, Laura P; Ganey, Patricia E; Roth, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    Mouse hepatic parenchymal cells (HPCs) have become the most frequently used in vitro model to study mechanisms of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. It is universally accepted that APAP hepatocellular injury requires bioactivation by cytochromes P450 (P450s), but this remains unproven in primary mouse HPCs in vitro, especially over the wide range of concentrations that have been employed in published reports. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that APAP-induced hepatocellular death in vitro depends solely on P450s. We evaluated APAP cytotoxicity and APAP-protein adducts (a biomarker of metabolic bioactivation by P450) using primary mouse HPCs in the presence and absence of a broad-spectrum inhibitor of P450s, 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT). 1-ABT abolished formation of APAP-protein adducts at all concentrations of APAP (0-14 mM), but eliminated cytotoxicity only at small concentrations (≦5 mM), indicating the presence of a P450-independent mechanism at larger APAP concentrations. P450-independent cell death was delayed in onset relative to toxicity observed at smaller concentrations. p-Aminophenol was detected in primary mouse HPCs exposed to large concentrations of APAP, and a deacetylase inhibitor [bis (4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP)] significantly reduced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, APAP hepatocellular injury in vitro occurs by at least two mechanisms, a P450-dependent mechanism that operates at concentrations of APAP ≦ 5 mM and a P450-independent mechanism that predominates at larger concentrations and is slower in onset. p-Aminophenol most likely contributes to the latter mechanism. These findings should be considered in interpreting results from APAP cytotoxicity studies in vitro and in selecting APAP concentrations for use in such studies. PMID:26065700

  16. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity: role of metabolic activation, reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, and mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Hinson, Jack A; Reid, Angela B; McCullough, Sandra S; James, Laura P

    2004-10-01

    Large doses of the analgesic acetaminophen cause centrilobular hepatic necrosis in man and in experimental animals. It has been previously shown that acetaminophen is metabolically activated by CYP enzymes to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. This species is normally detoxified by GSH, but following a toxic dose GSH is depleted and the metabolite covalently binds to a number of different proteins. Covalent binding occurs only to the cells developing necrosis. Recently we showed that these cells also contain nitrated tyrosine residues. Nitrotyrosine is mediated by peroxynitrite, a reactive nitrogen species formed by rapid reaction between nitric oxide and superoxide and is normally detoxified by GSH. Thus, acetaminophen toxicity occurs with increased oxygen/nitrogen stress. This manuscript will review current data on acetaminophen covalent binding, increased oxygen/nitrogen stress, and mitochondrial permeability transition, a toxic mechanism that is both mediated by and leads to increased oxygen/nitrogen stress. PMID:15554248

  17. A Cytochrome P450–Independent Mechanism of Acetaminophen-Induced Injury in Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Kazuhisa; Albee, Ryan; Letzig, Lynda G.; Lehner, Andreas F.; Scott, Michael A.; Buchweitz, John P.; James, Laura P.; Ganey, Patricia E.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse hepatic parenchymal cells (HPCs) have become the most frequently used in vitro model to study mechanisms of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. It is universally accepted that APAP hepatocellular injury requires bioactivation by cytochromes P450 (P450s), but this remains unproven in primary mouse HPCs in vitro, especially over the wide range of concentrations that have been employed in published reports. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that APAP-induced hepatocellular death in vitro depends solely on P450s. We evaluated APAP cytotoxicity and APAP-protein adducts (a biomarker of metabolic bioactivation by P450) using primary mouse HPCs in the presence and absence of a broad-spectrum inhibitor of P450s, 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT). 1-ABT abolished formation of APAP-protein adducts at all concentrations of APAP (0–14 mM), but eliminated cytotoxicity only at small concentrations (≦5 mM), indicating the presence of a P450-independent mechanism at larger APAP concentrations. P450-independent cell death was delayed in onset relative to toxicity observed at smaller concentrations. p-Aminophenol was detected in primary mouse HPCs exposed to large concentrations of APAP, and a deacetylase inhibitor [bis (4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP)] significantly reduced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, APAP hepatocellular injury in vitro occurs by at least two mechanisms, a P450-dependent mechanism that operates at concentrations of APAP ≦ 5 mM and a P450-independent mechanism that predominates at larger concentrations and is slower in onset. p-Aminophenol most likely contributes to the latter mechanism. These findings should be considered in interpreting results from APAP cytotoxicity studies in vitro and in selecting APAP concentrations for use in such studies. PMID:26065700

  18. The role of intrahepatic CD3 +/CD4 −/CD8 − double negative T (DN T) cells in enhanced acetaminophen toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Getachew, Yonas; Cusimano, Frank A.; James, Laura P.; Thiele, Dwain L.

    2014-10-15

    The role of the immune system, specifically NK, NKT and CD3 cells, in acetaminophen (APAP) induced liver injury remains inconsistently defined. In the present study, wild type (C57BL/6J) mice and granzyme B deficient (GrB −/−) mice were treated with acetaminophen to assess the role of the immune system in acute liver injury. Doses of acetaminophen that induced sub lethal liver injury in wild type mice unexpectedly produced fatal hepatotoxicity in granzyme B deficient (GrB −/−) mice. Analysis revealed that GrB −/− mice had an increased population of intrahepatic CD3 (+), CD4 (−), and CD8 (−) lymphocytes expressing the CD69 activation marker and Fas ligand. Depletion of these cells in the GrB −/− and wild type mice made them less susceptible to APAP injury, while depletion of NK1.1 (+) cells or both CD4 (+) and CD8 (+) T cells failed to provide the same hepatoprotection. Transfer of the GrB −/− IHLs further exacerbated liver injury and increased mortality in wild type mice but not in LRP/LPR mice, lacking fas expression. Conclusions: Acetaminophen toxicity is enhanced by the presence of activated, FasL expressing intrahepatic CD3 (+), CD4 (−), CD8 (−), NK1.1 (−) T cells. Depletion of these cells from GrB −/− mice and wild type mice greatly reduces mortality and improves the course of liver injury recovery. - Highlights: • Intrahepatic lymphocytes (IHLs) from GrB −/− mice harbor activated DNT cells. • IHLs from GrB −/− mice exhibit enhanced Fas ligand expression. • Acetaminophen toxicity is enhanced by activated, FasL expressing DNT cells.

  19. Protective Activity of Total Polyphenols from Genista quadriflora Munby and Teucrium polium geyrii Maire in Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Baali, Nacera; Belloum, Zahia; Baali, Samiya; Chabi, Beatrice; Pessemesse, Laurence; Fouret, Gilles; Ameddah, Souad; Benayache, Fadila; Benayache, Samir; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Cabello, Gérard; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of drug-induced hepatic diseases and several studies have demonstrated that diet supplementation with plants rich in antioxidant compounds provides a variety of health benefits in these circumstances. Genista quadriflora Munby (Gq) and Teucrium polium geyrii Maire (Tp) are known to possess antioxidant and numerous biological properties and these endemic plants are often used for dietary or medicinal applications. Herein, we evaluated the beneficial effect of rich-polyphenol fractions of Gq and Tp to prevent Acetaminophen-induced liver injury and investigated the mechanisms involved in this protective action. Rats were orally administered polyphenolic extracts from Gq or Tp (300 mg/kg) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC: 200 mg/kg) once daily for ten days prior to the single oral administration of Acetaminophen (APAP: 1 g/kg). The results show that preventive administration of polyphenolic extracts from Gq or Tp exerts a hepatoprotective influence during APAP treatment by improving transaminases leakage and liver histology and stimulating antioxidant defenses. Besides, suppression of liver CYP2E1, GSTpi and TNF-α mRNA levels, with enhancement of mitochondrial bioenergetics may contribute to the observed hepatoprotection induced by Gq and Tp extracts. The effect of Tp extract is significantly higher (1.5-2 fold) than that of Gq extract and NAC regarding the enhancement of mitochondrial functionality. Overall, this study brings the first evidence that pretreatment with these natural extracts display in vivo protective activity against APAP hepatotoxicity through improving mitochondrial bioenergetics, oxidant status, phase I and II enzymes expression and inflammatory processes probably by virtue of their high total polyphenols content. PMID:27043622

  20. Protective Activity of Total Polyphenols from Genista quadriflora Munby and Teucrium polium geyrii Maire in Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Baali, Nacera; Belloum, Zahia; Baali, Samiya; Chabi, Beatrice; Pessemesse, Laurence; Fouret, Gilles; Ameddah, Souad; Benayache, Fadila; Benayache, Samir; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Cabello, Gérard; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of drug-induced hepatic diseases and several studies have demonstrated that diet supplementation with plants rich in antioxidant compounds provides a variety of health benefits in these circumstances. Genista quadriflora Munby (Gq) and Teucrium polium geyrii Maire (Tp) are known to possess antioxidant and numerous biological properties and these endemic plants are often used for dietary or medicinal applications. Herein, we evaluated the beneficial effect of rich-polyphenol fractions of Gq and Tp to prevent Acetaminophen-induced liver injury and investigated the mechanisms involved in this protective action. Rats were orally administered polyphenolic extracts from Gq or Tp (300 mg/kg) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC: 200 mg/kg) once daily for ten days prior to the single oral administration of Acetaminophen (APAP: 1 g/kg). The results show that preventive administration of polyphenolic extracts from Gq or Tp exerts a hepatoprotective influence during APAP treatment by improving transaminases leakage and liver histology and stimulating antioxidant defenses. Besides, suppression of liver CYP2E1, GSTpi and TNF-α mRNA levels, with enhancement of mitochondrial bioenergetics may contribute to the observed hepatoprotection induced by Gq and Tp extracts. The effect of Tp extract is significantly higher (1.5–2 fold) than that of Gq extract and NAC regarding the enhancement of mitochondrial functionality. Overall, this study brings the first evidence that pretreatment with these natural extracts display in vivo protective activity against APAP hepatotoxicity through improving mitochondrial bioenergetics, oxidant status, phase I and II enzymes expression and inflammatory processes probably by virtue of their high total polyphenols content. PMID:27043622

  1. Lower susceptibility of female mice to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: Role of mitochondrial glutathione, oxidant stress and c-jun N-terminal kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Kuo; Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-11-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes severe hepatotoxicity in animals and humans. However, the mechanisms underlying the gender differences in susceptibility to APAP overdose in mice have not been clarified. In our study, APAP (300 mg/kg) caused severe liver injury in male mice but 69–77% lower injury in females. No gender difference in metabolic activation of APAP was found. Hepatic glutathione (GSH) was rapidly depleted in both genders, while GSH recovery in female mice was 2.6 fold higher in the mitochondria at 4 h, and 2.5 and 3.3 fold higher in the total liver at 4 h and 6 h, respectively. This faster recovery of GSH, which correlated with greater induction of glutamate-cysteine ligase, attenuated mitochondrial oxidative stress in female mice, as suggested by a lower GSSG/GSH ratio at 6 h (3.8% in males vs. 1.4% in females) and minimal centrilobular nitrotyrosine staining. While c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was similar at 2 and 4 h post-APAP, it was 3.1 fold lower at 6 h in female mice. However, female mice were still protected by the JNK inhibitor SP600125. 17β-Estradiol pretreatment moderately decreased liver injury and oxidative stress in male mice without affecting GSH recovery. Conclusion: The lower susceptibility of female mice is achieved by the improved detoxification of reactive oxygen due to accelerated recovery of mitochondrial GSH levels, which attenuates late JNK activation and liver injury. However, even the reduced injury in female mice was still dependent on JNK. While 17β-estradiol partially protects male mice, it does not affect hepatic GSH recovery. - Highlights: • Female mice are less susceptible to acetaminophen overdose than males. • GSH depletion and protein adduct formation are similar in both genders. • Recovery of hepatic GSH levels is faster in females and correlates with Gclc. • Reduced oxidant stress in females leads to reduced JNK activation. • JNK activation and mitochondrial translocation are critical

  2. Mouse liver protein sulfhydryl depletion after acetaminophen exposure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Greenhaw, James; Shi, Qiang; Roberts, Dean W; Hinson, Jack A; Muskhelishvili, Levan; Davis, Kelly; Salminen, William F

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury is the leading cause of acute liver failure in many countries. This study determined the extent of liver protein sulfhydryl depletion not only in whole liver homogenate but also in the zonal pattern of sulfhydryl depletion within the liver lobule. A single oral gavage dose of 150 or 300 mg/kg APAP in B6C3F1 mice produced increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels, liver necrosis, and glutathione depletion in a dose-dependent manner. Free protein sulfhydryls were measured in liver protein homogenates by labeling with maleimide linked to a near infrared fluorescent dye followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Global protein sulfhydryl levels were decreased significantly (48.4%) starting at 1 hour after the APAP dose and maintained at this reduced level through 24 hours. To visualize the specific hepatocytes that had reduced protein sulfhydryl levels, frozen liver sections were labeled with maleimide linked to horseradish peroxidase. The centrilobular areas exhibited dramatic decreases in free protein sulfhydryls while the periportal regions were essentially spared. These protein sulfhydryl-depleted regions correlated with areas exhibiting histopathologic injury and APAP binding to protein. The majority of protein sulfhydryl depletion was due to reversible oxidation since the global- and lobule-specific effects were essentially reversed when the samples were reduced with tris(2-carboxyethy)phosphine before maleimide labeling. These temporal and zonal pattern changes in protein sulfhydryl oxidation shed new light on the importance that changes in protein redox status might play in the pathogenesis of APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:23093024

  3. THE GAP JUNCTION INHIBITOR 2-AMINOETHOXY-DIPHENYL-BORATE PROTECTS AGAINST ACETAMINOPHEN HEPATOTOXICITY BY INHIBITING CYTOCHROME P450 ENZYMES AND C-JUN N-TERMINAL KINASE ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Du, Kuo; Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Xie, Yuchao; Farhood, Anwar; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. Although many aspects of the mechanism are known, recent publications suggest that gap junctions composed of connexin32 function as critical intercellular communication channels which transfer cytotoxic mediators into neighboring hepatocytes and aggravate liver injury. However, these studies did not consider off-target effects of reagents used in these experiments, especially the gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate (2-APB). In order to assess the mechanisms of protection of 2-APB in vivo, male C56Bl/6 mice were treated with 400 mg/kg APAP to cause extensive liver injury. This injury was prevented when animals were co-treated with 20 mg/kg 2-APB and was attenuated when 2-APB was administered 1.5h after APAP. However, the protection was completely lost when 2-APB was given 4–6h after APAP. Measurement of protein adducts and c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation indicated that 2-APB reduced both protein binding and JNK activation, which correlated with hepatoprotection. Although some of the protection was due to the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), in vitro experiments clearly demonstrated that 2-APB directly inhibits cytochrome P450 activities. In addition, JNK activation induced by phorone and tert-butylhydroperoxide in vivo was inhibited by 2-APB. The effects against APAP toxicity in vivo were reproduced in primary cultured hepatocytes without use of DMSO and in the absence of functional gap junctions. We conclude that the protective effect of 2-APB was caused by inhibition of metabolic activation of APAP and inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway and not by blocking connexin32-based gap junctions. PMID:24070586

  4. The gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by inhibiting cytochrome P450 enzymes and c-jun N-terminal kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Du, Kuo; Williams, C David; McGill, Mitchell R; Xie, Yuchao; Farhood, Anwar; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-12-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. Although many aspects of the mechanism are known, recent publications suggest that gap junctions composed of connexin32 function as critical intercellular communication channels which transfer cytotoxic mediators into neighboring hepatocytes and aggravate liver injury. However, these studies did not consider off-target effects of reagents used in these experiments, especially the gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate (2-APB). In order to assess the mechanisms of protection of 2-APB in vivo, male C56Bl/6 mice were treated with 400 mg/kg APAP to cause extensive liver injury. This injury was prevented when animals were co-treated with 20 mg/kg 2-APB and was attenuated when 2-APB was administered 1.5 h after APAP. However, the protection was completely lost when 2-APB was given 4-6 h after APAP. Measurement of protein adducts and c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation indicated that 2-APB reduced both protein binding and JNK activation, which correlated with hepatoprotection. Although some of the protection was due to the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), in vitro experiments clearly demonstrated that 2-APB directly inhibits cytochrome P450 activities. In addition, JNK activation induced by phorone and tert-butylhydroperoxide in vivo was inhibited by 2-APB. The effects against APAP toxicity in vivo were reproduced in primary cultured hepatocytes without use of DMSO and in the absence of functional gap junctions. We conclude that the protective effect of 2-APB was caused by inhibition of metabolic activation of APAP and inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway and not by blocking connexin32-based gap junctions. PMID:24070586

  5. The impact of partial manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2)-deficiency on mitochondrial oxidant stress, DNA fragmentation and liver injury during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, Anup; Lebofsky, Margitta; Weinman, Steven A.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-03-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in many countries. The mechanism of cell death is initiated by formation of a reactive metabolite that binds to mitochondrial proteins and promotes mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidant stress. Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) is a critical defense enzyme located in the mitochondrial matrix. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the functional consequences of partial SOD2-deficiency (SOD2+/-) on intracellular signaling mechanisms of necrotic cell death after APAP overdose. Treatment of C57Bl/6J wild type animals with 200 mg/kg APAP resulted in liver injury as indicated by elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase activities (2870 {+-} 180 U/L) and centrilobular necrosis at 6 h. In addition, increased tissue glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels and GSSG-to-GSH ratios, delayed mitochondrial GSH recovery, and increased mitochondrial protein carbonyls and nitrotyrosine protein adducts indicated mitochondrial oxidant stress. In addition, nuclear DNA fragmentation (TUNEL assay) correlated with translocation of Bax to the mitochondria and release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). Furthermore, activation of c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) was documented by the mitochondrial translocation of phospho-JNK. SOD2+/- mice showed 4-fold higher ALT activities and necrosis, an enhancement of all parameters of the mitochondrial oxidant stress, more AIF release and more extensive DNA fragmentation and more prolonged JNK activation. Conclusions: the impaired defense against mitochondrial superoxide formation in SOD2+/- mice prolongs JNK activation after APAP overdose and consequently further enhances the mitochondrial oxidant stress leading to exaggerated mitochondrial dysfunction, release of intermembrane proteins with nuclear DNA fragmentation and more necrosis.

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Property of Plantago major Leaf Extract Reduces the Inflammatory Reaction in Experimental Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hussan, Farida; Mansor, Adila Sofea; Hassan, Siti Nazihahasma; Tengku Nor Effendy Kamaruddin, Tg Nurul Tasnim; Budin, Siti Balkis; Othman, Faizah

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic injury induces inflammatory process and cell necrosis. Plantago major is traditionally used for various diseases. This study aimed to determine the anti-inflammatory property of P. major leaf extracts on inflammatory reaction following acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 5 groups, namely, normal control (C), APAP, aqueous (APAP + AQ), methanol (APAP + MT), and ethanol (APAP + ET) extract treated groups. All APAP groups received oral APAP (2 g/kg) at day 0. Then, 1000 mg/kg dose of P. major extracts was given for six days. The levels of liver transaminases were measured at day 1 and day 7 after APAP induction. At day 7, the blood and liver tissue were collected to determine plasma cytokines and tissue 11β-HSD type 1 enzyme. The in vitro anti-inflammatory activities of methanol, ethanol, and aqueous extracts were 26.74 ± 1.6%, 21.69 ± 2.81%, and 12.23 ± 3.15%, respectively. The ALT and AST levels were significantly higher in the APAP groups at day 1 whereas the enzyme levels of all groups showed no significant difference at day 7. The extracts treatment significantly reduced the proinflammatory cytokine levels and significantly increased the 11β-HSD type 1 enzyme activity (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the P. major extracts attenuate the inflammatory reaction following APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:26300946

  7. Acute and chronic effects of IL-22 on acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dechun; Wang, Yan; Wang, Hua; Weng, Honglei; Kong, Xiaoni; Martin-Murphy, Brittany V; Li, Yongmei; Park, Ogyi; Dooley, Steven; Ju, Cynthia; Gao, Bin

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury (AILI) accounts for half of the acute liver failure cases in the United States. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of AILI is necessary for the development of novel antidotes. We found that pretreatment with IL-22 protected mice from APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity. The protection was dependent on STAT3, as IL-22 failed to reduce APAP hepatotoxicity in liver-specific STAT3 knockout mice. In contrast to the acute exposure to IL-22, the endogenous chronic overexpression of IL-22 in IL-22 transgenic (TG) mice or IL-22 adenovirus treatment for 6 wk resulted in a markedly increased susceptibility to AILI. Furthermore, the hepatic expression levels of cytochrome 2E1 (Cyp2E1) and Cyp1A2 were much higher in IL-22TG mice. Ablation of Cyp2E1 but not hepatic STAT3 abolished AILI and protein-adduct formation in IL-22TG mice. Finally, hepatic expression of HNF-1α, a transcriptional factor that is known to control Cyp2E1 expression, was elevated in IL-22TG mice compared with wild-type mice. Upregulation of hepatic Cyp2E1 was only observed in mice with constitutive overexpression of IL-22 but not with short-term treatment with one dose of IL-22 or multiple doses of IL-22 for 2 wk. In conclusion, short-term acute IL-22 exposure protects mice against AILI through STAT3 activation; however, chronic constitutive overexpression of IL-22 exacerbates AILI by increasing Cyp2E1 and toxic reactive APAP metabolite production. These findings may not only enhance our understanding of the effects of chronic inflammation on AILI in patients with liver disease, but are also helpful to identify novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of AILI. PMID:25063867

  8. ACETAMINOPHEN-INDUCED HEPATIC NEUTROPHIL ACCUMULATION AND INFLAMMATORY LIVER INJURY IN CD18-DEFICIENT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Background Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is currently the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in the US and many European countries. Although intracellular signaling mechanisms are critical for hepatocellular injury, a contribution of inflammatory cells, especially neutrophils, has been suggested. However, conflicting results were obtained when using immunological intervention strategies. Aims The role of neutrophils was investigated using a CD18-deficient mouse model. Results Treatment of C57Bl/6 wild type mice with 300 mg/kg APAP resulted in severe liver cell necrosis at 12 and 24 h. This injury was accompanied by formation of cytokines and chemokines and accumulation of neutrophils in the liver. However, there was no difference in the inflammatory response or liver injury in CD18-deficient mice compared to wild type animals. In contrast to treatment with endotoxin, no upregulation of CD11b or priming for reactive oxygen was observed on neutrophils isolated from the peripheral blood or the liver after APAP administration. Furthermore, animals treated with endotoxin 3 h after APAP experienced an exaggerated inflammatory response as indicated by substantially higher cytokine and chemokine formation and twice the number of neutrophils in the liver. However, liver injury in the two-hit model was the same as with APAP alone. Conclusions Our data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils contribute to APAP hepatotoxicity or that a neutrophil-mediated injury phase could be provoked by a second, pro-inflammatory hit. Thus, APAP-induced liver injury in mice is dominated by intracellular mechanisms of cell death rather than by neutrophilic inflammation. PMID:20500806

  9. S-adenosyl-L-methionine protection of acetaminophen mediated oxidative stress and identification of hepatic 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, James Mike; Kuhlman, Christopher; Terneus, Marcus V.; Labenski, Matthew T.; Lamyaithong, Andre Benja; Ball, John G.; Lau, Serrine S.; Valentovic, Monica A.

    2014-12-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is protected by S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) treatment 1 hour (h) after APAP in C57/Bl6 mice. This study examined protein carbonylation as well as mitochondrial and cytosolic protein adduction by 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) using mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Additional studies investigated the leakage of mitochondrial proteins and 4-HNE adduction of these proteins. Male C57/Bl6 mice (n = 5/group) were divided into the following groups and treated as indicated: Veh (15 ml/kg water, ip), SAMe (1.25 mmol/kg, ip), APAP (250 mg/kg), and SAMe given 1 h after APAP (S + A). APAP toxicity was confirmed by an increase (p < 0.05) in plasma ALT (U/l) and liver weight/10 g body weight relative to the Veh, SAMe and S + A groups 4 h following APAP treatment. SAMe administered 1 h post-APAP partially corrected APAP hepatotoxicity as ALT and liver weight/10 g body weights were lower in the S + A group compared the APAP group. APAP induced leakage of the mitochondrial protein, carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS-1) into the cytosol and which was reduced in the S + A group. SAMe further reduced the extent of APAP mediated 4-HNE adduction of CPS-1. MS analysis of hepatic and mitochondrial subcellular fractions identified proteins from APAP treated mice. Site specific 4-HNE adducts were identified on mitochondrial proteins sarcosine dehydrogenase and carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS-1). In summary, APAP is associated with 4-HNE adduction of proteins as identified by MS analysis and that CPS-1 leakage was greater in APAP treated mice. SAMe reduced the extent of 4-HNE adduction of proteins as well as leakage of CPS-1. - Highlights: • Acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity protected by S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) • 4-Hydroxynonenal adducted to sarcosine dehydrogenase • 4-Hydroxynonenal adducted to carbamoyl phosphate synthetase-1 • SAMe reduced APAP mediated CPS-1 mitochondrial leakage.

  10. Quantification of a biomarker of acetaminophen protein adducts in human serum by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry: clinical and animal model applications.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sarah F; King, Amber D; Chang, Yan; Murray, Gordon J; Norris, Hye-Ryun K; Dart, Richard C; Green, Jody L; Curry, Steven C; Rollins, Douglas E; Wilkins, Diana G

    2015-03-15

    The aims of this study were to develop, validate, and apply a high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) method for quantification of protein-derived 3-(cystein-S-yl)-acetaminophen (APAP-Cys) in human serum. Formation of acetaminophen (APAP) protein adducts is thought to be a critical, early event in the development of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, and quantification of these protein adducts in human serum represents a valuable tool for assessment of APAP exposure, metabolism, and toxicity. In the reported procedure, serum samples were first dialyzed or passed through gel filtration columns to remove APAP-Cys not covalently bound to proteins. Serum eluates were then subjected to enzymatic protease digestion to liberate protein-bound APAP-Cys. Norbuprenorphine-D3 was utilized as an internal standard (IS). APAP-Cys and IS were recovered from digested serum by protein precipitation with acetonitrile, and sample extracts were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The method was validated by assessment of intra- and inter-assay accuracy and imprecision on two different analytical instrument platforms. APAP-Cys could be accurately quantified from 0.010 to 10μM, and intra- and inter-assay imprecision were <15% on both analytical instruments. APAP-Cys was stable in human serum for three freeze-thaw cycles and for 24h at ambient temperature. Extracted samples were stable when stored in refrigerated autosamplers for the typical duration of analysis or when stored at -20°C for six days. Results from process efficiency and matrix effect experiments indicated adequate recovery from human serum and insignificant ion suppression or enhancement. The utility and sensitivity of the reported procedure were illustrated by analysis of clinical samples collected from subjects taking chronic, therapeutic doses of APAP. Applicability to other biological matrices was also demonstrated by measurement of protein-derived APAP-Cys in plasma

  11. Mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced cell death in primary human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Dorko, Kenneth; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-09-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most prevalent cause of drug-induced liver injury in western countries. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of injury after APAP overdose in various animal models; however, the importance of these mechanisms for humans remains unclear. Here we investigated APAP hepatotoxicity using freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from either donor livers or liver resections. PHH were exposed to 5 mM, 10 mM or 20 mM APAP over a period of 48 h and multiple parameters were assessed. APAP dose-dependently induced significant hepatocyte necrosis starting from 24 h, which correlated with the clinical onset of human liver injury after APAP overdose. Interestingly, cellular glutathione was depleted rapidly during the first 3 h. APAP also resulted in early formation of APAP-protein adducts (measured in whole cell lysate and in mitochondria) and mitochondrial dysfunction, indicated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential after 12 h. Furthermore, APAP time-dependently triggered c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol and translocation of phospho-JNK to the mitochondria. Both co-treatment and post-treatment (3 h) with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reduced JNK activation and significantly attenuated cell death at 24 h and 48 h after APAP. The clinical antidote N-acetylcysteine offered almost complete protection even if administered 6 h after APAP and a partial protection when given at 15 h. Conclusion: These data highlight important mechanistic events in APAP toxicity in PHH and indicate a critical role of JNK in the progression of injury after APAP in humans. The JNK pathway may represent a therapeutic target in the clinic. - Highlights: • APAP reproducibly causes cell death in freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes. • APAP induces adduct formation, JNK activation and mitochondrial dysfunction in PHH. • Mitochondrial adducts and JNK translocation are delayed in PHH compared to

  12. High-mobility group box-1 protein and keratin-18, circulating serum proteins informative of acetaminophen-induced necrosis and apoptosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Daniel J; Williams, Dominic P; Kipar, Anja; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Regan, Sophie L; Sathish, Jean G; Kitteringham, Neil R; Park, B Kevin

    2009-12-01

    Drug-induced hepatotoxicity represents a major clinical problem and an impediment to new medicine development. Serum biomarkers hold the potential to provide information about pathways leading to cellular responses within inaccessible tissues, which can inform the medicinal chemist and the clinician with respect to safe drug design and use. Hepatocyte apoptosis, necrosis, and innate immune activation have been defined as features of the toxicological response associated with the hepatotoxin acetaminophen (APAP). Within this investigation, we have unambiguously identified and characterized by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry differing circulating molecular forms of high-mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) and keratin-18 (K18), which are linked to the mechanisms and pathological changes induced by APAP in the mouse. Hypoacetylated HMGB1 (necrosis indicator), caspase-cleaved K18 (apoptosis indicator), and full-length K18 (necrosis indicator) present in serum showed strong correlations with the histological time course of cell death and was more sensitive than alanine aminotransferase activity. We have further identified a hyperacetylated form of HMGB1 (inflammatory indicator) in serum, which indicated that hepatotoxicity was associated with an inflammatory response. The inhibition of APAP-induced apoptosis and K18 cleavage by the caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe) fluoromethyl ketone are associated with increased hepatic damage, by a shift to necrotic cell death only. These findings illustrate the initial verification of K18 and HMGB1 molecular forms as serum-based sensitive tools that provide insights into the cellular dynamics involved in APAP hepatotoxicity within an inaccessible tissue. Based on these findings, potential exists for the qualification and measurement of these proteins to further assist in vitro, in vivo, and clinical bridging in toxicological research. PMID:19783637

  13. ROLE OF THE NALP3 INFLAMMASOME IN ACETAMINOPHEN-INDUCED STERILE INFLAMMATION AND LIVER INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. David; Antoine, Daniel J.; Shaw, Patrick J.; Benson, Craig; Farhood, Anwar; Williams, Dominic P.; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Park, B. Kevin; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US and UK. Recent studies implied that APAP-induced injury is partially mediated by interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which can activate and recruit neutrophils, exacerbating injury. Mature IL-1β is formed by caspase-1, dependent on inflammasome activation. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the role of the Nalp3 inflammasome on release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), hepatic neutrophil accumulation and liver injury (ALT, necrosis) after APAP overdose. Mice deficient for each component of the Nalp3 inflammasome (Caspase-1, ASC and NALP3) were treated with 300 mg/kg APAP for 24 h; these mice had similar neutrophil recruitment and liver injury as APAP-treated C57Bl/6 wildtype animals. In addition, plasma levels of DAMPs (DNA fragments, keratin-18, hypo- and hyper-acetylated forms of high mobility group box-1 protein) were similarly elevated with no significant difference between wildtype and gene knockout mice. In addition, aspirin treatment, which has been postulated to attenuate cytokine formation and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome after APAP, had no effect on release of DAMPs, hepatic neutrophil accumulation or liver injury. Together these data confirm the release of DAMPs and a sterile inflammatory response after APAP overdose. However, as previously reported minor endogenous formation of IL-1β and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome have little impact on APAP hepatotoxicity. It appears that the Nalp3 inflammasome is not a promising therapeutic target to treat APAP overdose. PMID:21396389

  14. Role of the Nalp3 inflammasome in acetaminophen-induced sterile inflammation and liver injury.

    PubMed

    Williams, C David; Antoine, Daniel J; Shaw, Patrick J; Benson, Craig; Farhood, Anwar; Williams, Dominic P; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Park, B Kevin; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US and UK. Recent studies implied that APAP-induced injury is partially mediated by interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which can activate and recruit neutrophils, exacerbating injury. Mature IL-1β is formed by caspase-1, dependent on inflammasome activation. The objective of this invetstigation was to evaluate the role of the Nalp3 inflammasome on release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), hepatic neutrophil accumulation and liver injury (ALT, necrosis) after APAP overdose. Mice deficient for each component of the Nalp3 inflammasome (caspase-1, ASC and Nalp3) were treated with 300mg/kg APAP for 24h; these mice had similar neutrophil recruitment and liver injury as APAP-treated C57Bl/6 wildtype animals. In addition, plasma levels of DAMPs (DNA fragments, keratin-18, hypo- and hyper-acetylated forms of high mobility group box-1 protein) were similarly elevated with no significant difference between wildtype and gene knockout mice. In addition, aspirin treatment, which has been postulated to attenuate cytokine formation and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome after APAP, had no effect on release of DAMPs, hepatic neutrophil accumulation or liver injury. Together, these data confirm the release of DAMPs and a sterile inflammatory response after APAP overdose. However, as previously reported minor endogenous formation of IL-1β and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome have little impact on APAP hepatotoxicity. It appears that the Nalp3 inflammasome is not a promising therapeutic target to treat APAP overdose. PMID:21396389

  15. Role of the Nalp3 inflammasome in acetaminophen-induced sterile inflammation and liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Antoine, Daniel J.; Shaw, Patrick J.; Benson, Craig; Farhood, Anwar; Williams, Dominic P.; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Park, B. Kevin; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US and UK. Recent studies implied that APAP-induced injury is partially mediated by interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), which can activate and recruit neutrophils, exacerbating injury. Mature IL-1{beta} is formed by caspase-1, dependent on inflammasome activation. The objective of this invetstigation was to evaluate the role of the Nalp3 inflammasome on release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), hepatic neutrophil accumulation and liver injury (ALT, necrosis) after APAP overdose. Mice deficient for each component of the Nalp3 inflammasome (caspase-1, ASC and Nalp3) were treated with 300 mg/kg APAP for 24 h; these mice had similar neutrophil recruitment and liver injury as APAP-treated C57Bl/6 wildtype animals. In addition, plasma levels of DAMPs (DNA fragments, keratin-18, hypo- and hyper-acetylated forms of high mobility group box-1 protein) were similarly elevated with no significant difference between wildtype and gene knockout mice. In addition, aspirin treatment, which has been postulated to attenuate cytokine formation and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome after APAP, had no effect on release of DAMPs, hepatic neutrophil accumulation or liver injury. Together, these data confirm the release of DAMPs and a sterile inflammatory response after APAP overdose. However, as previously reported minor endogenous formation of IL-1{beta} and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome have little impact on APAP hepatotoxicity. It appears that the Nalp3 inflammasome is not a promising therapeutic target to treat APAP overdose.

  16. Role of Bile Acids in Liver Injury and Regeneration following Acetaminophen Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Bharat; Borude, Prachi; Edwards, Genea; Walesky, Chad; Cleveland, Joshua; Li, Feng; Ma, Xiaochao; Apte, Udayan

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids play a critical role in liver injury and regeneration, but their role in acetaminophen (APAP)–induced liver injury is not known. We tested the effect of bile acid modulation on APAP hepatotoxicity using C57BL/6 mice, which were fed a normal diet, a 2% cholestyramine (CSA)–containing diet for bile acid depletion, or a 0.2% cholic acid (CA)–containing diet for 1 week before treatment with 400 mg/kg APAP. CSA-mediated bile acid depletion resulted in significantly higher liver injury and delayed regeneration after APAP treatment. In contrast, 0.2% CA supplementation in the diet resulted in a moderate delay in progression of liver injury and significantly higher liver regeneration after APAP treatment. Either CSA-mediated bile acid depletion or CA supplementation did not affect hepatic CYP2E1 levels or glutathione depletion after APAP treatment. CSA-fed mice exhibited significantly higher activation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinases and a significant decrease in intestinal fibroblast growth factor 15 mRNA after APAP treatment. In contrast, mice fed a 0.2% CA diet had significantly lower c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase activation and 12-fold higher fibroblast growth factor 15 mRNA in the intestines. Liver regeneration after APAP treatment was significantly faster in CA diet–fed mice after APAP administration secondary to rapid cyclin D1 induction. Taken together, these data indicate that bile acids play a critical role in both initiation and recovery of APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:24007882

  17. Hepatoprotective effect of Crocus sativus (saffron) petals extract against acetaminophen toxicity in male Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Omidi, Arash; Riahinia, Narges; Montazer Torbati, Mohammad Bagher; Behdani, Mohammad-Ali

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity is known to be common and potentially fatal. This study aims to investigate the protective effects of hydroalcoholic extract, remaining from Crocus sativus petals (CSP) against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity by measuring the blood parameters and studying the histopathology of liver in male rats. Materials and Methods: Wister rats (24) were randomly assigned into four groups including: I) healthy, receiving normal saline; II) Intoxicated, receiving only APAP (600 mg/kg); III) pre-treated with low dose of CSP (10 mg /kg) and receiving APAP (600 mg/kg); IV) pre-treated with high dose of CSP (20 mg/kg) and receiving APAP (600 mg/kg). Results: The APAP treatment resulted in higher levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and bilirubin, along with lower total protein and albumin concentration than the control group. The administration of CSP with a dose of 20 mg/kg was found to result in lower levels of AST, ALT and bilirubin, with a significant higher concentration of total protein and albumin. The histopathological results regarding liver pathology, revealed sever conditions including cell swelling, severe inflammation and necrosis in APAP-exposed rats, which was quiet contrasting compared to the control group. The pre-treated rats with low doses of ‍CSP showed hydropic degeneration with mild necrosis in centrilobular areas of the liver, while the same subjects with high doses of ‍CSP appeared to have only mild hepatocyte degeneration. Conclusions: Doses of 20 mg/kg of CSP ameliorates APAP–induced acute liver injury in rats. It was concluded that the antioxidant property of CSP resulted in reducing the oxidative stress complications of toxic levels of APAP in intoxicated rats. PMID:25386395

  18. Morin mitigates acetaminophen-induced liver injury by potentiating Nrf2 regulated survival mechanism through molecular intervention in PHLPP2-Akt-Gsk3β axis.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Fatima; Mathur, Alpana; Kakkar, Poonam

    2015-10-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is frequently taken to relieve pain. Staggered APAP overdoses have been reported to cause acetaminophen-induced liver injury (AILI). Identification of efficacious therapeutic modalities to address complications imposed by accidental/intentional long-term APAP ingestion is needed. Morin, a plant-derived phytochemical, possesses a multitude of pharmacological properties including hepatoprotective action; however, the underlying mechanisms have been inadequately explored. Our present report demonstrates significant attenuation of APAP-mediated liver injury by morin supplementation in vivo as indicated by reduction in histological and serum markers of hepatotoxicity. Morin not only limited necroinflammation as revealed by reduced HMGB1 release, NALP3 and caspase-1 maturation, but also suppressed oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. This suggests that morin may have exerted its cytoprotective role by way of early intervention in the pathway leading to perpetuation of AILI. Morin reinforced cellular defenses by suppressing Nrf2 ubiquitination and promoting nuclear Nrf2 retention as well as ARE-Nrf2 binding affinity. The effects were observed to be a result of molecular intervention in the activity of PHLPP2, a phosphatase previously reported by us to subdue cellular Nrf2 responses via Fyn kinase activation. Morin was observed to inhibit APAP-induced increase in PHLPP2 activity ex vivo as well as its association with cellular target Akt1. As a result, morin prevented oxidative stress induced deactivation of Akt (Ser473) leading to suppression in GSK3β and Fyn kinase activation. The study supports the inhibitory action of morin against PHLPP2-regulated Nrf2-suppression and hence indentifies Nrf2-potentiating property of morin that may be exploited in developing novel therapeutic strategy to address AILI. PMID:26286854

  19. Comparison of S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) and N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) Protective Effects on Hepatic Damage when Administered After Acetaminophen Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Terneus, Marcus V.; Brown, J. Michael; Carpenter, A. Betts; Valentovic, Monica A.

    2008-01-01

    In the clinical setting, antidotes are generally administered after the occurrence of a drug overdose. Therefore, the most pertinent evaluation of any new agent should model human exposure. This study tested whether acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity was reversed when S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) was administered after APAP exposure, similar to what occurs in clinical situations. Comparisons were made for potency between SAMe and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), the current treatment for APAP toxicity. Male C57BL/6 mice were fasted overnight and divided into groups: control (VEH), SAMe treated (SAMe), APAP treated (APAP), N-acetylcysteine treated (NAC), SAMe or NAC administered 1 h after APAP (SAMe+APAP) and (NAC+APAP), respectively. Mice were injected Intraperitoneal (ip) with water (VEH) or 250 mg/kg APAP (15 ml/kg). One 1h later, mice were injected (ip) with 1.25 mmol/kg SAMe (SAMe+APAP) or NAC (NAC+APAP). Hepatotoxicity was evaluated 4 h after APAP or VEH treatment. APAP induced centrilobular necrosis, increased liver weight and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels, depressed total hepatic glutathione (GSH), increased protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) adducted proteins. Treatment with SAMe 1 hr after APAP overdose (SAMe+APAP) was hepatoprotective and was comparable to NAC+APAP. Treatment with SAMe or NAC 1 h after APAP was sufficient to return total hepatic glutathione (GSH) to levels comparable to the VEH group. Western blot showed reversal of APAP mediated effects in the SAMe+APAP and NAC+APAP groups. In summary, SAMe was protective when given 1 h after APAP and was comparable to NAC. PMID:18068290

  20. S-adenosyl-l-methionine protection of acetaminophen mediated oxidative stress and identification of hepatic 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brown, James Mike; Kuhlman, Christopher; Terneus, Marcus V; Labenski, Matthew T; Lamyaithong, Andre Benja; Ball, John G; Lau, Serrine S; Valentovic, Monica A

    2014-12-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is protected by S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAMe) treatment 1hour (h) after APAP in C57/Bl6 mice. This study examined protein carbonylation as well as mitochondrial and cytosolic protein adduction by 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) using mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Additional studies investigated the leakage of mitochondrial proteins and 4-HNE adduction of these proteins. Male C57/Bl6 mice (n=5/group) were divided into the following groups and treated as indicated: Veh (15ml/kg water, ip), SAMe (1.25mmol/kg, ip), APAP (250mg/kg), and SAMe given 1h after APAP (S+A). APAP toxicity was confirmed by an increase (p<0.05) in plasma ALT (U/l) and liver weight/10g body weight relative to the Veh, SAMe and S+A groups 4h following APAP treatment. SAMe administered 1h post-APAP partially corrected APAP hepatotoxicity as ALT and liver weight/10g body weights were lower in the S+A group compared the APAP group. APAP induced leakage of the mitochondrial protein, carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS-1) into the cytosol and which was reduced in the S+A group. SAMe further reduced the extent of APAP mediated 4-HNE adduction of CPS-1. MS analysis of hepatic and mitochondrial subcellular fractions identified proteins from APAP treated mice. Site specific 4-HNE adducts were identified on mitochondrial proteins sarcosine dehydrogenase and carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS-1). In summary, APAP is associated with 4-HNE adduction of proteins as identified by MS analysis and that CPS-1 leakage was greater in APAP treated mice. SAMe reduced the extent of 4-HNE adduction of proteins as well as leakage of CPS-1. PMID:25246065

  1. S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine Protection of Acetaminophen Mediated Oxidative Stress and Identification of Hepatic 4-Hydroxynonenal Protein Adducts by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James Mike; Kuhlman, Christopher; Terneus, Marcus V.; Labenski, Matthew T.; Lamyaithong, Andre Benja; Ball, John G.; Lau, Serrine S.; Valentovic, Monica A.

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is protected by S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) treatment 1 hour (h) after APAP in C57/Bl6 mice. This study examined protein carbonylation as well as mitochondrial and cytosolic protein adduction by 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) using mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Additional studies investigated the leakage of mitochondrial proteins and 4-HNE adduction of these proteins. Male C57/Bl6 mice (n=5/group) were divided into the following groups and treated as indicated: Veh (15 ml/kg water, ip), SAMe (1.25 mmol/kg, ip), APAP (250 mg/kg), and SAMe given 1 h after APAP (S+A). APAP toxicity was confirmed by an increase (p<0.05) in plasma ALT (U/L) and liver weight/10 g body weight relative to the Veh, SAMe and S+A groups 4 h following APAP treatment. SAMe administered 1 h post APAP partially corrected APAP hepatotoxicity as ALT and liver weight/10 g body weights were lower in the S+A group compared the APAP group. APAP induced leakage of the mitochondrial protein, carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS-1) into the cytosol and which was reduced in the S+A group. SAMe further reduced the extent of APAP mediated 4-HNE adduction of CPS-1. MS analysis of hepatic and mitochondrial subcellular fractions identified proteins from APAP treated mice. Site specific 4-HNE adducts were identified on mitochondrial proteins sarcosine dehydrogenase and carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS-1). In summary, APAP is associated with 4-HNE adduction of proteins as identified by MS analysis and that CPS-1 leakage was greater in APAP treated mice. SAMe reduced the extent of 4-HNE adduction of proteins as well as leakage of CPS-1. PMID:25246065

  2. Nephroprotective and antioxidant activities of Salacia oblonga on acetaminophen-induced toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Palani, S; Raja, S; Kumar, S Nirmal; Kumar, B Senthil

    2011-11-01

    Salacia oblonga, a woody climbing plant belonging to the family Celastaceae, is widely distributed in India and other southeast Asian countries. The genus Salacia have been used particularly for the treatment of diabetes, obesity, gonorrhoea, rheumatism, pruritus and asthma. Acetaminophen (APAP), used as an analgesic drug, produces liver and kidney necrosis in mammals at high doses. The aim of this study was to investigate the nephroprotective and antioxidant activities of the ethanol extract of Salacia oblonga (EESO) at the two dose levels of 250 and 500 mg/kg bw on APAP-induced toxicity in rats. The results showed that APAP significantly increases the levels of serum urea, creatinine, and reduces levels of uric acid concentration. The EESO reduces these by increasing anti-oxidative responses as assessed by biochemical and histopathological parameters. In conclusion, our results suggest that the EESO possesses nephroprotective and antioxidant effects against APAP-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. PMID:21848492

  3. The modulatory effect of Moringa oleifera leaf extract on endogenous antioxidant systems and inflammatory markers in an acetaminophen-induced nephrotoxic mice model.

    PubMed

    Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Kura, Aminu Umar; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Md Isa, Norhaszalina; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2016-01-01

    N-Acetyl-p-Aminophenol (APAP), also known as acetaminophen, is the most commonly used over-the counter analgesic and antipyretic medication. However, its overdose leads to both liver and kidney damage. APAP-induced toxicity is considered as one of the primary causes of acute liver failure; numerous scientific reports have focused majorly on APAP hepatotoxicity. Alternatively, not many works approach APAP nephrotoxicity focusing on both its mechanisms of action and therapeutic exploration. Moringa oleifera (MO) is pervasive in nature, is reported to possess a surplus amount of nutrients, and is enriched with several bioactive candidates including trace elements that act as curatives for various clinical conditions. In this study, we evaluated the nephro-protective potential of MO leaf extract against APAP nephrotoxicity in male Balb/c mice. A single-dose acute oral toxicity design was implemented in this study. Group 2, 3, 4 and 5 received a toxic dose of APAP (400 mg/kg of bw, i.p) and after an hour, these groups were administered with saline (10 mL/kg), silymarin-positive control (100 mg/kg of bw, i.p), MO leaf extract (100 mg/kg of bw, i.p), and MO leaf extract (200 mg/kg bw, i.p) respectively. Group 1 was administered saline (10 mL/kg) during both the sessions. APAP-treated mice exhibited a significant elevation of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, sodium, potassium and chloride levels. A remarkable depletion of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD, CAT and GSH-Px with elevated MDA levels has been observed in APAP treated kidney tissues. They also exhibited a significant rise in pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) and decreased anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokine level in the kidney tissues. Disorganized glomerulus and dilated tubules with inflammatory cell infiltration were clearly observed in the histology of APAP treated mice kidneys. All these pathological changes were reversed in a dose-dependent manner after MO leaf extract treatment

  4. The modulatory effect of Moringa oleifera leaf extract on endogenous antioxidant systems and inflammatory markers in an acetaminophen-induced nephrotoxic mice model

    PubMed Central

    Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Kura, Aminu Umar; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Md. Isa, Norhaszalina

    2016-01-01

    N-Acetyl-p-Aminophenol (APAP), also known as acetaminophen, is the most commonly used over-the counter analgesic and antipyretic medication. However, its overdose leads to both liver and kidney damage. APAP-induced toxicity is considered as one of the primary causes of acute liver failure; numerous scientific reports have focused majorly on APAP hepatotoxicity. Alternatively, not many works approach APAP nephrotoxicity focusing on both its mechanisms of action and therapeutic exploration. Moringa oleifera (MO) is pervasive in nature, is reported to possess a surplus amount of nutrients, and is enriched with several bioactive candidates including trace elements that act as curatives for various clinical conditions. In this study, we evaluated the nephro-protective potential of MO leaf extract against APAP nephrotoxicity in male Balb/c mice. A single-dose acute oral toxicity design was implemented in this study. Group 2, 3, 4 and 5 received a toxic dose of APAP (400 mg/kg of bw, i.p) and after an hour, these groups were administered with saline (10 mL/kg), silymarin—positive control (100 mg/kg of bw, i.p), MO leaf extract (100 mg/kg of bw, i.p), and MO leaf extract (200 mg/kg bw, i.p) respectively. Group 1 was administered saline (10 mL/kg) during both the sessions. APAP-treated mice exhibited a significant elevation of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, sodium, potassium and chloride levels. A remarkable depletion of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD, CAT and GSH-Px with elevated MDA levels has been observed in APAP treated kidney tissues. They also exhibited a significant rise in pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) and decreased anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokine level in the kidney tissues. Disorganized glomerulus and dilated tubules with inflammatory cell infiltration were clearly observed in the histology of APAP treated mice kidneys. All these pathological changes were reversed in a dose-dependent manner after MO leaf extract treatment

  5. Contribution of acetaminophen-cysteine to acetaminophen nephrotoxicity II. Possible involvement of the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Stephan T.; Bruno, Mary K.; Horton, Robert A.; Hill, Dennis W.; Roberts, Jeanette C.; Cohen, Steven D. . E-mail: scohen@mcp.edu

    2005-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) nephrotoxicity has been observed both in humans and research animals. Our recent investigations have focused on the possible involvement of glutathione-derived APAP metabolites in APAP nephrotoxicity and have demonstrated that administration of acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS) potentiated APAP-induced renal injury with no effects on APAP-induced liver injury. Additionally, APAP-CYS treatment alone resulted in a dose-responsive renal GSH depletion. This APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion could interfere with intrarenal detoxification of APAP or its toxic metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI) and may be the mechanism responsible for the potentiation of APAP nephrotoxicity. Renal-specific GSH depletion has been demonstrated in mice and rats following administration of amino acid {gamma}-glutamyl acceptor substrates for {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT). The present study sought to determine if APAP-CYS-induced renal glutathione depletion is the result of disruption of the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle through interaction with {gamma}-GT. The results confirmed that APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion was antagonized by the {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT) inhibitor acivicin. In vitro analysis demonstrated that APAP-CYS is a {gamma}-glutamyl acceptor for both murine and bovine renal {gamma}-GT. Analysis of urine from mice pretreated with acivicin and then treated with APAP, APAP-CYS, or acetaminophen-glutathione identified a {gamma}-glutamyl-cysteinyl-acetaminophen metabolite. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that APAP-CYS contributes to APAP nephrotoxicity by depletion of renal GSH stores through interaction with the {gamma}-glutamyl cycle.

  6. Modulatory potentials of aqueous leaf and unripe fruit extracts of Carica papaya Linn. (Caricaceae) against carbon tetrachloride and acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Awodele, Olufunsho; Yemitan, Omoniyi; Ise, Peter Uduak; Ikumawoyi, Victor Olabowale

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Carica papaya Linn is used in a traditional medicine for hepatobiliary disorders. This study investigated the hepatomodulatory effects of aqueous extracts of C. papaya leaf (CPL) and unripe fruit (CPF) at doses of 100 and 300 mg/kg on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and acetaminophen (ACM)-induced liver toxicities in rats. Materials and Methods: Rats were administered CCl4 (3 ml/kg in olive oil, i.p.) followed by oral administration of CPL and CPF at 2, 6 and 10 h intervals. The ACM model proceeded with the same method but inclusive of animals treated with N-acetyl cysteine (3 ml/kg i.p). At the end of the study, serum levels of liver biomarkers and antioxidant enzymes were assessed and histology of the liver tissues determined. Results: There was a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in CCl4 and ACM-induced increases in serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and direct bilirubin at 100 and 300 mg/kg, respectively. The levels of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase and reduced GSH were decreased in both models with corresponding significantly (P < 0.05) elevated level of malondialdehyde. However, these antioxidant enzymes were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in CPL and CPF-treated rats. Histopathological assessment of the liver confirmed the protective effects of CPL and CPF on CCl4 and ACM-induced hepatic damage evidenced by the normal presentation of liver tissue architecture. Conclusion: These results indicate that aqueous extracts of C. papaya may be useful in preventing CCl4 and ACM-induced liver toxicities. PMID:27069723

  7. Glycyrrhizin Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Injury via Alleviating Tumor Necrosis Factor α–Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tingting; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Min; Yagai, Tomoki; Chai, Yingying; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Xie, Cen; Cheng, Xuefang; Zhang, Jun; Che, Yuan; Li, Feiyan; Wu, Yuzheng; Brocker, Chad N.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in Western countries. Glycyrrhizin (GL), a potent hepatoprotective constituent extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine liquorice, has potential clinical use in treating APAP-induced liver failure. The present study determined the hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanisms of action of GL and its active metabolite glycyrrhetinic acid (GA). Various administration routes and pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics analyses were used to differentiate the effects of GL and GA on APAP toxicity in mice. Mice deficient in cytochrome P450 2E1 enzyme (CYP2E1) or receptor interacting protein 3 (RIPK3) and their relative wild-type littermates were subjected to histologic and biochemical analyses to determine the potential mechanisms. Hepatocyte death mediated by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)/caspase was analyzed by use of human liver-derived LO2 cells. The pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics analysis using various administration routes revealed that GL but not GA potently attenuated APAP-induced liver injury. The protective effect of GL was found only with intraperitoneal and intravenous administration and not with gastric administration. CYP2E1-mediated metabolic activation and RIPK3-mediated necroptosis were unrelated to GL’s protective effect. However, GL inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis via interference with TNFα-induced apoptotic hepatocyte death. These results demonstrate that GL rapidly attenuates APAP-induced liver injury by directly inhibiting TNFα-induced hepatocyte apoptosis. The protective effect against APAP-induced liver toxicity by GL in mice suggests the therapeutic potential of GL for the treatment of APAP overdose. PMID:26965985

  8. Glycyrrhizin Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Injury via Alleviating Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Mediated Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tingting; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Min; Yagai, Tomoki; Chai, Yingying; Krausz, Kristopher W; Xie, Cen; Cheng, Xuefang; Zhang, Jun; Che, Yuan; Li, Feiyan; Wu, Yuzheng; Brocker, Chad N; Gonzalez, Frank J; Wang, Guangji; Hao, Haiping

    2016-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in Western countries. Glycyrrhizin (GL), a potent hepatoprotective constituent extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine liquorice, has potential clinical use in treating APAP-induced liver failure. The present study determined the hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanisms of action of GL and its active metabolite glycyrrhetinic acid (GA). Various administration routes and pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics analyses were used to differentiate the effects of GL and GA on APAP toxicity in mice. Mice deficient in cytochrome P450 2E1 enzyme (CYP2E1) or receptor interacting protein 3 (RIPK3) and their relative wild-type littermates were subjected to histologic and biochemical analyses to determine the potential mechanisms. Hepatocyte death mediated by tumor necrosis factorα(TNFα)/caspase was analyzed by use of human liver-derived LO2 cells. The pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics analysis using various administration routes revealed that GL but not GA potently attenuated APAP-induced liver injury. The protective effect of GL was found only with intraperitoneal and intravenous administration and not with gastric administration. CYP2E1-mediated metabolic activation and RIPK3-mediated necroptosis were unrelated to GL's protective effect. However, GL inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis via interference with TNFα-induced apoptotic hepatocyte death. These results demonstrate that GL rapidly attenuates APAP-induced liver injury by directly inhibiting TNFα-induced hepatocyte apoptosis. The protective effect against APAP-induced liver toxicity by GL in mice suggests the therapeutic potential of GL for the treatment of APAP overdose. PMID:26965985

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of Rosa damascena Mill. on acetaminophen-induced oxidative stress in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Monika; Shakya, Arvind Kumar; Sharma, Neetu; Shrivastava, Sadhana; Shukla, Sangeeta

    2012-01-01

    Rosa damascena (RD) is a widely cultivated ornamental plant. It acts as an astringent, aperients, carminative, and refrigerant and is used in respiratory disorders, tonsillitis, eye disorders, migraines, gynecological disorders, and menopausal symptoms. The aim of this study is to investigate the hepatoprotective activity of the aqueous extract of RD flowers at different oral dose levels (250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg body weight) on acetaminophen (2 g/kg oral N-acetyl-p-aminophenol [APAP])-induced toxicity in rats. APAP administration altered various biochemical parameters, including serum transaminases, serum alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, albumin, bilirubin, urea and creatinine, hepatic lipid peroxidation, and reduced glutathione levels. Adenosine triphosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase activity in the liver was decreased significantly in animals treated with APAP. These values are retrieved significantly by treatment with RD extract at all 3 doses in dose-dependant manner. Apart from these, histopathological changes also reveal the protective nature of the RD extract against acetaminophen-induced necrotic damage of hepatic tissues. In conclusion, these data suggest that the aqueous extract of RD may prevent hepatic damage from APAP-induced toxicity in rats and is likely to be mediated through its antioxidant activities. PMID:23339694

  10. Acetaminophen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is also used in combination with opioid (narcotic) medications to relieve moderate to severe pain. Acetaminophen is in a class of medications called analgesics (pain relievers) and antipyretics (fever reducers). It works by changing ...

  11. Acetaminophen overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... a variety of over-the-counter and prescription pain relievers. Tylenol is a brand name for acetaminophen. Other ... team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Medicines and Children Pain Relievers Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  12. Evaluation of nephroprotective, diuretic, and antioxidant activities of plectranthus amboinicus on acetaminophen-induced nephrotoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Palani, S; Raja, S; Naresh, R; Kumar, B Senthil

    2010-05-01

    Plectranthus amboinicus (PA), commonly known as country borage, is a folkoric medicinal plant. Juice from its leaves is commonly used for illnesses including liver and renal conditions in the Asian sub-continent. Acetaminophen (APAP), used as an analgesic, produces liver and kidney necrosis in mammals at high doses. The aim of this study was to investigate the nephroprotective, diuretic, and antioxidant activities of the ethanol extract of PA at two doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg bw on APAP-induced toxicity in rats. This study shows that APAP significantly increases the levels of serum urea (UR), hemoglobin (Hb), total leukocyte count, creatinine, raised body weight, and reduced levels of neutrophils, granulocytes, uric acid, and platelet concentration. Ethanol extract of PA rescued these phenotypes by increasing anti-oxidative responses as assessed by biochemistry and histopathology. In addition, the ethanol extract of PA at two doses showed a significant diuretic activity by increased levels of total urine output and urinary elerolytes such as sodium and potassium. In conclusion, these data suggest that the ethanol extract of PA possess nephroprotective and antioxidant effects against APAP-induced nephrotoxicity and strong diuretics effect in rats. PMID:20367443

  13. Acetaminophen induces accumulation of functional rat CYP3A via polyubiquitination dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Santoh, Masataka; Sanoh, Seigo; Takagi, Masashi; Ejiri, Yoko; Kotake, Yaichiro; Ohta, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is extensively used as an analgesic and antipyretic drug. APAP is partly metabolized to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, a reactive metabolite, by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 2E1 and 3A4. Some reports have indicated that CYP3A protein production and its metabolic activity are induced by APAP in rats in vivo. The CYP3A subfamily is believed to be transcriptionally regulated by chemical compounds. However, the mechanism underlying these responses is not completely understood. To clarify these mechanisms, we assessed the effects of APAP on CYP3A1/23 protein levels according to mRNA synthesis and protein degradation in rat hepatocyte spheroids, a model of liver tissue, in vivo. APAP induced CYP3A1/23 protein levels and metabolic activity. However, no change in CYP3A1/23 mRNA levels was observed. Moreover, APAP prolonged the half-life of CYP3A1/23 protein. CYP3A is known to be degraded via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. APAP significantly was found to decrease levels of polyubiquitinated CYP3A1/23 and glycoprotein 78, an E3 ligase of CYP3A1/23. These findings demonstrate that APAP induces accumulation of functional CYP3A protein via inhibition of protein degradation. Our findings may lead to the determination of novel drug-drug interactions with APAP. PMID:26900149

  14. Acetaminophen induces accumulation of functional rat CYP3A via polyubiquitination dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Santoh, Masataka; Sanoh, Seigo; Takagi, Masashi; Ejiri, Yoko; Kotake, Yaichiro; Ohta, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is extensively used as an analgesic and antipyretic drug. APAP is partly metabolized to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, a reactive metabolite, by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 2E1 and 3A4. Some reports have indicated that CYP3A protein production and its metabolic activity are induced by APAP in rats in vivo. The CYP3A subfamily is believed to be transcriptionally regulated by chemical compounds. However, the mechanism underlying these responses is not completely understood. To clarify these mechanisms, we assessed the effects of APAP on CYP3A1/23 protein levels according to mRNA synthesis and protein degradation in rat hepatocyte spheroids, a model of liver tissue, in vivo. APAP induced CYP3A1/23 protein levels and metabolic activity. However, no change in CYP3A1/23 mRNA levels was observed. Moreover, APAP prolonged the half-life of CYP3A1/23 protein. CYP3A is known to be degraded via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. APAP significantly was found to decrease levels of polyubiquitinated CYP3A1/23 and glycoprotein 78, an E3 ligase of CYP3A1/23. These findings demonstrate that APAP induces accumulation of functional CYP3A protein via inhibition of protein degradation. Our findings may lead to the determination of novel drug–drug interactions with APAP. PMID:26900149

  15. Moringa oleifera Lam prevents acetaminophen induced liver injury through restoration of glutathione level.

    PubMed

    Fakurazi, S; Hairuszah, I; Nanthini, U

    2008-08-01

    Initiation of acetaminophen (APAP) toxicities is believed to be promoted by oxidative stress during the event of overdosage. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective action of Moringa oleifera Lam (MO), an Asian plant of high medicinal value, against a single high dose of APAP. Groups of five male Sprague-Dawley rats were pre-administered with MO (200 and 800 mg/kg) prior to a single dose of APAP (3g/kg body weight; p.o). Silymarin was used as an established hepatoprotective drug against APAP induced liver injury. The hepatoprotective activity of MO extract was observed following significant histopathological analysis and reduction of the level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in groups pretreated with MO compared to those treated with APAP alone. Meanwhile, the level of glutathione (GSH) was found to be restored in MO-treated animals compared to the groups treated with APAP alone. These observations were comparable to the group pretreated with silymarin prior to APAP administration. Group that was treated with APAP alone exhibited high level of transaminases and ALP activities besides reduction in the GSH level. The histological hepatocellular deterioration was also evidenced. The results from the present study suggested that the leaves of MO can prevent hepatic injuries from APAP induced through preventing the decline of glutathione level. PMID:18514995

  16. Hepatotoxic Mycotoxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of fungi. Aflatoxins represent one of the most important classes of hepatotoxic mycotoxins known to adversely affect human health. Aflatoxins are the most potent identified mycotoxins and are produced by three fungal species: the common fungal molds Aspergillus...

  17. Acetaminophen overdose associated with double serum concentration peaks

    PubMed Central

    Papazoglu, Cristian; Ang, Jonathan R.; Mandel, Michael; Basak, Prasanta; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen is the most commonly used analgesic–antipyretic medication in the United States. Acetaminophen overdose, a frequent cause of drug toxicity, has been recognized as the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal hepatic necrosis. N-Acetylcysteine is the recommended antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Despite evidence on the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine for prevention of hepatic injury, controversy persists about the optimal duration of the therapy. Here, we describe the case of a 65-year-old male with acetaminophen overdose and opioid co-ingestion who developed a second peak in acetaminophen serum levels after completing the recommended 21-hour intravenous N-acetylcysteine protocol and when the standard criteria for monitoring drug levels was achieved. Prolongation of N-acetylcysteine infusion beyond the standard protocol, despite a significant gap in treatment, was critical for successful avoidance of hepatotoxicity. Delay in acetaminophen absorption may be associated with a second peak in serum concentration following an initial declining trend, especially in cases of concomitant ingestion of opioids. In patients with acetaminophen toxicity who co-ingest other medications that may potentially delay gastric emptying or in those with risk factors for delayed absorption of acetaminophen, we recommend close monitoring of aminotransferase enzyme levels, as well as trending acetaminophen concentrations until undetectable before discontinuing the antidote therapy. PMID:26653695

  18. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Takeki; Kosyk, Oksana; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Bradford, Blair U.; Tech, Katherine; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Boorman, Gary A.; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Mason, Ronald P.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Tryndyak, Volodymyr P.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2013-01-15

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  19. Argininosuccinate synthetase as a plasma biomarker of liver injury after acetaminophen overdose in rodents and humans

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Cao, Mengde; Svetlov, Archie; Sharpe, Matthew R.; Williams, C. David; Curry, Steven C.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Svetlov, Stanislav I.

    2014-01-01

    Context New biomarkers are needed in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. Plasma argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a promising candidate. Objective Characterize ASS in APAP hepatotoxicity. Methods ASS was measured in plasma from rodents and humans with APAP hepatotoxicity. Results In mice, ASS increased before injury, peaked before ALT, and decreased rapidly. Fischer rats had a greater increase in ASS relative to ALT. Patients with abnormal liver test results had very high ASS compared to controls. ASS appeared to increase early in some patients, and declined rapidly in all. Conclusions : ASS may be a useful biomarker of acute cell death in APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:24597531

  20. Preventive Effect of the Korean Traditional Health Drink (Taemyeongcheong) on Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatic Damage in ICR Mice.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ruo-Kun; Song, Jia-Le; Lim, Yaung-Iee; Kim, Yong-Kyu; Park, Kun-Young

    2015-03-01

    This study was to investigate the preventive effect of taemyeongcheong (TMC, a Korean traditional health drink) on acetaminophen (APAP, 800 mg/kg BW)-induced hepatic damage in ICR mice. TMC is prepared from Saururus chinensis, Taraxacum officinale, Zingiber officinale, Cirsium setidens, Salicornia herbacea, and Glycyrrhizae. A high dose of TMC (500 mg/kg BW) was found to decrease APAP-induced increases in serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase. TMC pretreatment also increased the hepatic levels of hepatic catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione, and reduced serum levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 in mice administered APAP (P<0.05). TMC (500 mg/kg BW) reduced hepatic mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2, and iNOS by 87%, 84%, 89%, 85%, and 88%, respectively, in mice treated with APAP (P<0.05). Furthermore, histological observations suggested TMC pretreatment dose-dependently prevented APAP-induced hepatocyte damage. These results suggest that TMC could be used as a functional health drink to prevent hepatic damage. PMID:25866750

  1. Hepatoprotective effects of Chai-Hu-Ching-Kan-Tang on acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Hsiang; Ng, Lean-Teik; Yen, Feng-Lin; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2007-01-01

    Chai-Hu-Ching-Kan-Tang (CHCKT) is one of the traditional Chinese medicine prescriptions commonly used to treat liver diseases. In this study, we evaluated the hepatoprotective effects of aqueous CHCKT extract at various concentrations (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight) on acetaminophen (APAP)-induced acute liver injury in rats. Results showed that CHCKT treatments significantly decreased the level of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (sGOT) and glutamic pyruvic transaminase (sGPT) in APAP-treated groups. CHCKT also significantly decreased the level of lipid peroxides and increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes (i.e. SOD and GPx). Histopathological observation further confirmed the hepatoprotective activity of CHCKT as indicated by the amelioration in the central necrosis and fatty changes of the liver after APAP induction. Interestingly, the hepatoprotective activity of CHCKT at concentrations 125~500 mg/kg appeared to be as good as 12.5 mg/kg silymarin (a commercial hepatoprotective agent). Taken together, these results suggest that aqueous extract of CHCKT possesses potent hepatoprotective effects agianst APAP-induced liver injury in rats. PMID:17265552

  2. Preventive Effect of the Korean Traditional Health Drink (Taemyeongcheong) on Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatic Damage in ICR Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ruo-Kun; Song, Jia-Le; Lim, Yaung-Iee; Kim, Yong-Kyu; Park, Kun-Young

    2015-01-01

    This study was to investigate the preventive effect of taemyeongcheong (TMC, a Korean traditional health drink) on acetaminophen (APAP, 800 mg/kg BW)-induced hepatic damage in ICR mice. TMC is prepared from Saururus chinensis, Taraxacum officinale, Zingiber officinale, Cirsium setidens, Salicornia herbacea, and Glycyrrhizae. A high dose of TMC (500 mg/kg BW) was found to decrease APAP-induced increases in serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase. TMC pretreatment also increased the hepatic levels of hepatic catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione, and reduced serum levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 in mice administered APAP (P<0.05). TMC (500 mg/kg BW) reduced hepatic mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2, and iNOS by 87%, 84%, 89%, 85%, and 88%, respectively, in mice treated with APAP (P<0.05). Furthermore, histological observations suggested TMC pretreatment dose-dependently prevented APAP-induced hepatocyte damage. These results suggest that TMC could be used as a functional health drink to prevent hepatic damage. PMID:25866750

  3. Connexin32: a mediator of acetaminophen-induced liver injury?

    PubMed

    Maes, Michaël; McGill, Mitchell R; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Lebofsky, Margitta; Maria Monteiro de Araújo, Cintia; Tiburcio, Taynã; Veloso Alves Pereira, Isabel; Willebrords, Joost; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Farhood, Anwar; Zaidan Dagli, Maria Lucia; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Connexin32 is the building block of hepatocellular gap junctions, which control direct intercellular communication and thereby act as goalkeepers of liver homeostasis. This study was set up to investigate whether connexin32 is involved in hepatotoxicity induced by the analgesic and antipyretic drug acetaminophen. To this end, whole body connexin32 knock-out mice were overdosed with acetaminophen followed by sampling at different time points within a 24-h time frame. Evaluation was done based upon a series of clinically and mechanistically relevant read-outs, including protein adduct formation, histopathological examination, measurement of alanine aminotransferase activity, cytokine production, levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione and hepatic protein amounts of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In essence, it was found that genetic ablation of connexin32 has no influence on several key events in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity, including cell death, inflammation or oxidative stress, yet it does affect production of protein adducts as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen steady-state protein levels. This outcome is not in line with previous studies, which are contradicting on their own, as both amplification and alleviation of this toxicological process by connexin32 have been described. This could question the suitability of the currently available models and tools to investigate the role of connexin32 in acetaminophen-triggered hepatotoxicity. PMID:26739117

  4. Leflunomide or A77 1726 protect from acetaminophen-induced cell injury through inhibition of JNK-mediated mitochondrial permeability transition in immortalized human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Seah, Quee Ming; Tan, Rachel C.H.; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Beerheide, Walter; Boelsterli, Urs A. . E-mail: phcbua@nus.edu.sg

    2006-11-15

    Leflunomide, a disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug, protects against T-cell-mediated liver injury by poorly understood mechanisms. The active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726 (teriflunomide) has been shown to inhibit stress-activated protein kinases (JNK pathway), which are key regulators of mitochondria-mediated cell death. Therefore, we hypothesized that leflunomide may protect from drugs that induce the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) by blocking the JNK signaling pathway. To this end, we exposed cultured immortalized human hepatocytes (HC-04) to the standard protoxicant drug acetaminophen (APAP), which induces CsA-sensitive mPT-mediated cell death. We determined the effects of leflunomide on the extent of APAP-induced hepatocyte injury and the upstream JNK-mediated mitochondrial signaling pathways. We found that leflunomide or A77 1726 concentration-dependently protected hepatocytes from APAP (1 mM)-induced mitochondrial permeabilization and lethal cell injury. This was not due to proximal inhibition of CYP-catalyzed APAP bioactivation to its thiol-reactive metabolite. Instead, we demonstrate that leflunomide (20 {mu}M) inhibited the APAP-induced early (3 h) activation (phosphorylation) of JNK1/2, thus inhibiting phosphorylation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and preventing P-Bcl-2-mediated induction of the mPT. This greatly attenuated mitochondrial cytochrome c release, which we used as a marker for mitochondrial permeabilization. The specific JNK2 inhibitor SP600125 similarly protected from APAP-induced cell death. In conclusion, these findings are consistent with our hypothesis that leflunomide protects from protoxicant-induced hepatocyte injury by inhibiting JNK signaling and preventing mPT induction.

  5. Protective role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 in acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdi, Mohammed Korrapati, Midhun C.; Chakraborty, Mala; Yee, Steven B.; Pohl, Lance R.

    2008-09-12

    Recent studies in mice suggest that stress-activated c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase 2 (JNK2) plays a pathologic role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury (AILI), a major cause of acute liver failure (ALF). In contrast, we present evidence that JNK2 can have a protective role against AILI. When male C57BL/6J wild type (WT) and JNK2{sup -/-} mice were treated with 300 mg APAP/kg, 90% of JNK2{sup -/-} mice died of ALF compared to 20% of WT mice within 48 h. The high susceptibility of JNK2{sup -/-} mice to AILI appears to be due in part to deficiencies in hepatocyte proliferation and repair. Therefore, our findings are consistent with JNK2 signaling playing a protective role in AILI and further suggest that the use of JNK inhibitors as a potential treatment for AILI, as has been recommended by other investigators, should be reconsidered.

  6. TRPA1 mediates the hypothermic action of acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Clive; Andersson, David A.; Bevan, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is an effective antipyretic and one of the most commonly used analgesic drugs. Unlike antipyretic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, APAP elicits hypothermia in addition to its antipyretic effect. Here we have examined the mechanisms responsible for the hypothermic activity of APAP. Subcutaneous, but not intrathecal, administration of APAP elicited a dose dependent decrease in body temperature in wildtype mice. Hypothermia was abolished in mice pre-treated with resiniferatoxin to destroy or defunctionalize peripheral TRPV1-expressing terminals, but resistant to inhibition of cyclo-oxygenases. The hypothermic activity was independent of TRPV1 since APAP evoked hypothermia was identical in wildtype and Trpv1−/− mice, and not reduced by administration of a maximally effective dose of a TRPV1 antagonist. In contrast, a TRPA1 antagonist inhibited APAP induced hypothermia and APAP was without effect on body temperature in Trpa1−/− mice. In a model of yeast induced pyrexia, administration of APAP evoked a marked hypothermia in wildtype and Trpv1−/− mice, but only restored normal body temperature in Trpa1−/− and Trpa1−/−/Trpv1−/− mice. We conclude that TRPA1 mediates APAP evoked hypothermia. PMID:26227887

  7. Role of nicotinamide (vitamin B3) in acetaminophen-induced changes in rat liver: Nicotinamide effect in acetaminophen-damged liver.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Yomna I; Mahmoud, Asmaa A

    2016-06-01

    Acetaminophen is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent, which is safe at therapeutic doses. However, overdoses of acetaminophen induce severe oxidative stress, which leads to acute liver failure. Nicotinamide has proven effective in ameliorating many pathological conditions that occur due to oxidative stress. This study verifies the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of nicotinamide against the hepatic pathophysiological and ultrastructural alterations induced by acetaminophen. Wistar rats intoxicated with an acute overdose of acetaminophen (5g/kg b.wt) were given a single dose of nicotinamide (500mg/kg b.wt) either before or after intoxication. Acetaminophen caused significant elevation in the liver functions and lipid peroxidation marker, and decline in the activities of the hepatic antioxidant enzymes. This oxidative injury was associated with hepatic centrilobular necrosis, hemorrage, vacuolar degeneration, lipid accumulation and mitochondrial alterations. Treating intoxicated rats with nicotinamide (500mg/kg) significantly ameliorated acetaminophen-induced biochemical changes and pathological injuries. However, administering the same dose of nicotinamide to healthy animals or prior to acetaminophen-intoxication induced hepatotoxicity. Caution should be taken when administering high doses of NAM because of its possible hepatotoxicity. Considering the wide use of nicotinamide, there is an important need for monitoring nicotinamide tolerance, safety and efficacy in healthy and diseased subjects. PMID:27211843

  8. Acetaminophen dosing for children

    MedlinePlus

    Taking acetaminophen (Tylenol) can help children with colds and fever feel better. As with all drugs, it is important to give children the correct dose. Acetaminophen is safe when taken as directed. But taking ...

  9. Acetaminophen, Butalbital, and Caffeine

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of acetaminophen, Butalbital, Caffeine comes as a capsule and tablet to take by mouth. It usually is taken every 4 hours ... explain any part you do not understand. Take acetaminophen, Butalbital, Caffeine exactly as directed. Do not take ...

  10. Potential of Extracellular MicroRNAs as Biomarkers of Acetaminophen Toxicity in Children

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xi; Salminen, William F; Shi, Qiang; Greenhaw, James; Gill, Pritmohinder S; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Beger, Richard D; Mendrick, Donna L; Mattes, William B.; James, Laura P

    2015-01-01

    Developing biomarkers for detecting acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity has been widely investigated. Recent studies of adults with APAP-induced liver injury have reported human serum microRNA-122 (miR-122) as a novel biomarker of APAP-induced liver injury. The goal of this study was to examine extracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) as potential biomarkers for APAP liver injury in children. Global levels of serum and urine miRNAs were examined in three pediatric subgroups: 1) healthy children (n=10), 2) hospitalized children receiving therapeutic doses of APAP (n=10) and 3) children hospitalized for APAP overdose (n=8). Out of 147 miRNAs detected in the APAP overdose group, eight showed significantly increased median levels in serum (miR-122, −375, −423-5p, −30d-5p, −125b-5p, −4732-5p, −204-5p, and −574-3p), compared to the other groups. Analysis of urine samples from the same patients had significantly increased median levels of four miRNAs (miR-375, −940, −9-3p and −302a) compared to the other groups. Importantly, correlation of peak serum APAP protein adduct levels (an indicator of the oxidation of APAP to the reactive metabolite N-acetylpara-quinone imine) with peak miRNA levels showed that the highest correlation was observed for serum miR-122 (R=0.94; p<0.01) followed by miR-375 (R=0.70; p=0.05). Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate that miRNAs are increased in children with APAP toxicity and correlate with APAP protein adducts, suggesting a potential role as biomarkers of APAP toxicity. PMID:25708609

  11. Glycodeoxycholic Acid Levels as Prognostic Biomarker in Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; McGill, Mitchell R.; Staggs, Vincent S.; Winefield, Robert D.; Gholami, Parviz; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Sharpe, Matthew R.; Curry, Steven C.; Lee, William M.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced acute liver failure (ALF) remains a major clinical problem. Although a majority of patients recovers after severe liver injury, a subpopulation of patients proceeds to ALF. Bile acids are generated in the liver and accumulate in blood during liver injury, and as such, have been proposed as biomarkers for liver injury and dysfunction. The goal of this study was to determine whether individual bile acid levels could determine outcome in patients with APAP-induced ALF (AALF). Serum bile acid levels were measured in AALF patients using mass spectrometry. Bile acid levels were elevated 5–80-fold above control values in injured patients on day 1 after the overdose and decreased over the course of hospital stay. Interestingly, glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) was significantly increased in non-surviving AALF patients compared with survivors. GDCA values obtained at peak alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and from day 1 of admission indicated GDCA could predict survival in these patients by receiver-operating characteristic analysis (AUC = 0.70 for day 1, AUC = 0.68 for peak ALT). Of note, AALF patients also had significantly higher levels of serum bile acids than patients with active cholestatic liver injury. These data suggest measurements of GDCA in this patient cohort modestly predicted outcome and may serve as a prognostic biomarker. Furthermore, accumulation of bile acids in serum or plasma may be a result of liver cell dysfunction and not cholestasis, suggesting elevation of circulating bile acid levels may be a consequence and not a cause of liver injury. PMID:25239633

  12. Galangin Prevents Acute Hepatorenal Toxicity in Novel Propacetamol-Induced Acetaminophen-Overdosed Mice.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Shiun; Chien, Chia-Chih; Lin, Ting-Hui; Liu, Chia-Chi; Liu, Rosa Huang; Su, Hong-Lin; Chiu, Yung-Tsung; Wang, Sue-Hong

    2015-11-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes severe liver and kidney damage. APAP-induced liver injury (AILI) represents the most frequent cause of drug-induced liver failure. APAP is relatively insoluble and can only be taken orally; however, its prodrug, propacetamol, is water soluble and usually injected directly. In this study, we examined the time-dependent effects of AILI after propacetamol injection in mice. After analyses of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities and liver histopathology, we demonstrated that a novel AILI mouse model can be established by single propacetamol injection. Furthermore, we compared the protective and therapeutic effects of galangin with a known liver protective extract, silymarin, and the only clinical agent for treating APAP toxicity, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), at the same dose in the model mice. We observed that galangin and silymarin were more effective than NAC for protecting against AILI. However, only NAC greatly improved both the survival time and rate consequent to a lethal dose of propacetamol. To decipher the hepatic protective mechanism(s) of galangin, galangin pretreatment significantly decreased the hepatic oxidative stress, increased hepatic glutathione level, and decreased hepatic microsomal CYP2E1 levels induced by propacetamol injection. In addition, propacetamol injection also reproduced the probability of APAP-induced kidney injury (AIKI), appearing similar to a clinical APAP overdose. Only galangin pretreatment showed the protective effect of AIKI. Thus, we have established a novel mouse model for AILI and AIKI using a single propacetamol injection. We also demonstrated that galangin provides significant protection against AILI and AIKI in this mouse model. PMID:26501381

  13. STAT3, a Key Parameter of Cytokine-Driven Tissue Protection during Sterile Inflammation – the Case of Experimental Acetaminophen (Paracetamol)-Induced Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mühl, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, or paracetamol) overdosing is a prevalent cause of acute liver injury. While clinical disease is initiated by overt parenchymal hepatocyte necrosis in response to the analgetic, course of intoxication is substantially influenced by associated activation of innate immunity. This process is supposed to be set in motion by release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) from dying hepatocytes and is accompanied by an inflammatory cytokine response. Murine models of APAP-induced liver injury emphasize the complex role that DAMPs and cytokines play in promoting either hepatic pathogenesis or resolution and recovery from intoxication. Whereas the function of key inflammatory cytokines is controversially discussed, a subclass of specific cytokines capable of efficiently activating the hepatocyte signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 pathway stands out as being consistently protective in murine models of APAP intoxication. Those include foremost interleukin (IL)-6, IL-11, IL-13, and IL-22. Above all, activation of STAT3 under the influence of these cytokines has the capability to drive hepatocyte compensatory proliferation, a key principle of the regenerating liver. Herein, the role of these specific cytokines during experimental APAP-induced liver injury is highlighted and discussed in a broader perspective. In hard-to-treat or at-risk patients, standard therapy may fail and APAP intoxication can proceed toward a fatal condition. Focused administration of recombinant STAT3-activating cytokines may evolve as novel therapeutic approach under those ill-fated conditions. PMID:27199988

  14. Effects of pregnancy on the toxicity and metabolism of acetaminophen in mice.

    PubMed

    Larrey, D; Letteron, P; Foliot, A; Descatoire, V; Degott, C; Geneve, J; Tinel, M; Pessayre, D

    1986-04-01

    Although acetaminophen is widely used in pregnant women, the effects of pregnancy on its hepatotoxicity remain unknown. We assessed these effects in pregnant mice (17-18 days of gestation). The hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen (300-400 mg X kg-1 i.p.) was increased markedly in pregnant mice, as judged by increased serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase activity, higher incidence of liver necrosis and greater mortality. In vitro, acetaminophen sulfotransferase activity was increased by 47% in pregnant mice, but acetaminophen glucuronosyltransferase activity was decreased by 54%; the metabolic activation of acetaminophen to covalently bound metabolites was unchanged. Glutathione S-transferase activities were decreased slightly. In vivo, after administration of acetaminophen (300 mg X kg-1 i.p.), the 24-hr urinary excretion of the sulfate conjugate was increased (from 12% of the recovered dose in nonpregnant mice to 21% in pregnant mice), that of the glucuronide was decreased (from 61 to 52%), whereas those of the cysteine and mercapturic acid conjugates and that of acetaminophen were unchanged. Finally, the plasma clearance and the apparent volume of distribution of acetaminophen (both expressed per body weight) remained unchanged. Similarly, in vivo covalent binding to hepatic proteins 4 hr after administration of acetaminophen (300 and 400 mg X kg-1 i.p.) remained unchanged as were in vivo indexes of lipid peroxidation. In contrast, liver glutathione concentration, albeit initially normal, fell to much lower levels after administration of acetaminophen (200-400 mg X kg-1 i.p.) or diethylmaleate (0.5 ml X kg-1 i.p.) in pregnant mice, and recovered more slowly thereafter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3083096

  15. Simultaneous quantification of acetaminophen and five acetaminophen metabolites in human plasma and urine by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry: Method validation and application to a neonatal pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sarah F; King, Amber D; van den Anker, John N; Wilkins, Diana G

    2015-12-15

    Drug metabolism plays a key role in acetaminophen (paracetamol)-induced hepatotoxicity, and quantification of acetaminophen metabolites provides critical information about factors influencing susceptibility to acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in clinical and experimental settings. The aims of this study were to develop, validate, and apply high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) methods for simultaneous quantification of acetaminophen, acetaminophen-glucuronide, acetaminophen-sulfate, acetaminophen-glutathione, acetaminophen-cysteine, and acetaminophen-N-acetylcysteine in small volumes of human plasma and urine. In the reported procedures, acetaminophen-d4 and acetaminophen-d3-sulfate were utilized as internal standards (IS). Analytes and IS were recovered from human plasma (10μL) by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Human urine (10μL) was prepared by fortification with IS followed only by sample dilution. Calibration concentration ranges were tailored to literature values for each analyte in each biological matrix. Prepared samples from plasma and urine were analyzed under the same HPLC-ESI-MS/MS conditions, and chromatographic separation was achieved through use of an Agilent Poroshell 120 EC-C18 column with a 20-min run time per injected sample. The analytes could be accurately and precisely quantified over 2.0-3.5 orders of magnitude. Across both matrices, mean intra- and inter-assay accuracies ranged from 85% to 112%, and intra- and inter-assay imprecision did not exceed 15%. Validation experiments included tests for specificity, recovery and ionization efficiency, inter-individual variability in matrix effects, stock solution stability, and sample stability under a variety of storage and handling conditions (room temperature, freezer, freeze-thaw, and post-preparative). The utility and suitability of the reported procedures were illustrated by analysis of pharmacokinetic samples

  16. Acute hepatotoxicity: a predictive model based on focused illumina microarrays.

    PubMed

    Zidek, Nadine; Hellmann, Juergen; Kramer, Peter-Juergen; Hewitt, Philip G

    2007-09-01

    Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is a major issue for drug development, and toxicogenomics has the potential to predict toxicity during early toxicity screening. A bead-based Illumina oligonucleotide microarray containing 550 liver specific genes has been developed. We have established a predictive screening system for acute hepatotoxicity by analyzing differential gene expression profiles of well-known hepatotoxic and nonhepatotoxic compounds. Low and high doses of tetracycline, carbon tetrachloride (CCL4), 1-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT), erythromycin estolate, acetaminophen (AAP), or chloroform as hepatotoxicants, clofibrate, theophylline, naloxone, estradiol, quinidine, or dexamethasone as nonhepatotoxic compounds, were administered as a single dose to male Sprague-Dawley rats. After 6, 24, and 72 h, livers were taken for histopathological evaluation and for analysis of gene expression alterations. All hepatotoxic compounds tested generated individual gene expression profiles. Based on leave-one-out cross-validation analysis, gene expression profiling allowed the accurate discrimination of all model compounds, 24 h after high dose treatment. Even during the regeneration phase, 72 h after treatment, CCL4, ANIT, and AAP were predicted to be hepatotoxic, and only these three compounds showed histopathological changes at this time. Furthermore, we identified 64 potential marker genes responsible for class prediction, which reflected typical hepatotoxicity responses. These genes and pathways, commonly deregulated by hepatotoxicants, may be indicative of the early characterization of hepatotoxicity and possibly predictive of later hepatotoxicity onset. Two unknown test compounds were used for prevalidating the screening test system, with both being correctly predicted. We conclude that focused gene microarrays are sufficient to classify compounds with respect to toxicity prediction. PMID:17522070

  17. Human Ex-Vivo Liver Model for Acetaminophen-induced Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Schreiter, Thomas; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Schlattjan, Martin; Treckmann, Jürgen; Paul, Andreas; Strucksberg, Karl-Heinz; Baba, Hideo A.; Odenthal, Margarete; Gieseler, Robert K.; Gerken, Guido; Arteel, Gavin E.; Canbay, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Reliable test systems to identify hepatotoxicity are essential to predict unexpected drug-related liver injury. Here we present a human ex-vivo liver model to investigate acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Human liver tissue was perfused over a 30 hour period with hourly sampling from the perfusate for measurement of general metabolism and clinical parameters. Liver function was assessed by clearance of indocyanine green (ICG) at 4, 20 and 28 hours. Six pieces of untreated human liver specimen maintained stable liver function over the entire perfusion period. Three liver sections incubated with low-dose acetaminophen revealed strong damage, with ICG half-lives significantly higher than in non-treated livers. In addition, the release of microRNA-122 was significantly higher in acetaminophen-treated than in non-treated livers. Thus, this model allows for investigation of hepatotoxicity in human liver tissue upon applying drug concentrations relevant in patients. PMID:27550092

  18. Hydrazine inhalation hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yung Hsiang; Chong, C H; Ng, W T; Lim, D

    2007-10-01

    Abstract Hydrazine is a hazardous chemical commonly used as a reactant in rocket and jet fuel cells. Animal studies have demonstrated hepatic changes after hydrazine inhalation. Human case reports of hydrazine inhalation hepatotoxicity are rare. We report a case of mild hepatotoxicity following brief hydrazine vapour inhalation in a healthy young man, which resolved completely on expectant management. PMID:17761725

  19. Different Contribution of Redox-Sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Channels to Acetaminophen-Induced Death of Human Hepatoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Heba; Kozai, Daisuke; Sakaguchi, Reiko; Numata, Tomohiro; Mori, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a safe analgesic antipyretic drug at prescribed doses. Its overdose, however, can cause life-threatening liver damage. Though, involvement of oxidative stress is widely acknowledged in APAP-induced hepatocellular death, the mechanism of this increased oxidative stress and the associated alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis are still unclear. Among members of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels activated in response to oxidative stress, we here identify that redox-sensitive TRPV1, TRPC1, TRPM2, and TRPM7 channels underlie Ca2+ entry and downstream cellular damages induced by APAP in human hepatoma (HepG2) cells. Our data indicate that APAP treatment of HepG2 cells resulted in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) depletion, and Ca2+ entry leading to increased apoptotic cell death. These responses were significantly suppressed by pretreatment with the ROS scavengers N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene disulfonic acid disodium salt monohydrate (Tiron), and also by preincubation of cells with the glutathione inducer Dimethylfumarate (DMF). TRP subtype-targeted pharmacological blockers and siRNAs strategy revealed that suppression of either TRPV1, TRPC1, TRPM2, or TRPM7 reduced APAP-induced ROS formation, Ca2+ influx, and cell death; the effects of suppression of TRPV1 or TRPC1, known to be activated by oxidative cysteine modifications, were stronger than those of TRPM2 or TRPM7. Interestingly, TRPV1 and TRPC1 were labeled by the cysteine-selective modification reagent, 5,5′-dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid)-2biotin (DTNB-2Bio), and this was attenuated by pretreatment with APAP, suggesting that APAP and/or its oxidized metabolites act directly on the modification target cysteine residues of TRPV1 and TRPC1 proteins. In human liver tissue, TRPV1, TRPC1, TRPM2, and TRPM7 channels transcripts were localized mainly to hepatocytes and Kupffer cells. Our findings strongly suggest that APAP-induced

  20. Acetaminophen and Codeine

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of acetaminophen and codeine comes as a tablet, capsule, and liquid to take by mouth. It usually is taken every 6 ... explain any part you do not understand. Take acetaminophen and codeine exactly as directed.Codeine can be ...

  1. Bactrian ("double hump") acetaminophen pharmacokinetics: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Robert G; McKeown, Nathanael J; West, Patrick L; Burke, Christopher R

    2010-09-01

    After acute ingestion, acetaminophen (APAP) is generally absorbed within 4 h and the APAP concentration ([APAP]) slowly decreases with a predictable half-life. Alterations in these pharmacokinetic principles have been rarely reported. We report here three cases of an unusual double hump, or Bactrian, pattern of [APAP]. We review the literature to describe the case characteristics of these rare cases. A 38-year-old woman ingested 2 g hydrocodone/65 g acetaminophen. Her [APAP] peaked at 289 mcg/mL (8 h), decreased to 167 mcg/mL (31 h), then increased to 240 mcg/mL (39 h). She developed liver injury (peak AST 1603 IU/L; INR1.6). A 25-year-old man ingested 2 g diphenhydramine/26 g APAP. His [APAP] peaked at 211 mcg/mL (15 h), decreased to 185 mcg/mL (20 h), and increased again to 313 mcg/mL (37 h). He developed liver injury (peak AST 1153; INR 2.1). A 16-year-old boy ingested 5 g diphenhydramine and 100 g APAP. His [APAP] peaked at 470 mcg/mL (25 h), decreased to 313 mcg/mL (36 h), then increased to 354 mcg/mL (42 h). He developed liver injury (peak AST 8,686 IU/L; peak INR 5.9). We report three cases of Bactrian ("double hump") pharmacokinetics after massive APAP overdoses. Cases with double hump pharmacokinetics may be associated with large ingestions (26-100 g APAP) and are often coingested with antimuscarinics or opioids. Several factors may contribute to these altered kinetics including the insolubility of acetaminophen, APAP-induced delays in gastric emptying, opioid or antimuscarinic effects, or enterohepatic circulation. Patients with double hump APAP concentrations may be at risk for liver injury, with AST elevations and peaks occurring later than what is typical for acute APAP overdoses. PMID:20446076

  2. Acetaminophen by infusion.

    PubMed

    Turkoski, Beatrice B

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen is a nonsteroidal, nonsalicylate analgesic and antipyretic that is, today, the most common medication ingredient found in oral and rectal over-the-counter and prescription drugs. However, it was not until 2010 that Ofirmev (acetaminophen), an injection form of acetaminophen, was approved for treating mild to moderate pain, as an adjunct to opioids for severe pain, and reduction of fever in those younger than 2 years. Thus, intravenous acetaminophen may be appropriately used in a wide variety of settings and nurses who are knowledgeable and informed about the correct use of intravenous acetaminophen will be able to reduce the potential for medication misadventures. In this article, the uses and cautions for Ofirmev are discussed. PMID:25989127

  3. Confusion: acetaminophen dosing changes based on NO evidence in adults.

    PubMed

    Krenzelok, Edward P; Royal, Mike A

    2012-06-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) plays a vital role in American health care, with in excess of 25 billion doses being used annually as a nonprescription medication. Over 200 million acetaminophen-containing prescriptions, usually in combination with an opioid, are dispensed annually. While acetaminophen is recognized as a safe and effective analgesic and antipyretic, it is also associated with significant morbidity and mortality (hepatotoxicity) if doses in excess of the therapeutic amount are ingested inappropriately. The maximum daily therapeutic dose of 3900-4000 mg was established in separate actions in 1977 and 1988, respectively, via the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) monograph process for nonprescription medications. The FDA has conducted multiple advisory committee meetings to evaluate acetaminophen and its safety profile, and has suggested (but not mandated) a reduction in the maximum daily dosage from 3900-4000 mg to 3000-3250 mg. In 2011, McNeil, the producer of the Tylenol® brand of acetaminophen, voluntarily reduced the maximum daily dose of its 500 mg tablet product to 3000 mg/day, and it has pledged to change the labeling of its 325 mg/tablet product to reflect a maximum of 3250 mg/day. Generic manufacturers have not changed their dosing regimens and they have remained consistent with the established monograph dose. Therefore, confusion will be inevitable as both consumers and health care professionals try to determine the proper therapeutic dose of acetaminophen. Which is the correct dose of acetaminophen: 3000 mg if 500 mg tablets are used, 3250 mg with 325 mg tablets, or 3900 mg when 650 mg arthritis-strength products are used? PMID:22530736

  4. Acetaminophen and codeine overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 162. Doyon S. Opioids. In: Tintinalli ... FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2015. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2014:appendix VI. Hendrickson RG, McKeown NJ. Acetaminophen. ...

  5. In vivo hepatotoxicity study of rats in comparison with in vitro hepatotoxicity screening system.

    PubMed

    Kikkawa, Rie; Fujikawa, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Hamada, Yoshimasa; Yamada, Hiroshi; Horii, Ikuo

    2006-02-01

    For the establishment of a high throughput screening system using primary cell cultures, investigation of elucidated toxicities to assess the correlation between in vitro and in vivo hepatotoxicity is necessary in the safety evaluation of the compound. In the previous study, we reported the usability of rat primary cultured hepatocytes for establishment of high throughput screening system. To confirm the reliability of rat primary hepatocytes culture screening system, we conducted a single-dose in vivo study with relatively high dose of hepatotoxicant in rats using 4 reference compounds (acetaminophen, amiodarone, tetracycline, carbon tetrachloride), and investigated histopathological changes and expression of oxidative stress-related proteins by immunohistochemistry. We also carried out a proteomics analysis for estimating the reliable and sensitive biomarkers. Histopathologically, compound-specific hepatotoxicity was detected at 24 hr after administration in all compounds except amiodarone, which is known to induce phospholipidosis. Immunohistochemically, oxidative stress-related proteins were increased within 6 hr after administration in all treated groups. Proteomics analysis revealed several protein biomarkers related to oxidative stress and mitochondrial metabolism-regulation, which had been previously detected by proteomics analysis in in vitro screening system. Oxidative stress-related proteins were considered as useful biomarkers of hepatotoxicity; since they were detected by immunohistochemistry and proteomics analysis prior to appearance of compound-specific histopathological changes detected by light microscopy. Considering the relevance of in vitro system to in vivo system from the aspect of new biomarkers related to the toxicogenomics/toxicoproteomics, in vitro primary cell culture system would be sufficient to detect hepatotoxicity in the early stage of drug discovery. PMID:16538041

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Acetaminophen-Induced Changes in Mitochondrial Protein Expression Using Spectral Counting

    PubMed Central

    Stamper, Brendan D.; Mohar, Isaac; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Nelson, Sidney D.

    2011-01-01

    Comparative proteomic analysis following treatment with acetaminophen (APAP) was performed on two different models of APAP-mediated hepatocellular injury in order to both identify common targets for adduct formation and track drug-induced changes in protein expression. Male C57BL/6 mice were used as a model for APAP-mediated liver injury in vivo and TAMH cells were used as a model for APAP-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. SEQUEST was unable to identify the precise location of sites of adduction following treatment with APAP in either system. However, semiquantitative analysis of the proteomic datasets using spectral counting revealed a downregulation of P450 isoforms associated with APAP bioactivation, and an upregulation of proteins related to the electron transport chain by APAP compared to control. Both mechanisms are likely compensatory in nature as decreased P450 expression is likely to attenuate toxicity associated with N-acetyl-p-quinoneimine (NAPQI) formation, whereas APAP-induced electron transport chain component upregulation may be an attempt to promote cellular bioenergetics. PMID:21329376

  7. Hepatoprotective activity of Tribulus terrestris extract against acetaminophen-induced toxicity in a freshwater fish (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    PubMed

    Kavitha, P; Ramesh, R; Bupesh, G; Stalin, A; Subramanian, P

    2011-12-01

    The potential protective role of Tribulus terrestris in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in Oreochromis mossambicus was investigated. The effect of oral exposure of acetaminophen (500 mg/kg) in O. mossambicus at 24-h duration was evaluated. The plant extract (250 mg/kg) showed a remarkable hepatoprotective activity against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. It was judged from the tissue-damaging level and antioxidant levels in liver, gill, muscle and kidney tissues. Further acetaminophen impact induced a significant rise in the tissue-damaging level, and the antioxidant level was discernible from the enzyme activity modulations such as glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamate pyruvic transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase, lipid peroxidase and reduced glutathione. The levels of all these enzymes have significantly (p < 0.05) increased in acetaminophen-treated fish tissues. The elevated levels of these enzymes were significantly controlled by the treatment of T. terrestris extract (250 kg/mg). Histopathological changes of liver, gill and muscle samples were compared with respective controls. The results of the present study specify the hepatoprotective and antioxidant properties of T. terrestris against acetaminophen-induced toxicity in freshwater fish, O. mossambicus. PMID:21975853

  8. Protection against acetaminophen-induced liver injury by allopurinol is dependent on aldehyde oxidase-mediated liver preconditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes severe and occasionally fatal liver injury. Numerous drugs that attenuate APAP toxicity have been described. However these compounds frequently protect by cytochrome P450 inhibition, thereby preventing the initiating step of toxicity. We have previously shown that pretreatment with allopurinol can effectively protect against APAP toxicity, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the current study, C3HeB/FeJ mice were administered allopurinol 18 h or 1 h prior to an APAP overdose. Administration of allopurinol 18 h prior to APAP overdose resulted in an 88% reduction in liver injury (serum ALT) 6 h after APAP; however, 1 h pretreatment offered no protection. APAP-cysteine adducts and glutathione depletion kinetics were similar with or without allopurinol pretreatment. The phosphorylation and mitochondrial translocation of c-jun-N-terminal-kinase (JNK) have been implicated in the progression of APAP toxicity. In our study we showed equivalent early JNK activation (2 h) however late JNK activation (6 h) was attenuated in allopurinol treated mice, which suggests that later JNK activation is more critical for the toxicity. Additional mice were administered oxypurinol (primary metabolite of allopurinol) 18 h or 1 h pre-APAP, but neither treatment protected. This finding implicated an aldehyde oxidase (AO)-mediated metabolism of allopurinol, so mice were treated with hydralazine to inhibit AO prior to allopurinol/APAP administration, which eliminated the protective effects of allopurinol. We evaluated potential targets of AO-mediated preconditioning and found increased hepatic metallothionein 18 h post-allopurinol. These data show metabolism of allopurinol occurring independent of P450 isoenzymes preconditions the liver and renders the animal less susceptible to an APAP overdose. - Highlights: • 18 h allopurinol pretreatment protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • 1 h allopurinol pretreatment does not protect from APAP-induced

  9. Potential of extracellular microRNAs as biomarkers of acetaminophen toxicity in children

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Salminen, William F.; Shi, Qiang; Greenhaw, James; Gill, Pritmohinder S.; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Beger, Richard D.; Mendrick, Donna L.; Mattes, William B.; and others

    2015-04-15

    Developing biomarkers for detecting acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity has been widely investigated. Recent studies of adults with APAP-induced liver injury have reported human serum microRNA-122 (miR-122) as a novel biomarker of APAP-induced liver injury. The goal of this study was to examine extracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) as potential biomarkers for APAP liver injury in children. Global levels of serum and urine miRNAs were examined in three pediatric subgroups: 1) healthy children (n = 10), 2) hospitalized children receiving therapeutic doses of APAP (n = 10) and 3) children hospitalized for APAP overdose (n = 8). Out of 147 miRNAs detected in the APAP overdose group, eight showed significantly increased median levels in serum (miR-122, -375, -423-5p, -30d-5p, -125b-5p, -4732-5p, -204-5p, and -574-3p), compared to the other groups. Analysis of urine samples from the same patients had significantly increased median levels of four miRNAs (miR-375, -940, -9-3p and -302a) compared to the other groups. Importantly, correlation of peak serum APAP protein adduct levels (an indicator of the oxidation of APAP to the reactive metabolite N-acetyl-para-quinone imine) with peak miRNA levels showed that the highest correlation was observed for serum miR-122 (R = 0.94; p < 0.01) followed by miR-375 (R = 0.70; p = 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate that miRNAs are increased in children with APAP toxicity and correlate with APAP protein adducts, suggesting a potential role as biomarkers of APAP toxicity. - Highlights: • Serum miR-122 and miR-375 levels were increased in children with APAP overdose. • Urine levels of miR-375 and miR-940 were increased in the APAP overdose group. • Peak serum miR-122 levels were correlated with peak serum APAP protein adducts.

  10. Regulation of alternative macrophage activation in the liver following acetaminophen intoxication by stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Carol R.; Hankey, Pamela; Mishin, Vladimir; Francis, Mary; Yu, Shan; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-07-15

    Stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase (STK) is a transmembrane receptor reported to play a role in macrophage switching from a classically activated/proinflammatory phenotype to an alternatively activated/wound repair phenotype. In the present studies, STK{sup −/−} mice were used to assess the role of STK in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity as evidence suggests that the pathogenic process involves both of these macrophage subpopulations. In wild type mice, centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminase levels were observed within 6 h of acetaminophen administration (300 mg/kg, i.p.). Loss of STK resulted in a significant increase in sensitivity of mice to the hepatotoxic effects of acetaminophen and increased mortality, effects independent of its metabolism. This was associated with reduced levels of hepatic glutathione, rapid upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and prolonged induction of heme oxygenase-1, suggesting excessive oxidative stress in STK{sup −/−} mice. F4/80, a marker of mature macrophages, was highly expressed on subpopulations of Kupffer cells in livers of wild type, but not STK{sup −/−} mice. Whereas F4/80{sup +} macrophages rapidly declined in the livers of wild type mice following acetaminophen intoxication, they increased in STK{sup −/−} mice. In wild type mice hepatic expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-12, products of classically activated macrophages, increased after acetaminophen administration. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and its receptor, CCR2, as well as IL-10, mediators involved in recruiting and activating anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages, also increased in wild type mice after acetaminophen. Loss of STK blunted the effects of acetaminophen on expression of TNFα, IL-1β, IL-12, MCP-1 and CCR2, while expression of IL-10 increased. Hepatic expression of CX3CL1, and its receptor, CX3CR1 also increased in STK{sup −/−} mice

  11. Acetaminophen structure-toxicity studies: In vivo covalent binding of a nonhepatotoxic analog, 3-hydroxyacetanilide

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S.A.; Price, V.F.; Jollow, D.J. )

    1990-09-01

    High doses of 3-hydroxyacetanilide (3HAA), a structural isomer of acetaminophen, do not produce hepatocellular necrosis in normal male hamsters or in those sensitized to acetaminophen-induced liver damage by pretreatment with a combination of 3-methylcholanthrene, borneol, and diethyl maleate. Although 3HAA was not hepatotoxic, the administration of acetyl-labeled (3H or 14C)3HAA (400 mg/kg, ip) produced levels of covalently bound radiolabel that were similar to those observed after an equimolar, hepatotoxic dose of (G-3H)acetaminophen. The covalent nature of 3HAA binding was demonstrated by retention of the binding after repetitive organic solvent extraction following protease digestion. Hepatic and renal covalent binding after 3HAA was approximately linear with both dose and time. In addition, 3HAA produced only a modest depletion of hepatic glutathione, suggesting the lack of a glutathione threshold. 3-Methylcholanthrene pretreatment increased and pretreatment with cobalt chloride and piperonyl butoxide decreased the hepatic covalent binding of 3HAA, indicating the involvement of cytochrome P450 in the formation of the 3HAA reactive metabolite. The administration of multiple doses or a single dose of (ring-3H)3HAA to hamsters pretreated with a combination of 3-methylcholanthrene, borneol, and diethyl maleate produced hepatic levels of 3HAA covalent binding that were in excess of those observed after a single, hepatotoxic acetaminophen dose. These data suggest that the nature and/or the intracellular processing of the reactive metabolites of acetaminophen and 3HAA are different. These data also demonstrate that absolute levels of covalently bound xenobiotic metabolites cannot be utilized as absolute predictors of cytotoxic potential.

  12. [Analgesic/Antipyretic treatment: ibuprofen or acetaminophen? An update].

    PubMed

    Olive, Georges

    2006-01-01

    Because of the adverse effects associated with aspirin, especially Reye's syndrome in children, practitioners currently use as first line therapy drugs such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen. Their pharmacokinetic characteristics are not quite identical: both are absorbed rapidly and have high bioavailability, however, unlike acetaminophen, ibuprofen is characterized by high plasma protein binding and a limited distribution volume. Both drugs are metabolized essentially in the liver into inactive hydroxylated or glucoronidated metabolites by conjugation but acetaminophen is also transformed into an oxidation compound--normally reduced by glutathione--which, in the case of acute overdosing with depletion of endogenous glutathione stores, may lead to severe hepatotoxicity. Old age and light to moderate renal or hepatic failure do not significantly modify their pharmacokinetic parameters, and thus do not call for dose adjustment. Clinical trials have shown both drugs to have comparable efficacy on pain and fever, with perhaps a slight advantage for ibuprofen. In practice, the choice will depend on the prescription habits of the practitioner, patient's (or parents') preferences and, above all, the pathological context and possible contra-indications. PMID:16886709

  13. Acetaminophen: old drug, new warnings.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Amy; Corey, Rebecca; Leonard, Mandy; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2010-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), concerned about the incidence of acute liver failure due to acetaminophen (Tylenol) overdose, has mandated new labeling on acetaminophen packaging. It is also considering (but has not enacted) reducing the maximum daily dose from 4 g (possibly to 3,250 mg), banning acetaminophen-narcotic combination products, and changing the current maximum single dose of 1 g to prescription status, making 650 mg the highest recommended nonprescription dose. We review the epidemiology, toxicology, and management of acetaminophen overdose and steps the FDA and physicians can take to prevent it. PMID:20048026

  14. Protective Effect of Acacia nilotica (L.) against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatocellular Damage in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Narayanan; Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2013-01-01

    The potential biological functions of A. nilotica have long been described in traditional system of medicine. However, the protective effect of A. nilotica on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity is still unknown. The present study attempted to investigate the protective effect of A. nilotica against acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in Wistar rats. The biochemical liver functional tests Alanine transaminase (ALT), Aspartate transaminase (AST), Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin, total protein, oxidative stress test (Lipid peroxidation), antioxidant parameter glutathione (GSH), and histopathological changes were examined. Our results show that the pretreatment with A. nilotica (250 mg/kg·bw) orally revealed attenuation of serum activities of ALT, AST, ALP, liver weight, and total bilirubin levels that were enhanced by administration of acetaminophen. Further, pretreatment with extract elevated the total protein and GSH level and decreased the level of LPO. Histopathological analysis confirmed the alleviation of liver damage and reduced lesions caused by acetaminophen. The present study undoubtedly provides a proof that hepatoprotective action of A. nilotica extract may rely on its effect on reducing the oxidative stress in acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in rat model. PMID:23864853

  15. Satkara (Citrus macroptera) Fruit Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatorenal Toxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sudip; Islam, Md Aminul; Tanvir, E M; Ahmed, Romana; Das, Sagarika; Rumpa, Nur-E-Noushin; Hossen, Md Sakib; Parvez, Mashud; Gan, Siew Hua; Khalil, Md Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Although Citrus macroptera (Rutaceae), an indigenous fruit in Bangladesh, has long been used in folk medicine, however, there is a lack of information concerning its protective effects against oxidative damage. The protective effects of an ethanol extract of Citrus macroptera (EECM) against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity were investigated in rats. Rats (treatment groups) were pretreated with EECM at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, respectively, orally for 30 days followed by acetaminophen administration. Silymarin (100 mg/kg) was administered as a standard drug over a similar treatment period. Our findings indicated that oral administration of acetaminophen induced severe hepatic and renal injuries associated with oxidative stress, as observed by 2-fold higher lipid peroxidation (TBARS) compared to control. Pretreatment with EECM prior to acetaminophen administration significantly improved all investigated biochemical parameters, that is, transaminase activities, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, γ-glutamyl transferase activities and total bilirubin, total cholesterol, triglyceride and creatinine, urea, uric acid, sodium, potassium and chloride ions, and TBARS levels. These findings were confirmed by histopathological examinations. The improvement was prominent in the group that received 1000 mg/kg EECM. These findings suggested that C. macroptera fruit could protect against acetaminophen-induced hepatonephrotoxicity, which might be via the inhibition of lipid peroxidation. PMID:27034701

  16. Satkara (Citrus macroptera) Fruit Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatorenal Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sudip; Islam, Md. Aminul; Tanvir, E. M.; Ahmed, Romana; Das, Sagarika; Rumpa, Nur-E-Noushin; Hossen, Md. Sakib; Parvez, Mashud; Gan, Siew Hua; Khalil, Md. Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Although Citrus macroptera (Rutaceae), an indigenous fruit in Bangladesh, has long been used in folk medicine, however, there is a lack of information concerning its protective effects against oxidative damage. The protective effects of an ethanol extract of Citrus macroptera (EECM) against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity were investigated in rats. Rats (treatment groups) were pretreated with EECM at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, respectively, orally for 30 days followed by acetaminophen administration. Silymarin (100 mg/kg) was administered as a standard drug over a similar treatment period. Our findings indicated that oral administration of acetaminophen induced severe hepatic and renal injuries associated with oxidative stress, as observed by 2-fold higher lipid peroxidation (TBARS) compared to control. Pretreatment with EECM prior to acetaminophen administration significantly improved all investigated biochemical parameters, that is, transaminase activities, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, γ-glutamyl transferase activities and total bilirubin, total cholesterol, triglyceride and creatinine, urea, uric acid, sodium, potassium and chloride ions, and TBARS levels. These findings were confirmed by histopathological examinations. The improvement was prominent in the group that received 1000 mg/kg EECM. These findings suggested that C. macroptera fruit could protect against acetaminophen-induced hepatonephrotoxicity, which might be via the inhibition of lipid peroxidation. PMID:27034701

  17. Intravenous acetaminophen use in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Shastri, Nirav

    2015-06-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used pediatric medication that has recently been approved for intravenous use in the United States. The purpose of this article was to review the pharmacodynamics, indications, contraindications, and precautions for the use of intravenous acetaminophen in pediatrics. PMID:26035501

  18. Acetaminophen increases the risk of arsenic-mediated development of hepatic damage in rats by enhancing redox-signaling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Majhi, Chhaya Rani; Khan, Saleem; Leo, Marie Dennis Marcus; Prawez, Shahid; Kumar, Amit; Sankar, Palanisamy; Telang, Avinash Gopal; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath

    2014-02-01

    We evaluated whether the commonly used analgesic-antipyretic drug acetaminophen can modify the arsenic-induced hepatic oxidative stress and also whether withdrawal of acetaminophen administration during the course of long-term arsenic exposure can increase susceptibility of liver to arsenic toxicity. Acetaminophen was co-administered orally to rats for 3 days following 28 days of arsenic pre-exposure (Phase-I) and thereafter, acetaminophen was withdrawn, but arsenic exposure was continued for another 28 days (Phase-II). Arsenic increased lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, depleted glutathione (GSH), and decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities. Acetaminophen caused exacerbation of arsenic-mediated lipid peroxidation and ROS generation and further enhancement of serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities. In Phase-I, acetaminophen caused further GSH depletion and reduction in SOD, catalase, GPx and GR activities, but in Phase-II, only GPx and GR activities were more affected. Arsenic did not alter basal and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-mediated NO production, but decreased constitutive NOS (cNOS)-mediated NO release. Arsenic reduced expression of endothelial NOS (eNOS) and iNOS genes. Acetaminophen up-regulated eNOS and iNOS expression and NO production in Phase-I, but reversed these effects in Phase-II. Results reveal that acetaminophen increased the risk of arsenic-mediated hepatic oxidative damage. Withdrawal of acetaminophen administration also increased susceptibility of liver to hepatotoxicity. Both ROS and NO appeared to mediate lipid peroxidation in Phase-I, whereas only ROS appeared responsible for peroxidative damage in Phase-II. PMID:22120977

  19. Acute renal dysfunction in acetaminophen poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mour, Girish; Feinfeld, Donald A; Caraccio, Thomas; McGuigan, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Although acetaminophen (APAP)-associated liver injury is well recognized, there are few reports describing APAP nephrotoxicity, and most of them are single cases. It has also been suggested that N-acetylcysteine (NAC), used to treat the hepatotoxicity, may be harmful to the kidneys. To examine this contention and to determine whether renal involvement in APAP poisoning is at all common, we analyzed the incidence and outcome of acute renal dysfunction in patients hospitalized for APAP overdose reported to our regional poison center over a year. Eleven APAP-poisoned patients had elevated liver function tests; nine of them had azotemia. Those with higher AST levels tended to be younger and to have lower APAP levels on admission. Two patients with acute renal injury died after admission. The other seven patients with renal dysfunction recovered in 2 to 7 days. Six of these received NAC; their mean serum creatinine fell from 3.2 +/- 2.0 versus 1.7 +/- 0.9 mg/dL (p < 0.05). We conclude that acute renal failure is not uncommon in APAP poisoning and appears to be unrelated to the degree of liver injury. NAC therapy did not seem to worsen nephrotoxicity. PMID:16060123

  20. Identification of a metabolic biomarker panel in rats for prediction of acute and idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jinchun; Slavov, Svetoslav; Schnackenberg, Laura K.; Ando, Yosuke; Greenhaw, James; Yang, Xi; Salminen, William; Mendrick, Donna L.; Beger, Richard

    2014-01-01

    It has been estimated that 10% of acute liver failure is due to “idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity”. The inability to identify such compounds with classical preclinical markers of hepatotoxicity has driven the need to discover a mechanism-based biomarker panel for hepatotoxicity. Seven compounds were included in this study: two overt hepatotoxicants (acetaminophen and carbon tetrachloride), two idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants (felbamate and dantrolene), and three non-hepatotoxicants (meloxicam, penicillin and metformin). Male Sprague–Dawley rats were orally gavaged with a single dose of vehicle, low dose or high dose of the compounds. At 6 h and 24 h post-dosing, blood was collected for metabolomics and clinical chemistry analyses, while organs were collected for histopathology analysis. Forty-one metabolites from previous hepatotoxicity studies were semi-quantified and were used to build models to predict hepatotoxicity. The selected metabolites were involved in various pathways, which have been noted to be linked to the underlying mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. PLS models based on all 41 metabolite or smaller subsets of 6 (6 h), 7 (24 h) and 20 (6 h and 24 h) metabolites resulted in models with an accuracy of at least 97.4% for the hold-out test set and 100% for training sets. When applied to the external test sets, the PLS models predicted that 1 of 9 rats at both 6 h and 24 h treated with idiosyncratic liver toxicants was exposed to a hepatotoxic chemical. In conclusion, the biomarker panel might provide information that along with other endpoint data (e.g., transcriptomics and proteomics) may diagnose acute and idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity in a clinical setting. PMID:25379137

  1. Inhibition of human platelet function in vitro and ex vivo by acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Lages, B; Weiss, H J

    1989-03-15

    The effects of acetaminophen (APAP) in vitro, or ex vivo following APAP ingestion, on human platelet aggregation, 14C-5HT secretion, and thromboxane B2 (TxB2) formation were assessed. APAP added in vitro to citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) inhibited aggregation, secretion, and TxB2 formation induced by collagen, epinephrine, arachidonate, and the ionophore A23187, but had no effect on the responses induced by the endoperoxide analog U44069. Arachidonate-induced responses were inhibited by lower concentrations of APAP than were the responses to the other agonists. In PRP obtained 1 hour after ingestion of 650 mg or 1000 mg APAP, arachidonate-induced TxB2 formation was inhibited by 40-99% in five subjects tested, whereas inhibition of collagen- or epinephrine-induced TxB2 formation was less consistent. Aggregation and secretion responses were not altered by APAP ingestion in 4 of the 5 subjects, but were inhibited in the remaining subject, who had the highest plasma APAP levels. In contrast to aspirin and indomethacin, APAP-induced inhibition of collagen-stimulated TxB2 formation could be partially overcome with increasing collagen concentrations. No such partial correction occurred with epinephrine, however. In washed platelet suspensions labeled with 3H-arachidonate, both APAP and aspirin inhibited the formation of labeled PGD2 and PGE2, as well as TxB2. These results suggest that APAP acts in human platelets as a reversible inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase, as found previously in other tissues, and that recent APAP ingestion can, on occasion, produce inhibition of platelet functional responses measured in vitro. PMID:2499947

  2. [New aspects of drug hepatotoxicity].

    PubMed

    Denjean, P; Nouel, O; N'Guyen, J M; Beneton, C; Allain, H

    1990-12-01

    This article sets out to report the new hepatotoxic drugs identified during the course of 1989 and to describe the state of the art about drugs suspected of hepatotoxicity, such as amoxicillin-a clavulinic or, to a lesser extent, octreotide. In contrast, Exifone, a recently introduced drug, was withdrawn from the market within a year. One is surprised to find drugs such as Buprenorphine and Trimebutine listed, which have never induced clinical cases of hepatitis despite widespread use. The article also reviews the drugs with recognized hepatotoxicity and tries to present the most up-to-date information about them. PMID:2082807

  3. How to Safely Give Acetaminophen

    MedlinePlus

    ... up a dose of acetaminophen within the first 20 minutes, it's usually safe to give your child another ... holds the first dose down for longer than 20 minutes before spitting up, you should wait 4 hours ...

  4. Pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen in children.

    PubMed

    Peterson, R G; Rumack, B H

    1978-11-01

    Acetaminophen absorption may occur at a somewhat greater rate in children if the syrup form is utilized. The overall plasma elimination of acetaminophen is somewhat slow in the neonate, but is comparable to that of adults in both children and adolescents, as judged by half-life determinations. This would suggest that the frequency of acetaminophen administration in children should be similar to the schedule recommended for adults and that a dosing interval of four hours should not result in drug accumulation. The question of a toxic quantity of acetaminophen for young children must remain open until adequate metabolic or retrospective toxicologic data become known. Since the volumes of distribution appear to be the same in both adults and children, the same dose should apply in both groups; currently, 10 mg/kg is considered to be both safe and effective for antipyresis. PMID:364399

  5. Acetaminophen kinetics in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Divoll, M; Abernethy, D R; Ameer, B; Greenblatt, D J

    1982-02-01

    Thirty-two healthy men and women, 23 to 78 yr old, received single 650-mg intravenous doses of acetaminophen and the drug's kinetics were determined from multiple plasma samples drawn over the next 8 to 12 hr. Acetaminophen elimination half-life averaged 2.7 hr (range, 1.9 to 4.3 hr) and was not related to age or sex. Volume of distribution (corrected for weight) was larger in men than in women (0.99 and 0.86 l/kg) and declined with age in both sexes. This probably reflects increased fat per kilogram body weight in women and in the elderly, together with incomplete distribution of this nonlipophilic drug into body fat. Acetaminophen clearance tended to decline with age in both sexes, but differences were of borderline significance. On the basis of kinetics data alone, adjustment of acetaminophen dosage for the elderly is generally not necessary. PMID:7056022

  6. Genomic cluster and network analysis for predictive screening for hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Tamio; Kikkawa, Rie; Hamada, Yoshimasa; Horii, Ikuo

    2006-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to estimate the usefulness of genomic approaches to predict hepatotoxicity. Male rats were treated with acetaminophen (APAP), carbon tetrachloride (CCL), amiodarone (AD) or tetracycline (TC) at toxic doses. Their livers were extracted 6 or 24 hr after the dosings and were used for subsequent examinations. At 6 hr there were no histological changes noted in any of the groups except for the CCL group, but at 24 hr, such changes were noted in all but the AD group. Regarding genomic analysis, we performed hierarchical cluster analysis using S-plus software. The individual microarray data were clearly classified into 5 treatment-related clusters at 24 hr as well as at 6 hr, even though no morphological changes were noted at 6 hr. In the gene expression analysis using GeneSpring, transcription factor and oxidative stress- and lipid metabolism-related genes were markedly affected in all treatment groups at both time points when compared with the corresponding control values. Finally, we investigated gene networks in the above-affected genes by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. Down-regulation of lipid metabolism-related genes regulated by SREBP1 was observed in all treatment groups at both time points, and up-regulation of oxidative stress-related genes regulated by Nrf2 was observed in the APAP and CCL treatment groups. From the above findings, for the application of genomic approaches to predict hepatotoxicity, we considered that cluster analysis for classification and early prediction of hepatotoxicity and network analysis for investigation of toxicological biomarkers would be useful. PMID:17202758

  7. Detection of hepatotoxicity potential with metabolite profiling (metabolomics) of rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Mattes, W; Davis, K; Fabian, E; Greenhaw, J; Herold, M; Looser, R; Mellert, W; Groeters, S; Marxfeld, H; Moeller, N; Montoya-Parra, G; Prokoudine, A; van Ravenzwaay, B; Strauss, V; Walk, T; Kamp, H

    2014-11-01

    While conventional parameters used to detect hepatotoxicity in drug safety assessment studies are generally informative, the need remains for parameters that can detect the potential for hepatotoxicity at lower doses and/or at earlier time points. Previous work has shown that metabolite profiling (metabonomics/metabolomics) can detect signals of potential hepatotoxicity in rats treated with doxorubicin at doses that do not elicit hepatotoxicity as monitored with conventional parameters. The current study extended this observation to the question of whether such signals could be detected in rats treated with compounds that can elicit hepatotoxicity in humans (i.e., drug-induced liver injury, DILI) but have not been reported to do so in rats. Nine compounds were selected on the basis of their known DILI potential, with six other compounds chosen as negative for DILI potential. A database of rat plasma metabolite profiles, MetaMap(®)Tox (developed by metanomics GmbH and BASF SE) was used for both metabolite profiles and mode of action (MoA) metabolite signatures for a number of known toxicities. Eight of the nine compounds with DILI potential elicited metabolite profiles that matched with MoA patterns of various rat liver toxicities, including cholestasis, oxidative stress, acetaminophen-type toxicity and peroxisome proliferation. By contrast, only one of the six non-DILI compounds showed a weak match with rat liver toxicity. These results suggest that metabolite profiling may indeed have promise to detect signals of hepatotoxicity in rats treated with compounds having DILI potential. PMID:25086301

  8. Ethanol and Acetaminophen Synergistically Induce Hepatic Aggregation and TCH346-Insensitive Nuclear Translocation of GAPDH

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Natasha T.; Portney, Daniel A.; Willcockson, Helen H.; Maitra, Dhiman; Martin, Hope C.; Greenson, Joel K.; Omary, M. Bishr

    2016-01-01

    The glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) signals during cellular stress via several post-translational modifications that change its folding properties, protein-protein interactions and sub-cellular localization. We examined GAPDH properties in acute mouse liver injury due to ethanol and/or acetaminophen (APAP) treatment. Synergistic robust and time-dependent nuclear accumulation and aggregation of GAPDH were observed only in combined, but not individual, ethanol/APAP treatments. The small molecule GAPDH-targeting compound TCH346 partially attenuated liver damage possibly via mitochondrial mechanisms, and independent of nuclear accumulation and aggregation of GAPDH. These findings provide a novel potential mechanism for hepatotoxicity caused by combined alcohol and acetaminophen exposure. PMID:27513663

  9. Calcium transport, thiol status, and hepatotoxicity following N-nitrosodimethylamine exposure in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Reitman, F.A.; Berger, M.L.; Minnema, D.J.; Shertzer, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    The hepatotoxicant N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is presumed to exert toxicity through reactive metabolites. NDMA is similar in this respect to numerous other hepatotoxicants, for which hepatotoxicity is also associated with a rapid depletion of soluble and/or protein thiols, and an inhibition of calcium transport systems. The authors examined the hypothesis that hepatotoxicity for NDMA is preceded by thiol depletion and/or inhibition of calcium transport in isolated liver subcellular fractions. Centrizonal liver necrosis in mice was evident at 24 but not at 12 h subsequent to intraperitoneal administration of 40 mg NDMA/kg. Hepatotoxicity was not preceded by depletion of liver protein-free sulfhydryls, nor by protein sulfhydryl depletion in liver whole homogenate, microsomal, or plasma membrane fractions. NDMA-mediated toxicity was also not preceded by inhibition of calcium uptake capability by microsomal, mitochondrial, or plasma membrane fractions. In contrast, carbon tetrachloride produced the expected rapid decrease in microsomal calcium uptake capability, followed by a centrizonal necrosis that was maximal at about 24 h. These studies suggest that the mechanism of NDMA hepatotoxicity may differ from that of a number of other hepatotoxicants (e.g., carbon tetrachloride, acetaminophen, bromobenzene) for which toxicity is also mediated through reactive metabolites.

  10. Kids with Mild Asthma Can Take Acetaminophen

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160475.html Kids With Mild Asthma Can Take Acetaminophen: Study Finding counters past research ... 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Acetaminophen does not worsen asthma symptoms in young children, a new study finds. ...

  11. Know Concentration Before Giving Acetaminophen to Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... urging consumers to carefully read the labels of liquid acetaminophen marketed for infants to avoid giving the ... less concentrated version for all children. Until now, liquid acetaminophen marketed for infants has only been available ...

  12. Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Injury by Modulating Regulatory T Cells and IL-10 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunseong; Keum, Dong June; Kwak, Jung won; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Bae, Hyunsu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) from bee venom against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity through CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells (Treg) in mice. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used antipyretic and analgesic, but an acute or cumulative overdose of acetaminophen can cause severe hepatic failure. Tregs have been reported to possess protective effects in various liver diseases and kidney toxicity. We previously found that bee venom strongly increased the Treg population in splenocytes and subsequently suppressed immune disorders. More recently, we found that the effective component of bee venom is PLA2. Thus, we hypothesized that PLA2 could protect against liver injury induced by acetaminophen. To evaluate the hepatoprotective effects of PLA2, C57BL/6 mice or interleukin-10-deficient (IL-10−/−) mice were injected with PLA2 once a day for five days and sacrificed 24 h (h) after acetaminophen injection. The blood sera were collected 0, 6, and 24 h after acetaminophen injection for the analysis of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). PLA2-injected mice showed reduced levels of serum AST, ALT, proinflammatory cytokines, and nitric oxide (NO) compared with the PBS-injected control mice. However, IL-10 was significantly increased in the PLA2-injected mice. These hepatic protective effects were abolished in Treg-depleted mice by antibody treatment and in IL-10−/− mice. Based on these findings, it can be concluded that the protective effects of PLA2 against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity can be mediated by modulating the Treg and IL-10 production. PMID:25478691

  13. Acetaminophen: a practical pharmacologic overview.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, C H; MacDonald, N C; Cornett, J W

    1984-01-01

    Acetaminophen is an effective analgesic and antipyretic agent with few adverse effects when used in recommended dosages. The drug is metabolized mainly in the liver, and the several end products have no harmful effects. An intermediate compound in a minor metabolic pathway, however, is toxic; it is normally inactivated by glutathione. In the case of an acetaminophen overdose the hepatic stores of glutathione seem to become depleted, leaving the toxic intermediate free to damage liver tissue. Such damage is unlikely to occur unless the plasma concentration of acetaminophen peaks above 150 micrograms/mL--a level far in excess of the 5 to 20 micrograms/mL achieved with therapeutic doses of the drug. Long-term therapeutic use of acetaminophen does not appear to be associated with liver damage, although some case reports suggest the possibility. Acetaminophen poisoning follows an acute overdose and, if untreated, is manifested clinically by an initial phase of nonspecific signs and symptoms, a latent period in which the liver transaminase levels rise and then, 3 to 5 days after the ingestion, signs of more serious hepatic dysfunction. Most patients do not progress beyond the first or second phase. They and those who survive the third phase recover with no residual injury to the liver. Appropriate antidotal therapy markedly reduces the severity of the initial damage. PMID:6733646

  14. Multiple-dose acetaminophen pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Sahajwalla, C G; Ayres, J W

    1991-09-01

    Four different treatments of acetaminophen (Tylenol) were administered in multiple doses to eight healthy volunteers. Each treatment (325, 650, 825, and 1000 mg) was administered five times at 6-h intervals. Saliva acetaminophen concentration versus time profiles were determined. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and compared to determine whether acetaminophen exhibited linear or dose-dependent pharmacokinetics. For doses less than or equal to 18 mg/kg, area under the curve (AUC), half-life (t1/2), mean residence time (MRT), and ratio of AUC to dose for the first dose were compared with the last dose. No statistically significant differences were observed in dose-corrected AUC for the first or last dose among subjects or treatments. Half-lives and MRT were not significantly different among treatments for the first or the last dose. Statistically significant differences in t1/2 and MRT were noted (p less than 0.05) among subjects for the last dose. A plot of AUC versus dose for the first and the last doses exhibited a linear relationship. Dose-corrected saliva concentration versus time curves for the treatments were superimposable. Thus, acetaminophen exhibits linear pharmacokinetics for doses of 18 mg/kg or less. Plots of AUC versus dose for one subject who received doses higher than 18 mg/kg were curved, suggesting nonlinear behavior of acetaminophen in this subject. PMID:1800709

  15. The Prescription Pattern of Acetaminophen and Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Patients with Liver Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Young Mi; Yoon, Ki Tae; Heo, Jeong; Woo, Hyun Young; Lim, Won; An, Dae Seong; Han, Jun Hee; Cho, Mong

    2016-10-01

    Analgesics, known to be hepatotoxic drugs, are frequently prescribed to patients with liver cirrhosis who are prone to drug-induced liver injury. No guidelines are available regarding the prescription of analgesics in these patients. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the prescription pattern of most frequently used analgesics in patients with cirrhosis. We assessed the prescription pattern of acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with liver cirrhosis registered in Health Insurance Review Assessment Service database between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012. A total of 125,505 patients with liver cirrhosis were registered from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Of that group, 50,798 (40.5%) patients claimed reimbursement for at least one prescription for acetaminophen or NSAIDs during the one year follow-up period. Overall, NSAIDs (82.7%) were more prescribed than acetaminophen (64.5%). NSAIDs were more prescribed than acetaminophen even in decompensated cirrhosis compared with compensated cirrhosis (71.5% vs. 68.8%, P value < 0.001). There was a marked difference in prescription preference between acetaminophen and NSAIDs among physicians. Internists more frequently prescribed acetaminophen than NSAIDs compared to other physicians (50.9% vs. 76.2%, P < 0.001). Gastroenterologists more frequently prescribed acetaminophen over NSAIDs compared to other internists (80.9% vs. 51.2%, P < 0.001). Analgesics were prescribed in 40.5% of patients with cirrhosis. NSAIDs were more frequently prescribed although they should be avoided. The prescription pattern of analgesics were different significantly among physicians in patients with liver cirrhosis. The harmful effects of NSAIDs in patients with cirrhosis should be reminded to all physicians prescribing analgesics. PMID:27550489

  16. Intravenous paracetamol (acetaminophen).

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sean T; Scott, Lesley J

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous paracetamol (rINN)/intravenous acetaminophen (USAN) is an analgesic and antipyretic agent, recommended worldwide as a first-line agent for the treatment of pain and fever in adults and children. In double-blind clinical trials, single or multiple doses of intravenous paracetamol 1 g generally provided significantly better analgesic efficacy than placebo treatment (as determined by primary efficacy endpoints) in adult patients who had undergone dental, orthopaedic or gynaecological surgery. Furthermore, where evaluated, intravenous paracetamol 1 g generally showed similar analgesic efficacy to a bioequivalent dose of propacetamol, and a reduced need for opioid rescue medication. In paediatric surgical patients, recommended doses of intravenous paracetamol 15 mg/kg were not significantly different from propacetamol 30 mg/kg for the treatment of pain, and showed equivocal analgesic efficacy compared with intramuscular pethidine 1 mg/kg in several randomized, active comparator-controlled studies. In a randomized, noninferiority study in paediatric patients with an infection-induced fever, intravenous paracetamol 15 mg/kg treatment was shown to be no less effective than propacetamol 30 mg/kg in terms of antipyretic efficacy. Intravenous paracetamol was well tolerated in clinical trials, having a tolerability profile similar to placebo. Additionally, adverse reactions emerging from the use of the intravenous formulation of paracetamol are extremely rare (<1/10 000). [table: see text]. PMID:19192939

  17. Acetaminophen injection: a review of clinical information.

    PubMed

    Jones, Virginia M

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen injection is an antipyretic and analgesic agent recently marketed in the United States as Ofirmev. Five published trials directly compare acetaminophen injection to drugs available in the United States. For management of pain in adults, acetaminophen injection was at least as effective as morphine injection in renal colic, oral ibuprofen after cesarean delivery, and oral acetaminophen after coronary artery bypass surgery. In children (3 to 16 years old), single-dose acetaminophen injection was similar to meperidine intramuscular (i.m.) for pain after tonsillectomy; readiness for discharge from the recovery room was shorter with acetaminophen injection (median 15 minutes) compared with meperidine i.m. (median 25 minutes), P = .005. In children (2 to 5 years old) postoperative adenotonsillectomy or adenoidectomy, the time to rescue analgesia was superior with high-dose acetaminophen rectal suppository (median 10 hours) compared with acetaminophen injection (median 7 hours), P = .01. One published trial demonstrated acetaminophen injection is noninferior to propacetamol injection for fever related to infection in pediatric patients. Dosing adjustments are not required when switching between oral and injectable acetaminophen formulations in adult and adolescent patients. Acetaminophen injection represents another agent for multimodal pain management. PMID:21936636

  18. Predose and Postdose Blood Gene Expression Profiles Identify the Individuals Susceptible to Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Hu, Bin; Zheng, Jie; Ji, Cai; Fan, Xiaohui; Gao, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The extent of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) can vary greatly between different individuals. Thus, it is crucial to identify susceptible population to DILI. The aim of this study was to determine whether transcriptomics analysis of predose and postdose rat blood would allow prediction of susceptible individuals to DILI using the widely applied analgesic acetaminophen (APAP) as a model drug. Based on ranking in alanine aminotransferase levels, five most susceptible and five most resistant rats were identified as two sub-groups after APAP treatment. Predose and postdose gene expression profiles of blood samples from these rats were determined by microarray analysis. The expression of 158 genes innately differed in the susceptible rats from the resistant rats in predose data. In order to identify more reliable biomarkers related to drug responses for detecting individuals susceptibility to APAP-induced liver injury (AILI), the changes of these genes' expression posterior to APAP treatment were detected. Through the further screening method based on the trends of gene expression between the two sub-groups before and after drug treatment, 10 genes were identified as potential predose biomarkers to distinguish between the susceptible and resistant rats. Among them, four genes, Incenp, Rpgrip1, Sbf1, and Mmp12, were found to be reproducibly in real-time PCR with an independent set of animals. They were all innately higher expressed in resistant rats to AILI, which are closely related to cell proliferation and tissue repair functions. It indicated that rats with higher ability of cell proliferation and tissue repair prior to drug treatment might be more resistant to AILI. In this study, we demonstrated that combination of predose and postdose gene expression profiles in blood might identify the drug related inter-individual variation in DILI, which is a novel and important methodology for identifying susceptible population to DILI. PMID:26512990

  19. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury. PMID:26208104

  20. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury. PMID:26208104

  1. A Systematic Strategy for Screening and Application of Specific Biomarkers in Hepatotoxicity Using Metabolomics Combined With ROC Curves and SVMs.

    PubMed

    Li, Yubo; Wang, Lei; Ju, Liang; Deng, Haoyue; Zhang, Zhenzhu; Hou, Zhiguo; Xie, Jiabin; Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Yanjun

    2016-04-01

    Current studies that evaluate toxicity based on metabolomics have primarily focused on the screening of biomarkers while largely neglecting further verification and biomarker applications. For this reason, we used drug-induced hepatotoxicity as an example to establish a systematic strategy for screening specific biomarkers and applied these biomarkers to evaluate whether the drugs have potential hepatotoxicity toxicity. Carbon tetrachloride (5 ml/kg), acetaminophen (1500 mg/kg), and atorvastatin (5 mg/kg) are established as rat hepatotoxicity models. Fifteen common biomarkers were screened by multivariate statistical analysis and integration analysis-based metabolomics data. The receiver operating characteristic curve was used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the biomarkers. We obtained 10 specific biomarker candidates with an area under the curve greater than 0.7. Then, a support vector machine model was established by extracting specific biomarker candidate data from the hepatotoxic drugs and nonhepatotoxic drugs; the accuracy of the model was 94.90% (92.86% sensitivity and 92.59% specificity) and the results demonstrated that those ten biomarkers are specific. 6 drugs were used to predict the hepatotoxicity by the support vector machines model; the prediction results were consistent with the biochemical and histopathological results, demonstrating that the model was reliable. Thus, this support vector machine model can be applied to discriminate the between the hepatic or nonhepatic toxicity of drugs. This approach not only presents a new strategy for screening-specific biomarkers with greater diagnostic significance but also provides a new evaluation pattern for hepatotoxicity, and it will be a highly useful tool in toxicity estimation and disease diagnoses. PMID:26781514

  2. Phenotypic and biomarker evaluation of zebrafish larvae as an alternative model to predict mammalian hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Verstraelen, Sandra; Peers, Bernard; Maho, Walid; Hollanders, Karen; Remy, Sylvie; Berckmans, Pascale; Covaci, Adrian; Witters, Hilda

    2016-09-01

    Zebrafish phenotypic assays have shown promise to assess human hepatotoxicity, though scoring of liver morphology remains subjective and difficult to standardize. Liver toxicity in zebrafish larvae at 5 days was assessed using gene expression as the biomarker approach, complementary to phenotypic analysis and analytical data on compound uptake. This approach aimed to contribute to improved hepatotoxicity prediction, with the goal of identifying biomarker(s) as a step towards the development of transgenic models for prioritization. Morphological effects of hepatotoxic compounds (acetaminophen, amiodarone, coumarin, methapyrilene and myclobutanil) and saccharin as the negative control were assessed after exposure in zebrafish larvae. The hepatotoxic compounds induced the expected zebrafish liver degeneration or changes in size, whereas saccharin did not have any phenotypic adverse effect. Analytical methods based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were optimized to measure stability of selected compounds in exposure medium and internal concentration in larvae. All compounds were stable, except amiodarone for which precipitation was observed. There was a wide variation between the levels of compound in the zebrafish larvae with a higher uptake of amiodarone, methapyrilene and myclobutanil. Detection of hepatocyte markers (CP, CYP3A65, GC and TF) was accomplished by in situ hybridization of larvae to coumarin and myclobutanil and confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Experiments showed decreased expression of all markers. Next, other liver-specific biomarkers (i.e. FABP10a and NR1H4) and apoptosis (i.e. CASP-3 A and TP53) or cytochrome P450-related (CYP2K19) and oxidoreductase activity-related (ZGC163022) genes, were screened. Links between basic mechanisms of liver injury and results of biomarker responses are described. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26946349

  3. Acetaminophen Modulates P-Glycoprotein Functional Expression at the Blood-Brain Barrier by a Constitutive Androstane Receptor–Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Brandon J.; Sanchez-Covarrubias, Lucy; Zhang, Yifeng; Laracuente, Mei-Li; Vanderah, Todd W.; Ronaldson, Patrick T.; Davis, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Effective pharmacologic treatment of pain with opioids requires that these drugs attain efficacious concentrations in the central nervous system (CNS). A primary determinant of CNS drug permeation is P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an endogenous blood-brain barrier (BBB) efflux transporter that is involved in brain-to-blood transport of opioid analgesics (i.e., morphine). Recently, the nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) has been identified as a regulator of P-gp functional expression at the BBB. This is critical to pharmacotherapy of pain/inflammation, as patients are often administered acetaminophen (APAP), a CAR-activating ligand, in conjunction with an opioid. Our objective was to investigate, in vivo, the role of CAR in regulation of P-gp at the BBB. Following APAP treatment, P-gp protein expression was increased up to 1.4–1.6-fold in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, APAP increased P-gp transport of BODIPY-verapamil in freshly isolated rat brain capillaries. This APAP-induced increase in P-gp expression and activity was attenuated in the presence of CAR pathway inhibitor okadaic acid or transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D, suggesting P-gp regulation is CAR-dependent. Furthermore, morphine brain accumulation was enhanced by P-gp inhibitors in APAP-treated animals, suggesting P-gp–mediated transport. A warm-water (50°C) tail-flick assay revealed a significant decrease in morphine analgesia in animals treated with morphine 3 or 6 hours after APAP treatment, as compared with animals treated concurrently. Taken together, our data imply that inclusion of APAP in a pain treatment regimen activates CAR at the BBB and increases P-gp functional expression, a clinically significant drug-drug interaction that modulates opioid analgesic efficacy. PMID:24019224

  4. Hepatotoxicity of molecular targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sałek-Zań, Agata

    2014-01-01

    A constant increase in occurrence of neoplasms is observed; hence new methods of therapy are being intensively researched. One of the methods of antineoplastic treatment is molecular targeted therapy, which aims to influence individual processes occurring in cells. Using this type of medications is associated with unwanted effects resulting from the treatment. Liver damage is a major adverse effect diagnosed during targeted therapy. Drug-induced liver damage can occur as necrosis of hepatocytes, cholestatic liver damage and cirrhosis. Hepatotoxicity is evaluated on the basis of International Consensus Criteria. Susceptibility of the liver to injury is connected not only with toxicity of the used medications but also with metastasis, coexistence of viral infections or other chronic diseases as well as the patient's age. It has been proven that in most cases the liver injury is caused by treatment with multikinase inhibitors, in particular tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ordered the inclusion of additional labels – so-called “black box warnings” – indicating increased risk of liver injury when treating with pazopanib, sunitinib, lapatinib and regorafenib. A meta-analysis published in 2013 showed that treating neoplastic patients with tyrosine kinase inhibitors can increase the risk of drug-induced liver damage at least twofold. Below the mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury and hepatotoxic effects of molecular targeted therapy are described. PMID:26034384

  5. A Long-term Co-perfused Disseminated Tuberculosis-3D Liver Hollow Fiber Model for Both Drug Efficacy and Hepatotoxicity in Babies

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shashikant; Pasipanodya, Jotam G.; Ramachandran, Geetha; Deshpande, Devyani; Shuford, Stephen; Crosswell, Howland E.; Cirrincione, Kayle N.; Sherman, Carleton M.; Swaminathan, Soumya; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of disseminated tuberculosis in children ≤ 6 years has not been optimized. The pyrazinamide-containing combination regimen used to treat disseminated tuberculosis in babies and toddlers was extrapolated from adult pulmonary tuberculosis. Due to hepatotoxicity worries, there are no dose–response studies in children. We designed a hollow fiber system model of disseminated intracellular tuberculosis with co-perfused three-dimensional organotypic liver modules to simultaneously test for efficacy and toxicity. We utilized pediatric pharmacokinetics of pyrazinamide and acetaminophen to determine dose-dependent pyrazinamide efficacy and hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen concentrations that cause hepatotoxicity in children led to elevated liver function tests, while 100 mg/kg pyrazinamide did not. Surprisingly, pyrazinamide did not kill intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis up to fourfold the standard dose as monotherapy or as combination therapy, despite achieving high intracellular concentrations. Host-pathogen RNA-sequencing revealed lack of a pyrazinamide exposure transcript signature in intracellular bacteria or of phagolysosome acidification on pH imaging. Artificial intelligence algorithms confirmed that pyrazinamide was not predictive of good clinical outcomes in children ≤ 6 years who had extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Thus, adding a drug that works inside macrophages could benefit children with disseminated tuberculosis. Our in vitro model can be used to identify such new regimens that could accelerate cure while minimizing toxicity. PMID:27211555

  6. A Long-term Co-perfused Disseminated Tuberculosis-3D Liver Hollow Fiber Model for Both Drug Efficacy and Hepatotoxicity in Babies.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shashikant; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Ramachandran, Geetha; Deshpande, Devyani; Shuford, Stephen; Crosswell, Howland E; Cirrincione, Kayle N; Sherman, Carleton M; Swaminathan, Soumya; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of disseminated tuberculosis in children≤6years has not been optimized. The pyrazinamide-containing combination regimen used to treat disseminated tuberculosis in babies and toddlers was extrapolated from adult pulmonary tuberculosis. Due to hepatotoxicity worries, there are no dose-response studies in children. We designed a hollow fiber system model of disseminated intracellular tuberculosis with co-perfused three-dimensional organotypic liver modules to simultaneously test for efficacy and toxicity. We utilized pediatric pharmacokinetics of pyrazinamide and acetaminophen to determine dose-dependent pyrazinamide efficacy and hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen concentrations that cause hepatotoxicity in children led to elevated liver function tests, while 100mg/kg pyrazinamide did not. Surprisingly, pyrazinamide did not kill intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis up to fourfold the standard dose as monotherapy or as combination therapy, despite achieving high intracellular concentrations. Host-pathogen RNA-sequencing revealed lack of a pyrazinamide exposure transcript signature in intracellular bacteria or of phagolysosome acidification on pH imaging. Artificial intelligence algorithms confirmed that pyrazinamide was not predictive of good clinical outcomes in children≤6years who had extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Thus, adding a drug that works inside macrophages could benefit children with disseminated tuberculosis. Our in vitro model can be used to identify such new regimens that could accelerate cure while minimizing toxicity. PMID:27211555

  7. Acetaminophen attenuates error evaluation in cortex.

    PubMed

    Randles, Daniel; Kam, Julia W Y; Heine, Steven J; Inzlicht, Michael; Handy, Todd C

    2016-06-01

    Acetaminophen has recently been recognized as having impacts that extend into the affective domain. In particular, double blind placebo controlled trials have revealed that acetaminophen reduces the magnitude of reactivity to social rejection, frustration, dissonance and to both negatively and positively valenced attitude objects. Given this diversity of consequences, it has been proposed that the psychological effects of acetaminophen may reflect a widespread blunting of evaluative processing. We tested this hypothesis using event-related potentials (ERPs). Sixty-two participants received acetaminophen or a placebo in a double-blind protocol and completed the Go/NoGo task. Participants' ERPs were observed following errors on the Go/NoGo task, in particular the error-related negativity (ERN; measured at FCz) and error-related positivity (Pe; measured at Pz and CPz). Results show that acetaminophen inhibits the Pe, but not the ERN, and the magnitude of an individual's Pe correlates positively with omission errors, partially mediating the effects of acetaminophen on the error rate. These results suggest that recently documented affective blunting caused by acetaminophen may best be described as an inhibition of evaluative processing. They also contribute to the growing work suggesting that the Pe is more strongly associated with conscious awareness of errors relative to the ERN. PMID:26892161

  8. The Social Side Effects of Acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischkowski, Dominik

    About 23% of all adults in the US take acetaminophen during an average week (Kaufman, Kelly, Rosenberg, Anderson, & Mitchell, 2002) because acetaminophen is an effective physical painkiller and easily accessible over the counter. The physiological side effects of acetaminophen are well documented and generally mild when acetaminophen is consumed in the appropriate dosage. In contrast, the psychological and social side effects of acetaminophen are largely unknown. Recent functional neuroimaging research suggests that the experience of physical pain is fundamentally related to the experience of empathy for the pain of other people, indicating that pharmacologically reducing responsiveness to physical pain also reduces cognitive, affective, and behavioral responsiveness to the pain of others. I tested this hypothesis across three double-blind between-subjects drug intervention studies. Two experiments showed that acetaminophen had moderate effects on empathic affect, specifically personal distress and empathic concern, and a small effect on empathic cognition, specifically perceived pain, when facing physical and social pain of others. The same two experiments and a third experiment also showed that acetaminophen can increase the willingness to inflict pain on other people, i.e., actual aggressive behavior. This effect was especially pronounced among people low in dispositional empathic concern. Together, these findings suggest that the physical pain system is more involved in the regulation of social cognition, affect, and behavior than previously assumed and that the experience of physical pain and responsiveness to the pain of others share a common neurochemical basis. Furthermore, these findings suggest that acetaminophen has unappreciated but serious social side effects, and that these side effects may depend on psychological characteristics of the drug consumer. This idea is consistent with recent theory and research on the context-dependency of neurochemical

  9. Aloe vera attenuated liver injury in mice with acetaminophen-induced hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    that Aloe vera attenuate APAP-induced hepatitis through the improvement of liver histopathology by decreased oxidative stress, reduced liver injury, and restored hepatic GSH. PMID:25005608

  10. Acetaminophen from liver to brain: New insights into drug pharmacological action and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Carolina I; Pérez, María J; Manautou, José E; Mottino, Aldo D

    2016-07-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a well-known analgesic and antipyretic drug. It is considered to be safe when administered within its therapeutic range, but in cases of acute intoxication, hepatotoxicity can occur. APAP overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the northern hemisphere. Historically, studies on APAP toxicity have been focused on liver, with alterations in brain function attributed to secondary effects of acute liver failure. However, in the last decade the pharmacological mechanism of APAP as a cannabinoid system modulator has been documented and some articles have reported "in situ" toxicity by APAP in brain tissue at high doses. Paradoxically, low doses of APAP have been reported to produce the opposite, neuroprotective effects. In this paper we present a comprehensive, up-to-date overview of hepatic toxicity as well as a thorough review of both toxic and beneficial effects of APAP in brain. PMID:26921661

  11. Paracetamol hepatotoxicity and microsomal function.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, R; Dave, K R; Katyare, S S

    1999-03-01

    The effect of paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity in rats (650 mg/kg) on microsomal function was examined. Paracetamol treatment resulted in lowered Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in the microsomes with decrease in V(max) of the low affinity high V(max) component II. However, the temperature kinetics was not influenced significantly. The total phospholipid and cholesterol contents as well as lipid peroxidation in the microsomes were unchanged. However, content of acidic phospholipids: phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol decreased by 50% with a reciprocal increase in the sphingomyelin content; the lysophosphoglyceride content increased by 12-fold. The microsomal membrane appeared to be more fluidized following paracetamol treatment. Paracetamol treatment also resulted in a significant reduction in the sulfhydryl groups content. PMID:21781911

  12. Anabolic androgenic steroid-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bond, Peter; Llewellyn, William; Van Mol, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) have been abused for decades by both professional and amateur athletes in order to improve physical performance or muscle mass. AAS abuse can cause adverse effects, among which are hepatotoxic effects. These effects include cholestatic icterus and possibly peliosis hepatis and hepatocellular carcinoma or adenoma. In particular, 17α-alkylated AAS appear to be hepatotoxic, whereas nonalkylated AAS appear not to be. The 17α-alkyl substitution retards hepatic metabolism of the AAS rendering it orally bioavailable. The mechanism responsible for the hepatotoxicity induced by 17α-alkylated AAS remains poorly understood. However, oxidative stress has been repeatedly shown to be associated with it. In this manuscript we present a hypothesis which describes a potential mechanism responsible for AAS-induced hepatotoxicity, based on several observations from the literature which suggest oxidative stress being a causal factor. PMID:27372877

  13. Don't Double Up on Acetaminophen

    MedlinePlus

    ... be sure to talk to your health care professional before you use a medicine containing acetaminophen. This article appears on FDA's Consumer Updates page , which features the latest on all FDA-regulated products. January ...

  14. Did acetaminophen provoke the autism epidemic?

    PubMed

    Good, Peter

    2009-12-01

    Schultz et al (2008) raised the question whether regression into autism is triggered, not by the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, but by acetaminophen (Tylenol) given for its fever and pain. Considerable evidence supports this contention, most notably the exponential rise in the incidence of autism since 1980, when acetaminophen began to replace aspirin for infants and young children. The impetus for this shift - a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warning that aspirin was associated with Reye's syndrome - has since been compellingly debunked. If aspirin is not to be feared as a cause of Reyes syndrome, and acetaminophen is to be feared as a cause of autism, can the autism epidemic be reversed by replacing acetaminophen with aspirin or other remedies? PMID:20030462

  15. Acetaminophen (paracetamol) oral absorption and clinical influences.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Taylor, Robert; Decker, John F; Patrick, Jeffrey T

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a widely used nonopioid, non-NSAID analgesic that is effective against a variety of pain types, but the consequences of overdose can be severe. Because acetaminophen is so widely available as a single agent and is increasingly being formulated in fixed-ratio combination analgesic products for the potential additive or synergistic analgesic effect and/or reduced adverse effects, accidental cumulative overdose is an emergent concern. This has rekindled interest in the sites, processes, and pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen oral absorption and the clinical factors that can influence these. The absorption of oral acetaminophen occurs primarily along the small intestine by passive diffusion. Therefore, the rate-limiting step is the rate of gastric emptying into the intestines. Several clinical factors can affect absorption per se or the rate of gastric emptying, such as diet, concomitant medication, surgery, pregnancy, and others. Although acetaminophen does not have the abuse potential of opioids or the gastrointestinal bleeding or organ adverse effects of NSAIDs, excess amounts can produce serious hepatic injury. Thus, an understanding of the sites and features of acetaminophen absorption--and how they might be influenced by factors encountered in clinical practice--is important for pain management using this agent. It can also provide insight for design of formulations that would be less susceptible to clinical variables. PMID:26013309

  16. Hydroxyapatite crystallization in the presence of acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangood, A.; Malkaj, P.; Dalas, E.

    2006-05-01

    The effect of acetaminophen; a widely used analgesic and fever reducing medicine; in supersaturated solutions of calcium phosphate was investigated under plethostatic conditions, at 37 °C, 0.15 M NaCl, pH 7.40. The rates of crystal growth measured in the presence of acetaminophen 1.654×10 -4 mol dm -3 to 6.616×10 -4 mol dm -3 were reduced by 43% to 79%, respectively. The inhibition effect on the crystal growth rate may be explained through adsorption onto the active growth sites. Kinetic analysis suggested Langmuir-type adsorption of acetaminophen on the HAP surface with a affinity value of 2.4×10 -4 dm 3 mol -1, for the substrate in the concentration range investigated. The electrophoretic mobility measurements showed that in the presence of acetaminophen the charge of the acetaminophen covered HAP particles was shifted to more negative values as compared to bare HAP. In the presence of acetaminophen no changes observed in the HAP overgrown morphology or in the apparent order of crystallization.

  17. Towards non-invasive 3D hepatotoxicity assays with optical coherence phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Leonard J.; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Treskes, Philipp; Hayes, Peter C.; Plevris, John N.; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional tissue-engineered models are increasingly recognised as more physiologically-relevant than standard 2D cell culture for pre-clinical drug toxicity testing. However, many types of conventional toxicity assays are incompatible with dense 3D tissues. This study investigated the use of optical coherence phase microscopy (OCPM) as a novel approach to assess cell death in 3D tissue culture. For 3D micro-spheroid formation Human hepatic C3A cells were encapsulated in hyaluronic acid gels and cultured in 100μl MEME/10%FBS in 96-well plates. After spheroid formation the 3D liver constructs were exposed to acetaminophen on culture day 8. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in 3D cultures was evaluated using standard biochemical assays. An inverted OCPM in common path configuration was developed with a Callisto OCT engine (Thorlabs), centred at 930nm and a custom scanning head. Intensity data were used to perform in-depth microstructural imaging. In addition, phase fluctuations were measured by collecting several successive B scans at the same location, and statistics on the first time derivative of the phase, i.e. time fluctuations, were analysed over the acquisition time interval to retrieve overall cell viability. OCPM intensity (cell cluster size) and phase fluctuation statistics were directly compared with biochemical assays. In this study, we investigated optical coherence phase tomography to assess cell death in a 3d liver model after exposure to a prototypical hepatotoxin, acetaminophen. We showed that OCPM has the potential to assess noninvasively and label-free drug toxicity in 3D tissue models.

  18. Identification of oxidative stress-related proteins for predictive screening of hepatotoxicity using a proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshinori; Kikkawa, Rie; Yamada, Hiroshi; Horii, Ikuo

    2005-08-01

    We investigated the effects of three hepatotoxicants, acetaminophen (APAP), amiodarone (AD) and tetracycline (TC), on protein expression in primary cultured rat hepatocytes with toxicoproteomic approach, which is two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry. The objectives of this study were to search for alternative toxicity biomarkers which could be detected with high sensitivity prior to the appearance of morphological changes or alterations of analytical conventional biomarkers. The related proteins in the process of cell degeneration/necrosis such as cell death, lipid metabolism and lipid/carbohydrate metabolism were mainly affected under exposure to APAP, AD and TC, respectively. Among the differentially expressed proteins, several oxidative stress-related proteins were clearly identified after 24-hr exposure, even though they were not affected for 6-hr exposure. They were glutathione peroxidase (GPX) as a down-regulated protein as well as peroxiredoxin 1 (PRX1) and peroxiredoxin 2 (PRX2) as up-regulated proteins, which are known to serve as antioxidative enzymes in cells. These findings suggested that the focused proteins, GPX and PRXs, could be utilized as biomarkers of hepatotoxicity, and they were useful for setting high throughput screening methods to assess hepatotoxicity in the early stage of drug discovery. PMID:16141655

  19. Acetaminophen During Pregnancy May Up Risk of ADHD in Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Acetaminophen During Pregnancy May Up Risk of ADHD in Kids But only association found, and researchers ... their child will develop behavioral problems such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a new study suggests. Acetaminophen is generally ...

  20. Evaluation of an in vitro toxicogenetic mouse model for hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Stephanie M.; Bradford, Blair U.; Soldatow, Valerie Y.; Witek, Rafal; Kaiser, Robert; Stewart, Todd; Amaral, Kirsten; Freeman, Kimberly; Black, Chris; LeCluyse, Edward L.; Ferguson, Stephen S.

    2010-12-15

    Numerous studies support the fact that a genetically diverse mouse population may be useful as an animal model to understand and predict toxicity in humans. We hypothesized that cultures of hepatocytes obtained from a large panel of inbred mouse strains can produce data indicative of inter-individual differences in in vivo responses to hepato-toxicants. In order to test this hypothesis and establish whether in vitro studies using cultured hepatocytes from genetically distinct mouse strains are feasible, we aimed to determine whether viable cells may be isolated from different mouse inbred strains, evaluate the reproducibility of cell yield, viability and functionality over subsequent isolations, and assess the utility of the model for toxicity screening. Hepatocytes were isolated from 15 strains of mice (A/J, B6C3F1, BALB/cJ, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, CAST/EiJ, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, BALB/cByJ, AKR/J, MRL/MpJ, NOD/LtJ, NZW/LacJ, PWD/PhJ and WSB/EiJ males) and cultured for up to 7 days in traditional 2-dimensional culture. Cells from B6C3F1, C57BL/6J, and NOD/LtJ strains were treated with acetaminophen, WY-14,643 or rifampin and concentration-response effects on viability and function were established. Our data suggest that high yield and viability can be achieved across a panel of strains. Cell function and expression of key liver-specific genes of hepatocytes isolated from different strains and cultured under standardized conditions are comparable. Strain-specific responses to toxicant exposure have been observed in cultured hepatocytes and these experiments open new opportunities for further developments of in vitro models of hepatotoxicity in a genetically diverse population.

  1. Protective effects of Parinari curatellifolia flavonoids against acetaminophen-induced hepatic necrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Olaleye, Mary Tolulope; Amobonye, Ayodeji Emmannuel; Komolafe, Kayode; Akinmoladun, Afolabi Clement

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the hepatoprotective potential of Parinari curatellifolia Planch (Chrysobalanaceae) in experimental rats in order to ascertain the validity of folkloric claims of its effectiveness in the treatment of hepatic-related disorders. Flavonoid extract of P. curatellifolia seed, PCF (10-, 20- or 30 mg/kg body weight) or silymarin (25 mg/kg), dissolved in corn oil, was administered by gavage to experimental animals once daily for 14 consecutive days before liver damage was chemically induced through the administration of acetaminophen (2 g/kg p.o.) on the 14th day. Hepatoprotection was assessed by analyzing liver homogenate and serum for markers of hepatotoxicity – alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities as well as prothrombin time (PT). Evaluation of biochemical indices of oxidative stress – level of lipid peroxides (LPO), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, along with histological assessment of hepatic tissue sections were also carried out. Results revealed that all doses of PCF significantly (P < 0.001) and dose dependently prevented acetaminophen-induced increase in serum activities of hepatic enzymes (ALT, AST, GGT, LDH) and PT. Furthermore, PCF (10- and 20 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.001) reduced lipid peroxidation in liver tissue and restored the activities of the antioxidant enzymes SOD and catalase toward normal levels. Histopathology of the liver tissue showed that PCF mitigated the toxicant-induced hepatocellular necrosis, reduced inflammatory cell infiltration and enhanced hepatocyte regeneration. The results indicated that P. curatellifolia flavonoids demonstrated remarkable hepatoprotective activity in acute liver injury caused by acetaminophen. PMID:25313285

  2. Acetaminophen cytotoxicity is ameliorated in a human liver organotypic co-culture model

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Leonard J.; Navarro, Maria; Treskes, Philipp; Samuel, Kay; Tura-Ceide, Olga; Morley, Steven D.; Hayes, Peter C.; Plevris, John N.

    2015-01-01

    Organotypic liver culture models for hepatotoxicity studies that mimic in vivo hepatic functionality could help facilitate improved strategies for early safety risk assessment during drug development. Interspecies differences in drug sensitivity and mechanistic profiles, low predictive capacity, and limitations of conventional monocultures of human hepatocytes, with high attrition rates remain major challenges. Herein, we show stable, cell-type specific phenotype/cellular polarity with differentiated functionality in human hepatocyte-like C3A cells (enhanced CYP3A4 activity/albumin synthesis) when in co-culture with human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs), thus demonstrating biocompatibility and relevance for evaluating drug metabolism and toxicity. In agreement with in vivo studies, acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity was most profound in HUVEC mono-cultures; whilst in C3A:HUVEC co-culture, cells were less susceptible to the toxic effects of APAP, including parameters of oxidative stress and ATP depletion, altered redox homeostasis, and impaired respiration. This resistance to APAP is also observed in a primary human hepatocyte (PHH) based co-culture model, suggesting bidirectional communication/stabilization between different cell types. This simple and easy-to-implement human co-culture model may represent a sustainable and physiologically-relevant alternative cell system to PHHs, complementary to animal testing, for initial hepatotoxicity screening or mechanistic studies of candidate compounds differentially targeting hepatocytes and endothelial cells. PMID:26632255

  3. Hepatotoxicity of New Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs).

    PubMed

    Liakoni, Evangelia; Rätz Bravo, Alexandra E; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    Case reports and analyses of clinical studies and of pharmacovigilance data suggest that new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are associated with a small risk for hepatotoxicity. The objective of this publication is to summarize the current data about this subject, with a special emphasis on pharmacovigilance data in the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Individual Case Safety Reports (ICSR) database and on potential mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. For that, all available case reports as well as published analyses of clinical studies were obtained with a detailed search in PubMed. In addition, pharmacovigilance data from VigiBase(®), the WHO Global ICRS database, were extracted and analyzed. The data show that liver injury associated with NOACs was reported in clinical studies and in pharmacovigilance databases. Several case reports described potentially life-threatening hepatotoxicity in patients treated with rivaroxaban or dabigatran. For rivaroxaban, most affected patients were symptomatic and liver injury was most often hepatocellular or mixed. The frequency was between 0.1 and 1 % in clinical studies and was by trend lower than for comparators (mostly enoxaparin or warfarin). Comparing the pharmacovigilance reports for the individual NOACs, more hepatic adverse events were reported for rivaroxaban than for dabigatran or apixaban. With the exception of edoxaban, for which only few reports are available, patients with acute liver failure have been reported for every NOAC, but most patients had concomitant drugs or diseases. So far, there are no clear mechanisms explaining the hepatotoxicity of these drugs. We conclude that hepatotoxicity appears to be associated with all NOACs currently on the market. Hepatotoxicity associated with NOACs is idiosyncratic; it appears at therapeutic doses, is rare and the mechanism is not related to the pharmacological action of these drugs. Prescribers should inform patients about possible symptoms of hepatotoxicity and stop these

  4. Clinical and economic evidence for intravenous acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yu-Chen; Reddy, Prabashni

    2012-06-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen received United States Food and Drug Administration approval in November 2010 for the management of mild-to-moderate pain, management of moderate-to-severe pain with adjunctive opioid analgesics, and reduction of fever. Although intravenous acetaminophen generally improved pain relief and demonstrated opioid-sparing effects compared with placebo, it did not consistently reduce the frequency of opioid-related adverse events (e.g., postoperative nausea and vomiting). The safety and efficacy of intravenous acetaminophen as an antipyretic agent have been documented in adults and children; however, its cost is several-fold higher than that of the oral and rectal formulations. Although use of intravenous acetaminophen has reduced other postoperative resource utilization (e.g., hospital length of stay) in some studies outside the United States in patients undergoing abdominal surgery, a full economic evaluation in the United States has yet to be undertaken. In addition, its administration time (15-min infusion) and packaging (glass, single-use vial) have the potential to adversely affect patient flow in the postanesthesia care unit, create burden on patient care units, and lead to drug waste. Furthermore, 1 g of intravenous acetaminophen is formulated in 100 ml of solution, which may be an issue for patients with fluid restrictions. Given the clinical and economic evidence currently available, intravenous acetaminophen should not replace oral or rectal acetaminophen, but its use may be considered in a limited number of patients who cannot receive drugs orally and rectally and who cannot tolerate other parenteral nonopioid analgesic or antipyretic agents. PMID:22570116

  5. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Limits Liver Injury and Facilitates Regeneration after Acetaminophen Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Bajt, Mary Lynn; Yan, Hui-Min; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Deficiency in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene expression is known to promote growth factor activation and regeneration in a number of hepatotoxicity models. To evaluate if PAI-1 has similar effects in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity, wild-type (WT) and PAI-1 gene knockout mice (PAI-KO) were treated with 200 mg/kg APAP and liver injury and its repair were assessed. In WT animals, plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities increased during the first 12 h and then returned to baseline within 48 h. The area of necrosis increased in parallel to the ALT values, peaked between 12 and 24 h and was completely resolved by 96 h. The regenerative response of cells outside the necrotic area, as indicated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein and cyclin D1 gene expression, was observed within 24 h, peaked at 48 h and then declined but remained elevated until 96 h. Liver injury in response to APAP was similar in PAI-KO as in WT animals during the first 12 h. However, plasma ALT values and the area of necrosis further increased during the following 12 h with development of massive intrahepatic hemorrhage. Approximately, 50% of the PAI-KO animals did not survive. Although liver injury of the surviving animals was repaired, the regeneration process was delayed until 48 h. A potential reason for this delay may have been due to the more severe injury and/or the increased expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. Our data indicate that PAI activation limits liver injury and mortality during APAP hepatotoxicity by preventing excessive hemorrhage and thereby facilitating tissue repair. PMID:18469330

  6. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 limits liver injury and facilitates regeneration after acetaminophen overdose.

    PubMed

    Bajt, Mary Lynn; Yan, Hui-Min; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2008-08-01

    Deficiency in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene expression is known to promote growth factor activation and regeneration in a number of hepatotoxicity models. To evaluate if PAI-1 has similar effects in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity, wild-type (WT) and PAI-1 gene knockout mice (PAI-KO) were treated with 200 mg/kg APAP and liver injury and its repair were assessed. In WT animals, plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities increased during the first 12 h and then returned to baseline within 48 h. The area of necrosis increased in parallel to the ALT values, peaked between 12 and 24 h and was completely resolved by 96 h. The regenerative response of cells outside the necrotic area, as indicated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein and cyclin D(1) gene expression, was observed within 24 h, peaked at 48 h and then declined but remained elevated until 96 h. Liver injury in response to APAP was similar in PAI-KO as in WT animals during the first 12 h. However, plasma ALT values and the area of necrosis further increased during the following 12 h with development of massive intrahepatic hemorrhage. Approximately, 50% of the PAI-KO animals did not survive. Although liver injury of the surviving animals was repaired, the regeneration process was delayed until 48 h. A potential reason for this delay may have been due to the more severe injury and/or the increased expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. Our data indicate that PAI activation limits liver injury and mortality during APAP hepatotoxicity by preventing excessive hemorrhage and thereby facilitating tissue repair. PMID:18469330

  7. Herbal hepatotoxicity: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Teschke, Rolf; Frenzel, Christian; Glass, Xaver; Schulze, Johannes; Eickhoff, Axel

    2013-01-01

    This review deals with herbal hepatotoxicity, identical to herb induced liver injury (HILI), and critically summarizes the pitfalls associated with the evaluation of assumed HILI cases. Analysis of the relevant publications reveals that several dozens of different herbs and herbal products have been implicated to cause toxic liver disease, but major quality issues limit the validity of causality attribution. In most of these reports, discussions around quality specifications regarding herbal products, case data presentations and causality assessment methods prevail. Though the production of herbal drugs is under regulatory surveillance and quality aspects are normally not a matter of concern, low quality of the less regulated herbal supplements may be a critical issue considering product batch variability, impurities, adulterants and herb misidentifications. Regarding case data presentation, essential diagnostic information is often lacking, as is the use of valid and liver specific causality assessment methods that also consider alternative diseases. At present, causality is best assessed by using the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences scale ( CIOMS) in its original or updated form, which should primarily be applied prospectively by the treating physician when evaluating a patient rather than retrospectively by regulatory agencies. To cope with these problems, a common quality approach by manufacturers, physicians and regulatory agencies should strive for the best quality. We propose steps for improvements with impact on future cases of liver injury by herbs, herbal drugs and herbal supplements. PMID:22831551

  8. Assessment of hepatotoxic liabilities by transcript profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Ruepp, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.ruepp@roche.com; Boess, Franziska; Suter, Laura; Vera, Maria Cristina de; Steiner, Guido; Steele, Thomas; Weiser, Thomas; Albertini, Silvio

    2005-09-01

    Male Wistar rats were treated with various model compounds or the appropriate vehicle controls in order to create a reference database for toxicogenomics assessment of novel compounds. Hepatotoxic compounds in the database were either known hepatotoxicants or showed hepatotoxicity during preclinical testing. Histopathology and clinical chemistry data were used to anchor the transcript profiles to an established endpoint (steatosis, cholestasis, direct acting, peroxisomal proliferation or nontoxic/control). These reference data were analyzed using a supervised learning method (support vector machines, SVM) to generate classification rules. This predictive model was subsequently used to assess compounds with regard to a potential hepatotoxic liability. A steatotic and a non-hepatotoxic 5HT{sub 6} receptor antagonist compound from the same series were successfully discriminated by this toxicogenomics model. Additionally, an example is shown where a hepatotoxic liability was correctly recognized in the absence of pathological findings. In vitro experiments and a dog study confirmed the correctness of the toxicogenomics alert. Another interesting observation was that transcript profiles indicate toxicologically relevant changes at an earlier timepoint than routinely used methods. Together, these results support the useful application of toxicogenomics in raising alerts for adverse effects and generating mechanistic hypotheses that can be followed up by confirmatory experiments.

  9. Chronic Acetaminophen Exposure in Pediatric Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Estella M.; Im, Kelly; Belle, Steven H.; Squires, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol [APAP]) is a widely used medication that can cause hepatotoxicity. We examined characteristics and outcomes of children with chronic exposure (CE) to APAP in the multinational Pediatric Acute Liver Failure (PALF) Study. METHODS: A total of 895 children enrolled from 2002 to 2009 were grouped by APAP exposure history as: CE (received multiple doses \\x{2265}2 days; n = 83), single dose exposure (SE; n = 85), and no exposure (NE; n = 498). CE was the reference group for pairwise comparisons. Median values are shown. RESULTS: Patients with CE compared with those with SE were younger (3.5 vs 15.2 years, P < .0001), less likely to be female (46% vs 82%, P < .0001), and more likely to be Hispanic (25% vs 7%, P = .001), but they did not differ significantly from the NE group. At enrollment, total bilirubin was lower with CE than with NE (3.2 vs 13.1 mg/dL, P < .001). Alanine aminotransferase levels were higher with CE than with NE (2384 vs 855 IU/L, P < .0001), but lower than with SE (5140 IU/L, P < .0001). Survival without liver transplantation at 21 days was worse for CE than for SE (68% vs 92%, P = .0004) but better than for NE (49%, P = .008). CONCLUSIONS: Children in the PALF study with CE had lower bilirubin and higher alanine aminotransferase than those with NE. Outcomes with CE were worse than with SE but better than with NE. Potential reasons for this outcomes advantage over non–APAP-exposed subjects should be explored. PMID:23439908

  10. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Hepatotoxicity

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV and Hepatotoxicity (Last updated 1/7/2016; last reviewed 1/7/2016) Key Points Hepatotoxicity means damage to the ... the liver can be life-threatening. What HIV medicines can cause hepatotoxicity? HIV medicines in the following ...

  11. Human Skin-Derived Stem Cells as a Novel Cell Source for In Vitro Hepatotoxicity Screening of Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    De Kock, Joery; Branson, Steven; Vinken, Mathieu; Meganathan, Kesavan; Chaudhari, Umesh; Sachinidis, Agapios; Govaere, Olivier; Roskams, Tania; De Boe, Veerle; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Human skin-derived precursors (hSKP) are postnatal stem cells with neural crest properties that reside in the dermis of human skin. These cells can be easily isolated from small (fore) skin segments and have the capacity to differentiate into multiple cell types. In this study, we show that upon exposure to hepatogenic growth factors and cytokines, hSKP acquire sufficient hepatic features that could make these cells suitable in vitro tools for hepatotoxicity screening of new chemical entities and already existing pharmaceutical compounds. Indeed, hepatic differentiated hSKP [hSKP-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hSKP-HPC)] express hepatic progenitor cell markers (EPCAM, NCAM2, PROM1) and adult hepatocyte markers (ALB), as well as key biotransformation enzymes (CYP1B1, FMO1, GSTA4, GSTM3) and influx and efflux drug transporters (ABCC4, ABCA1, SLC2A5). Using a toxicogenomics approach, we could demonstrate that hSKP-HPC respond to acetaminophen exposure in a comparable way to primary human hepatocytes in culture. The toxicological responses “liver damage”, “liver proliferation”, “liver necrosis” and “liver steatosis” were found to be significantly enriched in both in vitro models. Also genes associated with either cytotoxic responses or induction of apoptosis (BCL2L11, FOS, HMOX1, TIMP3, and AHR) were commonly upregulated and might represent future molecular biomarkers for hepatotoxicity. In conclusion, our data gives a first indication that hSKP-HPC might represent a suitable preclinical model for in vitro screening of hepatotoxicity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in which human postnatal stem cells derived from skin are described as a potentially relevant cell source for in vitro hepatotoxicity testing of pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:23952781

  12. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I–III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  13. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Needleman, Steven M

    2013-07-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I-III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  14. [Acetaminophen (paracetamol) causing renal failure: report on 3 pediatric cases].

    PubMed

    Le Vaillant, J; Pellerin, L; Brouard, J; Eckart, P

    2013-06-01

    Renal failure secondary to acetaminophen poisoning is rare and occurs in approximately 1-2 % of patients with acetaminophen overdose. The pathophysiology is still being debated, and renal acetaminophen toxicity consists of acute tubular necrosis, without complication if treated promptly. Renal involvement can sometimes occur without prior liver disease, and early renal manifestations usually occur between the 2nd and 7th day after the acute acetaminophen poisoning. While therapy is exclusively symptomatic, sometimes serious metabolic complications can be observed. The monitoring of renal function should therefore be considered as an integral part of the management of children with acute, severe acetaminophen intoxication. We report 3 cases of adolescents who presented with acute renal failure as a result of voluntary drug intoxication with acetaminophen. One of these 3 girls developed severe renal injury without elevated hepatic transaminases. None of the 3 girls' renal function required hemodialysis, but one of the 3 patients had metabolic complications after her acetaminophen poisoning. PMID:23628119

  15. Quercitrin from Toona sinensis (Juss.) M.Roem. Attenuates Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Toxicity in HepG2 Cells and Mice through Induction of Antioxidant Machinery and Inhibition of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Truong, Van-Long; Ko, Se-Yeon; Jun, Mira; Jeong, Woo-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Quercitrin is found in many kinds of vegetables and fruits, and possesses various bioactive properties. The aim of the present study was to elucidate hepatoprotective mechanisms of quercitrin isolated from Toona sinensis (Juss.) M.Roem. (syn. Cedrela sinensis Juss.), using acetaminophen (APAP)-treated HepG2 cell and animal models. In an in vitro study, quercitrin suppressed the production of reactive oxygen species and enhanced expression of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), activity of antioxidant response element (ARE)-reporter gene, and protein levels of NADPH: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD-2) in APAP-treated HepG2 cells. In an in vivo study, Balb/c mice were orally administered with 10 or 50 mg/kg of quercitrin for 7 days and followed by the injection with single dose of 300 mg/kg APAP. Quercitrin decreased APAP-caused elevation of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels, liver necrosis, the expression of pro-inflammatory factors including inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2 and inerleukin-1β, and phosphorylation of kinases including c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38. Quercitrin restored protein levels of Nrf2, NQO1 and activities and expressions of CAT, GPx, SOD-2. The results suggested that quercitrin attenuates APAP-induced liver damage by the activation of defensive genes and the inhibition of pro-inflammatory genes via the suppressions of JNK and p38 signaling. PMID:27428996

  16. Quercitrin from Toona sinensis (Juss.) M.Roem. Attenuates Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Toxicity in HepG2 Cells and Mice through Induction of Antioxidant Machinery and Inhibition of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Van-Long; Ko, Se-Yeon; Jun, Mira; Jeong, Woo-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Quercitrin is found in many kinds of vegetables and fruits, and possesses various bioactive properties. The aim of the present study was to elucidate hepatoprotective mechanisms of quercitrin isolated from Toona sinensis (Juss.) M.Roem. (syn. Cedrela sinensis Juss.), using acetaminophen (APAP)-treated HepG2 cell and animal models. In an in vitro study, quercitrin suppressed the production of reactive oxygen species and enhanced expression of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), activity of antioxidant response element (ARE)-reporter gene, and protein levels of NADPH: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD-2) in APAP-treated HepG2 cells. In an in vivo study, Balb/c mice were orally administered with 10 or 50 mg/kg of quercitrin for 7 days and followed by the injection with single dose of 300 mg/kg APAP. Quercitrin decreased APAP-caused elevation of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels, liver necrosis, the expression of pro-inflammatory factors including inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2 and inerleukin-1β, and phosphorylation of kinases including c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38. Quercitrin restored protein levels of Nrf2, NQO1 and activities and expressions of CAT, GPx, SOD-2. The results suggested that quercitrin attenuates APAP-induced liver damage by the activation of defensive genes and the inhibition of pro-inflammatory genes via the suppressions of JNK and p38 signaling. PMID:27428996

  17. Macrophage activation by factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes: Potential role of HMGB1

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-06-15

    Toxic doses of acetaminophen (AA) cause hepatocellular necrosis. Evidence suggests that activated macrophages contribute to the pathogenic process; however, the factors that activate these cells are unknown. In these studies, we assessed the role of mediators released from AA-injured hepatocytes in macrophage activation. Treatment of macrophages with conditioned medium (CM) collected 24 hr after treatment of mouse hepatocytes with 5 mM AA (CM-AA) resulted in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Macrophage expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and catalase mRNA was also upregulated by CM-AA, as well as cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and 12/15-lipoxygenase (LOX). CM-AA also upregulated expression of the proinflammatory chemokines, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2. The effects of CM-AA on expression of COX-2, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2 were inhibited by blockade of p44/42 MAP kinase, suggesting a biochemical mechanism mediating macrophage activation. Hepatocytes injured by AA were found to release HMGB1, a potent macrophage activator. This was inhibited by pretreatment of hepatocytes with ethyl pyruvate (EP), which blocks HMGB1 release. EP also blocked CM-AA induced ROS production and antioxidant expression, and reduced expression of COX-2, but not MIP-1{alpha} or MIP-2. These findings suggest that HMGB1 released by AA-injured hepatocytes contributes to macrophage activation. This is supported by our observation that expression of the HMGB1 receptor RAGE is upregulated in macrophages in response to CM-AA. These data indicate that AA-injured hepatocytes contribute to the inflammatory environment in the liver through the release of mediators such as HMGB1. Blocking HMGB1/RAGE may be a useful approach to limiting classical macrophage activation and AA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Research Highlights: > These studies analyze macrophage activation by mediators released from acetaminophen-damaged hepatocytes. > Factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes induce

  18. [Use of acetaminophen in the community].

    PubMed

    Guberman, D

    1990-01-01

    Acetaminophen (Acamol) is one of the most widely used medications in children. The recommended dose is 10-15 mg/kg every 4 hours, and up to 5 doses a day. In a prospective study in an outpatient clinic, 101 parents of children 5 years old or younger were asked to describe their use of acetaminophen for their children, including dose, mode administration and maximal frequency of administration for fever. 2/3 used the syrup and 1/3 used suppositories. The average single dose was 13.8 +/- 5.5 mg/kg. Only 61% of the children received reasonable quantities of acetaminophen per dose. While 12% got an overdose of 20 mg/kg or more, 27% got an underdose of less than 10 mg/kg. Treatment was as often as every 2-3 hours in 13% of the children but only once every 8-24 hours in 22%. To overcome inadequate administration of acetaminophen, parents must be properly educated. PMID:2303194

  19. Study of an anaphylactoid reaction to acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chien-Ming; Chen, Wu-Charng; Lin, Ching-Yuang

    2002-01-01

    Generalized itching, urticaria and anaphylactic shock developed in a 9-year-old girl on two separate occasions after she ingested acetaminophen. She was admitted to our hospital for observation during oral challenge. Total eosinophil counts, total serum IgE, IgA, IgG, IgM, C3, and C4, specific IgE antibodies to six common allergens, and skin prick tests to purified acetaminophen and acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) were unremarkable. No reaction occurred on open challenge with acetylsalicylic acid and mefenamic acid. However, urticaria and itching sensation occurred 45 min after ingesting 50 mg of purified acetaminophen. Dizziness, shivering, tachycardia and fainting also developed later. These symptoms resolved after treatment with a diphenhydramine injection and intravenous infusion of normal saline. There was a marked increase in the blood histamine level after challenge. In vitro histamine release before oral challenge was also abnormally as high as 50%. In summary, she had an immediate allergic reaction to acetaminophen but was tolerant to acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:12148965

  20. Effects of Acetaminophen on Left Atrial Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jun-Hei; Cheng, Pao-Yun; Hsu, Chih-Hsueng; Chen, Yao-Chang; Hong, Po-Da

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been observed that acetaminophen shows cardioprotective efficacy in mammals. In this study, we investigated the electromechanical effects of acetaminophen on the left atrium (LA). Methods Conventional microelectrodes were used to record the action potentials (AP) in rabbit LA preparations. The action potential duration (APD) at repolarization levels of 90%, 50% and 20% of the AP amplitude (APD90, APD50, and APD20, respectively), resting membrane potential, and contractile force were measured during 2 Hz electrical stimulation before and after sequential acetaminophen administration to the LA. Results Acetaminophen (0.1, 0.3, 1, and 3 mM) reduced APD20 from 9.4 ± 1.2 to 8.0 ± 1.1 (p < 0.05), 7.1 ± 0.8 (p < 0.05), 7.8 ± 1.1, and 6.8 ± 1.2 ms (p < 0.05), respectively, and APD50 from 20.2 ± 1.9 to 17.4 ± 2.0, 15.6 ± 1.8 (p < 0.05), 15.8 ± 2.2 (p < 0.05), and 14.1 ± 2.4 ms (p < 0.05), respectively, in a concentration-dependent manner. APD90 was reduced from 72.0 ± 3.6 to 64.7 ± 4.2, 61.9 ± 4.3, 60.5 ± 3.7, and 53.4 ± 4.4 ms (p < 0.05), respectively. Acetaminophen increased LA contractility from 45 ± 9 to 52 ± 10 (p < 0.05), 55 ± 9 (p < 0.01), 58 ± 9 (p < 0.01), and 60 ± 9 mg (p < 0.01), respectively, in a concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of the NOS inhibitor L-NAME or PKG-I inhibitor DT-2, additional acetaminophen treatment did not significantly increase LA contractility. Conclusions Acetaminophen modulated the electromechanical characteristics of LA by inhibiting the NOS and PKG I pathway, and then contributed to the positive inotropic effect. PMID:27471362

  1. Effect of 70-nm silica particles on the toxicity of acetaminophen, tetracycline, trazodone, and 5-aminosalicylic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Kondoh, M; Watari, A; Hasezaki, T; Isoda, K; Tsutsumi, Y; Yagi, K

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to nano-sized particles is increasing because they are used in a wide variety of industrial products, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. Some animal studies indicate that such nanomaterials may have some toxicity, but their synergistic actions on the adverse effects of drugs are not well understood. In this study, we investigated whether 70-nm silica particles (nSP70), which are widely used in cosmetics and drug delivery, affect the toxicity of a drug for inflammatory bowel disease (5-aminosalicylic acid), an antibiotic drug (tetracycline), an antidepressant drug (trazodone), and an antipyretic drug (acetaminophen) in mice. Co-administration of nSP70 with trazodone did not increase a biochemical marker of liver injury. In contrast, co-administration increased the hepatotoxicity of the other drugs. Co-administration of nSP70 and tetracycline was lethal. These findings indicate that evaluation of synergistic adverse effects is important for the application of nano-sized materials. PMID:21612156

  2. Hepatocyte spheroid culture on fibrous scaffolds with grafted functional ligands as an in vitro model for predicting drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shili; Wei, Jiaojun; Liu, Yaowen; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Jianmei; Li, Xiaohong

    2015-12-01

    The identification of a biologic substrate for maintaining hepatocyte functions is essential to provide reliable and predictable models for in vitro drug screening. In the current study, a three-dimensional culture of hepatocytes was established on highly porous fibrous scaffolds with grafted galactose and RGD to afford extensive cell-cell and cell-scaffold interactions spatially. The pore size and ligand densities indicated significant effects on the formation of hepatocyte spheroids in balancing the cell retention, adhesion, and migration on fibrous scaffolds. Fibrous scaffolds with an average pore size of 60 μm and surface grafting densities of galactose at 5.9 nmol/cm(2) and RGD at 6.9 pmol/cm(2) provided optimal microenvironments for hepatocyte infiltration and multicellular spheroid formation. Significant promotions were also demonstrated in the syntheses of albumin and urea and the activities of phase I (CYP 3A11 and CYP 2C9) and phase II enzymes. The in vitro metabolism tests on testosterone and acetaminophen by hepatocytes on the optimal scaffolds indicated the predicated clearance rates of 50.7 and 22.6 ml/min/kg, respectively, which were comparable to the in vivo values of rats. The in vitro hepatotoxicity tests on amiodarone hydrochloride and acetaminophen predicted the half maximal effective concentrations (EC50) to reflect the in vivo toxic plasma concentrations in human. In addition, the enzyme activities, predicted clearance rates and hepatotoxicity values of hepatocytes on the optimal scaffolds experienced sensitive responsiveness to specific inducers or inhibitors of CYP 3A11 and phase II enzymes, exhibiting in vivo-in vitro correlations to a certain extent. These results demonstrate the feasibility of hepatocyte spheroid culture on fibrous scaffolds as an potential in vitro testing model to predict the in vivo drug metabolism, hepatotoxicity, and drug-drug interactions. PMID:26409440

  3. Models of Drug-induced Liver Injury for Evaluation of Phytotherapeutics and Other Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Jaeschke, Hartmut; Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup

    2013-01-01

    Extracts from medicinal plants, many of which have been used for centuries, are increasingly tested in models of hepatotoxicity. One of the most popular models to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of natural products is acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury, although other hepatotoxicity models such as carbon tetrachloride, thioacetamide, ethanol and endotoxin are occasionally used. APAP overdose is a clinically relevant model of drug-induced liver injury. Critical mechanisms and signaling pathways, which trigger necrotic cell death and sterile inflammation, are discussed. Although there is increasing understanding of the pathophysiology of APAP-induced liver injury, the mechanism is complex and prone to misinterpretation, especially when unknown chemicals such as plant extracts are tested. This review discusses the fundamental aspects that need to be considered when using this model, such as selection of the animal species or in vitro system, timing and dose-responses of signaling events, metabolic activation and protein adduct formation, the role of lipid peroxidation and apoptotic versus necrotic cell death, and the impact of the ensuing sterile inflammatory response. The goal is to enable researchers to select the appropriate model and experimental conditions for testing of natural products that will yield clinically relevant results and allow valid interpretations of the pharmacological mechanisms. PMID:23353004

  4. Hepatotoxicity Induced by "the 3Ks": Kava, Kratom and Khat.

    PubMed

    Pantano, Flaminia; Tittarelli, Roberta; Mannocchi, Giulio; Zaami, Simona; Ricci, Serafino; Giorgetti, Raffaele; Terranova, Daniela; Busardò, Francesco P; Marinelli, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The 3Ks (kava, kratom and khat) are herbals that can potentially induce liver injuries. On the one hand, growing controversial data have been reported about the hepatotoxicity of kratom, while, on the other hand, even though kava and khat hepatotoxicity has been investigated, the hepatotoxic effects are still not clear. Chronic recreational use of kratom has been associated with rare instances of acute liver injury. Several studies and case reports have suggested that khat is hepatotoxic, leading to deranged liver enzymes and also histopathological evidence of acute hepatocellular degeneration. Numerous reports of severe hepatotoxicity potentially induced by kava have also been highlighted, both in the USA and Europe. The aim of this review is to focus on the different patterns and the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity induced by "the 3Ks", while trying to clarify the numerous aspects that still need to be addressed. PMID:27092496

  5. [A Case of Acetaminophen Poisoning Associated with Tramcet Overdose].

    PubMed

    Urabe, Shigehiko; Terao, Yoshiaki; Tuji, Tikako; Egashira, Takashi; Goto, Shino; Fukusaki, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Tramcet is a mixture of tramadol and acetaminophen. Acetaminophen poisoning may be caused by excessive intake of Tramcet. A 17-year-old female took excessive quantity of Tramcet before noon. She reported it herself in the emergency room. Her main complaint was nausea and dizziness. Acetaminophen may cause liver damage with dose-dependent manner. Because there was a possibility of acetaminophen poisoning, we started oral acetylcysteine. She was discharged from hospital 5 days later without side effects of acetylecysteine and liver damage. PMID:27483669

  6. Herbal Supplements and Hepatotoxicity: A Short Review.

    PubMed

    Haslan, Haszianaliza; Suhaimi, Farihah Haji; Das, Srijit

    2015-10-01

    Herbal products have gained popularity over the past few decades. The reasons attributed to the rise in popularity are cheaper costs, easy availability, patient compliance and fewer side effects. However, liver toxicity following consumption of herbal remedies is on the increase. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand the mechanism of action of the herbal supplements on the liver. Occasionally, herbal supplements may also interact with conventional drugs. The present review focusses on a few herbs such as Aloe barbadensis, Atractylis gummifera, Centella asiatica, Mitragyna speciosa, Morinda citrifolia, Larea tridentata, Symphytum officinale, Teucrium chamaedrys and Xanthium strumarium, which are reported to cause hepatotoxicity in humans and animals. Prior knowledge on hepatotoxicity caused by herbs may be beneficial for clinicians and medical practitioners. PMID:26669124

  7. Large animal hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic plants.

    PubMed

    Oladosu, L A; Case, A A

    1979-10-01

    The hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic plants of large domestic animals have been reviewed. The most important ones are those widely distributed as weeds over pastures, negelcted forests and grasslands, those used as ornamentals, the nitrate concentrating forage crops, and the cyanophoric plants. Crotolaria spp, the ragwort (Senecia jacobaea), the lantana spp. and heliotopum are common hepatoxic plants. Amaranthus retroflexus, Datura stramonium, Solanum rostratum, and the castor oil plant (Ricinus communis) are nephrotoxic plants. PMID:516370

  8. Predictive toxicology using systemic biology and liver microfluidic “on chip” approaches: Application to acetaminophen injury

    SciTech Connect

    Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Bunescu, Andrei; Elena-Herrmann, Bénédicte; Snouber, Leila Choucha; Griscom, Laurent; Razan, Florence; Bois, Frederic Y.; Legallais, Cécile; and others

    2012-03-15

    We have analyzed transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic profiles of hepatoma cells cultivated inside a microfluidic biochip with or without acetaminophen (APAP). Without APAP, the results show an adaptive cellular response to the microfluidic environment, leading to the induction of anti-oxidative stress and cytoprotective pathways. In presence of APAP, calcium homeostasis perturbation, lipid peroxidation and cell death are observed. These effects can be attributed to APAP metabolism into its highly reactive metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). That toxicity pathway was confirmed by the detection of GSH-APAP, the large production of 2-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxybutyrate, and methionine, cystine, and histidine consumption in the treated biochips. Those metabolites have been reported as specific biomarkers of hepatotoxicity and glutathione depletion in the literature. In addition, the integration of the metabolomic, transcriptomic and proteomic collected profiles allowed a more complete reconstruction of the APAP injury pathways. To our knowledge, this work is the first example of a global integration of microfluidic biochip data in toxicity assessment. Our results demonstrate the potential of that new approach to predictive toxicology. -- Highlights: ► We cultivated liver cells in microfluidic biochips ► We integrated transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomics profiles ► Pathways reconstructions were proposed in control and acetaminophen treated cultures ► Biomarkers were identified ► Comparisons with in vivo studies were proposed.

  9. Intestinal Glucose Uptake Protects Liver from Lipopolysaccharide and d-Galactosamine, Acetaminophen, and Alpha-Amanitin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zanobbio, Laura; Palazzo, Marco; Gariboldi, Silvia; Dusio, Giuseppina F.; Cardani, Diego; Mauro, Valentina; Marcucci, Fabrizio; Balsari, Andrea; Rumio, Cristiano

    2009-01-01

    We have recently observed that oral administration of d-glucose saves animals from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced death. This effect is the likely consequence of glucose-induced activation of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter-1. In this study, we investigated possible hepatoprotective effects of glucose-induced, sodium-dependent, glucose transporter-1 activation. We show that oral administration of d-glucose, but not of either d-fructose or sucrose, prevents LPS-induced liver injury, as well as liver injury and death induced by an overdose of acetaminophen. In both of these models, physiological liver morphology is maintained and organ protection is confirmed by unchanged levels of the circulating markers of hepatotoxicity, such as alanine transaminase or lactate dehydrogenase. In addition, d-glucose was found to protect the liver from α-amanitin-induced liver injury. In this case, in contrast to the previously described models, a second signal had to be present in addition to glucose to achieve protective efficacy. Toll-like receptor 4 stimulation that was induced by low doses of LPS was identified as such a second signal. Eventually, the protective effect of orally administered glucose on liver injury induced by LPS, overdose of acetaminophen, or α-amanitin was shown to be mediated by the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10. These findings, showing glucose-induced protective effects in several animal models of liver injury, might be relevant in view of possible therapeutic interventions against different forms of acute hepatic injury. PMID:19700751

  10. Inhibitor of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Breckenridge, David G.; Liles, John T.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic activation and oxidant stress are key events in the pathophysiology of acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. The initial mitochondrial oxidative stress triggered by protein adduct formation is amplified by c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and ultimately cell necrosis. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is considered the link between oxidant stress and JNK activation. The objective of the current study was to assess the efficacy and mechanism of action of the small-molecule ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 in a murine model of APAP hepatotoxicity. APAP (300 mg/kg) caused extensive glutathione depletion, JNK activation and translocation to the mitochondria, oxidant stress and liver injury as indicated by plasma ALT activities and area of necrosis over a 24 h observation period. Pretreatment with 30 mg/kg of GS-459679 almost completely prevented JNK activation, oxidant stress and injury without affecting the metabolic activation of APAP. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of GS-459679, mice were treated with APAP and then with the inhibitor. Given 1.5 h after APAP, GS-459679 was still protective, which was paralleled by reduced JNK activation and p-JNK translocation to mitochondria. However, GS-459679 treatment was not more effective than N-acetylcysteine, and the combination of GS-459679 and N-acetylcysteine exhibited similar efficacy as N-acetylcysteine monotherapy, suggesting that GS-459769 and N-acetylcysteine affect the same pathway. Importantly, inhibition of ASK1 did not impair liver regeneration as indicated by PCNA staining. In conclusion, the ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 protected against APAP toxicity by attenuating JNK activation and oxidant stress in mice and may have therapeutic potential for APAP overdose patients. - Highlights: • Two ASK1 inhibitors protected against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • The ASK1 inhibitors protect when used as pre- or post-treatment. • Protection by ASK1 inhibitor is

  11. Liver hepatotoxicity associated with pantoprazole: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Mehmet; Celik, Yilmaz; Karadas, Sevdegul; Olmez, Sehmus; Cifci, Adem

    2014-06-01

    Hepatotoxicity may occasionally develop over the course of treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Although skin reactions, interstitial nephritis, pancytopenia, anaphylaxis, and generalized edema have been reported to be associated with PPIs, hepatotoxicity associated with oral pantoprazole is very rare. In this report, we present a case of hepatotoxicity in a 35-year-old man who received pantoprazole (40 mg/day) for acute gastritis. One week after discontinuation of pantoprazole, his liver function began to improve, and the patient gradually fully recovered. Although this toxicity occurs only infrequently, pantoprazole should be considered as a rare hepatotoxic agent in the literature. PMID:24652021

  12. Hepatotoxicity associated with choline magnesium trisalicylate: case report and review of salicylate-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cersosimo, R J; Matthews, S J

    1987-01-01

    A case of a 21-year-old woman who had developed mild hepatotoxicity while receiving choline magnesium trisalicylate therapy is described. She presented with fever and mild hepatic enzyme elevations before salicylate therapy was instituted. Liver function tests (LFT) returned to normal within five days of hospitalization but she continued to develop daily fevers. Blood, urine, and throat cultures were negative. An acute viral illness or reactivation of systemic lupus erythematosus were the suspected diagnoses. Choline magnesium trisalicylate was then administered in an effort to control her fever, and was successful. After three days of salicylate therapy her LFT values began to rise. They continued to rise for five more days before salicylate hepatotoxicity was suspected. Choline magnesium trisalicylate was discontinued after eight days and the patient's LFT quickly returned to normal. The source of fever was never identified, although infection with cytomegalovirus was considered the most likely cause. Salicylate-induced hepatotoxicity is reviewed. PMID:3301251

  13. N-acetylcysteine overdose after acetaminophen poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Ghafar Ali; Astaraki, Peyman; Mohtashami, Azita Zafar; Ahadi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is used widely and effectively in oral and intravenous forms as a specific antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Here we report a rare case of iatrogenic NAC overdose following an error in preparation of the solution, and describe its clinical symptoms. Laboratory results and are presented and examined. A 23-year-old alert female patient weighing 65 kg presented to the emergency ward with weakness, lethargy, extreme fatigue, nausea, and dizziness. She had normal arterial blood gas and vital signs. An excessive dosage of NAC over a short period of time can lead to hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure in patients with normal glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and finally to death. Considering the similarity between some of the clinical symptoms of acetaminophen overdose and NAC overdose, it is vitally important for the administration phases and checking of the patient's symptoms to be carried out attentively and cautiously. PMID:25767408

  14. Comparative study of flurbiprofen, zomepirac sodium, acetaminophen plus codeine, and acetaminophen for the relief of postsurgical dental pain.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, A; Marrero, I; Olson, N; McCormick, N; Laska, E M

    1986-03-24

    The relative analgesic efficacy and safety of single oral doses of 50 and 100 mg of flurbiprofen (Ansaid, Upjohn) were compared with 100 mg of zomepirac sodium, 650 mg of acetaminophen plus 60 mg of codeine, 650 mg of acetaminophen alone, and placebo in a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study. A total of 182 patients entered the study with moderate pain from a third molar extraction and were evaluated for six hours. For many efficacy variables, all active treatments were significantly (p less than or equal to 0.05) more effective than placebo. The two doses of flurbiprofen gave approximately similar results, suggesting a plateau effect above 50 mg. With the exception of relief at one hour, there were no significant differences between zomepirac and either dose of flurbiprofen. However, the mean response with zomepirac was greater than with either 50 or 100 mg of flurbiprofen during the first four hours and lower during the last two hours. The analgesic effects of acetaminophen alone were not significantly different from acetaminophen in combination with codeine. At the first hour, acetaminophen plus codeine led to significantly better pain relief than did 100 mg of flurbiprofen. After the first hour, flurbiprofen resulted in greater mean scores than acetaminophen alone or acetaminophen plus codeine, and these differences were significant at the fifth and sixth hours. Five patients had adverse reactions while receiving acetaminophen, acetaminophen plus codeine, or placebo. There were no adverse effects with flurbiprofen or zomepirac. PMID:3515924

  15. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NANT blocks acetaminophen toxicity and protein nitration in freshly isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sudip; Melnyk, Stepan B; Krager, Kimberly J; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Letzig, Lynda G; James, Laura P; Hinson, Jack A

    2015-12-01

    3-Nitrotyrosine (3NT) in liver proteins of mice treated with hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) has been postulated to be causative in toxicity. Nitration is by a reactive nitrogen species formed from nitric oxide (NO). The source of the NO is unclear. iNOS knockout mice were previously found to be equally susceptible to APAP toxicity as wildtype mice and iNOS inhibitors did not decrease toxicity in mice or in hepatocytes. In this work we examined the potential role of nNOS in APAP toxicity in hepatocytes using the specific nNOS inhibitor NANT (10 µM)(N-[(4S)-4-amino-5-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]pentyl]-N'-nitroguanidinetris (trifluoroacetate)). Primary hepatocytes (1 million/ml) from male B6C3F1 mice were incubated with APAP (1mM). Cells were removed and assayed spectrofluorometrically for reactive nitrogen and oxygen species using diaminofluorescein (DAF) and Mitosox red, respectively. Cytotoxicity was determined by LDH release into media. Glutathione (GSH, GSSG), 3NT, GSNO, acetaminophen-cysteine adducts, NAD, and NADH were measured by HPLC. APAP significantly increased cytotoxicity at 1.5-3.0 h. The increase was blocked by NANT. NANT did not alter APAP mediated GSH depletion or acetaminophen-cysteine adducts in proteins which indicated that NANT did not inhibit metabolism. APAP significantly increased spectroflurometric evidence of reactive nitrogen and oxygen formation at 0.5 and 1.0 h, respectively, and increased 3NT and GSNO at 1.5-3.0 h. These increases were blocked by NANT. APAP dramatically increased NADH from 0.5-3.0 h and this increase was blocked by NANT. Also, APAP decreased the Oxygen Consumption Rate (OCR), decreased ATP production, and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which were all blocked by NANT. PMID:26454079

  16. Role of lipid peroxidation as a mechanism of liver injury after acetaminophen overdose in mice.

    PubMed

    Knight, Tamara R; Fariss, Marc W; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2003-11-01

    Mitochondrial oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation have been implicated in the pathophysiology of acetaminophen-induced (AAP-induced) liver injury. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that lipid peroxidation (LPO) might be involved in the injury mechanism. Male C3Heb/FeJ mice fed a diet high in vitamin E (1 g d-alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg diet) for 1 week had 6.7-fold higher hepatic tocopherol levels than animals on the control diet (8.2 +/- 0.1 nmol/g liver). Treatment of fasted mice with 300 mg/kg AAP caused centrilobular necrosis with high plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities at 6 h (3280 +/- 570 U/l) but no evidence of LPO (hepatic malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal). Animals on the vitamin E diet had similar injury and LPO as mice on the control diet. To verify a potential effect of the vitamin E diet on drug-induced liver injury, animals were pretreated with a combination of phorone, FeSO4, and allyl alcohol. We observed, 2 h after allyl alcohol, massive LPO and liver cell injury in the livers of animals on the control diet, as indicated by a 32-fold increase in malondialdehyde levels, extensive staining for 4-hydroxynonenal, and ALT activities of 2310 +/- 340 U/l. Animals on the vitamin E diet had 40% lower hepatic malondialdehyde levels and 85% lower ALT values. Similar results were obtained when animals were treated for 3 days with alpha- or gamma-tocopherol (0.19 mmol/kg, ip). Both treatments reduced LPO and injury after allyl alcohol but had no effect on AAP hepatotoxicity. Thus, despite the previously shown mitochondrial oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation, LPO does not appear to be a critical event in AAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:12944590

  17. Inhibitor of Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 Protects Against Acetaminophen-induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Breckenridge, David G.; Liles, John T.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic activation and oxidant stress are key events in the pathophysiology of acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. The initial mitochondrial oxidative stress triggered by protein adduct formation is amplified by c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and ultimately cell necrosis. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is considered the link between oxidant stress and JNK activation. The objective of the current study was to assess the efficacy and mechanism of action of the small-molecule ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 in a murine model of APAP hepatotoxicity. APAP (300 mg/kg) caused extensive glutathione depletion, JNK activation and translocation to the mitochondria, oxidant stress and liver injury as indicated by plasma ALT activities and area of necrosis over a 24h observation period. Pretreatment with 30 mg/kg of GS-459679 almost completely prevented JNK activation, oxidant stress and injury without affected the metabolic activation of APAP. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of GS-459679, mice were treated with APAP and then with the inhibitor. Given 1.5h after APAP, GS-459679 was still protective, which was paralleled by reduced JNK activation and p-JNK translocation to mitochondria. However, GS-459679 treatment was not more effective than N-acetylcysteine, and the combination of GS-459679 and N-acetylcysteine exhibited similar efficacy as N-acetylcysteine monotherapy, suggesting that GS-459769 and N-acetylcysteine affect the same pathway. Importantly, inhibition of ASK1 did not impair liver regeneration as indicated by PCNA staining. In conclusion, the ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 protected against APAP toxicity by attenuating JNK activation and oxidant stress in mice and may have therapeutic potential for APAP overdose patients. PMID:25818599

  18. Inhibitor of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Breckenridge, David G; Liles, John T; Lebofsky, Margitta; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic activation and oxidant stress are key events in the pathophysiology of acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. The initial mitochondrial oxidative stress triggered by protein adduct formation is amplified by c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and ultimately cell necrosis. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is considered the link between oxidant stress and JNK activation. The objective of the current study was to assess the efficacy and mechanism of action of the small-molecule ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 in a murine model of APAP hepatotoxicity. APAP (300 mg/kg) caused extensive glutathione depletion, JNK activation and translocation to the mitochondria, oxidant stress and liver injury as indicated by plasma ALT activities and area of necrosis over a 24h observation period. Pretreatment with 30 mg/kg of GS-459679 almost completely prevented JNK activation, oxidant stress and injury without affecting the metabolic activation of APAP. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of GS-459679, mice were treated with APAP and then with the inhibitor. Given 1.5h after APAP, GS-459679 was still protective, which was paralleled by reduced JNK activation and p-JNK translocation to mitochondria. However, GS-459679 treatment was not more effective than N-acetylcysteine, and the combination of GS-459679 and N-acetylcysteine exhibited similar efficacy as N-acetylcysteine monotherapy, suggesting that GS-459769 and N-acetylcysteine affect the same pathway. Importantly, inhibition of ASK1 did not impair liver regeneration as indicated by PCNA staining. In conclusion, the ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 protected against APAP toxicity by attenuating JNK activation and oxidant stress in mice and may have therapeutic potential for APAP overdose patients. PMID:25818599

  19. Optimization in development of acetaminophen syrup formulation.

    PubMed

    Worakul, Nimit; Wongpoowarak, Wibul; Boonme, Prapaporn

    2002-03-01

    Formulation of acetaminophen syrup could be developed by an optimization technique to reduce the time and cost of study. Cosolvents were used in the formulation because of the low solubility of acetaminophen in water. They were composed of polyethylene glycol 4000, propylene glycol, sorbitol solution, and glycerin. Their effects on the solubility of acetaminophen and the pH of formulations were investigated. Effects on taste and price were calculated based on their properties. Simulation study of the effect of cosolvents upon the formulation scores was performed, using an algorithm based upon a simulated annealing concept to achieve the global optima and heuristic optimization concept to accelerate convergence. The program written as a Visual Basic module within Microsoft Access 97 was used to simulate and assess the optimal cosolvent amounts to achieve the most desirable formulations automatically according to the specified criteria. Formulators could customize the optimal formulation according to their needs and cost constraints by redefining the desirable outcomes in the source code of the program. PMID:12026227

  20. Plasma and liver acetaminophen-protein adduct levels in mice after acetaminophen treatment: Dose–response, mechanisms, and clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Norris, Hye-Ryun K.; Slawson, Matthew H.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Xie, Yuchao; Williams, C. David; Wilkins, Diana G.; Rollins, Douglas E.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-06-15

    At therapeutic doses, acetaminophen (APAP) is a safe and effective analgesic. However, overdose of APAP is the principal cause of acute liver failure in the West. Binding of the reactive metabolite of APAP (NAPQI) to proteins is thought to be the initiating event in the mechanism of hepatotoxicity. Early work suggested that APAP-protein binding could not occur without glutathione (GSH) depletion, and likely only at toxic doses. Moreover, it was found that protein-derived APAP-cysteine could only be detected in serum after the onset of liver injury. On this basis, it was recently proposed that serum APAP-cysteine could be used as diagnostic marker of APAP overdose. However, comprehensive dose–response and time course studies have not yet been done. Furthermore, the effects of co-morbidities on this parameter have not been investigated. We treated groups of mice with APAP at multiple doses and measured liver GSH and both liver and plasma APAP-protein adducts at various timepoints. Our results show that protein binding can occur without much loss of GSH. Importantly, the data confirm earlier work that showed that protein-derived APAP-cysteine can appear in plasma without liver injury. Experiments performed in vitro suggest that this may involve multiple mechanisms, including secretion of adducted proteins and diffusion of NAPQI directly into plasma. Induction of liver necrosis through ischemia–reperfusion significantly increased the plasma concentration of protein-derived APAP-cysteine after a subtoxic dose of APAP. While our data generally support the measurement of serum APAP-protein adducts in the clinic, caution is suggested in the interpretation of this parameter. - Highlights: • Extensive GSH depletion is not required for APAP-protein binding in the liver. • APAP-protein adducts appear in plasma at subtoxic doses. • Proteins are adducted in the cell and secreted out. • Coincidental liver injury increases plasma APAP-protein adducts at subtoxic doses

  1. Acetaminophen prevents oxidative burst and delays apoptosis in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Marisa; Costa, Vera M; Ribeiro, Daniela; Couto, Diana; Porto, Graça; Carvalho, Félix; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2013-05-23

    Acetaminophen is a frequently prescribed over-the-counter drug to reduce fever and pain in the event of inflammatory process. As neutrophils are relevant cells in inflammatory processes, the putative interaction of acetaminophen with these cells, if present, would be of paramount importance. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of acetaminophen in human neutrophils' oxidative burst and lifespan in vitro. The obtained results demonstrate that acetaminophen efficiently modulates neutrophils' oxidative burst in phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils, in a concentration-dependent manner, at in vivo relevant concentrations. It was clearly demonstrated that acetaminophen is a strong scavenger of HOCl and H2O2, which probably contributed to the effect observed in neutrophils. Acetaminophen also induced the depletion of glutathione in stimulated neutrophils, suggesting its transformation into a reactive intermediate. Obtained results further revealed that acetaminophen affects programmed cell death of human neutrophils, resulting in a delay of previously stimulated neutrophils-mediated apoptosis. Overall, our data suggested that acetaminophen has considerable potential to be included in anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies, by preventing biological damage induced by an excessive production of reactive species generated in activated neutrophils and by extending the lifespan of neutrophils, favoring the elimination of pathogens, thus contributing to tissue healing and resolution of inflammation. PMID:23518321

  2. Protective effect of diethyldithiocarbamate and carbon disulfide against liver injury induced by various hepatotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Y; Nakayama, N

    1982-09-01

    Diethyldithiocarbamate (DTC) and carbon disulfide (CS2), at nearly equimolar oral dose levels, protected mice against liver damage induced by carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, bromotrichloromethane, thioacetamide, bromobenzene, furosemide, acetaminophen, dimethylnitrosamine and trichloroethylene, as evidenced by the suppression of elevations in plasma GPT activity and liver calcium content, and of histopathological alterations. Both agents also prolonged hexobarbital sleeping time and zoxazolamine paralysis time in mice. DTC and SC, alone, given orally, decreased microsomal metabolism of several substrates (aniline, p-nitroanisole, hexobarbital, zoxazolamine, aminopyrine and 3,4-benzopyrene), CC14-induced lipid peroxidation, and cytochrome P-450 content. The loss of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity was also observed in the experiments in vitro using liver slices and isolated microsomes. Since a characteristic common to such diverse hepatotoxins is that they require metabolic activation before exhibiting hepatotoxicity, the protective mechanisms of DTC and CS2 may involve their interference with the process of metabolic activation of these hepatotoxins. The protective action of DTC may be mediated almost entirely through CS2 when administered orally and at least partly with parenteral administration, since, in CCl4-induced liver injury, DTC was most effective when given orally, while the action of CS2 was less dependent on the route of administration. Thus CS2 and CS2-producing agents in vivo such as dithiocarbamate derivatives and disulfiram may modify toxicological and pharmacological effects of foreign compounds by inhibiting microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity in the liver. PMID:6291543

  3. Investigation of proteomic biomarkers in in vivo hepatotoxicity study of rat liver: toxicity differentiation in hepatotoxicants.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshinori; Kikkawa, Rie; Yamada, Hiroshi; Horii, Ikuo

    2006-02-01

    We investigated the overall protein expression profiles in the in vivo hepatotoxicity of rats induced by four well-recognized hepatotoxicants. Acetaminophen (APAP), amiodarone (AMD), tetracycline (TC) and carbon tetrachloride (CTC) were administered to male rats by gavages and the liver at 24 hr post-dosing was applied to the proteomic experiment. Blood biochemistry and histopathology were examined to identify specific changes related to the compounds given. Protein expression in the liver was investigated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE), and spots showing a significantly different expression in treated versus control group were excised from gels and identified by Q-Tof mass spectrometer. They were well characterized based on their functions related to the mechanisms of toxicity of the compounds. Among them, we focused on the 8 proteins that were affected by all 4 compounds examined. Proteins related to oxidative stress response such as carbonic anhydrase III (CA3) and 60kDa heat shock protein (HSP60), and energy metabolism such as adenylate kinase 4 (AK4) were found. Moreover, hierarchical clustering analysis using 2D-gel spots information revealed the possibility to differentiate the groups based on their toxicity levels such as severity of liver damage. These results suggested that assessing the effects of hepatotoxicants on protein expression is worth trying to screen candidate compounds at the developmental stage of drugs. PMID:16538043

  4. Lipidomic profiling reveals protective function of fatty acid oxidation in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity[S

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaolei; Yao, Dan; Gosnell, Blake A.; Chen, Chi

    2012-01-01

    During cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity, lipid accumulation occurs prior to necrotic cell death in the liver. However, the exact influences of cocaine on the homeostasis of lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In this study, the progression of subacute hepatotoxicity, including centrilobular necrosis in the liver and elevation of transaminase activity in serum, was observed in a three-day cocaine treatment, accompanying the disruption of triacylglycerol (TAG) turnover. Serum TAG level increased on day 1 of cocaine treatment but remained unchanged afterwards. In contrast, hepatic TAG level was elevated continuously during three days of cocaine treatment and was better correlated with the development of hepatotoxicity. Lipidomic analyses of serum and liver samples revealed time-dependent separation of the control and cocaine-treated mice in multivariate models, which was due to the accumulation of long-chain acylcarnitines together with the disturbances of many bioactive phospholipid species in the cocaine-treated mice. An in vitro function assay confirmed the progressive inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation after the cocaine treatment. Cotreatment of fenofibrate significantly increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)-targeted genes and the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation activity in the cocaine-treated mice, resulting in the inhibition of cocaine-induced acylcarnitine accumulation and other hepatotoxic effects. Overall, the results from this lipidomics-guided study revealed that the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation plays an important role in cocaine-induced liver injury. PMID:22904346

  5. TRPM2 channels mediate acetaminophen-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Kheradpezhouh, Ehsan; Ma, Linlin; Morphett, Arthur; Barritt, Greg J; Rychkov, Grigori Y

    2014-02-25

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is the most frequently used analgesic and antipyretic drug available over the counter. At the same time, acetaminophen overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure and the leading cause of chronic liver damage requiring liver transplantation in developed countries. Acetaminophen overdose causes a multitude of interrelated biochemical reactions in hepatocytes including the formation of reactive oxygen species, deregulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis, covalent modification and oxidation of proteins, lipid peroxidation, and DNA fragmentation. Although an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in hepatocytes is a known consequence of acetaminophen overdose, its importance in acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity is not well understood, primarily due to lack of knowledge about the source of the Ca(2+) rise. Here we report that the channel responsible for Ca(2+) entry in hepatocytes in acetaminophen overdose is the Transient Receptor Potential Melanostatine 2 (TRPM2) cation channel. We show by whole-cell patch clamping that treatment of hepatocytes with acetaminophen results in activation of a cation current similar to that activated by H2O2 or the intracellular application of ADP ribose. siRNA-mediated knockdown of TRPM2 in hepatocytes inhibits activation of the current by either acetaminophen or H2O2. In TRPM2 knockout mice, acetaminophen-induced liver damage, assessed by the blood concentration of liver enzymes and liver histology, is significantly diminished compared with wild-type mice. The presented data strongly suggest that TRPM2 channels are essential in the mechanism of acetaminophen-induced hepatocellular death. PMID:24569808

  6. Mechanistic study on formaldehyde-induced hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Strubelt, O.; Younes, M.; Pentz, R.; Kuehnel, W. )

    1989-01-01

    In isolated, hemoglobin-free perfused livers of fasted rats, formaldehyde at an initial concentration of 10 mmol/l produced toxicity as evidenced by a release of enzymes (GPT, SDH) and of glutathione (mainly GSSG) into the perfusate, an accumulation of calcium in the liver, and a depletion of hepatic glatathione. Formaldehyde also led to an enhanced release of malondialdehyde into the perfusate, indicating peroxidative processes and decreased hepatic oxygen consumption by about 50-70%. The electron microscopic investigation of formaldehyde-exposed livers showed a destruction of the mitochondria (ruptured membranes, loss of the cristae) and some damage of the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Feeding the rats prior to surgery attenuated the hepatotoxic effects of 10 mmol/l formaldehyde. At an initial concentration of 3 mmol/l, formaldehyde did not release enzymes from livers of fed or fasted rats but only from whose glutathione content had been depleted by treatment with phorone (250 mg/kg ip 2 h earlier). Formaldehyde liberated glucose and lactate from the livers of fed but not from those of fasted rats, indicating anaerobic energy supply in the fed state. The hepatotoxic action of formaldehyde is not due to its metabolism to formate or to the 10% methanol added as a stabilizing agent to the commercially available 37% solution named formalin.

  7. Levofloxacin-induced hepatotoxicity and death.

    PubMed

    Gulen, Muge; Ay, Mehmet Oguzhan; Avci, Akkan; Acikalin, Ayca; Icme, Ferhat

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is a major cause of hepatocellular injury in patients admitting to emergency services with acute liver failure. Hepatic necrosis may be at varying degrees from mild elevations in transaminases to fulminant hepatitis, and even death. The case of a 53-year-old female patient with toxic hepatitis due to levofloxacin and multiple organ failure secondary to toxic hepatitis is presented. Patient suffered itching, redness, and rash after receiving a single dose of 750 mg of levofloxacin tablets for pulmonary infection 10 days ago. Skin lesions had regressed within 3 days, but desquamation formed all over the body. After the fifth day of drug intake, complaints of abdominal pain, vomiting, and yellowing in skin color had started. The patient was referred to our emergency department with these complaints 10 days after drug intake. Patient was thought as a candidate for liver transplant, but cardiopulmonary arrest occurred, and the patient died before she could be referred to a transplant center. This case is important because hepatotoxicity and death due to levofloxacin is uncommon in the literature. PMID:24067876

  8. Nalbuphine, acetaminophen, and their combination in postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Forbes, J A; Kolodny, A L; Chachich, B M; Beaver, W T

    1984-06-01

    In a double-blind study with the use of subjective reports of patients as indices of analgesia, we compared the analgesic effect of oral nalbuphine and acetaminophen and determined the contribution of each to the efficacy of their combination. In this parallel 2 X 2 factorial study, 129 inpatients after surgery were randomly assigned to treatment with a single oral dose of nalbuphine hydrochloride (30 mg), acetaminophen (650 mg), the combination of nalbuphine (30 mg) and acetaminophen (650 mg), or placebo. In the factorial analysis, both the nalbuphine and acetaminophen effects were significant for virtually every measure of total and peak analgesia, whereas the interaction contrast was not significant for any measure of analgesic effect. This indicates that the analgesic effect of the combination represents the additive effect of its constituents and is consistent with the results of studies of combinations of codeine and other opioids with aspirin or acetaminophen. There were few adverse effects other than sedation, which occurred twice as frequently in patients treated with nalbuphine as in those receiving acetaminophen or placebo. Our data suggest that this combination should prove at least as effective as any currently marketed narcotic-containing combination. Since nalbuphine has less dependence liability than narcotics and exhibits a ceiling on respiratory depression, its combination with acetaminophen should also be safer than comparable narcotic combinations. PMID:6734037

  9. Proteomic investigation of signatures for geniposide-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Junying; Zhang, Fangbo; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Chunyu; Li, Xianyu; Li, Defeng; Liu, Xin; Yang, Hongjun; Huang, Luqi

    2014-12-01

    Evaluating the safety of traditional medicinal herbs and their major active constituents is critical for their widespread usage. Geniposide, a major active constituent with a defined structure from the traditional medicinal herb Gardenia jasminoides ELLIS fruit, exhibits remarkable anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, and antifibrotic properties and has been used in a variety of medical fields, mainly for the treatment of liver diseases. However, geniposide-induced hepatotoxicity and methods for the early detection of hepatotoxicity have yet to be reported. In this study, geniposide-induced hepatotoxicity was investigated. In addition, candidate biomarkers for the earlier detection of geniposide-induced hepatotoxicity were identified using a label-free quantitative proteomics approach on a geniposide overdose-induced liver injury in a rat model. Using an accurate intensity-based, absolute quantification (iBAQ)-based, one-step discovery and verification approach, a candidate biomarker panel was easily obtained from individual samples in response to different conditions. To determine the biomarkers' early detection abilities, five candidate biomarkers were selected and tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Two biomarkers, glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) and glycogen phosphorylase (PYGL), were found to indicate hepatic injuries significantly earlier than the current gold standard liver biomarker. This study provides a first insight into geniposide-induced hepatotoxicity in a rat model and describes a method for the earlier detection of this hepatotoxicity, facilitating the efficient monitoring of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:25336395

  10. Rutin Attenuates Hepatotoxicity in High-Cholesterol-Diet-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    AlSharari, Shakir D.; Al-Rejaie, Salim S.; Abuohashish, Hatem M.; Ahmed, Mohamed M.; Hafez, Mohamed M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective. High-cholesterol diet (HCD) intends to increase the oxidative stress in liver tissues inducing hepatotoxicity. Rutin is a natural flavonoid (vitamin p) which is known to have antioxidative properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential effects of Rutin on hypercholesterolemia-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Materials and Methods. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: G-I control, G-II Rutin, G-III HCD, and G-IV Rutin + HCD. The liver functions and lipid profile were used to evaluate the HCD-induced hepatotoxicity. Quantitative real time-PCR was carried out to evaluate the expression levels of genes in TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway. Results. Rutin in combination with HCD showed a significant protective effect against hepatotoxicity. HCD caused significant increase in the mRNA expression of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), Mothers Against Decapentaplegic Homolog 2 (Smad-2), Mothers Against Decapentaplegic Homolog 4 (Smad-4), Bcl-2-binding component 3 (Bbc3), caspase-3, P53 and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and decrease in the expression levels of Cyclin depended kinase inhibitor (P21) and Interleukin-3 (IL-3) in hepatic cells. Conclusion. TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway is involved in HCD-induced hepatotoxicity and Rutin inhibits the hepatotoxicity via suppressing this pathway. Therefore, Rutin might be considered as a protective agent for hepatotoxicity. PMID:27239252

  11. Mechanisms of Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Dean W.; James, Laura P.

    2010-01-01

    Although considered safe at therapeutic doses, at higher doses, acetaminophen produces a centrilobular hepatic necrosis that can be fatal. Acetaminophen poisoning accounts for approximately one-half of all cases of acute liver failure in the United States and Great Britain today. The mechanism occurs by a complex sequence of events. These events include: (1) CYP metabolism to a reactive metabolite which depletes glutathione and covalently binds to proteins; (2) loss of glutathione with an increased formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in hepatocytes undergoing necrotic changes; (3) increased oxidative stress, associated with alterations in calcium homeostasis and initiation of signal transduction responses, causing mitochondrial permeability transition; (4) mitochondrial permeability transition occurring with additional oxidative stress, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and loss of the ability of the mitochondria to synthesize ATP; and (5) loss of ATP which leads to necrosis. Associated with these essential events there appear to be a number of inflammatory mediators such as certain cytokines and chemokines that can modify the toxicity. Some have been shown to alter oxidative stress, but the relationship of these modulators to other critical mechanistic events has not been well delineated. In addition, existing data support the involvement of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in the initiation of regenerative processes leading to the reestablishment of hepatic structure and function. PMID:20020268

  12. Investigation of a hepatotoxicity screening system in primary cell cultures --"what biomarkers would need to be addressed to estimate toxicity in conventional and new approaches?".

    PubMed

    Kikkawa, Rie; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Fukushima, Tamio; Yamada, Hiroshi; Horii, Ikuo

    2005-02-01

    High throughput toxicological estimation is required for safety evaluation in the early stage of drug discovery. In this context, establishment of an in vitro screening system reflecting in vivo toxicity is demanded for earlier safety assessment. We investigated LDH release and mitochondrial respiration (WST-1 reduction assay; WST-1) to detect cytotoxicity, morphological evaluation, and proteomics for estimating the reliable and sensitive biomarkers by using rat primary hepatocytes exposed to the compounds (acetaminophen, amiodarone, tetracycline and carbon tetrachloride) that are known to induce hepatotoxicity. In LDH release, no significant difference was detected between the control and compound exposed cells after exposure for 3 or 6 hr, but a dose-dependent increase was observed after exposure for 24 hr. Regarding the WST-1 assay, a dose-dependent reduction was detected after exposure for 6 and 24 hr to all of the compounds evaluated. In the proteomics analysis, 31 candidate proteins were identified from among the 103 demonstrating altered expression spots after exposure to acetaminophen. It was concluded that the cytotoxicity was detected earlier by measuring WST-1 than by measuring LDH release because the reduction of mitochondrial respiration is an expressions of earlier toxicity for cellular function, while the measured increase in the LDH release occurs after the failure of the cell membrane. Mitochondrial respiration ability was a useful parameter for cytotoxicity in in vitro hepato-toxicity screening, as cytotoxicity can be detected during the early stage of exposure. In addition to the conventional biomarkers, several protein biomarkers which relate to oxidative stress and metabolism-regulation were detected. Further comprehensive analysis of defined proteins would be necessary to estimate the more sensitive toxicology biomarker. PMID:15800402

  13. Ketoprofen, acetaminophen plus oxycodone, and acetaminophen in the relief of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, A; Olson, N Z; Zighelboim, I; De Castro, A

    1993-11-01

    Ketoprofen (Orudis) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is currently approved in the United States for the management of mild to moderate pain. The objective of this trial was to determine the effectiveness of orally administered ketoprofen in the management of severe postoperative pain. This randomized, double-blind parallel study compared the efficacy and safety of single doses of 100 mg or 50 mg ketoprofen, the combination of 650 mg acetaminophen plus 10 mg oxycodone hydrochloride, 650 mg acetaminophen, or placebo in 240 patients with severe postoperative pain after cesarean section. Analgesia for the first dose was assessed over an 8-hour period. Multiple doses of 100 mg or 50 mg ketoprofen and the combination at half the dose (325 mg acetaminophen plus 5 mg oxycodone) were also assessed for up to 7 days. The 100 and 50 mg doses of ketoprofen and the combination were statistically superior to acetaminophen and placebo for many analgesic measures. A dose response was observed between the two doses of ketoprofen, with the 100 mg dose providing significantly greater analgesia over the lower dose. Ketoprofen, 100 mg, was at least as effective as the combination and its effects lasted longer, with the exception of hour 1 when the combination was superior. Remedication time for the group receiving 100 mg ketoprofen was significantly longer than for the other treatment groups. Significantly more patients who took repeated doses of the combination (84%) than those who took either dose of ketoprofen (70%) had adverse effects. Ketoprofen at both dose levels was shown to be effective, long-lasting, and well tolerated, and it should be considered as a viable option for the management of moderate to severe postoperative pain. PMID:8222498

  14. Possible fatal acetaminophen intoxication with atypical clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    De-Giorgio, Fabio; Lodise, Maria; Chiarotti, Marcello; d'Aloja, Ernesto; Carbone, Arnaldo; Valerio, Luca

    2013-09-01

    Acetaminophen or paracetamol, a commonly used over-the-counter analgesic, is known to elicit severe adverse reactions when taken in overdose, chronically at therapeutic dosage or, sporadically, following single assumptions of a therapeutic dose. Damage patterns including liver damage and, rarely, acute tubular necrosis or a fixed drug exanthema. We present a case of fatal acetaminophen toxicity with postmortem blood concentration 78 μg/mL and unusual clinical features, including a visually striking and massive epidermolysis and rhabdomyolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation and myocardial ischemia. This case is compared with the most similar previous reports in terms of organ damage, clinical presentation, and cause of death. We conclude that a number of severe patterns of adverse effects to acetaminophen are emerging that were previously greatly underestimated, thus questioning the adequacy of the clinical spectrum traditionally associated with acetaminophen intoxication and leading to the need to review this spectrum and the associated diagnostic criteria. PMID:23822653

  15. Careful: Acetaminophen in Pain Relief Medicines Can Cause Liver Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careful: Acetaminophen in pain relief medicines can cause liver damage Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... word or may have the abbreviation "APAP." Severe liver damage may occur and may lead to death ...

  16. Hepatotoxicity of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Montessori, Valentina; Harris, Marianne; Montaner, Julio S G

    2003-05-01

    Hepatotoxicity is an adverse effect of all available classes of antiretrovirals, including nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI). A syndrome of hepatic steatosis and lactic acidosis has been recognized as a rare, potentially fatal complication since the advent of NRTI monotherapy in the early 1990s. Today, NRTI remain the backbone of antiretroviral combination regimens, and, with the success of current treatment strategies, exposure to two or more of these agents may occur over a number of years. Hepatic steatosis and lactic acidosis are accordingly being observed more frequently, along with a more recently recognized syndrome of chronic hyperlactatemia. These as well as other adverse effects of NRTI are mediated by inhibition of human DNA polymerase gamma, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver and other tissues. Early recognition and intervention are essential to avert serious outcomes. PMID:12800069

  17. Retinoids Modulate Thioacetamide-Induced Acute Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Shmarakov, Igor O.; Borschovetska, Vira L.; Marchenko, Mykhailo M.; Blaner, William S.

    2014-01-01

    The literature indicates that retinoids can influence the metabolism and actions of xenobiotics and conversely that xenobiotics can influence the metabolism and actions of retinoids. We were interested in understanding the degree to which hepatic retinoid stores, accumulated over a lifetime, affect xenobiotic metabolism, and actions. To investigate this, we induced liver injury through administration of the hepatotoxin thioacetamide (TAA) to chow fed wild type (WT) mice and lecithin:retinol acyltransferase-deficient (Lrat−/−) mice that are genetically unable to accumulate hepatic retinoid stores. Within 48 h of TAA-treatment, WT mice develop liver injury as evidenced by focal necrotic areas and increases in serum ALT activity and myeloperoxidase activity in hepatic parenchyma. Simultaneously, features of hepatic encephalopathy develop, as evidenced by a 25% increase in blood ammonia and a threefold reduction of blood glucose levels. This is accompanied by reduced hepatic glutathione, and increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, protein carbonyl and sulfhydryl groups, and increased cytochrome P450-catalyzed hydroxylation activity and flavin-containing monooxygenase activity in microsomes prepared from WT liver. Strikingly, none of these TAA-induced effects were observed for matched Lrat−/− mice. To confirm that TAA hepatotoxicity depends on retinoid availability, we administered, over 48 h, four oral doses of 3000 IU retinyl acetate each to the mice. This led to the development of hepatotoxicity in Lrat−/− mice that was similar in extent to that observed in WT mice. Our findings establish that endogenous hepatic retinoid stores can modulate the toxicity of TAA in mice. PMID:24614237

  18. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury in rats and mice: Comparison of protein adducts, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the mechanism of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Williams, C. David; Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the West. In mice, APAP hepatotoxicity can be rapidly induced with a single dose. Because it is both clinically relevant and experimentally convenient, APAP intoxication has become a popular model of liver injury. Early data demonstrated that rats are resistant to APAP toxicity. As a result, mice are the preferred species for mechanistic studies. Furthermore, recent work has shown that the mechanisms of APAP toxicity in humans are similar to mice. Nevertheless, some investigators still use rats. New mechanistic information from the last forty years invites a reevaluation of the differences between these species. Comparison may provide interesting insights and confirm or exclude the rat as an option for APAP studies. To this end, we treated rats and mice with APAP and measured parameters of liver injury, APAP metabolism, oxidative stress, and activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Consistent with earlier data, we found that rats were highly resistant to APAP toxicity. Although overall APAP metabolism was similar in both species, mitochondrial protein adducts were significantly lower in rats. Accordingly, rats also had less oxidative stress. Finally, while mice showed extensive activation and mitochondrial translocation of JNK, this could not be detected in rat livers. These data support the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is critical for the development of necrosis after APAP treatment. Because mitochondrial damage also occurs in humans, rats are not a clinically relevant species for studies of APAP hepatotoxicity. Highlights: ► Acetaminophen overdose causes severe liver injury only in mice but not in rats. ► APAP causes hepatic GSH depletion and protein adduct formation in rats and mice. ► Less protein adducts were measured in rat liver mitochondria compared to mouse. ► No oxidant stress, peroxynitrite formation or JNK activation was present in rats. ► The

  19. Effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine acetylation in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tahir, I M; Iqbal, T; Saleem, S; Mehboob, H; Akhter, N; Riaz, M

    2016-03-01

    The effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine N-acetylation by human N-acetyltrasferase-2 (NAT2) was studied in 19 (n=19) healthy male volunteers in two different phases. In the first phase of the study the volunteers were given an oral dose of sulfamethazine 500 mg alone and blood and urine samples were collected. After the 10-day washout period the same selected volunteers were again administered sulfamethazine 500 mg along with 1000 mg acetaminophen. The acetylation of sulfamethazine by human NAT2 in both phases with and without acetaminophen was determined by HPLC to establish their respective phenotypes. In conclusion obtained statistics of present study revealed that acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) decreased sulfamethazine acetylation in plasma of both slow and fast acetylator male volunteers. A highly significant (P<0.0001) decrease in plasma-free and total sulfamethazine concentration was also observed when acetaminophen was co-administered. Urine acetylation status in both phases of the study was found not to be in complete concordance with that of plasma. Acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) increased the acetyl, free and total sulfamethazine concentration in urine of both slow and fast acetylators. Urine acetylation analysis has not been found to be a suitable approach for phenotypic studies. PMID:26519524

  20. Acute Liver Failure including Acetaminophen Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Acute liver failure (ALF) is a dramatic and highly unpredictable clinical syndrome defined by the sudden onset of coagulopathy and encephalopathy. Although many disease processes can cause ALF, acetaminophen overdose is the leading cause in the United States, and has a 66% chance of recovery with early N-acetylcysteine treatment and supportive care. Cerebral edema and infectious complications are notoriously difficult to detect and treat in ALF patients and may lead to irreversible brain damage and multi-organ failure. Emergency liver transplantation is associated with a 70% 1-year patient survival but 20% of listed patients die, highlighting the importance of early referral of ALF patients with a poor prognosis to a liver transplant center. PMID:18570942

  1. Age does not alter acetaminophen absorption.

    PubMed

    Divoll, M; Ameer, B; Abernethy, D R; Greenblatt, D J

    1982-04-01

    Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (age range, 22-78 years) received 650 mg of acetaminophen (AAP) on three separate occasions. The modes of administration were 1) intravenous, 5-minute infusion; 2) oral, with two 325-mg tablets; and 3) oral, with 650 mg as an elixir preparation. Plasma levels of AAP were determined in blood samples drawn up to 12 hours after the dose. The mean (+/- sd) kinetic variables for absorption of AAP from tablets in young and elderly were peak plasma concentration, 11.8 (+/- 4.2) vs 10.9 (+/- 4.1) micrograms/ml; peak time, 0.79 (+/- .54) vs 0.69 (+/- .40) hours after the dose; absorption half-life, 12.6 (+/- 9.8) vs. 8.2 (+/- 5.3) minutes; and absolute systemic availability, 79 (+/- 9) vs 72 (+/- 11) per cent. For AAP elixir, the corresponding values were 12.6 (+/- 5.4) vs 13.7 (+/- 6.0) micrograms/ml; 0.52 (+/- .24) vs 0.54 (+/- .51) hours; 8.6 (+/- 6.2) vs 6.1 (+/- 6.6) minutes; and 87 (+/- 9) vs 80 (+/- 9) per cent. Absolute bioavailability of both oral dosage forms was significantly less then 100 per cent in all groups. Elderly subjects tended to show lower availability of both oral preparations, but the difference was of borderline significance (P less than .50). Age did not influence any other measures of absorption. Since the absorption rate of acetaminophen may be indicative of the gastric emptying rate, age does not appear to alter this rate-limiting step in drug absorption. PMID:7069091

  2. A cellular model to study drug-induced liver injury in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Application to acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Michaut, Anaïs; Le Guillou, Dounia; Moreau, Caroline; Bucher, Simon; McGill, Mitchell R; Martinais, Sophie; Gicquel, Thomas; Morel, Isabelle; Robin, Marie-Anne; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Fromenty, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) can increase susceptibility to hepatotoxicity induced by some xenobiotics including drugs, but the involved mechanisms are poorly understood. For acetaminophen (APAP), a role of hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) is suspected since the activity of this enzyme is consistently enhanced during NAFLD. The first aim of our study was to set up a cellular model of NAFLD characterized not only by triglyceride accumulation but also by higher CYP2E1 activity. To this end, human HepaRG cells were incubated for one week with stearic acid or oleic acid, in the presence of different concentrations of insulin. Although cellular triglycerides and the expression of lipid-responsive genes were similar with both fatty acids, CYP2E1 activity was significantly increased only by stearic acid. CYP2E1 activity was reduced by insulin and this effect was reproduced in cultured primary human hepatocytes. Next, APAP cytotoxicity was assessed in HepaRG cells with or without lipid accretion and CYP2E1 induction. Experiments with a large range of APAP concentrations showed that the loss of ATP and glutathione was almost always greater in the presence of stearic acid. In cells pretreated with the CYP2E1 inhibitor chlormethiazole, recovery of ATP was significantly higher in the presence of stearate with low (2.5mM) or high (20mM) concentrations of APAP. Levels of APAP-glucuronide were significantly enhanced by insulin. Hence, HepaRG cells can be used as a valuable model of NAFLD to unveil important metabolic and hormonal factors which can increase susceptibility to drug-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26739624

  3. Modeling Drug- and Chemical-Induced Hepatotoxicity with Systems Biology Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sudin; Shoda, Lisl K.M.; Zhang, Qiang; Woods, Courtney G.; Howell, Brett A.; Siler, Scott Q.; Woodhead, Jeffrey L.; Yang, Yuching; McMullen, Patrick; Watkins, Paul B.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2012-01-01

    We provide an overview of computational systems biology approaches as applied to the study of chemical- and drug-induced toxicity. The concept of “toxicity pathways” is described in the context of the 2007 US National Academies of Science report, “Toxicity testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and A Strategy.” Pathway mapping and modeling based on network biology concepts are a key component of the vision laid out in this report for a more biologically based analysis of dose-response behavior and the safety of chemicals and drugs. We focus on toxicity of the liver (hepatotoxicity) – a complex phenotypic response with contributions from a number of different cell types and biological processes. We describe three case studies of complementary multi-scale computational modeling approaches to understand perturbation of toxicity pathways in the human liver as a result of exposure to environmental contaminants and specific drugs. One approach involves development of a spatial, multicellular “virtual tissue” model of the liver lobule that combines molecular circuits in individual hepatocytes with cell–cell interactions and blood-mediated transport of toxicants through hepatic sinusoids, to enable quantitative, mechanistic prediction of hepatic dose-response for activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor toxicity pathway. Simultaneously, methods are being developing to extract quantitative maps of intracellular signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks perturbed by environmental contaminants, using a combination of gene expression and genome-wide protein-DNA interaction data. A predictive physiological model (DILIsym™) to understand drug-induced liver injury (DILI), the most common adverse event leading to termination of clinical development programs and regulatory actions on drugs, is also described. The model initially focuses on reactive metabolite-induced DILI in response to administration of acetaminophen, and spans multiple biological

  4. 76 FR 2691 - Prescription Drug Products Containing Acetaminophen; Actions To Reduce Liver Injury From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... acetaminophen drugs (final rule, 74 FR 19385, April 29, 2009; and technical amendment, 74 FR 61512, November 25... is produced when acetaminophen is broken down by the body (Ref. 5). With low doses of acetaminophen... Syndrome, chronic alcoholism, acute excess alcohol use, and use of anticonvulsant or...

  5. Tramadol and acetaminophen tablets for dental pain.

    PubMed Central

    Medve, R. A.; Wang, J.; Karim, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the efficacy and time to analgesia of a new tramadol/acetaminophen combination tablet to those of tramadol or acetaminophen (APAP) alone. A meta-analysis was performed of 3 separate single-dose, double-blind, parallel-group trials in patients with moderate or severe pain following extraction of 2 or more third molars. Patients in each study were evenly randomized to a single dose of tramadol/APAP (75 mg/650 mg), tramadol 75 mg, APAP 650 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, or placebo. Active control with ibuprofen was used to determine model sensitivity. Pain relief (scale, 0-4) and pain intensity (scale, 0-3) were reported at 30 minutes after the dose and then hourly for 8 hours. Total pain relief over 8 hours (TOTPAR8) and the sum of pain intensity differences (SPID8) were calculated from the hourly scores. Time to onset of pain relief was determined by the double-stopwatch technique, and patients were advised to wait at least 2 hours before taking supplemental analgesia. Patients assessed overall efficacy (scale, 1-5) upon completion. In all, 1197 patients (age range, 16-46 years) were evaluable for efficacy; treatment groups in each study were similar at baseline. Pain relief was superior to placebo (P < or = .0001) for all treatments. Pain relief provided by tramadol/ APAP was superior to that of tramadol or APAP alone, as shown by mean TOT-PAR8 (12.1 vs 6.7 and 8.6, respectively, P < or = .0001) and SPID8 (4.7 vs 0.9 and 2.7, respectively, P < or = .0001). Estimated onset of pain relief was 17 minutes (95% CI, 15-20 minutes) for tramadol/APAP compared with 51 minutes (95% CI, 40-70 minutes) for tramadol, 18 minutes (95% CI, 16-21 minutes) for APAP, and 34 minutes (95% CI, 28-44 minutes) for ibuprofen. Median time to supplemental analgesia and mean overall assessment of efficacy were greater (P < .05) for the tramadol/APAP group (302 minutes and 3.0, respectively) than for the tramadol (122 minutes and 2.0) or APAP (183 minutes and 2

  6. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michaël; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure. PMID:26631581

  7. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Michaël; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure. PMID:26631581

  8. The role of nicotinic acid metabolites in flushing and hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Stern, Ralph H

    2007-07-01

    Flushing and hepatotoxicity are important adverse effects of nicotinic acid. This article reviews the role of metabolism of nicotinic acid in the production of these side effects. The suggestion that nicotinic acid (NUA) formation produces flushing is traced to a correlation of flushing with NUA C(max) (maximal concentration) and the observation that aspirin inhibits NUA formation and flushing. The former does not establish causation and the latter can be explained by inhibition of prostaglandin formation. Recent characterization of the GPR109A receptor that mediates prostaglandin release by Langerhans cells to produce flushing has shown nicotinic acid, not NUA, is responsible. The suggestion that nicotinamide metabolites produce hepatotoxicity is not supported by any data. The mechanism of hepatotoxicity is unknown and a toxic metabolite of nicotinic acid has not been identified. Different nicotinic acid formulations produce different metabolite patterns due to nonlinear pharmacokinetics, but there is no evidence that these differences have any clinical importance. PMID:21291680

  9. A rapid quantitative determination of acetaminophen in plasma.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, S E; Zurzola, F J

    1982-11-01

    A simple method is described for the rapid, quantitative analysis of acetaminophen in plasma. The nonconjugated acetaminophen present in the plasma following drug administration is determined after plasma protein precipitation by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) at a wavelength of 240 nm. Acetaminophen (I) is detectable at levels as low as 0.1 microgram/ml. Mean recoveries of 94% with a coefficient of variation of 3% were obtained for plasma standards whose concentrations ranged from 0 to 32 microgram/ml. Interassay variability of the slope of the standard curve had a coefficient of variation of 2.7%. Application and verification of this method by comparison with another procedure run simultaneously during several human bioavailability studies are described. PMID:7175728

  10. Metabolic activation of furan moiety makes Diosbulbin B hepatotoxic.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Lin, Dongju; Gao, Huiyuan; Xu, Youjun; Meng, Dongya; Smith, Charles Vincent; Peng, Ying; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Diosbulbin B (DIOB), a furanoid, is a major constituent of herbal medicine Dioscorea bulbifera L. Exposure to DIOB caused liver injury in humans and experimental animals. The mechanisms of DIOB-induced hepatotoxicities remain unknown. The present study demonstrated that DIOB induced hepatotoxicities in a time- and dose-dependent manner in mice. H&E stained histopathologic image showed the occurrence of necrosis in the liver obtained from the mice treated with DIOB at dose of 200 mg/kg. Pretreatment with KTC protected the animals from hepatotoxicities and hepatic GSH depletion induced by DIOB, increased area under the concentration-time curve of blood DIOB, decreased urinary excretion of GSH conjugates derived from DIOB, and increased urinary excretion of parent drug. Pretreatment with BSO exacerbated DIOB-induced hepatotoxicities. In order to define the role of furan moiety in DIOB-induced liver toxicities, we replaced the furan of DIOB with a tetrahydrofuran group by chemical hydrogenation of the furan ring of DIOB. No liver injury was observed in the animals given the same doses of tetrahydro-DIOB. The furan moiety was essential for DIOB-induced hepatotoxicities. The results implicate the cis-enedial reactive metabolite of DIOB was responsible for the observed toxicities. The observed modest depletion of hepatic GSH in DIOB-treated animals suggests the actions of one or more reactive metabolites, and the hepatic injury observed could be due at least in part to reactions of these metabolites with crucial biomolecules. Cytochrome P450 3A enzymes are implicated in DIOB-induced hepatotoxicities by catalyzing the formation of the reactive metabolite of DIOB. PMID:25851819

  11. The hepatic inflammatory response after acetaminophen overdose: role of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lawson, J A; Farhood, A; Hopper, R D; Bajt, M L; Jaeschke, H

    2000-04-01

    Acetaminophen overdose induces severe liver injury and hepatic failure. There is evidence that inflammatory cells may be involved in the pathophysiology. Thus, the aim of this investigation was to characterize the neutrophilic inflammatory response after treatment of C3Heb/FeJ mice with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen. A time course study showed that neutrophils accumulate in the liver parallel to or slightly after the development of liver injury. The number of neutrophils in the liver was substantial (209 +/- 64 PMN/50 high-power fields at 12 h) compared to baseline levels (7 +/- 1). Serum levels of TNF-alpha and the C-X-C chemokines KC and MIP-2 increased by 28-, 14-, and 295-fold, respectively, over levels found in controls during the injury process. In addition, mRNA expression of MIP-2 and KC were upregulated in livers of acetaminophen-treated animals as determined by ribonuclease protection assay. However, none of these mediators were generated in large enough quantities to account for neutrophil sequestration in the liver. There was no upregulation of Mac-1 (CD11b/ CD18) or shedding of L-selectin on circulating neutrophils. Moreover, an anti-CD18 antibody had no protective effect against acetaminophen overdose during the first 24 h. These results indicate that there is a local inflammatory response after acetaminophen overdose, including a substantial accumulation of neutrophils in the liver. Because of the critical importance of beta2 integrins for neutrophil cytotoxicity, these results suggest that neutrophils do not contribute to the initiation or progression of AAP-induced liver. The inflammation observed after acetaminophen overdose may be characteristic for a response sufficient to recruit neutrophils for the purpose of removing necrotic cells but is not severe enough to cause additional damage. PMID:10774834

  12. Toxicity of 50-nm polystyrene particles co-administered to mice with acetaminophen, 5-aminosalicylic acid or tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Isoda, K; Nozawa, T; Tezuka, M; Ishida, I

    2014-09-01

    We investigated whether nano-sized polystyrene particles affect drug-induced toxicity. The particles, which are widely used industrially, had diameters of 50 (NPP50), 200 (NPP200) or 1000 (NPP1000) nm. The toxic chemicals tested were acetaminophen (APAP), 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), tetracycline (TC), and sodium valproate (VPA). All treatments in the absence of the nanoparticles were non-lethal and did not result in severe toxicity. However, when mice were injected with APAP, 5-ASA or TC together with polystyrene particles, synergistic, enhanced toxicity was observed in mice injected with NPP50. These synergic effects were not observed in mice co-injected with NPP200 or NPP1000. On the other hand, co-administration of VPA and NPP50, NPP200 or NPP1000 did not elevate toxicity. The results show that NPP50 differs in hepatotoxicity depending on the drug co-administered. These findings suggest that further evaluation of the interactions between polystyrene nanoparticles and drugs is a critical prerequisite to the pharmaceutical application of nanotechnology. PMID:25272938

  13. Effects of Hepatoprotective Compounds from the Leaves of Lumnitzera racemosa on Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Damage in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Ahmed Gomaa Gomaa; Samy, Mamdouh Nabil; Sugimoto, Sachiko; Otsuka, Hideaki; Abdel-Salam, Hosni; Matsunami, Katsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the n-BuOH fraction of the mangrove plant Lumnitzera racemosa WILLD. (Combretaceae) led to the isolation of one new flavonoid glycoside; myrcetin 3-O-methyl glucuronate (1), one new phenolic glycoside; lumniracemoside (2) and one new aliphatic alcohol glycoside; n-hexanol 1-O-rutinoside (3), in addition to seven known compounds (4-10). The structures of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic analyses (UV, IR, high resolution-electrospray ionization (HR-ESI)-MS, one- and two-dimensional (1D- and 2D)-NMR). Compound 7 showed the highest hepatoprotective activity against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity using human HepG2 cells at protection % value of 34.2±3.1%, while compounds 1, 2, 3, 6, and 9 showed weak to moderate hepatoprotective activity (11.6-18.9%). Almost all of these compounds showed stronger 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity compared with the standard Trolox. These results suggest the usefulness of this plant extract and the isolated compounds as promising hepatoprotective agents. PMID:27039833

  14. Herbal Hepatotoxicity: Clinical Characteristics and Listing Compilation.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Christian; Teschke, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Herb induced liver injury (HILI) and drug induced liver injury (DILI) share the common characteristic of chemical compounds as their causative agents, which were either produced by the plant or synthetic processes. Both, natural and synthetic chemicals are foreign products to the body and need metabolic degradation to be eliminated. During this process, hepatotoxic metabolites may be generated causing liver injury in susceptible patients. There is uncertainty, whether risk factors such as high lipophilicity or high daily and cumulative doses play a pathogenetic role for HILI, as these are under discussion for DILI. It is also often unclear, whether a HILI case has an idiosyncratic or an intrinsic background. Treatment with herbs of Western medicine or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) rarely causes elevated liver tests (LT). However, HILI can develop to acute liver failure requiring liver transplantation in single cases. HILI is a diagnosis of exclusion, because clinical features of HILI are not specific as they are also found in many other liver diseases unrelated to herbal use. In strikingly increased liver tests signifying severe liver injury, herbal use has to be stopped. To establish HILI as the cause of liver damage, RUCAM (Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method) is a useful tool. Diagnostic problems may emerge when alternative causes were not carefully excluded and the correct therapy is withheld. Future strategies should focus on RUCAM based causality assessment in suspected HILI cases and more regulatory efforts to provide all herbal medicines and herbal dietary supplements used as medicine with strict regulatory surveillance, considering them as herbal drugs and ascertaining an appropriate risk benefit balance. PMID:27128912

  15. Herbal Hepatotoxicity: Clinical Characteristics and Listing Compilation

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, Christian; Teschke, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Herb induced liver injury (HILI) and drug induced liver injury (DILI) share the common characteristic of chemical compounds as their causative agents, which were either produced by the plant or synthetic processes. Both, natural and synthetic chemicals are foreign products to the body and need metabolic degradation to be eliminated. During this process, hepatotoxic metabolites may be generated causing liver injury in susceptible patients. There is uncertainty, whether risk factors such as high lipophilicity or high daily and cumulative doses play a pathogenetic role for HILI, as these are under discussion for DILI. It is also often unclear, whether a HILI case has an idiosyncratic or an intrinsic background. Treatment with herbs of Western medicine or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) rarely causes elevated liver tests (LT). However, HILI can develop to acute liver failure requiring liver transplantation in single cases. HILI is a diagnosis of exclusion, because clinical features of HILI are not specific as they are also found in many other liver diseases unrelated to herbal use. In strikingly increased liver tests signifying severe liver injury, herbal use has to be stopped. To establish HILI as the cause of liver damage, RUCAM (Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method) is a useful tool. Diagnostic problems may emerge when alternative causes were not carefully excluded and the correct therapy is withheld. Future strategies should focus on RUCAM based causality assessment in suspected HILI cases and more regulatory efforts to provide all herbal medicines and herbal dietary supplements used as medicine with strict regulatory surveillance, considering them as herbal drugs and ascertaining an appropriate risk benefit balance. PMID:27128912

  16. The analgesic efficacy of flurbiprofen compared to acetaminophen with codeine.

    PubMed

    Cooper, S A; Kupperman, A

    1991-01-01

    In a single-dose, parallel group, randomized block treatment allocation study, the relative analgesic efficacy of flurbiprofen, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, was compared to acetaminophen 650 mg with codeine 60 mg, zomepirac sodium 100 mg, and placebo. A total of 226 post-surgical dental patients (146 females and 80 males) participated in the study. Flurbiprofen in 50 mg and 100 mg dosages demonstrated effective analgesic activity with the 100 mg dosage being at least as effective as the acetaminophen/codeine combination. The results of this study support previous work on flurbiprofen. PMID:1930699

  17. Hepatotoxicity Related to Anti-tuberculosis Drugs: Mechanisms and Management.

    PubMed

    Ramappa, Vidyasagar; Aithal, Guruprasad P

    2013-03-01

    Development of idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity is an intricate process involving both concurrent as well as sequential events determining the direction of the pathways, degree of liver injury and its outcome. Decades of clinical observation have identified a number of drug and host related factors that are associated with an increased risk of antituberculous drug-induced hepatotoxicity, although majority of the studies are retrospective with varied case definitions and sample sizes. Investigations on genetic susceptibility to hepatotoxicity have so far focused on formation and accumulation reactive metabolite as well as factors that contribute to cellular antioxidant defense mechanisms and the environment which can modulate the threshold for hepatocyte death secondary to oxidative stress. Recent advances in pharmacogenetics have promised the development of refined algorithms including drug, host and environmental risk factors that allow better tailoring of medications based on accurate estimates of risk-benefit ratio. Future investigations exploring the pathogenesis of hepatotoxicity should be performed using human tissue and samples whenever possible, so that the novel findings can be translated readily into clinical applications. PMID:25755470

  18. Identification of Toxic Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids and Their Common Hepatotoxicity Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinmiao; Kang, Hong; Feng, Jun; Yang, Yiyan; Tang, Kailin; Zhu, Ruixin; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Cao, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids (PAs) are currently one of the most important botanical hepatotoxic ingredients. Glutathion (GSH) metabolism is the most reported pathway involved in hepatotoxicity mechanism of PAs. We speculate that, for different PAs, there should be a common mechanism underlying their hepatotoxicity in GSH metabolism. Computational methods were adopted to test our hypothesis in consideration of the limitations of current experimental approaches. Firstly, the potential targets of 22 PAs (from three major PA types) in GSH metabolism were identified by reverse docking; Secondly, glutathione S-transferase A1 (GSTA1) and glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) targets pattern was found to be a special characteristic of toxic PAs with stepwise multiple linear regressions; Furthermore, the molecular mechanism underlying the interactions within toxic PAs and these two targets was demonstrated with the ligand-protein interaction analysis; Finally, GSTA1 and GPX1 were proved to be significant nodes in GSH metabolism. Overall, toxic PAs could be identified by GSTA1 and GPX1 targets pattern, which suggests their common hepatotoxicity mechanism: the interfering of detoxication in GSH metabolism. In addition, all the strategies developed here could be extended to studies on toxicity mechanism of other toxins. PMID:26959016

  19. LETHALITY AND HEPATOTOXICITY OF COMPLEX WASTE MIXTURES (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male F344 rats were exposed by gavage to samples of complex mixtures and evaluated 24 hours later. Seven of the 10 samples caused death at doses ranging from 1 to 5 ml/kg body wt. Eight of the 10 samples were hepatotoxic based on histopathologic evaluation; 6 were centrilobular a...

  20. Analgesic efficacy of acetaminophen for controlling postextraction dental pain

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Ashwini; Bhargava, Darpan; Gupta, Manas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the clinical safety of acetaminophen over other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, this clinical trial was formulated to assess the analgesic efficacy of acetaminophen for controlling postextraction dental pain when compared to commonly prescribed ibuprofen. Aim: The aim was to assess the analgesic efficacy of paracetamol/acetaminophen in postextraction dental pain. Settings and Design: Double-blind, randomized prospective clinical trial. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients requiring bilateral maxillary and mandibular premolar extraction for their orthodontic treatment were included in the study to evaluate the efficacy of acetaminophen in controlling postextraction dental pain. Statistical Analysis Used: Unpaired t-test. Results and Conclusions: Clinically, both the postoperative analgesics exerted similar pain control with minor variations of recorded visual analog scale scores by the patients in both the groups. It may be concluded from the findings of this study that paracetamol at a dosage of 500 mg thrice a day (1.5 g) is sufficient to achieve reliable pain control following exodontia provided the surgical trauma caused to the investing tissues is minimal. PMID:25593867

  1. 21 CFR 862.3030 - Acetaminophen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acetaminophen test system. 862.3030 Section 862.3030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  2. 21 CFR 862.3030 - Acetaminophen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetaminophen test system. 862.3030 Section 862.3030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  3. 21 CFR 862.3030 - Acetaminophen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetaminophen test system. 862.3030 Section 862.3030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  4. Augmentation of acetaminophen analgesia by the antihistamine phenyltoloxamine.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, A; Zighelboim, I; De Castro, A; Sorrentino, J V; Smith, D S; Bartizek, R D; Olson, N Z

    1989-07-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was performed to compare the analgesic activity of the combination of 650 mg acetaminophen plus 60 mg phenyltoloxamine citrate with that of 650 mg acetaminophen alone. Two hundred female inpatients who had severe pain associated with a recent episiotomy procedure were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of one of the two active treatments or a placebo. Analgesia was assessed over a 6-hour period. Treatments were compared on the basis of standard subjective scales for pain intensity and relief, a number of derived variables based on these data and two global measures. For essentially all measures, the two active treatments were significantly superior to the placebo control. The combination was significantly superior to acetaminophen alone for all analgesic measures including SPID, TOTAL, and global ratings. The results of this study demonstrate that 60 mg phenyltoloxamine produces significant augmentation of the analgesic activity of 650 mg acetaminophen in postepisiotomy pain. PMID:2569485

  5. 21 CFR 862.3030 - Acetaminophen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acetaminophen test system. 862.3030 Section 862.3030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  6. 21 CFR 862.3030 - Acetaminophen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acetaminophen test system. 862.3030 Section 862.3030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  7. Metabolism of AM404 From Acetaminophen at Human Therapeutic Dosages in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Shun; Shiraishi, Seiji; Miyano, Kanako; Sudo, Yuka; Toda, Akiko; Mogi, Masayuki; Hara, Mayumi; Yokoyama, Akinobu; Kawasaki, Yoshihiko; Taniguchi, Mikio; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acetaminophen, an analgesic and antipyretic drug, has been used clinically for more than a century. Previous studies showed that acetaminophen undergoes metabolic transformations to form an analgesic compound, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) arachidonamide (AM404), in the rodent brain. However, these studies were performed with higher concentrations of acetaminophen than are used in humans. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to examine the metabolism of AM404 from acetaminophen in the rat brain at a concentration of 20 mg/kg, which is used in therapeutic practice in humans, and to compare the pharmacokinetics between them. Materials and Methods: We used rat brains to investigate the metabolism of AM404 from acetaminophen at concentrations (20 mg/kg) used in humans. In addition, we determined the mean pharmacokinetic parameters for acetaminophen and its metabolites, including AM404. Results: The maximum plasma concentrations of acetaminophen and AM404 in the rat brain were 15.8 µg/g and 150 pg/g, respectively, with corresponding AUC0-2h values of 8.96 μg hour/g and 117 pg hour/g. The tmax for both acetaminophen and AM404 was 0.25 hour. Conclusions: These data suggest that AM404’s concentration-time profile in the brain is similar to those of acetaminophen and its other metabolites. Measurement of blood acetaminophen concentration seems to reflect the concentration of the prospective bioactive substance, AM404. PMID:27110534

  8. Infrared spectroscopic studies to understand the effect of drugs at molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bhawana; Gautam, Rekha; Chandrasekar, Bhagawat; Rakshit, Srabanti; Kumar B. N., Vinay; Boopathy, Sivaraman; Nandi, Dipankar; Somasundaram, Kumaravel; Umapathy, Siva

    2012-06-01

    In the recent past, there have been enormous efforts to understand effect of drugs on human body. Prior to understand the effect of drugs on human body most of the experiments are carried out on cells or model organisms. Here we present our study on the effect of chemotherapeutic drugs on cancer cells and the acetaminophen (APAP) induced hepatotoxicity in mouse model. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) have attracted attention as potential drug molecules for the treatment of cancer. These are the chemotherapeutic drugs which have indirect mechanistic action against cancer cells via acting against histone deacetylases (HDAC). It has been known that different HDAC enzymes are over-expressed in various types of cancers for example; HDAC1 is over expressed in prostate, gastric and breast carcinomas. Therefore, in order to optimise chemotherapy, it is important to determine the efficacy of various classes of HDAC inhibitor drugs against variety of over-expressed HDAC enzymes. In the present study, FTIR microspectroscopy has been employed to predict the acetylation and propionylation brought in by HDIs. The liver plays an important role in cellular metabolism and is highly susceptible to drug toxicity. APAP which is an analgesic and antipyretic drug is extensively used for therapeutic purposes and has become the most common cause of acute liver failure (ALF). In the current study, we have focused to understand APAP induced hepatotoxicity using FTIR microspectroscopy. In the IR spectrum the bands corresponding to glycogen, ester group and were found to be suitable markers to predict liver injury at early time point (0.5hr) due to APAP both in tissue and serum in comparison to standard biochemical assays. Our studies show the potential of FTIR spectroscopy as a rapid, sensitive and non invasive detection technique for future clinical diagnosis.

  9. Acetaminophen injection: a review of clinical information including forms not available in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fox, Erin R; Jones, Virginia M; Beckwith, M Christina

    2012-06-01

    Acetaminophen injection is an antipyretic and analgesic agent recently marketed in the United States as Ofirmev. A recent review published in the Journal of Pain & Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy focused on the labeled uses of acetaminophen injection in the United States. A variety of studies were excluded that may be of interest to clinicians. This addendum provides these citations and further insight into the strategy used to develop the review. Acetaminophen injection represents another agent for multimodal pain management. PMID:22506845

  10. Misunderstanding and Potential Unintended Misuse of Acetaminophen among Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    King, Jennifer P.; Doane, Cindy; Wilson, Karen M.; Wolf, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Acetaminophen is highly accessible yet potentially dangerous when used incorrectly. In attempts to address concerns about acetaminophen, The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has identified gaps in evidence about unintentional misuse among adolescents. Therefore, our objectives were to assess: adolescents’: 1) health literacy; 2) knowledge about acetaminophen; 3) recent use of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines; 4) and use of medication dosing instructions to understand the medicine and how to use it (‘acetaminophen skills’). Methods Subjects and Setting: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of adolescents and young adults (ages 16–23 years) recruited from education settings and health care sites in Monroe County, New York, from 11/08–9/09. Measures: Using structured in-person interviews, we assessed acetaminophen knowledge and recent use of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines. We assessed participants’ ability to identify acetaminophen in OTC products and answer questions about instructions for acetaminophen use through role-plays of everyday health scenarios. We measured health literacy with the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) for participants >18, and the REALM-Teen for those <18. Results Confusion about acetaminophen and its use was common. Limited health literacy was an independent risk factor for poor knowledge, misunderstanding, and potential unsafe use of acetaminophen-containing medicines, however, most participants at all health literacy levels erred dangerously in ‘unsafe’ understanding of acetaminophen use from label instructions. Conclusions Individuals with limited health literacy may face disproportionate risk of unsafe use of acetaminophen due to confusion and misunderstanding of label information. Better labeling, public health programs, and educational efforts could facilitate safer use of acetaminophen. PMID:21951256

  11. [Acetaminophen-induced hypothermia, an AIDS related side-effect? About 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Denes, Eric; Amaniou, Monique; Rogez, Jean-Philippe; Weinbreck, Pierre; Merle, Louis

    2002-10-01

    Hypothermia is an uncommon side effect of acetaminophen. We report 4 cases of HIV-infected patients who developed hypothermia after intravenous injection of propacetamol (the parenteral formulation of acetaminophen). The mechanism of this hypothermia is unknown. AIDS-induced changes in the metabolism of acetaminophen, could be an explanation. AIDS-associated opportunistic diseases may account for part of the mechanism. These hypothermias occur within 6 hours after the injection, are well tolerated and regress spontaneously. PMID:12486392

  12. Drug Utilization, Dosing, and Costs After Implementation of Intravenous Acetaminophen Guidelines for Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Nicholas M.; Parbuoni, Kristine; Morgan, Jill A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The objectives of this evaluation of medication use were to characterize the use of intravenous acetaminophen at our institution and to determine if acetaminophen was prescribed at age-appropriate dosages per institutional guidelines, as well as to evaluate compliance with restrictions for use. Total acquisition costs associated with intravenous acetaminophen usage is described as well. METHODS This retrospective study evaluated the use of acetaminophen in pediatric patients younger than 18 years of age, admitted to a tertiary care hospital, who received at least 1 dose of intravenous acet-aminophen between August 1, 2011, and January 31, 2012. RESULTS A total of 52 doses of intravenous acetaminophen were administered to 31 patients during the 6-month study period. Most patients were admitted to the otorhinolaryngology service (55%), and the majority of doses were administered either in the operating room (46%) or in the intensive care unit (46%). Nineteen doses (37%) of intravenous acetaminophen were administered to patients who did not meet institutional guidelines' eligibility criteria. Three patients received single doses of intravenous acetaminophen that were greater than the dose recommended for their age. One patient during the study period received more than the recommended 24-hour maximum cumulative dose for acetaminophen. Total acquisition cost of intravenous acetaminophen therapy over the 6-month study period was $530.40. CONCLUSIONS Intravenous acetaminophen was used most frequently among pediatric patients admitted to the otorhinolaryngology service during the perioperative period. Nineteen doses (37%) were administered to patients who did not meet the institutional guidelines' eligibility criteria. Our data support reinforcing the availability of institutional guidelines to promote cost-effective use of intravenous acetaminophen while minimizing the prescription of inappropriate doses. PMID:24782690

  13. Interference by acetaminophen in the glucose oxidase-peroxidase method for blood glucose determination.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann-Raab, I; Jonen, H G; Jähnchen, E; Kahl, G F; Groth, U

    1976-10-01

    Acetaminophen, p-aminophenol, and oxyphenbutazone interfere with the glucose oxidase/peroxidase method for glucose. Structurally related compounds that lack a free phenolic hydroxyl group (acetanilide, aniline, and phenylbutazone) do not interfere. During the analytical procedure acetaminophen is consumed. One mole of acetaminophen leads to an apparent loss of four moles of glucose. The hexokinase/glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase method (Boehringer Hexokinase method) is not affected by these substances. PMID:975521

  14. Hepatotoxicity Induced by “the 3Ks”: Kava, Kratom and Khat

    PubMed Central

    Pantano, Flaminia; Tittarelli, Roberta; Mannocchi, Giulio; Zaami, Simona; Ricci, Serafino; Giorgetti, Raffaele; Terranova, Daniela; Busardò, Francesco P.; Marinelli, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The 3Ks (kava, kratom and khat) are herbals that can potentially induce liver injuries. On the one hand, growing controversial data have been reported about the hepatotoxicity of kratom, while, on the other hand, even though kava and khat hepatotoxicity has been investigated, the hepatotoxic effects are still not clear. Chronic recreational use of kratom has been associated with rare instances of acute liver injury. Several studies and case reports have suggested that khat is hepatotoxic, leading to deranged liver enzymes and also histopathological evidence of acute hepatocellular degeneration. Numerous reports of severe hepatotoxicity potentially induced by kava have also been highlighted, both in the USA and Europe. The aim of this review is to focus on the different patterns and the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity induced by “the 3Ks”, while trying to clarify the numerous aspects that still need to be addressed. PMID:27092496

  15. Interaction of white and pink grapefruit juice with acetaminophen (paracetamol) in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Amitava; Reyes, Meredith A; Risin, Semyon A; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2008-12-01

    Grapefruit juice increases bioavailability of a number of drugs because of inhibition of the P-glycoprotein pump and inhibition of intestinal cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme. However, interaction between acetaminophen (also known as paracetamol in many parts of the world) and grapefruit juice has never been reported. The interaction of grapefruit juice with acetaminophen was examined in an in vivo mouse model. BALB/c mice were fed 200 microL of white grapefruit juice or pink grapefruit juice by oral gavage (three mice in each group) followed by oral delivery of 10, 50, or 100 mg/kg acetaminophen 1 hour later. Blood was withdrawn from the retro-orbital venous plexus at 1 hour and 2 hours after feeding with acetaminophen. The concentrations of acetaminophen in sera of mice were determined by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. White grapefruit juice increased concentrations of acetaminophen in mice both 1 hour and 2 hours after feeding compared to controls. In contrast, pink grapefruit juice increased acetaminophen concentrations 2 hours after feeding compared to controls. Because acetaminophen is almost completely absorbed these effects seems to be related to increased elimination half-life of acetaminophen because of interaction with grapefruit juice. PMID:19053875

  16. The effect of acetaminophen administration on its disposition and body stores of sulphate.

    PubMed

    Hendrix-Treacy, S; Wallace, S M; Hindmarsh, K W; Wyant, G M; Danilkewich, A

    1986-01-01

    This investigation was designed to investigate the effects of ingestion of multiple therapeutic doses of acetaminophen on the disposition of the drug and on the cosubstrate, sulfate. Nine healthy volunteers and nine outpatients receiving acetaminophen for chronic pain were involved in the study. Volunteers were given a single 650 mg oral dose of acetaminophen. One week later they were given 650 mg of acetaminophen every six hours for five doses. Patients were maintained on their normal treatment and dosage schedules (600 mg every 3 to 8 h) for the study. In healthy volunteers the half-life of acetaminophen after single and multiple dosing was not significantly different. However, the fraction of acetaminophen recovered in the urine as the sulfate conjugate was less and the glucuronide conjugate greater after multiple dosing than after a single of the drug. There was no difference in the percentage recovered as the parent compound between single and multiple dosing. Serum sulfate levels fluctuated over the 6-h period following administration of single and multiple doses of acetaminophen to volunteers. The mean serum sulfate concentration was less after administration of five sequential 650 mg doses of acetaminophen than after a single dose. The renal clearance of inorganic sulfate showed a corresponding decrease. Unexpectedly, patients on chronic acetaminophen therapy exhibited elevated serum sulfate levels (levels higher than the maximum sulfate concentration seen in volunteers). PMID:3732362

  17. In vitro evaluation of hepatotoxic drugs in human hepatocytes from multiple donors: Identification of P450 activity as a potential risk factor for drug-induced liver injuries.

    PubMed

    Utkarsh, Doshi; Loretz, Carol; Li, Albert P

    2016-08-01

    A possible risk factor for drug-induced hepatotoxicity is drug metabolizing enzyme activity, which is known to vary among individuals due to genetic (genetic polymorphism) and environmental factors (environmental pollutants, foods, and medications that are inhibitors or inducers of drug metabolizing enzymes). We hypothesize that hepatic cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase (CYP) activity is one of the key risk factors for drug induced liver injuries (DILI) in the human population, especially for drugs that are metabolically activated to cytotoxic/reactive metabolites. Human hepatocytes from 19 donors were evaluated for the activities of 8 major P450 isoforms: CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1 and CYP3A4. Extensive individual variations were observed, consistent with what is known to be in the human population. As CYP3A4 is known to be one of the most important P450 isoforms for drug metabolism, studies were performed to evaluate the relationship between the in vitro cytotoxicity of hepatotoxic drugs and CYP3A4 activity. In a proof of concept study, hepatocytes from six donors (lots) representing the observed range of CYP3A4 activities were chosen for the evaluation of in vitro hepatotoxicity of four drugs known to be associated with acute liver failure: acetaminophen, cyclophosphamide, ketoconazole, and tamoxifen. The hepatocytes were cultured in collagen-coated plates and treated with the hepatotoxicants for approximately 24 h, followed by viability determination based on cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) contents. HH1023, the lot of hepatocytes with the highest CYP3A4 activity, was found to be the most sensitive to the cytotoxicity of all 4 hepatotoxic drugs, thereby suggesting that high CYP3A4 activity may be a risk factor. To further validate the relationship, a second study was performed with hepatocytes from 16 donors. In this study, the hepatocytes were quantified for CYP3A4 activity at the time of treatment. Results of the

  18. The Possible Efficacy of Artichoke in Fluconazole Related Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Toprak, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Although fluconazole related hepatotoxicity (FRH) is rare, mortal acute hepatic necrosis and jaundice were reported in immunocompromised states such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and bone marrow transplant (BMT). We present a case of a patient with multiple sclerosis who developed hepatotoxicity with the use of a single 150 mg fluconazole tablet for fungal vaginitis, 10 days after methylprednisolone pulse treatment. Our patient's alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels were decreased, 1200 U/L and 800 U/L, respectively, and bilirubin levels were consistent at 37 mg/dL. Artichoke which has anticholestatic and antioxidant properties was used by our patient. She consumed a 30 mg artichoke leaf extract tea 3 times a day. The bilirubin levels significantly declined at the end of the first week and all liver function tests were normalized within 2 months. PMID:25374729

  19. Hepatotoxicity by Drugs: The Most Common Implicated Agents

    PubMed Central

    Björnsson, Einar S.

    2016-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an underreported and underestimated adverse drug reaction. Information on the documented hepatotoxicity of drugs has recently been made available by a website that can be accessed in the public domain: LiverTox (http://livertox.nlm.nih.gov). According to critical analysis of the hepatotoxicity of drugs in LiverTox, 53% of drugs had at least one case report of convincing reports of liver injury. Only 48 drugs had more than 50 case reports of DILI. Amoxicillin-clavulanate is the most commonly implicated agent leading to DILI in the prospective series. In a recent prospective study, liver injury due to amoxicillin-clavulanate was found to occur in approximately one out of 2300 users. Drugs with the highest risk of DILI in this study were azathioprine and infliximab. PMID:26861310

  20. Tea not Tincture: Hepatotoxicity Associated with Rooibos Herbal Tea

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Michael; Matoso, Andres; Maidan, Eyal; Wands, Jack

    2013-01-01

    A 52-year-old male presented with signs of acute hepatitis and liver failure. Laboratory investigations for common etiologies were unrevealing, but history suggested liver injury secondary to ingestion of a traditional South African herbal tea made with rooibos and buchu. Livery biopsy confirmed a toxin-mediated liver injury. The patient recovered liver function after stopping the herbal tea. Although hepatotoxicity associated with rooibos and buchu has rarely been reported, anecdotal correspondence with South African physicians confirmed suspected cases. Hepatotoxicity may be due to the heterogeneous composition of herbal teas due to small-batch manufacturing. Our case clearly outlines the need to suspect herbal causes of idiopathic liver injury. PMID:26157822

  1. Rofecoxib-induced hepatotoxicity: A forgotten complication of the coxibs

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Brian; Leung, Yvette; Urbanski, Stefan J; Myers, Robert P

    2006-01-01

    Rofecoxib is a member of the coxib family of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs that selectively inhibit cyclooxygenase-2. Although the coxibs are generally well-tolerated, rofecoxib was recently withdrawn from the market due to concerns regarding cardiovascular safety. Rare cases of hepatic injury attributable to the coxibs have been reported. In the present study, two additional cases of severe hepatotoxicity are described in patients with cholestatic symptoms and abnormal liver biochemistry, shortly following the initiation of rofecoxib for arthritic complaints. In both cases, liver histology was compatible with drug-induced hepatotoxicity, and rapid clinical and biochemical improvements were observed following rofecoxib discontinuation. With new coxibs and expanding indications on the horizon, physicians in all areas of practice must be aware of this disorder and consider it in any patient who develops hepatic dysfunction after taking a coxib. PMID:16691302

  2. Type 2 diabetic rats are sensitive to thioacetamide hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Dnyanmote, Ankur V.; Warbritton, Alan; Latendresse, John R.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2006-03-15

    Previously, we reported high hepatotoxic sensitivity of type 2 diabetic (DB) rats to three dissimilar hepatotoxicants. Additional work revealed that a normally nonlethal dose of CCl{sub 4} was lethal in DB rats due to inhibited compensatory tissue repair. The present study was conducted to investigate the importance of compensatory tissue repair in determining the final outcome of hepatotoxicity in diabetes, using another structurally and mechanistically dissimilar hepatotoxicant, thioacetamide (TA), to initiate liver injury. A normally nonlethal dose of TA (300 mg/kg, ip), caused 100% mortality in DB rats. Time course studies (0 to 96 h) showed that in the non-DB rats, liver injury initiated by TA as assessed by plasma alanine or aspartate aminotransferase and hepatic necrosis progressed up to 48 h and regressed to normal at 96 h resulting in 100% survival. In the DB rats, liver injury rapidly progressed resulting in progressively deteriorating liver due to rapidly expanding injury, hepatic failure, and 100% mortality between 24 and 48 h post-TA treatment. Covalent binding of {sup 14}C-TA-derived radiolabel to liver tissue did not differ from that observed in the non-DB rats, indicating similar bioactivation-based initiation of hepatotoxicity. S-phase DNA synthesis measured by [{sup 3}H]-thymidine incorporation, and advancement of cells through the cell division cycle measured by PCNA immunohistochemistry, were substantially inhibited in the DB rats compared to the non-DB rats challenged with TA. Thus, inhibited cell division and compromised tissue repair in the DB rats resulted in progressive expansion of liver injury culminating in mortality. In conclusion, it appears that similar to type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes also increases sensitivity to dissimilar hepatotoxicants due to inhibited compensatory tissue repair, suggesting that sensitivity to hepatotoxicity in diabetes occurs in the absence as well as presence of insulin.

  3. Effect of coriander on thioacetamide-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Abdel Halim A; Ali, Ehab Mostafa M; Moselhey, Said S; Tousson, Ehab; El-Said, Karim S

    2014-08-01

    Thioacetamide (TAA) is a potent hepatotoxin that causes centrilobulal necrosis and nephrotoxic damage following acute administration. Prolonged exposure to TAA can result in bile duct proliferation and liver cirrhosis histologically similar to that caused due to viral hepatitis infection. Coriander in food increases the antioxidant content, acting as a natural antioxidant and inhibiting undesirable oxidation processes. The present study investigated the antioxidant activity of Coriandrum sativum on TAA-induced hepatotoxicity in the male rats. Phenolic content and antioxidant activity were evaluated in the coriander leaves and seeds. Forty-eight adult male rats were divided into four groups. Group I (control), group II (TAA injected rats), group III (TAA injected rats fed coriander leaves) and group IV (TAA injected rats fed coriander seeds). The results revealed that serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities were significantly increased in the groups II, III and IV as compared to the normal control. Oxidative stress in the group II was manifested by a significant rise in nitric oxide (NO), thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels and myloperoxidase (MPO) activities in the liver tissues as compared with the control group. Rats fed with coriander leaves and seeds showed a decrease in the serum ALT, AST and ALP activities and in the liver NO and TBARS levels as compared to the group II. Histopathological study revealed that coriander feeding attenuated TAA-induced hepatotoxicity in the rats. In conclusion, coriander leaves attenuate hepatotoxicity induced by TAA more than that of seeds due to the higher content of phenolic compounds and antioxidants in the leaves of coriander. Liver of rats intoxicated with TAA exhibited advanced CIRRHOSIS: in the form of macronodular and micronodular structure surrounded by fibrous tissue. Treatment with coriander leaves and seeds helps in improving

  4. What's in a teaspoon? Underdosing with acetaminophen in family practice.

    PubMed

    Hyam, E; Brawer, M; Herman, J; Zvieli, S

    1989-09-01

    A study was made of 100 paediatric encounters in which an accompanying parent stated that the child had been given acetaminophen syrup during the preceding 24 hours. In 80% of cases a household teaspoon had been used to determine the amount of medication required. The volumes of these spoons were measured using a syringe. The range was from 1.5 to 5 cm3 with 79% containing 2 to 3 cm3. The mean volume was 2.95 cm3 (SD 0.79) and the median was 2.5 cm3. The mean dose administered was 62% of that recommended when the calculation was made according to age and 64% according to body weight. Much of the underdosing observed was due to parents' assumption that a household teaspoon contains 5 cm3 of acetaminophen syrup and also to a failure to correct for advancing age and increasing weight. PMID:2792624

  5. Involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in nefazodone-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Marta; Barbosa, Inês A; Seabra, Cátia; Beltrão, Nuno; Santos, Raquel; Vega-Naredo, Ignacio; Oliveira, Paulo J; Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa

    2016-08-01

    Nefazodone (NEF) is an antidepressive agent that was widely used in the treatment of depression until its withdrawal from the market, due to reports of liver injury and failure. NEF hepatotoxicity has been associated with mitochondrial impairment due to interference with the OXPHOS enzymatic activities, increased ROS generation and decreased antioxidant defenses. However, the mechanisms by which NEF induces mitochondrial dysfunction in hepatocytes are not completely understood. Here, we investigated the mitochondrial mechanisms affected upon NEF exposure and whether these might be linked to drug hepatotoxicity, in order to infer liabilities of future drug candidates. Two moderately hepatotoxic NEF concentrations (20 and 50 μM) were selected from dose-response growth curves performed in HepG2 cells. Cell viability, caspase activity, nuclear morphology, mitochondrial transmembrane potential, mitochondrial superoxide levels, and the expression of genes associated with different cellular pathways were evaluated at different time points. NEF treatment led to an increase in the expression of genes associated with DNA-damage response, antioxidant defense and apoptosis and a decreased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, DNA repair, cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, which seem to constitute mechanisms underlying the observed mitochondrial and cell function impairment. PMID:27288927

  6. Hepatotoxicity induced by methimazole in a previously healthy patient.

    PubMed

    Gallelli, Luca; Staltari, Orietta; Palleria, Caterina; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Ferraro, Maria

    2009-09-01

    We report a case of hepatotoxicity induced by methimazole treatment in a patient affected by hyperthyroidism. A 54-year-old man, presented to our observation for palpitations, excessive sweating, weakness, heat intolerance and weight loss. On physical examination, his blood pressure was 140/90 mmHg and heart beat was 100/min regular. He had mild tremors and left exophthalmos. Laboratory test revealed a significant increase in serum thyroid hormone levels with a decrease in thyroid stimulating hormone levels. A diagnosis of hyperthyroidism was made and he began treatment with methimazole (30 mg/day). Fourteen days later, he returned for the development of scleral icterus, followed by dark urine, and abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant. Laboratory examinations and liver biopsy performed a diagnosis of cholestatic hepatitis, secondary to methimazole usage. Methimazole was promptly withdrawn and cholestyramine, ursodeoxycholic acid, and chlorpheniramine were given. After five days, abdominal pain resolved and laboratory parameters returned to normal. Naranjo probability scale indicated a probable relationship between hepatotoxicity and methimazole therapy. In conclusion physicians should be aware the risk of hepatotoxicity related with methimazole. PMID:19534646

  7. Toxic epidermal necrolysis caused by acetaminophen featuring almost 100% skin detachment: Acetaminophen is associated with a risk of severe cutaneous adverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hideaki; Kamiyama, Taisuke; Sasaki, Shun; Kobayashi, Kae; Fukuda, Kenichiro; Miyake, Yasufumi; Aruga, Tohru; Sueki, Hirohiko

    2016-03-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is an adverse reaction that can be induced by various drugs; the associated mortality rate is 20-25%. A previous report showed a weak association between TEN and acetaminophen. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration declared that acetaminophen is associated with a risk of serious skin reactions, including TEN. Here, we describe the case of a 43-year-old Japanese woman with TEN caused by acetaminophen. She had poorly controlled ulcerative colitis and was treated with high doses of prednisolone, infliximab, acetaminophen and lansoprazole. Nine days after administrating acetaminophen, targetoid erythematous and bullous lesions appeared on the patient's trunk, palms and the soles of her feet. The skin lesions expanded rapidly; within 3 weeks, skin detachment was detected across nearly 100% of the patient's body. However, no mucosal involvement of the eyes, oral cavity or genitalia was found. We performed lymphocyte transformation tests using various drugs; however, a high stimulation index was obtained only with acetaminophen. The patient recovered following treatment with plasmapheresis, i.v. immunoglobulin therapy, topical medication and supportive therapy. Acetaminophen is included in many prescription and over-the-counter products; thus, clinicians should monitor their patients for severe drug reactions, including TEN. PMID:26362011

  8. Can in vitro metabolism-dependent covalent binding data in liver microsomes distinguish hepatotoxic from nonhepatotoxic drugs? An analysis of 18 drugs with consideration of intrinsic clearance and daily dose.

    PubMed

    Obach, R Scott; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Soglia, John R; Zhao, Sabrina X

    2008-09-01

    In vitro covalent binding assessments of drugs have been useful in providing retrospective insights into the association between drug metabolism and a resulting toxicological response. On the basis of these studies, it has been advocated that in vitro covalent binding to liver microsomal proteins in the presence and the absence of NADPH be used routinely to screen drug candidates. However, the utility of this approach in predicting toxicities of drug candidates accurately remains an unanswered question. Importantly, the years of research that have been invested in understanding metabolic bioactivation and covalent binding and its potential role in toxicity have focused only on those compounds that demonstrate toxicity. Investigations have not frequently queried whether in vitro covalent binding could be observed with drugs with good safety records. Eighteen drugs (nine hepatotoxins and nine nonhepatotoxins in humans) were assessed for in vitro covalent binding in NADPH-supplemented human liver microsomes. Of the two sets of nine drugs, seven in each set were shown to undergo some degree of covalent binding. Among hepatotoxic drugs, acetaminophen, carbamazepine, diclofenac, indomethacin, nefazodone, sudoxicam, and tienilic acid demonstrated covalent binding, while benoxaprofen and felbamate did not. Of the nonhepatotoxic drugs evaluated, buspirone, diphenhydramine, meloxicam, paroxetine, propranolol, raloxifene, and simvastatin demonstrated covalent binding, while ibuprofen and theophylline did not. A quantitative comparison of covalent binding in vitro intrinsic clearance did not separate the two groups of compounds, and in fact, paroxetine, a nonhepatotoxin, showed the greatest amount of covalent binding in microsomes. Including factors such as the fraction of total metabolism comprised by covalent binding and the total daily dose of each drug improved the discrimination between hepatotoxic and nontoxic drugs based on in vitro covalent binding data; however, the

  9. In vitro clearance of intravenous acetaminophen in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Gillogly, A; Kilbourn, C; Waldvogel, J; Martin, J; Annich, G; Wagner, D

    2013-03-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life support system used as a bridge to transplantation in critically ill patients who suffer from acute respiratory or cardiac failure with resultant hypoxemia and tissue hypoxia. This is not amendable to conventional support intervention. Previous studies have shown significant drug losses in the components of an ECMO circuit, leading to decreased plasma drug levels. An in vitro study was conducted to determine: (1) changes in intravenous acetaminophen levels over time and (2) changes in concentration observed between different sites of the ECMO circuit. A single bolus dose of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen was injected into a standard blood-primed ECMO circuit. Plasma drug concentrations in the circuit were then measured at specific time points at three different locations to determine concentrations of the drug at time 0, 15, 30, 60, 240 and 360 minutes. The three samples were drawn pre- and post-membrane oxygenator and the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing. A second bolus dose was administered 24 hours after the first in order to compare "new" and "old" circuits. This entire process was repeated a total of three times. The results show that acetaminophen concentrations do not change significantly over time, with consistent levels seen in both new and old circuits (N=9). Average old circuit concentrations were approximately two times greater than the average new circuit concentrations after the circuit was re-dosed at 24 hours. Drug sequestration in the circuit was not significant in any of the three sites measured. It appears that, while acetaminophen levels remain relatively constant over a six hour period, dosing adjustments may be required for use in a circuit beyond the initial 24 hour period, depending on physiologic clearance of the drug. Assuming a six-hour dosing interval, levels should remain constant. PMID:23201817

  10. Acetaminophen Modulates the Transcriptional Response to Recombinant Interferon-β

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Aaron; Flaman, Anathea S.; Prasad, Shiv S.; Gravel, Caroline; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole L.; Li, Xuguang

    2010-01-01

    Background Recombinant interferon treatment can result in several common side effects including fever and injection-site pain. Patients are often advised to use acetaminophen or other over-the-counter pain medications as needed. Little is known regarding the transcriptional changes induced by such co-administration. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested whether the administration of acetaminophen causes a change in the response normally induced by interferon-β treatment. CD-1 mice were administered acetaminophen (APAP), interferon-β (IFN-β) or a combination of IFN-β+APAP and liver and serum samples were collected for analysis. Differential gene expression was determined using an Agilent 22 k whole mouse genome microarray. Data were analyzed by several methods including Gene Ontology term clustering and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. We observed a significant change in the transcription profile of hepatic cells when APAP was co-administered with IFN-β. These transcriptional changes included a marked up-regulation of genes involved in signal transduction and cell differentiation and down-regulation of genes involved in cellular metabolism, trafficking and the IκBK/NF-κB cascade. Additionally, we observed a large decrease in the expression of several IFN-induced genes including Ifit-3, Isg-15, Oasl1, Zbp1 and predicted gene EG634650 at both early and late time points. Conclusions/Significance A significant change in the transcriptional response was observed following co-administration of IFN-β+APAP relative to IFN-β treatment alone. These results suggest that administration of acetaminophen has the potential to modify the efficacy of IFN-β treatment. PMID:20544007

  11. Formulation and characterization of acetaminophen nanoparticles in orally disintegrating films.

    PubMed

    Al-Nemrawi, Nusaiba K; Dave, Rutesh H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare orally disintegrating films containing nanoparticles loaded with acetaminophen. Nanoparticles were prepared by the emulsion-solvent evaporation method where acetone phase containing acetaminophen and poly(lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) was added to water phase containing hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose, poly ethylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and aspartame in a rate of 1.5 drop s(-1) and agitated at 1200 rpm. The size, polydispersity index (PI) and drug entrapment (DE) were measured. The emulsions were cast to form films, which were evaluated physico-mechanically. The effect of different degrees of hydrolization of PVA and polymerization of PLGA and the effect of different ratios of PVA to PLGA was studied. Films with acceptable physico-mechanical properties were further studied. The size and PI of the nanoparticles was dependent on PVA hydrolization, PLGA polymerization and the ratio of PVA to PLGA. All films disintegrated in less than one minute, but acetaminophen was not free in the dissolution media even after six days. These results may indicate that although the nanoparticles released from the films immediately when impressed in solution the drug is sustained in the nanoparticles for longer time, which is to be clarified in future work. PMID:25013958

  12. Aspirin and Acetaminophen Use and the Risk of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friel, Grace; Liu, Cici S.; Kolomeyevskaya, Nonna V.; Hampras, Shalaka S.; Kruszka, Bridget; Schmitt, Kristina; Cannioto, Rikki A.; Lele, Shashikant B.; Odunsi, Kunle O.; Moysich, Kirsten B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study, we investigated whether regular use of aspirin or acetaminophen was associated with risk of cervical cancer in women treated at an American cancer hospital. Methods This case-control study included 328 patients with cervical cancer and 1,312 controls matched on age and decade enrolled. Controls were women suspected of having but not ultimately diagnosed with a neoplasm. Analgesic use was defined as regular (at least once per week for ≥6 months), frequent (≥7 tablets/week), very long term (≥11 years), or frequent, long term (≥7 tablets per week for ≥5 years). Results Compared to nonusers, frequent aspirin use was associated with decreased odds of cervical cancer (odds ratio, 0.53; 95%confidence interval, 0.29–0.97). A slightly larger association was observed with frequent, long-term use of aspirin (odds ratio, 0.46; 95% confidence interval, 0.22–0.95). Acetaminophen use was not associated with the risk of cervical cancer. Conclusions Our findings suggest that frequent and frequent, long-term use of aspirin is associated with decreased odds of cervical cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first US-based study examining these associations. Given the widespread use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen worldwide, further investigations of the possible role of analgesics in cervical cancer, using a larger sample size with better-defined dosing regimens, are warranted. PMID:25856123

  13. Validity of a two-point acetaminophen pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Scavone, J M; Greenblatt, D J; Blyden, G T; Luna, B G; Harmatz, J S

    1990-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a single 650-mg intravenous dose of acetaminophen were determined in 82 volunteers using multiple (13 or more) plasma acetaminophen concentrations measured by high pressure liquid chromatography during 24 h after dosage. Kinetic values from the complete study were compared with kinetic estimates based on only two data points: (a) the 2- and 6-h points only; and (b) the 3 and 6-h points only. For elimination half-life, values from the complete study (mean 2.42 h) were highly correlated (r = 0.87 and 0.84) with methods a and b (means 2.41 and 2.43 h), with regression slopes of 1.00 and 0.99, respectively. For clearance, the complete study values (mean 312 ml/min) were highly correlated (r = 0.97 and 0.97) with method a and b values, but both two-point methods significantly overestimated clearance (means 350 and 355 ml/min) by an average of 13 and 14%, respectively. Results for volume of distribution were similar to those for clearance. Although acetaminophen elimination half-life can be estimated with reasonable precision using a two-point blood-sampling procedure, clearance and volume of distribution values using the two-point method overestimate the actual values. PMID:2305419

  14. Absolute and relative bioavailability of oral acetaminophen preparations.

    PubMed

    Ameer, B; Divoll, M; Abernethy, D R; Greenblatt, D J; Shargel, L

    1983-08-01

    Eighteen healthy volunteers received single 650-mg doses of acetaminophen by 5-min intravenous infusion, in tablet form by mouth in the fasting state, and in elixir form orally in the fasting state in a three-way crossover study. An additional eight subjects received two 325-mg tablets from two commercial vendors in a randomized crossover fashion. Concentrations of acetaminophen in multiple plasma samples collected during the 12-hr period after each dose were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Following a lag time averaging 3-4 min, absorption of oral acetaminophen was first order, with apparent absorption half-life values averaging 8.4 (elixir) and 11.4 (tablet) min. The mean time-to-peak concentration was significantly longer after tablet (0.75 hr) than after elixir (0.48 hr) administration. Peak plasma concentrations and elimination half-lives were similar following both preparations. Absolute systemic availability of the elixir (87%) was significantly greater than for the tablets (79%). Two commercially available tablet formulations did not differ significantly in peak plasma concentrations, time-to-peak, or total area under the plasma concentration curve and therefore were judged to be bioequivalent. PMID:6688635

  15. Acetaminophen effects on behavioral thermoregulation in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Vitulli, W F; Kaiser, G A; Maranto, D L; Blake, S E; Storey, T M; McPherson, K P; Luper, S L

    1999-02-01

    Acetaminophen (N-Acetyl-p-aminophenol) was administered intraperitoneally to 15 Sprague-Dawley rats partitioned into 3 studies (5 rats per study) using a within subjects, repeated-measures reversal design. Behavioral thermoregulation was assessed in a cold Skinner Box using 5-sec. exposures of microwave radiation [Specific Absorption Rate = 0.34 Watts/kg/(mW/cm2)] as reinforcing stimuli under a fixed-interval 2-min. schedule of positive reinforcement. Doses of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mg/kg (in solutions of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, and 5%) acetaminophen showed stable rates of operant responding for heat compared with significant changes in rates for comparable doses of aspirin in a 1993 study by Vitulli, et al. Weight reductions and temperature increases varied significantly with before-session and after-session measures, respectively. 1994-95 biochemical data of Murphy, et al. from humans following aspirin or acetaminophen ingestion which affect thermoregulation and sleep patterns are discussed in conjunction with behavioral data from rats. PMID:10214655

  16. Developmental exposure to acetaminophen does not induce hyperactivity in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Isabel; Knaup, Sabine; Romanos, Marcel; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Drepper, Carsten; Lillesaar, Christina

    2016-08-01

    First line pain relief medication during pregnancy relies nearly entirely on the over-the-counter analgesic acetaminophen, which is generally considered safe to use during gestation. However, recent epidemiological studies suggest a risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-like symptoms in children if mothers use acetaminophen during pregnancy. Currently, there are no experimental proofs that prenatal acetaminophen exposure causes developmental brain alterations of progeny. Exposure to high acetaminophen concentrations causes liver toxicity, which is well investigated in different model organisms. However, sub-liver-toxic concentrations have not been experimentally investigated with respect to ADHD endophenotypes such as hyperactivity. We used zebrafish to investigate the potential impact of acetaminophen exposure on locomotor activity levels, and compared it to the established zebrafish Latrophilin 3 (Lphn3) ADHD-model. We determined the sub-liver-toxic concentration of acetaminophen in zebrafish larvae and treated wild-type and lphn3.1 knockdown larvae with increasing concentrations of acetaminophen. We were able to confirm that lphn3.1 knockdown alone causes hyperactivity, strengthening the implication of Lphn3 dysfunction as an ADHD risk factor. Neither acute nor chronic exposure to acetaminophen at sub-liver-toxic concentrations in wild-type or lphn3.1 knock-downs increases locomotor activity levels. Together our findings show that embryonic to larval exposure to acetaminophen does not cause hyperactivity in zebrafish larvae. Furthermore, there are no additive and/or synergistic effects of acetaminophen exposure in a susceptible background induced by knock-down of lphn3.1. Our experimental study suggests that there is, at least in zebrafish larvae, no direct link between embryonic acetaminophen exposure and hyperactivity. Further work is necessary to clarify this issue in humans. PMID:27116683

  17. Pathophysiological role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation during acetaminophen-induced liver cell necrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Cover, Cathleen; Fickert, Peter; Knight, Tamara R; Fuchsbichler, Andrea; Farhood, Anwar; Trauner, Michael; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2005-03-01

    DNA fragmentation in hepatocytes occurs early after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose in mice. DNA strandbreaks can induce excessive activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP), which may lead to oncotic necrosis. Based on controversial findings with chemical PARP inhibitors, the role of PARP-1 activation in AAP hepatotoxicity remains unclear. To investigate PARP-1 activation and evaluate a pathophysiological role of PARP-1, we used both PARP inhibitors (3-aminobenzamide; 5-aminoisoquinolinone) and PARP gene knockout mice (PARP-/-). Treatment of C3Heb/FeJ mice with 300 mg/kg AAP resulted in DNA fragmentation and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) release as early as 3 h, with further increase of these parameters up to 12 h. Few nuclei of hepatocytes stained positive for poly-ADP-ribosylated nuclear proteins (PAR) as indicator for PARP-1 activation at 4.5 h. However, the number of PAR-positive cells and staining intensity increased substantially at 6 and 12 h. Pretreatment with 500 mg/kg 3-aminobenzamide before AAP attenuated hepatic glutathione depletion and completely eliminated DNA fragmentation and liver injury. Delayed treatment several hours after AAP was still partially protective. On the other hand, liver injury was not attenuated in PARP-/- mice compared to wild-type animals. Similarly, the specific PARP-1 inhibitor 5-aminoisoquinolinone (5 mg/kg) was not protective. However, 3-aminobenzamide attenuated liver injury in WT and PARP-/- mice. In summary, PARP-1 activation is a consequence of DNA fragmentation after AAP overdose. However, PARP-1 activation is not a relevant event for AAP-induced oncotic necrosis. The protection of 3-aminobenzamide against AAP-induced liver injury was due to reduced metabolic activation and potentially its antioxidant effect but independent of PARP-1 inhibition. PMID:15601672

  18. Postoperative pain relief with pentazocine and acetaminophen: comparison with other analgesic combinations and placebo.

    PubMed

    Petti, A

    1985-01-01

    A single-blind, parallel-group study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an analgesic combining 650 mg of acetaminophen and 25 mg of pentazocine in 129 patients with moderate postoperative pain. Comparisons were made with a combination containing acetaminophen (300 mg) and codeine (30 mg), a combination containing acetaminophen (650 mg) and propoxyphene napsylate (100 mg), and a placebo. A nurse observer queried patients at regular intervals over a six-hour period concerning the intensity of pain and the degree of pain relief. The scores obtained were used in the calculation of standard measures of analgesic efficacy. Acetaminophen/pentazocine proved to be significantly superior to placebo and equivalent to the other active analgesic combinations. No side effects were reported with acetaminophen/pentazocine, acetaminophen/propoxyphene napsylate, or placebo. One mild side effect was questionably associated with acetaminophen/codeine. This study demonstrates that the combination of acetaminophen and pentazocine is as safe and effective in controlling postoperative pain of moderate severity as other commonly used analgesics. PMID:2870808

  19. Bromfenac sodium, acetaminophen/oxycodone, ibuprofen, and placebo for relief of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G H; Van Wagoner, J D; Brown, J; Cooper, S A

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this double-masked, parallel-group, multicenter, inpatient study was to compare bromfenac with an acetaminophen/oxycodone combination and ibuprofen in patients who had pain due to abdominal gynecologic surgery. In the 8-hour, single-dose phase, 238 patients received single oral doses of bromfenac (50 or 100 mg), acetaminophen 650 mg/oxycodone 10 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, or placebo. In the multiple-dose phase, 204 patients received bromfenac, acetaminophen/oxycodone, or ibuprofen for up to 5 days. In the single-dose phase, both bromfenac doses produced peak analgesic responses equivalent to acetaminophen/oxycodone, but the responses to bromfenac were longer lasting. Bromfenac produced significantly better overall (8-hour) analgesic summed scores than acetaminophen/oxycodone. Ibuprofen was less efficacious than the other analgesics. The remedication rate was lower in both bromfenac groups than in the other treatment groups. The acetaminophen/oxycodone group reported more somnolence and vomiting. Single doses of bromfenac provided analgesia at least equivalent to that of the acetaminophen/oxycodone combination, with a longer duration of action. Both doses of bromfenac and acetaminophen/oxycodone were superior to ibuprofen in this study. PMID:9220215

  20. Impact of Intraoperative Acetaminophen Administration on Postoperative Opioid Consumption in Patients Undergoing Hip or Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Cathy; McGee, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Opioid utilization for acute pain has been associated with numerous adverse events, potentially resulting in longer inpatient stays and increased costs. Objective: To examine the effect of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen administered intraoperatively on postoperative opioid consumption in adult subjects who underwent hip or knee replacement. Methods: This retrospective cohort study evaluated postoperative opioid consumption in 176 randomly selected adult subjects who underwent hip or knee replacement at Duke University Hospital (DUH). Eighty-eight subjects received a single, intraoperative, 1 g dose of IV acetaminophen. The other subjects did not receive any IV acetaminophen. This study evaluated mean opioid consumption (in oral morphine equivalents) during the 24-hour postoperative period in the 2 groups. Other endpoints included length of stay in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU), incidence of oversedation, need for acute opioid reversal, and adjunctive analgesic utilization. Results: Subjects who were given a single dose of intraoperative acetaminophen received an average of 149.3 mg of oral morphine equivalents during the 24 hours following surgery compared to 147.2 mg in participants who were not exposed to IV acetaminophen (P = .904). The difference in average length of PACU stay between the IV acetaminophen group (163 minutes) and those subjects not exposed to IV acetaminophen (169 minutes) was not statistically significant (P = .588). No subjects in the study experienced oversedation or required acute opioid reversal. Conclusion: There was not a statistically significant difference in postoperative opioid consumption between patients receiving and not receiving IV acetaminophen intraoperatively. PMID:25673891

  1. Analgesic effect of acetaminophen, phenyltoloxamine and their combination in postoperative oral surgery pain.

    PubMed

    Forbes, J A; Barkaszi, B A; Ragland, R N; Hankle, J J

    1984-01-01

    In this factorial study, 148 outpatients with pain after oral surgery were randomly assigned, on a double-blind basis, a single oral dose of acetaminophen 650 mg, phenyltoloxamine 60 mg, a combination of acetaminophen 650 mg with phenyltoloxamine 60 mg, or placebo. Using a self-rating record, subjects rated their pain and its relief hourly for 6 hours after medication. Measures of total and peak analgesia were derived from these subjective reports. The acetaminophen effect was significant for every measure of total and peak analgesia. The phenyltoloxamine effect was not significant for any measure of analgesia. Although efficacy was lower for the acetaminophen-phenyltoloxamine combination than for acetaminophen alone, for every variable, the contrast for interaction was not statistically significant. The results of this study differ from those of previous studies in patients with headache and musculoskeletal pain. All adverse effects were transitory and consistent with the known pharmacologic profiles of the study medications or the backup analgesic. PMID:6483639

  2. Hepatotoxic potential of asarones: in vitro evaluation of hepatotoxicity and quantitative determination in herbal products

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dhavalkumar N.; Ho, Han K.; Tan, Liesbet L.; Tan, Mui-Mui B.; Zhang, Qian; Low, Min-Yong; Chan, Cheng-Leng; Koh, Hwee-Ling

    2015-01-01

    α and β asarones are natural constituents of some aromatic plants, especially species of the genus Acorus (Araceae). In addition to reports of beneficial properties of asarones, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity are also reported. Due to potential toxic effects of β-asarone, a limit of exposure from herbal products of ~2 μg/kg body weight/day has been set temporarily until a full benefit/risk assessment has been carried out by the European Medicines Agency. Therefore, it is important to monitor levels of β-asarone in herbal products. In this study, we developed a simple, rapid and validated GC-MS method for quantitative determination of asarones and applied it in 20 pediatric herbal products after detecting high concentrations of β-asarone in a product suspected to be implicated in hepatotoxicity in a 3 month old infant. Furthermore, targeted toxicological effects were further investigated in human hepatocytes (THLE-2 cells) by employing various in vitro assays, with the goal of elucidating possible mechanisms for the observed toxicity. Results showed that some of the products contained as much as 4–25 times greater amounts of β-asarone than the recommended levels. In 4 of 10 samples found to contain asarones, the presence of asarones could not be linked to the labeled ingredients, possibly due to poor quality control. Cell-based investigations in THLE-2 cells confirmed the cytotoxicity of β-asarone (IC50 = 40.0 ± 2.0 μg/mL) which was associated with significant lipid peroxidation and glutathione depletion. This observed cytotoxic effect is likely due to induction of oxidative stress by asarones. Overall, the results of this study ascertained the usability of this GC-MS method for the quantitative determination of asarones from herbal products, and shed light on the importance of controlling the concentration of potentially toxic asarones in herbal products to safeguard consumer safety, especially when the target consumers are young children. Further

  3. Hepatotoxicity during Treatment for Tuberculosis in People Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Araújo-Mariz, Carolline; Lopes, Edmundo Pessoa; Acioli-Santos, Bartolomeu; Maruza, Magda; Montarroyos, Ulisses Ramos; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar; Lacerda, Heloísa Ramos; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito de Barros; de Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima P. Militão

    2016-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity is frequently reported as an adverse reaction during the treatment of tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of hepatotoxicity and to identify predictive factors for developing hepatotoxicity after people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) start treatment for tuberculosis. This was a prospective cohort study with PLWHA who were monitored during the first 60 days of tuberculosis treatment in Pernambuco, Brazil. Hepatotoxicity was considered increased levels of aminotransferase, namely those that rose to three times higher than the level before initiating tuberculosis treatment, these levels being associated with symptoms of hepatitis. We conducted a multivariate logistic regression analysis and the magnitude of the associations was expressed by the odds ratio with a confidence interval of 95%. Hepatotoxicity was observed in 53 (30.6%) of the 173 patients who started tuberculosis treatment. The final multivariate logistic regression model demonstrated that the use of fluconazole, malnutrition and the subject being classified as a phenotypically slow acetylator increased the risk of hepatotoxicity significantly. The incidence of hepatotoxicity during treatment for tuberculosis in PLWHA was high. Those classified as phenotypically slow acetylators and as malnourished should be targeted for specific care to reduce the risk of hepatotoxicity during treatment for tuberculosis. The use of fluconazole should be avoided during tuberculosis treatment in PLWHA. PMID:27332812

  4. Ribonuclease H1-dependent hepatotoxicity caused by locked nucleic acid-modified gapmer antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Kasuya, Takeshi; Hori, Shin-ichiro; Watanabe, Ayahisa; Nakajima, Mado; Gahara, Yoshinari; Rokushima, Masatomo; Yanagimoto, Toru; Kugimiya, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Gapmer antisense oligonucleotides cleave target RNA effectively in vivo, and is considered as promising therapeutics. Especially, gapmers modified with locked nucleic acid (LNA) shows potent knockdown activity; however, they also cause hepatotoxic side effects. For developing safe and effective gapmer drugs, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity is required. Here, we investigated the cause of hepatotoxicity derived from LNA-modified gapmers. Chemical modification of gapmer’s gap region completely suppressed both knockdown activity and hepatotoxicity, indicating that the root cause of hepatotoxicity is related to intracellular gapmer activity. Gene silencing of hepatic ribonuclease H1 (RNaseH1), which catalyses gapmer-mediated RNA knockdown, strongly supressed hepatotoxic effects. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of a target mRNA did not result in any hepatotoxic effects, while the gapmer targeting the same position on mRNA as does the siRNA showed acute toxicity. Microarray analysis revealed that several pre-mRNAs containing a sequence similar to the gapmer target were also knocked down. These results suggest that hepatotoxicity of LNA gapmer is caused by RNAseH1 activity, presumably because of off-target cleavage of RNAs inside nuclei. PMID:27461380

  5. Candidate Gene Polymorphisms in Patients with Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Inga; Hazarika, Suwagmani; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Greenblatt, David J.; Lee, William M.

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen is a leading cause of acute liver failure (ALF). Genetic differences might predispose some individuals to develop ALF. In this exploratory study, we evaluated genotype frequency differences among patients enrolled by the ALF Study Group who had developed ALF either intentionally from a single-time-point overdose of acetaminophen (n = 78), unintentionally after chronic high doses of acetaminophen (n = 79), or from causes other than acetaminophen (n = 103). The polymorphisms evaluated included those in genes encoding putative acetaminophen-metabolizing enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A6, UGT1A9, UGT2B15, SULT1A1, CYP2E1, and CYP3A5) as well as CD44 and BHMT1. Individuals carrying the CYP3A5 rs776746 A allele were overrepresented among ALF patients who had intentionally overdosed with acetaminophen, with an odds ratio of 2.3 (95% confidence interval, 1.1–4.9; P = 0.034) compared with all other ALF patients. This finding is consistent with the enhanced bioactivation of acetaminophen by the CYP3A5 enzyme. Persons homozygous for the CD44 rs1467558 A allele were also overrepresented among patients who had unintentionally developed ALF from chronic acetaminophen use, with an odds ratio of 4.0 (1.0–17.2, P = 0.045) compared with all other ALF subjects. This finding confirms a prior study that found elevated serum liver enzyme levels in healthy volunteers with the CD44 rs1467558 AA genotype who had consumed high doses of acetaminophen for up to 2 weeks. However, both genetic associations were considered relatively weak, and they were not statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons testing. Nevertheless, both CYP3A5 rs776746 and CD44 rs1467558 warrant further investigation as potential genomic markers of enhanced risk of acetaminophen-induced ALF. PMID:24104197

  6. Sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to acetaminophen reveals biological pathways that affect patient survival

    PubMed Central

    BUSH, STEPHEN H.; TOLLIN, SHARON; MARCHION, DOUGLAS C.; XIONG, YIN; ABBASI, FOROUGH; RAMIREZ, INGRID J.; ZGHEIB, NADIM BOU; BOAC, BERNADETTE; JUDSON, PATRICIA L.; CHON, HYE SOOK; WENHAM, ROBERT M.; APTE, SACHIN M.; CUBITT, CHRISTOPHER L.; BERGLUND, ANDERS E.; HAVRILESKY, LAURA J.; LANCASTER, JOHNATHAN M.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiological data support the potential activity of acetaminophen against ovarian cancer (OVCA). In this study, we sought to confirm the activity of acetaminophen in OVCA cell lines and to investigate the molecular basis of response. A total of 16 OVCA cell lines underwent pretreatment (baseline) genome-wide expression measurements and were then treated with and analyzed for acetaminophen sensitivity. Pearson's correlation analysis was performed to identify genes that were associated with OVCA acetaminophen response. The identified genes were subjected to pathway analysis, and the expression of each represented pathway was summarized using principal component analysis. OVCA acetaminophen response pathways were analyzed in 4 external clinico-genomic datasets from 820 women for associations with overall survival from OVCA. Acetaminophen exhibited antiproliferative activity against all tested OVCA cell lines, with half maximal inhibitory concentration values ranging from 63.2 to 403 µM. Pearson's correlation followed by biological pathway analysis identified 13 pathways to be associated with acetaminophen sensitivity (P<0.01). Associations were observed between patient survival from OVCA and expression of the following pathways: Development/angiotensin signaling via β-arrestin (P=0.04), protein folding and maturation/angiotensin system maturation (P=0.02), signal transduction/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway (P=0.03) and androstenedione and testosterone biosynthesis and metabolism (P=0.02). We confirmed that acetaminophen was active against OVCA cells in vitro. Furthermore, we identified 4 molecular signaling pathways associated with acetaminophen response that may also affect overall survival in women with OVCA, including the JNK pathway, which has been previously implicated in the mechanism of action of acetaminophen and is predictive of decreased survival in women with OVCA. PMID:26998291

  7. Perioperative Intravenous Acetaminophen Attenuates Lipid Peroxidation in Adults Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Billings IV, Frederic T.; Petracek, Michael R.; Roberts II, L. Jackson; Pretorius, Mias

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) lyses erythrocytes and induces lipid peroxidation, indicated by increasing plasma concentrations of free hemoglobin, F2-isoprostanes, and isofurans. Acetaminophen attenuates hemeprotein-mediated lipid peroxidation, reduces plasma and urine concentrations of F2-isoprostanes, and preserves kidney function in an animal model of rhabdomyolysis. Acetaminophen also attenuates plasma concentrations of isofurans in children undergoing CPB. The effect of acetaminophen on lipid peroxidation in adults has not been studied. This was a pilot study designed to test the hypothesis that acetaminophen attenuates lipid peroxidation in adults undergoing CPB and to generate data for a clinical trial aimed to reduce acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery. Methods and Results In a prospective double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, sixty adult patients were randomized to receive intravenous acetaminophen or placebo starting prior to initiation of CPB and for every 6 hours for 4 doses. Acetaminophen concentrations measured 30 min into CPB and post-CPB were 11.9±0.6 μg/mL (78.9±3.9 μM) and 8.7±0.3 μg/mL (57.6±2.0 μM), respectively. Plasma free hemoglobin increased more than 15-fold during CPB, and haptoglobin decreased 73%, indicating hemolysis. Plasma and urinary markers of lipid peroxidation also increased during CPB but returned to baseline by the first postoperative day. Acetaminophen reduced plasma isofuran concentrations over the duration of the study (P = 0.05), and the intraoperative plasma isofuran concentrations that corresponded to peak hemolysis were attenuated in those subjects randomized to acetaminophen (P = 0.03). Perioperative acetaminophen did not affect plasma concentrations of F2-isoprostanes or urinary markers of lipid peroxidation. Conclusions Intravenous acetaminophen attenuates the increase in intraoperative plasma isofuran concentrations that occurs during CPB, while urinary markers were unaffected

  8. Green Tea Extract-induced Acute Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Emoto, Yuko; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Yuki, Michiko; Yuri, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Sayama, Kazutoshi; Tsubura, Airo

    2014-01-01

    Although green tea is considered to be a healthy beverage, hepatotoxicity associated with the consumption of green tea extract has been reported. In the present study, we characterized the hepatotoxicity of green tea extract in rats and explored the responsible mechanism. Six-week-old IGS rats received a single intraperitoneal (ip) injection of 200 mg/kg green tea extract (THEA-FLAN 90S). At 8, 24, 48 and 72 hrs and 1 and 3 months after exposure, liver damage was assessed by using blood-chemistry, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry to detect cell death (TUNEL and caspase-3) and proliferative activity (PCNA). Analyses of malondialdehyde (MDA) in serum and the liver and of MDA and thymidine glycol (TG) by immunohistochemistry, as oxidative stress markers, were performed. Placental glutathione S-transferase (GST-P), which is a marker of hepatocarcinogenesis, was also immunohistochemically stained. To examine toxicity at older ages, 200 mg/kg green tea extract was administered to 18-wk-old female rats. In 6-wk-old rats, 12% of males and 50% of females died within 72 hrs. In 18-wk-old rats, 88% died within 72 hrs. The serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and/or total bilirubin increased in both males and females. Single-cell necrosis with positive signs of TUNEL and caspase-3 was seen in perilobular hepatocytes from 8 hrs onward in all lobular areas. PCNA-positive hepatocytes increased at 48 hrs. MDA levels in the serum and liver tended to increase, and MDA- and TG-positive hepatocytes were seen immunohistochemically. GST-P–positive hepatocellular altered foci were detected in one female rat at the 3-month time point. In conclusion, a single injection of green tea extract induced acute and severe hepatotoxicity, which might be associated with lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidative stress in hepatocytes. PMID:25378801

  9. Antioxidant modulation of nevirapine induced hepatotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Popoola, Temidayo; Rotimi, Kunle; Ikumawoyi, Victor; Okunowo, Wahab

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS related mortality has been dramatically reduced by the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, ART presents with associated adverse effects. One of such adverse effects is hepatotoxicity observed with nevirapine (NVP) containing ART. Since previous studies showed that NVP hepatotoxicity may be due to oxidative stress via generation of oxidative radicals, this study sought to evaluate the protective effects of antioxidants in alleviating NVP induced hepatotoxicity. Rats were divided into 6 groups with 8 animals per group and received doses of the antioxidants jobelyn (10.7 mg/kg/day), vitamin C (8 mg/kg/day), vitamin E (5 mg/kg/day) and/or NVP (6 mg/kg/day) for 60 days. The animals were sacrificed on day 61 by cervical dislocation, blood samples were collected for biochemical and hematological examination. The liver of the sacrificed animals was weighed and subjected to histopathological examination. There was a statistically significant (p<0.05) elevation in MDA level observed in the NVP group as compared with control. The results further showed non-significant decreases in the levels of MDA in the NVP plus antioxidant groups, except vitamin C, when compared with the NVP alone group. Vitamin E and Vitamin E plus C treated groups showed significantly (p<0.05) higher levels of SOD, CAT and GSH. The results also showed statistically significantly (p<0.05) lower levels of ALT and AST in the antioxidant treated groups There was an observed significantly (p<0.05) higher level of TP and urea in the antioxidant treated rats. A significantly (p<0.05) higher white blood cell count was observed in the antioxidant groups. Histopathological assessment of the liver extracted from the rats showed no visible pathology across the groups. Observations from this study suggest a potentially positive modulatory effect of antioxidants and may be indicative for the inclusion of antioxidants in nevirapine containing ART. PMID:27486354

  10. Acute hepatotoxicity of ethylene and halogenated ethylenes after PCB pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Conolly, R B; Jaeger, R J

    1977-12-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that ethylene, vinyl fluoride monomer (VFM), vinyl chloride monomer (VCM), and vinyl bromide monomer (VBM) are all acutely hepatotoxic in rats pretreated with polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB). The time course of hepatic injury development after exposure and several parameters, environmental and chemical, affecting this toxicity were evaluated in the work reported here. Liver injury, as measured by serum alanine-alpha-ketoglutarate transaminase (SAKT) or sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), develops progressively over a 24-hr period following a 4-hr inhalation exposure of PCB-pretreated rats to ethylene or VCM. Environmental temperature during exposure to VCM does not affect hepatotoxicity or mortality below 30.3 degrees C. At 33.8 degrees C, however, mortality and SAKT are dramatically increased. Overnight fasting, which depletes hepatic glutathione (GSH) of PCB-pretreated rats before exposure to ethylene or VCM, significantly increases the hepatotoxicity of these compounds as measured by SDH. The combined effects of fasting and of trichloropropane epoxide (TCPE), an inhibitor of epoxide hydrase (EH), were also examined. TCPE treatment of fasted PCB-pretreated rats immediately before exposure was synergistic in increasing the acute toxicity of ethylene and VCM. TCPE increased mortality in fed or fasted rats exposed to VFM, but there was no effect of fasting alone. Both fasting and TCPE increased the sensitivity of PCB-pretreated rats to VBM, but there was not a clearly synergistic effect of fasting plus TCPE. These data suggest that the acute toxicity of these compounds is mediated through epoxide intermediates. PMID:417916

  11. Selection of agents for prevention of cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yingjun; Lu, Xiuqiang; Lu, Chunwei; Li, Gexin; Jin, Yaping; Tang, Hao

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the optimal combination of agents used along with cisplatin for protection of hepatotoxicity. Animal experiment was carried out based on the orthogonal design L(8) (2(7)) setting seven factors with two different levels of each, and eight groups of mice were needed. The agents tested in this study were zinc, selenium, fosfomycin, sodium thiosulfate (STS), N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), methionine and taurine. Mice were supplemented by gavage with various combinations of agents as designed in the orthogonal table once a day for nine days beginning two days before cisplatin administration. 3.5mg/kg body weight of cisplatin was given intraperitoneally once a day for five days simultaneously. After cessation of cisplatin administration, the agents were supplemented continuously for two days. Activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in serum, levels of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in liver were analyzed after cessation of supplementation. Results showed zinc, fosfomycin and methionine were the effective factors for protection of weight loss; fosfomycin and methionine were the effective factors for prevention of decreased liver ratio; selenium, fosfomycin and STS were the effective factors for prevention of increased ALT activities in serum. On the other hand, methionine was the only effective factor for prevention of decreased GSH levels in liver; zinc, selenium and fosfomycin were the effective factors for prevention of increased MDA levels in liver. Based on the data observed in this study, the optimum combinations of agents were selenium, fosfomycin, methionine and taurine, and zinc, selenium, STS and methionine. In conclusion, each agent used in this study could play a beneficial role for prevention of cisplatin hepatotoxicity, however, none could play the crucial role. The potentiated actions for prevention of cisplatin hepatotoxicity could be achieved via combined use of these agents. PMID:18282716

  12. Curcumin Attenuates Hepatotoxicity Induced by Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Khorsandi, Layasadat; Mansouri, Esrafil; Orazizadeh, Mahmoud; Jozi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Zinc oxide nanoparticles (NZnO) are increasingly used in modern life. Most metal nanoparticles have adverse effects on the liver. Aims: To explore the protective action of curcumin (Cur) against hepatotoxicity induced by NZnO in rats. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Control group animals received normal saline, while the Cur group animals were treated with 200 mg/kg of Cur orally for 21 days. NZnO-intoxicated rats received 50 mg/kg of NZnO for 14 days by gavage method. In the NZnO+Cur group, rats were pretreated with Cur for 7 days before NZnO administration. Plasma activities of Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were measured as biomarkers of hepatotoxicity. Hepatic levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were measured for detection of oxidative stress in liver tissue. Histological changes and apoptosis in liver tissue were studied by using Hematoxylin-eosin staining and the transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. Results: NZnO induced a significant increase in plasma AST (2.8-fold), ALT (2.7-fold) and ALP (1.97-fold) activity in comparison to the control group (p<0.01). NZnO increased MDA content and reduced SOD and GPx activities. NZnO caused liver damage including centrilobular necrosis and microvesicular steatosis. The percentage of apoptosis in hepatocytes was increased in NZnO-treated rats (p<0.01). Pre-treatment of Cur significantly reduced lipid peroxidation (39%), increased SOD (156%) and GPx (26%) activities, and attenuated ALT (47%), AST (41%) and ALP (30%) activities. Pre-treatment with Cur also decreased the histology changes and apoptotic index of hepatocytes (p<0.05). Conclusion: These findings indicate that Cur effectively protects against NZnO-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. However, future studies are required to propose Cur as a potential protective agent against hepatotoxicity

  13. Differential gene expression in mouse liver associated with the hepatoprotective effect of clofibrate

    SciTech Connect

    Moffit, Jeffrey S.; Koza-Taylor, Petra H.; Holland, Ricky D.; Thibodeau, Michael S.; Beger, Richard D.; Lawton, Michael P.; Manautou, Jose E. . E-mail: jose.manautou@uconn.edu

    2007-07-15

    Pretreatment of mice with the peroxisome proliferator clofibrate (CFB) protects against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Previous studies have shown that activation of the nuclear peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is required for this effect. The present study utilizes gene expression profile analysis to identify potential pathways contributing to PPAR{alpha}-mediated hepatoprotection. Gene expression profiles were compared between wild type and PPAR{alpha}-null mice pretreated with vehicle or CFB (500 mg/kg, i.p., daily for 10 days) and then challenged with APAP (400 mg/kg, p.o.). Total hepatic RNA was isolated 4 h after APAP treatment and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MGU74 v2.0 GeneChips. Gene expression analysis was performed utilizing GeneSpring (registered) software. Our analysis identified 53 genes of interest including vanin-1, cell cycle regulators, lipid-metabolizing enzymes, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, an acetaminophen binding protein. Vanin-1 could be important for CFB-mediated hepatoprotection because this protein is involved in the synthesis of cysteamine and cystamine. These are potent antioxidants capable of ameliorating APAP toxicity in rodents and humans. HPLC-ESI/MS/MS analysis of liver extracts indicates that enhanced vanin-1 gene expression results in elevated cystamine levels, which could be mechanistically associated with CFB-mediated hepatoprotection.

  14. Implications of Sensorineural Hearing Loss With Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Novac, Andrei; Iosif, Anamaria M.; Groysman, Regina; Bota, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is an infrequently recognized side effect of pain medication abuse. Chronic pain patients treated with opiates develop different degrees of tolerance to pain medications. In many cases, the tolerance becomes the gateway to a variety of cycles of overuse and unmasking of significant psychiatric morbidity and mortality. An individualized approach utilizing combined treatment modalities (including nonopiate pharmaceuticals) is expected to become the norm. Patients can now be provided with multidisciplinary care that addresses an individual’s psychiatric, social, and medical needs, which requires close cooperation between physicians of varying specialties. This report describes a patient who experienced hearing loss from hydrocodone/acetaminophen abuse. PMID:26835162

  15. Drug interactions: inhibition of acetaminophen glucuronidation by drugs.

    PubMed

    Bolanowska, W; Gessner, T

    1978-07-01

    Glucuronidation of [3H]acetaminophen (APAP) was studied in rat liver preparations. Both Triton X-100 and UDP-N acetylglucosamine (UDPAG) activated 3- to 4-fold the glucuronidation of APAP by liver homogenates or microsomes. Prednisolone inhibited microsomal glucuronidation of APAP, yielding apparent noncompetitive kinetics in native and in UDPAG-activated microsomes. Studies with UDPAG-activated microsomal preparations show that many drugs can inhibit glucuronidation of APAP markedly; among the most poten inhibitors are: morphine, dicumarol, hydroxyzine, phenolphthalein, chloramphenicol and tetracycline. PMID:660554

  16. Implications of Sensorineural Hearing Loss With Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen Abuse.

    PubMed

    Novac, Andrei; Iosif, Anamaria M; Groysman, Regina; Bota, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is an infrequently recognized side effect of pain medication abuse. Chronic pain patients treated with opiates develop different degrees of tolerance to pain medications. In many cases, the tolerance becomes the gateway to a variety of cycles of overuse and unmasking of significant psychiatric morbidity and mortality. An individualized approach utilizing combined treatment modalities (including nonopiate pharmaceuticals) is expected to become the norm. Patients can now be provided with multidisciplinary care that addresses an individual's psychiatric, social, and medical needs, which requires close cooperation between physicians of varying specialties. This report describes a patient who experienced hearing loss from hydrocodone/acetaminophen abuse. PMID:26835162

  17. Comparing the Efficacy of Intravenous Acetaminophen and Intravenous Meperidine in Pain Relief After Outpatient Urological Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kolahdouzan, Khosro; Eydi, Mahmood; Mohammadipour Anvari, Hassan; Golzari, Samad EJ; Abri, Reyhaneh; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Ojaghihaghighi, Seyed Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain relief after surgery is an essential component of postoperative care. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of intravenous acetaminophen and intravenous meperidine in pain relief after outpatient urological surgery. Patients and Methods: In a prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial, 100 outpatients of urological surgery were studied in two groups of acetaminophen (A) and meperidine (M). Patients in group A received 1g of acetaminophen in 100 mL saline within 15 minutes and patients in group M received a single intravenous injection of meperidine 0.5 mg/kg, 15 minutes prior to the end of operation. Postoperative pain was recorded using visual analog scale (VAS). Vital signs, nausea, vomiting, dizziness and respiratory depressions were compared between the two groups. Results: Pain severity in patients treated with intravenous acetaminophen six hours after the operation within one-hour interval was significantly lower than meperidine group (P < 0.0001). Ninety patients in the meperidine group and five patients in the acetaminophen group required additional doses of analgesics. Nausea was significantly lower in acetaminophen group than meperidine group. Conclusions: Intravenous acetaminophen reduced pain following outpatient urological surgery more significantly than meperidine. PMID:25798377

  18. Acetaminophen for analgesia following pyloromyotomy: does the route of administration make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Arvid; Thung, Arlyne; Tobias, Joseph D

    2016-01-01

    Background During the perioperative care of infants with hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, an opioid-sparing technique is often advocated due to concerns such as postoperative hypoventilation and apnea. Although the rectal administration of acetaminophen is commonly employed, an intravenous (IV) preparation is also currently available, but only limited data are available regarding IV acetaminophen use for infants undergoing pyloromyotomy. The objective of the current study was to compare the efficacy of IV and rectal acetaminophen for postoperative analgesia in infants undergoing laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. Methods A retrospective review of the use of IV and rectal acetaminophen in infants undergoing laparoscopic pyloromyotomy was performed. The efficacy was assessed by evaluating the perioperative need for supplemental analgesic agents, postoperative pain scores, tracheal extubation time, time in the postanesthesia care unit, time to oral feeding, and time to hospital discharge. Results The study cohort included 68 patients, of whom 34 patients received IV acetaminophen and 34 received rectal acetaminophen. All patients also received local infiltration of the surgical site with 0.25% bupivacaine. No intraoperative opioids were administered. There was no difference between the two groups with regard to postoperative pain scores, need for supplemental analgesic agents, time in the postanesthesia care unit, or time in the hospital. There was no difference in the number of children who tolerated oral feeds on the day of surgery or in postoperative complications. Conclusion Our preliminary data suggest that there is no clinical difference or advantage with the use of IV versus rectal acetaminophen in infants undergoing laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. PMID:27022299

  19. BGP-15 inhibits caspase-independent programmed cell death in acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Gabor; Szarka, Andras; Lotz, Gabor; Doczi, Judit; Wunderlich, Livius; Kiss, Andras; Jemnitz, Katalin; Veres, Zsuzsa; Banhegyi, Gabor; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Suemegi, Balazs; Mandl, Jozsef

    2010-02-15

    It has been recently shown that acute acetaminophen toxicity results in endoplasmic reticulum redox stress and an increase in cells with apoptotic phenotype in liver. Since activation of effector caspases was absent, the relevance of caspase-independent mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death was investigated. BGP-15, a drug with known protective actions in conditions involving redox imbalance, has been co-administered with a single sublethal dose of acetaminophen. Proapoptotic events and outcome of the injury were investigated. ER redox alterations and early ER-stress-related signaling events induced by acetaminophen, such as ER glutathione depletion, phosphorylation of eIF2alpha and JNK and induction of the transcription factor GADD153, were not counteracted by co-treatment with BGP-15. However, BGP-15 prevented AIF mitochondria-to-nucleus translocation and mitochondrial depolarization. BGP-15 co-treatment attenuated the rate of acetaminophen-induced cell death as assessed by apoptotic index and enzyme serum release. These results reaffirm that acute acetaminophen toxicity involves oxidative stress-induced caspase-independent cell death. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of AIF translocation may effectively protect against or at least delay acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death.

  20. A review of the hepatotoxic plant Lantana camara.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Om P; Sharma, Sarita; Pattabhi, Vasantha; Mahato, Shashi B; Sharma, Pritam D

    2007-05-01

    Lantana (Lantana camara Linn) is a noxious weed that grows in many tropical and subtropical parts of the world. Ingestion of lantana foliage by grazing animals causes cholestasis and hepatotoxicity. Both ruminants and nonruminant animals such as guinea pigs, rabbits, and female rats are susceptible to the hepatotoxic action of lantana toxins. The hepatotoxins are pentacyclic triterpenoids called lantadenes. Molecular structure of lantadenes has been determined. Green unripe fruits of the plant are toxic to humans. Lantana spp. exert allelopathic action on the neighboring vegetation. The allelochemicals have been identified as phenolics, with umbelliferone, methylcoumarin, and salicylic acid being the most phytotoxic. In addition to phenolics, a recent report indicates lantadene A and B as more potent allelochemicals. Management of lantana toxicosis in animals is achieved by drenching with activated charcoal and supportive therapy. Recent reports on the bilirubin clearance effect of Chinese herbal tea Yin Zhi Huang (decoction of the plant Yin Chin, Artemisia capillaries, and three other herbs) or its active ingredient 6,7-dimethylesculetin, in jaundice are very exciting and warrant investigations on its, possible, ameliorative effects in lantana intoxicated animals. Research is being conducted on new drug discovery based on natural products in different parts of the lantana plant. PMID:17453937

  1. Hepatotoxicity by Dietary Supplements: A Tabular Listing and Clinical Characteristics.

    PubMed

    García-Cortés, Miren; Robles-Díaz, Mercedes; Ortega-Alonso, Aida; Medina-Caliz, Inmaculada; Andrade, Raul J

    2016-01-01

    Dietary supplements (DS) are extensively consumed worldwide despite unproven efficacy. The true incidence of DS-induced liver injury (DSILI) is unknown but is probably under-diagnosed due to the general belief of safety of these products. Reported cases of herbals and DS-induced liver injury are increasing worldwide. The aim of this manuscript is to report a tabular listing with a description of DS associated with hepatotoxicity as well as review the phenotype and severity of DSILI. Natural remedies related to hepatotoxicity can be divided into herbal product-induced liver injury and DS-induced liver injury. In this article, we describe different DS associated with liver injury, some of them manufactured DS containing several ingredients (Herbalife™ products, Hydroxycut™, LipoKinetix™, UCP-1 and OxyELITE™) while others have a single ingredient (green tea extract, linoleic acid, usnic acid, 1,3-Dimethylamylamine, vitamin A, Garcinia cambogia and ma huang). Additional DS containing some of the aforementioned ingredients implicated in liver injury are also covered. We have also included illicit androgenic anabolic steroids for bodybuilding in this work, as they are frequently sold under the denomination of DS despite being conventional drugs. PMID:27070596

  2. Inflammatory Stress and Idiosyncratic Hepatotoxicity: Hints from Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiaomin; Luyendyk, James P.; Ganey, Patricia E.

    2009-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) present a serious human health problem. They are major contributors to hospitalization and mortality throughout the world (Lazarou et al., 1998; Pirmohamed et al., 2004). A small fraction (less than 5%) of ADRs can be classified as “idiosyncratic.” Idiosyncratic ADRs (IADRs) are caused by drugs with diverse pharmacological effects and occur at various times during drug therapy. Although IADRs affect a number of organs, liver toxicity occurs frequently and is the primary focus of this review. Because of the inconsistency of clinical data and the lack of experimental animal models, how IADRs arise is largely undefined. Generation of toxic drug metabolites and induction of specific immunity are frequently cited as causes of IADRs, but definitive evidence supporting either mechanism is lacking for most drugs. Among the more recent hypotheses for causation of IADRs is that inflammatory stress induced by exogenous or endogenous inflammagens is a susceptibility factor. In this review, we give a brief overview of idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity and the inflammatory response induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide. We discuss the inflammatory stress hypothesis and use as examples two drugs that have caused IADRs in human patients: ranitidine and diclofenac. The review focuses on experimental animal models that support the inflammatory stress hypothesis and on the mechanisms of hepatotoxic response in these models. The need for design of epidemiological studies and the potential for implementation of inflammation interaction studies in preclinical toxicity screening are also discussed briefly. PMID:19805476

  3. Hepatotoxicity by Dietary Supplements: A Tabular Listing and Clinical Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    García-Cortés, Miren; Robles-Díaz, Mercedes; Ortega-Alonso, Aida; Medina-Caliz, Inmaculada; Andrade, Raul J.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary supplements (DS) are extensively consumed worldwide despite unproven efficacy. The true incidence of DS-induced liver injury (DSILI) is unknown but is probably under-diagnosed due to the general belief of safety of these products. Reported cases of herbals and DS-induced liver injury are increasing worldwide. The aim of this manuscript is to report a tabular listing with a description of DS associated with hepatotoxicity as well as review the phenotype and severity of DSILI. Natural remedies related to hepatotoxicity can be divided into herbal product-induced liver injury and DS-induced liver injury. In this article, we describe different DS associated with liver injury, some of them manufactured DS containing several ingredients (Herbalife™ products, Hydroxycut™, LipoKinetix™, UCP-1 and OxyELITE™) while others have a single ingredient (green tea extract, linoleic acid, usnic acid, 1,3-Dimethylamylamine, vitamin A, Garcinia cambogia and ma huang). Additional DS containing some of the aforementioned ingredients implicated in liver injury are also covered. We have also included illicit androgenic anabolic steroids for bodybuilding in this work, as they are frequently sold under the denomination of DS despite being conventional drugs. PMID:27070596

  4. Bisphenol A Induces Hepatotoxicity through Oxidative Stress in Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Zeinab K.; Elobeid, Mai A.; Virk, Promy; Omer, Sawsan A.; ElAmin, Maha; Daghestani, Maha H.; AlOlayan, Ebtisam M.

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are cytotoxic agents that lead to significant oxidative damage. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a contaminant with increasing exposure to it and exerts both toxic and estrogenic effects on mammalian cells. Due to limited information concerning the effect of BPA on liver, this study investigates whether BPA causes hepatotoxicity by induction of oxidative stress in liver. Rats were divided into five groups: The first four groups, BPA (0.1, 1, 10, 50 mg/kg/day) were administrated orally to rats for four weeks. The fifth group was taken water with vehicle. The final body weights in the 0.1 mg group showed a significant decrease compared to control group. Significant decreased levels of reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase and catalase activity were found in the 50 mg BPA group compared to control groups. High dose of BPA (50 mg/kg) significantly increased the biochemical levels of ALT, ALP and total bilirubin. BPA effect on the activity of antioxidant genes was confirmed by real time PCR in which the expression levels of these genes in liver tissue were significantly decrease compared to control. Data from this study demonstrate that BPA generate ROS and reduce the antioxidant gene expression that causes hepatotoxicity. PMID:22888396

  5. Lipoic acid attenuates Aroclor 1260-induced hepatotoxicity in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Aly, Hamdy A A; Mansour, Ahmed M; Hassan, Memy H; Abd-Ellah, Mohamed F

    2016-08-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the mechanistic aspect of Aroclor 1260-induced hepatotoxicity and its protection by lipoic acid. The adult male Albino rats were divided into six groups. Group I served as control. Group II received lipoic acid (35 mg/kg/day). Aroclor 1260 was given to rats by oral gavage at doses 20, 40, or 60 mg/kg/day (Groups III, IV, and V, respectively). Group VI was pretreated with lipoic acid (35 mg/kg/day) 24 h before Aroclor 1260 (40 mg/kg/day). Treatment in all groups was continued for further 15 consecutive days. Serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase activities and total bilirubin, total cholesterol, and triglycerides were significantly increased while total protein, total albumin, and high-density lipoprotein were significantly decreased. Hydrogen peroxide production and lipid peroxidation were significantly increased while superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and reduced glutathione (GSH) content was significantly decreased in liver. Caspase-3 & -9 activities were significantly increased in liver. Lipoic acid pretreatment significantly reverted all these abnormalities toward their normal levels. In conclusion, Aroclor 1260 induced liver dysfunction, at least in part, by induction of oxidative stress. Apoptotic effect of hepatic cells is involved in Aroclor 1260-induced liver injury. Lipoic acid could protect rats against Aroclor 1260-induced hepatotoxicity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 913-922, 2016. PMID:25533183

  6. Bee sting therapy-induced hepatotoxicity: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Alqutub, Adel Nazmi; Masoodi, Ibrahim; Alsayari, Khalid; Alomair, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    The use of bee venom as a therapeutic agent for the relief of joint pains dates back to Hippocrates, and references to the treatment can be found in ancient Egyptian and Greek medical writings as well. Also known as apitherapy, the technique is widely used in Eastern Europe, Asia, and South America. The beneficial effects of bee stings can be attributed to mellitinin, an anti-inflammatory agent, known to be hundred times stronger than cortisone. Unfortunately, certain substances in the bee venom trigger allergic reactions which can be life threatening in a sensitized individual. Multiple stings are known to cause hemolysis, kidney injury, hepatotoxicity and myocardial infarction. The toxicity can be immediate or can manifest itself only weeks after the exposure. We describe hepatotoxicity in a 35-year-old female, following bee sting therapy for multiple sclerosis. She presented to our clinic 3 wk after therapy with a history of progressive jaundice. The patient subsequently improved, and has been attending our clinic now for the last 9 mo. PMID:22059110

  7. Inflammatory stress and idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity: hints from animal models.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaomin; Luyendyk, James P; Ganey, Patricia E; Roth, Robert A

    2009-09-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) present a serious human health problem. They are major contributors to hospitalization and mortality throughout the world (Lazarou et al., 1998; Pirmohamed et al., 2004). A small fraction (less than 5%) of ADRs can be classified as "idiosyncratic." Idiosyncratic ADRs (IADRs) are caused by drugs with diverse pharmacological effects and occur at various times during drug therapy. Although IADRs affect a number of organs, liver toxicity occurs frequently and is the primary focus of this review. Because of the inconsistency of clinical data and the lack of experimental animal models, how IADRs arise is largely undefined. Generation of toxic drug metabolites and induction of specific immunity are frequently cited as causes of IADRs, but definitive evidence supporting either mechanism is lacking for most drugs. Among the more recent hypotheses for causation of IADRs is that inflammatory stress induced by exogenous or endogenous inflammagens is a susceptibility factor. In this review, we give a brief overview of idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity and the inflammatory response induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide. We discuss the inflammatory stress hypothesis and use as examples two drugs that have caused IADRs in human patients: ranitidine and diclofenac. The review focuses on experimental animal models that support the inflammatory stress hypothesis and on the mechanisms of hepatotoxic response in these models. The need for design of epidemiological studies and the potential for implementation of inflammation interaction studies in preclinical toxicity screening are also discussed briefly. PMID:19805476

  8. Variability in Acetaminophen Labeling Practices: a Missed Opportunity to Enhance Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    King, Jennifer P; McCarthy, Danielle M; Serper, Marina; Jacobson, Kara L; Mullen, Rebecca J; Parker, Ruth M; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Confusion regarding a drug's active ingredient may lead to simultaneous use of multiple acetaminophen-containing prescriptions and increase the risk of unintentional overdose. The objective of this study was to examine prescription labeling practices for commonly prescribed acetaminophen-containing analgesics, specifically focusing on how active ingredient information and concomitant use warnings were conveyed. Patients with new acetaminophen-containing prescriptions were recruited upon discharge from an emergency department in Chicago or at an outpatient, hospital-based pharmacy in Atlanta. Label information was transcribed from prescription bottles and patients' knowledge of active ingredient was assessed by in-person interviews. Among the 245 acetaminophen-containing prescriptions, hydrocodone was the most common second active ingredient (n = 208, 84.8 %) followed by oxycodone (n = 28, 11.4 %). Acetaminophen was identified by its full name on 6.9 % (n = 17) of labels; various abbreviations were used in 93.1 % of cases. One hundred forty-seven bottles used auxiliary warning labels with the majority of labels (n = 130, 88.4 %) warning about maximum dose and 11.5 % (n = 17) about concomitant use. Most of the study participants (n = 177, 72.2 %) were not able to identify acetaminophen as an active ingredient in their prescription. There was no significant association between the use of unabbreviated labels including warning information and patients' awareness of acetaminophen as an active ingredient (36.4 vs. 27.3 %, p = 0.50). We noted high variability in labeling practices and warning information conveyed to patients receiving acetaminophen-containing prescriptions. Missed opportunities to adequately convey risk information may contribute to the burden of acetaminophen-related liver injury. PMID:25697756

  9. Toxicity from repeated doses of acetaminophen in children: Assessment of causality and dose in reported cases

    PubMed Central

    Heard, Kennon; Bui, Alison; Mlynarchek, Sara L; Green, Jody L.; Bond, G. Randall; Clark, Richard F.; Kozer, Eran; Koff, Raymond S.; Dart, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Liver injury has been reported in children treated with repeated doses of acetaminophen. The objective of this study is to identify and validate reports of liver injury or death in children younger than 6 years of age following repeated therapeutic doses of acetaminophen. Methods We reviewed United States (US) Poison Center data, peer-reviewed literature, US FDA Adverse event reports and US Manufacturer safety reports describing adverse effects following acetaminophen administration. Reports that described hepatic abnormalities (description of liver injury or abnormal laboratory testing) or death following administration to children younger than 6 years of age were included. The identified reports were double abstracted and then reviewed by an expert panel to determine if the hepatic injury was related to acetaminophen, and whether the dose of acetaminophen was therapeutic (≤75 mg/kg) or supra-therapeutic. Results Our search yielded 2531 reports of adverse events associated with acetaminophen use. From these cases, we identified 76 cases of hepatic injury and 26 deaths associated with repeated acetaminophen administration. There were 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities and no deaths associated with what our panel determined to be therapeutic doses. A large proportion of cases could not be fully evaluated due to incomplete case reporting. Conclusions While we identified numerous examples of liver injury and death following repeated doses of acetaminophen, all of the deaths and all but 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities involved doses greater than 75 mg/kg/day. This study suggests that the doses of less than 75 mg/kg/day of acetaminophen are safe for children younger than 6 years of age. PMID:22407198

  10. Relationship between serum acetaminophen concentration and N-acetylcysteine-induced adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Awang, Rahmat; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Khan, Halilol Rahman Mohamed; Sawalha, Ansam F; Sweileh, Waleed M; Al-Jabi, Samah W

    2010-09-01

    Intravenous N-acetylcysteine is usually regarded as a safe antidote. However, during the infusion of the loading dose, different types of adverse drug reactions (ADR) may occur. The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between the incidence of different types of ADR and serum acetaminophen concentration in patients presenting to the hospital with acetaminophen overdose. This is a retrospective study of patients admitted to the hospital for acute acetaminophen overdose over a period of 5 years (1 January 2004 to 31 December 2008). Parametric and non-parametric tests were used to test differences between groups depending on the normality of the data. SPSS 15 was used for data analysis. Of 305 patients with acetaminophen overdose, 146 (47.9%) were treated with intravenous N-acetylcysteine and 139 (45.6%) were included in this study. Different types of ADR were observed in 94 (67.6%) patients. Low serum acetaminophen concentrations were significantly associated with cutaneous anaphylactoid reactions but not other types of ADR. Low serum acetaminophen concentration was significantly associated with flushing (p < 0.001), rash (p < 0.001) and pruritus (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences in serum acetaminophen concentrations between patients with and without the following ADR: gastrointestinal reactions (p = 0.77), respiratory reactions (p = 0.96), central nervous reactions (p = 0.82) and cardiovascular reactions (p = 0.37). In conclusion, low serum acetaminophen concentrations were associated with higher cutaneous anaphylactoid reactions. Such high serum acetaminophen concentrations may be protective against N-acetylcysteine-induced cutaneous ADR. PMID:20374238

  11. Study on the reaction mechanism and the static injection chemiluminescence method for detection of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongjun; Zhang, Huili; Yu, Songcheng; Yu, Fei; Li, Yanqiang; Zhang, Hongquan; Qu, Lingbo; Harrington, Peter de B

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen, also called paracetamol, is found in Tylenol, Excedrin and other products as over-the-counter medicines. In this study, acetaminophen as a luminol signal enhancer was used in the chemiluminescence (CL) substrate solution of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for the first time. The use of acetaminophen in the luminol-HRP-H2O2 system affected not only the intensity of the obtained signal, but also its kinetics. It was shown that acetaminophen was to be a potent enhancer of the luminol-HRP-H2O2 system. A putative enhancement mechanism for the luminol-H2O2-HRP-acetaminophen system is presented. The resonance of the nucleophilic amide group and the benzene ring of acetaminophen structure have a great effect on O-H bond dissociation energy of the phenol group and therefore on phenoxyl radical stabilization. These radicals act as mediators between HRP and luminol in an electron transfer reaction that generates luminol radicals and subsequently light emission, in which the intensity of CL is enhanced in the presence of acetaminophen. In addition, a simple method was developed to detect acetaminophen by static injection CL based on the enhanced CL system of luminol-H2O2-HRP by acetaminophen. Experimental conditions, such as pH and concentrations of substrates, have been examined and optimized. The proposed method exhibited good performance, the linear range was from 0.30 to 7.5 mM, the relative standard deviation was 1.86% (n = 10), limit of detection was 0.16 mM and recovery was 99 ± 4%. PMID:23408702

  12. Plasma concentrations after high-dose (45 mg.kg-1) rectal acetaminophen in children.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, C J; McCormack, J P; Reichert, C C; Marsland, C P

    1995-11-01

    Although the recommended dose of rectal acetaminophen (25-30 mg.kg-1) is twice that for oral administration (10-15 mg.kg-1), the literature justifies the use of a higher dose when acetaminophen is administered via the rectal route. We measured venous plasma acetaminophen concentrations resulting from 45 mg.kg-1 of rectal acetaminophen in ten ASA 1, 15 kg paediatric patients undergoing minor surgery with a standardized anaesthetic. After induction of anaesthesia, a single 650 mg suppository (Abenol, SmithKline Beecham Pharma Inc.) was administered rectally. Plasma was sampled at t = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240 min in the first five patients and at t = 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300, 420 min in the subsequent five. Acetaminophen plasma concentrations were determined using a TDxFLx fluorescence polarization immunoassay (Abbott Laboratories, Toronto, Ontario). The maximum plasma concentration was 88 +/- 39 mumol.L-1 (13 +/- 6 micrograms.ml-1) and the time of peak plasma concentration was 198 +/- 70 min (mean +/- SD). At 420 min, the mean plasma concentration was 46 +/- 18 mumol.L-1 (7.0 +/- 0.9 micrograms.ml-1). No plasma concentrations associated with toxicity (> 800 mumol.L-1) were identified. A 45 mg.kg-1 rectal dose of acetaminophen resulted in peak plasma concentrations comparable with those resulting from 10-15 mg.kg-1 of oral acetaminophen at three hours after suppository insertion. It is concluded that the delayed and erratic absorption of acetaminophen after rectal administration leads to unpredictable plasma concentrations. Rectal acetaminophen will not be consistently effective for providing rapid onset of analgesia in children. PMID:8590508

  13. Prenatal and infant acetaminophen exposure, antioxidant gene polymorphisms and childhood asthma

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Seif O; Newson, Roger B; Ring, Susan M; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J; Holloway, John W; Henderson, A John

    2016-01-01

    Background Prenatal and infant acetaminophen exposure has been associated with an increased risk of childhood asthma phenotypes. Demonstration of biologically plausible interactions between these exposures and maternal and child antioxidant gene polymorphisms would strengthen causal inference. Objective To explore potential interactions between prenatal and infant acetaminophen exposure and antioxidant genotypes on childhood asthma. Methods In the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) we typed a functional Nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) polymorphism and glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1, T1 and P1 polymorphisms. Effects of prenatal and infant acetaminophen exposure on asthma phenotypes at 7 years were stratified by genotype in >4,000 mothers and >5,000 children. Results Risk of asthma and wheezing associated with early gestation acetaminophen exposure was increased when maternal copies of the minor T allele of Nrf2 were present (P interaction 0.02 and 0.04, respectively). Risk of asthma associated with late gestation exposure was higher when maternal GSTT1 genotype was present, rather than absent (P interaction 0.006), and risk of wheezing was increased when maternal GSTM1 was present (P interaction 0.04). Whilst acetaminophen use in infancy was associated with an increased risk of atopy, child antioxidant genotype did not modify associations between infant acetaminophen use and asthma phenotypes. However, the increased risk of asthma and wheezing associated with late gestation acetaminophen exposure in the presence of maternal GSTM1 was further enhanced when GSTM1 was also present in the child. Conclusion Maternal antioxidant gene polymorphisms may modify the relation between prenatal acetaminophen exposure and childhood asthma, strengthening evidence for a causal association. In contrast, relations between infant acetaminophen use and asthma and atopy were not modified by child genotype, and may be confounded by pre

  14. Use of acetaminophen (paracetamol) during pregnancy and the risk of autism spectrum disorder in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-02-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is available over the counter in most countries and is widely considered to be safe for use during pregnancy; studies report gestational exposures to acetaminophen that lie in the 46%-65% range. Acetaminophen influences inflammatory and immunologic mechanisms and may predispose to oxidative stress; these and other effects are hypothesized to have the potential to compromise neurodevelopment in the fetal and infant brain. Two ecological studies suggested that population-level trends in the use of acetaminophen were associated with trends in the incidence/prevalence of autism; one of these studies specifically examined acetaminophen use during pregnancy. One large prospective observational cohort study found that gestational exposure to acetaminophen (especially when the duration of exposure was 28 days or more) was associated with motor milestone delay, gross and fine motor impairments, communication impairment, impairments in internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and hyperactivity, all at age 3 years; however, social and emotional developmental behaviors were mostly unaffected. A very recent large cohort study with a 12.7-year follow-up found that gestational exposure to acetaminophen was associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorder, but only when a hyperkinetic disorder was also present. In the light of existing data associating acetaminophen use during pregnancy and subsequent risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, this new finding suggests that the predisposition, if any, is toward the hyperkinetic syndrome rather than to autism. In summary, the empirical data are very limited, but whatever empirical data exist do not support the suggestion that the use of acetaminophen during pregnancy increases the risk of autism in the offspring. PMID:26930528

  15. Effect of Acetaminophen Ingestion on Thermoregulation of Normothermic, Non-febrile Humans

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Josh; Mauger, Alexis; Thomasson, Katie; White, Stephanie; Taylor, Lee

    2016-01-01

    In non-febrile mouse models, high dose acetaminophen administration causes profound hypothermia. However, this potentially hazardous side-effect has not been confirmed in non-febrile humans. Thus, we sought to ascertain whether an acute therapeutic dose (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) of acetaminophen would reduce non-febrile human core temperature in a sub-neutral environment. Ten apparently healthy (normal core temperature, no musculoskeletal injury, no evidence of acute illness) Caucasian males participated in a preliminary study (Study 1) to determine plasma acetaminophen concentration following oral ingestion of 20 mg⋅kg lean body mass acetaminophen. Plasma samples (every 20 min up to 2-hours post ingestion) were analyzed via enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Thirteen (eight recruited from Study 1) apparently healthy Caucasian males participated in Study 2, and were passively exposed to 20°C, 40% r.h. for 120 min on two occasions in a randomized, repeated measures, crossover design. In a double blind manner, participants ingested acetaminophen (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) or a placebo (dextrose) immediately prior to entering the environmental chamber. Rectal temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, and thermal sensation were monitored continuously and recorded every 10 min. In Study 1, the peak concentration of acetaminophen (14 ± 4 μg/ml) in plasma arose between 80 and 100 min following oral ingestion. In Study 2, acetaminophen ingestion reduced the core temperature of all participants, whereas there was no significant change in core temperature over time in the placebo trial. Mean core temperature was significantly lower in the acetaminophen trial compared with that of a placebo (p < 0.05). The peak reduction in core temperature in the acetaminophen trial was reached at 120 min in six of the thirteen participants, and ranged from 0.1 to 0.39°C (average peak reduction from baseline = 0.19 ± 0.09°C). There was no significant difference in skin

  16. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Associated with Acetaminophen Use during Viral Infections.

    PubMed

    Ban, Ga-Young; Ahn, Seun-Joo; Yoo, Hye-Soo; Park, Hae-Sim; Ye, Young-Min

    2016-08-01

    An association between drug treatment for viral infections and severe cutaneous adverse reactions has been noted. We investigated six patients diagnosed with Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) after being prescribed acetaminophen for suspected viral illnesses. Multiplex analysis was performed to measure cytokine levels in sera before and after treatment. IL-2Rα levels significantly decreased during the convalescence phase. Although acetaminophen is relatively safe, the drug can trigger SJS/TEN in patients with suspected viral infections. T-cells and monocytes may be key components of the link between viral infection and acetaminophen-induced SJS/TEN. PMID:27574505

  17. Stevens–Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Associated with Acetaminophen Use during Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Ga-Young; Ahn, Seun-Joo; Yoo, Hye-Soo; Park, Hae-Sim

    2016-01-01

    An association between drug treatment for viral infections and severe cutaneous adverse reactions has been noted. We investigated six patients diagnosed with Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) after being prescribed acetaminophen for suspected viral illnesses. Multiplex analysis was performed to measure cytokine levels in sera before and after treatment. IL-2Rα levels significantly decreased during the convalescence phase. Although acetaminophen is relatively safe, the drug can trigger SJS/TEN in patients with suspected viral infections. T-cells and monocytes may be key components of the link between viral infection and acetaminophen-induced SJS/TEN. PMID:27574505

  18. Effect of Acetaminophen Ingestion on Thermoregulation of Normothermic, Non-febrile Humans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Josh; Mauger, Alexis; Thomasson, Katie; White, Stephanie; Taylor, Lee

    2016-01-01

    In non-febrile mouse models, high dose acetaminophen administration causes profound hypothermia. However, this potentially hazardous side-effect has not been confirmed in non-febrile humans. Thus, we sought to ascertain whether an acute therapeutic dose (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) of acetaminophen would reduce non-febrile human core temperature in a sub-neutral environment. Ten apparently healthy (normal core temperature, no musculoskeletal injury, no evidence of acute illness) Caucasian males participated in a preliminary study (Study 1) to determine plasma acetaminophen concentration following oral ingestion of 20 mg⋅kg lean body mass acetaminophen. Plasma samples (every 20 min up to 2-hours post ingestion) were analyzed via enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Thirteen (eight recruited from Study 1) apparently healthy Caucasian males participated in Study 2, and were passively exposed to 20°C, 40% r.h. for 120 min on two occasions in a randomized, repeated measures, crossover design. In a double blind manner, participants ingested acetaminophen (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) or a placebo (dextrose) immediately prior to entering the environmental chamber. Rectal temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, and thermal sensation were monitored continuously and recorded every 10 min. In Study 1, the peak concentration of acetaminophen (14 ± 4 μg/ml) in plasma arose between 80 and 100 min following oral ingestion. In Study 2, acetaminophen ingestion reduced the core temperature of all participants, whereas there was no significant change in core temperature over time in the placebo trial. Mean core temperature was significantly lower in the acetaminophen trial compared with that of a placebo (p < 0.05). The peak reduction in core temperature in the acetaminophen trial was reached at 120 min in six of the thirteen participants, and ranged from 0.1 to 0.39°C (average peak reduction from baseline = 0.19 ± 0.09°C). There was no significant difference in skin

  19. Development of oral acetaminophen chewable tablets with inhibited bitter taste.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Onishi, Hiraku; Takahashi, Yuri; Iwata, Masanori; Machida, Yoshiharu

    2003-01-30

    Various formulations with some matrix bases and corrigents were examined for development of oral chewable tablets which suppressed the bitter taste of acetaminophen, often used as an antipyretic for infants. Corn starch/lactose, cacao butter and hard fat (Witepsol H-15) were used for matrix bases, and sucrose, cocoa powder and commercial bitter-masking powder mixture made from lecithin (Benecoat BMI-40) were used for corrigents against bitter taste. The bitter taste intensity was evaluated using volunteers by comparison of test samples with standard solutions containing quinine at various concentrations. For the tablets made of matrix base and drug, Witepsol H-15 best inhibited the bitter taste of the drug, and the bitter strength tended to be suppressed with increase in the Witepsol H-15 amount. When the inhibitory effect on the bitter taste of acetaminophen solution was compared among the corrigents, each tended to suppress the bitter taste; especially, Benecoat BMI-40 exhibited a more inhibitory effect. Further, chewable tablets were made of one matrix base and one corrigent, and of one matrix base and two kinds of corrigents, their bitter taste intensities after chewing were compared. As a result, the tablets made of Witepsol H-15/Benecoat BMI-40/sucrose, of Witepsol H-15/cocoa powder/sucrose and of Witepsol H-15/sucrose best masked the bitter taste so that they were tolerable enough to chew and swallow. The dosage forms best masking bitter taste showed good release of the drug, indicating little change in bioavailability by masking. PMID:12527182

  20. Formulation and Characterization of Acetaminophen Nanoparticles in Orally Disintegrating Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AI-Nemrawi, Nusaiba K.

    The purpose of this study is to prepare acetaminophen loaded nanoparticles to be cast directly, while still in the emulsion form, into Orally Disintegrating Films (ODF). By casting the nanoparticles in the films, we expected to keep the particles in a stable form where the nanoparticles would be away from each other to prevent their aggregation. Once the films are applied on the buccal mucosa, they are supposed to dissolve within seconds, releasing the nanoparticles. Then the nanoparticles could be directly absorbed through the mucosa to the blood stream and deliver acetaminophen there. The oral cavity mucosa is one of the most attractive sites for systemic drug delivery due to its high permeability and blood supply. Furthermore, it is robust and shows short recovery times after stress or damage, and the drug bypasses first pass effect and avoids presystemic elimination in the GI tract. Nanoencapsulation increases drug efficacy, specificity, tolerability and therapeutic index. These Nanocapsules have several advantages in the protection of premature degradation and interaction with the biological environment, enhancement of absorption into a selected tissue, bioavailability, retention time and improvement of intracellular penetration. The most important characteristics of nanoparticles are their size, encapsulation efficiency (EE), zeta potential (surface charge), and the drug release profiles. Unfortunately, nanoparticles tend to precipitate or aggregate into larger particles within a short time after preparation or during storage. Some solutions for this problem were mentioned in literature including lyophilization and spray drying. These methods are usually expensive and give partial solutions that might have secondary problems; such as low re-dispersion efficacy of the lyophilized NPs. Furthermore, most of the formulations of NPs are invasive or topical. Few formulas are available to be given orally. Fast disintegrating films (ODFs) are rapidly gaining interest

  1. The analgesic efficacy of intra-articular acetaminophen in an experimental model of carrageenan-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Oguzhan; Canbay, Ozgur; Celebi, Nalan; Sahin, Altan; Konan, Ali; Atilla, Pergin; Aypar, Ulku

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acetaminophen is one of the most common drugs used for the treatment of pain and fever. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of intra-articular (IA) acetaminophen on carrageenan-induced arthritic pain-related behaviour and spinal c-Fos expression in rats. METHODS: The present study was performed using 20 Sprague Dawley rats. Forty microlitres of IA 0.9% NaCl was injected in the control group, and 40 μL of IA carrageenan was injected in the carrageenan group. One hour after carrageenan injection, 400 μg of IA acetaminophen was injected in the IA acetaminophen group, and 400 μg of intraperitoneal (IP) acet-aminophen was injected in the IP acetaminophen group. One day before injection, and 4 h and 8 h after injection, diameters of both knee joints, motility of the rat, paw loading and joint mobility were assessed. After the rats were euthanized, L3 and L4 spinal segments were excised for c-Fos assessment. RESULTS: IA acetaminophen decreased both the severity and distribution of c-Fos expression. IP acetaminophen decreased only the distribution of c-Fos expression. IA acetaminophen decreased knee diameter at 8 h. IA and IP acetaminophen increased rat motility and paw loading scores. Joint mobility scores of IP acetaminophen were similar to saline at 8 h. CONCLUSIONS: Results of the present study indicate an analgesic and/or possible anti-inflammatory effect of IA acetaminophen and provide further evidence on the efficacy of systemic acetaminophen injection in reducing arthritic pain. PMID:24093120

  2. Hepatotoxicity Associated with Long-versus Short-Course HIV-Prophylactic Nevirapine Use

    PubMed Central

    McKoy, June M.; Bennett, Charles L.; Scheetz, Marc H.; Differding, Virginia; Chandler, Kevin L.; Scarsi, Kimberly K.; Yarnold, Paul R.; Sutton, Sarah; Palella, Frank; Johnson, Stuart; Obadina, Eniola; Raisch, Dennis W.; Parada, Jorge P.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objective The antiretroviral nevirapine can cause severe hepatotoxicity when used ‘off-label’ for preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT), newborn post-exposure prophylaxis and for pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis among non-HIV-infected individuals. We describe the incidence of hepatotoxicity with short- versus long-course nevirapine-containing regimens in these groups. Methods We reviewed hepatotoxicity cases among non-HIV-infected individuals and HIV-infected pregnant women and their offspring receiving short- (≤4 days) versus long-course (≥5 days) nevirapine prophylaxis. Sources included adverse event reports from pharmaceutical manufacturers and the US FDA, reports from peer-reviewed journals/scientific meetings and the Research on Adverse Drug events And Reports (RADAR) project. Hepatotoxicity was scored using the AIDS Clinical Trial Group criteria. Results Toxicity data for 8216 patients treated with nevirapine-containing regimens were reviewed. Among 402 non-HIV-infected individuals receiving short- (n = 251) or long-course (n = 151) nevirapine, rates of grade 1–2 hepatotoxicity were 1.99%versus 5.30%, respectively, and rates of grade 3–4 hepatotoxicity were 0.00% versus 13.25%, respectively (p < 0.001 for both comparisons). Among 4740 HIV-infected pregnant women receiving short- (n = 3031) versus long-course (n = 1709) nevirapine, rates of grade 1–2 hepatotoxicity were 0.62% and 7.04%, respectively, and rates of grade 3–4 hepatotoxicity were 0.23% versus 4.39%, respectively (p < 0.001 for both comparisons). The rates of grade 3–4 hepatotoxicity among 3074 neonates of nevirapine-exposed HIV-infected pregnant women were 0.8% for those receiving short-course (n = 2801) versus 1.1%for those receiving long-course (n = 273) therapy (p < 0.72). Conclusions Therapy duration appears to significantly predict nevirapine hepatotoxicity. Short-course nevirapine for HIV prophylaxis is associated with fewer hepatotoxic

  3. Liver Protein Targets of Hepatotoxic 4-Bromophenol Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Koen, Yakov M.; Hajovsky, Heather; Liu, Ke; Williams, Todd D.; Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Staudinger, Jeffrey L.; Hanzlik, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    The hepatotoxicity of bromobenzene (BB) is directly related to the covalent binding of both initially formed epoxide and secondary quinone metabolites to at least 45 different liver proteins. 4-Bromophenol (4BP) is a significant BB metabolite and a precursor to reactive quinone metabolites, yet when administered exogenously it has negligible hepatotoxicity compared to BB. The protein adducts of 4BP were thus labeled as non-toxic (Monks, T. J.; Hinson, J. A.; Gillette, J. R. (1982) Life Sci. 30, 841–848). To help identify which BB-derived adducts might be related to its cytotoxicity, we sought to identify the supposedly non-toxic adducts of 4BP and eliminate them from the BB target protein list. Administration of [14C]-4BP to phenobarbital-induced rats resulted in covalent binding of 0.25, 0.33 and 0.42 nmol-eq 4BP/mg protein in the mitochondrial, microsomal and cytosolic fractions, respectively. These values may be compared to published values of 3–6 nmol/mg protein from a comparable dose of [14C]-BB. After subcellular fractionation and 2D electrophoresis, 47 radioactive spots on 2D gels of the mitochondrial, microsomal and cytosolic fractions were excised, digested and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Twenty nine of these spots contained apparently single proteins, of which 14 were non-redundant. Nine of the 14 are known BB targets. Incubating freshly-isolated rat hepatocytes with 4BP (0.1–0.5 mM) produced time- and concentration-dependent increases in lactate dehydrogenase release and changes in cellular morphology. LC-MS/MS analysis of the cell culture medium revealed rapid and extensive sulfation and glucuronidation of 4BP as well as formation of a quinone-derived glutathione conjugate. Studies with 7-hydroxycoumarin (7HC), (−)-borneol or D-(+)-galactosamine (DGN) showed that inhibiting the glucuronidation/sulfation of 4BP increased the formation of a GSH-bromoquinone adduct, increased covalent binding of 4BP to hepatocyte proteins and potentiated its cytotoxicity

  4. A zeolite modified carbon paste electrode as useful sensor for voltammetric determination of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Ahmadpour-Mobarakeh, Leila; Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    The voltammetric behavior of a carbon paste electrode modified with Co(II)-exchanged zeolite A (Co(II)-A/ZMCPE) for determination of acetaminophen was studied. The proposed electrode showed a diffusion controlled reaction with the electron transfer rate constant (Ks) of 0.44s(-1) and charge transfer coefficient of 0.73 in the absence of acetaminophen. A linear voltammetric response was obtained in the range of 0.1 to 190μmolL(-1) of acetaminophen [r(2)=0.9979, r=0.9989 (n=10)] with a detection limit of 0.04μmolL(-1). The method was successfully applied to the analysis of acetaminophen in some drugs. PMID:25686976

  5. Sleep Disruption and Proprioceptive Delirium due to Acetaminophen in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Carnovale, Carla; Pozzi, Marco; Nisic, Andrea Angelo; Scrofani, Elisa; Perrone, Valentina; Antoniazzi, Stefania; Radice, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 7-year-old boy, who received acetaminophen for the treatment of hyperpyrexia, due to an infection of the superior airways. 13 mg/kg (260 mg) of acetaminophen was administered orally before bedtime, and together with the expected antipyretic effect, the boy experienced sleep disruption and proprioceptive delirium. The symptoms disappeared within one hour. In the following six months, acetaminophen was administered again twice, and the reaction reappeared with similar features. Potential alternative explanations were excluded, and analysis with the Naranjo algorithm indicated a “probable” relationship between acetaminophen and this adverse reaction. We discuss the potential mechanisms involved, comprising imbalances in prostaglandin levels, alterations of dopamine, and cannabinoid and serotonin signalings. PMID:23573447

  6. Acetaminophen Use: An Unusual Cause of Drug-Induced Pulmonary Eosinophilia

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Pierre, Mathieu D.; Moran-Mendoza, Onofre

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary eosinophilia (PE) can be found in very diverse pathological processes. Several medications have also been associated with this entity. Acetaminophen is a medication commonly used in multiple different drug formulations, many of which are available without a prescription. It has however been associated with pulmonary eosinophilia (eosinophilic pneumonia) in a few cases in Japan. We describe the case of a 68-year-old Caucasian female who presented with new persistent dry cough and dyspnea on exertion after she started using up to 4 grams of acetaminophen on a daily basis. Chest imaging revealed peripheral lower lung zone ground glass and reticular opacities, and increased eosinophils were present on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). The patient's symptoms markedly improved upon acetaminophen cessation, and significantly decreased eosinophils were seen on repeat BAL. To our knowledge, this is the first case of likely acetaminophen-induced pulmonary eosinophilia reported outside Japan. PMID:27445539

  7. Efficacy of charcoal cathartic versus ipecac in reducing serum acetaminophen in a simulated overdose.

    PubMed

    McNamara, R M; Aaron, C K; Gemborys, M; Davidheiser, S

    1989-09-01

    The traditional role of gastric emptying as the initial step in the management of the poisoned patient has recently been questioned; immediate activated charcoal administration has been recommended by some. In the setting of acetaminophen overdose, ipecac-induced emesis may interfere with subsequent oral antidotal therapy. Therefore, we conducted a study to compare the efficacy of initial therapy with ipecac with therapy with activated charcoal-cathartic in a simulated acetaminophen overdosage. Ten healthy volunteers participated in a randomized, crossover trial. Subjects ingested 3.0 g acetaminophen, followed by either no intervention, 30 mL syrup of ipecac, or 50 g activated charcoal-sorbitol solution at one hour. Serial acetaminophen levels were determined at intervals over eight hours. Both interventions significantly reduced the area under the curve compared with control (P less than .05). When comparing ipecac with activated charcoal-cathartic, no significant difference was noted among these groups. PMID:2569851

  8. Effects of prednisone, aspirin, and acetaminophen on an in vivo biologic response to interferon in humans.

    PubMed

    Witter, F R; Woods, A S; Griffin, M D; Smith, C R; Nadler, P; Lietman, P S

    1988-08-01

    In healthy volunteers receiving a single intramuscular dose of 18 X 10(6) U interferon alone or after 24 hours of an 8-day course of prednisone (40 mg/day), aspirin (650 mg every 4 hours), or acetaminophen (650 mg every 4 hours), the magnitude of the biologic response to interferon was quantified by measuring the time course of the induction of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase and resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus infection in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Prednisone decreased the AUC of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity (p less than 0.05), whereas administration of aspirin or acetaminophen did not affect this biologic response. No measurable effect was seen during administration of prednisone, aspirin, or acetaminophen on the duration or intensity of vesicular stomatitis virus yield reduction. The side effects seen with interferon administration at the dose tested were not altered in a clinically meaningful manner by prednisone, aspirin, or acetaminophen. PMID:2456175

  9. Acetaminophen intake and risk of asthma, hay fever and eczema in early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Vlaski, Emilija; Stavric, Katerina; Isjanovska, Rozalinda; Seckova, Lidija; Kimovska, Milica

    2007-09-01

    A positive association between acetaminophen intake and allergic diseases has recently been reported in developed countries with impaired oxidant/antioxidant balance and promotion of atopy as proposed underlying mechanisms. The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between acetaminophen intake and asthma, hay fever, and eczema in The Republic of Macedonia as a country with acetaminophen intake not physician-controlled, high passive smoke exposure and dietary antioxidant intake, and moderately low prevalence of allergic diseases. Self-reported data obtained through the standardized International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase Three written questionnaires of 3026 adolescents aged 13/14 years from randomly selected schools in Skopje, the capital of Macedonia, were used. The frequency of current acetaminophen intake--both unadjusted and adjusted for confounding factors--was correlated to current and ever-diagnosed asthma, hay fever and eczema by odds ratios (OR, 95% CI) in binary logistic regression. Use of acetaminophen at least once monthly increased the risk of current wheeze (adjusted OR 2.04, 1.31-3.20 p = 0.002), asthma 'ever' (adjusted OR 2.77, 1.06-7.26 p=0.039), current allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (adjusted OR 2.95, 1.79-4.88 p=0.000) and hay fever 'ever' (adjusted OR 2.25, 1.36-3.70 p=0.002). A significant association between frequent acetaminophen intake and atopic eczema and also between infrequent acetaminophen intake and investigated allergic diseases was not established. The findings suggest an increased risk of asthma and hay fever, but not atopic eczema associated with frequent acetaminophen use in a developing country. PMID:17893435

  10. Probenecid impairment of acetaminophen and lorazepam clearance: direct inhibition of ether glucuronide formation.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, D R; Greenblatt, D J; Ameer, B; Shader, R I

    1985-08-01

    Eleven subjects received acetaminophen (650 mg i.v.) on two occasions in random sequence, with and without concurrent administration of probenecid (500 mg) every 6 hr. Nine subjects similarly received lorazepam (2 mg. i.v.) with and without concurrent probenecid. Acetaminophen half-life was prolonged during probenecid treatment (mean +/- S.E., 4.30 +/- 0.23 vs. 2.51 +/- 0.16 hr; P less than .001) due to markedly decreased clearance (178 +/- 13 vs. 329 +/- 24 ml/min; P less than .001) with no change in volume of distribution (65 +/- 4 vs. 69 +/- 3 l; NS). Urinary excretion of acetaminophen glucuronide during 24 hr was decreased (84 +/- 9 vs. 260 +/- 21 mg of acetaminophen as glucuronide; P less than .001) and acetaminophen sulfate excretion was increased (323 +/- 25 vs. 217 +/- 17 mg of acetaminophen as sulfate; P less than .005) during concurrent probenecid treatment. However, the sum of the two conjugated metabolites was not significantly different (407 +/- 28 vs. 476 +/- 20 mg of acetaminophen as glucuronide plus sulfate excreted per 24 hr; NS). Lorazepam half-life was also prolonged during probenecid treatment (33.0 +/- 3.9 vs. 14.3 +/- 1.08 hr; P less than .001) due to decreased clearance (44.7 +/- 5.4 vs. 80.3 +/- 13.2 ml/min; P less than .001) with no change in volume of distribution (111 +/- 5 vs. 111 +/- 7 l; NS). Formation of the ether glucuronides of acetaminophen and lorazepam is impaired markedly by therapeutic doses of probenecid. Sulfate conjugation is not affected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4020675

  11. Patient knowledge and use of acetaminophen in over-the-counter medications.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Jason; Sands, Shannon; Davis, Erica; Nielsen, Joel; Warholak, Terri

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate patient knowledge of over-the-counter (OTC) products containing acetaminophen and to determine patients' accuracy in dosing adult, child, and infant formulations. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING Six community pharmacies in Tucson, AZ, between February and May 2011. PARTICIPANTS 88 adults aged 19 to 89 years. INTERVENTION Investigator-administered, semistructured interviews. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patient knowledge of and ability to safely use OTC products containing acetaminophen, including understanding risks, identifying products, and dosing different formulations. RESULTS Although most (86%) participants heard of acetaminophen, only 68% understood at least one of its uses and only 9% knew the abbreviation APAP. Virtually all knew that consuming too much acetaminophen in 1 day could be harmful, but only 17% and 35% knew that overdoses could result in death or liver damage, respectively. On average, participants correctly identified 80% (range 27-100%) of products with and without acetaminophen from a lineup of 11 OTC products. Although 38% (n = 84) of participants correctly measured both the child and infant doses of acetaminophen, doses ranged from one-half to twice the amount of the labeled child dose and one-third of the labeled infant dose. Findings from the regression analysis suggested that on average, women and those with college degrees had higher overall scores, while participants' age or parent status were nonsignificant predictors. CONCLUSION Many patients remain confused about using acetaminophen safely, signaling the need for greater patient education to prevent unintentional harm. The results further specify common misunderstandings to address during patient contact, which also includes replacing "APAP" with "acetaminophen" on any prescription bottle labels or patient-directed information. PMID:24362497

  12. LC-MS/MS method development for quantitative analysis of acetaminophen uptake by the aquatic fungus Mucor hiemalis.

    PubMed

    Esterhuizen-Londt, Maranda; Schwartz, Katrin; Balsano, Evelyn; Kühn, Sandra; Pflugmacher, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Acetaminophen is a pharmaceutical, frequently found in surface water as a contaminant. Bioremediation, in particular, mycoremediation of acetaminophen is a method to remove this compound from waters. Owing to the lack of quantitative analytical method for acetaminophen in aquatic organisms, the present study aimed to develop a method for the determination of acetaminophen using LC-MS/MS in the aquatic fungus Mucor hiemalis. The method was then applied to evaluate the uptake of acetaminophen by M. hiemalis, cultured in pellet morphology. The method was robust, sensitive and reproducible with a lower limit of quantification of 5 pg acetaminophen on column. It was found that M. hiemalis internalize the pharmaceutical, and bioaccumulate it with time. Therefore, M. hiemalis was deemed a suitable candidate for further studies to elucidate its pharmaceutical tolerance and the longevity in mycoremediation applications. PMID:26950900

  13. Acute hepatotoxicity induced by hepatotoxins in Suncus murinus

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.; Saito, H.; Yohro, T.; Shiga, J.

    1986-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted to contrast the hepatotoxicity of several chemicals in the musk shrew (Suncus murinus) versus other common laboratory species (mouse or rat), and the following results were obtained from serum enzymes (SGOT and SGPT) and histopathological findings of liver specimens. (1) The sensitivity of Suncus liver to CCl/sub 4/ was different from that of mouse liver. (2) The sensitivity of Suncus liver to ..beta..-D-galactosamine was weaker than that of rat liver. (3) The sensitivity of Suncus liver to ethanol was stronger than that of mouse liver. After a single oral administration of ethanol (99.5% v/v, 0.1 ml/50 g body weight), the gallbladder of Suncus became enlarged and dark blue in color. (4) A striking fatty degeneration was seen 24 h after a single ip administration of amethopterin at 50 mg/kg in Suncus liver.

  14. Severe hepatotoxicity associated with the combination of spiramycin plus metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Rola; El-Halabi, Mustapha; Ghaith, Ola; Jurdi, Nawaf; Azar, Cecilio; Mansour, Nabil; Sharara, Ala I

    2011-03-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a leading cause of acute liver failure and is the most frequent reason for post-marketing drug withdrawal. The spectrum of liver injury is wide, ranging from mild and subclinical injury, noticeable only on routine biochemical testing, to fulminant liver failure and death. Antibiotics, as a group, are a leading cause of DILI. We herein describe 4 patients who developed moderate to severe hepatotoxicity after exposure to a commercially - available combination of two antibiotics - spiramycin and metronidazole - commonly used for the treatment and prevention of periodontal infections. No other aetiology for liver injury could be identified in all cases. Two patients recovered spontaneously, and two had a more severe course, one responding to corticosteroids and mycophenolate mofetil and the other requiring liver transplantation for subacute massive necrosis. PMID:21429456

  15. Nephrotoxic and hepatotoxic effects of chromium compounds in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, R.; Diaz-Mayans, J.; Nunez, A.

    1986-03-01

    The nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic and cardiotoxic actions of hexavalent chromium compounds, as well as their effects on lung, blood and circulation may contribute to the fatal outcome of chromium intoxication. Although trivalent chromium have been regarded as relatively biologically inert, there are a few salts of chromium III that have been found to be carcinogenic when inhaled, ingested or brought in contact with the tissues. Sensitive persons and industry workers have been subjects of dermatitis, respiratory tract injuries and digestive ulcers due to chromium compounds. In this work, the authors have studied the effect of trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds on rats measuring the transaminases (GOT and GPT), urea and creatinine levels in serum of chromium poisoned animals at different times.

  16. Free radical formation in vivo and hepatotoxicity due to anesthesia with halothane

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, J.L.; Beckwith, A.L.; Bastin, F.N.; Adams, J.F.; Cousins, M.J.; Hall, P.

    1982-09-01

    In vivo studies were undertaken to determine whether free radical formation in the liver during administration of various halogenated anesthetics is associated with hepatotoxicity of these agents in an animal model. In addition to the anesthetics halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane, carbon tetrachloride was studied as an example of a hepatotoxic halogenated compound acting by a free radical mechanism. Free radicals were trapped in vivo during anesthesia as stable adducts using the spin trap, alpha-phenyl-t-butyl nitrone. These adducts were extracted from the liver and studied by electron spin resonance spectrometry. Free radicals were detected after administration of halothane or carbon tetrachloride, compounds which were hepatotoxic under the conditions of the experiment, but were not found after anesthesia induced with enflurane or isoflurane, anesthetics which were not hepatotoxic under identical conditions. The free radical trapped after alpha-phenyl-t-butyl nitrone treatment of halothane-anesthetized rats appeared to be a metabolic intermediate of halothane.

  17. Synergistic hepatotoxicity by cadmium and chlorpyrifos: disordered hepatic lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Guo, Wenli; Qian, Yi; Zhang, Shuping; Ren, Difeng; Liu, Sijin

    2015-07-01

    Due to its extensive application, chlorpyrifos (CPF) has contaminated a diverse range of environmental substrates, fruits and vegetables. A number of studies have suggested that CPF may incur adverse effects on human health, including neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and endocrine disruption. Additionally, cadmium (Cd) is one of the most prevalent environmental heavy metals, as a result of considerable use in a wide spectrum of industrial fields. Exposure to Cd can cause several lesions in various organs, including the liver, kidneys and lungs. CPF and Cd often co-exist in the environment, food and crops, however, their joint exposure and potential synergistic toxicity are largely neglected and unrecognized. Our previous study characterized an interaction between CPF and Cd, which may occur via bonding between Cd2+ and the nitrogen atom in the pyridine ring of CPF, or the chelation between one Cd2+ and two CPF molecules. Our previous study also identified increased hepatotoxicity induced by CPF and Cd together compared with the individual compounds. In the present study, the effects of the concomitant exposure of CPF and Cd on lipid metabolism in hepatocytes was investigated. The results demonstrated an accumulation of lipids in hepatocytes, induced by the CPF and Cd complex, which was fundamentally distinct from its parental chemicals. Notably, the molecular mechanism by which the CPF-Cd complex significantly induced hepatic lipogenesis was revealed, elevating the concentrations of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 and fatty acid synthase. These findings pave the way for future studies in recognizing synergistic biological effects between pollutants. PMID:25707953

  18. Carnitine deficiency provokes cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Majed, Abdulhakeem A

    2007-03-01

    This study investigates whether or not carnitine deficiency is a risk factor and could contribute to cisplatin-induced liver toxicity. A total of 60 adult male Wistar albino rats were divided into six groups. The first three groups were injected intraperitoneally with normal saline, propionyl-l-carnitine (500 mg/kg), and d-carnitine (500 mg/kg), respectively, for 10 successive days. The fourth, fifth and sixth groups were injected intraperitoneally with the same doses of normal saline, propionyl-l-carnitine and d-carnitine, respectively, for 5 successive days before and after a single dose of cisplatin (7 mg/kg). Administration of the standard nephrotoxic dose of cisplatin did not produce any changes in serum alanine transaminase and gamma-glutamyl transferase and no morphological changes in liver tissues. However, it did produce a significant increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and total nitrate/nitrite and a significant decrease in reduced glutathione content in liver tissues. On the other hand, combined treatment with cisplatin and d-carnitine induced a dramatic increase in serum alanine transaminase and gamma-glutamyl transferase, as well as progressive reduction in total carnitine and ATP content in liver tissue. Moreover, histopathological examination of liver tissues confirmed the biochemical data, where cisplatin and d-carnitine combination showed signs of liver injury manifested as focal necro-inflammatory changes and portal inflammation. Interestingly, in carnitine supplemented rats using propionyl-l-carnitine, cisplatin did not produce any biochemical and histopathological changes in liver tissues. In conclusion, data from this study suggest for the first time that (1) carnitine deficiency is a risk factor and could precipitate cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity, (2) oxidative stress is not the main cause of cisplatin-related hepatotoxicity and (3) propionyl-l-carnitine prevents the development of cisplatin-induced liver injury. PMID

  19. The Effect of Acetaminophen on Oxidative Modification of Low-Density Lipoproteins in Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Özsoy, Meral Baş; Pabuçcuoğlu, Aysun

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) contributes to the pathology of atherosclerosis. Antioxidants may protect LDL against oxidative modification. Acetaminophen, a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent, has significant antioxidant properties. However, there is little evidence to suggest that acetaminophen acts as an antioxidant for LDL oxidation in vivo. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effect of acetaminophen on LDL oxidation in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. The oxidative modification of LDL was identified by conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). In the cholesterol group which rabbits were fed a diet contained 1% g cholesterol for 8 weeks, TBARS contents and conjugated diene levels in the plasma and isolated LDL samples significantly increased compared with the control rabbits (p<0.05). However, in the cholesterol + acetaminophen group, the TBARS contents and conjugated diene levels were significantly lower than that of the cholesterol group (p<0.05). The results from in vitro studies also demonstrated that the LDL isolated from serum was oxidized by Cu++ ions and this oxidation reduced in the presence of acetaminophen. The reduced oxidative modification of LDL by acetaminophen may be of therapeutic value in preventing the development and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:18392104

  20. Comparison of oral nalbuphine, acetaminophen, and their combination in postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Jain, A K; Ryan, J R; McMahon, F G; Smith, G

    1986-03-01

    This double-blind, randomized, parallel, placebo-controlled study evaluated the analgesic effects of single oral doses of 30 mg nalbuphine, 650 mg acetaminophen, and the contribution of each to the efficacy of their combination in 128 hospitalized patients with postoperative pain. Subjective reports of patients evaluated each hour for 6 hours were used as indices of analgesic response. Both nalbuphine and acetaminophen were significantly superior to placebo for most measures of total and peak analgesia. The interaction contrast between nalbuphine and acetaminophen was not significant for any analgesic measurements, indicating an additive effect of the components. The combination was the most effective treatment, followed by nalbuphine, acetaminophen, and placebo. Effects of the combination were significantly different from those of acetaminophen at 4, 5, and 6 hours and from those of placebo at 1 to 6 hours. There was no significant difference in the frequency or intensity of side effects among the groups. The combination of nalbuphine and acetaminophen appears to be a therapeutically useful combination. PMID:3512149

  1. Treatment of mild to moderate pain of acute soft tissue injury: diflunisal vs acetaminophen with codeine.

    PubMed

    Muncie, H L; King, D E; DeForge, B

    1986-08-01

    Acute soft tissue injuries create pain and limitation of function. Treatment requires analgesia and time for full recovery. Acetaminophen with codeine (650 mg plus 60 mg, respectively, every 4 to 6 hours) is used frequently as the analgesic of choice. Diflunisal (1,000 mg initially then 500 mg twice a day) vs acetaminophen with codeine was prospectively studied in the treatment of acute mild to moderate pain from soft tissue injuries. Thirty-five patients with acute strains, sprains, or low back pain were randomized to treatment (17 acetaminophen with codeine vs 18 diflunisal). Both groups were similar in the amount of pain and type of injury at initiation of therapy. Patient pain rating went from 3.3 +/- 0.6 to 1.6 +/- 1.5 for acetaminophen with codeine and from 3.3 +/- 0.6 to 1.3 +/- 1.1 for diflunisal. However, 65 percent of acetaminophen with codeine patients experienced side effects, with 35 percent of these patients stopping the medication because of intolerable side effects. In the diflunisal group, 28 percent of the patients experienced side effects and 5 percent had to stop the medication early. Diflunisal was found to be an effective analgesic in mild to moderate pain of acute soft tissue injuries, and caused fewer and more tolerable side effects than did acetaminophen with codeine. PMID:2942630

  2. Circadian rhythm of serum sulfate levels in man and acetaminophen pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, D A; Wallace, S M; Verbeeck, R K

    1990-01-01

    The circadian variation of serum inorganic sulfate levels was studied in healthy volunteers. The effect of subchronic acetaminophen administration (650 mg q.i.d. for 4 days) on serum inorganic sulfate levels was investigated and the possible role of fluctuating serum inorganic sulfate levels on the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen was evaluated. During a 24 h cycle, serum inorganic sulfate levels were lowest in the morning (11.00 h) and typically increased in the afternoon to reach a maximum in the early evening (19.00 h). Average 24 h serum concentrations were 360 microM and the difference between minimum and maximum levels was on average 25.8%. Subchronic administration of acetaminophen (650 mg q.i.d. for 4 days) significantly reduced serum inorganic sulfate levels to a 24 h average of 253 microM. The circadian rhythm, however, was not affected and the difference between minimum (12.00 h) and maximum (18.50 h) serum concentrations was 31.3%. Subchronic acetaminophen administration lead to a significant decrease in the renal excretion (-51%) and renal clearance (-33%) of inorganic sulfate. No significant differences were found in the disposition kinetics of acetaminophen and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates during two consecutive dosing intervals (08.00-14.00 h, 14.00-20.00 h) on Day 4 of the acetaminophen regimen. PMID:2253663

  3. Successful treatment of pegaspargase-induced acute hepatotoxicity with vitamin B complex and L-carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Karur, Vinit; Herrington, Jon D.; Walker, Mary G.

    2016-01-01

    Pegaspargase is a chemotherapy drug used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). One of the adverse effects of pegaspargase is hepatotoxicity, which can rapidly lead to liver failure and death. We report a patient with ALL who developed pegaspargase-induced severe hepatotoxicity that was rescued by treatment with vitamin B complex and L-carnitine. Our patient had a quicker response than prior reported cases, suggesting this treatment might be a better regimen. PMID:26722167

  4. [Determination of serum acetaminophen based on the diazo reaction and its application in the evaluation of gastric emptying].

    PubMed

    Li, Cai-na; Sun, Su-juan; Shen, Zhu-fang

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to establish a method to determine the serum acetaminophen concentration based on diazo reaction, and apply it in the gastric emptying evaluation. Theoretically, acetaminophen could take hydrolysis reaction in hydrochloric acid solution to produce p-aminophenol, which could then take diazo reaction resulting in a product with special absorption peak at 312 nm. Then the serum acetaminophen concentration and recovery rate were calculated according to the standard curve drawn with absorbance at 312 nm. ICR mice were given a dose of acetaminophen (500 mg x kg(-1)) by gavage and the serum acetaminophen was dynamically measured through the diazo reaction. Besides, ICR mice were subcutaneously injected with the long-acting GLP-1 analog GW002 before the gavage of acetaminophen, and serum acetaminophen concentration was measured as above to study how GW002 could influence the gastric emptying. The data showed acetaminophen ranging from 0 to 160 μg x mL(-1) could take diazo reaction with excellent linear relationship, and the regression equation was y = 0.0181 x +0.0104, R2 = 0.9997. The serum acetaminophen was also measured with good linear relationship (y = 0.0045 x + 0.0462, R = 0.9982) and the recovery rate was 97.4%-116.7%. The serum concentration of acetaminophen reached peak at about 0.5 h after gavage, and then gradually decreased. GW002 could significantly lower the serum acetaminophen concentration and make the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) decrease by 28.4%. In conclusion, a method for the determination of serum acetaminophen based on the diazo reaction was established with good accuracy and could be used in the evaluation of gastric emptying. PMID:26234136

  5. Acute intoxication with aniline: detection of acetaminophen as aniline metabolite.

    PubMed

    Iwersen-Bergmann, S; Schmoldt, A

    2000-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman unwittingly ingested an unknown substance together with her breakfast coffee. She suffered effects such as strong headache, generalized cyanosis, and a burning sensation of the lips and collapsed some minutes later. After admission into hospital a methemoglobin level of 35% was determined in the blood. Treatment by administration of tolonium chloride (toluidine blue) resulted in complete recovery of the patient. The toxic agent was identified as aniline by GC with mass selective detection after organic solvent extraction and 11 h after ingestion the plasma aniline level was 0.13 mg/l. Acetanilide (0.79 mg/ml) and acetaminophen (2.3 mg/ml) were identified in plasma as metabolites of aniline. It was assumed that a high metabolic capacity for acetylation protected the victim from more severe reactions. Her husband confessed later that he had tried to poison her. PMID:10876991

  6. Effect of Acetaminophen Alone and in Combination with Morphine and Tramadol on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Isoflurane in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Julio R.; Ibancovichi, José A.; Sanchez-Aparicio, Pedro; Acevedo-Arcique, Carlos M.; Moran-Muñoz, Rafael; Recillas-Morales, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been observed that acetaminophen potentiates the analgesic effect of morphine and tramadol in postoperative pain management. Its capacity as an analgesic drug or in combinations thereof to reduce the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of inhalational anesthetics represents an objective measure of this effect during general anesthesia. In this study, the effect of acetaminophen with and without morphine or tramadol was evaluated on the isoflurane MAC. Methods Forty-eight male Wistar rats were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen. MACISO was determined from alveolar gas samples at the time of tail clamping without the drug, after administering acetaminophen (300 mg/kg), morphine (3 mg/kg), tramadol (10 mg/kg), acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + morphine (3 mg/kg), and acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + tramadol (10 mg/kg). Results The control and acetaminophen groups did not present statistically significant differences (p = 0.98). The values determined for MACISO after treatment with acetaminophen + morphine, acetaminophen + tramadol, morphine, and tramadol were 0.98% ± 0.04%, 0.99% ± 0.009%, 0.97% ± 0.02%, and 0.99% ± 0.01%, respectively. Conclusions The administration of acetaminophen did not reduce the MAC of isoflurane and did not potentiate the reduction in MACISO by morphine and tramadol in rats, and therefore does not present a sparing effect of morphine or tramadol in rats anesthetized with isoflurane. PMID:26605541

  7. Immune mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Krenkel, Oliver; Mossanen, Jana C; Tacke, Frank

    2014-12-01

    An overdose of acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP), also termed paracetamol, can cause severe liver damage, ultimately leading to acute liver failure (ALF) with the need of liver transplantation. APAP is rapidly taken up from the intestine and metabolized in hepatocytes. A small fraction of the metabolized APAP forms cytotoxic mitochondrial protein adducts, leading to hepatocyte necrosis. The course of disease is not only critically influenced by dose of APAP and the initial hepatocyte damage, but also by the inflammatory response following acetaminophen-induced liver injury (AILI). As revealed by mouse models of AILI and corresponding translational studies in ALF patients, necrotic hepatocytes release danger-associated-molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by resident hepatic macrophages, Kupffer cell (KC), and neutrophils, leading to the activation of these cells. Activated hepatic macrophages release various proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α or IL-1β, as well as chemokines (e.g., CCL2) thereby further enhancing inflammation and increasing the influx of immune cells, like bone-marrow derived monocytes and neutrophils. Monocytes are mainly recruited via their receptor CCR2 and aggravate inflammation. Infiltrating monocytes, however, can mature into monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMF), which are, in cooperation with neutrophils, also involved in the resolution of inflammation. Besides macrophages and neutrophils, distinct lymphocyte populations, especially γδ T cells, are also linked to the inflammatory response following an APAP overdose. Natural killer (NK), natural killer T (NKT) and T cells possibly further perpetuate inflammation in AILI. Understanding the complex interplay of immune cell subsets in experimental models and defining their functional involvement in disease progression is essential to identify novel therapeutic targets for human disease. PMID:25568858

  8. Acetaminophen Attenuates Lipid Peroxidation in Children Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Scott A.; Zaccagni, Hayden; Bichell, David P.; Christian, Karla G.; Mettler, Bret A.; Donahue, Brian S.; Roberts, L. Jackson; Pretorius, Mias

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hemolysis, occurring during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), is associated with lipid peroxidation and postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI). Acetaminophen (ApAP) inhibits lipid peroxidation catalyzed by hemeproteins and in an animal model attenuated rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI. This pilot study tests the hypothesis that ApAP attenuates lipid peroxidation in children undergoing CPB. Design Single center prospective randomized double blinded study. Setting University-affiliated pediatric hospital. Patients Thirty children undergoing elective surgical correction of a congenital heart defect. Interventions Patients were randomized to ApAP (OFIRMEV® (acetaminophen) injection, Cadence Pharmaceuticals, San Diego, CA) or placebo every 6 hours for 4 doses starting before the onset of CPB. Measurement and Main Results Markers of hemolysis, lipid peroxidation (isofurans and F2-isoprostanes) and AKI were measured throughout the perioperative period. CPB was associated with a significant increase in free hemoglobin (from a pre-bypass level of 9.8±6.2 mg/dl to a peak of 201.5±42.6 mg/dl post-bypass). Plasma and urine isofuran and F2-isoprostane concentrations increased significantly during surgery. The magnitude of increase in plasma isofurans was greater than the magnitude in increase in plasma F2-isoprostanes. ApAP attenuated the increase in plasma isofurans compared to placebo (P=0.02 for effect of study drug). There was no significant effect of ApAP on plasma F2-isoprostanes or urinary makers of lipid peroxidation. ApAP did not affect postoperative creatinine, urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin or prevalence of AKI. Conclusion CPB in children is associated with hemolysis and lipid peroxidation. ApAP attenuated the increase in plasma isofuran concentrations. Future studies are needed to establish whether other therapies that attenuate or prevent the effects of free hemoglobin result in more effective inhibition of lipid peroxidation in patients

  9. Effect of Intravenous Acetaminophen on Postoperative Opioid Use in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Saha, Ronik; Shah, Neal; Hanna, Adel; DeMuro, Jonas; Calixte, Rose; Brathwaite, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of opioids to achieve adequate pain relief following surgery is a common clinical practice. Opioids, however, are associated with serious adverse effects, such as respiratory depression, excessive sedation, and prolonged ileus, as well as increased mortality. The administration of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen to control postoperative pain has been effective in reducing opioid consumption in various surgical populations, but no studies have been conducted in bariatric surgery patients. This investigation was performed to determine whether IV acetaminophen reduces opioid requirements after bariatric surgery. Methods: IV acetaminophen was added to the Winthrop-University Hospital formulary in September 2012. We conducted a retrospective chart-review analysis of bariatric surgery patients who received at least four doses of IV acetaminophen (1 g every six hours) plus opioids from October 2012 to March 2013 (after IV acetaminophen was added to the hospital formulary), compared with bariatric surgery patients who received only opioids for postoperative pain control from January 2012 to June 2012 (before IV acetaminophen was added to the hospital formulary). The study’s primary endpoint was the difference between the two groups in opioid consumption, expressed in oral morphine equivalents (OMEs). Secondary endpoints included the reduction in the baseline pain score; the total amount of each opioid used; and the average hospital length of stay (LOS). Results: A total of 96 patients were identified for potential enrollment from January 2012 to March 2013. Eight patients, however, did not qualify for participation because they had received only one dose of IV acetaminophen. The remaining 88 patients comprised two study groups: IV acetaminophen plus opiates (n = 44) and IV opiates alone (n = 44). Paradoxically, the patients in the acetaminophen/opiates group required significantly more opiates (in OMEs) compared with the group that received opiates

  10. Bortezomib alleviates drug-induced liver injury by regulating CYP2E1 gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    PARK, WOO-JAE; KIM, SO-YEON; KIM, YE-RYUNG; PARK, JOO-WON

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure, i.e., the fatal deterioration of liver function, is the most common indication that emergency liver transplantation is necessary. Moreover, in the USA, drug-induced liver injury (DILI), including acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity, is the main cause of acute liver failure. Matching a donor for liver transplantation is extremely difficult, and thus the development of a novel therapy for DILI is urgently needed. Following recent approval by the FDA of the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib, its therapeutic effects on various human diseases, including solid and hematologic malignancies, have been validated. However, the specific action of proteasomal inhibition in cases of DILI had not been elucidated prior to this study. To examine the effects of proteasomal inhibition in DILI experimentally, male C56Bl/6 mice were injected with 1 mg bortezomib/kg before APAP treatment. Bortezomib not only alleviated APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in a time- and dose-dependent manner, it also alleviated CCl4- and thioacetamide-induced hepatotoxicity. We also noted that bortezomib significantly reduced cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) expression and activity in the liver, which was accompanied by the induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In addition, bortezomib decreased hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α-induced promoter activation of CYP2E1 in Hep3B cells. By contrast, another proteasome inhibitor, MG132, did not cause ER stress and did not markedly affect CYP2E1 enzyme activity. Liver injury induced by APAP was aggravated by MG132, possibly via elevation of connexin 32 expression. This study suggests that proteasome inhibition has different effects in cases of DILI depending on the specific inhibitor being used. Furthermore, results from the mouse model indicated that bortezomib, but not MG132, was effective in alleviating DILI. ER stress induced by proteasome inhibition has previously been shown to exert various effects on DILI patients, and thus each

  11. Formulation and Characterization of Acetaminophen Nanoparticles in Orally Disintegrating Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AI-Nemrawi, Nusaiba K.

    The purpose of this study is to prepare acetaminophen loaded nanoparticles to be cast directly, while still in the emulsion form, into Orally Disintegrating Films (ODF). By casting the nanoparticles in the films, we expected to keep the particles in a stable form where the nanoparticles would be away from each other to prevent their aggregation. Once the films are applied on the buccal mucosa, they are supposed to dissolve within seconds, releasing the nanoparticles. Then the nanoparticles could be directly absorbed through the mucosa to the blood stream and deliver acetaminophen there. The oral cavity mucosa is one of the most attractive sites for systemic drug delivery due to its high permeability and blood supply. Furthermore, it is robust and shows short recovery times after stress or damage, and the drug bypasses first pass effect and avoids presystemic elimination in the GI tract. Nanoencapsulation increases drug efficacy, specificity, tolerability and therapeutic index. These Nanocapsules have several advantages in the protection of premature degradation and interaction with the biological environment, enhancement of absorption into a selected tissue, bioavailability, retention time and improvement of intracellular penetration. The most important characteristics of nanoparticles are their size, encapsulation efficiency (EE), zeta potential (surface charge), and the drug release profiles. Unfortunately, nanoparticles tend to precipitate or aggregate into larger particles within a short time after preparation or during storage. Some solutions for this problem were mentioned in literature including lyophilization and spray drying. These methods are usually expensive and give partial solutions that might have secondary problems; such as low re-dispersion efficacy of the lyophilized NPs. Furthermore, most of the formulations of NPs are invasive or topical. Few formulas are available to be given orally. Fast disintegrating films (ODFs) are rapidly gaining interest

  12. Physical and Chemical Compatibility of Injectable Acetaminophen During Simulated Y-Site Administration

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Collin; Boehme, Sabrina; Ouellette, Jacquelyn; Stidham, Chanelle; MacKay, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The physical and chemical compatibility of intravenous acetaminophen with commonly administered injectable medications was evaluated. Methods: Simulated Y-site evaluation was accomplished by mixing 2 mL of acetaminophen (10 mg/mL) with 2 mL of an alternative intravenous medication and subsequently storing the mixture in a polypropylene syringe for 4 hours. The aliquot solutions were visually inspected and evaluated for crystal content at 4 hours by infusing 4 mL of the medication mixture through a 0.45-μm nitrocellulose filter disc. Medication mixtures that were selected for chemical stability testing were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography at 0, 1, and 4 hours using a Zorbax Eclipse Plus C18, 4.6 x 100 mm, 3.5-μm column for separation of analytes with subsequent diode-array detection. Medications were considered chemically compatible if the concentrations of all components were >90% of the original concentrations during the 4 hour simulated Y-site compatibility test. Results: U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) standards for physical particle counts were met for acetaminophen injection (10 mg/mL) when combined with cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, clindamycin, dexamethasone, diphenhydramine, dolasetron, fentanyl, granisetron, hydrocortisone, hydromorphone, ketorolac, meperidine, methylprednisolone, midazolam, morphine, nalbuphine, ondansetron, piperacillin/tazobactam, ranitidine, and vancomycin. Injectable acetaminophen is incompatible with acyclovir and diazepam and therefore should not be administered concomitantly with either of these products. Further testing confirmed the chemical compatibility of acetaminophen with ceftriaxone, diphenhydramine, granisetron, ketorolac, nalbuphine, ondansetron, piperacillin/tazobactam, and vancomycin. Conclusion: All medications tested with acetaminophen were physically compatible except for acyclovir and diazepam. All 8 medications tested for chemical compatibility with acetaminophen were stable over the 4

  13. TRPV1 in Brain Is Involved in Acetaminophen-Induced Antinociception

    PubMed Central

    Eschalier, Alain; Zygmunt, Peter M.; Högestätt, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acetaminophen, the major active metabolite of acetanilide in man, has become one of the most popular over-the-counter analgesic and antipyretic agents, consumed by millions of people daily. However, its mechanism of action is still a matter of debate. We have previously shown that acetaminophen is further metabolized to N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z -eicosatetraenamide (AM404) by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in the rat and mouse brain and that this metabolite is a potent activator of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in vitro. Pharmacological activation of TRPV1 in the midbrain periaqueductal gray elicits antinociception in rats. It is therefore possible that activation of TRPV1 in the brain contributes to the analgesic effect of acetaminophen. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that the antinociceptive effect of acetaminophen at an oral dose lacking hypolocomotor activity is absent in FAAH and TRPV1 knockout mice in the formalin, tail immersion and von Frey tests. This dose of acetaminophen did not affect the global brain contents of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and endocannabinoids. Intracerebroventricular injection of AM404 produced a TRPV1-mediated antinociceptive effect in the mouse formalin test. Pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 in the brain by intracerebroventricular capsazepine injection abolished the antinociceptive effect of oral acetaminophen in the same test. Conclusions This study shows that TRPV1 in brain is involved in the antinociceptive action of acetaminophen and provides a strategy for developing central nervous system active oral analgesics based on the coexpression of FAAH and TRPV1 in the brain. PMID:20862299

  14. Eucalyptus globulus extract protects upon acetaminophen-induced kidney damages in male rat

    PubMed Central

    Dhibi, Sabah; Mbarki, Sakhria; Elfeki, Abdelfettah; Hfaiedh, Najla

    2014-01-01

    Plants have historically been used in treating many diseases. Eucalyptus globules, a rich source of bioactive compounds, and have been shown to possess antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study, carried out on male Wistar rats, was to evaluate the beneficial effects of Eucalyptus globulus extract upon acetaminophen-induced damages in kidney. Our study is realized in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences of Sfax (Tunisia). 32 Wistar male rats; were divided into 4 batches: a control group (n=8), a group of rats treated with acetaminophen (goomg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection during 4 days (n=8), a group receiving Eucalyptus globulus extract (130 mg of dry leaves/kg/day) in drinking water during 42 days after 2 hours of acetaminophen administration (during 4 days) (n=8) and group received only Eucalyptus (n=8) during 42 days. After 6 weeks, animals from each group were rapidly sacrificed by decapitation. Blood serum was obtained by centrifugation. Under our experimental conditions, acetaminophen poisoning resulted in an oxidative stress evidenced by statistically significant losses in the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide-dismutase (SOD), glutathione-peroxidase (GPX) activities and an increase in lipids peroxidation level in renal tissue of acetaminophen-treated group compared with the control group. Acetaminophen also caused kidney damage as evident by statistically significant (p<0.05) increase in levels of creatinine and urea and decreased levels of uric acid and proteins in blood. Histological analysis demonstrated alteration of proximal tubules, atrophy of the glomerule and dilatation of urinary space. Previous administration of plant extract is found to alleviate this acetaminophen-induced damage. PMID:24856382

  15. Eucalyptus globulus extract protects upon acetaminophen-induced kidney damages in male rat.

    PubMed

    Dhibi, Sabah; Mbarki, Sakhria; Elfeki, Abdelfettah; Hfaiedh, Najla

    2014-05-01

    Plants have historically been used in treating many diseases. Eucalyptus globules, a rich source of bioactive compounds, and have been shown to possess antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study, carried out on male Wistar rats, was to evaluate the beneficial effects of Eucalyptus globulus extract upon acetaminophen-induced damages in kidney. Our study is realized in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences of Sfax (Tunisia). 32 Wistar male rats; were divided into 4 batches: a control group (n=8), a group of rats treated with acetaminophen (900 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection during 4 days (n=8), a group receiving Eucalyptus globulus extract (130 mg of dry leaves/kg/day) in drinking water during 42 days after 2 hours of acetaminophen administration (during 4 days) (n=8) and group received only Eucalyptus (n=8) during 42 days. After 6 weeks, animals from each group were rapidly sacrificed by decapitation. Blood serum was obtained by centrifugation. Under our experimental conditions, acetaminophen poisoning resulted in an oxidative stress evidenced by statistically significant losses in the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide-dismutase (SOD), glutathione-peroxidase (GPX) activities and an increase in lipids peroxidation level in renal tissue of acetaminophen-treated group compared with the control group. Acetaminophen also caused kidney damage as evident by statistically significant (p<0.05) increase in levels of creatinine and urea and decreased levels of uric acid and proteins in blood. Histological analysis demonstrated alteration of proximal tubules, atrophy of the glomerule and dilatation of urinary space. Previous administration of plant extract is found to alleviate this acetaminophen-induced damage. PMID:24856382

  16. Effect of antipyrine coadministration on the kinetics of acetaminophen and lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Blyden, G T; Greenblatt, D J; LeDuc, B W; Scavone, J M

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic interactions between antipyrine and acetaminophen were evaluated in 7 healthy volunteers. On 3 occasions subjects received: 1, antipyrine 1.0 g intravenously (i.v.); 2, acetaminophen 650 mg i.v.; 3, antipyrine 1.0 g and acetaminophen 650 mg i.v. simultaneously. Between Trials 1 and 3, antipyrine elimination t1/2 (17.2 vs 17.4 h), clearance (0.44 vs 0.43 ml.min-1.kg-1) and 24-h recovery of antipyrine and metabolites (313 vs 293 mg) did not differ significantly. Between Trials 2 and 3, acetaminophen VZ was reduced (1.14 vs 1.00 l.kg-1), t1/2 prolonged (2.7 vs 3.3 h), clearance reduced (4.8 vs 3.6 ml.min-1.kg-1), and fractional urinary recovery of acetaminophen glucuronide reduced. Eight additional subjects received 50 mg of lidocaine hydrochloride i.v. in the control state, and on a second occasion immediately after antipyrine 1.0 g given i.v. The two trials did not differ significantly in lidocaine VZ (2.6 vs 2.7 l.kg-1), t1/2 (2.0 vs 2.4 h) or clearance (15.0 vs 13.5 ml.min-1.kg-1). Although acetaminophen does not alter antipyrine kinetics, acute administration of antipyrine appears to impair acetaminophen clearance, possibly via inhibition of glucuronide formation. However, antipyrine has no significant effect on the kinetics of a single i.v. dose of lidocaine. PMID:3197750

  17. Supra-additive effects of tramadol and acetaminophen in a human pain model.

    PubMed

    Filitz, Jörg; Ihmsen, Harald; Günther, Werner; Tröster, Andreas; Schwilden, Helmut; Schüttler, Jürgen; Koppert, Wolfgang

    2008-06-01

    The combination of analgesic drugs with different pharmacological properties may show better efficacy with less side effects. Aim of this study was to examine the analgesic and antihyperalgesic properties of the weak opioid tramadol and the non-opioid acetaminophen, alone as well as in combination, in an experimental pain model in humans. After approval of the local Ethics Committee, 17 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this double-blind and placebo-controlled study in a cross-over design. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation at high current densities (29.6+/-16.2 mA) induced spontaneous acute pain (NRS=6 of 10) and distinct areas of hyperalgesia for painful mechanical stimuli (pinprick-hyperalgesia). Pain intensities as well as the extent of the areas of hyperalgesia were assessed before, during and 150 min after a 15 min lasting intravenous infusion of acetaminophen (650 mg), tramadol (75 mg), a combination of both (325 mg acetaminophen and 37.5mg tramadol), or saline 0.9%. Tramadol led to a maximum pain reduction of 11.7+/-4.2% with negligible antihyperalgesic properties. In contrast, acetaminophen led to a similar pain reduction (9.8+/-4.4%), but a sustained antihyperalgesic effect (34.5+/-14.0% reduction of hyperalgesic area). The combination of both analgesics at half doses led to a supra-additive pain reduction of 15.2+/-5.7% and an enhanced antihyperalgesic effect (41.1+/-14.3% reduction of hyperalgesic areas) as compared to single administration of acetaminophen. Our study provides first results on interactions of tramadol and acetaminophen on experimental pain and hyperalgesia in humans. Pharmacodynamic modeling combined with the isobolographic technique showed supra-additive effects of the combination of acetaminophen and tramadol concerning both, analgesia and antihyperalgesia. The results might act as a rationale for combining both analgesics. PMID:17709207

  18. Age-related decrease in cerebrovascular-derived neuroprotective proteins: effect of acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Debjani; Sanchez, Alma; Yin, Xiangling; Martinez, Joseph; Grammas, Paula

    2012-01-01

    As the population ages, the need for effective methods to maintain brain function in older adults is increasingly pressing. Vascular disease and neurodegenerative disorders commonly co-occur in older persons. Cerebrovascular products contribute to the neuronal milieu and have important consequences for neuronal viability. In this regard vascular derived neuroprotective proteins, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) are important for maintaining neuronal viability, especially in the face of injury and disease. The objective of this study is to measure and compare levels of VEGF, PEDF and PACAP released from isolated brain microvessels of Fischer 344 rats at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months of age. Addition of acetaminophen to isolated brain microvessels is employed to determine whether this drug affects vascular expression of these neuroprotective proteins. Experiments on cultured brain endothelial cells are performed to explore the mechanisms/mediators that regulate the effect of acetaminophen on en