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Sample records for acetate acetone methanol

  1. Densities and refractive indices of acetone + methanol + 2-methyl-2-butanol at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Orge, B.; Iglesias, M.; Tojo, J.; Legido, J.L.

    1995-11-01

    Densities and refractive indices at 298.15 K for acetone + methanol + 2-methyl-2-butanol and the binary acetone + 2-methyl-2-butanol and methanol + 2-methyl-2-butanol mixtures have been measured as a function of the mole fraction at atmospheric pressure. Results have been correlated with analytical expressions.

  2. Molecular modeling of phase behavior and microstructure of acetone-chloroform-methanol binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Ganesh; Georgiev, Grigor; Potoff, Jeffrey J

    2005-10-20

    Force fields based on a Lennard-Jones (LJ) 12-6 plus point charge functional form are developed for acetone and chloroform specifically to reproduce the minimum pressure azeotropy found experimentally in this system. Point charges are determined from a CHELPG population analysis performed on an acetone-chloroform dimer. The required electrostatic surface for this dimer is determined from ab initio calculations performed with MP2 theory and the 6-31g++(3df,3pd) basis set. LJ parameters are then optimized such that the liquid-vapor coexistence curve, critical parameters, and vapor pressures are well reproduced by simulation. Histogram-reweighting Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble are used to determine the phase diagrams for the binary mixtures acetone-chloroform, acetone-methanol, and chloroform-methanol. The force fields developed in this work reproduce the minimum pressure azeotrope in the acetone-chloroform mixture found in experiment. The predicted azeotropic composition of x(CHCl3) = 0.77 is in fair agreement with the experimental value of x(CHCl3)expt = 0.64. The new force fields were also found to provide improved predictions of the pressure-composition behavior of acetone-methanol and chloroform-methanol when compared to other force fields commonly used for vapor-liquid equilibria calculations. NPT simulations were conducted at 300 K and 1 bar for equimolar mixtures of acetone-chloroform, acetone-methanol, and methanol-chloroform. Analysis of the microstructure reveals significant hydrogen bonding occurring between acetone and chloroform. Limited interspecies hydrogen bonding was found in the acetone-methanol or chloroform-methanol mixtures.

  3. Densities and refractive indices for acetone + methanol + 1-propanol at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, M.; Orge, B.; Tojo, J.

    1996-03-01

    Densities and refractive indices at 298.15 K for acetone + methanol + 1-propanol and the binary acetone + 1-propanol and methanol + 1-propanol mixtures have been measured as a function of the mole fraction at atmospheric pressure. Parameters of analytical expressions which represent the composition dependences of physical properties and excess values are reported. The refractive index results are compared with estimation methods. The excess properties for the ternary mixture are compared with those estimated on the basis of binary property contributions.

  4. Expression of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 Genes in Escherichia coli for Acetone Production and Acetate Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Lourdes L.; Welker, Neil E.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    1998-01-01

    A synthetic acetone operon (ace4) composed of four Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 genes (adc, ctfAB, and thl, coding for the acetoacetate decarboxylase, coenzyme A transferase, and thiolase, respectively) under the control of the thl promoter was constructed and was introduced into Escherichia coli on vector pACT. Acetone production demonstrated that ace4 is expressed in E. coli and resulted in the reduction of acetic acid levels in the fermentation broth. Since different E. coli strains vary significantly in their growth characteristics and acetate metabolism, ace4 was expressed in three E. coli strains: ER2275, ATCC 11303, and MC1060. Shake flask cultures of MC1060(pACT) produced ca. 2 mM acetone, while both strains ER2275(pACT) and ATCC 11303(pACT) produced ca. 40 mM acetone. Glucose-fed cultures of strain ATCC 11303(pACT) resulted in a 150% increase in acetone titers compared to those of batch shake flask cultures. External addition of sodium acetate to glucose-fed cultures of ATCC 11303(pACT) resulted in further increased acetone titers. In bioreactor studies, acidic conditions (pH 5.5 versus 6.5) improved acetone production. Despite the substantial acetone evaporation due to aeration and agitation in the bioreactor, 125 to 154 mM acetone accumulated in ATCC 11303(pACT) fermentations. These acetone titers are equal to or higher than those produced by wild-type C. acetobutylicum. This is the first study to demonstrate the ability to use clostridial genes in nonclostridial hosts for solvent production. In addition, acetone-producing E. coli strains may be useful hosts for recombinant protein production in that detrimental acetate accumulation can be avoided. PMID:9501448

  5. Site Competition During Coadsorption of Acetone with Methanol and Water on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

    2011-08-02

    The competitive interaction between acetone and two solvent molecules (methanol and water) for surface sites on rutile TiO2(110) was studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). On a vacuum reduced TiO2(110) surface, which possessed ~5% oxygen vacancy sites, excess methanol displaced preadsorbed acetone molecules to weakly bound and physisorbed desorption states below 200 K, whereas acetone was stabilized to 250 K against displacement by methanol on an oxidized surface through formation of an acetone-diolate species. These behaviors of acetone differ from the competitive interactions between acetone and water in that acetone is less susceptible to displacement by water. Examination of acetone+methanol and acetone+water multilayer combinations shows that acetone is more compatible in water-ice films than in methanol-ice films, presumably because water has greater potential as a hydrogen-bond donor than does methanol. Acetone molecules displaced from the TiO2(110) surface by water are more likely to be retained in the near-surface region, having a greater opportunity to revisit the surface, than when methanol is used as a coadsorbate. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  6. Microscopic roots of alcohol-ketone demixing: infrared spectroscopy of methanol-acetone clusters.

    PubMed

    Kollipost, Franz; Domanskaya, Alexandra V; Suhm, Martin A

    2015-03-19

    Infrared spectra of isolated methanol-acetone clusters up to tetramers are experimentally characterized for the first time. They show evidence for a nanometer-scale demixing trend of the cold species. In combination with quantum calculations, the mutual repulsion is demonstrated to start beyond three molecular units, whereas individual molecules still prefer to form a mixed complex.

  7. Free energy of mixing of acetone and methanol: a computer simulation investigation.

    PubMed

    Idrissi, Abdenacer; Polok, Kamil; Barj, Mohammed; Marekha, Bogdan; Kiselev, Mikhail; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2013-12-19

    The change of the Helmholtz free energy, internal energy, and entropy accompanying the mixing of acetone and methanol is calculated in the entire composition range by the method of thermodynamic integration using three different potential model combinations of the two compounds. In the first system, both molecules are described by the OPLS, and in the second system, both molecules are described by the original TraPPE force field, whereas in the third system a modified version of the TraPPE potential is used for acetone in combination with the original TraPPE model of methanol. The results reveal that, in contrast with the acetone-water system, all of these three model combinations are able to reproduce the full miscibility of acetone and methanol, although the thermodynamic driving force of this mixing is very small. It is also seen, in accordance with the finding of former structural analyses, that the mixing of the two components is driven by the entropy term corresponding to the ideal mixing, which is large enough to overcompensate the effect of the energy increase and entropy loss due to the interaction of the unlike components in the mixtures. Among the three model combinations, the use of the original TraPPE model of methanol and modified TraPPE model of acetone turns out to be clearly the best in this respect, as it is able to reproduce the experimental free energy, internal energy, and entropy of mixing values within 0.15 kJ/mol, 0.2 kJ/mol, and 1 J/(mol K), respectively, in the entire composition range. The success of this model combination originates from the fact that the use of the modified TraPPE model of acetone instead of the original one in these mixtures improves the reproduction of the entropy of mixing, while it retains the ability of the original model of excellently reproducing the internal energy of mixing.

  8. Acetone

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetone ; CASRN 67 - 64 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  9. Sources and sinks of acetone, methanol, and acetaldehyde in North Atlantic marine air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, A. C.; Hopkins, J. R.; Carpenter, L. J.; Stanton, J.; Read, K. A.; Pilling, M. J.

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of acetone, methanol, acetaldehyde and a range of non-methane hydrocarbons have been made in North Atlantic marine air at the Mace Head observatory. Under maritime conditions the combination of OVOCs (acetone, methanol and acetaldehyde) contributed up to 85% of the total mass of measured non methane organics in air and up to 80% of the OH radical organic sink, when compared with the sum of all other organic compounds including non-methane hydrocarbons, DMS and OH-reactive halocarbons (trichloromethane and tetrachloroethylene). The observations showed anomalies in the variance and abundance of acetaldehyde and acetone over that expected for species with a remote terrestrial emission source and OH controlled chemical lifetime. A detailed model incorporating an explicit chemical degradation mechanism indicated in situ formation during air mass transport was on timescales longer than the atmospheric lifetime of precursor hydrocarbons or primary emission. The period over which this process was significant was similar to that of airmass motion on intercontinental scales, and formation via this route may reproduce that of a widespread diffuse source. The model indicates that continued short chain OVOC formation occurs many days from the point of emission, via longer lived intermediates of oxidation such as organic peroxides and long chain alcohols.

  10. Sources and sinks of acetone, methanol, and acetaldehyde in North Atlantic air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, A. C.; Hopkins, J. R.; Carpenter, L. J.; Stanton, J.; Read, K. A.; Pilling, M. J.

    2005-03-01

    Measurements of acetone, methanol, acetaldehyde and a range of non-methane hydrocarbons have been made in North Atlantic marine air at the Mace Head observatory. Under maritime conditions the combination of OVOCs (acetone, methanol and 5 acetaldehyde) contributed up to 85% of the total mass of measured non methane organics in air and up to 80% of the OH radical organic sink, when compared with the sum of all other organic compounds including non-methane hydrocarbons, DMS and OH-reactive halocarbons (trichloromethane and tetrachloroethylene). The observations showed anomalies in the variance and abundance of acetaldehyde and acetone 10 over that expected for species with a remote terrestrial emission source and OH controlled chemical lifetime. A detailed model incorporating an explicit chemical degradation mechanism indicated in situ formation during air mass transport was on timescales longer than the atmospheric lifetime of precursor hydrocarbons or primary emission. The period over which this process was significant was similar to that of airmass mo15 tion on intercontinental scales, and formation via this route may reproduce that of a widespread diffuse source. The model indicates that continued short chain OVOC formation occurs many days from the point of emission, via longer lived intermediates of oxidation such as organic peroxides and long chain alcohols.

  11. Measurements of acetone, acetic acid, and formic acid in the northern midlatitude upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, Thomas; MöHler, Ottmar; Arnold, Frank

    1999-06-01

    We have measured acetone, acetic acid, and formic acid concentrations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over Germany. The measurements were performed by ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry using new kinetic data on ion molecule reactions of formic and acetic acids with negative ions obtained at our laboratory. Mean volume mixing ratios between 384 and 832 parts per trillion (pptv) for acetone, 110 and 357 pptv for acetic acid, and 59 and 215 pptv for formic acid were obtained. The correlation between formic acid and acetic acid was very poor (r2 = 0.14). A better correlation could be observed for acetone and acetic acid, with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.46 and a slope (acetic acid/acetone) of 0.31. For acetic acid a maximum around 9 km was observed. A significant fraction of the acetic acid observed in the lower stratosphere may be due to in situ photochemical production by reactions of HO2 and CH3O2 with peroxy acetyl radicals produced by the photolysis of acetone. In the upper troposphere, vertical transport is much more efficient, and significant acetic acid production is only possible if HOx concentrations are elevated, making the production of acetic acid fast enough to compete with vertical transport.

  12. Application of finite inverse gas chromatography in hypromellose acetate succinate-water-acetone systems.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Sheng-Wei; Sturm, Derek R; Moser, Justin D; Danner, Ronald P

    2016-09-30

    A modification of a GC was developed to investigate both infinitely dilute and finite concentrations of solvents in polymers. Thermodynamic properties of hypromellose acetate succinate (HPMCAS-L)-acetone-water systems are important for the optimization of spray-drying processes used in pharmaceutical manufacturing of solid dispersion formulations. These properties, at temperatures below the glass transition temperature, were investigated using capillary column inverse gas chromatography (CCIGC). Water was much less soluble in the HPMCAS-L than acetone. Experiments were also conducted at infinitely dilute concentrations of one of the solvents in HPMCAS-L that was already saturated with the other solvent. Overall the partitioning of the water was not significantly affected by the presence of either water or acetone in the polymer. The acetone partition coefficient decreased as either acetone or water was added to the HPMCAS-L. A representation of the HPMCAS-L structure in terms of UNIFAC groups has been developed. With these groups, the UNIFAC-vdw-FV model did a reasonable job of predicting the phase equilibria in the binary and ternary systems. The Flory-Huggins correlation with fitted interaction parameters represented the data well. PMID:27629480

  13. Shear viscosity of polar liquid mixtures via non-equilibrium molecular dynamics: water, methanol, and acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler Richard, Dean R.; Rowley, L.

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) with isobaric and isokinetic controls were used to simulate the shear viscosity for binary mixtures of water, methanol and acetone, and for ternary mixtures. In all, 22 different liquid composition points were simulated at 298.15 K and 0.1 MPa. A new set of acetone potential parameters was developed, while slight variants to existing water and methanol models were used. Long range Coulombic interactions were computed with the Ewald sum adapted to Lees-Edwards boundary conditions as formulated in Wheeler, D. R., Fuller, N. G., and Rowley, R. L., 1997, Molec. Phys., 92, 55. The attractive (dispersive) part of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions also was handled by a lattice sum. A hybrid mixing rule was used for the LJ cross interactions. Viscosities extrapolated to zero shear compared well with experimental results, having a mean absolute error of 14% and no errors greater than 30%. Although the simulations successfully predicted viscosity maxima for mixtures high in water content, the peak heights tended to be too low, probably due to the limitations of the water model. The results suggest that NEMD may be a viable means of estimating viscosities for polar liquid mixtures with an unrestricted number of components.

  14. Acetone and Ethyl Acetate in Commercial Nail Polish Removers: A Quantitative NMR Experiment Using an Internal Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, David W.

    1997-12-01

    The qualitative and quantitative analysis of commercial nail polish removers is performed on a 60 MHz NMR spectrometer. After taking NMR spectra of the polish removers, students can make peak assignments for the known components of acetone and ethyl acetate. Using these spectra, students are also able to identify the unknown alcohol present in the remover as ethanol. Quantitative analysis of either the acetone or ethyl acetate in the nail polish removers is accomplished by comparing the analyte peak intensities with that of an internal standard. The system in which deuterated acetone is used as a solvent and methylene chloride as an internal standard gave precise results for both commercial removers and for standards prepared from pure acetone or an ethyl acetate/ethanol mixture. As recovery from the standards was approximately 96 - 98% of what was anticipated, the analysis of the commercial products is also believed to be accurate.

  15. Photooxidation of Acetone on TiO2(110): Conversion to Acetate via Methyl Radical Ejection

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2005-06-23

    It is generally held that radicals form and participate in heterogeneous photocatalytic processes on oxide surfaces, although understanding the mechanistic origins and fates of such species is difficult. In this study, photodesorption and thermal desorption techniques show that acetone is converted into acetate on the surface of TiO(110) in a two step process that involves, first, a thermal reaction between acetone and coadsorbed oxygen to make a surface acetone-oxygen complex, followed second by a photochemical reaction that ejects a methyl radical from the surface and converts the acetone-oxygen complex into acetate. Designation of the photodesorption species to methyl radicals was confirmed using isotopically labeled acetone. The yield of photodesorbed methyl radicals correlates well with the amount depleted of acetone and with the yield of acetate left on the surface, both gauged using post-irradiation temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The thermal reaction between adsorbed acetone and oxygen to form the acetone-oxygen complex exhibits an approximate activation barrier of about 10 kJ/mol. A prerequisite to this reaction is the presence of surface Ti?? sites that enable O? adsorption. Creation of these sites by vacuum reduction of the surface prior to acetone and oxygen co-adsorption results in an initial spike in the photodecomposition rate, but replenishment of these sites by photolytic means (i.e., by trapping excited electrons at the surface) appears to be a slow step a sustained reaction. Evidence in this study for the ejection of organic radicals from the surface during photo-oxidation catalysis on TiO provides support for mechanistic pathways that involve both adsorbed and non-adsorbed species.

  16. Acetone-soluble cellulose acetate extracted from waste blended fabrics via ionic liquid catalyzed acetylation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xunwen; Lu, Canhui; Zhang, Wei; Tian, Dong; Zhang, Xinxing

    2013-10-15

    Isolation of cellulose from waste polyester/cotton blended fabrics (WBFs) is a bottleneck for recycling and exploiting waste textiles. The objective of this study was to provide a new environmental-friendly and efficient approach for extracting cellulose derivatives and polyester from WBFs. A Bronsted acidic ionic liquid (IL) N-methyl-imidazolium bisulfate, [Hmim]HSO4, was used as a novel catalyst for acetylation of cellulose rather than a solvent with the aim to overcome low isolation efficiency associated with the very high viscosity and relatively high costs of ILs. The extraction yield of acetone-soluble cellulose acetate (CA) was 49.3%, which corresponded to a conversion of 84.5% of the cellulose in the original WBFs; meanwhile, 96.2% of the original poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) was recovered. The extracted CA was characterized by (1)H NMR, FTIR, XRD and TGA analysis, and the results indicated that high purity acetone-soluble CA and carbohydrate-free PET could be isolated in this manner from WBFs.

  17. Protein content and enzyme activities in methanol- and acetate-grown Methanosarcina thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, P E; DiMarco, A A; Bobik, T A; Cabell, M C; Ferry, J G

    1990-01-01

    The cell extract protein content of acetate- and methanol-grown Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1 was examined by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. More than 100 mutually exclusive spots were present in acetate- and methanol-grown cells. Spots corresponding to acetate kinase, phosphotransacetylase, and the five subunits of the carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complex were identified in acetate-grown cells. Activities of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase, formylmethanofuran:tetrahydromethanopterin formyltransferase, 5,10-methenyltetrahydromethanopterin cyclohydrolase, methylene tetrahydromethanopterin:coenzyme F420 oxidoreductase, formate dehydrogenase, and carbonic anhydrase were examined in acetate- and methanol-grown Methanosarcina thermophila. Levels of formyltransferase in either acetate- or methanol-grown Methanosarcina thermophila were approximately half the levels detected in H2-CO2-grown Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. All other enzyme activities were significantly lower in acetate- and methanol-grown Methanosarcina thermophila. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:2307649

  18. Mutual diffusion of binary liquid mixtures containing methanol, ethanol, acetone, benzene, cyclohexane, toluene, and carbon tetrachloride.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Carrion, Gabriela; Janzen, Tatjana; Muñoz-Muñoz, Y Mauricio; Vrabec, Jadran

    2016-03-28

    Mutual diffusion coefficients of all 20 binary liquid mixtures that can be formed out of methanol, ethanol, acetone, benzene, cyclohexane, toluene, and carbon tetrachloride without a miscibility gap are studied at ambient conditions of temperature and pressure in the entire composition range. The considered mixtures show a varying mixing behavior from almost ideal to strongly non-ideal. Predictive molecular dynamics simulations employing the Green-Kubo formalism are carried out. Radial distribution functions are analyzed to gain an understanding of the liquid structure influencing the diffusion processes. It is shown that cluster formation in mixtures containing one alcoholic component has a significant impact on the diffusion process. The estimation of the thermodynamic factor from experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium data is investigated, considering three excess Gibbs energy models, i.e., Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC. It is found that the Wilson model yields the thermodynamic factor that best suits the simulation results for the prediction of the Fick diffusion coefficient. Four semi-empirical methods for the prediction of the self-diffusion coefficients and nine predictive equations for the Fick diffusion coefficient are assessed and it is found that methods based on local composition models are more reliable. Finally, the shear viscosity and thermal conductivity are predicted and in most cases favorably compared with experimental literature values. PMID:27036455

  19. Mutual diffusion of binary liquid mixtures containing methanol, ethanol, acetone, benzene, cyclohexane, toluene, and carbon tetrachloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara-Carrion, Gabriela; Janzen, Tatjana; Muñoz-Muñoz, Y. Mauricio; Vrabec, Jadran

    2016-03-01

    Mutual diffusion coefficients of all 20 binary liquid mixtures that can be formed out of methanol, ethanol, acetone, benzene, cyclohexane, toluene, and carbon tetrachloride without a miscibility gap are studied at ambient conditions of temperature and pressure in the entire composition range. The considered mixtures show a varying mixing behavior from almost ideal to strongly non-ideal. Predictive molecular dynamics simulations employing the Green-Kubo formalism are carried out. Radial distribution functions are analyzed to gain an understanding of the liquid structure influencing the diffusion processes. It is shown that cluster formation in mixtures containing one alcoholic component has a significant impact on the diffusion process. The estimation of the thermodynamic factor from experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium data is investigated, considering three excess Gibbs energy models, i.e., Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC. It is found that the Wilson model yields the thermodynamic factor that best suits the simulation results for the prediction of the Fick diffusion coefficient. Four semi-empirical methods for the prediction of the self-diffusion coefficients and nine predictive equations for the Fick diffusion coefficient are assessed and it is found that methods based on local composition models are more reliable. Finally, the shear viscosity and thermal conductivity are predicted and in most cases favorably compared with experimental literature values.

  20. Multiannual observations of acetone, methanol, and acetaldehyde in remote tropical atlantic air: implications for atmospheric OVOC budgets and oxidative capacity.

    PubMed

    Read, K A; Carpenter, L J; Arnold, S R; Beale, R; Nightingale, P D; Hopkins, J R; Lewis, A C; Lee, J D; Mendes, L; Pickering, S J

    2012-10-16

    Oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) in the atmosphere are precursors to peroxy acetyl nitrate (PAN), affect the tropospheric ozone budget, and in the remote marine environment represent a significant sink of the hydroxyl radical (OH). The sparse observational database for these compounds, particularly in the tropics, contributes to a high uncertainty in their emissions and atmospheric significance. Here, we show measurements of acetone, methanol, and acetaldehyde in the tropical remote marine boundary layer made between October 2006 and September 2011 at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (CVAO) (16.85° N, 24.87° W). Mean mixing ratios of acetone, methanol, and acetaldehyde were 546 ± 295 pptv, 742 ± 419 pptv, and 428 ± 190 pptv, respectively, averaged from approximately hourly values over this five-year period. The CAM-Chem global chemical transport model reproduced annual average acetone concentrations well (21% overestimation) but underestimated levels by a factor of 2 in autumn and overestimated concentrations in winter. Annual average concentrations of acetaldehyde were underestimated by a factor of 10, rising to a factor of 40 in summer, and methanol was underestimated on average by a factor of 2, peaking to over a factor of 4 in spring. The model predicted summer minima in acetaldehyde and acetone, which were not apparent in the observations. CAM-Chem was adapted to include a two-way sea-air flux parametrization based on seawater measurements made in the Atlantic Ocean, and the resultant fluxes suggest that the tropical Atlantic region is a net sink for acetone but a net source for methanol and acetaldehyde. Inclusion of the ocean fluxes resulted in good model simulations of monthly averaged methanol levels although still with a 3-fold underestimation in acetaldehyde. Wintertime acetone levels were better simulated, but the observed autumn levels were more severely underestimated than in the standard model. We suggest that the latter may

  1. Models construction for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentations with acetate/butyrate consecutively feeding by graph theory.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Shi, Zhongping; Li, Xin

    2014-05-01

    Several fermentations with consecutively feeding of acetate/butyrate were conducted in a 7 L fermentor and the results indicated that exogenous acetate/butyrate enhanced solvents productivities by 47.1% and 39.2% respectively, and changed butyrate/acetate ratios greatly. Then extracellular butyrate/acetate ratios were utilized for calculation of acids rates and the results revealed that acetate and butyrate formation pathways were almost blocked by corresponding acids feeding. In addition, models for acetate/butyrate feeding fermentations were constructed by graph theory based on calculation results and relevant reports. Solvents concentrations and butanol/acetone ratios of these fermentations were also calculated and the results of models calculation matched fermentation data accurately which demonstrated that models were constructed in a reasonable way.

  2. Effects of acetone, acetonitrile, ethanol, methanol and DMSO on cytochrome P450 in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatic microsomes.

    PubMed

    Sakalli, Sidika; Burkina, Viktoriia; Zlabek, Vladimir; Zamaratskaia, Galia

    2015-01-01

    In vitro impacts of five organic solvents on cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme activity were investigated using hepatic microsomes of rainbow trout. The rates of several CYP450-mediated reactions were investigated at solvent concentrations ranging from 0.01% to 3%. The solvents greatly affected all tested reactions. In at least 0.8% ethanol, 2% methanol or acetone, 1% acetonitrile or 3% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity decreased and at 3% acetonitrile or ethanol, it was undetected. At 3%, all tested solvents except methanol reduced 7-benzyloxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin-O-debenzylase (BFCOD) activity, but at low concentrations of ethanol (2% and lower) or DMSO (1% and lower), it was induced. This was not seen with the inclusion of a pre-incubation step. p-Nitrophenolhydroxylase (PNPH) activity was not affected at concentrations below 1% DMSO, and at 2% acetonitrile it was reduced, as it was above 1% methanol or 0.5% ethanol. Acetone did not affect PNPH activity with or without a pre-incubation step. In general, the degree of inhibition was similar with and without the pre-incubation step. We conclude that the concentration of organic solvent for solubilizing the substrate and inhibitor in in vitro microsomal studies should be minimized.

  3. Synthesis of acetic acid via methanol hydrocarboxylation with CO2 and H2

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Qingli; Zhang, Jingjing; Cui, Meng; Han, Buxing

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid is an important bulk chemical that is currently produced via methanol carbonylation using fossil based CO. Synthesis of acetic acid from the renewable and cheap CO2 is of great importance, but state of the art routes encounter difficulties, especially in reaction selectivity and activity. Here we report a route to produce acetic acid from CO2, methanol and H2. The reaction can be efficiently catalysed by Ru–Rh bimetallic catalyst using imidazole as the ligand and LiI as the promoter in 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI) solvent. It is confirmed that methanol is hydrocarboxylated into acetic acid by CO2 and H2, which accounts for the outstanding reaction results. The reaction mechanism is proposed based on the control experiments. The strategy opens a new way for acetic acid production and CO2 transformation, and represents a significant progress in synthetic chemistry. PMID:27165850

  4. Catalysis of the Carbonylation of Alcohols to Carboxylic Acids Including Acetic Acid Synthesis from Methanol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Denis; DeKleva, Thomas W.

    1986-01-01

    Monsanto's highly successful synthesis of acetic acid from methanol and carbon monoxide illustrates use of new starting materials to replace pretroleum-derived ethylene. Outlines the fundamental aspects of the acetic acid process and suggests ways of extending the synthesis to higher carboxylic acids. (JN)

  5. Application of acetone acetals as water scavengers and derivatization agents prior to the gas chromatographic analysis of polar residual solvents in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    van Boxtel, Niels; Wolfs, Kris; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2015-12-18

    The sensitivity of gas chromatography (GC) combined with the full evaporation technique (FET) for the analysis of aqueous samples is limited due to the maximum tolerable sample volume in a headspace vial. Using an acetone acetal as water scavenger prior to FET-GC analysis proved to be a useful and versatile tool for the analysis of high boiling analytes in aqueous samples. 2,2-Dimethoxypropane (DMP) was used in this case resulting in methanol and acetone as reaction products with water. These solvents are relatively volatile and were easily removed by evaporation enabling sample enrichment leading to 10-fold improvement in sensitivity compared to the standard 10μL FET sample volumes for a selection of typical high boiling polar residual solvents in water. This could be improved even further if more sample is used. The method was applied for the determination of residual NMP in an aqueous solution of a cefotaxime analogue and proved to be considerably better than conventional static headspace (sHS) and the standard FET approach. The methodology was also applied to determine trace amounts of ethylene glycol (EG) in aqueous samples like contact lens fluids, where scavenging of the water would avoid laborious extraction prior to derivatization. During this experiment it was revealed that DMP reacts quantitatively with EG to form 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane (2,2-DD) under the proposed reaction conditions. The relatively high volatility (bp 93°C) of 2,2-DD makes it possible to perform analysis of EG using the sHS methodology making additional derivatization reactions superfluous.

  6. Acetonic and Methanolic Extracts of Heterotheca inuloides, and Quercetin, Decrease CCl4-Oxidative Stress in Several Rat Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Huerta-Gertrudis, Bernardino; García-Cruz, Mercedes Edna; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Sánchez-González, Dolores Javier; Camacho-Carranza, Rafael; Espinosa-Aguirre, Jesús Javier

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that the acetonic and methanolic extracts of H. inuloides prevent carbon tetrachloride-(CCl4) induced oxidative stress in vital tissues. Pretreatment with both H. inuloides extracts or quercetin attenuated the increase in serum activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin (BB), creatinine (CRE), and creatine kinase (CK), and impeded the decrease of γ-globulin (γ-GLOB) and albumin (ALB) observed in CCl4-induced tissue injury. The protective effect was confirmed by histological analysis with hematoxylin-eosin and periodic acid/Schiff's reagent. Level of lipid peroxidation was higher in the organs of rats exposed to CCl4 than in those of the animals treated with Heterohteca extracts or quercetin, and these showed levels similar to the untreated group. Pretreatment of animals with either of the extracts or quercetin also prevented the increase of 4-hydroxynonenal and 3-nitrotyrosine. Pretreatment with the plant extracts or quercetin attenuated CCl4 toxic effects on the activity of several antioxidant enzymes. The present results strongly suggest that the chemopreventive effect of the extracts used and quercetin, against CCl4 toxicity, is associated with their antioxidant properties and corroborated previous results obtained in liver tissue. PMID:23365610

  7. Methanol and ethanol oxidase respiratory chains of the methylotrophic acetic acid bacterium, Acetobacter methanolicus.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, K; Takahashi, K; Takahashi, M; Ameyama, M; Adachi, O

    1992-06-01

    Acetobacter methanolicus is a unique acetic acid bacterium which has a methanol oxidase respiratory chain, as seen in methylotrophs, in addition to its ethanol oxidase respiratory chain. In this study, the relationship between methanol and ethanol oxidase respiratory chains was investigated. The organism is able to grow by oxidizing several carbon sources, including methanol, glycerol, and glucose. Cells grown on methanol exhibited a high methanol-oxidizing activity and contained large amounts of methanol dehydrogenase and soluble cytochromes c. Cells grown on glycerol showed higher oxygen uptake rate and dehydrogenase activity with ethanol but little methanol-oxidizing activity. Furthermore, two different terminal oxidases, cytochrome c and ubiquinol oxidases, have been shown to be involved in the respiratory chain; cytochrome c oxidase predominates in cells grown on methanol while ubiquinol oxidase predominates in cells grown on glycerol. Both terminal oxidases could be solubilized from the membranes and separated from each other. The cytochrome c oxidase and the ubiquinol oxidase have been shown to be a cytochrome co and a cytochrome bo, respectively. Methanol-oxidizing activity was diminished by several treatments that disrupt the integrity of the cells. The activity of the intact cells was inhibited with NaCl and/or EDTA, which disturbed the interaction between methanol dehydrogenase and cytochrome c. Ethanol-oxidizing activity in the membranes was inhibited with 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, which inhibited ubiquinol oxidase but not cytochrome c oxidase. Alcohol dehydrogenase has been purified from the membranes of glycerol-grown cells and shown to reduce ubiquinone-10 as well as a short side-chain homologue in detergent solution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. The enthalpies and entropies of pefloxacin dissolution in methanol, ethanol, 1-Propanol, 2-Propanol, acetone, and chloroform at 293.15-323.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.-L.; Cui, S.-J.; Wang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The solubilities of pefloxacin in methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, acetone, and chloroform have been determined from 293.15 to 323.15 K by a static equilibrium method. The experimental data were correlated with the modified Apelblat equation. The positive Δsol H and Δsol S for each system revealed that pefloxacin dissolution in each solvent is an entropy-driven process.

  9. Salt effect on the isobaric vapor-liquid equilibrium of the methyl acetate + methanol system

    SciTech Connect

    Iliuta, M.C.; Thyrion, F.C.; Landauer, O.M.

    1996-07-01

    The effect of sodium thiocyanate at constant salt mole fraction from 0.01 to 0.05 and at saturation on the vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) of methyl acetate + methanol has been studied at 101.32 kPa using a modified Othmer equilibrium still. The salt exhibited both salting-in and salting-out effects on the methyl acetate, the azeotrope being eliminated at saturation. The results were correlated using the extended UNIQUAC model of Sander et al. and the electrolytic NRTL model of Mock et al.

  10. Adsorptive Separation of Methanol-Acetone on Isostructural Series of Metal-Organic Frameworks M-BTC (M = Ti, Fe, Cu, Co, Ru, Mo): A Computational Study of Adsorption Mechanisms and Metal-Substitution Impacts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Chen, Huiyong; Xiao, Jing; Liu, Defei; Liu, Zewei; Qian, Yu; Xi, Hongxia

    2015-12-01

    The adsorptive separation properties of M-BTC isostructural series (M = Ti, Fe, Cu, Co, Ru, Mo) for methanol-acetone mixtures were investigated by using various computational procedures of grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations (GCMC), density functional theory (DFT), and ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST), following with comprehensive understanding of adsorbate-metal interactions on the adsorptive separation behaviors. The obtained results showed that the single component adsorptions were driven by adsorbate-framework interactions at low pressures and by framework structures at high pressures, among which the mass effects, electrostatics, and geometric accessibility of the metal sites also played roles. In the case of methanol-acetone separation, the selectivity of methanol on M-BTCs decreased with rising pressures due to the pressure-dependent separation mechanisms: the cooperative effects between methanol and acetone hindered the separation at low pressures, whereas the competitive effects of acetone further resulted in the lower selectivity at high pressures. Among these M-BTCs, Ti and Fe analogues exhibited the highest thermodynamic methanol/acetone selectivity, making them promising for adsorptive methanol/acetone separation processes. The investigation provides mechanistic insights on how the nature of metal centers affects the adsorption properties of MOFs, and will further promote the rational design of new MOF materials for effective gas mixture separation. PMID:26581027

  11. Improved Butanol-Methanol (BUME) Method by Replacing Acetic Acid for Lipid Extraction of Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Mutya; Wang, Miao; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica; Han, Xianlin

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of lipids from biological samples is a critical step in lipidomics, especially for shotgun lipidomics where lipid extracts are directly infused into a mass spectrometer. The butanol-methanol (BUME) extraction method was originally developed to extract lipids from plasma samples with 1 % acetic acid. Considering some lipids are sensitive to acidic environments, we modified this protocol by replacing acetic acid with lithium chloride solution and extended the modified extraction to tissue samples. Although no significant reduction of plasmalogen levels in the acidic BUME extracts of rat heart samples was found, the modified method was established to extract various tissue samples, including rat liver, heart, and plasma. Essentially identical profiles of the majority of lipid classes were obtained from the extracts of the modified BUME and traditional Bligh-Dyer methods. However, it was found that neither the original, nor the modified BUME method was suitable for 4-hydroxyalkenal species measurement in biological samples. PMID:27245345

  12. Properties of the liquid-vapor interface of acetone-methanol mixtures, as seen from computer simulation and ITIM surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Idrissi, Abdenacer; Hantal, György; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2015-04-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the liquid-vapor interface of acetone-methanol mixtures of different compositions, including the two neat systems, have been performed on the canonical (N,V,T) ensemble at 293 K. The intrinsic liquid surface has been determined in terms of the Identification of the Truly Interfacial Molecules (ITIM) method. The results have revealed that the proximity of the interface influences the properties of only the first molecular layer of the liquid phase, while the second layer already turns out to be bulk-like in every respect. The two molecules are distributed uniformly along the macroscopic surface normal axis, as no strong preference for surface adsorption is shown by any of them. However, similarly to the bulk liquid phase, both molecules exhibit a marked tendency for self-association within the surface layer. Surface orientations are found to be composition independent; all the preferred orientations of both molecules correspond to the same alignment of the molecular dipole vector, which is nearly parallel to the macroscopic surface plane, declining only 10-20° from it towards the vapor phase. The surface properties are thus primarily governed by dipolar interactions, whereas hydrogen bonding within the surface layer, which decreases steadily with an increase in the acetone mole fraction, plays only a minor role in this respect.

  13. Identification of acetate- or methanol-assimilating bacteria under nitrate-reducing conditions by stable-isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Toshifumi; Yoshie, Sachiko; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Hirata, Akira; Iwami, Norio; Inamori, Yuhei

    2006-08-01

    Stable-isotope probing (SIP) was used to identify acetate- or methanol-assimilating bacteria under nitrate-reducing conditions in activated sludge. A sludge sample obtained from wastewater treatment systems was incubated in a denitrifying batch reactor fed with synthetic wastewater containing [(13)C]acetate or [(13)C]methanol as the main carbon source and nitrate as the electron acceptor. We analyzed how growth of bacterial populations was stimulated by acetate or methanol as the external carbon source in nitrogen-removal systems. Most of the acetate- or methanol-assimilating bacteria identified by SIP have been known as denitrifiers in wastewater treatment systems. When acetate was used as the carbon source, 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from (13)C-labeled DNA were closely related to the 16S rRNA genes of Comamonadaceae (e.g., Comamonas and Acidovorax) and Rhodocyclaceae (e.g., Thauera and Dechloromonas) of the Betaproteobacteria, and Rhodobacteraceae (e.g., Paracoccus and Rhodobacter) of the Alphaproteobacteria. When methanol was used as the carbon source, 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from (13)C-DNA were affiliated with Methylophilaceae (e.g., Methylophilus, Methylobacillus, and Aminomonas) and Hyphomicrobiaceae. Rarefaction curves for clones retrieved from (13)C-DNA showed that the diversity levels for methanol-assimilating bacteria were considerably lower than those for acetate-assimilating bacteria. Furthermore, we characterized nitrite reductase genes (nirS and nirK) as functional marker genes for denitrifier communities in acetate- or methanol-assimilating populations and detected the nirS or nirK sequence related to that of some known pure cultures, such as Alcaligenes, Hyphomicrobium, and Thauera. However, most of the nirS or nirK sequences retrieved from (13)C-DNA were clustered in some unidentified groups. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries retrieved from (13)C-DNA, these unidentified nir sequences might be identified by examining the

  14. Three-dimensionally ordered and wormhole-like mesoporous iron oxide catalysts highly active for the oxidation of acetone and methanol.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yunsheng; Dai, Hongxing; Jiang, Haiyan; Zhang, Lei; Deng, Jiguang; Liu, Yuxi

    2011-02-15

    Three-dimensionally (3D) ordered and wormhole-like mesoporous iron oxides (denoted as Fe-KIT6 and Fe-CA) were respectively prepared by adopting the 3D ordered mesoporous silica KIT-6-templating and modified citric acid-complexing strategies, and characterized by a number of analytical techniques. It is shown that the Fe-KIT6-400 and Fe-CA-400 catalysts derived after 400°C-calcination possessed high surface areas (113-165 m(2)/g), high surface adsorbed oxygen concentrations, and good low-temperature reducibility, giving 90% conversion below 189 and 208°C for acetone and methanol oxidation at 20,000 mL/(g h), respectively. It is believed that the good catalytic performance of Fe-CA-400 and Fe-KIT6-400 was related to factors such as higher surface area and oxygen adspecies concentration, better low-temperature reducibility, and 3D mesoporous architecture.

  15. Comparison of the nutritional value and biological activities of the acetone, methanol and water extracts of the leaves of Solanum nigrum and Leonotis leonorus.

    PubMed

    Jimoh, F O; Adedapo, A A; Afolayan, A J

    2010-03-01

    The nutritional, phytochemical, antioxidant and antibacterial activities of the acetone, methanol and water extracts of the leaves of Solanum nigrum and Leonotis leonorus were investigated using standard analytical methods in order to assess the numerous potential of the leaves of these plants. The proximate analysis showed the that the leaves of the two plants were rich in moisture content, ash content, crude protein, crude lipid, crude fibre and carbohydrate. Elemental analysis in mg/100g (DW) indicated that the leaves contained sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, phosphorus, copper, manganese, and nitrogen. The chemical composition in mg/100g (DW) for alkaloid, saponins, and phytate were moderate. The plants were also rich in polyphenols and had good antioxidant activities. The different extracts of the plants had activities against some of the organisms used in this study. Comparing the nutrient and chemical constituents with recommended dietary allowance (RDA) values, the results reveal that the leaves contain an appreciable amount of nutrients, minerals, and phytochemicals and low levels of toxicants. PMID:20079394

  16. Acetone poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Dimethyl formaldehyde poisoning; Dimethyl ketone poisoning; Nail polish remover poisoning ... Acetone can be found in: Nail polish remover Some cleaning solutions Some glues, including rubber cement Some lacquers Other products may also contain acetone.

  17. Protective Effect of the Methanolic Extract of Malva parviflora L. leaves on Acetic Acid-induced Ulcerative Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dugani, Aisha; Dakhil, Bushra; Treesh, Soad

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a general term describing chronic, idiopathic relapsing, inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract of unknown etiology. Previous studies have indicated that Malva parviflora leaf extract possesses anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiulcerogenic activity. activity. This work aimed to investigatee the anti-inflammatory effect of the methanolic (MEMP) and aqueous (AEMP) extracts of M. parviflora leaves on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods: 42 male Wistar albino rats were divided into seven groups (n = 6). Group I: Normal saline control group with no colitis; Group II: Acetic acid colitis group; Group III: 100 mg/kg/5 d MEMP; Group IV: 200 mg/kg/5 d.MEMP; Group V: 100 mg/kg/5 d AEMP; Group VI: 200 mg/kg/5 d AEMP; Group VII: Prednisolone group (2 mg/kg/5 d). Treatments were followed by induction of colitis using intrarectal instillation of 2 mL of 4% acetic acid. Colon damage was evaluated macroscopically (spleen weight/body weight, colon weight/length ratio) and the histological changes were also recorded. Results: The results of this study showed that acetic acid caused severe inflammation of the colon and a significant increase in spleen weight/body weight, and an increase in colon weight/length ratio compared with normal control group. Pretreatment with MEMP and AEMP for 5 days followed by induction of colitis resulted in a significant attenuation of spleen weight and colon weight/length ratio compared with acetic acid control group. Methanolic extract provided better anticolitic effect than aqueous extract; the effect was prominent at the dose of 200 mg/kg. Histopathological findings confirmed the protective effect of the MEMP. Conclusion: In conclusion, MEMP could ameliorate mucosal damage in experimentally induced colitis when given orally. PMID:27184642

  18. Methanol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methanol ; CASRN 67 - 56 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  19. Growth of layered basic zinc acetate in methanolic solutions and its pyrolytic transformation into porous zinc oxide films.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Eiji; Fujihara, Shinobu; Kimura, Toshio; Imai, Hiroaki

    2004-04-15

    Layered basic zinc acetate (LBZA), Zn(5)(OH)(8)(CH(3)COO)(2).2H(2)O, was deposited on glass substrates by a chemical bath deposition (CBD) method using methanolic solutions of zinc acetate dihydrate. The substrates were put into bottles filled with the solutions and sealed up and were kept at 60 degrees C in a drying oven. Immersion time necessary for the deposition of LBZA films was typically more than 28 h. This was a key to inducing heterogeneous nucleation of LBZA through control over a degree of supersaturation in the evolution of a unique, nest-like morphology. Hydration water contained by zinc acetate dihydrate was quantitatively enough to promote hydrolysis of zinc acetate. The LBZA films were transformed into nanocrystalline, porous ZnO films without morphological deformation by heating at 150 degrees C in air. A mechanism of the formation of the nest-like morphology was discussed based on nonaqueous solution reactions, nucleation, and crystal growth during the CBD process.

  20. Mechanistic investigation of the uncatalyzed esterification reaction of acetic acid and acid halides with methanol: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Monsurat M; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn E M; Honarparvar, Bahareh; Kruger, Hendrik G

    2016-10-01

    Implementation of catalysts to drive reactions from reactants to products remains a burden to synthetic and organic chemists. In spite of investigations into the kinetics and mechanism of catalyzed esterification reactions, less effort has been made to explore the possibility of an uncatalyzed esterification process. Therefore, a comprehensive mechanistic perspective for the uncatalyzed mechanism at the molecular level is presented. Herein, we describe the non-catalyzed esterification reaction of acetic acid and its halide derivatives (XAc, where X= OH, F, Cl, Br, I) with methanol (MeOH) through a concerted process. The reaction in vacuum and methanol was performed using the density functional theory (DFT) method at M06-2X level with def2-TZVP basis set after a careful literature survey and computations. Esterification through cyclic 4- or 6-membered transition state structures in one- or two-step concerted mechanisms were investigated. The present study outlines the possible cyclic geometry conformations that may occur during experiments at simple ratio of reactants. The free energy of activation for acetic acid and acetyl chloride are 36 kcal mol(-1) and 21 kcal mol(-1), respectively. These are in good agreement with available experimental results from the literature. The selected quantum chemical descriptors proved to be useful tools in chemical reactivity prediction for the reaction mechanism. This quantum mechanics study can serve as a necessary step towards revisiting uncatalyzed reaction mechanisms in some classical organic reactions. PMID:27604278

  1. (N,N'-Di-ethyl-thio-urea-κS)tris-(triphenylphosphane-κP)silver(I) acetate methanol monosolvate.

    PubMed

    Wattanakanjana, Yupa; Nimthong, Arunpatcha; Kamrod, Chanakan

    2014-06-01

    In the mononuclear title complex, [Ag(C5H12N2S)(C18H15P)3](CH3COO)·CH3OH, the Ag(I) ion is in a distorted tetra-hedral coordination geometry formed by three P atoms from three tri-phenyl-phosphane ligands and one S atom from an N,N'-di-ethyl-thio-urea ligand. In the crystal, the acetate anion is connected to the complex mol-ecule via a pair of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds [graph-set motif R (2) 2(8)] and the solvent methanol mol-ecule is connected to the anion via an O-H⋯O hydrogen bond. This aggregate is further connected through a weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bond, forming a chain along [100]. In addition, sixfold phenyl embraces with inter-molecular distances of 6.6463 (13)-6.667 (2) Å are arranged in a chain along [001]. The combination of hydrogen bonding and phen-yl⋯phenyl inter-actions leads to the formation of a two-dimensional network parallel to (010). PMID:24940203

  2. The effects of chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of Brassica rapa L. on cell-mediated immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Jafarian-Dehkordi, A; Zolfaghari, B; Mirdamadi, M

    2013-07-01

    Turnips with a long history of usage, are helpful in preventing breast and prostate cancer, inflammation and body`s immune system dysfunction. In this study, we investigated the effects of chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of Brassica rapa L. on cell-mediated immune response in mice. Chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of B. rapa glands were prepared by maceration method. To study the effects of B. rapa on acquired immunity, groups of Balb/c mice (n=8) were used. Sheep red blood cell (SRBC) was injected (s.c., 1×10(8)cells/ml, 0.02 ml) and 5 days later, different extracts (10, 100 and 500 mg/kg), betamethasone (4 mg/kg) and Levamisol (4 mg/kg) as a positive control and normal saline as a negative control were given i.p. After 1 h SRBC was injected to footpad (s.c., 1×10(8)cells/ml, 0.02 ml) and footpad swelling was measured up to 72 h. To investigate the effects of B. rapa on innate immunity the same procedure was used, but animals only received one injection of SRBC 1 h after i.p. injection of test compounds. Our findings showed that SRBC induced an increase in paw swelling with maximum response at 6-8 and 2-4 h for innate and acquired immunity, respectively. Betamethasone inhibited and levamisol increased paw thickness in both models. In both innate and acquired immunity models, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of B. rapa glands significantly and dose-dependently reduced paw thickness. Ethyl acetate extract showed better effect. As glucosinolates are better extracted by ethyl acetate, it may be concluded that they are contributed in the more pronounced effects of ethyl acetate extract.

  3. The effects of chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of Brassica rapa L. on cell-mediated immune response in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jafarian-Dehkordi, A.; Zolfaghari, B.; Mirdamadi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Turnips with a long history of usage, are helpful in preventing breast and prostate cancer, inflammation and body`s immune system dysfunction. In this study, we investigated the effects of chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of Brassica rapa L. on cell-mediated immune response in mice. Chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of B. rapa glands were prepared by maceration method. To study the effects of B. rapa on acquired immunity, groups of Balb/c mice (n=8) were used. Sheep red blood cell (SRBC) was injected (s.c., 1×108cells/ml, 0.02 ml) and 5 days later, different extracts (10, 100 and 500 mg/kg), betamethasone (4 mg/kg) and Levamisol (4 mg/kg) as a positive control and normal saline as a negative control were given i.p. After 1 h SRBC was injected to footpad (s.c., 1×108cells/ml, 0.02 ml) and footpad swelling was measured up to 72 h. To investigate the effects of B. rapa on innate immunity the same procedure was used, but animals only received one injection of SRBC 1 h after i.p. injection of test compounds. Our findings showed that SRBC induced an increase in paw swelling with maximum response at 6-8 and 2-4 h for innate and acquired immunity, respectively. Betamethasone inhibited and levamisol increased paw thickness in both models. In both innate and acquired immunity models, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of B. rapa glands significantly and dose-dependently reduced paw thickness. Ethyl acetate extract showed better effect. As glucosinolates are better extracted by ethyl acetate, it may be concluded that they are contributed in the more pronounced effects of ethyl acetate extract. PMID:24019825

  4. Effect of sludge age on methanogenic and glycogen accumulating organisms in an aerobic granular sludge process fed with methanol and acetate.

    PubMed

    Pronk, M; Abbas, B; Kleerebezem, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-09-01

    The influence of sludge age on granular sludge formation and microbial population dynamics in a methanol- and acetate-fed aerobic granular sludge system operated at 35°C was investigated. During anaerobic feeding of the reactor, methanol was initially converted to methane by methylotrophic methanogens. These methanogens were able to withstand the relatively long aeration periods. Lowering the anaerobic solid retention time (SRT) from 17 to 8 days enabled selective removal of the methanogens and prevented unwanted methane formation. In absence of methanogens, methanol was converted aerobically, while granule formation remained stable. At high SRT values (51 days), γ-Proteobacteria were responsible for acetate removal through anaerobic uptake and subsequent aerobic growth on storage polymers formed [so called metabolism of glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAO)]. When lowering the SRT (24 days), Defluviicoccus-related organisms (cluster II) belonging to the α-Proteobacteria outcompeted acetate consuming γ-Proteobacteria at 35°C. DNA from the Defluviicoccus-related organisms in cluster II was not extracted by the standard DNA extraction method but with liquid nitrogen, which showed to be more effective. Remarkably, the two GAO types of organisms grew separately in two clearly different types of granules. This work further highlights the potential of aerobic granular sludge systems to effectively influence the microbial communities through sludge age control in order to optimize the wastewater treatment processes. PMID:26059251

  5. Effect of sludge age on methanogenic and glycogen accumulating organisms in an aerobic granular sludge process fed with methanol and acetate

    PubMed Central

    Pronk, M; Abbas, B; Kleerebezem, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-01-01

    The influence of sludge age on granular sludge formation and microbial population dynamics in a methanol- and acetate-fed aerobic granular sludge system operated at 35°C was investigated. During anaerobic feeding of the reactor, methanol was initially converted to methane by methylotrophic methanogens. These methanogens were able to withstand the relatively long aeration periods. Lowering the anaerobic solid retention time (SRT) from 17 to 8 days enabled selective removal of the methanogens and prevented unwanted methane formation. In absence of methanogens, methanol was converted aerobically, while granule formation remained stable. At high SRT values (51 days), γ-Proteobacteria were responsible for acetate removal through anaerobic uptake and subsequent aerobic growth on storage polymers formed [so called metabolism of glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAO)]. When lowering the SRT (24 days), Defluviicoccus-related organisms (cluster II) belonging to the α-Proteobacteria outcompeted acetate consuming γ-Proteobacteria at 35°C. DNA from the Defluviicoccus-related organisms in cluster II was not extracted by the standard DNA extraction method but with liquid nitrogen, which showed to be more effective. Remarkably, the two GAO types of organisms grew separately in two clearly different types of granules. This work further highlights the potential of aerobic granular sludge systems to effectively influence the microbial communities through sludge age control in order to optimize the wastewater treatment processes. PMID:26059251

  6. Enhanced effects of nonisotopic hafnium chloride in methanol as a substitute for uranyl acetate in TEM contrast of ultrastructure of fungal and plant cells.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ken-Ichi; Inoue, Kanako; Kanematsu, Satoko; Horiuchi, Yoshitaka; Park, Pyoyun

    2011-09-01

    This ultrastructural study showed that nonisotopic methanolic hafnium chloride and aqueous lead solution was an excellent new electron stain for enhancing TEM contrasts of fungal and plant cell structures. The ultrastructural definition provided by the new stain was often superior to that provided by conventional staining with uranyl acetate and lead. Definition of fine ultrastructure was also supported by quantitative data on TEM contrast ratios of organelles and components in fungal and plant cells. In particular, polysaccharides, which were localized in cell walls, glycogen particles, starch grains, and plant Golgi vesicle components, were much more reactive to the new stain than to the conventional one. The new nonisotopic stain is useful for enhancing the contrast of ultrastructure in biological tissues and is a safer alternative to uranyl acetate.

  7. Calculation for liquid-liquid equilibria of quaternary alkane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water systems used in counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Zhao, Mengqiang; Yu, Yanmei; Li, Zongcheng

    2007-06-01

    The calculation of liquid-liquid equilibrium compositions of solvent systems is very important for the work on counter-current chromatography (CCC), especially the phase composition and volume ratio obtained from liquid-liquid equilibrium calculation. In this work, liquid-liquid equilibria of quaternary Arizona solvent systems, alkane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water, and related ternary systems are correlated and predicted using the non-random two-liquid model (NRTL). Hexane, heptane and isooctane are the used alkanes. The parameters in the model are regressed only with the special systems considered. Detailed comparison with experimental data shows that liquid-liquid equilibria of these systems can be predicted with greatly improved accuracy as compared to the group contribution method (UNIFAC).

  8. Cognitive enhancing and antioxidant activity of ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the methanol extract of Hibiscus rosa sinensis in scopolamine-induced amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Nade, Vandana S.; Kanhere, Sampat V.; Kawale, Laxman A.; Yadav, Adhikrao V.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the cognitive enhancing and antioxidant activity of Hibiscus rosa sinensis. Materials and Methods: The learning and memory was impaired by administration of scopolamine (1 mg/kg, i.p.) in mice which is associated with altered brain oxidative status. The object recognition test (ORT) and passive avoidance test (PAT) were used to assess cognitive enhancing activity. Animals were treated with an ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the methanol extract of H. sinensis (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o). Results: The ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the methanol extract of H. sinensis (EASF) attenuated amnesia induced by scopolamine and aging. The discrimination index (DI) was significantly decreased in the aged and scopolamine group in ORT. Pretreatment with EASF significantly increased the DI. In PAT, scopolamine-treated mice exhibited significantly shorter step-down latencies (SDL). EASF treatment showed a significant increase in SDL in young, aged as well as in scopolamine-treated animals. The biochemical analysis of brain revealed that scopolamine treatment increased lipid peroxidation and decreased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GSH). Administration of extract significantly reduced LPO and reversed the decrease in brain SOD and GSH levels. The administration of H. sinensis improved memory in amnesic mice and prevented the oxidative stress associated with scopolamine. The mechanism of such protection of H. sinensis may be due to augmentation of cellular antioxidants. Conclusion: The results of the present study suggested that H. sinensis had a protective role against age and scopolamine-induced amnesia, indicating its utility in management of cognitive disorders. PMID:21572646

  9. Emissions of formaldehyde, acetic acid, methanol, and other trace gases from biomass fires in North Carolina measured by airborne Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokelson, R. J.; Goode, J. G.; Ward, D. E.; Susott, R. A.; Babbitt, R. E.; Wade, D. D.; Bertschi, I.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Hao, W. M.

    1999-12-01

    Biomass burning is an important source of many trace gases in the global troposphere. We have constructed an airborne trace gas measurement system consisting of a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) coupled to a "flow-through" multipass cell (AFTIR) and installed it on a U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service King Air B-90. The first measurements with the new system were conducted in North Carolina during April 1997 on large, isolated biomass fire plumes. Simultaneous measurements included Global Positioning System (GPS); airborne sonde; particle light scattering, CO, and CO2; and integrated filter and canister samples. AFTIR spectra acquired within a few kilometers of the fires yielded excess mixing ratios for 10 of the most common trace gases in the smoke: water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, formaldehyde, acetic acid, formic acid, methanol, ethylene, and ammonia. Emission ratios to carbon monoxide for formaldehyde, acetic acid, and methanol were each 2.5±1%. This is in excellent agreement with (and confirms the relevance of) our results from laboratory fires. However, these ratios are significantly higher than the emission ratios reported for these compounds in some previous studies of "fresh" smoke. We present a simple photochemical model calculation that suggests that oxygenated organic compounds should be included in the assessment of ozone formation in smoke plumes. Our measured emission factors indicate that biomass fires could account for a significant portion of the oxygenated organic compounds and HOx present in the tropical troposphere during the dry season. Our fire measurements, along with recent measurements of oxygenated biogenic emissions and oxygenated organic compounds in the free troposphere, indicate that these rarely measured compounds play a major, but poorly understood, role in the HOx, NOx, and O3 chemistry of the troposphere.

  10. Phytochemical composition, GC-MS analysis, in vitro antioxidant and antibacterial potential of clove flower bud (Eugenia caryophyllus) methanolic extract.

    PubMed

    Hemalatha, R; Nivetha, P; Mohanapriya, C; Sharmila, G; Muthukumaran, C; Gopinath, M

    2016-02-01

    Plant derived pharmacologically active compounds have gained importance in food and pharmaceutical industries. The aim of the present study is to identify and study the antioxidant, antimicrobial properties of the phytochemicals present in the crude extract of Eugenia caryophyllus flower buds. The antioxidant activity of the methanol, acetone and chloroform extract was evaluated by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. The methanol extract showed better radical scavenging activity than other selected solvents. Preliminary screening of phytochemicals was carried out in methanol extract and total phenol content was found high. Antibacterial activity was determined by well diffusion assay and methanol extract was found effective against Klebsiella pneumonia. FTIR and GC-MS results indicate the presence of aromatic compounds and major constituents were found to be eugenol and eugenyl acetate. Results of this study implied that Eugenia caryophyllus flower bud extract could be considered as health nutriments in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:27162398

  11. Photo-catalytic oxidation of acetone on a TiO2 powder: An in situ FTIR investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Szanyi, János; Kwak, Ja Hun

    2015-09-01

    In situ transmission infrared spectroscopy was used to investigate the photo-oxidation of acetone on a commercial, oxidized TiO2 (P25) powder catalyst under UV irradiation at ambient temperature, in the absence and presence of gas phase O2. The photochemistry of a number of organic molecules (1-butanone, methanol and acetic acid,) under the same conditions was also studied in order to identify reaction intermediates and products formed in the photo-oxidation of acetone. Under anaerobic conditions (in the absence of gas phase oxygen) limited extent of photo-oxidation of acetone took place on the oxidized TiO2 sample. In the presence of O2 in the gas phase, however, acetone was completely converted to acetates and formates, and ultimately CO2. The initial step in the sequence of photo-induced reactions is the ejection of a methyl radical, resulting in the formation of surface acetates (from the acetyl group) and formates (from the methyl radicals). Acetate ions are also converted to formates, that, in turn, photo-oxidized to CO2. Under the experimental conditions applied the accumulation of carbonates and bicarbonates were observed on the TiO2 surface as the photo-oxidation of acetone proceeded (this was also observed during the course of photo-oxidation of all the other organics studied here). When the initial radical ejection step produced hydrocarbons containing more than one C atoms (as in the case in 2-butanone and mesytil oxide), the formation of aldehydes on the catalyst surface was also observed as a result of secondary reactions. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy. JHK also acknowledges the support of this work by the 2014 Research Fund of UNIST (Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan, Korea). The authors thank M

  12. Rubrene endoperoxide acetone monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Shinashi, Kiyoaki; Uchida, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The title acetone solvate, C42H28O2·C3H6O [systematic name: 1,3,10,12-tetra­phenyl-19,20-dioxapenta­cyclo­[10.6.2.02,11.04,9.013,18]icosa-2(11),3,5,7,9,13,15,17-octa­ene acetone monosolvate], is a photooxygenation product of rubrene (systematic name: 5,6,11,12-tetra­phenyl­tetra­cene). The mol­ecule bends at the bridgehead atoms, which are linked by the O—O transannular bond, with a dihedral angle of 49.21 (6)° between the benzene ring and the naphthalene ring system of the tetra­cene unit. In the crystal, the rubrene mol­ecules are linked by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a column along the c axis. The acetone solvent mol­ecules form a dimer around a crystallographic inversion centre through a carbon­yl–carbonyl dipolar inter­action. A C—H⋯O hydrogen bond between the rubrene and acetone mol­ecules is also observed. PMID:22590045

  13. Rubrene endoperoxide acetone monosolvate.

    PubMed

    Shinashi, Kiyoaki; Uchida, Akira

    2012-04-01

    The title acetone solvate, C(42)H(28)O(2)·C(3)H(6)O [systematic name: 1,3,10,12-tetra-phenyl-19,20-dioxapenta-cyclo-[10.6.2.0(2,11).0(4,9).0(13,18)]icosa-2(11),3,5,7,9,13,15,17-octa-ene acetone monosolvate], is a photooxygenation product of rubrene (systematic name: 5,6,11,12-tetra-phenyl-tetra-cene). The mol-ecule bends at the bridgehead atoms, which are linked by the O-O transannular bond, with a dihedral angle of 49.21 (6)° between the benzene ring and the naphthalene ring system of the tetra-cene unit. In the crystal, the rubrene mol-ecules are linked by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a column along the c axis. The acetone solvent mol-ecules form a dimer around a crystallographic inversion centre through a carbon-yl-carbonyl dipolar inter-action. A C-H⋯O hydrogen bond between the rubrene and acetone mol-ecules is also observed. PMID:22590045

  14. Photodegradation of acetone in dilute aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, M.I.; Bolton, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Photochemical methods for destroying organic pollutants found in industrial wastewaters and groundwaters are being used successfully in environment treatment systems. This study focuses on acetone photodegradation in aqueous solution by UV irradiation (1 kW medium pressure Hg lamp) in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Intermediates such as acetic and formic acids were detected. The kinetic data were evaluated and the reaction mechanisms were postulated considering the influence of oxygen concentration and pH. The generation of {sm_bullet}OH radicals from the photolysis of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces a faster decomposition of acetone (depending on H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration) than does direct photolysis.

  15. Effect of Coadsorbed Water on the Photodecomposition of Acetone on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2008-06-10

    The influence of coadsorbed water on the photodecomposition of acetone on TiO2 was examined using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and the rutile TiO2(110) surface as a model photocatalyst. Of the two major influences ascribed to water in the heterogeneous photocatalysis literature (promotion via OH radical supply and inhibition due to site blocking), only the negative influence of water was observed. As long as the total water and acetone coverage was maintained well below the first layer saturation coverage (‘1 ML’), little inhibition of acetone photodecomposition was observed. However, as the total water+acetone coverage exceeded 1 ML, acetone was preferentially displaced from the first layer to physisorbed states by water and the extent of acetone photodecomposition attenuated. The displacement originated from water compressing acetone into high coverage regions where increased acetone-acetone repulsions caused displacement from the first layer. The immediate product of acetone photodecomposition was adsorbed acetate, which occupies twice as many surface sites per molecule as compared to acetone. Since the acetate intermediate was more stable on the TiO2(110) surface than either water or acetone (as gauged by TPD) and since its photodecomposition rate was less than that of acetone, additional surface sites were not opened up during acetone photodecomposition for previously displaced acetone molecules to re-enter the first layer. Results in this study suggest that increased molecular-level repulsions between organic molecules brought about by increased water coverage are as influential in the inhibiting effect of water on photooxidation rates as are water-organic repulsions.

  16. Isobutanol-methanol mixtures from synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesia, E.

    1996-01-10

    A series of Cu{sub 0.5}CeMe(II)O{sub x} catalysts (Me refers to Group II alkali earth elements) have been prepared by coprecipitating the corresponding metal nitrates with potassium carbonate. The bulk composition of the catalyst has been determined by atomic absorption (AA) analysis. High-pressure isobutanol synthesis studies have been carried out over a standard BASF Cs-promoted Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. At a CO conversion level of 32%, the isobutanol carbon selectivity is about 5%; whereas that of methanol is 40.2%. A 100% selectivity sum has now been obtained as a result of using response factors measured by the laboratory. The reactions of ethanol and acetic acid over a number of catalysts have been investigated using a temperature programmed surface reaction (TPSR) technique. Ethanol and acetone are the only desorption products observed over Cs-promoted Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. Surface acetate ion is believed to be the precursor for acetone formation. Over calcined hydrotalcites, i.e., MgO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ethylene is formed instead of acetone. The amount of ethylene formed decreases as Mg/Al ratio increases, suggesting a role of aluminum ions in ethanol dehydration reactions.

  17. Acetate Production by Methanogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Peter; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Mah, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Methanosarcina barkeri MS and 227 and Methanosarcina mazei S-6 produced acetate when grown on H2-CO2, methanol, or trimethylamine. Marked differences in acetate production by the two bacterial species were found, even though methane and cell yields were nearly the same. M. barkeri produced 30 to 75 μmol of acetate per mmol of CH4 formed, but M. mazei produced only 8 to 9 μmol of acetate per mmol of CH4. PMID:16348006

  18. Proteomic analysis of nitrate-dependent acetone degradation by Alicycliphilus denitrificans strain BC.

    PubMed

    Oosterkamp, Margreet J; Boeren, Sjef; Atashgahi, Siavash; Plugge, Caroline M; Schaap, Peter J; Stams, Alfons J M

    2015-06-01

    Alicycliphilus denitrificans strain BC grows anaerobically on acetone with nitrate as electron acceptor. Comparative proteomics of cultures of A. denitrificans strain BC grown on either acetone or acetate with nitrate was performed to study the enzymes involved in the acetone degradation pathway. In the proposed acetone degradation pathway, an acetone carboxylase converts acetone to acetoacetate, an AMP-dependent synthetase/ligase converts acetoacetate to acetoacetyl-CoA, and an acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase cleaves acetoacetyl-CoA to two acetyl-CoA. We also found a putative aldehyde dehydrogenase associated with acetone degradation. This enzyme functioned as a β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase catalyzing the conversion of surplus acetoacetate to β-hydroxybutyrate that may be converted to the energy and carbon storage compound, poly-β-hydroxybutyrate. Accordingly, we confirmed the formation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate in acetone-grown cells of strain BC. Our findings provide insight in nitrate-dependent acetone degradation that is activated by carboxylation of acetone. This will aid studies of similar pathways found in other microorganisms degrading acetone with nitrate or sulfate as electron acceptor.

  19. Quantitative Clinical Diagnostic Analysis of Acetone in Human Blood by HPLC: A Metabolomic Search for Acetone as Indicator

    PubMed Central

    Akgul Kalkan, Esin; Sahiner, Mehtap; Ulker Cakir, Dilek; Alpaslan, Duygu; Yilmaz, Selehattin

    2016-01-01

    Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH) as a derivatizing reagent, an analytical method was developed for the quantitative determination of acetone in human blood. The determination was carried out at 365 nm using an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) diode array detector (DAD). For acetone as its 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivative, a good separation was achieved with a ThermoAcclaim C18 column (15 cm × 4.6 mm × 3 μm) at retention time (tR) 12.10 min and flowrate of 1 mL min−1 using a (methanol/acetonitrile) water elution gradient. The methodology is simple, rapid, sensitive, and of low cost, exhibits good reproducibility, and allows the analysis of acetone in biological fluids. A calibration curve was obtained for acetone using its standard solutions in acetonitrile. Quantitative analysis of acetone in human blood was successfully carried out using this calibration graph. The applied method was validated in parameters of linearity, limit of detection and quantification, accuracy, and precision. We also present acetone as a useful tool for the HPLC-based metabolomic investigation of endogenous metabolism and quantitative clinical diagnostic analysis. PMID:27298750

  20. Acetone production with metabolically engineered strains of Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Sabrina; Gerdom, Marzena; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Linder, Sonja; Flüchter, Sebastian; Öztürk, Hatice; Blümke, Wilfried; May, Antje; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Bahl, Hubert; Dürre, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Expected depletion of oil and fossil resources urges the development of new alternative routes for the production of bulk chemicals and fuels beyond petroleum resources. In this study, the clostridial acetone pathway was used for the formation of acetone in the acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The acetone production operon (APO) containing the genes thlA (encoding thiolase A), ctfA/ctfB (encoding CoA transferase), and adc (encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase) from Clostridium acetobutylicum were cloned under the control of the thlA promoter into four vectors having different replicons for Gram-positives (pIP404, pBP1, pCB102, and pCD6). Stable replication was observed for all constructs. A. woodii [pJIR_actthlA] achieved the maximal acetone concentration under autotrophic conditions (15.2±3.4mM). Promoter sequences of the genes ackA from A. woodii and pta-ack from C. ljungdahlii were determined by primer extension (PEX) and cloned upstream of the APO. The highest acetone production in recombinant A. woodii cells was achieved using the promoters PthlA and Ppta-ack. Batch fermentations using A. woodii [pMTL84151_actthlA] in a bioreactor revealed that acetate concentration had an effect on the acetone production, due to the high Km value of the CoA transferase. In order to establish consistent acetate concentration within the bioreactor and to increase biomass, a continuous fermentation process for A. woodii was developed. Thus, acetone productivity of the strain A. woodii [pMTL84151_actthlA] was increased from 1.2mgL(-1)h(-1) in bottle fermentation to 26.4mgL(-1)h(-1) in continuous gas fermentation. PMID:26971669

  1. Acetone production with metabolically engineered strains of Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Sabrina; Gerdom, Marzena; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Linder, Sonja; Flüchter, Sebastian; Öztürk, Hatice; Blümke, Wilfried; May, Antje; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Bahl, Hubert; Dürre, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Expected depletion of oil and fossil resources urges the development of new alternative routes for the production of bulk chemicals and fuels beyond petroleum resources. In this study, the clostridial acetone pathway was used for the formation of acetone in the acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The acetone production operon (APO) containing the genes thlA (encoding thiolase A), ctfA/ctfB (encoding CoA transferase), and adc (encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase) from Clostridium acetobutylicum were cloned under the control of the thlA promoter into four vectors having different replicons for Gram-positives (pIP404, pBP1, pCB102, and pCD6). Stable replication was observed for all constructs. A. woodii [pJIR_actthlA] achieved the maximal acetone concentration under autotrophic conditions (15.2±3.4mM). Promoter sequences of the genes ackA from A. woodii and pta-ack from C. ljungdahlii were determined by primer extension (PEX) and cloned upstream of the APO. The highest acetone production in recombinant A. woodii cells was achieved using the promoters PthlA and Ppta-ack. Batch fermentations using A. woodii [pMTL84151_actthlA] in a bioreactor revealed that acetate concentration had an effect on the acetone production, due to the high Km value of the CoA transferase. In order to establish consistent acetate concentration within the bioreactor and to increase biomass, a continuous fermentation process for A. woodii was developed. Thus, acetone productivity of the strain A. woodii [pMTL84151_actthlA] was increased from 1.2mgL(-1)h(-1) in bottle fermentation to 26.4mgL(-1)h(-1) in continuous gas fermentation.

  2. Methanol test

    MedlinePlus

    ... sources of methanol in the body include fruits, vegetables, and diet drinks that contain aspartame. Methanol is ... eat or drink it in toxic amounts. Methanol poisoning mainly affects the digestive system, nervous system, and ...

  3. Fate of acetone in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Stephens, D.W.; Shultz, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The physical, chemical, and biological processes that might affect the concentration of acetone in water were investigated in laboratory studies. Processes considered included volatilization, adsorption by sediments, photodecomposition, bacterial degradation, and absorption by algae and molds. It was concluded that volatilization and bacterial degradation were the dominant processes determining the fate of acetone in streams and rivers. ?? 1982.

  4. Catalysis of methyl acetate formation from methanol alone by ({mu}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5})(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}RuX (X=Cl, SnCl{sub 3}, SnF{sub 3}): High activity for the SnF{sub 3} complex

    SciTech Connect

    Einaga, Hisahiro; Yamakawa, Tetsu; Shinoda, Sumio

    1994-12-31

    The authors have recently shown that the Ru(II)-Sn(II) bimetallic complex can catalyze the unprecedented one-step formation of acetic acid (or methyl acetate) with methanol used as the sole source. It was suggested that the reaction consists of sequential processes of methanol {r_arrow} formaldehyde (methyl){r_arrow}methyl formate {r_arrow} acetic acid (methyl acetate). While the Ru(II) complexes capable of catalyzing the dehydrogenation of methanol into methyl formate are known, this catalyst system is unique because of its extra ability to isomerize methyl formate to acetic acid without a CO atmosphere (usually high pressure) or an iodide promoter (often corrosive to reaction apparatus). In this communication, the authors examine the cyclopentadienyl bis(triphenylphosphine) ruthenium(II) auxilliary in view of its well defined geometry and configurational stability, and demonstrate that combination with the SnF{sub 3} ligand gives quite high catalytic ability compared to the conventional SnCl{sub 3} ligand. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Acetone-based cellulose solvent.

    PubMed

    Kostag, Marc; Liebert, Tim; Heinze, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Acetone containing tetraalkylammonium chloride is found to be an efficient solvent for cellulose. The addition of an amount of 10 mol% (based on acetone) of well-soluble salt triethyloctylammonium chloride (Et3 OctN Cl) adjusts the solvent's properties (increases the polarity) to promote cellulose dissolution. Cellulose solutions in acetone/Et3 OctN Cl have the lowest viscosity reported for comparable aprotic solutions making it a promising system for shaping processes and homogeneous chemical modification of the biopolymer. Recovery of the polymer and recycling of the solvent components can be easily achieved.

  6. Acetone Chemistry on Oxidized and Reduced TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A

    2004-12-09

    The chemistry of acetone on the oxidized and reduced surfaces of TiO2(110) was examined using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The reduced surface was prepared with about 7% oxygen vacancy sites by annealing in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) at 850 K, and the oxidized surface was prepared by exposure of the reduced surface to molecular oxygen at 95 K followed by heating the surface to a variety of temperatures between 200 and 500 K. Acetone adsorbs molecularly on the reduced surface with no evidence for either decomposition or preferential binding at vacancy sites. Based on HREELS, the majority of acetone molecules adsorbed in an η¹ configuration at Ti⁴⁺ sites through interaction of lone pair electrons on the carbonyl oxygen atom. Repulsive acetone-acetone interactions shift the desorption peak from 345 K at low coverage to 175 K as the first layer saturates with a coverage of ~ 1 ML. In contrast, about 7% of the acetone adlayer decomposes when the surface is pretreated with molecular oxygen. Acetate is among the detected decomposition products, but only comprises about 1/3rd of the amount of acetone decomposed and its yield depends on the temperature at which the O₂ exposed surface was preheated to prior to acetone adsorption. Aside from the small level of irreversible decomposition, about 0.25 ML of acetone is stabilized to 375 K by coadsorbed oxygen. These acetone species exhibit an HREELS spectrum unlike that of η¹-acetone or of any other species proposed to exist from the interaction of acetone with TiO₂ powders. Based on the presence of extensive ¹⁶O/¹⁸O exchange between acetone and coadsorbed oxygen in the 375 K acetone TPD state, it is proposed that a polymeric form of acetone forms on the TiO₂(110) surface through nucleophilic attack of oxygen on the carbonyl carbon atom of acetone, and is propagated to neighboring η¹-acetone molecules. This process is initiated

  7. Insights into Acetone Photochemistry on Rutile TiO2(110). 1. Off-Normal CH3 Ejection from Acetone Diolate.

    SciTech Connect

    Petrik, Nikolay G.; Henderson, Michael A.; Kimmel, Gregory A.

    2015-06-04

    Thermal- and photon-stimulated reactions of acetone co-adsorbed with oxygen on rutile TiO2(110) surface are studied with infrared reflection-adsorption spectroscopy (IRAS) combined with temperature programmed desorption and angle-resolved photon stimulated desorption. IRAS results show that n2-acetone diolate ((CH3)2COO) is produced via thermally-activated reactions between the chemisorbed oxygen with co-adsorbed acetone. Formation of acetone diolate is also consistent with 18O / 16O isotopic exchange experiments. During UV irradiation at 30 K, CH3 radicals are ejected from the acetone diolate with a distribution that is peaked at .-. +- 66 degrees from the surface normal along the azimuth (i.e. perpendicular to the rows of bridging oxygen and Ti5c ions). This distribution is also consistent with the orientation of the C–CH3 bonds in the n2-acetone diolate on TiO2(110). The acetone diolate peaks disappear from the IRAS spectra after UV irradiation and new peaks are observed and associated with n2-acetate. The data presented here demonstrate direct signatures of the proposed earlier 2-step mechanism for acetone photooxidation on TiO2(110)

  8. Uptake and Reactions of Formaldehyde, Acetaldehyde, Acetone, Propanal and Ethanol in Sulfuric Acid solutions at 200-240 K: Implications for upper tropospheric aerosol composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Williams, M. B.; Axson, J.; Michelsen, R.

    2007-12-01

    The production of light absorbing, organic material in aerosol that is normally considered to be transparent in the UV and visible wavelength regions has significant implications for biogeochemical cycling and climate modelling. Production mechanisms likely involve carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde, acetone, acetaldehyde and propanal that are present in significant quantities in the upper troposphere (UT). In this study, we have performed experiments focusing on a class of acid catalyzed carbonyl reactions, the formation of acetals. R2C=O + 2R'OH --> R2C(OR')2 + H2O Using a Knudsen cell apparatus, we have measured the rate of uptake of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, propanal, and ethanol into sulfuric acid solutions ranging between 40-70 wt% of acid, containing 0-0.1 M of ethanol, acetone or formaldehyde at temperatures of 220-250 K. For all reactant pairs, the aldol condensation path, including self reaction, should be insignificant at the acidities studied. Evidence for reaction between organics was observed for all pairs, except those involving propanal which were likely limited by the very low solubility. We attribute enhanced uptake to the formation of acetals, such as 1,1-diethoxyethane and 2,2- diethoxypropane, among others. Enhanced uptake was observed to proceed on timescales > 1 hour and sometimes shows complex dependence on acidity that is likely related to speciation of the individual carbonyls in acidic solution. The acetal products do not absorb in the visible but are less volatile than parent molecules, allowing for accumulation in sulfuric acid particles, and enhanced uptake. Cross reactions of carbonyls with alcohols in sulfuric acid medium have not been previously measured, yet methanol and ethanol show high solubility and are present at significant concentrations in the UT. Thus even at slow reaction rates, the acetal reaction has ample starting material and proceeds under conditions common to the UT. We will present results for the

  9. 21 CFR 173.210 - Acetone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acetone. 173.210 Section 173.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD... Substances § 173.210 Acetone. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for acetone in...

  10. 21 CFR 173.210 - Acetone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetone. 173.210 Section 173.210 Food and Drugs..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.210 Acetone. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for acetone in spice oleoresins when present therein as a residue from the extraction of spice....

  11. 21 CFR 173.210 - Acetone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acetone. 173.210 Section 173.210 Food and Drugs..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.210 Acetone. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for acetone in spice oleoresins when present therein as a residue from the extraction of spice....

  12. 21 CFR 173.210 - Acetone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetone. 173.210 Section 173.210 Food and Drugs..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.210 Acetone. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for acetone in spice oleoresins when present therein as a residue from the extraction of spice....

  13. 21 CFR 173.210 - Acetone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acetone. 173.210 Section 173.210 Food and Drugs..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.210 Acetone. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for acetone in spice oleoresins when present therein as a residue from the extraction of spice....

  14. Fermentation and genomic analysis of acetone-uncoupled butanol production by Clostridium tetanomorphum.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fuyu; Bao, Guanhui; Zhao, Chunhua; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin; Dong, Hongjun

    2016-02-01

    In typical acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, acetone is the main by-product (50 % of butanol mass) of butanol production, resulting in a low yield of butanol. It is known that some Clostridium tetanomorphum strains are able to produce butanol without acetone in nature. Here, we described that C. tetanomorphum strain DSM665 can produce 4.16 g/L butanol and 4.98 g/L ethanol at pH 6.0, and 9.81 g/L butanol and 1.01 g/L ethanol when adding 1 mM methyl viologen. Butyrate and acetate could be reassimilated and no acetone was produced. Further analysis indicated that the activity of the acetate/butyrate:acetoacetyl-CoA transferase responsible for acetone production is lost in C. tetanomorphum DSM665. The genome of C. tetanomorphum DSM665 was sequenced and deposited in DDBJ, EMBL, and GenBank under the accession no. APJS00000000. Sequence analysis indicated that there are no typical genes (ctfA/B and adc) that are typically parts of an acetone synthesis pathway in C. tetanomorphum DSM665. This work provides new insights in the mechanism of clostridial butanol production and should prove useful for the design of a high-butanol-producing strain.

  15. Acetone and isopropanol in ruminal fluid and feces of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Shiogama, Yumiko

    2010-03-01

    Acetone and its metabolite isopropanol are produced by gut microbes as well as by the host's metabolism. To evaluate the production of acetone and isopropanol in alimentary tracts, a total of 80 pair-samples of feces and ruminal fluid were taken in lactating dairy cows that had been fed silage-containing diets. Acetone and isopropanol were analyzed, together with ethanol and volatile fatty acids (VFAs). Isopropanol was detected in 57 fecal and all the ruminal samples; however, the ruminal isopropanol and ethanol concentrations were distinctly lower than those in the feces. Acetone was detected in 13 fecal and 53 ruminal samples; however, there was no significant difference in acetone concentrations between the feces and the ruminal fluid. The group with higher fecal isopropanol concentration showed higher fecal proportions of acetate accompanied by low proportion of minor VFA, which consisted of isobutyrate and iso- and n-valerate. In the group with higher ruminal isopropanol concentration, ethanol concentration was higher; the ruminal VFA profiles showed only a negligible difference. Fecal and ruminal ethanol concentrations were not affected by feed ethanol. Thus, the colon showed an accelerated alcoholic fermentation compared with the rumen of dairy cows; however, acetone was present at higher frequency in the rumen than in the feces.

  16. Student Preparation of Acetone from 2-Propanol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, J. M.; McKee, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and materials needed are provided for an experiment in which acetone is produced from 2-propanol. The experiment does not use magnetic stirring, avoids the necessity for exhaustive extractions with ether, and produces a 60-percent yield of redistilled acetone within a two-and-one-half-hour laboratory period.…

  17. Mesoxalaldehyde acetals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordeeva, G.N.; Kalashnikov, S.M.; Popov, Yu.N.; Kruglov, E.A.; Imashev, U.B.

    1987-11-10

    The treatment of methylglyoxal acetals by alkyl nitrites in the presence of the corresponding aliphatic alcohols and hydrochloric acid leads to the formation of linear mesoxalaldehyde acetals, whose structure was established by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The major pathways for the decomposition of these molecules upon electron impact were established.

  18. Mutagenic and cytotoxic activities of Limonium globuliferum methanol extracts.

    PubMed

    Eren, Yasin

    2016-10-01

    Unmonitored use of plant extractions alone or in combination with drugs may cause important health problems and toxic effects. Limonium (Plumbaginaceae) plants are known as antibacterial, anticancer and antivirus agent. But it is possible that this genus may have toxic effects. This study evaluated the mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of Limonium globuliferum (Boiss. et Heldr.) O. Kuntze (Plumbaginaceae) acetone/methanol (2:1), and methanol extracts of root, stem, and leaf. Different parts of this species were used in order to compare the mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of these parts. Ames test was carried out with S. typhimurium TA98, and TA100 strains. Strains were incubated at 37 °C for 72 h. MDBK cell line was used in MTT test. 10,000, 1000, 100, 10, 1 and 0.1 µg/plate concentrations of plant extracts were used in Ames test. 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25 and 3.125 µg/ml concentrations of root, stem and leaf acetone/methanol (2:1) and methanol extracts were used in MTT test. Ames test results indicated that only methanol leaf extract (10,000 µg/plate) had mutagenic activity. L. globuliferum root methanol extracts (3.125 and 6.25 µg/ml) increased the proliferation rates. Root acetone/methanol (2:1) extracts were found highly cytotoxic in all treatments. The results indicated that leaf extracts had lower cytotoxic effects than root and stem extracts. High concentrations of L. globuliferum stem and leaf methanol extracts showed cytotoxic activity in all treatment periods while low concentrations of the stem methanol extracts increased the proliferation rates.

  19. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Hosseini Salekdeh, Ghasem; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated. PMID:26725518

  20. Saccharification behavior of cellulose acetate during enzymatic processing for microbial ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Hama, Shinji; Nakano, Kohsuke; Onodera, Kaoru; Nakamura, Masashi; Noda, Hideo; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to realize the potential application of cellulose acetate to enzymatic processing, followed by microbial ethanol fermentation. To eliminate the effect of steric hindrance of acetyl groups on the action of cellulase, cellulose acetate was subjected to deacetylation in the presence of 1N sodium hydroxide and a mixture of methanol/acetone, yielding 88.8-98.6% at 5-20% substrate loadings during a 48h saccharification at 50°C. Ethanol fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae attained a high yield of 92.3% from the initial glucose concentration of 44.2g/L; however, a low saccharification yield was obtained at 35°C, decreasing efficiency during simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Presaccharification at 50°C prior to SSF without increasing the total process time attained the ethanol titers of 19.8g/L (5% substrate), 38.0g/L (10% substrate), 55.9g/L (15% substrate), and 70.9g/L (20% substrate), which show a 12.0-16.2% improvement in ethanol yield.

  1. Ethyl acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl acetate ; CASRN 141 - 78 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  2. Phenylmercuric acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phenylmercuric acetate ; CASRN 62 - 38 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  3. Vinyl acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vinyl acetate ; CASRN 108 - 05 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  4. Ammonium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonium acetate ; CASRN 631 - 61 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  5. Thallium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 30 , 2009 , the assessment summary for Thallium acetate is included in t

  6. Bacterial degradation of acetone in an outdoor model stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Stephens, D.W.; Tai, D.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Diurnal variations of the acetone concentration in an outdoor model stream were measured with and without a nitrate supplement to determine if the nitrate supplement would stimulate bacterial degradation of the acetone. Acetone loss coefficients were computed from the diurnal data using a fitting procedure based on a Lagrangian particle model. The coefficients indicated that bacterial degradation of the acetone was occurring in the downstream part of the stream during the nitrate addition. However, the acetone concentrations stabilized at values considerably above the limit of detection for acetone determination, in contrast to laboratory respirometer studies where the acetone concentration decreased rapidly to less than the detection limit, once bacterial acclimation to the acetone had occurred. One possible explanation for the difference in behavior was the limited 6-hour residence time of the acetone in the model stream.

  7. Separation of polyphenols and caffeine from the acetone extract of fermented tea leaves (Camellia sinensis) using high-performance countercurrent chromatography.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo Jung; Hong, Yong Deog; Lee, Bumjin; Park, Jun Seong; Jeong, Hyun Woo; Kim, Wan Gi; Shin, Song Seok; Yoon, Kee Dong

    2015-07-21

    Leaves from Camellia sienensis are a popular natural source of various beverage worldwide, and contain caffeine and polyphenols derived from catechin analogues. In the current study, caffeine (CAF, 1) and three tea polyphenols including (-)-epigallocatechin 3-O-gallate (EGCg, 2), (-)-gallocatechin 3-O-gallate (GCg, 3), and (-)-epicatechin 3-O-gallate (ECg, 4) were isolated and purified by flow-rate gradient high-performance countercurrent chromatography (HPCCC) using a two-phase solvent system composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (1:9:1:9, v/v). Two hundred milligrams of acetone-soluble extract from fermented C. sinensis leaves was separated by HPCCC to give 1 (25.4 mg), 2 (16.3 mg), 3 (11.1 mg) and 4 (4.4 mg) with purities over 98%. The structures of 1-4 were elucidated by QTOF-MS, as well as 1H- and 13C-NMR, and the obtained data were compared to the previously reported values.

  8. Relationship of O2 Photodesorption in Photooxidation of Acetone on TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2008-07-31

    Organic photooxidation on TiO2 invariably involves the coexistence of organic species with oxygen on the surface at the same time. In the case of acetone and oxygen, both species exhibit their own interesting photochemistry on TiO2, but interdependences between the two are not understood. In this study, a rutile TiO2(110) surface possessing 7% surface oxygen vacancy sites is used as a model surface to probe the relationship between O2 photodesorption and acetone photodecomposition. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and photon stimulated desorption (PSD) measurements indicate that coadsorbed oxygen is essential to acetone photodecomposition on this surface, however the form of oxygen (molecular and dissociative) is not known. The first steps in acetone photodecomposition on TiO2(110) involve thermal activation with oxygen to form an acetone diolate ((CH3)2COO) species followed by photochemical decomposition to adsorbed acetate (CH3COO) and an ejected CH3 radical that is detected in PSD. Depending on the surface conditions, O2 PSD is also observed during the latter process. However, the time scales for the two PSD events (CH3 and O2) are quite different, withthe former occurring at ~10 times faster than the latter. By varying the preheating conditions or performing pre-irradiation on an O2 exposed surface, it becomes clear that the two PSD events are uncorrelated. That is, the O2 species responsible for O2 PSD is not a significant participant in the photochemistry of acetone on TiO2(110) and likely originates from a minority form of O2 on the surface. The CH3 and O2 PSD events do not appear to be in competition with each other suggesting either that ample charge carriers exist under the experimental conditions employed or that different charge carriers or excitation mechanisms are involved.

  9. 21 CFR 172.802 - Acetone peroxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... acetone peroxide, with minor proportions of higher polymers, manufactured by reaction of hydrogen peroxide... grams to 10 grams of hydrogen peroxide equivalent per 100 grams of the additive, plus carrier, for use in flour maturing and bleaching; or (2) approximately 0.75 gram of hydrogen peroxide equivalent...

  10. 21 CFR 172.802 - Acetone peroxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... acetone peroxide, with minor proportions of higher polymers, manufactured by reaction of hydrogen peroxide... grams to 10 grams of hydrogen peroxide equivalent per 100 grams of the additive, plus carrier, for use in flour maturing and bleaching; or (2) approximately 0.75 gram of hydrogen peroxide equivalent...

  11. 21 CFR 172.802 - Acetone peroxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... acetone peroxide, with minor proportions of higher polymers, manufactured by reaction of hydrogen peroxide... grams to 10 grams of hydrogen peroxide equivalent per 100 grams of the additive, plus carrier, for use in flour maturing and bleaching; or (2) approximately 0.75 gram of hydrogen peroxide equivalent...

  12. 21 CFR 172.802 - Acetone peroxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... acetone peroxide, with minor proportions of higher polymers, manufactured by reaction of hydrogen peroxide... grams to 10 grams of hydrogen peroxide equivalent per 100 grams of the additive, plus carrier, for use in flour maturing and bleaching; or (2) approximately 0.75 gram of hydrogen peroxide equivalent...

  13. 21 CFR 172.802 - Acetone peroxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... proportions of higher polymers, manufactured by reaction of hydrogen peroxide and acetone. (b) The additive...; or (2) approximately 0.75 gram of hydrogen peroxide equivalent per 100 grams of the additive, plus... agent in bread and roll production at not to exceed the quantity of hydrogen peroxide...

  14. [Methanol metabolism in plants].

    PubMed

    Stepanov, S S; Zolotar'ova, O K

    2011-01-01

    Methabolism of methanol in plant organisms is considered in the paper. Enzymes of consecutive oxidation of methanol and enzymes responsible for incorporation of carbon from methanol molecule to methyl groups of phospholipids, carboxylic acids and carbohydrates have been described. The peculiarity of plant organisms is in interaction of reactions of methanol transformation with pathways of photorespiration and C1-metabolism and in the capacity to use methanol carbon to form organic matter through photosynthesis. The inclusion of methanol metabolites in anabolic processes occurs at the level of formaldehyde and formiate. As a result, exogenous methanol at low concentrations can stimulate the photosynthetic efficiency of plants.

  15. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Carbonylation of Methyl Acetate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polichnowski, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a study of the rhodium-catalyzed, ioding-promoted carbonylation of methyl acetate. This study provides an interesting contrast between the carbonylation of methyl acetate and the carbonylation of methanol when similar rhodium/iodine catalyst systems are used. (JN)

  16. Flow injection spectrofluorimetric determination of reserpine in tablets by on-line acetone sensitized photochemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; He, Q

    2000-11-01

    On-line photochemical reaction of reserpine in the presence of acetone was investigated. Acetone was found to speed up the on-line photochemical conversion of reserpine into an intensively fluorescent compound. Not only reaction acidity but also the acetate buffer concentration affected the on-line photochemical induced fluorescence signal. Based on the observation an automated flow injection photochemical fluorimetric approach was developed. An injected sample zone was carried by a water stream to be merged with a acetate buffer (pH 3.4) solution containing 0.02% acetone in a knotted PTFE reactor (KR), which was freely coiled around a 6-W low pressure mercury lamp. While passing the KR, reserpine was transformed into an intensively fluorescent compound. It was on-line detected in a flow-through cell at the emission wavelength of 490 nm and excitation wavelength of 386 nm. At optimized conditions, a detection limit 0.45 mug l(-1) was achieved at a sampling rate of 90 h(-1). Eleven determinations of a 0.5 mg l(-1) reserpine standard solution gave a R.S.D. of 0.3%. The linear dynamic range of reserpine calibration curve was 0.01-0.75 mg l(-1). The proposed method was applied to assay the reserpine content in tablets and to monitor the dissolution profile of reserpine tablets. Satisfactory results were obtained for both the assays and dissolution studies. PMID:18968131

  17. Breath acetone analyzer: diagnostic tool to monitor dietary fat loss.

    PubMed

    Kundu, S K; Bruzek, J A; Nair, R; Judilla, A M

    1993-01-01

    Acetone, a metabolite of fat catabolism, is produced in excessive amounts in subjects on restricted-calorie weight-loss programs. Breath acetone measurements are useful as a motivational tool during dieting and for monitoring the effectiveness of weight-loss programs. We have developed a simple, easy-to-read method that quantifies the amount of acetone in a defined volume of exhaled breath after trapping the sample in a gas-analyzer column. The concentration of acetone, as measured by the length of a blue color zone in the analyzer column, correlates with results obtained by gas chromatography. Using the breath acetone analyzer to quantify breath acetone concentrations of dieting subjects, we established a correlation between breath acetone concentration and rate of fat loss (slope 52.2 nmol/L per gram per day, intercept 15.3 nmol/L, n = 78, r = 0.81). We also discussed the possibility of using breath acetone in diabetes management.

  18. 46 CFR 153.1035 - Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. 153.1035... Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1035 Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. No person may operate a tankship carrying a cargo of acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions, unless that cargo is...

  19. 46 CFR 153.1035 - Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. 153.1035... Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1035 Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. No person may operate a tankship carrying a cargo of acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions, unless that cargo is...

  20. 46 CFR 153.1035 - Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. 153.1035... Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1035 Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. No person may operate a tankship carrying a cargo of acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions, unless that cargo is...

  1. 46 CFR 153.1035 - Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. 153.1035... Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1035 Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. No person may operate a tankship carrying a cargo of acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions, unless that cargo is...

  2. 46 CFR 153.1035 - Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. 153.1035... Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1035 Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. No person may operate a tankship carrying a cargo of acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions, unless that cargo is...

  3. Acetone-butanol fermentation of marine macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Huesemann, Michael H; Kuo, Li-Jung; Urquhart, Lindsay; Gill, Gary A; Roesijadi, Guri

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to subject mannitol, either as a sole carbon source or in combination with glucose, and aqueous extracts of the kelp Saccharina spp., containing mannitol and laminarin, to acetone-butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum (ATCC 824). Both mannitol and glucose were readily fermented. Mixed substrate fermentations with glucose and mannitol resulted in diauxic growth of C. acetobutylicum with glucose depletion preceding mannitol utilization. Fermentation of kelp extract exhibited triauxic growth, with an order of utilization of free glucose, mannitol, and bound glucose, presumably laminarin. The lag in laminarin utilization reflected the need for enzymatic hydrolysis of this polysaccharide into fermentable sugars. The butanol and total solvent yields were 0.12 g/g and 0.16 g/g, respectively, indicating that significant improvements are still needed to make industrial-scale acetone-butanol fermentations of seaweed economically feasible.

  4. Increasing butanol/acetone ratio and solvent productivity in ABE fermentation by consecutively feeding butyrate to weaken metabolic strength of butyrate loop.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Shi, Zhongping; Li, Zhigang

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we attempted to increase butanol/acetone ratio and total solvent productivity in ABE fermentations with corn- and cassava-based media, by consecutively feeding a small amount of butyrate/acetate during solventogenic phase to weaken the metabolic strengths in butyrate/acetate closed-loops. Consecutively feeding a small amount of butyrate (a total of 3.0 g/L-broth) is most effective in improving performance of corn-based ABE fermentations, as it simultaneously increased average butanol/acetone ratio by 23 % (1.92-2.36) and total solvent productivity by 16 % (0.355-0.410 g/L/h) as compared with those of control. However, the butyrate feeding strategy could not improve butanol/acetone ratio and total solvent productivity in cassava-based ABE fermentations, where the metabolic strength of butyrate closed-loop had already been very low.

  5. Acetone in theGlobal Troposphere: Its Possible Role as a Global Source of PAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, H. B.; Kanakidou, M.

    1994-01-01

    Oxygenated hydrocarbons are thought to be important components of the atmosphere but, with the exception of formaldehyde, very little about their distribution and fate is known. Aircraft measurements of acetone (CH3COCH3), PAN (CH3CO3NO2) and other organic species (e. g. acetaldehyde, methanol and ethanol) have been performed over the Pacific, the southern Atlantic, and the subarctic atmospheres. Sampled areas extended from 0 to 12 km altitude over latitudes of 70 deg N to 40 deg S. All measurements are based on real time in-situ analysis of cryogenically preconcentrated air samples. Substantial concentrations of these oxygenated species (10-2000 ppt) have been observed at all altitudes and geographical locations in the troposphere. Important sources include, emissions from biomass burning, plant and vegetation, secondary oxidation of primary non-methane hydrocarbons, and man-made emissions. Direct measurements within smoke plumes have been used to estimate the biomass burning source. Photochemistry studies are used to suggest that acetone could provide a major source of peroxyacetyl radicals in the atmosphere and play an important role in sequestering reactive nitrogen. Model calculations show that acetone photolysis contributes significantly to PAN formation in the middle and upper troposphere.

  6. Methanol Uptake by Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Essin, A. M.; Golden, D. M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The global methanol budget is currently unbalanced, with source terms significantly larger than the sinks terms. To evaluate possible losses of gaseous methanol to sulfate aerosols, the solubility and reactivity of methanol in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols is under investigation. Methanol will partition into sulfate aerosols according to its Henry's law solubility. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H*, for cold (196 - 220 K) solutions ranging between 45 and 70 wt % H2SO4. We have found that methanol solubility ranges from approx. 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 7) M/atm for UT/LS conditions. Solubility increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. Although methanol is slightly more soluble than are acetone and formaldehyde, current data indicate that uptake by clean aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and any rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H is not significant over our experimental time scale for solutions below 80 wt % H2SO4. To confirm this directly, results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique will also be presented.

  7. High-flux cellulose acetate membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Boeddeker, K.W.; Finken, H.; Wenzlaff, A.

    1981-01-01

    Three routes to increase the permeate flux of asymmetric cellulose diacetate membranes of the Loeb-Sourirajan type were investigated: increasing the hydrophilicity of the membranes; increasing their compaction stability, and employing a swelling agent which allows for higher solvent-to-polymer ratio in the casting solution. The effect of casting solution composition on flux and rejection of formamide-modified cellulose acetate membrane is included, illustrating the general capability of this membrane type as function of solvent concentration. Membranes of casting solution composition cellulose diacetate/acetone/formamide 23/52/25 were used as reference membranes in the work. 6 figures. (DP)

  8. CRYSTAL AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF 6,6´-DIMETHOXY-GOSSYPOL:ACETIC ACID (1:1)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By crystallization from dilute solutions of acetic acid (2-4%) in diethyl ether, acetone, or methyl ethyl ketone, 6,6´-dimethoxy-gossypol forms an inclusion complex with acetic acid in a one-to-one molar ratio. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic P1bar1¯space group and has unit cell dimensio...

  9. Economic evaluation of the acetone - butanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lenz, T.G.; Morevra, A.R.

    1980-12-01

    The economics of producing acetone and 1-butanol via fermentation have been examined for a 45 X 10 to the power of 6 kg of solvents/year plant. For a molasses substrate, the total annual production costs were about $24.4 million vs. a total annual income of $36 million, with about $20 million total required capital. Molasses cost of about $24.4 million/year was critical to these economics. Liquid whey was next evaluated as an alternative feed. Whey feed saved about $11 million annually in feed costs and yielded about $7 million net additional annual revenues from protein sale. These primary differences gave an annual gross profit of about $15 million for the whey case and resulted in a discounted cash flow rate of return of 29%. It is concluded that waste based acetone-butanol production via fermentation deserves further attention in view of the attractive whey-based economics and the excellent potential of butanol as a fuel extender, especially for diesohol blending.

  10. Acetone-butanol Fermentation of Marine Macroalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Urquhart, Lindsay A.; Gill, Gary A.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2012-03-01

    Mannitol and laminarin, which are present at high concentrations in the brown macroalga Saccharina spp., a type of kelp, are potential biochemical feedstocks for butanol production. To test their bioconversion potential, aqueous extracts of the kelp Saccharina spp., mannitol, and glucose (a product of laminarin hydrolysis) were subjected to acetone-butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum (ATCC 824). Both mannitol and glucose were readily fermented. Mixed substrate fermentations with glucose and mannitol resulted in diauxic growth of C. acetobutylicum with glucose depletion preceding mannitol utilization. Fermentation of kelp extract exhibited triauxic growth, with an order of utilization of free glucose, mannitol, and bound glucose, presumably laminarin. The lag in laminarin utilization reflected the need for enzymatic hydrolysis of this polysaccharide into fermentable sugars. The butanol and total solvent yields were 0.12 g/g and 0.16 g/g, respectively, indicating that significant improvements are still needed to make industrial-scale acetone-butanol fermentations of seaweed economically feasible.

  11. Enzymology of acetone-butanol-isopropanol formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiann-Shin.

    1992-01-01

    The long-term goal of the project is to understand the fundamental properties of biological solvent production. Our approach is to elucidate first the molecular properties of solvent-producing enzymes and then to apply to information gained from the enzymological study to investigate control mechanisms for the solvent-producing pathways and the expression of solvent-production genes. Our research primarily involves two strains of Clostridium beijerinckii: C. Beijerinckii NRRL B593 which produces isopropanol in addition to acetone, butanol, and ethanol, and C. beijerinckii NRRL B592 which produces acetone, butanol and ethanol, but not isopropanol. In more recent studies, we also included another solvent-producing organism, Bacillus macerans. Objectives for the reporting period were: to characterize the distinct types of alcohol dehydrogenase; to purify and characterize acetoacetyl-CoA-reacting enzymes; and to clone and sequence the gene encoding the primary/secondary alcohol dehydrogenase of C beijerinckii NRRL B593 and to search for the promoter region for solvent-production genes.

  12. Excellent acetone sensing properties of porous ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang-Bai; Liu, Xing-Yi; Wang, Sheng-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Porous ZnO was obtained by hydrothermal method. The results of scanning electron microscope revealed the porous structure in the as-prepared materials. The acetone sensing test results of porous ZnO show that porous ZnO possesses excellent acetone gas sensing properties. The response is 35.5 at the optimum operating temperature of 320 °C to 100 ppm acetone. The response and recovery times to 50 ppm acetone are 2 s and 8 s, respectively. The lowest detecting limit to acetone is 0.25 ppm, and the response value is 3.8. Moreover, the sensors also exhibit excellent selectivity and long-time stability to acetone. Projected supported by the Project of Challenge Cup for College Students, China (Grant No. 450060497053).

  13. Catalytic Deprotection of Acetals In Strongly Basic Solution Usinga Self-Assembled Supramolecular 'Nanozyme'

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael D.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-07-26

    mechanical coupling of the ligands transfers the chirality from one metal center to the other, thereby requiring the {Delta}{Delta}{Delta}{Delta} or {Lambda}{Lambda}{Lambda}{Lambda} configurations of the assembly. While the 12- overall charge imparts water solubility, the naphthalene walls of the assembly provide a hydrophobic environment which is isolated from the bulk aqueous solution. This hydrophobic cavity has been utilized to kinetically stabilize a variety of water-sensitive guests such as tropylium,[11] iminium ions,[12] diazonium ions,[13] and reactive phosphonium species.[14] Furthermore, 1 has been used to encapsulate catalysts[15] for organic transformations as well as act as a catalyst for the 3-aza-Cope rearrangement of enammonium substrates[16] and the hydrolysis of acid-labile orthoformates.[17] Our recent work using 1 as a catalyst for orthoformate hydrolysis prompted our investigation of the ability of 1 to catalyze the deprotection of acetals (Scheme 1). With the ability of 1 to favor encapsulation of monocationic guests, we anticipated that the rates of acetal hydrolysis could be accelerated by stabilization of any of the cationic protonated intermediates along the mechanistic pathway upon encapsulation in 1. In contrast to the stability of 2,2-dimethoxypropane in H{sub 2}O at pH 10, addition of the acetal to a solution of 1 at this pH quickly yielded the products of hydrolysis (acetone and methanol). Addition of a strongly binding inhibitor for the interior cavity of 1, such as NEt{sub 4}{sup +} (log (K{sub a}) = 4.55), inhibited the overall reaction, confirming that 1 is active in the catalysis.

  14. Acetone evaporation monitoring using a caterpillar-like microstructured fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, A. D.; Ferreira, M. F. S.; Moura, J. P.; André, R. M.; Silva, S. O.; Kobelke, J.; Bierlich, J.; Wondraczek, K.; Schuster, K.; Frazão, O.

    2015-09-01

    A new microstructured optical fiber is demonstrated to detect acetone evaporation by observing the time response of the reflected signal at 1550nm. The sensor consists on a caterpillar-like fiber, with a transversal microfluidic channel created with a Focused Ion Beam technique, spliced to a single-mode fiber. Different stages were visible between the dipping and the evaporation of acetone and of a mixture of water and acetone. It was also possible to detect the presence of water vapor.

  15. Apparatus and method for monitoring breath acetone and diabetic diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Cao, Wenqing

    2008-08-26

    An apparatus and method for monitoring diabetes through breath acetone detection and quantitation employs a microplasma source in combination with a spectrometer. The microplasma source provides sufficient energy to produce excited acetone fragments from the breath gas that emit light. The emitted light is sent to the spectrometer, which generates an emission spectrum that is used to detect and quantify acetone in the breath gas.

  16. The Methanol Economy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, George; Prakash, G. K.

    2014-02-01

    The Methanol Economy Project is based on the concept of replacing fossil fuels with methanol generated either from renewable resources or abundant natural (shale) gas. The full methanol cycle was investigated in this project, from production of methanol through bromination of methane, bireforming of methane to syngas, CO2 capture using supported amines, co-electrolysis of CO2 and water to formate and syngas, decomposition of formate to CO2 and H2, and use of formic acid in a direct formic acid fuel cell. Each of these projects achieved milestones and provided new insights into their respective fields.

  17. Carrier effects of active carbon for methanol carbonylation with supported transition metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, K.; Omata, K.; Yagita, H.

    1996-10-01

    Transition metals such as nickel or noble metals showed excellent catalytic activities for the vapor phase carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid. Reaction proceeded via the carbonylation of methanol to methyl acetate and its successive carbonylation to acetic acid anhydride followed by the hydrolysis. Under slightly pressurized conditions and at around 250{degrees}C methanol was completely carbonylated to acetic acid with the selectivity of 97% or higher. Also, other group 8 metals including noble metals showed excellent catalytic activity only when they were supported on active carbon, whose activity, ordered by strength of metal-halogen bonding showed a volcano-shape relationship with the peak at Rh. The role of active carbon as the active carrier was clarified by kinetics and catalyst characterization which showed that active carbon promoted the reductive elimination of intermediate for acetic acid formation by donating electron from carbon to nickel species.

  18. Dissociative electron attachment studies on acetone

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhudesai, Vaibhav S. Tadsare, Vishvesh; Ghosh, Sanat; Gope, Krishnendu; Davis, Daly; Krishnakumar, E.

    2014-10-28

    Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to acetone is studied in terms of the absolute cross section for various fragment channels in the electron energy range of 0–20 eV. H{sup −} is found to be the most dominant fragment followed by O{sup −} and OH{sup −} with only one resonance peak between 8 and 9 eV. The DEA dynamics is studied by measuring the angular distribution and kinetic energy distribution of fragment anions using Velocity Slice Imaging technique. The kinetic energy and angular distribution of H{sup −} and O{sup −} fragments suggest a many body break-up for the lone resonance observed. The ab initio calculations show that electron is captured in the multi-centered anti-bonding molecular orbital which would lead to a many body break-up of the resonance.

  19. OF MICE, MEN, MONKEYS AND METABOLISM: AN UPDATE ON THE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF METHANOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    With a world production ca. 30 million tons per year, methanol is a solvent, is used to produce formaldehyde, MTBE, and acetic acid, is a component of aspartame, and has been proposed as an alternate vehicle fuel. Methanol occurs naturally in plants and animals. It is sequentiall...

  20. Topical treatment of acne rosacea with benzoyl peroxide acetone gel.

    PubMed

    Montes, L F; Cordero, A A; Kriner, J; Loder, J; Flanagan, A D

    1983-08-01

    A group of patients with acne rosacea was treated with 5 percent benzoyl peroxide acetone gel for four weeks and then with 10 percent benzoyl peroxide acetone gel for an additional four weeks. A parallel group of patients was treated with a matching placebo (acetone gel vehicle). At the end of the first four weeks of treatment the dropout rate due to lack of improvement was 23 and 63 percent for benzoyl peroxide acetone gel and placebo, respectively. Benzoyl peroxide acetone gel was superior to placebo with respect to improvement in the overall severity of the lesions when judged by photographs, and by reduction of erythema, papules, and pustules. Results after treatment with benzoyl peroxide acetone gel were better during weeks five to eight than during weeks one to four for all lesions except telangiectasia. Benzoyl peroxide acetone gel was superior to placebo when the overall responses were compared. In addition, the benzoyl peroxide acetone gel-treated group, but not the placebo-treated group, showed a significantly better response during weeks five to eight compared to weeks one to four.

  1. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  2. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  3. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  4. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  5. Effect of cobalt on the anaerobic thermophilic conversion of methanol.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Paula L; Jiang, Bo; Cysneiros, Denise; Stams, Alfons J M; Lettinga, Gatze

    2004-02-20

    The importance of cobalt on the anaerobic conversion of methanol under thermophilic conditions was studied in three parallel lab-scale UASB-reactors and in cobalt-limited enriched cultures. Reactors R1, R2, and R3 were fed with methanol in a bicarbonate-buffered medium, supplied with iron and macronutrients: in R1 all metals were supplied (control), R2 was cobalt deprived, and in R3 all metals were deprived. In the 136 days of continuous experiment, a drop in performance was observed over the last 30 days. Particularly in R3, both methanol removal and methane formation dropped by 7.1% and 13.7%, respectively, compared to the control reactor, R1. When the medium was cobalt-deprived, acetate was not produced and, as a consequence, the enriched consortium lost its capacity to degrade acetate, indicating that the acetotrophic microorganisms were washed out. The addition of 0.5 microM of cobalt to a cobalt-deprived enrichment culture led to acetate accumulation. The results obtained in this study indicate that the mixed consortium requires a proper amount of cobalt, and its addition to a concentration of 0.1 microM leads to the highest methanol conversion rate, with methane as the sole end product from methanol.

  6. Effect of Cobalt Particle Size on Acetone Steam Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Zhang, He; Yu, Ning; Davidson, Stephen D.; Wang, Yong

    2015-06-11

    Carbon-supported cobalt nanoparticles with different particle sizes were synthesized and characterized by complementary characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, N-2 sorption, acetone temperature-programmed desorption, transmission electron microscopy, and CO chemisorption. Using acetone steam reforming reaction as a probe reaction, we revealed a volcano-shape curve of the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency of acetone) and the CO2 selectivity as a function of the cobalt particle size with the highest activity and selectivity observed at a particle size of approximately 12.8nm. Our results indicate that the overall performance of acetone steam reforming is related to a combination of particle-size-dependent acetone decomposition, water dissociation, and the oxidation state of the cobalt nanoparticles.

  7. Reactivity and reaction intermediates for acetic acid adsorbed on CeO2(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Calaza, Florencia C.; Chen, Tsung -Liang; Mullins, David R.; Xu, Ye; Steven H. Overbury

    2015-05-02

    Adsorption and reaction of acetic acid on a CeO2(1 1 1) surface was studied by a combination of ultra-highvacuum based methods including temperature desorption spectroscopy (TPD), soft X-ray photoelectronspectroscopy (sXPS), near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and reflection absorption IRspectroscopy (RAIRS), together with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. TPD shows that thedesorption products are strongly dependent upon the initial oxidation state of the CeO2 surface, includingselectivity between acetone and acetaldehyde products. The combination of sXPS and NEXAFS demon-strate that acetate forms upon adsorption at low temperature and is stable to above 500 K, above whichpoint ketene, acetone and acetic acid desorb. Furthermore, DFT and RAIRS show that below 500 K, bridge bondedacetate coexists with a moiety formed by adsorption of an acetate at an oxygen vacancy, formed bywater desorption.

  8. Reactivity and reaction intermediates for acetic acid adsorbed on CeO2(111)

    DOE PAGES

    Calaza, Florencia C.; Chen, Tsung -Liang; Mullins, David R.; Xu, Ye; Steven H. Overbury

    2015-05-02

    Adsorption and reaction of acetic acid on a CeO2(1 1 1) surface was studied by a combination of ultra-highvacuum based methods including temperature desorption spectroscopy (TPD), soft X-ray photoelectronspectroscopy (sXPS), near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and reflection absorption IRspectroscopy (RAIRS), together with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. TPD shows that thedesorption products are strongly dependent upon the initial oxidation state of the CeO2 surface, includingselectivity between acetone and acetaldehyde products. The combination of sXPS and NEXAFS demon-strate that acetate forms upon adsorption at low temperature and is stable to above 500 K, above whichpoint ketene, acetone and acetic acidmore » desorb. Furthermore, DFT and RAIRS show that below 500 K, bridge bondedacetate coexists with a moiety formed by adsorption of an acetate at an oxygen vacancy, formed bywater desorption.« less

  9. Dietary methanol and autism.

    PubMed

    Walton, Ralph G; Monte, Woodrow C

    2015-10-01

    The authors sought to establish whether maternal dietary methanol during pregnancy was a factor in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders. A seven item questionnaire was given to women who had given birth to at least one child after 1984. The subjects were solicited from a large primary care practice and several internet sites and separated into two groups - mothers who had given birth to a child with autism and those who had not. Average weekly methanol consumption was calculated based on questionnaire responses. 550 questionnaires were completed by women who gave birth to a non-autistic child. On average these women consumed 66.71mg. of methanol weekly. 161 questionnaires were completed by women who had given birth to an autistic child. The average estimated weekly methanol consumption for this group was 142.31mg. Based on the results of the Wilcoxon rank sum-test, we see a significant difference between the reported methanol consumption rates of the two groups. This study suggests that women who have given birth to an autistic child are likely to have had higher intake of dietary sources of methanol than women who have not. Further investigation of a possible link of dietary methanol to autism is clearly warranted.

  10. Acetone odor and irritation thresholds obtained from acetone-exposed factory workers and from control (occupationally unexposed) subjects.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, C J; Dalton, P; Brody, M J; Lawley, H J

    1997-10-01

    Sensitivity of olfaction (smell) and chemesthesis (irritation) was evaluated for 2-propanone (acetone) and 1-butanol in acetone-exposed workers (AEW; N = 32) during a workday and unexposed subjects (microES; N = 32). Irritation sensitivity was assessed using a method that relies on the ability of individuals to localize irritants on the body. When a volatile compound is inhaled into one nostril and air into the other, the stimulated side can be determined (lateralized) only after the concentration reaches a level that stimulates the trigeminal nerve (irritation); compounds stimulating olfaction alone cannot be lateralized. Intranasal lateralization thresholds offer an objective measure of sensory irritation elicited by volatile compounds. Test results indicated that neither olfactory nor lateralization thresholds for butanol differed between AEW and microES. Olfactory thresholds to acetone in AEW (855 ppm) were elevated relative to those of microES (41 ppm), as were lateralization thresholds (36,669 ppm and 15,758 ppm, respectively). Within AEW, level of occupational exposure was not correlated with thresholds. Other measures revealed that microES used more irritation descriptors than did AEW on trials where the acetone concentration was below the lateralization threshold. This is noteworthy because microES received lower concentrations of acetone to evaluate than did AEW. These results suggest that exposures to acetone induce changes in acetone sensitivity that are specific to acetone. The acetone concentrations eliciting sensory irritation using the lateralization technique were all well above current occupational exposure standards. The current study indicates that acetone is a weak sensory irritant and that sensory adaptation is an important factor affecting its overall irritancy. PMID:9342830

  11. An ethanolamine plasmalogen artifact formed by acetone extraction of freeze-dried tissue.

    PubMed

    Helmy, F M; Hack, M H

    1966-07-01

    Extraction of freeze-dried tissues by acetone results in the in vitro production of an acetone derivative (imine) of the ethanolamine phosphatides. Some of the properties of the acetone imine of ethanolamine plasmalogen are discussed.

  12. Measuring breath acetone for monitoring fat loss: Review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Endogenous acetone production is a by‐product of the fat metabolism process. Because of its small size, acetone appears in exhaled breath. Historically, endogenous acetone has been measured in exhaled breath to monitor ketosis in healthy and diabetic subjects. Recently, breath acetone concentration (BrAce) has been shown to correlate with the rate of fat loss in healthy individuals. In this review, the measurement of breath acetone in healthy subjects is evaluated for its utility in predicting fat loss and its sensitivity to changes in physiologic parameters. Results BrAce can range from 1 ppm in healthy non‐dieting subjects to 1,250 ppm in diabetic ketoacidosis. A strong correlation exists between increased BrAce and the rate of fat loss. Multiple metabolic and respiratory factors affect the measurement of BrAce. BrAce is most affected by changes in the following factors (in descending order): dietary macronutrient composition, caloric restriction, exercise, pulmonary factors, and other assorted factors that increase fat metabolism or inhibit acetone metabolism. Pulmonary factors affecting acetone exchange in the lung should be controlled to optimize the breath sample for measurement. Conclusions When biologic factors are controlled, BrAce measurement provides a non‐invasive tool for monitoring the rate of fat loss in healthy subjects. PMID:26524104

  13. Acetone cluster ion beam irradiation on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryuto, H.; Kakumoto, Y.; Itozaki, S.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H.

    2013-11-01

    Acetone cluster ions were produced by the adiabatic expansion method without using a support gas. The acceleration voltage of the acetone cluster ion beam was from 3 to 9 kV. The sputter depths of silicon irradiated with acetone cluster ion beams increased with acceleration voltage and fluence of the acetone cluster ion beams. The sputter depth was close to that induced by the ethanol cluster ion beam accelerated at the same acceleration voltage. The sputtering yield of silicon by the acetone cluster ion beam at an acceleration voltage of 9 kV was approximately 100 times larger than that for an argon monomer ion beam at 9 keV. The sputter depths of silicon dioxide irradiated with the acetone cluster ion beams were smaller than those of silicon, but larger than those induced by ethanol cluster ion beams. The XPS analysis of silicon surface indicated that the silicon surface was more strongly oxidized by the irradiation of acetone cluster ion beam than ethanol cluster ion beam.

  14. [Use of sodium acetate in feed rations in ketotic cows].

    PubMed

    Vojtísek, B; Hamrík, J; Hronová, B; Diblíková, I; Minksová, E

    1989-10-01

    On a farm where the ration of cows contained 88.0 g of butyric acid, an experimental group of cows (n = 8), producing milk containing 7.9 mg or more acetone per litre, was studied for 14 days for the effect of a 250 g supplement of sodium acetate to the ration (combined with single i.m. administration of vitamins A, D2 and E) on selected metabolism parameters and on milk production. As distinct from the control group of cows (n = 8) from the same farm which produced milk containing 3.9 mg or less acetone per litre and which were fed without sodium acetone supplements, a tendency of increased alkaemia of the organism was suggested in the experimental cows. This tendency manifested itself during the trial in increased pH values, increased base excess (BE) and standard bicarbonate (SB) in the blood, and in an increase in the pH value and net acido basic secretion in urine. A decrease was recorded in the concentration of the acetone + acetacetic acid sum, the same as beta-hydroxybutyric acid in blood and the sum of acetone and acetacetic acid in milk (P less than 0.01). An insignificant increase of the activity of gammaglutamyl transpeptidase (GMT) was recorded in the blood serum of the experimental cows and a significant increase occurred in the content of potassium (up to P less than 0.01) and urea (up to P less than 0.01) in urine. The supplement of sodium acetate to the feed ration did not influence the degree of ketonuria and the finding of urobilinogen in urine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Determination of breath acetone in 149 type 2 diabetic patients using a ringdown breath-acetone analyzer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meixiu; Chen, Zhuying; Gong, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Jiang, Chenyu; Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Zhennang; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2015-02-01

    Over 90% of diabetic patients have Type 2 diabetes. Although an elevated mean breath acetone concentration has been found to exist in Type 1 diabetes (T1D), information on breath acetone in Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has yet to be obtained. In this study, we first used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to validate a ringdown breath-acetone analyzer based on the cavity-ringdown-spectroscopy technique, through comparing breath acetone concentrations in the range 0.5-2.5 ppm measured using both methods. The linear fitting of R = 0.99 suggests that the acetone concentrations obtained using both methods are consistent with a largest standard deviation of ±0.4 ppm in the lowest concentration of the range. Next, 620 breath samples from 149 T2D patients and 42 healthy subjects were collected and tested using the breath analyzer. Four breath samples were taken from each subject under each of four different conditions: fasting, 2 h post-breakfast, 2 h post-lunch, and 2 h post-dinner. Simultaneous blood glucose levels were also measured using a standard diabetic-management blood-glucose meter. For the 149 T2D subjects, their exhaled breath acetone concentrations ranged from 0.1 to 19.8 ppm; four different ranges of breath acetone concentration, 0.1-19.8, 0.1-7.1, 0.1-6.3, and 0.1-9.5 ppm, were obtained for the subjects under the four different conditions, respectively. For the 42 healthy subjects, their breath acetone concentration ranged from 0.1 to 2.6 ppm; four different ranges of breath acetone concentration, 0.3-2.6, 0.1-2.6, 0.1-1.7, and 0.3-1.6 ppm, were obtained for the four different conditions. The mean breath acetone concentration of the 149 T2D subjects was determined to be 1.5 ± 1.5 ppm, which was 1.5 times that of 1.0 ± 0.6 ppm for the 42 healthy subjects. No correlation was found between the breath acetone concentration and the blood glucose level of the T2D subjects and the healthy volunteers. This study using a relatively large number of

  16. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  17. The Methanol Multibeam Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James A.; Cohen, R. J.; Caswell, J. L.; Fuller, G. A.; Brooks, K.; Burton, M. G.; Chrysostomou, A.; Diamond, P. J.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gray, M. D.; Hoare, M. G.; Masheder, M. R. W.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; Pestalozzi, M.; Phillips, C.; Quinn, L.; Thompson, M. A.; Voronkov, M.; Walsh, A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Wong-McSweeney, D.; Yates, J. A.; Cox, J.

    2007-03-01

    A new 7-beam methanol multibeam receiver is being used to survey the Galaxy for newly forming massive stars, that are pinpointed by strong methanol maser emission at 6.668 GHz. The receiver, jointly constructed by Jodrell Bank Observatory (JBO) and the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF), was successfully commissioned at Parkes in January 2006. The Parkes-Jodrell survey of the Milky Way for methanol masers is two orders of magnitude faster than previous systematic surveys using 30-m class dishes, and is the first systematic survey of the entire Galactic plane. The first 53 days of observations with the Parkes telescope have yielded 518 methanol sources, of which 218 are new discoveries. We present the survey methodology as well as preliminary results and analysis.

  18. In situ hydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and microdiesel production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from oleaginous fungal biomass.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Elhagag Ahmed; Abd-Alla, Mohamed Hemida; Bagy, Magdy Mohamed Khalil; Morsy, Fatthy Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    An in situ batch fermentation technique was employed for biohydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and microdiesel production from oleaginous fungal biomass using the anaerobic fermentative bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Oleaginous fungal Cunninghamella echinulata biomass which has ability to accumulate up to 71% cellular lipid was used as the substrate carbon source. The maximum cumulative hydrogen by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from crude C. echinulata biomass was 260 ml H2 l(-1), hydrogen production efficiency was 0.32 mol H2 mole(-1) glucose and the hydrogen production rate was 5.2 ml H2 h(-1). Subsequently, the produced acids (acetic and butyric acids) during acidogenesis phase are re-utilized by ABE-producing clostridia and converted into acetone, butanol, and ethanol. The total ABE produced by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 during batch fermentation was 3.6 g l(-1) from crude fungal biomass including acetone (1.05 g l(-1)), butanol (2.19 g l(-1)) and ethanol (0.36 g l(-1)). C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 has ability to produce lipolytic enzymes with a specific activity 5.59 U/mg protein to hydrolyze ester containing substrates. The lipolytic potential of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was used as a biocatalyst for a lipase transesterification process using the produced ethanol from ABE fermentation for microdiesel production. The fatty acid ethyl esters (microdiesel) generated from the lipase transesterification of crude C. echinulata dry mass was analyzed by GC/MS as 15.4% of total FAEEs. The gross energy content of biohydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and biodiesel generated through C. acetobutylicum fermentation from crude C. echinulata dry mass was 3113.14 kJ mol(-1). These results suggest a possibility of integrating biohydrogen, acetone, butanol and ethanol production technology by C. acetobutylicum with microdiesel production from crude C. echinulata dry mass and therefore improve the feasibility and commercialization of bioenergy production.

  19. In situ hydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and microdiesel production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from oleaginous fungal biomass.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Elhagag Ahmed; Abd-Alla, Mohamed Hemida; Bagy, Magdy Mohamed Khalil; Morsy, Fatthy Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    An in situ batch fermentation technique was employed for biohydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and microdiesel production from oleaginous fungal biomass using the anaerobic fermentative bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Oleaginous fungal Cunninghamella echinulata biomass which has ability to accumulate up to 71% cellular lipid was used as the substrate carbon source. The maximum cumulative hydrogen by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from crude C. echinulata biomass was 260 ml H2 l(-1), hydrogen production efficiency was 0.32 mol H2 mole(-1) glucose and the hydrogen production rate was 5.2 ml H2 h(-1). Subsequently, the produced acids (acetic and butyric acids) during acidogenesis phase are re-utilized by ABE-producing clostridia and converted into acetone, butanol, and ethanol. The total ABE produced by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 during batch fermentation was 3.6 g l(-1) from crude fungal biomass including acetone (1.05 g l(-1)), butanol (2.19 g l(-1)) and ethanol (0.36 g l(-1)). C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 has ability to produce lipolytic enzymes with a specific activity 5.59 U/mg protein to hydrolyze ester containing substrates. The lipolytic potential of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was used as a biocatalyst for a lipase transesterification process using the produced ethanol from ABE fermentation for microdiesel production. The fatty acid ethyl esters (microdiesel) generated from the lipase transesterification of crude C. echinulata dry mass was analyzed by GC/MS as 15.4% of total FAEEs. The gross energy content of biohydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and biodiesel generated through C. acetobutylicum fermentation from crude C. echinulata dry mass was 3113.14 kJ mol(-1). These results suggest a possibility of integrating biohydrogen, acetone, butanol and ethanol production technology by C. acetobutylicum with microdiesel production from crude C. echinulata dry mass and therefore improve the feasibility and commercialization of bioenergy production. PMID

  20. Toward portable breath acetone analysis for diabetes detection.

    PubMed

    Righettoni, Marco; Tricoli, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    Diabetes is a lifelong condition that may cause death and seriously affects the quality of life of a rapidly growing number of individuals. Acetone is a selective breath marker for diabetes that may contribute to the monitoring of related metabolic disorder and thus simplify the management of this illness. Here, the overall performance of Si-doped WO(3) nanoparticles, made by flame spray pyrolysis, as portable acetone detectors is critically reviewed focusing on the requirements for medical diagnostics. The effect of flow rate, chamber volume and acetone dissociation within the measuring chamber is discussed with respect to the calibration of the sensor response. The challenges for the fabrication of portable breath acetone sensors based on chemo-resistive detectors are underlined indicating possible solutions and novel research directions. PMID:21828897

  1. Toward Portable Breath Acetone Analysis for Diabetes Detection

    PubMed Central

    Righettoni, Marco; Tricoli, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a lifelong condition that may cause death and seriously affects the quality of life of a rapidly growing number of individuals. Acetone is a selective breath marker for diabetes that may contribute to the monitoring of related metabolic disorder and thus simplify the management of this illness. Here, the overall performance of Si-doped WO3 nanoparticles made by flame spray pyrolysis as portable acetone detectors is critically reviewed focusing on the requirements for medical diagnostic. The effect of flow rate, chamber volume and acetone dissociation within the measuring chamber are discussed with respect to the calibration of the sensor response. The challenges for the fabrication of portable breath acetone sensors based on chemo-resistive detectors are underlined indicating possible solutions and novel research directions. PMID:21828897

  2. Characterisation of cellulose films regenerated from acetone/water coagulants.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hongjuan; Yuan, Zaiwu; Fan, Qingrui; Dai, Xiaonan; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Zhaojiang; Qin, Menghua

    2014-02-15

    A precooled aqueous solution of 7 wt% NaOH/12 wt% urea was used to dissolve cellulose up to a concentration of 2 wt%, which was then coagulated in an acetone/water mixture to regenerate cellulose film. The volume ratio of acetone to water (φ) had a dominant influence on film dimensional stability, film-forming ability, micromorphology, and mechanical strength. The film regenerated at φ=2.0 showed excellent performance in both dimensional stability and film-forming ability. Compared to that from pure acetone, the cellulose film from the acetone/water mixture with φ=2.0 was more densely interwoven, since the cellulosic fibrils formed during regeneration had pores with smaller average diameter. The alkali capsulated in the film during film formation could be released at quite a slow rate into the surrounding aqueous solution. The regenerated cellulose film with adjustable structure and properties may have potential applications in drug release and ultra filtration.

  3. Acetone sensor based on zinc oxide hexagonal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Hastir, Anita Singh, Onkar Anand, Kanika Singh, Ravi Chand

    2014-04-24

    In this work hexagonal tubes of zinc oxide have been synthesized by co-precipitation method. For structural, morphological, elemental and optical analysis synthesized powders were characterized by using x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning microscope, EDX, UV-visible and FTIR techniques. For acetone sensing thick films of zinc oxide have been deposited on alumina substrate. The fabricated sensors exhibited maximum sensing response towards acetone vapour at an optimum operating temperature of 400°C.

  4. Maximizing recovery of water-soluble proteins through acetone precipitation.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Andrew M J; Wall, Mark J; Doucette, Alan A

    2013-09-24

    Solvent precipitation is commonly used to purify protein samples, as seen with the removal of sodium dodecyl sulfate through acetone precipitation. However, in its current practice, protein loss is believed to be an inevitable consequence of acetone precipitation. We herein provide an in depth characterization of protein recovery through acetone precipitation. In 80% acetone, the precipitation efficiency for six of 10 protein standards was poor (ca. ≤15%). Poor recovery was also observed for proteome extracts, including bacterial and mammalian cells. As shown in this work, increasing the ionic strength of the solution dramatically improves the precipitation efficiency of individual proteins, and proteome mixtures (ca. 80-100% yield). This is obtained by including 1-30 mM NaCl, together with acetone (50-80%) which maximizes protein precipitation efficiency. The amount of salt required to restore the recovery correlates with the amount of protein in the sample, as well as the intrinsic protein charge, and the dielectric strength of the solution. This synergistic approach to protein precipitation in acetone with salt is consistent with a model of ion pairing in organic solvent, and establishes an improved method to recover proteins and proteome mixtures in high yield.

  5. Achievements and perspectives to overcome the poor solvent resistance in acetone and butanol-producing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ezeji, Thaddeus; Milne, Caroline; Price, Nathan D; Blaschek, Hans P

    2010-02-01

    Anaerobic bacteria such as the solventogenic clostridia can ferment a wide range of carbon sources (e.g., glucose, galactose, cellobiose, mannose, xylose, and arabinose) to produce carboxylic acids (acetic and butyric) and solvents such as acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE). The fermentation process typically proceeds in two phases (acidogenic and solventogenic) in a batch mode. Poor solvent resistance by the solventogenic clostridia and other fermenting microorganisms is a major limiting factor in the profitability of ABE production by fermentation. The toxic effect of solvents, especially butanol, limits the concentration of these solvents in the fermentation broth, limiting solvent yields and adding to the cost of solvent recovery from dilute solutions. The accepted dogma is that toxicity in the ABE fermentation is due to chaotropic effects of butanol on the cell membranes of the fermenting microorganisms, which poses a challenge for the biotechnological whole-cell bio-production of butanol. This mini-review is focused on (1) the effects of solvents on inhibition of cell metabolism (nutrient transport, ion transport, and energy metabolism); (2) cell membrane fluidity, death, and solvent tolerance associated with the ability of cells to tolerate high concentrations of solvents without significant loss of cell function; and (3) strategies for overcoming poor solvent resistance in acetone and butanol-producing microorganisms.

  6. Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) Fermentation Wastewater Treatment by Oleaginous Yeast Trichosporon cutaneum.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lian; Huang, Chao; Li, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Xue-Fang; Wang, Bo; Wang, Can; Zeng, Xin-An; Chen, Xin-De

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation wastewater with high chemical oxygen demand (COD) value (about 18,000 mg/L) was biologically treated by oleaginous yeast Trichosporon cutaneum without any pretreatment. During fermentation, most COD degradation was finished within 48 h and finally, a maximum COD degradation of 68% was obtained. The highest biomass and lipid content was 4.9 g/L and 14.7%, respectively. Various materials including sugars (glucose and xylose), organic acids (acetic acid and butyric acid), and alcohol compounds (ethanol and butanol) could be utilized as carbon sources by T. cutaneum simultaneously; thus, it has a broad carbon source spectrum and is a potential microorganism for biological treatment for various wastewaters. Overall, the lipid composition of microbial oils produced by this bioconversion is similar to that of vegetable oils, and thus, it could be used for biodiesel production.

  7. Lipid extraction and iontophoretic transport of leuprolide acetate through porcine epidermis.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, S K; Singh, J

    2001-03-14

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of lipid extraction by the simple alkyl acetates of increasing carbon chain lengths (e.g. methyl, ethyl, propyl, butyl, pentyl, hexyl, and octyl acetates) and iontophoresis on the in-vitro transport of leuprolide acetate through porcine epidermis. The extent of lipid extraction from the stratum corneum (SC) by alkyl acetates was studied by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Ethyl, propyl, pentyl, hexyl, and octyl acetates significantly increased (P < 0.05) the permeability of leuprolide acetate through the epidermis in comparison to the control (epidermis without alkyl acetate treatment). Iontophoresis further increased (P < 0.05) the permeability of leuprolide acetate for all the alkyl acetates studied, when compared to their corresponding passive permeability. Ethyl acetate produced the maximum passive (13.47 microg/cm(2)/h) and iontophoretic (89.79 microg/cm(2)/h) flux among all the alkyl acetates studied. The SC treated with alkyl acetates showed a decrease in peak heights and areas of asymmetric and symmetric C--H stretching absorbances in comparison to untreated SC. A greater percentage decrease in peak heights and areas was obtained by ethyl acetate. Chloroform:methanol(2:1) [C:M(2:1)] was used as a positive control for lipid extraction. Our findings provide evidence that alkyl acetates cause lipid extraction, which leads to an enhancement in the passive and iontophoretic permeability of leuprolide acetate. PMID:11250109

  8. Methanol in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Madden, S. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    The first observation of methanol in cold dark clouds TMC 1, L 134 N, and B 335 is reported. In all three clouds, the relative abundance of methanol was found to be in the range of 10 to the -9th (i.e., almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde), with no observable variation between the clouds. Methanol emission showed a complex velocity structure; in TMC 1, clear indications of non-LTE were observed. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L 134 N; the upper limit of the column density of dimethyl ether in L 134 N was estimated to be 4 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm, assuming 5 K rotation temperature and LTE. This limit makes the abundance ratio (CH3)2O/CH3OH not higher than 1/5, indicating that dimethyl ether is not overabundant in this dark cloud.

  9. Acetone in the atmosphere: Distribution, sources, and sinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, H. B.; O'Hara, D.; Herlth, D.; Sachse, W.; Blake, D. R.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Kanakidou, M.; Crutzen, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    Acetone (CH3COCH3) was found to be the dominant nonmethane organic species present in the atmosphere sampled primarily over eastern Canada (0-6 km, 35 deg-65 deg N) during ABLE3B (July to August 1990). A concentration range of 357 to 2310 ppt (= 10(exp -12) v/v) with a mean value of 1140 +/- 413 ppt was measured. Under extremely clean conditions, generally involving Arctic flows, lowest (background) mixing ratios of 550 +/- 100 ppt were present in much of the troposphere studied. Correlations between atmospheric mixing ratios of acetone and select species such as C2H2, CO, C3H8, C2Cl4 and isoprene provided important clues to its possible sources and to the causes of its atmospheric variability. Biomass burning as a source of acetone has been identified for the first time. By using atmospheric data and three-dimensional photochemical models, a global acetone source of 40-60 Tg (= 10(exp 12) g)/yr is estimated to be present. Secondary formation from the atmospheric oxidation of precursor hydrocarbons (principally propane, isobutane, and isobutene) provides the single largest source (51%). The remainder is attributable to biomass burning (26%), direct biogenic emissions (21%), and primary anthropogenic emissions (3%). Atmospheric removal of acetone is estimated to be due to photolysis (64%), reaction with OH radicals (24%), and deposition (12%). Model calculations also suggest that acetone photolysis contributed significantly to PAN formation (100-200 ppt) in the middle and upper troposphere of the sampled region and may be important globally. While the source-sink equation appears to be roughly balanced, much more atmospheric and source data, especially from the southern hemisphere, are needed to reliably quantify the atmospheric budget of acetone.

  10. Acetone in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere: Impact on trace gases and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, F.; Bürger, V.; Droste-Fanke, B.; Grimm, F.; Krieger, A.; Schneider, J.; Stilp, T.

    Upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric acetone measurements have been performed in summer and winter 1994 through 1996 at latitudes between 30°N and 75°N using ion-molecule reaction mass spectrometry. We observed very high acetone volume mixing ratios of up to 3000 pptv (parts per trillion by volume) in extended air masses and in summer when acetone destruction by photodissociation is fast. This indicates efficient transport of acetone and photochemical acetone precursors to the upper troposphere and efficient upper tropospheric formation of acetone products, especially HOx radicals and PAN. Our data indicate large HOx production from acetone which has important implications for other trace gases and aerosols.

  11. Biogenic and biomass burning sources of acetone to the troposphere

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, C.S.

    1997-04-01

    Acetone may be an important source of reactive odd hydrogen in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. This source of odd hydrogen may affect the concentration of a number of species, including ozone, nitrogen oxides, methane, and others. Traditional, acetone had been considered a by-product of the photochemical oxidation of other species, and had not entered models as a primary emission. However, recent work estimates a global source term of 40-60 Tg acetone/year. Of this, 25% is directly emitted during biomass burning, and 20% is directly emitted by evergreens and other plants. Only 3% is due to anthropogenic/industrial emissions. The bulk of the remainder, 51% of the acetone source, is a secondary product from the oxidation of propane, isobutane, and isobutene. Also, while it is speculated that the oxidation of pinene (a biogenic emission) may also contribute about 6 Tg/year, this term is highly uncertain. Thus, the two largest primary sources of acetone are biogenic emission and biomass burning, with industrial/anthropogenic emissions very small in comparison.

  12. Sensor gas analyzer for acetone determination in expired air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Vitaly V.

    2001-05-01

    Diseases and changes in the way of life change the concentration and composition of the expired air. Our adaptable gas analyzer is intended for the selective analysis of expired air and can be adapted for the solution of current diagnostic and analytical tasks by the user (a physician or a patient). Having analyzed the existing trends in the development of noninvasive diagnostics we have chosen the method of noninvasive acetone detection in expired air, where the acetone concentration correlates with blood and urine glucose concentrations. The appearance of acetone in expired air is indicative of disorders that may be caused not only by diabetes but also be wrong diet, incorrect sportsmen training etc. To control the disorders one should know the acetone concentration in the human body. This knowledge allows one to judge upon the state of the patient, choose a correct diet that will not cause damage to the patient's health, determine sportsmen training efficiency and results and solve the artificial pancreas problem. Our device provide highly accurate analysis, rapid diagnostics and authentic acetone quantification in the patient's body at any time aimed at prediction of the patient's state and assessing the efficiency of the therapy used. Clinical implementation of the device will improve the health and save lives of many thousands of diabetes sufferers.

  13. Methanol from coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Economic feasibility of methanol or methyl fuel produced from coal using existing technology is discussed. Other factors considered include environmental, safety, toxicity, transportation, so storage, ease of burning, and retrofitting of present boilers. Demonstrations of its uses as a boiler fuel and as a turbine fuel are cited.

  14. Nitrate-Dependent Degradation of Acetone by Alicycliphilus and Paracoccus Strains and Comparison of Acetone Carboxylase Enzymes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dullius, Carlos Henrique; Chen, Ching-Yuan; Schink, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    A novel acetone-degrading, nitrate-reducing bacterium, strain KN Bun08, was isolated from an enrichment culture with butanone and nitrate as the sole sources of carbon and energy. The cells were motile short rods, 0.5 to 1 by 1 to 2 μm in size, which gave Gram-positive staining results in the exponential growth phase and Gram-negative staining results in the stationary-growth phase. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate was assigned to the genus Alicycliphilus. Besides butanone and acetone, the strain used numerous fatty acids as substrates. An ATP-dependent acetone-carboxylating enzyme was enriched from cell extracts of this bacterium and of Alicycliphilus denitrificans K601T by two subsequent DEAE Sepharose column procedures. For comparison, acetone carboxylases were enriched from two additional nitrate-reducing bacterial species, Paracoccus denitrificans and P. pantotrophus. The products of the carboxylase reaction were acetoacetate and AMP rather than ADP. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of cell extracts and of the various enzyme preparations revealed bands corresponding to molecular masses of 85, 78, and 20 kDa, suggesting similarities to the acetone carboxylase enzymes described in detail for the aerobic bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain Py2 (85.3, 78.3, and 19.6 kDa) and the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. Protein bands were excised and compared by mass spectrometry with those of acetone carboxylases of aerobic bacteria. The results document the finding that the nitrate-reducing bacteria studied here use acetone-carboxylating enzymes similar to those of aerobic and phototrophic bacteria. PMID:21841031

  15. Ce{sup 3+}-exchanged montmorillonite (Ce{sup 3+}-mont) as a useful substrate-selective acetalization catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Tateiwa, Jun-ichi; Horiuchi, Hiroki; Uemura, Sakae

    1995-06-30

    Cation-exchanged montmorillonite (M{sup n+}-mont; M{sup n+} = Ce{sup 3+}, Zr{sup 4+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Al{sup 3+}, Zn{sup 2+}, H{sup +}, and Na{sup +}) was evaluated as a catalyst for the acetalization of carbonyl compounds with methanol. Cyclohexanones, benzaldehydes, and acid-sensitive 2-furancarboxaldehyde were efficiently acetalized in methanol in the presence of Ce{sup 3+}-mont. 30 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, Gerald Charles; Zoeller, Joseph Robert; Depew, Leslie Sharon

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  17. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, G.C.; Zoeller, J.R.; Depew, L.S.

    1998-03-24

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  18. Acetone Powder From Dormant Seeds of Ricinus communis L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, Elisa D. C.; Maciel, Fábio M.; Villeneuve, Pierre; Lago, Regina C. A.; Machado, Olga L. T.; Freire, Denise M. G.

    The influence of several factors on the hydrolytic activity of lipase, present in the acetone powder from dormant castor seeds (Ricinus communis) was evaluated. The enzyme showed a marked specificity for short-chain substrates. The best reaction conditions were an acid medium, Triton X-100 as the emulsifying agent and a temperature of 30°C. The lipase activity of the acetone powder of different castor oil genotypes showed great variability and storage stability of up to 90%. The toxicology analysis of the acetone powder from genotype Nordestina BRS 149 showed a higher ricin (toxic component) content, a lower 2S albumin (allergenic compound) content, and similar allergenic potential compared with untreated seeds.

  19. Acetone-butanol-ethanol production in a novel continuous flow system.

    PubMed

    Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Hafez, Hisham; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the potential of using a novel integrated biohydrogen reactor clarifier system (IBRCS) for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production using a mixed culture at different organic loading rates (OLRs). The results of this study showed that using a setting tank after the fermenter and recycle the settled biomass to the fermenter is a practical option to achieve high biomass concentration in the fermenter and thus sustainable ABE fermentation in continuous mode. The average ABE concentrations of 2.3, 7.0, and 14.6gABE/L which were corresponding to ABE production rates of 0.4, 1.4, and 2.8gABE/Lreactorh were achieved at OLRs of 21, 64, and 128gCOD/Lreactord, respectively. The main volatile fatty acids components in the effluent were acetic, propionic, and butyric acids. Acetic acid was the predominant component in the OLR-1, while butyric acid was the predominant acid in OLRs 2 and 3.

  20. Specific Anion Effects on the Kinetics of Iodination of Acetone.

    PubMed

    Lo Nostro, Pierandrea; Mazzini, Virginia; Ninham, Barry W; Ambrosi, Moira; Dei, Luigi; Baglioni, Piero

    2016-08-18

    Specific ion effects on the kinetics of iodination of acetone in an acidic medium are investigated by UV/Vis spectrophotometry as a function of nature of the acid and temperature. The results indicate that the order of the reaction with respect to acetone is practically unaffected by the composition of the acid while the value of the mixed constant k1 K increases according to the sequence HBr

  1. Acne vulgaris: treatment with topical benzoyl peroxide acetone gel.

    PubMed

    Montes, L F

    1977-05-01

    The topical effect on acne of a benzoyl peroxide acetone gel was studied over an eight week period and simultaneously compared with the effect of a benzoyl peroxide lotion and a vitamin A acid cream. The three formulations produced a significant reduction in the number of comedones. The two benzoyl peroxide formulations substantially reduced the number of papules, but this effect was not observed to a significant degree with the vitamin A acid. Burning sensation following application, a common problem with the benzoyl peroxide alcohol gels, was not reported by patients using the benzoyl peroxide acetone gel.

  2. Optical properties of polyaniline-coated silica spheres: aging effect in acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung-Wu; Kim, Sang-Jo; Kang, So-Yeon; Moon, Sang-Hyeon; Park, Eun-Hye; Kang, Kwang-Sun

    2015-10-01

    Polyaniline (PAn)-coated silica spheres have been synthesized by attaching various amounts of N-[3- (trimethoxysilyl)propyl]aniline (TMSPA) and polymerizing with ammonium persulfate. The ratios of tetraethoxy orthosilicate and TMSPA were 10:1 (PAn-A), 5:1 (PAn-B), and 3:1 (PAn-C). After polymerization of the aniline moieties the -OH absorption peak drastically reduced and the new sharp peaks appeared at 1398 cm-1 and 617 cm-1 representing C-N and C-S stretching vibrations, respectively. The polymerized spheres were soaked into the acetone for three months. New absorption peak at 1712 cm-1 representing C=O stretching vibration of an ester appears after three months storage in acetone and becomes stronger with the smaller amount of PAn. Although the sphere film color is gray when it is dried, the color turned to dark when it was wetted with methanol. Complicated solvatochromic behavior was observed for whole UV-visible range depending on the solvent. The solution color changed from clear to dark brown, brown, and yellow for the PAnA, PAnB and PAnC, respectively. The absorption peaks of the dried solution for PAn-A and PAn-B at 3230, 2972, 2926, 1712, 1434/1377, and 1051 cm-1 represent C-OH, R-CH3, R2-CH2, -C=O, C-H, and Si- O-Si absorption, respectively. Photoluminescence peak of the solution shifted toward longer wavelength with the decrease the amount of PAn. The sequence of the amount of new material formation is PAn-A > PAn-B > PAn-C.

  3. Eucomic acid methanol monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-Qiang; Li, Yao-Lan; Wang, Guo-Cai; Liang, Zhi-Hong; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2011-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound [systematic name: 2-hy­droxy-2-(4-hy­droxy­benz­yl)butane­dioic acid methanol monosolvate], C11H12O6·CH3OH, the dihedral angles between the planes of the carboxyl groups and the benzene ring are 51.23 (9) and 87.97 (9)°. Inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions involving the hy­droxy and carb­oxy­lic acid groups and the methanol solvent mol­ecule give a three-dimensional structure. PMID:22091200

  4. Methanol in dark clouds.

    PubMed

    Friberg, P; Madden, S C; Hjalmarson, A; Irvine, W M

    1988-01-01

    We report observations, for the first time, of the 2(0) - 1(0)A+ and E, 2(-1) - 1(-1) E, and 1(0) - 0(0)A+ lines of methanol (CH3OH) in three dark cold clouds, TMC1, L134N, and B335. The CH3OH emission is extended in these clouds and shows a complex velocity structure. Clear indications of non LTE excitation are observed in TMC 1. Estimated column densities are a few 10(13) cm-2. Although less abundant than formaldehyde (H2CO), methanol is almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), in these clouds. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L134N, to an upper limit of 4 10(12) cm-2 (3 sigma). Implications for dark cloud excitation and chemistry are discussed. A new, more accurate, rest frequency 96741.39(0.01) MHz is determined for the 2(0) - 1(0) A+ E line of methanol.

  5. The toxicity of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tephly, T.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Methanol toxicity in humans and monkeys is characterized by a latent period of many hours followed by a metabolic acidosis and ocular toxicity. This is not observed in most lower animals. The metabolic acidosis and blindness is apparently due to formic acid accumulation in humans and monkeys, a feature not seen in lower animals. The accumulation of formate is due to a deficiency in formate metabolism which is, in turn, related, in part, to low hepatic tetrahydrofolate (H{sub 4}folate). An excellent correlation between hepatic H{sub 4} folate and formate oxidation rates has been shown within and across species. Thus, humans and monkeys possess low hepatic H{sub 4}folate levels, low rates of formate oxidation and accumulation of formate after methanol. Formate, itself, produces blindness in monkeys in the absence of metabolic acidosis. In addition to low hepatic H{sub 4}folate concentrations, monkeys and humans also have low hepatic 10-formyl H{sub 4}folate dehydrogenase levels, the enzyme which is the ultimate catalyst for conversion of formate to carbon dioxide. This review presents the basis for the role of folic acid-dependent reactions in the regulation of methanol toxicity.

  6. California methanol assessment. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, R.; Dutzi, E.; Gershman, R.; Heft, R.; Kalema, W.; Maynard, D.

    1983-01-01

    Energy feedstock sources for methanol; methanol and other synfuels; transport, storage, and distribution; air quality impact of methanol use in vehicles, chemical methanol production and use; methanol utilization in vehicles; methanol utilization in stationary applications; and environmental and regulatory constraints are discussed.

  7. Determination of trace amounts of formaldehyde in acetone.

    PubMed

    Huang, X H Hilda; Ip, H S Simon; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2007-12-01

    A method to quantify sub-ppm levels of formaldehyde in acetone has been developed and it is reported here. In this method, the different reactivities and stabilities of sulfite with formaldehyde and acetone are used to separate the two carbonyl compounds. Sulfite reacts with formaldehyde to form hydroxymethanesulfonate (HMS), the non-volatile and stable nature of which allows its separation from bulk acetone solvent. The resulting HMS is then converted back to formaldehyde under basic conditions, and formaldehyde is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and quantified in its DNP hydrazone form using high-performance liquid chromatography-UV detection. The method detection limit at the 99% confidence level was 0.051 mg L(-1). A batch of samples can be processed within 4 h. The method has been applied to quantify the amount of formaldehyde in an analytical-grade acetone and in a commercial nail polish remover and the level of formaldehyde was found to be 0.175 and 0.184 mg L(-1), respectively. PMID:17996534

  8. NASOPHARYNGEAL CONCENTRATIONS IN THE HUMAN VOLUNTEER BREATHING ACETONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to examine the absorption of a common chemical into the nasopharyngeal region in humans, a 57 year old male volunteer inhaled uniformly labeled 13C-acetone at 1.4 ppm for 30 min while performing different breathing maneuvers; nose inhale, nose exhale (NINE); mouth ...

  9. Engineering of a modular and synthetic phosphoketolase pathway for photosynthetic production of acetone from CO2 in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 under light and aerobic condition.

    PubMed

    Chwa, Jun-Won; Kim, Wook Jin; Sim, Sang Jun; Um, Youngsoon; Woo, Han Min

    2016-08-01

    Capture and conversion of CO2 to valuable chemicals is intended to answer global challenges on environmental issues, climate change and energy security. Engineered cyanobacteria have been enabled to produce industry-relevant chemicals from CO2 . However, the final products from cyanobacteria have often been mixed with fermented metabolites during dark fermentation. In this study, our engineering of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 enabled continuous conversion of CO2 to volatile acetone as sole product. This process occurred during lighted, aerobic culture via both ATP-driven malonyl-CoA synthesis pathway and heterologous phosphoketolase (PHK)-phosphotransacetylase (Pta) pathway. Because of strong correlations between the metabolic pathways of acetate and acetone, supplying the acetyl-CoA directly from CO2 in the engineered strain, led to sole production of acetone (22.48 mg/L ± 1.00) without changing nutritional constraints, and without an anaerobic shift. Our engineered S. elongatus strains, designed for acetone production, could be modified to create biosolar cell factories for sustainable photosynthetic production of acetyl-CoA-derived biochemicals. PMID:26879003

  10. A fully integrated standalone portable cavity ringdown breath acetone analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Meixiu; Jiang, Chenyu; Gong, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Chen, Zhuying; Wang, Zhennan; Kang, Meiling; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2015-09-01

    Breath analysis is a promising new technique for nonintrusive disease diagnosis and metabolic status monitoring. One challenging issue in using a breath biomarker for potential particular disease screening is to find a quantitative relationship between the concentration of the breath biomarker and clinical diagnostic parameters of the specific disease. In order to address this issue, we need a new instrument that is capable of conducting real-time, online breath analysis with high data throughput, so that a large scale of clinical test (more subjects) can be achieved in a short period of time. In this work, we report a fully integrated, standalone, portable analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique for near-real time, online breath acetone measurements. The performance of the portable analyzer in measurements of breath acetone was interrogated and validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that this new analyzer is useful for reliable online (online introduction of a breath sample without pre-treatment) breath acetone analysis with high sensitivity (57 ppb) and high data throughput (one data per second). Subsequently, the validated breath analyzer was employed for acetone measurements in 119 human subjects under various situations. The instrument design, packaging, specifications, and future improvements were also described. From an optical ringdown cavity operated by the lab-set electronics reported previously to this fully integrated standalone new instrument, we have enabled a new scientific tool suited for large scales of breath acetone analysis and created an instrument platform that can even be adopted for study of other breath biomarkers by using different lasers and ringdown mirrors covering corresponding spectral fingerprints.

  11. A fully integrated standalone portable cavity ringdown breath acetone analyzer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meixiu; Jiang, Chenyu; Gong, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Chen, Zhuying; Wang, Zhennan; Kang, Meiling; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2015-09-01

    Breath analysis is a promising new technique for nonintrusive disease diagnosis and metabolic status monitoring. One challenging issue in using a breath biomarker for potential particular disease screening is to find a quantitative relationship between the concentration of the breath biomarker and clinical diagnostic parameters of the specific disease. In order to address this issue, we need a new instrument that is capable of conducting real-time, online breath analysis with high data throughput, so that a large scale of clinical test (more subjects) can be achieved in a short period of time. In this work, we report a fully integrated, standalone, portable analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique for near-real time, online breath acetone measurements. The performance of the portable analyzer in measurements of breath acetone was interrogated and validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that this new analyzer is useful for reliable online (online introduction of a breath sample without pre-treatment) breath acetone analysis with high sensitivity (57 ppb) and high data throughput (one data per second). Subsequently, the validated breath analyzer was employed for acetone measurements in 119 human subjects under various situations. The instrument design, packaging, specifications, and future improvements were also described. From an optical ringdown cavity operated by the lab-set electronics reported previously to this fully integrated standalone new instrument, we have enabled a new scientific tool suited for large scales of breath acetone analysis and created an instrument platform that can even be adopted for study of other breath biomarkers by using different lasers and ringdown mirrors covering corresponding spectral fingerprints.

  12. Measurement of the diffusion coefficient of acetone in succinonitrile at its melting point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, M. A.; Glicksman, M. E.; Singh, N. B.

    1988-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of acetone in liquid succinonitrile at 331.1 K was determined using the method of McBain and Dawson (1935). Only dilute mixtures of SCN-acetone were studied. The interdiffusion constant was determined to be 0.0000127 sq cm/s and was essentially independent of the acetone concentration over the range investigated (0.5 to 18 mol pct acetone).

  13. Artificial photosynthesis - CO2 towards methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazimek, D.; Czech, B.

    2011-03-01

    The new insight into the problem of carbon dioxide utilization into valuable compound - methanol and then its transformation into fuel is presented. Because the highly endothermic requirements of the reaction of CO2 hydrogenation a photocatalytic route is applied. Combining of the two reactions: water splitting and CO2 hydrogenation using H2O as a source of hydrogen at the same time and place are proposed. The studies over modified TiO2 catalysts supported on Al2O3 were conducted in a self-designed circulated photocatalytic reaction system under at room temperature and constant pressure. Experimental results indicated that the highest yield of the photoreduction of CO2 with H2O were obtained using TiO2 with the active anatase phase modified by Ru and WO3 addition. The conversion was very high - almost 97% of CO2 was transformed mainly into methanol (14%vol.) and into small amount of formic and acetic acid and ester.

  14. An improvement of separation and response applying post-column compensation and one-step acetone protein precipitation for the determination of coenzyme Q10 in rat plasma by SFC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rujie; Li, Yingchao; Liu, Cuiru; Xu, Youjun; Zhao, Longshan; Zhang, Tianhong

    2016-09-15

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) solid dispersion was prepared to improve its oral bioavailability due to the poor solubility of CoQ10. To evaluate the pharmacokinetic behaviors of CoQ10 solid dispersion, a simple, rapid, sensitive and environment friendly method for the determination of CoQ10 in rat plasma was developed. In this study, samples were prepared by one-step protein precipitation with acetone and then the supercritical fluid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (SFC-ESI-MS/MS) method was used. The separation was achieved by an ACQUITY UPC(2)™ BEH 2-EP column (100mm×3mm, 1.7μm) maintained at 35°C, using carbon dioxide (≥99.99%) and methanol (85:15, v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0ml/min. To improve the response and sensitivity, the compensation solvent of methanol with 2mM ammonium acetate at a flow rate of 0.2ml/min was used and the total analysis time was only 1.5min for each sample. The detection was carried out on a tandem mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization (ESI) source and the mass transition ion pair was m/z 881.0→197.0 and 285.1→193.0 for CoQ10 and diazepam, internal standard (IS), respectively. Calibration curve was linear over the concentration range of 2.00-500.00ng/ml (r(2)≥0.998) with a lower limit of quantification of 2.00ng/ml. The intra- and inter-day accuracy and precision were below 15% for all quality control samples. The proposed method was rapid, accurate and reproducible, which was suitable to compare the pharmacokinetic behaviors in rats after a single oral dose of 100mg/kg CoQ10 solid dispersion or tablets.

  15. An improvement of separation and response applying post-column compensation and one-step acetone protein precipitation for the determination of coenzyme Q10 in rat plasma by SFC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rujie; Li, Yingchao; Liu, Cuiru; Xu, Youjun; Zhao, Longshan; Zhang, Tianhong

    2016-09-15

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) solid dispersion was prepared to improve its oral bioavailability due to the poor solubility of CoQ10. To evaluate the pharmacokinetic behaviors of CoQ10 solid dispersion, a simple, rapid, sensitive and environment friendly method for the determination of CoQ10 in rat plasma was developed. In this study, samples were prepared by one-step protein precipitation with acetone and then the supercritical fluid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (SFC-ESI-MS/MS) method was used. The separation was achieved by an ACQUITY UPC(2)™ BEH 2-EP column (100mm×3mm, 1.7μm) maintained at 35°C, using carbon dioxide (≥99.99%) and methanol (85:15, v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0ml/min. To improve the response and sensitivity, the compensation solvent of methanol with 2mM ammonium acetate at a flow rate of 0.2ml/min was used and the total analysis time was only 1.5min for each sample. The detection was carried out on a tandem mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization (ESI) source and the mass transition ion pair was m/z 881.0→197.0 and 285.1→193.0 for CoQ10 and diazepam, internal standard (IS), respectively. Calibration curve was linear over the concentration range of 2.00-500.00ng/ml (r(2)≥0.998) with a lower limit of quantification of 2.00ng/ml. The intra- and inter-day accuracy and precision were below 15% for all quality control samples. The proposed method was rapid, accurate and reproducible, which was suitable to compare the pharmacokinetic behaviors in rats after a single oral dose of 100mg/kg CoQ10 solid dispersion or tablets. PMID:27507667

  16. Methanol simplifies gas processing

    SciTech Connect

    Minkkinen, A.; Jonchere, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    Recent development of a simple single solvent technology goes far to meet the complete gas processing needs. The use of methanol, as practiced in the IPFEXOL process, where it is used not only as a hydrate inhibitor and antifreeze agent but as an acid gas extraction solvent makes the complete gas processing scheme simple and probably the most cost effective as well. This paper presents several gas processing applications where water, hydrocarbon liquids and acid gases are removed from natural wellhead production gases. Water and hydrocarbon liquids removal is achieved to the extent necessary to make a pipeline transportable gas or meet downstream cryogenic processing demands. These are illustrated with recent applications of the IFPEX-1 process successfully operating today in North America and the Far East. A recent North Sea offshore project is highlighted showing the particular advantages in offshore applications. For the removal of water and hydrocarbon liquids together with a substantial quantity of not only CO{sub 2} but H{sub 2}S, the most complete methanol use scheme is presented. This is illustrated with the development of an advanced version of the IFPEX-2 process containing some innovative but simple equipment concepts which yields high pressure dry acid gases for reinjection or a high quality acid gas destined to Claus type sulfur recovery.

  17. Methane from acetate.

    PubMed

    Ferry, J G

    1992-09-01

    The general features are known for the pathway by which most methane is produced in nature. All acetate-utilizing methanogenic microorganisms contain CODH which catalyzes the cleavage of acetyl-CoA; however, the pathway differs from all other acetate-utilizing anaerobes in that the methyl group is reduced to methane with electrons derived from oxidation of the carbonyl group of acetyl-CoA to CO2. The current understanding of the methanogenic fermentation of acetate provides impressions of nature's novel solutions to problems of methyl transfer, electron transport, and energy conservation. The pathway is now at a level of understanding that will permit productive investigations of these and other interesting questions in the near future. PMID:1512186

  18. Economic evaluation of the acetone-butane fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lenz, T.G.; Moreira, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    The economics of producing acetone as 1-butanol via fermentation have been examined for a 45 x 1 kg of solvents/year plant. For a molasses substrate the total annual production costs were approximately $39 million vs. a total annual income of $36 million, with approximatley $20 million total required capital. Molasses cost of approximately $24.4 million/year was critical to these economics. Liquid whey was next evaluated as an alternative feed. Whey feed saved approximately 11 million dollars annually in feed costs and yielded approximately 8 million net additional annual revenues from protein sale. The primary differences gave an annual gross profit of approximately $15 million for the whey case and resulted in a discounted cash flow rate return of 29%. Waste-based acetone-butanol production via fermentation deserves further attention in view of the attractive whey-based economics and the excellent potential of butanol as a fuel extender, especially for diesohol blending.

  19. Effects of acetone on methyl ethyl ketone peroxide runaway reaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan-Fu; Tseng, Jo-Ming; Wu, Tsung-Chih; Shu, Chi-Min

    2008-05-30

    Runaway reactions by methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKPO) are an important issue in Asia, due to its unstable structure and extensive heat release during upset situations. This study employed differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to draw the experimental data for MEKPO 31 mass% and with acetone 99 mass% on three types of heating rate of 2, 4, and 10 degrees C/min; the kinetic and safety parameters were then evaluated via curve fitting. Through the reproducible tests in each condition, the results show that acetone is not a contaminant, because it could increase the activation energy (Ea) and onset temperature (To) when combined with MEKPO, which differs from the hazard information of the material safety data sheet (MSDS).

  20. Conversion of Acetic Acid from the Catalytic Pyrolysis of Xylan Over CeO2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heejin; Ko, Jeong Huy; Kwon, Woo Hyun; Park, Young-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    CeO2 was synthesized hydrothermally in supercritical water and applied to the catalytic pyrolysis of xylan. Acetic acid, which is the main component in bio-oil produced from the non-catalytic pyrolysis of xylan, deteriorates the fuel quality of the oil. Catalysis over CeO2 effectively converted the acetic acid to ketone species, such as acetone, thereby reducing the acidity of the oil considerably. The content of aromatics in bio-oil was also increased substantially by catalysis. PMID:27483777

  1. Ethanol, acetone and ammonia gas room temperature operated sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Iqbal; Bedi, R. K.

    2013-06-01

    CuO nanocrystalline thick films were fabricated from powder synthesized by a sol-gel auto combustion route at different pH value of the precursor solution. The gas sensing response of thick film samples towards ethanol, acetone and ammonia gases has been tested and response has been found to be higher for ammonia gas. The sensor recovers its original state after ammonia exposure.

  2. Self-Associating Behavior of Acetone in Liquid Krypton.

    PubMed

    De Beuckeleer, Liene I; Herrebout, Wouter A

    2016-02-18

    Acetone molecules are inclined to self-associate through dipole-dipole interactions because of their large dipole moment. Infrared spectroscopy of compounds dissolved in liquid noble gases supported by high level ab initio calculations allows investigating the self-associating behavior and determining the thermodynamical properties. In this study, infrared spectra of various concentrations of acetone dissolved in liquid krypton are recorded at constant temperature. Overlapping monomer and dimer spectra are separated by analyzing the obtained data sets with numerical methods based on least-squares fitting. Although acetone is known to self-associate, only a few spectral features have been presented in literature before. In this study, the application of new numerical approaches succeeds in resolving overlapping spectra and allows observing isolated acetone dimer absorption bands for the complete mid infrared spectrum. By use of data sets of spectra recorded at temperatures between 134 and 142 K, the experimental standard dimerization enthalpy was determined to be -10.8 kJ mol(-1). MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations predicted a stacked and planar dimer geometry of which the stacked geometry is more stable. Combining MP2 energies and single point corrections involving CCSD(T) calculations and complete basis set extrapolations based on the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ equilibrium geometry lead to complexation energy of -28.4 kJ mol(-1) for the stacked geometry and -15.1 kJ mol(-1) for the planar geometry. The corresponding values for the complexation enthalpies in solution, obtained by combining these values with corrections for thermal and solvent influences are -13.7 and -5.8 kJ mol(-1).

  3. Self-Associating Behavior of Acetone in Liquid Krypton.

    PubMed

    De Beuckeleer, Liene I; Herrebout, Wouter A

    2016-02-18

    Acetone molecules are inclined to self-associate through dipole-dipole interactions because of their large dipole moment. Infrared spectroscopy of compounds dissolved in liquid noble gases supported by high level ab initio calculations allows investigating the self-associating behavior and determining the thermodynamical properties. In this study, infrared spectra of various concentrations of acetone dissolved in liquid krypton are recorded at constant temperature. Overlapping monomer and dimer spectra are separated by analyzing the obtained data sets with numerical methods based on least-squares fitting. Although acetone is known to self-associate, only a few spectral features have been presented in literature before. In this study, the application of new numerical approaches succeeds in resolving overlapping spectra and allows observing isolated acetone dimer absorption bands for the complete mid infrared spectrum. By use of data sets of spectra recorded at temperatures between 134 and 142 K, the experimental standard dimerization enthalpy was determined to be -10.8 kJ mol(-1). MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations predicted a stacked and planar dimer geometry of which the stacked geometry is more stable. Combining MP2 energies and single point corrections involving CCSD(T) calculations and complete basis set extrapolations based on the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ equilibrium geometry lead to complexation energy of -28.4 kJ mol(-1) for the stacked geometry and -15.1 kJ mol(-1) for the planar geometry. The corresponding values for the complexation enthalpies in solution, obtained by combining these values with corrections for thermal and solvent influences are -13.7 and -5.8 kJ mol(-1). PMID:26805773

  4. Reverse osmosis application for butanol-acetone fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.; Iannotti, E.L.; Fischer, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The problems of dilute solvent concentration in butanol-acetone fermentation can be solved by using reverse osmosis to dewater the fermentation liquor. Polyamide membranes exhibited butanol rejection rates as high as 85%. Optimum rejection of butanol occurs at a pressure of approximately 5.5 to 6.5 MPa and hydraulic recoveries of 50-70%. Flux ranged from 0.5 to 1.8 l.

  5. Acetone oxidation using ozone on manganese oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yan; Reed, Corey; Lee, Yong-Kul; Oyama, S Ted

    2005-09-22

    Supported manganese oxide catalysts were prepared by the impregnation of alumina foam blocks washcoated with alumina and silica. The manganese content based on the weight of the washcoats was 10 wt % calculated as MnO2. Fourier transform profiles of the Mn K-edge EXAFS spectra for these samples gave three distinctive peaks at 0.15, 0.25, and 0.32 nm and were close to the profiles of Mn3O4 and beta-MnO2. The number of surface active sites was determined through oxygen chemisorption measurements at a reduction temperature (Tred = 443 K) obtained from temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) experiments. Acetone catalytic oxidation was studied from room temperature to 573 K, and was found to be highly accelerated by the use of ozone on both catalysts with substantial reductions in the reaction temperature. The only carbon-containing product detected was CO2. The alumina-supported catalyst was found to be more active than the silica-supported catalyst in acetone and ozone conversion, with higher turnover frequencies (TOFs) for both reactions. The pressure drop through the foam was low and increased little (0.003 kPa/10 000 h(-1)) with space velocity. In situ steady-state Raman spectroscopy measurements during the acetone catalytic oxidation reaction showed the presence of an adsorbed acetone species with a C-H bond at 2930 cm(-1) and a peroxide species derived from ozone with an O-O bond at 890 cm(-1).

  6. Acetone Oxidation using Ozone on Manganese Oxide Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Xi,Y.; Reed, C.; Lee, Y.; Oyama, S.

    2005-01-01

    Supported manganese oxide catalysts were prepared by the impregnation of alumina foam blocks washcoated with alumina and silica. The manganese content based on the weight of the washcoats was 10 wt % calculated as MnO{sub 2}. Fourier transform profiles of the Mn K-edge EXAFS spectra for these samples gave three distinctive peaks at 0.15, 0.25, and 0.32 nm and were close to the profiles of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and {beta}-MnO{sub 2}. The number of surface active sites was determined through oxygen chemisorption measurements at a reduction temperature (T{sub red} = 443 K) obtained from temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) experiments. Acetone catalytic oxidation was studied from room temperature to 573 K, and was found to be highly accelerated by the use of ozone on both catalysts with substantial reductions in the reaction temperature. The only carbon-containing product detected was CO{sub 2}. The alumina-supported catalyst was found to be more active than the silica-supported catalyst in acetone and ozone conversion, with higher turnover frequencies (TOFs) for both reactions. The pressure drop through the foam was low and increased little (0.003 kPa/10 000 h{sup -1}) with space velocity. In situ steady-state Raman spectroscopy measurements during the acetone catalytic oxidation reaction showed the presence of an adsorbed acetone species with a C-H bond at 2930 cm{sup -1} and a peroxide species derived from ozone with an O-O bond at 890 cm{sup -1}.

  7. Density and viscosity of binary mixtures of ethyl acetate with methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, butan-1-ol, 2-methylpropan-1-ol, and 2-methylpropan-2-ol at (298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K

    SciTech Connect

    Nikam, P.S.; Mahale, T.R.; Hasan, M.

    1996-09-01

    Densities and viscosities have been measured for the binary mixtures of ethyl acetate with linear and branched alkanols (C{sub 1}-C{sub 4}) at (298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K. The experimental density ({zeta}) and viscosity ({eta}) values were used to calculate the excess molar volume (V{sup E}) and viscosity deviation ({Delta}{eta}). The V{sup E} and {Delta}{eta} values have been fitted to a Redlich-Kister polynomial.

  8. OTEC energy via methanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, W.H.; Richards, D.; Niemeyer, W.G.; Shoemaker, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The conceptual design of an 160 MW/sub e/ OTEC plantship has been documented; it is designed to produce 1000 tonne/day of fuel-grade methanol from coal slurry shipped to the plantship, using oxygen and hydrogen from the on-board electrolysis of water. Data and components are used that were derived by Brown and Root Development, Inc. (BARDI) in designing a barge-mounted plant to make methanol from natural gas for Litton Industries and in the design and construction of a coal-to-ammonia demonstration plant in operation at Muscle Shoals, Alabama, for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The OTEC-methanol plant design is based on the use of the Texaco gasifier and Lurgi synthesis units. The sale price of OTEC methanol delivered to port from this first-of-a-kind plant is estimated to be marginally competitive with methanol from other sources at current market prices.

  9. California methanol assessment. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, R.; Dutzi, E.; Gershman, R.; Heft, R.; Kalema, W.; Maynard, D.

    1983-01-01

    The near term methanol industry, the competitive environment, long term methanol market, the transition period, air quality impacts of methanol, roles of the public and private sectors are considered.

  10. Search for Deuterated methyl acetate in the ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorai, Prasanta; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Das, Ankan; Majumdar, Liton; Sahu, Dipen; Sivaraman, Bhalamurugan

    2016-07-01

    Methyl acetate (CH_3COOCH_3 ) has been recently observed by IRAM 30 m radio telescope in Orion. But the existence of its deuterated form are yet to be confirmed. Here, we study the properties of methyl acetate and its singly deuterated forms (CH_3COOCH_3, CH_2DCOOCH_3 and CH_3COOCH_2D). Our simulation results reveal that deuterated forms of methyl acetate could efficiently be produced both in gas as well as in ice phase. Production of methyl acetate could follow radical-radical reaction between acetyl (CH_3CO) and methoxy (CH_3O) radicals. To predict abundances of CH_3COOCH_3 along with its two singly deuterated isotopomers and its two isomers (ethyl formate and hydroxy acetone), we prepare a large gas-grain chemical network to study chemical evolution of these molecules. Since gas phase rate coefficients of our newly adopted network for methyl acetate and its related species were unknown, in our simulation, either we consider similar rate coefficients for similar types of reactions (by following existing data bases) or we carry out quantum chemical calculations to estimate the unknown rate coefficients. For the surface reactions, we use adsorption energies of reactants from some earlier studies. Moreover, we perform quantum chemical calculations to find out various spectral properties of various forms of methyl acetate in infrared, ultraviolet and sub-millimeter regions. We prepare two catalog files for the rotational transitions of CH_2DCOOCH_3 and CH_3COOCH_2D in JPL format, which might be useful for its detection in regions of interstellar media where CH_3COOCH_3 has already been observed.

  11. Acetate dependence of tumors.

    PubMed

    Comerford, Sarah A; Huang, Zhiguang; Du, Xinlin; Wang, Yun; Cai, Ling; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Walters, Holly; Tantawy, Mohammed N; Fu, Allie; Manning, H Charles; Horton, Jay D; Hammer, Robert E; McKnight, Steven L; Tu, Benjamin P

    2014-12-18

    Acetyl-CoA represents a central node of carbon metabolism that plays a key role in bioenergetics, cell proliferation, and the regulation of gene expression. Highly glycolytic or hypoxic tumors must produce sufficient quantities of this metabolite to support cell growth and survival under nutrient-limiting conditions. Here, we show that the nucleocytosolic acetyl-CoA synthetase enzyme, ACSS2, supplies a key source of acetyl-CoA for tumors by capturing acetate as a carbon source. Despite exhibiting no gross deficits in growth or development, adult mice lacking ACSS2 exhibit a significant reduction in tumor burden in two different models of hepatocellular carcinoma. ACSS2 is expressed in a large proportion of human tumors, and its activity is responsible for the majority of cellular acetate uptake into both lipids and histones. These observations may qualify ACSS2 as a targetable metabolic vulnerability of a wide spectrum of tumors.

  12. Methanol crossover in direct methanol fuel cell systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovar, B. S.; Bender, G.; Davey, J. R.; Zelenay, P.

    2003-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are currently being investigated for a number of different applications from several milliwatts to near kilowatt size scales (cell phones, laptops, auxiliary power units, etc .). Because methanol has a very high energy density, over 6000 W hr/kg, a DMFC can possibly have greatly extended lifetimes compared to the batteries, doesn't present the storage problems associated with hydrogen fuel cells and can possibly operate more efficiently and cleanly than internal combustion engines.

  13. Phase transitions of amorphous solid acetone in confined geometry investigated by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sunghwan; Kang, Hani; Kim, Jun Soo; Kang, Heon

    2014-11-26

    We investigated the phase transformations of amorphous solid acetone under confined geometry by preparing acetone films trapped in amorphous solid water (ASW) or CCl4. Reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) were used to monitor the phase changes of the acetone sample with increasing temperature. An acetone film trapped in ASW shows an abrupt change in the RAIRS features of the acetone vibrational bands during heating from 80 to 100 K, which indicates the transformation of amorphous solid acetone to a molecularly aligned crystalline phase. Further heating of the sample to 140 K produces an isotropic solid phase, and eventually a fluid phase near 157 K, at which the acetone sample is probably trapped in a pressurized, superheated condition inside the ASW matrix. Inside a CCl4 matrix, amorphous solid acetone crystallizes into a different, isotropic structure at ca. 90 K. We propose that the molecularly aligned crystalline phase formed in ASW is created by heterogeneous nucleation at the acetone-water interface, with resultant crystal growth, whereas the isotropic crystalline phase in CCl4 is formed by homogeneous crystal growth starting from the bulk region of the acetone sample.

  14. Molybdenum disulfide catalyzed tungsten oxide for on-chip acetone sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Ahn, Sung Hoon; Park, Sangwook; Cai, Lili; Zhao, Jiheng; He, Jiajun; Zhou, Minjie; Park, Joonsuk; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2016-09-01

    Acetone sensing is critical for acetone leak detection and holds a great promise for the noninvasive diagnosis of diabetes. It is thus highly desirable to develop a wearable acetone sensor that has low cost, miniature size, sub-ppm detection limit, great selectivity, as well as low operating temperature. In this work, we demonstrate a cost-effective on-chip acetone sensor with excellent sensing performances at 200 °C using molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) catalyzed tungsten oxide (WO3). The WO3 based acetone sensors are first optimized via combined mesoscopic nanostructuring and silicon doping. Under the same testing conditions, our optimized mesoporous silicon doped WO3 [Si:WO3(meso)] sensor shows 2.5 times better sensitivity with ˜1000 times smaller active device area than the state-of-art WO3 based acetone sensor. Next, MoS2 is introduced to catalyze the acetone sensing reactions for Si:WO3(meso), which reduces the operating temperature by 100 °C while retaining its high sensing performances. Our miniaturized acetone sensor may serve as a wearable acetone detector for noninvasive diabetes monitoring or acetone leakage detection. Moreover, our work demonstrates that MoS2 can be a promising nonprecious catalyst for catalytic sensing applications.

  15. Acetone PLIF concentration measurements in a submerged round turbulent jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Z. D.; Chikishev, L. M.; Dulin, V. M.

    2016-10-01

    Transport of passive scalar in near-field of a submerged turbulent jet, was studied experimentally by using the planar laser-induced fluorescence technique. The jet issued from a round pipe with the inner diameter and length of 21 mm and 700 mm, respectively. Three cases of Reynolds numbers were studied: Re=3000, 6000, and 9000. Vapor of acetone, mixed to the jet flow, served as a passive fluorescent tracer. The paper describes data processing utilized to convert intensity of fluorescence images to the instantaneous concentration.

  16. Methanol Oxidation on Pt3Sn(111) for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells: Methanol Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Zhigang; Guo, Chen; Wang, Weili; Wei, Shuxian; Ng, Siu-Pang; Chen, Xiangfeng; Ding, Ning; Guo, Wenyue; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2016-05-18

    PtSn alloy, which is a potential material for use in direct methanol fuel cells, can efficiently promote methanol oxidation and alleviate the CO poisoning problem. Herein, methanol decomposition on Pt3Sn(111) was systematically investigated using periodic density functional theory and microkinetic modeling. The geometries and energies of all of the involved species were analyzed, and the decomposition network was mapped out to elaborate the reaction mechanisms. Our results indicated that methanol and formaldehyde were weakly adsorbed, and the other derivatives (CHxOHy, x = 1-3, y = 0-1) were strongly adsorbed and preferred decomposition rather than desorption on Pt3Sn(111). The competitive methanol decomposition started with the initial O-H bond scission followed by successive C-H bond scissions, (i.e., CH3OH → CH3O → CH2O → CHO → CO). The Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relations and energy barrier decomposition analyses identified the C-H and O-H bond scissions as being more competitive than the C-O bond scission. Microkinetic modeling confirmed that the vast majority of the intermediates and products from methanol decomposition would escape from the Pt3Sn(111) surface at a relatively low temperature, and the coverage of the CO residue decreased with an increase in the temperature and decrease in partial methanol pressure.

  17. Methanol related deaths in Edirne.

    PubMed

    Azmak, Derya

    2006-01-01

    In this retrospective autopsy study, a detailed analysis of methanol related deaths in Trakya region of Turkey is presented and departmental autopsy records, toxicology and histopathology results are analyzed. We found that methanol poisonings comprise 2.83% of all forensic autopsies (n:18), 88.8% of the cases were male, most of the victims were aged between 41 and 45. Blood methanol concentrations range widely from 55 to 479 mg per 100ml. Ethyl alcohol was detected in 44.4% of the cases. Most of the cases died in hospital and were poisoned through the consumption of alcoholic beverages from illicit sources and colognes. It is important for physicians to be aware of methanol poisoning symptoms and for forensic pathologists to obtain samples for toxicology during autopsies. Some preventative strategies including to routine control of the stores, to prevent the production of illegal alcoholic beverages, etc. should be developed.

  18. Isolation of cellulose from rice straw and its conversion into cellulose acetate catalyzed by phosphotungstic acid.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guozhi; Wang, Min; Liao, Chongjing; Fang, Tao; Li, Jianfen; Zhou, Ronghui

    2013-04-15

    Cellulose was isolated from rice straw by pretreatment with dilute alkaline and acid solutions successively, and it was further transferred into cellulose acetate in the presence of acetic anhydride and phosphotungstic acid (H3PW12O40·6H2O). The removal of hemicellulose and lignin was affected by the concentration of KOH and the immersion time in acetic acid solution, and 83wt.% content of cellulose in the treated rice straw was obtained after pretreatment with 4% KOH and immersion in acetic acid for 5h. Phosphotungstic acid was found to be an effective catalyst for the acetylation of the cellulose derived from rice straw. The degree of substitution (DS) values revealed a significant effect for the solubility of cellulose acetate, and the acetone-soluble cellulose acetate with DS values around 2.2 can be obtained by changing the amount of phosphotungstic acid and the time of acetylation. Both the structure of cellulose separated from rice straw and cellulose acetate were confirmed by FTIR and XRD.

  19. Acetone-Assisted Oxygen Vacancy Diffusion on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yaobiao; Zhang, Bo; Ye, Jingyun; Ge, Qingfeng; Zhang, Zhenrong

    2012-10-18

    We have studied the dynamic relationship between acetone and bridge-bonded oxygen (Ob) vacancy (VO) defect sites on the TiO2(110)-1 × 1 surface using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density function theory (DFT) calculations. We report an adsorbate-assisted VO diffusion mechanism. The STM images taken at 300 K show that acetone preferably adsorbs on the VO site and is mobile. The sequential isothermal STM images directly show that the mobile acetone effectively migrates the position of VO by a combination of two acetone diffusion channels: one is the diffusion along the Ob row and moving as an alkyl group, which heals the initial VO; another is the diffusion from the Ob row to the fivecoordinated Ti4+ row and then moving along the Ti4+ row as an acetone, which leaves a VO behind. The calculated acetone diffusion barriers for the two channels are comparable and agree with experimental results.

  20. Fate of acetone in an outdoor model stream in southern Mississippi, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Stephens, D.W.; Shultz, D.J.; Tai, D.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The fate of acetone in water was investigated in an outdoor model stream located in southern Mississippi, U.S.A. Acetone was injected continuously for 32 days resulting in small milligram-perliter concentrations in the stream. Rhodamine-WT dye was injected at the beginning and at the end of the study to determine the time-of-travel and dispersion characteristics of the stream. A 12-h injection of t-butyl alcohol (TBA) was used to determine the volatilization characteristics of the stream. Volatilization controlled the acetone concentration in the stream. Significant bacterial degradation of acetone did not occur, contrary to expectations based on previous laboratory studies. Attempts to induce degradation of the acetone by injecting glucose and a nutrient solution containing bacteria acclimated to acetone were unsuccessful. Possible explanations for the lack of bacterial degradation included a nitrate limitation and a limited residence time in the stream system. ?? 1988.

  1. MrpA functions in energy conversion during acetate-dependent growth of Methanosarcina acetivorans.

    PubMed

    Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Apolinario, Ethel E; Sowers, Kevin R; Ferry, James G

    2013-09-01

    The role of the multisubunit sodium/proton antiporter (Mrp) of Methanosarcina acetivorans was investigated with a mutant deleted for the gene encoding the MrpA subunit. Antiporter activity was 5-fold greater in acetate-grown versus methanol-grown wild-type cells, consistent with the previously published relative levels of mrp transcript. The rate, final optical density, and dry weight/methane ratio decreased for the mutant versus wild type when cultured with a growth-limiting concentration of acetate. All growth parameters of the mutant or wild type were identical when grown with methanol in medium containing a growth-limiting Na(+) concentration of 1.04 M. The lag phase, growth rate, and final optical density for growth of the mutant were suboptimal compared to the wild type when cultured with acetate in medium containing either 0.54 or 1.04 M Na(+). The addition of 25 mM NaCl to resting cell suspensions stimulated ATP synthesis driven by a potassium diffusion potential. ATP synthesis was greater in wild-type than mutant cells grown with acetate, a trend that held for methanol-grown cells, albeit less pronounced. Both sodium and proton ionophores reduced ATP synthesis in the wild type grown with either substrate. The results indicated that the Mrp complex is essential for efficient ATP synthesis and optimal growth at the low concentrations of acetate encountered in the environment.

  2. Fabrication of a SnO2-based acetone gas sensor enhanced by molecular imprinting.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenhu; Ruan, Xiaofan; Yu, Qiuxiang; Yu, Zetai; Huang, Xintang

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a new route to design a highly sensitive SnO2-based sensor for acetone gas enhanced by the molecular imprinting technique. Unassisted and acetone-assisted thermal synthesis methods are used to synthesis SnO2 nanomaterials. The prepared SnO2 nanomaterials have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption. Four types of SnO2 films were obtained by mixing pure deionized water and liquid acetone with the two types of as-prepared powders, respectively. The acetone gas sensing properties of sensors coated by these films were evaluated. Testing results reveal that the sensor coated by the film fabricated by mixing liquid acetone with the SnO2 nanomaterial synthesized by the acetone-assisted thermal method exhibits the best acetone gas sensing performance. The sensor is optimized for the smooth adsorption and desorption of acetone gas thanks to the participation of acetone both in the procedure of synthesis of the SnO2 nanomaterial and the device fabrication, which results in a distinct response-recovery behavior.

  3. Anti-inflammatory activity of methanol extract of Kalopanax pictus bark and its fractions.

    PubMed

    Lee, E B; Li, D W; Hyun, J E; Kim, I H; Whang, W K

    2001-10-01

    The methanol extract of Kalopanax pictus bark was evaluated on anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities in animal models. The extract produced a significant inhibition of vascular permeability at doses of 1 and 3 g/kg, p.o. in mice and of leucocyte emigration at doses of 0.15 and 0.3 g/rat, s.c., in CMC-pouch of rats. However, the extract (0.25 and 3 g/kg, p.o.) did not show anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced edema of rats. The extract at a dose of 2.5 g/kg, p.o. inhibited writhing syndromes, whereas it did not exhibit anti-nociceptive in Randall-Selitto assay. The methanol extract was then partitioned with n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and butanol to give each soluble fraction and finally water soluble fraction. Among those fractions, the inhibitory effect on vascular permeability in mice was produced by ethyl acetate soluble fraction in this activity-guided fractionation. The methanol extract showed low acute toxicity in mice. These results suggest that the methanol extract of Kalopanax pictus bark has an anti-inflammatory activity which is distributed in the ethyl acetate fraction. PMID:11535364

  4. EFFECT OF STARCH ADDITION ON THE PERFORMANCE AND SLUDGE CHARACTERIZATION OF UASB PROCESS TREATING METHANOLIC WASTEWATER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Feng; Kobayashi, Takuro; Takahashi, Shintaro; Li, Yu-You; Omura, Tatsuo

    A mesophilic(35℃) UASB reactor treating synthetic wastewater containing methanol with addition of starch was continuously operated for over 430 days by changing the organic loading rate from 2.5 to 120kg-COD/m3.d. The microbial community structure of the granules was analyzed with the molecular tools and its metabolic characteristics were evaluated using specific methanogenic activity tests. The process was successfully operated with over 98% soluble COD removal efficiency at VLR 30kg-COD/m3.d for approximately 300 days, and granulation satisfactory proceeded. The results of cloning and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis suggest that groups related the genus Methanomethylovorans and the genus Methanosaeta were predominant in the reactor although only the genus Methanomethylovorans was predominant in the reactor treating methanolic wastewater in the previous study. Abundance of the granules over 0.5 mm in diameter in the reactor treating methanolic wastewater with addition of starch was 3 times larger than that in the reactor treating methanolic wastewater. Specific methanogenic activity tests in this study indicate that the methanol-methane pathway and the methanol-H2/CO2-methane pathway were predominant, and however, there was a certain level of activity for acetate-methane pathway unlike the reactor treating methanolic wastewater. These results suggest addition of starch might be responsible for diversifying the microbial community and encouraging the granulation.

  5. Anti-Oxidant, Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Properties of the Acetone Leaf Extract of Vernonia Amygdalina in Some Laboratory Animals

    PubMed Central

    Adedapo, Adeolu Alex; Aremu, Olujoke Janet; Oyagbemi, Ademola Adetokunbo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Vernonia amygdalina is a medicinal plant of great importance that has its fresh leaves rich in vitamins and salt hence, it is valuable in human diet. The anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of its acetone leaf extract were evaluated in this study to validate its folkloric use. Methods: The acetone extract is prepared by dissolving ground plant materials (200g) in 1 L of acetone for 48 h, filtered, and then dried using rotary evaporator before it is used for the pharmacological investigations. Standard phytochemical methods were used to test for the presence of phytoactive compounds in the plant. Acute toxicity was carried out in mice to determine safe doses for use. The anti-inflammatory activities were conducted using carrageenan and histamine to induce oedema in rats while analgesic activities were embarked upon using acetic acid- induced writhing test and formalin-induced paw lick test. The anti-oxidant activities were assessed in vitro using ABTS, DPPH, FRAP and total polyphenolics. Results: The results from this study showed that the 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of the acetone extract caused significant reduction in oedema induced by both carrageenan and histamine. Similar effect was observed in analgesic tests which were comparable to that of indomethacin, the reference drug used in the study. Conclusion: The anti-oxidant effects were also good and the pharmacological activities may be due to the presence of polyphenols and other phytochemicals contained in the plant. The study may have thus validated the folkloric use of this plant as a medicinal and nutritional agent. PMID:25671194

  6. Rapid starting methanol reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Chludzinski, Paul J.; Dantowitz, Philip; McElroy, James F.

    1984-01-01

    The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

  7. Effect of acetone accumulation on structure and dynamics of lipid membranes studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Posokhov, Yevgen O; Kyrychenko, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The modulation of the properties and function of cell membranes by small volatile substances is important for many biomedical applications. Despite available experimental results, molecular mechanisms of action of inhalants and organic solvents, such as acetone, on lipid membranes remain not well understood. To gain a better understanding of how acetone interacts with membranes, we have performed a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a POPC bilayer in aqueous solution in the presence of acetone, whose concentration was varied from 2.8 to 11.2 mol%. The MD simulations of passive distribution of acetone between a bulk water phase and a lipid bilayer show that acetone favors partitioning into the water-free region of the bilayer, located near the carbonyl groups of the phospholipids and at the beginning of the hydrocarbon core of the lipid membrane. Using MD umbrella sampling, we found that the permeability barrier of ~0.5 kcal/mol exists for acetone partitioning into the membrane. In addition, a Gibbs free energy profile of the acetone penetration across a bilayer demonstrates a favorable potential energy well of -3.6 kcal/mol, located at 15-16Å from the bilayer center. The analysis of the structural and dynamics properties of the model membrane revealed that the POPC bilayer can tolerate the presence of acetone in the concentration range of 2.8-5.6 mol%. The accumulation of the higher acetone concentration of 11.2 mol% results, however, in drastic disordering of phospholipid packing and the increase in the membrane fluidity. The acetone molecules push the lipid heads apart and, hence, act as spacers in the headgroup region. This effect leads to the increase in the average headgroup area per molecule. In addition, the acyl tail region of the membrane also becomes less dense. We suggest, therefore, that the molecular mechanism of acetone action on the phospholipid bilayer has many common features with the effects of short chain alcohols, DMSO, and

  8. Evaluating the Potential Importance of Monoterpene Degradation for Global Acetone Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelp, M. M.; Brewer, J.; Keller, C. A.; Fischer, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    Acetone is one of the most abundant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, but estimates of the global source of acetone vary widely. A better understanding of acetone sources is essential because acetone serves as a source of HOx in the upper troposphere and as a precursor to the NOx reservoir species peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). Although there are primary anthropogenic and pyrogenic sources of acetone, the dominant acetone sources are thought to be from direct biogenic emissions and photochemical production, particularly from the oxidation of iso-alkanes. Recent work suggests that the photochemical degradation of monoterpenes may also represent a significant contribution to global acetone production. We investigate that hypothesis using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. In this work, we calculate the emissions of eight terpene species (α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene, myrcene, sabinene, trans-β-ocimene, and an 'other monoterpenes' category which contains 34 other trace species) and couple these with upper and lower bound literature yields from species-specific chamber studies. We compare the simulated acetone distributions against in situ acetone measurements from a global suite of NASA aircraft campaigns. When simulating an upper bound on yields, the model-to-measurement comparison improves for North America at both the surface and in the upper troposphere. The inclusion of acetone production from monoterpene degradation also improves the ability of the model to reproduce observations of acetone in East Asian outflow. However, in general the addition of monoterpenes degrades the model comparison for the Southern Hemisphere.

  9. An analysis of human response to the irritancy of acetone vapors.

    PubMed

    Arts, J H E; Mojet, J; van Gemert, L J; Emmen, H H; Lammers, J H C M; Marquart, J; Woutersen, R A; Feron, V J

    2002-01-01

    Studies on the irritative effects of acetone vapor in humans and experimental animals have revealed large differences in the lowest acetone concentration found to be irritative to the respiratory tract and eyes. This has brought on much confusion in the process of setting occupational exposure limits for acetone. A literature survey was carried out focusing on the differences in results between studies using subjective (neuro)behavioral methods (questionnaires) and studies using objective measurements to detect odor and irritation thresholds. A critical review of published studies revealed that the odor detection threshold of acetone ranges from about 20 to about 400 ppm. Loss of sensitivity due to adaptation and/or habituation to acetone odor may occur, as was shown in studies comparing workers previously exposed to acetone with previously unexposed subjects. It further appeared that the sensory irritation threshold of acetone lies between 10,000 and 40,000 ppm. Thus, the threshold for sensory irritation is much higher than the odor detection limit, a conclusion that is supported by observations in anosmics, showing a ten times higher irritation threshold level than the odor threshold found in normosmics. The two-times higher sensory irritation threshold observed in acetone-exposed workers compared with previously nonexposed controls can apart from adaptation be ascribed to habituation. An evaluation of studies on subjectively reported irritation at acetone concentrations < 1000 ppm shows that perception of odor intensity, information bias, and exposure history (i.e., habituation) are confounding factors in the reporting of irritation thresholds and health symptoms. In conclusion, subjective measures alone are inappropriate for establishing sensory irritation effects and sensory irritation threshold levels of odorants such as acetone. Clearly, the sensory irritation threshold of acetone should be based on objective measurements. PMID:11852913

  10. Method of making a cellulose acetate low density microcellular foam

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, James A.

    1978-01-01

    Low-density microcellular foam having a cell size of not greater than 2 .mu.m and method of making by dissolving cellulose acetate in an acetone-based solvent, gelling the solution in a water bath maintained at 0-10.degree. C for a selected period of time to allow impurities to diffuse out, freezing the gel, and then freeze-drying wherein water and solvents sublime and the gel structure solidifies into low-density microcellular foam. The foam has a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3 and cell size of about 0.3 to 2 .mu.m. The small cell size foam is particularly adaptable for encapsulation of laser targets.

  11. [Adsorption characteristics of acetone and butanone onto honeycomb ZSM-5 molecular sieve].

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Luan, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Qiang; Ye, Ping-Wei; Li, Kai; Wang, Xi-Qin

    2013-12-01

    Adsorption capacity of acetone and acetone-butanone mixture onto honeycomb ZSM-5 molecular sieve was measured in this paper, and the influences of relative humidity, initial adsorbate concentration and airflow velocity on the adsorption process were investigated. Besides, adsorption performance parameters were calculated by Wheeler's equation. The results showed that relative humidity had no obvious influence on the acetone adsorption performance, which suggests that this material has good hydrophobic ability; in the low concentration range, the dynamic saturated adsorption capacity of acetone increased with the increase of initial concentration, but in the occasion of high concentration of acetone gas (more than 9 mg x L(-1)), the dynamic saturated adsorption capacity maintained at a certain level and did not vary with the increase of initial concentration; the increase of air flow velocity resulted in significant increase of acetone adsorption rate constant, at the same time the critical layer thickness of the adsorbent bed also increased significantly. In the cases of acetone-butanone mixture, the adsorption capacity of butanone onto ZSM-5 was clearly higher than that of acetone.

  12. Increased microsomal interaction with iron and oxygen radical generation after chronic acetone treatment.

    PubMed

    Puntarulo, S; Cederbaum, A I

    1988-01-12

    In vivo administration of acetone influences a variety of reactions catalyzed by rat liver microsomes. The effect of chronic treatment with acetone (1% acetone in the water for 10-12 days) on interaction with iron and subsequent oxygen radical generation by liver microsomes was evaluated. Microsomes from the acetone-treated rats displayed elevated rates of H2O2 generation, an increase in iron-dependent lipid peroxidation, and enhanced chemiluminescence upon the addition of t-butylhydroperoxide. The ferric EDTA-catalyzed production of formaldehyde from DMSO or of ethylene from 2-keto-4-thiomethylbutyrate was increased 2-fold after acetone treatment. This increase in hydroxyl radical generation was accompanied by a corresponding increase in NADPH utilization and was sensitive to inhibition by catalase and a competitive scavenger, ethanol, but not to superoxide dismutase. In vitro addition of acetone to microsomes had no effect on oxygen radical generation. Associated with the chronic acetone treatment was a 2-fold increase in the microsomal content of cytochrome P-450 and in the activity of NADPH-cytochrome-P-450 reductase. It appears that increased oxygen radical generation by microsomes after chronic acetone treatment reflects the increase in the major enzyme components which comprise the mixed-function oxidase system.

  13. A comparative study of methanol as a supplementary carbon source for enhancing denitrification in primary and secondary anoxic zones.

    PubMed

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Bowyer, Jocelyn C; Foley, Leah; Keller, Jürg; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2009-04-01

    A comparative study on the use of methanol as a supplementary carbon source to enhance denitrification in primary and secondary anoxic zones is reported. Three lab-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBR) were operated to achieve nitrogen and carbon removal from domestic wastewater. Methanol was added to the primary anoxic period of the first SBR, and to the secondary anoxic period of the second SBR. No methanol was added to the third SBR, which served as a control. The extent of improvement on the denitrification performance was found to be dependent on the reactor configuration. Addition to the secondary anoxic period is more effective when very low effluent nitrate levels are to be achieved and hence requires a relatively large amount of methanol. Adding a small amount of methanol to the secondary anoxic period may cause nitrite accumulation, which does not improve overall nitrogen removal. In the latter case, methanol should be added to the primary anoxic period. The addition of methanol can also improve biological phosphorus removal by creating anaerobic conditions and increasing the availability of organic carbon in wastewater for polyphosphate accumulating organisms. This potentially provides a cost-effective approach to phosphorus removal from wastewater with a low carbon content. New fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) probes targeting methanol-utilising denitrifiers were designed using stable isotope probing. Microbial structure analysis of the sludges using the new and existing FISH probes clearly showed that the addition of methanol stimulated the growth of specific methanol-utilizing denitrifiers, which improved the capability of sludge to use methanol and ethanol for denitrification, but reduced its capability to use wastewater COD for denitrification. Unlike acetate, long-term application of methanol has no negative impact on the settling properties of the sludge.

  14. Detection of acetone processing of castor bean mash for forensic investigation of ricin preparation methods.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Helen W; Wahl, Jon H; Metoyer, Candace N; Colburn, Heather A; Wahl, Karen L

    2010-07-01

    Samples containing the toxic castor bean protein ricin have been recently seized in connection with biocriminal activity. Analytical methods that enable investigators to determine how the samples were prepared and to match seized samples to potential source materials are needed. One commonly described crude ricin preparation method is acetone extraction of crushed castor beans. Here, we describe the use of solid-phase microextraction and headspace analysis to determine whether castor beans were processed by acetone extraction. We prepared acetone-extracted castor bean mash, along with controls of unextracted mash and mash extracted with nonacetone organic solvents. Samples of acetone-extracted mash and unextracted mash were stored in closed containers for up to 109 days at both room temperature and -20 degrees C, and in open containers at room temperature for up to 94 days. Acetone-extracted bean mash could consistently be statistically distinguished from controls, even after storage in open containers for 94 days. PMID:20345778

  15. Integration of stable isotope and trace contaminant concentration for enhanced forensic acetone discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, James J.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wahl, Jon H.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2013-07-18

    We analyzed 21 neat acetone samples from 15 different suppliers to demonstrate the utility of a coupled stable isotope and trace contaminant strategy for distinguishing forensically-relevant samples. By combining these two pieces of orthogonal data we could discriminate all of the acetones that were produced by the 15 different suppliers. Using stable isotope ratios alone, we were able to distinguish 9 acetone samples, while the remaining 12 fell into four clusters with highly similar signatures. Adding trace chemical contaminant information enhanced discrimination to 13 individual acetones with three residual clusters. The acetones within each cluster shared a common manufacturer and might, therefore, not be expected to be resolved. The data presented here demonstrates the power of combining orthogonal data sets to enhance sample fingerprinting and highlights the role disparate data could play in future forensic investigations.

  16. Boron nitride nanotube based nanosensor for acetone adsorption: a DFT simulation.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Masoud Darvish; Rezvani, Mahyar

    2013-03-01

    We have investigated the adsorption properties of acetone on zigzag single-walled BNNTs using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results obtained show that acetone is strongly bound to the outer surface of a (5,0) BNNT on the top site directly above the boron atom, with a binding energy of -96.16 kJ mol(-1) and a B-O binding distance of 1.654 Å. Our first-principles calculations also predict that the ability of zigzag BNNTs to adsorb acetone is significantly stronger than the corresponding ability of zigzag CNTs. A comparative investigation of BNNTs with different diameters indicated that the ability of the side walls of the tubes to adsorb acetone decreases significantly for nanotubes with larger diameters. Furthermore, the stability of the most stable acetone/BNNT complex was tested using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation at room temperature. PMID:23179768

  17. Quantum magnetic deflagration in acetate.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Mínguez, A; Hernandez, J M; Macià, F; García-Santiago, A; Tejada, J; Santos, P V

    2005-11-18

    We report controlled ignition of magnetization reversal avalanches by surface acoustic waves in a single crystal of acetate. Our data show that the speed of the avalanche exhibits maxima on the magnetic field at the tunneling resonances of Mn(12). Combined with the evidence of magnetic deflagration in Mn(12) acetate, this suggests a novel physical phenomenon: deflagration assisted by quantum tunneling. PMID:16384178

  18. Quantum magnetic deflagration in acetate.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Mínguez, A; Hernandez, J M; Macià, F; García-Santiago, A; Tejada, J; Santos, P V

    2005-11-18

    We report controlled ignition of magnetization reversal avalanches by surface acoustic waves in a single crystal of acetate. Our data show that the speed of the avalanche exhibits maxima on the magnetic field at the tunneling resonances of Mn(12). Combined with the evidence of magnetic deflagration in Mn(12) acetate, this suggests a novel physical phenomenon: deflagration assisted by quantum tunneling.

  19. An acetone bio-sniffer (gas phase biosensor) enabling assessment of lipid metabolism from exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ming; Chien, Po-Jen; Toma, Koji; Arakawa, Takahiro; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2015-11-15

    Several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released from human breath or skin. Like chemical substances in blood or urine, some of these vapors can provide valuable information regarding the state of the human body. A highly sensitive acetone biochemical gas sensor (bio-sniffer) was developed and used to measure exhaled breath acetone concentration, and assess lipid metabolism based on breath acetone analysis. A fiber-optic biochemical gas sensing system was constructed by attaching a flow-cell with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH) immobilized membrane onto a fiber-optic NADH measurement system. The NADH measurement system utilizes an ultraviolet-light emitting diode with peak emission of 335 nm as an excitation light source. NADH is consumed by the enzymatic reaction of S-ADH, and the consumption is proportional to the concentration of acetone vapor. Phosphate buffer which contained NADH was circulated into the flow-cell to rinse products and the excessive substrates from the optode. The change of fluorescent emitted from NADH is analyzed by the PMT. Hence, fluorescence intensity decreased as the acetone concentration increased. The relationship between fluorescence intensity and acetone concentration was identified from 20 ppb to 5300 ppb. This interval included the concentration of acetone vapor in the breath of healthy people and those suffering from disorders of carbohydrate metabolism. Finally, the acetone bio-sniffer was used to measure breath acetone during an exercise stress test on an ergometer after a period of fasting. The concentration of acetone in breath was shown to significantly increase after exercise. This biosensor allows rapid, highly sensitive and selective measurement of lipid metabolism.

  20. An acetone bio-sniffer (gas phase biosensor) enabling assessment of lipid metabolism from exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ming; Chien, Po-Jen; Toma, Koji; Arakawa, Takahiro; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2015-11-15

    Several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released from human breath or skin. Like chemical substances in blood or urine, some of these vapors can provide valuable information regarding the state of the human body. A highly sensitive acetone biochemical gas sensor (bio-sniffer) was developed and used to measure exhaled breath acetone concentration, and assess lipid metabolism based on breath acetone analysis. A fiber-optic biochemical gas sensing system was constructed by attaching a flow-cell with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH) immobilized membrane onto a fiber-optic NADH measurement system. The NADH measurement system utilizes an ultraviolet-light emitting diode with peak emission of 335 nm as an excitation light source. NADH is consumed by the enzymatic reaction of S-ADH, and the consumption is proportional to the concentration of acetone vapor. Phosphate buffer which contained NADH was circulated into the flow-cell to rinse products and the excessive substrates from the optode. The change of fluorescent emitted from NADH is analyzed by the PMT. Hence, fluorescence intensity decreased as the acetone concentration increased. The relationship between fluorescence intensity and acetone concentration was identified from 20 ppb to 5300 ppb. This interval included the concentration of acetone vapor in the breath of healthy people and those suffering from disorders of carbohydrate metabolism. Finally, the acetone bio-sniffer was used to measure breath acetone during an exercise stress test on an ergometer after a period of fasting. The concentration of acetone in breath was shown to significantly increase after exercise. This biosensor allows rapid, highly sensitive and selective measurement of lipid metabolism. PMID:26079672

  1. [Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles]. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Zinder, S.H.

    1994-02-01

    Acetate is the precursor of approximately two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors and many other methanogenic habitats. Besides their intrinsic interest, thermophilic acetotrophic methanogenic cultures usually grow at least twice as fast as their mesophilic counterparts, making them more amenable to study. In recent years, attention has been mainly focused on the thermophilic acetate utilizing methanogen Methanothrix strain CALS-1. Methanothrix, also called Methanosaeta, is one of only two methanogenic genera known to convert acetate to methane, the other being Methanosarcina. The faster-growing more versatile Methanosarcina has been better studied. However, when one examines anaerobic digestor contents, Methanothrix is often the dominant acetate-utilizing methanogen. As described in previous progress reports, the authors have achieved methanogenesis from acetate in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strain CALS-1 grown in a pH auxostat. Using these cell extracts, specific activities for methanogenesis from acetate and ATP of 100--300 nmol/min were routinely obtained, levels comparable to the rate in whole cells, which is not usually the case in methanogenic extracts. Recently obtained results are given and discussed for the following: Methanogenesis in crude extracts; Role of the cell membrane in methanogenesis from acetate; Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase; Novel thermophilic cultures converting acetate to methane; and Methanol-utilizing methanogen.

  2. Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren; Xiaoming

    2003-07-22

    A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

  3. Formation of halogenated acetones in the lower troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattler, Tobias; Wittmer, Julian; Krause, Torsten; Schöler, Heinz Friedrich; Kamilli, Katharina; Held, Andreas; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Ofner, Johannes; Atlas, Elliot

    2015-04-01

    Western Australia is a semi-/arid region that is heavily influenced by climate change and agricultural land use. The area is known for its saline lakes with a wide range of hydrogeochemical parameters and consists of ephemeral saline and saline groundwater fed lakes with a pH range from 2.5 to 7.1. In 2012 a novel PTFE-chamber was setup directly on the lakes. The 1.5 m³ cubic chamber was made of UV transparent PTFE foil to permit photochemistry while preventing dilution of the air due to lateral wind transport. This experimental setup allows linking measured data directly to the chemistry of and above the salt lakes. Air samples were taken using stainless steel canisters and measured by GC-MS/ECD. Sediment, crust and water samples were taken for investigation of potential VOC and VOX emissions in the laboratory using GC-MS. Several lakes were investigated and canister samples were taken over the day to see diurnal variations. The first samples were collected at 6 a.m. and from this time every 2 hours a canister was filled with chamber air. Concentrations of chloroacetone up to 15 ppb and of bromoacetone up to 40 ppb in the air samples were detected. The concentrations vary over the day and display their highest values around noon. Soil and water samples showed a variety of highly volatile and semi-volatile VOC/VOX but no halogenated acetones. An abiotic formation of these VOC/VOX seems conclusive due to iron-catalysed reactions below the salt crust [1]. The salt crust is the interface through which VOC/VOX pass from soil/groundwater to the atmosphere where they were photochemically altered. This explains the finding of halo acetones only in the air samples and not in water and soil samples measured in the laboratory. The main forming pathway for these haloacetones is the direct halogenation due to atomic chlorine and bromine above the salt lakes [2]. A minor pathway is the atmospheric degradation of chloropropane and bromopropane [3]. These halopropanes were found

  4. Acetone and Water on TiO₂ (110): Competition for Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2005-04-12

    The competitive interaction between acetone and water for surface sites on TiO? (110) was examined using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Two surface pretreatment methods were employed, one involving vacuum reduction of the surface by annealing at 850 K in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) and another involving surface oxidation with molecular oxygen. In the former case the surface possessed about 7% oxygen vacancy sites and in the latter reactive oxygen species (adatoms and molecules) were deposited on the surface as a result of oxidative filling of vacancy sites. On the reduced surface, excess water displaced all but about 20% of a saturated d6-acetone first layer to physisorbed desorption states, whereas about 40% of the first layer d6-acetone was stabilized on the oxidized surface against displacement by water through a reaction between oxygen and d6-acetone. The displacement of acetone on both surface is explained in terms of the relative desorption energies of each molecule on the clean surface and role of intermolecular repulsions in shifting their respective desorption features to lower temperatures with increasing coverage. Although first layer water desorbs from TiO? (110) at slightly lower temperature (275 K) than submonolayer coverages of d6-acetone (340 K), intermolecular repulsions between d6-acetone molecules shift its leading edge for desorption to 170 K as the first layer is saturated In contrast, the desorption leading edge for first layer water (with or without coadsorbed d6-acetone) was at 210 K. This small difference in the onsets for d6-acetone and water desorption resulted in the majority of d6-acetone being compressed into islands by water and eventually displaced from the first layer when excess water was adsorbed. On the oxidized surface the species resulting from reaction of d6-acetone and oxygen was not influence by increasing water coverages. This species was stable on the clean surface up to 375 K (well past the first layer water TPD

  5. A Portable Real-Time Ringdown Breath Acetone Analyzer: Toward Potential Diabetic Screening and Management.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chenyu; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Zhennan; Chen, Zhuying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2016-07-30

    Breath analysis has been considered a suitable tool to evaluate diseases of the respiratory system and those that involve metabolic changes, such as diabetes. Breath acetone has long been known as a biomarker for diabetes. However, the results from published data by far have been inconclusive regarding whether breath acetone is a reliable index of diabetic screening. Large variations exist among the results of different studies because there has been no "best-practice method" for breath-acetone measurements as a result of technical problems of sampling and analysis. In this mini-review, we update the current status of our development of a laser-based breath acetone analyzer toward real-time, one-line diabetic screening and a point-of-care instrument for diabetic management. An integrated standalone breath acetone analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique has been developed. The instrument was validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The linear fittings suggest that the obtained acetone concentrations via both methods are consistent. Breath samples from each individual subject under various conditions in total, 1257 breath samples were taken from 22 Type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, 312 Type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, which is one of the largest numbers of T2D subjects ever used in a single study, and 52 non-diabetic healthy subjects. Simultaneous blood glucose (BG) levels were also tested using a standard diabetic management BG meter. The mean breath acetone concentrations were determined to be 4.9 ± 16 ppm (22 T1D), and 1.5 ± 1.3 ppm (312 T2D), which are about 4.5 and 1.4 times of the one in the 42 non-diabetic healthy subjects, 1.1 ± 0.5 ppm, respectively. A preliminary quantitative correlation (R = 0.56, p < 0.05) between the mean individual breath acetone concentration and the mean individual BG levels does exist in 20 T1D subjects with no ketoacidosis. No direct correlation is observed in T1D subjects, T2D

  6. A Portable Real-Time Ringdown Breath Acetone Analyzer: Toward Potential Diabetic Screening and Management.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chenyu; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Zhennan; Chen, Zhuying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2016-01-01

    Breath analysis has been considered a suitable tool to evaluate diseases of the respiratory system and those that involve metabolic changes, such as diabetes. Breath acetone has long been known as a biomarker for diabetes. However, the results from published data by far have been inconclusive regarding whether breath acetone is a reliable index of diabetic screening. Large variations exist among the results of different studies because there has been no "best-practice method" for breath-acetone measurements as a result of technical problems of sampling and analysis. In this mini-review, we update the current status of our development of a laser-based breath acetone analyzer toward real-time, one-line diabetic screening and a point-of-care instrument for diabetic management. An integrated standalone breath acetone analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique has been developed. The instrument was validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The linear fittings suggest that the obtained acetone concentrations via both methods are consistent. Breath samples from each individual subject under various conditions in total, 1257 breath samples were taken from 22 Type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, 312 Type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, which is one of the largest numbers of T2D subjects ever used in a single study, and 52 non-diabetic healthy subjects. Simultaneous blood glucose (BG) levels were also tested using a standard diabetic management BG meter. The mean breath acetone concentrations were determined to be 4.9 ± 16 ppm (22 T1D), and 1.5 ± 1.3 ppm (312 T2D), which are about 4.5 and 1.4 times of the one in the 42 non-diabetic healthy subjects, 1.1 ± 0.5 ppm, respectively. A preliminary quantitative correlation (R = 0.56, p < 0.05) between the mean individual breath acetone concentration and the mean individual BG levels does exist in 20 T1D subjects with no ketoacidosis. No direct correlation is observed in T1D subjects, T2D

  7. A Portable Real-Time Ringdown Breath Acetone Analyzer: Toward Potential Diabetic Screening and Management

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chenyu; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Zhennan; Chen, Zhuying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2016-01-01

    Breath analysis has been considered a suitable tool to evaluate diseases of the respiratory system and those that involve metabolic changes, such as diabetes. Breath acetone has long been known as a biomarker for diabetes. However, the results from published data by far have been inconclusive regarding whether breath acetone is a reliable index of diabetic screening. Large variations exist among the results of different studies because there has been no “best-practice method” for breath-acetone measurements as a result of technical problems of sampling and analysis. In this mini-review, we update the current status of our development of a laser-based breath acetone analyzer toward real-time, one-line diabetic screening and a point-of-care instrument for diabetic management. An integrated standalone breath acetone analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique has been developed. The instrument was validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The linear fittings suggest that the obtained acetone concentrations via both methods are consistent. Breath samples from each individual subject under various conditions in total, 1257 breath samples were taken from 22 Type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, 312 Type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, which is one of the largest numbers of T2D subjects ever used in a single study, and 52 non-diabetic healthy subjects. Simultaneous blood glucose (BG) levels were also tested using a standard diabetic management BG meter. The mean breath acetone concentrations were determined to be 4.9 ± 16 ppm (22 T1D), and 1.5 ± 1.3 ppm (312 T2D), which are about 4.5 and 1.4 times of the one in the 42 non-diabetic healthy subjects, 1.1 ± 0.5 ppm, respectively. A preliminary quantitative correlation (R = 0.56, p < 0.05) between the mean individual breath acetone concentration and the mean individual BG levels does exist in 20 T1D subjects with no ketoacidosis. No direct correlation is observed in T1D subjects, T

  8. Conditioned Place Preference to Acetone Inhalation and the Effects on Locomotor Behavior and 18FDG Uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, J.C.; Dewey, S.L.; Schiffer, W.; Lee, D.

    2006-01-01

    Acetone is a component in many inhalants that have been widely abused. While other solvents have addictive potential, such as toluene, it is unclear whether acetone alone contains addictive properties. The locomotor, relative glucose metabolism and abusive effects of acetone inhalation were studied in animals using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm and [18F]2-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (18FDG) imaging. The CPP apparatus contains two distinct conditioning chambers and a middle adaptation chamber, each lined with photocells to monitor locomotor activity. Adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats (n=16; 90-110 g) were paired with acetone in least preferred conditioning chamber, determined on the pretest day. The animals were exposed to a 10,000 ppm dose for an hour, alternating days with air. A CPP test was conducted after the 3rd, 6th and 12th pairing. In these same animals, the relative glucose metabolism effects were determined using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18FDG. Following the 3rd pairing, there was a significant aversion to the acetone paired chamber (190.9 ± 13.7 sec and 241.7 ± 16.9 sec, acetone and air, respectively). After the 6th pairing, there was no significant preference observed with equal time spent in each chamber (222 ± 21 sec and 207 ± 20 sec, acetone and air-paired, respectively). A similar trend was observed after the 12th pairing (213 ± 21 sec and 221 ± 22 sec, acetone and air-paired, respectively). Locomotor analysis indicated a significant decrease (p<0.05) from air pairings to acetone pairings on the first and sixth pairings. The observed locomotor activity was characteristic of central nervous system (CNS) depressants, without showing clear abusive effects in this CPP model. In these studies, acetone vapors were not as reinforcing as other solvents, shown by overall lack of preference for the acetone paired side of the chamber. PET imaging indicated a regionally specific distribution of 18FDG uptake following

  9. Acidification of methanol-fed anaerobic granular sludge bioreactors by cobalt deprivation: Induction and microbial community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fermoso, Fernando G; Collins, Gavin; Bartacek, Jan; O'Flaherty, Vincent; Lens, Piet

    2008-01-01

    The acidification of mesophilic (30 degrees C) methanol-fed upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors induced by cobalt deprivation from the influent was investigated by coupling the reactor performance (pH 7.0; organic loading rate 4.5 g COD . L(-1) . d(-1)) to the microbial ecology of the bioreactor sludge. The latter was investigated by specific methanogenic activity (SMA) measurements and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to quantify the abundance of key organisms over time. This study hypothesized that under cobalt limiting conditions, the SMA on methanol of the sludge gradually decreases, which ultimately results in methanol accumulation in the reactor effluent. Once the methanol accumulation surpasses a threshold value (about 8.5 mM for the sludge investigated), reactor acidification occurs because acetogens outcompete methylothrophic methanogens at these elevated methanol concentrations. Methanogens present in granular sludge at the time of the acidification do not use methanol as the direct substrate and are unable to degrade acetate. Methylotrophic/acetoclastic methanogenic activity was found to be lost within 10 days of reactor operation, coinciding with the disappearance of the Methanosarcina population. The loss of SMA on methanol can thus be used as an accurate parameter to predict reactor acidification of methanol-fed UASB reactors operating under cobalt limiting conditions.

  10. Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2001-10-02

    The fuel utilization of a direct methanol fuel cell is enhanced for improved cell efficiency. Distribution plates at the anode and cathode of the fuel cell are configured to distribute reactants vertically and laterally uniformly over a catalyzed membrane surface of the fuel cell. A conductive sheet between the anode distribution plate and the anodic membrane surface forms a mass transport barrier to the methanol fuel that is large relative to a mass transport barrier for a gaseous hydrogen fuel cell. In a preferred embodiment, the distribution plate is a perforated corrugated sheet. The mass transport barrier may be conveniently increased by increasing the thickness of an anode conductive sheet adjacent the membrane surface of the fuel cell.

  11. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source.

  12. Determination of acetone and methyl ethyl ketone in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tai, D.Y.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical procedures for the determination of acetone and methyl ethyl ketone in water samples were developed. Concentrations in the milligram-per-liter range were determined by injecting an aqueous sample into the analysis system through an injection port, trapping the organics on Tenax-GC at room temperature, and thermally desorbing the organics into a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector for analysis. Concentrations in the microgram-per-liter range were determined by sweeping the headspace vapors over a water sample at 50C, trapping on Tenax-GC, and thermally desorbing the organics into the gas chromatograph. The precision for two operators of the milligram-per-liter concentration procedure, expressed as the coefficient of variation, was generally less than 2 percent for concentrations ranging from 16 to 160 milligrams per liter. The precision from two operators of the microgram-per-liter concentration procedure was between 2 and 4 percent for concentrations of 20 and 60 micrograms per liter. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Biochemical activities of acetone extracts of Hyssopus angustifolius.

    PubMed

    Alinezhad, Heshmatollah; Baharfar, Robabeh; Zare, Mahboobeh; Azimi, Razieh; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidant and antihemolytic activities of acetone extracts of Hyssopus angustifolius flowers, leaf and stems were investigated employing different in vitro and ex vivo assay systems. IC50, for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity were 239.4 +/- 8.4 microg/mL for flowers, 357.8 +/- 11.1 microg/mL for stems and 182.5 +/- 7.5 microg/mL for leaf. All extracts showed moderate nitric oxide scavenging activity. The leaf extract exhibited better hydrogen peroxide scavenging and Fe2+ chelating activity than the others (IC50 were 261.0 +/- 6.2 microg/mL for hydrogen peroxide and 534.0 +/- 9.9 microg/mL for Fe3+ chelating activity). The extracts exhibited good antioxidant activity in linoleic acid peroxidation system and weak reducing power ability. The leaf extract showed better antihemolytic activity than the flower and stem (IC50 = 65.7 +/- 1.8 microg/mL).

  14. Derivatization reaction-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detection of trace acetone.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Chen, Zhuo; Zheng, Chengbin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Hou, Xiandeng; Wu, Li; Tian, Yunfei

    2016-08-01

    A facile method was developed for determination of trace volatile acetone by coupling a derivatization reaction to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). With iodide modified Ag nanoparticles (Ag IMNPs) as the SERS substrate, acetone without obvious Raman signal could be converted to SERS-sensitive species via a chemical derivatization reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH). In addition, acetone can be effectively separated from liquid phase with a purge-sampling device and then any serious interference from sample matrices can be significantly reduced. The optimal conditions for the derivatization reaction and the SERS analysis were investigated in detail, and the selectivity and reproducibility of this method were also evaluated. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for acetone was 5mgL(-1) or 0.09mM (3σ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 80mgL(-1) acetone (n=9) was 1.7%. This method was successfully used for the determination of acetone in artificial urine and human urine samples with spiked recoveries ranging from 92% to 110%. The present method is convenient, sensitive, selective, reliable and suitable for analysis of trace acetone, and it could have a promising clinical application in early diabetes diagnosis. PMID:27216660

  15. Adsorption and Reaction of Acetone over CeOX(111) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Gordon, Wesley O; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2009-01-01

    This study reports the interaction of acetone (CH3COCH3), the simplest ketone, with well ordered CeO2(111) thin film surfaces. The fully oxidized CeO2(111) surface shows a weak interaction with acetone with the sole desorption product (TPD) being acetone at 210 K. The chemisorbed molecule binds to the surface as the ?1-acetone species rather than through a bridge-bonded dioxy-configuration. Exposure of a CeO2(111) surface to acetone at 600K removes oxygen as CO and results in the conversion of Ce4+ to Ce3+. Acetone chemisorbs strongly on reduced CeO2-x(111) with molecular acetone desorbing near 500 K. Decomposition also occurs with H2 desorbing between 450 and 600 K and C reacting with O in the ceria to desorb above 650 K. A stable species exists from 200 to 500 K on the reduced surface that has three unique types of C. High resolution C 1s XPS spectra indicate these are Ce-CH2, C-CH3 and C-O species. C k-edge NEXAFS indicates the presence of C{double_bond}C and C{double_bond}O bonds. It is postulated that the intermediate is a carbanion bonded through both O and C atoms to Ce cations.

  16. Derivatization reaction-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detection of trace acetone.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Chen, Zhuo; Zheng, Chengbin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Hou, Xiandeng; Wu, Li; Tian, Yunfei

    2016-08-01

    A facile method was developed for determination of trace volatile acetone by coupling a derivatization reaction to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). With iodide modified Ag nanoparticles (Ag IMNPs) as the SERS substrate, acetone without obvious Raman signal could be converted to SERS-sensitive species via a chemical derivatization reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH). In addition, acetone can be effectively separated from liquid phase with a purge-sampling device and then any serious interference from sample matrices can be significantly reduced. The optimal conditions for the derivatization reaction and the SERS analysis were investigated in detail, and the selectivity and reproducibility of this method were also evaluated. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for acetone was 5mgL(-1) or 0.09mM (3σ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 80mgL(-1) acetone (n=9) was 1.7%. This method was successfully used for the determination of acetone in artificial urine and human urine samples with spiked recoveries ranging from 92% to 110%. The present method is convenient, sensitive, selective, reliable and suitable for analysis of trace acetone, and it could have a promising clinical application in early diabetes diagnosis.

  17. Adsorption and Reaction of Acetone over CeOx(111) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Senanayake, S.; Gordon, W; Overbury, S; Mullins, D

    2009-01-01

    This study reports the interaction of acetone (CH{sub 3}COCH{sub 3}), the simplest ketone, with well ordered CeO2(111) thin film surfaces. The fully oxidized CeO{sub 2}(111) surface shows a weak interaction with acetone with the sole desorption product (TPD) being acetone at 210 K. The chemisorbed molecule binds to the surface as the 1-acetone species rather than through a bridge-bonded dioxy-configuration. Exposure of a CeO{sub 2}(111) surface to acetone at 600K removes oxygen as CO and results in the conversion of Ce{sup 4+} to Ce{sup 3+}. Acetone chemisorbs strongly on reduced CeO{sub 2-x}(111) with molecular acetone desorbing near 500 K. Decomposition also occurs with H{sub 2} desorbing between 450 and 600 K and C reacting with O in the ceria to desorb above 650 K. A stable species exists from 200 to 500 K on the reduced surface that has three unique types of C. High resolution C 1s XPS spectra indicate these are Ce-CH{sub 2}, C-CH{sub 3} and C-O species. C k-edge NEXAFS indicates the presence of C{double_bond}C and C{double_bond}O bonds. It is postulated that the intermediate is a carbanion bonded through both O and C atoms to Ce cations.

  18. A cross-sectional study of breath acetone based on diabetic metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenwen; Liu, Yong; Lu, Xiaoyong; Huang, Yanping; Liu, Yu; Cheng, Shouquan; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-02-26

    Breath acetone is a known biomarker for diabetes mellitus in breath analysis. In this work, a cross-sectional study of breath acetone based on clinical metabolic disorders of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was carried out. Breath acetone concentrations of 113 T2DM patients and 56 apparently healthy individuals were measured at a single time point. Concentrations varied from 0.22 to 9.41 ppmv (mean 1.75 ppmv) for T2DM, which were significantly higher than those for normal controls (ranged from 0.32 to 1.96 ppmv, mean 0.72 ppmv, p = 0.008). Observations in our work revealed that breath acetone concentrations elevated to different degrees, along with the abnormality of blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), triglyceride and cholesterol. Breath acetone showed obviously positive correlations with blood ketone and urine ketone. Possible metabolic relations between breath acetone and diabetic disorders were also discussed. This work aimed at giving an overall assessment of breath acetone from the perspective of clinical parameters for type 2 diabetes.

  19. Catalytic function of the mycobacterial binuclear iron monooxygenase in acetone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Nakao, Tomomi; Kino, Kuniki

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium smegmatis strain mc(2)155 and Mycobacterium goodii strain 12523 are able to grow on acetone and use it as a source of carbon and energy. We previously demonstrated by gene deletion analysis that the mimABCD gene cluster, which encodes a binuclear iron monooxygenase, plays an essential role in acetone metabolism in these mycobacteria. In the present study, we determined the catalytic function of MimABCD in acetone metabolism. Whole-cell assays were performed using Escherichia coli cells expressing the MimABCD complex. When the recombinant E. coli cells were incubated with acetone, a product was detected by gas chromatography (GC) analysis. Based on the retention time and the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) spectrum, the reaction product was identified as acetol (hydroxyacetone). The recombinant E. coli cells produced 1.02 mM of acetol from acetone within 24 h. Furthermore, we demonstrated that MimABCD also was able to convert methylethylketone (2-butanone) to 1-hydroxy-2-butanone. Although it has long been known that microorganisms such as mycobacteria metabolize acetone via acetol, this study provides the first biochemical evidence for the existence of a microbial enzyme that catalyses the conversion of acetone to acetol.

  20. Interactions of ionic liquids and acetone: thermodynamic properties, quantum-chemical calculations, and NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Elia; Ferro, Victor R; Palomar, Jose; Ortega, Juan; Rodriguez, Juan Jose

    2013-06-20

    The interactions between ionic liquids (ILs) and acetone have been studied to obtain a further understanding of the behavior of their mixtures, which generally give place to an exothermic process, mutual miscibility, and negative deviation of Raoult's law. COSMO-RS was used as a suitable computational method to systematically analyze the excess enthalpy of IL-acetone systems (>300), in terms of the intermolecular interactions contributing to the mixture behavior. Spectroscopic and COSMO-RS results indicated that acetone, as a polar compound with strong hydrogen bond acceptor character, in most cases, establishes favorable hydrogen bonding with ILs. This interaction is strengthened by the presence of an acidic cation and an anion with dispersed charge and non-HB acceptor character in the IL. COSMO-RS predictions indicated that gas-liquid and vapor-liquid equilibrium data for IL-acetone systems can be finely tuned by the IL selection, that is, acting on the intermolecular interactions between the molecular and ionic species in the liquid phase. NMR measurements for IL-acetone mixtures at different concentrations were also carried out. Quantum-chemical calculations by using molecular clusters of acetone and IL species were finally performed. These results provided additional evidence of the main role played by hydrogen bonding in the behavior of systems containing ILs and HB acceptor compounds, such as acetone. PMID:23688030

  1. Protein precipitation of diluted samples in SDS-containing buffer with acetone leads to higher protein recovery and reproducibility in comparison with TCA/acetone approach.

    PubMed

    Santa, Cátia; Anjo, Sandra I; Manadas, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    Proteomic approaches are extremely valuable in many fields of research, where mass spectrometry methods have gained an increasing interest, especially because of the ability to perform quantitative analysis. Nonetheless, sample preparation prior to mass spectrometry analysis is of the utmost importance. In this work, two protein precipitation approaches, widely used for cleaning and concentrating protein samples, were tested and compared in very diluted samples solubilized in a strong buffer (containing SDS). The amount of protein recovered after acetone and TCA/acetone precipitation was assessed, as well as the protein identification and relative quantification by SWATH-MS yields were compared with the results from the same sample without precipitation. From this study, it was possible to conclude that in the case of diluted samples in denaturing buffers, the use of cold acetone as precipitation protocol is more favourable than the use of TCA/acetone in terms of reproducibility in protein recovery and number of identified and quantified proteins. Furthermore, the reproducibility in relative quantification of the proteins is even higher in samples precipitated with acetone compared with the original sample.

  2. Comment on "Can existing models quantitatively describe the mixing behavior of acetone with water" [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 124516 (2009)].

    PubMed

    Kang, Myungshim; Perera, Aurelien; Smith, Paul E

    2009-10-21

    A recent publication indicated that simulations of acetone-water mixtures using the KBFF model for acetone indicate demixing at mole fractions less than 0.28 of acetone, in disagreement with experiment and two previously published studies. Here, we indicate some inconsistancies in the current study which could help to explain these differences. PMID:20568888

  3. Techno-economic Analysis for the Thermochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol via Acetic Acid Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yunhua; Jones, Susanne B.

    2009-04-01

    Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications. As a widely available biomass form, lignocellulosic biomass can have a major impact on domestic transportation fuel supplies and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). This study performs a techno-economic analysis of the thermo chemical conversion of biomass to ethanol, through methanol and acetic acid, followed by hydrogenation of acetic acid to ethanol. The conversion of syngas to methanol and methanol to acetic acid are well-proven technologies with high conversions and yields. This study was undertaken to determine if this highly selective route to ethanol could provide an already established economically attractive route to ethanol. The feedstock was assumed to be wood chips at 2000 metric ton/day (dry basis). Two types of gasification technologies were evaluated: an indirectly-heated gasifier and a directly-heated oxygen-blown gasifier. Process models were developed and a cost analysis was performed. The carbon monoxide used for acetic acid synthesis from methanol and the hydrogen used for hydrogenation were assumed to be purchased and not derived from the gasifier. Analysis results show that ethanol selling prices are estimated to be $2.79/gallon and $2.81/gallon for the indirectly-heated gasifier and the directly-heated gasifier systems, respectively (1stQ 2008$, 10% ROI). These costs are above the ethanol market price for during the same time period ($1.50 - $2.50/gal). The co-production of acetic acid greatly improves the process economics as shown in the figure below. Here, 20% of the acetic acid is diverted from ethanol production and assumed to be sold as a co-product at the prevailing market prices ($0.40 - $0.60/lb acetic acid), resulting in competitive ethanol production costs.

  4. Evaluation of Tribulus terrestris Linn (Zygophyllaceae) acetone extract for larvicidal and repellence activity against mosquito vectors.

    PubMed

    Singh, S P; Raghavendra, K; Singh, R K; Mohanty, S S; Dash, A P

    2008-12-01

    Acetone extracts of leaves and seeds from the Tribulus terrestris (Zygophyllaceae) were tested against mature and immature different mosquito vectors under laboratory condition. The extract showed strong larvicidal, properties 100 per cent mortality in the 3rd-instar larvae was observed in the bioassays with An. culicifacies Giles species A, An. stephensi Liston, Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Aedes aegypti Linn, against 200 ppm of the leaf acetone extract and 100 ppm seed acetone extract. The LC50 values of leaf acetone extract estimated for 3rd-instars An. culicifacies species A, An. stephensi, Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti after 24 hour of exposure were 117, 124, 168 and 185 ppm respectively. The LC50 values of seed acetone extract estimated for 3rd-instars An. culicifacies species A, An. stephensi, Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti after 24 hour of exposure were 100, 72, 91 and 91 ppm respectively. It is confirmed from the LC50 values that the seed acetone extract of T. terrestris is more effective compared to leaf extracts. A significant (P<0.004) higher concentration of acetone extract leaf was required to kill equal number of larvae i.e. against acetone extract of seed. The seed acetone extract showed strong repellent activity against adults mosquitoes. Per cent protection obtained against Anopheles culicifacies species A 100% repellency in 1 h, 6 h; Anopheles stephensi 100% repellency in 0 h, 4 h, 6 h; and Culex quinquefasciatus 100% repellency in 0 h, 2 h, 4 h, at 10% concentration respectively. Against Deet- 2.5% An. culicifacies Giles species A has shown 100% repellency in 1 h, 2 h, 6 h, An. stephensi Liston 99% repellency in 4 h, and Culex quinquefasciatus Say has shown 100% repellency in 1 h, 2 h.

  5. Chronic effects of acetone on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) during early life-stage development

    SciTech Connect

    Mank, M.; Swigert, J.

    1995-12-31

    A 28-day post-hatch early life-stage development toxicity test was conducted to determine the chronic effects of acetone on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). In this study, less than 24-hour old fathead minnow embryos were exposed to 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mL acetone/L and a negative control for a 4-day pre-hatch period and 28 days following hatch. During the pre-hatch period, no adverse effects on embryo survival or hatching success were observed in any of the treatment groups tested when compared to the negative control. From completion of matching to test termination, fathead minnows exposed to 4.0 mL acetone/L, experienced reduced survival, a statistically significant reduction in growth and impairment of critical behavioral functions when compared to the negative control group. Growth of fathead minnows exposed to 2.0 mL acetone/L also experienced a statistically significant effect upon growth when compared to the negative control, however, survival and behavior were not affected during the post-hatch period. Survival, growth, and behavior of fathead minnows exposed to 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 mL acetone/L from hatching to test termination was comparable to the control group. The no observed effect concentration (NOEC) for fathead minnows exposed to acetone during early life-stage development was 1.0 mL acetone/L, and the lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) was 2.0 mL acetone/L. The maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC) was calculated to be 1.4 mL acetone/L.

  6. Evaluation of Tribulus terrestris Linn (Zygophyllaceae) acetone extract for larvicidal and repellence activity against mosquito vectors.

    PubMed

    Singh, S P; Raghavendra, K; Singh, R K; Mohanty, S S; Dash, A P

    2008-12-01

    Acetone extracts of leaves and seeds from the Tribulus terrestris (Zygophyllaceae) were tested against mature and immature different mosquito vectors under laboratory condition. The extract showed strong larvicidal, properties 100 per cent mortality in the 3rd-instar larvae was observed in the bioassays with An. culicifacies Giles species A, An. stephensi Liston, Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Aedes aegypti Linn, against 200 ppm of the leaf acetone extract and 100 ppm seed acetone extract. The LC50 values of leaf acetone extract estimated for 3rd-instars An. culicifacies species A, An. stephensi, Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti after 24 hour of exposure were 117, 124, 168 and 185 ppm respectively. The LC50 values of seed acetone extract estimated for 3rd-instars An. culicifacies species A, An. stephensi, Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti after 24 hour of exposure were 100, 72, 91 and 91 ppm respectively. It is confirmed from the LC50 values that the seed acetone extract of T. terrestris is more effective compared to leaf extracts. A significant (P<0.004) higher concentration of acetone extract leaf was required to kill equal number of larvae i.e. against acetone extract of seed. The seed acetone extract showed strong repellent activity against adults mosquitoes. Per cent protection obtained against Anopheles culicifacies species A 100% repellency in 1 h, 6 h; Anopheles stephensi 100% repellency in 0 h, 4 h, 6 h; and Culex quinquefasciatus 100% repellency in 0 h, 2 h, 4 h, at 10% concentration respectively. Against Deet- 2.5% An. culicifacies Giles species A has shown 100% repellency in 1 h, 2 h, 6 h, An. stephensi Liston 99% repellency in 4 h, and Culex quinquefasciatus Say has shown 100% repellency in 1 h, 2 h. PMID:19579717

  7. Selective methanol or formate production during continuous CO₂ fermentation by the acetogen biocatalysts engineered via integration of synthetic pathways using Tn7-tool.

    PubMed

    Tyurin, Michael; Kiriukhin, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Methanol-resistant mutant acetogen Clostridium sp. MT1424 originally producing only 365 mM acetate from CO₂/CO was engineered to eliminate acetate production and spore formation using Cre-lox66/lox71-system to power subsequent methanol production via expressing synthetic methanol dehydrogenase, formaldehyde dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase, three copies of each, assembled in cluster and integrated to chromosome using Tn7-based approach. Production of 2.2 M methanol was steady (p < 0.005) in single step fermentations of 20 % CO₂ + 80 % H₂ blend (v/v) 25 day runs each in five independent repeats. If the integrated cluster comprised only three copies of formate dehydrogenase the respective recombinants produced 95 mM formate (p < 0.005) under the same conditions. For commercialization, the suggested source of inorganic carbon would be CO₂ waste of IGCC power plant. Hydrogen may be produced in situ via powered by solar panels electrolysis.

  8. Selective methanol or formate production during continuous CO₂ fermentation by the acetogen biocatalysts engineered via integration of synthetic pathways using Tn7-tool.

    PubMed

    Tyurin, Michael; Kiriukhin, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Methanol-resistant mutant acetogen Clostridium sp. MT1424 originally producing only 365 mM acetate from CO₂/CO was engineered to eliminate acetate production and spore formation using Cre-lox66/lox71-system to power subsequent methanol production via expressing synthetic methanol dehydrogenase, formaldehyde dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase, three copies of each, assembled in cluster and integrated to chromosome using Tn7-based approach. Production of 2.2 M methanol was steady (p < 0.005) in single step fermentations of 20 % CO₂ + 80 % H₂ blend (v/v) 25 day runs each in five independent repeats. If the integrated cluster comprised only three copies of formate dehydrogenase the respective recombinants produced 95 mM formate (p < 0.005) under the same conditions. For commercialization, the suggested source of inorganic carbon would be CO₂ waste of IGCC power plant. Hydrogen may be produced in situ via powered by solar panels electrolysis. PMID:23519429

  9. Characteristics of acetone cluster ion beam for surface processing and modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryuto, H.; Kakumoto, Y.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H.

    2014-02-01

    An acetone cluster ion beam was produced by the adiabatic expansion method without using helium as a support gas. The cluster source for the production of ethanol clusters was replaced with that sealed with metal gaskets. The Laval nozzle for the production of ethanol clusters was also replaced with a stainless steel conical nozzle. The cluster size distributions of the acetone cluster ion beams had mean values approximately at 2 × 103 molecules and increased with source pressure. The typical beam current density of the acetone cluster ion beam was approximately 0.5 μA/cm2.

  10. Characteristics of acetone cluster ion beam for surface processing and modification.

    PubMed

    Ryuto, H; Kakumoto, Y; Takeuchi, M; Takaoka, G H

    2014-02-01

    An acetone cluster ion beam was produced by the adiabatic expansion method without using helium as a support gas. The cluster source for the production of ethanol clusters was replaced with that sealed with metal gaskets. The Laval nozzle for the production of ethanol clusters was also replaced with a stainless steel conical nozzle. The cluster size distributions of the acetone cluster ion beams had mean values approximately at 2 × 10(3) molecules and increased with source pressure. The typical beam current density of the acetone cluster ion beam was approximately 0.5 μA/cm(2).

  11. The direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Halpert, G.; Narayanan, S.R.; Frank, H.

    1995-08-01

    This presentation describes the approach and progress in the ARPA-sponsored effort to develop a Direct Methanol, Liquid-Feed Fuel Cell (DMLFFC) with a solid Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) for battery replacement in small portable applications. Using Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) developed by JPL and Giner, significant voltage was demonstrated at relatively high current densities. The DMLFFC utilizes a 3 percent aqueous solution of methanol that is oxidized directly in the anode (fuel) chamber and oxygen (air) in the cathode chamber to produce water and significant power. The only products are water and CO{sub 2}. The ARPA effort is aimed at replacing the battery in the BA 5590 military radio.

  12. Methanol production method and system

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Michael J.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    1984-01-01

    Ethanol is selectively produced from the reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the presence of a transition metal carbonyl catalyst. Methanol serves as a solvent and may be accompanied by a less volatile co-solvent. The solution includes the transition metal carbonyl catalysts and a basic metal salt such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal formate, carbonate or bicarbonate. A gas containing a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio, as is present in a typical gasifer product, is contacted with the solution for the preferential production of ethanol with minimal water as a byproduct. Fractionation of the reaction solution provides substantially pure ethanol product and allows return of the catalysts for reuse.

  13. Analgesic and Antipyretic Activities of Methanol Extract and Its Fraction from the Root of Schoenoplectus grossus

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Nirmal Kumar; Rahman, S. M. Abdur; Akbar, Mohammad Ahsanul

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to evaluate analgesic and antipyretic activities of the methanol extract and its different fractions from root of Schoenoplectus grossus using acetic acid induced writhing and radiant heat tail flick method of pain models in mice and yeast induced pyrexia in rats at the doses of 400 and 200 mg/kg. In acetic acid writhing test, the methanol extract, petroleum ether, and carbon tetrachloride fractions produced significant (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05) inhibition of writhing responses in dose dependent manner. The methanol extract at 400 and 200 mg/kg being more protective with 54% and 45.45% of inhibition compared to diclofenac sodium of 56% followed by petroleum ether fractions of 49.69% and 39.39% at the same doses. The extracts did not produce any significant antinociceptive activity in tail flick test except standard morphine. When studied on yeast induced pyrexia, methanol and petroleum ether fractions significantly lowered the rectal temperature time dependently in a manner similar to standard drug paracetamol and distinctly more significant (P < 0.001) after second hour. These findings suggest that the root extracts of S. grossus possess significant peripherally acting analgesic potential and antipyretic property. The phytochemical screening showed the presence of flavonoids, alkaloids, and tannins. PMID:26977173

  14. Withanolide artifacts formed in methanol.

    PubMed

    Cao, Cong-Mei; Zhang, Huaping; Gallagher, Robert J; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2013-11-22

    Methanol solutions of the main withanolides (6-8) naturally present in Physalis longifolia yielded five artificial withanolides (1-5), including three new compounds (1-3). Withanolides 1 and 2 were identified as intramolecular Michael addition derivatives, while withanolides 3-5 were the result of intermolecular Michael addition. A comprehensive literature investigation was conducted to identify potential withanolide Michael addition artifacts isolated from Solanaceous species to date.

  15. Role of nickel in high rate methanol degradation in anaerobic granular sludge bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Fermoso, Fernando G.; Collins, Gavin; Bartacek, Jan; O’Flaherty, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    The effect of nickel deprivation from the influent of a mesophilic (30°C) methanol fed upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor was investigated by coupling the reactor performance to the evolution of the Methanosarcina population of the bioreactor sludge. The reactor was operated at pH 7.0 and an organic loading rate (OLR) of 5–15 g COD l−1 day−1 for 191 days. A clear limitation of the specific methanogenic activity (SMA) on methanol due to the absence of nickel was observed after 129 days of bioreactor operation: the SMA of the sludge in medium with the complete trace metal solution except nickel amounted to 1.164 (±0.167) g CH4-COD g VSS−1 day−1 compared to 2.027 (±0.111) g CH4-COD g VSS−1 day−1 in a medium with the complete (including nickel) trace metal solution. The methanol removal efficiency during these 129 days was 99%, no volatile fatty acid (VFA) accumulation was observed and the size of the Methanosarcina population increased compared to the seed sludge. Continuation of the UASB reactor operation with the nickel limited sludge lead to incomplete methanol removal, and thus methanol accumulation in the reactor effluent from day 142 onwards. This methanol accumulation subsequently induced an increase of the acetogenic activity in the UASB reactor on day 160. On day 165, 77% of the methanol fed to the system was converted to acetate and the Methanosarcina population size had substantially decreased. Inclusion of 0.5 μM Ni (dosed as NiCl2) to the influent from day 165 onwards lead to the recovery of the methanol removal efficiency to 99% without VFA accumulation within 2 days of bioreactor operation. PMID:18247139

  16. Studies on methanol - oxidizing yeast. III. Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Volfová, O

    1975-01-01

    Oxidation of methanol, formaldehyde and formic acid was studied in cells and cell-free extract of the yeast Candida boidinii No. 11Bh. Methanol oxidase, an enzyme oxidizing methanol to formaldehyde, was formed inducibly after the addition of methanol to yeast cells. The oxidation of methanol by cell-free extract was dependent on the presence of oxygen and independent of any addition of nicotine-amide nucleotides. Temperature optimum for the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde was 35 degrees C, pH optimum was 8.5. The Km for methanol was 0.8mM. The cell-free extract exhibited a broad substrate specificity towards primary alcohols (C1--C6). The activity of methanol oxidase was not inhibited by 1mM KCN, EDTA or monoiodoacetic acid. The strongest inhibitory action was exerted by p-chloromercuribenzoate. Both the cells and the cell-free extract contained catalase which participated in the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde; the enzyme was constitutively formed by the yeast. The pH optimum for the degradation of H2O2 was in the same range as the optimum for methanol oxidation, viz. at 8.5. Catalase was more resistant to high pH than methanol oxidase. The cell-free extract contained also GSH-dependent NAD-formaldehyde dehydrogenase with Km = 0.29mM and NAD-formate dehydrogenase with Km = 55mM. PMID:240764

  17. Direct methanol fuel cell and system

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2004-10-26

    A fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and a polymer electrolyte membrane located between anode and cathode gas diffusion backings uses a methanol vapor fuel supply. A permeable polymer electrolyte membrane having a permeability effective to sustain a carbon dioxide flux equivalent to at least 10 mA/cm.sup.2 provides for removal of carbon dioxide produced at the anode by reaction of methanol with water. Another aspect of the present invention includes a superabsorpent polymer material placed in proximity to the anode gas diffusion backing to hold liquid methanol or liquid methanol solution without wetting the anode gas diffusion backing so that methanol vapor from the liquid methanol or liquid methanol-water solution is supplied to the membrane.

  18. Amidic and acetonic cryoprotectants improve cryopreservation of volvocine green algae.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, A; Nishii, I

    2012-01-01

    A number of volvocalean green algae species were subjected to a two-step cryopreservation protocol with various cryoprotectants. Potential cryoprotectants were methanol (DMSO), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N,N-dimethylacetamide, N-methylformamide, and hydroxyacetone (HA). We confirmed prior reports that MeOH was effective for cryopreserving Chlamydomonas, but did not work well for larger volvocaleans such as Volvox. In contrast, DMF and HA were effective for both unicellular and multicellular representatives. When we used a cold-inducible transposon to probe Southern blots of Volvox DNA samples taken before and after storage for one month in LN, we could detect no differences, indicating that the genome had remained relatively stable and that the transposon had not been induced by the cryopreservation procedure. We believe these methods will facilitate long-term storage of several volvocine algal species, including Volvox strains harboring transposon-induced mutations of developmental interest. PMID:22825787

  19. DFT study on the chemical sensitivity of C3N nanotubes toward acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Zargham

    2016-02-01

    Potential application of single-walled C3N nanotubes was investigated as chemical sensors for acetone molecules based on the density functional theory calculations. It was found that the pristine nanotube weakly adsorbs an acetone molecule with the adsorption energy of - 9.7 kcal/mol, and its electronic properties are not sensitive to this molecule. By replacing a C atom with a Si atom, the nanotube becomes a p-type semiconductor. The adsorption energy of the acetone molecule on the Si-doped nanotube becomes much more negative (Ead=-67.4 kcal/mol). The adsorption process leads to a sizable increase in the resistance of the Si-doped tube, thereby, it can show the presence of acetone molecule, creating an electronic signal. Also, the sensitivity of these devices can be controlled by the doping level of Si atoms. By increasing the number of dopant atoms from 1 to 4, the sensitivity is gradually increased.

  20. Preparation of spherical optical microresonators and their resonance spectra in air and gaseous acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matějec, Vlastimil; Todorov, Filip; Jelínek, Michal; Fibrich, Martin; Chomát, Miroslav; Kubeček, Vaclav; Barton, Ivo; Martan, Tomas; Berková, Daniela

    2012-02-01

    This paper deals with the preparation of spherical silica whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microresonators and with their resonance spectra measured in air and in acetone vapors. Spherical microresonators with a diameter ranging from 320 to 360 micrometers have been prepared by heating the tip of a silica fiber by a hydrogen-oxygen burner. Details of this preparation are shown on spherical and spheroidal microresonators. The prepared microspheres were excited by a fiber taper and their resonance spectra were measured and Q factors estimated. Changes in the resonance spectra of the microspheres due to their contact with acetone vapor heated to 55 °C or with liquid acetone have been observed. These changes are explained by interaction of acetone with silica and by temperature changes of the microspheres.

  1. [Selenazoles. XII. (1) Reaction of 4-(p-tolyl)-selenosemi-carbazides of acetic, benzoic, isonicotinic, nicotinic and picolinic acid with omega-acetophenone].

    PubMed

    Biliński, S; Bielak, L; Chmielewski, J; Marcewicz-Rojewska, B; Musik, I

    1989-01-01

    The cyclization of 4-(p-tolyl)-selenosemicarbazides of acetic, benzoic, isonicotinic, nicotinic and picolinic acids (Ia-e) with omega-bromoacetophenone was investigated in the medium of methanol (Method A) or in methanol in the presence of anhydrous sodium acetate (Method B). Acid hydrolysis of compounds IIf-i and IVa-c, e was studied. Results of UV and IR spectrometric measurements and of the in vitro microbiological studies are presented. In contradistinction to corresponding thiosemicarbazides, the change in N4 nitrogen atom basicity of the parent selenosemicarbazide I (pKa of p-toluidine = 5.1), in comparison to that of 4-phenyl-selenosemicarbazide (pKa of aniline = 4.63), proved to influence the equilibrium of the reaction with omega-bromoacetophenone only in the methanol medium without addition of anhydrous sodium acetate (Method A).

  2. Electrocatalytic reduction of acetone in a proton-exchange-membrane reactor: a model reaction for the electrocatalytic reduction of biomass.

    PubMed

    Green, Sara K; Tompsett, Geoffrey A; Kim, Hyung Ju; Bae Kim, Won; Huber, George W

    2012-12-01

    Acetone was electrocatalytically reduced to isopropanol in a proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) reactor on an unsupported platinum cathode. Protons needed for the reduction were produced on the unsupported Pt-Ru anode from either hydrogen gas or electrolysis of water. The current efficiency (the ratio of current contributing to the desired chemical reaction to the overall current) and reaction rate for acetone conversion increased with increasing temperature or applied voltage for the electrocatalytic acetone/water system. The reaction rate and current efficiency went through a maximum with respect to acetone concentration. The reaction rate for acetone conversion increased with increasing temperature for the electrocatalytic acetone/hydrogen system. Increasing the applied voltage for the electrocatalytic acetone/hydrogen system decreased the current efficiency due to production of hydrogen gas. Results from this study demonstrate the commercial feasibility of using PEM reactors to electrocatalytically reduce biomass-derived oxygenates into renewable fuels and chemicals. PMID:22961747

  3. Electrocatalytic reduction of acetone in a proton-exchange-membrane reactor: a model reaction for the electrocatalytic reduction of biomass.

    PubMed

    Green, Sara K; Tompsett, Geoffrey A; Kim, Hyung Ju; Bae Kim, Won; Huber, George W

    2012-12-01

    Acetone was electrocatalytically reduced to isopropanol in a proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) reactor on an unsupported platinum cathode. Protons needed for the reduction were produced on the unsupported Pt-Ru anode from either hydrogen gas or electrolysis of water. The current efficiency (the ratio of current contributing to the desired chemical reaction to the overall current) and reaction rate for acetone conversion increased with increasing temperature or applied voltage for the electrocatalytic acetone/water system. The reaction rate and current efficiency went through a maximum with respect to acetone concentration. The reaction rate for acetone conversion increased with increasing temperature for the electrocatalytic acetone/hydrogen system. Increasing the applied voltage for the electrocatalytic acetone/hydrogen system decreased the current efficiency due to production of hydrogen gas. Results from this study demonstrate the commercial feasibility of using PEM reactors to electrocatalytically reduce biomass-derived oxygenates into renewable fuels and chemicals.

  4. Evaluation of acetone vapors toxicity on Plodia interpunctella (Hubner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) eggs.

    PubMed

    Pourmirza, Ali Asghr; Nasab, Fershteh Sadeghi; Zadeh, Abas Hossein

    2007-08-01

    The efficacy of acetone vapors against carefully aged eggs of Plodia interpunctella (Hubner) at 17+/-1 and 27+/-1 degrees C at different dosage levels of acetone over various exposure times was determined. Acetone was found to be toxic to Indian meal moth eggs. Considerable variation in the susceptibility of different age groups of eggs was apparent in the fiducial limits of the LD50 values. An inverse relationship between LD50 values and exposure times was observed in age groups of tested eggs. At 27+/-1 degrees C and 24 h exposure period, eggs aged 1-2 day-old were more tolerant to acetone than other age groups, followed by 0-1 day-old, 2-3 day-old and 3-4 day-old eggs. A similar pattern of susceptibility of eggs was observed at 72 h exposure. In all bioassays, eggs exposed to higher dosages of acetone developed at smaller rate. This was significant for the eggs, which were exposed to the highest dosage for 24 h. Increasing the temperature from 17+/-1 to 27+/-1 degrees C greatly increased the efficacy of acetone. At 27+/-1 degrees C eggs of P. interpunctella were killed by less than one-third of the dosage required for control at 17+/-1 degrees C. Acetone achieved 50% mortality with a dosage of 82.76 mg L(-1) in 1-2 day-old eggs at 27+/-1 degrees C. At this temperature hatching was retarded and greatly diminished when eggs aged 1-2 day-old were exposed to 80 mg L(-1) of acetone for the 24 h exposure period. There was no evidence of a hatch delay longer than the time spent under vapors for eggs exposed at 17+/-1 or 27+/-1 degrees C, indicating that some development must have occurred under fumigation.

  5. Upper Bound for Neutron Emission from Sonoluminescing Bubbles in Deuterated Acetone

    SciTech Connect

    Camara, C. G.; Putterman, S. J.; Hopkins, S. D.; Suslick, K. S.

    2007-02-09

    An experimental search for nuclear fusion inside imploding bubbles of degassed deuterated acetone at 0 degree sign C driven by a 15 atm sound field and seeded with a neutron generator reveals an upper bound that is a factor of 10 000 less than the signal reported by Taleyarkhan et al. The strength of our upper bound is limited by the weakness of sonoluminescence, which we ascribe to the relatively high vapor pressure of acetone.

  6. The Marangoni convection induced by acetone desorption from the falling soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Yong; Li, Zhangyun; Wang, Yongyi; Huang, Jiali

    2012-05-01

    By means of the falling soap film tunnel and the Schlieren optical method, the Marangoni convection were observed directly in the immediate interfacial neighborhood during the desorption process of acetone from the falling soap film. Moreover, the hydraulic characteristics of the falling soap film tunnel, the acetone concentration, the surface tension of the soap liquid and the mass transfer has been investigated in details through the experimental or theoretical method.

  7. KI-catalyzed α-acyloxylation of acetone with carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya-Dong; Huang, Bei; Zhang, Yue-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Xu; Dai, Jian-Jun; Xu, Jun; Xu, Hua-Jian

    2016-07-01

    The KI-catalyzed reaction of acetone with aromatic carboxylic acids is achieved, leading to α-acyloxycarbonyl compounds in good to excellent yields under mild reaction conditions. The present method exhibits good functional-group compatibility. Notably, this reaction system is even suitable for cinnamic acid, 3-phenylpropiolic acid and 4-phenylbutanoic acid. A kinetic isotope effect (KIE) study indicates that C-H cleavage of the acetone is the rate-limiting step in the catalytic cycle. PMID:27251323

  8. Cellulose acetate from oil palm empty fruit bunch via a one step heterogeneous acetylation.

    PubMed

    Wan Daud, Wan Rosli; Djuned, Fauzi Muhammad

    2015-11-01

    Acetone soluble oil palm empty fruit bunch cellulose acetate (OPEFB-CA) of DS 2.52 has been successfully synthesized in a one-step heterogeneous acetylation of OPEFB cellulose without necessitating the hydrolysis stage. This has only been made possible by the mathematical modeling of the acetylation process by manipulating the variables of reaction time and acetic anhydride/cellulose ratio (RR). The obtained model was verified by experimental data with an error of less than 2.5%. NMR analysis showed that the distribution of the acetyl moiety among the three OH groups of cellulose indicates a preference at the C6 position, followed by C3 and C2. XRD revealed that OPEFB-CA is highly amorphous with a degree of crystallinity estimated to be ca. 6.41% as determined from DSC. The OPEFB-CA films exhibited good mechanical properties being their tensile strength and Young's modulus higher than those of the commercial CA. PMID:26256348

  9. Cellulose acetate from oil palm empty fruit bunch via a one step heterogeneous acetylation.

    PubMed

    Wan Daud, Wan Rosli; Djuned, Fauzi Muhammad

    2015-11-01

    Acetone soluble oil palm empty fruit bunch cellulose acetate (OPEFB-CA) of DS 2.52 has been successfully synthesized in a one-step heterogeneous acetylation of OPEFB cellulose without necessitating the hydrolysis stage. This has only been made possible by the mathematical modeling of the acetylation process by manipulating the variables of reaction time and acetic anhydride/cellulose ratio (RR). The obtained model was verified by experimental data with an error of less than 2.5%. NMR analysis showed that the distribution of the acetyl moiety among the three OH groups of cellulose indicates a preference at the C6 position, followed by C3 and C2. XRD revealed that OPEFB-CA is highly amorphous with a degree of crystallinity estimated to be ca. 6.41% as determined from DSC. The OPEFB-CA films exhibited good mechanical properties being their tensile strength and Young's modulus higher than those of the commercial CA.

  10. Metabolic methanol: molecular pathways and physiological roles.

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, Yuri L; Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V; Komarova, Tatiana V

    2015-04-01

    Methanol has been historically considered an exogenous product that leads only to pathological changes in the human body when consumed. However, in normal, healthy individuals, methanol and its short-lived oxidized product, formaldehyde, are naturally occurring compounds whose functions and origins have received limited attention. There are several sources of human physiological methanol. Fruits, vegetables, and alcoholic beverages are likely the main sources of exogenous methanol in the healthy human body. Metabolic methanol may occur as a result of fermentation by gut bacteria and metabolic processes involving S-adenosyl methionine. Regardless of its source, low levels of methanol in the body are maintained by physiological and metabolic clearance mechanisms. Although human blood contains small amounts of methanol and formaldehyde, the content of these molecules increases sharply after receiving even methanol-free ethanol, indicating an endogenous source of the metabolic methanol present at low levels in the blood regulated by a cluster of genes. Recent studies of the pathogenesis of neurological disorders indicate metabolic formaldehyde as a putative causative agent. The detection of increased formaldehyde content in the blood of both neurological patients and the elderly indicates the important role of genetic and biochemical mechanisms of maintaining low levels of methanol and formaldehyde.

  11. Adsorption study of acetone on acid-doped ice surfaces between 203 and 233 K.

    PubMed

    Journet, E; Le Calvé, S; Mirabel, Ph

    2005-07-28

    Adsorption studies of acetone on pure ice surfaces obtained by water freezing or deposition or on frozen ice surfaces doped either with HNO3 or H2SO4 have been performed using a coated wall flow tube coupled to a mass spectrometric detection. The experiments were conducted over the temperature range 203-233 K and freezing solutions containing either H2SO4 (0.2 N) or HNO3 (0.2-3 N). Adsorption of acetone on these ice surfaces was always found to be totally reversible whatever were the experimental conditions. The number of acetone molecules adsorbed per ice surface unit N was conventionally plotted as a function of acetone concentration in the gas phase. For the same conditions, the amount of acetone molecules adsorbed on pure ice obtained by deposition are about 3-4 times higher than those measured on frozen ice films, H2SO4-doped ice surfaces lead to results comparable to those obtained on pure ice. On the contrary, N increases largely with increasing concentrations of nitric acid in ice surfaces, up to about 300 times under our experimental conditions and for temperatures ranging between 213 and 233 K. Finally, the results are discussed and used to reestimate the partitioning of acetone between the ice and gas phases in clouds of the upper troposphere.

  12. 21 CFR 173.228 - Ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 1 (Ethyl Acetate; p. 372, 3d Ed., 1981), which are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethyl acetate. 173.228 Section 173.228 Food and..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.228 Ethyl acetate. Ethyl acetate (CAS Reg. No....

  13. 21 CFR 173.228 - Ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 1 (Ethyl Acetate; p. 372, 3d Ed., 1981), which are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethyl acetate. 173.228 Section 173.228 Food and..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.228 Ethyl acetate. Ethyl acetate (CAS Reg. No....

  14. 21 CFR 73.2396 - Lead acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lead acetate. 73.2396 Section 73.2396 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2396 Lead acetate. (a) Identity. The color additive lead acetate is the trihydrate of lead (2+) salt of acetic acid. The color additive has the chemical formula...

  15. 21 CFR 73.2396 - Lead acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lead acetate. 73.2396 Section 73.2396 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2396 Lead acetate. (a) Identity. The color additive lead acetate is the trihydrate of lead (2+) salt of acetic acid. The color additive has the chemical formula...

  16. 21 CFR 73.2396 - Lead acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lead acetate. 73.2396 Section 73.2396 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2396 Lead acetate. (a) Identity. The color additive lead acetate is the trihydrate of lead (2+) salt of acetic acid. The color additive has the chemical formula...

  17. 21 CFR 73.2396 - Lead acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lead acetate. 73.2396 Section 73.2396 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2396 Lead acetate. (a) Identity. The color additive lead acetate is the trihydrate of lead (2+) salt of acetic acid. The color additive has the chemical formula...

  18. 21 CFR 73.2396 - Lead acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lead acetate. 73.2396 Section 73.2396 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2396 Lead acetate. (a) Identity. The color additive lead acetate is the trihydrate of lead (2+) salt of acetic acid. The color additive has the chemical formula...

  19. Design and Operation of an Electrochemical Methanol Concentration Sensor for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T. I.; Chun, W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of a 150-Watt packaged power source based on liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells is being pursued currently at the Jet propulsion Laboratory for defense applications. In our studies we find that the concentration of methanol in the fuel circulation loop affects the electrical performance and efficiency the direct methanol fuel cell systems significantly. The practical operation of direct methanol fuel cell systems, therefore, requires accurate monitoring and control of methanol concentration. The present paper reports on the principle and demonstration of an in-house developed electrochemical sensor suitable for direct methanol fuel cell systems.

  20. Recent Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, the effects of methanol crossover and airflow rates on the cathode potential of an operating direct methanol fuel cell are explored. Techniques for quantifying methanol crossover in a fuel cell and for separating the electrical performance of each electrode in a fuel cell are discussed. The effect of methanol concentration on cathode potential has been determined to be significant. The cathode is found to be mass transfer limited when operating on low flow rate air and high concentrations of methanol. Improvements in cathode structure and operation at low methanol concentration have been shown to result in improved cell performance.

  1. Towards a methanol economy based on homogeneous catalysis: methanol to H2 and CO2 to methanol.

    PubMed

    Alberico, E; Nielsen, M

    2015-04-21

    The possibility to implement both the exhaustive dehydrogenation of aqueous methanol to hydrogen and CO2 and the reverse reaction, the hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol and water, may pave the way to a methanol based economy as part of a promising renewable energy system. Recently, homogeneous catalytic systems have been reported which are able to promote either one or the other of the two reactions under mild conditions. Here, we review and discuss these developments.

  2. Toxicity assessment and analgesic activity investigation of aqueous acetone extracts of Sida acuta Burn f . and Sida cordifolia L. (Malvaceae), medicinal plants of Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sida acuta Burn f. and Sida cordifolia L. (Malvaceae) are traditionally used in Burkina Faso to treat several ailments, mainly pains, including abdominal infections and associated diseases. Despite the extensive use of these plants in traditional health care, literature provides little information regarding their toxicity and the pharmacology. This work was therefore designed to investigate the toxicological effects of aqueous acetone extracts of Sida acuta Burn f. and Sida cordifolia L. Furthermore, their analgesic capacity was assessed, in order to assess the efficiency of the traditional use of these two medicinal plants from Burkina Faso. Method For acute toxicity test, mice were injected different doses of each extract by intraperitoneal route and the LD50 values were determined. For the subchronic toxicity evaluation, Wistar albinos rats were treated by gavage during 28 days at different doses of aqueous acetone extracts and then haematological and biochemical parameters were determined. The analgesic effect was evaluated in mice by the acetic-acid writhing test and by the formalin test. Results For the acute toxicity test, the LD50 values of 3.2 g/kg and 3.4 g/kg respectively for S. acuta Burn f. and S. cordifolia L. were obtained. Concerning the haematological and biochemical parameters, data varied widely (increase or decrease) according to dose of extracts and weight of rats and did not show clinical correlations. The extracts have produced significant analgesic effects by the acetic acid writhing test and by the hot plate method (p <0.05) and a dose-dependent inhibition was observed. Conclusion The overall results of this study may justify the traditional uses of S. acuta and S. cordifolia . PMID:22883637

  3. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food... GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be produced by...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid....

  6. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid....

  7. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid....

  8. Methods of conditioning direct methanol fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Cynthia; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2005-11-08

    Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer electrolyte membrane of the membrane electrode assembly to a cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, and an electrical current of polarity opposite to that in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is drawn through the membrane electrode assembly, wherein methanol is oxidized at the cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly while the catalyst on the anode surface is reduced. Surface oxides on the direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst of the membrane electrode assembly are thereby reduced.

  9. Propane Clathrate Hydrate Formation Accelerated by Methanol.

    PubMed

    Amtawong, Jaruwan; Guo, Jin; Hale, Jared S; Sengupta, Suvrajit; Fleischer, Everly B; Martin, Rachel W; Janda, Kenneth C

    2016-07-01

    The role of methanol as both an inhibitor and a catalyst for the formation of clathrate hydrates (CHs) has been a topic of intense study. We report a new quantitative study of the kinetics of propane CH formation at 253 K from the reaction of propane gas with <75 μm ice particles that have been doped with varying amounts of methanol. We find that methanol significantly accelerates the formation reaction with quite small doping quantities. Even for only 1 methanol molecule per 10 000 water molecules, the maximum uptake rate of propane into CHs is enhanced and the initiation pressure is reduced. These results enable more efficient production of CHs for gas storage. This remarkable acceleration of the CH formation reaction by small quantities of methanol may place constraints on the mechanism of the inhibition effect observed under other conditions, usually employing much larger quantities of methanol. PMID:27275862

  10. A novel process for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1992-01-28

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to conduct studies of the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol by a novel process. In previous reports, we provided evidence for a two step reaction in series: the carbonylation of methanol to methyl formate taking place in a non-equilibrium region in the vicinity of the copper chromite surface, and the hydrogenolysis of methyl formate to methanol taking place on the surface of the copper chromite. The synergism between the two catalysts enhances the rate of methanol formation. In this quarter, we tested several copper chromites (with different surface areas and stabilizing agents) on the rate of methanol synthesis. It seems likely that pore diffusion limitations control the hydrogenolysis reaction since the rate of methanol formation is proportional to the square root of the copper chromite surface area. Elemental analyses using Inductively Coupled Plasma analysis and pore size distribution analysis of copper chromite were carried out.

  11. Asymptomatic blood methanol in emergency room patients.

    PubMed

    Wargotz, E S; Werner, M

    1987-06-01

    Over a four-month period, methanol was found in the blood of 18 patients among 687 sequential emergency room admissions screened for alcohols by gas chromatography. In the patients with positive results, blood ethanol ranged from 6 to 570 mg/dL (1.3-123.7 mmol/L), blood methanol from 2.3 to 4.0 mg/dL (0.72-1.25 mmol/L). Methanol exposure during preparation of the sampling site or in the course of specimen handling, ingestion of denatured alcohol, as well as methanol production from the metabolism of aspartame are ruled out as causes for these findings. The authors conclude that endogenous methanol production is the probable major cause, while methanol as a fermentation congener may be a contributory minor cause.

  12. Acetone and Water on TiO₂(110): H/D Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2005-04-12

    Isotopic H/D exchange between coadsorbed acetone and water on the TiO?(110) surface was examined using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) as a function of coverage and two surface pretreatments (oxidation and reduction). Coadsorbed acetone and water interact repulsively on reduced TiO?(110) based on results from the companion paper to this study, with water exerting a greater influence in destabilizing acetone and acetone having only a nominal influence on water. Despite the repulsive interaction between these coadsorbates, about 0.02 ML of a 1 ML d6-acetone on the reduced surface exhibits H/D exchange with coadsorbed water, with the exchange occurring exclusively in the high temperature region of the d?-acetone TPD spectrum at {approx}340 K. The effect was confirmed with combinations of d?-acetone and D?O. The extent of exchange decreased on the reduced surface with water coverages above {approx}0.3 ML due to the ability of water to displace coadsorbed acetone from first layer sites to the multilayer. In contrast, the extent of exchange increased by a factor of 3 when the surface was pre-oxidized prior to coadsorption. In this case, there was no evidence for the negative influence of high water coverages on the extent of H/D exchange. Comparison of the TPD spectra from the exchange products (either d?- or d?-acetone depending on the coadsorption pairing) suggests that, in addition to the 340 K exchange process seen on the reduced surface, a second exchange process was observed on the oxidized surface at {approx}390 K. In both cases (oxidized and reduced), desorption of the H/D exchange products appeared to be reaction limited and to involve the influence of OH/OD groups (or water formed during recombinative desorption of OH/OD groups) instead of molecularly adsorbed water. The 340 K exchange process is assigned to reaction at step sites and the 390 K exchange process is attributed to the influence of oxygen adatoms deposited during surface oxidation. The H

  13. 40 CFR 721.10001 - 2-Ethoxyethanol, 2-ethoxyethanol acetate, 2-methoxyethanol, and 2-methoxyethanol acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... acetate, 2-methoxyethanol, and 2-methoxyethanol acetate. 721.10001 Section 721.10001 Protection of...-ethoxyethanol acetate, 2-methoxyethanol, and 2-methoxyethanol acetate. (a) Chemical substances and significant...-80-5), 2-ethoxyethanol acetate (CAS No. 111-15-9), 2-methoxyethanol (CAS No. 109-86-4), and...

  14. Method of steam reforming methanol to hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Beshty, Bahjat S.

    1990-01-01

    The production of hydrogen by the catalyzed steam reforming of methanol is accomplished using a reformer of greatly reduced size and cost wherein a mixture of water and methanol is superheated to the gaseous state at temperatures of about 800.degree. to about 1,100.degree. F. and then fed to a reformer in direct contact with the catalyst bed contained therein, whereby the heat for the endothermic steam reforming reaction is derived directly from the superheated steam/methanol mixture.

  15. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source. Water loss from the cell is minimized by making the conductive cathode assembly hydrophobic and the conductive anode assembly hydrophilic.

  16. Determination of residual acetone and acetone related impurities in drug product intermediates prepared as Spray Dried Dispersions (SDD) using gas chromatography with headspace autosampling (GCHS).

    PubMed

    Quirk, Emma; Doggett, Adrian; Bretnall, Alison

    2014-08-01

    Spray Dried Dispersions (SDD) are uniform mixtures of a specific ratio of amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and polymer prepared via a spray drying process. Volatile solvents are employed during spray drying to facilitate the formation of the SDD material. Following manufacture, analytical methodology is required to determine residual levels of the spray drying solvent and its associated impurities. Due to the high level of polymer in the SDD samples, direct liquid injection with Gas Chromatography (GC) is not a viable option for analysis. This work describes the development and validation of an analytical approach to determine residual levels of acetone and acetone related impurities, mesityl oxide (MO) and diacetone alcohol (DAA), in drug product intermediates prepared as SDDs using GC with headspace (HS) autosampling. The method development for these analytes presented a number of analytical challenges which had to be overcome before the levels of the volatiles of interest could be accurately quantified. GCHS could be used after two critical factors were implemented; (1) calculation and application of conversion factors to 'correct' for the reactions occurring between acetone, MO and DAA during generation of the headspace volume for analysis, and the addition of an equivalent amount of polymer into all reference solutions used for quantitation to ensure comparability between the headspace volumes generated for both samples and external standards. This work describes the method development and optimisation of the standard preparation, the headspace autosampler operating parameters and the chromatographic conditions, together with a summary of the validation of the methodology. The approach has been demonstrated to be robust and suitable to accurately determine levels of acetone, MO and DAA in SDD materials over the linear concentration range 0.008-0.4μL/mL, with minimum quantitation limits of 20ppm for acetone and MO, and 80ppm for DAA.

  17. Cobalt (II) chloride promoted formation of honeycomb patterned cellulose acetate films.

    PubMed

    Naboka, Olga; Sanz-Velasco, Anke; Lundgren, Per; Enoksson, Peter; Gatenholm, Paul

    2012-02-01

    CoCl(2) containing honeycomb patterned films were prepared from cellulose acetate (CA)/CoCl(2)/acetone solutions by the breath figure method in a wide range of humidities. Size and pore regularity depend on the CA/CoCl(2) molar ratio and humidity. When replacing CoCl(2) with Co(NO(3))(2) or CoBr(2), no formation of ordered porosity in the cellulose acetate films is observed. According to data from scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis (EDX), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, the key role in the formation of honeycomb structures can be attributed to the physical and chemical properties of CoCl(2) - hygroscopicity, low interaction with CA, and extraction from CA/CoCl(2)/acetone solution by water droplets condensed on the surface of the CA/CoCl(2) solution. Obtained films are prospective for using in catalysis, hydrogen fuel cells, and optical sensing materials.

  18. Analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid in Acetobacter: molecular mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria are used for industrial vinegar production because of their remarkable ability to oxidize ethanol and high resistance to acetic acid. Although several molecular machineries responsible for acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria have been reported, the entire mechanism that confers acetic acid resistance has not been completely understood. One of the promising methods to elucidate the entire mechanism is global analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Recently, two proteins whose production was greatly enhanced by acetic acid in Acetobacter aceti were identified to be aconitase and a putative ABC-transporter, respectively; furthermore, overexpression or disruption of the genes encoding these proteins affected acetic acid resistance in A. aceti, indicating that these proteins are involved in acetic acid resistance. Overexpression of each gene increased acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter, which resulted in an improvement in the productivity of acetic acid fermentation. Taken together, the results of the proteomic analysis and those of previous studies indicate that acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria is conferred by several mechanisms. These findings also provide a clue to breed a strain having high resistance to acetic acid for vinegar fermentation.

  19. Bioinduced Room-Temperature Methanol Reforming.

    PubMed

    Heim, Leo E; Thiel, Daniel; Gedig, Christian; Deska, Jan; Prechtl, Martin H G

    2015-08-24

    Imitating nature's approach in nucleophile-activated formaldehyde dehydrogenation, air-stable ruthenium complexes proved to be exquisite catalysts for the dehydrogenation of formaldehyde hydrate as well as for the transfer hydrogenation to unsaturated organic substrates at loadings as low as 0.5 mol %. Concatenation of the chemical hydrogen-fixation route with an oxidase-mediated activation of methanol gives an artificial methylotrophic in vitro metabolism providing methanol-derived reduction equivalents for synthetic hydrogenation purposes. Moreover, for the first time methanol reforming at room temperature was achieved on the basis of this bioinduced dehydrogenation path delivering hydrogen gas from aqueous methanol.

  20. Methanol-Resistant Oxygen-Reduction Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, A. K.; Raman, R. K.

    2003-08-01

    Methanol oxidation in the cathode compartment of the fuel cell, which occurs during the oxygen-reduction reaction on Pt-based cathodes, constitutes a significant performance loss in the direct methanol fuel cells. Over the past decade, four types of methanol-resistant oxygen-reduction catalysts have been developed to circumvent this problem. Among these, transition-metal chalcogenides, and in particular RuSe, have shown effective selectivity to oxygen-reduction reaction in the presence of methanol. These catalysts not only can enhance the performance of the conventional direct methanol fuel cells but also could provide a route to develop mixed-reactants direct methanol fuel cells, which could be highly cost-effective in comparison with the conventional direct methanol fuel cells. This article is a brief update on the preparation, characterization, and implications of methanol-resistant oxygen-reduction catalysts.

  1. Selective clean-up applicable to aqueous acetone extracts for the determination of carbendazim and thiabendazole in fruits and vegetables by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Di Muccio, A; Girolimetti, S; Attard Barbini, D; Pelosi, P; Generali, T; Vergori, L; De Merulis, G; Leonelli, A; Stefanelli, P

    1999-02-12

    Fungicide residues in vegetables (benomyl, carbendazim, thiabendazole) are analyzed through a clean-up procedure that uses a portion of the aqueous acetone extract prepared for multiresidue methodology. A portion of the aqueous acetone extract (equivalent to 5 g of vegetables) is loaded onto an Extrelut-20 cartridge (the cartridge is filled with a coarse, large-pore diatomaceous material). Then, acetone is partially removed by an upward stream of nitrogen at 2l/min for 30 min. Benzimidazolic fungicides are recovered by percolating the cartridge with 100 ml of 0.1 M phosphoric acid solution, which also serves to convert benomyl to carbendazim. The percolating acid solution is drained on-line through a strong cation-exchange (SCX) solid-phase extraction cartridge with the aid of a slight vacuum. Benzimidazolic fungicides are retained on the SCX cartridge. The phosphoric acid solution is discarded together with the washings of the SCX cartridge, i.e., water followed by methanol-water (75:25), that remove unwanted coextractives. Finally, benzimidazolic fungicides are recovered by eluting the SCX cartridge with methanol-ammonium formate buffer (75:25). The final extract is then analyzed by reversed-phase HPLC with UV detection. Recoveries from crops such as apples, lettuce, strawberries and citrus fruits are generally greater than 80% and no interferences were observed. The clean-up is simple and straightforward, requires only disposable items, water solutions and a few milliliters of solvent and a minimum number of manipulations, and does not require concentration steps or electrical equipment. PMID:10074700

  2. Isolation of an enzyme complex with carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity containing corrinoid and nickel from acetate-grown Methanosarcina thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Terlesky, K C; Nelson, M J; Ferry, J G

    1986-01-01

    Fast protein liquid chromatography of cell extract from methanol- or acetate-grown Methanosarcina thermophila resolved two peaks of CO dehydrogenase activity. The activity of one of the CO dehydrogenases was sixfold greater in acetate-grown compared with methanol-grown cells. This CO dehydrogenase was purified to apparent homogeneity (70 mumol of methyl viologen reduced per min per mg of protein) and made up greater than 10% of the cellular protein of acetate-grown cells. The native enzyme (Mr 250,000) formed aggregates with an Mr of approximately 1,000,000. The enzyme contained five subunits (Mrs 89,000, 71,000, 60,000, 58,000, and 19,000), suggesting a multifunctional enzyme complex. Nickel, iron, cobalt, zinc, inorganic sulfide, and a corrinoid were present in the complex. The UV-visible spectrum suggested the presence of iron-sulfur centers. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum contained g values of 2.073, 2.049, and 2.028; these features were broadened in enzyme that was purified from cells grown in the presence of medium enriched with 61Ni, indicating the involvement of this metal in the spectrum. The pattern of potassium cyanide inhibition indicated that cyanide binds at or near the CO binding site. The properties of the enzyme imply an involvement in the dissimilation of acetate to methane, possibly by cleavage of acetate or activated acetate. Images PMID:3023296

  3. Anthelmintic and in vitro antioxidant evaluation of fractions of methanol extract of Leea asiatica leaves

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Saikat; De, Biplab; Devanna, N.; Chakraborty, Raja

    2012-01-01

    Leea asiatica, a folk medicinal plant of India, is used in the treatment of worm infection and other oxidative stress-related disorders, traditionally. In the present study, the in vitro anthelmintic and in vitro antioxidant activity of different fractions of the methanol extract from the Leea asiatica leaves were evaluated. The fraction displayed significant anthelmintic activity against Indian adult earthworms (Pheretima posthuma). The ethyl acetate fraction showed a better paralysis activity (13.99 ± 0.59), while the methanol fraction showed a better death time (63.76 ± 0.73 minutes), when compared with other fractions, at a dose of 50 mg/ml concentration. The anthelmintic activity of methanol and the ethyl acetate fraction were almost similar and comparable to the standard drug, piperazine citrate. The petroleum ether fraction did not produce a potent anthelmintic effect compared to the standard. The in vitro antioxidant activity was evaluated by using the diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay, nitric oxide radical scavenging assay, lipid peroxidation assay, and the ferric thiocyanate method. The ethyl acetate fraction showed better antioxidant activity in all tested methods. The IC50 value of the ethyl acetate fraction in the DPPH radical, nitric oxide radical scavenging assay, and lipid peroxidation assay were 9.5, 13.0, and 57.0 μg/ml, respectively. The fractions significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited the peroxidation of linoleic acid. The results confirmed the folk use of Leea asiatica in warm infection and the plant could be viewed as a potential source of natural anthelmintic and antioxidant compound. PMID:23284215

  4. Isolation of stigmasterol and beta-sitosterol from methanolic extract of root bark of Calotropis gigantea (Linn).

    PubMed

    Habib, M Rowshanul; Nikkon, Farjana; Rahman, Matiar; Haque, M Ekramul; Karim, M Rezaul

    2007-11-15

    Aim of this study is to identify and characterize the bioactive principles from the root bark of Calotropis gigantea. It has wide folk medicinal use. For isolation of the compounds, the dried root bark's powder of Calotropis gigantea were subjected to hot extraction and then the crude methanol (MeOH) extract was fractionated with petroleum ether, chloroform and ethyl acetate. Two compounds were isolated and purified from petroleum ether fraction of crude methanol extract and the structures were determined as stigmasterol and beta-sitosterol by analysis of physical, chemical and spectral characteristics (1D NMR and mass spectrometry).

  5. Aqueous Methanol Extracts of Cochlospermum tinctorium (A. Rich) Possess Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, TS; Magaji, MG; Yaro, AH; Musa, AM; Adamu, AK

    2011-01-01

    Cochlopermum tinctorium A. Rich. (Cochlospermaceae) is a commonly used medicinal plant in the West Africa sub-region for the management of various conditions including pain and inflammatory conditions. In the present study, we report the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the aqueous methanol leaf (20–80 mg/kg), root (7.5–30 mg/kg), and root bark (20–80 mg/kg) extracts of the plant. The analgesic potentials of the extracts were studied using acetic acid induced writhing and hot plate tests in mice while the anti-inflammatory activity was investigated using carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats.The extracts significantly and dose dependently inhibited the acetic acid-induced writhing in mice. However, the highest protection against writhing was produced by aqueous methanol leaf extract at the dose of 80 mg/kg (96.65%) which even was greater than that of the standard agent, ketoprofen (82.30%). The extracts did not significantly increase mean latency of response in the hot plate test. However, aqueous methanol root bark extract at the dose of 20 mg/kg significantly (P < 0.05) increased the mean latency of pain response. While the extracts of the root and root bark extracts of the plant afforded non dose-dependent protection against carrageenan-induced edema, the aqueous methanol leaf extract significantly and dose-dependently inhibited carrageenan-induced hind paw edema at the end of the third hour.The present study suggests that the aqueous methanol leaf, root, and root bark extracts of Cochlopermum tinctorium possess analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities which lend some credence to the ethnomedical claim of the use of the plant in the management of pain and inflammatory conditions. PMID:21897665

  6. Ni/Pd-Decorated Carbon NFs as an Efficient Electrocatalyst for Methanol Oxidation in Alkaline Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Ibrahim M. A.; Khalil, Khalil Abdelrazek; Mousa, Hamouda M.; Barakat, Nasser A. M.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, Ni/Pd-decorated carbon nanofibers (NFs) were fabricated as an electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation. These NFs were synthesized based on carbonization of poly(vinyl alcohol), which has high carbon content compared to many polymers used to prepare carbon NFs. Typically, calcination of an electrospun mat composed of nickel acetate, palladium acetate, and poly(vinyl alcohol) can produce Ni/Pd-doped carbon NFs. The introduced NFs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, line TEM energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray powder diffraction. These physicochemical characterizations are acceptable tools to investigate the crystallinity and chemistry of the fabricated Ni/Pd-carbon NFs. Accordingly, the prepared NFs were tested to enhance the economic and catalytic behavior of methanol electrooxidation. Experimentally, the obtained onset potential was small compared to many reported materials; 0.32 V (versus Ag/AgCl as a reference electrode). At the same time, the current density changed from 5.08 mA/cm2 in free methanol at 0.6 V to 12.68 mA/cm2 in 0.1 mol/L methanol, which can be attributed to the MeOH oxidation. Compared to nanoparticles, the NFs have a distinct effect on the electrocatalytic performance of material due to the effect of the one-dimensional structure, which facilitates the electron transfer. Overall, the presented work opens a new way for non-precious one-dimensional nanostructured catalysts for direct methanol fuel cell technology.

  7. Biogeochemical Cycle of Methanol in Anoxic Deep-Sea Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, Katsunori; Tani, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naoya; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Kano, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Ryo; Suzuki, Yohey

    2016-01-01

    The biological flux and lifetime of methanol in anoxic marine sediments are largely unknown. We herein reported, for the first time, quantitative methanol removal rates in subsurface sediments. Anaerobic incubation experiments with radiotracers showed high rates of microbial methanol consumption. Notably, methanol oxidation to CO2 surpassed methanol assimilation and methanogenesis from CO2/H2 and methanol. Nevertheless, a significant decrease in methanol was not observed after the incubation, and this was attributed to the microbial production of methanol in parallel with its consumption. These results suggest that microbial reactions play an important role in the sources and sinks of methanol in subseafloor sediments. PMID:27301420

  8. Metabolism of (2-14C)acetate and its use in assessing hepatic Krebs cycle activity and gluconeogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, W.C.; Magnusson, I.; Chandramouli, V.; Kumaran, K.; Wahren, J.; Landau, B.R. )

    1991-04-15

    To examine the fate of the carbons of acetate and to evaluate the usefulness of labeled acetate in assessing intrahepatic metabolic processes during gluconeogenesis, (2-14C)acetate, (2-14C)ethanol, and (1-14C)ethanol were infused into normal subjects fasted 60 h and given phenyl acetate. Distributions of 14C in the carbons of blood glucose and glutamate from urinary phenylacetylglutamine were determined. With (2-14C)acetate and (2-14C)ethanol, carbon 1 of glucose had about twice as much 14C as carbon 3. Carbon 2 of glutamate had about twice as much 14C as carbon 1 and one-half to one-third as much as carbon 4. There was only a small amount in carbon 5. These distributions are incompatible with the metabolism of (2-14C)acetate being primarily in liver. Therefore, (2-14C)acetate cannot be used to study Krebs cycle metabolism in liver and in relationship to gluconeogenesis, as has been done. The distributions can be explained by: (a) fixation of 14CO2 from (2-14C)acetate in the formation of the 14C-labeled glucose and glutamate in liver and (b) the formation of 14C-labeled glutamate in a second site, proposed to be muscle. (1,3-14C)Acetone formation from the (2-14C)acetate does not contribute to the distributions, as evidenced by the absence of 14C in carbons 2-4 of glutamate after (1-14C)ethanol administration.

  9. Cellulose esters synthesized using a tetrabutylammonium acetate and dimethylsulfoxide solvent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yongqi; Miao, Jiaojiao; Jiang, Zeming; Sun, Haibo; Zhang, Liping

    2016-07-01

    Cellulose acetate (CA) and cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) were homogeneously synthesized in a novel tetrabutylammonium acetate/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent system, without any catalyst, at temperatures below 70 °C. The molecular structures of the cellulose esters (CEs) and distributions of the substituents in the anhydroglucose repeating units were determined using 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the degree of substitution (DS) values were determined using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The structures of the CEs, regenerated cellulose (RC), and pulp were determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The thermal properties of the products were determined using thermogravimetric analysis. The temperatures of initial decomposition of the CEs were up to 40 °C higher than those of the RC and pulp. All the CEs were highly soluble in DMSO, but were insoluble in acetone. CAs with DS values less than 2.6 swelled or were poorly dissolved in CHCl3, but those with DS values above 2.9 dissolved rapidly. CAPs with DS values above 2.6 had good solubilities in ethyl acetate.

  10. Acetone laser-induced fluorescence for temperature and multiparameter imaging in gaseous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Mark Clinton

    1999-10-01

    Acetone (CH3COCH3) is an excellent tracer for planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging in gaseous flows due to its low toxicity, high vapor pressure, and accessible absorption (225-320 nm) and fluorescence (350-550 nm) features. A fluorescence yield limited by rapid intersystem crossing reduces the importance of collisional effects. Since the initial work of Lozano (1992), acetone PLIF has been applied with quantitative success in studies of gas-phase mixing under isothermal, isobaric conditions. More recently, improved understanding of acetone fluorescence dependences has opened up possibilities for new diagnostics across a range of conditions. Through modeling and experimental measurement of fluorescence dependences, the current work aims to make existing diagnostics more quantitative and to allow development of new diagnostics for other parameters, in particular temperature. To this end, temperature dependences of fluorescence are measured at excitation wavelengths across the acetone absorption spectrum. Fluorescence per unit acetone mole fraction decreases significantly with increasing temperature for short wavelengths (248 and 266 nm) and weakly (308 nm) or not at all (320 nm) for longer wavelengths. These effects are related to changes in absorption cross-section and fluorescence yield with temperature. A quantitative multistep decay model of fluorescence yield explains the observed temperature and wavelength functionalities and also predicts effects of pressure and composition. Measurements of pressure and composition dependences of acetone fluorescence between 0.5 and 16 atm, with excitation at 248, 266, and 308 nm, are found to agree with model predictions. A mild fluorescence quenching effect of oxygen is observed, which the model, with slight modification, can explain as well. Temperature and multiparameter imaging diagnostics are made possible by the improved understanding of acetone photophysical behavior. Excitation at 248 or 266 nm is

  11. Breath acetone monitoring by portable Si:WO3 gas sensors

    PubMed Central

    Righettoni, Marco; Tricoli, Antonio; Gass, Samuel; Schmid, Alex; Amann, Anton; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2013-01-01

    Breath analysis has the potential for early stage detection and monitoring of illnesses to drastically reduce the corresponding medical diagnostic costs and improve the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic illnesses. In particular, the detection of acetone in the human breath is promising for non-invasive diagnosis and painless monitoring of diabetes (no finger pricking). Here, a portable acetone sensor consisting of flame-deposited and in situ annealed, Si-doped epsilon-WO3 nanostructured films was developed. The chamber volume was miniaturized while reaction-limited and transport-limited gas flow rates were identified and sensing temperatures were optimized resulting in a low detection limit of acetone (~20 ppb) with short response (10–15 s) and recovery times (35–70 s). Furthermore, the sensor signal (response) was robust against variations of the exhaled breath flow rate facilitating application of these sensors at realistic relative humidities (80–90%) as in the human breath. The acetone content in the breath of test persons was monitored continuously and compared to that of state-of-the-art proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Such portable devices can accurately track breath acetone concentration to become an alternative to more elaborate breath analysis techniques. PMID:22790702

  12. Recovery and reuse of spent acetone via a mobile solvent recovery unit

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, M.W.

    1996-11-01

    The Monsanto Chemical Company operates a plastics and resins plant located in Addyston, Ohio. The process equipment requires routine rinsing with technical grade acetone between batches. Due to the volumes of spent acetone generated and the associated RCRA hazardous waste regulations, the plant sought to recycle and reuse the acetone to reduce the purchase cost of virgin acetone and the cost of spent acetone disposal. One of the first options explored was package unit distillation units. The cost of these units was in the $20--$30,000 range in 1989 dollars. Even though the cost of a package unit was not deemed unreasonable, there were additional costs and concerns that led to elimination of this option. The unit would have required additional manpower to operate and maintain, i.e., at least a fraction of an operator and mechanic. For plant safety reasons, it was desired to operate this package unit outside the production building, thus construction of an outbuilding would have added to the expense of the project. Additionally, there were concerns of package unit reliability. During this evaluation, tractor-trailer mounted distillation units were discovered. The portable units were equipped with either thin-film evaporator technology capable of processing 240 to 480 gallons per hour, or pot still (batch) distillation technology capable of rates from 120 to 240 gallons per hour. Both units were constructed of stainless steel.

  13. Field Demonstration of Acetone Pretreatment and Composting of Particulate-TNT-Contaminated Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Radtke, Corey William; Smith, D.; Owen, S.; Roberto, Francisco Figueroa

    2002-02-01

    Solid fragments of explosives in soil are common in explosives testing and training areas. In this study we initially sieved the upper 6 in of contaminated soil through a 3-mm mesh, and found 2, 4, 6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) fragments. These contributed to an estimated concentration of 1.7 kg per cubic yard soil, or for 2000 ppm TNT in the soil. Most of the fragments ranged 4 mm to 10 mm diameter in size, but explosives particles weighing up to 56 g (about 4 cm diameter) were frequently observed. An acetone pretreatment/composting system was then demonstrated at field scale. The amount of acetone required for a TNT-dissolving slurry process was controlled by the viscosity of the soil/acetone mix rather than the TNT dissolution rate. The amount needed was estimated at about 55 gallons acetone per cubic yard soil. Smaller, 5- to 10-mm-diameter fragments went into solution in less than 15 min at a mixer speed of 36 rpm, with a minimum of 2 g TNT going into solution per 30 min for the larger chunks. The slurries were than mixed with compost starting materials and composted in a vented 1 yd3 container. After 34 days incubation time TNT was below the site-specific regulatory threshold of 44 ppm. TNT metabolites and acetone were also below their regulatory thresholds established for the site.

  14. The Reactions of Acetone with the Surfaces of Uranium Dioxide Single Crystal and Thin Film

    SciTech Connect

    King,R.; Senanayake, S.; Chong, S.; Idriss, H.

    2007-01-01

    The reaction of acetone, as an example of a carbonyl compound, is studied over UO2 (1 1 1) single crystal and thin film surfaces. Over the stoichiometric single crystal surface, acetone is molecularly and weakly adsorbed with a computed activation energy for desorption in the range of 95-65 kJ/mol with pre-exponential factors between 1011 and 1013 s-1. On the contrary, acetone reacts very strongly on the O-defected single crystal and thin film surfaces. In addition to total decomposition evidence of aldolization and cyclization reactions were seen. The thin film of UO2 was studied by synchrotron light, providing high resolution photoelectron spectroscopy in the core level, and high sensitivity in the both the core and valence band regions. The U5f line was considerably enhanced at grazing angle when compared to that obtained at normal angle for the O-defected surface, showing that the surface is more reduced than the next layers. The U 4f lines indicated the presence of U cations in lower oxidation states than +4 for the O-defected surface. These lines were considerably attenuated upon adsorption of acetone, due to surface oxidation by C{double_bond}O bond dissociation. The reaction pathway for acetone on the O-defected surface is presented, and compared to that of the previously studied acetaldehyde molecule.

  15. Dielectric barrier discharge micro-plasma emission spectrometry for the detection of acetone in exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Dong-Xue; Yu, Yong-Liang; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Acetone is a predominant volatile organic compound (VOC) in the exhaled breath and a promising biomarker for diabetes and ketoacidosis. A non-thermal micro-plasma generated in a planar dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is used as a radiation source for the excitation of gaseous acetone followed by its quantification with optical emission spectrometry (OES). Gaseous acetone can be directly sampled, while liquid acetone is evaporated by heated tungsten coil and then introduced into the DBD micro-plasma by a helium carrier flow for performing optical emission and detection at a 519 nm emission line. In the present study, the exhaled breath is collected and transferred into aqueous medium for sampling. With a sampling volume of 7 μL in a micro-drop, a linear range of 40-1600 mg L(-1) is obtained along with a detection limit of 44 ng and a precision of 5.7% RSD. The present system is successfully applied to the determination of breath acetone for both diabetic patients and healthy volunteers.

  16. Study of the exhaled acetone in type 1 diabetes using quantum cascade laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Reyes, Adonis; Horsten, Roland C; Urbach, H Paul; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    The acetone concentration exhaled in the breath of three type 1 diabetes patients (two minors and one adult) and one healthy volunteer is studied using a quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopic system. Using the acetone signature between 1150 and 1250 cm(-1) and a multiline fitting method, the concentration variations on the order of parts per billion by volume were measured. Blood glucose and ketone concentrations in blood measurements were performed simultaneously to study their relation with acetone in exhaled breath. We focus on personalized studies to better understand the role of acetone in diabetes. For each volunteer, we performed a series of measurements over a period of time, including overnight fastings of 11 ± 1 h and during ketosis-hyperglycemia events for the minors. Our results highlight the importance of performing personalized studies because the response of the minors to the presence of ketosis was consistent but unique for each individual. Also, our results emphasize the need for performing more studies with T1D minors, because the acetone concentration in the breath of the minors differs, with respect to those reported in the literature, which are based on adults.

  17. Breath acetone monitoring by portable Si:WO3 gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Righettoni, Marco; Tricoli, Antonio; Gass, Samuel; Schmid, Alex; Amann, Anton; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2012-08-13

    Breath analysis has the potential for early stage detection and monitoring of illnesses to drastically reduce the corresponding medical diagnostic costs and improve the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic illnesses. In particular, the detection of acetone in the human breath is promising for non-invasive diagnosis and painless monitoring of diabetes (no finger pricking). Here, a portable acetone sensor consisting of flame-deposited and in situ annealed, Si-doped epsilon-WO(3) nanostructured films was developed. The chamber volume was miniaturized while reaction-limited and transport-limited gas flow rates were identified and sensing temperatures were optimized resulting in a low detection limit of acetone (∼20ppb) with short response (10-15s) and recovery times (35-70s). Furthermore, the sensor signal (response) was robust against variations of the exhaled breath flow rate facilitating application of these sensors at realistic relative humidities (80-90%) as in the human breath. The acetone content in the breath of test persons was monitored continuously and compared to that of state-of-the-art proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Such portable devices can accurately track breath acetone concentration to become an alternative to more elaborate breath analysis techniques. PMID:22790702

  18. Photochemical degradation of citrate buffers leads to covalent acetonation of recombinant protein therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Valliere-Douglass, John F; Connell-Crowley, Lisa; Jensen, Randy; Schnier, Paul D; Trilisky, Egor; Leith, Matt; Follstad, Brian D; Kerr, Jennifer; Lewis, Nathan; Vunnum, Suresh; Treuheit, Michael J; Balland, Alain; Wallace, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Novel acetone and aldimine covalent adducts were identified on the N-termini and lysine side chains of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Photochemical degradation of citrate buffers, in the presence of trace levels of iron, is demonstrated as the source of these modifications. The link between degradation of citrate and the observed protein modifications was conclusively established by tracking the citrate decomposition products and protein adducts resulting from photochemical degradation of isotope labeled 13C citrate by mass spectrometry. The structure of the acetone modification was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy on modified–free glycine and found to correspond to acetone linked to the N-terminus of the amino acid through a methyl carbon. Results from mass spectrometric fragmentation of glycine modified with an acetone adduct derived from 13C labeled citrate indicated that the three central carbons of citrate are incorporated onto protein amines in the presence of iron and light. While citrate is known to stoichiometrically decompose to acetone and CO2 through various intermediates in photochemical systems, it has never been shown to be a causative agent in protein carbonylation. Our results point to a previously unknown source for the generation of reactive carbonyl species. This work also highlights the potential deleterious impact of trace metals on recombinant protein therapeutics formulated in citrate buffers. PMID:20836085

  19. Vibrational Excitation of Both Products of the Reaction of CN Radicals with Acetone in Solution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient electronic and vibrational absorption spectroscopy unravel the mechanisms and dynamics of bimolecular reactions of CN radicals with acetone in deuterated chloroform solutions. The CN radicals are produced by ultrafast ultraviolet photolysis of dissolved ICN. Two reactive forms of CN radicals are distinguished by their electronic absorption bands: “free” (uncomplexed) CN radicals, and “solvated” CN radicals that are complexed with solvent molecules. The lifetimes of the free CN radicals are limited to a few picoseconds following their photolytic production because of geminate recombination to ICN and INC, complexation with CDCl3 molecules, and reaction with acetone. The acetone reaction occurs with a rate coefficient of (8.0 ± 0.5) × 1010 M–1 s–1 and transient vibrational spectra in the C=N and C=O stretching regions reveal that both the nascent HCN and 2-oxopropyl (CH3C(O)CH2) radical products are vibrationally excited. The rate coefficient for the reaction of solvated CN with acetone is 40 times slower than for free CN, with a rate coefficient of (2.0 ± 0.9) × 109 M–1 s–1 obtained from the rise in the HCN product v1(C=N stretch) IR absorption band. Evidence is also presented for CN complexes with acetone that are more strongly bound than the CN–CDCl3 complexes because of CN interactions with the carbonyl group. The rates of reactions of these more strongly associated radicals are slower still. PMID:26192334

  20. Efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii from sugar beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Bellido, Carolina; Infante, Celia; Coca, Mónica; González-Benito, Gerardo; Lucas, Susana; García-Cubero, María Teresa

    2015-08-01

    Sugar beet pulp (SBP) has been investigated as a promising feedstock for ABE fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii. Although lignin content in SBP is low, a pretreatment is needed to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation yields. Autohydrolysis at pH 4 has been selected as the best pretreatment for SBP in terms of sugars release and acetone and butanol production. The best overall sugars release yields from raw SBP ranged from 66.2% to 70.6% for this pretreatment. The highest ABE yield achieved was 0.4g/g (5.1g/L of acetone and 6.6g/L butanol) and 143.2g ABE/kg SBP (62.3g acetone and 80.9g butanol) were obtained when pretreated SBP was enzymatically hydrolyzed at 7.5% (w/w) solid loading. Higher solid loadings (10%) offered higher acetone and butanol titers (5.8g/L of acetone and 7.8g/L butanol). All the experiments were carried out under not-controlling pH conditions reaching about 5.3 in the final samples.

  1. Vibrational Excitation of Both Products of the Reaction of CN Radicals with Acetone in Solution.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Greg T; Preston, Thomas J; Greaves, Stuart J; Greetham, Gregory M; Clark, Ian P; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2015-12-17

    Transient electronic and vibrational absorption spectroscopy unravel the mechanisms and dynamics of bimolecular reactions of CN radicals with acetone in deuterated chloroform solutions. The CN radicals are produced by ultrafast ultraviolet photolysis of dissolved ICN. Two reactive forms of CN radicals are distinguished by their electronic absorption bands: "free" (uncomplexed) CN radicals, and "solvated" CN radicals that are complexed with solvent molecules. The lifetimes of the free CN radicals are limited to a few picoseconds following their photolytic production because of geminate recombination to ICN and INC, complexation with CDCl3 molecules, and reaction with acetone. The acetone reaction occurs with a rate coefficient of (8.0 ± 0.5) × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1) and transient vibrational spectra in the C═N and C═O stretching regions reveal that both the nascent HCN and 2-oxopropyl (CH3C(O)CH2) radical products are vibrationally excited. The rate coefficient for the reaction of solvated CN with acetone is 40 times slower than for free CN, with a rate coefficient of (2.0 ± 0.9) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) obtained from the rise in the HCN product v1(C═N stretch) IR absorption band. Evidence is also presented for CN complexes with acetone that are more strongly bound than the CN-CDCl3 complexes because of CN interactions with the carbonyl group. The rates of reactions of these more strongly associated radicals are slower still. PMID:26192334

  2. Destruction of acetone using a small-scale arcjet plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, H.R.; Fleddermann, C.B.; Gahl, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    A small-scale thermal plasma torch has been constructed to determine the feasibility of its use to dispose of hazardous solvent wastes. The system has been studied using acetone as a test compound. The plasma jet is generated using argon and a commercial AC/DC welding supply. The system is operated using torch currents ranging from 50 to 200 A and solvent flow rates in the range 0--200 ml/h. Oxygen is added to alter the chemistry occurring in the reaction chamber. The destruction of acetone and the relative amounts of the reaction by-products are monitored using a residual gas analyzer. The pyrolysis products consist primarily of CO, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and other C{sub x}H{sub y} radicals when no oxygen is added to the system. By adding oxygen to the system, thermal oxidation processes occur that increase the production of CO{sub 2} and significantly decrease the amount of acetone in the exhaust gases. This paper includes data on the destruction efficiency of acetone as a function of solvent flow rate, torch power, argon flow rate and oxygen injection rate. The results indicate that greater than 99% destruction efficiency of acetone can be achieved with addition of oxygen to the reaction mixture using an arcjet current of 75 A.

  3. Detection of Acetone Processing of Castor Bean Mash for Forensic Investigation of Ricin Preparation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Wahl, Jon H.; Metoyer, Candace N.; Colburn, Heather A.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2010-07-01

    The toxic protein ricin is of concern as a potential biological threat agent (BTA) Recently, several samples of ricin have been seized in connection with biocriminal activity. Analytical methods are needed that enable federal investigators to determine how the samples were prepared, to match seized samples to potential source materials, and to identify samples that may have been prepared by the same method using the same source materials. One commonly described crude ricin preparation method is acetone extraction of crushed castor beans. Here we describe the use of solid-phase microextraction and headspace analysis of crude ricin preparation samples to determine whether they were processed by acetone extraction. In all cases, acetone-extracted bean mash could be distinguished from un-extracted mash or mash extracted with other organic solvents. Statistical analysis showed that storage in closed containers for up to 109 days had no effect on acetone signal intensity. Signal intensity in acetone-extracted mash decreased during storage in open containers, but extracted mash could still be distinguished from un-extracted mash after 94 days.

  4. Dielectric barrier discharge micro-plasma emission spectrometry for the detection of acetone in exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Dong-Xue; Yu, Yong-Liang; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Acetone is a predominant volatile organic compound (VOC) in the exhaled breath and a promising biomarker for diabetes and ketoacidosis. A non-thermal micro-plasma generated in a planar dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is used as a radiation source for the excitation of gaseous acetone followed by its quantification with optical emission spectrometry (OES). Gaseous acetone can be directly sampled, while liquid acetone is evaporated by heated tungsten coil and then introduced into the DBD micro-plasma by a helium carrier flow for performing optical emission and detection at a 519 nm emission line. In the present study, the exhaled breath is collected and transferred into aqueous medium for sampling. With a sampling volume of 7 μL in a micro-drop, a linear range of 40-1600 mg L(-1) is obtained along with a detection limit of 44 ng and a precision of 5.7% RSD. The present system is successfully applied to the determination of breath acetone for both diabetic patients and healthy volunteers. PMID:26695309

  5. Scaleable production and separation of fermentation-derived acetic acid. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-08

    Half of U.S. acetic acid production is used in manufacturing vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) and is economical only in very large production plants. Nearly 80% of the VAM is produced by methanol carbonylation, which requires high temperatures and exotic construction materials and is energy intensive. Fermentation-derived acetic acid production allows for small-scale production at low temperatures, significantly reducing the energy requirement of the process. The goal of the project is to develop a scaleable production and separation process for fermentation-derived acetic acid. Synthesis gas (syngas) will be fermented to acetic acid, and the fermentation broth will be continuously neutralized with ammonia. The acetic acid product will be recovered from the ammonium acid broth using vapor-based membrane separation technology. The process is summarized in Figure 1. The two technical challenges to success are selecting and developing (1) microbial strains that efficiently ferment syngas to acetic acid in high salt environments and (2) membranes that efficiently separate ammonia from the acetic acid/water mixture and are stable at high enough temperature to facilitate high thermal cracking of the ammonium acetate salt. Fermentation - Microbial strains were procured from a variety of public culture collections (Table 1). Strains were incubated and grown in the presence of the ammonium acetate product and the fastest growing cultures were selected and incubated at higher product concentrations. An example of the performance of a selected culture is shown in Figure 2. Separations - Several membranes were considered. Testing was performed on a new product line produced by Sulzer Chemtech (Germany). These are tubular ceramic membranes with weak acid functionality (see Figure 3). The following results were observed: (1) The membranes were relatively fragile in a laboratory setting; (2) Thermally stable {at} 130 C in hot organic acids; (3) Acetic acid rejection > 99%; and (4

  6. Reductive opening of carbohydrate phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetals.

    PubMed

    Chéry, Florence; Cabianca, Elena; Tatibouët, Arnaud; De Lucchi, Ottorino; Lindhorst, Thisbe K; Rollin, Patrick

    2015-11-19

    The phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetal is a relatively new protecting group in carbohydrate chemistry. However, carbohydrate-derived phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetals show a different behavior in reductive desulfonylation than simple symmetrical acetals. Here we have investigated various SET-type reaction conditions in order to open PSE acetals regioselectively and to produce chiral ω-hydroxyethenyl ethers. Whereas sodium amalgam leads to a mixture of regioisomeric vinyl ethers besides the ethylidene acetal, samarium iodide is suited for regioselective ring opening. This is shown with seven different carbohydrate PSE acetals, both of the 1,3-dioxane and the 1,3-dioxolane type. PMID:26469209

  7. Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology of Methanol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methanol is a high production volume chemical used as a feedstock for chemical syntheses and as a solvent and fuel additive. Methanol is acutely toxic to humans, causing acidosis, blindness in death at high dosages, but its developmental and reproductive toxicity in humans is poo...

  8. Methanol Steam Reforming for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Palo, Daniel R.; Dagle, Robert A.; Holladay, Jamie D.

    2007-09-11

    Review article covering developments in methanol steam reforming in the context of PEM fuel cell power systems. Subjects covered include methanol background, use, and production, comparison to other fuels, power system considerations, militrary requirements, competing technologies, catalyst development, and reactor and system development and demonstration.

  9. COMMERCIAL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF THE LIQUID PHASE METHANOL (LPMEOH) PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    E.C. Heydorn; B.W. Diamond; R.D. Lilly

    2003-06-01

    . Overall plant availability (defined as the percentage of time that the LPMEOH{trademark} demonstration unit was able to operate, with the exclusion of scheduled outages) was 97.5%, and the longest operating run without interruption of any kind was 94 days. Over 103.9 million gallons of methanol was produced; Eastman accepted all of the available methanol for use in the production of methyl acetate, and ultimately cellulose acetate and acetic acid.

  10. Mosquito larvicidal properties of Orthisiphon thymiflorus (Roth) Sleesen. (Family: Labiatae) against mosquito vectors, Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To determine the larvicidal activity of hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone, and methanol extracts of Orthosiphon thymiflorus leaves against Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti. Methods: Larvicidal activity was determined in laboratory bioassays using var...

  11. Measurement of Fuel Concentration Profile at Leading Edge of Lifted Flame with Acetone Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Mitsutomo; Sekine, Kazushi; Hashimoto, Kouta; Saiki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Hidemi; Masuya, Goro

    This is a study of the leading-edge characteristics of a methane-air triple flame. Few experiment results are available for physical examination of such characteristics, so further experimental investigations are strongly needed to understand the stability mechanism in a mixture with a steep concentration gradient. To this end, we measured concentration profiles at the leading edge of a flame using acetone laser-induced fluorescence (acetone LIF). The results demonstrated that the lifted height of the flame changed when acetone was added to the mixture and correlated well with increased C2 radical behind the flame edge. However, the OH radical luminous intensity, measured with a spectroscope, did not change with addition of acetone. Moreover, the burning velocity obtained by the Bunsen-burner method remained constant when acetone was added to the mixture. Therefore, acetone had little influence on burning intensity. Acetone LIF can thus be employed to measure the local concentration gradient at the leading edge of a flame. The acetone LIF signals could be corrected to consider the thermal effect by using silicone oil vanishing-plane data. From the corrected acetone LIF data, the width between the lean and rich flammability limits (flammability limit width) in the flow upstream of the flame with a steep concentration gradient was clearly observed and could be quantitatively compared with the recent numerical results.

  12. Using acetone as solvent to study removal of anthracene in soil inhibits microbial activity and alters nitrogen dynamics.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Edgar Vázquez; Rodríguez, Viviana; Gaytán, Alejandro García; Luna-Guido, Marco; Betancur-Galvis, Liliana A; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc

    2009-08-01

    Acetone is often used as a carrier to contaminate soil with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and then to study the factors that control their removal. Acetone is an organic solvent that might affect soil processes. An alkaline saline (Texcoco soil) and an agricultural soil (Acolman soil) were amended with or without acetone, nitrogen + phosphorus (NP), and contaminated with anthracene at 520 mg/kg soil while emissions of CO2 and N2O and concentrations of NH4+, NO2(-) and NO3(-) were monitored. The CO2 emission rate decreased greater than 10 times in the soils amended with acetone. Emission of N2O decreased 70 times in the Acolman soil amended with acetone and NP and 5 times in the Texcoco soil. The concentration of NH4+ decreased in the unamended Acolman and Texcoco soil but increased when acetone was added in the first and remained constant in the latter. Acetone inhibited the increase in the amount of NO3(-) in the Acolman soil but not in the Texcoco soil. It was found that microbial activity as evidenced by the emission of CO2, nitrification, and production of N2O were inhibited by acetone. The amount of acetone used as solvent should thus be kept to a minimum, but it can be assumed that its effect on soil processes will be temporary, as microorganisms are known to repopulate soil quickly.

  13. Increased blood concentration of isopropanol in ketotic dairy cows and isopropanol production from acetone in the rumen.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate acetone and isopropanol metabolism in bovine ketosis, the blood concentrations of isopropanol, acetone, plasma 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-HB) and other metabolites were analyzed in 12 healthy controls and 15 ketotic dairy cows including fatty liver and inferior prognosis after laparotomy for displaced abomasum. In ruminal fluid taken from 6 ketotic cows, ruminal isopropanol and acetone were also analyzed. Ketotic cows showed higher concentrations of isopropanol, acetone, 3-HB and nonesterified fatty acid, and higher activities of aspartate transaminase and gamma-glutamyl transferase than control cows. Blood samples had higher concentration of isopropanol accompanied by increased acetone. In the ketotic cows, acetone was detected not only in blood but also in ruminal fluid, while higher ruminal isopropanol did not necessarily accompany its elevation in the blood. Using 2 steers with rumen cannula, all ruminal content was emptied and then substituted with artificial saliva to evaluate the importance of ruminal microbes in isopropanol production. Under each condition of intact and emptied rumen, acetone was infused into the rumen and blood isopropanol was analyzed. The elevation in the blood isopropanol concentration after acetone infusion was markedly inhibited by the emptying. Here, increased blood concentrations of isopropanol and acetone were observed in ketotic cows, and the importance of ruminal microbes in isopropanol production was confirmed.

  14. High-sensitivity detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and its precursor acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunayevskiy, Ilya; Tsekoun, Alexei; Prasanna, Manu; Go, Rowel; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2007-09-01

    Triacetone triperoxide (C9H18O6, molecular mass of 222.24 g/mol) (TATP) is a powerful explosive that is easy to synthesize using commonly available household chemicals, acetone, and hydrogen peroxide 1 2. Because of the simplicity of its synthesis, TATP is often the explosive of choice for terrorists, including suicide bombers. For providing safety to the population, early detection of TATP and isolation of such individuals are essential. We report unambiguous, high-sensitivity detection of TATP and its precursor, acetone, using room-temperature quantum cascade laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (QCL-PAS). The available sensitivity is such that TATP, carried on a person (at a nominal body temperature of 37 °C), should be detectable at some distance. The combination of demonstrated detection of TATP and acetone should be ideal for screening at airports and other public places for providing increased public safety.

  15. Detection of Interstellar Acetone toward the Orion-KL Hot Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedel, D. N.; Snyder, L. E.; Remijan, Anthony J.; Turner, B. E.

    2005-10-01

    We present the first detection of interstellar acetone [(CH3)2CO] toward the high-mass star-forming region Orion-KL and the first detection of vibrationally excited (CH3)2CO in the interstellar medium (ISM). Using the BIMA array, 28 emission features that can be assigned to 54 acetone transitions were detected. Furthermore, 37 of these transitions have not been previously observed in the ISM. The observations also show that the acetone emission is concentrated toward the hot core region of Orion-KL, contrary to the distribution of other large oxygen-bearing molecules. From our rotational temperature diagram, we find a beam-averaged (CH3)2CO column density of [2.0(0.3)-8.0(1.2)]×1016 cm-2 and a rotational temperature of 176(48)-194(66) K.

  16. Mid-Infrared vibrational spectra of discrete acetone-ligated cerium hydroxide cations

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Groenewold; A. K. Gianotto; K. C. Cossel; M. J. Van Stipdonk; J. Oomens; N. Polfer; W. A. De JOng; M. E. McIllwain

    2007-02-01

    Cerium (III) hydroxy reactive sites are responsible for several important heterogeneous catalysis processes, and understanding the reaction chemistry of substrate molecules like CO, H2O, and CH3OH as they occur in heterogeneous media is a challenging task. We report here the first infrared spectra of model gas-phase cerium complexes and use the results as a benchmark to assist evaluation of the accuracy of ab initio calculations. Complexes containing [CeOH]2+ ligated by three- and four-acetone molecules were generated by electrospray ionization and characterized using wavelength-selective infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). The C=O stretching frequency for the [CeOH(acetone)4]2+ species appeared at 1650 cm-1 and was red-shifted by 90 cm-1 compared to unligated acetone. The magnitude of this shift for the carbonyl frequency was even greater for the [CeOH(acetone)3]2+ complex: the IRMPD peak consisted of two dissociation channels, an initial elimination of acetone at 1635 cm-1, and elimination of acetone accompanied by a serial charge separation producing [CeO(acetone)]+ at 1599 cm-1, with the overall frequency centered at 1616 cm-1. The increasing red shift observed as the number of acetone ligands decreases from four to three is consistent with transfer of more electron density per ligand in the less coordinated complexes. The lower frequency measured for the elimination/charge separation process is likely due to anharmonicity resulting from population of higher vibrational states. The C-C stretching frequency in the complexes is also influenced by coordination to the metal: it is blue-shifted compared to bare acetone, indicating a slight strengthening of the C-C bond in the complex, with the intensity of the absorption decreasing with decreasing ligation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations using three different functionals (LDA, B3LYP, and PBE0) are used to predict the infrared spectra of the complexes. Calculated frequencies for the carbonyl

  17. Mid-Infrared Vibrational Spectra of Discrete Acetone-Ligated Cerium Hydroxide Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G. S.; Gianotto, Anita K.; Cossel, Kevin C.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Oomens, Jos; Polfer, Nick; Moore, D.T.; De Jong, Wibe A.; McIIwain, Michael E.

    2007-02-15

    Cerium (III) hydroxy reactive sites are responsible for several important heterogeneous catalysis processes, and understanding the reaction chemistry of substrate molecules like CO, H2O, and CH3OH as they occur in heterogeneous media is a challenging task. We report here the first infrared spectra of model gas-phase cerium complexes and use the results as a benchmark to assist evaluation of the accuracy of ab initio calculations. Complexes containing [CeOH]2+ ligated by three- and four-acetone molecules were generated by electrospray ionization and characterized using wavelength-selective infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). The C=O stretching frequency for the [CeOH(acetone)4]2+ species appeared at 1650 cm-1 and was red-shifted by 90 cm-1 compared to unligated acetone. The magnitude of this shift for the carbonyl frequency was even greater for the [CeOH(acetone)3]2+ complex: the IRMPD peak consisted of two dissociation channels, an initial elimination of acetone at 1635 cm-1, and elimination of acetone accompanied by a serial charge separation producing [CeO(acetone)]+ at 1599 cm-1, with the overall frequency centered at 1616 cm-1. The increasing red shift observed as the number of acetone ligands decreases from four to three is consistent with transfer of more electron density per ligand in the less coordinated complexes. The lower frequency measured for the elimination/charge separation process is likely due to anharmonicity resulting from population of higher vibrational states. The C-C stretching frequency in the complexes is also influenced by coordination to the metal: it is blue-shifted compared to bare acetone, indicating a slight strengthening of the C-C bond in the complex, with the intensity of the absorption decreasing with decreasing ligation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations using three different functionals (LDA, B3LYP, and PBE0) are used to predict the infrared spectra of the complexes. Calculated frequencies for the carbonyl

  18. Thiamine pyrophosphate stimulates acetone activation by Desulfococcus biacutus as monitored by a fluorogenic ATP analogue.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Acosta, Olga B; Hardt, Norman; Hacker, Stephan M; Strittmatter, Tobias; Schink, Bernhard; Marx, Andreas

    2014-06-20

    Acetone can be degraded by aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Studies with the strictly anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfococcus biacutus indicate that acetone degradation by these bacteria starts with an ATP-dependent carbonylation reaction leading to acetoacetaldehyde as the first reaction product. The reaction represents the second example of a carbonylation reaction in the biochemistry of strictly anaerobic bacteria, but the exact mechanism and dependence on cofactors are still unclear. Here, we use a novel fluorogenic ATP analogue to investigate its mechanism. We find that thiamine pyrophosphate is a cofactor of this ATP-dependent reaction. The products of ATP cleavage are AMP and pyrophosphate, providing first insights into the reaction mechanism by indicating that the reaction proceeds without intermediate formation of acetone enol phosphate.

  19. Mobility and molecular ions of dimethyl methyl phosphonate, methyl salicylate and acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, D. M.

    1983-06-01

    The mobilities of positive and negative reactant ions are reported for (H2O)nH(+); (H2O)2O2 and (H2O)2CO3(-) ion clusters. The formation of positive DMMP monomer and dimer is reported, and equilbria molecular reactions are reported. Acetone is reported as forming a dimer at 81 ppb with a reduced mobility (K sub o) of 1.82, Methyl salicylate is shown to form a protonated and hydrated positive monomer. Mixtures of DMMP and methyl salicylate with acetone showed a substantial change in DMMP ion clustering and little or no change in the methyl salicylate mobility spectra. Negative ions were not observed for DMMP, methyl salicylate, acetone and the mixtures under the conditions reported.

  20. Acetone-Linked Peptides: A Convergent Approach for Peptide Macrocyclization and Labeling.

    PubMed

    Assem, Naila; Ferreira, David J; Wolan, Dennis W; Dawson, Philip E

    2015-07-20

    Macrocyclization is a broadly applied approach for overcoming the intrinsically disordered nature of linear peptides. Herein, it is shown that dichloroacetone (DCA) enhances helical secondary structures when introduced between peptide nucleophiles, such as thiols, to yield an acetone-linked bridge (ACE). Aside from stabilizing helical structures, the ketone moiety embedded in the linker can be modified with diverse molecular tags by oxime ligation. Insights into the structure of the tether were obtained through co-crystallization of a constrained S-peptide in complex with RNAse S. The scope of the acetone-linked peptides was further explored through the generation of N-terminus to side chain macrocycles and a new approach for generating fused macrocycles (bicycles). Together, these studies suggest that acetone linking is generally applicable to peptide macrocycles with a specific utility in the synthesis of stabilized helices that incorporate functional tags.

  1. Demonstration of a mid-infrared cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer for breath acetone detection.

    PubMed

    Ciaffoni, Luca; Hancock, Gus; Harrison, Jeremy J; van Helden, Jean-Pierre H; Langley, Cathryn E; Peverall, Robert; Ritchie, Grant A D; Wood, Simon

    2013-01-15

    A high-resolution absorption spectrum of gaseous acetone near 8.2 μm has been taken using both Fourier transform and quantum cascade laser (QCL)-based infrared spectrometers. Absolute absorption cross sections within the 1215-1222 cm(-1) range have been determined, and the spectral window around 1216.5 cm(-1) (σ = 3.4 × 10(-19) cm(2) molecule(-1)) has been chosen for monitoring trace acetone in exhaled breath. Acetone at sub parts-per-million (ppm) levels has been measured in a breath sample with a precision of 0.17 ppm (1σ) by utilizing a cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer constructed from the QCL source and a linear, low-volume, optical cavity. The use of a water vapor trap ensured the accuracy of the results, which have been corroborated by mass spectrometric measurements.

  2. High-sensitivity detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and its precursor acetone.

    PubMed

    Dunayevskiy, Ilya; Tsekoun, Alexei; Prasanna, Manu; Go, Rowel; Patel, C Kumar N

    2007-09-01

    Triacetone triperoxide (C(9)H(18)O(6), molecular mass of 222.24 g/mol) (TATP) is a powerful explosive that is easy to synthesize using commonly available household chemicals, acetone, and hydrogen peroxide 1 2. Because of the simplicity of its synthesis, TATP is often the explosive of choice for terrorists, including suicide bombers. For providing safety to the population, early detection of TATP and isolation of such individuals are essential. We report unambiguous, high-sensitivity detection of TATP and its precursor, acetone, using room-temperature quantum cascade laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (QCL-PAS). The available sensitivity is such that TATP, carried on a person (at a nominal body temperature of 37 degrees C), should be detectable at some distance. The combination of demonstrated detection of TATP and acetone should be ideal for screening at airports and other public places for providing increased public safety.

  3. Decomposition of acetone by hydrogen peroxide/ozone process in a rotating packed contactor.

    PubMed

    Ku, Young; Huang, Yun-Jen; Chen, Hua-Wei; Hou, Wei-Ming

    2011-07-01

    The direct use of ozone (O3) in water and wastewater treatment processes is found to be inefficient, incomplete, and limited by the ozone transfer between the gas-liquid interface because of its low solubility and instability in aqueous solutions. Therefore, rotating packed contactors were introduced to improve the transfer of ozone from the gaseous phase to the solution phase, and the effect of several reaction parameters were investigated on the temporal variations of acetone concentration in aqueous solution. The decomposition rate constant of acetone was enhanced by increasing the rotor speed from 450 to 1800 rpm. Increasing the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)/O3 molar ratios accelerated the decomposition rate until a certain optimum H2O2/O3 molar ratio was reached; further addition of H2O2 inhibited the decomposition of acetone, possibly because excessive amounts of H2O2 added might serve as a scavenger to deplete hydroxyl free radicals.

  4. Acetone Sensing Properties of a Gas Sensor Composed of Carbon Nanotubes Doped With Iron Oxide Nanopowder

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qiulin; Fang, Jiahua; Liu, Wenyi; Xiong, Jijun; Zhang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanopowder was prepared by a precipitation method and then mixed with different proportions of carbon nanotubes. The composite materials were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A fabricated heater-type gas sensor was compared with a pure Fe2O3 gas sensor under the influence of acetone. The effects of the amount of doping, the sintering temperature, and the operating temperature on the response of the sensor and the response recovery time were analyzed. Experiments show that doping of carbon nanotubes with iron oxide effectively improves the response of the resulting gas sensors to acetone gas. It also reduces the operating temperature and shortens the response recovery time of the sensor. The response of the sensor in an acetone gas concentration of 80 ppm was enhanced, with good repeatability. PMID:26569253

  5. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degrees C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4% for acetate samples larger than 5 micromoles. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined.

  6. Ozone decomposition in aqueous acetate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sehested, K.; Holcman, J.; Bjergbakke, E.; Hart, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    The acetate radical ion reacts with ozone with a rate constant of k = (1.5 +/- 0.5) x 10Z dmT mol s . The products from this reaction are CO2, HCHO, and O2 . By subsequent reaction of the peroxy radical with ozone the acetate radical ion is regenerated through the OH radical. A chain decomposition of ozone takes place. It terminates when the acetate radical ion reacts with oxygen forming the unreactive peroxy acetate radical. The chain is rather short as oxygen is developed, as a result of the ozone consumption. The inhibiting effect of acetate on the ozone decay is rationalized by OH scavenging by acetate and successive reaction of the acetate radical ion with oxygen. Some products from the bimolecular disappearance of the peroxy acetate radicals, however, react further with ozone, reducing the effectiveness of the stabilization.

  7. Metagenomic analyses reveal the involvement of syntrophic consortia in methanol/electricity conversion in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamuro, Ayaka; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Abe, Takashi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    Methanol is widely used in industrial processes, and as such, is discharged in large quantities in wastewater. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have the potential to recover electric energy from organic pollutants in wastewater; however, the use of MFCs to generate electricity from methanol has not been reported. In the present study, we developed single-chamber MFCs that generated electricity from methanol at the maximum power density of 220 mW m(-2) (based on the projected area of the anode). In order to reveal how microbes generate electricity from methanol, pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA-gene amplicons and Illumina shotgun sequencing of metagenome were conducted. The pyrosequencing detected in abundance Dysgonomonas, Sporomusa, and Desulfovibrio in the electrolyte and anode and cathode biofilms, while Geobacter was detected only in the anode biofilm. Based on known physiological properties of these bacteria, it is considered that Sporomusa converts methanol into acetate, which is then utilized by Geobacter to generate electricity. This speculation is supported by results of shotgun metagenomics of the anode-biofilm microbes, which reconstructed relevant catabolic pathways in these bacteria. These results suggest that methanol is anaerobically catabolized by syntrophic bacterial consortia with electrodes as electron acceptors.

  8. Metagenomic Analyses Reveal the Involvement of Syntrophic Consortia in Methanol/Electricity Conversion in Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamamuro, Ayaka; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Abe, Takashi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    Methanol is widely used in industrial processes, and as such, is discharged in large quantities in wastewater. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have the potential to recover electric energy from organic pollutants in wastewater; however, the use of MFCs to generate electricity from methanol has not been reported. In the present study, we developed single-chamber MFCs that generated electricity from methanol at the maximum power density of 220 mW m−2 (based on the projected area of the anode). In order to reveal how microbes generate electricity from methanol, pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA-gene amplicons and Illumina shotgun sequencing of metagenome were conducted. The pyrosequencing detected in abundance Dysgonomonas, Sporomusa, and Desulfovibrio in the electrolyte and anode and cathode biofilms, while Geobacter was detected only in the anode biofilm. Based on known physiological properties of these bacteria, it is considered that Sporomusa converts methanol into acetate, which is then utilized by Geobacter to generate electricity. This speculation is supported by results of shotgun metagenomics of the anode-biofilm microbes, which reconstructed relevant catabolic pathways in these bacteria. These results suggest that methanol is anaerobically catabolized by syntrophic bacterial consortia with electrodes as electron acceptors. PMID:24852573

  9. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3 or C2H3O2Na·3H2O, CAS Reg. No. 6131-90-4) is the sodium salt of acetic acid and occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues....

  10. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  15. 21 CFR 556.380 - Melengestrol acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Melengestrol acetate. 556.380 Section 556.380 Food... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.380 Melengestrol acetate. A tolerance of 25 parts per billion is established for residues of the parent compound, melengestrol acetate, in fat of cattle....

  16. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  17. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  18. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  19. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  20. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  6. Thermophilic sulfate reduction and methanogenesis with methanol in a high rate anaerobic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Weijma, J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Pol, L.W.H.; Lettinga, G.

    2000-02-05

    Sulfate reduction outcompeted methanogenesis at 65 C and pH 7.5 in methanol and sulfate-fed expanded granular sludge bed reactors operated at hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 14 and 2.5 h, both under methanol-limiting and methanol-overloading conditions. After 100 and 50 days for the reactors operated at 14 and 3.5 h, respectively, sulfide production accounted for 80% of the methanol-COD consumed by the sludge. The specific methanogenic activity on methanol of the sludge from a reactor operated at HRTs of down to 3.5 h for a period of 4 months gradually decreased from 0.83 gCOD {sm_bullet} gVSS{sup {minus}1} {sm_bullet} day{sup {minus}1} at the start to a value of less than 0.05 gCOD {sm_bullet} gVSS{sup {minus}1} {sm_bullet} day{sup {minus}1}, showing that the relative number of methanogens decreased and eventually became very low. By contrast, the increase of the specific sulfidogenic activity of sludge from 0.22 gCOD {sm_bullet} gVSS{sup {minus}1} {sm_bullet} day{sup {minus}1} to a final value of 1.05 gCOD {sm_bullet} gVSS{sup {minus}1} {sm_bullet} day{sup {minus}1} showed that sulfate reducing bacteria were enriched. Methanol degradation by a methanogenic culture obtained from a reactor by serial dilution of the sludge was inhibited in the presence of vancomycin, indicating that methanogenesis directly from methanogenic culture obtained from a reactor by serial dilution of the sludge was inhibited in the presence of vancomycin, indicating that methanogenesis directly from methanol was not important. H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and formate, but not acetate, were degraded to methane in the presence of vancomycin. These results indicated that methanol degradation to methane occurs via the intermediates H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and formate. The high and low specific methanogenic activity of sludge on H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and formate, respectively, indicated that the former substrate probably acts as the main electron donor for the methanogens during methanol degradation. As

  7. Selective photocatalytic reduction of CO2 to methanol in CuO-loaded NaTaO3 nanocubes in isopropanol

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Tianyu; Chen, Jingshuai; Wang, Yuwen; Yin, Xiaohong; Shao, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Summary A series of NaTaO3 photocatalysts were prepared with Ta2O5 and NaOH via a hydrothermal method. CuO was loaded onto the surface of NaTaO3 as a cocatalyst by successive impregnation and calcination. The obtained photocatalysts were characterized by XRD, SEM, UV–vis, EDS and XPS and used to photocatalytically reduce CO2 in isopropanol. This worked to both absorb CO2 and as a sacrificial reagent to harvest CO2 and donate electrons. Methanol and acetone were generated as the reduction product of CO2 and the oxidation product of isopropanol, respectively. NaTaO3 nanocubes loaded with 2 wt % CuO and synthesized in 2 mol/L NaOH solution showed the best activity. The methanol and acetone yields were 137.48 μmol/(g·h) and 335.93 μmol/(g·h), respectively, after 6 h of irradiation. Such high activity could be attributed to the good crystallinity, morphology and proper amount of CuO loading, which functioned as reductive sites for selective formation of methanol. The reaction mechanism was also proposed and explained by band theory. PMID:27335766

  8. Photochemistry of 2-nitrobenzylidene acetals.

    PubMed

    Sebej, Peter; Solomek, Tomás; Hroudná, L'ubica; Brancová, Pavla; Klán, Petr

    2009-11-20

    Photolysis of dihydroxy compounds (diols) protected as 2-nitrobenzylidene acetals (ONBA) and subsequent acid- or base-catalyzed hydrolysis of the 2-nitrosobenzoic acid ester intermediates result in an efficient and high-yielding release of the substrates. We investigated the scope and limitations of ONBA photochemistry and expanded upon earlier described two-step procedures to show that the protected diols of many structural varieties can also be liberated in a one-pot procedure. In view of the fact that the acetals of nonsymmetrically substituted diols are converted into one of the corresponding 2-nitrosobenzoic acid ester isomers with moderate to high regioselectivity, the mechanism of their formation was studied using various experimental techniques. The experimental data were found to be in agreement with DFT-based quantum chemical calculations that showed the preferential cleavage occurs on the acetal C-O bond in the vicinity of more electron-withdrawing (or less electron-donating) groups. The study also revealed considerable complexity in the cleavage mechanism and that the structural variations in the substrate can significantly alter the reaction pathway. This deprotection strategy was found to be also applicable for 2-thioethanol when released from the corresponding monothioacetal in the presence of a reducing agent, such as ascorbic acid.

  9. Engineering Escherichia coli for methanol conversion.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jonas E N; Meyer, Fabian; Litsanov, Boris; Kiefer, Patrick; Potthoff, Eva; Heux, Stéphanie; Quax, Wim J; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vorholt, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria utilize methanol and other reduced one-carbon compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy. For this purpose, these bacteria evolved a number of specialized enzymes and pathways. Here, we used a synthetic biology approach to select and introduce a set of "methylotrophy genes" into Escherichia coli based on in silico considerations and flux balance analysis to enable methanol dissimilation and assimilation. We determined that the most promising approach allowing the utilization of methanol was the implementation of NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase and the establishment of the ribulose monophosphate cycle by expressing the genes for hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase (Phi). To test for the best-performing enzymes in the heterologous host, a number of enzyme candidates from different donor organisms were selected and systematically analyzed for their in vitro and in vivo activities in E. coli. Among these, Mdh2, Hps and Phi originating from Bacillus methanolicus were found to be the most effective. Labeling experiments using (13)C methanol with E. coli producing these enzymes showed up to 40% incorporation of methanol into central metabolites. The presence of the endogenous glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation pathway of E. coli did not adversely affect the methanol conversion rate. Taken together, the results of this study represent a major advancement towards establishing synthetic methylotrophs by gene transfer.

  10. Ion-paired extraction of cephalosporins in acetone prior to their analysis by capillary liquid chromatography in environmental water and meat samples.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Molina, Carolina; García-Campaña, Ana M; del Olmo-Iruela, Monsalud

    2013-10-15

    Ion-pair extraction of cephalosporins from aqueous solution into acetone by the addition of ammonium sulfate to a 1:2 (v/v) acetone-water solvent was carried out followed by their determination using reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography. The analytes included are cephoperazone, cefquinome, cephalexin, cephapirin, cephaloniun, cephamandole, cephazolin and cephadroxile. In order to form the ion-pair, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was selected as cationic ion-pairing agent at a concentration of 0.9 mM using 10mM phosphate buffer at pH 8 as the optimum condition for the aqueous solution. The applied methodology, named salting-out assisted liquid/liquid extraction (SALLE) involves the use of 1.25 g of ammonium sulfate as salting-out agent. The separation of cephalosporins using a Luna C18 (150 mm × 0.3mm, 5 µm, 100 Å) column was achieved under the following conditions: a gradient program combining solvent A (0.1% formic acid in water, pH 4) and solvent B (acetonitrile-methanol (50:50, v/v)), at a flow rate of 20 µl min(-1), column temperature 35°C and injection volume 7 µl with UV detection at 250 nm. The limits of quantification for the studied compounds were between 4.3 and 22.7 μg/L for water samples and 4.1 and 73.3 μg/kg in the case of beef samples, lower than the maximum residue limits permitted by the EU for this kind of food. The developed methodology has demonstrated its suitability for the analysis of these widely applied antibiotics in environmental water and meat samples, including beef and pork muscle, with high sensitivity, precision and satisfactory recoveries.

  11. Advanced direct methanol fuel cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdan, Monjid; Kosek, John A.

    1999-11-01

    The goal of the program was an advanced proton-exchange membrane (PEM) for use as the electrolyte in a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell which provides reduced methanol crossover while simultaneously providing high conductivity and low membrane water content. The approach was to use a membrane containing precross-linked fluorinated base polymer films and subsequently to graft the base film with selected materials. Over 80 different membranes were prepared. The rate of methanol crossover through the advanced membranes was reduced 90%. A 5-cell stack provided stable performance over a 100-hour life test. Preliminary cost estimates predicted a manufacturing cost at $4 to $9 per kW.

  12. Hydroxy acetone and lactic acid synthesis from aqueous propylene glycol/hydrogen peroxide catalysis on Pd-black

    SciTech Connect

    Disselkamp, Robert S.; Harris, Benjamin D.; Hart, Todd R.

    2008-07-20

    The production of polyol chemicals is of increasing interest as they are obtained from the catalytic processing of biological feedstock materials, which also is becoming more prevalent. A case in point is glycerol production, formed as a byproduct in biodiesel catalytic processing. Here we report the reaction of a simple 1,2-diol, propylene glycol, with hydrogen peroxide and a Pd-black catalyst under reflux conditions at 368 K. The experiments were performed by either co-addition of hydrogen peroxide with air sparging, or addition of hydrogen peroxide alone, each yielding hydroxy acetone (HA) and acetic acid (AA) products, with a lesser amount of lactic acid (LA) formed. Product conversion data at near neutral pH versus hydrogen peroxide equivalents added relative to substrate is presented. Hydrogen peroxide addition without air sparging at 5 equivalents resulted in 65% conversion with an HA:AA molar ratio of 2:1. Conversely, hydrogen peroxide addition with air sparging at only 0.75 equivalents resulted in 40% conversion with an HA:AA ratio of 3:1. From this it is concluded that although the product distribution in these chemistries is somewhat unchanged by air sparging, it is surprising that the amount of reactive oxygen is greatly enhanced with co-addition of O2/H2O2. Additional studies have revealed the amount of LA formed can be enhanced under acidic conditions (pH=1.5 compared to pH=8.5), such that 26% of total product formation is LA. Since hydrogen peroxide is an environmentally clean reagent and becoming more cost effective to use, this work may guide future applied investigations into polyol chemical syntheses.

  13. [Autochthonous yeasts isolated in Tenerife wines and their influence on ethyl acetate and higher alcohol concentrations analyzed by gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Salvadores, M P; Díaz, M E; Cardell, E

    1993-12-01

    A taxonomic study of yeasts present on Tenerife wines, (Tacoronte-Acentejo Specific Denomination) has been carried out. Nine species of the genera: Saccharomyces, Torulaspora, Brettanomyces, Kluyveromyces, Debaryomyces, Saccharomycodes, Hansenula, Pichia and Candida have been isolated. Parallely we analysed volatile compounds of the wines such as ethyl acetate, methanol, isobutanol and amylic alcohols by gas chromatography. Appreciable quantities of ethyl acetate were detected due to the low fermentative power of species such as Candida glabrata and Debaryomyces hansenii. The greatest concentration of amylic alcohols were found in wines containing yeast with high alcohol producing power like Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  14. Methanogenesis from methanol and methylamines and acetogenesis from hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the sediments of a eutrophic lake

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, D.R.; Klug, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    /sup 14/C-tracer techniques were used to examine the metabolism of methanol and methylamines and acetogenesis from hydrogen and carbon dioxide in sediments from the profundal and littoral zones of eutrophic Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. Methanogens were primarily responsible for the metabolism of methanol, mono-methylammine, and trimethylamine and maintained the pool size of these substrates below 10 ..mu..M in both sediment types. Methanol and methylamines were the precursors for less than 5 and 1%, respectively, of the total methane produced. Methanol and methylamines continued to be metabolized to methane when the sulfate concentration in the sediment was increased to 20 mM. Less than 2% of the total acetate production was derived from carbon dioxide reduction. Hydrogen consumption by hydrogen-oxidizing acetogens was 5% or less of the total hydrogen uptake by acetogens and methanogens. These results, in conjunction with previous studies, emphasize that acetate and hydrogen are the major methane precursors and that methanogens are the predominant hydrogen consumers in the sediments of this eutrophic lake.

  15. Methanogenesis from methanol and methylamines and acetogenesis from hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the sediments of a eutrophic lake.

    PubMed

    Lovley, D R; Klug, M J

    1983-04-01

    C-tracer techniques were used to examine the metabolism of methanol and methylamines and acetogenesis from hydrogen and carbon dioxide in sediments from the profundal and littoral zones of eutrophic Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. Methanogens were primarily responsible for the metabolism of methanol, monomethylamine, and trimethylamine and maintained the pool size of these substrates below 10 muM in both sediment types. Methanol and methylamines were the precursors for less than 5 and 1%, respectively, of the total methane produced. Methanol and methylamines continued to be metabolized to methane when the sulfate concentration in the sediment was increased to 20 mM. Less than 2% of the total acetate production was derived from carbon dioxide reduction. Hydrogen consumption by hydrogen-oxidizing acetogens was 5% or less of the total hydrogen uptake by acetogens and methanogens. These results, in conjunction with previous studies, emphasize that acetate and hydrogen are the major methane precursors and that methanogens are the predominant hydrogen consumers in the sediments of this eutrophic lake.

  16. Biodegradation of cellulose acetate by Neisseria sicca.

    PubMed

    Sakai, K; Yamauchi, T; Nakasu, F; Ohe, T

    1996-10-01

    Bacteria capable of assimilating cellulose acetate, strains SB and SC, were isolated from soil on a medium containing cellulose acetate as a carbon source, and identified as Neisseria sicca. Both strains degraded cellulose acetate membrane filters (degree of substitution, DS, mixture of 2.8 and 2.0) and textiles (DS, 2.34) in a medium containing cellulose acetate (DS, 2.34) or its oligomer, but were not able to degrade these materials in a medium containing cellobiose octaacetate. Biodegradation of cellulose acetate (DS, 1.81 and 2.34) on the basis of biochemical oxygen demand reached 51 and 40% in the culture of N. sicca SB and 60 and 45% in the culture of N. sicca SC within 20 days. A decrease in the acetyl content of degraded cellulose acetate films and powder was confirmed by infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. After 10-day cultivation of N. sicca SB and SC, the number-average molecular weight of residual cellulose acetate decreased by 9 and 5%, respectively. Activities of enzymes that released acetic acid and produced reducing sugars from cellulose acetate were mainly present in the culture supernatant. Reactivity of enzymes for cellulose acetate (DS, 1.81) was higher than that for cellulose acetate (DS, 2.34).

  17. 40 CFR 721.10238 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. 721.10238 Section 721.10238 Protection of..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts (PMN P-09-147; CAS...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10238 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. 721.10238 Section 721.10238 Protection of..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts (PMN P-09-147; CAS...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10238 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. 721.10238 Section 721.10238 Protection of..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts (PMN P-09-147; CAS...

  20. Neurotoxicity associated with occupational exposure to acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, and cyclohexanone.

    PubMed

    Mitran, E; Callender, T; Orha, B; Dragnea, P; Botezatu, G

    1997-01-01

    The neurotoxic effects of acetone, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), and cyclohexanone on Romanian workers and the impact of those effects on industry environmental standards have been controversial subjects. To scientifically substantiate the standards, a study was conducted on three groups of workers to determine the changes induced by ketone solvents on the central and peripheral nervous systems. Groups of exposed workers and matched controls were studied for each solvent: acetone, 71 exposed and 86 controls from a coin printing factory; MEK, 41 exposed and 63 controls from a cable factory; and cyclohexanone, 75 exposed and 85 controls from a furniture factory. The subjects' mean age was 36 years. The mean length of exposure was 14 years. Study participants completed a questionnaire, responded to questions about alcohol consumption, submitted to a clinical examination, submitted samples for identification of biological exposure markers, and underwent motor nerve conduction velocity and neurobehavioral tests. Results showed that workers exposed to acetone were most affected in terms of human performance and evidence of neurotoxicity, followed by workers exposed to MEK and workers exposed to cyclohexanone. On the basis of the results, it was proposed that the 6-hr permissible exposure limits for acetone, MEK, and cyclohexanone be reduced to less than 500, 200, and 150 mg/m3, respectively.

  1. A simple procedure for preparing chitin oligomers through acetone precipitation after hydrolysis in concentrated hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Kazami, Nao; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Mizutani, Daisuke; Masuda, Tatsuhiko; Wakita, Satoshi; Oyama, Fumitaka; Kawakita, Masao; Sugahara, Yasusato

    2015-11-01

    Chitin oligomers are of interest because of their numerous biologically relevant properties. To prepare chitin oligomers containing 4-6 GlcNAc units [(GlcNAc)4-6], α- and β-chitin were hydrolyzed with concentrated hydrochloric acid at 40 °C. The reactant was mixed with acetone to recover the acetone-insoluble material, and (GlcNAc)4-6 was efficiently recovered after subsequent water extraction. Composition analysis using gel permeation chromatography and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry indicated that (GlcNAc)4-6 could be isolated from the acetone-insoluble material with recoveries of approximately 17% and 21% from the starting α-chitin and β-chitin, respectively. The acetone precipitation method is highly useful for recovering chitin oligomers from the acid hydrolysate of chitin. The changes in the molecular size and higher-order structure of chitin during the course of hydrolysis were also analyzed, and a model that explains the process of oligomer accumulation is proposed.

  2. Photooxidation of Isopropanol and Acetone Using TiO(sub 2) Suspension and UV Light

    SciTech Connect

    El-Morsi, Taha; Nanny, Mark A.

    2004-03-31

    Small polar organic compounds such as alcohols, ketones and aldehydes are highly soluble and do not adsorb strongly to the TiO2 surface and, therefore, may be fairly resistant to photocatalytic degradation. Photodegradation of an aqueous solution of isopropanol and its resulting photodegradation product acetone was investigated as a function of TiO2 substrate concentrations and solution ionic strength and pH. In the presence of 2g/L TiO2, isopropanol completely disappeared within 3 hrs, resulting in the nearly complete transformation into acetone. Subsequent photodegradation of acetone occurred at a much slower rate and resulted in complete mineralization. Increasing the pH slightly decreased the photodegradation rate. Conversely, the degradation rate was enhanced slightly by increasing the ionic strength. The presence of tetranitromethane decreased the isopropanol degradation significantly. This result, combined with the minimal degree of adsorption of isopropanol and acetone onto the surface of the photocatalyst, suggests that the photodegradation pathway occurs via free OH radicals in bulk solution rather than on the catalyst surface.

  3. Chemical-specific adjustment factors for intraspecies variability of acetone toxicokinetics using a probabilistic approach.

    PubMed

    Mörk, Anna-Karin; Johanson, Gunnar

    2010-07-01

    Human health risk assessment has begun to depart from the traditional methods by replacement of the default assessment factors by more reasonable, data-driven, so-called chemical-specific adjustment factors (CSAFs). This study illustrates a scheme for deriving CSAFs in the general and occupationally exposed populations by quantifying the intraspecies toxicokinetic variability in surrogate dose using probabilistic methods. Acetone was used as a model substance. The CSAFs were derived by Monte Carlo simulation, combining a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for acetone, probability distributions of the model parameters from a Bayesian analysis of male volunteer experimental data, and published distributions of physiological and anatomical parameters for females and children. The simulations covered how factors such as age, gender, endogenous acetone production, and fluctuations in workplace air concentration and workload influence peak and average acetone levels in blood, used as surrogate doses. According to the simulations, CSAFs of 2.1, 2.9, and 3.8 are sufficient to cover the differences in surrogate dose at the upper 90th, 95th, and 97.5th percentile, respectively, of the general population. However, higher factors were needed to cover the same percentiles of children. The corresponding CSAFs for the occupationally exposed population were 1.6, 1.8, and 1.9. The methodology presented herein allows for derivation of CSAFs not only for populations as a whole but also for subpopulations of interest. Moreover, various types of experimental data can readily be incorporated in the model. PMID:20400482

  4. Assessment of in situ butanol recovery by vacuum during acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butanol fermentation is product limiting due to butanol toxicity to microbial cells. Butanol (boiling point: 118 deg C) boils at a greater temperature than water (boiling point: 100 deg C) and application of vacuum technology to integrated acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation and recovery may ...

  5. Synthesis and antimalarial activity of dihydroperoxides and tetraoxanes conjugated with bis(benzyl)acetone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Franco, Lucas Lopardi; de Almeida, Mauro Vieira; E Silva, Luiz Francisco Rocha; Vieira, Pedro Paulo Ribeiro; Pohlit, Adrian Martin; Valle, Marcelo Siqueira

    2012-05-01

    Dihydroperoxides and tetraoxanes derived from symmetrically substituted bis(arylmethyl)acetones were synthesized in modest to good yields using several methods. Three of these compounds exhibit an important in vitro antimalarial activity (1.0 μm ≤ IC(50)  ≤ 5.0 μm) against blood forms of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

  6. Daboia russellii and Naja kaouthia venom neutralization by lupeol acetate isolated from the root extract of Indian sarsaparilla Hemidesmus indicus R.Br.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ipshita; Chakravarty, A K; Gomes, A

    2006-06-15

    The present study reports the isolation and purification of lupeol acetate from the methanolic root extract of Indian medicinal plant Hemidesmus indicus (L.) R.Br. (family: Asclepiadaceae) which could neutralize venom induced action of Daboia russellii and Naja kaouthia on experimental animals. Lupeol acetate could significantly neutralize lethality, haemorrhage, defibrinogenation, edema, PLA(2) activity induced by Daboia russellii venom. It also neutralized Naja kaouthia venom induced lethality, cardiotoxicity, neurotoxicity and respiratory changes in experimental animals. Lupeol acetate potentiated the protection by snake venom antiserum action against Daboia russellii venom induced lethality in male albino mice. Venom induced changes in lipid peroxidation and super oxide dismutase activity was antagonized by lupeol acetate. Snake venom neutralization by lupeol acetate and its possible mechanism of action has been discussed.

  7. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.13 ), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  8. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1991-02-12

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.-), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  9. Advances in direct oxidation methanol fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, S.; Narayanan, S. R.; Vamos, E.; Frank, H.; Halpert, G.; Laconti, Anthony B.; Kosek, J.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Olah, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel cells that can operate directly on fuels such as methanol are attractive for low to medium power applications in view of their low weight and volume relative to other power sources. A liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell has been developed based on a proton exchange membrane electrolyte and Pt/Ru and Pt catalyzed fuel and air/O2 electrodes, respectively. The cell has been shown to deliver significant power outputs at temperatures of 60 to 90 C. The cell voltage is near 0.5 V at 300 mA/cm(exp 2) current density and an operating temperature of 90 C. A deterrent to performance appears to be methanol crossover through the membrane to the oxygen electrode. Further improvements in performance appear possible by minimizing the methanol crossover rate.

  10. Methanol: A Versatile Fuel for Immediate Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, T. B.; Lerner, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Advocates the large-scale production and use of methanol as a substitute for the diminishing reserves of low-cost petroleum resources. Describes the manufacturing process and advantages of the versatile fuel. (JR)

  11. BHP may scale up methanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1993-06-23

    Broken Hill Pty. (BHP: Melbourne) says otherwise uneconomic gas reserves in the Timor Sea off northwest Australia could be developed if the company`s plans to commercialize a novel gas-to-methanol technology prove to be viable. BHP is building an A$70-million ($50 million) research unit in Victoria using ICI`s Leading Concept Methanol gas-to-methanol process. If this unit proves viable, it could be put on a vessel and taken to Timor Sea where BHP has oil exploration and production interests. Timor gas is not economically viable because of lack of nearby markets. The 54,000-m.t./year research plant, located at Werrbee near Melbourne, is scheduled to start production in the second half of 1994, according to BHP manager Joe Evon. The plant is being built by Davy/John Brown. Provided the economic climate is right, BHP is expected to build a world-scale methanol plant offshore.

  12. An acetone microsensor with a ring oscillator circuit fabricated using the commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Shih, Po-Jen

    2014-07-17

    This study investigates the fabrication and characterization of an acetone microsensor with a ring oscillator circuit using the commercial 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The acetone microsensor contains a sensitive material, interdigitated electrodes and a polysilicon heater. The sensitive material is α-Fe2O3 synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The sensor requires a post-process to remove the sacrificial oxide layer between the interdigitated electrodes and to coat the α-Fe2O3 on the electrodes. When the sensitive material adsorbs acetone vapor, the sensor produces a change in capacitance. The ring oscillator circuit converts the capacitance of the sensor into the oscillation frequency output. The experimental results show that the output frequency of the acetone sensor changes from 128 to 100 MHz as the acetone concentration increases 1 to 70 ppm.

  13. Radical Scavenging by Acetone: A New Perspective to Understand Laccase/ABTS Inactivation and to Recover Redox Mediator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Zhou, Pandeng; Wu, Xing; Sun, Jianliang; Chen, Shicheng

    2015-11-04

    The biosynthetic utilization of laccase/mediator system is problematic because the use of organic cosolvent causes significant inhibition of laccase activity. This work explored how the organic cosolvent impacts on the laccase catalytic capacity towards 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) in aqueous solution. Effects of acetone on the kinetic constants of laccase were determined and the results showed Km and Vmax varied exponentially with increasing acetone content. Acetone as well as some other cosolvents could transform ABTS radicals into its reductive form. The content of acetone in media significantly affected the radical scavenging rates. Up to 95% of the oxidized ABTS was successfully recovered in 80% (v/v) acetone in 60 min. This allows ABTS recycles at least six times with 70%-75% of active radicals recovered after each cycle. This solvent-based recovery strategy may help improve the economic feasibility of laccase/ABTS system in biosynthesis.

  14. An Acetone Microsensor with a Ring Oscillator Circuit Fabricated Using the Commercial 0.18 μm CMOS Process

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Shih, Po-Jen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the fabrication and characterization of an acetone microsensor with a ring oscillator circuit using the commercial 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The acetone microsensor contains a sensitive material, interdigitated electrodes and a polysilicon heater. The sensitive material is α-Fe2O3 synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The sensor requires a post-process to remove the sacrificial oxide layer between the interdigitated electrodes and to coat the α-Fe2O3 on the electrodes. When the sensitive material adsorbs acetone vapor, the sensor produces a change in capacitance. The ring oscillator circuit converts the capacitance of the sensor into the oscillation frequency output. The experimental results show that the output frequency of the acetone sensor changes from 128 to 100 MHz as the acetone concentration increases 1 to 70 ppm. PMID:25036331

  15. Esterification of acrylic acid with methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chubarov, G.A.; Danov, S.M.; Logutov, V.I.; Obmelyukhina, T.N.

    1984-01-01

    The esterification of acrylic acid with methanol in the absence of catalysis by strong mineral acids has been studied. The esterification rate was estimated from the amount of methyl acrylate formed at the end of a definite time, and the reaction rate was found to be first order with respect to methanol and second order with respect to acrylic acid. Mathematical relationships in good agreement with experimental data were derived from the results of the kinetic studies.

  16. Profiling and relative quantification of phosphatidylethanolamine based on acetone stable isotope derivatization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Wei, Fang; Xu, Ji-qu; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-yan; Han, Xianlin; Quek, Siew-young; Huang, Feng-hong; Chen, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is considered to be one of the pivotal lipids for normal cellular function as well as disease initiation and progression. In this study, a simple, efficient, reliable, and inexpensive method for the qualitative analysis and relative quantification of PE, based on acetone stable isotope derivatization combined with double neutral loss scan-shotgun electrospray ionization tandem-quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis (ASID-DNLS-Shotgun ESI-MS/MS), was developed. The ASID method led to alkylation of the primary amino groups of PE with an isopropyl moiety. The use of acetone (d0-acetone) and deuterium-labeled acetone (d6-acetone) introduced a 6 Da mass shift that was ideally suited for relative quantitative analysis, and enhanced sensitivity for mass analysis. The DNLS model was introduced to simultaneously analyze the differential derivatized PEs by shotgun ESI-MS/MS with high selectivity and accuracy. The reaction specificity, labeling efficiency, and linearity of the ASID method were thoroughly evaluated in this study. Its excellent applicability was validated by qualitative and relative quantitative analysis of PE species presented in liver samples from rats fed different diets. Using the ASID-DNLS-Shotgun ESI-MS/MS method, 45 PE species from rat livers have been identified and quantified in an efficient manner. The level of total PEs tended to decrease in the livers of rats on high fat diets compared with controls. The levels of PE 32:1, 34:3, 34:2, 36:3, 36:2, 42:10, plasmalogen PE 36:1 and lyso PE 22:6 were significantly reduced, while levels of PE 36:1 and lyso PE 16:0 increased.

  17. Perceived odor, irritation, and health symptoms following short-term exposure to acetone.

    PubMed

    Dalton, P; Wysocki, C J; Brody, M J; Lawley, H J

    1997-05-01

    The subjectivity of irritancy judgments can bias attempts to establish exposure guidelines that protect individuals from the sensory irritation produced by volatile chemicals. At low to moderate chemical concentrations, naive and occupationally exposed individuals often show considerable variation in the reported levels of perceived irritation. Such variation could result from differences in exposure history, differences in the perceived odor of a chemical, or differences in generalized response tendencies to report irritation, or response bias. Thus, experimental evaluation of sensory irritancy must dissociate sensory irritation from response bias. To this end, judgments of perceived irritation from 800 ppm acetone were obtained from acetone-exposed workers and age- and gender-matched naive controls. To assess the role of response bias during exposure to odorants, subjects were also exposed to phenylethyl alcohol (PEA), an odorant that does not produce sensory irritation. Following exposure, subjects completed a subjective symptom survey that included symptoms that have been associated with long-term solvent exposures and symptoms that have not. Acetone-exposed workers and naive controls reported large differences in the perceived intensity of odor and irritation from acetone, yet no differences in the perception of PEA. However, for both groups, the most significant factors mediating reported irritancy and health symptoms from acetone were the perceived intensity of its odor and an individual's bias to report irritation from PEA. The perception of odor intensity and degree of response bias will differ between and within groups of exposed and naive individuals; hence, an assessment of the influence of these factors in experimental and workplace studies of chemical irritancy is warranted. PMID:9099358

  18. BaFe12O19 powder with high magnetization prepared by acetone-aided coprecipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hsuan-Fu

    2013-09-01

    BaFe12O19 particles with high magnetization were produced using an acetone-aided coprecipitation process. An aqueous solution of iron and barium nitrates, in an Fe3+/Ba2+ molar ratio of 12, was added in a stirred precipitation liquid medium composed of H2O, CH3(CO)CH3 and NH4OH. After reacting metallic ions with ammonia, the precipitates were formed, centrifugally filtered, freeze dried and calcined. Effects of amount of the acetone in the precipitation liquid medium on the formation of crystalline BaFe12O19 were investigated. The presence of acetone in the precipitation liquid medium can greatly promote formation of the crystalline BaFe12O19 at temperature as low as 650 °C and can enhance magnetization of the derived particles. On the other hand, raising the calcination temperature can effectively accelerate development of crystallite morphology and magnetic characters of the barium hexaferrites. While the barium hexaferrite powder obtained without acetone additions and calcined at 1000 °C had magnetization (measured at 50 kOe; M(50 kOe)) of 63.5 emu/g, remanence magnetization (Mr) of 31.3 emu/g and coercivity (Hc) of 4.7 kOe, the single magnetic domain size BaFe12O19 powder with M(50 kOe) of 70.6 emu/g, Mr of 34.4 emu/g and Hc of 3.7 kOe was produced at 1000 °C, using a precipitation liquid medium of 64 vol% acetone.

  19. Methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst composite for direct methanol fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Zelenay, Piotr

    2006-09-05

    A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having a methanol fuel supply, oxidant supply, and its membrane electrode assembly (MEA) formed of an anode electrode and a cathode electrode with a membrane therebetween, a methanol oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of Pt.sub.3Cr/C so that oxidation at the cathode of methanol that crosses from the anode through the membrane to the cathode is reduced with a concomitant increase of net electrical potential at the cathode electrode.

  20. Methanol-Tolerant Cathode Catalyst Composite For Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Zelenay, Piotr

    2006-03-21

    A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having a methanol fuel supply, oxidant supply, and its membrane electrode assembly (MEA) formed of an anode electrode and a cathode electrode with a membrane therebetween, a methanol oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of a platinum-chromium alloy so that oxidation at the cathode of methanol that crosses from the anode through the membrane to the cathode is reduced with a concomitant increase of net electrical potential at the cathode electrode.

  1. Transesterification of waste vegetable oil under pulse sonication using ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Pulse sonication effect on transesterification of waste vegetable oil was studied. • Effects of ethanol, methanol, and alcohol mixtures on FAMEs yield were evaluated. • Effect of ultrasonic intensity, power density, and its output rates were evaluated. • Alcohol mixtures resulted in higher biodiesel yields due to better solubility. - Abstract: This study reports on the effects of direct pulse sonication and the type of alcohol (methanol and ethanol) on the transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil without any external heating or mechanical mixing. Biodiesel yields and optimum process conditions for the transesterification reaction involving ethanol, methanol, and ethanol–methanol mixtures were evaluated. The effects of ultrasonic power densities (by varying sample volumes), power output rates (in W), and ultrasonic intensities (by varying the reactor size) were studied for transesterification reaction with ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol (50%-50%) mixtures. The optimum process conditions for ethanol or methanol based transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil were determined as: 9:1 alcohol to oil ratio, 1% wt. catalyst amount, 1–2 min reaction time at a power output rate between 75 and 150 W. It was shown that the transesterification reactions using ethanol–methanol mixtures resulted in biodiesel yields as high as >99% at lower power density and ultrasound intensity when compared to ethanol or methanol based transesterification reactions.

  2. Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) Photoionization of Small Methanol and Methanol-Water Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Belau, Leonid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-04-24

    In this work, we report on the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH+(n = 1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH+, (CH3OH)2+, (CH3OH)nH+ (n = 1-9), and (CH3OH)n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-9) as a function of photon energy. With an increasein the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for the methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.

  3. Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Musahid; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Belau, Leonid; Kostko, Oleg

    2008-05-12

    In this work we report on thevacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuumultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH +, (CH 3OH)2 +, (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-9), and (CH 3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-9 ) as a function of photon energy. With an increase in the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.

  4. Microfluidic distillation chip for methanol concentration detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao-Nan; Liu, Chan-Chiung; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Ju, Wei-Jhong; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2016-03-17

    An integrated microfluidic distillation system is proposed for separating a mixed ethanol-methanol-water solution into its constituent components. The microfluidic chip is fabricated using a CO2 laser system and comprises a serpentine channel, a boiling zone, a heating zone, and a cooled collection chamber filled with de-ionized (DI) water. In the proposed device, the ethanol-methanol-water solution is injected into the microfluidic chip and driven through the serpentine channel and into the collection chamber by means of a nitrogen carrier gas. Following the distillation process, the ethanol-methanol vapor flows into the collection chamber and condenses into the DI water. The resulting solution is removed from the collection tank and reacted with a mixed indicator. Finally, the methanol concentration is inversely derived from the absorbance measurements obtained using a spectrophotometer. The experimental results show the proposed microfluidic system achieves an average methanol distillation efficiency of 97%. The practicality of the proposed device is demonstrated by detecting the methanol concentrations of two commercial fruit wines. It is shown that the measured concentration values deviate by no more than 3% from those obtained using a conventional bench top system.

  5. Highly Porous Regenerated Cellulose Fiber Mats via the Co-Forcespinning of Cellulose Acetate for Separator Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Alejandro; Mao, Yuanbing

    2015-03-01

    Improvements in battery technology are necessary for the transition away from a fossil fuel based economy. An important bottle-neck in battery efficiency is the quality of the separator, which separates the cathode and anode to prevent a short-circuit while still allowing the ions in solution to flow as close to unabated as possible. In this work solutions of cellulose acetate, polyvinyldiflourine (pvdf), and polyvinylpyrrolidone (pvp) dissolved in a 2:1 v/v acetone/dimethylacetamide solvent mixture were Forcespun to create nonwoven fiber mats of nanoscale diameter. These mats were then soaked in a NaOH solution so as to both strip the pvp from the fiber as well as regenerate cellulose from its acetate derivative for the purpose of creating high surface area, nanoporous, hydrophilic, and ioniclly conductive cellulose/pvdf nonwoven mats for the purposes of testing their suitability as battery separators

  6. Iron(III)-catalyzed cyclization of alkynyl aldehyde acetals: experimental and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tongyu; Yang, Qin; Li, Dongpo; Dong, Jinhua; Yu, Zhengkun; Li, Yuxue

    2010-08-01

    FeCl(3)6 H(2)O- and FeBr(3)-catalyzed Prins cyclization/halogenation of alkynyl aldehyde acetals has been realized with acetyl chloride or bromide as halogen source in dichloromethane to afford 2-(1-halobenzylidene or alkylidene)-substituted five-membered carbo- and heterocycles, and thus provides an alternative route for vinylic C-Cl and C-Br bond formation. Five- to eight-membered cyclic enones were efficiently synthesized by FeCl(3)6.H(2)O-catalyzed intramolecular cyclization of alkynyl aldehyde acetals in acetone under mild conditions. An oxocarbonium species generated in situ is proposed to initiate the reaction, and the target products are formed via vinylogous carbenium cation and oxete intermediates according to DFT calculations. Intermolecular reactions of alkynes and aldehyde acetals were also investigated with 20-40 mol% FeCl(3)6.H(2)O catalyst, and produced alpha,beta-unsaturated enones and chlorinated indene derivatives. The present protocol has applications in the synthesis of carbo-, oxa- and azacycles. PMID:20583061

  7. Genome-guided analysis of physiological and morphological traits of the fermentative acetate oxidizer Thermacetogenium phaeum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Thermacetogenium phaeum is a thermophilic strictly anaerobic bacterium oxidizing acetate to CO2 in syntrophic association with a methanogenic partner. It can also grow in pure culture, e.g., by fermentation of methanol to acetate. The key enzymes of homoacetate fermentation (Wood-Ljungdahl pathway) are used both in acetate oxidation and acetate formation. The obvious reversibility of this pathway in this organism is of specific interest since syntrophic acetate oxidation operates close to the energetic limitations of microbial life. Results The genome of Th. phaeum is organized on a single circular chromosome and has a total size of 2,939,057 bp. It comprises 3.215 open reading frames of which 75% could be assigned to a gene function. The G+C content is 53.88 mol%. Many CRISPR sequences were found, indicating heavy phage attack in the past. A complete gene set for a phage was found in the genome, and indications of phage action could also be observed in culture. The genome contained all genes required for CO2 reduction through the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, including two formyl tetrahydrofolate ligases, three carbon monoxide dehydrogenases, one formate hydrogenlyase complex, three further formate dehydrogenases, and three further hydrogenases. The bacterium contains a menaquinone MQ-7. No indications of cytochromes or Rnf complexes could be found in the genome. Conclusions The information obtained from the genome sequence indicates that Th. phaeum differs basically from the three homoacetogenic bacteria sequenced so far, i.e., the sodium ion-dependent Acetobacterium woodii, the ethanol-producing Clostridium ljungdahlii, and the cytochrome-containing Moorella thermoacetica. The specific enzyme outfit of Th. phaeum obviously allows ATP formation both in acetate formation and acetate oxidation. PMID:23259483

  8. Pharmacokinetics of methanol and formate in female cynomolgus monkeys exposed to methanol vapors.

    PubMed

    Medinsky, M A; Dorman, D C; Bond, J A; Moss, O R; Janszen, D B; Everitt, J I

    1997-06-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments contain mandates for reduced automotive emissions and add new requirements for the use of alternative fuels such as methanol to reduce certain automotive pollutants. Methanol is acutely toxic in humans at relatively low doses, and the potential for exposure to methanol will be increased if it is used in automotive fuel. Formate is the metabolite responsible for neurotoxic effects of acute methanol exposure. Since formate metabolism is dependent on folate, potentially sensitive folate-deficient subpopulations, such as pregnant women, may accumulate formate and be at higher risk from low-level methanol exposure. Our objective was to determine the pharmacokinetics of 14C-methanol and 14C-formate in normal and folate-deficient monkeys after exposure to 14C-methanol vapors at environmentally relevant concentrations: below the threshold limit value (TLV), at the TLV of 200 parts per million (ppm), and above the TLV. Four normal adult female cynomolgus monkeys were individually anesthetized with isoflurane, and each was exposed by endotracheal intubation to 10, 45, 200, or 900 ppm 14C-methanol for 2 hours. Concentrations of the inhaled and exhaled 14C-methanol, blood concentrations of 14C-methanol and 14C-formate, exhaled 14C-carbon dioxide (14CO2), and respiratory parameters were measured during exposure. After exposure, 14C-methanol and 14CO2 exhaled, 14C-methanol and 14C-formate excreted in urine, and 14C-methanol and 14C-formate in blood were quantified. The amounts of exhaled 14C-methanol and 14CO2, blood concentrations of 14C-methanol and 14C-formate, and 14C-methanol and 14C-formate excreted in urine were linearly related to methanol exposure concentration. For all exposures, blood concentrations of 14C-methanol-derived formate were 10 to 1000 times lower than endogenous blood formate concentrations (100 to 200 mM) reported for monkeys and were several orders of magnitude lower than levels of formate known to be toxic. Since the

  9. Medroxyprogesterone acetate exacerbates glutamate excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Jon; Morales, Alison; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2006-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that progesterone functions as a neuroprotective agent whereas medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA; Provera) does not. Moreover, MPA antagonized the neuroprotective and neurotrophic outcomes induced by 17beta-estradiol (E2). Towards developing effective hormone therapies for protection against neurodegeneration, we sought to determine whether formulation, chemical features or prevention versus treatment mode of exposure affected the outcome of MPA treatment in survival of primary hippocampal neurons. Results of these analyses indicated that both crystalline MPA and a pharmaceutical formulation (Depo-Provera) lacked neuroprotective efficacy, indicating that the effects were not dependent upon MPA formulation. Likewise, MPA in the prevention and treatment paradigms were equally ineffective at promoting neuronal survival, indicating that timing of MPA administration was not a factor. Further, the detrimental effects of MPA were not due to the presence of the acetate group, as medroxyprogesterone was as ineffective as MPA in promoting neuronal survival. Moreover, MPA pretreatment exacerbated neuron death induced by glutamate excitotoxicity as indicated by a 40% increase in neuron death determined by direct live/dead cell count and a commensurate increase in the number of positive cells by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end-labeling. Collectively these results predict that the progestin formulation of hormone therapy will affect the vulnerability of the central nervous system to degenerative insults.

  10. Adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation of acetone on TiO{sub 2}: An in situ transmission FT-IR study

    SciTech Connect

    El-Maazawi, M.; Finken, A.N.; Nair, A.B.; Grassian, V.H.

    2000-04-01

    In situ transmission Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the mechanistic details of adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation of acetone on TiO{sub 2} surfaces at 298 K. The adsorption of acetone has been followed as a function of coverage on clean TiO{sub 2} surfaces (dehydrated TiO{sub 2}). Infrared spectra at low acetone coverages ({theta} < 0.05 ML) show absorption bands at 2,973, 2,931, 1,702, 1,448, and 1,363 cm{sup {minus}1} which are assigned to the vibrational modes of molecularly adsorbed acetone. At higher coverages, the infrared spectra show that adsorbed acetone can undergo an Aldol condensation reaction followed by dehydration to yield (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}C{double_bond}CHCOCH{sub 3}, 4-methyl-3-penten-2-one or, more commonly called, mesityl oxide. The ratio of surface-bound mesityl oxide to acetone depends on surface coverage. At saturation coverage, nearly 60% of the adsorbed acetone has reacted to yield mesityl oxide on the surface. In contrast, on TiO{sub 2} surfaces with preadsorbed water (hydrated TiO{sub 2}), very little mesityl oxide forms. Infrared spectroscopy was also used to monitor the photocatalytic oxidation of adsorbed acetone as a function of acetone coverage, oxygen pressure, and water adsorption. Based on the dependence of the rate of the reaction on oxygen pressure, acetone coverage, and water adsorption, it is proposed that there are potentially three mechanisms for the photooxidation of adsorbed acetone on TiO{sub 2}. In the absence of preadsorbed H{sub 2}O, one mechanism involves the formation of a reactive O{sup {minus}}(ads) species, from gas-phase O{sub 2}, which reacts with adsorbed acetone molecules. The second mechanism involves TiO{sub 2} lattice oxygen. In the presence of adsorbed H{sub 2}O, reactive hydroxyl radicals are proposed to initiate the photooxidation of acetone.

  11. Determination of melengestrol acetate in feedstuffs with liquid chromatographic preparatory column cleanup and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Weigand, J L; Dille, D S

    1988-01-01

    Melengestrol acetate (MGA) is determined by liquid chromatography using a fraction from preparatory LC as a means of sample cleanup for feedstuffs, both dry and liquid. Dry ground feed is Soxhlet extracted with hexane and passed through a 2% deactivated alumina column for initial cleanup. The eluate is evaporated, redissolved in methanol, filtered, and injected onto a preparatory LC column. The fraction containing MGA is separated from the remaining matrix, evaporated to dryness, dissolved in methanol, and quantitated by LC analysis. Liquid supplements are extracted in methanol, and the extract is evaporated to near dryness. The residue is diluted with water, extracted with chloroform, passed through sodium sulfate, and evaporated to dryness. The remaining sample is dissolved in methanol prior to preparative LC and quantitative LC. Recoveries for 2 laboratory-fortified commercial feeds, one dry and one liquid, containing 0.39 and 0.40 mg/lb, were 98.3% +/- 4.4 and 95.8% +/- 4.3, respectively. Results compare favorably with existing methods. Up to a 4-fold time savings was realized by this method without automation.

  12. Reduction of methanol in brewed wine by the use of atmospheric and room-temperature plasma method and the combination optimization of malt with different adjuncts.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ming-Hua; Liang, Ying-Jie; Chai, Jiang-Yan; Zhou, Shi-Shui; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2014-11-01

    Methanol, often generated in brewed wine, is highly toxic for human health. To decrease the methanol content of the brewed wine, atmospheric and room-temperature plasma (ARTP) was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with lower methanol content. Headspace gas chromatography was used to determine the identity and concentration of methanol with butyl acetate as internal standard in brewed wine. With 47.4% higher and 26.3% positive mutation rates were obtained, the ARTP jet exhibited a strong effect on mutation breeding of S. cerevisiae. The mutant S. cerevisiae S12 exhibited the lowest methanol content, which was decreased by 72.54% compared with that of the wild-type strain. Subsequently, the mutant S. cerevisiae S12 was used to ferment different combinations of malt and adjuncts for lower methanol content and higher alcoholic content. It was shown that the culture 6#, which was 60% malt, 20% wheat, and 20% corn, was the best combinations of malt and adjuncts, with the lowest methanol content (104.8 mg/L), and a relatively higher alcoholic content (15.3%, v/v). The optimal malt-adjunct culture 6#, treated with the glucoamylase dose of 0.04 U/mg of grain released the highest reducing sugars (201.6 mg/mL). It was indicated that the variation in reducing sugars among the combinations of malt and different adjuncts could be due to the dose of exogenous enzymes.

  13. Determination of equilibrium constants for the reaction between acetone and HO2 using infrared kinetic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grieman, Fred J; Noell, Aaron C; Davis-Van Atta, Casey; Okumura, Mitchio; Sander, Stanley P

    2011-09-29

    The reaction between the hydroperoxy radical, HO(2), and acetone may play an important role in acetone removal and the budget of HO(x) radicals in the upper troposphere. We measured the equilibrium constants of this reaction over the temperature range of 215-272 K at an overall pressure of 100 Torr using a flow tube apparatus and laser flash photolysis to produce HO(2). The HO(2) concentration was monitored as a function of time by near-IR diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy. The resulting [HO(2)] decay curves in the presence of acetone are characterized by an immediate decrease in initial [HO(2)] followed by subsequent decay. These curves are interpreted as a rapid (<100 μs) equilibrium reaction between acetone and the HO(2) radical that occurs on time scales faster than the time resolution of the apparatus, followed by subsequent reactions. This separation of time scales between the initial equilibrium and ensuing reactions enabled the determination of the equilibrium constant with values ranging from 4.0 × 10(-16) to 7.7 × 10(-18) cm(3) molecule(-1) for T = 215-272 K. Thermodynamic parameters for the reaction determined from a second-law fit of our van't Hoff plot were Δ(r)H°(245) = -35.4 ± 2.0 kJ mol(-1) and Δ(r)S°(245) = -88.2 ± 8.5 J mol(-1) K(-1). Recent ab initio calculations predict that the reaction proceeds through a prereactive hydrogen-bonded molecular complex (HO(2)-acetone) with subsequent isomerization to a hydroxy-peroxy radical, 2-hydroxyisopropylperoxy (2-HIPP). The calculations differ greatly in the energetics of the complex and the peroxy radical, as well as the transition state for isomerization, leading to significant differences in their predictions of the extent of this reaction at tropospheric temperatures. The current results are consistent with equilibrium formation of the hydrogen-bonded molecular complex on a short time scale (100 μs). Formation of the hydrogen-bonded complex will have a negligible impact on the

  14. Determination of equilibrium constants for the reaction between acetone and HO2 using infrared kinetic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grieman, Fred J; Noell, Aaron C; Davis-Van Atta, Casey; Okumura, Mitchio; Sander, Stanley P

    2011-09-29

    The reaction between the hydroperoxy radical, HO(2), and acetone may play an important role in acetone removal and the budget of HO(x) radicals in the upper troposphere. We measured the equilibrium constants of this reaction over the temperature range of 215-272 K at an overall pressure of 100 Torr using a flow tube apparatus and laser flash photolysis to produce HO(2). The HO(2) concentration was monitored as a function of time by near-IR diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy. The resulting [HO(2)] decay curves in the presence of acetone are characterized by an immediate decrease in initial [HO(2)] followed by subsequent decay. These curves are interpreted as a rapid (<100 μs) equilibrium reaction between acetone and the HO(2) radical that occurs on time scales faster than the time resolution of the apparatus, followed by subsequent reactions. This separation of time scales between the initial equilibrium and ensuing reactions enabled the determination of the equilibrium constant with values ranging from 4.0 × 10(-16) to 7.7 × 10(-18) cm(3) molecule(-1) for T = 215-272 K. Thermodynamic parameters for the reaction determined from a second-law fit of our van't Hoff plot were Δ(r)H°(245) = -35.4 ± 2.0 kJ mol(-1) and Δ(r)S°(245) = -88.2 ± 8.5 J mol(-1) K(-1). Recent ab initio calculations predict that the reaction proceeds through a prereactive hydrogen-bonded molecular complex (HO(2)-acetone) with subsequent isomerization to a hydroxy-peroxy radical, 2-hydroxyisopropylperoxy (2-HIPP). The calculations differ greatly in the energetics of the complex and the peroxy radical, as well as the transition state for isomerization, leading to significant differences in their predictions of the extent of this reaction at tropospheric temperatures. The current results are consistent with equilibrium formation of the hydrogen-bonded molecular complex on a short time scale (100 μs). Formation of the hydrogen-bonded complex will have a negligible impact on the

  15. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY, ANALGESIC AND ANTIPYRETIC ACTIVITIES OF THE AQUEOUS METHANOLIC EXTRACT OF BERBERIS CALLIOBOTRYS IN ALBINO MICE.

    PubMed

    Alamgeer; Naz, Huma; Rasool, Shadid; Raza, Sayed Atif; Ahmad, Taseer; Ahsan, Haseeb; Mushtaq, Muhammad Naveed; Asif, Hira; Khan, Zahid; Noor, Nabeela; Utra, Ambreen Malik; Umme-Habiba-Hassan

    2016-01-01

    The aqueous methanolic extract of stem part of Berberis calliobotiys (AMEBC) was evaluated for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities in albino mice. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by using carrageenan and albumin induced paw edema, while the analgesic effect was assessed by using formalin-induced paw licking and acetic acid induced abdominal writhing in mice. The brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia model was used for antipyretic investigation. Ibuprofen (40 mg/kg) was used as a standard drug in all the three models. The aqueous methanolic extract at both (250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg) doses, showed highly significant (p < 0.001) reduction in paw edema induced by carrageenan and albumin. Moreover, the aqueous methanolic extract also highly significantly (p < 0.001) reduced (87%) the formalin-induced paw licking at 500 mg/kg. The highly significant (p < 0.001) reductions (24.48% and 37.9%) was also observed in the number of writhings. Furthermore, aqueous methanolic extract also demonstrated significant (p < 0.001) antipyretic activity against yeast induced pyrexia. The maximum effect was observed in all the three parameters at 500 mg/kg dose. The results suggest a potential benefit of the aqueous methanolic extract of Berbeis calliobotrys in treating conditions associated with inflammation, pain and fever. PMID:27505907

  16. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY, ANALGESIC AND ANTIPYRETIC ACTIVITIES OF THE AQUEOUS METHANOLIC EXTRACT OF BERBERIS CALLIOBOTRYS IN ALBINO MICE.

    PubMed

    Alamgeer; Naz, Huma; Rasool, Shadid; Raza, Sayed Atif; Ahmad, Taseer; Ahsan, Haseeb; Mushtaq, Muhammad Naveed; Asif, Hira; Khan, Zahid; Noor, Nabeela; Utra, Ambreen Malik; Umme-Habiba-Hassan

    2016-01-01

    The aqueous methanolic extract of stem part of Berberis calliobotiys (AMEBC) was evaluated for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities in albino mice. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by using carrageenan and albumin induced paw edema, while the analgesic effect was assessed by using formalin-induced paw licking and acetic acid induced abdominal writhing in mice. The brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia model was used for antipyretic investigation. Ibuprofen (40 mg/kg) was used as a standard drug in all the three models. The aqueous methanolic extract at both (250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg) doses, showed highly significant (p < 0.001) reduction in paw edema induced by carrageenan and albumin. Moreover, the aqueous methanolic extract also highly significantly (p < 0.001) reduced (87%) the formalin-induced paw licking at 500 mg/kg. The highly significant (p < 0.001) reductions (24.48% and 37.9%) was also observed in the number of writhings. Furthermore, aqueous methanolic extract also demonstrated significant (p < 0.001) antipyretic activity against yeast induced pyrexia. The maximum effect was observed in all the three parameters at 500 mg/kg dose. The results suggest a potential benefit of the aqueous methanolic extract of Berbeis calliobotrys in treating conditions associated with inflammation, pain and fever.

  17. Assessment of methanol electro-oxidation for direct methanol-air fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, S.D.; Sen, R.K.

    1988-07-01

    The Office of Energy Storage and Distribution of the US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of a methanol-air fuel cell for transportation application. The approach used at Los Alamos National Laboratory converts the methanol fuel to a hydrogen-rich gas in a reformer, then operates the fuel cell on hydrogen and air. The reformer tends to be bulky (raising vehicle packaging problems), has a long startup period, and is not well suited for the transient operation required in a vehicle. Methanol, however, can be oxidized electrochemically in the fuel cell. If this process can be conducted efficiently, a direct methanol-air fuel cell can be used, which does not require a reformer. The objective of this study is to assess the potential of developing a suitable catalyst for the direct electrochemical oxidation of methanol. The primary conclusion of this study is that no acceptable catalysts exist can efficiently oxidize methanol electrochemically and have the desired cost and lifetime for vehicle applications. However, recent progress in understanding the mechanism of methanol oxidation indicates that a predictive base can be developed to search for methanol oxidation catalysts and can be used to methodically develop improved catalysts. Such an approach is strongly recommended. The study also recommends that until further progress in developing high-performance catalysts is achieved, research in cell design and testing is not warranted. 43 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Transesterification of waste vegetable oil under pulse sonication using ethanol, methanol and ethanol-methanol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-12-01

    This study reports on the effects of direct pulse sonication and the type of alcohol (methanol and ethanol) on the transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil without any external heating or mechanical mixing. Biodiesel yields and optimum process conditions for the transesterification reaction involving ethanol, methanol, and ethanol-methanol mixtures were evaluated. The effects of ultrasonic power densities (by varying sample volumes), power output rates (in W), and ultrasonic intensities (by varying the reactor size) were studied for transesterification reaction with ethanol, methanol and ethanol-methanol (50%-50%) mixtures. The optimum process conditions for ethanol or methanol based transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil were determined as: 9:1 alcohol to oil ratio, 1% wt. catalyst amount, 1-2 min reaction time at a power output rate between 75 and 150 W. It was shown that the transesterification reactions using ethanol-methanol mixtures resulted in biodiesel yields as high as >99% at lower power density and ultrasound intensity when compared to ethanol or methanol based transesterification reactions.

  19. Understanding Palladium Acetate from a User Perspective.

    PubMed

    Carole, William A; Colacot, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    The behavior of palladium acetate is reviewed with respect to its synthesis, characterization, structure (in both solution and solid state), and activation pathways. In addition, comparisons of catalytic activities between pure palladium acetate and two common byproducts, Pd3 (OAc)5 (NO2 ) and polymeric [Pd(OAc)2 ]n , typically present in commercially available material are reviewed. Hence, this minireview serves as a concise guide for the users of palladium acetate from both academia and industry. PMID:27125630

  20. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sodium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sodium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... sodium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... sodium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3...

  4. Ultratrace Measurement of Acetone from Skin Using Zeolite: Toward Development of a Wearable Monitor of Fat Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuki; Hiyama, Satoshi; Toyooka, Tsuguyoshi; Takeuchi, Shoji; Itabashi, Keiji; Okubo, Tatsuya; Tabata, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of gases emitted from human skin and contained in human breath has received increasing attention in recent years for noninvasive clinical diagnoses and health checkups. Acetone emitted from human skin (skin acetone) should be a good indicator of fat metabolism, which is associated with diet and exercise. However, skin acetone is an analytically challenging target because it is emitted in very low concentrations. In the present study, zeolite was investigated for concentrating skin acetone for subsequent semiconductor-based analysis. The adsorption and desorption characteristics of five zeolites with different structures and those hydrophobicities were compared. A hydrophobic zeolite with relatively large pores (approximately 1.6 times larger than the acetone molecule diameter) was the best concentrator of skin acetone among the zeolites tested. The concentrator developed using zeolite was applied in a semiconductor-based gas sensor in a simulated mobile environment where the closed space was frequently collapsed to reflect the twisting and elastic movement of skin that would be encountered in a wearable device. These results could be used to develop a wearable analyzer for skin acetone, which would be a powerful tool for preventing and alleviating lifestyle-related diseases.

  5. A two-stage combined trickle bed reactor/biofilter for treatment of styrene/acetone vapor mixtures.

    PubMed

    Vanek, Tomas; Halecky, Martin; Paca, Jan; Zapotocky, Lubos; Gelbicova, Tereza; Vadkertiova, Renata; Kozliak, Evguenii; Jones, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Performance of a two-stage biofiltration system was investigated for removal of styrene-acetone mixtures. High steady-state acetone loadings (above C(in)(Ac) = 0.5 g.m(-3) corresponding to the loadings > 34.5 g.m(-3).h(-1)) resulted in a significant inhibition of the system's performance in both acetone and styrene removal. This inhibition was shown to result from the acetone accumulation within the upstream trickle-bed bioreactor (TBR) circulating mineral medium, which was observed by direct chromatographic measurements. Placing a biofilter (BF) downstream to this TBR overcomes the inhibition as long as the biofilter has a sufficient bed height. A different kind of inhibition of styrene biodegradation was observed within the biofilter at very high acetone loadings (above C(in)(Ac) = 1.1 g.m(-3) or 76 g.m(-3).h(-1) loading). In addition to steady-state measurements, dynamic tests confirmed that the reactor overloading can be readily overcome, once the accumulated acetone in the TBR fluids is degraded. No sizable metabolite accumulation in the medium was observed for either TBR or BF. Analyses of the biodegradation activities of microbial isolates from the biofilm corroborated the trends observed for the two-stage biofiltration system, particularly the occurrence of an inhibition threshold by excess acetone.

  6. Photocatalytic degradation of gaseous acetone, toluene, and p-xylene using a TiO2 thin film.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wen J; Li, Jian; Jin, Yu Q

    2010-09-01

    A nano-structured TiO(2) thin film immobilized on glass springs was prepared by the sol-gel method, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Acetone, toluene and p-xylene were chosen as common VOCs for a photocatalytic degradation study of both mixed and pure gases using the TiO(2) thin film. Addition of hydrogen peroxide promoted activation of the catalyst during acetone degradation. The effects of gas flow rate and UV light wavelength were investigated with the pure gases. Gas flow rate greatly influenced the degradation. The highest degradation rates were 77.7% (at 3 L/min) for acetone, 61.9% (at 3 L/min) for toluene, and 55% (at 7 L/min) for p-xylene. A UV light wavelength of 254 nm provided greater degradation of the VOCs than 365 nm UV light. The degradation rates of p-xylene and acetone in the gas mixture were lower than those of pure p-xylene and acetone. The opposite trend was observed for toluene. Acetone, both in the mixed gas and pure, had the highest degradation efficiency. Acetone, toluene and p-xylene degradation followed Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics.

  7. 40 CFR 721.6660 - Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime-blocked (generic name). 721.6660 Section 721.6660... Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime-blocked..., acetone oxime-blocked (PMN P-88-1658) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  8. 40 CFR 721.6660 - Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime-blocked (generic name). 721.6660 Section 721.6660... Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime-blocked..., acetone oxime-blocked (PMN P-88-1658) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  9. Insights on Clusters Formation Mechanism by Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. 2. The Case of Acetone-Water Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Russo, C.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is the second of a series dealing with clusters formation mechanism. In part 1, water clusters with the addition of an electrophilic molecule such as ethanol were studied by Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS). Mass distributions of molecular clusters of ethanol, water and ethanol-water mixed clusters, were obtained by means of two different ionization methods: Electron Ionization (EI) and picosecond laser Photo-Ionization (PI) at a wavelength of 355 nm. In part 2, the same experimental approach was employed to obtain mass spectra of clusters generated by acetone-water binary mixtures with a different composition. Strong dependence of the mass spectra of clusters with EI and PI on the acetone-water mixing ratio was observed. It was shown that the spectral pattern changes gradually and water-rich cluster signals become fainter while acetone-rich cluster signals become more intensive with increasing acetone concentrations from 0.3% to 40%. Owing to the hydrogen bond acceptor character of acetone, its self-association is discouraged with respect to ethanol. The autocorrelation function (AF) was used to analyze the variation of the water clusters composition with the increase of the acetone concentration in terms of fundamental periodicities. However, although acetone and ethanol present a very different hydrogen-bonding ability, similarly to ethanol-water system, in acetone-water system the formation of water-rich clusters and subsequent metastable fragmentation are the dominant process that determine the clusters distribution, irrespective of the ionization process, while the ionization process significantly affects the acetone-rich clusters distribution.

  10. Insights on Clusters Formation Mechanism by Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. 2. The Case of Acetone-Water Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Russo, C.

    2016-08-01

    This paper is the second of a series dealing with clusters formation mechanism. In part 1, water clusters with the addition of an electrophilic molecule such as ethanol were studied by Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS). Mass distributions of molecular clusters of ethanol, water and ethanol-water mixed clusters, were obtained by means of two different ionization methods: Electron Ionization (EI) and picosecond laser Photo-Ionization (PI) at a wavelength of 355 nm. In part 2, the same experimental approach was employed to obtain mass spectra of clusters generated by acetone-water binary mixtures with a different composition. Strong dependence of the mass spectra of clusters with EI and PI on the acetone-water mixing ratio was observed. It was shown that the spectral pattern changes gradually and water-rich cluster signals become fainter while acetone-rich cluster signals become more intensive with increasing acetone concentrations from 0.3% to 40%. Owing to the hydrogen bond acceptor character of acetone, its self-association is discouraged with respect to ethanol. The autocorrelation function (AF) was used to analyze the variation of the water clusters composition with the increase of the acetone concentration in terms of fundamental periodicities. However, although acetone and ethanol present a very different hydrogen-bonding ability, similarly to ethanol-water system, in acetone-water system the formation of water-rich clusters and subsequent metastable fragmentation are the dominant process that determine the clusters distribution, irrespective of the ionization process, while the ionization process significantly affects the acetone-rich clusters distribution.

  11. Opportunities for coal to methanol conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    The accumulations of mining residues in the anthracite coal regions of Pennsylvania offer a unique opportunity to convert the coal content into methanol that could be utilized in that area as an alternative to gasoline or to extend the supplies through blending. Additional demand may develop through the requirements of public utility gas turbines located in that region. The cost to run this refuse through coal preparation plants may result in a clean coal at about $17.00 per ton. After gasification and synthesis in a 5000 ton per day facility, a cost of methanol of approximately $3.84 per million Btu is obtained using utility financing. If the coal is to be brought in by truck or rail from a distance of approximately 60 miles, the cost of methanol would range between $4.64 and $5.50 per million Btu depending upon the mode of transportation. The distribution costs to move the methanol from the synthesis plant to the pump could add, at a minimum, $2.36 per million Btu to the cost. In total, the delivered cost at the pump for methanol produced from coal mining wastes could range between $6.20 and $7.86 per million Btu.

  12. Effect of perchloroethylene (PCE) on methane and acetate production by a methanogenic consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Bereded-Samuel, Y.; Petersen, J.N.; Skeen, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    The effects of perchloroethylene (PCE) concentration in the range of 0-100 mg/L on methane and acetate production by a methanol-enriched methanogenic consortia were investigated at 17{degrees}C. The results indicate that PCE is more inhibitory to methanogenesis than to acetogenesis. At concentrations as low as 10 ppm, PCE affects the methanogenic activity of the consortium, and has completely inhibited this activity at 100 ppm. Conversely, PCE does not begin to inhibit acetogenic activity until the concentration is above 10 ppm, and has not completely inhibited it even at a PCE concentration of 100 ppm. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Positron scattering from vinyl acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, L.; Zecca, A.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Brunger, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    Using a Beer-Lambert attenuation approach, we report measured total cross sections (TCSs) for positron scattering from vinyl acetate (C4H6O2) in the incident positron energy range 0.15-50 eV. In addition, we also report an independent atom model with screening corrected additivity rule computation results for the TCSs, differential and integral elastic cross sections, the positronium formation cross section and inelastic integral cross sections. The energy range of these calculations is 1-1000 eV. While there is a reasonable qualitative correspondence between measurement and calculation for the TCSs, in terms of the energy dependence of those cross sections, the theory was found to be a factor of ˜2 larger in magnitude at the lower energies, even after the measured data were corrected for the forward angle scattering effect.

  14. Hydrothermal Synthesis of ZnO Structures Formed by High-Aspect-Ratio Nanowires for Acetone Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhen; Wang, Yong; Li, Zhanguo; Yu, Naisen

    2016-07-01

    Snowflake-like ZnO structures originating from self-assembled nanowires were prepared by a low-temperature aqueous solution method. The as-grown hierarchical ZnO structures were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The results showed that the snowflake-like ZnO structures were composed of high-aspect-ratio nanowires. Furthermore, gas-sensing properties to various testing gases of 10 and 50 ppm were measured, which confirms that the ZnO structures were of good selectivity and response to acetone and could serve for acetone sensor to detect low-concentration acetone.

  15. Extractive fermentation of acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Busche, R.M.

    1991-12-31

    In this technoeconomic evaluation of the manufacture of acetic acid by fermentation, the use of the bacterium: Acetobacter suboxydans from the old vinegar process was compared with expected performance of the newer Clostridium thermoaceticum bacterium. Both systems were projected to operate as immobilized cells in a continuous, fluidized bed bioreactor, using solvent extraction to recover the product. Acetobacter metabolizes ethanol aerobically to produce acid at 100 g/L in a low pH medium. This ensures that the product is in the form of a concentrated extractable free acid, rather than as an unextractable salt. Unfortunately, yields from glucose by way of the ethanol fermentation are poor, but near the biological limits of the organisms involved. Conversely, C. thermoaceticum is a thermophilic anaerobe that operates at high fermentation rates on glucose at neutral pH to produce acetate salts directly in substantially quantitative yields. However, it is severely inhibited by product, which restricts concentration to a dilute 20 g/L. An improved Acetobacter system operating with recycled cells at 50 g/L appears capable of producing acid at $0.38/lb, as compared with a $0.29/lb price for synthetic acid. However, this system has only a limited margin for process improvement. The present Clostridium system cannot compete, since the required selling price would be $0.42/lb. However, if the organism could be adapted to tolerate higher product concentrations at acid pH, selling price could be reduced to $0.22/lb, or about 80% of the price of synthetic acid.

  16. Disposition of acetone, methyl ethyl ketone and cyclohexanone in acute poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sakata, M; Kikuchi, J; Haga, M; Ishiyama, N; Maeda, T; Ise, T; Hikita, N

    1989-01-01

    A case of coma due to the drinking of a liquid cement for polyvinyl chloride resin, containing acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, cyclohexanone and polyvinyl chloride is described. The patient also simultaneously ingested the alcoholic beverage, sake. After gastric lavage, plasma exchanges and direct hemoperfusions, the patient recovered. The concentrations of these chemicals in plasma and urine were analyzed at various time intervals to estimate the clearance. The elimination half lives for acetone and methyl ethyl ketone were 18 hours and 10 hours, respectively. Although cyclohexanone made up the largest component in the solvents, the blood level was extremely low and a large amount of cyclohexanol, a metabolite of cyclohexanone was detected in the blood and urine. The glucuronide metabolite of cyclohexanol was also estimated after the hydrolysis with beta-glucuronidase. Since the conversion of cyclohexanone to cyclohexanol is known to be catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase, possible interactions between sake ingestion and cyclohexanone metabolism is proposed.

  17. Technical and economic assessment of processes for the production of butanol and acetone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This report represents a preliminary technical and economic evaluation of a process which produces mixed solvents (butaol/acetone/ethanol) via fermentation of sugars derived from renewable biomass resources. The objective is to assess the technology of producing butanol/acetone from biomass, and select a viable process capable of serving as a base case model for technical and economic analysis. It is anticipated that the base case process developed herein can then be used as the basis for subsequent studies concerning biomass conversion processes capable of producing a wide range of chemicals. The general criteria utilized in determining the design basis for the process are profit potential and non-renewable energy displacement potential. The feedstock chosen, aspen wood, was selected from a number of potential renewable biomass resources as the most readily available in the United States and for its relatively large potential for producing reducing sugars.

  18. DSC and curing kinetics study of epoxy grouting diluted with furfural -acetone slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H.; Sun, D. W.; Li, B.; Liu, Y. T.; Ran, Q. P.; Liu, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The use of furfural-acetone slurry as active diluents of Bisphenol-A epoxy resin (DGEBA) groutings has been studied by dynamic and non-isothermal DSC for the first time. Curing kinetics study was investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetries at different heating rates. Activation enery (Ea) was calculated based on Kissinger and Ozawa Methods, and the results showed that Ea increased from 58.87 to 71.13KJ/mol after the diluents were added. The furfural-acetone epoxy matrix could cure completely at the theoretical curing temperature of 365.8K and the curing time of 139mins, which were determined by the kinetic model parameters.

  19. Investigations on the structure of DMSO and acetone in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    McLain, Sylvia E; Soper, Alan K

    2007-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and acetone have been investigated using neutron diffraction augmented with isotopic substitution and empirical potential structure refinement computer simulations. Each solute has been measured at two concentrations-1:20 and 1:2 solute:water mole ratios. At both concentrations for each solute, the tetrahedral hydrogen bonding network of water is largely unperturbed, though the total water molecule coordination number is reduced in the higher 1:2 concentrations. With higher concentrations of acetone, water tends to segregate into clusters, while in higher concentrations of DMSO the present study reconfirms that the structure of the liquid is dominated by DMSO-water interactions. This result may have implications for the highly nonideal behavior observed in the thermodynamic functions for 1:2 DMSO-water solutions.

  20. Graphene oxide foams and their excellent adsorption ability for acetone gas

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yongqiang; Zhang, Nana; Wu, Fei; Xu, Fangqiang; Liu, Yu; Gao, Jianping

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • GO and RGO foams were prepared using a simple and green method, unidirectional freeze-drying. • The porous structure of the foams can be adjusted by changing GO concentrations. • GO and RGO foams show good adsorption efficiency for acetone gas. - Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) foams were prepared using a unidirectional freeze-drying method. These porous carbon materials were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption behavior of the two kinds of foams for acetone was studied. The result showed that the saturated adsorption efficiency of the GO foams was over 100%, and was higher than that of RGO foams and other carbon materials.

  1. Roles of Acetone and Diacetone Alcohol in Coordination and Dissociation Reactions of Uranyl Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Daniel; Schoendorff, George E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.; Gibson, John K.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2012-12-03

    Combined collision-induced dissociation mass-spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations were employed to elucidate the molecular structure of "hypercoordinated" species and the energetics of water-elimination reactions of uranyl acetone complexes observed in earlier work (Rios, D.; Rutkowski, P. X.; Van Stipdonk, M. J.; Gibson, J. K. Inorg. Chem. 2011, 50, 4781). It is shown that the "hypercoordinated" species contain diacetone alcohol ligands bonded in either bidentate or monodentate fashion, which are indistinguishable from (acetone)2 in mass spectrometry. Calculations confirm that four diacetone ligands can form stable complexes, but that the effective number of atoms coordinating with uranium in the equatorial plane does not exceed five. Diacetone alcohol ligands are shown to form mesityl oxide ligands and alkoxide species through the elimination of water, providing an explanation for the observed water-elimination reactions.

  2. Proton transfer reactions between nitric acid and acetone, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde in the solid phase.

    PubMed

    Lasne, Jérôme; Laffon, Carine; Parent, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    The heterogeneous and homogeneous reactions of acetone, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde with solid nitric acid (HNO(3)) films have been studied with Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy (RAIRS) under Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) conditions in the 90-170 K temperature range. In the bulk or at the surface of the films, nitric acid transfers its proton to the carbonyl function of the organic molecules, producing protonated acetone-H(+), hydroxyacetone-H(+), acetaldehyde-H(+) and benzaldehyde-H(+), and nitrate anions NO(3)(-), a reaction not observed when nitric acid is previously hydrated [J. Lasne, C. Laffon and Ph. Parent, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 697]. This provides a molecular-scale description of the carbonyl protonation reaction in an acid medium, the first step of the acid-catalyzed condensation of carbonyl compounds, fuelling the growth of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere.

  3. Mechanism for the uncatalyzed cyclic acetone-peroxide formation reaction: an experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Fuentes, Eduardo A; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C; Hidalgo-Santiago, Migdalia; Moreno, Martha; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P

    2013-10-17

    In this study, a mechanism for the uncatalyzed reaction between acetone and hydrogen peroxide is postulated. The reaction leads to the formation of the important homemade explosives collectively known as cyclic acetone peroxides (CAP). The proposed mechanistic scheme is based on Raman, GC-MS, and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, and it is supported by ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results demonstrate that the proposed mechanism for the uncatalyzed formation reaction of CAP occurs in three steps: monomer formation, polymerization of the 2-hydroperoxipropan-2-ol monomer, and cyclization. The temporal decay of the intensities of important assigned-bands is in excellent agreement with the proposed mechanism. Previous reports also confirm that the polymerization step is favored in comparison to other possible pathways.

  4. Biofiltration of a mixture of ethylene, ammonia, n-butanol, and acetone gases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Li, Congna; Heber, Albert J; Ni, Jiqin; Huang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    This study describes cleaning of a waste gas stream using bench scale biofilters (BFs) or biotrickling filters (BTFs). The gas stream contained a mixture of acetone, n-butanol, methane, ethylene, and ammonia, and was diverted uniformly to six biofilters and four biotrickling filters. The biofilters were packed with either perlite (BF-P), polyurethane foam (BF-F), or a mixture of compost, wood chips, and straw (BF-C), whereas the biotrickling filters contained either perlite (BTF-P) or polyurethane foam (BTF-F). Experimental results showed that both BFs and BTFs packed with various media were able to achieve complete removal of highly soluble compounds such as acetone, n-butanol, and ammonia of which the dimensionless Henry's constants (H) are less than 0.01. Methane was not removed due to its extreme insolubility (H>30). However, the ethylene (H ≈ 9) removal efficiencies depended on trickle water flow rates, media surface areas, and ammonia gas levels.

  5. Uptake of acetone, ethanol and benzene to snow and ice: effects of surface area and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbatt, J. P. D.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Ullerstam, M.; Ye, T. J.

    2008-10-01

    The interactions of gas-phase acetone, ethanol and benzene with smooth ice films and artificial snow have been studied. In one technique, the snow is packed into a cylindrical column and inserted into a low-pressure flow reactor coupled to a chemical-ionization mass spectrometer for gas-phase analysis. At 214 and 228 K, it is found for acetone and ethanol that the adsorbed amounts per surface area match those for adsorption to thin films of ice formed by freezing liquid water, when the specific surface area of the snow (as determined from Kr adsorption at 77 K) and the geometric surface area of the ice films are used. This indicates that freezing thin films of water leads to surfaces that are smooth at the molecular level. Experiments performed to test the effect of film growth on ethanol uptake indicate that uptake is independent of ice growth rate, up to 2.4 µm min-1. In addition, traditional Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) experiments were performed with these gases on artificial snow from 238 to 266.5 K. A transition from a BET type I isotherm indicative of monolayer formation to a BET type II isotherm indicative of multilayer uptake is observed for acetone at T>=263 K and ethanol at T>=255 K, arising from solution formation on the ice. When multilayer formation does not occur, as was the case for benzene at T<=263 K and for acetone at T<=255 K, the saturated surface coverage increased with increasing temperature, consistent with the quasi-liquid layer affecting adsorption prior to full dissolution/multilayer formation.

  6. Excess protons in water-acetone mixtures. II. A conductivity study.

    PubMed

    Semino, Rocío; Longinotti, M Paula

    2013-10-28

    In the present work we complement a previous simulation study [R. Semino and D. Laria, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 194503 (2012)] on the disruption of the proton transfer mechanism in water by the addition of an aprotic solvent, such as acetone. We provide experimental measurements of the mobility of protons in aqueous-acetone mixtures in a wide composition range, for water molar fractions, xw, between 0.05 and 1.00. Furthermore, new molecular dynamics simulation results are presented for rich acetone mixtures, which provide further insight into the proton transport mechanism in water-non-protic solvent mixtures. The proton mobility was analyzed between xw 0.05 and 1.00 and compared to molecular dynamics simulation data. Results show two qualitative changes in the proton transport composition dependence at xw ∼ 0.25 and 0.8. At xw < 0.25 the ratio of the infinite dilution molar conductivities of HCl and LiCl, Λ(0)(HCl).Λ(0)(LiCl)(-1), is approximately constant and equal to one, since the proton diffusion is vehicular and equal to that of Li(+). At xw ∼ 0.25, proton mobility starts to differ from that of Li(+) indicating that above this concentration the Grotthuss transport mechanism starts to be possible. Molecular dynamics simulation results showed that at this threshold concentration the probability of interconversion between two Eigen structures starts to be non-negligible. At xw ∼ 0.8, the infinite molar conductivity of HCl concentration dependence qualitatively changes. This result is in excellent agreement with the analysis presented in the previous simulation work and it has been ascribed to the interchange of water and acetone molecules in the second solvation shell of the hydronium ion.

  7. Excess protons in water-acetone mixtures. II. A conductivity study.

    PubMed

    Semino, Rocío; Longinotti, M Paula

    2013-10-28

    In the present work we complement a previous simulation study [R. Semino and D. Laria, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 194503 (2012)] on the disruption of the proton transfer mechanism in water by the addition of an aprotic solvent, such as acetone. We provide experimental measurements of the mobility of protons in aqueous-acetone mixtures in a wide composition range, for water molar fractions, xw, between 0.05 and 1.00. Furthermore, new molecular dynamics simulation results are presented for rich acetone mixtures, which provide further insight into the proton transport mechanism in water-non-protic solvent mixtures. The proton mobility was analyzed between xw 0.05 and 1.00 and compared to molecular dynamics simulation data. Results show two qualitative changes in the proton transport composition dependence at xw ∼ 0.25 and 0.8. At xw < 0.25 the ratio of the infinite dilution molar conductivities of HCl and LiCl, Λ(0)(HCl).Λ(0)(LiCl)(-1), is approximately constant and equal to one, since the proton diffusion is vehicular and equal to that of Li(+). At xw ∼ 0.25, proton mobility starts to differ from that of Li(+) indicating that above this concentration the Grotthuss transport mechanism starts to be possible. Molecular dynamics simulation results showed that at this threshold concentration the probability of interconversion between two Eigen structures starts to be non-negligible. At xw ∼ 0.8, the infinite molar conductivity of HCl concentration dependence qualitatively changes. This result is in excellent agreement with the analysis presented in the previous simulation work and it has been ascribed to the interchange of water and acetone molecules in the second solvation shell of the hydronium ion. PMID:24182052

  8. Surface tension isotherms of the dioxane-acetone-water and glycerol-ethanol-water ternary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhambulatov, R. S.; Dadashev, R. Kh.; Elimkhanov, D. Z.; Dadashev, I. N.

    2016-10-01

    The results of the experimental and theoretical studies of the concentration dependence of surface tension of aqueous solutions of the 1,4-dioxane-acetone-water and glycerol-ethanol-water ternary systems were given. The studies were performed by the hanging-drop method on a DSA100 tensiometer. The maximum error of surface tension was 1%. The theoretical models for calculating the surface tension of the ternary systems of organic solutions were analyzed.

  9. Acetone variability in the upper troposphere: analysis of CARIBIC observations and LMDz-INCA chemistry-climate model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, T.; Szopa, S.; Zahn, A.; Schuck, T.; Brenninkmeijer, C.; Sprung, D.; Slemr, F.

    2011-03-01

    This paper investigates the acetone variability in the upper troposphere (UT) as sampled during the CARIBIC airborne experiment and simulated by the LMDz-INCA global chemistry climate model. The aim is to (1) describe spatial distribution and temporal variability of acetone; (2) define observation-based constraints to improve tropospheric modelling of the acetone; and (3) investigate the representativeness of the observational data set. According to the model results, South Asia (including part of the Indian Ocean, all India, China, and Indochinese peninsula) and Europe are net source regions of acetone, where near 25% of North Hemispheric (NH) primary emissions and 40% of the NH chemical production of acetone take place. The impact of these net source regions on continental upper tropospheric acetone is studied by analysing CARIBIC observations of 2006 and 2007 when most flight routes stretch between Frankfurt, Germany, and Manila, Philippines, and by focussing over 3 sub-regions where acetone variability is strong: Europe-Mediterranean, Central South China and South China Sea. Acetone volume mixing ratio (vmr) in UT varies with the season, increasing from winter to summer by a factor 2 to 4. Spatial variability is also important, as acetone vmr may vary in summer by more than 1000 pptv within only 5 latitude-longitude degrees, and standard deviation on measurements acquired during a short flight sequence over a sub-region may reach 40%. 200 pptv difference may also be observed between successive inbound and outbound flights over the same sub-region, due to different flight specifications (trajectory in relation to plume, time for insulation). A satisfactory agreement for the abundance of acetone is found between model results and observations, with e.g. only 30% over-estimation of the annual average over Central-South China and the South China Sea (between 450 and 600 pptv), and an under-estimation by less than 20% over Europe Mediterranean (around 800 pptv

  10. Cobalt/copper-decorated carbon nanofibers as novel non-precious electrocatalyst for methanol electrooxidation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Co/Cu-decorated carbon nanofibers are introduced as novel electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation. The introduced nanofibers have been prepared based on graphitization of poly(vinyl alcohol) which has high carbon content compared to many polymer precursors for carbon nanofiber synthesis. Typically, calcination in argon atmosphere of electrospun nanofibers composed of cobalt acetate tetrahydrate, copper acetate monohydrate, and poly(vinyl alcohol) leads to form carbon nanofibers decorated by CoCu nanoparticles. The graphitization of the poly(vinyl alcohol) has been enhanced due to presence of cobalt which acts as effective catalyst. The physicochemical characterization affirmed that the metallic nanoparticles are sheathed by thin crystalline graphite layer. Investigation of the electrocatalytic activity of the introduced nanofibers toward methanol oxidation indicates good performance, as the corresponding onset potential was small compared to many reported materials; 310 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl electrode) and a current density of 12 mA/cm2 was obtained. Moreover, due to the graphite shield, good stability was observed. Overall, the introduced study opens new avenue for cheap and stable transition metals-based nanostructures as non-precious catalysts for fuel cell applications. PMID:24387682

  11. Cobalt/copper-decorated carbon nanofibers as novel non-precious electrocatalyst for methanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, Nasser A. M.; El-Newehy, Mohamed; Al-Deyab, Salem S.; Kim, Hak Yong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Co/Cu-decorated carbon nanofibers are introduced as novel electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation. The introduced nanofibers have been prepared based on graphitization of poly(vinyl alcohol) which has high carbon content compared to many polymer precursors for carbon nanofiber synthesis. Typically, calcination in argon atmosphere of electrospun nanofibers composed of cobalt acetate tetrahydrate, copper acetate monohydrate, and poly(vinyl alcohol) leads to form carbon nanofibers decorated by CoCu nanoparticles. The graphitization of the poly(vinyl alcohol) has been enhanced due to presence of cobalt which acts as effective catalyst. The physicochemical characterization affirmed that the metallic nanoparticles are sheathed by thin crystalline graphite layer. Investigation of the electrocatalytic activity of the introduced nanofibers toward methanol oxidation indicates good performance, as the corresponding onset potential was small compared to many reported materials; 310 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl electrode) and a current density of 12 mA/cm2 was obtained. Moreover, due to the graphite shield, good stability was observed. Overall, the introduced study opens new avenue for cheap and stable transition metals-based nanostructures as non-precious catalysts for fuel cell applications.

  12. Methanol and the productivity of tropical crops

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, T.U.

    1995-12-31

    Studies are being conducted in Trinidad and Tobago, St. Lucia and St. Kitts/Nevis to determine the effect of aqueous solutions of methanol on the growth and yield of a wide range of vegetable, field and perennial crops. The paper presents a summary of results to data for ten of the crops studied. Six of these crops, lettuce, sweet pepper, tomato, mango and breadfruit, have shown significant increases in growth or yield with methanol application, while others such as pigeon pea, rice, banana and cocoa have shown more limited responses. There appears to be some potential for the use of methanol in tropical crop production but further studies are required before this apparent potential can be harnessed.

  13. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, C E; Self, J L; Copley, J R D; Faraone, A

    2016-07-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD3OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids. PMID:27394112

  14. Intracranial hemorrhage associated with methanol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Sebe, Ahmet; Satar, Salim; Uzun, Belkan; Topal, Metin; Yesilagac, Hasan; Avci, Andakkan

    2006-12-01

    Methanol is a common component of gasoline, antifreeze, washer fluid, perfume, household cleaners and various other industrial products. Acute methanol poisoning produces severe metabolic acidosis, serious neurologic sequelae and rarely imaging findings. In this paper, we describe a 35-year-old man with methanol intoxication who was in a comatose stage. Computed tomography (CT) showed widespread brain edema and hemorrhages localized in the supratentorial region of the temporal lobe, nearly 3 x 1 cm in a crescent shape, in the white matter surrounding the capsula externa and extending to the periventricular white matter and occipital lobes. Temporal lobe hemorrhage in our patient might also have been due to the effect of heparinization during hemodialysis, metabolic and lactic acidosis, or formate.

  15. Thermally integrated staged methanol reformer and method

    DOEpatents

    Skala, Glenn William; Hart-Predmore, David James; Pettit, William Henry; Borup, Rodney Lynn

    2001-01-01

    A thermally integrated two-stage methanol reformer including a heat exchanger and first and second reactors colocated in a common housing in which a gaseous heat transfer medium circulates to carry heat from the heat exchanger into the reactors. The heat transfer medium comprises principally hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methanol vapor and water vapor formed in a first stage reforming reaction. A small portion of the circulating heat transfer medium is drawn off and reacted in a second stage reforming reaction which substantially completes the reaction of the methanol and water remaining in the drawn-off portion. Preferably, a PrOx reactor will be included in the housing upstream of the heat exchanger to supplement the heat provided by the heat exchanger.

  16. Efficient green methanol synthesis from glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Muhammad H.; Dummer, Nicholas F.; Knight, David W.; Jenkins, Robert L.; Howard, Mark; Moulijn, Jacob; Taylor, Stuart H.; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2015-12-01

    The production of biodiesel from the transesterification of plant-derived triglycerides with methanol has been commercialized extensively. Impure glycerol is obtained as a by-product at roughly one-tenth the mass of the biodiesel. Utilization of this crude glycerol is important in improving the viability of the overall process. Here we show that crude glycerol can be reacted with water over very simple basic or redox oxide catalysts to produce methanol in high yields, together with other useful chemicals, in a one-step low-pressure process. Our discovery opens up the possibility of recycling the crude glycerol produced during biodiesel manufacture. Furthermore, we show that molecules containing at least two hydroxyl groups can be converted into methanol, which demonstrates some aspects of the generality of this new chemistry.

  17. Methanol sensor operated in a passive mode

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2002-01-01

    A sensor outputs a signal related to a concentration of methanol in an aqueous solution adjacent the sensor. A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is included with an anode side and a cathode side. An anode current collector supports the anode side of the MEA and has a flow channel therethrough for flowing a stream of the aqueous solution and forms a physical barrier to control access of the methanol to the anode side of the MEA. A cathode current collector supports the cathode side of the MEA and is configured for air access to the cathode side of the MEA. A current sensor is connected to measure the current in a short circuit across the sensor electrodes to provide an output signal functionally related to the concentration of methanol in the aqueous solution.

  18. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, C. E.; Self, J. L.; Copley, J. R. D.; Faraone, A.

    2016-07-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD3OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids.

  19. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy for differentiation of molecular configurations and solvent properties between acetone and dimethyl sulfoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yuan-Chun; Kuo, Hsiao-Ching; Jia, Hsi-Wei

    2016-04-01

    The differences in molecular configuration and solvent properties between acetone and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) were investigated using the developed technique of 1H, 13C, 17O, and 1H self-diffusion liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Acetone and DMSO samples in the forms of pure solution, ionic salt-added solution were used to deduce their active sites, relative dipole moments, dielectric constants, and charge separations. The NMR results suggest that acetone is a trigonal planar molecule with a polarized carbonyl double bond, whereas DMSO is a trigonal pyramidal-like molecule with a highly polarized S-O single bond. Both molecules use their oxygen atoms as the active sites to interact other molecules. These different molecular models explain the differences their physical and chemical properties between the two molecules and explain why DMSO is classified as an aprotic but highly dipolar solvent. The results are also in agreement with data obtained using X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and theoretical calculations.

  20. Bayesian population analysis of a washin-washout physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for acetone

    SciTech Connect

    Moerk, Anna-Karin; Jonsson, Fredrik; Johanson, Gunnar

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to derive improved estimates of population variability and uncertainty of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model parameters, especially of those related to the washin-washout behavior of polar volatile substances. This was done by optimizing a previously published washin-washout PBPK model for acetone in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation. The sensitivity of the model parameters was investigated by creating four different prior sets, where the uncertainty surrounding the population variability of the physiological model parameters was given values corresponding to coefficients of variation of 1%, 25%, 50%, and 100%, respectively. The PBPK model was calibrated to toxicokinetic data from 2 previous studies where 18 volunteers were exposed to 250-550 ppm of acetone at various levels of workload. The updated PBPK model provided a good description of the concentrations in arterial, venous, and exhaled air. The precision of most of the model parameter estimates was improved. New information was particularly gained on the population distribution of the parameters governing the washin-washout effect. The results presented herein provide a good starting point to estimate the target dose of acetone in the working and general populations for risk assessment purposes.

  1. Sensitive and selective cataluminescence-based sensor system for acetone and diethyl ether determination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qihui; Li, Bo; Wang, Yuhuai; Shou, Zhouxiang; Shi, Guolong

    2015-05-01

    A three-dimensional hierarchical CdO nanostructure with a novel bio-inspired morphology is reported. The field emission scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometer were employed to characterize the as-prepared samples. In gas-sensing measurements, acetone and diethyl ether were employed as target gases to investigate cataluminescence (CTL) sensing properties of the CdO nanostructure. The results show that the as-fabricated CdO nanostructure exhibited outstanding CTL properties such as stable intensity, high signal/noise values, short response and recovery time. The limit of detection of acetone and diethyl ether was ca. 6.5 ppm and 6.7 ppm, respectively, which was below the standard permitted concentrations. Additionally, a principal components analysis method was used to investigate the recognizable ability of the CTL sensor, and it was found that acetone and diethyl ether can be distinguished clearly. The performance of the bio-inspired CdO nanostructure-based sensor system suggested the promising application of the CdO nanostructure as a novel highly efficient CTL sensing material.

  2. Acetone Sensing by Modified SnO2 Nanocrystalline Sensor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivetsky, V. V.; Petukhov, D. V.; Eliseev, A. A.; Smirnov, A. V.; Rumyantseva, M. N.; Gaskov, Aleksandre M.

    A complementary gas sensor and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry study was performed to investigate the chemical basis of acetone vapor sensing via semiconductor metal oxide gas sensors. The effect of additives to nanocrystalline SnO2-based sensor materials was analyzed. The main process that contributes to the electrical yield of this interaction and thus to the sensor response is a complete acetone oxidation to CO2and H2O. At the same time it is clearly shown that this sensor response is severely limited by the rate of desorption of the reaction products. The main contributors to this negative influence on the sensor response are heavy organic compounds with molar masses larger than that of acetone. It is also shown that their negative effect could be mitigated by the incorporation of catalytic clusters of gold on the surface of SnO2based sensor materials. This kind of catalyst acts either as a preventor of the formation of heavy and complex organic molecules on the sensor surface or as a combustion catalyst, which facilitates their decomposition.

  3. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of acetone in mice and rats: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Stoney, K.H.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1988-11-01

    Acetone, an aliphatic ketone, is a ubiquitous industrial solvent and chemical intermediate; consequently, the opportunity for human exposure is high. The potential for acetone to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 440, 2200, or 11000 ppm, and in Swiss (CD-1) mice exposed to 0, 440, 2200, and 6600 ppm acetone vapors, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.32 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 46 refs., 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  4. Research into acetone removal from air by biofiltration using a biofilter with straight structure plates

    PubMed Central

    Baltrėnas, Pranas; Zagorskis, Alvydas; Misevičius, Antonas

    2015-01-01

    The biological air treatment method is based on the biological destruction of organic compounds using certain cultures of microorganisms. This method is simple and may be applied in many branches of industry. The main element of biological air treatment devices is a filter charge. Tests were carried out using a new-generation laboratory air purifier with a plate structure. This purifier is called biofilter. The biofilter has a special system for packing material humidification which does not require additional energy inputs. In order to extend the packing material's durability, it was composed of thermally treated birch fibre. Pollutant (acetone) biodegradation occurred on thermally treated wood fibre in this research. According to the performed tests and the received results, the process of biodestruction was highly efficient. When acetone was passed through biofilter's packing material at 0.08 m s−1 rate, the efficiency of the biofiltration process was from 70% up to 90%. The species of bacteria capable of removing acetone vapour from the air, i.e. Bacillus (B. cereus, B. subtilis), Pseudomonas (P. aeruginosa, P. putida), Stapylococcus (S. aureus) and Rhodococcus sp., was identified in this study during the process of biofiltration. Their amount in the biological packing material changed from 1.6 × 107 to 3.7 × 1011 CFU g−1. PMID:26019659

  5. A Ringdown Breath Analyzer for Diabetes Monitoring: Breath Acetone in Diabetic Patients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuji; Mbi, Armstrong; Shepherd, Mark

    2008-03-01

    It is highly desirable for millions of diabetic patients to have a non-blood, non-invasive, point-of-care device for monitoring daily blood glucose (BG) levels and the adequacy of diabetic treatment and control. Cavity ringdown spectroscopy, due to its unique capability of high sensitivity, fast-response, and relatively low cost for instrumentation, has the potential for medical application through non-invasive analysis of breath biomarkers. We report the first ringdown acetone breath analyzer for clinic testing with diabetic outpatients. The instrument was set in a clinic center and 34 outpatients (24 T1D and 10 T2D) were tested during a four-day period. 10 T1D subjects and 15 nondiabetic persons were tested in our laboratory. Three juvenile-onset T1D subjects were selected for a 24-hr monitoring on the variations of breath acetone and simultaneous BG level. In this talk, we present our research findings including the correlations of breath acetone with BG level and A1C.

  6. Photocatalytic conversion of methane to methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.; Noceti, R.P.; D`Este, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    A long-term goal of our research group is the exploration of novel pathways for the direct oxidation of methane to liquid fuels, chemicals, and intermediates. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol is attractive. The products of reaction, methanol and hydrogen, are both commercially desirable, methanol being used as is or converted to a variety of other chemicals, and the hydrogen could be utilized in petroleum and/or chemical manufacturing. Methane is produced as a by-product of coal gasification. Depending upon reactor design and operating conditions, up to 18% of total gasifier product may be methane. In addition, there are vast proven reserves of geologic methane in the world. Unfortunately, a large fraction of these reserves are in regions where there is little local demand for methane and it is not economically feasible to transport it to a market. There is a global research effort under way in academia, industry, and government to find methods to convert methane to useful, more readily transportable and storable materials. Methanol, the initial product of methane oxidation, is a desirable product of conversion because it retains much of the original energy of the methane while satisfying transportation and storage requirements. Investigation of direct conversion of methane to transportation fuels has been an ongoing effort at PETC for over 10 years. One of the current areas of research is the conversion of methane to methanol, under mild conditions, using light, water, and a semiconductor photocatalyst. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol, is attractive. Research in the laboratory is directed toward applying the techniques developed for the photocatalytic splitting of the water and the photochemical conversion of methane.

  7. Neuromuscular Functions on Experimental Acute Methanol Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Moral, Ali Reşat; Çankayalı, İlkin; Sergin, Demet; Boyacılar, Özden

    2015-01-01

    Objective The incidence of accidental or suicidal ingestion of methyl alcohol is high and methyl alcohol intoxication has high mortality. Methyl alcohol intoxication causes severe neurological sequelae and appears to be a significant problem. Methyl alcohol causes acute metabolic acidosis, optic neuropathy leading to permanent blindness, respiratory failure, circulatory failure and death. It is metabolised in the liver, and its metabolite formic acid has direct toxic effects, causing oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and increased lipid peroxidation associated with the mechanism of neurotoxicity. Methanol is known to cause acute toxicity of the central nervous system; however, the effects on peripheral neuromuscular transmission are unknown. In our study, we aimed to investigate the electrophysiological effects of experimentally induced acute methanol intoxication on neuromuscular transmission in the early period (first 24 h). Methods After approval by the Animal Experiment Ethics Committee of Ege University, the study was carried out on 10 Wistar rats, each weighing about 200 g. During electrophysiological recordings and orogastric tube insertion, the rats were anaesthetised using intra-peritoneal (IP) injection of ketamine 100 mg kg−1 and IP injection of xylazine 10 mg kg−1. The rats were given 3 g kg−1 methyl alcohol by the orogastric tube. Electrophysiological measurements from the gastrocnemius muscle were compared with baseline. Results Latency measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 0.81±0.11 ms and 0.76±0.12 ms, respectively. CMAP amplitude measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 9.85±0.98 mV and 9.99±0.40 mV, respectively. CMAP duration measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 9.86±0.03 ms and 9.86±0.045 ms, respectively. Conclusion It was concluded that experimental methanol intoxication in the acute phase (first 24 h) did not affect neuromuscular function. PMID:27366524

  8. Validation of a Thin-Layer Chromatography for the Determination of Hydrocortisone Acetate and Lidocaine in a Pharmaceutical Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Dołowy, Małgorzata; Kulpińska-Kucia, Katarzyna; Pyka, Alina

    2014-01-01

    A new specific, precise, accurate, and robust TLC-densitometry has been developed for the simultaneous determination of hydrocortisone acetate and lidocaine hydrochloride in combined pharmaceutical formulation. The chromatographic analysis was carried out using a mobile phase consisting of chloroform + acetone + ammonia (25%) in volume composition 8 : 2 : 0.1 and silica gel 60F254 plates. Densitometric detection was performed in UV at wavelengths 200 nm and 250 nm, respectively, for lidocaine hydrochloride and hydrocortisone acetate. The validation of the proposed method was performed in terms of specificity, linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), precision, accuracy, and robustness. The applied TLC procedure is linear in hydrocortisone acetate concentration range of 3.75 ÷ 12.50 μg·spot−1, and from 1.00 ÷ 2.50 μg·spot−1 for lidocaine hydrochloride. The developed method was found to be accurate (the value of the coefficient of variation CV [%] is less than 3%), precise (CV [%] is less than 2%), specific, and robust. LOQ of hydrocortisone acetate is 0.198 μg·spot−1 and LOD is 0.066 μg·spot−1. LOQ and LOD values for lidocaine hydrochloride are 0.270 and 0.090 μg·spot−1, respectively. The assay value of both bioactive substances is consistent with the limits recommended by Pharmacopoeia. PMID:24526880

  9. Neat methanol fuel cell power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abens, S.; Farooque, M.

    1985-12-01

    Attention is given to a fuel cell development effort which has been directed, by ease-of-supply, low weight, and low volume criteria toward the use of undiluted methanol. Partial oxidation and internal water recovery concepts are incorporated, allowing the onboard dilution of methanol fuel through mixing with exhaust-recovered water. This scheme is successfully demonstrated for the case of a 3 kW unit employing commercial cross flow heat exchangers, as well as for a 5 kW reformer flue exhaust water recovery design with U.S. Air force baseload stationary applications. The USAF powerplant has an overall thermal efficiency of 32 percent at rated load.

  10. A novel process for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1992-01-01

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to study the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol (MEOH) in the liquid phase by a novel method. In previous reports, we provided evidence for a two step reaction consisting of a carbonylation reaction taking place mainly in the film'' close to a copper chromite surface followed by a hydrogenolysis reaction taking place on the surface of the copper chromite. The interaction between the two catalysts enhances the rate of methanol formation. In this quarter, we reexamined the equilibrium concentration for methyl formate and obtained data at higher loadings of copper chromite.

  11. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  12. 37 GHz Methanol Masers : Horsemen of the Apocalypse for the Class II Methanol Maser Phase?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  13. Manufacturing Ethyl Acetate From Fermentation Ethanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, Naresh K.; Ingham, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Conceptual process uses dilute product of fermentation instead of concentrated ethanol. Low-concentration ethanol, extracted by vacuum from fermentation tank, and acetic acid constitutes feedstock for catalytic reaction. Product of reaction goes through steps that increases ethyl acetate content to 93 percent by weight. To conserve energy, heat exchangers recycle waste heat to preheat process streams at various points.

  14. First discovery of acetone extract from cottonseed oil sludge as a novel antiviral agent against plant viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Feng, Chaohong; Hou, Caiting; Hu, Lingyun; Wang, Qiaochun; Wu, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    A novel acetone extract from cottonseed oil sludge was firstly discovered against plant viruses including Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Rice stripe virus (RSV) and Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV). Gossypol and β-sitosterol separated from the acetone extract were tested for their effects on anti-TMV and analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assay. In vivo and field trials in different geographic distributions and different host varieties declared that this extract mixture was more efficient than the commercial agent Ningnanmycin with a broad spectrum of anti-plant-viruses activity. No phytotoxic activity was observed in the treated plants and environmental toxicology showed that this new acetone extract was environmentally friendly, indicating that this acetone extract has potential application in the control of plant virus in the future.

  15. First Discovery of Acetone Extract from Cottonseed Oil Sludge as a Novel Antiviral Agent against Plant Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Feng, Chaohong; Hou, Caiting; Hu, Lingyun; Wang, Qiaochun; Wu, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    A novel acetone extract from cottonseed oil sludge was firstly discovered against plant viruses including Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Rice stripe virus (RSV) and Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV). Gossypol and β-sitosterol separated from the acetone extract were tested for their effects on anti-TMV and analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assay. In vivo and field trials in different geographic distributions and different host varieties declared that this extract mixture was more efficient than the commercial agent Ningnanmycin with a broad spectrum of anti-plant-viruses activity. No phytotoxic activity was observed in the treated plants and environmental toxicology showed that this new acetone extract was environmentally friendly, indicating that this acetone extract has potential application in the control of plant virus in the future. PMID:25705894

  16. Co-production of acetone and ethanol with molar ratio control enables production of improved gasoline or jet fuel blends.

    PubMed

    Baer, Zachary C; Bormann, Sebastian; Sreekumar, Sanil; Grippo, Adam; Toste, F Dean; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    The fermentation of simple sugars to ethanol has been the most successful biofuel process to displace fossil fuel consumption worldwide thus far. However, the physical properties of ethanol and automotive components limit its application in most cases to 10-15 vol% blends with conventional gasoline. Fermentative co-production of ethanol and acetone coupled with a catalytic alkylation reaction could enable the production of gasoline blendstocks enriched in higher-chain oxygenates. Here we demonstrate a synthetic pathway for the production of acetone through the mevalonate precursor hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA. Expression of this pathway in various strains of Escherichia coli resulted in the co-production of acetone and ethanol. Metabolic engineering and control of the environmental conditions for microbial growth resulted in controllable acetone and ethanol production with ethanol:acetone molar ratios ranging from 0.7:1 to 10.0:1. Specifically, use of gluconic acid as a substrate increased production of acetone and balanced the redox state of the system, predictively reducing the molar ethanol:acetone ratio. Increases in ethanol production and the molar ethanol:acetone ratio were achieved by co-expression of the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE) from E. coli MG1655 and by co-expression of pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhB) from Z. mobilis. Controlling the fermentation aeration rate and pH in a bioreactor raised the acetone titer to 5.1 g L(-1) , similar to that obtained with wild-type Clostridium acetobutylicum. Optimizing the metabolic pathway, the selection of host strain, and the physiological conditions employed for host growth together improved acetone titers over 35-fold (0.14-5.1 g/L). Finally, chemical catalysis was used to upgrade the co-produced ethanol and acetone at both low and high molar ratios to higher-chain oxygenates for gasoline and jet fuel applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2079-2087. © 2016 Wiley

  17. Co-production of acetone and ethanol with molar ratio control enables production of improved gasoline or jet fuel blends.

    PubMed

    Baer, Zachary C; Bormann, Sebastian; Sreekumar, Sanil; Grippo, Adam; Toste, F Dean; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    The fermentation of simple sugars to ethanol has been the most successful biofuel process to displace fossil fuel consumption worldwide thus far. However, the physical properties of ethanol and automotive components limit its application in most cases to 10-15 vol% blends with conventional gasoline. Fermentative co-production of ethanol and acetone coupled with a catalytic alkylation reaction could enable the production of gasoline blendstocks enriched in higher-chain oxygenates. Here we demonstrate a synthetic pathway for the production of acetone through the mevalonate precursor hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA. Expression of this pathway in various strains of Escherichia coli resulted in the co-production of acetone and ethanol. Metabolic engineering and control of the environmental conditions for microbial growth resulted in controllable acetone and ethanol production with ethanol:acetone molar ratios ranging from 0.7:1 to 10.0:1. Specifically, use of gluconic acid as a substrate increased production of acetone and balanced the redox state of the system, predictively reducing the molar ethanol:acetone ratio. Increases in ethanol production and the molar ethanol:acetone ratio were achieved by co-expression of the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE) from E. coli MG1655 and by co-expression of pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhB) from Z. mobilis. Controlling the fermentation aeration rate and pH in a bioreactor raised the acetone titer to 5.1 g L(-1) , similar to that obtained with wild-type Clostridium acetobutylicum. Optimizing the metabolic pathway, the selection of host strain, and the physiological conditions employed for host growth together improved acetone titers over 35-fold (0.14-5.1 g/L). Finally, chemical catalysis was used to upgrade the co-produced ethanol and acetone at both low and high molar ratios to higher-chain oxygenates for gasoline and jet fuel applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2079-2087. © 2016 Wiley

  18. Liquid phase methanol reactor staging process for the production of methanol

    DOEpatents

    Bonnell, Leo W.; Perka, Alan T.; Roberts, George W.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention is a process for the production of methanol from a syngas feed containing carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Basically, the process is the combination of two liquid phase methanol reactors into a staging process, such that each reactor is operated to favor a particular reaction mechanism. In the first reactor, the operation is controlled to favor the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide, and in the second reactor, the operation is controlled so as to favor the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. This staging process results in substantial increases in methanol yield.

  19. Selective Concentration of Ultra-trace Acetone in the Air by Cryogenic Temperature Programmed Desorption (cryo-TPD).

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Taku T; Sakaguchi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    A gas analytical technique with compact size, low cost, sufficient sensitivity, and excellent reproducibility is required in many fields including exhaled breath analysis for medical monitoring. In the present study, we examined selective acetone concentration by quench condensation at cryogenic temperature followed by temperature programmed desorption (cryogenic temperature programmed desorption (cryo-TPD)) for possible applications to breath analysis for medical monitoring. The essence of cryo-TPD is rough mass selection by thermal desorption followed by quantification of certain species using mass spectrometry. The performance of cryo-TPD was investigated in the acetone concentration range below 1 × 10(-6) volume fraction (1 ppmv). It was found that acetone is selectively quench-condensed on a tungsten substrate at 50 K without the major components of air, such as N2 and O2. The concentrated acetone gas was obtained by the following thermal desorption at around 151 K. Under conditions of condensation for 1 min and pressure of 1 × 10(-2) Pa, the lowest limit of detection reached well below 10 × 10(-9) volume fraction (10 ppbv). The relationship between the cetone intensity of cryo-TPD and the acetone concentration in the gas was almost linear in the ppbv range. The separation of acetone and propanal using the fragmentation pattern, which have almost the identical molecular mass, was also demonstrated in the present study. PMID:27682397

  20. Methanol decomposition bottoming cycle for IC engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purohit, G.; Houseman, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of methanol decomposition using engine exhaust heat, and examines its potential for use in the operation of passenger cars, diesel trucks, and diesel-electric locomotives. Energy economy improvements of 10-20% are calculated over the representative driving cycles without a net loss in power. Some reductions in exhaust emissions are also projected.

  1. A Search for Class I Methanol Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratap, P.

    2001-12-01

    Class I masers are thought to be associated with outflow activity from young stars and are easily explained with a collisional pumping model. However, masers have been found in regions where there is no apparent star formation or outflow activity. These masers could be probing a very early stage of star formation. Most searches for Class I masers have been done toward regions of known star formation. Such searches are biased as they would not find masers offset by distances greater than the telescope beam. The MIT Haystack Observatory Class I methanol maser survey is a project conducted by undergraduate students using the Haystack 37-m telescope. Each student maps a chosen molecular cloud and searches for maser emission. Once the student project is complete the data becomes part of a database of methanol masers. This collaborative observing strategy results in an unbiased search for new sites of methanol maser activity. Currently five clouds have been mapped and several new sites of methanol maser activity have been discovered. This project is funded by the Divisions of Astronomy and Undergraduate Education of the National Science Foundation.

  2. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  3. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  4. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Improvements to non-acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  5. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  6. HYDROGEN BONDING IN THE METHANOL DIMER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work, two methanol molecules are placed in different arrangements to study hydrogen bonding in carbohydrate materials such as cellulose. Energy was calculated as a function of both hydrogen bond length and angle over wide ranges, using quantum mechanics (QM). The QM wavefunctions are analyze...

  7. Methanol Steam Reformer on a Silicon Wafer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Malen, J; Piggott, T; Morse, J; Sopchak, D; Greif, R; Grigoropoulos, C; Havstad, M; Upadhye, R

    2004-04-15

    A study of the reforming rates, heat transfer and flow through a methanol reforming catalytic microreactor fabricated on a silicon wafer are presented. Comparison of computed and measured conversion efficiencies are shown to be favorable. Concepts for insulating the reactor while maintaining small overall size and starting operation from ambient temperature are analyzed.

  8. Methanex, Hoechst Celanese dissolve methanol partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, G.D.L.

    1993-03-31

    One of the many joint venture alliances recently announced in the petrochemical sector is ending in divorce. Hoechst Celanese Chemical (Dallas) and Methanex Corp. (Vancouver) are in the process of dissolving the partnership they had formed to restart Hoechst Celanese's methanol plant at Clear Lake, TX. Hoechst Celanese says it is actively seeking replacement partners and has several likely prospects, while Methanex is concentrating on its other ventures. Those include its just-completed acquisition of Fletcher Challenge's (Auckland, NZ) methanol business and a joint venture with American Cyanamid to convert an ammonia plant at Fortier, LA to methanol. Methanex will still be the world's largest producer of methanol. Officially, the negotiations between Methanex and Hoechst Celanese just broke down over the last month or so,' says Steve Yurich, operations manager for the Clear Lake plant. Market sources, however, say that Methanex found itself with too many irons in the fire' and pulled out before it ran into financial or perhaps even antitrust difficulties.

  9. A novel process for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1991-01-01

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to conduct studies of the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol by a novel process. In previous reports, we provided evidence for a two step reaction in series, the carbonylation reaction mainly taking place in a non-equilibrium region in the vicinity of the Cu-chromite surface, and the hydrogenolysis reaction taking place on the surface of the Cu-chromite. The synergism between the two catalysts enhances the rate of methanol formation. In this quarter, we studied the effect of pressure and temperature on the rate of MeOH synthesis. We also compared the reaction rate of a syngas feed simulated for an H{sub 2}/CO ratio from a Texaco gasifier with a methanol balanced syngas feed (H{sub 2}/CO=2). Atomic absorption analysis of solid and liquid samples for the KOMe/Cu-chromite runs was undertaken to identify the distribution of potassium at the end of the methanol synthesis runs. Modelling studies were initiated with emphasis on both kinetic and process behavior. 12 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Metacridamide B methanol-d4 monosolvate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The title compound was extracted from conidia of the fungus Metarhizium acridum. Crystals were obtained as a methanol-d4 solvate. The tail part of the 4-methylhexan-2-yl group exhibits disorder over two positions, with an occupancy ratio of 0.682 (9):0.318 (9). The crystal structure confirms the abs...

  11. Optimized fuel cell grade hydrogen from methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongtaek

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate reaction rates liar making hydrogen from methanol, kinetic studies of methanol decomposition, methanol steam reforming, water gas shift reaction, and CO selective oxidation have been performed. These reactions were studied in a micro reactor testing unit using a commercial Cu-ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for the first three reactions and Pt-Fe/gamma-alumina catalyst for the last reaction. The activity tests were performed between 120˜325°C and atmospheric pressure with a range of feed rates and compositions. For methanol decomposition, water addition to the feed increased the yield of hydrogen and reduced the formation of by-products. XPS analysis of used catalyst samples and time on-stream data showed that the Cu2+ oxidation state of copper favors methanol decomposition. A simplified reaction network of 5 elementary reactions was proposed and all five rate expressions were obtained using non-linear least squares optimization, numerical integration of a one-dimensional PFR model, and extensive experimental data. Similar numerical analysis was carried out to obtain the rate expressions for methanol steam reaction, the water gas shift reaction, and CO selective oxidation. For the kinetics of the water gas shift reaction, an empirical rate expression was obtained from the experimental data. Based on a review of published work on the WGS reaction mechanism, our study found that a rate expression derived from a regenerative mechanism and another rate expression derived from adsorptive mechanism fit the experimental data equally well. For the kinetics of CO preferential oxidation, a reaction model in which three reactions (CO oxidation, H2 oxidation and the WGS reaction) occur simultaneously was chosen to predict the reactor performance. In particular the reverse water gas shift reaction had an important role when fitting the experimental data precisely and explained the selectivity decrease at higher reaction temperatures. Combining the three reactors and several

  12. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Aricò, Antonino S; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D'Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-11-24

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion(®) were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate-PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion(®) 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm(-2) vs. 64 mW·cm(-2)). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm(-2) equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm(-2) for Nafion(®) 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm² for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm² for Nafion(®) 115).

  13. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Aricò, Antonino S.; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D’Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115). PMID:26610582

  14. Conversion of crude methanol to gasoline with extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.; Smyth, S.C.

    1987-11-24

    A continuous process for converting crude methanol to gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons in a catalytic reaction zone with a crystalline acid zeolite catalyst at elevated temperature and pressure is described comprising the steps of: (a) contacting a crude methanol feedstock containing a minor amount of water with a liquid hydrocarbon extraction stream under extraction conditions favorable to selective extraction of the methanol, thereby providing an extract liquid stream rich in methanol and an aqueous raffinate stream lean in methanol; (b) charging the extracted methanol substantially free of water to the reaction zone under process conditions to convert substantially all methanol to hydrocarbons; (c) cooling reaction effluent to recover aqueous liquid by-product stream, gas rich in C/sub 2/ + hydrocarbons, liquid rich in C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ and C/sub 5/ + hydrocarbons; and (d) contacting crude methanol feedstock with at least a portion of the liquid hydrocarbons employed as extraction liquid.

  15. An undercovered health threat in Turkey: transdermal methanol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Uca, Ali Ulvi; Kozak, Hasan Hüseyin; Altaş, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Methanol is a clear, colorless solvent used in antifreeze solutions, varnishes, cologne, copying machine fluids, perfume, spirit, paint, and fuel. Even small amounts of ingested methanol can cause acute permanent neurological dysfunction and irreversible blindness. Although there are many reports of methanol poisoning due to suicidal or accidental ingestion, reports of transdermal absorption are rare. We present a 68-year-old man with transdermal methanol intoxication applied to our hospital's emergency department with weakness, loss of vision, and altered state of consciousness.

  16. Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01

    This feasibility study includes all phases of methanol production from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The study examines: production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-day methanol production facility; potential environmental impacts of the whole project; safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol; and development of site specific cost estimates.

  17. Effect of coagulant bath on the gas permeation properties of cellulose acetate asymmetric membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, F.; Hasbullah, H.; Jami'an, W. N. R.; Salleh, W. N. H. W.; Ibrahim, N.; Ali, R. R.

    2016-06-01

    Membrane based gas separation process technology has been recognized as one of the most efficient and advanced unit operation for gas separation. One of the problems in membrane gas separation is membrane performance. This paper explores the application of cellulose acetate (CA) membrane for natural gas purification and separation by improving its permeability and selectivity. The main interest in this research is to study the effect of quench medium on the gas separation performance towards its physical characteristics and gas separation performance of CA membrane. Cellulose acetate polymer was dissolved in n- methyl-2-pyrrolidone solvent and casted onto a glass plate using a pneumatically controlled casting system with fixed shear rate and solvent evaporation times. The parameter varied was the non-solvent used as quench medium during membrane post treatment that were methanol and n-hexane. The different quench media as post treatment affected the O2 and N2 gas permeation and O2/N2 selectivity as well as the tensile strength of the flat sheet asymmetric membrane. Combination of methanol and n-hexane as quench media gave the best result than the other steps. This solvent exchange step influenced the morphology by producing thin skin layer and thus gives better gas separation performance than other steps

  18. Conversion to eslicarbazepine acetate monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    French, Jacqueline; Jacobson, Mercedes P.; Pazdera, Ladislav; Gough, Mallory; Cheng, Hailong; Grinnell, Todd; Blum, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) monotherapy. Methods: This post hoc pooled analysis of 2 randomized double-blind studies (093-045 and -046) included adults with partial-onset seizures medically uncontrolled by 1 or 2 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Following the baseline period (8 weeks), eligible patients were randomized 2:1 to receive ESL 1,600 mg or 1,200 mg once daily for 18 weeks; the primary endpoint was study exit by meeting predefined exit criteria (signifying worsening seizure control). In each study, treatment was considered effective if the upper 95% confidence limit for exit rate was lower than the historical control threshold (65.3%). Results: Pooled exit rates were as follows: ESL 1,600 mg = 20.6% (95% confidence interval: 15.6%–26.8%); ESL 1,200 mg = 30.8% (23.0%–40.5%). Use of 2 baseline AEDs or rescue medication, US location, epilepsy duration ≥20 years, and higher maximum baseline seizure frequency were associated with higher exit risks. Median percent reductions in standardized seizure frequency between baseline and the 18-week double-blind period were as follows: ESL 1,600 mg = 43.2%; ESL 1,200 mg = 35.7%; baseline carbamazepine use was associated with smaller reductions. Safety profiles were similar between ESL doses. Conclusions: Exit rates for ESL monotherapy (1,600 mg and 1,200 mg once daily) were lower than the historical control threshold, irrespective of baseline AED use and region, with no additional safety concerns identified. Clinical factors and location clearly influence treatment responses in conversion-to-monotherapy trials. Classification of evidence: This pooled analysis provides Class IV evidence that for adults with medically uncontrolled partial-onset seizures, ESL monotherapy is well tolerated and effective. PMID:26911639

  19. Intravitreal injection of octreotide acetate.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J E; Westra, I; Woltering, E A; Winthrop, K L; Barrie, R; O'Dorisio, T M; Holmes, D

    1997-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the feasibility of injecting the somatostatin analogue, octreotide acetate (OA), into the vitreous cavity. Previous work suggests that octreotide effectively inhibits angiogenesis in vitro, thus its use in vivo may slow the progression of proliferative eye disease. Fifty micrograms of aqueous OA in 50 microliters aqueous solution was injected into the mid-vitreous of kitten eyes (n = 6), and OA levels were monitored over 4 days. A long-acting release form of octreotide (OA-LAR) was also injected into the mid-vitreous of rabbit eyes at doses of 0.36 (n = 16), 1.1 (n = 1), 2.1 (n = 1), 4.05 (n = 1), 8.2 (n = 1), and 36 mg (n = 3) in solution; and octreotide concentrations were measured at various time points over 42 days. OA concentrations were determined by a highly specific radioimmunoassay. Aqueous octreotide was eliminated rapidly (t1/2 = 16 hours) from the vitreous of the kitten eye, with only negligible amounts recoverable 4 days post-injection. In the long-acting form, OA in the rabbit eye reached peak levels at 28 days. By 42 days, OA levels had declined to the 14-day level. Doses of OA-LAR of 1.1 mg or less produced no gross evidence of clinical toxicity and elicited no grossly visible ocular side effects. Doses greater than 1.1 mg produced significant toxicity, including cataracts and rubeosis. The 28-day peak release for long-acting OA implies that monthly intravitreal injections could provide continual high levels of OA. Intravitreal injection of long-acting OA provides sustained, high concentrations of drug, and deserves further study as a potential treatment of proliferative eye diseases.

  20. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…