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Sample records for acetaminophen caffeine carbamazepine

  1. The role of sorption and biodegradation in the removal of acetaminophen, carbamazepine, caffeine, naproxen and sulfamethoxazole during soil contact: A kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hernández, Virtudes; Meffe, Raffaella; Herrera López, Sonia; de Bustamante, Irene

    2016-07-15

    In countries like Spain, where water is a limited resource, reusing effluents from wastewater treatment plants may imply the introduction of incompletely eliminated pollutants into the environment. Therefore, this work identified the role of sorption and biodegradation in attenuating pharmaceutical compounds (acetaminophen, carbamazepine, caffeine, naproxen and sulfamethoxazole) in natural soil. It also determined which sorption and removal ("sorption+biodegradation") kinetics models describe the behaviour of these substances in the water-soil system. Presence of potential transformation products (TPs) as a result of pharmaceuticals biodegradation was also studied. To this end, serial batch-type experiments were performed with a soil:water ratio of 1:4 and an initial pharmaceutical concentration of 100μgL(-1). Despite results are dependent on soil characteristics, they revealed that, for those substances with a higher affinity to the soil used (loamy sand), sorption seems to play a key role during the first 48h of contact with soil, and gives way to biodegradation afterwards. The sorption of the pharmaceuticals studied follows a pseudo second-order kinetics. Caffeine and sulfamethoxazole displayed the fastest initial sorption velocities (h=2055 and h=228μgkg(-1)h(-1), respectively). The removal kinetics experiments, satisfactorily simulated by the first-order kinetics model, indicated the presence of potential microbial adaptation to degradation. Indeed, half-lives decreased from 1.6- to 11.7-fold with respect to initial values. The microbial capacity to degrade sulfamethoxazole could be a matter of concern if bacteria have developed resistance to this antibiotic. Caffeine, acetaminophen and sulfamethoxazole were mitigated to a greater extent, whereas the removal of naproxen and carbamazepine was more limited. The appearance of epoxy-carbamazepine and N4-acetyl-sulfamethoxazole as possible TPs of carbamazepine and sulfamethoxazole, respectively, indicated that

  2. Acetaminophen toxicity with concomitant use of carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Jickling, Glen; Heino, Angela; Ahmed, S Nizam

    2009-12-01

    Acetaminophen is a widely used analgesic that can cause acute liver failure when consumed above a maximum daily dose. Certain patients may be at increased risk of hepatocellular damage even at conventional therapeutic doses. We report a case of a 34-year-old man on carbamazepine for complex partial seizures who developed acute liver and renal failure on less than 2.5 grams a day of acetaminophen. This raises caution that patients on carbamazepine should avoid chronic use of acetaminophen, and if required use at lower doses with vigilant monitoring for signs of liver damage.

  3. Acetaminophen

    MedlinePlus

    Backprin® (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Caffeine, Magnesium Salicylate) ... Forte® (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Caffeine, Magnesium Salicylate, Phenyltoloxamine)

  4. Fecal coliforms, caffeine and carbamazepine in stormwater collection systems in a large urban area.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Sébastien; Aboulfadl, Khadija; Dorner, Sarah; Payment, Pierre; Deschamps, Guy; Prévost, Michèle

    2012-01-01

    Water samples from streams, brooks and storm sewer outfall pipes that collect storm waters across the Island of Montréal were analyzed for caffeine, carbamazepine and fecal coliforms. All samples contained various concentrations of these tracers, indicating a widespread sanitary contamination in urban environments. Fecal coliforms and caffeine levels ranged over several orders of magnitude with a modest correlation between caffeine and fecal coliforms (R(2) value of 0.558). An arbitrary threshold of 400 ng caffeine L(-1) allows us to identify samples with an elevated fecal contamination, as defined by more than 200 colony-forming units per 100 mL (cfu 100 mL(-1)) of fecal coliforms. Low caffeine levels were sporadically related to high fecal coliform counts. Lower levels of caffeine and fecal coliforms were observed in the brooks while the larger streams and storm water discharge points contained over ten times more. The carbamazepine data showed little or no apparent correlation to caffeine. These data suggest that this storm water collection system, located in a highly urbanized urban environment, is widely contaminated by domestic sewers as indicated by the ubiquitous presence of fecal contaminants as well as caffeine and carbamazepine. Caffeine concentrations were relatively well correlated to fecal coliforms, and could potentially be used as a chemical indicator of the level of contamination by sanitary sources. The carbamazepine data was not significantly correlated to fecal coliforms and of little use in this dataset.

  5. A safety assessment of fixed combinations of acetaminophen and acetylsalicylic acid, coformulated with caffeine.

    PubMed

    Bach, P H; Berndt, W O; Delzell, E; Dubach, U; Finn, W F; Fox, J M; Hess, R; Michielsen, P; Sandler, D P; Trump, B; Williams, G

    1998-11-01

    Overuse and abuse of phenacetin-containing mixed analgesics has contributed to end-stage renal disease. Combination analgesics, especially those coformulated with caffeine, have been implicated as imparting a greater risk of analgesic-associated nephropathy (AAN) than single or coformulated analgesics without caffeine. This has led to a recommendation that the sale of "two plus caffeine" analgesic mixtures be reclassified from over-the-counter to prescription only availability. There is a rational basis for coformulating acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and acetaminophen (paracetamol) as this reduces the dose of each, without altering efficacy. The coformulation of caffeine with these analgesics has a significant adjuvant effect and increases analgesic efficacy 1.4-1.6-fold. Currently available animal and human data do not support the notion that the nephrotoxic risk from coformulated ASA and acetaminophen is higher than the risk from either ASA or acetaminophen alone, in equivalent analgesic doses. There are no epidemiological data that implicate caffeine in AAN, and only limited evidence that links excessive acetaminophen usage to renal disease. There is no evidence that caffeine increases analgesics papillotoxicity directly. The presence of caffeine in mixtures of analgesics are no more addictive than other sources of caffeine. There is no evidence to suggest that adding caffeine to analgesic mixtures enhances the potential for promoting analgesic misuse in the general population. Thus distinct therapeutic benefits of ASA, acetaminophen and caffeine appear to outweigh any known risk. It is doubtful if preventing the availability of these products will significantly affect the role of analgesic abuse/overuse in end-stage renal disease. Better risk management would come from a focused educational program, developed in a close collaboration between industry, healthcare professionals and consumer organizations, such a program must warn against the potential dangers of

  6. Carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Alrashood, S T

    2016-01-01

    This chapter includes the aspects of carbamazepine. The drug is synthesized by the use of 5H-dibenz[b,f]azepine and phosgene followed by subsequent reaction with ammonia. Carbamazepine is generally used for the treatment of seizure disorders and neuropathic pain, it is also important as off-label for a second-line treatment for bipolar disorder and in combination with an antipsychotic in some cases of schizophrenia when treatment with a conventional antipsychotic alone has failed. Other uses may include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, phantom limb syndrome, complex regional pain syndrome, borderline personality disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. The chapter discusses the drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics and presents various methods of analysis of this drug such electrochemical analysis, spectroscopic analysis, and chromatographic techniques of separation. It also discusses its physical properties such as solubility characteristics, X-ray powder diffraction pattern, and thermal methods of analysis. The chapter is concluded with a discussion on its biological properties such as activity, toxicity, and safety.

  7. Identification and Quantitative Analysis of Acetaminophen, Acetylsalicylic Acid, and Caffeine in Commercial Analgesic Tablets by LC-MS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenk, Christopher J.; Hickman, Nicole M.; Fincke, Melissa A.; Motry, Douglas H.; Lavine, Barry

    2010-01-01

    An undergraduate LC-MS experiment is described for the identification and quantitative determination of acetaminophen, acetylsalicylic acid, and caffeine in commercial analgesic tablets. This inquiry-based experimental procedure requires minimal sample preparation and provides good analytical results. Students are provided sufficient background…

  8. Immunoassays as high-throughput tools: monitoring spatial and temporal variations of carbamazepine, caffeine and cetirizine in surface and wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Bahlmann, Arnold; Carvalho, José João; Weller, Michael G; Panne, Ulrich; Schneider, Rudolf J

    2012-11-01

    Carbamazepine (CBZ), caffeine and cetirizine were monitored by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in surface and wastewaters from Berlin, Germany. This fast and cost-efficient method enabled to assess the spatial and temporal variation of these anthropogenic markers in a high-throughput screening. CBZ and cetirizine were detected by the same antibody, which selectively discriminates between both compounds depending on the pH value used in the incubation step. To our best knowledge, this is the first dual-analyte immunoassay working with a single antibody. The frequent sampling with 487 samples being processed allowed for the repeated detection of unusually high concentrations of CBZ and caffeine. ELISA results correlate well with the ones obtained by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Caffeine concentrations found in surface waters were elevated by combined sewer overflows after stormwater events. During the hay fever season, the concentrations of the antihistamine drug cetirizine increased in both surface and wastewaters. Caffeine was almost completely removed during wastewater treatment, while CBZ and cetirizine were found to be more persistent. The maximum concentrations of caffeine, CBZ and cetirizine found in influent wastewater by LC-MS/MS were 470, 5.0 and 0.49 μg L(-1), while in effluent wastewater the concentrations were 0.22, 4.5 and 0.51 μg L(-1), respectively. For surface waters, concentrations up to 3.3, 4.5 and 0.72 μg L(-1) were found, respectively.

  9. Efficacy of fixed combinations of acetylsalicyclic acid, acetaminophen and caffeine in the treatment of idiopathic headache: a review.

    PubMed

    Anneken, K; Evers, S; Husstedt, I W

    2010-04-01

    Headache is one of the most common reasons for patients to visit their general practitioner. Most of these patients suffer from migraine, tension-type headache, or a combination of the two; they tend to self-medicate using over the counter combination headache preparations, particularly acetylsalicyclic acid (ASA) and acetaminophen coformulated with caffeine, which is one of the most commonly used combination analgesics in these patients worldwide. We reviewed studies on the efficacy and safety of this combination. In the treatment of migraine and tension-type headache, the combination of ASA, acetaminophen, and caffeine has been shown to be more efficacious and superior to monotherapy with the single substances of the combination. According to literature, there is no evidence for higher prevalence of undesirable side-effects of combination analgesics in comparison to monotherapy.

  10. Effect of venous dexamethasone, oral caffeine and acetaminophen on relative frequency and intensity of postdural puncture headache after spinal anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Masoudifar, Mehrdad; Aghadavoudi, Omid; Adib, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) is a relatively common complication after regional anesthesia, especially in younger people, bothersome to patients and needs prophylaxis to prevent this complication. This study was conducted aiming to determine the preventive effect of dexamethasone plus caffeine and acetaminophen on relative frequency and intensity of PDPH after spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: In a clinical trial study, 90 candidates for the lower extremities orthopedic elective operation were divided into two groups of 45 individuals each. Intervention group received the compound of 500 mg acetaminophen +65 mg oral caffeine +8 mg venous dexamethasone an hour before spinal blocking, and the control group received placebo tablets + a dexamethasone equivalent volume of venous normal saline. The level of postoperative headache at the time of entrance to recovery and discharge, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h postoperatively were measured based on Visual Analog Scale criterion in the two groups and then compared with each other. Results: During the study, 24 patients in the control group and 17 patients in the intervention group were afflicted with headache; however, with no significant difference (P = 0.14). Total frequency of headache incidence was 35 times in the control group and 27 times in the intervention group (P = 0.32). Conclusions: Though the taking of acetaminophen + caffeine + dexamethasone is associated with a decrease in headache intensity and duration and decrease in PDPH incidence, compared with placebo, however, no essentially and statistically significant effect was produced. PMID:27169097

  11. Yes, caffeine, ibuprofen, carbamazepine, novobiocin and tamoxifen have an effect on Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774).

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Martínez, Gabriela V; DelValls, Angel T; Laura Martín-Díaz, M

    2015-10-01

    Reports indicating the presence of pharmaceutical in fresh water environment in the ngL(-1) to µgL(-1) range are occurring with increasing frequency. It is also a fact that pharmaceuticals may produce adverse effects on aquatic organisms. Nevertheless, there is still a lack of knowledge regarding how these emergent contaminants may affect aquatic biota. The goal of this research was to evaluate the sublethal responses in Corbicula fluminea such as, general stress (lysosomal membrane stability [LMS]), biomarkers of phase I and II (etoxyresorufin O-deethylase [EROD], dibenzylfluorescein dealkylase [DBF], gluthathione-S-transferase [GST]), oxidative stress (gluthathione reductase [GR], gluthathione peroxidase [GPX], lipid peroxidation [LPO]), and biomarkers of effect (DNA damage) after 21 days of exposure to caffeine, ibuprofen, carbamazepine, novobiocin and tamoxifen at 0.1, 1, 5, 10, 15, 50µgL(-1). Environmental concentrations tested in this study caused general stress and produced changes on biomarkers tested. LMS, responses from phase I and II enzymatic activity, oxidative stress, and biomarker of effect represent important ecotoxicological information, and will provide a useful reference for the assessment of selected drugs and the effects which these compounds may have on aquatic invertebrates, using C. fluminea as a bioindicator species.

  12. Pharmacokinetic Herb-Drug Interaction between Essential Oil of Aniseed (Pimpinella anisum L., Apiaceae) and Acetaminophen and Caffeine: A Potential Risk for Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Samojlik, Isidora; Petković, Stojan; Stilinović, Nebojša; Vukmirović, Saša; Mijatović, Vesna; Božin, Biljana

    2016-02-01

    Aniseed (Pimpinella anisum L., Apiaceae) and its essential oil (EO) have been widely used. Because there are some data about the impact of aniseed EO on drug effects, this survey aimed to assess the potential of pharmacokinetic herb-drug interaction between aniseed EO and acetaminophen and caffeine in mice. The chemical analysis (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) of aniseed EO has confirmed trans-anethole (87.96%) as the main component. The pharmacokinetic studies of intraperitoneally (i.p.) and orally applied acetaminophen (200 mg/kg) and caffeine (20 mg/kg) were performed in mice after 5 days of oral treatment with human equivalent dose of aniseed EO (0.3 mg/kg/day). The analysis of pharmacokinetic data showed that in the group treated by aniseed EO, the significant decrease in the peak plasma concentration of acetaminophen after oral application (p = 0.024) was revealed when compared with control group and the reduction of systemic exposure to the drug after oral application (74 ± 32% vs. 85 ± 35% in the control) was noted. The bioavailability of orally applied caffeine was also significantly decreased (p = 0.022) after the EO treatment in comparison with the control (57 ± 24% vs. 101 ± 29%). Therefore, the compromised therapeutic efficacy of acetaminophen and caffeine during the usage of aniseed EO preparations should be considered.

  13. Predicting the excess solubility of acetanilide, acetaminophen, phenacetin, benzocaine, and caffeine in binary water/ethanol mixtures via molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Andrew S; Parameswaran, Sreeja; Liu, Shuai; Kolavennu, Anasuya; Mobley, David L

    2015-01-28

    We present a general framework to predict the excess solubility of small molecular solids (such as pharmaceutical solids) in binary solvents via molecular simulation free energy calculations at infinite dilution with conventional molecular models. The present study used molecular dynamics with the General AMBER Force Field to predict the excess solubility of acetanilide, acetaminophen, phenacetin, benzocaine, and caffeine in binary water/ethanol solvents. The simulations are able to predict the existence of solubility enhancement and the results are in good agreement with available experimental data. The accuracy of the predictions in addition to the generality of the method suggests that molecular simulations may be a valuable design tool for solvent selection in drug development processes.

  14. Predicting the excess solubility of acetanilide, acetaminophen, phenacetin, benzocaine, and caffeine in binary water/ethanol mixtures via molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluch, Andrew S.; Parameswaran, Sreeja; Liu, Shuai; Kolavennu, Anasuya; Mobley, David L.

    2015-01-01

    We present a general framework to predict the excess solubility of small molecular solids (such as pharmaceutical solids) in binary solvents via molecular simulation free energy calculations at infinite dilution with conventional molecular models. The present study used molecular dynamics with the General AMBER Force Field to predict the excess solubility of acetanilide, acetaminophen, phenacetin, benzocaine, and caffeine in binary water/ethanol solvents. The simulations are able to predict the existence of solubility enhancement and the results are in good agreement with available experimental data. The accuracy of the predictions in addition to the generality of the method suggests that molecular simulations may be a valuable design tool for solvent selection in drug development processes.

  15. Hediste diversicolor as bioindicator of pharmaceutical pollution: Results from single and combined exposure to carbamazepine and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Pires, Adília; Almeida, Ângela; Calisto, Vânia; Schneider, Rudolf J; Esteves, Valdemar I; Wrona, Frederick J; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Figueira, Etelvina; Freitas, Rosa

    2016-10-01

    Several environmental stressors have been identified as key and/or emerging drivers of habitat change that could significantly influence marine near-shore ecosystems. These include increasing discharges of pharmaceutical contaminants into the aquatic coastal systems. Pharmaceutical drugs are often detected in aquatic environments but still information on their toxicity impacts on inhabiting species is scarce, especially when acting in combination. Furthermore, almost no information is available on the impacts of pharmaceuticals in polychaetes, often the most abundant taxon in benthic communities and commonly used as indicator species of environmental conditions. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the biochemical alterations induced in the polychaete Hediste diversicolor, from a low contaminated area at the Ria de Aveiro lagoon (Portugal), by the antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (0.0 - control, 0.3, 3.0, 6.0 and 9.0μg/L) and the stimulant caffeine (0.0 - control, 0.5, 3.0, and 18.0μg/L), acting alone and in combination (0.3 CBZ+0.5 CAF and 6.0 CBZ+3.0 CAF). Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities was determined in Hediste diversicolor from each condition. Lipid peroxidation (LPO), glutathione reduced and oxidized (GSH and GSSG), glycogen and electron transport system (ETS) were also measured. The results obtained clearly revealed that both drugs induced oxidative stress in H. diversicolor, shown by the increase on LPO levels and decrease on total glutathione and GSH/GSSG ratio with the increase of exposure concentrations. Furthermore, the present findings demonstrated that polychaetes biotransformation capacity as well as antioxidant defense mechanisms were not sufficiently efficient to fight against the excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to LPO when organisms were exposed to both drugs. Our results also demonstrated that polychaetes tended to decrease the activity of ETS when exposed to

  16. Using lysosomal membrane stability of haemocytes in Ruditapes philippinarum as a biomarker of cellular stress to assess contamination by caffeine, ibuprofen, carbamazepine and novobiocin.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Martínez, Gabriela V; Buratti, Sara; Fabbr, Elena; DelValls, Angel T; Martín-Díaz, M Laura

    2013-07-01

    Although pharmaceuticals have been detected in the environment only in the range from ng/L to microg/L, it has been demonstrated that they can adversely affect the health status of aquatic organisms. Lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) has previously been applied as an indicator of cellular well-being to determine health status in bivalve mussels. The objective of this study is to evaluate LMS in Ruditapes philippinarum haemolymph using the neutral red retention assay (NRRA). Clams were exposed in laboratory conditions to caffeine (0.1, 5, 15, 50 microg/L), ibuprofen (0.1, 5, 10, 50 microg/L), carbamazepine and novobiocin (both at 0.1, 1, 10, 50 microg/L) for 35 days. Results show a dose-dependent effect of the pharmaceuticals. The neutral red retention time measured at the end of the bioassay was significantly reduced by 50% after exposure to environmental concentrations (p < 0.05) (caffeine = 15 microg/L; ibuprofen = 10 microg/L; carbamazepine = 1 microg/L and novobiocin = 1 microg/L), compared to controls. Clams exposed to these pharmaceuticals were considered to present a diminished health status (retention time < 45 min), significantly worse than controls (96 min) (p < 0.05). The predicted no environmental effect concentration (PNEC) results showed that these pharmaceuticals are very toxic at the environmental concentrations tested. Measurement of the alteration of LMS has been found to be a sensitive technique that enables evaluation of the health status of clams after exposure to pharmaceuticals under laboratory conditions, thus representing a robust Tier-1 screening biomarker.

  17. Caffeine

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines for alertness contain synthetic caffeine. So do energy drinks and "energy-boosting" gums and snacks. Most people consume caffeine ... of cola: 35-45 mg An 8-ounce energy drink: 70-100 mg An 8-ounce cup ...

  18. Caffeine

    MedlinePlus

    ... energy boost and elevates mood. Caffeine is in tea, coffee, chocolate, many soft drinks, and pain relievers ... coffee (drip method) 5 ounces 115 mg* Iced tea 12 ounces 70 mg* Cocoa beverage 5 ounces ...

  19. Caffeine

    MedlinePlus

    ... and elevates mood. Caffeine is in tea, coffee, chocolate, many soft drinks, and pain relievers and other ... 70 mg* Cocoa beverage 5 ounces 4 mg* Chocolate milk beverage 8 ounces 5 mg* Dark chocolate ...

  20. Single and multi-component adsorption of salicylic acid, clofibric acid, carbamazepine and caffeine from water onto transition metal modified and partially calcined inorganic-organic pillared clay fixed beds.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Lafaurie, Wilman A; Román, Félix R; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J

    2015-01-23

    Fixed-beds of transition metal (Co(2+), Ni(2+) or Cu(2+)) inorganic-organic pillared clays (IOCs) were prepared to study single- and multi-component non-equilibrium adsorption of a set of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs: salicylic acid, clofibric acid, carbamazepine and caffeine) from water. Adsorption capacities for single components revealed that the copper(II) IOCs have better affinity toward salicylic and clofibric acid. However, multi-component adsorption tests showed a considerable decrease in adsorption capacity for the acids and an unusual selectivity toward carbamazepine depending on the transition metal. This was attributed to a combination of competition between PPCPs for adsorption sites, adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, and plausible pore blocking caused by carbamazepine. The cobalt(II) IOC bed that was partially calcined to fractionate the surfactant moiety showcased the best selectivity toward caffeine, even during multi-component adsorption. This was due to a combination of a mildly hydrophobic surface and interaction between the PPCP and cobalt(II). In general, the tests suggest that these IOCs may be a potential solution for the removal of PPCPs if employed in a layered-bed configuration, to take care of families of adsorbates in a sequence that would produce sharpened concentration wavefronts.

  1. Acetaminophen, Butalbital, and Caffeine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for ...

  2. Determination of residues of acetaminophen, caffeine, and drotaverine hydrochloride on swabs collected from pharmaceutical manufacturing equipment using HPLC in support of cleaning validation.

    PubMed

    Hassouna, Mohamed E M; Issa, Yousry M; Zayed, Ashraf G

    2014-01-01

    An HPLC method was developed for the simultaneous determination of residues of acetaminophen (paracetamol, PA), caffeine (CA), and drotaverine HCl (DH) on swabs collected from pharmaceutical manufacturing equipment surfaces. The challenge in cleaning validation is to develop analytical methods that are sensitive enough to detect traces of the active compounds remaining on the surface of pharmaceutical manufacturing equipment after cleaning. Chromatography was performed in the isocratic mode on a Hypersil C18 BDS column using the mobile phase 0.02 M tetrabutylammonium bisulfate-methanol (100 + 45, v/v) at 50°C with UV detection at 210 nm. The method was tested for specificity, linearity, LOD, LOQ, accuracy, and precision for determination of traces of the above-mentioned drugs. The time required for a single analysis was 12 min. The response was linear in the ranges of 6.900-52.100, 1.040-7.800, and 0.694-5.210 μg/mL for PA, CA, and DH, respectively.

  3. Chemometric resolution of fully overlapped CE peaks: quantitation of carbamazepine in human serum in the presence of several interferences.

    PubMed

    Vera-Candioti, Luciana; Culzoni, María J; Olivieri, Alejandro C; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2008-11-01

    Drug monitoring in serum samples was performed using second-order data generated by CE-DAD, processed with a suitable chemometric strategy. Carbamazepine could be accurately quantitated in the presence of its main metabolite (carbamazepine epoxide), other therapeutic drugs (lamotrigine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, phenylephrine, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, theophylline, caffeine, acetyl salicylic acid), and additional serum endogenous components. The analytical strategy consisted of the following steps: (i) serum sample clean-up to remove matrix interferences, (ii) data pre-processing, in order to reduce the background and to correct for electrophoretic time shifts, and (iii) resolution of fully overlapped CE peaks (corresponding to carbamazepine, its metabolite, lamotrigine and unexpected serum components) by the well-known multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares algorithm, which extracts quantitative information that can be uniquely ascribed to the analyte of interest. The analyte concentration in serum samples ranged from 2.00 to 8.00 mg/L. Mean recoveries were 102.6% (s=7.7) for binary samples, and 94.8% (s=13.5) for spiked serum samples, while CV (%)=4.0 was computed for five replicate, indicative of the acceptable accuracy and precision of the proposed method.

  4. The distribution dynamics and desorption behaviour of mobile pharmaceuticals and caffeine to combined sewer sediments.

    PubMed

    Hajj-Mohamad, M; Darwano, H; Duy, S Vo; Sauvé, S; Prévost, M; Arp, H P H; Dorner, S

    2017-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are discharged to the environment from wastewater resource recovery facilities, sewer overflows, and illicit sewer connections. To understand the fate of pharmaceuticals, there is a need to better understand their sorption dynamics to suspended sediments (SS) and settled sediments (StS) in sewer systems. In this study, such sorption dynamics to both SS and StS were assessed using a batch equilibrium method under both static and dynamic conditions. Experiments were performed with natively occurring and artificially modified concentrations of sewer pharmaceuticals (acetaminophen, theophylline, carbamazepine, and a metabolite of carbamazepine) and caffeine. Differences in apparent distribution coefficients, Kd,app, between SS and StS were related to differences in their organic carbon (OC) content, and the practice of artificially modifying the concentration. Kd,app values of modified contaminant concentrations and high OC sediments were substantially higher. Pseudo-second order desorption rates for these mobile compounds were also quantified. Successive flushing events to simulate the addition of stormwater to sewer networks revealed that aqueous concentrations would not necessarily decrease, because the added water will rapidly return to equilibrium concentrations with the sediments. Sorption and desorption kinetics must be considered in addition to dilution, to avoid underestimating the influence of dilution on concentrations of pharmaceuticals discharged to the environment.

  5. Acetaminophen overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... measure and monitor the person's vital signs, including temperature, pulse, breathing rate, and blood pressure. Blood tests will be done to check how much acetaminophen is in the blood. The person may receive: Activated charcoal Airway support, including oxygen, breathing tube through the ...

  6. How to Safely Give Acetaminophen

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old How to Safely Give Acetaminophen KidsHealth > For Parents > How to Safely Give Acetaminophen ... without getting a doctor's OK first. What Is Acetaminophen Also Called? Acetaminophen is the generic name of ...

  7. Quantitative HPLC Analysis of an Analgesic/Caffeine Formulation: Determination of Caffeine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Glenda K.

    1998-04-01

    A modern high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) laboratory experiment which entails the separation of acetaminophen, aspirin, and caffeine and the quantitative assay of caffeine in commercial mixtures of these compounds has been developed. Our HPLC protocol resolves these compounds in only three minutes with a straightforward chromatographic apparatus which consists of a C-18 column, an isocratic mobile phase, UV detection at 254 nm, and an integrator; an expensive, sophisticated system is not required. The separation is both repeatable and rapid. Moreover, the experiment can be completed in a single three-hour period. The experiment is appropriate for any chemistry student who has completed a minimum of one year of general chemistry and is ideal for an analytical or instrumental analysis course. The experiment detailed herein involves the determination of caffeine in Goody's Extra Strength Headache Powders, a commercially available medication which contains acetaminophen, aspirin, and caffeine as active ingredients. However, the separation scheme is not limited to this brand of medication nor is it limited to caffeine as the analyte. With only minor procedural modifications, students can simultaneously quantitate all of these compounds in a commercial mixture. In our procedure, students prepare a series of four caffeine standard solutions as well as a solution from a pharmaceutical analgesic/caffeine mixture, chromatographically analyze each solution in quadruplicate, and plot relative average caffeine standard peak area versus concentration. From the mathematical relationship that results, the concentration of caffeine in the commercial formulation is obtained. Finally, the absolute standard deviation of the mean concentration is calculated.

  8. Acetaminophen dosing for children

    MedlinePlus

    Tylenol ... Acetaminophen is used to help: Reduce aches, pain, sore throat, and fever in children with a cold ... Children's acetaminophen can be taken as liquid or chewable tablet. If your child is under 2 years old, check ...

  9. Caffeine overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002579.htm Caffeine overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Caffeine is a substance that exists naturally in certain ...

  10. Acetaminophen and Codeine

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of acetaminophen and codeine comes as a tablet, capsule, and liquid to take by mouth. It usually is taken every 6 ... explain any part you do not understand. Take acetaminophen and codeine exactly as directed.Codeine can be ...

  11. [Hyponatremia - carbamazepine medication complications].

    PubMed

    Dedinská, I; Maňka, V; Ságová, I; Klimentová, A; Makovický, P; Polko, J; Sadloňová, J; Mokáň, M

    2012-01-01

    Hyponatremia can be defined like the low sodium concentration, lower that 135 mmol/l. It becomes really serious when the concentration is lower than 120 mmol/l. The most frequent causes of hyponatremia are: the extrarenal loss (GIT, skin, bleeding, sequestration), the renal loss (diuretics, nephritis with the salt loss, osmotical diuresis, the Addison disease), hypothyroidism, the lack of glucocorticoids, emotional stress, pain, pseudohyponatremia (incorrect taking, dyslipoproteinemia). There is fatigue, exhaustion, headache and vertigoes dominating in the clinical record file. By the deficit increasing a patient becomes delirious, comatose even with the shock development. It is necessary to separate sufficient supply of sodium from much more often reason, which is loss of sodium which can be caused by: excessive sweating, vomitting with the metabolical alkalosis development, diarrhoea with the metabolical acidosis development, renal losses (a phase of renal failure). Treatment of hyponatremia: intensive treatment starts at the level of plasmatic concentration of sodium under 120 mmol/l or when neurological symptoms of brain oedema are present. In the therapy it is necessary to avoid fast infusions of hypertonic saline solutions (3-5% NaCl solutions) because of the danger of the development of serious CNS complications (intracranial bleeding, etc.). It is recommended to adjust the plasmatic concentration of sodium up to 120 mmol/l during the first four hours and a subsequent correction should not be higher than 2 mmol per an hour. Treatment of the basic illness is very important. We present 2 case histories: a 74-year old female patient and a 69-year old female patient both with the hyponatremia caused by taking of carbamazepine. We want to inform and warn about not only a well known side effect during long-term treatment but about hyponatremia that arose within 48 hours after the start of taking medicine as well.

  12. Caffeine in the diet

    MedlinePlus

    Diet - caffeine ... Caffeine is absorbed and passes quickly into the brain. It does not collect in the bloodstream or ... been consumed. There is no nutritional need for caffeine. It can be avoided in the diet. Caffeine ...

  13. Phytoremediation of carbamazepine and its metabolite 10,11-epoxycarbamazepine by C3 and C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Ryšlavá, Helena; Pomeislová, Alice; Pšondrová, Šárka; Hýsková, Veronika; Smrček, Stanislav

    2015-12-01

    The anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine is considered as an indicator of sewage water pollution: however, its uptake by plants and effect on metabolism have not been sufficiently documented, let alone its metabolite (10,11-epoxycarbamazepine). In a model system of sterile, hydroponically cultivated Zea mays (as C4 plant) and Helianthus annuus (as C3 plant), the uptake and effect of carbamazepine and 10,11-epoxycarbamazepine were studied in comparison with those of acetaminophen and ibuprofen. Ibuprofen and acetaminophen were effectively extracted from drug-supplemented media by both plants, while the uptake of more hydrophobic carbamazepine was much lower. On the other hand, the carbamazepine metabolite, 10,11-epoxycarbamazepine, was, unlike sunflower, willingly taken up by maize plants (after 96 h 88 % of the initial concentration) and effectively stored in maize tissues. In addition, the effect of the studied pharmaceuticals on the plant metabolism (enzymes of Hatch-Slack cycle, peroxidases) was followed. The activity of bound peroxidases, which could cause xylem vessel lignification and reduction of xenobiotic uptake, was at the level of control plants in maize leaves contrary to sunflower. Therefore, our results indicate that maize has the potential to remove 10,11-epoxycarbamazepine from contaminated soils.

  14. Carbamazepine-induced hypertension: A rare case

    PubMed Central

    Kharb, Preeti; Mittal, Niti; Gupta, Mahesh C.

    2015-01-01

    A 74-year-old female with trigeminal neuralgia developed hypertension after the initiation of carbamazepine therapy. The time sequence of start of the suspected drug and onset of hypertension are consistent with the diagnosis. The hypertension did not resolve with antihypertensive therapy or dose reduction of carbamazepine. Patient recovered after the carbamazepine therapy was discontinued. The positive rechallenge and positive dechallenge showed association of carbamazepine therapy with hypertension as its adverse effect. This is a rare case that we report of carbamazepine-induced hypertension and this report may act as alerting mechanism to the health care professionals especially neurologists. PMID:26816475

  15. Is carbamazepine a human teratogen?

    PubMed

    Vajda, F J E; O'Brien, T J; Graham, J; Lander, C M; Eadie, M J

    2016-01-01

    The foetal outcomes of 2,635 pregnancies recorded in the Australian Pregnancy Register were studied. In at least the initial 4months of 515 pregnancies, there had been no intrauterine exposure to antiepileptic drugs, though the women involved in 264 of these pregnancies took antiepileptic drugs in later pregnancies. Compared with these 515 drug-unexposed pregnancies, foetal malformations risks were increased more than five-fold in association with valproate monotherapy, and more than doubled in association with carbamazepine monotherapy (p<0.05). There were no statistically significant increases in malformation rates associated with other more commonly used antiepileptic drugs, while the malformation risk in relation to levetiracetam exposure was lower than that in the drug-unexposed pregnancies. The published literature has rather consistently shown raised malformation rates associated with carbamazepine monotherapy, though only once was it statistically significant. There now appears to be enough evidence to make it likely that carbamazepine possesses some teratogenic capacity. This makes it unwise to employ the malformation rate associated with carbamazepine monotherapy as a comparator when assessing the foetal hazards from exposure to newer antiepileptic drugs. Levetiracetam may prove a better comparator if adequate untreated control material is unobtainable.

  16. Water intoxication in epileptic patients receiving carbamazepine.

    PubMed Central

    Perucca, E; Garratt, A; Hebdige, S; Richens, A

    1978-01-01

    Plasma sodium and osmolality were determined in 80 adult epileptic patients receiving chronic treatment with carbamazepine and in 50 control patients treated with other anticonvulsant drugs. Mean plasma osmolality was significantly lower in the carbamazepine-treated patients but mean plasma sodium did not differ in the two groups. Hyponatraemia was found in five of the carbamazine-treated patients and hypo-osmolality in six. None of the control patients had hyponatraemia and only one had a borderline low osmolality. Three of the 13 patients receiving carbamazepine alone were hyponatraemic. Plasma sodium concentration correlated negatively with both daily carbamazepine dose and serum carbamazepine level. Free water clearance after an oral water load was determined in six patients on carbamazepine alone and in six normal subjects not receiving drug therapy. The capacity of some of the patients to excrete the water load was found to be grossly impaired. PMID:681958

  17. Caffeine and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Caffeine and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Caffeine and ... 12-ounce (355-milliliter) can of soda. How Caffeine Affects Kids A stimulant that affects kids and ...

  18. Investigation of pharmaceutical drugs and caffeine-containing foods using Fourier and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KaraliÅ«nas, Mindaugas; Venckevičius, Rimvydas; Kašalynas, Irmantas; Puc, Uroš; Abina, Andreja; Jeglič, Anton; Zidanšek, Aleksander; Valušis, Gintaras

    2015-08-01

    Several pharmaceutical drugs, such as alprazolam, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, activated carbon and others, and caffeine-containing foods were tested using terahertz (THz) time domain spectroscopy in the range from 0.3 to 2 THz. The dry powder of pharmaceutical drugs was mixed with HDPE and pressed into the pellets using hydraulic press. The coffee grounds were also pressed into the pellets after ball-milling and mixing with HDPE. The caffeine containing liquid foods were dried out on the paper strips of various stacking. Experiments allow one to determine characteristic spectral signatures of the investigated substances within THz range caused by active pharmaceutical ingredients, like in the case of caffeine, as well as supporting pharmaceutical ingredients. Spectroscopic THz imaging approach is considered as a possible option to identify packaged pharmaceutical drugs. The caffeine spectral features in the tested caffeine containing foods are difficult to observed due to the low caffeine concentration and complex caffeine chemical surrounding.

  19. Carbamazepine

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormally excited or irritated mood) or mixed episodes (symptoms of mania and depression that happen at the same time) in patients with bipolar I disorder (manic-depressive disorder; a disease that causes episodes of depression, episodes ...

  20. Evaluating pharmaceuticals and caffeine as indicators of fecal contamination in drinking water sources of the Greater Montreal region.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar, Atlasi; Aboulfadl, Khadija; Viglino, Liza; Broséus, Romain; Sauvé, Sébastien; Madoux-Humery, Anne-Sophie; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A; Prévost, Michèle

    2012-06-01

    We surveyed four different river systems in the Greater Montreal region, upstream and downstream of entry points of contamination, from April 2007 to January 2009. The studied compounds belong to three different groups: PPCPs (caffeine, carbamazepine, naproxen, gemfibrozil, and trimethoprim), hormones (progesterone, estrone, and estradiol), and triazine herbicides and their metabolites (atrazine, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, simazine, and cyanazine). In the system A, B, and C having low flow rate and high TOC, we observed the highest detection frequencies and mass flows of PPCPs compared to the other compounds, reflecting discharge of urban contaminations through WWTPs and CSOs. However, in River D, having high flow rate and low TOC, comparable frequency of detection of triazine and their by-products and PPCPs, reflecting cumulative loads of these compounds from the Great Lakes as well as persistency against natural attenuation processes. Considering large differences in the removal efficiencies of caffeine and carbamazepine, a high ratio of caffeine/carbamazepine might be an indicative of a greater proportion of raw sewage versus treated wastewater in surface waters. In addition, caffeine appeared to be a promising indicator of recent urban fecal contaminations, as shown by the significant correlation with FC (R(2)=0.45), while carbamazepine is a good indicator of cumulative persistence compounds.

  1. Carbamazepine and serum sodium levels.

    PubMed

    Kalff, R; Houtkooper, M A; Meyer, J W; Goedhart, D M; Augusteijn, R; Meinardi, H

    1984-06-01

    Serum sodium levels of 674 epileptic patients were tabulated according to the following categories: less than 135 mmol/L, hyponatremia (28 patients); 135-145 mmol/L, normonatremia (530 patients); greater than 145 mmol/L, hypernatremia (116 patients). One hundred one patients were treated with antiepileptics without carbamazepine (CBZ), 113 with CBZ monotherapy, and 460 with CBZ plus other antiepileptic drugs. Twenty-three patients could be followed up after the first detection of a serum sodium level of less than 135 mg/L. Ten patients were consistently hyponatremic (greater than 50% of the follow-up measurements were less than 135 mg/L), whereas the remaining 13 were occasionally hyponatremic. The following facts could be derived from the study: (1) The hyponatremic group was significantly older compared with the other groups. (2) In patients not treated with CBZ, no hyponatremia was seen. Only two patients on CBZ monotherapy showed hyponatremia. (3) The combination of CBZ, valproic acid, especially in high dosages, and barbiturates seemed to lead to hyponatremia. (4) The excretion of antidiuretic hormone, measured in 12 patients, was subnormal (less than 25 ng/24 h) in seven hyponatremic patients and in three normonatremic patients and normal (25-250 ng/24 h) in two other normonatremic patients. (5) Cyclic AMP, measured in five hyponatremic patients, was normal. (6) In all patients the hyponatremia was slight and did not cause any clinical symptoms. Special treatment was not required.

  2. Caffeine Use and Extroversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landrum, R. Eric; Meliska, Charles J.

    Some research on the stimulant effect of caffeine suggests that the amount of behavioral enhancement produced by caffeine may depend on subjects' prior experience with the task and the drug. A study was undertaken to test whether prior experience with a task while under the influence of caffeine would facilitate performance of that task. Male…

  3. Acetaminophen and Children: Why Dosage Matters

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Children's health An acetaminophen overdose is serious — and it can happen easier than you might think. ... 29, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/childrens-health/in-depth/acetaminophen/art-20046721 . Mayo ...

  4. Brivaracetam and carbamazepine interaction in healthy subjects and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Stockis, Armel; Chanteux, Hugues; Rosa, Maria; Rolan, Paul

    2015-07-01

    This phase I, open-label study investigated the effects of steady-state brivaracetam administration on steady-state pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine, and steady-state carbamazepine administration on single-dose and steady-state pharmacokinetics of brivaracetam, in 14 healthy participants who received brivaracetam 200mg single doses on days 1 and 22, and 200mg twice daily (bid) on days 24-35; and were titrated to carbamazepine 300mg bid on days 4-35. Brivaracetam did not significantly alter carbamazepine area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) over a dosing interval, but resulted in a 2.6-fold increase in carbamazepine-epoxide. Carbamazepine decreased brivaracetam AUC by 29%, while hydroxy-brivaracetam metabolite was increased by 17%. Urinary 6β-hydroxycortisol/cortisol ratio was unchanged by brivaracetam, but was increased 3-fold by carbamazepine. In vitro hydrolysis of carbamazepine-epoxide in human hepatocytes was inhibited by brivaracetam, with an IC50 of 8.2μM. Brivaracetam 200mg bid was predicted to increase carbamazepine-epoxide by 2.3-fold, in close agreement with the observed value. In conclusion, brivaracetam did not modify carbamazepine exposure but increased carbamazepine-epoxide. Carbamazepine modestly decreased brivaracetam exposure and increased oxidative metabolism.

  5. Caffeine: Friend or Foe?

    PubMed

    Doepker, Candace; Lieberman, Harris R; Smith, Andrew Paul; Peck, Jennifer D; El-Sohemy, Ahmed; Welsh, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    The debate on the safety of and regulatory approaches for caffeine continues among various stakeholders and regulatory authorities. This decision-making process comes with significant challenges, particularly when considering the complexities of the available scientific data, making the formulation of clear science-based regulatory guidance more difficult. To allow for discussions of a number of key issues, the North American Branch of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) convened a panel of subject matter experts for a caffeine-focused session entitled "Caffeine: Friend or Foe?," which was held during the 2015 ILSI Annual Meeting. The panelists' expertise covered topics ranging from the natural occurrence of caffeine in plants and interindividual metabolism of caffeine in humans to specific behavioral, reproductive, and cardiovascular effects related to caffeine consumption. Each presentation highlighted the potential risks, benefits, and challenges that inform whether caffeine exposure warrants concern. This paper aims to summarize the key topics discussed during the session.

  6. Caffeine and exercise.

    PubMed

    Paluska, Scott A

    2003-08-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly consumed drug in the world, and athletes frequently use it as an ergogenic aid. It improves performance and endurance during prolonged, exhaustive exercise. To a lesser degree it also enhances short-term, high-intensity athletic performance. Caffeine improves concentration, reduces fatigue, and enhances alertness. Habitual intake does not diminish caffeine's ergogenic properties. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the physiologic effects of caffeine, but adenosine receptor antagonism most likely accounts for the primary mode of action. It is relatively safe and has no known negative performance effects, nor does it cause significant dehydration or electrolyte imbalance during exercise. Routine caffeine consumption may cause tolerance or dependence, and abrupt discontinuation produces irritability, mood shifts, headache, drowsiness, or fatigue. Major sport governing bodies ban excessive use of caffeine, but current monitoring techniques are inadequate, and ethical dilemmas persist regarding caffeine intake by athletes.

  7. Caffeine Consumption by College Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loke, Wing Hong

    1988-01-01

    Surveyed 542 undergraduates concerning their caffeine consumption. Found that subjects consumed less caffeine than average caffeine-drinking population. Coffee was main beverage used. Subjects reported drinking more caffeine when preparing for examinations. Suggests that caffeine may have some beneficial effects on learning. (Author/NB)

  8. [Caffeine and children].

    PubMed

    D'ius, P B

    1997-01-01

    Beverages containing caffeine are consumed by most people in most countries most days. Consumption is mostly in beverages such as coffee, tea and some soft drinks, and smaller amounts from other foods such as chocolate. Children also consume caffeine, though in smaller amounts even relative to their smaller size. Many questions have been asked about possible health effects of caffeine and have been answered by scientific research. Studies on pregnant women consuming caffeine show no effects on the fetus, infants, or on development followed up to school age. There have been many studies on children of school age. For example, it has been shown that a single dose of 3 mg/kg is without appreciable effect on a variety of behavioral and physiological functions, and even 10 mg/kg, had only minimal effects, within the normal range of differences between the children without caffeine. While newborn infants metabolize caffeine slowly, children from less than 1 year to adolescence metabolize caffeine about twice as fast as non-smoking adults. The numerous studies showing safety of caffeine in adults, combined with the direct studies in children showing they are similar and not more susceptible to caffeine than adults, gives assurance that lifelong consumption of caffeine in foods and beverages, starting in childhood, is without deleterious effects on health.

  9. Caffeine Consumption, Expectancies of Caffeine-Enhanced Performance, and Caffeinism Symptoms among University Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, John R.; Petree, Allen

    1990-01-01

    Gathered self-report data on college students' (n=797) expectations of caffeine-enhanced performance, level of beverage caffeine consumed daily, and caffeinism signs experienced after consumption of caffeinated beverages. Results supported extending the expectancies model of substance use motivation from alcohol to caffeine. (Author/ABL)

  10. Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome secondary to carbamazepine

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Shannon C.

    2017-01-01

    Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) is a potentially fatal multiorgan drug reaction that presents with various cutaneous eruptions. There is a genetic predisposition to such reactions. We present a young woman with AHS due to carbamazepine that presented as an atypical erythema multiforme with elevated liver enzymes. PMID:28127149

  11. Intravenous paracetamol (acetaminophen).

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sean T; Scott, Lesley J

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous paracetamol (rINN)/intravenous acetaminophen (USAN) is an analgesic and antipyretic agent, recommended worldwide as a first-line agent for the treatment of pain and fever in adults and children. In double-blind clinical trials, single or multiple doses of intravenous paracetamol 1 g generally provided significantly better analgesic efficacy than placebo treatment (as determined by primary efficacy endpoints) in adult patients who had undergone dental, orthopaedic or gynaecological surgery. Furthermore, where evaluated, intravenous paracetamol 1 g generally showed similar analgesic efficacy to a bioequivalent dose of propacetamol, and a reduced need for opioid rescue medication. In paediatric surgical patients, recommended doses of intravenous paracetamol 15 mg/kg were not significantly different from propacetamol 30 mg/kg for the treatment of pain, and showed equivocal analgesic efficacy compared with intramuscular pethidine 1 mg/kg in several randomized, active comparator-controlled studies. In a randomized, noninferiority study in paediatric patients with an infection-induced fever, intravenous paracetamol 15 mg/kg treatment was shown to be no less effective than propacetamol 30 mg/kg in terms of antipyretic efficacy. Intravenous paracetamol was well tolerated in clinical trials, having a tolerability profile similar to placebo. Additionally, adverse reactions emerging from the use of the intravenous formulation of paracetamol are extremely rare (<1/10 000). [table: see text].

  12. Transcriptomic studies on liver toxicity of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Toska, Endrit; Zagorsky, Robert; Figler, Bryan; Cheng, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen is widely used as a pain reliever and to reduce fever. At high doses, it can cause severe hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen overdose has become the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. The mechanisms for acetaminophen-induced liver injury are unclear. Transcriptomic studies can identify the changes in expression of thousands of genes when exposed to supratherapeutic doses of acetaminophen. These studies elucidated the mechanism of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and also provide insight into future development of diagnosis and treatment options for acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure. The following is a brief overview of some recent transcriptomic studies and gene-expression-based prediction models on liver toxicity induced by acetaminophen.

  13. Hydroxyzine and cetirizine interfere with the PENTINA carbamazepine assay but not with the ADVIA CENTEUR carbamazepine assay.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Amitava; Tso, Gertie; Johnson, Myrtle; Chow, Loretta

    2010-02-01

    Because of a published report indicating significant interference of hydroxyzine with the particle-enhanced turbidimetric inhibition immunoassay (PENTINA) carbamazepine assay, we investigated whether such interference can be avoided by using the ADVIA Centaur carbamazepine assay. Both the Dimension Vista analyzer and ADVIA Centaur analyzer are available from Siemens Diagnostics. Aliquots of a drug-free serum pool were supplemented with various concentrations of hydroxyzine or cetirizine (0.05 microg/mL to 20 microg/mL covering therapeutic and toxic levels in serum) followed by analysis using both assays. We observed significant apparent carbamazepine concentrations using the PENTINA assay but no apparent carbamazepine level using the ADVIA Centaur assay. Because crossreactivity should be studied in the presence of the primary analyte, we also prepared a serum carbamazepine pool from patients receiving carbamazepine and then supplemented aliquots of this pool with various amounts of hydroxyzine or cetirizine followed by reanalyzing carbamazepine concentration using both assays. We observed falsely elevated carbamazepine values using the PENTINA assay but no interference was observed using the ADVIA Centaur assay. However, the falsely elevated carbamazepine values using the PENTINA assay were clinically significant at hydroxyzine or cetirizine concentrations expected in patients with severe overdoses with these drugs. We conclude that the ADVIA Centaur carbamazepine assay is free from interference of both hydroxyzine and cetirizine.

  14. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury. PMID:26208104

  15. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury.

  16. Ryegrass uptake of carbamazepine and ibuprofen applied by urine fertilization.

    PubMed

    Winker, Martina; Clemens, Joachim; Reich, Margrit; Gulyas, Holger; Otterpohl, Ralf

    2010-03-15

    Human urine is a potential alternative fertilizer for agriculture. However, its usage is associated with a risk of spreading pharmaceutical residues to fields. The individual and combined behavior of carbamazepine and ibuprofen was investigated by GC/MS analysis in a greenhouse experiment using ryegrass fertilized with pharmaceutical-spiked urine. Only carbamazepine could be detected in soil, roots, and aerial plant parts. Fifty-three per cent of carbamazepine originally present in the urine was recovered in soil samples taken after three months. Additionally, 34% of carbamazepine was found in aerial plant parts and 0.3% in roots. Model calculations showed that neither roots nor Casparian strip posed a considerable barrier to uptake. Carbamazepine transport was clearly driven by transpiration. Ibuprofen was not detected in the soil or in any plant parts after three months. This was assumed to be due to biodegradation of ibuprofen. Carbamazepine and ibuprofen, singly or in combination, did not adversely affect the growth of ryegrass.

  17. [Extended hemoperfusion in the treatment of acute carbamazepine intoxication].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Azorín, S; Peces, C; Selgas, R

    2010-01-01

    Carbamazepine is used in the treatment of epilepsy, and also prescribed in neuralgic pain syndromes, and certain affective disorders. Carbamazepine intoxication with suicide attempt is a relatively common clinical problem that can result in coma, respiratory depression, arrhythmia, hemodynamic instability and death. The drug's relatively high molecular weight, elevated volume of distribution and intense protein-binding render it difficult to extracorporeal removal, but published experience with hemoperfusion or hemodialysis present variable results. We describe a case report involving carbamazepine intoxication who was successfully treated with charcoal hemoperfusion. With this treatment the half-life of carbamazepine was reduced with rapid lowering of carbamazepine levels and clinical improvement. Based on our experience in this patient and a review of previously reported cases, extended charcoal hemoperfusion should be considered for serious carbamazepine intoxication because free as well as bound drug fractions are eliminated via this technique.

  18. Spectrophotometric Analysis of Caffeine

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad Bhawani, Showkat; Fong, Sim Siong; Mohamad Ibrahim, Mohamad Nasir

    2015-01-01

    The nature of caffeine reveals that it is a bitter white crystalline alkaloid. It is a common ingredient in a variety of drinks (soft and energy drinks) and is also used in combination with various medicines. In order to maintain the optimum level of caffeine, various spectrophotometric methods have been developed. The monitoring of caffeine is very important aspect because of its consumption in higher doses that can lead to various physiological disorders. This paper incorporates various spectrophotometric methods used in the analysis of caffeine in various environmental samples such as pharmaceuticals, soft and energy drinks, tea, and coffee. A range of spectrophotometric methodologies including chemometric techniques and derivatization of spectra have been used to analyse the caffeine. PMID:26604926

  19. Spectrophotometric Analysis of Caffeine.

    PubMed

    Ahmad Bhawani, Showkat; Fong, Sim Siong; Mohamad Ibrahim, Mohamad Nasir

    2015-01-01

    The nature of caffeine reveals that it is a bitter white crystalline alkaloid. It is a common ingredient in a variety of drinks (soft and energy drinks) and is also used in combination with various medicines. In order to maintain the optimum level of caffeine, various spectrophotometric methods have been developed. The monitoring of caffeine is very important aspect because of its consumption in higher doses that can lead to various physiological disorders. This paper incorporates various spectrophotometric methods used in the analysis of caffeine in various environmental samples such as pharmaceuticals, soft and energy drinks, tea, and coffee. A range of spectrophotometric methodologies including chemometric techniques and derivatization of spectra have been used to analyse the caffeine.

  20. In situ dehydration of carbamazepine dihydrate: a novel technique to prepare amorphous anhydrous carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Han, J; Zhang, G G; Grant, D J; Suryanarayanan, R

    2000-01-01

    The purposes of this project were to prepare amorphous carbamazepine by dehydration of crystalline carbamazepine dihydrate, and to study the kinetics of crystallization of the prepared amorphous phase. Amorphous carbamazepine was formed and characterized in situ in the sample chamber of a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), and a variable temperature x-ray powder diffractometer (VTXRD). It has a glass transition temperature of 56 degrees C and it is a relatively strong glass with a strength parameter of 37. The kinetics of its crystallization were followed by isothermal XRD, under a controlled water vapor pressure of 23 Torr. The crystallization kinetics are best described by the three-dimensional nuclear growth model with rate constants of 0.014, 0.021, and 0.032 min-1 at 45, 50, and 55 degrees C, respectively. When the Arrhenius equation was used, the activation energy of crystallization was calculated to be 74 kJ/mol in the presence of water vapor (23 Torr). On the basis of the Kissinger plot, the activation energy of crystallization in the absence of water vapor (0 Torr water vapor pressure) was determined to be 157 kJ/mol. Dehydration of the dihydrate is a novel method to prepare amorphous carbamazepine; in comparison with other methods, it is a relatively gentle and effective technique.

  1. Carbamazepine clearance and seizure stability during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Emily L; Stowe, Zachary N; Ritchie, James C; Newport, D Jeffrey; Newman, Melanee L; Knight, Bettina; Pennell, Page B

    2014-04-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize the alterations in total and free carbamazepine (CBZ) and in total and free carbamazepine-epoxide (CBZ-EPO) clearances during pregnancy, to calculate the change in free fractions of CBZ and CBZ-EPO during pregnancy, and to determine whether seizure worsening is associated with a low ratio to nonpregnant baseline concentration of total or free CBZ or CBZ-EPO. Women on CBZ were enrolled before conception or during pregnancy in this prospective, observational study. Concomitant medications and seizure frequency were recorded. Serum total and free CBZ and CBZ-EPO were collected at each visit. Changes in the clearance of all four compounds and free fractions of CBZ and CBZ-EPO were compared with nonpregnant baseline. During pregnancy, the ratios to baseline concentrations of total and free CBZ and CBZ-EPO were compared for months with and without increased seizure frequency. Total and free CBZ and CBZ-EPO clearances were calculated in 15 pregnancies in 12 women. Clearances did not change for any of these compounds during pregnancy. The free fraction of CBZ increased from 0.23 at baseline to a maximum of 0.32 in the third trimester (p=0.008). In the six women on CBZ monotherapy with adequate seizure diaries and blood sampling, seizure worsening did not correspond to a ratio to baseline concentration of less than 0.65 for total or free CBZ or CBZ-EPO. In conclusion, total and free CBZ and CBZ-EPO clearances did not change substantially during pregnancy, and seizure frequency worsening was not associated with decreased concentrations of total or free CBZ; therefore, therapeutic drug monitoring may not be necessary for all women on CBZ during pregnancy. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed before definitive recommendations can be made. Carbamazepine monotherapy may be a relatively safe and cost effective treatment option for women with focal epilepsy syndromes during pregnancy.

  2. Probable interaction between trazodone and carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Romero, A; Mayordomo-Aranda, A; García-Delgado, R; Durán-Quintana, J A

    2011-06-01

    The need to maintain long-term treatment of chronic pathologies makes the appearance of interactions possible when such therapies incorporate other drugs to deal with the aggravation of the same or other intercurrent pathologies. A case is presented in which the addition of trazodone to a chronic treatment with carbamazepine (CBZ) is associated with symptoms typical for intoxication by this antiepileptic, accompanied by a raised serum concentration. When the trazodone was suspended, these symptoms lessened and the concentration of CBZ decreased progressively, suggesting a probable interaction between the 2 drugs.

  3. Caffeine and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... caffeine from sodas, it's also found in coffee, tea, chocolate, coffee ice cream or frozen yogurt, as ... medicines. Some parents may give their kids iced tea in place of soda, thinking that it's a ...

  4. Carbamazepine Withdrawal-induced Hyperalgesia in Chronic Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhenyu; Yang, Bing; Yang, Bin; Shi, Le; Sun, Qing-Li; Sun, A-Ping; Lu, Lin; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Rongsheng; Zhai, Suodi

    2015-11-01

    Combined pharmacological treatments are the most used approach for neuropathic pain. Carbamazepine, an antiepileptic agent, is generally used as a third-line treatment for neuropathic pain and can be considered an option only when patients have not responded to the first- and second-line medications. In the case presented herein, a patient with neuropathic pain was treated using a combined pharmacological regimen. The patient's pain deteriorated, despite increasing the doses of opioids, when carbamazepine was discontinued, potentially because carbamazepine withdrawal disrupted the balance that was achieved by the multifaceted pharmacological regimen, thus inducing hyperalgesia. Interestingly, when carbamazepine was prescribed again, the patient's pain was successfully managed. Animal research has reported that carbamazepine can potentiate the analgesic effectiveness of morphine in rodent models of neuropathic pain and postoperative pain. This clinical case demonstrates that carbamazepine may have a synergistic effect on the analgesic effectiveness of morphine and may inhibit or postpone opioid-induced hyperalgesia. We postulate that a probable mechanism of action of carbamazepine may involve -aminobutyric acid-ergic potentiation and the interruption of glutamatergic function via N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Further research is warranted to clarify the analgesic action of carbamazepine and its potential use for the prevention of opioid-induced hyperalgesia in chronic neuropathic pain patients.

  5. Acetaminophen use and asthma in children

    PubMed Central

    Sakulchit, Teeranai; Goldman, Ran D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Question A child with a history of asthma came to my clinic with acute fever. I have heard that acetaminophen might be associated with exacerbation of asthma. Is it safe if I recommend acetaminophen for this child? Answer Most studies suggest an association between acetaminophen use in children and development of asthma later in childhood. However, several confounding factors in study design might contribute to this positive correlation, and without a prospective controlled trial, confirming this finding is challenging. If children have a known history of asthma, it is likely safe to administer a single dose of acetaminophen without concern of precipitating adverse respiratory symptoms. Regular use of acetaminophen to relieve fever or pain does not seem to exacerbate asthma in children more than ibuprofen does. PMID:28292797

  6. Acetaminophen use and asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Sakulchit, Teeranai; Goldman, Ran D

    2017-03-01

    Question A child with a history of asthma came to my clinic with acute fever. I have heard that acetaminophen might be associated with exacerbation of asthma. Is it safe if I recommend acetaminophen for this child? Answer Most studies suggest an association between acetaminophen use in children and development of asthma later in childhood. However, several confounding factors in study design might contribute to this positive correlation, and without a prospective controlled trial, confirming this finding is challenging. If children have a known history of asthma, it is likely safe to administer a single dose of acetaminophen without concern of precipitating adverse respiratory symptoms. Regular use of acetaminophen to relieve fever or pain does not seem to exacerbate asthma in children more than ibuprofen does.

  7. Stevens-Johnson syndrome induced by carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Czajkowski, Rafał; Weiss-Rostkowska, Violetta; Wankiewicz, Anna; Drewa, Tomasz; Placek, Waldemar; Biedka, Marta; Zegarska, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a mucocutaneous disorder induced by an immune-complex-mediated hypersensitivity reaction. Nearly half of cases are caused by a reaction to drugs or appear during viral infections and malignancies. A very few cases are caused by a bacterial infection (Streptococcus) or Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Graft versus host disease is another well-established cause, independent of drugs. No specific etiology has been identified in up to half of cases. We report a 54-year-old man with SJS induced by carbamazepine. Reported patient had prodromal symptoms like fever, headache and polyarthralgia, which preceded mucocutaneous lesions by 3 days. Physical examination on admission, revealed asthenic male with a temperature of 37.2 degrees C and generalized dermatitis with positive Nikolsky sign, large erosions of the palms and soles, onychomadesis, numerous oral and vermilion border of the lips erosions. The patient was administered systemic steroidotherapy and carbamazepine dose was gradually decreased and finally replaced with valproic acid and valproate sodium. During the hospitalization, temperature normalized and the skin lesions disappeared after 3 weeks of treatment.

  8. Carbamazepine for acute and chronic pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Carbamazepine is used to treat chronic neuropathic pain. Objectives Evaluation of analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of carbamazepine for acute and chronic pain management (except headaches). Search methods Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of carbamazepine in acute, chronic or cancer pain were identified, searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, SIGLE and Cochrane CENTRAL to June 2010, reference lists of retrieved papers, and reviews. Selection criteria RCTs reporting the analgesic effects of carbamazepine. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted results and scored for quality. Numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) or harm (NNH) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated from dichotomous data for effectiveness, adverse effects and adverse event withdrawal. Issues of study quality, size, duration, and outcomes were examined. Main results Fifteen included studies (12 cross-over design; three parallel-group) with 629 participants. Carbamazepine was less effective than prednisolone in preventing postherpetic neuralgia following acute herpes zoster (1 study, 40 participants). No studies examined acute postoperative pain. Fourteen studies investigated chronic neuropathic pain: two lasted eight weeks, others were four weeks or less (mean 3 weeks, median 2 weeks). Five had low reporting quality. Ten involved fewer than 50 participants; mean and median maximum treatment group sizes were 34 and 29. Outcome reporting was inconsistent. Most placebo controlled studies indicated that carbamazepine was better than placebo. Five studies with 298 participants provided dichotomous results; 70% improved with carbamazepine and 12% with placebo. Carbamazepine at any dose, using any definition of improvement was significantly better than placebo (70% versus 12% improved; 5 studies, 298 participants); relative benefit 6.1 (3.9 to 9.7), NNT 1.7 (1.5 to 2.0). Four studies (188 participants) reporting outcomes equivalent to 50% pain reduction or more

  9. Caffeine, extraversion and working memory.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that extraverts performing a working memory task benefit more from caffeine than do introverts. The present study aimed to replicate this and extend our knowledge by using a lower dose of caffeine (65 mg) and a range of tasks related to different components of working memory. In addition, tasks assessing psychomotor speed and the encoding of new information were included to determine whether caffeine-extraversion interactions were restricted to working memory tasks. A double-blind design was used, with 128 participants being randomly assigned to caffeinated or de-caffeinated coffee conditions. The results showed that caffeine interacted with extraversion in the predicted direction for serial recall and running memory tasks. Caffeine improved simple reaction time and the speed of encoding of new information, effects which were not modified by extraversion. These results suggest possible biological mechanisms underlying effects of caffeine on cognitive performance.

  10. Influence of hydrophilic polymers on the complexation of carbamazepine with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Medarević, Djordje; Kachrimanis, Kyriakos; Djurić, Zorica; Ibrić, Svetlana

    2015-10-12

    In this study binary carbamazepine-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, as well as ternary carbamazepine-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-hydrophilic polymer systems were used to improve dissolution rate of carbamazepine. It has been shown that addition of hydrophilic polymers (Soluplus® and two types of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose-Metolose® 90SH-100 and Metolose® 65SH-1500) significantly increased solubilization capacity of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin for carbamazepine. Evaluation of carbamazepine-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-hydrophilic polymer interactions using molecular modeling techniques showed interactions between carbamazepine, which dissociates from inclusion complexes and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose that can prevent crystallization of dissolved carbamazepine. These results can contribute to better understanding of drug-cyclodextrin-hydrophilic polymer interactions which are still not well understood. After evaluation of carbamazepine solubilization with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and hydrophilic polymers, both binary carbamazepine-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and ternary carbamazepine-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-hydrophilic polymer systems were prepared by spray drying. The results of solid state characterization methods showed amorphous nature of carbamazepine in all spray dried systems, which together with the results of molecular modeling techniques indicates inclusion complex formation. Carbamazepine dissolution rate was significantly improved from spray dried formulations compared to pure drug. Binary carbamazepine-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and ternary carbamazepine-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-Soluplus® systems exhibited the fastest carbamazepine release, wherein the entire amount of carbamazepine was released during first 5 min.

  11. Caffeine content of decaffeinated coffee.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Rachel R; Fuehrlein, Brian; Goldberger, Bruce A; Gold, Mark S; Cone, Edward J

    2006-10-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed drug in the world with coffee representing a major source of intake. Despite widespread availability, various medical conditions necessitate caffeine-restricted diets. Patients on certain prescription medications are advised to discontinue caffeine intake. Such admonition has implications for certain psychiatric patients because of pharmacokinetic interactions between caffeine and certain anti-anxiety drugs. In an effort to abstain from caffeine, patients may substitute decaffeinated for caffeinated coffee. However, decaffeinated beverages are known to contain caffeine in varying amounts. The present study determined the caffeine content in a variety of decaffeinated coffee drinks. In phase 1 of the study, 10 decaffeinated samples were collected from different coffee establishments. In phase 2 of the study, Starbucks espresso decaffeinated (N=6) and Starbucks brewed decaffeinated coffee (N=6) samples were collected from the same outlet to evaluate variability of caffeine content of the same drink. The 10 decaffeinated coffee samples from different outlets contained caffeine in the range of 0-13.9 mg/16-oz serving. The caffeine content for the Starbucks espresso and the Starbucks brewed samples collected from the same outlet were 3.0-15.8 mg/shot and 12.0-13.4 mg/16-oz serving, respectively. Patients vulnerable to caffeine effects should be advised that caffeine may be present in coffees purported to be decaffeinated. Further research is warranted on the potential deleterious effects of consumption of "decaffeinated" coffee that contains caffeine on caffeine-restricted patients. Additionally, further exploration is merited for the possible physical dependence potential of low doses of caffeine such as those concentrations found in decaffeinated coffee.

  12. The Social Side Effects of Acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischkowski, Dominik

    About 23% of all adults in the US take acetaminophen during an average week (Kaufman, Kelly, Rosenberg, Anderson, & Mitchell, 2002) because acetaminophen is an effective physical painkiller and easily accessible over the counter. The physiological side effects of acetaminophen are well documented and generally mild when acetaminophen is consumed in the appropriate dosage. In contrast, the psychological and social side effects of acetaminophen are largely unknown. Recent functional neuroimaging research suggests that the experience of physical pain is fundamentally related to the experience of empathy for the pain of other people, indicating that pharmacologically reducing responsiveness to physical pain also reduces cognitive, affective, and behavioral responsiveness to the pain of others. I tested this hypothesis across three double-blind between-subjects drug intervention studies. Two experiments showed that acetaminophen had moderate effects on empathic affect, specifically personal distress and empathic concern, and a small effect on empathic cognition, specifically perceived pain, when facing physical and social pain of others. The same two experiments and a third experiment also showed that acetaminophen can increase the willingness to inflict pain on other people, i.e., actual aggressive behavior. This effect was especially pronounced among people low in dispositional empathic concern. Together, these findings suggest that the physical pain system is more involved in the regulation of social cognition, affect, and behavior than previously assumed and that the experience of physical pain and responsiveness to the pain of others share a common neurochemical basis. Furthermore, these findings suggest that acetaminophen has unappreciated but serious social side effects, and that these side effects may depend on psychological characteristics of the drug consumer. This idea is consistent with recent theory and research on the context-dependency of neurochemical

  13. Is caffeine a cognitive enhancer?

    PubMed

    Nehlig, Astrid

    2010-01-01

    The effects of caffeine on cognition were reviewed based on the large body of literature available on the topic. Caffeine does not usually affect performance in learning and memory tasks, although caffeine may occasionally have facilitatory or inhibitory effects on memory and learning. Caffeine facilitates learning in tasks in which information is presented passively; in tasks in which material is learned intentionally, caffeine has no effect. Caffeine facilitates performance in tasks involving working memory to a limited extent, but hinders performance in tasks that heavily depend on working memory, and caffeine appears to rather improve memory performance under suboptimal alertness conditions. Most studies, however, found improvements in reaction time. The ingestion of caffeine does not seem to affect long-term memory. At low doses, caffeine improves hedonic tone and reduces anxiety, while at high doses, there is an increase in tense arousal, including anxiety, nervousness, jitteriness. The larger improvement of performance in fatigued subjects confirms that caffeine is a mild stimulant. Caffeine has also been reported to prevent cognitive decline in healthy subjects but the results of the studies are heterogeneous, some finding no age-related effect while others reported effects only in one sex and mainly in the oldest population. In conclusion, it appears that caffeine cannot be considered a ;pure' cognitive enhancer. Its indirect action on arousal, mood and concentration contributes in large part to its cognitive enhancing properties.

  14. Ad lib caffeine consumption, symptoms of caffeinism, and academic performance.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, K; Andress, D

    1981-04-01

    The authors explored the relationship between ad lib caffeine consumption in college students and the incidence of caffeinism, characterized by heightened anxiety, depression, and various psychophysiological reactions. Students were randomly selected from four groups (abstainers from caffeine and low, moderate, and high consumers). A survey battery assessed the effects of caffeine, incidence of psychophysiological disorders, state-trait anxiety, and depression. The moderate and high consumer groups combined reported significantly higher trait anxiety and depression scores when compared with abstainers. The high consumer group also reported significantly higher levels of symptoms of caffeinism, higher frequency of psychophysiological disorders, and lower academic performance.

  15. Lichen sclerosus et atrophicus induced by carbamazepine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pranteda, G; Muscianese, M; Grimaldi, M; Fidanza, L; Pranteda, G; Narcisi, A; Nistico, S; Bottoni, U

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of Lichen Sclerosus in a 73-year-old man who had been treated for epilepsy with carbamazepine. Lichen sclerosus et atrophicus (LSA), also called lichen sclerosus (LS), is a chronic inflammatory cutaneous condition characterized by white plaques with epidermal atrophy and scarring. To date no cases of LSA has been linked to carbamazepine, although in a few cases lichenoid eruptions but without sclero-atrophy have been described after exposure to this drug. Therefore, to our knowledge, this is the first report of a Lichen sclerosus et atrophicus induced by carbamazepine.

  16. Caffeine and cognitive performance: persistent methodological challenges in caffeine research.

    PubMed

    James, Jack E

    2014-09-01

    Human cognitive performance is widely perceived to be enhanced by caffeine at usual dietary doses. However, the evidence for and against this belief continues to be vigorously contested. Controversy has centred on caffeine withdrawal and withdrawal reversal as potential sources of experimental confounding. In response, some researchers have enlisted "caffeine-naïve" experimental participants (persons alleged to consume little or no caffeine) assuming that they are not subject to withdrawal. This mini-review examines relevant research to illustrate general methodological challenges that have been the cause of enduring confusion in caffeine research. At issue are the processes of caffeine withdrawal and withdrawal reversal, the definition of caffeine-naïve, the population representativeness of participants deemed to be caffeine-naïve, and confounding due to caffeine tolerance. Attention to these processes is necessary if premature conclusions are to be avoided, and if caffeine's complex effects and the mechanisms responsible for those effects are to be illuminated. Strategies are described for future caffeine research aimed at minimising confounding from withdrawal and withdrawal reversal.

  17. Caffeine and pharmaceuticals as indicators of waste water contamination in wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, R.L.; Zaugg, S.D.; Thomas, J.M.; Howcroft, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    The presence of caffeine or human pharmaceuticals in ground water with elevated nitrate concentrations can provide a clear, unambiguous indication that domestic waste water is a source of some of the nitrate. Water from domestic, public supply, and monitoring wells in three communities near Reno, Nevada, was sampled to test if caffeine or pharmaceuticals are common, persistent, and mobile enough in the environment that they can be detected in nitrate-contaminated ground water and, thus, can be useful indicators of recharge from domestic waste water. Results of this study indicate that these compounds can be used as indicators of recharge from domestic waste water, although their usefulness is limited because caffeine is apparently nonconservative and the presence of prescription pharmaceuticals is unpredictable. The absence of caffeine or pharmaceuticals in ground water with elevated nitrate concentrations does not demonstrate that the aquifer is free of waste water contamination. Caffeine was detected in ground water samples at concentrations up to 0.23 ??g/L. The human pharmaceuticals chlorpropamide, phensuximide, and carbamazepine also were detected in some samples.

  18. Did acetaminophen provoke the autism epidemic?

    PubMed

    Good, Peter

    2009-12-01

    Schultz et al (2008) raised the question whether regression into autism is triggered, not by the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, but by acetaminophen (Tylenol) given for its fever and pain. Considerable evidence supports this contention, most notably the exponential rise in the incidence of autism since 1980, when acetaminophen began to replace aspirin for infants and young children. The impetus for this shift - a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warning that aspirin was associated with Reye's syndrome - has since been compellingly debunked. If aspirin is not to be feared as a cause of Reyes syndrome, and acetaminophen is to be feared as a cause of autism, can the autism epidemic be reversed by replacing acetaminophen with aspirin or other remedies?

  19. Pediatric carbamazepine suspension overdose-clinical manifestations and toxicokinetics.

    PubMed

    Perez, Alberto; Wiley, James F

    2005-04-01

    Two toddlers ingested unknown quantities of their older sibling's carbamazepine suspension and rapidly manifested central nervous depression requiring intubation in 1 patient. Coma was the primary clinical finding throughout their care with no anticholinergic syndrome, seizures, or dysrhythmia. Both patients recovered without sequelae within 24 hours. Initial carbamazepine concentrations were 36.6 and 22.7 mg/L. The elimination rates (zero-order kinetic) were approximately 1.4 and 0.75 mg/L per hour. We provide the first toxicokinetic data for carbamazepine suspension overdose in children. We confirm that the oral absorption of suspension carbamazepine is rapid necessitating prompt referral to a health care facility for this exposure.

  20. Cellulose acetate butyrate microparticles for controlled release of carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, P; Boué, C; Chaumeil, J C

    1996-01-01

    Cellulose acetate butyrate microparticles loaded in carbamazepine were prepared by a solvent evaporation technique. A decrease of the amount of organic solvent (from 80 to 40 ml of methylene chloride) increased the microparticle average diameter (73-111 and 207 microns) and decreased the carbamazepine release rate (T50% increased from 3.3 to 16.8 and 166.4 min). The microparticle area under the curve at 120 min was similar to that obtained with Tegretol LP 200 tablets.

  1. Acetaminophen (paracetamol) oral absorption and clinical influences.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Taylor, Robert; Decker, John F; Patrick, Jeffrey T

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a widely used nonopioid, non-NSAID analgesic that is effective against a variety of pain types, but the consequences of overdose can be severe. Because acetaminophen is so widely available as a single agent and is increasingly being formulated in fixed-ratio combination analgesic products for the potential additive or synergistic analgesic effect and/or reduced adverse effects, accidental cumulative overdose is an emergent concern. This has rekindled interest in the sites, processes, and pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen oral absorption and the clinical factors that can influence these. The absorption of oral acetaminophen occurs primarily along the small intestine by passive diffusion. Therefore, the rate-limiting step is the rate of gastric emptying into the intestines. Several clinical factors can affect absorption per se or the rate of gastric emptying, such as diet, concomitant medication, surgery, pregnancy, and others. Although acetaminophen does not have the abuse potential of opioids or the gastrointestinal bleeding or organ adverse effects of NSAIDs, excess amounts can produce serious hepatic injury. Thus, an understanding of the sites and features of acetaminophen absorption--and how they might be influenced by factors encountered in clinical practice--is important for pain management using this agent. It can also provide insight for design of formulations that would be less susceptible to clinical variables.

  2. Limited Knowledge of Acetaminophen in Patients with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saab, Sammy; Konyn, Peter G.; Viramontes, Matthew R.; Jimenez, Melissa A.; Grotts, Jonathan F.; Hamidzadah, Wally; Dang, Veronica P.; Esmailzadeh, Negin L.; Choi, Gina; Durazo, Francisco A.; El-Kabany, Mohamed M.; Han, Steven-Huy B.; Tong, Myron J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims: Unintentional acetaminophen overdose remains the leading cause of acute liver failure in the United States. Patients with underlying liver disease are at higher risk of poor outcomes from acetaminophen overdose. Limited knowledge of acetaminophen may be a preventable contributor to elevated rates of overdose and thus acute liver failure. The purpose of this study is to assess knowledge of acetaminophen dosing and presence of acetaminophen in common combination products in patients with liver disease. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with liver disease at the Pfleger Liver Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles between June 2015 and August 2016. Patients completed a demographic questionnaire and an acetaminophen knowledge survey. Additional information was obtained from the medical record. Results: Of 401 patients with liver disease, 30 (15.7%) were able to correctly identify that people without liver disease can safely take up to 4 g/day of acetaminophen. The majority of patients (79.9%–86.8%) did not know that Norco® (hydrocone/acetaminophen), Vicodin® (hydrocone/acetaminophen) and Percocet® (oxycodone/acetaminophen) contained acetaminophen. Only 45.3% of the patients knew that Tylenol® #3 contained acetaminophen. Conclusions: We conclude that patients with liver disease have critically low levels of knowledge of acetaminophen, putting them at risk both of acetaminophen overdose, as well as undermedication, and inadequate management of chronic pain. We recommend an increase in education efforts regarding acetaminophen dosage and its safety in the setting of liver disease. Increasing education for those at risk of low acetaminophen knowledge is essential to minimizing acetaminophen overdose rates and optimizing pain management. PMID:28097095

  3. Caffeine Reinforces Flavor Preference and Behavior in Moderate Users but Not in Low Caffeine Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dack, Charlotte; Reed, Phil

    2009-01-01

    The study examined the role of caffeine consumption in caffeine reinforcement. Previous findings have shown that caffeine reinforced flavor preference in moderate caffeine consumers who are caffeine deprived. However, most of these studies have employed rating procedures only, and have not shown the effectiveness of caffeine to reinforce behaviors…

  4. Analytical performance evaluation of ADVIA Chemistry Carbamazepine_2 assay: minimal cross-reactivity with carbamazepine 10, 11-epoxide and none with hydroxyzine or cetirizine.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Amitava; Reyes, Meredith A; Davis, Barbara G; Marlow, Anne M; Johnson, Myrtle

    2010-01-01

    Carbamazepine is an anticonvulsant requiring routine therapeutic drug monitoring. Recently, Siemens Healthcare Diagnostic Division released a new carbamazepine assay: ADVIA Chemistry Carbamazepine_2 (Carbamazepine_2) for application on ADVIA analyzers. We evaluated the analytical performance of this assay as well as its potential cross-reactivities with carbamazepine 10, 11-epoxide, hydroxyzine, and cetirizine. The within-run and between-run precisions of the Carbamzepine-2 assay were <6% and limit of detection was 0.5 microg/ml using ADVIA 1800 analyzer. The assay was linear up to a carbamazepine concentration of 20.0 microg/ml. The new method compared well with a widely used carbamazepine EMIT 2000 assay on the Hitachi 917 analyzer. Using 75 patients' specimens (where carbamazepine concentrations varied from 0.5 to 21.7 microg/ml) and carbamazepine EMIT 2000 as the reference method (x-axis), we observed the following regression equation: y=1.04 x+0.32 (r=0.99). The new carbazepine_2 method was not affected by a hemoglobin concentration of 1,000 mg/dl, conjugated or unconjugated bilirubin concentration of 60 mg/dl, and triglyceride concentration of 1,000 mg/dl. In addition, this assay showed no cross-reactivity with hydroxyzine or cetirizine and demonstrated minimal cross-reactivity with carbamazepine 10, 11-epoxide. We conclude that the ADVIA Chemistry carbamazepine_2 assay has adequate precision and accuracy for routine therapeutic drug monitoring of carbamazepine in clinical laboratories.

  5. Soil persistence and fate of carbamazepine, lincomycin, caffeine, and iburpofen from wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reuse of treated wastewater for groundwater recharge is an effective way to provide advanced treatment and water storage in the desert southwest. Contaminants such as human drugs, found in treated effluent, have been identified as a potential problem for use of this water. The town of Gilbert, A...

  6. Teratogenic effect of Carbamazepine use during pregnancy in the mice.

    PubMed

    Elshama, Said Said; Osman, Hosam Eldin Hussein; El-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry

    2015-01-01

    Carbamazepine use is the first choice of antiepileptic drugs among epileptic pregnant females. There are many inconclusive studies regard the safety of carbamazepine use during pregnancy. This study aims to investigate the morphological and histopathological teratogenic effects of carbamazepine use during pregnancy. The healthy pregnant females mice divided into equal five groups (each n=20). The first (control) group received distilled water/day. Second, third, fourth and fifth group received 8.75, 22.75, 52.5, 65 mg of carbamazepine/day respectively. Carbamazepine and water were given by gastric gavage throughout gestational period. Fetuses were delivered on the 18th day of gestation by hysterectomy. Fetal measurements and appearance were assessed with investigation the histopathological changes of brain and spinal cord. There was a significant decrease of weight, different organs weight, length, upper and lower limb length of mice in the first day of delivery in fifth group. There was a significant increase of weight, different organs weight, length, upper and lower limb length in the third group. Many congenital anomalies such as spina bifida, meromelia, microphalmia, oligodactyly, anencephaly, neurodegeneration of brain and spinal cord were noticedin fifth group. Teratogenic effect of carbamazepine represented as growth retardation and neurodevelopmental toxicity depending on its overdose degree.

  7. Caffeine and sports performance.

    PubMed

    Burke, Louise M

    2008-12-01

    Athletes are among the groups of people who are interested in the effects of caffeine on endurance and exercise capacity. Although many studies have investigated the effect of caffeine ingestion on exercise, not all are suited to draw conclusions regarding caffeine and sports performance. Characteristics of studies that can better explore the issues of athletes include the use of well-trained subjects, conditions that reflect actual practices in sport, and exercise protocols that simulate real-life events. There is a scarcity of field-based studies and investigations involving elite performers. Researchers are encouraged to use statistical analyses that consider the magnitude of changes, and to establish whether these are meaningful to the outcome of sport. The available literature that follows such guidelines suggests that performance benefits can be seen with moderate amounts (~3 mg.kg-1 body mass) of caffeine. Furthermore, these benefits are likely to occur across a range of sports, including endurance events, stop-and-go events (e.g., team and racquet sports), and sports involving sustained high-intensity activity lasting from 1-60 min (e.g., swimming, rowing, and middle and distance running races). The direct effects on single events involving strength and power, such as lifts, throws, and sprints, are unclear. Further studies are needed to better elucidate the range of protocols (timing and amount of doses) that produce benefits and the range of sports to which these may apply. Individual responses, the politics of sport, and the effects of caffeine on other goals, such as sleep, hydration, and refuelling, also need to be considered.

  8. Relationships between pharmacokinetic parameters of carbamazepine and therapeutic response in patients with bipolar disease.

    PubMed

    Chbili, Chahra; Bannour, Souhail; Khlifi, Saida; Ben Hadj Ali, Bechir; Saguem, Saad

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationship between plasma levels of carbamazepine and its active metabolite 10,11-epoxide-carbamazepine, and the therapeutic response in patients with bipolar disease. Thirteen patients were kept on a fixed individual dose of carbamazepine for 19 weeks under psychiatric care. Steady-state plasma concentrations of carbamazepine and its metabolite 10,11-epoxide-carbamazepine were measured at weeks 4, 12, and 20 by HPLC essay. Simultaneously, the psychopathologic state was assessed using the Brief Psychiatric rating scale (BPRS). Upon correlational analysis, mean BPRS scores did not correlate with the plasma levels of carbamazepine, whereas both mean plasma levels of 10, 11-epoxide-carbamazepine concentrations and 10,11-epoxide-carbamazepine to plasma carbamazepine ratio were closely correlated with mean values of BPRS scores (r = 0.80, p =10(-4), r= -0.89, p =10(-3) respectively). Optimum therapeutic response was observed among patients who had a plasma metabolite level of 1.4 μg/mL and a plasma carbamazepine concentrations of 7 μg/mL simultaneously. These results suggest that both plasma carbamazepine and 10,11-epoxide-carbamazepine levels must be fixed to achieve optimum therapeutic response. In order to reach these conditions, inhibitor drugs (such as valproic acid) or inductor drugs (such as phenobarbital) of epoxyde-hydrolase might be coadministered with the carbamazepine in order to adapt the plasma level of 10,11-epoxide-carbamazepine.

  9. Caffeine consumption among medical students.

    PubMed

    Mino, Y; Yasuda, N; Fujimura, T; Ohara, H

    1990-12-01

    Recently, caffeine consumption in Japan is thought to have increased. Although caffeine had been considered to be harmless, there have been studies which suggests an association between caffeine and health and give rise to vigorous discussion. However, in Japan, there have been few epidemiological studies on caffeine consumption among a general population. A questionnaire survey was conducted among medical students and the results were as follows: 1) High dose users (estimated daily caffeine use is 250 mg or more) were observed in 15.2% and the proportion was higher in males than in females. 2) The respondents gave sleepiness, dry mouth and so on, as reasons for taking caffeine beverages, and gave, as the effects of caffeine, becoming clear-headed, shaking off sleepiness, and epigastric discomfort or pain. 3) A third of respondents have experienced taking caffeine tablets and ampules to shake off sleepiness and, in males, the more caffeine they had daily, the more who reported the experience. 4) Caffeine consumption has an association with alcohol use and smoking habit among males.

  10. Parents: Acetaminophen in Pain Relief Medicines Can Cause Liver Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents: Acetaminophen in pain relief medicines can cause liver damage Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... whole word or may have the abbreviation "APAP." Liver damage: Giving your child more acetaminophen than directed ...

  11. Transplacental Passage of Acetaminophen in Term Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Joshua F; Patil, Avinash S; Langman, Loralie J; Penn, Hannah J; Derleth, Douglas; Watson, William J; Brost, Brian C

    2016-11-02

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine the maternal and fetal pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of acetaminophen after administration of a therapeutic oral dose. Study Design After obtaining Institutional Review Board approval and their written informed consent, pregnant women were given a single oral dose (1,000 mg) of acetaminophen upon admission for scheduled cesarean delivery. Maternal venous blood and fetal cord blood were obtained at the time of delivery and acetaminophen levels were measured using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. PK parameters were calculated by noncompartmental analysis. Nonparametric correlation of maternal/fetal acetaminophen levels and PK curves were calculated. Results In this study, 34 subjects were enrolled (median, 32 years; range, 25-39 years). The median maternal weight was 82 kg (range, 62-100 kg). All but two subjects were delivered beyond 39 weeks' gestation. The median newborn birth weight was 3,590 g (interquartile range, 3,403-3,848 g). Noncompartmental analysis described similar PK parameters in the maternal (T1/2, 84 minutes; apparent clearance [Cl/F], 28.8 L/h; apparent volume of distribution [Vd/F], 57.5 L) and fetal compartments (T1/2, 82 minutes; Cl/F, 31.2 L/h; Vd/F, 61.2 L). Paired maternal/fetal acetaminophen levels were highly correlated (p < 0.0001). Conclusion Fetal acetaminophen PKs in the fetus parallels that in the mother suggesting that placental transfer is flow limited. Maternal acetaminophen levels can be used as a surrogate for fetal exposure.

  12. Caffeine consumption in young children.

    PubMed

    Warzak, William J; Evans, Shelby; Floress, Margaret T; Gross, Amy C; Stoolman, Sharon

    2011-03-01

    Two hundred twenty-eight surveyed parents reported that their 5 to 7 year old children drank approximately 52 mg of caffeine daily and their 8 to 12 year old children drank 109 mg daily. Caffeine consumption and hours slept were significantly negatively correlated, but caffeine consumption and enuresis were not significantly correlated. Spanish-speaking parents reported fewer bedwetting events than their English-speaking peers.

  13. Caffeine and headache: specific remarks.

    PubMed

    Espinosa Jovel, C A; Sobrino Mejía, F E

    2015-02-26

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychostimulant worldwide. Excessive caffeine consumption induces a series of both acute and chronic biological and physiological changes that may give rise to cognitive decline, depression, fatigue, insomnia, cardiovascular changes, and headache. Chronic consumption of caffeine promotes a pro-nociceptive state of cortical hyperexcitability that can intensify a primary headache or trigger a headache due to excessive analgesic use. This review offers an in-depth analysis of the physiological mechanisms of caffeine and its relationship with headache.

  14. Interaction of carbamazepine with herbs, dietary supplements, and food: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fong, Sophia Yui Kau; Gao, Qiong; Zuo, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background. Carbamazepine (CBZ) is a first-line antiepileptic drug which may be prone to drug interactions. Systematic review of herb- and food-drug interactions on CBZ is warranted to provide guidance for medical professionals when prescribing CBZ. Method. A systematic review was conducted on six English databases and four Chinese databases. Results. 196 out of 3179 articles fulfilled inclusion criteria, of which 74 articles were reviewed and 33 herbal products/dietary supplement/food interacting with CBZ were identified. No fatal or severe interactions were documented. The majority of the interactions were pharmacokinetic-based (80%). Traditional Chinese medicine accounted for most of the interactions (n = 17), followed by food (n = 10), dietary supplements (n = 3), and other herbs/botanicals (n = 3). Coadministration of 11 and 12 of the studied herbal products/dietary supplement/food significantly decreased or increased the plasma concentrations of CBZ. Regarding pharmacodynamic interaction, Xiao-yao-san, melatonin, and alcohol increased the side effects of CBZ while caffeine lowered the antiepileptic efficacy of CBZ. Conclusion. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the documented interactions between CBZ and herbal products/food/dietary supplements which assists healthcare professionals to identify potential herb-drug and food-drug interactions, thereby preventing potential adverse events and improving patients' therapeutic outcomes when prescribing CBZ.

  15. Interaction of Carbamazepine with Herbs, Dietary Supplements, and Food: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background. Carbamazepine (CBZ) is a first-line antiepileptic drug which may be prone to drug interactions. Systematic review of herb- and food-drug interactions on CBZ is warranted to provide guidance for medical professionals when prescribing CBZ. Method. A systematic review was conducted on six English databases and four Chinese databases. Results. 196 out of 3179 articles fulfilled inclusion criteria, of which 74 articles were reviewed and 33 herbal products/dietary supplement/food interacting with CBZ were identified. No fatal or severe interactions were documented. The majority of the interactions were pharmacokinetic-based (80%). Traditional Chinese medicine accounted for most of the interactions (n = 17), followed by food (n = 10), dietary supplements (n = 3), and other herbs/botanicals (n = 3). Coadministration of 11 and 12 of the studied herbal products/dietary supplement/food significantly decreased or increased the plasma concentrations of CBZ. Regarding pharmacodynamic interaction, Xiao-yao-san, melatonin, and alcohol increased the side effects of CBZ while caffeine lowered the antiepileptic efficacy of CBZ. Conclusion. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the documented interactions between CBZ and herbal products/food/dietary supplements which assists healthcare professionals to identify potential herb-drug and food-drug interactions, thereby preventing potential adverse events and improving patients' therapeutic outcomes when prescribing CBZ. PMID:24023584

  16. Demonstrating Advanced Oxidation Coupled with Biodegradation for Removal of Carbamazepine (WERF Report INFR6SG09)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbamazepine is an anthropogenic pharmaceutical found in wastewater effluents that is quite resistant to removal by conventional wastewater treatment processes. Hydroxyl radical-based advanced oxidation processes can transform carbamazepine into degradation products but cannot m...

  17. Caffeine addiction? Caffeine for youth? Time to act!

    PubMed

    Budney, Alan J; Emond, Jennifer A

    2014-11-01

    While data accumulate and discussion evolves on the clinical importance of caffeine addiction and its classification, the growing practices of (i) adding increasing amounts of caffeine to drinks and other consumables, (ii) promoting these as performance enhancers and (iii) targeting youth as the consumer raise concerns that require immediate action.

  18. [Acetaminophen (paracetamol) causing renal failure: report on 3 pediatric cases].

    PubMed

    Le Vaillant, J; Pellerin, L; Brouard, J; Eckart, P

    2013-06-01

    Renal failure secondary to acetaminophen poisoning is rare and occurs in approximately 1-2 % of patients with acetaminophen overdose. The pathophysiology is still being debated, and renal acetaminophen toxicity consists of acute tubular necrosis, without complication if treated promptly. Renal involvement can sometimes occur without prior liver disease, and early renal manifestations usually occur between the 2nd and 7th day after the acute acetaminophen poisoning. While therapy is exclusively symptomatic, sometimes serious metabolic complications can be observed. The monitoring of renal function should therefore be considered as an integral part of the management of children with acute, severe acetaminophen intoxication. We report 3 cases of adolescents who presented with acute renal failure as a result of voluntary drug intoxication with acetaminophen. One of these 3 girls developed severe renal injury without elevated hepatic transaminases. None of the 3 girls' renal function required hemodialysis, but one of the 3 patients had metabolic complications after her acetaminophen poisoning.

  19. Carbamazepine and folic acid in trigeminal neuralgia patients.

    PubMed Central

    al-Musaed, A A; Zakrzewska, J M; Bain, B J

    1992-01-01

    The effect of carbamazepine monotherapy on the red cell folate level of 133 patients with trigeminal neuralgia was evaluated. The patient group had a significantly lower mean value of red cell folate levels compared with 110 controls. No significant correlation was found between the red cell folate levels and the mean cell volume or haemoglobin values in either the carbamazepine or control group. In addition no significant correlation was found between the red cell folate levels and drug dosage. Administration of folic acid supplements raised the mean value of red cell folate significantly. Dietary folate intake was assessed in 43 trigeminal neuralgia patients and 33 matched control patients and there was no significant difference between the groups. Patients taking carbamazepine should be advised on a well-balanced diet rich in folate as opposed to being given a routine prescription of folic acid. PMID:1548649

  20. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sudano, Isabella; Flammer, Andreas J; Roas, Susanne; Enseleit, Frank; Noll, Georg; Ruschitzka, Frank

    2012-08-01

    Selective and non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as well as acetaminophen belong to the most widely prescribed therapeutic agents worldwide. Their efficacy in pain relief notwithstanding, the use of NSAIDs is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk, which can be partly attributed to their blood pressure raising potential. Adequately powered placebo-controlled trials specifically evaluating the cardiovascular safety of NSAIDs vs. selective COX inhibitors are currently underway. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the cardiovascular effects of NSAIDs and acetaminophen, and their potential clinical consequences.

  1. Adsorption of the antiepileptic carbamazepine onto agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Calisto, Vania; Esteves, Valdemar I

    2012-05-01

    Carbamazepine is an antiepileptic pharmaceutical which is commonly found in environmental matrices. It passes through wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) almost completely unaffected and has been found to be highly persistent in the environment. The application of sludge in agricultural fields and the use of WWTP effluents for irrigation constitute a potential source of soil contamination. Consequently, the assessment of the interaction between carbamazepine and soils is of crucial importance to understand its fate in the environment. To monitor the sorption behavior of carbamazepine onto agricultural soils, batch equilibrium experiments were performed using soils subjected to distinct long-term fertilizations. In order to follow the adsorption experiments, an UV spectral deconvolution methodology was applied and the results compared with those from micellar electrokinetic chromatography. The results obtained by both methods did not present significant statistical differences at 95% confidence level. Therefore, it was proven that, in the context of adsorption studies, UV spectral deconvolution is a valid alternative to common chromatographic methods, with the major advantage of being a simple and fast procedure. The adsorption of carbamazepine onto the selected soils was satisfactorily described by the Freundlich model. The obtained Freundlich parameters (K(F)) (between 1.79 ± 0.07 and 4.8 ± 0.2 mg kg(-1) (mg L(-1))(-N)) indicate that the adsorption behavior of carbamazepine is dependent on the soil fertilization. Also, it is not extensively sorbed, indicating that carbamazepine present in soils can be a potential source of contamination of surface and ground waters through run-off and infiltration.

  2. Caffeine to Sustain Operational Fatigue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-01

    It Caffeine is the most widely used psychostimulant and provided data about the most commonly used may be useful in operational fatigue-coping...palpitation, psychomotor agitation. Caffeine candy 05 withdrawal may cause headache, fatigue, anxiety, soda 04 insomnia, nausea, performance impainnents. snuff

  3. The Janus face of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Sallaberry, Cássia; Mioranzza, Sabrina; Botton, Paulo Henrique S; Rosemberg, Denis B

    2013-11-01

    Caffeine is certainly the psychostimulant substance most consumed worldwide. Over the past years, chronic consumption of caffeine has been associated with prevention of cognitive decline associated to aging and mnemonic deficits of brain disorders. While its preventive effects have been reported extensively, the cognitive enhancer properties of caffeine are relatively under debate. Surprisingly, there are scarce detailed ontogenetic studies focusing on neurochemical parameters related to the effects of caffeine during prenatal and earlier postnatal periods. Furthermore, despite the large number of epidemiological studies, it remains unclear how safe is caffeine consumption during pregnancy and brain development. Thus, the purpose of this article is to review what is currently known about the actions of caffeine intake on neurobehavioral and adenosinergic system during brain development. We also reviewed other neurochemical systems affected by caffeine, but not only during brain development. Besides, some recent epidemiological studies were also outlined with the control of "pregnancy signal" as confounding variable. The idea is to tease out how studies on the impact of caffeine consumption during brain development deserve more attention and further investigation.

  4. Caffeine, diabetes, cognition, and dementia.

    PubMed

    Biessels, Geert Jan

    2010-01-01

    People with diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of cognitive dysfunction. This review explores the relation between caffeine intake, diabetes, cognition and dementia, focusing on type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Epidemiological studies on caffeine/coffee intake and T2DM risk are reviewed. Next, the impact of T2DM on cognition is addressed. Finally, the potential for caffeine to modulate the risk of cognitive decline in the context of diabetes is explored. The conclusion is that, although epidemiological studies indicate that coffee/caffeine consumption is associated with a decreased risk of T2DM and possibly also with a decreased dementia risk, we can at present not be certain that these associations are causal. For now, recommendations for coffee consumption in individuals with T2DM or pre-diabetic stages are therefore difficult to establish, but it should be acknowledged that caffeine does appear to have several properties that warrant further investigations in this field.

  5. The Effects of Caffeine on Athletic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry W.; McIntire, Kyle; Streitz, Carmyn; Jackson, Allen; Gaudet, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Athletes who use caffeine before exercising or competition may be upgrading themselves more than they realize. Caffeine is classified as a stimulant and is the most commonly used drug in the world. Caffeine has the same affects that amphetamines and cocaine have, just to a lesser degree. Caffeine crosses the membranes of all the body's tissues. It…

  6. Carbamazepine-Induced Hyponatremia in Patients with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Ted; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study of 40 patients with mental retardation receiving carbamazepine found hyponatremia in only 5 percent of these patients and found a statistically, but not clinically, significant decrease in serum sodium levels in patients receiving anticonvulsant polytherapy. Results support the use of this drug with patients with mental retardation and…

  7. Caffeine modulates attention network function.

    PubMed

    Brunyé, Tad T; Mahoney, Caroline R; Lieberman, Harris R; Taylor, Holly A

    2010-03-01

    The present work investigated the effects of caffeine (0mg, 100mg, 200mg, 400mg) on a flanker task designed to test Posner's three visual attention network functions: alerting, orienting, and executive control [Posner, M. I. (2004). Cognitive neuroscience of attention. New York, NY: Guilford Press]. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind study using a repeated-measures design, we found that the effects of caffeine on visual attention vary as a function of dose and the attention network under examination. Caffeine improved alerting and executive control function in a dose-response manner, asymptoting at 200mg; this effect is congruent with caffeine's adenosine-mediated effects on dopamine-rich areas of brain, and the involvement of these areas in alerting and the executive control of visual attention. Higher doses of caffeine also led to a marginally less efficient allocation of visual attention towards cued regions during task performance (i.e., orienting). Taken together, results of this study demonstrate that caffeine has differential effects on visual attention networks as a function of dose, and such effects have implications for hypothesized interactions of caffeine, adenosine and dopamine in brain areas mediating visual attention.

  8. Inadequacy of carbamazepine-spiked model wastewaters for testing photocatalysis efficiency.

    PubMed

    Gulyas, Holger; Ogun, Moses Kolade; Meyer, Wibke; Reich, Margrit; Otterpohl, Ralf

    2016-01-15

    The study was performed in order to clarify whether carbamazepine-spiked solutions used as model wastewaters are suitable for the assessment of carbamazepine removal from real secondary municipal effluents by photocatalytic oxidation in the presence and absence of activated carbon. Therefore, carbamazepine (10 mg L(-1)) was dissolved in deionized water or in secondary municipal effluent. Photocatalytic oxidation of these model wastewaters was carried out with TiO2 "P25" (100 mg L(-1)) and UV-A lamps in the absence and in the presence of 20 mg L(-1) powdered activated carbon (PAC). Carbamazepine was analyzed photometrically. In deionized water at pH 5.5, carbamazepine was nearly completely removed with a UV dose of 6.48 kJ L(-1). A similar efficiency of photocatalytic oxidation of carbamazepine added to secondary effluent was observed when the suspension pH was 2.7, while at pH 8 and 10.6, carbamazepine removal from spiked secondary effluent with the same UV dose was only 40 and 60%, respectively. Although PAC addition resulted in an initial adsorptive carbamazepine reduction of 20 to 35% from the model wastewaters, it did not lead to markedly enhanced carbamazepine removal in the subsequent photocatalysis phase. During photocatalytic oxidation of unspiked secondary effluent (initial carbamazepine concentration: 133 ng L(-1)) at pH 7.3 with and without PAC, carbamazepine concentrations were analyzed by HPLC/MS/MS. While PAC addition resulted in the adsorption of about 90% of the initial carbamazepine, photocatalysis did not lead to any carbamazepine removal at all. This indicates that the experiments with spiked model wastewaters – even in a secondary effluent matrix – are absolutely inadequate for predicting photocatalytic carbamazepine removal under real conditions.

  9. Acetaminophen-induced cellulitis-like fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Fathallah, Neila; Ben Salem, Chaker; Slim, Raoudha; Boussofara, Lobna; Ghariani, Najet; Bouraoui, Kamel

    2011-03-01

    Acetaminophen is a widely used analgesic drug. Its adverse reactions are rare but severe. An 89-year-old man developed an indurated edematous and erythematous plaque on his left arm 1 day after acetaminophen ingestion. Cellulitis was suspected and antibiotictherapy was started but there was no improvement of the rash; there was a spectacular extension of the lesion with occurrence of flaccid vesicles and blisters in the affected sites. The diagnosis of generalized-bullous-fixed drug eruption induced by acetaminophen was considered especially with a reported history of a previous milder reaction occurring in the same site. Acetaminophen was withdrawn and the rash improved significantly. According to the Naranjo probability scale, the eruption experienced by the patient was probably due to acetaminophen. Clinicians should be aware of the ability of acetaminophen to induce fixed drug eruption that may clinically take several aspects and may be misdiagnosed.

  10. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Echeverri, Darío; Montes, Félix R.; Cabrera, Mariana; Galán, Angélica; Prieto, Angélica

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial. PMID:21188209

  11. [Carbamazepine and psychotropic treatment interaction: Two case studies of carbamazepine overdosage].

    PubMed

    Fernandez, A; Dor, E; Menard, M-L; Askenazy, F; Thümmler, S

    2015-05-01

    Drug interaction is a frequent situation in pediatrics and child psychiatry. Carbamazepine (CBZ) is an antiepileptic drug used as a mood stabilizer in child psychiatry. CBZ is known to be a potent inducer of various CYP isoenzymes of cytochrome P450, which might result in a decrease in the plasma concentration of associated treatments. We describe two cases of CBZ overdosage in adolescent inpatients (14 and 16 years). The patients were treated with risperidone associated with fluoxetine in one and with loxapine in the other case, and CBZ was introduced as a mood stabilizer. Patients presented typical clinical symptoms (fatigue, dizziness, gastrointestinal signs, blurred vision). Overdosage was confirmed by an elevated CBZ plasma concentration (17 and 15.5 mg/L, therapeutic range 4-12 mg/L). We recommend introducing CBZ very progressively in patients treated with psychotropics, particularly when it is associated to several treatments. An intensification of clinical and biological follow-up with early plasma concentration testing should allow for better treatment adjustment.

  12. Acetaminophen overdose associated with double serum concentration peaks

    PubMed Central

    Papazoglu, Cristian; Ang, Jonathan R.; Mandel, Michael; Basak, Prasanta; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen is the most commonly used analgesic–antipyretic medication in the United States. Acetaminophen overdose, a frequent cause of drug toxicity, has been recognized as the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal hepatic necrosis. N-Acetylcysteine is the recommended antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Despite evidence on the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine for prevention of hepatic injury, controversy persists about the optimal duration of the therapy. Here, we describe the case of a 65-year-old male with acetaminophen overdose and opioid co-ingestion who developed a second peak in acetaminophen serum levels after completing the recommended 21-hour intravenous N-acetylcysteine protocol and when the standard criteria for monitoring drug levels was achieved. Prolongation of N-acetylcysteine infusion beyond the standard protocol, despite a significant gap in treatment, was critical for successful avoidance of hepatotoxicity. Delay in acetaminophen absorption may be associated with a second peak in serum concentration following an initial declining trend, especially in cases of concomitant ingestion of opioids. In patients with acetaminophen toxicity who co-ingest other medications that may potentially delay gastric emptying or in those with risk factors for delayed absorption of acetaminophen, we recommend close monitoring of aminotransferase enzyme levels, as well as trending acetaminophen concentrations until undetectable before discontinuing the antidote therapy. PMID:26653695

  13. Immunochemical quantitation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in serum and liver proteins of acetaminophen-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Pumford, N R; Hinson, J A; Potter, D W; Rowland, K L; Benson, R W; Roberts, D W

    1989-01-01

    Using a recently developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts we have quantitated the formation of these specific adducts in liver and serum protein of B6C3F1 male mice dosed with acetaminophen. Administration of acetaminophen at doses of 50, 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg to mice resulted in evidence of hepatotoxicity (increase in serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase) at 4 hr in the 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg treatment groups only. The formation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in liver protein was not observed in the groups receiving 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg doses, but was observed in the groups receiving doses above 300 mg/kg of acetaminophen. Greater levels of adduct formation were observed at the higher doses. 3-(Cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts were also observed in serum of mice receiving hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen. After a 400 mg/kg dose of acetaminophen, 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in the liver protein reached peak levels 2 hr after dosing. By 12 hr the levels decreased to approximately 10% of the peak level. In contrast, 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in serum protein were delayed, reaching a sustained peak 6 to 12 hr after dosing. The dose-response correlation between the appearance of serum aminotransferases and 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in serum protein and the temporal correlation between the decrease in 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in liver protein and the appearance of adducts in serum protein are consistent with a hepatic origin of the adducts detected in serum protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Caffeine, cognition, and socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Janet; Fox, Helen C; Whalley, Lawrence J

    2010-01-01

    There is interest in age-related cognitive decline and environmental risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD). This interest is focused on individual differences in exposure to agents that may harm or protect cognitive function. Caffeine is used as a short acting mental stimulant and may possess longer-term properties that protect against age-related decline and, possibly, AD. The current study aimed to: 1) examine current cognitive function in a narrow age range sample (n=351) without dementia (MMSE>25) who are, by reason of age, entering the period of increased risk of AD; and 2) link cognitive function to self-reported intake of caffeine and socioeconomic status (SES). Possible confounding by gender, childhood intelligence, education, and symptoms of anxiety and depression was introduced into the statistical model. There were significant differences between SES groups in caffeine intake (p< 0.05) and cognitive performance (p< 0.001). Higher quartiles of caffeine intake were associated with slower digit symbol speed (F =3.38, p< 0.02) but this finding was removed after allowing for SES. The results are discussed in terms of the withdrawal effects of caffeine during cognitive testing and strong links between SES and cognitive performance. No evidence in support of cognitive enhancing effects of caffeine was found.

  15. Caffeine, exercise and the brain.

    PubMed

    Meeusen, Romain; Roelands, Bart; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine can improve exercise performance when it is ingested at moderate doses (3-6 mg/kg body mass). Caffeine also has an effect on the central nervous system (CNS), and it is now recognized that most of the performance-enhancing effect of caffeine is accomplished through the antagonism of the adenosine receptors, influencing the dopaminergic and other neurotransmitter systems. Adenosine and dopamine interact in the brain, and this might be one mechanism to explain how the important components of motivation (i.e. vigor, persistence and work output) and higher-order brain processes are involved in motor control. Caffeine maintains a higher dopamine concentration especially in those brain areas linked with 'attention'. Through this neurochemical interaction, caffeine improves sustained attention, vigilance, and reduces symptoms of fatigue. Other aspects that are localized in the CNS are a reduction in skeletal muscle pain and force sensation, leading to a reduction in perception of effort during exercise and therefore influencing the motivational factors to sustain effort during exercise. Because not all CNS aspects have been examined in detail, one should consider that a placebo effect may also be present. Overall, it appears that the performance-enhancing effects of caffeine reside in the brain, although more research is necessary to reveal the exact mechanisms through which the CNS effect is established.

  16. Effects of caffeine on sleep and cognition.

    PubMed

    Snel, Jan; Lorist, Monicque M

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine can be used effectively to manipulate our mental state. It is beneficial in restoring low levels of wakefulness and in counteracting degraded cognitive task performance due to sleep deprivation. However, caffeine may produce detrimental effects on subsequent sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness. This justifies a careful consideration of risks related to sleep deprivation in combination with caffeine consumption, especially in adolescents. The efficacy of caffeine to restore detrimental effects of sleep deprivation seems to be partly due to caffeine expectancy and to placebo effects. The claim that stimulant effects of caffeine are related to withdrawal or withdrawal reversal seems to be untenable.

  17. Caffeine fatalities--four case reports.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, Per; Nordén-Pettersson, Lotta; Ahlner, Johan

    2004-01-06

    Four cases of fatal intoxications with caffeine are described. Caffeine is widely available in beverages and in different OTC-products, in many of them in combinations with other drugs like ephedrine. Caffeine is not as harmless as one might believe. An overdose of caffeine alone, intentional or not, might be deadly. It seems to be warranted to include caffeine in the drug-screening of forensic autopsy cases. It is not motivated from a medical point of view to sell pure caffeine over the counter.

  18. The effects of the psychiatric drug carbamazepine on freshwater invertebrate communities and ecosystem dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Amanda L; Bernot, Melody J; Bernot, Randall J

    2014-10-15

    Freshwater ecosystems are persistently exposed to pharmaceutical pollutants, including carbamazepine. Despite the ubiquity and recalcitrance of carbamazepine, the effects of this pharmaceutical on freshwater ecosystems and communities are unclear. To better understand how carbamazepine influences the invertebrate community and ecosystem dynamics in freshwaters, we conducted a mesocosm experiment utilizing environmentally relevant concentrations of carbamazepine (200 and 2000 ng/L). Mesocosms were populated with four gastropod taxa (Elimia, Physa, Lymnaea and Helisoma), zooplankton, filamentous algae and phytoplankton. After a 31 d experimental duration, structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to relate changes in the community structure and ecosystem dynamics to carbamazepine exposure. Invertebrate diversity increased in the presence of carbamazepine. Additionally, carbamazepine altered the biomass of Helisoma and Elimia, induced a decline in Daphnia pulex abundance and shifted the zooplankton community toward copepod dominance. Lastly, carbamazepine decreased the decomposition of organic matter and indirectly altered primary production and dissolved nutrient concentrations. Changes in the invertebrate community occurred through both direct (i.e., exposure to carbamazepine) and indirect pathways (i.e., changes in food resource availability). These data indicate that carbamazepine may alter freshwater community structure and ecosystem dynamics and could have profound effects on natural systems.

  19. Caffeine as a model drug of dependence: recent developments in understanding caffeine withdrawal, the caffeine dependence syndrome, and caffeine negative reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, R R; Chausmer, A L

    2000-11-01

    Caffeine is an excellent model compound for understanding drugs of abuse/dependence. The results of self-administration and choice studies in humans clearly demonstrate the reinforcing effects of low and moderate doses of caffeine. Caffeine reinforcement has been demonstrated in about 45% of normal subjects with histories of moderate and heavy caffeine use. Recent studies provide compelling evidence that caffeine physical dependence potentiates the reinforcing effects of caffeine through the mechanism of withdrawal symptom avoidance. Tolerance to the subjective and sleep-disrupting effects of caffeine in humans has been demonstrated. Physical dependence as reflected in a withdrawal syndrome in humans has been repeatedly demonstrated in adults and recently demonstrated in children. Withdrawal severity is an increasing function of caffeine maintenance dose, with withdrawal occurring at doses as low as 100 mg per day. Increased cerebral blood flow may be the physiological mechanism for caffeine withdrawal headache. Case studies in adults and adolescents clearly demonstrate that some individuals meet DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for a substance dependence syndrome on caffeine, including feeling compelled to continue caffeine use despite desires and recommendations to the contrary. Survey data suggest that 9% to 30% percent of caffeine consumers may be caffeine dependent according to DSM-IV criteria.

  20. Exacerbation of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by the anthelmentic drug fenbendazole.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Carol R; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2012-02-01

    Fenbendazole is a broad-spectrum anthelmintic drug widely used to prevent or treat nematode infections in laboratory rodent colonies. Potential interactions between fenbendazole and hepatotoxicants such as acetaminophen are unknown, and this was investigated in this study. Mice were fed a control diet or a diet containing fenbendazole (8-12 mg/kg/day) for 7 days prior to treatment with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) or phosphate buffered saline. In mice fed a control diet, acetaminophen administration resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases, which were evident within 12 h. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was markedly increased in mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet, as measured histologically and by significant increases in serum transaminase levels. Moreover, in mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet, but not the control diet, 63% mortality was observed within 24 h of acetaminophen administration. Fenbendazole by itself had no effect on liver histology or serum transaminases. To determine if exaggerated hepatotoxicity was due to alterations in acetaminophen metabolism, we analyzed sera for the presence of free acetaminophen and acetaminophen-glucuronide. We found that there were no differences in acetaminophen turnover. We also measured cytochrome P450 (cyp) 2e1, cyp3a, and cyp1a2 activity. Whereas fenbendazole had no effect on the activity of cyp2e1 or cyp3a, cyp1a2 was suppressed. A prolonged suppression of hepatic glutathione (GSH) was also observed in acetaminophen-treated mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet when compared with the control diet. These data demonstrate that fenbendazole exacerbates the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen, an effect that is related to persistent GSH depletion. These findings are novel and suggest a potential drug-drug interaction that should be considered in experimental protocols evaluating mechanisms of hepatotoxicity in rodent colonies treated with fenbendazole.

  1. Carbamazepine in Bipolar Disorder With Pain: Reviewing Treatment Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Austin; O’Connell, Christopher R.; Nallapula, Kishan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine if any monotherapy drug treatment has robust efficacy to treat comorbid bipolar disorder and chronic pain. Data Sources: The American Psychiatric Association (APA) treatment guidelines for bipolar mood disorder and the 2012 Cochrane database for pain disorders. Study Selection: We relied on the treatment guides to determine if the drugs that are APA guideline–supported to treat bipolar disorder have supporting data from the Cochrane database for chronic pain. Data Synthesis: No single drug was mentioned by either guideline to treat this comorbidity. However, carbamazepine was the only drug that has guideline-supported robust efficacy in the management of each condition separately. Conclusions: Carbamazepine was found to have strong preclinical data for the treatment of comorbid bipolar mood disorder and chronic pain disorders. While requiring more studies in this population, we propose that this treatment modality may benefit patients. PMID:25667814

  2. [Skin reaction to carbamazepine or DRESS syndrome: a case presentation].

    PubMed

    Cabrera Fundora, Emigdio Jesús; Cabrera Osorio, Yuliet; Cabrera Osorio, Claudia

    2016-02-25

    Carbamazepine is a frequently used drug that can produce adverse reactions like vertigo, somnolence and severe skin reactions like Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms Syndrome (DRESS Syndrome). This syndrome is characterized by a late-appearing, slow-progressing cutaneous eruption accompanied by atypical lymphocytes, eosinophilia, and systemic symptoms such as fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatic compromise, and renal dysfunction that can be severe enough to cause death. We present a case that aims to highlight the importance of an early diagnosis of DRESS syndrome to adjust therapy and improve survival. The patient is a female patient prescribed carbamazepine for trigeminal neuralgia who presented with skin lesions, which were initially attributed to a hypersensitivity reaction. The lesions worsened in spite of treatment and systemic symptoms ensued. A diagnosis of DRESS syndrome was proposed and steroid treatment was initiated with rapid improvement.

  3. Caffeine: Can It Help Me Lose Weight?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caffeine is found in many beverages, including coffee, tea, energy drinks and colas; in products containing cocoa ... A, et al. The effect of caffeine, green tea and tyrosine on thermogenesis and energy intake. European ...

  4. Caffeine Intake Among Adolescents in Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Gera, Mridul; Kalra, Swati; Gupta, Piyush

    2016-01-01

    Background: Availability and advertising of caffeinated drinks is on the rise in Indian market. Excess caffeine intake may have deleterious effects on health. Objective: To estimate the daily consumption of caffeine among urban school-going adolescents from Delhi. Materials and Methods: A school-based survey was conducted to determine the amount and pattern of caffeine consumption among students of classes 9-12, using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Of 300 participants (median age 15 year, 174 boys), 291 (97%) were consuming caffeine [mean (SD): 121.0 (98.2) mg/day]. Nineteen (6%) students were consuming more than 300 mg of caffeine per day. Tea/coffee contributed to more than 50% of the caffeine intake. The rest was derived from cola beverages, chocolates, and energy drinks. Conclusion: Average caffeine consumption among school-going adolescents from Delhi is high. The findings of this preliminary survey need to be confirmed in larger data sets. PMID:27051091

  5. Decrease of plasma and urinary oxidative metabolites of acetaminophen after consumption of watercress by human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Mohr, S N; Yang, C S

    1996-12-01

    To investigate the effect of the consumption of watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.), a cruciferous vegetable, on acetaminophen metabolism, the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen and its metabolites were studied in a crossover trial of human volunteers. A single oral dose of acetaminophen (1 gm) was given 10 hours after ingestion of watercress homogenates (50 gm). In comparison with acetaminophen only, the ingestion of watercress resulted in a significant reduction in the area under the plasma cysteine acetaminophen (Cys-acetaminophen) concentration-time curve and in the peak plasma Cys-acetaminophen concentration by 28% +/- 3% and by 21% +/- 4% (mean +/- SE; n = 7; p < 0.005), respectively. Correspondingly, the Cys-acetaminophen formation rate constant and Cys-acetaminophen formation fraction were decreased by 55% +/- 9% and 52% +/- 7% (p < 0.01), respectively. Consistent with the results obtained from the plasma, the total urinary excretion of Cys-acetaminophen in 24 hours was also reduced. A decrease of mercapturate acetaminophen, a Cys-acetaminophen metabolite, was also shown in the plasma and urine samples. However, the plasma pharmacokinetic processes and the urinary excretions of acetaminophen, acetaminophen glucuronide, and acetaminophen sulfate were not altered significantly by the watercress treatment. These results suggest that the consumption of watercress causes a decrease in the levels of oxidative metabolites of acetaminophen, probably due to inhibition of oxidative metabolism of this drug.

  6. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: studies on the mechanism of cysteamine protection

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.G.; Jollow, D.J.

    1986-03-30

    Inhibition of the cytochrome P-450-dependent formation of the acetaminophen-reactive metabolite was investigated as a possible mechanism for cysteamine protection against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Studies in isolated hamster hepatocytes indicated that cysteamine competitively inhibited the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system as represented by formation of the acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate. However, cysteamine was not a potent inhibitor of glutathione conjugate formation (Ki = 1.17 mM). Cysteamine also weakly inhibited the glucuronidation of acetaminophen (Ki = 2.44 mM). In vivo studies were in agreement with the results obtained in isolated hepatocytes; cysteamine moderately inhibited both glucuronidation and the cytochrome P-450-dependent formation of acetaminophen mercapturate. The overall elimination rate constant (beta) for acetaminophen was correspondingly decreased. Since cysteamine decreased both beta and the apparent rate constant for mercapturate formation (K'MA), the proportion of the dose of acetaminophen which is converted to the toxic metabolite (K'MA/beta) was not significantly decreased in the presence of cysteamine. Apparently, cysteamine does inhibit the cytochrome P-450-dependent formation of the acetaminophen-reactive metabolite, but this effect is not sufficient to explain antidotal protection.

  7. Effects of acute caffeine administration on adolescents.

    PubMed

    Temple, Jennifer L; Dewey, Amber M; Briatico, Laura N

    2010-12-01

    Acute caffeine administration has physiological, behavioral, and subjective effects. Despite its widespread use, few studies have described the impact of caffeine consumption in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acute caffeine administration in adolescents. We measured cardiovascular responses and snack food intake after acute administration of 0 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg, and 200 mg of caffeine. We also compared usual food intake and subjective effects of caffeine between high- and low-caffeine consumers. Finally, we conducted a detailed analysis of caffeine sources and consumption levels. We found main effects of caffeine dose on heart rate (HR) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), with HR decreasing and DBP increasing with increasing caffeine dose. There were significant interactions among gender, caffeine use, and time on DBP. High caffeine consumers (>50 mg/day) reported using caffeine to stay awake and drinking coffee, tea, soda, and energy drinks more than low consumers (<50 mg/day). Boys were more likely than girls to report using getting a rush, more energy, or improved athletic performance from caffeine. Finally, when we examined energy and macronutrient intake, we found that caffeine consumption was positively associated with laboratory energy intake, specifically from high-sugar, low-fat foods and also positively associated with protein and fat consumption outside of the laboratory. When taken together, these data suggest that acute caffeine administration has a broad range of effects in adolescents and that the magnitude of these effects is moderated by gender and chronic caffeine consumption.

  8. The relationship between pharmacokinetic parameters of carbamazepine and therapeutic response in epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Hassine, Anis; Laouani, Aicha; Amor, Sana Ben; Nouira, Manel; Ammou, Sofiène Ben

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prescribed dose and carbamazepine plasma concentration to achieve the optimal therapeutic efficacy are highly variable from one patient to the other. Our study aimed to determine whether biological parameters may be used as plasma markers that can individually adjust the carbamazepine dose necessary to optimize therapeutic efficacy. Material and methods Ninety-four epileptic patients under carbamazepine monotherapy and who have never used combination therapy were recruited from the consecutive admissions at the Department of Neurology “CHU Sahloul” of Sousse Central Hospital in Tunisia from February 2010 to April 2011. The patients were monitored for epilepsy for three years on average. Carbamazepine and 10,11-epoxide-carbamazepine concentrations were analyzed through high-performance liquid chromatography. Simultaneously, therapeutic efficacy was assessed through the annual number of seizures in each patient. Results Our results showed the absence of any significant correlations between specific dose (mg/kg/day), carbamazepine plasma concentrations and therapeutic efficacy (r = 0.0025, p = 0.30; r = 0.1584, p = 0.38 respectively), whereas both plasma 10,11-epoxide-carbamazepine concentration and 10,11-epoxide-carbamazepine to plasma carbamazepine ratio were closely correlated with therapeutic efficacy (r = 0.34, p = 0.03; r = 0.45, p = 0.008 respectively). The optimum therapeutic response was observed among patients who simultaneously had a plasma concentration of 0.8 μg/ml of metabolite and 5.5 μg/ml of carbamazepine. Conclusions The results suggest that plasma levels of both carbamazepine and of 10,11-epoxide-carbamazepine must be set to achieve an optimum therapeutic response.

  9. A Case Report of a Carbamazepine Overdose With Focus on Pharmacokinetic Aspects.

    PubMed

    Mittag, N; Meister, S; Berg, A M J; Walther, U I

    2016-03-01

    In this article a case of carbamazepine overdose is reported. It is common to use immuno-based methods in the field of therapeutic drug monitoring but it might be difficult to adapt such values to toxicological cases. For carbamazepine overdoses it is recommended also to determine the metabolite carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide. Especially for critical conditions a definite substance identification should be performed. In addition, quantifying main metabolites is recommended for an acute clinical toxicological assessment.

  10. Update on caffeine consumption, disposition and action.

    PubMed

    Mandel, H G

    2002-09-01

    This report represents a current summary of the caffeine contents of various commercial products, and provides data on the spectrum of caffeine intake levels in man. A summary of the substance's pharmacokinetics describes information on its disposition in the body. The effects of caffeine are related to its interaction with adenosine receptors.

  11. Influence of mexiletine on caffeine elimination.

    PubMed

    Joeres, R; Klinker, H; Heusler, H; Epping, J; Richter, E

    1987-01-01

    In an acute experiment in healthy volunteers and in patients under long-term treatment for cardiac arrhythmias, mexiletine inhibits caffeine elimination by about 50%. The clearance of mexiletine is not influenced by caffeine. Some side effects of mexiletine may possibly at least partially be attributable to a retention of caffeine.

  12. 21 CFR 182.1180 - Caffeine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Caffeine. 182.1180 Section 182.1180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1180 Caffeine. (a) Product. Caffeine. (b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions,...

  13. 21 CFR 182.1180 - Caffeine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Caffeine. 182.1180 Section 182.1180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1180 Caffeine. (a) Product. Caffeine. (b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions,...

  14. 21 CFR 182.1180 - Caffeine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Caffeine. 182.1180 Section 182.1180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1180 Caffeine. (a) Product. Caffeine. (b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions,...

  15. 21 CFR 182.1180 - Caffeine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Caffeine. 182.1180 Section 182.1180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1180 Caffeine. (a) Product. Caffeine....

  16. 21 CFR 182.1180 - Caffeine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Caffeine. 182.1180 Section 182.1180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1180 Caffeine. (a) Product. Caffeine. (b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions,...

  17. Caffeine Use and Young Adult Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vener, Arthur M.; Krupka, Lawrence R.

    1982-01-01

    Surveyed college women and men and found that caffeine was consumed by a large proportion of the respondents. Women consumed a larger amount of caffeine and used more substances containing this drug. An increase in caffeine usage with increased psychic stress was observed for women only. (Author)

  18. In vivo exposure of marine mussels to carbamazepine and 10-hydroxy-10,11-dihydro-carbamazepine: Bioconcentration and metabolization.

    PubMed

    Boillot, C; Martinez Bueno, M J; Munaron, D; Le Dreau, M; Mathieu, O; David, A; Fenet, H; Casellas, C; Gomez, E

    2015-11-01

    Aquatic organisms are exposed to pharmaceuticals present in natural waters, but few data are available on the accumulation of these substances in such organisms. The present study evaluated the in vivo bioconcentration of two anticonvulsants--carbamazepine (CBZ) and 10-hydroxy-10,11-dihydro-carbamazepine (10 OH)--in marine mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) exposed to nominal 10 μg L(-1) concentrations for one week. The bioconcentration factors (BCFs) were 3.9 and 4.5 L kg(-1) dry weight (dw) for CBZ and 10 OH, respectively. CBZ accumulation reached an average tissue concentration of 29.3 ± 4.8 ng g(-1) dw, and 10 OH accumulated up to 40.9 ± 4.6 ng g(-1) dw in tissues within one week, showing first-order kinetics. BCF obtained with linear QSAR models correctly estimated the CBZ bioconcentration and overestimated the 10 OH bioconcentration to some extent. The detection of two metabolites (carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide and acridine) among the five sought suggested an active metabolism for CBZ. In contrast, none of the 10 OH metabolites were detected in mussels exposed to 10 OH. CBZ showed higher accumulation in the digestive gland, where some relevant metabolites were detected, than in other studied tissues. The implication of those findings on field biomonitoring is discussed.

  19. Caffeine-induced psychiatric manifestations: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hee Ryung; Woo, Young Sup; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2015-07-01

    The association between caffeine consumption and various psychiatric manifestations has long been observed. We present two cases that show the ability of caffeine to induce psychotic and manic symptoms, and we also review the extant literature on caffeine-induced psychiatric manifestations. On the basis of our own and others' findings, we suggest that caffeine may be related to not only de-novo psychotic or mood symptoms but also to aggravation of pre-existing psychotic or mood disorders. We therefore suggest that caffeine consumption among patients with mood or psychotic symptoms should be assessed carefully in clinical practice as part of routine psychiatric evaluations.

  20. Genome-wide association study of caffeine metabolites provides new insights to caffeine metabolism and dietary caffeine-consumption behavior.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Marilyn C; Kacprowski, Tim; Menni, Cristina; Gustafsson, Stefan; Pivin, Edward; Adamski, Jerzy; Artati, Anna; Eap, Chin B; Ehret, Georg; Friedrich, Nele; Ganna, Andrea; Guessous, Idris; Homuth, Georg; Lind, Lars; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mangino, Massimo; Pedersen, Nancy L; Pietzner, Maik; Suhre, Karsten; Völzke, Henry; Bochud, Murielle; Spector, Tim D; Grabe, Hans J; Ingelsson, Erik

    2016-10-03

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world and presents with wide interindividual variation in metabolism. This variation may modify potential adverse or beneficial effects of caffeine on health. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of plasma caffeine, paraxanthine, theophylline, theobromine and paraxanthine/caffeine ratio among up to 9,876 individuals of European ancestry from six population-based studies. A single SNP at 6p23 (near CD83) and several SNPs at 7p21 (near AHR), 15q24 (near CYP1A2) and 19q13.2 (near CYP2A6) met GW-significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) and were associated with one or more metabolites. Variants at 7p21 and 15q24 associated with higher plasma caffeine and lower plasma paraxanthine/caffeine (slow caffeine metabolism) were previously associated with lower coffee and caffeine consumption behavior in GWAS. Variants at 19q13.2 associated with higher plasma paraxanthine/caffeine (slow paraxanthine metabolism) were also associated with lower coffee consumption in the UK Biobank (n = 94 343, P < 1.0 × 10(-6)). Variants at 2p24 (in GCKR), 4q22 (in ABCG2) and 7q11.23 (near POR) that were previously associated with coffee consumption in GWAS were nominally associated with plasma caffeine or its metabolites. Taken together, we have identified genetic factors contributing to variation in caffeine metabolism and confirm an important modulating role of systemic caffeine levels in dietary caffeine consumption behavior. Moreover, candidate genes identified encode proteins with important clinical functions that extend beyond caffeine metabolism.

  1. Make Caffeine Visible: a Fluorescent Caffeine “Traffic Light” Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wang; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Zhai, Duanting; Er, Jun Cheng; Zhang, Liyun; Kale, Anup Atul; Agrawalla, Bikram Keshari; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Chang, Young-Tae

    2013-07-01

    Caffeine has attracted abundant attention due to its extensive existence in beverages and medicines. However, to detect it sensitively and conveniently remains a challenge, especially in resource-limited regions. Here we report a novel aqueous phase fluorescent caffeine sensor named Caffeine Orange which exhibits 250-fold fluorescence enhancement upon caffeine activation and high selectivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicate that π-stacking and hydrogen-bonding contribute to their interactions while dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrate the change of Caffeine Orange ambient environment induces its fluorescence emission. To utilize this probe in real life, we developed a non-toxic caffeine detection kit and tested it for caffeine quantification in various beverages. Naked-eye sensing of various caffeine concentrations was possible based on color changes upon irradiation with a laser pointer. Lastly, we performed the whole system on a microfluidic device to make caffeine detection quick, sensitive and automated.

  2. Carbamazepine enhances the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gwanwoo; Huang, Yueming; Washington, Jacqueline M; Briggs, Nicole W; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate transporters (also called excitatory amino acid transporters, EAAT) participate in maintaining extracellular homeostasis of glutamate, a major excitatory neurotransmitter, and regulating glutamate neurotransmission. EAAT3, the major neuronal EAAT, may also regulate gamma-aminobutyric acid-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission. Dysfunction of EAAT3 has been shown to induce seizure in rats. We hypothesize that carbamazepine, a commonly used antiepileptic agent, enhances EAAT3 activity. We tested this hypothesis using oocytes artificially expressing EAAT3 and C6 rat glioma cells expressing endogenous EAAT3. In oocytes, carbamazepine dose-dependently enhanced EAAT3 activity. The EC50 of this carbamazepine effect was 12.2muM. The concentrations of carbamazepine to significantly enhance EAAT3 activity were within the therapeutic serum levels (17-51muM) of carbamazepine for the antiepileptic effect. Carbamazepine decreased the Km but did not change the maximal response of EAAT3 to glutamate. Carbamazepine-increased EAAT3 activity was inhibited by wortmannin or LY-294002, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors, but was not affected by staurosporine, chelerythrine or calphostin C, protein kinase C inhibitors. In C6 cells, carbamazepine also enhanced the endogenous EAAT3 activity. However, carbamazepine did not affect the activity of EAAT4 expressed in Cos7 cells. These results suggest that carbamazepine at clinically relevant concentrations specifically enhances the affinity of EAAT3 for glutamate to increase EAAT3 activity via a PI3K-dependent pathway. EAAT3 may be a therapeutic target for carbamazepine in the central nervous system.

  3. Contribution of acetaminophen-cysteine to acetaminophen nephrotoxicity in CD-1 mice: I. Enhancement of acetaminophen nephrotoxicity by acetaminophen-cysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Stephan T.; Bruno, Mary K.; Hennig, Gayle E.; Horton, Robert A.; Roberts, Jeanette C.; Cohen, Steven D. . E-mail: scohen@mcp.edu

    2005-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) nephrotoxicity has been observed both in humans and research animals. Recent studies suggest a contributory role for glutathione (GSH)-derived conjugates of APAP in the development of nephrotoxicity. Inhibitors of either {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase ({gamma}-GT) or the probenecid-sensitive organic anion transporter ameliorate APAP-induced nephrotoxicity but not hepatotoxicity in mice and inhibition of {gamma}-GT similarly protected rats from APAP nephrotoxicity. Protection against APAP nephrotoxicity by disruption of these GSH conjugate transport and metabolism pathways suggests that GSH conjugates are involved. APAP-induced renal injury may involve the acetaminophen-glutathione (APAP-GSH) conjugate or a metabolite derived from APAP-GSH. Acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS) is a likely candidate for involvement in APAP nephrotoxicity because it is both a product of the {gamma}-GT pathway and a probable substrate for the organic anion transporter. The present experiments demonstrated that APAP-CYS treatment alone depleted renal but not hepatic glutathione (GSH) in a dose-responsive manner. This depletion of renal GSH may predispose the kidney to APAP nephrotoxicity by diminishing GSH-mediated detoxification mechanisms. Indeed, pretreatment of male CD-1 mice with APAP-CYS before challenge with a threshold toxic dose of APAP resulted in significant enhancement of APAP-induced nephrotoxicity. This was evidenced by histopathology and plasma blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels at 24 h after APAP challenge. APAP alone was minimally nephrotoxic and APAP-CYS alone produced no detectable injury. By contrast, APAP-CYS pretreatment did not alter the liver injury induced by APAP challenge. These data are consistent with there being a selective, contributory role for APAP-GSH-derived metabolites in APAP-induced renal injury that may involve renal-selective GSH depletion.

  4. Overnight caffeine abstinence and negative reinforcement of preference for caffeine-containing drinks.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P J; Richardson, N J; Elliman, N A

    1995-08-01

    It has been suggested that liking for the taste, flavour and aroma of, for example, coffee and tea is acquired through the process of classical conditioning, involving association of these orosensory cues with the psychopharmacological consequences of caffeine ingestion. Accordingly, this study investigated caffeine reinforcement by assessing changes in preference for a novel drink consumed with or without caffeine. Particular care was taken to use "ecologically valid" procedures; that is, overnight caffeine abstinence followed by a cup-of-coffee equivalent dose of caffeine (70 mg) at breakfast. Caffeine had no significant effects on drink preference or mood in subjects with habitually low intakes of caffeine. In contrast, moderate users of caffeine developed a relative dislike for the drink lacking caffeine and showed somewhat lowered mood following overnight caffeine abstinence (e.g., less lively, clearheaded and cheerful), which was significantly improved by caffeine. These together with other recent results strongly suggest that, in everyday life, caffeine reinforcement can occur as the result of the alleviation by caffeine of the adverse effects of overnight caffeine abstinence (negative reinforcement). They also demonstrate the utility of this flavour-conditioning procedure, which could be applied in the wider investigation of the reinforcing properties of drugs.

  5. Caffeine: implications for alertness in athletes.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Naomi L; Dinges, David F

    2005-04-01

    Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed drugs in the world, taken socially and for its alertness- and performance-promoting actions. Extensive reports assert that caffeine increases alertness and cognitive performance levels and, when taken before exercise, demonstrates ergogenic properties. Caffeine ingestion has been associated with increased performance during endurance submaximal, and acute, high-intensity exercise. The exact mechanism of action for the performance effects of caffeine is unknown, although several physiologically and psychologically based theories exist as to how caffeine achieves increased performance capabilities. This paper outlines the known sites of caffeine activity in the body,and discusses these with respect to the effects of caffeine observed during performance assessments.

  6. Potential role of caveolin-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Carol R.; Gray, Joshua P.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Cervelli, Jessica; Bremer, Nicole; Kim, Yunjung; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2010-05-15

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a membrane scaffolding protein, which functions to regulate intracellular compartmentalization of various signaling molecules. In the present studies, transgenic mice with a targeted disruption of the Cav-1 gene (Cav-1{sup -/-}) were used to assess the role of Cav-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Treatment of wild-type mice with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases. This was correlated with decreased expression of Cav-1 in the liver. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was significantly attenuated in Cav-1{sup -/-} mice, an effect that was independent of acetaminophen metabolism. Acetaminophen administration resulted in increased hepatic expression of the oxidative stress marker, lipocalin 24p3, as well as hemeoxygenase-1, but decreased glutathione and superoxide dismutase-1; no differences were noted between the genotypes suggesting that reduced toxicity in Cav-1{sup -/-} mice is not due to alterations in antioxidant defense. In wild-type mice, acetaminophen increased mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1beta, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), as well as cyclooxygenase-2, while 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX), which generates anti-inflammatory lipoxins, decreased. Acetaminophen-induced changes in MCP-1 and 15-LOX expression were greater in Cav-1{sup -/-} mice. Although expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, a potent hepatocyte mitogen, was up-regulated in the liver of Cav-1{sup -/-} mice after acetaminophen, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and survivin, markers of cellular proliferation, were delayed, which may reflect the reduced need for tissue repair. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Cav-1 plays a role in promoting inflammation and toxicity during the pathogenesis of acetaminophen-induced injury.

  7. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Takeki; Kosyk, Oksana; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Bradford, Blair U.; Tech, Katherine; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Boorman, Gary A.; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Mason, Ronald P.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Tryndyak, Volodymyr P.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2013-01-15

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  8. Caffeinated beverages and decreased fertility.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, A; Weinberg, C; Baird, D

    104 healthy women who had been attempting to become pregnant for three months were interviewed about their use of caffeinated beverages, alcohol, and cigarettes. In their subsequent cycles, women who consumed more than the equivalent of one cup of coffee per day were half as likely to become pregnant, per cycle, as women who drank less. A dose-response effect was present.

  9. Caffeine Modulates Attention Network Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunye, Tad T.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Lieberman, Harris R.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigated the effects of caffeine (0 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 400 mg) on a flanker task designed to test Posner's three visual attention network functions: alerting, orienting, and executive control [Posner, M. I. (2004). "Cognitive neuroscience of attention". New York, NY: Guilford Press]. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind…

  10. Caffeine Use Affects Pregnancy Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diego, Miguel; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Vera, Yanexy; Gil, Karla; Gonzalez-Garcia, Adolfo

    2008-01-01

    A sample of 750 women were interviewed during pregnancy on their depression and anxiety symptoms, substance use and demographic variables. A subsample was seen again at the neonatal stage (n = 152), and their infants were observed for sleep-wake behavior. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were related to caffeine use. Mothers who consumed more…

  11. Reversal by phenytoin of carbamazepine-induced water intoxication: a pharmacokinetic interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Perucca, E; Richens, A

    1980-01-01

    The hypothesis that phenytoin may antagonise the antidiuretic effect of carbamazepine has been examined by comparing the free water clearance response to a standard water load in 36 patients stabilised on different drug regimes. The diuretic response to the water load was significantly greater in patients receiving chronic treatment with carbamazepine and phenytoin in combination than in matched control subjects receiving carbamazepine as a single drug. Acute administration of phenytoin (1,100 mg), however, had no significant influence on carbamazepine-induced antidiuresis. Evidence is presented that reversal of the antidiuretic effect of carbamazepine by chronic phenytoin administration is secondary to a marked reduction of the serum carbamazepine concentration during combined therapy. These results suggest that the risk of developing water intoxication is greater in patients receiving carbamazepine alone than in those receiving phenytoin in combination. Since the antidiuretic effect is correlated with the serum carbamazepine concentration rather than with the prescribed daily dose, monitoring the serum level of the drug is likely to provide the best rational approach to the prevention of excessive water retention. PMID:7205298

  12. Comparison of equilibrium and non-equilibrium distribution coefficients for the human drug carbamazepine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The distribution coefficient (KD) for the human drug carbamazepine was measured using a non-equilibrium technique. Repacked soil columns were prepared using an Airport silt loam (Typic Natrustalf) with an average organic matter content of 2.45%. Carbamazepine solutions were then leached through th...

  13. Transformation Pathways of the Recalcitrant Pharmaceutical Compound Carbamazepine by the White-Rot Fungus Pleurotus ostreatus: Effects of Growth Conditions.

    PubMed

    Golan-Rozen, Naama; Seiwert, Bettina; Riemenschneider, Christina; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Chefetz, Benny; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2015-10-20

    The widely used anticonvulsant pharmaceutical carbamazepine is recalcitrant in many environmental niches and thus poses a challenge in wastewater treatment. We followed the decomposition of carbamazepine by the white-rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus in liquid culture compared to solid-state fermentation on lignocellulosic substrate where different enzymatic systems are active. Carbamazepine metabolites were identified using liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS). In liquid culture, carbamazepine was only transformed to 10,11-epoxy carbamazepine and 10,11-dihydroxy carbamazepine as a dead-end product. During solid-state fermentation, carbamazepine metabolism resulted in the generation of an additional 22 transformation products, some of which are toxic. Under solid-state-fermentation conditions, 10,11-epoxy carbamazepine was further metabolized via acridine and 10,11-dihydroxy carbamazepine pathways. The latter was further metabolized via five subpathways. When (14)C-carbonyl-labeled carbamazepine was used as the substrate, (14)C-CO2 release amounted to 17.4% of the initial radioactivity after 63 days of incubation. The proposed pathways were validated using metabolites (10,11-epoxy carbamazepine, 10,11-dihydroxy carbamazepine, and acridine) as primary substrates and following their fate at different time points. This work highlights the effect of growth conditions on the transformation pathways of xenobiotics. A better understanding of the fate of pollutants during bioremediation treatments is important for establishment of such technologies.

  14. Evaluation of thyroid hormones in children receiving carbamazepine or valproate: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kafadar, İhsan; Kılıç, Betül Aydın; Arapoglu, Mujde; Yalçın, Koray; Dalgıç, Nazan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the alterations in thyroid function during carbamazepine or valproate monotherapy in a prospective study. Forty patients treated with valproate, 33 patients treated with carbamazepine, and 36 control patients, all aged between 2 and 18 years, were enrolled in our study. Serum levels of thyroid hormones were measured before the beginning of the antiepileptic therapy and at 6 and 12 months of treatment. Carbamazepine-treated patients showed mean serum thyroid hormone levels significantly lower than baseline evaluation and the control group. Thyroid-stimulating hormone levels at 6 and 12 months were not significantly different in carbamazepine treated patients. Serum hormone levels did not change during valproate treatment. Thyroid-stimulating hormone levels were significantly higher at the 12th month of valproate treatment. Our data suggest that although carbamazepine causes significant alterations in thyroid hormone levels, these changes do not lead to clinical symptoms at the follow-up period of 12 months.

  15. Effect of an acidic beverage (Coca-Cola) on the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, S; Dixit, R K; Garg, S K

    2002-01-01

    The effect of an acidic beverage (Coca-Cola) on the pharmacokinetics of a single dose of carbamazepine was studied. In a two-way cross-over design with a 1 week washout period, 10 healthy volunteers were randomized to received 200 mg carbamazepine orally with 300 ml of Coca-Cola or water. Blood samples were collected at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after drug administration. Plasma carbamazepine levels were higher with Coca-Cola as compared to water. The AUC0-infinity and Cmax of carbamazepine were significantly enhanced after Coca-Cola while tmax was achieved earlier with Coca-Cola. The results of the study indicate that concomitant administration of Coca-Cola enhances the rate and extent of absorption of carbamazepine.

  16. Ecotoxicological impact of pharmaceuticals found in treated wastewaters: study of carbamazepine, clofibric acid, and diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Benoît; Paxéus, Nicklas; Lo Giudice, Roberto; Pollio, Antonino; Garric, Jeanne

    2003-07-01

    In four countries (France, Greece, Italy, and Sweden) occurrence in sewage treatment plant (STP) effluents and ecotoxicity of the pharmaceuticals carbamazepine, clofibric acid, and diclofenac were investigated. Bioassays were performed on bacteria, algae, microcrustaceans, and fishes in order to calculate their predicted no-effect concentrations (PNEC) and to perform a first approach of risk characterization. For this aim, risk has been estimated by the predicted environmental concentration/PNEC ratio and the measured environmental concentration/PNEC ratio. First, regarding the PNEC, carbamazepine appears to be the more hazardous compound. Second, even though it is demonstrated that carbamazepine, clofibric acid, and diclofenac have been detected in effluents, only carbamazepine have been detected in all sewage treatment plants with the greatest concentrations. Third, risk quotients greater than unity were calculated only for carbamazepine, suggesting that risk for the water compartment is expected.

  17. Consumption of caffeinated beverages and the awareness of their caffeine content among Dutch students.

    PubMed

    Mackus, Marlou; van de Loo, Aurora J A E; Benson, Sarah; Scholey, Andrew; Verster, Joris C

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the knowledge of caffeine content of a variety of caffeinated beverages among Dutch university students. A pencil-and-paper survey was conducted among N = 800 Dutch students. Most participants (87.8%) reported consuming caffeinated beverages during the past 24 h. Their mean ± SD past 24-h caffeine intake from beverages was 144.2 ± 169.5 mg (2.2 ± 3.0 mg/kg bw). Most prevalent sources of caffeine were coffee beverages (50.8%) and tea (34.8%), followed by energy drink (9.2%), cola (4.7%), and chocolate milk (0.5%). Participants had poor knowledge on the relative caffeine content of caffeinated beverages. That is, they overestimated the caffeine content of energy drinks and cola, and underestimated the caffeine content of coffee beverages. If caffeine consumption is a concern, it is important to inform consumers about the caffeine content of all caffeine containing beverages, including coffee and tea. The current findings support previous research that the most effective way to reduce caffeine intake is to limit the consumption of coffee beverages and tea.

  18. Caffeine tolerance: behavioral, electrophysiological and neurochemical evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.T.; Khan, S.; Forde, J.; Hirsh, K.R.

    1985-06-17

    The development of tolerance to the stimulatory action of caffeine upon mesencephalic reticular neurons and upon spontaneous locomotor activity was evaluated in rats after two weeks of chronic exposure to low doses of caffeine (5-10 mg/kg/day via their drinking water). These doses are achievable through dietary intake of caffeine-containing beverages in man. Concomitant measurement of (/sup 3/H)-CHA binding in the mesencephalic reticular formation was also carried out in order to explore the neurochemical basis of the development of tolerance. Caffeine, 2.5 mg/kg i.v., markedly increased the firing rate of reticular neurons in caffeine naive rats but failed to modify the neuronal activity in a group exposed chronically to low doses of caffeine. In addition, in spontaneous locomotor activity studies, the data show a distinct shift to the right of the caffeine dose-response curve in caffeine pretreated rats. These results clearly indicate that tolerance develops to the stimulatory action of caffeine upon the reticular formation at the single neuronal activity level as well as upon spontaneous locomotor activity. Furthermore, in chronically caffeine exposed rats, an increase in the number of binding sites for (/sup 3/H)-CHA was observed in reticular formation membranes without any change in receptor affinity. 28 references, 4 figures.

  19. [Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome associated with carbamazepine-induced hypertension].

    PubMed

    Furuta, Natsumi; Fujita, Yukio; Sekine, Akiko; Ikeda, Masaki; Okamoto, Koichi

    2009-04-01

    A 21-year-old man developed idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, and was admitted to our hospital. Although neuralgia was promptly resolved after oral carbamazepine (CBZ) administration, he developed arterial hypertension (from 110/60 mmHg to 170/126 mmHg) followed by consciousness disturbance several days after the initiation of carbamazepine. MRI T2-weighted, FLAIR and ADC images demonstrated transient hyperintense lesions of the bilateral fronto-parieto-occipital subcortical white matter. These lesions showed isointensity on diffusion-weighted images. Since these alterations suggested the presence of vasogenic edema induced by hypertension, we diagnosed him as having reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) induced by hypertension. Persistent hypertension despite the administration of various anti-hypertension drugs finally improved after oral CBZ therapy was discontinued. Therefore, we considered that hypertension was induced by oral CBZ therapy. This is a rare case in which high blood pressure was caused by CBZ. There is no previous report of RPLS induced by CBZ administration. Further investigation to determine whether CBZ is capable of causing arterial hypertension is warranted.

  20. Insecticidal activity of caffeine aqueous solutions and caffeine oleate emulsions against Drosophila melanogaster and Hypothenemus hampei.

    PubMed

    Araque, Pedronel; Casanova, Herley; Ortiz, Carlos; Henao, Beatriz; Pelaez, Carlos

    2007-08-22

    The bioactivity of caffeine aqueous solutions (0.20-2.00 wt %) and caffeine oleate emulsions (20 vol % oil, 2.00 wt % surfactant, 0.04 wt % caffeine, 0.05 wt % oleic acid) was assessed against two biological models: Drosophila melanogaster and Hypothenemus hampei. The caffeine aqueous solutions showed no insecticidal activity, whereas caffeine oleate emulsions had high bioactivity against both D. melanogaster and H. hampei. By preparing the caffeine oleate emulsions with anionic surfactants (i.e., sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium laureate, and sodium oleate), we obtained a lethal time 50 (LT50) of 23 min. In the case of caffeine oleate emulsions prepared with nonionic surfactants (i.e., Tween 20 and Tween 80), a LT50 of approximately 17 min was observed. The high bioactivity of the caffeine oleate emulsion against H. hampei opens the possibility of using this insecticide formulation as an effective way to control this pest that greatly affects coffee plantations around the world.

  1. A case of atrial tachycardia sensitive to increased caffeine intake.

    PubMed

    Kinugawa, Toru; Kurita, Takashi; Nohara, Ryuji; Smith, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    A 33-year-old Japanese man with atrial tachycardia visited our clinic. He regularly consumed daily alcohol with cola, one cup of regular coffee, and a candy containing 0.7 mg of caffeine per tablet. After stopping his caffeine intake, his arrhythmia ameliorated. Since caffeine might be associated with his arrhythmia, a caffeine load test (equivalent to his daily intake of caffeine) was performed for 4 days. Atrial tachycardia time from a Holter recording was 44.2 minute/day before the caffeine load, compared with 215.2 minute/day during the caffeine load. Plasma caffeine concentration before and during caffeine loading was 3.1 mg/dL and 5.4 mg/dL, respectively. Caffeine use seemed to be an important factor for his atrial tachycardia, since his arrhythmia became worse during caffeine load testing and was ameliorated after the cessation of caffeine.

  2. NQO2 is a reactive oxygen species generating off-target for acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Teemu P; Björklund, Mikael

    2014-12-01

    The analgesic and antipyretic compound acetaminophen (paracetamol) is one of the most used drugs worldwide. Acetaminophen overdose is also the most common cause for acute liver toxicity. Here we show that acetaminophen and many structurally related compounds bind quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) in vitro and in live cells, establishing NQO2 as a novel off-target. NQO2 modulates the levels of acetaminophen derived reactive oxygen species, more specifically superoxide anions, in cultured cells. In humans, NQO2 is highly expressed in liver and kidney, the main sites of acetaminophen toxicity. We suggest that NQO2 mediated superoxide production may function as a novel mechanism augmenting acetaminophen toxicity.

  3. Acetaminophen induced Steven Johnson syndrome-toxic epidermal necrolysis overlap.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Ali; Shahab, Ahmed; Hussain, Syed Ather

    2012-05-01

    Steven Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis are rare but severe form of hypersensitivity inflammatory reactions to multiple offending agents including drugs. Acetaminophen is extensively used due to its analgesic and anti-pyretic properties. It is rendered to be relatively safe, with hepatotoxicity considered to be the major adverse effect. However, very few cases of Steven Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis have been reported with acetaminophen usage in the past. We present the case of a 40 years old lady who developed an overlap of the two condition after taking several doses of acetaminophen for fever. She presented with widespread maculopapular rash, stinging in the eyes, oral mucosal ulcerations and high grade fever. She was successfully treated with corticosteroid therapy along with the supportive treatment. This case addresses the fact, that severe hypersensitivity reactions can occur with acetaminophen which can be potentially life threatening.

  4. Careful: Acetaminophen in Pain Relief Medicines Can Cause Liver Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careful: Acetaminophen in pain relief medicines can cause liver damage Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... word or may have the abbreviation "APAP." Severe liver damage may occur and may lead to death ...

  5. Caffeine reduces myocardial blood flow during exercise.

    PubMed

    Higgins, John P; Babu, Kavita M

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine consumption has been receiving increased interest from both the medical and lay press, especially given the increased amounts now available in energy products. Acute ingestion of caffeine usually increases cardiac work; however, caffeine impairs the expected proportional increase in myocardial blood flow to match this increased work of the heart, most notably during exercise. This appears to be mainly due to caffeine's effect on blocking adenosine-induced vasodilatation in the coronary arteries in normal healthy subjects. This review summarizes the available medical literature specifically relating to pure caffeine tablet ingestion and reduced exercise coronary blood flow, and suggests possible mechanisms. Further studies are needed to evaluate this effect for other common caffeine-delivery systems, including coffee, energy beverages, and energy gels, which are often used for exercise performance enhancement, especially in teenagers and young athletes.

  6. Caffeine deprivation state modulates coffee consumption but not attentional bias for caffeine-related stimuli.

    PubMed

    Stafford, L D; Yeomans, M R

    2005-11-01

    Previous research has shown that caffeine deprivation state can exert a strong influence on the ability of caffeine to reinforce behaviour. Recent work has also found evidence for an attentional bias in habitual caffeine users. It remains unclear whether deprivation state can influence attentional bias. Here we explored the relationship between caffeine deprivation, attentional bias to caffeine-related stimuli and subsequent caffeine reinforcement measured by consumption of coffee. In three experiments, participants (between-subjects: n=28; within-subjects: n=20, within-subjects: n=20) were preloaded with either caffeine (experiments 1 and 3 : 100 mg; experiment 2 : 150 mg) or placebo, and in experiments 1 and 2 they completed a novel attentional bias task involving pre-attentive word recognition, and in experiment 3 a dot-probe task. In experiments 2 and 3, this was followed by a test of coffee consumption. Greater recognition for caffeine-related words (experiments 1 and 2) and faster reaction times to probes replacing caffeine-related rather than control stimuli (experiment 3) confirmed caffeine-related attentional biases, but in no case was this affected by manipulation of caffeine-deprivation state. Participants in a deprived versus nondeprived state, however, experienced increases in drowsiness and headaches (experiment 2) and reduced alertness (experiment 3). Further, coffee consumption was greatest when participants were caffeine-deprived than when they were nondeprived. Findings are discussed in relation to prevailing theories of drug addiction.

  7. Carbamazepine, carbamazepine epoxide and dihydroxycarbamazepine sorption to soil and occurrence in a wastewater reuse site in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Fenet, Hélène; Mathieu, Olivier; Mahjoub, Olfa; Li, Zhi; Hillaire-Buys, Dominique; Casellas, Claude; Gomez, Elena

    2012-06-01

    Treated wastewater is being increasingly used for irrigation and aquifer replenishment through artificial recharge. However, wastewater reuse can result in contamination of exposed soil and groundwater by chemicals such as some pharmaceuticals and their metabolites. The fate of these molecules depends largely on their capacity to sorb onto soil and aquifer materials during infiltration. In this study, the sorption isotherm of carbamazepine (CBZ), an anti-seizure medication, and two of its metabolites, i.e. carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide (CBZ-EP) and 10,11-dihydro-10,11-dihydroxycarbamazepine (DiOH-CBZ), were determined in two soils in laboratory assays. In the field, the presence of CBZ and its metabolites were investigated in soil and in groundwater underlying an irrigated area with treated wastewater. The results showed that CBZ had the highest carbon normalised sorption coefficients in the two tested soils (irrigated soil and a Lufa SP2.4 reference soil) followed by CBZ-EP and DiOH-CBZ, indicating the relatively higher mobility of CBZ metabolites compared to CBZ. The chromatographic analysis revealed that CBZ and its two metabolites were present in treated wastewater used for irrigation and in groundwater. In soil samples, CBZ concentrations showed a build-up taking place with irrigation. The mobility of metabolites in soil and their potential biodegradation require further investigation.

  8. Caffeine synthase and related methyltransferases in plants.

    PubMed

    Misako, Kato; Kouichi, Mizuno

    2004-05-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is a purine alkaloid present in high concentrations in tea and coffee and it is also found in a number of beverages such as coca cola. It is necessary to elucidate the caffeine biosynthetic pathway and to clone the genes related to the production of caffeine not only to determine the metabolism of the purine alkaloid but also to control the content of caffeine in tea and coffee. The available data support the operation of a xanthosine-->7-methylxanthosine-->7-methylxanthine-->theobromine-->caffeine pathway as the major route to caffeine. Since the caffeine biosynthetic pathway contains three S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) dependent methylation steps, N-methyltransferases play important roles. This review focuses on the enzymes and genes involved in the methylation of purine ring. Caffeine synthase, the SAM-dependent methyltransferase involved in the last two steps of caffeine biosynthesis, was originally purified from young tea leaves (Camellia sinensis). The isolated cDNA, termed TCS1, consists of 1,483 base pairs and encodes a protein of 369 amino acids. Subsequently, the homologous genes that encode caffeine biosynthetic enzymes from coffee (Coffea arabica) were isolated. The recombinant proteins are classified into the three types on the basis of their substrate specificity i.e. 7-methylxanthosine synthase, theobromine synthase and caffeine synthase. The predicted amino acid sequences of caffeine biosynthetic enzymes derived from C. arabica exhibit more than 80% homology with those of the clones and but show only 40% homology with TCS1 derived from C. sinensis. In addition, they share 40% homology with the amino acid sequences of salicylic carboxyl methyltransferase, benzoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase and jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase which belong to a family of motif B' methyltransferases which are novel plant methyltransferases with motif B' instead of motif B as the conserved region.

  9. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity.

  10. Inhibitory effects of Schisandra chinensis on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun-Peng; Bai, Yu; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Jin-Zhen

    2014-05-01

    Schisandra chinensis is a well-known traditional medicinal herb. Acetaminophen is a commonly used over-the-counter analgesic and overdose of acetaminophen was the most frequent cause of acute liver failure. However, no studies have demonstrated the role of Schisandra chinensis in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure to the best of our knowledge. In this study, an acute liver injury model was established in mice using acetaminophen. The protective role of Schisandra chinensis was detected by histopathological analysis, and measurement of the serum transaminase levels and hepatic Cyp activity levels in the mouse model. Subsequently, hepatocytes were isolated from the livers of the mouse model. The cell cycle, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species were determined using flow cytometry. Cell proliferation and 26S proteasome activity were determined using spectrophotometry. Schisandra chinensis was found to resist acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by protecting mitochondria and lysosomes and inhibiting the phosphor-c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway. These findings provide a novel application of Schisandra chinensis against acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

  11. Effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine acetylation in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tahir, I M; Iqbal, T; Saleem, S; Mehboob, H; Akhter, N; Riaz, M

    2016-03-01

    The effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine N-acetylation by human N-acetyltrasferase-2 (NAT2) was studied in 19 (n=19) healthy male volunteers in two different phases. In the first phase of the study the volunteers were given an oral dose of sulfamethazine 500 mg alone and blood and urine samples were collected. After the 10-day washout period the same selected volunteers were again administered sulfamethazine 500 mg along with 1000 mg acetaminophen. The acetylation of sulfamethazine by human NAT2 in both phases with and without acetaminophen was determined by HPLC to establish their respective phenotypes. In conclusion obtained statistics of present study revealed that acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) decreased sulfamethazine acetylation in plasma of both slow and fast acetylator male volunteers. A highly significant (P<0.0001) decrease in plasma-free and total sulfamethazine concentration was also observed when acetaminophen was co-administered. Urine acetylation status in both phases of the study was found not to be in complete concordance with that of plasma. Acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) increased the acetyl, free and total sulfamethazine concentration in urine of both slow and fast acetylators. Urine acetylation analysis has not been found to be a suitable approach for phenotypic studies.

  12. Acetaminophen for Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review on Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Zandra Nymand; Dideriksen, Dorthe; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Handberg, Gitte; Pottegård, Anton

    2016-03-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is the most commonly used analgesic worldwide and recommended as first-line treatment in all pain conditions by WHO. We performed a systematic literature review to evaluate the efficacy of acetaminophen when used for chronic pain conditions. Applying three broad search strategies for acetaminophen use in chronic pain in both Embase and PubMed, 1551 hits were obtained. After cross-reference searches of both trials and 38 reviews, seven studies comparing acetaminophen in continuous dosing regimens of more than 2 weeks with placebo were included. The review was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines. All studies were conducted in patients with hip- or knee osteoarthritis and six of seven studies had observation periods of less than 3 months. All included studies showed no or little efficacy with dubious clinical relevance. In conclusion, there is little evidence to support the efficacy of acetaminophen treatment in patients with chronic pain conditions. Assessment of continuous efficacy in the many patients using acetaminophen worldwide is recommended.

  13. The effects of acetaminophen on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of warfarin.

    PubMed

    Kwan, D; Bartle, W R; Walker, S E

    1999-01-01

    The oral anticoagulant warfarin is clinically administered as a racemic mixture of two enantiomers, (R) and (S). Many relevant drug interactions with warfarin have been attributed to the specific metabolic inhibition of the elimination of the more pharmacologically active (S)-enantiomer. To investigate reports that acetaminophen can potentiate the anticoagulant effect of warfarin, 20 healthy male volunteers were each given single oral 20 mg doses of racemic warfarin on three separate occasions: (1) alone, (2) after 1 day of acetaminophen (4 g/d), and (3) after 2 weeks of acetaminophen (4 g/d). The urinary excretion pattern of acetaminophen and its metabolites was not significantly altered over its course of administration. The (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of warfarin exhibited significantly different pharmacokinetic properties. However, acetaminophen did not alter the disposition of either (R)- or (S)-warfarin. All subjects exhibited a pharmacodynamic response to racemic warfarin. The response was not significantly altered in the presence of acute or chronic acetaminophen dosing, as assessed by prothrombin time and factor VII concentrations.

  14. Ferroptosis is Involved in Acetaminophen Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, Tamás; Jemnitz, Katalin; Kardon, Tamás; Mandl, József; Szarka, András

    2015-09-01

    The recently described form of programmed cell death, ferroptosis can be induced by agents causing GSH depletion or the inhibition of GPX4. Ferroptosis clearly shows distinct morphologic, biochemical and genetic features from apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. Since NAPQI the highly reactive metabolite of the widely applied analgesic and antipyretic, acetaminophen induces a cell death which can be characterized by GSH depletion, GPX inhibition and caspase independency the involvement of ferroptosis in acetaminophen induced cell death has been investigated. The specific ferroptosis inhibitor ferrostatin-1 failed to elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated HepG2 cells. It should be noticed that these cells do not form NAPQI due to the lack of phase I enzyme expression therefore GSH depletion cannot be observed. However in the case of acetaminophen treated primary mouse hepatocytes the significant elevation of cell viability could be observed upon ferrostatin-1 treatment. Similar to ferrostatin-1 treatment, the addition of the RIP1 kinase inhibitor necrostatin-1 could also elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated primary hepatocytes. Ferrostatin-1 has no influence on the expression of CYP2E1 or on the cellular GSH level which suggest that the protective effect of ferrostatin-1 in APAP induced cell death is not based on the reduced metabolism of APAP to NAPQI or on altered NAPQI conjugation by cellular GSH. Our results suggest that beyond necroptosis and apoptosis a third programmed cell death, ferroptosis is also involved in acetaminophen induced cell death in primary hepatocytes.

  15. Expectation of having consumed caffeine can improve performance and mood.

    PubMed

    Dawkins, Lynne; Shahzad, Fatima-Zahra; Ahmed, Suada S; Edmonds, Caroline J

    2011-12-01

    We explored whether caffeine, and expectation of having consumed caffeine, affects attention, reward responsivity and mood using double-blinded methodology. 88 participants were randomly allocated to 'drink-type' (caffeinated/decaffeinated coffee) and 'expectancy' (told caffeinated/told decaffeinated coffee) manipulations. Both caffeine and expectation of having consumed caffeine improved attention and psychomotor speed. Expectation enhanced self-reported vigour and reward responsivity. Self-reported depression increased at post-drink for all participants, but less in those receiving or expecting caffeine. These results suggest caffeine expectation can affect mood and performance but do not support a synergistic effect.

  16. Caffeine fostering of mycoparasitic fungi against phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Sano, Cecile M; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Sano, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethixanthine) is a typical purine alkaloid produced in more than 80 plant species. Its biological role is considered to strengthen plant's defense capabilities, directly as a toxicant to biotic attackers (allelopathy) and indirectly as an activator of defense system (priming). Caffeine is actively secreted into rhizosphere through primary root, and possibly affects the structure of microbe community nearby. The fungal community in coffee plant rhizosphere is enriched with particular species, including Trichoderma family, a mycoparasite that attacks and kills phytopathogens by coiling and destroying their hyphae. In the present study, the caffeine response of 8 filamentous fungi, 4 mycoparasitic Trichoderma, and 4 prey phytopathogens, was examined. Results showed that allelopathic effect of caffeine on fungal growth and development was differential, being stronger on pathogens than on Trichoderma species. Upon confronting, the prey immediately ceased the growth, whereas the predator continued to grow, indicating active mycoparasitism to have occurred. Caffeine enhanced mycoparasitism up to 1.7-fold. Caffeine thus functions in a double-track manner against fungal pathogens: first by direct suppression of growth and development, and second by assisting their natural enemy. These observations suggest that caffeine is a powerful weapon in the arms race between plants and pathogens by fostering enemy's enemy, and we propose the idea of "caffeine fostering" as the third role of caffeine.

  17. The interoceptive Pavlovian stimulus effects of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jennifer E; Li, Chia; Palmatier, Matthew I; Bevins, Rick A

    2007-04-01

    The present research sought to test whether caffeine functioned as a Pavlovian cue in two ways--as a positive drug feature or as a conditional stimulus (CS). As a positive feature (Experiment 1), brief light presentations were followed by sucrose only on sessions in which caffeine (10 mg/kg) was administered. On intermixed saline sessions, light presentations were not followed by sucrose. The light came to control robust goal tracking (i.e., conditioned responding) only in caffeine sessions. Thus, caffeine disambiguates when the light was paired with sucrose. Decreasing the dose of caffeine decreased the conditioned responding evoked by the light (ED(50)=4.16 mg/kg). Neither nicotine nor amphetamine substituted for the caffeine feature. As a CS, caffeine (10 or 30 mg/kg, Experiments 2a and 2b, respectively) signaled intermittent access to sucrose--no light presentations. No sucrose or lights were presented on intermixed saline sessions. The caffeine CS, regardless of training dose, acquired the ability to evoke only a weak goal-tracking CR. The nature of this dissociation between caffeine as a drug feature and a CS is discussed within the context of past research finding a similar dissociation with amphetamine and chlordiazepoxide, but not with nicotine.

  18. Caffeine--an atypical drug of dependence.

    PubMed

    Daly, J W; Fredholm, B B

    1998-01-01

    Caffeine has both positive effects that contribute to widespread consumption of caffeine-containing beverages and adverse unpleasant effects if doses are increased. Caffeine has weak reinforcing properties, but with little or no evidence for upward dose adjustment, possibly because of the adverse effects of higher doses. Withdrawal symptoms, although relatively limited with respect to severity, do occur, and may contribute to maintenance of caffeine consumption. Health hazards are small if any and caffeine use is not associated with incapacitation. Thus, although caffeine can be argued to fulfill regulatory criteria as a dependence-producing drug, the extensive use of caffeine-containing beverages poses little apparent risk to the consumer or to society. The positive stimulatory effects of caffeine appear in large measure to be due to blockade of A2A receptors that stimulate GABAergic neurons of inhibitory pathways to the dopaminergic reward system of the striatum. However, blockade of striatal A1 receptors may also play a role. The mechanisms underlying negative effects of higher doses of caffeine are as yet not well defined.

  19. Caffeine, adenosine receptors, and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Costenla, Ana Rita; Cunha, Rodrigo A; de Mendonça, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Few studies to date have looked at the effects of caffeine on synaptic plasticity, and those that did used very high concentrations of caffeine, whereas the brain concentrations attained by regular coffee consumption in humans should be in the low micromolar range, where caffeine exerts pharmacological actions mainly by antagonizing adenosine receptors. Accordingly, rats drinking caffeine (1 g/L) for 3 weeks, displayed a concentration of caffeine of circa 22 microM in the hippocampus. It is known that selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonists facilitate, whereas selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonists attenuate, long term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus. Although caffeine is a non-selective antagonist of adenosine receptors, it attenuates frequency-induced LTP in hippocampal slices in a manner similar to selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. These effects of low micromolar concentration of caffeine (30 microM) are maintained in aged animals, which is important when a possible beneficial effect for caffeine in age-related cognitive decline is proposed. Future studies will still be required to confirm and detail the involvement of A1 and A2A receptors in the effects of caffeine on hippocampal synaptic plasticity, using both pharmacological and genetic approaches.

  20. Relationships between the psychiatric drug carbamazepine and freshwater macroinvertebrate community structure.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Amanda L; Bernot, Melody J; Bernot, Randall J

    2014-10-15

    Pharmaceutical pollutants are commonly detected in surface waters and have the potential to affect non-target organisms. However, there is limited understanding of how these emerging contaminants may affect macroinvertebrate communities. The pharmaceutical carbamazepine is ubiquitous in surface waters around the world and is a pollutant of particular concern due to its recalcitrance and toxicity. To better understand the potential effects of carbamazepine on natural macroinvertebrate communities, we related stream macroinvertebrate abundance to carbamazepine concentrations. Macroinvertebrate and water samples were collected from 19 streams in central Indiana in conjunction with other stream physiochemical characteristics. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to relate macroinvertebrate richness to carbamazepine concentrations. Macroinvertebrate richness was positively correlated with increasing concentrations of carbamazepine. From the SEM we infer that carbamazepine influences macroinvertebrate richness through indirect pathways linked to Baetidae abundance. Baetidae abundance influenced ephemeropteran abundance and FBOM percent organic matter, both of which altered macroinvertebrate richness. The pharmaceutical carbamazepine may alter freshwater macroinvertebrate species composition, which could have significant consequences to ecosystem processes.

  1. Determination of the psychoactive drugs carbamazepine and diazepam in hospital effluent and identification of their metabolites.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Carlos A A; Oliveira, Maurício S; Mallmann, Carlos A; Martins, Ayrton F

    2015-11-01

    This study addresses the occurrence of carbamazepine and diazepam and their metabolites in the wastewater of the University Hospital (HUSM) of the Federal University of Santa Maria, RS-Brazil. Samples were collected from three sampling points of the sewage treatment system: point A ('emergency effluent'), point B ('general effluent') and point C ('water course-receptor'). Eight metabolites were identified: carbamazepine-10-11-epoxide, 10-dihydro-carbamazepine, 2-OH-carbamazepine, iminoquinone, acridone, nordiazepam, oxazepam and temazepam. The mean concentrations in the emergency, general effluent and water course-receptor were as follows: 433.0 ± 4.7, 349.0 ± 5.0 and 485.0 ± 5.6 ng L(-1), for carbamazepine and 550.0 ± 4.3, 441.0 ± 7.9 and 586.6 ± 9.3 ng L(-1), for diazepam, respectively. Liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-QqLIT-MS) proved to be a method fit-to-purpose. The determination of carbamazepine and diazepam, and the identification of active metabolites showing environmental persistence (carbamazepine-10-11-epoxide, nordiazepam and oxazepam) revealed the need for a more effective treatment of the HUSM effluent. As far as we know, no similar study has been carried out on the wastewater of Brazilian hospitals.

  2. Carbamazepine breakthrough as indicator for specific vulnerability of karst springs: application on the Jeita spring, Lebanon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doummar, J.; Geyer, T.; Noedler, K.; Sauter, M.

    2014-12-01

    The pharmaceutical drug carbamazepine is considered an effective wastewater marker. The varying concentration of this drug was analyzed in a mature karst spring following a precipitation event. The results show that carbamazepine is an indicator of wastewater entering the system through a fast flow pathway, leading to an increase of the drug concentrations in spring water shortly after a strong rainfall event. The analysis of the breakthrough curve of carbamazepine along with the electrical conductivity signal and major ions chemograph allowed the development of a conceptual model for precipitation event-based flow and transport in the investigated karst system. Furthermore the amount of newly recharged water and the mass of carbamazepine reaching the aquifer system during the event could be estimated using a simple mixing approach. The distance between the karst spring and the potential carbamazepine source was estimated by the combination of results from artificial tracer tests and the carbamazepine breakthrough curve. The assessment of spring responses to precipitation event using persistent drugs like carbamazepine helps assess the effect of waste water contamination at a spring and gives therefore insights to the specific vulnerability of a karst spring.

  3. Acetaminophen Induces Apoptosis in Rat Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; Santos, Pablo; Blanco, Almudena; Muñoz-Fernández, Maríangeles; Ceña, Valentín

    2010-01-01

    Background Acetaminophen (AAP) is widely prescribed for treatment of mild pain and fever in western countries. It is generally considered a safe drug and the most frequently reported adverse effect associated with acetaminophen is hepatotoxicity, which generally occurs after acute overdose. During AAP overdose, encephalopathy might develop and contribute to morbidity and mortality. Our hypothesis is that AAP causes direct neuronal toxicity contributing to the general AAP toxicity syndrome. Methodology/Principal Findings We report that AAP causes direct toxicity on rat cortical neurons both in vitro and in vivo as measured by LDH release. We have found that AAP causes concentration-dependent neuronal death in vitro at concentrations (1 and 2 mM) that are reached in human plasma during AAP overdose, and that are also reached in the cerebrospinal fluid of rats for 3 hours following i.p injection of AAP doses (250 and 500 mg/Kg) that are below those required to induce acute hepatic failure in rats. AAP also increases both neuronal cytochrome P450 isoform CYP2E1 enzymatic activity and protein levels as determined by Western blot, leading to neuronal death through mitochondrial–mediated mechanisms that involve cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activation. In addition, in vivo experiments show that i.p. AAP (250 and 500 mg/Kg) injection induces neuronal death in the rat cortex as measured by TUNEL, validating the in vitro data. Conclusions/Significance The data presented here establish, for the first time, a direct neurotoxic action by AAP both in vivo and in vitro in rats at doses below those required to produce hepatotoxicity and suggest that this neurotoxicity might be involved in the general toxic syndrome observed during patient APP overdose and, possibly, also when AAP doses in the upper dosing schedule are used, especially if other risk factors (moderate drinking, fasting, nutritional impairment) are present. PMID:21170329

  4. In vitro degradation of carbamazepine and diclofenac by crude lignin peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjun; Geissen, Sven-Uwe

    2010-04-15

    Carbamazepine and diclofenac were frequently detected in water bodies. In this study, crude lignin peroxidase, produced from a white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, was studied on its in vitro degradation of both drugs. The influencing parameters were studied, including pH, the hydrogen peroxide concentration, veratryl alcohol and the temperature. It was found that LiP completely degraded diclofenac at pH 3.0-4.5 and 3-24 ppm H(2)O(2) while the degradation efficiency of carbamazepine was mostly below 10%. The addition of veratryl alcohol and the increased temperature did not enhance the degradation of carbamazepine.

  5. Electrochemical degradation of carbamazepine using modified electrode with graphene-AuAg composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogacean, F.; Biris, A. R.; Socaci, C.; Floare-Avram, V.; Rosu, M. C.; Coros, M.; Pruneanu, S.

    2015-12-01

    Carbamazepine is a pharmaceutical drug which has been detected in surface and drinking water primarily due to human usage but also from the accidental disposal of pharmaceuticals into sewers. We have developed a graphene-modified electrode which was tested at the detection and degradation of carbamazepine. The oxidation process was studied by cyclic voltammetry in aqueous and organic solutions. The electrochemical degradation of carbamazepine was performed by polarizing the working electrode at a certain potential, for different times (from 5 to 60 minutes). The degradation efficiency was highly dependent on the type of solution and on the supporting electrolyte.

  6. A perspective on the epidemiology of acetaminophen exposure and toxicity in the United States.

    PubMed

    Blieden, Marissa; Paramore, L Clark; Shah, Dhvani; Ben-Joseph, Rami

    2014-05-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly-used analgesic in the US and, at doses of more than 4 g/day, can lead to serious hepatotoxicity. Recent FDA and CMS decisions serve to limit and monitor exposure to high-dose acetaminophen. This literature review aims to describe the exposure to and consequences of high-dose acetaminophen among chronic pain patients in the US. Each year in the US, approximately 6% of adults are prescribed acetaminophen doses of more than 4 g/day and 30,000 patients are hospitalized for acetaminophen toxicity. Up to half of acetaminophen overdoses are unintentional, largely related to opioid-acetaminophen combinations and attempts to achieve better symptom relief. Liver injury occurs in 17% of adults with unintentional acetaminophen overdose.

  7. Caffeine in sport. Urinary excretion of caffeine in healthy volunteers after intake of common caffeine-containing beverages.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, P J; Müller, F R; Müller, F O

    1988-08-20

    The presence of a concentration of caffeine greater than or equal to 15 micrograms/ml in urine of athletes participating in competitive sport is a disqualifying factor. A study was conducted to establish how much caffeine needs to be ingested--in the form of coffee, tea or Coca-Cola--to approach or exceed this limit. Nine healthy volunteers participated in a randomised cross-over study and received caffeine in the form of these beverages, ingested within 15 minutes, in doses ranging from 1.52 mg/kg to 17.53 mg/kg. The latter dose is equivalent to nearly 8 cups of ordinary percolated coffee. The maximum caffeine concentration in urine recorded was 14 micrograms/ml, 3 hours after ingestion. A significant correlation was found between the caffeine dose and the maximum urinary concentration. The mean recovery of caffeine in urine was between 0.74% and 0.91% of the administered dose. The nature of the beverage did not appear to influence the degree of caffeine excretion. It is concluded that if a concentration of 15 micrograms caffeine/ml urine is recorded, it can safely be accepted that the athlete purposely ingested large amounts of the substance, in whatever form.

  8. Caffeine and exercise: metabolism, endurance and performance.

    PubMed

    Graham, T E

    2001-01-01

    Caffeine is a common substance in the diets of most athletes and it is now appearing in many new products, including energy drinks, sport gels, alcoholic beverages and diet aids. It can be a powerful ergogenic aid at levels that are considerably lower than the acceptable limit of the International Olympic Committee and could be beneficial in training and in competition. Caffeine does not improve maximal oxygen capacity directly, but could permit the athlete to train at a greater power output and/or to train longer. It has also been shown to increase speed and/or power output in simulated race conditions. These effects have been found in activities that last as little as 60 seconds or as long as 2 hours. There is less information about the effects of caffeine on strength; however, recent work suggests no effect on maximal ability, but enhanced endurance or resistance to fatigue. There is no evidence that caffeine ingestion before exercise leads to dehydration, ion imbalance, or any other adverse effects. The ingestion of caffeine as coffee appears to be ineffective compared to doping with pure caffeine. Related compounds such as theophylline are also potent ergogenic aids. Caffeine may act synergistically with other drugs including ephedrine and anti-inflammatory agents. It appears that male and female athletes have similar caffeine pharmacokinetics, i.e., for a given dose of caffeine, the time course and absolute plasma concentrations of caffeine and its metabolites are the same. In addition, exercise or dehydration does not affect caffeine pharmacokinetics. The limited information available suggests that caffeine non-users and users respond similarly and that withdrawal from caffeine may not be important. The mechanism(s) by which caffeine elicits its ergogenic effects are unknown, but the popular theory that it enhances fat oxidation and spares muscle glycogen has very little support and is an incomplete explanation at best. Caffeine may work, in part, by

  9. Elimination of carbamazepine in a non-sterile fungal bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjun; Geissen, Sven-Uwe

    2012-05-01

    A properly configured bioreactor is in need to transfer the fungal biodegradation of recalcitrant pollutants into real applications. In this study, a novel plate bioreactor was designed to eliminate carbamazepine (CBZ), a widely concerned pharmaceutical, with the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium grown on polyether foam under non-sterile conditions. The bioreactor was operated in both sequence batch and continuous modes. It was found that the sufficient supply with nutrients is crucial for an effective elimination of CBZ. Given the conditions, a high elimination of CBZ (60-80%) was achieved. The effective elimination was stable in a continuous operation for a long term (around 100 days). The high elimination of CBZ could also be achieved under real conditions with the effluent from a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

  10. Differential effects of carbamazepine on negatively versus positively reinforced responding.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Mary; Harvey, Mark T; Roberts, Celeste; Patterson, Tina G; Kennedy, Craig H

    2002-12-01

    To assess its effects on negatively versus positively reinforced operant behavior, carbamazepine (CBZ) or vehicle was acutely administered to rats. Negative reinforcement baselines consisted of a free-operant avoidance task with 5-s shock-shock and 20-s response-shock intervals. Positive reinforcement baselines consisted of responding for food pellets on a variable interval 30-s schedule. Ascending dose-effect functions were established using CBZ for negatively reinforced responding (vehicle, 25, 50, 100 mg/kg ip) and positively reinforced responding (vehicle, 12.5, 25, 50, 100 mg/kg ip). Negatively reinforced responses and avoided shocks were significantly reduced by CBZ injections at 100 mg/kg. Positively reinforced responses and food pellet deliveries were significantly reduced by CBZ injections at 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg. The results show that CBZ has differential, dose-dependent effects on negatively versus positively reinforced responding.

  11. Analytic performance evaluation of a new turbidimetric immunoassay for carbamazepine on the ADVIA 1650 analyzer: effect of carbamazepine 10,11-epoxide.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Amitava; Datta, Pradip

    2005-02-01

    Carbamazepine, an anticonvulsant, requires therapeutic drug monitoring. Recently Bayer HealthCare, Diagnostics Division released a turbidimetric immunoassay of carbamazepine on the ADVIA 1650 analyzer. We evaluated the analytic performance of this assay by comparing values obtained with this new assay in sera of 54 patients receiving carbamazepine with the values obtained by using a widely used fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) and a chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA). The new turbidimetric immunoassay for carbamazepine showed excellent precision. The low control showed a total CV of 4.9% (mean 2.86, SD 0.14 microg/mL), the medium control demonstrated a total CV of 3.5% (mean 7.79, SD 0.27 microg/mL), and the high control showed a total CV of 4.8% (mean 16.15, SD 0.78 microg/mL). The assay was linear up to a carbamazepine concentration of 20 microg/mL. The assay showed excellent dilution recovery and recovery of samples supplemented with carbamazepine (mean recovery 102.2%). We observed an excellent correlation between the values obtained by the FPIA (x-axis) assay and the new turbidimetric (y-axis) assay (y = 0.96 x - 0.46, r = 0.99, n = 54). We also observed excellent correlation between the values obtained by the CLIA (x-axis) and the turbidimetric (y-axis) assay (y = 1.10 x -0.32, r = 0.99, n = 54). However, the slope of 1.10 was higher than the slope of 0.96 observed with the regression equation obtained by using values obtained by the FPIA and the turbidimetric assay. The positive bias obtained with the new turbidimetric assay compared with the CLIA assay resulted from lower cross reactivity of carbamazepine 10,11-epoxide, the active metabolite of carbamazepine, with CLIA. On the other hand, the cross reactivity of the metabolite is similar between the new turbidimetric assay and the FPIA assay. We conclude that the new turbidimetric assay can be used for routine monitoring of carbamazepine in clinical laboratories.

  12. Mood and performance effects of caffeine in relation to acute and chronic caffeine deprivation.

    PubMed

    Richardson, N J; Rogers, P J; Elliman, N A; O'Dell, R J

    1995-10-01

    The mood and performance effects of caffeine deprivation (either 90 min, overnight, or at least 7 days) and ingestion (70 and 250 mg) were compared in young adults who were normally either moderate consumers (n = 49) or nonconsumers of caffeine (n = 18). Overnight caffeine deprivation produced dysphoric symptoms characteristic of caffeine withdrawal that were reduced, but still present, after longer-term abstinence. Acute caffeine intake affected the withdrawn consumers, nonwithdrawn consumers, and nonconsumers similarly. It increased jitteriness and decrease tiredness and headache. Furthermore, hand steadiness decreased as caffeine dose increased, whereas 70 mg, but not 250 mg, of caffeine was found to enhance performance on a simple reaction time task. These findings support the view that the negative effects experienced after overnight and longer-term caffeine deprivation play a significant role in influencing consumption of caffeine-containing drinks. Therefore, it would appear that to avoid the dysphoric symptoms resulting from both under- and overconsumption, regular caffeine consumers would have to regulate their caffeine intake fairly precisely.

  13. Effect of caffeine concentration on biomass production, caffeine degradation, and morphology of Aspergillus tamarii.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Sánchez, G; Roussos, S; Augur, C

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the initial caffeine concentration (1-8 g/L) on growth and caffeine consumption by Aspergillus tamarii as well as pellet morphology, in submerged fermentation. Caffeine was used as sole nitrogen source. At 1 g/L of initial caffeine concentration, caffeine degradation was not affected, resulting in a production of 8.7 g/L of biomass. The highest biomass production (12.4-14.8 g/L) was observed within a range of 2 to 4 g/L of initial caffeine concentration. At these initial caffeine concentrations, after 96 h of fermentation, 41-51 % of the initial caffeine was degraded. Using an initial caffeine concentration of 2-3 g/L, the highest specific growth rate was observed (μ = 0.069 1/h). Biomass production decreased at 8 g/L of initial caffeine concentration. A. tamarii formed mainly pellets at all concentrations tested. The size of the pellet decreased at a caffeine concentration of 8 g/L.

  14. Aqueous chlorination of carbamazepine: kinetic study and transformation product identification.

    PubMed

    Soufan, M; Deborde, M; Delmont, A; Legube, B

    2013-09-15

    Carbamazepine reactivity and fate during chlorination was investigated in this study. From a kinetic standpoint, a third-order reaction (first-order relative to the CBZ concentration and second-order relative to the free chlorine concentration) was observed at neutral and slightly acidic pH, whereas a second-order reaction (first order relative to the CBZ concentration and first order relative to the free chlorine concentration) was noted under alkaline conditions. In order to gain insight into the observed pH-dependence of the reaction order, elementary reactions (i.e. reactions of Cl2, Cl2O, HOCl with CBZ and of ClO(-) with CBZ or of HOCl with the ionized form of CBZ) were highlighted and second order rate constants of each of them were calculated. Close correlations between the experimental and modeled values were obtained under these conditions. Cl2 and Cl2O were the main chlorination agents at neutral and acidic pH. These results indicate that, for a 1 mg/L free chlorine concentration and 1-10 mg/L chloride concentration at pH 7, halflives about 52-69 days can be expected. A low reactivity of chlorine with CBZ could thus occur under the chlorination steps used during water treatment. From a mechanistic viewpoint, several transformation products were observed during carbamazepine chlorination. As previously described for the chlorination of polynuclear aromatic or unsaturated compounds, we proposed monohydroxylated, epoxide, diols or chlorinated alcohol derivatives of CBZ for the chemical structures of these degradation products. Most of these compounds seem to accumulate in solution in the presence of excess chlorine.

  15. Confusion: acetaminophen dosing changes based on NO evidence in adults.

    PubMed

    Krenzelok, Edward P; Royal, Mike A

    2012-06-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) plays a vital role in American health care, with in excess of 25 billion doses being used annually as a nonprescription medication. Over 200 million acetaminophen-containing prescriptions, usually in combination with an opioid, are dispensed annually. While acetaminophen is recognized as a safe and effective analgesic and antipyretic, it is also associated with significant morbidity and mortality (hepatotoxicity) if doses in excess of the therapeutic amount are ingested inappropriately. The maximum daily therapeutic dose of 3900-4000 mg was established in separate actions in 1977 and 1988, respectively, via the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) monograph process for nonprescription medications. The FDA has conducted multiple advisory committee meetings to evaluate acetaminophen and its safety profile, and has suggested (but not mandated) a reduction in the maximum daily dosage from 3900-4000 mg to 3000-3250 mg. In 2011, McNeil, the producer of the Tylenol® brand of acetaminophen, voluntarily reduced the maximum daily dose of its 500 mg tablet product to 3000 mg/day, and it has pledged to change the labeling of its 325 mg/tablet product to reflect a maximum of 3250 mg/day. Generic manufacturers have not changed their dosing regimens and they have remained consistent with the established monograph dose. Therefore, confusion will be inevitable as both consumers and health care professionals try to determine the proper therapeutic dose of acetaminophen. Which is the correct dose of acetaminophen: 3000 mg if 500 mg tablets are used, 3250 mg with 325 mg tablets, or 3900 mg when 650 mg arthritis-strength products are used?

  16. Acetaminophen protects brain endothelial cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Debjani; Grammas, Paula

    2009-05-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that acetaminophen has unappreciated anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Drugs that affect oxidant and inflammatory stress in the brain are of interest because both processes are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disease. The objective of this study is to determine whether acetaminophen affects the response of brain endothelial cells to oxidative stress. Cultured brain endothelial cells are pre-treated with acetaminophen and then exposed to the superoxide-generating compound menadione (25 microM). Cell survival, inflammatory protein expression, and anti-oxidant enzyme activity are measured. Menadione causes a significant (p<0.001) increase in endothelial cell death as well as an increase in RNA and protein levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1, macrophage inflammatory protein alpha, and RANTES. Menadione also evokes a significant (p<0.001) increase in the activity of the anti-oxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD). Pre-treatment of endothelial cell cultures with acetaminophen (25-100 microM) increases endothelial cell survival and inhibits menadione-induced expression of inflammatory proteins and SOD activity. In addition, we document, for the first time, that acetaminophen increases expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2. Suppressing Bcl2 with siRNA blocks the pro-survival effect of acetaminophen. These data show that acetaminophen has anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects on the cerebrovasculature and suggest a heretofore unappreciated therapeutic potential for this drug in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease that are characterized by oxidant and inflammatory stress.

  17. Use of Arctium lappa Extract Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Kott, Attalla Farag; Bin-Meferij, Mashael Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe destructive hepatic injuries can be induced by acetaminophen overdose and may lead to acute hepatic failure. Objective To investigate the ameliorative effects of Arctium lappa root extract on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods Rats were divided into 4 groups: normal control group, Arctium lappa extract group, acetaminophen-injected group, and acetaminophen treated with Arctium lappa extract group. Results The treatment with Arctium lappa extract reduced serum alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase in the acetaminophen group when compared with the control group. DNA fragments in the acetaminophen-injected group were also significantly increased (P < 0.05). The comet assay revealed increased detaching tail length and DNA concentration during the hepatic toxicity in the acetaminophen group. The malondialdehyde content was inhibited by Arctium lappa treatment (12.97±0.89 nmol/mg) when compared with the acetaminophen-treated-only group (12.97±0.89 nmol/mg). Histopathologic examination revealed that acetaminophen administration produced hepatic cell necrosis, infiltrate of lymphocytes, and vacuolation that were associated with the acetaminophen-treated animal group, but the degree of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was mediated by treatment with Arctium lappa extract. Conclusions Arctium lappa can prevent most of the hepatic tissue damage caused by acetaminophen overdose in rats. PMID:26543508

  18. Biochemical changes associated with the potentiation of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by brief anesthesia with diethyl ether.

    PubMed

    To, E C; Wells, P G

    1986-12-01

    Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in male CD-1 mice was enhanced markedly by brief anesthesia with diethyl ether (ether), and particularly so if acetaminophen was given several hours after ether. The present study was conducted to examine the possible biochemical mechanisms behind this delayed toxicologic synergism. In vitro biochemical studies indicated that ether anesthesia produced a delayed reduction in the activities of glucuronyl transferase and glutathione (GSH) S-transferase, and in the hepatic content of GSH. The hepatic content but not activity of the cytochromes P-450 was initially reduced by ether but recovered by the time of maximal toxicologic enhancement. In vivo studies showed that ether produced a small decrease in the plasma concentrations of glucuronide and sulfate conjugates of acetaminophen, with a concomitant, minor increase in the half-life of acetaminophen, and a major increase in the bioactivation of acetaminophen, as determined by an early, 2-fold increase in the plasma GSH and cysteine conjugates of acetaminophen, and a 3-fold increase in the covalent binding of acetaminophen to hepatocellular protein. Decreases produced by ether in the in vivo production of acetaminophen glucuronide correlated with increasing plasma concentrations of unmetabolised acetaminophen, decreasing hepatic GSH content and increasing covalent binding of acetaminophen to hepatocellular protein when these measurements were performed in the same animals. The biochemical mechanisms underlying the potentiation of acetaminophen hepatoxicity as measured by plasma glutamic pyruvic transaminase concentrations appeared to be due to delayed, complex effects of ether upon multiple enzymatic pathways of acetaminophen elimination and detoxification.

  19. Caffeinated Energy Drinks -- A Growing Problem

    PubMed Central

    Reissig, Chad J.; Strain, Eric C.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2009-01-01

    Since the introduction of Red Bull in Austria in 1987 and in the United States in 1997, the energy drink market has grown exponentially. Hundreds of different brands are now marketed, with caffeine content ranging from a modest 50 mg to an alarming 505 mg per can or bottle. Regulation of energy drinks, including content labeling and health warnings differs across countries, with some of the most lax regulatory requirements in the U.S. The absence of regulatory oversight has resulted in aggressive marketing of energy drinks, targeted primarily toward young males, for psychoactive, performance-enhancing and stimulant drug effects. There are increasing reports of caffeine intoxication from energy drinks, and it seems likely that problems with caffeine dependence and withdrawal will also increase. In children and adolescents who are not habitual caffeine users, vulnerability to caffeine intoxication may be markedly increased due to an absence of pharmacological tolerance. Genetic factors may also contribute to an individual’s vulnerability to caffeine related disorders including caffeine intoxication, dependence, and withdrawal. The combined use of caffeine and alcohol is increasing sharply, and studies suggest that such combined use may increase the rate of alcohol-related injury. Several studies suggest that energy drinks may serve as a gateway to other forms of drug dependence. Regulatory implications concerning labeling and advertising, and the clinical implications for children and adolescents are discussed. PMID:18809264

  20. Health aspects of caffeine: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Ruxton, C

    This article examines the benefits and risks associated with caffeinated foods and drinks, taking an evidence-based approach to identify appropriate daily caffeine limits. Suggestions are provided on how to structure dietary advice for different patient groups including children, individuals with hypertension, renal patients, athletes and older adults.

  1. Creatine and Caffeine: Considerations for Concurrent Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E

    2015-12-01

    Nutritional supplementation is a common practice among athletes, with creatine and caffeine among the most commonly used ergogenic aids. Hundreds of studies have investigated the ergogenic potential of creatine supplementation, with consistent improvements in strength and power reported for exercise bouts of short duration (≤ 30 s) and high intensity. Caffeine has been shown to improve endurance exercise performance, but results are mixed in the context of strength and sprint performance. Further, there is conflicting evidence from studies comparing the ergogenic effects of coffee and caffeine anhydrous supplementation. Previous research has identified independent mechanisms by which creatine and caffeine may improve strength and sprint performance, leading to the formulation of multi-ingredient supplements containing both ingredients. Although scarce, research has suggested that caffeine ingestion may blunt the ergogenic effect of creatine. While a pharmacokinetic interaction is unlikely, authors have suggested that this effect may be explained by opposing effects on muscle relaxation time or gastrointestinal side effects from simultaneous consumption. The current review aims to evaluate the ergogenic potential of creatine and caffeine in the context of high-intensity exercise. Research directly comparing coffee and caffeine anhydrous is discussed, along with previous studies evaluating the concurrent supplementation of creatine and caffeine.

  2. Extraction of Caffeine--A Modern Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Paul Shea; Smith, Eileen Patricia

    1969-01-01

    Describes an organic chemistry experiment suitable for high school students in second year or an advanced chemistry course. The techniques for the extraction and purification of caffeine from various household materials are described. Further experimentation with the extracted caffeine is suggested. (LC)

  3. Caffeine antagonizes diazepam effects in man.

    PubMed

    Mattila, M J; Palva, E; Savolainen, K

    1982-04-01

    In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study on parallel groups of medical students diazepam 10 mg impaired cognitive skills and caused muscle relaxation. A 250 mg dose of caffeine given in decaffeinated coffee counteracted these better than a 500 mg dose. Subjectively, diazepam exerted a calming effect which was counteracted by caffeine at either at either dose levels.

  4. [A case report of monitoring on carbamazepine in breast feeding woman].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Yang, Li; Wei, Yuan; Xiong, Xin; Zhou, Yong; Zhai, Suo-di

    2010-10-18

    To evaluate the safety of oral cabamazepine during breast milk feeding. The carbamazepine concentration in breast milk of one epilepsy maternal patient was assayed by high performance liquid chromatography, and the literature was reviewed to find the nursing evidence in the use of cabamazepine. The carbamazepine concentration in breast milk ranged from 0.34-0.86 mg/L. The neonate daily dose intake was estimated ranging from 0.34 mg to 0.86 mg through breast-feeding in theory. The literature showed that carbamazepine was generally considered safe for use during breast feeding; however, adverse effects should be monitored as recommended. It is better to avoid feeding at high concentration level to minimize the harm of carbamazepine to the baby.

  5. A case of organic brain syndrome following head injury successfully treated with carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Bouvy, P F; van de Wetering, B J; Meerwaldt, J D; Bruijn, J B

    1988-03-01

    A case of organic brain syndrome occurring in relation to psychological stress 2 years after a severe head injury is described. Treatment with haloperidol resulted only in slight improvement. A dramatic improvement was achieved with carbamazepine.

  6. Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome Caused by Carbamazepine Used for the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Yuko; Shirafuji, Yoshinori; Hamada, Toshihisa; Masui, Masanori; Obata, Kyoichi; Yao, Mayumi; Kishimoto, Koji; Sasaki, Akira

    2016-01-01

    An 88-year-old man was diagnosed with trigeminal neuralgia, and treatment of carbamazepine 200 mg/day was initiated. About 6 weeks later, the patient developed a skin rash accompanied by fever. He was admitted to hospital and diagnosed with drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) caused by carbamazepine. Oral carbamazepine treatment was stopped, but blood tests showed acute liver and acute renal failure. Drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test (DLST) for carbamazepine, human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6) IgG, and CMV-HRP were negative. Oral prednisolone therapy was begun 18 days later. The titer of HHV-6 IgG antibodies was then detected (640 times). Following treatment, liver and renal function improved and the erythema disappeared. PMID:27885344

  7. Caffeine reduces dipyridamole-induced myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, P.; Aengevaeren, W.R.; Corstens, F.H.; Thien, T. )

    1989-10-01

    The mechanism of action of coronary vasodilation after dipyridamole may be based on inhibition of cellular uptake of circulating endogenous adenosine. Since caffeine has been reported to be a competitive antagonist of adenosine we studied the effect of caffeine on the outcome of dipiridamole-{sup 201}Tl cardiac imaging in one patient. During caffeine abstinence dipyridamole induced myocardial ischemia with down-slope ST depressions on the ECG, and reversible perfusion defects on the scintigrams. When the test was repeated 1 wk later on similar conditions, but now shortly after infusion of caffeine (4 mg/kg), the ECG showed nodepressions, and the scintigrams only slight signs of ischemia. We conclude that when caffeine abstinence is not sufficient, the widespread use of coffee and related products may be responsible for false-negative findings in dipyridamole-201Tl cardiac imaging.

  8. Caffeine as a Potential Quorum Sensing Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Norizan, Siti Nur Maisarah; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Quorum sensing enables bacteria to control the gene expression in response to the cell density. It regulates a variety of bacterial physiological functions such as biofilm formation, bioluminescence, virulence factors and swarming which has been shown contribute to bacterial pathogenesis. The use of quorum sensing inhibitor would be of particular interest in treating bacterial pathogenicity and infections. In this work, we have tested caffeine as quorum sensing inhibitor by using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 as a biosensor. We verified that caffeine did not degrade the N-acyl homoserine lactones tested. In this work, it is shown that caffeine could inhibit N-acyl homoserine lactone production and swarming of a human opportunistic pathogen, namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation providing evidence on the presence of anti-quorum sensing activity in caffeine. Our work will allow caffeine to be explored as anti-infective drugs. PMID:23598500

  9. Behavioral Management of Excessive Caffeine Consumption: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Greene, Douglas; And Others

    Although caffeine is seemingly harmless in ordinary daily intake, there has been increasing concern about the possible side effects of habitual caffeine ingestion. The excessive daily ingestion of caffeine in the form of coffee, soda pop, tea, and various medications may lead to a chronic disorder known as caffeinism. This study tested the…

  10. Comparison of equilibrium and non-equilibrium distribution coefficients for the human drug carbamazepine in soil.

    PubMed

    Williams, C F; Watson, J E; Nelson, S D

    2014-01-01

    The distribution coefficient (KD) for the human drug carbamazepine was measured using a non-equilibrium technique. Repacked soil columns were prepared using an Airport silt loam (Typic Natrustalf) with an average organic matter content of 2.45%. Carbamazepine solutions were then leached through the columns at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mL min(-1) representing average linear velocities of 1.8, 3.5 and 5.3 cm h(-1) respectively. Each flow rate was replicated three times and three carbamazepine pulses were applied to each column resulting in a total of 9 columns with 27 total carbamazepine pulses. Breakthrough curves were used to determine KD using the parameter fitting software CXTFIT. Results indicate that as flow rate decreased from 5.3 to 1.8 cm h(-1), KD increased an average of 21%. Additionally, KD determined by column leaching (14.7-22.7 L kg(-1)) was greater than KD determined by a 2h batch equilibrium adsorption (12.6 L kg(-1)). Based on these KD's carbamazepine would be generally characterized as non-mobile in the soil investigated. However, repeated carbamazepine applications resulted in an average 22% decrease in KD between the first and third applications. Decreasing KD is attributed to differences in sorption site kinetics and carbamazepine residence time in contact with the soil. This would indicate that the repeated use of reclaimed wastewater at high application rates for long-term irrigation or groundwater recharge has the potential to lead to greater transport of carbamazepine than KD determined by batch equilibrium would predict.

  11. Caffeine, mental health, and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Lara, Diogo R

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine intake is so common that its pharmacological effects on the mind are undervalued. Since it is so readily available, individuals can adjust their own dose, time of administration and dose intervals of caffeine, according to the perceived benefits and side effects of each dose. This review focuses on human studies of caffeine in subjects with and without psychiatric disorders. Besides the possibility of mild drug dependence, caffeine may bring benefits that contribute to its widespread use. These benefits seem to be related to adaptation of mental energy to the context by increasing alertness, attention, and cognitive function (more evident in longer or more difficult tasks or situations of low arousal) and by elevating mood. Accordingly, moderate caffeine intake (< 6 cups/day) has been associated with less depressive symptoms, fewer cognitive failures, and lower risk of suicide. However, its putative therapeutic effects on depression and ADHD have been insufficiently studied. Conversely, in rare cases high doses of caffeine can induce psychotic and manic symptoms, and more commonly, anxiety. Patients with panic disorder and performance social anxiety disorder seem to be particularly sensitive to the anxiogenic effects of caffeine, whereas preliminary data suggests that it may be effective for some patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). The threshold for the anxiogenic effect of caffeine is influenced by a polymorphism of the A2A receptor. In summary, caffeine can be regarded as a pharmacological tool to increase energy and effortful behavior in daily activities. More populational (cross-sectional and prospective) and experimental studies are necessary to establish the role of caffeine intake in psychiatric disorders, especially its putative efficacy on depressive mood and cognitive/attentional disorders.

  12. Effects of short-term exposure to fluoxetine and carbamazepine to the collembolan Folsomia candida.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M; Cardoso, D N; Soares, A M V M; Loureiro, S

    2015-02-01

    Pharmaceuticals, emerging environmental contaminants, have their ecotoxicological effects to non-target organisms in soil largely unknown. This study assessed short-term effects of two human pharmaceuticals, carbamazepine and fluoxetine, to Folsomia candida. Avoidance to spiked soils was assessed after 48 and 96 h exposure and biochemical changes (acetylcholinesterase and glutathione S-transferase activities, and lipid peroxidation levels) after 96 h. F. candida avoided soils spiked with 0.04, 0.4 and 4 mg carbamazepine kg(-1) after 48 h. However, higher number of organisms were found in soils with 40 mg carbamazepine kg(-1), a behavior also displayed for 40 mg fluoxetine kg(-1) spiked soils. After 96 h, F. candida showed avoidance behavior to soils with 4 and 40 mg carbamazepine kg(-1). Acetylcholinesterase activity decreased in 0.4 mg fluoxetine kg(-1) exposed organisms. Peroxidative damages were detected in organisms exposed to 4 and 40 mg kg(-1) carbamazepine and glutathione S-transferase inhibition was observed at 40 mg kg(-1). Data suggests that carbamazepine and fluoxetine may pose risk to soil collembolan.

  13. Pharmacokinetic interaction studies of fenugreek with CYP3A substrates cyclosporine and carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Al-Jenoobi, Fahad I; Alam, Mohd Aftab; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Korashy, Hesham M; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M; Iqbal, Muzaffar; Ahad, Abdul; Raish, Mohammad

    2014-06-01

    The present study investigated the effect of fenugreek seed powder on disposition of CYP3A substrates, cyclosporine and carbamazepine. Rabbits were treated with fenugreek seed powder (300 mg/kg p.o.) for 8 days and on 8th day the single dose of cyclosporine (30 mg/kg, p.o.) and carbamazepine (40 mg/kg, p.o.) were administered to the corresponding group after 1 h of fenugreek administration. Blood samples were drawn at several time points and analyzed by using UPLC-MS (cyclosporine) and HPLC (carbamazepine). Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by using PK Solver. The present investigation reveals that there was no statistically significant difference between pre- and post-treated pharmacokinetic parameters such as AUC(o-t), AUC(o-∞), C(max), T(max), T(1/2), K(el), MRT(o-∞) , V(z/F), and Cl/F for cyclosporine and carbamazepine. Two tailed "P" values for all these pharmacokinetic parameters were more than 0.05, indicating insignificant impact of fenugreek treatment on the disposition of cyclosporine and carbamazepine. Further, fenugreek may also not have any significant effect on the functionality of P-glycoprotein as cyclosporine is a substrate to P-glycoprotein. The outcomes of present study suggested that fenugreek may not likely to interfere cyclosporine and carbamazepine pharmacokinetics, when co-administered with these drugs.

  14. Successful treatment of severe carbamazepine toxicity with 5% albumin-enhanced continuous venovenous hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Rajeev; Rizzo, Meagan; Cole, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Carbamazepine overdose is a common, toxic ingestion, manifesting as central nervous system (CNS) and respiratory depression. Carbamazepine is highly protein bound with a large volume of distribution and, therefore, inefficiently removed by conventional hemodialysis. We describe the successful use of continuous venovenous hemodialysis (CVVHD) with 5% albumin enhanced dialysate in a 31-year-old female who developed CNS depression, hypotension and respiratory failure, requiring mechanical ventilation, after an intentional ingestion of approximately 10 g of extended release carbamazepine, Tegretol CR(®). The peak drug level was 26 mcg/ml, therapeutic range 8-12 mcg/ml, with toxicity often developing a level above 15 mcg/ml. Normal half-life of drug elimination is 35-60 h in carbamazepine naïve patients. In contrast, with albumin-enhanced dialysis, we observed a drug half-life of 18 h. She was extubated on day two and was transferred to inpatient psychiatry by day 3 without significant neurologic sequelae. In vitro studies have been done with bovine blood demonstrating significant carbamazepine removal using CVVHD with albumin-enhanced dialysate. There has been very limited experience using albumin-enhanced CVVHD in an adult patient with carbamazepine toxicity.

  15. Crystallization of Carbamazepine in Proximity to Its Precursor Iminostilbene and a Silica Surface

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous films of the anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine are easily accessible by various methods, while the crystallization into specific polymorphs represents a challenging and time-consuming task. In this work, the crystallization of drop cast carbamazepine at silica surfaces is investigated by atomic force microscopy and both in situ and ex situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. The pristine films grow with low crystallization rates into a triclinic polymorph, exhibiting poor orientational order within films. However, if iminostilbene, a chemical precursor of carbamazepine, is added to the solution, enhanced crystallization rates result. The individual components crystallize phase-separated upon solvent evaporation without the formation of cocrystals. Iminostilbene reduces the time scale of carbamazepine crystallization from several hours to minutes. Besides the change in crystallization dynamics, iminostilbene induces order to the carbamazepine crystallites, evident as a 110 texture. In situ data of intermixed solutions demonstrate that iminostilbene crystallization occurs first. The iminostilbene crystals then act as templates for carbamazepine growth, whereby fully epitaxial growth is suggested from the results. The findings motivate such an approach for other systems, as this solution-processed, intrinsic epitaxial behavior might be employed in up-scaled manufacturing processes. PMID:27175105

  16. Determination of human pharmaceuticals in pre- and post-sewage treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahrim, Nurfaizah Abu; Abdullah, Md. Pauzi; Aziz, Yang Farina Abdul

    2013-11-01

    In this present work, an analytical method based on solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS) in positive electrospray ionisation mode was successfully applied to real samples for the determination of human pharmaceuticals in pre- and post-sewage treatment samples. The ten target compounds selected in this study include acetaminophen, theophylline, caffeine, metoprolol, sulfamethoxazole, carbamazepine, prednisolone, ketoprofen, norgestrel and simvastatin. Acetaminophen, theophylline and caffeine were present at all five raw sewage samples. In addition, this work provides the first report on the investigation and detection of theophylline in sewage treatment plant (STP) samples in Malaysia.

  17. Understanding lactic acidosis in paracetamol (acetaminophen) poisoning.

    PubMed

    Shah, Anoop D; Wood, David M; Dargan, Paul I

    2011-01-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is one of the most commonly taken drugs in overdose in many areas of the world, and the most common cause of acute liver failure in both the UK and USA. Paracetamol poisoning can result in lactic acidosis in two different scenarios. First, early in the course of poisoning and before the onset of hepatotoxicity in patients with massive ingestion; a lactic acidosis is usually associated with coma. Experimental evidence from studies in whole animals, perfused liver slices and cell cultures has shown that the toxic metabolite of paracetamol, N-acetyl-p-benzo-quinone imine, inhibits electron transfer in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and thus inhibits aerobic respiration. This occurs only at very high concentrations of paracetamol, and precedes cellular injury by several hours. The second scenario in which lactic acidosis can occur is later in the course of paracetamol poisoning as a consequence of established liver failure. In these patients lactate is elevated primarily because of reduced hepatic clearance, but in shocked patients there may also be a contribution of peripheral anaerobic respiration because of tissue hypoperfusion. In patients admitted to a liver unit with paracetamol hepatotoxicity, the post-resuscitation arterial lactate concentration has been shown to be a strong predictor of mortality, and is included in the modified King's College criteria for consideration of liver transplantation. We would therefore recommend that post-resuscitation lactate is measured in all patients with a severe paracetamol overdose resulting in either reduced conscious level or hepatic failure.

  18. Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity: a Comprehensive Update

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Eric; Babar, Arooj; Choudhary, Moaz; Kutner, Matthew; Pyrsopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatic injury and subsequent hepatic failure due to both intentional and non-intentional overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) has affected patients for decades, and involves the cornerstone metabolic pathways which take place in the microsomes within hepatocytes. APAP hepatotoxicity remains a global issue; in the United States, in particular, it accounts for more than 50% of overdose-related acute liver failure and approximately 20% of the liver transplant cases. The pathophysiology, disease course and management of acute liver failure secondary to APAP toxicity remain to be precisely elucidated, and adverse patient outcomes with increased morbidity and mortality continue to occur. Although APAP hepatotoxicity follows a predictable timeline of hepatic failure, its clinical presentation might vary. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) therapy is considered as the mainstay therapy, but liver transplantation might represent a life-saving procedure for selected patients. Future research focus in this field may benefit from shifting towards obtaining antidotal knowledge at the molecular level, with focus on the underlying molecular signaling pathways. PMID:27350943

  19. Sulforaphane protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jung-Ran; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Oh, Won-Keun; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress is closely associated with acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxicity. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant defense enzyme, has been shown to protect against oxidant-induced tissue injury. This study investigated whether sulforaphane (SFN), as a HO-1 inducer, plays a protective role against APAP hepatotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment of primary hepatocyte with SFN induced nuclear factor E2-factor related factor (Nrf2) target gene expression, especially HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, and suppressed APAP-induced glutathione (GSH) depletion and lipid peroxidation, which eventually leads to hepatocyte cell death. A comparable effect was observed in mice treated with APAP. Mice were treated with 300 mg/kg APAP 30 min after SFN (5 mg/kg) administration and were then sacrificed after 6 h. APAP alone caused severe liver injuries as characterized by increased plasma AST and ALT levels, GSH depletion, apoptosis, and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) formations. This APAP-induced liver damage was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with SFN. Furthermore, while hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased by APAP exposure, pretreatment with SFN completely blocked ROS formation. These results suggest that SFN plays a protective role against APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity through antioxidant effects mediated by HO-1 induction. SFN has preventive action in oxidative stress-mediated liver injury.

  20. Erdosteine against acetaminophen induced renal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Isik, Bunyamin; Bayrak, Reyhan; Akcay, Ali; Sogut, Sadik

    2006-07-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) induced toxicities have been a major problem in clinical practice. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate a possible protective role of erdosteine, a mucolytic agent having antioxidant properties via its active metabolites, on APAP induced renal damage in rats. Female Wistar Albino rats were divided into groups including control, erdosteine (150 mg/kg, oral), APAP (1 g/kg, oral) APAP+erdosteine (150 mg/kg, oral) and APAP+erdosteine (300 mg/kg, oral). APAP treatment caused lipid peroxidation as well as high NO level in renal tissue. Also, APAP treated rats had decreased activities of CAT and GSH-Px, but not SOD. In addition, tubular epithelial degeneration, vacuolization and cell desquamation were clearly observed in the APAP treated rats. The cellular debris in the proximal tubules and cortical interstitial congestions were prominent in the kidneys of APAP treated rats. BUN and creatinine levels were increased after APAP administration. All these pathological changes were reversed after erdosteine treatments. Erdosteine treated APAP groups showed milder tubular degeneration, epithelial vacuolization in the proximal tubules, lesser cellular desquamation and better morphology when compared with APAP groups. In conclusion, erdosteine may be a choice of preventive treatment against APAP induced nephrotoxicity.

  1. Patient perception and knowledge of acetaminophen in a large family medicine service.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Christopher M; Dankenbring, Dawn M

    2014-06-01

    The use of acetaminophen is currently under increased scrutiny by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) due to the risk of intentional and more concerning, unintentional overdose-related hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen is responsible for an estimated 48% of all acute liver failure diagnoses. The purpose of this study is to evaluate patient perception and knowledge of the safe use and potential toxicity of acetaminophen-containing products. The authors conducted a descriptive, 2-week study using a convenience sample from a large family medicine clinic waiting room. Survey questions assessed ability to identify acetaminophen, knowledge of the current recommended maximum daily dose, respondent acetaminophen use patterns, common adverse effects associated with acetaminophen, and respondent self-reported alcohol consumption. Acetaminophen safety information was provided to all persons regardless of participation in the study. Of the 102 patients who chose to participate, 79% recognized acetaminophen as a synonym of Tylenol, whereas only 9% identified APAP as a frequently used abbreviation. One third of respondents thought acetaminophen was synonymous with ibuprofen and naproxen. Approximately one fourth of patients correctly identified the then maximum recommended daily acetaminophen dose of 4 g. Seventy-eight percent of patients correctly identified hepatotoxicity as the most common serious adverse effect. We conclude that patient deficiencies in knowledge of acetaminophen recognition, dosing, and toxicity warrant public education by health professionals at all levels of interaction. Current initiatives are promising; however, further efforts are required.

  2. Caffeine in your drink: natural or synthetic?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijun; Kujawinski, Dorothea M; Federherr, Eugen; Schmidt, Torsten C; Jochmann, Maik A

    2012-03-20

    Owing to possible adulteration and health concerns, it is important to discriminate between natural and synthetic food ingredients. A new method for compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) by coupling high-temperature reversed-phase liquid chromatography to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HT-RPLC/IRMS) was developed for discrimination of natural and synthetic caffeine contained in all types of drinks. The analytical parameters such as stationary phase, column inner diameter, and column temperature were optimized for the separation of caffeine directly from drinks (without extraction). On the basis of the carbon isotope analysis of 42 natural caffeine samples including coffee beans, tea leaves, guaraná powder, and maté leaves, and 20 synthetic caffeine samples from different sources by high-temperature reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry, it is concluded that there are two distinguishable groups of caffeine δ(13)C-values: one between -25 and -32‰ for natural caffeine, and the other between -33 and -38‰ for synthetic caffeine. Isotope analysis by HT-RPLC/IRMS has been applied to identify the caffeine source in 38 drinks. Four mislabeled products were detected due to added but nonlabeled synthetic caffeine with δ(13)C-values lower than -33‰. This work is the first application of HT-RPLC/IRMS to real-world food samples, which showed several advantages: simple sample preparation (only dilution), high throughput, long-term column stability, and high precision of δ(13)C-value. Thus, HT-RPLC/IRMS can be a very promising tool in stable isotope analysis of nonvolatile compounds.

  3. Acetaminophen versus Ibuprofen in Young Children with Mild Persistent Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, W.J.; Mauger, D.T.; Paul, I.M.; Moy, J.N.; Boehmer, S.J.; Szefler, S.J.; Fitzpatrick, A.M.; Jackson, D.J.; Bacharier, L.B.; Cabana, M.D.; Covar, R.; Holguin, F.; Lemanske, R.F.; Martinez, F.D.; Pongracic, J.A.; Beigelman, A.; Baxi, S.N.; Benson, M.; Blake, K.; Chmiel, J.F.; Daines, C.L.; Daines, M.O.; Gaffin, J.M.; Gentile, D.A.; Gower, W.A.; Israel, E.; Kumar, H.V.; Lang, J.E.; Lazarus, S.C.; Lima, J.J.; Ly, N.; Marbin, J.; Morgan, W.J.; Myers, R.E.; Olin, J.T.; Peters, S.P.; Raissy, H.H.; Robison, R.G.; Ross, K.; Sorkness, C.A.; Thyne, S.M.; Wechsler, M.E.; Phipatanakul, W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Studies have suggested an association between frequent acetaminophen use and asthma-related complications among children, leading some physicians to recommend that acetaminophen be avoided in children with asthma; however, appropriately designed trials evaluating this association in children are lacking. METHODS In a multicenter, prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial, we enrolled 300 children (age range, 12 to 59 months) with mild persistent asthma and assigned them to receive either acetaminophen or ibuprofen when needed for the alleviation of fever or pain over the course of 48 weeks. The primary outcome was the number of asthma exacerbations that led to treatment with systemic glucocorticoids. Children in both treatment groups received standardized asthma-controller therapies that were used in a simultaneous, factorially linked trial. RESULTS Participants received a median of 5.5 doses (interquartile range, 1.0 to 15.0) of trial medication; there was no significant between-group difference in the median number of doses received (P = 0.47). The number of asthma exacerbations did not differ significantly between the two groups, with a mean of 0.81 per participant with acetaminophen and 0.87 per participant with ibuprofen over 46 weeks of follow-up (relative rate of asthma exacerbations in the acetaminophen group vs. the ibuprofen group, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.69 to 1.28; P = 0.67). In the acetaminophen group, 49% of participants had at least one asthma exacerbation and 21% had at least two, as compared with 47% and 24%, respectively, in the ibuprofen group. Similarly, no significant differences were detected between acetaminophen and ibuprofen with respect to the percentage of asthma-control days (85.8% and 86.8%, respectively; P = 0.50), use of an albuterol rescue inhaler (2.8 and 3.0 inhalations per week, respectively; P = 0.69), unscheduled health care utilization for asthma (0.75 and 0.76 episodes per participant

  4. Caffeine Promotes Global Spatial Processing in Habitual and Non-Habitual Caffeine Consumers

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Grace E.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Brunyé, Tad T.; Taylor, Holly A.; Kanarek, Robin B.

    2013-01-01

    Information processing is generally biased toward global cues, often at the expense of local information. Equivocal extant data suggests that arousal states may accentuate either a local or global processing bias, at least partially dependent on the nature of the manipulation, task, and stimuli. To further differentiate the conditions responsible for such equivocal results we varied caffeine doses to alter physiological arousal states and measured their effect on tasks requiring the retrieval of local versus global spatial knowledge. In a double-blind, repeated-measures design, non-habitual (Experiment 1; N = 36, M = 42.5 ± 28.7 mg/day caffeine) and habitual (Experiment 2; N = 34, M = 579.5 ± 311.5 mg/day caffeine) caffeine consumers completed four test sessions corresponding to each of four caffeine doses (0, 100, 200, 400 mg). During each test session, participants consumed a capsule containing one of the three doses of caffeine or placebo, waited 60 min, and then completed two spatial tasks, one involving memorizing maps and one spatial descriptions. A spatial statement verification task tested local versus global spatial knowledge by differentially probing memory for proximal versus distal landmark relationships. On the map learning task, results indicated that caffeine enhanced memory for distal (i.e., global) compared to proximal (i.e., local) comparisons at 100 (marginal), 200, and 400 mg caffeine in non-habitual consumers, and marginally beginning at 200 mg caffeine in habitual consumers. On the spatial descriptions task, caffeine enhanced memory for distal compared to proximal comparisons beginning at 100 mg in non-habitual but not habitual consumers. We thus provide evidence that caffeine-induced physiological arousal amplifies global spatial processing biases, and these effects are at least partially driven by habitual caffeine consumption. PMID:24146646

  5. Caffeine induced changes in cerebral circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.

    1985-09-01

    While the caffeine induced cerebral vasoconstriction is well documented, the effects of oral ingestion of the drug in a dose range comparable to the quantities in which it is usually consumed and the intensity and duration of the associated reduction in cerebral circulation are unknown. Cerebral blood flow was measured via the TTXenon inhalation technique before and thirty and ninety minutes after the oral administration of 250 mg of caffeine or a placebo, under double-blind conditions. Caffeine ingestion was found to be associated with significant reductions in cerebral perfusion thirty and ninety minutes later. The placebo group showed no differences between the three sets of cerebral blood flow values.

  6. Effects of caffeine on perceptual judgment.

    PubMed

    Gupta, U; Dubey, G P; Gupta, B S

    1994-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of caffeine on the estimation of felt width of blocks employing haptic presentation. Following a between-subject design, 160 male postgraduate students classified as high or low impulsives received either placebo or one of four doses of caffeine citrate (1, 2, 3 and 4 mg/kg body weight). A double-blind procedure was adopted for drug administration. Caffeine produced differential effects on the performance of high and low impulsives, facilitated performance (decreased error in perceptual judgment) in high impulsives but had no influence on the performance of low impulsives. The dose-response trends also followed different patterns in the two groups of subjects.

  7. Interactions between carbamazepine and polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000: characterisations of the physical, solid dispersed and eutectic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Naima, Z; Siro, T; Juan-Manuel, G D; Chantal, C; René, C; Jerome, D

    2001-02-01

    The influence of a hydrophilic carrier (PEG 6000) on the polymorphism of carbamazepine, an antiepileptic drug, was investigated in binary physical mixtures and solid dispersions by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetry, hot-stage microscopy (HSM), and X-ray diffractometry, respectively. This study provides also an attempt to develop a method to calculate more precisely the eutectic composition. In rather ideal physical mixtures, carbamazepine was found as monoclinic Form III. In solid dispersions, the drug was found to crystallize as trigonal Form II; a eutectic invariant in the PEG 6000-rich composition domain (6% of carbamazepine mass) was evidenced by DSC experiments and confirmed by HSM observations. In the binary phase diagram the ideal carbamazepine liquidus curve was located at temperatures higher than the respective experimental ones. This suggests that drug can be maintained in the liquid state in the temperature-mass fraction (T--x) region between the two carbamazepine liquidus curves. This indicates in turn that attractive interactions occur between carbamazepine and PEG 6000-chains. These interactions have been also claimed to prevent carbamazepine from degradation into iminostilbene (a compound resulting from the chemical degradation of carbamazepine which is postulated to be responsible for the idiosyncratic toxicity of the drug) and thought to lead to the crystallization of metastable Carbamazepine II from melt. The negative excess entropy for eutectic mixtures indicated that the drug crystals are finely dispersed in the bulk of polymer chains.

  8. Therapeutic bioequivalency study of brand name versus generic carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Oles, K S; Penry, J K; Smith, L D; Anderson, R L; Dean, J C; Riela, A R

    1992-06-01

    We performed a randomized double-blind crossover therapeutic bioequivalency study of a generic (Epitol) versus a brand name (Tegretol) carbamazepine product under steady-state conditions in 40 epileptic patients. Each patient received 90-day supplies of Epitol or Tegretol and placebo, which replaced the usual dosage of the alternate product. Group A consisted of 20 seizure-free (from 5 months to 2 years) patients and group B of 20 patients with seizures refractory to drug therapy. In group A, four patients had seizures, two on both Epitol and Tegretol and two on Tegretol. In group B, the average seizure frequencies were 0.25 seizures per day on Epitol and 0.22 seizures per day on Tegretol. Average seizure frequencies were statistically the same (at a 20% difference, p less than 0.05). Areas under the curve were statistically the same (at a 20% difference, p = 0.05). Average peak heights were statistically the same (at a 20% difference, p less than 0.05). Average time to peak was earlier with Epitol. Epitol and Tegretol performed equally well in clinical efficacy and bioequivalency.

  9. Pulsed corona discharge oxidation of aqueous carbamazepine micropollutant.

    PubMed

    Ajo, Petri; Krzymyk, Ewelina; Preis, Sergei; Kornev, Iakov; Kronberg, Leif; Louhi-Kultanen, Marjatta

    2016-08-01

    The anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) receives growing attention due to slow biodegradation and inherent accumulation in the aquatic environment. The application of a gas-phase pulsed corona discharge (PCD) was investigated to remove CBZ from synthetic solutions and spiked wastewater effluent from a municipal wastewater treatment facility. The treated water was showered between high voltage (HV) wires and grounded plate electrodes, to which ultra-short HV pulses were applied. CBZ was readily oxidized and 1-(2-benzaldehyde)-4-hydroquinazoline-2-one (BQM) and 1-(2-benzaldehyde)-4-hydro-quinazoline-2,4-dione (BQD) were identified as the most abundant primary transformation products, which, contrary to CBZ ozonation data available in the literature, were further easily oxidized with PCD: BQM and BQD attributed to only a minor portion of the target compound oxidized. In concentrations commonly found in wastewater treatment plant effluents (around 5 µg L(-1)), up to 97% reduction in CBZ concentration was achieved at mere 0.3 kW h m(-3) energy consumption, and over 99.9% was removed at 1 kW h m(-3). The PCD application proved to be efficient in the removal of both the parent substance and its known transformation products, even with the competing reactions in the complex composition of wastewater.

  10. Oxcarbazepine versus carbamazepine in the treatment of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Su, Yi; Guo, Yi; Ding, Yao; Xu, Sha; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Shuang; Ding, Meiping

    2012-12-01

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is an uncommon neurological disorder, consisting of brief attacks of involuntary movements triggered by sudden action. Patients with PKD generally respond positively to antiepileptic drugs. We compared the efficacy and tolerability of oxcarbazepine (OXC) and carbamazepine (CBZ) in the treatment of PKD, in order to find the optimal prescription. This retrospective study reviewed monotherapy use of CBZ or OXC in 28 patients with PKD during 2005-2011, dividing into two groups. The frequency and severity of attacks and adverse events were recorded. Ten patients in the OXC group and 12 in the CBZ group continued the therapy for more than 12 months. The 12-month retention rate was 76.92% and 80.00%. Both groups showed a marked reduction in attack frequency and the degree of reduction did not differ significantly between the groups. Side effects in patients with OXC included headache, diplopia, and elevated hepatic enzymes, while diplopia, nausea, and leukopenia were recorded in CBZ group. Another three cases were found with better tolerance when converted to OXC from CBZ for rash, drowsiness, diplopia, and nervousness. In conclusion, OXC and CBZ are similarly effective and tolerated in the treatment of PKD, however, more evidence from larger and blind prospective trials are needed.

  11. Carbamazepine induced pitch shift and octave space representation.

    PubMed

    Braun, Martin; Chaloupka, Vladimir

    2005-12-01

    Octave-circular pitch perception, the repetition of pitch scale qualities when surpassing the octave interval, has been observed in behavioral data from humans and monkeys, but the underlying anatomy and physiology is still unknown. Here we analyze octave circularity in a concert pianist with absolute pitch, both under medication with the neurotropic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) and without medication. Analysis of 4619 responses in a pitch identification task revealed an internal tone-scale representation, based on the norm-tone scale re A4=440 Hz, with an octave-circular pattern of strongly and weakly represented tones. CBZ caused a global down-shift of pitch (ca. 1 semitone at 500 Hz), but no down-shift of the octave-circular pattern of tone characteristics. This pattern was similar in the six tested octave ranges (32.7-2093 Hz), both under the control and the CBZ condition. Pattern repetition always occurred at octave intervals and did not reflect the stretched octaves of piano tuning. The results indicate that CBZ influences pitch detection peripheral of an octave-circular pitch representation. Thus they support previous evidence for pitch detection in the auditory midbrain and for octave-circular pitch mapping in the auditory thalamus.

  12. How habitual caffeine consumption and dose influence flavour preference conditioning with caffeine.

    PubMed

    Tinley, Elizabeth M; Durlach, Paula J; Yeomans, Martin R

    2004-09-15

    This study investigated the effects of both habitual caffeine use and dose administered in determining the ability of caffeine to reinforce conditioned changes in flavour preference. Thirty overnight-withdrawn moderate caffeine consumers and 30 non or low-dose caffeine (non/low) consumers evaluated five novel-flavoured fruit teas. Subsequently, their median-rated tea was used in four ensuing conditioning sessions. Either placebo, 1 or 2 mg/kg of caffeine (n=10 consumers, 10 non/low consumers in each condition), was added to the target tea, and all five teas were reevaluated at a final tasting. Pleasantness ratings over the four conditioning sessions indicated that non/low consumers' liking increased for the noncaffeinated fruit tea with no change for the tea containing either 1 or 2 mg/kg of caffeine. Among consumers, pleasantness ratings tended to decrease for the noncaffeinated fruit tea but increased significantly at the 1-mg dose and showed a tendency to increase at the 2-mg dose. Similar effects were shown in the evaluations made before and after conditioning, with no change in the nonexposed drinks. These results show that 1.0 mg/kg of caffeine reinforces changes in flavour pleasantness in acutely withdrawn habitual consumers but not in nonconsumers or nondependent low-caffeine consumers, further endorsing the negative-reinforcement theory of conditioning with caffeine.

  13. Caffeine metabolites not caffeine protect against riboflavin photosensitized oxidative damage related to skin and eye health.

    PubMed

    Scurachio, R S; Mattiucci, F; Santos, W G; Skibsted, L H; Cardoso, D R

    2016-10-01

    Caffeine metabolites were found to bind riboflavin with dissociation constant in the millimolar region by an exothermic process with positive entropy of reaction, which was found by (1)H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to occur predominantly by hydrogen bonding with water being released from riboflavin solvation shell upon caffeine metabolite binding to riboflavin. The caffeine metabolites 1-methyl uric acid and 1,7-dimethyl uric acid were shown by transient absorption laser flash photolysis to be efficient as quenchers of triplet riboflavin with second-order rate constant of 1.4 10(8)Lmol(-1)s(-1) and 1.0 10(8)Lmol(-1)s(-1), respectively, in aqueous solution of pH6.4 at 25°C and more efficient than the other caffeine metabolite 1,7-dimethyl xanthine with second-order rate constant of 4.2 10(7)Lmol(-1)s(-1). Caffeine was in contrast found to be non-reactive towards triplet riboflavin. Caffeine metabolites rather than caffeine seem accordingly important for the observed protective effect against cutaneous melanoma identified for drinkers of regular but not of decaffeinated coffee. The caffeine metabolites, but not caffeine, were by time resolved single photon counting found to quench singlet excited riboflavin through exothermic formation of ground-state precursor complexes indicating importance of hydrogen bounding through keto-enol tautomer's for protection of oxidizable substrates and sensitive structures against riboflavin photosensitization.

  14. Performance effects and metabolic consequences of caffeine and caffeinated energy drink consumption on glucose disposal.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Jane; Graham, Terry E

    2014-10-01

    This review documents two opposing effects of caffeine and caffeine-containing energy drinks, i.e., their positive effects on athletic performance and their negative impacts on glucose tolerance in the sedentary state. Analysis of studies examining caffeine administration prior to performance-based exercise showed caffeine improved completion time by 3.6%. Similar analyses following consumption of caffeine-containing energy drinks yielded positive, but more varied, benefits, which were likely due to the diverse nature of the studies performed, the highly variable composition of the beverages consumed, and the range of caffeine doses administered. Conversely, analyses of studies administering caffeine prior to either an oral glucose tolerance test or insulin clamp showed a decline in whole-body glucose disposal of ~30%. The consequences of this resistance are unknown, but there may be implications for the development of a number of chronic diseases. Both caffeine-induced performance enhancement and insulin resistance converge with the primary actions of caffeine on skeletal muscle.

  15. Uptake of carbamazepine by rhizomes and endophytic bacteria of Phragmites australis.

    PubMed

    Sauvêtre, Andrés; Schröder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbamazepine is an antiepileptic and mood-stabilizing drug which is used widely in Europe and North America. In the environment, it is found as a persistent and recalcitrant contaminant, being one of the most prominent hazardous pharmaceuticals and personal care products in effluents of wastewater treatment plants. Phragmites australis is one of the species with both, the highest potential of detoxification and phytoremediation. It has been used successfully in the treatment of industrial and municipal wastewater. Recently, the identification of endophytic microorganisms from different plant species growing in contaminated sites has provided a list of candidates which could be used as bio-inoculants for bioremediation of difficult compounds. In this study, Phragmites australis plants were exposed to 5 mg/L of carbamazepine. After 9 days the plants had removed 90% of the initial concentration. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from these plants and further characterized. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequencing revealed that the majority of these isolates belong to three groups: Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Carbamazepine uptake and plant growth promoting (PGP) traits were analyzed among the isolates. Ninety percent of the isolates produce indole acetic acid (IAA) and all of them possess at least one of the PGP traits tested. One isolate identified as Chryseobacterium taeanense combines good carbamazepine uptake and all of the PGP traits. Rhizobium daejeonense can remove carbamazepine and produces 23 μg/mL of IAA. Diaphorobacter nitroreducens and Achromobacter mucicolens are suitable for carbamazepine removal while both, Pseudomonas veronii and Pseudomonas lini show high siderophore production and phosphate solubilization. Alone or in combination, these isolates might be applied as inoculates in constructed wetlands in order to enhance the phytoremediation of carbamazepine during wastewater treatment.

  16. Carbamazepine alone and in combination with doxycycline attenuates isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Errami, Mounir; Tassa, Amina T; Galindo, Cristi L; Skinner, Michael A.; Hill, Joseph A; Garner, Harold R

    2010-01-01

    β-adrenergic signaling is involved in the development of cardiac hypertrophy (CH), justifying the use of β-blockers as a therapy to minimize and postpone the consequences of this disease. Evidence suggests that adenylate cyclase, a downstream effector of the β-adrenergic pathway, might be a therapeutic target. We examined the effects of the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ), an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase. In a murine cardiac hypertrophy model, carbamazepine significantly attenuates isoproteronol (ISO)-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Carbamazepine also has an effect in transverse aortic banding induced cardiac hypertrophy (TAB) (P=0.07). When carbamazepine was given in combination with the antibiotic doxycycline (DOX), which inhibits matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), therapeutic outcome measured by heart weight-to-body weight and heart weight-to-tibia length ratios was improved compared to either drug alone. Additionally, the combination therapy resulted in an increase in the survival rate over a 56-day period compared to that of untreated mice with cardiac hypertrophy or either drug used alone. Moreover, in support of a role for carbamaze -pine as a β-adrenergic antagonist via cAMP inhibition, a lower heart rate and a lower level of the activated phosphorylated form of the cAMP Response Element-Binding (CREB) were observed in heart extracts from mice treated with carbamazepine. Gene expression analysis identified 19 genes whose expression is significantly altered in treated animals and might be responsible for the added benefit provided by the combination therapy. These results suggest that carbamazepine acts as a β-adrenergic antagonist. Carbamazepine and doxycycline are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as drugs that might complement medications for cardiac hypertrophy or serve as an alternative therapy to traditional β-blockers. Furthermore, these agents reproducibly impact the expression of genes that may serve as additional

  17. Carbamazepine alone and in combination with doxycycline attenuates isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Errami, Mounir; Tassa, Amina T; Galindo, Cristi L; Skinner, Michael A; Hill, Joseph A; Garner, Harold R

    2010-06-23

    β-adrenergic signaling is involved in the development of cardiac hypertrophy (CH), justifying the use of β-blockers as a therapy to minimize and postpone the consequences of this disease. Evidence suggests that adenylate cyclase, a downstream effector of the β-adrenergic pathway, might be a therapeutic target. We examined the effects of the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ), an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase. In a murine cardiac hypertrophy model, carbamazepine significantly attenuates isoproteronol (ISO)-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Carbamazepine also has an effect in transverse aortic banding induced cardiac hypertrophy (TAB) (P=0.07). When carbamazepine was given in combination with the antibiotic doxycycline (DOX), which inhibits matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), therapeutic outcome measured by heart weight-to-body weight and heart weight-to-tibia length ratios was improved compared to either drug alone. Additionally, the combination therapy resulted in an increase in the survival rate over a 56-day period compared to that of untreated mice with cardiac hypertrophy or either drug used alone. Moreover, in support of a role for carbamaze -pine as a β-adrenergic antagonist via cAMP inhibition, a lower heart rate and a lower level of the activated phosphorylated form of the cAMP Response Element-Binding (CREB) were observed in heart extracts from mice treated with carbamazepine. Gene expression analysis identified 19 genes whose expression is significantly altered in treated animals and might be responsible for the added benefit provided by the combination therapy. These results suggest that carbamazepine acts as a β-adrenergic antagonist. Carbamazepine and doxycycline are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as drugs that might complement medications for cardiac hypertrophy or serve as an alternative therapy to traditional β-blockers. Furthermore, these agents reproducibly impact the expression of genes that may serve as additional

  18. Uptake of carbamazepine by rhizomes and endophytic bacteria of Phragmites australis

    PubMed Central

    Sauvêtre, Andrés; Schröder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbamazepine is an antiepileptic and mood-stabilizing drug which is used widely in Europe and North America. In the environment, it is found as a persistent and recalcitrant contaminant, being one of the most prominent hazardous pharmaceuticals and personal care products in effluents of wastewater treatment plants. Phragmites australis is one of the species with both, the highest potential of detoxification and phytoremediation. It has been used successfully in the treatment of industrial and municipal wastewater. Recently, the identification of endophytic microorganisms from different plant species growing in contaminated sites has provided a list of candidates which could be used as bio-inoculants for bioremediation of difficult compounds. In this study, Phragmites australis plants were exposed to 5 mg/L of carbamazepine. After 9 days the plants had removed 90% of the initial concentration. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from these plants and further characterized. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequencing revealed that the majority of these isolates belong to three groups: Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Carbamazepine uptake and plant growth promoting (PGP) traits were analyzed among the isolates. Ninety percent of the isolates produce indole acetic acid (IAA) and all of them possess at least one of the PGP traits tested. One isolate identified as Chryseobacterium taeanense combines good carbamazepine uptake and all of the PGP traits. Rhizobium daejeonense can remove carbamazepine and produces 23 μg/mL of IAA. Diaphorobacter nitroreducens and Achromobacter mucicolens are suitable for carbamazepine removal while both, Pseudomonas veronii and Pseudomonas lini show high siderophore production and phosphate solubilization. Alone or in combination, these isolates might be applied as inoculates in constructed wetlands in order to enhance the phytoremediation of carbamazepine during wastewater treatment. PMID:25750647

  19. Serum nitrite and nitrate levels in epileptic children using valproic acid or carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Karabiber, Hamza; Yakinci, Cengiz; Durmaz, Yasar; Temel, Ismail; Mehmet, Nihayet

    2004-01-01

    In experimental epilepsy studies, nitric oxide was found to act as both proconvulsant and anticonvulsant. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of valproic acid and carbamazepine on serum levels of nitrite and nitrate, which are the metabolites of nitric oxide. To achieve this goal, serum nitrite and nitrate levels were determined in active epileptic 34 children using valproic acid and 23 children using carbamazepine and in non-active epileptic 38 children (control group) not using any antiepileptic drug. In the valproic acid group serum nitrite and nitrate levels were 2.66 +/- 2.11 micromol/l and 69.35 +/- 23.20 micromol/l, 1.89 +/- 1.01 micromol/l and 49.39 +/- 10.61 micromol/l in the carbamazepine group, and 1.22 +/- 0.55 micromol/l, 29.53 +/- 10.05 micromol in the control group, respectively. Nitrite and nitrate levels were significantly high in both valproic acid and carbamazepine groups compared to the control group (P < 0.01). When valproic acid and carbamazepine groups were compared to each other, level of nitrate was found statistically higher in the valproic acid group in relation to the carbamazepine group (P < 0.01), however, there was no statistically significant difference in the levels of nitrite (P > 0.05). No relation could be found between serum drug levels and nitrite and nitrate levels. According to these results, it can be suggested that valproic acid and carbamazepine might have antiepileptic effects through nitric oxide.

  20. Caffeine's effects on true and false memory.

    PubMed

    Capek, Sarah; Guenther, R Kim

    2009-06-01

    Caffeine's effects on recall of word lists were investigated using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm. College students were administered either 200 mg of caffeine or a 250-mg lactose placebo; after 30 min., they were tested on recall using six word lists. Words of each list were semantically related to a single word (a "critical lure") that was not presented in the list. Participants administered caffeine recalled more list words and more critical lures than participants administered lactose. Recall of list words was negatively correlated with recall of critical lures. Caffeine appears to intensify the strength of connections among list words and critical lures, thereby enhancing both true and false memory.

  1. Caffeinated alcohol beverages: a public health concern.

    PubMed

    Attwood, Angela S

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of alcohol mixed with caffeinated energy drinks is becoming popular, and the number of pre-mixed caffeinated alcohol products on the worldwide market is increasing. There is public health concern and even occasional legal restriction relating to these drinks, due to associations with increased intoxication and harms. The precise nature and degree of the pharmacological relationship between caffeine and alcohol is not yet elucidated, but it is proposed that caffeine attenuates the sedative effects of alcohol intoxication while leaving motor and cognitive impairment unaffected. This creates a potentially precarious scenario for users who may underestimate their level of intoxication and impairment. While legislation in some countries has restricted production or marketing of pre-mixed products, many individuals mix their own energy drink-alcohol 'cocktails'. Wider dissemination of the risks might help balance marketing strategies that over-emphasize putative positive effects.

  2. The Effects of Caffeine on Hyperactive Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firestone, Philip; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The psychological, physiological, and behavioral effects of a 2-week regimen of 300 mg of caffeine on 20 hyperactive males between the ages of 5 and 12 years were examined, using a double-blind crossover format. (Author)

  3. Caffeine intake reduces sleep duration in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Francesca; Araújo, Joana; Barros, Henrique; Lopes, Carla; Agodi, Antonella; Barchitta, Martina; Ramos, Elisabete

    2013-09-01

    In our study, we hypothesized that higher caffeine intake would be associated with lower sleep duration among 13-year-old adolescents. In addition, we aimed to identify food sources of caffeine intake in this sample. Eligible participants were adolescents who were born in 1990 and attended school in Porto, Portugal, in 2003/2004. Self-administered questionnaires were used, and diet was evaluated using a food frequency questionnaire. From the 2160 eligible participants, only 1522 with valid information regarding their diet were included in this study. In our sample, the median intake of caffeine was 23.1 mg/d, with soft drinks being the major source. Ice tea presented the highest median (25th-75th percentiles) contribution (33.1% [14.0-52.1]), followed by cola (21.1% [6.4-37.6]). Regarding cocoa products, chocolate bars presented a median contribution of 5.1% (1.0-14.0), and snacks containing chocolate had a contribution of 3.0% (0.5-7.2). Coffee and tea presented a negligible contribution. Adolescents who reported less sleep duration and those who spent more time watching TV during the weekend had a significantly higher caffeine intake. Overall, boys had higher intakes of caffeine from soft drinks, and private school attendees, those who had parents with more education, who reported less television viewing time and had lower body mass index presented higher intakes of caffeine from chocolate. Considering sleeping more than 9.5 hours as a reference class, for each increase of 10 mg/d in caffeine intake, we found that the odds ratio of sleeping 8.5 hours or less was 1.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.19). Our results support the hypothesis that caffeine intake was inversely associated with sleep duration in adolescents.

  4. Caffeine supplementation and peak anaerobic power output.

    PubMed

    Glaister, Mark; Muniz-Pumares, Daniel; Patterson, Stephen D; Foley, Paul; McInnes, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine supplementation on peak anaerobic power output (Wmax). Using a counterbalanced, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 14 well-trained men completed three trials of a protocol consisting of a series of 6-s cycle ergometer sprints, separated by 5-min passive recovery periods. Sprints were performed at progressively increasing torque factors to determine the peak power/torque relationship and Wmax. Apart from Trial 1 (familiarisation), participants ingested a capsule containing 5 mg·kg(-1) of caffeine or placebo, one hour before each trial. The effects of caffeine on blood lactate were investigated using capillary samples taken after each sprint. The torque factor which produced Wmax was not significantly different (p ≥ 0.05) between the caffeine (1.15 ± 0.08 N·m·kg(-1)) and placebo (1.13 ± 0.10 N·m·kg(-1)) trials. There was, however, a significant effect (p < 0.05) of supplementation on Wmax, with caffeine producing a higher value (1885 ± 303 W) than placebo (1835 ± 290 W). Analysis of the blood lactate data revealed a significant (p < 0.05) torque factor × supplement interaction with values being significantly higher from the sixth sprint (torque factor 1.0 N·m·kg(-1)) onwards following caffeine supplementation. The results of this study confirm previous reports that caffeine supplementation significantly increases blood lactate and Wmax. These findings may explain why the majority of previous studies, which have used fixed-torque factors of around 0.75 N·m·kg(-1) and thereby failing to elicit Wmax, have failed to find an effect of caffeine on sprinting performance.

  5. Connexin32: a mediator of acetaminophen-induced liver injury?

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Michaël; McGill, Mitchell R.; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Lebofsky, Margitta; de Araújo, Cintia Maria Monteiro; Tiburcio, Taynã; Pereira, Isabel Veloso Alves; Willebrords, Joost; Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Farhood, Anwar; Dagli, Maria Lucia Zaidan; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Connexin32 is the building block of hepatocellular gap junctions, which control direct intercellular communication and thereby act as goalkeepers of liver homeostasis. This study was set up to investigate whether connexin32 is involved in hepatotoxicity induced by the analgesic and antipyretic drug acetaminophen. To this end, whole body connexin32 knock-out mice were overdosed with acetaminophen followed by sampling at different time points within a 24-hour time frame. Evaluation was done based upon a series of clinically and mechanistically relevant read-outs, including protein adduct formation, histopathological examination, measurement of alanine aminotransferase activity, cytokine production, levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione, and hepatic protein amounts of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In essence, it was found that genetic ablation of connexin32 has no influence on several key events in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity, including cell death, inflammation or oxidative stress, yet it does affect production of protein adducts as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen steady-state protein levels. This outcome is not in line with previous studies, which are contradicting on their own, as both amplification and alleviation of this toxicological process by connexin32 have been described. This could question the suitability of the currently available models and tools to investigate the role of connexin32 in acetaminophen-triggered hepatotoxicity. PMID:26739117

  6. Connexin32: a mediator of acetaminophen-induced liver injury?

    PubMed

    Maes, Michaël; McGill, Mitchell R; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Lebofsky, Margitta; Maria Monteiro de Araújo, Cintia; Tiburcio, Taynã; Veloso Alves Pereira, Isabel; Willebrords, Joost; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Farhood, Anwar; Zaidan Dagli, Maria Lucia; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Connexin32 is the building block of hepatocellular gap junctions, which control direct intercellular communication and thereby act as goalkeepers of liver homeostasis. This study was set up to investigate whether connexin32 is involved in hepatotoxicity induced by the analgesic and antipyretic drug acetaminophen. To this end, whole body connexin32 knock-out mice were overdosed with acetaminophen followed by sampling at different time points within a 24-h time frame. Evaluation was done based upon a series of clinically and mechanistically relevant read-outs, including protein adduct formation, histopathological examination, measurement of alanine aminotransferase activity, cytokine production, levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione and hepatic protein amounts of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In essence, it was found that genetic ablation of connexin32 has no influence on several key events in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity, including cell death, inflammation or oxidative stress, yet it does affect production of protein adducts as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen steady-state protein levels. This outcome is not in line with previous studies, which are contradicting on their own, as both amplification and alleviation of this toxicological process by connexin32 have been described. This could question the suitability of the currently available models and tools to investigate the role of connexin32 in acetaminophen-triggered hepatotoxicity.

  7. Metabonomic analysis of Bombyx mori (Heterocera: Bombysidae) treated with acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Yin, W M; Xu, X; He, Y; Wei, G B; Sima, Y H; Shi-Qing, Xu

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of using Bombyx mori as model animal is attracting more attention. Whether the effect of drugs on the metabolite profiling was consistent with those in mammals was an aspect to evaluate the feasibility of B. mori as model animal. In this study, we used acetaminophen to treat Dazao fifth-instar B. mori, and its metabolites in hemolymph were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The corresponding data were processed and analyzed by total model analysis, principal component analysis, partial least squares-discriminant analysis, orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis, and finally, the difference metabolites between acetaminophen group and control group were selected and identified by our reference material database and the National Institute of Standard and Technology database. The results showed that acetaminophen administration induced elevation of metabolites related to energy source, the intermediate of cholesterol synthesis, and the metabolites related to melanization and also induced the decrease of metabolites in pathway of Krebs cycle, the cholesterol, and sitosterol, which suggested that acetaminophen administration inhibited energy metabolism and promoted the expenditure and imbalance of hormone and melanization.

  8. [Inotropic activity induced by carbamazepine-alkyne derivative in an isolated heart model and perfused to constant flow].

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Valverde, Lauro; Díaz-Cedillo, Francisco; López-Ramos, María; García-Cervera, Elodia; Quijano-Ascencio, Karen

    2011-06-01

    Inotropic activity induced by carbamazepine-alkyne derivative in an isolated heart model and perfused to constant flow Introduction. Few data exist with respect to the effects of carbamazepine and its derivatives at cardiovascular level; furthermore, the molecular mechanisms and cellular site of action are still unclear. Objective. The effects induced by carbamazepine-alquine derivative on perfusion pressure, vascular resistance and left ventricular pressure were evaluated. Materials and methods. The effects of carbamazepine and carbamazepine-alquine on the perfusion pressure, vascular resistance and left ventricular pressure were examined in isolated rat hearts (Langendorff model). Results. Four results were obtained: (1) The carbamazepine-alquine derivative 10-9 mM increased the perfusion pressure and vascular resistance in comparison with the carbamazepine 10-9 mM; (2) the effect of carbamazepine-alquine derivative 10-9-10-4 mM on left ventricular pressure not was inhibited by metoprolol or prazosin at a dose of 10-6 mM; (3) nifedipine 10-6 mM blocked the effects exerted by the carbamazepine-alquine derivative 10-9-10--4 mM on left ventricular pressure, and (4) the carbamazepine-alquine derivative at dose of 10-9 mM increased the concentration of intracellular calcium over a time period of 3-18 min; nevertheless, in presence of nifedipine 10-6 mM this effect was inhibited significantly (p=0.005). Conclusions. The activity exerted by carbamazepine-alquine derivative on perfusion pressure, vascular resistance and left ventricular pressure involved activation of calcium channel type-L, brought indirectly changes in the intracellular calcium levels and subsequently induced a positive inotropic effect.

  9. Carbamazepine inhibits distinct chemoconvulsant-induced seizure-like activity in Dugesia tigrina.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Latha; Desaer, Cassie

    2011-10-01

    Planaria, non-parasitic flatworms, were recently shown to be a simple yet sensitive model for investigating the pharmacology of convulsants and anticonvulsants. The present findings show that three distinct chemoconvulsants, (-)-nicotine, picrotoxin, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), induce dose-dependent seizure-like paroxysms in the planarian Dugesia tigrina. Carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, iminodibenzyl derivatives, exhibit anticonvulsive effects mediated mainly through the inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Apart from these primary molecular targets, both carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine are known to activate γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors and inhibit NMDA activated glutamate receptors and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The present study shows that in D. tigrina both carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine inhibit chemoconvulsant-induced seizure behaviors in a dose-dependent manner. Carbamazepine (100 μM) decreased by ~65% the cumulative mean planarian seizure-like activity (pSLA) observed in the presence of (-)-nicotine (10 μM), picrotoxin (5mM), or NMDA (3mM), whereas oxcarbazepine (1 μM) decreased by 45% the cumulative mean pSLA induced by (-)-nicotine (10μM). The results demonstrate, for the first time, the anti-seizure pharmacology of carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine in an invertebrate seizure model.

  10. Human health risk assessment of carbamazepine in surface waters of North America and Europe.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Virginia L; Perino, Christopher; D'Aco, Vincent J; Hartmann, Andreas; Bechter, Rudolf

    2010-04-01

    A human health risk assessment was carried out for environmental exposures to carbamazepine (CBZ) and its major human metabolites, carbamazepine diol (CBZ-DiOH) and carbamazepine N-glucuronide (CBZ-N-Glu). Carbamazepine is an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) used worldwide as a medicine for treating epileptic seizures and trigeminal neuralgia. Carbamazepine tends to be detected in surface water more frequently, and at relatively higher concentrations, than most other APIs. Predicted no effect levels (PNECs) for CBZ and its major human metabolites were developed for surface waters to be protective of human health from environmental exposures from drinking water and fish consumption. These PNECs were compared to both measured (MEC) and predicted (PEC) environmental concentrations for North America and Europe. PECs were calculated using the geo-referenced models PhATE for North America and GREAT-ER for Europe. The combined PNEC for drinking water and fish consumption for CBZ is 226,000ng/L. Ninetieth percentile MECs ranged from 150 to 220ng/L, while 90th percentile PECs ranged from 333 to 658ng/L. Calculated margins of safety (MOS) therefore range from 340 to 1500. MOS for the major metabolites are significantly higher. This assessment indicates that CBZ and its major metabolites have high MOS (>1) and thus should have no appreciable risk to human health through environmental exposures based on available human data.

  11. Intranasal administration of carbamazepine to mice: a direct delivery pathway for brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Serralheiro, Ana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Falcão, Amílcar

    2014-08-18

    The currently available antiepileptic drugs are typically administered via oral or intravenous (IV) routes which commonly exhibit high systemic distribution into non-targeted tissues, leading to peripheral adverse effects and limited brain uptake. In order to improve the efficacy and tolerability of the antiepileptic drug therapy, alternative administration strategies have been investigated. The purpose of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine administered via intranasal (IN) and IV routes to mice, and to investigate whether a direct transport of the drug from nose to brain could be involved. The similar pharmacokinetic profiles obtained in all matrices following both administration routes indicate that, after IN delivery, carbamazepine reaches quickly and extensively the bloodstream, achieving the brain predominantly via systemic circulation. However, the uneven biodistribution of carbamazepine through the brain regions with higher concentrations in the olfactory bulb and frontal cortex following IN instillation, in comparison with the homogenous brain distribution pattern after IV injection, strongly suggests the involvement of a direct transport of carbamazepine from nose to brain. Therefore, it seems that IN delivery represents a suitable and promising alternative route to administer carbamazepine not only for the chronically use of the drug but also in emergency conditions.

  12. Environmental concentration of carbamazepine accelerates fish embryonic development and disturbs larvae behavior.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Liyuan; Cheng, Jinping; Yi, Jun; Rotchell, Jeanette M; Zhu, Xiaotong; Zhou, Junliang

    2016-09-01

    Environmental pollution caused by pharmaceuticals has been recognized as a major threat to the aquatic ecosystems. Carbamazepine, as the widely prescribed antiepileptic drug, has been frequently detected in the aquatic environment and has created concerns about its potential impacts in the aquatic organisms. The effects of carbamazepine on zebrafish embryos were studied by examining their phenotype, behavior and molecular responses. The results showed that carbamazepine disturbed the normal growth and development of exposed zebrafish embryos and larvae. Upon exposure to carbamazepine at 1 μg/L, the hatching rate, body length, swim bladder appearance and yolk sac absorption rate were significantly increased. Embryos in treatment groups were more sensitive to touch and light stimulation. At molecular level, exposure to an environmentally relevant concentration (1 μg/L) of carbamazepine disturbed the expression pattern of neural-related genes of zebrafish embryos and larvae. This study suggests that the exposure of fish embryo to antiepileptic drugs, at environmentally relevant concentrations, affects their early development and impairs their behavior. Such impacts may have future repercussions by affecting fish population structure.

  13. Effects of caffeine on human health.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, P; Jordan, S; Eastwood, J; Rotstein, J; Hugenholtz, A; Feeley, M

    2003-01-01

    Caffeine is probably the most frequently ingested pharmacologically active substance in the world. It is found in common beverages (coffee, tea, soft drinks), in products containing cocoa or chocolate, and in medications. Because of its wide consumption at different levels by most segments of the population, the public and the scientific community have expressed interest in the potential for caffeine to produce adverse effects on human health. The possibility that caffeine ingestion adversely affects human health was investigated based on reviews of (primarily) published human studies obtained through a comprehensive literature search. Based on the data reviewed, it is concluded that for the healthy adult population, moderate daily caffeine intake at a dose level up to 400 mg day(-1) (equivalent to 6 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) in a 65-kg person) is not associated with adverse effects such as general toxicity, cardiovascular effects, effects on bone status and calcium balance (with consumption of adequate calcium), changes in adult behaviour, increased incidence of cancer and effects on male fertility. The data also show that reproductive-aged women and children are 'at risk' subgroups who may require specific advice on moderating their caffeine intake. Based on available evidence, it is suggested that reproductive-aged women should consume caffeine per day (equivalent to 4.6 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for a 65-kg person) while children should consume

  14. [Caffeine in nutrition. Article 1. Consumption with food and regulation].

    PubMed

    Bessonov, V V; Khanferyan, R A

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a review of the literature data on the effect of caffeine contained in a variety of foods on the functions of human, it presents the modern international legal regulatory rules in the consumption of caffeine, and caffeine consumption rules corresponding to the technical regulations of the Customs Union (Russian Federation, Kazakhstan, Belaruss). It describes the sources of caffeine in the traditional diet and its consumption, safety evaluation in connection with the acute and chronic caffeine consumption and the value of caffeine as an ingredient in soft drinks tonic.

  15. Thermal decomposition and non-isothermal decomposition kinetics of carbamazepine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhen-li; Zhang, Duan-feng; Chen, Fei-xiong; Miao, Jun-yan; Ren, Bao-zeng

    2014-12-01

    The thermal stability and kinetics of isothermal decomposition of carbamazepine were studied under isothermal conditions by thermogravimetry (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at three heating rates. Particularly, transformation of crystal forms occurs at 153.75°C. The activation energy of this thermal decomposition process was calculated from the analysis of TG curves by Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Doyle, distributed activation energy model, Šatava-Šesták and Kissinger methods. There were two different stages of thermal decomposition process. For the first stage, E and log A [s-1] were determined to be 42.51 kJ mol-1 and 3.45, respectively. In the second stage, E and log A [s-1] were 47.75 kJ mol-1 and 3.80. The mechanism of thermal decomposition was Avrami-Erofeev (the reaction order, n = 1/3), with integral form G(α) = [-ln(1 - α)]1/3 (α = ˜0.1-0.8) in the first stage and Avrami-Erofeev (the reaction order, n = 1) with integral form G(α) = -ln(1 - α) (α = ˜0.9-0.99) in the second stage. Moreover, Δ H ≠, Δ S ≠, Δ G ≠ values were 37.84 kJ mol-1, -192.41 J mol-1 K-1, 146.32 kJ mol-1 and 42.68 kJ mol-1, -186.41 J mol-1 K-1, 156.26 kJ mol-1 for the first and second stage, respectively.

  16. Efficacy of Intravenous Infusion of Acetaminophen for Intrapartum Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Zutshi, Vijay; Rani, Kumari Usha; Patel, Madhumita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The intensity of pain experienced by women in labour, has been found to affect the progress of labour, foetal well-being and maternal psychology. Adverse effects associated with commonly used opioids for providing intrapartum analgesia have created a need for an alternative non-opioid drug. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of an intravenous infusion of 1000 mg of acetaminophen as an intrapartum analgesic. Materials and Methods The present prospective single-centre, single blind, placebo-controlled randomized interventional study was conducted in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Vardhaman Mahavir Medical College & Safdarjung Hospital over a period of six months from September 2014 to March 2015. After receiving the ethical clearance and written informed consent. The first 200 consecutive parturients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were recruited into the study. Women were then randomised to receive either intravenous 1000 mg (100ml) of acetaminophen (Group A, n=100) or 100 ml normal saline (Group B, n=100). Primary outcome assessed was effectiveness of acetaminophen to provide an adequate amount of analgesia, as measured by a change in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain intensity score at various times after drug administration. Secondary outcomes measured were duration of labour, need for additional rescue analgesia and presence of adverse maternal or foetal effect. Results There was pain reduction at 1 and 2 hours in both groups (p<0.001). However, it was more significant in the acetaminophen group, especially at 1 hour. Duration of labour was shortened in both the groups, without any maternal and foetal adverse effects. Conclusion Intravenous acetaminophen is an efficacious non-opioid drug for relieving labour pain without any significant maternal and foetal adverse effects. PMID:27656511

  17. Degradation of exogenous caffeine by Populus alba and its effects on endogenous caffeine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pierattini, Erika C; Francini, Alessandra; Raffaelli, Andrea; Sebastiani, Luca

    2016-04-01

    This is the first study reporting the presence of endogenous caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline in all organs of poplar plants. Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used in order to evaluate the uptake, translocation, and metabolism of caffeine-(trimethyl-(13)C) in Populus alba L. Villafranca clone grown in hydroponic conditions. We investigated the remediation of caffeine since it is one of the most widely consumed drugs and it is frequently detected in wastewater treatment plant effluents, surface water, and groundwater worldwide. Our results demonstrated that poplar can absorb and degrade exogenous caffeine without negative effects on plant health. Data showed that concentrations of all endogenous compounds varied depending on caffeine-(trimethyl-(13)C) treatments. In particular, in control conditions, endogenous caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline were mainly distributed in roots. On the other hand, once caffeine-(trimethyl-(13)C) was provided, this compound and its dimethy-(13)C metabolites are mainly localized at leaf level. In conclusion, our results support the possible use of Villafranca clone in association with other water treatment systems in order to complete the process of caffeine remediation.

  18. Conditioned flavour preference negatively reinforced by caffeine in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Yeomans, M R; Spetch, H; Rogers, P J

    1998-06-01

    This study examined whether 100 mg caffeine could reinforce preference for the flavour of a novel drink in moderate caffeine users, both after overnight caffeine abstinence and 2 h after receiving 100 mg caffeine, using a two-stage between-groups procedure with 36 volunteers. In the first stage, liking for a test drink (fruit tea) was assessed at breakfast following overnight caffeine abstinence, with half the subjects receiving caffeine. Liking for the tea increased significantly over four trials for subjects receiving caffeine, and decreased significantly in those without caffeine. These effects were greatest in subjects who rated the drink as highly novel. In stage two, subjects evaluated a second drink (fruit-juice) 2 h after receiving the tea, and again half the subjects received caffeine Those subjects who received caffeine in stage two but not stage one showed a significant increase in liking for the fruit-juice over the 4 test days, whereas subjects who did not receive caffeine at either stage showed a progressive decrease in liking for this drink. In contrast, no significant change in liking for the fruit-juice was seen at stage two for subjects who had received caffeine in stage one, regardless of the presence or absence of caffeine at stage two. Caffeine at breakfast increased ratings of energetic and lively, and energetic ratings also increased following caffeine in the fruit-juice in subjects who had not had caffeine at breakfast. Overall, these data are consistent with a negative reinforcement model of caffeine reinforcement, and demonstrate further the utility of the conditioned flavour preference method for evaluating reinforcing effects of drugs in humans.

  19. Caffeine increases food intake while reducing anxiety-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Patrick; Levack, Russell; Watters, Jared; Xu, Zhenping; Yang, Yunlei

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of different doses of caffeine on appetite and anxiety-related behavior. Additionally, we sought to determine if withdrawal from chronic caffeine administration promotes anxiety. In this study, we utilized rodent open field testing and feeding behavior assays to determine the effects of caffeine on feeding and anxiety-related behavior (n = 8 mice; 4-8 weeks old). We also measured 2 h and 24 h food intake and body-weight during daily administration of caffeine (n = 12 mice; 4-8 weeks old). To test for caffeine withdrawal induced anxiety, anxiety-related behavior in rodents was quantified following withdrawal from four consecutive days of caffeine administration (n = 12 mice; 4-8 weeks old). We find that acute caffeine administration increases food intake in a dose-dependent manner with lower doses of caffeine more significantly increasing food intake than higher doses. Acute caffeine administration also reduced anxiety-related behaviors in mice without significantly altering locomotor activity. However, we did not observe any differences in 24 h food intake or body weight following chronic caffeine administration and there were no observable differences in anxiety-related behaviors during caffeine withdrawal. In conclusion, we find that caffeine can both increase appetite and decrease anxiety-related behaviors in a dose dependent fashion. Given the complex relationship between appetite and anxiety, the present study provides additional insights into potential caffeine-based pharmacological mechanisms governing appetite and anxiety disorders, such as bulimia nervosa.

  20. Caffeine intake by patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Vendramini, L.C.; Nishiura, J.L.; Baxmann, A.C.; Heilberg, I.P.

    2012-01-01

    Because caffeine may induce cyst and kidney enlargement in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), we evaluated caffeine intake and renal volume using renal ultrasound in ADPKD patients. Caffeine intake was estimated by the average of 24-h dietary recalls obtained on 3 nonconsecutive days in 102 ADPKD patients (68 females, 34 males; 39 ± 12 years) and compared to that of 102 healthy volunteers (74 females, 28 males; 38 ± 14 years). The awareness of the need for caffeine restriction was assessed. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical records of the patients. Mean caffeine intake was significantly lower in ADPKD patients versus controls (86 vs 134 mg/day), and 63% of the ADPKD patients had been previously aware of caffeine restriction. Caffeine intake did not correlate with renal volume in ADPKD patients. There were no significant differences between the renal volumes of patients in the highest and lowest tertiles of caffeine consumption. Finally, age-adjusted multiple linear regression revealed that renal volume was associated with hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage 3 and the time since diagnosis, but not with caffeine intake. The present small cross-sectional study indicated a low level of caffeine consumption by ADPKD patients when compared to healthy volunteers, which was most likely due to prior awareness of the need for caffeine restriction. Within the range of caffeine intake observed by ADPKD patients in this study (0-471 mg/day), the renal volume was not directly associated with caffeine intake. PMID:22801417

  1. Degradation of orange dyes and carbamazepine by soybean peroxidase immobilized on silica monoliths and titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Calza, Paola; Zacchigna, Dario; Laurenti, Enzo

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the removal of three common dyes (orange I, orange II, and methylorange) and of the anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine from aqueous solutions by means of enzymatic and photocatalytic treatment was studied. Soybean peroxidase (SBP) was used as biocatalyst, both free in solution and immobilized on silica monoliths, and titanium dioxide as photocatalyst. The combination of the two catalysts led to a faster (about two to four times) removal of all the orange dyes compared to the single systems. All the dyes were completely removed within 2 h, also in the presence of immobilized SBP. As for carbamazepine, photocatalytic treatment prevails on the enzymatic degradation, but the synergistic effect of two catalysts led to a more efficient degradation; carbamazepine's complete disappearance was achieved within 60 min with combined system, while up to 2 h is required with TiO2 only.

  2. Plasma-exchange treatment for severe carbamazepine intoxication: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kozanoglu, Ilknur; Kahveci, Suat; Asma, Suheyl; Yeral, Mahmut; Noyan, Aytul; Boga, Can; Ozdogu, Hakan

    2014-06-01

    Acute poisoning is an important cause of morbidity and mortality during childhood. This manuscript reports the positive outcome of a pediatric case with a history of accidental carbamazepine intake treated using plasma exchange. A 3-year-old male presented with severe carbamazepine intoxication. He was comatose and had generalized tonic clonic seizure, ventricular tachycardia, and hypotension. Although he did not respond to classical therapies, we performed two sessions of plasma exchange. The patient recovered rapidly and was discharged from the hospital six days from the time of carbamazepine ingestion with no complication or neurologic impairment. Plasma exchange can be performed safely in very small children, and it might be the first line treatment, particularly for intoxication with drugs that have high plasma-protein-binding properties.

  3. Carbamazepine-induced anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome--pathogenic and diagnostic considerations.

    PubMed

    Scerri, L; Shall, L; Zaki, I

    1993-11-01

    Two epileptic patients developed an infectious mononucleosis-like illness which subsequently proved to be a carbamazepine-induced anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome. Patch testing to carbamazepine 3 years later was positive in the one patient tested and negative in normal controls. The second patient died a few weeks after the illness, secondary to long-standing cardiac disease without having undergone patch testing. A skin biopsy was, however, consistent with an immune complex mediated drug reaction. Patch testing for systemically administered drugs is generally believed to be of little value in diagnosing drug allergies. However, we reinforce a previous suggestion that this investigation may be helpful in some cases of anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome caused by carbamazepine. The pathogenic role of type 3 and 4 hypersensitivity is also discussed.

  4. Cetirizine as pH-dependent cross-reactant in a carbamazepine-specific immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Bahlmann, Arnold; Falkenhagen, Jana; Weller, Michael G; Panne, Ulrich; Schneider, Rudolf J

    2011-04-07

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was hyphenated with a previously reported carbamazepine-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as a screening approach to water analysis in order to identify possible interferences from transformation products. Treated wastewater was analysed and three substances were recognized by the antibody besides carbamazepine: the metabolites 10,11-dihydro-10,11-epoxycarbamazepine and 2-hydroxycarbamazepine plus the structurally not obviously related antihistamine cetirizine. The molar cross-reactivity against cetirizine was found to be pH-dependent and assessed to be 400% at pH 4.5 and 22% at pH 10.5. Performing the ELISA at pH 10.5 greatly improved the accuracy when carbamazepine was determined in surface and wastewater samples.

  5. HLA-B∗ 1502 is associated with carbamazepine induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome in North Indian population.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ritu; Sharma, Madhulika; Modi, Manish; Garg, Vivek Kumar; Salaria, Manilla

    2014-11-01

    The evidence of association between HLA-B(∗)1502 and anticonvulsant induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) from the Indian population is scant. Patients with a history of SJS/TEN secondary to carbamazepine or phenytoin were enrolled. The control group comprised of patients who had received carbamazepine/phenytoin for ⩾ 6 months without any adverse cutaneous event. Low-resolution DNA typing for HLA-B and high resolution HLA-B(∗)15 typing was performed. Seventeen patients with history of SJS/TEN secondary to carbamazepine (9) or phenytoin (8) and 50 tolerant controls (carbamazepine-37; phenytoin-13) were enrolled. The mean age of patients and controls was 33.9 ± 11.6 and 28.1 ± 9.9 years, respectively. HLA-B(∗)1502 was observed in 2/9 (22.2%) carbamazepine-SJS/TEN patients and none of the 37 carbamazepine tolerant controls (p = 0.035). HLA-B(∗)1502 was not observed in any of the 8 phenytoin-SJS/TEN patients or the 13 phenytoin tolerant controls. Our data suggests that HLA-B(∗)1502 is a risk factor for carbamazepine induced SJS/TEN. Therefore, HLA-B(∗)1502 testing should be performed prior to initiating carbamazepine in North Indian population.

  6. Carbamazepine as a novel small molecule corrector of trafficking-impaired ATP-sensitive potassium channels identified in congenital hyperinsulinism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Chun; Olson, Erik M; Zhou, Qing; Kryukova, Yelena; Sampson, Heidi M; Thomas, David Y; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2013-07-19

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels consisting of sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) and the potassium channel Kir6.2 play a key role in insulin secretion by coupling metabolic signals to β-cell membrane potential. Mutations in SUR1 and Kir6.2 that impair channel trafficking to the cell surface lead to loss of channel function and congenital hyperinsulinism. We report that carbamazepine, an anticonvulsant, corrects the trafficking defects of mutant KATP channels previously identified in congenital hyperinsulinism. Strikingly, of the 19 SUR1 mutations examined, only those located in the first transmembrane domain of SUR1 responded to the drug. We show that unlike that reported for several other protein misfolding diseases, carbamazepine did not correct KATP channel trafficking defects by activating autophagy; rather, it directly improved the biogenesis efficiency of mutant channels along the secretory pathway. In addition to its effect on channel trafficking, carbamazepine also inhibited KATP channel activity. Upon subsequent removal of carbamazepine, however, the function of rescued channels was recovered. Importantly, combination of the KATP channel opener diazoxide and carbamazepine led to enhanced mutant channel function without carbamazepine washout. The corrector effect of carbamazepine on mutant KATP channels was also demonstrated in rat and human β-cells with an accompanying increase in channel activity. Our findings identify carbamazepine as a novel small molecule corrector that may be used to restore KATP channel expression and function in a subset of congenital hyperinsulinism patients.

  7. Carbamazepine as a Novel Small Molecule Corrector of Trafficking-impaired ATP-sensitive Potassium Channels Identified in Congenital Hyperinsulinism*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Chun; Olson, Erik M.; Zhou, Qing; Kryukova, Yelena; Sampson, Heidi M.; Thomas, David Y.; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2013-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels consisting of sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) and the potassium channel Kir6.2 play a key role in insulin secretion by coupling metabolic signals to β-cell membrane potential. Mutations in SUR1 and Kir6.2 that impair channel trafficking to the cell surface lead to loss of channel function and congenital hyperinsulinism. We report that carbamazepine, an anticonvulsant, corrects the trafficking defects of mutant KATP channels previously identified in congenital hyperinsulinism. Strikingly, of the 19 SUR1 mutations examined, only those located in the first transmembrane domain of SUR1 responded to the drug. We show that unlike that reported for several other protein misfolding diseases, carbamazepine did not correct KATP channel trafficking defects by activating autophagy; rather, it directly improved the biogenesis efficiency of mutant channels along the secretory pathway. In addition to its effect on channel trafficking, carbamazepine also inhibited KATP channel activity. Upon subsequent removal of carbamazepine, however, the function of rescued channels was recovered. Importantly, combination of the KATP channel opener diazoxide and carbamazepine led to enhanced mutant channel function without carbamazepine washout. The corrector effect of carbamazepine on mutant KATP channels was also demonstrated in rat and human β-cells with an accompanying increase in channel activity. Our findings identify carbamazepine as a novel small molecule corrector that may be used to restore KATP channel expression and function in a subset of congenital hyperinsulinism patients. PMID:23744072

  8. HLA-A★3101 and Carbamazepine-Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Mark; Alfirevic, Ana; Bourgeois, Stephane; Farrell, John J.; Kasperavičiūtė, Dalia; Carrington, Mary; Sills, Graeme J.; Marson, Tony; Jia, Xiaoming; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Molokhia, Mariam; Johnson, Michael R.; O’Connor, Gerard D.; Chaila, Elijah; Alhusaini, Saud; Shianna, Kevin V.; Radtke, Rodney A.; Heinzen, Erin L.; Walley, Nicole; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pichler, Werner; Park, B. Kevin; Depondt, Chantal; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Goldstein, David B.; Deloukas, Panos; Delanty, Norman; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Carbamazepine causes various forms of hypersensitivity reactions, ranging from maculopapular exanthema to severe blistering reactions. The HLA-B★1502 allele has been shown to be strongly correlated with carbamazepine-induced Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS–TEN) in the Han Chinese and other Asian populations but not in European populations. METHODS We performed a genomewide association study of samples obtained from 22 subjects with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, 43 subjects with carbamazepine-induced maculopapular exanthema, and 3987 control subjects, all of European descent. We tested for an association between disease and HLA alleles through proxy single-nucleotide polymorphisms and imputation, confirming associations by high-resolution sequence-based HLA typing. We replicated the associations in samples from 145 subjects with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions. RESULTS The HLA-A★3101 allele, which has a prevalence of 2 to 5% in Northern European populations, was significantly associated with the hypersensitivity syndrome (P = 3.5×10−8). An independent genomewide association study of samples from subjects with maculopapular exanthema also showed an association with the HLA-A★3101 allele (P = 1.1×10−6). Follow-up genotyping confirmed the variant as a risk factor for the hypersensitivity syndrome (odds ratio, 12.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27 to 121.03), maculopapular exanthema (odds ratio, 8.33; 95% CI, 3.59 to 19.36), and SJS–TEN (odds ratio, 25.93; 95% CI, 4.93 to 116.18). CONCLUSIONS The presence of the HLA-A★3101 allele was associated with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions among subjects of Northern European ancestry. The presence of the allele increased the risk from 5.0% to 26.0%, whereas its absence reduced the risk from 5.0% to 3.8%. (Funded by the U.K. Department of Health and others.) PMID:21428769

  9. Aspirin curtails the acetaminophen-induced rise in brain norepinephrine levels.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Himant; Maharaj, Deepa S; Saravanan, Karruppagounder S; Mohanakumar, Kochupurackal P; Daya, Santy

    2004-06-01

    We previously showed that acetaminophen administration to rats increases forebrain serotonin levels as a result of the inhibition of liver tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). In this study we determined whether aspirin alone and in combination with acetaminophen could further influence brain serotonin as well as norepinephrine levels and if so whether the status of the liver TDO activity would be altered. The results show that acetaminophen alone increases brain serotonin as well as norepinephrine levels with a concomitant inhibition of liver TDO activity. In contrast, aspirin did not alter the levels of these monoamines but increased serotonin turnover in the brain while acetaminophen decreased the turnover. When combined with acetaminophen, aspirin overrides the reduced serotonin turnover induced by acetaminophen. This report demonstrates the potential of these agents to alter neurotransmitter levels in the brain.

  10. Adaptation to acetaminophen exposure elicits major changes in expression and distribution of the hepatic proteome.

    PubMed

    Eakins, R; Walsh, J; Randle, L; Jenkins, R E; Schuppe-Koistinen, I; Rowe, C; Starkey Lewis, P; Vasieva, O; Prats, N; Brillant, N; Auli, M; Bayliss, M; Webb, S; Rees, J A; Kitteringham, N R; Goldring, C E; Park, B K

    2015-11-26

    Acetaminophen overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure. One dose of 10-15 g causes severe liver damage in humans, whereas repeated exposure to acetaminophen in humans and animal models results in autoprotection. Insight of this process is limited to select proteins implicated in acetaminophen toxicity and cellular defence. Here we investigate hepatic adaptation to acetaminophen toxicity from a whole proteome perspective, using quantitative mass spectrometry. In a rat model, we show the response to acetaminophen involves the expression of 30% of all proteins detected in the liver. Genetic ablation of a master regulator of cellular defence, NFE2L2, has little effect, suggesting redundancy in the regulation of adaptation. We show that adaptation to acetaminophen has a spatial component, involving a shift in regionalisation of CYP2E1, which may prevent toxicity thresholds being reached. These data reveal unexpected complexity and dynamic behaviour in the biological response to drug-induced liver injury.

  11. Adaptation to acetaminophen exposure elicits major changes in expression and distribution of the hepatic proteome

    PubMed Central

    Eakins, R.; Walsh, J.; Randle, L.; Jenkins, R. E.; Schuppe-Koistinen, I.; Rowe, C.; Starkey Lewis, P.; Vasieva, O.; Prats, N.; Brillant, N.; Auli, M.; Bayliss, M.; Webb, S.; Rees, J. A.; Kitteringham, N. R.; Goldring, C. E.; Park, B. K.

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure. One dose of 10–15 g causes severe liver damage in humans, whereas repeated exposure to acetaminophen in humans and animal models results in autoprotection. Insight of this process is limited to select proteins implicated in acetaminophen toxicity and cellular defence. Here we investigate hepatic adaptation to acetaminophen toxicity from a whole proteome perspective, using quantitative mass spectrometry. In a rat model, we show the response to acetaminophen involves the expression of 30% of all proteins detected in the liver. Genetic ablation of a master regulator of cellular defence, NFE2L2, has little effect, suggesting redundancy in the regulation of adaptation. We show that adaptation to acetaminophen has a spatial component, involving a shift in regionalisation of CYP2E1, which may prevent toxicity thresholds being reached. These data reveal unexpected complexity and dynamic behaviour in the biological response to drug-induced liver injury. PMID:26607827

  12. Adsorption of carbamazepine by carbon nanotubes: effects of DOM introduction and competition with phenanthrene and bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Ilya; Chen, Yona; Xing, Baoshan; Chefetz, Benny

    2013-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes, organic contaminants and dissolved organic matter (DOM) are co-introduced into the environment. Thus, the interactions between these components have to be evaluated to better understand their environmental behavior. In this study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were used as sorbent, carbamazepine was the primary adsorbate, and bisphenol A and phenanthrene were used as competitors. Strong competition with bisphenol A and no effect of phenanthrene on adsorption of carbamazepine was obtained. The hydrophobic neutral fraction of the DOM exhibited the strongest reductive effect on carbamazepine adsorption, most probably due to interactions in solution. In contrast, the hydrophobic acid fraction decreased carbamazepine adsorption mainly via direct competition. When DOM and bisphenol A were co-introduced, the adsorption of carbamazepine was significantly reduced. This study suggests that the chemical nature of DOM can significantly affect the sorptive behavior of polar organic pollutants with carbon nanotubes when all are introduced to the aquatic system.

  13. Neurobehavioral hazard identification and characterization for caffeine.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Duncan; Rodricks, Joseph V; Mariano, Gregory F

    2016-02-01

    This report evaluates the scientific literature on caffeine with respect to potential central nervous system (CNS) effects, specifically effects on sleep, anxiety, and aggression/risk-taking. Caffeine has been the subject of more scientific safety studies than any other food ingredient. It is important, therefore, to evaluate new studies in the context of this large existing body of knowledge. The safety of caffeine can best be described in a narrative form, and is not usefully expressed in terms of a "bright line" numerical value like an "acceptable daily intake" (ADI). Caffeine intake has been associated with a range of reversible physiological effects, in a few studies at levels of less than 100 mg in sensitive individuals. It is also clear that many people can tolerate much greater levels - perhaps up to 600-800 mg/day or more - without experiencing such effects. The reasons for this type of variability in response are described in this report. Based on all the available evidence, there is no reason to believe that experiencing such effects from caffeine intake has any significant or lasting effect on health. The point at which caffeine intake may cause harm to the CNS is not readily identifiable, in part because data on the effects of daily intakes greater than 600 mg is limited. Effects of caffeine on risk-taking and aggressive behavior in young people have received considerable publicity, yet are the most difficult to study because of ethical concerns and limitations in the ability to design appropriate studies. At present, the weight of available evidence does not support these concerns, yet this should not preclude ongoing careful monitoring of the scientific literature.

  14. Significance to human health of carbamazepine detected in fruits and vegetables irrigated with recycled water.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Bahman

    2017-03-01

    The relevance and significance of the findings of chemicals of emerging concern at nanogram concentrations in recycled water is critically important for the consumers of these crops. The relevance and significance of these chemicals at these concentrations is placed in perspective in terms of the number of years of consumption necessary to accrue one acceptable daily intake every day, over a lifetime, specifically for carbamazepine. In this paper, the number of years is calculated and found to far exceed the maximum human life expectancy, even assuming that the individual consumes a mix of fruits and vegetables irrigated with recycled water throughout an 80-year life span, excluding other food crops free from carbamazepine.

  15. Removal of carbamazepine and naproxen by immobilized Phanerochaete chrysosporium under non-sterile condition.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueqing; de Toledo, Renata Alves; Wang, Shengpeng; Shim, Hojae

    2015-03-25

    This study explored the utilization of a white-rot fungus (WRF), Phanerochaete chrysosporium, immobilized in wood chips, to remove carbamazepine and naproxen under non-sterile condition. The removal efficiencies for both pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) in artificially contaminated water were improved by 4% for naproxen and 30% for carbamazepine in seven days, compared to without wood chips. Although adsorption was crucial at the early stage, bioremoval was found to be the main removal mechanism for both PhACs. The extracellular enzymes played important roles in the naproxen removal, while the intracellular enzyme system was responsible for the carbamazepine removal. The increased of intracellular enzyme activity through the immobilization of WRF cells may contribute to the significantly enhanced removal efficiency for carbamazepine. In addition, the removal of naproxen or carbamazepine slightly increased when both compounds coexisted, compared to the system where the two pharmaceuticals existed separately. Based on the batch experimental results, a fixed-bed bioreactor packed with a mixture of WRF mycelia pellets and wood chips was developed and operated with the intermittent feeding and continuous aerating mode for 28 days under non-sterile condition, with naproxen and carbamazepine spiked into the influent at 1.0 mg L(-1). Almost complete removal of naproxen and 60-80% removal of carbamazepine were obtained in the first two weeks. However, the removal efficiencies for both compounds suddenly dropped to as low as less than 20% by the 14th day, possibly due to the contamination by other microorganisms in the reactor. After the addition of 8.25% sodium hypochlorite at the ratio of 1:100 (v/v) into the influent tank on both Day 20 and Day 25, a rapid recovery (higher than 95%) was achieved in the naproxen removal, by effectively inhibiting contamination in the reactor. In comparison, the same rebounding phenomenon was not observed for carbamazepine and this

  16. A "hidden" co-crystal of caffeine and adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Bucar, Dejan-Kresimir; Henry, Rodger F; Lou, Xiaochun; Borchardt, Thomas B; Zhang, Geoff G Z

    2007-02-07

    Co-crystal formation between caffeine and adipic acid has been explored over the years without success; utilizing the newly developed co-crystal screening method, we have finally discovered this "hidden" caffeine and adipic acid co-crystal.

  17. The effect of caffeine on pregnancy outcome variables.

    PubMed

    Hinds, T S; West, W L; Knight, E M; Harland, B F

    1996-07-01

    The American public consumes a wide array of caffeinated products as coffee, tea, chocolate, cola beverages, and caffeine-containing medication. Therefore, it seems of value to inform both the scientific community and the consumer about the potential effects of excessive caffeine consumption, particularly by pregnant women. The results of this literature review suggest that heavy caffeine use (> or = 300 mg per day) during pregnancy is associated with small reductions in infant birth weight that may be especially detrimental to premature or low-birth-weight infants. Some researchers also document an increased risk of spontaneous abortion associated with caffeine consumption prior to and during pregnancy. However, overwhelming evidence indicates that caffeine is not a human teratogen, and that caffeine appears to have no effect on preterm labor and delivery. More research is needed before unambiguous statements about the effects of caffeine on pregnancy outcome variables can be made.

  18. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and sterile inflammation: The mechanism of protection of Chlorogenic acid.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-05

    Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is characterized by extensive necrotic cell death and a sterile inflammatory response. A recent report suggested that a therapeutic intervention with chlorogenic acid, a dietary polyphenolic compound, protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury by inhibiting the inflammatory injury. The purpose of this letter is to discuss a number of reasons why the protective mechanism of chlorogenic acid against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity does not involve an anti-inflammatory effect and provides an alternative explanation for the observed protection.

  19. Is caffeine excess part of your differential diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Bridle, Leisa; Remick, June; Duffy, Evelyn

    2004-04-01

    The consumption of caffeine, and its effect on the human body, is a topic of ongoing debate. The average consumer may unwittingly consume excessive amounts of caffeine that may lead to adverse physiological side effects. Even the most astute clinician may miss caffeine-excess in the differential diagnosis. Therefore, a careful patient history, including a food and beverage diary, may be helpful in diagnosis of caffeine excess.

  20. Caffeine use among active duty US Army soldiers.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Harris R; Stavinoha, Trisha; McGraw, Susan; White, Alan; Hadden, Louise; Marriott, Bernadette P

    2012-06-01

    Eighty-percent of the US adult population regularly consumes caffeine, but limited information is available on the extent and patterns of use. Caffeine use is a public health issue and its risks and benefits are regularly considered in scientific literature and the lay media. Recently, new caffeine-containing products have been introduced and are widely available on Army bases and are added to rations to maintain cognitive performance. This study surveyed caffeine consumption and demographic characteristics in 990 US Army soldiers. Data were weighted by age, sex, rank, and Special Forces status. Total caffeine intake and intake from specific products were estimated. Logistic regression was used to examine relationships between caffeine use and soldier demographic and lifestyle characteristics. Eighty-two percent of soldiers consumed caffeine at least once a week. Mean daily caffeine consumption was 285 mg/day (347 mg/day among regular caffeine consumers). Male soldiers consumed, on average, 303 mg/day and females 163 mg/day (regular consumers: 365 mg/day for male soldiers, 216 mg/day for female soldiers). Coffee was the main source of caffeine intake. Among young males, energy drinks were the largest source of caffeine intake, but their intake was not greater than older males. Regression analysis indicated an association of higher caffeine intake with male sex, white race, and tobacco use (P<0.01). Most soldiers consume caffeine in levels accepted as safe, but some consume greater quantities than recommended, although definitive information on safe upper limits of caffeine intake is not available. Labels of caffeine-containing products should provide caffeine content so individuals can make informed decisions.

  1. Modulation of catecholamine release from rat striatal slices by the fixed combination of aspirin, paracetamol and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Fiebich, Bernd L; Candelario-Jalil, Eduardo; Mantovani, Michela; Heinzmann, Marcus; Akundi, Ravi Shankar; Hüll, Michael; Knörle, Rainer; Schnierle, Peter; Finkenzeller, Günter; Aicher, Bernhard

    2006-04-01

    The fixed combination of aspirin, paracetamol (acetaminophen) and caffeine has been used successfully to treat different kinds of pain including migraine attacks. Even when this formulation has been marketed for a long time, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying its therapeutic effectiveness have not been completely elucidated. In the present investigation, we have studied the effects of the fixed combination of aspirin, paracetamol and caffeine (APC) on the release of dopamine and noradrenaline from rat striatal slices in an attempt to find potential new mechanisms of action of this widely used analgesic combination. We found that APC produced a significant reduction in extracellular dopamine and a dramatic increase in norepinephrine release from the slices incubated with different concentrations of APC (dose relationship 1:1:0.2, corresponding to the dose-relationship of Thomapyrin). These findings suggest that the modulation of catecholaminergic neurotransmission is a new pharmacological effect of APC which could explain the mechanism of action of this formulation, considering that the independent effect of either compound alone does not explain the potent antinociceptive properties when observed in combination.

  2. Caffeine Taste Signaling in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulou, Anthi A.; Köhn, Saskia; Stehle, Bernhard; Lutz, Michael; Wüst, Alexander; Mazija, Lorena; Rist, Anna; Galizia, C. Giovanni; Lüdke, Alja; Thum, Andreas S.

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila larva has a simple peripheral nervous system with a comparably small number of sensory neurons located externally at the head or internally along the pharynx to assess its chemical environment. It is assumed that larval taste coding occurs mainly via external organs (the dorsal, terminal, and ventral organ). However, the contribution of the internal pharyngeal sensory organs has not been explored. Here we find that larvae require a single pharyngeal gustatory receptor neuron pair called D1, which is located in the dorsal pharyngeal sensilla, in order to avoid caffeine and to associate an odor with caffeine punishment. In contrast, caffeine-driven reduction in feeding in non-choice situations does not require D1. Hence, this work provides data on taste coding via different receptor neurons, depending on the behavioral context. Furthermore, we show that the larval pharyngeal system is involved in bitter tasting. Using ectopic expressions, we show that the caffeine receptor in neuron D1 requires the function of at least four receptor genes: the putative co-receptors Gr33a, Gr66a, the putative caffeine-specific receptor Gr93a, and yet unknown additional molecular component(s). This suggests that larval taste perception is more complex than previously assumed already at the sensory level. Taste information from different sensory organs located outside at the head or inside along the pharynx of the larva is assembled to trigger taste guided behaviors. PMID:27555807

  3. Caffeine and performance in clay target shooting.

    PubMed

    Share, Bianca; Sanders, Nick; Kemp, Justin

    2009-04-01

    Controversy surrounds the influence that caffeine has on accuracy and cognitive performance in precision activities such as shooting and archery. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of two doses of caffeine on shooting performance, reaction time, and target tracking times in the sport of clay target shooting. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design was undertaken by seven elite male shooters from the double-trap discipline. Three intervention trials (2 mg caffeine . kg(-1) body mass (BM); 4 mg caffeine . kg(-1) BM; placebo) were undertaken, in which shooters completed four rounds per trial of 50 targets per round. Performance accuracy (score) and digital video footage (for determination of reaction time and target tracking times) were gathered during competition. Data were analysed using repeated-measures analysis of variance. No differences in shooting accuracy, reaction time or target tracking times among the three intervention trials or across the four rounds within each intervention were observed (P > 0.05). The results indicate that ingestion of < or =4 mg caffeine . kg(-1) BM does not provide performance benefits to elite performers of clay target shooting in the double-trap discipline.

  4. Caffeine accelerates recovery from general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Fong, Robert; Mason, Peggy; Fox, Aaron P; Xie, Zheng

    2014-03-01

    General anesthetics inhibit neurotransmitter release from both neurons and secretory cells. If inhibition of neurotransmitter release is part of an anesthetic mechanism of action, then drugs that facilitate neurotransmitter release may aid in reversing general anesthesia. Drugs that elevate intracellular cAMP levels are known to facilitate neurotransmitter release. Three cAMP elevating drugs (forskolin, theophylline, and caffeine) were tested; all three drugs reversed the inhibition of neurotransmitter release produced by isoflurane in PC12 cells in vitro. The drugs were tested in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Animals were injected with either saline or saline containing drug. All three drugs dramatically accelerated recovery from isoflurane anesthesia, but caffeine was most effective. None of the drugs, at the concentrations tested, had significant effects on breathing rates, O2 saturation, heart rate, or blood pressure in anesthetized animals. Caffeine alone was tested on propofol-anesthetized rats where it dramatically accelerated recovery from anesthesia. The ability of caffeine to accelerate recovery from anesthesia for different chemical classes of anesthetics, isoflurane and propofol, opens the possibility that it will do so for all commonly used general anesthetics, although additional studies will be required to determine whether this is in fact the case. Because anesthesia in rodents is thought to be similar to that in humans, these results suggest that caffeine might allow for rapid and uniform emergence from general anesthesia in human patients.

  5. Caffeine Use Disorder: A Comprehensive Review and Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Steven E.; Juliano, Laura M.; Hughes, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly used drug in the world. Although consumption of low to moderate doses of caffeine is generally safe, an increasing number of clinical studies are showing that some caffeine users become dependent on the drug and are unable to reduce consumption despite knowledge of recurrent health problems associated with continued use. Thus, the World Health Organization and some health care professionals recognize caffeine dependence as a clinical disorder. In this comprehensive literature review, we summarize published research on the biological evidence for caffeine dependence; we provide a systematic review of the prevalence of caffeine dependence and rates of endorsement of clinically meaningful indicators of distress and functional impairment among habitual caffeine users; we discuss the diagnostic criteria for Caffeine Use Disorder—a condition for further study included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.); and we outline a research agenda to help guide future clinical, epidemiological, and genetic investigations of caffeine dependence. Numerous controlled laboratory investigations reviewed in this article show that caffeine produces behavioral and physiological effects similar to other drugs of dependence. Moreover, several recent clinical studies indicate that caffeine dependence is a clinically meaningful disorder that affects a nontrivial proportion of caffeine users. Nevertheless, more research is needed to determine the reliability, validity, and prevalence of this clinically important health problem. PMID:24761279

  6. Caffeine Consumption Patterns and Beliefs of College Freshmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIlvain, Gary E.; Noland, Melody P.; Bickel, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Background: Caffeine consumption by young people has increased dramatically over the last decade through increased coffee consumption and "energy drinks." In higher amounts, caffeine causes many adverse effects that are cause for concern. Purpose: Purposes of this study were to determine: (1) the amount of caffeine consumed by a sample…

  7. Occurrence and concentration of caffeine in Oregon coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez del Rey, Zoe; Granek, Elise F; Sylvester, Steve

    2012-07-01

    Caffeine, a biologically active drug, is recognized as a contaminant of freshwater and marine systems. We quantified caffeine concentrations in Oregon's coastal ocean to determine whether levels correlated with proximity to caffeine pollution sources. Caffeine was analyzed at 14 coastal locations, stratified between populated areas with sources of caffeine pollution and sparsely populated areas with no major caffeine pollution sources. Caffeine concentrations were measured in major water bodies discharging near sampling locations. Caffeine in seawater ranged from below the reporting limit (8.5 ng/L) to 44.7 ng/L. Caffeine occurrence and concentrations in seawater did not correspond with pollution threats from population density and point and non-point sources, but did correspond with storm event occurrence. Caffeine concentrations in rivers and estuaries draining to the coast ranged from below the reporting limit to 152.2 ng/L. This study establishes the occurrence of caffeine in Oregon's coastal waters, yet relative importance of sources, seasonal variability, and processes affecting caffeine transport into the coastal ocean require further research.

  8. Caffeine levels in beverages from Argentina's market: application to caffeine dietary intake assessment.

    PubMed

    Olmos, V; Bardoni, N; Ridolfi, A S; Villaamil Lepori, E C

    2009-03-01

    The caffeine content of different beverages from Argentina's market was measured. Several brands of coffees, teas, mates, chocolate milks, soft and energy drinks were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet detection. The highest concentration level was found in short coffee (1.38 mg ml(-1)) and the highest amount per serving was found in instant coffee (95 mg per serving). A consumption study was also carried out among 471 people from 2 to 93 years of age to evaluate caffeine total dietary intake by age and to identify the sources of caffeine intake. The mean caffeine intake among adults was 288 mg day(-1) and mate was the main contributor to that intake. The mean caffeine intake among children of 10 years of age and under was 35 mg day(-1) and soft drinks were the major contributors to that intake. Children between 11 and 15 years old and teenagers (between 16 and 20 years) had caffeine mean intakes of 120 and 240 mg day(-1), respectively, and mate was the major contributor to those intakes. Drinking mate is a deep-rooted habit among Argentine people and it might be the reason for their elevated caffeine mean daily intake.

  9. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions.

    PubMed

    Guessous, Idris; Pruijm, Menno; Ponte, Belén; Ackermann, Daniel; Ehret, Georg; Ansermot, Nicolas; Vuistiner, Philippe; Staessen, Jan; Gu, Yumei; Paccaud, Fred; Mohaupt, Markus; Vogt, Bruno; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Pechère-Berstchi, Antoinette; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Burnier, Michel; Eap, Chin B; Bochud, Murielle

    2015-03-01

    Intake of caffeinated beverages might be associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality possibly via the lowering of blood pressure. We estimated the association of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolites in a population-based sample. Families were randomly selected from the general population of Swiss cities. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was conducted using validated devices. Urinary caffeine, paraxanthine, theophylline, and theobromine excretions were measured in 24 hours urine using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We used mixed models to explore the associations of urinary excretions with blood pressure although adjusting for major confounders. The 836 participants (48.9% men) included in this analysis had mean age of 47.8 and mean 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 120.1 and 78.0 mm Hg. For each doubling of caffeine excretion, 24-hour and night-time systolic blood pressure decreased by 0.642 and 1.107 mm Hg (both P values <0.040). Similar inverse associations were observed for paraxanthine and theophylline. Adjusted night-time systolic blood pressure in the first (lowest), second, third, and fourth (highest) quartile of paraxanthine urinary excretions were 110.3, 107.3, 107.3, and 105.1 mm Hg, respectively (P trend <0.05). No associations of urinary excretions with diastolic blood pressure were generally found, and theobromine excretion was not associated with blood pressure. Anti-hypertensive therapy, diabetes mellitus, and alcohol consumption modify the association of caffeine urinary excretion with systolic blood pressure. Ambulatory systolic blood pressure was inversely associated with urinary excretions of caffeine and other caffeine metabolites. Our results are compatible with a potential protective effect of caffeine on blood pressure.

  10. Co-administration of N-Acetylcysteine and Acetaminophen Efficiently Blocks Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Owumi, Solomon E; Andrus, James P; Herzenberg, Leonard A; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical Research Although acetaminophen (APAP) is an effective analgesic and anti-pyretic, APAP overdose is the most frequent cause of serious, often lethal, drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Administration of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) within 8 hours of APAP overdose effectively mitigates APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Thus, preventing APAP toxicity before it occurs by formulating APAP with NAC is logical and, as we show here in a mouse model, is effective in preventing APAP toxicity. Thus, toxic oral APAP doses sufficient to cause severe widespread liver damage do not cause significant damage when administered concurrently with equal amounts of NAC, that is, in the NAC-APAP treated animals, hepatic transaminases increase only marginally and liver architecture remains fully intact. Thus, we conclude that concomitant oral dosing with APAP and NAC can provide a convenient and effective way of preventing toxicity associated with large dosage of APAP. From a public health perspective, these findings support the concept that a co-formulation of APAP plus NAC is a viable over-the-counter (OTC) alternative to the current practice of providing APAP OTC and treating APAP toxicity if/when it occurs. In essence, our findings indicate that replacing the current OTC APAP with a safe and functional APAP/NAC formulation could prevent the accidental and intentional APAP toxicity that occurs today.

  11. Detection of quantitative trait loci affecting caffeine metabolism by interval mapping in a genome-wide scan of C3H/HeJ x APN F(2) mice.

    PubMed

    Casley, W L; Menzies, J A; Whitehouse, L W; Moon, T W

    1999-12-01

    Caffeine metabolite ratios have been widely used to measure cytochrome P-450 1A2 activity in humans. Serum paraxanthine/caffeine ratio is one such index of this activity. We had previously demonstrated genetic variation of this trait among inbred mouse strains. In the present study, we have undertaken a genome-wide scan for quantitative trait loci affecting this trait with an interval mapping approach on an F(2) intercross population of acetaminophen nonsusceptible and C3H/HeJ inbred mice. A statistically significant association (log-likelihood ratio = 25.0) between a locus on chromosome 9, which colocalized with the murine Cyp1a2 locus, and the plasma paraxanthine/caffeine ratio was identified. This result suggested the presence of an expression polymorphism affecting this gene. A second locus was identified on chromosome 1 (log-likelihood ratio = 9.7) for which no obvious candidate gene has been identified. The influence of this locus on the paraxanthine/caffeine index was more significant among males (log-likelihood ratio = 6.3) than females (log-likelihood ratio = 3.6). A third locus was identified on chromosome 4 with a less statistically robust association (log-likelihood ratio = 3.4) to the paraxanthine/caffeine phenotype. Collectively, these three loci accounted for 63.2% of the variation observed in the F(2) population for this phenotype. These results demonstrate the potential for genetic variation arising from factors other than CYP1A2 activity to influence the plasma paraxanthine/caffeine ratio in mice. This study demonstrates the utility of quantitative genetics in the analysis of polygenic drug metabolism.

  12. Aspirin and acetaminophen: should they be available over the counter?

    PubMed

    Brune, Kay; Hinz, Burkhard; Otterness, Ivan

    2009-02-01

    Traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs block cyclooxygenase (COX). They are the most widely used drugs for pain relief. They are indispensable for their effects but are condemned for their adverse drug reactions. Two COX inhibitors, acetaminophen and aspirin, are the most widely used over-the-counter drugs. They have low (but useful) therapeutic activity, but they are endowed with specific risks that are not seen with most other COX inhibitors. Both are lethal if taken in overdose. Each is stigmatized by severe adverse effects. Aspirin results in prolonged inhibition of blood coagulation, and acetaminophen can result in liver toxicity at normal dose and liver failure at higher dose. Both drugs cause many deaths every year. We recommend that the status of both drugs be changed to prescription only. Their continued availability over the counter poses an unacceptable risk to the general population.

  13. Caffeine and taurine enhance endurance performance.

    PubMed

    Imagawa, T F; Hirano, I; Utsuki, K; Horie, M; Naka, A; Matsumoto, K; Imagawa, S

    2009-07-01

    Caffeine enhances endurance performance; however, its effect on accumulated lactate remains unclear. Conversely, taurine, which also enhances endurance performance, decreases accumulated lactate. In this study, the effect of combination of caffeine and taurine on endurance performance was assessed. Mice ran on a treadmill, and the accumulated lactate was measured. In addition, muscle fibers from the gastrocnemius muscle of the mice were stained with ATPase and analyzed. The use of caffeine and taurine over a 2 week period enhanced endurance performance. Moreover, taurine significantly decreased the accumulated concentration of lactate over long running distances. However, the diameter of the cross-sections and ratios of Types I, IIA, and IIB muscle fibers were not affected.

  14. Role of nicotinamide (vitamin B3) in acetaminophen-induced changes in rat liver: Nicotinamide effect in acetaminophen-damged liver.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Yomna I; Mahmoud, Asmaa A

    2016-06-01

    Acetaminophen is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent, which is safe at therapeutic doses. However, overdoses of acetaminophen induce severe oxidative stress, which leads to acute liver failure. Nicotinamide has proven effective in ameliorating many pathological conditions that occur due to oxidative stress. This study verifies the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of nicotinamide against the hepatic pathophysiological and ultrastructural alterations induced by acetaminophen. Wistar rats intoxicated with an acute overdose of acetaminophen (5g/kg b.wt) were given a single dose of nicotinamide (500mg/kg b.wt) either before or after intoxication. Acetaminophen caused significant elevation in the liver functions and lipid peroxidation marker, and decline in the activities of the hepatic antioxidant enzymes. This oxidative injury was associated with hepatic centrilobular necrosis, hemorrage, vacuolar degeneration, lipid accumulation and mitochondrial alterations. Treating intoxicated rats with nicotinamide (500mg/kg) significantly ameliorated acetaminophen-induced biochemical changes and pathological injuries. However, administering the same dose of nicotinamide to healthy animals or prior to acetaminophen-intoxication induced hepatotoxicity. Caution should be taken when administering high doses of NAM because of its possible hepatotoxicity. Considering the wide use of nicotinamide, there is an important need for monitoring nicotinamide tolerance, safety and efficacy in healthy and diseased subjects.

  15. Toxic epidermal necrolysis caused by acetaminophen featuring almost 100% skin detachment: Acetaminophen is associated with a risk of severe cutaneous adverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hideaki; Kamiyama, Taisuke; Sasaki, Shun; Kobayashi, Kae; Fukuda, Kenichiro; Miyake, Yasufumi; Aruga, Tohru; Sueki, Hirohiko

    2016-03-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is an adverse reaction that can be induced by various drugs; the associated mortality rate is 20-25%. A previous report showed a weak association between TEN and acetaminophen. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration declared that acetaminophen is associated with a risk of serious skin reactions, including TEN. Here, we describe the case of a 43-year-old Japanese woman with TEN caused by acetaminophen. She had poorly controlled ulcerative colitis and was treated with high doses of prednisolone, infliximab, acetaminophen and lansoprazole. Nine days after administrating acetaminophen, targetoid erythematous and bullous lesions appeared on the patient's trunk, palms and the soles of her feet. The skin lesions expanded rapidly; within 3 weeks, skin detachment was detected across nearly 100% of the patient's body. However, no mucosal involvement of the eyes, oral cavity or genitalia was found. We performed lymphocyte transformation tests using various drugs; however, a high stimulation index was obtained only with acetaminophen. The patient recovered following treatment with plasmapheresis, i.v. immunoglobulin therapy, topical medication and supportive therapy. Acetaminophen is included in many prescription and over-the-counter products; thus, clinicians should monitor their patients for severe drug reactions, including TEN.

  16. Caffeine and coffee as therapeutics against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Arendash, Gary W; Cao, Chuanhai

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have increasingly suggested that caffeine/coffee could be an effective therapeutic against Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have utilized a transgenic mouse model for AD in well-controlled studies to determine if caffeine and/or coffee have beneficial actions to protect against or reverse AD-like cognitive impairment and AD pathology. AD mice given caffeine in their drinking water from young adulthood into older age showed protection against memory impairment and lower brain levels of the abnormal protein (amyloid-beta; Abeta) thought to be central to AD pathogenesis. Moreover, "aged" cognitively-impaired AD mice exhibited memory restoration and lower brain Abeta levels following only 1-2 months of caffeine treatment. We believe that the cognitive benefits of chronic caffeine administration in AD mice are due to caffeine itself, and not metabolites of caffeine; this, because our long-term administration of theophylline to AD mice provided no cognitive benefits. In acute studies involving AD mice, one oral caffeine treatment quickly reduced both brain and plasma Abeta levels - similarly rapid alterations in plasma Abeta levels were seen in humans following acute caffeine administration. "Caffeinated" coffee provided to AD mice also quickly decreased plasma Abeta levels, but not "decaffeinated" coffee, suggesting that caffeine is critical to decreasing blood Abeta levels. Caffeine appears to provide its disease-modifying effects through multiple mechanisms, including a direct reduction of Abeta production through suppression of both beta- and gamma-secretase levels. These results indicate a surprising ability of moderate caffeine intake (the human equivalent of 500 mg caffeine or 5 cups of coffee per day) to protect against or treat AD in a mouse model for the disease and a therapeutic potential for caffeine against AD in humans.

  17. Carbamazepine- or Oxcarbazepine-Induced Hyponatraemia or Leucopenia, or Both, in Residents with a Developmental Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiskala, Hannu; Tokola, Ritta; Tammisto, Paavo; Kaski, Markus

    1997-01-01

    A study investigated the prevalence of carbamazepine- or oxcarbazepine-induced hyponatraemia and leucopenia in 334 Finnish individuals with developmental disabilities. Medication with these drugs resulted in significantly lower levels of serum sodium and counts of blood leucocytes. Because of difficulties in expressing their symptoms, this…

  18. Sorption-desorption of carbamazepine by palygorskite-montmorillonite (PM) filter medium.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Tedros M; Levy, Jonathan; Krekeler, Mark P S; Danielson, Neil D; Stalcup, Apryll

    2015-01-23

    Palygorskite-montmorillonite (PM) was studied as a potential sewage treatment effluent filter material for carbamazepine. Batch sorption experiments were conducted as a function of granule size (0.3-0.6, 1.7-2.0 and 2.8mm) and different sewage effluent conditions (pH, ionic strength and temperature). Results showed PM had a mix of fibrous and plate-like morphologies. Sorption and desorption isotherms were fitted to the Freundlich model. Sorption is granule size-dependent and the medium granule size would be an appropriate size for optimizing both flow and carbamazepine retention. Highest and lowest sorption capacities corresponded to the smallest and the largest granule sizes, respectively. The lowest and the highest equilibrium aqueous (Ce) and sorbed (qe) carbamazepine concentrations were 0.4 mg L(-1) and 4.5 mg L(-1), and 0.6 mg kg(-1) and 411.8 mg kg(-1), respectively. Observed higher relative sorption at elevated concentrations with a Freundlich exponent greater than one, indicated cooperative sorption. The sorption-desorption hysteresis (isotherm non-singularity) indicated irreversible sorption. Higher sorption observed at higher rather than at lower ionic strength conditions is likely due to a salting-out effect. Negative free energy and the inverse sorption capacity-temperature relationship indicated the carbamazepine sorption process was favorable or spontaneous. Solution pH had little effect on sorption.

  19. Genetic screening for human leukocyte antigen alleles prior to carbamazepine treatment.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jeremy C K; Murrell, Dedee F; Hersch, Mark I

    2015-12-01

    We describe a 28-year-old Malaysian Australian man of Han Chinese descent with toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), occurring 2 weeks after commencing carbamazepine. He was subsequently found to be positive for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*1502. Carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/TEN is strongly associated with the HLA-B*1502 allele, which is highly prevalent in Han Chinese, Malay, Thai and Indian populations. Prospective screening for the allele may prevent this cutaneous adverse drug reaction from occurring, but many neurologists and other medical practitioners are still unaware of the medico-legal risks of prescribing carbamazepine in susceptible populations and the availability of HLA-B*1502 testing. Performing HLA-B*1502 genotyping and avoiding carbamazepine in at-risk individuals has been proven to decrease incidences of drug-induced TEN. This test is widely available at most large pathology services in Australia, with results available within 2 weeks. The recommendation by regulatory bodies should be strengthened to ensure that the broad medical community is made more aware of this pertinent issue.

  20. Carbamazepine hypersensitivity syndrome triggered by a human herpes virus reactivation in a genetically predisposed patient.

    PubMed

    Calligaris, Lorenzo; Stocco, Gabriele; De Iudicibus, Sara; Marino, Sara; Decorti, Giuliana; Barbi, Egidio; Carrozzi, Marco; Marchetti, Federico; Bartoli, Fiora; Ventura, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    A case of severe hypersensitivity syndrome, triggered by carbamazepine in the presence of a concomitant active human herpes virus (HHV) 6 and 7 infection is described. To further understand the molecular mechanism of this adverse reaction, analyses of the genetic variants of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and of the epoxide hydrolase gene (EPHX1), previously associated with carbamazepine hypersensitivity, were performed. A lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) was conducted in order to detect drug-specific lymphocytes. In the hypersensitive patient, 2 genetic factors previously associated with intolerance to carbamazepine were detected: the allele HLA-A*3101 and homozygosity for the variant allele of SNP rs1051740 in EPHX1. Drug-specific lymphocytes could be detected by LTT when the HHV was active (positive PCR for viral DNA and increased anti-HHV 6 IgG titer), but not when it was no longer active. In conclusion, we document a case of severe carbamazepine hypersensitivity triggered by viral reactivation in a patient presenting the interaction of 2 unfavorable genetic factors.

  1. Mobility of pharmaceuticals carbamazepine, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and propyphenazone in miscible-displacement experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheytt, Traugott J.; Mersmann, Petra; Heberer, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    Many pharmaceuticals pass the unsaturated zone before reaching an aquifer. Therefore, laboratory sand column transport experiments were conducted to study the transport behavior of carbamazepine, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and propyphenazone under unsaturated conditions. The test water was artificial sewage effluent to simulate the infiltration of reused wastewater. The test water was spiked with the pharmaceutically active compounds and the tracer LiCl. Afterwards it was passed through laboratory sand columns, one experiment for each pharmaceutical. The physical and chemical parameters were recorded and general ions measured. Pharmaceuticals were measured using solid phase extraction, derivatization, and detection with GC-MS. The column experiments indicate a significant elimination of ibuprofen (54%), propyphenazone (55%), and diclofenac (35%), whereas carbamazepine was not eliminated. Retardation factors varied between 1.84 for carbamazepine, 2.51 for propyphenazone, 3.00 for ibuprofen, and 4.80 for diclofenac. These results show that mobility and elimination of diclofenac, ibuprofen, and propyphenazone is about in the same range as for experiments under saturated conditions whereas carbamazepine had a significantly lower sorption and elimination under unsaturated conditions.

  2. Formulation of unidirectional release buccal patches of carbamazepine and study of permeation through porcine buccal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Govindasamy, Parthasarathy; Kesavan, Bhaskar Reddy; Narasimha, Jayaveera Korlakunta

    2013-01-01

    Objective To achieve transbuccal release of carbamazepine by loading in unidirectional release mucoadhesive buccal patches. Methods Buccal patches of carbamazepine with unidirectional drug release were prepared using hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl pyrrolidone and ethyl cellulose by solvent casting method. Water impermeable backing layer (Pidilite® Biaxially-oriented polypropylene film) of patches provided unidirectional drug release. They were evaluated for thickness, mass uniformity, surface pH and folding endurance. Six formulations FA2, FA8, FA10, FB1, FB14 and FB16 (folding endurance above 250) were evaluated further for swelling studies, ex vivo mucoadhesive strength, ex vivo mucoadhesion time, in vitro drug release, ex vivo permeation, accelerated stability studies and FTIR and XRD spectral studies. Results The ex vivo mucoadhesion time of patches ranged between 109 min (FA10) to 126 min (FB14). The ex vivo mucoadhesive force was in the range of 0.278 to 0.479 kg/m/s. The in vitro drug release studies revealed that formulation FA8 released 84% and FB16 released 99.01% of drug in 140 min. Conclusions The prepared unidirectional buccal patches of carbamazepine provided a maximum drug release within specified mucoadhesion period and it indicates a potential alternative drug delivery system for systemic delivery of carbamazepine. PMID:24093793

  3. Inhibitory effect of stiripentol on carbamazepine and saquinavir metabolism in human

    PubMed Central

    Cazali, N; Tran, A; Treluyer, J M; Rey, E; d'Athis, P; Vincent, J; Pons, G

    2003-01-01

    Aims To characterize the in vitro and in vivo inhibitory effect of stiripentol, a new anticonvulsant, on the metabolism of carbamazepine and saquinavir, which are substrates of CYP3A4. Methods Human liver microsomes and cDNA-expressed CYP enzymes were used for the in vitro experiments. Pharmacokinetic data from epileptic children and healthy adults were used for the carbamazepine and saquinavir in vivo studies, respectively. Results Carbamazepine biotransformation to its 10,11-epoxide by human liver microsomes (Vmax = 10.3 nmol min−1 nmol−1 P450, apparent Km = 362 µm), cDNA-expressed CYP3A4 (Vmax = 1.17 nmol min−1 nmol−1 P450, apparent Km = 119 µm) and CYP2C8 (Vmax = 0.669 nmol min−1 nmol−1 P450, apparent Km = 757 µm) was inhibited by stiripentol (IC50 14, 5.1, 37 µM and apparent Ki 3.7, 2.5, 35 µm, respectively). Saquinavir biotransformation to its major metabolite M7 by human liver microsomes (Vmax = 5.7 nmol min−1 nmol−1 P450, apparent Km = 0.79 µm) was inhibited by stiripentol (IC50 163 µM, apparent Ki 86 µm). In epileptic children treated with carbamazepine and stiripentol, the plasma concentration ratio of carbamazepine epoxide/carbamazepine was decreased by 65%. The in vivo apparent Ki for stiripentol ranged from 10.5 to 41.4 µm. The pharmacokinetics of saquinavir was not modified by stiripentol in healthy adults. The 95% confidence intervals for the difference for Cmax and AUC of saquinavir between the placebo and stiripentol phase were (−39.8, 39.8) and (−33.2, 112), respectively. Conclusions These results showed that stiripentol was a weak inhibitor of saquinavir metabolism both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, stiripentol is a potent inhibitor of carbamazepine 10,11-epoxide formation in vitro and in vivo in epileptic patients. PMID:14651727

  4. Extracorporeal treatment for carbamazepine poisoning: Systematic review and recommendations from the EXTRIP workgroup

    PubMed Central

    Ghannoum, Marc; Yates, Christopher; Galvao, Tais F.; Sowinski, Kevin M.; Vo, Thi Hai Vân; Coogan, Andrew; Gosselin, Sophie; Lavergne, Valery; Nolin, Thomas D.; Hoffman, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Context. The Extracorporeal Treatments in Poisoning (EXTRIP) workgroup was created to provide evidence and consensus-based recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatments (ECTRs) in poisoning. Objectives. To perform a systematic review and provide clinical recommendations for ECTR in carbamazepine poisoning. Methods. After a systematic literature search, the subgroup extracted the data and summarized the findings following a pre-determined format. The entire workgroup voted via a two-round modified Delphi method to reach a consensus on voting statements, using a RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method to quantify disagreement. Anonymous votes were compiled, returned, and discussed in person. A second vote determined the final recommendations. Results. Seventy-four articles met inclusion criteria. Articles included case reports, case series, descriptive cohorts, pharmacokinetic studies, and in-vitro studies; two poor-quality observational studies were identified, yielding a very low quality of evidence for all recommendations. Data on 173 patients, including 6 fatalities, were reviewed. The workgroup concluded that carbamazepine is moderately dialyzable and made the following recommendations: ECTR is suggested in severe carbamazepine poisoning (2D). ECTR is recommended if multiple seizures occur and are refractory to treatment (1D), or if life-threatening dysrhythmias occur (1D). ECTR is suggested if prolonged coma or respiratory depression requiring mechanical ventilation are present (2D) or if significant toxicity persists, particularly when carbamazepine concentrations rise or remain elevated, despite using multiple-dose activated charcoal (MDAC) and supportive measures (2D). ECTR should be continued until clinical improvement is apparent (1D) or the serum carbamazepine concentration is below 10 mg/L (42 the μ in μmol/L looks weird.) (2D). Intermittent hemodialysis is the preferred ECTR (1D), but both intermittent hemoperfusion (1D) or continuous

  5. Fennel and raspberry leaf as possible inhibitors of acetaminophen oxidation.

    PubMed

    Langhammer, Astrid Jordet; Nilsen, Odd Georg

    2014-10-01

    In addition to CYP2E1, several CYP isoenzymes, notably CYP1A2, 2D6, and 3A4, are suggested to contribute in acetaminophen oxidation and formation of the hepatotoxic metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). The in vitro CYP2E1 inhibitory potentials of fennel and raspberry leaf, herbs previously found to inhibit CYP1A2, 2D6, and 3A4 activities in vitro, were investigated. Extracts from commercially available herbal products were incubated with recombinant cDNA-expressed human CYP2E1. A validated LC/MS/MS methodology was applied for determination of 6-hydroxychlorzoxazone formation with disulfiram used as a positive inhibitory control. CYP2E1 IC50 inhibition constants were found to be 23 ± 4 and 27 ± 5 µg/ml for fennel and raspberry leaf, respectively, constants significantly lower than those presented in the literature for other herbal extracts. Together with previous findings, the presented in vitro data for CYP2E1 inhibition suggest that fennel and raspberry leaf have a significant potential of inhibiting all the major metabolic pathways for acetaminophen oxidation and NAPQI formation. Both herbs should be further investigated for their in vivo ability of inhibiting acetaminophen oxidation and NAPQI formation.

  6. Acetaminophen effects on behavioral thermoregulation in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Vitulli, W F; Kaiser, G A; Maranto, D L; Blake, S E; Storey, T M; McPherson, K P; Luper, S L

    1999-02-01

    Acetaminophen (N-Acetyl-p-aminophenol) was administered intraperitoneally to 15 Sprague-Dawley rats partitioned into 3 studies (5 rats per study) using a within subjects, repeated-measures reversal design. Behavioral thermoregulation was assessed in a cold Skinner Box using 5-sec. exposures of microwave radiation [Specific Absorption Rate = 0.34 Watts/kg/(mW/cm2)] as reinforcing stimuli under a fixed-interval 2-min. schedule of positive reinforcement. Doses of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mg/kg (in solutions of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, and 5%) acetaminophen showed stable rates of operant responding for heat compared with significant changes in rates for comparable doses of aspirin in a 1993 study by Vitulli, et al. Weight reductions and temperature increases varied significantly with before-session and after-session measures, respectively. 1994-95 biochemical data of Murphy, et al. from humans following aspirin or acetaminophen ingestion which affect thermoregulation and sleep patterns are discussed in conjunction with behavioral data from rats.

  7. Acute acetaminophen overdose is associated with dose-dependent hypokalaemia: a prospective study of 331 patients.

    PubMed

    Waring, W Stephen; Stephen, Alexandra F L; Malkowska, Aleks M; Robinson, Oliver D G

    2008-03-01

    Hypokalaemia is a recognized complication of acute acetaminophen overdose. It is unclear whether this might be a pharmacological effect of acetaminophen, or due to association with confounding factors. The present study sought to better characterize the relationship between acetaminophen concentrations and risk of hypokalaemia. A prospective study of patients received N-acetylcysteine treatment within 15 hr of acute acetaminophen ingestion. Serum potassium concentrations were determined before and after N-acetylcysteine. Serum acetaminophen concentrations were used to indicate overall drug exposure by comparison to the Rumack-Matthew nomogram. Hypokalaemia was pre-defined by serum concentrations <3.5 mmol/l, and groups compared by Mann-Whitney tests. There were 331 patients. Median (95% confidence interval) fall in serum potassium concentration after N-acetylcysteine was 0.05 mmol/l (-0.11-0.30 mmol/l) if acetaminophen concentrations were below the 'high-risk' treatment line, 0.30 mmol/l (0.17-0.40 mmol/l) if between the 'high-risk' and 'normal' treatment lines (P = 0.0358), and 0.40 mmol/l (0.20-0.50 mmol/l) if above the 'normal' treatment line (P = 0.0136). A receiver operating characteristic showed that high acetaminophen concentrations were predictive of hypokalaemia (P = 0.0001 versus zero discriminatory line), and 4 hr acetaminophen concentration >156 mmol/l gave 81% sensitivity and 48% specificity. The risk of hypokalaemia after acute acetaminophen overdose depends on the extent of acetaminophen exposure, irrespective of N-acetylcysteine administration and independent of whether vomiting occurred. Acetaminophen appears to cause concentration-dependent hypokalaemia after overdose, and the pharmacological basis requires further consideration.

  8. The effects of the pharmaceutical carbamazepine on life history characteristics of flat-headed mayflies (Heptageniidae) and aquatic resource interactions.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Amanda L; Bernot, Melody J; Bernot, Randall J

    2014-11-01

    Pharmaceutical pollutants are commonly detected in freshwater ecosystems around the world and have biological effects on aquatic organisms. However, current understanding of the influence this contaminant class has on freshwater communities and ecosystems is lacking. Recently the scientific community has called for research focusing on certain pharmaceuticals due to their ubiquity and potential toxicity. Carbamazepine is one of these pharmaceuticals. To better understand the effect carbamazepine has on life history characteristics of aquatic organisms and consumer-resource interactions, we quantified the influence of carbamazepine on the development, growth and behavior of mayfly nymphs (Stenonema sp.) and the alterations in food consumer-resource interactions between Stenonema and algae (Chaetophora). Microcosms were assembled in a factorial design containing algae and mayfly nymphs native to central Indiana and dosed with environmentally relevant concentrations of carbamazepine. From this ecotoxicological experiment we were able to infer that carbamazepine at 2,000 ng/L influenced the development and behavior of Stenonema nymphs and the body dimensions of adult individuals. However, it appears that carbamazepine does not influence consumer-resource interactions at concentrations found in surface waters. The pharmaceutical carbamazepine may influence the behavior, growth and development of mayflies, which could have significant consequences at the population, community and ecosystem level.

  9. Impact of caffeine and coffee on our health.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira; Ramirez-Mares, Marco Vinicio

    2014-10-01

    Coffee is the most frequently consumed caffeine-containing beverage. The caffeine in coffee is a bioactive compound with stimulatory effects on the central nervous system and a positive effect on long-term memory. Although coffee consumption has been historically linked to adverse health effects, new research indicates that coffee consumption may be beneficial. Here we discuss the impact of coffee and caffeine on health and bring attention to the changing caffeine landscape that includes new caffeine-containing energy drinks and supplements, often targeting children and adolescents.

  10. Maternal exposure to carbamazepine at environmental concentrations can cross intestinal and placental barriers.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Gaurav; Huber, David P; Aho, Ken; Finney, Bruce; Bearden, Shawn; Zarbalis, Konstantinos S; Thomas, Michael A

    2016-05-27

    Psychoactive pharmaceuticals have been found as teratogens at clinical dosage during pregnancy. These pharmaceuticals have also been detected in minute (ppb) concentrations in drinking water in the US, and are environmental contaminants that may be complicit in triggering neurological disorders in genetically susceptible individuals. Previous studies have determined that psychoactive pharmaceuticals (fluoxetine, venlafaxine and carbamazepine) at environmentally relevant concentrations enriched sets of genes regulating development and function of the nervous system in fathead minnows. Altered gene sets were also associated with potential neurological disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Subsequent in vitro studies indicated that psychoactive pharmaceuticals altered ASD-associated synaptic protein expression and gene expression in human neuronal cells. However, it is unknown if environmentally relevant concentrations of these pharmaceuticals are able to cross biological barriers from mother to fetus, thus potentially posing risks to nervous system development. The main objective of this study was to test whether psychoactive pharmaceuticals (fluoxetine, venlafaxine, and carbamazepine) administered through the drinking water at environmental concentrations to pregnant mice could reach the brain of the developing embryo by crossing intestinal and placental barriers. We addressed this question by adding (2)H-isotope labeled pharmaceuticals to the drinking water of female mice for 20 days (10 pre-and 10 post-conception days), and quantifying (2)H-isotope enrichment signals in the dam liver and brain of developing embryos using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Significant levels of (2)H enrichment was detected in the brain of embryos and livers of carbamazepine-treated mice but not in those of control dams, or for fluoxetine or venlafaxine application. These results provide the first evidence that carbamazepine in drinking water and at typical

  11. Caffeine promotes wakefulness via dopamine signaling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Nall, Aleksandra H.; Shakhmantsir, Iryna; Cichewicz, Karol; Birman, Serge; Hirsh, Jay; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely-consumed psychoactive drug in the world, but our understanding of how caffeine affects our brains is relatively incomplete. Most studies focus on effects of caffeine on adenosine receptors, but there is evidence for other, more complex mechanisms. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which shows a robust diurnal pattern of sleep/wake activity, caffeine reduces nighttime sleep behavior independently of the one known adenosine receptor. Here, we show that dopamine is required for the wake-promoting effect of caffeine in the fly, and that caffeine likely acts presynaptically to increase dopamine signaling. We identify a cluster of neurons, the paired anterior medial (PAM) cluster of dopaminergic neurons, as the ones relevant for the caffeine response. PAM neurons show increased activity following caffeine administration, and promote wake when activated. Also, inhibition of these neurons abrogates sleep suppression by caffeine. While previous studies have focused on adenosine-receptor mediated mechanisms for caffeine action, we have identified a role for dopaminergic neurons in the arousal-promoting effect of caffeine. PMID:26868675

  12. Symptoms Attributed to Consumption of Caffeinated Beverages in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sojar, Sakina H.; Shrier, Lydia A.; Ziemnik, Rosemary E.; Sherritt, Lon; Spalding, Allegra L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Pediatric caffeine use has become increasingly prevalent. The American Academy of Pediatrics discourages caffeine use by children and adolescents due to its adverse impact on sleep and blood pressure. The objective of this study was to measure prevalence of physical and emotional symptoms related to caffeine consumption among adolescents receiving primary care. Methods: A convenience sample of patients (N = 179; 73% female) aged 12–17 presenting for routine primary care completed the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Substance Abuse Module questionnaire, which included questions regarding use of caffeine. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize prevalence of caffeine use and caffeine-related symptoms. Associations of number of caffeine-related symptoms with age, gender, and race/ethnicity were also analyzed. Results: Sixty-seven percent of participants (n = 120) reported past 30-day caffeinated beverage consumption. Of those, 68% (n = 82) reported at least one symptom or problem attributed to caffeine use or withdrawal, including caffeine cravings, 24% (n = 29); frequent urination, 21% (n = 25); difficulty falling asleep, 18% (n = 22); and feeling anxious, 3.3% (n = 4). Conclusions: In our sample, caffeinated beverage consumption by adolescents was frequently associated with physical and emotional symptoms, as well as problems attributed to use. PMID:26649254

  13. Caffeine-induced physiological arousal accentuates global processing biases.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Caroline R; Brunyé, Tad T; Giles, Grace; Lieberman, Harris R; Taylor, Holly A

    2011-07-01

    The effects of caffeine-induced arousal on global versus local object focus were investigated in non-habitual consumers using a double-blind, within-subjects, repeated-measures design. Following an overnight fast, low caffeine consumers (N=36; M=42.5mg/day caffeine) completed 5 counterbalanced test sessions (normal consumption, 0mg, 100mg, 200mg, and 400mg) separated by at least 3 days. During each session, volunteers either consumed their normal amount of caffeine or were administered 1 of 4 treatment pills. One hour later they completed two tasks assessing visual attention, in counterbalanced order. Measures of mood, salivary caffeine and cortisol were taken at multiple time points. Dose-dependent elevation of caffeine in the saliva demonstrated the experimental manipulation was effective. Furthermore, analyses of the mood and arousal measures detected consistent changes on arousal subscales and caffeine administration elevated saliva cortisol. Analyses of the visual attention tasks revealed that caffeine-induced physiological arousal produced global processing biases, after as little as 100mg caffeine. These data suggest caffeine consumption may influence how individuals attend to and process information in their environment and could influence daily tasks such as face recognition, learning new environments and navigation, especially for those who normally consume little caffeine.

  14. Pharmacokinetics for topically applied caffeine in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kronschläger, Martin; Forsman, Erik; Yu, Zhaohua; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Löfgren, Stefan; Meyer, Linda M; Bergquist, Jonas; Söderberg, Per

    2014-05-01

    Topically applied caffeine was recently identified as a promising candidate molecule for cataract prevention. Little is known about the pharmacokinetics for topically applied caffeine. Potential toxicity of 72 mM caffeine on the ocular surface and the lens was qualitatively monitored and no toxic effects were observed. The concentration of caffeine was measured in the lens and the blood after topical application of 72 mM caffeine to groups of 10 animals sacrificed at 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after topical application. The lens concentration decreased throughout the observation period while the blood concentration increased up to 120 min. Further, the concentration of caffeine in the lens and blood was measured 30 min after topical application of caffeine, the concentration of caffeine being 0.72, 3.34, 15.51 and 72 mM depending on group belonging, in groups of 10 animals. The caffeine concentration in lens and blood, respectively, increased proportionally to the caffeine concentration topically applied. The rat blood concentrations achieved were far below the equivalent threshold dose of FDA recommended daily dose for humans. This information is important for further development of caffeine eye drops for cataract prevention.

  15. Caffeine promotes wakefulness via dopamine signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nall, Aleksandra H; Shakhmantsir, Iryna; Cichewicz, Karol; Birman, Serge; Hirsh, Jay; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-02-12

    Caffeine is the most widely-consumed psychoactive drug in the world, but our understanding of how caffeine affects our brains is relatively incomplete. Most studies focus on effects of caffeine on adenosine receptors, but there is evidence for other, more complex mechanisms. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which shows a robust diurnal pattern of sleep/wake activity, caffeine reduces nighttime sleep behavior independently of the one known adenosine receptor. Here, we show that dopamine is required for the wake-promoting effect of caffeine in the fly, and that caffeine likely acts presynaptically to increase dopamine signaling. We identify a cluster of neurons, the paired anterior medial (PAM) cluster of dopaminergic neurons, as the ones relevant for the caffeine response. PAM neurons show increased activity following caffeine administration, and promote wake when activated. Also, inhibition of these neurons abrogates sleep suppression by caffeine. While previous studies have focused on adenosine-receptor mediated mechanisms for caffeine action, we have identified a role for dopaminergic neurons in the arousal-promoting effect of caffeine.

  16. The pH dependent Raman spectroscopic study of caffeine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Gu, Huaimin; Zhong, Liang; Hu, Yongjun; Liu, Fang

    2011-02-01

    First of all the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and normal Raman spectra of caffeine aqueous solution were obtained at different pH values. In order to obtain the detailed vibrational assignments of the Raman spectroscopy, the geometry of caffeine molecule was optimized by density functional theory (DFT) calculation. By comparing the SERS of caffeine with its normal spectra at different pH values; it is concluded that pH value can dramatically affect the SERS of caffeine, but barely affect the normal Raman spectrum of caffeine aqueous solution. It can essentially affect the reorientation of caffeine molecule to the Ag colloid surface, but cannot impact the vibration of functional groups and chemical bonds in caffeine molecule.

  17. Effect of microbial fermentation on caffeine content of tea leaves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaogang; Hu, Shuxia; Wan, Xiaochun; Pan, Caiyuan

    2005-09-07

    Caffeine is widely used in the food and pharmaceutical industries. For safety concerns, natural caffeine is preferred over synthetic products despite of its high cost. To explore more economical methods of acquiring natural caffeine, we adopted a microbial fermentation technique to increase the caffeine content of tea leaves. Our studies showed that the caffeine content in tea leaves increased reasonably after treating leaves with microorganisms for a period of time (i.e. orthodox pile-fermentation), and the amount of caffeine content increase varied significantly between black and green teas (27.57% and 86.41%). These results suggested that the change of caffeine content in tea leaves during the pile-fermentation depended not only on the growth and reproduction of microorganisms, but also on the tea composition.

  18. Regulatory status of caffeine in the United States.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Leah S; Mihalov, Jeremy J; Carlson, Susan J; Mattia, Antonia

    2014-10-01

    This article summarizes the history of the regulation of caffeine, a key component of caffeine-containing energy drinks and other caffeine-containing energy products, in the United States. Caffeine as an ingredient in food has been regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since 1958, when the Food Additives Amendment to the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act was enacted. It is listed as a substance that is generally recognized as safe by experts for its intended use in cola-type beverages at levels not to exceed 200 parts per million. Here, the history of FDA evaluations of the safe use of, as well as consumer exposure to, caffeine in food in the United States is outlined. Finally, the FDA's current concerns about caffeine and caffeine-containing energy products are reported, along with the current activities to address those concerns.

  19. Energy Drinks and the Neurophysiological Impact of Caffeine

    PubMed Central

    Persad, Leeana Aarthi Bagwath

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive stimulant with prevalent use across all age groups. It is a naturally occurring substance found in the coffee bean, tea leaf, the kola nut, cocoa bean. Recently there has been an increase in energy drink consumption leading to caffeine abuse, with aggressive marketing and poor awareness on the consequences of high caffeine use. With caffeine consumption being so common, it is vital to know the impact caffeine has on the body, as its effects can influence cardio-respiratory, endocrine, and perhaps most importantly neurological systems. Detrimental effects have being described especially since an over consumption of caffeine has being noted. This review focuses on the neurophysiological impact of caffeine and its biochemical pathways in the human body. PMID:22025909

  20. Energy drinks and the neurophysiological impact of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Persad, Leeana Aarthi Bagwath

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive stimulant with prevalent use across all age groups. It is a naturally occurring substance found in the coffee bean, tea leaf, the kola nut, cocoa bean. Recently there has been an increase in energy drink consumption leading to caffeine abuse, with aggressive marketing and poor awareness on the consequences of high caffeine use. With caffeine consumption being so common, it is vital to know the impact caffeine has on the body, as its effects can influence cardio-respiratory, endocrine, and perhaps most importantly neurological systems. Detrimental effects have being described especially since an over consumption of caffeine has being noted. This review focuses on the neurophysiological impact of caffeine and its biochemical pathways in the human body.

  1. Caffeine Expectancy Questionnaire (CaffEQ): Construction, Psychometric Properties, and Associations with Caffeine Use, Caffeine Dependence, and Other Related Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntley, Edward D.; Juliano, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    Expectancies for drug effects predict drug initiation, use, cessation, and relapse, and may play a causal role in drug effects (i.e., placebo effects). Surprisingly little is known about expectancies for caffeine even though it is the most widely used psychoactive drug in the world. In a series of independent studies, the nature and scope of…

  2. Contribution of acetaminophen-cysteine to acetaminophen nephrotoxicity II. Possible involvement of the gamma-glutamyl cycle.

    PubMed

    Stern, Stephan T; Bruno, Mary K; Horton, Robert A; Hill, Dennis W; Roberts, Jeanette C; Cohen, Steven D

    2005-01-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) nephrotoxicity has been observed both in humans and research animals. Our recent investigations have focused on the possible involvement of glutathione-derived APAP metabolites in APAP nephrotoxicity and have demonstrated that administration of acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS) potentiated APAP-induced renal injury with no effects on APAP-induced liver injury. Additionally, APAP-CYS treatment alone resulted in a dose-responsive renal GSH depletion. This APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion could interfere with intrarenal detoxification of APAP or its toxic metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI) and may be the mechanism responsible for the potentiation of APAP nephrotoxicity. Renal-specific GSH depletion has been demonstrated in mice and rats following administration of amino acid gamma-glutamyl acceptor substrates for gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT). The present study sought to determine if APAP-CYS-induced renal glutathione depletion is the result of disruption of the gamma-glutamyl cycle through interaction with gamma-GT. The results confirmed that APAP-CYS-induced renal GSH depletion was antagonized by the gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT) inhibitor acivicin. In vitro analysis demonstrated that APAP-CYS is a gamma-glutamyl acceptor for both murine and bovine renal gamma-GT. Analysis of urine from mice pretreated with acivicin and then treated with APAP, APAP-CYS, or acetaminophen-glutathione identified a gamma-glutamyl-cysteinyl-acetaminophen metabolite. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that APAP-CYS contributes to APAP nephrotoxicity by depletion of renal GSH stores through interaction with the gamma-glutamyl cycle.

  3. Immunoblot analysis of protein containing 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in serum and subcellular liver fractions from acetaminophen-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Pumford, N R; Hinson, J A; Benson, R W; Roberts, D W

    1990-07-01

    The hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen is believed to be mediated by the metabolic activation of acetaminophen to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine which covalently binds to cysteinyl residues on proteins as 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts. The formation of these adducts in hepatic protein correlates with the hepatotoxicity. In this study, the formation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in specific cellular proteins was investigated using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and detected using affinity-purified antisera specific for 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts on immunoblots. These techniques were used to investigate the liver 10,000g supernatant and serum from B6C3F1 mice that received hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen. More than 15 proteins containing 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts were detected in the liver 10,000g supernatant. The most prominent protein containing 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in the hepatic 10,000g supernatant had a relative molecular mass of 55 kDa. Serum proteins containing 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts had molecular masses similar to those found in the liver 10,000g supernatant (55, 87, and approximately 102 kDa). These data, combined with our previous findings describing the temporal relationship between the appearance of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in protein in the serum and the decrease in the levels of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in protein in the liver, suggested that liver adducts were released into the serum following lysis of hepatocytes. The temporal relationship between the formation of specific adducts and hepatotoxicity in mice following a hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen was examined using immunoblots of mitochondria, microsomes, cytosol, and plasma membranes. Hepatotoxicity indicated by serum alanine aminotransferase levels was increased at 2 and 4 hr after dosing. The cytosolic fraction contained numerous proteins with 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen

  4. Transfer of Nicotine, Cotinine and Caffeine Into Breast Milk in a Smoker Mother Consuming Caffeinated Drinks.

    PubMed

    Calvaresi, Valeria; Escuder, Diana; Minutillo, Adele; Bastons-Compta, Adriana; García-Algar, Oscar; Pallás Alonso, Carmen Rosa; Pacifici, Roberta; Pichini, Simona

    2016-07-01

    Although the habits of cigarette smoking and associated coffee drinking are generally ceased during pregnancy, they are often reinitiated after delivery when the breastfeeding period starts. This is a case report of a 32-year-old lactating smoker mother who consumed caffeinated drinks and who agreed to donate breast milk after smoking one cigarette (containing 0.6 mg of nicotine) and drinking one cup of espresso (containing 80 mg of caffeine) for an investigation of the excretion of nicotine, its major metabolite cotinine and caffeine into the breast milk and subsequent transfer to the infant. Nicotine and its metabolite cotinine peaked in the breast milk at 0.5 h after the cigarette smoking, and caffeine peaked 2 h after drinking coffee. Moreover, the nicotine disappeared from the milk by 3 h, the caffeine required 24 h and the cotinine required 72 h. The relative infant doses of caffeine, nicotine and cotinine were found to be 8.9, 12.8 and 77.6%, respectively. In the light of these results obtained after the mother smoked only one cigarette and consumed one cup of espresso, if a lactating mother cannot refrain from smoking cigarettes, she should extend the time between the last smoked cigarette and breastfeeding to at least 3 h when the nicotine has been completely eliminated from the milk. Similarly, nursing mothers should also drink coffee sparingly and immediately after nursing and avoid coffee or caffeinated beverages for at least 4 h prior to breastfeeding to minimize the infant's exposure to caffeine.

  5. Multiscale modeling reveals inhibitory and stimulatory effects of caffeine on acetaminophen‐induced toxicity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, C; Cordes, H; Baier, V; Blank, LM

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic drug that is frequently co‐administered with caffeine (CAF) in the treatment of pain. It is well known that APAP may cause severe liver injury after an acute overdose. However, the understanding of whether and to what extent CAF inhibits or stimulates APAP‐induced hepatotoxicity in humans is still lacking. Here, a multiscale analysis is presented that quantitatively models the pharmacodynamic (PD) response of APAP during co‐medication with CAF. Therefore, drug‐drug interaction (DDI) processes were integrated into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models at the organism level, whereas drug‐specific PD response data were contextualized at the cellular level. The results provide new insights into the inhibitory and stimulatory effects of CAF on APAP‐induced hepatotoxicity for crucially affected key cellular processes and individual genes at the patient level. This study might facilitate the risk assessment of drug combination therapies in humans and thus may improve patient safety in clinical practice. PMID:28130915

  6. Sulphation of acetaminophen by the human cytosolic sulfotransferases: a systematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akihiro; Liu, Ming-Yih; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Saeki, Yuichi; Suiko, Masahito; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2015-12-01

    Sulphation is known to be critically involved in the metabolism of acetaminophen in vivo. This study aimed to systematically identify the major human cytosolic sulfotransferase (SULT) enzyme(s) responsible for the sulphation of acetaminophen. A systematic analysis showed that three of the twelve human SULTs, SULT1A1, SULT1A3 and SULT1C4, displayed the strongest sulphating activity towards acetaminophen. The pH dependence of the sulphation of acetaminophen by each of these three SULTs was examined. Kinetic parameters of these three SULTs in catalysing acetaminophen sulphation were determined. Moreover, sulphation of acetaminophen was shown to occur in HepG2 human hepatoma cells and Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells under the metabolic setting. Of the four human organ samples tested, liver and intestine cytosols displayed considerably higher acetaminophen-sulphating activity than those of lung and kidney. Collectively, these results provided useful information concerning the biochemical basis underlying the metabolism of acetaminophen in vivo previously reported.

  7. Hepatoprotective effects of rice-derived peptides against acetaminophen-induced damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Kayoko; Moritani, Chie; Uraji, Misugi; Fujita, Akiko; Kawakami, Koji; Hatanaka, Tadashi; Suzaki, Etsuko; Tsuboi, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Glutathione, the most abundant intracellular antioxidant, protects cells against reactive oxygen species induced oxidative stress and regulates intracellular redox status. We found that rice peptides increased intracellular glutathione levels in human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells. Acetaminophen is a commonly used analgesic. However, an overdose of acetaminophen causes severe hepatotoxicity via depletion of hepatic glutathione. Here, we investigated the protective effects of rice peptides on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. ICR mice were orally administered rice peptides (0, 100 or 500 mg/kg) for seven days, followed by the induction of hepatotoxicity via intraperitoneal injection of acetaminophen (700 mg/kg). Pretreatment with rice peptides significantly prevented increases in serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase levels and protected against hepatic glutathione depletion. The expression of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, a key regulatory enzyme in the synthesis of glutathione, was decreased by treatment with acetaminophen, albeit rice peptides treatment recovered its expression compared to that achieved treatment with acetaminophen. In addition, histopathological evaluation of the livers also revealed that rice peptides prevented acetaminophen-induced centrilobular necrosis. These results suggest that rice peptides increased intracellular glutathione levels and could protect against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

  8. The effect of aging on acetaminophen pharmacokinetics, toxicity and Nrf2 in Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Mach, John; Huizer-Pajkos, Aniko; Cogger, Victoria C; McKenzie, Catriona; Le Couteur, David G; Jones, Brett E; de Cabo, Rafael; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the effect of aging on hepatic pharmacokinetics and the degree of hepatotoxicity following a toxic dose of acetaminophen. Young and old male Fischer 344 rats were treated with 800 mg/kg acetaminophen (young n = 8, old n = 5) or saline (young n = 9, old n = 9). Serum measurements showed old rats treated with acetaminophen had significantly lower serum alanine aminotransferase and higher acetaminophen and acetaminophen glucuronide levels and creatinine, compared with acetaminophen treated young rats (p < .05). Immunoblotting and activity assays showed old saline-treated rats had twofold lower cytochrome P450 2E1 activity and threefold higher NAD(P)H quinone oxireductase 1 protein expression and activity than young saline-treated rats (p < .05), although Nrf2, glutathione cysteine ligase-modulatory subunit, glutathione cysteine ligase-catalytic subunit, and cytochrome P450 2E1 protein expressions were unchanged. Primary hepatocytes isolated from young rats treated with 10 mM acetaminophen had lower survival than those from old rats (52.4% ± 5.8%, young; 83.6% ± 1.7%, old, p < .05). The pharmacokinetic changes described may decrease susceptibility to acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity but may increase risk of nephrotoxicity in old age.

  9. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and HIF-1α induction in acetaminophen toxicity in mice occurs without hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S; Hennings, Leah; Letzig, Lynda; Simpson, Pippa M; Hinson, Jack A; James, Laura P

    2011-05-01

    HIF-1α is a nuclear factor important in the transcription of genes controlling angiogenesis including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both hypoxia and oxidative stress are known mechanisms for the induction of HIF-1α. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are mechanistically important in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the mouse. MPT may occur as a result of oxidative stress and leads to a large increase in oxidative stress. We previously reported the induction of HIF-1α in mice with APAP toxicity and have shown that VEGF is important in hepatocyte regeneration following APAP toxicity. The following study was performed to examine the relative contribution of hypoxia versus oxidative stress to the induction of HIF-1α in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Time course studies using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole showed no staining for pimonidazole at 1 or 2h in B6C3F1 mice treated with APAP. Staining for pimonidazole was present in the midzonal to periportal regions at 4, 8, 24 and 48h and no staining was observed in centrilobular hepatocytes, the sites of the toxicity. Subsequent studies with the MPT inhibitor cyclosporine A showed that cyclosporine A (CYC; 10mg/kg) reduced HIF-1α induction in APAP treated mice at 1 and 4h and did not inhibit the metabolism of APAP (depletion of hepatic non-protein sulfhydryls and hepatic protein adduct levels). The data suggest that HIF-1α induction in the early stages of APAP toxicity is secondary to oxidative stress via a mechanism involving MPT. In addition, APAP toxicity is not mediated by a hypoxia mechanism.

  10. Altered expression of the caffeine synthase gene in a naturally caffeine-free mutant of Coffea arabica

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we studied the biosynthesis of caffeine by examining the expression of genes involved in this biosynthetic pathway in coffee fruits containing normal or low levels of this substance. The amplification of gene-specific transcripts during fruit development revealed that low-caffeine fruits had a lower expression of the theobromine synthase and caffeine synthase genes and also contained an extra transcript of the caffeine synthase gene. This extra transcript contained only part of exon 1 and all of exon 3. The sequence of the mutant caffeine synthase gene revealed the substitution of isoleucine for valine in the enzyme active site that probably interfered with enzymatic activity. These findings indicate that the absence of caffeine in these mutants probably resulted from a combination of transcriptional regulation and the presence of mutations in the caffeine synthase amino acid sequence. PMID:21637458

  11. Psychostimulant and Other Effects of Caffeine in 9- to 11-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heatherley, Susan V.; Hancock, Katie M. F.; Rogers, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Recent research on adults suggests that "beneficial" psychostimulant effects of caffeine are found only in the context of caffeine deprivation; that is, caffeine improves psychomotor and cognitive performance in habitual caffeine consumers following caffeine withdrawal. Furthermore, no net benefit is gained because…

  12. A Survey of Caffeine Use and Associated Side Effects in a College Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Greene, Douglas; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Surveyed 270 college students concerning their caffeine consumption. Results suggest there is identifiable group using excessive amounts of caffeine. Identified several deleterious effects possibly related to caffeine use. Approximately 75 percent of caffeine users surveyed rarely sought information on caffeine content of products or avoided…

  13. 'Omics analysis of low dose acetaminophen intake demonstrates novel response pathways in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Jetten, Marlon J.A.; Gaj, Stan; Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa; Kok, Theo M. de; Delft, Joost H.M. van; Lommen, Arjen; Someren, Eugene P. van; Jennen, Danyel G.J.; Claessen, Sandra M.; Peijnenburg, Ad A.C.M.; Stierum, Rob H.; Kleinjans, Jos C.S.

    2012-03-15

    Acetaminophen is the primary cause of acute liver toxicity in Europe/USA, which led the FDA to reconsider recommendations concerning safe acetaminophen dosage/use. Unfortunately, the current tests for liver toxicity are no ideal predictive markers for liver injury, i.e. they only measure acetaminophen exposure after profound liver toxicity has already occurred. Furthermore, these tests do not provide mechanistic information. Here, 'omics techniques (global analysis of metabolomic/gene-expression responses) may provide additional insight. To better understand acetaminophen-induced responses at low doses, we evaluated the effects of (sub-)therapeutic acetaminophen doses on metabolite formation and global gene-expression changes (including, for the first time, full-genome human miRNA expression changes) in blood/urine samples from healthy human volunteers. Many known and several new acetaminophen-metabolites were detected, in particular in relation to hepatotoxicity-linked, oxidative metabolism of acetaminophen. Transcriptomic changes indicated immune-modulating effects (2 g dose) and oxidative stress responses (4 g dose). For the first time, effects of acetaminophen on full-genome human miRNA expression have been considered and confirmed the findings on mRNA level. 'Omics techniques outperformed clinical chemistry tests and revealed novel response pathways to acetaminophen in humans. Although no definitive conclusion about potential immunotoxic effects of acetaminophen can be drawn from this study, there are clear indications that the immune system is triggered even after intake of low doses of acetaminophen. Also, oxidative stress-related gene responses, similar to those seen after high dose acetaminophen exposure, suggest the occurrence of possible pre-toxic effects of therapeutic acetaminophen doses. Possibly, these effects are related to dose-dependent increases in levels of hepatotoxicity-related metabolites. -- Highlights: ► 'Omics techniques outperformed

  14. Caffeine Does Not Modulate Inhibitory Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tieges, Zoe; Snel, Jan; Kok, Albert; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2009-01-01

    The effects of a 3 mg/kg body weight (BW) dose of caffeine were assessed on behavioral indices of response inhibition. To meet these aims, we selected a modified AX version of the Continuous Performance Test (CPT), the stop task, and the flanker task. In three double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects experiments, these tasks were…

  15. Acetaminophen self-administered in the drinking water increases the pain threshold of rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Mickley, G Andrew; Hoxha, Zana; Biada, Jaclyn M; Kenmuir, Cynthia L; Bacik, Stephanie E

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the addition of flavored acetaminophen suspension (for example, Children's Tylenol) in the drinking water of rats may not be effective in producing postoperative analgesia because of low levels of consumption. However, these investigations neither measured analgesia nor compared the consumption by rats that had undergone surgery with that by unmanipulated rats. The present study reports that although unmanipulated rats naive to the taste of flavored acetaminophen do indeed drink significantly less of this liquid than tap water, they drank sufficient amounts of the acetaminophen-containing solution to significantly raise pain thresholds, as measured by the hot-plate test. Moreover, rats that had undergone surgery drank significantly more acetaminophen solution than did those that had no surgery. These data suggest that oral self-administration of flavored acetaminophen by rats may be an appropriate means to reduce pain.

  16. Acetaminophen and meloxicam inhibit platelet aggregation and coagulation in blood samples from humans.

    PubMed

    Martini, Angela K; Rodriguez, Cassandra M; Cap, Andrew P; Martini, Wenjun Z; Dubick, Michael A

    2014-12-01

    Acetaminophen (Ace) and meloxicam (Mel) are the two types of analgesic and antipyretic medications. This study investigated the dose responses of acetaminophen and meloxicam on platelet aggregation and coagulation function in human blood samples. Blood samples were collected from six healthy humans and processed to make platelet-adjusted (100 × 10 cells/μl) blood samples. Acetaminophen (Tylenol, Q-PAP, 100 mg/ml) was added at the doses of 0 μg/ml (control), 214 μg/ml (the standard dose, 1 ×), 4 ×, 8 ×, 10 ×, 12 ×, 16 ×, and 20 ×. Similarly, meloxicam (Metacam, 5 mg/ml) was added at doses of 0 μg/ml (control), 2.85 μg/ml (the standard dose, 1 ×), 4 ×, 8 ×, 10 ×, 12 ×, 16 ×, and 20 ×. Fifteen minutes after the addition of acetaminophen and/or meloxicam, platelet aggregation was stimulated with collagen (2 μg/ml) or arachidonic acid (0.5 mmol/l) and assessed using a Chrono-Log 700 aggregometer. Coagulation function was assessed by prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and using Rotem thrombelastogram. A robust inhibition by acetaminophen and/or meloxicam was observed in arachidonic acid-stimulated platelet aggregation starting at 1 × dose. Collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation was inhibited by ACE starting at 1 × (78 ± 10% of control), and by meloxicam starting at 4 × (72 ± 5% of control, both P < 0.05). The inhibitions by acetaminophen and meloxicam combined were similar to those by acetaminophen or meloxicam. aPTT was prolonged by meloxicam starting at 4 ×. No changes were observed in PT or any of Rotem measurements by acetaminophen and/or meloxicam. Acetaminophen and meloxicam compromised platelet aggregation and aPTT. Further effort is warranted to characterize the effects of acetaminophen and meloxicam on bleeding in vivo.

  17. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in mice: Effect of age, frailty and exposure type.

    PubMed

    Kane, Alice E; Mitchell, Sarah J; Mach, John; Huizer-Pajkos, Aniko; McKenzie, Catriona; Jones, Brett; Cogger, Victoria; Le Couteur, David G; de Cabo, Rafael; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used analgesic that can cause severe hepatotoxicity in overdose. Despite old age and frailty being associated with extensive and long-term utilization of acetaminophen and a high prevalence of adverse drug reactions, there is limited information on the risks of toxicity from acetaminophen in old age and frailty. This study aimed to assess changes in the risk and mechanisms of hepatotoxicity from acute, chronic and sub-acute acetaminophen exposure with old age and frailty in mice. Young and old male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either acute (300 mg/kg via oral gavage), chronic (100 mg/kg/day in diet for six weeks) or sub-acute (250 mg/kg, t.i.d., for three days) acetaminophen, or saline control. Pre-dosing mice were scored for the mouse clinical frailty index, and after dosing serum and liver tissue were collected for assessment of toxicity and mechanisms. There were no differences with old age or frailty in the degree of hepatotoxicity induced by acute, chronic or subacute acetaminophen exposure as assessed by serum liver enzymes and histology. Age-related changes in the acetaminophen toxicity pathways included increased liver GSH concentrations, increased NQO1 activity and an increased pro- and anti-inflammatory response to acetaminophen in old age. Frailty-related changes included a negative correlation between frailty index and serum protein, albumin and ALP concentrations for some mouse groups. In conclusion, although there were changes in some pathways that would be expected to influence susceptibility to acetaminophen toxicity, there was no overall increase in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity with old age or frailty in mice.

  18. Candidate gene polymorphisms in patients with acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Court, Michael H; Peter, Inga; Hazarika, Suwagmani; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Greenblatt, David J; Lee, William M

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen is a leading cause of acute liver failure (ALF). Genetic differences might predispose some individuals to develop ALF. In this exploratory study, we evaluated genotype frequency differences among patients enrolled by the ALF Study Group who had developed ALF either intentionally from a single-time-point overdose of acetaminophen (n = 78), unintentionally after chronic high doses of acetaminophen (n = 79), or from causes other than acetaminophen (n = 103). The polymorphisms evaluated included those in genes encoding putative acetaminophen-metabolizing enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A6, UGT1A9, UGT2B15, SULT1A1, CYP2E1, and CYP3A5) as well as CD44 and BHMT1. Individuals carrying the CYP3A5 rs776746 A allele were overrepresented among ALF patients who had intentionally overdosed with acetaminophen, with an odds ratio of 2.3 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-4.9; P = 0.034) compared with all other ALF patients. This finding is consistent with the enhanced bioactivation of acetaminophen by the CYP3A5 enzyme. Persons homozygous for the CD44 rs1467558 A allele were also overrepresented among patients who had unintentionally developed ALF from chronic acetaminophen use, with an odds ratio of 4.0 (1.0-17.2, P = 0.045) compared with all other ALF subjects. This finding confirms a prior study that found elevated serum liver enzyme levels in healthy volunteers with the CD44 rs1467558 AA genotype who had consumed high doses of acetaminophen for up to 2 weeks. However, both genetic associations were considered relatively weak, and they were not statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons testing. Nevertheless, both CYP3A5 rs776746 and CD44 rs1467558 warrant further investigation as potential genomic markers of enhanced risk of acetaminophen-induced ALF.

  19. Toxicity from repeated doses of acetaminophen in children: assessment of causality and dose in reported cases.

    PubMed

    Heard, Kennon; Bui, Alison; Mlynarchek, Sara L; Green, Jody L; Bond, G Randall; Clark, Richard F; Kozer, Eran; Koff, Raymond S; Dart, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Liver injury has been reported in children treated with repeated doses of acetaminophen. The objective of this study was to identify and validate reports of liver injury or death in children younger than 6 years who were administered repeated therapeutic doses of acetaminophen. We reviewed US Poison Center data, peer-reviewed literature, US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reports, and US Manufacturer Safety Reports describing adverse effects after acetaminophen administration. Reports that described hepatic abnormalities (description of liver injury or abnormal laboratory testing) or death after acetaminophen administration to children younger than 6 years were included. The identified reports were double abstracted and then reviewed by an expert panel to determine if the hepatic injury was related to acetaminophen and whether the dose of acetaminophen was therapeutic (≤75 mg/kg) or supratherapeutic. Our search yielded 2531 reports of adverse events associated with acetaminophen use. From these cases, we identified 76 cases of hepatic injury and 26 deaths associated with repeated acetaminophen administration. There were 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities and no deaths associated with what our panel determined to be therapeutic doses. A large proportion of cases could not be fully evaluated due to incomplete case reporting. Although we identified numerous examples of liver injury and death after repeated doses of acetaminophen, all the deaths and all but 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities involved doses more than 75 mg/kg per day. This study suggests that the doses of less than 75 mg/kg per day of acetaminophen are safe for children younger than 6 years.

  20. Caffeine Awareness in Children: Insights from a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Thakre, Tushar P.; Deoras, Ketan; Griffin, Catherine; Vemana, Aarthi; Podmore, Petra; Krishna, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Caffeine, a commonly consumed psychoactive substance, can have significant effects on sleep. Caffeine intake among children is increasing, mainly in the form of sodas. However, adolescent caffeine consumers may lack knowledge about the caffeine content in common beverages. If true, this very fact may hamper the assessment of the effects of caffeine consumption on sleep in children if such assessments are a priori dependent on responders being able to reliably distinguish between caffeinated and noncaffeinated beverages. This preliminary study investigated adolescents' caffeine knowledge and intake at a Cleveland-area public middle school. Methods: Seventh- and eighth-grade students were surveyed using: (1) the Caffeine Literacy and Sleep Study (CLASS), a 15-question pilot instrument designed to assess caffeine knowledge and intake by type, quantity and timing, as well as sleep habits; and (2) the Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire (CASQ), a validated survey measuring excessive daytime sleepiness in adolescents. These questionnaires were distributed and collected during a specified class period. Results: Of the 635 seventh- and eighth-grade students who attended school on the day of the study, 555 (87%) participated. Lack of knowledge about caffeine content of particular drinks was noted in seventh and eighth graders of both sexes with nearly 29% unaware that their favorite drinks contain caffeine and more than 50% unable to correctly identify the drinks with the most caffeine. A low percentage of students correctly identified light-colored sodas lacking caffeine: 7-Up (24.1%), Sierra Mist (38.9%), ginger ale (39.8%), Sprite (39.8%), and Fresca (53.7%). The percentages of students correctly identifying caffeinated light-colored beverages were: Arizona Green Tea (43.5%), Mello Yellow (50.9%), and A&W cream soda (67.6%). However, Mountain Dew was correctly identified by most (93.5%) as caffeinated. Conclusions: Students were not

  1. Immunochemical quantitation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts in subcellular liver fractions following a hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Pumford, N R; Roberts, D W; Benson, R W; Hinson, J A

    1990-08-01

    The hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen correlates with the formation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts. Using a sensitive and specific immunochemical assay, we quantitated the formation of these protein adducts in liver fractions and serum after administration of a hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (400 mg/kg) to B6C3F1 mice. Adducts in the cytosolic fraction increased to 3.6 nmol/mg protein at 2 hr and then decreased to 1.1 nmol/mg protein by 8 hr. Concomitant with the decrease in adducts in the cytosol, 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts appeared in serum and their levels paralleled increases in serum alanine aminotransferase. Microsomal protein adducts peaked at 1 hr (0.7 nmol/mg protein) and subsequently decreased to 0.2 nmol/mg at 8 hr. The 4000 g pellet (nuclei, plasma membranes, and cell debris) had the highest level of adducts (3.5 nmol/mg protein), which remained constant from 1 to 8 hr. Evaluation of fractions purified from a 960 g pellet indicated that the highest concentration of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts was located in plasma membranes and mitochondria; peak levels were 10.3 and 5.1 nmol/mg respectively. 3-(Cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts were detected in nuclei only after enzymatic hydrolysis of the proteins. The localization of high levels of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts in plasma membranes and mitochondria may play a critical role in acetaminophen toxicity.

  2. Behavioral outcomes in children exposed prenatally to lamotrigine, valproate, or carbamazepine

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Uma; Adams, Jane; Macklin, Eric A.; Dhillon, Ruby; McCarthy, Katherine D.; Dworetzky, Barbara; Klein, Autumn; Holmes, Lewis B.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate adaptive behavior outcomes of children prenatally exposed to lamotrigine, valproate, or carbamazepine, and to determine if these outcomes were dose-dependent. Methods Data were collected from women enrolled in the North American Anti-epileptic Drug (AED) Pregnancy Registry who had taken lamotrigine, valproate, or carbamazepine monotherapies throughout pregnancy to suppress seizures. The adaptive behavior of 252 exposed children (including 104 lamotrigine-exposed, 97 carbamazepine-exposed, and 51 valproate-exposed), ages 3- to 6-years-old, was measured using the Vineland-II Adaptive Behavior Scales, administered to each mother by telephone. Mean Adaptive Behavior Composite (ABC), domain standard scores for communication, daily living, socialization and motor skills, and adaptive levels were analyzed and correlated with first trimester drug dose. Results After adjusting for maternal age, education, folate use, cigarette and alcohol exposure, gestational age, and birth weight by propensity score analysis, the mean ABC score for valproate-exposed children was 95.6 (95% CI [91, 101]), versus 100.8 (95% CI [98, 103]) and 103.5 (95% CI [101, 106]) for carbamazepine- and lamotrigine-exposed children, respectively (ANOVA; p=0.017). Significant differences were observed among the three drug groups in the ABC (p=0.017), socialization (p=0.026), and motor (p=0.018) domains, with a trend toward significance in the communication domain (p=0.053). Valproate-exposed children scored lowest and lamotrigine-exposed children scored highest in every category. Valproate-exposed children were most likely to perform at a low or moderately low adaptive level in each category. Higher valproate dose was associated with significantly lower ABC (p=0.020), socialization (p=0.009), and motor (p=0.041) scores before adjusting for confounders. After adjusting for the above variables, increasing VPA dose was associated with decreasing Vineland scores in all domains, but the

  3. Characterization of phenytoin, carbamazepine, vinpocetine and clorgyline simultaneous effects on sodium channels and catecholamine metabolism in rat striatal nerve endings.

    PubMed

    Sitges, María; Aldana, Blanca I; Chiu, Luz M; Nekrassov, Vladimir

    2009-03-01

    The effects of two classic antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine and phenytoin), a potential antiepileptic (vinpocetine) and a monoamine-oxidase inhibitor (clorgyline) on the simultaneous changes (detected by HPLC) on Glu, Asp, dopamine and DOPAC inside and outside striatal isolated nerve endings were investigated. Under resting conditions phenytoin, carbamazepine and clorgyline increased dopamine release. Phenytoin and clorgyline increased internal dopamine and decreased DOPAC formation. Carbamazepine decreased internal dopamine and practically did not change DOPAC formation. Glu and Asp release was unchanged. Neurotransmitter release induced by the Na+ channel opener veratridine was reduced by all the antiepileptic drugs tested, except phenytoin which, like clorgyline, facilitated veratridine-induced dopamine release. We conclude that besides the antagonism exerted by carbamazepine, phenytoin and vinpocetine on excitatory neurotransmitters release triggered by Na+ channel activation, that might importantly contribute to their anticonvulsant action, they exert different actions on striatal dopamine distribution, that might explain their different side effect profiles.

  4. Human Exposure to Wastewater-Derived Pharmaceuticals in Fresh Produce: A Randomized Controlled Trial Focusing on Carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Paltiel, Ora; Fedorova, Ganna; Tadmor, Galit; Kleinstern, Geffen; Maor, Yehoshua; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-04-19

    Fresh water scarcity has led to increased use of reclaimed wastewater as an alternative and reliable source for crop irrigation. Beyond microbiological safety, concerns have been raised regarding contamination of reclaimed wastewater by xenobiotics including pharmaceuticals. This study focuses on carbamazepine, an anticonvulsant drug which is ubiquitously detected in reclaimed wastewater, highly persistent in soil, and taken up by crops. In a randomized controlled trial we demonstrate that healthy individuals consuming reclaimed wastewater-irrigated produce excreted carbamazepine and its metabolites in their urine, while subjects consuming fresh water-irrigated produce excreted undetectable or significantly lower levels of carbamazepine. We also report that the carbamazepine metabolite pattern at this low exposure level differed from that observed at therapeutic doses. This "proof of concept" study demonstrates that human exposure to xenobiotics occurs through ingestion of reclaimed wastewater-irrigated produce, providing real world data which could guide risk assessments and policy designed to ensure the safe use of wastewater for crop irrigation.

  5. Multivariate control charts based on net analyte signal (NAS) and Raman spectroscopy for quality control of carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Werickson Fortunato de Carvalho; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2011-10-31

    Raman spectroscopy and control charts based on the net analyte signal (NAS) were applied to polymorphic characterization of carbamazepine. Carbamazepine presents four polymorphic forms: I-IV (dihydrate). X-ray powder diffraction was used as a reference technique. The control charts were built generating three charts: the NAS chart that corresponds to the analyte of interest (form III in this case), the interference chart that corresponds to the contribution of other compounds in the sample and the residual chart that corresponds to nonsystematic variations. For each chart, statistical limits were developed using samples within the quality specifications. It was possible to identify the different polymorphic forms of carbamazepine present in pharmaceutical formulations. Thus, an alternative method for the quality monitoring of the carbamazepine polymorphic forms after the crystallization process is presented.

  6. Conditioned flavour preferences reinforced by caffeine consumed after lunch.

    PubMed

    Richardson, N J; Rogers, P J; Elliman, N A

    1996-07-01

    Caffeine-consuming adult males and females were divided into two groups, those who regularly consumed a caffeinated drink after lunch ("users" n = 21) and those who did not ("nonusers" n = 23). After lunch on weekdays during a 2-week conditioning period, these subjects consumed a novel flavoured fruit juice drink paired with either a caffeine (100 mg) or a placebo capsule. Preferences for this "target" drink and six other novel-flavoured fruit juice drinks were assessed before and then after 5 and 10 conditioning trials. The users showed a significantly greater increase in preference for the caffeine-paired target drink than for the placebo-paired target drink, whereas the nonusers showed a slight trend in the opposite direction. These changes in preference did not generalise to the nontarget drink flavours. For habitual postlunch caffeine users, caffeine alleviated the postlunch dip in mood experienced by those in the placebo condition. Thus, the increase in preference for the caffeine-paired target drink was consistent with the improved mood state that resulted from caffeine consumption. It is unlikely, however, that the subjects were aware of this relationship. These results provide strong evidence for the existence of a reinforcing effect of caffeine, which probably plays a significant role in the acquisition of preferences for caffeine-containing drinks.

  7. Self-report reliability and symptomatology of habitual caffeine consumption.

    PubMed

    James, J E; Bruce, M S; Lader, M H; Scott, N R

    1989-04-01

    1. A large body of research on the demography of caffeine use and its potential health consequences has been undermined by the absence of empirical data on the reliability of retrospective self-reports of caffeine consumption. 2. The principal aim of the present study was to use standard bioanalytic method to assess the reliability of subjects' self-reported caffeine use. Saliva samples were obtained from 142 first-and second-year medical students and assayed for caffeine and paraxanthine. 3. Self-reported caffeine use was found to be significantly correlated with salivary caffeine (r = 0.31, P less than 0.001) and paraxanthine (r = 0.42, P less than 0.001), thereby providing qualified support for use of questionnaires to estimate patterns of caffeine consumption. 4. A secondary aim of the study was to extend previous research concerning the symptomatology of caffeine use by examining the association between caffeine exposure and a variety of measures of somatic and psychological health. Caffeine consumption was reliably associated with the self-reported occurrence of somatic symptoms, but not psychological well-being.

  8. Legitimacy of concerns about caffeine and energy drink consumption.

    PubMed

    Wesensten, Nancy J

    2014-10-01

    Whether caffeine and energy drink consumption presents a critical emerging health problem is not currently known. Available evidence suggests that energy drink consumption represents a change in the ways in which individuals in the United States consume caffeine but that the amount of caffeine consumed daily has not appreciably increased. In the present review, the question of whether Americans are sleep deprived (a potential reason for using caffeine) is briefly explored. Reported rates of daily caffeine consumption (based on beverage formulation) and data obtained from both civilian and military populations in the United States are examined, the efficacy of ingredients other than caffeine in energy drinks is discussed, and the safety and side effects of caffeine are addressed, including whether evidence supports the contention that excessive caffeine/energy drink consumption induces risky behavior. The available evidence suggests that the main legitimate concern regarding caffeine and energy drink use is the potential negative impact on sleep but that, otherwise, there is no cause for concern regarding caffeine use in the general population.

  9. Caffeine Intake and Risk of Urinary Incontinence Progression Among Women

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Mary K.; Resnick, Neil M.; Grodstein, Francine

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the association between long-term caffeine intake and risk of urinary incontinence (UI) progression over 2 years among women with moderate UI. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study in 21,564 women with moderate UI enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study and Nurses’ Health Study II. Incontinence progression was identified from questionnaires during 2 years of follow-up. Baseline caffeine intake (ie, average intake during the past year) and change in caffeine intake during the 4 years prior to baseline were measured using food frequency questionnaires. Odds ratios (ORs) for incontinence progression according to caffeine intake were calculated for each cohort separately, and then for both cohorts combined. Results The percentage of women with UI progression was similar across categories of baseline level of caffeine intake and change in caffeine intake prior to baseline. For example, percentages were 21% versus 22% comparing 450 mg or more to less than 150 mg of caffeine per day (adjusted OR 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70-1.08). Comparing women with increased caffeine intake to those with stable caffeine intake, percentages with progression were 22% versus 20% (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.95-1.22). Results were similar in separate analyses of urgency and stress UI. Conclusion Long-term caffeine intake over one year was not associated with risk of UI progression over 2 years among women with moderate incontinence, although we could not examine acute effects of caffeine. Improved understanding of the effect of caffeine on the bladder is needed to better advise women with incontinence about caffeine intake. PMID:22525905

  10. Effects of adolescent caffeine consumption on cocaine sensitivity.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Casey E; Levis, Sophia C; Schreiner, Drew C; Amat, Jose; Maier, Steven F; Bachtell, Ryan K

    2015-03-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly used psychoactive substance, and consumption by adolescents has risen markedly in recent years. We identified the effects of adolescent caffeine consumption on cocaine sensitivity and determined neurobiological changes within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) that may underlie caffeine-induced hypersensitivity to cocaine. Male Sprague-Dawley rats consumed caffeine (0.3 g/l) or water for 28 days during adolescence (postnatal day 28-55; P28-P55) or adulthood (P67-P94). Testing occurred in the absence of caffeine during adulthood (P62-82 or P101-121). Cocaine-induced and quinpirole (D2 receptor agonist)-induced locomotion was enhanced in rats that consumed caffeine during adolescence. Adolescent consumption of caffeine also enhanced the development of a conditioned place preference at a sub-threshold dose of cocaine (7.5 mg/kg, i.p.). These behavioral changes were not observed in adults consuming caffeine for an equivalent period of time. Sucrose preferences were not altered in rats that consumed caffeine during adolescence, suggesting there are no differences in natural reward. Caffeine consumption during adolescence reduced basal dopamine levels and augmented dopamine release in the NAc in response to cocaine (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Caffeine consumption during adolescence also increased the expression of the dopamine D2 receptor, dopamine transporter, and adenosine A1 receptor and decreased adenosine A2A receptor expression in the NAc. Consumption of caffeine during adulthood increased adenosine A1 receptor expression in the NAc, but no other protein expression changes were observed. Together these findings suggest that caffeine consumption during adolescence produced changes in the NAc that are evident in adulthood and may contribute to increases in cocaine-mediated behaviors.

  11. Design, formulation and evaluation of caffeine chewing gum

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Jalilian, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Caffeine which exists in drinks such as coffee as well as in drug dosage forms in the global market is among the materials that increase alertness and decrease fatigue. Compared to other forms of caffeine, caffeine gum can create faster and more prominent effects. In this study, the main goal is to design a new formulation of caffeine gum with desirable taste and assess its physicochemical properties. Materials and Methods: Caffeine gum was prepared by softening of gum bases and then mixing with other formulation ingredients. To decrease the bitterness of caffeine, sugar, aspartame, liquid glucose, sorbitol, manitol, xylitol, and various flavors were used. Caffeine release from gum base was investigated by mechanical chewing set. Content uniformity test was also performed on the gums. The gums were evaluated in terms of organoleptic properties by the Latin-Square design at different stages. Results: After making 22 formulations of caffeine gums, F11 from 20 mg caffeine gums and F22 from 50 mg caffeine gums were chosen as the best formulation in organoleptic properties. Both types of gum released about 90% of their own drug content after 30 min. Drug content of 20 and 50 mg caffeine gum was about 18.2-21.3 mg and 45.7-53.6 mg respectively. Conclusion: In this study, 20 and 50 mg caffeine gums with suitable and desirable properties (i.e., good taste and satisfactory release) were formulated. The best flavor for caffeine gum was cinnamon. Both kinds of 20 and 50 mg gums succeeded in content uniformity test. PMID:24223387

  12. Carbamazepine pharmacokinetics are not affected by zonisamide: in vitro mechanistic study and in vivo clinical study in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle; Levy, Rene H; Bergen, Donna; Garnett, William; Rosenfeld, William; Mather, Gary; Shah, Jaymin; Grundy, John S

    2004-11-01

    Carbamazepine is metabolized by CYP3A4 and several other cytochrome P450 enzymes. The potential effects of zonisamide on carbamazepine pharmacokinetics (PK) have not been well characterized, with contradictory literature reports. Hence, an in vitro study was designed to evaluate the cytochrome P450 inhibition spectrum of zonisamide using human liver microsomes. Further, an in vivo steady-state study was performed to measure the effect of zonisamide on carbamazepine PK in epileptic patients, and monitor zonisamide PK. In vitro human liver microsomes were incubated with zonisamide (200, 600 or 1000 microM) in the presence of appropriate probe substrates to assess selected cytochrome P450 activities. In vivo, the effect of zonisamide, up to 400 mg/day, on the steady-state PK of carbamazepine and carbamazepine-epoxide (CBZ-E) was studied in 18 epileptic patients. In vitro, zonisamide did not inhibit CYP1A2 and 2D6, and only weakly inhibited CYP2A6, 2C9, 2C19, and 2E1. The estimated Ki for zonisamide inhibition of CYP3A4 was 1076 microM, 12 times higher than typical unbound therapeutic serum zonisamide concentrations. In vivo, no statistically significant differences were observed for mean Cmax, Tmax, and AUC0-12 of total and free carbamazepine and CBZ-E measured before and after zonisamide administration (300-400 mg/day for 14 days). However, CBZ-E renal clearance was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced by zonisamide. The observed mean zonisamide t1/2 (36.3h), relative to approximately 65 h reported in subjects on zonisamide monotherapy, reflects known CYP3A4 induction by carbamazepine. Based on the lack of clinically relevant in vitro and in vivo effects, adjustment of carbamazepine dosing should not be required with concomitant zonisamide administration.

  13. Subjective Responses to Caffeine Are Influenced by Caffeine Dose, Sex, and Pubertal Stage

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Amanda M.; Martin, Catherine; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Background: Our previous work has shown that there are sex differences in subjective responses to acute caffeine administration in adolescents. The purpose of this study was to determine if these sex differences are dependent on pubertal development. Materials and Methods: We examined subjective responses before and after administration of 0, 1, and 2 mg/kg of caffeine in pre- and postpubertal boys and girls (n = 112). In addition, we examined differences in subjective responses to acute caffeine in both the luteal and follicular phases of the menstrual cycle in postpubertal girls. Results: Caffeine at both doses resulted in greater changes in responses on the Addiction Research Center Inventory and the Brief Assessment of Mood States compared with placebo. Girls reported greater increases from baseline to peak in feeling different and liking the feeling than boys after 2 mg/kg of caffeine regardless of pubertal stage. Postpubertal girls also had a greater decrease from baseline in reports of feeling high and greater increases from baseline in reports of wanting more than postpubertal males. Finally, girls had greater changes (both increases and decreases) in responses on the Brief Mood Questionnaire when in the follicular phase compared with the luteal phase. This was also true for reports of feeling high and feeling different on the Drug Effects Questionnaire. None of these effects varied as a function of usual caffeine use, suggesting that differences are not the result of tolerance or sensitization. Conclusions: These results suggest that subjective responses to caffeine emerge before puberty, but sex differences may be strengthened after pubertal development. PMID:26649252

  14. Quantitative Analysis by Isotopic Dilution Using Mass Spectroscopy: The Determination of Caffeine by GC-MS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Devon W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for quantitative analysis of caffeine by an isotopic dilution method for coupled gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Discusses caffeine analysis and experimental methodology. Lists sample caffeine concentrations found in common products. (MVL)

  15. Influence of acetaminophen on performance during time trial cycling.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Alexis R; Jones, Andrew M; Williams, Craig A

    2010-01-01

    To establish whether acetaminophen improves performance of self-paced exercise through the reduction of perceived pain, 13 trained male cyclists performed a self-paced 10-mile (16.1 km) cycle time trial (TT) following the ingestion of either acetaminophen (ACT) or a placebo (PLA), administered in randomized double-blind design. TT were completed in a significantly faster time (t(12) = 2.55, P < 0.05) under the ACT condition (26 min 15 s +/- 1 min 36 s vs. 26 min 45 s +/- 2 min 2 s). Power output (PO) was higher during the middle section of the TT in the ACT condition, resulting in a higher mean PO (P < 0.05) (265 +/- 12 vs. 255 +/- 15 W). Blood lactate concentration (B[La]) and heart rate (HR) were higher in the ACT condition (B[La] = 6.1 +/- 2.9 mmol/l; HR = 87 +/- 7%max) than in the PLA condition (B[La] = 5.1 +/- 2.6 mmol/l; HR = 84 +/- 9%max) (P < 0.05). No significant difference in rating of perceived exertion (ACT = 15.5 +/- 0.2; PLA = 15.7 +/- 0.2) or perceived pain (ACT = 5.6 +/- 0.2; PLA = 5.5 +/- 0.2) (P > 0.05) was observed. Using acetaminophen, participants cycled at a higher mean PO, with an increased HR and B[La], but without changes in perceived pain or exertion. Consequently, completion time was significantly faster. These findings support the notion that exercise is regulated by pain perception, and increased pain tolerance can improve exercise capacity.

  16. Carbamazepine suppresses synchronized afterdischarging in disinhibited immature rat hippocampus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Smith, K L; Swann, J W

    1987-01-06

    Bath application of therapeutic concentrations of the anticonvulsant carbamazepine suppressed penicillin-induced synchronized afterdischarging in immature rat CA3 hippocampal pyramidal cells. Afterdischarging was completely abolished in all preparations at a concentration of 30 microM (IC50 = 8.5 +/- 1.4 microM; mean +/- S.E.M.). The duration of the preceding epileptiform burst was not altered at this concentration and was diminished by only 24.4 +/- 1.2% at a supratherapeutic concentration of 100 microM. These results suggest that a carbamazepine-sensitive neurophysiological mechanism distinct from those responsible for epileptiform burst generation plays a key role in the generation of afterdischarges in developing hippocampus.

  17. Implications of Sensorineural Hearing Loss With Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Novac, Andrei; Iosif, Anamaria M.; Groysman, Regina; Bota, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is an infrequently recognized side effect of pain medication abuse. Chronic pain patients treated with opiates develop different degrees of tolerance to pain medications. In many cases, the tolerance becomes the gateway to a variety of cycles of overuse and unmasking of significant psychiatric morbidity and mortality. An individualized approach utilizing combined treatment modalities (including nonopiate pharmaceuticals) is expected to become the norm. Patients can now be provided with multidisciplinary care that addresses an individual’s psychiatric, social, and medical needs, which requires close cooperation between physicians of varying specialties. This report describes a patient who experienced hearing loss from hydrocodone/acetaminophen abuse. PMID:26835162

  18. Heavy caffeine intake in pregnancy and sudden infant death syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ford, R; Schluter, P; Mitchell, E; Taylor, B; Scragg, R; Stewart, A; the, N; OSMOND, C.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To examine the association between maternal caffeine consumption during pregnancy and the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
METHODS—A nationwide case-control study surveying parents of 393 SIDS victims and parents of 1592 control infants. Caffeine consumption in each of the first and third trimesters was estimated by questionnaire. Heavy caffeine intake was defined as 400 mg/day or more (equivalent to four or more cups of coffee per day).
RESULTS—Infants whose mothers had heavy caffeine consumption throughout their pregnancy had a significantly increased risk for SIDS (odds ratio 1.65; 95% confidence interval 1.15 to 2.35) after adjusting for likely confounding factors.
CONCLUSION—Caffeine intake has been associated with fetal harm and now SIDS. Reducing heavy caffeine intake during pregnancy could be another way to lessen the risk of SIDS. This needs confirmation by others.

 PMID:9534669

  19. Caffeine content of energy drinks, carbonated sodas, and other beverages.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Rachel R; Goldberger, Bruce A; Cone, Edward J

    2006-03-01

    The caffeine content of 10 energy drinks, 19 carbonated sodas, and 7 other beverages was determined. In addition, the variability of the caffeine content of Coca-Cola fountain soda was evaluated. Caffeine was isolated from the samples by liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed by gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection. The caffeine concentration of the caffeinated energy drinks ranged from none detected to 141.1 mg/serving. The caffeine content of the carbonated sodas ranged from none detected to 48.2 mg/serving, and the content of the other beverages ranged from < 2.7 to 105.7 mg/serving. The intra-assay mean, standard deviation, and % coefficient of variation for the Coca-Cola fountain samples were 44.5, 2.95, and 6.64 mg/serving, respectively.

  20. Caffeine's mechanisms of action and its cosmetic use.

    PubMed

    Herman, A; Herman, A P

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine is being increasingly used in cosmetics due to its high biological activity and ability to penetrate the skin barrier. This alkaloid is frequently used as a hydrophilic model substance in human and animal skin penetration as well as different synthetic membrane using Franz diffusion cell experiments. The commercially available topical formulations of caffeine normally contain 3% caffeine. As for a cosmetic purpose, caffeine is used as an active compound in anti-cellulite products because it prevents excessive accumulation of fat in cells. This alkaloid stimulates the degradation of fats during lipolysis through inhibition of the phosphodiesterase activity. Caffeine has potent antioxidant properties. It helps protect cells against the UV radiation and slows down the process of photoaging of the skin. Moreover, caffeine contained in cosmetics increases the microcirculation of blood in the skin and also stimulates the growth of hair through inhibition of the 5-α-reductase activity.

  1. Caffeine potentiates the enhancement by choline of striatal acetylcholine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. A.; Ulus, I. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effect of peripherally administered caffeine (50 mg/kg), choline (30, 60, or 120 mg/kg) or combinations of both drugs on the spontaneous release of acetylcholine (ACh) from the corpus striatum of anesthetized rats using in vivo microdialysis. Caffeine alone or choline in the 30 or 60 mg/kg dose failed to increase ACh in microdialysis samples; the 120 mg/kg choline dose significantly enhanced ACh during the 80 min following drug administration. Coadministration of caffeine with choline significantly increased ACh release after each of the choline doses tested. Peak microdialysate levels with the 120 mg/kg dose were increased 112% when caffeine was additionally administered, as compared with 54% without caffeine. These results indicate that choline administration can enhance spontaneous ACh release from neurons, and that caffeine, a drug known to block adenosine receptors on these neurons, can amplify the choline effect.

  2. Carbamazepine inhibits angiotensin I-converting enzyme, linking it to the pathogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, S S; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, M G; Guimarães, P B; Wasinski, F; Pereira, F E G; Canzian, M; Centeno, R S; Carrete, H; Yacubian, E M; Carmona, A K; Vieira, R F F; Nakaie, C R; Sabatini, R A; Perosa, S R; Bacurau, R F P; Gouveia, T L F; Gallo, G; Würtele, M; Cavalheiro, E A; Silva, J A; Pesquero, J B; Araujo, R C

    2012-01-01

    We find that a common mutation that increases angiotensin I-converting enzyme activity occurs with higher frequency in male patients suffering from refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. However, in their brains, the activity of the enzyme is downregulated. As an explanation, we surprisingly find that carbamazepine, commonly used to treat epilepsy, is an inhibitor of the enzyme, thus providing a direct link between epilepsy and the renin–angiotensin and kallikrein–kinin systems. PMID:22832858

  3. Prophylactic and Therapeutic Potential of Acetyl-L-carnitine against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Salman A; Alanazi, Abdulrazaq; Bakheet, Saleh A; Alharbi, Naif O; Nagi, Mahmoud N

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic effects of acetylcarnitine against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity were studied in mice. To evaluate the prophylactic effects of acetylcarnitine, mice were supplemented with acetylcarnitine (2 mmol/kg/day per oral (p.o.) for 5 days) before a single dose of acetaminophen (350 mg/kg intraperitoneal (i.p.)). Animals were sacrificed 6 h after acetaminophen injection. Acetaminophen significantly increased the markers of liver injury, hepatic reactive oxygen species, and nitrate/nitrite, and decreased hepatic glutathione (GSH) and the antioxidant enzymes. Acetylcarnitine supplementation resulted in reversal of all biochemical parameters toward the control values. To explore the therapeutic effects of acetylcarnitine, mice were given a single dose of acetylcarnitine (0.5, 1, and 2 mmol/kg p.o.) 1.5 h after acetaminophen. Animals were sacrificed 6 h after acetaminophen. Acetylcarnitine administration resulted in partial reversal of liver injury only at 2 mmol/kg p.o. At equimolar doses, N-acetylcystiene was superior as therapeutic agent to acetylcarnitine. However, acetylcarnitine potentiated the effect of N-acetylcystiene in the treatment of acetaminophen toxicity.

  4. Use of acetaminophen in relation to the occurrence of cancer: a review of epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Noel S

    2016-12-01

    Acetaminophen has several pharmacologic properties that suggest it could be carcinogenic in human beings. A number of epidemiologic studies have been conducted to examine whether use of acetaminophen actually predisposes to the occurrence of one or more forms of cancer. There are inherent limitations to many of these studies, including the inaccurate identification of users and nonusers of acetaminophen, relatively short follow-up for cancer incidence, and the potential for confounding by indication. The present manuscript reviews the results of epidemiologic studies of acetaminophen use in relation to cancer incidence published through the end of 2015. The limitations of the underlying studies notwithstanding, some interim conclusions can be reached. For all but several forms of cancer, there is no suggestion that persons who have taken acetaminophen are at altered risk, even persons who have consumed a large quantity of the drug or those who have taken it for an extended duration. While in some studies the incidence of renal cell carcinoma has been observed to be increased among acetaminophen users, several other studies have failed to observe any such association; the reason for the discrepant findings is unclear. Some of the small number of studies that have presented data on the incidence of lymphoma, leukemia, and plasma cell disorders have found the risk to be modestly higher in users than nonusers of acetaminophen, but the results of other studies of these malignancies will be needed to gauge the possible role of publication bias as the basis for the positive results.

  5. BGP-15 inhibits caspase-independent programmed cell death in acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Gabor; Szarka, Andras; Lotz, Gabor; Doczi, Judit; Wunderlich, Livius; Kiss, Andras; Jemnitz, Katalin; Veres, Zsuzsa; Banhegyi, Gabor; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Suemegi, Balazs; Mandl, Jozsef

    2010-02-15

    It has been recently shown that acute acetaminophen toxicity results in endoplasmic reticulum redox stress and an increase in cells with apoptotic phenotype in liver. Since activation of effector caspases was absent, the relevance of caspase-independent mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death was investigated. BGP-15, a drug with known protective actions in conditions involving redox imbalance, has been co-administered with a single sublethal dose of acetaminophen. Proapoptotic events and outcome of the injury were investigated. ER redox alterations and early ER-stress-related signaling events induced by acetaminophen, such as ER glutathione depletion, phosphorylation of eIF2alpha and JNK and induction of the transcription factor GADD153, were not counteracted by co-treatment with BGP-15. However, BGP-15 prevented AIF mitochondria-to-nucleus translocation and mitochondrial depolarization. BGP-15 co-treatment attenuated the rate of acetaminophen-induced cell death as assessed by apoptotic index and enzyme serum release. These results reaffirm that acute acetaminophen toxicity involves oxidative stress-induced caspase-independent cell death. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of AIF translocation may effectively protect against or at least delay acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death.

  6. The effects of caffeine and expectancy on attention and memory.

    PubMed

    Oei, Adam; Hartley, Laurence R

    2005-04-01

    The present study contrasted caffeine's effects on individuals who expect caffeine to stimulate them and those who do not. Secondly, whether a message that caffeine rather than placebo was administered would also affect these two groups of subjects differently was investigated. The study was conducted single-blind in a 2x2x2 mixed design. The between subjects factor was whether they expected caffeine to stimulate them (E+) or not (E-) according to their self reports obtained before the experiment began. The within subjects factors were message (told caffeine vs told placebo) and beverage type (given caffeine vs placebo). Sixteen subjects in each group (n=32) performed on signal detection, memory scanning and delayed free recall tasks following ingestion of either caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee on two sessions each, a total of four experimental sessions. On each session, subjects were given a message regarding their drink (told caffeine vs told placebo). However, on two sessions there was a mismatch between the message and drink given. For signal detection, performance under caffeine was better than placebo in the E+ but not the E- group. However, subjects in the E+ group did not benefit more than the E- group in either message condition. On memory scanning, detections and false alarms did not differ for either beverage, nor was there a differential finding in the E+ and E- groups. However, reaction time under caffeine condition was shorter. No effects of message were found. Caffeine and message also did not have any effect on performance on the delayed free recall task. The hypothesis that caffeine and message would affect E+ and E- subjects differentially was partly supported.

  7. Caffeine as an indicator of estrogenic activity in source water.

    PubMed

    Montagner, C C; Umbuzeiro, G A; Pasquini, C; Jardim, W F

    2014-08-01

    Caffeine has already been used as an indicator of anthropogenic impacts, especially the ones related to the disposal of sewage in water bodies. In this work, the presence of caffeine has been correlated with the estrogenic activity of water samples measured using the BLYES assay. After testing 96 surface water samples, it was concluded that caffeine can be used to prioritize samples to be tested for estrogenic activity in water quality programs evaluating emerging contaminants with endocrine disruptor activity.

  8. In Silico Identification of Bioremediation Potential: Carbamazepine and Other Recalcitrant Personal Care Products.

    PubMed

    Aukema, Kelly G; Escalante, Diego E; Maltby, Meghan M; Bera, Asim K; Aksan, Alptekin; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2017-01-17

    Emerging contaminants are principally personal care products not readily removed by conventional wastewater treatment and, with an increasing reliance on water recycling, become disseminated in drinking water supplies. Carbamazepine, a widely used neuroactive pharmaceutical, increasingly escapes wastewater treatment and is found in potable water. In this study, a mechanism is proposed by which carbamazepine resists biodegradation, and a previously unknown microbial biodegradation was predicted computationally. The prediction identified biphenyl dioxygenase from Paraburkholderia xenovorans LB400 as the best candidate enzyme for metabolizing carbamazepine. The rate of degradation described here is 40 times greater than the best reported rates. The metabolites cis-10,11-dihydroxy-10,11-dihydrocarbamazepine and cis-2,3-dihydroxy-2,3-dihydrocarbamazepine were demonstrated with the native organism and a recombinant host. The metabolites are considered nonharmful and mitigate the generation of carcinogenic acridine products known to form when advanced oxidation methods are used in water treatment. Other recalcitrant personal care products were subjected to prediction by the Pathway Prediction System and tested experimentally with P. xenovorans LB400. It was shown to biodegrade structurally diverse compounds. Predictions indicated hydrolase or oxygenase enzymes catalyzed the initial reactions. This study highlights the potential for using the growing body of enzyme-structural and genomic information with computational methods to rapidly identify enzymes and microorganisms that biodegrade emerging contaminants.

  9. Carbamazepine-induced Life-threatening Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Agranulocytosis: The Maiden Case

    PubMed Central

    Avinash, A.; Kunder, Sushil Kiran; Madhyastha, Sharath; Meenakumari, K.

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome is one of the few dermatological emergencies in clinical practice. The syndrome is often secondary to the usage of drugs, of which allopurinol, penicillins, sulfa drugs, ibuprofen, sodium valproate, phenytoin, lamotrigine and carbamazepine are commonly implicated. Agranulocytosis is the existence of a clinically significant reduction in neutrophil count. This condition is a serious threat to the patient, as he/she is at a greater risk of contracting bacterial or fungal infections, which may prove to be fatal. The co-existence of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and agranulocytosis in the same patient further increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports available in the existing literature, of cases that were reported with both these life-threatening conditions in a single patient, at the same point of time. This is a case narrative of a patient who presented with both Stevens-Johnson syndrome and agranulocytosis, following the administration of carbamazepine The patient’s differential leucocyte count revealed a neutrophil proportion of 2.33%. A causality assessment done using Naranjo’s algorithm showed that carbamazepine “definitely” caused Agranulocytosis and “probably” caused Stevens-Johnson syndrome. PMID:28208879

  10. Field and laboratory fish tissue accumulation of the anti-convulsant drug carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Santos N; Foster, Michael; Constantine, Lisa A; Huggett, Duane B

    2012-10-01

    Understanding the potential for human and veterinary pharmaceuticals to accumulate in the tissues of biota is a topic of increasing importance in the pharmaceutical risk assessment process. However, few data are available in the literature that compare the ability of laboratory bioconcentration studies to predict field tissue concentrations. To begin to address this data gap, bioconcentration factors (BCF) for carbamazepine (CBZ), a human anticonvulsant that modulates Na+ channels, were determined using laboratory experiments with Pimephales notatus and Ictalurus punctatus. These data were compared to field derived bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for Oreochromis niloticus from the Denton, Texas Wastewater Treatment Plant. The 42 d kinetic BCFs (BCFk) for white muscle and liver of P. notatus were 1.9 and 4.6, respectively, while the white muscle, liver, brain, and plasma BCFk's of I. punctatus were 1.8, 1.5, 1.6, and 7.1, respectively. Field derived BAF values (2.5-3.8) for O. niloticus were similar to those derived in laboratory studies. Partitioning values between blood plasma and individual tissues were calculated for I. punctatus and O. niloticus, with the values indicating that tissue levels of carbamazepine are similar or slightly higher than plasma concentrations. Collectively these data suggest that the fish laboratory BCF and field derived BCF/BAF values for carbamazepine are similar and much lower than the European Union regulatory threshold of 2000 for designation of a "B" substance.

  11. GC-MS analysis and ecotoxicological risk assessment of triclosan, carbamazepine and parabens in Indian rivers.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Babu Rajendran; Shanmugam, Govindaraj; Velu, Geetha; Rengarajan, Bhuvaneshwari; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2011-02-28

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products are used extensively worldwide and their residues are frequently reported in aquatic environments. In this study, antiepileptic, antimicrobial and preservative compounds were analyzed in surface water and sediment from the Kaveri, Vellar and Tamiraparani rivers, and in the Pichavaram mangrove in India by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The mean concentration of carbamazepine recorded in the Kaveri River water (28.3 ng/L) was higher than in the other rivers and the mangrove. Because carbamazepine is used only in human drugs, this may reflect the relative contributions of human excretions/sewage in these rivers. The mean triclosan level in the Tamiraparani River (944 ng/L) was an order of magnitude greater than in the other water systems, and the concentrations at two of the sites reported here (3800-5160 ng/L) are, to our best knowledge, among the highest detected in surface waters. Sediment levels were, however, comparable with other sites. We conclude that industrial releases are likely major contributors of triclosan into this river system. Among parabens, ethyl paraben was predominantly observed. Hazard Quotients suggest greater environmental risks for triclosan than for carbamazepine and parabens. This is the first study on antiepileptic, antimicrobial and preservatives in rivers and mangroves from India.

  12. Derivation of water quality standards for carbamazepine, metoprolol, and metformin and comparison with monitoring data.

    PubMed

    Moermond, Caroline T A; Smit, C Els

    2016-04-01

    Environmental quality standards (EQSs) for 3 pharmaceuticals in surface water were derived: carbamazepine (epilepsy), metoprolol (heart failure), and metformin (diabetes). In recent years, these pharmaceuticals have been detected frequently in Dutch surface waters. The proposed standards are based on ecotoxicity data from national and European authorization dossiers and additional information obtained from open literature. The methods used are in accordance with the methodology of the Water Framework Directive and national frameworks for risk limit derivation. Only the exposure route regarding direct ecotoxic effects on ecosystems could be taken into account for deriving EQSs. The exposure route of secondary poisoning of fish-eating animals was not triggered, and not enough data were available or accessible to derive an EQS for the exposure of humans due to consumption of fish. Monitoring data for surface waters worldwide show that the proposed quality standards for carbamazepine may be exceeded. It could be expected that when carbamazepine use increases or effluents are diluted less during dry seasons, standards will be exceeded more often.

  13. Mass balance analysis of triclosan, diethyltoluamide, crotamiton and carbamazepine in sewage treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Nakada, N; Yasojima, M; Okayasu, Y; Komori, K; Suzuki, Y

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of antibacterial triclosan, insect-repellent diethyltoluamide (DEET), anticonvulsant carbamazepine, and antipruritic crotamiton was investigated at two sewage treatment plants (STPs) to clarify their complete mass balance. Twenty-four-hour flow-proportional composite samples were collected from the influent and effluent of primary and final sedimentation tanks, a biofiltration tank and disinfection tanks. Sludge samples (i.e., activated and excess sludge) and samples of the return flow from the sludge treatment process were collected in the same manner. The analytes in both the dissolved and particulate phases were individually determined by a gas chromatograph equipped with mass spectrometer. Triclosan was dominantly detected in the particulate phase especially in the early stage of treatment (up to 83%) and was efficiently removed (over 90%) in STPs, mainly by sorption to sewage sludge. Limited removal was observed for DEET (55+/-24%), while no significant removal was demonstrated for crotamiton or carbamazepine. The solid-water distribution coefficients (K(d), n=4) for triclosan (log K(d): 3.7-5.1), DEET (1.3-1.9) and crotamiton (1.1-1.6) in the sludge samples are also determined in this study. These findings indicate the limitations of current sewage treatment techniques for the removal of these water-soluble drugs (i.e. DEET, carbamazepine, and crotamiton).

  14. Influence of combinations of acetylsalicylic acid, acetaminophen, and diclofenac on platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Galliard-Grigioni, Katja S; Fehr, Martin; Reinhart, Walter H

    2008-10-24

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is often given together with other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen. The latter have been accused in epidemiologic studies to cause an increased cardiovascular risk. We have, therefore, analysed the influence of various such drug combinations on platelet aggregation in vitro. Citrated blood was incubated with either 25 microg/ml acetaminophen, 0.5 microg/ml aspirin, 0.04 microg/ml diclofenac, or buffer; followed by a second of the above-mentioned solutions. After a 20 min incubation, platelet aggregation was assessed with a platelet function analyser (PFA-100), which measures the pore closure time (CT) by aggregating platelets. The length of CT reflects the degree of platelet inhibition. Acetaminophen alone did not affect platelet aggregation. Aspirin and diclofenac both increased CT (184+/-69 s, P<0.01 and 196+/-54 s, P<0.001; control 120+/-13 s). Combinations of either aspirin and diclofenac, aspirin and acetaminophen, or diclofenac and acetaminophen increased CT further (290+/-22 s, 281+/-36 s, 288+/-25 s, respectively, P<0.001). The time sequence of drug application was important: when diclofenac or acetaminophen was added before aspirin, platelet aggregation was less inhibited than when given in opposite order, i.e. aspirin prior to diclofenac or acetaminophen. We conclude that acetaminophen by itself does not affect platelet aggregation, but potentiates the antiaggregatory effect of aspirin or diclofenac. Aspirin given before acetaminophen or diclofenac had a more potent antiaggregatory effect than vice versa. These observations may have clinical implications.

  15. Variability in Acetaminophen Labeling Practices: a Missed Opportunity to Enhance Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    King, Jennifer P; McCarthy, Danielle M; Serper, Marina; Jacobson, Kara L; Mullen, Rebecca J; Parker, Ruth M; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Confusion regarding a drug's active ingredient may lead to simultaneous use of multiple acetaminophen-containing prescriptions and increase the risk of unintentional overdose. The objective of this study was to examine prescription labeling practices for commonly prescribed acetaminophen-containing analgesics, specifically focusing on how active ingredient information and concomitant use warnings were conveyed. Patients with new acetaminophen-containing prescriptions were recruited upon discharge from an emergency department in Chicago or at an outpatient, hospital-based pharmacy in Atlanta. Label information was transcribed from prescription bottles and patients' knowledge of active ingredient was assessed by in-person interviews. Among the 245 acetaminophen-containing prescriptions, hydrocodone was the most common second active ingredient (n = 208, 84.8 %) followed by oxycodone (n = 28, 11.4 %). Acetaminophen was identified by its full name on 6.9 % (n = 17) of labels; various abbreviations were used in 93.1 % of cases. One hundred forty-seven bottles used auxiliary warning labels with the majority of labels (n = 130, 88.4 %) warning about maximum dose and 11.5 % (n = 17) about concomitant use. Most of the study participants (n = 177, 72.2 %) were not able to identify acetaminophen as an active ingredient in their prescription. There was no significant association between the use of unabbreviated labels including warning information and patients' awareness of acetaminophen as an active ingredient (36.4 vs. 27.3 %, p = 0.50). We noted high variability in labeling practices and warning information conveyed to patients receiving acetaminophen-containing prescriptions. Missed opportunities to adequately convey risk information may contribute to the burden of acetaminophen-related liver injury.

  16. Use of acetaminophen (paracetamol) during pregnancy and the risk of autism spectrum disorder in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-02-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is available over the counter in most countries and is widely considered to be safe for use during pregnancy; studies report gestational exposures to acetaminophen that lie in the 46%-65% range. Acetaminophen influences inflammatory and immunologic mechanisms and may predispose to oxidative stress; these and other effects are hypothesized to have the potential to compromise neurodevelopment in the fetal and infant brain. Two ecological studies suggested that population-level trends in the use of acetaminophen were associated with trends in the incidence/prevalence of autism; one of these studies specifically examined acetaminophen use during pregnancy. One large prospective observational cohort study found that gestational exposure to acetaminophen (especially when the duration of exposure was 28 days or more) was associated with motor milestone delay, gross and fine motor impairments, communication impairment, impairments in internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and hyperactivity, all at age 3 years; however, social and emotional developmental behaviors were mostly unaffected. A very recent large cohort study with a 12.7-year follow-up found that gestational exposure to acetaminophen was associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorder, but only when a hyperkinetic disorder was also present. In the light of existing data associating acetaminophen use during pregnancy and subsequent risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, this new finding suggests that the predisposition, if any, is toward the hyperkinetic syndrome rather than to autism. In summary, the empirical data are very limited, but whatever empirical data exist do not support the suggestion that the use of acetaminophen during pregnancy increases the risk of autism in the offspring.

  17. Study on the reaction mechanism and the static injection chemiluminescence method for detection of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongjun; Zhang, Huili; Yu, Songcheng; Yu, Fei; Li, Yanqiang; Zhang, Hongquan; Qu, Lingbo; Harrington, Peter de B

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen, also called paracetamol, is found in Tylenol, Excedrin and other products as over-the-counter medicines. In this study, acetaminophen as a luminol signal enhancer was used in the chemiluminescence (CL) substrate solution of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for the first time. The use of acetaminophen in the luminol-HRP-H2O2 system affected not only the intensity of the obtained signal, but also its kinetics. It was shown that acetaminophen was to be a potent enhancer of the luminol-HRP-H2O2 system. A putative enhancement mechanism for the luminol-H2O2-HRP-acetaminophen system is presented. The resonance of the nucleophilic amide group and the benzene ring of acetaminophen structure have a great effect on O-H bond dissociation energy of the phenol group and therefore on phenoxyl radical stabilization. These radicals act as mediators between HRP and luminol in an electron transfer reaction that generates luminol radicals and subsequently light emission, in which the intensity of CL is enhanced in the presence of acetaminophen. In addition, a simple method was developed to detect acetaminophen by static injection CL based on the enhanced CL system of luminol-H2O2-HRP by acetaminophen. Experimental conditions, such as pH and concentrations of substrates, have been examined and optimized. The proposed method exhibited good performance, the linear range was from 0.30 to 7.5 mM, the relative standard deviation was 1.86% (n = 10), limit of detection was 0.16 mM and recovery was 99 ± 4%.

  18. Direct Evidence of Acetaminophen Interference with Subcutaneous Glucose Sensing in Humans: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Ananda; Veettil, Sona; Dyer, Roy; Peyser, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Recent advances in accuracy and reliability of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices have focused renewed interest on the use of such technology for therapeutic dosing of insulin without the need for independent confirmatory blood glucose meter measurements. An important issue that remains is the susceptibility of CGM devices to erroneous readings in the presence of common pharmacologic interferences. We report on a new method of assessing CGM sensor error to pharmacologic interferences using the example of oral administration of acetaminophen. Materials and Methods: We examined the responses of several different Food and Drug Administration–approved and commercially available CGM systems (Dexcom [San Diego, CA] Seven® Plus™, Medtronic Diabetes [Northridge, CA] Guardian®, and Dexcom G4® Platinum) to oral acetaminophen in 10 healthy volunteers without diabetes. Microdialysis catheters were placed in the abdominal subcutaneous tissue. Blood and microdialysate samples were collected periodically and analyzed for glucose and acetaminophen concentrations before and after oral ingestion of 1 g of acetaminophen. We compared the response of CGM sensors with the measured acetaminophen concentrations in the blood and interstitial fluid. Results: Although plasma glucose concentrations remained constant at approximately 90 mg/dL (approximately 5 mM) throughout the study, CGM glucose measurements varied between approximately 85 to 400 mg/dL (from approximately 5 to 22 mM) due to interference from the acetaminophen. The temporal profile of CGM interference followed acetaminophen concentrations measured in interstitial fluid (ISF). Conclusions: This is the first direct measurement of ISF concentrations of putative CGM interferences with simultaneous measurements of CGM performance in the presence of the interferences. The observed interference with glucose measurements in the tested CGM devices coincided temporally with appearance of

  19. Antibacterial activity of caffeine against plant pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sledz, Wojciech; Los, Emilia; Paczek, Agnieszka; Rischka, Jacek; Motyka, Agata; Zoledowska, Sabina; Piosik, Jacek; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of a plant secondary metabolite - caffeine. Caffeine is present in over 100 plant species. Antibacterial activity of caffeine was examined against the following plant-pathogenic bacteria: Ralstonia solanacearum (Rsol), Clavibacter michiganesis subsp. sepedonicus (Cms), Dickeya solani (Dsol), Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba), Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc), Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst), and Xanthomonas campestris subsp. campestris (Xcc). MIC and MBC values ranged from 5 to 20 mM and from 43 to 100 mM, respectively. Caffeine increased the bacterial generation time of all tested species and caused changes in cell morphology. The influence of caffeine on the synthesis of DNA, RNA and proteins was investigated in cultures of plant pathogenic bacteria with labelled precursors: [(3)H]thymidine, [(3)H]uridine or (14)C leucine, respectively. RNA biosynthesis was more affected than DNA or protein biosynthesis in bacterial cells treated with caffeine. Treatment of Pba with caffeine for 336 h did not induce resistance to this compound. Caffeine application reduced disease symptoms caused by Dsol on chicory leaves, potato slices, and whole potato tubers. The data presented indicate caffeine as a potential tool for the control of diseases caused by plant-pathogenic bacteria, especially under storage conditions.

  20. Caffeine enhances micturition through neuronal activation in micturition centers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Sam; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Hwan, Lakkyong; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Jin, Jun-Jang; Chung, Jun-Young; Kim, Khae-Hawn

    2014-12-01

    Caffeine may promote incontinence through its diuretic effect, particularly in individuals with underlying detrusor overactivity, in addition to increasing muscle contraction of the bladder smooth muscle. Caffeine may also affect bladder function via central micturition centers, including the medial preoptic area, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray, and pontine micturition center. However, the biochemical mechanisms of caffeine in central micturition centers affecting bladder function remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of caffeine on the central micturition reflex were investigated by measuring the degree of neuronal activation, and by quantifying nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in rats. Following caffeine administration for 14 days, a urodynamic study was performed to assess the changes to bladder function. Subsequently, immunohistochemical staining to identify the expression of c‑Fos and NGF in the central micturition areas was performed. Ingestion of caffeine increased bladder smooth muscle contraction pressure and time as determined by cystometry. Expression levels of c‑Fos and NGF in all central micturition areas were significantly increased following the administration of caffeine. The effects on contraction pressure and time were the most potent and expression levels of c‑Fos and NGF were greatest at the lowest dose of caffeine. These results suggest that caffeine facilitates bladder instability through enhancing neuronal activation in the central micturition areas.

  1. The interaction of caffeine with substituted cyclodextrins in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhova, I. V.; Kumeev, R. S.; Al'Per, G. A.

    2007-07-01

    The interaction of caffeine with hydroxypropyl-and methylcyclodextrins in water was studied by the calorimetry, spectroscopy, and solubility methods at 298.15 K. The interaction of caffeine with these cyclodextrins did not result in the formation of stable inclusion complexes and was mostly accompanied by predominantly endothermic effects of particle dehydration. The introduction of substituents and changes in the size of cyclodextrin molecular cavity did not influence the ability of cyclodextrins to form complexes with caffeine. The conclusion was drawn that substituted cyclodextrins could not be used for increasing the solubility of caffeine in water.

  2. Caffeine intake is related to successful weight loss maintenance.

    PubMed

    Icken, D; Feller, S; Engeli, S; Mayr, A; Müller, A; Hilbert, A; de Zwaan, M

    2016-04-01

    The effect of caffeine intake on weight loss maintenance has not been examined in humans. We compared the daily consumption of coffee and caffeinated beverages between 494 weight loss maintainers and 2129 individuals from the general population controlling for sociodemographic variables, body mass index and physical activity level. Weight loss maintainers reported to consume significantly more cups of coffee and caffeinated beverages compared with the participants in the general population sample. Thus, consumption of caffeinated beverages might support weight loss maintenance. Further studies should investigate possible mechanisms.

  3. Exercise and sport performance with low doses of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Spriet, Lawrence L

    2014-11-01

    Caffeine is a popular work-enhancing supplement that has been actively researched since the 1970s. The majority of research has examined the effects of moderate to high caffeine doses (5-13 mg/kg body mass) on exercise and sport. These caffeine doses have profound effects on the responses to exercise at the whole-body level and are associated with variable results and some undesirable side effects. Low doses of caffeine (<3 mg/kg body mass, ~200 mg) are also ergogenic in some exercise and sport situations, although this has been less well studied. Lower caffeine doses (1) do not alter the peripheral whole-body responses to exercise; (2) improve vigilance, alertness, and mood and cognitive processes during and after exercise; and (3) are associated with few, if any, side effects. Therefore, the ergogenic effect of low caffeine doses appears to result from alterations in the central nervous system. However, several aspects of consuming low doses of caffeine remain unresolved and suffer from a paucity of research, including the potential effects on high-intensity sprint and burst activities. The responses to low doses of caffeine are also variable and athletes need to determine whether the ingestion of ~200 mg of caffeine before and/or during training and competitions is ergogenic on an individual basis.

  4. Caffeine Content in Popular Energy Drinks and Energy Shots.

    PubMed

    Attipoe, Selasi; Leggit, Jeffrey; Deuster, Patricia A

    2016-09-01

    The use of energy beverages is high among the general population and military personnel. Previous studies have reported discrepancies between the actual amount of caffeine in products and the amount of caffeine on stated labels. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the content of caffeine listed on the labels of various energy drinks and energy shots. Top-selling energy drinks (n = 9) and energy shots (n = 5) were purchased from retail stores. Three of each of the 14 products were purchased and analyzed for caffeine content by an independent laboratory. Of the 14 products tested, 5 did not provide caffeine amounts on their facts panel-of those, 3 listed caffeine as an ingredient and 2 listed caffeine as part of a proprietary blend. The remaining 9 (of 14) products stated the amounts of caffeine on their labels, all of which were within 15% of the amount indicated on the label. In this study, although the energy beverages that indicated the amount of caffeine it contained had values within ±15% of the amount listed on the label, a potentially acceptable range, this finding is not acceptable with regard to current labeling regulations, which require added ingredients to total 100%.

  5. Effect of Caffeinated Soft Drinks on Salivary Flow

    PubMed Central

    Tantbirojn, Daranee; Augustson, David G.; Guo, Hongfei

    2013-01-01

    Background Soft drinks containing caffeine have been associated with more aggressive forms of dental decay. Cariogenicity of caffeinated soft drinks may be attributed to the effect of caffeine on salivary flow. This study assessed whether caffeinated soft drinks produced short-term oral dryness in healthy adults. Methods The authors collected saliva on two separate days from 35 participants before and one hour after drinking a soft drink. On one of the days the soft drink was caffeinated and on the other day it was not. Saliva collection involved 15 minutes unstimulated whole saliva, 5 minutes paraffin-stimulated whole saliva, and 10 seconds labial minor salivary gland output. Results Unstimulated and stimulated flow rates slightly increased and minor gland output slightly decreased one hour after the soft drink consumption regardless of caffeine content. These changes were not statistically significant (two-period two-treatment crossover trial using two-stage Grizzle model, p>0.05). A linear mixed model statistic did not show the caffeine effect on salivary flow rate. Conclusions Caffeinated soft drink consumption had no significant effect on salivary flow rate after one hour by any of the three measures employed in this study. Caffeine's contribution to the cariogenicity of soft drinks is likely by centrally-mediated effects on consumption patterns. PMID:24761280

  6. Caffeine intake may modulate inflammation markers in trained rats.

    PubMed

    Barcelos, Rômulo Pillon; Souza, Mauren Assis; Amaral, Guilherme Pires; Stefanello, Silvio Terra; Bresciani, Guilherme; Fighera, Michele Rechia; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; de Vargas Barbosa, Nilda

    2014-04-21

    Caffeine is presented in many commercial products and has been proven to induce ergogenic effects in exercise, mainly related to redox status homeostasis, inflammation and oxidative stress-related adaptation mechanisms. However, most studies have mainly focused on muscle adaptations, and the role of caffeine in different tissues during exercise training has not been fully described. The aim of this study was therefore, to analyze the effects of chronic caffeine intake and exercise training on liver mitochondria functioning and plasma inflammation markers. Rats were divided into control, control/caffeine, exercise, and exercise/caffeine groups. Exercise groups underwent four weeks of swimming training and caffeine groups were supplemented with 6 mg/kg/day. Liver mitochondrial swelling and complex I activity, and plasma myeloperoxidase (MPO) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were measured. An anti-inflammatory effect of exercise was evidenced by reduced plasma MPO activity. Additionally, caffeine intake alone and combined with exercise decreased the plasma AChE and MPO activities. The per se anti-inflammatory effect of caffeine intake should be highlighted considering its widespread use as an ergogenic aid. Therefore, caffeine seems to interfere on exercise-induced adaptations and could also be used in different exercise-related health treatments.

  7. Caffeine Consumption and Sleep Quality in Australian Adults.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emily J; Coates, Alison M; Kohler, Mark; Banks, Siobhan

    2016-08-04

    Caffeine is commonly consumed to help offset fatigue, however, it can have several negative effects on sleep quality and quantity. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between caffeine consumption and sleep quality in adults using a newly validated caffeine food frequency questionnaire (C-FFQ). In this cross sectional study, 80 adults (M ± SD: 38.9 ± 19.3 years) attended the University of South Australia to complete a C-FFQ and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Caffeine consumption remained stable across age groups while the source of caffeine varied. Higher total caffeine consumption was associated with decreased time in bed, as an estimate of sleep time (r = -0.229, p = 0.041), but other PSQI variables were not. Participants who reported poor sleep (PSQI global score ≥ 5) consumed 192.1 ± 122.5 mg (M ± SD) of caffeine which was significantly more than those who reported good sleep quality (PSQI global score < 5; 125.2 ± 62.6 mg; p = 0.008). The C-FFQ was found to be a quick but detailed way to collect population based caffeine consumption data. The data suggests that shorter sleep is associated with greater caffeine consumption, and that consumption is greater in adults with reduced sleep quality.

  8. Caffeine consumption and anxiety and depressive symptomatology among medical students.

    PubMed

    Mino, Y; Yasuda, N; Fujimura, T; Ohara, H

    1990-12-01

    Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed psychoactive substances in the world and is ingested in a variety of favorites, such as coffee, tea, cola and so on. Although it has been suggested that high dose caffeine users have more anxiety and depressive symptoms than low users, this relationship is not clear in Japan, where caffeine consumption is considered to be less than in Western countries. A questionnaire survey was conducted among medical students and 291 out of 423 initial subjects completed it. Among males, caffeine consumption was significantly and positively correlated with anxiety symptoms, when alcohol use and smoking habit were adjusted. However, there was no relationship between caffeine consumption and depressive symptoms. Among females, although there was no association between caffeine consumption and anxiety symptoms, high dose caffeine users showed less depressive symptoms than moderate and low users, when alcohol use was adjusted. It is suggested that caffeine use is one of the important factors, in researching psychological health among the general population. We need further epidemiological studies to determine whether there is a causal relationship between caffeine and psychological ill health or not.

  9. Bisphenol A migration from cans containing coffee and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong-Hun; Kondo, Fusao

    2002-09-01

    This study was conducted to reconfirm the possibility and level of bisphenol A (BPA) migration from cans containing coffee and test the relationship between caffeine concentration and BPA migration from the can coating. BPA migration from cans containing decaffeinated and non-decaffeinated instant coffee averaged 66.2 and 84.0 ng ml(-1), respectively. In our study, the possibility of BPA migration from cans containing coffee after processing was found. In addition, the more caffeine content in the water solution of caffeine increased, the more BPA migration grew. This means that caffeine can have an effect on BPA migration from the can coating.

  10. Urinary caffeine after coffee consumption and heat dehydration.

    PubMed

    Chambaz, A; Meirim, I; Décombaz, J

    2001-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of heat-induced dehydration on urinary caffeine excretion after the consumption of a strong coffee solution. Following ingestion of coffee (caffeine 4.9+/-0.1 [SE] mg/kg, 3-4 cups), ten healthy males were intermittently exposed to heat in a sauna until they had lost 2.9 % of lean mass. On a separate occasion, they consumed the same amount of coffee but remained quiet and euhydrated (control). Urine flow was reduced 7-fold in dehydration. At these low excretion rates (< 30 ml/h), caffeine concentration was negatively correlated with flow. Peak urinary caffeine (Cmax) was 7.6 +/- 0.4 (SE) microg/ml in dehydration and 7.1 +/- 0.2 microg/ml in the control (p > 0.05). Compared with the control, dehydration delayed Cmax by 1 hour, maintained higher saliva caffeine concentration (6.1 vs 5.2 microg/ml, p < 0.05) and a lower saliva paraxanthine/caffeine ratio (p < 0.001). The 24h-recovery of caffeine in urine was reduced (1.2 vs 2.8% of dose, p < 0.001), however at least 2.6% of dose were lost in sweat. These results suggest that the rise in circulating caffeine due to delayed metabolic clearance was partly opposed by a sizeable elimination in sweat. Therefore, heat dehydration did not lead to higher concentration of caffeine in urine after coffee ingestion.

  11. Effects of caffeine on performance of low intensity tasks.

    PubMed

    Scott, William H; Coyne, Karen M; Johnson, Monique M; Lausted, Christopher G; Sahota, Manjit; Johnson, Arthur T

    2002-04-01

    31 college age men and women who consume less than three caffeinated beverages per week agreed to participate as subjects in research on the effects of acute caffeine intake on low intensity task performance. All subjects performed two randomly administered test conditions: (1) caffeine (5 mg/kg) and (2) placebo on separate visits following an initial 1-hr. orientation visit. Subjects were administered the beverage 30 min. prior to performing 12 separate tests assessing basic mathematics, simple response, logical reasoning, hand-eye coordination, and spatial and assembly skills. The Spielberger State Anxiety test was administered immediately after consuming the test beverage and once again at posttest. Analysis showed that caffeine did not significantly affect performance on all tests with the exception of the peripheral awareness (hand-eye coordination) test on which performance was higher after ingesting caffeine. The placebo treatment produced no effect on state anxiety, which contrasted with a significant rise in anxiety after caffeine consumption. State anxiety values were significantly greater after caffeine treatment relative to the placebo at pretest, and this difference persisted at posttest. These results demonstrated that the dose of caffeine increased scores on state anxiety for individuals who consumed less than three caffeinated beverages weekly but had very little effect on performance of low intensity tasks, except for a hand-eye coordination test involving peripheral awareness. Perhaps longer continuous performance of more demanding tasks would be more sensitive.

  12. Caffeine Consumption and Sleep Quality in Australian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Emily J.; Coates, Alison M.; Kohler, Mark; Banks, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is commonly consumed to help offset fatigue, however, it can have several negative effects on sleep quality and quantity. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between caffeine consumption and sleep quality in adults using a newly validated caffeine food frequency questionnaire (C-FFQ). In this cross sectional study, 80 adults (M ± SD: 38.9 ± 19.3 years) attended the University of South Australia to complete a C-FFQ and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Caffeine consumption remained stable across age groups while the source of caffeine varied. Higher total caffeine consumption was associated with decreased time in bed, as an estimate of sleep time (r = −0.229, p = 0.041), but other PSQI variables were not. Participants who reported poor sleep (PSQI global score ≥ 5) consumed 192.1 ± 122.5 mg (M ± SD) of caffeine which was significantly more than those who reported good sleep quality (PSQI global score < 5; 125.2 ± 62.6 mg; p = 0.008). The C-FFQ was found to be a quick but detailed way to collect population based caffeine consumption data. The data suggests that shorter sleep is associated with greater caffeine consumption, and that consumption is greater in adults with reduced sleep quality. PMID:27527212

  13. Effects of caffeine on postural stability.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, Ashlee; Sklaar, Jessica; Viirre, Erik; Chase, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a caffeine-containing "energy drink" on postural stability. Twenty-three young adult participants stood on a balance-measuring platform for two intervals of 30 seconds each, once with eyes open and once with eyes closed. Subjects performed the tasks before and 1 hour after consumption. Results showed no significant effect, either with eyes open or eyes closed, on movement of the body's center of pressure.

  14. Effect of Acetaminophen Ingestion on Thermoregulation of Normothermic, Non-febrile Humans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Josh; Mauger, Alexis; Thomasson, Katie; White, Stephanie; Taylor, Lee

    2016-01-01

    In non-febrile mouse models, high dose acetaminophen administration causes profound hypothermia. However, this potentially hazardous side-effect has not been confirmed in non-febrile humans. Thus, we sought to ascertain whether an acute therapeutic dose (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) of acetaminophen would reduce non-febrile human core temperature in a sub-neutral environment. Ten apparently healthy (normal core temperature, no musculoskeletal injury, no evidence of acute illness) Caucasian males participated in a preliminary study (Study 1) to determine plasma acetaminophen concentration following oral ingestion of 20 mg⋅kg lean body mass acetaminophen. Plasma samples (every 20 min up to 2-hours post ingestion) were analyzed via enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Thirteen (eight recruited from Study 1) apparently healthy Caucasian males participated in Study 2, and were passively exposed to 20°C, 40% r.h. for 120 min on two occasions in a randomized, repeated measures, crossover design. In a double blind manner, participants ingested acetaminophen (20 mg⋅kg lean body mass) or a placebo (dextrose) immediately prior to entering the environmental chamber. Rectal temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, and thermal sensation were monitored continuously and recorded every 10 min. In Study 1, the peak concentration of acetaminophen (14 ± 4 μg/ml) in plasma arose between 80 and 100 min following oral ingestion. In Study 2, acetaminophen ingestion reduced the core temperature of all participants, whereas there was no significant change in core temperature over time in the placebo trial. Mean core temperature was significantly lower in the acetaminophen trial compared with that of a placebo (p < 0.05). The peak reduction in core temperature in the acetaminophen trial was reached at 120 min in six of the thirteen participants, and ranged from 0.1 to 0.39°C (average peak reduction from baseline = 0.19 ± 0.09°C). There was no significant difference in skin

  15. Interpretation of hair findings in children: about a case involving carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Kintz, Pascal

    2014-06-01

    This office has been recently involved in a case dealing with child custody, where the final outcome was difficult to establish. The following concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in the hair of a 21-month-old girl: 154 (0-1 cm), 198 (1-2 cm), 247 (2-3 cm), and 368 pg/mg (3-4 cm) after decontamination. Obviously, the concentrations measured in the hair were much lower than those observed in patients under daily treatment. In this sense, the frequency of exposures appears as infrequent (low level of exposure), with marked decrease in the more recent period. However, the girl was never prescribed carbamazepine and the mother, who was under carbamazepine therapy, denied any administration. The Judge asked if this could result from a single exposure and at which period. At least, three possible interpretations of the measured carbamazepine concentrations were addressed: (1) decrease in administration in the more recent period; (2) increase of body weight due to growing, so the same dosage will result in lower concentrations in hair; and (3) sweat contamination from the mother at the time the girl is with her in bed, the older hair being in contact longer with the bedding. In this case, it was impossible to conclude that the child was deliberately administered carbamazepine. The results of the analysis of hair could indicate that she was in an environment where carbamazepine was being used and where the drug was not being handled and stored with appropriate care. There are many differences between the hair from children and those from adults: hair from children is thinner and more porous, the ratio anagen and catagen phases are not maintained, and the growth rate can be different, at some periods, from the usual 1 cm/month. These differences, together with the influence of PK-PD parameters are reviewed in this paper, as a basis for suitable interpretation. In view of these results it is proposed that a single hair

  16. Missed paracetamol (acetaminophen) overdose due to confusion regarding drug names.

    PubMed

    Hewett, David G; Shields, Jennifer; Waring, W Stephen

    2013-07-01

    Immediate management of drug overdose relies upon the patient account of what was ingested and how much. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is involved in around 40% of intentional overdose episodes, and remains the leading cause of acute liver failure in many countries including the United Kingdom. In recent years, consumers have had increasing access to medications supplied by international retailers via the internet, which may have different proprietary or generic names than in the country of purchase. We describe a patient that presented to hospital after intentional overdose involving 'acetaminophen' purchased via the internet. The patient had difficulty recalling the drug name, which was inadvertently attributed to 'Advil', a proprietary non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. The error was later recognised when the drug packaging became available, but the diagnosis of paracetamol overdose and initiation of acetylcysteine antidote were delayed. This case illustrates the benefit of routinely measuring paracetamol concentrations in all patients with suspected poisoning, although this is not universally accepted in practice. Moreover, it highlights the importance of the internet as a source of medications for intentional overdose, and emphasises the need for harmonisation of international drug names to improve patient safety.

  17. Serotonin deficiency exacerbates acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyao; Song, Sidong; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Ruiyao; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Sushun; Meng, Fandi; Wu, Qifei; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-29

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a major cause of acute liver failure. Peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) is a cytoprotective neurotransmitter which is also involved in the hepatic physiological and pathological process. This study seeks to investigate the mechanisms involved in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, as well as the role of 5-HT in the liver's response to APAP toxicity. We induced APAP hepatotoxicity in mice either sufficient of serotonin (wild-type mice and TPH1-/- plus 5- Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)) or lacking peripheral serotonin (Tph1-/- and wild-type mice plus p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA)). Mice with sufficient 5-HT exposed to acetaminophen have a significantly lower mortality rate and a better outcome compared with mice deficient of 5-HT. This difference is at least partially attributable to a decreased level of inflammation, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, Glutathione (GSH) depletion, peroxynitrite formation, hepatocyte apoptosis, elevated hepatocyte proliferation, activation of 5-HT2B receptor, less activated c-Jun NH₂-terminal kinase (JNK) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in the mice sufficient of 5-HT versus mice deficient of 5-HT. We thus propose a physiological function of serotonin that serotonin could ameliorate APAP-induced liver injury mainly through inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis ER stress and promoting liver regeneration.

  18. Disposition of acetaminophen at 4, 6, and 8 g/day for 3 days in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Gelotte, C K; Auiler, J F; Lynch, J M; Temple, A R; Slattery, J T

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the disposition and tolerability of 1, 1.5, and 2 g acetaminophen every 6 h for 3 days. Group I healthy adults received acetaminophen (4 then 6 g/day) or placebo; Group II received acetaminophen (4 then 8 g/day) or placebo. Acetaminophen and metabolites were measured in plasma and urine. Hepatic aminotransferases were measured daily. At steady state, acetaminophen concentrations were surprisingly lower than predicted from single-dose data, although sulfate formation clearance (fCL) was lower as expected, indicating cofactor depletion with possible sulfotransferase saturation. In contrast, glucuronide fCL was unexpectedly higher, strongly suggesting glucuronosyltransferase induction. This is the first evidence that acetaminophen induces its own glucuronidation. No dose-dependent differences were detected in fCL of thiol metabolites formed via cytochrome P4502E1. Hepatic aminotransferases stayed within reference ranges, and the incidence and frequency of adverse events were similar for acetaminophen and placebo. Although dose-dependence of acetaminophen disposition was reported previously, this study shows a novel finding of time-dependent disposition during repeated dosing. Unexpected increases in glucuronide fCL more than offset decreases in sulfate fCL, thus increasing acetaminophen clearance overall. Thiol metabolite fCL remained constant up to 8 g/day. These findings have important implications in short-term (3 day) tolerability of supratherapeutic acetaminophen doses in healthy adults.

  19. A multicentre comparative trial of sodium valproate and carbamazepine in adult onset epilepsy. Adult EPITEG Collaborative Group.

    PubMed Central

    Richens, A; Davidson, D L; Cartlidge, N E; Easter, D J

    1994-01-01

    The long-term efficacy and safety of sodium valproate and carbamazepine in adult outpatients with newly diagnosed primary generalised or partial and secondarily generalised seizures were compared in a randomised, open, multicentre study at 22 neurology outpatient clinics. Patients were randomised to oral sodium valproate (Epilim EC enteric coated 200 mg tablets twice daily, n = 149) or oral carbamazepine (100 mg twice daily increasing to 200 mg twice daily in week 2, n = 151) and followed up for three years. If clinically necessary, dosages were regularly increased until seizures were controlled or toxicity developed. Sodium valproate and carbamazepine controlled both primary generalised and partial seizures equally effectively overall. Significantly more patients on sodium valproate than carbamazepine (126/140 (90%) v 105/141 (75%), p = 0.001) remained on randomised treatment for at least six months. Skin rashes occurred significantly more often in carbamazepine recipients than in sodium valproate recipients (11.2% v 1.7%, p < 0.05) and carbamazepine was associated with a higher withdrawal rate because of adverse events (15% v 5% on sodium valproate) in the first six months of treatment. There was no difference between the drugs in the rate of withdrawal because of poor seizure control at any stage, regardless of seizure type. At the end of the three year trial period, over 70% of the available patients were still on randomised treatment or had recently stopped treatment after achieving full seizure control. Sodium valproate and carbamazepine were both associated with a high degree of overall seizure control regardless of seizure type and both have good long-term tolerability in adult patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy. Recommendations are made for a higher initial dosage regime for sodium valproate in partial seizures. PMID:8006647

  20. Energy drink consumption and impact on caffeine risk.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Barbara M; Campbell, Donald M; Cressey, Peter; Egan, Ursula; Horn, Beverley

    2014-01-01

    The impact of caffeine from energy drinks occurs against a background exposure from naturally occurring caffeine (coffee, tea, cocoa and foods containing these ingredients) and caffeinated beverages (kola-type soft drinks). Background caffeine exposure, excluding energy drinks, was assessed for six New Zealand population groups aged 15 years and over (n = 4503) by combining concentration data for 53 caffeine-containing foods with consumption information from the 2008/09 New Zealand Adult Nutrition Survey (ANS). Caffeine exposure for those who consumed energy drinks (n = 138) was similarly assessed, with inclusion of energy drinks. Forty-seven energy drink products were identified on the New Zealand market in 2010. Product volumes ranged from 30 to 600 ml per unit, resulting in exposures of 10-300 mg caffeine per retail unit consumed. A small percentage, 3.1%, of New Zealanders reported consuming energy drinks, with most energy drink consumers (110/138) drinking one serving per 24 h. The maximum number of energy drinks consumed per 24 h was 14 (total caffeine of 390 mg). A high degree of brand loyalty was evident. Since only a minor proportion of New Zealanders reported consuming energy drinks, a greater number of New Zealanders exceeded a potentially adverse effect level (AEL) of 3 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for caffeine from caffeine-containing foods than from energy drinks. Energy drink consumption is not a risk at a population level because of the low prevalence of consumption. At an individual level, however, teenagers, adults (20-64 years) and females (16-44 years) were more likely to exceed the AEL by consuming energy drinks in combination with caffeine-containing foods.

  1. Caffeine triggers behavioral and neurochemical alterations in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Ardais, A P; Borges, M F; Rocha, A S; Sallaberry, C; Cunha, R A; Porciúncula, L O

    2014-06-13

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide but concerns arise about the growing intake of caffeine-containing drinks by adolescents since the effects of caffeine on cognitive functions and neurochemical aspects of late brain maturation during adolescence are poorly known. We now studied the behavioral impact in adolescent male rats of regular caffeine intake at low (0.1mg/mL), moderate (0.3mg/mL) and moderate/high (1.0mg/mL) doses only during their active period (from 7:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M.). All tested doses of caffeine were devoid of effects on locomotor activity, but triggered anxiogenic effects. Caffeine (0.3 and 1mg/mL) improved the performance in the object recognition task, but the higher dose of caffeine (1.0mg/mL) decreased the habituation to an open-field arena, suggesting impaired non-associative memory. All tested doses of caffeine decreased the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein and synaptosomal-associated protein-25, but failed to modify neuron-specific nuclear protein immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Caffeine (0.3-1mg/mL) increased the density of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and proBDNF density as well as adenosine A1 receptor density in the hippocampus, whereas the higher dose of caffeine (1mg/mL) increased the density of proBDNF and BDNF and decreased A1 receptor density in the cerebral cortex. These findings document an impact of caffeine consumption in adolescent rats with a dual impact on anxiety and recognition memory, associated with changes in BDNF levels and decreases of astrocytic and nerve terminal markers without overt neuronal damage in hippocampal and cortical regions.

  2. Cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism of caffeine in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Alexandra; Fraichard, Stephane; Le Goff, Gaëlle; Faure, Philippe; Artur, Yves; Ferveur, Jean-François; Heydel, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine), an alkaloid produced by plants, has antioxidant and insecticide properties that can affect metabolism and cognition. In vertebrates, the metabolites derived from caffeine have been identified, and their functions have been characterized. However, the metabolites of caffeine in insects remain unknown. Thus, using radiolabelled caffeine, we have identified some of the primary caffeine metabolites produced in the body of Drosophila melanogaster males, including theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline. In contrast to mammals, theobromine was the predominant metabolite (paraxanthine in humans; theophylline in monkeys; 1, 3, 7-trimethyluric acid in rodents). A transcriptomic screen of Drosophila flies exposed to caffeine revealed the coordinated variation of a large set of genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing proteins, including several cytochromes P450s (CYPs) that were highly overexpressed. Flies treated with metyrapone--an inhibitor of CYP enzymes--showed dramatically decreased caffeine metabolism, indicating that CYPs are involved in this process. Using interference RNA genetic silencing, we measured the metabolic and transcriptomic effect of three candidate CYPs. Silencing of CYP6d5 completely abolished theobromine synthesis, whereas CYP6a8 and CYP12d1 silencing induced different consequences on metabolism and gene expression. Therefore, we characterized several metabolic products and some enzymes potentially involved in the degradation of caffeine. In conclusion, this pioneer approach to caffeine metabolism in insects opens novel perspectives for the investigation of the physiological effects of caffeine metabolites. It also indicates that caffeine could be used as a biomarker to evaluate CYP phenotypes in Drosophila and other insects.

  3. Increased caffeine consumption is associated with reduced hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Modi, Apurva A; Feld, Jordan J; Park, Yoon; Kleiner, David E; Everhart, James E; Liang, T Jake; Hoofnagle, Jay H

    2010-01-01

    Although coffee consumption has been associated with reduced frequency of liver disease, it is unclear whether the effect is from coffee or caffeine and whether there is an effect on hepatic fibrosis specifically. This study was undertaken to use a food-frequency instrument for dietary caffeine consumption to evaluate the relationship between caffeine intake and liver fibrosis. Patients undergoing liver biopsy completed a detailed caffeine questionnaire on three occasions over a 6-month period. Caffeine intake was compared between patients with mild and advanced liver fibrosis (bridging fibrosis/cirrhosis). Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between caffeine consumption and hepatic fibrosis. One hundred seventy-seven patients (99 male, 104 white, 121 with chronic hepatitis C virus [HCV] infection) undergoing liver biopsy completed the caffeine questionnaire on up to three occasions. Results from repeated questionnaires were consistent. Daily caffeine consumption above the 75(th) percentile for the cohort (308 mg = approximately 2.25 cups of coffee equivalents) was associated with reduced liver fibrosis (odds ratio [OR], 0.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.14-0.80; P = 0.015) and the protective association persisted after controlling for age, sex, race, liver disease, body mass index, and alcohol intake in all patients (OR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.09-0.67; P = 0.006), as well as the subset with HCV infection (OR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05-0.66; P = 0.009). Despite a modest trend, consumption of caffeine from sources other than coffee or of decaffeinated coffee was not associated with reduced liver fibrosis. A reliable tool for measurement of caffeine consumption demonstrated that caffeine consumption, particularly from regular coffee, above a threshold of approximately 2 coffee-cup equivalents per day, was associated with less severe hepatic fibrosis.

  4. Adsorption behavior of the catechins and caffeine onto polyvinylpolypyrrolidone.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhan-Bo; Liang, Yue-Rong; Fan, Fang-Yuan; Ye, Jian-Hui; Zheng, Xin-Qiang; Lu, Jian-Liang

    2011-04-27

    Adsorbent is one of the most important factors for separation efficiency in fixed-bed purification techniques. The adsorption behavior of catechins and caffeine onto polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) was investigated by static adsorption tests. The results showed that catechins rather than caffeine were preferred to adsorb onto PVPP since the adsorption selectivity coefficient of total catechins vs caffeine was around 22.5, and that adsorption of catechins could be described by the pseudo-second-order model. Adsorption amount of caffeine onto PVPP in green tea extracts solution was much higher than that in purified caffeine solution although the initial concentration of caffeine was similar in the two solutions, indicating the caffeine might be attached with catechins which were adsorbed by PVPP instead of being adsorbed by PVPP directly. The results also showed that the adsorption capacity of catechins and caffeine decreased with an increase in temperature, and that Freundlich and Langmuir models were both suitable for describing the isothermal adsorption of catechins, but not suitable for caffeine. The predicted maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of total catechins by PVPP was 671.77 mg g(-1) at 20 °C, which was significantly higher than that by other reported adsorbents. The thermodynamics analyses indicated that the adsorption of catechins onto PVPP was a spontaneous and exothermic physisorption process, revealing lower temperature was favorable for the adsorption of catechins. Elution tests showed that the desorption rates of catechins and caffeine were higher than 91% and 99% after two elution stages; in detail, almost all of the caffeine could be washed down at the water eluting stage, while catechins could be recovered at the dimethyl sulfoxide/ethanol solution eluting stage. Thus, the PVPP could be used as an excellent alternative adsorbent candidate for separating catechins from crude tea extracts, although some investigations, such as exploring the new

  5. Immunohistochemical localization and quantification of the 3-(cystein-S-yl)-acetaminophen protein adduct in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D W; Bucci, T J; Benson, R W; Warbritton, A R; McRae, T A; Pumford, N R; Hinson, J A

    1991-02-01

    Acetaminophen overdose causes severe hepatotoxicity in humans and laboratory animals, presumably by metabolism to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine: and binding to cysteine groups as 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen-protein adduct. Antiserum specific for the adduct was used immunohistochemically to demonstrate the formation, distribution, and concentration of this specific adduct in livers of treated mice and was correlated with cell injury as a function of dose and time. Within the liver lobule, immunohistochemically demonstrable adduct occurred in a temporally progressive, central-to-peripheral pattern. There was concordance between immunohistochemical staining and quantification of the adduct in hepatic 10,000g supernate, using a quantitative particle concentration fluorescence immunoassay. Findings include: 1) immunochemically detectable adduct before the appearance of centrilobular necrosis, 2) distinctive lobular zones of adduct localization with subsequent depletion during the progression of toxicity, 3) drug-protein binding in hepatocytes at subhepatotoxic doses and before depletion of total hepatic glutathione, 4) immunohistochemical evidence of drug binding in the nucleus, and 5) adduct in metabolically active and dividing hepatocytes and in macrophagelike cells in the regenerating liver.

  6. A zeolite modified carbon paste electrode as useful sensor for voltammetric determination of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Ahmadpour-Mobarakeh, Leila; Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    The voltammetric behavior of a carbon paste electrode modified with Co(II)-exchanged zeolite A (Co(II)-A/ZMCPE) for determination of acetaminophen was studied. The proposed electrode showed a diffusion controlled reaction with the electron transfer rate constant (Ks) of 0.44s(-1) and charge transfer coefficient of 0.73 in the absence of acetaminophen. A linear voltammetric response was obtained in the range of 0.1 to 190μmolL(-1) of acetaminophen [r(2)=0.9979, r=0.9989 (n=10)] with a detection limit of 0.04μmolL(-1). The method was successfully applied to the analysis of acetaminophen in some drugs.

  7. Drugs in the Chemistry Laboratory: The Conversion of Acetaminophen into Phenacetin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volker, Eugene J.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which acetaminophen is converted into phenacetin, that has been used at Shepherd College in an introductory chemistry course for nurses and in the organic chemistry laboratory. (BT)

  8. The common pain of surrealism and death: acetaminophen reduces compensatory affirmation following meaning threats.

    PubMed

    Randles, Daniel; Heine, Steven J; Santos, Nathan

    2013-06-01

    The meaning-maintenance model posits that any violation of expectations leads to an affective experience that motivates compensatory affirmation. We explore whether the neural mechanism that responds to meaning threats can be inhibited by acetaminophen, in the same way that acetaminophen inhibits physical pain or the distress caused by social rejection. In two studies, participants received either acetaminophen or a placebo and were provided with either an unsettling experience or a control experience. In Study 1, participants wrote about either their death or a control topic. In Study 2, participants watched either a surrealist film clip or a control film clip. In both studies, participants in the meaning-threat condition who had taken a placebo showed typical compensatory affirmations by becoming more punitive toward lawbreakers, whereas those who had taken acetaminophen, and those in the control conditions, did not.

  9. Simultaneous quantification of acetaminophen and five acetaminophen metabolites in human plasma and urine by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry: Method validation and application to a neonatal pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sarah F; King, Amber D; van den Anker, John N; Wilkins, Diana G

    2015-12-15

    Drug metabolism plays a key role in acetaminophen (paracetamol)-induced hepatotoxicity, and quantification of acetaminophen metabolites provides critical information about factors influencing susceptibility to acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in clinical and experimental settings. The aims of this study were to develop, validate, and apply high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) methods for simultaneous quantification of acetaminophen, acetaminophen-glucuronide, acetaminophen-sulfate, acetaminophen-glutathione, acetaminophen-cysteine, and acetaminophen-N-acetylcysteine in small volumes of human plasma and urine. In the reported procedures, acetaminophen-d4 and acetaminophen-d3-sulfate were utilized as internal standards (IS). Analytes and IS were recovered from human plasma (10μL) by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Human urine (10μL) was prepared by fortification with IS followed only by sample dilution. Calibration concentration ranges were tailored to literature values for each analyte in each biological matrix. Prepared samples from plasma and urine were analyzed under the same HPLC-ESI-MS/MS conditions, and chromatographic separation was achieved through use of an Agilent Poroshell 120 EC-C18 column with a 20-min run time per injected sample. The analytes could be accurately and precisely quantified over 2.0-3.5 orders of magnitude. Across both matrices, mean intra- and inter-assay accuracies ranged from 85% to 112%, and intra- and inter-assay imprecision did not exceed 15%. Validation experiments included tests for specificity, recovery and ionization efficiency, inter-individual variability in matrix effects, stock solution stability, and sample stability under a variety of storage and handling conditions (room temperature, freezer, freeze-thaw, and post-preparative). The utility and suitability of the reported procedures were illustrated by analysis of pharmacokinetic samples

  10. Degradation of caffeine by conductive diamond electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Indermuhle, Chloe; Martín de Vidales, Maria J; Sáez, Cristina; Robles, José; Cañizares, Pablo; García-Reyes, Juan F; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; Comninellis, Christos; Rodrigo, Manuel A

    2013-11-01

    The use of Conductive-Diamond Electrochemical Oxidation (CDEO) and Sonoelectrochemical Oxidation (CDSEO) has been evaluated for the removal of caffeine of wastewater. Effects of initial concentration, current density and supporting electrolyte on the process efficiency are assessed. Results show that caffeine is very efficiently removed with CDEO and that depletion of caffeine has two stages depending on its concentration. At low concentrations, opposite to what it is expected in a mass-transfer controlled process, the efficiency increases with current density very significantly, suggesting a very important role of mediated oxidation processes on the removal of caffeine. In addition, the removal of caffeine is faster than TOC, indicating the formation of reaction intermediates. The number and relative abundance of them depend on the operating conditions and supporting electrolyte used. In chloride media, removal of caffeine is faster and more efficiently, although the occurrence of more intermediates takes place. CDSEO does not increase the efficiency of caffeine removal, but it affects to the formation of intermediates. A detailed characterization of intermediates by liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry seems to indicate that the degradation of caffeine by CDEO follows an oxidation pathway similar to mechanism proposed by other advanced oxidation processes.

  11. Caffeine consumption and the risk of reproductive hazards.

    PubMed

    Leviton, A

    1988-02-01

    Recent reports on the relationship between caffeine consumption by pregnant women and their infants' risk of miscarriage, low birth weight, preterm delivery and congenital malformations were reviewed. The evidence continues to support the view that moderate consumption of caffeine by pregnant women does not adversely affect their fetuses.

  12. [Reciprocal action between caffeine, other stimulants and drugs].

    PubMed

    Czok, G

    1980-12-01

    Caffeine is ingested not only with beverages as coffee, tea, coca-cola but also in form of many analgetic drugs. Therefore interactions of this substance with other biologically active substances and drugs should be expected, and the knowledge of these would be of practical importance. The interactions between caffeine and alcohol, smoking, salicylic acid, phenacetin, barbiturates, and theobromine are described.

  13. Caffeine Use among Active Duty Navy and Marine Corps Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Knapik, Joseph J.; Trone, Daniel W.; McGraw, Susan; Steelman, Ryan A.; Austin, Krista G.; Lieberman, Harris R.

    2016-01-01

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate 89% of Americans regularly consume caffeine, but these data do not include military personnel. This cross-sectional study examined caffeine use in Navy and Marine Corps personnel, including prevalence, amount of daily consumption, and factors associated with use. A random sample of Navy and Marine Corps personnel was contacted and asked to complete a detailed questionnaire describing their use of caffeine-containing substances, in addition to their demographic, military, and lifestyle characteristics. A total of 1708 service members (SMs) completed the questionnaire. Overall, 87% reported using caffeinated beverages ≥1 time/week, with caffeine users consuming a mean ± standard error of 226 ± 5 mg/day (242 ± 7 mg/day for men, 183 ± 8 mg/day for women). The most commonly consumed caffeinated beverages (% users) were coffee (65%), colas (54%), teas (40%), and energy drinks (28%). Multivariable logistic regression modeling indicated that characteristics independently associated with caffeine use (≥1 time/week) included older age, white race/ethnicity, higher alcohol consumption, and participating in less resistance training. Prevalence of caffeine use in these SMs was similar to that reported in civilian investigations, but daily consumption (mg/day) was higher. PMID:27735834

  14. Caffeine Use among Active Duty Navy and Marine Corps Personnel.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J; Trone, Daniel W; McGraw, Susan; Steelman, Ryan A; Austin, Krista G; Lieberman, Harris R

    2016-10-09

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate 89% of Americans regularly consume caffeine, but these data do not include military personnel. This cross-sectional study examined caffeine use in Navy and Marine Corps personnel, including prevalence, amount of daily consumption, and factors associated with use. A random sample of Navy and Marine Corps personnel was contacted and asked to complete a detailed questionnaire describing their use of caffeine-containing substances, in addition to their demographic, military, and lifestyle characteristics. A total of 1708 service members (SMs) completed the questionnaire. Overall, 87% reported using caffeinated beverages ≥1 time/week, with caffeine users consuming a mean ± standard error of 226 ± 5 mg/day (242 ± 7 mg/day for men, 183 ± 8 mg/day for women). The most commonly consumed caffeinated beverages (% users) were coffee (65%), colas (54%), teas (40%), and energy drinks (28%). Multivariable logistic regression modeling indicated that characteristics independently associated with caffeine use (≥1 time/week) included older age, white race/ethnicity, higher alcohol consumption, and participating in less resistance training. Prevalence of caffeine use in these SMs was similar to that reported in civilian investigations, but daily consumption (mg/day) was higher.

  15. The Effects of Caffeine on Memory for Word Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erikson, George; And Others

    Research has suggested that behavioral differences may account for the effects of caffeine on information processing. To investigate the effects of caffeine on memory for supraspan word lists, 107 college students (47 males, 60 females), divided into 12 groups by high and low impulsivity scores on the Eysenck Personality Inventory, participated in…

  16. The Effects of Caffeine and Provocation on Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Tamara J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Administered caffeine to males (N=39) who were provoked or not provoked by a partner. Provoked participants attributed their feelings to both the drug and their partner's behavior. Angered subjects were more aversive when thinking they had taken caffeine but reduced their aggression when told the drug was a placebo. (Author/JAC)

  17. Caffeine. Courseware Evaluation for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This courseware evaluation rates the "Caffeine" program developed by Lane Community College and sold by the Oregon Department of Education. (The program--not included in this document--is part of a computer-assisted instruction project with nursing applications.) Part A describes "Caffeine" in terms of topics (food and…

  18. Effects of Pre- and Postnatal Caffeine Exposure on Human Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Sandra W.; Dowler, Jeffrey K.

    An investigation was made of the behavioral effects of caffeine in a sample of 313 newborns and their mothers. A weighted measure of caffeine based on daily ingestion of coffee, tea, and cola was derived from a maternal interview. The majority of mothers consumed the equivalent of about 1.3 cups of coffee per day. Infant outcome measures included…

  19. Structural features of DNA interaction with caffeine and theophylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali; Varavipour, Maryam

    2008-03-01

    Caffeine and theophylline are strong antioxidants that prevent DNA damage. The anticancer and antiviral activities of these natural products are implicated in their mechanism of actions. However, there has been no information on the interactions of these xanthine derivatives with individual DNA at molecular level. The aim of this study was to examine the stability and structural features of calf-thymus DNA complexes with caffeine and theophylline in aqueous solution, using constant DNA concentration (6.25 mM) and various caffeine or theophylline/DNA(P) ratios of 1/80, 1/40, 1/20, 1/10, 1/5, 1/2 and 1/1. FTIR, UV-visible spectroscopic methods were used to determine the ligand external binding modes, the binding constant and the stability of caffeine, theophylline-DNA complexes in aqueous solution. Spectroscopic evidence showed that the complexation of caffeine and theophylline with DNA occurred via G-C and A-T and PO 2 group with overall binding constants of K(caffeine-DNA) = 9.7 × 10 3 M -1 and K(theophylline-DNA) = 1.7 × 10 4 M -1. The affinity of ligand-DNA binding is in the order of theophylline > caffeine. A partial B to A-DNA transition occurs upon caffeine and theophylline complexation.

  20. Assessing caffeine intake in the United Kingdom diet.

    PubMed

    Fitt, Emily; Pell, David; Cole, Darren

    2013-10-01

    Caffeine occurs naturally in the leaves and seeds of many plants and is artificially added to some beverages. Consumption of caffeine has been linked to both positive and adverse health outcomes. We incorporated estimates of caffeine content (mg/100g or ml) of foods and drinks, taken from the published literature, to provide a preliminary estimate of caffeine intake for the UK population, based on data collected in the National Diet and Nutrition Survey 2008-10. Among consumers mean total caffeine intakes of adult men 19+ y were significantly greater than intakes by boys 4-10y and 11-18y (p<0.05), with the same age-related differences seen for females. 4.1% of men 19+ y and 3.8% of women 19+ y had caffeine intakes in excess of 300mg/d. The addition of caffeine to UK food composition databases will allow more detailed study of the health effects of caffeine consumption.

  1. Subjective and objective effects of coffee consumption - caffeine or expectations?

    PubMed

    Dömötör, Zs; Szemerszky, R; Köteles, F

    2015-03-01

    Impact of 5 mg/kg caffeine, chance of receiving caffeine (stimulus expectancies), and expectations of effects of caffeine (response expectancies) on objective (heart rate (HR), systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP), measures of heart rate variability (HRV), and reaction time (RT)) and subjective variables were investigated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment with a no-treatment group. Participants were 107 undergraduate university students (mean age 22.3 ± 3.96 years). Consumption of 5 mg/kg caffeine had an impact on participants' SBP, standard deviation of normal heartbeat intervals, HR (decrease), and subjective experience 40 minutes later even after controlling for respective baseline values, stimulus and response expectancies, and habitual caffeine consumption. No effects on DBP, high frequency component of HRV, the ratio of low- and high-frequency, and RT were found. Beyond actual caffeine intake, response expectancy score was also a determinant of subjective experience which refers to a placebo component in the total effect. Actual autonomic (SBP, HR) changes and somatosensory amplification tendency, however, had no significant impact on subjective experience. Placebo reaction plays a role in the subjective changes caused by caffeine consumption but it has no impact on objective variables. Conditional vs deceptive administration of caffeine (i.e. stimulus expectancies) had no impact on any assessed variable.

  2. The Interaction of Sorbitol with Caffeine in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Tavagnacco, Letizia; Brady, John W; Cesàro, Attilio

    2013-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on a system of caffeine interacting with the sugar alcohol sorbitol. The system examined had a caffeine concentration 0.083 m and a sugar concentration 1.08 m. The trajectories of all molecules in the system were collected over a period of 80 ns and analyzed to determine whether there is any tendency for sorbitol to bind to caffeine, and if so, by what mechanism. The results show that the sorbitol molecules have an affinity for the caffeine molecules and that the binding occurred by the interaction of the aliphatic hydrophobic protons of the sugar with the caffeine face. This intermolecular association via face-to-face stacking, as suggested by simulation studies, is similar to that found for sucrose and for D-glucose, which overwhelmingly exists in the pyranose ring chair form in aqueous solution, as well as for caffeine-caffeine association. The sorbitol molecules, however, exist as relatively extended chains and are, therefore, topologically quite different from the sugars sucrose and glucose. The comparison of the average conformation of sorbitol molecules bound to caffeine with that of molecules in the free state shows a substantial similarity.

  3. International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Erica R; Ziegenfuss, Tim; Kalman, Doug; Kreider, Richard; Campbell, Bill; Wilborn, Colin; Taylor, Lem; Willoughby, Darryn; Stout, Jeff; Graves, B Sue; Wildman, Robert; Ivy, John L; Spano, Marie; Smith, Abbie E; Antonio, Jose

    2010-01-27

    Position Statement: The position of The Society regarding caffeine supplementation and sport performance is summarized by the following seven points: 1.) Caffeine is effective for enhancing sport performance in trained athletes when consumed in low-to-moderate dosages (~3-6 mg/kg) and overall does not result in further enhancement in performance when consumed in higher dosages (>/= 9 mg/kg). 2.) Caffeine exerts a greater ergogenic effect when consumed in an anhydrous state as compared to coffee. 3.) It has been shown that caffeine can enhance vigilance during bouts of extended exhaustive exercise, as well as periods of sustained sleep deprivation. 4.) Caffeine is ergogenic for sustained maximal endurance exercise, and has been shown to be highly effective for time-trial performance. 5.) Caffeine supplementation is beneficial for high-intensity exercise, including team sports such as soccer and rugby, both of which are categorized by intermittent activity within a period of prolonged duration. 6.) The literature is equivocal when considering the effects of caffeine supplementation on strength-power performance, and additional research in this area is warranted. 7.) The scientific literature does not support caffeine-induced diuresis during exercise, or any harmful change in fluid balance that would negatively affect performance.

  4. LC-MS/MS method development for quantitative analysis of acetaminophen uptake by the aquatic fungus Mucor hiemalis.

    PubMed

    Esterhuizen-Londt, Maranda; Schwartz, Katrin; Balsano, Evelyn; Kühn, Sandra; Pflugmacher, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Acetaminophen is a pharmaceutical, frequently found in surface water as a contaminant. Bioremediation, in particular, mycoremediation of acetaminophen is a method to remove this compound from waters. Owing to the lack of quantitative analytical method for acetaminophen in aquatic organisms, the present study aimed to develop a method for the determination of acetaminophen using LC-MS/MS in the aquatic fungus Mucor hiemalis. The method was then applied to evaluate the uptake of acetaminophen by M. hiemalis, cultured in pellet morphology. The method was robust, sensitive and reproducible with a lower limit of quantification of 5 pg acetaminophen on column. It was found that M. hiemalis internalize the pharmaceutical, and bioaccumulate it with time. Therefore, M. hiemalis was deemed a suitable candidate for further studies to elucidate its pharmaceutical tolerance and the longevity in mycoremediation applications.

  5. Acetaminophen intake and risk of asthma, hay fever and eczema in early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Vlaski, Emilija; Stavric, Katerina; Isjanovska, Rozalinda; Seckova, Lidija; Kimovska, Milica

    2007-09-01

    A positive association between acetaminophen intake and allergic diseases has recently been reported in developed countries with impaired oxidant/antioxidant balance and promotion of atopy as proposed underlying mechanisms. The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between acetaminophen intake and asthma, hay fever, and eczema in The Republic of Macedonia as a country with acetaminophen intake not physician-controlled, high passive smoke exposure and dietary antioxidant intake, and moderately low prevalence of allergic diseases. Self-reported data obtained through the standardized International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase Three written questionnaires of 3026 adolescents aged 13/14 years from randomly selected schools in Skopje, the capital of Macedonia, were used. The frequency of current acetaminophen intake--both unadjusted and adjusted for confounding factors--was correlated to current and ever-diagnosed asthma, hay fever and eczema by odds ratios (OR, 95% CI) in binary logistic regression. Use of acetaminophen at least once monthly increased the risk of current wheeze (adjusted OR 2.04, 1.31-3.20 p = 0.002), asthma 'ever' (adjusted OR 2.77, 1.06-7.26 p=0.039), current allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (adjusted OR 2.95, 1.79-4.88 p=0.000) and hay fever 'ever' (adjusted OR 2.25, 1.36-3.70 p=0.002). A significant association between frequent acetaminophen intake and atopic eczema and also between infrequent acetaminophen intake and investigated allergic diseases was not established. The findings suggest an increased risk of asthma and hay fever, but not atopic eczema associated with frequent acetaminophen use in a developing country.

  6. Liuweiwuling tablets protect against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: What is the protective mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Du, Kuo; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Study of the effects of natural products, including traditional Chinese Medicines, on acetaminophen hepatotoxicity has gained considerable popularity in recent years, and some of them showed positive results and even promising therapeutic potentials. A recent report suggested that Liuweiwuling tablets protect against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and promote liver regeneration in a rodent model through alleviating the inflammatory response. However, several concerns exist regarding the limitations of the experimental design and interpretation of the data presented in this manuscript. PMID:27004010

  7. Acetaminophen absorption kinetics in altered gastric emptying: establishing a relevant pharmacokinetic surrogate using published data.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2015-06-01

    Acetaminophen has been used as a tool for clinical and nonclinical experimental designs that evaluate gastric emptying because acetaminophen is not absorbed in stomach but efficiently absorbed from the small intestine. Published pharmacokinetic data of acetaminophen in subjects with normal gastric emptying vs. impaired gastric emptying (i.e., morphine treatment) were evaluated to select a key surrogate. Using Caverage (average concentration), computed from the exposure within the first hour, individual rank distribution was plotted across different studies. Caverage was highly correlated with Cmax (maximum concentration) in subjects with normal gastric emptying (R(2) = .7532) but not in those where gastric emptying was impaired (R(2) = .0213). The 50th percentile value of the distribution pattern of 1/Caverage in acetaminophen+morphine-treated group (coincided with the first shift in the slope) was considered as the cutoff point to figure out the impaired gastric emptying. The individual rank distribution plots for 1/Caverage across different studies supported similar trends in subjects with normal gastric emptying but showed a distinct distribution pattern in the cohort of impaired gastric emptying. Caverage, calculated within the first hour of dosing of acetaminophen (average concentration at 0-1 hour, C0-1havg), can be used as a key surrogate to distinguish the effects of gastric emptying on the absorption of acetaminophen. A 4 μg/mL C0-1havg of acetaminophen (dose: 1.5 g) may be used as cutoff point in future clinical investigations of acetaminophen to clarify the role of gastric emptying.

  8. Acetaminophen use and risk of myocardial infarction and stroke in a hypertensive cohort.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Rachael L; Walters, Matthew R; Morton, Ross; Touyz, Rhian M; Dominiczak, Anna F; Morrison, David S; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Meredith, Peter A; McInnes, Gordon T; Dawson, Jesse

    2015-05-01

    Recent data suggest that self-reported acetaminophen use is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events and that acetaminophen causes a modest blood pressure rise. There are no randomized trials or studies using verified prescription data of this relationship. We aimed to assess the relationship between verified acetaminophen prescription data and risk of myocardial infarction or stroke in patients with hypertension. We performed a retrospective data analysis using information contained within the UK Clinical Research Practice Datalink. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios for myocardial infarction (primary end point), stroke, and any cardiovascular event (secondary end points) associated with acetaminophen use during a 10-year period. Acetaminophen exposure was a time-dependent variable. A propensity-matched design was also used to reduce potential for confounding. We included 24,496 hypertensive individuals aged ≥ 65 years. Of these, 10,878 were acetaminophen-exposed and 13,618 were not. There was no relationship between risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, or any cardiovascular event and acetaminophen exposure on adjusted analysis (hazard ratio, 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.76-1.27; hazard ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.86-1.38; and hazard ratio, 1.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.37; respectively). Results in the propensity-matched sample (n=4000 per group) and when men and women were analyzed separately were similar. High-frequency users (defined as receiving a prescription for >75% of months) were also not at increased risk. After allowance for potentially confounding variables, the use of acetaminophen was not associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction or stroke in a large cohort of hypertensive patients.

  9. Diabetic KK-A(y) mice are highly susceptible to oxidative hepatocellular damage induced by acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Kon, Kazuyoshi; Ikejima, Kenichi; Okumura, Kyoko; Arai, Kumiko; Aoyama, Tomonori; Watanabe, Sumio

    2010-08-01

    Despite pathophysiological similarities to alcoholic liver disease, susceptibility to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in metabolic syndrome-related nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has not been well elucidated. In this study, therefore, we investigated acetaminophen-induced liver injury in KK-A(y) mice, an animal model of metabolic syndrome. Twelve-week-old male KK-A(y) and C57Bl/6 mice were injected intraperitoneally with 300 or 600 mg/kg acetaminophen, and euthanized 6 h later. Liver histology was assessed, and hepatic expression of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal was detected by immunohistochemistry. Levels of reduced glutathione were determined spectrophotometrically. Phosphorylation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) was analyzed by Western blotting. Hepatocytes were isolated from both strains by collagenase perfusion, and cell death and oxidative stress were measured fluorometrically by use of propidium iodide and 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2'7'-dichloro-dihydrofluorescein diacetate acetyl ester, respectively. Acetaminophen induced more severe necrosis and apoptosis of hepatocytes in KK-A(y) mice than in C57Bl/6 mice and significantly increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels in KK-A(y) mice. Acetaminophen-induction of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal in the liver was potentiated, whereas the levels of reduced glutathione in liver were lower in KK-A(y) mice. Acetaminophen-induced phosphorylation of JNK in the liver was also enhanced in KK-A(y) mice. Exposure to 20 microM tert-butyl hydroperoxide did not kill hepatocytes isolated from C57Bl/6 mice but induced cell death and higher oxidative stress in hepatocytes from KK-A(y) mice. These results demonstrated that acetaminophen toxicity is increased in diabetic KK-A(y) mice mainly due to enhanced oxidative stress in hepatocytes, suggesting that metabolic syndrome-related steatohepatitis is an exacerbating factor for acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

  10. Blockade of Notch signaling promotes acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Longfeng; Ke, Michael; Yue, Shi; Xiao, Wen; Yan, Youde; Deng, Xiaozhao; Ying, Qi-Long; Li, Jun; Ke, Bibo

    2017-03-13

    Liver injury after experimental acetaminophen treatment is mediated both by direct hepatocyte injury through a P450-generated toxic metabolite and indirectly by activated liver Kupffer cells and neutrophils. This study was designed to investigate the role of Notch signaling in the regulation of innate immune responses in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury. Using a mouse model of APAP-induced liver injury, wild-type (WT) and toll-like receptor 4 knockout (TLR4 KO) mice were injected intraperitoneally with APAP or PBS. Some animals were injected with γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT or DMSO vehicle. For the in vitro study, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were transfected with Notch1 siRNA, TLR4 siRNA, and non-specific (NS) siRNA and stimulated with LPS. Indeed, paracetamol/acetaminophen-induced liver damage was worse after Notch blockade with DAPT in wild-type mice, which was accompanied by significantly increased ALT levels, diminished hairy and enhancer of split-1 (Hes1), and phosphorylated Stat3 and Akt but enhanced high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), TLR4, NF-κB, and NLRP3 activation after APAP challenge. Mice receiving DAPT increased macrophage and neutrophil accumulation and hepatocellular apoptosis. However, TLR4 KO mice that received DAPT reduced APAP-induced liver damage and NF-κB, NLRP3, and cleaved caspase-1 activation. BMMs transfected with Notch1 siRNA reduced Hes1 and phosphorylated Stat3 and Akt but augmented HMGB1, TLR4, NF-κB, and NLRP3. Furthermore, TLR4 siRNA knockdown resulted in decreased NF-κB and NLRP3 and cleaved caspase-1 and IL-1β levels following LPS stimulation. These results demonstrate that Notch signaling regulates innate NLRP3 inflammasome activation through regulation of HMGB1/TLR4/NF-κB activation in APAP-induced liver injury. Our novel findings underscore the critical role of the Notch1-Hes1 signaling cascade in the regulation of innate immunity in APAP-triggered liver inflammation. This might imply a novel therapeutic

  11. Association of serum caffeine concentrations with blood lipids in caffeine-drug users and nonusers - results of German National Health Surveys from 1984 to 1999.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Melchert, Hans-Ulrich; Knopf, Hildtraud; Braemer-Hauth, Marianne; Gerding, Barbara; Pabel, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies regarding effects of caffeine on lipids focused mainly on coffee consumption, the real association of serum caffeine concentrations with blood lipids is unclear. 814 caffeine-drug users who had taken any caffeine/caffeine-containing pharmaceutical products and 623 nonusers without any drug use in the last seven days before the medical interview were identified from German National Health Surveys from 1984 to 1999. Serum caffeine concentrations were measured by using EIA for caffeine-drug users and nonusers in the same laboratory. Blood lipids were measured routinely for all survey participants. The association of caffeine concentrations with blood lipids was established by means of partial correlation analysis and regression analysis. After controlling for influence factors, caffeine concentrations were closely positively related to triglycerides in caffeine-drug users (male: r = 0.245, p < 0.001; female: r = 0.117, p = 0.018) and related to HDL-C in female nonusers (r = 0.245, p < 0.001). No associations were found between caffeine concentrations and total cholesterol and LDL-C levels in any groups of our study. Acute intake of caffeine might increase triglycerides levels especially in men while chronic intake of caffeine might be weakly but positively associated with HDL-C concentrations in women. The effects of caffeine on the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases should be further confirmed through epidemiological studies.

  12. Caffeine dimerization: effects of sugar, salts, and water structure.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Seishi

    2015-10-01

    Sugars and salts strongly affect the dimerization of caffeine in water. Such a change of dimerization, considered to be crucial for bitter taste suppression, has long been rationalized by the change of "water structure" induced by the additives; "kosmotropic" (water structure enhancing) salts and sugars promote dimerization, whereas "chaotropic" (water structure breaking) salts suppress dimerization. Based on statistical thermodynamics, here we challenge this consensus; we combine the rigorous Kirkwood-Buff theory of solution with the classical isodesmic model of caffeine association. Instead of the change of water structure, we show that the enhancement of caffeine dimerization is due to the exclusion of additives from caffeine, and that the weakening of dimerization is due to the binding of additives on caffeine.

  13. Caffeine challenge test and panic disorder: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Vilarim, Marina Machado; Rocha Araujo, Daniele Marano; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2011-08-01

    This systematic review aimed to examine the results of studies that have investigated the induction of panic attacks and/or the anxiogenic effect of the caffeine challenge test in patients with panic disorder. The literature search was performed in PubMed, Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde and the ISI Web of Knowledge. The words used for the search were caffeine, caffeine challenge test, panic disorder, panic attacks and anxiety disorder. In total, we selected eight randomized, double-blind studies where caffeine was administered orally, and none of them controlled for confounding factors in the analysis. The percentage of loss during follow-up ranged between 14.3% and 73.1%. The eight studies all showed a positive association between caffeine and anxiogenic effects and/or panic disorder.

  14. Use of caffeine and nicotine in people with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jill M; Gandhi, Kunal K

    2008-06-01

    There are numerous reports of increased use of both caffeine and nicotine in schizophrenia. Clinical effects of these substances are important and may complicate the interpretation of schizophrenia symptoms and antipsychotic medication side effects. Use of caffeine and nicotine is often linked, with smokers using more caffeine due to interacting metabolic effects. Studies of neurobiology reveal evidence of specific brain changes in schizophrenia that are impacted by nicotine and caffeine and suggest self-medication effects. Interestingly both substances are linked to altered inhibitory mechanisms in brain functioning. Few studies have examined both simultaneously which is critical given their metabolic and symptomatic interactions. This paper reviews use of caffeine and nicotine in people with schizophrenia and gives recommendations for their further study.

  15. Dimer excision in Escherichia coli in the presence of caffeine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, R.H.

    1980-07-01

    The observation that polA1 and recL152 mutations result in both slow pyrimidine dimer excision and large repair patch size leads to the hypothesis that patch size is directly related to the rate of excision. In this study caffeine, a known inhibitor of excision repair, was used to examine the extent of correlation between excision rate and patch size by measuring patch size in the presence of several concentrations of caffeine. Both the rate of excision and the resistance to ultraviolet radiation were reduced with increasing concentrations of caffeine after irradiation. Caffeine also inhibited the rate at which incisions were made and prolonged the time required to rejoin the discontinuities. Patch size, however, was unaffected by caffeine treatment.

  16. Acute caffeine administration affects zebrafish response to a robotic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Ladu, Fabrizio; Mwaffo, Violet; Li, Jasmine; Macrì, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Zebrafish has been recently proposed as a valid animal model to investigate the fundamental mechanisms regulating emotional behavior and evaluate the modulatory effects exerted by psychoactive compounds. In this study, we propose a novel methodological framework based on robotics and information theory to investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish exposed to acute caffeine treatment. In a binary preference test, we studied the response of caffeine-treated zebrafish to a replica of a shoal of conspecifics moving in the tank. A purely data-driven information theoretic approach was used to infer the influence of the replica on zebrafish behavior as a function of caffeine concentration. Our results demonstrate that acute caffeine administration modulates both the average speed and the interaction with the replica. Specifically, zebrafish exposed to elevated doses of caffeine show reduced locomotion and increased sensitivity to the motion of the replica. The methodology developed in this study may complement traditional experimental paradigms developed in the field of behavioral pharmacology.

  17. Caffeine augments Alprazolam induced cytotoxicity in human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Saha, Biswarup; Mukherjee, Ananda; Samanta, Saheli; Saha, Piyali; Ghosh, Anup Kumar; Santra, Chitta Ranjan; Karmakar, Parimal

    2009-09-01

    Combined effects of alprazolam (Alp), a member of benzodiazepine group of drugs and caffeine on human cell lines, HeLa and THP1 were investigated in this study. Alp mediated cytotoxicity was enhanced while caffeine was present. The cell death was confirmed by observing morphological changes, LDH assay and membrane anisotropic study. Also such combined effects induced elevated level of ROS and depletion of GSH. The mechanism of cell death induced by simultaneous treatment of Alp and caffeine was associated with the calcium-mediated activation of mu-calpain, release of lysosomal protease cathepsin B, activation of PARP and cleavage of caspase 3. Our results indicate that, Alp alone induces apoptosis in human cells but in the presence of caffeine it augments necrosis in a well-regulated pathway. Thus our observations strongly suggest that, alprazolam and caffeine together produce severe cytotoxicity in human cell lines.

  18. Hepatoprotective effect of coenzyme Q10 in rats with acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Amr A; Jresat, Iyad

    2012-03-01

    The potential protective effect of coenzyme Q10 against acute liver injury induced by a single dose of acetaminophen (700 mg/kg, p.o.) was investigated in rats. Coenzyme Q10 treatment was given as two i.p. injections, 10 mg/kg each, at 1 and 12 h following acetaminophen administration. Coenzyme Q10 significantly reduced the levels of serum aminotransferases, suppressed lipid peroxidation, prevented the decreases of reduced glutathione and catalase activity, decreased the elevations of tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide as well as attenuating the reductions of selenium and zinc ions in liver tissue resulting from acetaminophen administration. Histopathological liver tissue damage mediated by acetaminophen was ameliorated by coenzyme Q10. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that coenzyme Q10 significantly decreased the acetaminophen-induced overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor-κB, caspase-3 and p53 in liver tissue. It was concluded that coenzyme Q10 protects rat liver against acute acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, most probably through its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects.

  19. Hepatoprotective effects of Arctium lappa on carbon tetrachloride- and acetaminophen-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Lin, S C; Chung, T C; Lin, C C; Ueng, T H; Lin, Y H; Lin, S Y; Wang, L Y

    2000-01-01

    The root of Arctium lappa Linne (A. lappa) (Compositae), a perennial herb, has been cultivated for a long time as a popular vegetable. In order to investigate the hepatoprotective effects of A. lappa, male ICR mice were injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4, 32 microl/kg, i.p.) or acetaminophen (600 mg/kg, i.p.). A. lappa suppressed the SGOT and SGPT elevations induced by CCl4 or acetaminophen in a dose-dependent manner and alleviated the severity of liver damage based on histopathological observations. In an attempt to elucidate the possible mechanism(s) of this hepatoprotective effect, glutathione (GSH), cytochrome P-450 (P-450) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were studied. A. lappa reversed the decrease in GSH and P-450 induced by CCl4 and acetaminophen. It was also found that A. lappa decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content in CCl4 or acetaminophen-intoxicated mice. From these results, it was suggested that A. lappa could protect the liver cells from CCl4 or acetaminophen-induced liver damages, perhaps by its antioxidative effect on hepatocytes, hence eliminating the deleterious effects of toxic metabolites from CCl4 or acetaminophen.

  20. From painkiller to empathy killer: acetaminophen (paracetamol) reduces empathy for pain.

    PubMed

    Mischkowski, Dominik; Crocker, Jennifer; Way, Baldwin M

    2016-09-01

    Simulation theories of empathy hypothesize that empathizing with others' pain shares some common psychological computations with the processing of one's own pain. Support for this perspective has largely relied on functional neuroimaging evidence of an overlap between activations during the experience of physical pain and empathy for other people's pain. Here, we extend the functional overlap perspective to the neurochemical level and test whether a common physical painkiller, acetaminophen (paracetamol), can reduce empathy for another's pain. In two double-blind placebo-controlled experiments, participants rated perceived pain, personal distress and empathic concern in response to reading scenarios about another's physical or social pain, witnessing ostracism in the lab, or visualizing another study participant receiving painful noise blasts. As hypothesized, acetaminophen reduced empathy in response to others' pain. Acetaminophen also reduced the unpleasantness of noise blasts delivered to the participant, which mediated acetaminophen's effects on empathy. Together, these findings suggest that the physical painkiller acetaminophen reduces empathy for pain and provide a new perspective on the neurochemical bases of empathy. Because empathy regulates prosocial and antisocial behavior, these drug-induced reductions in empathy raise concerns about the broader social side effects of acetaminophen, which is taken by almost a quarter of adults in the United States each week.

  1. Impact of Educational Levels and Health Literacy on Community Acetaminophen Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Ip, Eric J; Tang, Terrill T-L; Cheng, Vincent; Yu, Junhua; Cheongsiatmoy, Derren S

    2015-12-01

    Patient understanding of acetaminophen is important for its safe and appropriate self-use. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area to determine the impact of educational level, patient health literacy score, and other demographic characteristics on acetaminophen knowledge. A 17-item, in-person, paper-and-pen questionnaire containing questions about demographics and acetaminophen knowledge was administered to 311 adults outside 5 local grocery stores in varying socioeconomic communities. Knowledge assessed was whether Tylenol-McNeil contains acetaminophen, maximum daily dose, and primary organ affected by toxicity. Participant health literacy was evaluated using the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine-Short Form (REALM-SF) test. Of the 300 who successfully completed the study, only 3.8% of all subjects were able to answer all 3 acetaminophen knowledge questions correctly regardless of educational level or health literacy score. This reaffirms that a lack of appropriate acetaminophen knowledge remains present in the general population, and further efforts to educate patients will be needed to prevent adverse events.

  2. Acetaminophen Use for Fever in Children Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Stephen T; Gould, Georgianna G

    2016-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is characterized by persistent deficits in social communication and restrictive behavior, interests, and activities. Our previous case-control study showed that use of acetaminophen at age 12–18 months is associated with increased likelihood for ASD (OR 8.37, 95% CI 2.08–33.7). In this study, we again show that acetaminophen use is associated with ASD (p = 0.013). Because these children are older than in our first study, the association is reversed; fewer children with ASD vs. non-ASD children use acetaminophen as a “first choice” compared to “never use” (OR 0.165, 95% CI 0.045, 0.599). We found significantly more children with ASD vs. non- ASD children change to the use of ibuprofen when acetaminophen is not effective at reducing fever (p = 0.033) and theorize this change in use is due to endocannabinoid system dysfunction. We also found that children with ASD vs. non-ASD children are significantly more likely to show an increase in sociability when they have a fever (p = 0.037) and theorize that this increase is due to anandamide activation of the endocannabinoid system in ASD children with low endocannabinoid tone from early acetaminophen use. In light of this we recommend that acetaminophen use be reviewed for safety in children. PMID:27695658

  3. The effect of acetaminophen nanoparticles on liver toxicity in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Rezayat, S Mahdi; Montazeri, Naser; Pourshamsian, Khalil; Zeinali, Reza; Asefnejad, Azadeh; Rahimi, Mehdi; Zadehzare, Mohammadmajid; Mahmoudi, Mehran; Mazinani, Rohollah; Ziaei, Mehdi

    2010-04-07

    Acetaminophen, a pain-reliever, is one of the most widely used medications in the world. Acetaminophen with normal dosage is considered a nontoxic drug for therapeutic applications, but when taken at overdose levels it produces liver damage in human and various animal species. By a high energy mechanically activated method, we produced acetaminophen in a nanometer crystalline size (24 nm). Forty-eight hours after injection of crystalline particles with normal and reduced size of our drug, the effect of liver toxicity was compared by determination of liver transferase enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). These enzymes were examined by routine colorimetric methods using commercial kits and pathologic investigations. Statistical analysis and pathological figures indicated that ALT delivery and toxicity in reduced size acetaminophen was significantly reduced when compared with normal size acetaminophen. Pathology figures exhibited reduced necrosis effects, especially the confluent necrosis, in the central part of the lobule in the reduced size acetaminophen samples when compared with the normal samples.

  4. Factors influencing the caffeine test for cytochrome P 448-dependent liver function.

    PubMed

    Joeres, R; Klinker, H; Huesler, H; Epping, J; Hofstetter, G; Drost, D; Reuss, H; Zilly, W; Richter, E

    1987-01-01

    Liver functions in patients with liver disease can be estimated by caffeine clearance. Our data, however, demonstrate the additional influence of factors other than liver disease on the caffeine test. Smoking enhances caffeine clearance in both healthy volunteers and patients with severe hepatic disorders, whereas co-medication with mexiletine strongly inhibits caffeine elimination.

  5. Understanding Adolescent Caffeine Use: Connecting Use Patterns with Expectancies, Reasons, and Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludden, Alison Bryant; Wolfson, Amy R.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about adolescents' caffeine use, yet caffeinated soda, and more recently coffee and energy drinks, are part of youth culture. This study examines adolescents' caffeine use and, using cluster analysis, identifies three groups of caffeine users who differed in their reasons for use, expectancies, and sleep behaviors. In this high…

  6. Variation in caffeine concentration in single coffee beans.

    PubMed

    Fox, Glen P; Wu, Alex; Yiran, Liang; Force, Lesleigh

    2013-11-13

    Twenty-eight coffee samples from around the world were tested for caffeine levels to develop near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) calibrations for whole and ground coffee. Twenty-five individual beans from five of those coffees were used to develop a NIRS calibration for caffeine concentration in single beans. An international standard high-performance liquid chromatography method was used to analyze for caffeine content. Coffee is a legal stimulant and possesses a number of heath properties. However, there is variation in the level of caffeine in brewed coffee and other caffeinated beverages. Being able to sort beans on the basis of caffeine concentration will improve quality control in the level of caffeine in those beverages. The range in caffeine concentration was from 0.01 mg/g (decaffeinated coffee) to 19.9 mg/g (Italian coffee). The majority of coffees were around 10.0-12.0 mg/g. The NIRS results showed r(2) values for bulk unground and ground coffees were >0.90 with standard errors <2 mg/g. For the single-bean calibration the r(2) values were between 0.85 and 0.93 with standard errors of cross validation of 0.8-1.6 mg/g depending upon calibration. The results showed it was possible to develop NIRS calibrations to estimate the caffeine concentration of individual coffee beans. One application of this calibration could be sorting beans on caffeine concentration to provide greater quality control for high-end markets. Furthermore, bean sorting may open new markets for novel coffee products.

  7. Caffeine causes pulmonary hypertension syndrome (ascites) in broilers.

    PubMed

    Kamely, M; Torshizi, M A Karimi; Rahimi, S; Wideman, R F

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS), or ascites, is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance accompanied by right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and fluid accumulation in the abdominal cavity. Experimental models are required for triggering PHS to study the pathogenesis of this syndrome and to select resistant genetic lines. Caffeine increases vascular resistance and promotes systemic hypertension in mammals, but a similar effect of caffeine on the pulmonary circulation had not previously been demonstrated. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of caffeine alone (Exp. 1) or in combination with cold temperature (Exp. 2) on parameters associated with PHS in young broiler chicks. In Exp. 1, 288 chicks were distributed among 24 pens and brooded at standard environmental temperatures, and on d 3 through 42 caffeine was added to the water at doses of 0 (control), 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 mg/(kg BW·d). In Exp. 2, 192 chicks were distributed among 16 pens and brooded at cool environmental temperatures, and on d 3 through 42 caffeine was added to the water at doses of 0 (control), 15, 30, and 45 mg/(kg BW·d). In Exp. 1 caffeine administered at or above 12.5 mg/(kg BW·d) induced severe PHS and resulted in acute mortality and RVH ( < 0.05). Hematocrit also slightly increased by caffeine supplementation ( = 0.07). In Exp. 2 caffeine-treated broilers exposed to cold temperatures remarkably exhibited PHS incidences and developed RVH with right ventricular to total ventricular weight ratios of 30% or greater. Moreover, hematocrit significantly increased because of caffeine supplementation in cool ambient temperature ( = 0.002). Our data demonstrate that caffeine induces high incidences of PHS in broilers, which is exacerbated by exposure to low temperatures.

  8. Caffeine Induction of Sulfotransferases in Rat Liver and Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tianyan; Chen, Yue; Huang, Chaoqun; Chen, Guangping

    2011-01-01

    Sulfotransferases (SULTs) are important phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. SULTs regulation by hormones and other endogenous molecules is relatively well understood, while xenobiotic induction of SULTs is not well studied. Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed psychoactive substances. However, SULTs regulation by caffeine has not been reported. In this report, male and female rats were treated with different oral doses of caffeine (2, 10, 50 mg/kg/day) for 7 days. Western blot and real-time RT-PCR were used to investigate the changes of SULT protein and mRNA expression following the caffeine treatment. Caffeine induced both rat aryl sulfotransferase (rSULT1A1, AST-IV) and rat hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase (rSULT2A1, STa) in the liver and intestine of female rats in a dose-dependent manner. Caffeine induction of rSULT1A1 and rSULT2A1 in the female rat intestine was much stronger than that in the liver. Although caffeine induced rSULT1A1 significantly in the male rat liver, it did not significantly induce rSULT2A1. In male rat intestine, caffeine significantly induced rSULT2A1. The different SULTs induction patterns in male and female rats suggest that the regulation of rat SULTs by caffeine may be affected by different hormone secretion patterns and levels. Our results suggest that consumption of caffeine can induce drug metabolizing SULTs in drug detoxification tissues. PMID:21721019

  9. Effects of caffeine on session ratings of perceived exertion.

    PubMed

    Killen, L G; Green, J M; O'Neal, E K; McIntosh, J R; Hornsby, J; Coates, T E

    2013-03-01

    This study examined effects of caffeine on session ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) following 30 min constant-load cycling. Individuals (n = 15) of varying aerobic fitness completed a [Formula: see text] max trial and two 30 min cycling bouts (double-blind, counterbalanced) following ingestion of 6 mL/kg of caffeine or matched placebo. RPE overall, legs and breathing were estimated every 5 min and session RPE was estimated 30 min post-exercise using the OMNI pictorial scale. Session RPE for caffeine and placebo trails were compared using paired t test. Between-trial comparisons of HR, RPE overall, RPE legs and RPE breathing were analyzed using an independent 2 (trial) × 6 (time point) repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) for each dependent variable. Caffeine resulted in a significantly lower session RPE (p < 0.05) for caffeine (6.1 ± 2.2) versus placebo (6.8 ± 2.1). Acute perceptual responses were significantly lower for caffeine for RPE overall (15, 20, 25, and 30 min), RPE breathing (15, 20, 25, and 30 min) and RPE legs (20 and 30 min). Survey responses post-exercise revealed greater feelings of nervousness, tremors, restlessness and stomach distress following caffeine versus placebo. Blunted acute RPE and survey responses suggest participants responded to caffeine ingestion. Caffeine decreased acute RPE during exercise which could partially account for lower session RPE responses. However, decreased session RPE could also reveal a latent analgesic affect of caffeine extending into recovery. Extending the understanding of session RPE could benefit coaches in avoiding overtraining when adjusting training programs.

  10. Caffeine exposure alters cardiac gene expression in embryonic cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiefan; Mei, Wenbin; Barbazuk, William B; Rivkees, Scott A; Wendler, Christopher C

    2014-12-15

    Previous studies demonstrated that in utero caffeine treatment at embryonic day (E) 8.5 alters DNA methylation patterns, gene expression, and cardiac function in adult mice. To provide insight into the mechanisms, we examined cardiac gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in cardiomyocytes shortly after exposure to physiologically relevant doses of caffeine. In HL-1 and primary embryonic cardiomyocytes, caffeine treatment for 48 h significantly altered the expression of cardiac structural genes (Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b, Tnni3), hormonal genes (Anp and BnP), cardiac transcription factors (Gata4, Mef2c, Mef2d, Nfatc1), and microRNAs (miRNAs; miR208a, miR208b, miR499). In addition, expressions of these genes were significantly altered in embryonic hearts exposed to in utero caffeine. For in utero experiments, pregnant CD-1 dams were treated with 20-60 mg/kg of caffeine, which resulted in maternal circulation levels of 37.3-65.3 μM 2 h after treatment. RNA sequencing was performed on embryonic ventricles treated with vehicle or 20 mg/kg of caffeine daily from E6.5-9.5. Differential expression (DE) analysis revealed that 124 genes and 849 transcripts were significantly altered, and differential exon usage (DEU) analysis identified 597 exons that were changed in response to prenatal caffeine exposure. Among the DE genes identified by RNA sequencing were several cardiac structural genes and genes that control DNA methylation and histone modification. Pathway analysis revealed that pathways related to cardiovascular development and diseases were significantly affected by caffeine. In addition, global cardiac DNA methylation was reduced in caffeine-treated cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that caffeine exposure alters gene expression and DNA methylation in embryonic cardiomyocytes.

  11. The effect of caffeine ingestion on delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Caitlin F; Hatfield, Disa L; Riebe, Deborah A

    2013-11-01

    The beneficial effects of caffeine on aerobic activity and resistance training performance are well documented. However, less is known concerning caffeine's potential role in reducing perception of pain and soreness during exercise. In addition, there is no information regarding the effects of caffeine on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effect of caffeine ingestion on muscle soreness, blood enzyme activity, and performance after a bout of elbow flexion/extension exercise. Nine low-caffeine-consuming males (body mass: 76.68 ± 8.13 kg; height: 179.18 ± 9.35 cm; age: 20 ± 1 year) were randomly assigned to ingest either caffeine or placebo 1 hour before completing 4 sets of 10 bicep curls on a preacher bench, followed by a fifth set in which subjects completed as many repetitions as possible. Soreness and soreness on palpation intensity were measured using three 0-10 visual analog scales before exercise, and 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours after exercise. After a washout period, subjects crossed over to the other treatment group. Caffeine ingestion resulted in significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower levels of soreness on day 2 and day 3 compared with placebo. Total repetitions in the final set of exercise increased with caffeine ingestion compared with placebo. This study demonstrates that caffeine ingestion immediately before an upper-body resistance training out enhances performance. A further beneficial effect of sustained caffeine ingestion in the days after the exercise bout is an attenuation of DOMS. This decreased perception of soreness in the days after a strenuous resistance training workout may allow individuals to increase the number of training sessions in a given time period.

  12. Caffeine exposure alters cardiac gene expression in embryonic cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiefan; Mei, Wenbin; Barbazuk, William B.; Rivkees, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that in utero caffeine treatment at embryonic day (E) 8.5 alters DNA methylation patterns, gene expression, and cardiac function in adult mice. To provide insight into the mechanisms, we examined cardiac gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in cardiomyocytes shortly after exposure to physiologically relevant doses of caffeine. In HL-1 and primary embryonic cardiomyocytes, caffeine treatment for 48 h significantly altered the expression of cardiac structural genes (Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b, Tnni3), hormonal genes (Anp and BnP), cardiac transcription factors (Gata4, Mef2c, Mef2d, Nfatc1), and microRNAs (miRNAs; miR208a, miR208b, miR499). In addition, expressions of these genes were significantly altered in embryonic hearts exposed to in utero caffeine. For in utero experiments, pregnant CD-1 dams were treated with 20–60 mg/kg of caffeine, which resulted in maternal circulation levels of 37.3–65.3 μM 2 h after treatment. RNA sequencing was performed on embryonic ventricles treated with vehicle or 20 mg/kg of caffeine daily from E6.5-9.5. Differential expression (DE) analysis revealed that 124 genes and 849 transcripts were significantly altered, and differential exon usage (DEU) analysis identified 597 exons that were changed in response to prenatal caffeine exposure. Among the DE genes identified by RNA sequencing were several cardiac structural genes and genes that control DNA methylation and histone modification. Pathway analysis revealed that pathways related to cardiovascular development and diseases were significantly affected by caffeine. In addition, global cardiac DNA methylation was reduced in caffeine-treated cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that caffeine exposure alters gene expression and DNA methylation in embryonic cardiomyocytes. PMID:25354728

  13. Influence of environmental conditions on the kinetics and mechanism of dehydration of carbamazepine dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Suryanarayanan, R

    1998-11-01

    The object of this project was to study the influence of temperature and water vapor pressure on the kinetics and mechanism of dehydration of carbamazepine dihydrate and to establish the relationship between the dehydration mechanism and the solid-state of the anhydrous phase formed. Three experimental techniques were utilized to study the kinetics of dehydration of carbamazepine dihydrate (C15H12N2O.2H2O)-thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and variable temperature powder X-ray diffractometry (VTXRD). These techniques respectively provide information about the changes in weight, heat flow and solid-state (phase) during the dehydration process. The instrumental setup was modified so that simultaneous control of both the temperature and the water vapor pressure was possible. The experiments were carried out at different temperatures, ranging from 26 to 64 degrees C. In the absence of water vapor, the dehydration followed the 2-dimensional phase boundary controlled model at all the temperatures studied. In the next stage, the water vapor pressure was altered while the studies were carried out at a single temperature of 44 degrees C. The dehydration was 2-dimensional phase boundary controlled at water vapor pressures < or = 5.1 torr while the Avrami-Erofeev kinetics (3-dimensional nucleation) was followed at water vapor pressures > or = 12.0 torr. In the former case, the anhydrous phase formed was X-ray amorphous while it was the crystalline anhydrous gamma-carbamazepine in the latter. Thus a relationship between the mechanism of dehydration and the solid-state of the product phase was evident. The dehydration conditions influence not only the mechanism but also the solid-state of the anhydrous phase formed. While the techniques of TGA and DSC have found extensive use in studying dehydration reactions, VTXRD proved to be an excellent complement in characterizing the solid-states of the reactant and product phases.

  14. Effect of Acetaminophen Alone and in Combination with Morphine and Tramadol on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Isoflurane in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Julio R.; Ibancovichi, José A.; Sanchez-Aparicio, Pedro; Acevedo-Arcique, Carlos M.; Moran-Muñoz, Rafael; Recillas-Morales, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been observed that acetaminophen potentiates the analgesic effect of morphine and tramadol in postoperative pain management. Its capacity as an analgesic drug or in combinations thereof to reduce the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of inhalational anesthetics represents an objective measure of this effect during general anesthesia. In this study, the effect of acetaminophen with and without morphine or tramadol was evaluated on the isoflurane MAC. Methods Forty-eight male Wistar rats were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen. MACISO was determined from alveolar gas samples at the time of tail clamping without the drug, after administering acetaminophen (300 mg/kg), morphine (3 mg/kg), tramadol (10 mg/kg), acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + morphine (3 mg/kg), and acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + tramadol (10 mg/kg). Results The control and acetaminophen groups did not present statistically significant differences (p = 0.98). The values determined for MACISO after treatment with acetaminophen + morphine, acetaminophen + tramadol, morphine, and tramadol were 0.98% ± 0.04%, 0.99% ± 0.009%, 0.97% ± 0.02%, and 0.99% ± 0.01%, respectively. Conclusions The administration of acetaminophen did not reduce the MAC of isoflurane and did not potentiate the reduction in MACISO by morphine and tramadol in rats, and therefore does not present a sparing effect of morphine or tramadol in rats anesthetized with isoflurane. PMID:26605541

  15. A case of acetaminophen (paracetamol) causing renal failure without liver damage in a child and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Ozan; Genc, Gurkan; Bek, Kenan; Sullu, Yurdanur

    2010-01-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a widely used drug and known as a safety antipyretic and analgesic drug in childhood. Acetaminophen-associated liver damage is more recognized than kidney damage. Nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity can be seen together after acetaminophen overdose, but renal damage without liver damage is a rarely seen entity in all age groups being reported more rarely in childhood. We present here a 16-year-old girl with renal failure without liver damage because of acetaminophen toxicity and a review of literature for pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical course, treatment, and outcome.

  16. Examination of gelling agents to produce acetaminophen jelly.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yutaka; Iwazaki, Yuka; Onuki, Yoshinori; Funatani, Chiaki; Murata, Isamu; Kanamoto, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    The current study used 3 types of carrageenan (denoted here as Car)-κ, ι, and λ-to prepare a jelly vehicle for acetaminophen (AAP), and then compared their usefulness as jelly vehicles. The rheological characteristics of each preparation were assessed and then drug elution from the preparation was assessed using dissolution testing. The behavior of each preparation when immersed in water was also examined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to better understand the drug elution behaviour of each preparation. Viscoelasticity measurements revealed that 0.75 w/v%-ι-Car and 1.25 w/v%-λ-Car had viscoelasticity values equivalent to that of 0.5 w/v%-κ-Car. Dissolution testing of these 3 preparations indicated that 100% drug elution took 45 min with 0.5 w/v%-κ-Car while it took only 5 min with 0.75 w/v%-ι-Car and 1.25 w/v%-λ-Car. When deuterium oxide was added to κ-Car 0.5%, the MRI images darkened overall starting immediately after addition. The images revealed that the sample and deuterium oxide quickly mixed. In contrast, images revealed that deuterium oxide gradually penetrated κ-Car 1.0%. MRI images had uniform contrast, and deuterium oxide took 6 h or longer to penetrate the samples overall. These findings suggest that water is less apt to penetrate a jelly with an increased car concentration and a denser 3-dimensional network structure. Differences in the structure of car are said to result in better gelling, with κ having the best gelling characteristics, followed by ι and then λ. Thus, this paper discusses the role that vehicle gelling strength plays in the elution of acetaminophen.

  17. Effects of doxylamine and acetaminophen on postoperative sleep.

    PubMed

    Smith, G M; Smith, P H

    1985-05-01

    The separate and combined effects of doxylamine succinate (25 mg) and acetaminophen (1 gm) on sleep were studied by interview procedures and information from medical records of 2,931 postoperative patients. The sample contained 1,617 patients with mild or moderate pain and 1,314 who were free of pain. Each received either doxylamine alone (S), acetaminophen alone (A), a combination of both drugs (C), or placebo (P). Drug treatment was double blind and randomized separately for the pain and pain-free subsamples. Twelve measures of sleep were determined. C was more beneficial than S or A, and S and A were each superior to P. For all 12 sleep measures, the effect of the combination (C - P) approximated or exceeded the sum of the two separate effects (S - P) + (A - P). The presence of either drug tended to enhance the sleep benefit of the other. The sedative and analgesic benefits to sleep were at least additive, and some outcome measures suggested synergism. In the total sample, the contributions of sedative and analgesic similar. Among patients with pain, contributions of the analgesic surpassed those of the sedative. For patients free of pain, the sedative was better, but even pain-free patients had enhanced sleep after the analgesic. The analgesic, but not the sedative, reduced pain; the analgesic induced the feeling of being well rested and not tired; the sedative induced a feeling of being drugged. Nondrug variables (e.g., pain, sex, age, and sleep expectations) influenced sleep outcome at least as much as drugs, but randomization and the large sample prevented those extraneous variables from biasing drug comparisons.

  18. Raman detected differential scanning calorimetry of polymorphic transformations in acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, John F; Batykefer, Linda M; Tuschel, David D

    2008-12-15

    Acetaminophen is known to crystallize in three polymorphic forms. Thermally induced transformations between the crystalline forms and the super-cooled liquid have been observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), but the assignment of calorimetric transitions to specific polymorphic transformations remains challenging, because the transition temperatures for several transformations are close to one another, and the characteristics of the observed transitions depend on experimental variables that are often poorly controlled. This paper demonstrates the simultaneous application of DSC and Raman microscopy for the observation of thermally driven transitions between polymorphs of pharmaceutical materials. Raman detected differential scanning calorimetry (RD-DSC) has been used to monitor the DSC thermograms of super-cooled liquid acetaminophen and confirms the assignment of two exothermic transitions to specific polymorphic transformations. Principal component analysis of the Raman spectra have been used to determine the number of independent components that participate in the phase transformations, and multivariate regression has been used to determine transition temperatures from the spectral data. The influence of the laser excitation source on measured DSC thermograms has also been investigated, and it has been demonstrated that a baseline shift occurs in RD-DSC when a polymorphic transformation occurs between crystalline and amorphous forms. RD-DSC has been used to examine the influence of sample aging and sample pan configuration on the observed polymorphic transformations, and both of these variables were found to influence the thermal behavior of the sample. The results demonstrate the advantage of simultaneous Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry for the unambiguous assignment of thermally driven polymorphic transformations.

  19. Acetaminophen Attenuates Lipid Peroxidation in Children Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Scott A.; Zaccagni, Hayden; Bichell, David P.; Christian, Karla G.; Mettler, Bret A.; Donahue, Brian S.; Roberts, L. Jackson; Pretorius, Mias

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hemolysis, occurring during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), is associated with lipid peroxidation and postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI). Acetaminophen (ApAP) inhibits lipid peroxidation catalyzed by hemeproteins and in an animal model attenuated rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI. This pilot study tests the hypothesis that ApAP attenuates lipid peroxidation in children undergoing CPB. Design Single center prospective randomized double blinded study. Setting University-affiliated pediatric hospital. Patients Thirty children undergoing elective surgical correction of a congenital heart defect. Interventions Patients were randomized to ApAP (OFIRMEV® (acetaminophen) injection, Cadence Pharmaceuticals, San Diego, CA) or placebo every 6 hours for 4 doses starting before the onset of CPB. Measurement and Main Results Markers of hemolysis, lipid peroxidation (isofurans and F2-isoprostanes) and AKI were measured throughout the perioperative period. CPB was associated with a significant increase in free hemoglobin (from a pre-bypass level of 9.8±6.2 mg/dl to a peak of 201.5±42.6 mg/dl post-bypass). Plasma and urine isofuran and F2-isoprostane concentrations increased significantly during surgery. The magnitude of increase in plasma isofurans was greater than the magnitude in increase in plasma F2-isoprostanes. ApAP attenuated the increase in plasma isofurans compared to placebo (P=0.02 for effect of study drug). There was no significant effect of ApAP on plasma F2-isoprostanes or urinary makers of lipid peroxidation. ApAP did not affect postoperative creatinine, urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin or prevalence of AKI. Conclusion CPB in children is associated with hemolysis and lipid peroxidation. ApAP attenuated the increase in plasma isofuran concentrations. Future studies are needed to establish whether other therapies that attenuate or prevent the effects of free hemoglobin result in more effective inhibition of lipid peroxidation in patients

  20. N-acetylcysteine amide, a promising antidote for acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Khayyat, Ahdab; Tobwala, Shakila; Hart, Marcia; Ercal, Nuran

    2016-01-22

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP) is one of the most widely used over the counter antipyretic and analgesic medications. It is safe at therapeutic doses, but its overdose can result in severe hepatotoxicity, a leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in the USA. Depletion of glutathione (GSH) is one of the initiating steps in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity; therefore, one strategy for restricting organ damage is to restore GSH levels by using GSH prodrugs. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a GSH precursor, is the only currently approved antidote for an acetaminophen overdose. Unfortunately, fairly high doses and longer treatment times are required due to its poor bioavailability. In addition, oral and I.V. administration of NAC in a hospital setting are laborious and costly. Therefore, we studied the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), a novel antioxidant with higher bioavailability, and compared it with NAC in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice. Our results showed that NACA is better than NAC at a low dose (106mg/kg) in preventing oxidative stress and protecting against APAP-induced damage. NACA significantly increased GSH levels and the GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver to 66.5% and 60.5% of the control, respectively; and it reduced the level of ALT by 30%. However, at the dose used, NAC was not effective in combating the oxidative stress induced by APAP. Thus, NACA appears to be better than NAC in reducing the oxidative stress induced by APAP. It would be of great value in the health care field to develop drugs like NACA as more effective and safer options for the prevention and therapeutic intervention in APAP-induced toxicity.

  1. Determination of association constant of host-guest supramolecular complex (molecular recognition of carbamazepine, antiseizure drug, with calix(4)arene).

    PubMed

    Meenakshi, C; Jayabal, P; Ramakrishnan, V

    2015-12-05

    The thermodynamic property of the host-guest, inclusion complex formed between p-t-butyl calix(4)arene which is a supramolecule, and the antiseizure drug, carbamazepine was studied. p-t-Butyl calix(4)arene has been used as a host molecule and carbamazepine as a guest molecule. Optical absorption spectral studies were carried out to investigate the molecular recognition properties of p-t-butyl calix(4)arene with carbamazepine. The stochiometry of the host-guest complexes formed and the association constant were determined. An interesting 1:2 stochiometric host-guest complex was formed. Job's continuous method of variation and Benesi-Hildebrand expression were used for the determination of binding constant and the stochiometry of the host-guest complex formed. Molecular dimension of the host molecule plays a vital role in the formation of the host-guest stochiometric complexes.

  2. Hippocampal agenesis in an individual who engaged in violent criminal behaviors after discontinuing carbamazepine and paroxetine treatment.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Hiroaki; Akiyoshi, Jotaro; Kanehisa, Masayuki; Ishitobi, Yoshinobu; Tsuru, Jusen; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Shimomura, Tsuyoshi; Kawano, Yoshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Antidepressant discontinuation syndrome (ADS) occurs after abrupt discontinuation of an antidepressant medication. A 23-year-old man with right hippocampal agenesis demonstrated sexual crime (hypersexuality) since the age of eight and had been successfully treated with carbamazepine since the age of 13. He had required increased doses of paroxetine and carbamazepine owing to the development of an unstable affect after quitting his job. He abruptly stopped taking his medication for 3 days and his criminal behaviors re-emerged. We examined changes in brain structure and activity before and after medication cessation, using MRI and functional MRI (fMRI). The image of a girl in a swimsuit increased activity in the thalamus only after medication discontinuation. The alteration in thalamic activity might induce hypersexuality. We conclude that a primary hypersexuality had been suppressed with carbamazepine and paroxetine treatment, and the discontinuation of the medication caused the hypersexuality.

  3. Studies on the kinetics of carbamazepine degradation in aqueous matrix in the course of modified Fenton's reactions.

    PubMed

    Karpinska, Agnieszka; Sokół, Aneta; Karpinska, Joanna

    2015-03-15

    The present article describes a study into the kinetics of carbamazepine degradation under influence of the standard Fenton's reagent, light-enhanced Fenton's reagent, as well as modified Fenton's systems in which iron(II) ion is replaced by Cu(I), Cu(II), Ni(II), Mn(II), Cr(III) and V(V) ions. In the course of the study it was established that V(V) ion modified Fenton's reagent was equally effective in relation to carbamazepine as the standard reagent. Parameters of both standard and modified Fenton's reagents were optimized. It was observed that an increased concentration of inorganic ions and acidic pH levels precipitated the decomposition of carbamazepine.

  4. Caffeine Content Labeling: A Missed Opportunity for Promoting Personal and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Kole, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Current regulation of caffeine-containing products is incoherent, fails to protect consumers' interests, and should be modified in multiple ways. We make the case for one of the regulatory reforms that are needed: all consumable products containing added caffeine should be required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to include caffeine quantity on their labels. Currently, no foods or beverages that contain caffeine are required to include caffeine content on their labels. Strengthening these lax labeling requirements could prevent direct caffeine-induced harm, protect those most vulnerable to caffeine-related side effects, and enhance consumer autonomy and effective caffeine use. Consumers have an interest in regulating their intake of caffeine and thus, ought to know how much caffeine their foods and beverages contain. PMID:24761278

  5. Caffeine Content Labeling: A Missed Opportunity for Promoting Personal and Public Health.

    PubMed

    Kole, Jon; Barnhill, Anne

    2013-09-01

    Current regulation of caffeine-containing products is incoherent, fails to protect consumers' interests, and should be modified in multiple ways. We make the case for one of the regulatory reforms that are needed: all consumable products containing added caffeine should be required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to include caffeine quantity on their labels. Currently, no foods or beverages that contain caffeine are required to include caffeine content on their labels. Strengthening these lax labeling requirements could prevent direct caffeine-induced harm, protect those most vulnerable to caffeine-related side effects, and enhance consumer autonomy and effective caffeine use. Consumers have an interest in regulating their intake of caffeine and thus, ought to know how much caffeine their foods and beverages contain.

  6. Caffeine withdrawal, sleepiness, and driving performance: what does the research really tell us?

    PubMed

    Heatherley, Susan V

    2011-05-01

    As a psychostimulant, caffeine is thought to reduce road accidents by keeping drivers alert and wakeful. Studies have found that caffeine can improve performance on vigilance tasks and in driving simulators under normal sleeping conditions and after sleep restriction or deprivation. However, there is increasing evidence that these beneficial effects of caffeine are due to withdrawal reversal. Studies comparing the effects of caffeine versus placebo on driving performance have tested habitual caffeine consumers deprived of caffeine from the evening before the test day. The conclusion from this review is, therefore, that improvements in driving performance and alertness after caffeine are likely to represent withdrawal reversal rather than a net beneficial effect of caffeine. Further research using designs that control for caffeine withdrawal are necessary and, accordingly, advice given to the public on use of caffeine as an antidote to tiredness and impaired performance should be reviewed.

  7. The Combined Effects of Alcohol, Caffeine and Expectancies on Subjective Experience, Impulsivity and Risk-Taking

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Adrienne J.; de Wit, Harriet; Lilje, Todd C.; Kassel, Jon D.

    2013-01-01

    Caffeinated alcoholic beverage (CAB) consumption is a rapidly growing phenomenon among young adults and is associated with a variety of health-risk behaviors. The current study examined whether either caffeinated alcohol or the expectation of receiving caffeinated alcohol altered affective, cognitive and behavioral outcomes hypothesized to contribute to risk behavior. Young adult social drinkers (N=146) participated in a single session where they received alcohol (peak Breath Alcohol Content = .088 g/dL, SD = .019; equivalent to about 4 standard drinks) and were randomly assigned to one of four further conditions 1) no caffeine, no caffeine expectancy, 2) caffeine and caffeine expectancy, 3) no caffeine but caffeine expectancy, 4) caffeine but no caffeine expectancy. Participants’ habitual CAB consumption was positively correlated with measures of impulsivity and risky behavior, independently of study drugs. Administration of caffeine (mean dose = 220 mg, SD = 38; equivalent to about 2.75 Red Bulls) in the study reduced subjective ratings of intoxication and reversed the decrease in desire to continue drinking, regardless of expectancy. Caffeine also reduced the effect of alcohol on inhibitory reaction time (faster incorrect responses). Participants not expecting caffeine were less attentive after alcohol, whereas participants expecting caffeine were not, regardless of caffeine administration. Alcohol decreased response accuracy in all participants except those who both expected and received caffeine. Findings suggest that CABs may elevate risk for continued drinking by reducing perceived intoxication, and by maintaining the desire to continue drinking. Simply expecting to consume caffeine may reduce the effects of alcohol on inattention, and either expecting or consuming caffeine may protect against other alcohol-related performance decrements. Caffeine, when combined with alcohol, has both beneficial and detrimental effects on mechanisms known to contribute to

  8. The combined effects of alcohol, caffeine, and expectancies on subjective experience, impulsivity, and risk-taking.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Adrienne J; de Wit, Harriet; Lilje, Todd C; Kassel, Jon D

    2013-06-01

    Caffeinated alcoholic beverage (CAB) consumption is a rapidly growing phenomenon among young adults and is associated with a variety of health-risk behaviors. The current study examined whether either caffeinated alcohol or the expectation of receiving caffeinated alcohol altered affective, cognitive, and behavioral outcomes hypothesized to contribute to risk behavior. Young adult social drinkers (N = 146) participated in a single session where they received alcohol (peak Breath Alcohol Content = .088 g/dL, SD = .019; equivalent to about four standard drinks) and were randomly assigned to one of four further conditions: 1) no caffeine, no caffeine expectancy, 2) caffeine and caffeine expectancy, 3) no caffeine but caffeine expectancy, 4) caffeine but no caffeine expectancy. Participants' habitual CAB consumption was positively correlated with measures of impulsivity and risky behavior, independently of study drugs. Administration of caffeine (mean dose = 220 mg, SD = 38; equivalent to about 2.75 Red Bulls) in the study reduced subjective ratings of intoxication and reversed the decrease in desire to continue drinking, regardless of expectancy. Caffeine also reduced the effect of alcohol on inhibitory reaction time (RT) (faster incorrect responses). Participants not expecting caffeine were less attentive after alcohol, whereas participants expecting caffeine were not, regardless of caffeine administration. Alcohol decreased response accuracy in all participants except those who both expected and received caffeine. Findings suggest that CABs may elevate risk for continued drinking by reducing perceived intoxication, and by maintaining the desire to continue drinking. Simply expecting to consume caffeine may reduce the effects of alcohol on inattention, and either expecting or consuming caffeine may protect against other alcohol-related performance decrements. Caffeine, when combined with alcohol, has both beneficial and detrimental effects on mechanisms known to

  9. [Gabapentin treatment in a female patient with panic disorder and adverse effects under carbamazepine during benzodiazepine withdrawal].

    PubMed

    Himmerich, Hubertus; Nickel, Thomas; Dalal, Mira A; Müller, Marianne B

    2007-03-01

    Despite their addictive potential, benzodiazepines belong to the most often prescribed drugs. We report on a patient with alprazolam dependence, who initially was treated with carbamazepine because of severe withdrawal symptoms. Due to liver enzyme elevation related to carbamazepine, we had to stop this treatment and instead of that started gabapentin treatment. Under this new therapy, the patient showed a dramatic relief of withdrawal symptoms and of the panic attacks recurring during withdrawal. Hence, due to their effectiveness and tolerability, newer anticonvulsants could be considered as medication for benzodiazepine withdrawal and as an alternative for benzodiazepine treatment in panic disorders.

  10. Ergogenic effects of low doses of caffeine on cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Nathan T; Trilk, Jennifer L; Singhal, Arpit; O'Connor, Patrick J; Cureton, Kirk J

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to learn whether low doses of caffeine have ergogenic, perceptual, and metabolic effects during cycling. To determine the effects of 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg caffeine on cycling performance, differentiated ratings of perceived exertion (D-RPE), quadriceps pain intensity, and metabolic responses to cycling exercise, 13 cyclists exercised on a stationary ergometer for 15 min at 80% VO, then, after 4 min of active recovery, completed a 15-min VO2peak performance ride 60 min after ingesting caffeine or placebo. Work done (kJ/kg) during the performance ride was used as a measure of performance. D-RPE, pain ratings, and expired-gas data were obtained every 3 min, and blood lactate concentrations were obtained at 15 and 30 min. Compared with placebo, caffeine doses of 2 and 3 mg/kg increased performance by 4% (95% CI: 1.0-6.8%, p = .02) and 3% (95% CI: -0.4% to 6.8%, p = .077), respectively. These effects were ergogenic, on average, but varied considerably in magnitude among individual cyclists. There were no effects of caffeine on D-RPE or pain throughout the cycling task. Selected metabolic variables were affected by caffeine, consistent with its known actions. The authors conclude that caffeine preparations of 2 and 3 mg/kg enhanced performance, but future work should aim to explain the considerable interindividual variability of the drug's ergogenic properties.

  11. Caffeine promotes glutamate and histamine release in the posterior hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    John, Joshi; Kodama, Tohru; Siegel, Jerome M

    2014-09-15

    Histamine neurons are active during waking and largely inactive during sleep, with minimal activity during rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Caffeine, the most widely used stimulant, causes a significant increase of sleep onset latency in rats and humans. We hypothesized that caffeine increases glutamate release in the posterior hypothalamus (PH) and produces increased activity of wake-active histamine neurons. Using in vivo microdialysis, we collected samples from the PH after caffeine administration in freely behaving rats. HPLC analysis and biosensor measurements showed a significant increase in glutamate levels beginning 30 min after caffeine administration. Glutamate levels remained elevated for at least 140 min. GABA levels did not significantly change over the same time period. Histamine level significantly increased beginning 30 min after caffeine administration and remained elevated for at least 140 min. Immunostaining showed a significantly elevated number of c-Fos-labeled histamine neurons in caffeine-treated rats compared with saline-treated animals. We conclude that increased glutamate levels in the PH activate histamine neurons and contribute to caffeine-induced waking and alertness.

  12. Complex Behavior of Caffeine Crystallites on Muscovite Mica Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Defined fabrication of organic thin films is highly desired in technological, as well as pharmaceutical, applications since morphology and crystal structure are directly linked to physical, electrical, and optical properties. Within this work, the directed growth of caffeine deposited by hot wall epitaxy (HWE) on muscovite mica is studied. Optical and atomic force microscopy measurements reveal the presence of caffeine needles exhibiting a preferable alignment in the azimuthal directions with respect to the orientation of the defined mica surface. Specular X-ray diffraction and X-ray diffraction pole figure measurements give evidence that the β-polymorphic form of caffeine forms on the mica surface. All results consent that caffeine molecules have an edge-on conformation i.e. minimizing their interaction area with the surface. Furthermore, the azimuthal alignment of the long caffeine needle axis takes place along the [11̅0], [100], and [110] real space directions of mica; needles are observed every 60° azimuthally. While mica has a complex surface structure with mirror planes and lowered oxygen rows, the slightly disturbed 3-fold symmetry dictates the crystal alignment. This is different to previous findings for solution cast caffeine growth on mica. For HWE the needles align solely along the mica main directions whereby solution cast needles show an additional needle splitting due to a different alignment of caffeine with respect to the surface. PMID:26366127

  13. Physiology, biochemistry and possible applications of microbial caffeine degradation.

    PubMed

    Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N; Bhavya, B; Ashok, Nandhini

    2012-01-01

    Caffeine, a purine alkaloid is a constituent of widely consumed beverages. The scientific evidence which has proved the harm of this alkaloid has paved the way for innumerable research in the area of caffeine degradation. In addition to this, the fact that the by-products of the coffee and tea industry pollute the environment has called for the need of decaffeinating coffee and tea industry's by-products. Though physical and chemical methods for decaffeination are available, the lack of specificity for removal of caffeine in these techniques and their non-eco-friendly nature has opened the area of microbial and enzymatic degradation of caffeine. Another important application of microbial caffeine degradation apart from its advantages like specificity, eco-friendliness and cost-effectiveness is the fact that this process will enable the production of industrially and medically useful components of the caffeine degradation pathway like theobromine and theophylline. This is a comprehensive review which mainly focuses on caffeine degradation, large-scale degradation of the same and its applications in the industrial world.

  14. Excretion of caffeine and its primary degradation products into bile.

    PubMed

    Holstege, A; Kurz, M; Weinbeck, M; Gerok, W

    1993-01-01

    Caffeine, widely consumed in beverages, is known to alter several biliary parameters that can affect gallstone pathogenesis. To address the question whether methylxanthines can act on the luminal side of biliary epithelial cells, we measured caffeine and its primary demethylation products in human bile. Eight patients had an external biliary drainage due to bile duct or gallbladder disease. Two of the patients suffered from histologically confirmed liver cirrhosis. The levels of caffeine, paraxanthine, theobromine, and theophylline were monitored over 10 h in plasma and bile before and after a prior oral dose of caffeine (5 mg/kg b. wt.). Methylxanthines were enriched by an organic extraction procedure and separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Time-concentration curves in bile paralleled the time-course of methylxanthine levels in blood plasma. Accordingly, values in bile and blood plasma were highly correlated for each methylxanthine measured. Within 1 h after the oral test dose, peak levels of caffeine were obtained in both fluids. Biliary concentrations were either almost equal (caffeine) or lower (dimethylxanthines) than their respective values in blood plasma. The results of our study indicate that minor amounts of caffeine and its primary degradation products are excreted via the bile allowing local interference with epithelial cell metabolism of bile ducts and gallbladder.

  15. Chronic caffeine exposure potentiates nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, M; Swanner, L S; Yasar, S; Goldberg, S R

    1999-03-01

    The prevalence of tobacco smoking and coffee drinking place nicotine and caffeine among the most used licit drugs in many societies and their consumption is often characterised by concurrent use. The pharmacological basis for any putative interaction between these drugs remains unclear. Epidemiological reports support anecdotal evidence, which suggests that smokers consume caffeine to enhance the euphoric effects of nicotine. The aim of the present experiment was to examine effects of chronic exposure to caffeine on responding maintained by nicotine. Sprague-Dawley rats consuming caffeine (approximately 150-180 mg/kg per day) in their drinking water for 7 days prior to the beginning and throughout behavioural testing acquired intravenous nicotine self-administration (0.03 mg/kg per infusion) more rapidly than did controls. In a cross-over design, exclusion of caffeine brought levels of nicotine self-administration back to baseline, while adding caffeine to the drinking water of control rats increased responding maintained by nicotine over 90%. These findings strongly suggest that caffeine can potentiate the reinforcing properties of nicotine, thus highlighting the importance of environmental factors in shaping and maintaining tobacco smoking.

  16. Caffeine use in sports: considerations for the athlete.

    PubMed

    Sökmen, Bülent; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Kraemer, William J; Casa, Douglas J; Dias, Joao C; Judelson, Daniel A; Maresh, Carl M

    2008-05-01

    The ergogenic effects of caffeine on athletic performance have been shown in many studies, and its broad range of metabolic, hormonal, and physiologic effects has been recorded, as this review of the literature shows. However, few caffeine studies have been published to include cognitive and physiologic considerations for the athlete. The following practical recommendations consider the global effects of caffeine on the body: Lower doses can be as effective as higher doses during exercise performance without any negative coincidence; after a period of cessation, restarting caffeine intake at a low amount before performance can provide the same ergogenic effects as acute intake; caffeine can be taken gradually at low doses to avoid tolerance during the course of 3 or 4 days, just before intense training to sustain exercise intensity; and caffeine can improve cognitive aspects of performance, such as concentration, when an athlete has not slept well. Athletes and coaches also must consider how a person's body size, age, gender, previous use, level of tolerance, and the dose itself all influence the ergogenic effects of caffeine on sports performance.

  17. Caffeine in an Urbanized Estuary: Past and Present Influence ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Caffeine has been identified by previous research as a potential tracer of sanitary wastewater. To further assess the utility of caffeine as a tracer of wastewater sources, samples from 25 sites throughout Boston Harbor were collected and analyzed for caffeine by LC-MS/MS. Caffeine concentrations in Boston Harbor ranged from 15 ng/L in the outer harbor to a high of 185 ng/L in the inner harbor; mean concentrations and median concentrations were 51 ng/L were 33 ng/L respectively. These data were visualized by a simple inverse distance weighting model to improve the understanding of transport and fate dynamics of wastewater derived contaminants. Elevated concentrations of caffeine in the inner harbor during the sampling period were determined to be the result of a combined sewage overflow (CSO) event as well as illicit discharge of sanitary sewage into municipal storm drains. A comparison of contemporary results to data from 1998 to 1999 shows significant reductions in caffeine levels within the harbor. For instance, concentrations were reduced by a factor of approximately 20 at the site of the former wastewater effluent discharge outfall in Boston Harbor. Lower present-day concentrations throughout the harbor were attributed to the relocation of effluent discharge from within the harbor to Massachusetts Bay, and a reduction in the number and discharge volume of CSOs. Spatial distributions of caffeine identified CSOs as the major contemporary source of con

  18. Effects of theobromine and caffeine on mood and vigilance.

    PubMed

    Judelson, Daniel A; Preston, Amy G; Miller, Debra L; Muñoz, Colleen X; Kellogg, Mark D; Lieberman, Harris R

    2013-08-01

    Like caffeine, theobromine crosses the blood-brain barrier and binds to adenosine receptors, suggesting it might share caffeine's beneficial effects on mood and vigilance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the effect of theobromine doses commonly found in foods on mood and vigilance parameters sensitive to caffeine. Caffeine was tested as a positive control. Twenty-four men (age, 23 [3] years) completed 6 double-blind trials during which they consumed experimental beverages, assessed their mood using standardized self-report questionnaires, and completed a 2-hour visual vigilance task. Three experimental doses (100, 200, and 400 mg theobromine) were delivered in a cocoa-based beverage; 3 matched control treatments (0 mg theobromine, 400 mg theobromine, and 100 mg caffeine) were delivered in a non-cocoa beverage. Mean salivary concentrations of theobromine exhibited significant dose-dependent differences (400 mg trials > 200 mg trial > 100 mg trial > 0 mg trials; P < 0.005). At every dose tested, theobromine failed to consistently affect mood state or vigilance (P > 0.05), but 100-mg caffeine significantly decreased lethargy/fatigue and increased vigor (P = 0.006 and 0.011, respectively). These findings indicate theobromine does not influence mood and vigilance when administered in nutritionally relevant doses, despite sharing many of caffeine's structural characteristics.

  19. Assessment of caffeine intake in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ho Soo; Hwang, Ju Young; Choi, Jae Chon; Kim, Meehye

    2015-01-01

    An improved method for the analysis of caffeine in foods by HPLC was validated by measuring several analytical parameters. The caffeine contents of 1202 products available from Korean markets were analysed. A consumption study was conducted by using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), 2010-12, to estimate the caffeine intakes of the Korean population. The mean intakes of caffeine from all sources in the general population and consumers were 67.8 and 102.6 mg day(-1) for all age groups, respectively. The 95th percentile intakes of the general population and consumers were 250.7 and 313.7 mg day(-1), respectively. In those aged 30-49 years, the caffeine intakes of the general population and consumers were highest at 25.5% (101.8 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) and 36.6% (0.9 mg kg(-1) day(-1)), respectively, compared with the maximum recommended daily intake (400 mg day(-1)) for adults. In the general population, the main contributors to the total caffeine intake were carbonated beverage for the younger age groups and coffee for the adults. These data provide a current perspective on caffeine intake in the Korean population.

  20. Caffeinated Alcoholic Beverages – An Emerging Trend in Alcohol Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Kelle M; Hauser, Sheketha R; Bell, Richard L.; Engleman, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders are pervasive in society and their impact affects quality of life, morbidity and mortality, as well as individual productivity. Alcohol has detrimental effects on an individual’s physiology and nervous system, and is associated with disorders of many organ and endocrine systems impacting an individual’s health, behavior, and ability to interact with others. Youth are particularly affected. Unfortunately, adolescent usage also increases the probability for a progression to dependence. Several areas of research indicate that the deleterious effects of alcohol abuse may be exacerbated by mixing caffeine with alcohol. Some behavioral evidence suggests that caffeine increases alcohol drinking and binge drinking episodes, which in turn can foster the development of alcohol dependence. As a relatively new public health concern, the epidemiological focus has been to establish a need for investigating the effects of caffeinated alcohol. While the trend of co-consuming these substances is growing, knowledge of the central mechanisms associated with caffeinated ethanol has been lacking. Research suggests that caffeine and ethanol can have additive or synergistic pharmacological actions and neuroadaptations, with the adenosine and dopamine systems in particular implicated. However, the limited literature on the central effects of caffeinated ethanol provides an impetus to increase our knowledge of the neuroadaptive effects of this combination and their impact on cognition and behavior. Research from our laboratories indicates that an established rodent animal model of alcoholism can be extended to investigate the acute and chronic effects of caffeinated ethanol. PMID:25419478

  1. Effects of oral caffeine pretreatment on response to intravenous nicotine and cocaine.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew W; Strain, Eric C; Griffiths, Roland R

    2010-08-01

    Previous research suggests that under conditions of chronic daily caffeine administration, caffeine increases the effects of nicotine. Little is known about the effects of caffeine pretreatment on response to nicotine under infrequent caffeine administration conditions. The present study examined whether infrequent (not on consecutive days) acute oral caffeine administration alters subject-rated, physiological, and monetary value effects of intravenous nicotine in regular users of caffeine, tobacco, and cocaine. To determine the specificity of effects of caffeine on response to nicotine, the effects of caffeine administration on response to intravenous cocaine (another short-acting stimulant) were also studied. Fourteen (1 woman) volunteers participated in this 3-4 week, double-blind, inpatient study. Volunteers participated in 10 experimental conditions in pseudo-randomized order, in which oral caffeine (250 mg/70 kg) or placebo was administered 1 hr before an intravenous injection, consisting of nicotine (1 or 2 mg/70 kg), cocaine (15 or 30 mg/70 kg), or saline. Infrequent acute caffeine pretreatment attenuated the increase resulting from 2 mg/70 kg nicotine administration on ratings of "rush," "good effects," "liking," "high," and "drowsy/sleepy." Caffeine had no significant effect on physiological response to nicotine. Caffeine had no significant effect on subject-rated and physiological response to cocaine, with the exception that caffeine significantly augmented blood pressure response to cocaine. In contrast to the previous research using chronic caffeine maintenance, these data suggest that infrequent acute caffeine administration may attenuate nicotine effects.

  2. Regular caffeine consumption: a balance of adverse and beneficial effects for mood and psychomotor performance.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P J; Dernoncourt, C

    1998-04-01

    It has often been pointed out that caffeine is the most widely "used" psychoactive substance in the world, and accordingly, there is a very large amount of research available on the effects of caffeine on body and mind. In particular, a psychostimulant action of caffeine is generally accepted as well established; for example, caffeine has been found to quicken reaction time and enhance vigilance performance, and to increase self-rated alertness and improve mood. There is, however, a real difficulty in determining the net effects of caffeine. In a typical experiment the subjects have a history of regular caffeine consumption, and they are tested on caffeine and a placebo after a period of caffeine deprivation (often overnight). The problem with relying solely on this approach is that it leaves open the question as to whether the results obtained are due to beneficial effects of caffeine or to deleterious effects of caffeine deprivation. The present article briefly reviews this evidence on the psychostimulant effects of caffeine, and presents some new data testing the hypothesis that caffeine may enhance cognitive performance to a greater extent in older adults than in young adults. No age-related differences in the effects of caffeine on psychomotor performance were found. We conclude that overall there is little unequivocal evidence to show that regular caffeine use is likely to substantially benefit mood or performance. Indeed, one of the significant factors motivating caffeine consumption appears to be "withdrawal relief."

  3. Formulation and Characterization of Acetaminophen Nanoparticles in Orally Disintegrating Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AI-Nemrawi, Nusaiba K.

    The purpose of this study is to prepare acetaminophen loaded nanoparticles to be cast directly, while still in the emulsion form, into Orally Disintegrating Films (ODF). By casting the nanoparticles in the films, we expected to keep the particles in a stable form where the nanoparticles would be away from each other to prevent their aggregation. Once the films are applied on the buccal mucosa, they are supposed to dissolve within seconds, releasing the nanoparticles. Then the nanoparticles could be directly absorbed through the mucosa to the blood stream and deliver acetaminophen there. The oral cavity mucosa is one of the most attractive sites for systemic drug delivery due to its high permeability and blood supply. Furthermore, it is robust and shows short recovery times after stress or damage, and the drug bypasses first pass effect and avoids presystemic elimination in the GI tract. Nanoencapsulation increases drug efficacy, specificity, tolerability and therapeutic index. These Nanocapsules have several advantages in the protection of premature degradation and interaction with the biological environment, enhancement of absorption into a selected tissue, bioavailability, retention time and improvement of intracellular penetration. The most important characteristics of nanoparticles are their size, encapsulation efficiency (EE), zeta potential (surface charge), and the drug release profiles. Unfortunately, nanoparticles tend to precipitate or aggregate into larger particles within a short time after preparation or during storage. Some solutions for this problem were mentioned in literature including lyophilization and spray drying. These methods are usually expensive and give partial solutions that might have secondary problems; such as low re-dispersion efficacy of the lyophilized NPs. Furthermore, most of the formulations of NPs are invasive or topical. Few formulas are available to be given orally. Fast disintegrating films (ODFs) are rapidly gaining interest

  4. Caffeine intake and the risk of kidney stones123

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Eric N; Gambaro, Giovanni; Curhan, Gary C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although caffeine intake may increase urine calcium excretion, caffeine-containing beverages have been associated with a lower risk of nephrolithiasis. Objective: We sought to determine the association between caffeine intake and the risk of incident kidney stones in 3 large prospective cohorts. Design: We prospectively analyzed the association between intake of caffeine and incidence of kidney stones in 3 large ongoing cohort studies, the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS) and the Nurses’ Health Studies (NHS) I and II. Information on the consumption of caffeine and the incidence of kidney stones was collected by validated questionnaires. Results: The analysis included 217,883 participants; over a median follow-up of >8 y, 4982 incident cases occurred. After multivariate adjustment for age, BMI, fluid intake, and other factors, participants in the highest quintile of caffeine intake had a 26% (95% CI: 12%, 38%) lower risk of developing stones in the HPFS cohort, a 29% lower risk (95% CI: 15%, 41%) in the NHS I cohort, and a 31% lower risk (95% CI: 18%, 42%) in the NHS II cohort (P-trend < 0.001 for all cohorts). The association remained significant in the subgroup of participants with a low or no intake of caffeinated coffee in the HPFS cohort. Among 6033 participants with 24-h urine data, the intake of caffeine was associated with higher urine volume, calcium, and potassium and with lower urine oxalate and supersaturation for calcium oxalate and uric acid. Conclusion: Caffeine intake is independently associated with a lower risk of incident kidney stones. PMID:25411295

  5. Evaluation of the Reproductive and Developmental Risks of Caffeine

    PubMed Central

    Brent, Robert L; Christian, Mildred S; Diener, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    A risk analysis of in utero caffeine exposure is presented utilizing epidemiological studies and animal studies dealing with congenital malformation, pregnancy loss, and weight reduction. These effects are of interest to teratologists, because animal studies are useful in their evaluation. Many of the epidemiology studies did not evaluate the impact of the “pregnancy signal,” which identifies healthy pregnancies and permits investigators to identify subjects with low pregnancy risks. The spontaneous abortion epidemiology studies were inconsistent and the majority did not consider the confounding introduced by not considering the pregnancy signal. The animal studies do not support the concept that caffeine is an abortafacient for the wide range of human caffeine exposures. Almost all the congenital malformation epidemiology studies were negative. Animal pharmacokinetic studies indicate that the teratogenic plasma level of caffeine has to reach or exceed 60 µg/ml, which is not attainable from ingesting large amounts of caffeine in foods and beverages. No epidemiological study described the “caffeine teratogenic syndrome.” Six of the 17 recent epidemiology studies dealing with the risk of caffeine and fetal weight reduction were negative. Seven of the positive studies had growth reductions that were clinically insignificant and none of the studies cited the animal literature. Analysis of caffeine's reproductive toxicity considers reproducibility and plausibility of clinical, epidemiological, and animal data. Moderate or even high amounts of beverages and foods containing caffeine do not increase the risks of congenital malformations, miscarriage or growth retardation. Pharmacokinetic studies markedly improve the ability to perform the risk analyses. Birth Defects Res (Part B) 92:152–187, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21370398

  6. Acute acetaminophen (paracetamol) ingestion improves time to exhaustion during exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Alexis R; Taylor, Lee; Harding, Christopher; Wright, Benjamin; Foster, Josh; Castle, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a commonly used over-the-counter analgesic and antipyretic and has previously been shown to improve exercise performance through a reduction in perceived pain. This study sought to establish whether its antipyretic action may also improve exercise capacity in the heat by moderating the increase in core temperature. On separate days, 11 recreationally active participants completed two experimental time-to-exhaustion trials on a cycle ergometer in hot conditions (30°C, 50% relative humidity) after ingesting a placebo control or an oral dose of acetaminophen in a randomized, double-blind design. Following acetaminophen ingestion, participants cycled for a significantly longer period of time (acetaminophen, 23 ± 15 min versus placebo, 19 ± 13 min; P = 0.005; 95% confidence interval = 90-379 s), and this was accompanied by significantly lower core (-0.15°C), skin (-0.47°C) and body temperatures (0.19°C; P < 0.05). In the acetaminophen condition, participants also reported significantly lower ratings of thermal sensation (-0.39; P = 0.015), but no significant change in heart rate was observed (P > 0.05). This is the first study to demonstrate that an acute dose of acetaminophen can improve cycling capacity in hot conditions, and that this may be due to the observed reduction in core, skin and body temperature and the subjective perception of thermal comfort. These findings suggest that acetaminophen may reduce the thermoregulatory strain elicited from exercise, thus improving time to exhaustion.

  7. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice is dependent on Tlr9 and the Nalp3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Imaeda, Avlin B; Watanabe, Azuma; Sohail, Muhammad A; Mahmood, Shamail; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S; Flavell, Richard A; Mehal, Wajahat Z

    2009-02-01

    Hepatocyte death results in a sterile inflammatory response that amplifies the initial insult and increases overall tissue injury. One important example of this type of injury is acetaminophen-induced liver injury, in which the initial toxic injury is followed by innate immune activation. Using mice deficient in Tlr9 and the inflammasome components Nalp3 (NACHT, LRR, and pyrin domain-containing protein 3), ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD), and caspase-1, we have identified a nonredundant role for Tlr9 and the Nalp3 inflammasome in acetaminophen-induced liver injury. We have shown that acetaminophen treatment results in hepatocyte death and that free DNA released from apoptotic hepatocytes activates Tlr9. This triggers a signaling cascade that increases transcription of the genes encoding pro-IL-1beta and pro-IL-18 in sinusoidal endothelial cells. By activating caspase-1, the enzyme responsible for generating mature IL-1beta and IL-18 from pro-IL-1beta and pro-IL-18, respectively, the Nalp3 inflammasome plays a crucial role in the second step of proinflammatory cytokine activation following acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Tlr9 antagonists and aspirin reduced mortality from acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. The protective effect of aspirin on acetaminophen-induced liver injury was due to downregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, rather than inhibition of platelet degranulation or COX-1 inhibition. In summary, we have identified a 2-signal requirement (Tlr9 and the Nalp3 inflammasome) for acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and some potential therapeutic approaches.

  8. Cooperativity in CYP2E1 metabolism of acetaminophen and styrene mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Jessica H; Letzig, Lynda G; Roberts, Dean W; James, Laura P; Fifer, E Kim; Miller, Grover P

    2015-10-01

    Risk assessment for exposure to mixtures of drugs and pollutants relies heavily on in vitro characterization of their bioactivation and/or metabolism individually and extrapolation to mixtures assuming no interaction. Herein, we demonstrated that in vitro CYP2E1 metabolic activation of acetaminophen and styrene mixtures could not be explained through the Michaelis-Menten mechanism or any models relying on that premise. As a baseline for mixture studies with styrene, steady-state analysis of acetaminophen oxidation revealed a biphasic kinetic profile that was best described by negative cooperativity (Hill coefficient=0.72). The best-fit mechanism for this relationship involved two binding sites with differing affinities (Ks=830μM and Kss=32mM). Introduction of styrene inhibited that reaction less than predicted by simple competition and thus provided evidence for a cooperative mechanism within the mixture. Likewise, acetaminophen acted through a mixed-type inhibition mechanism to impact styrene epoxidation. In this case, acetaminophen competed with styrene for CYP2E1 (Ki=830μM and Ksi=180μM for catalytic and effector sites, respectively) and resulted in cooperative impacts on binding and catalysis. Based on modeling of in vivo clearance, cooperative interactions between acetaminophen and styrene resulted in profoundly increased styrene activation at low styrene exposure levels and therapeutic acetaminophen levels. Current Michaelis-Menten based toxicological models for mixtures such as styrene and acetaminophen would fail to detect this concentration-dependent relationship. Hence, future studies must assess the role of alternate CYP2E1 mechanisms in bioactivation of compounds to improve the accuracy of interpretations and predictions of toxicity.

  9. Protective effect of pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Gaurav; Krishna, Gopala; Chellappan, Dinesh Kumar; Gubbiyappa, Kumar Shiva; Candasamy, Mayuren; Dua, Kamal

    2014-08-01

    Acetaminophen has a reasonable safety profile when consumed in therapeutic doses. However, it could induce hepatotoxicity and even acute liver failure when taken at an overdose. Pioglitazone, PPARγ ligand, is clinically tested and used in treatment of diabetes. PPARγ is a key nuclear hormone receptor of lipid metabolisms and regulates several gene transcriptions associated with differentiation, growth arrest, and apoptosis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective activity of pioglitazone on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and to understand the relationship between the PPARγ and acetaminophen-induced hepato injury. For the experiment, Sprague-Dawley rats (160-180 g) were used and divided into four groups. Groups I and II were normal and experimental controls, respectively. Groups III and IV received the pioglitazone 20 mg/kg for 10 days. Hepatotoxicity was induced in Groups II and III on the eighth day with acetaminophen (i.p. 350 mg/kg body weight). The hepatoprotective effect was evaluated by performing an assay of the total protein, total bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and α-fetoprotein as well as glutathione peroxidase, lipid peroxidation, catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione transferase and liver histopathology. The assay results were presented as mean and standard error of mean for each group. The study group was compared with the control group by one-way ANOVA test. A p value of <0.05 was considered significant. Pioglitazone significantly reduced the elevated level of above serum marker enzymes and also inhibits the free radical formation by scavenging hydroxyl ions. It also restored the level of LPO and significantly elevated the levels of endogenous antioxidant enzymes in acetaminophen-challenged hepatotoxicity. Liver histopathological examination showed that pioglitazone administration antagonized acetaminophen -induced liver pathological damage. Various

  10. Glucuronidation in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes): studies with acetaminophen, oestradiol and morphine.

    PubMed

    Wong, H; Grace, J E; Wright, M R; Browning, M R; Grossman, S J; Bai, S A; Christ, D D

    2006-12-01

    The chimpanzee has recently been characterized as a surrogate for oxidative drug metabolism in humans and as a pharmacokinetic model for the selection of drug candidates. In the current study, the glucuronidation of acetaminophen, morphine and oestradiol was evaluated in the chimpanzee to extend the characterization of this important animal model. Following oral administration of acetaminophen (600 mg) to chimpanzees (n=2), pharmacokinetics were comparable with previously reported human values, namely mean oral clearance 0.91 vs. 0.62+/-0.05 l h-1 kg-1, apparent volume of distribution 2.29 vs. 1.65+/-0.25 l kg-1, and half-life 1.86 vs. 1.89+/-7h, for chimpanzee vs. human, respectively. Urinary excretions (percentage of dose) of acetaminophen, acetaminophen glucuronide and acetaminophen sulfate were also similar between chimpanzees and humans, namely 2.3 vs. 5.0, 63.1 vs. 54.7, and 25.0 vs. 32.3%, respectively. Acetaminophen, oestradiol and morphine glucuronide formation kinetics were investigated using chimpanzee (n=2) and pooled human liver microsomes (n=10). V(max) (app) and K(m)(app) (or S(50)(app)) for acetaminophen glucuronide, morphine 3- and 6-glucuronide, and oestradiol 3- and 17-glucuronide formation were comparable in both species. Eadie-Hofstee plots of oestradiol 3-glucuronide formation in chimpanzee microsomes were characteristic of autoactivation kinetics. Western immunoblot analysis of chimpanzee liver microsomes revealed a single immunoreactive band when probed with anti-human UGT1A1, anti-human UGT1A6, and anti-human UGT2B7. Taken coll