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Sample records for acetate butyrate cab

  1. Gas-permeable cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Hales, R H

    1977-09-01

    Gas-permeable cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) contact lenses may often be worn succesfully by aphakic and other patients who are unable to wear hard contact lenses. The comfort characteristics of the CAB lenses are betweeen those of hard and soft contact lenses. They are much more permeable to O2 and CO2 than soft lenses and thus are less apt to cause edema. They are more flexible and more wettable than hard lenses. This study presents 50 patients who, having had to discontinue wearing hard contact lenses because of discomfort, diffuse central corneal edema, or visual problems, were fitted with CAB contact lenses. Thirty of the fifty were able to wear the CAB lenses successfully.

  2. Homogeneous preparation of cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) from sugarcane bagasse cellulose in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kelin; Wang, Ben; Cao, Yan; Li, Huiquan; Wang, Jinshu; Lin, Weijiang; Mu, Chaoshi; Liao, Dankui

    2011-05-25

    Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) were prepared homogeneously in a 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AmimCl) ionic liquid system from sugarcane bagasse (SB). The reaction temperature, reaction time, and molar ratio of butyric (propionic) anhydride/anhydroglucose units in the cellulose affect the butyryl (B) or propionyl (P) content of CAB or CAP samples. The (13)C NMR data revealed the distribution of the substituents of CAB and CAP. The thermal stability of sugar cane bagasse cellulose was found by thermogravimetric analysis to have decreased after chemical modification. After reaction, the ionic liquid was effectively recycled and reused. This study provides a new way for high-value-added utilization of SB and realizing the objective of turning waste into wealth.

  3. Identification and quantitation of extractables from cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and estimation of their in vivo exposure levels.

    PubMed

    Ma, Decheng; Wasylaschuk, Walter R; Beasley, Christopher; Zhao, Zhongxi Zack; Harmon, Paul A; Ballard, John M; Pitzenberger, Steven M; Varga, Sandor L; Reed, Robert A

    2004-06-29

    The purpose of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively determine potential cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) extractables in a way to meaningfully predict the in vivo exposure resulting from clinical administration. Extractions of CAB-381-20 were performed in several solvent systems, consistently resulting in the detection of three extractables. The extractables have been identified as acetic acid, butyric acid, and E-2-ethyl-2-hexenoic acid (E-EHA) by LC/UV, LC/MS and NMR. Extraction studies of CAB powders in acetonitrile/phosphate buffer demonstrated quantitative extraction in 1 h for acetic acid (approximately 150 microg/g), butyric acid (approximately 200 microg/g), and EHA (approximately 20 microg/g). Subsequently, extraction studies for CAB powders and coated tablets in USP simulated gastric and intestinal fluids were performed to evaluate potential in vivo exposure. Similarly, acetic and butyric acids were quantitatively extracted from CAB-381-20 powder after 24 h exposure in both USP simulated fluids. The amounts of EHA extracted from CAB powder after 24 h were determined to be 2 and 16 microg/g in USP simulated gastric and intestinal fluids, respectively. After 24 h exposure in USP simulated fluids, the maximum amount of EHA extracted corresponds to < 0.3 microg of EHA per tablet. Pepsin and pancreatin in USP simulated fluids had no effect on EHA extraction and quantitation.

  4. Morphological development of polypropylene in immiscible blends with cellulose acetate butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isotactic polypropylenes (iPP) with different melt flow indexes were melt blended with cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and then prepared into microspheres or nanofibers following a novel process of producing well dispersed CAB/iPP immiscible blends and subsequent removal of the CAB matrix. The morp...

  5. Long-term stability of cellulose acetate butyrate thin films for nuclear certified reference materials.

    PubMed

    Buják, Renáta; Delva, Laurens; Erkoç, Mustafa; Bauwens, Jeroen; Jakopič, Rožle; Vincze, Laszlo; Aregbe, Yetunde; Cardon, Ludwig

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) thin films with 17, 35 and 52 wt% butyryl is carried out to select the most suitable matrix material for the U and Pu containing large-sized dried spike reference material. The virgin CAB samples were aged by vibrations, heat, humidity, UV light and X-rays. Characterization was done by thermo-analytical techniques, gel permeation chromatography, mechanical tests and via Rayleigh and Compton scattering. The results show that CAB with lower butyryl content can withstand higher operational temperatures and has greater mechanical strength while CAB with higher butyryl content seems to be more resistant to radiation.

  6. Fabrication of Tunable Submicro- or Nano-structured Polyethylene Materials form Immiscible Blends with Cellulose Acetate Butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) was prepared into micro- or submicro-spheres or nanofibers via melt blending or extrusion of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB)/LDPE immiscible blends and subsequent removal of the CAB matrix. The sizes of the PE spheres or fibers can be successfully controlled by varyi...

  7. Ketotifen controlled release from cellulose acetate propionate and cellulose acetate butyrate membranes.

    PubMed

    Sobral, Manuela C C M; Sobral, Abilio J F N; Guthrie, J T; Gil, M H

    2008-02-01

    Ketotifen was immobilised in cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) membranes and in cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) membranes. The characteristics of each system were evaluated under a range of experimental conditions. The topography and uniformity of the membranes was assessed using scanning electron microscopy. The release characteristics associated with Ketotifen were monitored spectrophotometrically. The swelling capacity of the membranes was evaluated and attributed to the combined effects of diffusion and of complex dissociation, during swelling. The materials produced were able to provide controlled release of Ketotifen due to their controlled swelling behaviour and adequate release properties. The results showed that the release of Ketotifen from the CAB membranes is higher but the release from the CAP membranes is more uniform.

  8. Performance of cellulose acetate butyrate membranes in hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.; Leban, M.

    1973-01-01

    Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) membranes are shown to give high salt and urea rejection with water flux of about 3 gallons/sq ft per day at 600 psig. Membranes prepared from a formulation containing glyoxal show a significant increase in flux and decrease in salt and urea rejection with drying time. Zero drying time gives maximum urea and salt rejection and is therefore most suitable for hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution.

  9. Polyethylene-supported polyvinylidene fluoride-cellulose acetate butyrate blended polymer electrolyte for lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Weishan; Zuo, Xiaoxi; Liu, Shengqi; Li, Zhao

    2013-03-01

    The polyethylene (PE)-supported polymer membranes based on the blended polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) are prepared for gel polymer electrolyte (GPE) of lithium ion battery. The performances of the prepared membranes and the resulting GPEs are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, linear potential sweep, and charge-discharge test. The effect of the ratio of PVDF to CAB on the performance of the prepared membranes is considered. It is found that the GPE based on the blended polymer with PVDF:CAB = 2:1 (in weight) has the largest ionic conductivity (2.48 × 10-3 S cm-1) and shows good compatibility with anode and cathode of lithium ion battery. The LiCoO2/graphite battery using this GPE exhibits superior cyclic stability at room temperature, storage performance at elevated temperature, and rate performance.

  10. Kinetics and species of flash pyrolysis of cellulose acetate butyrate: The binder of LOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Gongwer, P.E.; Arisawa, H.; Brill, T.B.

    1996-07-01

    The principal binder of many LOVA propellants is cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB). By the use of T-Jump/FTIR spectroscopy, CAB was flash-pyrolyzed to set temperatures in the 465--600 C range, while rapid-scan IR spectra were used to identify the main decomposition products and to measure the rate of formation of each product as a function of temperature. Eleven specific products, which include oligomers of CAB, acids, aldehydes, ketenes, esters, CO{sub 2} and CO, were quantified by chemometric procedures. The ketenes are the most novel products. The Arrhenius parameters reveal that below 510 {+-} 20 C, the rate of product evolution is controlled mainly by condensed phase reactions. Above 510 {+-} 20 C, the rate of product evolution is controlled by desorption/evaporation of the volatile products.

  11. Cellulose acetate butyrate and polycaprolactone for ketoprofen spray-dried microsphere preparation.

    PubMed

    Giunchedi, P; Conti, B; Maggi, L; Conte, U

    1994-01-01

    Ketoprofen-loaded microspheres made with a polymeric blend were prepared by a spray-drying technique. Organic solutions of two polymers, cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), in different weight ratios, and of ketoprofen (Ket) were prepared and sprayed, in different experimental conditions, achieving drug-loaded microspheres. The obtained spray-dried microspheres were characterized in terms of yield of production, shape, size, surface properties and drug content, and their in vitro drug release behaviours were determined at different pH values.

  12. Preparation and characterization of a customized cellulose acetate butyrate dispersion for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vaithiyalingam, Siva; Nutan, Mohammad; Reddy, Indra; Khan, Mansoor

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to prepare and characterize the aqueous-based pseudolatex system of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) for controlled drug delivery. Aqueous pseudolatex systems are advantageous over organic-based coating systems because these systems are devoid of criteria pollutants such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, nonmethane volatile organic compounds, and sulfur dioxide. Pseudolatex was prepared with CAB and polyvinyl alcohol (stabilizer) by a polymer emulsification technique. The stability of pseudolatex was evaluated. Particle size was measured and rheological experiments were conducted. The glass transition temperature, microscopic free volume, permeation coefficient, and mechanical properties of plasticized pseudolatex films were estimated. Surface roughness of coating on inert Nu-Pareil beads (Ingredient Technology Corp., Mahwah, NJ) was measured as a function of coating weight gain. The CAB Pseudolatex was found to be stabilized by steric forces. From intrinsic viscosity, the thickness of the stabilization layer was estimated. An increase in polymeric particles proportionately decreased the thickness of the stabilization layer. All the essential properties of a coating membrane such as microscopic free-volume fraction, permeability coefficient, mechanical properties, and glass transition temperature were fairly controllable as a function of plasticizer concentration. The pseudolatex dispersion of CAB was stable with negligible sedimentation volume and a particle size of 300 nm. Because CAB is water insoluble and non-ionizable, this pseudolatex can be used for pH-independent coating. The films obtained were strong and flexible for controlled drug delivery applications. Coating with the CAB dispersion reduced the surface roughness of beads but it remained stable as a function of increase in coating weight gain.

  13. Mechanical and thermal properties of eco-friendly poly(propylene carbonate)/cellulose acetate butyrate blends.

    PubMed

    Xing, Chenyang; Wang, Hengti; Hu, Qiaoqiao; Xu, Fenfen; Cao, Xiaojun; You, Jichun; Li, Yongjin

    2013-02-15

    The eco-friendly poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC)/cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) blends were prepared by melt-blending in a batch mixer for the first time. PPC and CAB were partially miscible because of the drastically shifted glass transition temperatures of both PPC and CAB, which originated from the specific interactions between carbonyl groups and hydroxyl groups. The incorporation of CAB into PPC matrix enhanced not only tensile strength and modulus of PPC dramatically, but also improved heat resistance and thermal stability of PPC significantly. The tensile strength and the modulus of PPC/CAB=50/50 blend are 27.7 MPa and 1.24 GPa, which are 21 times and 28 times higher than those of the unmodified PPC, respectively. Moreover, the elongation at break of PPC/CAB=50/50 blend is as high as 117%. In addition, the obtained blends exhibited good transparency, which is very important for the package materials. The results in this work pave new possibility for the massive application of eco-friendly polymer materials.

  14. Cellulose acetate butyrate microparticles for controlled release of carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, P; Boué, C; Chaumeil, J C

    1996-01-01

    Cellulose acetate butyrate microparticles loaded in carbamazepine were prepared by a solvent evaporation technique. A decrease of the amount of organic solvent (from 80 to 40 ml of methylene chloride) increased the microparticle average diameter (73-111 and 207 microns) and decreased the carbamazepine release rate (T50% increased from 3.3 to 16.8 and 166.4 min). The microparticle area under the curve at 120 min was similar to that obtained with Tegretol LP 200 tablets.

  15. Cellulose acetate butyrate microcapsules containing dextran ion-exchange resins as self-propelled drug release system.

    PubMed

    Fundueanu, Gheorghe; Constantin, Marieta; Esposito, Elisabetta; Cortesi, Rita; Nastruzzi, Claudio; Menegatti, Enea

    2005-07-01

    Sulfopropylated dextran microspheres (SP-Ms), (Dm = 80 microm) loaded with a water soluble drug (Tetracycline HCl), were included in cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) microcapsules. Spherical CAB microcapsules were obtained by oil in water (o/w) solvent evaporation method in the presence of an inert solvent as cyclohexane (CyH) or n-hexane (N-Hex), and different excipients (Phospholipon, Tween, Span, Eudragit RS 100). Chloroform was found to be the best solvent for the preparation of the microcapsules. Also, the sphericity as well as the porosity of the microcapsules was controlled by the presence of an inert solvent. The final concentration of the drug in CAB microparticles was up to 25% (w/w). The key factors for the successful preparation were also the viscosity of the polymer, while the wettability of the resulted microcapsules, the temperature of the preparation, and the porosity have modulated the release of the drug. The higher is the amount of encapsulated microspheres the thinner is the CAB wall between the compartments created by their incorporation. When these microspheres come in contact with the release medium, the pressure created by their swelling breaks the polymer film and the drug starts to be released. The more drug is released in phosphate buffer the higher is the swelling degree of the encapsulated ion exchange resins and the force created by their supplementary swelling will break the more resistants walls. In this way a self-propelled drug release is achieved, until almost all drug was eliberated.

  16. Development of theophylline floating microballoons using cellulose acetate butyrate and/or Eudragit RL 100 polymers with different permeability characteristics.

    PubMed

    Jelvehgari, M; Maghsoodi, M; Nemati, H

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to design a sustained release floating microcapsules of theophylline using two polymers of different permeability characteristics; Eudragit RL 100 (Eu RL) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) using the oil-in-oil emulsion solvent evaporation method. Polymers were used separately and in combination to prepare different microcapsules. The effect of drug-polymer interaction was studied for each of the polymers and for their combination. Encapsulation efficiency, the yield, particle size, floating capability, morphology of microspheres, powder X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were evaluated. The in vitro release studies were performed in PH 1.2 and 7.4. The optimized drug to polymer ratios was found to be 4:1 (F(2)) and 0.75:1 (F'(2)) with Eu RL and CAB, respectively. The best drug to polymer ratio in mix formulation was 4:1:1 (theophylline: Eu RL: CAB ratio). Production yield, loading efficiencies, and particle size of F(2) and F'(2) were found to be 59.14% and 45.39%, 73.93% and 95.87%, 372 and 273 micron, respectively. Microsphere prepared with CAB showed the best floating ability (80.3 ± 4.02% buoyancy) in 0.1 M HCl for over 12 h. The XRD and DSC showed that theophylline in the drug loaded microspheres was stable and in crystaline form. Microparticles prepared using blend of Eu RL and CAB polymers indicated more sustained pattern than the commercial tablet (P<0.05). Drug loaded floating microballoons prepared of combination of Eu RL and CAB with 1:1 ratio were found to be a suitable delivery system for sustained release delivery of theophylline which contained lower amount of polymer contents in the microspheres.

  17. FTIR Imaging Coupled with Multivariate Analysis for Study of Initial Diffusion of Different Solvents in Cellulose Acetate Butyrate Films

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblad, M.S.; Keyes, B.; Gedvilas, L.; Kelley, S.S.

    2008-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging was used to study the initial diffusion of different solvents in cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) films containing different amounts of acetyl and butyryl substituents. Different solvents and solvent/non-solvent mixtures were also studied. The FTIR imaging system allowed acquisition of sequential images of the CAB films as solvent penetration proceeded without disturbing the system. The interface between the non-swollen polymer and the initial swelling front could be identified using multivariate data analysis tools. For a series of ketone solvents the initial diffusion coefficients and diffusion rates could be quantified and were found to be related to the polar and hydrogen interaction parameters in the Hansen solubility parameters of the solvents. For the solvent/non-solvent system the initial diffusion rate decreased less than linearly with the weight-percent of non-solvent present in the solution, which probably was due to the swelling characteristic of the non-solvent. For a given solvent, increasing the butyryl content of the CAB increased the initial diffusion rate. Increasing the butyryl content from 17 wt.% butyryl to 37 wt.% butyryl produced a considerably larger increase in initial diffusion rate compared to an increase in butyryl content from 37 wt.% to 50 wt.% butyryl.

  18. Cellulose acetate butyrate/poly(caprolactonetriol) blends: Miscibility, mechanical properties, and in vivo inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Kanis, Luiz A; Marques, Ellen L; Zepon, Karine M; Pereira, Jefferson R; Pamato, Saulo; de Oliveira, Marcelo T; Danielski, Lucinéia G; Petronilho, Fabricia C

    2014-11-01

    This study reports the results of the characterization of cellulose acetate butyrate and polycaprolactone-triol blends in terms of miscibility, swelling capacity, mechanical properties, and inflammatory response in vivo. The cellulose acetate butyrate film was opaque and rigid, with glass transition (T g ) at 134℃ and melting temperature of 156℃. The cellulose acetate butyrate/polycaprolactone-triol films were transparent up to a polycaprolactone-triol content of 60%. T g of the cellulose acetate butyrate films decreased monotonically as polycaprolactone-triol was added to the blend, thus indicating miscibility. FTIR spectroscopy revealed a decrease in intramolecular hydrogen bonding in polycaprolactone-triol, whereas no hydrogen bonding was observed between cellulose acetate butyrate and -OH from polycaprolactone-triol. The increase in polycaprolactone-triol content in the blend decreased the water uptake. An increase in polycaprolactone-triol content decreased the modulus of elasticity and increased the elongation at break. A cellulose acetate butyrate/polycaprolactone-triol 70/30 blend implanted in rats showed only an acute inflammatory response 7 days after surgery. No change in inflammation mediators was observed.

  19. Models construction for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentations with acetate/butyrate consecutively feeding by graph theory.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Shi, Zhongping; Li, Xin

    2014-05-01

    Several fermentations with consecutively feeding of acetate/butyrate were conducted in a 7 L fermentor and the results indicated that exogenous acetate/butyrate enhanced solvents productivities by 47.1% and 39.2% respectively, and changed butyrate/acetate ratios greatly. Then extracellular butyrate/acetate ratios were utilized for calculation of acids rates and the results revealed that acetate and butyrate formation pathways were almost blocked by corresponding acids feeding. In addition, models for acetate/butyrate feeding fermentations were constructed by graph theory based on calculation results and relevant reports. Solvents concentrations and butanol/acetone ratios of these fermentations were also calculated and the results of models calculation matched fermentation data accurately which demonstrated that models were constructed in a reasonable way.

  20. Effect of the dispersion of Eudragit S100 powder on the properties of cellulose acetate butyrate microspheres containing theophylline made by the emulsion-solvent evaporation method.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Wasfy M; Obaidat, Ihab M

    2007-05-01

    The dispersion/incorporation of Eudragit S100 powder as a filler in cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB-551-0.01) microsphere containing theophylline was investigated as a means of controlling drug release. Microspheres of CAB-551-0.01 of different polymer solution concentrations/viscosities were prepared (preparations Z(0), Z(A), Z(B) and Z(C)) and evaluated and compared to microspheres of a constant concentration of CAB-551-0.01 containing different amounts of Eudragit S100 powder as a filler (preparations X(A), X(B) and X(C)). The organic solvent acetonitrile used was capable of dissolving the matrix former CAB-551-0.01 only but not Eudragit S100 powder in the emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The CAB-551-0.01 concentration in Z(A), Z(B) and Z(C) was equal to the total polymer concentration (CAB-551-0.01 and Eudragit S100 powder) in X(A), X(B) and X(C), respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to identify microspheres shape and morphology. In vitro dissolution studies were carried out on the microspheres at 37 degrees C (+/-0.5 degrees C) at two successive different pH media (1.2 +/- 0.2 for 2 h and 6.5 +/- 0.2 for 10 h). Z preparations exhibited low rates of drug release in the acidic and the slightly neutral media. On the other hand, X preparations showed an initial rapid release in the acidic medium followed by a decrease in the release rate at the early stage of dissolution in the slightly neutral pH which could be due to some relaxation and gelation of Eudragit S100 powder to form a gel network before it dissolves completely allowing the remained drug to be released.

  1. Production of electricity from acetate or butyrate using a single-chamber microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

    2005-01-15

    Hydrogen can be recovered by fermentation of organic material rich in carbohydrates, but much of the organic matter remains in the form of acetate and butyrate. An alternative to methane production from this organic matter is the direct generation of electricity in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). Electricity generation using a single-chambered MFC was examined using acetate or butyrate. Power generated with acetate (800 mg/L) (506 mW/m2 or 12.7 mW/ L) was up to 66% higher than that fed with butyrate (1000 mg/L) (305 mW/m2 or 7.6 mW/L), demonstrating that acetate is a preferred aqueous substrate for electricity generation in MFCs. Power output as a function of substrate concentration was well described by saturation kinetics, although maximum power densities varied with the circuit load. Maximum power densities and half-saturation constants were Pmax = 661 mW/m2 and Ks = 141 mg/L for acetate (218 ohms) and Pmax = 349 mW/m2 and Ks = 93 mg/L for butyrate (1000 ohms). Similar open circuit potentials were obtained in using acetate (798 mV) or butyrate (795 mV). Current densities measured for stable power outputwere higher for acetate (2.2 A/m2) than those measured in MFCs using butyrate (0.77 A/m2). Cyclic voltammograms suggested that the main mechanism of power production in these batch tests was by direct transfer of electrons to the electrode by bacteria growing on the electrode and not by bacteria-produced mediators. Coulombic efficiencies and overall energy recovery were 10-31 and 3-7% for acetate and 8-15 and 2-5% for butyrate, indicating substantial electron and energy losses to processes other than electricity generation. These results demonstrate that electricity generation is possible from soluble fermentation end products such as acetate and butyrate, but energy recoveries should be increased to improve the overall process performance.

  2. Isolation of acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    PubMed

    Cibis, Katharina Gabriela; Gneipel, Armin; König, Helmut

    2016-02-20

    In this study, acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria were isolated from thermophilic and mesophilic biogas plants (BGP) located in Germany. The fermenters were fed with maize silage and cattle or swine manure. Furthermore, pressurized laboratory fermenters digesting maize silage were sampled. Enrichment cultures for the isolation of acid-forming bacteria were grown in minimal medium supplemented with one of the following carbon sources: Na(+)-dl-lactate, succinate, ethanol, glycerol, glucose or a mixture of amino acids. These substrates could be converted by the isolates to acetic, propionic or butyric acid. In total, 49 isolates were obtained, which belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Tenericutes or Thermotogae. According to 16S rRNA gene sequences, most isolates were related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides, Defluviitoga tunisiensis and Dendrosporobacter quercicolus. Acetic, propionic or butyric acid were produced in cultures of isolates affiliated to Bacillus thermoamylovorans, Clostridium aminovalericum, Clostridium cochlearium/Clostridium tetani, C. sporosphaeroides, D. quercicolus, Proteiniborus ethanoligenes, Selenomonas bovis and Tepidanaerobacter sp. Isolates related to Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum produced acetic, butyric and lactic acid, and isolates related to D. tunisiensis formed acetic acid. Specific primer sets targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences were designed and used for real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The isolates were physiologically characterized and their role in BGP discussed.

  3. Butyrate production from oligofructose fermentation by the human faecal flora: what is the contribution of extracellular acetate and lactate?

    PubMed

    Morrison, Douglas J; Mackay, William G; Edwards, Christine A; Preston, Tom; Dodson, Brian; Weaver, Lawrence T

    2006-09-01

    Butyrate is an important substrate for maintenance of colonic health and oligofructose fermentation by human faecal bacteria can increase butyrate production in vitro. However, oligofructose appears to be fermented by mainly acetate and lactate-producing bacteria rather than butyrate-producing bacteria. Isotope labelling studies using [U-(13)C(6)]glucose were used to show that (13)C(2) and (13)C(4) were the major labelled butyrate species produced from glucose fermentation, via [(13)C(2)]acetate-acetyl CoA as intermediate. Bacterial interconversion reactions were quantified and acetate conversion to butyrate and lactate conversion to acetate, propionate and butyrate were observed. Addition of oligofructose to faecal batch cultures significantly increased butyrate production. Of the newly synthesised butyrate from oligofructose fermentation, 80 % was derived from interconversion of extracellular acetate and lactate, with acetate being quantitatively more significant. Carbohydrates, such as oligofructose, have prebiotic properties. In addition, oligofructose selectively stimulates the bacterial conversion of acetate and lactate to butyrate. Carbohydrates with similar properties represent a refinement of the prebiotic definition, termed butyrogenic prebiotics, because of their additional functionality.

  4. Acetate adaptation of clostridia tyrobutyricum for improved fermentation production of butyrate.

    PubMed

    Jaros, Adam M; Rova, Ulrika; Berglund, Kris A

    2013-12-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 is an acidogenic bacterium capable of utilizing xylose for the fermentation production of butyrate. Hot water extraction of hardwood lingocellulose is an efficient method of producing xylose where autohydrolysis of xylan is catalysed by acetate originating from acetyl groups present in hemicellulose. The presence of acetic acid in the hydrolysate might have a severe impact on the subsequent fermentations. In this study the fermentation kinetics of C. tyrobutyricum cultures after being classically adapted for growth at 26.3 g/L acetate equivalents were studied. Analysis of xylose batch fermentations found that even in the presence of high levels of acetate, acetate adapted strains had similar fermentation kinetics as the parental strain cultivated without acetate. The parental strain exposed to acetate at inhibitory conditions demonstrated a pronounced lag phase (over 100 hours) in growth and butyrate production as compared to the adapted strain (25 hour lag) or non-inhibited controls (0 lag). Additional insight into the metabolic pathway of xylose consumption was gained by determining the specific activity of the acetate kinase (AK) enzyme in adapted versus control batches. AK activity was reduced by 63% in the presence of inhibitory levels of acetate, whether or not the culture had been adapted.

  5. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of mucoadhesive microspheres consisting of dextran derivatives and cellulose acetate butyrate.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yasunori; Ogihara, Kanako; Yakou, Shigeru; Nagai, Tsuneji; Takayama, Kozo

    2003-06-04

    The objective of this study was to evaluate mucoadhesive properties and gastrointestinal transit of microspheres made of oppositely charged dextran derivatives and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB). The microspheres were prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation method. A reference microsphere was made of lactose instead of dextran derivatives. Microspheres with a diameter of 425-710 microm were examined for in vitro mucoadhesion by the everted sac method. The results indicated that the percentage of adherence to the rat small intestine was affected by the amount of dextran derivatives in the microspheres. After 1.5h, the adhering percent of the reference microspheres and the microspheres containing 50% of dextran derivatives were 34 and 74%, respectively. Then gastrointestinal transit after oral administration to rats was evaluated by counting the microspheres remaining in the stomach and small intestine. The microspheres containing 40% of dextran derivatives adhered to the stomach rather than the small intestine. Mathematical analysis revealed that the time required for 50% of microspheres to leave the stomach was 1.42h, three times longer than the reference. These findings suggest that the microsphere is a promising device as a multiple-unit mucoadhesive system.

  6. Optimization and characterization of controlled release multi-particulate beads formulated with a customized cellulose acetate butyrate dispersion.

    PubMed

    Vaithiyalingam, Siva; Khan, Mansoor A

    2002-03-02

    The objectives of the present investigation were: (1) to model the effect of process and formulation variables viz., coating weight gain, duration of curing, and plasticizer concentration on in-vitro release profile of verapamil HCl from multi-particulate beads formulated with a novel aqueous-based pseudolatex dispersion; (2) to optimize the formulation by response surface methodology (RSM) and artificial neural network (ANN); and (3) to characterize the optimized product by thermal and X-ray analyses. Inert beads (Nupareil) were loaded with verapamil HCl and subsequently coated with a custom designed aqueous-based pseudolatex dispersion of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB). Experiments were designed and data was collected according to a three factor, three level face centered central composite design. Data was analyzed for modeling and optimizing the release profile using both RSM and ANN. Model fitted the data and explained 90% of variability in response in the case of RSM and at least 70% in the case of ANN. Release profile was optimized for a zero-order model. Optimized formulations were prepared according to the factor combinations dictated by RSM and ANN. In each case, the observed drug release data of the optimized formulations was close to the predicted release pattern. However, the modeling and optimization abilities of RSM as evaluated by the R-squared values, were found to be higher than that of ANN. X-ray and drug content analysis suggested the absence of any degradation of verapamil HCl and excipients incorporated in the formulation.

  7. Butyric acid production from softwood hydrolysate by acetate-consuming Clostridium sp. S1 with high butyric acid yield and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsun; Kim, Ki-Yeon; Lee, Kyung Min; Youn, Sung Hun; Lee, Sun-Mi; Woo, Han Min; Oh, Min-Kyu; Um, Youngsoon

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the butyric acid production from softwood hydrolysate by acetate-consuming Clostridium sp. S1. Results showed that Clostridium sp. S1 produced butyric acid by simultaneously utilizing glucose and mannose in softwood hydrolysate and, more remarkably, it consumed acetic acid in hydrolysate. Clostridium sp. S1 utilized each of glucose, mannose, and xylose as well as mixed sugars simultaneously with partially repressed xylose utilization. When softwood (Japanese larch) hydrolysate containing glucose and mannose as the main sugars was used, Clostridium sp. S1 produced 21.17g/L butyric acid with the yield of 0.47g/g sugar and the selectivity of 1 (g butyric acid/g total acids) owing to the consumption of acetic acid in hydrolysate. The results demonstrate potential of Clostridium sp. S1 to produce butyric acid selectively and effectively from hydrolysate not only by utilizing mixed sugars simultaneously but also by converting acetic acid to butyric acid.

  8. Chicory increases acetate turnover, but not propionate and butyrate peripheral turnovers in rats.

    PubMed

    Pouteau, Etienne; Rochat, Florence; Jann, Alfred; Meirim, Isabelle; Sanchez-Garcia, Jose-Luis; Ornstein, Kurt; German, Bruce; Ballèvre, Olivier

    2008-02-01

    Chicory roots are rich in inulin that is degraded into SCFA in the caecum and colon. Whole-body SCFA metabolism was investigated in rats during food deprivation and postprandial states. After 22 h of food deprivation, sixteen rats received an IV injection of radioactive 14C-labelled SCFA. The volume of distribution and the fractional clearance rate of SCFA were 0.25-0.27 litres/kg and 5.4-5.9 %/min, respectively. The half-life in the first extracellular rapidly decaying compartment was between 0.9 and 1.4 min. After 22 h of food deprivation, another seventeen rats received a primed continuous IV infusion of 13C-labelled SCFA for 2 h. Isotope enrichment (13C) of SCFA was determined in peripheral arterial blood by MS. Peripheral acetate, propionate and butyrate turnover rates were 29, 4 and 0.3 micromol/kg per min respectively. Following 4 weeks of treatment with chicory root or control diets, eighteen fed rats received a primed continuous IV infusion of 13C-labelled SCFA for 2 h. Intestinal degradation of dietary chicory lowered caecal pH, enhanced caecal and colonic weights, caecal SCFA concentrations and breath H2. The diet with chicory supplementation enhanced peripheral acetate turnover by 25 % (P = 0.017) concomitant with an increase in plasma acetate concentration. There were no changes in propionate or butyrate turnovers. In conclusion, by setting up a multi-tracer approach to simultaneously assess the turnovers of acetate, propionate and butyrate it was demonstrated that a chronic chicory-rich diet significantly increases peripheral acetate turnover but not that of propionate or butyrate in rats.

  9. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of propylthiouracil microspheres made of Eudragit RL 100 and cellulose acetate butyrate polymers using the emulsion-solvent evaporation method.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, W M; Price, J C

    2005-05-01

    The objectives of this investigation are to evaluate the encapsulation efficiency of the anti-thyroid agent 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil using two polymers of different characteristics (cellulose acetate butyrate polymer, (CAB-551-0.01) and ammonio methacrylate copolymer (Eudragit RL 100) and to study the effect of this encapsulation on the drug release properties. Polymers were used separately and in combination to prepare different microspheres. Also, the effect of polymer solution phase viscosity was studied for each of the polymers and for their combinations. An Ostwald viscometer was used to evaluate the relative viscosities of polymer solution phases and their combinations. Microspheres with 25% theoretical drug loading of 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil core material were prepared by the emulsion solvent evaporation method. Microspheres prepared from CAB-551-0.01, which has higher relative polymer phase viscosity than Eudragit RL 100, showed significantly lower drug release rates and a noticeable lag time. Polymer combinations of CAB-551-0.01 and Eudragit RL 100 (1:1) showed an interesting synergistic increase in relative polymer solution viscosities at all concentrations. Unlike microspheres prepared from the two polymers separately which follow Higuchi spherical matrix release kinetics, microspheres prepared using a combination (1:1) of the two polymers showed near zero order with faster rates compared to those prepared using CAB-551-0.01 equivalent polymer concentrations. The results of this study suggest that 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil was successfully and efficiently encapsulated and release rates of matrix microspheres are related to polymer solution phase viscosity, but when polymer combinations were used other factors such as structural effects must be considered.

  10. Carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate: a review of the preparations, properties, and applications.

    PubMed

    El-Sakhawy, Mohamed; Kamel, Samir; Salama, Ahmed; Sarhan, Hebat-Allah

    2014-01-01

    Carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate (CMCAB) has gained increasing importance in several fields, particularly in coating technologies and pharmaceutical research. CMCAB is synthesized by esterification of CMC sodium salt with acetic and butyric anhydrides. CMCAB mixed esters are relatively high molecular weight (MW) thermoplastic polymers with high glass transition temperatures (Tg). CMCAB ester is dispersible in water and soluble in a wide range of organic solvents, allowing varied opportunity to the solvent choice. It makes application of coatings more consistent and defect-free. Its ability to slow down the release rate of highly water-soluble compounds and to increase the dissolution of poorly soluble compounds makes CMCAB a unique and potentially valuable tool in pharmaceutical and amorphous solid dispersions (ASD) formulations.

  11. Carboxymethyl Cellulose Acetate Butyrate: A Review of the Preparations, Properties, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Samir; Salama, Ahmed; Sarhan, Hebat-Allah

    2014-01-01

    Carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate (CMCAB) has gained increasing importance in several fields, particularly in coating technologies and pharmaceutical research. CMCAB is synthesized by esterification of CMC sodium salt with acetic and butyric anhydrides. CMCAB mixed esters are relatively high molecular weight (MW) thermoplastic polymers with high glass transition temperatures (Tg). CMCAB ester is dispersible in water and soluble in a wide range of organic solvents, allowing varied opportunity to the solvent choice. It makes application of coatings more consistent and defect-free. Its ability to slow down the release rate of highly water-soluble compounds and to increase the dissolution of poorly soluble compounds makes CMCAB a unique and potentially valuable tool in pharmaceutical and amorphous solid dispersions (ASD) formulations. PMID:25548679

  12. Influence of emulsifying agents on the properties of cellulose acetate butyrate and ethylcellulose microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Kristmundsdóttir, T; Ingvarsdóttir, K

    1994-01-01

    Microcapsules of ibuprofen were prepared according to the solvent evaporation method, using two coating polymers, cellulose acetate butyrate and ethylcellulose. The influence of two emulsifying agents, polysorbat 80 and polyvinyl alcohol, on the properties of the microcapsules was investigated. The results show that type and concentration of emulsifying agent influences size distribution, drug loading and amount of free drug on the surface of the microcapsules.

  13. Pathways of acetate, propionate, and butyrate formation by the human fecal microbial flora.

    PubMed

    Miller, T L; Wolin, M J

    1996-05-01

    The pathways of short-chain fatty acid (SCFA; acetate, propionate, and butyrate) formation from glucose were determined for the human fecal microbial communities of two subjects. The pathways were identified by radioisotope analysis of the SCFA and CO2 obtained after incubation of fecal suspensions with glucose under 20% CO2 with [1-14C]glucose, [3,4-14C]glucose, or 14CO2. Acetate was chemically degraded to learn the labeling of the methyl and carboxyl carbons. The labeling of CO2 and acetate showed that the major route of glucose catabolism was the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, with production of CO2 from pyruvate carboxyl carbon. Labeling of the methyl and carboxyl carbons of acetate by 14CO2 or [3,4-14C]glucose proved that acetate was formed from CO2 by the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. CO2 reduction accounted for about one-third of the acetate formed by suspensions from subject 1 and about one-fourth of the acetate formed by suspensions from subject 2. Propionate was formed by a CO2 fixation pathway, and butyrate was formed by classical routes of acetyl-S coenzyme A condensation. The amount of CO2 formed from [1-14C] glucose and acetate labeling patterns obtained with the other 14C precursors indicated that the Entner-Doudoroff, transketolase-transaldolase, and heterolactic pathways were not significant. Fermentation of cabbage cellulose by subject 1 followed the same pathways as were used for glucose. The results with suspensions from subject 2 suggested that some radioactive acetate was formed from the C-3 of glucose by the Bifidobacterium pathway.

  14. Analysis of the key enzymes of butyric and acetic acid fermentation in biogas reactors

    PubMed Central

    Gabris, Christina; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Dürre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of the mechanisms of acidogenesis, which is a key process during anaerobic digestion. To expose possible bottlenecks, specific activities of the key enzymes of acidification, such as acetate kinase (Ack, 0.23–0.99 U mg−1 protein), butyrate kinase (Buk, < 0.03 U mg−1 protein) and butyryl-CoA:acetate-CoA transferase (But, 3.24–7.64 U mg−1 protein), were determined in cell free extracts of biogas reactor content from three different biogas reactors. Furthermore, the detection of Ack was successful via Western blot analysis. Quantification of corresponding functional genes encoding Buk (buk) and But (but) was not feasible, although an amplification was possible. Thus, phylogenetic trees were constructed based on respective gene fragments. Four new clades of possible butyrate-producing bacteria were postulated, as well as bacteria of the genera Roseburia or Clostridium identified. The low Buk activity was in contrast to the high specific But activity in the analysed samples. Butyrate formation via Buk activity does barely occur in the investigated biogas reactor. Specific enzyme activities (Ack, Buk and But) in samples drawn from three different biogas reactors correlated with ammonia and ammonium concentrations (NH3 and NH4+-N), and a negative dependency can be postulated. Thus, high concentrations of NH3 and NH4+-N may lead to a bottleneck in acidogenesis due to decreased specific acidogenic enzyme activities. PMID:26086956

  15. Mechanical Behavior of TNAZ/CAB Explosives during High Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Y.; Capellos, C.; Travers, B.; Sharma, J.

    2004-07-01

    The mechanical behavior of melt-cast TNAZ/CAB (1,3,3-trinitroazetidine/cellulose acetate butyrate) explosives subjected to high acceleration has been studied in an ultracentrifuge at -10°C and 25°C. Melt-cast TNAZ/CAB was studied as a function of the percentage of the composition of CAB at -10°C and 25°C. The percentage of CAB in the samples varied from 0.5% to 3%. Failure occurs when the shear or tensile strength of the explosive is exceeded. The fracture acceleration of melt-cast TNAZ/CAB increases with the percentage of CAB in the explosive at both temperatures studied, -10°C and 25°C. While there is some variation among samples, it is found that the fracture acceleration of melt-cast 99%/1% TNAZ/CAB and melt-cast 99.5%/0.5% TNAZ/CAB at -10°C is less than that at 25°C.

  16. Cell growth on in situ photo-cross-linked electrospun acrylated cellulose acetate butyrate.

    PubMed

    Çakmakçı, Emrah; Güngör, Atilla; Kayaman-Apohan, Nilhan; Kuruca, Serap Erdem; Çetin, Muzaffer Beyza; Dar, Kadriye Akgün

    2012-01-01

    In this study, electrospinning was combined with UV curing technology for producing in situ photo cross-linked fibers from methacrylated cellulose acetate butyrate (CABIEM). ECV304 and 3T3 cells were seeded on electrospun fibrous scaffolds. Collagen modified CABIEM fibers were also prepared for improving cell adhesion and proliferation. Cross-linking and the morphology of the fibers were characterized by ATR-FTIR spectrometry and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The cytotoxicity of the fibers was examined using the MTT cytotoxicity assay. According to the results, electrospun fibrous scaffolds are non-toxic and cell viability depends on the amount of collagen. It was found that cell adhesion and cell growth were enhanced as the collagen percentage was increased.

  17. Pervaporation of water and ethanol using a cellulose acetate butyrate membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.S.; Lau, W.W.Y.; Rangaiah, G.P.; Sourirajan, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-10-15

    Okada and Matsuura's transport equations for pervaporation give rise to three fundamental parameters, namely, interfacial saturation vapor pressure P*, liquid transport parameter A/[delta], and vapor transport parameter B/[delta]. The effects of the chemical nature of the membrane material and the upstream operating pressures of 101.3 and 303.9 kPa on the above parameters were investigated from the pervaporation data at laboratory temperature (24 C) for water and ethanol using a cellulose acetate butyrate membrane. The results show that the P. values are essentially unaffected by the upstream pressure, and that they are generally higher than the literature values of saturation vapor pressure at 24 C. Further, the values for A/[delta] and B/[delta] tend to increase with increased upstream pressure for both systems studied. These results are discussed.

  18. Cellulose acetate butyrate-pH/thermosensitive polymer microcapsules containing aminated poly(vinyl alcohol) microspheres for oral administration of DNA.

    PubMed

    Fundueanu, Gheorghe; Constantin, Marieta; Bortolotti, Fabrizio; Cortesi, Rita; Ascenzi, Paolo; Menegatti, Enea

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this work is to safely transport bioadhesive microspheres loaded with DNA to intestine and to test their bioadhesive properties. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) microspheres were prepared by dispersion reticulation with glutaraldehyde and further aminated. These microspheres were firstly loaded with plasmid DNA by electrostatic interactions and then entrapped in cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) microcapsules for gastric protection. The entrapped PVA microspheres do not have enough force by swelling to produce the rupture of CAB shell, therefore the resistance of microcapsules was weakened by incorporating different amount of the pH/thermosensitive polymer (SP) based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid) (NIPAAm-co-MM-co-MA). This polymer is insoluble in gastric juice at pH 1.2 and 37 degrees C, but quickly solubilized in intestinal fluids (pH 6.8 and pH 7.4). Therefore, DNA loaded PVA microspheres were not expelled in acidic media but were almost entirely discharged in small intestine or colon. The integrity of DNA after entrapment was tested by agarose gel electrophoresis indicating that no DNA degradation occurs during encapsulation. The percentage of adhered microspheres on the mucus surface of everted intestinal tissue was 65+/-18% for aminated PVA microspheres without DNA and almost 50+/-15% for those loaded with DNA. Non-aminated PVA microspheres display the lowest adhesive properties (33+/-12%). In conclusion DNA loaded microspheres were progressively discharged in intestine. The integrity of DNA was not modified after entrapment and release, as proved by agarose gel electrophoresis. Both loaded and un-loaded aminated microspheres display good bioadhesive properties.

  19. Micromeritics and release behaviours of cellulose acetate butyrate microspheres containing theophylline prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation and emulsion non-solvent addition method.

    PubMed

    Jelvehgari, Mitra; Atapour, Fatemeh; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2009-07-01

    The present research work compares the effect of microsphere preparation technique on micromeritics and release behaviors of theophylline microspheres. Microspheres were prepared by oil-in oil (O(1)/O(2)) emulsion solvent evaporation method (ESE) using different ratios of anhydrous theophylline to cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB). Cyclohexane was used as non-solvent to modify the ESE technique (MESE method) and the effect of non-solvent volume on properties of microspheres was investigated. The obtained microspheres were analyzed in terms of drug content, particle size and encapsulation efficiency. The morphology of microsphere was studied using scanning electron microscope. The solid state of microspheres, theophylline and CAB were investigated using X-ray, FT-IR and DSC. The drug content of microspheres prepared by MESE method was significantly lower (15.54% +/- 0.46) than microspheres prepared by ESE method (41.08 +/- 0.40%). The results showed that as the amount of cyclohexane was increased from 2 mL to 6 mL the drug content of microspheres was increased from 15.54% to 28.71%. Higher encapsulation efficiencies were obtained for microspheres prepared by ESE method (95.87%) in comparison with MESE method (64.71%). Mean particle size of microsphere prepared by ESE method was not remarkably affected by drug to polymer ratio, whereas in MSES method when the volume of cyclohexane was increased the mean particle size of microsphere was significantly decreased. The ratio of drug to polymer significantly changed the rate of drug release from microspheres and the highest drug release was obtained for the microsphere with high drug to polymer ratio. The amount of cyclohexane did not significantly change the drug release. Although, x-ray showed a small change in crystallinity of theophylline in microspheres, DSC results proved that theophylline in microspheres is in amorphous state. No major chemical interaction between the drug and polymer was reported during the

  20. Synthesis at the air-water interface of a two-dimensional semi-interpenetrating network based on poly(dimethylsiloxane) and cellulose acetate butyrate.

    PubMed

    El Haitami, Alae; Backus, Ellen H G; Cantin, Sophie

    2014-10-14

    The UV-induced cross-linking of methacryloxypropyl-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) oligomers was studied at the air-water interface either in pure PDMS Langmuir monolayers or in mixed films containing cellulose acetate butyrate. Surface pressure-area isotherms, area measurement at constant surface pressure, Brewster angle microscopy observations, and infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy were combined to follow the evolution of the monolayers upon in situ UV photoirradiation. For both systems, the mean area per repeat unit decreases with irradiation time reflecting the monolayer contraction. In addition, SFG measurements evidence the conversion of the methacrylate groups into unconjugated poly(methacrylate) ones. These results demonstrate PDMS cross-linking, leading to the formation of either a single PDMS network or a PDMS network entrapped in a CAB matrix. The network formation is accompanied by morphology changes as shown by atomic force microscopy on the transferred monolayer. Indeed, filamentous structures appear on both pure and mixed preirradiated monolayers.

  1. Partition coefficients for acetic, propionic, and butyric acids in a crude oil/water system

    SciTech Connect

    Reinsel, M.A.; Borkowski, J.J.; Sears, J.T. . National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Biofilm Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    The effects of pH, temperature, and organic acid concentration on the partition coefficients for short-chain organic acids were measured in a crude oil/water system. Acetic, propionic, and butyric acids, as probable substrates for microbial souring of oil reservoirs, were used in conjunction with two types of crude oil. Temperatures of 35--75 C, pH values of 4.0--7.0, and acid concentrations of 10--1,000 mg/L were studied. Initial naturally occurring levels of organic acids in the crude oils were also determined. pH had by far the largest effect on the partition coefficient for all three organic acids for both types oil. At conditions normally seen in an oil reservoir (pH 5--7), the great percentage (85+%) of these acids were dissolved in the aqueous phase. The log of the partition coefficient K increased approximately linearly with the number of carbon atoms in the acid. It was seen that organic acids are readily available carbon sources for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) at normal reservoir conditions, and that crude oil may provide a source of organic acids in a low-pH, water-flooded reservoir.

  2. Disc-electrospun cellulose acetate butyrate nanofibers show enhanced cellular growth performances.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen; Niu, Haitao; Wu, Chunchen; Ke, Qinfei; Mo, Xiumei; Lin, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose acetate butyrate nanofibers were prepared separately by two electrospinning techniques; a needleless electrospinning using a disc as spinneret and a rotary drum as collector and a conventional needle electrospinning using a rotary drum as collector. Compared to the needle-electrospun nanofibers, the disc-electrospun nanofibers were coarser with a wider diameter distribution. Both fibers had a similar surface morphology and they showed no difference in chemical components, but the disc-electrospun nanofibers were slightly higher in crystallinity. The productivity of disc electrospinning was 150 times larger than that of needle electrospinning. The disc-electrospun nanofiber mats were found to have a three dimensional fibrous structure with an average pore size of 9.1 μm, while the needle-electrospun nanofibers looked more like a two-dimensional sheet with a much smaller average pore size (3.2 μm). Fibroblasts and Schwann cells were cultured on the fibrous matrices to assess the biocompatibility. The disc-electrospun nanofiber webs showed enhanced cellular growth for both fibroblasts and Schwann cells, especially in a long culture period.

  3. Preparation and characterization of nanoparticles of carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate containing acyclovir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Venkata Bharadwaz; Chopra, Maulick; Joseph, Emil; Mazumder, Sonal

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles of carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate complexed with the poorly soluble antiviral drug acyclovir (ACV) were produced by precipitation process and the formulation process and properties of nanoparticles were investigated. Two different particle synthesis methods were explored—a conventional precipitation method and a rapid precipitation in a multi-inlet vortex mixer. The particles were processed by rotavap followed by freeze-drying. Particle diameters as measured by dynamic light scattering were dependent on the synthesis method used. The conventional precipitation method did not show desired particle size distribution, whereas particles prepared by the mixer showed well-defined particle size ~125-450 nm before and after freeze-drying, respectively, with narrow polydispersity indices. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed chemical stability and intactness of entrapped drug in the nanoparticles. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the drug was in amorphous state in the polymer matrix. ACV drug loading was around 10 wt%. The release studies showed increase in solution concentration of drug from the nanoparticles compared to the as-received crystalline drug.

  4. The synergistic effect of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate and sodium butyrate on the death of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kato, Rie; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao; Azuma, Hideki; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko

    2014-04-05

    It has been suggested that the combined effect of natural products may improve the effect of treatment against the proliferation of cancer cells. In this study, we evaluated the combination of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), obtained from Alpinia galangal, and sodium butyrate, a major short chain fatty acid, on the growth of HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and found that treatment had a synergistic inhibitory effect. The number of HepG2 cells was synergistically decreased via apoptosis induction when cells were treated with both ACA and sodium butyrate. In ACA- and sodium butyrate-treated cells, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and NADPH oxidase activities were increased significantly. The decrease in cell number after combined treatment of ACA and sodium butyrate was diminished when cells were pretreated with catalase. These results suggest that an increase in intracellular ROS levels is involved in cancer cell death. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a cellular energy sensor, plays an essential role in controlling processes related to tumor development. In ACA- and sodium butyrate-treated cells, AMPK phosphorylation was induced significantly, and this induction improved when cells were pretreated with catalase. These results suggest that the increase in intracellular ROS is involved in the increase of AMPK phosphorylation. In normal hepatocyte cells, treatment with ACA and sodium butyrate did not decrease cell numbers or increase ROS levels. In conclusion, combined treatment with ACA and sodium butyrate synergistically induced apoptotic cell death via an increase in intracellular ROS and phosphorylation of AMPK. Our findings may provide new insight into the development of novel combination therapies against hepatocellular carcinoma.

  5. Quantification of butyryl CoA:acetate CoA-transferase genes reveals different butyrate production capacity in individuals according to diet and age.

    PubMed

    Hippe, Berit; Zwielehner, Jutta; Liszt, Kathrin; Lassl, Cornelia; Unger, Frank; Haslberger, Alexander G

    2011-03-01

    The gastrointestinal microbiota produces short-chain fatty acids, especially butyrate, which affect colonic health, immune function and epigenetic regulation. To assess the effects of nutrition and aging on the production of butyrate, the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene and population shifts of Clostridium clusters lV and XlVa, the main butyrate producers, were analysed. Faecal samples of young healthy omnivores (24 ± 2.5 years), vegetarians (26 ± 5 years) and elderly (86 ± 8 years) omnivores were evaluated. Diet and lifestyle were assessed in questionnaire-based interviews. The elderly had significantly fewer copies of the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene than young omnivores (P=0.014), while vegetarians showed the highest number of copies (P=0.048). The thermal denaturation of the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene variant melting curve related to Roseburia/Eubacterium rectale spp. was significantly more variable in the vegetarians than in the elderly. The Clostridium cluster XIVa was more abundant in vegetarians (P=0.049) and in omnivores (P<0.01) than in the elderly group. Gastrointestinal microbiota of the elderly is characterized by decreased butyrate production capacity, reflecting increased risk of degenerative diseases. These results suggest that the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene is a valuable marker for gastrointestinal microbiota function.

  6. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR INTRAVENOUS AND INHALATION-ROUTE PHARMACOKINETICS OF BUTYL ACETATE AND METABOLITES N-BUTANOL AND N-BUTYRIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessment for n-butyl acetate and metabolites n-butanol and n-butyric acid (the butyl series) can be accomplished with limited toxicity data and pharmacokinetic data for each compound through application of the "family approach" (Barton et al., 2000). The necessary quantita...

  7. Stability and interface properties of thin cellulose ester films adsorbed from acetone and ethyl acetate solutions.

    PubMed

    Amim, Jorge; Kosaka, Priscila M; Petri, Denise F S; Maia, Francisco C B; Miranda, Paulo B

    2009-04-15

    Stability and interface properties of cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) films adsorbed from acetone or ethyl acetate onto Si wafers have been investigated by means of contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Surface energy (gamma(S)(total)) values determined for CAP adsorbed from acetone are larger than those from ethyl acetate. In the case of CAB films adsorbed from ethyl acetate and acetone were similar. Dewetting was observed by AFM only for CAP films prepared from ethyl acetate. Positive values of effective Hamaker constant (A(eff)) were found only for CAP prepared from ethyl acetate, corroborating with dewetting phenomena observed by AFM. On the contrary, negative values of A(eff) were determined for CAP and CAB prepared from acetone and for CAB prepared from ethyl acetate, corroborating with experimental observations. Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectra indicated that CAP and CAB films prepared from ethyl acetate present more alkyl groups oriented perpendicularly to the polymer-air interface than those films prepared from acetone. Such preferential orientation corroborates with macroscopic contact angle measurements. Moreover, SFG spectra showed that acetone binds strongly to Si wafers, creating a new surface for CAP and CAB films.

  8. Diversity of human colonic butyrate-producing bacteria revealed by analysis of the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene.

    PubMed

    Louis, Petra; Young, Pauline; Holtrop, Grietje; Flint, Harry J

    2010-02-01

    Butyrate-producing bacteria play an important role in the human colon, supplying energy to the gut epithelium and regulating host cell responses. In order to explore the diversity and culturability of this functional group, we designed degenerate primers to amplify butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase sequences from faecal samples provided by 10 healthy volunteers. Eighty-eight per cent of amplified sequences showed >98% DNA sequence identity to CoA-transferases from cultured butyrate-producing bacteria, and these fell into 12 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The four most prevalent OTUs corresponded to Eubacterium rectale, Roseburia faecis, Eubacterium hallii and an unnamed cultured species SS2/1. The remaining 12% of sequences, however, belonged to 20 OTUs that are assumed to come from uncultured butyrate-producing strains. Samples taken after ingestion of inulin showed significant (P=0.019) increases in Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Because several of the dominant butyrate producers differ in their DNA % G+C content, analysis of thermal melt curves obtained for PCR amplicons of the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene provides a convenient and rapid qualitative assessment of the major butyrate producing groups present in a given sample. This type of analysis therefore provides an excellent source of information on functionally important groups within the colonic microbial community.

  9. Uniaxial drawing of poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate]/cellulose acetate butyrate blends and their orientation behavior.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Wuk; Tanaka, Toshihisa; Doi, Yoshiharu; Iwata, Tadahisa

    2005-09-16

    Miscible blends of PHB and CAB were prepared by the solvent-casting method with various blend compositions, and their orientation behavior was investigated during uniaxial drawing. X-ray analysis revealed that the orientation of the crystallizable PHB component in the drawn PHB/CAB blends was changed from c-axis-orientation to a-axis-orientation with increasing CAB content. The a-axis-orientation was a result from the a-axis-oriented crystal growth caused by the intramolecular nucleation and the confined crystal growth. For quantitative assessment of the chain orientation, the Hermans orientation functions of the two respective components were obtained from the polarized FT-IR measurements. The orientation function of pure PHB stretched to 5 times of its initial length was approximately 0.8. However the value decreased rapidly with increasing CAB content, and it turned to a negative value from 30 wt.-% CAB content. This indicates that the PHB chains were aligned perpendicular to the drawing direction. On the contrary, the value of the CAB component remained almost unchanged at about 0.1 regardless of the blend composition and the annealing time, indicating that the CAB chains were constantly oriented parallel to the drawing direction without any chain relaxation. In addition, SAXS analysis suggested that the lamellar stacking direction also changed from parallel to perpendicular in the stretching direction with increasing CAB content.

  10. Use of acetate, propionate and butyrate for reduction of nitrate and sulfate and methanogenesis in microcosms and bioreactors simulating an oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan; Shen, Yin; An, Dongshan; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2017-01-27

    Acetate, propionate and butyrate (volatile fatty acids, VFA) occur in oil field waters and are frequently used for microbial growth of oil field consortia. We determined the kinetics of use of these VFA components (3 mM of each) by an anaerobic oil field consortium in microcosms containing 2 mM sulfate and either 0, 4, 6, 8 or 13 mM of nitrate. Nitrate was reduced first with preference for acetate and propionate. Sulfate reduction then proceeded with propionate (not butyrate) as the electron donor, whereas the fermentation of butyrate (not propionate) was associated with methanogenesis. Microbial community analyses indicated Paracoccus-Thauera, Desulfobulbus and Syntrophomonas-Methanobacterium as the dominant taxa catalyzing these three processes. Most probable number assays showed the presence of up to 10(7)/ml of propionate-oxidizing SRB in waters from the Medicine Hat Glauconitic C field. Bioreactors with the same concentrations of sulfate and VFA responded similarly to increasing concentrations of injected nitrate as observed in the microcosms: sulfide formation was prevented by adding approximately 80% of the nitrate dose needed to completely oxidize VFA to CO2 in both. Thus this work has demonstrated that simple time-dependent observations of the use of acetate, propionate and butyrate for nitrate reduction, sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in microcosms are a good proxy for these processes in bioreactors of which monitoring is more complex.

  11. Driving carbon flux through exogenous butyryl-CoA: Acetate CoA-transferase to produce butyric acid at high titer in Thermobifida fusca.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Mao, Yin; Zhang, Xiaojuan

    2015-12-20

    Butyric acid, a 4-carbon short chain fatty acid, is widely used in chemical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. The low activity of butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase in Thermobifida fusca muS, a thermophilic actinobacterium whose optimal temperature was 55°C, was found to hinder the accumulation of high yield of butyric acid. In order to solve this problem, an exogenous butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase gene (actA) from Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum DSM571 was integrated into the chromosome of T. fusca muS by replacing celR gene, forming T. fusca muS-1. We demonstrated that on 5g/L cellulose, the yield of butyric acid by the engineered muS-1 strain was increased by 42.9 % compared to the muS strain. On 100g/L of cellulose, the muS-1 strain could consume 90.5% of total cellulose in 144h, with 33.2g/L butyric acid produced. Furthermore, on the mix substrates including the major components of biomass: cellulose, xylose, mannose and galactose, 70.4g/L butyric acid was produced in 168h by fed-batch fermentation. To validate the ability of fermenting biomass, the muS-1 strain was grown on the milled corn stover ranging from 200 to 250μm. The muS-1 strain had the highest butyrate titer 17.1g/L on 90g/L corn stover.

  12. Bioavailability of theophylline and thiamine disulfide incorporated into mucoadhesive microspheres consisting of dextran derivatives and cellulose acetate butyrate.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yasunori; Ogihara, Kanako; Yakou, Shigeru; Nagai, Tsuneji; Takayama, Kozo

    2003-12-01

    Mucoadhesive microspheres made of oppositely charged dextran derivatives and cellulose acetate butyrate (Ad-MS) were evaluated for their ability to improve the bioavailability of theophylline (TH) and thiamine disulfide (TDS). A drug suspension (or solution) and non-adhesive microspheres (MS) were used as references. In vitro drug release profiles from MS and Ad-MS were similar for each drug, whereas their gastrointestinal transits differed. The plasma concentration after oral administration of drug suspension (or solution), MS and Ad-MS was investigated in rats. In the case of TH, sustained plasma level profiles were observed after MS or Ad-MS administration, with similar C(max), T(max) and MRT( infinity ) values. AUC( infinity ) values of the suspension, MS and Ad-MS were statistically equivalence. These indicated that Ad-MS achieved a sustained plasma level profile without a decrease of AUC. In the case of TDS, MRT( infinity ) and AUC( infinity ) of Ad-MS were significantly larger than those of the solution and MS, indicating that the plasma level was sustained and the extent of bioavailability was increased. These results suggested that Ad-MS is a promising device for improvement of bioavailability of drugs those absorption windows are limited to upper part of the gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Release profiles of theophylline from microspheres consisting of dextran derivatives and cellulose acetate butyrate: effect of polyion complex formation.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yasunori; Yakou, Shigeru; Nagai, Tsuneji; Takayama, Kozo

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the utility of mixtures among oppositely charged dextran derivatives as constituents of a controlled release microsphere. Carboxymethyldextran (CMD) and dextran sulfate (DS) were used as polyanions, and [2-(diethylamino) ethyl] dextran (EA) and [2-hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium] dextran (CDC) as polycations. The microspheres consisting of hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymers were prepared by emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The mixtures, CMD/EA, CMD/CDC, DS/EA, and DS/CDC, were used as hydrophilic polymers, because they can interact with each other to form polyion complexes for the improvement of sustained-release performances. Cellulose acetate butyrate and theophylline were used as a model hydrophobic polymer and a model drug, respectively. The yield of microspheres was excellent (more than 95%). According to observation, by scanning election microscopy (SEM) microspheres were spherical with a rough surface. The in vitro drug release from microspheres was examined in the JP XIV first fluid, pH 1.2, and second fluid, p H 6.8, at 37 degrees C, and 100 rpm. In the DS/CDC system, drug release was depressed by formation of a polyion complex and not affected by pH of dissolution medium. The release rate was modulated by the ratio of hydrophilic and hydrophobic matrix. This particulate system, in which the polyion complex matrix is strengthened by a hydrophobic polymer, is a promising formulation for drug delivery.

  14. Diclofenac sodium loaded-cellulose acetate butyrate: effect of processing variables on microparticles properties, drug release kinetics and ulcerogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Nahla S; Ahmad, Amany A E

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and characterize diclofenac sodium loaded-cellulose acetate butyrate microparticles in order to obtain a controlled-release system. The influence of the type of polymer, the volume and composition of the internal phase, drug loading, surfactant concentration and additive added on microparticles characteristics (particle size, encapsulation efficiency, surface morphology and in vitro release profiles) was studied to optimize the microparticles system. The resultant microparticles were evaluated for the recovery, average particle size, drug loading and incorporation efficiency. The microparticles exhibited good flowing nature and compressibility index when compared to pure drug. Dissolution rate of diclofenac sodium in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) increased with increases in initial drug loading, surfactant concentration and addition of alcohol as co-solvent but decreased with increases in the concentration of additives such as Gantrez AN or Eudragit S100 in the internal phase. The dissolution data showed a Higuchi diffusion pattern for most of the formulations. About 56-81% reduction in ulcerogenic activity was observed with microparticles containing Eudragit S100 17-25%, based on total polymer concentration, when compared with pure diclofenac sodium.

  15. Transport of the two natural auxins, indole-3-butyric acid and indole-3-acetic acid, in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, Aaron M.; Poupart, Julie; Waddell, Candace S.; Muday, Gloria K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Polar transport of the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is important in a number of plant developmental processes. However, few studies have investigated the polar transport of other endogenous auxins, such as indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), in Arabidopsis. This study details the similarities and differences between IBA and IAA transport in several tissues of Arabidopsis. In the inflorescence axis, no significant IBA movement was detected, whereas IAA is transported in a basipetal direction from the meristem tip. In young seedlings, both IBA and IAA were transported only in a basipetal direction in the hypocotyl. In roots, both auxins moved in two distinct polarities and in specific tissues. The kinetics of IBA and IAA transport appear similar, with transport rates of 8 to 10 mm per hour. In addition, IBA transport, like IAA transport, is saturable at high concentrations of auxin, suggesting that IBA transport is protein mediated. Interestingly, IAA efflux inhibitors and mutations in genes encoding putative IAA transport proteins reduce IAA transport but do not alter IBA movement, suggesting that different auxin transport protein complexes are likely to mediate IBA and IAA transport. Finally, the physiological effects of IBA and IAA on hypocotyl elongation under several light conditions were examined and analyzed in the context of the differences in IBA and IAA transport. Together, these results present a detailed picture of IBA transport and provide the basis for a better understanding of the transport of these two endogenous auxins.

  16. A simple fiber-optic humidity sensor based on extrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity constructed by cellulose acetate butyrate film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Huang, Wo-Bin; Huang, Xu-Guang; Yu, Chang-yuan

    2013-12-01

    A fiber-optic relative humidity sensor with an extrinsic micro Fabry-Perot cavity constructed with a thin layer of cellulose acetate butyrate coated on a fiber end is presented. Its operational principle is based on the relative-humidity-dependent wavelength shift of the interference fringes formed by Fresnel reflections from both interfaces of the thin film. Both the experimental and theoretical analyses are investigated in detail. The experimental data for relative humidity ranging from 8.8% to 88.1% are measured in the both humidification and dehumidification processes, which fits the linear equation very well with a value of R2 = 0.9946. As observed, it shows a high sensitivity of 0.307 nm/%RH with a high resolution of 0.06%. The time-dependent response of the sensor is estimated. The long term stability of the sensor is also addressed with high precision of ±0.03% over 100 min. The proposed relative humidity sensor has a simple, solid, and compact structure.

  17. Simultaneous extraction and HPLC determination of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid in pea plant by using ionic liquid-modified silica as sorbent.

    PubMed

    Sheikhian, Leila; Bina, Sedigheh

    2016-01-15

    In this study, ionic liquid-modified silica was used as sorbent for simultaneous extraction and preconcentration of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid in pea plants. The effect of some parameters such as pH and ionic strength of sample solution, amount of sorbent, flow rate of aqueous sample solution and eluent solution, concentration of eluent solution, and temperature were studied for each hormone solution. Percent extraction of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid was strongly affected by pH of aqueous sample solution. Ionic strength of aqueous phase and temperature showed no serious effects on extraction efficiency of studied plant hormones. Obtained breakthrough volume was 200mL for each of studied hormones. Preconcentration factor for spectroscopic and chromatographic determination of studied hormones was 100 and 4.0×10(3) respectively. Each solid sorbent phase was reusable for almost 10 times of extraction/stripping procedure. Relative standard deviations of extraction/stripping processes of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid were 2.79% and 3.66% respectively. The calculated limit of detections for IBA and IAA were 9.1×10(-2)mgL(-1) and 1.6×10(-1)mgL(-1) respectively.

  18. Plasmonic-based colorimetric and spectroscopic discrimination of acetic and butyric acids produced by different types of Escherichia coli through the different assembly structures formation of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    La, Ju A; Lim, Sora; Park, Hyo Jeong; Heo, Min-Ji; Sang, Byoung-In; Oh, Min-Kyu; Cho, Eun Chul

    2016-08-24

    We present a plasmonic-based strategy for the colourimetric and spectroscopic differentiation of various organic acids produced by bacteria. The strategy is based on our discovery that particular concentrations of dl-lactic, acetic, and butyric acids induce different assembly structures, colours, and optical spectra of gold nanoparticles. We selected wild-type (K-12 W3110) and genetically-engineered (JHL61) Escherichia coli (E. coli) that are known to primarily produce acetic and butyric acid, respectively. Different assembly structures and optical properties of gold nanoparticles were observed when different organic acids, obtained after the removal of acid-producing bacteria, were mixed with gold nanoparticles. Moreover, at moderate cell concentrations of K-12 W3110 E. coli, which produce sufficient amounts of acetic acid to induce the assembly of gold nanoparticles, a direct estimate of the number of bacteria was possible based on time-course colour change observations of gold nanoparticle aqueous suspensions. The plasmonic-based colourimetric and spectroscopic methods described here may enable onsite testing for the identification of organic acids produced by bacteria and the estimation of bacterial numbers, which have applications in health and environmental sciences.

  19. Empirical prediction of net splanchnic release of ketogenic nutrients, acetate, butyrate and β-hydroxybutyrate in ruminants: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Loncke, C; Nozière, P; Bahloul, L; Vernet, J; Lapierre, H; Sauvant, D; Ortigues-Marty, I

    2015-03-01

    For energy feeding systems for ruminants to evolve towards a nutrient-based system, dietary energy supply has to be determined in terms of amount and nature of nutrients. The objective of this study was to establish response equations of the net hepatic flux and net splanchnic release of acetate, butyrate and β-hydroxybutyrate to changes in diet and animal profiles. A meta-analysis was applied on published data compiled from the FLuxes of nutrients across Organs and tissues in Ruminant Animals database, which pools the results from international publications on net splanchnic nutrient fluxes measured in multi-catheterized ruminants. Prediction variables were identified from current knowledge on digestion, hepatic and other tissue metabolism. Subsequently, physiological and other, more integrative, predictors were obtained. Models were established for intakes up to 41 g dry matter per kg BW per day and diets containing up to 70 g concentrate per 100 g dry matter. Models predicted the net hepatic fluxes or net splanchnic release of each nutrient from its net portal appearance and the animal profile. Corrections were applied to account for incomplete hepatic recovery of the blood flow marker, para-aminohippuric acid. Changes in net splanchnic release (mmol/kg BW per hour) could then be predicted by combining the previously published net portal appearance models and the present net hepatic fluxes models. The net splanchnic release of acetate and butyrate were thus predicted from the intake of ruminally fermented organic matter (RfOM) and the nature of RfOM (acetate: residual mean square error (RMSE)=0.18; butyrate: RMSE=0.01). The net splanchnic release of β-hydroxybutyrate was predicted from RfOM intake and the energy balance of the animals (RMSE=0.035), or from the net portal appearance of butyrate and the energy balance of the animals (RMSE=0.050). Models obtained were independent of ruminant species, and presented low interfering factors on the residuals, least

  20. Cloning and expression of clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 acetoacetyl-coenzyme A:acetate/butyrate:coenzyme A-transferase in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J.W.; Petersen, D.J.; Bennett, G.N. ); Papoutsakis, E.T. )

    1990-06-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferase (acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA-transferase (butyrate-acetoacetate CoA-transferase) (EC 2.8.3.9)) of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 is an important enzyme in the metabolic shift between the acid-producing and solvent-forming states of this organism. The genes encoding the two subunits of this enzyme have been cloned and subsequent subcloning experiments established the position of the structural genes for CoA-transferase. Complementation of Escherichia coli ato mutants with the recombinant plasmid pCoAT4 (pUC19 carrying a 1.8-kilobase insert of C. acetobutylicum DNA encoding CoA-transferase activity) enabled the transformants to grow on butyrate as a sole carbon source. Despite the ability of CoA-transferase to complement the ato defect in E. coli mutants, Southern blot and Western blot (immunoblot) analyses showed showed that neither the C. acetobutylicum genes encoding CoA-transferase nor the enzyme itself shared any apparent homology with its E. coli counterpart. Polypeptides of M{sub r} of the purified CoA-transferase subunits were observed by Western blot and maxicell analysis of whole-cell extracts of E.coli harboring pCoAT4. The proximity and orientation of the genes suggest that the genes encoding the two subunits of CoA-transferase may form an operon similar to that found in E. coli. In the plasmid, however, transcription appears to be primarily from the lac promoter of the vector.

  1. Cross-feeding between Bifidobacterium longum BB536 and acetate-converting, butyrate-producing colon bacteria during growth on oligofructose.

    PubMed

    Falony, Gwen; Vlachou, Angeliki; Verbrugghe, Kristof; De Vuyst, Luc

    2006-12-01

    In vitro coculture fermentations of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 and two acetate-converting, butyrate-producing colon bacteria, Anaerostipes caccae DSM 14662 and Roseburia intestinalis DSM 14610, with oligofructose as the sole energy source, were performed to study interspecies interactions. Two clearly distinct types of cross-feeding were identified. A. caccae DSM 14662 was not able to degrade oligofructose but could grow on the fructose released by B. longum BB536 during oligofructose breakdown. R. intestinalis DSM 14610 could degrade oligofructose, but only after acetate was added to the medium. Detailed kinetic analyses of oligofructose breakdown by the last strain revealed simultaneous degradation of the different chain length fractions, in contrast with the preferential degradation of shorter fractions by B. longum BB536. In a coculture of both strains, initial oligofructose degradation and acetate production by B. longum BB536 took place, which in turn also allowed oligofructose breakdown by R. intestinalis DSM 14610. These and similar cross-feeding mechanisms could play a role in the colon ecosystem and contribute to the combined bifidogenic/butyrogenic effect observed after addition of inulin-type fructans to the diet.

  2. Butyrate as preferred substrate for polyhydroxybutyrate production.

    PubMed

    Marang, Leonie; Jiang, Yang; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Kleerebezem, Robbert

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the suitability of butyrate as substrate for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production by microbial enrichment cultures was assessed. Two sequencing batch reactors were operated under feast-famine conditions: one fed with butyrate, and another with mixed acetate and butyrate. The obtained results were compared to previous results with acetate as sole substrate. In all three reactors Plasticicumulans acidivorans dominated the enrichment culture. The carbon uptake rate and PHA yield were significantly higher on butyrate than on acetate, resulting in a higher PHA production rate. When both substrates were available the bacteria strongly preferred the uptake of butyrate. Only after butyrate depletion acetate was taken up at a high rate. The molar substrate uptake rate remained the same, suggesting that substrate uptake is the rate-limiting step. The results show that for optimized waste-based PHA production the pre-fermentation process should be directed towards butyrate production.

  3. A simple fiber optic humidity sensor based on water-absorption characteristic of CAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang; Xu, Wei; Huang, Xuguang

    2015-02-01

    A simple fiber-optic relative humidity sensor based on cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and Fresnel reflection is proposed and investigated theoretically and experimentally. The sensing system is only composed of one light source, three optical couplers, two photo-detectors and two fiber sensing ends. The operation principle is based on relative Fresnel reflection and water-absorption characteristic of the CAB which simultaneously contains hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups. The water absorption process will lead to variation of the CAB's refractive index or permittivity. It has to be noted that the double-channel system can effectively eliminate the intensity fluctuation of the light source and the influence of the environment. In this paper, the relative humidity environments approximately ranging from 10 % to 100% are generated and measured both in the humidification and dehumidification processes, which shows a good repeatability and reveals a very good fitting feature with a high value of R2 above 0.99. It is of reflection type and can be simply extend to be a multi-point-monitoring system. The sensing system is of cost- effective, simple operation and high precision.

  4. Effect of cellulose acetate butyrate microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate on the flame retardancy, mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of intumescent flame-retardant ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer/microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate/polyamide-6 blends.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bibo; Tang, Qinbo; Hong, Ningning; Song, Lei; Wang, Lei; Shi, Yongqian; Hu, Yuan

    2011-09-01

    Ammonium polyphosphate (APP), a widely used intumescent flame retardant, has been microencapsulated by cellulose acetate butyrate with the aim of enhancing the water resistance of APP and the compatibility between the ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) matrix and APP. The structure of microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate (MCAPP) was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and water contact angle (WCA). The flame retadancy and thermal stability were investigated by a limiting oxygen index (LOI) test, UL-94 test, cone calorimeter, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The WCA results indicated that MCAPP has excellent water resistance and hydrophobicity. The results demonstrated that MCAPP enhanced interfacial adhesion, mechanical, electrical, and thermal stability of the EVA/MCAPP/polyamide-6 (PA-6) system. The microencapsulation not only imparted EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 with a higher LOI value and UL-94 rating but also could significantly improve the fire safety. Furthermore, the microencapsulated EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 composites can still pass the UL-94 V-0 rating after treatment with water for 3 days at 70 °C, indicating excellent water resistance. This investigation provides a promising formulation for the intumescent flame retardant EVA with excellent properties.

  5. Restricted distribution of the butyrate kinase pathway among butyrate-producing bacteria from the human colon.

    PubMed

    Louis, Petra; Duncan, Sylvia H; McCrae, Sheila I; Millar, Jacqueline; Jackson, Michelle S; Flint, Harry J

    2004-04-01

    The final steps in butyrate synthesis by anaerobic bacteria can occur via butyrate kinase and phosphotransbutyrylase or via butyryl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase. Degenerate PCR and enzymatic assays were used to assess the presence of butyrate kinase among 38 anaerobic butyrate-producing bacterial isolates from human feces that represent three different clostridial clusters (IV, XIVa, and XVI). Only four strains were found to possess detectable butyrate kinase activity. These were also the only strains to give PCR products (verifiable by sequencing) with degenerate primer pairs designed within the butyrate kinase gene or between the linked butyrate kinase/phosphotransbutyrylase genes. Further analysis of the butyrate kinase/phosphotransbutyrylase genes of one isolate, L2-50, revealed similar organization to that described previously from different groups of clostridia, along with differences in flanking sequences and phylogenetic relationships. Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase activity was detected in all 38 strains examined, suggesting that it, rather than butyrate kinase, provides the dominant route for butyrate formation in the human colonic ecosystem that contains a constantly high concentration of acetate.

  6. Transcriptome characterization by deep-RNA-sequencing underlies the mechanisms of butyrate-induced epigenomic regulation in bovine cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, acetate, propionate, and butyrate), especially butyrate, alter cell differentiation, proliferation, motility, and in particular, induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through its histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition activity. Butyrate is a great inducer of ...

  7. Cab Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Damman, Dennis

    2005-10-31

    Schneider National, Inc., SNI, has concluded the Cab Heating and Cooling evaluation of onboard, engine off idling solutions. During the evaluation period three technologies were tested, a Webasto Airtronic diesel fired heater for cold weather operation, and two different approaches to cab cooling in warm weather, a Webasto Parking Cooler, phase change storage system and a Bergstrom Nite System, a 12 volt electrical air conditioning approach to cooling. Diesel fired cab heaters were concluded to provide adequate heat in winter environments down to 10 F. With a targeted idle reduction of 17%, the payback period is under 2 years. The Webasto Parking Cooler demonstrated the viability of this type of technology, but required significant driver involvement to achieve maximum performance. Drivers rated the technology as ''acceptable'', however, in individual discussions it became apparent they were not satisfied with the system limitations in hot weather, (over 85 F). The Bergstrom Nite system was recognized as an improvement by drivers and required less direct driver input to operate. While slightly improved over the Parking Cooler, the hot temperature limitations were only slightly better. Neither the Parking Cooler or the Nite System showed any payback potential at the targeted 17% idle reduction. Fleets who are starting at a higher idle baseline may have a more favorable payback.

  8. 49 CFR 230.87 - Cab lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cab lights. 230.87 Section 230.87 Transportation... Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.87 Cab lights. Each steam locomotive shall have cab lights that... readings from their usual and proper positions in the cab. These lights shall be so located and...

  9. Derivation of a human equivalent concentration for n-butanol using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for n-butyl acetate and metabolites n-butanol and n-butyric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Deisinger, P. J.; Poet, Torka S.; English, J C.; Faber, W D.; Barton, H. A.; Corley, Rick A.; Clewell, III, H. J.

    2005-05-01

    The metabolic series (family) approach for risk assessment uses a dosimetry-based analysis to develop toxicity information for a group of metabolically linked compounds using pharmacokinetic (PK) data for each compound and toxicity data for the parent compound. An initial physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to support the implementation of the metabolic series approach for n-butyl acetate and its subsequent metabolites, n-butanol, and n-butyric acid (the butyl series) (Barton et al. 2000). In conjunction with pilot pharmacokinetic studies, the model was used to design the definitive intravenous (i.v.) PK studies. Rats were implanted with dual indwelling cannulae and administered test compounds by i.v. bolus dose, i.v. infusion, or by inhalation in a recirculating closed chamber. Hepatic, vascular and extravascular metabolic constants for metabolism were estimated by fitting the model to the blood time course data from these experiments. The respiratory bioavailability of n-butyl acetate and n-butanol was estimated from closed chamber inhalation studies and measured ventilation rates. The resulting butyl series PBPK model successfully reproduces the blood time course of these compounds following i.v. administration, and inhalation exposure to n-butyl acetate and n-butanol. A fully scaled human version of the model successfully reproduces arterial blood n-butanol kinetics following inhalation exposure to n-butanol. These validated i.v (rat) and inhalation route models (rat, butyl acetate, n-butanol; human, butanol only) can be used to support species and dose-route extrapolations required for risk assessment of butyl series family of compounds. Further, this work demonstrates the usefulness of i.v. kinetic data for parameterization of systemic metabolism and the value of collaboration between experimentalists and kineticists in the development of PBPK models. The product of this effort, validated rat and human PBPK models for the butyl

  10. 49 CFR 230.80 - Cabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... pipe, with properly rated valves and fittings. Live steam heating radiators must not be fastened to the cab. Exhaust steam radiators may be fastened to the cab. (c) Oil-burning steam locomotives. If the...

  11. 49 CFR 230.80 - Cabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... pipe, with properly rated valves and fittings. Live steam heating radiators must not be fastened to the cab. Exhaust steam radiators may be fastened to the cab. (c) Oil-burning steam locomotives. If the...

  12. 49 CFR 230.80 - Cabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... pipe, with properly rated valves and fittings. Live steam heating radiators must not be fastened to the cab. Exhaust steam radiators may be fastened to the cab. (c) Oil-burning steam locomotives. If the...

  13. 49 CFR 230.80 - Cabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... pipe, with properly rated valves and fittings. Live steam heating radiators must not be fastened to the cab. Exhaust steam radiators may be fastened to the cab. (c) Oil-burning steam locomotives. If the...

  14. 49 CFR 230.80 - Cabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... pipe, with properly rated valves and fittings. Live steam heating radiators must not be fastened to the cab. Exhaust steam radiators may be fastened to the cab. (c) Oil-burning steam locomotives. If the...

  15. Relationship between Indole-3-Acetic Acid Levels in Apple (Malus pumila Mill) Rootstocks Cultured in Vitro and Adventitious Root Formation in the Presence of Indole-3-Butyric Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Rafael; Nissen, Scott J.; Sutter, Ellen G.

    1989-01-01

    In vitro rooting response and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels were examined in two genetically related dwarfing apple (Malus pumila Mill) rootstocks. M.26 and M.9 were cultured in vitro using Linsmaier-Skoog medium supplemented with benzyladenine (BA), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), and 1,3,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid (PG). Rooting response was tested in Lepoivre medium supplemented with IBA and PG. IBA concentrations of 12.0 and 4.0 micromolar induced the maximum rooting percentages for M.9 and M.26, respectively. At these concentrations rooting response was 100% for M.26 and 80% for M.9. Free and conjugated IAA levels were determined in M.26 and M.9 shoots prior to root inducing treatment by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using 13[C6]IAA as internal standard. Basal sections of M.26 shoots contained 2.8 times more free IAA than similar tissue in M.9 (477.1 ± 6.5 versus 166.6 ± 6.7 nanograms per gram fresh weight), while free IAA levels in apical sections of M.26 and M.9 shoots were comparable (298.0 ± 4.4 versus 263.7 ± 9.3 nanograms per gram fresh weight). Conjugated IAA levels were significantly higher in M.9 than in M.26 indicating that a greater proportion of total IAA was present as a conjugate in M.9. These data suggest that differences between M.26 and M.9 rooting responses may be related to differences in free IAA levels in the shoot base. PMID:16666562

  16. Effect of Exogenous Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Indole-3-Butyric Acid on Internal Levels of the Respective Auxins and Their Conjugation with Aspartic Acid during Adventitious Root Formation in Pea Cuttings

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, Ann-Caroline; Jacobs, Fernando Alvarado; Eliasson, Lennart

    1991-01-01

    The influence of exogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) on the internal levels of these auxins was studied during the first 4 days of adventitious root formation in cuttings of Pisum sativum L. The quantitations were done by high performance liquid chromatography with spectrofluorometric detection. IBA, identified by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), was found to naturally occur in this plant material. The root inducing ability of exogenous IBA was superior to that of IAA. The IAA level in the tissue increased considerably on the first day after application of IAA, but rapidly decreased again, returning to a level twice the control by day 3. The predominant metabolic route was conjugation with aspartic acid, as reflected by the increase in the level of indole-3-acetylaspartic acid. The IBA treatment resulted in increases in the levels of IBA, IAA, and indole-3-acetylaspartic acid. The IAA content rapidly returned to control levels, whereas the IBA level remained high throughout the experimental period. High amounts of indole-3-butyrylaspartic acid were found in the tissue after feeding with IBA. The identity of the conjugate was confirmed by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance and GC-MS. IBA was much more stable in solution than IAA. No IAA was detected after 48 hours, whereas 70% IBA was still recovered after this time. The relatively higher root inducing ability of IBA is ascribed to the fact that its level remained elevated longer than that of IAA, even though IBA was metabolized in the tissue. Adventitious root formation is discussed on the basis of these findings. PMID:16668265

  17. 49 CFR 229.127 - Cab lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cab lights. 229.127 Section 229.127 Transportation... lights. (a) Each locomotive shall have cab lights which will provide sufficient illumination for the... normal positions in the cab. These lights shall be located, constructed, and maintained so that...

  18. 49 CFR 229.127 - Cab lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cab lights. 229.127 Section 229.127 Transportation... lights. (a) Each locomotive shall have cab lights which will provide sufficient illumination for the... normal positions in the cab. These lights shall be located, constructed, and maintained so that...

  19. 49 CFR 229.127 - Cab lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cab lights. 229.127 Section 229.127 Transportation... lights. (a) Each locomotive shall have cab lights which will provide sufficient illumination for the... normal positions in the cab. These lights shall be located, constructed, and maintained so that...

  20. 49 CFR 229.127 - Cab lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cab lights. 229.127 Section 229.127 Transportation... lights. (a) Each locomotive shall have cab lights which will provide sufficient illumination for the... normal positions in the cab. These lights shall be located, constructed, and maintained so that...

  1. 49 CFR 229.127 - Cab lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cab lights. 229.127 Section 229.127 Transportation... lights. (a) Each locomotive shall have cab lights which will provide sufficient illumination for the... normal positions in the cab. These lights shall be located, constructed, and maintained so that...

  2. 49 CFR 230.87 - Cab lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... engine crew's vision of the track and signals. Each steam locomotive shall also have a conveniently... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Cabs, Warning Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.87 Cab lights. Each steam locomotive shall have cab lights...

  3. 49 CFR 230.87 - Cab lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... engine crew's vision of the track and signals. Each steam locomotive shall also have a conveniently... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Cabs, Warning Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.87 Cab lights. Each steam locomotive shall have cab lights...

  4. 49 CFR 230.87 - Cab lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... engine crew's vision of the track and signals. Each steam locomotive shall also have a conveniently... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Cabs, Warning Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.87 Cab lights. Each steam locomotive shall have cab lights...

  5. 49 CFR 230.87 - Cab lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... engine crew's vision of the track and signals. Each steam locomotive shall also have a conveniently... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Cabs, Warning Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.87 Cab lights. Each steam locomotive shall have cab lights...

  6. Comparative study on the effect of electron beam irradiation on the physical properties of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bibo; Hong, Ningning; Shi, Yongqian; Wang, Biao; Sheng, Haibo; Song, Lei; Tang, Qinbo; Hu, Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) flame retarded by a combination of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate (MCAPP) and polyamide-6 (PA-6) have been crosslinked by high energy electron beam irradiation. The effect of high energy electron beam irradiation on the crosslinking degree, mechanical, electrical and thermal properties of EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 cable material was studied by gel content, heat extention test, mechanical test, dynamic mechanical analysis, high-insulation resistance meter and thermogravimetric analysis. The gel content and heat extention test results showed that the EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 composites can be easily crosslinked by electron beam irradiation. The tensile strength of EVA composites was drastically increased from 16.2 to maximum 26.2 MPa as the electron beam irradiation dose increases from 0 to 160 kGy. The volatilized products of EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 composites were analyzed and compared by thermogravimetric analysis/infrared spectrometry (TG-FTIR).

  7. The acetate kinase of Clostridum acetobutylicum strain P262.

    PubMed

    Diez-Gonzalez, F; Russell, J B; Hunter, J B

    1996-12-01

    Clostridum acetobutylicum strain P262 fermented glucose, pyruvate, or lactate, and the butyrate production was substrate-dependent. Differences in butyrate yield could not be explained by changes in butyrate kinase activities, but the butyrate production was inversely related to acetate kinase activity. The acetate kinase had a pH optimum of 8.0, a Km for acetate of 160 mM, and a kcat of 16, 800 min-1. The enyzme had a native molecular mass of 78 kDa; the size of 42 kDa on SDS-PAGE indicated that the acetate kinase of strain P262 was a homodimer.

  8. Increasing butanol/acetone ratio and solvent productivity in ABE fermentation by consecutively feeding butyrate to weaken metabolic strength of butyrate loop.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Shi, Zhongping; Li, Zhigang

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we attempted to increase butanol/acetone ratio and total solvent productivity in ABE fermentations with corn- and cassava-based media, by consecutively feeding a small amount of butyrate/acetate during solventogenic phase to weaken the metabolic strengths in butyrate/acetate closed-loops. Consecutively feeding a small amount of butyrate (a total of 3.0 g/L-broth) is most effective in improving performance of corn-based ABE fermentations, as it simultaneously increased average butanol/acetone ratio by 23 % (1.92-2.36) and total solvent productivity by 16 % (0.355-0.410 g/L/h) as compared with those of control. However, the butyrate feeding strategy could not improve butanol/acetone ratio and total solvent productivity in cassava-based ABE fermentations, where the metabolic strength of butyrate closed-loop had already been very low.

  9. Isolation of butyrate-utilizing bacteria from thermophilic and mesophilic methane-producing ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The ability of various ecosystems to convert butyrate to methane was studied in order to isolate the bacteria responsible for the conversion. When thermophilic digester sludge was enriched with butyrate, methane was produced without a lag period. Marine sediments enriched with butyrate required a 2-week incubation period before methanogenesis began. A thermophilic digester was studied in more detail and found by most-probable-number enumeration to have ca. 5 x 10/sup 6/ butyrate-utilizing bactera/ml of sludge. A thermophilic butyrate-utilizing bacterium was isolated in coculture with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and a Methanosarcina sp. This bacterium was a gram-negative, slightly curved rod that occurred singly, was nonmotile, and did not appear to produce spores. The thermophilic digester was infused with butyrate at the rate of 10 ..mu..moles/ml of sludge per day. Biogas production increased by 150%, with the percentage of methane increasing from 58% to 68%. Acetate, propionate, and butyrate did not accumulate. Butyrate-utilizing enrichments from mesophilic ecosystems were used in obtaining cocultures of butyrate-utilizing bacteria. These cocultures served as inocula for attempts to isolate pure cultures of butyrate-utilizing bacteria by use of hydrogenase-containing membrane fragments of Escherichia coli. After a 3-week incubation period, colonies appeared only in inoculated tubes that contained membrane fragments and butyrate.

  10. 49 CFR 393.203 - Cab and body components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Frames, Cab and Body Components, Wheels, Steering, and Suspension Systems § 393... a roof exit. (b) Bolts or brackets securing the cab or the body of the vehicle to the frame...

  11. 49 CFR 393.203 - Cab and body components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Frames, Cab and Body Components, Wheels, Steering, and Suspension Systems § 393... a roof exit. (b) Bolts or brackets securing the cab or the body of the vehicle to the frame...

  12. Butyrate Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Boosalis, Michael S.; Perrine, Susan P.; Sangerman, José

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In addition to being a part of the metabolic fatty acid fuel cycle, butyrate is also capable of inducing growth arrest in a variety of normal cell types and senescence-like phenotypes in gynecological cancer cells, inhibiting DNA synthesis and cell growth in colonic tumor cell lines, suppressing hTERT mRNA expression and telomerase activity in human prostate cancer cells, and inducing stem cell differentiation and apoptosis by DNA fragmentation. It regulates gene expression by inhibiting histone deacetylases (HDACs), enhances memory recovery and formation in mice, stimulates neurogenesis in the ischemic brain, promotes osteoblast formation, selectively blocks cell replication in transformed cells (compared to healthy cells), and can prevent and treat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mouse models of obesity, as well as stimulate fetal hemoglobin expression in individuals with hematologic diseases such as the thalassemias and sickle-cell disease, in addition to a multitude of other biochemical effects in vivo. However, efforts to exploit the potential of butyrate in the clinical treatment of cancer and other medical disorders are thwarted by its poor pharmacological properties (short half-life and first-pass hepatic clearance) and the multigram doses needed to achieve therapeutic concentrations in vivo. Herein, we review some of the methods used to overcome these difficulties with an emphasis on HDAC inhibition. PMID:23514803

  13. The CNET Automated Budget System (CABS) II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Morris G.; And Others

    The Chief of Naval Education and Training (CNET) Automated Budget System II (CABS II) is an improved and expanded version of an earlier system which was developed by the Training Analysis and Evaluation Group (TAEG) to provide an efficient, easy means of handling the large volume of data necessary to produce budget documents. Intended as a guide…

  14. Cellular Metabolism and Dose Reveal Carnitine-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms of Butyrate Oxidation in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Anna; Bennett, Natalie; MacDonald, Amber; Johnstone, Megan; Whelan, Jay; Donohoe, Dallas R

    2016-08-01

    Dietary fiber has been suggested to suppress colorectal cancer development, although the mechanisms contributing to this beneficial effect remain elusive. Butyrate, a fermentation product of fiber, has been shown to have anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on colorectal cancer cells. The metabolic fate of butyrate in the cell is important in determining whether, it acts as an HDAC inhibitor or is consumed as a short-chain fatty acid. Non-cancerous colonocytes utilize butyrate as the primary energy source whereas cancerous colonocytes increase glucose utilization through the Warburg effect. In this study, we show that butyrate oxidation is decreased in cancerous colonocytes compared to non-cancerous colonocytes. We demonstrate that colorectal cancer cells utilize both a carnitine-dependent and carnitine-independent mechanism that contributes to butyrate oxidation. The carnitine-dependent mechanism is contingent on butyrate concentration. Knockdown of CPT1A in colorectal cancer cells abolishes butyrate oxidation. In terms of selectivity, the carnitine-dependent mechanism only regulated butyrate oxidation, as acetate and propionate oxidation were carnitine-independent. Carnitine decreased the action of butyrate as an HDAC inhibitor and suppressed induction of H3 acetylation by butyrate in colorectal cancer cells. Thus, diminished oxidation of butyrate is associated with decreased HDAC inhibition and histone acetylation. In relation to the mechanism, we find that dichloroacetate, which decreases phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, increased butyrate oxidation and that this effect was carnitine-dependent. In conclusion, these data suggest that colorectal cancer cells decrease butyrate oxidation through inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, which is carnitine-dependent, and provide insight into why butyrate shows selective effects toward colorectal cancer cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1804-1813, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The CNET Automated Budget System (CABS) IV.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    is gratefully acknowledged. Mr. William Rayburn III, Mr. J. E. Armstrong, Mrs. Lorraine *Magness, and Ms. Carolyn Carson, in particular, provided...invaluable in this effort, the contributions of two individuals have been substantial and laudable. Mr. William F. Parrish designed the initial CABS and...Name VT1T CHUCK I 2 SS * 3 .no user .4 SUSAN * 5 . r; user" ) 6 no user 7 no user 8 .rc user * 9 .no user 10 .o user 11 .no user 12 .no user 13 .no

  16. Colonic butyrate- algesic or analgesic?

    PubMed

    Kannampalli, P; Shaker, R; Sengupta, J N

    2011-11-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common health issue that is characterized by abdominal pain, abnormal bowel movements, and altered visceral perception. The complexity and variability in symptoms pose serious challenges in treating IBS. Current therapy for IBS is primarily focused on reducing the abdominal pain, thereby improving the quality of life to a significant extent. Although the use of fiber rich diet is widely recommended in treating IBS, some studies have questioned its use. Intra-colonic butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid, is primarily produced by the fermentation of dietary fibers in the colon. In the existing literature there are conflicting reports about the function of butyrate. In rats it is known to induce visceral hypersensitivity without altered pathology, whereas in humans it has been reported to reduce visceral pain. Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for this contrasting effect of butyrate is important before recommending fiber rich diet to IBS patients.

  17. Function and phylogeny of bacterial butyryl-CoA:acetate transferases and their diversity in the proximal colon of swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studying the host-associated butyrate-producing bacterial community is important because butyrate is essential for colonic homeostasis and gut health. Previous research has identified the butyryl-coA:acetate transferase (2.3.8.3) as a the main gene for butyrate production in intestinal ecosystems; h...

  18. 49 CFR 229.121 - Locomotive cab noise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locomotive cab noise. 229.121 Section 229.121... § 229.121 Locomotive cab noise. (a) Performance standards for locomotives. (1) When tested for static noise in accordance with paragraph (a)(3) of this section, all locomotives of each design or model...

  19. 49 CFR 229.121 - Locomotive cab noise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locomotive cab noise. 229.121 Section 229.121... § 229.121 Locomotive cab noise. (a) Performance standards for locomotives. (1) When tested for static noise in accordance with paragraph (a)(3) of this section, all locomotives of each design or model...

  20. 49 CFR 229.121 - Locomotive cab noise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locomotive cab noise. 229.121 Section 229.121... § 229.121 Locomotive cab noise. (a) Performance standards for locomotives. (1) When tested for static noise in accordance with paragraph (a)(3) of this section, all locomotives of each design or model...

  1. Iron Modulates Butyrate Production by a Child Gut Microbiota In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dostal, Alexandra; Bircher, Lea; Pham, Van Thanh; Follador, Rainer; Zimmermann, Michael Bruce; Chassard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of iron (Fe) availability on butyrate production in the complex bacterial ecosystem of the human gut. Hence, different Fe availabilities were mimicked in an in vitro colonic fermentation model (the polyfermenter intestinal model called PolyFermS) inoculated with immobilized gut microbiota from a child and in batch cultures of the butyrate producer Roseburia intestinalis. Shifts in the microbial community (16S rRNA sequencing and quantitative PCR), metabolic activity (high-performance liquid chromatography), and expression of genes involved in butyrate production were assessed. In the PolyFermS, moderate Fe deficiency resulted in a 1.4-fold increase in butyrate production and a 5-fold increase in butyryl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase gene expression, while very strong Fe deficiency significantly decreased butyrate concentrations and butyrate-producing bacteria compared with the results under normal Fe conditions. Batch cultures of R. intestinalis grown in a low-Fe environment preferentially produced lactate and had reduced butyrate and hydrogen production, in parallel with upregulation of the lactate dehydrogenase gene and downregulation of the pyruvate:ferredoxin-oxidoreductase gene. In contrast, under high-Fe conditions, R. intestinalis cultures showed enhanced butyrate and hydrogen production, along with increased expression of the corresponding genes, compared with the results under normal-Fe conditions. Our data reveal the strong regulatory effect of Fe on gut microbiota butyrate producers and on the concentrations of butyrate, which contributes to the maintenance of host gut health. PMID:26578675

  2. Induction of erythroid differentiadon in K562 cells by different butyrate regimens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Jie; Qian, Xin-Hua; Li, Xi-Ping; Yao, Ying-Min

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the hemoglobinization induced by butyrate and observe the effects of different butyrate regimens on erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. METHODS: K562 cells, used as an in vitro model system, were stained with benzidine to assess hemoglobin (Hb) production in response to different treatment regimens of butyrate at varied concentrations. Comparison of the percentage of benzidine-positive cells (BZ%)in untreated and butyrate-treated K562 cells was performed. Protein absorption at 414 nm using a spectrophotometer and cellulose acetate gel electrophoresis were employed to determine the changes of Hb production in K562 cells. RESULT: The BZ% increased by 4 to 6 fold and Hb production by 9 to 14 fold 3 d after the cells were incubated with butyrate which selectively promoted fetal hemoglobin(HbF) production in K562 cells. The BZ% increased gradually and reached the peak of l9% to 28% on day 3 or 4 in cells receiving pulse treatment with butyrate for only once, followed by a subsequent rapid fall and on day 7 to 9, it decreased to the level of untreated K562 cells. The length of time for incubation with butyrate was not related to in the increment or the maintenance of the increased level of BZ%. Continuous treatment with butyrate yielded a similar result to that of a single administration of pulse treatment. In contrast, in cells with intermittent pulse treatment the BZ% reached a peak after 72 h and was maintained between 20% and 30% till 3 cycles of treatment was completed. CONCLUSION: Butyrate can induce the expression of globin genes and augment Hb producfion especially that of HbF. A sustained erythroid differentiation of K562 cells can be achieved by intermittent pulse treatment with butyrate which can be an ideal regimen for children with beta globin diseases.

  3. Structure modeling and functional analysis of recombinant dextransucrase from Weissella confusa Cab3 expressed in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shraddha; Verma, Anil Kumar; Kajala, Ilkka; Nyyssolä, Antti; Baruah, Rwivoo; Katina, Kati; Juvonen, Riikka; Tenkanen, Maija; Goyal, Arun

    2016-11-16

    The dextransucrase gene from Weissella confusa Cab3, having an open reading frame of 4.2 kb coding for 1,402 amino acids, was amplified, cloned, and expressed in Lactococcus lactis. The recombinant dextransucrase, WcCab3-rDSR was expressed as extracellular enzyme in M17 medium with a specific activity of 1.5 U/mg which after purification by PEG-400 fractionation gave 6.1 U/mg resulting in 4-fold purification. WcCab3-rDSR was expressed as soluble and homogeneous protein of molecular mass, approximately, 180 kDa as analyzed by SDS-PAGE. It displayed maximum enzyme activity at 35°C at pH 5.0 in 50 mM sodium acetate buffer. WcCab3-rDSR gave Km of 6.2 mM and Vm of 6.3 µmol/min/mg. The characterization of dextran synthesized by WcCab3-rDSR by Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analyses revealed the structural similarities with the dextran produced by the native dextransucrase. The modeled structure of WcCab3-rDSR using the crystal structures of dextransucrase from Lactobacillus reuteri (protein data bank, PDB id: 3HZ3) and Streptococcus mutans (PDB id: 3AIB) as templates depicted the presence of different domains such as A, B, C, IV, and V. The domains A and B are circularly permuted in nature having (β/α)8 triose phosphate isomerase-barrel fold making the catalytic core of WcCab3-rDSR. The structure superposition and multiple sequence alignment analyses of WcCab3-rDSR with available structures of enzymes from family 70 GH suggested that the amino acid residue Asp510 acts as a nucleophile, Glu548 acts as a catalytic acid/base, whereas Asp621 acts as a transition-state stabilizer and these residues are found to be conserved within the family.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of butyric acid derivative with xylitol.

    PubMed

    Desmet, G; Brazier, M; Cerutti, J; Chany, C; Arnould-Guerin, M L

    1991-01-01

    The short chain fatty acids, especially butyric acid salts have interesting biological properties. In some cases, transformed cells can recover a normal phenotype and in animal, butyrate salts increase antitumor resistance. Butyrate may be considered as possibly useful for antitumor therapy. But these products exhibit two essential disadvantages which restrict their clinical use in man: high concentrations required to achieve therapeutic effects and rapid excretion with short half life. In order to optimize the clinical use of butyrate, we studied a n-butyric acid ester obtained with xylitol selected for its physiological and metabolic inertia. Structure determination of tributyryl xylitol was carried out by mass and NMR spectrometry (MW = 344). The low toxicity and the antitumor effects of this ester, especially in association with Corynebacterium parvum and interferon, confirm its therapeutic interest. The slow excretion of this prodrug should make butyrate clinical use easier by preventing extensive systemic metabolism and metabolic side-effects due to cations of butyrate salts.

  5. Understanding and Predicting Gun Barrel Erosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Stabilized Discarding Sabot CAB Cellulose Acetate Butyrate CAN Cellulose Acetate Nitrate CAZ Chemically Affected Zone CFD Computational Fluid Dynamics EFC... acetate butyrate (RDX-CAB) propellants, for example, may contain up to 76% RDX [42]. Work by Caveny [30] re- portedly showed that RDX propellant...RDX content. At the same time, Kimura replaces the inert CAB binder with energetic cellulose acetate nitrate (CAN). ´is has the dual effect of

  6. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  7. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  8. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  9. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  10. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  11. Butyrate: A dietary inhibitor of histone deacetylases and an epigenetic regulator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate, propionate and butyrate, also known as volatile fatty acids (VFA), are produced in the gastrointestinal tract by microbial fermentation. Consumption of dietary fibers has been shown to have positive metabolic health effects, such as increasing satiety, an...

  12. Sodium butyrate mitigates in vitro ammonia generation in cecal content of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anping; Wang, Yan; Di Liao, Xin; Wu, Yinbao; Liang, Juan Boo; Laudadio, Vito; Tufarelli, Vincenzo

    2016-08-01

    One of the environmental challenges that modern poultry industry faced is odor pollution caused by ammonia emission. The objectives of the study were to determine the effect of sodium butyrate on the production of ammonia in the cecal contents of laying hens using in vitro gas production study and to elucidate the mechanism behind it. The study consisted of a control (without sodium butyrate), and three experimental groups added with 10, 15, and 20 mg of sodium butyrate, respectively. Results showed that ammonia production in headspace of the syringe decreased by 8.2, 23, and 23 %, respectively, while ammonium production from the fermentation broth decreased by 6.3, 14.4, and 13.7 %, respectively. Sodium butyrate had no significant effect on the contents of uric acid and urea, nitrate-N, or total N in all treatments. However, sodium butyrate decreased the urease and uricase activities (P < 0.05) in the fermentation broth. Sodium butyrate also altered volatile fatty acids profile of the fermentation broth by decreasing the production of isovalerate (P < 0.05) and increasing those of acetate, butyrate, and isobutyrate (P < 0.05). The MiSeq System Sequencing results showed that sodium butyrate increased the relative abundance of Bacteroides and Faecalibacterium (P < 0.05) and decreased the relative abundance of Desulfovibrio, Helicobacter, and Campylobacter (P < 0.05).Our results concluded that sodium butyrate changes the diversity and relative abundance of the microbes which altered the fermentation characteristics leading to reduction in ammonia production.

  13. Dietary fibres modulate the composition and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria in the large intestine of suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Mu, Chunlong; Zhang, Lingli; He, Xiangyu; Smidt, Hauke; Zhu, Weiyun

    2017-02-04

    Dietary fibres have been shown to affect early-life microbiota colonization in the large intestine of suckling piglets, however, much less is known as to whether they also modulate the composition and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria. Here, we investigated the effect of dietary fibres on the abundance, composition, and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria in suckling piglets. Piglets were fed a control diet or creep feeds containing alfalfa, wheat bran, or pure cellulose, respectively, from postnatal day 7 to 22. Large intestinal digesta and mucosa samples were collected for quantitative analysis of bacterial group-specific 16S ribosomal RNA- and butyrate production-related genes, and digesta samples for quantification of short-chain fatty acids. The alfalfa diet increased (P < 0.05) Clostridium cluster XIVa abundance, copies of genes encoding proteins involved in butyrate production (butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase, butyrate kinase), and butyrate concentration compared to the wheat bran diet in the digesta of the proximal colon. In the distal colonic digesta, animals fed the alfalfa diet had the highest number of butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene copies (P < 0.05) and numerically the highest butyrate concentration, albeit not significant (P > 0.05), compared to other groups. In the distal colonic mucosa, the cellulose diet increased (P < 0.05) the abundance of Clostridium cluster XIVa and copies of the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene compared to the alfalfa diet. These results indicated that dietary fibres modulate the abundance and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria in the large intestine of suckling piglets, and that a moderate supplementation of alfalfa and cellulose may benefit early-life gut health through the delivery of butyrate to the mucosa.

  14. Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, looking southeast. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  15. Antenna cab interior showing waveguide from external parabolic antenna (later ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Antenna cab interior showing waveguide from external parabolic antenna (later addition), looking north. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  16. Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, looking west. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  17. View of 175 ton hoisthouse from northeast. Hoist operator's cab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of 175 ton hoist-house from northeast. Hoist operator's cab is in foreground center. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn V Dynamic Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  18. 12. ELEVATOR DOORS AND CAB. Hot Springs National Park, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. ELEVATOR DOORS AND CAB. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Fordyce Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  19. 21 CFR 26.36 - Listing of CAB's.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... conformity assessment bodies (CAB's) to participate in confidence building activities by transmitting to...

  20. 21 CFR 26.46 - Listing of additional CAB's.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... operational period, additional conformity assessment bodies (CAB's) will be considered for equivalence...

  1. 21 CFR 26.46 - Listing of additional CAB's.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... operational period, additional conformity assessment bodies (CAB's) will be considered for equivalence...

  2. 21 CFR 26.36 - Listing of CAB's.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... conformity assessment bodies (CAB's) to participate in confidence building activities by transmitting to...

  3. Equipment boxes (later addition) one level down from antenna cab, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Equipment boxes (later addition) one level down from antenna cab, looking southwest. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  4. Evaluation of Proposed Cab Glass Coating for FAA Control Towers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    wear vision correction? None Contacts Glasses Both If required, which correction do you use: Monofocal Bifocal Trifocal Color perception results...i AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2013-0123 Evaluation of Proposed Cab Glass Coating for FAA Control Towers Eric E. Geiselman Alan R. Pinkus, Ph.D...COVERED (From - To) 30-12-2013 Final Jun 2012 – Jun 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaluation of Proposed Cab Glass Coating for FAA Control

  5. Characterization of butyrate transport across the luminal membranes of equine large intestine.

    PubMed

    Nedjadi, Taoufik; Moran, Andrew W; Al-Rammahi, Miran A; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2014-10-01

    The diet of the horse, pasture forage (grass), is fermented by the equine colonic microbiota to short-chain fatty acids, notably acetate, propionate and butyrate. Short-chain fatty acids provide a major source of energy for the horse and contribute to many vital physiological processes. We aimed to determine both the mechanism of butyrate uptake across the luminal membrane of equine colon and the nature of the protein involved. To this end, we isolated equine colonic luminal membrane vesicles. The abundance and activity of cysteine-sensitive alkaline phosphatase and villin, intestinal luminal membrane markers, were significantly enriched in membrane vesicles compared with the original homogenates. In contrast, the abundance of GLUT2 protein and the activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, known markers of the intestinal basolateral membrane, were hardly detectable. We demonstrated, by immunohistochemistry, that monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) protein is expressed on the luminal membrane of equine colonocytes. We showed that butyrate transport into luminal membrane vesicles is energized by a pH gradient (out < in) and is not Na(+) dependent. Moreover, butyrate uptake is time and concentration dependent, with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 5.6 ± 0.45 mm and maximal velocity of 614 ± 55 pmol s(-1) (mg protein)(-1). Butyrate transport is significantly inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, phloretin and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, all potent inhibitors of MCT1. Moreover, acetate and propionate, as well as the monocarboxylates pyruvate and lactate, also inhibit butyrate uptake. Data presented here support the conclusion that transport of butyrate across the equine colonic luminal membrane is predominantly accomplished by MCT1.

  6. Butyrate production in phylogenetically diverse Firmicutes isolated from the chicken caecum.

    PubMed

    Eeckhaut, Venessa; Van Immerseel, Filip; Croubels, Siska; De Baere, Siegrid; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Louis, Petra; Vandamme, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Sixteen butyrate-producing bacteria were isolated from the caecal content of chickens and analysed phylogenetically. They did not represent a coherent phylogenetic group, but were allied to four different lineages in the Firmicutes phylum. Fourteen strains appeared to represent novel species, based on a level of ≤ 98.5% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity towards their nearest validly named neighbours. The highest butyrate concentrations were produced by the strains belonging to clostridial clusters IV and XIVa, clusters which are predominant in the chicken caecal microbiota. In only one of the 16 strains tested, the butyrate kinase operon could be amplified, while the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene was detected in eight strains belonging to clostridial clusters IV, XIVa and XIVb. None of the clostridial cluster XVI isolates carried this gene based on degenerate PCR analyses. However, another CoA-transferase gene more similar to propionate CoA-transferase was detected in the majority of the clostridial cluster XVI isolates. Since this gene is located directly downstream of the remaining butyrate pathway genes in several human cluster XVI bacteria, it may be involved in butyrate formation in these bacteria. The present study indicates that butyrate producers related to cluster XVI may play a more important role in the chicken gut than in the human gut.

  7. Direct hydrogenation of biomass-derived butyric acid to n-butanol over a ruthenium-tin bimetallic catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Min; Upare, Pravin P; Chang, Jong-San; Hwang, Young Kyu; Lee, Jeong Ho; Hwang, Dong Won; Hong, Do-Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Jeong, Myung-Geun; Kim, Young Dok; Kwon, Young-Uk

    2014-11-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of organic carboxylic acids and their esters, for example, cellulosic ethanol from fermentation of acetic acid and hydrogenation of ethyl acetate is a promising possibility for future biorefinery concepts. A hybrid conversion process based on selective hydrogenation of butyric acid combined with fermentation of glucose has been developed for producing biobutanol. ZnO-supported Ru-Sn bimetallic catalysts exhibits unprecedentedly superior performance in the vapor-phase hydrogenation of biomass-derived butyric acid to n-butanol (>98% yield) for 3500 h without deactivation.

  8. Melatonin promotes adventitious root regeneration in in vitro shoot tip explants of the commercial sweet cherry rootstocks CAB-6P (Prunus cerasus L.), Gisela 6 (P. cerasus × P. canescens), and MxM 60 (P. avium × P. mahaleb).

    PubMed

    Sarropoulou, Virginia N; Therios, Ioannis N; Dimassi-Theriou, Kortessa N

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the effects of melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), a natural compound of edible plants on the rooting of certain commercial sweet cherry rootstocks. Shoot tip explants from previous in vitro cultures of the cherry rootstocks CAB-6P (Prunus cerasus L.), Gisela 6 (P. cerasus × P. canescens), and M × M 60 (P. avium × P. mahaleb) were included in the experiment. The effect of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) alone or in combination with melatonin was tested concerning their rooting potential. Seven concentrations of melatonin (0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, and 10 μM) alone or in combination with 5.71 μM of IAA or 4.92 μM of IBA were tested. For each rootstock, 21 treatments were included. The explants were grown in glass tubes containing 10 mL of substrate. The parameters measured include rooting percentage, number of roots per rooted explant, root length, and callus formation. The data presented in this study show that melatonin has a rooting promoting effect at a low concentration but a growth inhibitory effect at high concentrations. In the absence of auxin, 1 μM melatonin had auxinic response concerning the number and length of roots, but 10 μM melatonin was inhibitory to rooting in all the tested rootstocks. The final conclusion of this experiment is that exogenously applied melatonin acted as a rooting promoter and its action was similar to that of IAA.

  9. The Future of Butyric Acid in Industry

    PubMed Central

    Dwidar, Mohammed; Park, Jae-Yeon; Mitchell, Robert J.; Sang, Byoung-In

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the different applications of butyric acid and its current and future production status are highlighted, with a particular emphasis on the biofuels industry. As such, this paper discusses different issues regarding butyric acid fermentations and provides suggestions for future improvements and their approaches. PMID:22593687

  10. Flecainide acetate acetic acid solvates.

    PubMed

    Veldre, Kaspars; Actiņs, Andris; Eglite, Zane

    2011-02-01

    Flecainide acetate forms acetic acid solvates with 0.5 and 2 acetic acid molecules. Powder X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis/thermogravimetric, infrared, and potentiometric titration were used to determine the composition of solvates. Flecainide acetate hemisolvate with acetic acid decomposes to form a new crystalline form of flecainide acetate. This form is less stable than the already known polymorphic form at all temperatures, and it is formed due to kinetic reasons. Both flecainide acetate nonsolvated and flecainide acetate hemisolvate forms crystallize in monoclinic crystals, but flecainide triacetate forms triclinic crystals. Solvate formation was not observed when flecainide base was treated with formic acid, propanoic acid, and butanoic acid. Only nonsolvated flecainide salts were obtained in these experiments.

  11. Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-COMM) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2015-12-04

    The Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-Comm) was established in 2010 to conduct research to enable commercial viability of alternative liquid fuels produced from algal biomass. The main objective of CAB-Comm was to dramatically improve the viability of algae as a source of liquid fuels to meet US energy needs, by addressing several significant barriers to economic viability. To achieve this goal, CAB-Comm took a diverse set of approaches on three key aspects of the algal biofuels value chain: crop protection; nutrient utilization and recycling; and the development of genetic tools. These projects have been undertaken as collaboration between six academic institutions and two industrial partners: University of California, San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography; University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Rutgers University; University of California, Davis; Johns Hopkins University; Sapphire Energy; and Life Technologies.

  12. Physiological and Genetic Description of Dissimilatory Perchlorate Reduction by the Novel Marine Bacterium Arcobacter sp. Strain CAB

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Charlotte I.; Wang, Ouwei; Melnyk, Ryan A.; Bauer, Stefan; Lee, Joyce; Engelbrektson, Anna; Coates, John D.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A novel dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacterium (DPRB), Arcobacter sp. strain CAB, was isolated from a marina in Berkeley, CA. Phylogenetically, this halophile was most closely related to Arcobacter defluvii strain SW30-2 and Arcobacter ellisii. With acetate as the electron donor, strain CAB completely reduced perchlorate (ClO4−) or chlorate (ClO3−) [collectively designated (per)chlorate] to innocuous chloride (Cl−), likely using the perchlorate reductase (Pcr) and chlorite dismutase (Cld) enzymes. When grown with perchlorate, optimum growth was observed at 25 to 30°C, pH 7, and 3% NaCl. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) preparations were dominated by free-swimming straight rods with 1 to 2 polar flagella per cell. Strain CAB utilized a variety of organic acids, fructose, and hydrogen as electron donors coupled to (per)chlorate reduction. Further, under anoxic growth conditions strain CAB utilized the biogenic oxygen produced as a result of chlorite dismutation to oxidize catechol via the meta-cleavage pathway of aerobic catechol degradation and the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase enzyme. In addition to (per)chlorate, oxygen and nitrate were alternatively used as electron acceptors. The 3.48-Mb draft genome encoded a distinct perchlorate reduction island (PRI) containing several transposases. The genome lacks the pcrC gene, which was previously thought to be essential for (per)chlorate reduction, and appears to use an unrelated Arcobacter c-type cytochrome to perform the same function. PMID:23695836

  13. Genome-wide ChIP-seq mapping and analysis of butyrate-induced H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation and epigenomic landscapes alteration in bovine cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile short-chain fatty acids (VFAs, acetate, propionate, and butyrate) are nutrients especially critical to ruminants. Beyond their nutritional impact, clear evidence is beginning to link modifications in chromatin structure induced by butyrate to cell cycle progression, DNA replication and over...

  14. Butyrate production in phylogenetically diverse Firmicutes isolated from the chicken caecum

    PubMed Central

    Eeckhaut, Venessa; Van Immerseel, Filip; Croubels, Siska; De Baere, Siegrid; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Louis, Petra; Vandamme, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Summary Sixteen butyrate‐producing bacteria were isolated from the caecal content of chickens and analysed phylogenetically. They did not represent a coherent phylogenetic group, but were allied to four different lineages in the Firmicutes phylum. Fourteen strains appeared to represent novel species, based on a level of ≤ 98.5% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity towards their nearest validly named neighbours. The highest butyrate concentrations were produced by the strains belonging to clostridial clusters IV and XIVa, clusters which are predominant in the chicken caecal microbiota. In only one of the 16 strains tested, the butyrate kinase operon could be amplified, while the butyryl‐CoA : acetate CoA‐transferase gene was detected in eight strains belonging to clostridial clusters IV, XIVa and XIVb. None of the clostridial cluster XVI isolates carried this gene based on degenerate PCR analyses. However, another CoA‐transferase gene more similar to propionate CoA‐transferase was detected in the majority of the clostridial cluster XVI isolates. Since this gene is located directly downstream of the remaining butyrate pathway genes in several human cluster XVI bacteria, it may be involved in butyrate formation in these bacteria. The present study indicates that butyrate producers related to cluster XVI may play a more important role in the chicken gut than in the human gut. PMID:21375722

  15. The CNET Automated Budget System (CABS). TAEG Report No. 73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Morris G.; And Others

    This document describes the Chief of Naval Education and Training (CNET) Automated Budget System (CABS), which was developed by the Training Analysis and Evaluation Group (TAEG) to provide an efficient, easy means of handling the large volume of data necessary to produce budget documents. A guide provided for Naval Education and Training Command…

  16. 21 CFR 26.46 - Listing of additional CAB's.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Listing of additional CAB's. 26.46 Section 26.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT...

  17. 21 CFR 26.36 - Listing of CAB's.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Listing of CAB's. 26.36 Section 26.36 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT...

  18. 21 CFR 26.36 - Listing of CAB's.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Listing of CAB's. 26.36 Section 26.36 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT...

  19. 21 CFR 26.46 - Listing of additional CAB's.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Listing of additional CAB's. 26.46 Section 26.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT...

  20. 10. DETAIL, CAB SIDE. DETAIL, END OF BOOM. DETAIL, LOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL, CAB SIDE. DETAIL, END OF BOOM. DETAIL, LOWER PART OF TOWER, SHOWING METAL WHEELS AND CABLE SPOOLS. DETAIL, LOOKING UP AT THE UNDERSIDE OF THE REVOLVING PLATFORM ATOP THE TOWER. - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Crane, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  1. Detail of bridge crane #7216, with driver's cab in view, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of bridge crane #72-16, with driver's cab in view, view facing northeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, One-Story Storehouse, East side of the two 1936 Repair Basins, Berths B20 & B21, Fronting the intersection of Avenue C & Club Road, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. 21 CFR 26.46 - Listing of additional CAB's.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Listing of additional CAB's. 26.46 Section 26.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT...

  3. 21 CFR 26.36 - Listing of CAB's.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Listing of CAB's. 26.36 Section 26.36 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT...

  4. Mergers and Anti-trust Issues in Recent CAB Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, A. M.

    1972-01-01

    The airline industry is surveyed-particularly domestic trunklines-in relation to collective approaches to industry concerns. These actions are classified by the apparent degree of anti-trust issue present. Recent route merger cases are considered from the CAB staff viewpoint.

  5. 49 CFR Appendix H to Part 229 - Static Noise Test Protocols-In-Cab Static

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Static Noise Test Protocols-In-Cab Static H... Appendix H to Part 229—Static Noise Test Protocols—In-Cab Static This appendix prescribes the procedures for the in-cab static measurements of locomotives. I. Measurement Instrumentation The...

  6. 49 CFR Appendix H to Part 229 - Static Noise Test Protocols-In-Cab Static

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Static Noise Test Protocols-In-Cab Static H... Appendix H to Part 229—Static Noise Test Protocols—In-Cab Static This appendix prescribes the procedures for the in-cab static measurements of locomotives. I. Measurement Instrumentation The...

  7. 49 CFR 238.447 - Train operator's controls and power car cab layout.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Train operator's controls and power car cab layout... Specific Requirements for Tier II Passenger Equipment § 238.447 Train operator's controls and power car cab layout. (a) Train operator controls in the power car cab shall be arranged so as to minimize the...

  8. 49 CFR 238.209 - Forward end structure of locomotives, including cab cars and MU locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... cab cars and MU locomotives. 238.209 Section 238.209 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... locomotives, including cab cars and MU locomotives. (a)(1) The skin covering the forward-facing end of each locomotive, including a cab car and an MU locomotive, shall be: (i) Equivalent to a 1/2-inch steel plate...

  9. 49 CFR 229.14 - Non-MU control cab locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Non-MU control cab locomotives. 229.14 Section 229... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS General § 229.14 Non-MU control cab locomotives. On each non-MU control cab locomotive, only those components added to the...

  10. 49 CFR 238.209 - Forward end structure of locomotives, including cab cars and MU locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cab cars and MU locomotives. 238.209 Section 238.209 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... locomotives, including cab cars and MU locomotives. (a)(1) The skin covering the forward-facing end of each locomotive, including a cab car and an MU locomotive, shall be: (i) Equivalent to a 1/2-inch steel plate...

  11. 49 CFR 229.14 - Non-MU control cab locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Non-MU control cab locomotives. 229.14 Section 229... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS General § 229.14 Non-MU control cab locomotives. On each non-MU control cab locomotive, only those components added to the...

  12. 49 CFR 238.209 - Forward end structure of locomotives, including cab cars and MU locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cab cars and MU locomotives. 238.209 Section 238.209 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... locomotives, including cab cars and MU locomotives. (a)(1) The skin covering the forward-facing end of each locomotive, including a cab car and an MU locomotive, shall be: (i) Equivalent to a 1/2-inch steel plate...

  13. 49 CFR 229.14 - Non-MU control cab locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-MU control cab locomotives. 229.14 Section 229... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS General § 229.14 Non-MU control cab locomotives. On each non-MU control cab locomotive, only those components added to the...

  14. 49 CFR 229.14 - Non-MU control cab locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Non-MU control cab locomotives. 229.14 Section 229... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS General § 229.14 Non-MU control cab locomotives. On each non-MU control cab locomotive, only those components added to the...

  15. 49 CFR 229.14 - Non-MU control cab locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Non-MU control cab locomotives. 229.14 Section 229... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS General § 229.14 Non-MU control cab locomotives. On each non-MU control cab locomotive, only those components added to the...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1710 - Canopies or cabs; diesel-powered and electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Canopies or cabs; diesel-powered and electric... Miscellaneous § 75.1710 Canopies or cabs; diesel-powered and electric face equipment. In any coal mine where the... canopies or cabs to protect the miners operating such equipment from roof falls and from rib and face rolls....

  17. 30 CFR 75.1710 - Canopies or cabs; diesel-powered and electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Canopies or cabs; diesel-powered and electric... Miscellaneous § 75.1710 Canopies or cabs; diesel-powered and electric face equipment. In any coal mine where the... canopies or cabs to protect the miners operating such equipment from roof falls and from rib and face rolls....

  18. 30 CFR 75.1710 - Canopies or cabs; diesel-powered and electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Canopies or cabs; diesel-powered and electric... Miscellaneous § 75.1710 Canopies or cabs; diesel-powered and electric face equipment. In any coal mine where the... canopies or cabs to protect the miners operating such equipment from roof falls and from rib and face rolls....

  19. 30 CFR 75.1710 - Canopies or cabs; diesel-powered and electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Canopies or cabs; diesel-powered and electric... Miscellaneous § 75.1710 Canopies or cabs; diesel-powered and electric face equipment. In any coal mine where the... canopies or cabs to protect the miners operating such equipment from roof falls and from rib and face rolls....

  20. 30 CFR 75.1710 - Canopies or cabs; diesel-powered and electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Canopies or cabs; diesel-powered and electric... Miscellaneous § 75.1710 Canopies or cabs; diesel-powered and electric face equipment. In any coal mine where the... canopies or cabs to protect the miners operating such equipment from roof falls and from rib and face rolls....

  1. 49 CFR 238.411 - Rear end structures of power car cabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rear end structures of power car cabs. 238.411... II Passenger Equipment § 238.411 Rear end structures of power car cabs. The rear end structure of the cab of a power car shall be designed to include the following elements, or their structural...

  2. 49 CFR 238.411 - Rear end structures of power car cabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rear end structures of power car cabs. 238.411... II Passenger Equipment § 238.411 Rear end structures of power car cabs. The rear end structure of the cab of a power car shall be designed to include the following elements, or their structural...

  3. 49 CFR 238.411 - Rear end structures of power car cabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rear end structures of power car cabs. 238.411... II Passenger Equipment § 238.411 Rear end structures of power car cabs. The rear end structure of the cab of a power car shall be designed to include the following elements, or their structural...

  4. 49 CFR 238.411 - Rear end structures of power car cabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rear end structures of power car cabs. 238.411... II Passenger Equipment § 238.411 Rear end structures of power car cabs. The rear end structure of the cab of a power car shall be designed to include the following elements, or their structural...

  5. 49 CFR 238.447 - Train operator's controls and power car cab layout.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Train operator's controls and power car cab layout... Specific Requirements for Tier II Passenger Equipment § 238.447 Train operator's controls and power car cab layout. (a) Train operator controls in the power car cab shall be arranged so as to minimize the...

  6. 49 CFR 238.411 - Rear end structures of power car cabs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rear end structures of power car cabs. 238.411... II Passenger Equipment § 238.411 Rear end structures of power car cabs. The rear end structure of the cab of a power car shall be designed to include the following elements, or their structural...

  7. 49 CFR 238.447 - Train operator's controls and power car cab layout.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Train operator's controls and power car cab layout... layout. (a) Train operator controls in the power car cab shall be arranged so as to minimize the chance.... (d) Power car cab information displays shall be designed with the following characteristics:...

  8. 49 CFR 238.447 - Train operator's controls and power car cab layout.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Train operator's controls and power car cab layout... layout. (a) Train operator controls in the power car cab shall be arranged so as to minimize the chance.... (d) Power car cab information displays shall be designed with the following characteristics:...

  9. Mesoxalaldehyde acetals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordeeva, G.N.; Kalashnikov, S.M.; Popov, Yu.N.; Kruglov, E.A.; Imashev, U.B.

    1987-11-10

    The treatment of methylglyoxal acetals by alkyl nitrites in the presence of the corresponding aliphatic alcohols and hydrochloric acid leads to the formation of linear mesoxalaldehyde acetals, whose structure was established by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The major pathways for the decomposition of these molecules upon electron impact were established.

  10. Friction on Crack Surfaces During Compression of Explosives - A Possible Ignition Source for Unplanned Explosions Due to Accidental Deformations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    HMX - Cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine.. NC - Nitrocellulose. DNEB – Dinitroethylbenzene, TNEB – Trinitroethylbenzene. CAB - Cellulose Acetate ... Butyrate . BDNPA/F -Bis(2,2-Dinitropropyl) Acetal /Formal. Estane - Polyurethane. B – Property of the Binder. a (Wiegand and Reddingius, 2005

  11. Role of rumen butyrate in regulation of nitrogen utilization and urea nitrogen kinetics in growing sheep.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, U; Hu, Q; Baldwin, R L; Bequette, B J

    2015-05-01

    Butyrate, a major rumen VFA, has been indirectly linked to enhancement of urea recycling on the basis of increased expression of urea transporter in the rumen epithelia of steers fed a rumen butyrate-enhancing diet. Two studies were conducted to quantify the effect of elevated rumen butyrate concentrations on N balance, urea kinetics and rumen epithelial proliferation. Wether sheep (n= 4), fitted with a rumen cannula, were fed a pelleted ration (∼165 g CP/kg DM, 10.3 MJ ME/kg DM) at 1.8 × ME requirement. In Exp. 1, sheep were infused intraruminally with either an electrolyte buffer solution (Con-Buf) or butyrate dissolved in the buffer solution (But-Buf) during 8-d periods in a balanced crossover design. In Exp. 2, sheep were infused intraruminally with either sodium acetate (Na-Ac) or sodium butyrate (Na-But) for 9 d. All solutions were adjusted to pH 6.8 and 8.0 in Exp. 1 and 2, respectively, and VFA were infused at 10% of ME intake. [15N2] urea was continuously infused intravenously for the last 5 d of each period, and total urine and feces were collected. In Exp. 1, 2H5-phenylalanine was continuously infused intravenously over the last 12 h, after which a biopsy from the rumen papillae was taken for measurement of fractional protein synthesis rate (FSR). Butyrate infusion treatments increased (P = 0.1 in Exp. 1; P < 0.05 in Exp. 2) the proportion of rumen butyrate, and acetate infusion increased (P < 0.05) rumen acetate. All animals were in positive N balance (4.2 g N/d in Exp. 1; 7.0 g N/d in Exp. 2), but no difference in N retention was observed between treatments. In Exp. 2, urea entry (synthesis) rate was reduced ( < 0.05) by Na-But compared with the Na-Ac control. In Exp. 1, although But-Buf infusion increased the FSR of rumen papillae (35.3% ± 1.08%/d vs. 28.7% ± 1.08%/d; P < 0.05), urea kinetics were not altered by But-Buf compared with Con-Buf. These studies are the first to directly assess the role of butyrate in urea recycling and its effects on

  12. A Novel Role of Cab45-G in Mediating Cell Migration in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Judong; Li, Zengpeng; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Chenying; Zheng, Weibin; He, Yan; Song, Jianyuan; Wang, Wenjie; Zhou, Xifa; Lu, Xujing; Zhang, Shuyu; Chen, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)-binding protein of 45 kDa (Cab45), a CREC family member, is reported to be associated with Ca(2+)-dependent secretory pathways and involved in multiple diseases including cancers. Cab45-G, a Cab45 isoform protein, plays an important role in protein sorting and secretion at Golgi complex. However, its role in cancer cell migration remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that Cab45-G exhibited an increased expression in cell lines with higher metastatic potential and promoted cell migration in multiple types of cancer cells. Overexpression of Cab45-G resulted in an altered expression of the molecular mediators of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is a critical step in the tumor metastasis. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that overexpression of Cab45-G increased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -7 (MMP-2 and MMP-7). Conversely, knock-down of Cab45-G reduced the expression of the above MMPs. Moreover, forced expression of Cab45-G upregulated the level of phosphorylated ERK and modulated the secretion of extracellular proteins fibronectin and fibulin. Furthermore, in human cervical and esophageal cancer tissues, the expression of Cab45-G was found to be significantly correlated with that of MMP-2, further supporting the importance of Cab45-G on regulating cancer metastasis. Taken together, these results suggest that Cab45-G could regulate cancer cell migration through various molecular mechanisms, which may serve as a therapeutic target for the treatment of cancers.

  13. Identification, localization, and functional analysis of the homologues of mouse CABS1 protein in porcine testis.

    PubMed

    Shawki, Hossam H; Kigoshi, Takumi; Katoh, Yuki; Matsuda, Manabu; Ugboma, Chioma M; Takahashi, Satoru; Oishi, Hisashi; Kawashima, Akihiro

    2016-07-29

    Previously, we have identified a calcium-binding protein that is specifically expressed in spermatids and localized to the flagella of the mature sperm in mouse, so-called mCABS1. However, the physiological roles of CABS1 in the male reproductive system have not been fully elucidated yet. In the current study, we aimed to localize and clarify the role of CABS1 in porcine (pCABS1). We determined for the first time the full nucleotides sequence of pCABS1 mRNA. pCABS1 protein was detected on SDS-PAGE gel as two bands at 75 kDa and 70 kDa in adult porcine testis, whereas one band at 70 kDa in epididymal sperm. pCABS1 immunoreactivity in seminiferous tubules was detected in the elongated spermatids, and that in the epididymal sperm was found in the acrosome as well as flagellum. The immunoreactivity of pCABS1 in the acrosomai region disappeared during acrosome reaction. We also identified that pCABS1 has a transmembrane domain using computational prediction of the amino acids sequence. The treatment of porcine capacitated sperm with anti-pCABS1 antiserum significantly decreased acrosome reactions. These results suggest that pCABS1 plays an important role in controlling calcium ion signaling during the acrosome reaction.

  14. Identification, localization, and functional analysis of the homologues of mouse CABS1 protein in porcine testis

    PubMed Central

    Shawki, Hossam H.; Kigoshi, Takumi; Katoh, Yuki; Matsuda, Manabu; Ugboma, Chioma M.; Takahashi, Satoru; Oishi, Hisashi; Kawashima, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we have identified a calcium-binding protein that is specifically expressed in spermatids and localized to the flagella of the mature sperm in mouse, so-called mCABS1. However, the physiological roles of CABS1 in the male reproductive system have not been fully elucidated yet. In the current study, we aimed to localize and clarify the role of CABS1 in porcine (pCABS1). We determined for the first time the full nucleotides sequence of pCABS1 mRNA. pCABS1 protein was detected on SDS-PAGE gel as two bands at 75 kDa and 70 kDa in adult porcine testis, whereas one band at 70 kDa in epididymal sperm. pCABS1 immunoreactivity in seminiferous tubules was detected in the elongated spermatids, and that in the epididymal sperm was found in the acrosome as well as flagellum. The immunoreactivity of pCABS1 in the acrosomai region disappeared during acrosome reaction. We also identified that pCABS1 has a transmembrane domain using computational prediction of the amino acids sequence. The treatment of porcine capacitated sperm with anti-pCABS1 antiserum significantly decreased acrosome reactions. These results suggest that pCABS1 plays an important role in controlling calcium ion signaling during the acrosome reaction. PMID:26960363

  15. Fragrance material review on 4-methylbenzyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 4-methylbenzyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 4-Methylbenzyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohol Simple Acid Esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 4-methylbenzyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties, skin irritation, skin sensitization, and elicitation data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances.

  16. Noise exposed of the operators of combine harvesters with and without a cab.

    PubMed

    Sümer, Sarp Korkut; Say, Sait M; Ege, Fikri; Sabanci, Alaettin

    2006-11-01

    A considerable number of the combine harvesters in Turkey are rather old and used without cabs resulting in unhealthy working conditions for their operators. Noise is one of the detrimental factors. This study deals with determining and comparing the noise exposed on the operators of the combines with and without a cab used for wheat harvesting in Turkey. The sound pressure levels (dB) at octave band center frequencies (31.5-8000Hz) and the sound levels (dBA) at the ear level of the operators were measured on 37 different combine harvesters with four different makes and different years from 1976 to 2001. Fifteen of the combines were without a cab, another 15 had original cabs while remaining seven combines had cabs mounted on them after manufacturing. The sound pressure levels were in a decreasing trend from the lower frequencies to higher frequencies. This trend was more noticeable for the combines with original cab and with the cab mounted after manufacturing compared to the ones without cab. The use of a cab was more effective in the insulation of the noise at the medium and higher frequencies, which have more bothersome effect compared to the lower frequencies. The sound pressure levels were 75-102dB and 46-89dB at low (31.5-500Hz) and high (500-8000Hz) frequencies for all combines, respectively. The sound pressure levels at the frequency of 4000Hz at which the human ear is most sensitive were 6-17dB lower for the combines with the cabs mounted after manufacturing and 9-28dB lower for the ones with the original cabs compared to the combines without cab. The sound levels were 85-90, 81-83, and 76-81dBA for the combines without cab, with cab mounted after manufacturing, and with original cab, respectively. The study showed that the use of a cab was useful in the insulation of the noise, particularly at higher frequencies. In addition, it protects the operator from the factors having detrimental effects on the working efficiency such as high temperature and dusty

  17. Production of butyrate from lysine and the Amadori product fructoselysine by a human gut commensal

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Thi Phuong Nam; Ritari, Jarmo; Boeren, Sjef; de Waard, Pieter; Plugge, Caroline M.; de Vos, Willem M.

    2015-01-01

    Human intestinal bacteria produce butyrate, which has signalling properties and can be used as energy source by enterocytes thus influencing colonic health. However, the pathways and the identity of bacteria involved in this process remain unclear. Here we describe the isolation from the human intestine of Intestinimonas strain AF211, a bacterium that can convert lysine stoichiometrically into butyrate and acetate when grown in a synthetic medium. Intestinimonas AF211 also converts the Amadori product fructoselysine, which is abundantly formed in heated foods via the Maillard reaction, into butyrate. The butyrogenic pathway includes a specific CoA transferase that is overproduced during growth on lysine. Bacteria related to Intestinimonas AF211 as well as the genetic coding capacity for fructoselysine conversion are abundantly present in colonic samples from some healthy human subjects. Our results indicate that protein can serve as a source of butyrate in the human colon, and its conversion by Intestinimonas AF211 and related butyrogens may protect the host from the undesired side effects of Amadori reaction products. PMID:26620920

  18. Converting Carbon Dioxide to Butyrate with an Engineered Strain of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, Kelly P.; Woodard, Trevor L.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to organic commodities via syngas metabolism or microbial electrosynthesis is an attractive option for production of renewable biocommodities. The recent development of an initial genetic toolbox for the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii has suggested that C. ljungdahlii may be an effective chassis for such conversions. This possibility was evaluated by engineering a strain to produce butyrate, a valuable commodity that is not a natural product of C. ljungdahlii metabolism. Heterologous genes required for butyrate production from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) were identified and introduced initially on plasmids and in subsequent strain designs integrated into the C. ljungdahlii chromosome. Iterative strain designs involved increasing translation of a key enzyme by modifying a ribosome binding site, inactivating the gene encoding the first step in the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetate, disrupting the gene which encodes the primary bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase for ethanol production, and interrupting the gene for a CoA transferase that potentially represented an alternative route for the production of acetate. These modifications yielded a strain in which ca. 50 or 70% of the carbon and electron flow was diverted to the production of butyrate with H2 or CO as the electron donor, respectively. These results demonstrate the possibility of producing high-value commodities from carbon dioxide with C. ljungdahlii as the catalyst. PMID:25336453

  19. Thallium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 30 , 2009 , the assessment summary for Thallium acetate is included in t

  20. Phenylmercuric acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phenylmercuric acetate ; CASRN 62 - 38 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  1. Ethyl acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl acetate ; CASRN 141 - 78 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  2. Ammonium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonium acetate ; CASRN 631 - 61 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  3. Vinyl acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vinyl acetate ; CASRN 108 - 05 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  4. Enzymology of butyrate formation by Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens.

    PubMed

    Miller, T L; Jenesel, S E

    1979-04-01

    Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens is a major butyrate-forming species in the bovine and ovine rumen. The enzymology of butyrate formation from pyruvate was investigated in cell-free extracts of B. fibrisolvens D1. Pyruvate owas oxidized to acetylcoenzyme A (CoA) in the presence of CoA.SH and benzyl viologen or flavin nucleotides. The bacterium uses thiolase, beta-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, crotonase, and crotonyl-CoA reductase to form butyryl-CoA from acetyl-CoA. Reduction of acetoacetyl-CoA to beta-hydroxybutyryl-CoA was faster with NADH than with NADPH. Crotonyl-CoA was reduced to butyryl-CoA by NADH, but not by NADPH, only in the presence of flavin nucleotides. Reduction of flavin nucleotides by NADH was much slower than the flavin-dependent reduction of crotonyl-CoA. This indicates that flavoproteins rather than free flavin participated in the reduction of crotonyl-CoA. Butyryl-CoA was converted to butyrate by phosphate butyryl transferase and butyrate kinase.

  5. Catalytic upgrading of butyric acid towards fine chemicals and biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Sjöblom, Magnus; Matsakas, Leonidas; Christakopoulos, Paul; Rova, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation-based production of butyric acid is robust and efficient. Modern catalytic technologies make it possible to convert butyric acid to important fine chemicals and biofuels. Here, current chemocatalytic and biocatalytic conversion methods are reviewed with a focus on upgrading butyric acid to 1-butanol or butyl-butyrate. Supported Ruthenium- and Platinum-based catalyst and lipase exhibit important activities which can pave the way for more sustainable process concepts for the production of green fuels and chemicals. PMID:26994015

  6. 49 CFR 236.514 - Interconnection of cab signal system with roadway signal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS..., AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards §...

  7. 49 CFR 236.514 - Interconnection of cab signal system with roadway signal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS..., AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards §...

  8. 49 CFR 236.514 - Interconnection of cab signal system with roadway signal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS..., AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards §...

  9. 49 CFR 236.514 - Interconnection of cab signal system with roadway signal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS..., AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards §...

  10. 49 CFR 236.514 - Interconnection of cab signal system with roadway signal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS..., AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards §...

  11. Searching for Synbiotics to increase Colonic Butyrate Concentration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is produced by microbial fermentation of plant fiber in the gut and a preferred substrate for gut epithelial cells. In ruminants, butyrate contributes to 70% of energy metabolism. In monogastric species, butyrate also plays an important role in energy metabolism in the hindgut. Moreover, bu...

  12. The enhancement of phase 2 enzyme activities by sodium butyrate in normal intestinal epithelial cells is associated with Nrf2 and p53.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Keisuke; Enami, Yuka; Kurajyo, Chika; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao; Konishi, Yotaro; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko

    2012-11-01

    Dietary fiber fermentation by the colonic bacterial flora produces short-chain fatty acids, acetate, propionate and butyrate. Among them, butyrate is considered to be the major energy substrate for colonocytes and, at least in rats, seems to protect against colonic carcinogenesis. In this study, we examined the effect and the mechanisms of short-chain fatty acids on the activity of phase 2 enzymes. Sodium butyrate increased phase 2 enzyme activities in normal rat small intestine epithelial cells, Glutathione S-transferase and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO) in a dose-dependent manner(;) however, other short-chain fatty acids did not increase them. The mechanism of the induction of phase 2 enzymes with sodium butyrate sodium butyrate, but not other short-chain fatty acids was related to the increase of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation and the decrease in the levels of nuclear fraction p53. Sodium butyrate also caused enhancement of Nrf2 mRNA levels and suppression of p53 mRNA levels. Sodium butyrate enhances the activities of phase 2 enzymes via an increase in the Nrf2 protein levels in the nucleus and a decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of p53.

  13. A cereal-based evening meal rich in indigestible carbohydrates increases plasma butyrate the next morning.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Anne C; Östman, Elin M; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach; Holst, Jens J; Björck, Inger M E

    2010-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an inverse relation between a whole grain consumption and risk of type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. One tentative mechanism relates to colonic metabolism of indigestible carbohydrates. In a previous study, we reported a positive relation between colonic fermentation and improved glucose tolerance. This work can be seen as an extension of that study, focusing on the tentative role of specific colonic metabolites, i.e. SCFA. Plasma concentrations of acetate, propionate, and butyrate were determined in the morning in healthy participants (5 women and 10 men, mean ± SD: 25.9 ± 3.2 y, BMI < 25) following 8 different cereal-based evening meals (50 g available starch) varying in content of indigestible carbohydrates. Each participant consumed all test meals in a random order on separate evenings. At a standardized breakfast following evening test meals, the postprandial glucose response (incremental area under the curve, 0-120 min) was inversely related to plasma butyrate (r = -0.26; P < 0.01) and acetate (r = -0.20; P < 0.05) concentrations. Evening meals composed of high-amylose barley kernels or high-β-glucan barley kernels resulted in higher plasma butyrate concentrations the following morning compared with an evening meal with white wheat bread (P < 0.05). The results support the view that cereal products rich in indigestible carbohydrates may improve glucose tolerance through a mechanism involving colonic fermentation and generation of SCFA, where in particular butyric acid may be involved. This mechanism may be one explanation by which whole grain is protective against type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  14. Diet is a major factor governing the fecal butyrate-producing community structure across Mammalia, Aves and Reptilia

    PubMed Central

    Vital, Marius; Gao, Jiarong; Rizzo, Mike; Harrison, Tara; Tiedje, James M

    2015-01-01

    Butyrate-producing bacteria have an important role in maintaining host health. They are well studied in human and medically associated animal models; however, much less is known for other Vertebrata. We investigated the butyrate-producing community in hindgut-fermenting Mammalia (n=38), Aves (n=8) and Reptilia (n=8) using a gene-targeted pyrosequencing approach of the terminal genes of the main butyrate-synthesis pathways, namely butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk). Most animals exhibit high gene abundances, and clear diet-specific signatures were detected with but genes significantly enriched in omnivores and herbivores compared with carnivores. But dominated the butyrate-producing community in these two groups, whereas buk was more abundant in many carnivorous animals. Clustering of protein sequences (5% cutoff) of the combined communities (but and buk) placed carnivores apart from other diet groups, except for noncarnivorous Carnivora, which clustered together with carnivores. The majority of clusters (but: 5141 and buk: 2924) did not show close relation to any reference sequences from public databases (identity <90%) demonstrating a large ‘unknown diversity'. Each diet group had abundant signature taxa, where buk genes linked to Clostridium perfringens dominated in carnivores and but genes associated with Ruminococcaceae bacterium D16 were specific for herbivores and omnivores. Whereas 16S rRNA gene analysis showed similar overall patterns, it was unable to reveal communities at the same depth and resolution as the functional gene-targeted approach. This study demonstrates that butyrate producers are abundant across vertebrates exhibiting great functional redundancy and that diet is the primary determinant governing the composition of the butyrate-producing guild. PMID:25343515

  15. Diet is a major factor governing the fecal butyrate-producing community structure across Mammalia, Aves and Reptilia.

    PubMed

    Vital, Marius; Gao, Jiarong; Rizzo, Mike; Harrison, Tara; Tiedje, James M

    2015-03-17

    Butyrate-producing bacteria have an important role in maintaining host health. They are well studied in human and medically associated animal models; however, much less is known for other Vertebrata. We investigated the butyrate-producing community in hindgut-fermenting Mammalia (n = 38), Aves (n = 8) and Reptilia (n = 8) using a gene-targeted pyrosequencing approach of the terminal genes of the main butyrate-synthesis pathways, namely butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk). Most animals exhibit high gene abundances, and clear diet-specific signatures were detected with but genes significantly enriched in omnivores and herbivores compared with carnivores. But dominated the butyrate-producing community in these two groups, whereas buk was more abundant in many carnivorous animals. Clustering of protein sequences (5% cutoff) of the combined communities (but and buk) placed carnivores apart from other diet groups, except for noncarnivorous Carnivora, which clustered together with carnivores. The majority of clusters (but: 5141 and buk: 2924) did not show close relation to any reference sequences from public databases (identity <90%) demonstrating a large 'unknown diversity'. Each diet group had abundant signature taxa, where buk genes linked to Clostridium perfringens dominated in carnivores and but genes associated with Ruminococcaceae bacterium D16 were specific for herbivores and omnivores. Whereas 16S rRNA gene analysis showed similar overall patterns, it was unable to reveal communities at the same depth and resolution as the functional gene-targeted approach. This study demonstrates that butyrate producers are abundant across vertebrates exhibiting great functional redundancy and that diet is the primary determinant governing the composition of the butyrate-producing guild.

  16. Biogas Production on Demand Regulated by Butyric Acid Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, K.; Schiffels, J.; Krafft, S.; Kuperjans, I.; Elbers, G.; Selmer, T.

    2016-03-01

    Investigating effects of volatile fatty acids on the biogas process it was observed that butyric acid can be used for transient stimulation of the methane production in biogas plants operating with low energy substrates like cattle manure. Upon addition of butyrate the methane output of the reactors doubled within 24 h and reached almost 3-times higher methane yields within 3-4 days. Butyrate was quantitatively eliminated and the reactors returned to the original productivity state within 3 days when application of butyrate was stopped. The opportunity to use butyrate feeding for increased biogas production on demand is discussed.

  17. Blockade of dendritic cell development by bacterial fermentation products butyrate and propionate through a transporter (Slc5a8)-dependent inhibition of histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nagendra; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Prasad, Puttur D; Martin, Pamela M; Lambert, Nevin A; Boettger, Thomas; Offermanns, Stefan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2010-09-03

    Mammalian colon harbors trillions of bacteria, yet there is no undue inflammatory response by the host against these bacteria under normal conditions. The bacterial fermentation products acetate, propionate, and butyrate are believed, at least in part, to be responsible for these immunosuppressive effects. Dendritic cells play an essential role in presentation of antigens to T lymphocytes and initiation of adaptive immune responses. Here we report that butyrate and propionate block the generation of dendritic cells from bone marrow stem cells, without affecting the generation of granulocytes. This effect is dependent on the Na(+)-coupled monocarboxylate transporter Slc5a8, which transports butyrate and propionate into cells, and on the ability of these two bacterial metabolites to inhibit histone deacetylases. Acetate, which is also a substrate for Slc5a8 but not an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, does not affect dendritic cell development, indicating the essential role of histone deacetylase inhibition in the process. The blockade of dendritic cell development by butyrate and propionate is associated with decreased expression of the transcription factors PU.1 and RelB. Butyrate also elicits its biologic effects through its ability to activate the G-protein-coupled receptor Gpr109a, but this mechanism is not involved in butyrate-induced blockade of dendritic cell development. The participation of Slc5a8 and the non-involvement of Gpr109a in butyrate effects have been substantiated using bone marrow cells obtained from Slc5a8(-/-) and Gpr109a(-/-) mice. These findings uncover an important mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory functions of the bacterial fermentation products butyrate and propionate.

  18. Blockade of Dendritic Cell Development by Bacterial Fermentation Products Butyrate and Propionate through a Transporter (Slc5a8)-dependent Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nagendra; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Prasad, Puttur D.; Martin, Pamela M.; Lambert, Nevin A.; Boettger, Thomas; Offermanns, Stefan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian colon harbors trillions of bacteria, yet there is no undue inflammatory response by the host against these bacteria under normal conditions. The bacterial fermentation products acetate, propionate, and butyrate are believed, at least in part, to be responsible for these immunosuppressive effects. Dendritic cells play an essential role in presentation of antigens to T lymphocytes and initiation of adaptive immune responses. Here we report that butyrate and propionate block the generation of dendritic cells from bone marrow stem cells, without affecting the generation of granulocytes. This effect is dependent on the Na+-coupled monocarboxylate transporter Slc5a8, which transports butyrate and propionate into cells, and on the ability of these two bacterial metabolites to inhibit histone deacetylases. Acetate, which is also a substrate for Slc5a8 but not an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, does not affect dendritic cell development, indicating the essential role of histone deacetylase inhibition in the process. The blockade of dendritic cell development by butyrate and propionate is associated with decreased expression of the transcription factors PU.1 and RelB. Butyrate also elicits its biologic effects through its ability to activate the G-protein-coupled receptor Gpr109a, but this mechanism is not involved in butyrate-induced blockade of dendritic cell development. The participation of Slc5a8 and the non-involvement of Gpr109a in butyrate effects have been substantiated using bone marrow cells obtained from Slc5a8−/− and Gpr109a−/− mice. These findings uncover an important mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory functions of the bacterial fermentation products butyrate and propionate. PMID:20601425

  19. Evaluation of a tractor cab using real-time aerosol counting instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Ronald M; Heitbrink, William A; Reed, Laurence D

    2002-01-01

    Aerosol instrumentation was used to evaluate air infiltration into tractor cabs that are used to protect the agricultural worker during pesticide applications. Preliminary surveys were conducted on three different manufactured agriculture enclosures. The results of these preliminary surveys indicated that aerosols are entering the cab through leak sources or are being generated inside the cab. These results identified the need for in-depth field evaluations of tractor cabs to identify any leak sources. To evaluate the ability of tractor cabs to reduce operator air contaminant exposure, field evaluations were conducted on two tractor cabs. Specifically, we evaluated: 1) the particle size distribution and the effectiveness of the filter system; and 2) air infiltration into the cab. These evaluations were also conducted to demonstrate the ease and practicality of using optical particle counters to evaluate the ability of cabin filtration systems. Pesticide particle size distribution during an air blast spray operation was also evaluated during the study. The field tests were conducted on a John Deere 7000 series tractor cab (tractor manufacturer's cab) and a Nelson spraycab (retrofit cab). Both cabs were equipped with high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter media which were assumed to be 99.97 percent efficient at removing the test aerosol, atmospheric condensation nuclei. Thus, the major source of aerosols inside the cab was assumed to be leakage around filters at the seals. Using a portable dust monitor (PDM), the ratio of the outside to inside aerosol measurements was used to calculate a cab protection factor. During the evaluations, one PDM was placed inside the tractor cab (near the tractor operator) and one PDM was placed outside (near the air intake) to count particles. During the evaluations, the instruments were switched to prevent instrument bias from affecting the findings. The ratio of the two measurements (i.e., protection factor = outside

  20. Fusobacterium polysaccharolyticum sp.nov., a gram-negative rod from the rumen that produces butyrate and ferments cellulose and starch.

    PubMed

    van Gylswyk, N O

    1980-01-01

    A new Gram-negative, non-sporulating, rod-shaped, anaerobic bacterium capable of fermenting cellulose and starch was isolated from the rumens of sheep fed supplemented maize stover diets. The organism fermented few carbohydrates, showing a preference for polysaccharides. The main acid products of carbohydrate fermentation were butyrate and formate. Acetate was utilized.

  1. Conceptual design study for an advanced cab and visual system, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rue, R. J.; Cyrus, M. L.; Garnett, T. A.; Nachbor, J. W.; Seery, J. A.; Starr, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The performance, design, construction and testing requirements are defined for developing an advanced cab and visual system. The rotorcraft system integration simulator is composed of the advanced cab and visual system and the rotorcraft system motion generator, and is part of an existing simulation facility. User's applications for the simulator include rotorcraft design development, product improvement, threat assessment, and accident investigation.

  2. Validity Studies Using the Comprehensive Ability Battery (CAB): IV. Predicting Achievement at the University Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakstian, A. Ralph; Woolsey, Lorette K.

    1985-01-01

    The paper presented evidence of the criterion related validity of several Comprehensive Ability Battery (CAB) tests relative to criterion variables representing first year college achievement. Information regarding the criterion related validity of nontraditional tests of the CAB reflecting divergent production hypothesized to be associated with…

  3. 49 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart E of... - Power Car Cab Forward End Structure Conceptual Implementation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Power Car Cab Forward End Structure Conceptual Implementation 1 Figure 1 to Subpart E of Part 238 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Subpart E of Part 238—Power Car Cab Forward End Structure Conceptual Implementation ER12MY99.000...

  4. Utilization of multiple substrates by butyrate kinase from Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Sirobhushanam, Sirisha; Galva, Charitha; Saunders, Lauren P; Sen, Suranjana; Jayaswal, Radheshyam; Wilkinson, Brian J; Gatto, Craig

    2017-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, the causative agent of listeriosis, can build up to dangerous levels in refrigerated foods potentially leading to expensive product recalls. An important aspect of the bacterium's growth at low temperatures is its ability to increase the branched-chain fatty acid anteiso C15:0 content of its membrane at lower growth temperatures, which imparts greater membrane fluidity. Mutants in the branched-chain α-keto dehydrogenase (bkd) complex are deficient in branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs,) but these can be restored by feeding C4 and C5 branched-chain carboxylic acids (BCCAs). This suggests the presence of an alternate pathway for production of acyl CoA precursors for fatty acid biosynthesis. We hypothesize that the alternate pathway is composed of butyrate kinase (buk) and phosphotransbutyrylase (ptb) encoded in the bkd complex which produce acyl CoA products by their sequential action through the metabolism of carboxylic acids. We determined the steady state kinetics of recombinant His-tagged Buk using 11 different straight-chain and BCCA substrates in the acyl phosphate forming direction. Buk demonstrated highest catalytic efficiency with pentanoate as the substrate. Low product formation observed with acetate (C2) and hexanoate (C6) as the substrates indicates that Buk is not involved in either acetate metabolism or long chain carboxylic acid activation. We were also able to show that Buk catalysis occurs through a ternary complex intermediate. Additionally, Buk demonstrates a strong preference for BCCAs at low temperatures. These results indicate that Buk may be involved in the activation and assimilation of exogenous carboxylic acids for membrane fatty acid biosynthesis.

  5. 30 CFR 75.1710-1 - Canopies or cabs; self-propelled diesel-powered and electric face equipment; installation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Canopies or cabs; self-propelled diesel-powered... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1710-1 Canopies or cabs; self-propelled diesel-powered... (6) of this section, be equipped with substantially constructed canopies or cabs, located...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1710-1 - Canopies or cabs; self-propelled diesel-powered and electric face equipment; installation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Canopies or cabs; self-propelled diesel-powered... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1710-1 Canopies or cabs; self-propelled diesel-powered... (6) of this section, be equipped with substantially constructed canopies or cabs, located...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1710-1 - Canopies or cabs; self-propelled diesel-powered and electric face equipment; installation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Canopies or cabs; self-propelled diesel-powered... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1710-1 Canopies or cabs; self-propelled diesel-powered... (6) of this section, be equipped with substantially constructed canopies or cabs, located...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1710-1 - Canopies or cabs; self-propelled diesel-powered and electric face equipment; installation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Canopies or cabs; self-propelled diesel-powered... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1710-1 Canopies or cabs; self-propelled diesel-powered... (6) of this section, be equipped with substantially constructed canopies or cabs, located...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1710-1 - Canopies or cabs; self-propelled diesel-powered and electric face equipment; installation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Canopies or cabs; self-propelled diesel-powered... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1710-1 Canopies or cabs; self-propelled diesel-powered... (6) of this section, be equipped with substantially constructed canopies or cabs, located...

  10. Center for Advanced Biofuel Systems (CABS) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kutchan, Toni M.

    2015-12-02

    One of the great challenges facing current and future generations is how to meet growing energy demands in an environmentally sustainable manner. Renewable energy sources, including wind, geothermal, solar, hydroelectric, and biofuel energy systems, are rapidly being developed as sustainable alternatives to fossil fuels. Biofuels are particularly attractive to the U.S., given its vast agricultural resources. The first generation of biofuel systems was based on fermentation of sugars to produce ethanol, typically from food crops. Subsequent generations of biofuel systems, including those included in the CABS project, will build upon the experiences learned from those early research results and will have improved production efficiencies, reduced environmental impacts and decreased reliance on food crops. Thermodynamic models predict that the next generations of biofuel systems will yield three- to five-fold more recoverable energy products. To address the technological challenges necessary to develop enhanced biofuel systems, greater understanding of the non-equilibrium processes involved in solar energy conversion and the channeling of reduced carbon into biofuel products must be developed. The objective of the proposed Center for Advanced Biofuel Systems (CABS) was to increase the thermodynamic and kinetic efficiency of select plant- and algal-based fuel production systems using rational metabolic engineering approaches grounded in modern systems biology. The overall strategy was to increase the efficiency of solar energy conversion into oils and other specialty biofuel components by channeling metabolic flux toward products using advanced catalysts and sensible design:1) employing novel protein catalysts that increase the thermodynamic and kinetic efficiencies of photosynthesis and oil biosynthesis; 2) engineering metabolic networks to enhance acetyl-CoA production and its channeling towards lipid synthesis; and 3) engineering new metabolic networks for the

  11. Radiation induces acid tolerance of Clostridium tyrobutyricum and enhances bioproduction of butyric acid through a metabolic switch

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Butyric acid as a renewable resource has become an increasingly attractive alternative to petroleum-based fuels. Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T is well documented as a fermentation strain for the production of acids. However, it has been reported that butyrate inhibits its growth, and the accumulation of acetate also inhibits biomass synthesis, making production of butyric acid from conventional fermentation processes economically challenging. The present study aimed to identify whether irradiation of C. tyrobutyricum cells makes them more tolerant to butyric acid inhibition and increases the production of butyrate compared with wild type. Results In this work, the fermentation kinetics of C. tyrobutyricum cultures after being classically adapted for growth at 3.6, 7.2 and 10.8 g·L-1 equivalents were studied. The results showed that, regardless of the irradiation used, there was a gradual inhibition of cell growth at butyric acid concentrations above 10.8 g·L-1, with no growth observed at butyric acid concentrations above 3.6 g·L-1 for the wild-type strain during the first 54 h of fermentation. The sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis also showed significantly different expression levels of proteins with molecular mass around the wild-type and irradiated strains. The results showed that the proportion of proteins with molecular weights of 85 and 106 kDa was much higher for the irradiated strains. The specific growth rate decreased by 50% (from 0.42 to 0.21 h-1) and the final concentration of butyrate increased by 68% (from 22.7 to 33.4 g·L-1) for the strain irradiated at 114 AMeV and 40 Gy compared with the wild-type strains. Conclusions This study demonstrates that butyric acid production from glucose can be significantly improved and enhanced by using 12C6+ heavy ion-irradiated C. tyrobutyricum. The approach is economical, making it competitive compared with similar fermentation processes. It may prove useful as

  12. Potential beneficial effects of butyrate in intestinal and extraintestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Canani, Roberto Berni; Costanzo, Margherita Di; Leone, Ludovica; Pedata, Monica; Meli, Rosaria; Calignano, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The multiple beneficial effects on human health of the short-chain fatty acid butyrate, synthesized from non-absorbed carbohydrate by colonic microbiota, are well documented. At the intestinal level, butyrate plays a regulatory role on the transepithelial fluid transport, ameliorates mucosal inflammation and oxidative status, reinforces the epithelial defense barrier, and modulates visceral sensitivity and intestinal motility. In addition, a growing number of studies have stressed the role of butyrate in the prevention and inhibition of colorectal cancer. At the extraintestinal level, butyrate exerts potentially useful effects on many conditions, including hemoglobinopathies, genetic metabolic diseases, hypercholesterolemia, insulin resistance, and ischemic stroke. The mechanisms of action of butyrate are different; many of these are related to its potent regulatory effects on gene expression. These data suggest a wide spectrum of positive effects exerted by butyrate, with a high potential for a therapeutic use in human medicine. PMID:21472114

  13. Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum, a butyrate producer with probiotic potential, is intrinsically tolerant to stomach and small intestine conditions.

    PubMed

    Geirnaert, Annelies; Steyaert, Alix; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Debruyne, Bo; Arends, Jan B A; Van Immerseel, Filip; Boon, Nico; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Butyrate has several beneficial properties that are essential to maintain gastrointestinal health. Therefore butyrate-producing bacteria are seen as the next generation of probiotics. The butyrate-producing bacterium Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum (a clostridial cluster IV strain) is such a promising probiotic candidate for people suffering from inflammatory bowel disease. To exert its beneficial properties, it is crucial that B. pullicaecorum survives the harsh conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract to arrive in the colon in a viable and metabolically active state. Before developing a stable formulation of B. pullicaecorum for oral administration, it is important to know its intrinsic acid and bile tolerance. We monitored the survival during and short chain fatty acid production after incubation in conditions simulating the stomach and small intestine using in vitro batch experiments. In case of acid conditions (pH 2 and pH 3), B. pullicaecorum was viable and active but not cultivable. Cultivability was restored during subsequent small intestine conditions. Importantly, bile and pancreatic juice had no lethal effect. Milk, as a suspension medium, only had a protective effect on the cultivability during the first hour at pH 2. B. pullicaecorum was still metabolically active after upper gastrointestinal conditions and produced short chain fatty acids, but a shift from butyrate to acetate production was observed. Although the butyrate-producing anaerobe B. pullicaecorum showed good intrinsic acid and bile tolerance in terms of viability and metabolic activity, colonization efficiency and butyrate production under colon conditions is needed to further evaluate its probiotic potential.

  14. Converting Carbon Dioxide to Butyrate with an Engineered Strain of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    SciTech Connect

    Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Woodard, TL; Lovley, DR

    2014-08-26

    Microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to organic commodities via syngas metabolism or microbial electrosynthesis is an attractive option for production of renewable biocommodities. The recent development of an initial genetic toolbox for the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii has suggested that C. ljungdahlii may be an effective chassis for such conversions. This possibility was evaluated by engineering a strain to produce butyrate, a valuable commodity that is not a natural product of C. ljungdahlii metabolism. Heterologous genes required for butyrate production from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) were identified and introduced initially on plasmids and in subsequent strain designs integrated into the C. ljungdahlii chromosome. Iterative strain designs involved increasing translation of a key enzyme by modifying a ribosome binding site, inactivating the gene encoding the first step in the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetate, disrupting the gene which encodes the primary bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase for ethanol production, and interrupting the gene for a CoA transferase that potentially represented an alternative route for the production of acetate. These modifications yielded a strain in which ca. 50 or 70% of the carbon and electron flow was diverted to the production of butyrate with H-2 or CO as the electron donor, respectively. These results demonstrate the possibility of producing high-value commodities from carbon dioxide with C. ljungdahlii as the catalyst. IMPORTANCE The development of a microbial chassis for efficient conversion of carbon dioxide directly to desired organic products would greatly advance the environmentally sustainable production of biofuels and other commodities. Clostridium ljungdahlii is an effective catalyst for microbial electrosynthesis, a technology in which electricity generated with renewable technologies, such as solar or wind, powers the conversion of carbon dioxide and water to organic products. Other electron donors

  15. Converting carbon dioxide to butyrate with an engineered strain of Clostridium ljungdahlii.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Nevin, Kelly P; Woodard, Trevor L; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-10-21

    Microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to organic commodities via syngas metabolism or microbial electrosynthesis is an attractive option for production of renewable biocommodities. The recent development of an initial genetic toolbox for the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii has suggested that C. ljungdahlii may be an effective chassis for such conversions. This possibility was evaluated by engineering a strain to produce butyrate, a valuable commodity that is not a natural product of C. ljungdahlii metabolism. Heterologous genes required for butyrate production from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) were identified and introduced initially on plasmids and in subsequent strain designs integrated into the C. ljungdahlii chromosome. Iterative strain designs involved increasing translation of a key enzyme by modifying a ribosome binding site, inactivating the gene encoding the first step in the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetate, disrupting the gene which encodes the primary bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase for ethanol production, and interrupting the gene for a CoA transferase that potentially represented an alternative route for the production of acetate. These modifications yielded a strain in which ca. 50 or 70% of the carbon and electron flow was diverted to the production of butyrate with H2 or CO as the electron donor, respectively. These results demonstrate the possibility of producing high-value commodities from carbon dioxide with C. ljungdahlii as the catalyst. Importance: The development of a microbial chassis for efficient conversion of carbon dioxide directly to desired organic products would greatly advance the environmentally sustainable production of biofuels and other commodities. Clostridium ljungdahlii is an effective catalyst for microbial electrosynthesis, a technology in which electricity generated with renewable technologies, such as solar or wind, powers the conversion of carbon dioxide and water to organic products. Other electron donors

  16. Measurement of Truck Cab Flow in Support of Wind Turbine Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Larwood, S. M.; Acker, B.; Sencenbaugh, J.

    1998-12-17

    This report describes an experiment to measure the airflow over a truck cab that can be used to conduct steady-state tests on an 8-kW wind turbine. The cab airflow measurements were made to document the turbine inflow for analytical models. The airflow measurements were made with an array of anemometers positioned to represent the turbine rotor disk. The data showed that the influence of the truck cab was primarily in the lower sector of the rotor disk. The influence was negligible in the rest of the rotor disk.

  17. Role of extracellular matrix protein CabA in resistance of Vibrio vulnificus biofilms to decontamination strategies.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hwan; Lee, Byungho; Jo, Youmi; Choi, Sang Ho

    2016-11-07

    Biofilms are recalcitrant and raise safety problems in the food industry. In this study, the role of CabA, an extracellular matrix protein, in the resistance of the biofilms of Vibrio vulnificus, a foodborne pathogen, to decontamination strategies was investigated. Biofilms of the cabA mutant revealed reduced resistance to detachment by vibration and disinfection by sodium hypochlorite compared to the biofilms of the parental wild type in vitro. The reduced resistance of the cabA mutant biofilms was complemented by introducing a recombinant cabA, indicating that the reduced resistance of the cabA mutant biofilms is caused by the inactivation of cabA. The expression of cabA was induced in cells bound to oyster, the primary vehicle of the pathogen. The cabA mutant biofilms on oyster are defective in biomass and resistance to detachment and disinfection. The bacterial cells in the wild-type biofilms are clustered by filaments which are not apparent in the cabA mutant biofilms. The combined results indicated that CabA contributes to the structural integrity of V. vulnificus biofilms possibly by forming filaments in the matrix and thus rendering the biofilms robust, suggesting that CabA could be a target to control V. vulnificus biofilms on oyster.

  18. Specific cell cycle synchronization with butyrate and cell cycle analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable for many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. To explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells, we investigated the property of the cell cyc...

  19. California Basin Studies (CaBS). Final contract report

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsline, D.S.

    1991-12-31

    The California Continental Borderland`s present configuration dates from about 4 to 5 X 10{sup 6} years Before Present (B.P.) and is the most recent of several configurations of the southern California margin that have evolved after the North America Plate over-rode the East Pacific Rise about 30 X 10{sup 6} years ago. The present morphology is a series of two to three northwest-southeast trending rows of depressions separated by banks and insular ridges. Two inner basins, Santa Monica and San Pedro, have been the site for the Department of Energy-funded California Basin Study (CaBS) Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins contain post-Miocene sediment thicknesses of about 2.5 and 1.5 km respectively. During the Holocene (past 10,000 years) about 10-12 m have accumulated. The sediment entered the basin by one or a combination of processes including particle infall (mainly as bioaggregates) from surface waters, from nepheloid plumes (surface, mid-depths and near-bottom), from turbidity currents, mass movements, and to a very minor degree direct precipitation. In Santa Monica Basin, during the last century, particle infall and nepheloid plume transport have been the most common processes. The former dominates in the central basin floor in water depths from 900 to 945 m. where a characteristic silt-clay with a typical mean diameter of about 0.006 mm, phi standard deviation.

  20. Potential Air Toxics Hot Spots in Truck Terminals and Cabs

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Thomas J.; Davis, Mary E.; Hart, Jaime E.; Blicharz, Andrew; Laden, Francine; Garshick, Eric

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hot spots are areas where concentrations of one or more air toxics — organic vapors or particulate matter (PM) — are expected to be elevated. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA*) screening values for air toxics were used in our definition of hot spots. According to the EPA, a screening value “is used to indicate a concentration of a chemical in the air to which a person could be continually exposed for a lifetime … and which would be unlikely to result in a deleterious effect (either cancer or noncancer health effects)” (U.S. EPA 2006). Our characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs; namely 18 hydrocarbons, methyl tert-butyl ether [MTBE], acetone, and aldehydes) was added onto our ongoing National Cancer Institute–funded study of lung cancer and particulate pollutant concentrations (PM with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 µm [PM2.5], elemental carbon [EC], and organic carbon [OC]) and source apportionment of the U.S. trucking industry. We focused on three possible hot spots within the trucking terminals: upwind background areas affected by nearby industrial parks; downwind areas affected by upwind and terminal sources; and the loading docks and mechanic shops within terminal as well as the interior of cabs of trucks being driven on city, suburban, and rural streets and on highways. METHODS In Phase 1 of our study, 15 truck terminals across the United States were each visited for five consecutive days. During these site visits, sorbent tubes were used to collect 12-hour integrated samples of hydrocarbons and aldehydes from upwind and downwind fence-line locations as well as inside truck cabs. Meteorologic data and extensive site information were collected with each sample. In Phase 2, repeat visits to six terminals were conducted to test the stability of concentrations across time and judge the representativeness of our previous measurements. During the repeat site visits, the sampling procedure was expanded to

  1. Secretory cargo sorting by Ca2+-dependent Cab45 oligomerization at the trans-Golgi network

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Birgit; Maiser, Andreas; Emin, Derya; Prescher, Jens; Beck, Gisela; Kienzle, Christine; Bartnik, Kira; Habermann, Bianca; Pakdel, Mehrshad; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Lamb, Don C.

    2016-01-01

    Sorting and export of transmembrane cargoes and lysosomal hydrolases at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) are well understood. However, elucidation of the mechanism by which secretory cargoes are segregated for their release into the extracellular space remains a challenge. We have previously demonstrated that, in a reaction that requires Ca2+, the soluble TGN-resident protein Cab45 is necessary for the sorting of secretory cargoes at the TGN. Here, we report that Cab45 reversibly assembles into oligomers in the presence of Ca2+. These Cab45 oligomers specifically bind secretory proteins, such as COMP and LyzC, in a Ca2+-dependent manner in vitro. In intact cells, mutation of the Ca2+-binding sites in Cab45 impairs oligomerization, as well as COMP and LyzC sorting. Superresolution microscopy revealed that Cab45 colocalizes with secretory proteins and the TGN Ca2+ pump (SPCA1) in specific TGN microdomains. These findings reveal that Ca2+-dependent changes in Cab45 mediate sorting of specific cargo molecules at the TGN. PMID:27138253

  2. Methods for measuring performance of vehicle cab air cleaning systems against aerosols and vapours.

    PubMed

    Bémer, D; Subra, I; Régnier, R

    2009-06-01

    Vehicle cabs equipped with an effective air cleaning and pressurization system, fitted to agricultural and off-road machineries, isolate drivers from the polluted environment, in which they are likely to work. These cabs provide protection against particulate and gaseous pollutants generated by these types of work activities. Two laboratory methods have been applied to determining the performance characteristics of two cabs of different design, namely, optical counting-based measurement of a potassium chloride (KCl) aerosol and fluorescein aerosol-based tracing. Results of cab confinement efficiency measurements agreed closely for these two methods implemented in the study. Measurements showed that high confinement efficiencies can be achieved with cabs, which are properly designed in ventilation/cleaning/airtightness terms. We also noted the importance of filter mounting airtightness, in which the smallest defect is reflected by significant degradation in cab performance. Determination of clean airflow rate by monitoring the decrease in test aerosol concentration in the test chamber gave excellent results. This method could represent an attractive alternative to methods involving gas tracing or air velocity measurement at blowing inlets.

  3. Measuring and modeling air exchange rates inside taxi cabs in Los Angeles, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shi; Yu, Nu; Wang, Yueyan; Zhu, Yifang

    2015-12-01

    Air exchange rates (AERs) have a direct impact on traffic-related air pollutant (TRAP) levels inside vehicles. Taxi drivers are occupationally exposed to TRAP on a daily basis, yet there is limited measurement of AERs in taxi cabs. To fill this gap, AERs were quantified in 22 representative Los Angeles taxi cabs including 10 Prius, 5 Crown Victoria, 3 Camry, 3 Caravan, and 1 Uplander under realistic driving (RD) conditions. To further study the impacts of window position and ventilation settings on taxi AERs, additional tests were conducted on 14 taxis with windows closed (WC) and on the other 8 taxis with not only windows closed but also medium fan speed (WC-MFS) under outdoor air mode. Under RD conditions, the AERs in all 22 cabs had a mean of 63 h-1 with a median of 38 h-1. Similar AERs were observed under WC condition when compared to those measured under RD condition. Under WC-MFS condition, AERs were significantly increased in all taxi cabs, when compared with those measured under RD condition. A General Estimating Equation (GEE) model was developed and the modeling results showed that vehicle model was a significant factor in determining the AERs in taxi cabs under RD condition. Driving speed and car age were positively associated with AERs but not statistically significant. Overall, AERs measured in taxi cabs were much higher than typical AERs people usually encounter in indoor environments such as homes, offices, and even regular passenger vehicles.

  4. Fragrance material review on ethyl phenyl carbinyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of ethyl phenyl carbinyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Ethyl phenyl carbinyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohol Simple Acid Esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for ethyl phenyl carbinyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties; acute toxicity; skin irritation; and skin sensitization data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances.

  5. Fragrance material review on 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group aryl alkyl alcohol simple acid esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes physical properties data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances.

  6. Gamma amino butyric acid accumulation in medicinal plants without stress

    PubMed Central

    Anju, P.; Moothedath, Ismail; Rema Shree, Azhimala Bhaskaranpillai

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) is an important ubiquitous four carbon nonprotein amino acid with an amino group attached to gamma carbon instead of beta carbon. It exists in different organisms including bacteria, plants, and animals and plays a crucial role in humans by regulating neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system. It is directly responsible for the regulation of muscle tone and also effective in lowering stress, blood pressure, and hypertension. Aim and Objective: The aim of the study was to develop the fingerprint profile of selected medicinally and economically important plants having central nervous system (CNS) activity and to determine the quantity of GABA in the selected plants grown under natural conditions without any added stress. Materials and Methods: The high-performance thin layer chromatography analysis was performed on precoated silica gel plate 60F–254 plate (20 cm × 10 cm) in the form of bands with width 8 mm using Hamilton syringe (100 μl) using n-butanol, acetic acid, and water in the proportion 5:2:2 as mobile phase in a CAMAG chamber which was previously saturated for 30 min. CAMAG TLC scanner 3 was used for the densitometric scanning at 550 nm. Specific marker compounds were used for the quantification. Results and Conclusion: Among the screened medicinal plants, Zingiber officinale and Solanum torvum were found to have GABA. The percentage of GABA present in Z. officinale and S. torvum were found to be 0.0114% and 0.0119%, respectively. The present work confirmed that among the selected CNS active medicinal plants, only two plants contain GABA. We found a negative correlation with plant having CNS activity and accumulation of GABA. The GABA shunt is a conserved pathway in eukaryotes and prokaryotes but, although the role of GABA as a neurotransmitter in mammals is clearly established, its role in plants is still vague. PMID:25861139

  7. A Proteomic View at the Biochemistry of Syntrophic Butyrate Oxidation in Syntrophomonas wolfei

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Alexander; Müller, Nicolai; Schink, Bernhard; Schleheck, David

    2013-01-01

    In syntrophic conversion of butyrate to methane and CO2, butyrate is oxidized to acetate by secondary fermenting bacteria such as Syntrophomonas wolfei in close cooperation with methanogenic partner organisms, e.g., Methanospirillum hungatei. This process involves an energetically unfavourable shift of electrons from the level of butyryl-CoA oxidation to the substantially lower redox potential of proton and/or CO2 reduction, in order to transfer these electrons to the methanogenic partner via hydrogen and/or formate. In the present study, all prominent membrane-bound and soluble proteins expressed in S. wolfei specifically during syntrophic growth with butyrate, in comparison to pure-culture growth with crotonate, were examined by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and identified by peptide fingerprinting-mass spectrometry. A membrane-bound, externally oriented, quinone-linked formate dehydrogenase complex was expressed at high level specifically during syntrophic butyrate oxidation, comprising a selenocystein-linked catalytic subunit with a membrane-translocation pathway signal (TAT), a membrane-bound iron-sulfur subunit, and a membrane-bound cytochrome. Soluble hydrogenases were expressed at high levels specifically during growth with crotonate. The results were confirmed by native protein gel electrophoresis, by formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase-activity staining, and by analysis of formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase activities in intact cells and cell extracts. Furthermore, constitutive expression of a membrane-bound, internally oriented iron-sulfur oxidoreductase (DUF224) was confirmed, together with expression of soluble electron-transfer flavoproteins (EtfAB) and two previously identified butyryl-CoA dehydrogenases. Our findings allow to depict an electron flow scheme for syntrophic butyrate oxidation in S. wolfei. Electrons derived from butyryl-CoA are transferred through a membrane-bound EtfAB:quinone oxidoreductase (DUF224) to a

  8. Butyrate production under aerobic growth conditions by engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Naoya; Vangnai, Alisa S; Pongtharangkul, Thunyarat; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2017-01-11

    Butyrate is an important industrial platform chemical. Although several groups have reported butyrate production under oxygen-limited conditions by a native producer, Clostridium tyrobutylicum, and by a metabolically engineered Escherichia coli, efforts to produce butyrate under aerobic growth conditions have met limited success. Here, we constructed a novel butyrate synthetic pathway that functions under aerobic growth conditions in E. coli, by modifying the 1-butanol synthetic pathway reported previously. The pathway consists of phaA (acetyltransferase) and phaB (NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl-CoA reductase) from Ralstonia eutropha, phaJ ((R)-specific enoyl-CoA hydratase) from Aeromonas caviae, ter (trans-enoyl-CoA reductase) from Treponema denticola, and endogenous thioesterase(s) of E. coli. To evaluate the potential of this pathway for butyrate production, culture conditions, including pH, oxygen supply, and concentration of inorganic nitrogen sources, were optimized in a mini-jar fermentor. Under the optimal conditions, butyrate was produced at a concentration of up to 140 mM (12.3 g/L in terms of butyric acid) after 54 h of fed-batch culture.

  9. Direct interspecies electron transfer accelerates syntrophic oxidation of butyrate in paddy soil enrichments.

    PubMed

    Li, Huijuan; Chang, Jiali; Liu, Pengfei; Fu, Li; Ding, Dewen; Lu, Yahai

    2015-05-01

    Syntrophic interaction occurs during anaerobic fermentation of organic substances forming methane as the final product. H2 and formate are known to serve as the electron carriers in this process. Recently, it has been shown that direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) occurs for syntrophic CH4 production from ethanol and acetate. Here, we constructed paddy soil enrichments to determine the involvement of DIET in syntrophic butyrate oxidation and CH4 production. The results showed that CH4 production was significantly accelerated in the presence of nanoFe3 O4 in all continuous transfers. This acceleration increased with the increase of nanoFe3 O4 concentration but was dismissed when Fe3 O4 was coated with silica that insulated the mineral from electrical conduction. NanoFe3 O4 particles were found closely attached to the cell surfaces of different morphology, thus bridging cell connections. Molecular approaches, including DNA-based stable isotope probing, revealed that the bacterial Syntrophomonadaceae and Geobacteraceae, and the archaeal Methanosarcinaceae, Methanocellales and Methanobacteriales, were involved in the syntrophic butyrate oxidation and CH4 production. Among them, the growth of Geobacteraceae strictly relied on the presence of nanoFe3 O4 and its electrical conductivity in particular. Other organisms, except Methanobacteriales, were present in enrichments regardless of nanoFe3 O4 amendment. Collectively, our study demonstrated that the nanoFe3 O4 -facilitated DIET occurred in syntrophic CH4 production from butyrate, and Geobacter species played the key role in this process in the paddy soil enrichments.

  10. Lactate- and acetate-based cross-feeding interactions between selected strains of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria and colon bacteria in the presence of inulin-type fructans.

    PubMed

    Moens, Frédéric; Verce, Marko; De Vuyst, Luc

    2017-01-16

    Cross-feeding interactions were studied between selected strains of lactobacilli and/or bifidobacteria and butyrate-producing colon bacteria that consume lactate but are not able to degrade inulin-type fructans (ITF) in a medium for colon bacteria (supplemented with ITF as energy source and acetate when necessary). Degradation of oligofructose by Lactobacillus acidophilus IBB 801 and inulin by Lactobacillus paracasei 8700:2 and Bifidobacterium longum LMG 11047 resulted in the release of free fructose into the medium and the production of mainly lactate (lactobacilli) and acetate (B. longum LMG 11047). During bicultures of Lb. acidophilus IBB 801 and Anaerostipes caccae DSM 14662(T) on oligofructose, the latter strain converted lactate (produced by the former strain from oligofructose) into butyrate and gases, but only in the presence of acetate. During bicultures of Lb. paracasei 8700:2 and A. caccae DSM 14662(T) or Eubacterium hallii DSM 17630 on inulin, the butyrate-producing strains consumed low concentrations of lactate and acetate generated by inulin degradation by the Lactobacillus strain. As more acetate was produced during tricultures of Lb. paracasei 8700:2 and B. longum LMG 11047, which degraded inulin simultaneously, and A. caccae DSM 14662(T) or E. hallii DSM 17630, a complete conversion of lactate into butyrate and gases by these butyrate-producing strains occurred. Therefore, butyrate production by lactate-consuming, butyrate-producing colon bacterial strains incapable of ITF degradation, resulted from cross-feeding of monosaccharides and lactate by an ITF-degrading Lactobacillus strain and acetate produced by a Bifidobacterium strain.

  11. Butyrate-Induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    butyrate-induced apoptosis was independent of cell cycle phase. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES prostate cancer, histone deacetylase inhibitors, bone...of cells plated) HDI histone deacetylase inhibitor SBHA suberoylbishydroxamate PKC protein kinase C activator SDS-PAGE SDS polyacrylamide gel...cancer cell lines 1. Summary of goals and findings Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDI) such as butyrate and suberoylbishydroxamate (SBHA) have

  12. pVT data of cellulose acetate butyrate in N,N-dimethylformamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfarth, Ch.

    This document is part of Subvolume D2 'Polymer Solutions - Physical Properties and their Relations I (Thermodynamic Properties: PVT -Data and miscellaneous Properties of polymer Solutions) of Volume 6 `Polymers' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII `Advanced Materials and Technologies'.

  13. Electrospun carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate (CMCAB) nanofiber for high rate lithium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Shao, Ziqiang; Yang, Mingshan; Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Feijun; Xie, Long; Lv, Shaoyi; Zhang, Yunhua

    2013-07-01

    Cellulose derivative CMCAB was synthesized, and nanometer fiber composite material was obtained from lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4, LFP)/CMCAB by electrospinning. Under the protection of inert gas, modified LFP/carbon nanofibers (CNF) nanometer material was obtained by carbonization in 600°C. IR, TG-DSC, SEM and EDS were performed to characterize their morphologies and structures. LFP/CNF composite materials were assembled into lithium-ion battery and tested their performance. Specific capacity was increased from 147.6 mAh g(-1) before modification to 160.8 mAh g(-1) after modification for the first discharge at the rate of 2C. After 200 charge-discharge cycles, when discharge rate was increased from 2C to 5C to 10C, modified battery capacity was reduced from 152.4 mAh g(-1) to 127.9 mAh g(-1) to 106 mAh g(-1). When the ratio was reduced from 10C to 5C to 2C, battery capacity can be quickly approximate to the original level. Cellulose materials that were applied to lithium battery can improve battery performance by electrospinning.

  14. Kineothrix alysoides, gen. nov., sp. nov., a saccharolytic butyrate-producer within the family Lachnospiraceae.

    PubMed

    Haas, Kelly Nicole; Blanchard, Jeffrey L

    2017-02-01

    An anaerobic, saccharolytic, spore-forming, butyrate-producing bacterium, strain KNHs209T, was isolated from a switchgrass microcosm seeded with forest soil. Cells were highly motile rods, often forming long filamentous chains which were easily observed moving under the microscope. Its closest phylogenetic relative was Eisenbergiella tayi (16S rRNA gene sequence identity 94.2 %), although it was easily distinguishable based on its morphology and physiology. Whole-genome sequencing enabled development of a minimal medium, and also suggested that the organism is capable of fixing nitrogen. Its wide variety of growth substrates was mirrored by a high number of encoded chemotaxis receptors (45, the highest in the family Lachnospiraceae). Strain KNHs209T utilized a wide variety of carbohydrates, but not cellulose or xylan. Fermentation products included formate, acetate and butyrate; sulfur compounds and nitrate were not reduced. Strain KNHs209T grew optimally at 35-40 °C and pH 7. The genomic DNA G+C content was 42.74 mol%; the major membrane fatty acids were C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. Based on phenotypic, genomic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic analyses, this organism represents a novel genus and species within the family Lachnospiraceae for which the name Kineothrix alysoides, gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is KNHs209T (=ATCC TSD-26T=DSM 100556T).

  15. Microbial metabolite butyrate facilitates M2 macrophage polarization and function.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian; Shu, Dingming; Zheng, Mingzhu; Wang, Jie; Luo, Chenglong; Wang, Yan; Guo, Fuyou; Zou, Xian; Lv, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Liu, Tianfei; Qu, Hao

    2016-04-20

    Metabolites from intestinal microbes modulate the mucosal immune system by regulating the polarization and expansion of T cells. Whether the microbial metabolites influence macrophage polarization, however, is poorly understood. Here, we show that the large bowel microbial fermentation product, butyrate, facilitates M2 macrophage polarization, in vitro and in vivo. The supernatant from butyrate-treated M2 macrophage increased the migration and enhanced the wound closure rate of MLE-12 cells. Butyrate attenuated intestinal inflammation in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, with a significant increase in colonic expression of the M2 macrophage-associated protein, Arg1. M2 macrophage treated with butyrate, had increased activation of the H3K9/STAT6 signaling pathway, suggesting a mechanism for butyrate facilitated M2 macrophage polarization. Collectively, our study indicated that commensal microbe-derived butyrate is a novel activator of STAT6-mediated transcription through H3K9 acetylation driving M2 macrophage polarization, and delineated new insights into the immune interplay underlying inflammatory bowel disease.

  16. Colonic mucin synthesis is increased by sodium butyrate.

    PubMed

    Finnie, I A; Dwarakanath, A D; Taylor, B A; Rhodes, J M

    1995-01-01

    The effects of sodium butyrate and sodium bromo-octanoate (an inhibitor of beta oxidation) on colonic mucus glycoprotein (mucin) synthesis have been assessed using tissue from colonic resection samples. Epithelial biopsy specimens were incubated for 16 hours in RPMI 1640 with glutamine, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and N-acetyl-[3H]-glucosamine ([3H]-Glc NAc), and differing concentrations of sodium butyrate. Incorporation of [3H] Glc NAc into mucin by normal epithelium at least 10 cm distant from colonic cancer was increased in the presence of sodium butyrate in a dose dependent manner, with maximum effect (476%) at a concentration of 0.1 mM (number of specimens = 24 from six patients, p < 0.001). The increase in response to butyrate was not seen when specimens were incubated in the presence of the beta oxidation inhibitor sodium bromo-octanoate 0.05 M. The striking increase in mucin synthesis that results when butyrate is added to standard nutrient medium suggests that this may be an important mechanism affecting the rate of mucin synthesis in vivo and may also explain the therapeutic effect of butyrate in colitis.

  17. DNA polymorphism in Cab locus of tomato induced by tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Nambisan, P; Chopra, V L; Mohapatra, T

    1992-03-01

    Plants were regenerated from callus induced from leaf disc explants of a tomato F1 hybrid heterozygous for three marker loci anthocyaninless (a), without anthocyanin (aw), and hairless (hl). Regenerants were studied for somaclonal variation at the phenotypic level by scoring for variation in the marker loci, and at the DNA level by probing geomic DNA blots with a chlorophyll a/b binding protein (Cab-3C) cDNA sequence. While no variation was observed at the phenotypic level in over 950 somaclones studied, DNA polymorphism for the Cab locus could be detected in two out of 17 somaclones tested. Tissue culture induced variation at the phenotypic level for specific loci is very low (less than 0.001 for a, aw or hl) but DNA sequence changes are induced at much greater frequency (approximately 0.1 for a multicopy gene family such as Cab).

  18. Superconductivity at 28 K in CaB3C3 predicted from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wanjin

    2013-11-01

    The structural parameters, electronic properties, and superconducting state in the graphite-like BxC1-x intercalation compound, CaB3C3, have been studied using pseudopotential density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. Electronic and electron-phonon coupling calculations reveal that CaB3C3 is hole conducting and superconducting with critical temperature 28.2 K, which is much higher than that of CaC6 (11.5 K). The excellent superconducting state in CaB3C3 stems from the simultaneous presence of highly mobile and extremely confined conduction electrons, which enhances electron pairing and superconductivity. The current calculations might stimulate further theoretical and experimental investigation in search of new superconducting states in graphite-like BxC1-x intercalated compounds.

  19. Light-independent developmental regulation of cab gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Brusslan, J A; Tobin, E M

    1992-01-01

    We found a transient increase in the amount of mRNA for four nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins during early development of Arabidopsis thaliana. This increase began soon after germination as cotyledons emerged from the seed coat; it occurred in total darkness and was not affected by external factors, such as gibberellins or light treatments used to stimulate germination. Three members of the cab gene family and the rbcS-1A gene exhibited this expression pattern. Because timing of the increase coincided with cotyledon emergence and because it occurred independently of external stimuli, we suggest that this increase represents developmental regulation of these genes. Further, 1.34 kilobases of the cab1 promoter was sufficient to confer this expression pattern on a reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings. The ability of the cab genes to respond to phytochrome preceded this developmental increase, showing that these two types of regulation are independent. Images PMID:1380166

  20. ATR-FTIR investigations of plasticizer diffusion in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miser, C. S.; McNesby, Kevin L.; Pesce-Rodriguez, Rose A.; Fifer, Robert A.

    1992-03-01

    An attenuated total reflectance FTIR (ATR-FTIR) technique has been developed for measuring the diffusion coefficients of liquids in polymer films. Data is being obtained for diffusion of plasticizers in nitrocellulose (NC), cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), and NC/CAB mixtures.

  1. Controlled and high throughput fabrication of poly(trimethylene terephthalate) nanofibers via melt extrusion of immiscible blends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immiscible blends of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and poly(trimethylene terephthalate) (PTT) were melt extruded through a two strand rod die. The extrudates were hot-drawn at the die exit at different draw ratios. PTT fibers were obtained by removal of the CAB matrix from the drawn extrudates, a...

  2. Controlled and high throughput fabrication of poly(trimethylene terphthalate) nanofibers via melt extrusion of immiscible blends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immiscible blends of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and poly(trimethylene terephthalate) (PTT) were melt extruded through a two strand rod die. The extrudates were hot-drawn at the die exit at different draw ratios. PTT fibers were obtained by removal of the CAB matrix from the drawn extrudates, a...

  3. A distinct alleles and genetic recombination of pmrCAB operon in species of Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hun; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2015-07-01

    To investigate pmrCAB sequence divergence in 5 species of Acinetobacter baumannii complex, a total of 80 isolates from a Korean hospital were explored. We evaluated nucleotide and amino acid polymorphisms of pmrCAB operon, and phylogenetic trees were constructed for each gene of prmCAB operon. Colistin and polymyxin B susceptibility was determined for all isolates, and multilocus sequence typing was also performed for A. baumannii isolates. Our results showed that each species of A. baumannii complex has divergent pmrCAB operon sequences. We identified a distinct pmrCAB allele allied with Acinetobacter nosocomialis in gene trees. Different grouping in each gene tree suggests sporadic recombination or emergence of pmrCAB genes among Acinetobacter species. Sequence polymorphisms among Acinetobacter species might not be associated with colistin resistance. We revealed that a distinct pmrCAB allele may be widespread across the continents such as North America and Asia and that sporadic genetic recombination or emergence of pmrCAB genes might occur.

  4. Evaluation of EA-934NA with 2.5 percent Cab-O-Sil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, Gordon A.

    1990-01-01

    Currently, Hysol adhesive EA-934NA is used to bond the Field Joint Protection System on the Shuttle rocket motors at Kennedy Space Center. However, due to processing problems, an adhesive with a higher viscosity is needed to alleviate these difficulties. One possible solution is to add Cab-O-Sil to the current adhesive. The adhesive strength and bond strengths that can be obtained when 2.5 percent Cab-O-Sil is added to adhesive EA-934NA are examined and tested over a range of test temperatures from -20 to 300 F. Tensile adhesion button and lap shear specimens were bonded to D6AC steel and uniaxial tensile specimens (testing for strength, initial tangent modulus, elongation and Poisson's ratio) were prepared using Hysol adhesive EA-934NA with 2.5 percent Cab-O-Sil added. These specimens were tested at -20, 20, 75, 100, 125, 150, 200, 250, and 300 F, respectively. Additional tensile adhesion button specimens bonding Rust-Oleum primed and painted D6AC steel to itself and to cork using adhesive EA-934NA with 2.5 percent Cab-O-Sil added were tested at 20, 75, 125, 200, and 300 F, respectively. Results generally show decreasing strength values with increasing test temperatures. The bond strengths obtained using cork as a substrate were totally dependent on the cohesive strength of the cork.

  5. 76. ARAII. After SL1 explosion, operators shielded crane cab try ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. ARA-II. After SL-1 explosion, operators shielded crane cab try to open door of SL-1 tank building. January 6, 1961. Ineel photo no. 61-80. Photographer: Holmes. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Blue-Light Regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana Cab1 Gene.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, J.; Kaufman, L. S.

    1994-01-01

    The steady-state level of Cab RNA in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana increases as a result of a single pulse of blue light. The threshold for the response is at or below 10[deg] [mu]mol m-2 and begins within 1 h of irradiation. The response is not prevented by far-red treatment, and the blue-light source used does not elicit and observable very low fluence phytochrome response for RbcS RNA. The time course for blue-light-induced transcript accumulation differs from that of red, the blue beginning more quickly. Transcripts derived from the Cab1 (AB140; Lhcb1*3) member of the gene family are responsible in part for the blue-light-induced accumulation. This is the same member of the gene family that is responsible for phytochrome-induced Cab gene expression (G.A. Karlin-Neumann, L. Sun, E.M. Tobin [1988] Plant Physiol 88: 1323-1331). The mutant hy4, which lacks blue-light-induced suppression of hypocotyl elongation, retains the ability of Cab RNA to respond to blue light. PMID:12232164

  7. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 238 - Alternative Dynamic Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives F Appendix F to Part 238 Transportation Other... Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives As specified in § 238.209(b), the forward end of a cab car or an MU locomotive may comply with the requirements of this appendix...

  8. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 238 - Alternative Dynamic Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives F Appendix F to Part 238 Transportation Other... Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives As specified in § 238.209(b), the forward end of a cab car or an MU locomotive may comply with the requirements of this appendix...

  9. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 238 - Alternative Dynamic Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives F Appendix F to Part 238 Transportation Other... Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives As specified in § 238.209(b), the forward end of a cab car or an MU locomotive may comply with the requirements of this appendix...

  10. Crystal Structure of Butyrate Kinase 2 from Thermotoga maritima, a Member of the ASKHA Superfamily of Phosphotransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Diao, Jiasheng; Hasson, Miriam S.

    2009-04-01

    The enzymatic transfer of phosphoryl groups is central to the control of many cellular processes. One of the phosphoryl transfer mechanisms, that of acetate kinase, is not completely understood. Besides better understanding of the mechanism of acetate kinase, knowledge of the structure of butyrate kinase 2 (Buk2) will aid in the interpretation of active-site structure and provide information on the structural basis of substrate specificity. The gene buk2 from Thermotoga maritima encodes a member of the ASKHA (acetate and sugar kinases/heat shock cognate/actin) superfamily of phosphotransferases. The encoded protein Buk2 catalyzes the phosphorylation of butyrate and isobutyrate. We have determined the 2.5-{angstrom} crystal structure of Buk2 complexed with ({beta},{gamma}-methylene) adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Buk2 folds like an open-shelled clam, with each of the two domains representing one of the two shells. In the open active-site cleft between the N- and C-terminal domains, the active-site residues consist of two histidines, two arginines, and a cluster of hydrophobic residues. The ATP binding region of Buk2 in the C-terminal domain consists of abundant glycines for nucleotide binding, and the ATP binding motif is similar to those of other members of the ASKHA superfamily. The enzyme exists as an octamer, in which four disulfide bonds form between intermolecular cysteines. Sequence alignment and structure superposition identify the simplicity of the monomeric Buk2 structure, a probable substrate binding site, the key residues in catalyzing phosphoryl transfer, and the substrate specificity differences among Buk2, acetate, and propionate kinases. The possible enzyme mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Crystal structure of butyrate kinase 2 from Thermotoga maritima, a member of the ASKHA superfamily of phosphotransferases.

    PubMed

    Diao, Jiasheng; Hasson, Miriam S

    2009-04-01

    The enzymatic transfer of phosphoryl groups is central to the control of many cellular processes. One of the phosphoryl transfer mechanisms, that of acetate kinase, is not completely understood. Besides better understanding of the mechanism of acetate kinase, knowledge of the structure of butyrate kinase 2 (Buk2) will aid in the interpretation of active-site structure and provide information on the structural basis of substrate specificity. The gene buk2 from Thermotoga maritima encodes a member of the ASKHA (acetate and sugar kinases/heat shock cognate/actin) superfamily of phosphotransferases. The encoded protein Buk2 catalyzes the phosphorylation of butyrate and isobutyrate. We have determined the 2.5-A crystal structure of Buk2 complexed with (beta,gamma-methylene) adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Buk2 folds like an open-shelled clam, with each of the two domains representing one of the two shells. In the open active-site cleft between the N- and C-terminal domains, the active-site residues consist of two histidines, two arginines, and a cluster of hydrophobic residues. The ATP binding region of Buk2 in the C-terminal domain consists of abundant glycines for nucleotide binding, and the ATP binding motif is similar to those of other members of the ASKHA superfamily. The enzyme exists as an octamer, in which four disulfide bonds form between intermolecular cysteines. Sequence alignment and structure superposition identify the simplicity of the monomeric Buk2 structure, a probable substrate binding site, the key residues in catalyzing phosphoryl transfer, and the substrate specificity differences among Buk2, acetate, and propionate kinases. The possible enzyme mechanisms are discussed.

  12. Protection of the vehicle cab environment against bacteria, fungi and endotoxins in composting facilities.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, O; Huyard, A; Rybacki, D; Do Quang, Z

    2012-06-01

    Microbial quality of air inside vehicle cabs is a major occupational health risk management issue in composting facilities. Large differences and discrepancies in protection factors between vehicles and between biological agents have been reported. This study aimed at estimating the mean protection efficiency of the vehicle cab environment against bioaerosols with higher precision. In-cab measurement results were also analysed to ascertain whether or not these protection systems reduce workers' exposure to tolerable levels. Five front-end loaders, one mobile mixer and two agricultural tractors pulling windrow turners were investigated. Four vehicles were fitted with a pressurisation and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration system. The four others were only equipped with pleated paper filter without pressurisation. Bacteria, fungi and endotoxins were measured in 72 pairs of air samples, simultaneously collected inside the cab and on the outside of the cab with a CIP 10-M sampler. A front-end loader, purchased a few weeks previously, fitted with a pressurisation and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration system, and with a clean cab, exhibited a mean protection efficiency of between 99.47% CI 95% [98.58-99.97%] and 99.91% [99.78-99.98%] depending on the biological agent. It is likely that the lower protection efficiency demonstrated in other vehicles was caused by penetration through the only moderately efficient filters, by the absence of pressurisation, by leakage in the filter-sealing system, and by re-suspension of particles which accumulated in dirty cabs. Mean protection efficiency in regards to bacteria and endotoxins ranged between 92.64% [81.87-97.89%] and 98.61% [97.41-99.38%], and between 92.68% [88.11-96.08%] and 98.43% [97.44-99.22%], respectively. The mean protection efficiency was the lowest when confronted with fungal spores, from 59.76% [4.19-90.75%] to 94.71% [91.07-97.37%]. The probability that in-cab exposure to fungi

  13. Waste Workers’ Exposure to Airborne Fungal and Bacterial Species in the Truck Cab and During Waste Collection

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Anne Mette; Alwan, Taif; Ørberg, Anders; Uhrbrand, Katrine; Jørgensen, Marie Birk

    2016-01-01

    A large number of people work with garbage collection, and exposure to microorganisms is considered an occupational health problem. However, knowledge on microbial exposure at species level is limited. The aim of the study was to achieve knowledge on waste collectors’ exposure to airborne inhalable fungal and bacterial species during waste collection with focus on the transport of airborne microorganisms into the truck cab. Airborne microorganisms were collected with samplers mounted in the truck cab, on the workers’ clothes, and outdoors. Fungal and bacterial species were quantified and identified. The study showed that the workers were exposed to between 112 and 4.8×104 bacteria m−3 air and 326 and 4.6×104 fungi m−3 air. The personal exposures to bacteria and fungi were significantly higher than the concentrations measured in the truck cabs and in the outdoor references. On average, the fungal and bacterial concentrations in truck cabs were 111 and 7.7 times higher than outdoor reference measurements. In total, 23 fungal and 38 bacterial species were found and identified. Most fungal species belonged to the genus Penicillium and in total 11 Penicillium species were found. Identical fungal species were often found both in a personal sample and in the same person’s truck cab, but concentrations were on average 27 times higher in personal samples. Concentrations of fungal and bacterial species found only in the personal samples were lower than concentrations of species also found in truck cabs. Skin-related bacteria constituted a large fraction of bacterial isolates found in personal and truck cab samples. In total, six Staphylococcus species were found. In outdoor samples, no skin-related bacteria were found. On average, concentrations of bacterial species found both in the truck cab and personal samples were 77 times higher in personal samples than in truck cab samples. In conclusion, high concentrations of fungi were found in truck cabs, but the

  14. U.S. Truck Driver Anthropometric Study and Multivariate Anthropometric Models for Cab Designs

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jinhua; Hsiao, Hongwei; Bradtmiller, Bruce; Kau, Tsui-Ying; Reed, Matthew R.; Jahns, Steven K.; Loczi, Josef; Hardee, H. Lenora; Piamonte, Dominic Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study presents data from a large-scale anthropometric study of U.S. truck drivers and the multivariate anthropometric models developed for the design of next-generation truck cabs. Background Up-to-date anthropometric information of the U.S. truck driver population is needed for the design of safe and ergonomically efficient truck cabs. Method We collected 35 anthropometric dimensions for 1,950 truck drivers (1,779 males and 171 females) across the continental United States using a sampling plan designed to capture the appropriate ethnic, gender, and age distributions of the truck driver population. Results Truck drivers are heavier than the U.S. general population, with a difference in mean body weight of 13.5 kg for males and 15.4 kg for females. They are also different in physique from the U.S. general population. In addition, the current truck drivers are heavier and different in physique compared to their counterparts of 25 to 30 years ago. Conclusion The data obtained in this study provide more accurate anthropometric information for cab designs than do the current U.S. general population data or truck driver data collected 25 to 30 years ago. Multivariate anthropometric models, spanning 95% of the current truck driver population on the basis of a set of 12 anthropometric measurements, have been developed to facilitate future cab designs. Application The up-to-date truck driver anthropometric data and multivariate anthropometric models will benefit the design of future truck cabs which, in turn, will help promote the safety and health of the U.S. truck drivers. PMID:23156628

  15. Pyruvate sparing by butyrate and propionate in proliferating colonic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Butler, R N; Stafford, I; Triantafillos, E; O'Dee, C D; Jarrett, I G; Fettman, M J; Roberts-Thomson, I C

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of fasting and fasting followed by refeeding on the relative activities of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in isolated rat colonocytes were estimated by the rate of production of 14CO2 from [1-14C]pyruvate and [3-14C]pyruvate, respectively. 2. Decarboxylation of pyruvate by the PDH complex exceeded that by the TCA cycle in both fasted and fasted/refed colonocytes, was higher in distal than in proximal colon, and was stimulated by refeeding following a fast. 3. Oxidation of pyruvate by both the PDH complex and the TCA cycle was inhibited by butyrate. 4. Propionate alone had no effect, but synergized with butyrate to further reduce pyruvate decarboxylation by the TCA cycle. 5. Preferential utilization of butyrate by proliferating colonic epithelial cells is postulated to maximize the energy yield and spare pyruvate and its precursors for alternative synthetic roles necessary for active cell division.

  16. Metabolic flexibility of a butyrate pathway mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Minyeong; Croux, Christian; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Soucaille, Philippe

    2017-01-31

    Clostridium acetobutylicum possesses two homologous buk genes, buk (or buk1) and buk2, which encode butyrate kinases involved in the last step of butyrate formation. To investigate the contribution of buk in detail, an in-frame deletion mutant was constructed. However, in all the Δbuk mutants obtained, partial deletions of the upstream ptb gene were observed, and low phosphotransbutyrylase and butyrate kinase activities were measured. This demonstrates that i) buk (CA_C3075) is the key butyrate kinase-encoding gene and that buk2 (CA_C1660) that is poorly transcribed only plays a minor role; and ii) strongly suggests that a Δbuk mutant is not viable if the ptb gene is not also inactivated, probably due to the accumulation of butyryl-phosphate, which might be toxic for the cell. One of the ΔbukΔptb mutants was subjected to quantitative transcriptomic (mRNA molecules/cell) and fluxomic analyses in acidogenic, solventogenic and alcohologenic chemostat cultures. In addition to the low butyrate production, drastic changes in metabolic fluxes were also observed for the mutant: i) under acidogenic conditions, the primary metabolite was butanol and a new metabolite, 2-hydroxy-valerate, was produced ii) under solventogenesis, 58% increased butanol production was obtained compared to the control strain under the same conditions, and a very high yield of butanol formation (0.3gg(-1)) was reached; and iii) under alcohologenesis, the major product was lactate. Furthermore, at the transcriptional level, adhE2, which encodes an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase and is known to be a gene specifically expressed in alcohologenesis, was surprisingly highly expressed in all metabolic states in the mutant. The results presented here not only support the key roles of buk and ptb in butyrate formation but also highlight the metabolic flexibility of C. acetobutylicum in response to genetic alteration of its primary metabolism.

  17. N-Butyrate alters chromatin accessibility to DNA repair enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1986-03-01

    Current evidence suggests that the complex nature of mammalian chromatin can result in the concealment of DNA damage from repair enzymes and their co-factors. Recently it has been proposed that the acetylation of histone proteins in chromatin may provide a surveillance system whereby damaged regions of DNA become exposed due to changes in chromatin accessibility. This hypothesis has been tested by: (i) using n-butyrate to induce hyperacetylation in human adenocarcinoma (HT29) cells; (ii) monitoring the enzymatic accessibility of chromatin in permeabilised cells; (iii) measuring u.v. repair-associated nicking of DNA in intact cells and (iv) determining the effects of n-butyrate on cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. The results indicate that the accessibility of chromatin to Micrococcus luteus u.v. endonuclease is enhanced by greater than 2-fold in n-butyrate-treated cells and that there is a corresponding increase in u.v. repair incision rates in intact cells exposed to the drug. Non-toxic levels of n-butyrate induce a block to G1 phase transit and there is a significant growth delay on removal of the drug. Resistance of HT29 cells to u.v.-radiation and adriamycin is enhanced in n-butyrate-treated cells whereas X-ray sensitivity is increased. Although changes in the responses of cells to DNA damaging agents must be considered in relation to the effects of n-butyrate on growth rate and cell-cycle distribution, the results are not inconsistent with the proposal that increased enzymatic-accessibility/repair is biologically favourable for the resistance of cells to u.v.-radiation damage. Overall the results support the suggested operation of a histone acetylation-based chromatin surveillance system in human cells.

  18. Oxadiazoles Have Butyrate-Specific Conditional Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Early, Julie V.; Casey, Allen; Martinez-Grau, Maria Angeles; Gonzalez Valcarcel, Isabel C.; Vieth, Michal; Ollinger, Juliane; Bailey, Mai Ann; Alling, Torey; Files, Megan; Ovechkina, Yulia

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a global pathogen of huge importance which can adapt to several host niche environments in which carbon source availability is likely to vary. We developed and ran a phenotypic screen using butyrate as the sole carbon source to be more reflective of the host lung environment. We screened a library of ∼87,000 small compounds and identified compounds which demonstrated good antitubercular activity against M. tuberculosis grown with butyrate but not with glucose as the carbon source. Among the hits, we identified an oxadiazole series (six compounds) which had specific activity against M. tuberculosis but which lacked cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. PMID:27044545

  19. Modeling of protein-peptide interactions using the CABS-dock web server for binding site search and flexible docking.

    PubMed

    Blaszczyk, Maciej; Kurcinski, Mateusz; Kouza, Maksim; Wieteska, Lukasz; Debinski, Aleksander; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kmiecik, Sebastian

    2016-01-15

    Protein-peptide interactions play essential functional roles in living organisms and their structural characterization is a hot subject of current experimental and theoretical research. Computational modeling of the structure of protein-peptide interactions is usually divided into two stages: prediction of the binding site at a protein receptor surface, and then docking (and modeling) the peptide structure into the known binding site. This paper presents a comprehensive CABS-dock method for the simultaneous search of binding sites and flexible protein-peptide docking, available as a user's friendly web server. We present example CABS-dock results obtained in the default CABS-dock mode and using its advanced options that enable the user to increase the range of flexibility for chosen receptor fragments or to exclude user-selected binding modes from docking search. Furthermore, we demonstrate a strategy to improve CABS-dock performance by assessing the quality of models with classical molecular dynamics. Finally, we discuss the promising extensions and applications of the CABS-dock method and provide a tutorial appendix for the convenient analysis and visualization of CABS-dock results. The CABS-dock web server is freely available at http://biocomp.chem.uw.edu.pl/CABSdock/.

  20. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, Gerald Charles; Zoeller, Joseph Robert; Depew, Leslie Sharon

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  1. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, G.C.; Zoeller, J.R.; Depew, L.S.

    1998-03-24

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  2. Alternate splicing regulated by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a signaling molecule and a potent inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HADCs), butyrate exerts its impacts on a broad range of biological processes, such as apoptosis and cell proliferation, in addition to its critical role in energy metabolism in ruminants. In this study, we examined the effect of...

  3. Development of a specific radioimmunoassay for cortisol 17-butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.N.; Lee, Y.F.; Bu'Lock, D.E.; August, P.; Anderson, D.C.

    1983-07-01

    We describe the development and validation of an assay for cortisol 17-butyrate in blood in which there is no significant cross reaction with endogenous corticosteroids at levels encountered normally in man. Preliminary data on blood levels of the drug in absorption studies are presented.

  4. 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid (MCPB)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    4 - ( 2 - Methyl - 4 - chlorophenoxy ) butyric acid ( MCPB ) ; CASRN 94 - 81 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Hea

  5. Hydrogen production by fermentation using acetic acid and lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mitsufumi; Nishimura, Yasuhiko

    2007-03-01

    Microbial hydrogen production from sho-chu post-distillation slurry solution (slurry solution) containing large amounts of organic acids was investigated. The highest hydrogen producer, Clostridium diolis JPCC H-3, was isolated from natural environment and produced hydrogen at 6.03+/-0.15 ml from 5 ml slurry solution in 30 h. Interestingly, the concentration of acetic acid and lactic acid in the slurry solution decreased during hydrogen production. The substrates for hydrogen production by C. diolis JPCC H-3, in particular organic acids, were investigated in an artificial medium. No hydrogen was produced from acetic acid, propionic acid, succinic acid, or citric acid on their own. Hydrogen and butyric acid were produced from a mixture of acetic acid and lactic acid, showing that C. diolis. JPCC H-3 could produce hydrogen from acetic acid and lactic acid. Furthermore, calculation of the Gibbs free energy strongly suggests that this reaction would proceed. In this paper, we describe for the first time microbial hydrogen production from acetic acid and lactic acid by fermentation.

  6. Production of Butyric Acid and Butanol from Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, David E.; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2005-08-25

    as a chemical are at $3.00 per gallon – wholesaling in 55 gallon drums for $6.80, with a worldwide market of 1.4 billion gallon per year. The market demand is expected to increase dramatically since butanol can now be produced economically from low-cost biomass. Butanol’s application as a replacement for gasoline will outpace ethanol, biodiesel and hydrogen when its safety and simplicity of use are seen. Butanol’s application for the Department of Defense as a clean-safe replacement for batteries when used in conjunction with fuel cell technology is seen as an application for the future. Disposable canisters made of PLA that carry butanol to be reformed and used to generate electricity for computers, night vision and stealth equipment can be easily disposed of. In a typical ABE fermentation, butyric, propionic and acetic acids are produced first by C. acetobutylicum; the culture then undergoes a metabolic shift and solvents (butanol, acetone, and ethanol) are formed (Fond et al., 1985). In conventional ABE fermentations, the butanol yield from glucose is low, typically at ~15% (w/w) and rarely exceeds 25% (0.77–1.3 gallons per bushel corn respectfully). The production of butanol is also limited by severe product inhibition. Butanol at a concentration of 10 g/L can significantly inhibit cell growth and the fermentation. Consequently, butanol titers in conventional ABE fermentations are usually lower than 13 g/L. The low butanol yield and butanol concentration made butanol production from glucose by ABE fermentation uneconomical.

  7. Induction of peroxisomes by butyrate-producing probiotics.

    PubMed

    Weng, Huachun; Endo, Kosuke; Li, Jiawei; Kito, Naoko; Iwai, Naoharu

    2015-01-01

    We previously found that peroxisomal biogenesis factor 11a (Pex11a) deficiency is associated with a reduction in peroxisome abundance and impaired fatty acid metabolism in hepatocytes, and results in steatosis. In the present study, we investigated whether butyrate induces Pex11a expression and peroxisome proliferation, and studied its effect on lipid metabolism. C57BL/6 mice fed standard chow or a high-fat diet (HFD) were treated with tributyrin, 4-phelybutyrate acid (4-PBA), or the butyrate-producing probiotics (Clostridium butyricum MIYAIRI 588 [CBM]) plus inulin (dietary fiber), and the body weight, white adipose tissue, serum triglycerides, mRNA expression, and peroxisome abundance were evaluated. Tributyrin or 4-PBA treatment significantly decreased body weight and increased hepatic mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) and Pex11a. In addition, 4-PBA treatment increased peroxisome abundance and the expression of genes involved in peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation (acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 and hydroxysteroid [17-beta] dehydrogenase 4). CBM and inulin administration reduced adipose tissue mass and serum triglycerides, induced Pex11a, acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1, and hydroxysteroid (17-beta) dehydrogenase 4 genes, and increased peroxisome abundance in mice fed standard chow or an HFD. In conclusion, elevation of butyrate availability (directly through administration of butyrate or indirectly via administration of butyrate-producing probiotics plus fiber) induces PPARα and Pex11a and the genes involved in peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation, increases peroxisome abundance, and improves lipid metabolism. These results may provide a new therapeutic strategy against hyperlipidemia and obesity.

  8. Experimental feed induction of ruminal lactic, propionic, or butyric acidosis in sheep.

    PubMed

    Lettat, A; Nozière, P; Silberberg, M; Morgavi, D P; Berger, C; Martin, C

    2010-09-01

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility to induce rumen acidosis with propionate, butyrate, or lactate as the major fermentation end products. Three rumen-cannulated Texel wethers were used in a 3 x 3 Latin square design. Each period consisted of 11 d of adaptation where wethers were daily fed at 90% of ad libitum intake a hay and wheat-based concentrate diet (4:1 ratio on a DM basis) in 2 equal portions followed by 3 d of acidosis induction. During the challenge, the morning feeding was replaced by an intraruminal supply of wheat (readily fermentable starch), corn (slowly fermentable starch), or beet pulp (easily digestible fiber), dosed at 1.2% of BW. Ruminal liquid samples were taken daily 1 h before (-1) and 1, 3, 5, and 6 h after intraruminal feed supply to measure pH, VFA, and lactic acid concentration. The differences between treatments accentuated throughout the 3-d challenge, being maximal and significant on d 3. Indeed, 6 h after the third day of the challenge, mean ruminal pH was less for wheat (4.85) than for corn (5.61; P = 0.008) and beet pulp (6.09; P = 0.001), and total VFA tended to be less for wheat (48.7 mM) than for corn and beet pulp (84.7 mM on average; P = 0.08). At the same time, the proportion of acetate was greater for wheat than for corn (75.5 and 62.2%, respectively; P = 0.005) but did not differ from beet pulp challenge (69.0%). The proportion of propionate was greatest for beet pulp compared with corn and wheat (21.0, 17.3, and 12.1%, respectively; P = 0.03), whereas the butyrate proportion was greatest for corn, intermediate for wheat, and least for beet pulp (16.3, 10.8, and 8.3%, respectively; P = 0.05). Lactate concentration was greatest for wheat (45.5 mM) compared with corn and beet pulp (8.3 mM on average; P = 0.01). Under our experimental conditions, ruminal lactic acidosis was successfully induced by wheat, whereas butyric and propionic subacute ruminal acidosis were respectively provoked by corn and beet pulp. We

  9. Quantification of transcriptome responses of the rumen epithelium to butyrate infusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyrate, produced by gut microorganisms play an important role in energy metabolism and physiology in ruminants as well as in human health. Butyrate is a preferred substrate in the rumen epithelium where approximately 90% of butyrate is metabolized. Additi...

  10. Flow cytometry analysis of cell cycle and specific cell synchronization with butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable in many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. The possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells was explored and the properties of butyrate-induced cell ...

  11. Role of rumen butyrate in regulation of nitrogen utilization and urea nitrogen kinetics in growing sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate, a major rumen VFA, has been indirectly linked to enhancement of urea recycling based on increased expression of urea transporter (UT-B) in the rumen epithelia of steers fed a rumen butyrate-enhancing diet. Two studies were conducted to quantify the effect of elevated rumen butyrate concent...

  12. Fermentative effluents from hydrogen producing bioreactor as substrate for poly(beta-OH) butyrate production with simultaneous treatment: an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Venkata Mohan, S; Reddy, M Venkateswar; Subhash, G Venkata; Sarma, P N

    2010-12-01

    The feasibility of bioplastics production as poly(beta-OH)butyrate (PHB) was studied with individual volatile fatty acids (VFA) and acid-rich effluents from a biohydrogen producing reactor (HBR) as primary substrates employing aerobic consortia as biocatalyst under anoxic microenvironment. Butyrate as substrate showed higher PHB productivity (33%) followed by acetate (32%), acids mixture (16%) and propionate (11%) among synthetic VFA studied. Acid-rich effluents from HBR yielded higher PHB productivity (25%) especially at lower substrate loading conditions. Decrement observed in PHB production (from 25% to 6%) with increase in substrate load might be due to the presence of high concentration of residual carbon along with acid metabolites. Neutral redox operation showed effective PHB production compared to acidic and basic conditions due to associated higher metabolic activity of the biocatalyst. The integrated approach helped to treat additional COD from acid-rich HBR effluents apart from by-product recovery.

  13. MiR-451 Promotes Cell Proliferation and Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer through Targeting CAB39

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jianhua; Zhang, Zhibin

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence shows that microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the regulation of various biological and pathologic processes in human cancers and the aberrant expression of miRNAs contributes to the tumor development. In this study, our findings indicate that miR-451 is significantly overexpressed in pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines and elevated expression of miR-451 contributes to promoted cell viability (in vitro and in vivo). Moreover, overexpression of miR-451 is closely linked to poor prognosis and lymphatic metastasis. Inhibition of miR-451 dramatically suppresses cell viability and invasion, promotes cell apoptosis, and induces cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, miR-451 directly targets CAB39 and negatively regulates its expression and inhibition of CAB39 contributes to the promoted cell viability and invasion. Our findings improve our understanding of the function of miR-451 in the identification and therapy of pancreatic cancer. PMID:28197410

  14. Driving to better health: cancer and cardiovascular risk assessment among taxi cab operators in Chicago.

    PubMed

    Apantaku-Onayemi, Funmi; Baldyga, William; Amuwo, Shaffdeen; Adefuye, Adedeji; Mason, Terry; Mitchell, Robin; Blumenthal, Daniel S

    2012-05-01

    While a number of investigations of the health of taxi cab drivers have been conducted in Europe, Asia, and Africa, virtually none have been conducted in the United States. We undertook a survey of taxi cab operators in the Chicago area to understand better their health status and health promotion practices. The survey was completed by a convenience sample of 751 Chicago taxi drivers. Taxi drivers had low rates of insurance coverage, fruit and vegetable consumption, and physical activity compared with the general Chicago population. Participation in cancer screening tests was also lower for this group. A high proportion of taxi drivers are immigrants. They tend to be highly educated and report a readiness to engage in more health-promoting behaviors. Further research is needed to develop a targeted intervention for this population.

  15. Driving to Better Health: Cancer and Cardiovascular Risk Assessment among Taxi Cab Operators in Chicago

    PubMed Central

    Apantaku-Onayemi, Funmi; Baldyga, William; Amuwo, Shaffdeen; Adefuye, Adedeji; Mason, Terry; Mitchell, Robin; Blumenthal, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    While a number of investigations of the health of taxi cab drivers have been conducted in Europe, Asia, and Africa, virtually none have been conducted in the United States. We undertook a survey of taxi cab operators in the Chicago area to understand better their health status and health promotion practices. The survey was completed by a convenience sample of 751 Chicago taxi drivers. Taxi drivers had low rates of insurance coverage, fruit and vegetable consumption, and physical activity compared with the general Chicago population. Participation in cancer screening tests was also lower for this group. A high proportion of taxi drivers are immigrants. They tend to be highly educated and report a readiness to engage in more health-promoting behaviors. Further research is needed to develop a targeted intervention for this population. PMID:22643623

  16. CAB-DWTM for 5 μm trace-width deposition of solar cell metallization top-contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Justin Hoey; Drew Thompson; Matt Robinson; Zakaria Mahmud; Orven F. Swenson; Iskander S. Akhatov; Douglas L. Schulz

    2009-06-08

    This paper reviews methods for creating solar cell grid contacts and explores how cell efficiency can be increased using CAB-DW{trademark}. Specifically, the efficiency of p-i-n structure solar cells built in-house with 90 {micro}m sputtered lines and 5 {micro}m CAB-DW lines were compared. Preliminary results of the comparison show a marked improvement in solar cell efficiency using CAB-DW. In addition to this, a theoretical and experimental analysis of the dynamics of particle impaction on a substrate (i.e. whether particle stick or bounce) will be discussed including how this analysis may lead to further improvement of CAB-DW.

  17. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES... TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by...

  18. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES... TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by...

  19. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES... TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by...

  20. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES... TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by...

  1. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES... TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by...

  2. Thermal Comfort Testing for Vehicle Operator/Passenger Workspaces (Truck Cabs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-09

    This TOP describes the procedure to quantify the thermal comfort of a truck cab in temperatures as hot and humid as possible. Facilities, instrumentation, health and safety, test conditions, test procedures, data required, and presentation of data will be discussed in this TOP. This TOP will supplement the following TOPs: TOP 1-1-006, TOP 2-2-508, TOP 2-4-001, and TOP 10-1-003.

  3. PBF Reactor Building (PER620). Camera is in cab of electricpowered ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Reactor Building (PER-620). Camera is in cab of electric-powered rail crane and facing east. Reactor pit and storage canal have been shaped. Floors for wings on east and west side are above and below reactor in view. Photographer: Larry Page. Date: August 23, 1967. INEEL negative no. 67-4403 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. Photometric follow-up of transiting exoplanets with the INTA-CAB robotic telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullán, A.; Eibe, M. T.; Cuesta, L.; Pérez-Verde, A.; Navas, J.

    2013-05-01

    We present some photometric results obtained by our group as part of a photometric follow-up of transiting exoplanets carried out with the INTA-CAB 50-cm robotic telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (Almería, Spain). We show light curves of WASP-10, HATP-20 and HATP-32 and, after that, we fit our results with theoretical models in order to obtain some parameters as the central times of transits, depths and the transit durations of this extrasolar planets.

  5. Terminal Information Processing System (TIPS) Consolidated CAB Display (CCD) Comparative Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    specification form, vendor responses to the specifications and the recommendation to include flight data management in the CCD System. 17. Key Words 15...Cab Display (CCD) 4 Summary 4 SYSTEM CONCEPTS 5 Information Management Language 5 Reliability 5 Expandability 8 Data Display 9 Real-Time Operational...terminal data management system. It briefly outlines a history of both and then presents the basic working guidelines used in developing the

  6. Sleeper Cab Climate Control Load Reduction for Long-Haul Truck Rest Period Idling

    SciTech Connect

    Lustbader, J. A.; Kreutzer, C.; Adelman, S.; Yeakel, S.; Zehme, J.

    2015-04-29

    Annual fuel use for long-haul truck rest period idling is estimated at 667 million gallons in the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s CoolCab project aims to reduce heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) loads and resulting fuel use from rest period idling by working closely with industry to design efficient long-haul truck climate control systems while maintaining occupant comfort. Enhancing the thermal performance of cab/sleepers will enable smaller, lighter, and more cost-effective idle reduction solutions. In order for candidate idle reduction technologies to be implemented at the original equipment manufacturer and fleet level, their effectiveness must be quantified. To address this need, a number of promising candidate technologies were evaluated through experimentation and modeling to determine their effectiveness in reducing rest period HVAC loads. For this study, load reduction strategies were grouped into the focus areas of solar envelope, occupant environment, and conductive pathways. The technologies selected for a complete-cab package of technologies were “ultra-white” paint, advanced insulation, and advanced curtains. To measure the impact of these technologies, a nationally-averaged solar-weighted reflectivity long-haul truck paint color was determined and applied to the baseline test vehicle. Using the complete-cab package of technologies, electrical energy consumption for long-haul truck daytime rest period air conditioning was reduced by at least 35% for summer weather conditions in Colorado. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's CoolCalc model was then used to extrapolate the performance of the thermal load reduction technologies nationally for 161 major U.S. cities using typical weather conditions for each location over an entire year.

  7. Nanofabrication in cellulose acetate.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hongjun; Lajos, Robert; Metlushko, Vitali; Elzy, Ed; An, Se Young; Sautner, Joshua

    2009-03-07

    We have demonstrated nanofabrication with commercialized cellulose acetate. Cellulose acetate is used for bulk nanofabrication and surface nanofabrication. In bulk nanofabrication, cellulose acetate reacts with an e-beam and permanent patterns are formed in it instead of being transferred to other substrates. We have studied the nano relief modulation performance of cellulose acetate before and after development. The depth of the nanopatterns is magnified after development, and is varied by exposing dosage and line width of the pattern. The thinnest 65 nm wide line is achieved in the bulk fabrication. We also demonstrate a binary phase Fresnel lens array which is directly patterned in a cellulose acetate sheet. Because of its unique mechanical and optical properties, cellulose is a good candidate for a template material for soft imprinting lithography. In the surface nanofabrication, cellulose acetate thin film spin-coated on silicon wafers is employed as a new resist for e-beam lithography. We achieved 50 nm lines with 100 nm pitches, dots 50 nm in diameter, and single lines with the smallest width of 20 nm. As a new resist of e-beam lithography, cellulose acetate has high resolution comparable with conventional resists, while having several advantages such as low cost, long stock time and less harmfulness to human health.

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Acetate-Utilizing Anaerobes from a Freshwater Sediment.

    PubMed

    Scholten, J.C.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2000-12-01

    Acetate-degrading anaerobic microorganisms in freshwater sediment were quantified by the most probable number technique. From the highest dilutions a methanogenic, a sulfate-reducing, and a nitrate-reducing microorganism were isolated with acetate as substrate. The methanogen (culture AMPB-Zg) was non-motile and rod-shaped with blunted ends (0.5-1 mm x 3-4 mm long). Doubling times with acetate at 30-35 degrees C were 5.6-8.1 days. The methanogen grew only on acetate. Analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence showed that AMPB-Zg is closely related to Methanosaeta concilii. The isolated sulfate-reducing bacterium (strain ASRB-Zg) was rod-shaped with pointed ends (0.5-0.7 mm x 1.5-3.5 mm long), weakly motile, spore forming, and gram positive. At the optimum growth temperature of 30 degrees C the doubling times with acetate were 3.9-5.3 days. The bacterium grew on a range of organic acids, such as acetate, butyrate, fumarate, and benzoate, but did not grow autotrophically with H2, CO2, and sulfate. The closest relative of strain ASRB-Zg is Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans. The nitrate-reducing bacterium (strain ANRB-Zg) was rod-shaped (0.5-0.7 mm x 0.7-1 mm long), weakly motile, and gram negative. Optimum growth with acetate occurred at 20-25 degrees C. The bacterium grew on a range of organic substrates, such as acetate, butyrate, lactate, and glucose, and did grow autotrophically with H2, CO2, and oxygen but not with nitrate. In the presence of acetate and nitrate, thiosulfate was oxidized to sulfate. Phylogenetically, the closest relative of strain ANRB-Zg is Variovorax paradoxus.

  9. In-Cab Air Quality of Trucks Air Conditioned and Kept in Electrified Truck Stop

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Doh-Won; Zietsman, Josias; Farzaneh, Mohamadreza; Li, Wen-Whai; Olvera, Hector; Storey, John Morse; Kranendonk, Laura

    2009-01-01

    At night, long-haul truck drivers rest inside the cabins of their vehicles. Therefore, the in-cab air quality while air conditioning (A/C) is being provided can be a great concern to the drivers health. The effect of using different A/C methods [truck's A/C, auxiliary power unit (APU), and truck stop electrification (TSE) unit] on in-cab air quality of a heavy-duty diesel vehicle was investigated at an electrified truck stop in the El Paso, Texas, area. The research team measured the in-cabin and the ambient air quality adjacent to the parked diesel truck as well as emissions from the truck and an APU while it was providing A/C. The measured results were compared and analyzed. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the TSE unit provided better in-cab air quality while supplying A/C. Furthermore, the truck and APU exhaust emissions were measured, and fuel consumption of the truck (while idling) and the APU (during operation) were compared. The results led to the finding that emissions from the APU were less than those from the truck's engine idling, but the APU consumed more fuel than the engine while providing A/C under given conditions.

  10. Conceptual design study for an advanced cab and visual system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rue, R. J.; Cyrus, M. L.; Garnett, T. A.; Nachbor, J. W.; Seery, J. A.; Starr, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to define requirements for an advanced cab and visual system. The rotorcraft system integration simulator is for engineering studies in the area of mission associated vehicle handling qualities. Principally a technology survey and assessment of existing and proposed simulator visual display systems, image generation systems, modular cab designs, and simulator control station designs were performed and are discussed. State of the art survey data were used to synthesize a set of preliminary visual display system concepts of which five candidate display configurations were selected for further evaluation. Basic display concepts incorporated in these configurations included: real image projection, using either periscopes, fiber optic bundles, or scanned laser optics; and virtual imaging with helmet mounted displays. These display concepts were integrated in the study with a simulator cab concept employing a modular base for aircraft controls, crew seating, and instrumentation (or other) displays. A simple concept to induce vibration in the various modules was developed and is described. Results of evaluations and trade offs related to the candidate system concepts are given, along with a suggested weighting scheme for numerically comparing visual system performance characteristics.

  11. Pesticide aerosol characteristics in the vicinity of an agricultural vehicle cab during application.

    PubMed

    Bémer, Denis; Fismes, Joelle; Subra, Isabelle; Blachère, Veronique; Protois, Jean-Claude

    2007-07-01

    Pesticide spraying for crop protection leads to the formation of a mist of droplets, part of which is dispersed into the atmosphere. The characteristics of this aerosol, namely its particle size distribution and concentration, were measured during five campaigns involving cereal crop growing, wine grape culture, and orcharding. The measurement method incorporated a tracer product (fluorescein) with the treatment product; the pesticide aerosol concentration was then deduced from the tracer concentration. This method was validated by comparing the pesticide concentration determined by tracing with the concentration determined by direct measurement of the active substance of the pesticide. Concentration was measured using sampling filters, and particle size distribution was measured using cascade impactors. Instruments were mounted on an agricultural vehicle cab to optimize aerosol characterization, and then the cab's confinement efficiency was determined. Aerosols analyzed were fine, featuring mass median diameters between 4 microm and 15 microm; they are therefore highly dispersive. Their concentration is sufficiently high to justify operator protection by an efficient, filtered-air, pressurized cab, especially in wine grape culture and orcharding, which are the sectors where the highest pesticide transfers have been observed.

  12. Vehicle design influences whole body vibration exposures: effect of the location of the front axle relative to the cab.

    PubMed

    Blood, Ryan P; Rynell, Patrik W; Johnson, Peter W

    2011-06-01

    Using a repeated measure design, this study compared differences in whole body vibration (WBV) exposures among 13 drivers who drove a truck with the cab over the front axle (cab-over design) and a truck with the cab situated behind the front axle (non-cab-over design). The drivers drove both trucks over a standardized route that comprised three distinct segments: a freeway segment, a city street segment with stop-and-go driving (traffic lights), and a city street segment without traffic lights. A portable WBV data acquisition system collected tri-axial time-weighted and raw WBV data per ISO 2631-1 and 2631-5 standards. Simultaneous global positioning system (GPS) data were also collected to compare vehicle speeds. The GPS data indicated that there were no speed differences between the two vehicles. However, average and impulsive z-axis vibration levels were significantly higher for the cab-over design than for the non-cab-over design. In addition, significant WBV exposure differences between road types were found, with the freeway segments having the lowest exposures and the city street segments without traffic lights having the highest exposures. Vehicle type and the associated WBV exposures should be considered when purchasing vehicles to be used by full-time professional vehicle operators.

  13. Ground and excited state properties of CaB6 determined byLDA and screened--exchange LDA investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsue, Y. C.

    2005-03-01

    CaB6 has recently attracted great interest because it exhibits weak high-temperature ferromagnetism when lightly doped by La and could possibly be useful in room temperature spintronic devices. In pure CaB6, its semiconductor nature has now been established experimentallyootnotetextB.K. Cho, et.al., PRB 69, 113202 (2004) and references therein.. Questions about its theoretical description are centered about the fact that first principles LDA calculations underestimate band gaps and in CaB6 results in a semi-metal with a 0.3 eV overlap at the X point. Here we use the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method (FLAPW)ootnotetextWimmer, Krakauer, Weinert and Freeman, PRB 24, 864(1981) within both the LDA and the screened--exchange LDA (sX--LDA) to determine the ground and excited state properties of CaB6. First, we did the geometry optimization with LDA and used this optimized structure in sX--LDA calculations. We find that CaB6 is a semiconductor with a gap of 0.68 eV at X in agreement with the recent experimental results. We also calculated the optical properties with spin--orbit coupling and full matrix elements. Finally, results of similar calculations for Eu and La doped CaB6 will be reported.

  14. Dewetting and surface properties of ultrathin films of cellulose esters.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, P M; Kawano, Y; Petri, D F S

    2007-12-15

    Surface properties of ultrathin films of cellulose esters deposited onto silicon wafers have been investigated by means of contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cellulose acetate (CA), cellulose acetate propionate (CAP), and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) films adsorbed or spin-coated onto Si wafers were annealed up to one week. Film stability was monitored by AFM. Dewetting has been observed for CA and CAP. Only CAB films with lower degree of esterification presented dewetting, CAB films with high degree of butyrate were stable even after one week annealing. Surface energy of CA, CAP, and CAB was indirectly determined by contact angle measurements using drops of water, formamide and diiodomethane. The surface energy decreased as the size of alkyl ester group or the degree of esterification increased because van der Waals interactions became weaker. Effective Hamaker constant A(eff) was calculated for CA, CAP, and CAB onto Si wafers in air. Negative values of A(eff) were found for CA, CAP, and lower butyrate content CAB, which are related to instability and agree with dewetting phenomena observed by AFM. In contrast, a positive A(eff) was determined for higher butyrate content CAB, corroborating with experimental observations.

  15. Formation of propionate and butyrate by the human colonic microbiota.

    PubMed

    Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2017-01-01

    The human gut microbiota ferments dietary non-digestible carbohydrates into short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). These microbial products are utilized by the host and propionate and butyrate in particular exert a range of health-promoting functions. Here an overview of the metabolic pathways utilized by gut microbes to produce these two SCFA from dietary carbohydrates and from amino acids resulting from protein breakdown is provided. This overview emphasizes the important role played by cross-feeding of intermediary metabolites (in particular lactate, succinate and 1,2-propanediol) between different gut bacteria. The ecophysiology, including growth requirements and responses to environmental factors, of major propionate and butyrate producing bacteria are discussed in relation to dietary modulation of these metabolites. A detailed understanding of SCFA metabolism by the gut microbiota is necessary to underpin effective strategies to optimize SCFA supply to the host.

  16. Butyrate influences intracellular levels of adenine and adenine derivatives in the fungus Penicillium restrictum.

    PubMed

    Zutz, Christoph; Chiang, Yi Ming; Faehnrich, Bettina; Bacher, Markus; Hellinger, Roland; Kluger, Bernhard; Wagner, Martin; Strauss, Joseph; Rychli, Kathrin

    2017-04-01

    Butyrate, a small fatty acid, has an important role in the colon of ruminants and mammalians including the inhibition of inflammation and the regulation of cell proliferation. There is also growing evidence that butyrate is influencing the histone structure in mammalian cells by inhibition of histone deacetylation. Butyrate shows furthermore an antimicrobial activity against fungi, yeast and bacteria, which is linked to its toxicity at a high concentration. In fungi there are indications that butyrate induces the production of secondary metabolites potentially via inhibition of histone deacetylases. However, information about the influence of butyrate on growth, primary metabolite production and metabolism, besides lipid catabolism, in fungi is scarce. We have identified the filamentous fungus Penicillium (P.) restrictum as a susceptible target for butyrate treatment in an antimicrobial activity screen. The antimicrobial activity was detected only in the mycelium of the butyrate treated culture. We investigated the effect of butyrate ranging from low (0.001mM) to high (30mM), potentially toxic, concentrations on biomass and antimicrobial activity. Butyrate at high concentrations (3 and 30mM) significantly reduced the fungal biomass. In contrast P. restrictum treated with 0.03mM of butyrate showed the highest antimicrobial activity. We isolated three antimicrobial active compounds, active against Staphylococcus aureus, from P. restrictum cellular extracts treated with butyrate: adenine, its derivate hypoxanthine and the nucleoside derivate adenosine. Production of all three compounds was increased at low butyrate concentrations. Furthermore we found that butyrate influences the intracellular level of the adenine nucleoside derivate cAMP, an important signalling molecule in fungi and various organisms. In conclusion butyrate treatment increases the intracellular levels of adenine and its respective derivatives.

  17. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaro, Christopher; Lazarova, Darina L.; Bordonaro, Michael

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulates butyrate's effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulation of butyrate's effects differ by cell context. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G{sub 1} to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that prevent or

  18. Sodium Butyrate Controls Cardiac Hypertrophy in Experimental Models of Rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhoomika M

    2017-04-07

    The aim of the present research was to study the effect of sodium butyrate (SB) on partial abdominal aorta constriction (PAAC)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and determine its mechanism of action. Healthy Wistar rats were exposed to PAAC for eight weeks. After eight weeks, we carried out hypertrophic and hemodynamic evaluation and measured oxidative stress parameters and mitochondrial DNA concentration. PAAC control animals exhibited cardiac hypertrophy, decreased hemodynamic functions and oxidative stress. Treatment with SB reduced hypertrophic indices, LV wall thickness, LV collagen levels, cardiomyocyte diameter, serum lipid levels and serum cardiac biomarkers. Treatment with SB also improved hemodynamic functions, prevented oxidative stress and increased mitochondrial DNA concentration. Improvement in hypertrophy due to HDAC inhibition was further confirmed by HDAC mRNA expression studies which revealed that SB decreases expression of prohypertrophic HDAC, i.e., HDAC2, without altering the expression of anti-hypertrophic HDAC5. Sodium butyrate produces beneficial effect on cardiac hypertrophy as is evident, specifically from reduction in hypertrophic parameters including collagen levels, improvement in mitochondrial DNA concentration and preservation of LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction. This beneficial effect of sodium butyrate is mediated through downregulation of class I HDACs, specifically HDAC2 without any effect on class II HDAC, i.e., HDAC5. Thus, selective class I HDAC inhibition is required for controlling cardiac hypertrophy. Newer HDAC inhibitors which are class I inhibitor and class II promoter can be designed to obtain a 'pan' or 'dual' natural HDAC 'regulators.'

  19. Fragrance material review on α-methylbenzyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of α-methylbenzyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. α-Methylbenzyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohol Simple Acid Esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for α-methylbenzyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, skin sensitization, elicitation, and repeated dose data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances.

  20. Effect of the butyrate prodrug pivaloyloxymethyl butyrate (AN9) on a mouse model for spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Jonathan D.; Butchbach, Matthew E. R.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an early-onset motor neuron disease that leads to loss of muscle function. Butyrate (BA)-based compounds markedly improve the survival and motor phenotype of SMA mice. In this study, we examine the protective effects of the BA prodrug pivaloyloxymethyl butyrate (AN9) on the survival of SMNΔ7 SMA mice. Oral administration of AN9 beginning at PND04 almost doubled the average lifespan of SMNΔ7 SMA mice. AN9 treatment also increased the growth rate of SMNΔ7 SMA mice when compared to vehicle-treated SMNΔ7 SMA mice. In conclusion, BA prodrugs like AN9 have ameliorative effects on SMNΔ7 SMA mice. PMID:27911337

  1. Modifying the product pattern of Clostridium acetobutylicum: physiological effects of disrupting the acetate and acetone formation pathways.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Dörte; Hönicke, Daniel; Ehrenreich, Armin; Schmidt, Michael; Weuster-Botz, Dirk; Bahl, Hubert; Lütke-Eversloh, Tina

    2012-05-01

    Clostridial acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation is a natural source for microbial n-butanol production and regained much interest in academia and industry in the past years. Due to the difficult genetic accessibility of Clostridium acetobutylicum and other solventogenic clostridia, successful metabolic engineering approaches are still rare. In this study, a set of five knock-out mutants with defects in the central fermentative metabolism were generated using the ClosTron technology, including the construction of targeted double knock-out mutants of C. acetobtuylicum ATCC 824. While disruption of the acetate biosynthetic pathway had no significant impact on the metabolite distribution, mutants with defects in the acetone pathway, including both acetoacetate decarboxylase (Adc)-negative and acetoacetyl-CoA:acyl-CoA transferase (CtfAB)-negative mutants, exhibited high amounts of acetate in the fermentation broth. Distinct butyrate increase and decrease patterns during the course of fermentations provided experimental evidence that butyrate, but not acetate, is re-assimilated via an Adc/CtfAB-independent pathway in C. acetobutylicum. Interestingly, combining the adc and ctfA mutations with a knock-out of the phosphotransacetylase (Pta)-encoding gene, acetate production was drastically reduced, resulting in an increased flux towards butyrate. Except for the Pta-negative single mutant, all mutants exhibited a significantly reduced solvent production.

  2. CABS-dock web server for the flexible docking of peptides to proteins without prior knowledge of the binding site

    PubMed Central

    Kurcinski, Mateusz; Jamroz, Michal; Blaszczyk, Maciej; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kmiecik, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Protein–peptide interactions play a key role in cell functions. Their structural characterization, though challenging, is important for the discovery of new drugs. The CABS-dock web server provides an interface for modeling protein–peptide interactions using a highly efficient protocol for the flexible docking of peptides to proteins. While other docking algorithms require pre-defined localization of the binding site, CABS-dock does not require such knowledge. Given a protein receptor structure and a peptide sequence (and starting from random conformations and positions of the peptide), CABS-dock performs simulation search for the binding site allowing for full flexibility of the peptide and small fluctuations of the receptor backbone. This protocol was extensively tested over the largest dataset of non-redundant protein–peptide interactions available to date (including bound and unbound docking cases). For over 80% of bound and unbound dataset cases, we obtained models with high or medium accuracy (sufficient for practical applications). Additionally, as optional features, CABS-dock can exclude user-selected binding modes from docking search or to increase the level of flexibility for chosen receptor fragments. CABS-dock is freely available as a web server at http://biocomp.chem.uw.edu.pl/CABSdock. PMID:25943545

  3. CABS-dock web server for the flexible docking of peptides to proteins without prior knowledge of the binding site.

    PubMed

    Kurcinski, Mateusz; Jamroz, Michal; Blaszczyk, Maciej; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kmiecik, Sebastian

    2015-07-01

    Protein-peptide interactions play a key role in cell functions. Their structural characterization, though challenging, is important for the discovery of new drugs. The CABS-dock web server provides an interface for modeling protein-peptide interactions using a highly efficient protocol for the flexible docking of peptides to proteins. While other docking algorithms require pre-defined localization of the binding site, CABS-dock does not require such knowledge. Given a protein receptor structure and a peptide sequence (and starting from random conformations and positions of the peptide), CABS-dock performs simulation search for the binding site allowing for full flexibility of the peptide and small fluctuations of the receptor backbone. This protocol was extensively tested over the largest dataset of non-redundant protein-peptide interactions available to date (including bound and unbound docking cases). For over 80% of bound and unbound dataset cases, we obtained models with high or medium accuracy (sufficient for practical applications). Additionally, as optional features, CABS-dock can exclude user-selected binding modes from docking search or to increase the level of flexibility for chosen receptor fragments. CABS-dock is freely available as a web server at http://biocomp.chem.uw.edu.pl/CABSdock.

  4. Conversion of cotton byproducts to mixed cellulose esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton byproducts, such as cotton burr and cottonseed hull, can be used as low-cost feedstock for the production of specialty chemicals. The conversion of these cellulosic byproducts into mixed cellulose esters, e.g., cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), was stud...

  5. Hydrogen bonding and molecular association in 2-(quinuclidinium)-butyric acid bromide hydrate studied by X-ray diffraction, DFT calculations, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy, and potentiometric titration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dega-Szafran, Z.; Katrusiak, A.; Szafran, M.; Barczyński, P.

    2010-06-01

    The structure of 2-(quinuclidinium)-butyric acid bromide hydrate (QNBu·H 2O·HBr, 3) has been determined by X-ray diffraction, DFT calculations and characterized by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. Crystals of 3 are monoclinic, space group P2 1. The water molecule interacts with the carboxylic group of 2-(quinuclidinium)-butyric acid and with the bromide anion by the COOH⋯OH 2 and HOH⋯Br hydrogen bonds of 2.575(3) and 3.293(2) Å, respectively. The structures of monomer ( 4) and dimeric cation ( 5) of the title complex have been optimized by the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) approach, yielding conformations consistent with this in the crystal. The solid-state FTIR spectra of 3 and its deuterated analogue have been measured and compared with the theoretical spectrum of 4. The assignments of the observed and predicted bands have been proposed. The molecule of 3 has a chiral center at the C(9) atom, which is responsible for the non-magnetically equivalence of the α-ring and C(11)H 2 methylene protons in 1H NMR spectrum. The values of p Ka of quinuclidinium-acetate (quinuclidine betaine), 2-(quinuclidinium)-propionate and 2-(quinuclidinium)-butyrate have been determined by the potentiometric titration of their hydrohalides.

  6. Tailoring the properties of asymmetric cellulose acetate membranes by gas plasma etching.

    PubMed

    Olde Riekerink, M B; Engbers, G H M; Wessling, M; Feijen, J

    2002-01-15

    Cellulose triacetate (CTA) ultrafilters and cellulose acetate blend (CAB) desalination membranes were treated with a radiofrequency gas plasma (tetrafluoromethane (CF(4)) or carbon dioxide (CO(2)), 47-49 W, 0.04-0.08 mbar). Treatment times were varied between 15 s and 120 min. The plasma-treated top layer of the membranes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and contact angle measurements to obtain information about surface structure, chemistry, and wettability, respectively. The membrane properties (e.g., permeability, selectivity, fouling) were studied by waterflux measurements, molecular weight cutoff measurements, and fouling experiments with bovine serum albumin. CO(2) plasma treatment resulted in gradual etching of the membrane's dense top layer. Permeation and selectivity changed significantly for treatment times of 0-15 min for CTA and 5-60 min for CAB membranes. Moreover, CTA membranes were hydrophilized during CO(2) plasma treatment whereas CF(4) plasma treatment led to hydrophobic surfaces due to strong fluorination of the top layer. This study shows that gas plasma etching can tailor the properties of asymmetric cellulose acetate membranes by simultaneously modifying the chemistry and structure of the top layer. The low fouling properties of CTA membranes were thereby largely maintained.

  7. Effects of sodium bicarbonate on butyric acid-induced epithelial cell damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Satoko; Sugano, Naoyuki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Arai, Noriyuki; Ota, Noriko; Ito, Koichi

    2008-12-01

    Butyric acid is detected in periodontal pockets and is thought to be involved in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease. We examined the effects of sodium bicarbonate on the butyric acid-induced epithelial cell damage. The human gingival carcinoma cell line Ca9-22 was cultured in medium that contained butyric acid with or without sodium bicarbonate. The viability of cells treated with sodium bicarbonate was significantly higher than that of cells treated with butyric acid alone. The effects of butyric acid on ICAM-1 expression were significantly improved by sodium bicarbonate. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, sodium bicarbonate was indicated to be a useful therapeutic agent to reduce the butyric acid-induced periodontal tissue damage.

  8. Pretreatment of corn stover with diluted acetic acid for enhancement of acidogenic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Wang, Lijuan; Lu, Xuebin; Zhang, Shuting

    2014-04-01

    A Box-Behnken design of response surface method was used to optimize acetic acid-catalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment of corn stover, in respect to acid concentration (0.05-0.25%), treatment time (5-15 min) and reaction temperature (180-210°C). Acidogenic fermentations with different initial pH and hydrolyzates were also measured to evaluate the optimal pretreatment conditions for maximizing acid production. The results showed that pretreatment with 0.25% acetic acid at 191°C for 7.74 min was found to be the most optimal condition for pretreatment of corn stover under which the production of acids can reach the highest level. Acidogenic fermentation with the hydrolyzate of pretreatment at the optimal condition at the initial pH=5 was shown to be butyric acid type fermentation, producing 21.84 g acetic acid, 7.246 g propionic acid, 9.170 butyric acid and 1.035 g isovaleric acid from 100g of corn stover in 900 g of water containing 2.25 g acetic acid.

  9. Expression of the succinate dehydrogenase genes (sdhCAB) from the facultatively anaerobic paenibacillus macerans during aerobic growth

    PubMed

    Schirawski; Hankeln; Unden

    1998-10-01

    Paenibacillus (formerly Bacillus) macerans is capable of succinate oxidation under oxic conditions and fumarate reduction under anoxic conditions. The reactions are catalyzed by different enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase (Sdh) and fumarate reductase (Frd). The genes encoding Sdh (sdhCAB) were analyzed. The gene products of sdhA and sdhB were similar to the subunits of known Sdh and Frd enzymes. The hydrophobic subunit SdhC showed close sequence similarity to the class of Sdh/Frd enzymes containing diheme cytochrome b. From the sdhCAB gene cluster two transcripts were produced, one comprising sdhCAB, the other sdhAB. The transcripts were found only during aerobic growth, and the amount was directly proportional to Sdh activity, but inversely proportional to Frd activity.

  10. Evaluation of albumin structural modifications through cobalt-albumin binding (CAB) assay.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunyoung; Eom, Ji-Eun; Jeon, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Tae Hee; Kim, Eunnam; Jhon, Gil-Ja; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2014-03-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant protein in the human body. HSA injections prepared by fractionating human blood have mainly covered the demand for albumin to treat hypoalbuminemia, the state of low concentration of albumin in blood. HSA in solution may exist in various forms such as monomers, oligomers, polymers, or as mixtures, and its conformational change and/or aggregation may occur easily. Considering these characteristics, there is a great chance of modification and polymer formation during the preparation processes of albumin products, especially injections. The albumin cobalt binding (ACB) test reported by Bar-Or et al. was originally designed to detect ischemia modified albumin (IMA), which contains the modified HSA N-terminal sequence by cleavage of the last two amino acids. In this study, we developed a cobalt albumin binding (CAB) assay to correct the flaws of the ACB test with improving the sensitivity and precision. The newly developed CAB assay easily detects albumin configuration alterations and may be able to be used in developing a quality control method for albumin and its pharmaceutical formulations including albumin injections.

  11. Butyrate-induced changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin cannot be correlated with transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Birren, B W; Taplitz, S J; Herschman, H R

    1987-01-01

    We examined in the H4IIE rat hepatoma cell line the relationship between butyrate-induced changes in the nuclease sensitivity of chromatin and changes in transcriptional activity of specific genes. The butyrate-inducible metallothionein I (MT-I) gene underwent a dramatic increase in DNase I sensitivity after 3 h of butyrate treatment. However, genes not transcribed in H4IIE cells underwent the same changes in DNase I sensitivity. Thus, butyrate-induced increases in DNase I sensitivity are not sufficient for the transcriptional activation of a gene. Butyrate treatment has also been reported to alter the sensitivity of sequences to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) in a manner reflecting their tissue-specific expression. Butyrate exposure caused increased digestion of the MT-I gene by MNase. However, butyrate-induced MNase sensitivity also occurred for genes which are neither transcribed in untreated cells nor butyrate inducible. Moreover, cadmium, a potent transcriptional activator of the MT-I gene, does not alter the sensitivity of the MT-I gene to MNase. Thus, the butyrate-induced alterations in MNase sensitivity are neither sufficient for, necessary for, nor indicative of transcriptional activation. Images PMID:3431545

  12. Choline acetate enhanced the catalytic performance of Candida rogusa lipase in AOT reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Xue, Luyan; Zhao, Yin; Yu, Lijie; Sun, Yanwen; Yan, Keqian; Li, Ying; Huang, Xirong; Qu, Yinbo

    2013-05-01

    Choline acetate is an ionic liquid composed of a kosmotropic anion and a chaotropic cation. According to Hofmeister series, a kosmotropic anion and/or a chaotropic cation could stabilize an enzyme, thereby facilitating the retention of the catalytic activity of the enzyme. In this work, we first report the influence of choline acetate on the activity and stability of lipase in AOT/water/isooctane reverse micelles. The indicator reaction is the lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl butyrate. The results show that a low level of choline acetate does not affect the microstructure of the AOT reverse micelles, but the ionic liquid can improve the catalytic efficiency of lipase. Fluorescence spectra show that a high level of choline acetate has an impact on the conformation of lipase, so the activation is mainly due to the influence of choline acetate on the nucleophilicity of water. Infrared spectra demonstrate that choline acetate can form stronger hydrogen bonds with water surrounding lipase, and therefore enhance the nucleophilicity of the water, which makes it easier to attack the acyl enzyme intermediate, thereby increasing the activity of the lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of the ester. A study on the stability of lipase in AOT reverse micelles indicates that the ionic liquid is able to maintain the activity of lipase to a certain extent. The effect of choline acetate is consistent with that predicted based on Hofmeister series.

  13. Mechanistic Insights into the Catalytic Oxidation of Carboxylic Acids on Au/TiO2: Partial Oxidation of Propionic and Butyric Acid to Gold Ketenylidene through Unsaturated Acids

    DOE PAGES

    McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; ...

    2014-12-12

    Here, the partial oxidation of model C2–C4 (acetic, propionic, and butyric) carboxylic acids on Au/TiO2 catalysts consisting of Au particles ~3 nm in size was investigated using transmission infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory. All three acids readily undergo oxidative dehydrogenation on Au/TiO2. Propionic and butyric acid dehydrogenate at the C2–C3 positions, whereas acetic acid dehydrogenates at the C1–C2 position. The resulting acrylate and crotonate intermediates are subsequently oxidized to form β-keto acids that decarboxylate. All three acids form a gold ketenylidene intermediate, Au2C=C=O, along the way to their full oxidation to form CO2. Infrared measurements of Au2C=C=O formation asmore » a function of time provides a surface spectroscopic probe of the kinetics for the activation and oxidative dehydrogenation of the alkyl groups in the carboxylate intermediates that form.« less

  14. Antimicrobial activity of butyrate glycerides toward Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Namkung, H; Yu, H; Gong, J; Leeson, S

    2011-10-01

    The antimicrobial activities of n-butyric acid and its derivatives against Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium perfringens were studied. n-Butyric acid and its derivatives (monobutyrin and a mixture of mono-, di-, and tri-glycerides of butyric acid) were added at different concentrations (ranging from 250 to 7,000 mg/kg to a media inoculated with either Salmonella Typhimurium or C. perfringens. The antimicrobial activity of butyric acid against C. perfringens was measured at 2 bacterium concentrations and 2 inoculations involving ambient aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The most effective antimicrobial activity for Salmonella Typhimurium was observed with n-butyric acid, with 90% inhibition rate at a concentration of 1,500 mg/kg. Although minimal inhibition for Salmonella Typhimurium was observed with butyric acid glycerides, lipase addition to a mixture of mono-, di-, and triglycerides of butyric acid increased (P < 0.01) antimicrobial activity of these derivatives. Antimicrobial activity of butyric acid and its derivative against C. perfringens was higher when using a moderate initial inoculation concentration (10(5)) compared with a higher initial concentration (10(7)) of this bacterium. At a lower inoculation of C. perfringens (10(5)), >90% inhibition rate by all butyric acid glycerides was observed with prior aerobic inoculation at 2,000 mg/kg, whereas using anaerobic inoculation, only 50% monobutyrin maintained >90% inhibitory effect at 3,000 mg/kg. The antimicrobial effect of monobutyrin against C. perfringens was generally higher (P < 0.01) for 50% monobutyrin than for 100% monobutyrin. Either a mixture of butyric acid derivatives or 50% monobutyrin decreased (P < 0.01) C. perfringens in a media containing intestinal contents whereas only 50% monobutyrin decreased (P < 0.01) Salmonella Typhimurium within a media containing cecal contents from mature Leghorns. These results show that n-butyric acid and 50% monobutyrin could be used to control Salmonella

  15. Butyrate enhances antibacterial effects while suppressing other features of alternative activation in IL-4-induced macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Maria R; Saxena, Alpana; Reyes, José-Luis; McKay, Derek M

    2016-05-15

    The short-chain fatty acid butyrate is produced by fermentation of dietary fiber by the intestinal microbiota; butyrate is the primary energy source of colonocytes and has immunomodulatory effects. Having shown that macrophages differentiated with IL-4 [M(IL-4)s] can suppress colitis, we hypothesized that butyrate would reinforce an M(IL-4) phenotype. Here, we show that in the presence of butyrate M(IL-4)s display reduced expression of their hallmark markers Arg1 and Ym1 and significantly suppressed LPS-induced nitric oxide, IL-12p40, and IL-10 production. Butyrate treatment likely altered the M(IL-4) phenotype via inhibition of histone deacetylation. Functionally, M(IL-4)s treated with butyrate showed increased phagocytosis and killing of bacteria, compared with M(IL-4) and this was not accompanied by enhanced proinflammatory cytokine production. Culture of regulatory T cells with M(IL-4)s and M(IL-4 + butyrate)s revealed that both macrophage subsets suppressed expression of the regulatory T-cell marker Foxp3. However, Tregs cocultured with M(IL-4 + butyrate) produced less IL-17A than Tregs cocultured with M(IL-4). These data illustrate the importance of butyrate, a microbial-derived metabolite, in the regulation of gut immunity: the demonstration that butyrate promotes phagocytosis in M(IL-4)s that can limit T-cell production of IL-17A reveals novel aspects of bacterial-host interaction in the regulation of intestinal homeostasis.

  16. Effects of dietary sodium butyrate on hepatic biotransformation and pharmacokinetics of erythromycin in chickens.

    PubMed

    Csikó, G; Nagy, G; Mátis, G; Neogrády, Z; Kulcsár, Á; Jerzsele, A; Szekér, K; Gálfi, P

    2014-08-01

    Butyrate, a commonly applied feed additive in poultry nutrition, can modify the expression of certain genes, including those encoding cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. In comparative in vitro and in vivo experiments, the effect of butyrate on hepatic CYP genes was examined in primary cultures of chicken hepatocytes and in liver samples of chickens collected from animals that had been given butyrate as a feed additive. Moreover, the effect of butyrate on the biotransformation of erythromycin, a marker substance for the activity of enzymes of the CYP3A family, was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Butyrate increased the expression of the avian-specific CYP2H1 both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, the avian CYP3A37 expression was decreased in hepatocytes following butyrate exposure, but not in the in vivo model. CYP1A was suppressed by butyrate in the in vitro experiments, and overexpressed in vivo in butyrate-fed animals. The concomitant incubation of hepatocytes with butyrate and erythromycin led to an increased CYP2H1 expression and a less pronounced inhibition of CYP3A37. In in vivo pharmacokinetic experiments, butyrate-fed animals given a single i.m. injection of erythromycin, a slower absorption phase (longer T(half-abs) and delayed T(max)) but a rapid elimination phase of this marker substrate was observed. Although these measurable differences were detected in the pharmacokinetics of erythromycin, it is unlikely that a concomitant application of sodium butyrate with erythromycin or other CYP substrates will cause clinically significant feed-drug interaction in chickens.

  17. 75 FR 1179 - Passenger Equipment Safety Standards; Front End Strength of Cab Cars and Multiple-Unit Locomotives

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ...This final rule is intended to further the safety of passenger train occupants by amending existing regulations to enhance requirements for the structural strength of the front end of cab cars and multiple-unit (MU) locomotives. These enhancements include the addition of requirements concerning structural deformation and energy absorption by collision posts and corner posts at the forward end......

  18. 49 CFR 236.511 - Cab signals controlled in accordance with block conditions stopping distance in advance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... conditions stopping distance in advance. 236.511 Section 236.511 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND... SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems...

  19. 49 CFR 236.511 - Cab signals controlled in accordance with block conditions stopping distance in advance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... conditions stopping distance in advance. 236.511 Section 236.511 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND... SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems...

  20. 49 CFR 236.511 - Cab signals controlled in accordance with block conditions stopping distance in advance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... conditions stopping distance in advance. 236.511 Section 236.511 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND... SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems...

  1. 49 CFR 236.511 - Cab signals controlled in accordance with block conditions stopping distance in advance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... conditions stopping distance in advance. 236.511 Section 236.511 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND... SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems...

  2. 49 CFR 236.511 - Cab signals controlled in accordance with block conditions stopping distance in advance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... conditions stopping distance in advance. 236.511 Section 236.511 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND... SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems...

  3. Application of Sleeper Cab Thermal Management Technologies to Reduce Idle Climate Control Loads in Long-Haul Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Lustbader, J. A.; Venson, T.; Adelman, S.; Dehart, C.; Yeakel, S.; Castillo, M. S.

    2012-10-01

    Each intercity long-haul truck in the U.S. idles approximately 1,800 hrs per year, primarily for sleeper cab hotel loads. Including workday idling, over 2 billion gallons of fuel are used annually for truck idling. NREL's CoolCab project works closely with industry to design efficient thermal management systems for long-haul trucks that keep the cab comfortable with minimized engine idling and fuel use. The impact of thermal load reduction technologies on idle reduction systems were characterized by conducting thermal soak tests, overall heat transfer tests, and 10-hour rest period A/C tests. Technologies evaluated include advanced insulation packages, a solar reflective film applied to the vehicle's opaque exterior surfaces, a truck featuring both film and insulation, and a battery-powered A/C system. Opportunities were identified to reduce heating and cooling loads for long-haul truck idling by 36% and 34%, respectively, which yielded a 23% reduction in battery pack capacity of the idle-reduction system. Data were also collected for development and validation of a CoolCalc HVAC truck cab model. CoolCalc is an easy-to-use, simplified, physics-based HVAC load estimation tool that requires no meshing, has flexible geometry, excludes unnecessary detail, and is less time-intensive than more detailed computer-aided engineering modeling approaches.

  4. Lipopeptides, a novel protein, and volatile compounds contribute to the antifungal activity of the biocontrol agent Bacillus atrophaeus CAB-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyun; Li, Baoqing; Wang, Ye; Guo, Qinggang; Lu, Xiuyun; Li, Shezeng; Ma, Ping

    2013-11-01

    Bacillus atrophaeus CAB-1 displays a high inhibitory activity against various fungal pathogens and suppresses cucumber powdery mildew and tomato gray mold. We extracted and identified lipopeptides and secreted proteins and volatile compounds produced by strain CAB-1 to investigate the mechanisms involved in its biocontrol performance. In vitro assays indicated all three types of products contributed to the antagonistic activity against the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Each of these components also effectively prevented the occurrence of the cucumber powdery mildew caused by Sphaerotheca fuliginea under greenhouse conditions. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry revealed that the major bioactive lipopeptide was fengycin A (C15-C17). We isolated the crude-secreted proteins of CAB-1 and purified a fraction with antifungal activity. This protein sequence shared a high identity with a putative phage-related pre-neck appendage protein, which has not been reported as an antifungal factor. The volatile compounds produced by CAB-1 were complex, including a range of alcohols, phenols, amines, and alkane amides. O-anisaldehyde represented one of the most abundant volatiles with the highest inhibition on the mycelial growth of B. cinerea. To our knowledge, this is the first report on profiling three types of antifungal substances in Bacilli and demonstrating their contributions to plant disease control.

  5. Bioinformatic dissecting of TP53 regulation pathway underlying butyrate-induced histone modification in epigenetic regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate affects cell proliferation, differentiation and motility. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. TP53 is one of the most active upstream regulators discovered by IPA in our RNA sequencing data set. The TP53 signaling pathway pl...

  6. 40 CFR 180.331 - 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and conjugated, determined as the acid, in or on food commodities, as follows: Commodity Parts per... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid... Tolerances § 180.331 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General....

  7. 40 CFR 180.331 - 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and conjugated, determined as the acid, in or on food commodities, as follows: Commodity Parts per... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid... Tolerances § 180.331 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General....

  8. 40 CFR 180.331 - 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and conjugated, determined as the acid, in or on food commodities, as follows: Commodity Parts per... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid... Tolerances § 180.331 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General....

  9. 40 CFR 180.331 - 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and conjugated, determined as the acid, in or on food commodities, as follows: Commodity Parts per... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid... Tolerances § 180.331 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General....

  10. Transcriptomic sequencing reveals a set of unique genes activated by butyrate-induced histone modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes induced by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), a set of unique gen...

  11. Butyric acid from anaerobic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213 was found producing butyrate under strict anaerobic conditions. This strain produced 9.47 g L-1 butyric acid from MRS media (0.48 g/g glucose). RPT-4213 was also used to ferment dilute acid pretreated hydrolysates including wheat straw (WSH), corn fiber (CFH...

  12. Butyric acid from anaerobic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by Clostridium tyrobutyricum strain RPT-4213

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly isolated Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213 was found to produce butyrate under anaerobic conditions. Fermentations using Lactobacilli MRS Broth produced 9.47 g L-1 butyric acid from glucose (0.48 g/g glucose). However, the strain was not capable of utilizing five carbon sugars. To assess the a...

  13. Effect of Sodium Butyrate on Growth Performance and Response to Lipopolysaccharide in Weanling Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of dietary sodium butyrate on growth performance and response to E. coli. lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in weanling pigs. In the first 28 d experiment, 180 pigs (initial BW 6.3 kg) were fed 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4% sodium butyrate, or 110 mg/kg d...

  14. CAB-Align: A Flexible Protein Structure Alignment Method Based on the Residue-Residue Contact Area

    PubMed Central

    Terashi, Genki; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are flexible, and this flexibility has an essential functional role. Flexibility can be observed in loop regions, rearrangements between secondary structure elements, and conformational changes between entire domains. However, most protein structure alignment methods treat protein structures as rigid bodies. Thus, these methods fail to identify the equivalences of residue pairs in regions with flexibility. In this study, we considered that the evolutionary relationship between proteins corresponds directly to the residue–residue physical contacts rather than the three-dimensional (3D) coordinates of proteins. Thus, we developed a new protein structure alignment method, contact area-based alignment (CAB-align), which uses the residue–residue contact area to identify regions of similarity. The main purpose of CAB-align is to identify homologous relationships at the residue level between related protein structures. The CAB-align procedure comprises two main steps: First, a rigid-body alignment method based on local and global 3D structure superposition is employed to generate a sufficient number of initial alignments. Then, iterative dynamic programming is executed to find the optimal alignment. We evaluated the performance and advantages of CAB-align based on four main points: (1) agreement with the gold standard alignment, (2) alignment quality based on an evolutionary relationship without 3D coordinate superposition, (3) consistency of the multiple alignments, and (4) classification agreement with the gold standard classification. Comparisons of CAB-align with other state-of-the-art protein structure alignment methods (TM-align, FATCAT, and DaliLite) using our benchmark dataset showed that CAB-align performed robustly in obtaining high-quality alignments and generating consistent multiple alignments with high coverage and accuracy rates, and it performed extremely well when discriminating between homologous and nonhomologous pairs of proteins in both

  15. CAB-Align: A Flexible Protein Structure Alignment Method Based on the Residue-Residue Contact Area.

    PubMed

    Terashi, Genki; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are flexible, and this flexibility has an essential functional role. Flexibility can be observed in loop regions, rearrangements between secondary structure elements, and conformational changes between entire domains. However, most protein structure alignment methods treat protein structures as rigid bodies. Thus, these methods fail to identify the equivalences of residue pairs in regions with flexibility. In this study, we considered that the evolutionary relationship between proteins corresponds directly to the residue-residue physical contacts rather than the three-dimensional (3D) coordinates of proteins. Thus, we developed a new protein structure alignment method, contact area-based alignment (CAB-align), which uses the residue-residue contact area to identify regions of similarity. The main purpose of CAB-align is to identify homologous relationships at the residue level between related protein structures. The CAB-align procedure comprises two main steps: First, a rigid-body alignment method based on local and global 3D structure superposition is employed to generate a sufficient number of initial alignments. Then, iterative dynamic programming is executed to find the optimal alignment. We evaluated the performance and advantages of CAB-align based on four main points: (1) agreement with the gold standard alignment, (2) alignment quality based on an evolutionary relationship without 3D coordinate superposition, (3) consistency of the multiple alignments, and (4) classification agreement with the gold standard classification. Comparisons of CAB-align with other state-of-the-art protein structure alignment methods (TM-align, FATCAT, and DaliLite) using our benchmark dataset showed that CAB-align performed robustly in obtaining high-quality alignments and generating consistent multiple alignments with high coverage and accuracy rates, and it performed extremely well when discriminating between homologous and nonhomologous pairs of proteins in both

  16. Acetate Kinase Isozymes Confer Robustness in Acetate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Siu Hung Joshua; Nørregaard, Lasse; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2014-01-01

    Acetate kinase (ACK) (EC no: 2.7.2.1) interconverts acetyl-phosphate and acetate to either catabolize or synthesize acetyl-CoA dependent on the metabolic requirement. Among all ACK entries available in UniProt, we found that around 45% are multiple ACKs in some organisms including more than 300 species but surprisingly, little work has been done to clarify whether this has any significance. In an attempt to gain further insight we have studied the two ACKs (AckA1, AckA2) encoded by two neighboring genes conserved in Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) by analyzing protein sequences, characterizing transcription structure, determining enzyme characteristics and effect on growth physiology. The results show that the two ACKs are most likely individually transcribed. AckA1 has a much higher turnover number and AckA2 has a much higher affinity for acetate in vitro. Consistently, growth experiments of mutant strains reveal that AckA1 has a higher capacity for acetate production which allows faster growth in an environment with high acetate concentration. Meanwhile, AckA2 is important for fast acetate-dependent growth at low concentration of acetate. The results demonstrate that the two ACKs have complementary physiological roles in L. lactis to maintain a robust acetate metabolism for fast growth at different extracellular acetate concentrations. The existence of ACK isozymes may reflect a common evolutionary strategy in bacteria in an environment with varying concentrations of acetate. PMID:24638105

  17. Comparison of MERV 16 and HEPA filters for cab filtration of underground mining equipment

    PubMed Central

    Cecala, A.B.; Organiscak, J.A.; Noll, J.D.; Zimmer, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Significant strides have been made in optimizing the design of filtration and pressurization systems used on the enclosed cabs of mobile mining equipment to reduce respirable dust and provide the best air quality to the equipment operators. Considering all of the advances made in this area, one aspect that still needed to be evaluated was a comparison of the efficiencies of the different filters used in these systems. As high-efficiency particulate arrestance (HEPA) filters provide the highest filtering efficiency, the general assumption would be that they would also provide the greatest level of protection to workers. Researchers for the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) speculated, based upon a previous laboratory study, that filters with minimum efficiency reporting value, or MERV rating, of 16 may be a more appropriate choice than HEPA filters in most cases for the mining industry. A study was therefore performed comparing HEPA and MERV 16 filters on two kinds of underground limestone mining equipment, a roof bolter and a face drill, to evaluate this theory. Testing showed that, at the 95-percent confidence level, there was no statistical difference between the efficiencies of the two types of filters on the two kinds of mining equipment. As the MERV 16 filters were less restrictive, provided greater airflow and cab pressurization, cost less and required less-frequent replacement than the HEPA filters, the MERV 16 filters were concluded to be the optimal choice for both the roof bolter and the face drill in this comparative-analysis case study. Another key finding of this study is the substantial improvement in the effectiveness of filtration and pressurization systems when using a final filter design. PMID:27524838

  18. CAB Contribution to HARMONI: The first light spectrograph of the E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqueras López, J.; Arribas, S.; Calcines, A.

    2017-03-01

    HARMONI (High Angular Resolution Monolithic Optical and Near-infrared Integral field spectrograph) is a visible and near-infrared (0.47 to 2.45 μm) integral field spectrograph selected as a first-light instrument for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). With four spatial scales (60, 20, 10 and 4 mas) and a wide range of spectral resolving powers (R=3500, 7500, 20000), HARMONI will allow scientists to address many of the E-ELT science cases. The HARMONI Consortium is led by the University of Oxford, and is also formed by the UK Astronomy Technology Centre (UKATC, Edinburgh, UK), Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (CRAL), Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM), Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC, Spain) and the Centro de Astrobiología (CAB INTA-CSIC, Spain). We summarize here the current status of the project, and describe the participation of CAB to design and manufacture two of the instrument sub-systems: the calibration unit and the secondary guiding module. The calibration unit will simulate the optical output of the telescope, and provide the functionality needed to illuminate the focal plane in such a way that the following type of data can be obtained: data aimed at removing the instrumental signature from the raw data and to convert the data into a data product that uses physical units, data required for monitoring the status of the instrument, and data required for calibrating the secondary guiding subsystem. The secondary guiding subsystem basic requirement is to provide knowledge (relative or absolute) of the location of the science focal plane on timescales of a few seconds and longer (up to months), with an accuracy of 2mas or 0.1x the input FWHM (at H/K bands), whichever is greater. The subsystem should achieve this level performance for different observation modes, e.g. no- AO, GLAO and LTAO modes.

  19. Is butyrate the link between diet, intestinal microbiota and obesity-related metabolic diseases?

    PubMed

    Brahe, L K; Astrup, A; Larsen, L H

    2013-12-01

    It is increasingly recognized that there is a connection between diet, intestinal microbiota, intestinal barrier function and the low-grade inflammation that characterizes the progression from obesity to metabolic disturbances, making dietary strategies to modulate the intestinal environment relevant. In this context, the ability of some Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria to produce the short-chain fatty acid butyrate is interesting. A lower abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria has been associated with metabolic risk in humans, and recent studies suggest that butyrate might have an anti-inflammatory potential that can alleviate obesity-related metabolic complications, possibly due to its ability to enhance the intestinal barrier function. Here, we review and discuss the potential of butyrate as an anti-inflammatory mediator in metabolic diseases, and the potential for dietary interventions increasing the intestinal availability of butyrate.

  20. A specific member of the Cab multigene family can be efficiently targeted and disrupted in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, A H; Codón, A C; Ivascu, C; Russo, V E; Knight, C; Cove, D; Schaefer, D G; Chakhparonian, M; Zrÿd, J P

    1999-02-01

    The analysis of phenotypic change resulting from gene disruption following homologous recombination provides a powerful technique for the study of gene function. This technique has so far been difficult to apply to plants because the frequency of gene disruption following transformation with constructs containing DNA homologous to genomic sequences is low (0.01 to 0.1%). It has recently been shown that high rates of gene disruption (up to 90%) can be achieved in the moss Physcomitrella patens using genomic sequences of unknown function. We have used this system to examine the specificity of gene disruption in Physcomitrella using a member of the Cab multigene family. We have employed the previously characterised Cab gene ZLAB1 and have isolated segments of 13 other closely related members of the Cab gene family. In the 199-bp stretch sequenced, the 13 new members of the Cab family show an average of 8.5% divergence from the DNA sequence of ZLAB1. We observed 304 silent substitutions and 16 substitutions that lead to a change in the amino acid sequence of the protein. We cloned 1029 bp of the coding region of ZLAB1 (including 177 of the 199 bp with high homology to the 13 new Cab genes) into a vector containing a selectable hygromycin resistance marker, and used this construct to transform P. patens. In three of nine stable transformants tested, the construct had inserted in, and disrupted, the ZLAB1 gene. There was no discernible phenotype associated with the disruption. We have therefore shown that gene disruption is reproducible in P. patens and that the requirement for sequence homology appears to be stringent, therefore allowing the role of individual members of a gene family to be analysed in land plants for the first time.

  1. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Claycombe, Kate J; Reindl, Katie M

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of a high-fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk, while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer-preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of DCA and butyrate (two major metabolites in colon lumen), we examined the effects of physiologically relevant doses of butyrate (0.5-2 mmol/l) and DCA (0.05-0.3 mmol/l) on colon cell proliferation. We hypothesize that butyrate and DCA each modulates the cell cycle and apoptosis via common and distinct cellular signaling targets. In this study, we demonstrated that both butyrate and DCA inhibited cell proliferation by up to 89% and 92% and increased cell apoptosis rate by up to 3.1- and 4.5-fold, respectively. Cell cycle analyses revealed that butyrate led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in the S-phase fraction, but DCA induced an increase in only G1 fraction with a concomitant drop in the S-phase fraction when compared with the untreated cells. The examination of early cellular signaling revealed that DCA but not butyrate increased intracellular reactive oxygen species, genomic DNA breakage, the activation of ERK1/2, caspase-3 and PARP. In contrast, DCA decreased activated Rb protein level, and butyrate but not DCA increased p21 expression. Collectively, although both butyrate and DCA inhibit colonic cell proliferation, butyrate increases tumor suppressor gene expression, whereas DCA decreases tumor suppressor activation in cell cycle and apoptosis pathways.

  2. In vitro intestinal bioaccessibility of alkylglycerols versus triacylglycerols as vehicles of butyric acid.

    PubMed

    Martín, Diana; Morán-Valero, María I; Señoráns, Francisco J; Reglero, Guillermo; Torres, Carlos F

    2011-03-01

    Butyric acid has been the subject of much attention last years due to its bioactivity. However, the potential advantages of butyrate are limited by the problem to reach enough plasma concentrations; therefore, pro-drugs have been proposed as an alternative to natural butyrate. A comparative study on in vitro intestinal digestion of 2,3-dibutyroil-1-O-octadecyl glycerol (D-SCAKG) and tributyrin (TB), as potential pro-drugs of butyric acid, was performed. Aliquots were taken at different times of digestion for studying the extent and rate of hydrolysis of both substrates. The micellar phase (MP) and oily phase (OP) formed in the digestion media were separated and their composition in lipid products was analyzed. Initially, it was confirmed that the in vitro model reproduced physiological results by testing against olive oil as a standard lipid. The progress of in vitro intestinal digestion of D-SCAKG was slower than that of TB. TB hydrolyzed completely to butyric acid, whereas D-SCAKG mainly yielded 2-butyroil-1-O-octadecyl glycerol (M-SCAKG), followed by butyric acid and 1-O-octadecyl glycerol (AKG). The MP from both substrates mainly consisted of butyric acid. Minor levels of M-SCAKG and AKG were also found in the MP after hydrolysis of D-SCAKG, the M-SCAKG being mainly distributed in the OP. Therefore, D-SCAKG produced a stable form of esterified butyric acid as M-SCAKG after in vitro intestinal digestion, unlike TB. Additionally, such a product would integrate both bioactive compounds, butyric acid and alkylglycerol, within the same molecule. Free butyric acid and AKG would be also released, which are lipid products of interest as well.

  3. Intestinimonas butyriciproducens gen. nov., sp. nov., a butyrate-producing bacterium from the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Kläring, Karoline; Hanske, Laura; Bui, Nam; Charrier, Cédric; Blaut, Michael; Haller, Dirk; Plugge, Caroline M; Clavel, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    A Gram-positive, spore-forming, non-motile, strictly anaerobic rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from the caecal content of a TNF(deltaARE) mouse. The isolate, referred to as strain SRB-521-5-I(T), was originally cultured on a reduced agar medium containing yeast extract, rumen fluid and lactic acid as main energy and carbon sources. Phylogenetic analysis of partial 16S rRNA genes revealed that the species most closely related to strain SRB-521-5-I(T) were Flavonifractor plautii and Pseudoflavonifractor capillosus (<95 % sequence similarity; 1436 bp). In contrast to F. plautii and P. capillosus, strain SRB-521-5-I(T) contained a substantial amount of C18 : 0 dimethylacetal. Additional major fatty acids were C14 : 0 methyl ester, C16 : 0 dimethylacetal and C18 : 0 aldehyde. Strain SRB-521-5-I(T) differed in its enzyme profile from F. plautii and P. capillosus by being positive for dextrin, maltotriose, turanose, dl-lactic acid and d-lactic acid methyl ester but negative for d-fructose. In reduced Wilkins-Chalgren-Anaerobe broth, strain SRB-521-5-I(T) produced approximately 8 mM butyrate and 4 mM acetate. In contrast to F. plautii, the strain did not metabolize flavonoids. It showed intermediate resistance towards the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, colistin and tetracycline. Based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, we propose the name Intestinimonas butyriciproducens gen. nov., sp. nov. to accommodate strain SRB-521-5-I(T) ( = DSM 26588(T) = CCUG 63529(T)) as the type strain.

  4. Kallolide A acetate pyrazoline.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Escudero, Idaliz; Marrero, Jeffrey; Rodríguez, Abimael D

    2012-01-01

    IN THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF KALLOLIDE A ACETATE PYRAZOLINE [SYSTEMATIC NAME: 7-methyl-16-oxo-4,10-bis-(prop-1-en-2-yl)-17,18-dioxa-14,15-diaza-tetra-cyclo-[9.4.2.1(6,9).0(1,12)]octa-deca-6,8,14-trien-5-yl acetate], C(23)H(28)N(2)O(5), there is a 12-member-ed carbon macrocyclic structure. In addition, there is a tris-ubstituted furan ring, an approximately planar γ-lactone ring [maximum deviation of 0.057 (3) Å] and a pyraz-oline ring, the latter in an envelope conformation. The pyrazoline and the γ-lactone rings are fused in a cis configuration. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by weak C-H⋯O inter-actions, forming a two-dimensional network parallel to (001). An intra-molecular C-H⋯O hydrogen bond is also present.

  5. Kallolide A acetate pyrazoline

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Escudero, Idaliz; Marrero, Jeffrey; Rodríguez, Abimael D.

    2012-01-01

    In the crystal structure of kallolide A acetate pyrazoline [systematic name: 7-methyl-16-oxo-4,10-bis­(prop-1-en-2-yl)-17,18-dioxa-14,15-diaza­tetra­cyclo­[9.4.2.16,9.01,12]octa­deca-6,8,14-trien-5-yl acetate], C23H28N2O5, there is a 12-member­ed carbon macrocyclic structure. In addition, there is a tris­ubstituted furan ring, an approximately planar γ-lactone ring [maximum deviation of 0.057 (3) Å] and a pyraz­oline ring, the latter in an envelope conformation. The pyrazoline and the γ-lactone rings are fused in a cis configuration. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by weak C—H⋯O inter­actions, forming a two-dimensional network parallel to (001). An intra­molecular C—H⋯O hydrogen bond is also present. PMID:22259545

  6. Butyrate induces ROS-mediated apoptosis by modulating miR-22/SIRT-1 pathway in hepatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pant, Kishor; Yadav, Ajay K; Gupta, Parul; Islam, Rakibul; Saraya, Anoop; Venugopal, Senthil K

    2017-03-07

    Butyrate is one of the short chain fatty acids, produced by the gut microbiota during anaerobic fermentation of dietary fibres. It has been shown that it can inhibit tumor progression via suppressing histone deacetylase and can induce apoptosis in cancer cells. However, the comprehensive pathway by which butyrate mediates apoptosis and growth arrest in cancer cells still remains unclear. In this study, the role of miR-22 in butyrate-mediated ROS release and induction of apoptosis was determined in hepatic cells. Intracellular expression of miR-22 was increased when the Huh 7 cells were incubated with sodium butyrate. Over-expression of miR-22 or addition of sodium butyrate inhibited SIRT-1 expression and enhanced the ROS production. Incubation of cells with anti-miR-22 reversed the effects of butyrate. Butyrate induced apoptosis via ROS production, cytochrome c release and activation of caspase-3, whereas addition of N-acetyl cysteine or anti-miR-22 reversed these butyrate-induced effects. Furthermore, sodium butyrate inhibited cell growth and proliferation, whereas anti-miR-22 inhibited these butyrate-mediated changes. The expression of PTEN and gsk-3 was found to be increased while p-akt and β-catenin expression was decreased significantly by butyrate. These data showed that butyrate modulated both apoptosis and proliferation via miR-22 expression in hepatic cells.

  7. Butyrate inhibits cancerous HCT116 cell proliferation but to a lesser extent in noncancerous NCM460 colon cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects on colon cancer development. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate at the cellular level remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate inhibits cancerous cell proliferation but to a lesser...

  8. Butyrate plays differential roles in cellular signaling in cancerous HCT116 and noncancerous NCM460 colon cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects in colon. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate at the cellular level remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate plays differential roles in cancerous and non-cancerous cells through si...

  9. In vitro and in vivo study of transcriptome alternation induced by butyrate in cattle using deep RNA-seq

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs,), especially butyrate, affect cell differentiation, proliferation, and motility. Furthermore, butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through its inhibition on histone deacetylases (HDACs). Butyrate is a potent inducer of histone hyper-acetylation in cells a...

  10. In vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption of calcium [1-14C]butyrate in free or protected forms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is a by-product of microbial carbohydrate fermentation that occurs primarily in the large intestine. When added to feed, butyrate quickly disappears in the upper digestive tract. Because butyrate is important for the epithelial cell development and for mucosal integrity, and for animal grow...

  11. Mechanism of butyrate-induced vasorelaxation of rat mesenteric resistance artery.

    PubMed Central

    Aaronson, P. I.; McKinnon, W.; Poston, L.

    1996-01-01

    1. The vasorelaxant effect of the sodium salt of the short chain fatty acid, butyrate, on preconstricted rat small mesenteric arteries (mean inner diameter approximately 300 microns) was characterized. Isometric force development was measured with a myograph, and intracellular pH (pHi) was simultaneously monitored, in arteries loaded with the fluorescent dye BCECF in its acetomethoxy form. Sodium butyrate (substituted isosmotically for NaCl) was applied to arteries after noradrenaline (NA) or high K+ contractures were established. 2. Arteries preconstricted with a concentration of NA inducing an approximately half maximal contraction were relaxed by 91.5 +/- 6.3% by 50 mmol l-1 butyrate. This concentration of butyrate did not, however, cause a significant relaxation of contractures to a maximal (5 mumol l-1) NA concentration, and also failed to relax significantly contractures stimulated by high (45 and 90 mmol l-1) K+ solutions. Contractures elicited with a combination of NA (at a submaximal concentration) and 45 mmol l-1 K+ were, however, markedly relaxed by butyrate. 3. Investigation of the concentration-dependency of the butyrate-induced relaxation of the half maximal NA response revealed an EC50 for butyrate of approximately 22 mmol l-1. 4. Sodium butyrate (50 mmol l-1) caused pHi to decrease from 7.25 +/- 0.02 to 6.89 +/- 0.08 (n = 4, P < 0.001). However, the vasorelaxant effect of butyrate on the submaximal NA contracture was not significantly modified when this fall in intracellular pH was prevented by the simultaneous application of NH4Cl. 5. Butyrate-induced relaxation was also unaffected by endothelial denudation and inhibition of NO synthase with N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (100 mumol l-1). 6. The relaxation of the NA contracture by 50 mmol l-1 sodium butyrate was abolished in arteries pretreated with the cyclic AMP antagonist Rp-cAMPS (25 mumol l-1). 7. We conclude that the butyrate-induced relaxation of the NA contracture is independent of

  12. Characterization of a Clostridium beijerinckii spo0A mutant and its application for butyl butyrate production.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung-Oh; Wang, Yi; Lu, Ting; Jin, Yong-Su; Blaschek, Hans P

    2017-01-01

    Spo0A is a master regulator that governs the metabolic shift of solventogenic Clostridium species such as Clostridium beijerinckii. Its disruption can thus potentially cause a significant alteration of cellular physiology as well as metabolic patterns. To investigate the specific effect of spo0A disruption in C. beijerinckii, a spo0A mutant of C. beijerinckii was characterized in this study. In a batch fermentation with pH control at 6.5, the spo0A mutant accumulated butyrate and butanol up to 8.96 g/L and 3.32 g/L, respectively from 60 g/L glucose. Noticing the unique phenotype of the spo0A mutant accumulating both butyrate and butanol at significant concentrations, we decided to use the spo0A mutant for the production of butyl butyrate that can be formed by the condensation of butyrate and butanol during the ABE fermentation in the presence of the enzyme lipase. Butyl butyrate is a value-added chemical that has numerous uses in the food and fragrance industry. Moreover, butyl butyrate as a biofuel is compatible with Jet A-1 aviation kerosene and used for biodiesel enrichment. In an initial trial of small-scale extractive batch fermentation using hexadecane as the extractant with supplementation of lipase CalB, the spo0A mutant was subjected to acid crash due to the butyrate accumulation, and thus produced only 98 mg/L butyl butyrate. To alleviate the butyrate toxicity, the biphasic medium was supplemented with 10 g/L CaCO3 and 5 g/L butanol. The butyl butyrate production was then increased up to 2.73 g/L in the hexadecane layer. When continuous agitation was performed to enhance the esterification and extraction of butyl butyrate, 3.32 g/L butyl butyrate was obtained in the hexadecane layer. In this study, we successfully demonstrated the use of the C. beijerinckii spo0A mutant for the butyl butyrate production through the simultaneous ABE fermentation, condensation, and extraction. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 106-112. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals

  13. Short-term effect of acetate and ethanol on methane formation in biogas sludge.

    PubMed

    Refai, Sarah; Wassmann, Kati; Deppenmeier, Uwe

    2014-08-01

    Biochemical processes in biogas plants are still not fully understood. Especially, the identification of possible bottlenecks in the complex fermentation processes during biogas production might provide potential to increase the performance of biogas plants. To shed light on the question which group of organism constitutes the limiting factor in the anaerobic breakdown of organic material, biogas sludge from different mesophilic biogas plants was examined under various conditions. Therefore, biogas sludge was incubated and analyzed in anaerobic serum flasks under an atmosphere of N2/CO2. The batch reactors mirrored the conditions and the performance of the full-scale biogas plants and were suitable test systems for a period of 24 h. Methane production rates were compared after supplementation with substrates for syntrophic bacteria, such as butyrate, propionate, or ethanol, as well as with acetate and H2+CO2 as substrates for methanogenic archaea. Methane formation rates increased significantly by 35 to 126 % when sludge from different biogas plants was supplemented with acetate or ethanol. The stability of important process parameters such as concentration of volatile fatty acids and pH indicate that ethanol and acetate increase biogas formation without affecting normally occurring fermentation processes. In contrast to ethanol or acetate, other fermentation products such as propionate, butyrate, or H2 did not result in increased methane formation rates. These results provide evidence that aceticlastic methanogenesis and ethanol-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria are not the limiting factor during biogas formation, respectively, and that biogas plant optimization is possible with special focus on methanogenesis from acetate.

  14. Butyrate upregulates endogenous host defense peptides to enhance disease resistance in piglets via histone deacetylase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Haitao; Guo, Bingxiu; Gan, Zhenshun; Song, Deguang; Lu, Zeqing; Yi, Hongbo; Wu, Yueming; Wang, Yizhen; Du, Huahua

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate has been used to treat different inflammatory disease with positive outcomes, the mechanisms by which butyrate exerts its anti-inflammatory effects remain largely undefined. Here we proposed a new mechanism that butyrate manipulate endogenous host defense peptides (HDPs) which contributes to the elimination of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and thus affects the alleviation of inflammation. An experiment in piglets treated with butyrate (0.2% of diets) 2 days before E. coli O157:H7 challenge was designed to investigate porcine HDP expression, inflammation and E. coli O157:H7 load in feces. The mechanisms underlying butyrate-induced HDP gene expression and the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of macrophage 3D4/2 cells in vitro were examined. Butyrate treatment (i) alleviated the clinical symptoms of E. coli O157:H7-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and the severity of intestinal inflammation; (ii) reduced the E. coli O157:H7 load in feces; (iii) significantly upregulated multiple, but not all, HDPs in vitro and in vivo via histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition; and (iv) enhanced the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of 3D4/2 cells. Our findings indicate that butyrate enhances disease resistance, promotes the clearance of E. coli O157:H7, and alleviates the clinical symptoms of HUS and inflammation, partially, by affecting HDP expression via HDAC inhibition. PMID:27230284

  15. Two cytotoxic cell proteinase genes are differentially sensitive to sodium butyrate.

    PubMed Central

    Frégeau, C J; Helgason, C D; Bleackley, R C

    1992-01-01

    The 5'-flanking regions of two cytotoxic cell protease genes, CCP1 and 2, are sufficient to confer cytotoxic T lymphocyte-specific expression when fused to a reporter gene. The two regulatory regions are, however, differentially sensitive to treatment of the recipient cell, MTL 2.8.2, with sodium butyrate. With CCP1 a six-fold increase in cat expression was observed, whereas CCP2 was insensitive to the butyrate treatment. One major butyrate-sensitive regions was defined in the CCP1 5'-flanking sequence between -243 to -112 and another less effective one between-682 to -427. These fragments of DNA were also able to confer responsiveness to butyrate when ligated to a heterologous fos promoter. These sequences within the 5' flank of CCP1 share homology with other elements that have been defined as butyrate-responsive. We believe that our results argue against a pleiotropic affect of butyrate such as histone acetylation. More likely sodium butyrate is mediating a specific stimulation of transcription through modification of the activities of selected transcriptional regulatory proteins that in turn affect their interactions with proteins bound to the promoter. Images PMID:1620608

  16. Butyrate Protects Rat Liver against Total Hepatic Ischemia Reperfusion Injury with Bowel Congestion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingbao; Wang, Fangrui; Ma, Zhenyu; Qiao, Yingli

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is an unavoidable consequence of major liver surgery, especially in liver transplantation with bowel congestion, during which endotoxemia is often evident. The inflammatory response aggravated by endotoxin after I/R contributes to liver dysfunction and failure. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of butyrate, a naturally occurring four-carbon fatty acid in the body and a dietary component of foods such as cheese and butter, on hepatic injury complicated by enterogenous endotoxin, as well as to examine the underlying mechanisms involved. SD rats were subjected to a total hepatic ischemia for 30 min after pretreatment with either vehicle or butyrate, followed by 6 h and 24 h of reperfusion. Butyrate preconditioning markedly improved hepatic function and histology, as indicated by reduced transaminase levels and ameliorated tissue pathological changes. The inflammatory factors levels, macrophages activation, TLR4 expression, and neutrophil infiltration in live were attenuated by butyrate. Butyrate also maintained the intestinal barrier structures, reversed the aberrant expression of ZO-1, and decreased the endotoxin translocation. We conclude that butyrate inhibition of endotoxin translocation, macrophages activation, inflammatory factors production, and neutrophil infiltration is involved in the alleviation of total hepatic I/R liver injury in rats. This suggests that butyrate should potentially be utilized in liver transplantation. PMID:25171217

  17. Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Butyric Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Fukushima, Kazuo; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that butyric acid, an extracellular metabolite from periodontopathic bacteria, induced apoptosis in murine thymocytes, splenic T cells, and human Jurkat T cells. In this study, we examined the ability of butyric acid to induce apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on this apoptosis. Butyric acid significantly inhibited the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody- and concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses in a dose-dependent fashion. This inhibition of PBMC growth by butyric acid depended on apoptosis in vitro. It was characterized by internucleosomal DNA digestion and revealed by gel electrophoresis followed by a colorimetric DNA fragmentation assay to occur in a concentration-dependent fashion. Butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 protease activity but not by caspase-1 protease activity. LPS potentiated butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that LPS increased the proportion of sub-G1 cells and the number of late-stage apoptotic cells induced by butyric acid. Annexin V binding experiments with fractionated subpopulations of PBMC in flow cytometory revealed that LPS accelerated the butyric acid-induced CD3+-T-cell apoptosis followed by similar levels of both CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell apoptosis. The addition of LPS to PBMC cultures did not cause DNA fragmentation, suggesting that LPS was unable to induce PBMC apoptosis directly. These data suggest that LPS, in combination with butyric acid, potentiates CD3+ PBMC T-cell apoptosis and plays a role in the apoptotic depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. PMID:9864191

  18. Butyrate stimulates tissue-type plasminogen-activator synthesis in cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, T; van den Berg, J; Töns, A; Platenburg, G; Rijken, D C; van den Berg, E

    1987-01-01

    Incubation of cultured human endothelial cells with 5 mM-dibutyryl cyclic AMP led to an approx. 2-fold increase in tissue-type plasminogen-activator (t-PA) production over a 24 h incubation period. The stimulating effect of dibutyryl cyclic AMP could be explained by the slow liberation of butyrate, as the effect could be reproduced by addition of free butyrate to the medium, but not by addition of 8-bromo cyclic AMP or forskolin, agents known to raise intracellular cyclic AMP levels. With butyrate, an accelerated accumulation of t-PA antigen in the conditioned medium (CM) was observed after a lag period of about 6 h. Increasing amounts of butyrate caused an increasingly stimulatory effect, reaching a plateau at 5 mM-butyrate. The relative enhancement of t-PA production in the presence of 5 mM-butyrate varied among different endothelial cell cultures from 6- to 25-fold in 24 h CM. Such an increase in t-PA production was observed with both arterial and venous endothelial cells. The butyrate-induced increases in t-PA production were accompanied by increased t-PA mRNA levels. Analysis of radiolabelled CM and cell extracts by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis indicated that the potent action of butyrate is probably restricted to a small number of proteins. The accumulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) in CM from butyrate-treated cells varied only moderately. In our study of the relationship between structure and stimulatory activity, we found that a straight-chain C4 monocarboxylate structure with a methyl group at one end and a carboxy moiety at the other seems to be required for the optimal induction of t-PA in cultured endothelial cells. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:2827633

  19. Comparative In silico Analysis of Butyrate Production Pathways in Gut Commensals and Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Swadha; Kaur, Harrisham; Mande, Sharmila S.

    2016-01-01

    Biosynthesis of butyrate by commensal bacteria plays a crucial role in maintenance of human gut health while dysbiosis in gut microbiome has been linked to several enteric disorders. Contrastingly, butyrate shows cytotoxic effects in patients with oral diseases like periodontal infections and oral cancer. In addition to these host associations, few syntrophic bacteria couple butyrate degradation with sulfate reduction and methane production. Thus, it becomes imperative to understand the distribution of butyrate metabolism pathways and delineate differences in substrate utilization between pathogens and commensals. The bacteria utilize four pathways for butyrate production with different initial substrates (Pyruvate, 4-aminobutyrate, Glutarate and Lysine) which follow a polyphyletic distribution. A comprehensive mining of complete/draft bacterial genomes indicated conserved juxtaposed genomic arrangement in all these pathways. This gene context information was utilized for an accurate annotation of butyrate production pathways in bacterial genomes. Interestingly, our analysis showed that inspite of a beneficial impact of butyrate in gut, not only commensals, but a few gut pathogens also possess butyrogenic pathways. The results further illustrated that all the gut commensal bacteria (Faecalibacterium, Roseburia, Butyrivibrio, and commensal species of Clostridia etc) ferment pyruvate for butyrate production. On the contrary, the butyrogenic gut pathogen Fusobacterium utilizes different amino acid metabolism pathways like those for Glutamate (4-aminobutyrate and Glutarate) and Lysine for butyrogenesis which leads to a concomitant release of harmful by-products like ammonia in the process. The findings in this study indicate that commensals and pathogens in gut have divergently evolved to produce butyrate using distinct pathways. No such evolutionary selection was observed in oral pathogens (Porphyromonas and Filifactor) which showed presence of pyruvate as well as

  20. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jintao; Yi, Man; Zha, Longying; Chen, Siqiang; Li, Zhijia; Li, Cheng; Gong, Mingxing; Deng, Hong; Chu, Xinwei; Chen, Jiehua; Zhang, Zheqing; Mao, Limei; Sun, Suxia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells. Methods Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29) were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5–5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining), and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot. Results Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II), beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg)3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin

  1. Chitin butyrate coated electrospun nylon-6 fibers for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Hem Raj; Kim, Han Joo; Bhatt, Lok Ranjan; Joshi, Mahesh Kumar; Kim, Eun Kyo; Kim, Jeong In; Abdal-hay, Abdalla; Hui, K. S.; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we describe the preparation and characterizations of chitin butyrate (CB) coated nylon-6 nanofibers using single-spinneret electrospinning of blends solution. The physicochemical properties of nylon-6 composite fibers with different proportions of CB to nylon-6 were determined using FE-SEM, TEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurement. FE-SEM and TEM images revealed that the nylon-6 and CB were immiscible in the as-spun nanofibers, and phase separated nanofiber morphology becomes more pronounced with increasing amounts of CB. The bone formation ability of composite fibers was evaluated by incubating in biomimetic simulated body fluid. In order to assay the cytocompatibility and cell behavior on the composite scaffolds, osteoblast cells were seeded on the matrix. Results suggest that the deposition of CB layer on the surface of nylon-6 could increase its cell compatibility and bone formation ability. Therefore, as-synthesized nanocomposite fibrous mat has great potentiality in hard tissue engineering.

  2. Aspects of pharmacodynamics and biotransformation of the glucocorticoid resocortol butyrate.

    PubMed

    Coert, A; Verheijen, F; Horspool, L J I; Mol, J A

    2004-10-01

    Aspects of the biotransformation and pharmacodynamics of the novel glucocorticoid resocortol butyrate (RCB) and its metabolites were assessed in vitro and in vivo in comparison with selected reference compounds. The main route of biotransformation of ((3)H)-RCB in the skin and the liver was 5alpha-reduction of the A-ring followed by reduction of the 3-carbonyl group. In the liver, metabolism was much more rapid than in the skin and 5beta-reduction also occurred. RCB had a relative binding affinity for the glucocorticoid receptor similar to that of triamcinolone acetonide, about 1.5 times that of dexamethasone, three times that of betamethasone valerate (BMV) and 10-14 times that of cortisol. The metabolites of RCB displayed only low to very low affinities for the receptor. The suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis was investigated in placebo- and positive-controlled studies in dogs by measurement of basal and corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) stimulated plasma cortisol concentrations. The AUC of the plasma cortisol vs. time curve following CRH stimulation, a measure of adrenal suppression, was reduced significantly after topical application of BMV compared with the pretreatment values. The AUC in the RCB group was not reduced significantly. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone concentrations were not affected. Oral administration of RCB did not suppress adrenocortical function, whereas BMV induced almost complete suppression of basal and CRH-induced cortisol concentrations. The pharmacodynamics of RCB makes it a relatively safe glucocorticosteroid for topical application.

  3. n-Butyrate inhibits Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation and cytokine transcription in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diakos, Christos; Prieschl, Eva E.; Saeemann, Marcus D.; Boehmig, Georg A.; Csonga, Robert; Sobanov, Yury; Baumruker, Thomas; Zlabinger, Gerhard J. . E-mail: gerhard.zlabinger@meduniwien.ac.at

    2006-10-20

    Mast cells are well known to contribute to type I allergic conditions but only recently have been brought in association with chronic relapsing/remitting autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease and ulcerative colitis. Since the bacterial metabolite n-butyrate is considered to counteract intestinal inflammation we investigated the effects of this short chain fatty acid on mast cell activation. Using RNAse protection assays and reporter gene technology we show that n-butyrate downregulates TNF-{alpha} transcription. This correlates with an impaired activation of the Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) but not other MAP kinases such as ERK and p38 that are largely unaffected by n-butyrate. As a consequence, we observed a decreased nuclear activity of AP-1 and NF-AT transcription factors. These results indicate that n-butyrate inhibits critical inflammatory mediators in mast cells by relatively selectively targeting the JNK signalling.

  4. Combining microbial cultures for efficient production of electricity from butyrate in a microbial electrochemical cell.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Joseph F; Garcia-Peña, Ines; Parameswaran, Prathap; Torres, César I; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2014-10-01

    Butyrate is an important product of anaerobic fermentation; however, it is not directly used by characterized strains of the highly efficient anode respiring bacteria (ARB) Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrochemical cells. By combining a butyrate-oxidizing community with a Geobacter rich culture, we generated a microbial community which outperformed many naturally derived communities found in the literature for current production from butyrate and rivaled the highest performing natural cultures in terms of current density (∼ 11A/m(2)) and Coulombic efficiency (∼ 70%). Microbial community analyses support the shift in the microbial community from one lacking efficient ARB in the marine hydrothermal vent community to a community consisting of ∼ 80% Geobacter in the anode biofilm. This demonstrates the successful production and adaptation of a novel microbial culture for generating electrical current from butyrate with high current density and high Coulombic efficiency, by combining two mixed microbial cultures containing complementing biochemical pathways.

  5. Butyrate and glucose metabolism by colonocytes in experimental colitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, M; Krishnan, S; Ramakrishna, B; Mathan, M; Pulimood, A; Murthy, S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Impaired colonocyte metabolism of butyrate has been implicated in the aetiopathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Colonocyte butyrate metabolism was investigated in experimental colitis in mice.
METHODS—Colitis was induced in Swiss outbred white mice by oral administration of 4% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS). Colonocytes isolated from colitic and normal control mice were incubated with [14C]butyrate or glucose, and production of 14CO2, as well as of intermediate metabolites (acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate and lactate), was measured. The effect of different substrate concentrations on oxidation was also examined.
RESULTS—Butyrate oxidation (µmol/h per mg protein; mean (SEM)) was significantly reduced in DSS colitis, values on day 7 of DSS administration being 0.177 (0.007) compared with 0.406 (0.035) for control animals (p<0.001). Glucose oxidation (µmol/h per mg protein; mean (SEM)) on day 7 of DSS administration was significantly higher than in controls (0.06 (0.006) v 0.027 (0.004), p<0.001). Production of β-hydroxybutyrate was decreased and production of lactate increased in DSS colitis compared with controls. Increasing butyrate concentration from 10 to 80 mM enhanced oxidation in DSS colitis (0.036 (0.002) to 0.285 (0.040), p<0.001), although it continued to remain lower than in controls. Surface and crypt epithelial cells showed similar ratios of butyrate to glucose oxidation. When 1 mM DSS was added to normal colonocytes in vitro, it did not alter butyrate oxidation. The initial histological lesion of DSS administration was very patchy and involved crypt cells. Abnormal butyrate oxidation became apparent only after six days of DSS administration, at which time histological abnormalities were more widespread.
CONCLUSIONS—Colonocyte metabolism of butyrate, but not of glucose, is impaired in DSS colitis, and may be important in pathophysiology. Histological abnormalities preceded measurable defects in butyrate

  6. In vivo binding of hot pepper bZIP transcription factor CabZIP1 to the G-box region of pathogenesis-related protein 1 promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Boo-Ja; Park, Chang-Jin; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Paek, Kyung-Hee . E-mail: khpaek95@korea.ac.kr

    2006-05-26

    We find that salicylic acid and ethephon treatment in hot pepper increases the expression of a putative basic/leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor gene, CabZIP1. CabZIP1 mRNA is expressed ubiquitously in various organs. The green fluorescent protein-fused transcription factor, CabZIP1::GFP, can be specifically localized to the nucleus, an action that is consistent with the presence of a nuclear localization signal in its protein sequence. Transient overexpression of the CabZIP1 transcription factor results in an increase in PR-1 transcripts level in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrate that CabZIP1 binds to the G-box elements in native promoter of the hot pepper pathogenesis-related protein 1 (CaPR-1) gene in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that CabZIP1 plays a role as a transcriptional regulator of the CaPR-1 gene.

  7. Effects of MERV 16 filters and routine work practices on enclosed cabs for reducing respirable dust and DPM exposures in an underground limestone mine

    PubMed Central

    Noll, J.D.; Cecala, A.B.; J.A.Organiscak; Rider, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    An effective technique to minimize miners’ respirable dust and diesel exposure on mobile mining equipment is to place mine operators in enclosed cabs with designed filtration and pressurization systems. Many factors affect the performance of these enclosed cab systems, and one of the most significant factors is the effectiveness of the filtration system. High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-type filters are typically used because they are highly efficient at capturing all types and sizes of particles, including those in the submicron range such as diesel particulate matter (DPM). However, in laboratory tests, minimum efficiency reporting value (MERV) 16 filters have proven to be highly efficient for capturing DPM and respirable dust. Also, MERV 16 filters can be less restrictive to cab airflow and less expensive than HEPA filters. To verify their effectiveness in the field, MERV 16 filters were used in the enclosed cab filtration system on a face drill and roof bolting mining machine and tested at an underground limestone mine. Test results showed that DPM and respirable dust concentrations were reduced by more than 90% when the cabs were properly sealed. However, when the cab door was opened periodically throughout the shift, the reduction efficiency of the MERV 16 filters was reduced to 80% on average. PMID:26236044

  8. Effect of Acetate on Molecular and Physiological Aspects of Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 Solvent Production and Strain Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Kuang; Blaschek, Hans P.

    1999-01-01

    The addition of sodium acetate to chemically defined MP2 medium was found to increase and stabilize solvent production and also increase glucose utilization by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052. RNA and enzyme analyses indicated that coenzyme A (CoA) transferase was highly expressed and has higher activity in C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 grown in MP2 medium containing added sodium acetate than in the microorganism grown without sodium acetate. RNA analysis suggested the existence of a sol operon and confirmed the presence of a ptb-buk operon in C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052. In addition to CoA transferase, C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 grown in MP2 medium containing added acetate demonstrated higher acetate kinase- and butyrate kinase-specific activity than when the culture was grown in MP2 medium containing no added acetate. Southern blot analysis with chromosomal DNA isolated from solventogenic and degenerated C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 indicated that C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 strain degeneration does not involve loss of the CoA transferase genes. The addition of acetate to MP2 medium may induce the expression of the sol operon, which ensures solvent production and prevents strain degeneration in C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052. PMID:9925574

  9. Oncogenic Ras promotes butyrate-induced apoptosis through inhibition of gelsolin expression.

    PubMed

    Klampfer, Lidija; Huang, Jie; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji; Augenlicht, Leonard

    2004-08-27

    Activation of Ras promotes oncogenesis by altering a multiple of cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, differentiation, and apoptosis. Oncogenic Ras can either promote or inhibit apoptosis, depending on the cell type and the nature of the apoptotic stimuli. The response of normal and transformed colonic epithelial cells to the short chain fatty acid butyrate, a physiological regulator of epithelial cell maturation, is also divergent: normal epithelial cells proliferate, and transformed cells undergo apoptosis in response to butyrate. To investigate the role of k-ras mutations in butyrate-induced apoptosis, we utilized HCT116 cells, which harbor an oncogenic k-ras mutation and two isogenic clones with targeted inactivation of the mutant k-ras allele, Hkh2, and Hke-3. We demonstrated that the targeted deletion of the mutant k-ras allele is sufficient to protect epithelial cells from butyrate-induced apoptosis. Consistent with this, we showed that apigenin, a dietary flavonoid that has been shown to inhibit Ras signaling and to reverse transformation of cancer cell lines, prevented butyrate-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells. To investigate the mechanism whereby activated k-ras sensitizes colonic cells to butyrate, we performed a genome-wide analysis of Ras target genes in the isogenic cell lines HCT116, Hkh2, and Hke-3. The gene exhibiting the greatest down-regulation by the activating k-ras mutation was gelsolin, an actin-binding protein whose expression is frequently reduced or absent in colorectal cancer cell lines and primary tumors. We demonstrated that silencing of gelsolin expression by small interfering RNA sensitized cells to butyrate-induced apoptosis through amplification of the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-7. These data therefore demonstrate that gelsolin protects cells from butyrate-induced apoptosis and suggest that Ras promotes apoptosis, at least in part, through its ability to down-regulate the expression of gelsolin.

  10. CREB-binding protein, p300, butyrate, and Wnt signaling in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bordonaro, Michael; Lazarova, Darina L

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the distinctive roles played by the transcriptional coactivators CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and cell physiology in colorectal cancer (CRC). Specifically, we focus on the effects of CBP- and p300-mediated Wnt activity on (1) neoplastic progression; (2) the activities of butyrate, a breakdown product of dietary fiber, on cell signaling and colonic cell physiology; (3) the development of resistance to histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis), including butyrate and synthetic HDACis, in colonic cells; and (4) the physiology and number of cancer stem cells. Mutations of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway initiate the majority of CRC cases, and we have shown that hyperactivation of this pathway by butyrate and other HDACis promotes CRC cell apoptosis. This activity by butyrate may in part explain the preventive action of fiber against CRC. However, individuals with a high-fiber diet may still develop neoplasia; therefore, resistance to the chemopreventive action of butyrate likely contributes to CRC. CBP or p300 may modify the ability of butyrate to influence colonic cell physiology since the two transcriptional coactivators affect Wnt signaling, and likely, its hyperactivation by butyrate. Also, CBP and p300 likely affect colonic tumorigenesis, as well as stem cell pluripotency. Improvement of CRC prevention and therapy requires a better understanding of the alterations in Wnt signaling and gene expression that underlie neoplastic progression, stem cell fate, and the development of resistance to butyrate and clinically relevant HDACis. Detailed knowledge of how CBP- and p300 modulate colonic cell physiology may lead to new approaches for anti-CRC prevention and therapeutics, particularly with respect to combinatorial therapy of CBP/p300 inhibitors with HDACis. PMID:26217075

  11. Butyrate suppression of histone deacetylation leads to accumulation of multiacetylated forms of histones H3 and H4 and increased DNase I sensitivity of the associated DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Vidali, G; Boffa, L C; Bradbury, E M; Allfrey, V G

    1978-01-01

    Exposure of HeLa cells to Na butyrate leads to an accumulation of multiacetylated forms of histones H3 and H4. Our studies of histone acetylation in HeLa S-3 cells show that 7 mM butyrate suppresses the deacetylation of histones without influencing the rate of radioactive acetate incorporation. An alteration in nucleosome structure in highly acetylated chromatin is indicated by an increased rate of DNA degradation by DNase I. A close association of acetylated histones with the DNase I-sensitive sequences is confirmed by the finding that histones remaining after limited DNase I digestion are depleted in the multiacetylated forms of histones H3 and H4. DNase I treatment has also been found to selectively release [3H]acetyl-labeled H3 and H4 from avian erythrocyte nuclei under conditions previously shown to preferentially degrade the globlin genes in erthyrocyte chromatin. Our results are consistent with the view that histone acetylation provides a key to the mechanism for altering chromatin structure at the nucleosomal level, and that this may explain the selective DNase I sensitivity of transcriptionally active DNA sequences in different cell types. PMID:276864

  12. Kinetic and thermodynamic control of butyrate conversion in non-defined methanogenic communities.

    PubMed

    Junicke, H; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Kleerebezem, R

    2016-01-01

    Many anaerobic conversions proceed close to thermodynamic equilibrium and the microbial groups involved need to share their low energy budget to survive at the thermodynamic boundary of life. This study aimed to investigate the kinetic and thermodynamic control mechanisms of the electron transfer during syntrophic butyrate conversion in non-defined methanogenic communities. Despite the rather low energy content of butyrate, results demonstrate unequal energy sharing between the butyrate-utilizing species (17 %), the hydrogenotrophic methanogens (9-10 %), and the acetoclastic methanogens (73-74 %). As a key finding, the energy disproportion resulted in different growth strategies of the syntrophic partners. Compared to the butyrate-utilizing partner, the hydrogenotrophic methanogens compensated their lower biomass yield per mole of electrons transferred with a 2-fold higher biomass-specific electron transfer rate. Apart from these thermodynamic control mechanisms, experiments revealed a ten times lower hydrogen inhibition constant on butyrate conversion than proposed by the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1, suggesting a much stronger inhibitory effect of hydrogen on anaerobic butyrate conversion. At hydrogen partial pressures exceeding 40 Pa and at bicarbonate limited conditions, a shift from methanogenesis to reduced product formation was observed which indicates an important role of the hydrogen partial pressure in redirecting electron fluxes towards reduced products such as butanol. The findings of this study demonstrate that a careful consideration of thermodynamics and kinetics is required to advance our current understanding of flux regulation in energy-limited syntrophic ecosystems.

  13. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be produced by the calcium hydroxide neutralization of acetic acid. (b) The ingredient meets...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be produced by the calcium hydroxide neutralization of acetic acid. (b) The ingredient meets...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be produced by the calcium hydroxide neutralization of acetic acid. (b) The ingredient meets...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be produced by the calcium hydroxide neutralization of acetic acid. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the...

  17. Pallidol hexa­acetate ethyl acetate monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Qinyong; Taylor, Dennis K.; Ng, Seik Weng; Tiekink, Edward R. T.

    2013-01-01

    The entire mol­ecule of pallidol hexa­acetate {systematic name: (±)-(4bR,5R,9bR,10R)-5,10-bis­[4-(acet­yloxy)phen­yl]-4b,5,9b,10-tetra­hydro­indeno­[2,1-a]indene-1,3,6,8-tetrayl tetra­acetate} is completed by the application of twofold rotational symmetry in the title ethyl acetate solvate, C40H34O12·C4H8O2. The ethyl acetate mol­ecule was highly disordered and was treated with the SQUEEZE routine [Spek (2009 ▶). Acta Cryst. D65, 148–155]; the crystallographic data take into account the presence of the solvent. In pallidol hexa­acetate, the dihedral angle between the fused five-membered rings (r.m.s. deviation = 0.100 Å) is 54.73 (6)°, indicating a significant fold in the mol­ecule. Significant twists between residues are also evident as seen in the dihedral angle of 80.70 (5)° between the five-membered ring and the pendent benzene ring to which it is attached. Similarly, the acetate residues are twisted with respect to the benzene ring to which they are attached [C—O(carb­oxy)—C—C torsion angles = −70.24 (14), −114.43 (10) and −72.54 (13)°]. In the crystal, a three-dimensional architecture is sustained by C—H⋯O inter­actions which encompass channels in which the disordered ethyl acetate mol­ecules reside. PMID:24046702

  18. Morphology Evolution of Polypropylene in Immiscible Polymer Blends for Fabrication of Nanofibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immiscible blends of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and isotactic polypropylenes (iPPs) with different melting index were extruded through a two-strand rod die. The extrudates were hot-drawn at the die exit at different draw ratios by controlling the drawing speed. The morphologies of iPP fibers e...

  19. High-Fat Diet Reduces the Formation of Butyrate, but Increases Succinate, Inflammation, Liver Fat and Cholesterol in Rats, while Dietary Fibre Counteracts These Effects

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsdottir, Greta; Xu, Jie; Molin, Göran; Ahrné, Siv; Nyman, Margareta

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is linked to type 2 diabetes and risk factors associated to the metabolic syndrome. Consumption of dietary fibres has been shown to have positive metabolic health effects, such as by increasing satiety, lowering blood glucose and cholesterol levels. These effects may be associated with short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), particularly propionic and butyric acids, formed by microbial degradation of dietary fibres in colon, and by their capacity to reduce low-grade inflammation. Objective To investigate whether dietary fibres, giving rise to different SCFAs, would affect metabolic risk markers in low-fat and high-fat diets using a model with conventional rats for 2, 4 and 6 weeks. Material and Methods Conventional rats were administered low-fat or high-fat diets, for 2, 4 or 6 weeks, supplemented with fermentable dietary fibres, giving rise to different SCFA patterns (pectin – acetic acid; guar gum – propionic acid; or a mixture – butyric acid). At the end of each experimental period, liver fat, cholesterol and triglycerides, serum and caecal SCFAs, plasma cholesterol, and inflammatory cytokines were analysed. The caecal microbiota was analysed after 6 weeks. Results and Discussion Fermentable dietary fibre decreased weight gain, liver fat, cholesterol and triglyceride content, and changed the formation of SCFAs. The high-fat diet primarily reduced formation of SCFAs but, after a longer experimental period, the formation of propionic and acetic acids recovered. The concentration of succinic acid in the rats increased in high-fat diets with time, indicating harmful effect of high-fat consumption. The dietary fibre partly counteracted these harmful effects and reduced inflammation. Furthermore, the number of Bacteroides was higher with guar gum, while noticeably that of Akkermansia was highest with the fibre-free diet. PMID:24236183

  20. Butyrate modulates antioxidant enzyme expression in malignant and non-malignant human colon tissues.

    PubMed

    Jahns, Franziska; Wilhelm, Anne; Jablonowski, Nadja; Mothes, Henning; Greulich, Karl Otto; Glei, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The induction of antioxidant enzymes is an important mechanism in colon cancer chemoprevention, but the response of human colon tissue to butyrate, a gut fermentation product derived from dietary fiber, remains largely unknown. Therefore, our study investigated the effect of a butyrate treatment on catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in matched human colon tissues of different transformation stages (n = 3-15 in each group) ex vivo. By performing quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot, and spectrophotometric measurements, we found an increase in SOD2 at expression and activity level in colonic adenocarcinomas (mRNA: 1.96-fold; protein: 1.41-fold, activity: 1.8-fold; P < 0.05). No difference was detectable for CAT between normal, adenoma, and carcinoma colon tissues. Treatment of normal colon epithelium (12 h) with a physiologically relevant concentration of butyrate (10 mM) resulted in a significant increase (P < 0.05) in CAT mRNA (1.24-fold) and protein (1.39-fold), without affecting the enzymatic activity. Consequently, preliminary experiments failed to show any protective effect of butyrate against H2 O2 -mediated DNA damage. Despite a significantly lowered SOD2 transcript (0.51-fold, P < 0.01) and, to a lesser extent, protein level (0.86-fold) after butyrate exposure of normal colon cells, the catalytic activity was significantly enhanced (1.19-fold, P < 0.05), suggesting an increased protection against tissue superoxide radicals. In malignant tissues, greater variations in response to butyrate were observed. Furthermore, both enzymes showed an age-dependent decrease in activity in normal colon epithelium (CAT: r = -0.49, P = 0.09; SOD2: r = -0.58, P = 0.049). In conclusion, butyrate exhibited potential antioxidant features ex vivo but cellular consequences need to be investigated more in depth.

  1. Mechanism of Butyrate Stimulation of Triglyceride Storage and Adipokine Expression during Adipogenic Differentiation of Porcine Stromovascular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hui; Ajuwon, Kolapo M.

    2015-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA), products of microbial fermentation of dietary fiber, exert multiple metabolic effects in cells. Previously, we had demonstrated that soluble fiber influenced fat mass accumulation, gut microbial community structure and SCFA production in pigs. The current study was designed to identify effects of SCFA treatment during adipogenic differentiation of porcine stromovascular cells on lipid metabolism and adipokine expression. Differentiating cells were treated with varying concentrations of butyrate. Results show that butyrate treatment enhanced adipogenesis and lipid accumulation, perhaps through upregulation of glucose uptake and de novo lipogenesis and other mechanisms that include induction of SREBP-1c, C/EBPα/β, GLUT4, LPL, PPARγ, GPAT4, DGAT1 and DGAT2 expression. In addition, butyrate induced adiponectin expression, resulting in activation of downstream target genes, such as AMPK and AKT. Activation of AMPK by butyrate led to phosphorylation of ACC. Although increased ACO gene expression was seen with butyrate treatment, experiments with the peroxisomal fatty acid inhibitor, thioridazine, suggest that butyrate may have an inhibitory effect on peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. Our studies also provide evidence that butyrate may inhibit lipolysis, perhaps in an FFAR3-dependent manner. Therefore, this study presents a novel paradigm for butyrate action in adipocytes and shows that adipocytes are capable of utilizing butyrate, leading to increased expression of adiponectin for enhanced glucose uptake and improved insulin sensitivity. PMID:26713737

  2. Isolation of a Butyrate-Utilizing Bacterium in Coculture with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum from a Thermophilic Digester †

    PubMed Central

    Henson, J. Michael; Smith, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Sludge from a thermophilic, 55°C digester produced methane without a lag period when enriched with butyrate. The sludge was found by most-probable-number enumeration to have ca. 5 × 106 butyrate-utilizing bacteria per ml. A thermophilic butyrate-utilizing bacterium was isolated in coculture with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. This bacterium was a gram-negative, slightly curved rod, occurred singly, was nonmotile, and did not appear to produce spores. When this coculture was incubated with Methanospirillum hungatei at 37°C, the quantity of methane produced was less than 5% of the methane produced when the coculture was incubated at 55°C, the routine incubation temperature. The coculture required clarified digester fluid. The addition of yeast extract to medium containing 5% clarified digester fluid stimulated methane production when a Methanosarcina sp. was present. Hydrogen in the gas phase prevented butyrate utilization. However, when the hydrogen was removed, butyrate utilization began. Penicillin G and d-cycloserine caused the complete inhibition of butyrate utilization by the coculture. The ability of various ecosystems to convert butyrate to methane was studied. Marine sediments enriched with butyrate required a 2-week incubation period before methanogenesis began. Hypersaline sediments did not produce methane after 3 months when enriched with butyrate. Images PMID:16346813

  3. Butyrate Inhibits Cancerous HCT116 Colon Cell Proliferation but to a Lesser Extent in Noncancerous NCM460 Colon Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Huawei; Taussig, David P.; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Johnson, LuAnn K.; Hakkak, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects on colon cancer development. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate inhibits cancerous cell proliferation but to a lesser extent in noncancerous cells through regulating apoptosis and cellular-signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis by exposing cancerous HCT116 or non-cancerous NCM460 colon cells to physiologically relevant doses of butyrate. Cellular responses to butyrate were characterized by Western analysis, fluorescent microscopy, acetylation, and DNA fragmentation analyses. Butyrate inhibited cell proliferation, and led to an induction of apoptosis, genomic DNA fragmentation in HCT116 cells, but to a lesser extent in NCM460 cells. Although butyrate increased H3 histone deacetylation and p21 tumor suppressor expression in both cell types, p21 protein level was greater with intense expression around the nuclei in HCT116 cells when compared with that in NCM460 cells. Furthermore, butyrate treatment increased the phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (p-ERK1/2), a survival signal, in NCM460 cells while it decreased p-ERK1/2 in HCT116 cells. Taken together, the activation of survival signaling in NCM460 cells and apoptotic potential in HCT116 cells may confer the increased sensitivity of cancerous colon cells to butyrate in comparison with noncancerous colon cells. PMID:28045428

  4. The inhibitor of histone deacetylases sodium butyrate enhances the cytotoxicity of mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Gospodinov, Anastas; Popova, Stanislava; Vassileva, Ivelina; Anachkova, Boyka

    2012-10-01

    The use of histone deacetylase inhibitors has been proposed as a promising approach to increase the cell killing effect of DNA damage-inducing drugs in chemotherapy. However, the molecular mechanism of their action remains understudied. In the present article, we have assessed the effect of the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate on the DNA damage response induced by the crosslinking agent mitomycin C. Sodium butyrate increased mitomycin C cytotoxicity, but did not impair the repair pathways required to remove mitomycin C-induced lesions as neither the rate of nucleotide excision repair nor the homologous recombination repair rate were diminished. Sodium butyrate treatment abrogated the S-phase cell-cycle checkpoint in mitomycin C-treated cells and induced the G(2)-M checkpoint. However, sodium butyrate treatment alone resulted in accumulation of reactive oxygen species, double-strand breaks in DNA, and apoptosis. These results imply that the accumulation of reactive oxygen species-mediated increase in DNA lesion burden may be the major mechanism by which sodium butyrate enhances the cytotoxicity of mitomycin C.

  5. Butyric acid fermentation from pretreated and hydrolysed wheat straw by an adapted Clostridium tyrobutyricum strain

    PubMed Central

    Baroi, G N; Baumann, I; Westermann, P; Gavala, H N

    2015-01-01

    Butyric acid is a valuable building-block for the production of chemicals and materials and nowadays it is produced exclusively from petroleum. The aim of this study was to develop a suitable and robust strain of Clostridium tyrobutyricum that produces butyric acid at a high yield and selectivity from lignocellulosic biomasses. Pretreated (by wet explosion) and enzymatically hydrolysed wheat straw (PHWS), rich in C6 and C5 sugars (71.6 and 55.4 g l−1 of glucose and xylose respectively), was used as substrate. After one year of serial selections, an adapted strain of C. tyrobutyricum was developed. The adapted strain was able to grow in 80% (v v−1) PHWS without addition of yeast extract compared with an initial tolerance to less than 10% PHWS and was able to ferment both glucose and xylose. It is noticeable that the adapted C. tyrobutyricum strain was characterized by a high yield and selectivity to butyric acid. Specifically, the butyric acid yield at 60–80% PHWS lie between 0.37 and 0.46 g g−1 of sugar, while the selectivity for butyric acid was as high as 0.9–1.0 g g−1 of acid. Moreover, the strain exhibited a robust response in regards to growth and product profile at pH 6 and 7. PMID:26230610

  6. Consolidated Bioprocessing for Butyric Acid Production from Rice Straw with Undefined Mixed Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Binling; Chi, Xue; Meng, Jia; Sheng, Zhanwu; Zheng, Lili; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Li, Jianzheng

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable source with great potential for biofuels and bioproducts. However, the cost of cellulolytic enzymes limits the utilization of the low-cost bioresource. This study aimed to develop a consolidated bioprocessing without the need of supplementary cellulase for butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass. A stirred-tank reactor with a working volume of 21 L was constructed and operated in batch and semi-continuous fermentation modes with a cellulolytic butyrate-producing microbial community. The semi-continuous fermentation with intermittent discharging of the culture broth and replenishment with fresh medium achieved the highest butyric acid productivity of 2.69 g/(L· d). In semi-continuous operation mode, the butyric acid and total carboxylic acid concentrations of 16.2 and 28.9 g/L, respectively, were achieved. Over the 21-day fermentation period, their cumulative yields reached 1189 and 2048 g, respectively, corresponding to 41 and 74% of the maximum theoretical yields based on the amount of NaOH pretreated rice straw fed in. This study demonstrated that an undefined mixed culture-based consolidated bioprocessing for butyric acid production can completely eliminate the cost of supplementary cellulolytic enzymes. PMID:27822203

  7. Integrative analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression in butyrate-treated CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Wippermann, Anna; Rupp, Oliver; Brinkrolf, Karina; Hoffrogge, Raimund; Noll, Thomas

    2016-11-24

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the versatile properties of CHO cells as the major production cell line for biopharmaceutical molecules are not entirely understood yet, although several 'omics' data facilitate the understanding of CHO cells and their reactions to environmental conditions. However, genome-wide studies of epigenetic processes such as DNA methylation are still limited. To prove the applicability and usefulness of integrating DNA methylation and gene expression data in a biotechnological context, we exemplarily analyzed the time course of cellular reactions upon butyrate addition in antibody-producing CHO cells by whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and CHO-specific cDNA microarrays. Gene expression and DNA methylation analyses showed that pathways known to be affected by butyrate, including cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as pathways potentially involved in butyrate-induced hyperproductivity such as central energy metabolism and protein biosynthesis were affected. Differentially methylated regions were furthermore found to contain binding-site motifs of specific transcription factors and were hypothesized to represent regulatory regions closely connected to the cellular response to butyrate. Generally, our experiment underlines the benefit of integrating DNA methylation and gene expression data, as it provided potential novel candidate genes for rational cell line development and allowed for new insights into the butyrate effect on CHO cells.

  8. New holographic polymeric composition based on plexiglass, polyvinyl butyral, and phenanthrenquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusevich, Vladislav; Tolstik, Elen; Kowarschik, Richard; Egorova, Elena; Matusevich, Yuri I.; Krul, Leonid

    2013-05-01

    The newly developed Plexiglas films containing polyvinyl butyral resins and phenanthrenequinone molecules as photosensitive dopant, which are proposed for the practical application as interlayer of laminated safety glass, are shown for the first time. The injection of the phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate) into the polyvinyl butyral protective interlayer provides a homogenous distribution of the recording holographic medium in the layer and allows fixing the entire surface grating in the laminated glass. In addition, the original properties of polyvinyl butyral as a connecting material were preserved during manufacturing of the laminated glass. This allows a recording of holographic structures directly after baking of the laminated glass, thus reducing the destruction of the gratings due to the elevated temperatures. The diffractive structures in phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate)-polyvinyl butyral polymeric layers with thicknesses of hundreds of microns are sealed between two panels of glass (so-called laminated glass) and are generated by illumination with an Argon-laser of 514 nm. Efficiently fixed and long-term stable holographic gratings recorded in the phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate)-polyvinyl butyral layer enable to produce transparent laminated glass with inserted diffractive elements, which can be used e.g. for Head-up Displays in automobile windshields or as holographic light concentrators for solar cells.

  9. Consolidated Bioprocessing for Butyric Acid Production from Rice Straw with Undefined Mixed Culture.

    PubMed

    Ai, Binling; Chi, Xue; Meng, Jia; Sheng, Zhanwu; Zheng, Lili; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Li, Jianzheng

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable source with great potential for biofuels and bioproducts. However, the cost of cellulolytic enzymes limits the utilization of the low-cost bioresource. This study aimed to develop a consolidated bioprocessing without the need of supplementary cellulase for butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass. A stirred-tank reactor with a working volume of 21 L was constructed and operated in batch and semi-continuous fermentation modes with a cellulolytic butyrate-producing microbial community. The semi-continuous fermentation with intermittent discharging of the culture broth and replenishment with fresh medium achieved the highest butyric acid productivity of 2.69 g/(L· d). In semi-continuous operation mode, the butyric acid and total carboxylic acid concentrations of 16.2 and 28.9 g/L, respectively, were achieved. Over the 21-day fermentation period, their cumulative yields reached 1189 and 2048 g, respectively, corresponding to 41 and 74% of the maximum theoretical yields based on the amount of NaOH pretreated rice straw fed in. This study demonstrated that an undefined mixed culture-based consolidated bioprocessing for butyric acid production can completely eliminate the cost of supplementary cellulolytic enzymes.

  10. Simulation and evaluation of the Sh-2F helicopter in a shipboard environment using the interchangeable cab system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulk, C. H., Jr.; Astill, D. L.; Donley, S. T.

    1983-01-01

    The operation of the SH-2F helicopter from the decks of small ships in adverse weather was simulated using a large amplitude vertical motion simulator, a wide angle computer generated imagery visual system, and an interchangeable cab (ICAB). The simulation facility, the mathematical programs, and the validation method used to ensure simulation fidelity are described. The results show the simulator to be a useful tool in simulating the ship-landing problem. Characteristics of the ICAB system and ways in which the simulation can be improved are presented.

  11. Identification of the topological defects of optical indicatrix orientation in CaB4O7 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasylkiv, Yu; Skab, I.; Vlokh, R.

    2016-08-01

    We develop an experimental method for the identification of the topological defects of optical indicatrix orientation, which appear in glass samples with residual mechanical stresses. The criteria needed to determine the sign of the strength of topological defects are formulated. The method is verified on the example of a non-annealed CaB4O7 glass sample that manifests spatially inhomogeneous residual stresses. We have found that at least seven topological defects of optical indicatrix orientation exist under the condition when a light beam propagates through a parallelepiped-shaped glass sample. The strengths of all the defects detected by us are equal to +1/2.

  12. Cab45 is required for Ca2+-dependent secretory cargo sorting at the trans-Golgi network

    PubMed Central

    Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Kienzle, Christine; Carreras-Sureda, Amado; Valverde, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+ import into the lumen of the trans-Golgi network (TGN) by the secretory pathway calcium ATPase1 (SPCA1) is required for the sorting of secretory cargo. How is Ca2+ retained in the lumen of the Golgi, and what is its role in cargo sorting? We show here that a soluble, lumenal Golgi resident protein, Cab45, is required for SPCA1-dependent Ca2+ import into the TGN; it binds secretory cargo in a Ca2+-dependent reaction and is required for its sorting at the TGN. PMID:23266954

  13. Mechanistic Insights into the Catalytic Oxidation of Carboxylic Acids on Au/TiO2: Partial Oxidation of Propionic and Butyric Acid to Gold Ketenylidene through Unsaturated Acids

    SciTech Connect

    McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; Yates, Jr., John T.

    2014-12-12

    Here, the partial oxidation of model C2–C4 (acetic, propionic, and butyric) carboxylic acids on Au/TiO2 catalysts consisting of Au particles ~3 nm in size was investigated using transmission infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory. All three acids readily undergo oxidative dehydrogenation on Au/TiO2. Propionic and butyric acid dehydrogenate at the C2–C3 positions, whereas acetic acid dehydrogenates at the C1–C2 position. The resulting acrylate and crotonate intermediates are subsequently oxidized to form β-keto acids that decarboxylate. All three acids form a gold ketenylidene intermediate, Au2C=C=O, along the way to their full oxidation to form CO2. Infrared measurements of Au2C=C=O formation as a function of time provides a surface spectroscopic probe of the kinetics for the activation and oxidative dehydrogenation of the alkyl groups in the carboxylate intermediates that form.

  14. Butyric acid esterification kinetics over Amberlyst solid acid catalysts: the effect of alcohol carbon chain length.

    PubMed

    Pappu, Venkata K S; Kanyi, Victor; Santhanakrishnan, Arati; Lira, Carl T; Miller, Dennis J

    2013-02-01

    The liquid phase esterification of butyric acid with a series of linear and branched alcohols is examined. Four strong cation exchange resins, Amberlyst™ 15, Amberlyst™ 36, Amberlyst™ BD 20, and Amberlyst™ 70, were used along with para-toluenesulfonic acid as a homogeneous catalyst. The effect of increasing alcohol carbon chain length and branching on esterification rate at 60°C is presented. For all catalysts, the decrease in turnover frequency (TOF) with increasing carbon chain length of the alcohol is described in terms of steric hindrance, alcohol polarity, and hydroxyl group concentration. The kinetics of butyric acid esterification with 2-ethylhexanol using Amberlyst™ 70 catalyst is described with an activity-based, pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model that includes autocatalysis by butyric acid.

  15. Collagen-Immobilized Lipases Show Good Activity and Reusability for Butyl Butyrate Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dewei, Song; Min, Chen; Haiming, Cheng

    2016-11-01

    Candida rugosa lipases were immobilized onto collagen fibers through glutaraldehyde cross-linking method. The immobilization process has been optimized. Under the optimal immobilization conditions, the activity of the collagen-immobilized lipase reached 340 U/g. The activity was recovered of 28.3 % by immobilization. The operational stability of the obtained collagen-immobilized lipase for hydrolysis of olive oil emulsion was determined. The collagen-immobilized lipase showed good tolerance to temperature and pH variations in comparison to free lipase. The collagen-immobilized lipase was also applied as biocatalyst for synthesis of butyl butyrate from butyric acid and 1-butanol in n-hexane. The conversion yield was 94 % at the optimal conditions. Of its initial activity, 64 % was retained after 5 cycles for synthesizing butyl butyrate in n-hexane.

  16. Evaluation of recycling the effluent of hydrogen fermentation for biobutanol production: kinetic study with butyrate and sucrose concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Hsing; Jian, Zih-Ce

    2013-10-01

    Butyrate in the effluent of hydrogen-producing bioreactor is a potential feed for biobutanol production. For recycling butyrate, this study investigated the kinetics of biobutanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B592 from different paired concentrations of butyrate and sucrose in a series of batch reactors. Results show that the lag time of butanol production increased with higher concentration of either sucrose or butyrate. In regression analyses, the maximum specific butanol production potential of 6.49 g g(-1) of dry cell was projected for 31.9 g L(-1) sucrose and 1.3 g L(-1) butyrate, and the maximum specific butanol production rate of 0.87 g d(-1) g(-1) of dry cell was predicted for 25.0 g L(-1) sucrose and 2.6 g L(-1) butyrate. The specific butanol production potential will decrease if more butyrate is added to the reactor. However, both sucrose and butyrate concentrations are weighted equally on the specific butanol production rate. This observation also is true on butanol yield. The maximum butanol yield of 0.49 mol mol(-1) was projected for 25.0 g L(-1) sucrose and 2.3 g L(-1) butyrate. In addition, a confirmation study found butanol yield increased from 0.2 to 0.3 mol mol(-1) when butyrate addition increased from 0 to 1 g L(-1) under low sugar concentration (3.8 g L(-1) sucrose). The existence of butyrate increases the activity of biobutanol production and reduces the fermentable sugar concentration needed for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

  17. Membrane Complexes of Syntrophomonas wolfei Involved in Syntrophic Butyrate Degradation and Hydrogen Formation

    PubMed Central

    Crable, Bryan R.; Sieber, Jessica R.; Mao, Xinwei; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa; Gunsalus, Robert; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Nguyen, Hong; McInerney, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Syntrophic butyrate metabolism involves the thermodynamically unfavorable production of hydrogen and/or formate from the high potential electron donor, butyryl-CoA. Such redox reactions can occur only with energy input by a process called reverse electron transfer. Previous studies have demonstrated that hydrogen production from butyrate requires the presence of a proton gradient, but the biochemical machinery involved has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the gene and enzyme systems involved in reverse electron transfer by Syntrophomonas wolfei were investigated using proteomic and gene expression approaches. S. wolfei was grown in co-culture with Methanospirillum hungatei or Dehalococcoides mccartyi under conditions requiring reverse electron transfer and compared to both axenic S. wolfei cultures and co-cultures grown in conditions that do not require reverse electron transfer. Blue native gel analysis of membranes solubilized from syntrophically grown cells revealed the presence of a membrane-bound hydrogenase, Hyd2, which exhibited hydrogenase activity during in gel assays. Bands containing a putative iron-sulfur (FeS) oxidoreductase were detected in membranes of crotonate-grown and butyrate grown S. wolfei cells. The genes for the corresponding hydrogenase subunits, hyd2ABC, were differentially expressed at higher levels during syntrophic butyrate growth when compared to growth on crotonate. The expression of the FeS oxidoreductase gene increased when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei. Additional membrane-associated proteins detected included FoF1 ATP synthase subunits and several membrane transporters that may aid syntrophic growth. Furthermore, syntrophic butyrate metabolism can proceed exclusively by interspecies hydrogen transfer, as demonstrated by growth with D. mccartyi, which is unable to use formate. These results argue for the importance of Hyd2 and FeS oxidoreductase in reverse electron transfer during syntrophic butyrate degradation

  18. Extractive fermentation for butyric acid production from glucose by Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zetang; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2003-04-05

    A novel extractive fermentation for butyric acid production from glucose, using immobilized cells of Clostridium tyrobutyricum in a fibrous bed bioreactor, was developed by using 10% (v/v) Alamine 336 in oleyl alcohol as the extractant contained in a hollow-fiber membrane extractor for selective removal of butyric acid from the fermentation broth. The extractant was simultaneously regenerated by stripping with NaOH in a second membrane extractor. The fermentation pH was self-regulated by a balance between acid production and removal by extraction, and was kept at approximately pH 5.5 throughout the study. Compared with conventional fermentation, extractive fermentation resulted in a much higher product concentration (>300 g/L) and product purity (91%). It also resulted in higher reactor productivity (7.37 g/L. h) and butyric acid yield (0.45 g/g). Without on-line extraction to remove the acid products, at the optimal pH of 6.0, the final butyric acid concentration was only approximately 43.4 g/L, butyric acid yield was 0.423 g/g, and reactor productivity was 6.77 g/L. h. These values were much lower at pH 5.5: 20.4 g/L, 0.38 g/g, and 5.11 g/L. h, respectively. The improved performance for extractive fermentation can be attributed to the reduced product inhibition by selective removal of butyric acid from the fermentation broth. The solvent was found to be toxic to free cells in suspension, but not harmful to cells immobilized in the fibrous bed. The process was stable and provided consistent long-term performance for the entire 2-week period of study.

  19. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is regulated by butyrate induced epigenetic modulation of gene expression in bovine cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present evidence that butyrate induced histone acetylation regulates miRNA expression. MicroRNA expression microarray profiling revealed that 35 miRNA transcripts are significantly (p <0.05) differentially expressed after cells were treated with 10 mM butyrate. Among them, 11 transcripts are dif...

  20. Radioimmunotherapy of human colon cancer xenografts by using {sup 131}I labeled-CAb{sub 1} F(ab'){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ling; Xu Huiyun; Mi Li; Bian Huijie; Qin Jun; Xiong Hua; Feng Qiang; Wen Ning; Tian Rong; Xu Liqing; Shen Xiaomei; Tang Hao; Chen Zhinan . E-mail: znchen@fmmu.edu.cn

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Therapeutic efficacy, suitable dose, and administration times of {sup 131}I-CAb{sub 1} F(ab'){sub 2}, a new monoclonal antibody therapeutics specifically directed against a cell surface-associated glycoprotein of colon cancer, were investigated in this article. Methods and Materials: In human colon cancer xenografts, {sup 131}I-CAb{sub 1} F(ab'){sub 2} at the dose of 125 {mu}Ci, 375 {mu}Ci, and 1125 {mu}Ci were administrated intraperitoneally on Days 6 and 18 after implantation of HR8348 cells with CAb{sub 1} high reactivity. Survival time and tumor growth inhibition rate were used to evaluate the efficacy and safety of {sup 131}I-CAb{sub 1} F(ab'){sub 2} in treatment of colon cancer xenografts. Results: Treatment of 125, 375, and 1125 {mu}Ci {sup 131}I-CAb1 F(ab'){sub 2} did not significantly decrease the mean survival time of nude mice when compared with nontreated groups (p = 0.276, 0.865, 0.582, respectively). Moreover, the mean survival times of nude mice receiving 375 {mu}Ci and 1125 {mu}Ci {sup 131}I-CAb1 F(ab'){sub 2} were significantly longer than that of 5-FU-treated groups (p 0.018 and 0.042). Tumor growth inhibition rates of the first therapy were 35.67% and 41.37%, with corresponding {sup 131}I-labeled antibody dosage of 375 {mu}Ci and 1125 {mu}Ci. After single attack dosage, second reinforcement therapy may rise efficacy significantly. Tumor growth inhibition rates of 125 {mu}Ci, 375 {mu}Ci, and 1125 {mu}Ci {sup 131}I-labeled antibody on Day 20 posttherapy were 42.65%, 56.56%, and 84.41%, respectively. Histopathology examination revealed that tissue necrosis of various degrees was found in {sup 131}I-CAb1 F(ab'){sub 2}-treated groups. Conclusion: {sup 131}I-CAb{sub 1} F(ab'){sub 2} is safe and effective for colon cancer. It may be a novel and potentially adjuvant therapeutics for colon cancer.

  1. Acetate fuels the cancer engine.

    PubMed

    Lyssiotis, Costas A; Cantley, Lewis C

    2014-12-18

    Cancer cells have distinctive nutrient demands to fuel growth and proliferation, including the disproportionate use of glucose, glutamine, and fatty acids. Comerford et al. and Mashimo et al. now demonstrate that several types of cancer are avid consumers of acetate, which facilitates macromolecular biosynthesis and histone modification.

  2. Origins of blood acetate in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, B M; Williamson, D H

    1977-01-01

    A novel enzymimc cycling assay for the determination of acetate in biological material is described. Measurements of the acetate concentration in blood and liver samples from rats of various ages and nutritional states with this assay are reported. The contribution of the intestine, the liver and the rest of the body to maintaining the concentration of acetate in the circulation is examined. Evidence is presented that the gut flora constitute the main source of acetate in blood of fed adult rats, though endogenous production of acetate is of significance in other situations. The streptozotocin-diabetic rat has an elevated blood acetate concentration. PMID:597244

  3. Partial molar volumes of some alpha-amino acids in aqueous sodium acetate solutions at 308.15 K.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Yan, Z; Zhuo, K; Lu, J

    1999-08-30

    The apparent molar volumes V(2,phi) have been determined for glycine, DL-alpha-alanine, DL-alpha-amino-n-butyric acid, DL-valine and DL-leucine in aqueous solutions of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mol kg(-1) sodium acetate by density measurements at 308.15 K. These data have been used to derive the infinite dilution apparent molar volumes V(0)(2,phi) for the amino acids in aqueous sodium acetate solutions and the standard volumes of transfer, Delta(t)V(0), of the amino acids from water to aqueous sodium acetate solutions. It has been observed that both V(0)(2,phi) and Delta(t)V(0) vary linearly with increasing number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain of the amino acids. These linear correlations have been utilized to estimate the contributions of the charged end groups (NH(3)(+), COO(-)), CH(2) group and other alkyl chains of the amino acids to V(0)(2,phi) and Delta(t)V(0). The results show that V(0)(2,phi) values for (NH(3)(+), COO(-)) groups increase with sodium acetate concentration, and those for CH(2) are almost constant over the studied sodium acetate concentration range. The transfer volume increases and the hydration number of the amino acids decreases with increasing electrolyte concentrations. These facts indicate that strong interactions occur between the ions of sodium acetate and the charged centers of the amino acids. The volumetric interaction parameters of the amino acids with sodium acetate were calculated in water. The pair interaction parameters are found to be positive and decreased with increasing alkyl chain length of the amino acids, suggesting that sodium acetate has a stronger dehydration effect on amino acids which have longer hydrophobic alkyl chains. These phenomena are discussed by means of the co-sphere overlap model.

  4. Controlled-release cellulose esters matrices for water-soluble diclofenac sodium: compression and dissolution studies.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, W M; Alzoubi, N M

    2014-02-01

    Matrix tablets comprising of a blend of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) or cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) and alpha-lactose monohydrate were prepared by direct compression to control the release of diclofenac sodium. Tablet formulations containing CAP75000 or CAB50-54 exhibited highest extents, but lowest onsets of plastic deformation and lowest release rates in buffer medium, while tablets containing CAP15000 or CAB35-39 exhibited lowest extents, but highest rates of plastic deformation and highest release rates in buffer medium. The DA values obtained from Heckel plots and the DI values obtained from Kawakita plots showed similar trends. A plot of compression pressure or crushing strengths against T50% showed curvilinear relationship for all tablets. Tablets containing 40 % CAB35-39 (formulation F7D) was considered the best formulation in terms of T50%, compressibility and compactability.

  5. Effect of abomasal butyrate infusion on gene expression in the duodenum of lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A previous study infusing butyrate into the abomasum of sheep produced increased oxygen, glucose, glutamate, and glutamine uptake by the portal-drained viscera. These changes were thought to be partially due to increases in glycolysis and cell proliferation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate...

  6. Perturbation dynamics of the rumen microbiota in response to exogenous butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The capacity of the rumen microbiota to produce volatile fatty acids (VFA) has important implications in animal well-being and production. We investigated temporal changes of the rumen microbiota in response to butyrate infusion using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Phyla were identified in ...

  7. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of a high fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of D...

  8. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of a high fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of DCA and...

  9. Evaluation of butyrate-induced production of a mannose-6-phosphorylated therapeutic enzyme using parallel bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Madhavarao, Chikkathur N; Agarabi, Cyrus D; Wong, Lily; Müller-Loennies, Sven; Braulke, Thomas; Khan, Mansoor; Anderson, Howard; Johnson, Gibbes R

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactor process changes can have a profound effect on the yield and quality of biotechnology products. Mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) glycan content and the enzymatic catalytic kinetic parameters are critical quality attributes (CQAs) of many therapeutic enzymes used to treat lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Here, we have evaluated the effect of adding butyrate to bioreactor production cultures of human recombinant β-glucuronidase produced from CHO-K1 cells, with an emphasis on CQAs. The β-glucuronidase produced in parallel bioreactors was quantified by capillary electrophoresis, the catalytic kinetic parameters were measured using steady-state analysis, and mannose-6-phosphorylation status was assessed using an M6P-specific single-chain antibody fragment. Using this approach, we found that butyrate treatment increased β-glucuronidase production up to approximately threefold without significantly affecting the catalytic properties of the enzyme. However, M6P content in β-glucuronidase was inversely correlated with the increased enzyme production induced by butyrate treatment. This assessment demonstrated that although butyrate dramatically increased β-glucuronidase production in bioreactors, it adversely impacted the mannose-6-phosphorylation of this LSD therapeutic enzyme. This strategy may have utility in evaluating manufacturing process changes to improve therapeutic enzyme yields and CQAs.

  10. Genome Sequence of the Butyrate-Producing Anaerobic Bacterium Anaerostipes hadrus PEL 85.

    PubMed

    Kant, Ravi; Rasinkangas, Pia; Satokari, Reetta; Pietilä, Taija E; Palva, Airi

    2015-04-02

    Anaerostipes hadrus PEL 85, which was isolated from human feces, is a Gram-positive rod-shaped bacterium. The species may play an important role in gut health, as it was previously reported to produce butyric acid. Here, we present the genome assembly of PEL 85, a novel strain of A. hadrus.

  11. Exploring the Genome of a Butyric Acid Producer, Clostridium butyricum INCQS635

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Fernanda Gomes; Tschoeke, Diogo Antonio; Miranda, Milene; Pereira, Nei; Valle, Rogério; Thompson, Cristiane C.

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Clostridium butyricum INCQS635 was obtained by means of ion sequencing. The genome provides further insight into the genetic repertoire involved with metabolic pathways related to the fermentation of different compounds and organic solvents synthesis (i.e., butyric acid) with biofuel applications. PMID:25414496

  12. An Acute Butyr-Fentanyl Fatality: A Case Report with Postmortem Concentrations.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Iain M; Trochta, Amber; Gary, Ray D; Wright, Jennifer; Mena, Othon

    2016-03-01

    In this case report, we present an evaluation of the distribution of postmortem concentrations of butyr-fentanyl in a fatality attributed principally to the drug. A man who had a history of intravenous drug abuse was found unresponsive on the bathroom floor of his home. Drug paraphernalia was located on the bathroom counter. Toxicology testing, which initially screened positive for fentanyl by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, subsequently confirmed butyr-fentanyl, which was then quantitated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-specific ion monitoring (GC-MS SIM) analysis following liquid-liquid extraction. The butyr-fentanyl peripheral blood concentration was quantitated at 58 ng/mL compared with the central blood concentration of 97 ng/mL. The liver concentration was 320 ng/g, the vitreous was 40 ng/mL, the urine was 670 ng/mL and the gastric contained 170 mg. Acetyl-fentanyl was also detected in all biological specimens tested. Peripheral blood concentration was quantitated at 38 ng/mL compared with the central blood concentration of 32 ng/mL. The liver concentration was 110 ng/g, the vitreous was 38 ng/mL, the urine was 540 ng/mL and the gastric contained <70 mg. The only other drug detected was a relatively low concentration of benzoylecgonine. The cause of death was certified as acute butyr-fentanyl, acetyl-fentanyl and cocaine intoxication, and the manner of death was certified as accident.

  13. Inhibition of mouse B16 melanoma by sodium butyrate correlated to tumor associated macrophages differentiation suppression

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fen; Mou, Yun-Zhu; Xiang, Xiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: As one member of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) family, Sodium butyrate (NaB) was found out that could be used as a differentiation inducer of much cancer cell. But its effects on tumor microenvironment cells are not well recognized. The goal of this research is to investigate the effect of NaB on B16 melanoma and analysis its relevant mechanism. Methods: We observed the effect of sodium butyrate on B16 melanoma in vivo and in vitro. MTT method was performed to detect cell apoptosis rate after treatment. Tumor associated macrophage infiltration condition was detected by flow cytometry. Western-blotting and immunohistochemical method were used to detect the expression of tumor associated macrophage cytokines. Results: A certain concentration of sodium butyrate could effectively inhibit B16 melanoma growth in vivo and in vitro, and this inhibition effects related to the suppression of tumor associated macrophage differentiation. At the same time we observed the relevant macrophage factors were down-regulated compared to the control. Conclusion: Sodium butyrate could effectively inhibit B16 melanoma growth through suppressing tumor associated macrophage proliferation and reduce relevant pro-tumor macrophage factors expression, which may help to promote the clinical study of melanoma epigenetic therapy. PMID:26064327

  14. 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy)butyric acid (2,4-DB)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    4 - ( 2,4 - Dichlorophenoxy ) butyric acid ( 2,4 - DB ) ; CASRN 94 - 82 - 6 Health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in IRIS only after a comprehensive review of chronic toxicity data by U.S . EPA health scientists from several Program Offices and the Office of Research and

  15. Behavior of Plastic Bonded Composite Explosives During High Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Y.

    1998-03-01

    The mechanical behavior of plastic bonded composite explosives has been studied during high acceleration in an ultracentrifuge. The pressed explosives studied include LX-14 [95% HMX (cyclotetramethylene- tetranitramine), 5% Estane], Composition A3 type II [91% RDX (cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine), 99% BDNPF (bis-dinitropropyl acetal formal), 6% CAB (cellulose acetate butyrate)], and PAX-3 (85% HMX, 9% BDNPF, 6% CAB/25% Aluminum). The fracture strength of LX-14 is greater than all pressed explosives studied to date. The fracture strength of Composition A3 type II is smaller than all pressed explosives studied to date.

  16. Characterization of the Morphology of RDX Particles Formed by Laser Ablation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    Experimental Method 2.1 Materials The energetic materials studied included an M43 propellant grain that consists of ~76% RDX, 12% cellulose acetate ... butyrate (CAB), 8% plasticizer, and 4% nitrocellulose (NC) (26). Class-1 ( m) and class-5 (ឝ m) military-grade and research-grade (i.e...17% for type-II RDX produced by an acetic anhydride Bachmann process) (28). Once ablated, SEM cannot differentiate between RDX particles and HMX

  17. Strengthening and Stiffening of Plastic Bonded Explosives Under Pressure and Metal-Like Mechanical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    cyclortrimethylene trinitramine, NC - nitrocellulose, CAB - cellulose acetate butyrate , BDNPAIF - -Bis(2,2-Dintropropyl) Acetal /Formal, ESTANE - polyurethane, B...obtained for PAX 2A. While detailed results for these three composites will be published separately , the stress-strain curves for unconfined and confined...School ATTN: ATSH-CD-CSO-OR Fort Benning, GA 31905-5660 14 Commander U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command ATTN: AMSAV-DACL 4300 Goodfellow Blvd St. Louis

  18. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degrees C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4% for acetate samples larger than 5 micromoles. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined.

  19. Ozone decomposition in aqueous acetate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sehested, K.; Holcman, J.; Bjergbakke, E.; Hart, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    The acetate radical ion reacts with ozone with a rate constant of k = (1.5 +/- 0.5) x 10Z dmT mol s . The products from this reaction are CO2, HCHO, and O2 . By subsequent reaction of the peroxy radical with ozone the acetate radical ion is regenerated through the OH radical. A chain decomposition of ozone takes place. It terminates when the acetate radical ion reacts with oxygen forming the unreactive peroxy acetate radical. The chain is rather short as oxygen is developed, as a result of the ozone consumption. The inhibiting effect of acetate on the ozone decay is rationalized by OH scavenging by acetate and successive reaction of the acetate radical ion with oxygen. Some products from the bimolecular disappearance of the peroxy acetate radicals, however, react further with ozone, reducing the effectiveness of the stabilization.

  20. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate.

    PubMed

    Gelwicks, J T; Hayes, J M

    1990-01-01

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degrees C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4% for acetate samples larger than 5 micromoles. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3 or C2H3O2Na·3H2O, CAS Reg. No. 6131-90-4) is the sodium salt of acetic acid and occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues....

  2. PET neuroimaging studies of [18F]CABS13 in a double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease and non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Steven H.; Holland, Jason P.; Stephenson, Nickeisha A.; Kassenbrock, Alina; Rotstein, Benjamin H.; Daignault, Cory P.; Lewis, Rebecca; Collier, Lee; Hooker, Jacob M.; Vasdev, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Fluorine-18 labeled 2-fluoro-8-hydroxyquinoline ([18F]CABS13) is a promising positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceutical based on a metal chelator developed to probe the “metal hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease”. Herein, a practical radiosynthesis of [18F]CABS13 was achieved by radiofluorination followed by deprotection of an O-benzyloxymethyl group. Automated production and formulation of [18F]CABS13 resulted in 19 ± 5% uncorrected radiochemical yield, relative to starting [18F]fluoride, with ≥95% chemical and radiochemical purities, and high specific activity (>2.5 Ci/μmol) within 80 minutes. Temporal PET neuroimaging studies were carried out in female transgenic B6C3- Tg(APPswe,PSEN1dE9)85Dbo/J (APP/PS1) and age-matched wild-type (WT) B6C3F1/J control mice at 3, 7 and 10 months of age. [18F]CABS13 showed an overall higher uptake and retention of radioactivity in the central nervous system of APP/PS1 mice versus WT mice with increasing age. However, PET/magnetic resonance imaging in normal non-human primates revealed that the tracer had low uptake in the brain and rapid formation of a hydrophilic radiometabolite. Identification of more metabolically stable 18F-hydroxyquinolines that can be readily accessed by the radiochemical strategy presented herein is underway. PMID:25776827

  3. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 238 - Alternative Dynamic Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alternative Dynamic Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives F Appendix F to Part 238 Transportation Other... TRANSPORTATION PASSENGER EQUIPMENT SAFETY STANDARDS Pt. 238, App. F Appendix F to Part 238—Alternative...

  4. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 238 - Alternative Dynamic Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alternative Dynamic Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives F Appendix F to Part 238 Transportation Other... TRANSPORTATION PASSENGER EQUIPMENT SAFETY STANDARDS Pt. 238, App. F Appendix F to Part 238—Alternative...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  16. 21 CFR 522.2476 - Trenbolone acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... days. (A) 140 milligrams (mg) trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting of 7 pellets, each pellet containing 20 mg trenbolone acetate) per implant dose. (B) 140 mg trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting... 29 mg tylosin tartrate) per implant dose. (ii) Indications for use. For improved feed...

  17. 21 CFR 522.2476 - Trenbolone acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... days. (A) 140 milligrams (mg) trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting of 7 pellets, each pellet containing 20 mg trenbolone acetate) per implant dose. (B) 140 mg trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting... 29 mg tylosin tartrate) per implant dose. (ii) Indications for use. For improved feed...

  18. Photochemistry of 2-nitrobenzylidene acetals.

    PubMed

    Sebej, Peter; Solomek, Tomás; Hroudná, L'ubica; Brancová, Pavla; Klán, Petr

    2009-11-20

    Photolysis of dihydroxy compounds (diols) protected as 2-nitrobenzylidene acetals (ONBA) and subsequent acid- or base-catalyzed hydrolysis of the 2-nitrosobenzoic acid ester intermediates result in an efficient and high-yielding release of the substrates. We investigated the scope and limitations of ONBA photochemistry and expanded upon earlier described two-step procedures to show that the protected diols of many structural varieties can also be liberated in a one-pot procedure. In view of the fact that the acetals of nonsymmetrically substituted diols are converted into one of the corresponding 2-nitrosobenzoic acid ester isomers with moderate to high regioselectivity, the mechanism of their formation was studied using various experimental techniques. The experimental data were found to be in agreement with DFT-based quantum chemical calculations that showed the preferential cleavage occurs on the acetal C-O bond in the vicinity of more electron-withdrawing (or less electron-donating) groups. The study also revealed considerable complexity in the cleavage mechanism and that the structural variations in the substrate can significantly alter the reaction pathway. This deprotection strategy was found to be also applicable for 2-thioethanol when released from the corresponding monothioacetal in the presence of a reducing agent, such as ascorbic acid.

  19. A cluster of primary pneumonic plague transmitted in a truck cab in a new enzootic focus in China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huiming; Dong, Xingqi; Li, Furong; Xie, Xu; Song, Zhizhong; Shao, Zhujun; Li, Zhongjie; Tong, Zhaohui; Wang, Guangfa; Zhang, Hongtao; Yang, Tielong; He, Gao; He, Zeyuan; Fontaine, Robert E; Zeng, Guang

    2013-05-01

    We investigated a cluster of five cases of severe pneumonia from one village in Yunnan Province, China. We searched for severe pneumonia in the village and hospitals. We interviewed patients and family members about exposures. We tested acute and convalescent sera for antigen and antibody of severe acute respiratory syndrome, avian influenza, and plague. The only common exposure of the five patients was riding together in the enclosed cab of a truck for 1.5 hours while taking the first patient to the hospital. Seroconversion to plague F1 antigen confirmed plague in three survivors. Unfamiliarity of clinicians with plague and lack of sputum examination, blood culture, or postmortem examination delayed the diagnosis. No plague cases occurred among family and village contacts and health care workers. High infectivity in this cluster was limited to a crowded, poorly ventilated truck.

  20. Comparison of the butyrate effects on neurotransmitter receptors in neurohybrids NG108-15 and NCB-20 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.Z.; Chuang, D.M.

    1987-08-31

    The authors previous study demonstrated that long term treatment of NCB-20 cells with sodium butyrate resulted in a marked increase in the density of delta-opioid receptors with a much lesser effect on muscarinic cholinergic and no effect on alpha/sub 2/-adrenergic receptors. In the present study the authors investigated the effect of sodium butyrate on these three types of receptors in NG108-15 cells whose neuroblastoma parent is the same as that of NCB-20 cells. Long term treatment of NG108-15 cells with sodium butyrate (0.5 mM) induced a 2-fold increase in the density of the specific binding of /sup 3/H-clonidine. A comparable increase in the number of binding sites was detected when /sup 3/H-yohimbine was used as the receptor ligand. The butyrate-induced increase in the alpha/sub 2/-adrenergic receptor binding could be totally abolished by treatment with a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, suggesting that synthesis of receptor protein is involved. The same butyrate treatment had no significant effect on opioid and muscarinic cholinergic receptor bindings. Thus, butyrate effects on the expression of these three types of receptors in NG108-15 and NCB-20 cells are dramatically different. These data suggest that induction by butyrate of neurotransmitter receptors requires concerted action of genetic factors of both parents of the neurohybrids. 22 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Supplementing the maternal diet of rats with butyrate enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in the skeletal muscles of weaned offspring.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanping; Gao, Shixing; Jun, Guo; Zhao, Ruqian; Yang, Xiaojing

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of maternal dietary butyrate supplementation on energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in offspring skeletal muscle and the possible mediating mechanisms. Virgin female rats were randomly assigned to either control or butyrate diets (1 % butyrate sodium) throughout gestation and lactation. At the end of lactation (21 d), the offspring were killed by exsanguination from the abdominal aorta under anaesthesia. The results showed that maternal butyrate supplementation throughout gestation and lactation did not affect offspring body weight. However, the protein expressions of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPR) 43 and 41 were significantly enhanced in offspring skeletal muscle of the maternal butyrate-supplemented group. The ATP content, most of mitochondrial DNA-encoded gene expressions, the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 4 protein contents and the mitochondrial DNA copy number were significantly higher in the butyrate group than in the control group. Meanwhile, the protein expressions of type 1 myosin heavy chain, mitochondrial transcription factor A, PPAR-coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and uncoupling protein 3 were significantly increased in the gastrocnemius muscle of the treatment group compared with the control group. These results indicate for the first time that maternal butyrate supplementation during the gestation and lactation periods influenced energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis through the GPR and PGC-1α pathways in offspring skeletal muscle at weaning.

  2. Effect of partially protected butyrate used as feed additive on growth and intestinal metabolism in sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Robles, R; Lozano, A B; Sevilla, A; Márquez, L; Nuez-Ortín, W; Moyano, F J

    2013-12-01

    Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid extensively used in animal nutrition since it promotes increases in body weight and other multiple beneficial effects on the intestinal tract. Although such effects have been demonstrated in several species, very few studies have assessed them in fish. On the other hand, little is known about the metabolic processes underlying these effects. In the present work, growth parameters and changes in more than 80 intestinal metabolites (nucleotides, amino acids and derivatives, glycolytic intermediates, redox coenzymes and lipid metabolism coenzymes) have been quantified in juvenile sea bream fed a butyrate-supplemented diet. Results showed a significant increase in the weight of fish receiving butyrate, while metabolomics provided some clues on the suggested effects of this feed additive. It seems that butyrate increased the availability of several essential amino acids and nucleotide derivatives. Also, the energy provision for enteric cells might have been enhanced by a decrease in glucose and amino acid oxidation related to the use of butyrate as fuel. Additionally, butyrate might have increased transmethylation activity. This work represents an advance in the knowledge of the metabolic consequences of using butyrate as an additive in fish diets.

  3. Relationship of Enhanced Butyrate Production by Colonic Butyrate-Producing Bacteria to Immunomodulatory Effects in Normal Mice Fed an Insoluble Fraction of Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sachi; Yamamoto, Kana; Yamada, Kazuki; Furuya, Kanon; Uyeno, Yutaka

    2016-05-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of feeding a fiber-rich fraction of Brassica vegetables on the immune response through changes in enteric bacteria and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production in normal mice. The boiled-water-insoluble fraction of Brassica rapa L. (nozawana), which consists mainly of dietary fiber, was chosen as a test material. A total of 31 male C57BL/6J mice were divided into two groups and housed in a specific-pathogen-free facility. The animals were fed either a control diet or the control diet plus the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction for 2 weeks and sacrificed to determine microbiological and SCFA profiles in lower-gut samples and immunological molecules. rRNA-based quantification indicated that the relative population of Bacteroidetes was markedly lower in the colon samples of the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction-fed group than that in the controls. Populations of the Eubacterium rectale group and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, both of which are representative butyrate-producing bacteria, doubled after 2 weeks of fraction intake, accompanying a marginal increase in the proportion of colonic butyrate. In addition, feeding with the fraction significantly increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tended to increase splenic regulatory T cell numbers but significantly reduced the population of cells expressing activation markers. We demonstrated that inclusion of the boiled-water-insoluble fraction of B. rapa L. can alter the composition of the gut microbiota to decrease the numbers of Bacteroidetes and to increase the numbers of butyrate-producing bacteria, either of which may be involved in the observed shift in the production of splenic IL-10.

  4. Effect of Butyrate on Collagen Expression, Cell Viability, Cell Cycle Progression and Related Proteins Expression of MG-63 Osteoblastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mei-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Ling; Liou, Eric Jein-Wein; Tang, Chia-Mei; Wang, Tong-Mei; Liu, Hsin-Cheng; Liao, Ming-Wei; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Chan, Chiu-Po; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Aims Butyric acid is one major metabolic product generated by anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria of periodontal and root canal infection. Butyric acid affects the activity of periodontal cells such as osteoblasts. The purposes of this study were to investigate the effects of butyrate on MG-63 osteoblasts. Methods MG-63 cells were exposed to butyrate and cell viability was estimated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The mRNA and protein expression of type I collagen and cell cycle-related proteins were measured by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blotting or immunofluorescent staining. Cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was analyzed by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence flow cytometry. Results Exposure to butyrate suppressed cell proliferation, and induced G2/M (8 and 16 mM) cell cycle arrest of MG-63 cells. Some cell apoptosis was noted. The mRNA expression of cdc2 and cyclin-B1 decreased after exposure to butyrate. The protein expression of type I collagen, cdc2 and cyclin B1 were decreased, whereas the expression of p21, p27 and p57 was stimulated. Under the treatment of butyrate, ROS production in MG-63 cells markedly increased. Conclusions The secretion of butyric acid by periodontal and root canal microorganisms may inhibit bone cell growth and matrix turnover. This is possibly due to induction of cell cycle arrest and ROS generation and inhibition of collagen expression. These results suggest the involvement of butyric acid in the pathogenesis of periodontal and periapical tissue destruction by impairing bone healing responses. PMID:27893752

  5. Measuring the Performance of Attention Networks with the Dalhousie Computerized Attention Battery (DalCAB): Methodology and Reliability in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephanie A. H.; Butler, Beverly C.; Kintzel, Franziska; Johnson, Anne; Klein, Raymond M.; Eskes, Gail A.

    2016-01-01

    Attention is an important, multifaceted cognitive domain that has been linked to three distinct, yet interacting, networks: alerting, orienting, and executive control. The measurement of attention and deficits of attention within these networks is critical to the assessment of many neurological and psychiatric conditions in both research and clinical settings. The Dalhousie Computerized Attention Battery (DalCAB) was created to assess attentional functions related to the three attention networks using a range of tasks including: simple reaction time, go/no-go, choice reaction time, dual task, flanker, item and location working memory, and visual search. The current study provides preliminary normative data, test-retest reliability (intraclass correlations) and practice effects in DalCAB performance 24-h after baseline for healthy young adults (n = 96, 18–31 years). Performance on the DalCAB tasks demonstrated Good to Very Good test-retest reliability for mean reaction time, while accuracy and difference measures (e.g., switch costs, interference effects, and working memory load effects) were most reliable for tasks that require more extensive cognitive processing (e.g., choice reaction time, flanker, dual task, and conjunction search). Practice effects were common and pronounced at the 24-h interval. In addition, performance related to specific within-task parameters of the DalCAB sub-tests provides preliminary support for future formal assessment of the convergent validity of our interpretation of the DalCAB as a potential clinical and research assessment tool for measuring aspects of attention related to the alerting, orienting, and executive control networks. PMID:27375517

  6. Structural Analysis and Quantitative Determination of Clevidipine Butyrate Impurities Using an Advanced RP-HPLC Method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuxia; Zhou, Fan; Yan, Fei; Yang, Feng; Yao, Yuxian; Zou, Qiaogen

    2016-03-01

    Eleven potential impurities, including process-related compounds and degradation products, have been analyzed by comprehensive studies on the manufacturing process of clevidipine butyrate. Possible formation mechanisms could also be devised. MS and NMR techniques have been used for the structural characterization of three previously unreported impurities (Imp-3, Imp-5 and Imp-11). To separate and quantify the potential impurities in a simultaneous fashion, an efficient and advanced RP-HPLC method has been developed. In doing so, four major degradation products (Imp-2, Imp-4, Imp-8 and Imp-10) can be observed under varying stress conditions. This analytical method has been validated according to ICH guidelines with respect to specificity, accuracy, linearity, robustness and stability. The method described has been demonstrated to be applicable in routine quality control processes and stability evaluation studies of clevidipine butyrate.

  7. Butyrate Infusions in the Ovine Fetus Delay the Biologic Clock for Globin Gene Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Susan P.; Rudolph, Abraham; Faller, Douglas V.; Roman, Christine; Cohen, Ruth A.; Chen, Shao-Jing; Kan, Yuet Wai

    1988-11-01

    The switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin expression is regulated in many mammalian species by a developmental clock-like mechanism and determined by the gestational age of the fetus. Prolonging fetal globin gene expression is of considerable interest for therapeutic potential in diseases caused by abnormal β -globin genes. Butyric acid, which is found in increased plasma concentrations in infants of diabetic mothers who have delayed globin gene switching, was infused into catheterized fetal lambs in utero during the time of the normal globin gene switch period. The globin gene switch was significantly delayed in three of four butyrate-treated fetuses compared with controls and was entirely prevented in one fetus in whom the infusion was begun before the globin switch was under way. These data provide a model for investigating and arresting the biologic clock of hemoglobin switching.

  8. Enhancement of acetate productivity in a thermophilic (55 °C) hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor with mixed culture syngas (H2/CO2) fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Qi; Yu, Shi-Jin; Zhang, Fang; Xia, Xiu-Yang; Zeng, Raymond J

    2017-03-01

    Conversion of organic wastes to syngas is an attractive way to utilize wastes. The produced syngas can be further used to produce a variety of chemicals. In this study, a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor with mix cultures was operated at 55 °C to convert syngas (H2/CO2) into acetate. A high concentration of acetate (42.4 g/L) was reached in batch experiment while a maximum acetate production rate of 10.5 g/L/day was achieved in the continuous-flow mode at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 1 day. Acetate was the main product in both batch and continuous-flow experiments. n-Butyrate was the other byproduct in the reactor. Acetate accounted for more than 98.5 and 99.1% of total volatile fatty acids in batch and continuous modes, respectively. Illumina Miseq high-throughput sequencing results showed that microorganisms were highly purified and enriched in the reactor. The main genus was Thermoanaerobacterium (66% of relative abundance), which was usually considered as H2 producer in the literature, however, likely played a role as a H2 consumer in this study. This study provides a new method to generate the high producing rate and purity of acetate from syngas.

  9. Differential Effects of Sodium Butyrate and Lithium Chloride on Rhesus Monkey Trophoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Priyadarsini; Thirkill, Twanda L.; Ji, Jennifer; Monte, Louise H.; Douglas, Gordon C.

    2015-01-01

    Trophoblast differentiation during early placental development is critical for successful pregnancy and aberrant differentiation causes preeclampsia and early pregnancy loss. During the first trimester, cytotrophoblasts are exposed to low oxygen tension (equivalent to~2%-3% O2) and differentiation proceeds along an extravillous pathway (giving rise to invasive extravillous cytotrophoblasts) and a villous pathway (giving rise to multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast). Interstitial extravillous cytotrophoblasts invade the decidua, while endovascular extravillous cytotrophoblasts are involved in re-modelling uterine spiral arteries. We tested the idea that sodium butyrate (an epigenetic modulator) induces trophoblast differentiation in early gestation rhesus monkey trophoblasts through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The results show that syncytiotrophoblast formation was increased by butyrate, accompanied by nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, and increased expression of EnvV2 and galectin-1 (two factors thought to be involved in trophoblast fusion). Surprisingly, the expression of GCM1 and syncytin-2 was not affected by sodium butyrate. When trophoblasts were incubated with lithium chloride, a GSK3 inhibitor that mimics Wnt activation, nuclear accumulation of β-catenin also occurred but differentiation into syncytiotrophoblast was not observed. Instead the cells differentiated to mononucleated spindle-shaped cells and showed molecular and behavioral characteristics of endovascular trophoblasts. Another highly specific inhibitor of GSK3, CHIR99021, failed to induce endovascular trophoblast characteristics. These observations suggest that activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway correlates with both trophoblast differentiation pathways, but that additional factors determine specific cell fate decisions. Other experiments suggested that the differential effects of sodium butyrate and lithium chloride might be explained by their effects on TNFα production. The

  10. Polyvinyl butyral films containing leuco-malachite green as low-dose dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Hoang Hoa; Solomon, H. M.; Taguchi, M.; Kojima, T.

    2008-04-01

    Thin films containing leuco-malachite green (LMG) dye in polyvinyl butyral (PVB) have been developed for dose measurements of a few hundreds Gy level. The film shows significant color change in the visible range, and the sensitivity of the film to absorbed dose was enhanced by addition of chloride-containing compounds, such as chloral hydrate or 2,2,2-trichloroethanol. The film is suitable as dosimeters for dose measurements, e.g. in food irradiation and environmental protection.

  11. Pepper CabZIP63 acts as a positive regulator during Ralstonia solanacearum or high temperature-high humidity challenge in a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lei; Liu, Zhiqin; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Tong; Liang, Jiaqi; Wen, Jiayu; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiazhi; Shi, Lanping; Tang, Qian; Shi, Wei; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Lin, Wei; Wang, Rongzhang; Yu, Huanxin; Mou, Shaoliang; Hussain, Ansar; Cheng, Wei; Cai, Hanyang; He, Li; Guan, Deyi; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2016-04-01

    CaWRKY40 is known to act as a positive regulator in the response of pepper (Capsicum annuum) to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation (RSI) or high temperature-high humidity (HTHH), but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Herein, we report that CabZIP63, a pepper bZIP family member, participates in this process by regulating the expression of CaWRKY40. CabZIP63 was found to localize in the nuclei, be up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, bind to promoters of both CabZIP63(pCabZIP63) and CaWRKY40(pCaWRKY40), and activate pCabZIP63- and pCaWRKY40-driven β-glucuronidase expression in a C- or G-box-dependent manner. Silencing of CabZIP63 by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in pepper plants significantly attenuated their resistance to RSI and tolerance to HTHH, accompanied by down-regulation of immunity- or thermotolerance-associated CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1, and CaHSP24. Hypersensitive response-mediated cell death and expression of the tested immunity- and thermotolerance-associated marker genes were induced by transient overexpression (TOE) of CabZIP63, but decreased by that of CabZIP63-SRDX. Additionally, binding of CabZIP63 to pCaWRKY40 was up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, and the transcript level of CaWRKY40 and binding of CaWRKY40 to the promoters of CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1 and CaHSP24 were up-regulated by TOE of CabZIP63. On the other hand, CabZIP63 was also up-regulated transcriptionally by TOE of CaWRKY40. The data suggest collectively that CabZIP63 directly or indirectly regulates the expression of CaWRKY40 at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level, forming a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40 during pepper's response to RSI or HTHH. Altogether, our data will help to elucidate the underlying mechanism of crosstalk between pepper's response to RSI and HTHH.

  12. Pepper CabZIP63 acts as a positive regulator during Ralstonia solanacearum or high temperature–high humidity challenge in a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lei; Liu, Zhiqin; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Tong; Liang, Jiaqi; Wen, Jiayu; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiazhi; Shi, Lanping; Tang, Qian; Shi, Wei; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Lin, Wei; Wang, Rongzhang; Yu, Huanxin; Mou, Shaoliang; Hussain, Ansar; Cheng, Wei; Cai, Hanyang; He, Li; Guan, Deyi; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2016-01-01

    CaWRKY40 is known to act as a positive regulator in the response of pepper (Capsicum annuum) to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation (RSI) or high temperature–high humidity (HTHH), but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Herein, we report that CabZIP63, a pepper bZIP family member, participates in this process by regulating the expression of CaWRKY40. CabZIP63 was found to localize in the nuclei, be up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, bind to promoters of both CabZIP63 (pCabZIP63) and CaWRKY40 (pCaWRKY40), and activate pCabZIP63- and pCaWRKY40-driven β-glucuronidase expression in a C- or G-box-dependent manner. Silencing of CabZIP63 by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in pepper plants significantly attenuated their resistance to RSI and tolerance to HTHH, accompanied by down-regulation of immunity- or thermotolerance-associated CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1, and CaHSP24. Hypersensitive response-mediated cell death and expression of the tested immunity- and thermotolerance-associated marker genes were induced by transient overexpression (TOE) of CabZIP63, but decreased by that of CabZIP63-SRDX. Additionally, binding of CabZIP63 to pCaWRKY40 was up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, and the transcript level of CaWRKY40 and binding of CaWRKY40 to the promoters of CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1 and CaHSP24 were up-regulated by TOE of CabZIP63. On the other hand, CabZIP63 was also up-regulated transcriptionally by TOE of CaWRKY40. The data suggest collectively that CabZIP63 directly or indirectly regulates the expression of CaWRKY40 at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level, forming a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40 during pepper’s response to RSI or HTHH. Altogether, our data will help to elucidate the underlying mechanism of crosstalk between pepper’s response to RSI and HTHH. PMID:26936828

  13. Potentiated antitumor effects of a combination therapy with a farnesyltransferase inhibitor L-744,832 and butyrate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kopec, Maciej; Strusinska, Katarzyna; Legat, Magdalena; Makowski, Marcin; Jakobisiak, Marek; Golab, Jakub

    2004-05-01

    Farnesyltransferase inhibitors, butyrate and butyric acid derivatives have previously been reported to exert anti-tumor activity in experimental models in vitro and in vivo and have recently gained acceptance as potential anticancer agents. In our study, we examined antitumor effects of a combination of a farnesyltransferase inhibitor L-744,832 and butyrate in vitro against MDA-MB-231 and MIA PaCa-2 human cancer cells. This combination therapy showed synergistic antitumor activity against MDA-MB-231 cells, which was at least in part due to induction of p27KIP1 expression. Both drugs increased intracellular levels of p53 as well but there was no significant difference between the groups treated with single drugs and the group treated with their combination. In MIA PaCa-2 cells, the combination therapy exerted additive antitumor activity. Our results illustrate possible application of the farnesyltransferase inhibitor L-744,832 and butyrate as a combination therapy of cancer.

  14. Evaluation of enteric matrix microspheres prepared by emulsion-solvent evaporation using scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, W M; Price, J C

    2004-02-01

    Theophylline microspheres were prepared by the emulsion-solvent evaporation method using cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB381-20) and mixtures of CAB381-20(R) and cellulose acetate phthalate. The physical state of the drug, polymers and microspheres surfaces were determined using scanning electron microscopy. For those microspheres prepared using mixtures of CAB381-20 and cellulose acetate phthalate, scanning electron micrographs were taken before dissolution and also at different stages of dissolution (in SGF, pH 1.2 and in simulated intestinal fluid, pH 7.5). Micrographs were taken of the outside surfaces of the microspheres and of the cleaved microspheres showing their interiors (core). Drug crystals were observed on or near the surface of microspheres prepared from the polymer mixtures, while no drug particles or crystals were seen on the surfaces of microspheres prepared solely from CAB381-20. An acid wash for less than 2 min was capable of extracting all drug on the surface of the microspheres prepared from a mixture of CAB381-20 and cellulose acetate phthalate. The absence of drug crystals on the surface of CAB381-20 microspheres is believed to prevent initial drug release and create a lag time in release profiles. Results suggest that in both microsphere formulations, a layer of drug-free polymer is formed outside the core matrix and is believed to be responsible for the near zero-order release profiles.

  15. Severity of atopic disease inversely correlates with intestinal microbiota diversity and butyrate-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nylund, L; Nermes, M; Isolauri, E; Salminen, S; de Vos, W M; Satokari, R

    2015-02-01

    The reports on atopic diseases and microbiota in early childhood remain contradictory, and both decreased and increased microbiota diversity have been associated with atopic eczema. In this study, the intestinal microbiota signatures associated with the severity of eczema in 6-month-old infants were characterized. Further, the changes in intestinal microbiota composition related to the improvement of this disease 3 months later were assessed. The severity of eczema correlated inversely with microbiota diversity (r = -0.54, P = 0.002) and with the abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria (r = -0.52, P = 0.005). During the 3-month follow-up, microbiota diversity increased (P < 0.001) and scoring atopic dermatitis values decreased (P < 0.001) in all infants. This decrease coincided with the increase in bacteria related to butyrate-producing Coprococcus eutactus (r = -0.59, P = 0.02). In conclusion, the high diversity of microbiota and high abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria were associated with milder eczema, thus suggesting they have a role in alleviating symptoms of atopic eczema.

  16. TLR ligands and butyrate increase Pyy expression through two distinct but inter-regulated pathways.

    PubMed

    Larraufie, Pierre; Doré, Joël; Lapaque, Nicolas; Blottière, Hervé M

    2017-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium is an active barrier separating the host from its microbiota. It senses microbial compounds through expression of a wide range of receptors including the Toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLRs have been shown to regulate epithelium permeability or secretion of defensin by Paneth cells. However, the expression and function of TLRs in enteroendocrine L-cells, a specific subtype of intestinal cells secreting PYY and GLP-1, have not yet been assessed. PYY and GLP-1 are implicated in regulation of gut motility, food intake and insulin secretion, and are of great interest regarding obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a cellular model of human L-cells and a reporter system for NF-κB activation pathway, we reported functional expression of TLRs in these cells. Stimulation with specific TLR-agonists increased expression of Pyy but not Proglucagon in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Moreover, the effect of TLR stimulation was additive to butyrate, a product of bacterial fermentation, on Pyy expression. Additionally, butyrate also increased Tlr expression, including Tlr4, and the NF-κB response to TLR stimulation. Altogether, our results demonstrated a role of TLRs in the modulation of Pyy expression and the importance of butyrate, a product of bacterial fermentation in regulation of microbial TLR-dependent sensing.

  17. Impact of butyrate on microbial selection in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shamim A; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2014-01-01

    Microbial selection in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal system was investigated in a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor fed exclusively with butyrate as a carbon source. As reported in the few previous studies, butyrate uptake was slow and phosphorus (P) release occurred during the entire anaerobic period. Polyphosphate-accumulating organism (PAO), i.e. Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (named as Accumulibacter), glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs), i.e. Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis (named as Competibacter) and Defluviicoccus-related, tetrad-forming alphaproteobacteria (named as Defluviicoccus) were identified using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The results show that Accumulibacter and Defluviicoccus were selected in the butyrate-fed reactor, whereas Competibacter was not selected. P removal was efficient at the beginning of the experiment with an increasing percentage relative abundance (% RA) of PAOs. The % RA of Accumulibacter and Defluviicoccus increased from 13% to 50% and 8% to 16%, respectively, and the % RA of Competibacter decreased from 8% to 2% during the experiment. After 6 weeks, P removal deteriorated with the poor correlation between the percentage of P removal and % RA of GAOs.

  18. The effects of prebiotics on microbial dysbiosis, butyrate production and immunity in HIV-infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Villar, S; Vázquez-Castellanos, J F; Vallejo, A; Latorre, A; Sainz, T; Ferrando-Martínez, S; Rojo, D; Martínez-Botas, J; Del Romero, J; Madrid, N; Leal, M; Mosele, J I; Motilva, M J; Barbas, C; Ferrer, M; Moya, A; Moreno, S; Gosalbes, M J; Estrada, V

    2016-12-21

    Altered interactions between the gut mucosa and bacteria during HIV infection seem to contribute to chronic immune dysfunction. A deeper understanding of how nutritional interventions could ameliorate gut dysbiosis is needed. Forty-four subjects, including 12 HIV(+) viremic untreated (VU) patients, 23 antiretroviral therapy-treated (ART(+)) virally suppressed patients (15 immunological responders and 8 non-responders) and 9 HIV(-) controls (HIV(-)), were blindly randomized to receive either prebiotics (scGOS/lcFOS/glutamine) or placebo (34/10) over 6 weeks in this pilot study. We assessed fecal microbiota composition using deep 16S rRNA gene sequencing and several immunological and genetic markers involved in HIV immunopathogenesis. The short dietary supplementation attenuated HIV-associated dysbiosis, which was most apparent in VU individuals but less so in ART(+) subjects, whose gut microbiota was found more resilient. This compositional shift was not observed in the placebo arm. Significantly, declines in indirect markers of bacterial translocation and T-cell activation, improvement of thymic output, and changes in butyrate production were observed. Increases in the abundance of Faecalibacterium and Lachnospira strongly correlated with moderate but significant increases of butyrate production and amelioration of the inflammatory biomarkers soluble CD14 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, especially among VU. Hence, the bacterial butyrate synthesis pathway holds promise as a viable target for interventions.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication, 21 December 2016; doi:10.1038/mi.2016.122.

  19. Utilization of acetate by Beggiatoa.

    PubMed

    Burton, S D; Morita, R Y; Miller, W

    1966-03-01

    Burton, Sheril D. (Institute of Marine Science, University of Alaska, College), Richard Y. Morita, and Wayne Miller. Utilization of acetate by Beggiatoa. J. Bacteriol. 91:1192-1200. 1966.-A proposed system which would permit acetate incorporation into four-carbon compounds without the presence of key enzymes of the citric acid cycle or glyoxylate cycle is described. In this system, acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) is condensed with glyoxylate to form malate, which, in turn, is converted to oxaloacetate. Oxaloacetate then reacts with glutamate to produce alpha-ketoglutarate, which is subsequently converted to isocitrate. Cleavage of isocitrate produces glyoxylate and succinate. Thus, the proposed system is similar to the glyoxylate bypass in that malate is produced from glyoxylate and acetyl-CoA, but differs from both the citric acid cycle and the glyoxylate bypass, since citrate and fumarate are not involved. Fumarase, aconitase, catalase, citritase, pyruvate kinase, enolase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, lactic dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, and condensing enzyme were not detectable in crude extracts of Beggiatoa. Succinate was oxidized by a soluble enzyme not associated with an electron-transport particle. Isocitrate was identified as the sole compound labeled when C(14)O(2) was added to a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, CO(2) generating system (crystalline glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate) in the presence of alpha-ketoglutarate.

  20. Proboscis conditioning experiments with honeybees, Apis mellifera caucasica, with butyric acid and DEET mixture as conditioned and unconditioned stimuli.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Charles I; Giray, Tugrul; Mixson, T Andrew; Nolf, Sondra L; Wells, Harrington; Kence, Aykut; Kence, Meral

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments are described investigating whether olfactory repellents DEET and butyric acid can support the classical conditioning of proboscis extension in the honeybee, Apis mellifera caucasica (Hymenoptera: Apidae). In the first experiment DEET and butyric acid readily led to standard acquisition and extinction effects, which are comparable to the use of cinnamon as a conditioned stimulus. These results demonstrate that the odor of DEET or butyric acid is not intrinsically repellent to honey bees. In a second experiment, with DEET and butyric acid mixed with sucrose as an unconditioned stimulus, proboscis conditioning was not established. After several trials, few animals responded to the unconditioned stimulus. These results demonstrate that these chemicals are gustatory repellents when in direct contact. In the last experiment a conditioned suppression paradigm was used. Exposing animals to butyric acid or DEET when the proboscis was extended by direct sucrose stimulation or by learning revealed that retraction of the proboscis was similar to another novel odor, lavender, and in all cases greatest when the animal was not permitted to feed. These results again demonstrate that DEET or butyric acid are not olfactory repellents, and in addition, conditioned suppression is influenced by feeding state of the bee.

  1. Butyrate induced cell cycle arrest in bovine cells through targeting gene expression relevant to DNA replication apparatus.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong-jun; Li, Robert W

    2008-03-17

    Using real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis in bovine kidney epithelial cells, we systematically investigated the effects of butyrate on patterns of gene expression relevant to DNA replication apparatus. The real-time PCR and Western blot data generally confirmed previously reported microarray data. Of the five genes tested by quantitative RT-PCR, CDKN1A (p21(waf1)) was up regulated, CDC2/cdk1, MCM6, ORC1L were down regulated, while ORC3L expression remained unchanged following butyrate treatment. Also consistent with RT-PCR results, Western blot analysis confirmed that butyrate up-regulated cyclin-kinase inhibitor p21(waf1) in a does-dependent manner. In contrast, butyrate treatment had no effect on the expression of ERK 1/2 proteins. Also consistent with mRNA results, ORC1 and MCM3 proteins were down-regulated by butyrate treatment, while ORC2 protein remained unchanged. The present results suggest that ORC1, not ORC2 or ORC3, along with MCM proteins play a critical role in regulating the initiation of DNA replication and cell cycle progression in MDBK cells and are targets of butyrate regulation.

  2. Enzymatic production of glycerol acetate from glycerol.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seokhyeon; Park, Chulhwan

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we report the enzymatic production of glycerol acetate from glycerol and methyl acetate. Lipases are essential for the catalysis of this reaction. To find the optimum conditions for glycerol acetate production, sequential experiments were designed. Type of lipase, lipase concentration, molar ratio of reactants, reaction temperature and solvents were investigated for the optimum conversion of glycerol to glycerol acetate. As the result of lipase screening, Novozym 435 (Immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B) was turned out to be the optimal lipase for the reaction. Under the optimal conditions (2.5 g/L of Novozym 435, 1:40 molar ratio of glycerol to methyl acetate, 40 °C and tert-butanol as the solvent), glycerol acetate production was achieved in 95.00% conversion.

  3. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation...

  7. Butyrate enhances the intestinal barrier by facilitating tight junction assembly via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Peng, Luying; Li, Zhong-Rong; Green, Robert S; Holzman, Ian R; Lin, Jing

    2009-09-01

    Butyrate, one of the SCFA, promotes the development of the intestinal barrier. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the butyrate regulation of the intestinal barrier are unknown. To test the hypothesis that the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier is mediated by the regulation of the assembly of tight junctions involving the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), we determined the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and inulin permeability in a Caco-2 cell monolayer model. We further used a calcium switch assay to study the assembly of epithelial tight junctions and determined the effect of butyrate on the assembly of epithelial tight junctions and AMPK activity. We demonstrated that the butyrate treatment increased AMPK activity and accelerated the assembly of tight junctions as shown by the reorganization of tight junction proteins, as well as the development of TER. AMPK activity was also upregulated by butyrate during calcium switch-induced tight junction assembly. Compound C, a specific AMPK inhibitor, inhibited the butyrate-induced activation of AMPK. The facilitating effect of butyrate on the increases in TER in standard culture media, as well as after calcium switch, was abolished by compound C. We conclude that butyrate enhances the intestinal barrier by regulating the assembly of tight junctions. This dynamic process is mediated by the activation of AMPK. These results suggest an intriguing link between SCFA and the intracellular energy sensor for the development of the intestinal barrier.

  8. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3 or C2H3O2Na·3H2O, CAS Reg. No. 6131-90-4) is the sodium salt of acetic acid and occurs naturally in plant...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3 or C2H3O2Na·3H2O, CAS Reg. No. 6131-90-4) is the sodium salt of acetic acid and occurs naturally in plant...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3 or C2H3O2Na·3H2O, CAS Reg. No. 6131-90-4) is the sodium salt of acetic acid and occurs naturally in plant...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3 or C2H3O2Na·3H2O, CAS Reg. No. 6131-90-4) is the sodium salt of acetic acid and occurs naturally in plant...

  12. Perturbation of Indole-3-Butyric Acid Homeostasis by the UDP-Glucosyltransferase UGT74E2 Modulates Arabidopsis Architecture and Water Stress Tolerance[W

    PubMed Central

    Tognetti, Vanesa B.; Van Aken, Olivier; Morreel, Kris; Vandenbroucke, Korneel; van de Cotte, Brigitte; De Clercq, Inge; Chiwocha, Sheila; Fenske, Ricarda; Prinsen, Els; Boerjan, Wout; Genty, Bernard; Stubbs, Keith A.; Inzé, Dirk; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species and redox signaling undergo synergistic and antagonistic interactions with phytohormones to regulate protective responses of plants against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, molecular insight into the nature of this crosstalk remains scarce. We demonstrate that the hydrogen peroxide–responsive UDP-glucosyltransferase UGT74E2 of Arabidopsis thaliana is involved in the modulation of plant architecture and water stress response through its activity toward the auxin indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). Biochemical characterization of recombinant UGT74E2 demonstrated that it strongly favors IBA as a substrate. Assessment of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), IBA, and their conjugates in transgenic plants ectopically expressing UGT74E2 indicated that the catalytic specificity was maintained in planta. In these transgenic plants, not only were IBA-Glc concentrations increased, but also free IBA levels were elevated and the conjugated IAA pattern was modified. This perturbed IBA and IAA homeostasis was associated with architectural changes, including increased shoot branching and altered rosette shape, and resulted in significantly improved survival during drought and salt stress treatments. Hence, our results reveal that IBA and IBA-Glc are important regulators of morphological and physiological stress adaptation mechanisms and provide molecular evidence for the interplay between hydrogen peroxide and auxin homeostasis through the action of an IBA UGT. PMID:20798329

  13. An Alteration in the Cecal Microbiota Composition by Feeding of 1-Kestose Results in a Marked Increase in the Cecal Butyrate Content in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Saki; Sugawa, Chie; Takahashi, Motoki; Endo, Akihito; Shimomura, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Functional food ingredients, including prebiotics, have been ardently developed for improving the intestinal environment. Fructooligosaccarides (FOS), including fructans, are the well researched and commercialized prebiotics. However, to our knowledge, few studies have been conducted on the physiological effects of each component of FOS as prebiotics. 1-Kestose, a component of FOS, is composed of one glucose and two fructose molecules, and is considered as a key prebiotic component in short-chain FOS. In the present study, we examined the effects of dietary 1-kestose using 0.5–5% 1-kestose diets on cecal microbiota composition and cecal contents of short-chain fatty acids and lactate in rats. The findings indicate that dietary 1-kestose induced cecal hypertrophy and alterations in the cecal microbiota composition, including a marked increase in the cell number of Bifidobacterium spp. These alterations were associated with significant increases in acetate and lactate, and a marked increase in butyrate in cecal contents. Furthermore, dietary 1-kestose induced a significant decrease in serum insulin concentration in rats fed 2.5–5% 1-kestose diet. These findings suggest a potential of 1-kestose to be a prebiotic for improving the metabolism of the host. PMID:27861621

  14. Pharmacological profile of 9,11-dehydrocortexolone 17alpha-butyrate (CB-03-04), a new androgen antagonist with antigonadotropic activity.

    PubMed

    Celasco, Giuseppe; Moroa, Luigi; Bozzella, Roberta; Ferraboschi, Patrizia; Bartorelli, Luisa; Di Marco, Roberto; Quattrocchi, Cinzia; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2005-01-01

    A series of new cortexolone-related derivatives has been synthesized and investigated for potential anti-androgenic activity. Among the steroids evaluated, 9,11-dehydrocortexolone 17alpha-butyrate (CB-03-04) was the most promising one. The compound displayed a strong local antiandrogenic activity in hamster's flank organ test, and it was also found to be effective in the rat after subcutaneous injection. When compared to other well known androgen antagonists, the rank order of topical anti-androgenic activity in that test was: cyproterone acetate (CAS 427-51-0) > or = CB-03-04 > finasteride (CAS 98319-26-7) > flutamide (CAS 13311-84-7). In addition, the steroid had selective antigonadotropic activity, when injected into parabiotic rats, and was about as active as progesterone. The activity of CB-03-04 was ascribed mainly to its ability to compete with the stimulating effects of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone and, concurrently, to inhibit the gonadotropins hypersecretion. This bimodal mechanism of action could be predictive for the clinical usefulness of the steroid in the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy.

  15. An Alteration in the Cecal Microbiota Composition by Feeding of 1-Kestose Results in a Marked Increase in the Cecal Butyrate Content in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tochio, Takumi; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Nakamura, Saki; Sugawa, Chie; Takahashi, Motoki; Endo, Akihito; Shimomura, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Functional food ingredients, including prebiotics, have been ardently developed for improving the intestinal environment. Fructooligosaccarides (FOS), including fructans, are the well researched and commercialized prebiotics. However, to our knowledge, few studies have been conducted on the physiological effects of each component of FOS as prebiotics. 1-Kestose, a component of FOS, is composed of one glucose and two fructose molecules, and is considered as a key prebiotic component in short-chain FOS. In the present study, we examined the effects of dietary 1-kestose using 0.5-5% 1-kestose diets on cecal microbiota composition and cecal contents of short-chain fatty acids and lactate in rats. The findings indicate that dietary 1-kestose induced cecal hypertrophy and alterations in the cecal microbiota composition, including a marked increase in the cell number of Bifidobacterium spp. These alterations were associated with significant increases in acetate and lactate, and a marked increase in butyrate in cecal contents. Furthermore, dietary 1-kestose induced a significant decrease in serum insulin concentration in rats fed 2.5-5% 1-kestose diet. These findings suggest a potential of 1-kestose to be a prebiotic for improving the metabolism of the host.

  16. Extractive fermentation of acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Busche, R.M.

    1991-12-31

    In this technoeconomic evaluation of the manufacture of acetic acid by fermentation, the use of the bacterium: Acetobacter suboxydans from the old vinegar process was compared with expected performance of the newer Clostridium thermoaceticum bacterium. Both systems were projected to operate as immobilized cells in a continuous, fluidized bed bioreactor, using solvent extraction to recover the product. Acetobacter metabolizes ethanol aerobically to produce acid at 100 g/L in a low pH medium. This ensures that the product is in the form of a concentrated extractable free acid, rather than as an unextractable salt. Unfortunately, yields from glucose by way of the ethanol fermentation are poor, but near the biological limits of the organisms involved. Conversely, C. thermoaceticum is a thermophilic anaerobe that operates at high fermentation rates on glucose at neutral pH to produce acetate salts directly in substantially quantitative yields. However, it is severely inhibited by product, which restricts concentration to a dilute 20 g/L. An improved Acetobacter system operating with recycled cells at 50 g/L appears capable of producing acid at $0.38/lb, as compared with a $0.29/lb price for synthetic acid. However, this system has only a limited margin for process improvement. The present Clostridium system cannot compete, since the required selling price would be $0.42/lb. However, if the organism could be adapted to tolerate higher product concentrations at acid pH, selling price could be reduced to $0.22/lb, or about 80% of the price of synthetic acid.

  17. The expression patterns of SAG12/Cab genes reveal the spatial and temporal progression of leaf senescence in Brassica napus L. with sensitivity to the environment.

    PubMed

    Gombert, Julie; Etienne, Philippe; Ourry, Alain; Le Dily, Frédérik

    2006-01-01

    Despite a high nitrate uptake capacity, the nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) of oilseed rape is weak due to a relatively low N remobilization from vegetative (mostly leaves) to growing parts of the plant. Thus, this crop requires a high rate of N fertilization and leaves fall with a high N content. In order to reduce the rate of N fertilization and to improve the environmental impact of oilseed rape, new genotypes could be selected on their capacity to mobilize the foliar N. Various indicators of leaf senescence in oilseed rape were analysed during plant growth, as well as during senescence induced by N deprivation. Metabolic changes in leaves of increasing age were followed in N-supplied and N-deprived rosettes by measuring chlorophyll, total N, and soluble protein contents. Similarly, the expression of genes known to be up-regulated (SAG12) or down-regulated (Cab) during leaf senescence was monitored. The amount of soluble proteins per leaf was a better indicator of leaf senescence than chlorophyll or total N content, but was not evaluated as an accurate indicator under conditions of N deprivation. On the other hand, up-regulation of SAG12 concomitantly with down-regulation of Cab in the leaf revealed the spatial and temporal progression of leaf senescence in oilseed rape. This study shows, for the first time at the whole plant level, that the SAG12/Cab gene expressions match the sink/source transition for N during both developmental and nutrient stress-induced leaf senescence.

  18. Increased Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure Is Associated With Altered Gut Microbiota Composition and Butyrate Production in Early Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Arango, Luisa F; Barrett, Helen L; McIntyre, H David; Callaway, Leonie K; Morrison, Mark; Dekker Nitert, Marloes

    2016-10-01

    The risk of developing pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia is higher in obese pregnant women. In obesity, the composition of the gut microbiota is altered. Obesity is also associated with low-grade inflammation. Metabolites from the gut microbiota may contribute to both hypertension and inflammation. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the composition of the gut microbiota in overweight and obese pregnant women is associated with blood pressure and levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. The composition of the gut microbiota was determined with 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing in 205 women at 16 weeks gestation from the SPRING study (the Study of Probiotics in Gestational Diabetes). Expression of butyrate-producing genes in the gut microbiota was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels were measured in fasting serum of a subset of 70 women. Blood pressure was slightly but significantly higher in obese compared with overweight women. The abundance of the butyrate-producing genus Odoribacter was inversely correlated with systolic blood pressure. Butyrate production capacity was decreased, but plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 concentrations increased in obese pregnant women. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels were inversely correlated with expression of butyrate kinase and Odoribacter abundance. This study shows that in overweight and obese pregnant women at 16 weeks gestation, the abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria and butyrate production in the gut microbiota is significantly negatively associated with blood pressure and with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels. Increasing butyrate-producing capacity may contribute to maintenance of normal blood pressure in obese pregnant women.

  19. Sodium Butyrate Reduces Colitogenic Immunoglobulin A-Coated Bacteria and Modifies the Composition of Microbiota in IL-10 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tenghui; Ding, Chao; Zhao, Mingli; Dai, Xujie; Yang, Jianbo; Li, Yi; Gu, Lili; Wei, Yao; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    High levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA)-coated bacteria may have a role in driving inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We therefore investigated the effect of sodium butyrate on microbiota in IBD prone interleukin (IL)-10−/− mice. At 8 weeks of age, mice were allocated into three groups (n = 4/group): normal (C57BL/6), IL-10−/−, and IL-10−/− treated with sodium butyrate (100 mM). Severity of colitis, inflammatory cytokine and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration in proximal colon contents, the percentage of IgA-coated bacteria and microbiota composition by 16S ribosomal RNA assessment of stool were measured after 4 weeks of treatment. Sodium butyrate ameliorated histological colitis and decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-6 in IL-10−/− mice compared with those without treatment. At the phylum level, a reduction in Bacteroidetes and an increase in Firmicutes in IL-10−/− mice treated with sodium butyrate were observed. Additionally, Prevotellaceae species were reduced in IL-10−/− mice treated with sodium butyrate as compared with those without treatment. The level of biodiversity was slightly increased and the amount of IgA-coated bacteria decreased in IL-10−/− mice treated with sodium butyrate compared with those without treatment. Our results indicate that sodium butyrate protects against colitis, possibly through modifying the gut microbiota, enriching biodiversity and reducing the amount of colitogenic IgA-coated bacteria in IL-10−/− mice. PMID:27886121

  20. Control of placental alkaline phosphatase gene expression in HeLa cells: induction of synthesis by prednisolone and sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Takahashi, S.

    1987-06-16

    HeLa S/sub 3/ cells produce an alkaline phosphatase indistinguishable from the enzyme from human term placenta. The phosphatase activity in these cells was induced by both prednisolone and sodium butyrate. Both agents stimulated de novo synthesis of the enzyme. The increase in phosphatase activity paralleled the increase in immunoactivity and biosynthesis of placental alkaline phosphatase. The fully processed phosphatase monomer in control, prednisolone-treated or butyrate-treated cells was a 64.5 K polypeptide, measured by both incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)methionine into enzyme protein and active-site labeling. The 64.5K polypeptide was formed by the incorporation of additional N-acetylneuraminic acid moieties to a precursor polypeptide of 61.5K. However, this biosynthetic pathway was identified only in butyrate-treated cells. In prednisolone-treated cells, the processing of 61.5K to 64.5K monomer was accelerated, and the presence of the 61.5 precursor could only be detected by either neuraminidase or monensin treatment. Phosphatase mRNA which comigrated with the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA of 2.7 kilobases was induced in the presence of either prednisolone or butyrate. Alkaline phosphatase mRNA is untreated HeLa S/sub 3/ cells migrated slightly faster than the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Butyrate also induced a second still faster migrating alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Both prednisolone and butyrate increased the steady-state levels of placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. The data indicate that the increase in phosphatase mRNA by prednisolone and butyrate resulted in the induction of alkaline phosphatase activity and biosynthesis in HeLa S/sub 3/ cells. Furthermore, both agents induced the expression of different alkaline phosphatase gene transcripts without altering its protein product.

  1. Steering Endogenous Butyrate Production in the Intestinal Tract of Broilers as a Tool to Improve Gut Health

    PubMed Central

    Onrust, Lonneke; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Driessche, Karolien; De Maesschalck, Celine; Vermeulen, Karen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The ban on antimicrobial growth promoters and efforts to reduce therapeutic antibiotic usage has led to major problems of gastrointestinal dysbiosis in livestock production in Europe. Control of dysbiosis without the use of antibiotics requires a thorough understanding of the interaction between the microbiota and the host mucosa. The gut microbiota of the healthy chicken is highly diverse, producing various metabolic end products, including gases and fermentation acids. The distal gut knows an abundance of bacteria from within the Firmicutes Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa that produce butyric acid, which is one of the metabolites that are sensed by the host as a signal. The host responds by strengthening the epithelial barrier, reducing inflammation, and increasing the production of mucins and antimicrobial peptides. Stimulating the colonization and growth of butyrate-producing bacteria thus may help optimizing gut health. Various strategies are available to stimulate butyrate production in the distal gut. These include delivery of prebiotic substrates that are broken down by bacteria into smaller molecules which are then used by butyrate producers, a concept called cross-feeding. Xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) are such compounds as they can be converted to lactate, which is further metabolized to butyrate. Probiotic lactic acid producers can be supplied to support the cross-feeding reactions. Direct feeding of butyrate-producing Clostridium cluster IV and XIVa strains are a future tool provided that large scale production of strictly anaerobic bacteria can be optimized. Current results of strategies that promote butyrate production in the gut are promising. Nevertheless, our current understanding of the intestinal ecosystem is still insufficient, and further research efforts are needed to fully exploit the capacity of these strategies. PMID:26734618

  2. Manufacturing Ethyl Acetate From Fermentation Ethanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, Naresh K.; Ingham, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Conceptual process uses dilute product of fermentation instead of concentrated ethanol. Low-concentration ethanol, extracted by vacuum from fermentation tank, and acetic acid constitutes feedstock for catalytic reaction. Product of reaction goes through steps that increases ethyl acetate content to 93 percent by weight. To conserve energy, heat exchangers recycle waste heat to preheat process streams at various points.

  3. Electron transfer induced fragmentation of acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Meneses, G.; Almeida, D.; Limão-Vieira, P.

    2014-04-01

    We present negative ion formation driven by electron transfer in atom (K) molecule (acetic acid) collisions. Acetic acid has been found in the interstellar medium, is also considered a biological related compound and as such studying low energy electron interactions will bring new insights as far as induced chemistry is concerned.

  4. CELLULOSE NITRATE-ACETATE MIXED ESTERS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    cellulose acetate . The degree of polymerization of the products, as estimated from viscosity data, shows the occurrence of chain degradation for both...mixed esters showed tensile strength at least comparable to that of films of cellulose nitrate or cellulose acetate . The impact sensitivity of the

  5. Use of Additives to Improve Performance of Methyl Butyrate-Based Lithium-Ion Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2011-01-01

    This work addresses the need for robust rechargeable batteries that can operate well over a wide temperature range. To this end, a number of electrolyte formulations have been developed that incorporate the use of electrolyte additives to improve the high-temperature resilience, low-temperature power capability, and life characteristics of methyl butyrate-based electrolyte solutions. These electrolyte additives include mono-fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC), lithium oxalate, vinylene carbonate (VC), and lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB), which have been shown to result in improved high-temperature resilience of all carbonate-based electrolytes. Improved performance has been demonstrated of Li-ion cells with methyl butyrate-based electrolytes, including 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %); 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 2% FEC; 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 4% FEC; 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + lithium oxalate; 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 2% VC; and 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 0.10M LiBOB. These electrolytes have been shown to improve performance in MCMB-LiNiCoO2 and graphite-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 experimental Li-ion cells. A number of LiPF6-based mixed carbonate electrolyte formulations have been developed that contain ester co-solvents, which have been optimized for operation at low temperature, while still providing reasonable performance at high temperature. For example, a number of ester co-solvents were investigated, including methyl propionate (MP), ethyl propionate (EP), methyl butyrate (MB), ethyl butyrate (EB), propyl butyrate (PB), and butyl butyrate (BB) in multi-component electrolytes of the following composition: 1.0M LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC) + ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) + X (20:60:20 v/v %) [where X = ester co-solvent]. ["Optimized Car bon ate and Ester-Based Li-Ion Electrolytes", NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 4 (April 2008), p. 56.] Focusing upon improved rate

  6. Impact of trace element addition on degradation efficiency of volatile fatty acids, oleic acid and phenyl acetate and on microbial populations in a biogas digester.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Anna; Einarsson, Peter; Schnürer, Anna; Sundberg, Carina; Ejlertsson, Jörgen; Svensson, Bo H

    2012-10-01

    The effect of trace element addition on anaerobic digestion of food industry- and household waste was studied using two semi-continuous lab-scale reactors, one (R30+) was supplied with Fe, Co and Ni, while the other (R30) acted as a control. Tracer analysis illustrated that methane production from acetate proceeded through syntrophic acetate oxidation (SAO) in both digesters. The effect of the trace elements was also evaluated in batch assays to determine the capacity of the microorganisms of the two digesters to degrade acetate, phenyl acetate, oleic acid or propionate, butyrate and valerate provided as a cocktail. The trace elements addition improved the performance of the process giving higher methane yields during start-up and early operation and lower levels of mainly acetate and propionate in the R30+ reactor. The batch assay showed that material from R30+ gave effects on methane production from all substrates tested. Phenyl acetate was observed to inhibit methane formation in the R30 but not in the R30+ assay. A real-time PCR analysis targeting methanogens on the order level as well as three SAO bacteria showed an increase in Methanosarcinales in the R30+ reactor over time, even though SAO continuously was the dominating pathway for methane production. Possibly, this increase explains the low VFA-levels and higher degradation rates observed in the R30+ batch incubations. These results show that the added trace elements affected the ability of the microflora to degrade VFAs as well as oleic acid and phenyl acetate in a community, where acetate utilization is dominated by SAO.

  7. Shaping reactor microbiomes to produce the fuel precursor n-butyrate from pretreated cellulosic hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Agler, Matthew T; Werner, Jeffrey J; Iten, Loren B; Dekker, Arjan; Cotta, Michael A; Dien, Bruce S; Angenent, Largus T

    2012-09-18

    To maximize the production of carboxylic acids with open cultures of microbial consortia (reactor microbiomes), we performed experiments to understand which factors affect the community dynamics and performance parameters. We operated six thermophilic (55 °C) bioreactors to test how the factors: (i) biomass pretreatment; (ii) bioreactor operating conditions; and (iii) bioreactor history (after perturbations during the operating period) affected total fermentation product and n-butyrate performance parameters with corn fiber as the cellulosic biomass waste. We observed a maximum total fermentation product yield of 39%, a n-butyrate yield of 23% (both on a COD basis), a maximum total fermentation production rate of 0.74 g COD l(-1) d(-1) and n-butyrate production rate of 0.47 g COD l(-1) d(-1) in bioreactors that were fed with dilute-acid pretreated corn fiber at a pH of 5.5. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes with constrained ordination and other statistical methods showed that changes in operating conditions to enable dilution of toxic carboxylic acid products, which lead to these maximum performance parameters, also altered the composition of the microbiome, and that the microbiome, in turn, affected the performance. Operating conditions are an important factor (tool for operators) to shape reactor microbiomes, but other factors, such as substrate composition after biomass pretreatment and bioreactor history are also important. Further optimization of operating conditions must relieve the toxicity of carboxylic acids at acidic bioreactor pH levels even more, and this can, for example, be accomplished by extracting the product from the bioreactor solutions.

  8. Lactate-utilizing bacteria, isolated from human feces, that produce butyrate as a major fermentation product.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Sylvia H; Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2004-10-01

    The microbial community of the human colon contains many bacteria that produce lactic acid, but lactate is normally detected only at low concentrations (<5 mM) in feces from healthy individuals. It is not clear, however, which bacteria are mainly responsible for lactate utilization in the human colon. Here, bacteria able to utilize lactate and produce butyrate were identified among isolates obtained from 10(-8) dilutions of fecal samples from five different subjects. Out of nine such strains identified, four were found to be related to Eubacterium hallii and two to Anaerostipes caccae, while the remaining three represent a new species within clostridial cluster XIVa based on their 16S rRNA sequences. Significant ability to utilize lactate was not detected in the butyrate-producing species Roseburia intestinalis, Eubacterium rectale, or Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Whereas E. hallii and A. caccae strains used both D- and L-lactate, the remaining strains used only the d form. Addition of glucose to batch cultures prevented lactate utilization until the glucose became exhausted. However, when two E. hallii strains and one A. caccae strain were grown in separate cocultures with a starch-utilizing Bifidobacterium adolescentis isolate, with starch as the carbohydrate energy source, the L-lactate produced by B. adolescentis became undetectable and butyrate was formed. Such cross-feeding may help to explain the reported butyrogenic effect of certain dietary substrates, including resistant starch. The abundance of E. hallii in particular in the colonic ecosystem suggests that these bacteria play important roles in preventing lactate accumulation.

  9. Tarsi of Male Heliothine Moths Contain Aldehydes and Butyrate Esters as Potential Pheromone Components.

    PubMed

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Ahn, Seung-Joon; Park, Kye-Chung; Meer, Robert Vander; Cardé, Ring T; Jurenka, Russell

    2016-05-01

    The Noctuidae are one of the most speciose moth families and include the genera Helicoverpa and Heliothis. Females use (Z)-11-hexadecenal as the major component of their sex pheromones except for Helicoverpa assulta and Helicoverpa gelotopoeon, both of which utilize (Z)-9-hexadecenal. The minor compounds found in heliothine sex pheromone glands vary with species, but hexadecanal has been found in the pheromone gland of almost all heliothine females so far investigated. In this study, we found a large amount (0.5-1.5 μg) of hexadecanal and octadecanal on the legs of males of four heliothine species, Helicoverpa zea, Helicoverpa armigera, H. assulta, and Heliothis virescens. The hexadecanal was found on and released from the tarsi, and was in much lower levels or not detected on the remaining parts of the leg (tibia, femur, trochanter, and coxa). Lower amounts (0.05-0.5 μg) of hexadecanal were found on female tarsi. This is the first known sex pheromone compound to be identified from the legs of nocturnal moths. Large amounts of butyrate esters (about 16 μg) also were found on tarsi of males with lower amounts on female tarsi. Males deposited the butyrate esters while walking on a glass surface. Decapitation did not reduce the levels of hexadecanal on the tarsi of H. zea males, indicating that hexadecanal production is not under the same neuroendocrine regulation system as the production of female sex pheromone. Based on electroantennogram studies, female antennae had a relatively high response to hexadecanal compared to male antennae. We consider the possible role of aldehydes and butyrate esters as courtship signals in heliothine moths.

  10. Enhancement of memory consolidation by the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Blank, Martina; Werenicz, Aline; Velho, Luciana Azevedo; Pinto, Diana F; Fedi, Ana Cláudia; Lopes, Mark William; Peres, Tanara Vieira; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Dornelles, Arethuza S; Roesler, Rafael

    2015-05-06

    Here we show that a systemic injection of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) sodium butyrate (NaB) immediately after training in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task produced an enhancement of memory consolidation that persisted across consecutive retention tests during 14 days in aged rats, while it did not significantly affect memory in young adults. Control aged and young adult rats showed comparable basal levels of memory retention. Our results suggest that HDACis can display memory-enhancing effects specific for aged animals, even in the absence of age-related memory impairment.

  11. Untangling the fiber yarn: butyrate feeds Warburg to suppress colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, Carlos; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2014-12-01

    Dietary composition has an important role in shaping the gut microbiota. In turn, changes in the diet directly impinge on bacterial metabolites present in the intestinal lumen. Whether such metabolites play a role in intestinal cancer has been a topic of hot debate. In this issue of Cancer Discovery, Donohoe and colleagues show that dietary fiber protects against colorectal carcinoma in a microbiota-dependent manner. Furthermore, fiber-derived butyrate acts as a histone deacetylase inhibitor, inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells experiencing the Warburg effect.

  12. In Vitro Effects of Dietary Inulin on Human Fecal Microbiota and Butyrate Production.

    PubMed

    Jung, Tae-Hwan; Jeon, Woo-Min; Han, Kyoung-Sik

    2015-09-01

    Administration of dietary fibers has various health benefits, mainly by increasing numbers of beneficial bacteria and enhancing production of short-chain fatty acids in the colon. There has been growing interest in the addition of dietary fiber to human diet, due to its prebiotic effects. This study aimed to evaluate the prebiotic activity of inulin using an in vitro batch fermentation system with human fecal microbiota. Fermentation of inulin resulted in a significantly greater ratio of Lactobacillus or Bifidobacteria to Enterobacteria strains as an index of healthy human intestine and elevated butyrate concentration, which are related to improvement of gut health.

  13. Depomedroxyprogesterone acetate for hot flashes.

    PubMed

    Barton, Debra; Loprinzi, Charles; Quella, Susan; Sloan, Jeff; Pruthi, Sandya; Novotny, Paul

    2002-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a long-acting preparation of medroxyprogesterone acetate for hot flash management, 3 men receiving androgen ablation therapy for prostate cancer and 15 women with a history of breast cancer were treated as part of clinical practice with three biweekly intramuscular injections of 500 mg depomedroxyprogesterone. A review of hot flash diaries and patient charts were completed to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of these injections for managing hot flashes. Treatment was associated with an approximate 90% decrease in hot flashes (95% CI 82-97%). Daily hot flash frequency decreased from a mean of 10.9 on the first day of treatment (95% CI 8.0-13.8 hot flashes per day) to a mean of 1.1 hot flashes 6 weeks later (95% CI 0.5-1.8 hot flashes) and to a mean of 0.7 hot flashes 12 weeks following therapy initiation (95% CI 0.1-1.2). Improvement in the hot flashes remained for months after discontinuing the injections in many patients. Reported side effects were minimal. This experience suggests that treatment with depomedroxyprogesterone may be an effective and well-tolerated option for the treatment of hot flashes.

  14. Vesicles protect activated acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Todd, Zoe R; House, Christopher H

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Methyl thioacetate, or activated acetic acid, has been proposed to be central to the origin of life and an important energy currency molecule in early cellular evolution. We have investigated the hydrolysis of methyl thioacetate under various conditions. Its uncatalyzed rate of hydrolysis is about 3 orders of magnitude faster (K=0.00663 s(-1); 100°C, pH 7.5, concentration=0.33 mM) than published rates for its catalyzed production, making it unlikely to accumulate under prebiotic conditions. However, our experiments showed that methyl thioacetate was protected from hydrolysis when inside its own hydrophobic droplets. Further, we found that methyl thioacetate protection from hydrolysis was also possible in droplets of hexane and in the membranes of nonanoic acid vesicles. Thus, the hydrophobic regions of prebiotic vesicles and early cell membranes could have offered a refuge for this energetic molecule, increasing its lifetime in close proximity to the reactions for which it would be needed. This model of early energy storage evokes an additional critical function for the earliest cell membranes.

  15. Predominant contribution of syntrophic acetate oxidation to thermophilic methane formation at high acetate concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hao, Li-Ping; Lü, Fan; He, Pin-Jing; Li, Lei; Shao, Li-Ming

    2011-01-15

    To quantify the contribution of syntrophic acetate oxidation to thermophilic anaerobic methanogenesis under the stressed condition induced by acidification, the methanogenic conversion process of 100 mmol/L acetate was monitored simultaneously by using isotopic tracing and selective inhibition techniques, supplemented with the analysis of unculturable microorganisms. Both quantitative methods demonstrated that, in the presence of aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens, a large percentage of methane (up to 89%) was initially derived from CO(2) reduction, indicating the predominant contribution of the syntrophic acetate oxidation pathway to acetate degradation at high acid concentrations. A temporal decrease of the fraction of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis from more than 60% to less than 40% reflected the gradual prevalence of the aceticlastic methanogenesis pathway along with the reduction of acetate. This apparent discrimination of acetate methanization pathways highlighted the importance of the syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacteria to initialize methanogenesis from high organic loadings.

  16. Accelerated dysbiosis of gut microbiota during aggravation of DSS-induced colitis by a butyrate-producing bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qianpeng; Wu, Yanqiu; Wang, Jing; Wu, Guojun; Long, Wenmin; Xue, Zhengsheng; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Xiaojun; Pang, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Yufeng; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Chenhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate-producing bacteria (BPB) are potential probiotic candidates for inflammatory bowel diseases as they are often depleted in the diseased gut microbiota. However, here we found that augmentation of a human-derived butyrate-producing strain, Anaerostipes hadrus BPB5, significantly aggravated colitis in dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-treated mice while exerted no detrimental effect in healthy mice. We explored how the interaction between BPB5 and gut microbiota may contribute to this differential impact on the hosts. Butyrate production and severity of colitis were assessed in both healthy and DSS-treated mice, and gut microbiota structural changes were analysed using high-throughput sequencing. BPB5-inoculated healthy mice showed no signs of colitis, but increased butyrate content in the gut. In DSS-treated mice, BPB5 augmentation did not increase butyrate content, but induced significantly more severe disease activity index and much higher mortality. BPB5 didn’t induce significant changes of gut microbiota in healthy hosts, but expedited the structural shifts 3 days earlier toward the disease phase in BPB5-augmented than DSS-treated animals. The differential response of gut microbiota in healthy and DSS-treated mice to the same potentially beneficial bacterium with drastically different health consequences suggest that animals with dysbiotic gut microbiota should also be employed for the safety assessment of probiotic candidates. PMID:27264309

  17. The effect of butyrate concentration on hydrogen production via photofermentation for use in a Martian habitat resource recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jackson Z.; Klaus, David M.; Maness, Pin-Ching; Spear, John R.

    2007-10-01

    Biological hydrogen production from waste biomass has both terrestrial and Martian advanced life support applications. Several forms of this process exist, but one process, indirect biophotolysis, is suitable for a potential Mars mission. This process is two-stage, combining a dark fermentation of starch or sugars with photofermentation of the remaining waste organic acids to produce hydrogen gas. Since butyrate is expected as one of the major inputs into photofermentation from the first stage, Rhodobacter sphaeroides SCJ, a photoheterotrophic purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium was examined for its potential in hydrogen production at 10–100 mM butyrate concentrations. As butyrate levels increased, hydrogen production increased up to 25 mM butyrate, and then decreased and ceased by 100 mM. Additionally, lag phase increased with butyrate concentration, possibly indicating substrate inhibition. Maximal substrate conversion efficiency was 8.0%; maximal light efficiency was 0.89%; and maximal hydrogen production rate was 7.7 μmol/(mg cdwh) (173 μL/ (mg cdwh)).These are generally lower than values reported in the literature.

  18. Effect Of Iron On The Sensitivity Of Hydrogen, Acetate, And Butyrate Metabolism To Inhibition By Long-Chain Fatty Acids In Vegetable-Oil-Enriched Freshwater Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater sediment microbial communities enriched by growth on vegetable oil in the presence of a substoichiometric amount of ferric hydroxide (sufficient to accept about 12% of the vegetable-oil-derived electrons) degrade vegetable oil to methane faster than similar microbial c...

  19. Capturing One of the Human Gut Microbiome’s Most Wanted: Reconstructing the Genome of a Novel Butyrate-Producing, Clostridial Scavenger from Metagenomic Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Jeraldo, Patricio; Hernandez, Alvaro; Nielsen, Henrik B.; Chen, Xianfeng; White, Bryan A.; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Nelson, Heidi; Alhquist, David; Boardman, Lisa; Chia, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The role of the microbiome in health and disease is attracting great attention, yet we still know little about some of the most prevalent microorganisms inside our bodies. Several years ago, Human Microbiome Project (HMP) researchers generated a list of “most wanted” taxa: bacteria both prevalent among healthy volunteers and distantly related to any sequenced organisms. Unfortunately, the challenge of assembling high-quality genomes from a tangle of metagenomic reads has slowed progress in learning about these uncultured bacteria. Here, we describe how recent advances in sequencing and analysis allowed us to assemble “most wanted” genomes from metagenomic data collected from four stool samples. Using a combination of both de novo and guided assembly methods, we assembled and binned over 100 genomes from an initial data set of over 1,300 Gbp. One of these genome bins, which met HMP’s criteria for a “most wanted” taxa, contained three essentially complete genomes belonging to a previously uncultivated species. This species is most closely related to Eubacterium desmolans and the clostridial cluster IV/Clostridium leptum subgroup species Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum (71–76% average nucleotide identity). Gene function analysis indicates that the species is an obligate anaerobe, forms spores, and produces the anti-inflammatory short-chain fatty acids acetate and butyrate. It also appears to take up metabolically costly molecules such as cobalamin, methionine, and branch-chained amino acids from the environment, and to lack virulence genes. Thus, the evidence is consistent with a secondary degrader that occupies a host-dependent, nutrient-scavenging niche within the gut; its ability to produce butyrate, which is thought to play an anti-inflammatory role, makes it intriguing for the study of diseases such as colon cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. In conclusion, we have assembled essentially complete genomes from stool metagenomic data, yielding

  20. Desulfonatronobacter acetoxydans sp. nov.,: a first acetate-oxidizing, extremely salt-tolerant alkaliphilic SRB from a hypersaline soda lake.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, D Y; Chernyh, N A; Poroshina, M N

    2015-09-01

    Recent intensive microbiological investigation of sulfidogenesis in soda lakes did not result in isolation of any pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) able to directly oxidize acetate. The sulfate-dependent acetate oxidation at haloalkaline conditions has, so far, been only shown in two syntrophic associations of novel Syntrophobacteraceae members and haloalkaliphilic hydrogenotrophic SRB. In the course of investigation of one of them, obtained from a hypersaline soda lake in South-Western Siberia, a minor component was observed showing a close relation to Desulfonatronobacter acidivorans--a "complete oxidizing" SRB from soda lakes. This organism became dominant in a secondary enrichment with propionate as e-donor and sulfate as e-acceptor. A pure culture, strain APT3, was identified as a novel member of the family Desulfobacteraceae. It is an extremely salt-tolerant alkaliphile, growing with butyrate at salinity up to 4 M total Na(+) with a pH optimum at 9.5. It can grow with sulfate as e-acceptor with C3-C9 VFA and also with some alcohols. The most interesting property of strain APT3 is its ability to grow with acetate as e-donor, although not with sulfate, but with sulfite or thiosulfate as e-acceptors. The new isolate is proposed as a new species Desulfonatronobacter acetoxydans.