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Sample records for acetate lactate ethanol

  1. Manufacturing Ethyl Acetate From Fermentation Ethanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, Naresh K.; Ingham, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Conceptual process uses dilute product of fermentation instead of concentrated ethanol. Low-concentration ethanol, extracted by vacuum from fermentation tank, and acetic acid constitutes feedstock for catalytic reaction. Product of reaction goes through steps that increases ethyl acetate content to 93 percent by weight. To conserve energy, heat exchangers recycle waste heat to preheat process streams at various points.

  2. A novel fermentation pathway in an Escherichia coli mutant producing succinic acid, acetic acid, and ethanol.

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M. I.; Millard, C. S.; Clark, D. P.; Chen, M. J.; Rathke, J. W.; Southern Illinois Univ.

    1998-04-01

    Escherichia coli strain NZN111, which is unable to grow fermentatively because of insertional inactivation of the genes encoding pyruvate: formate lyase and the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase, gave rise spontaneously to a chromosomal mutation that restored its ability to ferment glucose. The mutant strain, named AFP111, fermented glucose more slowly than did its wild-type ancestor, strain W1485, and generated a very different spectrum of products. AFP111 produced succinic acid, acetic acid, and ethanol in proportions of approx 2:1:1. Calculations of carbon and electron balances accounted fully for the observed products; 1 mol of glucose was converted to 1 mol of succinic acid and 0.5 mol each of acetic acid and ethanol. The data support the emergence in E.coli of a novel succinic acid:acetic acid:ethanol fermentation pathway.

  3. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.; Clausen, Edgar C.

    1992-01-01

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate.

  4. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, J.L.; Clausen, E.C.

    1992-12-22

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H[sub 2]O and/or CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate. 3 figs.

  5. Performance of dairy cows fed high levels of acetic acid or ethanol.

    PubMed

    Daniel, J L P; Amaral, R C; Sá Neto, A; Cabezas-Garcia, E H; Bispo, A W; Zopollatto, M; Cardoso, T L; Spoto, M H F; Santos, F A P; Nussio, L G

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol and acetic acid are common end products from silages. The main objective of this study was to determine whether high concentrations of ethanol or acetic acid in total mixed ration would affect performance in dairy cows. Thirty mid-lactation Holstein cows were grouped in 10 blocks and fed one of the following diets for 7 wk: (1) control (33% Bermuda hay + 67% concentrates), (2) ethanol [control diet + 5% ethanol, dry matter (DM) basis], or (3) acetic acid (control diet + 5% acetic acid, DM basis). Ethanol and acetic acid were diluted in water (1:2) and sprayed onto total mixed rations twice daily before feeding. An equal amount of water was mixed with the control ration. To adapt animals to these treatments, cows were fed only half of the treatment dose during the first week of study. Cows fed ethanol yielded more milk (37.9 kg/d) than those fed the control (35.8 kg/d) or acetic acid (35.3 kg/d) diets, mainly due to the higher DM intake (DMI; 23.7, 22.2, and 21.6 kg/d, respectively). The significant diet × week interaction for DMI, mainly during wk 2 and 3 (when acetic acid reached the full dose), was related to the decrease in DMI observed for the acetic acid treatment. There was a diet × week interaction in excretion of milk energy per DMI during wk 2 and 3, due to cows fed acetic acid sustained milk yield despite lower DMI. Energy efficiency was similar across diets. Blood metabolites (glucose, insulin, nonesterified fatty acids, ethanol, and γ-glutamyl transferase activity) and sensory characteristics of milk were not affected by these treatments. Animal performance suggested similar energy value for the diet containing ethanol compared with other diets. Rumen conversion of ethanol to acetate and a concomitant increase in methane production might be a plausible explanation for the deviation of the predicted energy value based on the heat of combustion. Therefore, the loss of volatile compounds during the drying process in the laboratory should be

  6. Ethanol sorption and partial molar volume in cellulose acetate films

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, B.A.; Kint, S.; Bailey, G.F.; Scherer, J.R.

    1986-03-13

    The absorption characteristics of cellulose acetate (CA398) and cellulose triacetate membranes for ethanol vapor were determined by integrated optical techniques. Changes in the refractive index and film thicknesses are used to calculate the ethanol concentration within the membrane, to calculate the partial molar volume of sorbed ethanol as a function of ethanol concentration, and to estimate the average void volume of the dry film. The refractive index is shown to be very sensitive to the available void space within the membrane. The average total void space for the films considered here was less than 1% of the dry polymer volume. 22 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  7. Detoxification of biomass derived acetate via metabolic conversion to ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, or ethyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Sillers, William Ryan; Van Dijken, Hans; Licht, Steve; Shaw, IV, Arthur J.; Gilbert, Alan Benjamin; Argyros, Aaron; Froehlich, Allan C.; McBride, John E.; Xu, Haowen; Hogsett, David A.; Rajgarhia, Vineet B.

    2017-03-28

    One aspect of the invention relates to a genetically modified thermophilic or mesophilic microorganism, wherein a first native gene is partially, substantially, or completely deleted, silenced, inactivated, or down-regulated, which first native gene encodes a first native enzyme involved in the metabolic production of an organic acid or a salt thereof, thereby increasing the native ability of said thermophilic or mesophilic microorganism to produce lactate or acetate as a fermentation product. In certain embodiments, the aforementioned microorganism further comprises a first non-native gene, which first non-native gene encodes a first non-native enzyme involved in the metabolic production of lactate or acetate. Another aspect of the invention relates to a process for converting lignocellulosic biomass to lactate or acetate, comprising contacting lignocellulosic biomass with a genetically modified thermophilic or mesophilic microorganism.

  8. Production of lactate and acetate by Lactobacillus coryniformis subsp. torquens DSM 20004(T) in comparison with Lactobacillus amylovorus DSM 20531(T).

    PubMed

    Slavica, Anita; Trontel, Antonija; Jelovac, Nuša; Kosovec, Željka; Šantek, Božidar; Novak, Srđan

    2015-05-20

    Lactobacillus coryniformis subsp. torquens DSM20004(T) is a d-lactate producer, with a portion of the d-lactate higher than 99.9% of total lactic acid produced. Acetate was identified as the second end-product that appeared at the end of the exponential growth phase in MRS medium when glucose concentration dropped to 38.41mM (6.92g/L). The acetate production was prolonged to the stationary phase, while the concentration of d-lactate remained constant. Other end-products were not identified by HPLC method. The known metabolic pathways of glucose fermentation in lactic acid bacteria do not produce the particular combination of these two end-products, but besides lactate and acetate also formate, ethanol and CO2 are produced. For comparison, the production of lactate and acetate by a d-/l-lactate producer Lactobacillus amylovorus DSM 20531(T) was also investigated. This strain produced equimolar quantities of d- and l-lactate in the MRS medium. Acetate was produced only when initial concentration of glucose was 55.51mM (10g/L) and production started in the exponential phase when concentration of glucose dropped to 35.52mM (6.40g/L). Similar behavior was observed with the initial concentration of maltose of 29.21mM (10g/L). An unstructured mathematical model was established for the bioprocess simulation.

  9. Potassium acetate and potassium lactate enhance the microbiological and physical properties of marinated catfish fillets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sodium or potassium salts such as lactate and acetate can be used to inhibit the growth of spoilage bacteria and food-borne pathogens, and thereby prolong the shelf-life of refrigerated seafood. However, minimal information is available regarding the combined effects of potassium salts (acetate and ...

  10. Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongchao; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Engle, Nancy L; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Liao, James C; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Guss, Adam M; Yang, Yunfeng; Graham, David E

    2012-01-01

    Background: The model bacterium Clostridium cellulolyticum efficiently hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose, using cellulosomes to degrade lignocellulosic biomass. Although it imports and ferments both pentose and hexose sugars to produce a mixture of ethanol, acetate, lactate, H2 and CO2, the proportion of ethanol is low, which impedes its use in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels. Therefore genetic engineering will likely be required to improve the ethanol yield. Random mutagenesis, plasmid transformation, and heterologous expression systems have previously been developed for C. cellulolyticum, but targeted mutagenesis has not been reported for this organism. Results: The first targeted gene inactivation system was developed for C. cellulolyticum, based on a mobile group II intron originating from the Lactococcus lactis L1.LtrB intron. This markerless mutagenesis system was used to disrupt both the paralogous L-lactate dehydrogenase (Ccel_2485; ldh) and L-malate dehydrogenase (Ccel_0137; mdh) genes, distinguishing the overlapping substrate specificities of these enzymes. Both mutations were then combined in a single strain. This double mutant produced 8.5-times more ethanol than wild-type cells growing on crystalline cellulose. Ethanol constituted 93% of the major fermentation products (by molarity), corresponding to a molar ratio of ethanol to organic acids of 15, versus 0.18 in wild-type cells. During growth on acid-pretreated switchgrass, the double mutant also produced four-times as much ethanol as wild-type cells. Detailed metabolomic analyses identified increased flux through the oxidative branch of the mutant s TCA pathway. Conclusions: The efficient intron-based gene inactivation system produced the first gene-targeted mutations in C. cellulolyticum. As a key component of the genetic toolbox for this bacterium, markerless targeted mutagenesis enables functional genomic research in C. cellulolyticum and rapid genetic engineering to

  11. Acetate Dose-Dependently Stimulates Milk Fat Synthesis in Lactating Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Natalie L; Harvatine, Kevin J

    2017-03-22

    Background: Acetate is a short-chain fatty acid (FA) that is especially important to cows because it is the major substrate for de novo FA synthesis. However, the effect of acetate supply on mammary lipid synthesis is not clear.Objective: The objective of this experiment was to determine the effect of increasing acetate supply on milk fat synthesis in lactating dairy cows.Methods: Six multiparous lactating Holstein cows were randomly assigned to treatments in a replicated design to investigate the effect of acetate supply on milk fat synthesis. Treatments were 0 (control), 5, 10, and 15 mol acetate/d continuously infused into the rumen for 4 d. Rumen short-chain FAs, plasma hormones and metabolites, milk fat concentration, and milk FA profile were analyzed on day 4 of each treatment. Polynomial contrasts were used to test the linear and quadratic effects of increasing acetate supply.Results: Acetate increased milk fat yield quadratically (P < 0.01) by 7%, 16%, and 14% and increased milk fat concentration linearly (P < 0.001) by 6%, 9%, and 11% for 5, 10, and 15 mol acetate/d, respectively, compared with the control treatment. Increased milk fat yield predominantly was due to a linear increase in 16-carbon FAs (P < 0.001) and a quadratic increase in de novo synthesized FAs (<16-carbon FAs; P < 0.01), indicating that there was stimulation of de novo synthesis pathways. Apparent transfer of acetate to milk fat was 33.4%, 36.2%, and 20.6% for 5, 10, and 15 mol/d, respectively. Acetate infusion linearly increased the relative concentration of rumen acetate (P < 0.001) before feeding, but not after feeding. Acetate linearly increased plasma ß-hydroxybutyric acid by 29%, 50%, and 78%, respectively, after feeding compared with the control treatment (P < 0.01).Conclusions: Increasing acetate supply to lactating cows increases milk fat synthesis, suggesting that nutritional strategies that increase ruminal acetate absorption would be expected to increase milk fat by

  12. Effect of acetic acid in recycling water on ethanol production for cassava in an integrated ethanol-methane fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinchao; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jianhua; Tang, Lei; Mao, Zhonggui

    2016-11-01

    Recently, the integrated ethanol-methane fermentation process has been studied to prevent wastewater pollution. However, when the anaerobic digestion reaction runs poorly, acetic acid will accumulate in the recycling water. In this paper, we studied the effect of low concentration of acetic acid (≤25 mM) on ethanol fermentation at different initial pH values (4.2, 5.2 or 6.2). At an initial pH of 4.2, ethanol yields increased by 3.0% and glycerol yields decreased by 33.6% as the acetic acid concentration was increased from 0 to 25 mM. Raising the concentration of acetic acid to 25 mM increased the buffering capacity of the medium without obvious effects on biomass production in the cassava medium. Acetic acid was metabolized by Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the reason that the final concentration of acetic acid was 38.17% lower than initial concentration at pH 5.2 when 25 mM acetic acid was added. These results confirmed that a low concentration of acetic acid in the process stimulated ethanol fermentation. Thus, reducing the acetic acid concentration to a controlled low level is more advantageous than completely removing it.

  13. Zymomonas with improved ethanol production in medium containing concentrated sugars and acetate

    DOEpatents

    Caimi, Perry G.; Chou, Yat-Chen; Franden, Mary Ann; Knoke, Kyle; Tao, Luan; Viitanen, Paul V.; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Yuying

    2010-09-28

    Through screening of a Zymomonas mutant library the himA gene was found to be involved in the inhibitory effect of acetate on Zymomonas performance. Xylose-utilizing Zymomonas further engineered to reduce activity of the himA gene were found to have increased ethanol production in comparison to a parental strain, when cultured in medium comprising xylose and acetate.

  14. Increase in ethanol yield via elimination of lactate production in an ethanol-tolerant mutant of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Ranjita; Prabhu, Sandeep; Lynd, Lee R; Guss, Adam M

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale production of lignocellulosic biofuel is a potential solution to sustainably meet global energy needs. One-step consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) is a potentially advantageous approach for the production of biofuels, but requires an organism capable of hydrolyzing biomass to sugars and fermenting the sugars to ethanol at commercially viable titers and yields. Clostridium thermocellum, a thermophilic anaerobe, can ferment cellulosic biomass to ethanol and organic acids, but low yield, low titer, and ethanol sensitivity remain barriers to industrial production. Here, we deleted the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene in ethanol tolerant strain of C. thermocellum adhE*(EA) in order to allow use of previously developed gene deletion tools, then deleted lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) to redirect carbon flux towards ethanol. Upon deletion of ldh, the adhE*(EA) ldh strain produced 30% more ethanol than wild type on minimal medium. The adhE*(EA) ldh strain retained tolerance to 5% v/v ethanol, resulting in an ethanol tolerant platform strain of C. thermocellum for future metabolic engineering efforts.

  15. Influence of maternal ethanol ingestion on copper utilization during gestation and lactation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, J.H.; Cerklewski, F.L.

    1986-03-05

    A factorial experiment was conducted to determine the influence of ethanol intake (30% of Kcal) on the utilization of copper (Cu) at two dietary levels of Cu during gestation and lactation in the rat. Cu levels in the liquid diet were adjusted to provide either 60% of the minimum requirement or a more than adequate intake. Both ethanol and low Cu depressed dam liver Cu, but the lowest concentration was produced when ethanol and low Cu were combined. Although only ethanol depressed pup liver Cu concentration, the effects observed in dams were reflected in pup Cu content of the metallothionein fraction eluted from a Sephadex G-75 column. Otherwise, neither the metallothionein content of maternal intestinal cells nor that of pup liver affected the outcome of ethanol-antagonized Cu utilization. Effects of ethanol on Cu status of dams and pups cannot be defined as a simple C deficiency even though liver iron was elevated because the ferroxidase activity of dam ceruloplasmin was enhanced rather than inhibited by ethanol which is in agreement with observations made in alcoholics. The authors results are more consistent with a possible enhancing effect of ethanol on biliary excretion of Cu. Exactly why ethanol would have this effect in dams is not defined by available data. In pups, however, maternal ethanol ingestion caused a 30% increase in pup plasma corticosterone, a steroid known to enhance loss of neonatal liver Cu by way of biliary excretion.

  16. Effects of breast pumping on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ethanol during lactation.

    PubMed

    Pepino, M Y; Mennella, J A

    2008-12-01

    This study tested two hypotheses. First, that breast pumping contributes to the previously observed decrease in ethanol bioavailability in lactating women. Second, that the effects of breast pumping are more pronounced when ethanol is consumed after a meal. The within-subject factor was test condition (fed or fasted) and the between-subject factor was experimental group (pumped before, PB; pumped after, PA). Those randomly assigned to the PB group (N = 8) breast pumped 1 h before drinking, whereas those assigned to the PA group (N = 8) breast pumped 0.6 h after drinking. Pumping before drinking significantly decreased blood ethanol concentration (P < 0.05) and ethanol bioavailability (P = 0.05). Pumping after drinking sped up elimination (P = 0.008), attenuated ethanol-induced hypothermia (P = 0.002), and increased feelings of stimulation (P = 0.03). The effects were more pronounced when ethanol was consumed after a meal. Common neural/hormonal responses to food and suckling may contribute additive effects in altering the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of ethanol, and perhaps of other drugs, during lactation.

  17. Direct Conversion of Cellulose into Ethyl Lactate in Supercritical Ethanol-Water Solutions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lisha; Yang, Xiaokun; Tian, Elli; Lin, Hongfei

    2016-01-08

    Biomass-derived ethyl lactate is a green solvent with a growing market as the replacement for petroleum-derived toxic organic solvents. Here we report, for the first time, the production of ethyl lactate directly from cellulose with the mesoporous Zr-SBA-15 silicate catalyst in a supercritical mixture of ethanol and water. The relatively strong Lewis and weak Brønsted acid sites on the catalyst, as well as the surface hydrophobicity, were beneficial to the reaction and led to synergy during consecutive reactions, such as depolymerization, retro-aldol condensation, and esterification. Under the optimum reaction conditions, ∼33 % yield of ethyl lactate was produced from cellulose with the Zr-SBA-15 catalyst at 260 °C in supercritical 95:5 (w/w) ethanol/water.

  18. Butyrate production from oligofructose fermentation by the human faecal flora: what is the contribution of extracellular acetate and lactate?

    PubMed

    Morrison, Douglas J; Mackay, William G; Edwards, Christine A; Preston, Tom; Dodson, Brian; Weaver, Lawrence T

    2006-09-01

    Butyrate is an important substrate for maintenance of colonic health and oligofructose fermentation by human faecal bacteria can increase butyrate production in vitro. However, oligofructose appears to be fermented by mainly acetate and lactate-producing bacteria rather than butyrate-producing bacteria. Isotope labelling studies using [U-(13)C(6)]glucose were used to show that (13)C(2) and (13)C(4) were the major labelled butyrate species produced from glucose fermentation, via [(13)C(2)]acetate-acetyl CoA as intermediate. Bacterial interconversion reactions were quantified and acetate conversion to butyrate and lactate conversion to acetate, propionate and butyrate were observed. Addition of oligofructose to faecal batch cultures significantly increased butyrate production. Of the newly synthesised butyrate from oligofructose fermentation, 80 % was derived from interconversion of extracellular acetate and lactate, with acetate being quantitatively more significant. Carbohydrates, such as oligofructose, have prebiotic properties. In addition, oligofructose selectively stimulates the bacterial conversion of acetate and lactate to butyrate. Carbohydrates with similar properties represent a refinement of the prebiotic definition, termed butyrogenic prebiotics, because of their additional functionality.

  19. Zymomonas with improved ethanol production in medium containing concentrated sugars and acetate

    DOEpatents

    Caimi, Perry G [Kennett Square, PA; Chou, Yat-Chen [Lakewood, CO; Franden, Mary Ann [Centennial, CO; Knoke, Kyle [Newark, DE; Tao, Luan [Havertown, PA; Viitanen, Paul V [West Chester, PA; Zhang, Min [Lakewood, CO; Zhang, Yuying [New Hope, PA

    2011-03-01

    Through screening of a Zymomonas mutant library the himA gene was found to be involved in the inhibitory effect of acetate on Zymomonas performance. Xylose-utilizing Zymomonas strains further engineered to reduce activity of the himA gene were found to have increased ethanol production in comparison to a parental strain, when cultured in mixed-sugars medium comprising xylose, and, in particular, in the presence of acetate.

  20. Increasing Anaerobic Acetate Consumption and Ethanol Yields in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with NADPH-Specific Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Henningsen, Brooks M.; Hon, Shuen; Covalla, Sean F.; Sonu, Carolina; Argyros, D. Aaron; Barrett, Trisha F.; Wiswall, Erin; Froehlich, Allan C.

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been engineered to use acetate, a primary inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as a cosubstrate during anaerobic ethanolic fermentation. However, the original metabolic pathway devised to convert acetate to ethanol uses NADH-specific acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase and quickly becomes constrained by limited NADH availability, even when glycerol formation is abolished. We present alcohol dehydrogenase as a novel target for anaerobic redox engineering of S. cerevisiae. Introduction of an NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (NADPH-ADH) not only reduces the NADH demand of the acetate-to-ethanol pathway but also allows the cell to effectively exchange NADPH for NADH during sugar fermentation. Unlike NADH, NADPH can be freely generated under anoxic conditions, via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. We show that an industrial bioethanol strain engineered with the original pathway (expressing acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis and with deletions of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes GPD1 and GPD2) consumed 1.9 g liter−1 acetate during fermentation of 114 g liter−1 glucose. Combined with a decrease in glycerol production from 4.0 to 0.1 g liter−1, this increased the ethanol yield by 4% over that for the wild type. We provide evidence that acetate consumption in this strain is indeed limited by NADH availability. By introducing an NADPH-ADH from Entamoeba histolytica and with overexpression of ACS2 and ZWF1, we increased acetate consumption to 5.3 g liter−1 and raised the ethanol yield to 7% above the wild-type level. PMID:26386051

  1. Increasing anaerobic acetate consumption and ethanol yields in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Henningsen, Brooks M; Hon, Shuen; Covalla, Sean F; Sonu, Carolina; Argyros, D Aaron; Barrett, Trisha F; Wiswall, Erin; Froehlich, Allan C; Zelle, Rintze M

    2015-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been engineered to use acetate, a primary inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as a cosubstrate during anaerobic ethanolic fermentation. However, the original metabolic pathway devised to convert acetate to ethanol uses NADH-specific acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase and quickly becomes constrained by limited NADH availability, even when glycerol formation is abolished. We present alcohol dehydrogenase as a novel target for anaerobic redox engineering of S. cerevisiae. Introduction of an NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (NADPH-ADH) not only reduces the NADH demand of the acetate-to-ethanol pathway but also allows the cell to effectively exchange NADPH for NADH during sugar fermentation. Unlike NADH, NADPH can be freely generated under anoxic conditions, via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. We show that an industrial bioethanol strain engineered with the original pathway (expressing acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis and with deletions of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes GPD1 and GPD2) consumed 1.9 g liter(-1) acetate during fermentation of 114 g liter(-1) glucose. Combined with a decrease in glycerol production from 4.0 to 0.1 g liter(-1), this increased the ethanol yield by 4% over that for the wild type. We provide evidence that acetate consumption in this strain is indeed limited by NADH availability. By introducing an NADPH-ADH from Entamoeba histolytica and with overexpression of ACS2 and ZWF1, we increased acetate consumption to 5.3 g liter(-1) and raised the ethanol yield to 7% above the wild-type level.

  2. Acetate as an active metabolite of ethanol: studies of locomotion, loss of righting reflex, and anxiety in rodents.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Marta; Betz, Adrienne J; San Miguel, Noemí; López-Cruz, Laura; Salamone, John D; Correa, Mercè

    2013-01-01

    IT HAS BEEN POSTULATED THAT A NUMBER OF THE CENTRAL EFFECTS OF ETHANOL ARE MEDIATED VIA ETHANOL METABOLITES: acetaldehyde and acetate. Ethanol is known to produce a large variety of behavioral actions such anxiolysis, narcosis, and modulation of locomotion. Acetaldehyde contributes to some of those effects although the contribution of acetate is less known. In the present studies, rats and mice were used to assess the acute and chronic effects of acetate after central or peripheral administration. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the comparison between central (intraventricular, ICV) and peripheral (intraperitoneal, IP) administration of acute doses of acetate on locomotion. CD1 male mice were used to study acute IP effects of acetate on locomotion, and also the effects of chronic oral consumption of acetate (0, 500, or 1000 mg/l, during 7, 15, 30, or 60 days) on ethanol- (1.0, 2.0, 4.0, or 4.5 g/kg, IP) induced locomotion, anxiolysis, and loss of righting reflex (LORR). In rats, ICV acetate (0.7-2.8 μmoles) reduced spontaneous locomotion at doses that, in the case of ethanol and acetaldehyde, had previously been shown to stimulate locomotion. Peripheral acute administration of acetate also suppressed locomotion in rats (25-100 mg/kg), but not in mice. In addition, although chronic administration of acetate during 15 days did not have an effect on spontaneous locomotion in an open field, it blocked ethanol-induced locomotion. However, ethanol-induced anxiolysis was not affected by chronic administration of acetate. Chronic consumption of acetate (up to 60 days) did not have an effect on latency to, or duration of LORR induced by ethanol, but significantly increased the number of mice that did not achieve LORR. The present work provides new evidence supporting the hypothesis that acetate should be considered a centrally-active metabolite of ethanol that contributes to some behavioral effects of this alcohol, such as motor suppression.

  3. Interaction effects of lactic acid and acetic acid at different temperatures on ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in corn mash.

    PubMed

    Graves, Tara; Narendranath, Neelakantam V; Dawson, Karl; Power, Ronan

    2007-01-01

    The combined effects of lactic acid and acetic acid on ethanol production by S. cerevisiae in corn mash, as influenced by temperature, were examined. Duplicate full factorial experiments (three lactic acid concentrations x three acetic acid concentrations) were performed to evaluate the interaction between lactic and acetic acids on the ethanol production of yeast at each of the three temperatures, 30, 34, and 37 degrees C. Corn mash at 30% dry solids adjusted to pH 4 after lactic and acetic acid addition was used as the substrate. Ethanol production rates and final ethanol concentrations decreased (P<0.001) progressively as the concentration of combined lactic and acetic acids in the corn mash increased and the temperature was raised from 30 to 37 degrees C. At 30 degrees C, essentially no ethanol was produced after 96 h when 0.5% w/v acetic acid was present in the mash (with 0.5, 2, and 4% w/v lactic acid). At 34 and 37 degrees C, the final concentrations of ethanol produced by the yeast were noticeably reduced by the presence of 0.3% w/v acetic acid and >or=2% w/v lactic acid. It can be concluded that, as in previous studies with defined media, lactic acid and acetic acid act synergistically to reduce ethanol production by yeast in corn mash. In addition, the inhibitory effects of combined lactic and acetic acid in corn mash were more apparent at elevated temperatures.

  4. Ethanol consumption during pregnancy and lactation. Changes in the nutritional status of predominantly breastfeeding mothers.

    PubMed

    Villalpando, S; Flores-Huerta, S; Fajardo, A; Hernandez-Beltran, M J

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the effects of ethanol, consumed as a mild fermented beverage called "pulque", during pregnancy and lactation on the food intake and some anthropometric indices of body composition of a group of lactating mothers in a town in central Mexico. Thirty two mothers who drank pulque during pregnancy and lactation and 61 non-drinking women with comparable characteristics were evaluated anthropometrically, their dietary and ethanol intake recorded during a 6-month postpartum period. Energy [(8360 +/- 2997 vs. 7156 +/- 2177 J) and protein (52.7 +/- 20.9 vs. 44.6 +/- 16.1 g)] 24-h intake, height, weight, body mass index, arm muscle and fat areas were greater in drinking mothers than in controls. Average total ethanol consumption varied from 0.48 - 0.55 g-1 kg-1.d-1. Drinking mothers lost weight less frequently. Additional energy provided by pulque might explain such a difference. More precise information about the changes in their body composition and energy balance are in order for confirmation.

  5. Determinations of ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetate in blood and urine during alcohol oxidation in man.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, S; Muto, T; Nagoya, T; Shimamura, M; Saito, M; Tainaka, H

    1989-01-01

    Blood and urine samples were analyzed for ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetate during alcohol oxidation in Japanese men by head space gas chromatography, following the consumption of 16 ml/kg of beer during a 20 min period. The maximum level of blood/urine ethanol was found to be 15-17 mM (20-22 mM), while that of acetaldehyde in a flusher and in non-flushers was 20 microM (52 microM) and 2-5 microM (10-13 microM), respectively. Acetate levels in these groups ranged from 0.2 mM (0.1 mM) to 0.8 mM (1.0 mM). Blood ethanol levels were dose dependent, whereas acetaldehyde and acetate levels reflected individual metabolic rates. The relative concentrations of ethanol and acetaldehyde in blood and that of acetate in alcohol metabolism could be summarized as follows: 7500 (15 mM): 1-3 (2-5 microM); 250-400 (0.5-0.8 mM) for non-flushers; and 7500 (15 mM): 5-10 (10-20 microM): 250-400 (0.5-0.8 mM) for a flusher.

  6. Application of acetate, lactate, and fumarate as electron donors in microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliv, Oresta M.; Bilyy, Oleksandr I.; Ferensovych, Yaroslav P.; Hnatush, Svitlana O.

    2013-09-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that use bacteria as the catalysts to oxidize organic and inorganic matter and generate current. Up to now, several classes of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms have been elucidated for various microorganisms. Shewanellaceae and Geobacteraceae families include the most of model exoelectrogenic microorganisms. Desulfuromonas acetoxidans bacterium inhabits aquatic sedimental sulfur-containing environments and is philogenetically close to representatives of Geobacteraceae family. Two chamber microbial fuel cell (0.3 l volume) was constructed with application of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 as anode biocatalyst. Acetic, lactic and fumaric acids were separately applied as organic electron donors for bacterial growth in constructed MFC. Bacterial cultivation in MFC was held during twenty days. Lactate oxidation caused electric power production with the highest value up to 0.071 mW on 64 hour of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 growth. Addition of acetic and fumaric acids into bacterial growth medium caused maximal power production up to 0.075 and 0.074 mW respectively on the 40 hour of their growth. Increasing of incubation time up to twentieth day caused decrease of generated electric power till 0.018 mW, 0.042 mW and 0.047 mW under usage of lactic, acetic and fumaric acids respectively by investigated bacteria. Power generation by D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 was more stabile and durable under application of acetic and fumaric acids as electron donors in constructed MFC, than under addition of lactic acid in the same concentration into the growth medium.

  7. Short-term effect of acetate and ethanol on methane formation in biogas sludge.

    PubMed

    Refai, Sarah; Wassmann, Kati; Deppenmeier, Uwe

    2014-08-01

    Biochemical processes in biogas plants are still not fully understood. Especially, the identification of possible bottlenecks in the complex fermentation processes during biogas production might provide potential to increase the performance of biogas plants. To shed light on the question which group of organism constitutes the limiting factor in the anaerobic breakdown of organic material, biogas sludge from different mesophilic biogas plants was examined under various conditions. Therefore, biogas sludge was incubated and analyzed in anaerobic serum flasks under an atmosphere of N2/CO2. The batch reactors mirrored the conditions and the performance of the full-scale biogas plants and were suitable test systems for a period of 24 h. Methane production rates were compared after supplementation with substrates for syntrophic bacteria, such as butyrate, propionate, or ethanol, as well as with acetate and H2+CO2 as substrates for methanogenic archaea. Methane formation rates increased significantly by 35 to 126 % when sludge from different biogas plants was supplemented with acetate or ethanol. The stability of important process parameters such as concentration of volatile fatty acids and pH indicate that ethanol and acetate increase biogas formation without affecting normally occurring fermentation processes. In contrast to ethanol or acetate, other fermentation products such as propionate, butyrate, or H2 did not result in increased methane formation rates. These results provide evidence that aceticlastic methanogenesis and ethanol-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria are not the limiting factor during biogas formation, respectively, and that biogas plant optimization is possible with special focus on methanogenesis from acetate.

  8. Screening and characterization of ethanol-tolerant and thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria from Chinese vinegar Pei.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Bai, Ye; Li, Dongsheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Ning; Hu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are important microorganisms in the vinegar industry. However, AAB have to tolerate the presence of ethanol and high temperatures, especially in submerged fermentation (SF), which inhibits AAB growth and acid yield. In this study, seven AAB that are tolerant to temperatures above 40 °C and ethanol concentrations above 10% (v/v) were isolated from Chinese vinegar Pei. All the isolated AAB belong to Acetobacter pasteurianus according to 16S rDNA analysis. Among all AAB, AAB4 produced the highest acid yield under high temperature and ethanol test conditions. At 4% ethanol and 30-40 °C temperatures, AAB4 maintained an alcohol-acid transform ratio of more than 90.5 %. High alcohol-acid transform ratio was still maintained even at higher temperatures, namely, 87.2, 77.1, 14.5 and 2.9% at 41, 42, 43 and 44 °C, respectively. At 30 °C and different initial ethanol concentrations (4-10%), the acid yield by AAB4 increased gradually, although the alcohol-acid transform ratio decreased to some extent. However, 46.5, 8.7 and 0.9% ratios were retained at ethanol concentrations of 11, 12 and 13%, respectively. When compared with AS1.41 (an AAB widely used in China) using a 10 L fermentor, AAB4 produced 42.0 g/L acetic acid at 37 °C with 10% ethanol, whereas AS1.41 almost stopped producing acetic acid. In conclusion, these traits suggest that AAB4 is a valuable strain for vinegar production in SF.

  9. Anaerobic degradation of lactate by syntrophic associations of methanosarcina barkeri and desulfovibrio species and effect of H2 on acetate degradation

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.; Bryant, M.P.

    1981-02-01

    When grown in the absence of added sulfate, cocultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans or Desulfovibrio vulgaris with Methanobrevibacter smithii (Methanobacterium ruminantium), which uses H2 and CO2 for methanogenesis, degraded lactate, with the production of acetate and CH4. When D. desulfuricans or D. vulgaris was grown in the absence of added sulfate in coculture with Methanosarcina barkeri (type strain), which uses both H2-CO2 and acetate for methanogenesis, lactate was stoichiometrically degraded to CH4 and presumably to CO2. During the first 12 days of incubation of the D. desulfuricans-M. barkeri coculture, lactate was completely degraded, with almost stoichiometric production of acetate and CH4. Later, acetate was degraded to CH4 and presumably to CO2. In experiments in which 20 mM acetate and 0 to 20 mM lactate were added to D. desulfuricans-M. barkeri cocultures, no detectable degradation of acetate occurred until the lactate was catabolized. The ultimate rate of acetate utilization for methanogenesis was greater for those cocultures receiving the highest levels of lactate. A small amount of H2 was detected in cocultures which contained D. desulfuricans and M. barkeri until after all lactate was degraded. The addition of H2, but not of lactate, to the growth medium inhibited acetate degradation by pure cultures of M. barkeri. Pure cultures of M. barkeri produced CH4 from acetate at a rate equivalent to that observed for cocultures containing M. barkeri. Inocula of M. barkeri grown with H2-CO2 as the methanogenic substrate produced CH4 from acetate at a rate equivalent to that observed for acetate-grown inocula when grown in a rumen fluid-vitamin-based medium but not when grown in a yeast extract-based medium. The results suggest that H2 produced by the Desulfovibrio species during growth with lactate inhibited acetate degradation by M. barkeri. (Refs. 26).

  10. Hydrogen, acetate, and lactate as electron donors for microbial manganese reduction in a manganese-rich coastal marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Vandieken, Verona; Finke, Niko; Thamdrup, Bo

    2014-03-01

    The role of hydrogen, acetate, and lactate as electron donors for microbial manganese reduction was investigated in manganese-rich marine sediment from Gullmar Fjord (Sweden). Here, manganese reduction accounted for 50% of the anaerobic carbon oxidation at 0-15 cm sediment depth. In anoxic incubations from 0 to 5 cm depth, where manganese reduction dominated completely as terminal electron-accepting process, the combined contribution of acetate and lactate as electron donors for manganese reducers corresponded to < ¼ of the electron flow. The concentrations, ¹⁴C-radiotracer turnover rates, and contributions to carbon oxidation of acetate and lactate associated with manganese reduction were similar to those found in deeper horizons dominated by concomitant iron and sulfate reduction and sulfate reduction alone, respectively. By contrast, hydrogen concentrations increased considerably with sediment depth, indicating thermodynamic control of the competition between the electron-accepting processes, and hydrogen may have contributed substantially to the > 75% of the electron flow that did not involve acetate and lactate. Alternatively, the oxidation of more complex organic substrates could be involved. Our study provides the first direct evidence of substrate utilization by a natural manganese-reducing community and indicates similar mechanisms of thermodynamic control and competition for electron donors as known from sediments dominated by iron reduction, sulfate reduction, or methanogenesis.

  11. Effects of sodium lactate and acetic acid derivatives on the quality and sensory characteristics of hot-boned pork sausage patties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sodium lactate and acetic acid derivatives were evaluated for their effects on color retention, microbial growth, and sensory attributes of hot-boned pork sausage patties. Treatments included: (a) sodium lactate (L), (b) buffered vinegar (V), (c) sodium lactate and vinegar mixture (LV), (d) control ...

  12. Enzymatic production of ethanol from cellulose using soluble cellulose acetate as an intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, K.M.; Ho, C.S.; Zabriskie, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    A two-stage process for the enzymatic conversion of cellulose to ethanol is proposed as an alternative to currently incomplete and relatively slow enzymatic conversion processes employing natural insoluble cellulose. This alternative approach is designed to promote faster and more complete conversion of cellulose to fermentable sugars through the use of a homogeneous enzymatic hydrolysis reaction. Cellulose is chemically dissolved in the first stage to form water-soluble cellulose acetate (WSCA). The WSCA is then converted to ethanol in a simultaneous saccharification-fermentation with Pestalotiopsis westerdijkii enzymes (containing cellulolytic and acetyl esterase components) and yeast.

  13. High temperature stimulates acetic acid accumulation and enhances the growth inhibition and ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under fermenting conditions.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ji-Min; Yang, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Sae-Um; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

    2014-07-01

    Cellular responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to high temperatures of up to 42 °C during ethanol fermentation at a high glucose concentration (i.e., 100 g/L) were investigated. Increased temperature correlated with stimulated glucose uptake to produce not only the thermal protectant glycerol but also ethanol and acetic acid. Carbon flux into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle correlated positively with cultivation temperature. These results indicate that the increased demand for energy (in the form of ATP), most likely caused by multiple stressors, including heat, acetic acid, and ethanol, was matched by both the fermentation and respiration pathways. Notably, acetic acid production was substantially stimulated compared to that of other metabolites during growth at increased temperature. The acetic acid produced in addition to ethanol seemed to subsequently result in adverse effects, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. This, in turn, appeared to cause the specific growth rate, and glucose uptake rate reduced leading to a decrease of the specific ethanol production rate far before glucose depletion. These results suggest that adverse effects from heat, acetic acid, ethanol, and oxidative stressors are synergistic, resulting in a decrease of the specific growth rate and ethanol production rate and, hence, are major determinants of cell stability and ethanol fermentation performance of S. cerevisiae at high temperatures. The results are discussed in the context of possible applications.

  14. Application of acetate buffer in pH adjustment of sorghum mash and its influence on fuel ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Renyong; Bean, Scott R; Crozier-Dodson, Beth Ann; Fung, Daniel Y C; Wang, Donghai

    2009-01-01

    A 2 M sodium acetate buffer at pH 4.2 was tried to simplify the step of pH adjustment in a laboratory dry-grind procedure. Ethanol yields or conversion efficiencies of 18 sorghum hybrids improved significantly with 2.0-5.9% (3.9% on average) of relative increases when the method of pH adjustment changed from traditional HCl to the acetate buffer. Ethanol yields obtained using the two methods were highly correlated (R (2) = 0.96, P < 0.0001), indicating that the acetate buffer did not influence resolution of the procedure to differentiate sorghum hybrids varying in fermentation quality. Acetate retarded the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but did not affect the overall fermentation rate. With 41-47 mM of undissociated acetic acid in mash of a sorghum hybrid at pH 4.7, rates of glucose consumption and ethanol production were inhibited during exponential phase but promoted during stationary phase. The maximum growth rate constants (mu(max)) were 0.42 and 0.32 h(-1) for cells grown in mashes with pH adjusted by HCl and the acetate buffer, respectively. Viable cell counts of yeast in mashes with pH adjusted by the acetate buffer were 36% lower than those in mashes adjusted by HCl during stationary phase. Coupled to a 5.3% relative increase in ethanol, a 43.6% relative decrease in glycerol was observed, when the acetate buffer was substituted for HCl. Acetate helped to transfer glucose to ethanol more efficiently. The strain tested did not use acetic acid as carbon source. It was suggested that decreased levels of ATP under acetate stress stimulate glycolysis to ethanol formation, increasing its yield at the expense of biomass and glycerol production.

  15. Saccharification behavior of cellulose acetate during enzymatic processing for microbial ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Hama, Shinji; Nakano, Kohsuke; Onodera, Kaoru; Nakamura, Masashi; Noda, Hideo; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to realize the potential application of cellulose acetate to enzymatic processing, followed by microbial ethanol fermentation. To eliminate the effect of steric hindrance of acetyl groups on the action of cellulase, cellulose acetate was subjected to deacetylation in the presence of 1N sodium hydroxide and a mixture of methanol/acetone, yielding 88.8-98.6% at 5-20% substrate loadings during a 48h saccharification at 50°C. Ethanol fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae attained a high yield of 92.3% from the initial glucose concentration of 44.2g/L; however, a low saccharification yield was obtained at 35°C, decreasing efficiency during simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Presaccharification at 50°C prior to SSF without increasing the total process time attained the ethanol titers of 19.8g/L (5% substrate), 38.0g/L (10% substrate), 55.9g/L (15% substrate), and 70.9g/L (20% substrate), which show a 12.0-16.2% improvement in ethanol yield.

  16. Efficient sugar release by acetic acid ethanol-based organosolv pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongdan; Wu, Shubin

    2014-12-03

    Acetic acid ethanol-based organosolv pretreatment of sugar cane bagasse was performed to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis. The effect of different parameters (including temperature, reaction time, solvent concentration, and acid catalyst dose) on pretreatment prehydrolyzate and subsequent enzymatic digestibility was determined. During the pretreatment process, 11.83 g of xylose based on 100 g of raw material could be obtained. After the ethanol-based pretreatment, the enzymatic hydrolysis was enhanced and the highest glucose yield of 40.99 g based on 100 g of raw material could be obtained, representing 93.8% of glucose in sugar cane bagasse. The maximum total sugar yields occurred at 190 °C, 45 min, 60:40 ethanol/water, and 5% dosage of acetic acid, reaching 58.36 g (including 17.69 g of xylose and 40.67 g of glucose) based on 100 g of raw material, representing 85.4% of total sugars in raw material. Furthermore, characterization of the pretreated sugar cane bagasse using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses were also developed. The results suggested that ethanol-based organosolv pretreatment could enhance enzymatic digestibilities because of the delignification and removal of xylan.

  17. STABILITY OF MFI ZEOLITE-FILLED PDMS MEMBRANES DURING PERVAPORATIVE ETHANOL RECOVERY FROM AQUEOUS MIXTURES CONTAINING ACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation is a potential process for recovering bioethanol produced from biomass fermentation. Fermentation broths contain ethanol, water, and a variety of other compounds, often including carboxylic acids. The effects of acetic acid on long-term pervaporation of aqueous et...

  18. Acetate as an active metabolite of ethanol: studies of locomotion, loss of righting reflex, and anxiety in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Marta; Betz, Adrienne J.; San Miguel, Noemí; López-Cruz, Laura; Salamone, John D.; Correa, Mercè

    2013-01-01

    It has been postulated that a number of the central effects of ethanol are mediated via ethanol metabolites: acetaldehyde and acetate. Ethanol is known to produce a large variety of behavioral actions such anxiolysis, narcosis, and modulation of locomotion. Acetaldehyde contributes to some of those effects although the contribution of acetate is less known. In the present studies, rats and mice were used to assess the acute and chronic effects of acetate after central or peripheral administration. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the comparison between central (intraventricular, ICV) and peripheral (intraperitoneal, IP) administration of acute doses of acetate on locomotion. CD1 male mice were used to study acute IP effects of acetate on locomotion, and also the effects of chronic oral consumption of acetate (0, 500, or 1000 mg/l, during 7, 15, 30, or 60 days) on ethanol- (1.0, 2.0, 4.0, or 4.5 g/kg, IP) induced locomotion, anxiolysis, and loss of righting reflex (LORR). In rats, ICV acetate (0.7–2.8 μmoles) reduced spontaneous locomotion at doses that, in the case of ethanol and acetaldehyde, had previously been shown to stimulate locomotion. Peripheral acute administration of acetate also suppressed locomotion in rats (25–100 mg/kg), but not in mice. In addition, although chronic administration of acetate during 15 days did not have an effect on spontaneous locomotion in an open field, it blocked ethanol-induced locomotion. However, ethanol-induced anxiolysis was not affected by chronic administration of acetate. Chronic consumption of acetate (up to 60 days) did not have an effect on latency to, or duration of LORR induced by ethanol, but significantly increased the number of mice that did not achieve LORR. The present work provides new evidence supporting the hypothesis that acetate should be considered a centrally-active metabolite of ethanol that contributes to some behavioral effects of this alcohol, such as motor suppression. PMID:23847487

  19. ETHANOL, ACETIC ACID, AND WATER ADSORPTION FROM BINARY AND TERNARY LIQUID MIXTURES ON HIGH-SILICA ZEOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption isotherms were measured for ethanol, acetic acid, and water adsorbed on high-silica ZSM-5 zeolite powder from binary and ternary liquid mixtures at room temperature. Ethanol and water adsorption on two high-silica ZSM-5 zeolites with different aluminum contents and a h...

  20. Techno-economic Analysis for the Thermochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol via Acetic Acid Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yunhua; Jones, Susanne B.

    2009-04-01

    Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications. As a widely available biomass form, lignocellulosic biomass can have a major impact on domestic transportation fuel supplies and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). This study performs a techno-economic analysis of the thermo chemical conversion of biomass to ethanol, through methanol and acetic acid, followed by hydrogenation of acetic acid to ethanol. The conversion of syngas to methanol and methanol to acetic acid are well-proven technologies with high conversions and yields. This study was undertaken to determine if this highly selective route to ethanol could provide an already established economically attractive route to ethanol. The feedstock was assumed to be wood chips at 2000 metric ton/day (dry basis). Two types of gasification technologies were evaluated: an indirectly-heated gasifier and a directly-heated oxygen-blown gasifier. Process models were developed and a cost analysis was performed. The carbon monoxide used for acetic acid synthesis from methanol and the hydrogen used for hydrogenation were assumed to be purchased and not derived from the gasifier. Analysis results show that ethanol selling prices are estimated to be $2.79/gallon and $2.81/gallon for the indirectly-heated gasifier and the directly-heated gasifier systems, respectively (1stQ 2008$, 10% ROI). These costs are above the ethanol market price for during the same time period ($1.50 - $2.50/gal). The co-production of acetic acid greatly improves the process economics as shown in the figure below. Here, 20% of the acetic acid is diverted from ethanol production and assumed to be sold as a co-product at the prevailing market prices ($0.40 - $0.60/lb acetic acid), resulting in competitive ethanol production costs.

  1. Acetate, lactate, propionate, and isobutyrate as electron donors for iron and sulfate reduction in Arctic marine sediments, Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Finke, Niko; Vandieken, Verona; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2007-01-01

    The contribution of volatile fatty acids (VFA) as e(-)-donors for anaerobic terminal oxidation of organic carbon through iron and sulfate reduction was studied in Arctic fjord sediment. Dissolved inorganic carbon, Fe(2+), VFA concentrations, and sulfate reduction were monitored in slurries from the oxidized (0-2 cm) and the reduced (5-9 cm) zone. In the 0-2 cm layer, 2/3 of the mineralization could be attributed to sulfate reduction and 1/3 to iron reduction. In the 5-9 cm layer, sulfate reduction was the sole mineralization process. Acetate and lactate turnover rates were measured by radiotracer. Inhibition of sulfate reduction with selenate resulted in the accumulation of acetate, propionate, and isobutyrate. The acetate turnover rates determined by radiotracer and accumulation after inhibition were similar. VFA turnover accounted for 21% and 52% of the mineralization through sulfate reduction in the 0-2 and 5-9 cm layer, respectively. Acetate and lactate turnover in the inhibited 0-2 cm slurry was attributed to iron reduction and accounted for 10% and 2% of the iron reduction. Therefore, 88% and 79% of the iron and sulfate reduction in the 0-2 cm layer, respectively, must be fueled by alternative e(-)-donors. The accumulation of VFA in the selenate-inhibited 0-2 cm slurry did not enhance iron reduction, indicating that iron reducers were not limited by VFA availability.

  2. Effect of pH and lactic or acetic acid on ethanol productivity by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in corn mash.

    PubMed

    Graves, Tara; Narendranath, Neelakantam V; Dawson, Karl; Power, Ronan

    2006-06-01

    The effects of lactic and acetic acids on ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in corn mash, as influenced by pH and dissolved solids concentration, were examined. The lactic and acetic acid concentrations utilized were 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0% w/v, and 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6% w/v, respectively. Corn mashes (20, 25 and 30% dry solids) were adjusted to the following pH levels after lactic or acetic acid addition: 4.0, 4.5, 5.0 or 5.5 prior to yeast inoculation. Lactic acid did not completely inhibit ethanol production by the yeast. However, lactic acid at 4% w/v decreased (P<0.05) final ethanol concentration in all mashes at all pH levels. In 30% solids mash set at pH < or =5, lactic acid at 3% w/v reduced (P<0.05) ethanol production. In contrast, inhibition by acetic acid increased as the concentration of solids in the mash increased and the pH of the medium declined. Ethanol production was completely inhibited in all mashes set at pH 4 in the presence of acetic acid at concentrations > or =0.8% w/v. In 30% solids mash set at pH 4, final ethanol levels decreased (P<0.01) with only 0.1% w/v acetic acid. These results suggest that the inhibitory effects of lactic acid and acetic acid on ethanol production in corn mash fermentation when set at a pH of 5.0-5.5 are not as great as that reported thus far using laboratory media.

  3. Effect of manganese ions on ethanol fermentation by xylose isomerase expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae under acetic acid stress.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ja Kyong; Um, Youngsoon; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2016-12-01

    The efficient fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the presence of inhibitors is highly desirable for bioethanol production. Among the inhibitors, acetic acid released during the pretreatment of lignocellulose negatively affects the fermentation performance of biofuel producing organisms. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of acetic acid on glucose and xylose fermentation by a high performance engineered strain of xylose utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SXA-R2P-E, harboring a xylose isomerase based pathway. The presence of acetic acid severely decreased the xylose fermentation performance of this strain. However, the acetic acid stress was alleviated by metal ion supplementation resulting in a 52% increased ethanol production rate under 2g/L of acetic acid stress. This study shows the inhibitory effect of acetic acid on an engineered isomerase-based xylose utilizing strain and suggests a simple but effective method to improve the co-fermentation performance under acetic acid stress for efficient bioethanol production.

  4. Effects of glucose, ethanol and acetic acid on regulation of ADH2 gene from Lachancea fermentati

    PubMed Central

    Yaacob, Norhayati; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Abdul Rahman, Nor Aini

    2016-01-01

    Background. Not all yeast alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) are repressed by glucose, as reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia stipitis ADH2 is regulated by oxygen instead of glucose, whereas Kluyveromyces marxianus ADH2 is regulated by neither glucose nor ethanol. For this reason, ADH2 regulation of yeasts may be species dependent, leading to a different type of expression and fermentation efficiency. Lachancea fermentati is a highly efficient ethanol producer, fast-growing cells and adapted to fermentation-related stresses such as ethanol and organic acid, but the metabolic information regarding the regulation of glucose and ethanol production is still lacking. Methods. Our investigation started with the stimulation of ADH2 activity from S. cerevisiae and L. fermentati by glucose and ethanol induction in a glucose-repressed medium. The study also embarked on the retrospective analysis of ADH2 genomic and protein level through direct sequencing and sites identification. Based on the sequence generated, we demonstrated ADH2 gene expression highlighting the conserved NAD(P)-binding domain in the context of glucose fermentation and ethanol production. Results. An increase of ADH2 activity was observed in starved L. fermentati (LfeADH2) and S. cerevisiae (SceADH2) in response to 2% (w/v) glucose induction. These suggest that in the presence of glucose, ADH2 activity was activated instead of being repressed. An induction of 0.5% (v/v) ethanol also increased LfeADH2 activity, promoting ethanol resistance, whereas accumulating acetic acid at a later stage of fermentation stimulated ADH2 activity and enhanced glucose consumption rates. The lack in upper stream activating sequence (UAS) and TATA elements hindered the possibility of Adr1 binding to LfeADH2. Transcription factors such as SP1 and RAP1 observed in LfeADH2 sequence have been implicated in the regulation of many genes including ADH2. In glucose fermentation, L. fermentati exhibited a bell-shaped ADH2

  5. Bio-conversion of apple pomace into ethanol and acetic acid: Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Indu; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2013-02-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose present in apple pomace was investigated using process variables such as enzyme activity of commercial cellulase, pectinase and β-glucosidase, temperature, pH, time, pre-treatments and end product separation. The interaction of enzyme activity, temperature, pH and time had a significant effect (P<0.05) on release of glucose. Optimal conditions of enzymatic saccharification were: enzyme activity of cellulase, 43units; pectinase, 183units; β-glucosidase, 41units/g dry matter (DM); temperature, 40°C; pH 4.0 and time, 24h. The sugars were fermented using Saccharomyces cerevisae yielding 19.0g ethanol/100g DM. Further bio-conversion using Acetobacter aceti resulted in the production of acetic acid at a concentration of 61.4g/100g DM. The present study demonstrates an improved process of enzymatic hydrolysis of apple pomace to yield sugars and concomitant bioconversion to produce ethanol and acetic acid.

  6. Ethanol, acetic acid, and water adsorption from binary and ternary liquid mixtures on high-silica zeolites.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Travis C; Vane, Leland M

    2006-04-11

    Adsorption isotherms were measured for ethanol, acetic acid, and water adsorbed on high-silica ZSM-5 zeolite powder from binary and ternary liquid mixtures at room temperature. Ethanol and water adsorption on two high-silica ZSM-5 zeolites with different aluminum contents and a high-silica beta zeolite were also compared. The amounts adsorbed were measured using a recently developed technique that accurately measures the changes in adsorbent/liquid mixture density and liquid concentration. This technique allows the adsorption of each compound in a liquid mixture to be measured. Adsorption data for binary mixtures were fit with the dual-site extended Langmuir model, and the parameters were used to predict ternary adsorption isotherms for each compound with reasonable accuracy. In ternary mixtures, acetic acid competed with ethanol and water for adsorption sites and reduced ethanol adsorption more than it reduced water adsorption.

  7. Glucose respiration and fermentation in Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae express different sensitivity patterns to ethanol and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, L; Côrte-Real, M; Loureiro, V; Loureiro-Dias, M C; Leão, C

    1997-10-01

    In the yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii ISA 1307, respiration and fermentation of glucose were exponentially inhibited by ethanol, both processes displaying similar sensitivity to the alcohol. Moreover, the degree of inhibition on fermentation was of the same magnitude as that reported for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Acetic acid also inhibited these two metabolic processes in Z. bailii, with the kinetics of inhibition again being exponential. However, inhibition of fermentation was much less pronounced than in S. cerevisiae. The values estimated with Z. bailii for the minimum inhibitory concentration of acetic acid ranged from 100 to 240 mmol 1(-1) total acetic acid compared with values of near zero reported for S. cerevisiae. The inhibitory effects of acetic acid on Z. bailii were not significantly potentiated by ethanol.

  8. Lactate- and acetate-based cross-feeding interactions between selected strains of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria and colon bacteria in the presence of inulin-type fructans.

    PubMed

    Moens, Frédéric; Verce, Marko; De Vuyst, Luc

    2017-01-16

    Cross-feeding interactions were studied between selected strains of lactobacilli and/or bifidobacteria and butyrate-producing colon bacteria that consume lactate but are not able to degrade inulin-type fructans (ITF) in a medium for colon bacteria (supplemented with ITF as energy source and acetate when necessary). Degradation of oligofructose by Lactobacillus acidophilus IBB 801 and inulin by Lactobacillus paracasei 8700:2 and Bifidobacterium longum LMG 11047 resulted in the release of free fructose into the medium and the production of mainly lactate (lactobacilli) and acetate (B. longum LMG 11047). During bicultures of Lb. acidophilus IBB 801 and Anaerostipes caccae DSM 14662(T) on oligofructose, the latter strain converted lactate (produced by the former strain from oligofructose) into butyrate and gases, but only in the presence of acetate. During bicultures of Lb. paracasei 8700:2 and A. caccae DSM 14662(T) or Eubacterium hallii DSM 17630 on inulin, the butyrate-producing strains consumed low concentrations of lactate and acetate generated by inulin degradation by the Lactobacillus strain. As more acetate was produced during tricultures of Lb. paracasei 8700:2 and B. longum LMG 11047, which degraded inulin simultaneously, and A. caccae DSM 14662(T) or E. hallii DSM 17630, a complete conversion of lactate into butyrate and gases by these butyrate-producing strains occurred. Therefore, butyrate production by lactate-consuming, butyrate-producing colon bacterial strains incapable of ITF degradation, resulted from cross-feeding of monosaccharides and lactate by an ITF-degrading Lactobacillus strain and acetate produced by a Bifidobacterium strain.

  9. Pervaporation of water and ethanol using a cellulose acetate butyrate membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.S.; Lau, W.W.Y.; Rangaiah, G.P.; Sourirajan, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-10-15

    Okada and Matsuura's transport equations for pervaporation give rise to three fundamental parameters, namely, interfacial saturation vapor pressure P*, liquid transport parameter A/[delta], and vapor transport parameter B/[delta]. The effects of the chemical nature of the membrane material and the upstream operating pressures of 101.3 and 303.9 kPa on the above parameters were investigated from the pervaporation data at laboratory temperature (24 C) for water and ethanol using a cellulose acetate butyrate membrane. The results show that the P. values are essentially unaffected by the upstream pressure, and that they are generally higher than the literature values of saturation vapor pressure at 24 C. Further, the values for A/[delta] and B/[delta] tend to increase with increased upstream pressure for both systems studied. These results are discussed.

  10. Lactation

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Lactation is the most energy-efficient way to provide for the dietary needs of young mammals, their mother's milk being actively protective, immunomodulatory, and ideal for their needs. Intrauterine mammary gland development in the human female is already apparent by the end of the sixth week of gestation. During puberty and adolescence secretions of the anterior pituitary stimulate the maturation of the graafian follicles in the ovaries and stimulate the secretion of follicular estrogens, which stimulate development of the mammary ducts. Pregnancy has the most dramatic effect on the breast, but development of the glandular breast tissue and deposition of fat and connective tissue continue under the influence of cyclic sex-hormone stimulation. Many changes occur in the nipple and breast during pregnancy and at delivery as a prelude to lactation. Preparation of the breasts is so effective that lactation could commence even if pregnancy were discontinued at 16 weeks. Following birth, placental inhibition of milk synthesis is removed, and a woman's progesterone blood levels decline rapidly. The breasts fill with milk, which is a high-density, low-volume feed called colostrum until about 30 hours after birth. Because it is not the level of maternal hormones, but the efficiency of infant suckling and/or milk removal that governs the volume of milk produced in each breast, mothers who permit their infants to feed ad libitum commonly observe that they have large volumes of milk 24-48 hours after birth. The two maternal reflexes involved in lactation are the milk-production and milk-ejection reflex. A number of complementary reflexes are involved when the infant feeds: the rooting reflex (which programmes the infant to search for the nipple), the sucking reflex (rhythmic jaw action creating negative pressure and a peristaltic action of the tongue), and the swallowing reflex. The infant's instinctive actions need to be consolidated into learned behaviour in the postpartum

  11. Development of cellulose acetate propionate membrane for separation of ethanol and ethyl tert-butyl ether mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, G.S.; Niang, M.; Schaetzel, P.

    1997-04-01

    For pervaporation separation of ethanol and ethyl tert-butyl ether mixtures, a cellulose acetate propionate membrane was chosen as the experimental membrane because of its high selectivity and good mass fluxes. The properties of the membranes were evaluated by the pervaporation separation of mixtures of ethyl tert-butyl ether/ethanol and the sorption experiments. The experimental results showed that the selectivity and the permeates depend on the ethanol concentration in the feed and the experimental temperature. With increases of the ethanol weight fraction in the feed and the temperature, the total and partial mass fluxes increased. With respect to the temperature, ethanol mass flux obeys the Arrhenius equation. The selectivity of this membrane decreases as the temperature and the ethanol concentration in the feed increase. This membrane shows special characteristics at the azeotropic composition. In the vicinity of the azeotropic point, minimum values of ethanol concentration in the permeate and in sorption solution are obtained. The swelling ratios increase when temperature and the ethanol concentration in the feed are increasing. The ethanol concentration in the sorption solution is also influenced by the temperature and the mixture`s composition. When the temperature increases, the sorption selectivity of the membrane decreases.

  12. Acetate and ethanol production from H2 and CO2 by Moorella sp. using a repeated batch culture.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinsuke; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Inokuma, Kentaro; Kita, Masayuki; Okada, Hideki; Nishio, Naomichi

    2005-03-01

    The growth inhibition of Moorella sp. HUC22-1 by undissociated acetic acid was analyzed using a non-competitive inhibition model coupled with a pH inhibition model. In the cells grown on H2 and CO2, the inhibition constant, K(p) of the undissociated acetic acid was 6.2 mM (164 mM as the total acetate at pH 6.2, pKa = 4.795, 55 degrees C), which was 1.5-fold higher than that obtained in cells grown on fructose. When a pH-controlled batch culture was performed using a fermentor at pH 6.2 with H2 and CO2, a maximum of 0.92 g/l of dry cell weight and 339 mM of acetate were produced after 220 h, which were 4.4- and 6.8-fold higher than those produced in the pH-uncontrolled batch culture, respectively. In order to reduce acetate inhibition in the culture medium, a repeated batch culture with cell recycling was performed at a constant pH with H2 and CO2. At a pH of 6.2, the total acetate production reached 840 mmol/l-reactor with 4.7 mmol/l-reactor of total ethanol production after 420 h. When the culture pH was maintained at 5.8, which was the optimum for ethanol production, the total ethanol production reached 15.4 mmol/l-reactor after 430 h, although the total acetate production was decreased to 675 mmol/l-reactor.

  13. The occurrence of Listeria monocytogens in retail ready-to-eat meat and poultry products related to the levels of Acetate and Lactate in the products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes is a psychrotrophic foodborne pathogen that has been isolated from ready-to-eat meat and poultry products (RTE meats). The purpose of this study was to quantify lactate and acetate levels in retail RTE meats that had been tested in a previous study for the presence of L. mono...

  14. Effect of ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetic Acid, and ethylene on changes in respiration and respiratory metabolites in potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Rychter, A; Janes, H W; Chin, C K; Frenkel, C

    1979-07-01

    Ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetic acid, when applied in a volatile state in air to potato tubers, led to a climacteric-like upsurge in respiration. The respiratory upsurge was markedly enhanced when the volatiles were applied in 100% O(2).Ethanol induced a decline in the level of 2-phosphoglyceric acid and phosphoenolpyruvate while leading to the accumulation of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates including isocitrate and alpha-ketoglutarate. The action of these compounds was similar to, but independent of, the action of ethylene.

  15. Behavioral effects of intraventricular injections of low doses of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate in rats: studies with low and high rate operant schedules.

    PubMed

    Arizzi, Maria N; Correa, Merce; Betz, Adrienne J; Wisniecki, Anna; Salamone, John D

    2003-12-17

    Although ethanol is typically classed as a sedative-hypnotic, low doses of ethanol have been shown to stimulate locomotor activity in mice. However, in rats the typical response to peripheral administration of ethanol is a dose-dependent suppression of motor activity and operant responding. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of intraventricular (ICV) infusions of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate on operant performance in rats. ICV injections of ethanol, acetaldehyde, or acetate were given to rats previously trained on either a differential-reinforcement-of-low-rates-of-responding (DRL) 30-s schedule, which generates low rates of responding, or a fixed ratio 5 (FR5) schedule, which generates relatively high rates. Ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate all produced a rate-increasing effect in rats on the DRL 30-s schedule at moderate doses (2.8 and 1.4 micromol, respectively). Acetate also produced a rate-decreasing effect on the DRL 30-s schedule at a larger dose (8.8 micromol). Performance on the FR5 schedule was unaltered by ethanol and acetaldehyde, even at doses as high as 17.6 micromol. However, acetate produced a rate-decreasing effect on the FR5 schedule at doses of 4.4, 5.6, and 8.8 micromol. Central administration of low doses of ethanol and its metabolites can increase operant responding on some schedules in rats. Acetate is the substance that is most potent for producing rate-suppressing effects. These results indicate that the major metabolites of ethanol are pharmacologically active when injected into the brain, and suggest that acetate may mediate some of the rate-suppressing effects of ethanol, such as sedation, ataxia or motor slowing.

  16. Effect of ethanol intake during lactation on male and female pups' liver and brain metabolism during the suckling-weaning transition period.

    PubMed

    Oyama, L M; Oller Do Nascimento, C M

    2003-06-01

    In rats, a high degree of brain development and myelination occurs during the first 15 days after birth. Ethanol intake by lactating rats modified 12 day-old pups' brain development and metabolism. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of maternal ethanol ingestion during lactation on prepubertal (24-day-old) pups' brain and liver metabolism. Lactating rats (4 male and 4 female litters) were divided into 2 groups: control--received control liquid diet, and ethanol--received liquid diet containing 4% of ethanol. On postnatal day 24, the pups were killed by decapitation. Liver and brain were utilized for measuring Adenosine Tri-phosphate-citrate lyase and malic enzymes activities. Brain slices were incubated in medium containing glucose to determine glucose consumption and oxidation, and lipid synthesis. The ethanol intake decreased male and female pups' body, brain and liver weight. Liver Adenosine Tri-phosphate-citrate lyase activity was decreased only in male pups of the ethanol group. The intake of ethanol solution by the dams increased glucose consumption and oxidation by the incubated female pups' brain slices and decreased glucose oxidation by the male pups' brain slices. It can be concluded that the effects of maternal ethanol intake on pups' development and metabolism are gender-related.

  17. Characterization of a recombinant flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that co-ferments glucose and xylose: II. influence of pH and acetic acid on ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Matsushika, Akinori; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2012-12-01

    The inhibitory effects of pH and acetic acid on the co-fermentation of glucose and xylose in complex medium by recombinant flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae MA-R4 were evaluated. In the absence of acetic acid, the fermentation performance of strain MA-R4 was similar between pH 4.0-6.0, but was negatively affected at pH 2.5. The addition of acetic acid to batch cultures resulted in negligible inhibition of several fermentation parameters at pH 6.0, whereas the interactive inhibition of pH and acetic acid on the maximum cell and ethanol concentrations, and rates of sugar consumption and ethanol production were observed at pH levels below 5.4. The inhibitory effect of acetic acid was particularly marked for the consumption rate of xylose, as compared with that of glucose. With increasing initial acetic acid concentration, the ethanol yield slightly increased at pH 5.4 and 6.0, but decreased at pH values lower than 4.7. Notably, ethanol production was nearly completely inhibited under low pH (4.0) and high acetic acid (150-200 mM) conditions. Together, these results indicate that the inhibitory effects of acetic acid and pH on ethanol fermentation by MA-R4 are highly synergistic, although the inhibition can be reduced by increasing the medium pH.

  18. Carbon monoxide fermentation to ethanol by Clostridium autoethanogenum in a bioreactor with no accumulation of acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Abubackar, Haris Nalakath; Veiga, María C; Kennes, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Fermentation of CO or syngas offers an attractive route to produce bioethanol. However, during the bioconversion, one of the challenges to overcome is to reduce the production of acetic acid in order to minimize recovery costs. Different experiments were done with Clostridium autoethanogenum. With the addition of 0.75 μM tungsten, ethanol production from carbon monoxide increased by about 128% compared to the control, without such addition, in batch mode. In bioreactors with continuous carbon monoxide supply, the maximum biomass concentration reached at pH 6.0 was 109% higher than the maximum achieved at pH 4.75 but, interestingly, at pH 4.75, no acetic acid was produced and the ethanol titer reached a maximum of 867 mg/L with minor amounts of 2,3-butanediol (46 mg/L). At the higher pH studied (pH 6.0) in the continuous gas-fed bioreactor, almost equal amounts of ethanol and acetic acid were formed, reaching 907.72 mg/L and 910.69 mg/L respectively.

  19. Density Functional Investigation of the Adsorption of Isooctane, Ethanol, and Acetic Acid on a Water-Covered Fe(100) Surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The presence of water in biofuels poses the question of how it affects the frictional performance of additives in fuels containing organic substances. To investigate the effect of water on the adsorption of molecules present in fuel and its additives we simulated within the framework of density functional theory the adsorption of ethanol, isooctane (2,2,4-trimethylpentane), and acetic acid on a bare and a water-covered Fe(100) surface. Van der Waals interactions are taken into account in our computations. In those molecules, where dispersion forces contribute significantly to the binding mechanism, the water layer has a stronger screening effect. Additionally, this effect can be enhanced by the presence of polar functional groups in the molecule. Thus, with the introduction of a water layer, the adsorption energy of isooctane and ethanol is reduced but it is increased in the case of the acetic acid. The adsorption configuration of ethanol is changed, while the one of acetic acid is moderately, and for isooctane only very slightly altered. Therefore, the effect of a water layer in the adsorption of organic molecules on an Fe(100) surface strongly depends on the type of bond and consequently, so do the tribological properties. PMID:25243045

  20. Density Functional Investigation of the Adsorption of Isooctane, Ethanol, and Acetic Acid on a Water-Covered Fe(100) Surface.

    PubMed

    Bedolla, Pedro O; Feldbauer, Gregor; Wolloch, Michael; Gruber, Christoph; Eder, Stefan J; Dörr, Nicole; Mohn, Peter; Redinger, Josef; Vernes, András

    2014-09-18

    The presence of water in biofuels poses the question of how it affects the frictional performance of additives in fuels containing organic substances. To investigate the effect of water on the adsorption of molecules present in fuel and its additives we simulated within the framework of density functional theory the adsorption of ethanol, isooctane (2,2,4-trimethylpentane), and acetic acid on a bare and a water-covered Fe(100) surface. Van der Waals interactions are taken into account in our computations. In those molecules, where dispersion forces contribute significantly to the binding mechanism, the water layer has a stronger screening effect. Additionally, this effect can be enhanced by the presence of polar functional groups in the molecule. Thus, with the introduction of a water layer, the adsorption energy of isooctane and ethanol is reduced but it is increased in the case of the acetic acid. The adsorption configuration of ethanol is changed, while the one of acetic acid is moderately, and for isooctane only very slightly altered. Therefore, the effect of a water layer in the adsorption of organic molecules on an Fe(100) surface strongly depends on the type of bond and consequently, so do the tribological properties.

  1. Synergistic Trap Response of the False Stable Fly and Little House Fly (Diptera: Muscidae) to Acetic Acid and Ethanol, Two Principal Sugar Fermentation Volatiles.

    PubMed

    Landolt, Peter J; Cha, Dong H; Zack, Richard S

    2015-10-01

    In an initial observation, large numbers of muscoid flies (Diptera) were captured as nontarget insects in traps baited with solutions of acetic acid plus ethanol. In subsequent field experiments, numbers of false stable fly Muscina stabulans (Fallén) and little house fly Fannia canicularis (L.) trapped with the combination of acetic acid plus ethanol were significantly higher than those trapped with either chemical alone, or in unbaited traps. Flies were trapped with acetic acid and ethanol that had been formulated in the water of the drowning solution of the trap, or dispensed from polypropylene vials with holes in the vial lids for diffusion of evaporated chemical. Numbers of both species of fly captured were greater with acetic acid and ethanol in glass McPhail traps, compared to four other similar wet trap designs. This combination of chemicals may be useful as an inexpensive and not unpleasant lure for monitoring or removing these two pest fly species.

  2. Effects of ethanol consumption during pregnancy and lactation on the outcome and postnatal growth of the offspring.

    PubMed

    Flores-Huerta, S; Hernández-Montes, H; Argote, R M; Villalpando, S

    1992-01-01

    Although information about the pregnancy outcome of alcoholic mothers is relatively abundant, no information is available about the effects of ethanol consumption on the infant's postnatal growth. This investigation aims to describe the physical growth of 32 infants born to mothers accustomed to drinking pulque, a mild alcoholic beverage, on a daily basis during pregnancy and lactation and to quantitate the ethanol disposed through the milk, as well as to identify cases of newborns with fetal alcohol syndrome. No full-blown cases of the syndrome were found: birth weight was similar to their non-drinking counterpart, but the relative risk of newborns to drinking mothers to have a low birth weight was 3.39. Ethanol found in milk accounted for 40 mg/day available to the infant. The postnatal growth of infants of ethanol drinkers was similar to that of controls. Further studies on their mental development are required in order to understand the extent of the effects of such a habit.

  3. Effect of the inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase, ethanol dehydrogenase, and phosphotransacetylase on 2,3-butanediol production in Klebsiella pneumoniae strain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background 2,3-Butanediol (2,3-BD) is a high-value chemical usually produced petrochemically but which can also be synthesized by some bacteria. To date, Klebsiella pneumoniae is the most powerful 2,3-BD producer which can utilize a wide range of substrates. However, many by-products are also produced by K. pneumoniae, such as ethanol, lactate, and acetate, which negatively regulate the 2,3-BD yield and increase the costs of downstream separation and purification. Results In this study, we constructed K. pneumoniae mutants with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ADH), and phosphotransacetylase (PTA) deletion individually by suicide vector conjugation. These mutants showed different behavior of production formation. Knock out of ldhA had little influence on the yield of 2,3-BD, whereas knock out of adhE or pta significantly improved the formation of 2,3-BD. The accumulation of the intermediate of 2,3-BD biosynthesis, acetoin, was decreased in all the mutants. The mutants were then tested in five different carbon sources and increased 2,3-BD was observed. Also a double mutant strain with deletion of adhE and ldhA was constructed which resulted in accelerated fermentation and higher 2,3-BD production. In fed-batch culture this strain achieved more than 100 g/L 2,3-BD from glucose with a relatively high yield of 0.49 g/g. Conclusion 2,3-BD production was dramatically improved with the inactivation of adhE and pta. The inactivation of ldhA could advance faster cell growth and shorter fermentation time. The double mutant strain with deletion of adhE and ldhA resulted in accelerated fermentation and higher 2,3-BD production. These results provide new insights for industrial production of 2,3-BD by K. pneumoniae. PMID:24669952

  4. Correlation between urinary 2-methoxy acetic acid and exposure of 2- methoxy ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Shih, T. S.; Liou, S. H.; Chen, C. Y.; Chou, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the correlation between airborne 2-methoxy ethanol (ME) exposures and the urinary 2-methoxy acetic acid (MAA) and to recommend a biological exposure index (BEI) for ME. METHODS: 8 Hour time weighted average (TWA) personal breathing zone samples and urine samples before and after the shift were collected from Monday to Saturday for 27 workers exposed to ME and on Friday for 30 control workers. RESULTS: No correlation was found between airborne exposure to ME and urinary MAA for nine special operation workers due to the use of personal protective equipment. For 18 regular operation workers, a significant correlation (r = 0.702, p = 0.001) was found between urinary MAA (mg/g creatinine) on Friday at the end of the shift and the weekly mean exposures of ME in a 5 day working week. The proposed BEI, which corresponds to exposure for 5 days and 8 hours a day to 5 ppm, extrapolated from the regression equation is 40 mg MAA/g creatinine. A significant correlation was also found between the weekly increase of urinary MAA (Friday after the shift minus Monday before the shift) and the weekly mean exposures of ME (r = 0.741). The recommended value of the weekly increase of urinary MAA for 5 days repeated exposures of 5 ppm ME is 20 mg/g creatinine. No urinary MAA was detected in workers in the non-exposed control group. CONCLUSIONS: The Friday urinary MAA after the shift or the weekly increase of urinary MAA is a specific and a good biomarker of weekly exposure to ME.   PMID:10658546

  5. High acetone-butanol-ethanol production in pH-stat co-feeding of acetate and glucose.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Wang, Qunhui; Sakai, Kenji; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported the metabolic analysis of butanol and acetone production from exogenous acetate by (13)C tracer experiments (Gao et al., RSC Adv., 5, 8486-8495, 2015). To clarify the influence of acetate on acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production, we first performed an enzyme assay in Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. Acetate addition was found to drastically increase the activities of key enzymes involved in the acetate uptake (phosphate acetyltransferase and CoA transferase), acetone formation (acetoacetate decarboxylase), and butanol formation (butanol dehydrogenase) pathways. Subsequently, supplementation of acetate during acidogenesis and early solventogenesis resulted in a significant increase in ABE production. To establish an efficient ABE production system using acetate as a co-substrate, several shot strategies were investigated in batch culture. Batch cultures with two substrate shots without pH control produced 14.20 g/L butanol and 23.27 g/L ABE with a maximum specific butanol production rate of 0.26 g/(g h). Furthermore, pH-controlled (at pH 5.5) batch cultures with two substrate shots resulted in not only improved acetate consumption but also a further increase in ABE production. Finally, we obtained 15.13 g/L butanol and 24.37 g/L ABE at the high specific butanol production rate of 0.34 g/(g h) using pH-stat co-feeding method. Thus, in this study, we established a high ABE production system using glucose and acetate as co-substrates in a pH-stat co-feeding system with C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4.

  6. Influence of an acetate- and a lactate-based balanced infusion solution on acid base physiology and hemodynamics: an observational pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The current pilot study compares the impact of an intravenous infusion of Ringer’s lactate to an acetate-based solution with regard to acid–base balance. The study design included the variables of the Stewart approach and focused on the effective strong ion difference. Because adverse hemodynamic effects have been reported when using acetate buffered solutions in hemodialysis, hemodynamics were also evaluated. Methods Twenty-four women who had undergone abdominal gynecologic surgery and who had received either Ringer’s lactate (Strong Ion Difference 28 mmol/L; n = 12) or an acetate-based solution (Strong Ion Difference 36.8 mmol/L; n = 12) according to an established clinical protocol and its precursor were included in the investigation. After induction of general anesthesia, a set of acid–base variables, hemodynamic values and serum electrolytes was measured three times during the next 120 minutes. Results Patients received a mean dose of 4,054 ± 450 ml of either one or the other of the solutions. In terms of mean arterial blood pressure and norepinephrine requirements there were no differences to observe between the study groups. pH and serum HCO3- concentration decreased slightly but significantly only with Ringer’s lactate. In addition, the acetate-based solution kept the plasma effective strong ion difference more stable than Ringer’s lactate. Conclusions Both of the solutions provided hemodynamic stability. Concerning consistency of acid base parameters none of the solutions seemed to be inferior, either. Whether the slight advantages observed for the acetate-buffered solution in terms of stability of pH and plasma HCO3- are clinically relevant, needs to be investigated in a larger randomized controlled trial. PMID:22769740

  7. Main and interaction effects of acetic acid, furfural, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid on growth and ethanol productivity of yeasts.

    PubMed

    Palmqvist, E; Grage, H; Meinander, N Q; Hahn-Hägerdal, B

    1999-04-05

    The influence of the factors acetic acid, furfural, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid on the ethanol yield (YEtOH) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, bakers' yeast, S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581, and Candida shehatae NJ 23 was investigated using a 2(3)-full factorial design with 3 centrepoints. The results indicated that acetic acid inhibited the fermentation by C. shehatae NJ 23 markedly more than by bakers' yeast, whereas no significant difference in tolerance towards the compounds was detected between the S. cerevisiae strains. Furfural (2 g L-1) and the lignin derived compound p-hydroxybenzoic acid (2 g L-1) did not affect any of the yeasts at the cell mass concentration used. The results indicated that the linear model was not adequate to describe the experimental data (the p-values of curvatures were 0.048 for NJ 23 and 0.091 for bakers' yeast). Based on the results from the 2(3)-full factorial experiment, an extended experiment was designed based on a central composite design to investigate the influence of the factors on the specific growth rate (mu), biomass yield (Yx), volumetric ethanol productivity (QEtOH), and YEtOH. Bakers' yeast was chosen in the extended experiment due to its better tolerance towards acetic acid, which makes it a more interesting organism for use in industrial fermentations of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. The inoculum size was reduced in the extended experiment to reduce any increase in inhibitor tolerance that might be due to a large cell inoculum. By dividing the experiment in blocks containing fermentations performed with the same inoculum preparation on the same day, much of the anticipated systematic variation between the experiments was separated from the experimental error. The results of the fitted model can be summarised as follows: mu was decreased by furfural (0-3 g L-1). Furfural and acetic acid (0-10 g L-1) also interacted negatively on mu. Furfural concentrations up to 2 g L-1 stimulated Yx in the absence of acetic acid whereas higher

  8. Breast pumping and lactational state exert differential effects on ethanol pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Mennella, Julie A; Pepino, M Yanina

    2010-03-01

    Prior research revealed that breast stimulation altered the way the lactating body handles alcohol. Its effects depended upon when it occurred relative to drinking. The goal of the present study was to determine whether breast pumping works independently of the physiological and metabolic changes that accompany lactation. To this end, we tested 12 women when they were exclusively breastfeeding 3-5-month-old infants and then again several months after lactation had ceased. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups that differed in the timing of breast pumping relative to drinking a 0.4g/kg dose of alcohol: one group breast pumped 0.6h after drinking (pumped after group) and the other pumped 1h before drinking (pumped before group). For each reproductive stage, subjects were tested on 2 separate days, consuming a standardized meal 1 h before drinking during 1 test day and remaining fasted during the other. Breath alcohol concentrations (BrAC) and temperature readings were obtained before and at fixed intervals after drinking. Pumping before drinking significantly decreased BrAC during both reproductive stages, whereas pumping after drinking resulted in different BrAC time curves during lactation when compared with after lactation. That is, levels were significantly lower during the descending phase of the time curve during than after lactation. The interactions between pumping and reproductive stage were most apparent during fed condition. Furthermore, women were more sensitive to hypothermic effects of both fasting and drinking alcohol during lactation. These findings add to the growing literature that lactating women metabolize alcohol differently, in part, due to the frequent breast stimulation during breastfeeding and the pronounced physiological changes that accompany one of the most energetically costly mammalian activities.

  9. Ethanol and acetic acid production from carbon monoxide in a Clostridium strain in batch and continuous gas-fed bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Abubackar, Haris Nalakath; Veiga, María C; Kennes, Christian

    2015-01-20

    The effect of different sources of nitrogen as well as their concentrations on the bioconversion of carbon monoxide to metabolic products such as acetic acid and ethanol by Clostridium autoethanogenum was studied. In a first set of assays, under batch conditions, either NH4Cl, trypticase soy broth or yeast extract (YE) were used as sources of nitrogen. The use of YE was found statistically significant (p < 0.05) on the product spectrum in such batch assays. In another set of experiments, three bioreactors were operated with continuous CO supply, in order to estimate the effect of running conditions on products and biomass formation. The bioreactors were operated under different conditions, i.e., EXP1 (pH = 5.75, YE 1g/L), EXP2 (pH = 4.75, YE 1 g/L) and EXP3 (pH = 5.75, YE 0.2 g/L). When compared to EXP2 and EXP3, it was found that EXP1 yielded the maximum biomass accumulation (302.4 mg/L) and products concentrations, i.e., acetic acid (2147.1 mg/L) and ethanol (352.6 mg/L). This can be attributed to the fact that the higher pH and higher YE concentration used in EXP1 stimulated cell growth and did, consequently, also enhance metabolite production. However, when ethanol is the desired end-product, as a biofuel, the lower pH used in EXP2 was more favourable for solventogenesis and yielded the highest ethanol/acetic acid ratio, reaching a value of 0.54.

  10. Ethanol and Acetic Acid Production from Carbon Monoxide in a Clostridium Strain in Batch and Continuous Gas-Fed Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Nalakath Abubackar, Haris; Veiga, María C.; Kennes, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different sources of nitrogen as well as their concentrations on the bioconversion of carbon monoxide to metabolic products such as acetic acid and ethanol by Clostridium autoethanogenum was studied. In a first set of assays, under batch conditions, either NH4Cl, trypticase soy broth or yeast extract (YE) were used as sources of nitrogen. The use of YE was found statistically significant (p < 0.05) on the product spectrum in such batch assays. In another set of experiments, three bioreactors were operated with continuous CO supply, in order to estimate the effect of running conditions on products and biomass formation. The bioreactors were operated under different conditions, i.e., EXP1 (pH = 5.75, YE 1g/L), EXP2 (pH = 4.75, YE 1 g/L) and EXP3 (pH = 5.75, YE 0.2 g/L). When compared to EXP2 and EXP3, it was found that EXP1 yielded the maximum biomass accumulation (302.4 mg/L) and products concentrations, i.e., acetic acid (2147.1 mg/L) and ethanol (352.6 mg/L). This can be attributed to the fact that the higher pH and higher YE concentration used in EXP1 stimulated cell growth and did, consequently, also enhance metabolite production. However, when ethanol is the desired end-product, as a biofuel, the lower pH used in EXP2 was more favourable for solventogenesis and yielded the highest ethanol/acetic acid ratio, reaching a value of 0.54. PMID:25608591

  11. Nematocyst discharge in Pelagia noctiluca (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa) oral arms can be affected by lidocaine, ethanol, ammonia and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Rossana; Marino, Angela; Dossena, Silvia; La Spada, Giuseppa

    2014-06-01

    Nematocyst discharge and concomitant delivery of toxins is triggered to perform both defence and predation strategies in Cnidarians, and may lead to serious local and systemic reactions in humans. Pelagia noctiluca (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa) is a jellyfish particularly abundant in the Strait of Messina (Italy). After accidental contact with this jellyfish, not discharged nematocysts or even fragments of tentacles or oral arms may tightly adhere to the human skin and, following discharge, severely increase pain and the other adverse consequences of the sting. The aim of the present study is to verify if the local anesthetic lidocaine and other compounds, like alcohols, acetic acid and ammonia, known to provide pain relief after jellyfish stings, may also affect in situ discharge of nematocysts. Discharge was induced by a combined physico-chemical stimulation of oral arms by chemosensitizers (such as N-acetylated sugars, aminoacids, proteins and nucleotides), in the presence or absence of 1% lidocaine, 70% ethanol, 5% acetic acid or 20% ammonia, followed by mechanical stimulation by a non-vibrating test probe. The above mentioned compounds failed to induce discharge per se, and dramatically impaired the chemosensitizer-induced discharge response. We therefore suggest that prompt local treatment of the stung epidermis with lidocaine, acetic acid, ethanol and ammonia may provide substantial pain relief and help in reducing possible harmful local and systemic adverse reaction following accidental contact with P. noctiluca specimens.

  12. Effect of acetic acid and pH on the cofermentation of glucose and xylose to ethanol by a genetically engineered strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Casey, Elizabeth; Sedlak, Miroslav; Ho, Nancy W Y; Mosier, Nathan S

    2010-06-01

    A current challenge of the cellulosic ethanol industry is the effect of inhibitors present in biomass hydrolysates. Acetic acid is an example of one such inhibitor that is released during the pretreatment of hemicellulose. This study examined the effect of acetic acid on the cofermentation of glucose and xylose under controlled pH conditions by Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A(LNH-ST), a genetically engineered industrial yeast strain. Acetic acid concentrations of 7.5 and 15 g L(-1), representing the range of concentrations expected in actual biomass hydrolysates, were tested under controlled pH conditions of 5, 5.5, and 6. The presence of acetic acid in the fermentation media led to a significant decrease in the observed maximum cell biomass concentration. Glucose- and xylose-specific consumption rates decreased as the acetic acid concentration increased, with the inhibitory effect being more severe for xylose consumption. The ethanol production rates also decreased when acetic acid was present, but ethanol metabolic yields increased under the same conditions. The results also revealed that the inhibitory effect of acetic acid could be reduced by increasing media pH, thus confirming that the undissociated form of acetic acid is the inhibitory form of the molecule.

  13. ADSORPTION AND MEMBRANE SEPARATION MEASUREMENTS WITH MIXTURES OF ETHANOL, ACETIC ACID, AND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biomass fermentation produces ethanol and other renewable biofuels. Pervaporation using hydrophobic membranes is potentially a cost-effective means of removing biofuels from fermentation broths for small- to medium-scale applications. Silicalite-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)...

  14. The effect of flooding on the exchange of the volatile C2-compounds ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid between leaves of Amazonian floodplain tree species and the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottenberger, S.; Kleiss, B.; Kuhn, U.; Wolf, A.; Piedade, M. T. F.; Junk, W.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2008-02-01

    The effect of root inundation on the leaf emissions of ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid was investigated with 2-3 years old tree seedlings of four Amazonian floodplain species by applying dynamic cuvette systems under greenhouse conditions. Emissions were monitored over a period of several days of inundation using a combination of Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and conventional techniques (HPLC, ion chromatography). Under non-flooded conditions, none of the species exhibited significant emissions of any of the compounds. A slight deposition of acetaldehyde and acetic acid was mainly observed, instead. Tree species specific variations in deposition velocities were largely due to variations in stomatal conductance. Flooding of the roots resulted in leaf emissions of ethanol and acetaldehyde by all species, while emissions of acetic acid occurred only by the species exhibiting the highest ethanol and acetaldehyde emission rates. All three compounds showed a similar diurnal emission profile, each displaying an emission burst in the morning, followed by a decline in the evening. This concurrent behavior supports the conclusion, that all three compounds emitted by the leaves are derived from ethanol produced in the roots by alcoholic fermentation, transported to the leaves with the transpiration stream and finally partly converted to acetaldehyde and acetic acid by enzymatic processes. Co-emissions and peaking in the early morning confirmed that root ethanol, after transportation with the transpiration stream to the leaves and enzymatic oxidation to acetaldehyde and acetate, is the metabolic precursor for all compounds emitted. Emission rates substantially varied among tree species, with maxima differing by up to two orders of magnitude (3-200 nmol m-2 min-1 for ethanol and 5-500 nmol m-2 min-1 for acetaldehyde). Acetic acid emissions reached 12 nmol m-2 min-1. The observed differences in emission rates between the tree species are discussed

  15. The effect of flooding on the exchange of the volatile C2-compounds ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid between leaves of Amazonian floodplain tree species and the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottenberger, S.; Kleiss, B.; Kuhn, U.; Wolf, A.; Piedade, M. T. F.; Junk, W.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2008-08-01

    The effect of root inundation on the leaf emissions of ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid in relation to assimilation and transpiration was investigated with 2 3 years old tree seedlings of four Amazonian floodplain species by applying dynamic cuvette systems under greenhouse conditions. Emissions were monitored over a period of several days of inundation using a combination of Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and conventional techniques (HPLC, ion chromatography). Under non-flooded conditions, none of the species exhibited measurable emissions of any of the compounds, but rather low deposition of acetaldehyde and acetic acid was observed instead. Tree species specific variations in deposition velocities were largely due to variations in stomatal conductance. Flooding of the roots resulted in leaf emissions of ethanol and acetaldehyde by all species, while emissions of acetic acid were only observed from the species exhibiting the highest ethanol and acetaldehyde emission rates. All three compounds showed a similar diurnal emission profile, each displaying an emission burst in the morning, followed by a decline in the evening. This concurrent behavior supports the conclusion, that all three compounds emitted by the leaves are derived from ethanol produced in the roots by alcoholic fermentation, transported to the leaves with the transpiration stream and finally partly converted to acetaldehyde and acetic acid by enzymatic processes. Co-emissions and peaking in the early morning suggest that root ethanol, after transportation with the transpiration stream to the leaves and enzymatic oxidation to acetaldehyde and acetate, is the metabolic precursor for all compounds emitted, though we can not totally exclude other production pathways. Emission rates substantially varied among tree species, with maxima differing by up to two orders of magnitude (25 1700 nmol m-2 min-1 for ethanol and 5 500 nmol m-2 min-1 for acetaldehyde). Acetic acid emissions

  16. Electrochemical Partial Reforming of Ethanol into Ethyl Acetate Using Ultrathin Co3O4 Nanosheets as a Highly Selective Anode Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical partial reforming of organics provides an alternative strategy to produce valuable organic compounds while generating H2 under mild conditions. In this work, highly selective electrochemical reforming of ethanol into ethyl acetate is successfully achieved by using ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets with exposed (111) facets as an anode catalyst. Those nanosheets were synthesized by a one-pot, templateless hydrothermal method with the use of ammonia. NH3 was demonstrated critical to the overall formation of ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets. With abundant active sites on Co3O4 (111), the as-synthesized ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activities toward water and ethanol oxidations in alkaline media. More importantly, over the Co3O4 nanosheets, the electrooxidation from ethanol to ethyl acetate was so selective that no other oxidation products were yielded. With such a high selectivity, an electrolyzer cell using Co3O4 nanosheets as the anode electrocatalyst and Ni–Mo nanopowders as the cathode electrocatalyst has been successfully built for ethanol reforming. The electrolyzer cell was readily driven by a 1.5 V battery to achieve the effective production of both H2 and ethyl acetate. After the bulk electrolysis, about 95% of ethanol was electrochemically reformed into ethyl acetate. This work opens up new opportunities in designing a material system for building unique devices to generate both hydrogen and high-value organics at room temperature by utilizing electric energy from renewable sources. PMID:27610415

  17. Improved ethanol production from xylose in the presence of acetic acid by the overexpression of the HAA1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sakihama, Yuri; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-03-01

    The hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass liberates sugars, primarily glucose and xylose, which are subsequently converted to ethanol by microbial fermentation. The rapid and efficient fermentation of xylose by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains is limited by weak acids generated during biomass pretreatment processes. In particular, acetic acid negatively affects cell growth, xylose fermentation rate, and ethanol production. The ability of S. cerevisiae to efficiently utilize xylose in the presence of acetic acid is an essential requirement for the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Here, an acetic acid-responsive transcriptional activator, HAA1, was overexpressed in a recombinant xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain to yield BY4741X/HAA1. This strain exhibited improved cell growth and ethanol production from xylose under aerobic and oxygen limited conditions, respectively, in the presence of acetic acid. The HAA1p regulon enhanced transcript levels in BY4741X/HAA1. The disruption of PHO13, a p-nitrophenylphosphatase gene, in BY4741X/HAA1 led to further improvement in both yeast growth and the ability to ferment xylose, indicating that HAA1 overexpression and PHO13 deletion act by different mechanisms to enhance ethanol production.

  18. Transport of acetic acid in Zygosaccharomyces bailii: effects of ethanol and their implications on the resistance of the yeast to acidic environments.

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, M J; Miranda, L; Côrte-Real, M; Leão, C

    1996-01-01

    Cells of Zygosaccharomyces bailii ISA 1307 grown in a medium with acetic acid, ethanol, or glycerol as the sole carbon and energy source transported acetic acid by a saturable transport system. This system accepted propionic and formic acids but not lactic, sorbic, and benzoic acids. When the carbon source was glucose or fructose, the cells displayed activity of a mediated transport system specific for acetic acid, apparently not being able to recognize other monocarboxylic acids. In both types of cells, ethanol inhibited the transport of labelled acetic acid. The inhibition was noncompetitive, and the dependence of the maximum transport rate on the ethanol concentration was found to be exponential. These results reinforced the belief that, under the referenced growth conditions, the acid entered the cells mainly through a transporter protein. The simple diffusion of the undissociated acid appeared to contribute, with a relatively low weight, to the overall acid uptake. It was concluded that in Z. bailii, ethanol plays a protective role against the possible negative effects of acetic acid by inhibiting its transport and accumulation. Thus, the intracellular concentration of the acid could be maintained at levels lower than those expected if the acid entered the cells only by simple diffusion. PMID:8795203

  19. Proton Conducting Polymer Membrane Using The Ionic Liquid 2-Hydroxyethylammonium Lactate For Ethanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, L.; José, N. M.; Boaventura, J.; Iglesias, M.; Mattedi, S.

    2011-12-01

    In this work, there were developed a proton conducting polymer membrane using an ammonium based protic ionic liquid: 2-hydroxyethylamominum lactate for use in proton exchange fuel cells (PEMFC). This kind of ionic liquid has been proven to be biodegradable and they have potentially low toxicity besides low cost of preparation, simple synthesis and purification. The prepared membranes are hybrid organic-inorganic materials. The polymeric matrix is prepared with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mixed with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in a ratio of 70/30% in weight. Then, the eletrolytical mixture containing sodium monododecylsulfate (SDS) and the ionic liquid was introduced in the lattice near the gel point, there were used different proportions of the eletrolyte from 5 to 30% in weight. The prepared membranes were characterized using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (DRX), termogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and conductivity and impedance measurements. The prepared materials are flexible, with good thermal and mechanical stability and with a great potential to be used as conducting membranes of fuel cells. The used mixture minimizes the lixiviation lost of the ionic liquid from the polymeric membrane and enhances the cell efficiency if compared with traditional synthetic membranes.

  20. Hypoglycemic Effect of Ethanol and Ethyl Acetate Extract of Phellinus baumii Fruiting Body in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Han; Wu, Fei-Hua; Yang, Yan; Wu, Na; Zhang, Jing-Song; Feng, Na; Tang, Chuan-Hong

    2015-01-01

    We investigated hypoglycemic effect of ethanol (EtOH) and ethyl acetate extract acetate (AcOEt) extracts in streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic mice. Our data showed the maximum inhibitory effect on the fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level was detected in STZ-induced diabetic mice administered with 400 mg/kg AcOEt extract of P. baumii. A lower glycated albumin (GA) level and a higher insulin level were observed in 400 mg/kg AcOEt and EtOH extract groups. Moreover, 400 mg/kg AcOEt and EtOH extract exhibited a stronger effect on increasing size and cell number of islets. The insulin expression level of β-cells and integrated optical density (IOD) value were significantly increased by the administration of 400 mg/kg AcOEt and EtOH extracts. Taken together, AcOEt and EtOH extracts of P. baumii fruiting body exhibited considerable hypoglycemic effect on STZ-induced diabetic mice. PMID:26221177

  1. Improved growth and ethanol fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of acetic acid by overexpression of SET5 and PPR1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Ming; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Cheng, Cheng; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the contribution of zinc-finger proteins to environmental stress tolerance, particularly inhibition from acetic acid, which is a potent inhibitor for cellulosic ethanol production by microbial fermentations, SET5 and PPR1 were overexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741. With 5 g/L acetic acid addition, engineered strains BY4741/SET5 and BY4741/PPR1 showed improved growth and enhanced ethanol fermentation performance compared to that with the control strain. Similar results were also observed in ethanol production using corn stover hydrolysate. Further studies indicated that SET5 and PPR1 overexpression in S. cerevisiae significantly improved activities of antioxidant enzymes and ATP generation in the presence of acetic acid, and consequently decreased intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (50.9 and 45.7%, respectively). These results revealed the novel functions of SET5 and PPR1 for the improvement of yeast acetic acid tolerance, and also implicated the involvement of these proteins in oxidative stress defense and energy metabolism in S. cerevisiae. This work also demonstrated that overexpression of SET5 and PPR1 would be a feasible strategy to increase cellulosic ethanol production efficiency.

  2. Effects of ethanol and acetic acid on the transport of malic acid and glucose in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe: implications in wine deacidification.

    PubMed

    Sousa, M J; Mota, M; Leão, C

    1995-02-15

    Ethanol and acetic acid, at concentrations which may occur during wine-making, inhibited the transport of L-malic acid in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The inhibition was non-competitive, the decrease of the maximum initial velocity following exponential kinetics. Glucose transport was not significantly affected either by ethanol (up to 13%, w/v) or by acetic acid (up to 1.5%, w/v). The uptake of labelled acetic acid followed simple diffusion kinetics, indicating that a carrier was not involved in its transport. Therefore, the undissociated acid appears to be the only form that enters the cells and is probably responsible for the toxic effects. Accordingly, deacidification by Ss. pombe during wine fermentation should take place before, rather than after, the main alcoholic fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  3. Elimination of acetate production to improve ethanol yield during continuous synthesis gas fermentation by engineered biocatalyst Clostridium sp. MTEtOH550.

    PubMed

    Berzin, Vel; Kiriukhin, Michael; Tyurin, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Acetogen strain Clostridum sp. MT653 produced acetate 273 mM (p < 0.005) and ethanol 250 mM (p < 0.005) from synthesis gas blend mixture of 64% CO and 36% H(2). Clostridum sp. MT653 was metabolically engineered to the biocatalyst strain Clostridium sp. MTEtOH550. The biocatalyst increased ethanol yield to 590 mM with no acetate production during single-stage continuous syngas fermentation due to expression of synthetic adh cloned in a multi-copy number expression vector. The acetate production was eliminated by inactivation of the pta gene in Clostridium sp. MTEtOH550. Gene introduction and gene elimination were achieved only using Syngas Biofuels Energy, Inc. electroporation generator. The electrotransformation efficiencies were 8.0 ± 0.2 × 10(6) per microgram of transforming DNA of the expression vector at cell viability ~15%. The frequency of suicidal vector integration to inactivate pta was ~10(-5) per the number of recipient cells. This is the first report on elimination of acetate production and overexpression of synthetic adh gene to engineer acetogen biocatalyst for selective biofuel ethanol production during continuous syngas fermentation.

  4. Oral administration of cobalt acetate alters milk fatty acid composition, consistent with an inhibition of stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase in lactating ewes.

    PubMed

    Frutos, P; Toral, P G; Ramos-Morales, E; Shingfield, K J; Belenguer, A; Hervás, G

    2014-02-01

    Previous investigations have shown that cobalt (Co) modifies milk fat composition in cattle, consistent with an inhibition of stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD) activity, but it remains unclear whether other ruminant species are also affected. The present study examined the effects of oral administration of Co acetate on intake, rumen function, and milk production and fatty acid (FA) composition in sheep. Twenty lactating Assaf ewes were allocated into 1 of 4 groups and used in a continuous randomized block design that involved a 15-d adaptation, a 6-d treatment, and a 10-d posttreatment period. During the treatment period, animals received an oral drench supplying 0 (control), 3 (Co3), 6 (Co6), and 9 (Co9) mg of Co/kg of BW per day, administered in 3 equal doses at 8-h intervals. Cobalt acetate had no influence on intake or milk fat and protein concentrations, whereas treatments Co6 and Co9 tended to lower milk yield. Results on rumen parameters showed no effects on rumen fermentation, FA composition, or bacterial community structure. Administration of Co acetate decreased milk concentrations of FA containing a cis-9 double bond and SCD product:substrate ratios, consistent with an inhibition of SCD activity in the ovine mammary gland. Temporal changes in milk fat composition indicated that the effects of treatments were evident within 3d of dosing, with further changes being apparent after 6d and reverting to pretreatment values by d 6 after administration. Effect on milk FA composition did not differ substantially in response to incremental doses of Co acetate. On average, Co decreased milk cis-9 10:1/10:0, cis-9 12:1/12:0, cis-9 14:1/14:0, cis-9 16:1/16:0, cis-9 17:1/17:0, cis-9 18:1/18:0, and cis-9,trans-11 18:2/trans-11 18:1 concentration ratios by 30, 32, 38, 33, 21, 24, and 25%, respectively. Changes in milk fat cis-9 10:1, cis-9 12:1, and cis-9 14:1 concentrations to Co treatment indicated that 51% of cis-9 18:1 and cis-9,trans-11 18:2 secreted in milk

  5. Vapor-liquid equilibrium measurements at 101. 32 kPa for binary mixtures of methyl acetate + ethanol or 1-propanol

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J.: Susial, P.; de Alfonso, C. )

    1990-07-01

    This paper reports on isobaric vapor-liquid equilibrium data at 101.32 {plus minus} 0.02 kPa for methyl acetate (1) + ethane (2) or + 1-propanol (2). The results are compared with those predicted by the UNIFAC and ASOG methods. The methyl acetate (1) + ethanol (2) system forms an azeotrope at 329.8 K and a molar concentration of x{sub 1} = 0.958. Both methods predict the vapor-phase compositions equally well, with overall mean errors of less than 5%.

  6. Efficient reduction of the formation of by-products and improvement of production yield of 2,3-butanediol by a combined deletion of alcohol dehydrogenase, acetate kinase-phosphotransacetylase, and lactate dehydrogenase genes in metabolically engineered Klebsiella oxytoca in mineral salts medium.

    PubMed

    Jantama, Kaemwich; Polyiam, Pattharasedthi; Khunnonkwao, Panwana; Chan, Sitha; Sangproo, Maytawadee; Khor, Kirin; Jantama, Sirima Suvarnakuta; Kanchanatawee, Sunthorn

    2015-07-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca KMS005 (∆adhE∆ackA-pta∆ldhA) was metabolically engineered to improve 2,3-butanediol (BDO) yield. Elimination of alcohol dehydrogenase E (adhE), acetate kinase A-phosphotransacetylase (ackA-pta), and lactate dehydrogenase A (ldhA) enzymes allowed BDO production as a primary pathway for NADH re-oxidation, and significantly reduced by-products. KMS005 was screened for the efficient glucose utilization by metabolic evolution. KMS005-73T improved BDO production at a concentration of 23.5±0.5 g/L with yield of 0.46±0.02 g/g in mineral salts medium containing 50 g/L glucose in a shake flask. KMS005-73T also exhibited BDO yields of about 0.40-0.42 g/g from sugarcane molasses, cassava starch, and maltodextrin. During fed-batch fermentation, KMS005-73T produced BDO at a concentration, yield, and overall and specific productivities of 117.4±4.5 g/L, 0.49±0.02 g/g, 1.20±0.05 g/Lh, and 27.2±1.1 g/gCDW, respectively. No acetoin, lactate, and formate were detected, and only trace amounts of acetate and ethanol were formed. The strain also produced the least by-products and the highest BDO yield among other Klebsiella strains previously developed.

  7. Crystal structure of a mixed-ligand dinuclear Ba-Zn complex with 2-meth-oxy-ethanol having tri-phenyl-acetate and chloride bridges.

    PubMed

    Utko, Józef; Sobocińska, Maria; Dobrzyńska, Danuta; Lis, Tadeusz

    2015-07-01

    The dinuclear barium-zinc complex, μ-chlorido-1:2κ(2) Cl:Cl-chlorido-2κCl-bis-(2-meth-oxy-ethanol-1κO)bis-(2-meth-oxy-ethanol-1κ(2) O,O')bis-(μ-tri-phenyl-acetato-1:2κ(2) O:O')bariumzinc, [BaZn(C20H15O2)2Cl2(C3H8O2)4], has been synthesized by the reaction of barium tri-phenyl-acetate, anhydrous zinc chloride and 2-meth-oxy-ethanol in the presence of toluene. The barium and zinc metal cations in the dinuclear complex are linked via one chloride anion and carboxyl-ate O atoms of the tri-phenyl-acetate ligands, giving a Ba⋯Zn separation of 3.9335 (11) Å. The irregular nine-coordinate BaO8Cl coordination centres comprise eight O-atom donors, six of them from 2-meth-oxy-ethanol ligands (four from two bidentate O,O'-chelate inter-actions and two from monodentate inter-actions), two from bridging tri-phenyl-acetate ligands and one from a bridging Cl donor. The distorted tetra-hedral coordination sphere of zinc comprises two O-atom donors from the tri-phenyl-acetate ligands and two Cl donors (one bridging and one terminal). In the crystal, O-H⋯Cl, O-H⋯O and C-H⋯Cl inter-molecular inter-actions form a layered structure, lying parallel to (001).

  8. Effects of acetic acid, ethanol, and SO(2) on the removal of volatile acidity from acidic wines by two Saccharomyces cerevisiae commercial strains.

    PubMed

    Vilela-Moura, Alice; Schuller, Dorit; Mendes-Faia, Arlete; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2010-07-01

    Herein, we report the influence of different combinations of initial concentration of acetic acid and ethanol on the removal of acetic acid from acidic wines by two commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains S26 and S29. Both strains reduced the volatile acidity of an acidic wine (1.0 gl(-1) acetic acid and 11% (v/v) ethanol) by 78% and 48%, respectively. Acetic acid removal by strains S26 and S29 was associated with a decrease in ethanol concentration of 0.7 and 1.2% (v/v), respectively. Strain S26 revealed better removal efficiency due to its higher tolerance to stress factors imposed by acidic wines. Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) in the concentration range 95-170 mg l(-1)inhibits the ability of both strains to reduce the volatile acidity of the acidic wine used under our experimental conditions. Therefore, deacidification should be carried out either in wines stabilized by filtration or in wines with SO(2)concentrations up to 70 mg l(-1). Deacidification of wines with the better performing strain S26 was associated with changes in the concentration of volatile compounds. The most pronounced increase was observed for isoamyl acetate (banana) and ethyl hexanoate (apple, pineapple), with an 18- and 25-fold increment, respectively, to values above the detection threshold. The acetaldehyde concentration of the deacidified wine was 2.3 times higher, and may have a detrimental effect on the wine aroma. Moreover, deacidification led to increased fatty acids concentration, but still within the range of values described for spontaneous fermentations, and with apparently no negative impact on the organoleptical properties.

  9. Activation of apoptosis by ethyl acetate fraction of ethanol extract of Dianthus superbus in HepG2 cell line.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Qing; Yin, Yan; Lei, Jia-Chuan; Zhang, Xiu-Qiao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Cheng-Li; Wu, Shan; He, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Yan-Wen; Zou, Guo-Lin

    2012-02-01

    Dianthus superbus L. is commonly used as a traditional Chinese medicine. We recently showed that ethyl acetate fraction (EE-DS) from ethanol extract of D. superbus exhibited the strongest antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. In this study, we examined apoptosis of HepG2 cells induced by EE-DS, and the mechanism underlying apoptosis was also investigated. Treatment of HepG2 cells with EE-DS (20-80 μg/ml) for 48 h led to a significant dose-dependent increase in the percentage of cells in sub-G1 phase by analysis of the content of DNA in cells, and a large number of apoptotic bodies containing nuclear fragments were observed in cells treated with 80 μg/ml of EE-DS for 24 h by using Hoechst 33258 staining. These data show that EE-DS can induce apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Immunoblot analysis showed that EE-DS significantly suppressed the expressions of Bcl-2 and NF-κB. Treatment of cells with EE-DS (80 μg/ml) for 48 h resulted in significant increase of cytochrome c in the cytosol, which indicated cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Activation of caspase-9 and -3 were also determined when the cells treated with EE-DS. The results suggest that apoptosis of HepG2 cells induced by EE-DS could be through the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) data showed that the composition of EE-DS is complicated. Further studies are needed to find the effective constituents of EE-DS.

  10. Sugar-glycerol cofermentations in lactobacilli: the fate of lactate.

    PubMed

    Veiga da Cunha, M; Foster, M A

    1992-02-01

    The simultaneous fermentation of glycerol and sugar by lactobacillus brevis B22 and Lactobacillus buchneri B190 increases both the growth rate and total growth. The reduction of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol by the lactobacilli was found to influence the metabolism of the sugar cofermented by channelling some of the intermediate metabolites (e.g., pyruvate) towards NADH-producing (rather than NADH-consuming) reactions. Ultimately, the absolute requirement for NADH to prevent the accumulation of 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde leads to a novel lactate-glycerol cofermentation. As a result, additional ATP can be made not only by (i) converting pyruvate to acetate via acetyl phosphate rather than to the ethanol usually found and (ii) oxidizing part of the intermediate pyruvate to acetate instead of the usual reduction to lactate but also by (iii) reoxidation of accumulated lactate to acetate via pyruvate. The conversion of lactate to pyruvate is probably catalyzed by NAD-independent lactate dehydrogenases that are found only in the cultures oxidizing lactate and producing 1,3-propanediol, suggesting a correlation between the expression of these enzymes and a raised intracellular NAD/NADH ratio. The enzymes metabolizing glycerol (glycerol dehydratase and 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase) were expressed in concert without necessary induction by added glycerol, although their expression may also be influenced by the intracellular NAD/NADH ratio set by the different carbohydrates fermented.

  11. Hydroethanolic extract of Baccharis trimera promotes gastroprotection and healing of acute and chronic gastric ulcers induced by ethanol and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida; da Silva, Luisa Mota; Ferreira, Daniele Maria; Galuppo, Larissa Favaretto; Borato, Debora Gasparin; Prando, Thiago Bruno Lima; Lourenço, Emerson Luiz Botelho; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Stefanello, Maria Élida Alves; Werner, Maria Fernanda de Paula; Acco, Alexandra

    2016-09-01

    Ethanol is a psychoactive substance highly consumed around the world whose health problems include gastric lesions. Baccharis trimera is used in folk medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. However, few studies have evaluated its biological and toxic effects. To validate the popular use of B. trimera and elucidate its possible antiulcerogenic and cytotoxic mechanisms, a hydroethanolic extract of B. trimera (HEBT) was evaluated in models of gastric lesions. Rats and mice were used to evaluate the protective and antiulcerogenic effects of HEBT on gastric lesions induced by ethanol, acetic acid, and chronic ethanol consumption. The effects of HEBT were also evaluated in a pylorus ligature model and on gastrointestinal motility. The LD50 of HEBT in mice was additionally estimated. HEBT was analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance, and a high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprint analysis was performed. Oral HEBT administration significantly reduced the lesion area and the oxidative stress induced by acute and chronic ethanol consumption. However, HEBT did not protect against gastric wall mucus depletion and did not alter gastric secretory volume, pH, or total acidity in the pylorus ligature model. Histologically, HEBT accelerated the healing of chronic gastric ulcers in rats, reflected by contractions of the ulcer base. Flavonoids and caffeoylquinic acids were detected in HEBT, which likely contributed to the therapeutic efficacy of HEBT, preventing or reversing ethanol- and acetic acid-induced ulcers, respectively. HEBT antiulcerogenic activity may be partially attributable to the inhibition of free radical generation and subsequent prevention of lipid peroxidation. Our results indicate that HEBT has both gastroprotective and curative activity in animal models, with no toxicity.

  12. Bioconversion of H2/CO 2 by acetogen enriched cultures for acetate and ethanol production: the impact of pH.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuyun; Fu, Bo; Zhang, Lijuan; Liu, He

    2015-06-01

    Syngas fermentation into ethanol and other bioproducts by mixed cultures is considered a promising biotechnology. Effects of pH on product generation and microbial community during H2/CO2 utilization by acetogen enrichment cultures were investigated in this work. The maximum acetate concentration reached 95.41 mmol L(-1) at pH 7, which was 71.7, 21.8 and 50.9% higher than at pH 5, 9 and 11, respectively. The maximum ethanol concentration at pH 7 was 45.7, 50, 72% higher than that at pH 5, 9 and 11, respectively. The CO dehydrogenase (CODH) gene copy number was highest at pH 7, indicating that metabolically active acetogens reached their highest level at pH 7. The CODH gene copy number at pH 9 was lower than at pH 7, but higher than at pH 5 and 11. Correspondingly, the enrichment cultures at pH 7 had the highest species richness and diversity, while those at pH 9 had the second highest diversity, and those at pH 5 and 11 had the lowest diversity. The shift in microbial community structure and the different active acetogen contents resulting from different pHs were responsible for the differences in acetate and ethanol production.

  13. Models construction for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentations with acetate/butyrate consecutively feeding by graph theory.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Shi, Zhongping; Li, Xin

    2014-05-01

    Several fermentations with consecutively feeding of acetate/butyrate were conducted in a 7 L fermentor and the results indicated that exogenous acetate/butyrate enhanced solvents productivities by 47.1% and 39.2% respectively, and changed butyrate/acetate ratios greatly. Then extracellular butyrate/acetate ratios were utilized for calculation of acids rates and the results revealed that acetate and butyrate formation pathways were almost blocked by corresponding acids feeding. In addition, models for acetate/butyrate feeding fermentations were constructed by graph theory based on calculation results and relevant reports. Solvents concentrations and butanol/acetone ratios of these fermentations were also calculated and the results of models calculation matched fermentation data accurately which demonstrated that models were constructed in a reasonable way.

  14. The voluntary intake of hay and silage by lactating cows in response to ruminal infusion of acetate or propionate, or both, with or without distension of the rumen by a balloon.

    PubMed

    Mbanya, J N; Anil, M H; Forbes, J M

    1993-05-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that negative feedback signals from abdominal receptors are integrated in an additive manner in the control of voluntary food intake, cows with rumen fistulas were given intraruminal infusions of sodium acetate or sodium propionate, or both, with or without distension of the rumen by balloon. Intakes were monitored during the 3 h experimental period and for 2 h after and samples of rumen fluid were taken for estimation of short-chain fatty acid concentrations and osmolality. Six cows in mid-lactation were fed on hay and concentrates and given, into the rumen, 5.5 mol sodium acetate, 5.2 mol sodium propionate and 7.5 l of distension. Compared with the control (water infusion), neither acetate, propionate nor distension significantly depressed hay intake when given separately. When given in combination, however, the following significantly depressed intake during the 3 h treatment period: propionate + distension, acetate + distension, acetate + propionate + distension. Seven cows in early lactation were fed on silage and concentrates and given, into the rumen, 9.0 mol sodium acetate, 4.0 mol sodium propionate and 10.0 litres of distension. Again, none of the three given alone depressed silage intake to a significant extent during the 3 h treatment period, whereas the following combinations had a significant effect: propionate + distension, acetate + distension, acetate + propionate + distension. Basal rumen osmolalities were similar for the two types of feed but infusion of the sodium salts caused a very much greater increase with silage than with hay.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Development of an Alcohol Dehydrogenase Biosensor for Ethanol Determination with Toluidine Blue O Covalently Attached to a Cellulose Acetate Modified Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Alpat, Şenol; Telefoncu, Azmi

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a novel voltammetric ethanol biosensor was constructed using alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Firstly, alcohol dehydrogenase was immobilized on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode modified by cellulose acetate (CA) bonded to toluidine blue O (TBO). Secondly, the surface was covered by a glutaraldehyde/bovine serum albumin (BSA) cross-linking procedure to provide a new voltammetric sensor for the ethanol determination. In order to fabricate the biosensor, a new electrode matrix containing insoluble Toluidine Blue O (TBO) was obtained from the process, and enzyme/coenzyme was combined on the biosensor surface. The influence of various experimental conditions was examined for the characterization of the optimum analytical performance. The developed biosensor exhibited sensitive and selective determination of ethanol and showed a linear response between 1 × 10−5 M and 4 × 10−4 M ethanol. A detection limit calculated as three times the signal-to-noise ratio was 5.0 × 10−6 M. At the end of the 20th day, the biosensor still retained 50% of its initial activity. PMID:22315566

  16. Development of an alcohol dehydrogenase biosensor for ethanol determination with toluidine blue O covalently attached to a cellulose acetate modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Alpat, Senol; Telefoncu, Azmi

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a novel voltammetric ethanol biosensor was constructed using alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Firstly, alcohol dehydrogenase was immobilized on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode modified by cellulose acetate (CA) bonded to toluidine blue O (TBO). Secondly, the surface was covered by a glutaraldehyde/bovine serum albumin (BSA) cross-linking procedure to provide a new voltammetric sensor for the ethanol determination. In order to fabricate the biosensor, a new electrode matrix containing insoluble Toluidine Blue O (TBO) was obtained from the process, and enzyme/coenzyme was combined on the biosensor surface. The influence of various experimental conditions was examined for the characterization of the optimum analytical performance. The developed biosensor exhibited sensitive and selective determination of ethanol and showed a linear response between 1 × 10(-5) M and 4 × 10(-4) M ethanol. A detection limit calculated as three times the signal-to-noise ratio was 5.0 × 10(-6) M. At the end of the 20(th) day, the biosensor still retained 50% of its initial activity.

  17. Modification of the Farr assay using ethanol-ammonium acetate precipitation and its application to the measurement of affinity of anti-HCG produced in several species.

    PubMed

    Thanavala, Y M; Hay, F C

    1978-01-01

    A double isotope modified Farr assay was used to determine the total binding sites and affinity of antibodies to human chorionic gonadotrophin. Precipitation of the antigen--antibody complex at equilibrium with ammonium sulphate gave very high levels of nonspecific binding. Good discrimination over background was observed using a specific anti-immunoglobulin serum. However since we were interested in measuring the affinity of antibodies raised in several animal species it was more appropriate to use a single nonspecies precipitating reagent. We found that the use of a mixture of ethanol-ammonium acetate gave very low levels of non-specific binding in baboons, marmosets, rabbits and mice.

  18. Comparison of solid-state and submerged-state fermentation for the bioprocessing of switchgrass to ethanol and acetate by Clostridium phytofermentans.

    PubMed

    Jain, Abhiney; Morlok, Charles K; Henson, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The conversion of sustainable energy crops using microbiological fermentation to biofuels and bioproducts typically uses submerged-state processes. Alternatively, solid-state fermentation processes have several advantages when compared to the typical submerged-state processes. This study compares the use of solid-state versus submerged-state fermentation using the mesophilic anaerobic bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans in the conversion of switchgrass to the end products of ethanol, acetate, and hydrogen. A shift in the ratio of metabolic products towards more acetate and hydrogen production than ethanol production was observed when C. phytofermentans was grown under solid-state conditions as compared to submerged-state conditions. Results indicated that the end product concentrations (in millimolar) obtained using solid-state fermentation were higher than using submerged-state fermentation. In contrast, the total fermentation products (in weight of product per weight of carbohydrates consumed) and switchgrass conversion were higher for submerged-state fermentation. The conversion of xylan was greater than glucan conversion under both fermentation conditions. An initial pH of 7 and moisture content of 80 % resulted in maximum end products formation. Scanning electron microscopy study showed the presence of biofilm formed by C. phytofermentans growing on switchgrass under submerged-state fermentation whereas bacterial cells attached to surface and no apparent biofilm was observed when grown under solid-state fermentation. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting consolidated bioprocessing of a lignocellulosic substrate by a mesophilic anaerobic bacterium under solid-state fermentation conditions.

  19. STABILITY OF MFI ZEOLITE-FILLED PDMS MEMBRANES DURING PERVAPORATIVE ETHANOL RECOVERY FROM AQUEOUS MIXTURES CONTAINING ACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation is potentially a cost-effective means of recovering biofuels, such as ethanol, from biomass fermentation broths for small- to medium-scale applications (~2 - 20 million liters per year). Hydrophobic zeolite-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes have been sho...

  20. Thermodynamics of Microbial Growth Coupled to Metabolism of Glucose, Ethanol, Short-Chain Organic Acids, and Hydrogen ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Roden, Eric E.; Jin, Qusheng

    2011-01-01

    A literature compilation demonstrated a linear relationship between microbial growth yield and the free energy of aerobic and anaerobic (respiratory and/or fermentative) metabolism of glucose, ethanol, formate, acetate, lactate, propionate, butyrate, and H2. This relationship provides a means to estimate growth yields for modeling microbial redox metabolism in soil and sedimentary environments. PMID:21216913

  1. Reductions in milk Δ9-desaturation ratios to oral dosing of cobalt-acetate are accompanied by the downregulation of SCD1 in lactating ewes.

    PubMed

    Toral, P G; Hervás, G; Frutos, P

    2015-03-01

    Oral administration of cobalt has been proven to alter milk fatty acid (FA) composition consistent with an inhibition of mammary stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD) activity in ruminants, but the mechanisms explaining its mode of action remain uncertain. In this study, Co (as Co-acetate) was dosed to lactating ewes with the aims of examining mammary gene expression during Co-induced changes in milk FA composition, and estimating the endogenous synthesis of SCD products in milk of sheep fed an 18:3n-3-enriched diet. Twelve Assaf ewes fed a diet supplemented with 2% linseed oil were allocated to 2 experimental groups and received an oral drench supplying either 0 (control) or 9 mg of Co/kg of body weight per day. Treatments were administered in 3 equal doses at 8-h intervals for 6 d. No effects of Co administration on animal performance were observed. The changes in milk FA (namely, reductions in most cis-9-containing FA) were consistent with an inhibition of SCD in the absence of detectable effects on the relative importance of mammary de novo synthesis and FA uptake. The high proportion of endogenous cis-9 trans-11 18:2 observed in this study (89%) would agree with a greater supply of trans-11 18:1 of ruminal origin in ewes fed linseed oil, compared with previous estimates in sheep fed a diet without lipid supplementation. Differences between studies could also be related to diet-induced changes in SCD activity. Altogether, both mechanisms would support that basal diet composition is a major determinant of the relative contribution of Δ9-desaturation to milk FA profile. Similarly, the consumption of a diet rich in 18:3n-3 might also explain the low proportion of milk cis-9 18:1 estimated to derive from Δ9-desaturation (29%). The administration of Co to ewes fed linseed oil allowed to discriminate minor 18:3 isomers in milk, such as cis-9 trans-12 cis-15 18:3, as SCD products. Finally, Co dosing lowered the mRNA abundance of SCD1 in the mammary secretory tissue

  2. Effects of dichloroacetate on the metabolism of glucose, pyruvate, acetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate and palmitate in rat diaphragm and heart muscle in vitro and on extraction of glucose, lactate, pyruvate and free fatty acids by dog heart in vivo

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Anthony; Allison, S. P.; Randle, Philip J.

    1973-01-01

    1. The extractions of glucose, lactate, pyruvate and free fatty acids by dog heart in vivo were calculated from measurements of their arterial and coronary sinus blood concentration. Elevation of plasma free fatty acid concentrations by infusion of intralipid and heparin resulted in increased extraction of free fatty acids and diminished extractions of glucose, lactate and pyruvate by the heart. It is suggested that metabolism of free fatty acids by the heart in vivo, as in vitro, may impair utilization of these substrates. These effects of elevated plasma free fatty acid concentrations on extractions by the heart in vivo were reversed by injection of dichloroacetate, which also improved extraction of lactate and pyruvate by the heart in vivo in alloxan diabetes. 2. Sodium dichloroacetate increased glucose oxidation and pyruvate oxidation in hearts from fed normal or alloxan-diabetic rats perfused with glucose and insulin. Dichloroacetate inhibited oxidation of acetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate and partially reversed inhibitory effects of these substrates on the oxidation of glucose. In rat diaphragm muscle dichloroacetate inhibited oxidation of acetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate and palmitate and increased glucose oxidation and pyruvate oxidation in diaphragms from alloxan-diabetic rats. Dichloroacetate increased the rate of glycolysis in hearts perfused with glucose, insulin and acetate and evidence is given that this results from a lowering of the citrate concentration within the cell, with a consequent activation of phosphofructokinase. 3. In hearts from normal rats perfused with glucose and insulin, dichloroacetate increased cell concentrations of acetyl-CoA, acetylcarnitine and glutamate and lowered those of aspartate and malate. In perfusions with glucose, insulin and acetate, dichloroacetate lowered the cell citrate concentration without lowering the acetyl-CoA or acetylcarnitine concentrations. Measurements of specific radioactivities of acetyl-CoA, acetylcarnitine

  3. Characteristics of lipid extraction from Chlorella sp. cultivated in outdoor raceway ponds with mixture of ethyl acetate and ethanol for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weidong; Wang, Zhongming; Yuan, Zhenhong

    2015-09-01

    In this work, neutral lipids (NLs) extraction capacity and selectivity of six solvents were firstly compared. In addition, an eco-friendly solvent combination of ethyl acetate and ethanol (EA/E) was proposed and tested for lipid extraction from Chlorella sp. cultivated in outdoor raceway ponds and effect of extraction variables on lipid yield were intensively studied. Results indicated that lipid extraction yield was increased with solvent to biomass ratio but did not vary significantly when the value exceeded 20:1. Lipid yield was found to be strongly dependent on extraction temperature and time. Finally, fatty acid profiles of lipid were determined and results indicated that the major components were octadecanoic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, demonstrating that the lipid extracted from the Chlorella sp. cultivated in outdoor raceway ponds by EA/E was suitable feedstock for biodiesel production.

  4. Application of Acetate Buffer in pH Adjustment of Mash and its Influence on Fuel Ethanol Fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 2M sodium acetate buffer at pH 4.2 was used to adjust pH of liquefied mashes in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) procedure. Although 5 mL of the buffer did not bring the pH values of the mashes (~100 mL) from a sorghum hybrid to 4.2, it kept the system stable (pH from 4.7 to ...

  5. Rewiring Lactococcus lactis for Ethanol Production

    PubMed Central

    Dehli, Tore; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2013-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known for their high tolerance toward organic acids and alcohols (R. S. Gold, M. M. Meagher, R. Hutkins, and T. Conway, J. Ind. Microbiol. 10:45–54, 1992) and could potentially serve as platform organisms for production of these compounds. In this study, we attempted to redirect the metabolism of LAB model organism Lactococcus lactis toward ethanol production. Codon-optimized Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) was introduced and expressed from synthetic promoters in different strain backgrounds. In the wild-type L. lactis strain MG1363 growing on glucose, only small amounts of ethanol were obtained after introducing PDC, probably due to a low native alcohol dehydrogenase activity. When the same strains were grown on maltose, ethanol was the major product and lesser amounts of lactate, formate, and acetate were formed. Inactivating the lactate dehydrogenase genes ldhX, ldhB, and ldh and introducing codon-optimized Z. mobilis alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHB) in addition to PDC resulted in high-yield ethanol formation when strains were grown on glucose, with only minor amounts of by-products formed. Finally, a strain with ethanol as the sole observed fermentation product was obtained by further inactivating the phosphotransacetylase (PTA) and the native alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE). PMID:23377945

  6. Rewiring Lactococcus lactis for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Solem, Christian; Dehli, Tore; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2013-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known for their high tolerance toward organic acids and alcohols (R. S. Gold, M. M. Meagher, R. Hutkins, and T. Conway, J. Ind. Microbiol. 10:45-54, 1992) and could potentially serve as platform organisms for production of these compounds. In this study, we attempted to redirect the metabolism of LAB model organism Lactococcus lactis toward ethanol production. Codon-optimized Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) was introduced and expressed from synthetic promoters in different strain backgrounds. In the wild-type L. lactis strain MG1363 growing on glucose, only small amounts of ethanol were obtained after introducing PDC, probably due to a low native alcohol dehydrogenase activity. When the same strains were grown on maltose, ethanol was the major product and lesser amounts of lactate, formate, and acetate were formed. Inactivating the lactate dehydrogenase genes ldhX, ldhB, and ldh and introducing codon-optimized Z. mobilis alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHB) in addition to PDC resulted in high-yield ethanol formation when strains were grown on glucose, with only minor amounts of by-products formed. Finally, a strain with ethanol as the sole observed fermentation product was obtained by further inactivating the phosphotransacetylase (PTA) and the native alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE).

  7. Ethanolic extract of roots from Arctium lappa L. accelerates the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric ulcer in rats: Involvement of the antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luisa Mota; Allemand, Alexandra; Mendes, Daniel Augusto G B; Dos Santos, Ana Cristina; André, Eunice; de Souza, Lauro Mera; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo; Dartora, Nessana; Marques, Maria Consuelo Andrade; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko; Werner, Maria Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the curative efficacy of the ethanolic extract (EET) of roots from Arctium lappa (bardana) in healing of chronic gastric ulcers induced by 80% acetic acid in rats and additionally studies the possible mechanisms underlying this action. Oral administration of EET (1, 3, 10 and 30mg/kg) reduced the gastric lesion area in 29.2%, 41.4%, 59.3% and 38.5%, respectively, and at 10mg/kg promoted significant regeneration of the gastric mucosa, which was confirmed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry. EET (10mg/kg) treatment did not increase the gastric mucus content but restored the superoxide dismutase activity, prevented the reduction of glutathione levels, reduced lipid hydroperoxides levels, inhibited the myeloperoxidase activity and reduced the microvascular permeability. In addition, EET reduced the free radical generation and increased scavenging of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals in vitro. Furthermore, intraduodenal EET (10 and 30mg/kg) decreased volume and acidity of gastric secretion. Total phenolic compounds were high in EET (Folin-Ciocalteau assay) and the analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed that the main compounds present in EET were a serie of hydroxycinnamoylquinic acid isomers. In conclusion, these data reveal that EET promotes regeneration of damaged gastric mucosa, probably through its antisecretory and antioxidative mechanisms.

  8. Lactation Consultant

    MedlinePlus

    ... human lactation. Job description Lactation consultants educate women, families, health professionals, and the community about breast feeding and human lactation; facilitate the development of policies which protect, promote, and support breastfeeding; ...

  9. Randomised controlled trial comparing percutaneous radiofrequency thermal ablation, percutaneous ethanol injection, and percutaneous acetic acid injection to treat hepatocellular carcinoma of 3 cm or less

    PubMed Central

    Lin, S-M; Lin, C-J; Lin, C-C; Hsu, C-W; Chen, Y-C

    2005-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA), percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), and percutaneous acetic acid injection (PAI) in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients and methods: A total of 187 patients with HCCs of 3 cm or less were randomly assigned to RFTA (n = 62), PEI (n = 62), or PAI (n = 63). Tumour recurrence and survival rates were assessed. Results: One, two, and three year local recurrence rates were 10%, 14%, and 14% in the RFTA group, 16%, 34%, and 34% in the PEI group, and 14%, 31%, and 31% in the PAI group (RFTA v PEI, p = 0.012; RFTA v PAI, p = 0.017). One, two, and three year survival rates were 93%, 81%, and 74% in the RFTA group, 88%, 66%, and 51% in the PEI group, and 90%, 67%, and 53% in the PAI group (RFTA v PEI, p = 0.031; RFTA v PAI, p = 0.038). One, two, and three year cancer free survival rates were 74%, 60%, and 43% in the RFTA group, 70%, 41%, and 21% in the PEI group, and 71%, 43%, and 23% in the PAI group (RFTA v PEI, p = 0.038; RFTA v PAI, p = 0.041). Tumour size, tumour differentiation, and treatment methods (RFTA v PEI and PAI) were significant factors for local recurrence, overall survival, and cancer free survival. Major complications occurred in 4.8% of patients (two with haemothorax, one gastric perforation) in the RFTA group and in none in two other groups (RFTA v PEI and PAI, p = 0.035). Conclusions: RFTA was superior to PEI and PAI with respect to local recurrence, overall survival, and cancer free survival rates, but RFTA also caused more major complications. PMID:16009687

  10. Ethanol production from glucose and xylose by immobilized Thermoanaerobacter pentosaceus at 70 °C in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor.

    PubMed

    Sittijunda, Sureewan; Tomás, Ana Faria; Reungsang, Alissara; O-thong, Sompong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-09-01

    The newly isolated extreme thermophilic ethanologen Thermoanaerobacter pentosaceus was immobilized in different support materials in order to improve its ethanol production ability. In batch fermentation, a maximum ethanol yield of 1.36 mol mol(-1) consumed sugars was obtained by T. pentosaceus immobilized on rapeseed straw. Additionally, immobilized T. pentosaceus' ethanol production was improved by 11% in comparison to free cells. In continuous mode, it was shown that hydraulic retention time (HRT) affected ethanol yield, and a dramatic shift from ethanol to acetate and lactate production occurred at an HRT of 6 h. The maximum ethanol yield and concentration, 1.50 mol mol(-1) consumed sugars and 12.4 g l(-1), were obtained with an HRT of 12 h. The latter represented an improvement of 60% in relation to previously obtained results. This indicates that immobilization of T. pentosaceus is an effective strategy to improve its ethanol production ability.

  11. The Effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging and Addition of Rosemary Extract, Sodium Acetate and Calcium Lactate Mixture on the Quality of Pre-cooked Hamburger Patties during Refrigerated Storage.

    PubMed

    Muhlisin; Kang, Sun Moon; Choi, Won Hee; Lee, Keun Taik; Cheong, Sung Hee; Lee, Sung Ki

    2013-01-01

    The effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP; 30% CO2+70% N2 or 100% N2) and an additive mixture (500 ppm rosemary extract, 3,000 ppm sodium acetate and 1,500 ppm calcium lactate) on the quality of pre-cooked hamburger patties during storage at 5°C for 14 d was evaluated. The addition of the additive mixture reduced aerobic and anaerobic bacteria counts in both 30% CO2-MAP (30% CO2+70% N2) and 100% N2-MAP (p<0.05). The 30% CO2-MAP was more effective to suppress the microbial growth than 100% N2-MAP, moreover the 30% CO2-MAP combined with additive mixture resulted in the lowest bacterial counts. The hamburger patties with additive mixture showed lower CIE L* and CIE a*, and higher CIE b* than those with no additive mixture. The 30% CO2-MAP tended to decrease the TBARS during storage regardless of the addition of additives. The use of 30% CO2-MAP in combination with additives mixture was effective for maintaining the quality and extending the shelf-life of pre-cooked hamburger patties.

  12. Fermentation method producing ethanol

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daniel I. C.; Dalal, Rajen

    1986-01-01

    Ethanol is the major end product of an anaerobic, thermophilic fermentation process using a mutant strain of bacterium Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum. This organism is capable of converting hexose and pentose carbohydrates to ethanol, acetic and lactic acids. Mutants of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum are capable of converting these substrates to ethanol in exceptionally high yield and with increased productivity. Both the mutant organism and the technique for its isolation are provided.

  13. Direct conversion of plant biomass to ethanol by engineered Caldicellulosiruptor bescii.

    PubMed

    Chung, Daehwan; Cha, Minseok; Guss, Adam M; Westpheling, Janet

    2014-06-17

    Ethanol is the most widely used renewable transportation biofuel in the United States, with the production of 13.3 billion gallons in 2012 [John UM (2013) Contribution of the Ethanol Industry to the Economy of the United States]. Despite considerable effort to produce fuels from lignocellulosic biomass, chemical pretreatment and the addition of saccharolytic enzymes before microbial bioconversion remain economic barriers to industrial deployment [Lynd LR, et al. (2008) Nat Biotechnol 26(2):169-172]. We began with the thermophilic, anaerobic, cellulolytic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii, which efficiently uses unpretreated biomass, and engineered it to produce ethanol. Here we report the direct conversion of switchgrass, a nonfood, renewable feedstock, to ethanol without conventional pretreatment of the biomass. This process was accomplished by deletion of lactate dehydrogenase and heterologous expression of a Clostridium thermocellum bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase. Whereas wild-type C. bescii lacks the ability to make ethanol, 70% of the fermentation products in the engineered strain were ethanol [12.8 mM ethanol directly from 2% (wt/vol) switchgrass, a real-world substrate] with decreased production of acetate by 38% compared with wild-type. Direct conversion of biomass to ethanol represents a new paradigm for consolidated bioprocessing, offering the potential for carbon neutral, cost-effective, sustainable fuel production.

  14. Direct Conversion of Plant Biomass to Ethanol by Engineered Caldicellulosiruptor bescii

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Daehwan; Cha, Minseok; Guss, Adam M; Westpheling, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol is the most widely used renewable transportation biofuel in the United States, with the production of 13.3 billion gallons in 2012 [John UM (2013) Contribution of the Ethanol Industry to the Economy of the United States]. Despite considerable effort to produce fuels from lignocellulosic biomass, chemical pretreatment and the addition of saccharolytic enzymes before microbial bioconversion remain economic barriers to industrial deployment [Lynd LR, et al. (2008) Nat Biotechnol 26(2):169-172]. We began with the thermophilic, anaerobic, cellulolytic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii, which efficiently uses unpretreated biomass, and engineered it to produce ethanol. Here we report the direct conversion of switchgrass, a nonfood, renewable feedstock, to ethanol without conventional pretreatment of the biomass. This process was accomplished by deletion of lactate dehydrogenase and heterologous expression of a Clostridium thermocellum bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase. Whereas wild-type C. bescii lacks the ability to make ethanol, 70% of the fermentation products in the engineered strain were ethanol [12.8 mM ethanol directly from 2% (wt/vol) switchgrass, a real-world substrate] with decreased production of acetate by 38% compared with wild-type. Direct conversion of biomass to ethanol represents a new paradigm for consolidated bioprocessing, offering the potential for carbon neutral, cost-effective, sustainable fuel production.

  15. Enhancing acetone biosynthesis and acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation performance by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae integrated with exogenous acetate addition.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongzhen; Ge, Laibing; Zhang, Jingshu; Ding, Jian; Chen, Rui; Shi, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Acetone is the major by-product in ABE fermentations, most researches focused on increasing butanol/acetone ratio by decreasing acetone biosynthesis. However, economics of ABE fermentation industry strongly relies on evaluating acetone as a valuable platform chemical. Therefore, a novel ABE fermentation strategy focusing on bio-acetone production by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae with exogenous acetate addition was proposed. Experimental and theoretical analysis revealed the strategy could, enhance C. acetobutylicum survival oriented amino acids assimilation in the cells; control NADH regeneration rate at moderately lower level to enhance acetone synthesis but without sacrificing butanol production; enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and direct most of extra consumed glucose into acetone/butanol synthesis routes. By implementing the strategy using synthetic or acetate fermentative supernatant, acetone concentrations increased to 8.27-8.55g/L from 5.86g/L of the control, while butanol concentrations also elevated to the higher levels of 13.91-14.23g/L from 11.63g/L simultaneously.

  16. Flecainide acetate acetic acid solvates.

    PubMed

    Veldre, Kaspars; Actiņs, Andris; Eglite, Zane

    2011-02-01

    Flecainide acetate forms acetic acid solvates with 0.5 and 2 acetic acid molecules. Powder X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis/thermogravimetric, infrared, and potentiometric titration were used to determine the composition of solvates. Flecainide acetate hemisolvate with acetic acid decomposes to form a new crystalline form of flecainide acetate. This form is less stable than the already known polymorphic form at all temperatures, and it is formed due to kinetic reasons. Both flecainide acetate nonsolvated and flecainide acetate hemisolvate forms crystallize in monoclinic crystals, but flecainide triacetate forms triclinic crystals. Solvate formation was not observed when flecainide base was treated with formic acid, propanoic acid, and butanoic acid. Only nonsolvated flecainide salts were obtained in these experiments.

  17. Acetone and isopropanol in ruminal fluid and feces of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Shiogama, Yumiko

    2010-03-01

    Acetone and its metabolite isopropanol are produced by gut microbes as well as by the host's metabolism. To evaluate the production of acetone and isopropanol in alimentary tracts, a total of 80 pair-samples of feces and ruminal fluid were taken in lactating dairy cows that had been fed silage-containing diets. Acetone and isopropanol were analyzed, together with ethanol and volatile fatty acids (VFAs). Isopropanol was detected in 57 fecal and all the ruminal samples; however, the ruminal isopropanol and ethanol concentrations were distinctly lower than those in the feces. Acetone was detected in 13 fecal and 53 ruminal samples; however, there was no significant difference in acetone concentrations between the feces and the ruminal fluid. The group with higher fecal isopropanol concentration showed higher fecal proportions of acetate accompanied by low proportion of minor VFA, which consisted of isobutyrate and iso- and n-valerate. In the group with higher ruminal isopropanol concentration, ethanol concentration was higher; the ruminal VFA profiles showed only a negligible difference. Fecal and ruminal ethanol concentrations were not affected by feed ethanol. Thus, the colon showed an accelerated alcoholic fermentation compared with the rumen of dairy cows; however, acetone was present at higher frequency in the rumen than in the feces.

  18. Dinosaur lactation?

    PubMed

    Else, Paul L

    2013-02-01

    Lactation is a process associated with mammals, yet a number of birds feed their newly hatched young on secretions analogous to the milk of mammals. These secretions are produced from various sections (crop organ, oesophageal lining and proventriculus) of the upper digestive tract and possess similar levels of fat and protein, as well as added carotenoids, antibodies and, in the case of pigeons and doves, epidermal growth factor. Parental care in avian species has been proposed to originate from dinosaurs. This study examines the possibility that some dinosaurs used secretory feeding to increase the rate of growth of their young, estimated to be similar to that of present day birds and mammals. Dinosaur 'lactation' could also have facilitated immune responses as well as extending parental protection as a result of feeding newly hatched young in nest environments. While the arguments for dinosaur lactation are somewhat generic, a case study for lactation in herbivorous site-nesting dinosaurs is presented. It is proposes that secretory feeding could have been used to bridge the gap between hatching and establishment of the normal diet in some dinosaurs.

  19. Isolation of acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    PubMed

    Cibis, Katharina Gabriela; Gneipel, Armin; König, Helmut

    2016-02-20

    In this study, acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria were isolated from thermophilic and mesophilic biogas plants (BGP) located in Germany. The fermenters were fed with maize silage and cattle or swine manure. Furthermore, pressurized laboratory fermenters digesting maize silage were sampled. Enrichment cultures for the isolation of acid-forming bacteria were grown in minimal medium supplemented with one of the following carbon sources: Na(+)-dl-lactate, succinate, ethanol, glycerol, glucose or a mixture of amino acids. These substrates could be converted by the isolates to acetic, propionic or butyric acid. In total, 49 isolates were obtained, which belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Tenericutes or Thermotogae. According to 16S rRNA gene sequences, most isolates were related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides, Defluviitoga tunisiensis and Dendrosporobacter quercicolus. Acetic, propionic or butyric acid were produced in cultures of isolates affiliated to Bacillus thermoamylovorans, Clostridium aminovalericum, Clostridium cochlearium/Clostridium tetani, C. sporosphaeroides, D. quercicolus, Proteiniborus ethanoligenes, Selenomonas bovis and Tepidanaerobacter sp. Isolates related to Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum produced acetic, butyric and lactic acid, and isolates related to D. tunisiensis formed acetic acid. Specific primer sets targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences were designed and used for real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The isolates were physiologically characterized and their role in BGP discussed.

  20. Mesoxalaldehyde acetals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordeeva, G.N.; Kalashnikov, S.M.; Popov, Yu.N.; Kruglov, E.A.; Imashev, U.B.

    1987-11-10

    The treatment of methylglyoxal acetals by alkyl nitrites in the presence of the corresponding aliphatic alcohols and hydrochloric acid leads to the formation of linear mesoxalaldehyde acetals, whose structure was established by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The major pathways for the decomposition of these molecules upon electron impact were established.

  1. Ethyl acetate fraction of adlay bran ethanolic extract inhibits oncogene expression and suppresses DMH-induced preneoplastic lesions of the colon in F344 rats through an anti-inflammatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheng-Pei; Hsu, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Din-Wen; Hsu, Hsing-Hua; Lin, Ju-Tsui; Shih, Chun-Kuang; Chiang, Wenchang

    2010-07-14

    Adlay ( Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) is a grass crop and was reported to possess anti-inflammatory activity and an antiproliferative effect in cancer cell lines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the ethyl acetate fraction of an adlay bran ethanolic extract (ABE-Ea) on colon carcinogenesis in an animal model and investigate its mechanism. Male F344 rats received 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) and consumed different doses of ABE-Ea. The medium-dose group (17.28 mg of ABE-Ea/day) exhibited the best suppressive effect on colon carcinogenesis and prevented preneoplastic mucin-depleted foci (MDF) formation. Moreover, RAS and Ets2 oncogenes were significantly down-regulated in this group compared to the negative control group, whereas Wee1, a gene involved in the cell cycle, was up-regulated. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression was significantly suppressed in all colons receiving the ABE-Ea, indicating that ABE-Ea delayed carcinogenesis by suppressing chronic inflammation. ABE-Ea included considerable a proportion of phenolic compounds, and ferulic acid was the major phenolic acid (5206 microg/g ABE-Ea) on the basis of HPLC analysis. Results from this study suggest that ABE-Ea suppressed DMH-indued preneoplastic lesions of the colon in F344 rats and that ferulic acid may be one of the active compounds.

  2. Elimination of hydrogenase active site assembly blocks H2 production and increases ethanol yield in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Ranjita; Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-02-01

    The native ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly consume cellulose and produce ethanol makes it a leading candidate for a consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) biofuel production strategy. C. thermocellum also synthesizes lactate, formate, acetate, H2, and amino acids that compete with ethanol production for carbon and electrons. Elimination of H2 production could redirect carbon flux towards ethanol production by making more electrons available for acetyl-CoA reduction to ethanol. C. thermocellum encodes four hydrogenases and rather than delete each individually, we targeted a hydrogenase maturase gene (hydG), involved in converting the three [FeFe] hydrogenase apoenzymes into holoenzymes. Further deletion of the [NiFe] hydrogenase (ech) resulted in a mutant that functionally lacks all four hydrogenases. H2 production in hydG ech was undetectable and ethanol yield increased nearly 2-fold compared to wild type. Interestingly, mutant growth improved upon the addition of acetate, which led to increased expression of genes related to sulfate metabolism, suggesting these mutants may use sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor to balance redox reactions. Genomic analysis of hydG revealed a mutation in adhE, resulting in a strain with both NADH- and NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase activities. While this same adhE mutation is found in ethanol tolerant C. thermocellum strain E50C, hydG and hydG ech are not more ethanol tolerant than wild type, illustrating the complicated interactions between redox balancing and ethanol tolerance in C. thermocellum. The dramatic increase in ethanol production here suggests that targeting protein post-translational modification is a promising new approach for inactivation of multiple enzymes simultaneously for metabolic engineering.

  3. Elimination of hydrogenase active site assembly blocks H2 production and increases ethanol yield in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGES

    Biswas, Ranjita; Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; ...

    2015-02-01

    The native ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly consume cellulose and produce ethanol makes it a leading candidate for a consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) biofuel production strategy. C. thermocellum also synthesizes lactate, formate, acetate, H2, and amino acids that compete with ethanol production for carbon and electrons. Elimination of H2 production could redirect carbon flux towards ethanol production by making more electrons available for acetyl-CoA reduction to ethanol. C. thermocellum encodes four hydrogenases and rather than delete each individually, we targeted a hydrogenase maturase gene (hydG), involved in converting the three [FeFe] hydrogenase apoenzymes into holoenzymes. Further deletion of the [NiFe]more » hydrogenase (ech) resulted in a mutant that functionally lacks all four hydrogenases. H2 production in hydG ech was undetectable and ethanol yield increased nearly 2-fold compared to wild type. Interestingly, mutant growth improved upon the addition of acetate, which led to increased expression of genes related to sulfate metabolism, suggesting these mutants may use sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor to balance redox reactions. Genomic analysis of hydG revealed a mutation in adhE, resulting in a strain with both NADH- and NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase activities. While this same adhE mutation is found in ethanol tolerant C. thermocellum strain E50C, hydG and hydG ech are not more ethanol tolerant than wild type, illustrating the complicated interactions between redox balancing and ethanol tolerance in C. thermocellum. The dramatic increase in ethanol production here suggests that targeting protein post-translational modification is a promising new approach for inactivation of multiple enzymes simultaneously for metabolic engineering.« less

  4. Establishment of steady-state metabolism of ethanol in perfused rat liver: the quantitative analysis using kinetic mechanism-based rate equations of alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chung-Tay; Lai, Ching-Long; Hsieh, Hsiu-Shan; Chi, Chin-Wen; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2010-09-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) catalyzes oxidation of ingested ethanol to acetaldehyde, the first step in hepatic metabolism. The purpose of this study was to establish an ex vivo rat liver perfusion system under defined and verified steady states with respect to the metabolites and the metabolic rates, and to quantitatively correlate the observed rates with simulations based on the kinetic mechanism-based rate equations of rat liver ADH. Class I ADH1 was isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats and characterized by steady-state kinetics in the Krebs-Ringer perfusion buffer with supplements. Nonrecirculating liver perfusion with constant input of ethanol at near physiological hepatic blood flow rate was performed in situ. Ethanol and the related metabolites acetaldehyde, acetate, lactate, and pyruvate in perfusates were determined. Results of the initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies showed that rat ADH1 conformed to the Theorell-Chance Ordered Bi Bi mechanism. Steady-state metabolism of ethanol in the perfused liver maintained up to 3h as evidenced by the steady-state levels of ethanol and metabolites in the effluent, and the steady-state ethanol disappearance rates and acetate production rates. The changes of the metabolic rates were qualitatively and in general quantitatively correlated to the results from simulations with the kinetic rate equations of ADH1 under a wide range of ethanol, in the presence of competitive inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole and of uncompetitive inhibitor isobutyramide. Preliminary flux control analysis estimated that apparent C(ADH)(J) in the perfused liver may approximate 0.7 at constant infusion with 1-2 mM ethanol, suggesting that ADH plays a major but not the exclusive role in governing hepatic ethanol metabolism. The reported steady-state rat liver perfusion system may potentially be applicable to other drug or drug-ethanol interaction studies.

  5. Elimination of metabolic pathways to all traditional fermentation products increases ethanol yields in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGES

    Papanek, Beth A.; Biswas, Ranjita; Rydzak, Thomas; ...

    2015-09-12

    Clostridium thermocellum has the natural ability to convert cellulose to ethanol, making it a promising candidate for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. To further improve its CBP capabilities, we study a mutant strain of C. thermocellum that was constructed (strain AG553; C. thermocellum Δhpt ΔhydG Δldh Δpfl Δpta-ack) to increase flux to ethanol by removing side product formation. Strain AG553 showed a two- to threefold increase in ethanol yield relative to the wild type on all substrates tested. On defined medium, strain AG553 exceeded 70% of theoretical ethanol yield on lower loadings of the model crystalline cellulosemore » Avicel, effectively eliminating formate, acetate, and lactate production and reducing H2 production by fivefold. On 5 g/L Avicel, strain AG553 reached an ethanol yield of 63.5% of the theoretical maximum compared with 19.9% by the wild type, and it showed similar yields on pretreated switchgrass and poplar. The elimination of organic acid production suggested that the strain might be capable of growth under higher substrate loadings in the absence of pH control. Final ethanol titer peaked at 73.4 mM in mutant AG553 on 20 g/L Avicel, at which point the pH decreased to a level that does not allow growth of C. thermocellum, likely due to CO2 accumulation. In comparison, the maximum titer of wild type C. thermocellum was 14.1 mM ethanol on 10 g/L Avicel. In conclusion, with the elimination of the metabolic pathways to all traditional fermentation products other than ethanol, AG553 is the best ethanol-yielding CBP strain to date and will serve as a platform strain for further metabolic engineering for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass.« less

  6. Elimination of metabolic pathways to all traditional fermentation products increases ethanol yields in Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Papanek, Beth; Biswas, Ranjita; Rydzak, Thomas; Guss, Adam M

    2015-11-01

    Clostridium thermocellum has the natural ability to convert cellulose to ethanol, making it a promising candidate for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. To further improve its CBP capabilities, a mutant strain of C. thermocellum was constructed (strain AG553; C. thermocellum Δhpt ΔhydG Δldh Δpfl Δpta-ack) to increase flux to ethanol by removing side product formation. Strain AG553 showed a two- to threefold increase in ethanol yield relative to the wild type on all substrates tested. On defined medium, strain AG553 exceeded 70% of theoretical ethanol yield on lower loadings of the model crystalline cellulose Avicel, effectively eliminating formate, acetate, and lactate production and reducing H2 production by fivefold. On 5 g/L Avicel, strain AG553 reached an ethanol yield of 63.5% of the theoretical maximum compared with 19.9% by the wild type, and it showed similar yields on pretreated switchgrass and poplar. The elimination of organic acid production suggested that the strain might be capable of growth under higher substrate loadings in the absence of pH control. Final ethanol titer peaked at 73.4mM in mutant AG553 on 20 g/L Avicel, at which point the pH decreased to a level that does not allow growth of C. thermocellum, likely due to CO2 accumulation. In comparison, the maximum titer of wild type C. thermocellum was 14.1mM ethanol on 10 g/L Avicel. With the elimination of the metabolic pathways to all traditional fermentation products other than ethanol, AG553 is the best ethanol-yielding CBP strain to date and will serve as a platform strain for further metabolic engineering for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass.

  7. Kinetics of Ethyl Acetate Synthesis Catalyzed by Acidic Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antunes, Bruno M.; Cardoso, Simao P.; Silva, Carlos M.; Portugal, Ines

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost experiment to carry out the second-order reversible reaction of acetic acid esterification with ethanol to produce ethyl acetate is presented to illustrate concepts of kinetics and reactor modeling. The reaction is performed in a batch reactor, and the acetic acid concentration is measured by acid-base titration versus time. The…

  8. Ethanol production by thermophilic bacteria: metabolic control of end product formation in Thermoanaerobium brockii

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Bassat, A.; Lamed, R.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1981-04-01

    Specific changes in the chemical and microbial composition fof Thermoanaerobium brockii fermentations were compared and related to alterations of process rates, end product yields, and growth parameters. Fermentation of starch as compared with glucose was associated with significant decreases in growth rate and intracellular fructose-1,6-bisphosphate concentration and with a dramatic increase in the ethanols/lactate product ratio. Glucose or pyruvate fermentation in the presence of acetone was correlated with increased substrate consumption, growth, acetate yield, and quantitative reduction of acetone to isopropanol in lieu of normal reduced fermentation products. Glucose fermentation in the presence of exogenous hydrogen was associated with inhibition of endogenous H/sub 2/ production. The effects of exogenous hydrogen on glucose fermentation were totally reversed by the addition of acetone. Glucose fermentation in coculture with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum correlated with increased growth, acetate yield, and the formation of methane in lieu of monoculture reduced products.

  9. Fermentation of D-xylose and L-arabinose to ethanol by Erwinia chrysanthemi

    SciTech Connect

    Tolan, J.S.; Finn, R.K.

    1987-09-01

    Erwinia spp. are gram-negative facultative anaerobes within the family Enterobacteriacae which possess several desirable traits for the conversion of pentose sugars to ethanol, such as the ability to ferment a broad range of carbohydrates and the ease with which they can be genetically modified. Twenty-eight strains of Erwinia carotovora and E. chrysanthemi were screened for the ability to ferment D-xylose to ethanol. E. chrysanthemi B374 was chosen for further study on the basis of its superior (4%) ethanol tolerance. They have characterized the fermentation of D-xylose and L-arabinose by the wild type and mutants which bear plasmids containing the pyruvate decarboxylase gene from Zymomonas mobilis. Expression of the gene markedly increased the yields of ethanol (from 0.7 up to 1.45 mol/mol of xylose) and decreased the yields of formate, acetate, and lactate. However, the cells with pyruvate decarboxylase grew only one-fourth as fast as the wild type and tolerated only 2% ethanol. Alcohol tolerance was stimulated by the addition of yeast extract to the growth medium. Xylose catabolism was characterized by a high saturation constant K/sub s/ (4.5 mM).

  10. Thallium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 30 , 2009 , the assessment summary for Thallium acetate is included in t

  11. Phenylmercuric acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phenylmercuric acetate ; CASRN 62 - 38 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  12. Ethyl acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl acetate ; CASRN 141 - 78 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  13. Ammonium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonium acetate ; CASRN 631 - 61 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  14. Vinyl acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vinyl acetate ; CASRN 108 - 05 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  15. Factors influencing cellulosome activity in consolidated bioprocessing of cellulosic ethanol.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenggang; Qin, Yong; Li, Yudong; Ji, Yuetong; Huang, Jianzhong; Song, Houhui; Xu, Jian

    2010-12-01

    The cellulosome, a multi-subunit protein complex catalyzing cellulose degradation in cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum, plays a crucial role in Consolidated Bioprocessing (CBP) of lignocellulose into ethanol. Here, activity of cellulosome was tested under varying concentrations of chemical compounds derived from lignocellulose pretreatment and fermentation. We found that, firstly, the cellulolytic activity of cellulosome was actually promoted by formate, acetate and lactate; secondly, cellulosome was tolerant up to 5mM furfural, 50mM p-hydroxybenzoic acid and 1mM catechol. Furthermore, the cellulosome exhibited higher ethanol tolerance and thermostability than commercialized fungal (Trichoderma reesei) cellulase. To probe the implication of these unique enzyme-features, C. thermocellum JYT01 was cultured under conditions optimal for cellulosome activity. This CBP system yielded 491 mM ethanol, the highest level reported thus far for C. thermocellum monocultures. These findings demonstrate the potential advantages of bacterial cellulosome, and provide a novel strategy for design, selection and optimization of the cellulosome-ethanologen partnership.

  16. Determination of the constants of affinity of FeCl3, CuCl2, and ZnCl2 for a nitrogen-containing organosilane bonded on Al2O3-cellulose acetate hybrid material surface from ethanol solution.

    PubMed

    Lazarin, Angélica M; Landers, Richard; Kholin, Yuriy V; Gushikem, Yoshitaka

    2002-10-01

    This work describes the preparation and characterization of a cellulose acetate fiber coated with Al(2)O(3), resulting in the organic-inorganic hybrid Cel/Al(2)O(3). Furthermore, the hybrid was modified by attaching organofunctional groups by reaction with the precursor reagents (RO)(3)Si(CH(2))(3)L (L=NH(2), NH(CH(2))(2)NH(2), NH(CH(2))(2)NH(CH(2))(2)NH(2), and N(2)C(3)H(3) (imidazole)), resulting in Cel/Al(2)O(3)/Si(CH(2))(3)NH(2) (1), Cel/Al(2)O(3)/Si(CH(2))(3)NH(CH(2))(2)NH(2) (2), Cel/Al(2)O(3)/Si(CH(2))(3)NH(CH(2))(2)NH(CH(2))(2)NH(2) (3), and Cel/Al(2)O(3)/Si(CH(2))(3)N(2)C(3)H(3) (4). The amounts of attached organofunctional groups were (in mmol per gram of the material) 1=1.90, 2=1.89, 3=1.66, and 4=1.35. The isotherms of adsorption of FeCl(3), CuCl(2), and ZnCl(2) by Cel/Al(2)O(3)/Si(CH(2))(3)L from ethanol solutions were obtained at 298 K. Accurate estimates of the specific sorption capacities and the heteregeneous stability constants of the immobilized metal complexes were determined with the aid of several computational procedures. It is shown that the sorptional capacities are much less than the concentrations of the attached organofunctional groups. As all sorption isotherms are fitted properly with the Langmuir isotherm equation, the effects of the energetic heterogeneity and the lateral interactions do not affect the chemisorption equilibria. The heterogeneous stability constants of the immobilized complexes are fairly high, which provides efficient removal of the metal ions from solutions by the hybrid materials.

  17. A continuous acetic acid system for polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of gliadins and other prolamines.

    PubMed

    Clements, R L

    1988-02-01

    A polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis system buffered by acetic acid alone was developed for electrophoresis of prolamines. When applied to gliadin electrophoresis, the acetic acid system produces more bands than does a conventional aluminum lactate-lactic acid system (using 12% acrylamide gels). The acetic acid system is relatively simple, requiring a single buffer component that is universally available in high purity.

  18. Deletion of Type I glutamine synthetase deregulates nitrogen metabolism and increases ethanol production in Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Rydzak, Thomas; Garcia, David; Stevenson, David M; Sladek, Margaret; Klingeman, Dawn M; Holwerda, Evert K; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M

    2017-04-08

    Clostridium thermocellum rapidly deconstructs cellulose and ferments resulting hydrolysis products into ethanol and other products, and is thus a promising platform organism for the development of cellulosic biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. While recent metabolic engineering strategies have targeted eliminating canonical fermentation products (acetate, lactate, formate, and H2), C. thermocellum also secretes amino acids, which has limited ethanol yields in engineered strains to approximately 70% of the theoretical maximum. To investigate approaches to decrease amino acid secretion, we attempted to reduce ammonium assimilation by deleting the Type I glutamine synthetase (glnA) in an essentially wild type strain of C. thermocellum. Deletion of glnA reduced levels of secreted valine and total amino acids by 53% and 44% respectively, and increased ethanol yields by 53%. RNA-seq analysis revealed that genes encoding the RNF-complex were more highly expressed in ΔglnA and may have a role in improving NADH-availability for ethanol production. While a significant up-regulation of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation and urea uptake suggested that deletion of glnA induces a nitrogen starvation response, metabolomic analysis showed an increase in intracellular glutamine levels indicative of nitrogen-rich conditions. We propose that deletion of glnA causes deregulation of nitrogen metabolism, leading to overexpression of nitrogen metabolism genes and, in turn, elevated glutamine levels. Here we demonstrate that perturbation of nitrogen assimilation is a promising strategy to redirect flux from the production of nitrogenous compounds toward biofuels in C. thermocellum.

  19. Biological production of ethanol fom coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Research is continuing in an attempt to increase both the ethanol concentration and product ratio using C. ljungdahlii. The purpose of this report is to present data (acetate to ethanol) utilizing a medium prepared especially for C. ljungdahlii. Medium development studies are presented, as well as reactor studies with the new medium in batch reactors. Continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with cell recycle. The use of this new medium has resulted in significant improvements in cell concentration, ethanol concentration and product ratio.

  20. Extraction and separation of lactate dehydrogenase inhibitors from Poria cocos (Schw.) Wolf based on a hyphenated technique and in vitro methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Sainan; Zhang, Jianxu; Li, Senlin; Liu, Chunming; Liu, Shu; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2017-02-20

    Stroke is one of the most common diseases worldwide. Lactate dehydrogenase inhibitors are widely used in the treatment of ischemic stroke, with natural products considered a promising source of lactate dehydrogenase inhibitors. In this study, ultrafiltration liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was used for the screening and identification of lactate dehydrogenase inhibitors from Poria cocos. Five lactate dehydrogenase inhibitors were selected: dehydropachymic acid, pachymic acid, dehydrotrametenolic acid, trametenolic acid, and eburicoic acid. The inhibitors were extracted and isolated with purities of 96.75, 98.15, 97.25, 95.46, and 94.88%, respectively, by using a new "hyphenated" strategy of microwave-assisted extraction coupled with counter-current chromatography and centrifugal partition chromatography by a two-phase solvent system of n-hexane/ethyl acetate/ethanol/water at the volume ratio 0.965:1.000:0.936:0.826 v/v/v/v. The bioactivity of the isolated compounds was assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay in PC12 cells. The results also showed that the hyphenated technique of microwave-assisted extraction coupled with counter-current chromatography and centrifugal partition chromatography was an efficient method for the continuous extraction and online isolation of chemical constituents from medicinal herbs. Furthermore, the research route based on the activity screening, extraction, separation, and activity verification of the compounds offered advantages of efficiency, orientation, and objectivity.

  1. Lactate dehydrogenase test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003471.htm Lactate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a protein that helps produce energy ...

  2. Ethanol Metabolism and Osmolarity Modify Behavioral Responses to Ethanol in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Alaimo, Joseph T.; Davis, Scott J.; Song, Sam S.; Burnette, Christopher R.; Grotewiel, Mike; Shelton, Keith L.; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan T.; Davies, Andrew G.; Bettinger, Jill C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethanol is metabolized by a two-step process in which alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) oxidizes ethanol to acetaldehyde, which is further oxidized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Although variation in ethanol metabolism in humans strongly influences the propensity to chronically abuse alcohol, few data exist on the behavioral effects of altered ethanol metabolism. Here, we used the nematode C. elegans to directly examine how changes in ethanol metabolism alter behavioral responses to alcohol during an acute exposure. Additionally, we investigated ethanol solution osmolarity as a potential explanation for contrasting published data on C. elegans ethanol sensitivity. Methods We developed a gas chromatography assay and validated a spectrophotometric method to measure internal ethanol in ethanol-exposed worms. Further, we tested the effects of mutations in ADH and ALDH genes on ethanol tissue accumulation and behavioral sensitivity to the drug. Finally, we tested the effects of ethanol solution osmolarity on behavioral responses and tissue ethanol accumulation. Results Only a small amount of exogenously applied ethanol accumulated in the tissues of C. elegans and consequently their tissue concentrations were similar to those that intoxicate humans. Independent inactivation of an ADH-encoding gene (sodh-1) or an ALDH-encoding gene (alh-6 or alh-13) increased the ethanol concentration in worms and caused hypersensitivity to the acute sedative effects of ethanol on locomotion. We also found that the sensitivity to the depressive effects of ethanol on locomotion is strongly influenced by the osmolarity of the exogenous ethanol solution. Conclusions Our results indicate that ethanol metabolism via ADH and ALDH has a statistically discernable but surprisingly minor influence on ethanol sedation and internal ethanol accumulation in worms. In contrast, the osmolarity of the medium in which ethanol is delivered to the animals has a more substantial effect on

  3. Acetic acid removal from corn stover hydrolysate using ethyl acetate and the impact on Saccharomyces cerevisiae bioethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Aghazadeh, Mahdieh; Ladisch, Michael R; Engelberth, Abigail S

    2016-07-08

    Acetic acid is introduced into cellulose conversion processes as a consequence of composition of lignocellulose feedstocks, causing significant inhibition of adapted, genetically modified and wild-type S. cerevisiae in bioethanol fermentation. While adaptation or modification of yeast may reduce inhibition, the most effective approach is to remove the acetic acid prior to fermentation. This work addresses liquid-liquid extraction of acetic acid from biomass hydrolysate through a pathway that mitigates acetic acid inhibition while avoiding the negative effects of the extractant, which itself may exhibit inhibition. Candidate solvents were selected using simulation results from Aspen Plus™, based on their ability to extract acetic acid which was confirmed by experimentation. All solvents showed varying degrees of toxicity toward yeast, but the relative volatility of ethyl acetate enabled its use as simple vacuum evaporation could reduce small concentrations of aqueous ethyl acetate to minimally inhibitory levels. The toxicity threshold of ethyl acetate, in the presence of acetic acid, was found to be 10 g L(-1) . The fermentation was enhanced by extracting 90% of the acetic acid using ethyl acetate, followed by vacuum evaporation to remove 88% removal of residual ethyl acetate along with 10% of the broth. NRRL Y-1546 yeast was used to demonstrate a 13% increase in concentration, 14% in ethanol specific production rate, and 11% ethanol yield. This study demonstrated that extraction of acetic acid with ethyl acetate followed by evaporative removal of ethyl acetate from the raffinate phase has potential to significantly enhance ethanol fermentation in a corn stover bioethanol facility. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:929-937, 2016.

  4. Ethanol poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002644.htm Ethanol poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ethanol poisoning is caused by drinking too much alcohol. ...

  5. Ethanol Basics

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  6. Acetic acid production from food wastes using yeast and acetic acid bacteria micro-aerobic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; He, Dongwei; Niu, Dongjie; Zhao, Youcai

    2015-05-01

    In this study, yeast and acetic acid bacteria strains were adopted to enhance the ethanol-type fermentation resulting to a volatile fatty acids yield of 30.22 g/L, and improve acetic acid production to 25.88 g/L, with food wastes as substrate. In contrast, only 12.81 g/L acetic acid can be obtained in the absence of strains. The parameters such as pH, oxidation reduction potential and volatile fatty acids were tested and the microbial diversity of different strains and activity of hydrolytic ferment were investigated to reveal the mechanism. The optimum pH and oxidation reduction potential for the acetic acid production were determined to be at 3.0-3.5 and -500 mV, respectively. Yeast can convert organic matters into ethanol, which is used by acetic acid bacteria to convert the organic wastes into acetic acid. The acetic acid thus obtained from food wastes micro-aerobic fermentation liquid could be extracted by distillation to get high-pure acetic acid.

  7. The acetate kinase of Clostridum acetobutylicum strain P262.

    PubMed

    Diez-Gonzalez, F; Russell, J B; Hunter, J B

    1996-12-01

    Clostridum acetobutylicum strain P262 fermented glucose, pyruvate, or lactate, and the butyrate production was substrate-dependent. Differences in butyrate yield could not be explained by changes in butyrate kinase activities, but the butyrate production was inversely related to acetate kinase activity. The acetate kinase had a pH optimum of 8.0, a Km for acetate of 160 mM, and a kcat of 16, 800 min-1. The enyzme had a native molecular mass of 78 kDa; the size of 42 kDa on SDS-PAGE indicated that the acetate kinase of strain P262 was a homodimer.

  8. Lactation and reproduction*

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, A. M.; Hytten, F. E.; Black, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    The authors review the literature on the effect of lactation on fertility in the absence of contraception and on the effects of contraceptive measures on lactation. They examine data from several countries on the intervals between births and on the return of menstruation and ovulation after childbirth, comparing lactating with nonlactating women. They conclude that lactation is an inefficient contraceptive for the individual, but that in populations sustained lactation is associated with reduced fertility. Possible physiological mechanisms causing lactation amenorrhoea are discussed. Though much of the literature on the effect of contraceptives on lactation is inadequate, there is general agreement that the estrogen component of hormonal preparations has an adverse effect on lactation, but that progestins alone do not. Many questions remain. Is this effect seen in established lactation, or only in the puerperal period? Is it a direct pharmacological effect, or are pill-users the mothers least motivated to maintain breast-feeding? Does a close relationship exist between hormones given and lactation performance? The authors comment on some of the technical deficiencies of previous studies in this field and discuss practical possibilities of, and limitations to, obtaining adequate scientific information in the future. PMID:1084804

  9. Fuel ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report discusses the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 which requires GAO to examine fuel ethanol imports from Central America and the Caribbean and their impact on the U.S. fuel ethanol industry. Ethanol is the alcohol in beverages, such as beer, wine, and whiskey. It can also be used as a fuel by blending with gasoline. It can be made from renewable resources, such as corn, wheat, grapes, and sugarcane, through a process of fermentation. This report finds that, given current sugar and gasoline prices, it is not economically feasible for Caribbean ethanol producers to meet the current local feedstock requirement.

  10. Lactate Oxidation Coupled to Iron or Electrode Reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA▿

    PubMed Central

    Call, Douglas F.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA completely oxidized lactate and reduced iron or an electrode, producing pyruvate and acetate intermediates. Compared to the current produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, G. sulfurreducens PCA produced 10-times-higher current levels in lactate-fed microbial electrolysis cells. The kinetic and comparative analyses reported here suggest a prominent role of G. sulfurreducens strains in metal- and electrode-reducing communities supplied with lactate. PMID:22003020

  11. Sucrose acetate isobutyrate as an in situ forming system for sustained risperidone release.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yaxin; Yu, Yeling; Tang, Xing

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to develop sustained-release sucrose acetate isobutyrate (SAIB) in situ formulations of risperidone for parenteral delivery. The formulations contained SAIB, solvent (anhydrous ethanol, ethyl lactate, or N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone), and additives such as polylactic acid (PLA). In vitro release profiles of risperidone from the SAIB formulations, which followed the Higuchii square root law, were obtained. An increase in SAIB content from 75% to 85% resulted in a reduction in the initial burst and the rate of risperidone release. The initial drug release could be increased by reducing the pH of the release medium and the release rate could be increased by an increase in drug loading. The burst release fell significantly from 20.0% to 3.5% following the inclusion of 10% (w/w) PLA in the formulations. In the case of this high viscosity depot system containing SAIB, anhydrous ethanol, PLA, and 25 mg/g risperidone, the in vivo biocompatible test results obtained support the use of SAIB as an injectable risperidone sustained-release formulation.

  12. Physiology of lactation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The breast changes in size, shape, and function during puberty, pregnancy, and lactation. The physiology of lactation is reviewed here. The breast is composed of fat and connective tissue that supports a tubuloalveolar structure. During development, anatomic changes involving new lobule formation an...

  13. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The fermentation pH has been observed to be the key parameter affecting the ratio of ethanol to acetate produced by Clostridium ljungdahlii. The effects of controlled pH on cell growth and product formation by C. ljungdahlii were measured. It was found that cell concentration and acetate concentration increased with pH, while the ethanol concentration was highest at the lower pH. The molar product ratio of ethanol to acetate was 0.74 at pH 4.0, 0.39 at pH 4.5 and 0.12 at pH 5.0. Future experiments will concentrate on studying other important parameters such as agitation rate and nutrients concentrations with controlled pH as a preclude to continuous reactor studies.

  14. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: specific activity and influence on the production of acetic acid, ethanol and higher alcohols in the first 48 h of fermentation of grape must.

    PubMed

    Millán, C; Mauricio, J C; Ortega, J M

    1990-01-01

    The changes in the specific activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-I and ADH-II) and aldehyde dehydrogenases [AIDH-NADP+ and AIDH-NAD(P)+] from Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the first 48 h of fermentation of grape must were investigated. The biosynthesis of ADH-I and AIDH-NADP+ took place basically during the adaptation of the yeasts to the must (first 4 h), while that of ADH-II occurred immediately after exponential growth (after 12 h). From the products produced by the yeast, only the specific rate of production of ethanol was found to be directly related to the specific activity of ADH-I.

  15. Metabolic Control of Anaerobic Glycolysis (Overexpression of Lactate Dehydrogenase in Transgenic Tomato Roots Supports the Davies-Roberts Hypothesis and Points to a Critical Role for Lactate Secretion.

    PubMed

    Rivoal, J.; Hanson, A. D.

    1994-11-01

    Roots of all plants examined so far have the potential for both ethanol and lactate fermentation. A short burst of lactate fermentation usually occurs when plant tissues are transferred from normoxic to anoxic conditions. According to the Davies-Roberts hypothesis, the consequent pH drop both initiates ethanol fermentation and blocks further production of lactate by inhibiting lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). However, the role of LDH in this pH control mechanism is still a matter of debate. To perturb the control system in a defined way, a barley LDH cDNA under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter was introduced into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv VFMT) using Agrobacterium rhizogenes. The transgenic root clones expressed up to 50 times the LDH activity of controls. The fermentative metabolism of these clones was compared using roots grown previously in normoxic conditions or roots given a 3-d hypoxic pretreatment. During the transition from normoxia to anoxia, lactate accumulation was no faster and no more extensive in transgenic roots than in controls. Similarly, during prolonged anoxia the flux of 14C from [U-14C] glucose to lactate and ethanol was not modified by the expression of the transgene. However, in both transgenic and control roots, hypoxic pretreatment increased the flux to lactate and promoted lactate export to the medium. These results show that LDH has a very low flux control coefficient for lactate fermentation, consistent with the Davies-Roberts hypothesis. Moreover, they suggest that lactate secretion exerts major control over long-term lactate glycolysis in vivo.

  16. Oxidation of ethanol in the rat brain and effects associated with chronic ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Du, Hongying; Jiang, Lihong; Ma, Xiaoxian; de Graaf, Robin A; Behar, Kevin L; Mason, Graeme F

    2013-08-27

    It has been reported that chronic and acute alcohol exposure decreases cerebral glucose metabolism and increases acetate oxidation. However, it remains unknown how much ethanol the living brain can oxidize directly and whether such a process would be affected by alcohol exposure. The questions have implications for reward, oxidative damage, and long-term adaptation to drinking. One group of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats was treated with ethanol vapor and the other given room air. After 3 wk the rats received i.v. [2-(13)C]ethanol and [1, 2-(13)C2]acetate for 2 h, and then the brain was fixed, removed, and divided into neocortex and subcortical tissues for measurement of (13)C isotopic labeling of glutamate and glutamine by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Ethanol oxidation was seen to occur both in the cortex and the subcortex. In ethanol-naïve rats, cortical oxidation of ethanol occurred at rates of 0.017 ± 0.002 µmol/min/g in astroglia and 0.014 ± 0.003 µmol/min/g in neurons, and chronic alcohol exposure increased the astroglial ethanol oxidation to 0.028 ± 0.002 µmol/min/g (P = 0.001) with an insignificant effect on neuronal ethanol oxidation. Compared with published rates of overall oxidative metabolism in astroglia and neurons, ethanol provided 12.3 ± 1.4% of cortical astroglial oxidation in ethanol-naïve rats and 20.2 ± 1.5% in ethanol-treated rats. For cortical astroglia and neurons combined, the ethanol oxidation for naïve and treated rats was 3.2 ± 0.3% and 3.8 ± 0.2% of total oxidation, respectively. (13)C labeling from subcortical oxidation of ethanol was similar to that seen in cortex but was not affected by chronic ethanol exposure.

  17. Metabolic regulation by lactate.

    PubMed

    Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2008-09-01

    For more than a century, the metabolic role of lactate has intrigued physiologists and biochemists. Yet, for the first half of the last century lactate had been designated as a waste product, and assigned no additional significance besides its controversial role in muscle fatigue. The decline of the lactate hypothesis for the onset of muscle fatigue and the defining of some modulatory properties attributed to lactate have increased the interest on this molecule. The present critical review aimed at evaluating some recent publications concerned with unveiling the regulatory actions of lactate in cellular function. Lactate has been described to modulate enzymes catalytic properties to affect hormonal release and responsiveness, and to control body homeostasis. Moreover, these properties are directly related to the genesis and the sustainability of pathological conditions, such as diabetes and cancer. In the end, we concluded that lactate should not be regarded as simply an anaerobic metabolite, but should be considered as a regulatory molecule that modulates the integration of metabolism.

  18. Production of Catalyst-Free Hyperpolarised Ethanol Aqueous Solution via Heterogeneous Hydrogenation with Parahydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salnikov, Oleg G.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Koptyug, Igor V.

    2015-09-01

    An experimental approach for the production of catalyst-free hyperpolarised ethanol solution in water via heterogeneous hydrogenation of vinyl acetate with parahydrogen and the subsequent hydrolysis of ethyl acetate was demonstrated. For an efficient hydrogenation, liquid vinyl acetate was transferred to the gas phase by parahydrogen bubbling and almost completely converted to ethyl acetate with Rh/TiO2 catalyst. Subsequent dissolution of ethyl acetate gas in water containing OH- ions led to the formation of catalyst- and organic solvent-free hyperpolarised ethanol and sodium acetate. These results represent the first demonstration of catalyst- and organic solvent-free hyperpolarised ethanol production achieved by heterogeneous hydrogenation of vinyl acetate vapour with parahydrogen and the subsequent ethyl acetate hydrolysis.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of redox reactions reveals metabolic engineering targets for D-lactate overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Hou, Bo Kyeng; Lee, Sung Gun; Kim, Joong Su; Lee, Dong-Woo; Lee, Sang Jun

    2013-07-01

    Most current metabolic engineering applications rely on the inactivation of unwanted reactions and the amplification of product-oriented reactions. All of the biochemical reactions involved with cellular metabolism are tightly coordinated with the electron flow, which depends on the cellular energy status. Thus, the cellular metabolic flux can be controlled either by modulation of the electron flow or the regulation of redox reactions. This study analyzed the genome-wide anaerobic fermentation products of 472 Escherichia coli single gene knockouts, which comprised mainly of dehydrogenases, oxidoreductases, and redox-related proteins. Many metabolic pathways that were located far from anaerobic mixed-acid fermentation significantly affected the profiles of lactic acid, succinic acid, acetic acid, formic acid, and ethanol. Unexpectedly, D-lactate overproduction was determined by a single gene deletion in dehydrogenases (e.g., guaB, pyrD, and serA) involved with nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Furthermore, the combined knockouts of guaB, pyrD, serA, fnr, arcA, or arcB genes, which are involved with anaerobic transcription regulation, enhanced D-lactate overproduction. These results suggest that the anaerobic fermentation profiles of E. coli can be tuned via the disruption of peripheral dehydrogenases in anaerobic conditions.

  20. The effect of carbon sources and lactate dehydrogenase deletion on 1,2-propanediol production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Berríos-Rivera, Susana J; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N

    2003-01-01

    In previous studies, we showed that cofactor manipulations can potentially be used as a tool in metabolic engineering. In this study, sugars similar to glucose, that can feed into glycolysis and pyruvate production, but with different oxidation states, were used as substrates. This provided a simple way of testing the effect of manipulating the NADH/NAD+ ratio or the availability of NADH on the metabolic patterns of Escherichia coli under anaerobic conditions and on the production of 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD), which requires NADH for its synthesis. Production of 1,2-PD was achieved by overexpressing the two enzymes methylglyoxal synthase from Clostridium acetobutylicum and glycerol dehydrogenase from E. coli. In addition, the effect of eliminating a pathway competing for NADH by using a ldh(-) strain (without lactate dehydrogenase activity) on the production of 1,2-PD was investigated. The oxidation state of the carbon source significantly affected the yield of metabolites, such as ethanol, acetate and lactate. However, feeding a more reduced carbon source did not increase the yield of 1,2-PD. The production of 1,2-PD with glucose as the carbon source was improved by the incorporation of a ldh(-) mutation. The results of these experiments indicate that our current 1,2-PD production system is not limited by NADH, but rather by the pathways following the formation of methylglyoxal.

  1. Genetic dissection of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Geng, Peng; Xiao, Yin; Hu, Yun; Sun, Haiye; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Gui-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Dissection of the hereditary architecture underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for ethanol fermentation. In this work, a genomics approach was used to dissect hereditary variations in acetic acid tolerance between two phenotypically different strains. A total of 160 segregants derived from these two strains were obtained. Phenotypic analysis indicated that the acetic acid tolerance displayed a normal distribution in these segregants, and suggested that the acetic acid tolerant traits were controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Thus, 220 SSR markers covering the whole genome were used to detect QTLs of acetic acid tolerant traits. As a result, three QTLs were located on chromosomes 9, 12, and 16, respectively, which explained 38.8-65.9 % of the range of phenotypic variation. Furthermore, twelve genes of the candidates fell into the three QTL regions by integrating the QTL analysis with candidates of acetic acid tolerant genes. These results provided a novel avenue to obtain more robust strains.

  2. A strategy to prevent the occurrence of Lactobacillus strains using lactate-tolerant yeast Candida glabrata in bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Itsuki; Nakamura, Toshihide; Shima, Jun

    2008-10-01

    Contamination of Lactobacillus sp. in the fermentation broth of bioethanol production decreases ethanol production efficiency. Although the addition of lactate to the broth can effectively inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus sp., it also greatly reduces the fermentation ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To overcome this conflict, lactate-tolerant yeast strains were screened. Candida glabrata strain NFRI 3164 was found to exhibit both higher levels of lactate tolerance and fermentation ability. Co-cultivation of C. glabrata was performed with Lactobacillus brevis and Lb. fermentum, which were reported as major contaminating bacteria during bioethanol production, in culture medium containing 2% lactate. Under these culture conditions, the growth of Lactobacillus strains was greatly inhibited, but the ethanol production of C. glabrata was not significantly affected. Our data show the possibility of designing an effective fuel ethanol production process that eliminates contamination by Lactobacillus strains through the combined use of lactate addition and C. glabrata.

  3. L-lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Spencer, T L; Lehninger, A L

    1976-02-15

    Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells were investigated with regard to their stability to transport L-lactate by measuring either the distribution of [14C]lactate or concomitant H+ ion movements. The movement of lactate was dependent on the pH difference across the cell membrane and was electroneutral, as evidenced by an observed 1:1 antiport for OH- ions or 1:1 symport with H+ ions. 2. Kinetic experiments showed that lactate transport was saturable, with an apparent Km of approx. 4.68 mM and a Vmax. as high as 680 nmol/min per mg of protein at pH 6.2 and 37 degrees C. 3. Lactate transport exhibited a high temperature dependence (activation energy = 139 kJ/mol). 4. Lactate transport was inhibited competitively by (a) a variety of other substituted monocarboxylic acids (e.g. pyruvate, Ki = 6.3 mM), which were themselves transported, (b) the non-transportable analogues alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 0.5 mM), alpha-cyano-3-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 2mM) and DL-p-hydroxyphenyl-lactate (Ki = 3.6 mM) and (c) the thiol-group reagent mersalyl (Ki = 125 muM). 5. Transport of simple monocarboxylic acids, including acetate and propionate, was insensitive to these inhibitors; they presumably cross the membrane by means of a different mechanism. 6. Experiments using saturating amounts of mersalyl as an "inhibitor stop" allowed measurements of the initial rates of net influx and of net efflux of [14C]lactate. Influx and efflux of lactate were judged to be symmetrical reactions in that they exhibited similar concentration dependence. 7. It is concluded that lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells is mediated by a carrier capable of transporting a number of other substituted monocarboxylic acids, but not unsubstituted short-chain aliphatic acids.

  4. L-lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, T L; Lehninger, A L

    1976-01-01

    Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells were investigated with regard to their stability to transport L-lactate by measuring either the distribution of [14C]lactate or concomitant H+ ion movements. The movement of lactate was dependent on the pH difference across the cell membrane and was electroneutral, as evidenced by an observed 1:1 antiport for OH- ions or 1:1 symport with H+ ions. 2. Kinetic experiments showed that lactate transport was saturable, with an apparent Km of approx. 4.68 mM and a Vmax. as high as 680 nmol/min per mg of protein at pH 6.2 and 37 degrees C. 3. Lactate transport exhibited a high temperature dependence (activation energy = 139 kJ/mol). 4. Lactate transport was inhibited competitively by (a) a variety of other substituted monocarboxylic acids (e.g. pyruvate, Ki = 6.3 mM), which were themselves transported, (b) the non-transportable analogues alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 0.5 mM), alpha-cyano-3-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 2mM) and DL-p-hydroxyphenyl-lactate (Ki = 3.6 mM) and (c) the thiol-group reagent mersalyl (Ki = 125 muM). 5. Transport of simple monocarboxylic acids, including acetate and propionate, was insensitive to these inhibitors; they presumably cross the membrane by means of a different mechanism. 6. Experiments using saturating amounts of mersalyl as an "inhibitor stop" allowed measurements of the initial rates of net influx and of net efflux of [14C]lactate. Influx and efflux of lactate were judged to be symmetrical reactions in that they exhibited similar concentration dependence. 7. It is concluded that lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells is mediated by a carrier capable of transporting a number of other substituted monocarboxylic acids, but not unsubstituted short-chain aliphatic acids. PMID:7237

  5. Recent Advances in Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-04-30

    With increased availability and decreased cost, ethanol is potentially a promising platform molecule for the production of a variety of value-added chemicals. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of recent advances in catalytic conversion of ethanol to a wide range of chemicals and fuels. We particularly focus on catalyst advances and fundamental understanding of reaction mechanisms involved in ethanol steam reforming (ESR) to produce hydrogen, ethanol conversion to hydrocarbons ranging from light olefins to longer chain alkenes/alkanes and aromatics, and ethanol conversion to other oxygenates including 1-butanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, diethyl ether, and ethyl acetate.

  6. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Previous results have shown that the medium pH, the composition of the medium and concentration of medium constituents significantly affect the ratio of ethanol to acetate in the product stream when fermenting CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} in synthesis gas to products by Clostridium ljungdahlii. An additional batch study was carried out varying the agitation rate at pH 4, 4.5 and 5.0. It was speculated that increased agitation rates in combination with low pH might result in increased ethanol production while, at the same time, yielding higher cell concentrations which could eventually result in higher ethanol concentrations.

  7. Extractive fermentation of acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Busche, R.M.

    1991-12-31

    In this technoeconomic evaluation of the manufacture of acetic acid by fermentation, the use of the bacterium: Acetobacter suboxydans from the old vinegar process was compared with expected performance of the newer Clostridium thermoaceticum bacterium. Both systems were projected to operate as immobilized cells in a continuous, fluidized bed bioreactor, using solvent extraction to recover the product. Acetobacter metabolizes ethanol aerobically to produce acid at 100 g/L in a low pH medium. This ensures that the product is in the form of a concentrated extractable free acid, rather than as an unextractable salt. Unfortunately, yields from glucose by way of the ethanol fermentation are poor, but near the biological limits of the organisms involved. Conversely, C. thermoaceticum is a thermophilic anaerobe that operates at high fermentation rates on glucose at neutral pH to produce acetate salts directly in substantially quantitative yields. However, it is severely inhibited by product, which restricts concentration to a dilute 20 g/L. An improved Acetobacter system operating with recycled cells at 50 g/L appears capable of producing acid at $0.38/lb, as compared with a $0.29/lb price for synthetic acid. However, this system has only a limited margin for process improvement. The present Clostridium system cannot compete, since the required selling price would be $0.42/lb. However, if the organism could be adapted to tolerate higher product concentrations at acid pH, selling price could be reduced to $0.22/lb, or about 80% of the price of synthetic acid.

  8. Percutaneous Sclerotherapy Using Acetic Acid After Failure of Alcohol Ablation in an Intra-abdominal Lymphangioma

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang Woo Cha, In Ho; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Hong, Suk Joo; Park, Cheol Min; Chung, Hwan Hoon

    2004-09-15

    We report a case of percutaneous sclerotherapy using acetic acid in a 22-year-old woman with an intra-abdominal cystic lymphangioma who was not successfully treated with ethanol despite multiple trials.

  9. Elimination of metabolic pathways to all traditional fermentation products increases ethanol yields in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Papanek, Beth A.; Biswas, Ranjita; Rydzak, Thomas; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-09-12

    Clostridium thermocellum has the natural ability to convert cellulose to ethanol, making it a promising candidate for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. To further improve its CBP capabilities, we study a mutant strain of C. thermocellum that was constructed (strain AG553; C. thermocellum Δhpt ΔhydG Δldh Δpfl Δpta-ack) to increase flux to ethanol by removing side product formation. Strain AG553 showed a two- to threefold increase in ethanol yield relative to the wild type on all substrates tested. On defined medium, strain AG553 exceeded 70% of theoretical ethanol yield on lower loadings of the model crystalline cellulose Avicel, effectively eliminating formate, acetate, and lactate production and reducing H2 production by fivefold. On 5 g/L Avicel, strain AG553 reached an ethanol yield of 63.5% of the theoretical maximum compared with 19.9% by the wild type, and it showed similar yields on pretreated switchgrass and poplar. The elimination of organic acid production suggested that the strain might be capable of growth under higher substrate loadings in the absence of pH control. Final ethanol titer peaked at 73.4 mM in mutant AG553 on 20 g/L Avicel, at which point the pH decreased to a level that does not allow growth of C. thermocellum, likely due to CO2 accumulation. In comparison, the maximum titer of wild type C. thermocellum was 14.1 mM ethanol on 10 g/L Avicel. In conclusion, with the elimination of the metabolic pathways to all traditional fermentation products other than ethanol, AG553 is the best ethanol-yielding CBP strain to date and will serve as a platform strain for further metabolic engineering for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass.

  10. CONVERSION OF LACTATE-C14 TO PROPIONATE BY THE RUMEN MICROFLORA12

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, R. L.; Wood, W. A.; Emery, R. S.

    1962-01-01

    Baldwin, R. L. (Michigan State University, East Lansing), W. A. Wood, and R. S. Emery. Conversion of lactate-C14 to propionate by the rumen microflora. J. Bacteriol. 83:907–913. 1962.—Rumen microflora enriched on five different diets calculated to present increasing carbohydrate or lactate availability were used to determine the contribution of the randomizing (succinate) and nonrandomizing (acrylate) routes to propionate with lactate-2-C14 and -3-C14 as substrates. Propionate was labeled as though 70 to 90% was formed via the nonrandomizing route. This percentage was highest on diets containing high levels of carbohydrate or lactate or both. Evidence for the presence of succinic dehydrogenase, acetokinase, phosphotransacetylase, and coenzyme A transphorase was obtained with cell-free extracts. Propionate-2-C14 and lactate-2-C14 were converted by extracts to the activated derivatives of acrylate, lactate, propionate, and acetate. PMID:13864343

  11. Analysis of Metabolic Pathways and Fluxes in a Newly Discovered Thermophilic and Ethanol-Tolerant Geobacillus Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Sapra, Rajat; Joyner, Dominique; Hazen, Terry C.; Myers, Samuel; Reichmuth, David; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-01-20

    A recently discovered thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius M10EXG, ferments a range of C5 (e.g., xylose) and C6 sugars (e.g., glucose) and istolerant to high ethanol concentrations (10percent, v/v). We have investigated the central metabolism of this bacterium using both in vitro enzyme assays and 13C-based flux analysis to provide insights into the physiological properties of this extremophile and explore its metabolism for bio-ethanol or other bioprocess applications. Our findings show that glucose metabolism in G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG proceeds via glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the TCA cycle; the Entner?Doudoroff pathway and transhydrogenase activity were not detected. Anaplerotic reactions (including the glyoxylate shunt, pyruvate carboxylase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) were active, but fluxes through those pathways could not be accuratelydetermined using amino acid labeling. When growth conditions were switched from aerobic to micro-aerobic conditions, fluxes (based on a normalized glucose uptake rate of 100 units (g DCW)-1 h-1) through the TCA cycle and oxidative pentose phosphate pathway were reduced from 64+-3 to 25+-2 and from 30+-2 to 19+-2, respectively. The carbon flux under micro-aerobic growth was directed formate. Under fully anerobic conditions, G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG used a mixed acid fermentation process and exhibited a maximum ethanol yield of 0.38+-0.07 mol mol-1 glucose. In silico flux balance modeling demonstrates that lactate and acetate production from G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG reduces the maximum ethanol yieldby approximately threefold, thus indicating that both pathways should be modified to maximize ethanol production.

  12. Lactate: Friend or Foe.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mederic M; Rajasekaran, Sathish; Thomsen, Timothy W; Peterson, Andrew R

    2016-03-01

    Lactic acid has played an important role in the traditional theory of muscle fatigue and limitation of endurance exercise performance. It has been called a waste product of anaerobic metabolism and has been believed to be responsible for the uncomfortable "burn" of intense exercise and directly responsible for the metabolic acidosis of exercise, leading to decreased muscle contractility and ultimately cessation of exercise. Although this premise has been commonly taught, it is not supported by the scientific literature and has led to a great deal of confusion among the sports medicine and exercise science communities. This review will provide the sports medicine clinician with an understanding of contemporary lactate theories, including lactate's role in energy production, its contributions to metabolic acidosis, and its function as an energy substrate for a variety of tissues. Lactate threshold concepts will also be discussed, including a practical approach to understanding prediction of performance and monitoring of training progress based on these parameters.

  13. Methods for increasing the production of ethanol from microbial fermentation

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.; Arora, Dinesh K.; Ko, Ching-Whan; Phillips, John Randall; Basu, Rahul; Wikstrom, Carl V.; Clausen, Edgar C.

    2007-10-23

    A stable continuous method for producing ethanol from the anaerobic bacterial fermentation of a gaseous substrate containing at least one reducing gas involves culturing a fermentation bioreactor anaerobic, acetogenic bacteria in a liquid nutrient medium; supplying the gaseous substrate to the bioreactor; and manipulating the bacteria in the bioreactor by reducing the redox potential, or increasing the NAD(P)H TO NAD(P) ratio, in the fermentation broth after the bacteria achieves a steady state and stable cell concentration in the bioreactor. The free acetic acid concentration in the bioreactor is maintained at less than 5 g/L free acid. This method allows ethanol to be produced in the fermentation broth in the bioreactor at a productivity greater than 10 g/L per day. Both ethanol and acetate are produced in a ratio of ethanol to acetate ranging from 1:1 to 20:1.

  14. Contraception in lactating women.

    PubMed

    Díaz, S; Croxatto, H B

    1993-12-01

    Lactating women need contraception after first menses, supplementation or 6 months postpartum, or before, according to personal or programmatic reasons. Non-hormonal methods have no influence on lactation and are the first choice. Intrauterine devices (IUDs) inserted during amenorrhea are safe and show good continuation rates. Progestin-only methods do not affect breast-feeding and should be used after 6 weeks to prevent transference of orally active steroids to the newborn. Progesterone rings and Nestorone implants are effective new methods, that use orally inactive steroids.

  15. Optimizing on-farm pretreatment of perennial grasses for fuel ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Digman, Matthew F; Shinners, Kevin J; Casler, Michael D; Dien, Bruce S; Hatfield, Ronald D; Jung, Hans-Joachim G; Muck, Richard E; Weimer, Paul J

    2010-07-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L.) were pretreated under ambient temperature and pressure with sulfuric acid and calcium hydroxide in separate experiments. Chemical loadings from 0 to 100g (kg DM)(-1) and durations of anaerobic storage from 0 to 180days were investigated by way of a central composite design at two moisture contents (40% or 60% w.b.). Pretreated and untreated samples were fermented to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae D5A in the presence of a commercially available cellulase (Celluclast 1.5L) and beta-glucosidase (Novozyme 188). Xylose levels were also measured following fermentation because xylose is not metabolized by S. cerevisiae. After sulfuric acid pretreatment and anaerobic storage, conversion of cell wall glucose to ethanol for reed canarygrass ranged from 22% to 83% whereas switchgrass conversions ranged from 16% to 46%. Pretreatment duration had a positive effect on conversion but was mitigated with increased chemical loadings. Conversions after calcium hydroxide pretreatment and anaerobic storage ranged from 21% to 55% and 18% to 54% for reed canarygrass and switchgrass, respectively. The efficacy of lime pretreatment was found to be highly dependent on moisture content. Moreover, pretreatment duration was only found to be significant for reed canarygrass. Although significant levels of acetate and lactate were observed in the biomass after storage, S. cerevisiae was not found to be inhibited at a 10% solids loading.

  16. Overexpression of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases acetic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Penner, Michael H; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid-mediated inhibition of the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars impedes development of plant biomass as a source of renewable ethanol. In order to overcome this inhibition, the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to synthesize acetyl-CoA from acetic acid was increased by overexpressing ACS2 encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase. Overexpression of ACS2 resulted in higher resistance to acetic acid as measured by an increased growth rate and shorter lag phase relative to a wild-type control strain, suggesting that Acs2-mediated consumption of acetic acid during fermentation contributes to acetic acid detoxification.

  17. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, Gerald Charles; Zoeller, Joseph Robert; Depew, Leslie Sharon

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  18. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, G.C.; Zoeller, J.R.; Depew, L.S.

    1998-03-24

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  19. Antidepressant Effect of Aminophylline After Ethanol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Escudeiro, Sarah Souza; Soares, Paula Matias; Almeida, Anália Barbosa; de Freitas Guimarães Lobato, Rodrigo; de Araujo, Dayane Pessoa; Macedo, Danielle Silveira; Sousa, Francisca Cléa Florenço; Patrocínio, Manoel Cláudio Azevedo; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2013-01-01

    This work investigated the association of acute ethanol and aminophylline administration on behavioral models of depression and prefrontal monoamine levels (i.e. norepinephrine and dopamine) in mice. The animals received a single dose of ethanol (2 g/kg) or aminophylline (5 or 10 mg/kg) alone or in association. Thirty minutes after the last drug administration, the animals were assessed in behavioral models by the forced swimming and tail suspension tests. After these tests, the animals were sacrificed and the prefrontal cortices dissected to measure monoamine content. Results showed that ethanol presented depression-like activity in the forced swimming and tail suspension tests. These effects were reversed by the association with aminophylline in all tests. Norepinephrine and dopamine levels decreased, while an increase in the dopamine metabolite, (4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acetic acid (DOPAC), after ethanol administration was observed. On the contrary, the association of ethanol and aminophylline increased the norepinephrine and dopamine content, while it decreased DOPAC when compared to the ethanol group, confirming the alterations observed in the behavioral tests. These data reinforce the involvement of the adenosinergic system on ethanol effects, highlighting the importance of the norepinephrine and dopamine pathways in the prefrontal cortex to the effects of ethanol. PMID:23641339

  20. In vivo measurement of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 activity in rat liver ethanol model using dynamic MRSI of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Josan, Sonal; Xu, Tao; Yen, Yi-Fen; Hurd, Ralph; Ferreira, Julio; Chen, Che-Hong; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Mayer, Dirk; Spielman, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    To date, measurements of the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2), a critical mitochondrial enzyme for the elimination of certain cytotoxic aldehydes in the body and a promising target for drug development, have been largely limited to in vitro methods. Recent advancements in MRS of hyperpolarized (13) C-labeled substrates have provided a method to detect and image in vivo metabolic pathways with signal-to-noise ratio gains greater than 10 000-fold over conventional MRS techniques. However aldehydes, because of their toxicity and short T1 relaxation times, are generally poor targets for such (13) C-labeled studies. In this work, we show that dynamic MRSI of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate and its conversion to [1-(13) C]lactate can provide an indirect in vivo measurement of ALDH2 activity via the concentration of NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form), a co-factor common to both the reduction of pyruvate to lactate and the oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetate. Results from a rat liver ethanol model (n = 9) show that changes in (13) C-lactate labeling following the bolus injection of hyperpolarized pyruvate are highly correlated with changes in ALDH2 activity (R(2) = 0.76).

  1. Fuel grade ethanol by solvent extraction: Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect

    Tedder, D.W.

    1987-04-01

    This report summarizes final results for ethanol recovery by solvent extraction and extractive distillation. At conclusion this work can be summarized as ethanol dehydration and recovery dilute fermentates is feasible using liquid/liquid extraction and extractive distillation. Compared to distillation, the economics are more attractive for less than 5 wt % ethanol. However, an economic bias in favor of SEED appears to exist even for 10 wt % feeds. It is of particular interest to consider the group extraction of ethanol and acetic acid followed by conversion to a mixture of ethanol and ethyl acetate. The latter species is a more valuable commodity and group extraction of inhibitory species is one feature of liquid/liquid extraction that is not easily accomodated using distillation. Upflow immobilized reactors offer the possibility of achieving high substrate conversion while also maintaining low metabolite concentrations. However, many questions remain to be answered with such a concept. 135 refs., 42 figs., 61 tabs.

  2. Ethanol cytotoxic effect on trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Clave, S; Joya, X; Salat-Batlle, J; Garcia-Algar, O; Vall, O

    2014-03-03

    Prenatal ethanol exposure may cause both, altered fetal neurodevelopment and impaired placental function. These disturbances can lead to growth retardation, which is one of the most prevalent features in Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). It is not known whether there is a specific pattern of cytotoxicity caused by ethanol that can be extrapolated to other cell types. The aim of this study was to determine the cytotoxic effects caused by sustained exposure of trophoblast cells to ethanol. The cytotoxic effect of sustained exposure to standard doses of ethanol on an in vitro human trophoblast cell line, JEG3, was examined. Viable cell count by exclusion method, total protein concentration, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and activation of apoptotic markers (P-H2AX, caspase-3 and PARP-1) were determined. Sustained exposure to ethanol decreased viable cell count and total protein concentration. LDH activity did not increased in exposed cells but apoptotic markers were detected. In addition, there was a dose-dependent relationship between ethanol concentration and apoptotic pathways activation. Sustained ethanol exposure causes cellular cytotoxicity by apoptotic pathways induction as a result of DNA damage. This apoptotic induction may partially explain the altered function of placental cells and the damage previously detected in other tissues.

  3. Geobacter sulfurreducens subsp. ethanolicus, subsp. nov., an ethanol-utilizing dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium from a lotus field.

    PubMed

    Viulu, Samson; Nakamura, Kohei; Kojima, Akihiro; Yoshiyasu, Yuki; Saitou, Sakiko; Takamizawa, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    An ethanol-utilizing Fe(III)-reducing bacterial strain, OSK2A(T), was isolated from a lotus field in Aichi, Japan. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of OSK2A(T) and related strains placed it within Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA(T). Strain OSK2A(T) was shown to be a Gram-negative, motile, rod-shaped bacterium, strictly anaerobic, 0.76-1.65 µm long and 0.28-0.45 μm wide. Its growth occurred at 20-40℃, pH 6.0-8.1, and it tolerated up to 1% NaCl. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 61.2 mol% and DNA-DNA hybridization value with Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA(T) was 60.7%. The major respiratory quinone was MK-8. The major fatty acids were 16:1 ω7c, 16:0, 14:0, 15:0 iso, 16:1 ω5c, and 18:1 ω7c. Strain OSK2A(T) could utilize H2, ethanol, acetate, lactate, pyruvate, and formate as substrates with Fe(III)-citrate as electron acceptor. Amorphous Fe(III) hydroxide, Fe(III)-NTA, fumarate, malate, and elemental sulfur were utilized as electron acceptors with either acetate or ethanol as substrates. Results obtained from physiological, DNA-DNA hybridization, and chemotaxonomic tests support genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain OSK2A(T) from its closest relative. The isolate is assigned as a novel subspecies with the name Geobacter sulfurreducens subsp. ethanolicus, subsp. nov. (type strain OSK2A(T)=DSMZ 26126(T)=JCM 18752(T)).

  4. 21 CFR 184.1311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferrous lactate. 184.1311 Section 184.1311 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1311 Ferrous lactate. (a) Ferrous lactate (iron (II) lactate.... It is prepared by reacting calcium lactate or sodium lactate with ferrous sulfate, direct reaction...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferrous lactate. 184.1311 Section 184.1311 Food... GRAS § 184.1311 Ferrous lactate. (a) Ferrous lactate (iron (II) lactate, C6H10FeO6, CAS Reg. No. 5905... reacting calcium lactate or sodium lactate with ferrous sulfate, direct reaction of lactic acid with...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferrous lactate. 184.1311 Section 184.1311 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1311 Ferrous lactate. (a) Ferrous lactate (iron (II) lactate.... It is prepared by reacting calcium lactate or sodium lactate with ferrous sulfate, direct reaction...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferrous lactate. 184.1311 Section 184.1311 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1311 Ferrous lactate. (a) Ferrous lactate (iron (II) lactate.... It is prepared by reacting calcium lactate or sodium lactate with ferrous sulfate, direct reaction...

  8. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Previously studies have shown the importance of both medium composition and concentration and medium pH on ethanol production of Clostridium ljungdahlii in fermenting CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} in synthesis gas. Four additional batch experiments involving medium composition and concentration were carried out in modified basal medium without yeast extract at pH 4.0. These experiments indicate that basal medium with only small amounts of B-vitamins can yield significant cell growth while yielding ethanol as the major product. Product ratios as high as 11.0 g ethanol per g acetate were obtained with half strength B-vitamins. Further experiments indicates that Ca-pantothenate may be necessary for the growth of C. ljungdahlii and that growth and ethanol production can occur simultaneously.

  9. Nanofabrication in cellulose acetate.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hongjun; Lajos, Robert; Metlushko, Vitali; Elzy, Ed; An, Se Young; Sautner, Joshua

    2009-03-07

    We have demonstrated nanofabrication with commercialized cellulose acetate. Cellulose acetate is used for bulk nanofabrication and surface nanofabrication. In bulk nanofabrication, cellulose acetate reacts with an e-beam and permanent patterns are formed in it instead of being transferred to other substrates. We have studied the nano relief modulation performance of cellulose acetate before and after development. The depth of the nanopatterns is magnified after development, and is varied by exposing dosage and line width of the pattern. The thinnest 65 nm wide line is achieved in the bulk fabrication. We also demonstrate a binary phase Fresnel lens array which is directly patterned in a cellulose acetate sheet. Because of its unique mechanical and optical properties, cellulose is a good candidate for a template material for soft imprinting lithography. In the surface nanofabrication, cellulose acetate thin film spin-coated on silicon wafers is employed as a new resist for e-beam lithography. We achieved 50 nm lines with 100 nm pitches, dots 50 nm in diameter, and single lines with the smallest width of 20 nm. As a new resist of e-beam lithography, cellulose acetate has high resolution comparable with conventional resists, while having several advantages such as low cost, long stock time and less harmfulness to human health.

  10. Shewanella spp. Use Acetate as an Electron Donor for Denitrification but Not Ferric Iron or Fumarate Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sukhwan; Sanford, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Lactate but not acetate oxidation was reported to support electron acceptor reduction by Shewanella spp. under anoxic conditions. We demonstrate that the denitrifiers Shewanella loihica strain PV-4 and Shewanella denitrificans OS217 utilize acetate as an electron donor for denitrification but not for fumarate or ferric iron reduction. PMID:23396327

  11. Overview on mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-02-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are a group of gram-negative or gram-variable bacteria which possess an obligate aerobic property with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor, meanwhile transform ethanol and sugar to corresponding aldehydes, ketones and organic acids. Since the first genus Acetobacter of AAB was established in 1898, 16 AAB genera have been recorded so far. As the main producer of a world-wide condiment, vinegar, AAB have evolved an elegant adaptive system that enables them to survive and produce a high concentration of acetic acid. Some researches and reviews focused on mechanisms of acid resistance in enteric bacteria and made the mechanisms thoroughly understood, while a few investigations did in AAB. As the related technologies with proteome, transcriptome and genome were rapidly developed and applied to AAB research, some plausible mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in some AAB strains have been published. In this review, the related mechanisms of AAB against acetic acid with acetic acid assimilation, transportation systems, cell morphology and membrane compositions, adaptation response, and fermentation conditions will be described. Finally, a framework for future research for anti-acid AAB will be provided.

  12. Caloramator boliviensis sp. nov., a thermophilic, ethanol-producing bacterium isolated from a hot spring.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Carla; Pozzo, Tania; Karlsson, Eva Nordberg; Alvarez, Maria Teresa; Mattiasson, Bo

    2012-07-01

    A novel moderately thermophilic, anaerobic, ethanol-producing bacterial strain, 45B(T), was isolated from a mixed sediment water sample collected from a hot spring at Potosi, Bolivia. The cells were straight to slightly curved rods approximately 2.5 µm long and 0.5 µm wide. The strain was Gram-stain-variable, spore-forming and monotrichously flagellated. Growth of the strain was observed at 45-65 °C and pH 5.5-8.0, with optima of 60 °C and pH 6.5. The substrates utilized by strain 45B(T) were xylose, cellobiose, glucose, arabinose, sucrose, lactose, maltose, fructose, galactose, mannose, glycerol, xylan, carboxymethylcellulose and yeast extract. The main fermentation product from xylose and cellobiose was ethanol (0.70 and 0.45 g ethanol per gram of consumed sugar, respectively). Acetate, lactate, propionate, carbon dioxide and hydrogen were also produced in minor quantities. 1,3-Propanediol was produced when glycerol-containing medium was supplemented with yeast extract. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C(15:0), C(16:0), iso-C(16:0), C(15:1), iso-C(14:0), C(13:0) and C(14:0). The polar lipids diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, an aminoglycolipid and 15 other unidentified lipids were predominant. The DNA G+C content of strain 45B(T) was 32.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity revealed that strain 45B(T) is located within the Gram-type positive Bacillus-Clostridium branch of the phylogenetic tree. On the basis of morphological and physiological properties and phylogenetic analysis, strain 45B(T) represents a novel species, for which the name Caloramator boliviensis sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is 45B(T) (=DSM 22065(T)=CCUG 57396(T)).

  13. Clean Transformation of Ethanol to Useful Chemicals. The Behavior of a Gold-Modified Silicalite Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Falletta, Ermelinda; Rossi, Michele; Teles, Joaquim Henrique; Della Pina, Cristina

    2016-03-19

    Upon addition of gold to silicalite-1 pellets (a MFI-type zeolite), the vapor phase oxidation of ethanol could be addressed to acetaldehyde or acetic acid formation. By optimizing the catalyst composition and reaction conditions, the conversion of ethanol could be tuned to acetaldehyde with 97% selectivity at 71% conversion or to acetic acid with 78% selectivity at total conversion. Considering that unloaded silicalite-1 was found to catalyze the dehydration of ethanol to diethylether or ethene, a green approach for the integrated production of four important chemicals is herein presented. This is based on renewable ethanol as a reagent and a modular catalytic process.

  14. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], CH[sub 4] and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the wild strain'' produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

  15. Traits of selected Clostridium strains for syngas fermentation to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Martin, Michael E; Richter, Hanno; Saha, Surya; Angenent, Largus T

    2016-03-01

    Syngas fermentation is an anaerobic bioprocess that could become industrially relevant as a biorefinery platform for sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. An important prerequisite for commercialization is adequate performance of the biocatalyst (i.e., sufficiently high production rate, titer, selectivity, yield, and stability of the fermentation). Here, we compared the performance of three potential candidate Clostridium strains in syngas-to-ethanol conversion: Clostridium ljungdahlii PETC, C. ljungdahlii ERI-2, and Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1. Experiments were conducted in a two-stage, continuously fed syngas-fermentation system that had been optimized for stable ethanol production. The two C. ljungdahlii strains performed similar to each other but different from C. autoethanogenum. When the pH value was lowered from 5.5 to 4.5 to induce solventogenesis, the cell-specific carbon monoxide and hydrogen consumption (similar rate for all strains at pH 5.5), severely decreased in JA1-1, but hardly in PETC and ERI-2. Ethanol production in strains PETC and ERI-2 remained relatively stable while the rate of acetate production decreased, resulting in a high ethanol/acetate ratio, but lower overall productivities. With JA1-1, lowering the pH severely lowered rates of both ethanol and acetate production; and as a consequence, no pronounced shift to solventogenesis was observed. The highest overall ethanol production rate of 0.301 g · L(-1)  · h(-1) was achieved with PETC at pH 4.5 with a corresponding 19 g/L (1.9% w/v) ethanol concentration and a 5.5:1 ethanol/acetate molar ratio. A comparison of the genes relevant for ethanol metabolism revealed differences between C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum that, however, did not conclusively explain the different phenotypes.

  16. Lactate in bitches with pyometra.

    PubMed

    Volpato, R; Rodello, L; Abibe, R B; Lopes, M D

    2012-12-01

    Lactate is a compound produced by the anaerobic metabolism of glucose, and hyperlactataemia occurs when the rate of production of lactate exceeds the rate of elimination. This occurs in situations of hypoxia and tissue hypoperfusion. Lactate has been considered a useful prognostic indicator in critically ill patients. Pyometra is a disease of adult female dogs characterized by inflammation of the uterus with an accumulation of exudate, which occurs during the luteal phase. It is one of the most common diseases that occur in the genital tract of female dogs. A total of 31 dogs were diagnosed with pyometra. The diagnosis was confirmed at ultrasonography. Of the 31 dogs, 25 females had open cervix pyometra and six had closed cervix pyometra. Plasma lactate concentrations were determined by an enzymatic colorimetric method. The average concentration (±SD) of plasma lactate in all 31 bitches with pyometra was 3.55 ± 0.46 mm. Healthy dogs had plasma lactate concentrations between 0.3 and 2.5 mm (mean ± SD). Concentrations ranged from 0.8 to 2.9 mm when plasma lactate was measured with a portable device and 0.4-2.6 mm with the blood gas analyser. Even though plasma lactate values vary between several studies and equipment used to measure concentrations, our results for dogs with pyometra are higher indicating hyperlactataemia (Thorneloe et al. , Can Vet J 48, 283-288). Plasma lactate in dogs with closed cervix pyometra was mean ± SD and in dogs with open cervix pyometra, it was mean ± SD. The plasma lactate concentration in dogs with pyometra was higher than in healthy bitches, and there was no influence of patency of the cervix on the concentration of plasma lactate concentrations. Plasma lactate concentrations were similar for animals with open and closed pyometra (3.54 ± 0.52 to 3.64 ± 1.03 mm).

  17. Generation and characterisation of stable ethanol-tolerant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Dragana; Fraser, Sarah; Chambers, Paul J; Rogers, Peter; Stanley, Grant A

    2010-02-01

    Saccharomyces spp. are widely used for ethanologenic fermentations, however yeast metabolic rate and viability decrease as ethanol accumulates during fermentation, compromising ethanol yield. Improving ethanol tolerance in yeast should, therefore, reduce the impact of ethanol toxicity on fermentation performance. The purpose of the current work was to generate and characterise ethanol-tolerant yeast mutants by subjecting mutagenised and non-mutagenised populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303-1A to adaptive evolution using ethanol stress as a selection pressure. Mutants CM1 (chemically mutagenised) and SM1 (spontaneous) had increased acclimation and growth rates when cultivated in sub-lethal ethanol concentrations, and their survivability in lethal ethanol concentrations was considerably improved compared with the parent strain. The mutants utilised glucose at a higher rate than the parent in the presence of ethanol and an initial glucose concentration of 20 g l(-1). At a glucose concentration of 100 g l(-1), SM1 had the highest glucose utilisation rate in the presence or absence of ethanol. The mutants produced substantially more glycerol than the parent and, although acetate was only detectable in ethanol-stressed cultures, both mutants produced more acetate than the parent. It is suggested that the increased ethanol tolerance of the mutants is due to their elevated glycerol production rates and the potential of this to increase the ratio of oxidised and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)/NADH) in an ethanol-compromised cell, stimulating glycolytic activity.

  18. The anaerobic chytridiomycete fungus Piromyces sp. E2 produces ethanol via pyruvate:formate lyase and an alcohol dehydrogenase E.

    PubMed

    Boxma, Brigitte; Voncken, Frank; Jannink, Sander; van Alen, Theo; Akhmanova, Anna; van Weelden, Susanne W H; van Hellemond, Jaap J; Ricard, Guenola; Huynen, Martijn; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Hackstein, Johannes H P

    2004-03-01

    Anaerobic chytridiomycete fungi possess hydrogenosomes, which generate hydrogen and ATP, but also acetate and formate as end-products of a prokaryotic-type mixed-acid fermentation. Notably, the anaerobic chytrids Piromyces and Neocallimastix use pyruvate:formate lyase (PFL) for the catabolism of pyruvate, which is in marked contrast to the hydrogenosomal metabolism of the anaerobic parabasalian flagellates Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus, because these organisms decarboxylate pyruvate with the aid of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO). Here, we show that the chytrids Piromyces sp. E2 and Neocallimastix sp. L2 also possess an alcohol dehydrogenase E (ADHE) that makes them unique among hydrogenosome-bearing anaerobes. We demonstrate that Piromyces sp. E2 routes the final steps of its carbohydrate catabolism via PFL and ADHE: in axenic culture under standard conditions and in the presence of 0.3% fructose, 35% of the carbohydrates were degraded in the cytosol to the end-products ethanol, formate, lactate and succinate, whereas 65% were degraded via the hydrogenosomes to acetate and formate. These observations require a refinement of the previously published metabolic schemes. In particular, the importance of the hydrogenase in this type of hydrogenosome has to be revisited.

  19. A genetically encoded FRET lactate sensor and its use to detect the Warburg effect in single cancer cells.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Alejandro; Ceballo, Sebastián; Ruminot, Iván; Lerchundi, Rodrigo; Frommer, Wolf B; Barros, Luis Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Lactate is shuttled between and inside cells, playing metabolic and signaling roles in healthy tissues. Lactate is also a harbinger of altered metabolism and participates in the pathogenesis of inflammation, hypoxia/ischemia, neurodegeneration and cancer. Many tumor cells show high rates of lactate production in the presence of oxygen, a phenomenon known as the Warburg effect, which has diagnostic and possibly therapeutic implications. In this article we introduce Laconic, a genetically-encoded Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based lactate sensor designed on the bacterial transcription factor LldR. Laconic quantified lactate from 1 µM to 10 mM and was not affected by glucose, pyruvate, acetate, betahydroxybutyrate, glutamate, citrate, α-ketoglutarate, succinate, malate or oxalacetate at concentrations found in mammalian cytosol. Expressed in astrocytes, HEK cells and T98G glioma cells, the sensor allowed dynamic estimation of lactate levels in single cells. Used in combination with a blocker of the monocarboxylate transporter MCT, the sensor was capable of discriminating whether a cell is a net lactate producer or a net lactate consumer. Application of the MCT-block protocol showed that the basal rate of lactate production is 3-5 fold higher in T98G glioma cells than in normal astrocytes. In contrast, the rate of lactate accumulation in response to mitochondrial inhibition with sodium azide was 10 times lower in glioma than in astrocytes, consistent with defective tumor metabolism. A ratio between the rate of lactate production and the rate of azide-induced lactate accumulation, which can be estimated reversibly and in single cells, was identified as a highly sensitive parameter of the Warburg effect, with values of 4.1 ± 0.5 for T98G glioma cells and 0.07 ± 0.007 for astrocytes. In summary, this article describes a genetically-encoded sensor for lactate and its use to measure lactate concentration, lactate flux, and the Warburg effect in single

  20. Contraceptive implants and lactation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Soledad

    2002-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of four contraceptive implants, plant, Implanon, Nestorone and Elcometrine, have been evaluated during use in the postpartum period by lactating women. These implants provide highly effective contraceptive protection with no negative effect on breastfeeding or infant growth and development. Breastfeeding women initiating Norplant use in the second postpartum month experience significantly longer periods of amenorrhea than do untreated women or intrauterine device users. After weaning, the bleeding pattern is similar to that observed in non-nursing women. Norplant use does not affect bone turnover and density during lactation. Norplant and Implanon release orally active progestins while Nestorone and Elcometrine implants release an orally inactive progestin, which represents an advantage since the infant should be free of steroidal effects. The infant's daily intake of steroids (estimated from concentrations in maternal milk during the first month of use) range from 90 to 100 ng of levonorgestrel (Norplant), 75-120 ng of etonogestrel (Implanon), and 50 ng and 110 ng of Nestorone (Nestorone and Elcometrine implants, respectively). Nursing women needing contraception may use progestin-only implants when nonhormonal methods are not available or acceptable. Implants that deliver orally active steroids should only be used after 6 weeks postpartum to avoid transferring of steroids to the newborn.

  1. Energy content of reduced-fat distillers grains for lactating dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Byproducts of ethanol production have become an important source of nutrients for dairy cows in recent years but accurate energy values have yet to be determined. Eight Holstein and 8 Jersey multiparous, lactating cows were used to complete 56 energy balances to determine the energy content of redu...

  2. Simultaneous production of acetic and gluconic acids by a thermotolerant Acetobacter strain during acetous fermentation in a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Mounir, Majid; Shafiei, Rasoul; Zarmehrkhorshid, Raziyeh; Hamouda, Allal; Ismaili Alaoui, Mustapha; Thonart, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The activity of bacterial strains significantly influences the quality and the taste of vinegar. Previous studies of acetic acid bacteria have primarily focused on the ability of bacterial strains to produce high amounts of acetic acid. However, few studies have examined the production of gluconic acid during acetous fermentation at high temperatures. The production of vinegar at high temperatures by two strains of acetic acid bacteria isolated from apple and cactus fruits, namely AF01 and CV01, respectively, was evaluated in this study. The simultaneous production of gluconic and acetic acids was also examined in this study. Biochemical and molecular identification based on a 16s rDNA sequence analysis confirmed that these strains can be classified as Acetobacter pasteurianus. To assess the ability of the isolated strains to grow and produce acetic acid and gluconic acid at high temperatures, a semi-continuous fermentation was performed in a 20-L bioreactor. The two strains abundantly grew at a high temperature (41°C). At the end of the fermentation, the AF01 and CV01 strains yielded acetic acid concentrations of 7.64% (w/v) and 10.08% (w/v), respectively. Interestingly, CV01 was able to simultaneously produce acetic and gluconic acids during acetic fermentation, whereas AF01 mainly produced acetic acid. In addition, CV01 was less sensitive to ethanol depletion during semi-continuous fermentation. Finally, the enzymatic study showed that the two strains exhibited high ADH and ALDH enzyme activity at 38°C compared with the mesophilic reference strain LMG 1632, which was significantly susceptible to thermal inactivation.

  3. 21 CFR 184.1311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... prepared by reacting calcium lactate or sodium lactate with ferrous sulfate, direct reaction of lactic acid with iron filings, reaction of ferrous chloride with sodium lactate, or reaction of ferrous...

  4. Acetic Acid Production by an Electrodialysis Fermentation Method with a Computerized Control System

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Yoshiyuki; Iwahara, Masayoshi; Hongo, Motoyoshi

    1988-01-01

    In acetic acid fermentation by Acetobacter aceti, the acetic acid produced inhibits the production of acetic acid by this microorganism. To alleviate this inhibitory effect, we developed an electrodialysis fermentation method such that acetic acid is continuously removed from the broth. The fermentation unit has a computerized system for the control of the pH and the concentration of ethanol in the fermentation broth. The electrodialysis fermentation system resulted in improved cell growth and higher productivity over an extended period; the productivity exceeded that from non-pH-controlled fermentation. During electrodialysis fermentation in our system, 97.6 g of acetic acid was produced from 86.0 g of ethanol; the amount of acetic acid was about 2.4 times greater than that produced by non-pH-controlled fermentation (40.1 g of acetic acid produced from 33.8 g of ethanol). Maximum productivity of electrodialysis fermentation in our system was 2.13 g/h, a rate which was 1.35 times higher than that of non-pH-controlled fermentation (1.58 g/h). PMID:16347520

  5. Point mutation of H3/H4 histones affects acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyong; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-10-10

    The molecular mechanism of acetic acid tolerance in yeast remains unclear despite of its importance for efficient cellulosic ethanol production. In this study, we examined the effects of histone H3/H4 point mutations on yeast acetic acid tolerance by comprehensively screening a histone H3/H4 mutant library. A total of 24 histone H3/H4 mutants (six acetic acid resistant and 18 sensitive) were identified. Compared to the wild-type strain, the histone acetic acid-resistant mutants exhibited improved ethanol fermentation performance under acetic acid stress. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed that changes in the gene expression in the acetic acid-resistant mutants H3 K37A and H4 K16Q were mainly related to energy production, antioxidative stress. Our results provide novel insights into yeast acetic acid tolerance on the basis of histone, and suggest a novel approach to improve ethanol production by altering the histone H3/H4 sequences.

  6. Microbial contamination of fuel ethanol fermentations.

    PubMed

    Beckner, M; Ivey, M L; Phister, T G

    2011-10-01

    Microbial contamination is a pervasive problem in any ethanol fermentation system. These infections can at minimum affect the efficiency of the fermentation and at their worse lead to stuck fermentations causing plants to shut down for cleaning before beginning anew. These delays can result in costly loss of time as well as lead to an increased cost of the final product. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are the most common bacterial contaminants found in ethanol production facilities and have been linked to decreased ethanol production during fermentation. Lactobacillus sp. generally predominant as these bacteria are well adapted for survival under high ethanol, low pH and low oxygen conditions found during fermentation. It has been generally accepted that lactobacilli cause inhibition of Saccharomyces sp. and limit ethanol production through two basic methods; either production of lactic and acetic acids or through competition for nutrients. However, a number of researchers have demonstrated that these mechanisms may not completely account for the amount of loss observed and have suggested other means by which bacteria can inhibit yeast growth and ethanol production. While LAB are the primary contaminates of concern in industrial ethanol fermentations, wild yeast may also affect the productivity of these fermentations. Though many yeast species have the ability to thrive in a fermentation environment, Dekkera bruxellensis has been repeatedly targeted and cited as one of the main contaminant yeasts in ethanol production. Though widely studied for its detrimental effects on wine, the specific species-species interactions between D. bruxellensis and S. cerevisiae are still poorly understood.

  7. [Effects of catalase activators and inhibitors on ethanol pharmacokinetic characteristics and ethanol and aldehyde-metabolizing enzyme activities in the rat liver and brain].

    PubMed

    Bardina, L R; Pron'ko, P S; Satanovskaia, V I; Alieva, E V

    2010-01-01

    The effects of catalase regulators (aminotriazole, lead acetate, taurine, di-2-ethylhexylphthalate) on the preference for ethanol, its pharmacokinetics, and activities of rat liver and brain ethanol and acetaldehyde-metabolizing enzymes were studied. Lead acetate (100 mg/kg, i.p., 7 days), aminotriazole (1 g/kg, i.p., 7 days), and taurine (650 mg/kg, i.g., 14 days) decreased ethanol consumption under conditions of free choice (10% ethanol water), whereas di-2-ethylhexylphthalate (300 mg/kg, i.g., 7 days) did not exert any effect on this parameter. Taurine, lead acetate and di-2-ethylhexylphthalate significantly activated liver ADH, MEOS and catalase peroxidase activity. Aminotriazole also activated ADH and MEOS, but inhibited liver catalase. The activities of liver and brain A1DH as well as catalase were insignificantly changed by this treatment. The 7-day administration of lead acetate, di-2-ethylhexylphthalate and aminotriazole administrations significantly influenced the ethanol (2 g/kg., i.p.) pharmacokinetic parameters: the area under the pharmacokinetic curve and the elimination half-life time were significantly reduced, whereas the elimination constant and clearance were increased. This unequivocally indicates accelerated ethanol elimination. The 14-day ingestion of taurine insignificantly changed the parameters of ethanol pharmacokinetics in rats.

  8. Lactate and lactate clearance in acute cardiac care patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Picariello, Claudio; Dini, Carlotta Sorini; Gensini, Gian Franco; Valente, Serafina

    2012-01-01

    Hyperlactataemia is commonly used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in intensive care settings. Recent studies documented that serial lactate measurements over time (or lactate clearance), may be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value for risk stratification in different pathological conditions. While the negative prognostic role of hyperlactataemia in several critical ill diseases (such as sepsis and trauma) is well established, data in patients with acute cardiac conditions (i.e. acute coronary syndromes) are scarce and controversial. The present paper provides an overview of the current available evidence on the clinical role of lactic acid levels and lactate clearance in acute cardiac settings (acute coronary syndromes, cardiogenic shock, cardiac surgery), focusing on its prognostic role. PMID:24062898

  9. Biological production of ethanol fom coal. [Quarterly report], December 22, 1991--March 21, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Research is continuing in an attempt to increase both the ethanol concentration and product ratio using C. ljungdahlii. The purpose of this report is to present data (acetate to ethanol) utilizing a medium prepared especially for C. ljungdahlii. Medium development studies are presented, as well as reactor studies with the new medium in batch reactors. Continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with cell recycle. The use of this new medium has resulted in significant improvements in cell concentration, ethanol concentration and product ratio.

  10. Selection of a Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Strain with a Decreased Ability To Produce Acetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Margolles, Abelardo

    2012-01-01

    We have characterized a new strain, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis CECT 7953, obtained by random UV mutagenesis, which produces less acetic acid than the wild type (CECT 7954) in three different experimental settings: De Man-Rogosa-Sharpe broth without sodium acetate, resting cells, and skim milk. Genome sequencing revealed a single Phe-Ser substitution in the acetate kinase gene product that seems to be responsible for the strain's reduced acid production. Accordingly, acetate kinase specific activity was lower in the low acetate producer. Strain CECT 7953 produced less acetate, less ethanol, and more yoghourt-related volatile compounds in skim milk than the wild type did. Thus, CECT 7953 shows promising potential for the development of dairy products fermented exclusively by a bifidobacterial strain. PMID:22389372

  11. Selection of a Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strain with a decreased ability to produce acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2012-05-01

    We have characterized a new strain, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis CECT 7953, obtained by random UV mutagenesis, which produces less acetic acid than the wild type (CECT 7954) in three different experimental settings: De Man-Rogosa-Sharpe broth without sodium acetate, resting cells, and skim milk. Genome sequencing revealed a single Phe-Ser substitution in the acetate kinase gene product that seems to be responsible for the strain's reduced acid production. Accordingly, acetate kinase specific activity was lower in the low acetate producer. Strain CECT 7953 produced less acetate, less ethanol, and more yoghourt-related volatile compounds in skim milk than the wild type did. Thus, CECT 7953 shows promising potential for the development of dairy products fermented exclusively by a bifidobacterial strain.

  12. Quantitative analysis of intermediary metabolism in rat hepatocytes incubated in the presence and absence of ethanol with a substrate mixture including ketoleucine.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, J M; Blum, J J

    1989-02-15

    Hepatocytes isolated from livers of fed rats were incubated with a mixture of glucose (10 mM), ribose (1.0 mM), acetate (1.25 mM), alanine (3.5 mM), glutamate (2.0 mM), aspartate (2.0 mM), 4-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid (ketoleucine) (3.0 mM), and, in paired flasks, 10 mM-ethanol. One substrate was 14C-radiolabelled in any given incubation. Incorporation of 14C into glucose, glycogen, CO2, lactate, alanine, aspartate, glutamate, acetate, urea, lipid glycerol, fatty acids and the 1- and 2,3,4-positions of ketone bodies was measured after 20 and 40 min of incubation under quasi-steady-state conditions. Data were analysed with the aid of a realistic structural metabolic model. In each of the four conditions examined, there were approx. 77 label incorporation measurements and several measurements of changes in metabolite concentrations. The considerable excess of measurements over the 37 independent flux parameters allowed for a stringent test of the model. A satisfactory fit to these data was obtained for each condition. There were large bidirectional fluxes along the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways, with net gluconeogenesis. Rates of ureagenesis, oxygen consumption and ketogenesis were high under all four conditions studied. Oxygen utilization was accurately predicted by three of the four models. There was complete equilibration between mitochondrial and cytosolic pools of acetate and of CO2, but for several of the metabolic conditions, two incompletely equilibrated pools of mitochondrial acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate were required. Ketoleucine was utilized at a rate comparable to that reported by others in perfused liver and entered the mitochondrial pool of acetyl-CoA directly associated with ketone body formation. Ethanol, which was metabolized at rates comparable to those in vivo, caused relatively few changes in overall flux patterns. Several effects related to the increased NADH/NAD+ ratio were observed. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was completely inhibited and the ratio

  13. Interaction of ethanol and the organophosphorus insecticide parathion.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, J A; Sultatos, L G

    1995-11-27

    Phosphorothioate insecticides such as parathion (O,O-diethyl-O-p-nitrophenyl phosphorothioate) undergo P450-dependent oxidative desulfuration, leading to both activation and detoxification of these compounds. Consequently, alterations in P450-dependent oxidative desulfuration may affect the acute toxicities of these insecticides. In the present study, pretreatment of mice with 15% ethanol in the drinking water for 6 days antagonized the acute toxicity of parathion, but not its toxic metabolite paraoxon (O,O-diethyl-O-p-nitrophenyl phosphate), suggesting that ethanol affected the oxidative desulfuration of this insecticide. The presence of ethanol within hepatic microsomal incubations did not alter the P450-dependent formation of paraoxon (activation) and p-nitrophenol (detoxification), although p-nitrophenol levels were increased in the presence of ethanol as a result of inhibition of its biotransformation to 4-nitrocatechol by CYP2E1. Ethanol exposure reduced hepatic pyruvate levels, but had no effect on levels of lactate, isocitrate, alpha-ketoglutarate, and malate. Calculation of cytosolic NAD+/NADH and cytosolic NADP+/NADPH redox ratios did not reveal any detectable difference in redox state between control and ethanol-treated mice. Since ethanol did not alter directly the P450-dependent activation or detoxification of parathion, and did not decrease NADPH levels, ethanol's antagonism of the acute toxicity of parathion may result from reduced availability of O2.

  14. Characterization of acetic acid bacteria in "traditional balsamic vinegar".

    PubMed

    Gullo, Maria; Caggia, Cinzia; De Vero, Luciana; Giudici, Paolo

    2006-02-01

    This study evaluated the glucose tolerance of acetic acid bacteria strains isolated from Traditional Balsamic Vinegar. The results showed that the greatest hurdle to acetic acid bacteria growth is the high sugar concentration, since the majority of the isolated strains are inhibited by 25% of glucose. Sugar tolerance is an important technological trait because Traditional Balsamic Vinegar is made with concentrated cooked must. On the contrary, ethanol concentration of the cooked and fermented must is less significant for acetic acid bacteria growth. A tentative identification of the isolated strains was done by 16S-23S-5S rDNA PCR/RFLP technique and the isolated strains were clustered: 32 strains belong to Gluconacetobacter xylinus group, two strains to Acetobacter pasteurianus group and one to Acetobacter aceti.

  15. Syntrophic Degradation of Lactate in Methanogenic Co-cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Birte; Stahl, David

    2010-05-17

    In environments where the amount of the inorganic electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, sulfate, sulfur oroxidized metal ions (Fe3+;Mn4+) is insufficient for complete breakdown of organic matter, methane is formed as the major reduced end product. In such methanogenic environments organic acids are degraded by syntrophic associations of fermenting, acetogenic bacteria (e.g., sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) as"secondary fermenters") and methanogenic archaea. In these consortia, the conversion of lactate to acetate, CO2 and methane depends on the cooperating activities of both metabolically distinct microbial groups that are tightly linked by the need to maintain the exchanged metabolites (hydrogenandformate) at very low concentrations.

  16. Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biologic...

  17. Acamprosate {monocalcium bis(3-acetamidopropane-1-sulfonate)} reduces ethanol-drinking behavior in rats and glutamate-induced toxicity in ethanol-exposed primary rat cortical neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Oka, Michiko; Hirouchi, Masaaki; Tamura, Masaru; Sugahara, Seishi; Oyama, Tatsuya

    2013-10-15

    Acamprosate, the calcium salt of bis(3-acetamidopropane-1-sulfonate), contributes to the maintenance of abstinence in alcohol-dependent patients, but its mechanism of action in the central nervous system is unclear. Here, we report the effect of acamprosate on ethanol-drinking behavior in standard laboratory Wistar rats, including voluntary ethanol consumption and the ethanol-deprivation effect. After forced ethanol consumption arranged by the provision of only one drinking bottle containing 10% ethanol, the rats were given a choice between two drinking bottles, one containing water and the other containing 10% ethanol. In rats selected for high ethanol preference, repeated oral administration of acamprosate diminished voluntary ethanol drinking. After three months of continuous access to two bottles, rats were deprived of ethanol for three days and then presented with two bottles again. After ethanol deprivation, ethanol preference was increased, and the increase was largely abolished by acamprosate. After exposure of primary neuronal cultures of rat cerebral cortex to ethanol for four days, neurotoxicity, as measured by the extracellular leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), was induced by incubation with glutamate for 1h followed by incubation in the absence of ethanol for 24h. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blocker 5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]-cyclohepten-5,10-imine, the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 antagonist 6-methyl-2-(phenylethynyl)pyridine and the voltage-gated calcium-channel blocker nifedipine all inhibited glutamate-induced LDH leakage from ethanol-exposed neurons. Acamprosate inhibited the glutamate-induced LDH leakage from ethanol-exposed neurons more strongly than that from intact neurons. In conclusion, acamprosate showed effective reduction of drinking behavior in rats and protected ethanol-exposed neurons by multiple blocking of glutamate signaling.

  18. 21 CFR 73.165 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferrous lactate. 73.165 Section 73.165 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.165 Ferrous lactate. (a) Identity. The color additive ferrous lactate is the ferrous lactate defined in § 184.1311 of this chapter. (b) Specifications. Ferrous...

  19. 21 CFR 73.165 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferrous lactate. 73.165 Section 73.165 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.165 Ferrous lactate. (a) Identity. The color additive ferrous lactate is the ferrous lactate defined in § 184.1311 of this chapter. (b) Specifications. Ferrous...

  20. 21 CFR 73.165 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferrous lactate. 73.165 Section 73.165 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.165 Ferrous lactate. (a) Identity. The color additive ferrous lactate is the ferrous lactate defined in § 184.1311 of this chapter. (b) Specifications. Ferrous...

  1. 21 CFR 73.165 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferrous lactate. 73.165 Section 73.165 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.165 Ferrous lactate. (a) Identity. The color additive ferrous lactate is the ferrous lactate defined in § 184.1311 of this chapter. (b) Specifications. Ferrous...

  2. 21 CFR 73.165 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferrous lactate. 73.165 Section 73.165 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.165 Ferrous lactate. (a) Identity. The color additive ferrous lactate is the ferrous lactate defined in § 184.1311 of this chapter. (b) Specifications. Ferrous...

  3. Kansas Ethanol Lyons Approval

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This update August 9, 2016 letter from EPA approves, with modifications, the petition from Kansas Ethanol, LLC, Lyons facility, regarding non-grandfathered ethanol produced through a dry mill process, qualifying under the Clean Air Act for renewable fuel

  4. Blood flow and nutrient exchange across the liver and gut of the dairy cow. Effects of lactation and fasting.

    PubMed

    Lomax, M A; Baird, G D

    1983-05-01

    The rate of blood flow in the portal and hepatic veins, and the net exchange across the gut and liver of volatile fatty acids (VFA), glucose, lactate, pyruvate, amino acids, ketone bodies, glycerol, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and oxygen, were measured in lactating and non-lactating cows (a) in the normal, fed state and (b) before, during and after 6 d of fasting. Blood flow rate through the liver was 52% higher in normal, fed, lactating cows as compared with non-lactating cows, and was decreased by fasting in both groups of cows. Portal blood flow rate increased with an increase in metabolizable energy (ME) intake. Lactating, as compared with non-lactating, cows exhibited lower arterial concentrations of glucose and lactate, higher net portal outputs of VFA and ketone bodies, a higher net hepatic output of glucose, and higher net hepatic uptake of propionate and lactate. The splanchnic outputs of acetate, glucose and hydroxybutyrate were all apparently greater in the lactating cows. Fasting caused a rapid decrease in the blood concentrations of the VFA and an increase in those of glycerol and NEFA. The portal, i.e. gut, outputs of VFA, lactate, ketone bodies, alanine and (serine + threonine), and the portal uptake of O2, were all decreased by fasting. Fasting for 6 h also decreased the hepatic output of glucose and acetate by 77 and 95% respectively, increased the hepatic uptake of pyruvate, glycerol and NEFA, and doubled hepatic ketone-body output. The splanchnic output of acetate and glucose and the splanchnic uptake of O2 were also decreased by fasting. The net portal outputs of VFA, lactate and hydroxybutyrate, and the net hepatic output of glucose, were all correlated with ME intake in fed and fasted cows. Hepatic glucose output was also correlated with milk yield. The net hepatic uptake of gluconeogenic precursors measured in this study could account for net hepatic glucose output in the fasted cows, but not in the fed cows. The net hepatic uptake of

  5. Anaphylactoid reaction to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Kelso, J M; Keating, M U; Squillace, D L; O'Connell, E J; Yunginger, J W; Sachs, M I

    1990-05-01

    We studied a 14-year-old boy who developed a pruritic rash and facial swelling after ingestion of beer or wine. A blinded challenge with purified ethanol was positive demonstrating ethanol itself to be the offending agent. An IgE-mediated reaction to ethanol or one of its metabolites as a hapten is possible, or the reaction may involve unusual metabolism of ethanol with accumulation of acetaldehyde and/or direct mast cell degranulation.

  6. [Plasma clearance of ethanol and its excretion in the milk of rural women who consume pulque].

    PubMed

    Argote-Espinosa, R M; Flores-Huerta, S; Hernández-Montes, H; Villalpando-Hernández, S

    1992-01-01

    Women from rural areas of the central plateau of Mexico drink during pregnancy and lactation a mild alcoholic beverage called pulque as a galactogogue. Ethanol present in milk could have a harmful effect on growth and development of breast-fed children. The purpose of this study was to quantify the ethanol consumed as pulque by eleven lactating rural women as well as its clearance rate in blood and milk. Mothers were separated in two groups depending upon the ethanol ingested in a single dose of pulque 0.21 +/- 0.08 g/kg of body weight (group A) and 0.44 +/- 0.11 g/kg (group B). Maximal concentration of ethanol was reached in milk at 60 minutes and almost equaled that in plasma. Both groups showed a similar clearance pattern regardless of the volume of pulque ingested. Clearance rates between groups were different: ethanol concentration in milk at 60 min were 8.4 +/- 3.0 mg/dL for group A and 26.2 +/- 7.0 mg/dL for group B. Two hours later ethanol levels were 3.6 +/- 3.4 mg/dL and 23.3 +/- 9.4 mg/dL respectively. Clearance rates were slower in mothers showing the highest concentration of ethanol in milk. The present data demonstrate that there is no differential elimination of ethanol in maternal blood and milk following ingestion of a moderate amount of pulque during lactation. The amount of ethanol received by infants through milk is relatively low and therefore it is unlikely to have harmful effects on them. Pulque consumption adds about 350 kcal/day to the customary dietary intake of these lactating women.

  7. Improvement of acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a zinc-finger-based artificial transcription factor and identification of novel genes involved in acetic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cui; Wei, Xiaowen; Sun, Cuihuan; Zhang, Fei; Xu, Jianren; Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu

    2015-03-01

    Acetic acid is present in cellulosic hydrolysate as a potent inhibitor, and the superior acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ensures good cell viability and efficient ethanol production when cellulosic raw materials are used as substrates. In this study, a mutant strain of S. cerevisiae ATCC4126 (Sc4126-M01) with improved acetic acid tolerance was obtained through screening strains transformed with an artificial zinc finger protein transcription factor (ZFP-TF) library. Further analysis indicated that improved acetic acid tolerance was associated with improved catalase (CAT) activity. The ZFP coding sequence associated with the improved phenotype was identified, and real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that three of the possible genes involved in the enhanced acetic acid tolerance regulated by this ZFP-TF, namely YFL040W, QDR3, and IKS1, showed decreased transcription levels in Sc4126-M01 in the presence of acetic acid, compared to those in the control strain. Sc4126-M01 mutants having QDR3 and IKS1 deletion (ΔQDR3 and ΔIKS1) exhibited higher acetic acid tolerance than the wild-type strain under acetic acid treatment. Glucose consumption rate and ethanol productivity in the presence of 5 g/L acetic acid were improved in the ΔQDR3 mutant compared to the wild-type strain. Our studies demonstrated that the synthetic ZFP-TF library can be used to improve acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae and that the employment of an artificial transcription factor can facilitate the exploration of novel functional genes involved in stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae.

  8. Acetate Kinase Isozymes Confer Robustness in Acetate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Siu Hung Joshua; Nørregaard, Lasse; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2014-01-01

    Acetate kinase (ACK) (EC no: 2.7.2.1) interconverts acetyl-phosphate and acetate to either catabolize or synthesize acetyl-CoA dependent on the metabolic requirement. Among all ACK entries available in UniProt, we found that around 45% are multiple ACKs in some organisms including more than 300 species but surprisingly, little work has been done to clarify whether this has any significance. In an attempt to gain further insight we have studied the two ACKs (AckA1, AckA2) encoded by two neighboring genes conserved in Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) by analyzing protein sequences, characterizing transcription structure, determining enzyme characteristics and effect on growth physiology. The results show that the two ACKs are most likely individually transcribed. AckA1 has a much higher turnover number and AckA2 has a much higher affinity for acetate in vitro. Consistently, growth experiments of mutant strains reveal that AckA1 has a higher capacity for acetate production which allows faster growth in an environment with high acetate concentration. Meanwhile, AckA2 is important for fast acetate-dependent growth at low concentration of acetate. The results demonstrate that the two ACKs have complementary physiological roles in L. lactis to maintain a robust acetate metabolism for fast growth at different extracellular acetate concentrations. The existence of ACK isozymes may reflect a common evolutionary strategy in bacteria in an environment with varying concentrations of acetate. PMID:24638105

  9. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  10. Lipid-enhanced ethanol production from xylose by Pachysolen tannophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Dekker, R.F.H.

    1986-04-01

    A number of different yeasts are now recognized as being capable of fermenting the pentose sugar, D-xylose, into ethanol. The most prominent among these are Pachysolen tannophilus and several Candida species. D-Xylose is found principally in lignocellulosic materials where it occurs as the main constitutent of the hemicellulosic xylans (1,4-..beta..-D-heteroxylans). With the exception of Candida XF-217, the conversion yields of xylose into ethanol for most yeasts were generally low (less than 70% of theoretical when grown on at least 50 g/l xylose). The low ethanol yields are attributable to a number of factors: 1) fermentation was not performed under conditions that maximize ethanol formation; 2) ethanol was not the major fermentation end-product, (e.g., acetic acid xylitol, and arabinitol are also known products, 3) ethanol toxicity; 4) ethanol is assimilated when the substrate becomes limiting; 4.8 and 5) osmotic sensitivity to high substrate levels, i.e. substrate inhibition. Attempts to increase ethanol yields of yeasts by adding exogenous lipids (e.g., oleic and linoleic acids, or ergosterol or its ester, lipid mixtures, or protein-lipid mixtures) to nutrient medium have succeeded in improving ethanol yields and also in reducing fermentation times. These lipids, when added to the nutrient medium, were incorporated into the yeast's cellular membrane. The protective action of these lipids was to alleviate the inhibitory effect of ethanol which then allowed the cells to tolerate higher ethanol levels. This communication reports on improved ethanol yields arising from the fermentation of xylose by a Pachysolen tannophilus strain when grown semi-aerobically in the presence of exogenous-added lipids. 17 references.

  11. L-Lactic acid production from glycerol coupled with acetic acid metabolism by Enterococcus faecalis without carbon loss.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Nao; Oba, Mana; Iwamoto, Mariko; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Noguchi, Takuya; Bonkohara, Kaori; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed Ali; Zendo, Takeshi; Shimoda, Mitsuya; Sakai, Kenji; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol is a by-product in the biodiesel production process and considered as one of the prospective carbon sources for microbial fermentation including lactic acid fermentation, which has received considerable interest due to its potential application. Enterococcus faecalis isolated in our laboratory produced optically pure L-lactic acid from glycerol in the presence of acetic acid. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis using [1, 2-(13)C2] acetic acid proved that the E. faecalis strain QU 11 was capable of converting acetic acid to ethanol during lactic acid fermentation of glycerol. This indicated that strain QU 11 restored the redox balance by oxidizing excess NADH though acetic acid metabolism, during ethanol production, which resulted in lactic acid production from glycerol. The effects of pH control and substrate concentration on lactic acid fermentation were also investigated. Glycerol and acetic acid concentrations of 30 g/L and 10 g/L, respectively, were expected to be appropriate for lactic acid fermentation of glycerol by strain QU 11 at a pH of 6.5. Furthermore, fed-batch fermentation with 30 g/L glycerol and 10 g/L acetic acid wholly exhibited the best performance including lactic acid production (55.3 g/L), lactic acid yield (0.991 mol-lactic acid/mol-glycerol), total yield [1.08 mol-(lactic acid and ethanol)]/mol-(glycerol and acetic acid)], and total carbon yield [1.06 C-mol-(lactic acid and ethanol)/C-mol-(glycerol and acetic acid)] of lactic acid and ethanol. In summary, the strain QU 11 successfully produced lactic acid from glycerol with acetic acid metabolism, and an efficient fermentation system was established without carbon loss.

  12. Microbiosensor for the detection of acetate in electrode-respiring biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Atci, Erhan; Babauta, Jerome T.; Sultana, Sujala T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a microbiosensor to measure acetate concentration profiles inside biofilms in situ. The working principle of the microbiosensor was based on the correlation between the acetate concentration and the current generated during acetate oxidation by Geobacter sulfurreducens. The microbiosensor consisted of a 30-μm carbon microelectrode with an open tip as a working electrode, with G. sulfurreducens biofilm on the tip and a pseudo Ag/AgCl reference electrode, all enclosed in a glass outer case with a 30-μm tip diameter. The microbiosensor showed a linear response in the 0–1.6 mM acetate concentration range with a 79 ± 8 μM limit of detection (S/N=2). We quantified the stirring effect and found it negligible. However, the interfering effect of alternative electron donors (lactate, formate, pyruvate, or hydrogen) was found to be significant. The usefulness of the acetate microbiosensor was demonstrated by measuring acetate concentration depth profiles within a G. sulfurreducens biofilm. The acetate concentration remained at bulk values throughout the biofilm when no current was passed, but it decreased from the bulk values to below the detection limit within 200 μm when current was allowed to pass. The zero acetate concentration at the bottom of the biofilm showed that the biofilm was acetate-limited. PMID:27016913

  13. Effects of Oxygen Availability on Acetic Acid Tolerance and Intracellular pH in Dekkera bruxellensis

    PubMed Central

    Capusoni, Claudia; Arioli, Stefania; Zambelli, Paolo; Moktaduzzaman, M.; Mora, Diego

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis, associated with wine and beer production, has recently received attention, because its high ethanol and acid tolerance enables it to compete with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in distilleries that produce fuel ethanol. We investigated how different cultivation conditions affect the acetic acid tolerance of D. bruxellensis. We analyzed the ability of two strains (CBS 98 and CBS 4482) exhibiting different degrees of tolerance to grow in the presence of acetic acid under aerobic and oxygen-limited conditions. We found that the concomitant presence of acetic acid and oxygen had a negative effect on D. bruxellensis growth. In contrast, incubation under oxygen-limited conditions resulted in reproducible growth kinetics that exhibited a shorter adaptive phase and higher growth rates than those with cultivation under aerobic conditions. This positive effect was more pronounced in CBS 98, the more-sensitive strain. Cultivation of CBS 98 cells under oxygen-limited conditions improved their ability to restore their intracellular pH upon acetic acid exposure and to reduce the oxidative damage to intracellular macromolecules caused by the presence of acetic acid. This study reveals an important role of oxidative stress in acetic acid tolerance in D. bruxellensis, indicating that reduced oxygen availability can protect against the damage caused by the presence of acetic acid. This aspect is important for optimizing industrial processes performed in the presence of acetic acid. IMPORTANCE This study reveals an important role of oxidative stress in acetic acid tolerance in D. bruxellensis, indicating that reduced oxygen availability can have a protective role against the damage caused by the presence of acetic acid. This aspect is important for the optimization of industrial processes performed in the presence of acetic acid. PMID:27235432

  14. Kallolide A acetate pyrazoline.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Escudero, Idaliz; Marrero, Jeffrey; Rodríguez, Abimael D

    2012-01-01

    IN THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF KALLOLIDE A ACETATE PYRAZOLINE [SYSTEMATIC NAME: 7-methyl-16-oxo-4,10-bis-(prop-1-en-2-yl)-17,18-dioxa-14,15-diaza-tetra-cyclo-[9.4.2.1(6,9).0(1,12)]octa-deca-6,8,14-trien-5-yl acetate], C(23)H(28)N(2)O(5), there is a 12-member-ed carbon macrocyclic structure. In addition, there is a tris-ubstituted furan ring, an approximately planar γ-lactone ring [maximum deviation of 0.057 (3) Å] and a pyraz-oline ring, the latter in an envelope conformation. The pyrazoline and the γ-lactone rings are fused in a cis configuration. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by weak C-H⋯O inter-actions, forming a two-dimensional network parallel to (001). An intra-molecular C-H⋯O hydrogen bond is also present.

  15. Kallolide A acetate pyrazoline

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Escudero, Idaliz; Marrero, Jeffrey; Rodríguez, Abimael D.

    2012-01-01

    In the crystal structure of kallolide A acetate pyrazoline [systematic name: 7-methyl-16-oxo-4,10-bis­(prop-1-en-2-yl)-17,18-dioxa-14,15-diaza­tetra­cyclo­[9.4.2.16,9.01,12]octa­deca-6,8,14-trien-5-yl acetate], C23H28N2O5, there is a 12-member­ed carbon macrocyclic structure. In addition, there is a tris­ubstituted furan ring, an approximately planar γ-lactone ring [maximum deviation of 0.057 (3) Å] and a pyraz­oline ring, the latter in an envelope conformation. The pyrazoline and the γ-lactone rings are fused in a cis configuration. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by weak C—H⋯O inter­actions, forming a two-dimensional network parallel to (001). An intra­molecular C—H⋯O hydrogen bond is also present. PMID:22259545

  16. Influence of the presence of Zymomonas anaerobia on the conversion of cellobiose, glucose, and xylose to ethanol by Clostridium saccharolyticum

    SciTech Connect

    Asther, M.; Khan, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    To convert sugar mixtures containing cellobiose, glucose, and xylose to ethanol in a single step, the possibility of using a coculture consisting of Clostridium saccharolyticum and Zymomonas anaerobia was studied. In monoculture, C. saccharolyticum utilized all three sugars; however, it preferentially utilized glucose and produced acetic acid in addition to ethanol. The formation of acetic acid from the metabolism of glucose inhibited the growth of C. saccharolyticum and, consequently, the utilization of cellobiose and xylose. In monoculture, Z. anaerobia utilized glucose at a rate of 50 g/L day, but it did not ferment cellobiose or xylose. In coculture, Z. anaerobia converted most of the glucose to ethanol during the lag phase of growth of C. saccharolyticum, which then converted cellobiose and xylose to ethanol. The use of this coculture increased both the rate and the efficiency of the conversion of these three sugars to ethanol, and produced relatively small amounts of acetic acid.

  17. Nutritional aspects of human lactation*

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, A. M.; Black, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the incidence and duration of breast-feeding in various countries, the volume and composition of breast milk, the health and nutrition of breast-fed babies as judged by growth and morbidity, maternal nutritional requirements during lactation, and the effect of prolonged lactation on maternal health. It appears that lactation can be as well sustained by impoverished as by affluent mothers, and that even in communities where malnutrition is common the average growth of infants is satisfactory up to the age of about 3 months on a diet of breast milk alone. Breast milk appears to have specific anti-infective properties, but prolonged breast-feeding will not prevent infections among older infants reared in a poor environment. The authors believe that breast-feeding is the best form of nutrition for the young infant and deplore its decline in modern industrial societies. The recommendations of various FAO/WHO Expert Groups on nutritional intakes during lactation are summarized. The need for an increased daily energy intake of 4.2 MJ (1 000 kcal) is questioned, and an increase of 2.5 MJ (600 kcal) is suggested. Data on the effect of prolonged lactation on the health of the mother are scanty; body weight appears to be maintained even among poorly nourished mothers. The authors stress the need for well-planned and technically adequate studies of the material and psychological factors involved in breast feeding. PMID:816479

  18. Analysis of performance losses of direct ethanol fuel cells with the aid of a reference electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangchun; Pickup, Peter G.

    The performances of direct ethanol fuel cells with different anode catalysts, different ethanol concentrations, and at different operating temperatures have been studied. The performance losses of the cell have been separated into individual electrode performance losses with the aid of a reference electrode, ethanol crossover has been quantified, and CO 2 and acetic acid production have been measured by titration. It has been shown that the cell performance strongly depends on the anode catalyst, ethanol concentration, and operating temperature. It was found that the cathode and anode exhibit different dependences on ethanol concentration and operating temperature. The performance of the cathode is very sensitive to the rate of ethanol crossover. Product analysis provides insights into the mechanisms of electro-oxidation of ethanol.

  19. Fermentation of sugars in orange peel hydrolysates to ethanol by recombinant Escherichia coli KO11

    SciTech Connect

    Grohmann, K.; Cameron, R.G.; Buslig, B.S.

    1995-12-31

    The conversion of monosaccharides in orange peel hydrolysates to ethanol by recombinant Escherichia coli KO11 has been investigated in pH-controlled batch fermentations at 32 and 37{degrees}C. pH values and concentration of peel hydrolysate were varied to determine approximate optimal conditions and limitations of these fermentations. Very high yields of ethanol were achieved by this microorganism at reasonable ethanol concentrations (28-48 g/L). The pH range between 5.8 and 6.2 appears to be optimal. The microorganism can convert all major monosaccharides in orange peel hydrolysates to ethanol and to smaller amounts of acetic and lactic acids. Acetic acid is coproduced in equimolar amounts with ethanol by catabolism of salts of galacturonic acid.

  20. Production of ethanol from corn stover hemicellulose hydrolyzate using Pichia stipitis.

    PubMed

    Agbogbo, Frank K; Wenger, Kevin S

    2007-11-01

    Hemicellulose liquid hydrolyzate from dilute acid pretreated corn stover was fermented to ethanol using Pichia stipitis CBS 6054. The fermentation rate increased with aeration but the pH also increased due to consumption of acetic acid by Pichia stipitis. Hemicellulose hydrolyzate containing 34 g/L xylose, 8 g/L glucose, 8 g/L Acetic acid, 0.73 g/L furfural, and 1 g/L hydroxymethyl furfural was fermented to 15 g/L ethanol in 72 h. The yield in all the hemicellulose hydrolyzates was 0.37-0.44 g ethanol/g (glucose + xylose). Nondetoxified hemicellulose hydrolyzate from dilute acid pretreated corn stover was fermented to ethanol with high yields, and this has the potential to improve the economics of the biomass to ethanol process.

  1. Alcohol causes a fatty pancreas. A rat model of ethanol-induced pancreatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J S; Colley, P W; Sosula, L; Pirola, R C; Chapman, B A; Somer, J B

    1982-01-01

    To develop an animal mode of alcoholic pancreatic steatosis, female Wistar rats were pair fed liquid diets, containing ethanol as 36% of calories or an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate for 3 weeks. Electron microscopic examination showed lipid vesicles localized principally at the bases of pancreatic acinar cells in the ethanol-fed rats. Ethanol feeding significantly increased pancreatic content of cholesteryl ester without changing levels of other lipids. Ethanol feeding enhanced labeled acetate, palmitate, oleate, and linoleate incorporation into cholesteryl ester. Therefore, increased esterification of cholesterol may, in part, explain the observed accumulation of cholesteryl ester.

  2. Improved Acetic Acid Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Overexpression of the WHI2 Gene Identified through Inverse Metabolic Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingying; Stabryla, Lisa; Wei, Na

    2016-01-29

    Development of acetic acid-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for economically viable production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, but the goal remains a critical challenge due to limited information on effective genetic perturbation targets for improving acetic acid resistance in the yeast. This study employed a genomic-library-based inverse metabolic engineering approach to successfully identify a novel gene target, WHI2 (encoding a cytoplasmatic globular scaffold protein), which elicited improved acetic acid resistance in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of WHI2 significantly improved glucose and/or xylose fermentation under acetic acid stress in engineered yeast. The WHI2-overexpressing strain had 5-times-higher specific ethanol productivity than the control in glucose fermentation with acetic acid. Analysis of the expression of WHI2 gene products (including protein and transcript) determined that acetic acid induced endogenous expression of Whi2 in S. cerevisiae. Meanwhile, the whi2Δ mutant strain had substantially higher susceptibility to acetic acid than the wild type, suggesting the important role of Whi2 in the acetic acid response in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, overexpression of WHI2 and of a cognate phosphatase gene, PSR1, had a synergistic effect in improving acetic acid resistance, suggesting that Whi2 might function in combination with Psr1 to elicit the acetic acid resistance mechanism. These results improve our understanding of the yeast response to acetic acid stress and provide a new strategy to breed acetic acid-resistant yeast strains for renewable biofuel production.

  3. Improved Acetic Acid Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Overexpression of the WHI2 Gene Identified through Inverse Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingying; Stabryla, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Development of acetic acid-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for economically viable production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, but the goal remains a critical challenge due to limited information on effective genetic perturbation targets for improving acetic acid resistance in the yeast. This study employed a genomic-library-based inverse metabolic engineering approach to successfully identify a novel gene target, WHI2 (encoding a cytoplasmatic globular scaffold protein), which elicited improved acetic acid resistance in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of WHI2 significantly improved glucose and/or xylose fermentation under acetic acid stress in engineered yeast. The WHI2-overexpressing strain had 5-times-higher specific ethanol productivity than the control in glucose fermentation with acetic acid. Analysis of the expression of WHI2 gene products (including protein and transcript) determined that acetic acid induced endogenous expression of Whi2 in S. cerevisiae. Meanwhile, the whi2Δ mutant strain had substantially higher susceptibility to acetic acid than the wild type, suggesting the important role of Whi2 in the acetic acid response in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, overexpression of WHI2 and of a cognate phosphatase gene, PSR1, had a synergistic effect in improving acetic acid resistance, suggesting that Whi2 might function in combination with Psr1 to elicit the acetic acid resistance mechanism. These results improve our understanding of the yeast response to acetic acid stress and provide a new strategy to breed acetic acid-resistant yeast strains for renewable biofuel production. PMID:26826231

  4. Aqueous-phase hydrogenation of acetic acid over transition metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Olcay, Hakan; Xu, Lijun; Xu, Ye; Huber, George

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of acetic acid to ethanol has been carried out in aqueous phase on several metals, with ruthenium being the most active and selective. DFT calculations suggest that the initial CO bond scission yielding acetyl is the key step and that the intrinsic reactivity of the metals accounts for the observed activity.

  5. Body fat mobilization in early lactation influences methane production of dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Bielak, A.; Derno, M.; Tuchscherer, A.; Hammon, H. M.; Susenbeth, A.; Kuhla, B.

    2016-01-01

    Long-chain fatty acids mobilized during early lactation of dairy cows are increasingly used as energy substrate at the expense of acetate. As the synthesis of acetate in the rumen is closely linked to methane (CH4) production, we hypothesized that decreased acetate utilization would result in lower ruminal acetate levels and thus CH4 production. Twenty heifers were sampled for blood, rumen fluid and milk, and CH4 production was measured in respiration chambers in week −4, +5, +13 and +42 relative to first parturition. Based on plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration determined in week +5, animals were grouped to the ten highest (HM; NEFA > 580 μmol) and ten lowest (LM; NEFA < 580 μmol) mobilizing cows. Dry matter intake (DMI), milk yield and ruminal short-chain fatty acids did not differ between groups, but CH4/DMI was lower in HM cows in week +5. There was a negative regression between plasma NEFA and plasma acetate, between plasma NEFA and CH4/DMI and between plasma cholecystokinin and CH4/DMI in week +5. Our data show for the first time that fat mobilization of the host in early lactation is inversely related with ruminal CH4 production and that this effect is not attributed to different DMI. PMID:27306038

  6. Transport of lactate and other short-chain monocarboxylates in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Cássio, F; Leão, C; van Uden, N

    1987-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae IGC4072 grown in lactic acid medium transported lactate by an accumulative electroneutral proton-lactate symport with a proton-lactate stoichiometry of 1:1. The accumulation ratio measured with propionate increased with decreasing pH from ca. 24-fold at pH 6.0 to ca. 1,400-fold at pH 3.0. The symport accepted the following monocarboxylates (Km values at 25 degrees C and pH 5.5): D-lactate (0.13 mM), L-lactate (0.13 mM), pyruvate (0.34 mM), propionate (0.09 mM), and acetate (0.05 mM), whereas apparently a different proton symport accepted formate (0.13 mM). The lactate system was inducible and was subject to glucose repression. Undissociated lactic acid entered the cells by simple diffusion. The permeability of the plasma membrane for undissociated lactic acid increased exponentially with pH, and the diffusion constant increased 40-fold when the pH was increased from 3.0 to 6.0. PMID:3034152

  7. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    A batch kinetic study involving Clostridium lungdahlii in a mineral medium was carried out in order to provide baseline data for the effects of nutrients on product ratio and kinetics. The use of this minimal medium containing vitamins, minerals, select amino acids and salts showed both a lower maximum specific growth rate and a lower maximum specific uptake rate than found when using a complex medium supplemented with 0.01% yeast extract. At the same time, the product ratio was improved slightly in favor of ethanol over acetate. Future experiments will measure the effects of ammonia and phosphate limitation on product ratio and process kinetics.

  8. Self-Supported 3D PdCu Alloy Nanosheets as a Bifunctional Catalyst for Electrochemical Reforming of Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaojing; Dai, Lei; Qin, Qing; Pei, Fei; Hu, Chengyi; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2017-03-01

    3D PdCu alloy nanosheets exhibit enhanced electrocatalytic activity toward hydrogen evolution reaction and ethanol oxidation reaction in alkaline media. Simultaneous hydrogen and acetate production via a solar-powered cell for ethanol reforming has been fabricated using the nanosheets as bifunctional electrocatalysts. The device is promising for the production of both hydrogen and value-added chemicals using renewable energy.

  9. Lactate Metabolism is Associated with Mammalian Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Jr; Mahieu, Nathaniel G.; Huang, Xiaojing; Singh, Manmilan; Crawford, Peter A; Johnson, Stephen L.; Gross, Richard W.; Schaefer, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that lactate secreted by fermenting cells can be oxidized or used as a gluconeogenic substrate by other cells and tissues. Within the fermenting cell itself, however, it is generally assumed that lactate is produced to replenish NAD+ and then is secreted. Here we explored the possibility that cytosolic lactate is metabolized by the mitochondria of fermenting mammalian cells. We found that fermenting HeLa and H460 cells utilize exogenous lactate carbon to synthesize a large percentage of their lipids. With high-resolution mass spectrometry, we found that both 13C and 2-2H labels from enriched lactate enter the mitochondria. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) inhibitor oxamate decreased respiration of isolated mitochondria incubated in lactate, but not isolated mitochondria incubated in pyruvate. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that LDHB localizes to the mitochondria. Taken together, our results demonstrate a link between lactate metabolism and the mitochondria of fermenting mammalian cells. PMID:27618187

  10. Targeting lactate metabolism for cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Joanne R.; Cleveland, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Lactate, once considered a waste product of glycolysis, has emerged as a critical regulator of cancer development, maintenance, and metastasis. Indeed, tumor lactate levels correlate with increased metastasis, tumor recurrence, and poor outcome. Lactate mediates cancer cell intrinsic effects on metabolism and has additional non–tumor cell autonomous effects that drive tumorigenesis. Tumor cells can metabolize lactate as an energy source and shuttle lactate to neighboring cancer cells, adjacent stroma, and vascular endothelial cells, which induces metabolic reprogramming. Lactate also plays roles in promoting tumor inflammation and in functioning as a signaling molecule that stimulates tumor angiogenesis. Here we review the mechanisms of lactate production and transport and highlight emerging evidence indicating that targeting lactate metabolism is a promising approach for cancer therapeutics. PMID:23999443

  11. Effect of inhibitors formed during wheat straw pretreatment on ethanol fermentation by Pichia stipitis.

    PubMed

    Bellido, Carolina; Bolado, Silvia; Coca, Mónica; Lucas, Susana; González-Benito, Gerardo; García-Cubero, María Teresa

    2011-12-01

    The inhibitory effect of the main inhibitors (acetic acid, furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural) formed during steam explosion of wheat straw was studied through ethanol fermentations of model substrates and hydrolysates from wheat straw by Pichia stipitis. Experimental results showed that an increase in acetic acid concentration led to a reduction in ethanol productivity and complete inhibition was observed at 3.5 g/L. Furfural produced a delay on sugar consumption rates with increasing concentration and HMF did not exert a significant effect. Fermentations of the whole slurry from steam exploded wheat straw were completely inhibited by a synergistic effect due to the presence of 1.5 g/L acetic acid, 0.15 g/L furfural and 0.05 g/L HMF together with solid fraction. When using only the solid fraction from steam explosion, hydrolysates presented 0.5 g/L of acetic acid, whose fermentations have submitted promising results, providing an ethanol yield of 0.45 g ethanol/g sugars and the final ethanol concentration reached was 12.2 g/L (10.9 g ethanol/100 g DM).

  12. Candida zemplinina can reduce acetic acid produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in sweet wine fermentations.

    PubMed

    Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Dolci, Paola; Giacosa, Simone; Torchio, Fabrizio; Tofalo, Rosanna; Torriani, Sandra; Suzzi, Giovanna; Rolle, Luca; Cocolin, Luca

    2012-03-01

    In this study we investigated the possibility of using Candida zemplinina, as a partner of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in mixed fermentations of must with a high sugar content, in order to reduce its acetic acid production. Thirty-five C. zemplinina strains, which were isolated from different geographic regions, were molecularly characterized, and their fermentation performances were determined. Five genetically different strains were selected for mixed fermentations with S. cerevisiae. Two types of inoculation were carried out: coinoculation and sequential inoculation. A balance between the two species was generally observed for the first 6 days, after which the levels of C. zemplinina started to decrease. Relevant differences were observed concerning the consumption of sugars, the ethanol and glycerol content, and acetic acid production, depending on which strain was used and which type of inoculation was performed. Sequential inoculation led to the reduction of about half of the acetic acid content compared to the pure S. cerevisiae fermentation, but the ethanol and glycerol amounts were also low. A coinoculation with selected combinations of S. cerevisiae and C. zemplinina resulted in a decrease of ~0.3 g of acetic acid/liter, while maintaining high ethanol and glycerol levels. This study demonstrates that mixed S. cerevisiae and C. zemplinina fermentation could be applied in sweet wine fermentation to reduce the production of acetic acid, connected to the S. cerevisiae osmotic stress response.

  13. Ethanol immunosuppression in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.R.

    1986-03-01

    Ethanol in concentrations equivalent to levels achieved by the ingestion of moderate to large amounts of alcoholic beverages has been shown to inhibit mitogen and anti-CD3 stimulated human T lymphocyte proliferation. This inhibition was monophasic suggesting that ethanol affected a single limiting component of T cell proliferation. In experiments designed to test the effect of ethanol on various aspects of proliferation, it was demonstrated that ethanol inhibited the capacity of exogenously supplied interleukin 2 to stimulate proliferation of T cells that had previously acquired interleukin 2 receptors in a monophasic, dose-dependent manner. Moreover, there was no suppression of interleukin 2 production or interleukin 2 receptor acquisition. Thus, ethanol was shown to mediate immunosuppression by a mechanism specific to one component of proliferation. Additive inhibition of T cell proliferation was seen with ethanol plus cyclosporin A which inhibits interleukin 2 production. The level of inhibition with 250 ng/ml cyclosporin A alone was equivalent to the level seen with 62 ng/ml cyclosporin A plus 20 mM (94 mg%) ethanol. Ethanol also suppressed an immune effector mechanism. NK cytotoxicity was depressed in a monophasic, dose-dependent manner. Thus, ethanol might be considered as a possible adjunct in immunosuppressive therapy.

  14. Characterization of Two Tetrachloroethene-Reducing, Acetate-Oxidizing Anaerobic Bacteria and Their Description as Desulfuromonas michiganensis sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Youlboong; Ritalahti, Kirsti M.; Sanford, Robert A.; Urbance, John W.; Flynn, Shannon J.; Tiedje, James M.; Löffler, Frank E.

    2003-01-01

    Two tetrachlorethene (PCE)-dechlorinating populations, designated strains BB1 and BRS1, were isolated from pristine river sediment and chloroethene-contaminated aquifer material, respectively. PCE-to-cis-1,2-dichloroethene-dechlorinating activity could be transferred in defined basal salts medium with acetate as the electron donor and PCE as the electron acceptor. Taxonomic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing placed both isolates within the Desulfuromonas cluster in the δ subdivision of the Proteobacteria. PCE was dechlorinated at rates of at least 139 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1 at pH values between 7.0 and 7.5 and temperatures between 25 and 30°C. Dechlorination also occurred at 10°C. The electron donors that supported dechlorination included acetate, lactate, pyruvate, succinate, malate, and fumarate but not hydrogen, formate, ethanol, propionate, or sulfide. Growth occurred with malate or fumarate alone, whereas oxidation of the other electron donors depended strictly on the presence of fumarate, malate, ferric iron, sulfur, PCE, or TCE as an electron acceptor. Nitrate, sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate, and other chlorinated compounds were not used as electron acceptors. Sulfite had a strong inhibitory effect on growth and dechlorination. Alternate electron acceptors (e.g., fumarate or ferric iron) did not inhibit PCE dechlorination and were consumed concomitantly. The putative fumarate, PCE, and ferric iron reductases were induced by their respective substrates and were not constitutively present. Sulfide was required for growth. Both strains tolerated high concentrations of PCE, and dechlorination occurred in the presence of free-phase PCE (dense non-aqueous-phase liquids). Repeated growth with acetate and fumarate as substrates yielded a BB1 variant that had lost the ability to dechlorinate PCE. Due to the 16S rRNA gene sequence differences with the closest relatives and the unique phenotypic characteristics, we propose that the new isolates are

  15. Imaging Pregnant and Lactating Patients.

    PubMed

    Tirada, Nikki; Dreizin, David; Khati, Nadia J; Akin, Esma A; Zeman, Robert K

    2015-10-01

    As use of imaging in the evaluation of pregnant and lactating patients continues to increase, misperceptions of radiation and safety risks have proliferated, which has led to often unwarranted concerns among patients and clinicians. When radiologic examinations are appropriately used, the benefits derived from the information gained usually outweigh the risks. This review describes appropriateness and safety issues, estimated doses for imaging examinations that use iodizing radiation (ie, radiography, computed tomography, nuclear scintigraphy, and fluoroscopically guided interventional radiology), radiation risks to the mother and conceptus during various stages of pregnancy, and use of iodinated or gadolinium-based contrast agents and radiotracers in pregnant and lactating women. Maternal radiation risk must be weighed with the potential consequences of missing a life-threatening diagnosis such as pulmonary embolus. Fetal risks (ie, spontaneous abortion, teratogenesis, or carcinogenesis) vary with gestational age and imaging modality and should be considered in the context of the potential benefit of medically necessary diagnostic imaging. When feasible and medically indicated, modalities that do not use ionizing radiation (eg, magnetic resonance imaging) are preferred in pregnant and lactating patients. Radiologists should strive to minimize risks of radiation to the mother and fetus, counsel patients effectively, and promote a realistic understanding of risks related to imaging during pregnancy and lactation.

  16. [Drugs and lactation. Part 2].

    PubMed

    Alerany Pardo, C; Bassons Boncompte, M T; Font Pous, M

    1986-01-01

    This document lists categories of drugs and provides brief descriptions of the effects on lactation and nursing infants of specific drugs within categories. Because any drug may pass to some extent to the mother's milk, the effect on the infant must always be considered before a drug is given to the mother. This review provides information on the excretion of drugs through breast milk and identifies drugs that are contraindicated for nursing mothers. The medications considered include drugs for gastrointestinal pathology, drugs for the central nervous system, hormones and hormone substitution drugs, radioisotopes, vitamins and minerals, foods and additives, social toxics such as nicotine and caffeine, and environmental agents. Among hormones and hormone substitution drugs, combinations of estrogens, estrogens and progestins, or estrogens and androgens at high doses may suppress lactation. Low doses of oral contraceptives (OCs) have slight effects on the volume of milk but may suppress lactation in women in whom lactation is not established. OCs also alter the composition of milk, although the changes are within normal limits and their clinical significance is not clear. Cases have been described in which OCs have caused breast development in boys and proliferation of vaginal epithelium in girls, although the causal relationship has not been proven. Androgens are contraindicated because they may cause masculinization of girls or precocious development in boys. Doses of over 50 mcg/day of ethinyl estradiol diminish milk production and may produce feminization of boys. Mestranol at doses of under 100 mcg/day produces insignificant levels in milk.

  17. Potential biofuel additive from renewable sources--Kinetic study of formation of butyl acetate by heterogeneously catalyzed transesterification of ethyl acetate with butanol.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sami H; Al-Rashed, Osama; Azeez, Fadhel A; Merchant, Sabiha Q

    2011-11-01

    Butyl acetate holds great potential as a sustainable biofuel additive. Heterogeneously catalyzed transesterification of biobutanol and bioethylacetate can produce butyl acetate. This route is eco-friendly and offers several advantages over the commonly used Fischer Esterification. The Amberlite IR 120- and Amberlyst 15-catalyzed transesterification is studied in a batch reactor over a range of catalyst loading (6-12 wt.%), alcohol to ester feed ratio (1:3 to 3:1), and temperature (303.15-333.15K). A butanol mole fraction of 0.2 in the feed is found to be optimum. Amberlite IR 120 promotes faster kinetics under these conditions. The transesterifications studied are slightly exothermic. The moles of solvent sorbed per gram of catalyst decreases (ethanol>butanol>ethyl acetate>butyl acetate) with decrease in solubility parameter. The dual site models, the Langmuir Hinshelwood and Popken models, are the most successful in correlating the kinetics over Amberlite IR 120 and Amberlyst 15, respectively.

  18. Cell-cell and intracellular lactate shuttles.

    PubMed

    Brooks, George A

    2009-12-01

    Once thought to be the consequence of oxygen lack in contracting skeletal muscle, the glycolytic product lactate is formed and utilized continuously in diverse cells under fully aerobic conditions. 'Cell-cell' and 'intracellular lactate shuttle' concepts describe the roles of lactate in delivery of oxidative and gluconeogenic substrates as well as in cell signalling. Examples of the cell-cell shuttles include lactate exchanges between between white-glycolytic and red-oxidative fibres within a working muscle bed, and between working skeletal muscle and heart, brain, liver and kidneys. Examples of intracellular lactate shuttles include lactate uptake by mitochondria and pyruvate for lactate exchange in peroxisomes. Lactate for pyruvate exchanges affect cell redox state, and by itself lactate is a ROS generator. In vivo, lactate is a preferred substrate and high blood lactate levels down-regulate the use of glucose and free fatty acids (FFA). As well, lactate binding may affect metabolic regulation, for instance binding to G-protein receptors in adipocytes inhibiting lipolysis, and thus decreasing plasma FFA availability. In vitro lactate accumulation upregulates expression of MCT1 and genes coding for other components of the mitochondrial reticulum in skeletal muscle. The mitochondrial reticulum in muscle and mitochondrial networks in other aerobic tissues function to establish concentration and proton gradients necessary for cells with high mitochondrial densities to oxidize lactate. The presence of lactate shuttles gives rise to the realization that glycolytic and oxidative pathways should be viewed as linked, as opposed to alternative, processes, because lactate, the product of one pathway, is the substrate for the other.

  19. Cell–cell and intracellular lactate shuttles

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, George A

    2009-01-01

    Once thought to be the consequence of oxygen lack in contracting skeletal muscle, the glycolytic product lactate is formed and utilized continuously in diverse cells under fully aerobic conditions. ‘Cell–cell’ and ‘intracellular lactate shuttle’ concepts describe the roles of lactate in delivery of oxidative and gluconeogenic substrates as well as in cell signalling. Examples of the cell–cell shuttles include lactate exchanges between between white-glycolytic and red-oxidative fibres within a working muscle bed, and between working skeletal muscle and heart, brain, liver and kidneys. Examples of intracellular lactate shuttles include lactate uptake by mitochondria and pyruvate for lactate exchange in peroxisomes. Lactate for pyruvate exchanges affect cell redox state, and by itself lactate is a ROS generator. In vivo, lactate is a preferred substrate and high blood lactate levels down-regulate the use of glucose and free fatty acids (FFA). As well, lactate binding may affect metabolic regulation, for instance binding to G-protein receptors in adipocytes inhibiting lipolysis, and thus decreasing plasma FFA availability. In vitro lactate accumulation upregulates expression of MCT1 and genes coding for other components of the mitochondrial reticulum in skeletal muscle. The mitochondrial reticulum in muscle and mitochondrial networks in other aerobic tissues function to establish concentration and proton gradients necessary for cells with high mitochondrial densities to oxidize lactate. The presence of lactate shuttles gives rise to the realization that glycolytic and oxidative pathways should be viewed as linked, as opposed to alternative, processes, because lactate, the product of one pathway, is the substrate for the other. PMID:19805739

  20. Metabolism of (2-14C)acetate and its use in assessing hepatic Krebs cycle activity and gluconeogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, W.C.; Magnusson, I.; Chandramouli, V.; Kumaran, K.; Wahren, J.; Landau, B.R. )

    1991-04-15

    To examine the fate of the carbons of acetate and to evaluate the usefulness of labeled acetate in assessing intrahepatic metabolic processes during gluconeogenesis, (2-14C)acetate, (2-14C)ethanol, and (1-14C)ethanol were infused into normal subjects fasted 60 h and given phenyl acetate. Distributions of 14C in the carbons of blood glucose and glutamate from urinary phenylacetylglutamine were determined. With (2-14C)acetate and (2-14C)ethanol, carbon 1 of glucose had about twice as much 14C as carbon 3. Carbon 2 of glutamate had about twice as much 14C as carbon 1 and one-half to one-third as much as carbon 4. There was only a small amount in carbon 5. These distributions are incompatible with the metabolism of (2-14C)acetate being primarily in liver. Therefore, (2-14C)acetate cannot be used to study Krebs cycle metabolism in liver and in relationship to gluconeogenesis, as has been done. The distributions can be explained by: (a) fixation of 14CO2 from (2-14C)acetate in the formation of the 14C-labeled glucose and glutamate in liver and (b) the formation of 14C-labeled glutamate in a second site, proposed to be muscle. (1,3-14C)Acetone formation from the (2-14C)acetate does not contribute to the distributions, as evidenced by the absence of 14C in carbons 2-4 of glutamate after (1-14C)ethanol administration.

  1. An in vitro model of the horse gut microbiome enables identification of lactate-utilizing bacteria that differentially respond to starch induction.

    PubMed

    Biddle, Amy S; Black, Samuel J; Blanchard, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    Laminitis is a chronic, crippling disease triggered by the sudden influx of dietary starch. Starch reaches the hindgut resulting in enrichment of lactic acid bacteria, lactate accumulation, and acidification of the gut contents. Bacterial products enter the bloodstream and precipitate systemic inflammation. Hindgut lactate levels are normally low because specific bacterial groups convert lactate to short chain fatty acids. Why this mechanism fails when lactate levels rapidly rise, and why some hindgut communities can recover is unknown. Fecal samples from three adult horses eating identical diets provided bacterial communities for this in vitro study. Triplicate microcosms of fecal slurries were enriched with lactate and/or starch. Metabolic products (short chain fatty acids, headspace gases, and hydrogen sulfide) were measured and microbial community compositions determined using Illumina 16S rRNA sequencing over 12-hour intervals. We report that patterns of change in short chain fatty acid levels and pH in our in vitro system are similar to those seen in in vivo laminitis induction models. Community differences between microcosms with disparate abilities to clear excess lactate suggest profiles conferring resistance of starch-induction conditions. Where lactate levels recover following starch induction conditions, propionate and acetate levels rise correspondingly and taxa related to Megasphaeraelsdenii reach levels exceeding 70% relative abundance. In lactate and control cultures, taxa related to Veillonellamontpellierensis are enriched as lactate levels fall. Understanding these community differences and factors promoting the growth of specific lactate utilizing taxa may be useful to prevent acidosis under starch-induction conditions.

  2. Acetate production from whey lactose using co-immobilized cells of homolactic and homoacetic bacteria in a fibrous-bed bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.; Yang, S.T.

    1998-11-20

    Acetate was produced from whey lactose in batch and fed-batch fermentations using co-immobilized cells of Clostridium formicoaceticum and Lactococcus lactis. The cells were immobilized in a spirally wound fibrous sheet packed in a 0.45-L column reactor, with liquid circulated through a 5-L stirred-tank fermentor. Industrial-grade nitrogen sources, including corn steep liquor, casein hydrolysate, and yeast hydrolysate, were studied as inexpensive nutrient supplements to whey permeate and acid whey. Supplementation with either 2.5% (v/v) corn steep liquor or 1.5 g/L casein hydrolysate was adequate for the cocultured fermentation. The overall acetic acid yield from lactose was 0.9 g/g, and the productivity was 0.25 g/(L h). Both lactate and acetate at high concentrations inhibited the homoacetic fermentation. To overcome these inhibitions, fed-batch fermentations were used to keep lactate concentration low and to adapt cells to high-concentration acetate. The final acetate concentration obtained in the fed-batch fermentations were used to keep lactate concentration low and to adapt cells to high-concentration acetate. The final acetate concentration obtained in the fed-batch fermentation was 75 g/L, which was the highest acetate concentration ever produced by C. formicoaceticum. Even at this high acetate concentration, the overall productivity was 0.18 g/(L h) based on the total medium volume and 1.23 g/(L h) based on the fibrous-bed reactor volume. The cells isolated from the fibrous-bed bioreactor at the end of this study were more tolerant to acetic acid than the original culture used to seed the bioreactor, indicating that adaptation and natural selection of acetate-tolerant strains occurred. This cocultured fermentation process could be used to produce a low-cost acetate deicer from whey permeate and acid whey.

  3. 21 CFR 582.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 582.1207 Section 582.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Product. Calcium lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 582.1207 Section 582.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Product. Calcium lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 582.1207 Section 582.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Product. Calcium lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 582.1207 Section 582.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Product. Calcium lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 582.1207 Section 582.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Product. Calcium lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  8. In vitro effects of ethanol and mouthrinse on permeability in an oral buccal mucosal tissue construct.

    PubMed

    Koschier, Francis; Kostrubsky, Vsevolod; Toole, Colleen; Gallo, Michael A

    2011-10-01

    The current study investigated the influence of ethanol and ethanol-containing mouthrinses on model chemical permeability in an in vitro oral buccal mucosal construct (EpiOral, ORL-200, MatTek). Innate ethanol transport and metabolism in the tissue construct was also studied. Caffeine flux in buccal tissue was measured after pre-treatment with < 26.9% ethanol or Listerine(®) products under conditions modeling a typical mouthwash rinsing. Specifically, a 30s exposure to alcohol products followed by a 10h non-treatment phase and then a second 30s exposure prior to addition of caffeine. At 10min specific intervals, media was collected from the basal part of the tissue insert for HPLC analysis of caffeine. The results demonstrated no increase in caffeine flux due to prior exposure to either ethanol or Listerine(®), and the flux and permeability constants were derived from the linear phase. No cytotoxicity or histopathological effects were observed in these tissues. We also studied the transepithelial transport and metabolism of ethanol in these tissues. Transport of ethanol was concentration-dependent with rate of diffusion proportional to the concentration gradient across the membrane. The potential metabolism of ethanol in the EpiOral construct was addressed by analyzing the remaining level of ethanol after incubation and de novo accumulation of acetaldehyde or acetic acid in culture media. Incubation for 30min incubation resulted in no change in ethanol level up to 2000mM, the highest concentration tested. No acetaldehyde or acetic acid was detected in culture media. In conclusion, ethanol and ethanol-containing mouthrinse treatment modeled after a typical daily mouthrinse pattern had no apparent effect on the permeability of the standard model chemical, caffeine. This exposure also had no effect on the viability of the tissue construct or histopathology, and uptake of ethanol was rapid into the tissue construct.

  9. Metabolic control analysis of L-lactate synthesis pathway in Rhizopus oryzae As 3.2686.

    PubMed

    Ke, Wei; Chang, Shu; Chen, Xiaoju; Luo, Shuizhong; Jiang, Shaotong; Yang, Peizhou; Wu, Xuefeng; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-11-01

    The relationship between the metabolic flux and the activities of the pyruvate branching enzymes of Rhizopus oryzae As 3.2686 during L-lactate fermentation was investigated using the perturbation method of aeration. The control coefficients for five enzymes, pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), pyruvate carboxylase (PC), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), were calculated. Our results indicated significant correlations between PDH and PC, PDC and LDH, PDC and ADH, LDH and ADH, and PDC and PC. It also appeared that PDH, PC, and LDH strongly controlled the L-lactate flux; PDH and ADH strongly controlled the ethanol flux; while PDH and PC strongly controlled the acetyl coenzyme A flux and the oxaloacetate flux. Further, the flux control coefficient curves indicated that the control of the system gradually transferred from PDC to PC during the steady state. Therefore, PC was the key rate-limiting enzyme that controls the flux distribution.

  10. Response to lactation induction differs by season of year and breed of dairy ewes.

    PubMed

    Andrade, B Ramírez; Salama, A A K; Caja, G; Castillo, V; Albanell, E; Such, X

    2008-06-01

    Lactation artificially induced (ART) by steroid hormones and natural lactation (NAT) after lambing were compared in 2 dairy sheep breeds (Manchega and Lacaune) in 2 experiments conducted during winter and spring. In experiment 1, ART ewes (14 Manchega and 9 Lacaune) were induced into lactation in winter by the standard protocol, which consisted of s.c. injections of estradiol and progesterone administered in 2 portions daily from d 1 to 7. Hydrocortisone acetate was injected s.c. daily on d 18 to 20. Milking was initiated on d 21 and continued for 13 wk. A similar group of NAT ewes was selected for the contemporary comparison of NAT vs. ART lactation. All Lacaune ewes, but only 3 of the 14 Manchega ewes (21%), were successfully induced into lactation. Despite the successful induction of lactation in Lacaune ewes, milk yield was much lower than that obtained in NAT lactation (1.23 +/- 0.14 vs. 2.51 +/- 0.15 L/ d). Milk composition from wk 5 to 13 did not differ between groups, except for whey protein, which was greater in ART than in NAT ewes (1.47 vs. 1.25%). In experiment 2, 19 Manchega ewes were divided into 2 groups and induced into lactation in spring by using the standard induction protocol, similar to that used in experiment 1 (control, n = 9), or the standard protocol modified with bovine somatotropin (bST, 250 mg/ewe on d 11; n = 10). Manchega ewes had an improved response to the standard protocol of lactation induction in spring compared with winter. Milk yield in bST-treated Manchega ewes was 98% greater than that in control ewes (402 +/- 85 vs. 203 +/- 86 mL/d). The use of bST during mammogenesis did not affect milk composition. In conclusion, marked differences between Manchega and Lacaune dairy ewes were observed in their response to lactation induction when using the standard protocol during different photoperiod conditions. The Manchega ewes were unable to establish lactation in winter but were able to do so in spring. The response to lactation

  11. Biological production of ethanol from coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the ``wild strain`` produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

  12. Ethanol tolerance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ingram, L O

    1990-01-01

    The adverse effects of ethanol on bacterial growth, viability, and metabolism are caused primarily by ethanol-induced leakage of the plasma membrane. This increase in membrane leakage is consistent with known biophysical properties of membranes and ethanolic solutions. The primary actions of ethanol result from colligative effects of the high molar concentrations rather than from specific interactions with receptors. The ethanol tolerance of growth in different microorganisms appears to result in large part from adaptive and evolutionary changes in cell membrane composition. Different cellular activities vary in their tolerance to ethanol. Therefore, it is essential that the aspect of cellular function under study be specifically defined and that comparisons of ethanol tolerance among systems share this common definition. Growth is typically one of the most sensitive cellular activities to inhibition by ethanol, followed by survival, or loss of reproductive ability. Glycolysis is the most resistant of these three activities. Since glycolysis is an exergonic process, a cell need not be able to grow or remain viable for glycolysis to occur.

  13. Nitrate addition to groundwater impacted by ethanol-blended fuel accelerates ethanol removal and mitigates the associated metabolic flux dilution and inhibition of BTEX biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Corseuil, Henry Xavier; Gomez, Diego E; Schambeck, Cássio Moraes; Ramos, Débora Toledo; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2015-03-01

    A comparison of two controlled ethanol-blended fuel releases under monitored natural attenuation (MNA) versus nitrate biostimulation (NB) illustrates the potential benefits of augmenting the electron acceptor pool with nitrate to accelerate ethanol removal and thus mitigate its inhibitory effects on BTEX biodegradation. Groundwater concentrations of ethanol and BTEX were measured 2 m downgradient of the source zones. In both field experiments, initial source-zone BTEX concentrations represented less than 5% of the dissolved total organic carbon (TOC) associated with the release, and measurable BTEX degradation occurred only after the ethanol fraction in the multicomponent substrate mixture decreased sharply. However, ethanol removal was faster in the nitrate amended plot (1.4 years) than under natural attenuation conditions (3.0 years), which led to faster BTEX degradation. This reflects, in part, that an abundant substrate (ethanol) can dilute the metabolic flux of target pollutants (BTEX) whose biodegradation rate eventually increases with its relative abundance after ethanol is preferentially consumed. The fate and transport of ethanol and benzene were accurately simulated in both releases using RT3D with our general substrate interaction module (GSIM) that considers metabolic flux dilution. Since source zone benzene concentrations are relatively low compared to those of ethanol (or its degradation byproduct, acetate), our simulations imply that the initial focus of cleanup efforts (after free-product recovery) should be to stimulate the degradation of ethanol (e.g., by nitrate addition) to decrease its fraction in the mixture and speed up BTEX biodegradation.

  14. Nitrate addition to groundwater impacted by ethanol-blended fuel accelerates ethanol removal and mitigates the associated metabolic flux dilution and inhibition of BTEX biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corseuil, Henry Xavier; Gomez, Diego E.; Schambeck, Cássio Moraes; Ramos, Débora Toledo; Alvarez, Pedro J. J.

    2015-03-01

    A comparison of two controlled ethanol-blended fuel releases under monitored natural attenuation (MNA) versus nitrate biostimulation (NB) illustrates the potential benefits of augmenting the electron acceptor pool with nitrate to accelerate ethanol removal and thus mitigate its inhibitory effects on BTEX biodegradation. Groundwater concentrations of ethanol and BTEX were measured 2 m downgradient of the source zones. In both field experiments, initial source-zone BTEX concentrations represented less than 5% of the dissolved total organic carbon (TOC) associated with the release, and measurable BTEX degradation occurred only after the ethanol fraction in the multicomponent substrate mixture decreased sharply. However, ethanol removal was faster in the nitrate amended plot (1.4 years) than under natural attenuation conditions (3.0 years), which led to faster BTEX degradation. This reflects, in part, that an abundant substrate (ethanol) can dilute the metabolic flux of target pollutants (BTEX) whose biodegradation rate eventually increases with its relative abundance after ethanol is preferentially consumed. The fate and transport of ethanol and benzene were accurately simulated in both releases using RT3D with our general substrate interaction module (GSIM) that considers metabolic flux dilution. Since source zone benzene concentrations are relatively low compared to those of ethanol (or its degradation byproduct, acetate), our simulations imply that the initial focus of cleanup efforts (after free-product recovery) should be to stimulate the degradation of ethanol (e.g., by nitrate addition) to decrease its fraction in the mixture and speed up BTEX biodegradation.

  15. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be produced by the calcium hydroxide neutralization of acetic acid. (b) The ingredient meets...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be produced by the calcium hydroxide neutralization of acetic acid. (b) The ingredient meets...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be produced by the calcium hydroxide neutralization of acetic acid. (b) The ingredient meets...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be produced by the calcium hydroxide neutralization of acetic acid. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the...

  19. Evidence of In Vivo Absorption of Lactate and Modulation of Short Chain Fatty Acid Absorption from the Reticulorumen of Non-Lactating Cattle Fed High Concentrate Diets

    PubMed Central

    Qumar, Muhammad; Khiaosa-ard, Ratchaneewan; Pourazad, Poulad; Wetzels, Stefanie U.; Klevenhusen, Fenja; Kandler, Wolfgang; Aschenbach, Jörg R.; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and lactate are endproducts of rumen fermentation and important energy sources for the host ruminant. Because their rapid accumulation results in ruminal acidosis, enhancement of the absorption of SCFA and lactate across reticuloruminal wall is instrumental in increasing energy supply and preventing ruminal acidosis in cattle. This study investigated whether the reticuloruminal absorption of SCFAs and lactate was altered by different strategies of high concentrate feeding. Eight rumen-cannulated, non-lactating Holstein cows were fed a forage-only diet (baseline) and then gradually adapted over 6 d to a 60% concentrate level. Thereafter, this concentrate-rich diet was fed for 4 wk either continuously (Con; n = 8) or interruptedly (Int; n = 8). Absorption of SCFAs and lactate was determined in vivo from the experimental buffer introduced into the washed reticulorumen. The buffer contained acetate, propionate, butyrate and lactate at a concentration of 60, 30, 10 and 5 mmol/L, respectively and Cr-EDTA as a marker for correcting ruminal water fluxes. The reticuloruminal absorption after 35 and 65 min of buffer incubation was measured at the baseline, after 1 wk of 60% concentrate feeding in the interrupted model (Int-1) and after 4 wk of concentrate feeding in both feeding models (Int-4 and Con-4). Data showed that the absorption rates of individual and total SCFAs during the first 35 min of incubation of Con-4 were highest (~1.7 times compared to baseline), while Int-1 and Int-4 were similar to respective baseline. Lactate was not absorbed during forage-only baseline and 1-wk concentrate feeding, but after 4-wk feeding of concentrates in both models. In conclusion, SCFAs absorption across the reticulorumen of non-lactating cattle was enhanced by the 4-wk continuous concentrate feeding, which seems to be more advantageous in terms of rumen acidosis prevention compared to the interrupted feeding model. The study provides evidence of

  20. Evidence of In Vivo Absorption of Lactate and Modulation of Short Chain Fatty Acid Absorption from the Reticulorumen of Non-Lactating Cattle Fed High Concentrate Diets.

    PubMed

    Qumar, Muhammad; Khiaosa-Ard, Ratchaneewan; Pourazad, Poulad; Wetzels, Stefanie U; Klevenhusen, Fenja; Kandler, Wolfgang; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and lactate are endproducts of rumen fermentation and important energy sources for the host ruminant. Because their rapid accumulation results in ruminal acidosis, enhancement of the absorption of SCFA and lactate across reticuloruminal wall is instrumental in increasing energy supply and preventing ruminal acidosis in cattle. This study investigated whether the reticuloruminal absorption of SCFAs and lactate was altered by different strategies of high concentrate feeding. Eight rumen-cannulated, non-lactating Holstein cows were fed a forage-only diet (baseline) and then gradually adapted over 6 d to a 60% concentrate level. Thereafter, this concentrate-rich diet was fed for 4 wk either continuously (Con; n = 8) or interruptedly (Int; n = 8). Absorption of SCFAs and lactate was determined in vivo from the experimental buffer introduced into the washed reticulorumen. The buffer contained acetate, propionate, butyrate and lactate at a concentration of 60, 30, 10 and 5 mmol/L, respectively and Cr-EDTA as a marker for correcting ruminal water fluxes. The reticuloruminal absorption after 35 and 65 min of buffer incubation was measured at the baseline, after 1 wk of 60% concentrate feeding in the interrupted model (Int-1) and after 4 wk of concentrate feeding in both feeding models (Int-4 and Con-4). Data showed that the absorption rates of individual and total SCFAs during the first 35 min of incubation of Con-4 were highest (~1.7 times compared to baseline), while Int-1 and Int-4 were similar to respective baseline. Lactate was not absorbed during forage-only baseline and 1-wk concentrate feeding, but after 4-wk feeding of concentrates in both models. In conclusion, SCFAs absorption across the reticulorumen of non-lactating cattle was enhanced by the 4-wk continuous concentrate feeding, which seems to be more advantageous in terms of rumen acidosis prevention compared to the interrupted feeding model. The study provides evidence of

  1. Pallidol hexa­acetate ethyl acetate monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Qinyong; Taylor, Dennis K.; Ng, Seik Weng; Tiekink, Edward R. T.

    2013-01-01

    The entire mol­ecule of pallidol hexa­acetate {systematic name: (±)-(4bR,5R,9bR,10R)-5,10-bis­[4-(acet­yloxy)phen­yl]-4b,5,9b,10-tetra­hydro­indeno­[2,1-a]indene-1,3,6,8-tetrayl tetra­acetate} is completed by the application of twofold rotational symmetry in the title ethyl acetate solvate, C40H34O12·C4H8O2. The ethyl acetate mol­ecule was highly disordered and was treated with the SQUEEZE routine [Spek (2009 ▶). Acta Cryst. D65, 148–155]; the crystallographic data take into account the presence of the solvent. In pallidol hexa­acetate, the dihedral angle between the fused five-membered rings (r.m.s. deviation = 0.100 Å) is 54.73 (6)°, indicating a significant fold in the mol­ecule. Significant twists between residues are also evident as seen in the dihedral angle of 80.70 (5)° between the five-membered ring and the pendent benzene ring to which it is attached. Similarly, the acetate residues are twisted with respect to the benzene ring to which they are attached [C—O(carb­oxy)—C—C torsion angles = −70.24 (14), −114.43 (10) and −72.54 (13)°]. In the crystal, a three-dimensional architecture is sustained by C—H⋯O inter­actions which encompass channels in which the disordered ethyl acetate mol­ecules reside. PMID:24046702

  2. Drug resistance marker-aided genome shuffling to improve acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dao-Qiong; Wu, Xue-Chang; Wang, Pin-Mei; Chi, Xiao-Qin; Tao, Xiang-Lin; Li, Ping; Jiang, Xin-Hang; Zhao, Yu-Hua

    2011-03-01

    Acetic acid existing in a culture medium is one of the most limiting constraints in yeast growth and viability during ethanol fermentation. To improve acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, a drug resistance marker-aided genome shuffling approach with higher screen efficiency of shuffled mutants was developed in this work. Through two rounds of genome shuffling of ultraviolet mutants derived from the original strain 308, we obtained a shuffled strain YZ2, which shows significantly faster growth and higher cell viability under acetic acid stress. Ethanol production of YZ2 (within 60 h) was 21.6% higher than that of 308 when 0.5% (v/v) acetic acid was added to fermentation medium. Membrane integrity, higher in vivo activity of the H+-ATPase, and lower oxidative damage after acetic acid treatment are the possible reasons for the acetic acid-tolerance phenotype of YZ2. These results indicated that this novel genome shuffling approach is powerful to rapidly improve the complex traits of industrial yeast strains.

  3. Biological production of ethanol from coal. [Quarterly report], March 22, 1990--June 21, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    The fermentation pH has been observed to be the key parameter affecting the ratio of ethanol to acetate produced by Clostridium ljungdahlii. The effects of controlled pH on cell growth and product formation by C. ljungdahlii were measured. It was found that cell concentration and acetate concentration increased with pH, while the ethanol concentration was highest at the lower pH. The molar product ratio of ethanol to acetate was 0.74 at pH 4.0, 0.39 at pH 4.5 and 0.12 at pH 5.0. Future experiments will concentrate on studying other important parameters such as agitation rate and nutrients concentrations with controlled pH as a preclude to continuous reactor studies.

  4. Acetic acid bacteria spoilage of bottled red wine -- a review.

    PubMed

    Bartowsky, Eveline J; Henschke, Paul A

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are ubiquitous organisms that are well adapted to sugar and ethanol rich environments. This family of Gram-positive bacteria are well known for their ability to produce acetic acid, the main constituent in vinegar. The oxidation of ethanol through acetaldehyde to acetic acid is well understood and characterised. AAB form part of the complex natural microbial flora of grapes and wine, however their presence is less desirable than the lactic acid bacteria and yeast. Even though AAB were described by Pasteur in the 1850s, wine associated AAB are still difficult to cultivate on artificial laboratory media and until more recently, their taxonomy has not been well characterised. Wine is at most risk of spoilage during production and the presence of these strictly aerobic bacteria in grape must and during wine maturation can be controlled by eliminating, or at least limiting oxygen, an essential growth factor. However, a new risk, spoilage of wine by AAB after packaging, has only recently been reported. As wine is not always sterile filtered prior to bottling, especially red wine, it often has a small resident bacterial population (<10(3) cfu/mL), which under conducive conditions might proliferate. Bottled red wines, sealed with natural cork closures, and stored in a vertical upright position may develop spoilage by acetic acid bacteria. This spoilage is evident as a distinct deposit of bacterial biofilm in the neck of the bottle at the interface of the wine and the headspace of air, and is accompanied with vinegar, sherry, bruised apple, nutty, and solvent like off-aromas, depending on the degree of spoilage. This review focuses on the wine associated AAB species, the aroma and flavour changes in wine due to AAB metabolism, discusses the importance of oxygen ingress into the bottle and presents a hypothesis for the mechanism of spoilage of bottled red wine.

  5. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Previous results have shown that the yeast extract concentration and the medium pH significantly affect the ratio of ethanol to acetate in the product stream when fermenting CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} in synthesis gas to products by Clostridium ljungdahlii. Further experimentation has demonstrated the impact of eliminating yeast extract from the medium (except for the slight quantity transferred with the inoculm), especially when coupled with low pH. An ethanol to acetate product ratio of 4.0 was obtained at pH 4.5 without yeast extract present in the medium when using culture previously exposed to growth-limiting H{sub 2}S. The product ratio was 2.0 at pH 4.0 (nearly three times the value of pH 4.5 and nine times the value of pH 5.0) without yeast extract present in the media when using the standard (unexposed) culture.

  6. Mutants of the pentose-fermenting yeast Pachysolen tannophilus tolerant to hardwood spent sulfite liquor and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Harner, Nicole K; Bajwa, Paramjit K; Habash, Marc B; Trevors, Jack T; Austin, Glen D; Lee, Hung

    2014-01-01

    A strain development program was initiated to improve the tolerance of the pentose-fermenting yeast Pachysolen tannophilus to inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Several rounds of UV mutagenesis followed by screening were used to select for mutants of P. tannophilus NRRL Y2460 with improved tolerance to hardwood spent sulfite liquor (HW SSL) and acetic acid in separate selection lines. The wild type (WT) strain grew in 50 % (v/v) HW SSL while third round HW SSL mutants (designated UHW301, UHW302 and UHW303) grew in 60 % (v/v) HW SSL, with two of these isolates (UHW302 and UHW303) being viable and growing, respectively, in 70 % (v/v) HW SSL. In defined liquid media containing acetic acid, the WT strain grew in 0.70 % (w/v) acetic acid, while third round acetic acid mutants (designated UAA301, UAA302 and UAA303) grew in 0.80 % (w/v) acetic acid, with one isolate (UAA302) growing in 0.90 % (w/v) acetic acid. Cross-tolerance of HW SSL-tolerant mutants to acetic acid and vice versa was observed with UHW303 able to grow in 0.90 % (w/v) acetic acid and UAA302 growing in 60 % (v/v) HW SSL. The UV-induced mutants retained the ability to ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol in defined media. These mutants of P. tannophilus are of considerable interest for bioconversion of the sugars in lignocellulosic hydrolysates to ethanol.

  7. Apoptotic effect of sodium acetate on a human gastric adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Zhang, X L; Jin, F; Wang, Q X; Xiao, R; Hao, Z H; Gui, Q D; Sun, J

    2016-10-05

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of sodium acetate on the viability of the human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) epithelial cell line. AGS cells were exposed to a range of concentrations of sodium acetate for different periods of time, and the sodium acetate-induced cytotoxic effects, including cell viability, DNA fragmentation, apoptotic gene expression, and caspase activity, were assessed. The changes in these phenotypes were quantified by performing a lactate dehydrogenase cell viability assay, annexin V staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL), and several caspase activity assays. In vitro studies demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of sodium acetate on the AGS cell line were dose- and time-dependent manners. No differences were found between the negative control and sodium acetate-treated cells stained with annexin V and subjected to the TUNEL assay. However, caspase-3 activity was increased in AGS cells exposed to sodium acetate. Overall, it was concluded that sodium acetate exerted an apoptotic effect in AGS cells via a caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway.

  8. Change in the plasmid copy number in acetic acid bacteria in response to growth phase and acetic acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Naoki; Astuti, Wiwik; Ishii, Yuri; Hidese, Ryota; Sakoda, Hisao; Fujiwara, Shinsuke

    2015-06-01

    Plasmids pGE1 (2.5 kb), pGE2 (7.2 kb), and pGE3 (5.5 kb) were isolated from Gluconacetobacter europaeus KGMA0119, and sequence analyses revealed they harbored 3, 8, and 4 genes, respectively. Plasmid copy numbers (PCNs) were determined by real-time quantitative PCR at different stages of bacterial growth. When KGMA0119 was cultured in medium containing 0.4% ethanol and 0.5% acetic acid, PCN of pGE1 increased from 7 copies/genome in the logarithmic phase to a maximum of 12 copies/genome at the beginning of the stationary phase, before decreasing to 4 copies/genome in the late stationary phase. PCNs for pGE2 and pGE3 were maintained at 1-3 copies/genome during all phases of growth. Under a higher concentration of ethanol (3.2%) the PCN for pGE1 was slightly lower in all the growth stages, and those of pGE2 and pGE3 were unchanged. In the presence of 1.0% acetic acid, PCNs were higher for pGE1 (10 copies/genome) and pGE3 (6 copies/genome) during the logarithmic phase. Numbers for pGE2 did not change, indicating that pGE1 and pGE3 increase their PCNs in response to acetic acid. Plasmids pBE2 and pBE3 were constructed by ligating linearized pGE2 and pGE3 into pBR322. Both plasmids were replicable in Escherichia coli, Acetobacter pasteurianus and G. europaeus, highlighting their suitability as vectors for acetic acid bacteria.

  9. Lactate production under fully aerobic conditions: the lactate shuttle during rest and exercise.

    PubMed

    Brooks, G A

    1986-12-01

    O2 insufficiency and other factors increase the rate of lactate production. Significant quantities of lactate are produced under postabsorptive as well as postprandial conditions in resting individuals. In humans during postabsorptive rest, 25-50% of the total carbohydrate combusted appears to pass through the lactate pool. During sustained submaximal (in terms of VO2max) exercise, the rates of lactate production (Ri) and oxidation (Rox) are greatly elevated as compared to rest. However, lactate production and oxidation increase relatively less than O2 consumption during moderate-intensity exercise. Because the lactate production index (RiI = Ri/VO2) decreases during submaximal, moderate-intensity exercise compared to rest, it is concluded that skeletal muscle and other sites of lactate production are effectively oxygenated. Alterations in the levels of circulating catecholamines can affect levels and turnover rates of glucose and lactate. In pure red dog gracilis muscle in situ and in the healthy and myocardium in vivo, contraction results in glycolysis and lactate production. This production of lactate occurs despite an apparent abundance of O2. Similarly, glucose catabolism in the human brain results in lactate production. The formation of lactate under fully aerobic conditions of rest and exercise represents an important mechanism by which different tissues share a carbon source (lactate) for oxidation and other processes such as gluconeogenesis. This mechanism has been termed the lactate shuttle.

  10. Ethanol physiology in the warehouse-staining fungus, Baudoinia compniacensis.

    PubMed

    Ewaze, Juliet O; Summerbell, Richard C; Scott, James A

    2008-11-01

    The fungus Baudoinia compniacensis colonizes the exterior surfaces of a range of materials, such as buildings, outdoor furnishings, fences, signs, and vegetation, in regions subject to periodic exposure to low levels of ethanol vapour, such as those in the vicinity of distillery aging warehouses and commercial bakeries. Here we investigated the basis of ethanol metabolism in Baudoinia and investigate the role of ethanol in cell germination and growth. Germination of mycelia of Baudoinia was enhanced by up to roughly 1d exposure to low ethanol concentrations, optimally 10ppm when delivered in vapour form and 5mm in liquid form. However, growth was strongly inhibited following exposure to higher ethanol concentrations for shorter durations (e.g., 1.7m for 6h). We found that ethanol was catabolized into central metabolism via alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ACDH). Isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDHs) were active in cells grown on glucose, but these enzymes were not expressed when ethanol was provided as a sole or companion carbon source. The glyoxylate cycle enzymes isocitrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (MS) activities observed in cells grown on acetate were comparable to those reported for other microorganisms. By replenishing tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates, it is likely that the functionality of the glyoxylate cycle is important in the establishment of luxuriant growth of Baudoinia compniacensis on ethanol-exposed, nutrient-deprived, exposed surfaces. In other fungi, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ADH II catalyses the conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde, which then can be metabolized via the TCA cycle. ADH II is known to be strongly repressed in the presence of glucose.

  11. Changes in free and bound alcohol metabolites in the urine during ethanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, S; Kanegae, T; Uchigasaki, S; Kitazawa, M; Fujioka, T; Fujioka, S; Imamura, Y; Nagoya, T; Shimamura, M; Mieda, Y

    1993-12-01

    Free and bound ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetate, acetone and methanol in urine during alcohol oxidation were analyzed by means of a head space gas chromatography. Four healthy male volunteers drank beer for 20 min with 16 ml/kg for non-flushers (A, B) and 8 ml/kg for flushers (C, D). In the urine, the highest bound ethanol levels were between 0.5-1.1 mM for the non-flushers (NF) and 0.2-0.3 mM for the flushers (F). The urine free ethanol levels were 23-70 times as high as bound ethanol levels. The maximum free acetaldehyde in urine was 11-13 microM for the NF and 26-55 microM for the F. The urine bound acetaldehyde levels were 4-5 microM for the NF and 7-15 microM for the F. Urine acetaldehyde existed in free forms at 2.4-3.6 times as high concentrations as in bound forms during ethanol oxidation. The urine free acetate ranged between 0.3-2.0 mM. The bound acetate varied between 0.7-1.1 mM. The urine free methanol at 70-110 microM before the intake increased to 104-180 microM. The bound methanol reached to 78-126 microM from 48-97 microM before the intake. Ethanol levels in the urine were ethanol dose-dependent, whereas it was thought that free and bound acetaldehyde or acetate reflected individual metabolic abilities and not the amount of ethanol consumed.

  12. Wet in situ transesterification of microalgae using ethyl acetate as a co-solvent and reactant.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeongseok; Kim, Bora; Chang, Yong Keun; Lee, Jae W

    2017-04-01

    This study addresses wet in situ transesterification of microalgae for the production of biodiesel by introducing ethyl acetate as both reactant and co-solvent. Ethyl acetate and acid catalyst are mixed with wet microalgae in one pot and the mixture is heated for simultaneous lipid extraction and transesterification. As a single reactant and co-solvent, ethyl acetate can provide higher FAEE yield and more saccharification of carbohydrates than the case of binary ethanol and chloroform as a reactant and a co-solvent. The optimal yield was 97.8wt% at 114°C and 4.06M catalyst with 6.67mlEtOAC/g dried algae based on experimental results and response surface methodology (RSM). This wet in situ transesterification of microalgae using ethyl acetate doesn't require an additional co-solvent and it also promises more economic benefit as combining extraction and transesterification in a single process.

  13. Genome shuffling in the ethanologenic yeast Candida krusei to improve acetic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wei, Pingying; Li, Zilong; He, Peng; Lin, Yuping; Jiang, Ning

    2008-02-01

    Genome shuffling was used to improve the acetic acid tolerance of an ethanologenic yeast, Candida krusei GL560. A mutant, S4-3, was isolated and selected after four rounds of genome shuffling. It was found that the mutant S4-3 had a higher viability in the YNBX (yeast nitrogen base/xylose) medium with acetic acid and grew better in the YPD (yeast extract, peptone and dextrose) medium [1% (w/v) yeast extract, 2% (w/v) peptone and 2% (w/v) glucose] with acetic acid than the parent strain GL560. The mutant S4-3 also improved its multiple stress tolerance to ethanol, H2O2, heat and freeze-thaw. Furthermore, S4-3 showed higher ethanol production than GL560 in EFM (ethanol fermentation medium) with or without acetic acid. The DNA content of S4-3 was similar to its parent strains in the genome shuffling. This suggested that gene exchange, as caused by homologous recombination, may have occurred during the process. Higher membrane integrity and intracellular catalase activity were two possible reasons for the higher acid-tolerance phenotype of S4-3. These results indicated that genome shuffling is a powerful means of rapidly improving the complex traits of non-haploid organisms, while still maintaining robust growth.

  14. Adaptive laboratory evolution of ethanologenic Zymomonas mobilis strain tolerant to furfural and acetic acid inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shui, Zong-Xia; Qin, Han; Wu, Bo; Ruan, Zhi-yong; Wang, Lu-shang; Tan, Fu-Rong; Wang, Jing-Li; Tang, Xiao-Yu; Dai, Li-Chun; Hu, Guo-Quan; He, Ming-Xiong

    2015-07-01

    Furfural and acetic acid from lignocellulosic hydrolysates are the prevalent inhibitors to Zymomonas mobilis during cellulosic ethanol production. Developing a strain tolerant to furfural or acetic acid inhibitors is difficul by using rational engineering strategies due to poor understanding of their underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, strategy of adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) was used for development of a furfural and acetic acid-tolerant strain. After three round evolution, four evolved mutants (ZMA7-2, ZMA7-3, ZMF3-2, and ZMF3-3) that showed higher growth capacity were successfully obtained via ALE method. Based on the results of profiling of cell growth, glucose utilization, ethanol yield, and activity of key enzymes, two desired strains, ZMA7-2 and ZMF3-3, were achieved, which showed higher tolerance under 7 g/l acetic acid and 3 g/l furfural stress condition. Especially, it is the first report of Z. mobilis strain that could tolerate higher furfural. The best strain, Z. mobilis ZMF3-3, has showed 94.84% theoretical ethanol yield under 3-g/l furfural stress condition, and the theoretical ethanol yield of ZM4 is only 9.89%. Our study also demonstrated that ALE method might also be used as a powerful metabolic engineering tool for metabolic engineering in Z. mobilis. Furthermore, the two best strains could be used as novel host for further metabolic engineering in cellulosic ethanol or future biorefinery. Importantly, the two strains may also be used as novel-tolerant model organisms for the genetic mechanism on the "omics" level, which will provide some useful information for inverse metabolic engineering.

  15. Biofuel Ethanol Transport Risk

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol production has increased rapidly over the last 10 years and many communities lack awareness of the increased and growing extent of biofuel transportation through their jurisdictions. These communities and their emergency responders may not have the information and resour...

  16. Process for producing ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Lantero, O.J.; Fish, J.J.

    1993-07-27

    A process is described for producing ethanol from raw materials containing a high dry solid mash level having fermentable sugars or constituents which can be converted into sugars, comprising the steps of: (a) liquefaction of the raw materials in the presence of an alpha amylase to obtain liquefied mash; (b) saccharification of the liquefied mash in the presence of a glucoamylase to obtain hydrolysed starch and sugars; (c) fermentation of the hydrolysed starch and sugars by yeast to obtain ethanol; and (d) recovering the obtained ethanol, wherein an acid fungal protease is introduced to the liquefied mash during the saccharification and/or to the hydrolysed starch and sugars during the fermentation, thereby increasing the rate of production of ethanol as compared to a substantially similar process conducted without the introduction of the protease.

  17. Enhancement of hypoxic liver damage by ethanol. Involvement of xanthine oxidase and the role of glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Younes, M; Strubelt, O

    1987-09-15

    Using isolated hemoglobin-free perfused rat livers we investigated the hepatotoxic effects of hypoxia, ethanol or the combination of both. Hypoxia only (90 min) led to a weak toxicity as evidenced by the efflux of the enzymes glutamate-pyruvate-transaminase (GPT) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH). This toxic effect was slightly higher in livers treated with ethanol (3 g/l) under normoxic conditions. Ethanol added under hypoxic conditions, however, showed a strong hepatotoxic effect. Under hypoxic conditions, lactate + pyruvate production was increased fivefold over control, indicating that glycolysis was more effectively undergone as main source of energy. Addition of ethanol suppressed this effect, indicating that ethanol inhibited glycolysis. These results indicate that ethanol potentiates hypoxic liver damage by inhibiting the main metabolic pathway yielding ATP under low oxygen tension resulting in a severe energy deficit. Allopurinol (100 mg/l) inhibited the toxic effects seen with ethanol + hypoxia. Also, the inhibitory action of ethanol on glycolysis was antagonized. Our results are consistent with the following model: hypoxia converts NAD-dependent xanthine dehydrogenase (XD) into the oxygen-dependent xanthine oxidase (XO). Due to hypoxia and ethanol, purine metabolites and acetaldehyde accumulate and are metabolized via XO. This process leads to the production of oxygen radicals which most probably mediate both the inhibition of glycolysis and the direct toxic effects towards liver cells.

  18. Exogenous lactate supply affects lactate kinetics of rainbow trout, not swimming performance

    PubMed Central

    Omlin, Teye; Langevin, Karolanne

    2014-01-01

    Intense swimming causes circulatory lactate accumulation in rainbow trout because lactate disposal (Rd) is not stimulated as strongly as lactate appearance (Ra). This mismatch suggests that maximal Rd is limited by tissue capacity to metabolize lactate. This study uses exogenous lactate to investigate what constrains maximal Rd and minimal Ra. Our goals were to determine how exogenous lactate affects: 1) Ra and Rd of lactate under baseline conditions or during graded swimming, and 2) exercise performance (critical swimming speed, Ucrit) and energetics (cost of transport, COT). Results show that exogenous lactate allows swimming trout to boost maximal Rd lactate by 40% and reach impressive rates of 56 μmol·kg−1·min−1. This shows that the metabolic capacity of tissues for lactate disposal is not responsible for setting the highest Rd normally observed after intense swimming. Baseline endogenous Ra (resting in normoxic water) is not significantly reduced by exogenous lactate supply. Therefore, trout have an obligatory need to produce lactate, either as a fuel for oxidative tissues and/or from organs relying on glycolysis. Exogenous lactate does not affect Ucrit or COT, probably because it acts as a substitute for glucose and lipids rather than extra fuel. We conclude that the observed 40% increase in Rd lactate is made possible by accelerating lactate entry into oxidative tissues via monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). This observation together with the weak expression of MCTs and the phenomenon of white muscle lactate retention show that lactate metabolism of rainbow trout is significantly constrained by transmembrane transport. PMID:25121611

  19. Hydrogen partial pressures in a thermophilic acetate-oxidizing methanogenic coculture. [THF, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.J.; Zinder, S.H. )

    1988-06-01

    Hydrogen partial pressures were measured in a thermophilic coculture comprised of a eubacterial rod which oxidized acetate to H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} and a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, Methanobacterium sp. strain THF. H{sub 2} partial pressures in the coculture were measured to be between 20 and 50 Pa (0.12 to 0.30 {mu}M) during acetate utilization, approximately one order of magnitude higher than originally predicted by Zinder and Koch. However, when {Delta}G{sub f} (free energy of formation) values were corrected for 60{degree}C, the predicted value was near 15 Pa, in closer agreement with the experimentally determined values. The coculture also oxidized ethanol to acetate with H{sub 2} partial pressure values as high as 200 Pa. Acetate was not used until after the ethanol was consumed and the H{sub 2} partial pressure decreased to 40 to 50 Pa. After acetate utilization, H{sub 2} partial pressures fell to approximately 10 Pa and remained there, indicating a threshold for H{sub 2} utilization by the methanogen. Axenic cultures of the acetate-oxidizing organism were combined with pure cultures of either Methanobacterium sp. strain THF or Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum {Delta}H to form reconstituted acetate-oxidizing cocultures. The H{sub 2} partial pressures measured in both of these reconstituted cocultures were similar to those measured in the original acetate-oxidizing rod coculture. Since M. thermoautotrophicum {Delta}H did not use formate as a substrate, formate is not necessarily involved in interspecies electron transfer in this coculture.

  20. Epidermal growth factor precursor in mouse lactating mammary gland alveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.F.; Teng, C.T.; Pentecost, B.T.; DiAugustine, R.P. )

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that high levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) occur in human and rodent milk and that oral administration of this polypeptide stimulates rodent gastrointestinal development. It is not known whether EGF in milk originates from cells of the lactating mammary gland or is sequestered from an extramammary source. In the present study, prepro-EGF mRNA (approximately 4.7 kilobases) was detected in the CD-1 mouse mammary gland throughout the period of lactation; by comparison, negligible levels of this EGF transcript were found in the gland during pregnancy. Low levels of EGF immunoreactivity (4-5 ng/g wet wt tissue) were extracted from lactating (day 18) mammary glands with dilute acetic acid. Immunolocalization was evident with antisera to either EGF or two other regions of the EGF precursor in essentially all alveolar cells of the lactating gland. The most prominent staining with antiserum to EGF was observed along the luminal borders of cells; this pattern of cellular staining required proteolytic pretreatment of tissue sections. Western blot analyses of cell membranes isolated from the day 16 lactating mammary gland revealed an EGF-immunoreactive band at about 145K, which was equivalent in size to the EGF precursor found in mouse kidney cell membranes. Despite these findings, labeling of lactating mammary gland mince with L-(35S)methionine and cysteine for up to 4 h did not reveal any specific bands in immunoprecipitates. These cumulative findings suggest that the precursor form of EGF occurs in alveolar cells of lactating mammary gland and that this protein is translocated to the cell membrane.

  1. Stat5a increases lactation of dairy cow mammary gland epithelial cells cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao Fei; Li, Meng; Li, Qing Zhang; Lu, Li Min; Tong, Hui Li; Gao, Xue Jun

    2012-10-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5a (Stat5a) transduces signals of extracellular cytokines and growth factors to the nucleus of mammary gland epithelial cells and thereby regulates gene transcription during pregnancy, lactation, and weaning. However, its function on the milk production of dairy cows needs further investigation. In this experiment, the effects of Stat5a on lactation ability of dairy cow mammary gland epithelial cells (DCMECs) were analyzed. Eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1+-stat5a-αS1 was constructed by inserting stat5a gene into the plasmid vector pcDNA3.1+ and replacing CMV promoter with α-S1-casein 5' flanking sequence. The recombinant vector was stably transfected into DCMECs after geneticin (G418) selection. The proliferation and viability of DCMECs, expression of β-casein and stat5a gene, and the content of lactose were detected. The results showed that stat5a gene in eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1+-stat5a-αS1 was highly expressed in DCMECs and could increase the lactation ability of DCMECs. The associativity of Stat5a with nutrients on the lactation ability of DCMECs was also evaluated. Lysine (Lys), methionine (Met), sodium acetate, β-sodium hydroxybutyrate, and glucose all had more positive effects on the lactation function of DCMECs after pcDNA3.1+-stat5a-αS1 transfection. The proliferation and viability of DCMECs, expression of β-casein and stat5a gene, and contents of lactose and triglyceride were detected. The results revealed that nutrients could promote expression of Stat5a gene to increase lactation of DCMECs. These data help to clarify the function of stat5 gene on lactation and gene regulatory networks linking stat5a.

  2. Reversible lactic acidosis associated with repeated intravenous infusions of sorbitol and ethanol.

    PubMed Central

    Batstone, G. F.; Alberti, K. G.; Dewar, A. K.

    1977-01-01

    Infusions of fructose or sorbitol are used commonly in parenteral nutrition and may cause lactic acidosis. A case is reported in whom blood lactate concentration was monitored frequently over a 5-day period during intravenous feeding with a sorbitol-ethanol-amino acid mixture. During the first five infusions blood lactate rose only moderately, but with the final infusion lactate rose to 11-1 mmol/l and the patient had a severe metabolic acidosis. In retrospect the patient had shown deterioration in renal and hepatic function tests during the preceding 24 hr. On terminating the infusions the blood lactate concentration fell rapidly. It is suggested that great care should be exercised when using such infusions in ill patients and acid base status and renal and hepatic function should be monitored frequently. PMID:22069

  3. Ethanol production from lignocellulose

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Wood, Brent E.

    2001-01-01

    This invention presents a method of improving enzymatic degradation of lignocellulose, as in the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, through the use of ultrasonic treatment. The invention shows that ultrasonic treatment reduces cellulase requirements by 1/3 to 1/2. With the cost of enzymes being a major problem in the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, this invention presents a significant improvement over presently available methods.

  4. Cashew apple bagasse as a source of sugars for ethanol production by Kluyveromyces marxianus CE025.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Maria Valderez Ponte; Rodrigues, Tigressa Helena Soares; Melo, Vania M M; Gonçalves, Luciana R B; de Macedo, Gorete Ribeiro

    2011-08-01

    The potential of cashew apple bagasse as a source of sugars for ethanol production by Kluyveromyces marxianus CE025 was evaluated in this work. This strain was preliminarily cultivated in a synthetic medium containing glucose and xylose and was able to produce ethanol and xylitol at pH 4.5. Next, cashew apple bagasse hydrolysate (CABH) was prepared by a diluted sulfuric acid pretreatment and used as fermentation media. This hydrolysate is rich in glucose, xylose, and arabinose and contains traces of formic acid and acetic acid. In batch fermentations of CABH at pH 4.5, the strain produced only ethanol. The effects of temperature on the kinetic parameters of ethanol fermentation by K. marxianus CE025 using CABH were also evaluated. Maximum specific growth rate (μ(max)), overall yields of ethanol based on glucose consumption [Formula: see text] and based on glucose + xylose consumption (Y ( P/S )), overall yield of ethanol based on biomass (Y ( P/X )), and ethanol productivity (P (E)) were determined as a function of temperature. Best results of ethanol production were achieved at 30°C, which is also quite close to the optimum temperature for the formation of biomass. The process yielded 12.36 ± 0.06 g l(-1) of ethanol with a volumetric production rate of 0.257 ± 0.002 g l(-1) h(-1) and an ethanol yield of 0.417 ± 0.003 g g(-1) glucose.

  5. Alcohol-induced suppression of gluconeogenesis is greater in ethanol fed female rat hepatocytes than males.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Ken D; Cogger, Alma A; Matveyenko, Aleksey V

    2007-03-01

    The impact of alcohol-induced suppression on hepatic gluconeogenesis (HGN) after chronic ethanol consumption between males and females is unknown. To determine the effects of chronic alcohol consumption (8 weeks) on HGN, the isolated hepatocyte technique was used on 24 h fasted male and female Wistar rats. Livers were initially perfused with collagenase and the hepatocytes were isolated. Aliquots of the cell suspension were placed in Krebs-Henseleit buffer and incubated for 30 min with lactate, [U -14C]lactate, and nine different concentrations of ethanol (EtOH). Dose-effect curves were generated for the determination of maximal and half-maximal alcohol-induced inhibition on HGN. There was no significant difference in HGN (lactate only and no EtOH) between males and females fed the control diet (88.5 +/- 5.1 nmol/mg protein/30 min). Similarly, the HGN (lactate only and no EtOH) in males fed the ethanol diet (ME) were not significantly different (82.8 +/- 3.5 nmol/mg protein/30 min) compared to controls. In contrast, the females chronically fed the ethanol diet (FE) had significantly (P < .05) lower HGN (67.8 +/- 4.6 nmol/mg protein/30 min) compared to both ME and controls. With alcohol in the incubation medium, the HGN significantly (P<.05) declined in all groups. While alcohol suppressed HGN to a larger (P < .05) extent in ME (45.8 +/- 3.7 nmol/mg protein/30 min) compared to controls (64.0 +/- 3.8 nmol/mg protein/30 min), the inhibition was even greater (P < .05) in FE (32.7 +/- 3.2 nmol/mg protein/30 min). The more pronounced effect of chronic alcohol consumption on HGN in the presence of ethanol in female hepatocytes was supported by the concomitant decreases (P < .05) in 14C-lactate incorporation into 14C-glucose, lactate uptake, and 14C-lactate uptake. The results suggest that chronic alcohol consumption elicits a greater reduction on HGN in the presence of ethanol in the hepatocytes of females compared to males.

  6. 21 CFR 184.1639 - Potassium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium lactate. 184.1639 Section 184.1639 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1639 Potassium lactate. (a) Potassium lactate (C3H5O3K, CAS Reg. No. 996-31-6) is the potassium salt of lactic acid. It is a hydroscopic, white, odorless solid and...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1639 - Potassium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium lactate. 184.1639 Section 184.1639 Food... GRAS § 184.1639 Potassium lactate. (a) Potassium lactate (C3H5O3K, CAS Reg. No. 996-31-6) is the potassium salt of lactic acid. It is a hydroscopic, white, odorless solid and is prepared commercially...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1639 - Potassium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium lactate. 184.1639 Section 184.1639 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1639 Potassium lactate. (a) Potassium lactate (C3H5O3K, CAS Reg. No. 996-31-6) is the potassium salt of lactic acid. It is a hydroscopic, white, odorless solid and...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1639 - Potassium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium lactate. 184.1639 Section 184.1639 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1639 Potassium lactate. (a) Potassium lactate (C3H5O3K, CAS Reg. No. 996-31-6) is the potassium salt of lactic acid. It is a hydroscopic, white, odorless solid and...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1639 - Potassium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium lactate. 184.1639 Section 184.1639 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1639 Potassium lactate. (a) Potassium lactate (C3H5O3K, CAS Reg. No. 996-31-6) is the potassium salt of lactic acid. It is a hydroscopic, white, odorless solid and...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1768 - Sodium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium lactate. 184.1768 Section 184.1768 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1768 Sodium lactate. (a) Sodium lactate (C3H5O3Na, CAS Reg. No. 72-17-3) is the sodium salt of lactic acid. It is prepared commercially by the neutralization of lactic acid...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1768 - Sodium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium lactate. 184.1768 Section 184.1768 Food and....1768 Sodium lactate. (a) Sodium lactate (C3H5O3Na, CAS Reg. No. 72-17-3) is the sodium salt of lactic acid. It is prepared commercially by the neutralization of lactic acid with sodium hydroxide. (b)...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1768 - Sodium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium lactate. 184.1768 Section 184.1768 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1768 Sodium lactate. (a) Sodium lactate (C3H5O3Na, CAS Reg. No. 72-17-3) is the sodium salt of lactic acid. It is prepared commercially by the neutralization of lactic acid...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1768 - Sodium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium lactate. 184.1768 Section 184.1768 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1768 Sodium lactate. (a) Sodium lactate (C3H5O3Na, CAS Reg. No. 72-17-3) is the sodium salt of lactic acid. It is prepared commercially by the neutralization of lactic acid...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1768 - Sodium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium lactate. 184.1768 Section 184.1768 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1768 Sodium lactate. (a) Sodium lactate (C3H5O3Na, CAS Reg. No. 72-17-3) is the sodium salt of lactic acid. It is prepared commercially by the neutralization of lactic acid...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O,...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O,...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O, where x is...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT... GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O, where x is any integer up to...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O,...

  1. Effect of Water on Ethanol Conversion over ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Muhammad Mahfuzur; Davidson, Stephen D.; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    This work focuses on understanding the role of water on ethanol conversion over zinc oxide (ZnO). It was found that a competitive adsorption between ethanol and water occurs on ZnO, which leads to the blockage of the strong Lewis acid site by water on ZnO. As a result, both dehydration and dehydrogenation reactions are inhibited. However, the extent of inhibition for dehydration is orders of magnitude higher than that for dehydrogenation, leading to the shift of reaction pathway from ethanol dehydration to dehydrogenation. In the secondary reactions for acetaldehyde conversion, water inhibits the acetaldehyde aldol-condensation to crotonaldehyde, favoring the oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetic acid, and then to acetone via ketonization at high temperature (i.e., 400 °C).

  2. Antinociceptive Activity of an Ethanol Extract of Justicia spicigera.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Morales, Juan Ramón; Alonso-Castro, Angel Josabad; Domínguez, Fabiola; Carranza-Álvarez, Candy; Castellanos, Luis Manuel Orozco; Martínez-Medina, Rosa María; Pérez-Urizar, José

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical Research The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antinociceptive and sedative activity of an ethanol extract of Justicia spicigera an evergreen used in Mexican traditional medicine for the relief of pain, wounds, fever and inflammation. At 200 mg/kg po, the maximum dose examined, the ethanol extract of J. spicigera (JSE) had analgesic activity in mice in the acetic acid writhing test, the second phase of the formalin test and the tail flick test that was similar in efficacy to the NSAID, naproxen (150 mg/kg po). JSE was inactive in the hot plate test and and the ketamine-induced sleeping time test; it had no sedative effects. These results show that the ethanol extract from the leaves of J. spicigera has antinociceptive effects in mice without inducing sedation. Drug Dev Res 77 : 180-186, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Further Improvement of the Robust Recombinant Saccharomyces Yeast for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Nancy, W. Y.; Adamec, Jiri; Mosier, Nathan, S.; Sedlak, Miroslav

    2011-04-07

    Since 1980, the PI's laboratory at Purdue University has been at the forefront in developing recombinant Saccharomyces yeast for cellulosic ethanol production. Their innovation enabled them to successfully develop the recombinant Saccharomyces yeast strain 424A(LNH-ST) that has been validated by scientists in industry, universities, and National Laboratories. Strain 424A(LNH-ST) has also been used by a company to produce cellulosic ethanol since 2004. Nevertheless, this strain still needs improvement, particularly to achieve high ethanol titer when cellulosic biomass hydrolysates are used for ethanol production. In this project, we were able to carry out a total genetic overhaul of our yeast by carrying out nine different tasks to improve our 424A(LNH-ST) strain. Through these tasks we enabled the yeast to co-ferment arabinose together with other four sugars generally present in all cellulosic biomass. Thus 424A(LNH-ST) can now ferment all five sugars, glucose, xylose, mannose, galactose and arabinose present in any cellulosic biomass. We also successfully used adaptation techniques and direct genetic improvements to develop improved 424A(LNH-ST) strains that are more resistant to acetic acid or ethanol. These are the most significant inhibitors of those commonly present in cellulosic hydrolysates that prevent 424A(LNH-ST) from producing high concentrations of cellulosic ethanol. The acetic acid resistant strain has 89% better xylose utilization in the presence of acetic acid and 25% better overall ethanol yield. The ethanol resistant strain has 250% better ethanol volumetric productivity. The three tasks for improving the main metabolic pathways have all been successfully completed but the impact of these improvements was less dramatic. This demonstrates our yeast already has effective metabolic systems for co-fermenting cellulosic sugars. However, our attempt to improve the yeast to transport xylose and arabinose more efficiently had only limited success. Thus

  4. Further Improvement of the Robust Recombinant Saccharomyces Yeast for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Nancy W. Y.; Adamec, Jiri; Mosier, Nathan, S.; Sedlak, Miroslav

    2011-04-09

    Since 1980, the PI’s laboratory at Purdue University has been at the forefront in developing recombinant Saccharomyces yeast for cellulosic ethanol production. Their innovation enabled them to successfully develop the recombinant Saccharomyces yeast strain 424A(LNH-ST) that has been validated by scientists in industry, universities, and National Laboratories. Strain 424A(LNH-ST) has also been used by a company to produce cellulosic ethanol since 2004. Nevertheless, this strain still needs improvement, particularly to achieve high ethanol titer when cellulosic biomass hydrolysates are used for ethanol production. In this project, we were able to carry out a total genetic overhaul of our yeast by carrying out nine different tasks to improve our 424A(LNH-ST) strain. Through these tasks we enabled the yeast to co-ferment arabinose together with other four sugars generally present in all cellulosic biomass. Thus 424A(LNH-ST) can now ferment all five sugars, glucose, xylose, mannose, galactose and arabinose present in any cellulosic biomass. We also successfully used adaptation techniques and direct genetic improvements to develop improved 424A(LNH-ST) strains that are more resistant to acetic acid or ethanol. These are the most significant inhibitors of those commonly present in cellulosic hydrolysates that prevent 424A(LNH-ST) from producing high concentrations of cellulosic ethanol. The acetic acid resistant strain has 89% better xylose utilization in the presence of acetic acid and 25% better overall ethanol yield. The ethanol resistant strain has 250% better ethanol volumetric productivity. The three tasks for improving the main metabolic pathways have all been successfully completed but the impact of these improvements was less dramatic. This demonstrates our yeast already has effective metabolic systems for co-fermenting cellulosic sugars. However, our attempt to improve the yeast to transport xylose and arabinose more efficiently had only limited success. Thus

  5. Monitoring electron donor metabolism under variable electron acceptor conditions using 13C-labeled lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.; Yang, L.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Three sets of flow-through columns constructed with aquifer sediment from Hanford (WA) were used to study reduction of Cr(VI) to poorly soluble Cr(III) under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing/fermentative, and iron-reducing conditions with lactate as the electron donor. In order to understand the relationship between electron donors and biomarkers, and to determine the differences in carbon isotope fractionation resulting from different microbial metabolic processes, we monitored the variation in carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), in total organic carbon (TOC), and in lactate, acetate and propionate. The greatest enrichment in 13C in columns was observed under denitrifying conditions. The δ13C of DIC increased by ~1750 to ~2000‰ fifteen days after supplementation of natural abundance lactate with a 13C-labeled lactate tracer (for an influent δ13C of ~2250‰ for the lactate) indicating almost complete oxidation of the electron donor. The denitrifying columns were among the most active columns and had the highest cell counts and the denitrification rate was highly correlated with Cr(VI) reduction rate. δ13C values of DIC ranged from ~540 to ~1170‰ for iron-reducing conditions. The lower enrichment in iron columns was related to the lower biological activity observed with lower yields of RNA and cell numbers in the column effluents. The carbon isotope shift in the sulfate-reducing ~198 to ~1960‰ for sulfate-reducing conditions reflecting the lower levels of the lactate in these columns. Additionally, in two of the sulfate columns, almost complete fermentation of the lactate occurred, producing acetate and propionate with the labeled carbon signature, but relatively smaller amounts of inorganic carbon. For all electron-accepting conditions, TOC yielded similar δ13C values as lactate stock solutions. Differences in C use efficiency, metabolic rate or metabolic pathway contributed to the differing TOC δ13C to DIC δ13C ratios between treatments

  6. Studies on the mechanism of synthesis of ethyl acetate in Kluyveromyces marxianus DSM 5422.

    PubMed

    Löser, Christian; Urit, Thanet; Keil, Peter; Bley, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Kluyveromyces marxianus converts whey-borne sugar into ethyl acetate, an environmentally friendly solvent with many applications. K. marxianus DSM 5422 presumably synthesizes ethyl acetate from acetyl-SCoA. Iron limitation as a trigger for this synthesis is explained by a diminished aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase activity (both enzymes depend on iron) causing diversion of acetyl-SCoA from the tricarboxic acid cycle to ester synthesis. Copper limitation as another trigger for ester synthesis in this yeast refers to involvement of the electron transport chain (all ETC complexes depend on iron and complex IV requires copper). This hypothesis was checked by using several ETC inhibitors. Malonate was ineffective but carboxin partially inhibited complex II and initiated ester synthesis. Antimycin A and cyanide as complexes III and IV inhibitors initiated ester synthesis only at moderate levels while higher concentrations disrupted all respiration and caused ethanol formation. A restricted supply of oxygen (the terminal electron acceptor) also initiated some ester synthesis but primarily forced ethanol production. A switch from aerobic to anaerobic conditions nearly stopped ester synthesis and induced ethanol formation. Iron-limited ester formation was compared with anaerobic ethanol production; the ester yield was lower than the ethanol yield but a higher market price, a reduced number of process stages, a faster process, and decreased expenses for product recovery by stripping favor biotechnological ester production.

  7. Lactation--how important is it?

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, U E; Walker, A R

    1994-02-01

    In Africa, with poverty rising, and health care diminishing, a nutritional question is-what are the limits of successful physiological adaptation to low dietary intakes? In this review the practice of lactation is discussed, from both past and present viewpoints. Orthodox Recommended Allowances for lactation are scarcely ever met. Yet, through various adaptations, the huge majority of African and similarly placed mothers lactate successfully and produce milk of good quantity and quality. The benefits from supplements are discussed; broadly, results have been disappointing. Some good and adverse non-dietary practices are considered. Benefits for infant and mother from lactation, even for protracted periods, far exceed drawbacks.

  8. Acetic Acid Detection Threshold in Synthetic Wine Samples of a Portable Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Macías, Miguel Macías; Manso, Antonio García; Orellana, Carlos Javier García; Velasco, Horacio Manuel González; Caballero, Ramón Gallardo; Chamizo, Juan Carlos Peguero

    2013-01-01

    Wine quality is related to its intrinsic visual, taste, or aroma characteristics and is reflected in the price paid for that wine. One of the most important wine faults is the excessive concentration of acetic acid which can cause a wine to take on vinegar aromas and reduce its varietal character. Thereby it is very important for the wine industry to have methods, like electronic noses, for real-time monitoring the excessive concentration of acetic acid in wines. However, aroma characterization of alcoholic beverages with sensor array electronic noses is a difficult challenge due to the masking effect of ethanol. In this work, in order to detect the presence of acetic acid in synthetic wine samples (aqueous ethanol solution at 10% v/v) we use a detection unit which consists of a commercial electronic nose and a HSS32 auto sampler, in combination with a neural network classifier (MLP). To find the characteristic vector representative of the sample that we want to classify, first we select the sensors, and the section of the sensors response curves, where the probability of detecting the presence of acetic acid will be higher, and then we apply Principal Component Analysis (PCA) such that each sensor response curve is represented by the coefficients of its first principal components. Results show that the PEN3 electronic nose is able to detect and discriminate wine samples doped with acetic acid in concentrations equal or greater than 2 g/L. PMID:23262483

  9. Acetic acid detection threshold in synthetic wine samples of a portable electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Macías, Miguel Macías; Manso, Antonio García; Orellana, Carlos Javier García; Velasco, Horacio Manuel González; Caballero, Ramón Gallardo; Chamizo, Juan Carlos Peguero

    2012-12-24

    Wine quality is related to its intrinsic visual, taste, or aroma characteristics and is reflected in the price paid for that wine. One of the most important wine faults is the excessive concentration of acetic acid which can cause a wine to take on vinegar aromas and reduce its varietal character. Thereby it is very important for the wine industry to have methods, like electronic noses, for real-time monitoring the excessive concentration of acetic acid in wines. However, aroma characterization of alcoholic beverages with sensor array electronic noses is a difficult challenge due to the masking effect of ethanol. In this work, in order to detect the presence of acetic acid in synthetic wine samples (aqueous ethanol solution at 10% v/v) we use a detection unit which consists of a commercial electronic nose and a HSS32 auto sampler, in combination with a neural network classifier (MLP). To find the characteristic vector representative of the sample that we want to classify, first we select the sensors, and the section of the sensors response curves, where the probability of detecting the presence of acetic acid will be higher, and then we apply Principal Component Analysis (PCA) such that each sensor response curve is represented by the coefficients of its first principal components. Results show that the PEN3 electronic nose is able to detect and discriminate wine samples doped with acetic acid in concentrations equal or greater than 2 g/L.

  10. Volatile organic compound emissions from dry mill fuel ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Brady, Daniel; Pratt, Gregory C

    2007-09-01

    Ethanol fuel production is growing rapidly in the rural Midwest, and this growth presents potential environmental impacts. In 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) entered into enforcement actions with 12 fuel ethanol plants in Minnesota. The enforcement actions uncovered underreported emissions and resulted in consent decrees that required pollution control equipment be installed. A key component of the consent decrees was a requirement to conduct emissions tests for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with the goal of improving the characterization and control of emissions. The conventional VOC stack test method was thought to underquantify total VOC emissions from ethanol plants. A hybrid test method was also developed that involved quantification of individual VOC species. The resulting database of total and speciated VOC emissions from 10 fuel ethanol plants is relatively small, but it is the most extensive to date and has been used to develop and gauge compliance with permit limits and to estimate health risks in Minnesota. Emissions were highly variable among facilities and emissions units. In addition to the variability, the small number of samples and the presence of many values below detection limits complicate the analysis of the data. To account for these issues, a nested bootstrap procedure on the Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate means and upper confidence limits. In general, the fermentation scrubbers and fluid bed coolers emitted the largest mass of VOC emissions. Across most facilities and emissions units ethanol was the pollutant emitted at the highest rate. Acetaldehyde, acetic acid, and ethyl acetate were also important emissions from some units. Emissions of total VOCs, ethanol, and some other species appeared to be a function of the beer feed rate, although the relationship was not reliable enough to develop a production rate-based emissions factor.

  11. Genome-wide overexpression screen for sodium acetate resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Peña, Pedro V; Glasker, Steven; Srienc, Friedrich

    2013-03-10

    The production of biofuels from cellulosic biomass is a promising technology for developing a renewable source of energy. Efforts to produce ethanol from cellulosic biomass using microbes, such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, face major challenges, including the need for detoxification. Here, we apply a strategy to discover genetic alterations that lead to improved robustness of S. cerevisiae in the presence of acetate, which is present at toxic concentrations in hemicellulose hydrolysates. Acetate in its protonated form (acetic acid) enters the cell through passive diffusion and dissociates into a proton and acetate, acidifying the cytosol and inhibiting cell function, an effect that is exacerbated in the presence of sodium. Through flow cytometry analysis, implemented as part of a novel cell culture technique, the Cytostat, we characterized the deleterious effects of sodium acetate on growth and on cell size homeostasis. Further, using the Cytostat to screen a genome-wide, gene overexpression library, we identified that overexpressing the ENA2 gene, a P-type sodium pump ATPase, provides a significant growth improvement in the presence of sodium acetate. Together, our data support the proposed mechanism for the synergistic growth inhibition exerted by acetate and sodium, as well as the mechanism that develops resistance.

  12. A comparative study of biodegradation of vinyl acetate by environmental strains.

    PubMed

    Greń, Izabela; Gąszczak, Agnieszka; Guzik, Urszula; Bartelmus, Grażyna; Labużek, Sylwia

    2011-06-01

    Four Gram-negative strains, E3_2001, EC1_2004, EC3_3502 and EC2_3502, previously isolated from soil samples, were subjected to comparative studies in order to select the best vinyl acetate degrader for waste gas treatment. Comparison of biochemical and physiological tests as well as the results of fatty acids analyses were comparable with the results of 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. The isolated strains were identified as Pseudomonas putida EC3_2001, Pseudomonas putida EC1_2004, Achromobacter xylosoxidans EC3_3502 and Agrobacterium sp. EC2_3502 strains. Two additional strains, Pseudomonas fluorescens PCM 2123 and Stenotrophomonas malthophilia KB2, were used as controls. All described strains were able to use vinyl acetate as the only source of carbon and energy under aerobic as well as oxygen deficiency conditions. Esterase, alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase were involved in vinyl acetate decomposition under aerobic conditions. Shorter degradation times of vinyl acetate were associated with accumulation of acetic acid, acetaldehyde and ethanol as intermediates in the culture fluids of EC3_2001 and KB2 strains. Complete aerobic degradation of vinyl acetate combined with a low increase in biomass was observed for EC3_2001 and EC1_2004 strains. In conclusion, P. putida EC1_2004 is proposed as the best vinyl acetate degrader for future waste gas treatment in trickle-bed bioreactors.

  13. Acetic acid bacteria in traditional balsamic vinegar: phenotypic traits relevant for starter cultures selection.

    PubMed

    Gullo, Maria; Giudici, Paolo

    2008-06-30

    This review focuses on acetic acid bacteria in traditional balsamic vinegar process. Although several studies are available on acetic acid bacteria ecology, metabolism and nutritional requirements, their activity as well as their technological traits in homemade vinegars as traditional balsamic vinegar is not well known. The basic technology to oxidise cooked grape must to produce traditional balsamic vinegar is performed by the so called "seed-vinegar" that is a microbiologically undefined starter culture obtained from spontaneous acetification of previous raw material. Selected starter cultures are the main technological improvement in order to innovate traditional balsamic vinegar production but until now they are rarely applied. To develop acetic acid bacteria starter cultures, selection criteria have to take in account composition of raw material, acetic acid bacteria metabolic activities, applied technology and desired characteristics of the final product. For traditional balsamic vinegar, significative phenotypical traits of acetic acid bacteria have been highlighted. Basic traits are: ethanol preferred and efficient oxidation, fast rate of acetic acid production, tolerance to high concentration of acetic acid, no overoxidation and low pH resistance. Specific traits are tolerance to high sugar concentration and to a wide temperature range. Gluconacetobacter europaeus and Acetobacter malorum strains can be evaluated to develop selected starter cultures since they show one or more suitable characters.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Acetate-Utilizing Anaerobes from a Freshwater Sediment.

    PubMed

    Scholten, J.C.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2000-12-01

    Acetate-degrading anaerobic microorganisms in freshwater sediment were quantified by the most probable number technique. From the highest dilutions a methanogenic, a sulfate-reducing, and a nitrate-reducing microorganism were isolated with acetate as substrate. The methanogen (culture AMPB-Zg) was non-motile and rod-shaped with blunted ends (0.5-1 mm x 3-4 mm long). Doubling times with acetate at 30-35 degrees C were 5.6-8.1 days. The methanogen grew only on acetate. Analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence showed that AMPB-Zg is closely related to Methanosaeta concilii. The isolated sulfate-reducing bacterium (strain ASRB-Zg) was rod-shaped with pointed ends (0.5-0.7 mm x 1.5-3.5 mm long), weakly motile, spore forming, and gram positive. At the optimum growth temperature of 30 degrees C the doubling times with acetate were 3.9-5.3 days. The bacterium grew on a range of organic acids, such as acetate, butyrate, fumarate, and benzoate, but did not grow autotrophically with H2, CO2, and sulfate. The closest relative of strain ASRB-Zg is Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans. The nitrate-reducing bacterium (strain ANRB-Zg) was rod-shaped (0.5-0.7 mm x 0.7-1 mm long), weakly motile, and gram negative. Optimum growth with acetate occurred at 20-25 degrees C. The bacterium grew on a range of organic substrates, such as acetate, butyrate, lactate, and glucose, and did grow autotrophically with H2, CO2, and oxygen but not with nitrate. In the presence of acetate and nitrate, thiosulfate was oxidized to sulfate. Phylogenetically, the closest relative of strain ANRB-Zg is Variovorax paradoxus.

  15. Biological production of ethanol from coal. [Quarterly report], September 22, 1990--December 21, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    Previous results have shown that the medium pH, the composition of the medium and concentration of medium constituents significantly affect the ratio of ethanol to acetate in the product stream when fermenting CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} in synthesis gas to products by Clostridium ljungdahlii. An additional batch study was carried out varying the agitation rate at pH 4, 4.5 and 5.0. It was speculated that increased agitation rates in combination with low pH might result in increased ethanol production while, at the same time, yielding higher cell concentrations which could eventually result in higher ethanol concentrations.

  16. Effect of lead acetate toxicity on experimental male albino rat

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Nabil M; Eweis, Esam A; El-Beltagi, Hossam S; Abdel-Mobdy, Yasmin E

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of different doses of lead acetate (1/20, 1/40 and 1/60 of LD50) on body weight gain, blood picture, plasma protein profile and the function of liver, kidney and thyroid gland. Methods Male albino rats were divided into four groups, the first group represented the health control animals, while the second, third and fourth groups were ingested orally with sub lethal doses of lead acetate (1/20, 1/40 and 1/60) of the oral LD50, respectively. One dose was ingested every two days during the experimental period (14 weeks) including the adaptation time. Blood was collected and used for all analysis. Results The results showed that, the ingestion of Pb2+ induced significant stimulation in glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (ALT) and glutamic-oxalacetic transaminease (AST) activity. Also, total soluble protein and albumin contents of plasma were significantly decreased, while the content of globulin was changed by the Pb2+ treatments. The cholinesterase activity was inhibited, but the activities of alkaline and acid phosphates and lactate dehydrogenase were stimulated, while plasma glucose level was elevated as a result of lead acetate intoxication. In case of blood picture, Pb2+ ingestion reduced the contents of hemoglobin and RBCs count of intoxicated rat's blood and the plasma levels of T3, T4 and blood WBCs count were decreased. Conclusions It can be concluded that lead acetate has harmful effect on experimental male albino rats. Therefore, the present work advises people to prevent exposure to the lead compound to avoid injurious hazard risk. PMID:23569832

  17. Lactate Sensors on Flexible Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuesong; Fu, Timothy; Kota, Pavan Kumar; Tjia, Maggie; Nguyen, Cuong Manh; Chiao, Jung-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Lactate detection by an in situ sensor is of great need in clinical medicine, food processing, and athletic performance monitoring. In this paper, a flexible, easy to fabricate, and low-cost biosensor base on lactate oxidase is presented. The fabrication processes, including metal deposition, sol-gel IrOx deposition, and drop-dry enzyme loading method, are described in detail. The loaded enzyme was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Cyclic voltammetry was used to characterize the sensors. Durability, sensibility, and selectivity of the biosensors were examined. The comparison for different electrode sizes and different sensing film materials was conducted. The sensor could last for four weeks with an average surface area normalized sensitivity of 950 nA/(cm2 mM) and 9250 nA/(cm2 mM) for Au-based electrodes, and IrOx-modified electrodes respectively, both with an electrode size of 100 × 50 μm. The self-referencing method to record noises simultaneously with the working electrode greatly improved sensor sensitivity and selectivity. The sensor showed little response to interference chemicals, such as glutamate and dopamine. PMID:27657147

  18. Breastfeeding practices and lactation mastitis.

    PubMed

    Foxman, B; Schwartz, K; Looman, S J

    1994-03-01

    Clinical impression suggests that lactation mastitis is associated with inexperienced nursers, improper nursing techniques, stress and fatigue. A pilot study was conducted to describe the frequency of self-reported breastfeeding practices during the first week post partum among 100 breastfeeding women delivering at a freestanding birthing center or participating in an early discharge program. Nine cases of lactation mastitis were identified from the survey population and an additional 8 from the target population for the survey. Seventeen controls matched by delivery date were identified from survey participants. The frequency of self-reported breastfeeding practices, the presence of fatigue and stress during the week prior to the mastitis date in the case was compared among cases and controls. In the first week post partum, most women fed their babies every 2-3 hr for approx. 20 min a feeding. The cradle or Madonna position was the most frequently used nursing position. Nine percent reported supplementing feedings with formula. Women with mastitis were more likely than controls to report a history of mastitis with a previous child. In the week prior to the mastitis date of the case, women with mastitis were more likely than controls to report breast or nipple pain and cracks or breast fissures. They were less likely to report being able to take a daytime nap. Future studies should focus on the relative importance of and interrelationships among these factors.

  19. In vitro antioxidant activity and inhibitory effect, on oleic acid-induced hepatic steatosis, of fractions and subfractions from oat (Avena sativa L.) ethanol extract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oats (Avena sativa L.) were extracted with 80% aqueous ethanol and the extract was successively isolated by liquid-liquid partition to yield n-hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and water layers. Among these extractions the ethyl acetate (EA) layer exhibited the highest total phenolic content (TPC), t...

  20. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 2, technology development, annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    Oil refineries discharge large volumes of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This program seeks to develop a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol, which can be blended with gasoline to reduce emissions. Production of ethanol from all 194 US refineries would save 450 billion BTU annually, would reduce crude oil imports by 110 million barrels/year and emissions by 19 million tons/year. Phase II efforts has yielded at least 3 cultures (Clostridium ljungdahlii, Isolate O-52, Isolate C-01) which are able to produce commercially viable concentrations of ethanol from CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} in petroleum waste gas. Single continuous stirred tank reactor studies have shown that 15-20 g/L of ethanol can be produced, with less than 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Culture and reactor optimization in Phase III should yield even higher ethanol concentrations and minimal acetic acid. Product recovery studies showed that ethanol is best recovered in a multi-step process involving solvent extraction/distillation to azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation, or direct distillation to the azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation. Projections show that the ethanol facility for a typical refinery would require an investment of about $30 million, which would be returned in less than 2 years.

  1. Acetate accumulation enhances mixed culture fermentation of biomass to lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Khor, Way Cern; Roume, Hugo; Coma, Marta; Vervaeren, Han; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-10-01

    Lactic acid is a high-in-demand chemical, which can be produced through fermentation of lignocellulosic feedstock. However, fermentation of complex substrate produces a mixture of products at efficiencies too low to justify a production process. We hypothesized that the background acetic acid concentration plays a critical role in lactic acid yield; therefore, its retention via selective extraction of lactic acid or its addition would improve overall lactic acid production and eliminate net production of acetic acid. To test this hypothesis, we added 10 g/L of acetate to fermentation broth to investigate its effect on products composition and concentration and bacterial community evolution using several substrate-inoculum combinations. With rumen fluid inoculum, lactate concentrations increased by 80 ± 12 % (cornstarch, p < 0.05) and 16.7 ± 0.4 % (extruded grass, p < 0.05) while with pure culture inoculum (Lactobacillus delbrueckii and genetically modified (GM) Escherichia coli), a 4 to 23 % increase was observed. Using rumen fluid inoculum, the bacterial community was enriched within 8 days to >69 % lactic acid bacteria (LAB), predominantly Lactobacillaceae. Higher acetate concentration promoted a more diverse LAB population, especially on non-inoculated bottles. In subsequent tests, acetate was added in a semi-continuous percolation system with grass as substrate. These tests confirmed our findings producing lactate at concentrations 26 ± 5 % (p < 0.05) higher than the control reactor over 20 days operation. Overall, our work shows that recirculating acetate has the potential to boost lactic acid production from waste biomass to levels more attractive for application.

  2. Beneficial effect of a low dose of ethanol on liver function and serum urate in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Aimi; Okazaki, Yukako; Kimoto, Akiko; Izu, Hanae; Kato, Norihisa

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the consumption of 1% or 2% (v/v) ethanol in drinking water for 12 wk on rats fed a high-fat diet. Body weight gain, food intake, and fluid intake were unaffected by ethanol intake. Adipose tissue weight, and serum glucose and lipids were unaffected. Compared to the control (no ethanol), 1% ethanol intake significantly reduced serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and ammonia (p<0.05), whereas 2% ethanol intake did so to a lesser extent. Serum urate was significantly lower in both the 1% and 2% ethanol groups than that in the control group (p<0.05). The results suggest a low dose of ethanol has beneficial effects on liver function and serum urate in rats fed a high-fat diet.

  3. Zinc, magnesium, and calcium ion supplementation confers tolerance to acetic acid stress in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae utilizing xylose.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ku Syahidah Ku; Sakamoto, Takatoshi; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a potential substrate for ethanol production. However, pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials produces inhibitory compounds such as acetic acid, which negatively affect ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Supplementation of the medium with three metal ions (Zn(2+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) ) increased the tolerance of S. cerevisiae toward acetic acid compared to the absence of the ions. Ethanol production from xylose was most improved (by 34%) when the medium was supplemented with 2 mM Ca(2+) , followed by supplementation with 3.5 mM Mg(2+) (29% improvement), and 180 μM Zn(2+) (26% improvement). Higher ethanol production was linked to high cell viability in the presence of metal ions. Comparative transcriptomics between the supplemented cultures and the control suggested that improved cell viability resulted from the induction of genes controlling the cell wall and membrane. Only one gene, FIT2, was found to be up-regulated in common between the three metal ions. Also up-regulation of HXT1 and TKL1 might enhance xylose consumption in the presence of acetic acid. Thus, the addition of ionic nutrients is a simple and cost-effective method to improve the acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae.

  4. Effects of ethanol addition on formation of hydroxyapatite through hydrothermal treatment of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, T.; Kamitakahara, M.; Kim, I. Y.; Ohtsuki, C.

    2011-10-01

    The mixture of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and calcium acetate monohydrate were hydrothermally treated in a condition of water-ethanol mixed solvent at 120 °C for various periods. The rate of hydroxyapatite (HAp) formation was decreased with increasing the volume ratio of ethanol, to result in formation of dicalcium phosphate anhydrous and β-tricalcium phosphate. Needle-like HAp particles were observed in the sample treated with the mere water. The sample treated with the ethanol-water mixed solvent had nano-sized HAp particles with a form of the plate-like crystals. The size of HAp crystal was decreased with increasing the fraction of ethanol. These results show that HAp formation and crystal growth were prevented by the ethanol addition.

  5. Acetate fuels the cancer engine.

    PubMed

    Lyssiotis, Costas A; Cantley, Lewis C

    2014-12-18

    Cancer cells have distinctive nutrient demands to fuel growth and proliferation, including the disproportionate use of glucose, glutamine, and fatty acids. Comerford et al. and Mashimo et al. now demonstrate that several types of cancer are avid consumers of acetate, which facilitates macromolecular biosynthesis and histone modification.

  6. Lactate oxidation in human skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Robert A; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Nordsborg, Nikolai B; Lundby, Carsten

    2013-04-01

    Lactate is an important intermediate metabolite in human bioenergetics and is oxidized in many different tissues including the heart, brain, kidney, adipose tissue, liver, and skeletal muscle. The mechanism(s) explaining the metabolism of lactate in these tissues, however, remains unclear. Here, we analyze the ability of skeletal muscle to respire lactate by using an in situ mitochondrial preparation that leaves the native tubular reticulum and subcellular interactions of the organelle unaltered. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from vastus lateralis muscle in 16 human subjects. Samples were chemically permeabilized with saponin, which selectively perforates the sarcolemma and facilitates the loss of cytosolic content without altering mitochondrial membranes, structure, and subcellular interactions. High-resolution respirometry was performed on permeabilized muscle biopsy preparations. By use of four separate and specific substrate titration protocols, the respirometric analysis revealed that mitochondria were capable of oxidizing lactate in the absence of exogenous LDH. The titration of lactate and NAD(+) into the respiration medium stimulated respiration (P ≤ 0.003). The addition of exogenous LDH failed to increase lactate-stimulated respiration (P = 1.0). The results further demonstrate that human skeletal muscle mitochondria cannot directly oxidize lactate within the mitochondrial matrix. Alternately, these data support previous claims that lactate is converted to pyruvate within the mitochondrial intermembrane space with the pyruvate subsequently taken into the mitochondrial matrix where it enters the TCA cycle and is ultimately oxidized.

  7. Metabolic engineering of Klebsiella oxytoca M5a1 to produce optically pure D-lactate in mineral salts medium.

    PubMed

    Sangproo, Maytawadee; Polyiam, Pattharasedthi; Jantama, Sirima Suvarnakuta; Kanchanatawee, Sunthorn; Jantama, Kaemwich

    2012-09-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca strains were constructed to produce optical pure d-lactate by pH-controlled batch fermentation in mineral salts medium. The alcohol dehydrogenase gene, adhE, and the phospho-transacetylase/acetate kinase A genes, pta-ackA, were deleted from the wild type. KMS002 (ΔadhE) and KMS004 (ΔadhE Δpta-ackA) exhibited d-lactate production as a primary pathway for the regeneration of NAD(+). Both strains produced 11-13 g/L of d-lactate in medium containing 2% (w/v) glucose with yields of 0.64-0.71 g/g glucose used. In sugarcane molasses, KMS002 and KMS004 produced 22-24 g/L of d-lactate with yields of 0.80-0.87 g/g total sugars utilized. Both strains also utilized maltodextrin derived from cassava starch and produced d-lactate at a concentration of 33-34 g/L with yields of 0.91-0.92 g/g maltodextrin utilized. These d-lactate yields are higher than those reported for engineered E. coli strains.

  8. Development of Biocomposites with Antioxidant Activity Based on Red Onion Extract and Acetate Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    López de Dicastillo, Carol; Navarro, Rosa; Guarda, Abel; Galotto, Maria José

    2015-01-01

    Antioxidant biocomposites have been successfully developed from cellulose acetate, eco-friendly triethyl citrate plasticizer and onion extract as a source of natural antioxidants. First, an onion extraction process was optimized to obtain the extract with highest antioxidant power. Extracts under absolute ethanol and ethanol 85% were the extracts with the highest antioxidant activity, which were the characterized through different methods, DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) and ABTS (2,2ʹ-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonate)), that measure radical scavenger activity, and polyphenolic and flavonoid content. Afterwards, the extract was incorporated in cellulose acetate as polymer matrix owing to develop an active material intended to oxidative sensitive food products packaging. Different concentrations of onion extract and plasticizer were statistically studied by using response surface methodology in order to analyze the influence of both factors on the release of active compounds and therefore the antioxidant activity of these materials. PMID:26783842

  9. Origins of blood acetate in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, B M; Williamson, D H

    1977-01-01

    A novel enzymimc cycling assay for the determination of acetate in biological material is described. Measurements of the acetate concentration in blood and liver samples from rats of various ages and nutritional states with this assay are reported. The contribution of the intestine, the liver and the rest of the body to maintaining the concentration of acetate in the circulation is examined. Evidence is presented that the gut flora constitute the main source of acetate in blood of fed adult rats, though endogenous production of acetate is of significance in other situations. The streptozotocin-diabetic rat has an elevated blood acetate concentration. PMID:597244

  10. Effect of chronic ethanol ingestion and exercise training on skeletal muscle in rat.

    PubMed

    Vila, L; Ferrando, A; Voces, J; Cabral de Oliveira, C; Prieto, J G; Alvarez, A I

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interactive effects of exercise training and chronic ethanol consumption on metabolism, capillarity, and myofibrillar composition in rat limb muscles. Male Wistar rats were treated in separate groups as follows: non exercised-control; ethanol (15%) in animals' drinking water for 12 weeks; exercise training in treadmill and ethanol administration plus exercise for 12 weeks. Ethanol administration decreased capillarity and increased piruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities in white gastrocnemius; in plantaris muscle, ethanol increased citrate synthase activity and decreased cross-sectional area of type I, IIa, and IIb fibres. Exercise increased capillarity in all four limb muscles and decreased type I fibre area in plantaris. The decreased capillarity effect induced by ethanol in some muscles, was ameliorated when alcohol was combined with exercise. While alcoholic myopathy affects predominantly type IIb fibres, ethanol administration and aerobic exercise in some cases can affect type I and type IIa fibre areas. The exercise can decrease some harmful effects produced by ethanol in the muscle, including the decrease in the fibre area and capillary density.

  11. CYP2E1-dependent hepatotoxicity and oxidative damage after ethanol administration in human primary hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lie-Gang; Yan, Hong; Yao, Ping; Zhang, Wen; Zou, Li-Jun; Song, Fang-Fang; Li, Ke; Sun, Xiu-Fa

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To observe the relationship between ethanol-induced oxidative damage in human primary cultured hepatocytes and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) activity, in order to address if inhibition of CYP2E1 could attenuate ethanol-induced cellular damage. METHODS: The dose-dependent (25-100 mmol/L) and time-dependent (0-24 h) exposures of primary human cultured hepatocytes to ethanol were carried out. CYP2E1 activity and protein expression were detected by spectrophotometer and Western blot analysis respectively. Hepatotoxicity was investigated by determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate transaminase (AST) level in hepatocyte culture supernatants, as well as the intracellular formation of malondialdehyde (MDA). RESULTS: A dose-and time-dependent response between ethanol exposure and CYP2E1 activity in human hepatocytes was demonstrated. Moreover, there was a time-dependent increase of CYP2E1 protein after 100 mmol/L ethanol exposure. Meanwhile, ethanol exposure of hepatocytes caused a time-dependent increase of cellular MDA level, LDH, and AST activities in supernatants. Furthermore, the inhibitor of CYP2E1, diallyl sulfide (DAS) could partly attenuate the increases of MDA, LDH, and AST in human hepatocytes. CONCLUSION: A positive relationship between ethanol-induced oxidative damage in human primary cultured hepatocytes and CYP2E1 activity was exhibited, and the inhibition of CYP2E1 could partly attenuate ethanol-induced oxidative damage. PMID:16052683

  12. Development of a hybrid fermentation-enzymatic bioprocess for the production of ethyl lactate from dairy waste.

    PubMed

    Koutinas, Michalis; Menelaou, Maria; Nicolaou, Evrydiki N

    2014-08-01

    This work explores the potential for the development of a hybrid fermentation-enzymatic process for the production of ethyl lactate from dairy waste. Cheese whey was used in Kluyveromyces marxianus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus batch cultures to produce ethanol and lactic acid respectively. Subsequently, the fermentation products were transferred into an organic phase through liquid-liquid extraction and ethyl lactate was formed in an esterification reaction catalyzed by lipases. The production of ethanol and lactic acid achieved under different conditions was 23gL(-1) and 29gL(-1), respectively. Furthermore, the efficiency of various organic solvents for the esterification reaction was evaluated and toluene was chosen for application in the process. The effect of water content was determined aiming to maximize the product yield and 40mgml(-1) was the optimal enzyme concentration. The bioprocess achieved maximum conversion of 33% constituting a valuable alternative to the application of energy demanding chemically derived methods.

  13. Group II intron-mediated deletion of lactate dehydrogenase gene in an isolated 1,3-propanediol producer Hafnia alvei AD27.

    PubMed

    Celińska, Ewelina; Drożdżyńska, Agnieszka; Wita, Agnieszka; Juzwa, Wojciech; Białas, Wojciech; Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Grajek, Włodzimierz

    2016-03-03

    Our previous studies showed that glycerol fermentation by Hafnia alvei AD27 strain was accompanied by formation of high quantities of lactate. The ultimate aim of this work was the elimination of excessive lactate production in the 1,3-propanediol producer cultures. Group II intron-mediated deletion of ldh (lactate dehydrogenase) gene in an environmental isolate of H. alvei AD27 strain was conducted. The effect of the Δldh genotype in H. alvei AD27 strain varied depending on the culture medium applied. Under lower initial glycerol concentration (20 gL(-1)), lactate and 1,3-propanediol production was fully abolished, and the main carbon flux was directed to ethanol synthesis. On the other hand, at higher initial glycerol concentrations (40 gL(-1)), 1,3-propanediol and lactate production was recovered in the recombinant strain. The final titers of 1,3-propanediol and ethanol were similar for the recombinant and the WT strains, while the Δldh genotype displayed significantly decreased lactate titer. The by-products profile was altered upon ldh gene deletion, while glycerol utilization and biomass accumulation remained unaltered. As indicated by flow-cytometry analyses, the internal pH was not different for the WT and the recombinant Δldh strains over the culture duration, however, the WT strain was characterized by higher redox potential.

  14. Microbial physiology-based model of ethanol metabolism in subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Qusheng; Roden, Eric E.

    2011-07-01

    A biogeochemical reaction model was developed based on microbial physiology to simulate ethanol metabolism and its influence on the chemistry of anoxic subsurface environments. The model accounts for potential microbial metabolisms that degrade ethanol, including those that oxidize ethanol directly or syntrophically by reducing different electron acceptors. Out of the potential metabolisms, those that are active in the environment can be inferred by fitting the model to experimental observations. This approach was applied to a batch sediment slurry experiment that examined ethanol metabolism in uranium-contaminated aquifer sediments from Area 2 at the U.S. Department of Energy Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, TN. According to the simulation results, complete ethanol oxidation by denitrification, incomplete ethanol oxidation by ferric iron reduction, ethanol fermentation to acetate and H 2, hydrogenotrophic sulfate reduction, and acetoclastic methanogenesis: all contributed significantly to the degradation of ethanol in the aquifer sediments. The assemblage of the active metabolisms provides a frame work to explore how ethanol amendment impacts the chemistry of the environment, including the occurrence and levels of uranium. The results can also be applied to explore how diverse microbial metabolisms impact the progress and efficacy of bioremediation strategies.

  15. Ethanol Variability in Coastal North Carolina, USA Rainwater and its Impact on the Atmospheric Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieber, R. J.; Avery, G. B.; Willey, J. D.; Mead, R. N.; Kinney, S.

    2011-12-01

    Our laboratory recently developed a simple and highly sensitive method capable of detecting nM levels of ethanol (CH3CH2OH) in precipitation. We have utilized this new method to determine the occurrence and variability of ethanol in rainwater in coastal North Carolina. Preliminary analysis of precipitation data reveals that ethanol concentrations are less than 1 micro molar with much variation between storm events. Concentrations of acetaldehyde and acetic acid typically occur at higher concentrations than ethanol although this was not true in all rain events. Further examination of rainwater concentration data reveals that there is a significant impact of air mass back trajectory on ethanol concentrations with significantly more ethanol in storms originating in the Midwest United States Corn Belt region relative to other marine or terrestrial storms. Gas phase measurements indicate that there is also a significant local anthropogenic input of ethanol from automobile exhaust. Currently we are working with researchers at the Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil in an effort to compare the concentration of ethanol in Brazilian rainwater, where ethanol makes up 40% of vehicle fuel, to rainwater collected at our North American site.

  16. Ethanol tolerance in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Casey, G P; Ingledew, W M

    1986-01-01

    It is now certain that the inherent ethanol tolerance of the Saccharomyces strain used is not the prime factor regulating the level of ethanol that can be produced in a high sugar brewing, wine, sake, or distillery fermentation. In fact, in terms of the maximum concentration that these yeasts can produce under batch (16 to 17% [v/v]) or fed-batch conditions, there is clearly no difference in ethanol tolerance. This is not to say, however, that under defined conditions there is no difference in ethanol tolerance among different Saccharomyces yeasts. This property, although a genetic determinant, is clearly influenced by many factors (carbohydrate level, wort nutrition, temperature, osmotic pressure/water activity, and substrate concentration), and each yeast strain reacts to each factor differently. This will indeed lead to differences in measured tolerance. Thus, it is extremely important that each of these be taken into consideration when determining "tolerance" for a particular set of fermentation conditions. The manner in which each alcohol-related industry has evolved is now known to have played a major role in determining traditional thinking on ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces yeasts. It is interesting to speculate on how different our thinking on ethanol tolerance would be today if sake fermentations had not evolved with successive mashing and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of rice carbohydrate, if distillers' worts were clarified prior to fermentation but brewers' wort were not, and if grape skins with their associated unsaturated lipids had not been an integral part of red wine musts. The time is now ripe for ethanol-related industries to take advantage of these findings to improve the economies of production. In the authors' opinion, breweries could produce higher alcohol beers if oxygenation (leading to unsaturated lipids) and "usable" nitrogen source levels were increased in high gravity worts. White wine fermentations could also, if

  17. Treatment of mastitis during lactation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of mastitis should be based on bacteriological diagnosis and take national and international guidelines on prudent use of antimicrobials into account. In acute mastitis, where bacteriological diagnosis is not available, treatment should be initiated based on herd data and personal experience. Rapid bacteriological diagnosis would facilitate the proper selection of the antimicrobial. Treating subclinical mastitis with antimicrobials during lactation is seldom economical, because of high treatment costs and generally poor efficacy. All mastitis treatment should be evidence-based, i.e., the efficacy of each product and treatment length should be demonstrated by scientific studies. Use of on-farm written protocols for mastitis treatment promotes a judicious use of antimicrobials and reduces the use of antimicrobials. PMID:22081939

  18. Differential effects of ethanol on regional glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmitter pathways in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vivek; Veeraiah, Pandichelvam; Subramaniam, Vaidyanathan; Patel, Anant Bahadur

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the effects of ethanol on neuronal and astroglial metabolism using (1)H-[(13)C]-NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with infusion of [1,6-(13)C2]/[1-(13)C]glucose or [2-(13)C]acetate, respectively. A three-compartment metabolic model was fitted to the (13)C turnover of GluC3 , GluC4, GABAC 2, GABAC 3, AspC3 , and GlnC4 from [1,6-(13)C2 ]glucose to determine the rates of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and neurotransmitter cycle associated with glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. The ratio of neurotransmitter cycle to TCA cycle fluxes for glutamatergic and GABAegic neurons was obtained from the steady-state [2-(13)C]acetate experiment and used as constraints during the metabolic model fitting. (1)H MRS measurement suggests that depletion of ethanol from cerebral cortex follows zero order kinetics with rate 0.18 ± 0.04 μmol/g/min. Acute exposure of ethanol reduces the level of glutamate and aspartate in cortical region. GlnC4 labeling was found to be unchanged from a 15 min infusion of [2-(13)C]acetate suggesting that acute ethanol exposure does not affect astroglial metabolism in naive mice. Rates of TCA and neurotransmitter cycle associated with glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons were found to be significantly reduced in cortical and subcortical regions. Acute exposure of ethanol perturbs the level of neurometabolites and decreases the excitatory and inhibitory activity differentially across the regions of brain. Depletion of ethanol and its effect on brain functions were measured using (1)H and (1)H-[(13)C]-NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with infusion of (13)C-labeled substrates. Ethanol depletion from brain follows zero order kinetics. Ethanol perturbs level of glutamate, and the excitatory and inhibitory activity in mice brain.

  19. Ethanol Impacts on BTEX Plumes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impacts of ethanol on benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) are beginning to become established through laboratory, modeling and field research. Usage of ethanol, which increased due to federal mandates, drives interest and potential impacts on BTEX. Through co...

  20. Effect of acute ethanol ingestion on fat absorption.

    PubMed

    Boquillon, M

    1976-12-01

    A test meal (300 mg casein, 600 mg sucrose, 100 mg corn oil, tracer dose of 9.10(3)H oleic acid) was given to fasting adult rats with intestinal lymph fistulas. One group received an acute oral dose of ethanol (3.2 g/kg body weight) simultaneously with the test meal. Controls received 2.5 ml of water instead of ethanol. Ingestion of ethanol temporarily delayed the removal of lipid radioactivity from the stomachs. More than 25% of radioactivity fed remained 8 hr after feeding whereas with control rats less than 10% of lipid radioactivity fed remained 6 hr after feeding. In controls and ethanol-treated rats, the amounts of exogenous lipids in the intestinal lumen and mucosa were low and similar enough. Quantities of endogenous and exogenous lipids found in the lymph collected during 24 hr after feeding were similar in the two groups, but the fat absorption peak was found after 6 hr in alcoholic rats and before 6 hr in controls. This delay was probably due to the retention of lipids in the stomach. More of the exogenous lipid was always transported by small particles moving in the region of alpha1 globulins in cellulose acetate electrophoresis than by larger particles remaining at the origin. This proportion was enhanced in the ethanol-treated animals. The larger fat particles were richer in endogenous fatty acids in alcohol-treated rats than in controls.

  1. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degrees C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4% for acetate samples larger than 5 micromoles. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined.

  2. Ozone decomposition in aqueous acetate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sehested, K.; Holcman, J.; Bjergbakke, E.; Hart, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    The acetate radical ion reacts with ozone with a rate constant of k = (1.5 +/- 0.5) x 10Z dmT mol s . The products from this reaction are CO2, HCHO, and O2 . By subsequent reaction of the peroxy radical with ozone the acetate radical ion is regenerated through the OH radical. A chain decomposition of ozone takes place. It terminates when the acetate radical ion reacts with oxygen forming the unreactive peroxy acetate radical. The chain is rather short as oxygen is developed, as a result of the ozone consumption. The inhibiting effect of acetate on the ozone decay is rationalized by OH scavenging by acetate and successive reaction of the acetate radical ion with oxygen. Some products from the bimolecular disappearance of the peroxy acetate radicals, however, react further with ozone, reducing the effectiveness of the stabilization.

  3. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate.

    PubMed

    Gelwicks, J T; Hayes, J M

    1990-01-01

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degrees C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4% for acetate samples larger than 5 micromoles. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined.

  4. Ethanol Myths Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-27

    Ethanol is a clean, renewable fuel that is helping to reduce our nation’s dependence on oil and can offer additional economic and environmental benefits in the future. This fact sheet is intended to address some common misconceptions about this important alternative fuel.

  5. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3 or C2H3O2Na·3H2O, CAS Reg. No. 6131-90-4) is the sodium salt of acetic acid and occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues....

  6. Sorghum to Ethanol Research

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlberg, Jeffrey A.; Wolfrum, Edward J.

    2010-09-28

    The development of a robust source of renewable transportation fuel will require a large amount of biomass feedstocks. It is generally accepted that in addition to agricultural and forestry residues, we will need crops grown specifically for subsequent conversion into fuels. There has been a lot of research on several of these so-called "dedicated bioenergy crops" including switchgrass, miscanthus, sugarcane, and poplar. It is likely that all of these crops will end up playing a role as feedstocks, depending on local environmental and market conditions. Many different types of sorghum have been grown to produce syrup, grain, and animal feed for many years. It has several features that may make it as compelling as other crops mentioned above as a renewable, sustainable biomass feedstock; however, very little work has been done to investigate sorghum as a dedicated bioenergy crop. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum biomass to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help

  7. A vinyl acetate sensor based on cataluminescence on MgO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen Chou; Cao, Xiaoan; Wen, Qiang; Wang, Zehua; Gao, Qianqian; Zhu, Huichang

    2009-10-15

    A novel cataluminescence (CTL) sensor using nanosized MgO as the sensing material for determination of the trace of vinyl acetate in air was proposed in the present study. Eight catalysts were examined and the results showed that the CTL intensity on MgO nanoparticles was the strongest. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range of the CTL intensity versus the concentration of vinyl acetate vapor was 2-2000 ppm with a detection limit of 1.0 ppm (3sigma) and a relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of 1.18% for five times determination of 1000 ppm vinyl acetate. There were no CTL emissions when foreign substances, including ammonia, benzene, acetic acid, formaldehyde and ethyl acetate, passed through the sensor. CTL emissions were detected for methanol, ethanol and acetaldehyde at levels around 5.5%, 10.1% and 13.4% compared with the responsed vinyl acetate. The sensor had a long lifetime more than 100 h.

  8. Antimicrobial, antioxidant, and cytotoxic properties of vasicine acetate synthesized from vasicine isolated from Adhatoda vasica L.

    PubMed

    Duraipandiyan, V; Al-Dhabi, N A; Balachandran, C; Ignacimuthu, S; Sankar, C; Balakrishna, K

    2015-01-01

    Adhatoda vasica (L.) (Acanthaceae) is used in the indigenous system of medicine in India. The alkaloid Vasicine was isolated from ethanolic extract of the leaves of A. vasica using column chromatography. Vasicine acetate was obtained by acetylation of Vasicine. Vasicine acetate exhibited good zone of inhibition against bacteria: 10 mm against E. aerogenes, 10 mm against S. epidermidis, and 10 mm against P. aeruginosa. Vasicine acetate showed minimum inhibitory concentration values against bacteria: M. luteus (125 μg/mL), E. aerogenes (125 μg/mL), S. epidermidis (125 μg/mL), and P. aeruginosa (125 μg/mL). The radical scavenging activity of Vasicine acetate was the maximum at 1000 μg/mL (66.15%). The compound showed prominent cytotoxic activity in vitro against A549 lung adenocarcinoma cancer cell line. Quantification of Vasicine and Vasicine acetate by HPLC-DAD analysis showed their contents to be 0.2293% and 0.0156%, respectively, on dry weight basis of the leaves. Vasicine acetate could be probed further in drug discovery programme.

  9. Amperometric determination of acetic acid with a trienzyme/poly(dimethylsiloxane)-bilayer-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, F; Sawaguchi, T; Sato, Y; Yabuki, S; Lijima, S

    2001-12-01

    A trienzyme sensor for the amperometric determination of acetic acid was prepared by immobilizing acetate kinase (AK), pyruvate kinase (PK), and pyruvate oxidase (PyOx) on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-coated electrode. AK catalyzes the phospho-transferring reaction between acetic acid and ATP to form ADP; PK, the phospho-transferring reaction between ADP and phosphoenolpyruvate to form pyruvic acid; and PyOx, the oxidation of pyruvic acid with oxygen. The oxygen consumption could be monitored by using the PDMS-coated electrode without interference from the PyOx reaction product, hydrogen peroxide. Thus, the concentration of acetic acid (5 microM-0.5 mM) could be determined from the decrease in the cathodic current at -0.4 V vs Ag/AgCl. This is the first example of a biosensor that can be used for the determination of acetic acid in ethanol-containing food samples. The acetate-sensing electrode could be used for more than one month.

  10. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  20. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  1. 21 CFR 522.2476 - Trenbolone acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... days. (A) 140 milligrams (mg) trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting of 7 pellets, each pellet containing 20 mg trenbolone acetate) per implant dose. (B) 140 mg trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting... 29 mg tylosin tartrate) per implant dose. (ii) Indications for use. For improved feed...

  2. 21 CFR 522.2476 - Trenbolone acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... days. (A) 140 milligrams (mg) trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting of 7 pellets, each pellet containing 20 mg trenbolone acetate) per implant dose. (B) 140 mg trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting... 29 mg tylosin tartrate) per implant dose. (ii) Indications for use. For improved feed...

  3. Photochemistry of 2-nitrobenzylidene acetals.

    PubMed

    Sebej, Peter; Solomek, Tomás; Hroudná, L'ubica; Brancová, Pavla; Klán, Petr

    2009-11-20

    Photolysis of dihydroxy compounds (diols) protected as 2-nitrobenzylidene acetals (ONBA) and subsequent acid- or base-catalyzed hydrolysis of the 2-nitrosobenzoic acid ester intermediates result in an efficient and high-yielding release of the substrates. We investigated the scope and limitations of ONBA photochemistry and expanded upon earlier described two-step procedures to show that the protected diols of many structural varieties can also be liberated in a one-pot procedure. In view of the fact that the acetals of nonsymmetrically substituted diols are converted into one of the corresponding 2-nitrosobenzoic acid ester isomers with moderate to high regioselectivity, the mechanism of their formation was studied using various experimental techniques. The experimental data were found to be in agreement with DFT-based quantum chemical calculations that showed the preferential cleavage occurs on the acetal C-O bond in the vicinity of more electron-withdrawing (or less electron-donating) groups. The study also revealed considerable complexity in the cleavage mechanism and that the structural variations in the substrate can significantly alter the reaction pathway. This deprotection strategy was found to be also applicable for 2-thioethanol when released from the corresponding monothioacetal in the presence of a reducing agent, such as ascorbic acid.

  4. Lactational mastitis caused by Streptococcus lactarius.

    PubMed

    Tena, Daniel; Fernández, Cristina; López-Garrido, Beatriz; Pérez-Balsalobre, Mercedes; Losa, Cristina; Medina-Pascual, María José; Sáez-Nieto, Juan Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Human infections caused by Streptococcus lactarius have not been previously reported. In the present report, we describe a lactational mastitis caused by this organism. The infection occurred in a 28-year-old breast-feeding female, with a 10-days history of moderate pain on the right breast. The patient was cured after antibiotic treatment with levofloxacin for 21 days. Our case shows that S. lactarius should be considered as a cause of lactational mastitis. The introduction of molecular microbiology techniques can be extremely useful for knowing the implication of streptococci in lactational mastitis.

  5. Elimination of glycerol production in anaerobic cultures of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain engineered to use acetic acid as an electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Guadalupe Medina, Víctor; Almering, Marinka J H; van Maris, Antonius J A; Pronk, Jack T

    2010-01-01

    In anaerobic cultures of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae, glycerol production is essential to reoxidize NADH produced in biosynthetic processes. Consequently, glycerol is a major by-product during anaerobic production of ethanol by S. cerevisiae, the single largest fermentation process in industrial biotechnology. The present study investigates the possibility of completely eliminating glycerol production by engineering S. cerevisiae such that it can reoxidize NADH by the reduction of acetic acid to ethanol via NADH-dependent reactions. Acetic acid is available at significant amounts in lignocellulosic hydrolysates of agricultural residues. Consistent with earlier studies, deletion of the two genes encoding NAD-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1 and GPD2) led to elimination of glycerol production and an inability to grow anaerobically. However, when the E. coli mhpF gene, encoding the acetylating NAD-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.10; acetaldehyde+NAD++coenzyme A<-->acetyl coenzyme A+NADH+H+), was expressed in the gpd1Delta gpd2Delta strain, anaerobic growth was restored by supplementation with 2.0 g liter(-1) acetic acid. The stoichiometry of acetate consumption and growth was consistent with the complete replacement of glycerol formation by acetate reduction to ethanol as the mechanism for NADH reoxidation. This study provides a proof of principle for the potential of this metabolic engineering strategy to improve ethanol yields, eliminate glycerol production, and partially convert acetate, which is a well-known inhibitor of yeast performance in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, to ethanol. Further research should address the kinetic aspects of acetate reduction and the effect of the elimination of glycerol production on cellular robustness (e.g., osmotolerance).

  6. Effect of ensiled hop (Humulus lupulus L.) residues on plasma acetate turnover rate in sheep.

    PubMed

    Al-Mamun, Mohammad; Saito, Aya; Sano, Hiroaki

    2011-06-01

    An isotope dilution method using [1-(13)C]sodium acetate was applied to determine the effect of feeding ensiled hop (Humulus lupulus L.) residues on plasma acetate turnover rate in six adult crossbred sheep. The sheep were fed 63 g/kg body weight (BW)(0.75)/day of either mixed hay of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) and reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L.) and round bale silage at 3:1 ratio (Hay-diet), or another where round bale silage was replaced by ensiled hop residues (Hop-diet) with a crossover design each of a 3-week period. The isotope dilution method was performed on day 21 of each dietary treatment. Dry matter digestibility was similar between diets, and nitrogen (N) digestibility was lower (P = 0.001) for Hop-diet than Hay-diet. However, N retention did not differ between diets. Plasma acetate concentration was lower (P = 0.04) for Hop-diet than Hay-diet, and the turnover rate of plasma acetate did not differ between diets. Plasma concentration of lactate and non-esterified fatty acids were similar between diets. Hop-diet was found almost comparable to Hay-diet on plasma acetate turnover rate in the present experimental conditions. Therefore, it could be concluded that hop residues partially could be used as an alternative to traditionally used round bale silage for rearing sheep.

  7. Ethanol and other oxygenateds from low grade carbonaceous resources

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, O.S.; Jung, K.D.; Han, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    Anhydrous ethanol and other oxygenates of C2 up can be produced quite competitively from low grade carbonaceous resources in high yield via gasification, methanol synthesis, carbonylation of methanol an hydrogenation consecutively. Gas phase carbonylation of methanol to form methyl acetate is the key step for the whole process. Methyl acetate can be produced very selectively in one step gas phase reaction on a fixed bed column reactor with GHSV over 5,000. The consecutive hydrogenation of methyl or ethyl acetate produce anhydrous ethanol in high purity. It is also attempted to co-produce methanol and DME in IGCC, in which low grade carbonaceous resources are used as energy sources, and the surplus power and pre-power gas can be stored in liquid form of methanol and DME during base load time. Further integration of C2 up oxygenate production with IGCC can improve its economics. The attempt of above extensive technology integration can generate significant industrial profitability as well as reduce the environmental complication related with massive energy consumption.

  8. Neuropeptide Y suppresses ethanol drinking in ethanol-abstinent, but not non-ethanol-abstinent, Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Nicholas W; Stewart, Robert B; Badia-Elder, Nancy E

    2008-11-01

    In outbred rats, increases in brain neuropeptide Y (NPY) activity suppress ethanol consumption in a variety of access conditions, but only following a history of ethanol dependence. NPY reliably suppresses ethanol drinking in alcohol-preferring rats, and this effect is augmented following a period of ethanol abstinence. The purpose of this experiment was to examine the effects of NPY on two-bottle choice ethanol drinking and feeding in Wistar rats that had undergone chronic ethanol vapor exposure, cycles of ethanol abstinence, or both. Ethanol-drinking Wistar rats were given 6 weeks of access to 15% (vol/vol) ethanol and water followed by either: two cycles of 1 week ethanol vapor exposure and 2 weeks with no ethanol; two cycles of 1 week ethanol bottle availability and 2 weeks with no ethanol; or 2 weeks of ethanol vapor exposure. Rats were infused intracerebroventricularly with one of four NPY doses (0.0, 2.5, 5.0, or 10.0 microg) following the ethanol exposure patterns described above, and tested for ethanol drinking and feeding in a two-bottle choice situation. NPY dose dependently increased food intake regardless of ethanol exposure history, but suppressed ethanol drinking only in rats that underwent cycles of ethanol access and ethanol abstinence. These results support the notion that dysregulation of brain NPY systems during chronic intermittent ethanol exposure is important in the motivational drive for subsequent relapse to ethanol drinking.

  9. Propionate stimulates pyruvate oxidation in the presence of acetate

    PubMed Central

    Purmal, Colin; Kucejova, Blanka; Sherry, A. Dean; Burgess, Shawn C.; Malloy, Craig. R.

    2014-01-01

    Flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) in the heart may be reduced by various forms of injury to the myocardium, or by oxidation of alternative substrates in normal heart tissue. It is important to distinguish these two mechanisms because imaging of flux through PDH based on the appearance of hyperpolarized (HP) [13C]bicarbonate derived from HP [1-13C]pyruvate has been proposed as a method for identifying viable myocardium. The efficacy of propionate for increasing PDH flux in the setting of PDH inhibition by an alternative substrate was studied using isotopomer analysis paired with exams using HP [1-13C]pyruvate. Hearts from C57/bl6 mice were supplied with acetate (2 mM) and glucose (8.25 mM). 13C NMR spectra were acquired in a cryogenically cooled probe at 14.1 Tesla. After addition of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate, 13C NMR signals from lactate, alanine, malate, and aspartate were easily detected, in addition to small signals from bicarbonate and CO2. The addition of propionate (2 mM) increased appearance of HP [13C]bicarbonate >30-fold without change in O2 consumption. Isotopomer analysis of extracts from the freeze-clamped hearts indicated that acetate was the preferred substrate for energy production, glucose contribution to energy production was minimal, and anaplerosis was stimulated in the presence of propionate. Under conditions where production of acetyl-CoA is dominated by the availability of an alternative substrate, acetate, propionate markedly stimulated PDH flux as detected by the appearance of hyperpolarized [13C]bicarbonate from metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. PMID:25320331

  10. Propionate stimulates pyruvate oxidation in the presence of acetate.

    PubMed

    Purmal, Colin; Kucejova, Blanka; Sherry, A Dean; Burgess, Shawn C; Malloy, Craig R; Merritt, Matthew E

    2014-10-15

    Flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) in the heart may be reduced by various forms of injury to the myocardium, or by oxidation of alternative substrates in normal heart tissue. It is important to distinguish these two mechanisms because imaging of flux through PDH based on the appearance of hyperpolarized (HP) [(13)C]bicarbonate derived from HP [1-(13)C]pyruvate has been proposed as a method for identifying viable myocardium. The efficacy of propionate for increasing PDH flux in the setting of PDH inhibition by an alternative substrate was studied using isotopomer analysis paired with exams using HP [1-(13)C]pyruvate. Hearts from C57/bl6 mice were supplied with acetate (2 mM) and glucose (8.25 mM). (13)C NMR spectra were acquired in a cryogenically cooled probe at 14.1 Tesla. After addition of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate, (13)C NMR signals from lactate, alanine, malate, and aspartate were easily detected, in addition to small signals from bicarbonate and CO2. The addition of propionate (2 mM) increased appearance of HP [(13)C]bicarbonate >30-fold without change in O2 consumption. Isotopomer analysis of extracts from the freeze-clamped hearts indicated that acetate was the preferred substrate for energy production, glucose contribution to energy production was minimal, and anaplerosis was stimulated in the presence of propionate. Under conditions where production of acetyl-CoA is dominated by the availability of an alternative substrate, acetate, propionate markedly stimulated PDH flux as detected by the appearance of hyperpolarized [(13)C]bicarbonate from metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate.

  11. Ethanol Sensitization during Adolescence or Adulthood Induces Different Patterns of Ethanol Consumption without Affecting Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Carrara-Nascimento, Priscila F.; Hoffmann, Lucas B.; Contó, Marcos B.; Marcourakis, Tania; Camarini, Rosana

    2017-01-01

    In previous study, we demonstrated that ethanol preexposure may increase ethanol consumption in both adolescent and adult mice, in a two-bottle choice model. We now questioned if ethanol exposure during adolescence results in changes of consumption pattern using a three-bottle choice procedure, considering drinking-in-the-dark and alcohol deprivation effect as strategies for ethanol consumption escalation. We also analyzed aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity as a measurement of ethanol metabolism. Adolescent and adult Swiss mice were treated with saline (SAL) or 2.0 g/kg ethanol (EtOH) during 15 days (groups: Adolescent-SAL, Adolescent-EtOH, Adult-SAL and Adult-EtOH). Five days after the last injection, mice were exposed to the three-bottle choice protocol using sucrose fading procedure (4% + sucrose vs. 8%–15% ethanol + sucrose vs. water + sucrose) for 2 h during the dark phase. Sucrose was faded out from 8% to 0%. The protocol was composed of a 6-week acquisition period, followed by four withdrawals and reexposures. Both adolescent and adult mice exhibited ethanol behavioral sensitization, although the magnitude of sensitization in adolescents was lower than in adults. Adolescent-EtOH displayed an escalation of 4% ethanol consumption during acquisition that was not observed in Adult-EtOH. Moreover, Adult-EtOH consumed less 4% ethanol throughout all the experiment and less 15% ethanol in the last reexposure period than Adolescent-EtOH. ALDH activity varied with age, in which older mice showed higher ALDH than younger ones. Ethanol pretreatment or the pattern of consumption did not have influence on ALDH activity. Our data suggest that ethanol pretreatment during adolescence but not adulthood may influence the pattern of ethanol consumption toward an escalation in ethanol consumption at low dose, without exerting an impact on ALDH activity. PMID:28386220

  12. Comparison of the Lactate Pro and Analox GM7 blood lactate analysers.

    PubMed

    van Someren, K A; Howatson, G; Nunan, D; Thatcher, R; Shave, R

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this study was firstly, to determine the level of agreement between the Lactate Pro and Analox GM7 for the measurement of blood lactate, and secondly, to examine whether these analysers may be used interchangeably to identify lactate parameters routinely used in the physiological assessment of athletes. Twenty well-trained male cyclists performed an incremental cycle ergometry test; duplicate blood samples were taken simultaneously throughout the test for lactate determination using the two analysers. Power output and heart rate at LT, LT1, 2 mmol.L-1, and 4 mmol.L-1 were calculated from the lactate values obtained from the two analysers. There was a strong linear relationship between the two analysers (Lactate Pro=1.4541xAnalox GM7-0.1287; R2=0.969, p<0.001; SEE=0.704) though the Lactate Pro overestimated blood lactate when compared to the Analox GM7; 95% ratio limits of agreement (Lactate Pro/Analox GM7) were 1.40x//1.35. Differences were found between analysers for power output and heart rate at LT1 (p<0.01), 2 mmol.L-1 (p<0.001), and 4 mmol.L-1 (p<0.001); no differences were found between analysers for power output or heart rate at LT. In conclusion, the average difference in blood lactate concentration measured by the Lactate Pro and the Analox GM7 was 40%, with 95% of measures differing by between 4% and 89%. This poor level of agreement and the significant differences between the two analysers in power output and heart rate associated with a number of lactate parameters indicate that these analysers should not be used interchangeably.

  13. A specialized citric acid cycle requiring succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) confers acetic acid resistance on the acidophile Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Elwood A; Francois, Julie A; Kappock, T Joseph

    2008-07-01

    Microbes tailor macromolecules and metabolism to overcome specific environmental challenges. Acetic acid bacteria perform the aerobic oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid and are generally resistant to high levels of these two membrane-permeable poisons. The citric acid cycle (CAC) is linked to acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti by several observations, among them the oxidation of acetate to CO2 by highly resistant acetic acid bacteria and the previously unexplained role of A. aceti citrate synthase (AarA) in acetic acid resistance at a low pH. Here we assign specific biochemical roles to the other components of the A. aceti strain 1023 aarABC region. AarC is succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase, which replaces succinyl-CoA synthetase in a variant CAC. This new bypass appears to reduce metabolic demand for free CoA, reliance upon nucleotide pools, and the likely effect of variable cytoplasmic pH upon CAC flux. The putative aarB gene is reassigned to SixA, a known activator of CAC flux. Carbon overflow pathways are triggered in many bacteria during metabolic limitation, which typically leads to the production and diffusive loss of acetate. Since acetate overflow is not feasible for A. aceti, a CO(2) loss strategy that allows acetic acid removal without substrate-level (de)phosphorylation may instead be employed. All three aar genes, therefore, support flux through a complete but unorthodox CAC that is needed to lower cytoplasmic acetate levels.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dehydrogenase-B pieces (subunits) of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme. This enzyme is found throughout the body and is important ... cells. There are five different forms of this enzyme, each made up of four protein subunits. Various ...

  15. Regulation of bone mineral loss during lactation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brommage, R.; Deluca, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of varyng dietary calcium and phosphorous levels, vitamin D deficiency, oophorectomy, adrenalectomy, and simultaneous pregnancy on bone mineral loss during lactation in rats are studied. The experimental procedures and evaluations are described. The femur ash weight of lactating and nonlactating rats are calculated. The data reveals that a decrease in dietary calcium of 0.02 percent results in an increased loss of bone mineral, an increase in calcium to 1.4 percent does not lessen bone mineral loss, and bone mineral loss in vitamin D deficient rats is independent of calcium levels. It is observed that changes in dietary phosphorous level, oophorectomy, adrenalectomy, and simultaneous pragnancy do not reduce bone mineral loss during lactation. The analysis of various hormones to determine the mechanism that triggers bone mineral loss during lactation is presented.

  16. Phyllodes Tumor in a Lactating Breast

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Sudha S.; Raju, K. V. V. N.; Nair, Haripreetha G.

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor is attributed to a small fraction of primary tumors of the breast. Such tumors occur rarely in pregnancy and lactation. We report a case of a 25-year-old lactating mother presenting with a lump in the left breast. Core needle biopsy was opined as phyllodes tumor with lactational changes, and subsequent wide local excision confirmed the diagnosis of benign phyllodes tumor with lactational changes. The characteristic gross and microscopic findings of a well-circumscribed lesion with leaf-like fibroepithelial growth pattern and typical nonuniform or diffuse stromal proliferation with periductal accentuation even in the absence of mitotic figures can help clinch the diagnosis. Benign phyllodes is known for its recurrence and requires wide excision and close follow-up. It is vital to identify these lesions even on limited biopsies as therapeutic options differ. This case is presented for its rarity and the diagnostic challenge it poses in limited biopsy. PMID:27081326

  17. [Natural remedies during pregnancy and lactation].

    PubMed

    Gut, E; Melzer, J; von Mandach, U; Saller, R

    2004-10-01

    Up to date there is a lack of systematically gathered data on the use of natural remedies (phytotherapeutic, homeopathic, anthroposophic, spagyric, Bach and Schussler remedies) during pregnancy and lactation. The aim of this non-representative pilot study on 139 women, who came for delivery to three institutions between mid-1997 and the beginning of 1998, was to receive data about how often and within which spectrum natural remedies are used during pregnancy and lactation. During pregnancy 96% and within the lactation period 84% of the women consumed at least 1 natural remedy. Phytotherapeutic drugs were used most frequently. In contrast to the widespread use of natural remedies by pregnant women and nursing mothers in this study, little information on the effectiveness and possible risks is available. Therefore it seems necessary to examine and evaluate natural remedies used during pregnancy and lactation.

  18. The ethanol stress response and ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stanley, D; Bandara, A; Fraser, S; Chambers, P J; Stanley, G A

    2010-07-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is traditionally used for alcoholic beverage and bioethanol production; however, its performance during fermentation is compromised by the impact of ethanol accumulation on cell vitality. This article reviews studies into the molecular basis of the ethanol stress response and ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae; such knowledge can facilitate the development of genetic engineering strategies for improving cell performance during ethanol stress. Previous studies have used a variety of strains and conditions, which is problematic, because the impact of ethanol stress on gene expression is influenced by the environment. There is however some commonality in Gene Ontology categories affected by ethanol assault that suggests that the ethanol stress response of S. cerevisiae is compromised by constraints on energy production, leading to increased expression of genes associated with glycolysis and mitochondrial function, and decreased gene expression in energy-demanding growth-related processes. Studies using genome-wide screens suggest that the maintenance of vacuole function is important for ethanol tolerance, possibly because of the roles of this organelle in protein turnover and maintaining ion homoeostasis. Accumulation of Asr1 and Rat8 in the nucleus specifically during ethanol stress suggests S. cerevisiae has a specific response to ethanol stress although this supposition remains controversial.

  19. Quantifying second generation ethanol inhibition: Design of Experiments approach and kinetic model development.

    PubMed

    Schneiderman, Steven J; Johnson, Roger W; Menkhaus, Todd J; Gilcrease, Patrick C

    2015-03-01

    While softwoods represent a potential feedstock for second generation ethanol production, compounds present in their hydrolysates can inhibit fermentation. In this study, a novel Design of Experiments (DoE) approach was used to identify significant inhibitory effects on Saccharomyces cerevisiae D5A for the purpose of guiding kinetic model development. Although acetic acid, furfural and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) were present at potentially inhibitory levels, initial factorial experiments only identified ethanol as a significant rate inhibitor. It was hypothesized that high ethanol levels masked the effects of other inhibitors, and a subsequent factorial design without ethanol found significant effects for all other compounds. When these non-ethanol effects were accounted for in the kinetic model, R¯(2) was significantly improved over an ethanol-inhibition only model (R¯(2)=0.80 vs. 0.76). In conclusion, when ethanol masking effects are removed, DoE is a valuable tool to identify significant non-ethanol inhibitors and guide kinetic model development.

  20. Lactate shuttling and lactate use as fuel after traumatic brain injury: metabolic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Dienel, Gerald A

    2014-01-01

    Lactate is proposed to be generated by astrocytes during glutamatergic neurotransmission and shuttled to neurons as ‘preferred' oxidative fuel. However, a large body of evidence demonstrates that metabolic changes during activation of living brain disprove essential components of the astrocyte–neuron lactate shuttle model. For example, some glutamate is oxidized to generate ATP after its uptake into astrocytes and neuronal glucose phosphorylation rises during activation and provides pyruvate for oxidation. Extension of the notion that lactate is a preferential fuel into the traumatic brain injury (TBI) field has important clinical implications, and the concept must, therefore, be carefully evaluated before implementation into patient care. Microdialysis studies in TBI patients demonstrate that lactate and pyruvate levels and lactate/pyruvate ratios, along with other data, have important diagnostic value to distinguish between ischemia and mitochondrial dysfunction. Results show that lactate release from human brain to blood predominates over its uptake after TBI, and strong evidence for lactate metabolism is lacking; mitochondrial dysfunction may inhibit lactate oxidation. Claims that exogenous lactate infusion is energetically beneficial for TBI patients are not based on metabolic assays and data are incorrectly interpreted. PMID:25204393

  1. Ethanol Enhances Hepatitis C Virus Replication through Lipid Metabolism and Elevated NADH/NAD+*

    PubMed Central

    Seronello, Scott; Ito, Chieri; Wakita, Takaji; Choi, Jinah

    2010-01-01

    Ethanol has been suggested to elevate HCV titer in patients and to increase HCV RNA in replicon cells, suggesting that HCV replication is increased in the presence and absence of the complete viral replication cycle, but the mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we use Huh7 human hepatoma cells that naturally express comparable levels of CYP2E1 as human liver to demonstrate that ethanol, at subtoxic and physiologically relevant concentrations, enhances complete HCV replication. The viral RNA genome replication is affected for both genotypes 2a and 1b. Acetaldehyde, a major product of ethanol metabolism, likewise enhances HCV replication at physiological concentrations. The potentiation of HCV replication by ethanol is suppressed by inhibiting CYP2E1 or aldehyde dehydrogenase and requires an elevated NADH/NAD+ ratio. In addition, acetate, isopropyl alcohol, and concentrations of acetone that occur in diabetics enhance HCV replication with corresponding increases in the NADH/NAD+. Furthermore, inhibiting the host mevalonate pathway with lovastatin or fluvastatin and fatty acid synthesis with 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid or cerulenin significantly attenuates the enhancement of HCV replication by ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, as well as acetate, whereas inhibiting β-oxidation with β-mercaptopropionic acid increases HCV replication. Ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, and acetate increase the total intracellular cholesterol content, which is attenuated with lovastatin. In contrast, both endogenous and exogenous ROS suppress the replication of HCV genotype 2a, as previously shown with genotype 1b. Conclusion: Therefore, lipid metabolism and alteration of cellular NADH/NAD+ ratio are likely to play a critical role in the potentiation of HCV replication by ethanol rather than oxidative stress. PMID:19910460

  2. Effective ethanol production by reutilizing waste distillage anaerobic digestion effluent in an integrated fermentation process coupled with both ethanol and methane fermentations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng Ming; Mao, Zhong Gui; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Jian Hua; Sun, Fu Bao; Tang, Lei; Zhang, Hong Jian

    2010-11-01

    An integrated ethanol-methane fermentation coupled system characterized with full wastewater reutilization was proposed. The waste distillage originated from ethanol distillation was treated with anaerobic digestion and then recycled for medium preparation in the next ethanol fermentation run. This process could enhance wastewater reutilization, save fresh water and reduce energy consumption in the cassava-based ethanol production. The results indicated that, when using anaerobic effluents from the digestion process with only one tank, an ethanol concentration of 10.5% (v/v) compatible with that of conventional one could be achieved, but ethanol fermentation was partially inhibited and operation time gradually prolonged from 48 to 105 h. Using anaerobic effluents from the digestion process with two subsequently connected tanks, ethanol fermentation performance could be largely improved, and the fermentation lag could be completely eliminated. The performance enhancement was due to the concentrations reduction in organic acids, such as acetic and propionic acids in the digestion effluents using two digestion tanks in-series.

  3. Interaction of Factors Related to Lactation Duration

    PubMed Central

    Boettcher, Joan P; Chezem, Jo Carol; Roepke, Judith; Whitaker, Tracy Adams

    1999-01-01

    Perceived social support and interpersonal dependency were studied as potential factors associated with lactation duration based upon previous breastfeeding experience. Inexperienced breastfeeding mothers perceived more social support than experienced breastfeeding mothers did. Perceived social support was not significantly correlated with lactation duration. An ancillary finding was that women providing a combination of breast milk and human milk substitutes had significantly lower social self-confidence than did mothers providing breast milk exclusively. PMID:22945984

  4. Iodine nutrition in pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Leung, Angela M; Pearce, Elizabeth N; Braverman, Lewis E

    2011-12-01

    Adequate iodine intake is required for the synthesis of thyroid hormones that are important for normal fetal and infant neurodevelopment. In this review, we discuss iodine physiology during pregnancy and lactation, methods to assess iodine sufficiency, the importance of adequate iodine nutrition, studies of iodine supplementation during pregnancy and lactation, the consequences of hypothyroidism during pregnancy, the current status of iodine nutrition in the United States, the global efforts toward achieving universal iodine sufficiency, and substances that may interfere with iodine use.

  5. Working memory and blood lactate levels.

    PubMed

    Perciavalle, Valentina; Maci, Tiziana; Perciavalle, Vincenzo; Massimino, Simona; Coco, Marinella

    2015-11-01

    The accumulation of lactate in the blood after a high-intensity exercise is associated with an increase of lactate extractions by the brain. Previously, a negative influence of blood lactate on attentional processes has been observed. The present study was carried out to examine the association of high blood lactate levels, induced with a maximal cycling, with another cognitive domain: working memory. For evaluation of working memory two different protocols were used: the first (Self-Ordered Pointing Task) capable of analyzing non-spatial working memory requiring the ability to generate and monitor a sequence of responses and the second for evaluating motor working memory necessary to perform a motor task. The study was carried out in 30 students (15 males and 15 females) who performed exhaustive exercise. In each subject, blood lactate was measured and motor as well as non-motor forms of working memory were evaluated before the exercise, at its end as well as 15 min after the exhaustion. It was observed that an increase of blood lactate levels is associated with a worsening of both types of working memory.

  6. [Improvement of acetic acid tolerance and fermentation performance of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of flocculent gene FLO1 and FLO1c].

    PubMed

    Du, Zhaoli; Cheng, Yanfei; Zhu, Hui; He, Xiuping; Zhang, Borun

    2015-02-01

    Flocculent gene FLO1 and its truncated form FLO1c with complete deletion of repeat unit C were expressed in a non-flocculent industrial strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae CE6 to generate recombinant flocculent strains 6-AF1 and 6-AF1c respectively. Both strains of 6-AF1 and 6-AF1c displayed strong flocculation and better cell growth than the control strain CE6-V carrying the empty vector under acetic acid stress. Moreover, the flocculent strains converted glucose to ethanol at much higher rates than the control strain CE6-V under acetic acid stress. In the presence of 0.6% (V/V) acetic acid, the average ethanol production rates of 6-AF1 and 6-AF1c were 1.56 and 1.62 times of that of strain CE6-V, while the ethanol production rates of 6-AF1 and 6-AF1c were 1.21 and 1.78 times of that of strain CE6-V under 1.0% acetic acid stress. Results in this study indicate that acetic acid tolerance and fermentation performance of industrial S. cerevisiae under acetic acid stress can be improved largely by flocculation endowed by expression of flocculent genes, especially FLO1c.

  7. Xylose fermentation to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

  8. Plasma membrane proteins Yro2 and Mrh1 are required for acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Takabatake, Akiko; Kawazoe, Nozomi; Izawa, Shingo

    2015-03-01

    Yro2 and its paralogous protein Mrh1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have seven predicted transmembrane domains and predominantly localize to the plasma membrane. Their physiological functions and regulation of gene expression have not yet been elucidated in detail. We herein demonstrated that MRH1 was constitutively expressed, whereas the expression of YRO2 was induced by acetic acid stress and entering the stationary phase. Fluorescence microscopic analysis revealed that Mrh1 and Yro2 were distributed as small foci in the plasma membrane under acetic acid stress conditions. The null mutants of these genes (mrh1∆, yro2∆, and mrh1∆yro2∆) showed delayed growth and a decrease in the productivity of ethanol in the presence of acetic acid, indicating that Yro2 and Mrh1 are involved in tolerance to acetic acid stress.

  9. Binge ethanol exposure in late gestation induces ethanol aversion in the dam but enhances ethanol intake in the offspring and affects their postnatal learning about ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Chotro, M. Gabriela; Arias, Carlos; Spear, Norman E.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies show that exposure to 1 or 2 g/kg ethanol during the last days of gestation increases ethanol acceptance in infant rats. We tested whether prenatal exposure to 3 g/kg, a relatively high ethanol dose, generates an aversion to ethanol in both the dam and offspring, and whether this prenatal experience affects the expression of learning derived from ethanol exposure postnatally. The answer was uncertain, since postnatal administration of a 3 g/kg ethanol dose induces an aversion to ethanol after postnatal day 10 but increases ethanol acceptance when administered during the first postnatal week. In the present study pregnant rats received intragastric administrations of water or ethanol (3 g/kg) on gestation days 17-20. On postnatal days 7-8 or 10-11 the offspring were administered water or ethanol (3 g/kg). Intake of ethanol and water, locomotor activity in an open-field and ethanol odor preference were evaluated in the pups, while the mothers were evaluated in terms of ethanol intake. Results indicated an aversion to ethanol in dams that had been administered ethanol during gestation, despite a general increase in ethanol intake observed in their pups relative to controls. The prenatal ethanol exposure also potentiated the increase in ethanol intake observed after intoxication on postnatal days 7-8. Ethanol intoxication on postnatal days 10-11 reduced ethanol consumption; this ethanol aversion was still evident in infant rats exposed prenatally to ethanol despite their general increase in ethanol intake. No effects of prenatal ethanol exposure were observed in terms of motor activity or odor preference. It is concluded that prenatal exposure to ethanol, even in a dose that induces ethanol aversion in the gestating dam, increases ethanol intake in infant rats and that this experience modulates age-related differences in subsequent postnatal learning about ethanol. PMID:19801275

  10. Physiological and fermentation properties of Bacillus coagulans and a mutant lacking fermentative lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Su, Yue; Rhee, Mun Su; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-03-01

    Bacillus coagulans, a sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, grows optimally at 50-55 °C and produces lactic acid as the primary fermentation product from both hexoses and pentoses. The amount of fungal cellulases required for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) at 55 °C was previously reported to be three to four times lower than for SSF at the optimum growth temperature for Saccharomyces cerevisiae of 35 °C. An ethanologenic B. coagulans is expected to lower the cellulase loading and production cost of cellulosic ethanol due to SSF at 55 °C. As a first step towards developing B. coagulans as an ethanologenic microbial biocatalyst, activity of the primary fermentation enzyme L-lactate dehydrogenase was removed by mutation (strain Suy27). Strain Suy27 produced ethanol as the main fermentation product from glucose during growth at pH 7.0 (0.33 g ethanol per g glucose fermented). Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) acting in series contributed to about 55% of the ethanol produced by this mutant while pyruvate formate lyase and ADH were responsible for the remainder. Due to the absence of PDH activity in B. coagulans during fermentative growth at pH 5.0, the l-ldh mutant failed to grow anaerobically at pH 5.0. Strain Suy27-13, a derivative of the l-ldh mutant strain Suy27, that produced PDH activity during anaerobic growth at pH 5.0 grew at this pH and also produced ethanol as the fermentation product (0.39 g per g glucose). These results show that construction of an ethanologenic B. coagulans requires optimal expression of PDH activity in addition to the removal of the LDH activity to support growth and ethanol production.

  11. Hyperoxia decreases muscle glycogenolysis, lactate production, and lactate efflux during steady-state exercise.

    PubMed

    Stellingwerff, Trent; Leblanc, Paul J; Hollidge, Melanie G; Heigenhauser, George J F; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the decreased muscle and blood lactate during exercise with hyperoxia (60% inspired O2) vs. room air is due to decreased muscle glycogenolysis, leading to decreased pyruvate and lactate production and efflux. We measured pyruvate oxidation via PDH, muscle pyruvate and lactate accumulation, and lactate and pyruvate efflux to estimate total pyruvate and lactate production during exercise. We hypothesized that 60% O2 would decrease muscle glycogenolysis, resulting in decreased pyruvate and lactate contents, leading to decreased muscle pyruvate and lactate release with no change in PDH activity. Seven active male subjects cycled for 40 min at 70% VO2 peak on two occasions when breathing 21 or 60% O2. Arterial and femoral venous blood samples and blood flow measurements were obtained throughout exercise, and muscle biopsies were taken at rest and after 10, 20, and 40 min of exercise. Hyperoxia had no effect on leg O2 delivery, O2 uptake, or RQ during exercise. Muscle glycogenolysis was reduced by 16% with hyperoxia (267 +/- 19 vs. 317 +/- 21 mmol/kg dry wt), translating into a significant, 15% reduction in total pyruvate production over the 40-min exercise period. Decreased pyruvate production during hyperoxia had no effect on PDH activity (pyruvate oxidation) but significantly decreased lactate accumulation (60%: 22.6 +/- 6.4 vs. 21%: 31.3 +/- 8.7 mmol/kg dry wt), lactate efflux, and total lactate production over 40 min of cycling. Decreased glycogenolysis in hyperoxia was related to an approximately 44% lower epinephrine concentration and an attenuated accumulation of potent phosphorylase activators ADPf and AMPf during exercise. Greater phosphorylation potential during hyperoxia was related to a significantly diminished rate of PCr utilization. The tighter metabolic match between pyruvate production and oxidation resulted in a decrease in total lactate production and efflux over 40 min of exercise during hyperoxia.

  12. Continuous lactation effects on mammary remodeling during late gestation and lactation in dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Safayi, S; Theil, P K; Hou, L; Engbaek, M; Nørgaard, J V; Sejrsen, K; Nielsen, M O

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to 1) elucidate whether continuous milking during late gestation in dairy goats negatively affects mammary remodeling and hence milk production in the subsequent lactation, and 2) identify the regulatory factors responsible for changes in cell turnover and angiogenesis in the continuously lactating mammary gland. Nine multiparous dairy goats were used. One udder half was dried off approximately 9 wk prepartum (normal lactation; NL), and the other udder half of the same goat was milked continuously (continuous lactation; CL) until parturition or until the half-udder milk yields had dropped to below 50 g/d. Mammary biopsies were obtained from each udder half just before the NL gland was dried off (before dry period), within the first 2 wk after drying-off (early dry period, samples available only for NL glands), in the mid dry period, within the last 2 wk before parturition (late dry period), and at d 1 (the day of parturition), 3, 10, 60, and 180 of lactation. Mammary morphology was characterized in biopsies by quantitative histology, and cell turnover was determined by immunohistochemistry (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and Ki-67). Transcription of genes encoding factors involved in mammary epithelial cell (MEC) turnover and vascular function was quantified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Results demonstrated that omitting the dry period was possible in goats but was not as easy as claimed before. Renewal of MEC was suppressed in CL glands, which resulted in a smaller MEC population in the subsequent lactation. At the time of parturition (and throughout lactation), the mammary glands subjected to CL had smaller alveoli, more fully differentiated MEC, and a substantially larger capillary fraction compared with NL glands. The continuously lactating gland thus resembled a normally lactating gland in an advanced stage of lactation. None of the studied genomic factors could account for these treatment

  13. Hypoxia and exercise provoke both lactate release and lactate oxidation by the human brain.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Morten; Rasmussen, Peter; Bohm, Aske M; Seifert, Thomas; Brassard, Patrice; Zaar, Morten; Homann, Pernille; Evans, Kevin A; Nielsen, Henning B; Secher, Niels H

    2012-07-01

    Lactate is shuttled between organs, as demonstrated in the Cori cycle. Although the brain releases lactate at rest, during physical exercise there is a cerebral uptake of lactate. Here, we evaluated the cerebral lactate uptake and release in hypoxia, during exercise and when the two interventions were combined. We measured cerebral lactate turnover via a tracer dilution method ([1-(13)C]lactate), using arterial to right internal jugular venous differences in 9 healthy individuals (5 males and 4 females), at rest and during 30 min of submaximal exercise in normoxia and hypoxia (F(i)o(2) 10%, arterial oxygen saturation 72 ± 10%, mean ± sd). Whole-body lactate turnover increased 3.5-fold and 9-fold at two workloads in normoxia and 18-fold during exercise in hypoxia. Although middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity increased during exercise in hypoxia, calculated cerebral mitochondrial oxygen tension decreased by 13 mmHg (P<0.001). At the same time, cerebral lactate release increased from 0.15 ± 0.1 to 0.8 ± 0.6 mmol min(-1) (P<0.05), corresponding to ∼10% of cerebral energy consumption. Concurrently, cerebral lactate uptake was 1.0 ± 0.9 mmol min(-1) (P<0.05), of which 57 ± 9% was oxidized, demonstrating that lactate oxidation may account for up to ∼33% of the energy substrate used by the brain. These results support the existence of a cell-cell lactate shuttle that may involve neurons and astrocytes.

  14. Splanchnic metabolism of dairy cows during the transition from late gestation through early lactation.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, C K; Aikman, P C; Lupoli, B; Humphries, D J; Beever, D E

    2003-04-01

    Blood flow and net nutrient fluxes for portal-drained viscera (PDV) and liver (total splanchnic tissues) were measured at 19 and 9 d prepartum and at 11, 21, 33, and 83 d in milk (DIM) in 5 multiparous Holstein-Friesian cows. Cows were fed a grass silage-based gestation ration initially and a corn silage-based lactation ration peripartum and postpartum. Meals were fed at 8-h intervals and hourly (n = 8) measures of splanchnic metabolism were started before (0730 h and 0830 h) feeding at 0830 h. Dry matter intakes (DMI) at 19 and 9 d prepartum were not different. Metabolism changes measured from 19 to 9 d prepartum were lower arterial insulin and acetate, higher arterial nonesterified fatty acids and increased net liver removal of glycerol. After calving, PDV and liver blood flow and oxygen consumption more than doubled as DMI and milk yield increased, but 85 and 93% of the respective increases in PDV and liver blood flow at 83 DIM had occurred by 11 DIM. Therefore, factors additional to DMI must also contribute to increased blood flow in early lactation. Most postpartum changes in net PDV and liver metabolism could be attributed to increases in DMI and digestion or increased milk yield and tissue energy loss. Glucose release was increasingly greater than calculated requirements as DIM increased, presumably as tissue energy balance increased. Potential contributions of lactate, alanine, and glycerol to liver glucose synthesis were greatest at 11 DIM but decreased by 83 DIM. Excluding alanine, there was no evidence of an increased contribution of amino acids to liver glucose synthesis is required in early lactation. Increased net liver removal of propionate (69%), lactate (20%), alanine (8%), and glycerol (4%) can account for increased liver glucose release in transition cows from 9 d before to 11 d after calving.

  15. Microbial Community Dynamics of Lactate Enriched Hanford Groundwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, Jennifer J.; Drake, Meghan M.; Carroll, Susan L.; Yang, Zamin K.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Brown, Stephen D.; Podar, Mircea; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2010-05-01

    The Department of Energy site at Hanford, WA, has been historically impacted by U and Cr from the nuclear weapons industry. In an attempt to stimulate microbial remediation of these metals, in-situ lactate enrichment experiments are ongoing. In order to bridge the gap from the laboratory to the field, we inoculated triplicate anaerobic, continuous-flow glass reactors with groundwater collected from well Hanford 100-H in order to obtain a stable, enriched community while selecting for metal-reducing bacteria. Each reactor was fed from a single carboy containing defined media with 30 mM lactate at a rate of 0.223 ml/min under continuous nitrogen flow at 9 ml/min. Cell counts, organic acids, gDNA (for qPCR and pyrosequencing) and gases were sampled during the experiment. Cell counts remained low (less than 1x107 cells/ml) during the first two weeks of the experiment, but by day 20, had reached a density greater than 1x108 cells/ml. Metabolite analysis showed a decrease in the lactate concentrations over time. Pyruvate concentrations ranged from 20-40 uM the first week of the experiment then was undetectable after day 10. Likewise, formate appeared in the reactors during the first week with concentrations of 1.48-1.65 mM at day 7 then the concentrations decreased to 0.69-0.95 on day 10 and were undetectable on day 15. Acetate was present in low amounts on day 3 (0.15-0.33 mM) and steadily increased to 3.35-5.22 mM over time. Similarly, carbon dioxide was present in low concentrations early on and increased to 0.28-0.35 mM as the experiment progressed. We also were able to detect low amounts of methane (10-20 uM) during the first week of the experiment, but by day 10 the methane was undetectable. From these results and pyrosequencing analysis, we conclude that a shift in the microbial community dynamics occurred over time to eventually form a stable and enriched microbial community. Comprehensive investigations such as these allow for the examination of not only which

  16. 1,2-diazole and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol and their regulatory effects on ethanol and lactic acid formation in the living culture of Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Thitiprasert, Sitanan; Sooksai, Sarintip; Thongchul, Nuttha

    2014-02-01

    In heterofermentation of Rhizopus oryzae, ethanol is the major byproduct which reduces the production of a desired product, an optically pure L-lactic acid. To improve lactic acid production, regulating the alcohol fermentative pathway to limit ethanol production has been done by various techniques. In vitro study on alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) inhibition in several organisms showed that 1,2-diazole and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol were competitively bound at the active sites that eventually limited ethanol production. In this study, 1,2-diazole and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol were present during fermentation of R. oryzae. It was found that both 1,2-diazole and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol not only strongly affected ethanol formation but they also indirectly regulated lactate production as observed by the decreasing affinity for glucose flux toward lactate and ethanol production. The increase in both ethanol and lactate formation rates revealed 1,2-diazole and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol not only regulated the reversible redox reaction by ADH, but they also caused the dynamic change in the conversion of all metabolites in the living R. oryzae in order to maintain the balanced flux for cellular growth and maintenance.

  17. Ethanol production from cellulose by a coculture of Zymomonas mobilis and a clostridium

    SciTech Connect

    Leschine, S.B.; Canale-Parola, E.

    1984-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis and a mesophilic cellulolytic clostridium (strain C7) were grown in coculture in a medium containing cellulose as fermentable substrate. The coculture was stable through at least ten serial transfers and produced markedly higher amounts of ethanol than monocultures of the cellulolytic clostridium. Glucose and cellobiose, derived from the breakdown of cellulose, accumulated in strain C7 monocultures, but not in cocultures. The molar ratio of ethanol to acetate was higher in cocultures than in monocultures of strain C7. The cellulolytic clostridium was relatively ethanol-tolerant, inasmuch as it grew and fermented cellulose in media containing up to 7 g of ethanol/100 ml. Cellulase (Avicelase) activity of strain C7 was inhibited by cellobiose, but not by glucose. 18 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  18. Rutin attenuates ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in hippocampal neuronal cells by increasing aldehyde dehydrogenase 2.

    PubMed

    Song, Kibbeum; Kim, Sokho; Na, Ji-Young; Park, Jong-Heum; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kwon, Jungkee

    2014-10-01

    Rutin is derived from buckwheat, apples, and black tea. It has been shown to have beneficial anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Ethanol is a central nervous system depressant and neurotoxin. Its metabolite, acetaldehyde, is critically toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) metabolizes acetaldehyde into nontoxic acetate. This study examined rutin's effects on ALDH2 activity in hippocampal neuronal cells (HT22 cells). Rutin's protective effects against acetaldehyde-based ethanol neurotoxicity were confirmed. Daidzin, an ALDH2 inhibitor, was used to clarify the mechanisms of rutin's protective effects. Cell viability was significantly increased after rutin treatment. Rutin significantly reversed ethanol-increased Bax, cytochrome c expression and caspase 3 activity, and decreased Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL protein expression in HT22 cells. Interestingly, rutin increased ALDH2 expression, while daidzin reversed this beneficial effect. Thus, this study demonstrates rutin protects HT22 cells against ethanol-induced neurotoxicity by increasing ALDH2 activity.

  19. Lipids and Oxidative Stress Associated with Ethanol-Induced Neurological Damage.

    PubMed

    Hernández, José A; López-Sánchez, Rosa C; Rendón-Ramírez, Adela

    2016-01-01

    The excessive intake of alcohol is a serious public health problem, especially given the severe damage provoked by chronic or prenatal exposure to alcohol that affects many physiological processes, such as memory, motor function, and cognitive abilities. This damage is related to the ethanol oxidation in the brain. The metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde and then to acetate is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species that accentuate the oxidative state of cells. This metabolism of ethanol can induce the oxidation of the fatty acids in phospholipids, and the bioactive aldehydes produced are known to be associated with neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration. As such, here we will review the role of lipids in the neuronal damage induced by ethanol-related oxidative stress and the role that lipids play in the related compensatory or defense mechanisms.

  20. Lipids and Oxidative Stress Associated with Ethanol-Induced Neurological Damage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The excessive intake of alcohol is a serious public health problem, especially given the severe damage provoked by chronic or prenatal exposure to alcohol that affects many physiological processes, such as memory, motor function, and cognitive abilities. This damage is related to the ethanol oxidation in the brain. The metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde and then to acetate is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species that accentuate the oxidative state of cells. This metabolism of ethanol can induce the oxidation of the fatty acids in phospholipids, and the bioactive aldehydes produced are known to be associated with neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration. As such, here we will review the role of lipids in the neuronal damage induced by ethanol-related oxidative stress and the role that lipids play in the related compensatory or defense mechanisms. PMID:26949445

  1. Biological production of ethanol from coal. [Quarterly report], December 22, 1990--March 21, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Previously studies have shown the importance of both medium composition and concentration and medium pH on ethanol production of Clostridium ljungdahlii in fermenting CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} in synthesis gas. Four additional batch experiments involving medium composition and concentration were carried out in modified basal medium without yeast extract at pH 4.0. These experiments indicate that basal medium with only small amounts of B-vitamins can yield significant cell growth while yielding ethanol as the major product. Product ratios as high as 11.0 g ethanol per g acetate were obtained with half strength B-vitamins. Further experiments indicates that Ca-pantothenate may be necessary for the growth of C. ljungdahlii and that growth and ethanol production can occur simultaneously.

  2. Biofilm formation and ethanol inhibition by bacterial contaminants of biofuel fermentation.

    PubMed

    Rich, Joseph O; Leathers, Timothy D; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Anderson, Amber M; Nunnally, Melinda S

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial contaminants can inhibit ethanol production in biofuel fermentations, and even result in stuck fermentations. Contaminants may persist in production facilities by forming recalcitrant biofilms. A two-year longitudinal study was conducted of bacterial contaminants from a Midwestern dry grind corn fuel ethanol facility. Among eight sites sampled in the facility, the combined liquefaction stream and yeast propagation tank were consistently contaminated, leading to contamination of early fermentation tanks. Among 768 contaminants isolated, 92% were identified as Lactobacillus sp., with the most abundant species being Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus mucosae, and Lactobacillus fermentum. Seven percent of total isolates showed the ability to form biofilms in pure cultures, and 22% showed the capacity to significantly inhibit ethanol production. However, these traits were not correlated. Ethanol inhibition appeared to be related to acetic acid production by contaminants, particularly by obligately heterofermentative species such as L. fermentum and L. mucosae.

  3. Ethanol determination in frozen fruit pulps: an application of quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    da Silva Nunes, Wilian; de Oliveira, Caroline Silva; Alcantara, Glaucia Braz

    2016-04-01

    This study reports the chemical composition of five types of industrial frozen fruit pulps (acerola, cashew, grape, passion fruit and pineapple fruit pulps) and compares them with homemade pulps at two different stages of ripening. The fruit pulps were characterized by analyzing their metabolic profiles and determining their ethanol content using quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (qNMR). In addition, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to extract more information from the NMR data. We detected ethanol in all industrial and homemade pulps; and acetic acid in cashew, grape and passion fruit industrial and homemade pulps. The ethanol content in some industrial pulps is above the level recommended by regulatory agencies and is near the levels of some post-ripened homemade pulps. This study demonstrates that qNMR can be used to rapidly detect ethanol content in frozen fruit pulps and food derivatives. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Utilization of acetate by Beggiatoa.

    PubMed

    Burton, S D; Morita, R Y; Miller, W

    1966-03-01

    Burton, Sheril D. (Institute of Marine Science, University of Alaska, College), Richard Y. Morita, and Wayne Miller. Utilization of acetate by Beggiatoa. J. Bacteriol. 91:1192-1200. 1966.-A proposed system which would permit acetate incorporation into four-carbon compounds without the presence of key enzymes of the citric acid cycle or glyoxylate cycle is described. In this system, acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) is condensed with glyoxylate to form malate, which, in turn, is converted to oxaloacetate. Oxaloacetate then reacts with glutamate to produce alpha-ketoglutarate, which is subsequently converted to isocitrate. Cleavage of isocitrate produces glyoxylate and succinate. Thus, the proposed system is similar to the glyoxylate bypass in that malate is produced from glyoxylate and acetyl-CoA, but differs from both the citric acid cycle and the glyoxylate bypass, since citrate and fumarate are not involved. Fumarase, aconitase, catalase, citritase, pyruvate kinase, enolase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, lactic dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, and condensing enzyme were not detectable in crude extracts of Beggiatoa. Succinate was oxidized by a soluble enzyme not associated with an electron-transport particle. Isocitrate was identified as the sole compound labeled when C(14)O(2) was added to a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, CO(2) generating system (crystalline glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate) in the presence of alpha-ketoglutarate.

  5. Antinociceptive Activity of Ethanol Extract from Duguetia chrysocarpa Maas (Annonaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva; Araújo, Edigênia Cavalcante da Cruz; Ribeiro, Luciano Augusto de Araújo; de Lima, Julianeli Tolentino; Nunes, Xirley Pereira; Lúcio, Ana Sílvia Suassuna Carneiro; Agra, Maria de Fátima; Barbosa Filho, José Maria

    2012-01-01

    The ethanol extract from the fruits of Duguetia chrysocarpa was evaluated for its antinociceptive activity in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. The intraperitoneal administration of the ethanol extract (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg body weight) showed a dose-dependent inhibition of acetic-acid-induced abdominal writhes. The extract also produced a significant inhibition of both phases of the formalin test in all doses tested and increased the reaction time in hot-plate test at dose of 200 mg/kg. The data obtained suggest that the antinociceptive effect of the extract may be mediated via both peripheral and central mechanisms. The phytochemical investigation yielded the isolation of the benzenoid derivative 3-methoxy-4-ethoxy benzoic acid which is being reported for the first time in this genus. PMID:22645460

  6. Antinociceptive activity of ethanol extract from Duguetia chrysocarpa Maas (Annonaceae).

    PubMed

    Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva; Araújo, Edigênia Cavalcante da Cruz; Ribeiro, Luciano Augusto de Araújo; de Lima, Julianeli Tolentino; Nunes, Xirley Pereira; Lúcio, Ana Sílvia Suassuna Carneiro; Agra, Maria de Fátima; Barbosa Filho, José Maria

    2012-01-01

    The ethanol extract from the fruits of Duguetia chrysocarpa was evaluated for its antinociceptive activity in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. The intraperitoneal administration of the ethanol extract (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg body weight) showed a dose-dependent inhibition of acetic-acid-induced abdominal writhes. The extract also produced a significant inhibition of both phases of the formalin test in all doses tested and increased the reaction time in hot-plate test at dose of 200 mg/kg. The data obtained suggest that the antinociceptive effect of the extract may be mediated via both peripheral and central mechanisms. The phytochemical investigation yielded the isolation of the benzenoid derivative 3-methoxy-4-ethoxy benzoic acid which is being reported for the first time in this genus.

  7. Unusal pattern of product inhibition: batch acetic acid fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bar, R.; Gainer, J.L.; Kirwan, D.J.

    1987-04-20

    The limited tolerance of microorganisms to their metabolic products results in inhibited growth and product formation. The relationship between the specific growth rate, micro, and the concentration of an inhibitory product has been described by a number of mathematical models. In most cases, micro was found to be inversely proportional to the product concentration and invariably the rate of substrate utilization followed the same pattern. In this communication, the authors report a rather unusual case in which the formation rate of a product, acetic acid, increased with a decreasing growth rate of the microorganism, Acetobacter aceti. Apparently, a similar behavior was mentioned in a review report with respect to Clostridium thermocellum in a batch culture but was not published in the freely circulating literature. The fermentation of ethanol to acetic acid, C/sub 2/H/sub 5/OH + O/sub 2/ = CH/sub 3/COOH + H/sub 2/O is clearly one of the oldest known fermentations. Because of its association with the commercial production of vinegar it has been a subject of extensive but rather technically oriented studies. Suprisingly, the uncommon uncoupling between the inhibited microbial growth and the product formation appears to have been unnoticed. 13 references.

  8. Nutritional value of pearl millet for lactating and growing goats.

    PubMed

    Gelaye, S; Terrill, T; Amoah, E A; Miller, S; Gates, R N; Hanna, W W

    1997-05-01

    Studies were conducted to assess nutritional value of pearl millet grain (Pennisetum glaucum [L] R. Br.) for lactating and growing goats. Three complete diets containing either 40% corn, 40% pearl millet, or 40% corn and pearl millet mixed 1:1 (wt/wt) were balanced to contain 16% crude protein and 2.24 Mcal DE/kg on an air-dry basis. Forty-five does were blocked by kidding date and randomly assigned to diets for a 7-wk investigation. Feed intake and milk production were unaffected (P > .25) by treatment, and they averaged 2.86 and 2.47 kg daily, respectively. Thirty-three growing goats were blocked by sex and fed the same diets for 15 wk. Daily growth rate and feed to gain ratio were depressed (P < .05) by 25.4 and 19.0%, respectively, when corn was completely replaced with pearl millet. Digestion coefficients for DM, GE, CP, and NDF were reduced by over 10 percentage units with partial or complete replacement of corn by pearl millet. Ruminal acetate and ratio of acetate to propionate increased (P < .05) but butyrate, propionate, and ammonia were depressed (P < .05) with the pearl millet diets. Growing goats consumed 43 meals daily. They consumed 26.9, 32.6, 27.4, and 13.1% of their ration during the morning (0600 to 1200), afternoon (1200 to 1800), evening (1800 to 2400), and night (2400 to 0600), respectively. Pearl millet is a useful energy feed for mature, but not for growing, goats.

  9. [Faecal lactate as a disease activity index of ulcerative colitis: application to assessment of efficacy in the treatment with total parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, M

    1989-08-01

    I investigated changes of faecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in 52 hospitalized patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) who had bloody diarrhoea (severe and moderate colitis). The results suggest that molar ratios of faecal lactate could be helpful to monitor the disease activity of UC patients. Faecal SCFA output correlated directly with faecal output. This finding reflected an increase in output of lactate and acetate. In severe colitis, concentrations of faecal lactate were increased, whereas those of faecal major components of SCFA (acetate, propionate and n-buty-rate) were markedly reduced. Further, faecal lactate concentrations were increased in cases with bloody diarrhoea and reduced in those with formed stool. Patients were divided into two groups according with their treatments: patients treated with total parenteral nutrition (TPN) or low-residue UC diet. The molar ratio of faecal lactate in the TPN group was reduced below 2% in four weeks, whereas that in the UC diet group was reduced into the 2% mark in eight weeks. These findings support that patients in the former group were more rapidly induced into remission.

  10. Lactate and force production in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Michael; Albertsen, Janni; Rentsch, Maria; Juel, Carsten

    2005-01-15

    Lactic acid accumulation is generally believed to be involved in muscle fatigue. However, one study reported that in rat soleus muscle (in vitro), with force depressed by high external K(+) concentrations a subsequent incubation with lactic acid restores force and thereby protects against fatigue. However, incubation with 20 mm lactic acid reduces the pH gradient across the sarcolemma, whereas the gradient is increased during muscle activity. Furthermore, unlike active muscle the Na(+)-K(+) pump is not activated. We therefore hypothesized that lactic acid does not protect against fatigue in active muscle. Three incubation solutions were used: 20 mM Na-lactate (which acidifies internal pH), 12 mM Na-lactate +8 mm lactic acid (which mimics the pH changes during muscle activity), and 20 mM lactic acid (which acidifies external pH more than internal pH). All three solutions improved force in K(+)-depressed rat soleus muscle. The pH regulation associated with lactate incubation accelerated the Na(+)-K(+) pump. To study whether the protective effect of lactate/lactic acid is a general mechanism, we stimulated muscles to fatigue with and without pre-incubation. None of the incubation solutions improved force development in repetitively stimulated muscle (Na-lactate had a negative effect). It is concluded that although lactate/lactic acid incubation regains force in K(+)-depressed resting muscle, a similar incubation has no or a negative effect on force development in active muscle. It is suggested that the difference between the two situations is that lactate/lactic acid removes the negative consequences of an unusual large depolarization in the K(+)-treated passive muscle, whereas the depolarization is less pronounced in active muscle.

  11. Glycolysis and the significance of lactate in traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Keri L. H.; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    In traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients, elevation of the brain extracellular lactate concentration and the lactate/pyruvate ratio are well-recognized, and are associated statistically with unfavorable clinical outcome. Brain extracellular lactate was conventionally regarded as a waste product of glucose, when glucose is metabolized via glycolysis (Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway) to pyruvate, followed by conversion to lactate by the action of lactate dehydrogenase, and export of lactate into the extracellular fluid. In TBI, glycolytic lactate is ascribed to hypoxia or mitochondrial dysfunction, although the precise nature of the latter is incompletely understood. Seemingly in contrast to lactate's association with unfavorable outcome is a growing body of evidence that lactate can be beneficial. The idea that the brain can utilize lactate by feeding into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle of neurons, first published two decades ago, has become known as the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis. Direct evidence of brain utilization of lactate was first obtained 5 years ago in a cerebral microdialysis study in TBI patients, where administration of 13C-labeled lactate via the microdialysis catheter and simultaneous collection of the emerging microdialysates, with 13C NMR analysis, revealed 13C labeling in glutamine consistent with lactate utilization via the TCA cycle. This suggests that where neurons are too damaged to utilize the lactate produced from glucose by astrocytes, i.e., uncoupling of neuronal and glial metabolism, high extracellular levels of lactate would accumulate, explaining the association between high lactate and poor outcome. Recently, an intravenous exogenous lactate supplementation study in TBI patients revealed evidence for a beneficial effect judged by surrogate endpoints. Here we review the current state of knowledge about glycolysis and lactate in TBI, how it can be measured in patients, and whether it can be modulated to achieve better

  12. Precipitation of DNA with Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael R; Sambrook, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    DNA can be precipitated out of solution for the removal of salts and/or for resuspension in an alternative buffer. Either ethanol or isopropanol can be used to achieve this purpose; however, the use of ethanol is generally preferred. Cations, provided as salts, are typically included to neutralize the negative charge of the DNA phosphate backbone. This method describes ethanol precipitation of DNA in microcentrifuge tubes.

  13. Ethanol production by the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus by expression of bacterial bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Keller, Matthew W; Lipscomb, Gina L; Nguyen, Diep M; Crowley, Alexander T; Schut, Gerrit J; Scott, Israel; Kelly, Robert M; Adams, Michael W W

    2017-02-14

    Ethanol is an important target for the renewable production of liquid transportation fuels. It can be produced biologically from pyruvate, via pyruvate decarboxylase, or from acetyl-CoA, by alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE). Thermophilic bacteria utilize AdhE, which is a bifunctional enzyme that contains both acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase activities. Many of these organisms also contain a separate alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) that generates ethanol from acetaldehyde, although the role of AdhA in ethanol production is typically not clear. As acetyl-CoA is a key central metabolite that can be generated from a wide range of substrates, AdhE can serve as a single gene fuel module to produce ethanol through primary metabolic pathways. The focus here is on the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows by fermenting sugar to acetate, CO2 and H2 . Previously, by the heterologous expression of adhA from a thermophilic bacterium, P. furiosus was shown to produce ethanol by a novel mechanism from acetate, mediated by AdhA and the native enzyme aldehyde oxidoreductase (AOR). In this study, the AOR gene was deleted from P. furiosus to evaluate ethanol production directly from acetyl-CoA by heterologous expression of the adhE gene from eight thermophilic bacteria. Only AdhEs from two Thermoanaerobacter strains showed significant activity in cell-free extracts of recombinant P. furiosus and supported ethanol production in vivo. In the AOR deletion background, the highest amount of ethanol (estimated 61% theoretical yield) was produced when adhE and adhA from Thermoanaerobacter were co-expressed.

  14. Ethanol production via fungal decomposition and fermentation of biomass. Phase II (FY 1981) annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Antonopoulos, A. A.; Wene, E. G.

    1981-10-01

    This program has as its main goal the isolation and development of Fusarium strains that can efficiently and economically decompose plant polysaccharides to pentoses and hexoses and ferment them to ethanol for fuel purposes. During Phase II (FY 1981) of this program, more than 800 new Fusarium isolates were isolated and screened. All showed cellulolytic activity. The Fusarium mutant ANL 3-72181 (derived after uv exposure of ANL 22 isolate) produced 2.45 iu cellulase after 14 days. This cellulase activity was achieved in the presence of 0.7 mg/mL extracellular protein. In separate tests, the use of both proteose peptone and yeast extract with 1% cellulose increased the production of extracellular protein three times over that on cellulose alone. Initial fermentation by Fusarium strains on 1% glucose produced up to 4.2 mg/mL ethanol in 48 hours. All Fusarium isolates and mutants found during this period were screened for xylose fermentation. Ethanol production during early experimentation required from 120 to 144 hours to yield 4.0 to 4.5 mg/mL ethanol from 1% xylose solutions. Through continuous selection of isolates, this time was reduced to 66 hours. By recycling Fusarium cell mass, fermentations of 1% xylose yielded 4.0 to 4.3 mg/mL ethanol in 48 hours. Consecutive fermentations of 2% xylose produced an average of 8.1 mg/mL ethanol in 48 hours. Fermentation of a 4.5% xylose + 2% glucose solution produced 21 mg/mL ethanol and 0.8 mg/mL acetic acid, while fermentation of a 7% xylose + 2% glucose solution yielded 25.5 mg/mL ethanol and 0.85 mg/mL acetic acid; these fermentations were aerated at a rate of 0.03 v/v-min.

  15. Enzymatic production of glycerol acetate from glycerol.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seokhyeon; Park, Chulhwan

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we report the enzymatic production of glycerol acetate from glycerol and methyl acetate. Lipases are essential for the catalysis of this reaction. To find the optimum conditions for glycerol acetate production, sequential experiments were designed. Type of lipase, lipase concentration, molar ratio of reactants, reaction temperature and solvents were investigated for the optimum conversion of glycerol to glycerol acetate. As the result of lipase screening, Novozym 435 (Immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B) was turned out to be the optimal lipase for the reaction. Under the optimal conditions (2.5 g/L of Novozym 435, 1:40 molar ratio of glycerol to methyl acetate, 40 °C and tert-butanol as the solvent), glycerol acetate production was achieved in 95.00% conversion.

  16. Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with defects in acetate metabolism: isolation and characterization of Acn- mutants.

    PubMed

    McCammon, M T

    1996-09-01

    The two carbon compounds, ethanol and acetate, can be oxidatively metabolized as well as assimilated into carbohydrate in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The distribution of acetate metabolic enzymes among several cellular compartments, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and cytoplasm makes it an intriguing system to study complex metabolic interactions. To investigate the complex process of carbon catabolism and assimilation, mutants unable to grow on acetate were isolated. One hundred five Acn- ("ACetate Nonutilizing") mutants were sorted into 21 complementation groups with an additional 20 single mutants. Five of the groups have defects in TCA cycle enzymes: MDH1, CIT1, ACO1, IDH1, and IDH2. A defect in RTG2, involved in the retrograde communication between the mitochondrion and the nucleus, was also identified. Four genes encode enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis: ICL1, MLS1, MDH2, and PCK1. Five other genes appear to be defective in regulating metabolic activity since elevated levels of enzymes in several metabolic pathways, including the glyoxylate cycle, gluconeogenesis, and acetyl-CoA metabolism, were detected in these mutants: ACN8, ACN9, ACN17, ACN18, and ACN42. In summary, this analysis has identified at least 22 and as many as 41 different genes involved in acetate metabolism.

  17. Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae with Defects in Acetate Metabolism: Isolation and Characterization of Acn(-) Mutants

    PubMed Central

    McCammon, M. T.

    1996-01-01

    The two carbon compounds, ethanol and acetate, can be oxidatively metabolized as well as assimilated into carbohydrate in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The distribution of acetate metabolic enzymes among several cellular compartments, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and cytoplasm makes it an intriguing system to study complex metabolic interactions. To investigate the complex process of carbon catabolism and assimilation, mutants unable to grow on acetate were isolated. One hundred five Acn(-) (``ACetate Nonutilizing'') mutants were sorted into 21 complementation groups with an additional 20 single mutants. Five of the groups have defects in TCA cycle enzymes: MDH1, CIT1, ACO1, IDH1, and IDH2. A defect in RTG2, involved in the retrograde communication between the mitochondrion and the nucleus, was also identified. Four genes encode enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis: ICL1, MLS1, MDH2, and PCK1. Five other genes appear to be defective in regulating metabolic activity since elevated levels of enzymes in several metabolic pathways, including the glyoxylate cycle, gluconeogenesis, and acetyl-CoA metabolism, were detected in these mutants: ACN8, ACN9, ACN17, ACN18, and ACN42. In summary, this analysis has identified at least 22 and as many as 41 different genes involved in acetate metabolism. PMID:8878673

  18. Acetic acid bacteria: A group of bacteria with versatile biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Saichana, Natsaran; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Adachi, Osao; Frébort, Ivo; Frebortova, Jitka

    2015-11-01

    Acetic acid bacteria are gram-negative obligate aerobic bacteria assigned to the family Acetobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria. They are members of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Swaminathania, Saccharibacter, Neoasaia, Granulibacter, Tanticharoenia, Ameyamaea, Neokomagataea, and Komagataeibacter. Many strains of Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter have been known to possess high acetic acid fermentation ability as well as the acetic acid and ethanol resistance, which are considered to be useful features for industrial production of acetic acid and vinegar, the commercial product. On the other hand, Gluconobacter strains have the ability to perform oxidative fermentation of various sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar acids leading to the formation of several valuable products. Thermotolerant strains of acetic acid bacteria were isolated in order to serve as the new strains of choice for industrial fermentations, in which the cooling costs for maintaining optimum growth and production temperature in the fermentation vessels could be significantly reduced. Genetic modifications by adaptation and genetic engineering were also applied to improve their properties, such as productivity and heat resistance.

  19. Ethanol from municipal cellulosic wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, A. J., Jr.; Timbario, T. J.; Mulloney, J. A., Jr.

    This paper addresses the use of municipal cellulosic wastes as a feedstock for producing ethanol fuels, and describes the application of enzymatic hydrolysis technology for their production. The concept incorporates recent process technology developments within the framework of an existing industry familiar with large-scale ethanol fermentation (the brewing industry). Preliminary indications are that the cost of producing ethanol via enzymatic hydrolysis in an existing plant with minimal facility modifications (low capital investment) can be significantly less than that of ethanol from grain fermentation.

  20. Induction of brain CYP2E1 by chronic ethanol treatment and related oxidative stress in hippocampus, cerebellum, and brainstem.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yanjun; Dong, Guicheng; Luo, Haiguang; Cao, Jie; Wang, Chang; Wu, Jianyuan; Feng, Yu-Qi; Yue, Jiang

    2012-12-16

    Ethanol is one of the most commonly abused substances, and oxidative stress is an important causative factor in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) is involved in ethanol metabolism in the brain. This study investigates the role of brain CYP2E1 in the susceptibility of certain brain regions to ethanol neurotoxicity. Male Wistar rats were intragastrically treated with ethanol (3.0 g/kg, 30 days). CYP2E1 protein, mRNA expression, and catalytic activity in various brain regions were respectively assessed by immunoblotting, quantitative quantum dot immunohistochemistry, real-time RT-PCR, and LC-MS. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was analyzed using a laser confocal scanning microscope. The hippocampus, cerebellum, and brainstem were selectively damaged after ethanol treatment, indicated by both lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and histopathological analysis. Ethanol markedly increased the levels of CYP2E1 protein, mRNA expression, and activity in the hippocampus and cerebellum. CYP2E1 protein and activity were significantly increased by ethanol in the brainstem, with no change in mRNA expression. ROS levels induced by ethanol paralleled the enhanced CYP2E1 proteins in the hippocampus, granular layer and white matter of cerebellum as well as brainstem. Brain CYP2E1 activity was positively correlated with the damage to the hippocampus, cerebellum, and brainstem. These results suggest that the selective sensitivity of brain regions to ethanol neurodegeneration may be attributed to the regional and cellular-specific induction of CYP2E1 by ethanol. The inhibition of CYP2E1 levels may attenuate ethanol-induced oxidative stress via ROS generation.

  1. Ethanol fermentation characteristics of recycled water by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in an integrated ethanol-methane fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinchao; Wang, Ke; Wang, Huijun; Zhang, Jianhua; Mao, Zhonggui

    2016-11-01

    An process of integrated ethanol-methane fermentation with improved economics has been studied extensively in recent years, where the process water used for a subsequent fermentation of carbohydrate biomass is recycled. This paper presents a systematic study of the ethanol fermentation characteristics of recycled process water. Compared with tap water, fermentation time was shortened by 40% when mixed water was employed. However, while the maximal ethanol production rate increased from 1.07g/L/h to 2.01g/L/h, ethanol production was not enhanced. Cell number rose from 0.6×10(8) per mL in tap water to 1.6×10(8) per mL in mixed water but although biomass increased, cell morphology was not affected. Furthermore, the use of mixed water increased the glycerol yield but decreased that of acetic acid, and the final pH with mixed water was higher than when using tap water.

  2. Formation of ethyl acetate by Kluyveromyces marxianus on whey during aerobic batch cultivation at specific trace element limitation.

    PubMed

    Urit, Thanet; Stukert, Anton; Bley, Thomas; Löser, Christian

    2012-12-01

    Kluyveromyces marxianus is able to transform lactose into ethyl acetate as a bulk product which offers a chance for an economical reuse of whey-borne sugar. Ethyl acetate is highly volatile and allows its process-integrated recovery by stripping from the aerated bioreactor. Extensive formation of ethyl acetate by K. marxianus DSM 5422 required restriction of yeast growth by a lack of trace elements. Several aerobic batch processes were done in a 1-L stirred reactor using whey-borne culture medium supplemented with an individual trace element solution excluding Mn, Mo, Fe, Cu, or Zn for identifying the trace element(s) crucial for the observed ester synthesis. Only a lack of Fe, Cu, or Zn restricted yeast growth while exclusion of Mn and Mo did not exhibit any effect due to a higher amount of the latter in the used whey. Limitation of growth by Fe or Cu caused significant production of ethyl acetate while limitation by Zn resulted in formation of ethanol. A lack of Fe or Cu obviously makes the respiratory chain inefficient resulting in an increased mitochondrial NADH level followed by a reduced metabolic flux of acetyl-SCoA into the citrate cycle. Synthesis of ethyl acetate from acetyl-SCoA and ethanol by alcoholysis is thus interpreted as an overflow metabolism.

  3. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation...

  7. [Interference of ethylene glycol on lactate assays].

    PubMed

    Graïne, H; Toumi, K; Roullier, V; Capeau, J; Lefèvre, G

    2007-01-01

    Ethylene glycol is broken down to three main organic acids: glycolic acid, glyoxylic acid and oxalic acid which cause severe metabolic acidosis. Effect of these three acids on lactate assays was evaluated in five blood gas analysers and two clinical chemistry analysers. For all systems, no influence of oxalic acid on lactate results could be demonstrated. No interference of glycolic acid could be observed on lactate assay performed with Rapid Lab 1265 (R: 104,9 +/- 12,1%), Vitros 950 (R: 105,7 +/- 5,3 %) and Architect ci8200 (R: 104,9 +/- 4,7%), but on the contrary, CCX 4, OMNI S, ABL 725 and 825 demonstrated a concentration-dependent interference. No interference of glyoxylic acid could be observed with Vitros 950, but a positive interference could be observed with ABL 725 and 825, OMNI S, CCX4 and Architect ci8200 A linear relationship between apparent lactate concentration found with ABL 725 and 825, OMNI S, CCX 4, and glyoxylic acid could be observed (0,94 < r < 0,99), a weaker interference being observed with Rapid Lab 1265 and Architect ci 8200. Our results demonstrated that in case of ethylene glycol poisoning, cautious interpretation of lactate assay should be done, since wrong results of lactacidemia could lead to misdiagnostic and delay patient treatment.

  8. Lactate metabolism during exercise in patients with mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Tina D; Orngreen, Mette C; Van Hall, Gerrit; Vissing, John

    2013-08-01

    Patients with mitochondrial DNA mutations often have elevated plasma lactate at rest and during exercise, but it is unknown whether the high lactate levels are caused by a high production, an impaired oxidation or a combination. We studied lactate kinetics in 10 patients with mtDNA mutations and 10 matched healthy control subjects at rest and during cycle exercise with a combination of femoral arterio-venous differences of lactate, and lactate tracer dilution methodology. During exercise, lactate concentration and production rates were several-fold higher in patients, but despite mitochondrial dysfunction, lactate was oxidized in muscle to the same extent as in healthy control subjects. This surprisingly high ability to burn lactate in working muscle with defective mitochondria, probably relates to the variability of oxidative capacity among muscle fibers. The data suggests that lactate is not solely an indicator of impaired oxidative capacity, but an important fuel for oxidative metabolism, even in muscle with severely impaired mitochondrial function.

  9. Comparison of Field Groundwater Biostimulation Experiments Using Polylactate and Lactate Solutions at the Chromium-Contaminated Hanford 100-H Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazen, T. C.; Faybishenko, B.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.; Sonnenthal, E. L.; Steefel, C.; Larsen, J.; Conrad, M. E.; Bill, M.; Christensen, J. N.; Brown, S. T.; Joyner, D.; Borglin, S. E.; Geller, J. T.; Chakraborty, R.; Nico, P. S.; Long, P. E.; Newcomer, D. R.; Arntzen, E.

    2011-12-01

    of acetate and propionate, the evolution of 13C in bicarbonate, and the rate of sulfate reduction. In contrast to the slow-release HRC injections, no long-term effects of biostimulation and Cr bioreduction were observed in groundwater after the lactate injections. The presentation will address these patterns of the geochemical, δ13C of DIC, and biomass changes in groundwater before and after the polylactate and lactate injections.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3 or C2H3O2Na·3H2O, CAS Reg. No. 6131-90-4) is the sodium salt of acetic acid and occurs naturally in plant...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3 or C2H3O2Na·3H2O, CAS Reg. No. 6131-90-4) is the sodium salt of acetic acid and occurs naturally in plant...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3 or C2H3O2Na·3H2O, CAS Reg. No. 6131-90-4) is the sodium salt of acetic acid and occurs naturally in plant...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3 or C2H3O2Na·3H2O, CAS Reg. No. 6131-90-4) is the sodium salt of acetic acid and occurs naturally in plant...

  14. The fraction of cells that resume growth after acetic acid addition is a strain-dependent parameter of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Steve; Fernández-Niño, Miguel; González-Ramos, Daniel; van Maris, Antonius J A; Nevoigt, Elke

    2014-06-01

    High acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a relevant phenotype in industrial biotechnology when using lignocellulosic hydrolysates as feedstock. A screening of 38 S. cerevisiae strains for tolerance to acetic acid revealed considerable differences, particularly with regard to the duration of the latency phase. To understand how this phenotype is quantitatively manifested, four strains exhibiting significant differences were studied in more detail. Our data show that the duration of the latency phase is primarily determined by the fraction of cells within the population that resume growth. Only this fraction contributed to the exponential growth observed after the latency phase, while all other cells persisted in a viable but non-proliferating state. A remarkable variation in the size of the fraction was observed among the tested strains differing by several orders of magnitude. In fact, only 11 out of 10(7)  cells of the industrial bioethanol production strain Ethanol Red resumed growth after exposure to 157 mM acetic acid at pH 4.5, while this fraction was 3.6 × 10(6) (out of 10(7)  cells) in the highly acetic acid tolerant isolate ATCC 96581. These strain-specific differences are genetically determined and represent a valuable starting point to identify genetic targets for future strain improvement.

  15. High-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry validation of medroxyprogesterone acetate in products of pork origin and serum.

    PubMed

    Giannetti, Luigi; Barchi, Daniela; Fiorucci, Fulvia; Gennuso, Elisa; Sanna, Patrizia; Pallagrosi, Marco; Neri, Bruno

    2005-08-01

    Different extraction and purification methods are described here to determine medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in pork meat and serum. Spiked samples are investigated over the concentration range of MPA 0.5-20 ng/g. Pork meat tissues are subjected to extraction using organic solvent, and pork serum is simply diluted with acetate buffer. Clean-up is performed using solid-phase extraction on a C18 cartridge, and MPA is eluted with ethanol. Aliquots are injected into a high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system. MPA content is determined on the basis of m/z 387-327 and 387-123 transitions.

  16. Cumulative lactate and hospital mortality in ICU patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Both hyperlactatemia and persistence of hyperlactatemia have been associated with bad outcome. We compared lactate and lactate-derived variables in outcome prediction. Methods Retrospective observational study. Case records from 2,251 consecutive intensive care unit (ICU) patients admitted between 2001 and 2007 were analyzed. Baseline characteristics, all lactate measurements, and in-hospital mortality were recorded. The time integral of arterial blood lactate levels above the upper normal threshold of 2.2 mmol/L (lactate-time-integral), maximum lactate (max-lactate), and time-to-first-normalization were calculated. Survivors and nonsurvivors were compared and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were applied. Results A total of 20,755 lactate measurements were analyzed. Data are srpehown as median [interquartile range]. In nonsurvivors (n = 405) lactate-time-integral (192 [0–1881] min·mmol/L) and time-to-first normalization (44.0 [0–427] min) were higher than in hospital survivors (n = 1846; 0 [0–134] min·mmol/L and 0 [0–75] min, respectively; all p < 0.001). Normalization of lactate <6 hours after ICU admission revealed better survival compared with normalization of lactate >6 hours (mortality 16.6% vs. 24.4%; p < 0.001). AUC of ROC curves to predict in-hospital mortality was the largest for max-lactate, whereas it was not different among all other lactate derived variables (all p > 0.05). The area under the ROC curves for admission lactate and lactate-time-integral was not different (p = 0.36). Conclusions Hyperlactatemia is associated with in-hospital mortality in a heterogeneous ICU population. In our patients, lactate peak values predicted in-hospital mortality equally well as lactate-time-integral of arterial blood lactate levels above the upper normal threshold. PMID:23446002

  17. Genome-guided analysis of physiological and morphological traits of the fermentative acetate oxidizer Thermacetogenium phaeum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Thermacetogenium phaeum is a thermophilic strictly anaerobic bacterium oxidizing acetate to CO2 in syntrophic association with a methanogenic partner. It can also grow in pure culture, e.g., by fermentation of methanol to acetate. The key enzymes of homoacetate fermentation (Wood-Ljungdahl pathway) are used both in acetate oxidation and acetate formation. The obvious reversibility of this pathway in this organism is of specific interest since syntrophic acetate oxidation operates close to the energetic limitations of microbial life. Results The genome of Th. phaeum is organized on a single circular chromosome and has a total size of 2,939,057 bp. It comprises 3.215 open reading frames of which 75% could be assigned to a gene function. The G+C content is 53.88 mol%. Many CRISPR sequences were found, indicating heavy phage attack in the past. A complete gene set for a phage was found in the genome, and indications of phage action could also be observed in culture. The genome contained all genes required for CO2 reduction through the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, including two formyl tetrahydrofolate ligases, three carbon monoxide dehydrogenases, one formate hydrogenlyase complex, three further formate dehydrogenases, and three further hydrogenases. The bacterium contains a menaquinone MQ-7. No indications of cytochromes or Rnf complexes could be found in the genome. Conclusions The information obtained from the genome sequence indicates that Th. phaeum differs basically from the three homoacetogenic bacteria sequenced so far, i.e., the sodium ion-dependent Acetobacterium woodii, the ethanol-producing Clostridium ljungdahlii, and the cytochrome-containing Moorella thermoacetica. The specific enzyme outfit of Th. phaeum obviously allows ATP formation both in acetate formation and acetate oxidation. PMID:23259483

  18. Early lactation production, health, and welfare characteristics of cows selected for extended lactation.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, J O; Mogensen, L; Kristensen, T

    2017-02-01

    Some cows are able to achieve relatively high milk yields during extended lactations beyond 305 d in milk, and farmers may be able to use this potential by selecting the most suitable cows for an extended lactation. However, the decision to postpone insemination has to rely on information available in early lactation. The main objectives of this study were, therefore, to assess the association between the information available in early lactation and the relative milk production of cows on extended lactation, and to investigate if this information can be used to differentiate time of first insemination between cows. Data came from 4 Danish private herds practicing extended lactation in which some cows are selected to have a delayed time of planned first insemination. Average herd size varied from 93 to 157 cows, and milk yield varied from 7,842 to 12,315 kg of energy-corrected milk (ECM) per cow per year across herds. The analysis was based on 422 completed extended lactations (427 ± 87 d), and each lactation was assigned to 1 of 3 (low, medium, and high) milk performance groups (MPG) within parity group within herd based on a standardized lactation yield. For cows in the high MPG, peak ECM yield, and ECM yield at dry off were significantly greater, the relative reduction in milk yield between 60 and 305 d in milk was significantly smaller, and a smaller proportion had a body condition score (scale: 1-5) at dry off of 3.5 or greater compared with cows in low MPG. Previous lactation days in milk at peak ECM yield and ECM yield at dry off were higher, the relative reduction in milk yield between 60 and 305 d in milk was smaller, and the number of inseminations per conception was higher for multiparous cows in high MPG compared with low. Current lactation ECM yield at second and third milk recording were greater for cows in high MPG compared with low. A principal component analysis indicated that variables related to fertility, diseases, and milk yield explained most

  19. [Effect of byproducts in lignocellulose hydrolysates on ethanol fermentation by Issatchenkia orientalis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengqin; Liu, Yaqiong; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xie, Hui; Song, Andong

    2014-05-01

    Byproducts in lignocellulose hydrolysates, namely sodium formate (1 to 5 g/L), sodium acetic (2.5 to 8.0 g/L), furfural (0.2-2 g/L), 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF, 1 to 1.0 g/L) or vanillin (0.5 to 2 g/L) were used to evaluate their effects on ethanol fermentation by Issatchenkia orientalis HN-1 using single factor test and the response surface central composite experiment. Results showed that most of the byproducts had no obvious inhibition on the production of ethanol, except for the addition of 2 g/L vanillin or 1 g/L of 5-HMF, which reduced the ethanol production by 20.38% and 11.2%, respectively. However, high concentration of some byproducts in lignocellulose hydrolysates, such as sodium formate (1 to 5 g/L), sodium acetic (2.5 to 8.0 g/L), furfural (0.2 to 2 g/L) and vanillin (0.5 to 2 g/L) inhibited the growth of I. orientalis HN-1 significantly. Compared with the control, the dry cell weight of I. orientalis HN-1 decreased by 25.04% to 37.02%, 28.83% to 43.82%, 20.06% to 37.60% and 26.39% to 52.64%, respectively, when the above components were added into the fermentation broth and the fermentation lasted for 36 h. No significant interaction effect of the various inhibitors (sodium formate, sodium acetic, furfural and vanillin) except for vanillin single factor on the ethanol production was observed based on the central composite experiments. The concentrations of byproducts in most lignocellulose hydrolysates were below the initial inhibition concentration on ethanol production by Issatchenkia orientalis HN-1, which indicated that Issatchenkia orientalis HN-1 can be used for ethanol production from lignocellulose hydrolysates.

  20. Comparison between acetate and hydrogen as electron donors and implications for the reductive dehalogenation of PCE and TCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Il-Su; Bae, Jae-Ho; McCarty, Perry L.

    2007-10-01

    Bioremediation by reductive dehalogenation of groundwater contaminated with tetrachloroethene (PCE) or trichloroethene (TCE) is generally carried out through the addition of a fermentable electron donor such as lactate, benzoate, carbohydrates or vegetable oil. These fermentable donors are converted by fermenting organisms into acetate and hydrogen, either of which might be used by dehalogenating microorganisms. Comparisons were made between H 2 and acetate on the rate and extent of reductive dehalogenation of PCE. PCE dehalogenation with H 2 alone was complete to ethene, but with acetate alone it generally proceeded only about half as fast and only to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE). Additionally, acetate was not used as an electron donor in the presence of H 2. These findings suggest the fermentable electron donor requirement for PCE dehalogenation to ethene can be reduced up to 50% by separating PCE dehalogenation into two stages, the first of which uses acetate for the conversion of PCE to cDCE, and the second uses H 2 for the conversion of cDCE to ethene. This can be implemented with a recycle system in which the fermentable substrate is added down-gradient, where the hydrogen being produced by fermentation effects cDCE conversion into ethene. The acetate produced is recycled up-gradient to achieve PCE conversion into cDCE. With the lower electron donor usage required, potential problems of aquifer clogging, excess methane production, and high groundwater chemical oxygen demand (COD) can be greatly reduced.

  1. Modification of Sexual Development and Carotene Production by Acetate and Other Small Carboxylic Acids in Blakeslea trispora and Phycomyces blakesleeanus

    PubMed Central

    Kuzina, Vera; Cerdá-Olmedo, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    In Phycomyces blakesleeanus and Blakeslea trispora (order Mucorales, class Zygomycetes), sexual interaction on solid substrates leads to zygospore development and to increased carotene production (sexual carotenogenesis). Addition of small quantities of acetate, propionate, lactate, or leucine to mated cultures on minimal medium stimulated zygospore production and inhibited sexual carotenogenesis in both Phycomyces and Blakeslea. In Blakeslea, the threshold acetate concentration was <1 mmol/liter for both effects, and the concentrations that had one-half of the maximal effect were <2 mmol/liter for carotenogenesis and >7 mmol/liter for zygosporogenesis. The effects on Phycomyces were similar, but the concentrations of acetate had to be multiplied by ca. 3 to obtain the same results. Inhibition of sexual carotenogenesis by acetate occurred normally in Phycomyces mutants that cannot use acetate as a carbon source and in mutants whose dormant spores cannot be activated by acetate. Small carboxylic acids may be signals that, independent of their ability to trigger spore germination in Phycomyces, modify metabolism and development during the sexual cycle of Phycomyces and Blakeslea, uncoupling two processes that were thought to be linked and mediated by a common mechanism. PMID:16820488

  2. Electrochemical and biochemical analysis of ethanol fermentation of zymomonas mobilis KCCM11336.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Bo Young; Hwang, Tae Sik; Park, Doo Hyun

    2009-07-01

    An electrochemical bioreactor (ECB) composed of a cathode compartment and an air anode was used in this study to characterize the ethanol fermentation of Zymomonas mobilis. The cathode and air anode were constructed of modified graphite felt with neutral red (NR) and a modified porous carbon plate with cellulose acetate and porous ceramic membrane, respectively. The air anode operates as a catalyst to generate protons and electrons from water. The growth and ethanol production of Z. mobilis were 50% higher in the ECB than were observed under anoxic nitrogen conditions. Ethanol production by growing cells and the crude enzyme of Z. mobilis were significantly lower under aerobic conditions than under other conditions. The growing cells and crude enzyme of Z. mobilis did not catalyze ethanol production from pyruvate and acetaldehyde. The membrane fraction of crude enzyme catalyzed ethanol production from glucose, but the soluble fraction did not. NADH was oxidized to NAD+ in association with H2O2 reduction, via the catalysis of crude enzyme. Our results suggested that NADH/NAD+ balance may be a critical factor for ethanol producton from glucose in the metabolism of Z. mobilis, and that the metabolic activity of both growing cells and crude enzyme for ethanol fermentation may be induced in the presence of glucose.

  3. Biochemical pathways generating post-mortem volatile compounds co-detected during forensic ethanol analyses.

    PubMed

    Boumba, Vassiliki A; Ziavrou, Kallirroe S; Vougiouklakis, Theodore

    2008-01-30

    In this contribution are presented the fermentations of the main substrates present in a decaying corpse, namely carbohydrates, amino acids, glycerol and fatty acids, generating the post-mortem volatile compounds that could be detected along with ethanol during the forensic ethanol analysis. The available literature (preferably reviews) on microbial metabolic pathways (enzymes, substrates, conditions) that are implicated in the formation of these volatiles has been reviewed. The microbial formation of the following volatiles is supported by the presented biochemical data: ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, 2-propanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, isobutanol, isoamyl alcohol, d-amyl alcohol, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and ethyl esters (mainly ethyl acetate). The extracted information was correlated with the existing forensic literature on the post-mortem detected volatiles. The significance of the microbial produced volatiles on the selection of an appropriate internal standard for the ethanol analysis has been considered. Finally, the possible contribution of the presence of volatiles in the interpretation of ethanol analysis results in post-mortem cases is discussed.

  4. Denatured ethanol release into gasoline residuals, Part 2: fate and transport.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Juliana G; Barker, James F

    2013-05-01

    When denatured ethanol (E95) is spilled in a site with previous gasoline contamination, it modifies the source distribution (Part 1). But it can also impact the transport and fate of hydrocarbons in the groundwater. Ethanol could cause an increase in dissolved concentrations and more persistent plumes due to cosolvency and decreased hydrocarbon biodegradation rates. To investigate these possibilities, two controlled releases were performed: first of E10 (gasoline with 10% ethanol) and one year later of E95 on top of the gasoline. Groundwater concentrations were monitored above and below the water table in multilevel wells. Soil cores and vapor samples were also collected over a period of approximately 400 days. Surprisingly, ethanol transport was very limited; at wells located 2.3m downgradient from the mid-point of the release trench, the maximum concentration measured was around 2400 mg/L. After 392 days, only 3% of the ethanol released migrated past 2.3 m, and no ethanol remained in the source. The processes that caused ethanol loss were likely volatilization, aerobic biodegradation in the unsaturated zone, and anaerobic biodegradation. Evidence that biodegradation was significant in the source zone includes increased CO2 concentrations in the vapor and the presence of biodegradation products (acetate concentrations up to 2300 mg/L). The position of the dissolved hydrocarbon plumes was slightly shifted, but the concentrations and mass flux remained within the same range as before the spill, indicating that cosolvency was not significant. Hydrocarbons in the groundwater were significantly biodegraded, with more than 63% of the mass being removed in 7.5m, even when ethanol was present in the groundwater. The impacts of ethanol on the hydrocarbon transport and fate were minimal, largely due to the separation of ethanol and hydrocarbons in the source (Part 1).

  5. Denatured ethanol release into gasoline residuals, Part 2: Fate and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Juliana G.; Barker, James F.

    2013-05-01

    When denatured ethanol (E95) is spilled in a site with previous gasoline contamination, it modifies the source distribution (Part 1). But it can also impact the transport and fate of hydrocarbons in the groundwater. Ethanol could cause an increase in dissolved concentrations and more persistent plumes due to cosolvency and decreased hydrocarbon biodegradation rates. To investigate these possibilities, two controlled releases were performed: first of E10 (gasoline with 10% ethanol) and one year later of E95 on top of the gasoline. Groundwater concentrations were monitored above and below the water table in multilevel wells. Soil cores and vapor samples were also collected over a period of approximately 400 days. Surprisingly, ethanol transport was very limited; at wells located 2.3 m downgradient from the mid-point of the release trench, the maximum concentration measured was around 2400 mg/L. After 392 days, only 3% of the ethanol released migrated past 2.3 m, and no ethanol remained in the source. The processes that caused ethanol loss were likely volatilization, aerobic biodegradation in the unsaturated zone, and anaerobic biodegradation. Evidence that biodegradation was significant in the source zone includes increased CO2 concentrations in the vapor and the presence of biodegradation products (acetate concentrations up to 2300 mg/L). The position of the dissolved hydrocarbon plumes was slightly shifted, but the concentrations and mass flux remained within the same range as before the spill, indicating that cosolvency was not significant. Hydrocarbons in the groundwater were significantly biodegraded, with more than 63% of the mass being removed in 7.5 m, even when ethanol was present in the groundwater. The impacts of ethanol on the hydrocarbon transport and fate were minimal, largely due to the separation of ethanol and hydrocarbons in the source (Part 1).

  6. Flocculating Zymomonas mobilis is a promising host to be engineered for fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ning; Bai, Yun; Liu, Chen-Guang; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Xu, Jian-Feng; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2014-03-01

    Whereas Saccharomyces cerevisiae uses the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway to metabolize glucose, Zymomonas mobilis uses the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. Employing the ED pathway, 50% less ATP is produced, which could lead to less biomass being accumulated during fermentation and an improved yield of ethanol. Moreover, Z. mobilis cells, which have a high specific surface area, consume glucose faster than S. cerevisiae, which could improve ethanol productivity. We performed ethanol fermentations using these two species under comparable conditions to validate these speculations. Increases of 3.5 and 3.3% in ethanol yield, and 58.1 and 77.8% in ethanol productivity, were observed in ethanol fermentations using Z. mobilis ZM4 in media containing ∼100 and 200 g/L glucose, respectively. Furthermore, ethanol fermentation bythe flocculating Z. mobilis ZM401 was explored. Although no significant difference was observed in ethanol yield and productivity, the flocculation of the bacterial species enabled biomass recovery by cost-effective sedimentation, instead of centrifugation with intensive capital investment and energy consumption. In addition, tolerance to inhibitory byproducts released during biomass pretreatment, particularly acetic acid and vanillin, was improved. These experimental results indicate that Z. mobilis, particularly its flocculating strain, is superior to S. cerevisiae as a host to be engineered for fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass.

  7. Lactate dehydrogenase is the key enzyme for pneumococcal pyruvate metabolism and pneumococcal survival in blood.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Paula; Al-Bayati, Firas A Y; Andrew, Peter W; Neves, Ana Rute; Yesilkaya, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a fermentative microorganism and causes serious diseases in humans, including otitis media, bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia. However, the mechanisms enabling pneumococcal survival in the host and causing disease in different tissues are incompletely understood. The available evidence indicates a strong link between the central metabolism and pneumococcal virulence. To further our knowledge on pneumococcal virulence, we investigated the role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which converts pyruvate to lactate and is an essential enzyme for redox balance, in the pneumococcal central metabolism and virulence using an isogenic ldh mutant. Loss of LDH led to a dramatic reduction of the growth rate, pinpointing the key role of this enzyme in fermentative metabolism. The pattern of end products was altered, and lactate production was totally blocked. The fermentation profile was confirmed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of glucose metabolism in nongrowing cell suspensions of the ldh mutant. In this strain, a bottleneck in the fermentative steps is evident from the accumulation of pyruvate, revealing LDH as the most efficient enzyme in pyruvate conversion. An increase in ethanol production was also observed, indicating that in the absence of LDH the redox balance is maintained through alcohol dehydrogenase activity. We also found that the absence of LDH renders the pneumococci avirulent after intravenous infection and leads to a significant reduction in virulence in a model of pneumonia that develops after intranasal infection, likely due to a decrease in energy generation and virulence gene expression.

  8. Ethanolic extract of Boswellia ovalifoliolata bark and leaf attenuates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Uma Mahesh, Bandari; Shrivastava, Shweta; Kuncha, Madhusudhana; Sahu, Bidya Dhar; Swamy, Challa Veerabhadra; Pragada, Rajeswara Rao; Naidu, V G M; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential protective effect of ethanolic extract of Boswellia ovalifoliolata (BO) bark and leaf against doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity in mice. Ethanolic extracts of BO bark (400 mg/kg) and leaves (250 mg/kg) were given orally to mice for 9 consecutive days and DOX (15 mg/kg; i.p.) was administered on the seventh day. Extract protected against DOX-induced ECG changes. It significantly inhibited DOX-provoked glutathione depletion and accumulation of malondialdehyde. The decrease in antioxidant enzyme activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase in cardiac tissue were significantly (p<0.05) mitigated after treatment with BO bark and leaf extracts. Pretreatment with BO significantly (p<0.05) restored the levels of DOX-induced rise of SGPT, SGOT, serum lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase-MB levels. These findings suggest that ethanolic extract of BO has protective effects against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity.

  9. Seven-day ethanol administration influence on the rat brain histaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Zimatkin, Sergey M; Phedina, Ekaterina M

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to clarify the effect of 7 days of ethanol administration upon brain histaminergic neurons in rats. Male Wistar rats were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 20% ethanol/saline (0.85% NaCl) daily, over 7 days, whereas control rats were given saline. The animals were decapitated 24 h after the 7th injection and samples of hypothalamus were prepared for light and electron microscopy, accompanied by morphometry to examine the histaminergic neurons. It was found that ethanol administration gradually decreased the duration of alcohol-induced sleep and decreased the total amount of histaminergic neurons and the amount of histologically normal neurons, but increased the amount of hypochromic neurons and shadow cells. The histaminergic neuron bodies and nuclei decreased in size. The ultrastructural changes in histaminergic neurons demonstrated activation of their nuclear apparatus, both destruction or hypertrophy and hyperplasia of organelles, especially lysosomes. The histochemical examination revealed the activation of lactate dehydrogenase and acid phosphatase, and inhibition of NADH-, NADPhH, and succinate dehydrogenases. Following 7 days of ethanol administration, histaminergic neurons exhibit the structural signs of hyperactivity, which can be related to neuronal adaptation to the actions of ethanol, and increased behavioral tolerance to ethanol.

  10. Inhibition effects on fermentation of hardwood extracted hemicelluloses by acetic acid and sodium.

    PubMed

    Walton, Sara; van Heiningen, Adriaan; van Walsum, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Extraction of hemicellulose from hardwood chips prior to pulping is a possible method for producing ethanol and acetic acid in an integrated forest bio-refinery, adding value to wood components normally relegated to boiler fuel. Hemicellulose was extracted from hardwood chips using green liquor, a pulping liquor intermediate consisting of aqueous NaOH, Na(2)CO(3), and Na(2)S, at 160 degrees C, held for 110 min in a 20 L rocking digester. The extracted liquor contained 3.7% solids and had a pH of 5.6. The organic content of the extracts was mainly xylo-oligosaccharides and acetic acid. Because it was dilute, the hemicellulose extract was concentrated by evaporation in a thin film evaporator. Concentrates from the evaporator reached levels of up to 10% solids. Inhibitors such as acetic acid and sodium were also concentrated by this method, presenting a challenge for the fermentation organisms. Fermentation experiments were conducted with Escherichia coli K011. The un-concentrated extract supported approximately 70% conversion of the initial sugars in 14 h. An extract evaporated down to 6% solids was also fermentable while a 10% solids extract was not initially fermentable. Strain conditioning was later found to enable fermentation at this level of concentration. Alternative processing schemes or inhibitor removal prior to fermentation are necessary to produce ethanol economically.

  11. Enzymes involved in vinyl acetate decomposition by Pseudomonas fluorescens PCM 2123 strain.

    PubMed

    Szczyrba, Elżbieta; Greń, Izabela; Bartelmus, Grażyna

    2014-03-01

    Esterases are widely used in food processing industry, but there is little information concerning enzymes involved in decompositions of esters contributing to pollution of environment. Vinyl acetate (an ester of vinyl alcohol and acetic acid) is a representative of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in decomposition, of which hydrolyses and oxidoreductases are mainly involved. Their activities under periodically changing conditions of environment are essential for the removal of dangerous VOCs. Esterase and alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase activities were determined in crude cell extract from Pseudomonas fluorescens PMC 2123 after vinyl acetate induction. All examined enzymes exhibit their highest activity at 30-35 °C and pH 7.0-7.5. Esterase preferably hydrolyzed ester bonds with short fatty chains without plain differences for C2 or C4. Comparison of Km values for alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases for acetaldehyde suggested that this metabolite was preferentially oxidized than reduced. Activity of alcohol dehydrogenase reducing acetaldehyde to ethanol suggested that one mechanism of defense against the elevated concentration of toxic acetaldehyde could be its temporary reduction to ethanol. Esterase activity was inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, while β-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid had no inhibitor effect. From among metal ions, only Mg(2+) and Fe(2+) stimulated the cleavage of ester bond.

  12. Biological production of ethanol from coal. [Fourth quarterly report], October 22, 1989--December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    Two batch and one continuous reactor study involving Clostridium ljungdahlii were carried out. First, the effects of H{sub 2} partial pressure on growth, CO and H{sub 2} uptake and product formation by C. ljungdahlii were investigated in batch culture. Over the concentration range studied, it was observed that CO was preferentially utilized in favor of H{sub 2}. It was also seen that increasing H{sub 2} partial pressures increased the ratio of ethanol to acetate. Finally, a two-stage CSTR system was successfully operated with C. ljungdahlii in which growth occurred in the first stage and ethanol production occurred in the second stage.

  13. The synthesis of n-caproate from lactate: a new efficient process for medium-chain carboxylates production

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; Tao, Yong; Liang, Cheng; Li, Xiangzhen; Wei, Na; Zhang, Wenjie; Zhou, Yan; Yang, Yanfei; Bo, Tao

    2015-01-01

    A unique microbiome that metabolizes lactate rather than ethanol for n-caproate production was obtained from a fermentation pit used for the production of Chinese strong-flavour liquor (CSFL). The microbiome was able to produce n-caproate at concentrations as high as 23.41 g/L at a maximum rate of 2.97 g/L/d in batch trials without in-line extraction. Compared with previous work using ethanol as the electron donor, the n-caproate concentration increased by 82.89%. High-throughput sequencing analysis showed that the microbiome was dominated by a Clostridium cluster IV, which accounted for 79.07% of total reads. A new process for n-caproate production was proposed, lactate oxidation coupled to chain elongation, which revealed new insight into the well-studied lactate conversion and carbon chain elongation. In addition, these findings indicated a new synthesis mechanism of n-caproate in CSFL. We believe that this efficient process will provide a promising opportunity for the innovation of waste recovery as well as for n-caproate biosynthesis. PMID:26403516

  14. Use of a flor velum yeast for modulating colour, ethanol and major aroma compound contents in red wine.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Juan; Moreno-García, Jaime; López-Muñoz, Beatriz; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; García-Martínez, Teresa

    2016-12-15

    The most important and negative effect of the global warming for winemakers in warm and sunny regions is the observed lag between industrial and phenolic grape ripeness, so only it is possible to obtain an acceptable colour when the ethanol content of wine is high. By contrast, the actual market trends are to low ethanol content wines. Flor yeast growing a short time under velum conditions, decreases the ethanol and volatile acidity contents, has a favorable effect on the colour and astringency and significantly changes the wine content in 1-propanol, isobutanol, acetaldehyde, 1,1-diethoxiethane and ethyl lactate. The Principal Component Analysis of six enological parameters or five aroma compounds allows to classify the wines subjected to different velum formation conditions. The obtained results in two tasting sessions suggest that the flor yeast helps to modulate the ethanol, astringency and colour and supports a new biotechnological perspective for red winemakers.

  15. Ethanol production by thermophilic bacteria: fermentation of cellulosic substrates by cocultures of Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, T.K.; Ben-Bassat, A.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1981-06-01

    The fermentation of various saccharides derived from cellulosic biomass to ethanol was examined in mono- and cocultures of Clostridium thermocellum strain LQRI and C. thermohydrosulfuricum strain 39E. C. thermohydrosulfuricum fermented glucose, cellobiose, and xylose, but not cellulose or xylan, and yielded ethanol/acetate ratios of >7.0 C. thermocellum fermented a variety of cellulosic substrates, glucose, and cellobiose, but not xylan or xylose, and yielded ethanol/acetate ratios of approx. 1.0. A stable coculture that contained nearly equal numbers of C. thermocellum and C. thermohydrosulfuricum was established that fermented a variety of cellulosic substrates, and the ethanol yield observed was twofold higher than in C. thermocellum monoculture fermentations. The metabolic basis for the enhanced fermentation effectiveness of the coculture on Solka Floc cellulose included: the ability of C. thermocellum cellulase to hydrolyze ..cap alpha..-cellulose and hemicellulose; the enhanced utilization of mono- and disaccharides by C. thermohydrosulfuricum; increased cellulose consumption; threefold increase in the ethanol production rate; and twofold decrease in the acetate production rate.

  16. Electron transfer induced fragmentation of acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Meneses, G.; Almeida, D.; Limão-Vieira, P.

    2014-04-01

    We present negative ion formation driven by electron transfer in atom (K) molecule (acetic acid) collisions. Acetic acid has been found in the interstellar medium, is also considered a biological related compound and as such studying low energy electron interactions will bring new insights as far as induced chemistry is concerned.

  17. CELLULOSE NITRATE-ACETATE MIXED ESTERS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    cellulose acetate . The degree of polymerization of the products, as estimated from viscosity data, shows the occurrence of chain degradation for both...mixed esters showed tensile strength at least comparable to that of films of cellulose nitrate or cellulose acetate . The impact sensitivity of the

  18. Direct synthesis of ethanol from dimethyl ether and syngas over combined H-Mordenite and Cu/ZnO catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingang; San, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Yi; Ichii, Takashi; Meng, Ming; Tan, Yisheng; Tsubaki, Noritatsu

    2010-10-25

    Ethanol was directly synthesized from dimethyl ether (DME) and syngas with the combined H-Mordenite and Cu/ZnO catalysts that were separately loaded in a dual-catalyst bed reactor. Methyl acetate (MA) was formed by DME carbonylation over the H-Mordenite catalyst. Thereafter, ethanol and methanol were produced by MA hydrogenation over the Cu/ZnO catalyst. With the reactant gas containing 1.0% DME, the optimized temperature for the reaction was at 493 K to reach 100% conversion. In the products, the yield of methanol and ethanol could reach 46.3% and 42.2%, respectively, with a small amount of MA, ethyl acetate, and CO(2). This process is environmentally friendly as the main byproduct methanol can be recycled to DME by a dehydration reaction. In contrast, for the physically mixed catalysts, the low conversion of DME and high selectivity of methanol were observed.

  19. LactMed: New NLM Database on Drugs and Lactation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Research News From NIH LactMed: New NLM Database on Drugs and Lactation Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... Javascript on. Photo: Comstock LactMed, a free online database with information on drugs and lactation, is one ...

  20. Novel Membrane Based Process for Producing Lactate Esters

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    Lactate Esters from Renewable Carbohydrate Feedstocks can Replace Petroleum-Derived Solvents. Lactate esters are versatile solvents that are biodegradable, nontoxic, and applicable to a wide range of industrial and consumer uses.

  1. Cellulosic ethanol production via consolidated bioprocessing at 75 °C by engineered Caldicellulosiruptor bescii

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Daehwan; Cha, Minseok; Snyder, Elise N.; Elkins, James G.; Guss, Adam M.; Westpheling, Janet

    2015-10-06

    In this paper, we report that the C. bescii genome does not encode an acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase or an acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and no ethanol production is detected in this strain. The recent introduction of an NADH-dependent AdhE from C. thermocellum (Fig. 1a) in an ldh mutant of this strain resulted in production of ethanol from un-pretreated switchgrass, but the thermolability of the C. thermocellum AdhE at the optimum growth temperature of C. bescii (78 °C) meant that ethanol was not produced above 65 °C. The adhB and adhE genes from Thermoanaerobacter pseudethanolicus 39E, an anaerobic thermophile that produces ethanol as a major fermentation product at 70 °C, were cloned and expressed in an ldh deletion mutant of C. bescii. The engineered strains produced ethanol at 75 °C, near the ethanol boiling point. The AdhB expressing strain produced ethanol (1.4 mM on Avicel, 0.4 mM on switchgrass) as well as acetate (13.0 mM on Avicel, 15.7 mM on switchgrass). The AdhE expressing strain produced more ethanol (2.3 mM on Avicel, 1.6 mM on switchgrass) and reduced levels of acetate (12.3 mM on Avicel, 15.1 mM on switchgrass). These engineered strains produce cellulosic ethanol at the highest temperature of any microorganism to date. In addition, the addition of 40 mM MOPS to the growth medium increased the maximal growth yield of C. bescii by approximately twofold. In conclusion, the utilization of thermostable enzymes will be critical to achieving high temperature CBP in bacteria such as C. bescii. The ability to produce ethanol at 75 °C, near its boiling point, raises the possibility that process optimization could allow in situ product removal of this end product to mitigate ethanol toxicity.

  2. Cellulosic ethanol production via consolidated bioprocessing at 75 °C by engineered Caldicellulosiruptor bescii

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Daehwan; Cha, Minseok; Snyder, Elise N.; ...

    2015-10-06

    In this paper, we report that the C. bescii genome does not encode an acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase or an acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and no ethanol production is detected in this strain. The recent introduction of an NADH-dependent AdhE from C. thermocellum (Fig. 1a) in an ldh mutant of this strain resulted in production of ethanol from un-pretreated switchgrass, but the thermolability of the C. thermocellum AdhE at the optimum growth temperature of C. bescii (78 °C) meant that ethanol was not produced above 65 °C. The adhB and adhE genes from Thermoanaerobacter pseudethanolicus 39E, an anaerobic thermophile that produces ethanol as amore » major fermentation product at 70 °C, were cloned and expressed in an ldh deletion mutant of C. bescii. The engineered strains produced ethanol at 75 °C, near the ethanol boiling point. The AdhB expressing strain produced ethanol (1.4 mM on Avicel, 0.4 mM on switchgrass) as well as acetate (13.0 mM on Avicel, 15.7 mM on switchgrass). The AdhE expressing strain produced more ethanol (2.3 mM on Avicel, 1.6 mM on switchgrass) and reduced levels of acetate (12.3 mM on Avicel, 15.1 mM on switchgrass). These engineered strains produce cellulosic ethanol at the highest temperature of any microorganism to date. In addition, the addition of 40 mM MOPS to the growth medium increased the maximal growth yield of C. bescii by approximately twofold. In conclusion, the utilization of thermostable enzymes will be critical to achieving high temperature CBP in bacteria such as C. bescii. The ability to produce ethanol at 75 °C, near its boiling point, raises the possibility that process optimization could allow in situ product removal of this end product to mitigate ethanol toxicity.« less

  3. The stable carbon isotope biogeochemistry of acetate and other dissolved carbon species in deep subseafloor sediments at the northern Cascadia Margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heuer, V.B.; Pohlman, J.W.; Torres, M.E.; Elvert, M.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

    2009-01-01

    Ocean drilling has revealed the existence of vast microbial populations in the deep subseafloor, but to date little is known about their metabolic activities. To better understand the biogeochemical processes in the deep biosphere, we investigate the stable carbon isotope chemistry of acetate and other carbon-bearing metabolites in sediment pore-waters. Acetate is a key metabolite in the cycling of carbon in anoxic sediments. Its stable carbon isotopic composition provides information on the metabolic processes dominating acetate turnover in situ. This study reports our findings for a methane-rich site at the northern Cascadia Margin (NE Pacific) where Expedition 311 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) sampled the upper 190 m of sediment. At Site U1329, ??13C values of acetate span a wide range from -46.0??? to -11.0??? vs. VPDB and change systematically with sediment depth. In contrast, ??13C values of both the bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (-21.6 ?? 1.3??? vs. VPDB) and the low-molecular-weight compound lactate (-20.9 ?? 1.8??? vs. VPDB) show little variability. These species are interpreted to represent the carbon isotopic composition of fermentation products. Relative to DOC, acetate is up to 23.1??? depleted and up to 9.1??? enriched in 13C. Broadly, 13C-depletions of acetate relative to DOC indicate flux of carbon from acetogenesis into the acetate pool while 13C-enrichments of pore-water acetate relative to DOC suggest consumption of acetate by acetoclastic methanogenesis. Isotopic relationships between acetate and lactate or DOC provide new information on the carbon flow and the presence and activity of specific functional microbial communities in distinct biogeochemical horizons of the sediment. In particular, they suggest that acetogenic CO2-reduction can coexist with methanogenic CO2-reduction, a notion contrary to the hypothesis that hydrogen levels are controlled by the thermodynamically most favorable electron-accepting process

  4. 21 CFR 582.5311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferrous lactate. 582.5311 Section 582.5311 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferrous lactate. 582.5311 Section 582.5311 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferrous lactate. 582.5311 Section 582.5311 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferrous lactate. 582.5311 Section 582.5311 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferrous lactate. 582.5311 Section 582.5311 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  9. Nutritional Guide for Pregnant and Lactating Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelbard, Nancy

    Designed to provide accurate and up-to-date information about nutrition and health, this booklet is centered on the nutritional needs of pregnant and lactating adolescents and on the role of schools and the California State Department of Education in meeting those needs. The first section presents information for pregnant adolescents regarding…

  10. Microbial production of lactate-containing polyesters

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jung Eun; Choi, So Young; Shin, Jae Ho; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Sang Yup

    2013-01-01

    Due to our increasing concerns on environmental problems and limited fossil resources, biobased production of chemicals and materials through biorefinery has been attracting much attention. Optimization of the metabolic performance of microorganisms, the key biocatalysts for the efficient production of the desired target bioproducts, has been achieved by metabolic engineering. Metabolic engineering allowed more efficient production of polyhydroxyalkanoates, a family of microbial polyesters. More recently, non-natural polyesters containing lactate as a monomer have also been produced by one-step fermentation of engineered bacteria. Systems metabolic engineering integrating traditional metabolic engineering with systems biology, synthetic biology, protein/enzyme engineering through directed evolution and structural design, and evolutionary engineering, enabled microorganisms to efficiently produce natural and non-natural products. Here, we review the strategies for the metabolic engineering of microorganisms for the in vivo biosynthesis of lactate-containing polyesters and for the optimization of whole cell metabolism to efficiently produce lactate-containing polyesters. Also, major problems to be solved to further enhance the production of lactate-containing polyesters are discussed. PMID:23718266

  11. Studying Reliability Using Identical Handheld Lactate Analyzers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Mark T.; Stavrianeas, Stasinos

    2008-01-01

    Accusport analyzers were used to generate lactate performance curves in an investigative laboratory activity emphasizing the importance of reliable instrumentation. Both the calibration and testing phases of the exercise provided students with a hands-on opportunity to use laboratory-grade instrumentation while allowing for meaningful connections…

  12. Optimization of a corn steep medium for production of ethanol from synthesis gas fermentation by Clostridium ragsdalei.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Jyotisna; Tanner, Ralph S

    2012-04-01

    Fermentation of biomass derived synthesis gas to ethanol is a sustainable approach that can provide more usable energy and environmental benefits than food-based biofuels. The effects of various medium components on ethanol production by Clostridium ragsdalei utilizing syngas components (CO:CO(2)) were investigated, and corn steep liquor (CSL) was used as an inexpensive nutrient source for ethanol production by C. ragsdalei. Elimination of Mg(2+), NH(4) (+) and PO(4) (3-) decreased ethanol production from 38 to 3.7, 23 and 5.93 mM, respectively. Eliminating Na(+), Ca(2+), and K(+) or increasing Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+), NH(4) (+) and PO(4) (3-) concentrations had no effect on ethanol production. However, increased Na(+) concentration (171 mM) inhibited growth and ethanol production. Yeast extract (0.5 g l(-1)) and trace metals were necessary for growth of C. ragsdalei. CSL alone did not support growth and ethanol production. Nutrients limiting in CSL were trace metals, NH(4) (+) and reducing agent (Cys: cysteine sulfide). Supplementation of trace metals, NH(4) (+) and CyS to CSL (20 g l(-1), wet weight basis) yielded better growth and similar ethanol production as compared to control medium. Using 10 g l(-1), the nutritional limitation led to reduced ethanol production. Higher concentrations of CSL (50 and 100 g l(-1)) were inhibitory for cell growth and ethanol production. The CSL could replace yeast extract, vitamins and minerals (excluding NH(4) (+)). The optimized CSL medium produced 120 and 50 mM of ethanol and acetate, respectively. The CSL could provide as an inexpensive source of most of the nutrients required for the syngas fermentation, and thus could improve the economics of ethanol production from biomass derived synthesis gas by C. ragsdalei.

  13. The metabolic costs of improving ethanol yield by reducing glycerol formation capacity under anaerobic conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Finely regulating the carbon flux through the glycerol pathway by regulating the expression of the rate controlling enzyme, glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH), has been a promising approach to redirect carbon from glycerol to ethanol and thereby increasing the ethanol yield in ethanol production. Here, strains engineered in the promoter of GPD1 and deleted in GPD2 were used to investigate the possibility of reducing glycerol production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae without jeopardising its ability to cope with process stress during ethanol production. For this purpose, the mutant strains TEFmut7 and TEFmut2 with different GPD1 residual expression were studied in Very High Ethanol Performance (VHEP) fed-batch process under anaerobic conditions. Results Both strains showed a drastic reduction of the glycerol yield by 44 and 61% while the ethanol yield improved by 2 and 7% respectively. TEFmut2 strain showing the highest ethanol yield was accompanied by a 28% reduction of the biomass yield. The modulation of the glycerol formation led to profound redox and energetic changes resulting in a reduction of the ATP yield (YATP) and a modulation of the production of organic acids (acetate, pyruvate and succinate). Those metabolic rearrangements resulted in a loss of ethanol and stress tolerance of the mutants, contrarily to what was previously observed under aerobiosis. Conclusions This work demonstrates the potential of fine-tuned pathway engineering, particularly when a compromise has to be found between high product yield on one hand and acceptable growth, productivity and stress resistance on the other hand. Previous study showed that, contrarily to anaerobiosis, the resulting gain in ethanol yield was accompanied with no loss of ethanol tolerance under aerobiosis. Moreover those mutants were still able to produce up to 90 gl-1 ethanol in an anaerobic SSF process. Fine tuning metabolic strategy may then open encouraging possibilities for further

  14. Depomedroxyprogesterone acetate for hot flashes.

    PubMed

    Barton, Debra; Loprinzi, Charles; Quella, Susan; Sloan, Jeff; Pruthi, Sandya; Novotny, Paul

    2002-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a long-acting preparation of medroxyprogesterone acetate for hot flash management, 3 men receiving androgen ablation therapy for prostate cancer and 15 women with a history of breast cancer were treated as part of clinical practice with three biweekly intramuscular injections of 500 mg depomedroxyprogesterone. A review of hot flash diaries and patient charts were completed to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of these injections for managing hot flashes. Treatment was associated with an approximate 90% decrease in hot flashes (95% CI 82-97%). Daily hot flash frequency decreased from a mean of 10.9 on the first day of treatment (95% CI 8.0-13.8 hot flashes per day) to a mean of 1.1 hot flashes 6 weeks later (95% CI 0.5-1.8 hot flashes) and to a mean of 0.7 hot flashes 12 weeks following therapy initiation (95% CI 0.1-1.2). Improvement in the hot flashes remained for months after discontinuing the injections in many patients. Reported side effects were minimal. This experience suggests that treatment with depomedroxyprogesterone may be an effective and well-tolerated option for the treatment of hot flashes.

  15. Vesicles protect activated acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Todd, Zoe R; House, Christopher H

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Methyl thioacetate, or activated acetic acid, has been proposed to be central to the origin of life and an important energy currency molecule in early cellular evolution. We have investigated the hydrolysis of methyl thioacetate under various conditions. Its uncatalyzed rate of hydrolysis is about 3 orders of magnitude faster (K=0.00663 s(-1); 100°C, pH 7.5, concentration=0.33 mM) than published rates for its catalyzed production, making it unlikely to accumulate under prebiotic conditions. However, our experiments showed that methyl thioacetate was protected from hydrolysis when inside its own hydrophobic droplets. Further, we found that methyl thioacetate protection from hydrolysis was also possible in droplets of hexane and in the membranes of nonanoic acid vesicles. Thus, the hydrophobic regions of prebiotic vesicles and early cell membranes could have offered a refuge for this energetic molecule, increasing its lifetime in close proximity to the reactions for which it would be needed. This model of early energy storage evokes an additional critical function for the earliest cell membranes.

  16. Predominant contribution of syntrophic acetate oxidation to thermophilic methane formation at high acetate concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hao, Li-Ping; Lü, Fan; He, Pin-Jing; Li, Lei; Shao, Li-Ming

    2011-01-15

    To quantify the contribution of syntrophic acetate oxidation to thermophilic anaerobic methanogenesis under the stressed condition induced by acidification, the methanogenic conversion process of 100 mmol/L acetate was monitored simultaneously by using isotopic tracing and selective inhibition techniques, supplemented with the analysis of unculturable microorganisms. Both quantitative methods demonstrated that, in the presence of aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens, a large percentage of methane (up to 89%) was initially derived from CO(2) reduction, indicating the predominant contribution of the syntrophic acetate oxidation pathway to acetate degradation at high acid concentrations. A temporal decrease of the fraction of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis from more than 60% to less than 40% reflected the gradual prevalence of the aceticlastic methanogenesis pathway along with the reduction of acetate. This apparent discrimination of acetate methanization pathways highlighted the importance of the syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacteria to initialize methanogenesis from high organic loadings.

  17. Bench-scale demonstration of biological production of ethanol from coal synthesis gas. Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    CSTR studies are being performed to measure the effects of important design parameters such as dissolved CO concentration, pH, nutrients composition and concentration, gas retention time and liquid dilution rate on reactor performance. The results of these studies will yield valuable design information on the variables affecting the ethanol to acetate product ratio and culture stability. Ethanol concentrations of 13 g/L with ethanol to acetate product ratios of 13 mol/mol have been attained at an 18 min gas retention time without cell recycle. A comparison of product recovery techniques shows that direct distillation or solvent extraction, followed by pervaporation or azeotropic distillation, is most appropriate for ethanol recovery.

  18. Photocatalytic direct conversion of ethanol to 1,1- diethoxyethane over noble-metal-loaded TiO2 nanotubes and nanorods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxia; Wu, Yupeng; Li, Li; Zhu, Zhenping

    2015-04-13

    As one of the most important biomass platform molecules, ethanol needs to have its product chain chemically extended to meet future demands in renewable fuels and chemicals. Additionally, chemical conversion of ethanol under mild and green conditions is still a major challenge. In this work, ethanol is directly converted into 1,1-diethoxyethane (DEE) and H2 under mild photocatalytic conditions over platinum-loaded TiO2 nanotubes and nanorods. The reaction follows a tandem dehydrogenation-acetalization mechanism, in which ethanol is first dehydrogenated into acetaldehyde and H(+) ion by photogenerated holes, and then acetalization between acetaldehyde and ethanol proceeds through promotion by H(+) ions formed in real time. Excess H(+) ions are simultaneously reduced into H2 by photogenerated electrons. This photocatalytic process has a very high reaction rate over nanosized tubular and rod-like TiO2 photocatalysts, reaching 157.7 mmol g(-1)  h(-1) in relatively low photocatalyst feeding. More importantly, the reaction is highly selective, with a nearly stoichiometric conversion of reacted ethanol into DEE. This photocatalytic dehydrogenation CO coupling of ethanol is a new green approach to the direct efficient conversion of ethanol into DEE and provides a promising channel for sustainable bioethanol applications.

  19. The Role of Monocarboxylate Transporters and Their Chaperone CD147 in Lactate Efflux Inhibition and the Anticancer Effects of Terminalia chebula in Neuroblastoma Cell Line N2-A

    PubMed Central

    Messeha, S. S.; Zarmouh, N. O.; Taka, E.; Gendy, S. G.; Shokry, G. R.; Kolta, M. G.; Soliman, K. F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims In the presence of oxygen, most of the synthesized pyruvate during glycolysis in the cancer cell of solid tumors is released away from the mitochondria to form lactate (Warburg Effect). To maintain cell homeostasis, lactate is transported across the cell membrane by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). The major aim of the current investigation is to identify novel compounds that inhibit lactate efflux that may lead to identifying effective targets for cancer treatment. Study Design In this study, 900 ethanol plant extracts were screened for their lactate efflux inhibition using neuroblastoma (N2-A) cell line. Additionally, we investigated the mechanism of inhibition for the most potent plant extract regarding monocarboxylate transporters expression, and consequences effects on viability, growth, and apoptosis. Methodology The potency of lactate efflux inhibition of ethanol plant extracts was evaluated in N2-A cells by measuring extracellular lactate levels. Caspase 3- activity and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining were performed to assess the apoptotic effect. The antiproliferative effect was measured using WST assay. Western blotting was performed to quantify protein expression of MCTs and their chaperone CD147 in treated cells lysates. Results Terminalia chebula plant extract was the most potent lactate efflux inhibitor in N2-A cells among the 900 - tested plant extracts. The results obtained show that extract of Terminalia chebula fruits (TCE) significantly (P = 0.05) reduced the expression of the MCT1, MCT3, MCT4 and the chaperone CD147. The plant extract was more potent (IC50 of 3.59 ± 0.26 μg/ml) than the MCT standard inhibitor phloretin (IC50 76.54 ± 3.19 μg/ml). The extract also showed more potency and selective cytotoxicity in cancer cells than DI-TNC1 primary cell line (IC50 7.37 ± 0.28 vs. 17.35 ± 0.19 μg/ml). Moreover, TCE Inhibited N2-A cell growth (IG50 = 5.20 ± 0.30 μg/ml) and induced apoptosis at the 7.5 μg/ml concentration

  20. Potassium sorbate reduces production of ethanol and 2 esters in corn silage.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Sasha D; Franco, Roberta B; Kung, Limin; Rotz, C Alan; Mitloehner, Frank

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of biological and chemical silage additives on the production of volatile organic compounds (VOC; methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, methyl acetate, and ethyl acetate) within corn silage. Recent work has shown that silage VOC can contribute to poor air quality and reduce feed intake. Silage additives may reduce VOC production in silage by inhibiting the activity of bacteria or yeasts that produce them. We produced corn silage in 18.9-L bucket silos using the following treatments: (1) control (distilled water); (2) Lactobacillus buchneri 40788, with 400,000 cfu/g of wet forage; (3) Lactobacillus plantarum MTD1, with 100,000 cfu/g; (4) a commercial buffered propionic acid-based preservative (68% propionic acid, containing ammonium and sodium propionate and acetic, benzoic, and sorbic acids) at a concentration of 1 g/kg of wet forage (0.1%); (5) a low dose of potassium sorbate at a concentration of 91 mg/kg of wet forage (0.0091%); (6) a high dose of potassium sorbate at a concentration of 1g/kg of wet forage (0.1%); and (7) a mixture of L. plantarum MTD1 (100,000 cfu/g) and a low dose of potassium sorbate (91 mg/kg). Volatile organic compound concentrations within silage were measured after ensiling and sample storage using a headspace gas chromatography method. The high dose of potassium sorbate was the only treatment that inhibited the production of multiple VOC. Compared with the control response, it reduced ethanol by 58%, ethyl acetate by 46%, and methyl acetate by 24%, but did not clearly affect production of methanol or 1-propanol. The effect of this additive on ethanol production was consistent with results from a small number of earlier studies. A low dose of this additive does not appear to be effective. Although it did reduce methanol production by 24%, it increased ethanol production by more than 2-fold and did not reduce the ethyl acetate concentration. All other treatments increased ethanol production