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Sample records for acetate cma catalyst

  1. Production of low-cost calcium magnesium acetate (CMA) as an environmentally friendly deicer from cheese whey

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.T.; Zhu, H.; Li, Y.; Tang, I.C.

    1993-12-31

    About 28 billion lbs of cheese whey are being wasted in the US because of the high biological oxygen demand (BOD) of whey, disposing of surplus whey is a pollution problem. An innovative, wide-scale solution to the whey disposal problem is to use whey as a zero- or low-cost feedstock for the production of an environmentally safe, noncorrosive, road deicer-calcium magnesium acetate (CMA). CMA can be used to replace some of the 10 to 14 million tons road salt used in the North America for deicing. A novel anaerobic fermentation process is developed to produce calcium magnesium acetate (CMA) from whey permeate. A co-culture consisting of homolactic (S. lactis) and homoacetic (C. formicoaceticum) bacteria was used to convert whey lactose to lactate and then to acetate in continuous, immobilized cell bioreactors. The acetate yield from lactose was {approximately}95% (wt/wt), and the final concentration of acetic acid was 4%. The acetic acid present in the fermentation broth can be recovered by solvent-extraction with a tertiary amine and reacted with dolomitic lime (Ca/MgO) to form a concentrated (>25%) CMA solution. About 25 tons CMA can be produced from a plant processing 1 million lbs whey permeate (4.5% lactose) per day. The production costs are estimated at {approximately}$220/ton CMA, which is only about one third of the present market price for CMA deicer. Therefore, about 0.8 million tons/yr CMA deicer can be produced from the currently unused whey. This will partially fulfill market demand for economically and environmentally sound chemicals for roadway deicing. This also will provide a viable solution to the whey disposal problem currently facing many dairies in the North America.

  2. CMA Announces the 1996 Responsible Care Catalyst Awards Winners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-06-01

    Eighteen exceptional teachers of science, chemical technology, chemistry, and chemical engineering have been selected to receive a Responsible Care Chemical Manufacturers Association's 1996 Catalyst Award. The Responsible Care Catalyst Awards Program honors individuals who have the ability to inspire students toward careers in chemistry and science-related fields through their excellent teaching ability in and out of the classroom. The program also seeks to draw public attention to the importance of quality chemistry and science teaching at the undergraduate level. Since the award was established in 1957, 502 teachers of science, chemistry, and chemical engineering have been honored. Winners are selected from a wide range of nominations submitted by colleagues, friends, and administrators. All pre-high school, high school, two and four-year college, or university teachers in the United States and Canada are eligible. Each award winner will be presented with a medal and citation. National award winners receive 5,000; regional award winners receive 2,500. National Winners. Martin N. Ackermann, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH Kenneth R. Jolls, Iowa State University, Ames, IA Suzanne Zobrist Kelly, Warren H. Meeker Elementary School, Ames, IA John V. Kenkel, Southeast Community College, Lincoln, NE George C. Lisensky, Beloit College, Beloit, WI James M. McBride, Yale University, New Haven, CT Marie C. Sherman, Ursuline Academy, St. Louis, MO Dwight D. Sieggreen, Cooke Middle School, Northville, MI Regional Winners Two-Year College. East-Georgianna Whipple-VanPatter, Central Community College, Hastings, NE West-David N. Barkan, Northwest College, Powell, WY High School. East-John Hnatow, Jr., Emmaus High School, Northampton, PA South-Carole Bennett, Gaither High School, Tampa, FL Midwest-Kenneth J. Spengler, Palatine High School, Palatine, IL West-Ruth Rand, Albuquerque, Albuquerque, NM Middle School. East-Thomas P. Kelly, Grandville Public Schools, Grandville, NH

  3. The effects of calcium magnesium acetate (CMA) deicing material on the water quality of Bear Creek, Clackamas County, Oregon, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, Dwight Q.; Wood, Tamara M.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, done in cooperation with the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), to evaluate the effects of the highway deicing material, calcium magnesium acetate (CMA), on the water quality of Bear Creek, in the Cascade Range of Oregon. ODOT began using CMA (an alternative deicer that has fewer adverse environmental effects than road salt) in the mid-1990s and began this study with the USGS to ensure that there were no unexpected effects on the water quality of Bear Creek. Streamflow, precipitation, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance, and water temperature were measured continuously through the 1998?99 winter. There was no measurable effect of the application of CMA to Highway 26 on the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), calcium concentration, or magnesium concentration of Bear Creek and its tributaries. BOD was small in all of the water samples, some of which were collected before CMA application, and some of which were collected after application. Five-day BOD values ranged from 0.1 milligrams per liter to 1.5 milligrams per liter, and 20-day BOD values ranged from 0.2 milligrams per liter to 2.0 milligrams per liter. Dissolved copper concentrations in a small tributary ditch on the north side of Highway 26 exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency aquatic life criteria on three occasions. These exceedances were probably not caused by the application of CMA because (1) one of the samples was a background sample (no recent CMA application), and (2) dissolved copper was not detected in Bear Creek water samples to which CMA was added during laboratory experiments.

  4. Heterogeneous catalyst for the production of acetic anhydride from methyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Ramprasad, Dorai; Waller, Francis Joseph

    1999-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for producing acetic anhydride by the reaction of methyl acetate, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that contains an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized phosphine groups, some of which phosphine groups are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the phosphine groups being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled for consecutive runs without loss in activity. Bifunctional catalysts for use in carbonylating dimethyl ether are also provided.

  5. Heterogeneous catalyst for the production of acetic anhydride from methyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Ramprasad, D.; Waller, F.J.

    1999-04-06

    This invention relates to a process for producing acetic anhydride by the reaction of methyl acetate, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that contains an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized phosphine groups, some of which phosphine groups are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the phosphine groups being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled for consecutive runs without loss in activity. Bifunctional catalysts for use in carbonylating dimethyl ether are also provided.

  6. Effects of calcium magnesium acetate on the combustion of coal-water slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Levendis, Y.A.

    1991-01-01

    The general objective of the project is to investigate the combustion behavior of single and multiple Coal-Water Fuel (CWF) particles burning at high temperature environments. Both uncatalyzed as well as catalyzed CWF drops with Calcium Magnesium Acetate (CMA) catalyst will be studies. Emphasis will also be given in the effects of CMA on the sulfur capture during combustion.

  7. Effects of calcium magnesium acetate on the combustion of Coal-Water Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The general objective of the project is to investigate the combustion behavior of single Coal-Water Slurry particles burning at high temperature environments. Both uncatalyzed as well catalyzed CWS drops with Calcium Magnesium Acetate (CMA) catalyst will be investigated. Emphasis will also be given in the effects of CMA on the sulfur capture during combustion.

  8. Effects of calcium magnesium acetate on the combustion of coal-water slurries. Ninth quarterly project status report, 1 September 1991--30 November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Levendis, Y.A.

    1991-12-31

    The general objective of the project is to investigate the combustion behavior of single and multiple Coal-Water Fuel (CWF) particles burning at high temperature environments. Both uncatalyzed as well as catalyzed CWF drops with Calcium Magnesium Acetate (CMA) catalyst will be studies. Emphasis will also be given in the effects of CMA on the sulfur capture during combustion.

  9. Effects of calcium magnesium acetate on the combustion of Coal-Water Slurries. Second quarterly project status report, 1 December 1989--28 February 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    The general objective of the project is to investigate the combustion behavior of single Coal-Water Slurry particles burning at high temperature environments. Both uncatalyzed as well catalyzed CWS drops with Calcium Magnesium Acetate (CMA) catalyst will be investigated. Emphasis will also be given in the effects of CMA on the sulfur capture during combustion.

  10. Tsuji-Trost N-allylation with allylic acetates using cellulose-Pd catalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    Allylic amines are synthesized using heterogeneous cellulose-Pd catalyst via N-allylation of amines; aliphatic and benzyl amines undergo facile reaction with substituted and unsubstituted allyl acetates in high yields.

  11. Heterogeneous catalyst for the production of ethylidene diacetate from acetic anhydride

    DOEpatents

    Ramprasad, Dorai; Waller, Francis Joseph

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for producing ethylidene diacetate by the reaction of acetic anhydride, acetic acid, hydrogen and carbon monoxide at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that is stable to hydrogenation and comprises an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized heteroatoms, some of which heteroatoms are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the heteroatoms being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled without loss in activity.

  12. Heterogeneous catalyst for the production of ethylidene diacetate from acetic anhydride

    DOEpatents

    Ramprasad, D.; Waller, F.J.

    1998-06-16

    This invention relates to a process for producing ethylidene diacetate by the reaction of acetic anhydride, acetic acid, hydrogen and carbon monoxide at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that is stable to hydrogenation and comprises an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized heteroatoms, some of which heteroatoms are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the heteroatoms being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled without loss in activity.

  13. Nanofiltration of rhodium tris(triphenylphosphine) catalyst in ethyl acetate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Mustafa, Ahmad K.; Taha, Mohd F.

    2012-09-01

    Solvent resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) using polymer membranes has recently received enhanced attention due to the search for cleaner and more energy-efficient technologies. The large size of the rhodium tris(triphenylphosphine) [HRh(CO)(PPh3)3] catalyst (>400 Da) - relative to other components of the hydroformylation reaction provides the opportunity for a membrane separation based on retention of the catalyst species while permeating the solvent. The compatibility of the solvent-polyimide membrane (DuraMem{trade mark, serif} 200 and DuraMem{trade mark, serif} 500) combinations was assessed in terms of the membrane stability in solvent plus non-zero solvent flux at 2.0 MPa. Good HRh(CO)(PPh3)3 rejection (>0.95) and solvent fluxes of 9.9 L/m2ṡh1 at 2.0 MPa were obtained in the catalyst-ethyl acetate-DuraMem 500 system. The effect of pressure and catalyst concentration on the solvent flux and catalyst rejection was conducted on the catalyst-ethyl acetate-membrane systems. Increasing pressure substantially improved both solvent flux and catalyst rejection, while increasing catalyst concentration was found to be beneficial in terms of substantial increases in catalyst rejection without significantly affecting solvent flux.

  14. CMA Infobase: clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Roberta Bronson

    2008-01-01

    The CMA Infobase is a free Web-based resource that contains evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. The database is maintained by the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) and is available on its Web site. The CMA Infobase currently contains 1,200-plus clinical practice guidelines either developed or endorsed by an authoritative health care organization located in Canada. It is an alternative source of free clinical practice guidelines to the National Guideline Clearinghouse. This column will cover the basics of CMA Infobase, including searching, special features, and available resources which complement the database. PMID:19042721

  15. Preparation of mesoporous MnO2/C catalyst for n-hexyl acetate synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zeheng; Pan, Yanmei; Mei, Zhousheng; Zhang, Weixin

    2012-03-01

    A mesoporous MnO2/C composite was prepared by impregnating self-made porous carbon spheres with manganese nitrate aqueous solution and subsequently reacting with KMnO4 aqueous solution. It was characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and the Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) pore size distribution. The as-prepared mesoporous MnO2/C composite was used as catalyst for the synthesis of n-hexyl acetate, and the effects of MnO2 loading and esterification reaction parameters on the esterification rate were investigated. The results prove that MnO2 loading has a significant effect on the catalytic activity and that the mesoporous MnO2/C composite exhibits high catalytic activity with an esterification rate of 96.42% under the conditions below: MnO2 loading (73.09 wt%), catalyst dosage (0.1% in total weight), acetic acid/n-hexanol molar ratio (2:1), reaction temperature (130 °C) and reaction time (5 h).

  16. Experimental and DFT studies of the conversion of ethanol and acetic acid on PtSn-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Alcala, Rafael; Shabaker, John W; Huber, George W; Sanchez-Castillo, Marco A; Dumesic, James A

    2005-02-17

    Reaction kinetics studies were conducted for the conversions of ethanol and acetic acid over silica-supported Pt and Pt/Sn catalysts at temperatures from 500 to 600 K. Addition of Sn to Pt catalysts inhibits the decomposition of ethanol to CO, CH4, and C2H6, such that PtSn-based catalysts are active for dehydrogenation of ethanol to acetaldehyde. Furthermore, PtSn-based catalysts are selective for the conversion of acetic acid to ethanol, acetaldehyde, and ethyl acetate, whereas Pt catalysts lead mainly to decomposition products such as CH4 and CO. These results are interpreted using density functional theory (DFT) calculations for various adsorbed species and transition states on Pt(111) and Pt3Sn(111) surfaces. The Pt3Sn alloy slab was selected for DFT studies because results from in situ (119)Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy and CO adsorption microcalorimetry of silica-supported Pt/Sn catalysts indicate that Pt-Sn alloy is the major phase present. Accordingly, results from DFT calculations show that transition-state energies for C-O and C-C bond cleavage in ethanol-derived species increase by 25-60 kJ/mol on Pt3Sn(111) compared to Pt(111), whereas energies of transition states for dehydrogenation reactions increase by only 5-10 kJ/mol. Results from DFT calculations show that transition-state energies for CH3CO-OH bond cleavage increase by only 12 kJ/mol on Pt3Sn(111) compared to Pt(111). The suppression of C-C bond cleavage in ethanol and acetic acid upon addition of Sn to Pt is also confirmed by microcalorimetric and infrared spectroscopic measurements at 300 K of the interactions of ethanol and acetic acid with Pt and PtSn on a silica support that had been silylated to remove silanol groups. PMID:16851198

  17. Constructing a polyfunctional zeolite-encaged metal catalyst for the multistage oxidation of ethanol into ethyl acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Shakhtakhtinskii, T.N.; Aliev, A.M.; Kuliev, A.R.

    1995-08-01

    To construct an efficient polyfunctional catalyst for the given multistage reaction, the authors previously studied the catalysts HNaY, clinosorb, H-clinoptilolite, and H-mordenite in the reaction of esterification of ethanol with acetic acid; CuH-clinoptilolite, Cu-clinosorb, CuH-mordenite, and CuHNaY in the reaction of oxidative dehydration of ethanol; PdH-clinoptilolite, Pd-clinosorb, PdH-mordenite, and PdHNaY in the oxidation of ethanol; and CuPdH-clinoptilolite in the oxidative transformation of ethanol into ethyl acetate. The catalytic activity of these zeolites and other Pd- and Cu-containing zeolite catalysts, which the authors synthesized by the ion-exchange technique, was studied in a flow-circulating set-up.

  18. Effects of calcium magnesium acetate on the combustion of coal-water slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Levendis, Y.A.

    1991-01-01

    The general objective of the project is to investigate the combustion behavior of single and multiple Coal-Water Fuel (CWF) particles burning at high temperature environments. Both uncatalyzed as well as catalyzed CWF drops wit Calcium Magnesium Acetate (CMA) catalyst will be studied. Emphasis will also be given in the effects of CMA on the sulfur capture during combustion. To help achieve these objectives the following project tasks were carried over this 8th three-month period. Project Tasks: Work on two major tasks was conducted over this period: (1) Trouble-sooting of the pyrometer calibration equipment and then re-calibrating the pyrometer with two different NIST lamps. (2) Production and characterization of CaO particles derived from Calcium Magnesium Acetate. These particles are very promising SO{sub 2} sorbents. 10 figs.

  19. Ethyl Acetate Abatement on Copper Catalysts Supported on Ceria Doped with Rare Earth Oxides.

    PubMed

    Carabineiro, Sónia Alexandra Correia; Konsolakis, Michalis; Marnellos, George Emmanouil-Nontas; Asad, Muhammad Faizan; Soares, Olívia Salomé Gonçalves Pinto; Tavares, Pedro Bandeira; Pereira, Manuel Fernando Ribeiro; Órfão, José Joaquim de Melo; Figueiredo, José Luís

    2016-01-01

    Different lanthanide (Ln)-doped cerium oxides (Ce0.5Ln0.5O1.75, where Ln: Gd, La, Pr, Nd, Sm) were loaded with Cu (20 wt. %) and used as catalysts for the oxidation of ethyl acetate (EtOAc), a common volatile organic compound (VOC). For comparison, both Cu-free (Ce-Ln) and supported Cu (Cu/Ce-Ln) samples were characterized by N₂ adsorption at -196 °C, scanning/transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature programmed reduction in H₂. The following activity sequence, in terms of EtOAc conversion, was found for bare supports: CeO₂ ≈ Ce0.5Pr0.5O1.75 > Ce0.5Sm0.5O1.75 > Ce0.5Gd0.5O1.75 > Ce0.5Nd0.5O1.75 > Ce0.5La0.5O1.75. Cu addition improved the catalytic performance, without affecting the activity order. The best catalytic performance was obtained for Cu/CeO₂ and Cu/Ce0.5Pr0.5O1.75 samples, both achieving complete EtOAc conversion below ca. 290 °C. A strong correlation was revealed between the catalytic performance and the redox properties of the samples, in terms of reducibility and lattice oxygen availability. Νo particular correlation between the VOC oxidation performance and textural characteristics was found. The obtained results can be explained in terms of a Mars-van Krevelen type redox mechanism involving the participation of weakly bound (easily reduced) lattice oxygen and its consequent replenishment by gas phase oxygen. PMID:27196886

  20. Control of coal combustion SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] emissions by in-boiler injection of CMA

    SciTech Connect

    Levendis, Y.A.; Wise, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    The principal objectives of the proposed research are two-fold: (A) To understand the mechanism and assess the effectiveness of sulfur capture by the chemical calcium magnesium acetate (CMA). And (B) To evaluate the NO[sub x] reduction capabilities of CMA by burning the organic constituents of the chemical (the acetate) and reducing NO to stable N[sub 2] The optimum conditions and the location of CMA introduction in the furnace will be identified. To achieve these goals water solutions of CMA or dry powders of CMA will be injected into hot air or gases simulating the furnace exhaust (containing CO[sub 2], SO[sub x] NO[sub x], H[sub 2]O, O[sub 2] etc.) and the composition of gaseous and solid products of the reaction will be monitored. The processes of burning the organic acetate as well as the calcination, sintering and sulfation of the remaining solid will be studied in detail.

  1. Multifunctional Pd/Ni-Co catalyst for hydrogen production by chemical looping coupled with steam reforming of acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Fermoso, Javier; Gil, María V; Rubiera, Fernando; Chen, De

    2014-11-01

    High yield of high-purity H2 from acetic acid, a model compound of bio-oil obtained from the fast pyrolysis of biomass, was produced by sorption-enhanced steam reforming (SESR). An oxygen carrier was introduced into a chemical loop (CL) coupled to the cyclical SESR process to supply heat in situ for the endothermic sorbent regeneration to increase the energy efficiency of the process. A new multifunctional 1 %Pd/20 %Ni-20 %Co catalyst was developed for use both as oxygen carrier in the CL and as reforming catalyst in the SESR whereas a CaO-based material was used as CO2 sorbent. In the sorbent-air regeneration step, the Ni-Co atoms in the catalyst undergo strong exothermic oxidation reactions that provide heat for the CaO decarbonation. The addition of Pd to the Ni-Co catalyst makes the catalyst active throughout the whole SESR-CL cycle. Pd significantly promotes the reduction of Ni-Co oxides to metallic Ni-Co during the reforming stage, which avoids the need for a reduction step after regeneration. H2 yield above 90 % and H2 purity above 99.2 vol % were obtained. PMID:25209388

  2. The Aerobic Oxidation of Bromide to Dibromine Catalyzed by Homogeneous Oxidation Catalysts and Initiated by Nitrate in Acetic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Partenheimer, Walt; Fulton, John L.; Sorensen, Christina M.; Pham, Van Thai; Chen, Yongsheng

    2014-06-01

    A small amount of nitrate, ~0.002 molal, initiates the Co/Mn catalyzed aerobic oxidation of bromide compounds (HBr,NaBr,LiBr) to dibromine in acetic acid at room temperature. At temperatures 40oC or less , the reaction is autocatalytic. Co(II) and Mn(II) themselves and mixed with ionic bromide are known homogeneous oxidation catalysts. The reaction was discovered serendipitously when a Co/Br and Co/Mn/Br catalyst solution was prepared for the aerobic oxidation of methyaromatic compounds and the Co acetate contained a small amount of impurity i.e. nitrate. The reaction was characterized by IR, UV-VIS, MALDI and EXAFS spectroscopies and the coordination chemistry is described. The reaction is inhibited by water and its rate changed by pH. The change in these variables, as well as others, are identical to those observed during homogeneous, aerobic oxidation of akylaromatics. A mechanism is proposed. Accidental addition of a small amount of nitrate compound into a Co/Mn/Br/acetic acid mixture in a large, commercial feedtank is potentially dangerous.

  3. Lipozyme TL IM as Catalyst for the Synthesis of Eugenyl Acetate in Solvent-Free Acetylation.

    PubMed

    Silva, María José A; Loss, Raquel A; Laroque, Denise A; Lerin, Lindomar A; Pereira, Gabriela N; Thon, Élise; Oliveira, J Vladimir; Ninow, Jorge L; Hense, Haiko; Oliveira, Débora

    2015-06-01

    The ability of commercial immobilized lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus (Lipozyme TL IM) to catalyze the acetylation of essential clove oil with acetic anhydride in a solvent-free system was studied, and the antimicrobial activity of the ester formed was evaluated as well. Experimental design based on two variables (eugenol to acetic anhydride molar ratio and temperature) was employed to evaluate the experimental conditions of eugenyl acetate ester production. The maximum conversion yield (92.86 %) was obtained using Lipozyme TL IM (5 wt%, based on the total amount of substrates), with eugenol to acetic anhydride molar ratio of 1:5 at 70 °C. The chemical structure of the eugenyl acetate ester obtained at the optimized condition, and purified, was confirmed by the proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) analysis. The antimicrobial activity of eugenyl acetate ester was proven effective on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, with means of 16.62 and 17.55 mm of inhibition halo. PMID:25875787

  4. Testing zinc chloride as a new catalyst for direct synthesis of cellulose di- and tri-acetate in a solvent free system under microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    El Nemr, Ahmed; Ragab, Safaa; El Sikaily, Amany

    2016-10-20

    This research demonstrates the effect of ZnCl2 as a catalyst on the esterification of commercial cotton cellulose using acetic anhydride in order to obtain di- and tri-cellulose acetates under microwave irradiation. It was discovered that microwave irradiation significantly increased the yield and reduced the reaction time. It was found that the maximum yield for cellulose triacetates was 95.83% under the reaction conditions that were as follows: 3min reaction time, 200mg of ZnCl2 catalyst and 20ml of Ac2O for 5g cellulose. However, the cellulose acetate obtained in this manner had the highest DS (2.87). The cellulose di-acetate was produced with the maximum yield of 89.97% and with the highest DS (2.69) using 25ml Ac2O, 200mg of ZnCl2 for 5g cellulose and in 3min reaction time. The effect of some factors such as the amount of used catalyst, the quantity of acetic acid anhydride and the reaction time of the esterification process have been investigated. The production of di- and tri-cellulose acetate and the degree of substitution were confirmed using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The thermal stability was investigated using thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The molecular weight and the degree of polymerization were obtained using Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC). The analysis confirmed the successful synthesis of di- and tri-cellulose acetate without degradation during the reaction; these results were found to be in contrast to some recent studies. The present study reveals that ZnCl2 is a new catalyst; it is effective as well as inexpensive and is a low toxicity catalyst for usage in cellulose esterification. PMID:27474655

  5. Effects of water and CMA in mitigating industrial road dust resuspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Fulvio; Escrig, Alberto; Sanfelix, Vicenta; Celades, Irina; Reche, Cristina; Monfort, Eliseo; Querol, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Water spraying and/or chemical suppressants such as salts and polymers have been suggested to reduce road dust resuspension due to their capability to increase adhesion, and therefore the effective size and weight of particles, but contrasting results have been obtained so further testing are needed. This study presents the first results of street washing and Calcium Magnesium Acetate (CMA) efficiencies at two industrial roads (paved and unpaved) in the Mediterranean region where the high solar radiation, warm climate, and scarce precipitation, may play a key role in determining the efficiency of mitigation techniques Results show that, at both sites, street washing (water only) was more effective than CMA. Street washing made observe 18% (daily basis) and >90% (first hour) reductions of kerbside PM10 concentrations for the paved and unpaved road respectively, while with CMA PM10 decrease was generally lower and with less statistical significance.

  6. Effects of metal and acidic sites on the reaction by-products of butyl acetate oxidation over palladium-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yue, Lin; He, Chi; Hao, Zhengping; Wang, Shunbing; Wang, Hailin

    2014-03-01

    Catalytic oxidation is widely used in pollution control technology to remove volatile organic compounds. In this study, Pd/ZSM-5 catalysts with different Pd contents and acidic sites were prepared via the impregnation method. All the catalysts were characterized by means of N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), H2 temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR), and NH3 temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD). Their catalytic performance was investigated in the oxidation of butyl acetate experiments. The by-products of the reaction were collected in thermal desorption tubes and identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. It was found that the increase of Pd content slightly changed the catalytic activity of butyl acetate oxidation according to the yield of CO2 achieved at 90%, but decreased the cracking by-products, whereas the enhancement of strong acidity over Pd-based catalysts enriched the by-product species. The butyl acetate oxidation process involves a series of reaction steps including protolysis, dehydrogenation, dehydration, cracking, and isomerization. Generally, butyl acetate was cracked to acetic acid and 2-methylpropene and the latter was an intermediate of the other by-products, and the oxidation routes of typical by-products were proposed. Trace amounts of 3-methylpentane, hexane, 2-methylpentane, pentane, and 2-methylbutane originated from isomerization and protolysis reactions. PMID:25079284

  7. Control of coal combustion SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions by in-boiler injection of CMA. First quarterly project status report, 1 October 1992--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Levendis, Y.A.; Wise, D.L.

    1992-12-31

    The principal objectives of the proposed research are two-fold: (A) To understand the mechanism and assess the effectiveness of sulfur capture by the chemical calcium magnesium acetate (CMA). And (B) To evaluate the NO{sub x} reduction capabilities of CMA by burning the organic constituents of the chemical (the acetate) and reducing NO to stable N{sub 2} The optimum conditions and the location of CMA introduction in the furnace will be identified. To achieve these goals water solutions of CMA or dry powders of CMA will be injected into hot air or gases simulating the furnace exhaust (containing CO{sub 2}, SO{sub x} NO{sub x}, H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2} etc.) and the composition of gaseous and solid products of the reaction will be monitored. The processes of burning the organic acetate as well as the calcination, sintering and sulfation of the remaining solid will be studied in detail.

  8. Bismuth Acetate as a Catalyst for the Sequential Protodeboronation of Di- and Triborylated Indoles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fangyi; Tyagarajan, Sriram; Perera, Damith; Krska, Shane W; Maligres, Peter E; Smith, Milton R; Maleczka, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    Bismuth(III) acetate is a safe, inexpensive, and selective facilitator of sequential protodeboronations, which when used in conjunction with Ir-catalyzed borylations allows access to a diversity of borylated indoles. The versatility of combining Ir-catalyzed borylations with Bi(III)-catalyzed protodeboronation is demonstrated by selectively converting 6-fluoroindole into products with Bpin groups at the 4-, 5-, 7-, 2,7-, 4,7-, 3,5-, and 2,4,7-positions and the late-stage functionalization of sumatriptan. PMID:26998615

  9. 7 CFR 1425.6 - Approved CMA's.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Approved CMA's. 1425.6 Section 1425.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COOPERATIVE MARKETING ASSOCIATIONS § 1425.6 Approved...

  10. Infrared Observations of FS CMa Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitko, Michael L.; Russell, R. W.; Lynch, D. K.; Grady, C. A.; Hammel, H. B.; Beerman, L. C.; Day, A. N.; Huelsman, D.; Rudy, R. J.; Brafford, S. M.; Halbedel, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    A subset of non-supergiant B[e] stars has recently been recognized as forming a fairly unique class of objects with very strong emission lines, infrared excesses, and locations not associated with star formation. The exact evolutionary state of these stars, named for the prototype FS CMa, is uncertain, and they have often been classified as isolated Herbig AeBe stars. We present infrared observations of two of these stars, HD 45677 (FS CMa), HD 50138 (MWC 158), and the candidate FS CMa star HD 190073 (V1295 Aql) that span over a decade in time. All three exhibit an emission band at 10 microns due to amorphous silicates, confirming that much (if not all) of the infrared excess is due to dust. HD 50138 is found to exhibit 20% variability between 3-13 microns that resembles that found in pre-main sequence systems (HD 163296 and HD 31648). HD 45677, despite large changes at visual wavelengths, has remained relatively stable in the infrared. To date, no significant changes have been observed in HD 190073. This work is supported in part by NASA Origins of Solar Systems grant NAG5-9475, NASA Astrophysics Data Program contract NNH05CD30C, and the Independent Research and Development program at The Aerospace Corporation.

  11. In situ FTIR investigation of acetic acid electrooxidation on carbon supported Pt-Sn based trimetallic catalysts: Influence of the nature of the third metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyhan, Seden; Léger, Jean-Michel; Kadırgan, Figen

    2014-12-01

    The effect of adding a third metal (Ni, Co, Pd, Rh) to Pt-Sn/C catalyst has been investigated for the adsorption and oxidation of acetic acid in acidic medium using in situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results showed that the decomposition of acetic acid on the surface leads to the formation of different intermediate species and products such as acetate, acetyl, carbonate, CO and CO2. The reaction pathway of CO2 production proceeds via the formation of acetyl or carbonate through surface acetate species. It has been found that the selectivity of the acetate was enhanced by the addition of any third metal. However, the presence of Pd or Co increases the relative intensity of IR band for CO2. This is probably due to success in facilitating of the Csbnd C bond cleavage of acetyl. On the other hand, the conversion of acetate to carbonate is strongly affected by the adsorbed water, as is evident from the pronounced changes in the OH stretching region with the presence of Pd or Ni.

  12. Friedel-Crafts Fluoroacetylation of Indoles with Fluorinated Acetic Acids for the Synthesis of Fluoromethyl Indol-3-yl Ketones under Catalyst- and Additive-Free Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shun-Jiang; Ren, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Yao-Yu; Guan, Zheng-Hui

    2016-05-20

    A simple and efficient protocol for the fluoroacetylation of indoles is reported. The reaction uses fluorinated acetic acids as the fluoroacetylation reagents to synthesize diverse fluoromethyl indol-3-yl ketones in good yields under catalyst- and additive-free conditions. In addition, the only byproduct is water in this transformation. The synthetic utility of this reaction was also demonstrated by the concise synthesis of α-(trifluoromethyl)(indol-3-yl)methanol and indole-3-carboxylic acid. PMID:27101475

  13. Oxidation of ethyl acetate by a high performance nanostructure (Ni, Mn)-Ag/ZSM-5 bimetallic catalysts and development of an artificial neural networks predictive modeling.

    PubMed

    Jodaei, Azadeh; Salari, Darush; Niaei, Ali; Khatamian, Masumeh; Hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of ethyl acetate in low concentration was investigated over mono-metallic Ag/ZSM5 and bimetallic (Ni, Mn)-Ag/ZSM-5 catalysts. Catalytic studies were carried out in a catalytic fixed bed reactor under atmospheric pressure. The sequence of catalytic activity was as follows: Ni-Ag-ZSM-5 > Mn-Ag-ZSM-5 > Ag-ZSM-5 > H-ZSM-5. The catalysts were characterized by ICP-AES, X-ray diffraction (XRD), low temperature nitrogen adsorption, NH(3)-TPD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectra (UV-vis). An artificial neural networks (ANN) model was developed to predict the performance of catalytic oxidation process over bimetallic Ni-Ag/ZSM-5 catalyst based on experimental data. For this purpose the standard feed forward back propagation algorithm was employed to train the model by using laboratory experimental data. A good agreement was resulted between experimental results and those obtained by ANN. Following order for variables effects on conversion yield of ethyl acetate was predicted by ANN model: reaction temperature (32.99%) > Ag loading (27.38%) > initial ethyl acetate concentration (23.58%) > Ni loading (16.05%). PMID:21104495

  14. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, Gerald Charles; Zoeller, Joseph Robert; Depew, Leslie Sharon

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  15. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, G.C.; Zoeller, J.R.; Depew, L.S.

    1998-03-24

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  16. Biomass bioconversion to calcium magnesium acetate deicing salt. Final project report on Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Trantolo, D.J.

    1989-06-01

    The project experimentally investigated using biomass as feedstock for conversion to calcium magnesium acetate (CMA), an alternative road salt. This new organic road salt will prevent corrosion of bridge decks, underground cables, and rusting of cars and trucks. CMA from biomass will reduce costs, compared to petroleum and natural gas for making this material. Phase I work focused on bioconversion of sewage sludge residuals to CMA. The process is based on a packed bed fermenter to produce acetic acid from biomass, as well as liquid ion exchange to recover acetic acid from the fermenter broth prior to the final production step which occurs by passing the acetic acid over limestone. In Phase I: (1) percent bioconversion and kinetics of biomass to acetic acid have been confirmed in small batch fermenters; (2) equilibrium constants for acetic acid recovery via liquid ion exchange have been documented; and (3) rates of conversion to CMA have been determined.

  17. Sun signs Valdez Principles; rejoining CMA

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, E.

    1993-02-17

    Four year after an investors' group developed the Valdez Principles in response to the Exxon oil spill, Sun Co. (Philadelphia) has become the first major corporation to sign on to the environmental commitment. Sun also says it plans to rejoin the Chemical Manufacturers Association (CMA) in light of new emphasis on its chemical business and to recommit to the Responsible Care program. Sun negotiated the commitment's working with the Coalition for Economically Responsible Economies (CERES; New York), which devised the code of conduct, now called the CERES Principles. It requries goals of reducing environmental impact, as well as annual environmental auditing and public reporting of results. Annual environmental reporting is coming,' says Sun chairman and CEO Robert H. Campbell. CERES' report provides credibility and accountability, he says. Sun's signing is the onset of a stampede,' says New York City Comptroller Elizabeth Holtzman, who advises on investment of the city's $47-billion pension funds. CERES says that between tens of' Fortune 500 companies have shown interest in a negotiated code. The 50 other signers are smaller companies. Du Pont says it is waiting to see Sun's agreement. Campbell says the commitment complements Sun's five-year-old program, which incorporates the American Petroleum Institute program and CMA's Responsible Care initiative. I don't think anything will change that the customer will notice,' he adds.

  18. Acetaldehyde partial oxidation on the Au(111) model catalyst surface: C-C bond activation and formation of methyl acetate as an oxidative coupling product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatok, Mustafa; Vovk, Evgeny I.; Shah, Asad A.; Turksoy, Abdurrahman; Ozensoy, Emrah

    2015-11-01

    Partial oxidation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) on the oxygen pre-covered Au(111) single crystal model catalyst was investigated via Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Temperature Programmed Reaction Spectroscopy (TPRS) techniques, where ozone (O3) was utilized as the oxygen delivery agent providing atomic oxygen to the reacting surface. We show that for low exposures of O3 and small surface oxygen coverages, two partial oxidation products namely, methyl acetate (CH3COOCH3) and acetic acid (CH3COOH) can be generated without the formation of significant quantities of carbon dioxide. The formation of methyl acetate as the oxidative coupling reaction product implies that oxygen pre-covered Au(111) single crystal model catalyst surface can activate C-C bonds. In addition to the generation of these products; indications of the polymerization of acetaldehyde on the gold surface were also observed as an additional reaction route competing with the partial and total oxidation pathways. The interplay between the partial oxidation, total oxidation and polymerization pathways reveals the complex catalytic chemistry associated with the interaction between the acetaldehyde and atomic oxygen on catalytic gold surfaces.

  19. Electrochemical Partial Reforming of Ethanol into Ethyl Acetate Using Ultrathin Co3O4 Nanosheets as a Highly Selective Anode Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical partial reforming of organics provides an alternative strategy to produce valuable organic compounds while generating H2 under mild conditions. In this work, highly selective electrochemical reforming of ethanol into ethyl acetate is successfully achieved by using ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets with exposed (111) facets as an anode catalyst. Those nanosheets were synthesized by a one-pot, templateless hydrothermal method with the use of ammonia. NH3 was demonstrated critical to the overall formation of ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets. With abundant active sites on Co3O4 (111), the as-synthesized ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activities toward water and ethanol oxidations in alkaline media. More importantly, over the Co3O4 nanosheets, the electrooxidation from ethanol to ethyl acetate was so selective that no other oxidation products were yielded. With such a high selectivity, an electrolyzer cell using Co3O4 nanosheets as the anode electrocatalyst and Ni–Mo nanopowders as the cathode electrocatalyst has been successfully built for ethanol reforming. The electrolyzer cell was readily driven by a 1.5 V battery to achieve the effective production of both H2 and ethyl acetate. After the bulk electrolysis, about 95% of ethanol was electrochemically reformed into ethyl acetate. This work opens up new opportunities in designing a material system for building unique devices to generate both hydrogen and high-value organics at room temperature by utilizing electric energy from renewable sources. PMID:27610415

  20. Electrochemical Partial Reforming of Ethanol into Ethyl Acetate Using Ultrathin Co3O4 Nanosheets as a Highly Selective Anode Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lei; Qin, Qing; Zhao, Xiaojing; Xu, Chaofa; Hu, Chengyi; Mo, Shiguang; Wang, Yu Olivia; Lin, Shuichao; Tang, Zichao; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-08-24

    Electrochemical partial reforming of organics provides an alternative strategy to produce valuable organic compounds while generating H2 under mild conditions. In this work, highly selective electrochemical reforming of ethanol into ethyl acetate is successfully achieved by using ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets with exposed (111) facets as an anode catalyst. Those nanosheets were synthesized by a one-pot, templateless hydrothermal method with the use of ammonia. NH3 was demonstrated critical to the overall formation of ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets. With abundant active sites on Co3O4 (111), the as-synthesized ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activities toward water and ethanol oxidations in alkaline media. More importantly, over the Co3O4 nanosheets, the electrooxidation from ethanol to ethyl acetate was so selective that no other oxidation products were yielded. With such a high selectivity, an electrolyzer cell using Co3O4 nanosheets as the anode electrocatalyst and Ni-Mo nanopowders as the cathode electrocatalyst has been successfully built for ethanol reforming. The electrolyzer cell was readily driven by a 1.5 V battery to achieve the effective production of both H2 and ethyl acetate. After the bulk electrolysis, about 95% of ethanol was electrochemically reformed into ethyl acetate. This work opens up new opportunities in designing a material system for building unique devices to generate both hydrogen and high-value organics at room temperature by utilizing electric energy from renewable sources. PMID:27610415

  1. Control of coal combustion SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions by in-boiler injection of CMA. Second quarterly project status report, 1 April 1993--30 June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Levendis, Y.A.; Wise, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    Objectives of the proposed research are two-fold: (A) To understand the mechanism and assess the effectiveness of sulfur capture by the chemical calcium magnesium acetate (CMA); and (B) To evaluate the NO{sub x} reduction capabilities of CMA by pyrolyzing the organic constituents of the chemical (the acetate) and reducing NO to stable N{sub 2}. The optimum conditions and the location of CMA introduction in the furnace will be identified. Water solutions of CMA or dry powders of CMA will be injected into hot air or gases simulating the furnace exhaust (containing CO{sub 2}, SO{sub x} NO{sub x} H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2} etc.) and the composition of gaseous and solid products of the reaction will be monitored. The processes of burning the organic acetate as well as the calcination, sintering and sulfation of the remaining solid will be studied. The effectiveness of ``homemade`` CMAs containing various amounts of calcium and magnesium will be investigated to explore the role of the two chemicals in the NO{sub x} and mainly the SO{sub 2} capture processes. CMA will be introduced in the matrix of coal particles by an ion exchange technique. Upon subsequent combustion, the SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} emissions will be monitored and compared to those from burning untreated coal. The composition and physical structure of the ash residues will also be examined.

  2. Catalytic liquid-phase oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetic acid over a Pt/CeO2-ZrO2-SnO2/γ-alumina catalyst.

    PubMed

    Choi, Pil-Gyu; Ohno, Takanobu; Masui, Toshiyuki; Imanaka, Nobuhito

    2015-10-01

    Pt/CeO2-ZrO2-SnO2/γ-Al2O3 catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation and wet impregnation methods for catalytic oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetic acid in water. In the present catalysts, Pt and CeO2-ZrO2-SnO2 were successfully dispersed on the γ-Al2O3 support. Dependences of platinum content and reaction time on the selective oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetic acid were investigated to optimize the reaction conditions for obtaining both high acetaldehyde conversion and highest selectivity to acetic acid. Among the catalysts, a Pt(6.4wt.%)/Ce0.68Zr0.17Sn0.15O2.0(16wt.%)/γ-Al2O3 catalyst showed the highest acetaldehyde oxidation activity. On this catalyst, acetaldehyde was completely oxidized after the reaction at 0°C for 8hr, and the selectivity to acetic acid reached to 95% and higher after the reaction for 4hr and longer. PMID:26456607

  3. Amavadin and other vanadium complexes as remarkably efficient catalysts for one-pot conversion of ethane to propionic and acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Kirillova, Marina V; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; da Silva, José A L; Guedes da Silva, Maria Fátima C; Fraústo da Silva, João J R; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic amavadin Ca[V{ON[CH(CH(3))COO](2)}(2)] and its models Ca[V{ON(CH(2)COO)(2)}(2)] and [VO{N(CH(2)CH(2)O)(3)}], in the presence of K(2)S(2)O(8) in trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), exhibit remarkable catalytic activity for the one-pot carboxylation of ethane to propionic and acetic acids with the former as the main product (overall yields up to 93 %, catalyst turnover numbers (TONs) up to 2.0 x 10(4)). The simpler V complexes [VO(CF(3)SO(3))(2)], [VO(acac)(2)] and VOSO(4) are less active. The effects of various factors, namely, C(2)H(6) and CO pressures, time, temperature, and amounts of catalyst, TFA and K(2)S(2)O(8), have been investigated, and this allowed optimisation of the process and control of selectivity. (13)C-labelling experiments indicated that the formation of acetic acid follows two pathways, the dominant one via oxidation of ethane with preservation of the C--C bond, and the other via rupture of this bond and carbonylation of the methyl group by CO; the C--C bond is retained in the formation of propionic acid upon carbonylation of ethane. The reactions proceed via both C- and O-centred radicals, as shown by experiments with radical traps. On the basis of detailed DFT calculations, plausible reaction mechanisms are discussed. The carboxylation of ethane in the presence of CO follows the sequential formation of C(2)H(5) (*), C(2)H(5)CO(*), C(2)H(5)COO(*) and C(2)H(5)COOH. The C(2)H(5)COO(*) radical is easily formed on reaction of C(2)H(5)CO(*) with a peroxo V catalyst via a V{eta(1)-OOC(O)C(2)H(5)} intermediate. In the absence of CO, carboxylation proceeds by reaction of C(2)H(5) (*) with TFA. For the oxidation of ethane to acetic acid, either with preservation or cleavage of the C-C bond, metal-assisted and purely organic pathways are also proposed and discussed. PMID:18058882

  4. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics of methylene blue on a low-cost adsorbent recovered from a spent catalyst of vinyl acetate synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengyong; Zhang, Zebiao; Fernández, Y.; Menéndez, J. A.; Niu, Hao; Peng, Jinhui; Zhang, Libo; Guo, Shenghui

    2010-02-01

    A regenerated activated carbon used as catalyst support in the synthesis of vinyl acetate has been tested as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of dyes. After a thorough textural characterization of the regenerated activated carbon, its adsorption isotherms and kinetics were determined using methylene blue as model compound at different initial concentrations. Both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were developed and then compared. It was found that the equilibrium data were best represented by the Langmuir isotherm model. The kinetic data were fitted to pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models, and it was found that the best fitting corresponded to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The results showed that this novel adsorbent had a high adsorption capacity, making it suitable for use in the treatment of methylene blue enriched wastewater.

  5. Effects of calcium magnesium acetate on the combustion of coal-water slurries. Twelfth quarterly project status report, 1 June 1992--31 August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Levendis, Y.A.

    1992-12-01

    The general objective of the project is to investigate the combustion behavior of single and multiple Coal-Water Fuel (CWF) particles burning at high temperature environments. Both uncatalyzed as well as catalyzed CWF drops with Calcium Magnesium Acetate (CMA)- catalyst will be studied. Emphasis will also be given in the effects of CMA on the sulfur capture during combustion. To help achieve these objectives the following project tasks were carried over this 11th three-month period. Work on three major tasks was conducted over this period: (a) We obtained a larger inventory of pyrometric and cinematographic observations on single CWF particles of micronized coal, with and without CMA, burning in various O{sub 2} Partial pressures and wall temperatures. (b) Preliminary reaction rate calculations were completed using simplified models. (c) Work has been started on optimizing and running a computer program that performs detailed calculation of reaction rates. (d) Development work on the new single drop generator has continued. (e) A new laboratory space has been prepared and assigned to this project.

  6. Catalyst-Free Photoredox Addition–Cyclisations: Exploitation of Natural Synergy between Aryl Acetic Acids and Maleimide

    PubMed Central

    Manley, David W; Mills, Andrew; O'Rourke, Christopher; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Walton, John C

    2014-01-01

    Suitably functionalised carboxylic acids undergo a previously unknown photoredox reaction when irradiated with UVA in the presence of maleimide. Maleimide was found to synergistically act as a radical generating photoxidant and as a radical acceptor, negating the need for an extrinsic photoredox catalyst. Modest to excellent yields of the product chromenopyrroledione, thiochromenopyrroledione and pyrroloquinolinedione derivatives were obtained in thirteen preparative photolyses. In situ NMR spectroscopy was used to study each reaction. Reactant decay and product build-up were monitored, enabling reaction profiles to be plotted. A plausible mechanism, whereby photo-excited maleimide acts as an oxidant to generate a radical ion pair, has been postulated and is supported by UV/Vis. spectroscopy and DFT computations. The radical-cation reactive intermediates were also characterised in solution by EPR spectroscopy. PMID:24652772

  7. Control of coal combustion SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions by in-boiler injection of CMA. Fourth quarterly project status report, 1 July 1993--30 September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Levendis, Y.A.; Wise, D.L.

    1993-12-01

    CMA, has demonstrated exceptional effectiveness in our laboratory as an in-boiler SO{sub 2} removal agent (Levendis, et al., 1993). This is due to the affinity of the calcium component of CMA for sulfur; the reaction results in solid sulfate salts. The current investigation explored the role of the organic component of CMA, as well as that in CA and CB, in removing the NO{sub x} emissions in the post-flame region of pulverized coal or residual oil-fired furnaces. This work was based on high-temperature laboratory-bench experiments under temperatures and oxygen concentrations similar to those found in commercial furnaces. The gas temperatures ranged from 450 to 1450{degrees}C and oxygen concentration varied from 0 to 5%. The residence time was in the order of 4 s. Injection of the CMA reagent at a mass ratio of CMA/NO of 41 (or an equivalent acetate/NO molar ratio of 17) reduced NO by more than 90% (at 0% O{sub 2} and temperatures above 850{degrees}C) to 50% (at 5% O{sub 2} and 650 to 850{degrees}C). At an oxygen concentration of 2%, NO reduction seemed to be most effective between 1000 and 1350{degrees}C with NO reductions of 70 to 80%. The efficacy of calcium acetate (CA) and calcium benzoate (CB) as NO{sub x} reducers was also explored, with CA (CA/NO mass ratio of 41 and acetate/NO molar ratio of 16) being less efficient than CMA with oxygen present but as efficient in 0% oxygen. CB (CB/NO mass ratio of 41 with benzoic acid/NO molar ratio of 9) was a-s efficient as CMA, regardless of O{sub 2} concentration, but at temperatures 300 to 450{degrees}C higher.

  8. Ecotoxicological evaluation of three deicers (NaCl, NaFo, CMA)-effect on terrestrial organisms.

    PubMed

    Robidoux, P Y; Delisle, C E

    2001-02-01

    The use of chemical deicers such as sodium chloride (NaCl) has increased significantly during the past three decades. Deicers induce metal corrosion and alter the physicochemical properties of soils and water. Environmental damage caused by the use of NaCl has prompted government agencies to find alternative deicers. This article presents a comparative ecotoxicological study of three deicers on soil organisms. Sodium formiate (NaFo) and calcium-magnesium acetate (CMA) are the most interesting commercially available deicers based upon their characteristics and potential toxicity. Organisms used in this study were four species of macrophytes (cress (Lepidium sativum), barley (Ordeum vulgare), red fescue grass (Festuca rubra), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis)) and an invertebrate (Eisenia fetida). Using standardized and modified methods, the relative toxicity of deicers was CMA < NaFo congruent with NaCl. The results demonstrate that these chemicals could have similar impacts in terrestrial environments since similar quantities of NaFo and greater amounts of CMA are necessary to achieve the same efficiency as NaCl. The toxicity of the tested substances was lower in natural composted soil than in artificial substrate (silica or OECD soil), indicating decreased environmental bioavailability. The response of the organisms changed according to endpoint, species, and soil characteristics (artificial substrate as compared to natural organic soil). The most sensitive endpoint measured was macrophyte growth with Kentucky bluegrass being the most sensitive species. PMID:11161687

  9. CMA Member Survey: Network Management Systems Showing Little Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusa, John M.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses results of a survey of 112 network and telecom managers--members of the Communications Managers Association (CMA)--to identify problems relating to the operation of large enterprise networks. Results are presented in a table under categories of: respondent profile; network management systems; carrier management; enterprise management;…

  10. Towards a Rational Design of a Continuous-Flow Method for the Acetalization of Crude Glycerol: Scope and Limitations of Commercial Amberlyst 36 and AlF₃·3H₂O as Model Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Sandro; Noè, Marco; Riello, Pietro; Perosa, Alvise; Selva, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The acetalization of six different types of glycerol including pure, wet, and crude-like grade compounds of compositions simulating those of crude glycerols produced by the biodiesel manufacture, was carried out with two model ketones such as acetone and 2-butanone. The reaction was investigated under continuous-flow (CF) conditions through a comparative analysis of an already known acetalization catalyst such as Amberlyst 36 (A36), and aluminum fluoride three hydrate (AlF₃·3H₂O, AF) whose use was never previously reported for the synthesis of acetals. At 10 bar and 25 °C, A36 was a highly active catalyst allowing good-to-excellent conversion (85%-97%) and selectivity (99%) when either pure or wet glycerol was used as a reagent. This catalyst however, proved unsuitable for the CF acetalization of crude-like glycerol (CG) since it severely and irreversibly deactivated in a few hours by the presence of low amounts of NaCl (2.5 wt %) which is a typical inorganic impurity of raw glycerol from the biorefinery. Higher temperature and pressure (up to 100 °C and 30 bar) were not successful to improve the outcome. By contrast, at 10 bar and 100 °C, AF catalyzed the acetalization of CG with both acetone and 2-butanone, yielding stable conversion and productivity up to 78% and 5.6 h(-1), respectively. A XRD analysis of fresh and used catalysts proved that the active phase was a solid solution (SS) of formula Al₂[F1-x(OH)x]₆(H₂O)y present as a component of the investigated commercial AF sample. A hypothesis to explain the role of such SS phase was then formulated based on the Brønsted acidity of OH groups of the solid framework. Overall, the AF catalyst allowed not only a straightforward upgrading of CG to acetals, but also a more cost-efficient protocol avoiding the expensive refining of raw glycerol itself. PMID:27213304

  11. ALMA Observations of Anisotropic Dust Mass Loss around VY CMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Gorman, E.; Vlemmings, W.; Richards, A. M. S.; Baudry, A.; De Beck, E.; Decin, L.; Harper, G. M.; Humphreys, E. M.; Kervella, P.; Khouri, T.; Muller, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present high resolution ALMA Science Verification data of the continuum emission around the highly evolved oxygen-rich red supergiant VY CMa. These data enable us to study the dust in its inner circumstellar environment at a spatial resolution of 129 mas at 321 GHz and 59 mas at 658 GHz, thus allowing us to trace dust on spatial scales down to 11 R⋆ (71 AU). Two prominent dust components are detected and resolved. We find that at least 17% of the dust mass around VY CMa is located in clumps ejected within a more quiescent roughly spherical stellar wind, with a quiescent dust mass loss rate of 5×10-6 M⊙ yr-1. The anisotropic morphology of the dust indicates a continuous, directed mass loss over a few decades, suggesting that this mass loss cannot be driven by large convection cells alone.

  12. Effectiveness of calcium magnesium acetate as an SO[sub x] sorbent in coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Levendis, Y.A.; Zhu, W.; Wise, D.L. ); Simons, G.A. )

    1993-05-01

    A fundamental study was conducted on the effectiveness of the chemical calcium magnesium acetate (CMA) as a sulfur capture agent during combustion of pulverized coal. It was based on high-temperature laboratory-bench experiments with the scope of exploring the use of CMA as a dry scrubbing'' medium for in-boiler injection. Two methods of CMA introduction in the furnace were considered: dry-spraying fine powders of the chemical and wet-spraying aqueous solutions to generate fine aerosols. It considered conditions pertinent to post-flame in-boiler injection of CMA to identify optimum temperatures and residence times. In addition to the versatility of the water-soluble CMA to enable spray drying injection and therefore eliminate grinding costs, there are other attractive features. Mainly, its ability to form highly cenospheric, popcorn''-like, oxide particles on heating to high temperatures. These cenospheres possess thin, porous walls with blowholes that enable penetration of the SO[sub 2] in the interior of the particle which promotes high sorbent utilization. SO[sub 2] captures in the order of 90% were achieved with dry-injection of the chemical at furnace gas temperatures of about 1,000[degree]C, a Ca/S ratio of 2, and particle size of [approximately] 50[mu]m. Moreover, CMA was superior (by over 40%) to either CaCO[sub 3] or Ca(OH)[sub 2] in sulfur capture effectiveness per unit mass of calcium. This commercially obtained CMA was even superior to reagent-grade calcium acetate (by as much as 30%), again per unit mass of calcium. The utilization of CMA and calcium acetate depended on the cenosphere wall thickness, rather than the particle size and, thus, outperformed other sorbents regardless of the size of the resulting oxide particles.

  13. ALMA observations of TiO2 around VY CMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Beck, Elvire; Vlemmings, Wouter; Muller, Sébastien; Black, John H.; O'Gorman, Eamon; Richards, Anita M. S.; Baudry, Alain; Maercker, Matthias; Decin, Leen; Humphreys, Elizabeth M.

    2016-07-01

    Titanium dioxide, TiO2, is a refractory species that could play a crucial role in the dust-condensation sequence around oxygen-rich evolved stars. We present and discuss the detections of 15 emission lines of TiO2 with ALMA in the complex environment of the red supergiant VY CMa. The observations reveal a highly clumpy, anisotropic outflow in which the TiO2 emission likely traces gas exposed to the stellar radiation field. We find evidence for a roughly east-west oriented, accelerating bipolar-like structure, of which the blue component runs into and breaks up around a solid continuum component. We see a distinct tail to the south-west for some transitions, consistent with features seen in the optical and near-infrared. We find that a significant fraction of TiO2 remains in the gas phase outside the dust-formation zone and suggest that this species might play only a minor role in the dust-condensation process around extreme oxygen-rich evolved stars like VY CMa.

  14. Singularity analysis and elimination of CMA in multistage PMD channel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Xinhui; Li, Yan; Du, Wentao; Cheng, Haiquan; Wu, Jian; Li, Wei; Lin, Jintong; Lu, Jianxin; Xu, Jian; Zhang, Guoyi; Luo, Huihong

    2015-08-01

    Polarization-division-multiplexed(PDM) optical coherent systems is considered a promising technique for next generation optical networks. With coherent detection, various impairments in the optical transmission system can be compensated by using digital signal processing (DSP) in the electrical domain. Constant modulus algorithm (CMA), due to its simplicity and immunity to phase noise, has been widely used to demultiplex polarizations and compensate received signals. On the other hand, CMA suffers from the singularity problem which results from Polarization- Dependent-Loss (PDL) and the less sensitivity in phase of CMA. Although many people have researched the singularity problem of CMA both in theory and experiments (modify CMA to avoid singularity problem), their theoretical channel model only contains fiber birefringence and does not consider the situation of multistage channel model which is used in long distance transmission system. Then we analyse the performance of CMA in the channel with multistage channel model through simulation. We change the initial tap of the traditional CMA which can achieve correct polarization demultiplexing without singularity in one stage channel model. But it is not very suitable in multistage channel model. We analysed singularity ratio in long distance transmission system. The simulation results play an active role in following research on singularity problem and the performance of CMA.

  15. Surface Tuning of La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 Perovskite Catalysts by Acetic Acid for NOx Storage and Reduction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Si, Wenzhe; Luo, Jinming; Su, Wenkang; Chang, Huazhen; Li, Junhua; Hao, Jiming; Crittenden, John

    2016-06-21

    Selective dissolution of perovskite A site (A of ABO3 structure) was performed on the La1 - xSrxCoO3 catalysts for the NOx storage and reduction (NSR) reaction. The surface area of the catalysts were enhanced using dilute HNO3 impregnation to dissolve Sr. Inactive SrCO3 was removed effectively within 6 h, and the catalyst preserved the perovskite framework after 24 h of treatment. The tuned catalysts exhibited higher NSR performance (both NOx storage and NO-to-NO2 oxidation) under lean-burn and fuel-rich cycles at 250 °C. Large amounts of NOx adsorption were due to the increase of nitrate/nitrite species bonding to the A site and the growth of newly formed monodentate nitrate species. Nitrate species were stored stably on the partial exposed Sr(2+) cations. These exposed Sr(2+) cations played an important role on the NOx reduction by C3H6. High NO-to-NO2 oxidation ability was due to the generation of oxygen defects and Co(2+)-Co(3+) redox couples, which resulted from B-site exsolution induced by A-site dissolution. Hence, our method is facile to modify the surface structures of perovskite catalysts and provides a new strategy to obtain highly active catalysts for the NSR reaction. PMID:27233105

  16. A Dynamic Tap Allocation for Concurrent CMA-DD Equalizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade, Diego von B. M.; Halmenschlager, Vitor; Ortolan, Leonardo; De Castro, Maria C. F.; De Castro, Fernando C. C.; Ourique, Fabrício

    2010-12-01

    This paper proposes a dynamic tap allocation for the concurrent CMA-DD equalizer as a low complexity solution for the blind channel deconvolution problem. The number of taps is a crucial factor which affects the performance and the complexity of most adaptive equalizers. Generally an equalizer requires a large number of taps in order to cope with long delays in the channel multipath profile. Simulations show that the proposed new blind equalizer is able to solve the blind channel deconvolution problem with a specified and reduced number of active taps. As a result, it minimizes the output excess mean square error due to inactive taps during and after the equalizer convergence and the hardware complexity as well.

  17. Testing of CMA-2000 Microwave Landing System (MLS) airborne receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labreche, L.; Murfin, A. J.

    1989-09-01

    Microwave landing system (MLS) is a precision approach and landing guidance system which provides position information and various air to ground data. Position information is provided on a wide coverage sector and is determined by an azimuth angle measurement, an elevation angle measurement, and a range measurement. MLS performance standards and testing of the MLS airborne receiver is mainly governed by Technical Standard Order TSO-C104 issued by the Federal Aviation Administration. This TSO defines detailed test procedures for use in determining the required performance under standard and stressed conditions. It also imposes disciplines on software development and testing procedures. Testing performed on the CMA-2000 MLS receiver and methods used in its validation are described. A computer automated test system has been developed to test for compliance with RTCA/DO-177 Minimum Operation Performance Standards. Extensive software verification and traceability tests designed to ensure compliance with RTCA/DO-178 are outlined.

  18. Performance analysis of conventional CMA and RLS in single carrier LTE uplink systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy P, Jaswini; Kotte, Swathi; Gannamaneni, Geetha Chowdary; Talluri, Kalyan Chakravarthy

    2011-10-01

    In wireless communication, channel equalization is one of the most challenging tasks because the broadcast channels are often subjected to multipath fading and several bandwidth limitations. Our project is mainly concerned with the Single Carrier Long Term Evolution (SC-LTE) uplink system model and its performance analysis when Fractionally Spaced Constant Modulus Algorithm (FS-CMA) and Recursive Least Squares Algorithm (RLS) are implemented. FS-CMA (CMA (1, 2) and CMA (2, 2)) and RLS algorithms are used individually to eliminate noise caused by multipath fading and Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN) in the stationary channel. The performance of conventional FS-CMA and RLS algorithm are compared using Bit Error Rate (BER) vs. Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), Convergence, Equalizer output, Peak to Average Power Ratio (PAPR) vs. SNR.

  19. Iron(III) complexes of 2-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)phenol and acetate or nitrate as catalysts for epoxidation of olefins with hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Amit Kumar; Samanta, Suvendu; Dutta, Supriya; Lucas, C. Robert; Dawe, Louise N.; Biswas, Papu; Adhikary, Bibhutosh

    2016-07-01

    Cheap and environmentally friendly Fe(III) catalysts [Fe(L)2(CH3COO)] (1) and [Fe(L)2(NO3)]·2CH3OH (2) where HL = 2-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)phenol for epoxidation of olefins have been developed. The catalysts have been characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV-Vis spectroscopy and by X-ray crystallography. The X-ray structures reveal mononuclear compounds having a bidentate acetate or nitrate in 1 and 2, respectively. Catalytic epoxidations of styrene and cyclohexene have been carried out homogeneously by using 30% aqueous hydrogen peroxide in acetonitrile in the presence of catalytic amounts of 1 or 2. Yields of the respective epoxides were fair (1) to good (2) and selectivities were good in all cases although 2 produced two to three times the yield, depending on the substrate, than 1 and higher selectivity as well. A hypothesis for these differences in catalytic efficacy between 1 and 2 that is consistent with mechanistic details of related enzymatic and biomimetic model systems is proposed. Herein we report [Fe(L)2(NO3)]·2CH3OH (2) as the first structurally characterized non-heme iron epoxidation catalyst with a bidentate nitrate ligand.

  20. Furore over language, shortage of women leaders signs of need for change at CMA, committee says.

    PubMed Central

    Rafuse, J

    1995-01-01

    Negative comments made recently about use of the term "chair" instead of "chairman," and the continuing shortage of women at decision-making levels of organized medicine are ample evidence that the work of the CMA's Gender Issues Committee (GIC) is not done, says the committee chair, Dr. May Cohen. At its fall meeting, the GIC said the CMA should actively promote greater representation by women physicians on its political and expert committees; a target of at least 25% membership within the next 2 to 5 years was suggested. The committee discussed other measures the CMA should consider in its attempts to become more representative of Canada's physician population. PMID:7828104

  1. Peculiarities of the accretion flow in the system HL CMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semena, A. N.; Revnivtsev, M. G.; Buckley, D.; Lutovinov, A. A.; Breitenbach, H.

    2016-06-01

    The properties of the aperiodic luminosity variability for the dwarf novaHLCMa are considered. The variability of the system HL CMa is shown to be suppressed at frequencies above 0.7 × 10-2 Hz. Different variability suppression mechanisms related to the radiation reprocessing time, partial disk evaporation, and characteristic variability formation time are proposed. It has been found that the variability suppression frequency does not change when the system passes from the quiescent state to the outburst one, suggesting that the accretion flow geometry is invariable. It is concluded from the optical and Xray luminosities of the system that the boundary layer on the white dwarf surface is optically thick in both quiescent and outburst states. The latter implies that the optically thick part of the accretion flow (disk) reaches the white dwarf surface. The accretion rate in the system and the accretion flow geometry and temperature have been estimated from the variability power spectra and spectral characteristics in a wide energy range, from the optical to X-ray ones.

  2. SRTC criticality safety technical review of SRT-CMA-930039

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, R.

    1993-12-03

    Review of SRT-CMA-930039, ``Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation (NCSE): DWPF Melter-Batch 1,`` December 1, 1993, has been performed by the Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC) Applied Physics Group. The NCSE is a criticality assessment of the Melt Cell in the DWPF. Additionally, this pertains only to Batch 1 operation, which differs from batches to follow. Plans for subsequent batch operations call for fissile material in the Salt Cell feed-stream, which necessitates a separate criticality evaluation in the future. The NCSE under review concludes that the process is safe from criticality events, even in the event that all lithium and boron neutron poisons are lost, provided uranium enrichments are less than 40%. Furthermore, if all the lithium and as much as 98% of the boron would be lost, uranium enrichments of 100% would be allowable. After a thorough review of the NCSE, this reviewer agrees with that conclusion. This technical review consisted of: an independent check of the methods and models employed, independent calculations application of ANSI/ANS 8.1, verification of WSRC Nuclear Criticality Safety Manual({sup 2}) procedures.

  3. Non-redox metal ion promoted oxidative coupling of indoles with olefins by the palladium(ii) acetate catalyst through dioxygen activation: experimental results with DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sicheng; Chen, Zhuqi; Qin, Shuhao; Lou, Chenlin; Senan, Ahmed M; Liao, Rong-Zhen; Yin, Guochuan

    2016-04-26

    Developing new catalytic technologies through C-H bond activation to synthesize versatile pharmaceuticals has attracted much attention in recent decades. This work introduces a new strategy in catalyst design for Pd(ii)-catalyzed C-H bond activation in which non-redox metal ions serving as Lewis acids play significant roles. In the oxidative coupling of indoles with olefins using dioxygen, it was found that Pd(OAc)2 alone as the catalyst is very sluggish at ambient temperature which provided a low yield of the olefination product, whereas adding non-redox metal ions to Pd(OAc)2 substantially improves its catalytic efficiency. In particular, it provided bis(indolyl)methane derivatives as the dominant product, a category of pharmacological molecules which could not be synthesized by Pd(ii)-catalyzed oxidative coupling previously. Detailed investigations revealed that the reaction proceeds by heterobimetallic Pd(ii)/Sc(iii)-catalyzed oxidative coupling of an indole with an olefin followed by Sc(iii)-catalyzed addition with a second indole molecule. DFT calculations disclosed that the formation of heterobimetallic Pd(ii)/Sc(iii) species substantially decreases the C-H bond activation energy barrier, and shifts the rate determining step from C-H bond activation of indole to the olefination step. This non-redox metal ion promoted Pd(ii)-catalyzed C-H bond activation may offer a new opportunity for catalyst design in organic synthesis, which has not been fully recognized yet. PMID:27075840

  4. A modified CMA for blind equalization and phase recovery in optical coherent receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hai; Chen, Xue; Zhou, Weiqin; Li, Zhiyu; Zhou, Xian; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2009-11-01

    In order to solve the phase rotating problem for constant modulus algorithm (CMA) in polarization division multiplexing system with optical coherent receivers, a modified constant modulus algorithm based on decomposing cost function into real and imaginary parts is proposed in this paper. Simulation results show that, the proposed algorithm can compensate any angle phase distortion arising from channel, and deal with phase offset caused by intradyne receiver, with better performance comparing the conventional CMA.

  5. Ammonium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonium acetate ; CASRN 631 - 61 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  6. Vinyl acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vinyl acetate ; CASRN 108 - 05 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  7. Ethyl acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl acetate ; CASRN 141 - 78 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  8. Phenylmercuric acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phenylmercuric acetate ; CASRN 62 - 38 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  9. Thallium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 30 , 2009 , the assessment summary for Thallium acetate is included in t

  10. Toward Understanding the B[e] Phenomenon. II. New Galactic FS CMa Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Manset, N.; Kusakin, A. V.; Chentsov, E. L.; Klochkova, V. G.; Zharikov, S. V.; Gray, R. O.; Grankin, K. N.; Gandet, T. L.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Rudy, R. J.; Lynch, D. K.; Venturini, C. C.; Mazuk, S.; Puetter, R. C.; Perry, R. B.; Levato, H.; Grosso, M.; Bernabei, S.; Polcaro, V. F.; Viotti, R. F.; Norci, L.; Kuratov, K. S.

    2007-12-01

    FS CMa stars form a group of objects with the B[e] phenomenon that were previously known as unclassified B[e] stars or B[e] stars with warm dust (B[e]WD) until recently. They exhibit strong emission-line spectra and strong IR excesses, most likely due to recently formed circumstellar dust. These properties have been suggested to be due to ongoing or recent rapid mass exchange in binary systems with hot primaries and various types of secondaries. The first paper of this series reported an analysis of the available information about previously known Galactic objects with the B[e] phenomenon, the initial selection of the FS CMa group objects, and a qualitative explanation of their properties. This paper reports the results of our new search for more FS CMa objects in the IRAS Point Source Catalog. We present new photometric criteria for identifying FS CMa stars as well as the first results of our observations of nine new FS CMa group members. With this addition, the FS CMa group has now 40 members, becoming the largest among the dust-forming hot star groups. We also present nine objects with no evidence for the B[e] phenomenon, but with newly discovered spectral line emission and/or strong IR excesses. Partially based on data obtained at the 6 m BTA Telescope of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, 3 m Shane Telescope of the Lick Observatory, 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith and 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescopes of the McDonald Observatory, 2.1 m telescope of the San Pedro Martir Observatory, 1.5 m telescope of the Loiano Observatory, and 0.8 m telescope of the Dark Sky Observatory.

  11. Engelhard expands oxidation catalysts portfolio

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1997-02-26

    Engelhard says its agreement earlier this month to market Amoco Chemical`s proprietary maleic anhydride catalyst reflects an effort to expand its speciality catalysts business (CW, Feb. 19, p.5). In particular, the company says it is looking for additional alliances to bolster its oxidation catalysts portfolio. {open_quotes}There are some areas of oxidation catalysis that are reasonably attractive,{close_quotes} says Paul Lamb, marketing director/chemical catalysts. He says that while Engelhard is not interested in commodity oxidation catalysts, such as those used to make sulfuric acid, it does want to boost offerings for higher-value oxidation catalysts. Engelhard is collaborating with Geon to offer oxychlorination catalysts for making ethylene dichloride. It also markets oxidation catalysts for vinyl acetate production.

  12. Process for the preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, G.C.; Zoeller, J.R.; Depew, L.S.

    1998-02-17

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting within a contact zone a mixture of ketene and acetaldehyde with an acid catalyst at about one bar pressure and between about 85 and 200 C and removing the reaction products from the contact zone.

  13. Process for the preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, Gerald Charles; Zoeller, Joseph Robert; Depew, Leslie Sharon

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting within a contact zone a mixture of ketene and acetaldehyde with an acid catalyst at about one bar pressure and between about 85.degree. and 200.degree. C. and removing the reaction products from the contact zone.

  14. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Carbonylation of Methyl Acetate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polichnowski, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a study of the rhodium-catalyzed, ioding-promoted carbonylation of methyl acetate. This study provides an interesting contrast between the carbonylation of methyl acetate and the carbonylation of methanol when similar rhodium/iodine catalyst systems are used. (JN)

  15. O-Allylation of phenols with allylic acetates in aqueous media using a magnetically separable catalytic system

    EPA Science Inventory

    Allylic ethers were synthesized in water using magnetically recoverable heterogeneous Pd catalyst via O-allylation of phenols with allylic acetates under ambient conditions. Aqueous reaction medium, easy recovery of the catalyst using an external magnet, efficient recycling, and ...

  16. KIC 4739791: A New R CMa-type Eclipsing Binary with a Pulsating Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Woo; Kim, Seung-Lee; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Koo, Jae-Rim; Lee, Chung-Uk; Youn, Jae-Hyuck

    2016-02-01

    The Kepler light curve of KIC 4739791 exhibits partial eclipses, the inverse O’Connell effect, and multiperiodic pulsations. Including a starspot on either of the binary components, the light-curve synthesis indicates that KIC 4739791 is in detached or semi-detached configuration with both a short orbital period and a low mass ratio. Multiple frequency analyses were performed in the light residuals after subtracting the binarity effects from the original Kepler data. We detected 14 frequencies: 6 in the low-frequency region (0.1-2.3 days-1) and 8 in the high-frequency region (18.2-22.0 days-1). Among these, six high frequencies with amplitudes of 0.62-1.97 mmag were almost constant over time for 200 days. Their pulsation periods and pulsation constants are in the ranges of 0.048-0.054 days and 0.025-0.031 days, respectively. In contrast, the other frequencies may arise from the alias effects caused by the orbital frequency or combination frequencies. We propose that KIC 4739791 is a short-period R CMa binary with the lowest mass ratio in the known classical Algols and that its primary component is a δ Sct pulsating star. Only four R CMa stars have been identified, three of which exhibit δ Sct-type oscillations. These findings make KIC 4739791 an attractive target for studies of stellar interior structure and evolution.

  17. THE PAN-PACIFIC PLANET SEARCH. I. A GIANT PLANET ORBITING 7 CMa

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Tinney, C. G.; Endl, Michael; Wang Liang; Johnson, John Asher; O'Toole, S. J.

    2011-12-20

    We introduce the Pan-Pacific Planet Search, a survey of 170 metal-rich Southern Hemisphere subgiants using the 3.9 m Anglo-Australian Telescope. We report the first discovery from this program, a giant planet orbiting 7 CMa (HD 47205) with a period of 763 {+-} 17 days, eccentricity e = 0.14 {+-} 0.06, and msin i = 2.6 {+-} 0.6 M{sub Jup}. The host star is a K giant with a mass of 1.5 {+-} 0.3 M{sub Sun} and metallicity [Fe/H] = 0.21 {+-} 0.10. The mass and period of 7 CMa b are typical of planets which have been found to orbit intermediate-mass stars (M{sub *} > 1.3 M{sub Sun }). Hipparcos photometry shows this star to be stable to 0.0004 mag on the radial-velocity period, giving confidence that this signal can be attributed to reflex motion caused by an orbiting planet.

  18. Oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  19. "Don't let others design your future", new CMA president tells physicians. Interview by Nancy Robb.

    PubMed Central

    Kazimirski, J

    1996-01-01

    Dr. Judith Kazimirski of Nova Scotia becomes the CMA's 126th president during the association's annual meeting in Sydney, NS, this month. She says her priority for the next year is to help the CMA play a lead role as the debate intensifies about the future of health and health care in Canada. "The time is right for a very public debate about what people want their system to be, what problems they're having, and how reform is moving ahead," she says, "and physicians have a critical leadership role to play." Images p452-a PMID:8801012

  20. Production of Catalyst-Free Hyperpolarised Ethanol Aqueous Solution via Heterogeneous Hydrogenation with Parahydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Salnikov, Oleg G.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Koptyug, Igor V.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental approach for the production of catalyst-free hyperpolarised ethanol solution in water via heterogeneous hydrogenation of vinyl acetate with parahydrogen and the subsequent hydrolysis of ethyl acetate was demonstrated. For an efficient hydrogenation, liquid vinyl acetate was transferred to the gas phase by parahydrogen bubbling and almost completely converted to ethyl acetate with Rh/TiO2 catalyst. Subsequent dissolution of ethyl acetate gas in water containing OH− ions led to the formation of catalyst- and organic solvent-free hyperpolarised ethanol and sodium acetate. These results represent the first demonstration of catalyst- and organic solvent-free hyperpolarised ethanol production achieved by heterogeneous hydrogenation of vinyl acetate vapour with parahydrogen and the subsequent ethyl acetate hydrolysis. PMID:26349543

  1. Production of Catalyst-Free Hyperpolarised Ethanol Aqueous Solution via Heterogeneous Hydrogenation with Parahydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salnikov, Oleg G.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Koptyug, Igor V.

    2015-09-01

    An experimental approach for the production of catalyst-free hyperpolarised ethanol solution in water via heterogeneous hydrogenation of vinyl acetate with parahydrogen and the subsequent hydrolysis of ethyl acetate was demonstrated. For an efficient hydrogenation, liquid vinyl acetate was transferred to the gas phase by parahydrogen bubbling and almost completely converted to ethyl acetate with Rh/TiO2 catalyst. Subsequent dissolution of ethyl acetate gas in water containing OH- ions led to the formation of catalyst- and organic solvent-free hyperpolarised ethanol and sodium acetate. These results represent the first demonstration of catalyst- and organic solvent-free hyperpolarised ethanol production achieved by heterogeneous hydrogenation of vinyl acetate vapour with parahydrogen and the subsequent ethyl acetate hydrolysis.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VY CMa ALMA NaCl images (Decin+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decin, L.; Richards, A. M. S.; Millar, T. J.; Baudry, A.; de, Beck E.; Homan, W.; Smith, N.; van de Sande, M.; Walsh, C.

    2016-07-01

    VY CMa was observed for ALMA Science Verification on 2013 16-19 August using 16-20 12-m antennas on baselines from 0.014-2.7km. The main objective was to map the H2O maser lines at 321 and 325GHz (Band 7) and 658GHz (Band 9), but several thermal lines identified with various rotational transitions of NaCl, TiO2, SO2, and SiO were also present in the spectral setting in addition to the continuum data. Four NaCl lines in the ground or first vibrational state are covered in the ALMA band 7 data. All of them are detected, albeit only two are unblended (see Table 1). (3 data files).

  3. A spectropolarimetric study of the Wolf-Rayet star EZ CMa1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Chevrotière, Antoine; St-Louis, Nicole; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the first deep, direct search for a magnetic field via Zeeman splitting in a Wolf-Rayet star. Using the highly-efficient ESPaDOnS (Echelle Spectro-Polarimetric Device for the Observations of Stars) at the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope, we observed at four different rotation phases one of the best WR candidates in the sky expected to harbor a magnetic field, the bright, variable WN4 star EZ CMa = WR6 = HD 50896. We looked for the characteristic circular polarization (Stokes V) pattern in strong emission lines that would arise as a consequence of a global, rotating magnetic field. Based on the work of Gayley and Ignace [1], we investigate the split-monopole scenario as a possible magnetic configuration and obtain an upper limit of ~ 300 G in the formation region of the strongest emission line HeII λ4686A˚.

  4. SEARCH FOR A MAGNETIC FIELD VIA CIRCULAR POLARIZATION IN THE WOLF-RAYET STAR EZ CMa

    SciTech Connect

    De la Chevrotiere, A.; St-Louis, N.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Collaboration: MiMeS Collaboration

    2013-02-20

    We report on the first deep, direct search for a magnetic field via the circular polarization of Zeeman splitting in a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star. Using the highly efficient ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we observed at three different epochs one of the best W-R candidates in the sky expected to harbor a magnetic field, the bright, highly variable WN4 star EZ CMa = WR6 = HD 50896. We looked for the characteristic circular polarization (Stokes V) pattern in strong emission lines that would arise as a consequence of a global, rotating magnetic field with a split monopole configuration. We also obtained nearly simultaneous linear polarization spectra (Stokes Q and U), which are dominated by electron scattering, most likely from a flattened wind with large-scale corotating structures. As the star rotates with a period of 3.766 days, our view of the wind changes, which in turn affects the value of the linear polarization in lines versus continuum at the {approx}0.2% level. Depending on the epoch of observation, our Stokes V data were affected by significant crosstalk from Stokes Q and U to V. We removed this spurious signal from the circular polarization data and experimented with various levels of spectral binning to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of our data. In the end, no magnetic field is unambiguously detected in EZ CMa. Assuming that the star is intrinsically magnetic and harbors a split monopole configuration, we find an upper limit of B {approx} 100 G for the intensity of its field in the line-forming regions of the stellar wind.

  5. Catalytic oxidation of butyl acetate over silver-loaded zeolites.

    PubMed

    Wong, Cheng Teng; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Bhatia, Subhash

    2008-09-15

    The performance of silver-loaded zeolite (HY and HZSM-5) catalysts in the oxidation of butyl acetate as a model volatile organic compound (VOC) was studied. The objective was to find a catalyst with superior activity, selectivity towards deep oxidation product and stability. The catalyst activity was measured under excess oxygen condition in a packed bed reactor operated at gas hourly space velocity (GHSV)=15,000-32,000 h(-1), reaction temperature between 150 and 500 degrees C and butyl acetate inlet concentration of 1000-4000 ppm. Both AgY and AgZSM-5 catalysts exhibited high activity in the oxidation of butyl acetate. Despite lower silver content, AgY showed better activity, attributed to better metal dispersion, surface characteristics and acidity, and its pore system. Total conversion of butyl acetate was achieved at above 400 degrees C. The oxidation of butyl acetate followed a simple power law model. The reaction orders, n and m were evaluated under differential mode by varying the VOC partial pressure between 0.004 and 0.018 atm and partial pressure of oxygen between 0.05 and 0.20 atm. The reaction rate was independent of oxygen concentration and single order with respect to VOC concentration. The activation energies were 19.78 kJ/mol for AgY and 32.26 kJ/mol for AgZSM-5, respectively. PMID:18294771

  6. Effect of calcium magnesium acetate on the forming property and fractal dimension of sludge pore structure during combustion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihui; Duan, Feng; Huang, Yaji; Chyang, Chiensong

    2015-12-01

    The changes in pore structure characteristics of sewage sludge particles under effect of calcium magnesium acetate (CMA) during combustion were investigated, the samples were characterized by N2 isothermal absorption method, and the data were used to analyze the fractal properties of the obtained samples. Results show that reaction time and the mole ratio of calcium to sulfur (Ca/S ratio) have notable impact on the pore structure and morphology of solid sample. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area (SBET) of sample increases with Ca/S ratio, while significant decreases with reaction time. The fractal dimension D has the similar trend with that of SBET, indicating that the surface roughness of sludge increases under the effect of CMA adding, resulting in improved the sludge combustion and the desulfurization process. PMID:26342334

  7. Antimicrobial Peptide CMA3 Derived from the CA-MA Hybrid Peptide: Antibacterial and Anti-inflammatory Activities with Low Cytotoxicity and Mechanism of Action in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-kook; Seo, Chang Ho; Luchian, Tudor

    2015-01-01

    CA-MA is a hybrid antimicrobial peptide (AMP) derived from two naturally occurring AMPs, cecropin A and magainin 2. CA-MA shows strong antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria but also exhibits cytotoxicity toward mammalian cells. Our objective was to identify CA-MA analogues with reduced cytotoxicity by systematic replacement of amino acids with positively charged R groups (His and Lys), aliphatic R groups (Leu), or polar R groups (Glu). Among the CA-MA analogues studied (CMA1 to -6), CMA3 showed the strongest antimicrobial activity, including against drug-resistant Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from hospital patients. CMA3 appeared to act by inducing pore formation (toroidal model) in the bacterial membrane. In cytotoxicity assays, CMA3 showed little cytotoxicity toward human red blood cells (hRBCs) or HaCaT cells. Additionally, no fluorescence was released from small or giant unilamellar vesicles exposed to 60 μM CMA3 for 80 s, whereas fluorescence was released within 35 s upon exposure to CA-MA. CMA3 also exerted strong lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-neutralizing activity in RAW 264.7 cells, and BALB/c mice exposed to LPS after infection by Escherichia coli showed improved survival after administration of one 0.5-mg/kg of body weight or 1-mg/kg dose of CMA3. Finally, in a mouse model of septic shock, CMA3 reduced the levels of proinflammatory factors, including both nitric oxide and white blood cells, and correspondingly reduced lung tissue damage. This study suggests that CMA3 is an antimicrobial/antiendotoxin peptide that could serve as the basis for the development of anti-inflammatory and/or antimicrobial agents with low cytotoxicity. PMID:26552969

  8. Young eccentric binary KL CMa revisited in the light of spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakış, Volkan

    2015-10-01

    The absolute dimensions of the components of the eccentric eclipsing binary KL CMa have been determined. The solution of light and radial velocity curves of high (Δλ = 0.14 Å) and intermediate (Δλ = 1.1 Å) resolution spectra yielded masses M1 = 3.55 ± 0.27 M⊙, M2 = 2.95 ± 0.24 M⊙ and radii R1 = 2.37 ± 0.09 R⊙, R2 = 1.70 ± 0.1 R⊙ for primary and secondary components, respectively. The system consists of two late B-type components at a distance of 220 ± 20 pc for an estimated reddening of E (B - V) = 0.127 . The present study provides an illustration of spectroscopy's crucial role in the analysis of binary systems in eccentric orbits. The eccentricity of the orbit (e = 0.20) of KL CMa is found to be bigger than the value given in the literature (e = 0.14). The apsidal motion rate of the system has been updated to a new value of w ˙ = 0 ° . 0199 ± 0.0002cycle-1 , which indicates an apsidal motion period of U = 87 ± 1 yrs, two times slower than given in the literature. Using the absolute dimensions of the components yielded a relatively weak relativistic contribution of w˙rel = 0 ° . 0013cycle-1 . The observed internal-structure component (logk2,obs = - 2.22 ± 0.01) is found to be in agreement with its theoretical value (logk2,theo = - 2.23). Both components of the system are found very close to the zero-age main-sequence and theoretical isochrones indicate a young age (τ = 50 Myr) for the system. Analysis of the spectral lines yields a faster rotation (Vrot1,2 = 100 km s-1) for the components than their synchronization velocities (Vrot,syn1 = 68 km s-1, Vrot,syn1 = 49 km s-1).

  9. ITC-CMA partnership and data needs for alkylphenols and ethoxylates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Rice, C.P.; Walker, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The ITC has been an independent advisory committee to the EPA Administrator since enactment of the Toxics Substances Control Act (TSCA) in 1976. The ITC identifies and coordinates U.S. Government data needs for TSCA-regulable chemicals, and makes recommendations to the Administrator for priority testing consideration. Chemicals recommended by the ITC are added to the TSCA Priority Testing List that is revised semi-annually in Reports to the Administrator. In recent Reports, the ITC added alkylphenols (APs) and ethoxylates to the Priority Testing List. About 500 million pounds are produced annually for industrial processing, cleaning and personal care products. APs have been detected in the tissues of fish from the Great Lakes, and one AP (nonylphenol) causes vitellogenin gene expression in trout hepatocytes. Numerous APs and ethoxylates were recommended by the ITC because data are needed on: (1) chemical composition, (2) environmental fate of parent chemicals and impurities, and (3) health and ecological effects (including toxicokinetics and endocrine-modulating effects). In response to the ITC's recommendations, two activities have ensued. First, the EPA promulgated rules requiring manufacturers, importers and processors of APs and ethoxylates to submit production and exposure reports, and unpublished health and safety studies, for review. Second, the Alkylphenols and Ethoxylates Panel of Chemical Manufacturers Association (CMA) and the ITC formed a Dialogue Group to discuss the data needs. Data needs and activities initiated by the Dialogue Group will be presented.

  10. Adaptive niche radii and niche shapes approaches for niching with the CMA-ES.

    PubMed

    Shir, Ofer M; Emmerich, Michael; Bäck, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    While the motivation and usefulness of niching methods is beyond doubt, the relaxation of assumptions and limitations concerning the hypothetical search landscape is much needed if niching is to be valid in a broader range of applications. Upon the introduction of radii-based niching methods with derandomized evolution strategies (ES), the purpose of this study is to address the so-called niche radius problem. A new concept of an adaptive individual niche radius is applied to niching with the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES). Two approaches are considered. The first approach couples the radius to the step size mechanism, while the second approach employs the Mahalanobis distance metric with the covariance matrix mechanism for the distance calculation, for obtaining niches with more complex geometrical shapes. The proposed approaches are described in detail, and then tested on high-dimensional artificial landscapes at several levels of difficulty. They are shown to be robust and to achieve satisfying results. PMID:20064027

  11. THE 2008 OUTBURST IN THE YOUNG STELLAR SYSTEM Z CMa: THE FIRST DETECTION OF TWIN JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, E. T.; Dougados, C.; Bonnefoy, M.; Bouvier, J.; Chauvin, G.; Garcia, P. J. V.; Malbet, F.; Perrin, M. D.; Bains, I.; Redman, M. P.; Ray, T. P.; Bouy, H.; Benisty, M.; Grankvin, K.

    2010-09-01

    The Z CMa binary is understood to undergo both FU Orionis (FUOR) and EX Orionis (EXOR) type outbursts. While the SE component has been spectroscopically classified as an FUOR, the NW component, a Herbig Be star, is the source of the EXOR outbursts. The system has been identified as the source of a large outflow; however, previous studies have failed to identify the driver. Here, we present adaptive optics assisted [Fe II] spectro-images which reveal for the first time the presence of two small-scale jets. Observations made using OSIRIS at the Keck Observatory show the Herbig Be star to be the source of the parsec-scale outflow, which within 2'' of the source shows signs of wiggling and the FUOR to be driving a {approx}0.''4 jet. The wiggling of the Herbig Be star's jet is evidence for an additional companion which could in fact be generating the EXOR outbursts, the last of which began in 2008. Indeed, the dynamical scale of the wiggling corresponds to a timescale of 4-8 years which is in agreement with the timescale of these outbursts. The spectro-images also show a bow-shock-shaped feature and possible associated knots. The origin of this structure is as of yet unclear. Finally, interesting low velocity structure is also observed. One possibility is that it originates in a wide-angle outflow launched from a circumbinary disk.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: V352 CMa V-band differential light curve (Kajatkari+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajatkari, P.; Jetsu, L.; Cole, E.; Hackman, T.; Henry, G. W.; Joutsiniemi, S.-L.; Lehtinen, J.; Makela, V.; Porceddu, S.; Ryynanen, K.; Solea, V.

    2015-05-01

    The included files present the numerical data of our analysis of the V352 CMa photometry. The data consists of differential Johnson V-band photometry using the star HD 43879 as the comparison star. The analysis has been performed using our previously published continuous period search (CPS) method, described in detail in Lehtinen et al., 2011A&A...527A.136L, Cat. J/A+A/527/A136. (2 data files).

  13. DISTANCE AND KINEMATICS OF THE RED HYPERGIANT VY CMa: VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY AND VERY LARGE ARRAY ASTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.; Reid, M. J.; Menten, K. M.; Zheng, X. W.

    2012-01-01

    We report astrometric results of phase-referencing very long baseline interferometry observations of 43 GHz SiO maser emission toward the red hypergiant VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa) using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). We measured a trigonometric parallax of 0.83 {+-} 0.08 mas, corresponding to a distance of 1.20{sup +0.13}{sub -0.10} kpc. Compared to previous studies, the spatial distribution of SiO masers has changed dramatically, while its total extent remains similar. The internal motions of the maser spots are up to 1.4 mas yr{sup -1}, corresponding to 8 km s{sup -1}, and show a tendency for expansion. After modeling the expansion of maser spots, we derived an absolute proper motion for the central star of {mu}{sub x} = -2.8 {+-} 0.2 and {mu}{sub y} = 2.6 {+-} 0.2 mas yr{sup -1} eastward and northward, respectively. Based on the maser distribution from the VLBA observations, and the relative position between the radio photosphere and the SiO maser emission at 43 GHz from the complementary Very Large Array observations, we estimate the absolute position of VY CMa at mean epoch 2006.53 to be {alpha}{sub J2000} = 07{sup h}22{sup m}58.{sup s}3259 {+-} 0.{sup s}0007, {delta}{sub J2000} = -25 Degree-Sign 46'03.''063 {+-} 0.''010. The position and proper motion of VY CMa from the VLBA observations differ significantly with values measured by the Hipparcos satellite. These discrepancies are most likely associated with inhomogeneities and dust scattering the optical light in the circumstellar envelope. The absolute proper motion measured with VLBA suggests that VY CMa may be drifting out of the giant molecular cloud to the east of it.

  14. A new process for producing calcium acetate from vegetable wastes for use as an environmentally friendly deicer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fangming; Zhang, Guangyi; Jin, Yujia; Watanabe, Yosiyuki; Kishita, Atsushi; Enomoto, Heiji

    2010-10-01

    A new process for producing calcium acetate, a non-corrosive deicer, is proposed. The process consists of a two-step continuous-flow hydrothermal conversion of vegetable wastes into acetic acid and the production of calcium acetate, followed by the separation and condensation of the product. The experiments for acetic acid production showed that there were almost no significant differences in acetic acid yields for the five different kinds of vegetables selected for the batch experiments or for their mixture in batch and continuous-flow experiments. Electrodialysis was chosen as a satisfactory method for separating and condensing the calcium acetate produced from the acetic acid solution obtained from the vegetable wastes. After purification by reverse-osmosis, the residual, depleted acid solution could be safely discharged. The calculation of the carbon balance for the proposed process showed that 21.3% of the TOC from vegetable wastes could be used as calcium/magnesium acetate (CMA) and over 22% as an environmentally friendly deicer. PMID:20483594

  15. Real-time experimental demonstration of PS-QPSK transmission with manipulated rotating and novel correlated CMA.

    PubMed

    Li, Haibo; Zeng, Tao; Li, Jie; Jiang, Feng; Liu, Ziqing; Hu, Rong; Luo, Ming; Wang, Yuanxiang; Li, Xiang; Yang, Qi; Yu, Shaohua; Huang, Liyan; Cao, Li

    2016-07-25

    In this paper, we propose a novel manipulated rotating polarization switched quadrature phase shift keying (MR-PS-QPSK) technique, and corresponding correlated constant modulus algorithm (CMA) for signal recovery. The latter utilizes the correlation between the PS-QPSK symbols in the two polarizations to lock the phase of output signals. Then the signals in the two polarizations are merged according to the recovered switching bit, which suppresses the noise and simplifies the subsequent process. A field programmable gate array (FPGA) based real-time platform is built for experimental demonstration. The experimental results show that the proposed MR-PS-QPSK modulation format with correlated CMA can provide 3.2 dB optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) improvement over dual-polarization QPSK (DP-QPSK) at back-to-back case and 3.8 dB OSNR improvement after fiber transmission at the same symbol rate, which corresponds to be about 2 dB OSNR improvement at the same bit rate. The resource consumption analysis in FPGA digital signal processing blocks and logic utilizations shows that the MR-PS-QPSK with correlated CMA only requires a small additional computational effort. PMID:27464115

  16. Control of coal combustion SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions by in-boiler injection of CMA. Final project report, July 1, 1992--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Levendis, Y.A.

    1995-04-01

    A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of carboxylic calcium and magnesium salts (e.g., calcium magnesium acetate or CMA, CaMg{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}COOH){sub 6}) for the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in oxygen-lean atmospheres. Experiments were performed in a high-temperature furnace that simulated the post-flame environment of a coal-fired boiler by providing similar temperatures and partial pressures of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. When injected into a hot environment, the salts calcined and formed highly porous {open_quotes}popcorn{close_quotes}-like cenospheres. Residual MgO and/or CaCO{sub 3} and CaO reacted heterogeneously with SO{sub 2} to form MgSO{sub 4} and/or CaCO{sub 4}. The organic components - which can be manufactured from wastes such as sewage sludge - gasified and reduced NO{sub x }to N{sub 2} efficiently if the atmosphere was moderately fuel-rich. Dry-injected CMA particles at a Ca/S ratio of 2, residence time of 1 second and bulk equivalence ratio of 1.3 removed over 90% of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} at gas temperatures {>=} 950{degrees}C. When the furnace isothermal zone was {<=} 950{degrees}C, Ca was essentially inert in the furnace quenching zone, while Mg continued to sorb SO{sub 2} as the gas temperature cooled at a rate of -130{degrees}C/sec. Hence, the removal of SO{sub 2} by CMA could continue for nearly the entire residence time of emissions in the exhaust stream of a power plant. Additional research is needed to improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of the relatively expensive carboxylic acid salts as dual SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} reduction agents. For example, wet injection of the salts could be combined with less expensive hydrocarbons such as lignite or even polymers such as poly(ethylene) that could be extracted from the municipal waste stream.

  17. RED SUPERGIANTS AS POTENTIAL TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS: SPATIALLY RESOLVED 4.6 {mu}m CO EMISSION AROUND VY CMa AND BETELGEUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Nathan; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Ryde, Nils E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu

    2009-03-15

    We present high-resolution 4.6 {mu}m CO spectra of the circumstellar environments of two red supergiants (RSGs) that are potential supernova (SN) progenitors: Betelgeuse and VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa). Around Betelgeuse, {sup 12}CO emission within {+-}3'' ({+-}12 km s{sup -1}) follows a mildly clumpy but otherwise spherical shell, smaller than its {approx}55'' shell in K I {lambda}7699. In stark contrast, 4.6 {mu}m CO emission around VY CMa is coincident with bright K I in its clumpy asymmetric reflection nebula, within {+-}5'' ({+-}40 km s{sup -1}) of the star. Our CO data reveal redshifted features not seen in K I spectra of VY CMa, indicating a more isotropic distribution of gas punctuated by randomly distributed asymmetric clumps. The relative CO and K I distribution in Betelgeuse arises from ionization effects within a steady wind, whereas in VY CMa, K I is emitted from skins of CO cloudlets resulting from episodic mass ejections 500-1000 yr ago. In both cases, CO and K I trace potential pre-SN circumstellar matter: we conclude that an extreme RSG like VY CMa might produce a Type IIn event like SN 1988Z if it were to explode in its current state, but Betelgeuse will not. VY CMa demonstrates that luminous blue variables are not necessarily the only progenitors of SNe IIn, but it underscores the requirement that SNe IIn suffer enhanced episodic mass loss shortly before exploding.

  18. B fields in OB stars (BOB): on the detection of weak magnetic fields in the two early B-type stars β CMa and ɛ CMa. Possible lack of a "magnetic desert" in massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; Castro, N.; Morel, T.; Langer, N.; Briquet, M.; Carroll, T. A.; Hubrig, S.; Nieva, M. F.; Oskinova, L. M.; Przybilla, N.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Schöller, M.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Ilyin, I.; de Koter, A.; Reisenegger, A.; Sana, H.

    2015-02-01

    Only a small fraction of massive stars seem to host a measurable structured magnetic field, whose origin is still unknown and whose implications for stellar evolution still need to be assessed. Within the context of the "B fields in OB stars (BOB)" collaboration, we used the HARPSpol spectropolarimeter to observe the early B-type stars β CMa (HD 44743; B1 II/III) and ɛ CMa (HD 52089; B1.5II) in December 2013 and April 2014. For both stars, we consistently detected the signature of a weak (<30 G in absolute value) longitudinal magnetic field, approximately constant with time. We determined the physical parameters of both stars and characterise their X-ray spectrum. For the β Cep star β CMa, our mode identification analysis led to determining a rotation period of 13.6 ± 1.2 days and of an inclination angle of the rotation axis of 57.6 ± 1.7°, with respect to the line of sight. On the basis of these measurements and assuming a dipolar field geometry, we derived a best fitting obliquity of about 22° and a dipolar magnetic field strength (Bd) of about 100 G (60 CMa we could only determine a lower limit on the dipolar magnetic field strength of 13 G. For this star, we determine that the rotation period ranges between 1.3 and 24 days. Our results imply that both stars are expected to have a dynamical magnetosphere, so the magnetic field is not able to support a circumstellar disk. We also conclude that both stars are most likely core hydrogen burning and that they have spent more than 2/3 of their main sequence lifetime. Ahistogram of the distribution of the dipolar magnetic field strength for the magnetic massive stars known to date does not show the magnetic field "desert" observed instead for intermediate-mass stars. The biases involved in the detection of (weak) magnetic

  19. Constraints on the Surface Magnetic Fields and Age of a Cool Hypergiant: XMM-Newton X-Ray Observations of VY CMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montez, Rodolfo, Jr.; Kastner, Joel H.; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Turok, Rebecca L.; Davidson, Kris

    2015-02-01

    The complex circumstellar ejecta of highly evolved, cool hypergiants are indicative of multiple, asymmetric mass-loss events. To explore whether such episodic, non-isotropic mass loss may be driven by surface magnetic activity, we have observed the archetypical cool hypergiant VY CMa with the XMM-Newton X-ray satellite observatory. The hypergiant itself is not detected in these observations. From the upper limit on the X-ray flux from VY CMa at the time of our observations (F X, UL ≈ 8 × 10-14 erg cm-2 s-1, corresponding to log LX /L bol <= -8), we estimate an average surface magnetic field strength fB <= 2 × 10-3 G (where f is the filling factor of magnetically active surface regions). These X-ray results for VY CMa represent the most stringent constraints to date on the magnetic field strength near the surface of a hypergiant. VY CMa's mass loss is episodic, however, and the hypergiant may have been in a state of low surface magnetic activity during the XMM observations. The XMM observations also yield detections of more than 100 X-ray sources within ~15' of VY CMa, roughly 50 of which have near-infrared counterparts. Analysis of X-ray hardness ratios and IR colors indicates that some of these field sources may be young, late-type stars associated with VY CMa, its adjacent molecular cloud complex, and the young cluster NGC 2362. Further study of the VY CMa field is warranted, given the potential to ascertain the evolutionary timescale of this enigmatic, massive star.

  20. MICROWAVE-ASSISTED PREPARATION OF 1-BUTYL-3-METHYLIMIDAZOLIUM TETRACHLOROGALLATE AND ITS CATALYTIC USE IN ACETAL FORMATION UNDER MILD CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrachlorogallate, [bmim][GaCl4], prepared via microwave-assisted protocol, is found to be an active catalyst for the efficient acetalization of aldehydes under mild conditions.

  1. Bimetallic Catalysts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinfelt, John H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical reaction rates can be controlled by varying composition of miniscule clusters of metal atoms. These bimetallic catalysts have had major impact on petroleum refining, where work has involved heterogeneous catalysis (reacting molecules in a phase separate from catalyst.) Experimentation involving hydrocarbon reactions, catalytic…

  2. Oxyhydrochlorination catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An improved catalyst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HCl and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  3. Acetate Dependence of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Comerford, Sarah A.; Huang, Zhiguang; Du, Xinlin; Wang, Yun; Cai, Ling; Witkiewicz, Agnes; Walters, Holly; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Fu, Allie; Manning, H. Charles; Horton, Jay D.; Hammer, Robert E.; McKnight, Steven L.; Tu, Benjamin P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Acetyl-CoA represents a central node of carbon metabolism that plays a key role in bioenergetics, cell proliferation and the regulation of gene expression. How highly glycolytic or hypoxic tumors are able to produce sufficient quantities of this metabolite to support cell growth and survival under nutrient-limiting conditions remains poorly understood. Here we show that the nucleocytosolic acetyl-CoA synthetase enzyme, ACSS2, supplies a key source of acetyl-CoA for tumors by capturing acetate as a carbon source. Despite exhibiting no gross deficits in growth or development, adult mice lacking ACSS2 exhibit a significant reduction in tumor burden in two different models of hepatocellular carcinoma. ACSS2 is expressed in a large proportion of human tumors and its activity is responsible for the majority of cellular acetate uptake into both lipids and histones. These observations may qualify ACSS2 as a targetable metabolic vulnerability of a wide spectrum of tumors. PMID:25525877

  4. Polymerization catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, V.

    1987-05-12

    A process is described for polymerizing at least one alpha olefin under conditions characteristic of Ziegler polymerization wherein the polymerization is conducted in the presence of a catalyst system which comprises: a supported catalyst prepared under anhydrous conditions by the sequential steps of: preparing a slurry of inert particulate support material; adding to the slurry a solution of an organomagnesium compound; adding to the slurry and reacting a solution of a zirconium halide compound, hafnium compound or mixtures thereof; adding to the slurry and reacting a halogenator; adding to the slurry and reacting a tetravalent titanium halide compound; and recovering solid catalyst.

  5. Polymerization catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, V.

    1986-10-21

    A process is described for polymerizing at least one alpha-olefin under conditions characteristic of Ziegler polymerization wherein the polymerization is conducted in the presence of a catalyst comprising: a supported catalyst prepared under anhydrous conditions by the steps of: (1) sequentially; (a) preparing a slurry of inert particulate support material; (b) adding to the slurry a solution of an organomagnesium compound; (c) adding to the slurry and reacting a solution of zirconium compound; and (2) thereafter; (d) adding to the slurry and reacting a halogenator; (e) adding to the slurry and reacting a tetravalent titanium compound; (f) recovering solid catalyst; and an organoaluminum compound.

  6. Karyotype analysis of four jewel-beetle species (Coleoptera, Buprestidae) detected by standard staining, C-banding, AgNOR-banding and CMA3/DAPI staining

    PubMed Central

    Karagyan, Gayane; Lachowska, Dorota; Kalashian, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The male karyotypes of Acmaeodera pilosellae persica Mannerheim, 1837 with 2n=20 (18+neoXY), Sphenoptera scovitzii Faldermann, 1835 (2n=38–46), Dicerca aenea validiuscula Semenov, 1895 – 2n=20 (18+Xyp) and Sphaerobothris aghababiani Volkovitsh et Kalashian, 1998 – 2n=16 (14+Xyp) were studied using conventional staining and different chromosome banding techniques: C-banding, AgNOR-banding, as well as fluorochrome Chromomycin A3 (CMA3) and DAPI. It is shown that C-positive segments are weakly visible in all four species which indicates a small amount of constitutive heterochromatin (CH). There were no signals after DAPI staining and some positive signals were discovered using CMA3 staining demonstrating absence of AT-rich DNA and presence of GC-rich clusters of CH. Nucleolus organizing regions (NORs) were revealed using Ag-NOR technique; argentophilic material mostly coincides with positive signals obtained using CMA3 staining. PMID:24260661

  7. Synthesis and herbicidal activities of benzothiazole N,O-acetals.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhiqin; Zhou, Fengxing; Wei, Shaopeng

    2015-10-01

    A new series of N,O-acetals were prepared via a simple one-pot reaction by the condensation of 2-amino-methybenzothiazole with aldehydes and alcohols. The title compounds were obtained in moderate to good yields in the presence of acid catalyst. Bioassay results indicated that some synthesized compounds had good herbicidal activity against both dicotyledon and monocotyledon weeds. This investigation provided a new type of herbicidal lead compounds, as well as its facile preparation method. PMID:26318996

  8. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  9. Practical Stannylation of Allyl Acetates Catalyzed by Nickel with Bu3 SnOMe.

    PubMed

    Komeyama, Kimihiro; Itai, Yuuhei; Takaki, Ken

    2016-06-27

    A practical and scalable nickel-catalyzed allylic stannylation of allyl acetates with Bu3 SnOMe is described. A variety of acyclic and cyclic allyl acetates, even with base-sensitive moieties, undergoes the stannylation by using NiBr2 /4,4'-di-tert-butylbipyridine (dtbpy)/Mn catalyst system to afford highly functionalized allyl stannanes with excellent regioselectivity and yields. Furthermore, the scope of protocol is also extended by the reaction of propargyl acetates, giving rise to propargyl or allenyl stannanes. Additionally, a unique diastereoselectivity using the nickel catalyst different from the palladium was demonstrated for the stannylation of cyclic allyl acetates. In the reaction, inexpensive and stable nickel complexes, abundant reductant (Mn), and atom-economical stannyl source were used. PMID:27124370

  10. FS CMa Type Binaries with the B[e] Phenomenon: Towards Solving a Long-standing Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Zharikov, S. V.; Manset, N.; Rossi, C.; Polcaro, V. F.

    The B[e] phenomenon is defined as the simultaneous presence of low-excitation forbidden line emission and strong infrared excess in the spectra of early-type stars. It was discovered in our galaxy nearly 40 years ago and is associated with objects at different evolutionary stages, ranging from the pre-main-sequence to the planetary nebula stage. Nearly half of the originally identified group members remained unclassified until recently. Our studies of the unclassified objects resulted in constraining their properties and fundamental parameters, expansion of the group, discovering binary features in many of its members, and suggesting a new name for the group (FS CMa type objects). Nevertheless, the nature of the secondary components and the evolutionary stage of the systems are still unclear. We review the group properties, present the best studied members, and discuss current understanding of the objects nature.

  11. Molecular characterization of constitutive heterochromatin in three species of Trypoxylon (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae: Trypoxylini) by CMA3/DAPI staining

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Rodolpho Santos Telles; Carvalho, Antonio Freire; Silva, Janisete Gomes; Costa, Marco Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Previous cytogenetic analyses in Trypoxylon Latreille, 1796 have been basically restricted to C-banding. In the present study, base-specific CMA3 and DAPI fluorochrome staining were used to characterize the constitutive heterochromatin in three Trypoxylon species. The heterochromatin was GC-rich in all the species studied; however, in Trypoxylon nitidum F. Smith, 1856the molecular composition of the heterochromatinwasdifferent among chromosome pairs. Conversely, the euchromatin was AT-rich in the three species. These results suggest high conservatism in the euchromatic regions as opposed to the heterochromatic regions that have a high rate of changes. In this study, we report the karyotype of Trypoxylon rugifrons F. Smith, 1873which has the lowest chromosome number in the genus and other characteristics of the likely ancestral Trypoxylon karyotype. PMID:24260620

  12. Colloidal nickel boride catalyst for hydrogenation of olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Y.; Fujishige, S.

    1981-04-01

    Colloidal nickel boride was prepared from nickel(II) chloride by reduction with sodium borohydride in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone in ethanol. Hydrogenation of various olefins was examined over the colloidal catalyst at 30/sup 0/C and atmospheric pressure. The colloidal nickel boride was much more effective than the precipitated nickel boride prepared in the absence of polyvinylpyrrolidone as a hydrogenation catalyst, especially for isopropenyl compounds. Additional amines and sodium acetate were slightly inhibitive to the colloidal catalyst, while, being strongly promotive to the precipitated catalyst. The colloidal nickel boride was superior to the charcoal-supported metals of the platinum group in catalytic activity for ..cap alpha..-methylstyrene.

  13. [Nomegestrol acetate: clinical pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Lello, S

    2009-10-01

    Progestogens are used in clinical practice in some conditions. Their effects depend on their chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, with important differences among various progestogens. Generally, progestins are classified according to their parent molecule, of which often they keep some features. Derivatives of 19-nor-progesterone are characterized by high selectivity of action on progestin receptor. In particular, nomegestrol acetate (NomAc) shows an important progestational potency, neutral gluco-lipid profile, and antigonadotropic activity. It is used for treating menstrual cycle disorders and for hormone replacement therapy in menopause in association with an estrogen. In future, thanks to its antigonadotropic activity, NomAc will be used in estroprogestin combinations in fertile women, thus taking advantage of its tolerability profile and obtaining numerous non-contraceptive benefits as well. PMID:19749678

  14. Effects of calcium magnesium acetate on the combustion of coal-water slurries. Final project report, 1 September 1989--28 February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Levendis, Y.A.; Wise, D.; Metghalchi, H.; Cumper, J.; Atal, A.; Estrada, K.R.; Murphy, B.; Steciak, J.; Hottel, H.C.; Simons, G.

    1993-07-01

    To conduct studies on the combustion of coal water fuels (CWFs) an appropriate facility was designed and constructed. The main components were (1) a high-temperature isothermal laminar flow furnace that facilitates observation of combustion events in its interior. The design of this system and its characterization are described in Chapter 1. (2) Apparatus for slurry droplet/agglomerate particle generation and introduction in the furnace. These devices are described in Chapters 1 and 3 and other attached publications. (3) An electronic optical pyrometer whose design, construction theory of operation, calibration and performance are presented in Chapter 2. (4) A multitude of other accessories, such as particle fluidization devices, a suction thermometer, a velocimeter, high speed photographic equipment, calibration devices for the pyrometer, etc., are described throughout this report. Results on the combustion of CWF droplets and CWF agglomerates made from micronized coal are described in Chapter 3. In the same chapter the combustion of CWF containing dissolved calcium magnesium acetate (CMA) axe described. The combustion behavior of pre-dried CWF agglomerates of pulverized grain coal is contrasted to that of agglomerates of micronized coal in Chapter 4. In the same chapter the combustion of agglomerates of carbon black and diesel soot is discussed as well. The effect of CMA on the combustion of the above materials is also discussed. Finally, the sulfur capture capability of CMA impregnated micronized and pulverized bituminous coals is examined in Chapter 5.

  15. Optimisation of n-Hexyl Acetate Synthesis in a Chromatographic Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Dipesh; Saha, Basudeb; Wakeman, Richard

    Laboratory scale batch chromatographic reactor experiments were carried for the esterification of acetic acid with n-hexanol to synthesise a value added ester, namely n-hexyl acetate in the presence of an ion exchange resin catalyst, Purolite CT-124. The effect of various parameters such as solvent flow rates in the regeneration step, amount of reactants in the reaction step and reaction step time was studied for optimisation of the reaction condition in a batch chromatographic reactor. This information would be useful for the design, operation and optimisation of n-hexyl acetate synthesis in a continuous chromatographic reactor.

  16. Vinyl ethers containing an epoxy group. XVI. Reaction of glycidol vinyloxyethyl ether with acetals

    SciTech Connect

    Nedolya, N.A.; Khil'ko, M.Ya.; Trofimov, B.A.; Sigalov, M.V.

    1988-10-10

    In order to obtain branched acetals with epoxide groups (prospective monomers and intermediates) the authors investigated the reaction of acetaldehyde diethyl and di(1,1,3-trihydrotetrafluoropropyl) acetals with glycidol vinyloxyethyl ether. The addition of acetals to vinyl epoxy ethers was realized, and the first representative of compounds of this type, i.e., 9-glycidyloxy-6-ethoxy-4-methyl-3,7-dioxanonane, was obtained. It was also impossible to add a fluoroacetal to butyl vinyl ether (0.08-1.00 wt. % of catalyst CF/sub 3/COOH, BF/sub 3//times/ OEt/sub 2/, 20-80/degree/C, 0.5-3 h).

  17. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  18. Synthesis of acetic acid via methanol hydrocarboxylation with CO2 and H2

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Qingli; Zhang, Jingjing; Cui, Meng; Han, Buxing

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid is an important bulk chemical that is currently produced via methanol carbonylation using fossil based CO. Synthesis of acetic acid from the renewable and cheap CO2 is of great importance, but state of the art routes encounter difficulties, especially in reaction selectivity and activity. Here we report a route to produce acetic acid from CO2, methanol and H2. The reaction can be efficiently catalysed by Ru–Rh bimetallic catalyst using imidazole as the ligand and LiI as the promoter in 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI) solvent. It is confirmed that methanol is hydrocarboxylated into acetic acid by CO2 and H2, which accounts for the outstanding reaction results. The reaction mechanism is proposed based on the control experiments. The strategy opens a new way for acetic acid production and CO2 transformation, and represents a significant progress in synthetic chemistry. PMID:27165850

  19. Synthesis of acetic acid via methanol hydrocarboxylation with CO2 and H2.

    PubMed

    Qian, Qingli; Zhang, Jingjing; Cui, Meng; Han, Buxing

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid is an important bulk chemical that is currently produced via methanol carbonylation using fossil based CO. Synthesis of acetic acid from the renewable and cheap CO2 is of great importance, but state of the art routes encounter difficulties, especially in reaction selectivity and activity. Here we report a route to produce acetic acid from CO2, methanol and H2. The reaction can be efficiently catalysed by Ru-Rh bimetallic catalyst using imidazole as the ligand and LiI as the promoter in 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI) solvent. It is confirmed that methanol is hydrocarboxylated into acetic acid by CO2 and H2, which accounts for the outstanding reaction results. The reaction mechanism is proposed based on the control experiments. The strategy opens a new way for acetic acid production and CO2 transformation, and represents a significant progress in synthetic chemistry. PMID:27165850

  20. Catalyst suppliers consolidate further, offer more catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1995-10-02

    The list of suppliers of catalysts to the petroleum refining industry has decreased by five since Oil and Gas Journal`s survey of refining catalysts and catalytic additives was last published. Despite the consolidation, the list of catalyst designations has grown to about 950 in this latest survey, compared to 820 listed in 1993. The table divides the catalysts by use and gives data on their primary differentiating characteristics, feedstock, products, form, bulk density,catalyst support, active agents, availability, and manufactures.

  1. Herschel SPIRE and PACS observations of the red supergiant VY CMa: analysis of the molecular line spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Mikako; Yates, J. A.; Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M.; Royer, P.; Cernicharo, J.; Decin, L.; Wesson, R.; Polehampton, E. T.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Van de Steene, G. C.; van Hoof, P. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the far-infrared and submillimetre molecular emission-line spectrum of the luminous M-supergiant VY CMa, observed with the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) and Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer for Herschel spectrometers aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. Over 260 emission lines were detected in the 190-650 μm SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer spectra, with one-third of the observed lines being attributable to H2O. Other detected species include CO, 13CO, H_2^{18}O, SiO, HCN, SO, SO2, CS, H2S and NH3. Our model fits to the observed 12CO and 13CO line intensities yield a 12C/13C ratio of 5.6 ± 1.8, consistent with measurements of this ratio for other M-supergiants, but significantly lower than previously estimated for VY CMa from observations of lower-J lines. The spectral line energy distribution for 20 SiO rotational lines shows two temperature components: a hot component at ˜1000 K, which we attribute to the stellar atmosphere and inner wind, plus a cooler ˜200 K component, which we attribute to an origin in the outer circumstellar envelope. We fit the line fluxes of 12CO, 13CO, H2O and SiO, using the SMMOL non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) line transfer code, with a mass-loss rate of 1.85 × 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 between 9R* and 350R*. We also fit the observed line fluxes of 12CO, 13CO, H2O and SiO with SMMOL non-LTE line radiative transfer code, along with a mass-loss rate of 1.85 × 10-4 M⊙ yr-1. To fit the high rotational lines of CO and H2O, the model required a rather flat temperature distribution inside the dust condensation radius, attributed to the high H2O opacity. Beyond the dust condensation radius the gas temperature is fitted best by an r-0.5 radial dependence, consistent with the coolant lines becoming optically thin. Our H2O emission-line fits are consistent with an ortho:para ratio of 3 in the outflow.

  2. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be produced by the calcium hydroxide neutralization of acetic acid. (b) The ingredient meets...

  3. Hydrocracking catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Hilfman, L.; O'Hara, M.

    1980-07-01

    A description is given of a process for the conversion of heavy hydrocarbon oil boiling above about 650/sup 0/F into lower boiling hydrocarbons, which comprises hydrocracking the heavy oil in admixture with hydrogen and in contact with a catalyst with comprising a ra re earth exchange metal component and a platinum group metal component supported on a mixture of ziegler alumina and a zeolite.

  4. Sulfonic acid catalysts prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Mizota, Tomotoshi; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Saito, Kyoichi, Saito

    1994-09-01

    In this study, the authors prepared two variations of graft-type acid catalysts with different adjacent groups by radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP), and compared the hydrolytic activity of the resultant acid catalysts for methyl acetate with that of commercially available SO{sub 3}H-type ion-exchange beads with different degrees of cross-linking. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  5. N-Allylation of amines with allyl acetates using chitosan-immobilized palladium

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple procedure for N-Allylation of allyl Acetates has been developed using a biodegradable and easily recyclable heterogeneous chitosan-supported palladium catalyst. The general methodology, applicable to wide range of substrates, has sustainable features that include a ligan...

  6. Enantioselective acylation of silyl ketene acetals through fluoride anion-binding catalysis.

    PubMed

    Birrell, James A; Desrosiers, Jean-Nicolas; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2011-09-01

    A highly enantioselective acylation of silyl ketene acetals with acyl fluorides has been developed to generate useful α,α-disubstituted butyrolactone products. This transformation is promoted by a new thiourea catalyst and 4-pyrrolidinopyridine and represents the first example of enantioselective thiourea anion-binding catalysis with fluoride. PMID:21800916

  7. Enhanced Activity of Nanocrystalline Beta Zeolite for Acylation of Veratrole with Acetic Anhydride.

    PubMed

    Aisha Mahmood Abdulkareem, Al-Turkustani; Selvin, Rosilda

    2016-04-01

    Friedel-Craft acylation of veratrole using homogeneous acid catalysts such as AlCl3, FeCl3, ZnCl2, and HF etc. produces acetoveratrone, (3',4'-dimethoxyacetophenone), which is the intermediate for synthesis of papavarine alkaloids. The problems associated with these homogeneous catalysts can be overcome by using heterogeneous solid catalysts. Since acetoveratrone is a larger molecule, large pore Beta zeolites with smaller particle sizes are beneficial for the liquid-phase acylation of veratrole, for easy diffusion of reactants and products. The present study aims in the acylation of veratrole with acetic anhydride using nanocrystalline Beta Zeolite catalyst. A systematic investigation of the effects of various reaction parameters was done. The catalysts were characterized for their structural features by using XRD, TEM and DLS analyses. The catalytic activity of nanocrystalline Beta zeolite was compared with commercial Beta zeolite for the acylation and was found that nanocrystalline Beta zeolite possessed superior activity. PMID:27451793

  8. Antibiofilm Properties of Acetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Morten; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Nielsen, Anne K.; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Homøe, Preben; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are known to be extremely tolerant toward antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents. These biofilms cause the persistence of chronic infections. Since antibiotics rarely resolve these infections, the only effective treatment of chronic infections is surgical removal of the infected implant, tissue, or organ and thereby the biofilm. Acetic acid is known for its antimicrobial effect on bacteria in general, but has never been thoroughly tested for its efficacy against bacterial biofilms. In this article, we describe complete eradication of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative biofilms using acetic acid both as a liquid and as a dry salt. In addition, we present our clinical experience of acetic acid treatment of chronic wounds. In conclusion, we here present the first comprehensive in vitro and in vivo testing of acetic acid against bacterial biofilms. PMID:26155378

  9. Molecular Active Sites in Heterogeneous Ir-La/C-Catalyzed Carbonylation of Methanol to Acetates.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Dagle, Robert; Tustin, Gerald C; Zoeller, Joseph R; Allard, Lawrence F; Wang, Yong

    2014-02-01

    We report that when Ir and La halides are deposited on carbon, exposure to CO spontaneously generates a discrete molecular heterobimetallic structure, containing an Ir-La covalent bond that acts as a highly active, selective, and stable heterogeneous catalyst for the carbonylation of methanol to produce acetic acid. This catalyst exhibits a very high productivity of ∼1.5 mol acetyl/mol Ir·s with >99% selectivity to acetyl (acetic acid and methyl acetate) without detectable loss in activity or selectivity for more than 1 month of continuous operation. The enhanced activity can be mechanistically rationalized by the presence of La within the ligand sphere of the discrete molecular Ir-La heterobimetallic structure, which acts as a Lewis acid to accelerate the normally rate-limiting CO insertion in Ir-catalyzed carbonylation. Similar approaches may provide opportunities for attaining molecular (single site) behavior similar to homogeneous catalysis on heterogeneous surfaces for other industrial applications. PMID:26276610

  10. Approaches to enhancing the quality of drug therapy. A joint statement by the CMA and the Canadian Pharmaceutical Association. Canadian Medical Association.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    This joint statement was developed by the CMA and the Canadian Pharmaceutical Association, a national association of pharmacists, and includes the goal of drug therapy, strategies for collaboration to optimize drug therapy and physicians' and pharmacists' responsibilities in drug therapy. The statement recognizes the importance of patients, physicians and pharmacists working in close collaboration and partnership to achieve optimal outcomes from drug therapy. PMID:8823225

  11. Magnetic silica supported palladium catalyst: synthesis of allyl aryl ethers in water

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and benign procedure for the synthesis of aryl allyl ethers has been developed using phenols, allyl acetates and magnetically recyclable silica supported palladium catalyst in water; performance of reaction in air and easy separation of the catalyst using an external mag...

  12. [Catalyst research]. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ian P Rothwell; David R McMillin

    2005-03-14

    Research results are the areas of catalyst precursor synthesis, catalyst fluxionality, catalyst stability, polymerization of {alpha}-olefins as well as the chemistry of Group IV and Group V metal centers with aryloxide and arylsulfide ligands.

  13. Kinetic Modeling of Esterification of Ethylene Glycol with Acetic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Vishnu P.; Mukherjee, Rudra Palash; Bantraj, Kandi; Maity, Sunil K.

    2010-10-01

    The reaction kinetics of the esterification of ethylene glycol with acetic acid in the presence of cation exchange resin has been studied and kinetic models based on empirical and Langmuir approach has been developed. The Langmuir based model involving eight kinetic parameters fits experimental data much better compared to empirical model involving four kinetic parameters. The effect of temperature and catalyst loading on the reaction system has been analyzed. Further, the activation energy and frequency factor of the rate constants for Langmuir based model has been estimated.

  14. Kinetic Modeling of Esterification of Ethylene Glycol with Acetic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Vishnu P.; Maity, Sunil K.; Mukherjee, Rudra Palash; Bantraj, Kandi

    2010-10-26

    The reaction kinetics of the esterification of ethylene glycol with acetic acid in the presence of cation exchange resin has been studied and kinetic models based on empirical and Langmuir approach has been developed. The Langmuir based model involving eight kinetic parameters fits experimental data much better compared to empirical model involving four kinetic parameters. The effect of temperature and catalyst loading on the reaction system has been analyzed. Further, the activation energy and frequency factor of the rate constants for Langmuir based model has been estimated.

  15. Enantioselective Hydrosilylation of Imines Catalyzed by Chiral Zinc Acetate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Bezłada, Agata; Szewczyk, Marcin; Mlynarski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    A series of zinc acetate complexes with optically pure diphenylethanediamine (DPEDA)-derived ligands have been employed as enantioselective catalyst for the hydrosilylation of various imines. High control of stereoselectivity (up to 97% ee) and excellent yields (up to 96%) were gained for a broad range of N-phosphinoylimines by using (R,R)-N,N'-dibenzyl-1,2-diphenylethane-1,2-diamine. This is the first successful application of an air-stable and environmentally friendly chiral Zn(OAc)2 complex instead of the previously used harmful diethylzinc in the asymmetric reduction of the C═N double bond. PMID:26667387

  16. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may...

  17. Kinetic Resolution of Racemic and Branched Monosubstituted Allylic Acetates by a Ruthenium-Catalyzed Regioselective Allylic Etherification.

    PubMed

    Shinozawa, Toru; Terasaki, Shou; Mizuno, Shota; Kawatsura, Motoi

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrated the kinetic resolution of racemic and branched monosubstituted allylic acetates by a ruthenium-catalyzed regioselective allylic etherification. The reaction was effectively catalyzed by the chiral ruthenium catalyst, which was generated by [RuCl2(p-cymene)]2 and (S,S)-iPr-pybox and a catalytic amount of TFA, and both the allylic etherification product and recovered allylic acetate were obtained as an enantiomerically enriched form with up to a 103 s value. PMID:27276556

  18. Enantioselective Synthesis of 1,2-Dihydronaphthalene-1-carbaldehydes by Addition of Boronates to Isochromene Acetals Catalyzed by Tartaric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Yi; Barbato, Keith S.; Moquist, Philip N.; Kodama, Tomohiro; Schaus, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Tartaric acid is an ideal asymmetric catalyst as it is abundant, cheap, and environmentally friendly. (+)-Tartaric acid was found to catalyze a novel enantioselective [4 + 2] cycloaddition of isochromene acetals and vinylboronates. A variety of substituted isochromene acetals were tolerated, furnishing the desired dihydronaphthalenes and dihydrobenzofluorene products in good yields. High enantiomeric ratios (up to 98.5:1.5) and excellent diastereoselectivities (all >99:1) were observed employing 10 mol % of (+)-tartaric acid as the catalyst, in combination with 5 mol % of Ho(OTf)3. PMID:25715172

  19. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, L.J.; Bray, L.A.

    1995-05-30

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: (a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; (b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; (c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and (d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications. 3 figs.

  20. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Laura J.; Bray, Lane A.

    1995-01-01

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications.

  1. The use of catalyst to enhance the wet oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Maugans, C; Kumfer, B

    2007-01-01

    Wet oxidation tests were performed on two pure compound streams: acetic acid and ammonia; and on two wastewater streams: acrylic acid wastewater and sulphide laden spent caustic. Test results showed that Mn/Ce and Pt/TiO2 were effective catalysts that greatly enhanced acetic acid, ammonia and acrylic acid wastewater destruction. However, the Mn/Ce catalyst performance appears to be inhibited by concentrated salts dissolved in solution. This could limit the applicability of this catalyst for the treatment of brackish wastewaters. Zr, Ce and Ce nanoparticles were also shown to exhibit some catalytic activity, however not to the extent of the Mn/Ce and the Pt/TiO2. PMID:17674847

  2. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of clove essential oil and eugenyl acetate produced by enzymatic esterification.

    PubMed

    Vanin, Adriana B; Orlando, Tainara; Piazza, Suelen P; Puton, Bruna M S; Cansian, Rogério L; Oliveira, Debora; Paroul, Natalia

    2014-10-01

    This work reports the maximization of eugenyl acetate production by esterification of essential oil of clove in a solvent-free system using Novozym 435 as catalyst. The antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of clove essential oil and eugenyl acetate produced were determined. The conditions that maximized eugenyl acetate production were 60 °C, essential oil of clove to acetic anhydride ratio of 1:5, 150 rpm, and 10 wt% of enzyme, with a conversion of 99.87 %. A kinetic study was performed to assess the influence of substrates' molar ratio, enzyme concentration, and temperature on product yield. Results show that an excess of anhydride, enzyme concentration of 5.5 wt%, 50 °C, and essential oil of clove to acetic anhydride ratio of 1:5 afforded nearly a complete conversion after 2 h of reaction. Comparing the antibacterial activity of the essential oil of clove before and after esterification, we observed a decrease in the antimicrobial activity of eugenyl acetate, particularly with regard to minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Both eugenyl acetate and clove essential oil were most effective to the gram-negative than gram-positive bacteria group. The results showed a high antioxidant potential for essential oil before and particularly after the esterification reaction thus becoming an option for the formulation of new antioxidant products. PMID:25104002

  3. Long-Life Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STC Catalysts, Inc. (SCi) manufactures a noble metal reducible oxide catalyst consisting primarily of platinum and tin dioxide deposited on a ceramic substrate. It is an ambient temperature oxidation catalyst that was developed primarily for Carbon Dioxide Lasers.The catalyst was developed by the NASA Langley Research Center for the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder Program (LAWS) which was intended to measure wind velocity on a global basis. There are a number of NASA owned patents covering various aspects of the catalyst.

  4. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kapapa, Thomas; Röhrer, Stefan; Struve, Sabine; Petscher, Matthias; König, Ralph; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Woischneck, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N = 4) or multiple (N = 6) doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group) who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P ≤ 0.05. Results. (1) Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2) The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3) There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients. PMID:25610644

  5. Vapor phase ketonization of acetic acid on ceria based metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Changjun; Karim, Ayman M.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Mei, Donghai; Wang, Yong

    2013-12-01

    The activities of CeO2, Mn2O3-CeO2 and ZrO2-CeO2 were measured for acetic acid ketonization under reaction conditions relevant to pyrolysis vapor upgrading. We show that the catalyst ranking changed depending on the reaction conditions. Mn2O3-CeO2 was the most active catalyst at 350 oC, while ZrO2 - CeO2 was the most active catalyst at 450 oC. Under high CO2 and steam concentration in the reactants, Mn2O3-CeO2 was the most active catalyst at 350 and 450 °C. The binding energies of steam and CO2 with the active phase were calculated to provide the insight into the tolerance of Mn2O3-CeO2 to steam and CO2.

  6. Reductive opening of carbohydrate phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetals.

    PubMed

    Chéry, Florence; Cabianca, Elena; Tatibouët, Arnaud; De Lucchi, Ottorino; Lindhorst, Thisbe K; Rollin, Patrick

    2015-11-19

    The phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetal is a relatively new protecting group in carbohydrate chemistry. However, carbohydrate-derived phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetals show a different behavior in reductive desulfonylation than simple symmetrical acetals. Here we have investigated various SET-type reaction conditions in order to open PSE acetals regioselectively and to produce chiral ω-hydroxyethenyl ethers. Whereas sodium amalgam leads to a mixture of regioisomeric vinyl ethers besides the ethylidene acetal, samarium iodide is suited for regioselective ring opening. This is shown with seven different carbohydrate PSE acetals, both of the 1,3-dioxane and the 1,3-dioxolane type. PMID:26469209

  7. Potential biofuel additive from renewable sources--Kinetic study of formation of butyl acetate by heterogeneously catalyzed transesterification of ethyl acetate with butanol.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sami H; Al-Rashed, Osama; Azeez, Fadhel A; Merchant, Sabiha Q

    2011-11-01

    Butyl acetate holds great potential as a sustainable biofuel additive. Heterogeneously catalyzed transesterification of biobutanol and bioethylacetate can produce butyl acetate. This route is eco-friendly and offers several advantages over the commonly used Fischer Esterification. The Amberlite IR 120- and Amberlyst 15-catalyzed transesterification is studied in a batch reactor over a range of catalyst loading (6-12 wt.%), alcohol to ester feed ratio (1:3 to 3:1), and temperature (303.15-333.15K). A butanol mole fraction of 0.2 in the feed is found to be optimum. Amberlite IR 120 promotes faster kinetics under these conditions. The transesterifications studied are slightly exothermic. The moles of solvent sorbed per gram of catalyst decreases (ethanol>butanol>ethyl acetate>butyl acetate) with decrease in solubility parameter. The dual site models, the Langmuir Hinshelwood and Popken models, are the most successful in correlating the kinetics over Amberlite IR 120 and Amberlyst 15, respectively. PMID:21908187

  8. An optimization study of PtSn/C catalysts applied to direct ethanol fuel cell: Effect of the preparation method on the electrocatalytic activity of the catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, T. S.; Palma, L. M.; Leonello, P. H.; Morais, C.; Kokoh, K. B.; De Andrade, A. R.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work was to perform a systematic study of the parameters that can influence the composition, morphology, and catalytic activity of PtSn/C nanoparticles and compare two different methods of nanocatalyst preparation, namely microwave-assisted heating (MW) and thermal decomposition of polymeric precursors (DPP). An investigation of the effects of the reducing and stabilizing agents on the catalytic activity and morphology of Pt75Sn25/C catalysts prepared by microwave-assisted heating was undertaken for optimization purposes. The effect of short-chain alcohols such as ethanol, ethylene glycol, and propylene glycol as reducing agents was evaluated, and the use of sodium acetate and citric acid as stabilizing agents for the MW procedure was examined. Catalysts obtained from propylene glycol displayed higher catalytic activity compared with catalysts prepared in ethylene glycol. Introduction of sodium acetate enhanced the catalytic activity, but this beneficial effect was observed until a critical acetate concentration was reached. Optimization of the MW synthesis allowed for the preparation of highly dispersed catalysts with average sizes lying between 2.0 and 5.0 nm. Comparison of the best catalyst prepared by MW with a catalyst of similar composition prepared by the polymeric precursors method showed that the catalytic activity of the material can be improved when a proper condition for catalyst preparation is achieved.

  9. ''KN'' series cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Klapstov, V.F.; Khlebrikova, M.A.; Maslova, A.A.; Nefedov, B.K.

    1986-09-01

    The basic directions in improving high-activity zeolitic cracking catalysts at the present stage are improvements in the resistance to attrition and increases in the bulk density of the catalysts, along with a changeover to relatively waste-free catalyst manufacturing technology. Catalysts of the ''KN'' series have been synthesized recently with improved quality characteristics. Low-waste technology is used in manufacturing them. Data are presented which show that the KN catalysts are better than the other Soviet catalysts. The starting materials and reagents in preparing the KN catalysts are technical alumina, rare-earth element nitrates, a natural component (such as clay conforming to specification TU-21-25-146-75), sodium hydroxide, and granulated sodium silicate. The preparation of the KN catalysts is described and no silica gel is used in manufacturing the KN series catalyst, in contrast to the RSG-6Ts catalyst. The use of KN series catalysts in place of KMTsR in catalytic cracking units will result in an increase in the naphtha yield by at least 20% by weight, as well as a reduction of the catalyst consumption by a factor of 2-3. A changeover to the commerical production of this catalyst will make it possible to reduce saline waste by a factor of 8-10 and reduce the catalyst cost by a factor of 1.5-2.

  10. 21 CFR 522.533 - Deslorelin acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Deslorelin acetate. (a) Specifications. Each implant contains 2.1 milligrams deslorelin acetate. (b) Sponsor.... One implant per mare. (ii) Indications for use. For inducing ovulation within 48 hours in...

  11. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degrees C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4% for acetate samples larger than 5 micromoles. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined.

  12. Ozone decomposition in aqueous acetate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sehested, K.; Holcman, J.; Bjergbakke, E.; Hart, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    The acetate radical ion reacts with ozone with a rate constant of k = (1.5 +/- 0.5) x 10Z dmT mol s . The products from this reaction are CO2, HCHO, and O2 . By subsequent reaction of the peroxy radical with ozone the acetate radical ion is regenerated through the OH radical. A chain decomposition of ozone takes place. It terminates when the acetate radical ion reacts with oxygen forming the unreactive peroxy acetate radical. The chain is rather short as oxygen is developed, as a result of the ozone consumption. The inhibiting effect of acetate on the ozone decay is rationalized by OH scavenging by acetate and successive reaction of the acetate radical ion with oxygen. Some products from the bimolecular disappearance of the peroxy acetate radicals, however, react further with ozone, reducing the effectiveness of the stabilization.

  13. A DFT study on the Cu (1 1 1) surface for ethyl acetate synthesis from ethanol dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruzhen; Zhang, Minhua; Yu, Yingzhe

    2012-07-01

    Copper-based catalysts have shown excellent catalytic performances. Despite extensive studies in the field, the microscopic mechanism of ethanol dehydrogenation to ethyl acetate (EA) on Cu-based catalysts remains controversial. Aiming to provide insight into the catalytic roles of Cu, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to study the elementary reactions involved in ethanol dehydrogenation to EA on Cu surfaces. In this work, the adsorption properties of ethanol, ethoxy, acetaldehyde, acetyl and EA on the Cu (1 1 1) catalyst surface were investigated. Based on two pathways, many transition states involved are located. The results show that the route proposed by Colley is more likely to happen.

  14. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3 or C2H3O2Na·3H2O, CAS Reg. No. 6131-90-4) is the sodium salt of acetic acid and occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues....

  15. Kinetics of the Methanogenic Fermentation of Acetate

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzaki, Satoshi; Nishio, Naomichi; Nagai, Shiro

    1990-01-01

    Inhibition of the fermentation of acetate to methane and carbon dioxide by acetate was analyzed with an acetate-acclimatized sludge and with Methanosarcina barkeri Fusaro under mesophilic conditions. A second-order substrate inhibition model, qch4 = qmS/[Ks + S + (S2/Ki)], where S was the concentration of undissociated acetic acid, not ionized acetic acid, could be applicable in both cases. The analysis resulted in substrate saturation constants, Ks, of 4.0 μM for the acclimatized sludge and 104 μM for M. barkeri. The threshold concentrations of undissociated acetic acid when no further acetate utilization was observed were 0.078 μM (pH 7.50) for the acclimatized sludge and 4.43 μM (pH 7.45) for M. barkeri. These kinetic results suggested that the concentration of undissociated acetic acid became a key factor governing the actual threshold acetate concentration for acetate utilization and that the acclimatized sludge in which Methanothrix spp. appeared dominant could utilize acetate better and survive at a lower concentration of undissociated acetic acid than could M. barkeri. Images PMID:16348323

  16. 21 CFR 522.2476 - Trenbolone acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... days. (A) 140 milligrams (mg) trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting of 7 pellets, each pellet containing 20 mg trenbolone acetate) per implant dose. (B) 140 mg trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting... 29 mg tylosin tartrate) per implant dose. (ii) Indications for use. For improved feed...

  17. 21 CFR 522.2476 - Trenbolone acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... days. (A) 140 milligrams (mg) trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting of 7 pellets, each pellet containing 20 mg trenbolone acetate) per implant dose. (B) 140 mg trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting... 29 mg tylosin tartrate) per implant dose. (ii) Indications for use. For improved feed...

  18. 21 CFR 522.2476 - Trenbolone acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... days. (A) 140 milligrams (mg) trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting of 7 pellets, each pellet containing 20 mg trenbolone acetate) per implant dose. (B) 140 mg trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting... 29 mg tylosin tartrate) per implant dose. (ii) Indications for use. For improved feed...

  19. 21 CFR 522.2476 - Trenbolone acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... days. (A) 140 milligrams (mg) trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting of 7 pellets, each pellet containing 20 mg trenbolone acetate) per implant dose. (B) 140 mg trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting... 29 mg tylosin tartrate) per implant dose. (ii) Indications for use. For improved feed...

  20. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  12. Acet-oxy-γ-valerolactone.

    PubMed

    Tristram, Cameron; Gainsford, Graeme J; Hinkley, Simon

    2013-06-01

    Levulinyl cellulose esters have been produced as an effective renewable binder for architectural coatings. The title compound, C7H10O4 (systematic name: 2-methyl-5-oxo-tetra-hydro-furan-2-yl acetate), assigned as the esterifying species, was isolated and crystallized to confirm the structure. In the crystal, the mol-ecules pack in layers parallel to (102) utilizing weak C-H⋯O inter-actions. PMID:23795112

  13. A green approach to ethyl acetate: quantitative conversion of ethanol through direct dehydrogenation in a Pd-Ag membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Gaofeng; Chen, Tao; He, Lipeng; Pinnau, Ingo; Lai, Zhiping; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2012-12-01

    Pincers do the trick: The conversion of ethanol to ethyl acetate and hydrogen was achieved using a pincer-Ru catalyst in a Pd-Ag membrane reactor. Near quantitative conversions and yields could be achieved without the need for acid or base promoters or hydrogen acceptors (see scheme). PMID:23136053

  14. Searching for Cool Dust in the Mid-to-Far Infrared: The Mass Loss Histories of the Hypergiants mu Cep, VY CMa, IRC +10420, and rho Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Roberta M.

    2016-01-01

    The most massive cool stars near the empircal upper limit of luminosity on the HR Diagram shed mass during brief, intense periods of enhanced mass loss. Their circumstellar environments show extensive and complex ejecta in scattered light at visual wavelengths. In the infrared, thermal emission from cooler dust in their ejecta can be used as a tracers of their mass loss histories. We combine high-resolution adaptive optics imaging from MMT/MIRAC (8 - 12 µm) with the new capabilities in far-infrared imaging of SOFIA/FORCAST and Herschel/PACS to probe further into the past for evidence of earlier mass loss for four famous objects: the red supergiants mu Cep and VY CMa and the yellow hypergiants IRC +10420 and rho Cas. We find evidence for a variable mass loss rate over several thousand years for mu Cep, while in contrast the lack of extended cold dust beyond VY CMa's visible ejecta indicates that its high mass loss episodes are recent. Despite its history of episodic mass loss, rho Cas has no resolved circumstellar ejecta. The new long wavelength photometry from FORCAST, however, confirms the presence of a slowly expanding dust shell from its 1946 event

  15. SRTC criticality safety technical review: Phase 1 criticality analysis for the 9972-9975 family of shipping casks: (SRT-CMA-940003)

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, R.

    1994-03-02

    Review of SRT-CMA-940003, ``Phase I Criticality Analysis For The 9972-9975 Family Of Shipping Casks (U). (SRT-CMA-940003).`` January 22, 1994, has been performed by the SRTC Applied Physics Group. The NCSE is a criticality assessment of the 9972-9975 family of shipping casks. This work is a follow-on of a previous criticality safety evaluation, with the differences between this and the previous evaluation are that now wall tolerances are modeled and more sophisticated analytical methods are applied. The NCSE under review concludes that, with one exception, the previously specified plutonium and uranium mass limits for 9972-9975 family of shipping casks do ensure that WSRC Nuclear Criticality Safety Manual requirements (ref. 1) are satisfied. The one exception is that the plutonium mass limit for the 9974 cask had to be reduced from 4.4 to 4.3 kg. In contrast, the 7.5 kg uranium mass limit for the 9974 cask was raised to 14.5 kg, making the uranium mass identical for all casks in this family. This technical review consisted of an independent check of the methods and models employed, application of ANSI/ANS 8.1 and 8.15, and verification of WSRC Nuclear Criticality Safety Manual procedures.

  16. Catalytic Deprotection of Acetals In Strongly Basic Solution Usinga Self-Assembled Supramolecular 'Nanozyme'

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael D.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-07-26

    Acetals are among the most commonly used protecting groups for aldehydes and ketones in organic synthesis due to their ease of installation and resistance to cleavage in neutral or basic solution.[1] The common methods for hydrolyzing acetals almost always involve the use of either Broensted acid or Lewis acid catalysts.[2] Usually aqueous acids or organic solutions acidified with organic or inorganic acids have been used for reconversion of the acetal functionality to the corresponding carbonyl group; however, recently a number of reports have documented a variety of strategies for acetal cleavage under mild conditions. These include the use of Lewis acids such as bismuth(III)[3] or cerium(IV),[4, 5] functionalized silica gel, such as silica sulfuric acid[6] or silica-supported pyridinium p-toluene sulfonate,[7] or the use of silicon-based reagents such as TESOTf-2,6-Lutidine.[8] Despite these mild reagents, all of the above conditions require either added acid or overall acidic media. Marko and co-workers recently reported the first example of acetal deprotection under mildly basic conditions using catalytic cerium ammonium nitrate at pH 8 in a water-acetonitrile solution.[5] Also recently, Rao and co-workers described a purely aqueous system at neutral pH for the deprotection of acetals using {beta}-cyclodextrin as the catalyst.[9] Herein, we report the hydrolysis of acetals in strongly basic aqueous solution using a self-assembled supramolecular host as the catalyst. During the last decade, we have used metal-ligand interactions for the formation of well-defined supramolecular assemblies with the stoichiometry M{sub 4}L{sub 6}6 (M = Ga{sup III} (1 refers to K{sub 12}[Ga{sub 4}L{sub 6}]), Al{sup III}, In{sup III}, Fe{sup III}, Ti{sup IV}, or Ge{sup IV}, L = N,N{prime}-bis(2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl)-1,5-diaminonaphthalene) (Figure 1).[10] The metal ions occupy the vertices of the tetrahedron and the bisbidentate catecholamide ligands span the edges. The strong

  17. A Study of Hypergiant Mass Loss in the Near-To-Mid Infrared: VY CMa, IRC +10420, mu Cep and rho Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Dinesh Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    Stars of initial mass greater than 9 M_sun become red supergiants (RSGs), a short-lived stage during which they experience mass-loss that strongly influences their post-RSG evolution and end state. The highest luminosity RSGs, referred to here as hypergiants, experience episodic mass-loss whose mechanism remains poorly understood and motivates observations to help constrain it. This thesis studies mass loss from hypergiant stars with near-to-mid infrared imaging over a range of angular scales. The recent mass-loss history of the extreme red supergiant VY Canis Majoris and the warm hypergiant star IRC +10420 are studied at the sub-arcsecond scale with adaptive optics imaging and imaging polarimetry from 1 - 5 micron using LMIRCam on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) and MMT-Pol at the MMT Observatory. The nebular features of VY CMa are found to be highly polarized at 1.3 and 3.1 micron, with optically thick scattering required to reproduce the observed surface brightness. The flux of VY CMa's peculiar ``Southwest Clump'' is demonstrated to be due almost entirely to optically thick scattering, with little thermal emission, and with a lower limit mass of 5E-03 M_sun in this single feature. The imaging polarimetry of IRC +10420 at 2.2 micron resolves nebular emission with intrinsic polarization of 30%, with a high surface brightness indicating optically thick scattering largely in the plane of the sky. Using the polarimetry to constrain the scattered light emission, it is shown that the nebula's the emission is mostly thermal with a color temperature well above that for typical astrophysical dust. To probe further into hypergiants' history of mass-loss, mid-IR imaging with MMT/ MIRAC and SOFIA/FORCAST is used to study VY CMa, IRC +10420 and two additional hypergiants: the RSG mu Cep and the warm hypergiant rho Cas. Using DUSTY 1-D radiative transfer models, mu Cep's mass-loss rate is found to have declined by about a factor of 5 over a 13,000 history, ranging from 5E

  18. Lewis Base Catalysts 6: Carbene Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The use of N-heterocyclic carbenes as catalysts for organic transformations has received increased attention in the past 10 years. A discussion of catalyst development and nucleophilic characteristics precedes a description of recent advancements and new reactions using N-heterocyclic carbenes in catalysis. PMID:21494949

  19. Support effects on hydrotreating activity of NiMo catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A. Arce-Estrada, E.M.; Torres-Huerta, A.M.

    2007-10-15

    The effect of the gamma alumina particle size on the catalytic activity of NiMoS{sub x} catalysts prepared by precipitation method of aluminum acetate at pH = 10 was studied. The structural characterization of the supports was measured by using XRD, pyridine FTIR-TPD and nitrogen physisorption. NiMo catalysts were characterized during the preparation steps (annealing and sulfidation) using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Hydrogen TPR studies of the NiMo catalysts were also carried out in order to correlate their hydrogenating properties and their catalytic functionality. Catalytic tests were carried out in a pilot plant at 613, 633 and 653 K temperatures. The results showed that the rate constants of hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatizing (HDA) at 613-653 K decreased in the following order: A > B > C corresponding to the increase of NiMoS particle size associated to these catalysts.

  20. Carbon nanotube patterning with capillary micromolding of catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewon; Ryu, Choonghan; Lee, Sungwoo; Jung, Donggeun; Kim, Hyoungsub; Chae, Heeyeop

    2007-11-01

    Patterning of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) chamber has been achieved by catalyst patterning using capillary micromolding process. Iron acetate catalyst nanoparticles were dissolved in ethanol and mold was fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The ethanol solution containing catalyst nanoparticles was filled into the microchannel formed between PDMS mold and Si-wafer by capillary force. The capillary action of different solvents was simulated by commercial CFD-ACE+ simulation code to determine optimal solvents. Simulated result shows that the choice of solvent was critical in this capillary filling process. After the catalyst patterning, MWNT was grown at 700 approximately 800 degrees C by PECVD process using CH4 and Ar gas in a scale of approximately 10 micro-meters in a tubular inductively coupled plasma reactor. Grown CNTs were analyzed by FE-SEM and Raman Spectroscopy. PMID:18047145

  1. Acetylphosphonate as a Surrogate of Acetate or Acetamide in Organocatalyzed Enantioselective Aldol Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Guang, Jie; Guo, Qunsheng

    2012-01-01

    Highly enantioselective aldol reactions of acetylphosphonates and activated carbonyl compounds was realized with cinchona alkaloid derived catalysts, in which the acetylphosphonate was directly used as an enolate precursor for the first time. The aldol product obtained was converted in situ to its corresponding ester or amide through methanolysis or aminolysis. The overall process may be viewed as formal highly enantioselective acetate or acetamide aldol reactions, which are very difficult to achieve directly with organocatalytic methods. PMID:22650245

  2. The role of carbon overlayers on Pt-based catalysts for H2-cleanup by CO-PROX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Sarria, F.; Garcia-Dali, S.; Palma, S.; Jimenez-Barrera, E. M.; Oliviero, L.; Bazin, P.; Odriozola, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we analyze the effect of the activation method on the catalytic activity of Pt-based catalysts supported on alumina in the PROX reaction. For this, model Pt/Al2O3 catalysts with variable amounts of acetic acid were prepared and their thermal evolution studied by FTIR spectroscopy. From the analysis of the nature of the platinum surface upon acetic acid decomposition and the gas phase evolved products, we have demonstrated the formation of partially hydrogenated carbon overlayers that tailor the activity of Pt-based catalysts in the PROX reaction.

  3. The role of catalyst precursor anions in coal gasification. Final technical report, September 1991--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Abotsi, G.M.K.

    1995-01-01

    The utilization of coal is currently limited by several factors, including the environmental impacts of coal use and the lack of cost-effective technologies to convert coal into useful gaseous and liquid products. Several catalysts have been evaluated for coal gasification and liquefaction. The activities of the catalysts are dependent on many factors such as the method of catalyst addition to the coal and the catalyst precursor type. Since catalyst addition to coal is frequently conducted in aqueous solution, the surface chemistry of colloidal coal particles will be expected to exert an influence on catalyst uptake. However, the effects of the various coal gasification catalyst precursors on the interfacial properties of coal during catalyst loading from solution has received little attention. The aim of this study is to ascertain the influence of the metal salts (i): calcium acetate (Ca(OOCCH{sub 3}){sub 2}), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) or calcium nitrate (Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}) and (ii): potassium acetate (KOOCCH{sub 3}), potassium chloride (KCl), potassium nitrate (KNO{sub 3}), potassium carbonate (K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) and potassium sulfate (K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) on the electrokinetic and adsorptive properties of coal and determine the relationship, if any, between coal surface electrokinetic properties, and catalyst loading and eventually its effects on the reactivities of coal chars.

  4. Organic chemistry. A rhodium catalyst for single-step styrene production from benzene and ethylene.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Benjamin A; Webster-Gardiner, Michael S; Cundari, Thomas R; Gunnoe, T Brent

    2015-04-24

    Rising global demand for fossil resources has prompted a renewed interest in catalyst technologies that increase the efficiency of conversion of hydrocarbons from petroleum and natural gas to higher-value materials. Styrene is currently produced from benzene and ethylene through the intermediacy of ethylbenzene, which must be dehydrogenated in a separate step. The direct oxidative conversion of benzene and ethylene to styrene could provide a more efficient route, but achieving high selectivity and yield for this reaction has been challenging. Here, we report that the Rh catalyst ((Fl)DAB)Rh(TFA)(η(2)-C2H4) [(Fl)DAB is N,N'-bis(pentafluorophenyl)-2,3-dimethyl-1,4-diaza-1,3-butadiene; TFA is trifluoroacetate] converts benzene, ethylene, and Cu(II) acetate to styrene, Cu(I) acetate, and acetic acid with 100% selectivity and yields ≥95%. Turnover numbers >800 have been demonstrated, with catalyst stability up to 96 hours. PMID:25908817

  5. Novel Synthesis of Phytosterol Ester from Soybean Sterol and Acetic Anhydride.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuming; Oyeyinka, Samson A; Ma, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Phytosterols are important bioactive compounds which have several health benefits including reduction of serum cholesterol and preventing cardiovascular diseases. The most widely used method in the synthesis of its ester analogous form is the use of catalysts and solvents. These methods have been found to present some safety and health concern. In this paper, an alternative method of synthesizing phytosterol ester from soybean sterol and acetic anhydride was investigated. Process parameters such as mole ratio, temperature and time were optimized. The structure and physicochemical properties of phytosterol acetic ester were analyzed. By the use of gas chromatography, the mole ratio of soybean sterol and acetic anhydride needed for optimum esterification rate of 99.4% was 1:1 at 135 °C for 1.5 h. FTIR spectra confirmed the formation of phytosterol ester with strong absorption peaks at 1732 and 1250 cm(-1) , which corresponds to the stretching vibration of C=O and C-O-C, respectively. These peaks could be attributed to the formation of ester links which resulted from the reaction between the hydroxyl group of soybean sterol and the carbonyl group of acetic anhydride. This paper provides a better alternative to the synthesis of phytosterol ester without catalyst and solvent residues, which may have potential application in the food, health-care food, and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:27240315

  6. System for reactivating catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  7. Searching for Cool Dust in the Mid-to-far Infrared: The Mass-loss Histories of the Hypergiants μ Cep, VY CMa, IRC+10420, and ρ Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Dinesh; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Jones, Terry J.; Marengo, Massimo; Gehrz, Robert D.; Helton, L. Andrew; Hoffmann, William F.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip M.

    2016-03-01

    We present mid- and far-IR imaging of four famous hypergiant stars: the red supergiants μ Cep and VY CMa, and the warm hypergiants IRC +10420 and ρ Cas. Our 11-37 μm SOFIA/FORCAST imaging probes cool dust not detected in visual and near-IR imaging studies. Adaptive optics 8-12 μm imaging of μ Cep and IRC +10420 with MMT/MIRAC reveals extended envelopes that are the likely sources of these stars’ strong silicate emission features. We find μ Cep’s mass-loss rate to have declined by about a factor of five over a 13,000 year history, ranging from 5 × 10-6 down to ˜1× 10-6 M⊙ yr-1. The morphology of VY CMa indicates a cooler dust component coincident with the highly asymmetric reflection nebulae seen in the visual and near-IR. The lack of cold dust at greater distances around VY CMa indicates that its mass-loss history is limited to the last ˜1200 years, with an average rate of 6 × 10-4 M⊙ yr-1. We find two distinct periods in the mass-loss history of IRC +10420 with a high rate of 2 × 10-3 M⊙ yr-1 until approximately 2000 years ago, followed by an order of magnitude decrease in the recent past. We interpret this change as evidence of its evolution beyond the RSG stage. Our new infrared photometry of ρ Cas is consistent with emission from the expanding dust shell ejected in its 1946 eruption, with no evidence of newer dust formation from its more recent events. Based on observations obtained with: (1) the NASA/DLR Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). SOFIA is jointly operated by the Universities Space Research Association, Inc. (USRA), under NASA contract NAS2-97001, and the Deutsches SOFIA Institut (DSI) under DLR contract 50 OK 0901 to the University of Stuttgart; and (2) the MMT Observatory on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  8. Catalyst patterning for nanowire devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nanowire devices may be provided that are based on carbon nanotubes or single-crystal semiconductor nanowires. The nanowire devices may be formed on a substrate. Catalyst sites may be formed on the substrate. The catalyst sites may be formed using lithography, thin metal layers that form individual catalyst sites when heated, collapsible porous catalyst-filled microscopic spheres, microscopic spheres that serve as masks for catalyst deposition, electrochemical deposition techniques, and catalyst inks. Nanowires may be grown from the catalyst sites.

  9. MOF-Derived Tungstated Zirconia as Strong Solid Acids toward High Catalytic Performance for Acetalization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Feng, Jian; Zhao, Yupei; Wang, Shaobin; Liu, Jian

    2016-09-14

    A strong solid acid, tungstated zirconia (WZ), has been prepared first using tungstate immobilized UiO-66 as precursors through a "double-solvent" impregnation method under mild calcination temperature. With moderate W contents, the as-synthesized WZ catalysts possess a high density of acid sites, and the proper heat treatment also has facilely led to a bunch of oligomeric tungsten clusters on stabilized tetragonal ZrO2. The resultant solid acids show an improved catalytic performance toward the benzaldehyde's acetalization in comparison with traditional zirconium hydroxide-prepared WZ. Notably, due to large surface area and additionally introduced strong acid sites, the MOF-derived WZ catalysts afforded conversion up to 86.0%. The facile method endows the WZ catalysts with superior catalytic activities and excellent recyclability, thus opening a new avenue for preparation of metal oxide-based solid superacids and superbases. PMID:27557351

  10. Understanding Palladium Acetate from a User Perspective.

    PubMed

    Carole, William A; Colacot, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    The behavior of palladium acetate is reviewed with respect to its synthesis, characterization, structure (in both solution and solid state), and activation pathways. In addition, comparisons of catalytic activities between pure palladium acetate and two common byproducts, Pd3 (OAc)5 (NO2 ) and polymeric [Pd(OAc)2 ]n , typically present in commercially available material are reviewed. Hence, this minireview serves as a concise guide for the users of palladium acetate from both academia and industry. PMID:27125630

  11. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sodium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... sodium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sodium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3...

  16. Textured catalysts and methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong; Zacher, Alan H.

    2007-03-06

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  17. A New Blind 2D-RAKE Receiver Based on CMA Criteria for Spread Spectrum Systems Suitable for Software Defined Radio Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Kei; Kamiya, Yukihiro; Fujii, Takeo; Suzuki, Yasuo

    Spread Spectrum (SS) has been widely used for various wireless systems such as cellular systems, wireless local area network (LAN) and so on. Using multiple antennas at the receiver, two-dimensional (2D) RAKE is realized over the time- and the space-domain. However, it should be noted that the 2D-RAKE receiver must detect the bit timing prior to the RAKE combining. In case of deep fading, it is often difficult to detect it due to low signal-to-noise power ratio (SNR). To solve this problem, we propose a new blind 2D-RAKE receiver based on the constant modulus algorithm (CMA). Since it does not need a priori bit timing detection, it is possible to compensate frequency selective fading even in very low SNR environments. The proposed method is particularly suitable for the software defined radio (SDR) architecture. The performance of the proposed method is investigated through computer simulations.

  18. Direct synthesis of ethanol from dimethyl ether and syngas over combined H-Mordenite and Cu/ZnO catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingang; San, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Yi; Ichii, Takashi; Meng, Ming; Tan, Yisheng; Tsubaki, Noritatsu

    2010-10-25

    Ethanol was directly synthesized from dimethyl ether (DME) and syngas with the combined H-Mordenite and Cu/ZnO catalysts that were separately loaded in a dual-catalyst bed reactor. Methyl acetate (MA) was formed by DME carbonylation over the H-Mordenite catalyst. Thereafter, ethanol and methanol were produced by MA hydrogenation over the Cu/ZnO catalyst. With the reactant gas containing 1.0% DME, the optimized temperature for the reaction was at 493 K to reach 100% conversion. In the products, the yield of methanol and ethanol could reach 46.3% and 42.2%, respectively, with a small amount of MA, ethyl acetate, and CO(2). This process is environmentally friendly as the main byproduct methanol can be recycled to DME by a dehydration reaction. In contrast, for the physically mixed catalysts, the low conversion of DME and high selectivity of methanol were observed. PMID:20715046

  19. Positron scattering from vinyl acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, L.; Zecca, A.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Brunger, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    Using a Beer-Lambert attenuation approach, we report measured total cross sections (TCSs) for positron scattering from vinyl acetate (C4H6O2) in the incident positron energy range 0.15-50 eV. In addition, we also report an independent atom model with screening corrected additivity rule computation results for the TCSs, differential and integral elastic cross sections, the positronium formation cross section and inelastic integral cross sections. The energy range of these calculations is 1-1000 eV. While there is a reasonable qualitative correspondence between measurement and calculation for the TCSs, in terms of the energy dependence of those cross sections, the theory was found to be a factor of ˜2 larger in magnitude at the lower energies, even after the measured data were corrected for the forward angle scattering effect.

  20. Extractive fermentation of acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Busche, R.M.

    1991-12-31

    In this technoeconomic evaluation of the manufacture of acetic acid by fermentation, the use of the bacterium: Acetobacter suboxydans from the old vinegar process was compared with expected performance of the newer Clostridium thermoaceticum bacterium. Both systems were projected to operate as immobilized cells in a continuous, fluidized bed bioreactor, using solvent extraction to recover the product. Acetobacter metabolizes ethanol aerobically to produce acid at 100 g/L in a low pH medium. This ensures that the product is in the form of a concentrated extractable free acid, rather than as an unextractable salt. Unfortunately, yields from glucose by way of the ethanol fermentation are poor, but near the biological limits of the organisms involved. Conversely, C. thermoaceticum is a thermophilic anaerobe that operates at high fermentation rates on glucose at neutral pH to produce acetate salts directly in substantially quantitative yields. However, it is severely inhibited by product, which restricts concentration to a dilute 20 g/L. An improved Acetobacter system operating with recycled cells at 50 g/L appears capable of producing acid at $0.38/lb, as compared with a $0.29/lb price for synthetic acid. However, this system has only a limited margin for process improvement. The present Clostridium system cannot compete, since the required selling price would be $0.42/lb. However, if the organism could be adapted to tolerate higher product concentrations at acid pH, selling price could be reduced to $0.22/lb, or about 80% of the price of synthetic acid.

  1. Methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong; Zacher, Alan H.

    2010-08-17

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  2. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  3. Catalyst enhances Claus operations

    SciTech Connect

    Dupin, T.; Voizin, R.

    1982-11-01

    An improved Claus catalyst offers superior activity that emphasizes hydrolysis of CS/sub 2/ in the first converter. The catalyst is insensitive to oxygen action at concentrations generally found in Claus gas feeds. It also has an excellent resistance to hydrothermal shocks that may occur during shutdown of the sulfur line. Collectively, these properties make this catalyst the most active formula now available for optimum Claus yields and COS/CS/sub 2/ hydrolysis conversion.

  4. Online Measurement of the Intramolecular Isotopic Composition of Acetate in Natural Porewater Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. B.; Arthur, M. A.; Freeman, K. H.

    2006-12-01

    other volatile acids and water on a polar column (Nukol, Supelco). Following the GC, the acetic acid is reacted with either a combustion furnace (for total acetate) or a pyrolysis furnace for the carboxyl carbon only. The pyrolysis furnace operates at 600°C with Pd wire catalyst and a continuous trickle of H2. The resulting CO2 is then analyzed by conventional IRMS. This GC-PY-IRMS technique is coupled to a GC-C-IRMS such that switching between oxidation and pyrolysis is accomplished by a simple switch followed by a short stabilization period. The above pyrolysis conditions result in a small but characterizable oxidation of methyl carbon to CO2. The cross-contamination of acetate methyl into the acetate carboxyl signal is estimated to be approximately 15 to 20% of the IRMS signal and an isotope dilution series is used to estimate and correct for this contamination. Since this technique is online and allows for the injection of water samples the need for sample extraction and separation are eliminated. This method also significantly improves detection limits over the Dias 2002 method by avoiding SPME injections which have unfavorable partition coefficients for aqueous solutions of acetate.

  5. METHOD OF PURIFYING CATALYSTS

    DOEpatents

    Joris, G.G.

    1958-09-01

    It has been fuund that the presence of chlorine as an impurity adversely affects the performance of finely divided platinum catalysts such as are used in the isotopic exchange process for the production of beavy water. This chlorine impurity may be removed from these catalysts by treating the catalyst at an elevated temperature with dry hydrogen and then with wet hydrogen, having a hydrogen-water vapor volume of about 8: 1. This alternate treatment by dry hydrogen and wet hydrogen is continued until the chlorine is largely removed from the catalyst.

  6. Polyolefin catalyst manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Inkrott, K.E.; Scinta, J.; Smith, P.D. )

    1989-10-16

    Statistical process control (SPC) procedures are absolutely essential for making new-generation polyolefin catalysts with the consistent high quality required by modern polyolefin processes. Stringent quality assurance is critical to the production of today's high-performance catalysts. Research and development efforts during the last 20 years have led to major technological improvements in the polyolefin industry. New generation catalysts, which once were laboratory curiosities, must now be produced commercially on a regular and consistent basis to meet the increasing requirements of the plastics manufacturing industry. To illustrate the more stringent requirements for producing the new generation polyolefin catalysts, the authors compare the relatively simple, first-generation polypropylene catalyst production requirements with some of the basic requirements of manufacturing a more complex new-generation catalyst, such as Catalyst Resources Inc.'s LYNX 900. The principles which hold true for the new-generation catalysts such as LYNX 900 are shown to apply equally to the scale-up of other advanced technology polyolefin catalysts.

  7. Liquefaction with microencapsulated catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Sol W.

    1985-01-01

    A method of dispersing a liquefaction catalyst within coal or other carbonaceous solids involves providing a suspension in oil of microcapsules containing the catalyst. An aqueous solution of a catalytic metal salt is emulsified in the water-immiscible oil and the resulting minute droplets microencapsulated in polymeric shells by interfacial polycondensation. The catalyst is subsequently blended and dispersed throughout the powdered carbonaceous material to be liquefied. At liquefaction temperatures the polymeric microcapsules are destroyed and the catalyst converted to minute crystallites in intimate contact with the carbonaceous material.

  8. Examination of mercaptobenzyl sulfonates as catalysts for native chemical ligation: application to the assembly of a glycosylated Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogue.

    PubMed

    Cowper, Ben; Sze, Tsz Mei; Premdjee, Bhavesh; Bongat White, Aileen F; Hacking, Andrew; Macmillan, Derek

    2015-02-21

    3/4-Mercaptobenzyl sulfonates were investigated as aryl thiol catalysts for native chemical ligation (NCL). Whilst catalysing NCL processes at a similar rate to 4-mercaptophenyl acetic acid (MPAA), the increased polarity and solubility of 3-mercaptobenzyl sulfonate in particular may favour its selection as NCL catalyst in many instances. PMID:25605668

  9. 21 CFR 556.380 - Melengestrol acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Melengestrol acetate. 556.380 Section 556.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.380 Melengestrol acetate. A tolerance of 25 parts...

  10. 21 CFR 556.380 - Melengestrol acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Melengestrol acetate. 556.380 Section 556.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.380 Melengestrol acetate. A tolerance of 25 parts...

  11. 21 CFR 556.380 - Melengestrol acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Melengestrol acetate. 556.380 Section 556.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.380 Melengestrol acetate. A tolerance of 25 parts...

  12. 21 CFR 556.380 - Melengestrol acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Melengestrol acetate. 556.380 Section 556.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.380 Melengestrol acetate. A tolerance of 25 parts...

  13. Manufacturing Ethyl Acetate From Fermentation Ethanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, Naresh K.; Ingham, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Conceptual process uses dilute product of fermentation instead of concentrated ethanol. Low-concentration ethanol, extracted by vacuum from fermentation tank, and acetic acid constitutes feedstock for catalytic reaction. Product of reaction goes through steps that increases ethyl acetate content to 93 percent by weight. To conserve energy, heat exchangers recycle waste heat to preheat process streams at various points.

  14. 21 CFR 173.228 - Ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 1 (Ethyl Acetate; p. 372, 3d Ed., 1981), which are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethyl acetate. 173.228 Section 173.228 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  15. Regeneration of commercial selective catalyst reduction catalysts deactivated by Pb and other inorganic elements.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanke; Wang, Jinxiu; Chen, Jinsheng; He, Xinjiang; Wang, Yujing; Song, Kai; Xie, Zongli

    2016-09-01

    The regeneration of commercial SCR (Selective Catalyst Reduction) catalysts deactivated by Pb and other elements was studied. The deactivated catalyst samples were prepared by chemical impregnation with mixed solution containing K2SO4, Na2SO4, CaSO4, Pb(NO3)2 and NH4H2PO4. A novel method combining Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt (EDTA-2Na) and H2SO4 solution (viz. catalysts treated by dilute EDTA-2Na and H2SO4 solution in sequence) was used to recover the activity of deactivated samples, and the effect was compared with single H2SO4, oxalic acid, acetic acid, EDTA or HNO3 solutions. The surface structure, acidity and reducibility of samples were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), H2-temperature programmed section (H2-TPR), NH3-temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and in situ DRIFTS. Impurities caused a decrease of specific surface area and surface reducibility, as well as Brønsted acid sites, and therefore led to severe deactivation of the SCR catalyst. The use of an acid solution alone possibly eliminated the impurities on the deactivated catalyst to some extent, and also increased the specific surface area and Brønsted acid sites and promoted the surface reducibility, thus recovered the activity partially. The combination of EDTA-2Na and H2SO4 could remove most of the impurities and improve the activity significantly. The removal of Pb should be an important factor for regeneration. Due to a high removal rate for Pb and other impurities, the combination of EDTA-2Na and H2SO4 solutions provided the best efficiency. PMID:27593277

  16. Lewis base activation of Lewis acids. Vinylogous aldol addition reactions of conjugated N,O-silyl ketene acetals to aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R

    2006-02-01

    N,O-Silyl dienyl ketene acetals derived from unsaturated morpholine amides have been developed as highly useful reagents for vinylogous aldol addition reactions. In the presence of SiCl4 and the catalytic action of chiral phosphoramide (R,R)-3, N,O-silyl dienyl ketene acetal 8 undergoes high-yielding and highly site-selective addition to a wide variety of aldehydes with excellent enantioselectivity. Of particular note is the high yields and selectivities obtained from aliphatic aldehydes. Low catalyst loadings (2-5 mol %) can be employed. The morpholine amide serves as a useful precursor for further synthetic manipulation. PMID:16433495

  17. Effects of various poisoning compounds on the activity and stereospecificity of heterogeneous Ziegler-Natta catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangjituabun, Kitti; Kim, Sang Yull; Hiraoka, Yuichi; Taniike, Toshiaki; Terano, Minoru; Jongsomjit, Bunjerd; Praserthdam, Piyasan

    2008-04-01

    A TiCl4/ethylbenzoate/MgCl2 Ziegler-Natta catalyst was pretreated with chemically different poisoning compounds to investigate their effects on the catalyst activity and stereospecificity for propylene polymerization. The poisoning power on the activity was in the order of methanol > acetone > ethyl acetate. A kinetic analysis using the stopped-flow method revealed that addition of the poisoning materials decreased the activity through the reduction of the number of active sites, whereas the catalyst isospecificity was hardly affected by these materials.

  18. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  19. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  20. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  1. Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, James H. (Inventor); Taylor, Jesse W. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Catalyst compositions and methods for F-T synthesis which exhibit high CO conversion with minor levels (preferably less than 35% and more preferably less than 5%) or no measurable carbon dioxide generation. F-T active catalysts are prepared by reduction of certain oxygen deficient mixed metal oxides.

  2. Improved zeolitic isocracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlberg, A.J.; Habib, M.M.; Moore, R.O.; Law, D.V.; Convery, L.J.

    1995-09-01

    Chevron Research Company introduced the first low pressure, low temperature catalytic hydrocracking process--ISOCRACKING--in 1959. Within the last four years, Chevron has developed and commercialized three new zeolitic ISOCRACKING catalysts. ICR 209 is Chevron`s latest noble metal ISOCRACKING catalyst. It offers improved liquid yield stability, longer life, and superior polynuclear aromatics control compared to its predecessor. ICR 209`s high hydrogenation activity generates the highest yields of superior quality jet fuel of any zeolitic ISOCRACKING catalyst. The second new ISOCRACKING catalyst, ICR 208, is a base metal catalyst which combines high liquid selectivity and high light naphtha octane in hydrocrackers operating for maximum naphtha production. ICR 210 is another new base metal catalyst which offers higher liquid yields and longer life than ICR 208 by virtue of a higher hydrogenation-to-acidity ratio. Both ICR 208 and ICR 210 have been formulated to provide higher liquid yield throughout the cycle and longer cycle length than conventional base metal/zeolite catalysts. This paper will discuss the pilot plant and commercial performances of these new ISOCRACKING catalysts.

  3. Improved catalysts and method

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.; Noceti, R.P.

    1990-12-31

    An improved catalyst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HCl and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride. 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Preparation and application of zirconium sulfate supported on SAPO-34 molecular sieve as solid acid catalyst for esterification

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Dongyan Ma, Hong; Cheng, Fei

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • SAPO-34 supported zirconium sulfate solid acid catalyst was prepared. • Esterification of acetic acid with ethanol can be catalyzed by ZS/SAPO-34. • The hydration of ZS is vital to the acidic property and catalytic performance. • The ZS/SAPO-34 catalyst treated at 200 °C shows good reusability. - Abstract: Zirconium sulfate (ZS) was supported on SAPO-34 molecular sieve by using an incipient wetness impregnation method with zirconium sulfate as the precursor. The as-prepared catalysts were used as solid acid catalyst for esterification reaction of acetic acid with ethanol. The influence of calcination temperature on the acidic property, catalytic activity, and reusability of ZS/SAPO-34 catalysts were mainly investigated. FT-IR, SEM, EDS and TG analysis have been carried out to demonstrate the characteristics of ZS/SAPO-34 catalysts. It was found that the 30 wt%ZS/SAPO-34 catalysts display the property of superacid irrespective of calcination temperature. The ZS/SAPO-34 catalyst treated at 200 °C can enhance the interaction between the supported ZS and SAPO-34 and keep the catalyst remaining substantially active after several reaction cycles. However, further increasing calcination temperature will cause the transfer of ZS from hydrate to anhydrous phase, and thus the decrease of activity.

  5. Combustion of volatile organic compounds over composite catalyst of Pt/γ-Al₂O₃ and beta zeolite.

    PubMed

    Takamitsu, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Wataru; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Sano, Tsuneji

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was carried out over a composite catalyst comprising Pt/γ-Al₂O₃ and protonated beta zeolite. The conversion of several VOCs such as ethyl acetate, butyl acetate, 2-propanol, 1,2-dichloroethane, and chloroethane over the composite catalyst was higher than the conversion over the conventional Pt/γ-Al₂O₃ catalyst, indicating a remarkable improvement in the oxidation activity of the composite. On the other hand, no difference in the conversion of methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, toluene, benzene, and chloroethylene was observed for the composite catalyst versus the Pt/γ-Al₂O₃ catalyst. To clarify the role of the zeolite component, the reaction products obtained using the composite catalyst were compared with those obtained using the Pt/γ-Al₂O₃ catalyst. For the cases in which considerable improvement in the oxidation activity was observed with the composite, it was revealed that the conversion of VOCs to intermediate compounds took place over the acidic sites of the zeolite; the intermediates tended to be easily oxidized to CO₂ on the Pt/γ-Al₂O₃ catalyst. In addition, the composite catalyst also exhibited high durability. High catalytic activity was maintained even after aging at 600°C for more than 1000 h. PMID:23445410

  6. Ligand-free Heck reaction: Pd(OAc)2 as an active catalyst revisited.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Kinney, Elizabeth P; Yang, Zhi

    2003-09-19

    Palladium acetate was shown to be an extremely active catalyst for the Heck reaction of aryl bromides. Both the base and the solvent were found to have a fundamental influence on the efficiency of the reaction, with K(3)PO(4) and N,N-dimethylacetamide being the optimal base and solvent, respectively. PMID:12968913

  7. The pharmacology of nomegestrol acetate.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiangyan; Seeger, Harald; Mueck, Alfred O

    2012-04-01

    Nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC) is a 19-norprogesterone derivative with high biological activity at the progesterone receptor, a weak anti-androgenic effect, but with no binding to estrogen, glucocorticoid or mineralocorticoid receptors. At dosages of 1.5mg/day or more, NOMAC effectively suppresses gonadotropic activity and ovulation in women of reproductive age. Hemostasis, lipids and carbohydrate metabolism remain largely unchanged. In normal and cancerous human breast cells, NOMAC has shown favorable effects on estrogen metabolism. Like natural progesterone (but in contrast to some other synthetic progestogens), it does not appear stimulate the proliferation of cancerous breast cells. While there has been some experience of the use of NOMAC in combination with estrogens as a hormone replacement therapy, most of the data on the compound are reported in the context of its inclusion as a component of a new contraceptive pill comprising 2.5mg NOMAC combined with 1.5mg estradiol. Because of its strong endometrial efficacy, and due to its high antigonadotropic activity and long elimination half-life (about 50h), the contraceptive efficacy of the new pill is maintained even when dosages are missed. Furthermore, for the first time with a monophasic 24/4 regimen containing estradiol, cyclical stability can be achieved comparable with that obtained using pills containing ethinyl estradiol and progestogens like levonorgestrel or drospirenone. The addition of NOMAC to estradiol means that the beneficial effects of estrogen are not lost, which is of especial importance in relation to the cardiovascular system. On the basis both of its pharmacology and of studies performed during the development of the NOMAC/estradiol pill, involving some 4000 women in total, good long-term tolerability can be expected for NOMAC, although its safety profile is still to be fully ascertained, as the clinical endpoint studies are yet to be completed. PMID:22364709

  8. Conversion to eslicarbazepine acetate monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    French, Jacqueline; Jacobson, Mercedes P.; Pazdera, Ladislav; Gough, Mallory; Cheng, Hailong; Grinnell, Todd; Blum, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) monotherapy. Methods: This post hoc pooled analysis of 2 randomized double-blind studies (093-045 and -046) included adults with partial-onset seizures medically uncontrolled by 1 or 2 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Following the baseline period (8 weeks), eligible patients were randomized 2:1 to receive ESL 1,600 mg or 1,200 mg once daily for 18 weeks; the primary endpoint was study exit by meeting predefined exit criteria (signifying worsening seizure control). In each study, treatment was considered effective if the upper 95% confidence limit for exit rate was lower than the historical control threshold (65.3%). Results: Pooled exit rates were as follows: ESL 1,600 mg = 20.6% (95% confidence interval: 15.6%–26.8%); ESL 1,200 mg = 30.8% (23.0%–40.5%). Use of 2 baseline AEDs or rescue medication, US location, epilepsy duration ≥20 years, and higher maximum baseline seizure frequency were associated with higher exit risks. Median percent reductions in standardized seizure frequency between baseline and the 18-week double-blind period were as follows: ESL 1,600 mg = 43.2%; ESL 1,200 mg = 35.7%; baseline carbamazepine use was associated with smaller reductions. Safety profiles were similar between ESL doses. Conclusions: Exit rates for ESL monotherapy (1,600 mg and 1,200 mg once daily) were lower than the historical control threshold, irrespective of baseline AED use and region, with no additional safety concerns identified. Clinical factors and location clearly influence treatment responses in conversion-to-monotherapy trials. Classification of evidence: This pooled analysis provides Class IV evidence that for adults with medically uncontrolled partial-onset seizures, ESL monotherapy is well tolerated and effective. PMID:26911639

  9. Nature's Treatment for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Studies on the Isolation of (-)-Menthol from Peppermint Oil and Its Conversion to (-)-Menthyl Acetate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Maeve; Connors, E´ilis Margaret; Anwar, Zeeshan; Walsh, John J.

    2015-01-01

    A simple, robust, and reproducible method was developed for the isolation of (-)-menthol from peppermint oil and to study the effect of different types of leaving groups, catalysts, solvents, and tertiary base on the extent of esterification of (-)-menthol to (-)-menthyl acetate. In this experiment, students compare leaving group properties of…

  10. Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum strain deficient in acetate production

    SciTech Connect

    Rothstein, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    A mutant of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum that is blocked in acetate production was isolated after treatment with nitrosoguanidine and selection for fluoroacetate resistance. The mutant produced more ethanol than the parent strain did.

  11. Acetate Causes Alcohol Hangover Headache in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Christina R.; Spangenberg, Rebecca Jay; Hoek, Jan B.; Silberstein, Stephen D.; Oshinsky, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Background The mechanism of veisalgia cephalgia or hangover headache is unknown. Despite a lack of mechanistic studies, there are a number of theories positing congeners, dehydration, or the ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde as causes of hangover headache. Methods We used a chronic headache model to examine how pure ethanol produces increased sensitivity for nociceptive behaviors in normally hydrated rats. Results Ethanol initially decreased sensitivity to mechanical stimuli on the face (analgesia), followed 4 to 6 hours later by inflammatory pain. Inhibiting alcohol dehydrogenase extended the analgesia whereas inhibiting aldehyde dehydrogenase decreased analgesia. Neither treatment had nociceptive effects. Direct administration of acetate increased nociceptive behaviors suggesting that acetate, not acetaldehyde, accumulation results in hangover-like hypersensitivity in our model. Since adenosine accumulation is a result of acetate formation, we administered an adenosine antagonist that blocked hypersensitivity. Discussion Our study shows that acetate contributes to hangover headache. These findings provide insight into the mechanism of hangover headache and the mechanism of headache induction. PMID:21209842

  12. Mafenide acetate allergy presenting as recurrent chondritis.

    PubMed

    Pickus, Evan J; Lionelli, Gerald T; Charles, E Woodall; Korentager, Richard A

    2002-02-01

    Acute chondritis has a strong predilection for recurrence. Mafenide acetate has been implicated in causing reactions that mimic this condition; however, these hypersensitivity reactions lack fever, fluctuance, and pain. The authors report a case of mafenide acetate allergy presenting as recurrent chondritis in a patient who had previously been treated successfully for this condition. In this patient, the allergic response resolved within 3 days after cessation of mafenide acetate. If unappreciated, it may have led to unnecessary operative intervention. Therefore, auricular edema and erythema, without fever, fluctuance, and pain, must be recognized by surgeons as a possible mafenide acetate allergy and must be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients who present with recurrent acute suppurative chondritis. PMID:11910229

  13. Increasing FCC regenerator catalyst level

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.F. )

    1993-11-01

    A Peruvian FCC unit's operations were improved by increasing the regenerator's catalyst level. This increase resulted in lower stack losses, an improved temperature profile, increased catalyst activity and a lower catalyst consumption rate. A more stable operation saved this Peruvian refiner over $131,000 per year in catalyst alone. These concepts and data may be suitable for your FCC unit as well.

  14. Nomegestrol acetate/estradiol: in oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lily P H; Plosker, Greg L

    2012-10-01

    Nomegestrol acetate/estradiol is a combined oral contraceptive with approval in many countries. This fixed-dose combination tablet contains nomegestrol acetate, a highly selective progestogen, and estradiol, a natural estrogen. It is the first monophasic combined oral contraceptive to contain estradiol, and is taken in 28-day cycles, consisting of 24 active therapy days with 4 placebo days (i.e. 24/4-day cycles). In two large, 1-year, randomized, open-label, multicentre, phase III trials in healthy adult women (aged 18-50 years), nomegestrol acetate/estradiol was at least as effective as drospirenone/ethinylestradiol as contraceptive therapy, as the pregnancy rates in women aged 18-35 years (primary efficacy population) in terms of the Pearl Index (primary endpoint) were numerically lower with nomegestrol acetate/estradiol, although the between-group difference was not statistically significant. In both trials, nomegestrol acetate/estradiol was given in a 24/4-day cycle, and drospirenone/ethinylestradiol was given in a 21/7-day cycle. The criteria for using condoms in case of forgotten doses were less stringent in the nomegestrol acetate/estradiol group than in the drospirenone/ethinylestradiol group. Nomegestrol acetate/estradiol therapy for up to 1 year was generally well tolerated in healthy adult women, with an acceptable tolerability profile in line with that expected for a combined oral contraceptive. The most commonly reported adverse events were acne and abnormal withdrawal bleeding (most often shorter, lighter or absent periods). Overall, compared with drospirenone/ethinylestradiol, nomegestrol acetate/estradiol appeared to be associated with less favourable acne-related outcomes, and shorter, lighter or absent periods. PMID:22950535

  15. Methanogenesis from acetate: a nonmethanogenic bacterium from an anaerobic acetate enrichment.

    PubMed

    Ward, D M; Mah, R A; Kaplan, I R

    1978-06-01

    A methanogenic acetate enrichment was initiated by inoculation of an acetate-mineral salts medium with domestic anaerobic digestor sludge and maintained by weekly transfer for 2 years. The enrichment culture contained a Methanosarcina and several obligately anaerobic nonmethanogenic bacteria. These latter organisms formed varying degrees of association with the Methanosarcina, ranging from the nutritionally fastidious gram-negative rod called the satellite bacterium to the nutritionally nonfastidious Eubacterium limosum. The satellite bacterium had growth requirements for amino acids, a peptide, a purine base, vitamin B12, and other B vitamins. Glucose, mannitol, starch, pyruvate, cysteine, lysine, leucine, isoleucine, arginine, and asparagine stimulated growth and hydrogen production. Acetate was neither incorporated nor metabolized by the satellite organism. Since acetate was the sole organic carbon source in the enrichment culture, organism(s) which metabolize acetate (such as the Methanosarcina) must produce substrates and growth factors for associated organisms which do not metabolize acetate. PMID:677881

  16. Oxidized cellulose esters: I. Preparation and characterization of oxidized cellulose acetates--a new class of biodegradable polymers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Yang, D

    2002-01-01

    Oxidized cellulose acetates (OCA), with a degree of substitution (DS) value ranging between 1.1 and 2.3 and a free carboxylic acid group content of 20% (w/w), have been prepared by reacting oxidized cellulose (OC, COOH content 20% w/w) with a mixture of acetic acid and acetic anhydride in the presence of sulfuric acid as a catalyst. The DS of OCA, in general, increased with increasing reaction temperature, reaction time, and concentration of acetic anhydride in the reaction mixture. The yield of OCA, in contrast, increased with increasing concentration of acetic anhydride and decreased with increasing reaction time and temperature. The intrinsic viscosity of OCA varied between 0.100 and 0.275, depending on the reaction conditions used during its preparation. In general, an increase in reaction temperature and the use of a prolonged reaction time decreased the intrinsic viscosity of OCA. No correlation was found between DS and intrinsic viscosity of OCA. The apparent pKa of OCA is 3.7-3.9. The new OCA polymers are practically insoluble in water and slowly dissolve in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solution. They are, however, soluble in a range of organic solvents (e.g. ethyl acetate, acetone, acetone/water, chloroform/methylene chloride, dimethylsulfoxide, dimethylformamide, and/or chloroform/methanol). PMID:12102594

  17. The human mast cell chymase gene (CMA1): Mapping to the cathepsin G/granzyme gene cluster and lineage-restricted expression

    SciTech Connect

    Caughey, G.H.; Schaumberg, T.H.; Zerweck, E.H. ); Butterfield, J.H. ); Hanson, R.D.; Ley, T.J. ); Silverman, G.A. )

    1993-03-01

    Genes encoding T-cell receptor [alpha]/[delta] chains, neutrophil cathepsin G, and lymphocyte CGL/granzymes are closely linked on chromosomal band 14q11.2. The current work identifies the human mast cell chymase gene (CMA1) as the fourth protease in this cluster and maps the gene to within 150 kb of the cathepsin G gene. The gene order is centromere-T cell receptor [alpha]/[delta]-CGL-1/granzyme B-CGL-2/granzyme H-cathepsin G-chymase. Chymase and cathepsin G genes are shown to be cotranscribed in the human mast cell line HMC-1 and in U-937 cells. Other cells transcribe cathepsin G or CGL/granzyme genes, but not chymase genes, suggesting a capacity for independent regulation. Comparison of the 5[prime] flank of the chymase gene with those of cathepsin G and CGL/granzymes reveals little overall homology. Only short regions of the 5[prime] flanks of the human and murine chymase genes sequenced to date are similar, suggesting that they are more distantly related than human and rodent CGL-1/granzyme B, the flanks of which are highly homologous. The expression patterns and clustering of genes provide possible clues to the presence of locus control regions that orchestrate lineage-restricted expression of leukocyte and mast cell proteases. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Cytogenetic analyses using C-banding and DAPI/CMA3 staining of four populations of the maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, 1855 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae)

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Alexandra A.; Braga, Lucas S.; Guedes, Raul Narciso C.; Tavares, Mara G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cytogenetic data avalaible for the maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, 1855 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), one of the most destructive pests of stored cereal grains, are controversial. Earlier studies focused on single populations and emphasized chromosome number and sex determination system. In this paper, the karyotypes of four populations of Sitophilus zeamais were characterized by conventional staining, C-banding and sequential staining with the fluorochromes chromomycin-A3/4-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (CMA3/DAPI). The analyses of metaphases obtained from the cerebral ganglia of last instar larvae and the testes of adults showed that the species had 2n = 22 chromosomes, with 10 autosomal pairs and a sex chromosome pair (XX in females and Xyp in males). Chromosome number, however, ranged from 2n = 22 to 26 due to the presence of 0–4 supernumerary chromosomes in individuals from the populations of Viçosa, Unai and Porto Alegre. With the exception of the Y chromosome, which was dot-like, all other chromosomes of this species were metacentric, including the supernumeraries. The heterochromatin was present in the centromeric regions of all autosomes and in the centromere of the X chromosome. The B chromosomes were partially or totally heterochromatic, and the Y chromosome was euchromatic. The heterochromatic regions were labeled with C-banding and DAPI, which showed that they were rich in AT base pairs. PMID:25893077

  19. Coverage Effects on the Palladium-Catalyzed Synthesis of Vinyl Acetate: Comparison between Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Calaza, Florencia; Stacchiola, Dario; Neurock, Matthew; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2010-02-24

    The high adsorbate coverages that form on the surfaces of many heterogeneous catalysts under steady-state conditions can significantly lower the activation energies for reactions that involve the coupling of two adsorbed intermediates while increasing those which result in adsorbate bond-breaking reactions. The influence of the surface coverage on the kinetics of metal-catalyzed reactions is often ignored in theoretical and even in some ultrahigh vacuum experimental studies. Herein, first principle density functional theoretical calculations are combined with experimental surface titration studies carried out over well-defined Pd(111) surfaces to explicitly examine the influence of coverage on the acetoxylation of ethylene to form vinyl acetate over Pd. The activation energies calculated for elementary steps in the Samanos and Moiseev pathways for vinyl acetate synthesis carried out on acetate-saturated palladium surfaces reveal that the reaction proceeds via the Samanos mechanism which is consistent with experimental results carried out on acetate-saturated Pd(111) surfaces. The rate-limiting step involves a β-hydride elimination from the adsorbed acetoxyethyl intermediate, which proceeds with an apparent calculated activation barrier of 53 kJ/mol which is in very good agreement with the experimental barrier of 55 ± 4 kJ/mol determined from kinetic measurements.

  20. Selective Enrichment Establishes a Stable Performing Community for Microbial Electrosynthesis of Acetate from CO₂.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sunil A; Arends, Jan B A; Vanwonterghem, Inka; van Meerbergen, Jarne; Guo, Kun; Tyson, Gene W; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-07-21

    The advent of renewable energy conversion systems exacerbates the existing issue of intermittent excess power. Microbial electrosynthesis can use this power to capture CO2 and produce multicarbon compounds as a form of energy storage. As catalysts, microbial populations can be used, provided side reactions such as methanogenesis are avoided. Here a simple but effective approach is presented based on enrichment of a robust microbial community via several culture transfers with H2:CO2 conditions. This culture produced acetate at a concentration of 1.29 ± 0.15 g L(-1) (maximum up to 1.5 g L(-1); 25 mM) from CO2 at a fixed current of -5 Am(-2) in fed-batch bioelectrochemical reactors at high N2:CO2 flow rates. Continuous supply of reducing equivalents enabled acetate production at a rate of 19 ± 2 gm(-2)d(-1) (projected cathode area) in several independent experiments. This is a considerably high rate compared with other unmodified carbon-based cathodes. 58 ± 5% of the electrons was recovered in acetate, whereas 30 ± 10% of the electrons was recovered in H2 as a secondary product. The bioproduction was most likely H2 based; however, electrochemical, confocal microscopy, and community analyses of the cathodes suggested the possible involvement of the cathodic biofilm. Together, the enrichment approach and galvanostatic operation enabled instant start-up of the electrosynthesis process and reproducible acetate production profiles. PMID:26079858

  1. Cellulose esters synthesized using a tetrabutylammonium acetate and dimethylsulfoxide solvent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yongqi; Miao, Jiaojiao; Jiang, Zeming; Sun, Haibo; Zhang, Liping

    2016-07-01

    Cellulose acetate (CA) and cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) were homogeneously synthesized in a novel tetrabutylammonium acetate/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent system, without any catalyst, at temperatures below 70 °C. The molecular structures of the cellulose esters (CEs) and distributions of the substituents in the anhydroglucose repeating units were determined using 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the degree of substitution (DS) values were determined using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The structures of the CEs, regenerated cellulose (RC), and pulp were determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The thermal properties of the products were determined using thermogravimetric analysis. The temperatures of initial decomposition of the CEs were up to 40 °C higher than those of the RC and pulp. All the CEs were highly soluble in DMSO, but were insoluble in acetone. CAs with DS values less than 2.6 swelled or were poorly dissolved in CHCl3, but those with DS values above 2.9 dissolved rapidly. CAPs with DS values above 2.6 had good solubilities in ethyl acetate.

  2. Ultrasound assisted lipase catalyzed synthesis of cinnamyl acetate via transesterification reaction in a solvent free medium.

    PubMed

    Tomke, Prerana D; Rathod, Virendra K

    2015-11-01

    Cinnamyl acetate is known for its use as flavor and fragrance material in different industries such as food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic etc. This work focuses on ultrasound assisted lipase (Novozym 435) catalyzed synthesis of cinnamyl acetate via transesterification of cinnamyl alcohol and vinyl acetate in non-aqueous, solvent free system. Optimization of various parameters shows that a higher yield of 99.99% can be obtained at cinnamyl alcohol to vinyl acetate ratio of 1:2 with 0.2% of catalyst, at 40°C and 150 rpm, with lower ultrasound power input of 50 W (Ultrasound intensity 0.81 W/cm(2)), at 25 kHz frequency, 50% duty cycle. Further, the time required for the maximum conversion is reduced to 20 min as compared to 60 min of conventional process. Similarly, the enzyme can be successfully reused seven times without loss of enzyme activity. Thus, ultrasound helps to enhance the enzyme catalyzed synthesis of flavors. PMID:26186841

  3. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Sopchak, David A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Reynolds, John G.; Satcher, Joseph H.; Gash, Alex E.

    2011-11-15

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  4. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Sopchak, David A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Reynolds, John G.; Satcher, Joseph H.; Gash, Alex E.

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  5. Catalysts and method

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    An improved catlayst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HC1 and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  6. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    DOEpatents

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  7. Polymerization catalyst system

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, V.

    1986-03-25

    This patent describes a catalyst system for polymerizing at least one alpha-olefin under conditions characteristic of Ziegler polymerization. This system consists of: 1. a supported polymerization catalyst or mixture of polymerization catalysts prepared under anhydrous conditions by the sequential steps of: (a) preparing a slurry of inert particulate porous support material; (b) adding to the slurry a solution of an organomagnesium compound; (c) adding to the slurry and reacting a solution of a zirconium halide compound, hafnium compound or mixtures thereof; (d) adding to the slurry and reacting a halogenator; (e) adding to the slurry and reacting a tetravalent titanium halide compound; and (f) recovering solid catalyst component; 2. an organoaluminum compound; and 3. a promotor of chlorinated hydrocarbons having one to 20 carbon atoms.

  8. Hydrocracking catalysts and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbear, G.E.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrocracking processes convert aromatic gas oils into high quality gasoline, diesel, and turbine stocks. They operate at high hydrogen pressures, typically greater than 1500 psig. Operating temperatures range from 600-700{degrees}F (315-382{degrees}C). Commercial catalysts vary in activity and selectivity, allowing process designers to emphasize middle distillates, naphtha, or both. Catalysts are quite stable in use, with two year unit run lengths typical. A pretreatment step to remove nitrogen compounds is usually part of the same process unit. These HDN units operate integrally with the hydrocracking. The hydrogenation reactions are strongly exothermic, while the cracking is roughly thermal neutral. This combination can lead to temperature runaways. To avoid this, cold hydrogen is injected at several points in hydrocracking reactors. The mechanics of mixing this hydrogen with the oil and redistributing the mixture over the catalyst bed are very important in controlling process operation and ensuring long catalyst life.

  9. Evaluation of the efficiency of tumor and tissue delivery of carrier-mediated agents (CMA) and small molecule (SM) agents in mice using a novel pharmacokinetic (PK) metric: relative distribution index over time (RDI-OT)

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Andrew J.; Rawal, Sumit; Sandison, Katie; Schell, Ryan; Schorzman, Allison; Deal, Allison; Feng, Lan; Ma, Ping; Mumper, Russell; DeSimone, Joseph; Zamboni, William C.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK) of carrier-mediated agents (CMA) is dependent upon the carrier system. As a result, CMA PK differs greatly from the PK of small molecule (SM) drugs. Advantages of CMAs over SMs include prolonged circulation time in plasma, increased delivery to tumors, increased antitumor response, and decreased toxicity. In theory, CMAs provide greater tumor drug delivery than SMs due to their prolonged plasma circulation time. We sought to create a novel PK metric to evaluate the efficiency of tumor and tissue delivery of CMAs and SMs. We conducted a study evaluating the plasma, tumor, liver, and spleen PK of CMAs and SMs in mice bearing subcutaneous flank tumors using standard PK parameters and a novel PK metric entitled relative distribution over time (RDI-OT), which measures efficiency of delivery. RDI-OT is defined as the ratio of tissue drug concentration to plasma drug concentration at each time point. The standard concentration versus time area under the curve values (AUC) of CMAs were higher in all tissues and plasma compared with SMs. However, 8 of 17 SMs had greater tumor RDI-OT AUC0–last values than their CMA comparators and all SMs had greater tumor RDI-OT AUC0–6 h values than their CMA comparators. Our results indicate that in mice bearing flank tumor xenografts, SMs distribute into tumor more efficiently than CMAs. Further research in additional tumor models that may more closely resemble tumors seen in patients is needed to determine if our results are consistent in different model systems. PMID:26392803

  10. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1993-01-05

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  11. Plasmatron-catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander; Alexeev, Nikolai

    2007-10-09

    A plasmatron-catalyst system. The system generates hydrogen-rich gas and comprises a plasmatron and at least one catalyst for receiving an output from the plasmatron to produce hydrogen-rich gas. In a preferred embodiment, the plasmatron receives as an input air, fuel and water/steam for use in the reforming process. The system increases the hydrogen yield and decreases the amount of carbon monoxide.

  12. Catalytic reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, W.C.; Kluksdahl, H.E.

    1980-12-09

    An improved catalyst, having a reduced fouling rate when used in a catalytic reforming process, said catalyst comprising platinum disposed on an alumina support wherein the alumina support is obtained by removing water from aluminum hydroxide produced as a by-product from a ziegler higher alcohol synthesis reaction, and wherein the alumina is calcined at a temperature of 1100-1400/sup 0/F so as to have a surface area of 165 to 215 square meters per gram.

  13. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1991-12-31

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  14. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, Rayford G.; Dosch, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  15. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, Robert J.; Gao, Hanrong

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilation, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical.

  16. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, R.J.; Gao, H.

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilication, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanidation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical. 2 figs.

  17. Comprehensive catalyst management

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, S.

    2007-05-15

    From January 2009, as SCR season expands from five months to year-round to meet new US Clean Air Interstate Rule standards, new catalyst strategies are increasingly important. Power plants will need a comprehensive management strategy that accounts for a wide range of old and new issues to achieve peak performance. An optimum plan is necessary for catalyst replacement or addition. SCR systems should be inspected and evaluated at least once a year. Levels of deactivation agents, most often arsenic and calcium oxide, need to match the particular coals used. Tools such as Cormetech's FIELD Guide are available to quantify the effect on catalyst life under various fuel-firing scenarios. Tests should be conducted to evaluate the NH{sub 3}/NOx distribution over time to maximise catalyst performance. The article gives a case study of catalyst management at the Tennessee Valley Authority Allen plant. Recent changes have created new variables to be considered in a catalyst management process, notably the expansion of the operating temperature range, mercury oxidation and SO{sub 3} emission limits. Cormetech has researched these areas. 5 figs., 2 photos.

  18. Novel ebullated bed catalyst regeneration technology improves regenerated catalyst quality

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, D.J.

    1995-09-01

    Regeneration of spent hydroprocessing catalysts has long been practiced by the refining industry. With increased pressures on refiners to reduce catalyst expenditures and waste generation, refiners are more frequently reusing spent hydroprocessing catalysts after ex-situ regeneration to restore catalytic activity. By reusing regenerated catalyst for at least two cycles, the refiner reduces catalyst waste by at least one-half. As environmental laws become more restrictive, spent hydroprocessing catalyst is more likely to be classified as hazardous waste. Disposal of spent catalyst, which was previously accomplished by landfilling, now requires more expensive reclamation techniques. TRICAT has introduced the TRICAT Regeneration Process (TRP), a novel ebullated bed regeneration plant, to improve the catalyst regeneration process. The ebullated bed design allows for better control of heat release during the regeneration process. As a result, the regeneration can be accomplished in a single-pass, with improved catalyst activity retention. Catalyst losses are also minimized due to reduced catalyst handling. Commercial results from the TRP have demonstrated successful scale-up of the technology from pilot scale. The plant has achieved complete recovery of the available catalyst activity with little or no losses in catalyst yield or extrudate length. The flexibility of the TRP to process a variety of catalysts is also discussed.

  19. Selective oxygenation of alkynes: a direct approach to diketones and vinyl acetate.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Feng; Gu, Zhen; Liu, Wentao; Wang, Ningning; Wang, Haijun; Xia, Yongmei; Gao, Haiyan; Liu, Xiang

    2014-12-28

    Arylalkynes can be converted into α-diketones with the use of a copper catalyst, and also be transformed into vinyl acetates under metal-free conditions, both in the presence of PhI(OAc)2 as an oxidant at room temperature. A series of substituted α-diketones were prepared in moderate to good yields. A variety of vinyl halides could be regio- and stereo-selectively synthesized under mild conditions, and I, Br and Cl could be all easily embedded into the alkynes. PMID:25356631

  20. Adrenocortical suppression in cats given megestrol acetate.

    PubMed

    Chastain, C B; Graham, C L; Nichols, C E

    1981-12-01

    Megestrol acetate was given orally to 8 cats at a dose of 2.5 mg every other day for 2 weeks and to 8 cats at a dose of 5.0 mg every day for 2 weeks. Four cats were designated nontreated controls. Pre-ACTH-stimulated plasma concentrations of cortisol (hydrocortisone) and ACTH-stimulated cortisol and tolerance to large-dose glucose infusion (IV) were determined on each of the 20 cats given megestrol acetate. Cats were restrained with acepromazine maleate and ketamine hydrochloride during blood sample collection and large-dose glucose infusion. Adrenocortical function and tolerance to large-dose glucose infusion were reevaluated for 4 weeks--after 1st and 2nd weeks of megestrol acetate treatment of the treated groups, and after 1st and 2nd weeks when treatment was stopped (ie, experiment weeks 3 and 4). Each week a cat from the control group and 2 cats from the 2 treated groups were selected to determine the changes occurring during the experiment for that week; after collection of plasma samples, each week's 5 selected cats were euthanatized and necropsied. Significant impairment of adrenocortical function and alteration of adrenocortical morphology occurred with both treated groups. The most severe adrenocortical alterations occurred in the cats 1 week after megestrol acetate was no longer given (ie, experiment week 3). Megestrol acetate-induced adrenocortical suppression contributed to the death of 1 cat. It was concluded that if stress occurs to cats on treatment or soon after treatment with megestrol acetate, glucocorticoids should be supplemented. The effects of megestrol acetate on glucose tolerance were overshadowed by the unforeseen intolerance caused by chemical restraint with acepromazine maleate and ketamine hydrochloride. PMID:6280517

  1. Hydrogen production from steam reforming of acetic acid over Cu-Zn supported calcium aluminate.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Pravakar; Patel, Madhumita; Pant, Kamal K

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen can be produced by catalytic steam reforming (CSR) of biomass-derived oil. Typically bio oil contains 12-14% acetic acid; therefore, this acid was chosen as model compound for reforming of biooil with the help of a Cu-Zn/Ca-Al catalyst for high yield of H(2) with low CH(4) and CO content. Calcium aluminate support was prepared by solid-solid reaction at 1350°C. X-ray diffraction indicates 12CaO·7Al(2)O(3) as major, CaA(l4)O(7) and Ca(5)A(l6)O(14) as minor phases. Cu and Zn were loaded onto the support by wet-impregnation at 10 and 1wt.%, respectively. The catalysts were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy TEM and the surface area for both support and Cu-Zn were 10.5 and 5.8m(2)/g, respectively. CSR was carried out in a tubular fixed bed reactor (I.D.=19mm) at temperatures between 600 and 800°C with 3-g loadings and (H(2)O/acetic acid) wt. ratio of 9:1. Significantly high (80%) yield of hydrogen was obtained over Cu-Zn/Ca-Al catalyst, as incorporation of Zn enhanced the H(2) yield by reducing deactivation of the catalyst. The coke formation on the support (Ca-12/Al-7) surface was negligible due to the presence of excess oxygen in the 12CaO·7Al(2)O(3) phase. PMID:22944490

  2. Acetate Transport and Utilization in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Deelchand, Dinesh K.; Shestov, Alexander A.; Koski, Dee M.; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2009-01-01

    Acetate, a glial-specific substrate, is an attractive alternative to glucose for the study of neuronal-glial interactions. The present study investigates the kinetics of acetate uptake and utilization in the rat brain in vivo during infusion of [2-13C]acetate using NMR spectroscopy. When plasma acetate concentration was increased, the rate of brain acetate utilization (CMRace) increased progressively and reached close to saturation for plasma acetate concentration > 2-3 mM, whereas brain acetate concentration continued to increase. The Michaelis-Menten constant for brain acetate utilization ( KMutil=0.01±0.14mM) was much smaller than for acetate transport through the blood-brain barrier ( KMt=4.18±0.83mM). The maximum transport capacity of acetate through the blood-brain barrier ( Vmaxt=0.96±0.18μmol/g/min) was nearly two-fold higher than the maximum rate of brain acetate utilization ( Vmaxutil=0.50±0.08μmol/g/min). We conclude that, under our experimental conditions, brain acetate utilization is saturated when plasma acetate concentrations increase above 2-3 mM. At such high plasma acetate concentration, the rate-limiting step for glial acetate metabolism is not the blood-brain barrier, but occurs after entry of acetate into the brain. PMID:19393008

  3. Tested Demonstrations: Buffer Capacity of Various Acetic Acid-Sodium Acetate Systems: A Lecture Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Craig J.; Panek, Mary G.

    1985-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a lecture experiment which uses indicators to illustrate the concept of differing buffer capacities by titrating acetic acid/sodium acetate buffers with 1.0 molar hydrochloric acid and 1.0 molar sodium hydroxide. A table with data used to plot the titration curve is included. (JN)

  4. Acetylation of Starch with Vinyl Acetate in Imidazolium Ionic Liquids and Characterization of Acetate Distribution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch was acetylated with vinyl acetate in different 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMIM) salts as solvent in effort to produce starches with different acetylation patterns. Overall degree of substitution was much higher for basic anions such as acetate and dicyanimide (dca) than for neutral anions ...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10001 - 2-Ethoxyethanol, 2-ethoxyethanol acetate, 2-methoxyethanol, and 2-methoxyethanol acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as 2-ethoxyethanol (CAS No. 110-80-5), 2-ethoxyethanol acetate (CAS No. 111-15-9), 2-methoxyethanol (CAS No. 109-86-4), and 2-methoxyethanol acetate (CAS No. 110-49-6) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10001 - 2-Ethoxyethanol, 2-ethoxyethanol acetate, 2-methoxyethanol, and 2-methoxyethanol acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as 2-ethoxyethanol (CAS No. 110-80-5), 2-ethoxyethanol acetate (CAS No. 111-15-9), 2-methoxyethanol (CAS No. 109-86-4), and 2-methoxyethanol acetate (CAS No. 110-49-6) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  7. [Degradation of thiometon in ethyl acetate].

    PubMed

    Satoh, M; Shimokawa, S; Kobata, M; Tanaka, T; Nakanishi, Y

    2001-04-01

    When performing multiresidue analysis of pesticides, the recovery of thiometon was less than 20% from carrots and eggplants, but about 100% from garlic chives and welsh onions. The recovery of thiometon was found to depend on the lot of ethyl acetate. A 2-year-old lot of ethyl acetate caused degradation of thiometon, but a fresh lot of ethyl acetate did not. Analysis showed that ethyl acetate stored for 2 years contained about 5 microL/mL of acetaldehyde. Thiometon was also degraded by acetone or acetonitrile, when acetaldehyde was added to them, in the same manner as by aged ethyl acetate. The fact that the recovery of thiometon from welsh onions was about 100% indicated that some of the mercaptans in allium vegetables may prevent thiometon degradation. Mercaptans such as L-cysteine and 3-mercaptoproionic acid were confirmed to prevent the degradation of thiometon and disulfoton. These findings show that mercaptans may be useful additives for analyzing thiometon and disulfoton. PMID:11486375

  8. Deactivator for olefin polymerization catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Rekers, L.J.; Speca, A.N.; Mayhew, H.W.

    1987-03-10

    A method is described comprising deactivating an olefin polymerization catalyst selected from the group consisting of Ziegler-Natta transition element catalysts and catalysts based on transition metal oxides by contacting the catalyst with a copolymer. The copolymer consists of an alpha-olefin having from 2 to about 12 carbon atoms and an unsaturated ester of a carboxylic acid. The deactivating copolymer is present in an amount such that the molar ratio of the unsaturated ester thereof to the sum of the transition element component of the polymerization catalyst and a cocatalyst for the transition element catalyst is in the range of between about 0.1 and about 6.

  9. A Search for X-Ray Evidence of a Compact Companion to the Unusual Wolf-Rayet Star HD 50896 (EZ CMa)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Itoh, Masayuki; Nagase, Fumiaki

    1998-01-01

    We analyze results of a approx.25 ksec ASCA X-ray observation of the unusual Wolf-Rayet star HD 50896 (= EZ CMa). This WN5 star shows optical and ultraviolet variability at a 3.766 day period, which has been interpreted as a possible signature of a compact companion. Our objective was to search for evidence of hard X-rays (greater than or equal to 5 keV) which could be present if the WN5 wind is accreting onto a compact object. The ASCA spectra are dominated by emission below 5 keV and show no significant emission in the harder 5-10 keV range. Weak emission lines are present, and the X-rays arise in an optically thin plasma which spans a range of temperatures from less than or equal to 0.4 keV up to at least approx. 2 keV. Excess X-ray absorption above the interstellar value is present, but the column density is no larger than N(sub H) approx. 10(exp 22)/sq cm. The absorption-corrected X-ray luminosity L(sub x)(0.5 - 10 keV) = 10(exp 32.85) erg/s gives L(sub x)/ L(sub bol) approx. 10(exp -6), a value that is typical of WN stars. No X-ray variability was detected. Our main conclusion is that the X-ray properties of HD 50896 are inconsistent with the behavior expected for wind accretion onto a neutron star or black hole companion. Alternative models based on wind shocks can explain most aspects of the X-ray behavior, and we argue that the hotter plasma near approx. 2 keV could be due to the WR wind shocking onto a normal (nondegenerate) companion.

  10. Megestrol acetate for treatment of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Schlaff, W D; Dugoff, L; Damewood, M D; Rock, J A

    1990-04-01

    Between 1977-1989, 29 women with symptomatic endometriosis were treated with megestrol acetate by the Johns Hopkins Division of Reproductive Endocrinology. All had previously received one or more alternative medical treatments for endometriosis, in each case discontinued because of poor response or development of unacceptable side effects. Treatment consisted of a daily dose of 40 mg megestrol acetate orally for up to 24 months. Disease-related symptoms (dysmenorrhea, noncyclic pelvic pain, and dyspareunia) were relieved in 86% of the subjects treated with an adequate course of therapy. Side effects were fairly well tolerated, although eight women discontinued treatment within 2 months and two others stopped the drug by 4 months. These preliminary findings suggest that megestrol acetate may be an effective treatment for patients with endometriosis, even those who have been unresponsive to other modes of therapy. PMID:2314784

  11. Quality assurance for purchased catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Puls, F.H. )

    1988-09-01

    Petrochemical industries require many different types of catalysts in process operations. A significantly portion of these requirements is being met through purchases from merchant catalyst suppliers. The importance of catalysts and of catalyst quality to these industries cannot be overstated. It is not surprising that in the quest for quality which has affected much of US industry in the last few years, catalysts were among the first products which were singled out for development of quality assurance. Currently, catalyst supplier auditing and certification procedures are being implemented. Primary emphasis is on the implementation of statistical process control procedures in the manufacture of commercially available catalyst. Thus, a trend exists to move from quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) for purchased catalysts to statistical process control (SPC). This development is being supported by audits of the suppliers' manufacturing quality control systems. The keystone of quality management is the concept of customer and supplier working together for their mutual advantage. The focus in this presentation will be on two topics. (1) Fixed bed catalysts: The recognition of lot-to-lot variations led to purchase specifications which then led to quality control procedures for purchased catalysts. (2) Catalyst suppliers: the limitations of quality control for catalysts will be discussed, and the efforts of catalyst suppliers to apply SPC will be mentioned.

  12. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Nanoparticle catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshfegh, A. Z.

    2009-12-01

    In this review, the importance of nanoparticles (NPs), with emphasis on their general and specific properties, especially the high surface-to-volume ratio (A/V), in many technological and industrial applications is studied. Some physical and chemical preparation methods for growing several metallic and binary alloy NP catalysts are reviewed. The growth and mechanism of catalytic reactions for synthesis of 1D nanostructures such as ZnO nanowires and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are discussed. Gas-phase production with emphasis on dependence of catalytic activity and selectivity on size, shape and structure of NPs is also investigated. Application of NP catalysts in several technological processes including H2 production and storage as well as antibacterial effect, gas sensors and fuel cells is discussed. The mechanism of H2 production from catalytic photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic degradation reactions of some organic dyes is discussed. Finally, the future outlook of NP catalysts in various disciplines is presented.

  14. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  15. Catalyst, method of making, and reactions using the catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA

    2009-03-03

    The present invention includes a catalyst having a layered structure with, (1) a porous support, (2) a buffer layer, (3) an interfacial layer, and optionally (4) a catalyst layer. The invention also provides a process in which a reactant is converted to a product by passing through a reaction chamber containing the catalyst.

  16. Catalyst, Method Of Making, And Reactions Using The Catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y.; Wang, Yong; Gao, Yufei

    2004-07-13

    The present invention includes a catalyst having a layered structure with, (1) a porous support, (2) a buffer layer, (3) an interfacial layer, and optionally (4) a catalyst layer. The invention also provides a process in which a reactant is converted to a product by passing through a reaction chamber containing the catalyst.

  17. Secret Lives of Catalysts Revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor

    2008-01-01

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division discuss the first-ever glimpse of nanoscale catalysts in action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/10/21/catalysts/

  18. Process of making supported catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, James A.; Subramanian, Somasundaram

    1992-01-01

    Oxide supported metal catalysts have an additional metal present in intimate association with the metal catalyst to enhance catalytic activity. In a preferred mode, iridium or another Group VIII metal catalyst is supported on a titania, alumina, tungsten oxide, silica, or composite oxide support. Aluminum ions are readsorbed onto the support and catalyst, and reduced during calcination. The aluminum can be added as aluminum nitrate to the iridium impregnate solution, e.g. chloroiridic acid.

  19. Interstitial modification of palladium nanoparticles with boron atoms as a green catalyst for selective hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chun Wong Aaron; Mahadi, Abdul Hanif; Li, Molly Meng-Jung; Corbos, Elena Cristina; Tang, Chiu; Jones, Glenn; Kuo, Winson Chun Hsin; Cookson, James; Brown, Christopher Michael; Bishop, Peter Trenton; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2014-01-01

    Lindlar catalysts comprising of palladium/calcium carbonate modified with lead acetate and quinoline are widely employed industrially for the partial hydrogenation of alkynes. However, their use is restricted, particularly for food, cosmetic and drug manufacture, due to the extremely toxic nature of lead, and the risk of its leaching from catalyst surface. In addition, the catalysts also exhibit poor selectivities in a number of cases. Here we report that a non-surface modification of palladium gives rise to the formation of an ultra-selective nanocatalyst. Boron atoms are found to take residence in palladium interstitial lattice sites with good chemical and thermal stability. This is favoured due to a strong host-guest electronic interaction when supported palladium nanoparticles are treated with a borane tetrahydrofuran solution. The adsorptive properties of palladium are modified by the subsurface boron atoms and display ultra-selectivity in a number of challenging alkyne hydrogenation reactions, which outclass the performance of Lindlar catalysts. PMID:25523894

  20. Interstitial modification of palladium nanoparticles with boron atoms as a green catalyst for selective hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chun Wong Aaron; Mahadi, Abdul Hanif; Li, Molly Meng-Jung; Corbos, Elena Cristina; Tang, Chiu; Jones, Glenn; Kuo, Winson Chun Hsin; Cookson, James; Brown, Christopher Michael; Bishop, Peter Trenton; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2014-12-01

    Lindlar catalysts comprising of palladium/calcium carbonate modified with lead acetate and quinoline are widely employed industrially for the partial hydrogenation of alkynes. However, their use is restricted, particularly for food, cosmetic and drug manufacture, due to the extremely toxic nature of lead, and the risk of its leaching from catalyst surface. In addition, the catalysts also exhibit poor selectivities in a number of cases. Here we report that a non-surface modification of palladium gives rise to the formation of an ultra-selective nanocatalyst. Boron atoms are found to take residence in palladium interstitial lattice sites with good chemical and thermal stability. This is favoured due to a strong host-guest electronic interaction when supported palladium nanoparticles are treated with a borane tetrahydrofuran solution. The adsorptive properties of palladium are modified by the subsurface boron atoms and display ultra-selectivity in a number of challenging alkyne hydrogenation reactions, which outclass the performance of Lindlar catalysts.

  1. Kinetic modeling and docking study of immobilized lipase catalyzed synthesis of furfuryl acetate.

    PubMed

    Mathpati, Ashwini C; Badgujar, Kirtikumar C; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2016-03-01

    The present work deals with the kinetic modeling and docking study for the furfuryl acetate synthesis using immobilized Burkholderia cepacia (BCL) lipase. Initially various lipases were immobilized on hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) base hybrid polymer matrix. After screening of various immobilized biocatalysts, HPMC:PVA:BCL was found to be a robust biocatalyst. Various reaction conditions were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) based on a four-factor-three-level Box-Behnken design. The optimal conditions were obtained at molar ratio of 1:2 of furfuryl alcohol to acyl donor, temperature 50°C with catalyst loading of 30mg in 3mL of non-aqueous media toluene. Under these conditions 99.98% yield was obtained in 3h. The Arrhenius plot showed that the activation energy for furfuryl acetate synthesis was 10.68kcal/mol. The kinetics of reaction was studied close to optimized conditions which obey order bi-bi model. Molecular docking study was carried out to understand the active site of BCL which is responsible for the reaction. It was observed that the reaction proceeds via acylation of the active serine of BCL and demonstrating strong hydrogen bond between the substrate and histidine site. The catalyst recyclability study was carried up to five cycles. PMID:26827768

  2. Synthesis of Cellulose Acetate from Cotton Byproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton burr and cottonseed hull are relatively inexpensive cotton byproducts. In an effort to derive greater value out of these natural renewable materials, we have succeeded in converting part of them into cellulose acetate without prior chemical breakdown or physical separation of cellulose, ligni...

  3. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Brown, Dan; Eustace, John

    2015-01-01

    Increment 45 - 46 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  4. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  5. 21 CFR 556.380 - Melengestrol acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Melengestrol acetate. 556.380 Section 556.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs §...

  6. Heat Bonding of Irradiated Ethylene Vinyl Acetate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Reliable method now available for joining parts of this difficult-tobond material. Heating fixture encircles ethylene vinyl acetate multiplesocket part, providing heat to it and to tubes inserted in it. Fixtures specially designed to match parts to be bonded. Tube-and-socket bonds made with this technique subjected to tensile tests. Bond strengths of 50 percent that of base material obtained consistently.

  7. 21 CFR 522.1881 - Prednisolone acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prednisolone acetate. 522.1881 Section 522.1881 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... used as supportive therapy pre- and postoperatively and for various stress conditions...

  8. Fragrance material review on phenethyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Vitale, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of phenethyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Phenethyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group aryl alkyl alcohol simple acid esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for phenethyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, skin sensitization, elicitation, toxicokinetics, repeated dose, genotoxicity, and carcinogenicity data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances. PMID:22414644

  9. Reactions of germanium tetrahalides with ketene acetals

    SciTech Connect

    Efimova, I.V.; Kazankova, M.A.; Lutsenko, I.F.

    1985-05-01

    Recently, the authors reported that alkyl vinyl ethers and terminal alkynes are readily germylated by germanium tetrahalides in the presence of a tertiary amine. To extend the range of applicability of this reaction and to obtain additional information on its mechanism, the authors study reactions of ketene acetals with germanium tetrachloride and tetrabromide in the presence of triethylamine.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS §...

  11. Non-precious metal catalysts prepared from precursor comprising cyanamide

    DOEpatents

    Chung, Hoon Taek; Zelenay, Piotr

    2015-10-27

    Catalyst comprising graphitic carbon and methods of making thereof; said graphitic carbon comprising a metal species, a nitrogen-containing species and a sulfur containing species. A catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction for an alkaline fuel cell was prepared by heating a mixture of cyanamide, carbon black, and a salt selected from an iron sulfate salt and an iron acetate salt at a temperature of from about 700.degree. C. to about 1100.degree. C. under an inert atmosphere. Afterward, the mixture was treated with sulfuric acid at elevated temperature to remove acid soluble components, and the resultant mixture was heated again under an inert atmosphere at the same temperature as the first heat treatment step.

  12. Catalytic and electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol over palladium-based nanoalloy catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Shan, Shiyao; Ng, Mei Shan; Yang, Lefu; Mott, Derrick; Fang, Weiqin; Kang, Ning; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2013-07-23

    The control of the nanoscale composition and structure of alloy catalysts plays an important role in heterogeneous catalysis. This paper describes novel findings of an investigation for Pd-based nanoalloy catalysts (PdCo and PdCu) for ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) in gas phase and alkaline electrolyte. Although the PdCo catalyst exhibits a mass activity similar to Pd, the PdCu catalyst is shown to display a much higher mass activity than Pd for the electrocatalytic EOR in alkaline electrolyte. This finding is consistent with the finding on the surface enrichment of Pd on the alloyed PdCu surface, in contrast to the surface enrichment of Co in the alloyed PdCo surface. The viability of C-C bond cleavage was also probed for the PdCu catalysts in both gas-phase and electrolyte-phase EOR. In the gas-phase reaction, although the catalytic conversion rate for CO2 product is higher over Pd than PdCu, the nanoalloy PdCu catalyst appears to suppress the formation of acetic acid, which is a significant portion of the product in the case of pure Pd catalyst. In the alkaline electrolyte, CO2 was detected from the gas phase above the electrolyte upon acid treatment following the electrolysis, along with traces of aldehyde and acetic acid. An analysis of the electrochemical properties indicates that the oxophilicity of the base metal alloyed with Pd, in addition to the surface enrichment of metals, may have played an important role in the observed difference of the catalytic and electrocatalytic activities. In comparison with Pd alloyed with Co, the results for Pd alloyed with Cu showed a more significant positive shift of the reduction potential of the oxygenated Pd species on the surface. These findings have important implications for further fine-tuning of the Pd nanoalloys in terms of base metal composition toward highly active and selective catalysts for EOR. PMID:23841935

  13. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  14. Catalyst increases COS conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Goodboy, K.P.

    1985-02-18

    Increasingly stringent air quality legislation is placing greater emphasis on conversion of COS and CS/sub 2/ in Claus plants for the maximum sulfur recovery. Overall sulfur recovery goals are dependent upon outstanding service from the Claus catalyst in each reactor because catalyst activity is a major factor influencing plant performance. Today's catalyst are much improved over those used 10 years ago for the Claus (H/sub 2/S/SO/sub 2/) reaction. Recent technical efforts have focused on the conversion of COS and CS/sub 2/. These carbon-sulfur compounds can account for as much as 50% of the sulfur going to the incinerator, which essentially converts all remaining sulfur species to SO/sub 2/ for atmospheric dispersion. Previously, the mechanism of Claus COS conversion, i.e., hydrolysis or oxidation by SO/sub 2/, was studied and the conclusion was that oxidation by SO/sub 2/ appears to be the predominate mode of COS conversion on sulfated alumina catalysts.

  15. Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar

    1984-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

  16. Catalyst, 2000-01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    "Catalyst" is a publication designed to assist higher education in developing alcohol and other drug prevention polices and programs that will foster students' academic and social development and promote campus and community safety. Issue 1 of volume 6 introduces a series of "Presidential Profiles" in which university presidents describe their…

  17. Tight bifunctional hierarchical catalyst.

    PubMed

    Højholt, Karen T; Vennestrøm, Peter N R; Tiruvalam, Ramchandra; Beato, Pablo

    2011-12-28

    A new concept to prepare tight bifunctional catalysts has been developed, by anchoring CoMo(6) clusters on hierarchical ZSM-5 zeolites for simultaneous use in HDS and hydrocracking catalysis. The prepared material displays a significant improved activity in HDS catalysis compared to the impregnated counterpart. PMID:22048337

  18. Salesperson, Catalyst, Manager, Leader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worth, Michael J.; Asp, James W., II

    1996-01-01

    This article examines four roles of the college or university development officer: salesperson (when direct solicitation is seen as the officer's primary role); catalyst (or sales manager, adviser, expert, facilitator); manager (stressing the importance of the overall office functioning); and leader (who exerts a leadership role in the…

  19. Sabatier Catalyst Poisoning Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallette, Tim; Perry, Jay; Abney, Morgan; Knox, Jim; Goldblatt, Loel

    2013-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been operational since 2010. The CRA uses a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane by reaction of the metabolic CO2 scrubbed from the cabin air and the hydrogen byproduct from the water electrolysis system used for metabolic oxygen generation. Incorporating the CRA into the overall air revitalization system has facilitated life support system loop closure on the ISS reducing resupply logistics and thereby enhancing longer term missions. The CRA utilizes CO2 which has been adsorbed in a 5A molecular sieve within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, CDRA. There is a potential of compounds with molecular dimensions similar to, or less than CO2 to also be adsorbed. In this fashion trace contaminants may be concentrated within the CDRA and subsequently desorbed with the CO2 to the CRA. Currently, there is no provision to remove contaminants prior to entering the Sabatier catalyst bed. The risk associated with this is potential catalyst degradation due to trace organic contaminants in the CRA carbon dioxide feed acting as catalyst poisons. To better understand this risk, United Technologies Aerospace System (UTAS) has teamed with MSFC to investigate the impact of various trace contaminants on the CRA catalyst performance at relative ISS cabin air concentrations and at about 200/400 times of ISS concentrations, representative of the potential concentrating effect of the CDRA molecular sieve. This paper summarizes our initial assessment results.

  20. Green acetylation of solketal and glycerol formal by heterogeneous acid catalysts to form a biodiesel fuel additive.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Jennifer R; Leite, Thays d C M; Pontes, Nathália S; Peres Pinto, Bianca; Mota, Claudio J A

    2014-09-01

    A glut of glycerol has formed from the increased production of biodiesel, with the potential to integrate the supply chain by using glycerol additives to improve biodiesel properties. Acetylated acetals show interesting cold flow and viscosity effects. Herein, a solventless heterogeneously catalyzed process for the acetylation of both solketal and glycerol formal to new products is demonstrated. The process is optimized by studying the effect of acetylating reagent (acetic acid and acetic anhydride), reagent molar ratios, and a variety of commercial solid acid catalysts (Amberlyst-15, zeolite Beta, K-10 Montmorillonite, and niobium phosphate) on the conversion and selectivities. High conversions (72-95%) and selectivities (86-99%) to the desired products results from using acetic anhydride as the acetylation reagent and a 1:1 molar ratio with all catalysts. Overall, there is a complex interplay between the solid catalyst, reagent ratio, and acetylating agent on the conversion, selectivities, and byproducts formed. The variations are discussed and explained in terms of reactivity, thermodynamics, and reaction mechanisms. An alternative and efficient approach to the formation of 100% triacetin involves the ring-opening, acid-catalyzed acetylation from solketal or glycerol formal with excesses of acetic anhydride. PMID:25045049

  1. CO2/H2 Methanation Reactivity of Nickel Oxide Based Catalyst Prepared from Different Nickel Salt Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razali, M. H.; Buang, N. A.; Bakar, W. A. W. A.

    2010-03-01

    The catalytic activity of NiO based catalyst prepared from different salt precursors of acetate, nitrate and sulphate salts were investigated towards CO2/H2 methanation reaction, in order to study the effect of type of precursor on the reactivity of the catalyst prepared. Results obtained showed that the NiO based catalyst prepared from nitrate precursor gave highest catalytic activity with 80.03% methanation of CO2 at 500° C of the reaction temperature. Characterization techniques such as FTIR, XRD and SEM were carried out to see the effect of various physical properties of the NiO based catalyst obtained from different salts precursors used, which contributed in a good CO2/H2 methanation reactivity of the catalyst.

  2. Preparation of Mn-Based Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalysts by Three Methods and Optimization of Process Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yi; Hong, Chen; Cheng, Bei; Zhang, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Mn-based catalysts enable high NOx conversion in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3. Three catalyst-production methods, namely, co-precipitation, impregnation, and sol-gel, were used in this study to determine the optimum method and parameters. The maximum catalytic activity was found for the catalyst prepared by sol-gel with a 0.5 Mn/Ti ratio. The denitrification efficiency using this catalyst was >90%, which was higher than those of catalysts prepared by the two other methods. The critical temperature of catalytic activity was 353 K. The optimum manganese acetate concentration and weathering time were 0.10 mol and 24 h, respectively. The gas hourly space velocity and O2 concentration were determined to be 12000 h-1 and 3%, respectively. PMID:24023841

  3. Noble metal ionic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hegde, M S; Madras, Giridhar; Patil, K C

    2009-06-16

    Because of growing environmental concerns and increasingly stringent regulations governing auto emissions, new more efficient exhaust catalysts are needed to reduce the amount of pollutants released from internal combustion engines. To accomplish this goal, the major pollutants in exhaust-CO, NO(x), and unburned hydrocarbons-need to be fully converted to CO(2), N(2), and H(2)O. Most exhaust catalysts contain nanocrystalline noble metals (Pt, Pd, Rh) dispersed on oxide supports such as Al(2)O(3) or SiO(2) promoted by CeO(2). However, in conventional catalysts, only the surface atoms of the noble metal particles serve as adsorption sites, and even in 4-6 nm metal particles, only 1/4 to 1/5 of the total noble metal atoms are utilized for catalytic conversion. The complete dispersion of noble metals can be achieved only as ions within an oxide support. In this Account, we describe a novel solution to this dispersion problem: a new solution combustion method for synthesizing dispersed noble metal ionic catalysts. We have synthesized nanocrystalline, single-phase Ce(1-x)M(x)O(2-delta) and Ce(1-x-y)Ti(y)M(x)O(2-delta) (M = Pt, Pd, Rh; x = 0.01-0.02, delta approximately x, y = 0.15-0.25) oxides in fluorite structure. In these oxide catalysts, Pt(2+), Pd(2+), or Rh(3+) ions are substituted only to the extent of 1-2% of Ce(4+) ion. Lower-valent noble metal ion substitution in CeO(2) creates oxygen vacancies. Reducing molecules (CO, H(2), NH(3)) are adsorbed onto electron-deficient noble metal ions, while oxidizing (O(2), NO) molecules are absorbed onto electron-rich oxide ion vacancy sites. The rates of CO and hydrocarbon oxidation and NO(x) reduction (with >80% N(2) selectivity) are 15-30 times higher in the presence of these ionic catalysts than when the same amount of noble metal loaded on an oxide support is used. Catalysts with palladium ion dispersed in CeO(2) or Ce(1-x)Ti(x)O(2) were far superior to Pt or Rh ionic catalysts. Therefore, we have demonstrated that the

  4. Lanthanum(III) catalysts for highly efficient and chemoselective transesterification.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Manabu; Ishihara, Kazuaki

    2013-03-11

    A facile, atom-economical, and chemoselective esterification is crucial in modern organic synthesis, particularly in the areas of pharmaceutical, polymer, and material science. However, a truly practical catalytic transesterification of carboxylic esters with various alcohols has not yet been well established, since, with many conventional catalysts, the substrates are limited to 1°- and cyclic 2°-alcohols. In sharp contrast, if we take advantage of the high catalytic activities of La(Oi-Pr)(3), La(OTf)(3), and La(NO(3))(3) as ligand-free catalysts, ligand-assisted or additive-enhanced lanthanum(III) catalysts can be highly effective acid-base combined catalysts in transesterification. A highly active dinuclear La(III) catalyst, which is prepared in situ from lanthanum(III) isopropoxide and 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethanol, is effective for the practical transesterification of methyl carboxylates, ethyl acetate, weakly reactive dimethyl carbonate, and much less-reactive methyl carbamates with 1°-, 2°-, and 3°-alcohols. As the second generation, nearly neutral "lanthanum(III) nitrate alkoxide", namely La(OR)(m)(NO(3))(3-m), has been developed. This catalyst is prepared in situ from inexpensive, stable, low-toxic lanthanum(III) nitrate hydrate and methyltrioctylphosphonium methyl carbonate, and is highly useful in the non-epimerized transesterification of α-substituted chiral carboxylic esters, even under azeotropic reflux conditions. In these practical La(III)-catalyzed transesterifications, colorless esters can be obtained in small- to large-scale synthesis without the need for inconvenient work-up or careful purification procedures. PMID:23325290

  5. Phenyl Acetate Preparation from Phenol and Acetic Acid: Reassessment of a Common Textbook Misconception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hocking, M. B.

    1980-01-01

    Reassesses a common textbook misconception that "...phenols cannot be esterified directly." Results of experiments are discussed and data tables provided of an effective method for the direct preparation of phenyl acetate. (CS)

  6. Sulfur condensation in Claus catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Schoffs, G.R.

    1985-02-01

    The heterogeneous reactions in which catalyst deactivation by pore plugging occur are listed and include: coke formation in petroleum processing, especially hydrocracking and hydrodesulfurization catalysts; steam reforming and methnation catalysts; ammonia synthesis catalyst; and automobile exhause catalysts. The authors explain how the Claus process converts hydrogen sulfide produced by petroleum desulfurization units and gas treatment processes into elemental sulfur and water. More than 15 million tons of sulfur are recovered annually by this process. Commercial Claus plants appear to operate at thermodynamic equilibrium. Depending on the H2S content of the feed and the number of reactors, total H2S conversion to elemental sulfur can exceed 95%.

  7. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  8. A note concerning acetate activation of peroxidative activity of catalases using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Baker, Warren L; Key, Christopher; Lonergan, Greg T

    2005-01-01

    Beef liver catalases showed peroxidative activity using 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid as the electron donor and hydrogen peroxide as the acceptor at a pH of 5. This activity was not observed at pH 7. The reaction depended on acetate concentration, although succinate and propionate could partly replace the acetate as a catalyst. Other haem proteins also catalyzed a peroxidative effect. The reaction using syringaldazine or the coupling between dimethylaminobenzoic acid and 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone was less effective and less sensitive. Evidence is presented that the reaction is associated with a conformational change of the catalase. PMID:15932252

  9. Bi(OTf)3-catalyzed addition of isocyanides to 2H-chromene acetals: an efficient pathway for accessing 2-carboxamide-2H-chromenes.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Longyun; Jin, Ming Yu; He, Qijie; Xie, Han; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Wang, Jun

    2016-09-14

    Bismuth triflate (Bi(OTf)3) is identified as an efficient catalyst for the direct addition of isocyanides to 2H-chromene acetals. The large scope of isocyanides and chromene acetals makes them suitable substrates in this catalytic system. By this synthetic strategy, a polyfunctional molecular scaffold, 2-carboxamide-2H-chromenes could be prepared efficiently in one step up to 95% yield. In addition, this efficient and practical protocol proceeded smoothly in the gram scale even when the catalytic loading was reduced to 2 mol%. PMID:27503764

  10. Dual component cracking catalyst with vanadium passivation and improved sulfur tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.V.; Jossens, L.W.

    1991-01-29

    This patent describes a dual component catalyst composition for the catalytic cracking of metal-containing hydrocarbonaceous feedstock. It comprises: a first component comprising an active cracking catalyst; and a second component, as a separate and distinct entity. The second component comprises: a calcium and magnesium containing material selected from the group consisting of dolomite, substantially amorphous calcium magnesium silicate, calcium magnesium oxide, calcium magnesium acetate, calcium magnesium carbonate, and calcium magnesium subcarbonate; a magnesium containing material comprising a hydrous magnesium silicate, and a binder selected from the group consisting of kaolin, bentonite, montmorillonite, saponite, hectorite, alumina, silica, titania, zirconia, silica-alumina, and combinations thereof.

  11. 21 CFR 582.5892 - a-Tocopherol acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5892 a-Tocopherol acetate. (a) Product. a-Tocopherol acetate. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. Impact of transition metal on nitrogen retention and activity of iron-nitrogen-carbon oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Selvarani; Leonard, Nathaniel; Barton, Scott Calabrese

    2014-03-14

    Iron based nitrogen doped carbon (FeNC) catalysts are synthesized by high-pressure pyrolysis of carbon and melamine with varying amounts of iron acetate in a closed, constant-volume reactor. The optimum nominal amount of Fe (1.2 wt%) in FeNC catalysts is established through oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) polarization. Since the quantity of iron used in FeNCs is very small, the amount of Fe retained in FeNC catalysts after leaching is determined by UV-VIS spectroscopy. As nitrogen is considered to be a component of active sites, the amount of bulk and surface nitrogen retention in FeNC catalysts are measured using elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. It is found that increasing nominal Fe content in FeNC catalysts leads to a decreased level of nitrogen retention. Thermogravimetric analysis demonstrates that increasing nominal Fe content leads to increased weight loss during pyrolysis, particularly at high temperatures. Catalysts are also prepared in the absence of iron source, and with iron removed by washing with hot aqua regia post-pyrolysis. FeNC catalysts prepared with no Fe show high retained nitrogen content but poor ORR activity, and aqua regia washed catalysts demonstrate similar activity to Fe-free catalysts, indicating that Fe is an active site component. PMID:24457909

  13. Expression of acetate permease-like (apl) genes in subsurface communities of Geobacter species under fluctuating acetate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Elifantz, H.; N'Guessan, L.A.; Mouser, P.J.; Williams, K H.; Wilkins, M J.; Risso, C.; Holmes, D.E.; Long, P.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    2010-03-01

    The addition of acetate to uranium-contaminated aquifers in order to stimulate the growth and activity of Geobacter species that reduce uranium is a promising in situ bioremediation option. Optimizing this bioremediation strategy requires that sufficient acetate be added to promote Geobacter species growth. We hypothesized that under acetate-limiting conditions, subsurface Geobacter species would increase the expression of either putative acetate symporters genes (aplI and aplII). Acetate was added to a uranium-contaminated aquifer (Rifle, CO) in two continuous amendments separated by 5 days of groundwater flush to create changing acetate concentrations. While the expression of aplI in monitoring well D04 (high acetate) weakly correlated with the acetate concentration over time, the transcript levels for this gene were relatively constant in well D08 (low acetate). At the lowest acetate concentrations during the groundwater flush, the transcript levels of aplII were the highest. The expression of aplII decreased 2-10-fold upon acetate reintroduction. However, the overall instability of acetate concentrations throughout the experiment could not support a robust conclusion regarding the role of apl genes in response to acetate limitation under field conditions, in contrast to previous chemostat studies, suggesting that the function of a microbial community cannot be inferred based on lab experiments alone.

  14. Expression of Acetate Permease-like (apl) Genes in Subsurface Communities of Geobacter Species Under Fluctuating Acetate Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Elifantz, H; N'Guessan, A L; Mouser, Paula; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J; Risso, Carla; Holmes, Dawn; Long, Philip E; Lovley, Derek R

    2010-09-01

    The addition of acetate to uranium-contaminated aquifers in order to stimulate the growth and activity of Geobacter species that reduce uranium is a promising in situ bioremediation option. Optimizing this bioremediation strategy requires that sufficient acetate be added to promote Geobacter species growth. We hypothesized that under acetate-limiting conditions, subsurface Geobacter species would increase the expression of either putative acetate symporters genes (aplI and aplII). Acetate was added to a uranium-contaminated aquifer (Rifle, CO) in two continuous amendments separated by 5 days of groundwater flush to create changing acetate concentrations. While the expression of aplI in monitoring well D04 (high acetate) weakly correlated with the acetate concentration over time, the transcript levels for this gene were relatively constant in well D08 (low acetate). At the lowest acetate concentrations during the groundwater flush, the transcript levels of aplII were the highest. The expression of aplII decreased 2–10-fold upon acetate reintroduction. However, the overall instability of acetate concentrations throughout the experiment could not support a robust conclusion regarding the role of apl genes in response to acetate limitation under field conditions, in contrast to previous chemostat studies, suggesting that the function of a microbial community cannot be inferred based on lab experiments alone.

  15. Methanol and methyl fuel catalysts. Final technical report, September 1978-August 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

    1980-12-15

    The Cu/ZnO methanol synthesis catalysts were investigated for (1) the role of additives such as alumina, ceria, and lanthana, (2) the effect of carbon dioxide in the H/sub 2//CO synthesis gas, (3) the chemisorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide on the catalysts, and (4) the chemical poisoning of the catalysts by sulfur- and chlorine-containing compounds. Maximum activity and selectivity were obtained with a binary catalyst having a composition of Cu/ZnO = 30/70 metal atomic percent and with a synthesis gas of H/sub 2//CO/CO/sub 2/ = 70/28/2 volume percent in the absence of strongly reducing or strongly oxidizing chemical poisons. Both the binary and the ternary catalysts were fully characterized by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), X-ray diffraction, electron spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and surface area-pore distribution measurements. Structural and morphologic information is presented in this report in detail for very active Cu/ZnO/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts prepared from acetates and for other catalysts in which the third component caused a loss of activity.

  16. Separating acetic acid from furol (furfural) by electrodialysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, S.F.; Li, C.S. Ye, S.T.; Shen, S.Y.; Wang, Y.T.; Yu, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    Furfural production by hydrolysis of fibrous plant materials is accompanied by formation of acetic acid in amounts depending on the material used. The amount of acetic formed in the hydrolysis of the fruit shell of oil-tea camellia (Camellia oleosa) (an oilseed-bearing tree) is equal to the amount of furfural. The acetic acid can be separated from the furfural and concentrated to 10% by electrodialysis. A smaller amount of furfural is separated with acetic acid.

  17. Cyproterone acetate in treatment of precocious puberty.

    PubMed Central

    Kauli, R; Pertzelan, A; Prager-Lewin, R; Grünebaum, M; Laron, Z

    1976-01-01

    Twenty-nine children (23 girls, 6 boys) with precocious puberty were treated with cyproterone acetate for various periods of time ranging from 6 months to 3 years 4 months. They received an oral dose ranging from 70-150 mg/m2 per day, or an intramuscular depot injection once a fortnight or once a month at a dose ranging from 107-230 mg/m2. Both forms of therapy were found to suppress the signs of sexual maturation, but the oral form proved to be superior. Only the younger patients with a bone age under 11 years showed a beneficial effect upon linear growth and bone maturation. No side effects were noted, but additional advantageous effects upon behaviour and sociability were. It is concluded that at present cyproterone acetate by mouth is the drug of choice in the treatment of precocious puberty. The treatment should be initiated as early as possible to attain maximum benefit. PMID:952553

  18. Facile hydrolysis and alcoholysis of palladium acetate.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Robin B; Bowen, John G; Davidson, Russell B; Haddow, Mairi F; Seymour-Julen, Annabelle E; Sparkes, Hazel A; Webster, Ruth L

    2015-05-26

    Palladium(II) acetate is readily converted into [Pd3 (μ(2) -OH)(OAc)5 ] (1) in the presence of water in a range of organic solvents and is also slowly converted in the solid state. Complex 1 can also be formed in nominally anhydrous solvents. Similarly, the analogous alkoxide complexes [Pd3 (μ(2) -OR)(OAc)5 ] (3) are easily formed in solutions of palladium(II) acetate containing a range of alcohols. An examination of a representative Wacker-type oxidation shows that the Pd-OH complex 1 and a related Pd-oxo complex 4 can be excluded as potential catalytic intermediates in the absence of exogenous water. PMID:25865439

  19. Thermochemical characteristics of cellulose acetates with different degrees of acetylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, V. N.; Ur'yash, V. F.; Kushch, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of cellulose acetates with different degrees of acetylation are determined. It is established that there is a proportional dependence of these thermochemical characteristics vs. the degree of acetylation, weight fraction of bonded acetic acid, and molar mass of the repeating unit of cellulose acetates.

  20. Acetate concentrations and oxidation in salt marsh sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Acetate concentrations and rates of acetate oxidation and sulfate reduction were measured in S. alterniflora sediments in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Pore water extracted from cores by squeezing or centrifugation contained in greater than 0.1 mM acetate and, in some instances, greater than 1.0 mM. Pore water sampled nondestructively contained much less acetate, often less than 0.01 mM. Acetate was associated with roots, and concentrations varied with changes in plant physiology. Acetate turnover was very low whether whole core or slurry incubations were used. Radiotracers injected directly into soils yielded rates of sulfate reduction and acetate oxidation not significantly different from core incubation techniques. Regardless of incubation method, acetate oxidation did not account for a substantial percentage of sulfate reduction. These results differ markedly from data for unvegetated coastal sediments where acetate levels are low, oxidation rate constants are high, and acetate oxication rates greatly exceed rates of sulfate reduction. The discrepancy between rates of acetate oxidation and sulfate reduction in these marsh soils may be due either to the utilization of substrates other than acetate by sulfate reducers or artifacts associated with measurements of organic utilization by rhizosphere bacteria. Care must be taken when interpreting data from salt marsh sediments since the release of material from roots during coring may affect the concentrations of certain compounds as well as influencing results obtained when sediment incubations are employed.

  1. 21 CFR 584.200 - Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. The feed additive ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate meets the requirement of 27 CFR 21.62, being not less than 92.5 percent ethyl alcohol, each 100 gallons... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate....

  2. 21 CFR 584.200 - Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. The feed additive ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate meets the requirement of 27 CFR 21.62, being not less than 92.5 percent ethyl alcohol, each 100 gallons... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate....

  3. 21 CFR 584.200 - Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. The feed additive ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate meets the requirement of 27 CFR 21.62, being not less than 92.5 percent ethyl alcohol, each 100 gallons... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate....

  4. 21 CFR 584.200 - Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. The feed additive ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate meets the requirement of 27 CFR 21.62, being not less than 92.5 percent ethyl alcohol, each 100 gallons... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate....

  5. 21 CFR 584.200 - Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate. The feed additive ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate meets the requirement of 27 CFR 21.62, being not less than 92.5 percent ethyl alcohol, each 100 gallons... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethyl alcohol containing ethyl acetate....

  6. Kinetics of Ethyl Acetate Synthesis Catalyzed by Acidic Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antunes, Bruno M.; Cardoso, Simao P.; Silva, Carlos M.; Portugal, Ines

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost experiment to carry out the second-order reversible reaction of acetic acid esterification with ethanol to produce ethyl acetate is presented to illustrate concepts of kinetics and reactor modeling. The reaction is performed in a batch reactor, and the acetic acid concentration is measured by acid-base titration versus time. The…

  7. 21 CFR 582.5933 - Vitamin A acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vitamin A acetate. 582.5933 Section 582.5933 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5933 Vitamin A acetate. (a) Product. Vitamin A acetate. (b) Conditions of use....

  8. 21 CFR 582.5933 - Vitamin A acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin A acetate. 582.5933 Section 582.5933 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5933 Vitamin A acetate. (a) Product. Vitamin A acetate. (b) Conditions of use....

  9. 21 CFR 582.5933 - Vitamin A acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vitamin A acetate. 582.5933 Section 582.5933 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5933 Vitamin A acetate. (a) Product. Vitamin A acetate. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 582.5933 - Vitamin A acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vitamin A acetate. 582.5933 Section 582.5933 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5933 Vitamin A acetate. (a) Product. Vitamin A acetate. (b) Conditions of use....

  11. 21 CFR 582.5933 - Vitamin A acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vitamin A acetate. 582.5933 Section 582.5933 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5933 Vitamin A acetate. (a) Product. Vitamin A acetate. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. Co-fermentation of acetate and sugars facilitating microbial lipid production on acetate-rich biomass hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhiwei; Zhou, Wenting; Shen, Hongwei; Yang, Zhonghua; Wang, Guanghui; Zuo, Zhenyu; Hou, Yali; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2016-05-01

    The process of lignocellulosic biomass routinely produces a stream that contains sugars plus various amounts of acetic acid. As acetate is known to inhibit the culture of microorganisms including oleaginous yeasts, little attention has been paid to explore lipid production on mixtures of acetate and sugars. Here we demonstrated that the yeast Cryptococcus curvatus can effectively co-ferment acetate and sugars for lipid production. When mixtures of acetate and glucose were applied, C. curvatus consumed both substrates simultaneously. Similar phenomena were also observed for acetate and xylose mixtures, as well as acetate-rich corn stover hydrolysates. More interestingly, the replacement of sugar with equal amount of acetate as carbon source afforded higher lipid titre and lipid content. The lipid products had fatty acid compositional profiles similar to those of cocoa butter, suggesting their potential for high value-added fats and biodiesel production. This co-fermentation strategy should facilitate lipid production technology from lignocelluloses. PMID:26874438

  13. Multiple-anion nonvolatile acetal (MANA) resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevremont, Jeffrey M.; Brainard, Robert L.; Reeves, Scott D.; Zhou, Xin; Nguyen, Thinh B.; Mackevich, Joseph F.; Anderson, Erik H.; Taylor, Gary N.

    2001-08-01

    New acetal or ketal blocking reagents were investigated for use in e-beam lithography and compared with the performance of ethyl vinyl either (EVE). Three blocking groups, (alpha) -Angelicalactone (AL), 6-methylene-5,6-benzo-1,4- dioxane (MBD), and MANA50 (an undisclosed blocking group used to show the potential of this chemistry) were reacted with poly(p-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) under acid catalyzed conditions to form AL-PHS, MBD-PHS, MANA50-PHS. The performance objectives pursued in the design of these new materials was to use acetal (ketal) chemistry to deliver wide process latitudes (e.g. good PED performance and minimal PEB sensitivity), use high molecular weight blocking groups to eliminate outgassing, and use the novel concept of multiple anions to deliver lithographic performance. These new materials are called Multiple Anion Nonvolatile Acetal (MANA) resists. Resists films were exposed with 50kV electrons, post exposure baked (PEB), and developed with 0.26 N TMAH. Resists prepared with the third blocking group, MANA50, gave contrast and imaging performance independent of PEB humidity and were relatively insensitive to PEB temperature and post exposure delay (PED). These resists gave the best resolution (90 nm) and profiles of all the materials tested, as well as showing no outgassing (as measured by film thickness loss).

  14. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Gerald P.; Zhao, Jianmin; Feng, Zhen

    1996-01-01

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered.

  15. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, G.P.; Zhao, J.; Feng, Z.

    1996-12-03

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered. 3 figs.

  16. Fluorination process using catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Hochel, Robert C.; Saturday, Kathy A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3, AgF.sub.2 and NiF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3 and AgF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

  17. FCC catalyst selection

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, G.D.L. ); McElhiney, G. )

    1989-09-01

    This paper discusses a commonly used technique for comparing FCC catalytic selectivities based on the ASTM microactivity test (MAT) procedure, ASTM D-3907-80. In its original form the ASTM test provides only very limited information on selectivity. However, extension of the ASTM MAT procedure by using additional product analyses gives a microselectivity test capable of providing detailed yield structure information. This modified MAT procedure thus provides a cost-effective and rapid means of comparing many catalysts.

  18. Steam reforming catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Kramarz, Kurt W.; Bloom, Ira D.; Kumar, Romesh; Ahmed, Shabbir; Wilkenhoener, Rolf; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel. A vapor of the hydrocarbon fuel and steam is brought in contact with a two-part catalyst having a dehydrogenation powder portion and an oxide-ion conducting powder portion at a temperature not less than about 770.degree.C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich. The H.sub.2 content of the hydrogen gas is greater than about 70 percent by volume. The dehydrogenation portion of the catalyst includes a group VIII metal, and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide from the group crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure and mixtures thereof. The oxide-ion conducting portion of the catalyst is a ceramic powder of one or more of ZrO.sub.2, CeO.sub.2, Bi.sub.2 O.sub.3, (BiVO).sub.4, and LaGaO.sub.3.

  19. Hydrotreating catalyst selection

    SciTech Connect

    Kellett, T.F.; Trevino, C.A.; Sartor, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrotreating catalyst selection can be correctly made in most cases by using a decision tree developed for choosing between the commonly used cobalt/molybdenum and nickel/molybdenum. The decision suggests the use of Co/Mo for desulfurizing straight-run feeds (except naphtha) and Ni/Mo for hydrogen uptake (saturating aromatics, treating fluid catalytic-cracking (FCC) feedstocks, improving color or thermal stability, and increasing the octane number) with any feed, and for denitrogenation of cracked feeds or mixed feeds with greater than or equal to 20% cracked materials. For desulfurization of cracked or mixed feeds and for desulfurization or denitrogenation of naphtha, the selection depends on the reaction conditions. Pilot-plant studies with the second-generation commercial Shell 344 (Co/Mo) and Shell 324 (Ni/Mo) catalysts used in hydrotreating vacuum gas oils, flashed distillate, or heavy catalytically cracked gas oil supported the predictions made with the decision tree, but the better performance of the Ni/Mo catalyst in desulfurizing a 20% coker/80% straight-run naphtha at low partial pressures of hydrogen was an unexpected result.

  20. Application of acetate, lactate, and fumarate as electron donors in microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliv, Oresta M.; Bilyy, Oleksandr I.; Ferensovych, Yaroslav P.; Hnatush, Svitlana O.

    2013-09-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that use bacteria as the catalysts to oxidize organic and inorganic matter and generate current. Up to now, several classes of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms have been elucidated for various microorganisms. Shewanellaceae and Geobacteraceae families include the most of model exoelectrogenic microorganisms. Desulfuromonas acetoxidans bacterium inhabits aquatic sedimental sulfur-containing environments and is philogenetically close to representatives of Geobacteraceae family. Two chamber microbial fuel cell (0.3 l volume) was constructed with application of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 as anode biocatalyst. Acetic, lactic and fumaric acids were separately applied as organic electron donors for bacterial growth in constructed MFC. Bacterial cultivation in MFC was held during twenty days. Lactate oxidation caused electric power production with the highest value up to 0.071 mW on 64 hour of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 growth. Addition of acetic and fumaric acids into bacterial growth medium caused maximal power production up to 0.075 and 0.074 mW respectively on the 40 hour of their growth. Increasing of incubation time up to twentieth day caused decrease of generated electric power till 0.018 mW, 0.042 mW and 0.047 mW under usage of lactic, acetic and fumaric acids respectively by investigated bacteria. Power generation by D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 was more stabile and durable under application of acetic and fumaric acids as electron donors in constructed MFC, than under addition of lactic acid in the same concentration into the growth medium.

  1. Mechanistic aspects of the ethanol steam reforming reaction for hydrogen production on Pt, Ni, and PtNi catalysts supported on gamma-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Sanchez, Maria Cruz; Navarro Yerga, Rufino M; Kondarides, Dimitris I; Verykios, Xenophon E; Fierro, Jose Luis G

    2010-03-25

    Mechanistic aspects of ethanol steam reforming on Pt, Ni, and PtNi catalysts supported on gamma-Al(2)O(3) are investigated from the analysis of adsorbed species and gas phase products formed on catalysts during temperature-programmed desorption of ethanol and during ethanol steam reforming reaction. DRIFTS-MS analyses of ethanol decomposition and ethanol steam reforming reactions show that PtNi and Ni catalysts are more stable than the Pt monometallic counterpart. Ethanol TPD results on Ni, Pt, and NiPt catalysts point to ethanol dehydrogenation and acetaldehyde decomposition as the first reaction pathways of ethanol steam reforming over the studied catalysts. The active sites responsible for the acetaldehyde decomposition are easily deactivated in the first minutes on-stream by carbon deposits. For Ni and PtNi catalysts, a second reaction pathway, consisting in the decomposition of acetate intermediates formed over the surface of alumina support, becomes the main reaction pathway operating in steam reforming of ethanol once the acetaldehyde decomposition pathway is deactivated. Taking into account the differences observed in the mechanism of ethanol decomposition, the better stability observed for PtNi catalyst is proposed to be related with a cooperative effect between Pt and Ni activities together with the enhanced ability of Ni to gasify the methyl groups formed by decomposition of acetate species. On the contrary, monometallic catalysts are believed to dehydrogenate these methyl groups forming coke that leads to deactivation of metal particles. PMID:19824680

  2. Influence of physicochemical treatments on iron-based spent catalyst for catalytic oxidation of toluene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Chai; Shim, Wang Geun

    2008-06-15

    The catalytic oxidation of toluene was studied over an iron-based spent and regenerated catalysts. Air, hydrogen, or four different acid solutions (oxalic acid (C2H2O4), citric acid (C6H8O7), acetic acid (CH3COOH), and nitric acid (HNO3)) were employed to regenerate the spent catalyst. The properties of pretreated spent catalyst were characterized by the Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), temperature programmed reduction (TPR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The air pretreatment significantly enhanced the catalytic activity of the spent catalyst in the pretreatment temperature range of 200-400 degrees C, but its catalytic activity diminished at the pretreatment temperature of 600 degrees C. The catalytic activity sequence with respect to the air pretreatment temperatures was 400 degrees C>200 degrees C>parent>600 degrees C. The TPR results indicated that the catalytic activity was correlated with both the oxygen mobility and the amount of available oxygen on the catalyst. In contrast, the hydrogen pretreatment had a negative effect on the catalytic activity, and toluene conversion decreased with increasing pretreatment temperatures (200-600 degrees C). The XRD and TPR results confirmed the formation of metallic iron which had a negative effect on the catalytic activity with increasing pretreatment temperature. The acid pretreatment improved the catalytic activity of the spent catalyst. The catalytic activity sequence with respect to different acids pretreatment was found to be oxalic acid>citric acid>acetic acid>or=nitric acid>parent. The TPR results of acid pretreated samples showed an increased amount of available oxygen which gave a positive effect on the catalytic activity. Accordingly, air or acid pretreatments were more promising methods of regenerating the iron-based spent catalyst. In particular, the oxalic acid pretreatment was found to be most effective in the formation of FeC2O4 species which contributed highly to the

  3. Evaluations of catalysts for wet oxidation waste management in CELSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguchi, Mitsuo; Nitta, Keiji

    1992-11-01

    A wet oxidation method is considered to be one of the most effective methods of waste processing and recycling in CELSS (Controlled Ecological Life Support System). The first test using rabbit waste as raw material was conducted under a decomposition temperature of 280 °C for 30 minutes and an initial pure oxygen pressure of 4.9 MPa (50 kgf/cm2) before heating, and the following results were obtained. The value of COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) was reduced 82.5 % by the wet oxidation. And also the Kjeldahl nitrogen concentration was decreased 98.8%. However, the organic carbon compound in the residual solution was almost acetic acid and ammonia was produced. In order to activate the oxidation more strongly, the second tests using catalysts such as Pd, Ru and Ru+Rh were conducted. As the results of these tests, the effectiveness of catalysts for oxidizing raw material ws shown as follows: COD and the Kjeldahl nitrogen values were drastically decreased 99.65 % and 99.88 %, respectively. Furthermore, the quantity of acetic acid and ammonia were reduced considerably. On the other hand, nitrate was showed a value 30 times as much as without catalytic oxidation.

  4. Overview on mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-02-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are a group of gram-negative or gram-variable bacteria which possess an obligate aerobic property with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor, meanwhile transform ethanol and sugar to corresponding aldehydes, ketones and organic acids. Since the first genus Acetobacter of AAB was established in 1898, 16 AAB genera have been recorded so far. As the main producer of a world-wide condiment, vinegar, AAB have evolved an elegant adaptive system that enables them to survive and produce a high concentration of acetic acid. Some researches and reviews focused on mechanisms of acid resistance in enteric bacteria and made the mechanisms thoroughly understood, while a few investigations did in AAB. As the related technologies with proteome, transcriptome and genome were rapidly developed and applied to AAB research, some plausible mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in some AAB strains have been published. In this review, the related mechanisms of AAB against acetic acid with acetic acid assimilation, transportation systems, cell morphology and membrane compositions, adaptation response, and fermentation conditions will be described. Finally, a framework for future research for anti-acid AAB will be provided. PMID:25575804

  5. LEED I/V determination of the structure of a MoO3 monolayer on Au(111): Testing the performance of the CMA-ES evolutionary strategy algorithm, differential evolution, a genetic algorithm and tensor LEED based structural optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primorac, E.; Kuhlenbeck, H.; Freund, H.-J.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of a thin MoO3 layer on Au(111) with a c(4 × 2) superstructure was studied with LEED I/V analysis. As proposed previously (Quek et al., Surf. Sci. 577 (2005) L71), the atomic structure of the layer is similar to that of a MoO3 single layer as found in regular α-MoO3. The layer on Au(111) has a glide plane parallel to the short unit vector of the c(4 × 2) unit cell and the molybdenum atoms are bridge-bonded to two surface gold atoms with the structure of the gold surface being slightly distorted. The structural refinement of the structure was performed with the CMA-ES evolutionary strategy algorithm which could reach a Pendry R-factor of ∼ 0.044. In the second part the performance of CMA-ES is compared with that of the differential evolution method, a genetic algorithm and the Powell optimization algorithm employing I/V curves calculated with tensor LEED.

  6. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.; Tzou, Ming-Shin; Jiang, Hui-Jong

    1987-01-01

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  7. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  8. Catalysts for emerging energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce C. Gates; George W. Huber; Christopher L. Marshall; Phillip N. Ross; Jeffrey Siirola; Yong Wang

    2008-04-15

    Catalysis is the essential technology for chemical transformation, including production of fuels from the fossil resources petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Typical catalysts for these conversions are robust porous solids incorporating metals, metal oxides, and/or metal sulfides. As efforts are stepping up to replace fossil fuels with biomass, new catalysts for the conversion of the components of biomass will be needed. Although the catalysts for biomass conversion might be substantially different from those used in the conversion of fossil feedstocks, the latter catalysts are a starting point in today's research. Major challenges lie ahead in the discovery of efficient biomass conversion catalysts, as well as in the discovery of catalysts for conversion of CO{sub 2} and possibly water into liquid fuels. 16 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Catalytic Reductive ortho-C-H Silylation of Phenols with Traceless, Versatile Acetal Directing Groups and Synthetic Applications of Dioxasilines.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yuanda; Asgari, Parham; Avullala, Thirupataiah; Jeon, Junha

    2016-06-29

    A new, highly selective, bond functionalization strategy, achieved via relay of two transition metal catalysts and the use of traceless acetal directing groups, has been employed to provide facile formation of C-Si bonds and concomitant functionalization of a silicon group in a single vessel. Specifically, this approach involves the relay of Ir-catalyzed hydrosilylation of inexpensive and readily available phenyl acetates, exploiting disubstituted silyl synthons to afford silyl acetals and Rh-catalyzed ortho-C-H silylation to provide dioxasilines. A subsequent nucleophilic addition to silicon removes the acetal directing groups and directly provides unmasked phenol products and, thus, useful functional groups at silicon achieved in a single vessel. This traceless acetal directing group strategy for catalytic ortho-C-H silylation of phenols was also successfully applied to preparation of multisubstituted arenes. Remarkably, a new formal α-chloroacetyl directing group has been developed that allows catalytic reductive C-H silylation of sterically hindered phenols. In particular, this new method permits access to highly versatile and nicely differentiated 1,2,3-trisubstituted arenes that are difficult to access by other catalytic routes. In addition, the resulting dioxasilines can serve as chromatographically stable halosilane equivalents, which allow not only removal of acetal directing groups but also introduce useful functional groups leading to silicon-bridged biaryls. We demonstrated that this catalytic C-H bond silylation strategy has powerful synthetic potential by creating direct applications of dioxasilines to other important transformations, examples of which include aryne chemistry, Au-catalyzed direct arylation, sequential orthogonal cross-couplings, and late-stage silylation of phenolic bioactive molecules and BINOL scaffolds. PMID:27265033

  10. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Dennis P.; Schmoeckel, Alison K.; Vernstrom, George D.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Wood, Thomas E.; Yang, Ruizhi; Easton, E. Bradley; Dahn, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, David G.

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  11. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhichao; Benavides, Pahola T.; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Cronauer, Donald C.

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of five different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5], Mo/Co/ γ-Al2O3, and Pt/ γ-Al2O3) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module.

  12. [Degradation of oxytetracycline with ozonation in acetic acid solvent].

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Yin; Li, Xiao-Rong; Zhu, Yi-Ping; Zhu, Jiang-Peng; Wang, Guo-Xiang

    2012-12-01

    Use acetic acid as the media of ozone degradation of oxytetracycline (OTC), and effects of the initial dosing ratio of ozone/OTC, ozone flow, free radical scavenger, metal ions on the removal rate of OTC were investigated respectively. The results showed that acetic acid had a high ozone stability and solubility. OTC had a high removal rate and degradation rate in acetic acid solution. With the increase of OTC dosage, the removal rate of OTC decreased in acetic acid. Removal rate of OTC was increased distinctly when ozone flow increased properly. It was also observed that free radical scavenger had a significantly negative effect on OTC ozonation degradation in acetic acid. Furthermore the main reactions of OTC ozone oxidation were direct oxidation and indirect oxidation in acetic acid. When Fe3+ and Co2+ were existent in acetic acid, the degradation of OTC was inhibited significantly. PMID:23379161

  13. Acetic acid removal from corn stover hydrolysate using ethyl acetate and the impact on Saccharomyces cerevisiae bioethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Aghazadeh, Mahdieh; Ladisch, Michael R; Engelberth, Abigail S

    2016-07-01

    Acetic acid is introduced into cellulose conversion processes as a consequence of composition of lignocellulose feedstocks, causing significant inhibition of adapted, genetically modified and wild-type S. cerevisiae in bioethanol fermentation. While adaptation or modification of yeast may reduce inhibition, the most effective approach is to remove the acetic acid prior to fermentation. This work addresses liquid-liquid extraction of acetic acid from biomass hydrolysate through a pathway that mitigates acetic acid inhibition while avoiding the negative effects of the extractant, which itself may exhibit inhibition. Candidate solvents were selected using simulation results from Aspen Plus™, based on their ability to extract acetic acid which was confirmed by experimentation. All solvents showed varying degrees of toxicity toward yeast, but the relative volatility of ethyl acetate enabled its use as simple vacuum evaporation could reduce small concentrations of aqueous ethyl acetate to minimally inhibitory levels. The toxicity threshold of ethyl acetate, in the presence of acetic acid, was found to be 10 g L(-1) . The fermentation was enhanced by extracting 90% of the acetic acid using ethyl acetate, followed by vacuum evaporation to remove 88% removal of residual ethyl acetate along with 10% of the broth. NRRL Y-1546 yeast was used to demonstrate a 13% increase in concentration, 14% in ethanol specific production rate, and 11% ethanol yield. This study demonstrated that extraction of acetic acid with ethyl acetate followed by evaporative removal of ethyl acetate from the raffinate phase has potential to significantly enhance ethanol fermentation in a corn stover bioethanol facility. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:929-937, 2016. PMID:27090191

  14. Sulphate-activated growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes over copper catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jarrn-Horng; Chen, Ching-Shiun; Zeng, Zhi-Yan; Chang, Chia-Wei; Chen, Hsiu-Wei

    2012-07-01

    A sulphate-activated mechanism is proposed to describe the growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over copper catalysts using chemical vapour deposition with helium-diluted ethylene. Sulphate-assisted copper catalysts afford a high-yield growth of bamboo-like CNTs at a mild temperature, 800 °C however, non-sulphate-assisted copper catalysts, e.g., copper acetate and copper nitrate prepared catalysts, were inert to CNT growth and only gave amorphous carbons (a-C) surrounding copper nanoparticles under the same conditions. Nevertheless, the addition of sulphate ions in the preparation step for the two inert catalysts can activate their abilities for CNT growth with remarkable yields. Furthermore, Raman spectra analysis demonstrates a linear dependence between the concentration of sulphate ions in copper catalysts and the ratio of CNT-a-C in the as-grown carbon soot. The sulphate-activated effect on CNT growth over copper catalysts could be related to a three-way interaction of sulphate ions, copper nanoparticles and support. In situ TEM images of an as-grown CNT irradiated by electron beams without the inlet of carbon sources reveal a new pathway of carbon diffusion through the bulk of copper nanoparticles and an enlarged inner-wall thickness of the on-site CNT. This carbon diffusion model over copper catalysts can provide new insights into the CNT growth mechanism over non-magnetic metal catalysts.A sulphate-activated mechanism is proposed to describe the growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over copper catalysts using chemical vapour deposition with helium-diluted ethylene. Sulphate-assisted copper catalysts afford a high-yield growth of bamboo-like CNTs at a mild temperature, 800 °C however, non-sulphate-assisted copper catalysts, e.g., copper acetate and copper nitrate prepared catalysts, were inert to CNT growth and only gave amorphous carbons (a-C) surrounding copper nanoparticles under the same conditions. Nevertheless, the addition of

  15. Heterogeneous catalysts for the direct, Halide-free carbonylation of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, B.; Smith, W.J.; Howard, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Copper containing mordenite catalysts (Cu-MOR) have been shown to be active and selective for the carbonylation of methanol under moderate conditions in the vapour phase and in the absence of any halide promoter. This paper describes the preparation, performance and in particular the characterization of this class of catalyst, comparing its performance with H-mordenite, which is also shown to be active in the carbonylation reaction. Initially both Cu-MOR and H-MOR catalyst methanol to gasoline (MTG) chemistry, but after about 6 hours on stream under typical conditions, (T = 623 K, p = 10 bar, CO: methanol ratio ca 10:1) acetic acid becomes the main product over Cu-MOR. Selectivity to acetyls (acetic acid + methyl acetate) remains at > 70% for ca 12 hours but gradually declines, giving way to the formation of dimethyl ether. H-MOR shows similar trends, but the period when MTG chemistry is observed is longer and that where acetyls are formed is shorter. Initially Cu(II) ions are distributed throughout the mordenite pore structure, but by the time activity to acetyls is observed the pore structure has largely become blocked by polymethyl benzenes, and much of the copper has become aggregated into large metal particles (d > 120 {Angstrom}). However FTIR studies using carbon monoxide as a probe molecule show that some non-zerovalent copper ions are still accessible. Structure - function relationships for these interesting materials are discussed briefly.

  16. Results of catalyst testing using iron-based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Darab, J.G.; Matson, D.W.

    1993-03-01

    As coal liquefaction catalysts, iron-based products are generally inferior to the more expensive molybdenum, cobalt, or nickel-based materials. However, the lower costs of production and recovery (or in the case of some iron catalysts, non-recovery) give the iron-based materials a potential economic advantage over the more efficient precious and semi-precious metal catalysts for this application. Recent research has shown that a number of different iron-containing materials can be successfully utilized as coal liquefaction catalysts or as catalyst. Pyrrhotite (Fe{sub 1-x}S) or a similar iron-sulfide phase is commonly believed to be the active catalyst in coal liquefaction and model compound pyrolysis reactions, although no specific phase has been yet been isolated as the actual catalyst species. The active iron-containing catalyst is usually generated in situ from an iron-oxide precursor and an elemental sulfur source under reducing conditions in the reactor vessel. Most research has concentrated on the use of common iron-oxide phases such as hematite or goethite (and their derivatives) as the iron-bearing precursor, or on non-specific iron materials produced by the reaction of various iron salts and compounds in the coal or liquefaction reactor. To our knowledge there has been no systematic effort to determine the optimum iron-containing precursor phase for producing active coal liquefaction catalysts, despite the fact that there are over ten iron-(hydroxy)oxide phases which can be easily synthesized in the laboratory. We have undertaken a systematic study to identify the most active iron-oxide catalyst precursor phases, the co-catalysts, and the coal pretreatments which will provide optimum yields in coal liquefaction processes.

  17. Results of catalyst testing using iron-based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Darab, J.G.; Matson, D.W.

    1993-03-01

    As coal liquefaction catalysts, iron-based products are generally inferior to the more expensive molybdenum, cobalt, or nickel-based materials. However, the lower costs of production and recovery (or in the case of some iron catalysts, non-recovery) give the iron-based materials a potential economic advantage over the more efficient precious and semi-precious metal catalysts for this application. Recent research has shown that a number of different iron-containing materials can be successfully utilized as coal liquefaction catalysts or as catalyst. Pyrrhotite (Fe[sub 1-x]S) or a similar iron-sulfide phase is commonly believed to be the active catalyst in coal liquefaction and model compound pyrolysis reactions, although no specific phase has been yet been isolated as the actual catalyst species. The active iron-containing catalyst is usually generated in situ from an iron-oxide precursor and an elemental sulfur source under reducing conditions in the reactor vessel. Most research has concentrated on the use of common iron-oxide phases such as hematite or goethite (and their derivatives) as the iron-bearing precursor, or on non-specific iron materials produced by the reaction of various iron salts and compounds in the coal or liquefaction reactor. To our knowledge there has been no systematic effort to determine the optimum iron-containing precursor phase for producing active coal liquefaction catalysts, despite the fact that there are over ten iron-(hydroxy)oxide phases which can be easily synthesized in the laboratory. We have undertaken a systematic study to identify the most active iron-oxide catalyst precursor phases, the co-catalysts, and the coal pretreatments which will provide optimum yields in coal liquefaction processes.

  18. Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalyst Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; White, James F.; Stevens, Don J.

    2007-09-03

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is tasked with obtaining commercially available or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. Commercially available catalysts and the most promising experimental catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. From the standpoint of producing C2+ alcohols as the major product, it appears that the rhodium catalyst is the best choice in terms of both selectivity and space-time yield (STY). However, unless the rhodium catalyst can be improved to provide minimally acceptable STYs for commercial operation, mixed alcohol synthesis will involve significant production of other liquid coproducts. The modified Fischer-Tropsch catalyst shows the most promise for providing both an acceptable selectivity to C2+ alcohols and total liquid STY. However, further optimization of the Fischer-Tropsch catalysts to improve selectivity to higher alcohols is highly desired. Selection of a preferred catalyst will likely entail a decision on the preferred coproduct slate. No other catalysts tested appear amenable to the significant improvements needed for acceptable STYs.

  19. Temperature dependence of ion transport in dilute tetrabutylammonium triflate-acetate solutions and self-diffusion in pure acetate liquids.

    PubMed

    Bopege, Dharshani N; Petrowsky, Matt; Fleshman, Allison M; Frech, Roger; Johnson, Matthew B

    2012-01-12

    Conductivities and static dielectric constants for 0.0055 M tetrabutylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate in n-butyl acetate, n-pentyl acetate, n-hexyl acetate, n-octyl acetate, and n-decyl acetate have been collected over the temperature range of 0-80 °C. Self-diffusion coefficients and static dielectric constants of pure acetates were obtained over the same temperature range. Both temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients and ionic conductivities of these pure acetates and dilute acetate solutions can be accurately described by the compensated Arrhenius formalism. Activation energies were calculated from compensated Arrhenius plots for both conductivity and diffusion data. Activation energies are higher for conductivity data of 0.0055 M TbaTf-acetates compared to diffusion data of pure acetates. The plot of the exponential prefactor versus the dielectric constant yields a single master curve for both conductivity and diffusion data. These data support the argument that mass and charge transport are thermally activated processes in the acetates, as previously observed in alcohol-based electrolytes. PMID:22145961

  20. DEHYDROGENATION CATALYST FOR PRODUCTION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this project were to better understand the effect of different catalyst preparation parameters, the effect of different catalyst treatment parameters, and the mechanism of deactivation. Accordingly, catalysts were made using various preparation methods and with...

  1. Chemoselectivities in acetalization, thioacetalization, oxathioacetalization and azathioacetalization.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ram Kinkar; Bagaria, Priyanka; Naik, Sarala; Kavala, Veerababurao; Patel, Bhisma K

    2006-02-16

    In the present article (experimental as well theoretical) the relative yields of cyclic (O,O), (S,S), (S,O), and (S,N) acetals, formed from p-(NO2)C6H4CHO and p-(OH)C6H4CHO, are compared. Atomic charges, global electrophilicity descriptor (w) [as proposed by Parr et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1999, 121, 1922] and hard-soft acid-base concept of Pearson (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1963, 85, 3533) are used to explain the experimental observations. Although the w values can explain the yields, charge and local softness values of the interacting sites explain the plausible reaction mechanism. The bisnucleophiles chosen for acetalization are CH2(OH)-CH2(OH) (glycol), CH2(SH)-CH2(SH) (dithiol), CH2(OH)-CH2(SH) (oxathiol) and CH2(SH)-CH2(NH2) (azathiol). For p-(NO2)C6H4CHO, the experimental yield of cyclic acetals were found to follow the trend as (S,N) > (S,O) > (O,O) > (S,S), which is also supported by theoretical explanation based on the w values and applying the concept of hard-hard (i.e., charge-controlled) and soft-soft (i.e., orbital-controlled) interaction between the interacting sites of the substrates (i.e., aldehydes) and the reactants (bisnucleophiles). Similarly, for p-(OH)C6H4CHO the relative yields of cyclic acetals follow the trend (S,N) approximately (S,S) > (S,O) > (O,O). It is argued that the attack on C(CHO) (i.e., C-atom of the CHO group) in p-(NO2)C6H4CHO by O(OH) (i.e., O-atom of OH group) or N(NH2) (i.e., N-atom of NH2 group) is mainly charge-controlled but the attack on C(CHO) in p-(OH)C6H4CHO) by S(SH) (i.e., S-atom of SH group) is orbital-controlled. PMID:16466254

  2. Cu-catalyzed conversion of propargyl acetates to E-α,β-unsaturated amides via ketenimine formation with sulfonyl azides.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Yalla Kiran; Ranjith Kumar, Gadi; Reddy, Maddi Sridhar

    2014-01-17

    The reaction between readily accessible propargyl acetates and sulfonyl azides in the presence of CuI catalyst yields trans-α,β-unsaturated N-tosylamides via N-sulfonyl ketenimine formation followed by a probable 1,3-OAc migration ([3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement). The reaction is very general, allowing all kinds of substitution, including alkyl, aryl (electron-donating, -withdrawing, and -neutral), heteroaryl, and vinyl groups, on the C-terminal of acrylamide. Also, the method affords the products at ambient temperature with excellent diastereoselectivity in moderate to good yields. PMID:24344764

  3. The role of catalyst precursor anions in coal gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Abotsi, G.M.K.

    1992-08-28

    The aims of the proposed project are to enrich our understanding of the roles of various aqueous soluble catalyst precursor anions on the surface electrical properties of coal and to ascertain the influence of the surface charge on the adsorption, dispersion, and activities of calcium and potassium. These goals will be achieved by impregnating a North Dakota lignite (PSOC 1482) and its demineralized derivative with calcium or potassium catalyst precursors containing acetate (CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}}), chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}), and carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) anions. Catalyst loading will be conducted under well-controlled conditions of solution pH and ionic strength. In the last quarter, the surface charge properties of the coal was determined as a function of acetate (CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}}), chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}), nitrate (NO{sup 3}{sup {minus}}), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) or sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}})concentration using the respective potassium salts of these anions. In general, low anion concentrations (10{sup {minus}3} or 10{sup {minus}2} mol/L) had little effect on the zeta potentials of the coals. However, the surface charge densities of the coal become less negative at 10-1 mol/L of the nitrate, carbonate or sulfate anions. These trends suggest that the surface charge density of the coal is controlled by the adsorption of potassium ions (K{sup +}) onto the coal particles. The net negative charge on the coal panicles creates a repulsive force between the anions and the coal surface and prevents the anions from exerting any significant effect on the coal's electrokinetic properties.

  4. Novel Reforming Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pfefferle, Lisa D; Haller, Gary L

    2012-10-16

    Aqueous phase reforming is useful for processing oxygenated hydrocarbons to hydrogen and other more useful products. Current processing is hampered by the fact that oxide based catalysts are not stable under high temperature hydrothermal conditions. Silica in the form of structured MCM-41 is thermally a more stable support for Co and Ni than conventional high surface area amorphous silica but hydrothermal stability is not demonstrated. Carbon nanotube supports, in contrast, are highly stable under hydrothermal reaction conditions. In this project we show that carbon nanotubes are stable high activity/selectivity supports for the conversion of ethylene glycol to hydrogen.

  5. Molecular water oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gratzel, Michael; Munavalli, Shekhar; Pern, Fu-Jann; Frank, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A dimeric composition of the formula: ##STR1## wherein L', L", L'", and L"" are each a bidentate ligand having at least one functional substituent, the ligand selected from bipyridine, phenanthroline, 2-phenylpyridine, bipyrimidine, and bipyrazyl and the functional substituent selected from carboxylic acid, ester, amide, halogenide, anhydride, acyl ketone, alkyl ketone, acid chloride, sulfonic acid, phosphonic acid, and nitro and nitroso groups. An electrochemical oxidation process for the production of the above functionally substituted bidentate ligand diaqua oxo-bridged ruthenium dimers and their use as water oxidation catalysts is described.

  6. Effects of different manganese precursors as promoters on catalytic performance of CuO-MnOx/TiO2 catalysts for NO removal by CO.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chuanzhi; Tang, Yingjie; Gao, Fei; Sun, Jingfang; Ma, Kaili; Tang, Changjin; Dong, Lin

    2015-06-28

    Two different precursors, manganese nitrate (MN) and manganese acetate (MA), were employed to prepare two series of catalysts, i.e., xCuyMn(N)/TiO2 and xCuyMn(A)/TiO2, by a co-impregnation method. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, LRS, CO-TPR, XPS and EPR spectroscopy. The results suggest that: (1) both xCuyMn(N)/TiO2 and xCuyMn(A)/TiO2 catalysts exhibit much higher catalytic activities than an unmodified Cu/TiO2 catalyst in the NO + CO reaction. Furthermore, the activities of catalysts modified with the same amount of manganese are closely dependent on manganese precursors. (2) The enhancement of activities for Mn-modified catalysts should be attributed to the formation of the surface synergetic oxygen vacancy (SSOV) Cu(+)-□-Mn(y+) in the reaction process. Moreover, since the formation of the SSOV (Cu(+)-□-Mn(3+)) in the xCuyMn(N)/TiO2 catalyst is easier than that (Cu(+)-□-Mn(2+)) in the xCuyMn(A)/TiO2 catalyst, the activity of the xCuyMn(N)/TiO2 catalyst is higher than that of the xCuyMn(A)/TiO2 catalyst. This conclusion is well supported by the XPS and EPR results. PMID:26027847

  7. Catalyst activity maintenance study for the liquid phase dimethyl ether process

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, X.D.; Toseland, B.A.; Underwood, R.P.

    1995-12-31

    The co-production of dimethyl ether (DME) and methanol from syngas is a process of considerable commercial attractiveness. DME coproduction can double the productivity of a LPMEOH process when using coal-derived syngas. This in itself may offer chemical producers and power companies increased flexibility and more profitable operation. DME is also known as a clean burning liquid fuel; Amoco and Haldor-Topsoe have recently announced the use of DME as an alternative diesel fuel. Moreover, DME can be an interesting intermediate in the production of chemicals such as olefins and vinyl acetate. The current APCl liquid phase dimethyl ether (LPDME) process utilizes a physical mixture of a commercial methanol synthesis catalyst and a dehydration catalyst (e.g., {gamma}-alumina). While this arrangement provides a synergy that results in much higher syngas conversion per pass compared to the methanol-only process, the stability of the catalyst system suffers. The present project is aimed at reducing catalyst deactivation both by understanding the cause(s) of catalyst deactivation and by developing modified catalyst systems. This paper describes the current understanding of the deactivation mechanism.

  8. Sphingolipids contribute to acetic acid resistance in Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Lina; Genheden, Samuel; Eriksson, Leif A; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Lignocellulosic raw material plays a crucial role in the development of sustainable processes for the production of fuels and chemicals. Weak acids such as acetic acid and formic acid are troublesome inhibitors restricting efficient microbial conversion of the biomass to desired products. To improve our understanding of weak acid inhibition and to identify engineering strategies to reduce acetic acid toxicity, the highly acetic-acid-tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii was studied. The impact of acetic acid membrane permeability on acetic acid tolerance in Z. bailii was investigated with particular focus on how the previously demonstrated high sphingolipid content in the plasma membrane influences acetic acid tolerance and membrane permeability. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we concluded that membranes with a high content of sphingolipids are thicker and more dense, increasing the free energy barrier for the permeation of acetic acid through the membrane. Z. bailii cultured with the drug myriocin, known to decrease cellular sphingo-lipid levels, exhibited significant growth inhibition in the presence of acetic acid, while growth in medium without acetic acid was unaffected by the myriocin addition. Furthermore, following an acetic acid pulse, the intracellular pH decreased more in myriocin-treated cells than in control cells. This indicates a higher inflow rate of acetic acid and confirms that the reduction in growth of cells cultured with myriocin in the medium with acetic acid was due to an increase in membrane permeability, thereby demonstrating the importance of a high fraction of sphingolipids in the membrane of Z. bailii to facilitate acetic acid resistance; a property potentially transferable to desired production organisms suffering from weak acid stress. PMID:26416641

  9. Process for the production of ethylidene diacetate from dimethyl ether using a heterogeneous catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ramprasad, Dorai; Waller, Francis Joseph

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for producing ethylidene diacetate by the reaction of dimethyl ether, acetic acid, hydrogen and carbon monoxide at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that is stable to hydrogenation and comprises an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized heteroatoms, some of which heteroatoms are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the heteroatoms being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled for 3 consecutive runs without loss in activity.

  10. Process for the production of ethylidene diacetate from dimethyl ether using a heterogeneous catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ramprasad, D.; Waller, F.J.

    1998-04-28

    This invention relates to a process for producing ethylidene diacetate by the reaction of dimethyl ether, acetic acid, hydrogen and carbon monoxide at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that is stable to hydrogenation and comprises an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized heteroatoms, some of which heteroatoms are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the heteroatoms being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled for 3 consecutive runs without loss in activity.

  11. Catalysts for low temperature oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Toops, Todd J.; Parks, III, James E.; Bauer, John C.

    2016-03-01

    The invention provides a composite catalyst containing a first component and a second component. The first component contains nanosized gold particles. The second component contains nanosized platinum group metals. The composite catalyst is useful for catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, and other pollutants at low temperatures.

  12. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Iton, Lennox E.; Pasterczyk, James W.; Winterer, Markus; Krause, Theodore R.

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  13. Doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2014-02-18

    A supported oxidation catalyst includes a support having a metal oxide or metal salt, and mixed metal particles thereon. The mixed metal particles include first particles including a palladium compound, and second particles including a precious metal group (PMG) metal or PMG metal compound, wherein the PMG metal is not palladium. The oxidation catalyst may also be used as a gas sensor.

  14. Immunotoxicity of trenbolone acetate in Japanese quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinn, M.J.; McKernan, M.; Lavoie, E.T.; Ottinger, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Trenbolone acetate is a synthetic androgen that is currently used as a growth promoter in many meat-exporting countries. Despite industry laboratories classifying trenbolone as nonteratogenic, data showed that embryonic exposure to this androgenic chemical altered development of the immune system in Japanese quail. Trenbolone is lipophilic, persistent, and released into the environment in manure used as soil fertilizer. This is the first study to date to assess this chemical's immunotoxic effects in an avian species. A one-time injection of trenbolone into yolks was administered to mimic maternal deposition, and subsequent effects on the development and function of the immune system were determined in chicks and adults. Development of the bursa of Fabricius, an organ responsible for development of the humoral arm of the immune system, was disrupted, as indicated by lower masse, and smaller and fewer follicles at day 1 of hatch. Morphological differences in the bursas persisted in adults, although no differences in either two measures of immune function were observed. Total numbers of circulating leukocytes were reduced and heterophil-lymphocyte ratios were elevated in chicks but not adults. This study shows that trenbolone acetate is teratogenic and immunotoxic in Japanese quail, and provides evidence that the quail immune system may be fairly resilient to embryonic endocrine-disrupting chemical-induced alterations following no further exposure posthatch.

  15. Phytogenic biosynthesis and emission of methyl acetate.

    PubMed

    Jardine, Kolby; Wegener, Frederik; Abrell, Leif; van Haren, Joost; Werner, Christiane

    2014-02-01

    Acetylation of plant metabolites fundamentally changes their volatility, solubility and activity as semiochemicals. Here we present a new technique termed dynamic (13) C-pulse chasing to track the fate of C1-3 carbon atoms of pyruvate into the biosynthesis and emission of methyl acetate (MA) and CO2 . (13) C-labelling of MA and CO2 branch emissions respond within minutes to changes in (13) C-positionally labelled pyruvate solutions fed through the transpiration stream. Strong (13) C-labelling of MA emissions occurred only under pyruvate-2-(13) C and pyruvate-2,3-(13) C feeding, but not pyruvate-1-(13) C feeding. In contrast, strong (13) CO2 emissions were only observed under pyruvate-1-(13) C feeding. These results demonstrate that MA (and other volatile and non-volatile metabolites) derive from the C2,3 atoms of pyruvate while the C1 atom undergoes decarboxylation. The latter is a non-mitochondrial source of CO2 in the light generally not considered in studies of CO2 sources and sinks. Within a tropical rainforest mesocosm, we also observed atmospheric concentrations of MA up to 0.6 ppbv that tracked light and temperature conditions. Moreover, signals partially attributed to MA were observed in ambient air within and above a tropical rainforest in the Amazon. Our study highlights the potential importance of acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis as a source of acetate esters and CO2 to the atmosphere. PMID:23862653

  16. Catalyst design for biorefining.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F

    2016-02-28

    The quest for sustainable resources to meet the demands of a rapidly rising global population while mitigating the risks of rising CO2 emissions and associated climate change, represents a grand challenge for humanity. Biomass offers the most readily implemented and low-cost solution for sustainable transportation fuels, and the only non-petroleum route to organic molecules for the manufacture of bulk, fine and speciality chemicals and polymers. To be considered truly sustainable, biomass must be derived from resources which do not compete with agricultural land use for food production, or compromise the environment (e.g. via deforestation). Potential feedstocks include waste lignocellulosic or oil-based materials derived from plant or aquatic sources, with the so-called biorefinery concept offering the co-production of biofuels, platform chemicals and energy; analogous to today's petroleum refineries which deliver both high-volume/low-value (e.g. fuels and commodity chemicals) and low-volume/high-value (e.g. fine/speciality chemicals) products, thereby maximizing biomass valorization. This article addresses the challenges to catalytic biomass processing and highlights recent successes in the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts facilitated by advances in nanotechnology and the synthesis of templated porous materials, as well as the use of tailored catalyst surfaces to generate bifunctional solid acid/base materials or tune hydrophobicity. PMID:26755755

  17. Catalysts for hydrocarbon oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, K.C.; Paffett, M.T.; Earl, W.L.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The focus of this project was elucidating structural aspects of a titanosilicate TS-1 that is an oxidation catalyst. The authors have prepared samples of TS-1 and used scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy to examine the samples of TS-1 for amorphous titanium-containing phases that may confound the analysis of the neutron scattering data. They observed that the volume fraction of titanium-containing impurity phases(s) determined from electron microscopy did not correlate well with that amount determined by ultraviolet-visible diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy. The authors also designed, constructed and tested a flow reactor that can be placed into the neutron flight path at the High Intensity Powder Diffractometer line at the Manual Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center. This reactor will allow for the observation of crystallographic changes of catalysts and other materials under reaction conditions.

  18. Torrefaction reduction of coke formation on catalysts used in esterification and cracking of biofuels from pyrolysed lignocellulosic feedstocks

    DOEpatents

    Kastner, James R; Mani, Sudhagar; Hilten, Roger; Das, Keshav C

    2015-11-04

    A bio-oil production process involving torrefaction pretreatment, catalytic esterification, pyrolysis, and secondary catalytic processing significantly reduces yields of reactor char, catalyst coke, and catalyst tar relative to the best-case conditions using non-torrefied feedstock. The reduction in coke as a result of torrefaction was 28.5% relative to the respective control for slow pyrolysis bio-oil upgrading. In fast pyrolysis bio-oil processing, the greatest reduction in coke was 34.9%. Torrefaction at 275.degree. C. reduced levels of acid products including acetic acid and formic acid in the bio-oil, which reduced catalyst coking and increased catalyst effectiveness and aromatic hydrocarbon yields in the upgraded oils. The process of bio-oil generation further comprises a catalytic esterification of acids and aldehydes to generate such as ethyl levulinate from lignified biomass feedstock.

  19. Synthesis of 5′-O-DMT-2′-O-TBS mononucleosides using an organic catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunggi; Blaisdell, Thomas P.; Kasaplar, Pinar; Sun, Xixi

    2014-01-01

    This unit describes a highly effective method to produce 5′-O-DMT-2′-O-TBS mononucleosides selectively using a small organic catalyst. This methodology avoids the tedious protection/deprotection strategy necessary to differentiate the 2′- and 3′-hydroxyl groups in a ribonucleoside. The catalyst was synthesized in two steps starting from the condensation of valinol and cyclopentyl aldehyde, followed by anionic addition of N-methylimidazole. Ring closure of the amino alcohol with N,N-dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal in methanol furnishes the catalyst. All four 2′-O-TBS protected mono-nucleosides, U, ABz, GIb, and CAc, were produced in a single step using 10 to 20 mol% of the catalyst at room temperature with excellent yields and selectivity. Further transformation to phosphoramidite demonstrates the utility of this protocol toward the preparation of monomers useful for automated synthesis of RNA. PMID:24961720

  20. Chemistry of enol ethers. LXXVII. Synthesis of acetals of phenyl-substituted glutaconaldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    Makin, S.M.; Kruglikova, R.I.; Lonina, N.N.

    1987-10-10

    The condensation of the acetals of acetophenone and acetaldehyde with enol ethers, as a result of which 2- and 3-phenyl-1,1,3-trialkoxybutanes were obtained, was studied. The acid hydrolysis of the products leads to the formation of 2- and 3-phenylbutenals, from which 2- and 3-phenyl-1-trimethylsilyloxy-1,3-butadienes were obtained by the action of trimethylchlorosilane and triethylamine. The reaction of the silyloxydienes with ethyl orthoformate in the presence of zinc chloride as catalyst gave the monoacetals of ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-phenylglutaconaldehydes, which were converted into the corresponding bisacetals by the further action of the orthoformate. The /sup 1/H NMR spectra of 50% solutions of the substances being analyzed in deuterochloroform or deuteroacetone were recorded on Bruker WH-90 and Bruker WM-250 instruments at 90 and 250 MHz respectively.

  1. Supported molten-metal catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Datta, Ravindra; Singh, Ajeet; Halasz, Istvan; Serban, Manuela

    2001-01-01

    An entirely new class of catalysts called supported molten-metal catalysts, SMMC, which can replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts used in the production of fuels, commodity chemicals, and fine chemicals, as well as in combating pollution. SMMC are based on supporting ultra-thin films or micro-droplets of the relatively low-melting (<600.degree. C.), inexpensive, and abundant metals and semimetals from groups 1, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16, of the periodic table, or their alloys and intermetallic compounds, on porous refractory supports, much like supported microcrystallites of the traditional solid metal catalysts. It thus provides orders of magnitude higher surface area than is obtainable in conventional reactors containing molten metals in pool form and also avoids corrosion. These have so far been the chief stumbling blocks in the application of molten metal catalysts.

  2. Where We Stand—CMA Position Papers: • Abortion • Acupuncture • Chiropractic • Confidentiality • Cost of Care • Drug Abuse • Environmental Health • Health Education for the Public • Health in the United States • Health Quackery • Health Maintenance Organizations and Prepaid Health Plans • Health Manpower • National Health Insurance • Physician's Assistants • Physician Unions • Professional Standards Review Organizations • Quality Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    1973-01-01

    To serve the interests of members and to function in the public interest, the California Medical Association must set policies and take positions on current issues affecting the health care of Californians. These policies then guide the activities of the Association in fulfilling its leadership role and its responsibility to the public. Delegates, elected by the membership of CMA's component medical societies, meet annually to deliberate and determine the policies and courses of action for the Association. Between meetings of these Delegates, the CMA Councilors, elected by their district membership, implement the directives of the Delegates and set interim policies. By this democratic process, the membership governs the CMA. Association members must be informed if they are to participate effectively in the affairs of their medical organizations. To disseminate better understanding of CMA's activities, position papers on current issues have been developed. They are based on House of Delegates resolutions and Council actions. Entitled “Where We Stand on Medical and Health Issues,” these papers represent the current policy positions of CMA. Each paper is annotated to give the reference source of the policy actions. As with any organization, CMA policies are subject to timely revision. When policies are amended or new policies are adopted, new papers will be developed. PMID:4148533

  3. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, John E.; Herzog, Timothy A.

    1998-01-01

    A metallocene catalyst system for the polymerization of .alpha.-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula ##STR1## wherein: R.sup.1, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyls as a substituent, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R.sup.8).sub.3 where R.sup.8 is selected from the group consisting of C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; R.sup.4 and R.sup.6 are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R.sup.1 and R.sup.3 ; R.sup.5 is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E.sup.1, E.sup.2 are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Si(R.sup.9).sub.2 --Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Ge(R.sup.9).sub.2, Sn(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2 --C(R.sup.9).sub.2, where R.sup.9 is C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C.sub.S or C.sub.1 -symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from .alpha.-olefin monomers.

  4. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, J.E.; Herzog, T.A.

    1998-01-13

    A metallocene catalyst system is described for the polymerization of {alpha}-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula shown wherein: R{sup 1}, R{sup 2}, and R{sup 3} are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyls as a substituent, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R{sup 8}){sub 3} where R{sup 8} is selected from the group consisting of C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; R{sup 4} and R{sup 6} are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R{sup 1} and R{sup 3}; R{sup 5} is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E{sup 1}, E{sup 2} are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Ge(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Sn(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, where R{sup 9} is C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C{sub S} or C{sub 1}-symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from {alpha}-olefin monomers.

  5. Direct hydrogenation of biomass-derived butyric acid to n-butanol over a ruthenium-tin bimetallic catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Min; Upare, Pravin P; Chang, Jong-San; Hwang, Young Kyu; Lee, Jeong Ho; Hwang, Dong Won; Hong, Do-Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Jeong, Myung-Geun; Kim, Young Dok; Kwon, Young-Uk

    2014-11-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of organic carboxylic acids and their esters, for example, cellulosic ethanol from fermentation of acetic acid and hydrogenation of ethyl acetate is a promising possibility for future biorefinery concepts. A hybrid conversion process based on selective hydrogenation of butyric acid combined with fermentation of glucose has been developed for producing biobutanol. ZnO-supported Ru-Sn bimetallic catalysts exhibits unprecedentedly superior performance in the vapor-phase hydrogenation of biomass-derived butyric acid to n-butanol (>98% yield) for 3500 h without deactivation. PMID:25123894

  6. Lipases and whole cell biotransformations of 2-hydroxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl)acetic acid and its ester.

    PubMed

    Majewska, Paulina; Serafin, Monika; Klimek-Ochab, Magdalena; Brzezińska-Rodak, Małgorzata; Żymańczyk-Duda, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    A wide spectrum of commercially available lipases and microbial whole cells catalysts were tested for biotransformations of 2-hydroxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl)acetic acid 1 and its butyryl ester. The best results were achieved for biocatalytic hydrolysis of ester: 2-butyryloxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl)acetic acid 2 performed by lipase from Candida cylindracea, what gave optically active products with 85% enantiomeric excess, 50% conversion degree and enantioselectivity 32.9 for one pair of enantiomers. Also enzymatic systems of Penicillium minioluteum and Fusarium oxysporum were able to hydrolyze tested compound with high enantiomeric excess (68-93% ee), enantioselectivity (44 for one pair of enantiomers) and conversion degree about 50-55%. Enzymatic acylation of hydroxyphosphinate was successful in case when porcine pancreas lipase was used. After 4days of biotransformation the conversion reaches 45% but the enantiomeric enrichment of the isomers mixture do not exceed 43%. Obtained chiral compounds are valuable derivatizing agents for spectroscopic (NMR) evaluation of enantiomeric excess for particular compounds (e.g. amino acids). PMID:26989983

  7. A radioimmunoassay for serum medroxyprogesterone acetate.

    PubMed

    Shrimanker, K; Saxena, B N; Fotherby, K

    1978-04-01

    When injected intramuscularly in a dose of 150 mg, Depo Provera, a microcrystalline suspension of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), will provide a contraceptive effect for at least 3 months. This paper describes a sensitive radioimmunoassay for MPA which has been used in the author's laboratory for the past 2 years. MPA was converted to MPA-3-CMO and the oxime was conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) by the mixed anahydride method. 4 rabbits were immunized with the antiserum. A high titre of MPA antibodies was detected 6 months after immunization. Serum from the rabbit with the highest titre of antibodies to MPA was subjected to radioimmunoassay. 7 days after the intramuscular injection of 150 mg Depo-Provera, serum levels of MPA were found in the range of 1750 to 9000 pg/ml. By 75 days, the levels had decreased to 680-2600 pg/ml. The method was found to have adequate accuracy, precision and sensitivity. PMID:661315

  8. Breast cancer and depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The preliminary results of a study of the incidence of breast cancer in relation to use of depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) are presented. The findings are based on data from three participating centres in Thailand, and one each in Kenya and Mexico. A relative risk for breast cancer of 0.7 was observed in women who had ever used DMPA; this was not statistically significant. Although no consistent decrease in risk with duration of use was observed, the lowest relative risk (0.5) was observed in women who had used DMPA for three or more years. These findings are based on small numbers and must be considered preliminary. However, they provide no evidence that DMPA increases the risk of breast cancer, and suggest that it may exert a protective effect, particularly in long-term users. PMID:2931206

  9. Synthesis and regeneration of lead (IV) acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Al-Shareef, H.N.; Moore, G.J.

    1996-11-01

    Lead acetate [Pb(O{sub 2}CMe){sub 4}] was easily synthesized from a warm solution of Pb{sub 3}O{sub 4}, HO{sub 2}CMe and O(OCMe){sub 2} following literature preparations when the appropriate measures to minimize water contamination were followed. Furthermore, Pb(O{sub 2}CMe){sub 4} which has been decomposed (evidenced by the appearance of a purple color due to oxidation) can be regenerated using a similar preparatory route. Introduction of Pb(O{sub 2}CMe){sub 4} from the two routes outlined above into the IMO process for production of PZT thin films gave films with comparable ferroelectric properties to commercially available Pb(O{sub 2}CMe){sub 4} precursors. However, the freshly synthesized material yields PZT films with better properties compared to the recycled material.

  10. Ceramic catalyst materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J.; Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K.

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  11. Redox properties and VOC oxidation activity of Cu catalysts supported on Ce₁-xSmxOδ mixed oxides.

    PubMed

    Konsolakis, Michalis; Carabineiro, Sónia A C; Tavares, Pedro B; Figueiredo, José L

    2013-10-15

    A series of Cu catalysts supported on Ce1-xSmxOδ mixed oxides with different molar contents (x=0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1), was prepared by wet impregnation and evaluated for volatile organic compounds (VOC) abatement, employing ethyl acetate as model molecule. An extensive characterization study was undertaken in order to correlate the morphological, structural and surface properties of catalysts with their oxidation activity. The optimum performance was obtained with Cu/CeO2 catalyst, which offers complete conversion of ethyl acetate into CO2 at temperatures as low as 260°C. The catalytic performance of Cu/Ce1-xSmxOδ was interpreted on the basis of characterization studies, showing that incorporation of samarium in ceria has a detrimental effect on the textural characteristics and reducibility of catalysts. Moreover, high Sm/Ce atomic ratios (from 1 to 3) resulted in a more reduced copper species, compared to CeO2-rich supports, suggesting the inability of these species to take part in the redox mechanism of VOC abatement. Sm/Ce surface atomic ratios are always much higher than the nominal ratios indicating an impoverishment of catalyst surface in cerium oxide, which is detrimental for VOC activity. PMID:23995554

  12. Chemical interactions in multimetal/zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtler, W.M.H.

    1992-02-07

    This report treats four subject areas: PtCu/NaY and Pd/Cu/NaY catalysts; reducibility of Ni in PdNi/NaY catalysts; CO hydrogenation over PdNi/NaY catalysts; and PdFe/NaY, Ga/H-ZSM5 and PtGa/H-ZSM5 catalysts.

  13. Green chemistry: Biodiesel made with sugar catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Masakazu; Takagaki, Atsushi; Okamura, Mai; Kondo, Junko N.; Hayashi, Shigenobu; Domen, Kazunari; Hara, Michikazu

    2005-11-01

    The production of diesel from vegetable oil calls for an efficient solid catalyst to make the process fully ecologically friendly. Here we describe the preparation of such a catalyst from common, inexpensive sugars. This high-performance catalyst, which consists of stable sulphonated amorphous carbon, is recyclable and its activity markedly exceeds that of other solid acid catalysts tested for `biodiesel' production.

  14. Chalcogen catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Choi, Jong-Ho; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas; Wieckowski, Andrzej; Cao, Dianxue

    2010-08-24

    A methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst and a membrane electrode assembly for fuel cells that includes such a cathode catalyst. The cathode catalyst includes a support having at least one transition metal in elemental form and a chalcogen disposed on the support. Methods of making the cathode catalyst and membrane electrode assembly are also described.

  15. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  16. Textured catalysts, methods of making textured catalysts, and methods of catalyzing reactions conducted in hydrothermal conditions

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2003-12-30

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  17. UV resistance and dimensional stability of wood modified with isopropenyl acetate.

    PubMed

    Nagarajappa, Giridhar B; Pandey, Krishna K

    2016-02-01

    Chemical modification of Rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis Müll.Arg) with isopropenyl acetate (IPA) in the presence of anhydrous aluminum chloride as a catalyst has been carried out under solvent free conditions. The level of modification was estimated by determining the weight percent gain and modified wood was characterized by FTIR-ATR and CP/MAS (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The effect of catalyst concentration on WPG was studied. UV resistance, moisture adsorption and dimensional stability of modified wood were evaluated. UV resistance of modified wood was evaluated by exposing unmodified and modified wood to UV irradiation in a QUV accelerated weathering tester. Unmodified wood showed rapid color changes and degradation of lignin upon exposure to UV light. Chemical modification of wood polymers with IPA was effective in reducing light induced color changes (photo-yellowing) at wood surfaces. In contrast to unmodified wood, modified wood exhibited bleaching. FTIR analysis of modified wood exposed to UV light indicated stabilization of wood polymers against UV degradation. Modified wood showed good dimensional stability and hydrophobicity. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that modification with IPA improved thermal stability of wood. Improved dimensional stability and UV resistance of modified wood indicates IPA as a promising reagent since there is no acid byproduct of reaction as observed in case of other esterification reactions. PMID:26722999

  18. Effective immobilisation of a metathesis catalyst bearing an ammonium-tagged NHC ligand on various solid supports.

    PubMed

    Skowerski, Krzysztof; Białecki, Jacek; Czarnocki, Stefan J; Żukowska, Karolina; Grela, Karol

    2016-01-01

    An ammonium-tagged ruthenium complex, 8, was deposited on several widely available commercial solid materials such as silica gel, alumina, cotton, filter paper, iron powder or palladium on carbon. The resulting catalysts were tested in toluene or ethyl acetate, and found to afford metathesis products in high yield and with extremely low ruthenium contamination. Depending on the support used, immobilised catalyst 8 shows also additional traits, such as the possibility of being magnetically separated or the use for metathesis and subsequent reduction of the obtained double bond in one pot. PMID:26877803

  19. Effective immobilisation of a metathesis catalyst bearing an ammonium-tagged NHC ligand on various solid supports

    PubMed Central

    Białecki, Jacek; Czarnocki, Stefan J; Żukowska, Karolina

    2016-01-01

    Summary An ammonium-tagged ruthenium complex, 8, was deposited on several widely available commercial solid materials such as silica gel, alumina, cotton, filter paper, iron powder or palladium on carbon. The resulting catalysts were tested in toluene or ethyl acetate, and found to afford metathesis products in high yield and with extremely low ruthenium contamination. Depending on the support used, immobilised catalyst 8 shows also additional traits, such as the possibility of being magnetically separated or the use for metathesis and subsequent reduction of the obtained double bond in one pot. PMID:26877803

  20. Acetic Acid Reforming over Rh Supported on La2O3/CeO2-ZrO2: Catalytic Performance and Reaction Pathway Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lemonidou, Angeliki A.; Vagia, Ekaterini C.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2013-07-11

    Reforming of acetic acid was investigated on Rh supported on CeO2-ZrO2 modified with 3 wt % La. The active catalyst converted acetic acid to H-2-rich gas and hardly formed coke. The low rate of coke formation is concluded to be related to the presence of redox-active oxygen limiting the concentration of coke precursors. Temperature-programmed O-18(2)) isotope exchange measurements showed that the La2O3 and Rh enhanced the mobility of lattice oxygen compared with that of the parent CeO2-ZrO2. Ketonization and decarboxylation of acetic acid are the dominating reactions over the latter up to 600 degrees C, whereas above 600 degrees C, steam reforming and water gas shift also contribute. Over 0.5 wt % Rh on La2O3/CeO2-ZrO2, reforming and water gas shift reactions dominate, even below 300 degrees C, producing mostly H-2 and CO2. Using isotope labeling, it is shown that acetic acid adsorbs dissociatively on Rh, forming acetates, which sequentially decarboxylate and form surface methyl groups. The latter are in turn converted to CO, CO2, and H-2.

  1. Upgrading oxygenated Fischer-Tropsch derivatives and one-step direct synthesis of ethyl acetate from ethanol - examples of the desirability of research on simple chemical compounds transformations.

    PubMed

    Klimkiewicz, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Oxygenates formed as by-products of Fischer-Tropsch syntheses can be transformed into other Fischer-Tropsch derived oxygenates instead of treating them as unwanted chemicals. One-step direct synthesis of ethyl acetate from ethanol is feasible with the use of some heterogeneous catalysts. Despite their apparent simplicity, both transformations are discussed as targeted fields of research. Furthermore, the two concepts are justified due to the environmental protection. Arguments regarding the Fischer-Tropsch process are focused on the opportunities of the utilization of undesirable by-products. The effective striving for their utilization can make the oxygenates the targeted products of this process. Arguments regarding the one-step direct synthesis of ethyl acetate underline the environmental protection and sustainability as a less waste-generating method but, above all, highlight the possibility of reducing the glycerol overproduction problem. The production of ethyl acetate from bioethanol and then transesterification of fats and oils with the use of ethyl acetate allows managing all the renewable raw materials. Thus, the process enables the biosynthesis of biodiesel without glycerine by-product and potentially would result in the increase in the demand for ethyl acetate. Graphical Abstract. PMID:25648719

  2. Structural evolution of molybdenum carbides in hot aqueous environments and impact on low-temperature hydroprocessing of acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae -Soon; Schwartz, Viviane; Santillan-Jimenez, Eduardo; Crocker, Mark; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A.; Lance, Michael J.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; More, Karren L.

    2015-03-13

    In this paper, we investigated the structural evolution of molybdenum carbides subjected to hot aqueous environments and their catalytic performance in low-temperature hydroprocessing of acetic acid. While bulk structures of Mo carbides were maintained after aging in hot liquid water, a portion of carbidic Mo sites were converted to oxidic sites. Water aging also induced changes to the non-carbidic carbon deposited during carbide synthesis and increased surface roughness, which in turn affected carbide pore volume and surface area. The extent of these structural changes was sensitive to the initial carbide structure and was lower under actual hydroprocessing conditions indicating the possibility of further improving the hydrothermal stability of Mo carbides by optimizing catalyst structure and operating conditions. Mo carbides were active in acetic acid conversion in the presence of liquid water, their activity being comparable to that of Ru/C. Finally, the results suggest that effective and inexpensive bio-oil hydroprocessing catalysts could be designed based on Mo carbides, although a more detailed understanding of the structure-performance relationships is needed, especially in upgrading of more complex reaction mixtures or real bio-oils.

  3. Structural evolution of molybdenum carbides in hot aqueous environments and impact on low-temperature hydroprocessing of acetic acid

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Choi, Jae -Soon; Schwartz, Viviane; Santillan-Jimenez, Eduardo; Crocker, Mark; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A.; Lance, Michael J.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; More, Karren L.

    2015-03-13

    In this paper, we investigated the structural evolution of molybdenum carbides subjected to hot aqueous environments and their catalytic performance in low-temperature hydroprocessing of acetic acid. While bulk structures of Mo carbides were maintained after aging in hot liquid water, a portion of carbidic Mo sites were converted to oxidic sites. Water aging also induced changes to the non-carbidic carbon deposited during carbide synthesis and increased surface roughness, which in turn affected carbide pore volume and surface area. The extent of these structural changes was sensitive to the initial carbide structure and was lower under actual hydroprocessing conditions indicating themore » possibility of further improving the hydrothermal stability of Mo carbides by optimizing catalyst structure and operating conditions. Mo carbides were active in acetic acid conversion in the presence of liquid water, their activity being comparable to that of Ru/C. Finally, the results suggest that effective and inexpensive bio-oil hydroprocessing catalysts could be designed based on Mo carbides, although a more detailed understanding of the structure-performance relationships is needed, especially in upgrading of more complex reaction mixtures or real bio-oils.« less

  4. High Temperature Membrane & Advanced Cathode Catalyst Development

    SciTech Connect

    Protsailo, Lesia

    2006-04-20

    Current project consisted of three main phases and eighteen milestones. Short description of each phase is given below. Table 1 lists program milestones. Phase 1--High Temperature Membrane and Advanced Catalyst Development. New polymers and advanced cathode catalysts were synthesized. The membranes and the catalysts were characterized and compared against specifications that are based on DOE program requirements. The best-in-class membranes and catalysts were downselected for phase 2. Phase 2--Catalyst Coated Membrane (CCM) Fabrication and Testing. Laboratory scale catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) were fabricated and tested using the down-selected membranes and catalysts. The catalysts and high temperature membrane CCMs were tested and optimized. Phase 3--Multi-cell stack fabrication. Full-size CCMs with the down-selected and optimized high temperature membrane and catalyst were fabricated. The catalyst membrane assemblies were tested in full size cells and multi-cell stack.

  5. Homogeneous gold-catalyzed efficient oxidative dimerization of propargylic acetates.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li; Zhang, Guozhu; Zhang, Liming

    2009-07-15

    A highly efficient gold-catalyzed oxidative dimerization of propargylic acetates is developed. In this chemistry, Selectfluor oxidation of Au(I) to Au(III) is readily incorporated into Au-catalyzed tandem reactions of propargylic acetates, and transmetallation and reductive elimination on Au(III) intermediates are likely involved. PMID:19362834

  6. 21 CFR 522.2478 - Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.2478 Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate. (a) Specifications. Each implant dose...) For an implant as described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section: (A) Amount. 200 mg trenbolone acetate... feed efficiency. (C) Limitations. Implant subcutaneously in ear only. Safety and effectiveness have...

  7. 21 CFR 522.2478 - Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.2478 Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate. (a) Specifications. Each implant dose...) For an implant as described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section: (A) Amount. 200 mg trenbolone acetate... feed efficiency. (C) Limitations. Implant subcutaneously in ear only. Safety and effectiveness have...

  8. 21 CFR 522.2478 - Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.2478 Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate. (a) Specifications. Each implant dose...) For an implant as described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section: (A) Amount. 200 mg trenbolone acetate... feed efficiency. (C) Limitations. Implant subcutaneously in ear only. Safety and effectiveness have...

  9. 21 CFR 522.2478 - Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.2478 Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate. (a) Specifications. Each implant dose...) For an implant as described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section: (A) Amount. 200 mg trenbolone acetate... feed efficiency. (C) Limitations. Implant subcutaneously in ear only. Safety and effectiveness have...

  10. Proteomic Analysis on Acetate Metabolism in Citrobacter sp. BL-4

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Man; Lee, Sung-Eun; Park, Byeoung-Soo; Son, Mi-Kyung; Jung, Young-Mi; Yang, Seung-Ok; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Hur, Sung-Ho; Yum, Jong Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Mass production of glucosamine (GlcN) using microbial cells is a worthy approach to increase added values and keep safety problems in GlcN production process. Prior to set up a microbial cellular platform, this study was to assess acetate metabolism in Citrobacter sp. BL-4 (BL-4) which has produced a polyglucosamine PGB-2. The LC-MS analysis was conducted after protein separation on the 1D-PAGE to accomplish the purpose of this study. 280 proteins were totally identified and 188 proteins were separated as acetate-related proteins in BL-4. Acetate was converted to acetyl-CoA by acetyl-CoA synthetase up-regulated in the acetate medium. The glyoxylate bypass in the acetate medium was up-regulated with over-expression of isocitrate lyases and 2D-PAGE confirmed this differential expression. Using 1H-NMR analysis, the product of isocitrate lyases, succinate, increased about 15 times in the acetate medium. During acetate metabolism proteins involved in the lipid metabolism and hexosamine biosynthesis were over-expressed in the acetate medium, while proteins involved in TCA cycle, pentose phosphate cycle and purine metabolism were down-regulated. Taken together, the results from the proteomic analysis can be applied to improve GlcN production and to develop metabolic engineering in BL-4. PMID:22211106

  11. 21 CFR 182.8892 - α-Tocopherol acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false α-Tocopherol acetate. 182.8892 Section 182.8892 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8892 α-Tocopherol acetate. (a) Product....

  12. 21 CFR 522.960b - Flumethasone acetate injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Flumethasone acetate injection. 522.960b Section 522.960b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.960b Flumethasone acetate injection....

  13. 21 CFR 522.960b - Flumethasone acetate solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Flumethasone acetate solution. 522.960b Section 522.960b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.960b Flumethasone acetate solution....

  14. 40 CFR 721.303 - Substituted acetate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.303 Substituted acetate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted acetate (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.303 - Substituted acetate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.303 Substituted acetate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted acetate (PMN...

  16. Secret Lives of Catalysts Revealed

    ScienceCinema

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai

    2010-01-08

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division discuss the first-ever glimpse of nanoscale catalysts in action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  17. Dichloromethane photodegradation using titanium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, J.F.; Suib, S.L.; Coughlin, R.W. )

    1989-06-01

    The use of titanium dioxide and titanium aluminosilicates in the photocatalytic destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbons is investigated. Titanium-exchanged clays, titanium-pillared clays, and titanium dioxide in the amorphous, anatase, and rutile forms are used to photocatalytically degrade dichloromethane to hydrochloric acid and carbon dioxide. Bentonite clays pillared by titanium dioxide are observed to be more catalytically active than titanium-exchanged clays. Clays pillared by titanium aluminum polymeric cations display about the same catalytic activity as that of titanium-exchanged clays. The rutile form of titanium dioxide is the most active catalyst studied for the dichloromethane degradation reaction. The anatase form of titanium dioxide supported on carbon felt was also used as a catalyst. This material is about five times more active than titanium dioxide-pillared clays. Degradation of dichloromethane using any of these catalysts can be enhanced by oxygen enrichment of the reaction solution or by preirradiating the catalyst with light.

  18. Secret Lives of Catalysts Revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai

    2008-10-15

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division discuss the first-ever glimpse of nanoscale catalysts in action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  19. Catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Brown, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Vannorman, John D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A catalyst for the combination of CO and O2 to form CO2 which includes a platinum group metal, e.g., platinum; a reducible metal oxide having mulitple valence states, e.g., SnO2; and a compound which can bind water to its structure, e.g., silica gel. This catalyst is ideally suited for application to high powered, pulsed, CO2 lasers operating in a sealed or closed cycle condition.

  20. Catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Brown, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Vannorman, John D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A catalyst is disclosed for the combination of CO and O2 to form CO2, which includes a platinum group metal (e.g., platinum); a reducable metal oxide having multiple valence states (e.g., SnO2); and a compound which can bind water to its structure (e.g., silica gel). This catalyst is ideally suited for application to high-powered pulsed, CO2 lasers operating in a sealed or closed-cycle condition.

  1. Waste catalysts for waste polymer.

    PubMed

    Salmiaton, A; Garforth, A

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic cracking of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) over fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts (1:6 ratio) was carried out using a laboratory fluidized bed reactor operating at 450 degrees C. Two fresh and two steam deactivated commercial FCC catalysts with different levels of rare earth oxide (REO) were compared as well as two used FCC catalysts (E-Cats) with different levels of metal poisoning. Also, inert microspheres (MS3) were used as a fluidizing agent to compare with thermal cracking process at BP pilot plant at Grangemouth, Scotland, which used sand as its fluidizing agent. The results of HDPE degradation in terms of yield of volatile hydrocarbon product are fresh FCC catalysts>steamed FCC catalysts approximately used FCC catalysts. The thermal cracking process using MS3 showed that at 450 degrees C, the product distribution gave 46 wt% wax, 14% hydrocarbon gases, 8% gasoline, 0.1% coke and 32% nonvolatile product. In general, the product yields from HDPE cracking showed that the level of metal contamination (nickel and vanadium) did not affect the product stream generated from polymer cracking. This study gives promising results as an alternative technique for the cracking and recycling of polymer waste. PMID:17084608

  2. New approaches in catalyst manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Lostaglio, V.J.; Carruthers, J.D.

    1986-03-01

    Changes in both petroleum refinery feedstocks and refinery product slates during the past 10 years have necessitated new approaches in catalyst manufacture. New hydrotreating catalysts are expected to improve polynuclear aromatic saturation, and to increase cetane index, mild hydrocracking, asphaltene conversion, and contaminant metal removal. Sulfur and nitrogen removal were once considered the sole benefits of hydroprocessing. To accommodate these needs, catalyst manufacturers have focused added attention on defining and achieving rigorous physical and chemical specifications for each new catalyst. It is considered essential to continually improve quality and process control in each manufacturing step. In addition, manufacturers have introduced new technology both in the process and in the evaluation of product. The importance of pore size distribution (PSD), for example, has been appreciated for 20 years or more but it is only within the past 10 years that routine measurement of PSD by mercury and/or nitrogen porosimetry has been applied throughout the entire manufacturing process. A greater emphasis on heavy oil hydrotreating has spurred demands for wide pore catalysts of small external dimensions to overcome the problems of diffusion-limited reactions. In turn, however, these properties may create problems with crush strength and catalyst attrition.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate contraception.

    PubMed

    Mishell, D R

    1996-05-01

    Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is an aqueous suspension of 17-acetoxy 6-methyl progestin administered by intramuscular injection for long-term contraception. This highly effective injectable formulation of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) has a prolonged duration of action since the progestin is released slowly from the muscle. MPA is detected in the serum within 30 minutes after an injection of 150 mg. Serum concentrations vary between individual women but generally plateau at about 1.0 ng/mL for about three months, after which there is a gradual decline. In some women, MPA can be detected in the serum for as long as nine months after a single injection of 150 mg. The circulating MPA initially inhibits the midcycle leutinizing hormone (LH) peak, but LH and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels remain in the range of those for the luteal phase of a pretreatment control cycle. Since ovulation is inhibited, serum progesterone levels remain low (< 0.4 ng/mL) for several months following an injection of DMPA. When MPA levels fall below 0.1 ng/mL, ovulation resumes. Thus, return to fertility is delayed for several months if a woman wishes to conceive after receiving one or more injections of DMPA. Following an injection of DMPA, serum estradiol levels initially are in the early to midfollicular phase range (mean approximately 50 pg/nL). Serum estradiol levels begin to rise about four months after a single injection when MPA levels fall below 0.5 ng/mL. For women who have used DMPA for several years, serum estradiol levels range between 10 and 92 pg/mL, with mean levels of about 40 pg/mL. Despite these low levels of estradiol, hot flushes are a rare event, and the vaginal epithelium remains moist and well rugated. Women using DMPA for several years do not observe a change in breast size. DMPA causes the endometrium to become atrophic, with small, straight endometrial glands and decidualized stroma. The cervical mucus remains thick and viscid. DMPA is a

  4. The clinical use of PET with 11C-acetate

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Ilaria; Nanni, Cristina; Allegri, Vincenzo; Morigi, Joshua James; Montini, Gian Carlo; Castellucci, Paolo; Fanti, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate clinical applications of 11C-acetate positron emission tomography (PET). Acetate is quickly metabolized into acetyl-CoA in human cells. In this form it can either enter into the tricarboxylic acid cycle, thus producing energy, as happens in the myocardium, or participate in cell membrane lipid synthesis, as happens in tumor cells. 11C-acetate PET was originally employed in cardiology, to study myocardial oxygen metabolism. More recently it has also been used to evaluate myocardial perfusion, as well as in oncology. The first studies of 11C-acetate focused on its use in prostate cancer. Subsequently, 11C-acetate was studied in other urological malignancies, as well as renal cell carcinoma and bladder cancer. Well differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma represents an 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET pitfall, so many authors have proposed to use 11C-acetate in addition to 18F-FDG in studying this tumor. 11C-acetate PET has also been used in other malignancies, such as brain tumors and lung carcinoma. Some authors reported a few cases in which 11C-acetate PET incidentally found multiple myeloma or rare tumors, such as thymoma, multicentric angiomyolipoma of the kidney and cerebellopontine angle schwannoma. Lastly, 11C-acetate PET was also employed in a differential diagnosis case between glioma and encephalitis. The numerous studies on 11C-acetate have demonstrated that it can be used in cardiology and oncology with no contraindications apart from pregnancy and the necessity of a rapid scan. Despite its limited availability, this tracer can surely be considered to be a promising one, because of its versatility and capacity to even detect non 18F-FDG-avid neoplasm, such as differentiated lung cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:23133801

  5. Fermentation of lignocellulosic sugars to acetic acid by Moorella thermoacetica.

    PubMed

    Ehsanipour, Mandana; Suko, Azra Vajzovic; Bura, Renata

    2016-06-01

    A systematic study of bioconversion of lignocellulosic sugars to acetic acid by Moorella thermoacetica (strain ATCC 39073) was conducted. Four different water-soluble fractions (hydrolysates) obtained after steam pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass were selected and fermented to acetic acid in batch fermentations. M. thermoacetica can effectively ferment xylose and glucose in hydrolysates from wheat straw, forest residues, switchgrass, and sugarcane straw to acetic acid. Xylose and glucose were completely utilized, with xylose being consumed first. M. thermoacetica consumed up to 62 % of arabinose, 49 % galactose and 66 % of mannose within 72 h of fermentation in the mixture of lignocellulosic sugars. The highest acetic acid yield was obtained from sugarcane straw hydrolysate, with 71 % of theoretical yield based on total sugars (17 g/L acetic acid from 24 g/L total sugars). The lowest acetic acid yield was observed in forest residues hydrolysate, with 39 % of theoretical yield based on total sugars (18 g/L acetic acid from 49 g/L total sugars). Process derived compounds from steam explosion pretreatment, including 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (0.4 g/L), furfural (0.1 g/L) and total phenolics (3 g/L), did not inhibit microbial growth and acetic acid production yield. This research identified two major factors that adversely affected acetic acid yield in all hydrolysates, especially in forest residues: (i) glucose to xylose ratio and (ii) incomplete consumption of arabinose, galactose and mannose. For efficient bioconversion of lignocellulosic sugars to acetic acid, it is imperative to have an appropriate balance of sugars in a hydrolysate. Hence, the choice of lignocellulosic biomass and steam pretreatment design are fundamental steps for the industrial application of this process. PMID:26992903

  6. Recycling acetic acid from polarizing film of waste liquid crystal display panels by sub/supercritical water treatments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruixue; Chen, Ya; Xu, Zhenming

    2015-05-19

    Waste liquid crystal display (LCD) panels mainly contain inorganic materials (glass substrate) and organic materials (polarizing film and liquid crystal). The organic materials should be removed first since containing polarizing film and liquid crystal is to the disadvantage of the indium recycling process. In the present study, an efficient and environmentally friendly process to obtain acetic acid from waste LCD panels by sub/supercritical water treatments is investigated. Furthermore, a well-founded reaction mechanism is proposed. Several highlights of this study are summarized as follows: (i) 99.77% of organic matters are removed, which means the present technology is quite efficient to recycle the organic matters; (ii) a yield of 78.23% acetic acid, a quite important fossil energy based chemical product is obtained, which can reduce the consumption of fossil energy for producing acetic acid; (iii) supercritical water acts as an ideal solvent, a requisite reactant as well as an efficient acid-base catalyst, and this is quite significant in accordance with the "Principles of Green Chemistry". In a word, the organic matters of waste LCD panels are recycled without environmental pollution. Meanwhile, this study provides new opportunities for alternating fossil-based chemical products for sustainable development, converting "waste" into "fossil-based chemicals". PMID:25915068

  7. Gas-Phase Structures of Ketene and Acetic Acid from Acetic Anhydride Using Very-High-Temperature Gas Electron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sandra J; Noble-Eddy, Robert; Masters, Sarah L

    2016-03-31

    The gas-phase molecular structure of ketene has been determined using samples generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride (giving acetic acid and ketene), using one permutation of the very-high-temperature (VHT) inlet nozzle system designed and constructed for the gas electron diffraction (GED) apparatus based at the University of Canterbury. The gas-phase structures of acetic anhydride, acetic acid, and ketene are presented and compared to previous electron diffraction and microwave spectroscopy data to show improvements in data extraction and manipulation with current methods. Acetic anhydride was modeled with two conformers, rather than a complex dynamic model as in the previous study, to allow for inclusion of multiple pyrolysis products. The redetermined gas-phase structure of acetic anhydride (obtained using the structure analysis restrained by ab initio calculations for electron diffraction method) was compared to that from the original study, providing an improvement on the description of the low vibrational torsions compared to the dynamic model. Parameters for ketene and acetic acid (both generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride) were also refined with higher accuracy than previously reported in GED studies, with structural parameter comparisons being made to prior experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:26916368

  8. An energy-conserving pyruvate-to-acetate pathway in Entamoeba histolytica. Pyruvate synthase and a new acetate thiokinase.

    PubMed

    Reeves, R E; Warren, L G; Susskind, B; Lo, H S

    1977-01-25

    Under anaerobic conditions, cells of Entamoeba histolytica grown with bacteria produce H2 and acetate while cells grown axenically produce neither. Aerobically, acetate is produced and O2 is consumed by amebae from either type of cells. Centrifuged extracts, 2.4 x 106 x g x min, from both types of cells contain pyruvate synthase (EC 1.2.7.1) and an acetate thiokinase which, together, form a system capable of converting pyruvate to acetate. Pyruvate synthase catalyzes the reaction: pyruvate + CoA leads to CO2 + acetyl-CoA + 2E. Electron acceptors which function with this enzyme are FAD, FMN, riboflavin, ferredoxin, and methyl viologen, but not NAD or NADP. The amebal acetate thiokinase catalyzes the reaction acetyl-CoA + ADP + Pi leads to acetate + ATP + CoA. For this apparently new enzyme we suggest the trivial name acetyl-CoA-synthetase (ADP-forming). Extracts from axenic amebae do not contain hydrogenase, but extracts from cells grown with bacteria do. It is postulated that in bacteria-grown amebae electrons generated at the pyruvate synthase step are utilized anaerobically to produce H2 via the hydrogenase and that the acetyl-CoA is converted to acetate in an energy-conserving step catalyzed by amebal acetyl-CoA synthetase. Aerobically, cells grown under either regimen may utilize the energy-conserving pyruvate-to-acetate pathway since O2 then serves as the ultimate electron acceptor. PMID:13076

  9. Biological Function of Acetic Acid-Improvement in Obesity and Glucose Tolerance by Acetic Acid in Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-07-29

    Fatty acids derived from adipose tissue are oxidized by β-oxidation to form ketone bodies as final products under the starving condition. Previously, we found that free acetic acid was formed concomitantly with the production of ketone bodies in isolated rat liver perfusion, and mitochondrial acetyl CoA hydrolase was appeared to be involved with the acetic acid production. It was revealed that acetic acid was formed as a final product of enhanced β-oxidation of fatty acids and utilized as a fuel in extrahepatic tissues under the starving condition. Under the fed condition, β-oxidation is suppressed and acetic acid production is decreased. When acetic acid was taken daily by obesity-linked type 2 diabetic Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats under the fed condition, it protected OLETF rats against obesity. Furthermore, acetic acid contributed to protect from the accumulation of lipid in the liver as well as abdominal fat in OLETF rats. Transcripts of lipogenic genes in the liver were decreased, while transcripts of myoglobin and Glut4 genes in abdominal muscles were increased in the acetic acid-administered OLETF rats. It is indicated that exogenously administered acetic acid would have effects on lipid metabolism in both the liver and the skeletal muscles, and have function that works against obesity and obesity-linked type 2 diabetes. PMID:26176799

  10. Measurement of the rates of oxindole-3-acetic acid turnover, and indole-3-acetic acid oxidation in Zea mays seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonhebel, H. M.; Bandurski, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    Oxindole-3-acetic acid is the principal catabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in Zea mays seedlings. In this paper measurements of the turnover of oxindole-3-acetic acid are presented and used to calculate the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation. [3H]Oxindole-3-acetic acid was applied to the endosperm of Zea mays seedlings and allowed to equilibrate for 24 h before the start of the experiment. The subsequent decrease in its specific activity was used to calculate the turnover rate. The average half-life of oxindole-3-acetic acid in the shoots was found to be 30 h while that in the kernels had an average half-life of 35h. Using previously published values of the pool sizes of oxindole-3-acetic acid in shoots and kernels from seedlings of the same age and variety, and grown under the same conditions, the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation was calculated to be 1.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the shoots and 7.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the kernels.

  11. The effect of oral sodium acetate administration on plasma acetate concentration and acid-base state in horses

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Amanda; Lindinger, Michael I

    2007-01-01

    Aim Sodium acetate (NaAcetate) has received some attention as an alkalinizing agent and possible alternative energy source for the horse, however the effects of oral administration remain largely unknown. The present study used the physicochemical approach to characterize the changes in acid-base status occurring after oral NaAcetate/acetic acid (NAA) administration in horses. Methods Jugular venous blood was sampled from 9 exercise-conditioned horses on 2 separate occasions, at rest and for 24 h following a competition exercise test (CET) designed to simulate the speed and endurance test of 3-day event. Immediately after the CETs horses were allowed water ad libitum and either: 1) 8 L of a hypertonic NaAcetate/acetic acid solution via nasogastric tube followed by a typical hay/grain meal (NAA trial); or 2) a hay/grain meal alone (Control trial). Results Oral NAA resulted in a profound plasma alkalosis marked by decreased plasma [H+] and increased plasma [TCO2] and [HCO3-] compared to Control. The primary contributor to the plasma alkalosis was an increased [SID], as a result of increased plasma [Na+] and decreased plasma [Cl-]. An increased [Atot], due to increased [PP] and a sustained increase in plasma [acetate], contributed a minor acidifying effect. Conclusion It is concluded that oral NaAcetate could be used as both an alkalinizing agent and an alternative energy source in the horse. PMID:18096070

  12. The innovation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Martin, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    A few years ago the software development company Intuit realized that it needed a new approach to galvanizing customers. The company's Net Promoter Score was faltering, and customer recommendations of new products were especially disappointing. Intuit decided to hold a two-day, off-site meeting for the company's top 300 managers with a focus on the role of design in innovation. One of the days was dedicated to a program called Design for Delight. The centerpiece of the day was a PowerPoint presentation by Intuit founder Scott Cook, who realized midway through that he was no Steve Jobs: The managers listened dutifully, but there was little energy in the room. By contrast, a subsequent exercise in which the participants worked through a design challenge by creating prototypes, getting feedback, iterating, and refining, had them mesmerized. The eventual result was the creation of a team of nine design-thinking coaches--"innovation catalysts"--from across Intuit who were made available to help any work group create prototypes, run experiments, and learn from customers. The process includes a "painstorm" (to determine the customer's greatest pain point), a "soljam" (to generate and then winnow possible solutions), and a "code-jam" (to write code "good enough" to take to customers within two weeks). Design for Delight has enabled employees throughout Intuit to move from satisfying customers to delighting them. PMID:21714388

  13. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid and oxindole-3-acetic acid to 2,3-dihydro-7-hydroxy-2-oxo-1H indole-3-acetic acid-7'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside in Zea mays seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonhebel, H. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Radiolabeled oxindole-3-acetic acid was metabolized by roots, shoots, and caryopses of dark grown Zea mays seedlings to 2,3-dihydro-7-hydroxy-2-oxo-1H indole-3-acetic acid-7'-O-beta-D-glycopyranoside with the simpler name of 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside. This compound was also formed from labeled indole-3-acetic acid supplied to intact seedlings and root segments. The glucoside of 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid was also isolated as an endogenous compound in the caryopses and shoots of 4-day-old seedlings. It accumulates to a level of 4.8 nanomoles per plant in the kernel, more than 10 times the amount of oxindole-3-acetic acid. In the shoot it is present at levels comparable to that of oxindole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-acetic acid (62 picomoles per shoot). We conclude that 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside is a natural metabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in Z. mays seedlings. From the data presented in this paper and in previous work, we propose the following route as the principal catabolic pathway for indole-3-acetic acid in Zea seedlings: Indole-3-acetic acid --> Oxindole-3-acetic acid --> 7-Hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid --> 7-Hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside.

  14. Micelles Protect and Concentrate Activated Acetic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Zoe; House, C.

    2014-01-01

    As more and more exoplanets are discovered and the habitability of such planets is considered, one can turn to searching for the origin of life on Earth in order to better understand what makes a habitable planet. Activated acetic acid, or methyl thioacetate, has been proposed to be central to the origin of life on Earth, and also as an important energy currency molecule in early cellular evolution. We have investigated the hydrolysis of methyl thioacetate under various conditions. Its uncatalyzed rate of hydrolysis is about three orders of magnitude faster (K = 0.00663 s^-1; 100°C, pH 7.5, concentration = 0.33mM) than published rates for its catalyzed production making it unlikely to accumulate under prebiotic conditions. However, we also observed that methyl thioacetate was protected from hydrolysis when inside its own hydrophobic droplets. We found that methyl thioacetate protection from hydrolysis was also possible in droplets of hexane and in the membranes of nonanoic acid micelles. Thus, the hydrophobic regions of prebiotic micelles and early cell membranes could have offered a refuge for this energetic molecule increasing its lifetime in close proximity to the reactions for which it would be needed. Methyl thioacetate could thus be important for the origin of life on Earth and perhaps for better understanding the potential habitability of other planets.

  15. Dexamethasone acetate encapsulation into Trojan particles.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gaete, Carolina; Fattal, Elias; Silva, Lídia; Besnard, Madeleine; Tsapis, Nicolas

    2008-05-22

    We have combined the therapeutic potential of nanoparticles systems with the ease of manipulation of microparticles by developing a hybrid vector named Trojan particles. We aim to use this new delivery vehicle for intravitreal administration of dexamethasone. Initialy, dexamethasone acetate (DXA) encapsulation into biodegradable poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles was optimized. Then, Trojan particles were formulated by spray drying 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DPPC), hyaluronic acid (HA) and different concentrations of nanoparticle suspensions. The effect of nanoparticles concentration on Trojan particle physical characteristics was investigated as well as the effect of the spray drying process on nanoparticles size. Finally, DXA in vitro release from nanoparticles and Trojan particles was evaluated under sink condition. SEM and confocal microscopy show that most of Trojan particles are spherical, hollow and possess an irregular surface due to the presence of nanoparticles. Neither Trojan particle tap density nor size distribution are significantly modified as a function of nanoparticles concentration. The mean nanoparticles size increase significantly after spray drying. Finally, the in vitro release of DXA shows that the excipient matrix provides protection to encapsulated nanoparticles by slowing drug release. PMID:18374442

  16. Eslicarbazepine acetate for partial-onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Rauchenzauner, Markus; Luef, Gerhard

    2011-12-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), a new voltage-gated sodium channel blocker that is chemically related to carbamazepine and partially metabolized to oxcarbazepine, has attracted attention as results of previous Phase II and III studies demonstrated and confirmed efficacy and tolerability of ESL 800 and 1200 mg once daily as add-on therapy for adult patients with drug-resistant partial-onset seizures. In children, efficacy data point towards a dose-dependent decrease in seizure frequency and tolerability analyses showed a low incidence of mild drug-related adverse effects at 5 and 15 mg/kg/day. The most frequently reported adverse effects were dizziness, somnolence, headache, diplopia, nausea and vomiting. The convenience of once-daily dosing and a short/simple titration regimen in combination with a comparative efficacy and tolerability profile might promote ESL as a valid alternative to the current adjunctive antiepileptic drug therapy armamentarium for drug-resistant partial seizures in adults. Since clinical trials in children and adolescents on ESL efficacy and safety are ongoing and data already published are far from conclusive, the therapeutic value of ESL in this special population has to be established in the near future. PMID:22091592

  17. Pharmacokinetics and drug interactions of eslicarbazepine acetate.

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio

    2012-06-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a novel once-daily antiepileptic drug (AED) approved in Europe since 2009 that was found to be efficacious and well tolerated in a phase III clinical program in adult patients with partial onset seizures previously not controlled with treatment with one to three AEDs, including carbamazepine (CBZ). ESL shares with CBZ and oxcarbazepine (OXC) the dibenzazepine nucleus bearing the 5-carboxamide substitute, but is structurally different at the 10,11 position. This molecular variation results in differences in metabolism, preventing the formation of toxic epoxide metabolites such as carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide. Unlike OXC, which is metabolized to both eslicarbazepine and (R)-licarbazepine, ESL is extensively converted to eslicarbazepine. The systemic exposure to eslicarbazepine after ESL oral administration is approximately 94% of the parent dose, with minimal exposure to (R)-licarbazepine and OXC. After ESL oral administration, the effective half-life (t(1/2,eff) ) of eslicarbazepine was 20-24 h, which is approximately two times longer than its terminal half-life (t(1/2)). At clinically relevant doses (400-1,600 mg/day) ESL has linear pharmacokinetics (PK) with no effects of gender or moderate liver impairment. However, because eslicarbazepine is eliminated primarily (66%) by renal excretion, dose adjustment is recommended for patients with renal impairment. Eslicarbazepine clearance is induced by phenobarbital, phenytoin, and CBZ and it dose-dependently decreases plasma exposure of oral contraceptive and simvastatin. PMID:22612290

  18. Biodegradable cellulose acetate nanofiber fabrication via electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Christoforou, Theopisti; Doumanidis, Charalabos

    2010-09-01

    Nanofiber manufacturing is one of the key advancements in nanotechnology today. Over the past few years, there has been a tremendous growth of research activities to explore electrospinning for nanofiber formation from a rich variety of materials. This quite simple and cost effective process operates on the principle that the solution is extracted under the action of a high electric field. Once the voltage is sufficiently high, a charged jet is ejected following a complicated looping trajectory. During its travel, the solvent evaporates leaving behind randomly oriented nanofibers accumulated on the collector. The combination of their nanoscale dimensionality, high surface area, porosity, flexibility and superior strength makes the electrospun fibers suitable for several value-added applications, such as filters, protecting clothes, high performance structures and biomedical devices. In this study biodegradable cellulose acetate (CA) nanofibrous membranes were produced using electrospinning. The device utilized consisted of a syringe equipped with a metal needle, a microdialysis pump, a high voltage supply and a collector. The morphology of the yielded fibers was determined using SEM. The effect of various parameters, including electric field strength, tip-to-collector distance, solution feed rate and composition on the morphological features of the electrospun fibers was examined. The optimum operating conditions for the production of uniform, non-beaded fibers with submicron diameter were also explored. The biodegradable CA nanofiber membranes are suitable as tissue engineering scaffolds and as reinforcements of biopolymer matrix composites in foils by ultrasonic welding methods. PMID:21133179

  19. Quantitative Structure of an Acetate Dye Molecule Analogue at the TiO2–Acetic Acid Interface

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The positions of atoms in and around acetate molecules at the rutile TiO2(110) interface with 0.1 M acetic acid have been determined with a precision of ±0.05 Å. Acetate is used as a surrogate for the carboxylate groups typically employed to anchor monocarboxylate dye molecules to TiO2 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). Structural analysis reveals small domains of ordered (2 × 1) acetate molecules, with substrate atoms closer to their bulk terminated positions compared to the clean UHV surface. Acetate is found in a bidentate bridge position, binding through both oxygen atoms to two 5-fold titanium atoms such that the molecular plane is along the [001] azimuth. Density functional theory calculations provide adsorption geometries in excellent agreement with experiment. The availability of these structural data will improve the accuracy of charge transport models for DSSC. PMID:27110318

  20. Nomegestrol acetate: pharmacology, safety profile and therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lello, Stefano

    2010-03-26

    This review summarizes the pharmacology, safety and clinical efficacy of nomegestrol acetate, based on the available published literature, and assesses the pharmacological characteristics that underlie a role in different gynaecological disorders and hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and a potential role in combination estrogen/progestogen oral contraception. Nomegestrol acetate is a potent, orally active progestogen with a favourable tolerability profile and neutral metabolic characteristics. Unlike the majority of older progestogens, which were 19-nortestosterone derivatives synthesized primarily for their antigonadotropic activity as a component of hormonal contraception in combination with an estrogen, nomegestrol acetate is a 19-norprogesterone derivative designed to bind specifically to the progesterone receptor, and is relatively lacking in affinity for other steroid receptors. Nomegestrol acetate exerts strong antiestrogenic effects at the level of the endometrium and has potent antigonadotropic activity, but without any residual androgenic or glucocorticoid properties. At a dosage of 1.25 mg/day, nomegestrol acetate inhibits ovulation while permitting follicle growth, whereas at dosages of 2.5 or 5 mg/day, both ovulation and follicle development are suppressed. The antigonadotropic action of nomegestrol acetate is mediated, like other progestins, at the hypothalamic and pituitary level. Moreover, nomegestrol acetate has partial antiandrogenic activity. Absorption of nomegestrol acetate is rapid after oral administration, reaching a peak serum concentration within 4 hours, with a terminal half-life of approximately 50 hours. Nomegestrol acetate has been used successfully for the treatment of some gynaecological disorders (menstrual disturbances, dysmenorrhoea, premenstrual syndrome) and as a component of HRT in combination with estradiol for the relief of menopausal symptoms; it has been approved in Europe as monotherapy for the treatment of the menopausal

  1. Simultaneous production of acetic and gluconic acids by a thermotolerant Acetobacter strain during acetous fermentation in a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Mounir, Majid; Shafiei, Rasoul; Zarmehrkhorshid, Raziyeh; Hamouda, Allal; Ismaili Alaoui, Mustapha; Thonart, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The activity of bacterial strains significantly influences the quality and the taste of vinegar. Previous studies of acetic acid bacteria have primarily focused on the ability of bacterial strains to produce high amounts of acetic acid. However, few studies have examined the production of gluconic acid during acetous fermentation at high temperatures. The production of vinegar at high temperatures by two strains of acetic acid bacteria isolated from apple and cactus fruits, namely AF01 and CV01, respectively, was evaluated in this study. The simultaneous production of gluconic and acetic acids was also examined in this study. Biochemical and molecular identification based on a 16s rDNA sequence analysis confirmed that these strains can be classified as Acetobacter pasteurianus. To assess the ability of the isolated strains to grow and produce acetic acid and gluconic acid at high temperatures, a semi-continuous fermentation was performed in a 20-L bioreactor. The two strains abundantly grew at a high temperature (41°C). At the end of the fermentation, the AF01 and CV01 strains yielded acetic acid concentrations of 7.64% (w/v) and 10.08% (w/v), respectively. Interestingly, CV01 was able to simultaneously produce acetic and gluconic acids during acetic fermentation, whereas AF01 mainly produced acetic acid. In addition, CV01 was less sensitive to ethanol depletion during semi-continuous fermentation. Finally, the enzymatic study showed that the two strains exhibited high ADH and ALDH enzyme activity at 38°C compared with the mesophilic reference strain LMG 1632, which was significantly susceptible to thermal inactivation. PMID:26253254

  2. Catalyst suppliers further consolidate business units

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1993-10-11

    The petroleum-refining catalyst industry sustained significant reorganization in 1993. A joint venture between two previous competitors and the consolidated of two sister companies reflect general trends in the global market-place. The Journal's latest survey lists more than 820 unique catalysts. This reduction of some 220 catalysts since the last complete catalyst compilation is partially the result of the deletion of some of the more specialized catalysts from this year's survey. Other factors contributing to this decrease include industry rationalization and the listing of catalyst families instead of individual products--especially in the fluid catalytic cracking category. The Journal's international refining-catalyst compilation lists catalysts manufactured for all major catalytic refinery processes by essentially all the world's petroleum catalyst producers and suppliers. The objective of the survey is two-fold: first, to list each catalyst by its specific designation or supplier identification in its process application category (for instance, hydrocracking); and second, to differentiate each catalyst from the others in that category. These differentiations can be made in terms of either the catalyst's application (for example, feedstock characteristics) or its physical characteristics (for instance, particle size or activity). The compilation is designed to provide a ready reference for both refiners and catalyst manufacturers. In the process, it may also help sort out the sometimes confusing nomenclature used to describe these catalysts.

  3. Catalyst for coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Huibers, Derk T. A.; Kang, Chia-Chen C.

    1984-01-01

    An improved catalyst for a coal liquefaction process; e.g., the H-Coal Process, for converting coal into liquid fuels, and where the conversion is carried out in an ebullated-catalyst-bed reactor wherein the coal contacts catalyst particles and is converted, in addition to liquid fuels, to gas and residual oil which includes preasphaltenes and asphaltenes. The improvement comprises a catalyst selected from the group consisting of the oxides of nickel molybdenum, cobalt molybdenum, cobalt tungsten, and nickel tungsten on a carrier of alumina, silica, or a combination of alumina and silica. The catalyst has a total pore volume of about 0.500 to about 0.900 cc/g and the pore volume comprises micropores, intermediate pores and macropores, the surface of the intermediate pores being sufficiently large to convert the preasphaltenes to asphaltenes and lighter molecules. The conversion of the asphaltenes takes place on the surface of micropores. The macropores are for metal deposition and to prevent catalyst agglomeration. The micropores have diameters between about 50 and about 200 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 50 to about 80% of the pore volume, whereas the intermediate pores have diameters between about 200 and 2000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume, and the macropores have diameters between about 2000 and about 10,000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume. The catalysts are further improved where they contain promoters. Such promoters include the oxides of vanadium, tungsten, copper, iron and barium, tin chloride, tin fluoride and rare earth metals.

  4. Pretreatment of CO oxidation catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannorman, John D.

    1988-01-01

    CO oxidation catalysts with high activity in the range of 25 C to 100 C are important for long-life, closed-cycle operation of pulsed carbon dioxide 2 lasers. A reductive pretreatment with either CO or H sub 2 was shown to significantly enhance the activity of a commerically-available platinum on tin (IV) oxide (Pt/SnO2) catalyst relative to an oxidative or inert pretreatment or no pretreatment. Pretreatment at temperatures of 175 C and above caused an initial dip in observed CO or O sub 2 loss or CO sub 2 formation in a test gas mixture of 1 percent CO and 0.5 percent O sub 2 in a He gas matrix before a steady-state yield was obtained. This dip was found to be caused by dehydration of the surface of the catalyst and was readily eliminated by humidifying the catalyst or the test gas mixture. It was also found that too much moisture resulted in a lower overall yield of CO sub 2. Under similar conditions, it is hypothesized that the effect of the humidification is to increase the concentration of OH groups on the surface of the catalyst. The effect of having high concentration of CO sub 2 in the test gas mixture upon the loss of CO and O sub 2 as well as the effect of periods of relaxation of the catalyst under non-test gas conditions was studied. The purpose of these studies was to gain an insight into the mechanism of CO oxidation on this type of catalyst.

  5. Computerized image analysis for acetic acid induced intraepithelial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Ferris, Daron G.; Lieberman, Rich W.

    2008-03-01

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) exhibits certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Immature and dysphasic cervical squamous epithelium turns white after application of acetic acid during the exam. The whitening process occurs visually over several minutes and subjectively discriminates between dysphasic and normal tissue. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician analyzing the acetic acid induced lesions (acetowhite region) in a fully automatic way. This paper reports a study designed to measure multiple parameters of the acetowhitening process from two images captured with a digital colposcope. One image is captured before the acetic acid application, and the other is captured after the acetic acid application. The spatial change of the acetowhitening is extracted using color and texture information in the post acetic acid image; the temporal change is extracted from the intensity and color changes between the post acetic acid and pre acetic acid images with an automatic alignment. The imaging and data analysis system has been evaluated with a total of 99 human subjects and demonstrate its potential to screening underserved women where access to skilled colposcopists is limited.

  6. Methane Production and Syntrophic Acetate Oxidation in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, M. E.; Chanton, J.; Bae, H.; Ogram, A.

    2012-12-01

    Methane production pathways in the Florida Everglades are influenced by factors such as nutrient levels, H2 concentrations, and temperature. Syntrophic acetate oxidizers can outcompete methanogens for acetate when conditions are right (high temperatures and low H2). During syntrophic acetate oxidation (SAO), which becomes more exergonic with increasing temperature, acetate is oxidized to carbon dioxide and H2, which can be utilized to produce methane via CO2 reduction. Everglades soil from along a nutrient gradient was incubated at 25°C and 45°C. The shift to the CO2 reduction pathway for methane formation that would be expected in high temperature incubations due to SAO should result in a decrease in δ13C-CH4 and increase in δ2H-CH4. Instead, we observed higher δ13C and lower δ2H in the methane produced in high temperature incubations. The higher than expected δ13C may be partly explained by lower kinetic isotope effects caused by temperature. Coupling between the syntrophic acetate oxidizers and the CO2 reducers, whereby isotopically light hydrogen from acetate is used in methane formation could lower δ2H-CH4. Separate experiments using 13C-labelled acetate revealed that potential SAO activity is low in soils collected from the Everglades.

  7. Perspectives for the biotechnological production of ethyl acetate by yeasts.

    PubMed

    Löser, Christian; Urit, Thanet; Bley, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Ethyl acetate is an environmentally friendly solvent with many industrial applications. The production of ethyl acetate currently proceeds by energy-intensive petrochemical processes which are based on natural gas and crude oil without exception. Microbial synthesis of ethyl acetate could become an interesting alternative. The formation of esters as aroma compounds in food has been repeatedly reviewed, but a survey which deals with microbial synthesis of ethyl acetate as a bulk product is missing. The ability of yeasts for producing larger amounts of this ester is known for a long time. In the past, this potential was mainly of scientific interest, but in the future, it could be applied to large-scale ester production from renewable raw materials. Pichia anomala, Candida utilis, and Kluyveromyces marxianus are yeasts which convert sugar into ethyl acetate with a high yield where the latter is the most promising one. Special attention was paid to the mechanism of ester synthesis including regulatory aspects and to the maximum and expectable yield. Synthesis of much ethyl acetate requires oxygen which is usually supplied by aeration. Ethyl acetate is highly volatile so that aeration results in its phase transfer and stripping. This stripping process cannot be avoided but requires adequate handling during experimentation and offers a chance for a cost-efficient process-integrated recovery of the synthesized ester. PMID:24788328

  8. The Effects of Acetate Buffer Concentration on Lysozyme Solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1996-01-01

    The micro-solubility column technique was employed to systematically investigate the effects of buffer concentration on tetragonal lysozyme solubility. While keeping the NaCl concentrations constant at 2%, 3%, 4%, 5% and 7%, and the pH at 4.0, we have studied the solubility of tetragonal lysozyme over an acetate buffer concentration range of 0.01M to 0.5M as a function of temperature. The lysozyme solubility decreased with increasing acetate concentration from 0.01M to 0.1M. This decrease may simply be due to the net increase in solvent ionic strength. Increasing the acetate concentration beyond 0.1M resulted in an increase in the lysozyme solubility, which reached a peak at - 0.3M acetate concentration. This increase was believed to be due to the increased binding of acetate to the anionic binding sites of lysozyme, preventing their occupation by chloride. In keeping with the previously observed reversal of the Hoffmeister series for effectiveness of anions in crystallizing lysozyme, acetate would be a less effective precipitant than chloride. Further increasing the acetate concentration beyond 0.3M resulted in a subsequent gradual decrease in the lysozyme solubility at all NaCl concentrations.

  9. SAGA Complex Components and Acetate Repression in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Georgakopoulos, Paraskevi; Lockington, Robin A.; Kelly, Joan M.

    2012-01-01

    Alongside the well-established carbon catabolite repression by glucose and other sugars, acetate causes repression in Aspergillus nidulans. Mutations in creA, encoding the transcriptional repressor involved in glucose repression, also affect acetate repression, but mutations in creB or creC, encoding components of a deubiquitination system, do not. To understand the effects of acetate, we used a mutational screen that was similar to screens that uncovered mutations in creA, creB, and creC, except that glucose was replaced by acetate to identify mutations that were affected for repression by acetate but not by glucose. We uncovered mutations in acdX, homologous to the yeast SAGA component gene SPT8, which in growth tests showed derepression for acetate repression but not for glucose repression. We also made mutations in sptC, homologous to the yeast SAGA component gene SPT3, which showed a similar phenotype. We found that acetate repression is complex, and analysis of facA mutations (lacking acetyl CoA synthetase) indicates that acetate metabolism is required for repression of some systems (proline metabolism) but not for others (acetamide metabolism). Although plate tests indicated that acdX- and sptC-null mutations led to derepressed alcohol dehydrogenase activity, reverse-transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed no derepression of alcA or aldA but rather elevated induced levels. Our results indicate that acetate repression is due to repression via CreA together with metabolic changes rather than due to an independent regulatory control mechanism. PMID:23173087

  10. SAGA complex components and acetate repression in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Georgakopoulos, Paraskevi; Lockington, Robin A; Kelly, Joan M

    2012-11-01

    Alongside the well-established carbon catabolite repression by glucose and other sugars, acetate causes repression in Aspergillus nidulans. Mutations in creA, encoding the transcriptional repressor involved in glucose repression, also affect acetate repression, but mutations in creB or creC, encoding components of a deubiquitination system, do not. To understand the effects of acetate, we used a mutational screen that was similar to screens that uncovered mutations in creA, creB, and creC, except that glucose was replaced by acetate to identify mutations that were affected for repression by acetate but not by glucose. We uncovered mutations in acdX, homologous to the yeast SAGA component gene SPT8, which in growth tests showed derepression for acetate repression but not for glucose repression. We also made mutations in sptC, homologous to the yeast SAGA component gene SPT3, which showed a similar phenotype. We found that acetate repression is complex, and analysis of facA mutations (lacking acetyl CoA synthetase) indicates that acetate metabolism is required for repression of some systems (proline metabolism) but not for others (acetamide metabolism). Although plate tests indicated that acdX- and sptC-null mutations led to derepressed alcohol dehydrogenase activity, reverse-transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed no derepression of alcA or aldA but rather elevated induced levels. Our results indicate that acetate repression is due to repression via CreA together with metabolic changes rather than due to an independent regulatory control mechanism. PMID:23173087

  11. Stable carbon isotope discrimination in rice field soil during acetate turnover by syntrophic acetate oxidation or acetoclastic methanogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Ralf; Klose, Melanie

    2011-03-01

    Rice fields are an important source for the greenhouse gas methane. In Italian rice field soil CH 4 is produced either by hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis, or by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and syntrophic acetate oxidation when temperatures are below and above about 40-45 °C, respectively. In order to see whether these acetate consumption pathways differently discriminate the stable carbon isotopes of acetate, we measured the δ 13C of total acetate and acetate-methyl as well as the δ 13C of CO 2 and CH 4 in rice field soil that had been pre-incubated at 45 °C and then shifted to different temperatures between 25 and 50 °C. Acetate transiently accumulated to about 6 mM, which is about one-third of the amount of CH 4 produced, irrespective of the incubation temperature and the CH 4 production pathway involved. However, the patterns of δ 13C of the CH 4 and CO 2 produced were different at low (25, 30, 35 °C) versus high (40, 45, 50 °C) temperatures. These patterns were consistent with CH 4 being exclusively formed by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at high temperatures, and by a combination of acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at low temperatures. The patterns of δ 13C of total acetate and acetate-methyl were also different at high versus low temperatures, indicating the involvement of different pathways of production and consumption of acetate at the two temperature regimes. Isotope fractionation during consumption of the methyl group of acetate was more pronounced at low ( α = 1.010-1.025) than at high ( α = 1.0-1.01) temperatures indicating that acetoclastic methanogenesis exhibits a stronger isotope effect than syntrophic acetate oxidation. Small amounts of propionate also transiently accumulated and were analyzed for δ 13C. The δ 13C values slightly increased (by about 10‰) during production and consumption of propionate, but were not affected by incubation temperature. Collectively, our results showed distinct

  12. Using nitrogen-rich polymeric network and iron(II) acetate as precursors to synthesize highly efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mei; Chen, Hongbiao; Yang, Duanguang; Gao, Yong; Li, Huaming

    2016-03-01

    Carbon-supported transition metal/nitrogen (M-N/C) materials are considered as one of the most promising electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) owing to their high ORR electrocatalytic activity, long-term stability, and excellent methanol tolerance. So far only a few examples of such catalysts are prepared from N-containing polymers. Herein, we report a novel Fe-N/C catalyst using a nitrogen-rich polymeric network and iron(II) acetate as the precursors. The porous polymeric network is fabricated by one-step Friedel-Crafts reaction of a low-cost cross-linker, formaldehyde dimethyl acetal, with 2,4,6-tripyrrol-1,3,5-triazine. Compared to commercial Pt/C catalyst, the as-prepared Fe-N/C electrocatalyst exhibits superior ORR activity in alkaline electrolyte, and comparable ORR activity in acidic medium. The results obtained are significant for the development of new Fe-N/C electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

  13. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, J.L.; Clausen, E.C.

    1992-12-22

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H[sub 2]O and/or CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate. 3 figs.

  14. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.; Clausen, Edgar C.

    1992-01-01

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate.

  15. Viscosity of Mixtures of α-Tocopherol Acetate + Mesitylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwajczaka, Elżbieta; Stagraczyński, Ryszard; Herba, Henryk; Świergielb, Jolanta; Jadżyn, Jan

    2009-08-01

    The paper presents results of the share viscosity measurements performed as a function of temperature and concentration for mixtures of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamine E acetate) and mesitylene, two liquids of essentially different viscosity (four order of magnitude difference at 280 K). The viscosity/ temperature dependence for pure α-tocopherol acetate as well as for the mixtures studied can be well described with the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation. The viscosities of the mixtures exhibit a strong negative deviation from the rule of additive dependence on concentration and for increasing temperature the maximum value of the deviation shows an exponential decreasing.

  16. Leuprolide acetate suppresses pedophilic urges and arousability.

    PubMed

    Schober, Justine M; Kuhn, Phyllis J; Kovacs, Paul G; Earle, James H; Byrne, Peter M; Fries, Ruth A

    2005-12-01

    Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy was compared with cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy augmented by leuprolide acetate (LA) for suppression of pedophilic behavior. Five male pedophiles (M age, 50 years; range, 36-58) were administered LA by Depo injection for 12 months, followed by saline placebo for 12 months. Testosterone levels, sexual interest preference by visual reaction time (Abel Assessment), penile tumescence (Monarch Penile Plethysmography, PPG), as well as strong sexual urges toward children and masturbatory frequency involving thoughts of children (polygraph), were measured every 3 months. On LA, testosterone decreased to castrate levels. Penile tumescence was significantly suppressed compared with baseline, but sufficient response remained to detect pedophilic interest. Pedophilic interest was also detected by visual reaction times. When asked about having pedophilic urges and masturbating to thoughts of children, all subjects self-reported a decrease. Polygraph responses indicated subjects were not deceptive. On placebo, testosterone and physiologic arousal eventually rose to baseline. As noted by polygraph, at baseline and on placebo, subjects were deceptive regarding increased pedophilic urges and masturbatory frequency. Interest preference, as measured by Abel Assessment and Monarch PPG, was generally unchanged throughout the study. Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy augmented with LA significantly reduced pedophilic fantasies, urges, and masturbation; however, pedophilic interest did not change during 1 year of therapy. Deceptive responses by polygraph suggested that self-report was unreliable. Follow-up utilizing objective measures is essential for monitoring efficacy of treatment in pedophilia. Our study supports the premise that suppression of pedophilic behavior is possible. LA may augment cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy and help break the sequence leading to a re-offense. PMID:16362253

  17. Low-temperature growth of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers by acetonitrile catalytic CVD using Ni-based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Makino, Yuri; Fukukawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Hideya; Watano, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    To synthesize nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNFs) at high growth rates and low temperatures less than 673 K, nickel species (metallic nickel and nickel oxide) supported on alumina particles were used as the catalysts for an acetonitrile catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The nickel:alumina mass ratio in the catalysts was fixed at 0.05:1. The catalyst precursors were prepared from various nickel salts (nitrate, chloride, sulfate, acetate, and lactate) and then calcined at 1073 K for 1 h in oxidative (air), reductive (hydrogen-containing argon), or inert (pure argon) atmospheres to activate the nickel-based catalysts. The effects of precursors and calcination atmosphere on the catalyst activity at low temperatures were studied. We found that the catalysts derived from nickel nitrate had relatively small crystallite sizes of nickel species and provided N-CNFs at high growth rates of 57 ± 4 g-CNF/g-Ni/h at 673 K in the CVD process using 10 vol% hydrogen-containing argon as the carrier gas of acetonitrile vapor, which were approximately 4 times larger than that of a conventional CVD process. The obtained results reveal that nitrate ions in the catalyst precursor and hydrogen in the carrier gas can contribute effectively to the activation of catalysts in low-temperature CVD. The fiber diameter and nitrogen content of N-CNFs synthesized at high growth rates were several tens of nanometers and 3.5 ± 0.3 at.%, respectively. Our catalysts and CVD process may lead to cost reductions in the production of N-CNFs.

  18. Bimetallic catalysts for hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhehao; Sun, Junming; Li, Yan; Datye, Abhaya K; Wang, Yong

    2012-12-21

    Research interest in bimetallic catalysts is mainly due to their tunable chemical/physical properties by a number of parameters like composition and morphostructure. In catalysis, numerous bimetallic catalysts have been shown to exhibit unique properties which are distinct from those of their monometallic counterparts. To meet the growing energy demand while mitigating the environmental concerns, numerous endeavors have been made to seek green and sustainable energy resources, among which hydrogen has been identified as the most promising one with bimetallic catalysts playing important roles. This tutorial review intends to summarize recent progress in bimetallic catalysts for hydrogen production, specifically focusing on that of reforming technologies as well as the relevant processes like water-gas shift (WGS) and CO preferential oxidation (PROX), and emphasizing on the fundamental understanding of the nature of catalytic sites responsible for generating high purity hydrogen and minimizing carbon monoxide formation. Meanwhile, some important synthesis and characterization methods of bimetallic catalysts developed so far are also summarized. PMID:23011345

  19. Bound zeolite catalyst and process for using the catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, J.L.; Poeppelmeier, K.R.; Funk, W.G.; Steger, J.J.; Fung, S.C.; Cross, V.R.

    1987-03-10

    A process is described for reforming naphtha. The process comprises (a) contacting the naphtha in the presence of hydrogen at elevated temperatures with a catalyst comprising a binder, a type L zeolite containing exchangeable cations of which at least 75% are selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, calcium and barium, at least one Group VIII noble metal, the particles of which are well dispersed over the surface of the catalyst and at least 90% of the noble metal associated with the zeolite is in the form of particles having a diameter of less than about 7 A; and (b) recovering reformed product.

  20. The transcriptional activator CorR is involved in biosynthesis of the phytotoxin coronatine and binds to the cmaABT promoter region in a temperature-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Bender, C L; Ullrich, M S

    1999-09-01

    A modified two-component regulatory system consisting of the histidine protein kinase CorS and two highly homologous response regulators, CorR and CorP, controls biosynthesis of the polyketide phytotoxin coronatine (COR) by Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea PG4180 in a temperature-dependent manner. COR synthesis is maximal at 18 degrees C but does not occur at 28 degrees C. Fusions of CorR and CorP to the maltose-binding protein (MBP) were overproduced in Escherichia coli and P. syringae PG4180, and tested for functionality by complementation of corR and corP mutants of PG4180, respectively. The cmaABT promoter region was defined by deletion mapping, and the DNA-binding capability of CorR and CorP was examined by gel retardation assays. When overproduced in P. syringae at 18 degrees C and purified, MBP-CorR was shown to bind specifically to a 218-bp DNA fragment corresponding to positions -841 to -623 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site of the cmaABT operon. In contrast, MBP-CorP and MBP itself, when overproduced in P. syringae and E. coli at 18 degrees C and 28 degrees C, respectively, did not bind to the 218-bp fragment or to any other DNA fragment analyzed. The CorP protein lacks typical DNA-binding motifs, suggesting that it might modulate the function of CorR. However, addition of purified MBP-CorP did not alter the DNA-binding activity of MBP-CorR. On the other hand, this activity was completely abolished when MBPCorR was overproduced at 28 degrees C or in a corS mutant, indicating that the binding of CorR depended on the growth temperature at which it was produced and was controlled by CorS. In addition, overproduction of MBP-CorR in a corP mutant of PG4180 also yielded inactive protein, underlining the importance of CorP for CorR activation. We propose that CorR is activated by CorS at low temperature and that CorP is required for this activation before CorR can bind to DNA. PMID:10517320

  1. [The mechanism of acetate assimilation in purple nonsulfur bacteria lacking the glyoxylate pathway: acetate assimilation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides cells].

    PubMed

    Filatova, L V; Berg, I A; Krasil'nikova, E N; Tsygankov, A A; Laurinavichene, T V; Ivanovskiĭ, R N

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of acetate assimilation in the purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, which lacks the glyoxylate pathway, is studied. It is found that the growth of this bacterium in batch and continuous cultures and the assimilation of acetate in cell suspensions are not stimulated by bicarbonate. The consumption of acetate is accompanied by the excretion of glyoxylate and pyruvate into the medium, stimulated by glyoxylate and pyruvate, and inhibited by citramalate. The respiration of cells in the presence of acetate is stimulated by glyoxylate, pyruvate, citramalate, and mesaconate. These data suggest that the citramalate cycle may function in Rba. sphaeroides in the form of an anaplerotic pathway instead of the glyoxylate pathway. At the same time, the low ratio of fixation rates for bicarbonate and acetate exhibited by the Rba. sphaeroides cells (approximately 0.1), as well as the absence of the stimulatory effect of acetate on the fixation of bicarbonate in the presence of the Calvin cycle inhibitor iodoacetate, suggests that pyruvate synthase is not involved in acetate assimilation in the bacterium Rba. sphaeroides. PMID:16119843

  2. Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

    1999-09-30

    Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare-earth exchanged

  3. Comparison of growth, acetate production, and acetate inhibition of Escherichia coli strains in batch and fed-batch fermentations.

    PubMed

    Luli, G W; Strohl, W R

    1990-04-01

    The growth characteristics and acetate production of several Escherichia coli strains were compared by using shake flasks, batch fermentations, and glucose-feedback-controlled fed-batch fermentations to assess the potential of each strain to grow at high cell densities. Of the E. coli strains tested, including JM105, B, W3110, W3100, HB101, DH1, CSH50, MC1060, JRG1046, and JRG1061, strains JM105 and B were found to have the greatest relative biomass accumulation, strain MC1060 accumulated the highest concentrations of acetic acid, and strain B had the highest growth rates under the conditions tested. In glucose-feedback-controlled fed-batch fermentations, strains B and JM105 produced only 2 g of acetate.liter-1 while accumulating up to 30 g of biomass.liter-1. Under identical conditions, strains HB101 and MC1060 accumulated less than 10 g of biomass.liter-1 and strain MC1060 produced 8 g of acetate.liter-1. The addition of various concentrations of sodium acetate to the growth medium resulted in a logarithmic decrease, with respect to acetate concentration, in the growth rates of E. coli JM105, JM105(pOS4201), and JRG1061. These data indicated that the growth of the E. coli strains was likely to be inhibited by the acetate they produced when grown on media containing glucose. A model for the inhibition of growth of E. coli by acetate was derived from these experiments to explain the inhibition of acetate on E. coli strains at neutral pH. PMID:2187400

  4. Comparison of growth, acetate production, and acetate inhibition of Escherichia coli strains in batch and fed-batch fermentations.

    PubMed Central

    Luli, G W; Strohl, W R

    1990-01-01

    The growth characteristics and acetate production of several Escherichia coli strains were compared by using shake flasks, batch fermentations, and glucose-feedback-controlled fed-batch fermentations to assess the potential of each strain to grow at high cell densities. Of the E. coli strains tested, including JM105, B, W3110, W3100, HB101, DH1, CSH50, MC1060, JRG1046, and JRG1061, strains JM105 and B were found to have the greatest relative biomass accumulation, strain MC1060 accumulated the highest concentrations of acetic acid, and strain B had the highest growth rates under the conditions tested. In glucose-feedback-controlled fed-batch fermentations, strains B and JM105 produced only 2 g of acetate.liter-1 while accumulating up to 30 g of biomass.liter-1. Under identical conditions, strains HB101 and MC1060 accumulated less than 10 g of biomass.liter-1 and strain MC1060 produced 8 g of acetate.liter-1. The addition of various concentrations of sodium acetate to the growth medium resulted in a logarithmic decrease, with respect to acetate concentration, in the growth rates of E. coli JM105, JM105(pOS4201), and JRG1061. These data indicated that the growth of the E. coli strains was likely to be inhibited by the acetate they produced when grown on media containing glucose. A model for the inhibition of growth of E. coli by acetate was derived from these experiments to explain the inhibition of acetate on E. coli strains at neutral pH. PMID:2187400

  5. Cosolvent gel-like materials from partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl acetate)s and borax.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Lora V; Terech, Pierre; Natali, Irene; Dei, Luigi; Carretti, Emiliano; Weiss, Richard G

    2011-09-20

    A gel-like, high-viscosity polymeric dispersion (HVPD) based on cross-linked borate, partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl acetate) (xPVAc, where x is the percent hydrolysis) is described. Unlike hydro-HVPDs prepared from poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and borate, the liquid portion of these materials can be composed of up to 75% of an organic cosolvent because of the influence of residual acetate groups on the polymer backbone. The effects of the degree of hydrolysis, molecular weight, polymer and cross-linker concentrations, and type and amount of organic cosolvent on the rheological and structural properties of the materials are investigated. The stability of the systems is explored through rheological and melting-range studies. (11)B NMR and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) are used to probe the structure of the dispersions. The addition of an organic liquid to the xPVAc-borate HVPDs results in a drastic increase in the number of cross-linked borate species as well as the agglomeration of the polymer into bundles. These effects result in an increase in the relaxation time and thermal stability of the networks. The ability to make xPVAc-borate HVPDs with very large amounts of and rather different organic liquids, with very different rheological properties that can be controlled easily, opens new possibilities for applications of PVAc-based dispersions. PMID:21848256

  6. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    DOEpatents

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  7. Novel catalyst widens octane opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, G.

    1987-01-01

    Of the octane upgrading options available, refiners are focusing on those which offer a low upgrading cost, a low capital cost and a short implementation time. The BP ETHEROL Process with the novel trifunctional catalyst satisfies all of these requirements and, with the added ability to produce heavier ethers than just MTBE, provides a new opportunity for octane enhancement. The trifunctional catalyst combines the benefits of etherification, diolefin hydrogenation and olefin isomerisation in one single catalyst and for essentially no incremental investment relative to a conventional MTBE unit. The economics demonstrate that at an upgrading cost of 15 cents per octane barrel, the BP ETHEROL Process is highly competitive with other octane upgrading options.

  8. A Mechanochemically Triggered "Click" Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Michael, Philipp; Binder, Wolfgang H

    2015-11-16

    "Click" chemistry represents one of the most powerful approaches for linking molecules in chemistry and materials science. Triggering this reaction by mechanical force would enable site- and stress-specific "click" reactions--a hitherto unreported observation. We introduce the design and realization of a homogeneous Cu catalyst able to activate through mechanical force when attached to suitable polymer chains, acting as a lever to transmit the force to the central catalytic system. Activation of the subsequent copper-catalyzed "click" reaction (CuAAC) is achieved either by ultrasonication or mechanical pressing of a polymeric material, using a fluorogenic dye to detect the activation of the catalyst. Based on an N-heterocyclic copper(I) carbene with attached polymeric chains of different flexibility, the force is transmitted to the central catalyst, thereby activating a CuAAC in solution and in the solid state. PMID:26420664

  9. Acetoxychavicol Acetate, an Antifungal Component of Alpinia galanga1.

    PubMed

    Janssen, A M; Scheffer, J J

    1985-12-01

    The essential oils from fresh and dried rhizomes of ALPINIA GALANGA showed an antimicrobial activity against gram-positive bacteria, a yeast and some dermatophytes, using the agar overlay technique. The main components of the oils were also tested and terpinen-4-ol was found most active. An N-pentane/diethyl ether extract of dried rhizomes was active against TRICHOPHYTON MENTAGROPHYTES. 1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate, 1'-acetoxyeugenol acetate and 1'-hydroxychavicol acetate identified by MS and NMR were found in the antifungally active fractions obtained by LSC. Acetoxychavicol acetate was active against the seven fungi tested and its MIC value for dermatophytes ranged from 50 to 250 microg/ml. Dried sliced rhizomes contained 1.5% of this compound. The compound was not found in rhizomes of ALPINIA OFFICINARUM, ZINGIBER OFFICINALE and KAEMPFERIA GALANGA. PMID:17345272

  10. Biosynthesis of the halogenated auxin, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Tivendale, Nathan D; Davidson, Sandra E; Davies, Noel W; Smith, Jason A; Dalmais, Marion; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid I; Quittenden, Laura J; Sutton, Lily; Bala, Raj K; Le Signor, Christine; Thompson, Richard; Horne, James; Reid, James B; Ross, John J

    2012-07-01

    Seeds of several agriculturally important legumes are rich sources of the only halogenated plant hormone, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid. However, the biosynthesis of this auxin is poorly understood. Here, we show that in pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid is synthesized via the novel intermediate 4-chloroindole-3-pyruvic acid, which is produced from 4-chlorotryptophan by two aminotransferases, TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE RELATED1 and TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE RELATED2. We characterize a tar2 mutant, obtained by Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes, the seeds of which contain dramatically reduced 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid levels as they mature. We also show that the widespread auxin, indole-3-acetic acid, is synthesized by a parallel pathway in pea. PMID:22573801

  11. Ice-melting characteristics of calcium magnesium acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, R. U.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the study are to determine the pertinent properties of Calcium/Magnesium Acetate and to determine the pH and ratio of calcium to magnesium that provide optimum road deicing characteristics.

  12. Deep cavitands featuring functional acetal-based walls.

    PubMed

    Degardin, Melissa; Busseron, Eric; Kim, Dang-A; Ajami, Dariush; Rebek, Julius

    2012-12-18

    The synthesis of deep cavitands with functionalized acetals as a fourth-wall is described. Recognition properties and stabilities of the complexes of two representative cavitands with aliphatic, aromatic, carbocyclic and adamantane guests were evaluated by NMR methods. PMID:23125977

  13. Fragrance material review on 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group aryl alkyl alcohol simple acid esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes physical properties data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances. PMID:22414652

  14. A molecular dynamics study of the ionic liquid, choline acetate.

    PubMed

    Willcox, Jon A L; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyung J

    2016-06-01

    Structural and dynamic properties of the ionic liquid (IL) choline acetate are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The hydroxyl group of choline shows significant hydrogen-bonding interactions with the oxygen atoms of acetate. Nearly all choline cations are found to form a hydrogen bond with acetate anions at 400 K, while about 67% of cations participate in hydrogen-bonding interactions at 600 K. At 400 K, subdiffusive and prominent non-Gaussian behavior persist for t > 10 ns. At 600 K, the usual diffusion regime is obtained after a few hundred ps of subdiffusive behavior. Analysis of reorientational motions of acetate ions, particularly those of their short axes, indicates a high degree of dynamic heterogeneity, in agreement with previous work on different IL systems. PMID:27188287

  15. Light and Acetate Regulate a Mitochondrial Malate Dehydrogenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Struck, Friedhelm; Grölz-Krug, Sabine; Boschek, Bruce; Zetsche, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    A malate dehydrogenase was purified from the unicellular green alga Chlorogonium elongatum Dangeard. The enzyme was localized in the mitochondria by immunogold electron microscopy and was found to be present on the cristae. The concentration of the enzyme is regulated by acetate and light. In cells cultured heterotrophically with acetate as carbon source the activity and the concentration of the enzyme is 5- to 6-fold higher than in autotrophic cells. In mixotrophically cultured cells (light and acetate) the enzyme level attains only half of the value of that in heterotrophic cells. Acetate induces an increase of the enzyme concentration while light has an inhibitory effect on this process. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:16665643

  16. Catalyst for Decomposition of Nitrogen Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Ates (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Jale (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a platinized tin oxide-based catalyst. It relates particularly to an improved platinized tin oxide-based catalyst able to decompose nitric oxide to nitrogen and oxygen without the necessity of a reducing gas.

  17. Catalysts for carbon and coal gasification

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Douglas W.; Spiro, Clifford L.; Kosky, Philip G.

    1985-01-01

    Catalyst for the production of methane from carbon and/or coal by means of catalytic gasification. The catalyst compostion containing at least two alkali metal salts. A particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used.

  18. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. [DOE patent

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Perkins, P.

    Novel compounds are described which are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO + H/sub 2/ to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  19. The role of copper species on Cu/γ-Al2O3 catalysts for NH3-SCO reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chunxia; Li, Xinyong; Qu, Zhenping; Tade, Moses; Liu, Shaomin

    2012-02-01

    UV-vis spectra, XRD, H2-TPR, TEM and ESR were used to characterize a series of Cu/γ-Al2O3 catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation using copper nitrate, copper acetate or copper sulfate as precursors, to study the role of Cu species on Cu/γ-Al2O3 catalysts for NH3-SCO reaction. It was found that the mixture of CuO phase and CuAl2O4 phase formed on various Cu/γ-Al2O3 catalysts, and the Cu species and dispersion had significant influence on the Cu/γ-Al2O3 activity. Highly dispersed CuO phase on the support would be related with its high activity for the NH3-SCO reaction.

  20. Fe3O4@B-MCM-41: A new magnetically recoverable nanostructured catalyst for the synthesis of polyhydroquinolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi-Alibeik, Mohammad; Rezaeipoor-Anari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Boron modified MCM-41 with magnetite core (Fe3O4@B-MCM-41) as a new magnetically recoverable heterogeneous catalyst was prepared and characterized by SEM, TEM, BET, XRD, VSM and FT-IR techniques. The catalytic activity of Fe3O4@B-MCM-41 was investigated in the four-component reaction of aldehyde, dimedone, active methylene compounds and ammonium acetate for the synthesis of polyhydroquinolines. According to optimization and characterization results the catalyst with Si:B:Fe3O4 mole composition of 40:4:1 has the best activity. The catalyst could be recovered easily by external magnet and has excellent reusability many times without significant decrease of activity.

  1. Microorganisms having enhanced resistance to acetate and methods of use

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Yang, Shihui

    2014-10-21

    The present invention provides isolated or genetically modified strains of microorganisms that display enhanced resistance to acetate as a result of increased expression of a sodium proton antiporter. The present invention also provides methods for producing such microbial strains, as well as related promoter sequences and expression vectors. Further, the present invention provides methods of producing alcohol from biomass materials by using microorganisms with enhanced resistance to acetate.

  2. Water dispersible microbicidal cellulose acetate phthalate film

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, A Robert; Strick, Nathan; Li, Yun-Yao

    2003-01-01

    Background Cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP) has been used for several decades in the pharmaceutical industry for enteric film coating of oral tablets and capsules. Micronized CAP, available commercially as "Aquateric" and containing additional ingredients required for micronization, used for tablet coating from water dispersions, was shown to adsorb and inactivate the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), herpesviruses (HSV) and other sexually transmitted disease (STD) pathogens. Earlier studies indicate that a gel formulation of micronized CAP has a potential as a topical microbicide for prevention of STDs including the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The objective of endeavors described here was to develop a water dispersible CAP film amenable to inexpensive industrial mass production. Methods CAP and hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) were dissolved in different organic solvent mixtures, poured into dishes, and the solvents evaporated. Graded quantities of a resulting selected film were mixed for 5 min at 37°C with HIV-1, HSV and other STD pathogens, respectively. Residual infectivity of the treated viruses and bacteria was determined. Results The prerequisites for producing CAP films which are soft, flexible and dispersible in water, resulting in smooth gels, are combining CAP with HPC (other cellulose derivatives are unsuitable), and casting from organic solvent mixtures containing ≈50 to ≈65% ethanol (EtOH). The films are ≈100 µ thick and have a textured surface with alternating protrusions and depressions revealed by scanning electron microscopy. The films, before complete conversion into a gel, rapidly inactivated HIV-1 and HSV and reduced the infectivity of non-viral STD pathogens >1,000-fold. Conclusions Soft pliable CAP-HPC composite films can be generated by casting from organic solvent mixtures containing EtOH. The films rapidly reduce the infectivity of several STD pathogens, including HIV-1. They are converted into gels and thus do not

  3. Bioavailability of acetate from two vinegar supplements: capsule and drink.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Shino; Fushimi, Takashi; Kishi, Mikiya; Irie, Shin; Tsuji, Shigeki; Hosokawa, Natsuko; Kaga, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    The bioavailability of acetate in various vinegar supplements, e.g. as capsules and drinks, remains unclear. Thus, we conducted a cross-over clinical study in 30 healthy subjects. After an overnight fast, subjects received each test sample in a randomised sequence: 9 vinegar capsules (containing 750 mg acetic acid in total) with 150 mL of water, 100 mL of vinegar drink (containing 750 mg acetic acid), and 150 mL of water as reference. Blood samples were collected before (defined as 0 min), at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120 and 180 min after each test sample intake. In the vinegar drink group, serum acetate concentration increased immediately after intake, peaked at 15 min and returned to baseline at 90 min. That in the vinegar capsule group rose slowly, peaked at 30 min and returned to baseline at 120 min. The peak values in both groups exceeded 200 µmol/L, the physiologically active concentration confirmed by in vitro experiment. In the reference group, levels remained constant throughout the 180-min period. The amount of absorbed acetate from the vinegar capsule group and the drink group was evaluated by the difference value of the area under the serum acetate concentration-time curve (AUC) between in each vinegar group and in the reference group (expressed as AUC(capsule-ref) and AUC(drink-ref ), respectively). AUC(capsule-ref) was about 80% of AUC(drink-ref ), but there was no significant difference between them. PMID:20924150

  4. Disease modifying potential of glatiramer acetate in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Corey-Bloom, Jody; Jia, Haiqun; Aikin, Alaina M.; Thomas, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Deficiencies in brain-derived-neurotrophic-factor have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD). Objective Glatiramer acetate, an FDA- approved drug used for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, has been shown to increase brain-derived-neurotrophic-factor levels in immune cells; hence, we investigated whether it could have similar effects in striatal cells. Methods Wild-type and HD striatal cells were treated with glatiramer acetate for 48 hrs. HD transgenic and wild-type mice were injected with glatiramer acetate (1.5 to1.7 mg/mouse) for five days. These treatments were followed by protein measurements for brain-derived-neurotrophic-factor. Results Glatiramer acetate elicited concentration-dependent increases in brain-derived-neurotrophic-factor protein levels in wild-type and HD striatal cells and in striatal tissue from N171-82Q transgenic mice. Glatiramer acetate also improved metabolic activity of HD striatal cells, and significantly reduced the early hyperactivity phenotype exhibited by N171-82Q transgenic mice. Conclusions These findings suggest that glatiramer acetate may represent a useful therapeutic approach for HD. The excellent safety and tolerability record of this compound makes it an ideal candidate for drug repurposing efforts. PMID:25300334

  5. Genetic dissection of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Geng, Peng; Xiao, Yin; Hu, Yun; Sun, Haiye; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Gui-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Dissection of the hereditary architecture underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for ethanol fermentation. In this work, a genomics approach was used to dissect hereditary variations in acetic acid tolerance between two phenotypically different strains. A total of 160 segregants derived from these two strains were obtained. Phenotypic analysis indicated that the acetic acid tolerance displayed a normal distribution in these segregants, and suggested that the acetic acid tolerant traits were controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Thus, 220 SSR markers covering the whole genome were used to detect QTLs of acetic acid tolerant traits. As a result, three QTLs were located on chromosomes 9, 12, and 16, respectively, which explained 38.8-65.9 % of the range of phenotypic variation. Furthermore, twelve genes of the candidates fell into the three QTL regions by integrating the QTL analysis with candidates of acetic acid tolerant genes. These results provided a novel avenue to obtain more robust strains. PMID:27430512

  6. Acetic acid oxidation and hydrolysis in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.C.; Marrone, P.A.; Tester, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    Acetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOH) hydrolysis and oxidation in supercritical water were examined from 425--600 C and 246 bar at reactor residence times of 4.4 to 9.8 s. Over the range of conditions studied, acetic acid oxidation was globally 0.72 {+-} 0.15 order in acetic acid and 0.27 {+-} 0.15 order in oxygen to a 95% confidence level, with an activation energy of 168 {+-} 21 kJ/mol, a preexponential factor of 10{sup 9.9{+-}1.7}, and an induction time of about 1.5 s at 525 C. Isothermal kinetic measurements at 550 C over the range 160 to 263 bar indicated that pressure or density did not affect the rate of acetic acid oxidation as much as was previously observed in the oxidation of hydrogen or carbon monoxide in supercritical water. Major products of acetic acid oxidation in supercritical water are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen. Trace amounts of propenoic acid were occasionally detected. Hydrolysis or hydrothermolysis in the absence of oxygen resulted in approximately 35% conversion of acetic acid at 600 C, 246 bar, and 8-s reactor residence time. Regression of the limited hydrolysis runs assuming a reaction rate first-order in organic gave a global rate expression with a preexponential factor of 10{sup 4.4{+-}1.1} and an activation energy of 94 {+-} 17 kJ/mol.

  7. Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, S.; Jothimurugesan, K.

    1999-07-27

    A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption process, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gases from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or passivating the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

  8. Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh; Jothimurugesan, Kandaswamy

    1999-01-01

    A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption processes, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gasses from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or "passivating" the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

  9. Polymer bound Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, W.-L.; Kurr, R.J.; Maly, N.A.; Parker, D.K.; Stozier, R.W.

    1986-06-24

    A process is described for the conversion of synthesis gas to hydrocarbons which comprises contacting the synthesis gas with a catalyst in the vapor phase at a temperature from 175/sup 0/C to 300/sup 0/C and a pressure of at least 1000 kPa. The improvement described here comprising using as the catalyst a catalyst.

  10. 40 CFR 721.9665 - Organotin catalysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organotin catalysts. 721.9665 Section... Substances § 721.9665 Organotin catalysts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as organotin catalysts (PMNs P-93-853,...

  11. 40 CFR 721.9665 - Organotin catalysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Organotin catalysts. 721.9665 Section... Substances § 721.9665 Organotin catalysts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as organotin catalysts (PMNs P-93-853,...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9665 - Organotin catalysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Organotin catalysts. 721.9665 Section... Substances § 721.9665 Organotin catalysts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as organotin catalysts (PMNs P-93-853,...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9665 - Organotin catalysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organotin catalysts. 721.9665 Section... Substances § 721.9665 Organotin catalysts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as organotin catalysts (PMNs P-93-853,...

  14. 40 CFR 721.9665 - Organotin catalysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Organotin catalysts. 721.9665 Section... Substances § 721.9665 Organotin catalysts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as organotin catalysts (PMNs P-93-853,...

  15. Cracking process with catalyst of combined zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Gladrow, E. M.; Winter, W. E.

    1981-09-01

    A hydrocarbon cracking catalyst comprises an ultrastable y-type crystalline zeolite, a small pore crystalline zeolite such as mordenite, an inorganic oxide matrix and, optionally, a porous inert component. The cracking catalyst has a high activity and selectivity for the production of high octane naphtha fractions from higher boiling point hydrocarbonaceous oils. Catalytic cracking processes utilizing the catalyst are also provided.

  16. Silver doped catalysts for treatment of exhaust

    DOEpatents

    Park, Paul Worn; Hester, Virgil Raymond; Ragle, Christie Susan; Boyer, Carrie L.

    2009-06-02

    A method of making an exhaust treatment element includes washcoating a substrate with a slurry that includes a catalyst support material. At least some of the catalyst support material from the slurry may be transferred to the substrate, and silver metal (Ag) is dispersed within the catalyst support material.

  17. Rhodium(III)-catalyzed C-C coupling of 7-azaindoles with vinyl acetates and allyl acetates.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai-Shuai; Wang, Cheng-Qi; Lin, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Dong, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour of electron-rich alkenes with 7-azaindoles in rhodium(III)-catalyzed C-H activation is investigated. Various substituted vinyl acetates and allyl acetates as coupling partners reacted smoothly providing a wide variety of 7-azaindole derivatives, and the selectivity of the coupling reaction is alkene-dependent. In addition, the approaches of rhodium(III)-catalyzed dehydrogenative Heck-type reaction (DHR) and carbonylation reaction were quite novel and simple. PMID:26553424

  18. Pulmonary and percutaneous absorption of 2-propoxyethyl acetate and 2-ethoxyethyl acetate in beagle dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Guest, D; Hamilton, M L; Deisinger, P J; DiVincenzo, G D

    1984-01-01

    A comparison was made of the absorption and elimination rates of 2-propoxyethyl acetate (PEA) and 2-ethoxyethyl acetate (EEA) following inhalation, dermal application or IV administration. Male beagle dogs were exposed to 50 ppm PEA or EEA for 5 hr, and breath samples were collected during the exposure and a 3-hr recovery period. Both compounds were rapidly absorbed through the lungs. After 10 min of exposure, the concentrations of the parent compounds in the expired breath were 5 to 10 ppm (80-90% absorption) and reached plateau values at about 3 hr of 13 ppm for PEA (74% absorption) and 16 ppm for EEA (68% absorption). Post-exposure breath samples declined exponentially to 0.5 ppm and 2 ppm after 3 hr for PEA and EEA, respectively. Expired concentrations of PEA were slightly, but significantly (p less than 0.025), lower than those of EEA at corresponding times during the exposure. After IV dosing with 1 mg/kg [ethyl-1,2-14C]PEA, the urine contained 61% and 88% of the dose in 4 and 24 hr, respectively. [14C]EEA was eliminated more slowly, with 20% and 61% of the dose appearing in the urine in 4 and 24 hr, respectively. Blood elimination half-lives were 1.6 hr for [14C]PEA and 7.9 hr for [14C]EEA. Only trace amounts of 14CO2 (less than 1%) or volatile materials (less than 0.1%) were detected in the expired air with either compound. For studies of percutaneous absorption, [14C]PEA or [14C]EEA was added to undiluted compound and applied in a glass cell to a shaved area on a dog's thorax for 30 or 60 min.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6499802

  19. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  20. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, K.D.

    1991-06-25

    Perovskites of the structure A[sub 2]B[sub 2]C[sub 3]O[sub 10] are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.