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Sample records for acetamiprid clothianidin dinotefuran

  1. Development of Immunoassay Based on Monoclonal Antibody Reacted with the Neonicotinoid Insecticides Clothianidin and Dinotefuran

    PubMed Central

    Uchigashima, Mikiko; Watanabe, Eiki; Ito, Shigekazu; Iwasa, Seiji; Miyake, Shiro

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) was developed for the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin. A new clothianidin hapten (3-[5-(3-methyl-2-nitroguanidinomethyl)-1,3-thiazol-2-ylthio] propionic acid) was synthesized and conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and was used for monoclonal antibody preparation. The resulting MoAb CTN-16A3-13 was characterized by a direct competitive ELISA (dc-ELISA). The 50% of inhibition concentration value with clothianidin was 4.4 ng/mL, and the working range was 1.5–15 ng/mL. The antibody showed high cross-reactivity (64%) to dinotefuran among the structurally related neonicotinoid insecticides. The recovery examinations of clothianidin for cucumber, tomato and apple showed highly agreement with the spiked concentrations; the recovery rate was between 104% and 124% and the coefficient of variation value was between 1.8% and 15%. Although the recovery rate of the dc-ELISA was slightly higher than that of HPLC analysis, the difference was small enough to accept the dc-ELISA as a useful method for residue analysis of clothianidin in garden crops. PMID:23202236

  2. Dual-labeled time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay for simultaneous detection of clothianidin and diniconazole in agricultural samples.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Enze; Shi, Haiyan; Zhou, Liangliang; Hua, Xiude; Feng, Lu; Yu, Tong; Wang, Minghua

    2016-02-01

    Europium (Eu(3+)) and samarium (Sm(3+)) were used as fluorescent labels to develop a highly sensitive dual-labeled time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TRFIA) for detect clothianidin and diniconazole in food samples. Under the optimized assay conditions, 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) and the limit of detection (LOD, IC10) of clothianidin were 5.08 and 0.021 μg/L, and 13.14 and 0.029 μg/L for diniconazole. The cross-reactivities (CRs) were negligible except dinotefuran (9.4%) and uniconazole (4.28%). The recoveries of clothianidin and diniconazole ranged from 79.3% to 108.7% in food samples. The results of TRFIA for the authentic samples were validated by gas chromatography (GC) analyses, and a satisfactory correlations were obtained. These results indicated that the method was an alternative tool for simultaneous detection of clothianidin and diniconazole in food samples. PMID:26304380

  3. 77 FR 52246 - Clothianidin; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ...This regulation establishes tolerances for residues of clothianidin in or on rice, grain at 0.01 ppm. Valent U.S.A. Corporation requested these tolerances under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act...

  4. Relationship between Urinary N-Desmethyl-Acetamiprid and Typical Symptoms including Neurological Findings: A Prevalence Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M. M.; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Aoyama, Yoshiko; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Taira, Kumiko

    2015-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists used worldwide. Their environmental health effects including neurotoxicity are of concern. We previously determined a metabolite of acetamiprid, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the urine of a patient, who exhibited some typical symptoms including neurological findings. We sought to investigate the association between urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and the symptoms by a prevalence case-control study. Spot urine samples were collected from 35 symptomatic patients of unknown origin and 50 non-symptomatic volunteers (non-symptomatic group, NSG, 4–87 year-old). Patients with recent memory loss, finger tremor, and more than five of six symptoms (headache, general fatigue, palpitation/chest pain, abdominal pain, muscle pain/weakness/spasm, and cough) were in the typical symptomatic group (TSG, n = 19, 5–69 year-old); the rest were in the atypical symptomatic group (ASG, n = 16, 5–78 year-old). N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and six neonicotinoids in the urine were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was the most frequent and highest in TSG (47.4%, 6.0 ppb (frequency, maximum)), followed by in ASG (12.5%, 4.4 ppb) and in NSG (6.0%, 2.2 ppb), however acetamiprid was not detected. Thiamethoxam was detected in TSG (31.6%, 1.4 ppb), in ASG (6.3%, 1.9 ppb), but not in NSG. Nitenpyram was detected in TSG (10.5%, 1.2 ppb), in ASG (6.3%, not quantified) and in NSG (2.0%, not quantified). Clothianidin was only detected in ASG (6.3%, not quantified), and in NSG (2.0%, 1.6 ppb). Thiacloprid was detected in ASG (6.3%, 0.1 ppb). The cases in TSG with detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and thiamethoxam were aged 5 to 62 years and 13 to 62 years, respectively. Detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was associated with increased prevalence of the symptoms (odds ratio: 14, 95% confidence interval: 3.5–57). Urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid can be used as a

  5. Relationship between Urinary N-Desmethyl-Acetamiprid and Typical Symptoms including Neurological Findings: A Prevalence Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Marfo, Jemima Tiwaa; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Aoyama, Yoshiko; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Taira, Kumiko

    2015-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists used worldwide. Their environmental health effects including neurotoxicity are of concern. We previously determined a metabolite of acetamiprid, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the urine of a patient, who exhibited some typical symptoms including neurological findings. We sought to investigate the association between urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and the symptoms by a prevalence case-control study. Spot urine samples were collected from 35 symptomatic patients of unknown origin and 50 non-symptomatic volunteers (non-symptomatic group, NSG, 4-87 year-old). Patients with recent memory loss, finger tremor, and more than five of six symptoms (headache, general fatigue, palpitation/chest pain, abdominal pain, muscle pain/weakness/spasm, and cough) were in the typical symptomatic group (TSG, n = 19, 5-69 year-old); the rest were in the atypical symptomatic group (ASG, n = 16, 5-78 year-old). N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and six neonicotinoids in the urine were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was the most frequent and highest in TSG (47.4%, 6.0 ppb (frequency, maximum)), followed by in ASG (12.5%, 4.4 ppb) and in NSG (6.0%, 2.2 ppb), however acetamiprid was not detected. Thiamethoxam was detected in TSG (31.6%, 1.4 ppb), in ASG (6.3%, 1.9 ppb), but not in NSG. Nitenpyram was detected in TSG (10.5%, 1.2 ppb), in ASG (6.3%, not quantified) and in NSG (2.0%, not quantified). Clothianidin was only detected in ASG (6.3%, not quantified), and in NSG (2.0%, 1.6 ppb). Thiacloprid was detected in ASG (6.3%, 0.1 ppb). The cases in TSG with detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and thiamethoxam were aged 5 to 62 years and 13 to 62 years, respectively. Detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was associated with increased prevalence of the symptoms (odds ratio: 14, 95% confidence interval: 3.5-57). Urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid can be used as a

  6. 77 FR 44233 - Clothianidin; Emergency Petition To Suspend; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... AGENCY Clothianidin; Emergency Petition To Suspend; Notice of Availability AGENCY: Environmental... immediately suspend Clothianidin and take other actions affecting the registration. The EPA is announcing the... organizations requesting that the EPA suspend registrations for the insecticide clothianidin for the...

  7. 77 FR 18710 - Acetamiprid; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... the insecticide acetamiprid. In the Federal Register of March 29, 2011 (76 FR 17374) (FRL-8867-4), EPA... filing. In the Federal Register of July 6, 2011 (76 FR 39358) (FRL-8875-6), EPA issued a notice pursuant..., entitled Regulatory Planning and Review (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993). Because this final rule has...

  8. Non-target effects of clothianidin on monarch butterflies.

    PubMed

    Pecenka, Jacob R; Lundgren, Jonathan G

    2015-04-01

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) frequently consume milkweed in and near agroecosystems and consequently may be exposed to pesticides like neonicotinoids. We conducted a dose response study to determine lethal and sublethal doses of clothianidin using a 36-h exposure scenario. We then quantified clothianidin levels found in milkweed leaves adjacent to maize fields. Toxicity assays revealed LC10, LC50, and LC90 values of 7.72, 15.63, and 30.70 ppb, respectively. Sublethal effects (larval size) were observed at 1 ppb. Contaminated milkweed plants had an average of 1.14±0.10 ppb clothianidin, with a maximum of 4 ppb in a single plant. This research suggests that clothianidin could function as a stressor to monarch populations. PMID:25839080

  9. Baseline Susceptibility of Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to Clothianidin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, neonate susceptibility to clothianidin, a highly effective contact and systemic neonicotinoid insecticide, was determined from both laboratory and field collected populations. Neonates were exposed to filter paper treated with increasing...

  10. Non-target effects of clothianidin on monarch butterflies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecenka, Jacob R.; Lundgren, Jonathan G.

    2015-04-01

    Monarch butterflies ( Danaus plexippus) frequently consume milkweed in and near agroecosystems and consequently may be exposed to pesticides like neonicotinoids. We conducted a dose response study to determine lethal and sublethal doses of clothianidin using a 36-h exposure scenario. We then quantified clothianidin levels found in milkweed leaves adjacent to maize fields. Toxicity assays revealed LC10, LC50, and LC90 values of 7.72, 15.63, and 30.70 ppb, respectively. Sublethal effects (larval size) were observed at 1 ppb. Contaminated milkweed plants had an average of 1.14 ± 0.10 ppb clothianidin, with a maximum of 4 ppb in a single plant. This research suggests that clothianidin could function as a stressor to monarch populations.

  11. Runoff and degradation of aerially applied dinotefuran in paddy fields and river.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Sayako; Ito, Masataka; Nagasawa, Shunsuke; Morohashi, Masayuki; Ohno, Masaki; Todate, Yukitaka; Kose, Tomohiro; Kawata, Kuniaki

    2015-06-01

    Variation, run-off and degradation characteristics of the insecticide dinotefuran, (EZ)-(RS)-1-methyl-2-nitro-3-(tetrahydro-3-furyl-methyl)guanidine, in water and soil from two paddy fields after aerial application was investigated as well as in river water. Maximum concentrations of dinotefuran were 290 and 720 µg/L in the two paddy waters, 25 and 28 µg/kg dry in the two paddy soils, and 10 µg/L in the river water. Runoff ratios of dinotefuran from the paddy fields were calculated as 14%-41%. Mean half-lives of dinotefuran were 5.4 days in the paddy water and 12 days in the paddy soil. Results obtained in this study are important for the evaluation of the actual behavior of dinotefuran in paddy fields and rivers. PMID:25917847

  12. Fate and effects of clothianidin in fields using conservation practices.

    PubMed

    de Perre, Chloé; Murphy, Tracye M; Lydy, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Despite the extensive use of the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin, and its known toxicity to beneficial insects such as pollinators, little attention has been given to its fate under agricultural field conditions. The present study investigated the fate and toxicity of clothianidin applied every other year as a corn seed-coating at 2 different rates, 0.25 mg/seed and 0.50 mg/seed, in an agricultural field undergoing a corn-soybean annual rotation, and conservation tillage. Concentrations were measured in soil, surface runoff, infiltration, and groundwater from 2011 to 2013. Clothianidin was detected at low concentrations in soil and water throughout the 2-yr corn and soybean rotation. Low and no-tillage had little or no effect on clothianidin concentrations. Laboratory toxicity bioassays were performed on nontarget species, including Daphnia magna, Hyalella azteca, Chironomus dilutus, Pimephales promelas and Eisenia fetida. Risk quotients were calculated from clothianidin concentrations measured in the field and compared with the laboratory toxicity bioassay results to assess the environmental risk of the insecticide. The risk quotient was found to be lower than the level of concern for C. dilutus, which was the most sensitive species tested; therefore, no short-term environmental risk was expected for the species investigated in the present study. PMID:25376402

  13. 76 FR 7712 - Clothianidin; Time-Limited Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... of May 19, 2010 (75 FR 28009) (FRL-8823-2), EPA issued a notice pursuant to section 408(d)(3) of... 6, 2008 (73 FR 6851) (FRL-8346-9), EPA had previously determined that the FQPA SF for clothianidin... Review (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993). Because this final rule has been exempted from review...

  14. Enantioselective degradation of chiral insecticide dinotefuran in greenhouse cucumber and soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiu; Dong, Fengshou; Xu, Jun; Liu, Xingang; Wang, Yunhao; Zheng, Yongquan

    2015-02-01

    The enantioselective degradation behavior of the chiral insecticide dinotefuran in cucumber and soil was investigated under greenhouse conditions based on the method established with a normal-phase high-performance chromatography (HPLC) on a ChromegaChiral CCA column (250 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm, ES Industries). The linearity range, matrix effect, precision, and accuracy of the method were evaluated and the method was then successfully applied for the enantioselective analysis of dinotefuran in cucumber and soil. Significant enantioselectivity of degradation was observed in soil according to the results. The (+)-dinotefuran was more persistent in soil with half-life of 21.7 d, which is much longer than that of (-)-dinotefuran (16.5 d). In cucumber, the (-)-dinotefuran also tended to be preferentially degraded both in foliar and douche treatment. However, the statistical analysis indicated the enantioselectivity of degradation in cucumber was not significant. The research provides the first report concerning the enantioselective degradation of dinotefuran enantiomers and the results can be used for understanding the insect-controlling effect and food safety evaluation. PMID:25378099

  15. Evaluation of environmental fate of acetamiprid in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Pitam, Sarika; Mukherjee, Irani; Kumar, Aman

    2013-03-01

    The acetamiprid, a nenicotinoid insecticide, is a popular crop protection agent used in fields as well as in protected cultivation. A laboratory experiment was conditions to study the effect of light, moisture, and pH on the persistence of acetamiprid in water and soil. Dissipation half-lives of acetamiprid in water at pH 4, 7, and 9 were 6.2, 7.3, and 5.1 days, respectively, and 4.3 days under UV and sunlight conditions. Half-life in soil at three concentrations, 0.1, 1.0, and 10 μg g(-1) under different moisture regimes varied from 21.5-22.8, 15.6-22.4, 10.0-15.8 days, respectively, indicating that acetamiprid dissipated faster in submerged soil as compared to field capacity moisture and dry conditions. The leaching study showed that the possibility for leaching of acetamiprid to ground water is extremely low under normal condition of average rainfall due to compact nature soil in the field. Acetamiprid poses low risks to the ecosystem because of their rapid dissipation and low-bound residues in the environment. PMID:22740158

  16. 40 CFR 180.578 - Acetamiprid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Citrus, dried pulp 1.20 Corn, sweet, forage 15 Corn, sweet, kernel plus cob with husks removed 0.01 Corn... U.S. registrations as of February 10, 2010, for the use of acetamiprid on dried tea. (2) Tolerances... paragraph (a)(1) or (a)(2) of this section as a result of the use on growing crops) as a result of...

  17. 40 CFR 180.578 - Acetamiprid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Citrus, dried pulp 1.20 Corn, sweet, forage 15 Corn, sweet, kernel plus cob with husks removed 0.01 Corn... U.S. registrations as of February 10, 2010, for the use of acetamiprid on dried tea. (2) Tolerances... paragraph (a)(1) or (a)(2) of this section as a result of the use on growing crops) as a result of...

  18. Efficacy of Dinotefuran (Alpine® spray and dust) on six species of stored product insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dinotefuran, an agonist of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, was evaluated both as a 0.5% active ingredient aerosol spray and a dust combined with diatomaceous earth (DE), 5 g/m2 and 10g/m2), at 45% r.h. and 75% r.h. Target species were six adult stored product insect species: Tribolium cast...

  19. A highly selective electrochemical impedance spectroscopy-based aptasensor for sensitive detection of acetamiprid.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lifang; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Huijie; Liu, Meichuan; Li, Zhengxin

    2013-05-15

    A simple aptasensor for sensitive and selective detection of acetamiprid has been developed based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). To improve sensitivity of the aptasensor, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were electrodeposited on the bare gold electrode surface by cycle voltammetry (CV), which was employed as a platform for aptamer immobilization. With the addition of acetamiprid, the formation of acetamiprid-aptamer complex on the AuNPs-deposited electrode surface resulted in an increase of electron transfer resistance (Ret). The change of Ret strongly depends on acetamiprid concentration, which is applied for acetamiprid quantification. A wide linear range was obtained from 5 to 600nM with a low detection limit of 1nM. The control experiments performed by employing the pesticides that may coexist or have similar structure with acetamiprid demonstrate that the aptasensor has only specific recognition to acetamiprid, resulting in high selectivity of the aptasensor. The dissociation constant, Kd of 23.41nM for acetamiprid-aptamer complex has been determined from the differential capacitance (Cd) by assuming a Langmuir isotherm, which indicates strong interaction between acetamiprid and aptamer, further proving high selectivity of the aptasensor. Besides, the applicability of the developed aptasensor has been successfully evaluated by determining acetamiprid in the real samples, wastewater and tomatoes. PMID:23274191

  20. Aptamer-based colorimetric sensing of acetamiprid in soil samples: sensitivity, selectivity and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huijie; Zhao, Guohua; Liu, Meichuan; Fan, Lifang; Cao, Tongcheng

    2013-09-15

    A simple and selective aptamer-based colorimetric method was developed for highly sensitive detection of acetamiprid, taking advantages of the sensitive target-induced colour changes that arisen from the interparticle plasmon coupling during the aggregation of Au nanoparticles (NPs). The results showed that the established method could be applied to detect acetamiprid in the linear range between 75 nM to 7.5 μM, with a low detection limit of 5 nM. Meanwhile, by employing an "artificial antibody" acetamiprid-binding aptamer (ABA) as recognition element, highly selective and specific colorimetric visualization of acetamiprid was obtained. It indicated that pesticides which may coexist with acetamiprid could not interfere with the detection of acetamiprid even that had similar structure with acetamiprid, such as imidacloprid and chlorpyrifos. Mechanism study suggested that it could be attributed to the specific supramolecular interaction between ABA and acetamiprid, as well as the resulted target-binding event induced conformation changes of ABA from random coil to hairpin structure. The practical application of the colorimetric method was realized for detecting acetamiprid in real soil samples and monitoring its natural degradation process. PMID:23846126

  1. Biological Monitoring of Human Exposure to Neonicotinoids Using Urine Samples, and Neonicotinoid Excretion Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Kouji H.; Tanaka, Keiko; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Imanaka, Mie; Niisoe, Tamon; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Inoue, Sumiko; Kusakawa, Koichi; Oshima, Masayo; Watanabe, Kiyohiko; Yasojima, Makoto; Takasuga, Takumi; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Background Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and imidacloprid) microdoses were orally ingested by nine healthy adults, and 24 h pooled urine samples were collected for 4 consecutive days after dosing. The excretion kinetics were modeled using one- and two-compartment models, then validated in a non-deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid microdose study involving 12 healthy adults. Increased urinary concentrations of labeled neonicotinoids were observed after dosing. Clothianidin was recovered unchanged within 3 days, and most dinotefuran was recovered unchanged within 1 day. Around 10% of the imidacloprid dose was excreted unchanged. Most of the acetamiprid was metabolized to desmethyl-acetamiprid. Spot urine samples from 373 Japanese adults were analyzed for neonicotinoids, and daily intakes were estimated. The estimated average daily intake of these neonicotinoids was 0.53–3.66 μg/day. The highest intake of any of the neonicotinoids in the study population was 64.5 μg/day for dinotefuran, and this was <1% of the acceptable daily intake. PMID:26731104

  2. Preliminary studies on the susceptibility level of Ceutorchynhus assimilis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to acetamiprid and chlorpyrifos in Poland and resistance mechanisms of the pest to acetamiprid.

    PubMed

    Zamojska, Joanna; Węgorek, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    The cabbage seed weevil, Ceutorchynhus assimilis (Paykull) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a pest that more and more often causes large financial losses for rapeseed cultivators in Poland and other European countries. One of the reasons of these problems is the resistance of the pest to certain active substances of insecticides. The aim of the study was to assess the susceptibility level of the pest to chlorpyrifos, an organophosphate substance, and acetamiprid, a neonicotinoid, and to determine its enzymatic mechanisms of susceptibility to acetamiprid using synergists, i.e., blockers of particular enzyme groups. The presented research is the first to discuss the mechanisms of the resistance of the cabbage seed weevil to acetamiprid. The achieved results showed medium, high, or very high resistance of the cabbage seed weevil to acetamiprid and its lack of resistance to chlorpyrifos. The research on the mechanisms of the resistance of the pest to acetamiprid revealed the participation of hydrolytic enzymes blocked by S,S,S-tributylphosphorotrithioate and glutathione transferases blocked by diethyl malonate in the metabolism of acetamiprid. The results did not show the participation of oxidative enzymes and esterases blocked by piperonyl butoxide in the detoxification of acetamiprid. PMID:25527578

  3. Mass Balance Assessment for Six Neonicotinoid Insecticides During Conventional Wastewater and Wetland Treatment: Nationwide Reconnaissance in United States Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Occurrence and removal of six high-production high-volume neonicotinoids was investigated in 13 conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and one engineered wetland. Flow-weighted daily composites were analyzed by isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, revealing the occurrence of imidacloprid, acetamiprid, and clothianidin at ng/L concentrations in WWTP influent (60.5 ± 40.0; 2.9 ± 1.9; 149.7 ± 289.5, respectively) and effluent (58.5 ± 29.1; 2.3 ± 1.4; 70.2 ± 121.8, respectively). A mass balance showed insignificant removal of imidacloprid (p = 0.09, CI = 95%) and limited removal of the sum of acetamiprid and its degradate, acetamiprid-N-desmethyl (18 ± 4%, p = 0.01, CI = 95%). Clothianidin was found only intermittently, whereas thiamethoxam, thiacloprid, and dinotefuran were never detected. In the wetland, no removal of imidacloprid or acetamiprid was observed. Extrapolation of data from 13 WWTPs to the nation as a whole suggests annual discharges on the order of 1000–3400 kg/y of imidacloprid contained in treated effluent to surface waters nationwide. This first mass balance and first United States nationwide wastewater reconnaissance identified imidacloprid, acetamiprid, and clothianidin as recalcitrant sewage constituents that persist through wastewater treatment to enter water bodies at significant loadings, potentially harmful to sensitive aquatic invertebrates. PMID:27196423

  4. Mass Balance Assessment for Six Neonicotinoid Insecticides During Conventional Wastewater and Wetland Treatment: Nationwide Reconnaissance in United States Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sadaria, Akash M; Supowit, Samuel D; Halden, Rolf U

    2016-06-21

    Occurrence and removal of six high-production high-volume neonicotinoids was investigated in 13 conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and one engineered wetland. Flow-weighted daily composites were analyzed by isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, revealing the occurrence of imidacloprid, acetamiprid, and clothianidin at ng/L concentrations in WWTP influent (60.5 ± 40.0; 2.9 ± 1.9; 149.7 ± 289.5, respectively) and effluent (58.5 ± 29.1; 2.3 ± 1.4; 70.2 ± 121.8, respectively). A mass balance showed insignificant removal of imidacloprid (p = 0.09, CI = 95%) and limited removal of the sum of acetamiprid and its degradate, acetamiprid-N-desmethyl (18 ± 4%, p = 0.01, CI = 95%). Clothianidin was found only intermittently, whereas thiamethoxam, thiacloprid, and dinotefuran were never detected. In the wetland, no removal of imidacloprid or acetamiprid was observed. Extrapolation of data from 13 WWTPs to the nation as a whole suggests annual discharges on the order of 1000-3400 kg/y of imidacloprid contained in treated effluent to surface waters nationwide. This first mass balance and first United States nationwide wastewater reconnaissance identified imidacloprid, acetamiprid, and clothianidin as recalcitrant sewage constituents that persist through wastewater treatment to enter water bodies at significant loadings, potentially harmful to sensitive aquatic invertebrates. PMID:27196423

  5. Acetamiprid removal in wastewater by the low-temperature plasma using dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanping; Ma, Xiaolong; Jiang, Yanyan; Cao, Xiaohong

    2014-08-01

    Degradation of acetamiprid in wastewater was studied in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. This reactor produces ultraviolet light and reactive species like ozone (O₃) can be used for the treatment of wastewater. We examined the factors that could affect the degradation process, including the discharge power, and the initial concentrations of acetamiprid, and O₃ which is generated by the DBD reactor. We also investigated the effect of adding Na₂B₄O₇ as a radical scavenger to probe the role of hydroxyl radical in the reaction. The results indicated that acetamiprid could be removed from aqueous solution effectively and hydroxyl radicals played an important role during the degradation by the low temperature plasma. The degradation process of acetamiprid fits the first-order kinetics. The degradation efficiency was 83.48 percent at 200 min when the discharge power was 170 W and the initial acetamiprid concentration was 50 mg/L. The removal efficiency of acetamiprid decreased with the increasing concentration of Na₂B₄O₇ because B₄O₇(2-) is an excellent radical scavenger that inhibited the generation of OH during the DBD process. The removal efficiency of acetamiprid improved in the presence of O₃. The main reason was that O₃ can oxidize certain organic compounds directly or indirectly by generating hydroxyl radicals. The degradation products of acetamiprid were characterized qualitatively and quantitatively using high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and UV-vis spectroscopy. PMID:24840877

  6. Biodegradation of the neonicotinoid insecticide Acetamiprid by bacterium Pigmentiphaga sp. strain AAP-1 isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangli; Yue, Wenlong; Liu, Yuan; Li, Feng; Xiong, Minhua; Zhang, Hui

    2013-06-01

    The Acetamiprid-degrading bacterium AAP-1 was isolated from contaminated soil, and identified as Pigmentiphaga sp. combined traditionary categorization method with modern molecule method. The strain could utilize Acetamiprid as the sole carbon, nitrogen and energy source for growth and metabolized 100 mgL(-1) Acetamiprid within 2.5h. During the degradation of Acetamiprid, one N-deacetylation metabolite, was characterized by FT-IR, GC-MS and NMR analysis. A novel microbial biodegradation pathway for Acetamiprid was proposed on the basis of the metabolite. Compared with uninoculated soils, the addition of the AAP-1 strain into soils treated with Acetamiprid gained a higher degradation rate, and the bacteria community analysis by T-RFLP in contaminated soil recovered after inoculation of the AAP-1 strain. On the basis of these results, strain AAP-1 has the potential to be used in the bioremediation of Acetamiprid-contaminated environments. This is the first report of Acetamiprid-degrading isolate from the genus of Pigmentiphaga. PMID:23624055

  7. Rapid detection of acetamiprid in foods using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS).

    PubMed

    Wijaya, Wisiani; Pang, Shintaro; Labuza, Theodore P; He, Lili

    2014-04-01

    Acetamiprid is a neonicotinoid pesticide that is commonly used in modern farming. Acetamiprid residue in food commodities can be a potential harm to human and has been implicated in the honey bee hive die off crisis. In this study, we developed rapid, simple, and sensitive methods to detect acetamiprid in apple juice and on apple surfaces using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). No pretreatment of apple juice sample was performed. A simple surface swab method was used to recover acetamiprid from the apple surface. Samples were incubated with silver dendrites for several minutes and SERS spectra were taken directly from the silver surface. Detection of a set of 5 apple juice samples can be done within 10 min. The swab-SERS method took 15 min for a set of 5 samples. Resulting spectral data were analyzed using principal component analysis. The highest acetamiprid peak at 634 cm(-1) was used to detect and quantify the amount of acetamiprid spiked in 1:1 water-methanol solvent, apple juice, and on apple surface. The SERS method was able to successfully detect acetamiprid at 0.5 μg/mL (0.5 ppm) in solvent, 3 μg/mL (3 ppm) in apple juice, and 0.125 μg/cm(2) on apple surfaces. The SERS methods provide simple, rapid, and sensitive ways to detect acetamiprid in beverages and on the surfaces of thick skinned fruits and vegetables. PMID:24620941

  8. A novel sensor for the detection of acetamiprid in vegetables based on its photocatalytic degradation compound.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dangqin; Xu, Qin; Yu, Liangyun; Mao, Airong; Hu, Xiaoya

    2016-03-01

    An electrochemical method for the indirect determination of acetamiprid was studied, using titanium dioxide photocatalysts coupled with a carbon paste electrode. The cyclic voltammetric results indicated that the photocatalytic degradation compound of acetamiprid had electroactivity in neutral solutions. The amount of acetamiprid was further indirectly determined by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetric analysis as a sensitive detection technique. The experimental parameters were optimized with regard to the photocatalytic degradation time, pH of buffer solution, accumulation potential and accumulation time. Under optimal conditions, the proposed electrochemical method could detect acetamiprid concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 2.0μM, with a detection limit (3S/N) of 0.2nM. Moreover, the proposed method displays excellent selectivity, good reproducibility, and acceptable operational stability and can be successfully applied to acetamiprid determination in vegetable samples with satisfying results. PMID:26471640

  9. Attractive toxic sugar baits: Control of mosquitoes with the low risk active ingredient dinotefuran and potential impacts on non-target organisms in Morocco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the efficacy of ATSB in the laboratory and the field with the low risk active ingredient dinotefuran against mosquito populations. Assays indicated that dinotefuran in solution with the sugar baits was ingested and resulted in high mortality of female Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes a...

  10. Impacts of chronic sublethal exposure to clothianidin on winter honeybees.

    PubMed

    Alkassab, Abdulrahim T; Kirchner, Wolfgang H

    2016-07-01

    A wide application of systemic pesticides and detection of their residues in bee-collected pollen and nectar at sublethal concentrations led to the emergence of concerns about bees' chronic exposure and possible sublethal effects on insect pollinators. Therefore, special attention was given to reducing unintentional intoxications under field conditions. The sensitivity of winter bees throughout their long lifespan to residual exposure of pesticides is not well known, since most previous studies only looked at the effects on summer bees. Here, we performed various laboratory bioassays to assess the effects of clothianidin on the survival and behavior of winter bees. Oral lethal and sublethal doses were administered throughout 12-day. The obtained LD50 values at 48, 72, 96 h and 10 days were 26.9, 18.0, 15.1 and 9.5 ng/bee, respectively. Concentrations <20 µg/kg were found to be sublethal. Oral exposure to sublethal doses was carried out for 12-day and, the behavioral functions were tested on the respective 13th day. Although slight reductions in the responses at the concentrations 10 and 15 µg/kg were observed, all tested sublethal concentrations had showed non-significant effects on the sucrose responsiveness, habitation of the proboscis extension reflex and olfactory learning performance. Nevertheless, chronic exposure to 15 µg/kg affected the specificity of the early long-term memory (24 h). Since the tested concentrations were in the range of field-relevant concentrations, our results strongly suggest that related-effects on winter and summer bees' sensitivity should also be studied under realistic conditions. PMID:27090425

  11. Lethal and sublethal effects of imidacloprid on Osmia lignaria and clothianidin on Megachile rotundata (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae).

    PubMed

    Abbott, V A; Nadeau, J L; Higo, H A; Winston, M L

    2008-06-01

    We examined lethal and sublethal effects of imidacloprid on Osmia lignaria (Cresson) and clothianidin on Megachile rotundata (F.) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae). We also made progress toward developing reliable methodology for testing pesticides on wild bees for use in pesticide registration by using field and laboratory experiments. Bee larvae were exposed to control, low (3 or 6 ppb), intermediate (30 ppb), or high (300 ppb) doses of either imidacloprid or clothianidin in pollen. Field experiments on both bee species involved injecting the pollen provisions with the corresponding pesticide. Only O. lignaria was used for the laboratory experiments, which entailed both injecting the bee's own pollen provisions and replacing the pollen provision with a preblended pollen mixture containing imidacloprid. Larval development, emergence, weight, and mortality were monitored and analyzed. There were no lethal effects found for either imidacloprid or clothianidin on O. lignaria and M. rotundata. Minor sublethal effects were detected on larval development for O. lignaria, with greater developmental time at the intermediate (30 ppb) and high doses (300 ppb) of imidacloprid. No similar sublethal effects were found with clothianidin on M. rotundata. We were successful in creating methodology for pesticide testing on O. lignaria and M. rotundata; however, these methods can be improved upon to create a more robust test. We also identified several parameters and developmental stages for observing sublethal effects. The detection of sublethal effects demonstrates the importance of testing new pesticides on wild pollinators before registration. PMID:18613579

  12. Aptamer-based Resonance Light Scattering for Sensitive Detection of Acetamiprid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengke; Chen, Dan; Wang, Qingqing; Wang, Qiuxia

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an aptasensor-based resonance light-scattering (RLS) method was developed for the sensitive and selective detection of acetamiprid. The ABA (acetamiprid binding aptamer)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (ABA-AuNPs) were used as a probe. Highly specific single-strand DNA (ssDNA, i.e, aptamers) that bind to acetamiprid with high affinity were employed to discriminate other pesticides, such as edifenphos, kanamycin, metribuzin et. al. The sensing approach is based on a specific interaction between acetamiprid and ABA. Aggregation of AuNPs was specifically induced by the desorption of the ABA from the surface of AuNPs, which caused the RLS signal intensity to be enhanced at 700 nm. The alteration of AuNPs' aggregation has been successfully optimized by controlling several conditions. Under the optimal conditions, the RLS intensity changes (I/I0) of AuNPs were linearly correlated with the acetamiprid concentration in the range of 0 - 100 nM. The detection limit is 1.2 nM (3σ). This method had also been used for acetamiprid detection in lake water samples. PMID:27396657

  13. [Photocatalytic degradation of acetamiprid by TiO2 and Xe lamp: kinetics and degradation intermediates].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Chang; Yang, Hai; Hu, Zhi-Bin; Lan, Shi-Lin

    2014-12-01

    Photocatalytic degradation kinetics of acetamiprid was studied by both of single-variable-at-a-time (SVAT) and central composite design (CCD) experiments based on four factors, such as catalyst dosages, substrate concentration, temperature and pH values. The results indicated that degradation of acetamiprid followed pseudo first-order kinetics by Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, increased with the increasing of temperature and the decreasing of substrate concentration. The photocatalytic degradation kinetic rate of acetamiprid was low in acid solutions, while high in weak acidic and alkaline solutions. After studying the synergistic effects of these four classic parameters, the optimal experiment conditions for photocatalytic degradation of acetamiprid were obtained as follows: TiO2 at 2.30 g x L(-1), initial acetamiprid concentration of 90.0 μmol x L(-1), temperature of 37.5 degrees C and pH value at 5.0. Lastly, 7 degradation intermediates of acetamiprid were detected during photocatalytic process by HPLC, and 6 of them exhibited more polar than the parent molecule. PMID:25826941

  14. Insecticide resistance monitoring and correlation analysis of insecticides in field populations of the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens (stål) in China 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Liao, Xun; Mao, Kaikai; Zhang, Kaixiong; Wan, Hu; Li, Jianhong

    2016-09-01

    The brown planthopper is a serious rice pest in China. Chemical insecticides have been considered a satisfactory means of controlling the brown planthopper. In the present study, we determined the susceptibility of twenty-one populations of Nilaparvata lugens to eleven insecticides by a rice-stem dipping method from 2012 to 2014 in eight provinces of China. These field-collected populations of N. lugens had developed high levels of resistance to imidacloprid (resistant ratio, RR=233.3-2029-fold) and buprofezin (RR=147.0-1222). Furthermore, N. lugens showed moderate to high levels of resistance to thiamethoxam (RR=25.9-159.2) and low to moderate levels of resistance to dinotefuran (RR=6.4-29.1), clothianidin (RR=6.1-33.6), ethiprole (RR=11.5-71.8), isoprocarb (RR=17.1-70.2), and chlorpyrifos (RR=7.4-30.7). In contrast, the susceptibility of N. lugens to etofenprox (RR=1.1-4.9), thiacloprid (RR=2.9-8.2) and acetamiprid (RR=2.7-26.2) remained susceptible to moderate levels of resistance. Significant correlations were detected between the LC50 values of imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, dinotefuran, buprofezin, and etofenprox, as well as between clothianidin and thiamethoxam, dinotefuran, ethiprole, acetamiprid, and thiacloprid. Similarly, significant correlations were observed between chlorpyrifos and etofenprox, acetamiprid and thiacloprid. Additionally, the activity of the detoxification enzymes of N. lugens showed a significant correlation with the log LC50 values of imidacloprid, dinotefuran and ethiprole. These results will be beneficial for effective insecticide resistance management strategies to prevent or delay the development of insecticide resistance. PMID:27521908

  15. Potential of the chemical dinotefuran in the control of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) (Acari: Ixodidae) semi-engorged female ticks.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Patrícia Rosa; Pizano, Marcos Aparecido; Remédio, Rafael Neodini; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; de Abreu, Rusleyd Maria Magalhães; Camargo Mathias, Maria Izabel

    2015-08-01

    Ticks are vectors of several pathogens to vertebrates, including the human being. They produce lesions on the hosts during the blood feeding and great economic losses. Several chemical acaricides have been used in an attempt to control tick infestations; however these substances are harmful to both the human being and non-target organisms, and to the environment. Therefore, there is a need to fight these ectoparasites through less harmful methods, less aggressive to the environment, non-target organisms and to the human health. The present study examined the efficacy of dinotefuran on the susceptibility of Rhipicephalus sanguineus semi-engorged females exposed to different concentrations of the product. Its lethal concentration of 50% (LC50) at 95% confidence interval was determined. The ticks were immersed in Petri dishes containing different concentrations of dinotefuran or distilled water for 5 minutes and then dried and maintained in an incubator for 7 days. The results showed the daily number of dead R. sanguineus semi-engorged females after being treated with different concentrations of dinotefuran. The mortality data in bioassay 2 were subjected to Probit analysis, where a LC50 of 10,182.253 ppm (8725.987-13,440.084) and 95% confidence interval were estimated. The susceptibility of R. sanguineus semi-engorged females to dinotefuran in higher concentrations of the acaricide was demonstrated, indicating that its effect is probably dose-dependent. In addition, the action of dinotefuran was slow and gradual, interfering in the development and growth of the individuals throughout the observation period (7 days). PMID:25956944

  16. Microbial Degradation of Acetamiprid by Ochrobactrum sp. D-12 Isolated from Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangli; Chen, Xiao; Yue, Wenlong; Zhang, Hui; Li, Feng; Xiong, Minghua

    2013-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are one of the most important commercial insecticides used worldwide. The potential toxicity of the residues present in environment to humans has received considerable attention. In this study, a novel Ochrobactrum sp. strain D-12 capable of using acetamiprid as the sole carbon source as well as energy, nitrogen source for growth was isolated and identified from polluted agricultural soil. Strain D-12 was able to completely degrade acetamiprid with initial concentrations of 0–3000 mg·L−1 within 48 h. Haldane inhibition model was used to fit the special degradation rate at different initial concentrations, and the parameters qmax, Ks and Ki were determined to be 0.6394 (6 h)−1, 50.96 mg·L−1 and 1879 mg·L−1, respectively. The strain was found highly effective in degrading acetamiprid over a wide range of temperatures (25–35°C) and pH (6–8). The effects of co-substrates on the degradation efficiency of acetamiprid were investigated. The results indicated that exogenously supplied glucose and ammonium chloride could slightly enhance the biodegradation efficiency, but even more addition of glucose or ammonium chloride delayed the biodegradation. In addition, one metabolic intermediate identified as N-methyl-(6-chloro-3-pyridyl)methylamine formed during the degradation of acetamiprid mediated by strain D-12 was captured by LC-MS, allowing a degradation pathway for acetamiprid to be proposed. This study suggests the bacterium could be a promising candidate for remediation of environments affected by acetamiprid. PMID:24386105

  17. Clothianidin in agricultural soils and uptake into corn pollen and canola nectar after multiyear seed treatment applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tianbo; Dyer, Dan G; McConnell, Laura L; Bondarenko, Svetlana; Allen, Richard; Heinemann, Oliver

    2016-02-01

    Limited data are available on the fate of clothianidin under realistic agricultural production conditions. The present study is the first large-scale assessment of clothianidin residues in soil and bee-relevant matrices from corn and canola fields after multiple years of seed-treatment use. The average soil concentration from 50 Midwest US corn fields with 2 yr to 11 yr of planting clothianidin-treated seeds was 7.0 ng/g, similar to predicted concentrations from a single planting of Poncho 250-treated corn seeds (6.3 ng/g). The water-extractable (i.e., plant-bioavailable) clothianidin residues in soil were only 10% of total residues. Clothianidin concentrations in soil reached a plateau concentration (amount applied equals amount dissipated) in fields with 4 or more application years. Concentrations in corn pollen from these fields were low (mean: 1.8 ng/g) with no correlation to total years of use or soil concentrations. For canola, soil concentrations from 27 Canadian fields with 2 yr to 4 yr of seed treatment use (mean = 5.7 ng/g) were not correlated with use history, and plant bioavailability was 6% of clothianidin soil residues. Average canola nectar concentrations were 0.6 ng/g and not correlated to use history or soil concentrations. Under typical cropping practices, therefore, clothianidin residues are not accumulating significantly in soil, plant bioavailability of residues in soil is limited, and exposure to pollinators will not increase over time in fields receiving multiple applications of clothianidin. PMID:26467536

  18. Agonist actions of clothianidin on synaptic and extrasynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on cockroach sixth abdominal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Thany, Steeve H

    2009-11-01

    Clothianidin is new neonicotinoid insecticide acting selectively on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Its effects on nAChRs expressed on cercal afferent/giant interneuron synapses and DUM neurons have been studied using mannitol-gap and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques, respectively. Bath-application of clothianidin-induced dose-dependent depolarizations of cockroach cercal afferent/giant interneuron synapses which were not reversed after wash-out suggesting a strong desensitization of postsynaptic interneurons at the 6th abdominal ganglion (A6). Clothinidin activity on the nerve preparation was characterized by an increased firing rate of action potentials which then ceased when the depolarization reached a peak. Clothianidin responses were insensitive to all muscarinic antagonists tested but were blocked by co-application of specific nicotinic antagonists methyllicaconitine, alpha-bungarotoxin and d-tubocurarine. In a second round of experiment, clothianidin actions were tested on DUM neurons isolated from the A6. There was a strong desensitization of nAChRs which was not affected by muscarinic antagonists, pirenzepine and atropine, but was reduced with nicotinic antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin. In addition, clothianidin-induced currents were completely blocked by methyllicaconitine suggesting that (1) clothianidin acted as a specific agonist of nAChR subtypes and (2) a small proportion of receptors blocked by MLA was insensitive to alpha-bungarotoxin. Moreover, because clothianidin currents were blocked by d-tubocurarine and mecamylamine, we provided that clothianidin was an agonist of both nAChRs: imidacloprid-sensitive nAChR1 and -insensitive nAChR2 subtypes. PMID:19583978

  19. The neonicotinoid clothianidin interferes with navigation of the solitary bee Osmia cornuta in a laboratory test.

    PubMed

    Jin, Nanxiang; Klein, Simon; Leimig, Fabian; Bischoff, Gabriela; Menzel, Randolf

    2015-09-01

    Pollinating insects provide a vital ecosystem service to crops and wild plants. Exposure to low doses of neonicotinoid insecticides has sub-lethal effects on social pollinators such as bumblebees and honeybees, disturbing their navigation and interfering with their development. Solitary Hymenoptera are also very important ecosystem service providers, but the sub-lethal effects of neonicotinoids have not yet been studied well in those animals. We analyzed the ability of walking Osmia to remember a feeding place in a small environment and found that Osmia remembers the feeding place well after 4 days of training. Uptake of field-realistic amounts of the neonicotinoid clothianidin (0.76 ng per bee) altered the animals' sensory responses to the visual environment and interfered with the retrieval of navigational memory. We conclude that the neonicotinoid clothianidin compromises visual guidance and the use of navigational memory in the solitary bee Osmia cornuta. PMID:26206356

  20. Immunoassay for acetamiprid detection: application to residue analysis and comparison with liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eiki; Miyake, Shiro; Baba, Koji; Eun, Heesoo; Endo, Shozo

    2006-11-01

    This work describes the fundamental ability of a commercial ELISA to determine acetamiprid and the application of the ELISA to residue analysis in fruit and vegetable samples. The ELISA exhibited satisfactory sensitivity (I (50) 0.6 ng/g; limit of detection 0.053 ng/g) and a high selectivity for acetamiprid versus other neonicotinoid analogs (thiacloprid amide). Methanol, which influenced the sensitivity of the ELISA the least, was selected as the extractant for the ELISA analysis. Simple dilution of sample extracts with water eliminated matrix interferences. Average recoveries from the acetamiprid-spiked agricultural samples were >95% using a simple extraction method. Analytical results obtained from the ELISA were comparable to those obtained from the reference HPLC method (r>0.99). The ELISA applied to the residue analysis of acetamiprid in agricultural products is a rapid, simple, and cost-effective method, and could be successfully applied to the detection of acetamiprid before the distribution of produce. PMID:16917672

  1. Effects of maternal clothianidin exposure on behavioral development in F₁ generation mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toyohito

    2012-09-01

    Female mice were exposed maternally to clothianidin through diet at levels of 0% (control), 0.002%, 0.006%, and 0.018% during gestation and lactation periods. Selected reproductive and neurobehavioral parameters were measured in F₁ generation. There was no adverse effect of clothianidin on litter size, litter weight, or sex ratio at birth. The average body weight of male and female offspring was increased significantly in a dose-related manner during the lactation period. With respect to behavioral developmental parameters, surface righting at postnatal day 7 of female offspring was accelerated significantly in a dose-related manner (p < 0.05). For movement activity of exploratory behavior at 3 weeks of age, the average speed (cm/s) of male offspring increased significantly in a dose-related manner (p < 0.05). With regard to spontaneous behavior in the F₁ generation, males showed more activity in some measured variables in the middle-dose group. The dose levels of clothianidin in the present study produced several adverse effects in the neurobehavioral parameters in mice. PMID:22025502

  2. Dissipation and residue of acetamiprid in watermelon and soil in the open field.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junxue; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Hongyan

    2012-09-01

    Residue dynamics of acetamiprid in watermelon and soil was studied in this paper utilizing liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The LODs for acetamiprid in whole watermelon, melon flesh and soil were 0.002 mg/kg. The fortified recoveries ranged from 73.7% to 107.5% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 1.7%-5.9%. Acetamiprid dissipated in watermelon and soil with the half-life 3.12-3.92 days and 1.18-1.46 days in two locations Beijing and Shandong provinces, respectively. In the terminal residue experiment, no higher residue than 0.01 mg/kg in melon flesh and 0.3 mg/kg in whole watermelon and soil were detected. PMID:22885545

  3. Clothianidin in agricultural soils and uptake into corn pollen and canola nectar after multiyear seed treatment applications

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Dan G.; McConnell, Laura L.; Bondarenko, Svetlana; Allen, Richard; Heinemann, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Limited data are available on the fate of clothianidin under realistic agricultural production conditions. The present study is the first large‐scale assessment of clothianidin residues in soil and bee‐relevant matrices from corn and canola fields after multiple years of seed‐treatment use. The average soil concentration from 50 Midwest US corn fields with 2 yr to 11 yr of planting clothianidin‐treated seeds was 7.0 ng/g, similar to predicted concentrations from a single planting of Poncho 250‐treated corn seeds (6.3 ng/g). The water‐extractable (i.e., plant‐bioavailable) clothianidin residues in soil were only 10% of total residues. Clothianidin concentrations in soil reached a plateau concentration (amount applied equals amount dissipated) in fields with 4 or more application years. Concentrations in corn pollen from these fields were low (mean: 1.8 ng/g) with no correlation to total years of use or soil concentrations. For canola, soil concentrations from 27 Canadian fields with 2 yr to 4 yr of seed treatment use (mean = 5.7 ng/g) were not correlated with use history, and plant bioavailability was 6% of clothianidin soil residues. Average canola nectar concentrations were 0.6 ng/g and not correlated to use history or soil concentrations. Under typical cropping practices, therefore, clothianidin residues are not accumulating significantly in soil, plant bioavailability of residues in soil is limited, and exposure to pollinators will not increase over time in fields receiving multiple applications of clothianidin. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:311–321. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. PMID:26467536

  4. Inheritance, realized heritability and biochemical mechanism of acetamiprid resistance in the cotton mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae).

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad Babar Shahzad; Abbas, Naeem; Shad, Sarfraz Ali

    2015-07-01

    The cotton mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae) is a serious pest in many countries of the world because of its polyphagous nature and has caused huge losses to the cotton crop. The aim of present study was to explore the mode of inheritance and mechanism of acetamiprid resistance in P. solenopsis. After five rounds of selection with acetamiprid, P. solenopsis developed a 315-fold resistance compared with the laboratory susceptible population. The LC50 values of progenies of both reciprocal crosses (F1 and F1') showed no significant difference and degree of dominance values were 0.56 and 0.93 for F1 and F1', respectively. Monogenic model of inheritance and Lande's method revealed that more than one factors were involved in acetamiprid resistance. Realized heritability (h(2)) value was 0.58 for acetamiprid resistance. A synergism study of piperonyl butoxide (PBO) and S,S,S-tributylphosphorotrithioate (DEF) with acetamiprid also showed the significant presence of P-450 mono-oxygenase and esterase in the acetamiprid resistance. Hence, acetamiprid resistance in the P. solenopsis was autosomal, incompletely dominant and polygenic. These results are a source of basic information to design and plan fruitful management programmes to control P. solenopsis. PMID:26071806

  5. A simple and rapid chemiluminescence aptasensor for acetamiprid in contaminated samples: Sensitivity, selectivity and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yingying; Xiu, Fu-Rong; Zheng, Minfeng; Li, Baoxin

    2016-09-15

    Ultralow concentration and selective detection of pesticide residue is important to evaluate the environmental and biological pollution and the threat to human health which single component pesticide can bring. Herein, we report an amplified chemiluminescence (CL) sensing platform for ultrasensitive and selective acetamiprid (widely used pesticide) detection. It is based on aptamer's high binding affinity to target and the relevance between AuNPs' morphology and its catalytic effect to stimulate the generation of CL in the presence of H2O2 and luminol. Moreover, AuNPs morphological slight change induced by aptamers' conformation during targets binding could lead to the significant change of catalytic properties. Therefore, the proposed sensing platform for pesticide residue exhibited a high sensitivity toward acetamiprid with a detection limit of 62pM, which was about 100-fold lower than that of other aptamer-based sensor for acetamiprid detection. Because of the intrinsic specificity of aptamer's recognization, this sensing platform has high selectivity. So, this sensing platform provides a label-free and cost-effective approach for sensitive and selective detection of single component pesticide residue. More importantly, this CL method was successfully used to determine acetamiprid in real contaminated samples. PMID:27131997

  6. Impact of the neonicotinoid acetamiprid on immature stages of the predator Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Fogel, Marilina N; Schneider, Marcela Inés; Desneux, Nicolas; González, Belén; Ronco, Alicia E

    2013-08-01

    Eriopis connexa is a native coccinelid predator in the Neotropical Region. In Argentina it is commonly found associated to sucking pests in several crops and among them aphids and whiteflies. These pests are usually controlled with newly developed systemic insecticides, such as the neonicotinoids. However, the compatibility between selective pesticides and natural enemies is required before incorporating them in integrated pest management (IPM) packages. Within this frame, the objective of this study was to evaluate the side effect of various concentrations/doses of one commonly used neonicotinoid in vegetal crops, acetamiprid, on immature stages of E. connexa by dipping or topical exposure for eggs and larvae, respectively. Acetamiprid reduced egg hatching from 34 to 100 %. Moreover, the embryogenesis was disrupted by insecticide at early embryo stage at all tested concentrations. Second larval instar was more susceptible to acetamiprid than the fourth one and this susceptibility was positively related with the tested concentrations. On the other hand, the survival reduction at larval stage reached 100 % from 20 mg a.i./L (10 % of maximum field concentration). Besides, the reproduction of the females developed from topical bioassays on fourth instar larvae was strongly affected, with reduction in fecundity and fertility from 22 to 44 % and from 37 to 45 %, respectively. Overall the results showed a high toxicity of acetamiprid on immature stages of E. connexa, demonstrating that this broadly used insecticide could reduce biocontrol services provided by this predator and could also likely disturb IPM programs. PMID:23793295

  7. Fate of imidacloprid and acetamiprid residues during black tea manufacture and transfer into tea infusion.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M; Shanker, A

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the loss/stability of neonicotinoids (imidacloprid and acetamiprid) residues during the manufacture of black tea and to study the transfer of these pesticides from made tea to its infusion. For orthodox black tea, the manufacturing process involves leaf harvesting (plucking two leaves and a bud), withering, rolling, fermentation (oxidation), and drying. Initial withering and final drying resulted in the loss of pesticide residues, but no significant reduction in residue levels resulted from the rolling and fermentation steps. The drying process resulted in a residue transfer of 64-70% and 69-74% of the initial level, whereas the brewing process resulted in a residue transfer of 37-39% and 45-49% of imidacloprid and acetamiprid, respectively, from dried tea into the infusion. The decrease in acetamiprid levels during drying was also significant (8-13%), whereas the total loss during the manufacturing process ranged from 26 to 31%. Further, brewing for longer periods (an extended brewing time) resulted in higher transfer (up to 44% for imidacloprid and 53% for acetamiprid) of pesticides to tea infusion. Further, the extent of pesticide leaching depends on its water solubility, partition coefficient, and the brewing time. PMID:19680885

  8. Aptamer contained triple-helix molecular switch for rapid fluorescent sensing of acetamiprid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Li, Ying; Liang, Jing; Zhu, Wenyue; Xu, Jingyue; Su, Ruifang; Yuan, Lei; Sun, Chunyan

    2016-11-01

    In this study, an aptamer-based fluorescent sensing platform using triple-helix molecular switch (THMS) was developed for the pesticide screening represented by acetamiprid. The THMS was composed of two tailored DNA probes: a label-free central target specific aptamer sequence flanked by two arm segments acting as a recognition probe; a hairpin-shaped structure oligonucleotide serving as a signal transduction probe (STP), labeled with a fluorophore and a quencher at the 3' and 5'-end, respectively. In the absence of acetamiprid, complementary bindings of two arm segments of the aptamers with the loop sequence of STP enforce the formation of THMS with the "open" configuration of STP, and the fluorescence of THMS is on. In the presence of target acetamiprid, the aptamer-target binding results in the formation of a structured aptamer/target complex, which disassembles the THMS and releases the STP. The free STP is folded to a stem loop structure, and the fluorescence is quenched. The quenched fluorescence intensity was proportional to the concentration of acetamiprid in the range from 100 to 1200nM, with the limit of detection (LOD) as low as 9.12nM. In addition, this THMS-based method has been successfully used to test and quantify acetamiprid in Chinese cabbage with satisfactory recoveries, and the results were in full agreement with those from LC-MS. The aptamer-based THMS presents distinct advantages, including high stability, remarkable sensitivity, and preservation of the affinity and specificity of the original aptamer. Most importantly, this strategy is convenient and generalizable by virtue of altering the aptamer sequence without changing the triple-helix structure. So, it is expected that this aptamer-based fluorescent assay could be extensively applied in the field of food safety inspection. PMID:27591592

  9. Impact of woodchip biochar amendment on the sorption and dissipation of pesticide acetamiprid in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiang-Yang; Mu, Chang-Li; Gu, Cheng; Liu, Cun; Liu, Xian-Jin

    2011-11-01

    Pyrolysis of vegetative biomass into biochar and application of the more stable form of carbon to soil have been shown to be effective in reducing the emission of greenhouse gases, improving soil fertility, and sequestering soil contaminants. However, there is still lack of information about the impact of biochar amendment in agricultural soils on the sorption and environmental fate of pesticides. In this study, we investigated the sorption and dissipation of a neonicotinoid insecticide acetamiprid in three typical Chinese agricultural soils, which were amended by a red gum wood (Eucalyptus spp.) derived biochar. Our results showed that the amendment of biochar (0.5% (w/w)) to the soils could significantly increase the sorption of acetamiprid, but the magnitudes of enhancement were varied. Contributions of 0.5% newly-added biochar to the overall sorption of acetamiprid were 52.3%, 27.4% and 11.6% for red soil, paddy soil and black soil, respectively. The dissipation of acetamiprid in soils amended with biochar was retarded compared to that in soils without biochar amendment. Similar to the sorption experiment, in soil with higher content of organic matter, the retardation of biochar on the dissipation of acetamiprid was lower than that with lower content of organic matter. The different effects of biochar in agricultural soils may attribute to the interaction of soil components with biochar, which would block the pore or compete for binding site of biochar. Aging effect of biochar application in agricultural soils and field experiments need to be further investigated. PMID:21862101

  10. Computational Insights into the Different Resistance Mechanism of Imidacloprid versus Dinotefuran in Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Chengchun; Feng, Yue; Li, Weihua; Shao, Xusheng; Xu, Zhiping; Cheng, Jiagao; Li, Zhong

    2016-02-17

    Insecticide resistance is a critical problem for pest control and management. For Bemisia tabaci, striking high metabolic resistance (generally conferred by CYP6CM1) was observed for imidacloprid (IMI) and most other neonicotinoid members. However, dinotefuran (DIN) displayed very low resistance factors, which indicated distinct metabolic properties. Here, molecular modeling methods were applied to explore the different resistance features of IMI versus DIN within the Q type of CYP6CM1. It was found that Arg225 played crucial roles in the binding of IMI-CYP6CM1vQ with a cation-π interaction and two stable H-bonds; however, such interactions were all absent in the DIN-CYP6CM1vQ system. The stable binding of IMI with CYP6CM1vQ would facilitate the following metabolic reaction, while the weak binding of DIN might disable its potential metabolism, which should be an important factor for their distinct resistance levels. The findings might facilitate future design of the antiresistance neonicotinoid molecules. PMID:26817991

  11. Simultaneous determination of residues in pollen and high-fructose corn syrup from eight neonicotinoid insecticides by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Collins, Erin M; Tao, Lin; Lu, Chensheng

    2013-11-01

    The neonicotinoids have recently been identified as a potential contributing factor to the sudden decline in adult honeybee population, commonly known as colony collapse disorder (CCD). To protect the health of honeybees and other pollinators, a new, simple, and sensitive liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of eight neonicotinoids, including acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, flonicamid, imidacloprid, nitenpyram, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam, in pollen and high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS). In this method, eight neonicotinoids, along with their isotope-labeled internal standards, were extracted from 2 g of pollen or 5 g of HFCS using an optimized quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe extraction procedure. The method limits of detection in pollen and HFCS matrices were 0.03 ng/g for acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam and ranged between 0.03 and 0.1 ng/g for nitenpyram and flonicamid. The precision and accuracy were well within the acceptable 20% range. Selectivity, linearity, lower limit of quantitation, matrix effect, recovery, and stability in autosampler were also evaluated during validation. This validated method has been used successfully in analyzing a set of pollen and HFCS samples collected for evaluating potential honeybee exposure to neonicotinoids. PMID:24081565

  12. The neonicotinoids thiacloprid, imidacloprid, and clothianidin affect the immunocompetence of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Brandt, Annely; Gorenflo, Anna; Siede, Reinhold; Meixner, Marina; Büchler, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    A strong immune defense is vital for honey bee health and colony survival. This defense can be weakened by environmental factors that may render honey bees more vulnerable to parasites and pathogens. Honey bees are frequently exposed to neonicotinoid pesticides, which are being discussed as one of the stress factors that may lead to colony failure. We investigated the sublethal effects of the neonicotinoids thiacloprid, imidacloprid, and clothianidin on individual immunity, by studying three major aspects of immunocompetence in worker bees: total hemocyte number, encapsulation response, and antimicrobial activity of the hemolymph. In laboratory experiments, we found a strong impact of all three neonicotinoids. Thiacloprid (24h oral exposure, 200 μg/l or 2000 μg/l) and imidacloprid (1 μg/l or 10 μg/l) reduced hemocyte density, encapsulation response, and antimicrobial activity even at field realistic concentrations. Clothianidin had an effect on these immune parameters only at higher than field realistic concentrations (50-200 μg/l). These results suggest that neonicotinoids affect the individual immunocompetence of honey bees, possibly leading to an impaired disease resistance capacity. PMID:26776096

  13. Photocatalytic degradation with immobilised TiO(2) of three selected neonicotinoid insecticides: imidacloprid, thiamethoxam and clothianidin.

    PubMed

    Zabar, Romina; Komel, Tilen; Fabjan, Jure; Kralj, Mojca Bavcon; Trebše, Polonca

    2012-09-01

    This research focused on photocatalytic degradation of imidacloprid, thiamethoxam and clothianidin employing a tailor-made photoreactor with six polychromatic fluorescent UVA (broad maximum at 355 nm) lamps and immobilised titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) on glass slides. The disappearance was followed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC-DAD) analyses, wherein the efficiency of mineralization was monitored by measurements of total organic carbon (TOC). Within 2h of photocatalysis, all three neonicotinoids were degraded following first order kinetics with rate constants k=0.035 ± 0.001 min(-1) for imidacloprid, k=0.019 ± 0.001 min(-1) for thiamethoxam and k=0.021 ± 0.000 min(-1) for clothianidin. However, the rate of mineralization was low, i.e. 19.1 ± 0.2% for imidacloprid, 14.4 ± 2.9% for thiamethoxam and 14.1 ± 0.4% for clothianidin. This indicates that several transformation products were formed instead. Some of them were observed within HPLC-DAD analyses and structures were proposed according to the liquid chromatography-electro spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry analyses (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The formation of clothianidin, as thiamethoxam transformation product, was reported for the first time. PMID:22668598

  14. Effects of a neonicotinoid insecticide (acetamiprid) on acetylcholinesterase activity and cuticular hydrocarbons profil in German cockroaches.

    PubMed

    Morakchi, S; Maïza, A; Farine, P; Aribi, N; Soltani, N

    2005-01-01

    Acetamiprid was incorporated into the diet at 2% dose corresponding to the LD50 and orally administrated to newly emerged adults of the German cockroach Blattella germanica and investigated on acetylcholinesterase activity and cuticular hydrocarbons profil. Acetylcholinesterase specific activity was determined on adult males and females after 24, 48 and 72 hours of treatment. Pentanic extracts of cuticular hydrocarbons in males and females after 6 days of treatment were analysed by gas chromatography. Data revealed an increase in acetylcholinesterase activity in both sexes from the control series. However, a significant inhibition in AChE was observed after treatment at 24, 48 and 72 hours especially in females. In addition, hydrocarbons profils were found qualitatively similar in all groups of insects. However, slight quantitative differences between sexes in control series were noted. Acetamiprid feminize the cuticular profil in males with significant reduction of cuticular compound, and these allowed separation of insects into two groups using multivariate analysis. PMID:16628926

  15. Molecular features and toxicological properties of four common pesticides, acetamiprid, deltamethrin, chlorpyriphos and fipronil.

    PubMed

    Taillebois, Emiliane; Alamiddine, Zakaria; Brazier, Christine; Graton, Jérôme; Laurent, Adèle D; Thany, Steeve H; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2015-04-01

    Structural features and selected physicochemical properties of four common pesticides: acetamiprid (neonicotinoid), chlorpyriphos (organophosphate insecticide), deltamethrin (pyrethroid) and fipronil (phenylpyrazole) have been investigated by Density Functional Theory quantum chemical calculations. The high flexible character of these insecticides is revealed by the numerous conformers obtained, located within a 20kJmol(-1) range in the gas phase. In line with this trend, a redistribution of the energetic minima is observed in water medium. Molecular electrostatic potential calculations provide a ranking of the potential interaction sites of the four insecticides. The theoretical studies reported in the present work are completed by comparative toxicological assays against three aphid strains. Thus, the same toxicity order for the two susceptible strains Myzus persicae 4106A and Acyrthosiphon pisum LSR1: acetamiprid>fipronil>deltamethrin>chlorpyriphos is revealed. In the resistant strain M. persicae 1300145, the toxicity order is modified: acetamiprid>fipronil>chlorpyriphos>deltamethrin. Interestingly, the strain 1300145 which is known to be resistant to neonicotinoids, is also less sensitive to deltamethrin, chlorpyriphos and fipronil. PMID:25716006

  16. Determination of acetamiprid residues in zucchini grown under greenhouse conditions: application to behavioral dynamics.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Kim, Bo-Mee; Park, Jong-Hyouk; Cho, Soon-Kil; Ghafar, M W; Abd El-Aty, A M; Shim, Jae-Han

    2011-01-01

    A simple analytical method was developed for the determination of acetamiprid residues in zucchini and zucchini leaves grown under greenhouse conditions using liquid chromatography. Residues were confirmed via tandem mass spectrometry in positive-ion electrospray ionization mode. The calibration curves were linear with correlation coefficients in excess of 0.999. The limits of detection and limits of quantification were 0.01 and 0.03 µg/g and 0.02 and 0.06 µg/g, for the zucchini and zucchini leaves, respectively. For validation purposes, recoveries studies were carried out at low and high levels, yielding recovery rates ranged from 85.7 to 92.2% in zucchini and from 90.5 to 101.9% in zucchini leaves, with a relative standard deviation of <12%. The results demonstrated that the pattern of acetamiprid dissipation followed pseudo first-order kinetics with a half-life of 1.9 and 2.5 days, respectively. The residues in zucchini leaves were substantially higher than in the zucchini plant itself. No residues were detected at 7 days post-application. The results of this study suggest that acetamiprid is acceptable for application in/on zucchini under the recommended dosage conditions. PMID:21182099

  17. Neonicotinoid clothianidin adversely affects insect immunity and promotes replication of a viral pathogen in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Di Prisco, Gennaro; Cavaliere, Valeria; Annoscia, Desiderato; Varricchio, Paola; Caprio, Emilio; Nazzi, Francesco; Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2013-11-12

    Large-scale losses of honey bee colonies represent a poorly understood problem of global importance. Both biotic and abiotic factors are involved in this phenomenon that is often associated with high loads of parasites and pathogens. A stronger impact of pathogens in honey bees exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides has been reported, but the causal link between insecticide exposure and the possible immune alteration of honey bees remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin negatively modulates NF-κB immune signaling in insects and adversely affects honey bee antiviral defenses controlled by this transcription factor. We have identified in insects a negative modulator of NF-κB activation, which is a leucine-rich repeat protein. Exposure to clothianidin, by enhancing the transcription of the gene encoding this inhibitor, reduces immune defenses and promotes the replication of the deformed wing virus in honey bees bearing covert infections. This honey bee immunosuppression is similarly induced by a different neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, but not by the organophosphate chlorpyriphos, which does not affect NF-κB signaling. The occurrence at sublethal doses of this insecticide-induced viral proliferation suggests that the studied neonicotinoids might have a negative effect at the field level. Our experiments uncover a further level of regulation of the immune response in insects and set the stage for studies on neural modulation of immunity in animals. Furthermore, this study has implications for the conservation of bees, as it will contribute to the definition of more appropriate guidelines for testing chronic or sublethal effects of pesticides used in agriculture. PMID:24145453

  18. Determination of neonicotinoid insecticides and their metabolites in honey bee and honey by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gbylik-Sikorska, Malgorzata; Sniegocki, Tomasz; Posyniak, Andrzej

    2015-05-15

    The original analytical method for the simultaneous determination and confirmation of neonicotinoids insecticides (imidacloprid, clothianidin, acetamiprid, thiametoxam, thiacloprid, nitenpyram, dinotefuran) and some of their metabolites (imidacloprid guanidine, imidacloprid olefin, imidacloprid urea, desnitro-imidacloprid hydrochloride, thiacloprid-amid and acetamiprid-N-desmethyl) in honey bee and honey was developed. Preparation of honey bee samples involves the extraction with mixture of acetonitrile and ethyl acetate followed by cleaned up using the Sep-Pak Alumina N Plus Long cartridges. Honey samples were dissolved in 1% mixture of acetonitrile and ethyl acetate with addition of TEA, then extracts were cleaned up with Strata X-CW cartridges. The identity of analytes was confirmed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. All compounds were separated on a Luna C18 column with gradient elution. The whole procedure was validated according to the requirements of SANCO 12571/2013. The average recoveries of the analytes ranged from 85.3% to 112.0%, repeatabilities were in the range of 2.8-11.2%, within-laboratory reproducibility was in the range of 3.3-14.6%, the limits of quantitation were in the range of 0.1-0.5μgkg(-1), depending of analyte and matrices. The validated method was successfully applied for the determination of clothianidin, imidacloprid and imidacloprid urea in real incurred honey bee samples and clothianidin in honey. PMID:25864015

  19. Effect of household and commercial processing on acetamiprid, azoxystrobin and methidathion residues during crude rapeseed oil production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yaping; Shibamoto, Takayuki; Li, Yanjie; Pan, Canping

    2013-01-01

    Rape crops with residues of acetamiprid, azoxystrobin and methidathion incurred from field trials were used to evaluate the effect of household and commercial crude rapeseed oil processing on the transfer of pesticide residues. The pesticides were applied at exaggerated dosage to quantify residue levels in processed samples. The processing procedure was conducted as closely as possible to the actual conditions in practice. The conditioning step removed at least 30% of pesticides, while azoxystrobin and methidathion were concentrated by at least 15% at the single pressing step. The residue level of methidathion was concentrated with a processing factor (PF) of 1.07, while azoxystrobin and acetamiprid decreased with PFs of 0.67 and 0.04, respectively, after all processing procedures. The overall magnitudes of acetamiprid, azoxystrobin and methidathion in rapeseed oil and meal were all decreased after processing compared with the magnitude of those in raw rapeseed. PMID:23756237

  20. Modeling photodegradation kinetics of three systemic neonicotinoids-dinotefuran, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam-in aqueous and soil environment.

    PubMed

    Kurwadkar, Sudarshan; Evans, Amanda; DeWinne, Dustan; White, Peter; Mitchell, Forrest

    2016-07-01

    Environmental presence and retention of commonly used neonicotinoid insecticides such as dinotefuran (DNT), imidacloprid (IMD), and thiamethoxam (THM) are a cause for concern and prevention because of their potential toxicity to nontarget species. In the present study the kinetics of the photodegradation of these insecticides were investigated in water and soil compartments under natural light conditions. The results suggest that these insecticides are fairly unstable in both aqueous and soil environments when exposed to natural sunlight. All 3 insecticides exhibit strong first-order degradation rate kinetics in the aqueous phase, with rate constants kDNT , kIMD , and kTHM of 0.20 h(-1) , 0.30 h(-1) , and 0.18 h(-1) , respectively. However, in the soil phase, the modeled photodegradation kinetics appear to be biphasic, with optimal rate constants k1DNT and k2DNT of 0.0198 h(-1) and 0.0022 h(-1) and k1THM and k2THM of 0.0053 h(-1) and 0.0014 h(-1) , respectively. Differentially, in the soil phase, imidacloprid appears to follow the first-order rate kinetics with a kIMD of 0.0013 h(-1) . These results indicate that all 3 neonicotinoids are photodegradable, with higher degradation rates in aqueous environments relative to soil environments. In addition, soil-encapsulated imidacloprid appears to degrade slowly compared with dinotefuran and thiamethoxam and does not emulate the faster degradation rates observed in the aqueous phase. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1718-1726. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26660507

  1. A large-scale field study examining effects of exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola on honey bee colony health, development, and overwintering success.

    PubMed

    Cutler, G Christopher; Scott-Dupree, Cynthia D; Sultan, Maryam; McFarlane, Andrew D; Brewer, Larry

    2014-01-01

    In summer 2012, we initiated a large-scale field experiment in southern Ontario, Canada, to determine whether exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola (oil seed rape) has any adverse impacts on honey bees. Colonies were placed in clothianidin seed-treated or control canola fields during bloom, and thereafter were moved to an apiary with no surrounding crops grown from seeds treated with neonicotinoids. Colony weight gain, honey production, pest incidence, bee mortality, number of adults, and amount of sealed brood were assessed in each colony throughout summer and autumn. Samples of honey, beeswax, pollen, and nectar were regularly collected, and samples were analyzed for clothianidin residues. Several of these endpoints were also measured in spring 2013. Overall, colonies were vigorous during and after the exposure period, and we found no effects of exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola on any endpoint measures. Bees foraged heavily on the test fields during peak bloom and residue analysis indicated that honey bees were exposed to low levels (0.5-2 ppb) of clothianidin in pollen. Low levels of clothianidin were detected in a few pollen samples collected toward the end of the bloom from control hives, illustrating the difficulty of conducting a perfectly controlled field study with free-ranging honey bees in agricultural landscapes. Overwintering success did not differ significantly between treatment and control hives, and was similar to overwintering colony loss rates reported for the winter of 2012-2013 for beekeepers in Ontario and Canada. Our results suggest that exposure to canola grown from seed treated with clothianidin poses low risk to honey bees. PMID:25374790

  2. A large-scale field study examining effects of exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola on honey bee colony health, development, and overwintering success

    PubMed Central

    Scott-Dupree, Cynthia D.; Sultan, Maryam; McFarlane, Andrew D.; Brewer, Larry

    2014-01-01

    In summer 2012, we initiated a large-scale field experiment in southern Ontario, Canada, to determine whether exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola (oil seed rape) has any adverse impacts on honey bees. Colonies were placed in clothianidin seed-treated or control canola fields during bloom, and thereafter were moved to an apiary with no surrounding crops grown from seeds treated with neonicotinoids. Colony weight gain, honey production, pest incidence, bee mortality, number of adults, and amount of sealed brood were assessed in each colony throughout summer and autumn. Samples of honey, beeswax, pollen, and nectar were regularly collected, and samples were analyzed for clothianidin residues. Several of these endpoints were also measured in spring 2013. Overall, colonies were vigorous during and after the exposure period, and we found no effects of exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola on any endpoint measures. Bees foraged heavily on the test fields during peak bloom and residue analysis indicated that honey bees were exposed to low levels (0.5–2 ppb) of clothianidin in pollen. Low levels of clothianidin were detected in a few pollen samples collected toward the end of the bloom from control hives, illustrating the difficulty of conducting a perfectly controlled field study with free-ranging honey bees in agricultural landscapes. Overwintering success did not differ significantly between treatment and control hives, and was similar to overwintering colony loss rates reported for the winter of 2012–2013 for beekeepers in Ontario and Canada. Our results suggest that exposure to canola grown from seed treated with clothianidin poses low risk to honey bees. PMID:25374790

  3. Dinotefuran-induced morphophysiological changes in the ovaries and midgut of semi-engorged females Rhipicephalus sanguineus Latreille, 1806 (Acari: Ixodidae) ticks.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Patrícia Rosa; Remédio, Rafael Neodini; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Anholeto, Luis Adriano; Mathias, Maria Izabel Camargo

    2016-02-01

    The present study demonstrated the effects of dinotefuran (active compound of the Protetor Pet® acaricide) in germ cells and the digestive processes of semi-engorged females of R. sanguineus exposed to different concentrations of the chemical. For this purpose, 120 semi-engorged females were divided into four treatment groups with 30 individuals each: group I or control (distilled water), group II (5000 ppm), group III (6250 ppm), and group IV (8334 ppm of dinotefuran). All ticks were immersed in different concentrations of dinotefuran or in distilled water for 5 min and then were dried and stored in biological oxygen demand (BOD) incubator for 7 days. The results show the action of this compound, exhibiting morphohistologic and histochemical changes in the oocytes and the midgut cells of individuals of different groups, which were compared with those of group I (control). The alterations occurred mainly in relation to the size of the germ cells and yolk granules; presence, quantity, size, and location of vacuoles found in the cytoplasm of these germ cells; the damage occurred in the generative cells of the midgut; the size of the digestive cells; the quantity of blood elements captured, accumulated digestive wastes and digestive vacuoles found in the cytoplasm of the digestive cells of the midgut, as well as the amount and distribution of proteins, polysaccharides, lipids of all cells in both organs. So, it has demonstrated the effectiveness of dinotefuran in the reduction of fertility and digestive processes of semi-engorged females of R. sanguineus, data that points the possibility of employing this chemical to control these ectoparasites. PMID:26614361

  4. Response surface methodology for the enantioseparation of dinotefuran and its chiral metabolite in bee products and environmental samples by supercritical fluid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zenglong; Dong, Fengshou; Li, Shasha; Zheng, Zuntao; Xu, Yongwei; Xu, Jun; Liu, Xingang; Zheng, Yongquan

    2015-09-01

    Tracing the enantiomers of dinotefuran and its metabolite in bee products and relevant environmental matrices is vital because of the high toxicity of their racemates to bees. In this study, a statistical optimization strategy using three-dimensional response surface methodology for the enantioseparation of dinotefuran and its metabolite UF was developed by a novel supercritical fluid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (SFC-MS/MS) technique. After direct evaluation of the chromatographic variables - co-solvent content, mobile phase flow rate, automated backpressure regulator pressure (ABPR), and column temperature - involved in the separation mechanism and assessment of the interactions among these variables, the optimal SFC-MS/MS working conditions were selected as a CO2/2% formic acid-methanol mobile phase, 1.9mL/min flow rate, 2009.8psi ABPR, and 26.0°C column temperature using an amylose tris-(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) chiral stationary phase under electrospray ionization positive mode. Baseline resolution, favorable retention, and high sensitivity of the two pairs of enantiomers were achieved in pollen, honey, water, and soil matrices within 4.5min. Additionally, the parameters affecting the dispersive solid-phase extraction procedure, such as the type and content of extractant or purification sorbents, were systematically screened to obtain better extraction yields of the enantiomers. Mean recoveries were between 78.3% and 100.2% with relative standard deviations lower than 8.0% in all matrices. The limits of quantification ranged from 1.0μg/kg to 12.5μg/kg for the dinotefuran and UF enantiomers. Furthermore, the developed method was effectively applied to authentic samples from a market, an irrigation canal, and a trial field, and the enantioselective dissipation of dinotefuran and UF in soil was demonstrated. PMID:26243706

  5. Influence of the insecticides acetamiprid and carbofuran on arylamidase and myrosinase activities in the tropical black and red clay soils.

    PubMed

    Mohiddin, G Jaffer; Srinivasulu, M; Maddela, N R; Manjunatha, B; Rangaswamy, V; Koch Kaiser, Alma Rosel; Maisincho Asqui, Jessica Cristina; Darwin Rueda, O

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of two insecticides, namely, acetamiprid and carbofuran on the enzymatic activities of arylamidase (as glucose formed from sinigrin) and myrosinase (as β-naphthylamine formed from L-leucine β-naphthylamide) in the black and red clay soils collected from a fallow groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) fields in the Anantapur District, Andhra Pradesh, India. The study was realized within the framework of the laboratory experiments in which the acetamiprid and carbofuran were applied to the soils at different doses (1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 kg ha(-1)). Initially, the physicochechemical properties of the soil samples were analyzed. After 10 days of pesticide application, the soil samples were analyzed for the enzyme activities. Acetamiprid and carbofuran stimulated the arylamidase and myrosinase activities at lower concentrations after 10 days incubation. Striking stimulation in soil enzyme activities was noticed at 2.5 kg ha(-1), persists for 20 days in both the soils. Overall, higher concentrations (5.0-10.0 kg ha(-1)) of acetamiprid and carbofuran were toxic or innocuous to the arylamidase and myrosinase activities. Nevertheless, the outcomes of the present study clearly indicate that the use of these insecticides (at field application rates) in the groundnut fields (black and red clay soils) stimulated the enzyme (arylamidase and myrosinase) activities. PMID:26024750

  6. Chronic Exposure of Imidacloprid and Clothianidin Reduce Queen Survival, Foraging, and Nectar Storing in Colonies of Bombus impatiens

    PubMed Central

    Scholer, Jamison; Krischik, Vera

    2014-01-01

    In an 11-week greenhouse study, caged queenright colonies of Bombus impatiens Cresson, were fed treatments of 0 (0 ppb actual residue I, imidacloprid; C, clothianidin), 10 (14 I, 9 C), 20 (16 I, 17C), 50 (71 I, 39 C) and 100 (127 I, 76 C) ppb imidacloprid or clothianidin in sugar syrup (50%). These treatments overlapped the residue levels found in pollen and nectar of many crops and landscape plants, which have higher residue levels than seed-treated crops (less than 10 ppb, corn, canola and sunflower). At 6 weeks, queen mortality was significantly higher in 50 ppb and 100 ppb and by 11 weeks in 20 ppb–100 ppb neonicotinyl-treated colonies. The largest impact for both neonicotinyls starting at 20 (16 I, 17 C) ppb was the statistically significant reduction in queen survival (37% I, 56% C) ppb, worker movement, colony consumption, and colony weight compared to 0 ppb treatments. Bees at feeders flew back to the nest box so it appears that only a few workers were collecting syrup in the flight box and returning the syrup to the nest. The majority of the workers sat immobilized for weeks on the floor of the flight box without moving to fed at sugar syrup feeders. Neonicotinyl residues were lower in wax pots in the nest than in the sugar syrup that was provided. At 10 (14) ppb I and 50 (39) ppb C, fewer males were produced by the workers, but queens continued to invest in queen production which was similar among treatments. Feeding on imidacloprid and clothianidin can cause changes in behavior (reduced worker movement, consumption, wax pot production, and nectar storage) that result in detrimental effects on colonies (queen survival and colony weight). Wild bumblebees depending on foraging workers can be negatively impacted by chronic neonicotinyl exposure at 20 ppb. PMID:24643057

  7. Clothianidin and Imidacloprid Residues in Poa annua (Poales: Poaceae) and Their Effects on Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Clavet, Christopher; Requintina, Matthew; Hampton, Emily; Cowles, Richard S; Byrne, Frank J; Alm, Steven R

    2014-12-01

    Competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to quantify the amounts of the neonicotinoids clothianidin and imidacloprid in Poa annua L. clippings from treated golf course fairways. Average clothianidin residues 7 d after application ranged from 674 to 1,550 ng/g tissue in 2012 and 455-2,220 ng/g tissue in 2013. Average clothianidin residues the day of application ranged from 17,100-38,800 ng/g tissue in 2014. Average imidacloprid residues 7 d after treatment ranged from 1,950-3,030 ng/g tissue in 2012 and 7,780-9,230 ng/g tissue in 2013. Average imidacloprid residues the day of application ranged from 31,500-40,400 ng/g tissue in 2014. Neonicotinoid or bifenthrin-neonicotinoid combination products applied in field plots in 2012 did not significantly reduce the numbers of larvae relative to the untreated control. However, in 2013, statistically significant reductions in the numbers of larvae recovered from treated field plots were associated with the presence of bifenthrin alone or when used in combination with neonicotinoid active ingredients. Listronotus maculicollis (Kirby) adults caged on neonicotinoid-, bifenthrin-, and bifenthrin-neonicotinoid-treated P. annua turf plugs fed on P. annua leaves, but mortality was only highly significantly different between treated and untreated foliage when weevils were placed on treated foliage the day after treatment and allowed to feed for 7 d. The modest degree of population suppression with bifenthrin in these experiments may not be adequate to justify the continued use of these products due to the increased risk of insecticide resistance and disruption of biological control. PMID:26470074

  8. Analysis of acetamiprid in vegetables using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mateu-Sánchez, Manuel; Moreno, Mercedes; Arrebola, F Javier; Martínez Vidal, José Luis

    2003-05-01

    A new analytical method has been validated for determining the insecticide acetamiprid in vegetables using gas chromatography (OC) and different mass spectrometric detection techniques, such as full-scan mass spectrometry (MS), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). For this purpose, a previous extraction of the vegetable sample was carried out with ethyl acetate. In GC-MS/MS, the lowest detectable concentration was 0.001 mg kg(-1), the average recovery rates at various fortification levels (0.015 and 0.030 mg kg(-1)) ranged between 82.4 and 85.7% and the relative standard deviations were lower than 12.2% in all cases. PMID:12769368

  9. Evaluation of river pollution of neonicotinoids in Osaka City (Japan) by LC/MS with dopant-assisted photoionisation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Terao, Tomoko; Hisatomi, Hirotaka; Kawasaki, Hideya; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2012-08-01

    An atmospheric pressure photoionisation (APPI) source for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was applied to determine neonicotinoid pesticides in the aquatic environment. Dopant-assisted APPI was very effective in the ionisation of neonicotinoids. Neonicotinoids generated protonated molecules in APPI with high sensitivity, while adduct ions, such as sodiated molecules, were predominantly generated in conventional electrospray ionisation. The ionisation of neonicotinoids was confirmed by ultra-high-resolution MS. An analytical method coupled with solid phase extraction was developed for acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, nitenpyram, and thiamethoxam. Method detection limits were 0.47 to 2.1 ng L(-1) for six neonicotinoids. Dinotefuran was the most frequent and highest among the neonicotinoids examined in the aquatic environment in Osaka, Japan. The maximum concentration of dinotefuran was 220 ng L(-1). Given the toxicity of neonicotinoids for aquatic creatures, the concentrations observed here were substantially low. The change in concentrations was temporally coincident with the period of the neonicotinoid application. Although rapid photodegradation and some degradation products have been elucidated, the degradation products in the aquatic environment were not identified in the present study. PMID:22767100

  10. Aptamer-based fluorescent screening assay for acetamiprid via inner filter effect of gold nanoparticles on the fluorescence of CdTe quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiajia; Li, Ying; Wang, Luokai; Xu, Jingyue; Huang, Yanjun; Luo, Yeli; Shen, Fei; Sun, Chunyan; Meng, Rizeng

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a novel aptamer-based fluorescent detection method for small molecules represented by acetamiprid based on the specific binding of aptamers with acetamiprid, and the inner filter effect (IFE) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the fluorescence of CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs). When CdTe QDs were mixed with AuNPs, the fluorescence of CdTe QDs was significantly quenched via IFE. The IFE efficiency could be readily modulated by the absorption and the aggregation state of AuNPs. The presence of salt could easily induce the aggregation of AuNPs, resulting in the fluorescence recovery of the quenched QDs. Acetamiprid-binding aptamer (ABA) could adsorb on the negatively charged AuNPs through the coordination interaction to protect AuNPs from salt-induced aggregation, so the fluorescence of CdTe QDs would be quenched by the IFE of AuNPs. However, the specific binding of ABA with acetamiprid could release the ABA from the surfaces of AuNPs and decrease the salt tolerance of AuNPs, so the IFE-decreased fluorescence of CdTe QDs was regained with the presence of acetamiprid, and the fluorescence enhancement efficiency was driven by the concentration of acetamiprid. Based on this principle, the aptamer-based fluorescent method for acetamiprid has been established and optimized. The assay exhibited excellent selectivity towards acetamiprid over its analogues and other pesticides which may coexist with acetamiprid. Under the optimum experiment conditions, the established method could be applied for the determination of acetamiprid with a wide linear range from 0.05 to 1.0 μM, and a low detection limit of 7.29 nM (3σ). Furthermore, this IFE-based method has been successfully utilized to detect acetamiprid in six types of vegetables, and the results were in full agreement with those from HPLC and LC-MS. The proposed method displays remarkable advantages of high sensitivity, rapid analysis, excellent selectivity, and would be suitable for the practical application

  11. Fenton and Fenton-like oxidation of pesticide acetamiprid in water samples: kinetic study of the degradation and optimization using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Mitsika, Elena E; Christophoridis, Christophoros; Fytianos, Konstantinos

    2013-11-01

    The aims of this study were (a) to evaluate the degradation of acetamiprid with the use of Fenton reaction, (b) to investigate the effect of different concentrations of H2O2 and Fe(2+), initial pH and various iron salts, on the degradation of acetamiprid and (c) to apply response surface methodology for the evaluation of degradation kinetics. The kinetic study revealed a two-stage process, described by pseudo- first and second order kinetics. Different H2O2:Fe(2+) molar ratios were examined for their effect on acetamiprid degradation kinetics. The ratio of 3 mg L(-1) Fe(2+): 40 mg L(-1) H2O2 was found to completely remove acetamiprid at less than 10 min. Degradation rate was faster at lower pH, with the optimal value at pH 2.9, while Mohr salt appeared to degrade acetamiprid faster. A central composite design was selected in order to observe the effects of Fe(2+) and H2O2 initial concentration on acetamiprid degradation kinetics. A quadratic model fitted the experimental data, with satisfactory regression and fit. The most significant effect on the degradation of acetamiprid, was induced by ferrous iron concentration followed by H2O2. Optimization, aiming to minimize the applied ferrous concentration and the process time, proposed a ratio of 7.76 mg L(-1) Fe(II): 19.78 mg L(-1) H2O2. DOC is reduced much more slowly and requires more than 6h of processing for 50% degradation. The use to zero valent iron, demonstrated fast kinetic rates with acetamiprid degradation occurring in 10 min and effective DOC removal. PMID:23871596

  12. Reduction of hazardous organic solvent in sample preparation for hydrophilic pesticide residues in agricultural products with conventional liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eiki; Kobara, Yuso; Baba, Koji; Eun, Heesoo

    2013-05-22

    An original extraction method using water as an extractant has been established for environmentally friendly sample preparation procedures for hydrophilic pesticides (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, flonicamid, imidacloprid, methomyl, pymetrozine, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam) in agricultural samples with conventional HPLC. Water-based extraction and cleanup with two solid-phase extraction cartridges can recover target hydrophilic pesticides quantitatively. The matrix effects of tested samples on the proposed method developed herein were negligibly small. Under the optimized conditions, the recoveries of almost all tested pesticides were 70-120% with satisfactory precision (%CV < 20%). The analytical data are in good accordance with Japanese or European Union guidelines for pesticide residue analysis. The reduction rate of hazardous organic solvents used for the proposed method and by reducing the sample size for extraction was about 70% compared with the Japanese authorized reference method used in this work. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed sample preparation procedures for hydrophilic pesticides. PMID:23614723

  13. Simultaneous determination of neonicotinoid insecticides in sunflower-treated seeds (hull and kernel) by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hernández, Laura; Higes, Mariano; Martín, María T; Nozal, María J; Bernal, José L

    2016-01-01

    A validated analytical method to determine seven neonicotinoids (dinotefuran, nitenpyram, thiamethoxam, clothianidin, imidacloprid, acetamiprid and thiacloprid) in sunflower seeds (hull and kernel) using HPLC coupled to electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is presented. Sample clean-up based on a solid-liquid extraction, and the removal of lipid fraction, in the case of kernels, is proposed and optimised. Low limits of detection and quantification were obtained, ranging from 0.3 × 10(-3) to 1.2 × 10(-3) µg g(-1) and from 1.0 × 10(-3) to 4.0 × 10(-3) µg g(-1), with good precision, and recovery values ranged from 90% to 104% for hulls and kernels. The method was applied for the analysis of five thiamethoxam-dressed sunflower seeds and four non-treated seeds, where, besides thiamethoxam, residues of the other neonicotinoid, clothianidin, were also detected and confirmed via tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Finally, the presence of residues of thiamethoxam and clothianidin in collected sunflower seeds (hulls) coming from coated seeds confirmed the translocation of these neonicotinoids through the plant up to these seeds. PMID:26678670

  14. Attractive Toxic Sugar Baits: Control of Mosquitoes With the Low-Risk Active Ingredient Dinotefuran and Potential Impacts on Nontarget Organisms in Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Khallaayoune, Khalid; Qualls, Whitney A.; Revay, Edita E.; Allan, Sandra A.; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Kravchenko, Vasiliy D.; Xue, Rui-De; Schlein, Yosef; Beier, John C.; Müller, Günter C.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSB) in the laboratory and field with the low-risk active ingredient dinotefuran against mosquito populations. Preliminary laboratory assays indicated that dinotefuran in solution with the sugar baits was ingested and resulted in high mortality of female Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Aedes aegypti Linnaeus. Field studies demonstrated >70% reduction of mosquito populations at 3 wk post-ATSB application. Nontarget feeding of seven insect orders—Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera, Orthoptera, and Neuroptera—was evaluated in the field after application of attractive sugar baits (ASB) on vegetation by dissecting the guts and searching for food dye with a dissecting microscope. Nontargets were found stained with ASB 0.9% of the time when the application was applied on green nonflowering vegetation. Only two families were significantly impacted by the ASB application: Culicidae (mosquitoes) and Chironomidae (nonbiting midges) of the order Diptera. Pollinators of the other insect orders were not significantly impacted. No mortality was observed in the laboratory studies with predatory nontargets, wolf spiders or ground beetles, after feeding for 3 d on mosquitoes engorged on ATSB applied to vegetation. Overall, this novel control strategy had little impact on nontarget organisms, including pollinators and beneficial insects, and was effective at controlling mosquito populations, further supporting the development of ATSB for commercial use. PMID:24331613

  15. Development and evaluation of alginate-chitosan nanocapsules for controlled release of acetamiprid.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Chauhan, Neetu; Gopal, Madhuban; Kumar, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2015-11-01

    Smart formulations based on nanomaterials have the capability to reduce the consumption of hazardous pesticides and their impact on human health and environment. Nanoformulations of agrochemicals have the potential to improve food productivity without compromising with the ecosystem. In the present work, controlled release nanocapsules containing acetamiprid were prepared by polyelectrolyte complexation of two natural macromolecules, i.e. alginate and chitosan. The size, morphology and chemical interaction studies of the prepared nanocapsules were investigated by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The zetapotential studies revealed stability of the nanocapsules. TEM results show spherical morphology of the nanocapsules. The encapsulation efficiency was found to be 62% as quantified by Ultra High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (UHPLC). Nanocapsules were analysed for controlled release in vitro at three different pH. Maximum release was observed at pH 10 followed by pH 7 and 4, respectively. A non-Fickian release mechanism was found to be followed by the nanoformulation. A controlled release pattern was also found from nanoformulation as compared to commercial formulation in soil. Thus this formulation can reduce the frequency of application of pesticides by controlling the release and will subsequently reduce their side effects. PMID:26321424

  16. Similar Comparative Low and High Doses of Deltamethrin and Acetamiprid Differently Impair the Retrieval of the Proboscis Extension Reflex in the Forager Honey Bee (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Thany, Steeve H.; Bourdin, Céline M.; Graton, Jérôme; Laurent, Adèle D.; Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Lebreton, Jacques; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of low (10 ng/bee) and high (100 ng/bee) doses of acetamiprid and deltamethrin insecticides on multi-trial learning and retrieval were evaluated in the honey bee Apis mellifera. After oral application, acetamiprid and deltamethrin at the concentrations used were not able to impair learning sessions. When the retention tests were performed 1 h, 6 h, and 24 h after learning, we found a significant difference between bees after learning sessions when drugs were applied 24 h before learning. Deltamethrin-treated bees were found to be more sensitive at 10 ng/bee and 100 ng/bee doses compared to acetamiprid-treated bees, only with amounts of 100 ng/bee and at 6 h and 24 h delays. When insecticides were applied during learning sessions, none of the tested insecticides was able to impair learning performance at 10 ng/bee or 100 ng/bee but retention performance was altered 24 h after learning sessions. Acetamiprid was the only one to impair retrieval at 10 ng/bee, whereas at 100 ng/bee an impairment of retrieval was found with both insecticides. The present results therefore suggest that acetamiprid and deltamethrin are able to impair retrieval performance in the honey bee Apis mellifera. PMID:26466901

  17. Similar Comparative Low and High Doses of Deltamethrin and Acetamiprid Differently Impair the Retrieval of the Proboscis Extension Reflex in the Forager Honey Bee (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Thany, Steeve H; Bourdin, Céline M; Graton, Jérôme; Laurent, Adèle D; Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Lebreton, Jacques; Questel, Jean-Yves le

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of low (10 ng/bee) and high (100 ng/bee) doses of acetamiprid and deltamethrin insecticides on multi-trial learning and retrieval were evaluated in the honey bee Apis mellifera. After oral application, acetamiprid and deltamethrin at the concentrations used were not able to impair learning sessions. When the retention tests were performed 1 h, 6 h, and 24 h after learning, we found a significant difference between bees after learning sessions when drugs were applied 24 h before learning. Deltamethrin-treated bees were found to be more sensitive at 10 ng/bee and 100 ng/bee doses compared to acetamiprid-treated bees, only with amounts of 100 ng/bee and at 6 h and 24 h delays. When insecticides were applied during learning sessions, none of the tested insecticides was able to impair learning performance at 10 ng/bee or 100 ng/bee but retention performance was altered 24 h after learning sessions. Acetamiprid was the only one to impair retrieval at 10 ng/bee, whereas at 100 ng/bee an impairment of retrieval was found with both insecticides. The present results therefore suggest that acetamiprid and deltamethrin are able to impair retrieval performance in the honey bee Apis mellifera. PMID:26466901

  18. Inhibition of PaCaMKII-E isoform in the dorsal unpaired median neurosecretory cells of cockroach reduces nicotine- and clothianidin-induced currents.

    PubMed

    List, Olivier; Calas-List, Delphine; Taillebois, Emiliane; Juchaux, Marjorie; Heuland, Emilie; Thany, Steeve H

    2014-08-01

    Cellular responses to Ca(2+) require intermediary proteins such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), which transduces the signal into downstream effects. We recently demonstrated that the cockroach genome encodes five different CaMKII isoforms, and only PaCaMKII-E isoform is specifically expressed in the dorsal unpaired median neurosecretory cells. In the present study, using antisense oligonucleotides, we demonstrated that PaCaMKII-E isoform inhibition reduced nicotine-induced currents through α-bungarotoxin-sensitive and -insensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. Specifically, PaCaMKII-E isoform is sufficient to repress nicotinic current amplitudes as a result of its depression by antisense oligonucleotides. Similar results were found using the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin, which acted as a full agonist of dorsal unpaired median neuron nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Clothianidin current amplitudes are strongly reduced under bath application of PaCaMKII-E antisense oligonucleotides but no significant results are found with α-bungarotoxin co-applied, demonstrating that CaMKII-E isoform affects nicotine currents through α-bungarotoxin-sensitive and -insensitive receptor subtypes whereas clothianidin currents are reduced via α-bungarotoxin-insensitive receptors. In addition, we found that intracellular calcium increase induced by nicotine and clothianidin were reduced by PaCaMKII-E antisense oligonucleotides, demonstrating that intracellular calcium increase induced by nicotine and clothianidin are affected by PaCaMKII-E inhibition. Cellular responses to Ca(2+) require intermediary proteins such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). We recently demonstrated that the cockroach genome encodes five different CaMKII isoforms and only PaCaMKII-E isoform was specifically expressed in the dorsal unpaired median neurosecretory cells. Here we show that specific inhibition of PaCaMKII-E isoform is

  19. Determination of acetamiprid, imidacloprid, and nitenpyram residues in vegetables and fruits by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection.

    PubMed

    Obana, Hirotaka; Okihashi, Msahiro; Akutsu, Kazuhiko; Kitagawa, Yoko; Hori, Shinjiro

    2002-07-31

    Determination of 3 neonicotinoid insecticides, nitenpyram, imidacloprid, and acetamiprid, was studied. Vegetables and fruits were extracted with acetonitrile. The crude extract was passed through a weak anion-exchange cartridge (PSA). The effluent was subjected to silica gel cartridge. Imidacloprid and acetamiprid were eluted with 10 mL of 4:6 (v/v) acetone/hexane, followed by nitenpyram with acetone (20 mL). Pesticides were determined by HPLC with a C-18 column and diode-array detection system. Imidacloprid and acetamiprid were recovered at about 90% at the spike levels with 0.2 and 2 mg/kg in cucumber, potato, tomato, eggplant, Japanese radish, and grape. Nitenpyram was recovered at 64-80%. Relative standard deviations were less than 10% throughout all the recovery tests. In the residue analysis, agriculturally incurred pesticides at 0.08-0.14 mg/kg were designated with UV spectra compared with respective reference standards. PMID:12137461

  20. Visual and fluorescent detection of acetamiprid based on the inner filter effect of gold nanoparticles on ratiometric fluorescence quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xu; Li, Hongxia; Li, Yang; Su, Xingguang

    2014-12-10

    In this work, we develop a simple and rapid sensing method for the visual and fluorescent detection of acetamiprid (AC) based on the inner-filter effect (IFE) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on ratiometric fluorescent quantum dots (RF-QDs). The RF-QDs based dual-emission nanosensor was fabricated by assembling green emissive QDs (QDs539nm, λem=539 nm) on the surface of red emissive QDs (QDs661nm, λem=661 nm)-doped silica microspheres. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of RF-QDs could be quenched by AuNPs based on IFE. Acetamiprid can adsorb on the surface of AuNPs due to its cyano group that has good affinity with gold, which could induce the aggregation of AuNPs accompanying color change from red to blue. Thus, the IFE of AuNPs on RF-QDs was weakened and the PL intensity of RF-QDs was recovered accordingly. Under the optimized conditions, the PL intensity of the RF-QDs/AuNPs system was proportional to the concentration of AC in the range of 0.025-5.0 μg mL(-1), with a detection limit of 16.8 μg L(-1). The established method had been used for AC detection in environmental and agricultural samples with satisfactory results. PMID:25441897

  1. The combined effect of clothianidin and environmental stress on the behavioral and reproductive function in male mice

    PubMed Central

    HIRANO, Tetsushi; YANAI, Shogo; OMOTEHARA, Takuya; HASHIMOTO, Rie; UMEMURA, Yuria; KUBOTA, Naoto; MINAMI, Kiichi; NAGAHARA, Daichi; MATSUO, Eiko; AIHARA, Yoshiko; SHINOHARA, Ryota; FURUYASHIKI, Tomoyuki; MANTANI, Youhei; YOKOYAMA, Toshifumi; KITAGAWA, Hiroshi; HOSHI, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Neonicotinoids, some of the most widely used pesticides in the world, act as agonists to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) of insects, resulting in death from abnormal excitability. Neonicotinoids unexpectedly became a major topic as a compelling cause of honeybee colony collapse disorder, which is damaging crop production that requires pollination worldwide. Mammal nAChRs appear to have a certain affinity for neonicotinoids with lower levels than those of insects; there is thus rising concern about unpredictable adverse effects of neonicotinoids on vertebrates. We hypothesized that the effects of neonicotinoids would be enhanced under a chronic stressed condition, which is known to alter the expression of targets of neonicotinoids, i.e., neuronal nAChRs. We performed immunohistochemical and behavioral analyses in male mice actively administered a neonicotinoid, clothianidin (CTD; 0, 10, 50 and 250 mg/kg/day), for 4 weeks under an unpredictable chronic stress procedure. Vacuolated seminiferous epithelia and a decrease in the immunoreactivity of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 were observed in the testes of the CTD+stress mice. In an open field test, although the locomotor activities were not affected, the anxiety-like behaviors of the mice were elevated by both CTD and stress. The present study demonstrates that the behavioral and reproductive effects of CTD become more serious in combination with environmental stress, which may reflect our actual situation of multiple exposure. PMID:25960033

  2. Label-free impedimetric aptasensor for detection of femtomole level acetamiprid using gold nanoparticles decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube-reduced graphene oxide nanoribbon composites.

    PubMed

    Fei, Airong; Liu, Qian; Huan, Juan; Qian, Jing; Dong, Xiaoya; Qiu, Baijing; Mao, Hanping; Wang, Kun

    2015-08-15

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube-reduced graphene oxide nanoribbon (Au/MWCNT-rGONR) composites were synthesized by a one-pot reaction. By employing the resulting Au/MWCNT-rGONR composites as the support for aptamer immobilization, we developed an ultrasensitive label-free electrochemical impedimetric aptasensor for acetamiprid detection, which was based on that the variation of electron transfer resistance was relevant to the formation of acetamiprid-aptamer complex at the modified electrode surface. Compared with pure Au NPs and MWCNT-rGONR, the Au/MWCNT-rGONR composites modified electrode was the most sensitive aptasensing platform for the determination of acetamiprid. The proposed aptasensor displayed a linear response for acetamiprid in the range from 5×10(-14) M to 1×10(-5) M with an extremely low detection limit of 1.7×10(-14) M (S/N=3). In addition, this impedimetric aptasensor possessed great advantages including the simple operation process, low-cost, selectivity and sensitivity, which provided a promising model for the aptamer-based detection with a direct impedimetric method. PMID:25797851

  3. A facile label-free colorimetric aptasensor for acetamiprid based on the peroxidase-like activity of hemin-functionalized reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenting; Qian, Jing; Yang, Xingwang; Jiang, Ding; Du, Xiaojiao; Wang, Kan; Mao, Hanping; Wang, Kun

    2015-03-15

    A facile aptasensor has been developed for the colorimetric detection of acetamiprid by using the hemin-functionalized reduced graphene oxide (hemin-rGO) composites. The as-prepared hemin-rGO composites possessed both the ability of rGO to physically adsorb the aptamers and the peroxidase-like activity of hemin that could catalyse 3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H2O2, to produce a solution with blue color. The well-dispersed hemin-rGO composites coagulated completely at the proper salt concentration; however, the coagulation of hemin-rGO was vanished when abundant aptamers were adsorbed on its surface because the attached negatively charged DNA backbone increased individual hemin-rGO electrostatic repulsion. In the detection scheme, acetamiprid with different concentrations was firstly incubated with the same amount of aptamer. The more acetamiprid in the tested solution, the less free aptamers were absorbed on the hemin-rGO surface, making the composites coagulate to a higher degree in the presence of the optimum NaCl concentration. As a consequence, the content of hemin-rGO in the supernatant was decreased after centrifugation, which catalysed oxidation of TMB in the presence of H2O2 to produce light blue color with a low absorbance. The color variation relavant to the acetamiprid concentration can be judged by the naked eyes and easily monitored by the inexpensive UV-vis spectrometer. Such designed aptasensor displayed a linear response for acetamiprid in the range from 100nM to 10μM with a detection limit of 40nM (S/N=3). This colorimetric aptasensing platform offers great advantages including the simple operation process, low-cost portable instrument, and user-friendly applications. PMID:25461136

  4. Systemic Insecticides Reduce Feeding, Survival and Fecundity of Adult Black Vine Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on a Variety of Ornamental Nursery Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of bioassays were conducted to test the systemic activity of clothianidin, chlorantraniliprole, dinotefuran, and thiamethoxam against adult black vine weevils (Otiorhynchus sulcatus F.) on Taxus, Heuchera, Astilbe, Sedum, Euonymus, and Rhododendron grown in containers. The insecticides wer...

  5. Monitoring changes in bemisia tabaci susceptibility to neonicotinoid insecticides in Arizona and California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory bioassays were carried out on field-collected and laboratory strains of Bemisia tabaci to evaluate relative toxicities of four neonicotinoid insecticides: acetamiprid, dinotefuran, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam. Susceptibility to all four neonicotinoids in leaf-uptake bioassays varied co...

  6. First national-scale reconnaissance of neonicotinoid insecticides in streams across the USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, Michelle L.; Kolpin, Dana W.

    2015-01-01

     To better understand the fate and transport of neonicotinoid insecticides, water samples were collected from streams across the United States. In a nationwide study, at least one neonicotinoid was detected in 53 % of the samples collected, with imidacloprid detected most frequently (37 %), followed by clothianidin (24 %), thiamethoxam (21 %), dinotefuran (13 %), acetamiprid (3 %) and thiacloprid (0 %). Clothianidin and thiamethoxam concentrations were positively related to the percentage of the land use in cultivated crop production and imidacloprid concentrations were positively related to the percentage of urban area within the basin. Additional sampling was also conducted in targeted research areas to complement these national-scale results, including determining: (1) neonicotinoid concentrations during elevated flow conditions in an intensely agricultural region; (2) temporal patterns of neonicotinoids in heavily urbanised basins; (3) neonicotinoid concentrations in agricultural basins in a nationally important ecosystem; and (4) in-stream transport of neonicotinoids near a wastewater treatment plant. Across all study areas, at least one neonicotinoid was detected in 63 % of the 48 streams sampled.

  7. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry as a new approach to analyze neonicotinoid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hernández, Laura; Hernández-Domínguez, Deamelys; Bernal, José; Neusüß, Christian; Martín, María T; Bernal, José L

    2014-09-12

    This paper represents the first report of a capillary electrophoresis (CE) method compatible with mass spectrometry (MS) detection for simultaneously analyzing seven neonicotinoid insecticides (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, nitenpyram, thiacloprid and thiamethoxam). Different variables affecting CE separation (buffer concentration, pH, applied voltage and injection time) and MS detection (electrospray parameters) were studied. Low limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were achieved for all analytes, ranging from 1.0 to 2.3μg/L, and from 3.5 to 7.2μg/L, respectively. In addition, the proposed method showed itself to be linear in the range from LOQ to 1000μg/L and to be precise, as the relative standard deviations of the migration times were lower than 4% in all cases. Finally, the proposed CE-MS method was applied to assess the efficacy of a beeswax cleaning treatment with oxalic acid to remove residues of three of the most commonly used neonicotinoids (clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam), use of which has recently been restricted by the European Union. PMID:25085817

  8. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of neonicotinoid pesticides and 6-chloronicotinic acid in environmental water with direct aqueous injection.

    PubMed

    Hao, Chunyan; Noestheden, Matthew R; Zhao, Xiaoming; Morse, David

    2016-06-21

    An efficient, high throughput and cost-effective direct aqueous injection approach for the analysis of neonicotinoid pesticides and a common metabolite in environmental water has been described here. The method determines eight neonicotinoid pesticides (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, flonicamid, imidacloprid, nitenpyram, thiacloprid, thiamethoxam) and 6-chloronicotinic acid (a common metabolite of the first generation neonicotinoids, acetamiprid, imidacloprid, nitenpyram and thiacloprid) without any sample enrichment/cleanup steps. The method detection limits are 2-8 ng/L for the neonicotinoids and 93 ng/L for 6-chloronicotinic acid. The performance of the QTRAP(®)5500 mass spectrometer was compared against a 4000QTRAP(®), and a QTRAP(®)6500, to provide insights for future method transfer among different generations of instrumentations. Critical mass spectrometric parameters such as collision energy were quite consistent among the three instruments evaluated. However, increased chemical background levels for some target compounds on the more sensitive instruments were observed. The application of differential ion mobility spectrometry combined with tandem mass spectrometry was demonstrated to have great potential in reducing chemical background and/or isobaric interferences inherited in sample matrices. This ISO 17025 accredited method was employed to quantitate neonicotinoids in Ontario stream water samples. Good correlation for analytical results of this direct aqueous injection approach and a previously published solid phase extraction approach warrant high confidence in data quality. PMID:27188316

  9. Simultaneous determination of neonicotinoid insecticides in human serum and urine using diatomaceous earth-assisted extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamamuro, Tadashi; Ohta, Hikoto; Aoyama, Mika; Watanabe, Daisuke

    2014-10-15

    A rapid and sensitive analytical method was developed for simultaneous determination of eight neonicotinoid insecticides (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, flonicamid, imidacloprid, nitenpyram, thiacloprid and thiamethoxam) and three specific metabolites of acetamiprid (N-desmethylacetamiprid, 5-(N-acetyl-N-methylaminomethyl)-2-chloropyridine and 5-(N-acetylaminomethyl)-2-chloropyridine) in human serum and urine. A diatomaceous earth-assisted extraction using Extrelut NT3 column with chloroform/2-propanol (3:1, v/v) as eluent was selected for the single step cleanup procedure for all the target compounds. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with multiple reaction monitoring mode. The limits of detection and the limits of quantification of eleven compounds were in the ranges of 0.1-0.2ng/mL and 0.5-10ng/mL for serum, 0.1-1ng/mL and 1-10ng/mL for urine, respectively. The extraction recoveries were between 80.9% and 101.8% for serum samples, 91.9% and 106% for urine samples. The intra-day RSDs and the inter-day RSDs were less than 11.5% and 13.2% for serum, less than 8.3% and 8.8% for urine. The proposed procedure will be suitable for forensic investigations of human poisoning cases with neonicotinoid insecticides. This is the first report of simultaneous determination of eight neonicotinoids in serum and urine samples. PMID:25168791

  10. Determination of acetamiprid and IM-1-2 in postmortem human blood, liver, stomach contents by HPLC-DAD.

    PubMed

    Yeter, Oya; Aydın, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    An HPLC-DAD method was developed to detect and quantify a neonicotinoid insecticide acetamiprid (ATP) and its metabolite IM-1-2 in autopsy samples of a fatal intoxication case. The postmortem blood and tissue distribution of ATP and IM-1-2 was determined for the first time. The method showed acceptable precisions and recoveries with relative standard deviations of <10% for ATP level and 1.38 % for IM-1-2. The detection and quantification limits for ATP were 0.015 μg/mL and 0.030 μg/mL for blood and were 0.035 μg/g and 0.050 μg/g for liver samples, respectively. The mean contents of ATP were 0.79 μg/g in the liver, 47.35 μg/g in the stomach contents and 2.7 μg/mL in the blood. IM-1-2 content was 17.0 μg/g in the stomach contents. ATP and IM-1-2 were not detected in the urine. The presence of ATP and IM-1-2 in the samples was confirmed by GC-MS. The method can be exploited in future forensic casework. PMID:24329162

  11. Determination of acetamiprid partial-intercalative binding to DNA by use of spectroscopic, chemometrics, and molecular docking techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Guowen; Zhou, Xiaoyue; Li, Yu

    2013-11-01

    Acetamiprid (ACT) is an insecticide widely used for controlling a variety of insect pests. The binding mode associated with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) upon interaction with ACT was determined using spectroscopic, chemometrics, and molecular docking techniques to clarify the interaction mechanism at the molecular level. Fluorescence titration suggested that the fluorescence quenching of ACT by ctDNA is a static procedure. The binding constants between ACT and ctDNA at different temperatures were calculated to be of the order 10(3)-10(4) L mol(-1). The positive values of enthalpy and entropy change suggested that the binding process is primarily driven by hydrophobic interactions. Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS), a chemometrics approach, was used to resolve the expanded UV-visible spectral data matrix. The concentration profiles and the spectra for the three reaction components (ACT, ctDNA, and ACT-ctDNA complex) of the system, which formed a highly overlapping composite response, were then successfully obtained and used to evaluate the progress of ACT interacting with ctDNA. The results of the single-stranded ctDNA and iodide quenching experiments, ctDNA-melting investigations, and viscosity measurements indicated that ACT binds to ctDNA by means of a partial intercalation. Molecular docking studies showed that the specific binding site is mainly located between the ACT and G-C base pairs of ctDNA. This docking prediction was confirmed by use of Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectral analysis. Results from circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy revealed that ACT induced a conformational change from the B-ctDNA form to the A-ctDNA form. PMID:23975088

  12. Influence of short-time imidacloprid and acetamiprid application on soil microbial metabolic activity and enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Yao, Jun; Chen, Huilun; Yi, Zhengji; Choi, Martin M F

    2014-09-01

    The influence of two neonicotinoids, i.e., imidacloprid (IMI) and acetamiprid (ACE), on soil microbial activities was investigated in a short period of time using a combination of the microcalorimetric approach and enzyme tests. Thermodynamic parameters such as Q T (J g(-1) soil), ∆H met (kJ mol(-1)), J Q/S (J g(-1) h(-1)), k (h(-1)), and soil enzymatic activities, dehydrogenase, phosphomonoesterase, arginine deaminase, and urease, were used to evaluate whole metabolic activity changes and acute toxicity following IMI and ACE treatment. Various profiles of thermogenic curves reflect different soil microbial activities. The microbial growth rate constant k, total heat evolution Q T (expect for IMI), and inhibitory ratio I show linear relationship with the doses of IMI and ACE. Q T for IMI increases at 0.0-20 μg g(-1) and then decreases at 20-80 μg g(-1), possibly attributing to the presence of tolerant microorganisms. The 50 % inhibitory ratios (IC50) of IMI and ACE are 95.7 and 77.2 μg g(-1), respectively. ACE displays slightly higher toxicity than IMI. Plots of k and Q T against microbial biomass-C indicate that the k and Q T are growth yield-dependent. IMI and ACE show 29.6; 40.4 and 23.0; and 23.3, 21.7, and 30.5 % inhibition of dehydrogenase, phosphomonoesterase, and urease activity, respectively. By contrast, the arginine deaminase activity is enhanced by 15.2 and 13.2 % with IMI and ACE, respectively. The parametric indices selected give a quantitative dose-response relationship of both insecticides and indicate that ACE is more toxic than IMI due to their difference in molecular structures. PMID:24819438

  13. Fabricating a novel label-free aptasensor for acetamiprid by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between NH2-NaYF4: Yb, Ho@SiO2 and Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiwei; Chen, Quansheng; Li, Huanhuan; Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen

    2016-06-15

    Rare earth-doped upconversion nanoparticles have promising potential in the field of pesticide detection because of their unique frequency upconverting capability and high detection sensitivity. This paper reports a novel aptamer-based nanosensor for acetamiprid detection using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between NH2-NaYF4: Yb, Ho@SiO2 (UCNPs) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Herein, GNPs as acceptors efficiently quench the fluorescence of UCNPs and acetamiprid specifically interacts with acetamiprid binding aptamer (ABA), causing the conformation changes of ABA from random coil to hairpin structure. Accordingly, ABA no longer stabilizes the GNPs in salt solution, leading to the varying aggregation extent of GNPs. Thus, the fluorescence of UCNPs are proportionally recovered. Under the optimized conditions, the enhancement efficiency was observed to increase linearly with the concentration of acetamiprid from 50 nM to 1000 nM, resulting in a relatively low limit of 3.2 nM. Additionally, the aptasensor demonstrated high selectivity to similar structure pesticides such as imidacloprid and chlorpyrifos, and further confirmed its application capacity in adulterated tea samples. PMID:26874106

  14. Exposure characterization of three major insecticide lines in urine of young children in Japan-neonicotinoids, organophosphates, and pyrethroids.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Aya; Ueyama, Jun; Kondo, Takaaki; Nomura, Hiroshi; Sugiura, Yuka; Saito, Isao; Nakane, Kunihiko; Takaishi, Ayuko; Ogi, Hiroko; Wakusawa, Shinya; Ito, Yuki; Kamijima, Michihiro

    2016-05-01

    The use of neonicotinoid (NEO) insecticides has increased over the past decade not only in Japan but also worldwide, while organophosphate (OP) and pyrethroid (PYR) insecticides are still conventionally used in agriculture and domestic pest control. However, limited data are currently available on the NEO exposure levels, especially in children, who are particularly vulnerable to environmental toxicants. Thus, the purpose of this study was to characterize the exposure to NEOs, as well as OPs and PYRs, in three-year-old Japanese children by assessing the range, distribution, and seasonal differences of the urinary concentrations of seven NEOs (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, thiacloprid, thiamethoxam, imidacloprid, and nitenpyram); four OP metabolites (dialkylphosphates [DAPs]), including dimethylphosphate, dimethylthiophosphate, diethylphosphate, and diethylthiophosphate; and three PYR metabolites (3-phenoxybenzoic acid, trans-chrysanthemumdicarboxylic acid, and 3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2- dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid). Urine samples were collected from 223 children (108 males and 115 females) in the summer and winter months. The detection rates of NEOs were 58% for dinotefuran, 25% for thiamethoxam, 21% for nitenpyram, and <16% for all other NEOs. The median and maximum concentrations of the sum of the seven NEOs (ΣNEO) were 4.7 and 370.2nmol/g creatinine, respectively. Urinary ΣNEO, dimethylphosphate, and all PYR metabolite concentrations were significantly higher in the summer than in the winter (p<0.05). The creatinine-adjusted concentration of ΣNEO significantly correlated with those of all DAPs (p<0.05) but not with those of the PYR metabolites. Moreover, the NEO-detected group showed higher urinary ΣDAP (sum of four OP metabolites) concentrations than the group without NEO detection. These findings suggest that children in Japan are environmentally exposed to the three major insecticide lines, and that the daily exposure sources of NEOs

  15. Impact of neonicotinoid insecticides on natural enemies in greenhouse and interiorscape environments.

    PubMed

    Cloyd, Raymond A; Bethke, James A

    2011-01-01

    The neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid, acetamiprid, dinotefuran, thiamethoxam and clothianidin are commonly used in greenhouses and/or interiorscapes (plant interiorscapes and conservatories) to manage a wide range of plant-feeding insects such as aphids, mealybugs and whiteflies. However, these systemic insecticides may also be harmful to natural enemies, including predators and parasitoids. Predatory insects and mites may be adversely affected by neonicotinoid systemic insecticides when they: (1) feed on pollen, nectar or plant tissue contaminated with the active ingredient; (2) consume the active ingredient of neonicotinoid insecticides while ingesting plant fluids; (3) feed on hosts (prey) that have consumed leaves contaminated with the active ingredient. Parasitoids may be affected negatively by neonicotinoid insecticides because foliar, drench or granular applications may decrease host population levels so that there are not enough hosts to attack and thus sustain parasitoid populations. Furthermore, host quality may be unacceptable for egg laying by parasitoid females. In addition, female parasitoids that host feed may inadvertently ingest a lethal concentration of the active ingredient or a sublethal dose that inhibits foraging or egg laying. There are, however, issues that require further consideration, such as: the types of plant and flower that accumulate active ingredients, and the concentrations in which they are accumulated; the influence of flower age on the level of exposure of natural enemies to the active ingredient; the effect of neonicotinoid metabolites produced within the plant. As such, the application of neonicotinoid insecticides in conjunction with natural enemies in protected culture and interiorscape environments needs further investigation. PMID:20721973

  16. Ultrasound/microwave-assisted solid-liquid-solid dispersive extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of neonicotinoid insecticides in Dendrobium officinale.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shuilian; Wu, Huizhen; Li, Zuguang; Wang, Jianmei; Zhang, Hu; Qian, Mingrong

    2015-01-01

    A one-step ultrasound/microwave-assisted solid-liquid-solid dispersive extraction procedure was used for the simultaneous determination of eight neonicotinoids (dinotefuran, nitenpyram, thiamethoxam, clothianidin, imidacloprid, acetamiprid, thiacloprid, imidaclothiz) in dried Dendrobium officinale by liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionization triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring mode. The samples were quickly extracted by acetonitrile and cleaned up by the mixed dispersing sorbents including primary secondary amine, C18 , and carbon-GCB. Parameters that could influence the ultrasound/microwave-assisted extraction efficiency such as microwave irradiation power, ultrasound irradiation power, temperature, and solvent were investigated. Recovery studies were performing well (70.4-113.7%) at three examined spiking levels (10, 50, and 100 μg/kg). Meanwhile, the limits of quantification for the neonicotinoids ranged from 0.87 to 1.92 μg/kg. The method showed good linearity in the concentration range of 1-100 μg/L with correlation coefficients >0.99. This quick and useful analytical method could provide a basis for monitoring neonicotinoid insecticide residues in herbs. PMID:25348589

  17. Optimized combination of dilution and refined QuEChERS to overcome matrix effects of six types of tea for determination eight neonicotinoid insecticides by ultra performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Weiting; Xiao, Yu; Qian, Xiaosan; Tong, Mengmeng; Hu, Yizheng; Hou, Ruyan; Hua, Rimao

    2016-11-01

    Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) is a primary tool for analysis of low volatility compounds in complex matrices. However, complex matrices, such as different types of tea, complicate analysis through ionization suppression or enhancement. In this study, sample preparation by a refined QuEChERS method combined with a dilution strategy removed almost all matrix effects caused by six types of tea. Tea samples were soaked with water and extracted with acetonitrile, cleaned up with a combination of PVPP (160mg) and GCB (20mg), and dried. Dried extracts were diluted with 20mL acetonitrile/water (15:85, v/v) before analysis by UPLC-MS/MS. The average recoveries of eight neonicotinoid insecticides (dinotefuran, nitenpyram, thiamethoxam, imidacloprid, clothianidin, imidaclothiz, acetamiprid, and thiacloprid) ranged from 66.3 to 108.0% from tea samples spiked at 0.01-0.5mgkg(-1). Relative standard deviations were below 16% for all recovery tests. The limit of quantification ranged from 0.01 to 0.05mgkg(-1). PMID:27211616

  18. In-coupled syringe assisted octanol-water partition microextraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for simultaneous determination of neonicotinoid insecticide residues in honey.

    PubMed

    Vichapong, Jitlada; Burakham, Rodjana; Srijaranai, Supalax

    2015-07-01

    A simple and fast method namely in-coupled syringe assisted octanol-water partition microextraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed for the extraction, preconcentration and determination of neonicotinoid insecticide residues (e.g. imidacloprid, acetamiprid, clothianidin, thiacloprid, thiamethoxam, dinotefuran, and nitenpyram) in honey. The experimental parameters affected the extraction efficiency, including kind and concentration of salt, kind of disperser solvent and its volume, kind of extraction solvent and its volume, shooting times and extraction time were investigated. The extraction process was carried out by rapid shooting of two syringes. Therefore, rapid dispersion and mass transfer processes was created between phases, and thus affects the extraction efficiency of the proposed method. The optimum extraction conditions were 10.00 mL of aqueous sample, 10% (w/v) Na2SO4, 1-octanol (100µL) as an extraction solvent, shooting 4 times and extraction time 2min. No disperser solvent and centrifugation step was necessary. Linearity was obtained within the range of 0.1-3000 ngmL(-1), with the correlation coefficients greater than 0.99. The high enrichment factor of the target analytes was 100 fold and low limit of detection (0.25-0.50 ngmL(-1)) could be obtained. This proposed method has been successfully applied in the analysis of neonicotinoid residues in honey, and good recoveries in the range of 96.93-107.70% were obtained. PMID:25882403

  19. Temporal Levels of Urinary Neonicotinoid and Dialkylphosphate Concentrations in Japanese Women Between 1994 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Jun; Harada, Kouji H; Koizumi, Akio; Sugiura, Yuka; Kondo, Takaaki; Saito, Isao; Kamijima, Michihiro

    2015-12-15

    Over the last two decades, usage of neonicotinoid (NEO) insecticides has increased due to their high selectivity for insects versus mammals and their effectiveness for extermination of insects resistant to conventional pesticides such as pyrethroids and organophosphates (OPs). However, historical change of the NEO exposure level in humans is poorly understood. The aim of this study is to reveal changes in the levels of NEO and OP exposure in the human body over the last two decades using biomonitoring technique. We quantified urinary concentrations of 7 NEOs (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, nitenpyram, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam) and 4 metabolites of OPs (dimethylphosphate, dimethylthiophosphate, diethylphosphate, and diethylthiophosphate) in 95 adult females aged 45-75 in 1994, 2000, 2003, 2009, and 2011 (n = 17-20 different individuals in each year). The results show that the detection rates of urinary NEOs in Japanese women increased significantly between 1994 and 2011, suggesting that intakes of NEOs into the human body rose during that period. In contrast, exposure to OPs having O,O-dimethyl moieties decreased steadily according to a finding that geometric means of urinary dimethylphosphate concentrations kept diminishing considerably. These changes may reflect the amounts of NEOs and OPs used as insecticides in Japan. PMID:26556224

  20. Determination of seven neonicotinoid insecticides in beeswax by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray-mass spectrometry using a fused-core column.

    PubMed

    Yáñez, Karen P; Bernal, José L; Nozal, María J; Martín, María T; Bernal, José

    2013-04-12

    A new method has been developed to measure seven neonicotinoid insecticides (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, nitenpyram, thiacloprid and thiamethoxam) in beeswax using liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) detection. Beeswax was melted and diluted in an n-hexane/isopropanol (8:2, v/v) mixture. After this, liquid extraction with water was performed followed by a clean-up on diatomaceous material based cartridges. The compounds were eluted with acetone, and the resulting solution was evaporated until dry and reconstituted with a mixture of water and acetonitrile 50:50 (v/v). The separation of all compounds was achieved in less than 15 min using a C18 reverse-phase fused-core column (Kinetex C18, 150 mm × 4.6 mm i.d.) and a mobile phase composed of a mixture of 0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile in gradient elution mode at 0.5 mL/min. This method was fully validated in terms of selectivity, linearity, precision and recovery. Low limits of detection and quantification could be achieved for all analytes ranging from 0.4 to 2.3 μg/kg, and from 1.5 to 7.0 μg/kg, respectively. Finally, the proposed method was applied to an analysis of neonicotinoid residues in beeswax samples from apiaries located close to fruit orchards. PMID:23473513

  1. Effective extraction method for determination of neonicotinoid residues in tea.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ru-Yan; Jiao, Wei-Ting; Qian, Xiao-San; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Xiao, Yu; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2013-12-26

    Sample preparation using an absorbent for removal of polyphenols and a solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge for cleanup followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been investigated for the simultaneous determination of eight neonicotinoid insecticides (dinotefuran, nitenpyram, thiamethoxam, imidacloprid, clothianidin, imidaclothiz, acetamiprid, and thiacloprid). After tea samples were soaked with water and extracted with acetonitrile, sample extracts were treated with an appropriate amount of polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) to effectively remove polyphenols. The treated extract was cleaned up with a Carb-PSA cartridge. Neonicotinoid insecticides were eluted with acetonitrile from the cartridge and dried. The extract was redissolved with methanol/water (1:9, v/v) and analyzed by conventional HPLC coupled with an ultraviolet detector. The recoveries of eight neonicotinoid insecticides in tea samples were 71.4-106.6% at 0.1-1.0 mg kg(-1) spiked levels. Relative standard deviations were <10% for all of the recovery tests. The established method was simple, effective, and accurate and could be used for monitoring neonicotinoid insecticides in tea. PMID:24308380

  2. Determination of neonicotinoid insecticides residues in eels using subcritical water extraction and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiming; Yang, Yunxia; Li, Yang; Fan, Xia; Ding, Shuangyang

    2013-05-13

    A rapid, sensitive, and environmental-friendly multi-residue method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of seven neonicotinoid insecticides (dinotefuran, nitenpyram, thiamethoxam, imidacloprid, clothianidin, acetamiprid, and thiacloprid) residues in eel samples. Subcritical water extraction was investigated as a novel and alternative technology for the extraction of neonicotinoids from eel matrices and the results were compared with the conventional ultrasonic and shaking extraction. The target compounds were identified and quantitatively determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) operated in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Under the current optimized chromatographic conditions, each LC run was completed in 5 min. Average recoveries of the seven analytes from fortified samples ranged between 84.6% and 102.0%, with relative standard deviations (RSD) lower than 10.8%. The limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) for neonicotinoids were in the ranges of 0.12-0.36 μg kg(-1) and 0.42-1.12 μg kg(-1), respectively. The proposed method is fast, sensitive, easy to perform, water-based thus more environmentally acceptable, making it applicable for high-throughput monitoring of insecticides residues in aquatic products. PMID:23622962

  3. Degradation and monitoring of acetamiprid, thiabendazole and their transformation products in an agro-food industry effluent during solar photo-Fenton treatment in a raceway pond reactor.

    PubMed

    Carra, Irene; Sirtori, Carla; Ponce-Robles, Laura; Sánchez Pérez, José Antonio; Malato, Sixto; Agüera, Ana

    2015-07-01

    In this study, pesticides acetamiprid and thiabendazole and their transformation products (TPs), seven from each pesticide, were successfully monitored during solar photo-Fenton treatment in a real secondary effluent from an agro-food industry spiked with 100μgL(-1) of each pesticide. To this end, a highly sensitive procedure was developed, based on liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (QqLIT-MS). In addition, finding low-cost and operational technology for the application of AOPs would then facilitate their use on a commercial level. Simple and extensive photoreactors such as raceway pond reactors (RPRs) are therefore proposed as an alternative for the application of solar photo-Fenton. Results showed that high degradation could be achieved in a complex water matrix (>99% TBZ and 91% ACTM in 240min) using a 120-L RPR pilot plant as novel technology. The analyses indicated that after the treatment only three TPs from ACTM were still present in the effluent, while the others had been removed. The study showed that the goal of either just removing the parent compounds, or going one step further and removing all the TPs, can significantly change the treatment time, which would affect process costs. PMID:25841181

  4. In utero and Lactational Exposure to Acetamiprid Induces Abnormalities in Socio-Sexual and Anxiety-Related Behaviors of Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Kazuhiro; Isobe, Tomohiko; Yang, Jiaxin; Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Yoshikane, Mitsuha; Nakayama, Shoji F.; Kawashima, Takaharu; Suzuki, Go; Hashimoto, Shunji; Nohara, Keiko; Tohyama, Chiharu; Maekawa, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Neonicotinoids, a widely used group of pesticides designed to selectively bind to insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, were considered relatively safe for mammalian species. However, they have been found to activate vertebrate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and could be toxic to the mammalian brain. In the present study, we evaluated the developmental neurotoxicity of acetamiprid (ACE), one of the most widely used neonicotinoids, in C57BL/6J mice whose mothers were administered ACE via gavage at doses of either 0 mg/kg (control group), 1.0 mg/kg (low-dose group), or 10.0 mg/kg (high-dose group) from gestational day 6 to lactation day 21. The results of a battery of behavior tests for socio-sexual and anxiety-related behaviors, the numbers of vasopressin-immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and testosterone levels were used as endpoints. In addition, behavioral flexibility in mice was assessed in a group-housed environment using the IntelliCage, a fully automated mouse behavioral analysis system. In adult male mice exposed to ACE at both low and high doses, a significant reduction of anxiety level was found in the light-dark transition test. Males in the low-dose group also showed a significant increase in sexual and aggressive behaviors. In contrast, neither the anxiety levels nor the sexual behaviors of females were altered. No reductions in the testosterone level, the number of vasopressin-immunoreactive cells, or behavioral flexibility were detected in either sex. These results suggest the possibility that in utero and lactational ACE exposure interferes with the development of the neural circuits required for executing socio-sexual and anxiety-related behaviors in male mice specifically. PMID:27375407

  5. Construction and analysis of an intergeneric fusion from Pigmentiphaga sp. strain AAP-1 and Pseudomonas sp. CTN-4 for degrading acetamiprid and chlorothalonil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangli; Zhu, Danfeng; Xiong, Minghua; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas sp. CTN-4 degrades chlorothalonil (CTN) but not acetamiprid (AAP), and Pigmentiphaga sp. strain AAP-1 degrades AAP but not CTN. A functional strain, AC, was constructed through protoplast fusion of two parental strains (Pseudomonas sp. CTN-4 and Pigmentiphaga sp. strain AAP-1) in order to simultaneously improve the degradation efficiency of AAP and CTN. Fusant-AC with eight transfers on plates containing two antibiotics and CTN was obtained. For the purpose of identifying and confirming the genetic relationship between fusant-AC and its parents, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) analysis were performed. In toto, RAPD fingerprint analysis produced 194 clear bands with 9 primers, which not only had bands in common with strains CTN-4 and AAP-1, but also had its own novel fusant-specific bands. The genetic similarity indices between fusant-AC and parental strains CTN-4 and AAP-1 were 0.40 and 0.69, respectively. The result of SEM indicated that the cell morphology of fusant-AC differed from both its parents. The fusant strain AC possesses a strong capability for AAP and CTN degradation. At AAP concentration (50-300 mg L(-1)), the degradation was achieved within 5 h. At the initial dose of 50 and 100 mg L(-1) CTN, the percentages reached 96 and 91 % over a 36-h incubation period. The present study indicates that the protoplast-fusion technique may have possible applications in environmental pollution control. PMID:27023810

  6. In utero and Lactational Exposure to Acetamiprid Induces Abnormalities in Socio-Sexual and Anxiety-Related Behaviors of Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kazuhiro; Isobe, Tomohiko; Yang, Jiaxin; Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Yoshikane, Mitsuha; Nakayama, Shoji F; Kawashima, Takaharu; Suzuki, Go; Hashimoto, Shunji; Nohara, Keiko; Tohyama, Chiharu; Maekawa, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Neonicotinoids, a widely used group of pesticides designed to selectively bind to insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, were considered relatively safe for mammalian species. However, they have been found to activate vertebrate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and could be toxic to the mammalian brain. In the present study, we evaluated the developmental neurotoxicity of acetamiprid (ACE), one of the most widely used neonicotinoids, in C57BL/6J mice whose mothers were administered ACE via gavage at doses of either 0 mg/kg (control group), 1.0 mg/kg (low-dose group), or 10.0 mg/kg (high-dose group) from gestational day 6 to lactation day 21. The results of a battery of behavior tests for socio-sexual and anxiety-related behaviors, the numbers of vasopressin-immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and testosterone levels were used as endpoints. In addition, behavioral flexibility in mice was assessed in a group-housed environment using the IntelliCage, a fully automated mouse behavioral analysis system. In adult male mice exposed to ACE at both low and high doses, a significant reduction of anxiety level was found in the light-dark transition test. Males in the low-dose group also showed a significant increase in sexual and aggressive behaviors. In contrast, neither the anxiety levels nor the sexual behaviors of females were altered. No reductions in the testosterone level, the number of vasopressin-immunoreactive cells, or behavioral flexibility were detected in either sex. These results suggest the possibility that in utero and lactational ACE exposure interferes with the development of the neural circuits required for executing socio-sexual and anxiety-related behaviors in male mice specifically. PMID:27375407

  7. Evaluation of a single application of Neonicotnoid and multi-application contact insecticides for flatheaded borer management in field grown Acer rubrum L. cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials evaluated insecticides for flatheaded borer (Chrysobothris femorata [Olivier]) control and red maple (Acer rubrum L.) cultivar growth over a 4-year period. Soil-applied systemic insecticides (acephate, imidacloprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and thiamethoxam) and trunk-applied contact i...

  8. 77 FR 70908 - Dinotefuran; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... May 23, 2012, (77 FR 30481) (FRL-9347- 8), EPA issued a document pursuant to FFDCA section 408(d)(3... level of skin irritation. The main target of toxicity is the nervous system but effects on the nervous system were only observed at high doses. Nervous system toxicity was manifested as clinical signs...

  9. 78 FR 21267 - Dinotefuran; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ...-For Tolerance In the Federal Register of May 23, 2012 (77 FR 30481) (FRL-9347-8), EPA issued a... ``Regulatory Planning and Review'' (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993). Because this final rule has been exempted...'' (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001) or Executive Order 13045, entitled ``Protection of Children...

  10. 77 FR 56133 - Dinotefuran; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ...-For Tolerance In the Federal Register of September 7, 2011 (76 FR 55329) (FRL- 8886-7), EPA issued a..., 2009 (74 FR 67098) (FRL-8803-1), the points of departure for many exposure scenarios differ than what... Executive Order 12866, entitled ``Regulatory Planning and Review'' (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993)....

  11. A critical review of neonicotinoid insecticides for developmental neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Larry P.; Li, Abby A.; Minnema, Daniel J.; Collier, Richard H.; Creek, Moire R.; Peffer, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A comprehensive review of published and previously unpublished studies was performed to evaluate the neonicotinoid insecticides for evidence of developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). These insecticides have favorable safety profiles, due to their preferential affinity for nicotinic receptor (nAChR) subtypes in insects, poor penetration of the mammalian blood–brain barrier, and low application rates. Nevertheless, examination of this issue is warranted, due to their insecticidal mode of action and potential exposure with agricultural and residential uses. This review identified in vitro, in vivo, and epidemiology studies in the literature and studies performed in rats in accordance with GLP standards and EPA guidelines with imidacloprid, acetamiprid, thiacloprid, clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and dinotefuran, which are all the neonicotinoids currently registered in major markets. For the guideline-based studies, treatment was administered via the diet or gavage to primiparous female rats at three dose levels, plus a vehicle control (≥20/dose level), from gestation day 0 or 6 to lactation day 21. F1 males and females were evaluated using measures of motor activity, acoustic startle response, cognition, brain morphometry, and neuropathology. The principal effects in F1 animals were associated with decreased body weight (delayed sexual maturation, decreased brain weight, and morphometric measurements) and acute toxicity (decreased activity during exposure) at high doses, without neuropathology or impaired cognition. No common effects were identified among the neonicotinoids that were consistent with DNT or the neurodevelopmental effects associated with nicotine. Findings at high doses were associated with evidence of systemic toxicity, which indicates that these insecticides do not selectively affect the developing nervous system. PMID:26513508

  12. A critical review of neonicotinoid insecticides for developmental neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Larry P; Li, Abby A; Minnema, Daniel J; Collier, Richard H; Creek, Moire R; Peffer, Richard C

    2016-02-01

    A comprehensive review of published and previously unpublished studies was performed to evaluate the neonicotinoid insecticides for evidence of developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). These insecticides have favorable safety profiles, due to their preferential affinity for nicotinic receptor (nAChR) subtypes in insects, poor penetration of the mammalian blood-brain barrier, and low application rates. Nevertheless, examination of this issue is warranted, due to their insecticidal mode of action and potential exposure with agricultural and residential uses. This review identified in vitro, in vivo, and epidemiology studies in the literature and studies performed in rats in accordance with GLP standards and EPA guidelines with imidacloprid, acetamiprid, thiacloprid, clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and dinotefuran, which are all the neonicotinoids currently registered in major markets. For the guideline-based studies, treatment was administered via the diet or gavage to primiparous female rats at three dose levels, plus a vehicle control (≥20/dose level), from gestation day 0 or 6 to lactation day 21. F1 males and females were evaluated using measures of motor activity, acoustic startle response, cognition, brain morphometry, and neuropathology. The principal effects in F1 animals were associated with decreased body weight (delayed sexual maturation, decreased brain weight, and morphometric measurements) and acute toxicity (decreased activity during exposure) at high doses, without neuropathology or impaired cognition. No common effects were identified among the neonicotinoids that were consistent with DNT or the neurodevelopmental effects associated with nicotine. Findings at high doses were associated with evidence of systemic toxicity, which indicates that these insecticides do not selectively affect the developing nervous system. PMID:26513508

  13. Multi-residue method for determination of selected neonicotinoid insecticides in honey using optimized dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jovanov, Pavle; Guzsvány, Valéria; Franko, Mladen; Lazić, Sanja; Sakač, Marijana; Šarić, Bojana; Banjac, Vojislav

    2013-07-15

    The objective of this study was to develop analytical method based on optimized dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) as a pretreatment procedure combined with reversed phase liquid chromatographic separation on C18 column and isocratic elution for simultaneous MS/MS determination of selected neonicotinoid insecticides in honey. The LC-MS/MS parameters were optimized to unequivocally provide good chromatographic separation, low detection (LOD, 0.5-1.0 μg kg(-1)) and quantification (LOQ, 1.5-2.5 μg kg(-1)) limits for acetamiprid, clothianidin, thiamethoxam, imidacloprid, dinotefuran, thiacloprid and nitenpyram in honey samples. Using different types (chloroform, dichloromethane) and volumes of extraction (0.5-3.0 mL) and dispersive (acetonitrile; 0.0-1.0 mL) solvent and by mathematical modeling it was possible to establish the optimal sample preparation procedure. Matrix-matched calibration and blank honey sample spiked in the concentration range of LOQ-100.0 μg kg(-1) were used to compensate the matrix effect and to fulfill the requirements of SANCO/12495/2011 for the accuracy (R 74.3-113.9%) and precision (expressed in terms of repeatability (RSD 2.74-11.8%) and within-laboratory reproducibility (RSDs 6.64-16.2%)) of the proposed method. The rapid (retention times 1.5-9.9 min), sensitive and low solvent consumption procedure described in this work provides reliable, simultaneous, and quantitative method applicable for the routine laboratory analysis of seven neonicotinoid residues in real honey samples. PMID:23622535

  14. 76 FR 25240 - Clothianidin; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... Tolerance In the Federal Register of June 23, 2010 (75 FR 35803) (FRL-8831- 3), EPA issued a notice pursuant... neurotoxicity were exhibited in both rats (decreased arousal, motor activity and locomotor activity) and mice... 6, 2008 (73 FR 6851) (FRL-8346-9), EPA had previously determined that the FQPA SF for...

  15. 78 FR 19130 - Clothianidin; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... December 8, 2011 (76 FR 76674) (FRL- 9328-8) and September 28, 2012 (77 FR 59578) (FRL-9364-6), EPA issued... FR 52246) (FRL-9360-4). C. Exposure Assessment 1. Dietary exposure from food and feed uses. In... ``Regulatory Planning and Review'' (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993). Because this final rule has been...

  16. Qualitative profiling and quantification of neonicotinoid metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taira, Kumiko; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Aoyama, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    Neonicotinoid pesticides have been widely applied for the production of fruits and vegetables, and occasionally detected in conventionally grown produce. Thus oral exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides may exist in the general population; however, neonicotinoid metabolites in human body fluids have not been investigated comprehensively. The purpose of this study is the qualitative profiling and quantitative analysis of neonicotinoid metabolites in the human spot urine by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Human urine samples were collected from three patients suspected of subacute exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides. A qualitative profiling of urinary metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) with a database of nominal molecular weights of 57 known metabolites of three neonicotinoid pesticides (acetamiprid, Imidacloprid, and clothianidin), as well as the parent compounds. Then a quantitative analysis of selected urinary metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with a standard pesticide and metabolite, which were detected by the qualitative profiling. The result of qualitative profiling showed that seven metabolites, i.e. an acetamiprid metabolite, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid; three Imidacloprid metabolites, 5-hydroxy-Imidacloprid, 4,5-dihydroxy-imidacloprid, 4,5-dehydro-Imidacloprid; a common metabolite of acetamiprid and Imidacloprid, N-(6-chloronicotinoyl)-glycine; and two clothianidin metabolites, N-desmethyl-clothianidin, N-(2-(methylsulfanyl)thiazole-5-carboxyl)-glycine, as well as acetamiprid, were detected in the urine of three cases. The result of the quantitative analysis showed N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was determined in the urine of one case, which had been collected on the first visit, at a concentration of 3.2 ng/mL. This is the first report on the qualitative and quantitative detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the human

  17. Qualitative Profiling and Quantification of Neonicotinoid Metabolites in Human Urine by Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Taira, Kumiko; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Aoyama, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    Neonicotinoid pesticides have been widely applied for the production of fruits and vegetables, and occasionally detected in conventionally grown produce. Thus oral exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides may exist in the general population; however, neonicotinoid metabolites in human body fluids have not been investigated comprehensively. The purpose of this study is the qualitative profiling and quantitative analysis of neonicotinoid metabolites in the human spot urine by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Human urine samples were collected from three patients suspected of subacute exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides. A qualitative profiling of urinary metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) with a database of nominal molecular weights of 57 known metabolites of three neonicotinoid pesticides (acetamiprid, Imidacloprid, and clothianidin), as well as the parent compounds. Then a quantitative analysis of selected urinary metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with a standard pesticide and metabolite, which were detected by the qualitative profiling. The result of qualitative profiling showed that seven metabolites, i.e. an acetamiprid metabolite, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid; three Imidacloprid metabolites, 5-hydroxy-Imidacloprid, 4,5-dihydroxy-imidacloprid, 4,5-dehydro-Imidacloprid; a common metabolite of acetamiprid and Imidacloprid, N-(6-chloronicotinoyl)-glycine; and two clothianidin metabolites, N-desmethyl-clothianidin, N-(2-(methylsulfanyl)thiazole-5-carboxyl)-glycine, as well as acetamiprid, were detected in the urine of three cases. The result of the quantitative analysis showed N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was determined in the urine of one case, which had been collected on the first visit, at a concentration of 3.2 ng/mL. This is the first report on the qualitative and quantitative detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the human

  18. 75 FR 6576 - Acetamiprid; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... the Federal Register of August 19, 2009 (74 FR 41898) (FRL-8426- 7), EPA issued a notice pursuant to..., entitled Regulatory Planning and Review (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993). Because this final rule has been... FR 28355, May 22, 2001) or Executive Order 13045, entitled Protection of Children from...

  19. 77 FR 43524 - Acetamiprid; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... FR 69690) (FRL- 9325-1), EPA issued a notice pursuant to FFDCA section 408(d)(3), 21 U.S.C. 346a(d)(3... Review'' (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993). Because this final rule has been exempted from review under... Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use'' (66 FR 28355, May...

  20. 78 FR 36671 - Acetamiprid; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ...-For Tolerance In the Federal Register of February 27, 2013 (78 FR 13295) (FRL- 9380-2), EPA issued a... . In the Federal Register of September 28, 2012 (77 FR 59578) (FRL- 9364-6), EPA issued a document... Review'' (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993). Because this final rule has been exempted from review...

  1. Efficacy of slow-release collar formulations of imidacloprid/flumethrin and deltamethrin and of spot-on formulations of fipronil/(s) - methoprene, dinotefuran/pyriproxyfen/permethrin and (s) –methoprene/amitraz/fipronil against Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Ctenocephalides felis felis on dogs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Two studies evaluating the efficacy of an imidacloprid/flumethrin collar (Seresto®, Bayer Animal Health, IVP), a deltamethrin collar (Scalibor®, MSD, CP1), a fipronil/(s)-methoprene spot-on (Frontline Combo®, Merial, CP2), a dinotefuran/pyriproxyfen/permethrin spot-on (Vectra 3D®, Ceva, CP3) and an amitraz/fipronil/(s)-methoprene spot-on (Certifect®, Merial, CP4/CP5) against repeated infestations with Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Ctenocephalides felis felis on dogs were conducted over periods of 226 days and 71 days respectively. Methods The first study comprised 4 groups of treated dogs and one untreated control group, and the second 3 groups of treated dogs and one control group. Each group consisted of 8 dogs. All dogs were infested with ticks and fleas at regular intervals. Ticks were counted 6 h, 18 h or 48 h after infestations and fleas 24 h after infestations. Efficacies of the treatments were calculated by comparison with the untreated control groups using standard descriptive statistics. Results The protective 48 h tick efficacy was 97.8% to 100% for the IVP (226 days), 69.3% to 97.4% for CP1 (170 days), 99.6% to 43.4% for CP2 (35 days) and 98% to 61.4% for CP3 (35 days). The protective 18 h tick efficacy was 98% to 99.6% for the IVP (71 days), 100% to 86.5% for CP4 (29 days), 100% to 72.8% for CP4 after re-treatment (35 days) and 98.8% to 54.3% for CP5 (35 days). The protective 6 h tick efficacy was 85.6% at Day 7 and 90.1% to 97.1% from Day 14 onwards for the IVP (70 days), 92.3% to 70.7% for CP4 (35 days), 97.5% to 65.2% for CP4 after re-treatment (35 days) and 95.1% to 51.8% for CP5 (35 days). The protective 24 h flea efficacy was 99.5/90.9% to 100% for the IVP (71/226 days), 66.7% to 83% for CP1 (170 days), 100% to 88.5% for CP2 (35 days), 100% to 73.3% for CP3 (35 days), 100% to 98.7% for CP4 (35 days), 100% to 87.5% for CP4 after re-treatment (35 days) and 100% to 79.5% for CP5

  2. 40 CFR 180.603 - Dinotefuran; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....2 Brassica, head and stem, subgroup 5A 1.4 Brassica, leafy greens, subgroup 5B 15.0 Cotton..., except Brassica, group 4 5.0 Vegetable, tuberous and corm, subgroup 1C 0.05 Watercress 8.0 1 There are...

  3. 40 CFR 180.603 - Dinotefuran; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....2 Brassica, head and stem, subgroup 5A 1.4 Brassica, leafy greens, subgroup 5B 15.0 Cotton..., except Brassica, group 4 5.0 Vegetable, tuberous and corm, subgroup 1C 0.05 Watercress 8.0 1 There are...

  4. 40 CFR 180.603 - Dinotefuran; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the table below: Commodity Parts per million Brassica, head and stem, subgroup 5A 1.4 Brassica, leafy... Vegetable, fruiting, group 8 0.7 Vegetable, cucurbit, group 9 0.5 Vegetable, leafy, except Brassica, group...

  5. 40 CFR 180.603 - Dinotefuran; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the table below: Commodity Parts per million Brassica, head and stem, subgroup 5A 1.4 Brassica, leafy... Vegetable, fruiting, group 8 0.7 Vegetable, cucurbit, group 9 0.5 Vegetable, leafy, except Brassica, group...

  6. 40 CFR 180.603 - Dinotefuran; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the table below: Commodity Parts per million Brassica, head and stem, subgroup 5A 1.4 Brassica, leafy... Vegetable, fruiting, group 8 0.7 Vegetable, cucurbit, group 9 0.5 Vegetable, leafy, except Brassica, group...

  7. 77 FR 67282 - Dinotefuran; Pesticide Tolerances for Emergency Exemptions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... issue of September 12, 2012 (77 FR 56133) (FRL-9359-6) in association with requests for tolerances to..., entitled ``Regulatory Planning and Review'' (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993). Because this final rule has..., Distribution, or Use'' (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001) or Executive Order 13045, entitled ``Protection of...

  8. 40 CFR 180.586 - Clothianidin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., group 16, except rice, forage 0.35 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice, hay 0.07 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice, stover 0.1 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice, straw 0.05 Grain, cereal, group 15, except rice 0.01 Grape...

  9. 40 CFR 180.586 - Clothianidin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and straw, group 16, except rice, forage 0.35 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice, hay 0.07 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice, stover 0.1 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group 16, except rice, straw 0.05 Grain, cereal, group 15, except...

  10. 40 CFR 180.586 - Clothianidin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., seed 0.01 Nut, tree, group 14 0.01 Peach 0.80 Pepper 0.80 Pomegranate 0.20 Potato, chips 0.6 Potato..., except pepper 0.20 Vegetable, leafy, except brassica, group 4 3.0 Vegetable, root, except sugar...

  11. 40 CFR 180.586 - Clothianidin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., seed 0.01 Nut, tree, group 14 0.01 Peach 0.80 Pepper 0.80 Pomegranate 0.20 Potato, chips 0.6 Potato..., except pepper 0.20 Vegetable, leafy, except brassica, group 4 3.0 Vegetable, root, except sugar...

  12. 40 CFR 180.586 - Clothianidin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Potato, chips 0.6 Potato, granules/flakes 1.5 Soybean, seed 0.02 Vegetable, brassica, leafy, group 5 1.9... Vegetable, leafy, except brassica, group 4 3.0 Vegetable, root, except sugar beet, subgroup 1B 0.8...

  13. Assessment of toxicity and potential risk of butene-fipronil using Drosophila melanogaster, in comparison to nine conventional insecticides.

    PubMed

    Arain, Muhammad Shahid; Hu, Xing-Xing; Li, Guo-Qing

    2014-02-01

    The toxicities of butene-fipronil to Drosophila melanogaster were evaluated, in comparison to nine conventional insecticides. According to the mean LD50 values of the larvae from CS, w(1118) and Oregan strains, butene-fipronil,abamectin, spinosad and chlorpyrifos exhibited high levels of toxicity. Imidacloprid, α-cypermethrin and clothianidin showed middle levels of toxicity. And acephate,methomyl and acetamiprid had low levels of toxicity. To the adults, butene-fipronil, α-cypermethrin, spinosad, and chlorpyrifos were relatively more toxic, whereas acephate,methomyl, acetamiprid, imidacloprid, clothianidin and abamectin were relatively less toxic. Butene-fipronil and abamectin were more toxic to larvae. In contrast, spinosad,a-cypermethrin, and clothianidin were more toxic to adults.Moreover, the toxic risk assessment using a risk quotient value revealed that butene-fipronil was safe to D. melanogaster adults. Thus, our results suggested that butene-fipronil is harmful to D. melanogaster larvae, but it is relatively safe to the adults. PMID:24233193

  14. Biological response of earthworm, Eisenia fetida, to five neonicotinoid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Pang, Sen; Mu, Xiyan; Qi, Suzhen; Li, Dongzhi; Cui, Feng; Wang, Chengju

    2015-08-01

    Earthworms (Eisenia fetida) are one of the most abundant terrestrial species, and play an important role in maintaining the ecological function of soil. Neonicotinoids are some of the most widely used insecticides applied to crops. Studies on the effect of neonicotinoids on E. fetida are limited. In the present work, we evaluated the effects of five neonicotinoid insecticides on reproduction, cellulase activity and the tissues of E. fetida. The results showed that, the LC50 of imidacloprid, acetamiprid, nitenpyram, clothianidin and thiacloprid was 3.05, 2.69, 4.34, 0.93 and 2.68mgkg(-1), respectively. They also could seriously affect the reproduction of E. fetida, reducing the fecundity by 84.0%, 39.5%, 54.3%, 45.7% and 39.5% at the sub-lethal concentrations of 2.0, 1.5, 0.80, 2.0 and 1.5mgkg(-1), respectively. The cellulase activity of E. fetida was most sensitive to clothianidin. Significant disruption of the epidermal and midgut tissue was observed after 14d exposure. In summary, we demonstrate that imidacloprid, acetamiprid, nitenpyram, clothianidin and thiacloprid have high toxic to earthworm, and can significantly inhibited fecundity and cellulase activity of E. fetida, and they also damage the epidermal and midgut cells of earthworm. PMID:25828917

  15. 40 CFR 180.578 - Acetamiprid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., brassica, leafy, group 5 1.20 Vegetable, cucurbit, group 9 0.50 Vegetable, fruiting, group 8 0.20 Vegetable, leafy, except brassica, group 4 3.00 Vegetable, legume, edible podded, subgroup 6A 0.60...

  16. 40 CFR 180.578 - Acetamiprid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-07F 0.35 Fruit, stone, group 12, except plum, prune 1.20 Grain, aspirated fractions 5.0 Mustard, seed... and bean, succulent shelled, subgroup 6B 0.40 Pistachio 0.10 Plum, prune, dried 0.40 Plum,...

  17. 40 CFR 180.578 - Acetamiprid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Fruit, stone, group 12, except plum, prune 1.20 Mustard, seed 0.010 Nut, tree, group 14 0.10 Onion, bulb... Pistachio 0.10 Plum, prune, dried 0.40 Plum, prune, fresh 0.20 Tea, dried1 50.0 Tomato, paste 0.40...

  18. Mortality of a wireworm, Agriotes obscurus (Coleoptera: Elateridae), after topical application of various insecticides.

    PubMed

    Van Herk, W G; Vernon, R S; Tolman, J H; Saavedra, H Ortiz

    2008-04-01

    Ten insecticides representing seven chemical groups were applied at various concentrations topically by using a Potter Spray Tower to evaluate their relative toxicities on the European wireworm Agriotes obscurus L. (Coleoptera: Elateridae). Wireworms were stored at 15 degrees C after exposure to organophosphate (OP) (chlorpyrifos, diazinon), pyrethroid (tefluthrin), thianicotinoid (thiamethoxam, clothianidin), chloronicotinoid (imidacloprid, acetamiprid), phenyl pyrazole (fipronil), organochlorine (lindane), and spinosyn (spinosad) insecticides, and their postapplication health was evaluated weekly for up to 301 d. LC50, LC90, LT50, and LT90 values were calculated for each chemical except acetamiprid, and compared with those of lindane, clothianidin, and chlorpyrifos. Wireworms exposed to OPs died or recovered more quickly (LT50 < 20 d, LT90 < 50 d), than those exposed to all other insecticides tested except tefluthrin (LT50 = 25.5 d, LT90 = 66.5 d). Wireworms exposed to sublethal concentrations of all neonicotinoids quickly became moribund after application but made a full recovery. Wireworms exposed to fipronil at concentrations near the LC90 value showed no intoxication symptoms for up to 35 d, and they did not recover after symptoms developed. For each chemical, increasing the concentration increased the time required for wireworms to recover but decreased the time required to kill wireworms. Fipronil was highly toxic to wireworms (LC50 = 0.0001%), but acetamiprid (LC50 = 1.82%), imidacloprid (LC50 = 0.83%), tefluthrin (LC50 = 0.23%), diazinon (LC50 = 0.54%), and spinosad (LC50 = 0.51%) were not. The toxicity of both clothianidin (LC50 = 0.07%) and thiamethoxam (LC50 = 0.17%) were similar to those oflindane (LC50 = 0.06%) and chlorpyrifos (LC50 = 0.10%). PMID:18459401

  19. Survey of neonicotinoids and fipronil in corn seeds for agriculture.

    PubMed

    Sabatino, Leonardo; Scordino, Monica; Pantò, Valentina; Chiappara, Elena; Traulo, Pasqualino; Gagliano, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Recently, legislative decisions withdrew or temporarily suspended the use of neonicotinoids and fipronil as seeds tanning in many countries because of their endocrine-disrupting activity imputable to the bees' toxicity. In this study, the occurrence of acetamiprid, fipronil, clothianidin, flonicamid, imidacloprid, nitenpyram, thiacloprid and thiamethoxam was detected in 66 samples of commercial treated corn seeds, collected in the Italian market in the frame of ministerial institutional quality control activity. Because of the lack of a validated analytical protocol for neonicotinoid detection in seeds, a routinely suitable liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS) analytical method was developed and statistically validated on fortified corn seeds. Survey results demonstrated that 88% of the investigated seed samples showed the presence of residues of clothianidin, fipronil, thiamethoxam and thiacloprid, either individually or simultaneously, with values that ranged from about 0.002 to 20 mg kg(-1), which evidenced the alarming illicit use of these pesticides in seed treatments. PMID:24786619

  20. Effect of dinotefuran on Bemisia tabaci (MED whitefly) and Amblyseius swirskii, 2016

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci is a polyphagous pest known to feed upon over 900 plant taxa, and is an effective vector of more than 100 plant damaging viruses. Among different biotypes of this cryptic species complex, MEAM1 and MED whitefly are the two most destructive members posing threats of several crops of ec...

  1. 76 FR 11453 - Dinotefuran; Receipt of Application for Emergency Exemption, Solicitation of Public Comment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... up to 150,000 acres of rice to control rice stink bug (Oebalus pugnax). The applicant proposes a use... rice to control rice stink bug (Oebalus pugnax). Information in accordance with 40 CFR part 166 was... rice stink bug in this case is not yield loss, but rather quality loss in the harvested rice....

  2. Transmembrane potential polarization, calcium influx, and receptor conformational state modulate the sensitivity of the imidacloprid-insensitive neuronal insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor to neonicotinoid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Bodereau-Dubois, Béatrice; List, Olivier; Calas-List, Delphine; Marques, Olivier; Communal, Pierre-Yves; Thany, Steeve H; Lapied, Bruno

    2012-05-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides act selectively on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Recent studies revealed that their efficiency was altered by the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation process and the intracellular signaling pathway involved in the regulation of nAChRs. Using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology adapted for dissociated cockroach dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons, we demonstrated that intracellular factors involved in the regulation of nAChR function modulated neonicotinoid sensitivity. DUM neurons were known to express two α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR subtypes: nAChR1 and nAChR2. Whereas nAChR1 was sensitive to imidacloprid, nAChR2 was insensitive to this insecticide. Here, we demonstrated that, like nicotine, acetamiprid and clothianidin, other types of neonicotinoid insecticides, acted as agonists on the nAChR2 subtype. Using acetamiprid, we revealed that both steady-state depolarization and hyperpolarization affected nAChR2 sensitivity. The measurement of the input membrane resistance indicated that change in the acetamiprid-induced agonist activity was related to the receptor conformational state. Using cadmium chloride, ω-conotoxin GVIA, and (R,S)-(3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-isoquinoline-1-yl)-2-phenyl-N,N-di-acetamide (LOE 908), we found that inhibition of calcium influx through high voltage-activated calcium channels and transient receptor potential γ (TRPγ) activated by both depolarization and hyperpolarization increased nAChR2 sensitivity to acetamiprid. Finally, using N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W7), forskolin, and cAMP, we demonstrated that adenylyl cyclase sensitive to the calcium/calmodulin complex regulated internal cAMP concentration, which in turn modulated TRPγ function and nAChR2 sensitivity to acetamiprid. Similar TRPγ-induced modulatory effects were also obtained when clothianidin was tested. These findings bring insights into the signaling pathway modulating

  3. Survey and Risk Assessment of Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Exposure to Neonicotinoid Pesticides in Urban, Rural, and Agricultural Settings.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, T J; Culbert, E M; Felsot, A S; Hebert, V R; Sheppard, W S

    2016-04-01

    A comparative assessment of apiaries in urban, rural, and agricultural areas was undertaken in 2013 and 2014 to examine potential honey bee colony exposure to neonicotinoid insecticides from pollen foraging. Apiaries ranged in size from one to hundreds of honey bee colonies, and included those operated by commercial, sideline (semicommercial), and hobbyist beekeepers. Residues in and on wax and beebread (stored pollen in the hive) were evaluated for the nitro-substituted neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid and its olefin metabolite and the active ingredients clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and dinotefuran. Beebread and comb wax collected from hives in agricultural landscapes were more likely to have detectable residues of thiamethoxam and clothianidin than that collected from hives in rural or urban areas (∼50% of samples vs. <10%). The maximum neonicotinoid residue detected in either wax or beebread was 3.9 ppb imidacloprid. A probabilistic risk assessment was conducted on the residues recovered from beebread in apiaries located in commercial, urban, and rural landscapes. The calculated risk quotient based on a dietary no observable adverse effect concentration (NOAEC) suggested low potential for negative effects on bee behavior or colony health. PMID:26791816

  4. Widespread use and frequent detection of neonicotinoid insecticides in wetlands of Canada's Prairie Pothole Region.

    PubMed

    Main, Anson R; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M; Michel, Nicole L; Cessna, Allan J; Morrissey, Christy A

    2014-01-01

    Neonicotinoids currently dominate the insecticide market as seed treatments on Canada's major Prairie crops (e.g., canola). The potential impact to ecologically significant wetlands in this dominantly agro-environment has largely been overlooked while the distribution of use, incidence and level of contamination remains unreported. We modelled the spatial distribution of neonicotinoid use across the three Prairie Provinces in combination with temporal assessments of water and sediment concentrations in wetlands to measure four active ingredients (clothianidin, thiamethoxam, imidacloprid and acetamiprid). From 2009 to 2012, neonicotinoid use was increasing; by 2012, applications covered an estimated ∼11 million hectares (44% of Prairie cropland) with >216,000 kg of active ingredients. Thiamethoxam, followed by clothianidin, were the dominant seed treatments by mass and area. Areas of high neonicotinoid use were identified as high density canola or soybean production. Water sampled four times from 136 wetlands (spring, summer, fall 2012 and spring 2013) across four rural municipalities in Saskatchewan similarly revealed clothianidin and thiamethoxam in the majority of samples. In spring 2012 prior to seeding, 36% of wetlands contained at least one neonicotinoid. Detections increased to 62% in summer 2012, declined to 16% in fall, and increased to 91% the following spring 2013 after ice-off. Peak concentrations were recorded during summer 2012 for both thiamethoxam (range: clothianidin (range:

  5. Widespread Use and Frequent Detection of Neonicotinoid Insecticides in Wetlands of Canada's Prairie Pothole Region

    PubMed Central

    Main, Anson R.; Headley, John V.; Peru, Kerry M.; Michel, Nicole L.; Cessna, Allan J.; Morrissey, Christy A.

    2014-01-01

    Neonicotinoids currently dominate the insecticide market as seed treatments on Canada's major Prairie crops (e.g., canola). The potential impact to ecologically significant wetlands in this dominantly agro-environment has largely been overlooked while the distribution of use, incidence and level of contamination remains unreported. We modelled the spatial distribution of neonicotinoid use across the three Prairie Provinces in combination with temporal assessments of water and sediment concentrations in wetlands to measure four active ingredients (clothianidin, thiamethoxam, imidacloprid and acetamiprid). From 2009 to 2012, neonicotinoid use was increasing; by 2012, applications covered an estimated ∼11 million hectares (44% of Prairie cropland) with >216,000 kg of active ingredients. Thiamethoxam, followed by clothianidin, were the dominant seed treatments by mass and area. Areas of high neonicotinoid use were identified as high density canola or soybean production. Water sampled four times from 136 wetlands (spring, summer, fall 2012 and spring 2013) across four rural municipalities in Saskatchewan similarly revealed clothianidin and thiamethoxam in the majority of samples. In spring 2012 prior to seeding, 36% of wetlands contained at least one neonicotinoid. Detections increased to 62% in summer 2012, declined to 16% in fall, and increased to 91% the following spring 2013 after ice-off. Peak concentrations were recorded during summer 2012 for both thiamethoxam (range: clothianidin (range:

  6. Co-metabolic biodegradation of acetamiprid by Pseudoxanthomonas sp. AAP-7 isolated from a long-term acetamiprid-polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangli; Zhao, Yanjiao; Gao, Hao; Yue, Wenlong; Xiong, Minghua; Li, Feng; Zhang, Hui; Ge, Wei

    2013-12-01

    An AAP-degrading bacterium, AAP-7, was isolated from AAP-polluted soil. AAP-7 was identified as Pseudoxanthomonas sp. on the basis of the comparative analysis of 16S rDNA sequences. The strain was able to transformate more than 80% AAP by means of co-metabolism and degraded AAP via hydrolysis or demethylation to form (E)-3-(((6-chloropyridin-3yl)methyl)(methyl)amino)acrylonitrile and N-((6-chloropyridin-3yl)methyl)-N-methylprop-1-en-2-amine, both of which transformed into ultimate product, which was 1-(6-chloropyridin-3yl)-N-methylmethanamine. A novel degradation pathway was proposed based on these metabolites. AAP could be transformed with a maximum specific degradation rate, half-saturation constant and inhibit constant of 1.775/36 h, 175.3 mg L(-1), and 396.5 mg L(-1), respectively, which proved that the degradation rate of AAP could be restrained at high AAP concentration. This paper highlights a significant potential use of co-metabolic cultures of microbial cells for the cleanup of AAP-contaminated soil. PMID:24177159

  7. Determination of neonicotinoid pesticides residues in agricultural samples by solid-phase extraction combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen; Han, Chao; Qian, Yan; Ding, Huiying; Chen, Xiaomei; Xi, Junyang

    2011-07-15

    This work reports a new sensitive multi-residue liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for detection, confirmation and quantification of six neonicotinoid pesticides (dinotefuran, thiamethoxam, clothiandin, imidacloprid, acetamiprid and thiacloprid) in agricultural samples (chestnut, shallot, ginger and tea). Activated carbon and HLB solid-phase extraction cartridges were used for cleaning up the extracts. Analysis is performed by LC-MS/MS operated in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, acquiring two specific precursor-product ion transitions per target compound. Quantification was carried by the internal standard method with D(4)-labeled imidacloprid. The method showed excellent linearity (R(2)≥0.9991) and precision (relative standard deviation, RSD≤8.6%) for all compounds. Limits of quantification (LOQs) were 0.01 mg kg(-1) for chestnut, shallot, ginger sample and 0.02 mg kg(-1) for tea sample. The average recoveries, measured at three concentrations levels (0.01 mg kg(-1), 0.02 mg kg(-1) and 0.1 mg kg(-1) for chestnut, shallot, ginger sample, 0.02 mg kg(-1), 0.04 mg kg(-1) and 0.2 mg kg(-1) for tea sample), were in the range 82.1-108.5%. The method was satisfactorily validated for the analysis of 150 agricultural samples (chestnut, shallot, ginger and tea). Imidacloprid and acetamiprid were detected at concentration levels ranging from 0.05 to 3.6 mg kg(-1). PMID:21641601

  8. 78 FR 72881 - Notice of Receipt of Requests to Voluntarily Cancel Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ...- Streptomycin Streptomycin. sulfate. 000264-00984 Titan FL Clothianidin, Thiram, Metalaxyl & Carboxin. 000264... Clothianidin. Treatment. 000264-01079 Three-Way VAP........ Clothianidin, Ipconazole & Metalaxyl. 000264-01082 Proceed Plus......... Metalaxyl, Tebuconazole, Prothioconazole & Clothianidin. 000464-00667 Bioban...

  9. 75 FR 47475 - Acetamiprid, Mepiquat; Order Denying NRDC’s Objections on Remand: Environmental Protection Agency

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    .... (70 FR 46706 (August 10, 2005)). NRDC sought judicial review of the August, 2005 order, and the U.S..., total bilirubin, albumin, hormones, and enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransfersase... Exposure to Pesticides in Food (June 21, 2000). (See 73 FR 42683, 42687 (July 23, 2008)). ii. Exposure...

  10. Molecular Effects of Neonicotinoids in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Christen, Verena; Mittner, Fabian; Fent, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Neonicotinoids are implicated in the decline of bee populations. As agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, they disturb acetylcholine receptor signaling leading to neurotoxicity. Several behavioral studies showed the link between neonicotinoid exposure and adverse effects on foraging activity and reproduction. However, molecular effects underlying these effects are poorly understood. Here we elucidated molecular effects at environmental realistic levels of three neonicotinoids and nicotine, and compared laboratory studies to field exposures with acetamiprid. We assessed transcriptional alterations of eight selected genes in caged honey bees exposed to different concentrations of the neonicotinoids acetamiprid, clothianidin, imidacloporid, and thiamethoxam, as well as nicotine. We determined transcripts of several targets, including nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α 1 and α 2 subunit, the multifunctional gene vitellogenin, immune system genes apidaecin and defensin-1, stress-related gene catalase and two genes linked to memory formation, pka and creb. Vitellogenin showed a strong increase upon neonicotinoid exposures in the laboratory and field, while creb and pka transcripts were down-regulated. The induction of vitellogenin suggests adverse effects on foraging activity, whereas creb and pka down-regulation may be implicated in decreased long-term memory formation. Transcriptional alterations occurred at environmental concentrations and provide an explanation for the molecular basis of observed adverse effects of neonicotinoids to bees. PMID:26990785

  11. Effectiveness of attract-and-kill systems using methyl eugenol incorporated with neonicotinoid insecticides against the oriental fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yi-Yuan; Hou, Roger F

    2008-04-01

    Laboratory bioassays and field trials were conducted to evaluate an "attract-and-kill" system using methyl eugenol (ME) with neonicotinoid insecticides against male oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae). In laboratory bioassays, mortality of male flies resulting from the conventional toxicant, naled was 98.3-100% at 24 through 72 h after treatment, whereas the neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid and acetamiprid caused only approximately 60-80% at 24 through 72 h after treatment. In the assays of residual effect, naled was persistent up to 96 wk, whereas imidacloprid or acetamiprid was persistent up to 150 wk, resulting in 38.9 or 61.2% male mortality, respectively. Imidacloprid, in particular, caused a delayed lethal effect on flies. In another experiment, male mortality within 28 wk from clothianidin, another neonicotinoid insecticide, was approximately 80% after exposure for 24 h, suggesting a delayed lethal effect similar to those treated with imidacloprid, and mortality was up to 91.8%, if observed, 72 h after treatment. In field trials, attractiveness was similar between ME alone and ME incorporated with naled or neonicotinoids, indicating that addition of these insecticides to ME in traps is not repellent to B. dorsalis males. Using an improved wick-typed trap with longer attractiveness for simulating field application, addition of imidacloprid or acetamiprid maintained 40.1 or 64.3% male mortality, respectively, when assayed once every 2 wk from traps placed in orchards for 42 wk without changing the poison, whereas incorporation with naled resulted in as high as 98.1% after 34 wk and approximately 80% at 42 wk, indicating that persistence is increased compared with sugarcane fiberboard blocks for carrying poison attractants. This study also suggests that neonicotinoid insecticides could be used as an alternative for broad-spectrum insecticides as toxicants in fly traps. PMID:18459398

  12. Thiamethoxam resistance selected in the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae): cross-resistance patterns, possible biochemical mechanisms and fitness costs analysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cong-Fen; Ma, Shao-Zhi; Shan, Cai-Hui; Wu, Shun-Fan

    2014-09-01

    The western flower thrips (WFT) Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), an important pest of various crops in the world, has invaded China since 2003. To understand the risks and to determine possible mechanisms of resistance to thiamethoxam in WFT, a resistant strain was selected under the laboratory conditions. Cross-resistance and the possible biochemical resistance mechanisms were investigated in this study. A 15.1-fold thiamethoxam-resistant WFT strain (TH-R) was established after selection for 55 generations. Compared with the susceptible strain (TH-S), the selected TH-R strain showed extremely high level cross-resistance to imidaclothiz (392.1-fold) and low level cross-resistance to dinotefuran (5.7-fold), acetamiprid (2.9-fold) and emamectin benzoate (2.1-fold), respectively. No cross-resistance to other fourteen insecticides was detected. Synergism tests showed that piperonyl butoxide (PBO) and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) produced a high synergism of thiamethoxam effects in the TH-R strain (2.6- and 2.6-fold respectively). However, diethyl maleate (DEM) did not act synergistically with thiamethoxam. Biochemical assays showed that mixed function oxidase (MFO) activities and carboxylesterase (CarE) activity of the TH-R strain were 2.8- and 1.5-fold higher than that of the TH-S strain, respectively. When compared with the TH-S strain, the TH-R strain had a relative fitness of 0.64. The results show that WFT develops resistance to thiamethoxam after continuous application and thiamethoxam resistance had considerable fitness costs in the WFT. It appears that enhanced metabolism mediated by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and CarE was a major mechanism for thiamethoxam resistance in the WFT. The use of cross-resistance insecticides, including imidaclothiz and dinotefuran, should be avoided for sustainable resistance management. PMID:25175655

  13. Potential application of immunoassays for simple, rapid and quantitative detections of phytoavailable neonicotinoid insecticides in cropland soils.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eiki; Seike, Nobuyasu; Motoki, Yutaka; Inao, Keiya; Otani, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the applicability of commercially available kit-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to simple, quick, and quantitative detection for three water-extractable (phytoavailable) neonicotinoid insecticides: dinotefuran, clothianidin, and imidacloprid in soils. ELISA showed excellent analytical sensitivity for determination, but with cross-reaction to structurally related neonicotinoid analogues, which might produce false positives. To analyze insecticides in soil samples of diverse physicochemical properties, they were extracted with water. The aqueous soil extracts were assayed directly with ELISA. No matrix interference was observed without additional dilution with water. Recovery experiments for the insecticides from aqueous soil extracts spiked at 2-10 ng/mL showed good accuracy (72-126%) and precision (<16%). Kit-based ELISAs were used to estimate soil-water distribution coefficients (Kd). Values estimated using this method showed positive correlation between organic carbon contents in soil and those for evaluated insecticides. Results indicate that the evaluated kit-based ELISA has applicability for simple, quick, and reliable detection of phytoavailable insecticides in soils and for estimating Kd values in soil. PMID:27344017

  14. Efficacy of Soil-Applied Neonicotinoid Insecticides for Long-term Protection Against Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    PubMed

    Smitley, David R; Herms, Daniel A; Davis, Terrance W

    2015-10-01

    Protection of green ash trees (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) from the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, by soil applications of neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, clothianidin, and dinotefuran) was tested at five locations between 2005 and 2013. Application rate and spring versus fall application dates were evaluated in tests with neighborhood street trees and in one plantation of 65 ash trees. Insecticide treatments of ash trees at all five sites were initiated as the leading edge of the EAB invasion began to kill the first ash trees at each location. Trees were treated and evaluated at each site for 4 to 7 yr. Spring applications of imidacloprid were more efficacious than fall applications. Application rates of 0.8 g a.i./cm dbh or greater per year gave a higher level of protection and were more consistent than rates of 0.56 g a.i./cm dbh per year or less. The number of years between the first observation of canopy loss due to EAB and death of most of the control trees varied from three to seven years among test sites, depending on how many non-treated ash trees were nearby. PMID:26453723

  15. Efficacy of Selected Insecticide Sprays and Aerosols against the Common Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Changlu; Singh, Narinderpal; Zha, Chen; Cooper, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the residual efficacy of four liquid sprays and four ready-to-use aerosols that are commonly used in the U.S. against a field-collected bed bug, Cimex lectularius L., strain with moderate resistance level to pyrethroids. The four liquid sprays were: Tandem (0.1% thiamethoxam, 0.03% lambda-cyhalothrin), Temprid SC (0.05% imidacloprid, 0.025% cyfluthrin), Transport GHP (0.05% acetamiprid, 0.06% bifenthrin), and Demand CS (0.03% lambda-cyhalothrin). The four aerosols were: Alpine (0.5% dinotefuran), Bedlam (0.4% sumithrin, 1.6% MGK 264), Bedlam Plus (0.4% sumithrin, 1% MGK 264, 0.05% imidacloprid), and Phantom (0.5% chlorfenapyr). Bed bugs were confined for 4 h to treated substrates (aged 24 h). Four substrates were tested: fabric, unpainted wood, painted wood, and vinyl. Bedlam, Demand CS, and Temprid SC resulted in ≤70% mortality on all tested substrates. Among the other five products, substrate type significantly affected their residual efficacy, except for Transport GHP, which caused ≥89.7% mortality regardless of the substrate. The effect of exposure time (5 min, 4 h, and 24 h) on the efficacy of Transport GHP and Phantom aerosol also was evaluated. A 4 h continuous exposure to Phantom aerosol or Transport GHP residue caused similar mortality to 24 h exposure and higher mortality than 5 min exposure. PMID:26840334

  16. Efficacy of Selected Insecticide Sprays and Aerosols against the Common Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changlu; Singh, Narinderpal; Zha, Chen; Cooper, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the residual efficacy of four liquid sprays and four ready-to-use aerosols that are commonly used in the U.S. against a field-collected bed bug, Cimex lectularius L., strain with moderate resistance level to pyrethroids. The four liquid sprays were: Tandem (0.1% thiamethoxam, 0.03% lambda-cyhalothrin), Temprid SC (0.05% imidacloprid, 0.025% cyfluthrin), Transport GHP (0.05% acetamiprid, 0.06% bifenthrin), and Demand CS (0.03% lambda-cyhalothrin). The four aerosols were: Alpine (0.5% dinotefuran), Bedlam (0.4% sumithrin, 1.6% MGK 264), Bedlam Plus (0.4% sumithrin, 1% MGK 264, 0.05% imidacloprid), and Phantom (0.5% chlorfenapyr). Bed bugs were confined for 4 h to treated substrates (aged 24 h). Four substrates were tested: fabric, unpainted wood, painted wood, and vinyl. Bedlam, Demand CS, and Temprid SC resulted in ≤70% mortality on all tested substrates. Among the other five products, substrate type significantly affected their residual efficacy, except for Transport GHP, which caused ≥89.7% mortality regardless of the substrate. The effect of exposure time (5 min, 4 h, and 24 h) on the efficacy of Transport GHP and Phantom aerosol also was evaluated. A 4 h continuous exposure to Phantom aerosol or Transport GHP residue caused similar mortality to 24 h exposure and higher mortality than 5 min exposure. PMID:26840334

  17. 77 FR 59186 - Notice of Receipt of Pesticide Products; Registration Applications To Register New Uses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    .... Corporation, P.O. Box 8025, Walnut Creek, CA 94596. Active ingredient: Clothianidin. Product Type: Insecticide... Creek, CA 94596. Active ingredient: Clothianidin. Product Type: Insecticide. Proposed Uses: Expansion...

  18. Determination of neonicotinoid insecticides and strobilurin fungicides in particle phase atmospheric samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Raina-Fulton, Renata

    2015-06-01

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method has been developed for the determination of neonicotinoids and strobilurin fungicides in the particle phase fraction of atmosphere samples. Filter samples were extracted with pressurized solvent extraction, followed by a cleanup step with solid phase extraction. Method detection limits for the seven neonicotinoid insecticides and six strobilurin fungicides were in the range of 1.0-4.0 pg/m(3). Samples were collected from June to September 2013 at two locations (Osoyoos and Oliver) in the southern Okanagan Valley Agricultural Region of British Columbia, where these insecticides and fungicides are recommended for use on tree fruit crops (apples, pears, cherries, peaches, apricots) and vineyards. This work represents the first detection of acetamiprid, imidacloprid, clothianidin, kresoxim-methyl, pyraclostrobin, and trifloxystrobin in particle phase atmospheric samples collected in the Okanagan Valley in Canada. The highest particle phase atmospheric concentrations were observed for imidacloprid, pyraclostrobin, and trifloxystrobin at 360.0, 655.6, and 1908.2 pg/m(3), respectively. PMID:25961332

  19. [Simultaneous determination of 6 neonicotinoid residues in soil using DLLME-HPLC and UV].

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-li; Shan, Hong; Li, Yan-hua; Zeng, Ya-ling; Shen, Xiu-li; Tong, Cheng-feng

    2013-09-01

    A simple, cheap and rugged method was developed for simultaneous deter mination of 6 neonicotinoid residues in soil, including imidacloprid, acetamiprid, thiamethoxam, thiacloprid, clothianidin and nitenpyram. The soil sample was produced by dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME) after extracted by the mixed solution of acetonitrile and CH2Cl2 (2:1, phi). The analytes were separated by HPLC with Alltima C18 column (4.6 mm x 250 mm, 5 microm) and detected by PDA at 260 nm. External standard method was used for quantification. The results showed that good linearity was obtained with correlation coefficients between 0.9982 and 0.9999 in the range of 0.5-200 microg x L(-1). The limits of detection (LODs) were in the range between 0.0005 and 0.003 microg x mL(-1) (S/N = 3). The method was validated with five soil samples spiked at three fortification levels (0.05, 0.1, 1.0 mg x kg(-1)) and recoveries were in the range of 55.3%-95.6% with RSD of 1.4%-7.0%. The effect of clean-up was evaluated by UV spectra and demonstrated that the method established is effective. In conclusion, this method is competent for the simultaneous analysis of 6 neonicotinoid residues in soil. PMID:24369670

  20. UHPLC/MS-MS Analysis of Six Neonicotinoids in Honey by Modified QuEChERS: Method Development, Validation, and Uncertainty Measurement.

    PubMed

    Proietto Galeano, Michele; Scordino, Monica; Sabatino, Leonardo; Pantò, Valentina; Morabito, Giovanni; Chiappara, Elena; Traulo, Pasqualino; Gagliano, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and reliable multiresidue analytical methods were developed and validated for the determination of 6 neonicotinoids pesticides (acetamiprid, clothianidin, imidacloprid, nitenpyram, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam) in honey. A modified QuEChERS method has allowed a very rapid and efficient single-step extraction, while the detection was performed by UHPLC/MS-MS. The recovery studies were carried out by spiking the samples at two concentration levels (10 and 40 μg/kg). The methods were subjected to a thorough validation procedure. The mean recovery was in the range of 75 to 114% with repeatability below 20%. The limits of detection were below 2.5 μg/kg, while the limits of quantification did not exceed 4.0 μg/kg. The total uncertainty was evaluated taking the main independent uncertainty sources under consideration. The expanded uncertainty did not exceed 49% for the 10 μg/kg concentration level and was in the range of 16-19% for the 40 μg/kg fortification level. PMID:26904611

  1. UHPLC/MS-MS Analysis of Six Neonicotinoids in Honey by Modified QuEChERS: Method Development, Validation, and Uncertainty Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Proietto Galeano, Michele; Scordino, Monica; Sabatino, Leonardo; Pantò, Valentina; Morabito, Giovanni; Chiappara, Elena; Traulo, Pasqualino; Gagliano, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and reliable multiresidue analytical methods were developed and validated for the determination of 6 neonicotinoids pesticides (acetamiprid, clothianidin, imidacloprid, nitenpyram, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam) in honey. A modified QuEChERS method has allowed a very rapid and efficient single-step extraction, while the detection was performed by UHPLC/MS-MS. The recovery studies were carried out by spiking the samples at two concentration levels (10 and 40 μg/kg). The methods were subjected to a thorough validation procedure. The mean recovery was in the range of 75 to 114% with repeatability below 20%. The limits of detection were below 2.5 μg/kg, while the limits of quantification did not exceed 4.0 μg/kg. The total uncertainty was evaluated taking the main independent uncertainty sources under consideration. The expanded uncertainty did not exceed 49% for the 10 μg/kg concentration level and was in the range of 16–19% for the 40 μg/kg fortification level. PMID:26904611

  2. The impact of insecticides applied in apple orchards on the predatory mite Kampimodromus aberrans (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Duso, Carlo; Ahmad, Shakeel; Tirello, Paola; Pozzebon, Alberto; Klaric, Virna; Baldessari, Mario; Malagnini, Valeria; Angeli, Gino

    2014-03-01

    Kampimodromus aberrans is an effective predatory mite in fruit orchards. The side-effects of insecticides on this species have been little studied. Field and laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of insecticides on K. aberrans. Field experiments showed the detrimental effects of etofenprox, tau-fluvalinate and spinosad on predatory mites. Spider mite (Panonychus ulmi) populations reached higher densities on plots treated with etofenprox and tau-fluvalinate than in the other treatments. Single or multiple applications of neonicotinoids caused no detrimental effects on predatory mites. In the laboratory, spinosad and tau-fluvalinate caused 100 % mortality. Etofenprox caused a significant mortality and reduced fecundity. The remaining insecticides did not affect female survival except for imidacloprid. Thiamethoxam, clothianidin, thiacloprid, chlorpyrifos, lufenuron and methoxyfenozide were associated with a significant reduction in fecundity. No effect on fecundity was found for indoxacarb or acetamiprid. Escape rate of K. aberrans in laboratory was relatively high for etofenprox and spinosad, and to a lesser extent thiacloprid. The use of etofenprox, tau-fluvalinate and spinosad was detrimental for K. aberrans and the first two insecticides induced spider mite population increases. The remaining insecticides caused no negative effects on predatory mites in field trials. Some of them (reduced fecundity and repellence) should be considered with caution in integrated pest management programs. PMID:24114337

  3. Simultaneous determination of eight neonicotinoid insecticide residues and two primary metabolites in cucumbers and soil by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with QuEChERS.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghany, Maha F; Hussein, Lobna A; El Azab, Noha F; El-Khatib, Ahmed H; Linscheid, Michael W

    2016-09-15

    A new, rapid, sensitive, precise and validated high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of eight neonicotinoid insecticides with their two primary metabolites in cucumbers and soil based on QuEChERS as a pretreatment procedure. In QuEChERS procedure, cucumber samples were extracted with acetonitrile and cleaned using (C18 sorbent material), while soil samples were extracted with a mixture of acetonitrile:dichloromethane (8.3:16.7v:v). The LC-MS/MS conditions were optimized to provide good selectivity and specificity of the developed method where neonicotinoids were separated using gradient elution of water and acetonitrile both containing 0.1% formic acid with Gemini C18 column where the last compound was eluted at 9.5min. Average recoveries of the eight neonicotinoids and their metabolites ranged between 81.6% and 95.7% in fortified cucumber samples with relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 13.18% and between 80.3% and 104% in fortified soil samples with relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 8.44%. The limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) for the ten compounds were in the ranges of (0.08-6.06ng/g) and (0.26-20ng/g), respectively. The method was applied successfully to determine residues and rate of disappearance of the eight neonicotinoids from cucumber and soil and their half-lives where a safety pre-harvest interval of 5days for acetampirid, 12days for imidacloprid, 15days for nitenpyram, 12days for thiamethoxam, 5days for flonicamid, 8days for clothianidin, 2days for Dinotefuran, and 1day for thiacloprid were suggested. PMID:27447929

  4. Cross-Resistance Between Azinphos-methyl and Acetamiprid in Populations of Codling Moth, Cydia pomonella (L.)(Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), from Washington State

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult and neonate larval assays were conducted to assess the response of field-collected codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), populations from apple. Male codling moth populations exhibited a range of responses to a discriminating concentration of azinphos-methyl in a survey of 20 populations. Popula...

  5. 75 FR 54622 - Pesticide Emergency Exemptions; Agency Decisions and State and Federal Agency Crisis Declarations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... program ended on April 30, 2009. Contact: Stacey Groce. On December 19, 2008, for the use of clothianidin... exemption: EPA authorized the use of clothianidin on onion to control corn maggot, onion maggot, and thrips... Carolina Department of Agriculture Crisis: On June 2, 2009, for the use clothianidin on sweet potato...

  6. Neonicotinoid insecticides inhibit cholinergic neurotransmission in a molluscan (Lymnaea stagnalis) nervous system.

    PubMed

    Vehovszky, Á; Farkas, A; Ács, A; Stoliar, O; Székács, A; Mörtl, M; Győri, J

    2015-10-01

    Neonicotinoids are highly potent and selective systemic insecticides, but their widespread use also has a growing impact on non-target animals and contaminates the environment, including surface waters. We tested the neonicotinoid insecticides commercially available in Hungary (acetamiprid, Mospilan; imidacloprid, Kohinor; thiamethoxam, Actara; clothianidin, Apacs; thiacloprid, Calypso) on cholinergic synapses that exist between the VD4 and RPeD1 neurons in the central nervous system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. In the concentration range used (0.01-1 mg/ml), neither chemical acted as an acetylcholine (ACh) agonist; instead, both displayed antagonist activity, inhibiting the cholinergic excitatory components of the VD4-RPeD1 connection. Thiacloprid (0.01 mg/ml) blocked almost 90% of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), while the less effective thiamethoxam (0.1 mg/ml) reduced the synaptic responses by about 15%. The ACh-evoked membrane responses of the RPeD1 neuron were similarly inhibited by the neonicotinoids, confirming that the same ACh receptor (AChR) target was involved. We conclude that neonicotinoids act on nicotinergic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the snail CNS. This has been established previously in the insect CNS; however, our data indicate differences in the background mechanism or the nAChR binding site in the snail. Here, we provide the first results concerning neonicotinoid-related toxic effects on the neuronal connections in the molluscan nervous system. Aquatic animals, including molluscs, are at direct risk while facing contaminated surface waters, and snails may provide a suitable model for further studies of the behavioral/neuronal consequences of intoxication by neonicotinoids. PMID:26340121

  7. Multiresidue analysis of pesticides with hydrolyzable functionality in cooked vegetables by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Joong; Park, Semin; Choi, Jin Young; Shim, Jae-Han; Shin, Eun-Ho; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Kim, Soo Taek; Abd El-Aty, A M; Jin, Jong Sung; Bae, Dong Won; Shin, Sung Chul

    2009-07-01

    It would be preferable for pesticide residues substituted by hydrolyzable functionality to be analyzed after cooking because their structures are apt to degrade during boiling and/or heating. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the quantitative determination of 44 pesticide residues with hydrolyzable functional group in five typical vegetable widely consumed in Republic of Korea is described. The sample clean-up was carried out according to the method of Food Code No. 83 established by the Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA). Zorbox XDB-C(18) column was selected for the analysis because of the best peak separation. The LC mobile phase consisted of water and 5 mm methanolic ammonium formate, which resulted in a peak shape with good symmetry at each run. Tandem mass spectroscopic (MS/MS) experiments were performed in ESI positive mode and the multiple reaction monitoring modes. A conventional matrix effect was modified to more comprehensive form 100gamma(ij) (%). A high matrix effect (<-30%) was detected for the seven polar pesticides, namely thiamethoxam, clothianidin, acetamiprid, aldicarb, thiacloprid, pirimicarb and methabenzthiazuron. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.1-8.1 microg/kg, indicating a good sensitivity. Most of the recoveries ranged from 70 to 131% with RSDs

  8. Occurrence and removal of organic micropollutants: An overview of the watch list of EU Decision 2015/495.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Marta O; Moreira, Nuno F F; Ribeiro, Ana R; Pereira, Manuel F R; Silva, Adrián M T

    2016-05-01

    Although there are no legal discharge limits for micropollutants into the environment, some regulations have been published in the last few years. Recently, a watch list of substances for European Union-wide monitoring was reported in the Decision 2015/495/EU of 20 March 2015. Besides the substances previously recommended to be included by the Directive 39/2013/EU, namely two pharmaceuticals (diclofenac and the synthetic hormone 17-alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2)) and a natural hormone (17-beta-estradiol (E2)), the first watch list of 10 substances/groups of substances also refers three macrolide antibiotics (azithromycin, clarithromycin and erythromycin), other natural hormone (estrone (E1)), some pesticides (methiocarb, oxadiazon, imidacloprid, thiacloprid, thiamethoxam, clothianidin, acetamiprid and triallate), a UV filter (2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate) and an antioxidant (2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol) commonly used as food additive. Since little is known about the removal of most of the substances included in the Decision 2015/495/EU, particularly regarding realistic concentrations in aqueous environmental samples, this review aims to: (i) overview the European policy in the water field; (ii) briefly describe the most commonly used conventional and advanced treatment processes to remove micropollutants; (iii) summarize the relevant data published in the last decade, regarding occurrence and removal in aqueous matrices of the 10 substances/groups of substances that were recently included in the first watch list for European Union monitoring (Decision 2015/495/EU); and (iv) highlight the lack of reports concerning some substances of the watch list, the study of un-spiked aquatic matrices and the assessment of transformation by-products. PMID:26967909

  9. Effect of pesticides on adult rove beetle Atheta coriaria (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) survival in growing medium.

    PubMed

    Cloyd, Raymond A; Timmons, Nicholas R; Goebel, Jessica M; Kemp, Kenneth E

    2009-10-01

    The rove beetle Atheta coriaria (Kraatz) (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) is a natural enemy (biological control agent) commercially available for control of certain greenhouse insect pests, including fungus gnats, shore flies, and thrips. This study assessed the compatibility of pesticides (insecticides and fungicides) used in greenhouses with A. coriaria adults. Treatments were applied to 473-ml deli squat containers half-filled with a growing medium. We evaluated the effects of the pesticides when releases of A. coriaria adults were performed both before and after application of the designated pesticide solutions. All three of the neonicotinoid-based insecticides (clothianidin, dinotefuran, and thiamethoxam) were directly harmful to A. coriaria adults with < or = 3.2 adults recovered (out of 20) among all three treatments across all experiments. In addition, the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos at the low (0.25 fl oz/100 gal) and high (0.50 fl oz/100 gal) label rates; the plant-derived essential oil product (Indoor Pharm) containing soybean and rosemary oil; and the insecticide/miticide chlorfenpyr were directly harmful to A. coriaria adults with recovery rates -8.6 (out of 20) among all the treatments. The fungicides (azoxystrobin, fosetyl-aluminum, and mefenoxam) were not directly toxic to A. coriaria adults, with < or = 17.7 adults recovered (out of 20) across all experiments. The insecticides (Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, flonicamid, Metarhizium anisopliae strain52, and spinosad) and insect growth regulator azadirachtin were also not directly toxic to A. coriaria adults. Furthermore, many of these same treatments did not inhibit the ability of adult A. coriaria to consume fungus gnat (Bradysia sp. nr. coprophila) larvae in a feeding behavior experiment. Although the neonicotinoid-based insecticides were directly harmful to adult A. coriaria, when adults were released 48, 72, or 96 h after application, survival increased dramatically over

  10. Preharvest quarantine treatments of Chlorantraniliprole,Clothianidin, & Imidacloprid-based insecticides for control of Japanese beetle Coleoptera:Scarabaeidae)& other scarab larvae in the root zone of field-grown nurserytrees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica Newman (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), is an important quarantine pest of nurseries. Nursery plant movement from P. japonica-infested regions is regulated by the U.S. Domestic Japanese Beetle Harmonization Plan (DJHP), which classifies states by risk categories. Treatm...

  11. Neonicotinoid-contaminated pollinator strips adjacent to cropland reduce honey bee nutritional status

    PubMed Central

    Mogren, Christina L.; Lundgren, Jonathan G.

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide pollinator declines are attributed to a number of factors, including pesticide exposures. Neonicotinoid insecticides specifically have been detected in surface waters, non-target vegetation, and bee products, but the risks posed by environmental exposures are still not well understood. Pollinator strips were tested for clothianidin contamination in plant tissues, and the risks to honey bees assessed. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) quantified clothianidin in leaf, nectar, honey, and bee bread at organic and seed-treated farms. Total glycogen, lipids, and protein from honey bee workers were quantified. The proportion of plants testing positive for clothianidin were the same between treatments. Leaf tissue and honey had similar concentrations of clothianidin between organic and seed-treated farms. Honey (mean±SE: 6.61 ± 0.88 ppb clothianidin per hive) had seven times greater concentrations than nectar collected by bees (0.94 ± 0.09 ppb). Bee bread collected from organic sites (25.8 ± 3.0 ppb) had significantly less clothianidin than those at seed treated locations (41.6 ± 2.9 ppb). Increasing concentrations of clothianidin in bee bread were correlated with decreased glycogen, lipid, and protein in workers. This study shows that small, isolated areas set aside for conservation do not provide spatial or temporal relief from neonicotinoid exposures in agricultural regions where their use is largely prophylactic. PMID:27412495

  12. Neonicotinoid-contaminated pollinator strips adjacent to cropland reduce honey bee nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Mogren, Christina L; Lundgren, Jonathan G

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide pollinator declines are attributed to a number of factors, including pesticide exposures. Neonicotinoid insecticides specifically have been detected in surface waters, non-target vegetation, and bee products, but the risks posed by environmental exposures are still not well understood. Pollinator strips were tested for clothianidin contamination in plant tissues, and the risks to honey bees assessed. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) quantified clothianidin in leaf, nectar, honey, and bee bread at organic and seed-treated farms. Total glycogen, lipids, and protein from honey bee workers were quantified. The proportion of plants testing positive for clothianidin were the same between treatments. Leaf tissue and honey had similar concentrations of clothianidin between organic and seed-treated farms. Honey (mean±SE: 6.61 ± 0.88 ppb clothianidin per hive) had seven times greater concentrations than nectar collected by bees (0.94 ± 0.09 ppb). Bee bread collected from organic sites (25.8 ± 3.0 ppb) had significantly less clothianidin than those at seed treated locations (41.6 ± 2.9 ppb). Increasing concentrations of clothianidin in bee bread were correlated with decreased glycogen, lipid, and protein in workers. This study shows that small, isolated areas set aside for conservation do not provide spatial or temporal relief from neonicotinoid exposures in agricultural regions where their use is largely prophylactic. PMID:27412495

  13. Efforts to eradicate yellow crazy ants on Johnston Atoll: Results from Crazy Ant Strike Team IX, December 2014-June 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banko, Paul C.; Peck, Robert W.; Donmoyer, Kevin; Kropidlowski, Stephan; Pollock, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The ecologically destructive yellow crazy ant (YCA; Anoplolepis gracilipes) was first detected on Johnston Atoll in January 2010. Within eight months, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service had mobilized its first crazy ant strike team (CAST), a group of biologists dedicated to testing and identifying insecticidal baits to be used to eradicate the ant on the atoll. During December 2014‒May 2015 CAST IX focused on testing hydrogel crystals saturated with sucrose solution (25%) carrying the insecticides thiamethoxam and dinotefuran against YCA. A series of experiments, including artificial nest box trials, and field-based palatability trials and eradication tests on small (500 m2 or 0.05 ha) and large plots (2500 m2 or 0.25 ha), were conducted to test concentrations of thiamethoxam ranging from 0.0005% to 0.01%, and dinotefuran at 0.05%. Additionally, the cat food-based matrix containing dinotefuran (0.05%), the standard bait used to suppress YCA on Johnston since 2011, and textured vegetable protein (TVP) carrying dinotefuran at 0.1% and 0.05% were included in large plot tests. Nest box trials were inconclusive due to a consistent loss of queen and worker ants in control boxes, so they were discontinued. Palatability trials suggested higher dosages of thiamethoxam (0.005 and 0.01%) were less attractive than lower dosages (0.0005 and 0.001%) and controls (sucrose only), but small and large plot experiments failed to identify a thiamethoxam concentration that was consistently effective at killing YCA. In contrast, hydrogel containing dinotefuran was consistently effective, killing >95% of YCA on small and large plots. As expected, the cat food bait effectively reduced YCA abundances, but was slightly less effective than hydrogel containing dinotefuran over time. Three successive, approximately weekly treatments of large plots with hydrogel bait, or other baits followed by hydrogel bait, suggest an increasing overall effectiveness, with no aversion of YCA to the bait

  14. Neonicotinoids target distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and neurons, leading to differential risks to bumblebees.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Christopher; Buckland, Stephen T; Samson, Andrew J; McArthur, Robin; Chamosa Pino, Victor; Bollan, Karen A; Huang, Jeffrey T-J; Connolly, Christopher N

    2016-01-01

    There is growing concern over the risk to bee populations from neonicotinoid insecticides and the long-term consequences of reduced numbers of insect pollinators to essential ecosystem services and food security. Our knowledge of the risk of neonicotinoids to bees is based on studies of imidacloprid and thiamethoxam and these findings are extrapolated to clothianidin based on its higher potency at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. This study addresses the specificity and consequences of all three neonicotinoids to determine their relative risk to bumblebees at field-relevant levels (2.5 ppb). We find compound-specific effects at all levels (individual cells, bees and whole colonies in semi-field conditions). Imidacloprid and clothianidin display distinct, overlapping, abilities to stimulate Kenyon cells, indicating the potential to differentially influence bumblebee behavior. Bee immobility was induced only by imidacloprid, and an increased vulnerability to clothianidin toxicity only occurred following chronic exposure to clothianidin or thiamethoxam. At the whole colony level, only thiamethoxam altered the sex ratio (more males present) and only clothianidin increased queen production. Finally, both imidacloprid and thiamethoxam caused deficits in colony strength, while no detrimental effects of clothianidin were observed. Given these findings, neonicotinoid risk needs to be considered independently for each compound and target species. PMID:27124107

  15. Low doses of a neonicotinoid insecticide modify pheromone response thresholds of central but not peripheral olfactory neurons in a pest insect.

    PubMed

    Rabhi, Kaouther K; Deisig, Nina; Demondion, Elodie; Le Corre, Julie; Robert, Guillaume; Tricoire-Leignel, Hélène; Lucas, Philippe; Gadenne, Christophe; Anton, Sylvia

    2016-02-10

    Insect pest management relies mainly on neurotoxic insecticides, including neonicotinoids, leaving residues in the environment. There is now evidence that low doses of insecticides can have positive effects on pest insects by enhancing various life traits. Because pest insects often rely on sex pheromones for reproduction, and olfactory synaptic transmission is cholinergic, neonicotinoid residues could modify chemical communication. We recently showed that treatments with different sublethal doses of clothianidin could either enhance or decrease behavioural sex pheromone responses in the male moth, Agrotis ipsilon. We investigated now effects of the behaviourally active clothianidin doses on the sensitivity of the peripheral and central olfactory system. We show with extracellular recordings that both tested clothianidin doses do not influence pheromone responses in olfactory receptor neurons. Similarly, in vivo optical imaging does not reveal any changes in glomerular response intensities to the sex pheromone after clothianidin treatments. The sensitivity of intracellularly recorded antennal lobe output neurons, however, is upregulated by a lethal dose 20 times and downregulated by a dose 10 times lower than the lethal dose 0. This correlates with the changes of behavioural responses after clothianidin treatment and suggests the antennal lobe as neural substrate involved in clothianidin-induced behavioural changes. PMID:26842577

  16. Neonicotinoids target distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and neurons, leading to differential risks to bumblebees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, Christopher; Buckland, Stephen T.; Samson, Andrew J.; McArthur, Robin; Chamosa Pino, Victor; Bollan, Karen A.; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2016-04-01

    There is growing concern over the risk to bee populations from neonicotinoid insecticides and the long-term consequences of reduced numbers of insect pollinators to essential ecosystem services and food security. Our knowledge of the risk of neonicotinoids to bees is based on studies of imidacloprid and thiamethoxam and these findings are extrapolated to clothianidin based on its higher potency at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. This study addresses the specificity and consequences of all three neonicotinoids to determine their relative risk to bumblebees at field-relevant levels (2.5 ppb). We find compound-specific effects at all levels (individual cells, bees and whole colonies in semi-field conditions). Imidacloprid and clothianidin display distinct, overlapping, abilities to stimulate Kenyon cells, indicating the potential to differentially influence bumblebee behavior. Bee immobility was induced only by imidacloprid, and an increased vulnerability to clothianidin toxicity only occurred following chronic exposure to clothianidin or thiamethoxam. At the whole colony level, only thiamethoxam altered the sex ratio (more males present) and only clothianidin increased queen production. Finally, both imidacloprid and thiamethoxam caused deficits in colony strength, while no detrimental effects of clothianidin were observed. Given these findings, neonicotinoid risk needs to be considered independently for each compound and target species.

  17. Neonicotinoids target distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and neurons, leading to differential risks to bumblebees

    PubMed Central

    Moffat, Christopher; Buckland, Stephen T.; Samson, Andrew J.; McArthur, Robin; Chamosa Pino, Victor; Bollan, Karen A.; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing concern over the risk to bee populations from neonicotinoid insecticides and the long-term consequences of reduced numbers of insect pollinators to essential ecosystem services and food security. Our knowledge of the risk of neonicotinoids to bees is based on studies of imidacloprid and thiamethoxam and these findings are extrapolated to clothianidin based on its higher potency at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. This study addresses the specificity and consequences of all three neonicotinoids to determine their relative risk to bumblebees at field-relevant levels (2.5 ppb). We find compound-specific effects at all levels (individual cells, bees and whole colonies in semi-field conditions). Imidacloprid and clothianidin display distinct, overlapping, abilities to stimulate Kenyon cells, indicating the potential to differentially influence bumblebee behavior. Bee immobility was induced only by imidacloprid, and an increased vulnerability to clothianidin toxicity only occurred following chronic exposure to clothianidin or thiamethoxam. At the whole colony level, only thiamethoxam altered the sex ratio (more males present) and only clothianidin increased queen production. Finally, both imidacloprid and thiamethoxam caused deficits in colony strength, while no detrimental effects of clothianidin were observed. Given these findings, neonicotinoid risk needs to be considered independently for each compound and target species. PMID:27124107

  18. Distribution of Heavy Metals in the Soils Associated with the Commonly Used Pesticides in Cotton Fields

    PubMed Central

    Shafiq, Musharaf; Chotana, Ghayoor Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural soils contain both heavy metals and pesticides originating from various agricultural practices. It is quite important to study the relationships between these two classes of compounds. To accomplish this, 52 soil samples were collected from cotton fields and analyzed for their metal contents (Ni, Cu, Co, Pb, Cr, and Cd) and levels of most commonly used pesticides (imidacloprid, acetamiprid, and emamectin). FAAS was used for metal estimation and the pesticides were determined by HPLC equipped with UV detector. The results of the study revealed slightly enhanced levels of Ni and Cd in these samples while the rest of the metals were present within tolerable range. Acetamiprid residues in soil were strongly positively correlated with Cu and negatively correlated with Cr. Similarly, imidacloprid in soil was negatively correlated with Ni. Thus it was evidenced that Cu stabilizes acetamiprid while Cr and Ni facilitate the degradation of acetamiprid and imidacloprid in the soil. PMID:27051560

  19. Distribution of Heavy Metals in the Soils Associated with the Commonly Used Pesticides in Cotton Fields.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Saadia Rashid; Shafiq, Musharaf; Chotana, Ghayoor Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural soils contain both heavy metals and pesticides originating from various agricultural practices. It is quite important to study the relationships between these two classes of compounds. To accomplish this, 52 soil samples were collected from cotton fields and analyzed for their metal contents (Ni, Cu, Co, Pb, Cr, and Cd) and levels of most commonly used pesticides (imidacloprid, acetamiprid, and emamectin). FAAS was used for metal estimation and the pesticides were determined by HPLC equipped with UV detector. The results of the study revealed slightly enhanced levels of Ni and Cd in these samples while the rest of the metals were present within tolerable range. Acetamiprid residues in soil were strongly positively correlated with Cu and negatively correlated with Cr. Similarly, imidacloprid in soil was negatively correlated with Ni. Thus it was evidenced that Cu stabilizes acetamiprid while Cr and Ni facilitate the degradation of acetamiprid and imidacloprid in the soil. PMID:27051560

  20. Susceptibility of immature stages of Homalodisca coagulata (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) to selected insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Susceptibility of immatures of the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca coagulata (Say) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), to 10 insecticides that included chlorpyrifos, dimethoate, endosulfan, bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, esfenvalerate, fenpropathrin, acetamiprid, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam was evaluated...

  1. Determination of deoxyribonucleic acids by a resonance light scattering technique and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Nianqin; Jia, Guifang; Hou, Shicong; Xiong, Yanmei; Dong, Yanhong

    2003-12-01

    For the first time, acetamiprid has been used to determine nucleic acid (DNA) using the resonance light scattering (RLS). The RLS of acetamiprid was greatly enhanced by DNA in the range of pH 1.6-1.8. A RLS peak at 313 nm was found, and the enhanced intensity of RLS at this wavelength was proportional to the concentration of DNA. The linear range of the calibration curve was 0-11.0 μg ml -1 with the detection limit of 20 ng ml -1. The nucleic acids in synthetic sample and in rice seedling extraction were determined satisfactorily. The interaction mechanism of acetamiprid and DNA is discussed. Mechanism studies show that the enhanced RLS is due to the aggregation of acetamiprid in the presence of DNA.

  2. COMPATABILITY OF SELECT INSECTICIDES WITH NATURAL ENEMIES OF THE GLASSY-WINGED SHARPSHOOTER AND OTHER PESTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The toxicity of two insect growth regulators (IGRs), buprotezin and pyriproxyfen; three neonicotinoids, acetamiprid. imidacloprid and thiamethoxam; and three conventional insecticides, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, and chlorpyrifos; were tested in the laboratory for compatibility with egg parasitoids (...

  3. Susceptibility of Bagrada hilaris (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) to Insecticides in Laboratory and Greenhouse Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, John C; Prabhaker, Nilima; Reed, Darcy A; Perring, Thomas M; Castle, Steven J; Huang, Ta-I

    2015-04-01

    Field-collected nymphs and adults of Bagrada hilaris (Burmeister) (Hemiptera: Penatatomidae) from three locations were evaluated for susceptibility to insecticides representing 10 classes of insecticide chemistry. Although relative susceptibilities differed between leaf-spray and leaf-dip Petri dish bioassays, consistently low LC50 values were determined for chlorpyrifos, bifenthrin, and lambda-cyhalothrin. Fenpropathrin and methomyl had intermediate values. Susceptibility to dinotefuran varied depending on the bioassay, possibly owing to leaf substrates used in the two bioassays. In soil systemic bioassays, the LC50 value of dinotefuran was significantly greater than that of two other neonicotinoids, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, and the anthranilic diamide, cyantraniliprole. Mortality and feeding damage of B. hilaris and plant growth on insecticide-treated plants in greenhouse trials were consistent with the laboratory bioassays; the best results were seen with bifenthrin, methomyl, and chlorpyrifos. Mortality to the neonicotinoids was not evident; however, feeding damage and plant growth responses on dinotefuran-treated plants damage were similar to the noninfested control. This highlights the apparent antifeedant properties of dinotefuran that may have prevented adults from injuring broccoli plants after exposure to foliar spray residues. Data presented serve as baseline susceptibilities that can be used to monitor for resistance development in field populations of B. hilaris. PMID:26470178

  4. Impacts of a neonicotinoid, neonicotinoid-pyrethroid premix, and anthranilic diamide insecticide on four species of turf-inhabiting beneficial insects.

    PubMed

    Larson, Jonathan L; Redmond, Carl T; Potter, Daniel A

    2014-03-01

    Many turf managers prefer to control foliage- and root-feeding pests with the same application, so-called multiple-targeting, using a single broad-spectrum insecticide or a premix product containing two or more active ingredients. We compared the impact of a neonicotinoid (clothianidin), a premix (clothianidin + bifenthrin), and an anthranilic diamide (chlorantraniliprole), the main insecticide classes used for multiple targeting, on four species of beneficial insects: Harpalus pennsylvanicus, an omnivorous ground beetle, Tiphia vernalis, an ectoparasitoid of scarab grubs, Copidosoma bakeri, a polyembryonic endoparasitoid of black cutworms, and Bombus impatiens, a native bumble bee. Ground beetles that ingested food treated with clothianidin or the premix suffered high mortality, as did C. bakeri wasps exposed to dry residues of those insecticides. Exposure to those insecticides on potted turf cores reduced parasitism by T. vernalis. Bumble bee colonies confined to forage on white clover (Trifolium repens L.) in weedy turf that had been treated with clothianidin or the premix had reduced numbers of workers, honey pots, and immature bees. Premix residues incapacitated H. pennsylvanicus and C. bakeri slightly faster than clothianidin alone, but otherwise we detected no synergistic or additive effects. Chlorantraniliprole had no apparent adverse effects on any of the beneficial species. Implications for controlling turf pests with least disruption of non-target invertebrates are discussed. PMID:24493235

  5. Unexpected effects of low doses of a neonicotinoid insecticide on behavioral responses to sex pheromone in a pest insect.

    PubMed

    Rabhi, Kaouther K; Esancy, Kali; Voisin, Anouk; Crespin, Lucille; Le Corre, Julie; Tricoire-Leignel, Hélène; Anton, Sylvia; Gadenne, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In moths, which include many agricultural pest species, males are attracted by female-emitted sex pheromones. Although integrated pest management strategies are increasingly developed, most insect pest treatments rely on widespread use of neurotoxic chemicals, including neonicotinoid insecticides. Residual accumulation of low concentrations of these insecticides in the environment is known to be harmful to beneficial insects such as honey bees. This environmental stress probably acts as an "info-disruptor" by modifying the chemical communication system, and therefore decreases chances of reproduction in target insects that largely rely on olfactory communication. However, low doses of pollutants could on the contrary induce adaptive processes in the olfactory pathway, thus enhancing reproduction. Here we tested the effects of acute oral treatments with different low doses of the neonicotinoid clothianidin on the behavioral responses to sex pheromone in the moth Agrotis ipsilon using wind tunnel experiments. We show that low doses of clothianidin induce a biphasic effect on pheromone-guided behavior. Surprisingly, we found a hormetic-like effect, improving orientation behavior at the LD20 dose corresponding to 10 ng clothianidin. On the contrary, a negative effect, disturbing orientation behavior, was elicited by a treatment with a dose below the LD0 dose corresponding to 0.25 ng clothianidin. No clothianidin effect was observed on behavioral responses to plant odor. Our results indicate that risk assessment has to include unexpected effects of residues on the life history traits of pest insects, which could then lead to their adaptation to environmental stress. PMID:25517118

  6. Unexpected Effects of Low Doses of a Neonicotinoid Insecticide on Behavioral Responses to Sex Pheromone in a Pest Insect

    PubMed Central

    Rabhi, Kaouther K.; Esancy, Kali; Voisin, Anouk; Crespin, Lucille; Le Corre, Julie; Tricoire-Leignel, Hélène; Anton, Sylvia; Gadenne, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In moths, which include many agricultural pest species, males are attracted by female-emitted sex pheromones. Although integrated pest management strategies are increasingly developed, most insect pest treatments rely on widespread use of neurotoxic chemicals, including neonicotinoid insecticides. Residual accumulation of low concentrations of these insecticides in the environment is known to be harmful to beneficial insects such as honey bees. This environmental stress probably acts as an “info-disruptor” by modifying the chemical communication system, and therefore decreases chances of reproduction in target insects that largely rely on olfactory communication. However, low doses of pollutants could on the contrary induce adaptive processes in the olfactory pathway, thus enhancing reproduction. Here we tested the effects of acute oral treatments with different low doses of the neonicotinoid clothianidin on the behavioral responses to sex pheromone in the moth Agrotis ipsilon using wind tunnel experiments. We show that low doses of clothianidin induce a biphasic effect on pheromone-guided behavior. Surprisingly, we found a hormetic-like effect, improving orientation behavior at the LD20 dose corresponding to 10 ng clothianidin. On the contrary, a negative effect, disturbing orientation behavior, was elicited by a treatment with a dose below the LD0 dose corresponding to 0.25 ng clothianidin. No clothianidin effect was observed on behavioral responses to plant odor. Our results indicate that risk assessment has to include unexpected effects of residues on the life history traits of pest insects, which could then lead to their adaptation to environmental stress. PMID:25517118

  7. [Residual pesticide concentrations after processing various types of tea and tea infusions].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takahide; Watanabe, Ayaka; Shitara, Hiroshi; Kaburagi, Yasuo; Shibata, Masahisa; Kanda, Noriko; Kurokawa, Chieko; Inoue, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Motonobu; Togawa, Masayuki; Ozawa, Akihito; Uchiyama, Toru; Koizumi, Yutaka; Nakamura, Yoriyuki; Masuda, Shuichi; Maitani, Tamio

    2013-01-01

    The effects of processing to produce various types of tea or infusion on the levels of pesticide residues in tea were investigated for three insecticides (chlorfenapyr, pyrimiphos-methyl, and clothianidin). Tea plants were sprayed with one of the three pesticides and cultivated under cover. The levels of pesticide residues in tea decreased after processing according to the time and temperature of heating, as well as fermentation. Although significant differences were not observed among the three pesticides in the ratio of decreased of pesticide concentration after processing to green tea, clothianidin, which is a neonicotinoid insecticide and has a lower log Pow value, tended to be transferred more than the other two insecticides into infusions. However, no significant difference in the ratios of clothianidin transferred to infusions was observed among green tea with three different leaf sizes. PMID:24025203

  8. Comparison of the dissipation behaviour of three neonicotinoid insecticides in tea.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ru-Yan; Hu, Jin-Feng; Qian, Xiao-San; Su, Ting; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Zhao, Xiu-Xia; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2013-01-01

    The dissipation behaviour of three neonicotinoids - thiamethoxam, imidacloprid and acetamiprid - was compared in tea shoots, in Chinese green and black tea, and after tea infusion in hot water. The simple and rapid analytical procedures for the quantification of these three residues in these matrices were developed using HPLC with ultraviolet (UV) detection. Degradation rates in tea shoots of neonicotinoids applied in either recommended or double dosages followed first-order kinetics, with half-lives of 1.62 or 1.58 days for thiamethoxam, of 2.45 or 2.67 days for imidacloprid, and of 3.24 or 3.85 days for acetamiprid, respectively. Through harvest and processing the residue retentions for thiamethoxam, imidacloprid and acetamiprid were 85.0%, 84.1% and 70.6% of the initial dosages in green tea, and 77.1%, 52.4% and 57.4% in black tea. These three residues all showed high transfer rates through green or black tea brewing of 80.5% or 81.6% for thiamethoxam, of 63.1% or 62.2% for imidacloprid, and of 78.3% or 80.6% for acetamiprid. Waiting periods between the last application and harvest of at least 12, 17 and 20 days were suggested for thiamethoxam, imidacloprid and acetamiprid, respectively, after application at their recommend dosages to ensure levels below a maximum residue limit (MRL) of 0.05 mg kg(-1). PMID:23906092

  9. Effect of home processing on the distribution and reduction of pesticide residues in apples.

    PubMed

    Kong, Z; Shan, W; Dong, F; Liu, X; Xu, J; Li, M; Zheng, Y

    2012-08-01

    The effect of home processing (washing, peeling, coring and juicing) on residue levels of chlorpyrifos, β-cypermethrin, tebuconazole, acetamiprid and carbendazim in apple segments was investigated. The pesticide residues were determined by UPLC-MS/MS and GC with a flame photometric (FPD) and electron capture detection (ECD). The results indicated that the pesticide residue levels in the apple peel and core were higher compared with in the apple flesh. After peeled and cored apple was processed into apple juice and pomace, chlorpyrifos, β-cypermethrin and tebuconazole were concentrated in the apple pomace. However, residues of acetamiprid and carbendazim were exceptions. The apple pomace was free of acetamiprid, which was mainly present in the apple juice. After washing the mean loss of chlorpyrifos, β-cypermethrin, tebuconazole, acetamiprid and carbendazim from apples under recommended dosage and twofold higher dosage were 17-21%, 6.7-7.1%, 13-32%, 42-67% and 47-50%, respectively. The pesticide residues were significantly reduced in the edible part of the apple except for β-cypermethrin during peeling and coring process. The removal effect of apple juicing was found to be the most pronounced on β-cypermethrin residue, which was reduced in the range of 81-84%, and the reductions of chlorpyrifos, tebuconazole, acetamiprid and carbendazim upon apple juicing were in the range of 15-36%. PMID:22738391

  10. Evaluation of Cyantraniliprole and Other Commercial Fly Baits under Laboratory and Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Parker, Casey; Baldwin, Rebecca; Pereira, Roberto; Koehler, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory and field trials were performed to evaluate the attractiveness and efficacy of commercial baits (cyantraniliprole; methomyl + (Z)-9-tricosene; dinotefuran + (Z)-9-tricosene; imidacloprid granular + (Z)-9-tricosene; and imidacloprid liquid + (Z)-9-tricosene). In choice tests; flies were most attracted to cyantraniliprole bait > dinotefuran + (Z)-9 > methomyl + (Z)-9 bait > imidacloprid granular + (Z)-9 bait > imidacloprid liquid + (Z)-9 bait. Significant degradation in bait efficacy was observed after two weeks of aging excluding imidacloprid granular; which began to degrade in field conditions after one week. Cyantraniliprole; the new fly bait active ingredient in Zyrox(®); had the longest time to knockdown in the laboratory tests; but on susceptible flies; achieved 95%-100% knockdown within an hour of exposure. Zyrox(®) was resistant to weathering for a week; and was more attractive to flies in the field when compared to methomyl + (Z)-9 bait. PMID:26610575

  11. Evaluation of Cyantraniliprole and Other Commercial Fly Baits under Laboratory and Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Casey; Baldwin, Rebecca; Pereira, Roberto; Koehler, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory and field trials were performed to evaluate the attractiveness and efficacy of commercial baits (cyantraniliprole; methomyl + (Z)-9-tricosene; dinotefuran + (Z)-9-tricosene; imidacloprid granular + (Z)-9-tricosene; and imidacloprid liquid + (Z)-9-tricosene). In choice tests; flies were most attracted to cyantraniliprole bait > dinotefuran + (Z)-9 > methomyl + (Z)-9 bait > imidacloprid granular + (Z)-9 bait > imidacloprid liquid + (Z)-9 bait. Significant degradation in bait efficacy was observed after two weeks of aging excluding imidacloprid granular; which began to degrade in field conditions after one week. Cyantraniliprole; the new fly bait active ingredient in Zyrox®; had the longest time to knockdown in the laboratory tests; but on susceptible flies; achieved 95%–100% knockdown within an hour of exposure. Zyrox® was resistant to weathering for a week; and was more attractive to flies in the field when compared to methomyl + (Z)-9 bait. PMID:26610575

  12. Interactions of light intensity, insecticide concentration, and time on the efficacy of systemic insecticides in suppressing populations of the sweetpotato whitefly (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and the citrus mealybug (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    PubMed

    Cloyd, Raymond A; Williams, Kimberly A; Byrne, Frank J; Kemp, Kenneth E

    2012-04-01

    The impact of light intensity on the uptake and persistence of the systemic neonicotinoid insecticides, imidacloprid and dinotefuran, were evaluated in poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd.) and yellow sage (Lantana camara L.). Insecticide residues were measured in leaves sampled from the treated plants at four time intervals after treatment to determine the relationship between insecticide concentration and efficacy against two insect pests: sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci Gennadius, and the citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri Risso. The insecticides were evaluated at their respective label rate and at the comparable label rate of the other insecticide under two different light environments: ambient and shade. The uptake of dinotefuran into yellow sage was more rapid at both treatment rates than both rates of imidacloprid, resulting in higher percent mortality of whitefly nymphs (89.8-100) compared with imidacloprid (14.1-89.2) across all 4 wk. Additionally, plants that received both rates of dinotefuran had fewer whitefly pupae (< 1.0) at week 4 compared with imidacloprid-treated plants (23.7-25.3). The uptake of dinotefuran into poinsettia plants was also more rapid and resulted in quicker and higher percent mortality of whitefly nymphs (89.5-99.6) compared with imidacloprid (14.1-89.2) across all 4 wk. However, despite efficient uptake, the efficacy of both systemic insecticides was less for citrus mealybug where percent mortality values were <50% among all the treatments across the 4 wk. The use of the two systemic insecticides evaluated in regards to pest management in horticultural cropping systems is discussed. PMID:22606821

  13. ABILITY OF AN ELISA-BASED SEED HEALTH TEST TO DETECT ERWINIA STEWARTII IN MAIZE SEED TREATED WITH FUNGICIDES AND INSECTICIDES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ELISA-based seed health test detected E. stewartii in infected maize seed treated with 11 combinations of captan, carboxin, clothianidin, imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, fludioxonil, mefenoxam, or thiram. Treated healthy seeds were blended with treated E. stewartii-infected seed of Jubilee or A632 t...

  14. ABILITY OF AN ELISA-BASED SEED HEALTH TEST TO DETECT ERWINIA STEWARTII IN MAIZE SEED TREATED WITH FUNGICIDES AND INSECTICIDES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ELISA-based seed health test detected E. stewartii in infected maize seed treated with 11 combinations of captan, carboxin, clothianidin, imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, fludioxonil, mefenoxam, or thiram. Treated, healthy seeds were blended with treated, E. stewartii-infected seeds of Jubilee or A632...

  15. 75 FR 35801 - Notice of Receipt of Several Pesticide Petitions Filed for Residues of Pesticide Chemicals in or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... published in the Federal Register of January 27, 2010 (75 FR 4274) (FRL-8807-2). A method validation was..., as published in the Federal Register of January 27, 2010 (75 FR 4274) (FRL-8807-2). A method... insecticide clothianidin, (E)-1-(2-chloro-1,3-thiazol-5-ylmethyl)- 3-methyl-2-nitroguanidine, in or on...

  16. Seed treatments for the control of insects and diseases in sugarbeet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect feeding and vectoring of viruses cause serious problems in sugarbeet production worldwide. In order to ameliorate insect and disease problems on sugarbeet, two seed treatments, Poncho Beta (60 g a.i. clothianidin + 8 g a.i. beta-cyfluthrin/100,000 seed) and Cruiser Tef (60 g a.i. thiamethoxa...

  17. Ft. Collins Sugar Beet Germplasm Evaluated for Resistance to Rhizomania and Storability in Idaho, 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet germplasm and commercial check cultivars were evaluated in a sprinkler-irrigated sugar beet field near Kimberly, ID where sugar beet was grown in 2009. The field trial relied on natural inoculum for rhizomania development. The seed was treated with clothianidin (2.1 oz a.i. per 100,000 ...

  18. 76 FR 50904 - Thiamethoxam; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... for clothianidin were reduced to 1X (February 11, 2011, 76 FR 7712) (FRL-8858-3). That decision is.... 1. Peanut. In the Federal Register of March 24, 2010 (75 FR 14154) (FRL-8815-6), EPA issued a notice..., 2010 (75 FR 32463) (FRL-8827-5), EPA issued a notice pursuant to section 408(d)(3) of FFDCA, 21...

  19. Insecticide seed treatments for sugarbeet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pest feeding and vectoring of viruses cause serious problems in sugarbeet production worldwide. In order to ameliorate pest and disease problems on sugarbeet, two seed treatments, Poncho Beta (60 g a.i. clothianidin + 8 g a.i. beta-cyfluthrin/100,000 seed) and Cruiser Tef (60 g a.i. thiamethoxam + 8...

  20. INFLUENCE OF HOST RESISTANCE AND INSECTICIDE SEED TREATMENTS ON CURLY TOP IN SUGAR BEETS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curly top on sugarbeets caused by Beet severe curly top virus or closely related strains is a considerable problem in arid growing regions of the western United States. Two insecticide seed treatments, Poncho Beta (60 g ai clothianidin + 8 g ai beta-cyfluthrin/100,000 seed) and Gaucho (45 g ai imid...

  1. Concentration-Response and Residual Activity of Insecticides to Control Herpetogramma phaeopteralis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) in St. Augustinegrass.

    PubMed

    Tofangsazi, Nastaran; Cherry, Ron H; Beeson, Richard C; Arthurs, Steven P

    2015-04-01

    Tropical sod webworm, Herpetogramma phaeopteralis Guenée, is an important pest of warm-season turfgrass in the Gulf Coast states of the United States, the Caribbean Islands, and Central America. Current control recommendations rely on topical application of insecticides against caterpillars. The objective of this study was to generate resistance baseline data of H. phaeopteralis to six insecticide classes. Residual activity of clothianidin, chlorantraniliprole, and bifenthrin was also compared under field conditions in Central Florida. Chlorantraniliprole was the most toxic compound tested (LC50 value of 4.5 ppm), followed by acephate (8.6 ppm), spinosad (31.1 ppm), clothianidin (46.6 ppm), bifenthrin (283 ppm) and Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki, (342 ppm). In field tests, all compounds at label rates were effective (≥94% mortality of larvae exposed to fresh residues). However, a more rapid decline in activity of clothianidin and bifenthrin was observed compared with chlorantraniliprole. Clothianidin had no statistically detectable activity after 4 wk post-application in spring and the fall, and bifenthrin had no detectable activity after 3 wk in the spring and the fall. However, chlorantraniliprole maintained significant activity (≥84% mortality) compared with other treatments throughout the 5-wk study period. This study provides new information regarding the relative toxicities and persistence of current insecticides used for H. phaeopteralis and other turfgrass caterpillars. PMID:26470184

  2. A sensitive and label-free photoelectrochemical aptasensor using Co-doped ZnO diluted magnetic semiconductor nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbo; Qiao, Yunfei; Li, Jing; Fang, Hailin; Fan, Dahe; Wang, Wei

    2016-03-15

    Co-doped ZnO diluted magnetic semiconductor as a novel photoelectric beacon was first constructed for photoelectrochemical (PEC) aptasensor of acetamiprid. The fabricated PEC sensing is based on the specific binding of acetamiprid and its aptamer, which induces the decreasement of enhanced photocurrent produced by the electron donor of quercetin. Co(2+) doping has a beneficial effect in extending the band width of light absorption of ZnO into the visible region and to promote the separation of the photoinduced carriers due to the sp-d exchange interactions existing between the band electrons and the localized d electrons of Co(2+). The fabricated aptasensor was linear with the concentration of acetamiprid in the range of 0.5-800 nmolL(-1) with the detection limit of 0.18 nmolL(-1). The presence of same concentration of other conventional pesticides did not interfere in the detection of acetamiprid and the recovery is between 96.2% and 103.7%. This novel PEC aptasensor has good performances with high sensitivity, good selectivity, low cost and portable features. The strategy of Co-doped ZnO diluted magnetic semiconductor paves a new way to improve the performances of PEC aptasensor. PMID:26436325

  3. Combined Sprays of Sex Pheromone and Insecticides to Attract and Kill Codling Moth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field trials were conducted to evaluate the potential of an "attract-and-kill" approach for control of codling moth by adding half-rates of microencapsulated (MEC) lambda-cyhalothrin or acetamiprid to a sex pheromone formulation in Turkey and the USA in 2006. Two apple orchards were divided into six...

  4. Toxicity of Six Insecticides on Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and Effect on Expression of Detoxification Genes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Qing; Wu, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Ya-Lin; Barros-Parada, Wilson

    2016-02-01

    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), is a key worldwide fruit pest that has evolved high levels of resistance to almost all classes of conventional insecticides. Neonicotinoids, a new reduced-risk biorational insecticide class, have remained an effective control approach. In this study, the toxicity and sublethal effect of conventional and reduced-risk biorational insecticides on transcripts abundance of three detoxification genes in codling moth were determined. Bioassays on a codling moth laboratory strain suggested that acetamiprid had the highest oral toxicity against the third-instar larvae compared with the other five pesticides. Results also indicated that acetamiprid exhibits long-term efficacy against codling moth even at 120 h post feeding. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the detoxification genes CYP9A61, CpGST1, and CpCE-1 were differentially induced or suppressed by deltamethrin, cypermethrin, methomyl, carbaryl, and imidacloprid, depending on the type of insecticides; in contrast, no significant difference in CYP9A61, CpGST1, and CpCE-1 expressions were observed after acetamiprid exposure, when compared with the control. These results suggest that the reduced-risk biorational insecticide acetamiprid is an effective insecticide with no induction of detoxification genes and can be integrated into the management of codling moth. PMID:26487743

  5. Evaluation of three neonicotinoid insecticides against the common pistachio psylla, Agonoscena pistaciae, and its natural enemies.

    PubMed

    Amirzade, Najmeh; Izadi, Hamzeh; Jalali, Mohammad Amin; Zohdi, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    The common pistachio psylla, Agonoscena pistaciae Burckhardt and Lauterer (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is a key pest in pistachio orchards in Iran. Chemical control is a common method to manage this pest. Compatibility between natural enemies and pesticides is a primary concern in programs of integrated pest management of the psyllid pest. In this research, susceptibility of fifth instar nymphs of Ag. pistaciae and fourth instar larvae of the two most common predators of this pest, Adalia bipunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and Coccinella undecimpunctata aegyptiaca Reiche, to acetamiprid, thiamethoxam, and imidacloprid was investigated. Probit analysis of concentration-mortality data was conducted to estimate the LC50 value. The results showed that thiamethoxam with an LC50 value of 56.35 mg a.i./L was more toxic to fifth instar nymphs of Ag. pistaciae in comparison to acetamiprid (60.75 mg a.i/L) and imidacloprid (138.21 mg a.i/L) . Imidacloprid with an LC50 value of 218.89 mg a.i/L compared to acetamiprid (222.65 mg a.i/L) and thiamethoxam (232.37 mg a.i/L) had more lethal effects on fourth instar larvae of Ad. bipunctata. However, on the fourth instar larvae of C. undecimpunctata aegyptica, acetamiprid with an LC50 value of 263.44 mg a.i/L was more toxic than thiamethoxam (296.62 mg a.i/L) and imidacloprid (447.82 mg a.i/L). The laboratory findings showed that the three tested insecticides were more toxic to the common pistachio psylla than to its natural predators. Thiamethoxam was the most toxic against Ag. pistaciae. However, its toxicity to the predators was lower than imidacloprid and acetamiprid. This result suggests that thiamethoxam is the best insecticide for control of Ag. pistaciae in combination with predatory lady beetles. PMID:25373182

  6. Evaluation of Three Neonicotinoid Insecticides Against the Common Pistachio Psylla, Agonoscena pistaciae, and Its Natural Enemies

    PubMed Central

    Amirzade, Najmeh; Izadi, Hamzeh; Jalali, Mohammad Amin; Zohdi, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    The common pistachio psylla, Agonoscena pistaciae Burckhardt and Lauterer (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is a key pest in pistachio orchards in Iran. Chemical control is a common method to manage this pest. Compatibility between natural enemies and pesticides is a primary concern in programs of integrated pest management of the psyllid pest. In this research, susceptibility of fifth instar nymphs of Ag. pistaciae and fourth instar larvae of the two most common predators of this pest, Adalia bipunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and Coccinella undecimpunctata aegyptiaca Reiche, to acetamiprid, thiamethoxam, and imidacloprid was investigated. Probit analysis of concentration-mortality data was conducted to estimate the LC50 value. The results showed that thiamethoxam with an LC50 value of 56.35 mg a.i./L was more toxic to fifth instar nymphs of Ag. pistaciae in comparison to acetamiprid (60.75 mg a.i/L) and imidacloprid (138.21 mg a.i/L). Imidacloprid with an LC50 value of 218.89 mg a.i/L compared to acetamiprid (222.65 mg a.i/L) and thiamethoxam (232.37 mg a.i/L) had more lethal effects on fourth instar larvae of Ad. bipunctata. However, on the fourth instar larvae of C. undecimpunctata aegyptica, acetamiprid with an LC50 value of 263.44 mg a.i/L was more toxic than thiamethoxam (296.62 mg a.i/L) and imidacloprid (447.82 mg a.i/L). The laboratory findings showed that the three tested insecticides were more toxic to the common pistachio psylla than to its natural predators. Thiamethoxam was the most toxic against Ag. pistaciae. However, its toxicity to the predators was lower than imidacloprid and acetamiprid. This result suggests that thiamethoxam is the best insecticide for control of Ag. pistaciae in combination with predatory lady beetles. PMID:25373182

  7. Evaluation of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) control provided by emamectin benzoate and two neonicotinoid insecticides, one and two seasons after treatment.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Deborah G; Poland, Therese M; Anulewicz, Andrea C; Lewis, Phillip; Cappaert, David

    2011-10-01

    Effective methods are needed to protect ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) from emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive buprestid that has killed millions of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. We randomly assigned 175 ash trees (11.5-48.1 cm in diameter) in 25 blocks located in three study sites in Michigan to one of seven insecticide treatments in May 2007. Treatments included 1) trunk-injected emamectin benzoate; 2) trunk-injected imidacloprid; 3) basal trunk spray of dinotefuran with or 4) without Pentra-Bark, an agricultural surfactant; 5) basal trunk spray of imidacloprid with or 6) without Pentra-Bark; or (7) control. Foliar insecticide residues (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and toxicity of leaves to adult A. planipennis (4-d bioassays) were quantified at 3-4-wk intervals posttreatment. Seven blocks of trees were felled and sampled in fall 2007 to quantify A. planipennis larval density. Half of the remaining blocks were retreated in spring 2008. Bioassays and residue analyses were repeated in summer 2008, and then all trees were sampled to assess larval density in winter. Foliage from emamectin benzoate-treated trees was highly toxic to adult A. planipennis, and larval density was < 1% of that in comparable control trees, even two seasons posttreatment. Larval densities in trees treated with trunk-injected imidacloprid in 2007 + 2008 were similar to control trees. Dinotefuran and imidacloprid were effectively translocated within trees treated with the noninvasive basal trunk sprays; the surfactant did not appreciably enhance A. planipennis control. In 2008, larval densities were 57-68% lower in trees treated with dinotefuran or imidacloprid trunk sprays in 2007 + 2008 than on controls, but densities in trees treated only in 2007 were similar to controls. Highly effective control provided by emamectin benzoate for > or = 2 yr may reduce costs or logistical issues associated with treatment. PMID:22066190

  8. Residues of neonicotinoids and their metabolites in honey and pollen from sunflower and maize seed dressing crops.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hernández, Laura; Hernández-Domínguez, Deamelys; Martín, María T; Nozal, María J; Higes, Mariano; Bernal Yagüe, José L

    2016-01-01

    A study was carried out to evaluate the possible presence of thiamethoxam, clothianidin and imidacloprid, as well as the metabolic breakdown products of these three neonicotinoids in pollen and honey obtained from brood chamber combs of honeybee colonies located next to sunflower and maize crops from coated seeds. Samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry detector, in combination with accurate mass tools such as diagnostic ions by exact mass, chlorine mass filters, and MS/MS experiments. The presence of thiamethoxam and clothianidin was confirmed in some of the pollen samples analyzed. Moreover, different metabolites of neonicotinoids were tentatively detected in the pollen and honey samples collected. The results suggested that four metabolites were found in the honey samples, while for pollen samples eleven metabolites were identified; among these, five were considered for the first time as metabolic breakdown products in sunflower and maize plants. PMID:26545338

  9. Ovicidal Activity of Organophosphate, Oxadiazine, Neonicotinoid and Insect Growth Regulator Chemistries on Northern Strain Plum Curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Eric J.; Middleton, Samantha M.; Wise, John C.

    2008-01-01

    An in vitro method was developed for assessing ovicidal effects of the organophosphate azinphos-methyl, the neonicotioids thiacloprid, thiamethoxam and clothianidin, the oxadiazine indoxacarb and the insect growth regulators novaluron and pyriproxifen on the plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst)(Coleoptera: Curculionidae). The baseline survivorship of this method was 88 percent. Plum curculio eggs were most sensitive to azinphos-methyl. Thiacloprid, clothianidin and the chitin synthesis inhibitor, novaluron, had LC50 values below 100 ppm. Thiamethoxam, indoxacarb and pyriproxifen were not ovicidal at 100 ppm. Octanol-water partitioning coefficients, log Kow, appeared to be an important indicator of ovicidal activity within the neonicotinoids. This new bioassay method eliminates the confounding of the insect-chemical and plant-chemical interactions and the results highlight the utility of a post-infestation curative approach to plum curculio management.

  10. Insect Nicotinic Receptor Agonists as Flea Adulticides in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Dai Tan; Hsu, Walter H.; Martin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Fleas are significant ectoparasites of small animals. They can be a severe irritant to animals and serve as a vector for a number of infectious diseases. In this article, we discuss the pharmacological characteristics of four insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists used as fleacides in dogs and cats, which include three neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, nitenpyram, and dinotefuran) and spinosad. Insect nAChR agonists are one of the most important new classes of insecticides, which are used to control sucking insects both on plants and on companion animals. These new compounds provide a new approach for practitioners to safely and effectively eliminate fleas. PMID:20646191

  11. Multiple routes of pesticide exposure for honey bees living near agricultural fields.

    PubMed

    Krupke, Christian H; Hunt, Greg J; Eitzer, Brian D; Andino, Gladys; Given, Krispn

    2012-01-01

    Populations of honey bees and other pollinators have declined worldwide in recent years. A variety of stressors have been implicated as potential causes, including agricultural pesticides. Neonicotinoid insecticides, which are widely used and highly toxic to honey bees, have been found in previous analyses of honey bee pollen and comb material. However, the routes of exposure have remained largely undefined. We used LC/MS-MS to analyze samples of honey bees, pollen stored in the hive and several potential exposure routes associated with plantings of neonicotinoid treated maize. Our results demonstrate that bees are exposed to these compounds and several other agricultural pesticides in several ways throughout the foraging period. During spring, extremely high levels of clothianidin and thiamethoxam were found in planter exhaust material produced during the planting of treated maize seed. We also found neonicotinoids in the soil of each field we sampled, including unplanted fields. Plants visited by foraging bees (dandelions) growing near these fields were found to contain neonicotinoids as well. This indicates deposition of neonicotinoids on the flowers, uptake by the root system, or both. Dead bees collected near hive entrances during the spring sampling period were found to contain clothianidin as well, although whether exposure was oral (consuming pollen) or by contact (soil/planter dust) is unclear. We also detected the insecticide clothianidin in pollen collected by bees and stored in the hive. When maize plants in our field reached anthesis, maize pollen from treated seed was found to contain clothianidin and other pesticides; and honey bees in our study readily collected maize pollen. These findings clarify some of the mechanisms by which honey bees may be exposed to agricultural pesticides throughout the growing season. These results have implications for a wide range of large-scale annual cropping systems that utilize neonicotinoid seed treatments. PMID

  12. Concentrations of neonicotinoid insecticides in honey, pollen and honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in central Saskatchewan, Canada.

    PubMed

    Codling, Garry; Al Naggar, Yahya; Giesy, John P; Robertson, Albert J

    2016-02-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides (NIs) and their transformation products were detected in honey, pollen and honey bees, (Apis mellifera) from hives located within 30 km of the City of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. Clothianidin and thiamethoxam were the most frequently detected NIs, found in 68 and 75% of honey samples at mean concentrations of 8.2 and 17.2 ng g(-1) wet mass, (wm), respectively. Clothianidin was also found in >50% of samples of bees and pollen. Concentrations of clothianidin in bees exceed the LD50 in 2 of 28 samples, while for other NIs concentrations were typically 10-100-fold less than the oral LD50. Imidaclorpid was detected in ∼30% of samples of honey, but only 5% of pollen and concentrations were

  13. Impact of Water Management on Efficacy of Insecticide Seed Treatments Against Rice Water Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Mississippi Rice.

    PubMed

    Adams, A; Gore, J; Musser, F; Cook, D; Catchot, A; Walker, T; Awuni, G A

    2015-06-01

    Two experiments were conducted at the Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville, MS, during 2011 and 2012 to determine the impact of water management practices on the efficacy of insecticidal seed treatments targeting rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel. Larval densities and yield were compared for plots treated with labeled rates of thiamethoxam, chlorantraniliprole, and clothianidin and an untreated control. In the first experiment, plots were subjected to flood initiated at 6 and 8 wk after planting. Seed treatments significantly reduced larval densities with the 8-wk flood timing, but not the 6-wk flood timing. Overall, the treated plots yielded higher than the control plots. In the second experiment, the impact of multiple flushes on the efficacy of insecticidal seed treatments was evaluated. Plots were subjected to zero, one, or two flushes with water. All seed treatments reduced larval densities compared with the untreated control. Significantly fewer larvae were observed in plots that received one or two flushes compared with plots that did not receive a flush. All seed treatments resulted in higher yields compared to the untreated control in the zero and one flush treatments. When two flushes were applied, yield from the thiamethoxam and clothianidin treated plots was not significantly different from those of the control plots, while the chlorantraniliprole treated plots yielded significantly higher than the control. These data suggest that time from planting to flood did not impact the efficacy of seed treatments, but multiple flushes reduced the efficacy of thiamethoxam and clothianidin. PMID:26470232

  14. No effect of low-level chronic neonicotinoid exposure on bumblebee learning and fecundity.

    PubMed

    Piiroinen, Saija; Botías, Cristina; Nicholls, Elizabeth; Goulson, Dave

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, many pollinators have declined in abundance and diversity worldwide, presenting a potential threat to agricultural productivity, biodiversity and the functioning of natural ecosystems. One of the most debated factors proposed to be contributing to pollinator declines is exposure to pesticides, particularly neonicotinoids, a widely used class of systemic insecticide. Also, newly emerging parasites and diseases, thought to be spread via contact with managed honeybees, may pose threats to other pollinators such as bumblebees. Compared to honeybees, bumblebees could be particularly vulnerable to the effects of stressors due to their smaller and more short-lived colonies. Here, we studied the effect of field-realistic, chronic clothianidin exposure and inoculation with the parasite Nosema ceranae on survival, fecundity, sugar water collection and learning using queenless Bombus terrestris audax microcolonies in the laboratory. Chronic exposure to 1 ppb clothianidin had no significant effects on the traits studied. Interestingly, pesticide exposure in combination with additional stress caused by harnessing bees for Proboscis Extension Response (PER) learning assays, led to an increase in mortality. In contrast to previous findings, the bees did not become infected by N. ceranae after experimental inoculation with the parasite spores, suggesting variability in host resistance or parasite virulence. However, this treatment induced a slight, short-term reduction in sugar water collection, potentially through stimulation of the immune system of the bees. Our results suggest that chronic exposure to 1 ppb clothianidin does not have adverse effects on bumblebee fecundity or learning ability. PMID:27014515

  15. No effect of low-level chronic neonicotinoid exposure on bumblebee learning and fecundity

    PubMed Central

    Botías, Cristina; Nicholls, Elizabeth; Goulson, Dave

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, many pollinators have declined in abundance and diversity worldwide, presenting a potential threat to agricultural productivity, biodiversity and the functioning of natural ecosystems. One of the most debated factors proposed to be contributing to pollinator declines is exposure to pesticides, particularly neonicotinoids, a widely used class of systemic insecticide. Also, newly emerging parasites and diseases, thought to be spread via contact with managed honeybees, may pose threats to other pollinators such as bumblebees. Compared to honeybees, bumblebees could be particularly vulnerable to the effects of stressors due to their smaller and more short-lived colonies. Here, we studied the effect of field-realistic, chronic clothianidin exposure and inoculation with the parasite Nosema ceranae on survival, fecundity, sugar water collection and learning using queenless Bombus terrestris audax microcolonies in the laboratory. Chronic exposure to 1 ppb clothianidin had no significant effects on the traits studied. Interestingly, pesticide exposure in combination with additional stress caused by harnessing bees for Proboscis Extension Response (PER) learning assays, led to an increase in mortality. In contrast to previous findings, the bees did not become infected by N. ceranae after experimental inoculation with the parasite spores, suggesting variability in host resistance or parasite virulence. However, this treatment induced a slight, short-term reduction in sugar water collection, potentially through stimulation of the immune system of the bees. Our results suggest that chronic exposure to 1 ppb clothianidin does not have adverse effects on bumblebee fecundity or learning ability. PMID:27014515

  16. Impact of Water Management on Efficacy of Insecticide Seed Treatments Against Rice Water Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Mississippi Rice

    PubMed Central

    Adams, A.; Gore, J.; Musser, F.; Cook, D.; Catchot, A.; Walker, T.; Awuni, G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted at the Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville, MS, during 2011 and 2012 to determine the impact of water management practices on the efficacy of insecticidal seed treatments targeting rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel. Larval densities and yield were compared for plots treated with labeled rates of thiamethoxam, chlorantraniliprole, and clothianidin and an untreated control. In the first experiment, plots were subjected to flood initiated at 6 and 8 wk after planting. Seed treatments significantly reduced larval densities with the 8-wk flood timing, but not the 6-wk flood timing. Overall, the treated plots yielded higher than the control plots. In the second experiment, the impact of multiple flushes on the efficacy of insecticidal seed treatments was evaluated. Plots were subjected to zero, one, or two flushes with water. All seed treatments reduced larval densities compared with the untreated control. Significantly fewer larvae were observed in plots that received one or two flushes compared with plots that did not receive a flush. All seed treatments resulted in higher yields compared to the untreated control in the zero and one flush treatments. When two flushes were applied, yield from the thiamethoxam and clothianidin treated plots was not significantly different from those of the control plots, while the chlorantraniliprole treated plots yielded significantly higher than the control. These data suggest that time from planting to flood did not impact the efficacy of seed treatments, but multiple flushes reduced the efficacy of thiamethoxam and clothianidin. PMID:26470232

  17. Effect of household and industrial processing on the levels of pesticide residues and degradation products in melons.

    PubMed

    Bonnechère, A; Hanot, V; Bragard, C; Bedoret, T; van Loco, J

    2012-01-01

    Two varieties of melons (Cucumis melo) were treated with two fungicides (carbendazim and maneb) and four insecticides (acetamiprid, cyromazin, imazalil and thiamethoxam) to quantify the effect of household processing on the pesticide residues. To ensure sufficiently high levels of residues in flesh and peel, the most concentrated formulations were applied observing good agricultural practice. The peeling step decreased the concentration of pesticide residues for maneb, imazalil and acetamiprid by more than 90%. Cyromazin, carbendazim and thiamethoxam were reduced by approximately 50%. The reduction of the pesticides could not be fully explained by the systemic character of the pesticides. However, the agricultural practices (time of application), solubility and mode of action (systemic versus contact pesticide) of the pesticides could be used to explain the difference in processing factors for the studied pesticides. Degradation products (melamine and ethylenethiourea) were also investigated in this study, but were not detected. PMID:22489844

  18. Investigation of pesticide residues in vegetables and fruits grown in various regions of Hatay, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sungur, Sana; Tunur, Cetin

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 175 pesticide residues in various vegetable and fruit samples grown in different regions of Hatay, Turkey, were investigated. Residue analyses were performed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with the QuEChERS method. In tomato, plum and apricot samples, pesticide residues were below the limits of detection. In other samples, at least one pesticide residue was detected. Twelve pesticides (acetamiprid, carbendazim, chlorpyrifos, fenarimol, fludioxonil, hexythiazox, imidacloprid, metalaxyl, pyridaben, pyriproxyfen, thiabendozole, triadimenol) were found at levels between 0.003 and 0.759 mg kg(-1). Only in cucumber samples, acetamiprid residues were found at levels greater than the maximum acceptable limit in Turkish Food Codex and European Union maximum residue limits (EU MRLs). In other samples, the detected residue amounts are less than the MRLs declared in the Turkish Food Codex and EU MRLs. PMID:24786407

  19. Potential new insecticides for the control of western flower thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on sweet pepper, tomato, and lettuce.

    PubMed

    Broughton, S; Herron, G A

    2009-04-01

    New pesticides are required to maintain effective resistance management strategies for control of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). We tested the efficacy of acetamiprid, and thiamethoxam, two neonicotinoids that represent a newer class of insecticides for the control of thrips. We also tested chlorfenapyr, a pyrrol compound, and a lower than registered rate of the biopesticide spinosad. Laboratory bioassays were used to predict the relative efficacy of insecticides against F. occidentalis and to forecast likely field rates. Two doses within the calculated LC99.99 range were used to predict field rates and trial rates of 0.5 g and 1.0 active ingredient (AI)/liter acetamiprid, 0.025 and 0.05 g (AI)/liter chlorfenapyr, 0.3 and 0.6 g (AI)/liter thiamethoxam, and 0.01 g (AI)/ liter spinosad were tested in the greenhouse against pepper, lettuce, and tomato. With the exception of acetamiprid, field trial doses predicted from laboratory bioassay translated to effective field efficacy. All products controlled F. occidentalis at the rates trialed and so have potential to augment current chemical controls. Increasing mortality correlated with increasing acetamiprid concentration in a greenhouse lettuce trial, suggesting that the higher trial rate (1.0 g [AI]/liter) may be required in some lettuce crops. The lower than registered (0.01 g [AI]/liter) rate of spinosad also significantly reduced F. occidentalis numbers and is a viable control option that may be useful in specific integrated pest management programs. The implications of introducing neonicotinoids into existing insecticide resistance management strategies for F. occidentalis are discussed. PMID:19449645

  20. Comparative Toxicities and Synergism of Apple Orchard Pesticides to Apis mellifera (L.) and Osmia cornifrons (Radoszkowski)

    PubMed Central

    Biddinger, David J.; Robertson, Jacqueline L.; Mullin, Chris; Frazier, James; Ashcraft, Sara A.; Rajotte, Edwin G.; Joshi, Neelendra K.; Vaughn, Mace

    2013-01-01

    The topical toxicities of five commercial grade pesticides commonly sprayed in apple orchards were estimated on adult worker honey bees, Apis mellifera (L.) (Hymenoptera: Apidae) and Japanese orchard bees, Osmia cornifrons (Radoszkowski) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae). The pesticides were acetamiprid (Assail 30SG), λ-cyhalothrin (Warrior II), dimethoate (Dimethoate 4EC), phosmet (Imidan 70W), and imidacloprid (Provado 1.6F). At least 5 doses of each chemical, diluted in distilled water, were applied to freshly-eclosed adult bees. Mortality was assessed after 48 hr. Dose-mortality regressions were analyzed by probit analysis to test the hypotheses of parallelism and equality by likelihood ratio tests. For A. mellifera, the decreasing order of toxicity at LD50 was imidacloprid, λ-cyhalothrin, dimethoate, phosmet, and acetamiprid. For O. cornifrons, the decreasing order of toxicity at LD50 was dimethoate, λ-cyhalothrin, imidacloprid, acetamiprid, and phosmet. Interaction of imidacloprid or acetamiprid with the fungicide fenbuconazole (Indar 2F) was also tested in a 1∶1 proportion for each species. Estimates of response parameters for each mixture component applied to each species were compared with dose-response data for each mixture in statistical tests of the hypothesis of independent joint action. For each mixture, the interaction of fenbuconazole (a material non-toxic to both species) was significant and positive along the entire line for the pesticide. Our results clearly show that responses of A. mellifera cannot be extrapolated to responses of O.cornifrons, and that synergism of neonicotinoid insecticides and fungicides occurs using formulated product in mixtures as they are commonly applied in apple orchards. PMID:24039783

  1. [Research on Identification and Determination of Pesticides in Apples Using Raman Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Chen; Peng, Yan-kun; Li, Yong-yu; Dhakal, Sagar; Xu, Tian-feng; Guo, Lang-hua

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy combined with chemometric methods has been thought to an efficient method for identification and determination of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables. In the present research, a rapid and nondestructive method was proposed and testified based on self-developed Raman system for the identification and determination of deltamethrin and acetamiprid remaining in apple. The peaks of Raman spectra at 574 and 843 cm(-1) can be used to identify deltamethrin and acetamiprid, respectively, the characteristic peaks of deltamethrin and acetamiprid were still visible when the concentrations of the two pesticides were 0.78 and 0.15 mg · kg(-1) in apples samples, respectively. Calibration models of pesticide content were developed by partial least square (PLS) algorithm with different spectra pretreatment methods (Savitzky-Golay smoothing, first derivative transformation, second derivative transformation, baseline calibration, standard normal variable transformation). The baseline calibration methods by 8th order polynomial fitting gave the best results. For deltamethrin, the obtained prediction coefficient (Rp) value from PLS model for the results of prediction and gas chromatography measurement was 0.94; and the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) was 0.55 mg · kg(-1). The values of Rp and RMSEP were respective 0.85 and 0.12 mg · kg(-1) for acetamiprid. According to the detect performance, applying Raman technology in the nondestructive determination of pesticide residuals in apples is feasible. In consideration of that it needs no pretreatment before spectra collection and causes no damage to sample, this technology can be used in detection department, fruit and vegetable processing enterprises, supermarket, and vegetable market. The result of this research is promising for development of industrially feasible technology for rapid, nondestructive and real time detection of different types of pesticide with its concentration in apples. This

  2. Comparative toxicities and synergism of apple orchard pesticides to Apis mellifera (L.) and Osmia cornifrons (Radoszkowski).

    PubMed

    Biddinger, David J; Robertson, Jacqueline L; Mullin, Chris; Frazier, James; Ashcraft, Sara A; Rajotte, Edwin G; Joshi, Neelendra K; Vaughn, Mace

    2013-01-01

    The topical toxicities of five commercial grade pesticides commonly sprayed in apple orchards were estimated on adult worker honey bees, Apis mellifera (L.) (Hymenoptera: Apidae) and Japanese orchard bees, Osmia cornifrons (Radoszkowski) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae). The pesticides were acetamiprid (Assail 30SG), λ-cyhalothrin (Warrior II), dimethoate (Dimethoate 4EC), phosmet (Imidan 70W), and imidacloprid (Provado 1.6F). At least 5 doses of each chemical, diluted in distilled water, were applied to freshly-eclosed adult bees. Mortality was assessed after 48 hr. Dose-mortality regressions were analyzed by probit analysis to test the hypotheses of parallelism and equality by likelihood ratio tests. For A. mellifera, the decreasing order of toxicity at LD₅₀ was imidacloprid, λ-cyhalothrin, dimethoate, phosmet, and acetamiprid. For O. cornifrons, the decreasing order of toxicity at LD₅₀ was dimethoate, λ-cyhalothrin, imidacloprid, acetamiprid, and phosmet. Interaction of imidacloprid or acetamiprid with the fungicide fenbuconazole (Indar 2F) was also tested in a 1∶1 proportion for each species. Estimates of response parameters for each mixture component applied to each species were compared with dose-response data for each mixture in statistical tests of the hypothesis of independent joint action. For each mixture, the interaction of fenbuconazole (a material non-toxic to both species) was significant and positive along the entire line for the pesticide. Our results clearly show that responses of A. mellifera cannot be extrapolated to responses of O.cornifrons, and that synergism of neonicotinoid insecticides and fungicides occurs using formulated product in mixtures as they are commonly applied in apple orchards. PMID:24039783

  3. Unique biochemical and molecular biological mechanism of synergistic actions of formamidine compounds on selected pyrethroid and neonicotinoid insecticides on the fourth instar larvae of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed Ahmed Ibrahim; Vogel, Christoph F A; Matsumura, Fumio

    2015-05-01

    We recently reported that formamidine pesticides such as amitraz and chlordimeform effectively synergize toxic actions of certain pyrethroid and neonicotinoid insecticides in some insect species on the 4th instar larvae of Aedes aegypti. Here we studied the biochemical basis of the synergistic actions of the formamidines in amplifying the toxicity of neonicotinoids and pyrethroids such as dinotefuran and thiamethoxam, as well as deltamethrin-fenvalerate type of pyrethroids. We tested the hypothesis that their synergistic actions are mediated by the octopamine receptor, and that the major consequence of octopamine receptor activation is induction of trehalase to increase glucose levels in the hemolymph. The results show that formamidines cause a significant up-regulation of the octopamine receptor and trehalase mRNA expressions. Furthermore, formamidines significantly elevate levels of free glucose when co-treated with dinotefuran, deltamethrin and fenvalerate, but not with permethrin or fenitrothion, which showed no synergistic toxic effects with formamidines. These results support the conclusion that the main mode of synergism is based on the ability to activate the octopamine receptor, which is particularly effective with insecticides causing hyperexcitation-induced glucose release and consequently leading to quick energy exhaustion. PMID:25987221

  4. Evaluation of pesticide toxicity at their field recommended doses to honeybees, Apis cerana and A. mellifera through laboratory, semi-field and field studies.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Johnson; Sah, Khushboo; Jain, S K; Bhatt, J C; Sushil, S N

    2015-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to determine the acute toxicity of pesticides in the laboratory, toxicity through spray on flowering plants of mustard (Tier II evaluation) and field on both Apis cerana and A. mellifera bees. The overall mortality of honey bees through topical (direct contact) were found significantly higher than that of indirect filter paper contamination assays. Insecticides viz., chlorpyriphos, dichlorvos, malathion, profenofos, monocrotophos and deltamethrin when exposed directly or indirectly at their field recommended doses caused very high mortality up to 100% to both the bees at 48 HAT. The insecticides that caused less mortality through filter paper contamination viz., flubendiamide, methyl demeton, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam caused very high morality through direct exposure. Apart from all the fungicides tested, carbendazim, mancozeb, chlorothalonil and propiconazole, insecticides acetamiprid and endosulfan were found safer to both the bees either by direct or indirect exposures. Tier II evaluation by spray of pesticides at their field recommended doses on potted mustard plants showed monocrotophos as the highly toxic insecticide with 100% mortality even with 1h of exposure followed by thiamethoxam, dichlorvos, profenofos and chlorpyriphos which are not to be recommended for use in pollinator attractive flowering plants. Acetamiprid and endosulfan did not cause any repellent effect on honey bees in the field trials endorse the usage of acetamiprid against sucking pest in flowering plants. PMID:25150969

  5. Comparison of the variability in the levels of pesticide residue observed in Japanese cabbage and grape units.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masahiro; Yajima, Tomonari; Iijima, Kazuaki; Sato, Kiyoshi

    2012-02-15

    To estimate variations in pesticide residue levels in crops, the variability factors (VFs, the 97.5th percentile of the residue levels in the sample divided by the average residue levels in the lot) in residue levels of acetamiprid and cypermethrin applied to cabbage and grapes were investigated, respectively. The VFs in the residue levels of both pesticides in cabbage (2.00 and 2.39, respectively) were clearly higher than those in grapes (1.82 and 1.63, respectively). Although the residue levels of both pesticides in grapes showed a normal distribution, those values in cabbage were slightly skewed at lower residue levels. Individual residue levels in grapes had a good agreement between acetamiprid and cypermethrin. In contrast, the distribution of cypermethrin residue levels in cabbage was slightly skewed at higher residue levels as compared to that of acetamiprid. These results indicate that the difference in the relative distribution of the two pesticides between cabbage and grapes might be due to the influence of various factors such as differences in crop species, plant cultivation methods, and physicochemical properties of the pesticides. PMID:22263932

  6. Aptamer-controlled reversible inhibition of gold nanozyme activity for pesticide sensing.

    PubMed

    Weerathunge, Pabudi; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Shukla, Ravi; Sharma, Tarun Kumar; Bansal, Vipul

    2014-12-16

    This study addresses the need for rapid pesticide (acetamiprid) detection by reporting a new colorimetric biosensing assay. Our approach combines the inherent peroxidase-like nanozyme activity of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with high affinity and specificity of an acetamiprid-specific S-18 aptamer to detect this neurotoxic pesticide in a highly rapid, specific, and sensitive manner. It is shown that the nanozyme activity of GNPs can be inhibited by its surface passivation with target-specific aptamer molecules. Similar to an enzymatic competitive inhibition process, in the presence of a cognate target, these aptamer molecules leave the GNP surface in a target concentration-dependent manner, reactivating GNP nanozyme activity. This reversible inhibition of the GNP nanozyme activity can either be directly visualized in the form of color change of the peroxidase reaction product or can be quantified using UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy. This approach allowed detection of 0.1 ppm acetamiprid within an assay time of 10 min. This reversible nanozyme activation/inhibition strategy may in principle be universally applicable for the detection of a range of environmental or biomedical molecules of interest. PMID:25340286

  7. Insecticide Resistance in Eggs and First Instars of the Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Brittany E.; Miller, Dini M.

    2015-01-01

    Two strains of the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius L., eggs and first instars collected from pyrethroid-resistant adults were evaluated for insecticide resistance and compared to a susceptible strain. Dose-response bioassays were conducted using two insecticide formulations (Temprid: imidacloprid/β-cyfluthrin, and Transport: acetamiprid/bifenthrin). The lethal concentration (LC50) for the two resistant egg strains exposed to imidacloprid/β-cyfluthrin ranged from 3 to 5-fold higher than susceptible strain eggs. Resistant strain eggs dipped into formulations of acetamiprid/bifenthrin had LC50 values which were significantly greater (39 to 1,080-fold) than susceptible strain eggs. Similar to eggs, resistant strain first instars exposed to residual applications of imidacloprid/β-cyfluthrin had LC50 values ranging from 121 to 493-fold greater than susceptible strain first instars. When resistant strain first instars were treated with acetamiprid/bifenthrin, they had LC50 values that were 99 to >1,900-fold greater than susceptible strain first instars. To determine differences between egg and first instar resistance, stage resistance ratios (SRR) were compared between the two stages. There was little difference between the egg and first instar stages, indicated by small SRR values ranging from 1.1 to 10.0. This study suggests that insecticide resistance is expressed early during bed bug development. PMID:26463070

  8. Insecticide Resistance in Eggs and First Instars of the Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae).

    PubMed

    Campbell, Brittany E; Miller, Dini M

    2015-01-01

    Two strains of the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius L., eggs and first instars collected from pyrethroid-resistant adults were evaluated for insecticide resistance and compared to a susceptible strain. Dose-response bioassays were conducted using two insecticide formulations (Temprid: imidacloprid/β-cyfluthrin, and Transport: acetamiprid/ bifenthrin). The lethal concentration (LC50) for the two resistant egg strains exposed to imidacloprid/β-cyfluthrin ranged from 3 to 5-fold higher than susceptible strain eggs. Resistant strain eggs dipped into formulations of acetamiprid/bifenthrin had LC50 values which were significantly greater (39 to 1,080-fold) than susceptible strain eggs. Similar to eggs, resistant strain first instars exposed to residual applications of imidacloprid/β-cyfluthrin had LC50 values ranging from 121 to 493-fold greater than susceptible strain first instars. When resistant strain first instars were treated with acetamiprid/bifenthrin, they had LC50 values that were 99 to >1,900-fold greater than susceptible strain first instars. To determine differences between egg and first instar resistance, stage resistance ratios (SRR) were compared between the two stages. There was little difference between the egg and first instar stages, indicated by small SRR values ranging from 1.1 to 10.0. This study suggests that insecticide resistance is expressed early during bed bug development. PMID:26463070

  9. Impact of currently used or potentially useful insecticides for canola agroecosystems on Bombus impatiens (Hymenoptera: Apidae), Megachile rotundata (Hymentoptera: Megachilidae), and Osmia lignaria (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae).

    PubMed

    Scott-Dupree, C D; Conroy, L; Harris, C R

    2009-02-01

    Pest management practices may be contributing to a decline in wild bee populations in or near canola (Brassica napus L.) agroecosystems. The objective of this study was to investigate the direct contact toxicity of five technical grade insecticides--imidacloprid, clothianidin, deltamethrin, spinosad, and novaluron--currently used, or with potential for use in canola integrated pest management on bees that may forage in canola: common eastern bumble bees [Bombus impatiens (Cresson); hereafter bumble bees], alfalfa leafcutting bees [Megachile rotundata (F.)], and Osmia lignaria Cresson. Clothianidin and to a lesser extent imidacloprid were highly toxic to all three species, deltamethrin and spinosad were intermediate in toxicity, and novaluron was nontoxic. Bumble bees were generally more tolerant to the direct contact applications > O. lignaria > leafcutting bees. However, differences in relative toxicities between the three species were not consistent, e.g., whereas clothianidin was only 4.9 and 1.3x more toxic, deltamethrin was 53 and 68x more toxic to leafcutting bees than to bumble bees and O. lignaria, respectively. Laboratory assessment of direct contact toxicity, although useful, is only one measure of potential impact, and mortality under field conditions may differ greatly depending on management practices. Research conducted using only honey bees as the indicator species may not adequately reflect the risk posed by insecticides to wild bees because of their unique biology and differential susceptibility. Research programs focused on determining nontarget impact on pollinators should be expanded to include not only the honey bee but also wild bee species representative of the agricultural system under investigation. PMID:19253634

  10. Assessing insecticide hazard to bumble bees foraging on flowering weeds in treated lawns.

    PubMed

    Larson, Jonathan L; Redmond, Carl T; Potter, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining bee-friendly habitats in cities and suburbs can help conserve the vital pollination services of declining bee populations. Despite label precautions not to apply them to blooming plants, neonicotinoids and other residual systemic insecticides may be applied for preventive control of lawn insect pests when spring-flowering weeds are present. Dietary exposure to neonicotinoids adversely affects bees, but the extent of hazard from field usage is controversial. We exposed colonies of the bumble bee Bombus impatiens to turf with blooming white clover that had been treated with clothianidin, a neonicotinoid, or with chlorantraniliprole, the first anthranilic diamide labeled for use on lawns. The sprays were applied at label rate and lightly irrigated. After residues had dried, colonies were confined to forage for six days, and then moved to a non-treated rural site to openly forage and develop. Colonies exposed to clothianidin-treated weedy turf had delayed weight gain and produced no new queens whereas those exposed to chlorantraniliprole-treated plots developed normally compared with controls. Neither bumble bees nor honey bees avoided foraging on treated white clover in open plots. Nectar from clover blooms directly contaminated by spray residues contained 171±44 ppb clothianidin. Notably, neither insecticide adversely impacted bee colonies confined on the treated turf after it had been mown to remove clover blooms present at the time of treatment, and new blooms had formed. Our results validate EPA label precautionary statements not to apply neonicotinoids to blooming nectar-producing plants if bees may visit the treatment area. Whatever systemic hazard through lawn weeds they may pose appears transitory, however, and direct hazard can be mitigated by adhering to label precautions, or if blooms inadvertently are contaminated, by mowing to remove them. Chlorantraniliprole usage on lawns appears non-hazardous to bumble bees. PMID:23776667

  11. A site-specific ecological risk assessment for corn-associated insecticides.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Sara A; Lydy, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    A site-specific ecological risk assessment (ERA) was conducted to examine the simultaneous use of genetically modified corn (Bt corn) with a neonicotinoid seed coating, clothianidin, and use of a granular insecticide, tefluthrin, to protect crops from pest damage. A field study was conducted on site, and exposure data from the literature were summarized to determine the matrices and exposure concentrations that nontarget species could typically experience within an agricultural ecosystem. To determine ecological effects on nontarget species, acute toxicity bioassays were conducted on earthworms (Eisenia fetida), amphipods (Hyalella azteca), and Elmid riffle beetle larvae (Ancyronyx spp.) in which the test species were exposed to single insecticides as well as the mixture of the 3 insecticides. In the risk characterization section of the ERA, stressor-response profiles for each species tested were compared with field distributions of the insecticides, and a margin of safety at the 10th percentile (MOS10) was calculated to estimate risk. No acute toxicity was observed in any of the 3 nontarget species after exposure to senescent Bt corn leaf tissue. Large MOS10 values were calculated for clothianidin to the nontarget species. When bioassays were compared with tefluthrin field distributions, very low MOS10 values were calculated for earthworms (0.06) and H. azteca (0.08) because the environmental concentrations often exceeded the stressor-response profile. No increased toxicity was observed when nontarget species were exposed to a mixture of the 3 insecticides. In summary, the genetically modified corn insecticidal proteins and clothianidin were not found at environmental concentrations exceeding benchmark values for ecological effects, but tefluthrin was consistently detected in the environment at levels that could be causing toxicity to nontarget species, especially if this pyrethroid is able to travel off site. PMID:25557061

  12. Assessing Insecticide Hazard to Bumble Bees Foraging on Flowering Weeds in Treated Lawns

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Jonathan L.; Redmond, Carl T.; Potter, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining bee-friendly habitats in cities and suburbs can help conserve the vital pollination services of declining bee populations. Despite label precautions not to apply them to blooming plants, neonicotinoids and other residual systemic insecticides may be applied for preventive control of lawn insect pests when spring-flowering weeds are present. Dietary exposure to neonicotinoids adversely affects bees, but the extent of hazard from field usage is controversial. We exposed colonies of the bumble bee Bombus impatiens to turf with blooming white clover that had been treated with clothianidin, a neonicotinoid, or with chlorantraniliprole, the first anthranilic diamide labeled for use on lawns. The sprays were applied at label rate and lightly irrigated. After residues had dried, colonies were confined to forage for six days, and then moved to a non-treated rural site to openly forage and develop. Colonies exposed to clothianidin-treated weedy turf had delayed weight gain and produced no new queens whereas those exposed to chlorantraniliprole-treated plots developed normally compared with controls. Neither bumble bees nor honey bees avoided foraging on treated white clover in open plots. Nectar from clover blooms directly contaminated by spray residues contained 171±44 ppb clothianidin. Notably, neither insecticide adversely impacted bee colonies confined on the treated turf after it had been mown to remove clover blooms present at the time of treatment, and new blooms had formed. Our results validate EPA label precautionary statements not to apply neonicotinoids to blooming nectar-producing plants if bees may visit the treatment area. Whatever systemic hazard through lawn weeds they may pose appears transitory, however, and direct hazard can be mitigated by adhering to label precautions, or if blooms inadvertently are contaminated, by mowing to remove them. Chlorantraniliprole usage on lawns appears non-hazardous to bumble bees. PMID:23776667

  13. [New drugs for small animals in 2014].

    PubMed

    Emmerich, I U

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, six active pharmaceutical ingredients were released on the German market for small animals. Those are the ektoparasiticide of the isoxazoline group afoxolaner (NexGard®) and fluralaner (Bravecto®) and the neonicotinoid dinotefuran (Vectra 3D, Vectra Felis), the antidiabetic protamine zinc insulin of human origin (ProZinc®), the antifungal agent ketoconazole (Fugazid®) as well as the cytostatic drug oclacitinib (Apoquel®). Two substances were authorized for an additional species. The antiparasiticide eprinomectin and the antibiotic clindamycin were also authorized for use in cats. In addition, two active pharmaceutical ingredients, which were approved 2014 for use in human medicine and are of potential interest to veterinary medicine, are discussed. These are the antihypertensive drug riociguat and the urological substance mirabegron. PMID:26013709

  14. Monitoring changes in Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) susceptibility to neonicotinoid insecticides in Arizona and California.

    PubMed

    Castle, S J; Prabhaker, N

    2013-06-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B is a highly prolific and polyphagous whitefly that established in much of North America during the 1980s. Neonicotinoid insecticides have been fundamental in regaining control over outbreak populations of B. tabaci, but resistance threatens their sustainability. Susceptibility of B. tabaci in the southwestern United States to four neonicotinoid insecticides varied considerably across populations within each year over a 3 yr period. Using a variability ratio of highest LC50 to lowest LC50 in field-collected whitefly adults from Arizona and California, the ranges of LC50(s) across all tests within compounds were highest to imidacloprid and lowest to thiamethoxam. Patterns of susceptibility were similar among all four neonicotinoid insecticides, but the greater variability in responses to imidacloprid and significantly higher LC50(s) attained indicated higher resistance levels to imidacloprid in all field populations. Further evidence of differential toxicities of neonicotinoids was observed in multiple tests of dinotefuran against imidacloprid-resistant lab strains that yielded significant differences in the LC50(s) of dinotefuran and imidacloprid in simultaneous bioassays. To test the possibility that resistance expression in field-collected insects was sometimes masked by stressful conditions, field strains cultured in a greenhouse without insecticide exposure produced significantly higher LC50(s) to all neonicotinoids compared with LC50(s) attained directly from the field. In harsh climates such as the American southwest, resistance expression in field-collected test insects may be strongly influenced by environmental stresses such as high temperatures, overcrowding, and declining host plant quality. PMID:23865208

  15. Effectiveness of a Reduced-Risk Insecticide Based Bed Bug Management Program in Low-Income Housing.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narinderpal; Wang, Changlu; Cooper, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) infestations are becoming increasingly common in low-income communities. Once they are introduced, elimination is very difficult. As part of the efforts to develop effective and safe bed bug management programs, we conducted a laboratory study evaluating the efficacy of a reduced-risk insecticide-Alpine aerosol (0.5% dinotefuran). We then conducted a field evaluation of a reduced-risk insecticide based integrated pest management (IPM) program in low-income family apartments with young children. In laboratory evaluations, direct spray and 5 min exposure to dry Alpine aerosol residue caused 100.0 ± 0.0 and 91.7 ± 8.3% mortality to bed bug nymphs, respectively. Direct Alpine aerosol spray killed 91.3 ± 4.3% of the eggs. The IPM program included education, steam, bagging infested linens, placing intercepting devices under furniture legs and corners of rooms, applying Alpine aerosol and Alpine dust (0.25% dinotefuran, 95% diatomaceous earth dust), and regularly scheduled monitoring and re-treatment. Nine apartments ranging from 1-1,428 (median: 29) bed bugs based on visual inspection and Climbup interceptor counts were included. Over a 6-month period, an average 172 g insecticide (Alpine aerosol + Alpine dust) was used in each apartment, a 96% reduction in pesticide usage compared to chemical only treatment reported in a similar environment. The IPM program resulted in an average of 96.8 ± 2.2% reduction in the number of bed bugs. However, elimination of bed bugs was only achieved in three lightly infested apartments (<30 bed bugs at the beginning). Elimination success was closely correlated with the level of bed bug populations. PMID:26462533

  16. Toxicity assessment of four insecticides with different modes of action on pupae and adults of Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a relevant predator of the Neotropical Region.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Marilina Noelia; Schneider, Marcela Inés; Rimoldi, Federico; Ladux, Lorena Sabrina; Desneux, Nicolas; Ronco, Alicia Estela

    2016-08-01

    Pesticides can be toxic to nontarget organisms including the natural enemies of agricultural pests, thus reducing the biodiversity of agroecosystems. The lethal and sublethal effects of four insecticides with different modes of action-pyriproxyfen, teflubenzuron, acetamiprid, and cypermethrin-were evaluated on pupae and adults of Eriopis connexa, an effective predator in horticultural crops. Pupal survival was reduced by pyriproxyfen (26 %) and cypermethrin (41 %). Malformations in adults emerged from treated pupae were observed after acetamiprid (82.7 and 100 % for 100 and 200 mg a.i./l, respectively), pyriproxyfen (48.6 %), and cypermethrin (13.3 %) treatments. A longer mean oviposition time was also observed in adults emerged from pupae treated with cypermethrin. Moreover, the latter insecticide as well as teflubenzuron did not reduce reproductive parameters, whereas females emerged from pyriproxyfen-treated pupae were not be able to lay eggs even when females showed large abdomens. Upon exposure of adults, survival was reduced to approximately 90 % by acetamiprid, but no reduction occurred with pyriproxyfen, teflubenzuron, or cypermethrin though the fecundity at fifth oviposition time of the female survivors was reduced. Pyriproxyfen decreased the hatching at all the oviposition times tested, whereas fertility was reduced in the fourth and fifth ovipositions by teflubenzuron and in the first and third ovipositions by cypermethrin. In conclusion, all four insecticides tested exhibited lethal or sublethal effects, or both, on E. connexa. The neurotoxic insecticides were more harmful than the insect-growth regulators, and pupae were more susceptible than adults. The toxicity of insecticides on the conservation of predators in agroecosystems of the Neotropical Region is discussed. PMID:27074926

  17. [Validation of ELISA Kits for Pesticide Residue Analysis in Vegetables and Fruits].

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Tomomi; Inoue, Tomomi; Hirakawa, Yuki; Miyake, Shiro; Ueno, Eiji; Saito, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Five kinds of commercially available ELISA kits (acetamiprid, azoxystrobin, chlorothalonil, fenitrothion and imidacloprid) were validated for determination of pesticide residues in vegetables and fruits. The reaction characteristics were also examined to evaluate their influence on the determinations. The trueness value was 91-162%, the repeatability was 2.1-16.2%, and the reproducibility was 4.0-20.3%. The desired values were achieved for 18 among 30 combinations (60%) of the ELISA kits and the agricultural products examined. A standard curve was necessary for each of the ELISA examinations. The matrix of the agricultural products and pipetting skill of the lab technician both influenced the measurment results. PMID:26699271

  18. Chronic exposure to neonicotinoids increases neuronal vulnerability to mitochondrial dysfunction in the bumblebee (Bombus terrestris).

    PubMed

    Moffat, Christopher; Pacheco, Joao Goncalves; Sharp, Sheila; Samson, Andrew J; Bollan, Karen A; Huang, Jeffrey; Buckland, Stephen T; Connolly, Christopher N

    2015-05-01

    The global decline in the abundance and diversity of insect pollinators could result from habitat loss, disease, and pesticide exposure. The contribution of the neonicotinoid insecticides (e.g., clothianidin and imidacloprid) to this decline is controversial, and key to understanding their risk is whether the astonishingly low levels found in the nectar and pollen of plants is sufficient to deliver neuroactive levels to their site of action: the bee brain. Here we show that bumblebees (Bombus terrestris audax) fed field levels [10 nM, 2.1 ppb (w/w)] of neonicotinoid accumulate between 4 and 10 nM in their brains within 3 days. Acute (minutes) exposure of cultured neurons to 10 nM clothianidin, but not imidacloprid, causes a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent rapid mitochondrial depolarization. However, a chronic (2 days) exposure to 1 nM imidacloprid leads to a receptor-dependent increased sensitivity to a normally innocuous level of acetylcholine, which now also causes rapid mitochondrial depolarization in neurons. Finally, colonies exposed to this level of imidacloprid show deficits in colony growth and nest condition compared with untreated colonies. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the poor navigation and foraging observed in neonicotinoid treated bumblebee colonies. PMID:25634958

  19. Thiamethoxam Seed Treatments Have No Impact on Pest Numbers or Yield in Cultivated Sunflowers.

    PubMed

    Bredeson, Michael M; Lundgren, Jonathan G

    2015-12-01

    The use of neonicotinoid seed treatments is a nearly ubiquitous practice in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) pest management. Sunflowers have a speciose pest complex, but also harbor a diverse and abundant community of beneficial, nontarget organisms which may be negatively affected by pest management practices. Here, we investigate how the foliar and subterranean arthropod pest communities in sunflower fields were affected by a thiamethoxam seed treatment over three site years (two years on one farm, and another year at an additional field in the second year). Thiamethoxam and its metabolite clothianidin in leaf tissue were quantified throughout the growing season, and yield differences between treatments were measured. Across site years, foliar herbivores and key pests of sunflowers were unaffected by the seed treatment. Likewise, subterranean herbivores were unaffected. Thiamethoxam was measurable in leaf tissue through the R1 plant stage, while its metabolite clothianidin was detected throughout flowering (R6). No difference in sunflower yield was observed between treatments across site years. This research suggests that neonicotinoid seed treatments in sunflowers do not always provide economic benefits to farmers in the form of pest reductions or yield improvements. Future research should focus on sunflower integrated pest management strategies that limit nontarget effects of agrochemicals, while providing greater economic returns to farmers. PMID:26340223

  20. Chronic exposure to neonicotinoids increases neuronal vulnerability to mitochondrial dysfunction in the bumblebee (Bombus terrestris)

    PubMed Central

    Moffat, Christopher; Pacheco, Joao Goncalves; Sharp, Sheila; Samson, Andrew J.; Bollan, Karen A.; Huang, Jeffrey; Buckland, Stephen T.; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    The global decline in the abundance and diversity of insect pollinators could result from habitat loss, disease, and pesticide exposure. The contribution of the neonicotinoid insecticides (e.g., clothianidin and imidacloprid) to this decline is controversial, and key to understanding their risk is whether the astonishingly low levels found in the nectar and pollen of plants is sufficient to deliver neuroactive levels to their site of action: the bee brain. Here we show that bumblebees (Bombus terrestris audax) fed field levels [10 nM, 2.1 ppb (w/w)] of neonicotinoid accumulate between 4 and 10 nM in their brains within 3 days. Acute (minutes) exposure of cultured neurons to 10 nM clothianidin, but not imidacloprid, causes a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent rapid mitochondrial depolarization. However, a chronic (2 days) exposure to 1 nM imidacloprid leads to a receptor-dependent increased sensitivity to a normally innocuous level of acetylcholine, which now also causes rapid mitochondrial depolarization in neurons. Finally, colonies exposed to this level of imidacloprid show deficits in colony growth and nest condition compared with untreated colonies. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the poor navigation and foraging observed in neonicotinoid treated bumblebee colonies.—Moffat, C., Pacheco, J. G., Sharp, S., Samson, A. J., Bollan, K. A., Huang, J., Buckland, S. T., Connolly, C. N. Chronic exposure to neonicotinoids increases neuronal vulnerability to mitochondrial dysfunction in the bumblebee (Bombus terrestris). PMID:25634958

  1. Fipronil application on rice paddy fields reduces densities of common skimmer and scarlet skimmer

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Atsushi; Hayashi, Takehiko I.; Ohnishi, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Kazutaka; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Goka, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Several reports suggested that rice seedling nursery-box application of some systemic insecticides (neonicotinoids and fipronil) is the cause of the decline in dragonfly species noted since the 1990s in Japan. We conducted paddy mesocosm experiments to investigate the effect of the systemic insecticides clothianidin, fipronil and chlorantraniliprole on rice paddy field biological communities. Concentrations of all insecticides in the paddy water were reduced to the limit of detection within 3 months after application. However, residuals of these insecticides in the paddy soil were detected throughout the experimental period. Plankton species were affected by clothianidin and chlorantraniliprole right after the applications, but they recovered after the concentrations decreased. On the other hand, the effects of fipronil treatment, especially on Odonata, were larger than those of any other treatment. The number of adult dragonflies completing eclosion was severely decreased in the fipronil treatment. These results suggest that the accumulation of these insecticides in paddy soil reduces biodiversity by eliminating dragonfly nymphs, which occupy a high trophic level in paddy fields. PMID:26979488

  2. Fipronil application on rice paddy fields reduces densities of common skimmer and scarlet skimmer.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Atsushi; Hayashi, Takehiko I; Ohnishi, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Kazutaka; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Goka, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Several reports suggested that rice seedling nursery-box application of some systemic insecticides (neonicotinoids and fipronil) is the cause of the decline in dragonfly species noted since the 1990s in Japan. We conducted paddy mesocosm experiments to investigate the effect of the systemic insecticides clothianidin, fipronil and chlorantraniliprole on rice paddy field biological communities. Concentrations of all insecticides in the paddy water were reduced to the limit of detection within 3 months after application. However, residuals of these insecticides in the paddy soil were detected throughout the experimental period. Plankton species were affected by clothianidin and chlorantraniliprole right after the applications, but they recovered after the concentrations decreased. On the other hand, the effects of fipronil treatment, especially on Odonata, were larger than those of any other treatment. The number of adult dragonflies completing eclosion was severely decreased in the fipronil treatment. These results suggest that the accumulation of these insecticides in paddy soil reduces biodiversity by eliminating dragonfly nymphs, which occupy a high trophic level in paddy fields. PMID:26979488

  3. Reproductive parameters of Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae) affected by neonicotinoid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Barati, Reihaneh; Hejazi, Mir Jalil

    2015-08-01

    Two-spotted spider mite is a major pest of many agricultural and ornamental crops worldwide. Some reports have indicated that application of neonicotinoid insecticides may lead to increased fecundity of this pest. If this is found to be true, the use of these pesticides may cause an outbreak of spider mite populations. Sublethal effects of three neonicotinoids, namely thiacloprid, acetamiprid and thiamethoxam were studied on T. urticae adults at field recommended doses. The experiments were carried out using bean leaf pieces in plastic Petri dishes. The adult mites were treated using two methods: (1) drench application and (2) spraying of leaves with Potter Spray Tower. Our results indicated that all neonicotinoids tested increased T. urticae population. In both treatment methods, acetamiprid treated mites had the highest intrinsic rate of population increase (rm) and finite rate of population increase (λ); and the lowest mean generation time (T) and doubling time among the treatments. If similar results are obtained from greenhouse and field trials, the use of these insecticides requires necessary precautions such as avoiding repeated use of neonicotinoid insecticide for controlling insect pests. PMID:25912952

  4. Slowing the Spread of Grapevine Leafroll-Associated Viruses in Commercial Vineyards With Insecticide Control of the Vector, Pseudococcus maritimus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae)

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, M. F.; Martinson, T.; Hesler, S.; Loeb, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Vineyards were surveyed for grapevine leafroll-associated viruses and their insect vectors in New York State’s Finger Lakes region in 2006–2008. Grape mealybug, Pseudococcus maritimus (Erhorn) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), European Fruit Lecanium, Parthenolecanium corni (Bouche), and Cottony Maple Scale, Pulvinaria acericola (Walsh and Riley) (Hemiptera: Coccidae) were identified as vector species in this region. An increase in the incidence of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 1 (GLRaV-1) and GLRaV-3 was observed in 8 of the 20 vineyards surveyed, which implies transmission by these insect vectors. Two of the vineyards for which a temporal increase in disease incidence was documented were then used to evaluate the efficacy of foliar applications of horticultural oil and two classes of insecticides for control of P. maritimus and for slowing virus spread over 2 years of vine protection. Delayed dormant applications of horticultural oil contributed to control of early season crawlers; however, this was not the case for control of summer populations. Applications of acetamiprid and spirotetramat achieved control in summer populations; however, spirotetramat outperformed acetamiprid in percent reduction of treated compared with control vines and in a side-by-side trial. Vines treated with spirotetramat had a lower percentage of new vines testing positive for GLRaV-1 than control vines after 2 years, while no other spray program altered the increase in incidence of GLRaV-1 or -3. PMID:26223949

  5. Effects of Orchard Pesticides on Galendromus occidentalis (Acari: Phytoseiidae): Repellency and Irritancy.

    PubMed

    Beers, Elizabeth H; Schmidt-Jeffris, Rebecca A

    2015-02-01

    The effects of repellency or irritancy in Galendromus occidentalis (Nesbitt) were studied for three rates of 16 pesticides commonly used in apple production. Adult female mites were exposed to residues in a series of choice bioassays (treated and untreated half of bean leaf disks). Novaluron, carbaryl, mancozeb+copper hydroxide, and sulfur were the most repellent materials to G. occidentalis, with females consistently avoiding the treated side of the leaf disk. Spirotetramat, flubendiamide, and cyantriniliprole caused an intermediate or inconsistent degree of repellency; azinphosmethyl, lambda-cyhalothrin, acetamiprid, thiacloprid, imidacloprid, spinetoram, spinosad, and chlorantriniliprole caused little to no repellency. Irritancy (running off of the disk, as opposed to resting on the untreated half) was the most pronounced in the acetamiprid and lambda-cyhalothrin treatments. Acute toxicity (within the 6 h test period) was highest in the lambda-cyhalothrin and spinetoram treatments; in the former case, the mortality at all rates tested was substantial enough to interfere with the measurement of behavioral effects. Although irritancy may be considered the more extreme form of repellency, there were several pesticides (carbaryl, cyantraniliprole, mancozeb+copper hydroxide, novaluron) where a moderate to high degree of repellency did not correspond to a high degree of irritancy. Similarly, repellency was not consistently related to acute toxicity; one of the most repellent materials (novaluron) was not acutely toxic. Behavioral effects may help explain instances where lethal or sublethal bioassays do not fully predict the effects of pesticides seen in orchard use. PMID:26470128

  6. Post-exposure temperature influence on the toxicity of conventional and new chemistry insecticides to green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae)

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Muhammad Mudassir; Afzal, Muhammad; Raza, Abu Bakar M.; Akram, Zeeshan; Waqar, Adil; Afzal, Muhammad Babar Shahzad

    2014-01-01

    Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) is an important biological control agent currently being used in many integrated pest management (IPM) programs to control insect pests. The effect of post-treatment temperature on insecticide toxicity of a spinosyn (spinosad), pyrethroid (lambda cyhalothrin), organophosphate (chlorpyrifos) and new chemistry (acetamiprid) to C. carnea larvae was investigated under laboratory conditions. Temperature coefficients of each insecticide tested were evaluated. From 20 to 40 °C, toxicity of lambda cyhalothrin and spinosad decreased by 2.15- and 1.87-fold while toxicity of acetamiprid and chlorpyrifos increased by 2.00 and 1.79-fold, respectively. The study demonstrates that pesticide effectiveness may vary according to environmental conditions. In cropping systems where multiple insecticide products are used, attention should be given to temperature variation as a key factor in making pest management strategies safer for biological control agents. Insecticides with a negative temperature coefficient may play a constructive role to conserve C. carnea populations. PMID:25972753

  7. Resistance Management for San Jose Scale (Hemiptera: Diaspididae).

    PubMed

    Buzzetti, K; Chorbadjian, R A; Nauen, R

    2015-12-01

    The San Jose scale Diaspidiotus perniciosus Comstock is one of the most important pests of deciduous fruit trees. The major cause of recent outbreaks in apple orchards is thought to be the development of insecticide resistance, specifically organophosphates. The first report was given in North America, and now, in Chile. In the present study, San Jose scale populations collected from two central regions of Chile were checked for their susceptibility to different mode of action insecticides in order to establish alternatives to manage this pest. No evidence of cross resistance between organophosphates insecticides and acetamiprid, buprofezin, pyriproxyfen, spirotetramat, sulfoxaflor, or thiacloprid was found. Baselines of LC50-LC95 for different life stages of San Jose scale are given, as reference to future studies of resistance monitoring. The systemic activity of acetamiprid, spirotetramat, and thiacloprid was higher than the contact residue effect of these compounds. For sulfoxaflor, both values were similar. Program treatments including one or more of these compounds are compared in efficacy and impact on resistance ratio values. In order to preserve new insecticides as an important tool to control San Jose scale, resistance management programs should be implemented, considering insecticide mode of action classes alternated or mixed. PMID:26470382

  8. Slowing the Spread of Grapevine Leafroll-Associated Viruses in Commercial Vineyards With Insecticide Control of the Vector, Pseudococcus maritimus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    PubMed

    Wallingford, A K; Fuchs, M F; Martinson, T; Hesler, S; Loeb, G M

    2015-01-01

    Vineyards were surveyed for grapevine leafroll-associated viruses and their insect vectors in New York State's Finger Lakes region in 2006-2008. Grape mealybug, Pseudococcus maritimus (Erhorn) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), European Fruit Lecanium, Parthenolecanium corni (Bouche), and Cottony Maple Scale, Pulvinaria acericola (Walsh and Riley) (Hemiptera: Coccidae) were identified as vector species in this region. An increase in the incidence of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 1 (GLRaV-1) and GLRaV-3 was observed in 8 of the 20 vineyards surveyed, which implies transmission by these insect vectors. Two of the vineyards for which a temporal increase in disease incidence was documented were then used to evaluate the efficacy of foliar applications of horticultural oil and two classes of insecticides for control of P. maritimus and for slowing virus spread over 2 years of vine protection. Delayed dormant applications of horticultural oil contributed to control of early season crawlers; however, this was not the case for control of summer populations. Applications of acetamiprid and spirotetramat achieved control in summer populations; however, spirotetramat outperformed acetamiprid in percent reduction of treated compared with control vines and in a side-by-side trial. Vines treated with spirotetramat had a lower percentage of new vines testing positive for GLRaV-1 than control vines after 2 years, while no other spray program altered the increase in incidence of GLRaV-1 or -3. PMID:26223949

  9. Post-exposure temperature influence on the toxicity of conventional and new chemistry insecticides to green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Muhammad Mudassir; Afzal, Muhammad; Raza, Abu Bakar M; Akram, Zeeshan; Waqar, Adil; Afzal, Muhammad Babar Shahzad

    2015-05-01

    Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) is an important biological control agent currently being used in many integrated pest management (IPM) programs to control insect pests. The effect of post-treatment temperature on insecticide toxicity of a spinosyn (spinosad), pyrethroid (lambda cyhalothrin), organophosphate (chlorpyrifos) and new chemistry (acetamiprid) to C. carnea larvae was investigated under laboratory conditions. Temperature coefficients of each insecticide tested were evaluated. From 20 to 40 °C, toxicity of lambda cyhalothrin and spinosad decreased by 2.15- and 1.87-fold while toxicity of acetamiprid and chlorpyrifos increased by 2.00 and 1.79-fold, respectively. The study demonstrates that pesticide effectiveness may vary according to environmental conditions. In cropping systems where multiple insecticide products are used, attention should be given to temperature variation as a key factor in making pest management strategies safer for biological control agents. Insecticides with a negative temperature coefficient may play a constructive role to conserve C. carnea populations. PMID:25972753

  10. Impact of insecticide exposure on the predation activity of the European earwig Forficula auricularia.

    PubMed

    Malagnoux, Laure; Capowiez, Yvan; Rault, Magali

    2015-09-01

    The European earwig Forficula auricularia is an effective predator in apple orchards. It is therefore crucial to study whether insecticides affect this natural pest control agent. Predation activity, i.e., the number of aphids eaten in 24 h, was determined under laboratory conditions after exposure of fourth-instar nymphs and adult earwigs to widely used insecticides (acetamiprid, chlorpyrifos-ethyl, deltamethrin, and spinosad), which were applied at the normal application rates. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and carboxylesterase activities were also measured as indicators of pesticide exposure. Predation activity decreased significantly in nymphs exposed to spinosad (62%) and chlorpyrifos-ethyl (98%) compared with controls. A similar response was found for both esterase activities. Spinosad had a stronger effect on AChE (-33%) whereas chlorpyrifos-ethyl affected CbE activity preferentially (-59%). Spinosad (20% of controls), acetamiprid (28%), and chlorpyrifos-ethyl (66%) also significantly decreased the predation behavior of adult male but not female (5 to 40%) earwigs. Adult AChE and CbE activities were also significantly reduced (28 to 67% of controls) in pesticide-exposed earwigs. Our results suggest that earwigs should be included in the environmental risk assessment framework for authorization of newly marketed plant protection products. Their predation behavior appears to be a sensitive and complementary biomarker. PMID:25963069

  11. Insecticide Toxicity to Adelphocoris lineolatus (Hemiptera: Miridae) and its Nymphal Parasitoid Peristenus spretus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Liu, Bing; Ali, Abid; Luo, Shu-Ping; Lu, Yan-Hui; Liang, Ge-Mei

    2015-08-01

    In China, Adelphocoris lineolatus (Goeze) (Hemiptera: Miridae) is an important pest of alfalfa, cotton, and other crops, while Peristenus spretus (Chen & van Achterberg) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is the dominant nymphal parasitoid of this mirid bug. In the present study, the toxicity of 17 common insecticides to A. lineolatus was evaluated, and the susceptibility of P. spretus to the insecticides with high toxicity to A. lineolatus was tested under laboratory conditions. Of the 17 insecticides tested, 12 (beta cypermethrin, deltamethrin, carbosulfan, acetamiprid, emamectin benzoate, imidacloprid, phoxim, chlorpyrifos, acephate, profenophos, hexaflumuron, and abamectin) had a highly toxic effect on second-instar nymphs of A. lineolatus, with LC(50) values ranging from 0.58 to 14.85 mg a.i. (active ingredient) liter(-1). Adults of P. spretus were most sensitive to chlorpyrifos, with LC(50) values of 0.03 mg a.i. liter(-1), followed by phoxim, acetamiprid, profenophos, carbosulfan, acephate, deltamethrin, emamectin benzoate, imidacloprid, beta-cypermethrin, and abamectin, with LC(50) values ranging from 0.06 to 3.09, whereas hexaflumuron exhibited the least toxicity to the parasitoid, with LC(50) values >500 mg a.i. liter(-1). A risk quotient analysis indicated that beta-cypermethrin, emamectin benzoate, abamectin, and hexaflumuron when applied against A. lineolatus were the least toxic to P. spretus. PMID:26470319

  12. Comparison of Insecticide Susceptibilities of Empoasca vitis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) from Three Main Tea-Growing Regions in China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qi; Yu, Hua-Yang; Niu, Chun-Dong; Yao, Rong; Wu, Shun-Fan; Chen, Zhuo; Gao, Cong-Fen

    2015-06-01

    Empoasca vitis (Göthe) is an important insect pest in tea-growing areas of China, and chemical control is the main tactic for the management of this pest. Due to the pressure of increasing insecticide resistance and more stringent food safety regulations, development of sound IPM strategies for E. vitis is an urgent matter. This study comparatively evaluated four field populations of E. vitis from three different tea-growing regions in China for their susceptibilities to eight insecticides using a simple leaf-dip methodology. E. vitis was found to be most sensitive to indoxacarb (LC50<0.5 mg/liter) and least sensitive to isoprocarb (LC50>5 mg/liter) and sophocarpidine (LC50>95 mg/liter, a botanical pesticide) regardless of populations. Population (geographical) variations were higher for indoxacarb and imidacloprid than other compounds. Judging by the 95% fiducial limits of LC50 values, all populations had similar susceptibilities to chlorfenapyr, bifenthrin, and acetamiprid or imidacloprid. Correlation analysis suggested that chlorfenapyr and indoxacarb or isoprocarb may have a high risk of cross resistance. Considering potency (LC50) and maximum residual levels, chlorfenapyr and bifenthrin are good insecticide options followed by acetamiprid and indoxacarb. These results provide valuable information to intelligently select insecticides for IPM programs that are efficacious against E. vitis while also managing insecticide resistance and maximum residual levels for tea production in China. PMID:26470253

  13. Silver nanoparticles anchored on nitrogen-doped graphene as a novel electrochemical biosensing platform with enhanced sensitivity for aptamer-based pesticide assay.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ding; Du, Xiaojiao; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Lei; Dai, Liming; Qian, Jing; Wang, Kun

    2015-09-21

    Silver nanoparticles (NPs) decorated nitrogen doped graphene (NG) nanocomposites were prepared through a one-step thermal-treatment route using arginine as the nitrogen source. By integrating the excellent electrical properties and large surface area of Ag NPs and NG, the obtained Ag/NG nanocomposites show more effective electron transfer and high loading capacity than Ag-graphene and pure NG. In the presence of a target, the stronger interaction between the aptamer and the target promotes the formation of a target-aptamer complex on the electrode surface which blocks the electron transfer. Based on this sensing mechanism, a novel and highly sensitive biosensing platform by the use of Ag/NG as enhancing materials is demonstrated for detection of the model target, acetamiprid. The presented aptasensor exhibited a wide linear response for acetamiprid in the range of 1 × 10(-13) M to 5 × 10(-9) M with a low detection limit of 3.3 × 10(-14) M (S/N = 3). Moreover, this electrochemical aptasensor avoided complicated labeling procedures and showed magnificent sensitivity, high selectivity and low cost, which made it not only convenient but also time-saving and applicable. Furthermore, the proposed design may offer a promising way to develop a new electrochemical aptasensor for sensitive and specific detection of a wide spectrum of analytes in food, medical and environmental fields. PMID:26252168

  14. Determination of nicotinyl pesticide residues in vegetables by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with quantum dot indirect laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Hua; Sun, Juan; Dai, Yong-Jia; Dong, Min

    2012-07-01

    A new assay was developed by use of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with indirect LIF fluorescence for the determination of thiamethoxam, acetamiprid, and imidacloprid residues in vegetables, in which the cadmium telluride quantum dots (QDs) synthesized in aqueous phase were used as fluorescent background substance and their excitation and emission wavelengths matched with LIF detector by engineering their size. The factors that affected the peak height and the resolution were optimized. The running buffer was composed of 4.4 μM cadmium telluride QDs as fluorescent background substance, 40 mM borate and 60 mM SDS, and its pH was adjusted to 8.0. The separation voltage was 25 kV. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits were 0.05, 0.01, and 0.009 mg/kg; the linear dynamic ranges were 0.5-30, 0.1-30, and 0.1-30 mg/L; and the average recoveries of spiked samples were 72.0-101.2, 74.0-106.7, and 77.8-105.1% for thiamethoxam, acetamiprid, and imidacloprid, respectively. The assay can meet the requirement of maximum residue limits to these three pesticides in the regulations of European Union and Japan, and has been applied for determining their residues in vegetables. PMID:22821497

  15. Enrichment of neonicotinoid insecticides from lemon juice sample with magnetic three-dimensional graphene as the adsorbent followed by determination with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Feng, Tao; Wang, Chun; Wu, Qiuhua; Wang, Zhi

    2014-06-01

    A novel 3D-graphene (3D-G) magnetic nanomaterial was prepared and used as an adsorbent for the extraction of four neonicotinoid insecticides (acetamiprid, imidacloprid, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam) from lemon juice sample. Then, HPLC with UV detection was applied for the determination of the neonicotinoid insecticides desorbed from the 3D-G magnetic nanomaterial. The main experimental parameters that affect the extraction efficiencies such as the amount of 3D-G magnetic nanomaterial, sample solution pH, extraction time, salting-out effect, and desorption conditions were studied and optimized. As a result, the linear concentration range of the method was from 0.3 to 100.0 ng/mL for thiacloprid, from 0.5 to 100.0 ng/mL for imidacloprid and acetamiprid, and from 1.0 to 100.0 ng/mL for thiamethoxam, with correlation coefficients of 0.9965-0.9985, respectively. The LODs of the method based on an S/N of 3 were between 0.08 and 0.2 ng/mL. The enrichment factors obtained were between 67 and 427, and the RSDs (n = 6) were in the range from 4.6 to 7.1%, and the recoveries of the method fell in the range of 88.75 to 111.60%. PMID:24634391

  16. Neonicotinoid insecticide residues in surface water and soil associated with commercial maize (corn) fields in southwestern Ontario.

    PubMed

    Schaafsma, Arthur; Limay-Rios, Victor; Baute, Tracey; Smith, Jocelyn; Xue, Yingen

    2015-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides have come under scrutiny for their potential unintended effects on non-target organisms, particularly pollinators in agro-ecosystems. As part of a larger study of neonicotinoid residues associated with maize (corn) production, 76 water samples within or around the perimeter of 18 commercial maize fields and neighbouring apiaries were collected in 5 maize-producing counties of southwestern Ontario. Residues of clothianidin (mean = 2.28, max. = 43.60 ng/mL) and thiamethoxam (mean = 1.12, max. = 16.50 ng/mL) were detected in 100 and 98.7% of the water samples tested, respectively. The concentration of total neonicotinoid residues in water within maize fields increased six-fold during the first five weeks after planting, and returned to pre-plant levels seven weeks after planting. However, concentrations in water sampled from outside the fields were similar throughout the sampling period. Soil samples from the top 5 cm of the soil profile were also collected in these fields before and immediately following planting. The mean total neonicotinoid residue was 4.02 (range 0.07 to 20.30) ng/g, for samples taken before planting, and 9.94 (range 0.53 to 38.98) ng/g, for those taken immediately after planting. Two soil samples collected from within an conservation area contained detectable (0.03 and 0.11 ng/g) concentrations of clothianidin. Of three drifted snow samples taken, the drift stratum containing the most wind-scoured soil had 0.16 and 0.20 ng/mL mainly clothianidin in the melted snow. The concentration was at the limit of detection (0.02 ng/mL) taken across the entire vertical profile. With the exception of one sample, water samples tested had concentrations below those reported to have acute, chronic or sublethal effects to honey bees. Our results suggest that neonicotinoids may move off-target by wind erosion of contaminated soil. These results are informative to risk assessment models for other non-target species in maize agro

  17. Neonicotinoid Insecticide Residues in Surface Water and Soil Associated with Commercial Maize (Corn) Fields in Southwestern Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Schaafsma, Arthur; Limay-Rios, Victor; Baute, Tracey; Smith, Jocelyn; Xue, Yingen

    2015-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides have come under scrutiny for their potential unintended effects on non-target organisms, particularly pollinators in agro-ecosystems. As part of a larger study of neonicotinoid residues associated with maize (corn) production, 76 water samples within or around the perimeter of 18 commercial maize fields and neighbouring apiaries were collected in 5 maize-producing counties of southwestern Ontario. Residues of clothianidin (mean = 2.28, max. = 43.60 ng/mL) and thiamethoxam (mean = 1.12, max. = 16.50 ng/mL) were detected in 100 and 98.7% of the water samples tested, respectively. The concentration of total neonicotinoid residues in water within maize fields increased six-fold during the first five weeks after planting, and returned to pre-plant levels seven weeks after planting. However, concentrations in water sampled from outside the fields were similar throughout the sampling period. Soil samples from the top 5 cm of the soil profile were also collected in these fields before and immediately following planting. The mean total neonicotinoid residue was 4.02 (range 0.07 to 20.30) ng/g, for samples taken before planting, and 9.94 (range 0.53 to 38.98) ng/g, for those taken immediately after planting. Two soil samples collected from within an conservation area contained detectable (0.03 and 0.11 ng/g) concentrations of clothianidin. Of three drifted snow samples taken, the drift stratum containing the most wind-scoured soil had 0.16 and 0.20 ng/mL mainly clothianidin in the melted snow. The concentration was at the limit of detection (0.02 ng/mL) taken across the entire vertical profile. With the exception of one sample, water samples tested had concentrations below those reported to have acute, chronic or sublethal effects to honey bees. Our results suggest that neonicotinoids may move off-target by wind erosion of contaminated soil. These results are informative to risk assessment models for other non-target species in maize agro

  18. Honey Bees' Behavior Is Impaired by Chronic Exposure to the Neonicotinoid Thiacloprid in the Field.

    PubMed

    Tison, Léa; Hahn, Marie-Luise; Holtz, Sophie; Rößner, Alexander; Greggers, Uwe; Bischoff, Gabriela; Menzel, Randolf

    2016-07-01

    The decline of pollinators worldwide is of growing concern and has been related to the use of plant-protecting chemicals. Most studies have focused on three neonicotinoid insecticides (clothianidin, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam) currently subject to a moratorium in the EU. Here, we focus on thiacloprid, a widely used cyano-substituted neonicotinoid thought to be less toxic to honey bees and of which use has increased in the last years. Honey bees (Apis mellifera carnica) were exposed chronically to thiacloprid in the field for several weeks at a sublethal concentration. Foraging behavior, homing success, navigation performance, and social communication were impaired, and thiacloprid residue levels increased both in the foragers and the nest mates over time. The effects observed in the field were not due to a repellent taste of the substance. For the first time, we present the necessary data for the risk evaluation of thiacloprid taken up chronically by honey bees in field conditions. PMID:27268938

  19. Cholinergic pesticides cause mushroom body neuronal inactivation in honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Mary J.; Moffat, Christopher; Saranzewa, Nastja; Harvey, Jenni; Wright, Geraldine A.; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides that target cholinergic neurotransmission are highly effective, but their use has been implicated in insect pollinator population decline. Honeybees are exposed to two widely used classes of cholinergic pesticide: neonicotinoids (nicotinic receptor agonists) and organophosphate miticides (acetylcholinesterase inhibitors). Although sublethal levels of neonicotinoids are known to disrupt honeybee learning and behaviour, the neurophysiological basis of these effects has not been shown. Here, using recordings from mushroom body Kenyon cells in acutely isolated honeybee brain, we show that the neonicotinoids imidacloprid and clothianidin, and the organophosphate miticide coumaphos oxon, cause a depolarization-block of neuronal firing and inhibit nicotinic responses. These effects are observed at concentrations that are encountered by foraging honeybees and within the hive, and are additive with combined application. Our findings demonstrate a neuronal mechanism that may account for the cognitive impairments caused by neonicotinoids, and predict that exposure to multiple pesticides that target cholinergic signalling will cause enhanced toxicity to pollinators. PMID:23535655

  20. Widespread occurrence of neonicotinoid insecticides in streams in a high corn and soybean producing region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, Michelle L.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are of environmental concern, but little is known about their occurrence in surface water. An area of intense corn and soybean production in the Midwestern United States was chosen to study this issue because of the high agricultural use of neonicotinoids via both seed treatments and other forms of application. Water samples were collected from nine stream sites during the 2013 growing season. The results for the 79 water samples documented similar patterns among sites for both frequency of detection and concentration (maximum:median) with clothianidin (75%, 257 ng/L:8.2 ng/L) > thiamethoxam (47%, 185 ng/L: imidacloprid (23%, 42.7 ng/L: <2 ng/L). Neonicotinoids were detected at all nine sites sampled even though the basin areas spanned four orders of magnitude. Temporal patterns in concentrations reveal pulses of neonicotinoids associated with rainfall events during crop planting, suggesting seed treatments as their likely source.

  1. A survey of neonicotinoid use and potential exposure to northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) and scaled quail (Callipepla squamata) in the Rolling Plains of Texas and Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Turaga, Uday; Peper, Steven T; Dunham, Nicholas R; Kumar, Naveen; Kistler, Whitney; Almas, Sadia; Presley, Steven M; Kendall, Ronald J

    2016-06-01

    Northern bobwhite (quail) (Colinus virginianus) and scaled quail (Callipepla squamata) populations have declined dramatically in the Rolling Plains ecoregion of Texas and Oklahoma (USA). There is rising concern about potential toxicity of neonicotinoids to birds. To investigate this concern, the authors examined crops of 81 northern bobwhite and 17 scaled quail to determine the presence or absence of seeds treated with 3 neonicotinoids (clothianidin, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam). No treated seeds were found in the 98 crops examined. Liver samples from all 98 quail were collected and analyzed for neonicotinoid residues. Analysis revealed very low concentrations of neonicotinoids within the quail liver samples. The results suggest there is little to no risk of direct toxicity to quail from neonicotinoids. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1511-1515. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26565740

  2. Sustained-release microsphere formulation containing an agrochemical by polyurethane polymerization during an agitation granulation process.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takatoshi; Tagami, Manabu; Ohtsubo, Toshiro; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2016-07-25

    In this report, a new solventless microencapsulation method by synthesizing polyurethane (PU) from polyol and isocyanate during an agglomeration process in a high-speed mixing apparatus was developed. Clothianidin (CTD), which is a neonicotinoid insecticide and highly effective against a wide variety of insect pests, was used as the model compound. The microencapsulated samples covered with PU (CTD microspheres) had a median diameter of <75μm and sustained-release properties. The CTD microspheres were analyzed by synchrotron X-ray computed tomography measurements. Multiple cores of CTD and other solid excipient were dispersed in PU. Although voids appeared in the CTD microspheres after CTD release, the spherical shape of the microspheres remained stable and no change in its framework was observed. The experimental release data were highly consistent with the Baker-Lonsdale model derived from drug release of spherical monolithic dispersions and consistent with the computed tomography measurements. PMID:27246815

  3. Residues of plant protection products in grey partridge eggs in French cereal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bro, Elisabeth; Devillers, James; Millot, Florian; Decors, Anouk

    2016-05-01

    The contamination of the eggs of farmland birds by currently used plant protection products (PPPs) is poorly documented despite a potential to adversely impact their breeding performance. In this context, 139 eggs of 52 grey partridge Perdix perdix clutches, collected on 12 intensively cultivated farmlands in France in 2010-2011, were analysed. Given the great diversity of PPPs applied on agricultural fields, we used exploratory GC/MS-MS and LC/MS-MS screenings measuring ca. 500 compounds. The limit of quantification was 0.01 mg/kg, a statutory reference. A total of 15 different compounds were detected in 24 clutches. Nine of them have been used by farmers to protect crops against fungi (difenoconazole, tebuconazole, cyproconazole, fenpropidin and prochloraz), insects (lambda-cyhalothrin and thiamethoxam/clothianidin) and weeds (bromoxynil and diflufenican). Some old PPPs were also detected (fipronil(+sulfone), HCH(α,β,δ isomers), diphenylamine, heptachlor(+epoxyde), DDT(Σisomers)), as well as PCBs(153, 180). Concentrations ranged between <0.01 and 0.05 mg/kg but reached 0.067 (thiamethoxam/clothianidin), 0.11 (heptachlor + epoxyde) and 0.34 (fenpropidin) mg/kg in some cases. These results testify an actual exposure of females and/or their eggs to PPPs in operational conditions, as well as to organochlorine pollutants or their residues, banned in France since several years if not several decades, that persistently contaminate the environment.Routes of exposure, probability to detect a contamination in the eggs, and effects on egg/embryo characteristics are discussed with regard to the scientific literature. PMID:26841780

  4. Mowing mitigates bioactivity of neonicotinoid insecticides in nectar of flowering lawn weeds and turfgrass guttation.

    PubMed

    Larson, Jonathan L; Redmond, Carl T; Potter, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Systemic neonicotinoid insecticides are used to control turfgrass insect pests. The authors tested their transference into nectar of flowering lawn weeds or grass guttation droplets, which, if high enough, could be hazardous to bees or other insects that feed on such exudates. The authors applied imidacloprid or clothianidin to turf with white clover, followed by irrigation, and used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to analyze residues in clover blooms that were directly sprayed during application or that formed after the first mowing. Imidacloprid residues in guttation fluid from field-grown creeping bentgrass were assessed similarly. The authors used Orius insidiosus, a small anthrocorid bug that is sensitive to dietary neonicotinoids, as a bioindicator of the exudates' toxicity. Nectar from directly sprayed clover blooms contained 5493 ng/g to 6588 ng/g imidacloprid or 2882 ng/g to 2992 ng/g clothianidin and was acutely toxic to Orius. Residues were 99.4% to 99.8% lower in nectar of blooms formed after mowing, and nontoxic to Orius. Imidacloprid residues in turfgrass guttation averaged 88 ng/g at 1 wk after treatment, causing some intoxication of Orius, but declined to 23 ng/g within 3 wk. Systemic transference of neonicotinoids into white clover nectar and creeping bentgrass guttation appears relatively low and transitory. The hazard to nontarget insects via nectar of flowering weeds in treated lawns can be mitigated by adhering to label precautions and mowing to remove blooms if they are inadvertently sprayed. PMID:25319809

  5. Efficacy of Rice Insecticide Seed Treatments at Selected Nitrogen Rates for Control of the Rice Water Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Everett, Mallory; Lorenz, Gus; Slaton, Nathan; Hardke, Jarrod

    2015-08-01

    Seed-applied insecticides are the standard control method used in the United States to minimize rice water weevil (Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel) injury to rice (Oryza sativa L.) roots, and often results in greater yields than rice that receives no seed-applied insecticide. Yield increases from seed-applied insecticides often occur even when insect pressure is low and should not cause yield loss. The research objective was to evaluate the effect of urea-nitrogen rate and seed-applied insecticide on number of rice water weevil larvae, nitrogen uptake, and rice grain yield. Six trials were conducted at the Pine Tree Research Station (PTRS) and the Rice Research Extension Center (RREC) to examine the response of rice plants receiving different insecticide-seed treatments and urea-nitrogen rate combinations. Insecticide-seed treatments included label rates of clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and a no-insecticide (fungicide only) control, in combination with season-total nitrogen rates of 0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 kg urea-nitrogen/ha. Rice seed that was treated with clothianidin or thiamethoxam generally had equal numbers of rice water weevil larvae, which were significantly fewer compared with rice that received no insecticide with an equivalent urea-nitrogen rate. Nitrogen uptake at panicle differentiation was not affected by insecticide-seed treatments at four of six sites and usually increased positively and linearly as urea-nitrogen rate increased. As urea-nitrogen rate increased, grain yield increased either linearly or nonlinearly. Averaged across urea-nitrogen rates, both insecticide seed treatments had similar yields that were 4 to 7% greater than the grain yields of rice that received no insecticide at four of the five harvested sites. PMID:26470317

  6. RFID Tracking of Sublethal Effects of Two Neonicotinoid Insecticides on the Foraging Behavior of Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Christof W.; Tautz, Jürgen; Grünewald, Bernd; Fuchs, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The development of insecticides requires valid risk assessment procedures to avoid causing harm to beneficial insects and especially to pollinators such as the honeybee Apis mellifera. In addition to testing according to current guidelines designed to detect bee mortality, tests are needed to determine possible sublethal effects interfering with the animal's vitality and behavioral performance. Several methods have been used to detect sublethal effects of different insecticides under laboratory conditions using olfactory conditioning. Furthermore, studies have been conducted on the influence insecticides have on foraging activity and homing ability which require time-consuming visual observation. We tested an experimental design using the radiofrequency identification (RFID) method to monitor the influence of sublethal doses of insecticides on individual honeybee foragers on an automated basis. With electronic readers positioned at the hive entrance and at an artificial food source, we obtained quantifiable data on honeybee foraging behavior. This enabled us to efficiently retrieve detailed information on flight parameters. We compared several groups of bees, fed simultaneously with different dosages of a tested substance. With this experimental approach we monitored the acute effects of sublethal doses of the neonicotinoids imidacloprid (0.15–6 ng/bee) and clothianidin (0.05–2 ng/bee) under field-like circumstances. At field-relevant doses for nectar and pollen no adverse effects were observed for either substance. Both substances led to a significant reduction of foraging activity and to longer foraging flights at doses of ≥0.5 ng/bee (clothianidin) and ≥1.5 ng/bee (imidacloprid) during the first three hours after treatment. This study demonstrates that the RFID-method is an effective way to record short-term alterations in foraging activity after insecticides have been administered once, orally, to individual bees. We contribute further information on

  7. Effects of Direct and Indirect Exposure of Insecticides to Garden Symphylan (Symphyla: Scutigerellidae) in Laboratory Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Shimat V

    2015-12-01

    The garden symphylan, Scutigerella immaculata Newport, is a serious soil pest whose root feeding affects yield and survival of several high valued crops in the California's central coast. Because organophosphate insecticides, widely used for S. immaculata control, are rigorously regulated and little is known about the efficacy of alternate insecticides, laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine insecticide efficacy through repellency and lethality. To determine indirect repellency (noncontact) of insecticides, choice assays were conducted where five S. immaculata were introduced into the arena to choose between insecticide-treated and untreated wells whereas, in direct repellency (contact) assays, three insecticide-treated 1-cm-diameter discs were pasted into the arena and the number of visits, time spent per visitation, and number of long-duration (>10 s) stays of five S. immaculata were quantified. To determine efficacy through direct mortality, number of S. immaculata died after 72 h were determined by introducing 10 S. immaculata to insecticide-treated soil assays. In indirect exposure bioassays, seven (clothianidin, oxamyl, zeta-cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, ethoprop, azadirachtin, and a combination of beta-cyfluthrin and imidacloprid) out of 14 insecticides tested elicited repellency to S. immaculata. Of six insecticides tested in the direct exposure assays, only tolfenpyrad elicited contact repellency. In soil assays, after 72 h of introduction, bifenthrin, oxamyl, clothianidin, zeta-cypermethrin, and tolfenpyrad caused 100, 95, 80, 44, and 44% S. immaculata mortality, respectively, which was significantly greater than distilled water and four other insecticides. The implications of these results on S. immaculata management in the California's central coast are discussed. PMID:26470373

  8. Determination of spirocyclic tetronic/tetramic acid derivatives and neonicotinoid insecticides in fruits and vegetables by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry after dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Belda, Marta; Garrido, Isabel; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hellín, Pilar; Flores, Pilar; Fenoll, José

    2016-07-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was used to preconcentrate three spirocyclic tetronic/tetramic acid derivatives (spirotetramat, spiromesifen and spirodiclofen) and five neonicotinoid (thiamethoxam, chlotianidin, imidacloprid, acetamiprid and thiacloprid) insecticides previously extracted from fruit and vegetable matrices with acetonitrile. The organic enriched phase was evaporated, reconstituted in 25μL acetonitrile and analyzed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry using a triple quadrupole in selected reaction monitoring mode. Enrichment factors in the 15-100 range were obtained. A matrix effect was observed, the detection limits varying between 0.025 and 0.5ngg(-1), depending on the compound and the sample matrix. The developed method was applied to the analysis of 25 samples corresponding to five different fruit and vegetable matrices. Only thiamethoxam was detected in a lemon sample at a concentration close to the quantification limit, and spiromesifen and spirotetramat at concentrations between 11.6 and 54.5ngg(-1). PMID:26920309

  9. The effects analysis of two neonicotinoid insecticides on in vitro maturation of porcine oocytes using hanging drop monoculture method

    PubMed Central

    ISHIKAWA, Sadamasa; HIRAGA, Kou; HIRADATE, Yuuki; TANEMURA, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Acetamiprid (ACE) and imidacroprid (IMI) are known neonicotinoid insecticides with strong affinities for the insect-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. These provide insect control by hyperstimulating insect nerves and are used for agricultural pest management. However, it has also been reported that ACE and IMI affect mammalian reproductive function. We determined the effects of ACE and IMI on the in vitro maturation of porcine oocytes. Significant decreases in nuclear maturation rates were observed in the ACE or IMI-exposed groups. Also, in matured oocytes from the ACE or IMI-exposed groups, irregular chromosomes were observed. Our results suggest that ACE and IMI exposure was detrimental to porcine oocytes and the extent of the effects depends on the concentration of exposure. PMID:25715671

  10. Determination of neonicotinoids in Estonian honey by liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Laaniste, Asko; Leito, Ivo; Rebane, Riin; Lõhmus, Rünno; Lõhmus, Ants; Punga, Fredrik; Kruve, Anneli

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to provide a comprehensive overview of neonicotinoid pesticide residues in honey samples for a single country and compare the results with the import data for neonicotinoid pesticides. The levels of four neonicotinoid pesticides, namely thiamethoxam, imidacloprid, acetamiprid, and thiacloprid, were determined in 294 honey samples harvested from 2005 to 2013 from more than 200 locations in Estonia. For the analyzed honey samples, 27% contained thiacloprid, and its levels in all cases were below the maximum residue level set by the European Union. The other neonicotinoids were not detected. The proportion of thiacloprid-positive samples for different years correlates well with the data on thiacloprid imports into Estonia, indicating that honey contamination with neonicotinoids can be estimated based on the import data. PMID:27050772

  11. The effects analysis of two neonicotinoid insecticides on in vitro maturation of porcine oocytes using hanging drop monoculture method.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Sadamasa; Hiraga, Kou; Hiradate, Yuuki; Tanemura, Kentaro

    2015-06-01

    Acetamiprid (ACE) and imidacroprid (IMI) are known neonicotinoid insecticides with strong affinities for the insect-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. These provide insect control by hyperstimulating insect nerves and are used for agricultural pest management. However, it has also been reported that ACE and IMI affect mammalian reproductive function. We determined the effects of ACE and IMI on the in vitro maturation of porcine oocytes. Significant decreases in nuclear maturation rates were observed in the ACE or IMI-exposed groups. Also, in matured oocytes from the ACE or IMI-exposed groups, irregular chromosomes were observed. Our results suggest that ACE and IMI exposure was detrimental to porcine oocytes and the extent of the effects depends on the concentration of exposure. PMID:25715671

  12. Analysis of 10 systemic pesticide residues in various baby foods using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Angel; Abd El-Aty, A M; Park, Jong-Hyouk; Goudah, Ayman; Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Do, Jung-Ah; Choi, Ok-Ja; Shim, Jae-Han

    2014-06-01

    Ten systemic pesticides, comprising methomyl, thiamethoxam, acetamiprid, carbofuran, fosthiazate, metalaxyl, azoxystrobin, diethofencarb, propiconazole, and difenoconazole, were detected in 13 baby foods (cereals, boiled potatoes, fruit and milk) using QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) for sample preparation and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for analysis. The matrix-matched calibration curves showed good linearity with determination coefficients (R(2) ) >0.992. The limits of detection and quantitation were 0.0015-0.003 and 0.005-0.01 mg/kg, respectively. The mean recoveries of three different concentrations ranged from 69.2 to 127.1% with relative standard deviations <20%. The method was successfully applied to 13 actual samples collected from a local market, and none of the samples were found to contain pesticide residues. This method is suitable for the identification and quantification of systemic pesticides with matrix-matched standards in various baby foods. PMID:24861738

  13. Insecticide residues in head lettuce, cabbage, Chinese cabbage, and broccoli grown in fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Miao-Fan; Chen, Jung-Fang; Syu, Jing-Jing; Pei, Chi; Chien, Hsiu-Pao

    2014-04-23

    The residues of four insecticides belonging to different families were studied on head lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var. capitata L.), cabbage (Brassica oleracea Linn. var. capitata DC.), Chinese cabbage (Brassica pekinensis Skeels), and broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) after pesticide application. To reduce application variability, a tank mix of acetamiprid 20% SP, chlorpyrifos 22.5% EC, deltamethrin 2.4% SC, and methomyl 40% SP was applied at recommended and double doses. Initial deposits of all pesticides on head lettuce were higher than those of the other three crops. The residues of chlorpyrifos and deltamethrin were higher than the maximum residue limits (MRLs) at recommended preharvest intervals (PHIs) on head lettuce and Chinese broccoli treated with higher doses. The residues of methomyl on head lettuce also showed the same phenomenon. PMID:24684565

  14. Generalized net analyte signal standard addition as a novel method for simultaneous determination: application in spectrophotometric determination of some pesticides.

    PubMed

    Asadpour-Zeynali, Karim; Saeb, Elhameh; Vallipour, Javad; Bamorowat, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of three neonicotinoid insecticides (acetamiprid, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam) by a novel method named generalized net analyte signal standard addition method (GNASSAM) in some binary and ternary synthetic mixtures was investigated. For this purpose, standard addition was performed using a single standard solution consisting of a mixture of standards of all analytes. Savings in time and amount of used materials are some of the advantages of this method. All determinations showed appropriate applicability of this method with less than 5% error. This method may be applied for linearly dependent data in the presence of known interferents. The GNASSAM combines the advantages of both the generalized standard addition method and net analyte signal; therefore, it may be a proper alternative for some other multivariate methods. PMID:24672886

  15. Processing factor for a selected group of pesticides in a wine-making process: distribution of pesticides during grape processing.

    PubMed

    Pazzirota, T; Martin, L; Mezcua, M; Ferrer, C; Fernandez-Alba, A R

    2013-01-01

    The processing factors (the pesticide concentration found in the wine/pesticide concentration found in grapes) of acetamiprid, azoxistrobin, carbaril, carbendazime, cyprodinil, dimethoate, dimethormorf, imazalil, imidacloprid, kresoxim methyl, penconazole, procymidone and thiabendazole were determined in a wine-making process. Pesticide analysis was performed using a multi-residue method for the determination of different pesticides both in wine and in grapes by extraction with acetonitrile followed by LC/MS. The pesticide distribution was studied for each step of the process, and the pesticide processing factors were calculated and found to vary among the different pesticides studied. pKow was found to affect a pesticide's processing factor; a linear correlation was obtained for all pesticide processing factors, except for dimethoate, which was the most water soluble. However, no correlation was found between the processing factor and the water solubility of pesticides. PMID:23875669

  16. Monitoring and risk assessment of 74 pesticide residues in Pu-erh tea produced in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongping; Wang, Qinghua; Jiang, Ying; Wang, Chuanpi; Yin, Peng; Liu, Xin; Lu, Chengyin

    2015-01-01

    A number of 100 Pu-erh tea samples from the 2013 harvest in Yunnan Province (China) were analysed for 74 pesticides. A total of 11 pesticides were detected. At least one pesticide was detected in 56% of the samples. None of these samples contained the 74 monitored pesticides at concentrations above the Chinese maximum residual levels. Imidacloprid, bifenthrin and acetamiprid were most frequently found, with percentages of 53%, 46% and 31%, respectively. These were also the top three pesticides with maximum concentrations of 140, 246 and 672 μg kg⁻¹, respectively. Residual levels of the monitored pesticides showed no significant correlation with the production time or area of Pu-erh tea. Whereas a high incidence of pesticide residues was detected in Pu-erh tea, the contamination levels observed do not pose any serious health risks. PMID:25308103

  17. Determination of neonicotinoid pesticide residues in vegetables and fruits with solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Obana, Hirotaka; Okihashi, Masahiro; Akutsu, Kazuhiko; Kitagawa, Yoko; Hori, Shinjiro

    2003-04-23

    A rapid and simple extraction method for the simultaneous analysis of five neonicotinoid insecticides has been developed. Twelve different fruit and vegetable matrixes were extracted with methanol and cleaned up using a graphitized carbon solid phase extraction cartridge loading with a 20% methanol solution. The concentrated eluate after methanol elution was then analyzed for pesticide residues by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry in the APCI positive mode. The five pesticides including nitenpyram, thiamethoxam, imidacloprid, acetamiprid, and thiacloprid were recovered at 70-95% at spike levels of 0.1 and 1 mg/kg in bell pepper, cucumber, eggplant, grape, grapefruit, Japanese radish, peach, pear, potato, rice, and tomato. Relative standard deviations were less than 10% for all of the recovery tests. The proposed method is fast, easy to perform, and could be utilized for regular monitoring of pesticide residues. PMID:12696927

  18. Sucrose Improves Insecticide Activity Against Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    Cowles, Richard S; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Holdcraft, Robert; Loeb, Gregory M; Elsensohn, Johanna E; Hesler, Steven P

    2015-04-01

    The addition of sucrose to insecticides targeting spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), enhanced lethality in laboratory, semifield, and field tests. In the laboratory, 0.1% sucrose added to a spray solution enhanced spotted wing drosophila feeding. Flies died 120 min earlier when exposed to spinosad residues at label rates enhanced with sucrose. Added sucrose reduced the LC50 for dried acetamiprid residues from 82 to 41 ppm in the spray solution. Laboratory bioassays of spotted wing drosophila mortality followed exposure to grape and blueberry foliage and/or fruit sprayed and aged in the field. On grape foliage, the addition of 2.4 g/liter of sugar with insecticide sprays resulted in an 11 and 6% increase of spotted wing drosophila mortality at 1 and 2 d exposures to residues, respectively, averaged over seven insecticides with three concentrations. In a separate experiment, spinetoram and cyantraniliprole reduced by 95-100% the larval infestation of blueberries, relative to the untreated control, 7 d after application at labeled rates when applied with 1.2 g/liter sucrose in a spray mixture, irrespective of rainfall; without sucrose infestation was reduced by 46-91%. Adding sugar to the organically acceptable spinosyn, Entrust, reduced larval infestation of strawberries by >50% relative to without sugar for five of the six sample dates during a season-long field trial. In a small-plot field test with blueberries, weekly applications in alternating sprays of sucrose plus reduced-risk insecticides, spinetoram or acetamiprid, reduced larval infestation relative to the untreated control by 76%; alternating bifenthrin and phosmet (without sucrose) reduced infestation by 65%. PMID:26470175

  19. An Observational Study of Honey Bee Colony Winter Losses and Their Association with Varroa destructor, Neonicotinoids and Other Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    van der Zee, Romée; Gray, Alison; Pisa, Lennard; de Rijk, Theo

    2015-01-01

    This article presents results of an analysis of honey bee losses over the winter of 2011-2012 in the Netherlands, from a sample of 86 colonies, located at 43 apiaries. The apiaries were selected using spatially stratified random sampling. Colony winter loss data were collected and related to various measures of colony strength recorded in summer, as well as data from laboratory analysis of sample material taken from two selected colonies in each of the 43 apiaries. The logistic regression model which best explained the risk of winter loss included, in order of statistical importance, the variables (1) Varroa destructor mite infestation rate in October 2011, (2) presence of the cyano-substituted neonicotinoids acetamiprid or thiacloprid in the first 2 weeks of August 2011 in at least one of the honey bee matrices honey, bees or bee bread (pollen), (3) presence of Brassica napus (oilseed rape) or Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard) pollen in bee bread in early August 2011, and (4) a measure of the unexplained winter losses for the postal code area where the colonies were located, obtained from a different dataset. We consider in the discussion that reduced opportunities for foraging in July and August because of bad weather may have added substantially to the adverse effects of acetamiprid and thiacloprid. A novel feature of this work is its use of postal code random effects from two other independent datasets collected in the annual national monitoring by questionnaires of winter losses of honey bees in the Netherlands. These were used to plan the sample selection and also in the model fitting of the data in this study. It should however be noted that the results of the present pilot study are based on limited data, which may consequently reveal strong factors but fail to demonstrate possible interaction effects. PMID:26154346

  20. Pesticide-mediated displacement of a phytoseiid predator, Neoseiulus womersleyi, by another phytoseiid predator, N. californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mohammad Shaef; Hanawa, Masumi; Gotoh, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    Neoseiulus womersleyi and N. californicus are two predators that are frequently used to control spider mites in fruit-tree orchards. Neoseiulus womersleyi used to be the dominant predator species in Japan, but since the 1990s in central and southwestern Japan, N. californicus populations have been increasing and have displaced populations of N. womersleyi. We previously observed the same phenomenon under laboratory conditions when these species were released at a 1:1 ratio, and attributed the displacement to asymmetrical intraguild predation. However, the ratio in fruit-tree orchards could be different from 1:1. Therefore, we hypothesized that differential susceptibilities to pesticides might accelerate species displacement of N. womersleyi by N. californicus, even if the ratio between these two species was extremely skewed in favor of N. womersleyi and no species displacement occurred otherwise. We examined the effects of 21 pesticides on egg-to-adult and adult survivorship in N. womersleyi and N. californicus. Among these pesticides, two neonicotinoids (acetamiprid and imidacloprid) had much severer effects on N. womersleyi than on N. californicus and thus could possibly account for the species displacement. When the two species were released onto leaf arenas at an N. californicus: N. womersleyi ratio of 1:9 in the absence of insecticide, no displacement was observed. However, just after acetamiprid or imidacloprid application, the proportion of N. californicus increased, causing N. californicus to displace N. womersleyi. Our results indicate that displacement in predator complexes of fruit-tree orchards could be due to different degrees of pesticide susceptibility. PMID:27207574

  1. An Observational Study of Honey Bee Colony Winter Losses and Their Association with Varroa destructor, Neonicotinoids and Other Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Romée; Gray, Alison; Pisa, Lennard; de Rijk, Theo

    2015-01-01

    This article presents results of an analysis of honey bee losses over the winter of 2011-2012 in the Netherlands, from a sample of 86 colonies, located at 43 apiaries. The apiaries were selected using spatially stratified random sampling. Colony winter loss data were collected and related to various measures of colony strength recorded in summer, as well as data from laboratory analysis of sample material taken from two selected colonies in each of the 43 apiaries. The logistic regression model which best explained the risk of winter loss included, in order of statistical importance, the variables (1) Varroa destructor mite infestation rate in October 2011, (2) presence of the cyano-substituted neonicotinoids acetamiprid or thiacloprid in the first 2 weeks of August 2011 in at least one of the honey bee matrices honey, bees or bee bread (pollen), (3) presence of Brassica napus (oilseed rape) or Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard) pollen in bee bread in early August 2011, and (4) a measure of the unexplained winter losses for the postal code area where the colonies were located, obtained from a different dataset. We consider in the discussion that reduced opportunities for foraging in July and August because of bad weather may have added substantially to the adverse effects of acetamiprid and thiacloprid. A novel feature of this work is its use of postal code random effects from two other independent datasets collected in the annual national monitoring by questionnaires of winter losses of honey bees in the Netherlands. These were used to plan the sample selection and also in the model fitting of the data in this study. It should however be noted that the results of the present pilot study are based on limited data, which may consequently reveal strong factors but fail to demonstrate possible interaction effects. PMID:26154346

  2. [Determination of eight pesticide residues in tea by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and its uncertainty evaluation].

    PubMed

    Hu, Beizhen; Cai, Haijiang; Song, Weihua

    2012-09-01

    A method was developed for the determination of eight pesticide residues (fipronil, imidacloprid, acetamiprid, buprofezin, triadimefon, triadimenol, profenofos, pyridaben) in tea by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The sample was extracted by accelerated solvent extraction with acetone-dichloromethane (1:1, v/v) as solvent, and the extract was then cleaned-up with a Carb/NH2 solid phase extraction (SPE) column. The separation was performed on a Hypersil Gold C, column (150 mm x 2. 1 mm, 5 microm) and with the gradient elution of acetonitrile and 0. 1% formic acid. The eight pesticides were determined in the modes of electrospray ionization (ESI) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The analytes were quantified by matrix-matched internal standard method for imidacloprid and acetamiprid, by matrix-matched external standard method for the other pesticides. The calibration curves showed good linearity in 1 - 100 microg/L for fipronil, and in 5 -200 microg/L for the other pesticides. The limits of quantification (LOQs, S/N> 10) were 2 p.g/kg for fipronil and 10 microg/kg for the other pesticides. The average recoveries ranged from 75. 5% to 115.0% with the relative standard deviations of 2.7% - 7.7% at the spiked levels of 2, 5, 50 microg/kg for fipronil and 10, 50, 100 microg/kg for the other pesticides. The uncertainty evaluation for the results was carried out according to JJF 1059-1999 "Evaluation and Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement". Items constituting measurement uncertainty involved standard solution, weighing of sample, sample pre-treatment, and the measurement repeatability of the equipment were evaluated. The results showed that the measurement uncertainty is mainly due to sample pre-treatment, standard curves and measurement repeatability of the equipment. The method developed is suitable for the conformation and quantification of the pesticides in tea. PMID:23285969

  3. Genetic, biochemical, and physiological characterization of spinosad resistance in Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae).

    PubMed

    Sayyed, Ali H; Saeed, Shafqat; Noor-Ul-Ane, M; Crickmore, Neil

    2008-10-01

    Bioassays (at generation G2) with a newly collected field population (designated MN) of Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) from Multan, Pakistan, indicated resistance to spinosad, indoxacarb, deltamethrin, abamectin, and acetamiprid. At G2 the field-derived population was divided into two subpopulations, one was selected (G2 to G11) with spinosad (Spino-SEL), whereas the second was left unselected (UNSEL). A significant reduction in the resistance ratio for each compound was observed in UNSEL at G12, indicating that the observed resistance to each insecticide was unstable. For Spino-SEL, bioassays at G12 found that selection with spinosad gave a resistance ratio of 283 compared with MN at G2. The resistance to indoxacarb and acetamiprid in the Spino-SEL population increased to 13- and 67-fold, respectively, compared with MN at G2. The toxicity of deltamethrin to Spino-SEL was similar to its toxicity to the MN population at G2. This suggests that spinosad selection maintained the otherwise unstable resistance to the compound. In contrast, resistance to abamectin decreased significantly from G2 to G12 in Spino-SEL. Logit regression analysis of F1 reciprocal crosses between Spino-SEL and the susceptible Lab-UK indicated that resistance to spinosad was inherited as an autosomal, incompletely recessive trait. The spinosad resistance allele significantly delays the developmental time, reduced pupal weight, number of eggs laid, and number of eggs hatched compared with Lab-UK. Further analysis suggests Spino-SEL exhibited a significantly lower intrinsic rate of population increase (r(m)) to all other populations tested. PMID:18950049

  4. Insecticide residues in pollen and nectar of a cucurbit crop and their potential exposure to pollinators.

    PubMed

    Dively, Galen P; Kamel, Alaa

    2012-05-01

    Neonicotinoids are systemic insecticides widely used on many pollinated agricultural crops, and increasing evidence indicates that they move to some extent into pollen and nectar. This study measured levels of neonicotinoid residues in pollen and nectar from a pumpkin crop treated with formulated products containing imidacloprid, dinotefuran, and thiamethoxam using different timings and application methods. Environmental conditions have a significant effect on overall residue levels; nectar residues were 73.5-88.8% less than pollen residues, and metabolites accounted for 15.5-27.2% of the total residue amounts. Foliar-applied treatments and chemigated insecticides applied through drip irrigation during flowering resulted in the highest residues of parent insecticide and metabolites, which may reach average levels up to 122 ng/g in pollen and 17.6 ng/g in nectar. The lowest levels of residues were detected in treatment regimens involving applications of insecticides at planting, as either seed dressing, bedding tray drench, or transplant water treatment. PMID:22452667

  5. Insecticidal sugar baits for adult biting midges.

    PubMed

    Snyder, D; Cernicchiaro, N; Allan, S A; Cohnstaedt, L W

    2016-06-01

    The mixing of an insecticide with sugar solution creates an oral toxin or insecticidal sugar bait (ISB) useful for reducing adult insect populations. The ability of ISBs to kill the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis Wirth and Jones (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), a vector of bluetongue virus, epizootic hemorrhagic disease and vesicular stomatitis viruses, was tested. The commercial insecticide formulations (percentage active ingredient) tested included bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, deltamethrin, permethrin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, thiamethoxam and spinosad. Mortality rates were determined for various concentrations of commercial formulations (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 1, 2 and 3%) and observed at 1, 4, 10 and 24 h post-exposure to the ISB. In the first set of assays, laboratory-reared midges were fed sugar ad libitum and then exposed to insecticide-treated sugar solutions to measure mortality. The second assay assessed competitive feeding: midges were provided with a control sugar solution (10% sucrose) in one vial, and a sugar and insecticide solution in another. Pyrethroid treatments resulted in the greatest mortality in the first hour at the lowest concentrations and spinosad consumption resulted in the least mortality. Biting midges were not deterred from feeding on the 1% ISB solutions despite the presence of an insecticide-free alternative source of sugar. PMID:26789534

  6. Residual efficacy of insecticides applied to exterior building material surfaces for control of nuisance infestations of Megacopta cribraria (Hemiptera: Plataspidae).

    PubMed

    Seiter, Nicholas J; Benson, Eric P; Reay-Jones, Francis P F; Greene, Jeremy K; Zungoli, Patricia A

    2013-12-01

    The plataspid Megacopta cribraria (F.), which was recently introduced to the United States, forms nuisance aggregations on the exteriors of homes when it seeks overwintering sites in the fall. Little to no published information is available on the efficacy of insecticides labeled for professional use and exterior applications on homes and other structures against this insect. In a series of three experiments, we evaluated the residual efficacy of nine insecticides incorporating pyrethroid, neonicotinoid, and oxadiazine active ingredients on surfaces composed of five exterior building materials (vinyl soffit, brick, painted and unfinished plywood, and metal) at rates labeled for use in structural perimeter applications. Pyrethroids and pyrethroid-neonicotinoid mixes were broadly effective, resulting in 100% mortality or knockdown within 24 h in most cases. The neonicotinoid dinotefuran performed similarly on metal and vinyl surfaces, but its residual efficacy was reduced on more porous brick and wood surfaces. The oxadiazine indoxacarb acted more slowly than the other materials, but its performance was maintained on porous surfaces. Overwintering adults of M. cribraria were generally susceptible to the broad-spectrum insecticides most commonly used for exterior applications to homes and other structures. PMID:24498747

  7. Honeybees Produce Millimolar Concentrations of Non-Neuronal Acetylcholine for Breeding: Possible Adverse Effects of Neonicotinoids.

    PubMed

    Wessler, Ignaz; Gärtner, Hedwig-Annabel; Michel-Schmidt, Rosmarie; Brochhausen, Christoph; Schmitz, Luise; Anspach, Laura; Grünewald, Bernd; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide use of neonicotinoid pesticides has caused concern on account of their involvement in the decline of bee populations, which are key pollinators in most ecosystems. Here we describe a role of non-neuronal acetylcholine (ACh) for breeding of Apis mellifera carnica and a so far unknown effect of neonicotinoids on non-target insects. Royal jelly or larval food are produced by the hypopharyngeal gland of nursing bees and contain unusually high ACh concentrations (4-8 mM). ACh is extremely well conserved in royal jelly or brood food because of the acidic pH of 4.0. This condition protects ACh from degradation thus ensuring delivery of intact ACh to larvae. Raising the pH to ≥5.5 and applying cholinesterase reduced the content of ACh substantially (by 75-90%) in larval food. When this manipulated brood was tested in artificial larval breeding experiments, the survival rate was higher with food supplemented by 100% with ACh (6 mM) than with food not supplemented with ACh. ACh release from the hypopharyngeal gland and its content in brood food declined by 80%, when honeybee colonies were exposed for 4 weeks to high concentrations of the neonicotinoids clothianidin (100 parts per billion [ppb]) or thiacloprid (8,800 ppb). Under these conditions the secretory cells of the gland were markedly damaged and brood development was severely compromised. Even field-relevant low concentrations of thiacloprid (200 ppb) or clothianidin (1 and 10 ppb) reduced ACh level in the brood food and showed initial adverse effects on brood development. Our findings indicate a hitherto unknown target of neonicotinoids to induce adverse effects on non-neuronal ACh which should be considered when re-assessing the environmental risks of these compounds. To our knowledge this is a new biological mechanism, and we suggest that, in addition to their well documented neurotoxic effects, neonicotinoids may contribute to honeybee colony losses consecutive to a reduction of the ACh content in

  8. Honeybees Produce Millimolar Concentrations of Non-Neuronal Acetylcholine for Breeding: Possible Adverse Effects of Neonicotinoids

    PubMed Central

    Wessler, Ignaz; Gärtner, Hedwig-Annabel; Michel-Schmidt, Rosmarie; Brochhausen, Christoph; Schmitz, Luise; Anspach, Laura; Grünewald, Bernd; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide use of neonicotinoid pesticides has caused concern on account of their involvement in the decline of bee populations, which are key pollinators in most ecosystems. Here we describe a role of non-neuronal acetylcholine (ACh) for breeding of Apis mellifera carnica and a so far unknown effect of neonicotinoids on non-target insects. Royal jelly or larval food are produced by the hypopharyngeal gland of nursing bees and contain unusually high ACh concentrations (4–8 mM). ACh is extremely well conserved in royal jelly or brood food because of the acidic pH of 4.0. This condition protects ACh from degradation thus ensuring delivery of intact ACh to larvae. Raising the pH to ≥5.5 and applying cholinesterase reduced the content of ACh substantially (by 75–90%) in larval food. When this manipulated brood was tested in artificial larval breeding experiments, the survival rate was higher with food supplemented by 100% with ACh (6 mM) than with food not supplemented with ACh. ACh release from the hypopharyngeal gland and its content in brood food declined by 80%, when honeybee colonies were exposed for 4 weeks to high concentrations of the neonicotinoids clothianidin (100 parts per billion [ppb]) or thiacloprid (8,800 ppb). Under these conditions the secretory cells of the gland were markedly damaged and brood development was severely compromised. Even field-relevant low concentrations of thiacloprid (200 ppb) or clothianidin (1 and 10 ppb) reduced ACh level in the brood food and showed initial adverse effects on brood development. Our findings indicate a hitherto unknown target of neonicotinoids to induce adverse effects on non-neuronal ACh which should be considered when re-assessing the environmental risks of these compounds. To our knowledge this is a new biological mechanism, and we suggest that, in addition to their well documented neurotoxic effects, neonicotinoids may contribute to honeybee colony losses consecutive to a reduction of the ACh content

  9. Laboratory Evaluation of the Toxicity of Systemic Insecticides to Emerald Ash Borer Larvae.

    PubMed

    Poland, Therese M; Ciaramitaro, Tina M; McCullough, Deborah G

    2016-04-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive phloem-feeding insect native to Asia, threatens at least 16 North American ash (Fraxinus) species and has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees in landscapes and forests. We conducted laboratory bioassays to assess the relative efficacy of systemic insecticides to control emerald ash borer larvae in winter 2009 and 2010. Second- and third-instar larvae were reared on artificial diet treated with varying doses of emamectin benzoate (TREE-äge, Arborjet, Inc., Woburn, MA), imidacloprid (Imicide, J. J Mauget Co., Arcadia, CA), dinotefuran (Safari, Valent Professional Products, Walnut Creek, CA), and azadirachtin (TreeAzin, BioForest Technologies, Inc., Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, and Azasol, Arborjet, Inc., Woburn, MA). All of the insecticides were toxic to emerald ash borer larvae, but lethal concentrations needed to kill 50% of the larvae (LC50), standardized by larval weight, varied with insecticide and time. On the earliest date with a significant fit of the probit model, LC50 values were 0.024 ppm/g at day 29 for TREE-äge, 0.015 ppm/g at day 63 for Imicide, 0.030 ppm/g at day 46 for Safari, 0.025 ppm/g at day 24 for TreeAzin, and 0.027 ppm/g at day 27 for Azasol. The median lethal time to kill 50% (LT50) of the tested larvae also varied with insecticide product and dose, and was longer for Imicide and Safari than for TREE-äge or the azadirachtin products. Insecticide efficacy in the field will depend on adult and larval mortality as well as leaf and phloem insecticide residues. PMID:26721288

  10. Evaluation of leaching potential of three systemic neonicotinoid insecticides in vineyard soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurwadkar, Sudarshan; Wheat, Remington; McGahan, Donald G.; Mitchell, Forrest

    2014-12-01

    Dinotefuran (DNT), imidacloprid (IMD), and thiamethoxam (THM) are commonly used neonicotinoid insecticides in a variety of agriculture operations. Although these insecticides help growers control pest infestation, the residual environmental occurrence of insecticides may cause unintended adverse ecological consequences to non-target species. In this study, the leaching behavior of DNT, IMD, and THM was investigated in soils collected from an active AgriLife Research Extension Center (AREC) vineyard. A series of column experiments were conducted to evaluate the leaching potential of insecticides under two experimental scenarios: a) individual pulse mode, and b) mixed pulse mode. In both scenarios, the breakthrough pattern of the insecticides in the mostly acidic to neutral vineyard soil clearly demonstrates medium to high leachability. Of the three insecticides studied for leaching, DNT has exhibited high leaching potential and exited the column with fewer pore volumes, whereas IMD was retained for longer, indicating lower leachability. Relative differences in leaching behavior of neonicotinoids could be attributed to their solubility with the leaching pattern IMD < THM < DNT showing strong correlation with increasing aqueous solubility 610 mg/L < 4100 mg/L < 39,830 mg/L. Triplicate column study experiments were conducted to evaluate the consistency of the breakthrough pattern of these insecticides. The repeatability of the breakthrough curves shows that both DNT and IMD are reproducible between runs, whereas, THM shows some inconsistency. Leaching behavior of neonicotinoid insecticides based on the leachability indices such as groundwater ubiquity score, relative leaching potential, and partitioning between different environmental matrices through a fugacity-based equilibrium criterion model clearly indicates that DNT may pose a greater threat to aquatic resources compared to IMD and THM.

  11. Evaluation of leaching potential of three systemic neonicotinoid insecticides in vineyard soil.

    PubMed

    Kurwadkar, Sudarshan; Wheat, Remington; McGahan, Donald G; Mitchell, Forrest

    2014-12-01

    Dinotefuran (DNT), imidacloprid (IMD), and thiamethoxam (THM) are commonly used neonicotinoid insecticides in a variety of agriculture operations. Although these insecticides help growers control pest infestation, the residual environmental occurrence of insecticides may cause unintended adverse ecological consequences to non-target species. In this study, the leaching behavior of DNT, IMD, and THM was investigated in soils collected from an active AgriLife Research Extension Center (AREC) vineyard. A series of column experiments were conducted to evaluate the leaching potential of insecticides under two experimental scenarios: a) individual pulse mode, and b) mixed pulse mode. In both scenarios, the breakthrough pattern of the insecticides in the mostly acidic to neutral vineyard soil clearly demonstrates medium to high leachability. Of the three insecticides studied for leaching, DNT has exhibited high leaching potential and exited the column with fewer pore volumes, whereas IMD was retained for longer, indicating lower leachability. Relative differences in leaching behavior of neonicotinoids could be attributed to their solubility with the leaching pattern IMD

  12. Cross-resistance, genetics, and realized heritability of resistance to fipronil in the house fly, Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae): a potential vector for disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Naeem; Khan, Hafiz Azhar Ali; Shad, Sarfraz Ali

    2014-04-01

    Houseflies, Musca domestica (L.), are ubiquitous pests that have the potential to spread a variety of pathogens to humans, poultries, and dairies. Pesticides are commonly used for the management of this pest. Fipronil is a GABA-gated chloride channel-inhibiting insecticide that has been commonly used for the management of different pests including M. domestica throughout the world. Many pests have developed resistance to this insecticide. A field-collected strain of M. domestica was selected with fipronil for continuous 11 generations to assess the cross-resistance, genetics, and realized heritability for designing a resistance management strategy. Laboratory bioassays were performed using the feeding method of mixing insecticide concentrations with 20% sugar solutions and cotton soaks dipped in insecticide solutions were provided to tested adult flies. Bioassay results at G12 showed that the fipronil-selected strain developed a resistance ratio of 140-fold compared to the susceptible strain. Synergism bioassay with piperonyl butoxide (PBO) and S,S,S,-tributyl phosphorotrithioate (DEF) indicated that fipronil resistance was associated with microsomal oxidase and also esterase. Reciprocal crosses between resistant and susceptible strains showed an autosomal and incompletely dominant resistance to fipronil. The LC50 values of F1 and F'1 strains were not significantly different and dominance values were 0.74 and 0.64, respectively. The resistance to fipronil was completely recessive (D(ML) = 0.00) at the highest dose and incompletely dominant at the lowest dose (D(ML) = 0.87). The monogenic resistance based on chi-square goodness of fit test and calculation of the minimum number of segregating genes showed that resistance to fipronil is controlled by multiple genes. The fipronil resistance strain confirmed very low cross-resistance to emamectin benzoate and spinosad while no cross-resistance to chlorpyrifos and acetamiprid when compared to that of the field population

  13. Research on identification and determination of mixed pesticides in apples using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Chen; Li, Yongyu; Peng, Yankun; Xu, Tianfeng; Dhakal, Sagar; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei

    2015-05-01

    Residual pesticides in fruits and vegetables have become one of the major food safety concerns around the world. At present, routine analytical methods used for the determination of pesticide residue on the surface of fruits and vegetables are destructive, complex, time-consuming, high cost and not environmentally friendly. In this study, a novel Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) method with silver colloid was developed for fast and sensitive nondestructive detection of residual pesticides in fruits and vegetables by using a self-developed Raman system. SERS technology is a combination of Raman spectroscopy and nanotechnology. SERS can greatly enhance the Raman signal intensity, achieve single-molecule detection, and has a simple sample pre-treatment characteristic of high sensitivity and no damage; in recent years it has begun to be used in food safety testing research. In this study a rapid and sensitive method was developed to identify and analyze mixed pesticides of chlorpyrifos, deltamethrin and acetamiprid in apple samples by SERS. Silver colloid was used for SERS measurement by hydroxylamine hydrochloride reduced. The advantages of this method are seen in its fast preparation at room temperature, good reproducibility and immediate applicability. Raman spectrum is highly interfered by noise signals and fluorescence background, which make it too complex to get good result. In this study the noise signals and fluorescence background were removed by Savitzky-Golay filter and min-max signal adaptive zooming method. Under optimal conditions, pesticide residues in apple samples can be detected by SERS at 0.005 μg/cm2 and 0.002 μg/cm2 for individual acetamiprid and thiram, respectively. When mixing the two pesticides at low concentrations, their characteristic peaks can still be identified from the SERS spectrum of the mixture. Based on the synthesized material and its application in SERS operation, the method represents an ultrasensitive SERS performance

  14. Neonicotinoid insecticides can serve as inadvertent insect contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Straub, Lars; Villamar-Bouza, Laura; Bruckner, Selina; Chantawannakul, Panuwan; Gauthier, Laurent; Khongphinitbunjong, Kitiphong; Retschnig, Gina; Troxler, Aline; Vidondo, Beatriz; Neumann, Peter; Williams, Geoffrey R

    2016-07-27

    There is clear evidence for sublethal effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on non-target ecosystem service-providing insects. However, their possible impact on male insect reproduction is currently unknown, despite the key role of sex. Here, we show that two neonicotinoids (4.5 ppb thiamethoxam and 1.5 ppb clothianidin) significantly reduce the reproductive capacity of male honeybees (drones), Apis mellifera Drones were obtained from colonies exposed to the neonicotinoid insecticides or controls, and subsequently maintained in laboratory cages until they reached sexual maturity. While no significant effects were observed for male teneral (newly emerged adult) body mass and sperm quantity, the data clearly showed reduced drone lifespan, as well as reduced sperm viability (percentage living versus dead) and living sperm quantity by 39%. Our results demonstrate for the first time that neonicotinoid insecticides can negatively affect male insect reproductive capacity, and provide a possible mechanistic explanation for managed honeybee queen failure and wild insect pollinator decline. The widespread prophylactic use of neonicotinoids may have previously overlooked inadvertent contraceptive effects on non-target insects, thereby limiting conservation efforts. PMID:27466446

  15. Bees prefer foods containing neonicotinoid pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Sébastien C.; Tiedeken, Erin Jo; Simcock, Kerry L.; Derveau, Sophie; Mitchell, Jessica; Softley, Samantha; Stout, Jane C.; Wright, Geraldine A.

    2015-05-01

    The impact of neonicotinoid insecticides on insect pollinators is highly controversial. Sublethal concentrations alter the behaviour of social bees and reduce survival of entire colonies. However, critics argue that the reported negative effects only arise from neonicotinoid concentrations that are greater than those found in the nectar and pollen of pesticide-treated plants. Furthermore, it has been suggested that bees could choose to forage on other available flowers and hence avoid or dilute exposure. Here, using a two-choice feeding assay, we show that the honeybee, Apis mellifera, and the buff-tailed bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, do not avoid nectar-relevant concentrations of three of the most commonly used neonicotinoids, imidacloprid (IMD), thiamethoxam (TMX), and clothianidin (CLO), in food. Moreover, bees of both species prefer to eat more of sucrose solutions laced with IMD or TMX than sucrose alone. Stimulation with IMD, TMX and CLO neither elicited spiking responses from gustatory neurons in the bees' mouthparts, nor inhibited the responses of sucrose-sensitive neurons. Our data indicate that bees cannot taste neonicotinoids and are not repelled by them. Instead, bees preferred solutions containing IMD or TMX, even though the consumption of these pesticides caused them to eat less food overall. This work shows that bees cannot control their exposure to neonicotinoids in food and implies that treating flowering crops with IMD and TMX presents a sizeable hazard to foraging bees.

  16. Biological and chemical control of the Asiatic garden beetle, Maladera castanea (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).

    PubMed

    Koppenhöfer, Albrecht M; Fuzy, Eugene M

    2003-08-01

    The efficacy of chemical and biological control agents against larvae of the Asiatic garden beetle, Maladera castanea (Arrow), in turfgrass under laboratory, greenhouse, and field conditions were determined. In field trials where insecticides were applied preventively against eggs and young larvae, the molt-accelerating compound halofenozide and the neonicotinoids imidacloprid and thiamethoxam were ineffective, whereas another neonicotinoid, clothianidin, provided 62-93% control. In greenhouse experiments against third instars in pots, the carbamate insecticide carbaryl was ineffective, whereas the organophosphate trichlorfon provided 71-83% control. In laboratory, greenhouse, and field experiments, the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora Poinar and Steinernema glaseri Steiner (not tested in the field) were ineffective against third instars, whereas S. scarabaei Stock & Koppenhöfer provided excellent control. In microplot field experiments at a rate of 2.5 x 10(9) infective juveniles per ha, H. bacteriophora provided 12-33% control and S. scarabaei 71-86% control. Combinations of S. scarabaei and imidacloprid did not provide more control of third instars compared with S. scarabaei alone. PMID:14503577

  17. Seed coating with a neonicotinoid insecticide negatively affects wild bees.

    PubMed

    Rundlöf, Maj; Andersson, Georg K S; Bommarco, Riccardo; Fries, Ingemar; Hederström, Veronica; Herbertsson, Lina; Jonsson, Ove; Klatt, Björn K; Pedersen, Thorsten R; Yourstone, Johanna; Smith, Henrik G

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on bees is vital because of reported declines in bee diversity and distribution and the crucial role bees have as pollinators in ecosystems and agriculture. Neonicotinoids are suspected to pose an unacceptable risk to bees, partly because of their systemic uptake in plants, and the European Union has therefore introduced a moratorium on three neonicotinoids as seed coatings in flowering crops that attract bees. The moratorium has been criticized for being based on weak evidence, particularly because effects have mostly been measured on bees that have been artificially fed neonicotinoids. Thus, the key question is how neonicotinoids influence bees, and wild bees in particular, in real-world agricultural landscapes. Here we show that a commonly used insecticide seed coating in a flowering crop can have serious consequences for wild bees. In a study with replicated and matched landscapes, we found that seed coating with Elado, an insecticide containing a combination of the neonicotinoid clothianidin and the non-systemic pyrethroid β-cyfluthrin, applied to oilseed rape seeds, reduced wild bee density, solitary bee nesting, and bumblebee colony growth and reproduction under field conditions. Hence, such insecticidal use can pose a substantial risk to wild bees in agricultural landscapes, and the contribution of pesticides to the global decline of wild bees may have been underestimated. The lack of a significant response in honeybee colonies suggests that reported pesticide effects on honeybees cannot always be extrapolated to wild bees. PMID:25901681

  18. Field-scale examination of neonicotinoid insecticide persistence in soil as a result of seed treatment use in commercial maize (corn) fields in southwestern Ontario.

    PubMed

    Schaafsma, Arthur; Limay-Rios, Victor; Xue, Yingen; Smith, Jocelyn; Baute, Tracey

    2016-02-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides, especially as seed treatments, have raised concerns about environmental loading and impacts on pollinators, biodiversity, and ecosystems. The authors measured concentrations of neonicotinoid residues in the top 5 cm of soil before planting of maize (corn) in 18 commercial fields with a history of neonicotinoid seed treatment use in southwestern Ontario in 2013 and 2014 using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. A simple calculator based on first-order kinetics, incorporating crop rotation, planting date, and seed treatment history from the subject fields, was used to estimate dissipation rate from the seed zone. The estimated half-life (the time taken for 50% of the insecticide to have dissipated by all mechanisms) based on 8 yr of crop history was 0.64 (range, 0.25-1.59) yr and 0.57 (range, 0.24-2.12) yr for 2013 and 2014, respectively. In fields where neonicotinoid residues were measured in both years, the estimated mean half-life between 2013 and 2014 was 0.4 (range, 0.27-0.6) yr. If clothianidin and thiamethoxam were used annually as a seed treatment in a typical crop rotation of maize, soybean, and winter wheat over several years, residues would plateau rather than continue to accumulate. Residues of neonicotinoid insecticides after 3 yr to 4 yr of repeated annual use tend to plateau to a mean concentration of less than 6 ng/g in agricultural soils in southwestern Ontario. PMID:26332416

  19. Efficacy of Selected Insecticides Applied to Hybrid Rice Seed.

    PubMed

    Adams, A; Gore, J; Musser, F; Cook, D; Catchot, A; Walker, T; Dobbins, C

    2016-02-01

    Hybrid rice and insecticide seed treatments targeting rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel, have altered the landscape of rice production. The effect of reduced seeding rates on seed treatment efficacy in hybrid rice has not been studied. During 2011 and 2012, an experiment was conducted at seven locations to determine the relationship between low seeding rates used in hybrid rice and efficacy of selected insecticidal seed treatments as measured by rice water weevil densities and yield. Labeled rates of thiamethoxam, chlorantraniliprole, and clothianidin were compared with higher rates of these products to determine if labeled rates provide an acceptable level of control of the rice water weevil. Study locations were divided into low, moderate, and high groups based on rice water weevil larval densities. All seed treatments and seed treatment rates reduced rice water weevil densities. However, there was no observed yield or economic benefit from the use of an insecticidal seed treatment in areas of low pressure. Differences in yield were observed among seed treatments and seed treatment rates in moderate and high pressure locations, and all seed treatments yielded better than the untreated plots, but these differences were not always economical. All seed treatments showed an economic advantage in areas of high weevil pressure, and there were no differences among seed treatment products or rates, suggesting that currently labeled seed treatment rates in hybrid rice are effective for rice water weevil management. PMID:26537671

  20. Solar photo-Fenton using peroxymonosulfate for organic micropollutants removal from domestic wastewater: comparison with heterogeneous TiO₂ photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Moussa Mahdi; Brienza, Monica; Goetz, Vincent; Chiron, Serge

    2014-12-01

    This work aims at decontaminating biologically treated domestic wastewater effluents from organic micropollutants by sulfate radical based (SO4(-)) homogeneous photo-Fenton involving peroxymonosulfate as an oxidant, ferrous iron (Fe(II)) as a catalyst and simulated solar irradiation as a light source. This oxidative system was evaluated by using several probe compounds belonging to pesticides (bifenthrin, mesotrione and clothianidin) and pharmaceuticals (diclofenac, sulfamethoxazole and carbamazepine) classes and its kinetic efficiency was compared to that to the well known UV-Vis/TiO2 heterogeneous photocatalysis. Except for carbamazepine, apparent kinetic rate constants were always 10 times higher in PMS/Fe(II)/UV-Vis than in TiO2/UV-Vis system and more than 70% of total organic carbon abatement was reached in less than one hour treatment. Hydroxyl radical (OH) and SO4(-) reactivity was investigated using mesotrione as a probe compound through by-products identification by liquid chromatography-high resolution-mass spectrometry and transformation pathways elucidation. In addition to two OH based transformation pathways, a specific SO4(-) transformation pathway which first involved degradation through one electron transfer oxidation processes followed by decarboxylation were probably responsible for mesotrione degradation kinetic improvement upon UV-Vis/PMS/Fe(II) system in comparison to UVVis/TiO2 system. PMID:25108605

  1. Chronic neonicotinoid pesticide exposure and parasite stress differentially affects learning in honeybees and bumblebees.

    PubMed

    Piiroinen, Saija; Goulson, Dave

    2016-04-13

    Learning and memory are crucial functions which enable insect pollinators to efficiently locate and extract floral rewards. Exposure to pesticides or infection by parasites may cause subtle but ecologically important changes in cognitive functions of pollinators. The potential interactive effects of these stressors on learning and memory have not yet been explored. Furthermore, sensitivity to stressors may differ between species, but few studies have compared responses in different species. Here, we show that chronic exposure to field-realistic levels of the neonicotinoid clothianidin impaired olfactory learning acquisition in honeybees, leading to potential impacts on colony fitness, but not in bumblebees. Infection by the microsporidian parasite Nosema ceranae slightly impaired learning in honeybees, but no interactive effects were observed. Nosema did not infect bumblebees (3% infection success). Nevertheless, Nosema-treated bumblebees had a slightly lower rate of learning than controls, but faster learning in combination with neonicotinoid exposure. This highlights the potential for complex interactive effects of stressors on learning. Our results underline that one cannot readily extrapolate findings from one bee species to others. This has important implications for regulatory risk assessments which generally use honeybees as a model for all bees. PMID:27053744

  2. Neonicotinoids Interfere with Specific Components of Navigation in Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Johannes; Müller, Teresa; Spatz, Anne-Kathrin; Greggers, Uwe; Grünewald, Bernd; Menzel, Randolf

    2014-01-01

    Three neonicotinoids, imidacloprid, clothianidin and thiacloprid, agonists of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the central brain of insects, were applied at non-lethal doses in order to test their effects on honeybee navigation. A catch-and-release experimental design was applied in which feeder trained bees were caught when arriving at the feeder, treated with one of the neonicotinoids, and released 1.5 hours later at a remote site. The flight paths of individual bees were tracked with harmonic radar. The initial flight phase controlled by the recently acquired navigation memory (vector memory) was less compromised than the second phase that leads the animal back to the hive (homing flight). The rate of successful return was significantly lower in treated bees, the probability of a correct turn at a salient landscape structure was reduced, and less directed flights during homing flights were performed. Since the homing phase in catch-and-release experiments documents the ability of a foraging honeybee to activate a remote memory acquired during its exploratory orientation flights, we conclude that non-lethal doses of the three neonicotinoids tested either block the retrieval of exploratory navigation memory or alter this form of navigation memory. These findings are discussed in the context of the application of neonicotinoids in plant protection. PMID:24646521

  3. Bees prefer foods containing neonicotinoid pesticides.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Sébastien C; Tiedeken, Erin Jo; Simcock, Kerry L; Derveau, Sophie; Mitchell, Jessica; Softley, Samantha; Radcliffe, Amy; Stout, Jane C; Wright, Geraldine A

    2015-05-01

    The impact of neonicotinoid insecticides on insect pollinators is highly controversial. Sublethal concentrations alter the behaviour of social bees and reduce survival of entire colonies. However, critics argue that the reported negative effects only arise from neonicotinoid concentrations that are greater than those found in the nectar and pollen of pesticide-treated plants. Furthermore, it has been suggested that bees could choose to forage on other available flowers and hence avoid or dilute exposure. Here, using a two-choice feeding assay, we show that the honeybee, Apis mellifera, and the buff-tailed bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, do not avoid nectar-relevant concentrations of three of the most commonly used neonicotinoids, imidacloprid (IMD), thiamethoxam (TMX), and clothianidin (CLO), in food. Moreover, bees of both species prefer to eat more of sucrose solutions laced with IMD or TMX than sucrose alone. Stimulation with IMD, TMX and CLO neither elicited spiking responses from gustatory neurons in the bees' mouthparts, nor inhibited the responses of sucrose-sensitive neurons. Our data indicate that bees cannot taste neonicotinoids and are not repelled by them. Instead, bees preferred solutions containing IMD or TMX, even though the consumption of these pesticides caused them to eat less food overall. This work shows that bees cannot control their exposure to neonicotinoids in food and implies that treating flowering crops with IMD and TMX presents a sizeable hazard to foraging bees. PMID:25901684

  4. Neonicotinoid formaldehyde generators: possible mechanism of mouse-specific hepatotoxicity/hepatocarcinogenicity of thiamethoxam.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Tami L; Casida, John E

    2013-02-01

    Thiamethoxam (TMX), an important insecticide, is hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic in mice but not rats. Studies of Syngenta Central Toxicology Laboratory on species specificity in metabolism established that TMX is a much better substrate for mouse liver microsomal CYPs than the corresponding rat or human enzymes in forming desmethyl-TMX (dm-TMX), which is also hepatotoxic, and clothianidin (CLO), which is not hepatotoxic or hepatocarcinogenic. They proposed that TMX hepatotoxicity/hepatocarcinogencity is due to dm-TMX and a further metabolite desmethyl-CLO (dm-CLO) (structurally analogous to a standard inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) acting synergistically. The present study considers formation of formaldehyde (HCHO) and N-methylol intermediates as an alternative mechanism of TMX hepatotoxicity/hepatocarcinogenicity. Comparison of neonicotinoid metabolism by mouse, rat and human microsomes with NADPH showed two important points. First, TMX and dm-TMX yield more HCHO than any other commercial neonicotinoid. Second, mouse microsomes give much higher conversion than rat or human microsomes. These observations provide an alternative hypothesis of HCHO and N-methylol intermediates from CYP-mediated oxidative oxadiazinane ring cleavage as the bioactivated hepatotoxicants. However, the proposed mono-N-methylol CYP metabolites are not observed, possibly further reacting in situ. PMID:23220038

  5. Neonicotinoid insecticides can serve as inadvertent insect contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Villamar-Bouza, Laura; Bruckner, Selina; Chantawannakul, Panuwan; Gauthier, Laurent; Khongphinitbunjong, Kitiphong; Retschnig, Gina; Troxler, Aline; Vidondo, Beatriz; Neumann, Peter; Williams, Geoffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    There is clear evidence for sublethal effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on non-target ecosystem service-providing insects. However, their possible impact on male insect reproduction is currently unknown, despite the key role of sex. Here, we show that two neonicotinoids (4.5 ppb thiamethoxam and 1.5 ppb clothianidin) significantly reduce the reproductive capacity of male honeybees (drones), Apis mellifera. Drones were obtained from colonies exposed to the neonicotinoid insecticides or controls, and subsequently maintained in laboratory cages until they reached sexual maturity. While no significant effects were observed for male teneral (newly emerged adult) body mass and sperm quantity, the data clearly showed reduced drone lifespan, as well as reduced sperm viability (percentage living versus dead) and living sperm quantity by 39%. Our results demonstrate for the first time that neonicotinoid insecticides can negatively affect male insect reproductive capacity, and provide a possible mechanistic explanation for managed honeybee queen failure and wild insect pollinator decline. The widespread prophylactic use of neonicotinoids may have previously overlooked inadvertent contraceptive effects on non-target insects, thereby limiting conservation efforts. PMID:27466446

  6. Bees prefer foods containing neonicotinoid pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Simcock, Kerry L.; Derveau, Sophie; Mitchell, Jessica; Softley, Samantha; Stout, Jane C.; Wright, Geraldine A.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of neonicotinoid insecticides on insect pollinators is highly controversial. Sublethal concentrations alter the behaviour of social bees and reduce survival of entire colonies1-3. However, critics argue that the reported negative effects only arise from neonicotinoid concentrations that are greater than those found in the nectar and pollen of pesticide-treated plants4. Furthermore, it has been suggested that bees could choose to forage on other available flowers and hence avoid or dilute exposure4,5. Here, using a two-choice feeding assay, we show that the honeybee, Apis mellifera, and the buff-tailed bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, do not avoid nectar-relevant concentrations of three of the most commonly-used neonicotinoids, imidacloprid (IMD), thiamethoxam (TMX), and clothianidin (CLO) in food. Moreover, bees of both species prefer to eat more of sucrose solutions laced with IMD or TMX than sucrose alone. Stimulation with IMD, TMX, and CLO neither elicited spiking responses from gustatory neurons in the bees’ mouthparts nor inhibited the responses of sucrose-sensitive neurons. Our data indicate that bees cannot taste neonicotinoids and are not repelled by them. Instead, bees preferred solutions containing IMD or TMX even though the consumption of these pesticides caused them to eat less food overall. This work shows that bees cannot control their exposure to neonicotinoids in food and implies that treating flowering crops with IMD and TMX presents a significant hazard to foraging bees. PMID:25901684

  7. Influence of Rice Seeding Rate on Efficacies of Neonicotinoid and Anthranilic Diamide Seed Treatments against Rice Water Weevil

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Jason; Lanka, Srinivas; Stout, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Rice in the U.S. is frequently seeded at low rates and treated before sowing with neonicotinoid or anthranilic diamide insecticides to target the rice water weevil. A previous study of the influence of seeding rate on rice water weevil densities showed an inverse relationship between seeding rates and immature weevil densities. This study investigated interactive effects of seeding rate and seed treatment on weevil densities and rice yields; in particular, experiments were designed to determine whether seed treatments were less effective at low seeding rates. Four experiments were conducted over three years by varying seeding rates of rice treated at constant per seed rates of insecticide. Larval suppression by chlorantraniliprole was superior to thiamethoxam or clothianidin, and infestations at low seeding rates were up to 47% higher than at high seeding rates. Little evidence was found for the hypothesis that seed treatments are less effective at low seeding rates; in only one of four experiments was the reduction in weevil densities by thiamethoxam greater at high than at low seeding rates. However, suppression of larvae by neonicotinoid seed treatments in plots seeded at low rates was generally poor, and caution must be exercised when using the neonicotioids at low seeding rates. PMID:26462952

  8. Efficacy of Selected Insecticides Applied to Hybrid Rice Seed

    PubMed Central

    Adams, A.; Gore, J.; Musser, F.; Cook, D.; Walker, T.; Dobbins, C.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid rice and insecticide seed treatments targeting rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel, have altered the landscape of rice production. The effect of reduced seeding rates on seed treatment efficacy in hybrid rice has not been studied. During 2011 and 2012, an experiment was conducted at seven locations to determine the relationship between low seeding rates used in hybrid rice and efficacy of selected insecticidal seed treatments as measured by rice water weevil densities and yield. Labeled rates of thiamethoxam, chlorantraniliprole, and clothianidin were compared with higher rates of these products to determine if labeled rates provide an acceptable level of control of the rice water weevil. Study locations were divided into low, moderate, and high groups based on rice water weevil larval densities. All seed treatments and seed treatment rates reduced rice water weevil densities. However, there was no observed yield or economic benefit from the use of an insecticidal seed treatment in areas of low pressure. Differences in yield were observed among seed treatments and seed treatment rates in moderate and high pressure locations, and all seed treatments yielded better than the untreated plots, but these differences were not always economical. All seed treatments showed an economic advantage in areas of high weevil pressure, and there were no differences among seed treatment products or rates, suggesting that currently labeled seed treatment rates in hybrid rice are effective for rice water weevil management. PMID:26537671

  9. Unreliable pesticide control of the vector psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) for the reduction of microorganism disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Katsuya; Miyazi, Kastuhiko; Matsuhira, Kunihiko; Yasuda, Keiji; Sadoyama, Yasutsune; Do, Hong Tuan; Doan, Van Bang

    2010-07-01

    Systemic insecticides and application methods were examined for the control of the vector psyllid of citrus greening disease, Diaphorina citri, on grown king mandarin trees in an orchard in southern Vietnam from May 2007 to September 2008. Leaf spraying of imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, and clothianidin attained about 50 % to 70 % mortality of the psyllid for one month after the application and showed decreased efficacy thereafter. Imidacloprid was more effective than the other two insecticides, but the efficacy on grown trees was still much lower than that following application to young seedlings. Trunk injection of these insecticides accomplished similar mortality, about 50 %, and the efficacy of the insecticides continued for one month. An adjuvant was used with the goal of protecting the insecticide applied on leaves from precipitation, and mineral oil was used for the same reason, as well as its potential to control the psyllid. Neither the adjuvant nor the mineral oil played an evident role in the increase of insecticide efficacy or longevity. Application of systemic insecticides at even 50 times the dose described above did not show an apparent increase in psyllid mortality. The insecticides commonly used for the control of the psyllid were not as effective on this insect on grown trees as we had expected they would be. PMID:20512737

  10. Pheromone-based action thresholds for control of the swede midge, Contarinia nasturtii (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), and residual insecticide efficacy in cole crops.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Rebecca H; Sears, Mark K

    2013-02-01

    The swede midge, Contarinia nasturtii (Kieffer), is an invasive gall midge causing economic damage to cole crops (Brassica oleracea L.) and other crucifers in eastern Canada and United States. An effective decision-making tool for timing insecticide applications is a critical part of an integrated pest management program against C. nasturtii. Experiments were undertaken over 2 yr and at three locations in southern Ontario to develop pheromone-based action thresholds for C. nasturtii in cabbage and broccoli. An economic comparison between action threshold and calendar insecticide regimes was undertaken. The threshold approach was both economically viable and successful at minimizing swede midge damage for cabbage, and an action threshold of five males per trap per day with a minimum 7 d retreatment interval successfully reduced damage to acceptable levels. However, this approach was not successful with broccoli, which, unlike cabbage, is susceptible to damage by C. nasturtii through all plant stages, including heading. Acetamiprid and lambda-cyhalothrin both demonstrated approximately 7 d residual activity against C. nasturtii. Registration labels for both insecticides specify a minimum 7 d retreatment interval, which is supported by residual efficacy results. More effective insecticidal products may have longer residual efficacy and improve efficacy of the action threshold approach for broccoli and cabbage. PMID:23448040

  11. [Insecticide resistance of Bemisia tabaci field populations].

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Xian; Weng, Qi-Yong; Huang, Jian; Liang, Zhi-Sheng; Lin, Gui-Jun; Wu, Dong-Dong

    2007-07-01

    Resistance to 13 insecticides in field populations of Bemisia tabaci from six regions (Fuzhou, Zhangzhou, Longyan, Sanming, Nanping, Ningde) of Fujian Province, China was monitored by adult leaf-dipping bioassay. Compared with the susceptible SUD-S strain, all the six field populations exhibited high levels of resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin (838.38-2460.52 fold), fenpropathrin (244.64-834.29 fold), cypermethrin (116.02-266.35 fold), deltamethrin (81.75-124.18 fold), acephate (425.18-875.56 fold) and chlorpyrifos (54.53-78.43 fold), moderate levels of resistance to dimethoate (14.16-17.66 fold), low to moderate levels of resistance to dichlorvos (6.23-11.25 fold) and low levels of resistance to methomyl (4.07-5.66 fold), respectively. Among these six field-collected populations, only Zhangzhou population had moderate resistance to imidacloprid, acetamiprid and thiamethoxam (23.08 fold, 10.32 fold and 24.60 fold, respectively). All field strains tested displayed no resistance to abamectin. PMID:17886654

  12. Determination of neonicotinoid insecticides residues in bovine milk samples by solid-phase extraction clean-up and liquid chromatography with diode-array detection.

    PubMed

    Seccia, Serenella; Fidente, Paola; Montesano, Domenico; Morrica, Patrizia

    2008-12-19

    In this paper we have developed an analytical method for the simultaneous determination of four nicotinoid insecticides [acetamiprid (ACT), imidacloprid (ICL), thiacloprid (TCL) and thiamethoxam (TMX)] in bovine whole milk. These analytes were extracted, in a single step with dichloromethane, from fortified milk samples, using Chem Elut cartridges, containing diatomaceous earth material. Insecticide's determination and quantification were performed by HPLC with diode-array detection (DAD). Average recoveries of the four insecticides from bovine milk samples were between 85.1 and 99.7% at spiking levels 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1 mg kg(-1). Relative standard deviations (RSDs) were no larger than 10% for all of the recovery tests. The calculated limits of quantitation (LOQ) ranged from 0.01 to 0.04 mg kg(-1) for the four insecticides, being equal to or lower than the maximum residue limits (MRLs) established by European legislation (0.01-0.05 mg kg(-1)). The developed method is linear at concentrations within the tested interval, with coefficients of determination higher than 0.9990. According to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC, decision limit (CCalpha) and detection capability (CCbeta) have been calculated. The proposed method is rapid, simple and could be utilized for the routine analysis of pesticides residues. PMID:19004450

  13. [Resistance risk, cross-resistance and biochemical resistance mechanism of Laodelphax striatellus to buprofezin].

    PubMed

    Mao, Xu-lian; Liu, Jin; Li, Xu-ke; Chi, Jia-jia; Liu, Yong-jie

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the resistance development law and biochemical resistance mechanism of Laodelphax striatellus to buprofezin, spraying rice seedlings was used to continuously screen resistant strains of L. striatellus and dipping rice seedlings was applied to determine the toxicity and cross-resistance of L. striatellus to insecticides. After 32-generation screening with buprofezin, L. striatellus developed 168.49 folds resistance and its reality heritability (h2) was 0.11. If the killing rate was 80%-90%, L. striatellus was expected to develop 10-fold resistance to buprofezin only after 5 to 6 generations breeding. Because the actual reality heritability of field populations was usually lower than that of the resistant strains, the production of field populations increasing with 10-fold resistance would need much longer time. The results of cross-resistance showed that resistant strain had high level cross-resistance with thiamethoxam and imidacloprid, low level cross-resistance with acetamiprid, and no cross-resistance with pymetrozine and chlorpyrifos. The activity of detoxification enzymes of different strains and the syergism of synergist were measured. The results showed that cytochrome P450 monooxygenase played a major role in the resistance of L. striatellus to buprofezin, the esterase played a minor role and the GSH-S-transferase had no effect. Therefore, L. striatellus would have high risk to develop resistance to buprofezin when used in the field and might be delayed by using pymetrozine and chlorpyrifos. PMID:27228617

  14. Field Study of the Comparative Efficacy of Three Pyrethroid/Neonicotinoid Mixture Products for the Control of the Common Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changlu; Singh, Narinderpal; Cooper, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Three insecticide mixtures that contain two classes of insecticides (pyrethroid and neonicotinoid) were recently developed to control bed bugs. We evaluated three integrated bed bug management strategies in apartments, each using the same non-chemical control methods and one of the three insecticide mixture products: Tandem (lambda-cyhalothrin + thiamethoxam), Temprid SC (beta-cyfluthrin + imidacloprid), and Transport Mikron (bifenthrin + acetamiprid). No insecticides were applied in the Control apartments. In all apartments, we installed vinyl mattress encasements (if not already present) and applied steam to beds and other infested upholstered furniture. Insecticide sprays were applied in the three treatments. Each treatment and the Control included 8-10 occupied apartments. Re-treatment was conducted during biweekly inspections if necessary. After eight weeks, the mean (± SEM) bed bug count reduction in the Tandem, Temprid SC, Transport Mikron, and Control was 89 ± 9, 87 ± 6, 98 ± 1, and 23 ± 54%, respectively. Only Tandem and Transport Mikron treatments resulted in significantly higher population reduction than the Control at eight weeks. There were no significant differences in mean percent reduction among the three treatments (Tandem, Temprid SC, Transport Mikron) at eight weeks. Tandem spray caused significantly faster bed bug reduction than Temprid SC spray and Transport Mikron spray. PMID:26463075

  15. Toxicity of Insecticides on Various Life Stages of Two Tortricid Pests of Cranberries and on a Non-Target Predator

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Wanumen, Andrea Carolina; Salamanca, Jordano; Holdcraft, Robert; Kyryczenko-Roth, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory and extended laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine the residual toxicities of various insecticides against two key pests of cranberries, Sparganothis sulfureana and Choristoneura parallela (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), and their non-target effects on the predatory Orius insidiosus (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae). The effects of nine insecticides with different modes of action on S. sulfureana and Ch. parallela eggs, larvae, and adults were tested in the laboratory, while the efficacy of a post-bloom application on larval mortality and mass of these pests and on adult O. insidiosus was evaluated in extended laboratory experiments. The organophosphate chlorpyrifos and the spinosyn spinetoram provided long-lasting (seven-day) control against all stages of both pests. The growth regulator methoxyfenozide and the diamides chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole had strong (1–7 days) larvicidal, particularly on young larvae, and growth inhibitory activity, but only the diamides were adulticidal. Among neonicotinoids, acetamiprid had stronger ovicidal and adulticidal activity than thiamethoxam, showing within-insecticide class differences in toxicities; however, both were weak on larvae. Lethality of novaluron and indoxacarb was inconsistent, varying depending on species and stage. Chlorpyrifos was most toxic to O. insidiosus. These results show species- and stage-specific toxicities, and greater compatibility with biological control, of the newer reduced-risk classes of insecticides than older chemistries. PMID:27092527

  16. Evaluation of QuEChERS sample preparation and liquid chromatography-triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry method for the determination of 109 pesticide residues in tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Golge, Ozgur; Kabak, Bulent

    2015-06-01

    A multiresidue method based on modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) sample preparation, followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed and validated for the determination of 109 selected multiclass pesticides in tomatoes. The recovery yields ranged from 77.1% to 113.2%, with repeatabilities of 4.4-19.2% and within-laboratory reproducibilities of 7.1-18.4%. The limit of detections (LODs) for target analytes in tomato extract were between 0.5 and 10.8μgkg(-1), and the limit of quantifications (LOQs) were between 1.3 and 30.4μgkg(-1). The expanded measurement uncertainty was not higher than 30% for all target analytes. The method has been successfully applied to the analysis of 345 tomato samples obtained from local markets and tomato traders. Residues of acetamiprid, azoxystrobin and triadimefon were identified and measured in 9.6% of tomato samples, ranging from 0.015 to 0.37mgkg(-1). PMID:25624240

  17. Photodegradation of neonicotinoid insecticides in water by semiconductor oxides.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, José; Garrido, Isabel; Hellín, Pilar; Flores, Pilar; Navarro, Simón

    2015-10-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of three neonicotinoid insecticides (NIs), thiamethoxam (TH), imidacloprid (IM) and acetamiprid (AC), in pure water has been studied using zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) as photocatalysts under natural sunlight and artificial light irradiation. Photocatalytic experiments showed that the addition of these chalcogenide oxides in tandem with the electron acceptor (Na2S2O8) strongly enhances the degradation rate of these compounds in comparison with those carried out with ZnO and TiO2 alone and photolytic tests. Comparison of catalysts showed that ZnO is the most efficient for the removal of such insecticides in optimal conditions and at constant volumetric rate of photon absorption. Thus, the complete disappearance of all the studied compounds was achieved after 10 and 30 min of artificial light irradiation, in the ZnO/Na2S2O8 and TiO2/Na2S2O8 systems, respectively. The highest degradation rate was noticed for IM, while the lowest rate constant was obtained for AC under artificial light irradiation. In addition, solar irradiation was more efficient compared to artificial light for the removal of these insecticides from water. The main photocatalytic intermediates detected during the degradation of NIs were identified. PMID:26002372

  18. Etoxazole resistance in predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis A.-H. (Acari: Phytoseiidae): Cross-resistance, inheritance and biochemical resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yorulmaz Salman, Sibel; Aydınlı, Fatma; Ay, Recep

    2015-07-01

    Phytoseiulus persimilis of the family Phytoseiidae is an effective predatory mite species that is used to control pest mites. The LC50 and LC60 values of etoxazole were determined on P. persimilis using a leaf-disc method and spraying tower. A laboratory selection population designated ETO6 was found to have a 111.63-fold resistance to etoxazole following 6 selection cycles. This population developed low cross-resistance to spinosad, spiromesifen, acetamiprid, indoxacarb, chlorantraniliprole, milbemectin and moderate cross-resistance to deltamethrin. PBO, IBP and DEM synergised resistance 3.17-, 2.85- and 3.60-fold respectively. Crossing experiments revealed that etoxazole resistance in the ETO6 population was an intermediately dominant and polygenic. In addition, detoxifying enzyme activities were increased 2.71-fold for esterase, 3.09-fold for glutathione S-transferase (GST) and 2.76-fold for cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) in the ETO6 population. Selection for etoxazole under laboratory conditions resulted in the development of etoxazole resistance in the predatory mite P. persimilis that are resistant to pesticides are considered valuable for use in resistance management programmes within integrated pest control strategies. PMID:26071813

  19. Application of QuEChERS based method for the determination of pesticides in nutraceutical products (Camellia sinensis) by liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Domínguez, Gerardo; Nieto-García, Antonio José; Romero-González, Roberto; Frenich, Antonia Garrido

    2015-06-15

    A QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) based method has been evaluated and validated for the determination and quantification of approximately 100 LC-amenable pesticides in nutraceutical products obtained from green tea (Camellia sinensis). Extraction was performed with acidified acetonitrile (acetic acid 1% (v/v)), and additional clean-up steps were not necessary. Pesticides determination was achieved using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqQ-MS/MS). Total running time was 11 min. Pesticides were quantified using matrix-matched calibration. Recoveries ranged from 70% to 117% and relative standard deviation (RSD) was lower than 20% at concentration levels of 25, 50 and 100 μg/kg for intra-day precision and equal or lower than 25% for inter-day precision. Limits of quantification (LOQ) were equal or lower than 25 μg/kg. The validated method was applied to commercial nutraceutical products, detecting acetamiprid (56 μg/kg) and carbendazim (13 μg/kg) in two samples. PMID:25660875

  20. Toxicity of Insecticides on Various Life Stages of Two Tortricid Pests of Cranberries and on a Non-Target Predator.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Wanumen, Andrea Carolina; Salamanca, Jordano; Holdcraft, Robert; Kyryczenko-Roth, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory and extended laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine the residual toxicities of various insecticides against two key pests of cranberries, Sparganothis sulfureana and Choristoneura parallela (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), and their non-target effects on the predatory Orius insidiosus (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae). The effects of nine insecticides with different modes of action on S. sulfureana and Ch. parallela eggs, larvae, and adults were tested in the laboratory, while the efficacy of a post-bloom application on larval mortality and mass of these pests and on adult O. insidiosus was evaluated in extended laboratory experiments. The organophosphate chlorpyrifos and the spinosyn spinetoram provided long-lasting (seven-day) control against all stages of both pests. The growth regulator methoxyfenozide and the diamides chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole had strong (1-7 days) larvicidal, particularly on young larvae, and growth inhibitory activity, but only the diamides were adulticidal. Among neonicotinoids, acetamiprid had stronger ovicidal and adulticidal activity than thiamethoxam, showing within-insecticide class differences in toxicities; however, both were weak on larvae. Lethality of novaluron and indoxacarb was inconsistent, varying depending on species and stage. Chlorpyrifos was most toxic to O. insidiosus. These results show species- and stage-specific toxicities, and greater compatibility with biological control, of the newer reduced-risk classes of insecticides than older chemistries. PMID:27092527

  1. Acid-base reaction-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for extraction of three classes of pesticides from fruit juice samples.

    PubMed

    Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Afshar Mogaddam, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-29

    A sample preparation method involving acid-base reaction-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with gas chromatography using nitrogen-phosphorous detection has been developed for the analysis of three classes of pesticides in juice samples. In this method, a basic organic solvent (p-chloroaniline) is used as an extraction solvent. It is dissolved in acidified deionized water and then injected into an alkaline aqueous sample solution. After injection, an acid-base reaction occurs and deprotonation of the organic solvent leads to formation of tiny droplets of the extractant and subsequent extraction of the analytes from sample solution. Under the optimum extraction conditions, the method showed low limits of detection and quantification in the range of 0.05-0.43ngmL(-1) and 0.17-1.43ngmL(-1), respectively. Extraction recoveries and enrichment factors were between 39.2 and 84.1% and between 548 and 1178, respectively. Relative standard deviations of less than 8.6% for the extraction of 2.0ngmL(-1) of each pesticide were obtained for intra- (n=6) and inter-day (n=4) precisions. Finally, different juice samples were successfully analyzed using the proposed method, and penconazole, diniconazole, triadimenol, and acetamiprid were determined in some samples at ngmL(-1) levels. PMID:26755415

  2. Sensitivity of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) to several new insecticides in China: effects of insecticide type and whitefly species, strain, and stage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Pan, Huipeng; Yang, Xin; Guo, Litao; Zhang, Youjun

    2014-01-01

    Whitefly biotypes B and Q are the two most damaging members of the Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) species complex. Control of B. tabaci (and especially of Q) has been impaired by resistance to commonly used insecticides. To find new insecticides for B. tabaci management in China, we investigated the sensitivity of eggs, larvae, and adults of laboratory strains of B and Q (named Lab-B and Lab-Q) and field strains of Q to several insecticides. For eggs, larvae, and adults of B. tabaci and for six insecticides (cyantraniliprole, chlorantraniliprole, pyriproxyfen, buprofezin, acetamiprid, and thiamethoxam), LC50 values were higher for Lab-Q than for Lab-B; avermectin LC50 values, however, were low for adults of both Lab-Q and Lab-B. Based on the laboratory results, insecticides were selected to test against eggs, larvae, and adults of four field strains of B. tabaci Q. Although the field strains differed in their sensitivity to the insecticides, the eggs and larvae of all strains were highly sensitive to cyantraniliprole, and the adults of all strains were highly sensitive to avermectin. The eggs, larvae, and adults of B. tabaci Q were generally more resistant than those of B. tabaci B to the tested insecticides. B. tabaci Q eggs and larvae were sensitive to cyantraniliprole and pyriproxyfen, whereas B. tabaci Q adults were sensitive to avermectin. Field trials should be conducted with cyantraniliprole, pyriproxyfen, and avermectin for control of B. tabaci Q and B in China. PMID:25434040

  3. Field Study of the Comparative Efficacy of Three Pyrethroid/Neonicotinoid Mixture Products for the Control of the Common Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changlu; Singh, Narinderpal; Cooper, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Three insecticide mixtures that contain two classes of insecticides (pyrethroid and neonicotinoid) were recently developed to control bed bugs. We evaluated three integrated bed bug management strategies in apartments, each using the same non-chemical control methods and one of the three insecticide mixture products: Tandem (lambda-cyhalothrin + thiamethoxam), Temprid SC (beta-cyfluthrin + imidacloprid), and Transport Mikron (bifenthrin + acetamiprid). No insecticides were applied in the Control apartments. In all apartments, we installed vinyl mattress encasements (if not already present) and applied steam to beds and other infested upholstered furniture. Insecticide sprays were applied in the three treatments. Each treatment and the Control included 8–10 occupied apartments. Re-treatment was conducted during biweekly inspections if necessary. After eight weeks, the mean (± SEM) bed bug count reduction in the Tandem, Temprid SC, Transport Mikron, and Control was 89 ± 9, 87 ± 6, 98 ± 1, and 23 ± 54%, respectively. Only Tandem and Transport Mikron treatments resulted in significantly higher population reduction than the Control at eight weeks. There were no significant differences in mean percent reduction among the three treatments (Tandem, Temprid SC, Transport Mikron) at eight weeks. Tandem spray caused significantly faster bed bug reduction than Temprid SC spray and Transport Mikron spray. PMID:26463075

  4. Direct Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Plant Leaves Using Surface-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization with Sputter-deposited Platinum Film.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Tomoyuki; Osaka, Issey; Hamada, Satoshi; Murakami, Tatsuya; Miyazato, Akio; Kawasaki, Hideya; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    Plant leaves administered with systemic insecticides as agricultural chemicals were analyzed using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is inadequate for the detection of insecticides on leaves because of the charge-up effect that occurs on the non-conductive surface of the leaves. In this study, surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization with a sputter-deposited platinum film (Pt-SALDI) was used for direct analysis of chemicals in plant leaves. Sputter-deposited platinum (Pt) films were prepared on leaves administered with the insecticides. A sputter-deposited Pt film with porous structure was used as the matrix for Pt-SALDI. Acephate and acetamiprid contained in the insecticides on the leaves could be detected using Pt-SALDI-MS, but these chemical components could not be adequately detected using MALDI-MS because of the charge-up effect. Enhancement of ion yields for the insecticides was achieved using Pt-SALDI, accompanied by prevention of the charge-up effect by the conductive Pt film. The movement of systemic insecticides in plants could be observed clearly using Pt-SALDI-IMS. The distribution and movement of components of systemic insecticides on leaves could be analyzed directly using Pt-SALDI-IMS. Additionally, changes in the properties of the chemicals with time, as an indicator of the permeability of the insecticides, could be evaluated. PMID:27169661

  5. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography for the determination of some neonicotinoid insecticides in cucumber samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuaihua; Yang, Xiumin; Yin, Xiaofang; Wang, Chun; Wang, Zhi

    2012-07-15

    A rapid, simple and sensitive method has been developed for the analysis of some neonicotinoid insecticides in cucumber samples by using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled with sweeping in micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC). Under optimised conditions, the enrichment factors were achieved in the range from 4000 to 10,000. The linearity of the method was in the range from 2.7 to 200 ng g(-1) for thiacloprid, acetamiprid and imidacloprid, and in the range from 4.0 to 200 ng g(-1) for imidaclothiz in cucumber samples, with the determination coefficients (r(2)) ranging from 0.9924 to 0.9968. The limits of detection (LODs, S/N=3) ranged from 0.8 to 1.2 ng g(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) at the concentration levels of 10.0 and 50.0 ng g(-1) each of the neonicotinoid insecticides in cucumber samples varied from 3.8% to 6.3%. The developed method has been successfully applied to the analysis of the neonicotinoid insecticides in cucumbers with a satisfactory result. PMID:25683431

  6. Molecular imprinted photonic crystal hydrogels for the rapid and label-free detection of imidacloprid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Mu, Zhongde; Liu, Ran; Pu, Yuepu; Yin, Lihong

    2013-12-15

    A novel sensor for the rapid and label-free detection of imidacloprid was developed based on the combination of a colloidal crystal templating method and a molecular imprinting technique. The molecular imprinted photonic hydrogel film was prepared with methacrylic acid as monomers, ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate as cross-linkers and imidacloprid as imprinting template molecules. When the colloidal crystal template and the molecularly imprinted template was removed, the resulted MIPH film possessed a highly ordered three-dimensional macroporous structure with nanocavities. The response of the MIPH film to imidacloprid in aqueous solution can be detected through a readable Bragg diffraction red shift. When the concentration of imidacloprid increased from 10(-13) to 10(-7) g/mL, the Bragg diffraction peak shifted from 551 to 589 nm, while there were no obvious peak shifts for thiamethoxam and acetamiprid. This sensor which comprises of no label techniques and expensive instruments has potential application for the detection of trace imidacloprid. PMID:23993570

  7. New approach to solar photo-Fenton operation. Raceway ponds as tertiary treatment technology.

    PubMed

    Carra, Irene; Santos-Juanes, Lucas; Acién Fernández, Francisco Gabriel; Malato, Sixto; Sánchez Pérez, José Antonio

    2014-08-30

    The photo-Fenton process has proven its efficiency in the removal of micropollutants. However, the high costs usually associated with it prevent a spread of this technology. An important factor affecting costs is the kind of photoreactor used, usually tubular with a reflecting surface. Tubular reactors like compound parabolic collectors, CPCs, involve high capital costs. In comparison, the application of less costly reactors such as the extensive raceway ponds (RPRs) would help to spread the use of the photo-Fenton process as tertiary treatment at commercial scale. As far as the authors know, RPRs have never been used in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) applications. This work is aimed at studying the applicability of RPRs to remove micropollutants with solar photo-Fenton. For this purpose, a pesticide mixture of commercial acetamiprid (ACTM) and thiabendazole (TBZ) (100μg/L each) was used in simulated secondary effluent. Iron concentration (1, 5.5 and 10mg/L) and liquid depth (5, 10 and 15cm) were studied as process variables. TBZ was removed at the beginning of the treatment (less than 5min), although ACTM removal times were longer (20-40min for the highest iron concentrations). High treatment capacity per surface area was obtained (48mg/hm(2) with 5.5mg Fe/L and 15cm liquid depth), proving the feasibility of using RPRs for micropollutant removal. PMID:25072137

  8. Effect of sampling size on the determination of accurate pesticide residue levels in Japanese agricultural commodities.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masahiro; Yajima, Tomonari; Iijima, Kazuaki; Sato, Kiyoshi

    2012-05-01

    The uncertainty in pesticide residue levels (UPRL) associated with sampling size was estimated using individual acetamiprid and cypermethrin residue data from preharvested apple, broccoli, cabbage, grape, and sweet pepper samples. The relative standard deviation from the mean of each sampling size (n = 2(x), where x = 1-6) of randomly selected samples was defined as the UPRL for each sampling size. The estimated UPRLs, which were calculated on the basis of the regulatory sampling size recommended by the OECD Guidelines on Crop Field Trials (weights from 1 to 5 kg, and commodity unit numbers from 12 to 24), ranged from 2.1% for cypermethrin in sweet peppers to 14.6% for cypermethrin in cabbage samples. The percentages of commodity exceeding the maximum residue limits (MRLs) specified by the Japanese Food Sanitation Law may be predicted from the equation derived from this study, which was based on samples of various size ranges with mean residue levels below the MRL. The estimated UPRLs have confirmed that sufficient sampling weight and numbers are required for analysis and/or re-examination of subsamples to provide accurate values of pesticide residue levels for the enforcement of MRLs. The equation derived from the present study would aid the estimation of more accurate residue levels even from small sampling sizes. PMID:22475588

  9. Effects of landuse and precipitation on pesticides and water quality in playa lakes of the southern high plains.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Todd A; Salice, Christopher J; Erickson, Richard A; McMurry, Scott T; Cox, Stephen B; Smith, Loren M

    2013-06-01

    The 25000 playa wetlands within the Southern High Plains (SHP) of the United States of America (USA) are the dominant hydrogeomorphic feature in the region, providing habitat for numerous plants and wildlife. The SHP are among the most intensively cultivated regions; there are concerns over the degradation and/or loss of playa wetland habitat. We examined water quality in playa wetlands surrounded by both grassland and agriculture and measured water concentrations of pesticides used on cotton (acephate, trifluralin, malathion, pendimethalin, tribufos, bifenthrin, λ-cyhalothrin, acetamiprid, and thiamethoxam), the dominant crop in the SHP. Pesticides used on cotton were detected in water samples collected from all playas. Precipitation events and the amount of cultivation were related to pesticide concentrations in sediment and water. Our results show that pesticide concentrations were related in some circumstances to time, precipitation, and tilled-index for some but not all pesticides. We further compared measured pesticide concentrations in playas to toxicity benchmarks used by the US EPA in pesticide ecological risk assessments to obtain some insight into the potential for ecological effects. For all pesticides in water, the maximum measured concentrations exceeded at least one toxicity benchmark, while median concentrations did not exceed any benchmarks. This analysis indicates that there is a potential for adverse effects of pesticides to aquatic organisms. PMID:23541358

  10. Pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables from the Aegean region, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bakırcı, Gözde Türköz; Yaman Acay, Dilek Bengü; Bakırcı, Fatih; Ötleş, Semih

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables from the Aegean region of Turkey. A total of 1423 samples of fresh fruit and vegetables were collected from 2010 to 2012. The samples were analysed to determine the concentrations of 186 pesticide residues. The analyses utilized ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) and gas chromatography with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD) confirmed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after a multi-residue extraction procedure (the QuEChERS method). The results were evaluated according to maximum residue limits (MRLs) for each commodity and pesticide by Turkish Regulation. All pomegranate, cauliflower and cabbage samples were pesticides-free. A total of 754 samples contained detectable residues at or below MRLs, and 48 (8.4%) of the fruit samples and 83 (9.8%) of the vegetable samples contained pesticide residues above MRLs. MRL values were most often exceeded in arugula, cucumber, lemon, and grape commodities. All detected pesticides in apricot, carrot, kiwifruit and leek were below the MRLs. Acetamiprid, chlorpyriphos and carbendazim were the most detected pesticide residues. PMID:24799252

  11. Identification and characterization of a novel calcyclin binding protein (CacyBP) gene from Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoli; Lu, Wenjing; Sun, Rujiang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2012-08-01

    Calcyclin binding protein (CacyBP), a homolog of Sgt1, was shown to interact with some S100 proteins, Skp1, tubulin, actin and ERK1/2 kinases. Studies have also shown that CacyBP is a neuronal protein in mammals. Limited information is available regarding the properties and functions of CacyBP in insects. Here, we cloned and characterized a novel CacyBP gene, named AccCacyBP, from honeybee (Apis cerana cerana). Bioinformatic analysis indicated that AccCacyBP was highly conserved and closely related to the CacyBP of other insects. Promoter analysis revealed a number of putative tissue, development and stress-related transcription factor-binding sites. RT-qPCR demonstrated that AccCacyBP was expressed at all of the stages of development, especially in the brains of honeybees. Moreover, immunohistochemistry analysis showed the presence of AccCacyBP in the brain. The transcript levels of AccCacyBP in the brains of honeybees were developmentally induced and upregulated by exposure to oxidative stresses, including UV-light, acetamiprid and HgCl(2). This study demonstrates that the CacyBP gene in honeybees may be a neuronal protein involved in the developmental regulation and the stress-response of the brain of honeybees. PMID:22539186

  12. Major Pesticides Are More Toxic to Human Cells Than Their Declared Active Principles

    PubMed Central

    Spiroux de Vendômois, Joël; Séralini, Gilles-Eric

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides are used throughout the world as mixtures called formulations. They contain adjuvants, which are often kept confidential and are called inerts by the manufacturing companies, plus a declared active principle, which is usually tested alone. We tested the toxicity of 9 pesticides, comparing active principles and their formulations, on three human cell lines (HepG2, HEK293, and JEG3). Glyphosate, isoproturon, fluroxypyr, pirimicarb, imidacloprid, acetamiprid, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole, and prochloraz constitute, respectively, the active principles of 3 major herbicides, 3 insecticides, and 3 fungicides. We measured mitochondrial activities, membrane degradations, and caspases 3/7 activities. Fungicides were the most toxic from concentrations 300–600 times lower than agricultural dilutions, followed by herbicides and then insecticides, with very similar profiles in all cell types. Despite its relatively benign reputation, Roundup was among the most toxic herbicides and insecticides tested. Most importantly, 8 formulations out of 9 were up to one thousand times more toxic than their active principles. Our results challenge the relevance of the acceptable daily intake for pesticides because this norm is calculated from the toxicity of the active principle alone. Chronic tests on pesticides may not reflect relevant environmental exposures if only one ingredient of these mixtures is tested alone. PMID:24719846

  13. Extraordinary resistance to insecticides reveals exotic Q biotype of Bemisia tabaci in the New World.

    PubMed

    Dennehy, Timothy J; Degain, Benjamin A; Harpold, Virginia S; Zaborac, Marni; Morin, Shai; Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Nichols, Robert L; Brown, Judith K; Byrne, Frank J; Li, Xianchun

    2010-12-01

    A strain of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) possessing unusually high levels of resistance to a wide range of insecticides was discovered in 2004 in the course of routine resistance monitoring in Arizona. The multiply resistant insects, collected from poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ex Klotzsch) plants purchased at a retail store in Tucson, were subjected to biotype analysis in three laboratories. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of naphthyl esterases and sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene (780 bp) confirmed the first detection of the Q biotype of B. tabaci in the New World. This U.S. Q biotype strain, referred to as Poinsettia'04, was highly resistant to two selective insect growth regulators, pyriproxyfen and buprofezin, and to mixtures of fenpropathrin and acephate. It was also unusually low in susceptibility to the neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid, acetamiprid, and thiamethoxam, relative to B biotype whiteflies. In 100 collections of whiteflies made in Arizona cotton (Gossypium spp.), vegetable, and melon (Cucumis melo L.) fields from 2001 to 2005, no Q biotypes were detected. Regions of the United States that were severely impacted by the introduction of the B biotype of B. tabaci in the 1980s would be well advised to promote measures that limit movement of the Q biotype from controlled environments into field systems and to formulate alternatives for managing this multiply-resistant biotype, in the event that it becomes more widely distributed. PMID:21309242

  14. Quantitation and accurate mass analysis of pesticides in vegetables by LC/TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Imma; Thurman, E Michael; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2005-05-01

    A quantitative method consisting of solvent extraction followed by liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS) analysis was developed for the identification and quantitation of three chloronicotinyl pesticides (imidacloprid, acetamiprid, thiacloprid) commonly used on salad vegetables. Accurate mass measurements within 3 ppm error were obtained for all the pesticides studied in various vegetable matrixes (cucumber, tomato, lettuce, pepper), which allowed an unequivocal identification of the target pesticides. Calibration curves covering 2 orders of magnitude were linear over the concentration range studied, thus showing the quantitative ability of TOF-MS as a monitoring tool for pesticides in vegetables. Matrix effects were also evaluated using matrix-matched standards showing no significant interferences between matrixes and clean extracts. Intraday reproducibility was 2-3% relative standard deviation (RSD) and interday values were 5% RSD. The precision (standard deviation) of the mass measurements was evaluated and it was less than 0.23 mDa between days. Detection limits of the chloronicotinyl insecticides in salad vegetables ranged from 0.002 to 0.01 mg/kg. These concentrations are equal to or better than the EU directives for controlled pesticides in vegetables showing that LC/TOF-MS analysis is a powerful tool for identification of pesticides in vegetables. Robustness and applicability of the method was validated for the analysis of market vegetable samples. Concentrations found in these samples were in the range of 0.02-0.17 mg/kg of vegetable. PMID:15859598

  15. Application of solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to the determination of neonicotinoid pesticide residues in fruit and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Di Muccio, Alfonso; Fidente, Paola; Barbini, Danilo Attard; Dommarco, Roberto; Seccia, Serenella; Morrica, Patrizia

    2006-03-01

    A rapid and simple method for simultaneous analysis of four neonicotinoid insecticides including acetamiprid, imidacloprid, thiacloprid and thiamethoxam in fruit and vegetable matrices has been developed. For instance, ready-to-use cartridges filled with a macroporous diatomaceous material were used to extract in a single step insecticide residues with dichloromethane from aqueous-acetone extracts of fruits and vegetables. The eluate was evaporated, the residue redissolved with methanol and then analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in the electrospray ionization (ESI) positive mode. Average recoveries of the four pesticides were between 74.5 and 105% at both spiking levels 0.1 and 1.0 mg kg(-1) in peach, pear, courgette, celery and apricot. Relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 10% for all of the recovery tests. The calculated limits of quantitation (LOQs) (0.1-0.5 mg kg(-1)) were equal or lower then the maximum residue limits (MRLs) established by European legislation (0.1-0.5 mg kg(-1)). The proposed method is fast, easy to perform and could be utilized for monitoring of pesticides residues. PMID:16448655

  16. Relative toxicity and residual activity of insecticides used in blueberry pest management: mortality of natural enemies.

    PubMed

    Roubos, Craig R; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Holdcraft, Robert; Mason, Keith S; Isaacs, Rufus

    2014-02-01

    A series of bioassays were conducted to determine the relative toxicities and residual activities of insecticides labeled for use in blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) on natural enemies, to identify products with low toxicity or short duration effects on biological control agents. In total, 14 insecticides were evaluated using treated petri dishes and four commercially available natural enemies (Aphidius colemani Viereck, Orius insidiosus [Say], Chrysoperla rufilabris [Burmeister], and Hippodamia convergens [Guérin-Menéville]). Dishes were aged under greenhouse conditions for 0, 3, 7, or 14 d before introducing insects to test residual activity. Acute effects (combined mortality and knockdown) varied by insecticide, residue age, and natural enemy species. Broad-spectrum insecticides caused high mortality to all biocontrol agents, whereas products approved for use in organic agriculture had little effect. The reduced-risk insecticide acetamiprid consistently caused significant acute effects, even after aging for 14 d. Methoxyfenozide, novaluron, and chlorantraniliprole, which also are classified as reduced-risk insecticides, had low toxicity, and along with the organic products could be compatible with biological control. This study provides information to guide blueberry growers in their selection of insecticides. Further research will be needed to determine whether adoption of a pest management program based on the use of more selective insecticides will result in higher levels of biological control in blueberry. PMID:24665711

  17. Evaluation of Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Exposed In Vitro to Neonicotinoid Insecticides News

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Segura, María Elena; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Martínez-Valenzuela, Carmen; Carbajal-López, Yolanda; Calderón-Ezquerro, María del Carmen; Cortés-Eslava, Josefina; García-Martínez, Rocío; Flores-Ramírez, Diana; Rodríguez-Romero, María Isabel; Méndez-Pérez, Patricia; Bañuelos-Ruíz, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Calypso (thiacloprid), Poncho (clothianidin), Gaucho (imidacloprid), and Jade (imidacloprid) are commercial neonicotinoid insecticides, a new class of agrochemicals in México. However, genotoxic and cytotoxic studies have not been performed. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of the four insecticides. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were evaluated using the alkaline comet and trypan blue dye exclusion assays. DNA damage was evaluated using two genotoxicity parameters: tail length and comet frequency. Exposure to 9.5 × 10−6 to 5.7 × 10−5 M Jade; 2.8 × 10−4 to 1.7 × 10−3 M Gaucho; 0.6 × 10−1 to 1.4 × 10−1 M Calypso; 1.2 × 10−1 to 9.5 × 10−1 M Poncho for 2 h induced a significant increase DNA damage with a concentration-dependent relationship. Jade was the most genotoxic of the four insecticides studied. Cytotoxicity was observed in cells exposed to 18 × 10−3 M Jade, 2.0 × 10−3 M Gaucho, 2.0 × 10−1 M Calypso, 1.07 M Poncho, and cell death occurred at 30 × 10−3 M Jade, 3.3 × 10−3 M Gaucho, 2.8 × 10−1 M Calypso, and 1.42 M Poncho. This study provides the first report of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in PBL following in vitro exposure to commercial neonicotinoid insecticides. PMID:22545045

  18. Potential exposure of pollinators to neonicotinoid insecticides from the use of insecticide seed treatments in the mid-southern United States.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Scott D; Lorenz, Gus M; Catchot, Angus L; Gore, Jeff; Cook, Don; Skinner, John; Mueller, Thomas C; Johnson, Donald R; Zawislak, Jon; Barber, Jonathan

    2014-08-19

    Research was done during 2012 to evaluate the potential exposure of pollinators to neonicotinoid insecticides used as seed treatments on corn, cotton, and soybean. Samples were collected from small plot evaluations of seed treatments and from commercial fields in agricultural production areas in Arkansas, Mississippi, and Tennessee. In total, 560 samples were analyzed for concentrations of clothianidin, imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, and their metabolites. These included pollen from corn and cotton, nectar from cotton, flowers from soybean, honey bees, Apis mellifera L., and pollen carried by foragers returning to hives, preplanting and in-season soil samples, and wild flowers adjacent to recently planted fields. Neonicotinoid insecticides were detected at a level of 1 ng/g or above in 23% of wild flower samples around recently planted fields, with an average detection level of about 10 ng/g. We detected neonicotinoid insecticides in the soil of production fields prior to planting at an average concentration of about 10 ng/g, and over 80% of the samples having some insecticide present. Only 5% of foraging honey bees tested positive for the presence of neonicotinoid insecticides, and there was only one trace detection (< 1 ng/g) in pollen being carried by those bees. Soybean flowers, cotton pollen, and cotton nectar contained little or no neonicotinoids resulting from insecticide seed treatments. Average levels of neonicotinoid insecticides in corn pollen ranged from less than 1 to 6 ng/g. The highest neonicotinoid concentrations were found in soil collected during early flowering from insecticide seed treatment trials. However, these levels were generally not well correlated with neonicotinoid concentrations in flowers, pollen, or nectar. Concentrations in flowering structures were well below defined levels of concern thought to cause acute mortality in honey bees. The potential implications of our findings are discussed. PMID:25010122

  19. Exposure of native bees foraging in an agricultural landscape to current-use pesticides.

    PubMed

    Hladik, Michelle L; Vandever, Mark; Smalling, Kelly L

    2016-01-15

    The awareness of insects as pollinators and indicators of environmental quality has grown in recent years, partially in response to declines in honey bee (Apis mellifera) populations. While most pesticide research has focused on honey bees, there has been less work on native bee populations. To determine the exposure of native bees to pesticides, bees were collected from an existing research area in northeastern Colorado in both grasslands (2013-2014) and wheat fields (2014). Traps were deployed bi-monthly during the summer at each land cover type and all bees, regardless of species, were composited as whole samples and analyzed for 136 current-use pesticides and degradates. This reconnaissance approach provides a sampling of all species and represents overall pesticide exposure (internal and external). Nineteen pesticides and degradates were detected in 54 composite samples collected. Compounds detected in >2% of the samples included: insecticides thiamethoxam (46%), bifenthrin (28%), clothianidin (24%), chlorpyrifos (17%), imidacloprid (13%), fipronil desulfinyl (7%; degradate); fungicides azoxystrobin (17%), pyraclostrobin (11%), fluxapyroxad (9%), and propiconazole (9%); herbicides atrazine (19%) and metolachlor (9%). Concentrations ranged from 1 to 310 ng/g for individual pesticides. Pesticides were detected in samples collected from both grasslands and wheat fields; the location of the sample and the surrounding land cover at the 1000 m radius influenced the pesticides detected but because of a small number of temporally comparable samples, correlations between pesticide concentration and land cover were not significant. The results show native bees collected in an agricultural landscape are exposed to multiple pesticides, these results can direct future research on routes/timing of pesticide exposure and the design of future conservation efforts for pollinators. PMID:26520270

  20. Insecticidal suppression of Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) vector of huanglongbing pathogens.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Jawwad A; Kostyk, Barry C; Stansly, Philip A

    2014-01-01

    Diaphorina citri vectors pathogens that cause 'huanglongbing' or citrus greening disease which poses a serious threat to citrus production worldwide. Vector suppression is critical to reduce disease spread. Efficacy is a main concern when choosing an insecticide. Insecticidal treatments of 49 products or 44 active ingredients (a.i) labeled or experimental were field tested between 2005-2013 as foliar sprays (250 treatments, 39 a.i) or soil applications (47 treatments, 9 a.i) to control D. citri in citrus. A combined effect of nymphal and adult suppression in response to sprays of 23 insecticides representing 9 modes of action (MoA) groups and 3 unknown MoA provided more than 90% reduction of adult D. citri over 24-68 days. Observable effects on nymphs were generally of shorter duration due to rapid maturation of flush. However, reduction of 76-100% nymphs or adults over 99-296 days was seen on young trees receiving drenches of the neonicotinoids imidacloprid, thiamethoxam or clothianidin (MoA 4A) and a novel anthranilic diamide, cyantraniliprole (MoA 28). Effective products identified for foliar sprays to control D. citri provide sufficient MoA groups for rotation to delay evolution of insecticide resistance by D. citri and other pests. However, cyantraniliprole is now the only available alternative for rotation with neonicotinoids in soil application to young trees. Sprays of up to eight of the most effective insecticides could be rotated over a year without repetition of any MoA and little or no recourse to neonicotinoids or cyantraniliprole, so important for protection of young trees. Other considerations effecting decisions of what and when to spray include prevalence of huanglongbing, pest pressure, pre-harvest intervals, overall budget, equipment availability, and conservation of beneficial arthropods. Examples of spray programs utilizing broad-spectrum and relatively selective insecticides are provided to improve vector management and may vary depending on

  1. Impact of Chronic Neonicotinoid Exposure on Honeybee Colony Performance and Queen Supersedure

    PubMed Central

    Sandrock, Christoph; Tanadini, Matteo; Tanadini, Lorenzo G.; Fauser-Misslin, Aline; Potts, Simon G.; Neumann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Honeybees provide economically and ecologically vital pollination services to crops and wild plants. During the last decade elevated colony losses have been documented in Europe and North America. Despite growing consensus on the involvement of multiple causal factors, the underlying interactions impacting on honeybee health and colony failure are not fully resolved. Parasites and pathogens are among the main candidates, but sublethal exposure to widespread agricultural pesticides may also affect bees. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate effects of sublethal dietary neonicotinoid exposure on honeybee colony performance, a fully crossed experimental design was implemented using 24 colonies, including sister-queens from two different strains, and experimental in-hive pollen feeding with or without environmentally relevant concentrations of thiamethoxam and clothianidin. Honeybee colonies chronically exposed to both neonicotinoids over two brood cycles exhibited decreased performance in the short-term resulting in declining numbers of adult bees (−28%) and brood (−13%), as well as a reduction in honey production (−29%) and pollen collections (−19%), but colonies recovered in the medium-term and overwintered successfully. However, significantly decelerated growth of neonicotinoid-exposed colonies during the following spring was associated with queen failure, revealing previously undocumented long-term impacts of neonicotinoids: queen supersedure was observed for 60% of the neonicotinoid-exposed colonies within a one year period, but not for control colonies. Linked to this, neonicotinoid exposure was significantly associated with a reduced propensity to swarm during the next spring. Both short-term and long-term effects of neonicotinoids on colony performance were significantly influenced by the honeybees’ genetic background. Conclusions/Significance Sublethal neonicotinoid exposure did not provoke increased winter losses. Yet

  2. Exposure of native bees foraging in an agricultural landscape to current-use pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, Michelle L.; Vandever, Mark; Smalling, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The awareness of insects as pollinators and indicators of environmental quality has grown in recent years, partially in response to declines in honey bee (Apis mellifera) populations. While most pesticide research has focused on honey bees, there has been less work on native bee populations. To determine the exposure of native bees to pesticides, bees were collected from an existing research area in northeastern Colorado from two land cover types: grasslands (2013-2014) and wheat fields (2014). Traps were deployed bi-monthly during the summer at each land cover type and all bees, regardless of species, were composited as whole samples and analyzed for 136 current-use pesticides and degradates. This reconnaissance approach provides a sampling of all species and represents overall pesticide exposure (internal and external). Nineteen pesticides and degradates were detected in 54 composite samples collected. Compounds detected in >10% of the samples included the insecticides thiamethoxam (46%), bifenthrin (28%), clothianidin (24%), chlorpyrifos (17%), and imidacloprid (13%), the fungicides azoxystrobin (17%), and pyraclostrobin (11%), and the herbicide atrazine (19%). Concentrations ranged from 1.1 to 312 ng/g for individual pesticides. Pesticides were detected in samples collected from both grasslands and wheat fields; the location of the sample and the surrounding land cover at the 1000 m buffer influenced the pesticides detected but because of a small number of temporally comparable samples, correlations between pesticide concentration and land cover were not significant. The results show native bees collected in both grasslands and wheat fields are exposed to multiple pesticides, these results can direct future research on routes/timing of pesticide exposure and the design of future conservation efforts for pollinators.

  3. Neonicotinoids in the Canadian aquatic environment: a literature review on current use products with a focus on fate, exposure, and biological effects.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J C; Dubetz, C; Palace, V P

    2015-02-01

    Developed to replace organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, neonicotinoids are structurally similar to nicotine. The three main neonicotinoid insecticides, imidacloprid, clothianidin, and thiamethoxam, are being re-evaluated by Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA). An important aspect of the re-evaluation is the potential for effects in non-target organisms, including aquatic organisms. Leaching into surface waters is one of the major concerns surrounding extensive use of neonicotinoids, especially in close proximity to water bodies. The PMRA has classified IMI as 'persistent' with a 'high' leaching potential. Globally, neonicotinoids have been detected in a variety of water bodies, typically at concentrations in the low μg/L range. While IMI has been included in some monitoring exercises, there are currently very few published data for the presence of CLO and THM in Canadian water bodies. The majority of neonicotinoid toxicity studies have been conducted with IMI due to its longer presence on the market and high prevalence of use. Aquatic insects are particularly vulnerable to neonicotinoids and chronic toxicity has been observed at concentrations of IMI below 1 μg/L. Acute toxicity has been reported at concentrations below 20 μg/L for the most sensitive species, including Hyalella azteca, ostracods, and Chironomus riparius. Fish, algae, amphibians, and molluscs are relatively insensitive to IMI. However, the biological effects of THM and CLO have not been as well explored. The Canadian interim water quality guideline for IMI is 0.23 μg/L, but there is currently insufficient use, fate, and toxicological information available to establish guidelines for CLO and THM. Based on concentrations of neonicotinoids reported in surface waters in Canada and globally, there is potential for aquatic invertebrates to be negatively impacted by neonicotinoids. Therefore, it is necessary to address knowledge gaps to inform decisions around guidelines

  4. Sensitive determination of mixtures of neonicotinoid and fungicide residues in pollen and single bumblebees using a scaled down QuEChERS method for exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    David, Arthur; Botías, Cristina; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Goulson, Dave; Hill, Elizabeth M

    2015-10-01

    To accurately estimate exposure of bees to pesticides, analytical methods are needed to enable quantification of nanogram/gram (ng/g) levels of contaminants in small samples of pollen or the individual insects. A modified QuEChERS extraction method coupled with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) analysis was tested to quantify residues of 19 commonly used neonicotinoids and fungicides and the synergist, piperonyl butoxide, in 100 mg samples of pollen and in samples of individual bumblebees (Bombus terrestris). Final recoveries ranged from 71 to 102 % for most compounds with a repeatability of below 20 % for both pollen and bumblebee extracts spiked at 5 and 40 ng/g. The method enables the detection of all compounds at sub-ng/g levels in both matrices and the method detection limits (MDL) ranged from 0.01 to 0.84 ng/g in pollen and 0.01 to 0.96 ng/g in individual bumblebees. Using this method, mixtures of neonicotinoids (thiamethoxam, clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiacloprid) and fungicides (carbendazim, spiroxamine, boscalid, tebuconazole, prochloraz, metconazole, fluoxastrobin, pyraclostrobin and trifloxystrobin) were detected in pollens of field bean, strawberry and raspberry at concentrations ranging from MDL, and in some bees, the fungicides carbendazim, boscalid, tebuconazole, flusilazole and metconazole were present at concentrations between 0.80 to 30 ng/g. This new method allows the analysis of mixtures of neonicotinoids and fungicides at trace levels in small quantities of pollen and individual bumblebees and thus will facilitate exposure assessment studies. PMID:26329280

  5. Effect of Bt maize and soil insecticides on yield, injury, and rootworm survival: implications for resistance management.

    PubMed

    Petzold-Maxwell, Jennifer L; Meinke, Lance J; Gray, Michael E; Estes, Ronald E; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2013-10-01

    A 2-yr field experiment was conducted to determine the effects on Diabrotica spp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) of an insecticidal seed treatment (Poncho 1250, (AI)/clothianidin) and a granular insecticide (Aztec 2.1G, (AI)/tebupirimphos and cyfluthrin) alone and in combination with maize producing the insectidical toxin Cry3Bb1 derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Yields for Bt maize plots were significantly greater than for non-Bt maize; however, insecticides did not significantly affect yield. Insecticides significantly decreased root injury in non-Bt maize plots, but there were no significant differences in root injury between Bt maize with or without either insecticide. Maize producing the Bt toxin Cry3Bb1 and the soil-applied insecticide Aztec significantly decreased survival of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte), while only Bt maize significantly decreased survival of the northern corn rootworm (Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence). For both species, Bt maize and each of the insecticides delayed emergence. In the absence of density-dependent mortality, Bt maize imposed 71 and 80% reduction in survival on the western corn rootworm and the northern corn rootworm, respectively. The data from this study do not support combining insecticide with Bt maize because the addition of insecticide did not increase yield or reduce root injury for Bt maize, and the level of rootworm mortality achieved with conventional insecticide was likely too low to delay the evolution of Bt resistance. In addition, delays in emergence from Bt maize combined with insecticides could promote assortative mating among Bt-selected individuals, which may hasten resistance evolution. PMID:24224233

  6. Applying an integrated refuge to manage western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae): effects on survival, fitness, and selection pressure.

    PubMed

    Petzold-Maxwell, Jennifer L; Alves, Analiza P; Estes, Ronald E; Gray, Michael E; Meinke, Lance J; Shields, Elson J; Thompson, Stephen D; Tinsley, Nicholas A; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2013-10-01

    The refuge strategy can delay resistance of insect pests to transgenic maize producing toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). This is important for the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), because of its history of adaptation to several management practices. A 2-yr study across four locations was conducted to measure the effects of integrated refuge (i.e., blended refuge) on western corn rootworm survival to adulthood, fitness characteristics, and susceptibility to Bt maize in the subsequent generation. The treatments tested in this study were as follows: a pure stand of Bt maize (event DAS-59122-7, which produces Bt toxins Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1), a pure stand of refuge (non-Bt maize), and two variations on an integrated refuge consisting of 94.4% Bt maize and 5.6% non-Bt maize. Within the two integrated refuge treatments, refuge seeds received a neonicotinoid insecticidal seed treatment of either 1.25 mg clothianidin per kernel or 0.25 mg thiamethoxam per kernel. Insects in the pure stand refuge treatment had greater survival to adulthood and earlier emergence than in all other treatments. Although fecundity, longevity, and head capsule width were reduced in treatments containing Bt maize for some site by year combinations, Bt maize did not have a significant effect on these factors when testing data across all sites and years. We found no differences in susceptibility of larval progeny to Bt maize in bioassays using progeny of adults collected from the four treatments. PMID:24224265

  7. A multi-year field study to evaluate the environmental fate and agronomic effects of insecticide mixtures.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Sara A; Strain, Katherine E; Campbell, Laura A; Young, Bryan G; Lydy, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    A mixture of insecticides used in corn production was monitored over a three-year period in a field study to determine how long each persists in the environment, where each insecticide travels within the corn field, and the efficacy of using soil-applied insecticides with genetically modified corn. The genetically modified corn contained the insecticidal Cry1Ab and Cry3Bb1 proteins (Bt corn) and the Cry1Ab protein was found to persist only during the corn growing season in soil, runoff water, and runoff sediment with highest concentrations measured during pollination. Very low concentrations of Cry1Ab proteins were measured in soil collected in the non-Bt corn field, and no Cry1Ab proteins were detected in shallow groundwater or soil pore water. Clothianidin, a neonicotinoid insecticide used as a seed coating, was detected in all matrices and remained persistent throughout the year in soil pore water. Tefluthrin, a pyrethroid insecticide applied at planting to control corn rootworm larvae (Diabrotica spp., Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) populations, was consistently detected in soil, runoff water, and runoff sediment during the corn growing season, but was not detected in groundwater or soil pore water. Tefluthrin did not have an effect on root damage from corn rootworm larvae feeding to Bt corn, but did prevent damage to non-Bt corn. A slight reduction in grain yield was observed in the non-Bt, no tefluthrin treatment when compared to all other treatments, but no significant difference in grain yield was observed among Bt corn treatments regardless of soil insecticide application. In the current study, the use of tefluthrin on Bt corn did not significantly affect crop damage or yield, and tefluthrin may travel off-site in runoff water and sediment. PMID:25163650

  8. Pharmacological identification of cholinergic receptor subtypes on Drosophila melanogaster larval heart.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Cole A; Ritter, Kyle; Robinson, Jonathan; English, Connor; Cooper, Robin L

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster heart is a popular model in which to study cardiac physiology and development. Progress has been made in understanding the role of endogenous compounds in regulating cardiac function in this model. It is well characterized that common neurotransmitters act on many peripheral and non-neuronal tissues as they flow through the hemolymph of insects. Many of these neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), have been shown to act directly on the D. melanogaster larval heart. ACh is a primary neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) of vertebrates and at the neuromuscular junctions on skeletal and cardiac tissue. In insects, ACh is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter of sensory neurons and is also prominent in the CNS. A full understanding regarding the regulation of the Drosophila cardiac physiology by the cholinergic system remains poorly understood. Here we use semi-intact D. melanogaster larvae to study the pharmacological profile of cholinergic receptor subtypes, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), in modulating heart rate (HR). Cholinergic receptor agonists, nicotine and muscarine both increase HR, while nAChR agonist clothianidin exhibits no significant effect when exposed to an open preparation at concentrations as low as 100 nM. In addition, both nAChR and mAChR antagonists increase HR as well but also display capabilities of blocking agonist actions. These results provide evidence that both of these receptor subtypes display functional significance in regulating the larval heart's pacemaker activity. PMID:26438517

  9. Life stage toxicity and residual activity of insecticides to codling moth and oriental fruit moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    PubMed

    Magalhaes, Leonardo C; Walgenbach, James F

    2011-12-01

    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), and oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck), are two key pests of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) in North Carolina. Growers extensively relied on organophosphate insecticides, primarily azinphosmethyl, for > 40 yr to manage these pests. Because of organophosphate resistance development and regulatory actions, growers are transitioning to management programs that use new, reduced-risk, and OP-replacement insecticides. This study evaluated the toxicity of a diversity of replacement insecticides to eggs, larvae, and adults, as well as an assessment of their residual activity, to codling moth and oriental fruit moth. Laboratory-susceptible strains of both species were used for all bioassays. Fresh field-harvested apples were used as a media for assessing the ovicidal activity of insecticides. For larval studies, insecticides were topically applied to the surface of lima bean-based diet, onto which neonates were placed. Toxicity was based on two measures of mortality; 5-d mortality and development to adult stage. Ovicidal bioassays showed that oriental fruit moth eggs were generally more tolerant than codling moth eggs to insecticides, with novaluron, acetamiprid, and azinphoshmethyl having the highest levels of toxicity to eggs of both species. In contrast, codling moth larvae generally were more tolerant than oriental fruit moth to most insecticides. Methoxyfenozide and pyriproxyfen were the only insecticides with lower LC50 values against codling moth than oriental fruit moth neonates. Moreover, a number of insecticides, particularly the IGRs methoxyfenozide and novaluron, the anthranilic diamide chlorantriliprole, and the spinosyn spinetoram, provided equal or longer residual activity against codling moth compared with azinphosmethyl in field studies. Results are discussed in relation to their use in devising field use patterns of insecticides and for insecticide resistance monitoring programs. PMID:22299357

  10. Multi-Drug Resistance Transporters and a Mechanism-Based Strategy for Assessing Risks of Pesticide Combinations to Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Guseman, Alex J; Miller, Kaliah; Kunkle, Grace; Dively, Galen P; Pettis, Jeffrey S; Evans, Jay D; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Hawthorne, David J

    2016-01-01

    Annual losses of honey bee colonies remain high and pesticide exposure is one possible cause. Dangerous combinations of pesticides, plant-produced compounds and antibiotics added to hives may cause or contribute to losses, but it is very difficult to test the many combinations of those compounds that bees encounter. We propose a mechanism-based strategy for simplifying the assessment of combinations of compounds, focusing here on compounds that interact with xenobiotic handling ABC transporters. We evaluate the use of ivermectin as a model substrate for these transporters. Compounds that increase sensitivity of bees to ivermectin may be inhibiting key transporters. We show that several compounds commonly encountered by honey bees (fumagillin, Pristine, quercetin) significantly increased honey bee mortality due to ivermectin and significantly reduced the LC50 of ivermectin suggesting that they may interfere with transporter function. These inhibitors also significantly increased honey bees sensitivity to the neonicotinoid insecticide acetamiprid. This mechanism-based strategy may dramatically reduce the number of tests needed to assess the possibility of adverse combinations among pesticides. We also demonstrate an in vivo transporter assay that provides physical evidence of transporter inhibition by tracking the dynamics of a fluorescent substrate of these transporters (Rhodamine B) in bee tissues. Significantly more Rhodamine B remains in the head and hemolymph of bees pretreated with higher concentrations of the transporter inhibitor verapamil. Mechanism-based strategies for simplifying the assessment of adverse chemical interactions such as described here could improve our ability to identify those combinations that pose significantly greater risk to bees and perhaps improve the risk assessment protocols for honey bees and similar sensitive species. PMID:26840460

  11. Activity of an essential oil derived from Chenopodium ambrosioides on greenhouse insect pests.

    PubMed

    Cloyd, Raymond A; Chiasson, Helene

    2007-04-01

    This study involved both greenhouse and laboratory experiments evaluating the effect of an essential oil product (QRD 400) derived from Chenopodium ambrosioides variety nr. Ambrosioides L. (Chenopodiaceae) on greenhouse insect pests that feed on different plant parts: citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri (Risso); longtailed mealybug, Pseudococcus longispinus (Targioni Tozzetti); western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), and fungus gnats (Bradysia spp.). Treatments were applied to coleus, Solenostemon scutellarioides plants; transvaal daisy, Gerbera jamesonii flowers; or growing medium, depending on the insect pest. The essential oil was most effective, based on adult emergence, on both the second and third instars of the fungus gnat Bradysia sp. nr. coprophila when applied as a drench to growing medium. In addition, there was a significant rate response for QRD 400 on fungus gnats. The QRD 400 treatment had the highest percentage of mortality on longtailed mealybug (55%) compared with the other treatments. However, the essential oil was less effective against citrus mealybug (3% mortality) and western flower thrips adults (18-34% mortality) compared with standard insecticides, such as acetamiprid (TriStar) and spinosad (Conserve), which are typically used by greenhouse producers. This lack of efficacy may be associated with volatility and short residual properties of the essential oil or with the essential oil taking longer to kill insect pests. Other insecticides and miticides evaluated, including sesame oil, garlic, paraffinic oil, and Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, provided minimal control of the designated insect pests. In addition, adult rove beetle Atheta coriaria Kraatz adults were not effective in controlling the larval instars of fungus gnats when applied at a rate of five adults per container. PMID:17461071

  12. Monitoring for Insecticide Resistance in Asian Citrus Psyllid (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) Populations in Florida.

    PubMed

    Kanga, Lambert H B; Eason, Julius; Haseeb, Muhammad; Qureshi, Jawwad; Stansly, Philip

    2016-04-01

    The development of insecticide resistance in Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, populations is a serious threat to the citrus industry. As a contribution to a resistance management strategy, we developed a glass vial technique to monitor field populations of Asian citrus psyllid for insecticide resistance. Diagnostic concentrations needed to separate susceptible genotypes from resistant individuals were determined for cypermethrin (0.5 μg per vial), malathion (1.0 μg per vial), diazinon (1.0 μg per vial), carbaryl (1.0 μg per vial), carbofuran (0.1 μg per vial), methomyl (1.0 μg per vial), propoxur (1.0 μg per vial), endosulfan (1.0 μg per vial), imidacloprid (0.5 μg per vial), acetamiprid (5.0 μg per vial), chlorfenapyr (2.5 μg per vial), and fenpyroximate (2.5 μg per vial). In 2014, resistance to two carbamate insecticides (carbaryl and carbofuran), one organophosphate (malathion), one pyrethroid (cypermethrin), and one pyrazole (fenpyroximate) was detected in field populations of Asian citrus psyllid in Immokalee, FL. There was no resistance detected to diazinon, methomyl, propoxur, endosulfan, imidacloprid, and chlorfenapyr. The levels of insecticide resistance were variable and unstable, suggesting that resistance could be successfully managed. The results validate the use of the glass vial bioassay to monitor for resistance in Asian citrus psyllid populations and provide the basis for the development of a resistance management strategy designed to extend the efficacy of all classes of insecticides used for control of the Asian citrus psyllid. PMID:26709293

  13. Multi-Drug Resistance Transporters and a Mechanism-Based Strategy for Assessing Risks of Pesticide Combinations to Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Guseman, Alex J.; Miller, Kaliah; Kunkle, Grace; Dively, Galen P.; Pettis, Jeffrey S.; Evans, Jay D.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Hawthorne, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Annual losses of honey bee colonies remain high and pesticide exposure is one possible cause. Dangerous combinations of pesticides, plant-produced compounds and antibiotics added to hives may cause or contribute to losses, but it is very difficult to test the many combinations of those compounds that bees encounter. We propose a mechanism-based strategy for simplifying the assessment of combinations of compounds, focusing here on compounds that interact with xenobiotic handling ABC transporters. We evaluate the use of ivermectin as a model substrate for these transporters. Compounds that increase sensitivity of bees to ivermectin may be inhibiting key transporters. We show that several compounds commonly encountered by honey bees (fumagillin, Pristine, quercetin) significantly increased honey bee mortality due to ivermectin and significantly reduced the LC50 of ivermectin suggesting that they may interfere with transporter function. These inhibitors also significantly increased honey bees sensitivity to the neonicotinoid insecticide acetamiprid. This mechanism-based strategy may dramatically reduce the number of tests needed to assess the possibility of adverse combinations among pesticides. We also demonstrate an in vivo transporter assay that provides physical evidence of transporter inhibition by tracking the dynamics of a fluorescent substrate of these transporters (Rhodamine B) in bee tissues. Significantly more Rhodamine B remains in the head and hemolymph of bees pretreated with higher concentrations of the transporter inhibitor verapamil. Mechanism-based strategies for simplifying the assessment of adverse chemical interactions such as described here could improve our ability to identify those combinations that pose significantly greater risk to bees and perhaps improve the risk assessment protocols for honey bees and similar sensitive species. PMID:26840460

  14. Killing Them with Kindness? In-Hive Medications May Inhibit Xenobiotic Efflux Transporters and Endanger Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Hawthorne, David J.; Dively, Galen P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Honey bees (Apis mellifera) have recently experienced higher than normal overwintering colony losses. Many factors have been evoked to explain the losses, among which are the presence of residues of pesticides and veterinary products in hives. Multiple residues are present at the same time, though most often in low concentrations so that no single product has yet been associated with losses. Involvement of a combination of residues to losses may however not be excluded. To understand the impact of an exposure to combined residues on honey bees, we propose a mechanism-based strategy, focusing here on Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) transporters as mediators of those interactions. Methodology/Principal Findings Using whole-animal bioassays, we demonstrate through inhibition by verapamil that the widely used organophosphate and pyrethroid acaricides coumaphos and τ-fluvalinate, and three neonicotinoid insecticides: imidacloprid, acetamiprid and thiacloprid are substrates of one or more MDR transporters. Among the candidate inhibitors of honey bee MDR transporters is the in-hive antibiotic oxytetracycline. Bees prefed oxytetracycline were significantly sensitized to the acaricides coumaphos and τ-fluvalinate, suggesting that the antibiotic may interfere with the normal excretion or metabolism of these pesticides. Conclusions/Significance Many bee hives receive regular treatments of oxytetracycline and acaricides for prevention and treatment of disease and parasites. Our results suggest that seasonal co-application of these medicines to bee hives could increase the adverse effects of these and perhaps other pesticides. Our results also demonstrate the utility of a mechanism-based strategy. By identifying pesticides and apicultural medicines that are substrates and inhibitors of xenobiotic transporters we prioritize the testing of those chemical combinations most likely to result in adverse interactions. PMID:22073195

  15. Control of sawflies in apple and pear in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Bangels, E; Belien, T

    2013-01-01

    In the Belgian fruit growing area, sawflies are generally common but minor pests in pome fruit. Though, intensity and frequency of sawfly damage in apple and pear is increasing the last years in IPM and especially in organic orchards. The main species are apple sawfly (Hoplocampa testudinea Klug) and pear sawfly (Hoplocaompa brevis Klug) and recently also pear shoot sawfly (Janus compressus Fabricius). Here we report efficacy results on all three sawfly species fromtrial of three consecutive years (2011, 2012, and 2013). Flights and embryonic development were monitored and small plot efficacy trials were executed. Control of apple sawfly was complete (97.6% Abbott -trial 2011) when thiacloprid at 120 g/ha LWA was applied at the moment embryos are visible in the sawfly eggs. In 2012, a trial was executed on pear sawfly. Applications with thiacloprid were executed when the embryo was visible in the pear sawfly eggs and earlier at the start of egg laying. At both application timings, 100% Abbott efficacy was reached. A number of other active ingredients were tested at the moment embryos are visible in the sawfly eggs and very interesting efficacy results were reached for thiofanate-methyl, indoxacarb, spinosad, pyrethrins + piperonyl butoxide (PBO) and acetamiprid. In 2013, a preflowering application with pyrethrins + PBO reached the highest control against this pest. The most effective active ingredients of the pear sawfly trial were applied also in a trial on pear shoot sawfly. Efficacies were low or lacking, except for thiacloprid. Thiacloprid is in pear growing in Belgium only registered before flowering and after harvest. Therefore further research is needed to test the effect of earlier applications against this pest. This is a valuable efficacy study on occasionally occurring pests that are able to cause considerable economic losses. PMID:25145248

  16. Photolytic and photocatalytic degradation of 6-chloronicotinic acid.

    PubMed

    Zabar, Romina; Dolenc, Darko; Jerman, Tina; Franko, Mladen; Trebše, Polonca

    2011-10-01

    This work describes for the first time the photolytic and photocatalytic degradation of 6-chloronicotinic acid (6CNA) in double deionised water, which is a degradation product of neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid and acetamiprid, and it is known to appear in different environmental matrices. Photolytic experiments were performed with three UVA (ultraviolet A) polychromatic fluorescent lamps with broad maximum at 355 nm, while photocatalytic experiments were performed using immobilised titanium dioxide (TiO₂) on six glass slides in the spinning basket inside a photocatalytic quartz cell under similar irradiation conditions. Photolytic degradation revealed no change in concentration of 6CNA within 120 min of irradiation, while the photocatalytic degradation within 120 min, obeyed first-order kinetics. The observed disappearance rate constant was k=0.011 ± 0.001 min⁻¹ and t½ was 63.1 ± 5.5 min. Mineralisation rate was estimated through total organic carbon (TOC) and measurements revealed no carbon removal in case of photolysis after 120 min of exposure. However in photocatalytic experiments 46 ± 7% mineralisation was achieved within 120 min of irradiation. Nevertheless, the removal of total nitrogen (TN) was not observed across all experiments. Ion chromatographic analyses indicated transformation of chlorine atoms to chloride and increase of nitrate(V) ions only via photocatalytic experiments. Efficiency of selected advanced oxidation process (AOP) was investigated through toxicity assessment with Vibrio fischeri luminescent bacteria and revealed higher adverse effects of treated samples on bacteria following photocatalytic degradation in spite of the fact that higher mineralisation was achieved. New hydroxylated product generated in photocatalytic experiments with TiO₂, was confirmed with liquid chromatography-electro spray ionisation mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) analyses, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and nuclear magnetic

  17. Assessment of toxicity risk of insecticides used in rice ecosystem on Trichogramma japonicum, an egg parasitoid of rice lepidopterans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueping; Wu, Changxing; Wang, Yanhua; Cang, Tao; Chen, Liping; Yu, Ruixian; Wang, Qiang

    2012-02-01

    Both chemical and biological methods are essential for control of insects, for example, lepidopterans, on rice. Thus, it is important to know the effect of chemicals on the biological control agents. In this study, we assessed the toxicity of commonly used insecticides on a biological control agent, Trichogramma japonicum Ahmead (an egg parasitoid of rice lepidopterans) by using a dry film residue method. Results showed that thirty insecticides from seven chemical classes exhibited various degree of toxicity to this parasitoid. Among the seven classes of chemicals tested, organophosphates (chlorpyrifos, fenitrothion, phoxim, profenofos, and triazophos) and carbamates (carbaryl, carbsulfan, isoprocarb, metolcarb, and promecarb) exhibited the highest intrinsic toxicity to T. japponicum, with an LC50 of 0.035 (0.029-0.044) to 0.49 (0.34-0.87) mg active ingredient (a.i.) L(-1), followed by antibiotics (abamectin, emamectin benzoate, and ivermectin), phenylpyrazoles (butane-fipronil, ethiprole, and fipronil), pyrethroids (cyhalthrin, cypermethrin, fenpropathrin, and lambda-cyhaothrin), and neonicotinoids (acetamiprid, imidacloprid, imidaclothiz, nitenpyram, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam). Moreover, the insect growth regulator insecticides (chlorfluazuron, fufenozide, hexaflumuron and tebufenozide) exhibited the lowest toxicity to the wasps with an LC50 of 3,383 (2406-5499) to 30206 (23107-41008) mg ai. L(-1). Risk quotient analysis showed that phenylpyrazoles, pyrethroids, insect growth regulators, neonicotinoids (with the exception of thiamethoxam), and antibiotics (with the exception of abamectin) are classified as safe agents to the parasitoid, while organophosphates and carbamates are classified as slightly, moderately, or highly toxic agents to the parasitoid. The data presented in this paper provided useful information on the selection of compatible insecticides with T. japonicum. PMID:22420260

  18. Management strategies in apple orchards influence earwig community.

    PubMed

    Malagnoux, Laure; Marliac, Gaëlle; Simon, Sylvaine; Rault, Magali; Capowiez, Yvan

    2015-04-01

    Our aim was to assess whether different apple orchard management strategies (low-input, organic, Integrated Pest Management (IPM)) would have an effect on earwigs, which are important natural enemies of apple pests. These commercial orchards were as well compared to abandoned orchards. The density of Forficula auricularia and Forficula pubescens was studied for three years in 74 orchards around Avignon. The pesticide usage, some orchard characteristics and two small-scale landscape parameters were characterized. Pesticide use was significantly different between low-input, organic and IPM orchards with particularly significant differences in the number of insecticide applications (2.2, 4.9 and 9.2 respectively). Pesticide use had a much stronger impact on earwig community than other characteristics. F. auricularia density was significantly lower in IPM orchards (0.47 individuals per tree) compared to organic, low-input and abandoned orchards (3.1, 4.5 and 1.6 individuals per tree, respectively). F. pubescens was almost absent from IPM orchards and its abundance was higher in abandoned or low-input orchards compared to organic orchards (1.5 and 2.8 vs 0.8 individuals per tree). The percentage of F. pubescens in the earwig community decreased from abandoned (52%) to low-input (40%), organic (15%) and IPM orchards (0.5%). These results were confirmed by LD50 assays showing that for the two pesticides causing mortality close to normal application rates (chlorpyrifos-ethyl and acetamiprid), F. pubescens was significantly more sensitive than F. auricularia. Since earwigs are also easy to capture and identify, they may be useful to estimate the effects of management strategies and their modification in pome fruit orchards. PMID:25577700

  19. Suspected poisoning of domestic animals by pesticides.

    PubMed

    Caloni, Francesca; Cortinovis, Cristina; Rivolta, Marina; Davanzo, Franca

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective study was carried out by reviewing all suspected cases of domestic animal poisoning attributed to pesticides, reported to the Milan Poison Control Centre (MPCC) between January 2011 and December 2013. During this period, pesticides were found to be responsible for 37.3% of all suspected poisoning enquiries received (815). The most commonly species involved was the dog (71.1% of calls) followed by the cat (15.8%), while a limited number of cases involved horses, goats and sheep. Most cases of exposure (47.1%) resulted in mild to moderate clinical signs. The outcome was reported in 59.9% of these cases, with death occurring in 10.4% of them. Insecticides (40.8%) proved to be the most common group of pesticides involved and exposure to pyrethrins-pyrethroids accounted for the majority of calls. According to the MPCC data, there has been a decrease in the number of suspected poisonings cases attributed to pesticides that have been banned by the EU, including aldicarb, carbofuran, endosulfan and paraquat. In contrast, there has been an increase of suspected poisoning cases attributed to the neonicotinoids, imidacloprid and acetamiprid, probably due to their widespread use in recent years. Cases of suspected poisoning that involved exposure to rodenticides accounted for 27.6% of calls received by the MPCC and anticoagulant rodenticides were the primary cause of calls, with many cases involving brodifacoum and bromadiolone. Herbicides were involved in 14.2% of calls related to pesticides and glyphosate was the main culprit in cases involving dogs, cats, horses, goats and sheep. As far as exposure to molluscicides (11.5%) and fungicides (5.9%), most of the cases involved dogs and the suspected poisoning agents were metaldehyde and copper compounds respectively. The data collected are useful in determining trends in poisoning episodes and identifying newly emerging toxicants, thus demonstrating the prevalence of pesticides as causative agents in animal

  20. Development of a new cucumber reference material for pesticide residue analysis: feasibility study for material processing, homogeneity and stability assessment.

    PubMed

    Grimalt, Susana; Harbeck, Stefan; Shegunova, Penka; Seghers, John; Sejerøe-Olsen, Berit; Emteborg, Håkan; Dabrio, Marta

    2015-04-01

    The feasibility of the production of a reference material for pesticide residue analysis in a cucumber matrix was investigated. Cucumber was spiked at 0.075 mg/kg with each of the 15 selected pesticides (acetamiprid, azoxystrobin, carbendazim, chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, diazinon, (α + β)-endosulfan, fenitrothion, imazalil, imidacloprid, iprodione, malathion, methomyl, tebuconazole and thiabendazole) respectively. Three different strategies were considered for processing the material, based on the physicochemical properties of the vegetable and the target pesticides. As a result, a frozen spiked slurry of fresh cucumber, a spiked freeze-dried cucumber powder and a freeze-dried cucumber powder spiked by spraying the powder were studied. The effects of processing and aspects related to the reconstitution of the material were evaluated by monitoring the pesticide levels in the three materials. Two separate analytical methods based on LC-MS/MS and GC-MS/MS were developed and validated in-house. The spiked freeze-dried cucumber powder was selected as the most feasible material and more exhaustive studies on homogeneity and stability of the pesticide residues in the matrix were carried out. The results suggested that the between-unit homogeneity was satisfactory with a sample intake of dried material as low as 0.1 g. A 9-week isochronous stability study was undertaken at -20 °C, 4 °C and 18 °C, with -70 °C designated as the reference temperature. The pesticides tested exhibited adequate stability at -20 °C during the 9-week period as well as at -70 °C for a period of 18 months. These results constitute a good basis for the development of a new candidate reference material for selected pesticides in a cucumber matrix. PMID:25627789

  1. Impact of insecticides on the invasive Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae): analysis of insecticide lethality.

    PubMed

    Leskey, Tracy C; Lee, Doo-Hyung; Short, Brent D; Wright, Starker E

    2012-10-01

    The efficacy of 37 insecticide treatments against adult Halyomorpha halys (Stål) was established based on exposure to 18-h old dry insecticide residue in laboratory bioassays. Individual adult H. halys were exposed to an insecticide residue for 4.5 h and then monitored daily for survivorship over a 7-d period. The proportion of dead and moribund insects was used as an estimate of overall insecticide efficacy against H. halys immediately after the exposure period and over the 7-d trial. Among all materials evaluated, 14 insecticides exhibited increasing efficacy, in which the percentage of dead and moribund insects (used as a measure of insecticide efficacy) increased by > 10% after 7 d. By contrast, insecticide efficacy values of eight insecticides declined by > 10% (based on recovery of adults from a moribund state) over the 7-d period with most belonging to the pyrethroid class. In this study, the efficacy value of neonicotinoid, acetamiprid, showed the greatest decline from 93 to 10% over 7 d. A lethality index (scale of 0-100) was developed to compare insecticides based on quantifying the immediate and longer-term effects of insecticide exposure on H. halys. Among all materials evaluated, dimethoate, malathion, bifenthrin, methidathion, endosulfan, methomyl, chlorpyrifos, acephate, fenpropathrin, and permethrin yielded the highest values (> 75) because of a high degree of immediate mortality with very little recovery. Our results provide baseline information regarding potential of candidate insecticides against adult H. halys and highlight the need to consider longer-term effects in establishing overall efficacy ratings against this invasive species. PMID:23156170

  2. Phenomenological study and application of the combined influence of iron concentration and irradiance on the photo-Fenton process to remove micropollutants.

    PubMed

    Carra, Irene; García Sánchez, José Luis; Casas López, José Luis; Malato, Sixto; Sánchez Pérez, José Antonio

    2014-04-15

    The presence of low concentrations of persistent pollutants in waters (μg/L or ng/L), also called micropollutants, brings as a consequence the need to apply advanced oxidation treatments for their removal. The successful application of solar-driven photo-Fenton to treat highly polluted wastewaters (g/L and mg/L of pollutants) has prompted its application to lowly polluted effluents. However, a decrease in contaminant concentration may involve an alteration in the intrinsic process phenomenon, which until now has only been widely studied at the milligram-per-litre level or higher with this process. The aim of this research was to study the combined influence of the operating variable (iron concentration) and the environmental variable (irradiance) and application on the photo-Fenton process at pH2.8 when removing micropollutants. For this purpose, experimentation was carried out at laboratory and pilot plant scales with a biocide mixture of acetamiprid (ACTM), thiabendazole (TBZ) and imazalil (IMZ) (100 μg/L each) as the model pollutant. Results indicated that above 15 WUV/m(2) and a light path length of 5 cm (the most commonly used path for this type of application) iron concentration limited the process and there was irradiance excess under these conditions. On the other hand, and given the circumstances of irradiance excess, a higher light path length (10 cm) was assessed. Results showed that path lengths wider than 5 cm are recommended since more wastewater volume could be treated with a higher process rate per surface unit. PMID:24530592

  3. Determination of neonicotinoid insecticides in environmental samples by micellar electrokinetic chromatography using solid-phase treatments.

    PubMed

    Ettiene, Gretty; Bauza, Roberto; Plata, María R; Contento, Ana M; Ríos, Angel

    2012-10-01

    A sensitive and reliable method based on MEKC has been developed and validated for trace determination of neonicotinoid insecticides (thiamethoxam, acetamiprid, and imidacloprid) and the metabolite 6-chloronicotinic acid in water and soil matrices. Optimum separation of the neonicotinoid insecticides was obtained on a 58 cm long capillary (75 μm id) using as the running electrolyte 40 mM SDS, 5 mM borate (pH 10.4), and 5% (v/v) methanol at a temperature of 25°C, a voltage of 25 kV and with hydrodynamic injection (10 s). The analysis time was less than 7 min. Prior to MEKC determination, the samples were purified and enriched by carrying out extraction-preconcentration steps. For aqueous samples, off-line SPE with a sorptive material such as Strata-X (polymeric hydrophobic sorbent) and octadecylsilane (C₁₈) was carried out to clean up and preconcentrate the insecticides. However, for soil samples, matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) was applied with C₁₈ used as the dispersant. Good linearity, accuracy, and precision were obtained and the detection limits were in the range between 0.01 and 0.07 μg mL⁻¹ for river water and 0.17 and 0.37 μg g⁻¹ for soil samples. Recovery levels reached greater than 92% for all of the assayed neonicotinoids in river water samples with Strata-X. In soil matrices, the best recoveries (63-99%) were obtained with MSPD. PMID:22997021

  4. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet combined with HPLC for the determination of neonicotinoid pesticides.

    PubMed

    Vichapong, Jitlada; Burakham, Rodjana; Srijaranai, Supalax

    2013-12-15

    A microextraction procedure based on vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet (VSLLME-SFO) for preconcentration of neonicotinoid pesticides, including acetamiprid, clotianidin, nitenpyram, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam, has been developed. In VSLLME-SFO process, the addition of surfactant (as an emulsifier), could be enhance the mass-transfer from the aqueous solution into the extraction solvent. The extraction solvent could be dispersed into the aqueous by vortex process. Other experimental parameters affected the extraction efficiency, including the kind and concentration of salt, concentration and volume of HCl, kind and concentration of surfactant and its volume, kind and volume of extraction solvent, vortex time and the centrifugation extraction time, were also optimized. The optimum extraction conditions of VSLLME-SFO were 10.00 mL of sample, 0.3% (w/v) Na2SO4, 50 µL of 0.050 mol L(-1) SDS, 1.0 mol L(-1) HCl (400 µL), 150 µL of octanol, vortex time 1 min and centrifugation time 10 min. The sediment phase was analyzed by subjecting it to HPLC using a mobile phase of 25% acetonitrile in water, at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1), and photodiode array detection at 254 nm. Under the optimum extraction conditions, high enrichment factors (20-100 fold) and low limit of detection (0.1-0.5 μg L(-1)) could be obtained. This method provided high sensitivity, low toxic organic solvents used, and simplicity of the extraction processes. The proposed method was successfully applied in the analysis of neonicotinoids in fruit juice and water samples. PMID:24209333

  5. Trace level determination of pyrethroid and neonicotinoid insecticides in beebread using acetonitrile-based extraction followed by analysis with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Giroud, Barbara; Vauchez, Antoine; Vulliet, Emmanuelle; Wiest, Laure; Buleté, Audrey

    2013-11-01

    Beebread is among the matrices suspected of contaminating honeybee. To better understand this contamination, the study aimed to develop an efficient, sensitive and reliable analytical method for the trace analysis of pesticides in beebread. This study focuses specifically on the insecticides pyrethroids and neonicotinoids and some of their metabolites. It describes the development and validation of an original analytical approach that consists of one simple extraction method based on modified QuEChERS followed by a selective and sensitive analysis by UHPLC-MS/MS to determine the target compounds in beebread. The method was validated using a quadratic fit. RSD values below 20% were obtained, except for 5-hydroxy-imidacloprid and imidacloprid at 0.5 ng/g, which exhibited RSDs of 25% and 21%, respectively. The intra-day precision was less than 10% for many of the investigated compounds. The inter-day precision varied between 2% and 36%, depending on the compound and the concentration. The recoveries varied from 53% to 119%, with averages of 83, 81 and 77% for the extraction of beebread samples spiked at 0.5, 5 and 10 ng/g, respectively. The LOD values for all the substances were below ng/g, with the exception of 6-chloronicotinic acid (LOD=1.7 ng/g). The method was then applied to the analysis of 32 beebread samples and revealed the presence of 7 of the target substances. The most frequently detected pesticides belonged to the neonicotinoid family and were generally present at low concentrations, but in some cases exceeded 170 ng/g (acetamiprid and thiacloprid). Some pyrethroids were also detected (lambda-cyhalothrine and bifenthrine), but at very low levels. PMID:24120025

  6. The influence of insecticides and vegetation in structuring Formica mound ant communities (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Maine lowbush blueberry.

    PubMed

    Choate, Beth; Drummond, Francis A

    2013-04-01

    Assessing the influence of new, reduced-risk insecticides on natural enemies within agroecosystems is essential to developing integrated pest management strategies. Three species of mound-building Formica ants are abundant throughout Maine lowbush blueberry fields (Formica exsectoides Forel, F. glacialis Wheeler, and F. ulkei Emery). All three species have been described in the literature as predaceous, with research demonstrating that F. exsectoides preys on major pest insects of lowbush blueberry. The objectives of this study were to determine the impact of common-use and newly introduced insecticides on Formica sp. ant communities in lowbush blueberry fields. Laboratory assays indicated that the commonly applied insecticide phosmet is toxic to F. exsectoides, even after 8 d of field weathering (P < 0.05). Species comparisons indicated that susceptibility varied with exposure to residues in the field. However, some of the reduced-risk biorational insecticides, such as acetamiprid, had little effect on survival of all three species. Abundance of each species in the field varied with lowbush blueberry pesticide-use strategy and amount of nonblueberry vegetation. Both F. exsectoides and F. glacialis were most abundant in organic fields; however, overall F. glacialis was the most abundant in fields of all management types. Field surveys support laboratory results suggesting that phosmet is highly toxic to these species and influences their spatial pattern. Manipulation of the crop to conserve natural enemies in lowbush blueberry is difficult because the crop is not planted; therefore, we must look closely at the incorporation of low toxicity insecticides with natural enemies to efficiently control pest insects. PMID:23786059

  7. Effect of Piperonyl Butoxide on the Toxicity of Four Classes of Insecticides to Navel Orangeworm (Amyelois transitella) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Demkovich, Mark; Dana, Catherine E; Siegel, Joel P; Berenbaum, May R

    2015-12-01

    Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), the navel orangeworm, is a highly polyphagous economic pest of almond, pistachio, and walnut crops in California. Increasing demand for these crops and their rising economic value has resulted in substantial increases of insecticide applications to reduce damage to acceptable levels. The effects of piperonyl butoxide (PBO), a methylenedioxyphenyl compound that can act as a synergist by inhibiting cytochrome P450-mediated detoxification on insecticide metabolism by A. transitella, were examined in a series of feeding bioassays with first-instar A. transitella larvae from a laboratory strain. PBO, however, can have a variety of effects on metabolism, including inhibition of glutathione-S-transferases and esterases and induction of P450s. In our study, PBO synergized the toxicity of acetamiprid, λ-cyhalothrin, and spinosad, suggesting possible involvement of P450s in their detoxification. In contrast, PBO interacted antagonistically with the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos, reducing its toxicity, an effect consistent with inhibition of P450-mediated bioactivation of this pesticide. The toxicity of the anthranilic diamide insecticide chlorantraniliprole was not altered by PBO, suggestive of little or no involvement of P450-mediated metabolism in its detoxification. Because a population of navel orangeworm in Kern County, CA, has already acquired resistance to the pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin through enhanced P450 activity, determining the effect of adding a synergist such as PBO on detoxification of all insecticide classes registered for use in navel orangeworm management can help to develop rotation practices that may delay resistance acquisition or to implement alternative management practices where resistance is likely to evolve. PMID:26470383

  8. Sowing simulation tests of a pneumatic drill equipped with systems aimed at reducing the emission of abrasion dust from maize dressed seed.

    PubMed

    Biocca, Marcello; Conte, Elisa; Pulcini, Patrizio; Marinelli, Enzo; Pochi, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    four a. i. (imidacloprid, clothianidin, thiametoxam, fipronil). The results showed regularly decreasing of the concentrations as distance increased, both in the air and at ground level. Moreover, the difference determined by the adoption of the drift reducing device (air deflectors) resulted clear and it can be quantified at around 50 % of the a.i. amounts observed without deflectors. Finally, the paper proposes a data processing method that, from the values observed at fixed point, provides the theoretical a.i. concentration behavior that would occur in field, under the same conditions of wind speed and direction and working speed. The obtained results are coherent with previous field test. PMID:21726139

  9. A Four-Year Field Program Investigating Long-Term Effects of Repeated Exposure of Honey Bee Colonies to Flowering Crops Treated with Thiamethoxam

    PubMed Central

    Pilling, Edward; Campbell, Peter; Coulson, Mike; Ruddle, Natalie; Tornier, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Neonicotinoid residues in nectar and pollen from crop plants have been implicated as one of the potential factors causing the declines of honey bee populations. Median residues of thiamethoxam in pollen collected from honey bees after foraging on flowering seed treated maize were found to be between 1 and 7 µg/kg, median residues of the metabolite CGA322704 (clothianidin) in the pollen were between 1 and 4 µg/kg. In oilseed rape, median residues of thiamethoxam found in pollen collected from bees were between <1 and 3.5 µg/kg and in nectar from foraging bees were between 0.65 and 2.4 µg/kg. Median residues of CGA322704 in pollen and nectar in the oilseed rape trials were all below the limit of quantification (1 µg/kg). Residues in the hive were even lower in both the maize and oilseed rape trials, being at or below the level of detection of 1 µg/kg for bee bread in the hive and at or below the level of detection of 0.5 µg/kg for hive nectar, honey and royal jelly samples. The long-term risk to honey bee colonies in the field was also investigated, including the sensitive overwintering stage, from four years consecutive single treatment crop exposures to flowering maize and oilseed rape grown from thiamethoxam treated seeds at rates recommended for insect control. Throughout the study, mortality, foraging behavior, colony strength, colony weight, brood development and food storage levels were similar between treatment and control colonies. Detailed examination of brood development throughout the year demonstrated that colonies exposed to the treated crop were able to successfully overwinter and had a similar health status to the control colonies in the following spring. We conclude that these data demonstrate there is a low risk to honey bees from systemic residues in nectar and pollen following the use of thiamethoxam as a seed treatment on oilseed rape and maize. PMID:24194871

  10. Insecticidal Suppression of Asian Citrus Psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) Vector of Huanglongbing Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Jawwad A.; Kostyk, Barry C.; Stansly, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Diaphorina citri vectors pathogens that cause ‘huanglongbing’ or citrus greening disease which poses a serious threat to citrus production worldwide. Vector suppression is critical to reduce disease spread. Efficacy is a main concern when choosing an insecticide. Insecticidal treatments of 49 products or 44 active ingredients (a.i) labeled or experimental were field tested between 2005–2013 as foliar sprays (250 treatments, 39 a.i) or soil applications (47 treatments, 9 a.i) to control D. citri in citrus. A combined effect of nymphal and adult suppression in response to sprays of 23 insecticides representing 9 modes of action (MoA) groups and 3 unknown MoA provided more than 90% reduction of adult D. citri over 24–68 days. Observable effects on nymphs were generally of shorter duration due to rapid maturation of flush. However, reduction of 76–100% nymphs or adults over 99–296 days was seen on young trees receiving drenches of the neonicotinoids imidacloprid, thiamethoxam or clothianidin (MoA 4A) and a novel anthranilic diamide, cyantraniliprole (MoA 28). Effective products identified for foliar sprays to control D. citri provide sufficient MoA groups for rotation to delay evolution of insecticide resistance by D. citri and other pests. However, cyantraniliprole is now the only available alternative for rotation with neonicotinoids in soil application to young trees. Sprays of up to eight of the most effective insecticides could be rotated over a year without repetition of any MoA and little or no recourse to neonicotinoids or cyantraniliprole, so important for protection of young trees. Other considerations effecting decisions of what and when to spray include prevalence of huanglongbing, pest pressure, pre-harvest intervals, overall budget, equipment availability, and conservation of beneficial arthropods. Examples of spray programs utilizing broad-spectrum and relatively selective insecticides are provided to improve vector management and may vary

  11. A four-year field program investigating long-term effects of repeated exposure of honey bee colonies to flowering crops treated with thiamethoxam.

    PubMed

    Pilling, Edward; Campbell, Peter; Coulson, Mike; Ruddle, Natalie; Tornier, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Neonicotinoid residues in nectar and pollen from crop plants have been implicated as one of the potential factors causing the declines of honey bee populations. Median residues of thiamethoxam in pollen collected from honey bees after foraging on flowering seed treated maize were found to be between 1 and 7 µg/kg, median residues of the metabolite CGA322704 (clothianidin) in the pollen were between 1 and 4 µg/kg. In oilseed rape, median residues of thiamethoxam found in pollen collected from bees were between <1 and 3.5 µg/kg and in nectar from foraging bees were between 0.65 and 2.4 µg/kg. Median residues of CGA322704 in pollen and nectar in the oilseed rape trials were all below the limit of quantification (1 µg/kg). Residues in the hive were even lower in both the maize and oilseed rape trials, being at or below the level of detection of 1 µg/kg for bee bread in the hive and at or below the level of detection of 0.5 µg/kg for hive nectar, honey and royal jelly samples. The long-term risk to honey bee colonies in the field was also investigated, including the sensitive overwintering stage, from four years consecutive single treatment crop exposures to flowering maize and oilseed rape grown from thiamethoxam treated seeds at rates recommended for insect control. Throughout the study, mortality, foraging behavior, colony strength, colony weight, brood development and food storage levels were similar between treatment and control colonies. Detailed examination of brood development throughout the year demonstrated that colonies exposed to the treated crop were able to successfully overwinter and had a similar health status to the control colonies in the following spring. We conclude that these data demonstrate there is a low risk to honey bees from systemic residues in nectar and pollen following the use of thiamethoxam as a seed treatment on oilseed rape and maize. PMID:24194871

  12. Planar solid phase extraction clean-up for pesticide residue analysis in tea by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oellig, Claudia; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2012-10-19

    Efficient clean-up is indispensable for preventing matrix effects in multi-residue analysis of pesticides in food by liquid and gas chromatography (LC and GC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). High-throughput planar solid phase extraction (HTpSPE) was recently introduced as a new clean-up concept in residue analysis of pesticides in fruit and vegetables (C. Oellig, W. Schwack, 2011 [45]). Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) was used to completely separate pesticides from matrix compounds and to focus them into a sharp zone, followed by extraction of the target zone by the TLC-MS interface. As rather challenging matrices, tea samples were chosen in this study. Besides chlorophylls and polyphenols, high amount of caffeine is co-extracted resulting in strong matrix effects both in LC-MS and GC-MS. The former HTpSPE procedure was adapted to initial extracts of green and black tea resulting in colorless extracts nearly free of matrix effects and interferences, as shown for seven chemically representative pesticides (acetamiprid, penconazole, azoxystrobin, chlorpyrifos, pirimicarb, fenarimol, and mepanipyrim). LC-MS/MS calibration curves obtained in the range of 0.002-0.5 mg/kg from matrix-matched standards and solvent standards were nearly identical and demonstrated the effectiveness of clean-up by HTpSPE. Mean recoveries determined by LC-MS/MS against solvent standards at spiking levels of 0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg ranged between 72 and 114% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 0.7-4.7% (n=4), while LC-MS measurements of tea samples spiked at 1 mg/kg provided recoveries of 81-104% with RSDs of 1.2-4.9% (n=6). Using LC-MS/MS, the method showed high sensitivity with signal-to-noise ratios>10 for concentrations below 0.002 mg/kg. HTpSPE of one sample was done in a few minutes, while numerous samples were cleaned in parallel at minimal costs with very low sample and solvent consumption. PMID:22981507

  13. The stable isotope fingerprinting technique for agricultural pesticide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, N.; Kawashima, H.

    2014-12-01

    The compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is nowadays an important and powerful tool in geochemical, environmental, and forensics field. In particular, the stable isotope ratio of pesticide is applied to biological process and reaction in the soil and distribution channel as forensics science. The aim of this study is to measure the stable isotope ratios of pesticide using various analytical methodologies, GC/IRMS, EA/IRMS, and LC/IRMS under high accuracy and precision. Therefore, these methods seemed to be important knowledge as geological field. In particular case, we present the method to measure carbon isotope ratio of nine malathion emulsion pesticides using GC/IRMS with cryo-focusing system to identify the source. In December 2013, food poisoning occurred after eating frozen dumplings (i.e., pizza and chicken nuggets) in Japan. There was a very high concentration, maximum value 15,000ppm, of malathion (diethyl (dimethoxythiophosphorylthio) succinate) in products. This incident was caused by an employee of process, and threatened the food safety. We analyzed the δ13C of malathion ranged from -30.63‰ to -29.54‰ (S.D. 0.10‰), the differences less than 1.0‰. All malathion emulsion sold in Japan are imported from Cheminova India Lat., Denmark to Sumitomo Chemical Co. Ltd., Japan. After that, Japanese each manufacture buy from Sumitomo Chemical Co. Ltd. And blended malathion and organic solvent (ethylbenzene and xylene). Therefore, ethylbenzene and xylene may be important tool as source identification. We measured the δ13C of ethylbenzene and m-,p-xylene, too. As the results, the δ13C of ethylbenzene and m-,p-xylene ranged from -28.20‰ to -20.84‰ (S.D. 0.16‰), -28.69‰ to -25.15‰ (S.D. 0.13‰), respectively. The δ13C of ethylbenzene and m-,p-xylene can be identified manufacture, although the δ13C of malathion indicated same value. In addition, we measured five pesticides (acephate, acetamiprid, glufosinate, glyphosate, and oxamyl) using

  14. Teppeki, selective insecticide about Bombus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Fanigliulo, Angela; Filì, Vittorio; Pacella, Rosa; Comes, Soccorsa; Crescenzi, Aniello

    2009-01-01

    At a time when a highly controversial debate about the causes of the widespread deaths of bees is taking place all over Europe, which accused the agriculture and its practices with particular reference to the harmful effects of some insecticides, it seems important to point out as another insecticide, the Teppeki, can be selective about bumble and have a good compatibility with the activity of the apiaries. This insecticide has the active ingredient flonicamid (500 g/kg) belonging to a new chemical class, called pyridinecarboxamides: the product works systemic and is known as having a long lasting efficacy against all important aphid species. Bioagritest test facility of Pignola (PZ, Italy) has conducted in two successive production cycles an experimental trial on a tomato hydroponic cultivation within the Agricola Bonsai farm in Sibari (CS, Italy), whose objective was to measure the selectivity of flonicamid on Bombus terrestris, insects playing an important role in the pollination of certain species grown in greenhouse such as Tomato, Eggplant, Pepper and Cucumber. On the pollinated flower B. terrestris leaves some trace of its visit, a typical dark trademark: on the detection of the marking of flowers was based the testing program conducted by Bioagritest. Two thesis were compared: A, standard) treatment with a foliar insecticide, the neonicotinoide acetamiprid, normally used for control of aphids and whiteflies (unlike other neonicotinoides--imidacloprid and thiametoxam--quite selective about B. terrestris) and B, Teppeki) foliar treatment with Teppeki, to the maximum dose indicated on the label. The experimental design included the use of randomized blocks with 4 repetitions (4 plots/thesis with 100 plants each). In every thesis six B. terrestris hives were placed 2 days before treatment: the respective holes remained closed during the treatment and the 12 following hours. In order to verify the pollination, by the detection of the flower marking, 2 flowers