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Sample records for acetate lactate pyruvate

  1. Interactions between Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism in Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii: In Vivo 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies

    PubMed Central

    Deborde, Catherine; Boyaval, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    In vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate the pathways and the regulation of pyruvate metabolism and pyruvate-lactate cometabolism noninvasively in living-cell suspensions of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii. The most important result of this work concerns the modification of fluxes of pyruvate metabolism induced by the presence of lactate. Pyruvate was temporarily converted to lactate and alanine; the flux to acetate synthesis was maintained, but the flux to propionate synthesis was increased; and the reverse flux of the first part of the Wood-Werkman cycle, up to acetate synthesis, was decreased. Pyruvate was consumed at apparent initial rates of 148 and 90 μmol · min−1 · g−1 (cell dry weight) when it was the sole substrate or cometabolized with lactate, respectively. Lactate was consumed at an apparent initial rate of 157 μmol · min−1 · g−1 when it was cometabolized with pyruvate. P. shermanii used several pathways, namely, the Wood-Werkman cycle, synthesis of acetate and CO2, succinate synthesis, gluconeogenesis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and alanine synthesis, to manage its pyruvate pool sharply. In both types of experiments, acetate synthesis and the Wood-Werkman cycle were the metabolic pathways used most. PMID:10788375

  2. Utilization of Lactate Isomers by Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii: Regulatory Role for Intracellular Pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Vaughan L.

    1986-01-01

    Five strains of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii utilized the l-(+) isomer of lactate at a faster rate than they did the d-(−) isomer when grown with a mixture of lactate isomers under a variety of conditions. ATCC 9614, grown anaerobically in defined medium containing 160 mM dl-lactate, utilized only 4 and 15% of the d-(−)-lactate by the time 50 and 90%, respectively, of the l-(+)-lactate was used. The intracellular pyruvate concentration was high (>100 mM) in the initial stages of lactate utilization, when either dl-lactate or the l-(+) isomer was the starting substrate. The concentration of this intermediate dropped during dl-lactate fermentation such that when only d-(−)-lactate remained, the concentration was <20 mM. When only the d-(−) isomer was initially present, a similar relatively low concentration of intracellular pyruvate was present, even at the start of lactate utilization. The NAD+-independent lactate dehydrogenase activities in extracts showed different kinetic properties with regard to pyruvate inhibition, depending upon the lactate isomer present. Pyruvate gave a competitive inhibitor pattern with l-(+)-lactate and a mixed-type inhibitor pattern with d-(−)-lactate. It is suggested that these properties of the lactate dehydrogenases and the intracellular pyruvate concentrations explain the preferential use of the l-(+) isomer. PMID:16347134

  3. A method for simultaneous echo planar imaging of hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate and 13C lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Galen D.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert; Lustig, Michael; Kerr, Adam B.; Pauly, John M.; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2012-04-01

    A rapid echo planar imaging sequence for dynamic imaging of [1-13C] lactate and [1-13C] pyruvate simultaneously was developed. Frequency-based separation of these metabolites was achieved by spatial shifting in the phase-encoded direction with the appropriate choice of echo spacing. Suppression of the pyruvate-hydrate and alanine resonances is achieved through an optimized spectral-spatial RF waveform. Signal sampling efficiency as a function of pyruvate and lactate excitation angle was simulated using two site exchange models. Dynamic imaging is demonstrated in a transgenic mouse model, and phantom validations of the RF pulse frequency selectivity were performed.

  4. NH4+ triggers the release of astrocytic lactate via mitochondrial pyruvate shunting

    PubMed Central

    Lerchundi, Rodrigo; Fernández-Moncada, Ignacio; Contreras-Baeza, Yasna; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Tamara; Mächler, Philipp; Wyss, Matthias T.; Stobart, Jillian; Baeza-Lehnert, Felipe; Alegría, Karin; Weber, Bruno; Barros, L. Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Neural activity is accompanied by a transient mismatch between local glucose and oxygen metabolism, a phenomenon of physiological and pathophysiological importance termed aerobic glycolysis. Previous studies have proposed glutamate and K+ as the neuronal signals that trigger aerobic glycolysis in astrocytes. Here we used a panel of genetically encoded FRET sensors in vitro and in vivo to investigate the participation of NH4+, a by-product of catabolism that is also released by active neurons. Astrocytes in mixed cortical cultures responded to physiological levels of NH4+ with an acute rise in cytosolic lactate followed by lactate release into the extracellular space, as detected by a lactate-sniffer. An acute increase in astrocytic lactate was also observed in acute hippocampal slices exposed to NH4+ and in the somatosensory cortex of anesthetized mice in response to i.v. NH4+. Unexpectedly, NH4+ had no effect on astrocytic glucose consumption. Parallel measurements showed simultaneous cytosolic pyruvate accumulation and NADH depletion, suggesting the involvement of mitochondria. An inhibitor-stop technique confirmed a strong inhibition of mitochondrial pyruvate uptake that can be explained by mitochondrial matrix acidification. These results show that physiological NH4+ diverts the flux of pyruvate from mitochondria to lactate production and release. Considering that NH4+ is produced stoichiometrically with glutamate during excitatory neurotransmission, we propose that NH4+ behaves as an intercellular signal and that pyruvate shunting contributes to aerobic lactate production by astrocytes. PMID:26286989

  5. NH4(+) triggers the release of astrocytic lactate via mitochondrial pyruvate shunting.

    PubMed

    Lerchundi, Rodrigo; Fernández-Moncada, Ignacio; Contreras-Baeza, Yasna; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Tamara; Mächler, Philipp; Wyss, Matthias T; Stobart, Jillian; Baeza-Lehnert, Felipe; Alegría, Karin; Weber, Bruno; Barros, L Felipe

    2015-09-01

    Neural activity is accompanied by a transient mismatch between local glucose and oxygen metabolism, a phenomenon of physiological and pathophysiological importance termed aerobic glycolysis. Previous studies have proposed glutamate and K(+) as the neuronal signals that trigger aerobic glycolysis in astrocytes. Here we used a panel of genetically encoded FRET sensors in vitro and in vivo to investigate the participation of NH4(+), a by-product of catabolism that is also released by active neurons. Astrocytes in mixed cortical cultures responded to physiological levels of NH4(+) with an acute rise in cytosolic lactate followed by lactate release into the extracellular space, as detected by a lactate-sniffer. An acute increase in astrocytic lactate was also observed in acute hippocampal slices exposed to NH4(+) and in the somatosensory cortex of anesthetized mice in response to i.v. NH4(+). Unexpectedly, NH4(+) had no effect on astrocytic glucose consumption. Parallel measurements showed simultaneous cytosolic pyruvate accumulation and NADH depletion, suggesting the involvement of mitochondria. An inhibitor-stop technique confirmed a strong inhibition of mitochondrial pyruvate uptake that can be explained by mitochondrial matrix acidification. These results show that physiological NH4(+) diverts the flux of pyruvate from mitochondria to lactate production and release. Considering that NH4(+) is produced stoichiometrically with glutamate during excitatory neurotransmission, we propose that NH4(+) behaves as an intercellular signal and that pyruvate shunting contributes to aerobic lactate production by astrocytes. PMID:26286989

  6. Increased lactate/pyruvate ratio augments blood flow in physiologically activated human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mintun, Mark A.; Vlassenko, Andrei G.; Rundle, Melissa M.; Raichle, Marcus E.

    2004-01-01

    The factors regulating cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in physiological activation remain the subject of great interest and debate. Recent experimental studies suggest that an increase in cytosolic NADH mediates increased blood flow in the working brain. Lactate injection should elevate NADH levels by increasing the lactate/pyruvate ratio, which is in near equilibrium with the NADH/NAD+ ratio. We studied CBF responses to bolus lactate injection at rest and in visual stimulation by using positron-emission tomography in seven healthy volunteers. Bolus lactate injection augmented the CBF response to visual stimulation by 38-53% in regions of the visual cortex but had no effect on the resting CBF or the whole-brain CBF. These lactate-induced CBF increases correlated with elevations in plasma lactate/pyruvate ratios and in plasma lactate levels but not with plasma pyruvate levels. Our observations support the hypothesis that an increase in the NADH/NAD+ ratio activates signaling pathways to selectively increase CBF in the physiologically stimulated brain regions.

  7. Enzyme mechanisms for pyruvate-to-lactate flux attenuation: a study of Sherpas, Quechuas, and hummingbirds.

    PubMed

    Hochachka, P W; Stanley, C; McKenzie, D C; Villena, A; Monge, C

    1992-10-01

    During incremental exercise to fatigue under hypobaric hypoxia, Andean Quechua natives form and accumulate less plasma lactate than do lowlanders under similar conditions. This phenomenon of low lactate accumulation despite hypobaric hypoxia, first discovered some half century ago, is known in Quechuas to be largely unaffected by acute exposure to hypoxia or by acclimatization to sea level conditions. Earlier Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and metabolic biochemistry studies suggest that closer coupling of energy demand and energy supply in Quechuas allows given changes in work rate with relatively modest changes in muscle adenylate and phosphagen concentrations, thus tempering the activation of glycolytic flux to pyruvate--a coarse control mechanism operating at the level of overall pathway flux. Later studies of enzyme activities in skeletal muscles of Quechuas and of Sherpas have identified a finely-tuned control mechanism which by adaptive modifications of a few key enzymes apparently serves to specifically attenuate pyruvate flux to lactate.

  8. The effect of erythropoietin on lactate, pyruvate and excess lactate under physical exercise in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Meierhenrich, R; Jedicke, H; Voigt, A; Lange, H

    1996-02-01

    To investigate EPO-induced increase of hemoglobin on energy metabolism plasma concentrations of lactate (L), pyruvate (P) and excess lactate (XL) were determined in ten dialysis patients at rest, immediately after 6 minutes of ergometric exercise as well as after recovery for 15 and 30 min. The investigations were performed before EPO-therapy at a mean Hb = 7.5 +/- 0.9 g/dl and under EPO-therapy at a mean Hb = 10.0 +/- 0.6 g/dl and at a mean Hb = 11.9 +/- 0.8 g/dl. Ten healthy subjects were subjected to the same investigation at Hb = 14.7 +/- 1.1 g/dl. There was a significant rise of L and XL in all patient groups under ergometric exercise. The increase of hemoglobin from 7.5 g/dl to 10.0 g/dl led to significantly (p < 0.01) lower L and XL concentrations immediately after exercise (L = 4.62 vs 3.23 mmol/l, XL = 2.37 vs 1.38 mmol/l). The further decrease of the mean L and XL values (L = 2.88 mmol/l, XL = 1.05 mmol/l) associated with the rise of hemoglobin to 11.9 g/dl could not be confirmed statistically. In contrast to all patient groups, there was no significant rise in XL in the healthy control subjects under physical exercise. The present results make it evident that patients with renal anemia react even to light physical exercise with pronounced tissue hypoxia in contrast to healthy subjects. The increase of the hemoglobin content under the EPO-therapy leads to a marked reduction of the tissue hypoxia and consequently of anaerobic energy production. A further rise of the hemoglobin content above and beyond 10.5 g/dl will have an additional positive effect on oxygen supply only in occasional cases. The comparison with healthy subjects shows that despite a very large degree of normalization of the hemoglobin content, no normalization of energy metabolism can be attained.

  9. n-Octyl gallate as inhibitor of pyruvate carboxylation and lactate gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin; Santos, Israel Souza; de Moraes, Amarilis Giaretta; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2015-04-01

    The alkyl gallates are found in several natural and industrial products. In the latter products, these compounds are added mainly for preventing oxidation. In the present work, the potencies of methyl gallate, n-propyl gallate, n-pentyl gallate, and n-octyl gallate as inhibitors of pyruvate carboxylation and lactate gluconeogenesis were evaluated. Experiments were done with isolated mitochondria and the isolated perfused rat liver. The potency of the gallic acid esters as inhibitors of pyruvate carboxylation in isolated mitochondria obeyed the following decreasing sequence: n-octyl gallate > n-pentyl gallate > n-propyl gallate > methyl gallate. A similar sequence of decreasing potency for lactate gluconeogenesis inhibition in the perfused liver was found in terms of the portal venous concentration. Both actions correlate with the lipophilicity of the compounds. The effects are harmful at high concentrations. At appropriate concentrations, however, octyl gallate should act therapeutically because its inhibitory action on gluconeogenesis will contribute further to its proposed antihyperglycemic effects.

  10. Pyruvate and lactate metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under fermentation, oxygen limitation, and fumarate respiration conditions.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Geydebrekht, Oleg V; Hill, Eric A; Reed, Jennifer L; Konopka, Allan E; Beliaev, Alexander S; Fredrickson, Jim K

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of a wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed the lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor-limited growth on lactate with O(2), lactate with fumarate, and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensable for growth, the respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under conditions of O(2) limitation but was required for anaerobic growth, likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as an electron donor and an electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by a recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H-independent d-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by the generation of proton motive force.

  11. Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2; lactate with fumarate; and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the TCA cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation but was required for anaerobic growth likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

  12. Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-30

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe growing by coupling organic matter oxidation to reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of these bacteria under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2 and fumarate, and pyruvate fermentation, which does not sustain growth but allows cells to survive for prolonged period. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of all ATP needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute much to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, and TCA cycle did not contribute significantly to substrate oxidation. Pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation, however was important for anaerobic growth probably supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. Unexpectedly, obtained results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination between substrate-level phosphorylation and a respiratory process, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). Based on involved enzymes localization we hypothesize that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

  13. Transport of lactate and pyruvate in the intraerythrocytic malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, J L; Saliba, K J; Kirk, K

    2001-01-01

    The mature, intraerythrocytic form of the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, is reliant on glycolysis for its energetic requirements. It produces large quantities of lactic acid, which have to be removed from the parasite's cytosol to maintain the cell's integrity and metabolic viability. Here we show that the monocarboxylates lactate and pyruvate are both transported across the parasite's plasma membrane via a H(+)/monocarboxylate symport process that is saturable and inhibited by the bioflavonoid phloretin. The results provide direct evidence for the presence at the parasite surface of a H(+)-coupled monocarboxylate transporter with features in common with members of the MCT (monocarboxylate transporter) family of higher eukaryotes. PMID:11311136

  14. Binding specificity of serum amyloid P component for the pyruvate acetal of galactose

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) is a normal plasma protein that is of interest because of its presence in amyloid deposits, its presence in normal human glomerular basement membrane, and its stable evolutionary conservation. It has calcium-dependent ligand-binding specificity for amyloid fibrils, fibronectin (Fn), C4-binding protein (C4bp), and agarose. Although the binding to agarose, a linear galactan hydrocolloid derived from some marine algae, is unlikely per se to be related to the physiological function of SAP, it does provide a model system in which to explore the precise ligand requirements of SAP. We report here that the amount of SAP from human, mouse, and plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L.) serum able to bind to agarose from different sources reflect precisely their pyruvate content. Methylation with diazomethane of the carboxyl groups in the pyruvate moiety of agarose completely abolishes SAP binding to agarose. The pyruvate in agarose exists as the 4,6-pyruvate acetal of beta-D-galactopyranose. We have therefore synthesized this galactoside, using a novel procedure, established its structure by analysis of its nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and shown that it completely inhibits all known calcium- dependent binding reactions of SAP. The R isomer of the cyclic acetal, methyl 4,6-O-(1-carboxyethylidene)-beta-D-galactopyranoside (MO beta DG) was effective at millimolar concentration and was more potent than its noncyclic analogue, while pyruvate, D-galactose, and methyl beta-D- galactopyranoside were without effect. The autologous protein ligands of SAP presumably, therefore express a structural determinant(s) that stereochemically resembles MO beta DG. Availability of this specific, well-characterized, low molecular weight ligand for SAP should facilitate further investigation of the function of SAP and its role in physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID:6707579

  15. Crystallographic study on the interaction of L-lactate oxidase with pyruvate at 1.9 A resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shujie; Umena, Yasufumi; Yorita, Kazuko; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Kita, Akiko; Fukui, Kiyoshi; Morimoto, Yukio . E-mail: morimoto@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-07-13

    L-Lactate oxidase (LOX) from Aerococcus viridans catalyzes the oxidation of L-lactate to pyruvate by the molecular oxygen and belongs to a large family of 2-hydroxy acid-dependent flavoenzymes. To investigate the interaction of LOX with pyruvate in structural details and understand the chemical mechanism of flavin-dependent L-lactate dehydrogenation, the LOX-pyruvate complex was crystallized and the crystal structure of the complex has been solved at a resolution of 1.90 A. One pyruvate molecule bound to the active site and located near N5 position of FMN for subunits, A, B, and D in the asymmetric unit, were identified. The pyruvate molecule is stabilized by the interaction of its carboxylate group with the side-chain atoms of Tyr40, Arg181, His265, and Arg268, and of its keto-oxygen atom with the side-chain atoms of Tyr146, Tyr215, and His265. The {alpha}-carbon of pyruvate is found to be 3.13 A from the N5 atom of FMN at an angle of 105.4{sup o} from the flavin N5-N10 axis.

  16. Sources and sinks of formic, acetic, and pyruvic acids over central Amazonia. II - Wet season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Andreae, M. O.; Berresheim, H.; Jacob, D. J.; Beecher, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    Potential sources and sinks of formic, acetic, and pyruvic acids over the Amazon forest were investigated using a photochemical model and data collected on gas phase concentrations of these acids in the forest canopy, boundary layer, and free troposphere over the central Amazon Basin during the 1987 wet season. It was found that the atmospheric reactions previously suggested in the literature as sources of carboxylic acids (i.e., the gas phase decomposition of isoprene, the reaction between CH3CO3 and a peroxide, and aqueous phase oxidation of CH2O) appear to be too slow to explain the observed concentrations, suggesting that other atmospheric reactions, so far unidentified, could make a major contribution to the carboxylic acid budgets.

  17. Acetate Utilization in Lactococcus lactis Deficient in Lactate Dehydrogenase: a Rescue Pathway for Maintaining Redox Balance

    PubMed Central

    Hols, Pascal; Ramos, Ana; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Delcour, Jean; de Vos, Willem M.; Santos, Helena; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    1999-01-01

    Acetate was shown to improve glucose fermentation in Lactococcus lactis deficient in lactate dehydrogenase. 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance studies using [2-13C]glucose and [2-13C]acetate as substrates demonstrated that acetate was exclusively converted to ethanol. This novel pathway provides an alternative route for NAD+ regeneration in the absence of lactate dehydrogenase. PMID:10464231

  18. Characterization of Acetate and Pyruvate Metabolism in Suspension Cultures of Zea mays by 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Dennis J.; Lee, Rino Y.; Adams, Douglas O.

    1987-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been applied to the direct observation of acetate and pyruvate metabolism in suspension cultures of Zea mays (var Black Mexican Sweet). Growth of the corn cells in the presence of 2 millimolar [2-13C]acetate resulted in a rapid uptake of the substrate from the medium and initial labeling (0-4 hours) of primarily the intracellular glutamate and malate pools. Further metabolism of these intermediates resulted in labeling of glutamine, aspartate, and alanine. With [1-13C]acetate as the substrate very little incorporation into intermediary metabolites was observed in the 13C NMR spectra due to loss of the label as 13CO2. Uptake of [3-13C]pyruvate by the cells was considerably slower than with [2-13C]acetate; however, the labelling patterns were similar with the exception of increased [3-13C] alanine generation with pyruvate as the substrate. Growth of the cells for up to 96 hours with 2 millimolar [3-13C]pyruvate ultimately resulted in labeling of valine, leucine, isoleucine, threonine, and the polyamine putrescine. PMID:16665721

  19. l-Lactate metabolism in HEP G2 cell mitochondria due to the l-lactate dehydrogenase determines the occurrence of the lactate/pyruvate shuttle and the appearance of oxaloacetate, malate and citrate outside mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Pizzuto, Roberto; Paventi, Gianluca; Porcile, Carola; Sarnataro, Daniela; Daniele, Aurora; Passarella, Salvatore

    2012-09-01

    As part of an ongoing study of l-lactate metabolism both in normal and in cancer cells, we investigated whether and how l-lactate metabolism occurs in mitochondria of human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep G2) cells. We found that Hep G2 cell mitochondria (Hep G2-M) possess an l-lactate dehydrogenase (ml-LDH) restricted to the inner mitochondrial compartments as shown by immunological analysis, confocal microscopy and by assaying ml-LDH activity in solubilized mitochondria. Cytosolic and mitochondrial l-LDHs were found to differ from one another in their saturation kinetics. Having shown that l-lactate itself can enter Hep G2 cells, we found that Hep G2-M swell in ammonium l-lactate, but not in ammonium pyruvate solutions, in a manner inhibited by mersalyl, this showing the occurrence of a carrier-mediated l-lactate transport in these mitochondria. Occurrence of the l-lactate/pyruvate shuttle and the appearance outside mitochondria of oxaloacetate, malate and citrate arising from l-lactate uptake and metabolism together with the low oxygen consumption and membrane potential generation are in favor of an anaplerotic role for l-LAC in Hep G2-M.

  20. Potassium acetate and potassium lactate enhance the microbiological and physical properties of marinated catfish fillets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sodium or potassium salts such as lactate and acetate can be used to inhibit the growth of spoilage bacteria and food-borne pathogens, and thereby prolong the shelf-life of refrigerated seafood. However, minimal information is available regarding the combined effects of potassium salts (acetate and ...

  1. In vitro development of bovine one-cell embryos: Influence of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, amino acids and vitamins.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; First, N L

    1992-05-01

    To elucidate the effect of nutrient substrates on embryo development, in vitro fertilized bovine one-cell embryos were cultured in a medium similar to synthetic oviduct fluid (SOF) but without glucose and containing 3.3 mM lactate, 0.3 mM pyruvate and 3 mg/ml bovine serum albumin (BSA) at 39 degrees C in 5% CO(2) in air. Results indicated that addition of glucose was not only unnecessary, but it also had a deleterious effect on embryo development to the morula stage. Lactate supported embryo development up to the morula stage as well as pyruvate. Supplementation with 20 amino acids contained in basal medium Eagle's (BME) and minimum essential medium (MEM) improved development to the morula stage dramatically and increased the cell number compared with that of the controls. Addition of the vitamins from MEM to SOF had no beneficial effect. The SOF with amino acids did not increase the frequency of blastocysts 7 days after in-vitro fertilization but did increase the total number of cells compared with that of the controls. Frequency of blastocysts at Day 7 in SOF with amino acids was equivalent to that of co-culture although the total cell number was lower. These results demonstrate that a semi-chemically defined medium can successfully support the development of bovine embryos to the morula stage to a limited extent, but the medium lacks some nutrients or growth factors to fully support development through the blastocyst stage. PMID:16727096

  2. In vitro development of bovine one-cell embryos: Influence of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, amino acids and vitamins.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; First, N L

    1992-05-01

    To elucidate the effect of nutrient substrates on embryo development, in vitro fertilized bovine one-cell embryos were cultured in a medium similar to synthetic oviduct fluid (SOF) but without glucose and containing 3.3 mM lactate, 0.3 mM pyruvate and 3 mg/ml bovine serum albumin (BSA) at 39 degrees C in 5% CO(2) in air. Results indicated that addition of glucose was not only unnecessary, but it also had a deleterious effect on embryo development to the morula stage. Lactate supported embryo development up to the morula stage as well as pyruvate. Supplementation with 20 amino acids contained in basal medium Eagle's (BME) and minimum essential medium (MEM) improved development to the morula stage dramatically and increased the cell number compared with that of the controls. Addition of the vitamins from MEM to SOF had no beneficial effect. The SOF with amino acids did not increase the frequency of blastocysts 7 days after in-vitro fertilization but did increase the total number of cells compared with that of the controls. Frequency of blastocysts at Day 7 in SOF with amino acids was equivalent to that of co-culture although the total cell number was lower. These results demonstrate that a semi-chemically defined medium can successfully support the development of bovine embryos to the morula stage to a limited extent, but the medium lacks some nutrients or growth factors to fully support development through the blastocyst stage.

  3. Transport of pyruvate nad lactate into human erythrocytes. Evidence for the involvement of the chloride carrier and a chloride-independent carrier.

    PubMed Central

    Halestrap, A P

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics and activation energy of entry of pyruvate and lactate into the erythrocyte were studied at concentrations below 4 and 15mM respectively. The Km and Vmax. values for both substrates are reported, and it is shown that pyruvate inhibits competitively with respect to lactate and vice versa. In both cases the Km for the carboxylate as a substrate was the same as its Ki as an inhibitor. Alpha-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and its analogues inhibited the uptake of both lactate and pyruvate competitively. Inhibition was also produced by treatment of cells with fluorodinitrobenzene but not with the thiol reagents or Pronase. At high concentrations of pyruvate or lactate (20mM), uptake of the carboxylate was accompanied by an efflux of Cl-ions. This efflux of Cl- was inhibited by alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and picrate and could be totally abolished by very low (less than 10 muM) concentrations of the inhibitor of Cl- transport, 4,4'-di-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid. This inhibitor titrated out the chlordie efflux induced by pyruvate, bicarbonate, formate and fluoride, in each case total inhibition becoming apparent when approximately 1.2x10(6) molecules of inhibitor were present per erythrocyte, that is, about one inhibitor molecule per molecule of the Cl- carrier. Evan when Cl- efflux was totally blocked pyruvate and lactate uptake occurred. Kinetic evidence is presented which suggests that the Cl- carrier can transport pyruvate and lactate with a high Km and high Vmax., but that an additional carrier with a low Km and a low Vmax. also exists. This carrier catalyses the exchange of small carboxylate anions with intracellular lactate, is competitively inhibited by alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and non-competitively inhibited by picrate. The Cl- carrier shows a reverse pattern of inhibition. It is concluded that net efflux of lactic acid from the cell must occur on the Cl- carrier and involve exchange with HCO3 - followed by loss of CO2. The low Km

  4. SU-E-QI-11: Measurement of Renal Pyruvate-To-Lactate Exchange with Hyperpolarized 13C MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, E; Johnson, K; Fain, S; Gordon, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Previous work [1] modeling the metabolic flux between hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate and [1-13C]lactate in magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) experiments failed to account for vascular signal artifacts. Here, we investigate a method to minimize the vascular signal and its impact on the fidelity of metabolic modeling. Methods: MRSI was simulated for renal metabolism in MATLAB both with and without bipolar gradients. The resulting data were fit to a two-site exchange model [1], and the effects of vascular partial volume artifacts on kinetic modeling were assessed. Bipolar gradients were then incorporated into a gradient echo sequence to validate the simulations experimentally. The degree of diffusion weighting (b = 32 s/mm{sup 2}) was determined empirically from 1H imaging of murine renal vascular signal. The method was then tested in vivo using MRSI with bipolar gradients following injection of hyperpolarized [1-{sup 13}C]pyruvate (∼80 mM at 20% polarization). Results: In simulations, vascular signal contaminated the renal metabolic signal at resolutions as high as 2 × 2 mm{sup 2} due to partial volume effects. The apparent exchange rate from pyruvate to lactate (k{sub p}) was underestimated in the presence of these artifacts due to contaminating pyruvate signal. Incorporation of bipolar gradients suppressed vascular signal and improved the accuracy of kp estimation. Experimentally, the in vivo results supported the ability of bipolar gradients to suppress vascular signal. The in vivo exchange rate increased, as predicted in simulations, from k{sub p} = 0.012 s-{sup 1} to k{sub p} = 0.020-{sup 1} after vascular signal suppression. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the limited accuracy of the two-site exchange model in the presence of vascular partial volume artifacts. The addition of bipolar gradients suppressed vascular signal and improved model accuracy in simulations. Bipolar gradients largely affected kp estimation in vivo. Currently

  5. Transport of lactate and acetate through the energized cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Axe, D.D.; Bailey, J.E.

    1995-07-05

    Escherichia coli produces lactate and acetate in significant amounts during both aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis. A model describing the mechanism of protein-mediated lactate transport has previously been proposed. A simple theoretical analysis here indicates that the proposed model would drain cellular energy resources by catalytically dissipating the proton-motive force. An experimental analysis of lactate and acetate transport employs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to measure the relative concentrations of these end products on the two sides of the cytoplasmic membrane of anaerobically glycolyzing cells. Comparison of measured concentration ratios of those expected at equilibrium for various transport modes indicates that acetate is a classical uncoupling agent, permeating the membrane at comparable rates in the dissociated and undissociated forms. The lactate concentration ratio changes markedly after an initial period of sustained glycolysis. This change is most readily explained as resulting from a lactate transport system that responds to an indicator of glycolytic activity. The data further indicate that lactate permeates the membrane in both dissociated and undissociated forms. Both acids, then, are capable of catalytically dissipating the proton-motive force.

  6. Pyruvate: A key Nutrient in Hypersaline Environments?

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Aharon

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most commonly occurring but difficult to isolate halophilic prokaryotes, Archaea as well as Bacteria, require or prefer pyruvate as carbon and energy source. The most efficient media for the enumeration and isolation of heterotrophic prokaryotes from natural environments, from freshwater to hypersaline, including the widely used R2A agar medium, contain pyruvate as a key ingredient. Examples of pyruvate-loving halophiles are the square, extremely halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi and the halophilic gammaproteobacterium Spiribacter salinus. However, surprisingly little is known about the availability of pyruvate in natural environments and about the way it enters the cell. Some halophilic Archaea (Halorubrum saccharovorum, Haloarcula spp.) partially convert sugars and glycerol to pyruvate and other acids (acetate, lactate) which are excreted to the medium. Pyruvate formation from glycerol was also shown during a bloom of halophilic Archaea in the Dead Sea. However, no pyruvate transporters were yet identified in the genomes of halophilic Archaea, and altogether, our understanding of pyruvate transport in the prokaryote world is very limited. Therefore, the preference for pyruvate by fastidious and often elusive halophiles and the empirically proven enhanced colony recovery on agar media containing pyruvate are still poorly understood.

  7. Pyruvate: A key Nutrient in Hypersaline Environments?

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Aharon

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most commonly occurring but difficult to isolate halophilic prokaryotes, Archaea as well as Bacteria, require or prefer pyruvate as carbon and energy source. The most efficient media for the enumeration and isolation of heterotrophic prokaryotes from natural environments, from freshwater to hypersaline, including the widely used R2A agar medium, contain pyruvate as a key ingredient. Examples of pyruvate-loving halophiles are the square, extremely halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi and the halophilic gammaproteobacterium Spiribacter salinus. However, surprisingly little is known about the availability of pyruvate in natural environments and about the way it enters the cell. Some halophilic Archaea (Halorubrum saccharovorum, Haloarcula spp.) partially convert sugars and glycerol to pyruvate and other acids (acetate, lactate) which are excreted to the medium. Pyruvate formation from glycerol was also shown during a bloom of halophilic Archaea in the Dead Sea. However, no pyruvate transporters were yet identified in the genomes of halophilic Archaea, and altogether, our understanding of pyruvate transport in the prokaryote world is very limited. Therefore, the preference for pyruvate by fastidious and often elusive halophiles and the empirically proven enhanced colony recovery on agar media containing pyruvate are still poorly understood. PMID:27682096

  8. Short-term prognostic value of perioperative coronary sinus-derived-serum cardiac troponin-I, creatine kinase-MB, lactate, pyruvate, and lactate-pyruvate ratio in adult patients undergoing open heart surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Ujjwal Kumar; Sheil, Avneesh; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Narang, Rajiv; Gharde, Parag; Malik, Vishwas; Kalaivani, Mani; Chaudhury, Arindam

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the release pattern of different cardiac metabolites and biomarkers directly from the coronary sinus (CS) and to establish the diagnostic discrimination limits of each marker protein and metabolites to evaluate perioperative myocardial injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Patients and Methods: Sixty-eight patients undergoing first mitral and/or aortic valve replacements with/without coronary artery bypass grafting and Bentall procedure under CPB and blood cardioplegic arrest were studied. All cardiac metabolites and biomarkers were measured in serial CS-derived blood samples at pre-CPB, immediate post aortic declamping, 10 minutes post-CPB and 12 hrs post-CPB. Results: Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of cardiac biomarkers indicated lactate-pyruvate ratio as the superior diagnostic discriminator of myocardial injury with an optimal “cut-off” value >10.8 immediately after aortic declamping (AUC, 0.92; 95% CI: 0.85-0.98). Lactate was the second best diagnostic discriminator of myocardial injury with an optimal “cut-off” value >2mmol/l at immediately after aortic declamping (AUC, 0.89; 95% CI: 0.80-0.96). Cardiac troponin-I was the third best diagnostic discriminator of myocardial injury with an optimal “cut-off” value >2.1ng/ml at immediately after aortic declamping (AUC, 0.88; 95% CI: 0.80-0.95). Creatine kinase-MB was the fourth best diagnostic discriminator of myocardial injury with an optimal “cut-off” value >58 log units/ml prior to decanulation (AUC, 0.85; 95% CI: 0.78-0.94). Conclusions: Measurable cardiac damage exists in all patients undergoing cardiac surgery under cardioplegic arrest. The degree of myocardial injury is more in patients with poor ventricular function and those requiring longer aortic clamp time. CS-derived lactate-pyruvate ratio, lactate, cTn-I served as superior diagnostic discriminators of peri-operative myocardial damage. PMID:27397448

  9. Determination of organic acids in biological fluids by ion chromatography: plasma lactate and pyruvate and urinary vanillylmandelic acid.

    PubMed

    Rich, W; Johnson, E; Lois, L; Kabra, P; Stafford, B; Marton, L

    1980-09-01

    We describe the general aspects of ion chromatography and how on-line counted ion-exchange techniques can be utilized to determine pyruvic and lactic acids in plasma and vanillymandelic acid in urine. Pyruvate and lactate are extracted from deproteinized plasma by use of an ion-exclusion resin. After elution from the resin, the plasma extract is chromatographed on an anion-exchange column, with 0.66 mmol/L sodium bicarbonate as the mobile phase. The effluent is detected with an electrical conductivity cell. Vanillylmandelic acid is extracted from diluted urine by use of an anion-exchange resin. After elution from resin, the urine extract is chromatographed on an ion-exclusion column, followed by electrochemical detection. We evaluated the procedures for precision, linearity, analytical recovery, intefering substances, and correlation with an established procedure. the combination of a preliminary resin extraction, an ion chromatographic separation, and a conductivity or electrochemical detector results in rapid, specific methods that can be adapted for use in the clinical laboratory. Preliminary data for other organic acids are presented.

  10. Improvement of Neuroenergetics by Hypertonic Lactate Therapy in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury Is Dependent on Baseline Cerebral Lactate/Pyruvate Ratio.

    PubMed

    Quintard, Hervé; Patet, Camille; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Suys, Tamarah; Bouzat, Pierre; Pellerin, Luc; Meuli, Reto; Magistretti, Pierre J; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Energy dysfunction is associated with worse prognosis after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent data suggest that hypertonic sodium lactate infusion (HL) improves energy metabolism after TBI. Here, we specifically examined whether the efficacy of HL (3h infusion, 30-40 μmol/kg/min) in improving brain energetics (using cerebral microdialysis [CMD] glucose as a main therapeutic end-point) was dependent on baseline cerebral metabolic state (assessed by CMD lactate/pyruvate ratio [LPR]) and cerebral blood flow (CBF, measured with perfusion computed tomography [PCT]). Using a prospective cohort of 24 severe TBI patients, we found CMD glucose increase during HL was significant only in the subgroup of patients with elevated CMD LPR >25 (n = 13; +0.13 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08-0.19] mmol/L, p < 0.001; vs. +0.04 [-0.05-0.13] in those with normal LPR, p = 0.33, mixed-effects model). In contrast, CMD glucose increase was independent from baseline CBF (coefficient +0.13 [0.04-0.21] mmol/L when global CBF was <32.5 mL/100 g/min vs. +0.09 [0.04-0.14] mmol/L at normal CBF, both p < 0.005) and systemic glucose. Our data suggest that improvement of brain energetics upon HL seems predominantly dependent on baseline cerebral metabolic state and support the concept that CMD LPR - rather than CBF - could be used as a diagnostic indication for systemic lactate supplementation following TBI.

  11. Antimicrobial and antioxidant effects of sodium acetate, sodium lactate, and sodium citrate in refrigerated sliced salmon

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Khalid Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the microbiological quality and lipid oxidation of fresh salmon slices treated by dipping in 2.5% (w/v) aqueous solution of sodium acetate (NaA), sodium lactate (NaL), or sodium citrate (NaC) and stored at 1 °C. The results revealed that these salts were efficient (P < 0.05) against the proliferation of various categories of spoilage microorganisms; including aerobic and psychrotrophic populations, Pseudomonas spp., H2S-producing bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, and Enterobacteriaceae. The general order of antibacterial activity of the different organic salts used was; sodium acetate > sodium lactate > sodium citrate. Lipid oxidation, as expressed by peroxide value (PV) and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) value, was significantly (P < 0.05) delayed in NaA- and NaC-treated samples. The antioxidant activity followed the order: NaC > NaA > NaL. The shelf life of the treated products was extended by 4–7 days more than that of the control. Therefore, sodium acetate, sodium lactate, and sodium citrate can be utilized as safe organic preservatives for fish under refrigerated storage. PMID:17471315

  12. Lactate and Pyruvate Are Major Sources of Energy for Stallion Sperm with Dose Effects on Mitochondrial Function, Motility, and ROS Production.

    PubMed

    Darr, Christa R; Varner, Dickson D; Teague, Sheila; Cortopassi, Gino A; Datta, Sandipan; Meyers, Stuart A

    2016-08-01

    Stallion sperm rely primarily on oxidative phosphorylation for production of ATP used in sperm motility and metabolism. The objective of the study was to identify which substrates included in Biggers, Whitten, and Whittingham (BWW) media are key to optimal mitochondrial function through measurements of sperm motility parameters, mitochondrial oxygen consumption, and cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. It was expected that mitochondrial substrates, pyruvate and lactate, would support sperm motility and mitochondrial function better than the glycolytic substrate, glucose, due to direct utilization within the mitochondria. Measurements were performed after incubation in modified BWW media with varying concentrations of lactate, pyruvate, and glucose. The effects of media and duration of incubation on sperm motility, ROS production, and oxygen consumption were determined using a linear mixed-effects model. Duplicate ejaculates from four stallions were used in three separate experiments to determine the effects of substrate availability and concentration on sperm motility and mitochondrial function and the relationship of oxygen consumption with cellular ROS production. The present results indicate that lactate and pyruvate are the most important sources of energy for stallion sperm motility and velocity, and elicit a dose-dependent response. Additionally, lactate and pyruvate are ideal for maximal mitochondrial function, as sperm in these media operate at a very high level of their bioenergetic capability due to the high rate of energy metabolism. Moreover, we found that addition of glucose to the media is not necessary for short-term storage of equine sperm, and may even result in reduction of mitochondrial function. Finally, we have confirmed that ROS production can be the result of mitochondrial dysfunction as well as intense mitochondrial activity.

  13. Pyruvate Kinase M2 and Lactate Dehydrogenase A Are Overexpressed in Pancreatic Cancer and Correlate with Poor Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Goran Hamid; Olde Damink, S. W. M.; Malago, Massimo; Dhar, Dipok Kumar; Pereira, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Despite advances in diagnostic technology, pancreatic cancer continues to be diagnosed at a late and incurable stage. Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis and to predict treatment response are urgently needed. Since alteration of glucose metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells, we proposed that pyruvate kinase type M2 (M2PK) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) enzymes could represent novel diagnostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer. In 266 tissue sections from normal pancreas, pancreatic cystic neoplasms, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and cancer, we evaluated the expression of PKM2, LDHA, Ki-67 and CD8+ by immunohistochemistry and correlated these markers with clinicopathological characteristics and patient survival. PKM2 and LDHA expression was also assessed by Western blot in 10 human pancreatic cancer cell lines. PKM2 expression increased progressively from cyst through PanIN to cancer, whereas LDHA was overexpressed throughout the carcinogenic process. All but one cell line showed high expression of both proteins. Patients with strong PKM2 and LDHA expression had significantly worse survival than those with weak PKM2 and/or LDHA expression (7.0 months vs. 27.9 months, respectively, p = 0.003, log rank test). The expression of both PKM2 and LDHA correlated directly with Ki-67 expression, and inversely with intratumoral CD8+ cell count. PKM2 was significantly overexpressed in poorly differentiated tumours and both PKM2 and LDHA were overexpressed in larger tumours. Multivariable analysis showed that combined expression of PKM2 and LDHA was an independent poor prognostic marker for survival. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a high expression pattern of two major glycolytic enzymes during pancreatic carcinogenesis, with increased expression in aggressive tumours and a significant adverse effect on survival. PMID:26989901

  14. Pyruvate Kinase M2 and Lactate Dehydrogenase A Are Overexpressed in Pancreatic Cancer and Correlate with Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Goran Hamid; Olde Damink, S W M; Malago, Massimo; Dhar, Dipok Kumar; Pereira, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Despite advances in diagnostic technology, pancreatic cancer continues to be diagnosed at a late and incurable stage. Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis and to predict treatment response are urgently needed. Since alteration of glucose metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells, we proposed that pyruvate kinase type M2 (M2PK) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) enzymes could represent novel diagnostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer. In 266 tissue sections from normal pancreas, pancreatic cystic neoplasms, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and cancer, we evaluated the expression of PKM2, LDHA, Ki-67 and CD8+ by immunohistochemistry and correlated these markers with clinicopathological characteristics and patient survival. PKM2 and LDHA expression was also assessed by Western blot in 10 human pancreatic cancer cell lines. PKM2 expression increased progressively from cyst through PanIN to cancer, whereas LDHA was overexpressed throughout the carcinogenic process. All but one cell line showed high expression of both proteins. Patients with strong PKM2 and LDHA expression had significantly worse survival than those with weak PKM2 and/or LDHA expression (7.0 months vs. 27.9 months, respectively, p = 0.003, log rank test). The expression of both PKM2 and LDHA correlated directly with Ki-67 expression, and inversely with intratumoral CD8+ cell count. PKM2 was significantly overexpressed in poorly differentiated tumours and both PKM2 and LDHA were overexpressed in larger tumours. Multivariable analysis showed that combined expression of PKM2 and LDHA was an independent poor prognostic marker for survival. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a high expression pattern of two major glycolytic enzymes during pancreatic carcinogenesis, with increased expression in aggressive tumours and a significant adverse effect on survival.

  15. Complete knockout of the lactate dehydrogenase A gene is lethal in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1, 2, 3 down-regulated CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Yip, Shirley S M; Zhou, Meixia; Joly, John; Snedecor, Bradley; Shen, Amy; Crawford, Yongping

    2014-09-01

    Accumulation of high level of lactate can negatively impact cell growth during fed-batch culture process. In this study, we attempted to knockout the lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) gene in CHO cells in order to attenuate the lactate level. To prevent the potential deleterious effect of pyruvate accumulation, consequent to LDHA knockout, on cell culture, we chose a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1, 2, and 3 (PDHK1, 2, and 3) knockdown cell line in which to knock out LDHA alleles. Around 3,000 clones were screened to obtain 152 mutants. Only heterozygous mutants were identified. An attempt to knockout the remaining wild-type allele from one such heterozygote yielded only two mutants after screening 567 clones. One had an extra valine. Another evidenced a duplication event, possessing at lease one wild-type and two different frameshifted alleles. Both mutants still retained LDH activity. Together, our data strongly suggest that a complete knockout of LDHA is lethal in CHO cells, despite simultaneous down-regulation of PDHK1, 2, and 3. PMID:24841241

  16. Physiological and Transcriptional Characterization of Escherichia Coli Strains Lacking Interconversion of Phosphoenolpyruvate and Pyruvate When Glucose and Acetate are Coutilized

    PubMed Central

    Sabido, Andrea; Sigala, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Chávez, Georgina; Flores, Noemí; Gosset, Guillermo; Bolívar, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) is a precursor involved in the biosynthesis of aromatics and other valuable compounds in Escherichia coli. The PEP:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is the major glucose transport system and the largest PEP consumer. To increase intracellular PEP availability for aromatics production purposes, mutant strains of E. coli JM101 devoid of the ptsHIcrr operon (PB11 strain) have been previously generated. In this derivative, transport and growth rate on glucose decreased significantly. A laboratory evolved strain derived from PB11 that partially recovered its growth capacity on glucose was named PB12. In the present study, we blocked carbon skeletons interchange between PEP and pyruvate (PYR) in these ptsHIcrr− strains by deleting the pykA, pykF, and ppsA genes. The PB11 pykAF− ppsA− strain exhibited no growth on glucose or acetate alone, but it was viable when both substrates were consumed simultaneously. In contrast, the PB12 pykAF− ppsA− strain displayed a low growth rate on glucose or acetate alone, but in the mixture, growth was significantly improved. RT-qPCR expression analysis of PB11 pykAF− ppsA− growing with both carbon sources showed a downregulation of all central metabolic pathways compared with its parental PB11 strain. Under the same conditions, transcription of most of the genes in PB12 pykAF− ppsA− did not change, and few like aceBAK, sfcA, and poxB were overexpressed compared with PB12. We explored the aromatics production capabilities of both ptsHIcrr− pykAF− ppsA− strains and the engineered PB12 pykAF− ppsA− tyrR− pheAev2+/pJLBaroGfbrtktA enhanced the yield of aromatic compounds when coutilizing glucose and acetate compared with the control strain PB12 tyrR− pheAev2+/pJLBaroGfbrtktA. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 1150–1160. © 2013 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24375081

  17. In boar sperm capacitation L-lactate and succinate, but not pyruvate and citrate, contribute to the mitochondrial membrane potential increase as monitored via safranine O fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Paventi, Gianluca; Lessard, Christian; Bailey, Janice L; Passarella, Salvatore

    2015-07-01

    Having ascertained using JC-1 as a probe that, in distinction with the controls, during capacitation boar sperm maintains high mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ), to gain some insight into the role of mitochondria in capacitation, we monitored ΔΨ generation due to externally added metabolites either in hypotonically-treated spermatozoa (HTS) or in intact cells by using safranine O as a probe. During capacitation, the addition to HTS of L-lactate and succinate but not those of pyruvate, citrate and ascorbate + TMPD resulted in increase of ΔΨ generation. Accordingly, the addition of L-lactate and succinate, but not that of citrate, to intact sperm resulted in ΔΨ generation increased in capacitation.

  18. Application of acetate, lactate, and fumarate as electron donors in microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliv, Oresta M.; Bilyy, Oleksandr I.; Ferensovych, Yaroslav P.; Hnatush, Svitlana O.

    2013-09-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that use bacteria as the catalysts to oxidize organic and inorganic matter and generate current. Up to now, several classes of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms have been elucidated for various microorganisms. Shewanellaceae and Geobacteraceae families include the most of model exoelectrogenic microorganisms. Desulfuromonas acetoxidans bacterium inhabits aquatic sedimental sulfur-containing environments and is philogenetically close to representatives of Geobacteraceae family. Two chamber microbial fuel cell (0.3 l volume) was constructed with application of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 as anode biocatalyst. Acetic, lactic and fumaric acids were separately applied as organic electron donors for bacterial growth in constructed MFC. Bacterial cultivation in MFC was held during twenty days. Lactate oxidation caused electric power production with the highest value up to 0.071 mW on 64 hour of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 growth. Addition of acetic and fumaric acids into bacterial growth medium caused maximal power production up to 0.075 and 0.074 mW respectively on the 40 hour of their growth. Increasing of incubation time up to twentieth day caused decrease of generated electric power till 0.018 mW, 0.042 mW and 0.047 mW under usage of lactic, acetic and fumaric acids respectively by investigated bacteria. Power generation by D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 was more stabile and durable under application of acetic and fumaric acids as electron donors in constructed MFC, than under addition of lactic acid in the same concentration into the growth medium.

  19. Altered Fermentative Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutants Lacking Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Both Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Catalanotti, C.; Dubini, A.; Subramanian, V.; Yang, W. Q.; Magneschi, L.; Mus, F.; Seibert, M.; Posewitz, M. C.; Grossman, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H2 production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H2 production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism.

  20. Physiological roles of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase and pyruvate formate-lyase in Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum JW/SL-YS485

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jilai; Olson, Daniel G.; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Tian, Liang; Murphy, Sean Jean-Loup; Lo, Jonathan; Lynd, Lee R.

    2015-09-15

    We report that Thermoanaerobacter saccharolyticum is a thermophilic microorganism that has been engineered to produce ethanol at high titer (30–70 g/L) and greater than 90 % theoretical yield. However, few genes involved in pyruvate to ethanol production pathway have been unambiguously identified. In T. saccharolyticum, the products of six putative pfor gene clusters and one pfl gene may be responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. To gain insights into the physiological roles of PFOR and PFL, we studied the effect of deletions of several genes thought to encode these activities. We found that that pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase enzyme (PFOR) is encoded by the pforA gene and plays a key role in pyruvate dissimilation. We further demonstrated that pyruvate formate-lyase activity (PFL) is encoded by the pfl gene. Although the pfl gene is normally expressed at low levels, it is crucial for biosynthesis in T. saccharolyticum. In pforA deletion strains, pfl expression increased and was able to partially compensate for the loss of PFOR activity. Deletion of both pforA and pfl resulted in a strain that required acetate and formate for growth and produced lactate as the primary fermentation product, achieving 88 % theoretical lactate yield. PFOR encoded by Tsac_0046 and PFL encoded by Tsac_0628 are only two routes for converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in T. saccharolyticum. The physiological role of PFOR is pyruvate dissimilation, whereas that of PFL is supplying C1 units for biosynthesis.

  1. Anaerobic degradation of lactate by syntrophic associations of methanosarcina barkeri and desulfovibrio species and effect of H2 on acetate degradation

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.; Bryant, M.P.

    1981-02-01

    When grown in the absence of added sulfate, cocultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans or Desulfovibrio vulgaris with Methanobrevibacter smithii (Methanobacterium ruminantium), which uses H2 and CO2 for methanogenesis, degraded lactate, with the production of acetate and CH4. When D. desulfuricans or D. vulgaris was grown in the absence of added sulfate in coculture with Methanosarcina barkeri (type strain), which uses both H2-CO2 and acetate for methanogenesis, lactate was stoichiometrically degraded to CH4 and presumably to CO2. During the first 12 days of incubation of the D. desulfuricans-M. barkeri coculture, lactate was completely degraded, with almost stoichiometric production of acetate and CH4. Later, acetate was degraded to CH4 and presumably to CO2. In experiments in which 20 mM acetate and 0 to 20 mM lactate were added to D. desulfuricans-M. barkeri cocultures, no detectable degradation of acetate occurred until the lactate was catabolized. The ultimate rate of acetate utilization for methanogenesis was greater for those cocultures receiving the highest levels of lactate. A small amount of H2 was detected in cocultures which contained D. desulfuricans and M. barkeri until after all lactate was degraded. The addition of H2, but not of lactate, to the growth medium inhibited acetate degradation by pure cultures of M. barkeri. Pure cultures of M. barkeri produced CH4 from acetate at a rate equivalent to that observed for cocultures containing M. barkeri. Inocula of M. barkeri grown with H2-CO2 as the methanogenic substrate produced CH4 from acetate at a rate equivalent to that observed for acetate-grown inocula when grown in a rumen fluid-vitamin-based medium but not when grown in a yeast extract-based medium. The results suggest that H2 produced by the Desulfovibrio species during growth with lactate inhibited acetate degradation by M. barkeri. (Refs. 26).

  2. Effects of intraruminal infusions of sodium acetate and sodium chloride on silage intake by lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Forbes, J M; Mbanya, J N; Anil, M H

    1992-12-01

    Lactating dairy cows prepared with rumen fistulas were fed on grass silage and concentrates and used in two experiments to compare the effects of sodium acetate and sodium chloride infused over 3 h into the rumen on the voluntary intake of silage. Silage intake was depressed in an approximately linear manner by increasing amounts (6-15 mol) of sodium acetate (NaOAc) and 15 mol NaCl had an effect similar to that of 12 mol NaOAc. Sodium in rumen fluid was significantly correlated with intake as was osmolality. 5.5, 7.4 or 9.1 mol of NaOAc significantly depressed silage intake, while 7.4 and 9.1 mol NaCl had significant effects. There were significant negative relationships between intake and the level of NaOAc or NaCl. It is concluded that the major effect of either salt was via the elevation of osmolality of rumen fluid and the relevance to normal control of feeding is discussed.

  3. Effects of sodium lactate and acetic acid derivatives on the quality and sensory characteristics of hot-boned pork sausage patties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sodium lactate and acetic acid derivatives were evaluated for their effects on color retention, microbial growth, and sensory attributes of hot-boned pork sausage patties. Treatments included: (a) sodium lactate (L), (b) buffered vinegar (V), (c) sodium lactate and vinegar mixture (LV), (d) control ...

  4. The lactate dehydrogenase--reduced nicotinamide--adenine dinucleotide--pyruvate complex. Kinetics of pyruvate binding and quenching of coeznyme fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Südi, J

    1974-04-01

    The stopped-flow kinetic studies described in this and the following paper (Südi, 1974) demonstrate that a Haldane-type description of the reversible lactate dehydrogenase reaction presents an experimentally feasible task. Combined results of these two papers yield numerical values for the six rate constants defined by the following equilibrium scheme, where E represents lactate dehydrogenase: [Formula: see text] The experiments were carried out at pH8.4 at a relatively low temperature (6.3 degrees C) with the pig heart enzyme. Identification of the above two intermediates and determination of the corresponding rate constants actually involve four series of independent observations in these studies, since (a) the reaction can be followed in both directions, and (b) both the u.v. absorption and the fluorescence of the coenzymes are altered in the reaction, and it is shown that these two spectral changes do not occur simultaneously. Kinetic observations made in the reverse direction are reported in this paper. It is demonstrated that the fluorescence of NADH can no longer be observed in the ternary complex E(NADH) (Pyr). Even though the oxidation-reduction reaction rapidly follows the formation of this complex, the numerical values of k(-4) (8.33x10(5)m(-1).s(-1)) and k(+4) (222s(-1)) are easily obtained from a directly observed second-order reaction step in which fluorescent but not u.v.-absorbing material is disappearing. U.v.-absorption measurements do not clearly resolve the subsequent oxidation-reduction step from the dissociation of lactate. It is shown that this must be due partly to the instrumental dead time, and partly to a low transient concentration of E(NAD+) (Lac) in the two-step sequential reaction in which the detectable disappearance of u.v.-absorbing material takes place. It is estimated that about one-tenth of the total change in u.v. absorption is due to a ;burst reaction' in which E(NAD+) (Lac) is produced, and this estimation yields, from k

  5. Identification of the Elusive Pyruvate Reductase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Steven J.; Taha, Hussein; Yeoman, Justin A.; Iamshanova, Oksana; Chan, Kher Xing; Boehm, Marko; Behrends, Volker; Bundy, Jacob G.; Bialek, Wojciech; Murray, James W.; Nixon, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Under anoxic conditions the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii activates various fermentation pathways leading to the creation of formate, acetate, ethanol and small amounts of other metabolites including d-lactate and hydrogen. Progress has been made in identifying the enzymes involved in these pathways and their subcellular locations; however, the identity of the enzyme involved in reducing pyruvate to d-lactate has remained unclear. Based on sequence comparisons, enzyme activity measurements, X-ray crystallography, biochemical fractionation and analysis of knock-down mutants, we conclude that pyruvate reduction in the chloroplast is catalyzed by a tetrameric NAD+-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase encoded by Cre07.g324550. Its expression during aerobic growth supports a possible function as a ‘lactate valve’ for the export of lactate to the mitochondrion for oxidation by cytochrome-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenases and by glycolate dehydrogenase. We also present a revised spatial model of fermentation based on our immunochemical detection of the likely pyruvate decarboxylase, PDC3, in the cytoplasm. PMID:26574578

  6. Identification of the Elusive Pyruvate Reductase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Steven J; Taha, Hussein; Yeoman, Justin A; Iamshanova, Oksana; Chan, Kher Xing; Boehm, Marko; Behrends, Volker; Bundy, Jacob G; Bialek, Wojciech; Murray, James W; Nixon, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Under anoxic conditions the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii activates various fermentation pathways leading to the creation of formate, acetate, ethanol and small amounts of other metabolites including d-lactate and hydrogen. Progress has been made in identifying the enzymes involved in these pathways and their subcellular locations; however, the identity of the enzyme involved in reducing pyruvate to d-lactate has remained unclear. Based on sequence comparisons, enzyme activity measurements, X-ray crystallography, biochemical fractionation and analysis of knock-down mutants, we conclude that pyruvate reduction in the chloroplast is catalyzed by a tetrameric NAD(+)-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase encoded by Cre07.g324550. Its expression during aerobic growth supports a possible function as a 'lactate valve' for the export of lactate to the mitochondrion for oxidation by cytochrome-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenases and by glycolate dehydrogenase. We also present a revised spatial model of fermentation based on our immunochemical detection of the likely pyruvate decarboxylase, PDC3, in the cytoplasm.

  7. Identification of the Elusive Pyruvate Reductase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Steven J; Taha, Hussein; Yeoman, Justin A; Iamshanova, Oksana; Chan, Kher Xing; Boehm, Marko; Behrends, Volker; Bundy, Jacob G; Bialek, Wojciech; Murray, James W; Nixon, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Under anoxic conditions the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii activates various fermentation pathways leading to the creation of formate, acetate, ethanol and small amounts of other metabolites including d-lactate and hydrogen. Progress has been made in identifying the enzymes involved in these pathways and their subcellular locations; however, the identity of the enzyme involved in reducing pyruvate to d-lactate has remained unclear. Based on sequence comparisons, enzyme activity measurements, X-ray crystallography, biochemical fractionation and analysis of knock-down mutants, we conclude that pyruvate reduction in the chloroplast is catalyzed by a tetrameric NAD(+)-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase encoded by Cre07.g324550. Its expression during aerobic growth supports a possible function as a 'lactate valve' for the export of lactate to the mitochondrion for oxidation by cytochrome-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenases and by glycolate dehydrogenase. We also present a revised spatial model of fermentation based on our immunochemical detection of the likely pyruvate decarboxylase, PDC3, in the cytoplasm. PMID:26574578

  8. Identification of a novel operon in Lactococcus lactis encoding three enzymes for lactic acid synthesis: phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, R M; Harris, C J; Hillier, A J; Davidson, B E

    1993-01-01

    The discovery of a novel multicistronic operon that encodes phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is reported. The three genes in the operon, designated pfk, pyk, and ldh, contain 340, 502, and 325 codons, respectively. The intergenic distances are 87 bp between pfk and pyk and 117 bp between pyk and ldh. Plasmids containing pfk and pyk conferred phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase activity, respectively, on their host. The identity of ldh was established previously by the same approach (R. M. Llanos, A. J. Hillier, and B. E. Davidson, J. Bacteriol. 174:6956-6964, 1992). Each of the genes is preceded by a potential ribosome binding site. The operon is expressed in a 4.1-kb transcript. The 5' end of the transcript was determined to be a G nucleotide positioned 81 bp upstream from the pfk start codon. The pattern of codon usage within the operon is highly biased, with 11 unused amino acid codons. This degree of bias suggests that the operon is highly expressed. The three proteins encoded on the operon are key enzymes in the Embden-Meyerhoff pathway, the central pathway of energy production and lactic acid synthesis in L. lactis. For this reason, we have called the operon the las (lactic acid synthesis) operon. Images PMID:8478320

  9. Regulation of synthesis of pyruvate carboxylase in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Yakunin, A F; Hallenbeck, P C

    1997-01-01

    The synthesis of pyruvate carboxylase (PC) was studied by using quantitative immunoblot analysis with an antibody raised against PC purified from Rhodobacter capsulatus and was found to vary 20-fold depending on the growth conditions. The PC content was high in cells grown on pyruvate or on carbon substrates metabolized via pyruvate (lactate, D-malate, glucose, or fructose) and low in cells grown on tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates or substrates metabolized without intermediate formation of pyruvate (acetate or glutamate). Under dark aerobic growth conditions with lactate as a carbon source, the PC content was approximately twofold higher than that found under light anaerobic growth conditions. The results of incubation experiments demonstrate that PC synthesis is induced by pyruvate and repressed by TCA cycle intermediates, with negative control dominating over positive control. The content of PC in R. capsulatus cells was also directly related to the growth rate in continuous cultures. The analysis of intracellular levels of pyruvate and TCA cycle intermediates in cells grown under different conditions demonstrated that the content of PC is directly proportional to the ratio between pyruvate and C4 dicarboxylates. These results suggest that the regulation of PC synthesis by oxygen and its direct correlation with growth rate may reflect effects on the balance of intracellular pyruvate and C4 dicarboxylates. Thus, this important enzyme is potentially regulated both allosterically and at the level of synthesis. PMID:9045800

  10. Altered Fermentative Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutants Lacking Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Both Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Alcohol Dehydrogenase[W

    PubMed Central

    Catalanotti, Claudia; Dubini, Alexandra; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Yang, Wenqiang; Magneschi, Leonardo; Mus, Florence; Seibert, Michael; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H2 production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H2 production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism. PMID:22353371

  11. Production of lactate and acetate by Lactobacillus coryniformis subsp. torquens DSM 20004(T) in comparison with Lactobacillus amylovorus DSM 20531(T).

    PubMed

    Slavica, Anita; Trontel, Antonija; Jelovac, Nuša; Kosovec, Željka; Šantek, Božidar; Novak, Srđan

    2015-05-20

    Lactobacillus coryniformis subsp. torquens DSM20004(T) is a d-lactate producer, with a portion of the d-lactate higher than 99.9% of total lactic acid produced. Acetate was identified as the second end-product that appeared at the end of the exponential growth phase in MRS medium when glucose concentration dropped to 38.41mM (6.92g/L). The acetate production was prolonged to the stationary phase, while the concentration of d-lactate remained constant. Other end-products were not identified by HPLC method. The known metabolic pathways of glucose fermentation in lactic acid bacteria do not produce the particular combination of these two end-products, but besides lactate and acetate also formate, ethanol and CO2 are produced. For comparison, the production of lactate and acetate by a d-/l-lactate producer Lactobacillus amylovorus DSM 20531(T) was also investigated. This strain produced equimolar quantities of d- and l-lactate in the MRS medium. Acetate was produced only when initial concentration of glucose was 55.51mM (10g/L) and production started in the exponential phase when concentration of glucose dropped to 35.52mM (6.40g/L). Similar behavior was observed with the initial concentration of maltose of 29.21mM (10g/L). An unstructured mathematical model was established for the bioprocess simulation.

  12. Epinephrine induces tissue perfusion deficit in porcine endotoxin shock: evaluation by regional CO(2) content gradients and lactate-to-pyruvate ratios.

    PubMed

    Martikainen, Tero J; Tenhunen, Jyrki J; Giovannini, Ivo; Uusaro, Ari; Ruokonen, Esko

    2005-03-01

    Epinephrine is widely used as a vasoconstrictor or inotrope in shock, although it may typically induce or augment lactic acidosis. Ongoing debate addresses the question of whether hyperlactatemia per se is a sign of tissue perfusion deficit or aerobic glycolysis. We wanted to test the hypothesis that epinephrine has selective detrimental effects on visceral perfusion and metabolism. We performed rigorous regional venous blood gas analyses as well as intraperitoneal microdialysis. We used a mathematical model to calculate regional arteriovenous CO(2) content gradients and estimated the magnitude of the Haldane effect in a porcine model of prolonged hypotensive shock induced by endotoxin infusion (mean arterial blood pressure < 60 mmHg). Subsequently, vasopressors (epinephrine or norepinephrine) were administered and adjusted to maintain systemic mean arterial pressure > 70 mmHg for 4 h. Epinephrine caused systemic hyperlactatemia and acidosis. Importantly, both systemic and regional venous lactate-to-pyruvate ratios increased. Epinephrine was associated with decreasing portal blood flow despite apparently maintained total splanchnic blood flow. Epinephrine increased gastric venous-to-arterial Pco(2) gradients and CO(2) content gradients with decreasing magnitude of the Haldane effect, and the regional gastric respiratory quotient remained higher after epinephrine as opposed to norepinephrine infusion. In addition, epinephrine induced intraperitoneal lactate and glycerol release. We did not observe these adverse hemodynamic or metabolic changes related to norepinephrine with the same arterial pressure goal. We conclude that high CO(2) content gradients with decreasing magnitude of the Haldane effect pinpoint the most pronounced perfusion deficiency to the gastric wall when epinephrine, as opposed to norepinephrine, is used in experimental endotoxin shock.

  13. Macromolecular crowding effect upon in vitro enzyme kinetics: mixed activation-diffusion control of the oxidation of NADH by pyruvate catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Balcells, Cristina; Pastor, Isabel; Vilaseca, Eudald; Madurga, Sergio; Cascante, Marta; Mas, Francesc

    2014-04-17

    Enzyme kinetics studies have been usually designed as dilute solution experiments, which differ substantially from in vivo conditions. However, cell cytosol is crowded with a high concentration of molecules having different shapes and sizes. The consequences of such crowding in enzymatic reactions remain unclear. The aim of the present study is to understand the effect of macromolecular crowding produced by dextran of different sizes and at diverse concentrations in the well-known reaction of oxidation of NADH by pyruvate catalyzed by L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Our results indicate that the reaction rate is determined by both the occupied volume and the relative size of dextran obstacles with respect to the enzyme present in the reaction. Moreover, we analyzed the influence of macromolecular crowding on the Michaelis-Menten constants, vmax and Km. The obtained results show that only high concentrations and large sizes of dextran reduce both constants suggesting a mixed activation-diffusion control of this enzymatic reaction due to the dextran crowding action. From our knowledge, this is the first experimental study that depicts mixed activation-diffusion control in an enzymatic reaction due to the effect of crowding.

  14. Physiological roles of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase and pyruvate formate-lyase in Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum JW/SL-YS485

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Jilai; Olson, Daniel G.; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Tian, Liang; Murphy, Sean Jean-Loup; Lo, Jonathan; Lynd, Lee R.

    2015-09-15

    We report that Thermoanaerobacter saccharolyticum is a thermophilic microorganism that has been engineered to produce ethanol at high titer (30–70 g/L) and greater than 90 % theoretical yield. However, few genes involved in pyruvate to ethanol production pathway have been unambiguously identified. In T. saccharolyticum, the products of six putative pfor gene clusters and one pfl gene may be responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. To gain insights into the physiological roles of PFOR and PFL, we studied the effect of deletions of several genes thought to encode these activities. We found that that pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase enzymemore » (PFOR) is encoded by the pforA gene and plays a key role in pyruvate dissimilation. We further demonstrated that pyruvate formate-lyase activity (PFL) is encoded by the pfl gene. Although the pfl gene is normally expressed at low levels, it is crucial for biosynthesis in T. saccharolyticum. In pforA deletion strains, pfl expression increased and was able to partially compensate for the loss of PFOR activity. Deletion of both pforA and pfl resulted in a strain that required acetate and formate for growth and produced lactate as the primary fermentation product, achieving 88 % theoretical lactate yield. PFOR encoded by Tsac_0046 and PFL encoded by Tsac_0628 are only two routes for converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in T. saccharolyticum. The physiological role of PFOR is pyruvate dissimilation, whereas that of PFL is supplying C1 units for biosynthesis.« less

  15. Molecular characterization of CcpA and involvement of this protein in transcriptional regulation of lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate formate-lyase in the ruminal bacterium Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Narito; Yoshii, Takahiro; Hino, Tsuneo

    2004-09-01

    A ccpA gene that encodes global catabolite control protein A (CcpA) in Streptococcus bovis was identified and characterized, and the involvement of CcpA in transcriptional control of a gene (ldh) encoding lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and a gene (pfl) encoding pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL) was examined. The ccpA gene was shown to be transcribed as a monocistronic operon. A catabolite-responsive element (cre) was found in the promoter region of ccpA, suggesting that ccpA transcription in S. bovis is autogenously regulated. CcpA required HPr that was phosphorylated at the serine residue at position 46 (HPr-[Ser-P]) for binding to the cre site, but glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, and NADP had no effect on binding. Diauxic growth was observed when S. bovis was grown in a medium containing glucose and lactose, but it disappeared when ccpA was disrupted, which indicates that CcpA is involved in catabolite repression in S. bovis. The level of ccpA mRNA was higher when cells were grown on glucose than when they were grown on lactose, which was in line with the level of ldh mRNA. When cells were grown on glucose, the ldh mRNA level was lower but the pfl mRNA level was higher in a ccpA-disrupted mutant than in the parent strain, which suggests that ldh transcription is enhanced and pfl transcription is suppressed by CcpA. The ccpA-disrupted mutant produced less lactate and more formate than the parent, probably because the mutant had reduced LDH activity and elevated PFL activity. In the upper region of both ldh and pfl, a cre-like sequence was found, suggesting that the complex consisting of CcpA and HPr-[Ser-P] binds to the possible cre sites. Thus, CcpA appears to be involved in the global regulation of sugar utilization in S. bovis. PMID:15345406

  16. Glucose metabolism and effect of acetate in ovine adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y T; White, L S; Muir, L A

    1982-08-01

    Isolated ovine adipocytes were incubated in vitro with specifically labeled 14C-glucose in the presence or absence of acetate. The flux patterns of glucose carbon through major metabolic pathways were estimated. When glucose was added as the sole substrate, approximately equal portions of glucose carbon (10%) were oxidized to CO2 in the pentose phosphate pathway, in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction and in the citrate cycle. Fifteen percent of the glucose carbon was incorporated into fatty acids and 43% was released as lactate and pyruvate. Addition of acetate to the medium increased glucose carbon uptake by 1.5-fold. Most of this increase was accounted for by a sevenfold increase in the activity of the pentose phosphate pathway. Acetate increased glucose carbon fluxes via pentose phosphate pathway to triose phosphates, from triose phosphate to pyruvate, into glyceride glycerol, into lactate and pyruvate and into pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate cycle CO2. Glucose carbon incorporated into fatty acids was decreased 50% by acetate while, carbon fluxes through the phosphofructokinase-aldolase reactions were not significantly increased. Results of this study suggest that, when glucose is the sole substrate, the conversion of glucose to fatty acids in ovine adipocytes may not be limited by the maximum capacity of hexokinase, the pentose phosphate pathway or enzymes involved in the conversion of triose phosphates to pyruvate and of pyruvate to fatty acid. Acetate increased glucose utilization apparently by increasing activity of the pentose phosphate pathway as a result of enhanced NADPH utilization for fatty acid synthesis. PMID:7142048

  17. DEGRADATION OF PYRUVATE BY MICROCOCCUS LACTILYTICUS II.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, N. G.; Ordal, E. J.; Whiteley, H. R.

    1962-01-01

    McCormick, N. G. (University of Washington, Seattle), E. J. Ordal, and H. R. Whiteley. Degradation of pyruvate by Micrococcus lactilyticus. II. Studies of cofactors in the formate-exchange reaction. J. Bacteriol. 83:899–906. 1962.—Enzyme preparations from Micrococcus lactilyticus2 are rendered inactive with respect to formate exchange by treatment with charcoal or Dowex-50, by dialysis, or by fractionation with ammonium sulfate. The activity may be completely restored by a “kochsaft” preparation (BES) obtained from M. lactilyticus and partially restored by similar BES preparations from Escherichia coli and Clostridium butyricum. Diphosphothiamine is required for formate exchange but full activity cannot be restored by known cofactors. Brief exposure to increased temperatures, air, extremes of pH, and absorption with charcoal and Dowex-50 decrease the cofactor activity of BES preparations. The addition of BES preparations from E. coli and Streptococcus faecalis causes a shift in the degradation of pyruvate by extracts of M. lactilyticus from the phosphoroclastic cleavage (to acetyl phosphate and formate) to the dismutation of pyruvate (to lactate, acetate, and carbon dioxide). C. cylindrosporum was found to mediate the formate-exchange reaction; the activity of crude extracts was stimulated by M. lactilyticus and C. butyricum BES preparations. M. lactilyticus BES also increased the formate-exchange activity of extracts of E. coli. PMID:16561937

  18. The occurrence of Listeria monocytogens in retail ready-to-eat meat and poultry products related to the levels of Acetate and Lactate in the products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes is a psychrotrophic foodborne pathogen that has been isolated from ready-to-eat meat and poultry products (RTE meats). The purpose of this study was to quantify lactate and acetate levels in retail RTE meats that had been tested in a previous study for the presence of L. mono...

  19. Co-administration of creatine plus pyruvate prevents the effects of phenylalanine administration to female rats during pregnancy and lactation on enzymes activity of energy metabolism in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of the offspring.

    PubMed

    Bortoluzzi, Vanessa Trindade; de Franceschi, Itiane Diehl; Rieger, Elenara; Wannmacher, Clóvis Milton Duval

    2014-08-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is the most frequent inborn error of metabolism. It is caused by deficiency in the activity of phenylalanine hydroxylase, leading to accumulation of phenylalanine and its metabolites. Untreated maternal PKU or hyperphenylalaninemia may result in nonphenylketonuric offspring with low birth weight and neonatal sequelae, especially microcephaly and intellectual disability. The mechanisms underlying the neuropathology of brain injury in maternal PKU syndrome are poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated the possible preventive effect of the co-administration of creatine plus pyruvate on the effects elicited by phenylalanine administration to female Wistar rats during pregnancy and lactation on some enzymes involved in the phosphoryltransfer network in the brain cortex and hippocampus of the offspring at 21 days of age. Phenylalanine administration provoked diminution of body, brain cortex an hippocampus weight and decrease of adenylate kinase, mitochondrial and cytosolic creatine kinase activities. Co-administration of creatine plus pyruvate was effective in the prevention of those alterations provoked by phenylalanine, suggesting that altered energy metabolism may be important in the pathophysiology of maternal PKU. If these alterations also occur in maternal PKU, it is possible that pyruvate and creatine supplementation to the phenylalanine-restricted diet might be beneficial to phenylketonuric mothers.

  20. Prenatal or lactational exposure of male rats to lead acetate. Effect on reproductive function

    SciTech Connect

    Thoreux-Manlay, A.; Pinon-Lataillade, G.; Coffigny, H.; Masse, R.; Soufir, J.C.

    1995-02-01

    Lead is an environmental pollutant which has received much attention, partly because of the particular sensitivity of children to this element. As regards the consequences of exposure to lead during fetal life or childhood, epidemiological studies have so far focused on its neuropsychological effects and little is known about the consequences of fetal or childhood exposure for reproduction. With respect to animals, the reproductive toxicity of lead in males exposed during prenatal life or the suckling period has only been considered in a few studies. Four such studies concerned the rat, the most current model of lead toxicity for male reproduction; two of studies considered the long term effects (i.e. during adulthood) of moderate in utero lead exposure, another covered the prenatal and neonatal periods and focused on the possible impact of lead intoxication on steriodogenesis before weaning, while the remaining study dealt with pituitary hormone level at the end of lead gavage in newborns. None of these investigations compared the effects of exposure during prenatal life to those of exposure via lactation, or the early effects (at about weaning time) to the long-term consequences during adulthood. Because of the paucity of data on these points, we conducted two experiments: in one, rats were exposed to lead prenatally, and in the other via maternal milk. In both cases male reproductive function at weaning and adulthood was examined. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Deletion of pyruvate decarboxylase by a new method for efficient markerless gene deletions in Gluconobacter oxydans.

    PubMed

    Peters, Björn; Junker, Anja; Brauer, Katharina; Mühlthaler, Bernadette; Kostner, David; Mientus, Markus; Liebl, Wolfgang; Ehrenreich, Armin

    2013-03-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans, a biotechnologically relevant species which incompletely oxidizes a large variety of carbohydrates, alcohols, and related compounds, contains a gene for pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC). This enzyme is found only in very few species of bacteria where it is normally involved in anaerobic ethanol formation via acetaldehyde. In order to clarify the role of PDC in the strictly oxidative metabolism of acetic acid bacteria, we developed a markerless in-frame deletion system for strain G. oxydans 621H which uses 5-fluorouracil together with a plasmid-encoded uracil phosphoribosyltransferase as counter selection method and used this technique to delete the PDC gene (GOX1081) of G. oxydans 621H. The PDC deletion mutant accumulated large amounts of pyruvate but almost no acetate during growth on D-mannitol, D-fructose or in the presence of L-lactate. This suggested that in G. oxydans acetate formation occurs by decarboxylation of pyruvate and subsequent oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetate. This observation and the efficiency of the markerless deletion system were confirmed by constructing deletion mutants of two acetaldehyde dehydrogenases (GOX1122 and GOX2018) and of the acetyl-CoA-synthetase (GOX0412). Acetate formation during growth of these mutants on mannitol did not differ significantly from the wild-type strain.

  2. Mitochondrial lactate metabolism is involved in antioxidative defense in human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lemire, Joseph; Auger, Christopher; Mailloux, Ryan; Appanna, Vasu D

    2014-04-01

    Although lactate has traditionally been known to be an end product of anaerobic metabolism, recent studies have revealed its disparate biological functions. Oxidative energy production and cell signaling are two important roles assigned to this monocarboxylic acid. Here we demonstrate that mitochondrial lactate metabolism to pyruvate mediated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in a human astrocytic cell line is involved in antioxidative defense. The pooling of this α-ketoacid helps to detoxify reactive oxygen species, with the concomitant formation of acetate. In-gel activity assays following blue native PAGE electrophoresis were utilized to demonstrate the increase in mitochondrial LDH activity coupled to the decrease in pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in the cells challenged by oxidative stress. The enhanced production of pyruvate with the concomitant formation of acetate in astrocytoma cells was monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography. The ability of pyruvate to fend off oxidative stress was visualized by fluorescence microscopy with the aid of the dye 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Immunoblotting helped confirm the presence of elevated levels of LDH in cells exposed to oxidative stress, and recovery experiments were performed with pyruvate to diminish the oxidative burden on the astrocytoma. The acetate, generated as a consequence of the antioxidative attribute of pyruvate, was subsequently channeled toward the production of lipids, a process facilitated by the upregulation in activity of acetyl-CoA synthetase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase, as demonstrated by in-gel activity assays. The mitochondrial lactate metabolism mediated by LDH appears to play an important role in antioxidative defence in this astrocytic system.

  3. Pyruvate anions neutralize peritoneal dialysate cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mahiout, A; Brunkhorst, R

    1995-01-01

    A new peritoneal dialysate containing pyruvate anions was developed in order to avoid cytotoxic effect of conventional lactate-based dialysate. The dialysate has a final pH of 5.4 to 5.6 and is composed of 1.36-3.86% glucose-monohydrate; 132 mmol/l sodium; 1.75 mmol/l calcium; 0.75 mmol/l magnesium; 102 mmol/l chloride and 35 mmol/l pyruvate. For cytotoxicity testing peritoneal macrophages, and mesothelial cells (MC) were exposed to conventional lactate dialysate, and pyruvate dialysate. We investigated the O2- generation and cytokine synthesis after endotoxin stimulation in peritoneal macrophages and the proliferation of mesothelial cells of cultured human MC. After exposure to lactate dialysate O2- generation and cytokine synthesis in peritoneal macrophages and proliferation of mesothelial cells were inhibited when compared to solution containing pyruvate and the control solution. After preincubation with 3.86% glucose containing solutions, all negative effects became even more pronounced in the lactate group whereas after pre-exposure to pyruvate containing solution the toxic effects were absent. These results suggest that the acute toxic effects of commercially available peritoneal dialysates can be avoided by the use of sodium pyruvate instead of sodium lactate.

  4. Metabolic profile in right lobe living donor hepatectomy: Comparison of lactated Ringer's solution and normal saline versus acetate based balanced salt solution – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Lakshmi; Seetharaman, Murukesh; Rajmohan, Nisha; Ramamurthi, Pavithra; Rajan, Sunil; Varghese, Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Lactate levels predict outcomes after hepatectomy. We compared metabolic effects of lactated versus lactate free solutions in living donor hepatectomy. Methods: Consecutive right lobe donors (n = 53) were alternatively allotted to lactated Ringer's solution and normal saline (Group L-control) or acetated crystalloid (Sterofundin B Braun® Group S -study group) in an observational prospective randomised study. The primary outcome measure was lactate level, and secondary outcomes were base excess, bicarbonate, glucose and chloride intra- and post-operatively. Mann–Whitney and Chi-square tests were used for analysis. Results: The intraoperative, post-operative lactate levels and the time for normalisation were comparable. Group L had significantly lower intraoperative bicarbonate levels (mmol/L) at 6 and 8 h (20.0 ± 2.14 vs. 21.3 ± 1.6, P = 0.0471; 18.68 ± 2.04 vs. 20.39 ± 17, P = 0.002), base excess at 4 and 6 h (mmol/L) (−3.64 ± 2.73 vs. −3.0 ± 1.52, P = 0.031; −6.64 ± 2.76 vs. −4.35 ± 1.7 P = 0.006). The intraoperative chloride levels (mmol/L) were higher in group L at 4 and 8 h (108 ± 5.9 vs. 105.99 ± 2.76, P = 0.0471; 109.51 ± 3.86 vs. 106.93 ± 3.09, P = 0.002). Intraoperative glucose (mg/dL) at 6 h was higher in group L, 160.55 ± 31.52 vs. 145.5 ± 24.29, P = 0.043. The highest post-operative chloride (mmol/L) was higher in Group L (112.3 ± 3.86 vs. 109.81 ± 3.72, P = 0.034). Post-operative base excess and bicarbonate showed an improved profile in Group S (−7.37 ± 2.99 vs. −5.06 ± 1.71 P = 0.001 and 17.79 ± 2.23 vs. 19.68 ± 1.51 P = 0.005). Conclusion: Acetated fluids were associated with higher levels of bicarbonate, lesser base deficit, glucose and chloride but no difference in lactate levels in comparison with Ringer's lactate and normal saline in living donor hepatectomy. PMID:27761034

  5. A defect in pyruvate decarboxylase in a child with an intermittent movement disorder

    PubMed Central

    Blass, John P.; Avigan, Joel; Uhlendorf, B. William

    1970-01-01

    A patient with an intermittent movement disorder has been found to have an inherited defect in pyruvate decarboxylase ((2-oxo-acid carboxy-lyase, E.C. 4.1.1.1.). The patient is a 9 yr old boy who since infancy has had repeated episodes of a combined cerebellar and choreoathetoid movement disorder. He has an elevated level of pyruvic acid in his blood, an elevated urinary alanine content, and less marked elevations in blood alanine and lactate. Methods were developed to study his metabolic abnormality in dilute suspensions of white blood cells and cultured skin fibroblasts, as well as in cell-free sonicates of fibroblasts. Oxidation of pyruvic acid-1-14C and pyruvic acid-2-14C by his cells and pyruvate decarboxylase activity in sonicates of his cells were less than 20% of those in cells from control subjects. Oxidation of glutamic acid-U-14C, acetate-1-14C, and palmitate-1-14C was normal, as was incorporation of alanine-U-14C into protein. The rate of oxidation of pyruvic acid by the father's cells and the activity of pyruvate decarboxylase in the father's sonicated fibroblasts were intermediate between those of the patient and those of controls. Values for the mother were at or just below the lower limits of the ranges in controls. Kinetic data suggested the posibility of several forms of pyruvate decarboxylase in this family. Possible mechanisms relating the chemical abnormality and the clinical symptoms in this patient are discussed. PMID:4313434

  6. Effects of potassium lactate, sodium chloride, sodium tripolyphosphate, and sodium acetate on colour, colour stability, and oxidative properties of injection-enhanced beef rib steaks.

    PubMed

    Knock, R C; Seyfert, M; Hunt, M C; Dikeman, M E; Mancini, R A; Unruh, J A; Higgins, J J; Monderen, R A

    2006-10-01

    This study determined the effects of potassium lactate (KL), sodium chloride, sodium tripolyphosphate, and sodium acetate on colour, colour stability, and oxidative properties of injection-enhanced beef rib steaks. Enhancement solutions (8.5% pump) contained combinations of KL (0% or 1.5%), sodium chloride (0.3% or 0.6%), sodium tripolyphosphate (0% or 0.3%), and sodium acetate (0% or 0.1%). Steaks were packaged in a high-oxygen modified atmosphere (80% O(2)/20% CO(2)). Steaks with KL or KL and sodium acetate were darker but more colour stable (P<0.05) than control steaks. Steaks had less glossy surfaces when they contained acetate (P<0.05) and KL (P<0.11). Increasing sodium chloride content resulted in darker, less colour-stable steaks (P<0.05). Removing phosphate had little impact on colour (P>0.05). Both KL and sodium acetate improved visual appearance of injection-enhanced beef rib steaks, whereas the greater salt level were detrimental.

  7. A Thermodynamic Model for Acetate, Lactate, and Oxalate Complexation with Am(III), Th(IV), Np(V), and U(VI) Valid to High Ionic Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Bynaum, R.V.; Free, S.J.; Moore, R.C.

    1999-01-15

    The organic ligands acetate, lactate, oxalate and EDTA have been identified as components of wastes targeted for disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) located in Southeastern New Mexico. The presence of these ligands is of concern because complexation of the actinides with the ligands may increase dissolved actinide concentrations and impact chemical retardation during transport. The current work considers the complexation of Am(III), Th (IV), Np(V), and U(W) with two of the organic ligands, acetate and lactate, in NaCl media from dilute through high concentration. A thermodynamic model for actinide complexation with the organic ligands has been developed based on the Pitzer activity coefficient formalism and the Harvie-Moller-Weare, Felmy-Weare database for describing brine evaporite systems. The model was parameterized using first apparent stability constant data from the literature. Because of complexation of other metal ions (Fe, Mg, Ni, Pb, etc.) present in the WIPP disposal room with the organic ligands, preliminary results from model calculations indicate the organic ligands do not significantly increase dissolved actinide concentrations.

  8. Products of Leishmania braziliensis glucose catabolism: release of D-lactate and, under anaerobic conditions, glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, T.N.; Davis, D.G.; London, R.E.; Blum, J.J.

    1987-10-01

    Leishmania braziliensis panamensis promastigotes were incubated with glucose as the sole carbon source. About one-fifth of the glucose consumed under aerobic conditions was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies with (1-/sup 13/C)glucose showed that the other products released were succinate, acetate, alanine, pyruvate, and lactate. Under anaerobic conditions, lactate output increased, glycerol became a major product, and, surprisingly, glucose consumption decreased. Enzymatic assays showed that the lactate formed was D(-)-lactate. The release of alanine during incubation with glucose as the sole carbon source suggested that appreciable proteolysis occurred, consistent with our observation that a large amount of ammonia was released under these conditions. The discoveries that D-lactate is a product of L. braziliensis glucose catabolism, that glycerol is produced under anaerobic conditions, and that the cells exhibit a reverse Pasteur effect open the way for detailed studies of the pathways of glucose metabolism and their regulation in this organism.

  9. Functional response of the isolated, perfused normoxic heart to pyruvate dehydrogenase activation by dichloroacetate and pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Jaimes, Rafael; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Brooks, Daina M.; Swift, Luther M.; Posnack, Nikki G.; Kay, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) and pyruvate activate pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a key enzyme that modulates glucose oxidation and mitochondrial NADH production. Both compounds improve recovery after ischemia in isolated hearts. However, the action of DCA and pyruvate in normoxic myocardium is incompletely understood. We measured the effect of DCA and pyruvate on contraction, mitochondrial redox state, and intracellular calcium cycling in isolated rat hearts during normoxic perfusion. Normalized epicardial NADH fluorescence (nNADH) and left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) were measured before and after administering DCA (5 mM) or pyruvate (5 mM). Optical mapping of Rhod-2AM was used to measure cytosolic calcium kinetics. DCA maximally activated PDH, increasing the ratio of active to total PDH from 0.48±0.03 to 1.03 ±0.03. Pyruvate sub-maximally activated PDH to a ratio of 0.75±0.02. DCA and pyruvate increased LVDP. When glucose was the only exogenous fuel, pyruvate increased nNADH by 21.4±2.9 % while DCA reduced nNADH by 21.4±6.1 % and elevated the incidence of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). When lactate, pyruvate, and glucose were provided together as exogenous fuels, nNADH increased with DCA, indicating that PDH activation with glucose as the only exogenous fuel depletes PDH substrate. Calcium transient time-to-peak was shortened by DCA and pyruvate and SR calcium re-uptake was 30 % longer. DCA and pyruvate increased SR calcium load in myocyte monolayers. Overall, during normoxia when glucose is the only exogenous fuel, DCA elevates SR calcium, increases LVDP and contractility, and diminishes mitochondrial NADH. Administering DCA with plasma levels of lactate and pyruvate mitigates the drop in mitochondrial NADH and prevents PVCs. PMID:26142699

  10. Pyruvate and Malate Transport and Oxidation in Corn Mitochondria 1

    PubMed Central

    Day, David A.; Hanson, John B.

    1977-01-01

    Pyruvate oxidation and swelling in pyruvate solutions by corn (Zea mays) mitochondria were inhibited by α-cyano-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid, an inhibitor of pyruvate transport in animal mitochondria; however, there was no inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity, and malate and NADH oxidation were not affected. These results suggest the presence of a pyruvate−-OH− exchange transporter which supplies the mitochondrion with oxidizable substrate. Lactate appears to be transported also, but not dicarboxylate anions or inorganic phosphate. The rate of pyruvate transport was much slower than that of malate, however, and valinomycin was required to elicit appreciable swelling in potassium pyruvate. Malate oxidation contributed significantly to respiration supported by pyruvate plus malate, and malate did not act solely as a “sparker” for pyruvate oxidation. NAD+-malic enzyme activity was found in sonicated preparations, and comparison of O2 consumption with CO2 released from 1-14C-pyruvate indicated that transported malate was being converted to pyruvate, particularly as the malate to pyruvate ratio increased. The results suggest that pyruvate transport becomes limiting under conditions of high energy demand, but that rapid malate transport makes up the difference, supplying pyruvate via malic enzyme and replenishing losses of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. PMID:16659908

  11. The Key to Acetate: Metabolic Fluxes of Acetic Acid Bacteria under Cocoa Pulp Fermentation-Simulating Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Philipp; Frey, Lasse Jannis; Berger, Antje; Bolten, Christoph Josef; Hansen, Carl Erik

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play an important role during cocoa fermentation, as their main product, acetate, is a major driver for the development of the desired cocoa flavors. Here, we investigated the specialized metabolism of these bacteria under cocoa pulp fermentation-simulating conditions. A carefully designed combination of parallel 13C isotope labeling experiments allowed the elucidation of intracellular fluxes in the complex environment of cocoa pulp, when lactate and ethanol were included as primary substrates among undefined ingredients. We demonstrate that AAB exhibit a functionally separated metabolism during coconsumption of two-carbon and three-carbon substrates. Acetate is almost exclusively derived from ethanol, while lactate serves for the formation of acetoin and biomass building blocks. Although this is suboptimal for cellular energetics, this allows maximized growth and conversion rates. The functional separation results from a lack of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzymes, typically present in bacteria to interconnect metabolism. In fact, gluconeogenesis is driven by pyruvate phosphate dikinase. Consequently, a balanced ratio of lactate and ethanol is important for the optimum performance of AAB. As lactate and ethanol are individually supplied by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts during the initial phase of cocoa fermentation, respectively, this underlines the importance of a well-balanced microbial consortium for a successful fermentation process. Indeed, AAB performed the best and produced the largest amounts of acetate in mixed culture experiments when lactic acid bacteria and yeasts were both present. PMID:24837393

  12. Oral administration of cobalt acetate alters milk fatty acid composition, consistent with an inhibition of stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase in lactating ewes.

    PubMed

    Frutos, P; Toral, P G; Ramos-Morales, E; Shingfield, K J; Belenguer, A; Hervás, G

    2014-02-01

    Previous investigations have shown that cobalt (Co) modifies milk fat composition in cattle, consistent with an inhibition of stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD) activity, but it remains unclear whether other ruminant species are also affected. The present study examined the effects of oral administration of Co acetate on intake, rumen function, and milk production and fatty acid (FA) composition in sheep. Twenty lactating Assaf ewes were allocated into 1 of 4 groups and used in a continuous randomized block design that involved a 15-d adaptation, a 6-d treatment, and a 10-d posttreatment period. During the treatment period, animals received an oral drench supplying 0 (control), 3 (Co3), 6 (Co6), and 9 (Co9) mg of Co/kg of BW per day, administered in 3 equal doses at 8-h intervals. Cobalt acetate had no influence on intake or milk fat and protein concentrations, whereas treatments Co6 and Co9 tended to lower milk yield. Results on rumen parameters showed no effects on rumen fermentation, FA composition, or bacterial community structure. Administration of Co acetate decreased milk concentrations of FA containing a cis-9 double bond and SCD product:substrate ratios, consistent with an inhibition of SCD activity in the ovine mammary gland. Temporal changes in milk fat composition indicated that the effects of treatments were evident within 3d of dosing, with further changes being apparent after 6d and reverting to pretreatment values by d 6 after administration. Effect on milk FA composition did not differ substantially in response to incremental doses of Co acetate. On average, Co decreased milk cis-9 10:1/10:0, cis-9 12:1/12:0, cis-9 14:1/14:0, cis-9 16:1/16:0, cis-9 17:1/17:0, cis-9 18:1/18:0, and cis-9,trans-11 18:2/trans-11 18:1 concentration ratios by 30, 32, 38, 33, 21, 24, and 25%, respectively. Changes in milk fat cis-9 10:1, cis-9 12:1, and cis-9 14:1 concentrations to Co treatment indicated that 51% of cis-9 18:1 and cis-9,trans-11 18:2 secreted in milk

  13. Effects of Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 supplementation on body weight, fecal pH, acetate, lactate, calprotectin, and IgA in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Ruchika; Koebnick, Corinna; Schildt, Janko; Mueller, Manfred; Radke, Michael; Blaut, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Preterm infants are prone to abnormal bacterial colonization of the intestine with ensuing adverse health effects. To examine whether the oral application of Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (probiotic) may improve selected indicators of health status in preterm infants, a double blind, placebo controlled randomized clinical study was performed on 69 preterm infants (<37 gestation wk). Weight gain was defined as the primary outcome measure. In antibiotic-treated infants, probiotic supplementation resulted in a higher body weight compared with placebo (p < 0.001). In the probiotic group, the fecal pH was significantly lower than in the placebo group. The fecal concentrations of acetate and lactate were 42 and 38% higher, respectively, in the probiotic group than in the placebo group. Fecal calprotectin was lower in the probiotic group (p = 0.041), while fecal IgA was higher in this group compared with the placebo group (p = 0.021). PMID:18552710

  14. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 nifJ mutant lacking pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    McNeely, Kelsey; Xu, Yu; Ananyev, Gennady; Bennette, Nicholas; Bryant, Donald A; Dismukes, G Charles

    2011-04-01

    The nifJ gene codes for pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), which reduces ferredoxin during fermentative catabolism of pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). A nifJ knockout mutant was constructed that lacks one of two pathways for the oxidation of pyruvate in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. Remarkably, the photoautotrophic growth rate of this mutant increased by 20% relative to the wild-type (WT) rate under conditions of light-dark cycling. This result is attributed to an increase in the quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) charge separation as measured by photosynthetic electron turnover efficiency determined using fast-repetition-rate fluorometry (F(v)/F(m)). During autofermentation, the excretion of acetate and lactate products by nifJ mutant cells decreased 2-fold and 1.2-fold, respectively. Although nifJ cells displayed higher in vitro hydrogenase activity than WT cells, H(2) production in vivo was 1.3-fold lower than the WT level. Inhibition of acetate-CoA ligase and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by glycerol eliminated acetate production, with a resulting loss of reductant and a 3-fold decrease in H(2) production by nifJ cells compared to WT cells. Continuous electrochemical detection of dissolved H(2) revealed two temporally resolved phases of H(2) production during autofermentation, a minor first phase and a major second phase. The first phase was attributed to reduction of ferredoxin, because its level decreased 2-fold in nifJ cells. The second phase was attributed to glycolytic NADH production and decreased 20% in nifJ cells. Measurement of the intracellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio revealed that the reductant generated by PFOR contributing to the first phase of H(2) production was not in equilibrium with bulk NADH/NAD(+) and that the second phase corresponded to the equilibrium NADH-mediated process. PMID:21317262

  15. Production of pyruvate from mannitol by mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shiori; Tanaka, Hideki; Hirayama, Makoto; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Mannitol is contained in brown macroalgae up to 33% (w/w, dry weight), and thus is a promising carbon source for white biotechnology. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a key cell factory, is generally regarded to be unable to assimilate mannitol for growth. We have recently succeeded in producing S. cerevisiae that can assimilate mannitol through spontaneous mutations of Tup1-Cyc8, each of which constitutes a general corepressor complex. In this study, we demonstrate production of pyruvate from mannitol using this mannitol-assimilating S. cerevisiae through deletions of all 3 pyruvate decarboxylase genes. The resultant mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative strain produced 0.86 g/L pyruvate without use of acetate after cultivation for 4 days, with an overall yield of 0.77 g of pyruvate per g of mannitol (the theoretical yield was 79%). Although acetate was not needed for growth of this strain in mannitol-containing medium, addition of acetate had a significant beneficial effect on production of pyruvate. This is the first report of production of a valuable compound (other than ethanol) from mannitol using S. cerevisiae, and is an initial platform from which the productivity of pyruvate from mannitol can be improved. PMID:26588105

  16. Production of pyruvate from mannitol by mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shiori; Tanaka, Hideki; Hirayama, Makoto; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Mannitol is contained in brown macroalgae up to 33% (w/w, dry weight), and thus is a promising carbon source for white biotechnology. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a key cell factory, is generally regarded to be unable to assimilate mannitol for growth. We have recently succeeded in producing S. cerevisiae that can assimilate mannitol through spontaneous mutations of Tup1-Cyc8, each of which constitutes a general corepressor complex. In this study, we demonstrate production of pyruvate from mannitol using this mannitol-assimilating S. cerevisiae through deletions of all 3 pyruvate decarboxylase genes. The resultant mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative strain produced 0.86 g/L pyruvate without use of acetate after cultivation for 4 days, with an overall yield of 0.77 g of pyruvate per g of mannitol (the theoretical yield was 79%). Although acetate was not needed for growth of this strain in mannitol-containing medium, addition of acetate had a significant beneficial effect on production of pyruvate. This is the first report of production of a valuable compound (other than ethanol) from mannitol using S. cerevisiae, and is an initial platform from which the productivity of pyruvate from mannitol can be improved.

  17. Highly efficient L-lactate production using engineered Escherichia coli with dissimilar temperature optima for L-lactate formation and cell growth

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    L-Lactic acid, one of the most important chiral molecules and organic acids, is produced via pyruvate from carbohydrates in diverse microorganisms catalyzed by an NAD+-dependent L-lactate dehydrogenase. Naturally, Escherichia coli does not produce L-lactate in noticeable amounts, but can catabolize it via a dehydrogenation reaction mediated by an FMN-dependent L-lactate dehydrogenase. In aims to make the E. coli strain to produce L-lactate, three L-lactate dehydrogenase genes from different bacteria were cloned and expressed. The L-lactate producing strains, 090B1 (B0013-070, ΔldhA::diflldD::Pldh-ldhLca), 090B2 (B0013-070, ΔldhA::diflldD::Pldh-ldhStrb) and 090B3 (B0013-070, ΔldhA::diflldD::Pldh-ldhBcoa) were developed from a previously developed D-lactate over-producing strain, E. coli strain B0013-070 (ack-ptappspflBdldpoxBadhEfrdA) by: (1) deleting ldhA to block D-lactate formation, (2) deleting lldD to block the conversion of L-lactate to pyruvate, and (3) expressing an L-lactate dehydrogenase (L-LDH) to convert pyruvate to L-lactate under the control of the ldhA promoter. Fermentation tests were carried out in a shaking flask and in a 25-l bioreactor. Strains 090B1, 090B2 or 090B3 were shown to metabolize glucose to L-lactate instead of D-lactate. However, L-lactate yield and cell growth rates were significantly different among the metabolically engineered strains which can be attributed to a variation between temperature optimum for cell growth and temperature optimum for enzymatic activity of individual L-LDH. In a temperature-shifting fermentation process (cells grown at 37°C and L-lactate formed at 42°C), E. coli 090B3 was able to produce 142.2 g/l of L-lactate with no more than 1.2 g/l of by-products (mainly acetate, pyruvate and succinate) accumulated. In conclusion, the production of lactate by E. coli is limited by the competition relationship between cell growth and lactate synthesis. Enzymatic properties, especially the thermodynamics of an L

  18. Involvement of pyruvate dehydrogenase in product formation in pyruvate-limited anaerobic chemostat cultures of Enterococcus faecalis NCTC 775.

    PubMed

    Snoep, J L; Teixeira de Mattos, M J; Postma, P W; Neijssel, O M

    1990-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis NCTC 775 was grown anaerobically in chemostat culture with pyruvate as the energy source. At low culture pH values, high in vivo and in vitro activities were found for both pyruvate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase. At high culture pH values the carbon flux was shifted towards pyruvate formate lyase. Some mechanisms possibly involved in this metabolic switch are discussed. In particular attention is paid to the NADH/NAD ratio (redox potential) and the fructose-1,6-bisphosphate-dependent lactate dehydrogenase activity as possible regulatory factors.

  19. L-lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Spencer, T L; Lehninger, A L

    1976-02-15

    Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells were investigated with regard to their stability to transport L-lactate by measuring either the distribution of [14C]lactate or concomitant H+ ion movements. The movement of lactate was dependent on the pH difference across the cell membrane and was electroneutral, as evidenced by an observed 1:1 antiport for OH- ions or 1:1 symport with H+ ions. 2. Kinetic experiments showed that lactate transport was saturable, with an apparent Km of approx. 4.68 mM and a Vmax. as high as 680 nmol/min per mg of protein at pH 6.2 and 37 degrees C. 3. Lactate transport exhibited a high temperature dependence (activation energy = 139 kJ/mol). 4. Lactate transport was inhibited competitively by (a) a variety of other substituted monocarboxylic acids (e.g. pyruvate, Ki = 6.3 mM), which were themselves transported, (b) the non-transportable analogues alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 0.5 mM), alpha-cyano-3-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 2mM) and DL-p-hydroxyphenyl-lactate (Ki = 3.6 mM) and (c) the thiol-group reagent mersalyl (Ki = 125 muM). 5. Transport of simple monocarboxylic acids, including acetate and propionate, was insensitive to these inhibitors; they presumably cross the membrane by means of a different mechanism. 6. Experiments using saturating amounts of mersalyl as an "inhibitor stop" allowed measurements of the initial rates of net influx and of net efflux of [14C]lactate. Influx and efflux of lactate were judged to be symmetrical reactions in that they exhibited similar concentration dependence. 7. It is concluded that lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells is mediated by a carrier capable of transporting a number of other substituted monocarboxylic acids, but not unsubstituted short-chain aliphatic acids.

  20. L-lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, T L; Lehninger, A L

    1976-01-01

    Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells were investigated with regard to their stability to transport L-lactate by measuring either the distribution of [14C]lactate or concomitant H+ ion movements. The movement of lactate was dependent on the pH difference across the cell membrane and was electroneutral, as evidenced by an observed 1:1 antiport for OH- ions or 1:1 symport with H+ ions. 2. Kinetic experiments showed that lactate transport was saturable, with an apparent Km of approx. 4.68 mM and a Vmax. as high as 680 nmol/min per mg of protein at pH 6.2 and 37 degrees C. 3. Lactate transport exhibited a high temperature dependence (activation energy = 139 kJ/mol). 4. Lactate transport was inhibited competitively by (a) a variety of other substituted monocarboxylic acids (e.g. pyruvate, Ki = 6.3 mM), which were themselves transported, (b) the non-transportable analogues alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 0.5 mM), alpha-cyano-3-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 2mM) and DL-p-hydroxyphenyl-lactate (Ki = 3.6 mM) and (c) the thiol-group reagent mersalyl (Ki = 125 muM). 5. Transport of simple monocarboxylic acids, including acetate and propionate, was insensitive to these inhibitors; they presumably cross the membrane by means of a different mechanism. 6. Experiments using saturating amounts of mersalyl as an "inhibitor stop" allowed measurements of the initial rates of net influx and of net efflux of [14C]lactate. Influx and efflux of lactate were judged to be symmetrical reactions in that they exhibited similar concentration dependence. 7. It is concluded that lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells is mediated by a carrier capable of transporting a number of other substituted monocarboxylic acids, but not unsubstituted short-chain aliphatic acids. PMID:7237

  1. Mitochondrial pyruvate transport: a historical perspective and future research directions

    PubMed Central

    McCommis, Kyle S.; Finck, Brian N.

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate is the end-product of glycolysis, a major substrate for oxidative metabolism, and a branching point for glucose, lactate, fatty acid and amino acid synthesis. The mitochondrial enzymes that metabolize pyruvate are physically separated from cytosolic pyruvate pools and rely on a membrane transport system to shuttle pyruvate across the impermeable inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). Despite long-standing acceptance that transport of pyruvate into the mitochondrial matrix by a carrier-mediated process is required for the bulk of its metabolism, it has taken almost 40 years to determine the molecular identity of an IMM pyruvate carrier. Our current understanding is that two proteins, mitochondrial pyruvate carriers MPC1 and MPC2, form a hetero-oligomeric complex in the IMM to facilitate pyruvate transport. This step is required for mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation and carboxylation – critical reactions in intermediary metabolism that are dysregulated in several common diseases. The identification of these transporter constituents opens the door to the identification of novel compounds that modulate MPC activity, with potential utility for treating diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and other common causes of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of the present review is to detail the historical, current and future research investigations concerning mitochondrial pyruvate transport, and discuss the possible consequences of altered pyruvate transport in various metabolic tissues. PMID:25748677

  2. /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ ratios method for detecting pyruvate carboxylation

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, J.K.; Bryan, B.M. III

    1985-11-15

    The pattern of oxidative metabolism of pyruvate may be assessed by comparing the steady-state /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from four isotopes in identical samples. The assay requires measuring the ratios of steady-state /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from two isotope pairs, (2-/sup 14/C)pyruvate:(3-/sup 14/C)pyruvate and (1-/sup 14/C)acetate:(2-/sup 14/C)acetate. These ratios are defined as the ''pyruvate /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ ratio'' and the ''acetate /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ ratio,'' respectively. If pyruvate is metabolized exclusively via pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), the two ratios will be identical. Alternatively, if any pyruvate enters the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle via pyruvate carboxylation (PC), the pyruvate /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ ratio will be less than the acetate /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ ratio. If pyruvate enters the TCA cycle only through PC (with oxaloacetate and fumarate in equilibrium) the pyruvate /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ ratio will approach a value of 1.0. An equation is presented for the quantitative evaluation of pyruvate oxidation by these two pathways. We have used this method to detect relative changes in the pattern of pyruvate metabolism in rat liver mitochondria produced by exposure to 1 mM octanoyl carnitine, a compound known to alter the PC:PDH activity ratio. The major advantages of the method are (i) that it provides a sensitive method for detecting pyruvate carboxylation at physiological pyruvate concentrations and (ii) that it provides a method for distinguishing between effects on pyruvate transport and effects on pyruvate oxidation.

  3. Metabolic analysis of Escherichia coli in the presence and absence of the carboxylating enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Gokarn, R.R.; Eiteman, M.A.; Altman, E.

    2000-05-01

    Fermentation patterns of Escherichia coli with and without the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC) and pyruvate carboxylase (PYC) enzymes were compared under anaerobic conditions with glucose as a carbon source. Time profiles of glucose and fermentation product concentrations were determined and used to calculate metabolic fluxes through central carbon pathways during exponential cell growth. The presence of the Rhizobium etli pyc gene in E. coli (JCL1242/pTrc99A-pyc) restored the succinate producing ability of E. coli ppc null mutants (JCL1242), with PYC competing favorably with both pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase. Succinate formation was slightly greater by JCL1242/pTrc99a-pyc than by cells which overproduced PPC(JCL1242/pPC201, ppc{sup +}), even though PPC activity in cell extracts of JCL1242/pPC201 (ppc{sup +}) was 40-fold greater than PYC activity in extracts of JCL1242/pTrc99a-pyc. Flux calculations indicate that during anaerobic metabolism the pyc{sup +} strain had a 34% greater specific glucose consumption rate, a 37% greater specific rate of ATP formation, and a 6% greater specific growth rate compared to the ppc{sup +} strain. In light of the important position of pyruvate at the juncture of NADH-generating pathways and NADH-dissimilating branches, the results show that when PPC or PYC is expressed, the metabolic network adapts by altering the flux to lactate and the molar ratio of ethanol to acetate formation.

  4. Transport of pyruvate into mitochondria is involved in methylmercury toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Yong; Ishida, Yosuke; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Naganuma, Akira; Hwang, Gi-Wook

    2016-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the overexpression of enzymes involved in the production of pyruvate, enolase 2 (Eno2) and D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld3) renders yeast highly sensitive to methylmercury and that the promotion of intracellular pyruvate synthesis may be involved in intensifying the toxicity of methylmercury. In the present study, we showed that the addition of pyruvate to culture media in non-toxic concentrations significantly enhanced the sensitivity of yeast and human neuroblastoma cells to methylmercury. The results also suggested that methylmercury promoted the transport of pyruvate into mitochondria and that the increased pyruvate concentrations in mitochondria were involved in intensifying the toxicity of methylmercury without pyruvate being converted to acetyl-CoA. Furthermore, in human neuroblastoma cells, methylmercury treatment alone decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the addition of pyruvate led to a further significant decrease. In addition, treatment with N-acetylcysteine (an antioxidant) significantly alleviated the toxicity of methylmercury and significantly inhibited the intensification of methylmercury toxicity by pyruvate. Based on these data, we hypothesize that methylmercury exerts its toxicity by raising the level of pyruvate in mitochondria and that mitochondrial dysfunction and increased levels of reactive oxygen species are involved in the action of pyruvate. PMID:26899208

  5. Phosphorylation site on yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlinger, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Yeast cells were disrupted in a Manton-Gaulin laboratory homogenizer. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified by fractionation with polyethylene glycol, isoelectric precipitation, ultracentrifugation and chromatography on hydroxylapatite. Final purification of the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was achieved by cation-exchange high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). No endogenous pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity was detected during the purification. However, the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was phosphorylated and inactivated with purified pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase from bovine kidney. Tryptic digestion of the /sup 32/P-labeled complex yielded a single phosphopeptide which was purified to homogeniety. The tryptic digest was subjected to chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. Radioactive fractions were pooled, concentrated, and subjected to anion-exchange HPLC. The column was developed with a linear gradient of ammonium acetate. Final purification of the phosphopeptide was achieved by chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column developed with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. The amino acid sequence of the homogeneous peptide was determined by manual modified Edman degradation.

  6. In vivo13C spectroscopy in the rat brain using hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and [2- 13C]pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjańska, Małgorzata; Iltis, Isabelle; Shestov, Alexander A.; Deelchand, Dinesh K.; Nelson, Christopher; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2010-10-01

    The low sensitivity of 13C spectroscopy can be enhanced using dynamic nuclear polarization. Detection of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and its metabolic products has been reported in kidney, liver, and muscle. In this work, the feasibility of measuring 13C signals of hyperpolarized 13C metabolic products in the rat brain in vivo following the injection of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and [2- 13C]pyruvate is investigated. Injection of [2- 13C]pyruvate led to the detection of [2- 13C]lactate, but no other downstream metabolites such as TCA cycle intermediates were detected. Injection of [1- 13C]pyruvate enabled the detection of both [1- 13C]lactate and [ 13C]bicarbonate. A metabolic model was used to fit the hyperpolarized 13C time courses obtained during infusion of [1- 13C]pyruvate and to determine the values of VPDH and VLDH.

  7. Microbiosensor for the detection of acetate in electrode-respiring biofilms.

    PubMed

    Atci, Erhan; Babauta, Jerome T; Sultana, Sujala T; Beyenal, Haluk

    2016-07-15

    The goal of this work was to develop a microbiosensor to measure acetate concentration profiles inside biofilms in situ. The working principle of the microbiosensor was based on the correlation between the acetate concentration and the current generated during acetate oxidation by Geobacter sulfurreducens. The microbiosensor consisted of a 30-µm carbon microelectrode with an open tip as a working electrode, with G. sulfurreducens biofilm on the tip and a pseudo Ag/AgCl reference electrode, all enclosed in a glass outer case with a 30-µm tip diameter. The microbiosensor showed a linear response in the 0-1.6mM acetate concentration range with a 79±8µM limit of detection (S/N=2). We quantified the stirring effect and found it negligible. However, the interfering effect of alternative electron donors (lactate, formate, pyruvate, or hydrogen) was found to be significant. The usefulness of the acetate microbiosensor was demonstrated by measuring acetate concentration depth profiles within a G. sulfurreducens biofilm. The acetate concentration remained at bulk values throughout the biofilm when no current was passed, but it decreased from the bulk values to below the detection limit within 200µm when current was allowed to pass. The zero acetate concentration at the bottom of the biofilm showed that the biofilm was acetate-limited. PMID:27016913

  8. Reductions in milk Δ9-desaturation ratios to oral dosing of cobalt-acetate are accompanied by the downregulation of SCD1 in lactating ewes.

    PubMed

    Toral, P G; Hervás, G; Frutos, P

    2015-03-01

    Oral administration of cobalt has been proven to alter milk fatty acid (FA) composition consistent with an inhibition of mammary stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD) activity in ruminants, but the mechanisms explaining its mode of action remain uncertain. In this study, Co (as Co-acetate) was dosed to lactating ewes with the aims of examining mammary gene expression during Co-induced changes in milk FA composition, and estimating the endogenous synthesis of SCD products in milk of sheep fed an 18:3n-3-enriched diet. Twelve Assaf ewes fed a diet supplemented with 2% linseed oil were allocated to 2 experimental groups and received an oral drench supplying either 0 (control) or 9 mg of Co/kg of body weight per day. Treatments were administered in 3 equal doses at 8-h intervals for 6 d. No effects of Co administration on animal performance were observed. The changes in milk FA (namely, reductions in most cis-9-containing FA) were consistent with an inhibition of SCD in the absence of detectable effects on the relative importance of mammary de novo synthesis and FA uptake. The high proportion of endogenous cis-9 trans-11 18:2 observed in this study (89%) would agree with a greater supply of trans-11 18:1 of ruminal origin in ewes fed linseed oil, compared with previous estimates in sheep fed a diet without lipid supplementation. Differences between studies could also be related to diet-induced changes in SCD activity. Altogether, both mechanisms would support that basal diet composition is a major determinant of the relative contribution of Δ9-desaturation to milk FA profile. Similarly, the consumption of a diet rich in 18:3n-3 might also explain the low proportion of milk cis-9 18:1 estimated to derive from Δ9-desaturation (29%). The administration of Co to ewes fed linseed oil allowed to discriminate minor 18:3 isomers in milk, such as cis-9 trans-12 cis-15 18:3, as SCD products. Finally, Co dosing lowered the mRNA abundance of SCD1 in the mammary secretory tissue

  9. Reductions in milk Δ9-desaturation ratios to oral dosing of cobalt-acetate are accompanied by the downregulation of SCD1 in lactating ewes.

    PubMed

    Toral, P G; Hervás, G; Frutos, P

    2015-03-01

    Oral administration of cobalt has been proven to alter milk fatty acid (FA) composition consistent with an inhibition of mammary stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD) activity in ruminants, but the mechanisms explaining its mode of action remain uncertain. In this study, Co (as Co-acetate) was dosed to lactating ewes with the aims of examining mammary gene expression during Co-induced changes in milk FA composition, and estimating the endogenous synthesis of SCD products in milk of sheep fed an 18:3n-3-enriched diet. Twelve Assaf ewes fed a diet supplemented with 2% linseed oil were allocated to 2 experimental groups and received an oral drench supplying either 0 (control) or 9 mg of Co/kg of body weight per day. Treatments were administered in 3 equal doses at 8-h intervals for 6 d. No effects of Co administration on animal performance were observed. The changes in milk FA (namely, reductions in most cis-9-containing FA) were consistent with an inhibition of SCD in the absence of detectable effects on the relative importance of mammary de novo synthesis and FA uptake. The high proportion of endogenous cis-9 trans-11 18:2 observed in this study (89%) would agree with a greater supply of trans-11 18:1 of ruminal origin in ewes fed linseed oil, compared with previous estimates in sheep fed a diet without lipid supplementation. Differences between studies could also be related to diet-induced changes in SCD activity. Altogether, both mechanisms would support that basal diet composition is a major determinant of the relative contribution of Δ9-desaturation to milk FA profile. Similarly, the consumption of a diet rich in 18:3n-3 might also explain the low proportion of milk cis-9 18:1 estimated to derive from Δ9-desaturation (29%). The administration of Co to ewes fed linseed oil allowed to discriminate minor 18:3 isomers in milk, such as cis-9 trans-12 cis-15 18:3, as SCD products. Finally, Co dosing lowered the mRNA abundance of SCD1 in the mammary secretory tissue

  10. Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Mat-Jan, F.; Alam, K.Y.; Clark, D.P. )

    1989-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative NAD-linked lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) have been isolated. These mutants showed no growth defects under anaerobic conditions unless present together with a defect in pyruvate formate lyase (pfl). Double mutants (pfl ldh) were unable to grow anaerobically on glucose or other sugars even when supplemented with acetate, whereas pfl mutants can do so. The ldh mutation was found to map at 30.5 min on the E. coli chromosome. The ldh mutant FMJ39 showed no detectable lactate dehydrogenase activity and produced no lactic acid from glucose under anaerobic conditions as estimated by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. We also found that in wild-type strains the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase was conjointly induced by anaerobic conditions and an acidic pH. Despite previous findings that phosphate concentrations affect the proportion of lactic acid produced during fermentation, we were unable to find any intrinsic effect of phosphate on lactate dehydrogenase activity, apart from the buffering effect of this ion.

  11. Glucose metabolism in perfused skeletal muscle. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in starvation, diabetes and exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Hagg, S A; Taylor, S I; Ruberman, N B

    1976-01-01

    1. The interconversion of pyruvate dehydrogenase between its inactive phosphorylated and active dephosphorylated forms was studied in skeletal muscle. 2. Exercise, induced by electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve (5/s), increased the measured activity of (active) pyruvate dehydrogenase threefold in intact anaesthetized rated within 2 min. No further increase was seen after 15 min of stimulation. 3. In the perfused rat hindquarter, (active) pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was decreased by 50% in muscle of starved and diabetic rats. Exercise produced a twofold increase in its activity in all groups; however, the relative differences between fed, starved and diabetic groups persisted. 4. Perfusion of muslce with acetoacetate (2 mM) decreased (active) pyruvate dehydrogenase activity by 50% at rest but not during exercise. 5. Whole-tissue concentrations of pyruvate and citrate, inhibitors of (active) pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase and (inactive) pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase respectively, were not altered by excerise. A decrease in the ATP/ADP ratio was observed, but did not appear to be sufficient to account for the increase in (active) pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. 6. The results suggest that interconversion of the phosphorylated and dephosphorylated forms of pyruvate dehydrogenase plays a major role in the regulation of pyruvate oxidation by eomparison of enzyme activity with measurements of lactate oxidation in the perfused hindquarter [see the preceding paper, Berger et al. (1976)] suggest that pyruvate oxidation is also modulated by the concentrations of substrates, cofactors and inhibitors of (active) pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. PMID:825112

  12. Pyruvate ingestion for 7 days does not improve aerobic performance in well-trained individuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, M. A.; Spriet, L. L.; Dyck, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    The purposes of the present studies were to test the hypotheses that lower dosages of oral pyruvate ingestion would increase blood pyruvate concentration and that the ingestion of a commonly recommended dosage of pyruvate (7 g) for 7 days would enhance performance during intense aerobic exercise in well-trained individuals. Nine recreationally active subjects (8 women, 1 man) consumed 7, 15, and 25 g of pyruvate and were monitored for a 4-h period to determine whether blood metabolites were altered. Pyruvate consumption failed to significantly elevate blood pyruvate, and it had no effect on indexes of carbohydrate (blood glucose, lactate) or lipid metabolism (blood glycerol, plasma free fatty acids). As a follow-up, we administered 7 g/day of either placebo or pyruvate, for a 1-wk period to seven, well-trained male cyclists (maximal oxygen consumption, 62.3 +/- 3.0 ml. kg(-1). min(-1)) in a randomized, double-blind, crossover trial. Subjects cycled at 74-80% of their maximal oxygen consumption until exhaustion. There was no difference in performance times between the two trials (placebo, 91 +/- 9 min; pyruvate, 88 +/- 8 min). Measured blood parameters (insulin, peptide C, glucose, lactate, glycerol, free fatty acids) were also unaffected. Our results indicate that oral pyruvate supplementation does not increase blood pyruvate content and does not enhance performance during intense exercise in well-trained cyclists.

  13. A probable dual mode of action for both L- and D-lactate neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Ximena; Rosafio, Katia; Wyss, Matthias T; Drandarov, Konstantin; Buck, Alfred; Pellerin, Luc; Weber, Bruno; Hirt, Lorenz

    2015-01-01

    Lactate has been shown to offer neuroprotection in several pathologic conditions. This beneficial effect has been attributed to its use as an alternative energy substrate. However, recent description of the expression of the HCA1 receptor for lactate in the central nervous system calls for reassessment of the mechanism by which lactate exerts its neuroprotective effects. Here, we show that HCA1 receptor expression is enhanced 24 hours after reperfusion in an middle cerebral artery occlusion stroke model, in the ischemic cortex. Interestingly, intravenous injection of L-lactate at reperfusion led to further enhancement of HCA1 receptor expression in the cortex and striatum. Using an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation model, we show that the HCA1 receptor agonist 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid reduces cell death. We also observed that D-lactate, a reputedly non-metabolizable substrate but partial HCA1 receptor agonist, also provided neuroprotection in both in vitro and in vivo ischemia models. Quite unexpectedly, we show D-lactate to be partly extracted and oxidized by the rodent brain. Finally, pyruvate offered neuroprotection in vitro whereas acetate was ineffective. Our data suggest that L- and D-lactate offer neuroprotection in ischemia most likely by acting as both an HCA1 receptor agonist for non-astrocytic (most likely neuronal) cells as well as an energy substrate. PMID:26036941

  14. Comprehensive review on lactate metabolism in human health.

    PubMed

    Adeva-Andany, M; López-Ojén, M; Funcasta-Calderón, R; Ameneiros-Rodríguez, E; Donapetry-García, C; Vila-Altesor, M; Rodríguez-Seijas, J

    2014-07-01

    Metabolic pathways involved in lactate metabolism are important to understand the physiological response to exercise and the pathogenesis of prevalent diseases such as diabetes and cancer. Monocarboxylate transporters are being investigated as potential targets for diagnosis and therapy of these and other disorders. Glucose and alanine produce pyruvate which is reduced to lactate by lactate dehydrogenase in the cytoplasm without oxygen consumption. Lactate removal takes place via its oxidation to pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase. Pyruvate may be either oxidized to carbon dioxide producing energy or transformed into glucose. Pyruvate oxidation requires oxygen supply and the cooperation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Enzymes of the gluconeogenesis pathway sequentially convert pyruvate into glucose. Congenital or acquired deficiency on gluconeogenesis or pyruvate oxidation, including tissue hypoxia, may induce lactate accumulation. Both obese individuals and patients with diabetes show elevated plasma lactate concentration compared to healthy subjects, but there is no conclusive evidence of hyperlactatemia causing insulin resistance. Available evidence suggests an association between defective mitochondrial oxidative capacity in the pancreatic β-cells and diminished insulin secretion that may trigger the development of diabetes in patients already affected with insulin resistance. Several mutations in the mitochondrial DNA are associated with diabetes mellitus, although the pathogenesis remains unsettled. Mitochondrial DNA mutations have been detected in a number of human cancers. d-lactate is a lactate enantiomer normally formed during glycolysis. Excess d-lactate is generated in diabetes, particularly during diabetic ketoacidosis. d-lactic acidosis is typically associated with small bowel resection. PMID:24929216

  15. Comprehensive review on lactate metabolism in human health.

    PubMed

    Adeva-Andany, M; López-Ojén, M; Funcasta-Calderón, R; Ameneiros-Rodríguez, E; Donapetry-García, C; Vila-Altesor, M; Rodríguez-Seijas, J

    2014-07-01

    Metabolic pathways involved in lactate metabolism are important to understand the physiological response to exercise and the pathogenesis of prevalent diseases such as diabetes and cancer. Monocarboxylate transporters are being investigated as potential targets for diagnosis and therapy of these and other disorders. Glucose and alanine produce pyruvate which is reduced to lactate by lactate dehydrogenase in the cytoplasm without oxygen consumption. Lactate removal takes place via its oxidation to pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase. Pyruvate may be either oxidized to carbon dioxide producing energy or transformed into glucose. Pyruvate oxidation requires oxygen supply and the cooperation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Enzymes of the gluconeogenesis pathway sequentially convert pyruvate into glucose. Congenital or acquired deficiency on gluconeogenesis or pyruvate oxidation, including tissue hypoxia, may induce lactate accumulation. Both obese individuals and patients with diabetes show elevated plasma lactate concentration compared to healthy subjects, but there is no conclusive evidence of hyperlactatemia causing insulin resistance. Available evidence suggests an association between defective mitochondrial oxidative capacity in the pancreatic β-cells and diminished insulin secretion that may trigger the development of diabetes in patients already affected with insulin resistance. Several mutations in the mitochondrial DNA are associated with diabetes mellitus, although the pathogenesis remains unsettled. Mitochondrial DNA mutations have been detected in a number of human cancers. d-lactate is a lactate enantiomer normally formed during glycolysis. Excess d-lactate is generated in diabetes, particularly during diabetic ketoacidosis. d-lactic acidosis is typically associated with small bowel resection.

  16. Quantitative studies of skeletal muscle lactate metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Pagliassotti, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    In Situ, single-pass perfusions were employed on three isolated rabbit skeletal muscle preparations of differing fiber type and oxidative capacity to investigate the influence of fiber type and oxidative capacity per se on net carbon, {sup 14}C-lactate, and {sup 3}H-glucose fluxes. Preparations were exposed to six lactate concentrations ranging from 1-11mM. At basal lactate concentrations all preparations displayed net lactate release, {sup 14}C-lactate removal and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release, all were linearly correlated with lactate concentration. By 4mM all preparations switched to net lactate uptake and {sup 14}C-lactate removal always exceeded net lactate uptake. To quantify the fate of net carbon, {sup 14}C-lactate, and {sup 3}H-glucose removal preparations were perfused at either basal or elevated lactate. Under basal conditions net carbon influx from glucose and glycogen was removed primarily via net lactate release in the glycolytic and mixed preparations and oxidation and net lactate release in the oxidative preparation. At elevated lactate, net carbon influx from lactate, pyruvate and glucose was removed primarily by net glycogen synthesis in the glycolytic preparation and both alanine release and oxidation in the mixed and oxidative preparations.

  17. Control of rat mammary-gland pyruvate dehydrogenase by insulin and prolactin.

    PubMed Central

    Field, B; Coore, H G

    1976-01-01

    Withdrawal of prolactin or of insulin from the circulation of lactating rats leads, within 3h, to increased inactivation by phosphorylation of mammary-gland pyruvate dehydrogenase. Prolactin may act by priming the tissue to respond directly to normal concentrations of circulating insulin and by this means be responsible for the increased activation of the enzyme during the course of normal lactation. PMID:133680

  18. Cell–cell and intracellular lactate shuttles

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, George A

    2009-01-01

    Once thought to be the consequence of oxygen lack in contracting skeletal muscle, the glycolytic product lactate is formed and utilized continuously in diverse cells under fully aerobic conditions. ‘Cell–cell’ and ‘intracellular lactate shuttle’ concepts describe the roles of lactate in delivery of oxidative and gluconeogenic substrates as well as in cell signalling. Examples of the cell–cell shuttles include lactate exchanges between between white-glycolytic and red-oxidative fibres within a working muscle bed, and between working skeletal muscle and heart, brain, liver and kidneys. Examples of intracellular lactate shuttles include lactate uptake by mitochondria and pyruvate for lactate exchange in peroxisomes. Lactate for pyruvate exchanges affect cell redox state, and by itself lactate is a ROS generator. In vivo, lactate is a preferred substrate and high blood lactate levels down-regulate the use of glucose and free fatty acids (FFA). As well, lactate binding may affect metabolic regulation, for instance binding to G-protein receptors in adipocytes inhibiting lipolysis, and thus decreasing plasma FFA availability. In vitro lactate accumulation upregulates expression of MCT1 and genes coding for other components of the mitochondrial reticulum in skeletal muscle. The mitochondrial reticulum in muscle and mitochondrial networks in other aerobic tissues function to establish concentration and proton gradients necessary for cells with high mitochondrial densities to oxidize lactate. The presence of lactate shuttles gives rise to the realization that glycolytic and oxidative pathways should be viewed as linked, as opposed to alternative, processes, because lactate, the product of one pathway, is the substrate for the other. PMID:19805739

  19. Kinetic Properties of Pyruvate Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase of Intestinal Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9.

    PubMed

    Kushkevych, Ivan V

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria reduce sulfate ions to hydrogen sulfide causing inflammatory bowel diseases of humans and animals. The bacteria consume lactate as electron donor which is oxidized to acetate via pyruvate in process of the dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity and the kinetic properties of the enzyme from intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio piger and Desulfomicrobium sp. have never been well-characterized and have not been yet studied. In this paper we present for the first time the specific activity of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase and the kinetic properties of the enzyme in cell-free extracts of both D. piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 intestinal bacterial strains. Microbiological, biochemical, biophysical and statistical methods were used in this work. The optimal temperature (+35°C) and pH 8.5 for enzyme reaction were determined. The spectral analysis of the puri- fied pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase from the cell-free extracts was demonstrated. Analysis of the kinetic properties of the studied enzyme was carried out. Initial (instantaneous) reaction velocity (V0), maximum amount of the product of reaction (Pmax), the reaction time (half saturation period) and maximum velocity of the pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase reaction (V ) were defined. Michaelis constants (Km) of the enzyme reaction were calculated for both intestinal bacterial strains. The studies of the kinetic enzyme properties in the intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria strains in detail can be prospects for clarifying the etiological role of these bacteria in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26373169

  20. Kinetic Properties of Pyruvate Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase of Intestinal Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9.

    PubMed

    Kushkevych, Ivan V

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria reduce sulfate ions to hydrogen sulfide causing inflammatory bowel diseases of humans and animals. The bacteria consume lactate as electron donor which is oxidized to acetate via pyruvate in process of the dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity and the kinetic properties of the enzyme from intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio piger and Desulfomicrobium sp. have never been well-characterized and have not been yet studied. In this paper we present for the first time the specific activity of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase and the kinetic properties of the enzyme in cell-free extracts of both D. piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 intestinal bacterial strains. Microbiological, biochemical, biophysical and statistical methods were used in this work. The optimal temperature (+35°C) and pH 8.5 for enzyme reaction were determined. The spectral analysis of the puri- fied pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase from the cell-free extracts was demonstrated. Analysis of the kinetic properties of the studied enzyme was carried out. Initial (instantaneous) reaction velocity (V0), maximum amount of the product of reaction (Pmax), the reaction time (half saturation period) and maximum velocity of the pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase reaction (V ) were defined. Michaelis constants (Km) of the enzyme reaction were calculated for both intestinal bacterial strains. The studies of the kinetic enzyme properties in the intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria strains in detail can be prospects for clarifying the etiological role of these bacteria in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  1. Effects of fasting on serial measurements of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate metabolism in tumors.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Eva M; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Gallagher, Ferdia A; Kettunen, Mikko I; Kennedy, Brett W C; Vowler, Sarah L; Burling, Keith A; Brindle, Kevin M

    2016-08-01

    Imaging of the metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate has shown considerable promise in preclinical studies in oncology, particularly for the assessment of early treatment response. The repeatability of measurements of (13) C label exchange between pyruvate and lactate was determined in a murine lymphoma model in fasted and non-fasted animals. The fasted state showed lower intra-individual variability, although the [1-(13) C]lactate/[1-(13) C]pyruvate signal ratio was significantly greater in fasted than in non-fasted mice, which may be explained by the higher tumor lactate concentrations in fasted animals. These results indicate that the fasted state may be preferable for the measurement of (13) C label exchange between pyruvate and lactate, as it reduces the variability and therefore should make it easier to detect the effects of therapy. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27309986

  2. Effects of fasting on serial measurements of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate metabolism in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Eva M.; Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Gallagher, Ferdia A.; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Kennedy, Brett W. C.; Vowler, Sarah L.; Burling, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the metabolism of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate has shown considerable promise in preclinical studies in oncology, particularly for the assessment of early treatment response. The repeatability of measurements of 13C label exchange between pyruvate and lactate was determined in a murine lymphoma model in fasted and non‐fasted animals. The fasted state showed lower intra‐individual variability, although the [1‐13C]lactate/[1‐13C]pyruvate signal ratio was significantly greater in fasted than in non‐fasted mice, which may be explained by the higher tumor lactate concentrations in fasted animals. These results indicate that the fasted state may be preferable for the measurement of 13C label exchange between pyruvate and lactate, as it reduces the variability and therefore should make it easier to detect the effects of therapy. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27309986

  3. A model based on absorbance data on the growth rate of Listeria monocytogenes and including the effects of pH, NaCl, Na-lactate and Na-acetate.

    PubMed

    Nerbrink, E; Borch, E; Blom, H; Nesbakken, T

    1999-03-01

    A mathematical model was developed for predicting the growth of L. monocytogenes at 9 degrees C in the presence of 70 ppm sodium nitrite, and at different levels of pH (5.5-6.5), sodium chloride (1.0-4.0%), sodium lactate (0-0.5%) and sodium acetate (0-0.6%). Collection of the growth data was done using absorbance measurements in broth cultures and the absorbance measurement was evaluated. The model was compared to the Food MicroModel, and against the growth of L. monocytogenes in a vacuum-packed meat product stored at 9 degrees C. A linear relationship was obtained, for the absorbance data on different dilutions of the inoculum, in the absorbance interval studied. There was also a linear relationship between the values of the maximum specific growth rates derived from the absorbance and the ones derived from viable count measurements; and corrections were made accordingly. The statistical evaluation showed that all the main factors, i.e. pH, sodium chloride, sodium lactate and sodium acetate were statistically significant for the growth rate of L. monocytogenes. Comparison to the Food MicroModel (FMM) showed a slight underprediction for the developed model (bias = 0.84). The predictions were, on average, within 20% of the FMM predictions (n = 10). Validation against the observed growth of L. monocytogenes inoculated into an emulsion type of sausage (n = 4) also showed a slight underprediction by the model. The predictions were, on average, 16% below the observed values in the sausage (Bias 0.84, Accuracy 1.26).

  4. L-serine enhances the anaerobic lactate metabolism of Veillonella dispar ATCC 17745.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, E

    1987-06-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, the rate of metabolism of lactate by starved resting cells of Veillonella dispar ATCC 17745 was very low. Because pyruvate was metabolized well by the starved cells, oxidation of lactate to pyruvate, which is the first step of the lactate metabolism, must have been limited in the cells. In the starved cells, the levels of the metabolic intermediates, oxalacetate or fumarate, of which reductions to malate or to succinate could be coupled with lactate oxidation to pyruvate and initiate lactate metabolism, were quite low, suggesting that these had been reduced during the starvation steps under strictly anaerobic conditions. Thus, the starved cells were unable to start the anaerobic lactate metabolism because of shortage of such reducible substrates. L-serine greatly enhanced anaerobic lactate metabolism of the starved cells. This enhancement may have been due to metabolism of L-serine itself and conversion to oxalacetate and fumarate, which made it possible to begin lactate oxidation.

  5. Sugar utilization in the hyperthermophilic, sulfate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain 7324: starch degradation to acetate and CO2 via a modified Embden-Meyerhof pathway and acetyl-CoA synthetase (ADP-forming).

    PubMed

    Labes, A; Schönheit, P

    2001-11-01

    The hyperthermophilic, sulfate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain 7324, rather than the type strain VC16, was found to grow on starch and sulfate as energy and carbon source. Fermentation products and enzyme activities were determined in starch-grown cells and compared to those of cells grown on lactate and sulfate. During exponential growth on starch, 1 mol of glucose-equivalent was incompletely oxidized with sulfate to approximately 2 mol acetate, 2 mol CO2 and 1 mol H2S. Starch-grown cells did not contain measurable amounts of the deazaflavin factor F420 (<0.03 nmol/mg protein) and thus did not show the F420-specific green-blue fluorescence. In contrast, lactate (1 mol) was completely oxidized with sulfate to 3 mol CO2 by strain 7324, and lactate-grown cells contained high amounts of F420 (0.6 nmol/mg protein). In extracts of starch-grown cells, the following enzymes of a modified Embden-Meyerhof pathway were detected: ADP-dependent hexokinase (ADP-HK), phosphoglucose isomerase, ADP-dependent 6-phosphofructokinase (ADP-PFK), fructose-1,6-phosphate aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (GAP:FdOR), phosphoglycerate mutase, enolase, and pyruvate kinase (PK). Specific activities of ADP-HK, ADP-PFK, GAP:FdOR, and PK were significantly higher in starch-grown cells than in lactate-grown cells, indicating induction of these enzymes during starch catabolism. Pyruvate conversion to acetate involved pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase. The findings indicate that the archaeal sulfate reducer A. fulgidus strain 7324 converts starch to acetate via a modified Embden-Meyerhof pathway and acetyl-CoA synthetase (ADP-forming). This is the first report of growth of a sulfate reducer on starch, i.e. on a polymeric sugar.

  6. Expression and specificity profile of the major acetate transporter AcpA in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Sá-Pessoa, Joana; Amillis, Sotiris; Casal, Margarida; Diallinas, George

    2015-03-01

    AcpA has been previously characterized as a high-affinity transporter essential for the uptake and use of acetate as sole carbon source in Aspergillus nidulans. Here, we follow the expression profile of AcpA and define its substrate specificity. AcpA-mediated acetate transport is detected from the onset of conidiospore germination, peaks at the time of germ tube emergence, and drops to low basal levels in germlings and young mycelia, where a second acetate transporter is also becoming apparent. AcpA activity also responds to acetate presence in the growth medium, but is not subject to either carbon or nitrogen catabolite repression. Short-chain monocarboxylates (benzoate, formate, butyrate and propionate) inhibit AcpA-mediated acetate transport with apparent inhibition constants (Ki) of 16.89±2.12, 9.25±1.01, 12.06±3.29 and 1.44±0.13mM, respectively. AcpA is also shown not to be directly involved in ammonia export, as proposed for its Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue Ady2p. In the second part of this work, we search for the unknown acetate transporter expressed in mycelia, and for other transporters that might contribute to acetate uptake. In silico analysis, genetic construction of relevant null mutants, and uptake assays, reveal that the closest AcpA homologue (AN1839), named AcpB, is the 'missing' secondary acetate transporter in mycelia. We also identify two major short-chain carboxylate (lactate, succinate, pyruvate and malate) transporters, named JenA (AN6095) and JenB (AN6703), which however are not involved in acetate uptake. This work establishes a framework for further exploiting acetate and carboxylate transport in filamentous ascomycetes. PMID:25708319

  7. Photochemistry of aqueous pyruvic acid.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Elizabeth C; Carpenter, Barry K; Shoemaker, Richard K; Vaida, Veronica

    2013-07-16

    The study of organic chemistry in atmospheric aerosols and cloud formation is of interest in predictions of air quality and climate change. It is now known that aqueous phase chemistry is important in the formation of secondary organic aerosols. Here, the photoreactivity of pyruvic acid (PA; CH3COCOOH) is investigated in aqueous environments characteristic of atmospheric aerosols. PA is currently used as a proxy for α-dicarbonyls in atmospheric models and is abundant in both the gas phase and the aqueous phase (atmospheric aerosols, fog, and clouds) in the atmosphere. The photoreactivity of PA in these phases, however, is very different, thus prompting the need for a mechanistic understanding of its reactivity in different environments. Although the decarboxylation of aqueous phase PA through UV excitation has been studied for many years, its mechanism and products remain controversial. In this work, photolysis of aqueous PA is shown to produce acetoin (CH3CHOHCOCH3), lactic acid (CH3CHOHCOOH), acetic acid (CH3COOH), and oligomers, illustrating the progression from a three-carbon molecule to four-carbon and even six-carbon molecules through direct photolysis. These products are detected using vibrational and electronic spectroscopy, NMR, and MS, and a reaction mechanism is presented accounting for all products detected. The relevance of sunlight-initiated PA chemistry in aqueous environments is then discussed in the context of processes occurring on atmospheric aerosols.

  8. Ethyl Pyruvate Combats Human Leukemia Cells but Spares Normal Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Susanne; Bigl, Marina; Buchold, Martin; Thieme, Rene; Wichmann, Gunnar; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl pyruvate, a known ROS scavenger and anti-inflammatory drug was found to combat leukemia cells. Tumor cell killing was achieved by concerted action of necrosis/apoptosis induction, ATP depletion, and inhibition of glycolytic and para-glycolytic enzymes. Ethyl lactate was less harmful to leukemia cells but was found to arrest cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. Both, ethyl pyruvate and ethyl lactate were identified as new inhibitors of GSK-3β. Despite the strong effect of ethyl pyruvate on leukemia cells, human cognate blood cells were only marginally affected. The data were compiled by immune blotting, flow cytometry, enzyme activity assay and gene array analysis. Our results inform new mechanisms of ethyl pyruvate-induced cell death, offering thereby a new treatment regime with a high therapeutic window for leukemic tumors. PMID:27579985

  9. Ethyl Pyruvate Combats Human Leukemia Cells but Spares Normal Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Birkenmeier, Gerd; Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Kurz, Susanne; Bigl, Marina; Pieroh, Philipp; Debebe, Tewodros; Buchold, Martin; Thieme, Rene; Wichmann, Gunnar; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl pyruvate, a known ROS scavenger and anti-inflammatory drug was found to combat leukemia cells. Tumor cell killing was achieved by concerted action of necrosis/apoptosis induction, ATP depletion, and inhibition of glycolytic and para-glycolytic enzymes. Ethyl lactate was less harmful to leukemia cells but was found to arrest cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. Both, ethyl pyruvate and ethyl lactate were identified as new inhibitors of GSK-3β. Despite the strong effect of ethyl pyruvate on leukemia cells, human cognate blood cells were only marginally affected. The data were compiled by immune blotting, flow cytometry, enzyme activity assay and gene array analysis. Our results inform new mechanisms of ethyl pyruvate-induced cell death, offering thereby a new treatment regime with a high therapeutic window for leukemic tumors. PMID:27579985

  10. Simultaneous steady-state and dynamic 13C NMR can differentiate alternative routes of pyruvate metabolism in living cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chendong; Harrison, Crystal; Jin, Eunsook S; Chuang, David T; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R; Merritt, Matthew E; DeBerardinis, Ralph J

    2014-02-28

    Metabolic reprogramming facilitates cancer cell growth, so quantitative metabolic flux measurements could produce useful biomarkers. However, current methods to analyze flux in vivo provide either a steady-state overview of relative activities (infusion of (13)C and analysis of extracted metabolites) or a dynamic view of a few reactions (hyperpolarized (13)C spectroscopy). Moreover, although hyperpolarization has successfully quantified pyruvate-lactate exchanges, its ability to assess mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism is unproven in cancer. Here, we combined (13)C hyperpolarization and isotopomer analysis to quantify multiple fates of pyruvate simultaneously. Two cancer cell lines with divergent pyruvate metabolism were incubated with thermally polarized [3-(13)C]pyruvate for several hours, then briefly exposed to hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate during acquisition of NMR spectra using selective excitation to maximize detection of H[(13)C]O3(-) and [1-(13)C]lactate. Metabolites were then extracted and subjected to isotopomer analysis to determine relative rates of pathways involving [3-(13)C]pyruvate. Quantitation of hyperpolarized H[(13)C]O3(-) provided a single definitive metabolic rate, which was then used to convert relative rates derived from isotopomer analysis into quantitative fluxes. This revealed that H[(13)C]O3(-) appearance reflects activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase rather than pyruvate carboxylation followed by subsequent decarboxylation reactions. Glucose substantially altered [1-(13)C]pyruvate metabolism, enhancing exchanges with [1-(13)C]lactate and suppressing H[(13)C]O3(-) formation. Furthermore, inhibiting Akt, an oncogenic kinase that stimulates glycolysis, reversed these effects, indicating that metabolism of pyruvate by both LDH and pyruvate dehydrogenase is subject to the acute effects of oncogenic signaling on glycolysis. The data suggest that combining (13)C isotopomer analyses and dynamic hyperpolarized (13)C spectroscopy may enable

  11. Simultaneous Steady-state and Dynamic 13C NMR Can Differentiate Alternative Routes of Pyruvate Metabolism in Living Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chendong; Harrison, Crystal; Jin, Eunsook S.; Chuang, David T.; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.; Merritt, Matthew E.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming facilitates cancer cell growth, so quantitative metabolic flux measurements could produce useful biomarkers. However, current methods to analyze flux in vivo provide either a steady-state overview of relative activities (infusion of 13C and analysis of extracted metabolites) or a dynamic view of a few reactions (hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopy). Moreover, although hyperpolarization has successfully quantified pyruvate-lactate exchanges, its ability to assess mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism is unproven in cancer. Here, we combined 13C hyperpolarization and isotopomer analysis to quantify multiple fates of pyruvate simultaneously. Two cancer cell lines with divergent pyruvate metabolism were incubated with thermally polarized [3-13C]pyruvate for several hours, then briefly exposed to hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate during acquisition of NMR spectra using selective excitation to maximize detection of H[13C]O3− and [1-13C]lactate. Metabolites were then extracted and subjected to isotopomer analysis to determine relative rates of pathways involving [3-13C]pyruvate. Quantitation of hyperpolarized H[13C]O3− provided a single definitive metabolic rate, which was then used to convert relative rates derived from isotopomer analysis into quantitative fluxes. This revealed that H[13C]O3− appearance reflects activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase rather than pyruvate carboxylation followed by subsequent decarboxylation reactions. Glucose substantially altered [1-13C]pyruvate metabolism, enhancing exchanges with [1-13C]lactate and suppressing H[13C]O3− formation. Furthermore, inhibiting Akt, an oncogenic kinase that stimulates glycolysis, reversed these effects, indicating that metabolism of pyruvate by both LDH and pyruvate dehydrogenase is subject to the acute effects of oncogenic signaling on glycolysis. The data suggest that combining 13C isotopomer analyses and dynamic hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopy may enable quantitative flux measurements in

  12. Pyruvate Incubation Enhances Glycogen Stores and Sustains Neuronal Function during Subsequent Glucose Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Pavan K; Sadgrove, Matthew P; Galeffi, Francesca; Turner, Dennis A.

    2011-01-01

    The use of energy substrates, such as lactate and pyruvate, has been shown to improve synaptic function when administered during glucose deprivation. In the present study, we investigatedwhether prolonged incubation with monocarboxylate (pyruvate or lactate) prior rather than duringglucose deprivation can also sustainsynaptic and metabolic function.Pyruvate pre-incubation(3-4 hr) significantly prolonged (>25 min) the tolerance of rat hippocampal slices to delayed glucose deprivation compared to control and lactate pre-incubated slices, as revealed by field excitatory post synaptic potentials (fEPSPs); pre-incubation with pyruvate alsoreduced the marked decrease in NAD(P)H fluorescence resulting from glucose deprivation. Moreover, pyruvate exposure led to enhancement of glycogen stores with time, compared to glucose alone(12 μmol/g tissue at 4 hr vs. 3.5 μmol/g tissue). Prolonged resistance to glucose deprivation following exogenous pyruvate incubation was prevented by glycogenolysis inhibitors, suggesting that enhanced glycogen mediates the delay in synaptic activity failure.The application of an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist enhanced glycogen utilization and prolonged the time to synaptic failure, further confirming this hypothesis of the importance of glycogen.Moreover, tissue levels of ATP werealso significantly maintained duringglucose deprivation in pyruvate pre-treated slices compared to control and lactate. In summary, these experiments indicate that pyruvate exposure prior to glucose deprivation significantly increased the energy buffering capacity of hippocampal slices, particularly by enhancing internal glycogen stores, delaying synaptic failure during glucose deprivation by maintaining ATP levels, and minimizing the decreasein the levels of NAD(P)H. PMID:21854850

  13. Pyruvate incubation enhances glycogen stores and sustains neuronal function during subsequent glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Pavan K; Sadgrove, Matthew P; Galeffi, Francesca; Turner, Dennis A

    2012-01-01

    The use of energy substrates, such as lactate and pyruvate, has been shown to improve synaptic function when administered during glucose deprivation. In the present study, we investigated whether prolonged incubation with monocarboxylate (pyruvate or lactate) prior rather than during glucose deprivation can also sustain synaptic and metabolic function. Pyruvate pre-incubation(3-4h) significantly prolonged (>25 min) the tolerance of rat hippocampal slices to delayed glucose deprivation compared to control and lactate pre-incubated slices, as revealed by field excitatory post synaptic potentials (fEPSPs); pre-incubation with pyruvate also reduced the marked decrease in NAD(P)H fluorescence resulting from glucose deprivation. Moreover, pyruvate exposure led to the enhancement of glycogen stores with time, compared to glucose alone (12 μmol/g tissue at 4h vs. 3.5 μmol/g tissue). Prolonged resistance to glucose deprivation following exogenous pyruvate incubation was prevented by glycogenolysis inhibitors, suggesting that enhanced glycogen mediates the delay in synaptic activity failure. The application of an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist enhanced glycogen utilization and prolonged the time to synaptic failure, further confirming this hypothesis of the importance of glycogen. Moreover, tissue levels of ATP were also significantly maintained during glucose deprivation in pyruvate pretreated slices compared to control and lactate. In summary, these experiments indicate that pyruvate exposure prior to glucose deprivation significantly increased the energy buffering capacity of hippocampal slices, particularly by enhancing internal glycogen stores, delaying synaptic failure during glucose deprivation by maintaining ATP levels, and minimizing the decrease in the levels of NAD(P)H.

  14. Glycolysis and the significance of lactate in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Keri L H; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    In traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients, elevation of the brain extracellular lactate concentration and the lactate/pyruvate ratio are well-recognized, and are associated statistically with unfavorable clinical outcome. Brain extracellular lactate was conventionally regarded as a waste product of glucose, when glucose is metabolized via glycolysis (Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway) to pyruvate, followed by conversion to lactate by the action of lactate dehydrogenase, and export of lactate into the extracellular fluid. In TBI, glycolytic lactate is ascribed to hypoxia or mitochondrial dysfunction, although the precise nature of the latter is incompletely understood. Seemingly in contrast to lactate's association with unfavorable outcome is a growing body of evidence that lactate can be beneficial. The idea that the brain can utilize lactate by feeding into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle of neurons, first published two decades ago, has become known as the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis. Direct evidence of brain utilization of lactate was first obtained 5 years ago in a cerebral microdialysis study in TBI patients, where administration of (13)C-labeled lactate via the microdialysis catheter and simultaneous collection of the emerging microdialysates, with (13)C NMR analysis, revealed (13)C labeling in glutamine consistent with lactate utilization via the TCA cycle. This suggests that where neurons are too damaged to utilize the lactate produced from glucose by astrocytes, i.e., uncoupling of neuronal and glial metabolism, high extracellular levels of lactate would accumulate, explaining the association between high lactate and poor outcome. Recently, an intravenous exogenous lactate supplementation study in TBI patients revealed evidence for a beneficial effect judged by surrogate endpoints. Here we review the current state of knowledge about glycolysis and lactate in TBI, how it can be measured in patients, and whether it can be modulated to achieve

  15. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... control the activity of the complex: pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase turns on (activates) the complex, while pyruvate dehydrogenase ... binding protein (the PDHX gene), and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase (the PDP1 gene) have been identified in people ...

  16. Measurement of the acute metabolic response to hypoxia in rat tumours in vivo using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and hyperpolarised pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Bluff, Joanne E.; Reynolds, Steven; Metcalf, Stephen; Alizadeh, Tooba; Kazan, Samira M.; Bucur, Adriana; Wholey, Emily G.; Bibby, Becky A.S.; Williams, Leigh; Paley, Martyn N.; Tozer, Gillian M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the rate constant for pyruvate to lactate conversion in tumours in response to a hypoxic challenge, using hyperpolarised 13C1-pyruvate and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Methods and materials Hypoxic inspired gas was used to manipulate rat P22 fibrosarcoma oxygen tension (pO2), confirmed by luminescence decay of oxygen-sensitive probes. Hyperpolarised 13C1-pyruvate was injected into the femoral vein of anaesthetised rats and slice-localised 13C magnetic resonance (MR) spectra acquired. Spectral integral versus time curves for pyruvate and lactate were fitted to a precursor-product model to estimate the rate constant for tumour conversion of pyruvate to lactate (kpl). Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and oxygen tension (ArtpO2) were monitored. Pyruvate and lactate concentrations were measured in freeze-clamped tumours. Results MABP, ArtpO2 and tumour pO2 decreased significantly during hypoxia. kpl increased significantly (p < 0.01) from 0.029 ± 0.002 s−1 to 0.049 ± 0.006 s−1 (mean ± SEM) when animals breathing air were switched to hypoxic conditions, whereas pyruvate and lactate concentrations were minimally affected by hypoxia. Both ArtpO2 and MABP influenced the estimate of kpl, with a strong negative correlation between kpl and the product of ArtpO2 and MABP under hypoxia. Conclusion The rate constant for pyruvate to lactate conversion, kpl, responds significantly to a rapid reduction in tumour oxygenation. PMID:25824978

  17. Lactate Dehydrogenase B Controls Lysosome Activity and Autophagy in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Lucie; Bański, Piotr; Sboarina, Martina; Dethier, Coralie; Danhier, Pierre; Fontenille, Marie-Joséphine; Van Hée, Vincent F; Vazeille, Thibaut; Tardy, Morgane; Falces, Jorge; Bouzin, Caroline; Porporato, Paolo E; Frédérick, Raphaël; Michiels, Carine; Copetti, Tamara; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2016-09-12

    Metabolic adaptability is essential for tumor progression and includes cooperation between cancer cells with different metabolic phenotypes. Optimal glucose supply to glycolytic cancer cells occurs when oxidative cancer cells use lactate preferentially to glucose. However, using lactate instead of glucose mimics glucose deprivation, and glucose starvation induces autophagy. We report that lactate sustains autophagy in cancer. In cancer cells preferentially to normal cells, lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB), catalyzing the conversion of lactate and NAD(+) to pyruvate, NADH and H(+), controls lysosomal acidification, vesicle maturation, and intracellular proteolysis. LDHB activity is necessary for basal autophagy and cancer cell proliferation not only in oxidative cancer cells but also in glycolytic cancer cells. PMID:27622334

  18. The Effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging and Addition of Rosemary Extract, Sodium Acetate and Calcium Lactate Mixture on the Quality of Pre-cooked Hamburger Patties during Refrigerated Storage

    PubMed Central

    Muhlisin; Kang, Sun Moon; Choi, Won Hee; Lee, Keun Taik; Cheong, Sung Hee; Lee, Sung Ki

    2013-01-01

    The effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP; 30% CO2+70% N2 or 100% N2) and an additive mixture (500 ppm rosemary extract, 3,000 ppm sodium acetate and 1,500 ppm calcium lactate) on the quality of pre-cooked hamburger patties during storage at 5°C for 14 d was evaluated. The addition of the additive mixture reduced aerobic and anaerobic bacteria counts in both 30% CO2-MAP (30% CO2+70% N2) and 100% N2-MAP (p<0.05). The 30% CO2-MAP was more effective to suppress the microbial growth than 100% N2-MAP, moreover the 30% CO2-MAP combined with additive mixture resulted in the lowest bacterial counts. The hamburger patties with additive mixture showed lower CIE L* and CIE a*, and higher CIE b* than those with no additive mixture. The 30% CO2-MAP tended to decrease the TBARS during storage regardless of the addition of additives. The use of 30% CO2-MAP in combination with additives mixture was effective for maintaining the quality and extending the shelf-life of pre-cooked hamburger patties. PMID:25049716

  19. Effects of eliminating pyruvate node pathways and of coexpression of heterogeneous carboxylation enzymes on succinate production by Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Yoko; Fukui, Keita; Nishio, Yousuke; Hashiguchi, Kenichi; Usuda, Yoshihiro; Sode, Koji

    2015-02-01

    Lowering the pH in bacterium-based succinate fermentation is considered a feasible approach to reduce total production costs. Newly isolated Enterobacter aerogenes strain AJ110637, a rapid carbon source assimilator under weakly acidic (pH 5.0) conditions, was selected as a platform for succinate production. Our previous work showed that the ΔadhE/PCK strain, developed from AJ110637 with inactivated ethanol dehydrogenase and introduced Actinobacillus succinogenes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK), generated succinate as a major product of anaerobic mixed-acid fermentation from glucose under weakly acidic conditions (pH <6.2). To further improve the production of succinate by the ΔadhE/PCK strain, metabolically engineered strains were designed based on the elimination of pathways that produced undesirable products and the introduction of two carboxylation pathways from phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate to oxaloacetate. The highest production of succinate was observed with strain ES04/PCK+PYC, which had inactivated ethanol, lactate, acetate, and 2,3-butanediol pathways and coexpressed PCK and Corynebacterium glutamicum pyruvate carboxylase (PYC). This strain produced succinate from glucose with over 70% yield (gram per gram) without any measurable formation of ethanol, lactate, or 2,3-butanediol under weakly acidic conditions. The impact of lowering the pH from 7.0 to 5.5 on succinate production in this strain was evaluated under pH-controlled batch culture conditions and showed that the lower pH decreased the succinate titer but increased its yield. These findings can be applied to identify additional engineering targets to increase succinate production. PMID:25416770

  20. Effects of eliminating pyruvate node pathways and of coexpression of heterogeneous carboxylation enzymes on succinate production by Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Yoko; Fukui, Keita; Nishio, Yousuke; Hashiguchi, Kenichi; Usuda, Yoshihiro; Sode, Koji

    2015-02-01

    Lowering the pH in bacterium-based succinate fermentation is considered a feasible approach to reduce total production costs. Newly isolated Enterobacter aerogenes strain AJ110637, a rapid carbon source assimilator under weakly acidic (pH 5.0) conditions, was selected as a platform for succinate production. Our previous work showed that the ΔadhE/PCK strain, developed from AJ110637 with inactivated ethanol dehydrogenase and introduced Actinobacillus succinogenes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK), generated succinate as a major product of anaerobic mixed-acid fermentation from glucose under weakly acidic conditions (pH <6.2). To further improve the production of succinate by the ΔadhE/PCK strain, metabolically engineered strains were designed based on the elimination of pathways that produced undesirable products and the introduction of two carboxylation pathways from phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate to oxaloacetate. The highest production of succinate was observed with strain ES04/PCK+PYC, which had inactivated ethanol, lactate, acetate, and 2,3-butanediol pathways and coexpressed PCK and Corynebacterium glutamicum pyruvate carboxylase (PYC). This strain produced succinate from glucose with over 70% yield (gram per gram) without any measurable formation of ethanol, lactate, or 2,3-butanediol under weakly acidic conditions. The impact of lowering the pH from 7.0 to 5.5 on succinate production in this strain was evaluated under pH-controlled batch culture conditions and showed that the lower pH decreased the succinate titer but increased its yield. These findings can be applied to identify additional engineering targets to increase succinate production.

  1. Effects of Eliminating Pyruvate Node Pathways and of Coexpression of Heterogeneous Carboxylation Enzymes on Succinate Production by Enterobacter aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yoko; Fukui, Keita; Nishio, Yousuke; Hashiguchi, Kenichi; Usuda, Yoshihiro; Sode, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Lowering the pH in bacterium-based succinate fermentation is considered a feasible approach to reduce total production costs. Newly isolated Enterobacter aerogenes strain AJ110637, a rapid carbon source assimilator under weakly acidic (pH 5.0) conditions, was selected as a platform for succinate production. Our previous work showed that the ΔadhE/PCK strain, developed from AJ110637 with inactivated ethanol dehydrogenase and introduced Actinobacillus succinogenes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK), generated succinate as a major product of anaerobic mixed-acid fermentation from glucose under weakly acidic conditions (pH <6.2). To further improve the production of succinate by the ΔadhE/PCK strain, metabolically engineered strains were designed based on the elimination of pathways that produced undesirable products and the introduction of two carboxylation pathways from phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate to oxaloacetate. The highest production of succinate was observed with strain ES04/PCK+PYC, which had inactivated ethanol, lactate, acetate, and 2,3-butanediol pathways and coexpressed PCK and Corynebacterium glutamicum pyruvate carboxylase (PYC). This strain produced succinate from glucose with over 70% yield (gram per gram) without any measurable formation of ethanol, lactate, or 2,3-butanediol under weakly acidic conditions. The impact of lowering the pH from 7.0 to 5.5 on succinate production in this strain was evaluated under pH-controlled batch culture conditions and showed that the lower pH decreased the succinate titer but increased its yield. These findings can be applied to identify additional engineering targets to increase succinate production. PMID:25416770

  2. Pyruvate neutralizes peritoneal dialysate cytotoxicity: maintained integrity and proliferation of cultured human mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brunkhorst, R; Mahiout, A

    1995-07-01

    Toxic effects of commercially available peritoneal dialysate (PD) fluid include damage to mesothelial cells (MC), causing a severely disturbed proliferation of cultured MC. We investigated the injury to the cell membrane (by release of lactate dehydrogenase, LDH), the proliferation (by cell counts and by 3H-thymidine incorporation), and optional the cytokine generation (by IL-1 receptor-antagonist production, IL-1 ra) of cultured human MC during the 48 hours after a 30 minute exposure to PD containing either 35 mmol/liter sodium lactate or sodium pyruvate. All solutions had a pH of 5.2 to 5.6 and were composed as standard PD. Glucose contents of 1.36 and 3.86 mmol/liter were tested. After exposure to the lactate-PD containing 1.36% glucose, LDH activity was increased by more than 30%, proliferation of MC was inhibited by more than 30%, and IL-1 ra production was reduced significantly when compared to pyruvate-PD and the control solution. After preincubation with 3.86% glucose containing PD, all negative effects became even more pronounced in the lactate group whereas the MC maintained their integrity, rate of proliferation and IL-1 ra release after pre-exposure to pyruvate containing PD. These results suggest that the acute toxic effects of commercially available PD on the integrity, proliferation and IL-1 ra production of MC can be avoided by the use of sodium pyruvate instead of sodium lactate.

  3. Renal cortical pyruvate as a potentially critical mediator of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ali C M; Zager, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Pyruvate is a key intermediary in both aerobic and anaerobic energy metabolisms. In addition, a burgeoning body of experimental literature indicates that it can also dramatically impact oxidant, proinflammatory, and cytoprotective pathways. In sum, these actions can confer protection against diverse forms of tissue damage. However, the fate of pyruvate during the evolution of acute kidney injury (AKI) has remained ill defined. Recent experimental studies have indicated that following either ischemic or nephrotoxic renal injury, marked and sustained pyruvate depletion results. While multiple potential mechanisms for this pyruvate loss may be involved, experimental data suggest that a loss of lactate (a dominant pyruvate precursor) and enhanced gluconeogenesis (i.e. pyruvate utilization) are involved. The importance of pyruvate depletion for AKI pathogenesis is underscored by observations that pyruvate therapy can attenuate diverse forms of experimental AKI. This protection may stem from reductions in tissue inflammation, improved anti-inflammatory defenses, and an enhanced cellular energy metabolism. The pieces of information that give rise to these conclusions are discussed in this brief report. PMID:25343836

  4. Effect of glucose and pyruvate in acidic and non-acidic peritoneal dialysis fluids on leukocytes cell functions.

    PubMed

    Mahiout, A; Matata, B M; Brunkhorst, R

    1997-03-01

    A new peritoneal dialysate containing pyruvate anions has been tested for its effects on cell functions and compared with conventional lactate and bicarbonate based solutions. The dialysate has a final pH of 5.4 to 5.6 and is composed of 1.36 to 3.86% glucose-monohydrate, 132 mmol/liter sodium, 1.75 mmol/liter calcium, 0.75 mmol/liter magnesium, 102 mmol/liter chloride and 35 mmol/liter pyruvate. For cytotoxicity testing peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were exposed to conventional lactate dialysate, pyruvate dialysate, bicarbonate dialysate and a control medium RPMI 1640 (Biochrom KG, Berlin, Germany), followed by activation with different bacterial stimuli. In addition, the study further investigated the effect of varying glucose concentration in the different dialysates ranging from 0 to 3.86% and pH changes between 5.2 and 7.4 on the cytotoxicity effect on the selected cells. Mononuclear cells exposed to pyruvate-based dialysate before stimulation with endotoxin exhibited a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mRNA signal comparable to those of cells exposed to RPMI. In contrast, exposure to lactate-based dialysate completely inhibited TNF-mRNA synthesis. In addition, cytokine synthesis in macrophages and PBMCs after exposure to pyruvate was less inhibited when compared to the corresponding levels measured after exposure to lactate. The chemotactic response of polymorphonuclear cells and O-2 generation in all tested cell types after exposure to pyruvate was found not to be inhibited, whereas a complete inhibition was observed after exposure to lactate. The results demonstrate that cytotoxicity effects of peritoneal dialysate on cell lines can be minimized by using a new dialysate formulation containing pyruvate anions instead of lactate.

  5. p53 negatively regulates transcription of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase Pdk2.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Tanupriya; Harris, Chris R

    2012-01-15

    In cancer cells, the aberrant conversion of pyruvate into lactate instead of acetyl-CoA in the presence of oxygen is known as the Warburg effect. The consequences and mechanisms of this metabolic peculiarity are incompletely understood. Here we report that p53 status is a key determinant of the Warburg effect. Wild-type p53 expression decreased levels of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-2 (Pdk2) and the product of its activity, the inactive form of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (P-Pdc), both of which are key regulators of pyruvate metabolism. Decreased levels of Pdk2 and P-Pdc in turn promoted conversion of pyruvate into acetyl-CoA instead of lactate. Thus, wild-type p53 limited lactate production in cancer cells unless Pdk2 could be elevated. Together, our results established that wild-type p53 prevents manifestation of the Warburg effect by controlling Pdk2. These findings elucidate a new mechanism by which p53 suppresses tumorigenesis acting at the level of cancer cell metabolism. PMID:22123926

  6. Metabolic networks to generate pyruvate, PEP and ATP from glycerol in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Alhasawi, Azhar; Thomas, Sean C; Appanna, Vasu D

    2016-04-01

    Glycerol is a major by-product of the biodiesel industry. In this study we report on the metabolic networks involved in its transformation into pyruvate, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and ATP. When the nutritionally-versatile Pseudomonas fluorescens was exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a mineral medium with glycerol as the sole carbon source, the microbe reconfigured its metabolism to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP) primarily via substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP). This alternative ATP-producing stratagem resulted in the synthesis of copious amounts of PEP and pyruvate. The production of these metabolites was mediated via the enhanced activities of such enzymes as pyruvate carboxylase (PC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). The high energy PEP was subsequently converted into ATP with the aid of pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK), phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PEPS) and pyruvate kinase (PK) with the concomitant formation of pyruvate. The participation of the phospho-transfer enzymes like adenylate kinase (AK) and acetate kinase (ACK) ensured the efficiency of this O2-independent energy-generating machinery. The increased activity of glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) in the stressed bacteria provided the necessary precursors to fuel this process. This H2O2-induced anaerobic life-style fortuitously evokes metabolic networks to an effective pathway that can be harnessed into the synthesis of ATP, PEP and pyruvate. The bioconversion of glycerol to pyruvate will offer interesting economic benefit. PMID:26920481

  7. Modeling non-linear kinetics of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate in the crystalloid-perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Mariotti, E; Orton, M R; Eerbeek, O; Ashruf, J F; Zuurbier, C J; Southworth, R; Eykyn, T R

    2016-04-01

    Hyperpolarized (13)C MR measurements have the potential to display non-linear kinetics. We have developed an approach to describe possible non-first-order kinetics of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate employing a system of differential equations that agrees with the principle of conservation of mass of the hyperpolarized signal. Simultaneous fitting to a second-order model for conversion of [1-(13)C] pyruvate to bicarbonate, lactate and alanine was well described in the isolated rat heart perfused with Krebs buffer containing glucose as sole energy substrate, or glucose supplemented with pyruvate. Second-order modeling yielded significantly improved fits of pyruvate-bicarbonate kinetics compared with the more traditionally used first-order model and suggested time-dependent decreases in pyruvate-bicarbonate flux. Second-order modeling gave time-dependent changes in forward and reverse reaction kinetics of pyruvate-lactate exchange and pyruvate-alanine exchange in both groups of hearts during the infusion of pyruvate; however, the fits were not significantly improved with respect to a traditional first-order model. The mechanism giving rise to second-order pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinetics was explored experimentally using surface fluorescence measurements of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide reduced form (NADH) performed under the same conditions, demonstrating a significant increase of NADH during pyruvate infusion. This suggests a simultaneous depletion of available mitochondrial NAD(+) (the cofactor for PDH), consistent with the non-linear nature of the kinetics. NADH levels returned to baseline following cessation of the pyruvate infusion, suggesting this to be a transient effect. PMID:26777799

  8. Lactate Dehydrogenase Catalysis: Roles of Keto, Hydrated, and Enol Pyruvate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meany, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Many carbonyl substrates of oxidoreductase enzymes undergo hydration and enolization so that these substrate systems are partitioned between keto, hydrated (gem-diol), and enol forms in aqueous solution. Some oxidoreductase enzymes are subject to inhibition by high concentrations of substrate. For such enzymes, two questions arise pertaining to…

  9. Effect of lead acetate toxicity on experimental male albino rat

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Nabil M; Eweis, Esam A; El-Beltagi, Hossam S; Abdel-Mobdy, Yasmin E

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of different doses of lead acetate (1/20, 1/40 and 1/60 of LD50) on body weight gain, blood picture, plasma protein profile and the function of liver, kidney and thyroid gland. Methods Male albino rats were divided into four groups, the first group represented the health control animals, while the second, third and fourth groups were ingested orally with sub lethal doses of lead acetate (1/20, 1/40 and 1/60) of the oral LD50, respectively. One dose was ingested every two days during the experimental period (14 weeks) including the adaptation time. Blood was collected and used for all analysis. Results The results showed that, the ingestion of Pb2+ induced significant stimulation in glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (ALT) and glutamic-oxalacetic transaminease (AST) activity. Also, total soluble protein and albumin contents of plasma were significantly decreased, while the content of globulin was changed by the Pb2+ treatments. The cholinesterase activity was inhibited, but the activities of alkaline and acid phosphates and lactate dehydrogenase were stimulated, while plasma glucose level was elevated as a result of lead acetate intoxication. In case of blood picture, Pb2+ ingestion reduced the contents of hemoglobin and RBCs count of intoxicated rat's blood and the plasma levels of T3, T4 and blood WBCs count were decreased. Conclusions It can be concluded that lead acetate has harmful effect on experimental male albino rats. Therefore, the present work advises people to prevent exposure to the lead compound to avoid injurious hazard risk. PMID:23569832

  10. Pyruvate modifies metabolic flux and nutrient sensing during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an immature swine model

    SciTech Connect

    Ledee, Dolena R.; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Olson, Aaron; Isern, Nancy G.; Robillard Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support for infants and children with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. Nutritional support is mandatory during ECMO, although specific actions for substrates on the heart have not been delineated. Prior work shows that enhancing pyruvate oxidation promotes successful weaning from ECMO. Accordingly, we closely examined the role of prolonged systemic pyruvate supplementation in modifying metabolic parameters during the unique conditions of ventricular unloading provided by ECMO. Twelve male mixed breed Yorkshire piglets (age 30-49 days) received systemic infusion of either normal saline (Group C) or pyruvate (Group P) during ECMO for 8 hours. Over the final hour piglets received [2-13C] pyruvate, and [13C6]-L-leucine, as an indicator for oxidation and protein synthesis. A significant increase in lactate and pyruvate concentrations occurred, along with an increase in the absolute concentration of all measured CAC intermediates. Group P showed greater anaplerotic flux through pyruvate carboxylation although pyruvate oxidation relative to citrate synthase flux was similar to Group C. The groups demonstrated similar leucine fractional contributions to acetyl-CoA and fractional protein synthesis rates. Pyruvate also promoted an increase in the phosphorylation state of several nutrient sensitive enzymes, such as AMPK and ACC, and promoted O-GlcNAcylation through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP). In conclusion, prolonged pyruvate supplementation during ECMO modified anaplerotic pyruvate flux and elicited changes in important nutrient and energy sensitive pathways, while preserving protein synthesis. Therefore, the observed results support the further study of nutritional supplementation and its downstream effects on cardiac adaptation during ventricular unloading.

  11. Lactate metabolism by pediococci isolated from cheese.

    PubMed

    Thomas, T D; McKay, L L; Morris, H A

    1985-04-01

    Pediococcus pentosaceus is commonly found among the adventitious microflora of Cheddar cheese. When this organism was incubated with L-(+)-lactate under anaerobic conditions, L-(+)-lactate was rapidly converted to D-(-)-lactate until racemic (DL) lactate was present. Under aerobic conditions this initial reaction was followed by a slower reaction resulting in the use of both lactate isomers and in the production of acetate and CO2. With intact cells the lactate oxidation system had an optimum pH of 5 to 6, depending on the initial lactate concentration. Cells grown anaerobically possessed lactate-oxidizing activity which increased two- to fourfold as sugar was exhausted from the medium. Aerobic growth further increased specific activities. Cheddar cheese was made with the deliberate addition of P. pentosaceus. When the resulting cheese was grated to expose a large surface area to O2, lactate was converted to acetate at a rate which depended on the density of pediococci in the cheese. The lactate oxidation system remained active in cheese which had been ripened for 6 months.

  12. Effects of oral creatine-pyruvate supplementation in cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Van Schuylenbergh, R; Van Leemputte, M; Hespel, P

    2003-02-01

    A double-blind study was performed to evaluate the effects of oral creatine-pyruvate administration on exercise performance in well-trained cyclists. Endurance and intermittent sprint performance were evaluated before (pretest) and after (posttest) one week of creatine-pyruvate intake (Cr(pyr), 2 x 3.5 g x d-1, n = 7) or placebo (PL, n = 7). Subjects first performed a 1-hour time trial during which the workload could be adjusted at 5-min intervals. Immediately they did five 10-sec sprints interspersed by 2-min rest intervals. Tests were performed on an individual race bicycle that was mounted on an ergometer. Steady-state power production on average was about 235-245 W, which corresponded to blood lactate concentrations of 4-5 mmol x l -1 and heart rate in the range of 160-170 beats x min -1. Power outputs as well as blood lactate levels and heart rates were similar between Cr(pyr) and PL at all times. Total work performed during the 1-h trial was 872 +/- 44 KJ in PL versus 891 +/- 51 KJ in CR pyr. During the intermittent sprint test power peaked at about 800-1000 watt within 2-3 sec, decreasing by 15-20 % towards the end of each sprint. Peak and mean power outputs were similar between groups at all times. Peak lactate concentrations after the final sprint were approximately 11 mmol x l -1 in both groups during both the pretest and the posttest. It is concluded that one week of creatine-pyruvate supplementation at a rate of 7 g x d -1 does not beneficially impact on either endurance capacity or intermittent sprint performance in cyclists.

  13. R-lipoic acid inhibits mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase.

    PubMed

    Korotchkina, Lioubov G; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S

    2004-10-01

    The four pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) and two pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase (PDP) isoenzymes that are present in mammalian tissues regulate activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of its pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) component. The effect of lipoic acids on the activity of PDKs and PDPs was investigated in purified proteins system. R-lipoic acid, S-lipoic acid and R-dihydrolipoic acid did not significantly affect activities of PDPs and at the same time inhibited PDKs to different extents (PDK1>PDK4 approximately PDK2>PDK3 for R-LA). Since lipoic acids inhibited PDKs activity both when reconstituted in PDC and in the presence of E1 alone, dissociation of PDK from the lipoyl domains of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase in the presence of lipoic acids is not a likely explanation for inhibition. The activity of PDK1 towards phosphorylation sites 1, 2 and 3 of E1 was decreased to the same extent in the presence of R-lipoic acid, thus excluding protection of the E1 active site by lipoic acid from phosphorylation. R-lipoic acid inhibited autophosphorylation of PDK2 indicating that it exerted its effect on PDKs directly. Inhibition of PDK1 by R-lipoic acid was not altered by ADP but was decreased in the presence of pyruvate which itself inhibits PDKs. An inhibitory effect of lipoic acid on PDKs would result in less phosphorylation of E1 and hence increased PDC activity. This finding provides a possible mechanism for a glucose (and lactate) lowering effect of R-lipoic acid in diabetic subjects. PMID:15512796

  14. Basis of pyruvate inhibition in Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Rao, G S; Berger, L R

    1970-05-01

    Addition of 10(-3)m pyruvic acid to cultures of Thiobacillus thiooxidans, at pH 2.3, results in its rapid intracellular accumulation and in the cessation of sulfur oxidation, CO(2) fixation, and oxygen consumption; at pH 7.0, pyruvate neither inhibits oxygen uptake nor accumulates appreciably intracellularly. Pyruvate does not affect CO(2) fixation in cell-free extracts. The data suggest that the cells of T. thiooxidans are passively permeable to pyruvic acid at low pH. Thus entry of pyruvic acid causes accumulation of pyruvate with a concomitant decrease in intracellular pH.

  15. The effect of ethanol or sorbitol on glucose production from pyruvate in isolated hepatocytes from 48-hour fasted guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, M K; Weissberger, L E

    1985-01-01

    Hepatocytes isolated from 48-hour, fasted guinea-pigs were incubated with glucose precursors to compare relative rates of glucose production. Glucose production from lactate and pyruvate was similar (2.61 vs 3.18 mumol/hr per 100 mg wet weight). Glucose production from fructose was greater than that from sorbitol (4.68 vs 1.63 mumol/hr per 100 mg wet weight). When ethanol was added to pyruvate-containing buffer, the flux of pyruvate to glucose and lactate was synergistically enhanced (5.28 vs 3.76 and 7.51 vs 2.88 mumol/hr per 100 mg wet weight, respectively). When sorbitol was added to buffer containing pyruvate, glucose and lactate production were even greater than that seen with ethanol (8.32 vs 5.38 and 15.99 vs 7.51 mumol/hr per 100 mg wet weight, respectively).

  16. The primary pathway for lactate oxidation in Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Vita, Nicolas; Valette, Odile; Brasseur, Gaël; Lignon, Sabrina; Denis, Yann; Ansaldi, Mireille; Dolla, Alain; Pieulle, Laetitia

    2015-01-01

    The ability to respire sulfate linked to lactate oxidation is a key metabolic signature of the Desulfovibrio genus. Lactate oxidation by these incomplete oxidizers generates reductants through lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), with the latter catalyzing pyruvate conversion into acetyl-CoA. Acetyl-CoA is the source of substrate-level phosphorylation through the production of ATP. Here, we show that these crucial steps are performed by enzymes encoded by a nonacistronic transcriptional unit named now as operon luo (for lactate utilization operon). Using a combination of genetic and biochemical techniques, we assigned a physiological role to the operon genes DVU3027-28 and DVU3032-33. The growth of mutant Δ26-28 was highly disrupted on D-lactate, whereas the growth of mutant Δ32-33 was slower on L-lactate, which could be related to a decrease in the activity of D-lactate or L-lactate oxidase in the corresponding mutants. The DVU3027-28 and DVU3032-33 genes thus encode functional D-LDH and L-LDH enzymes, respectively. Scanning of the genome for lactate utilization revealed several lactate permease and dehydrogenase homologs. However, transcriptional compensation was not observed in any of the mutants except for lactate permease. Although there is a high degree of redundancy for lactate oxidase, it is not functionally efficient in LDH mutants. This result could be related to the identification of several operon enzymes, including LDHs, in the PFOR activity bands, suggesting the occurrence of a lactate-oxidizing supermolecular structure that can optimize the performance of lactate utilization in Desulfovibrio species. PMID:26167158

  17. The primary pathway for lactate oxidation in Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Vita, Nicolas; Valette, Odile; Brasseur, Gaël; Lignon, Sabrina; Denis, Yann; Ansaldi, Mireille; Dolla, Alain; Pieulle, Laetitia

    2015-01-01

    The ability to respire sulfate linked to lactate oxidation is a key metabolic signature of the Desulfovibrio genus. Lactate oxidation by these incomplete oxidizers generates reductants through lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), with the latter catalyzing pyruvate conversion into acetyl-CoA. Acetyl-CoA is the source of substrate-level phosphorylation through the production of ATP. Here, we show that these crucial steps are performed by enzymes encoded by a nonacistronic transcriptional unit named now as operon luo (for lactate utilization operon). Using a combination of genetic and biochemical techniques, we assigned a physiological role to the operon genes DVU3027-28 and DVU3032-33. The growth of mutant Δ26-28 was highly disrupted on D-lactate, whereas the growth of mutant Δ32-33 was slower on L-lactate, which could be related to a decrease in the activity of D-lactate or L-lactate oxidase in the corresponding mutants. The DVU3027-28 and DVU3032-33 genes thus encode functional D-LDH and L-LDH enzymes, respectively. Scanning of the genome for lactate utilization revealed several lactate permease and dehydrogenase homologs. However, transcriptional compensation was not observed in any of the mutants except for lactate permease. Although there is a high degree of redundancy for lactate oxidase, it is not functionally efficient in LDH mutants. This result could be related to the identification of several operon enzymes, including LDHs, in the PFOR activity bands, suggesting the occurrence of a lactate-oxidizing supermolecular structure that can optimize the performance of lactate utilization in Desulfovibrio species. PMID:26167158

  18. Regulation of Blood Glucose by Hypothalamic Pyruvate Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Tony K. T.; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Pocai, Alessandro; Rossetti, Luciano

    2005-08-01

    The brain keenly depends on glucose for energy, and mammalians have redundant systems to control glucose production. An increase in circulating glucose inhibits glucose production in the liver, but this negative feedback is impaired in type 2 diabetes. Here we report that a primary increase in hypothalamic glucose levels lowers blood glucose through inhibition of glucose production in rats. The effect of glucose requires its conversion to lactate followed by stimulation of pyruvate metabolism, which leads to activation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels. Thus, interventions designed to enhance the hypothalamic sensing of glucose may improve glucose homeostasis in diabetes.

  19. Pro-inflammatory Macrophages Sustain Pyruvate Oxidation through Pyruvate Dehydrogenase for the Synthesis of Itaconate and to Enable Cytokine Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Meiser, Johannes; Krämer, Lisa; Sapcariu, Sean C.; Battello, Nadia; Ghelfi, Jenny; D'Herouel, Aymeric Fouquier; Skupin, Alexander; Hiller, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Upon stimulation with Th1 cytokines or bacterial lipopolysaccharides, resting macrophages shift their phenotype toward a pro-inflammatory state as part of the innate immune response. LPS-activated macrophages undergo profound metabolic changes to adapt to these new physiological requirements. One key step to mediate this metabolic adaptation is the stabilization of HIF1α, which leads to increased glycolysis and lactate release, as well as decreased oxygen consumption. HIF1 abundance can result in the induction of the gene encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) via phosphorylation. Therefore, it has been speculated that pyruvate oxidation through PDH is decreased in pro-inflammatory macrophages. However, to answer this open question, an in-depth analysis of this metabolic branching point was so far lacking. In this work, we applied stable isotope-assisted metabolomics techniques and demonstrate that pyruvate oxidation is maintained in mature pro-inflammatory macrophages. Glucose-derived pyruvate is oxidized via PDH to generate citrate in the mitochondria. Citrate is used for the synthesis of the antimicrobial metabolite itaconate and for lipogenesis. An increased demand for these metabolites decreases citrate oxidation through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, whereas increased glutamine uptake serves to replenish the TCA cycle. Furthermore, we found that the PDH flux is maintained by unchanged PDK1 abundance, despite the presence of HIF1. By pharmacological intervention, we demonstrate that the PDH flux is an important node for M(LPS) macrophage activation. Therefore, PDH represents a metabolic intervention point that might become a research target for translational medicine to treat chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26679997

  20. Lactate oxidation at the mitochondria: a lactate-malate-aspartate shuttle at work

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Lactate, the conjugate base of lactic acid occurring in aqueous biological fluids, has been derided as a “dead-end” waste product of anaerobic metabolism. Catalyzed by the near-equilibrium enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), the reduction of pyruvate to lactate is thought to serve to regenerate the NAD+ necessary for continued glycolytic flux. Reaction kinetics for LDH imply that lactate oxidation is rarely favored in the tissues of its own production. However, a substantial body of research directly contradicts any notion that LDH invariably operates unidirectionally in vivo. In the current Perspective, a model is forwarded in which the continuous formation and oxidation of lactate serves as a mitochondrial electron shuttle, whereby lactate generated in the cytosol of the cell is oxidized at the mitochondria of the same cell. From this perspective, an intracellular lactate shuttle operates much like the malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS); it is also proposed that the two shuttles are necessarily interconnected in a lactate-MAS. Among the requisite features of such a model, significant compartmentalization of LDH, much like the creatine kinase of the phosphocreatine shuttle, would facilitate net cellular lactate oxidation in a variety of cell types. PMID:25505376

  1. Isolated tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase can synthesize acetoin which inhibits pyruvate oxidation as well as other aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Baggetto, L G; Lehninger, A L

    1987-05-29

    Oxidation of 1 mM pyruvate by Ehrlich and AS30-D tumor mitochondria is inhibited by acetoin, an unusual and important metabolite of pyruvate utilization by cancer cells, by acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal and excess pyruvate. The respiratory inhibition is reversed by other substrates added to pyruvate and also by 0.5 mM ATP. Kinetic properties of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from these tumor mitochondria have been studied. This complex appears to be able to synthesize acetoin from acetaldehyde plus pyruvate and is competitively inhibited by acetoin. The role of a new regulatory pattern for tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase is presented.

  2. Induction of triglyceride accumulation and mitochondrial maintenance in muscle cells by lactate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingquan; Ye, Xin; Xie, Minhao; Ye, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Muscle exercise induces intramuscular triglyceride (TG) accumulation and promotes mitochondrial maintenance in myotubes. However, the mechanism underlying exercise effects remains unknown. In this study, lactic acid was tested as a signaling molecule in C2C12 myotubes to understand the mechanism. Intracellular TG storage was induced in the cells by sodium lactate. The lactate activity was observed with an inhibition of the cAMP-PKA pathway as indicated by a reduction in the phosphorylation status of CREB (pCREB). Induction of pCREB signal by forskolin was blocked by pretreatment of cells with lactate. The impact of lactate on mitochondrial function was examined with a focus on the activities of two enzymes, MCAT (malonylCoA:ACP transferase) and PDH (pyruvate dehydrogenase). The enzyme activities were induced in the cells by lactate. Expression of the lactate receptor (GPR81) and lactate transporters (MCT1/4) were induced as well by lactate. The lactate activities were observed at concentrations between 4-64 mM, and were not dependent on the increase in intracellular pyruvate. Pyruvate treatment did not generate the same effects in the cells. Those results suggest that lactate may induce intramuscular TG storage and mitochondrial maintenance in myotubes through inhibition of the cAMP pathway by activation of GPR81 in a positive feedback manner. PMID:27645401

  3. Induction of triglyceride accumulation and mitochondrial maintenance in muscle cells by lactate

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingquan; Ye, Xin; Xie, Minhao; Ye, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Muscle exercise induces intramuscular triglyceride (TG) accumulation and promotes mitochondrial maintenance in myotubes. However, the mechanism underlying exercise effects remains unknown. In this study, lactic acid was tested as a signaling molecule in C2C12 myotubes to understand the mechanism. Intracellular TG storage was induced in the cells by sodium lactate. The lactate activity was observed with an inhibition of the cAMP-PKA pathway as indicated by a reduction in the phosphorylation status of CREB (pCREB). Induction of pCREB signal by forskolin was blocked by pretreatment of cells with lactate. The impact of lactate on mitochondrial function was examined with a focus on the activities of two enzymes, MCAT (malonylCoA:ACP transferase) and PDH (pyruvate dehydrogenase). The enzyme activities were induced in the cells by lactate. Expression of the lactate receptor (GPR81) and lactate transporters (MCT1/4) were induced as well by lactate. The lactate activities were observed at concentrations between 4–64 mM, and were not dependent on the increase in intracellular pyruvate. Pyruvate treatment did not generate the same effects in the cells. Those results suggest that lactate may induce intramuscular TG storage and mitochondrial maintenance in myotubes through inhibition of the cAMP pathway by activation of GPR81 in a positive feedback manner. PMID:27645401

  4. Induction of triglyceride accumulation and mitochondrial maintenance in muscle cells by lactate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingquan; Ye, Xin; Xie, Minhao; Ye, Jianping

    2016-09-20

    Muscle exercise induces intramuscular triglyceride (TG) accumulation and promotes mitochondrial maintenance in myotubes. However, the mechanism underlying exercise effects remains unknown. In this study, lactic acid was tested as a signaling molecule in C2C12 myotubes to understand the mechanism. Intracellular TG storage was induced in the cells by sodium lactate. The lactate activity was observed with an inhibition of the cAMP-PKA pathway as indicated by a reduction in the phosphorylation status of CREB (pCREB). Induction of pCREB signal by forskolin was blocked by pretreatment of cells with lactate. The impact of lactate on mitochondrial function was examined with a focus on the activities of two enzymes, MCAT (malonylCoA:ACP transferase) and PDH (pyruvate dehydrogenase). The enzyme activities were induced in the cells by lactate. Expression of the lactate receptor (GPR81) and lactate transporters (MCT1/4) were induced as well by lactate. The lactate activities were observed at concentrations between 4-64 mM, and were not dependent on the increase in intracellular pyruvate. Pyruvate treatment did not generate the same effects in the cells. Those results suggest that lactate may induce intramuscular TG storage and mitochondrial maintenance in myotubes through inhibition of the cAMP pathway by activation of GPR81 in a positive feedback manner.

  5. Impact of Perturbed Pyruvate Metabolism on Adipocyte Triglyceride Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Si, Yaguang; Shi, Hai; Lee, Kyongbum

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to test the hypothesis that adipocyte TG accumulation could be altered by specifically perturbing pyruvate metabolism. We treated cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes with chemical inhibitors of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate carboxylase (PC), and characterized their global effects on intermediary metabolism using metabolic flux and isotopomer analysis. Inhibiting the enzymes over several days did not alter the adipocyte differentiation program as assessed by the expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The main metabolic effects were to up-regulate intracellular lipolysis and decrease TG accumulation. Inhibiting PC also up-regulated glycolysis. Flux estimates indicated that the reduction in TG was due to decreased de novo fatty acid synthesis. Exogenous addition of free fatty acids dose-dependently increased the cellular TG level in the inhibitor-treated adipocytes, but not in untreated control cells. The results of this study support our hypothesis regarding the critical role of pyruvate reactions in TG synthesis. PMID:19683593

  6. Isolation from estuarine sediments of a Desulfovibrio strain which can grow on lactate coupled to the reductive dehalogenation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, A.W.; Phelps, C.D.; Young, L.Y.

    1999-03-01

    Strain TBP-1, an anaerobic bacterium capable of reductively dehalogenating 2,4,6-tribromophenol to phenol, was isolated from estuarine sediments of the Arthur Kill in the New York/New Jersey harbor. It is a gram-negative, motile, vibrio-shaped, obligate anaerobe which grows on lactate, pyruvate, hydrogen, and fumarate when provided sulfate as an electron acceptor. The organism accumulates acetate when grown on lactate and sulfate, contains desulfoviridin, and will not grow in the absence of NaCl. It will not utilize acetate, succinate, propionate, or butyrate for growth via sulfate reduction. When supplied with lactate as an electron donor, strain TBP-1 will utilize sulfate, sulfite, sulfur, and thiosulfate for growth but not nitrate, fumarate, or acrylate. This organism debrominates 2-, 4-, 2,4-, 2,6-, and 2,4,6-bromophenol but not 3- or 2,3-bromophenol or monobrominated benzoates. It will not dehalogenate monochlorinated, fluorinated, or iodinated phenols or chlorinated benzoates. Together with its physiological characteristics, its 16S rRNA gene sequence places it in the genus Desulfovibrio. The average growth yield of strain TBP-1 grown on a defined medium supplemented with lactate and 2,4,6-bromophenol is 3.71 mg of protein/mmol of phenol produced, and the yield was 1.42 mg of protein/mmol of phenol produced when 40bromophenol was the electron acceptor. Average growth yields for Desulfovibrio sp. strain TBP-1 grown with 2,4,6-bromophenol, 4-bromophenol, or sulfate are 0.62, 0.71, and 1.07, respectively. Growth did not occur when either lactate or 2,4,6-bromophenol was omitted from the growth medium. These results indicate that Desulfovibrio sp. strain TBP-1 is capable of growth via halorespiration.

  7. Pyruvate fuels mitochondrial respiration and proliferation of breast cancer cells: effect of monocarboxylate transporter inhibition.

    PubMed

    Diers, Anne R; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Chang, Ching-Fang; Hogg, Neil

    2012-06-15

    Recent studies have highlighted the fact that cancer cells have an altered metabolic phenotype, and this metabolic reprogramming is required to drive the biosynthesis pathways necessary for rapid replication and proliferation. Specifically, the importance of citric acid cycle-generated intermediates in the regulation of cancer cell proliferation has been recently appreciated. One function of MCTs (monocarboxylate transporters) is to transport the citric acid cycle substrate pyruvate across the plasma membrane and into mitochondria, and inhibition of MCTs has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy to target metabolic pathways in cancer. In the present paper, we examined the effect of different metabolic substrates (glucose and pyruvate) on mitochondrial function and proliferation in breast cancer cells. We demonstrated that cancer cells proliferate more rapidly in the presence of exogenous pyruvate when compared with lactate. Pyruvate supplementation fuelled mitochondrial oxygen consumption and the reserve respiratory capacity, and this increase in mitochondrial function correlated with proliferative potential. In addition, inhibition of cellular pyruvate uptake using the MCT inhibitor α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid impaired mitochondrial respiration and decreased cell growth. These data demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial metabolism in proliferative responses and highlight a novel mechanism of action for MCT inhibitors through suppression of pyruvate-fuelled mitochondrial respiration.

  8. The disruption of JEN1 from Candida albicans impairs the transport of lactate.

    PubMed

    Soares-Silva, Isabel; Paiva, Sandra; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Casal, Margarida

    2004-01-01

    A lactate permease was biochemically identified in Candida albicans RM1000 presenting the following kinetic parameters at pH 5.0: Km 0.33+/-0.09 mM and Vmax 0.85+/-0.06 nmol s(-1) mg dry wt(-1). Lactate uptake was competitively inhibited by pyruvic and propionic acids; acetic acid behaved as a non-competitive substrate. An open reading frame (ORF) homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene JEN1 was identified (CaJEN1). Deletions of both CaJEN1 alleles of C. albicans (resulting strain CPK2) resulted in the loss of all measurable lactate permease activity. No CaJEN1 mRNA was detectable in glucose-grown cells neither activity for the lactate transporter. In a medium containing lactic acid, CaJEN1 mRNA was detected in the RM1000 strain, and no expression was found in cells of CPK2 strain. In a strain deleted in the CaCAT8 genes the expression of CaJEN1 was significantly reduced, suggesting the role of this gene as an activator for CaJEN1 expression. Both in C. albicans and in S. cerevisiae cells CaJEN1-GFP fusion was expressed and targeted to the plasma membrane. The native CaJEN1 was not functional in a S. cerevisiae jen1delta strain. Changing ser217-CTG codon (encoding leucine in S. cerevisiae) to a TCC codon restored the permease activity in S. cerevisiae, proving that the CaJEN1 gene codes for a monocarboxylate transporter. PMID:15764370

  9. Dinosaur lactation?

    PubMed

    Else, Paul L

    2013-02-01

    Lactation is a process associated with mammals, yet a number of birds feed their newly hatched young on secretions analogous to the milk of mammals. These secretions are produced from various sections (crop organ, oesophageal lining and proventriculus) of the upper digestive tract and possess similar levels of fat and protein, as well as added carotenoids, antibodies and, in the case of pigeons and doves, epidermal growth factor. Parental care in avian species has been proposed to originate from dinosaurs. This study examines the possibility that some dinosaurs used secretory feeding to increase the rate of growth of their young, estimated to be similar to that of present day birds and mammals. Dinosaur 'lactation' could also have facilitated immune responses as well as extending parental protection as a result of feeding newly hatched young in nest environments. While the arguments for dinosaur lactation are somewhat generic, a case study for lactation in herbivorous site-nesting dinosaurs is presented. It is proposes that secretory feeding could have been used to bridge the gap between hatching and establishment of the normal diet in some dinosaurs.

  10. Lactate does not activate NF-κB in oxidative tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Van Hée, Vincent F.; Pérez-Escuredo, Jhudit; Cacace, Andrea; Copetti, Tamara; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The lactate anion is currently emerging as an oncometabolite. Lactate, produced and exported by glycolytic and glutaminolytic cells in tumors, can be recycled as an oxidative fuel by oxidative tumors cells. Independently of hypoxia, it can also activate transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) in tumor and endothelial cells, promoting angiogenesis. These protumoral activities of lactate depend on lactate uptake, a process primarily facilitated by the inward, passive lactate-proton symporter monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1); the conversion of lactate and NAD+ to pyruvate, NADH and H+ by lactate dehydrogenase-1 (LDH-1); and a competition between pyruvate and α-ketoglutarate that inhibits prolylhydroxylases (PHDs). Endothelial cells do not primarily use lactate as an oxidative fuel but, rather, as a signaling agent. In addition to HIF-1, lactate can indeed activate transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in these cells, through a mechanism not only depending on PHD inhibition but also on NADH alimenting NAD(P)H oxidases to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). While NF-κB activity in endothelial cells promotes angiogenesis, NF-κB activation in tumor cells is known to stimulate tumor progression by conferring resistance to apoptosis, stemness, pro-angiogenic and metastatic capabilities. In this study, we therefore tested whether exogenous lactate could activate NF-κB in oxidative tumor cells equipped for lactate signaling. We report that, precisely because they are oxidative, HeLa and SiHa human tumor cells do not activate NF-κB in response to lactate. Indeed, while lactate-derived pyruvate is well-known to inhibit PHDs in these cells, we found that NADH aliments oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in mitochondria rather than NAD(P)H oxidases in the cytosol. These data were confirmed using oxidative human Cal27 and MCF7 tumor cells. This new information positions the malate-aspartate shuttle as a key player in the oxidative metabolism

  11. 13C-NMR analysis of Aspergillus mutants disturbed in pyruvate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dijkema, C; Visser, J

    1987-12-10

    The metabolic consequences of two defects in pyruvate metabolism of the hyphal fungus Aspergillus nidulans have been investigated by natural abundance 13C-NMR spectroscopy. A pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (pdh) mutant, grown on acetate, accumulates alanine upon starvation which is derived from mannitol reserves. The L-alanine level increases further upon incubation with the non-permissive substrate D-glucose. L-Glutamate is absent from these spectra as it is required both for the transamination of pyruvate and as a reaction on an impaired energy metabolism in such a pdh-deficient strain. A pyruvate carboxylase (pyc) mutant, grown upon acetate, only starts to accumulate alanine after a long incubation period with D-glucose, due to the long-lasting presence of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzyme, which are both induced by growth on acetate. When this strain is grown on D-fructose and L-glutamate, alanine also accumulates within 3 h upon transfer to D-glucose.

  12. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Hernandez, Agustin; Speed, Haley; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-03-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes waterborne diseases worldwide. There is no effective therapy for C. parvum infection. The parasite depends mainly on glycolysis for energy production. Lactate dehydrogenase is a major regulator of glycolysis. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase and high resolution crystal structures of the apo-enzyme and four ternary complexes. The ternary complexes capture the enzyme bound to NAD/NADH or its 3-acetylpyridine analog in the cofactor binding pocket, while the substrate binding site is occupied by one of the following ligands: lactate, pyruvate or oxamate. The results reveal distinctive features of the parasitic enzyme. For example, C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase prefers the acetylpyridine analog of NADH as a cofactor. Moreover, it is slightly less sensitive to gossypol inhibition compared with mammalian lactate dehydrogenases and not inhibited by excess pyruvate. The active site loop and the antigenic loop in C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are considerably different from those in the human counterpart. Structural features and enzymatic properties of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are similar to enzymes from related parasites. Structural comparison with malate dehydrogenase supports a common ancestry for the two genes.

  13. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Hernandez, Agustin; Speed, Haley; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-03-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes waterborne diseases worldwide. There is no effective therapy for C. parvum infection. The parasite depends mainly on glycolysis for energy production. Lactate dehydrogenase is a major regulator of glycolysis. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase and high resolution crystal structures of the apo-enzyme and four ternary complexes. The ternary complexes capture the enzyme bound to NAD/NADH or its 3-acetylpyridine analog in the cofactor binding pocket, while the substrate binding site is occupied by one of the following ligands: lactate, pyruvate or oxamate. The results reveal distinctive features of the parasitic enzyme. For example, C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase prefers the acetylpyridine analog of NADH as a cofactor. Moreover, it is slightly less sensitive to gossypol inhibition compared with mammalian lactate dehydrogenases and not inhibited by excess pyruvate. The active site loop and the antigenic loop in C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are considerably different from those in the human counterpart. Structural features and enzymatic properties of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are similar to enzymes from related parasites. Structural comparison with malate dehydrogenase supports a common ancestry for the two genes. PMID:25542170

  14. Multi-band frequency encoding method for metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Morze, Cornelius; Reed, Galen; Shin, Peter; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Hu, Simon; Bok, Robert; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2011-08-01

    A new method was developed for simultaneous spatial localization and spectral separation of multiple compounds based on a single echo, by designing the acquisition to place individual compounds in separate frequency encoding bands. This method was specially designed for rapid and robust metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized 13C substrates and their metabolic products, and was investigated in phantom studies and studies in normal mice and transgenic models of prostate cancer to provide rapid metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and its metabolic products [1- 13C]lactate and [1- 13C]alanine at spatial resolutions up to 3 mm in-plane. Elevated pyruvate and lactate signals in the vicinity of prostatic tissues were observed in transgenic tumor mice. The multi-band frequency encoding technique enabled rapid metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized 13C compounds with important advantages over prior approaches, including less complicated acquisition and reconstruction methods.

  15. D-Lactate transport and metabolism in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    de Bari, Lidia; Atlante, Anna; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Principato, Giovanni; Passarella, Salvatore

    2002-01-01

    In the present study we investigated whether isolated rat liver mitochondria can take up and metabolize D-lactate. We found the following: (1) externally added D-lactate causes oxygen uptake by mitochondria [P/O ratio (the ratio of mol of ATP synthesized to mol of oxygen atoms reduced to water during oxidative phosphorylation)=2] and membrane potential (Delta(psi)) generation in processes that are rotenone-insensitive, but inhibited by antimycin A and cyanide, and proton release from coupled mitochondria inhibited by alpha-cyanocinnamate, but not by phenylsuccinate; (2) the activity of the putative flavoprotein (D-lactate dehydrogenase) was detected in inside-out submitochondrial particles, but not in mitochondria and mitoplasts, as it is localized in the matrix phase of the mitochondrial inner membrane; (3) three novel separate translocators exist to mediate D-lactate traffic across the mitochondrial inner membrane: the D-lactate/H(+) symporter, which was investigated by measuring fluorimetrically the rate of endogenous flavin reduction, the D-lactate/oxoacid antiporter (which mediates both the D-lactate/pyruvate and D-lactate/oxaloacetate exchanges) and D-lactate/malate antiporter studied by monitoring photometrically the appearance of the D-lactate counteranions outside mitochondria. The D-lactate translocators, in the light of their different inhibition profiles separate from the monocarboxylate carrier, were found to differ from each other in the V(max) values and in the inhibition and pH profiles and were shown to regulate mitochondrial D-lactate metabolism in vitro. The D-lactate translocators and the D-lactate dehydrogenase could account for the removal of the toxic methylglyoxal from cytosol, as well as for D-lactate-dependent gluconeogenesis. PMID:11955284

  16. Intracellular Shuttle: The Lactate Aerobic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Rogério Santos de Oliveira; de Aguiar, Rafael Alves; Turnes, Tiago; Penteado Dos Santos, Rafael; Fernandes Mendes de Oliveira, Mariana; Caputo, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Lactate is a highly dynamic metabolite that can be used as a fuel by several cells of the human body, particularly during physical exercise. Traditionally, it has been believed that the first step of lactate oxidation occurs in cytosol; however, this idea was recently challenged. A new hypothesis has been presented based on the fact that lactate-to-pyruvate conversion cannot occur in cytosol, because the LDH enzyme characteristics and cytosolic environment do not allow the reaction in this way. Instead, the Intracellular Lactate Shuttle hypothesis states that lactate first enters in mitochondria and only then is metabolized. In several tissues of the human body this idea is well accepted but is quite resistant in skeletal muscle. In this paper, we will present not only the studies which are protagonists in this discussion, but the potential mechanism by which this oxidation occurs and also a link between lactate and mitochondrial proliferation. This new perspective brings some implications and comes to change our understanding of the interaction between the energy systems, because the product of one serves as a substrate for the other. PMID:22593684

  17. Atmospheric measurements of pyruvic and formic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreae, Meinrat O.; Li, Shao-Meng; Talbot, Robert W.

    1987-01-01

    Pyruvic acid, a product of the atmospheric oxidation of cresols and probably of isoprene, has been determined together with formic acid in atmospheric aerosols and rain as well as in the vapor phase. Both acids are present predominantly as vapor; only about 10-20 percent of the total atmospheric pyruvate and 1-2 percent of the total formate are in the particulate phase. The concentrations of pyruvic and formic acid are highly correlated, with typical formic-to-pyruvic ratios of 10-30 in the gas phase, 20-30 in rain, and 2-10 in aerosols. The gas-phase and rain ratios are comparable to those predicted to result from isoprene oxidation. Pyruvic acid levels were similar in the eastern United States (during summer) and the Amazon Basin, suggesting that natural processes, particularly the photochemical oxidation of isoprene, could account for most of the pyruvic acid present in the atmosphere.

  18. Mesoxalaldehyde acetals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordeeva, G.N.; Kalashnikov, S.M.; Popov, Yu.N.; Kruglov, E.A.; Imashev, U.B.

    1987-11-10

    The treatment of methylglyoxal acetals by alkyl nitrites in the presence of the corresponding aliphatic alcohols and hydrochloric acid leads to the formation of linear mesoxalaldehyde acetals, whose structure was established by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The major pathways for the decomposition of these molecules upon electron impact were established.

  19. Mitochondrial pyruvate carrier in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Štáfková, Jitka; Mach, Jan; Biran, Marc; Verner, Zdeněk; Bringaud, Frédéric; Tachezy, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Pyruvate is a key product of glycolysis that regulates the energy metabolism of cells. In Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of sleeping sickness, the fate of pyruvate varies dramatically during the parasite life cycle. In bloodstream forms, pyruvate is mainly excreted, whereas in tsetse fly forms, pyruvate is metabolized in mitochondria yielding additional ATP molecules. The character of the molecular machinery that mediates pyruvate transport across mitochondrial membrane was elusive until the recent discovery of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) in yeast and mammals. Here, we characterized pyruvate import into mitochondrion of T. brucei. We identified mpc1 and mpc2 homologs in the T. brucei genome with attributes of MPC protein family and we demonstrated that both proteins are present in the mitochondrial membrane of the parasite. Investigations of mpc1 or mpc2 gene knock-out cells proved that T. brucei MPC1/2 proteins facilitate mitochondrial pyruvate transport. Interestingly, MPC is expressed not only in procyclic trypanosomes with fully activated mitochondria but also in bloodstream trypanosomes in which most of pyruvate is excreted. Moreover, MPC appears to be essential for bloodstream forms, supporting the recently emerging picture that the functions of mitochondria in bloodstream forms are more diverse than it was originally thought. PMID:26748989

  20. Targeting Tumor Metabolism for Cancer Treatment: Is Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinases (PDKs) a Viable Anticancer Target?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Hu, Xiaohui; Tam, Kin Yip

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains a lethal threat to global lives. Development of novel anticancer therapeutics is still a challenge to scientists in the field of biomedicine. In cancer cells, the metabolic features are significantly different from those of normal ones, which are hallmarks of several malignancies. Recent studies brought atypical cellular metabolism, such as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect, into the scientific limelight. Targeting these altered metabolic pathways in cancer cells presents a promising therapeutic strategy. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs), key enzymes in the pathway of glucose metabolism, could inactivate the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) by phosphorylating it and preserving the substrates pyruvate, lactate and alanine for gluconeogenesis. Overexpression of PDKs could block the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to satisfy high oxygen demand in cancer cells, while inhibition of PDKs could upregulate the activity of PDC and rectify the balance between the demand and supply of oxygen, which could lead to cancer cell death. Thus, inhibitors targeting PDKs represent a promising strategy for cancer treatment by acting on glycolytic tumors while showing minimal side effects on the oxidative healthy organs. This review considers the role of PDKs as regulator of PDC that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate in mitochondrion. It is concluded that PDKs are solid therapeutic targets. Inhibition of PDKs could be an attractive therapeutic approach for the development of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26681918

  1. Exogenous Mg-ATP induces a large inhibition of pyruvate kinase in intact rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ichai, C; El-Mir, M Y; Nogueira, V; Piquet, M A; Chauvin, C; Fontaine, E; Leverve, X M

    2001-03-01

    Mg-ATP infusion in vivo has been reported to be beneficial both to organ function and survival rate in various models of shock. Moreover, a large variety of metabolic effects has been shown to occur in several tissues due to purinergic receptor activation. In the present work we studied the effects of exogenous Mg-ATP in rat liver cells perifused with dihydroxyacetone to investigate simultaneously gluconeogenetic and glycolytic pathways. We found a significant effect on oxidative phosphorylation as characterized by a decrease in oxygen consumption rate and in the cellular ATP-to-ADP ratio associated with an increase in lactate-to-pyruvate ratio. In addition, exogenous Mg-ATP induced rapid and reversible inhibition of both gluconeogenesis and glycolysis. The main effect on gluconeogenesis was located at the level of the fructose cycle, whereas the decrease in glycolysis was due to a strong inhibition of pyruvate kinase. Although pyruvate kinase inhibition induced by exogenous Mg-ATP was allosteric when assessed in vitro after enzyme extraction, we found a large decrease in the apparent maximal velocity when kinetics were assessed in vivo in intact perifused hepatocytes. This newly described short-term regulation of pyruvate kinase occurs only in the intact cell and may open new potentials for the pharmacological regulation of pyruvate kinase in vivo. PMID:11104754

  2. Propionate Increases Hepatic Pyruvate Cycling and Anaplerosis and Alters Mitochondrial Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Perry, Rachel J; Borders, Candace B; Cline, Gary W; Zhang, Xian-Man; Alves, Tiago C; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Rothman, Douglas L; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-06-01

    In mammals, pyruvate kinase (PK) plays a key role in regulating the balance between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis; however, in vivo regulation of PK flux by gluconeogenic hormones and substrates is poorly understood. To this end, we developed a novel NMR-liquid chromatography/tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to directly assess pyruvate cycling relative to mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism (VPyr-Cyc/VMito) in vivo using [3-(13)C]lactate as a tracer. Using this approach, VPyr-Cyc/VMito was only 6% in overnight fasted rats. In contrast, when propionate was infused simultaneously at doses previously used as a tracer, it increased VPyr-Cyc/VMito by 20-30-fold, increased hepatic TCA metabolite concentrations 2-3-fold, and increased endogenous glucose production rates by 20-100%. The physiologic stimuli, glucagon and epinephrine, both increased hepatic glucose production, but only glucagon suppressed VPyr-Cyc/VMito These data show that under fasting conditions, when hepatic gluconeogenesis is stimulated, pyruvate recycling is relatively low in liver compared with VMito flux and that liver metabolism, in particular pyruvate cycling, is sensitive to propionate making it an unsuitable tracer to assess hepatic glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and mitochondrial metabolism in vivo. PMID:27002151

  3. POST-EXERCISE LACTATE PRODUCTION AND METABOLISM IN THREE SPECIES OF AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL DECAPOD CRUSTACEANS

    PubMed

    Walsh

    1994-01-01

    Aquatic and terrestrial crustaceans are dependent on both aerobic and anaerobic metabolism for energy production during exercise. Anaerobic energy production is marked by an accumulation of lactate in both muscle tissue and haemolymph, but the metabolic fate of lactate is not clear. Lactate recycling via gluconeogenesis and the potential role of carbonic anhydrase (CA) in supplying bicarbonate for the carboxylation of pyruvate were investigated in three species of decapod crustaceans: Callinectes sapidus (aquatic), Cardisoma guanhumi (semi-terrestrial) and Gecarcinus lateralis (terrestrial). CA activity was found in mitochondria and cytoplasmic fractions of gill, hepatopancreas and muscle of all three species. Significant activities of key enzymes of gluconeogenesis (e.g. pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and fructose bisphosphatase), however, could not be detected. Exercise to exhaustion produced a species-specific pattern of accumulation and clearance of lactate in tissue and haemolymph, indicating a differential degree of reliance on anaerobic energy production. Treatment with acetazolamide, a CA inhibitor, did not significantly alter the pattern of lactate dynamics in animals given repeated bouts of exhaustive exercise interspersed with periods of recovery. Injection of [U-14C]lactate resulted in the appearance of label in both muscle glycogen and excreted carbon dioxide, suggesting multiple metabolic fates for lactate. Lactate turnover rates for G. lateralis were similar to those reported for fish. In these animals, gluconeogenesis possibly proceeds via the reversal of pyruvate kinase, or via the typical Cori cycle but so slowly that the uncatalysed supply of bicarbonate is sufficient to keep pace with the low activities of pyruvate carboxylase and the subsequent low rates of pyruvate carboxylation.

  4. Microbial Community Dynamics of Lactate Enriched Hanford Groundwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, Jennifer J.; Drake, Meghan M.; Carroll, Susan L.; Yang, Zamin K.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Brown, Stephen D.; Podar, Mircea; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2010-05-01

    The Department of Energy site at Hanford, WA, has been historically impacted by U and Cr from the nuclear weapons industry. In an attempt to stimulate microbial remediation of these metals, in-situ lactate enrichment experiments are ongoing. In order to bridge the gap from the laboratory to the field, we inoculated triplicate anaerobic, continuous-flow glass reactors with groundwater collected from well Hanford 100-H in order to obtain a stable, enriched community while selecting for metal-reducing bacteria. Each reactor was fed from a single carboy containing defined media with 30 mM lactate at a rate of 0.223 ml/min under continuous nitrogen flow at 9 ml/min. Cell counts, organic acids, gDNA (for qPCR and pyrosequencing) and gases were sampled during the experiment. Cell counts remained low (less than 1x107 cells/ml) during the first two weeks of the experiment, but by day 20, had reached a density greater than 1x108 cells/ml. Metabolite analysis showed a decrease in the lactate concentrations over time. Pyruvate concentrations ranged from 20-40 uM the first week of the experiment then was undetectable after day 10. Likewise, formate appeared in the reactors during the first week with concentrations of 1.48-1.65 mM at day 7 then the concentrations decreased to 0.69-0.95 on day 10 and were undetectable on day 15. Acetate was present in low amounts on day 3 (0.15-0.33 mM) and steadily increased to 3.35-5.22 mM over time. Similarly, carbon dioxide was present in low concentrations early on and increased to 0.28-0.35 mM as the experiment progressed. We also were able to detect low amounts of methane (10-20 uM) during the first week of the experiment, but by day 10 the methane was undetectable. From these results and pyrosequencing analysis, we conclude that a shift in the microbial community dynamics occurred over time to eventually form a stable and enriched microbial community. Comprehensive investigations such as these allow for the examination of not only which

  5. Quantitative analysis of intermediary metabolism in hepatocytes incubated in the presence and absence of glucagon with a substrate mixture containing glucose, ribose, fructose, alanine and acetate.

    PubMed Central

    Rabkin, M; Blum, J J

    1985-01-01

    Hepatocytes were isolated from the livers of fed rats and incubated, in the presence and absence of 100 nM-glucagon, with a substrate mixture containing glucose (10 mM), fructose (4 mM), alanine (3.5 mM), acetate (1.25 mM), and ribose (1 mM). In any given incubation one substrate was labelled with 14C. Incorporation of 14C into glucose, glycogen, CO2, lactate, alanine, glutamate, lipid glycerol and fatty acids was measured after 20 and 40 min of incubation under quasi-steady-state conditions [Borowitz, Stein & Blum (1977) J. Biol. Chem. 252, 1589-1605]. These data and the measured O2 consumption were analysed with the aid of a structural metabolic model incorporating all reactions of the glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and pentose phosphate pathways, and associated mitochondrial and cytosolic reactions. A considerable excess of experimental measurements over independent flux parameters and a number of independent measurements of changes in metabolite concentrations allowed for a stringent test of the model. A satisfactory fit to the data was obtained for each condition. Significant findings included: control cells were glycogenic and glucagon-treated cells glycogenolytic during the second interval; an ordered (last in, first out) model of glycogen degradation [Devos & Hers (1979) Eur. J. Biochem. 99, 161-167] was required in order to fit the experimental data; the pentose shunt contributed approx. 15% of the carbon for gluconeogenesis in both control and glucagon-treated cells; net flux through the lower Embden-Meyerhof pathway was in the glycolytic direction except during the 20-40 min interval in glucagon-treated cells; the increased gluconeogenesis in response to glucagon was correlated with a decreased pyruvate kinase flux and lactate output; fluxes through pyruvate kinase, pyruvate carboxylase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were not coordinately controlled; Krebs cycle activity did not change with glucagon treatment; flux through the malic enzyme was

  6. The effect of exogenous substrate concentrations on true and apparent metabolism of hyperpolarized pyruvate in the isolated perfused lung.

    PubMed

    Kadlecek, Stephen; Shaghaghi, Hoora; Siddiqui, Sarmad; Profka, Harrilla; Pourfathi, Mehrdad; Rizi, Rahim

    2014-12-01

    Although relatively metabolically inactive, the lung has an important role in maintaining systemic glycolytic intermediate and cytosolic redox balance. Failure to perform this function appropriately may lead to lung disease progression, including systemic aspects of these disorders. In this study, we experimentally probe the response of the isolated, perfused organ to varying glycolytic intermediate (pyruvate and lactate) concentrations, and the effect on the apparent metabolism of hyperpolarized 1-(13)C pyruvate. Twenty-four separate conditions were studied, from sub-physiological to super-physiological concentrations of each metabolite. A three-compartment model is developed, which accurately matches the full range of experiments and includes a full account of evolution of agent concentration and polarization. The model is then refined using a series of approximations which are shown to be applicable to cases of physiological relevance, and which facilitate an intuitive understanding of the saturation and scaling behavior. Perturbations of the model assumptions are used to determine the sensitivity to input parameter estimates, and finally the model is used to examine the relationship between measurements accessible by NMR and the underlying physiological parameters of interest. Based on the observed scaling of lactate labeling with lactate and pyruvate concentrations, we conclude that the level of hyperpolarized lactate signal in the lung is primarily determined by the rate at which NAD(+) is reduced to NADH. Further, although weak dependences on other factors are predicted, the modeled NAD(+) reduction rate is largely governed by the intracellular lactate pool size. Conditions affecting the lactate pool can therefore be expected to display the highest contrast in hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate imaging. The work is intended to serve as a basis both to interpret the signal dynamics of hyperpolarized measurements in the normal lung and to understand the cause of

  7. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... National (UK) Information Centre for Metabolic Diseases National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Pyruvate kinase deficiency of red cells Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  8. Neuron-astrocyte interactions, pyruvate carboxylation and the pentose phosphate pathway in the neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Morken, Tora Sund; Brekke, Eva; Håberg, Asta; Widerøe, Marius; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Glucose and acetate metabolism and the synthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters, anaplerosis, glutamate-glutamine cycling and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) have been extensively investigated in the adult, but not the neonatal rat brain. To do this, 7 day postnatal (P7) rats were injected with [1-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]acetate and sacrificed 5, 10, 15, 30 and 45 min later. Adult rats were injected and sacrificed after 15 min. To analyse pyruvate carboxylation and PPP activity during development, P7 rats received [1,2-(13)C]glucose and were sacrificed 30 min later. Brain extracts were analysed using (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Numerous differences in metabolism were found between the neonatal and adult brain. The neonatal brain contained lower levels of glutamate, aspartate and N-acetylaspartate but similar levels of GABA and glutamine per mg tissue. Metabolism of [1-(13)C]glucose at the acetyl CoA stage was reduced much more than that of [1,2-(13)C]acetate. The transfer of glutamate from neurons to astrocytes was much lower while transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to glutamatergic neurons was relatively higher. However, transport of glutamine from astrocytes to GABAergic neurons was lower. Using [1,2-(13)C]glucose it could be shown that despite much lower pyruvate carboxylation, relatively more pyruvate from glycolysis was directed towards anaplerosis than pyruvate dehydrogenation in astrocytes. Moreover, the ratio of PPP/glucose-metabolism was higher. These findings indicate that only the part of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that transfers glutamine from astrocytes to neurons is operating in the neonatal brain and that compared to adults, relatively more glucose is prioritised to PPP and pyruvate carboxylation. Our results may have implications for the capacity to protect the neonatal brain against excitotoxicity and oxidative stress.

  9. Metabolism of D-lactate and structurally related organic acids in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Husic, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    During the initial minutes of anaerobiosis, /sup 14/C-labeled D-lactate, derived from the photosynthetic sugar phosphate pool, accumulated in the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The production of the D-isomer of lactate by algae is in contrast to plant and mammalian cells in which L-lactate is formed. After initial lactate formation, Chlamydomonas exhibits a mixed-acid type fermentation, thereby avoiding lactate accumulation and enabling the cells to tolerate extended periods of anaerobiosis. A pyruvate reductase which catalyzes the formation of D-lactate in Chlamydomonas was partially purified and characterized. Lactate produced anaerobically was metabolized only when Chlamydomonas cells were returned to aerobic conditions, and reoxidation of the D-lactate was apparently catalyzed by a mitochondrial membrane-bound dehydrogenase, rather than by the soluble pyruvate reductase. Mutants of Chlamydomonas, deficient in mitochondrial respiration, were used to demonstrate that lactate metabolism was linked to the mitochondrial electron transport chain. In addition, the oxidation of glycolate, a structural analog of lactate, was also linked to mitochondrial electron transport in vivo.

  10. Efficient reduction of the formation of by-products and improvement of production yield of 2,3-butanediol by a combined deletion of alcohol dehydrogenase, acetate kinase-phosphotransacetylase, and lactate dehydrogenase genes in metabolically engineered Klebsiella oxytoca in mineral salts medium.

    PubMed

    Jantama, Kaemwich; Polyiam, Pattharasedthi; Khunnonkwao, Panwana; Chan, Sitha; Sangproo, Maytawadee; Khor, Kirin; Jantama, Sirima Suvarnakuta; Kanchanatawee, Sunthorn

    2015-07-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca KMS005 (∆adhE∆ackA-pta∆ldhA) was metabolically engineered to improve 2,3-butanediol (BDO) yield. Elimination of alcohol dehydrogenase E (adhE), acetate kinase A-phosphotransacetylase (ackA-pta), and lactate dehydrogenase A (ldhA) enzymes allowed BDO production as a primary pathway for NADH re-oxidation, and significantly reduced by-products. KMS005 was screened for the efficient glucose utilization by metabolic evolution. KMS005-73T improved BDO production at a concentration of 23.5±0.5 g/L with yield of 0.46±0.02 g/g in mineral salts medium containing 50 g/L glucose in a shake flask. KMS005-73T also exhibited BDO yields of about 0.40-0.42 g/g from sugarcane molasses, cassava starch, and maltodextrin. During fed-batch fermentation, KMS005-73T produced BDO at a concentration, yield, and overall and specific productivities of 117.4±4.5 g/L, 0.49±0.02 g/g, 1.20±0.05 g/Lh, and 27.2±1.1 g/gCDW, respectively. No acetoin, lactate, and formate were detected, and only trace amounts of acetate and ethanol were formed. The strain also produced the least by-products and the highest BDO yield among other Klebsiella strains previously developed. PMID:25895450

  11. Modeling non‐linear kinetics of hyperpolarized [1‐13C] pyruvate in the crystalloid‐perfused rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Mariotti, E.; Orton, M. R.; Eerbeek, O.; Ashruf, J. F.; Zuurbier, C. J.; Southworth, R.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarized 13C MR measurements have the potential to display non‐linear kinetics. We have developed an approach to describe possible non‐first‐order kinetics of hyperpolarized [1‐13C] pyruvate employing a system of differential equations that agrees with the principle of conservation of mass of the hyperpolarized signal. Simultaneous fitting to a second‐order model for conversion of [1‐13C] pyruvate to bicarbonate, lactate and alanine was well described in the isolated rat heart perfused with Krebs buffer containing glucose as sole energy substrate, or glucose supplemented with pyruvate. Second‐order modeling yielded significantly improved fits of pyruvate–bicarbonate kinetics compared with the more traditionally used first‐order model and suggested time‐dependent decreases in pyruvate–bicarbonate flux. Second‐order modeling gave time‐dependent changes in forward and reverse reaction kinetics of pyruvate–lactate exchange and pyruvate–alanine exchange in both groups of hearts during the infusion of pyruvate; however, the fits were not significantly improved with respect to a traditional first‐order model. The mechanism giving rise to second‐order pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinetics was explored experimentally using surface fluorescence measurements of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide reduced form (NADH) performed under the same conditions, demonstrating a significant increase of NADH during pyruvate infusion. This suggests a simultaneous depletion of available mitochondrial NAD+ (the cofactor for PDH), consistent with the non‐linear nature of the kinetics. NADH levels returned to baseline following cessation of the pyruvate infusion, suggesting this to be a transient effect. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26777799

  12. Identification of lactate dehydrogenase as a mammalian pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Mitsugu; Minematsu, Kenji; Shibata, Takahiro; Kondo, Tatsuhiko; Ishii, Takeshi; Uchida, Koji

    2016-05-27

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a redox-active o-quinone, is an important nutrient involved in numerous physiological and biochemical processes in mammals. Despite such beneficial functions, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be established. In the present study, using PQQ-immobilized Sepharose beads as a probe, we examined the presence of protein(s) that are capable of binding PQQ in mouse NIH/3T3 fibroblasts and identified five cellular proteins, including l-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) A chain, as potential mammalian PQQ-binding proteins. In vitro studies using a purified rabbit muscle LDH show that PQQ inhibits the formation of lactate from pyruvate in the presence of NADH (forward reaction), whereas it enhances the conversion of lactate to pyruvate in the presence of NAD(+) (reverse reaction). The molecular mechanism underlying PQQ-mediated regulation of LDH activity is attributed to the oxidation of NADH to NAD(+) by PQQ. Indeed, the PQQ-bound LDH oxidizes NADH, generating NAD(+), and significantly catalyzes the conversion of lactate to pyruvate. Furthermore, PQQ attenuates cellular lactate release and increases intracellular ATP levels in the NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Our results suggest that PQQ, modulating LDH activity to facilitate pyruvate formation through its redox-cycling activity, may be involved in the enhanced energy production via mitochondrial TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.

  13. Identification of lactate dehydrogenase as a mammalian pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Akagawa, Mitsugu; Minematsu, Kenji; Shibata, Takahiro; Kondo, Tatsuhiko; Ishii, Takeshi; Uchida, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a redox-active o-quinone, is an important nutrient involved in numerous physiological and biochemical processes in mammals. Despite such beneficial functions, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be established. In the present study, using PQQ-immobilized Sepharose beads as a probe, we examined the presence of protein(s) that are capable of binding PQQ in mouse NIH/3T3 fibroblasts and identified five cellular proteins, including l-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) A chain, as potential mammalian PQQ-binding proteins. In vitro studies using a purified rabbit muscle LDH show that PQQ inhibits the formation of lactate from pyruvate in the presence of NADH (forward reaction), whereas it enhances the conversion of lactate to pyruvate in the presence of NAD+ (reverse reaction). The molecular mechanism underlying PQQ-mediated regulation of LDH activity is attributed to the oxidation of NADH to NAD+ by PQQ. Indeed, the PQQ-bound LDH oxidizes NADH, generating NAD+, and significantly catalyzes the conversion of lactate to pyruvate. Furthermore, PQQ attenuates cellular lactate release and increases intracellular ATP levels in the NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Our results suggest that PQQ, modulating LDH activity to facilitate pyruvate formation through its redox-cycling activity, may be involved in the enhanced energy production via mitochondrial TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:27230956

  14. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia caused by pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hammer, S G; Lewan, R B

    1988-01-01

    We report an infant with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia due to pyruvate kinase deficiency. The initial approach involved rapid evaluation, phototherapy, and close monitoring of serum bilirubin levels. Follow-up included maintenance on folic acid, monitoring blood counts, and educating the parents about the course of pyruvate kinase deficiency, especially aplastic crisis. We suggest that the informed family practitioner can manage neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and pyruvate kinase deficiency with referrals at critical times to pediatric or surgical specialists. The practitioner must be able to recognize quickly the need for exchange transfusion for severe jaundice and for blood transfusions or splenectomy when significant anemia or aplastic crisis occurs.

  15. Ethyl acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl acetate ; CASRN 141 - 78 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  16. Phenylmercuric acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phenylmercuric acetate ; CASRN 62 - 38 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  17. Vinyl acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vinyl acetate ; CASRN 108 - 05 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  18. Ammonium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonium acetate ; CASRN 631 - 61 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  19. Thallium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 30 , 2009 , the assessment summary for Thallium acetate is included in t

  20. Metabolic engineering of lactate dehydrogenase rescues mice from acidosis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Abhinav P; Rafi, Mohammad; Woods, Elliot C; Gardner, Austin B; Murthy, Niren

    2014-06-05

    Acidosis causes millions of deaths each year and strategies for normalizing the blood pH in acidosis patients are greatly needed. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) pathway has great potential for treating acidosis due to its ability to convert protons and pyruvate into lactate and thereby raise blood pH, but has been challenging to develop into a therapy because there are no pharmaceutical-based approaches for engineering metabolic pathways in vivo. In this report we demonstrate that the metabolic flux of the LDH pathway can be engineered with the compound 5-amino-2-hydroxymethylphenyl boronic acid (ABA), which binds lactate and accelerates the consumption of protons by converting pyruvate to lactate and increasing the NAD(+)/NADH ratio. We demonstrate here that ABA can rescue mice from metformin induced acidosis, by binding lactate, and increasing the blood pH from 6.7 to 7.2 and the blood NAD(+)/NADH ratio by 5 fold. ABA is the first class of molecule that can metabolically engineer the LDH pathway and has the potential to have a significant impact on medicine, given the large number of patients that suffer from acidosis.

  1. Acute porcine renal metabolic effect of endogastric soft drink administration assessed with hyperpolarized [1‐13c]pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Esben Søvsø Szocska; Kjærgaard, Uffe; Bertelsen, Lotte Bonde; Ringgaard, Steffen; Stødkilde‐Jørgensen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to determine the quantitative reproducibility of metabolic breakdown products in the kidney following intravenous injection of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate and secondly to investigate the metabolic effect on the pyruvate metabolism of oral sucrose load using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization. By this technique, metabolic alterations in several different metabolic related diseases and their metabolic treatment responses can be accessed. Methods In four healthy pigs the lactate‐to‐pyruvate, alanine‐to‐pyruvate and bicarbonate‐to‐pyruvate ratio was measured following administration of regular cola and consecutive injections of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate four times within an hour. Results The overall lactate‐to‐pyruvate metabolic profile changed significantly over one hour following an acute sucrose load leading to a significant rise in blood glucose. Conclusion The reproducibility of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the healthy pig kidney demonstrated a repeatability of more than 94% for all metabolites and, furthermore, that the pyruvate to lactate conversion and the blood glucose level is elevated following endogastric sucrose administration. Magn Reson Med 74:558–563, 2015. © 2015 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:26014387

  2. The progression from a lower to a higher invasive stage of bladder cancer is associated with severe alterations in glucose and pyruvate metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, Vanessa R.; Oliveira, Pedro F.; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Pereira, José A.; Alves, Marco G.; Silva, Branca M.

    2015-07-01

    Cancer cells present a particular metabolic behavior. We hypothesized that the progression of bladder cancer could be accompanied by changes in cells glycolytic profile. We studied two human bladder cancer cells, RT4 and TCCSUP, in which the latter represents a more invasive stage. The levels of glucose, pyruvate, alanine and lactate in the extracellular media were measured by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The protein expression levels of glucose transporters 1 (GLUT1) and 3 (GLUT3), monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK1), glutamic-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined. Our data showed that glucose consumption and GLUT3 levels were similar in both cell lines, but TCCSUP cells displayed lower levels of GLUT1 and PFK expression. An increase in pyruvate consumption, concordant with the higher levels of lactate and alanine production, was also detected in TCCSUP cells. Moreover, TCCSUP cells presented lower protein expression levels of GPT and LDH. These results illustrate that bladder cancer progression is associated with alterations in cells glycolytic profile, namely the switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption in the more aggressive stage. This may be useful to develop new therapies and to identify biomarkers for cancer progression. - Highlights: • Metabolic phenotype of less and high invasive bladder cancer cells was studied. • Bladder cancer progression involves alterations in cells glycolytic profile. • More invasive bladder cancer cells switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption. • Our results may help to identify metabolic biomarkers of bladder cancer progression.

  3. [Progress in biotechnological production of pyruvic acid].

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Ming; Li, Yin; Du, Guo-Cheng; Chen, Jian

    2002-11-01

    Pyruvate, an important organic acid, is widely used in the industries of pharmaceuticals, chemicals, agrochemicals, food additives and so on. Compared with the chemical method, biotechnological production of pyruvic acid is an alternative approach because of the low cost and high product quality. In this article, biosynthesis of pyruvate, including direct fermentative production and resting cell method as well as enzymatic method, was discussed. Furthermore, a comparison of these different methods was proposed. Since, a multi-vitamin auxotrophic strain of Torulopsis glabrata is the most competitive strain for industrial production of pyruvate, emphasis was therefore placed on the development of strains screening and fermentation optimization. Finally, some suggestions were put forward to improve the research in this field in the near future.

  4. Inhibition of acetate ester biosynthesis in banana (Musa sapientum L.) fruit pulp under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wendakoon, Sumithra K; Ueda, Yoshinori; Imahori, Yoshihiro; Ishimaru, Megumi

    2004-03-24

    The effect of anaerobic conditions on acetate ester biosynthesis in ripened banana pulp was investigated. Incubation of the pulp in less than 1% O(2) resulted in a significant reduction in the formation of ethyl acetate. Regardless of the presence of a large amount of endogenous ethanol and the remaining exogenous isobutyl alcohol after complete anaerobic incubation with the pulp, the production of acetate ester decreased. The effect of addition of pyruvate, isobutyl alcohol, acetate, and methyl hexanoate on acetate ester formation in 100% N(2) was also investigated. The addition of pyruvate and isobutyl alcohol to the pulp gave lower acetate esters in N(2) than in air, whereas the pulp incubated with acetate and isobutyl alcohol produced more acetate ester in both conditions. Therefore, the lack of acetyl CoA, or more precisely acetate, in the tissue is the main reason for the inhibition of acetate ester formation under anaerobic conditions. The activity of beta-oxidation measured by incubation with methyl hexanoate was detected only in the samples incubated in air. The formation of acetyl CoA, derived from pyruvate through mitochondria and through beta-oxidation, was inhibited by anaerobic conditions, which suggests that mitochondrial activity and/or beta-oxidation are essential for ester biosynthesis.

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Desulfovibrio dechloracetivorans sp. nov., a Marine Dechlorinating Bacterium Growing by Coupling the Oxidation of Acetate to the Reductive Dechlorination of 2-Chlorophenol

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baolin; Cole, James R.; Sanford, Robert A.; Tiedje, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Strain SF3, a gram-negative, anaerobic, motile, short curved rod that grows by coupling the reductive dechlorination of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) to the oxidation of acetate, was isolated from San Francisco Bay sediment. Strain SF3 grew at concentrations of NaCl ranging from 0.16 to 2.5%, but concentrations of KCl above 0.32% inhibited growth. The isolate used acetate, fumarate, lactate, propionate, pyruvate, alanine, and ethanol as electron donors for growth coupled to reductive dechlorination. Among the halogenated aromatic compounds tested, only the ortho position of chlorophenols was reductively dechlorinated, and additional chlorines at other positions blocked ortho dechlorination. Sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate, and nitrate were also used as electron acceptors for growth. The optimal temperature for growth was 30°C, and no growth or dechlorination activity was observed at 37°C. Growth by reductive dechlorination was revealed by a growth yield of about 1 g of protein per mol of 2-CP dechlorinated, and about 2.7 g of protein per mole of 2,6-dichlorophenol dechlorinated. The physiological features and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence suggest that the organism is a novel species of the genus Desulfovibrio and which we have designated Desulfovibrio dechloracetivorans. The unusual physiological feature of this strain is that it uses acetate as an electron donor and carbon source for growth with 2-CP but not with sulfate. PMID:10831418

  6. Low-temperature NMR characterization of reaction of sodium pyruvate with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Asmus, Christopher; Mozziconacci, Olivier; Schöneich, Christian

    2015-02-12

    It was proposed that the reaction of sodium pyruvate and H2O2 generates the intermediate 2-hydroperoxy-2-hydroxypropanoate, which converts into acetate, CO2, and H2O ( Aleksankin et al. Kernenergie 1962 , 5 , 362 - 365 ). These conclusions were based on the products generated in (18)O-enriched water and H2O2 reacting with pyruvic acid at room temperature; however, the lifetime of 2-hydroperoxy-2-hydroxypropanoate at room temperature is too short for direct spectroscopic observation. Therefore, we applied the combination of low-temperature and (13)C NMR techniques to verify, for the first time, the formation of 2-deuteroperoxy-2-deuteroxypropanoate in mixtures of D2O and methanol-d4 and to monitor directly each species involved in the reaction between D2O2 and (13)C-enriched pyruvate. Our NMR results confirm the formation of 2-deuteroperoxy-2-deuteroxypropanoate, where the respective chemical shifts are supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. At near-neutral apparent pD (pD*) and -35 °C, the formation of 2-deuteroperoxy-2-deuteroxypropanoate occurred with k = 2.43 × 10(-3) dm(3)·mol(-1)·s(-1). The subsequent decomposition of 2-deuteroperoxy-2-deuteroxypropanoate into acetate, CO2, and D2O occurred with k = 2.58 × 10(-4) s(-1) at -35 °C. In order to provide a full kinetic analysis, we also monitored the equilibrium of pyruvate and methanol with the hemiacetal (2-deuteroxy-2-methoxypropanoate). The kinetics for the reaction of sodium pyruvate and D2O2 were fitted by taking into account all these equilibria and species.

  7. The fate of fluoropyruvate as an alternative substrate and inactivator of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Flournoy, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase component (E{sub 1}) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Escherichia coli catalyzes the decomposition of fluoropyruvate to CO{sub 2}, fluoride anion, and acetate. Acetyl thiamin pyrophosphate (acetyl-TPP) is an intermediate in this reaction. Incubation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex with ({sup 14}C)fluoropyruvate, TPP, CoASH, and either NADH or pyruvate as reducing agent leads to the formation of ({sup 14}C) acetylCoA. In this reaction the acetyl group of acetyl-TPP is partitioned by transfer to both CoASH and water. When the E{sub 1} component is incubated with ({sup 14}C)fluoropyruvate, TPP, and dihydrolipoamide, ({sup 14}C)acetyldihydrolipoamide is produced. The formation of ({sup 14}C)acetyldihydrolipoamide was examined as a function of dihydrolipoamide concentration. A plot of the extent of acetyl group-partitioning to dihydrolipoamide as a function of 1/(dihydrolipoamide) shows 95 {plus minus} 2% acetyl group transfer to dihydrolipoamide when dihydrolipoamide concentration is extrapolated to infinity. It is concluded that acetyl-TPP is chemically competent as an intermediate for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex catalyzed oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate.

  8. Observation of high enantioselectivity for the gas phase hydrogenation of methyl pyruvate using supported Pt catalysts pre-modified with cinchonidine.

    PubMed

    von Arx, Matthias; Dummer, Nicholas; Willock, David J; Taylor, Stuart H; Wells, Richard P K; Wells, Peter B; Hutchings, Graham J

    2003-08-01

    Pt supported on alpha-Al2O3, gamma-Al2O3 and SiO2 pre-modified with cinchonidine gives over 50% ee in the hydrogenation of methyl pyruvate to methyl lactate using gas phase reactants at 40 degrees C giving the first clear observation of high enantioselection at the gas/solid interface.

  9. L-Lactate protects neurons against excitotoxicity: implication of an ATP-mediated signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Jourdain, P.; Allaman, I.; Rothenfusser, K.; Fiumelli, H.; Marquet, P.; Magistretti, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Converging experimental data indicate a neuroprotective action of L-Lactate. Using Digital Holographic Microscopy, we observe that transient application of glutamate (100 μM; 2 min) elicits a NMDA-dependent death in 65% of mouse cortical neurons in culture. In the presence of L-Lactate (or Pyruvate), the percentage of neuronal death decreases to 32%. UK5099, a blocker of the Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier, fully prevents L-Lactate-mediated neuroprotection. In addition, L-Lactate-induced neuroprotection is not only inhibited by probenicid and carbenoxolone, two blockers of ATP channel pannexins, but also abolished by apyrase, an enzyme degrading ATP, suggesting that ATP produced by the Lactate/Pyruvate pathway is released to act on purinergic receptors in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Finally, pharmacological approaches support the involvement of the P2Y receptors associated to the PI3-kinase pathway, leading to activation of KATP channels. This set of results indicates that L-Lactate acts as a signalling molecule for neuroprotection against excitotoxicity through coordinated cellular pathways involving ATP production, release and activation of a P2Y/KATP cascade. PMID:26893204

  10. New insights into Escherichia coli metabolism: carbon scavenging, acetate metabolism and carbon recycling responses during growth on glycerol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Glycerol has enhanced its biotechnological importance since it is a byproduct of biodiesel synthesis. A study of Escherichia coli physiology during growth on glycerol was performed combining transcriptional-proteomic analysis as well as kinetic and stoichiometric evaluations in the strain JM101 and certain derivatives with important inactivated genes. Results Transcriptional and proteomic analysis of metabolic central genes of strain JM101 growing on glycerol, revealed important changes not only in the synthesis of MglB, LamB and MalE proteins, but also in the overexpression of carbon scavenging genes: lamB, malE, mglB, mglC, galP and glk and some members of the RpoS regulon (pfkA, pfkB, fbaA, fbaB, pgi, poxB, acs, actP and acnA). Inactivation of rpoS had an important effect on stoichiometric parameters and growth adaptation on glycerol. The observed overexpression of poxB, pta, acs genes, glyoxylate shunt genes (aceA, aceB, glcB and glcC) and actP, suggested a possible carbon flux deviation into the PoxB, Acs and glyoxylate shunt. In this scenario acetate synthesized from pyruvate with PoxB was apparently reutilized via Acs and the glyoxylate shunt enzymes. In agreement, no acetate was detected when growing on glycerol, this strain was also capable of glycerol and acetate coutilization when growing in mineral media and derivatives carrying inactivated poxB or pckA genes, accumulated acetate. Tryptophanase A (TnaA) was synthesized at high levels and indole was produced by this enzyme, in strain JM101 growing on glycerol. Additionally, in the isogenic derivative with the inactivated tnaA gene, no indole was detected and acetate and lactate were accumulated. A high efficiency aromatic compounds production capability was detected in JM101 carrying pJLBaroGfbrtktA, when growing on glycerol, as compared to glucose. Conclusions The overexpression of several carbon scavenging, acetate metabolism genes and the absence of acetate accumulation occurred in JM101

  11. Model-based analysis of an adaptive evolution experiment with Escherichia coli in a pyruvate limited continuous culture with glycerol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial strains that were genetically blocked in important metabolic pathways and grown under selective conditions underwent a process of adaptive evolution: certain pathways may have been deregulated and therefore allowed for the circumvention of the given block. A block of endogenous pyruvate synthesis from glycerol was realized by a knockout of pyruvate kinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in E. coli. The resulting mutant strain was able to grow on a medium containing glycerol and lactate, which served as an exogenous pyruvate source. Heterologous expression of a pyruvate carboxylase gene from Corynebacterium glutamicum was used for anaplerosis of the TCA cycle. Selective conditions were controlled in a continuous culture with limited lactate feed and an excess of glycerol feed. After 200–300 generations pyruvate-prototrophic mutants were isolated. The genomic analysis of an evolved strain revealed that the genotypic basis for the regained pyruvate-prototrophy was not obvious. A constraint-based model of the metabolism was employed to compute all possible detours around the given metabolic block by solving a hierarchy of linear programming problems. The regulatory network was expected to be responsible for the adaptation process. Hence, a Boolean model of the transcription factor network was connected to the metabolic model. Our model analysis only showed a marginal impact of transcriptional control on the biomass yield on substrate which is a key variable in the selection process. In our experiment, microarray analysis confirmed that transcriptional control probably played a minor role in the deregulation of the alternative pathways for the circumvention of the block. PMID:23033959

  12. Model-based analysis of an adaptive evolution experiment with Escherichia coli in a pyruvate limited continuous culture with glycerol.

    PubMed

    Feuer, Ronny; Gottlieb, Katrin; Viertel, Gero; Klotz, Johannes; Schober, Steffen; Bossert, Martin; Sawodny, Oliver; Sprenger, Georg; Ederer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    : Bacterial strains that were genetically blocked in important metabolic pathways and grown under selective conditions underwent a process of adaptive evolution: certain pathways may have been deregulated and therefore allowed for the circumvention of the given block. A block of endogenous pyruvate synthesis from glycerol was realized by a knockout of pyruvate kinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in E. coli. The resulting mutant strain was able to grow on a medium containing glycerol and lactate, which served as an exogenous pyruvate source. Heterologous expression of a pyruvate carboxylase gene from Corynebacterium glutamicum was used for anaplerosis of the TCA cycle. Selective conditions were controlled in a continuous culture with limited lactate feed and an excess of glycerol feed. After 200-300 generations pyruvate-prototrophic mutants were isolated. The genomic analysis of an evolved strain revealed that the genotypic basis for the regained pyruvate-prototrophy was not obvious. A constraint-based model of the metabolism was employed to compute all possible detours around the given metabolic block by solving a hierarchy of linear programming problems. The regulatory network was expected to be responsible for the adaptation process. Hence, a Boolean model of the transcription factor network was connected to the metabolic model. Our model analysis only showed a marginal impact of transcriptional control on the biomass yield on substrate which is a key variable in the selection process. In our experiment, microarray analysis confirmed that transcriptional control probably played a minor role in the deregulation of the alternative pathways for the circumvention of the block. PMID:23033959

  13. The effect of monosaccharide sugars and pyruvate on the differentiation and metabolism of sheep granulosa cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Campbell, B K; Onions, V; Kendall, N R; Guo, L; Scaramuzzi, R J

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of three monosaccharides or pyruvate on the ability of gonadotrophins to induce cellular proliferation and differentiation of cultured sheep granulosa cells. Lactate production and levels of mRNA expression for the glucose transporters SLC2A1, SLC2A4, SLC2A5 and SLC2A8 were also determined. No energy source in the culture media reduced cell number (50%) and oestradiol (E(2)) production. Dose and type of monosaccharide had a highly significant (P<0.001) effect on FSH-induced differentiation of the granulosa cells, and there was a highly significant interaction (P<0.001). Glucose supported higher levels of E(2) production than fructose, which was in turn higher than galactose (P<0.001). In contrast, pyruvate at low doses supported similar levels of E(2) production as glucose, but higher doses were markedly inhibitory to E(2) production (P<0.001). Cells responded positively to insulin (P<0.001) in the presence of all three monosaccharides. Glucose and the high doses of fructose resulted in the accumulation of lactate (P<0.001), but pyruvate, galactose and the low dose of fructose resulted in low lactate production. SLC2A5 expression was not detected and SLC2A8 expression was not affected, but SLC2A1 and SLC2A4 expression was depressed (P<0.05) by culture in the presence of fructose and glucose. These data show that glucose, metabolised under anoxic conditions to lactate, is the preferred energy substrate to support the gonadotrophin-induced differentiation of ovine granulosa cells in vitro, and that fructose and pyruvate, but not galactose, are alternative energy substrates despite marked differences in the way these substrates are metabolised. PMID:20634389

  14. L-Tryptophan catabolism by Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2 occurs through indole 3-pyruvic acid pathway.

    PubMed

    Kumavath, Ranjith N; Ramana, Ch V; Sasikala, Ch

    2010-09-01

    Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2 utilizes L: -tryptophan as the sole source of nitrogen for growth, and it has a doubling time of approximately 11 h (compared to 8 h with ammonium chloride). With cell free extracts in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate, indole-3-pyruvic acid, indole-3-acetaldehyde, indole-3-acetic acid, isatin, benzaldehyde, gallic acid and pyrogallol were identified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) analysis. The conversion of L: -tryptophan into indole 3-pyruvic acid and glutamate by an enzyme aminotransferase was confirmed and the catabolism of indole-3-pyruvic acid via side chain oxidation followed by ring oxidation, gallic acid and pyrogallol were confirmed as metabolites. In addition, the proposed pathway sequential conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid to the end product of pyrogallol was identified, including an enzymatic step that would convert isatin to benzaldehyde by an enzyme yet to be identified. At this stage of the study, the enzyme tryptophan aminotransferase in R. benzoatilyticus JA2 was demonstrated.

  15. Novel molecular mechanisms involved in hormonal regulation of lactate production in Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Regueira, Mariana; Artagaveytia, Silvana Lucía; Galardo, María Noel; Pellizzari, Eliana Herminia; Cigorraga, Selva Beatriz; Meroni, Silvina Beatriz; Riera, María Fernanda

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze molecular mechanisms involved in FSH and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) regulation of lactate production in rat Sertoli cells. The regulation of the availability of pyruvate, which is converted to lactate, could be a mechanism utilized by hormones to ensure lactate supply to germ cells. On one hand, the regulation of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase (PFKFB) expression could result in increased glycolysis, while an increase in pyruvate availability may also result from a lower conversion to acetyl-CoA by negative regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity by phosphorylation. Sertoli cell cultures obtained from 20-day-old rats were used. Stimulation of the cultures with FSH or bFGF showed that FSH increases Pfkfb1 and Pfkfb3 expression while bFGF increases Pfkfb1 mRNA levels. Additionally, we observed that FSH-stimulated lactate production was inhibited in the presence of a PFKFB3 inhibitor, revealing the physiological relevance of this mechanism. As for the regulation of PDC, analysis of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (Pdk) expression showed that FSH increases Pdk3 and decreases Pdk4 mRNA levels while bFGF increases the expression of all Pdks. In addition, we showed that bFGF increases phosphorylated PDC levels and that bFGF-stimulated lactate production is partially inhibited in the presence of a PDK inhibitor. Altogether, these results add new information regarding novel molecular mechanisms involved in hormonal regulation of lactate production in Sertoli cells. Considering that lactate is essential for the production of energy in spermatocytes and spermatids, these mechanisms might be relevant in maintaining spermatogenesis and male fertility. PMID:26224098

  16. The use of dynamic nuclear polarization 13C-pyruvate MRS in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam Espe; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Clemmensen, Andreas Ettrup; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an immense development of new targeted anti-cancer drugs. For practicing precision medicine, a sensitive method imaging for non-invasive, assessment of early treatment response and for assisting in developing new drugs is warranted. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a potent technique for non-invasive in vivo investigation of tissue chemistry and cellular metabolism. Hyperpolarization by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is capable of creating solutions of molecules with polarized nuclear spins in a range of biological molecules and has enabled the real-time investigation of in vivo metabolism. The development of this new method has been demonstrated to enhance the nuclear polarization more than 10,000-fold, thereby significantly increasing the sensitivity of the MRS with a spatial resolution to the millimeters and a temporal resolution at the subsecond range. Furthermore, the method enables measuring kinetics of conversion of substrates into cell metabolites and can be integrated with anatomical proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many nuclei and substrates have been hyperpolarized using the DNP method. Currently, the most widely used compound is 13C-pyruvate due to favoring technicalities. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate results in appearance of 13C-lactate, 13C-alanine and 13C-bicarbonate resonance peaks depending on the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. In cancer, the lactate level is increased due to increased glycolysis. The use of DNP enhanced 13C-pyruvate has in preclinical studies shown to be a sensitive method for detecting cancer and for assessment of early treatment response in a variety of cancers. Recently, a first-in-man 31-patient study was conducted with the primary objective to assess the safety of hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate in healthy subjects and prostate cancer patients. The study showed an elevated 13C-lactate/13C-pyruvate ratio in regions of biopsy

  17. Comparison of metabolic flux distributions for MDCK cell growth in glutamine- and pyruvate-containing media.

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, Yury; Wahl, Aljoscha; Dauner, Michael; Genzel, Yvonne; Reichl, Udo

    2008-01-01

    In mammalian cell cultures, ammonia that is released into the medium as a result of glutamine metabolism and lactate that is excreted due to incomplete glucose oxidation are both known to essentially inhibit the growth of cells. For some cell lines, for example, hybridoma cells, excreted ammonia also has an effect on product formation. Although glutamine has been generally considered as the major energy source for mammalian cells, it was recently found that various adherent cell lines (MDCK, CHO-K1, and BHK21) can grow as well in glutamine-free medium, provided glutamine is substituted with pyruvate. In such a medium the level of both ammonia and lactate released was significantly reduced. In this study, metabolic flux analysis (MFA) was applied to Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells cultivated in glutamine-containing and glutamine-free medium. The results of the MFA allowed further investigation of the influence of glutamine substitution with pyruvate on the metabolism of MDCK cells during different growth stages of adherent cells, e.g., early exponential and late contact-inhibited phase. Pyruvate seemed to directly enter the TCA cycle, whereas most of the glucose consumed was excreted as lactate. Although the exact mechanisms are not clear so far, this resulted in a reduction of the glucose uptake necessary for cellular metabolism in glutamine-free medium. Furthermore, consumption of ATP by futile cycles seemed to be significantly reduced when substituting glutamine with pyruvate. These findings imply that glutamine-free medium favors a more efficient use of nutrients by cells. However, a number of metabolic fluxes were similar in the two cultivations considered, e.g., most of the amino acid uptake and degradation rates or fluxes through the branch of the TCA cycle converting alpha-ketoglutarate to malate, which is responsible for the mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Besides, the specific rate of cell growth was approximately the same in both cultivations. Thus

  18. MCT1 modulates cancer cell pyruvate export and growth of tumors that co-express MCT1 and MCT4

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Candice Sun; Graham, Nicholas A.; Gu, Wen; Camacho, Carolina Espindola; Mah, Vei; Maresh, Erin L.; Alavi, Mohammed; Bagryanova, Lora; Krotee, Pascal A. L.; Gardner, Brian K.; Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Horvath, Steve; Chia, David; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Hurvitz, Sara A.; Dubinett, Steven M.; Critchlow, Susan E.; Kurdistani, Siavash K.; Goodglick, Lee; Braas, Daniel; Graeber, Thomas G.; Christofk, Heather R.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 (MCT1) inhibition is thought to block tumor growth through disruption of lactate transport and glycolysis. Here we show MCT1 inhibition impairs proliferation of glycolytic breast cancer cells co-expressing MCT1 and MCT4 via disruption of pyruvate rather than lactate export. MCT1 expression is elevated in glycolytic breast tumors, and high MCT1 expression predicts poor prognosis in breast and lung cancer patients. Acute MCT1 inhibition reduces pyruvate export but does not consistently alter lactate transport or glycolytic flux in breast cancer cells that co-express MCT1 and MCT4. Despite the lack of glycolysis impairment, MCT1 loss-of-function decreases breast cancer cell proliferation and blocks growth of mammary fat pad xenograft tumors. Our data suggest MCT1 expression is elevated in glycolytic cancers to promote pyruvate export, which when inhibited enhances oxidative metabolism and reduces proliferation. This study presents an alternative molecular consequence of MCT1 inhibitors further supporting their use as anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:26876179

  19. A comparison of quantitative methods for clinical imaging with hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Charlie J; McLean, Mary A; Schulte, Rolf F; Robb, Fraser J; Gill, Andrew B; McGlashan, Nicholas; Graves, Martin J; Schwaiger, Markus; Lomas, David J; Brindle, Kevin M; Gallagher, Ferdia A

    2016-04-01

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enables the metabolism of hyperpolarized (13)C-labelled molecules, such as the conversion of [1-(13)C]pyruvate to [1-(13)C]lactate, to be dynamically and non-invasively imaged in tissue. Imaging of this exchange reaction in animal models has been shown to detect early treatment response and correlate with tumour grade. The first human DNP study has recently been completed, and, for widespread clinical translation, simple and reliable methods are necessary to accurately probe the reaction in patients. However, there is currently no consensus on the most appropriate method to quantify this exchange reaction. In this study, an in vitro system was used to compare several kinetic models, as well as simple model-free methods. Experiments were performed using a clinical hyperpolarizer, a human 3 T MR system, and spectroscopic imaging sequences. The quantitative methods were compared in vivo by using subcutaneous breast tumours in rats to examine the effect of pyruvate inflow. The two-way kinetic model was the most accurate method for characterizing the exchange reaction in vitro, and the incorporation of a Heaviside step inflow profile was best able to describe the in vivo data. The lactate time-to-peak and the lactate-to-pyruvate area under the curve ratio were simple model-free approaches that accurately represented the full reaction, with the time-to-peak method performing indistinguishably from the best kinetic model. Finally, extracting data from a single pixel was a robust and reliable surrogate of the whole region of interest. This work has identified appropriate quantitative methods for future work in the analysis of human hyperpolarized (13)C data.

  20. Laboratory Prototype of Bioreactor for Oxidation of Toxic D-Lactate Using Yeast Cells Overproducing D-Lactate Cytochrome c Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Karkovska, Maria; Smutok, Oleh; Gonchar, Mykhailo

    2016-01-01

    D-lactate is a natural component of many fermented foods like yogurts, sour milk, cheeses, and pickles vegetable products. D-lactate in high concentrations is toxic for children and people with short bowel syndrome and provokes encephalopathy. These facts convincingly demonstrate a need for effective tools for the D-lactate removal from some food products. The main idea of investigation is focused on application of recombinant thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha "tr6," overproducing D-lactate: cytochrome c oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.2.4, D-lactate cytochrome c oxidoreductase, D-lactate dehydrogenase (cytochrome), DLDH). In addition to 6-fold overexpression of DLDH under a strong constitutive promoter (prAOX), the strain of H. polymorpha "tr6" (gcr1 catX/Δcyb2, prAOX_DLDH) is characterized by impairment in glucose repression of AOX promoter, devoid of catalase and L-lactate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities. Overexpression of DLDH coupling with the deletion of L-lactate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activity opens possibility for usage of the strain as a base for construction of bioreactor for removing D-lactate from fermented products due to oxidation to nontoxic pyruvate. A laboratory prototype of column-type bioreactor for removing a toxic D-lactate from model solution based on permeabilized cells of the H. polymorpha "tr6" and alginate gel was constructed and efficiency of this process was tested. PMID:27446952

  1. Laboratory Prototype of Bioreactor for Oxidation of Toxic D-Lactate Using Yeast Cells Overproducing D-Lactate Cytochrome c Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Karkovska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    D-lactate is a natural component of many fermented foods like yogurts, sour milk, cheeses, and pickles vegetable products. D-lactate in high concentrations is toxic for children and people with short bowel syndrome and provokes encephalopathy. These facts convincingly demonstrate a need for effective tools for the D-lactate removal from some food products. The main idea of investigation is focused on application of recombinant thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha “tr6,” overproducing D-lactate: cytochrome c oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.2.4, D-lactate cytochrome c oxidoreductase, D-lactate dehydrogenase (cytochrome), DLDH). In addition to 6-fold overexpression of DLDH under a strong constitutive promoter (prAOX), the strain of H. polymorpha “tr6” (gcr1 catX/Δcyb2, prAOX_DLDH) is characterized by impairment in glucose repression of AOX promoter, devoid of catalase and L-lactate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities. Overexpression of DLDH coupling with the deletion of L-lactate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activity opens possibility for usage of the strain as a base for construction of bioreactor for removing D-lactate from fermented products due to oxidation to nontoxic pyruvate. A laboratory prototype of column-type bioreactor for removing a toxic D-lactate from model solution based on permeabilized cells of the H. polymorpha “tr6” and alginate gel was constructed and efficiency of this process was tested. PMID:27446952

  2. Probing lactate secretion in tumours with hyperpolarised NMR.

    PubMed

    Durst, Markus; Koellisch, Ulrich; Daniele, Valeria; Steiger, Katja; Schwaiger, Markus; Haase, Axel; Menzel, Marion I; Schulte, Rolf F; Aime, Silvio; Reineri, Francesca

    2016-08-01

    Most tumours exhibit a high rate of glycolysis and predominantly produce energy by lactic acid fermentation. To maintain energy production and prevent toxicity, the lactate generated needs to be rapidly transported out of the cell. This is achieved by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), which therefore play an essential role in cancer metabolism and development. In vivo experiments were performed on eight male Fisher F344 rats bearing a subcutaneous mammary carcinoma after injection of hyperpolarised [1-(13) C]pyruvate. A Gd(III)DO3A complex that binds to pyruvate and its metabolites was used to efficiently destroy the extracellular magnetisation after hyperpolarised lactate had been formed. Moreover, a pulse sequence including a frequency-selective saturation pulse was designed so that the pyruvate magnetisation could be destroyed to exclude effects arising from further conversion. Given this preparation, metabolite transport out of the cell manifested as additional decay and apparent cell membrane transporter rates could thus be obtained using a reference measurement without a relaxation agent. In addition to slice-selective spectra, spatially resolved maps of apparent membrane transporter activity were acquired using a single-shot spiral gradient readout. A considerable increase in decay rate was detected for lactate, indicating rapid transport out of the cell. The alanine signal was unaltered, which corresponds to a slower efflux rate. This technique could allow for better understanding of tumour metabolism and progression, and enable treatment response measurements for MCT-targeted cancer therapies. Moreover, it provides vital insights into the signal kinetics of hyperpolarised [1-(13) C]pyruvate examinations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27348729

  3. Metabolic fate of lactate after vigorous activity in the leopard frog, Rana pipiens.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P A; Guderley, H

    1992-02-01

    Although the ability of isolated frog muscle to synthesize glycogen from lactate has long been known, it has never been demonstrated that this metabolic activity occurs in the intact frog. Our results clearly indicate that lactate glycogenesis in frog muscle occurs to a significant extent in vivo. During recovery from strenuous exercise, most of the lactate accumulated by frogs seems to be recycled into muscle glycogen because the lactate that disappears during recovery could account nearly stoichiometrically for the glycogen that accumulates in muscle. Furthermore, the decrease in body lactate and the increase in muscle glycogen follow corresponding time courses, suggesting a precursor-product relationship between lactate and glycogen. During recovery from intense exercise, hepatectomized and normal frogs have nearly identical extents of lactate elimination and glycogen synthesis. This suggests that muscle is the main tissue responsible for the recycling of lactate into muscle glycogen and that liver plays a negligible role in lactate disposal. The negligible hepatic contribution to lactate recycling results in part from the liver's incapacity to produce glucose from lactate. In support of this proposition, we show that frog liver perfused in vitro is unable to incorporate any detectable labeled lactate into glucose despite its excellent physiological integrity. Changes in dietary status, training state, season at which the experiments were done, exercise status, and composition of the perfusion media (pH, hormonal composition, physiological saline vs. culture medium) did not give rise to lactate gluconeogenesis. Because frog liver contains all the regulatory enzymes of the gluconeogenic pathway, its inability to synthesize glucose from lactate is not due to an absence of pyruvate carboxylase. A limited ability for lactate uptake may explain why frog liver cannot produce glucose from lactate. PMID:1539733

  4. Lactate Modulates the Activity of Primary Cortical Neurons through a Receptor-Mediated Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bozzo, Luigi; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Lactate is increasingly described as an energy substrate of the brain. Beside this still debated metabolic role, lactate may have other effects on brain cells. Here, we describe lactate as a neuromodulator, able to influence the activity of cortical neurons. Neuronal excitability of mouse primary neurons was monitored by calcium imaging. When applied in conjunction with glucose, lactate induced a decrease in the spontaneous calcium spiking frequency of neurons. The effect was reversible and concentration dependent (IC50 ∼4.2 mM). To test whether lactate effects are dependent on energy metabolism, we applied the closely related substrate pyruvate (5 mM) or switched to different glucose concentrations (0.5 or 10 mM). None of these conditions reproduced the effect of lactate. Recently, a Gi protein-coupled receptor for lactate called HCA1 has been introduced. To test if this receptor is implicated in the observed lactate sensitivity, we incubated cells with pertussis toxin (PTX) an inhibitor of Gi-protein. PTX prevented the decrease of neuronal activity by L-lactate. Moreover 3,5-dyhydroxybenzoic acid, a specific agonist of the HCA1 receptor, mimicked the action of lactate. This study indicates that lactate operates a negative feedback on neuronal activity by a receptor-mediated mechanism, independent from its intracellular metabolism. PMID:23951229

  5. The anti-tumour agent lonidamine is a potent inhibitor of the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier and plasma membrane monocarboxylate transporters.

    PubMed

    Nancolas, Bethany; Guo, Lili; Zhou, Rong; Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S; Leeper, Dennis B; Blair, Ian A; Glickson, Jerry D; Halestrap, Andrew P

    2016-04-01

    Lonidamine (LND) is an anti-tumour drug particularly effective at selectively sensitizing tumours to chemotherapy, hyperthermia and radiotherapy, although its precise mode of action remains unclear. It has been reported to perturb the bioenergetics of cells by inhibiting glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration, whereas indirect evidence suggests it may also inhibit L-lactic acid efflux from cells mediated by members of the proton-linked monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) family and also pyruvate uptake into the mitochondria by the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC). In the present study, we test these possibilities directly. We demonstrate that LND potently inhibits MPC activity in isolated rat liver mitochondria (Ki2.5 μM) and co-operatively inhibits L-lactate transport by MCT1, MCT2 and MCT4 expressed in Xenopus laevisoocytes with K0.5 and Hill coefficient values of 36-40 μM and 1.65-1.85 respectively. In rat heart mitochondria LND inhibited the MPC with similar potency and uncoupled oxidation of pyruvate was inhibited more effectively (IC50~ 7 μM) than other substrates including glutamate (IC50~ 20 μM). In isolated DB-1 melanoma cells 1-10 μM LND increased L-lactate output, consistent with MPC inhibition, but higher concentrations (150 μM) decreased L-lactate output whereas increasing intracellular [L-lactate] > 5-fold, consistent with MCT inhibition. We conclude that MPC inhibition is the most sensitive anti-tumour target for LND, with additional inhibitory effects on MCT-mediated L-lactic acid efflux and glutamine/glutamate oxidation. Together these actions can account for published data on the selective tumour effects of LND onL-lactate, intracellular pH (pHi) and ATP levels that can be partially mimicked by the established MPC and MCT inhibitor α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (CHC). PMID:26831515

  6. The anti-tumour agent lonidamine is a potent inhibitor of the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier and plasma membrane monocarboxylate transporters

    PubMed Central

    Nancolas, Bethany; Guo, Lili; Zhou, Rong; Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Blair, Ian A.; Glickson, Jerry D.; Halestrap, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Lonidamine (LND) is an anti-tumour drug particularly effective at selectively sensitising tumours to chemotherapy, hyperthermia and radiotherapy, although its precise mode of action remains unclear. It has been reported to perturb the bioenergetics of cells by inhibiting glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration, while indirect evidence suggests it may also inhibit L-lactic acid efflux from cells mediated by members of the proton-linked monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) family and also pyruvate uptake into the mitochondria by the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC). Here we test these possibilities directly. We demonstrate that LND potently inhibits MPC activity in isolated rat liver mitochondria (Ki 2.5 μM) and cooperatively inhibits L-lactate transport by MCT1, MCT2 and MCT4 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes with K0.5 and Hill Coefficient values of 36–40 μM and 1.65–1.85. In rat heart mitochondria LND inhibited the MPC with similar potency and uncoupled oxidation of pyruvate was inhibited more effectively (IC50 ~7 μM) than other substrates including glutamate (IC50 ~20 μM). In isolated DB-1 melanoma cells 1–10 μM LND increased L-lactate output, consistent with MPC inhibition, but higher concentrations (150 μM) decreased L-lactate output while increasing intracellular [L-lactate] > five-fold, consistent with MCT inhibition. We conclude that MPC inhibition is the most sensitive anti-tumour target for LND, with additional inhibitory effects on MCT-mediated L-lactic acid efflux and glutamine/glutamate oxidation. Together these actions can account for published data on the selective tumour effects of LND on L-lactate, intracellular pH (pHi) and ATP levels that can be partially mimicked by the established MPC and MCT inhibitor α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate. PMID:26831515

  7. Properties of lactate dehydrogenase in a psychrophilic marine bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, P; Yen, H C; Mathemeier, P F

    1985-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) from Vibrio marinus MP-1 was purified 15-fold and ammonium activated. The optimum pH for pyruvate reduction was 7.4. Maximum lactate dehydrogenase activity occurred at 10 to 15 degrees C, and none occurred at 40 degrees C. The crude-extract enzyme was stable between 15 and 20 degrees C and lost 50% of its activity after 60 min at 45 degrees C. The partially purified enzyme was stable between 8 and 15 degrees C and lost 50% of its activity after 60 min at 30 degrees C. The thermal stability of lactate dehydrogenase was increased by mercaptoethanol, with 50% remaining activity at 42 degrees C. Images PMID:4004236

  8. Partial reconstruction of in vitro gluconeogenesis arising from mitochondrial l-lactate uptake/metabolism and oxaloacetate export via novel L-lactate translocators.

    PubMed Central

    De Bari, Lidia; Atlante, Anna; Valenti, Daniela; Passarella, Salvatore

    2004-01-01

    In the light of the occurrence of L-lactate dehydrogenase inside the mitochondrial matrix, we looked at whether isolated rat liver mitochondria can take up and metabolize L-lactate, and provide oxaloacetate outside mitochondria, thus contributing to a partial reconstruction of gluconeogenesis in vitro. We found that: (1) L-lactate (10 mM), added to mitochondria in the presence of a cocktail of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis enzymes and cofactors, can lead to synthesis of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate at a rate of about 7 nmol/min per mg mitochondrial protein. (2) Three novel translocators exist to mediate L-lactate traffic across the inner mitochondrial membrane. An L-lactate/H+ symporter was identified by measuring fluorimetrically the rate of endogenous pyridine nucleotide reduction. Consistently, L-lactate oxidation was found to occur with P/O ratio=3 (where P/O ratio is the ratio of mol of ATP synthesized to mol of oxygen atoms reduced to water during oxidative phosphorylation) and with generation of membrane potential. Proton uptake, which occurred as a result of addition of L-lactate to RLM together with electron flow inhibitors, and mitochondrial swelling in ammonium L-lactate solutions were also monitored. L-Lactate/oxaloacetate and L-lactate/pyruvate anti-porters were identified by monitoring photometrically the appearance of L-lactate counter-anions outside mitochondria. These L-lactate translocators, which are distinct from the monocarboxylate carrier, were found to differ from each other in V(max) values and in inhibition and pH profiles, and proved to regulate mitochondrial L-lactate metabolism in vitro. The role of lactate/mitochondria interactions in gluconeogenesis is discussed. PMID:14960150

  9. Partial reconstruction of in vitro gluconeogenesis arising from mitochondrial l-lactate uptake/metabolism and oxaloacetate export via novel L-lactate translocators.

    PubMed

    De Bari, Lidia; Atlante, Anna; Valenti, Daniela; Passarella, Salvatore

    2004-05-15

    In the light of the occurrence of L-lactate dehydrogenase inside the mitochondrial matrix, we looked at whether isolated rat liver mitochondria can take up and metabolize L-lactate, and provide oxaloacetate outside mitochondria, thus contributing to a partial reconstruction of gluconeogenesis in vitro. We found that: (1) L-lactate (10 mM), added to mitochondria in the presence of a cocktail of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis enzymes and cofactors, can lead to synthesis of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate at a rate of about 7 nmol/min per mg mitochondrial protein. (2) Three novel translocators exist to mediate L-lactate traffic across the inner mitochondrial membrane. An L-lactate/H+ symporter was identified by measuring fluorimetrically the rate of endogenous pyridine nucleotide reduction. Consistently, L-lactate oxidation was found to occur with P/O ratio=3 (where P/O ratio is the ratio of mol of ATP synthesized to mol of oxygen atoms reduced to water during oxidative phosphorylation) and with generation of membrane potential. Proton uptake, which occurred as a result of addition of L-lactate to RLM together with electron flow inhibitors, and mitochondrial swelling in ammonium L-lactate solutions were also monitored. L-Lactate/oxaloacetate and L-lactate/pyruvate anti-porters were identified by monitoring photometrically the appearance of L-lactate counter-anions outside mitochondria. These L-lactate translocators, which are distinct from the monocarboxylate carrier, were found to differ from each other in V(max) values and in inhibition and pH profiles, and proved to regulate mitochondrial L-lactate metabolism in vitro. The role of lactate/mitochondria interactions in gluconeogenesis is discussed.

  10. Increased Brain Lactate Concentrations Without Increased Lactate Oxidation During Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    De Feyter, Henk M.; Mason, Graeme F.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Petersen, Kitt Falk

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that brain metabolism of acetate is increased more than twofold during hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetic (T1D) subjects with hypoglycemia unawareness. These data support the hypothesis that upregulation of blood-brain barrier monocarboxylic acid (MCA) transport may contribute to the maintenance of brain energetics during hypoglycemia in subjects with hypoglycemia unawareness. Plasma lactate concentrations are ∼10-fold higher than acetate concentrations, making lactate the most likely alternative MCA as brain fuel. We therefore examined transport of [3-13C]lactate across the blood-brain barrier and its metabolism in the brains of T1D patients and nondiabetic control subjects during a hypoglycemic clamp using 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Brain lactate concentrations were more than fivefold higher (P < 0.05) during hypoglycemia in the T1D subjects compared with the control subjects. Surprisingly, we observed no increase in the oxidation of blood-borne lactate in the T1D subjects, as reflected by similar 13C fractional enrichments in brain glutamate and glutamine. Taken together, these data suggest that in addition to increased MCA transport at the blood-brain barrier, there may be additional metabolic adaptations that contribute to hypoglycemia unawareness in patients with T1D. PMID:23715622

  11. In vivo measurement of ethanol metabolism in the rat liver using magnetic resonance spectroscopy of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Spielman, Daniel M.; Mayer, Dirk; Yen, Yi-Fen; Tropp, James; Hurd, Ralph E.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2009-01-01

    [1-13C]pyruvate is readily polarizable substrate that has been the subject of numerous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies of in vivo metabolism. In this work, 13C-MRS of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate is used to interrogate a metabolic pathway involved in neither aerobic nor anaerobic metabolism. In particular, ethanol consumption leads to altered liver metabolism, which when excessive is associated with adverse medical conditions including fatty liver disease, hepatitis, cirrhosis, and cancer. Here we present a method for noninvasively monitoring this important process in vivo. Following the bolus injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate, we demonstrate a significantly increased rat liver lactate production rate with the co-administration of ethanol (P = 0.0016 unpaired t-test). The affect is attributable to increased liver nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) associated with ethanol metabolism in combination with NADH's role as a coenzyme in pyruvate to lactate conversion. Beyond studies of liver metabolism, this novel in vivo assay of changes in NADH levels makes hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate a potentially viable substrate for studying the multiple in vivo metabolic pathways that use NADH (or NAD+) as a coenzyme, thus broadening the range of applications that have been discussed in the literature to date. PMID:19526498

  12. Measurement of lactate formation from glucose using (6- sup 3 H)- and (6- sup 14 C)glucose in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Virkamaeki, A.P.; Puhakainen, I.; Nurjhan, N.; Gerich, J.E.; Yki-Jaervinen, H. )

    1990-09-01

    To assess the validity of determining the origin of plasma lactate from the ratio of lactate and glucose specific activities (SA) during infusion of labeled glucose, normal subjects received infusions of (6-3H)- and (6-14C)glucose for 4 h after a 12 h fast, and, on another day, cold glucose labeled with both tracers during 4-6 h of hyperinsulinemia (approximately 650 microU/ml). Basally, less lactate was derived from plasma glucose when measured with (6-3H)glucose (27 +/- 2%) than with (6-14C)glucose (40 +/- 2%, P less than 0.001). Insulin did not increase the percent of lactate derived from plasma glucose when measured with (6-3H)glucose (29 +/- 2%) but did increase when measured with (6-14C)glucose (60 +/- 4%). The arterialized blood (A) (3H)lactate SA was 30-40% higher (P less than 0.01) than deep venous blood (V) (3H)lactate SA, whereas A and V (14C)lactate SA were similar. During conversion of alanine to lactate with glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in vitro, 32 +/- 2% of 3H in (3-3H)alanine was found in water and 68 +/- 2% in lactate. During infusion of (6-3H)- and (6-14C)glucose, the ratio of (14C)alanine to lactate SA (0.88 +/- 0.05) was less than the ratio of (3H)alanine to lactate SA (0.31 +/- 0.03, P less than 0.001). In conclusion (1) loss of 3H relative to 14C from position 6 in glucose occurs during lactate formation in extrahepatic tissues possibly due to the GPT reaction (alanine conversion to pyruvate), and (2) even under supraphysiologic hyperinsulinemic conditions not all of plasma lactate originates from plasma glucose.

  13. D-lactate metabolism in the alga, Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Husic, D.W.; Tolbert, N.E.

    1986-05-01

    (/sup 14/C)D-lactate rapidly accumulates in Chlamydomonas cells under anaerobic conditions from the sugar-phosphate pools which are labeled during photosynthesis with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. A soluble D-lactate dehydrogenase (30 ..mu..mol NADH oxidized/h/mg Chl), which functions only in the direction of pyruvate reduction, has been partially purified and characterized. The D-lactate is reoxidized in Chlamydomonas by a mitochondrial membrane-bound dehydrogenase. This enzyme is known in the plant literature as glycolate dehydrogenase, an enzyme of the oxidative photosynthetic carbon (C/sub 2/) cycle. This dehydrogenase may be linked to the mitochondrial electron transport chain, although the direct electron acceptor is unknown. Therefore, D-lactate accumulation may be, in part, due to the shut down of electron transport during anaerobiosis. In vivo chase experiments have shown that the D-lactate turns over rapidly when algal cells, which have been grown with air levels of CO/sub 2/ (0.04%), are returned to aerobic conditions in the light. Such turnover is not observed in cells which had been grown with 1 to 5% CO/sub 2/. Cells grown with high CO/sub 2/ have lower levels of glycolate dehydrogenase activity. They are currently using mutants of Chlamydomonas deficient in mitochondrial respiration to study the role of D-lactate oxidation in these algae.

  14. A novel mode of lactate metabolism in strictly anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Weghoff, Marie Charlotte; Bertsch, Johannes; Müller, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Lactate is a common substrate for major groups of strictly anaerobic bacteria, but the biochemistry and bioenergetics of lactate oxidation is obscure. The high redox potential of the pyruvate/lactate pair of E0 ' = -190 mV excludes direct NAD(+) reduction (E0 ' = -320 mV). To identify the hitherto unknown electron acceptor, we have purified the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the strictly anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The LDH forms a stable complex with an electron-transferring flavoprotein (Etf) that exhibited NAD(+) reduction only when reduced ferredoxin (Fd(2-) ) was present. Biochemical analyses revealed that the LDH/Etf complex of A. woodii uses flavin-based electron confurcation to drive endergonic lactate oxidation with NAD(+) as oxidant at the expense of simultaneous exergonic electron flow from reduced ferredoxin (E0 ' ≈ -500 mV) to NAD(+) according to: lactate + Fd(2-)  + 2 NAD(+)  → pyruvate + Fd + 2 NADH. The reduced Fd(2-) is regenerated from NADH by a sequence of events that involves conversion of chemical (ATP) to electrochemical ( Δ μ ˜ Na + ) and finally redox energy (Fd(2-) from NADH) via reversed electron transport catalysed by the Rnf complex. Inspection of genomes revealed that this metabolic scenario for lactate oxidation may also apply to many other anaerobes.

  15. The Pyruvate-Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Node

    PubMed Central

    Bücker, René; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Becker, Judith; Dersch, Petra; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Despite our increasing knowledge of the specific pathogenicity factors in bacteria, the contribution of metabolic processes to virulence is largely unknown. Here, we elucidate a tight connection between pathogenicity and core metabolism in the enteric pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis by integrated transcriptome and [13C]fluxome analysis of the wild type and virulence-regulator mutants. During aerobic growth on glucose, Y. pseudotuberculosis reveals an unusual flux distribution with a high level of secreted pyruvate. The absence of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators RovA, CsrA, and Crp strongly perturbs the fluxes of carbon core metabolism at the level of pyruvate metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and these perturbations are accompanied by transcriptional changes in the corresponding enzymes. Knock-outs of regulators of this metabolic branch point and of its central enzyme, pyruvate kinase (ΔpykF), result in mutants with significantly reduced virulence in an oral mouse infection model. In summary, our work identifies the pyruvate-TCA cycle node as a focal point for controlling the host colonization and virulence of Yersinia. PMID:25164818

  16. A mimic of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huanyu; Breslow, Ronald

    2010-10-15

    Pyruvic acid undergo decarboxylation catalyzed by a hydrophobic thiazolium salt and reacts with a hydrophobic analog of lipoic acid to form a hydrophobic acylthioester that reacts with aniline to form acetanilide in water, but only in the presence of a hydrophobically modified polyaziridine that acts to gather the reactants just as the enzyme complex does. PMID:20826089

  17. Lactation and reproduction*

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, A. M.; Hytten, F. E.; Black, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    The authors review the literature on the effect of lactation on fertility in the absence of contraception and on the effects of contraceptive measures on lactation. They examine data from several countries on the intervals between births and on the return of menstruation and ovulation after childbirth, comparing lactating with nonlactating women. They conclude that lactation is an inefficient contraceptive for the individual, but that in populations sustained lactation is associated with reduced fertility. Possible physiological mechanisms causing lactation amenorrhoea are discussed. Though much of the literature on the effect of contraceptives on lactation is inadequate, there is general agreement that the estrogen component of hormonal preparations has an adverse effect on lactation, but that progestins alone do not. Many questions remain. Is this effect seen in established lactation, or only in the puerperal period? Is it a direct pharmacological effect, or are pill-users the mothers least motivated to maintain breast-feeding? Does a close relationship exist between hormones given and lactation performance? The authors comment on some of the technical deficiencies of previous studies in this field and discuss practical possibilities of, and limitations to, obtaining adequate scientific information in the future. PMID:1084804

  18. Pyruvate Formate-Lyase Is Essential for Fumarate-Independent Anaerobic Glycerol Utilization in the Enterococcus faecalis Strain W11

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Yuki

    2014-01-01

    Although anaerobic glycerol metabolism in Enterococcus faecalis requires exogenous fumarate for NADH oxidation, E. faecalis strain W11 can metabolize glycerol in the absence of oxygen without exogenous fumarate. In this study, metabolic end product analyses and reporter assays probing the expression of enzymes involved in pyruvate metabolism were performed to investigate this fumarate-independent anaerobic metabolism of glycerol in W11. Under aerobic conditions, the metabolic end products of W11 cultured with glycerol were similar to those of W11 cultured with glucose. However, when W11 was cultured anaerobically, most of the glucose was converted to l-lactate, but glycerol was converted to ethanol and formate. During anaerobic culture with glycerol, the expression of the l-lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase E1αβ genes in W11 was downregulated, whereas the expression of the pyruvate formate-lyase (Pfl) and aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase genes was upregulated. These changes in the expression levels caused the change in the composition of end products. A pflB gene disruptant (Δpfl mutant) of W11 could barely utilize glycerol under anaerobic conditions, but the growth of the Δpfl mutant cultured with either glucose or dihydroxyacetone (DHA) under anaerobic conditions was the same as that of W11. Glucose metabolism and DHA generates one NADH molecule per pyruvate molecule, whereas glycerol metabolism in the dehydrogenation pathway generates two NADH molecules per pyruvate molecule. These findings demonstrate that NADH generated from anaerobic glycerol metabolism in the absence of fumarate is oxidized through the Pfl-ethanol fermentation pathway. Thus, Pfl is essential to avoid the accumulation of excess NADH during fumarate-independent anaerobic glycerol metabolism. PMID:24769696

  19. Pyruvate formate-lyase is essential for fumarate-independent anaerobic glycerol utilization in the Enterococcus faecalis strain W11.

    PubMed

    Doi, Yuki; Ikegami, Yuki

    2014-07-01

    Although anaerobic glycerol metabolism in Enterococcus faecalis requires exogenous fumarate for NADH oxidation, E. faecalis strain W11 can metabolize glycerol in the absence of oxygen without exogenous fumarate. In this study, metabolic end product analyses and reporter assays probing the expression of enzymes involved in pyruvate metabolism were performed to investigate this fumarate-independent anaerobic metabolism of glycerol in W11. Under aerobic conditions, the metabolic end products of W11 cultured with glycerol were similar to those of W11 cultured with glucose. However, when W11 was cultured anaerobically, most of the glucose was converted to l-lactate, but glycerol was converted to ethanol and formate. During anaerobic culture with glycerol, the expression of the l-lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase E1αβ genes in W11 was downregulated, whereas the expression of the pyruvate formate-lyase (Pfl) and aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase genes was upregulated. These changes in the expression levels caused the change in the composition of end products. A pflB gene disruptant (Δpfl mutant) of W11 could barely utilize glycerol under anaerobic conditions, but the growth of the Δpfl mutant cultured with either glucose or dihydroxyacetone (DHA) under anaerobic conditions was the same as that of W11. Glucose metabolism and DHA generates one NADH molecule per pyruvate molecule, whereas glycerol metabolism in the dehydrogenation pathway generates two NADH molecules per pyruvate molecule. These findings demonstrate that NADH generated from anaerobic glycerol metabolism in the absence of fumarate is oxidized through the Pfl-ethanol fermentation pathway. Thus, Pfl is essential to avoid the accumulation of excess NADH during fumarate-independent anaerobic glycerol metabolism. PMID:24769696

  20. In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging of Hyperpolarized [1-13C] Pyruvate Metabolism in Rat Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Darpolor, Moses M.; Yen, Yi-Fen; Chua, Mei-Sze; Xing, Lei; Clarke-Katzenberg, Regina H.; Shi, Wenfang; Mayer, Dirk; Josan, Sonal; Hurd, Ralph E.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Senadheera, Lasitha; So, Samuel; Hofmann, Lawrence V.; Glazer, Gary M.; Spielman, Daniel M.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the primary form of human adult liver malignancy, is a highly aggressive tumor with average survival rates that are currently less than a year following diagnosis. Most patients with HCC are diagnosed at an advanced stage, and no efficient marker exists for predicting prognosis and/or response(s) to therapy. We previously reported a high level of [1-13C] alanine in an orthotopic HCC using single-voxel hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In the present study, we implemented a 3D-magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) sequence to investigate this potential hallmark of cellular metabolism in rat livers bearing HCC (N=7 buffalo rats). In addition, quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine the mRNA levels of lactate dehydrogenase A, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1, and alanine transaminase. The enzymes levels were significantly higher in the tumor than the normal liver tissues within each rat, which is associated with the in vivo MRSI signal of [1-13C]alanine and [1-13C]lactate after a bolus intravenous injection of [1-13C]pyruvate. Histopathological analysis of these tumors confirms successful growth of HCC as a nodule in buffalo rats’ livers revealing malignancy and hyper-vascular architecture. More importantly, the results demonstrate that the metabolic fate of [1-13C]pyruvate conversion to [1-13C]alanine significantly supersedes that of [1-13C]pyruvate conversion to [1-13C]lactate potentially serving as a marker of HCC tumors. PMID:21674652

  1. Lactate Storm Marks Cerebral Metabolism following Brain Trauma*

    PubMed Central

    Lama, Sanju; Auer, Roland N.; Tyson, Randy; Gallagher, Clare N.; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Sutherland, Garnette R.

    2014-01-01

    Brain metabolism is thought to be maintained by neuronal-glial metabolic coupling. Glia take up glutamate from the synaptic cleft for conversion into glutamine, triggering glial glycolysis and lactate production. This lactate is shuttled into neurons and further metabolized. The origin and role of lactate in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains controversial. Using a modified weight drop model of severe TBI and magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy with infusion of 13C-labeled glucose, lactate, and acetate, the present study investigated the possibility that neuronal-glial metabolism is uncoupled following severe TBI. Histopathology of the model showed severe brain injury with subarachnoid and hemorrhage together with glial cell activation and positive staining for Tau at 90 min post-trauma. High resolution MR spectroscopy of brain metabolites revealed significant labeling of lactate at C-3 and C-2 irrespective of the infused substrates. Increased 13C-labeled lactate in all study groups in the absence of ischemia implied activated astrocytic glycolysis and production of lactate with failure of neuronal uptake (i.e. a loss of glial sensing for glutamate). The early increase in extracellular lactate in severe TBI with the injured neurons rendered unable to pick it up probably contributes to a rapid progression toward irreversible injury and pan-necrosis. Hence, a method to detect and scavenge the excess extracellular lactate on site or early following severe TBI may be a potential primary therapeutic measure. PMID:24849602

  2. Lactate Contribution to the Tumor Microenvironment: Mechanisms, Effects on Immune Cells and Therapeutic Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Moreno-Altamirano, María Maximina B.; Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Sánchez-García, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    Malignant transformation of cells leads to enhanced glucose uptake and the conversion of a larger fraction of pyruvate into lactate, even under normoxic conditions; this phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis is largely known as the Warburg effect. This metabolic reprograming serves to generate biosynthetic precursors, thus facilitating the survival of rapidly proliferating malignant cells. Extracellular lactate directs the metabolic reprograming of tumor cells, thereby serving as an additional selective pressure. Besides tumor cells, stromal cells are another source of lactate production in the tumor microenvironment, whose role in both tumor growth and the antitumor immune response is the subject of intense research. In this review, we provide an integral perspective of the relationship between lactate and the overall tumor microenvironment, from lactate structure to metabolic pathways for its synthesis, receptors, signaling pathways, lactate-producing cells, lactate-responding cells, and how all contribute to the tumor outcome. We discuss the role of lactate as an immunosuppressor molecule that contributes to tumor evasion and we explore the possibility of targeting lactate metabolism for cancer treatment, as well as of using lactate as a prognostic biomarker. PMID:26909082

  3. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity controls metabolic and malignant phenotype in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    McFate, Thomas; Mohyeldin, Ahmed; Lu, Huasheng; Thakar, Jay; Henriques, Jeremy; Halim, Nader D; Wu, Hong; Schell, Michael J; Tsang, Tsz Mon; Teahan, Orla; Zhou, Shaoyu; Califano, Joseph A; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Harris, Robert A; Verma, Ajay

    2008-08-15

    High lactate generation and low glucose oxidation, despite normal oxygen conditions, are commonly seen in cancer cells and tumors. Historically known as the Warburg effect, this altered metabolic phenotype has long been correlated with malignant progression and poor clinical outcome. However, the mechanistic relationship between altered glucose metabolism and malignancy remains poorly understood. Here we show that inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity contributes to the Warburg metabolic and malignant phenotype in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. PDC inhibition occurs via enhanced expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1 (PDK-1), which results in inhibitory phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase alpha (PDHalpha) subunit. We also demonstrate that PDC inhibition in cancer cells is associated with normoxic stabilization of the malignancy-promoting transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) by glycolytic metabolites. Knockdown of PDK-1 via short hairpin RNA lowers PDHalpha phosphorylation, restores PDC activity, reverts the Warburg metabolic phenotype, decreases normoxic HIF-1alpha expression, lowers hypoxic cell survival, decreases invasiveness, and inhibits tumor growth. PDK-1 is an HIF-1-regulated gene, and these data suggest that the buildup of glycolytic metabolites, resulting from high PDK-1 expression, may in turn promote HIF-1 activation, thus sustaining a feed-forward loop for malignant progression. In addition to providing anabolic support for cancer cells, altered fuel metabolism thus supports a malignant phenotype. Correction of metabolic abnormalities offers unique opportunities for cancer treatment and may potentially synergize with other cancer therapies. PMID:18541534

  4. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase regulatory mechanisms and inhibition in treating diabetes, heart ischemia, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Roche, T E; Hiromasa, Y

    2007-04-01

    The fraction of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) in the active form is reduced by the activities of dedicated PD kinase isozymes (PDK1, PDK2, PDK3 and PDK4). Via binding to the inner lipoyl domain (L2) of the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase (E2 60mer), PDK rapidly access their E2-bound PD substrate. The E2-enhanced activity of the widely distributed PDK2 is limited by dissociation of ADP from its C-terminal catalytic domain, and this is further slowed by pyruvate binding to the N-terminal regulatory (R) domain. Via the reverse of the PDC reaction, NADH and acetyl-CoA reductively acetylate lipoyl group of L2, which binds to the R domain and stimulates PDK2 activity by speeding up ADP dissociation. Activation of PDC by synthetic PDK inhibitors binding at the pyruvate or lipoyl binding sites decreased damage during heart ischemia and lowered blood glucose in insulin-resistant animals. PDC activation also triggers apoptosis in cancer cells that selectively convert glucose to lactate. PMID:17310282

  5. E4F1-mediated control of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is essential for skin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Goguet-Rubio, Perrine; Seyran, Berfin; Gayte, Laurie; Bernex, Florence; Sutter, Anne; Delpech, Hélène; Linares, Laetitia Karine; Riscal, Romain; Repond, Cendrine; Rodier, Geneviève; Kirsh, Olivier; Touhami, Jawida; Noel, Jean; Vincent, Charles; Pirot, Nelly; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Herault, Yann; Sitbon, Marc; Pellerin, Luc; Sardet, Claude; Lacroix, Matthieu; Le Cam, Laurent

    2016-09-27

    The multifunctional protein E4 transcription factor 1 (E4F1) is an essential regulator of epidermal stem cell (ESC) maintenance. Here, we found that E4F1 transcriptionally regulates a metabolic program involved in pyruvate metabolism that is required to maintain skin homeostasis. E4F1 deficiency in basal keratinocytes resulted in deregulated expression of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (Dlat), a gene encoding the E2 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. Accordingly, E4f1 knock-out (KO) keratinocytes exhibited impaired PDH activity and a redirection of the glycolytic flux toward lactate production. The metabolic reprogramming of E4f1 KO keratinocytes associated with remodeling of their microenvironment and alterations of the basement membrane, led to ESC mislocalization and exhaustion of the ESC pool. ShRNA-mediated depletion of Dlat in primary keratinocytes recapitulated defects observed upon E4f1 inactivation, including increased lactate secretion, enhanced activity of extracellular matrix remodeling enzymes, and impaired clonogenic potential. Altogether, our data reveal a central role for Dlat in the metabolic program regulated by E4F1 in basal keratinocytes and illustrate the importance of PDH activity in skin homeostasis. PMID:27621431

  6. A comparison of quantitative methods for clinical imaging with hyperpolarized 13C‐pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Charlie J.; McLean, Mary A.; Schulte, Rolf F.; Robb, Fraser J.; Gill, Andrew B.; McGlashan, Nicholas; Graves, Martin J.; Schwaiger, Markus; Lomas, David J.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enables the metabolism of hyperpolarized 13C‐labelled molecules, such as the conversion of [1‐13C]pyruvate to [1‐13C]lactate, to be dynamically and non‐invasively imaged in tissue. Imaging of this exchange reaction in animal models has been shown to detect early treatment response and correlate with tumour grade. The first human DNP study has recently been completed, and, for widespread clinical translation, simple and reliable methods are necessary to accurately probe the reaction in patients. However, there is currently no consensus on the most appropriate method to quantify this exchange reaction. In this study, an in vitro system was used to compare several kinetic models, as well as simple model‐free methods. Experiments were performed using a clinical hyperpolarizer, a human 3 T MR system, and spectroscopic imaging sequences. The quantitative methods were compared in vivo by using subcutaneous breast tumours in rats to examine the effect of pyruvate inflow. The two‐way kinetic model was the most accurate method for characterizing the exchange reaction in vitro, and the incorporation of a Heaviside step inflow profile was best able to describe the in vivo data. The lactate time‐to‐peak and the lactate‐to‐pyruvate area under the curve ratio were simple model‐free approaches that accurately represented the full reaction, with the time‐to‐peak method performing indistinguishably from the best kinetic model. Finally, extracting data from a single pixel was a robust and reliable surrogate of the whole region of interest. This work has identified appropriate quantitative methods for future work in the analysis of human hyperpolarized 13C data. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27414749

  7. Metabolic imaging of acute and chronic infarction in the perfused rat heart using hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Ball, Daniel R; Cruickshank, Rachel; Carr, Carolyn A; Stuckey, Daniel J; Lee, Philip; Clarke, Kieran; Tyler, Damian J

    2013-11-01

    Hyperpolarised (13)C MRI can be used to generate metabolic images of the heart in vivo. However, there have been no similar studies performed in the isolated perfused heart. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a method for the creation of (13)C metabolite maps of the perfused rat heart and to demonstrate the technique in a study of acute and chronic myocardial infarction. Male Wistar rat hearts were isolated, perfused and imaged before and after occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, creating an acute infarct group. In addition, a chronic infarct group was generated from hearts which had their LAD coronary artery occluded in vivo. Four weeks later, hearts were excised, perfused and imaged to generate metabolic maps of infused pyruvate and its metabolites lactate and bicarbonate. Myocardial perfusion and energetics were assessed by first-pass perfusion imaging and (31)P MRS, respectively. In both acute and chronically infarcted hearts, perfusion was reduced to the infarct region, as revealed by reduced gadolinium influx and lower signal intensity in the hyperpolarised pyruvate images. In the acute infarct region, there were significant alterations in the lactate (increased) and bicarbonate (decreased) signal ratios. In the chronically infarcted region, there was a significant reduction in both bicarbonate and lactate signals. (31)P-derived energetics revealed a significant decrease between control and chronic infarcted hearts. Significant decreases in contractile function between control and both acute and chronic infracted hearts were also seen. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that hyperpolarised pyruvate can detect reduced perfusion in the rat heart following both acute and chronic infarction. Changes in lactate and bicarbonate ratios indicate increased anaerobic metabolism in the acute infarct, which is not observed in the chronic infarct. Thus, this study has successfully demonstrated a novel imaging approach to assess

  8. Lactate is always the end product of glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Rogatzki, Matthew J.; Ferguson, Brian S.; Goodwin, Matthew L.; Gladden, L. Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Through much of the history of metabolism, lactate (La−) has been considered merely a dead-end waste product during periods of dysoxia. Congruently, the end product of glycolysis has been viewed dichotomously: pyruvate in the presence of adequate oxygenation, La− in the absence of adequate oxygenation. In contrast, given the near-equilibrium nature of the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) reaction and that LDH has a much higher activity than the putative regulatory enzymes of the glycolytic and oxidative pathways, we contend that La− is always the end product of glycolysis. Cellular La− accumulation, as opposed to flux, is dependent on (1) the rate of glycolysis, (2) oxidative enzyme activity, (3) cellular O2 level, and (4) the net rate of La− transport into (influx) or out of (efflux) the cell. For intracellular metabolism, we reintroduce the Cytosol-to-Mitochondria Lactate Shuttle. Our proposition, analogous to the phosphocreatine shuttle, purports that pyruvate, NAD+, NADH, and La− are held uniformly near equilibrium throughout the cell cytosol due to the high activity of LDH. La− is always the end product of glycolysis and represents the primary diffusing species capable of spatially linking glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:25774123

  9. [Lactate-guanidinium and lactate-lactate weak interactions in aqueous solutions].

    PubMed

    Horváth, P; Gergely, A; Noszál, B

    1995-07-01

    Spectropolarimetry was used to quantify the guanidinium-lactate and lactate-lactate equilibrium reactions. Association constants for the guanidinium-lactate and lactate-lactate formations are 6.11 and 1.12, respectively, in aqueous solution. The value 6.11 is certainly high among electrostatic interactions in water. This stability, however, can not account for the extremely strong lactate-protein binding, observed by NMR spectroscopy. The molar rotation coefficients for both the heteroassociation and homoassociation complexes are also calculated. The homoassociative lactate-lactate binding is the first such interaction, whose constant has been determined by spectropolarimetry in aqueous solution.

  10. Dichloroacetate increases glucose use and decreases lactate in developing rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.L.; Hatch, J.P.; Prihoda, T.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) activates pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) by inhibiting PDH kinase. Neutralized DCA (100 mg/kg) or saline was intravenously administered to 20 to 25-day-old rats (50-75g). Fifteen minutes later a mixture of {sup 6-14}C glucose and {sup 3}H fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was administered intravenously and the animals were sacrificed by microwave irradiation (2450 MHz, 8.0 kW, 0.6-0.8 sec) after 2 or 5 min. Brain regional rates of glucose use and metabolite levels were determined. DCA-treated rats had increased rates of glucose use in all regions studied (cortex, thalamus, striatum, and brain stem), with an average increase of 41%. Lactate levels were lower in all regions, by an average of 35%. There were no significant changes in levels of ATP, creatine phosphate, or glycogen in any brain region. Blood levels of lactate did not differ significantly between the DCA- and the saline-treated groups. Blood glucose levels were higher in the DCA group. In rats sacrificed by freeze-blowing, DCA treatment caused lower brain levels of both lactate and pyruvate. These results cannot be explained by any systemic effect of DCA. Rather, it appears that in the immature rat, DCA treatment results in activation of brain PDH, increased metabolism of brain pyruvate and lactate, and a resulting increase in brain glycolytic rate.

  11. Physiology of lactation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The breast changes in size, shape, and function during puberty, pregnancy, and lactation. The physiology of lactation is reviewed here. The breast is composed of fat and connective tissue that supports a tubuloalveolar structure. During development, anatomic changes involving new lobule formation an...

  12. Biosynthesis of the halogenated auxin, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Tivendale, Nathan D; Davidson, Sandra E; Davies, Noel W; Smith, Jason A; Dalmais, Marion; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid I; Quittenden, Laura J; Sutton, Lily; Bala, Raj K; Le Signor, Christine; Thompson, Richard; Horne, James; Reid, James B; Ross, John J

    2012-07-01

    Seeds of several agriculturally important legumes are rich sources of the only halogenated plant hormone, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid. However, the biosynthesis of this auxin is poorly understood. Here, we show that in pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid is synthesized via the novel intermediate 4-chloroindole-3-pyruvic acid, which is produced from 4-chlorotryptophan by two aminotransferases, TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE RELATED1 and TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE RELATED2. We characterize a tar2 mutant, obtained by Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes, the seeds of which contain dramatically reduced 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid levels as they mature. We also show that the widespread auxin, indole-3-acetic acid, is synthesized by a parallel pathway in pea. PMID:22573801

  13. Prenatal presentation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Niranjana; Tully, Hannah M; Chapman, Teresa

    2016-08-01

    We present the case of a female infant referred for prenatal MR evaluation of ventriculomegaly, which had been attributed by the referring obstetrician to aqueductal stenosis. Fetal MR confirmed ventriculomegaly but also demonstrated cerebral volume loss and white matter abnormalities. After birth, the infant developed persistent lactic acidosis. A diagnosis of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency was made on the basis of metabolic and molecular genetic studies. Ventriculomegaly is a common referral reason for fetal MR, yet there are few published reports of the radiographic findings that accompany inborn errors of metabolism, one potentially under-recognized cause of enlarged ventricles. This case contributes to this small body of literature on the imaging features of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency by describing pre- and postnatal MR findings and key clinical details. Our report emphasizes the necessity of considering pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency and other metabolic disorders as potential etiologies for fetal ventriculomegaly since prompt diagnosis may allow for early initiation of treatment and improve outcome. PMID:27026023

  14. Structure, function and regulation of pyruvate carboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Jitrapakdee, S; Wallace, J C

    1999-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC; EC 6.4.1.1), a member of the biotin-dependent enzyme family, catalyses the ATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate. PC has been found in a wide variety of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In mammals, PC plays a crucial role in gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis, in the biosynthesis of neurotransmitter substances, and in glucose-induced insulin secretion by pancreatic islets. The reaction catalysed by PC and the physical properties of the enzyme have been studied extensively. Although no high-resolution three-dimensional structure has yet been determined by X-ray crystallography, structural studies of PC have been conducted by electron microscopy, by limited proteolysis, and by cloning and sequencing of genes and cDNA encoding the enzyme. Most well characterized forms of active PC consist of four identical subunits arranged in a tetrahedron-like structure. Each subunit contains three functional domains: the biotin carboxylation domain, the transcarboxylation domain and the biotin carboxyl carrier domain. Different physiological conditions, including diabetes, hyperthyroidism, genetic obesity and postnatal development, increase the level of PC expression through transcriptional and translational mechanisms, whereas insulin inhibits PC expression. Glucocorticoids, glucagon and catecholamines cause an increase in PC activity or in the rate of pyruvate carboxylation in the short term. Molecular defects of PC in humans have recently been associated with four point mutations within the structural region of the PC gene, namely Val145-->Ala, Arg451-->Cys, Ala610-->Thr and Met743-->Thr. PMID:10229653

  15. Secondary. beta. -deuterium isotope effects in decarboxylation and elimination reactions of. cap alpha. -lactylthiamin: intrinsic isotope effects of pyruvate decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Kluger, R.; Brandl, M.

    1986-11-26

    The reactions of the adduct of pyruvate and thiamine, lactylthiamin (2-(lact-2-yl)thiamine), are accurate nonenzymic models for reactions of intermediates formed during catalysis by pyruvate decarboxylase. The enzymatic reaction generates lactylthiamin diphosphate from pyruvate and thiamine diphosphate. ..beta..-Deuterium isotope effects were determined for the nonenzymic reactions, and the results were related to isotope effects on the enzymic reaction. 2-(Lact-2-yl-..beta..-d/sub 3/) thiamine was prepared by condensation of methyl pyruvate-d/sub 3/ with thiamine followed by hydrolysis. The isotope effect for decarboxylation of lactylthiamin in acidic solution at 25/sup 0/C (k/sub H3//k/sub D3/) is 1.09 (standard deviation (SD) 0.015) in pH 3.8, 0.5 M sodium acetate: isotope effect = 1.095 (SD 0.014) in 0.001 M HCl. The reaction was also studied using 38% ethanolic aqueous sodium acetate (pH 3.8 before mixing with ethanol) since the enzymic sites are less polar than water and the reaction is significantly accelerated by the cosolvent. The isotope effect is within statistical range of that for the reaction in water, 1.105 (SD 0.016), indicating that acceleration by the solvent does not change the extent of hyperconjugative stabilization of the transition state relative to the ground state. The isotope effect for the base-catalyzed elimination of pyruvate from lactylthiamin was determined from kinetic studies by using multiwavelength analysis for reactions in pH 11 sodium carbonate solution. The isotope effect (k/sub H3//k/sub D3/) is 1.12 (SD 0.01), which is slightly higher than the effect on decarboxylation.

  16. Regulatory mechanisms of cellular respiration. III. Enzyme distribution in the cell. Its influence on the metabolism of pyruvic acid by bakers' yeast.

    PubMed

    BARRON, E S G; ARDAO, M I; HEARON, M

    1950-11-01

    The rate of the aerobic metabolism of pyruvic acid by bakers' yeast cells is determined mainly by the amount of undissociated acid present. As a consequence, the greatest rate of oxidation was observed at pH 2.8. Oxidation, at a slow rate, started at pH 1.08; at pH 9.4 there was no oxidation at all. The anaerobic metabolism, only a fraction of the aerobic, was observed only in acid solutions. There was none at pH values higher than 3. Pyruvic acid in the presence of oxygen was oxidized directly to acetic acid; in the absence of oxygen it was metabolized mainly by dismutation to lactic and acetic acids, and CO(2). Acetic acid formation was demonstrated on oxidation of pyruvic acid at pH 1.91, and on addition of fluoroacetic acid. Succinic acid formation was shown by addition of malonic acid. These metabolic pathways in a cell so rich in carboxylase may be explained by the arrangement of enzymes within the cell, so that carboxylase is at the center, while pyruvic acid oxidase is located at the periphery. Succinic and citric acids were oxidized only in acid solutions up to pH 4. Malic and alpha-ketoglutaric acids were not oxidized, undoubtedly because of lack of penetration.

  17. Fast volumetric imaging of ethanol metabolism in rat liver with hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Sonal; Spielman, Daniel; Yen, Yi-Fen; Hurd, Ralph; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Mayer, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Rapid, volumetric imaging of hyperpolarized 13C compounds allows the real time measurement of metabolic activity and can be useful in distinguishing between normal and diseased tissues. This work extends a fast 2D under-sampled spiral magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) sequence to provide volumetric coverage, acquiring a 16×16×12 matrix with a nominal 5 mm isotropic resolution in 4.5 s. The rapid acquisition enables a high temporal resolution for dynamic imaging. This dynamic 3D MRSI method was used to investigate hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate metabolism modulated by the administration of ethanol in rat liver. A significant increase in the pyruvate to lactate conversion was observed in the liver due to the greater availability of NADH from ethanol metabolism. PMID:22331837

  18. Design of spectral-spatial outer volume suppression RF pulses for tissue specific metabolic characterization with hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Albert P.; Leung, Kevin; Lam, Wilfred; Hurd, Ralph E.; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Cunningham, Charles H.

    2009-10-01

    [1- 13C] pyruvate pre-polarized via DNP has been used in animal models to probe changes in metabolic enzyme activities in vivo. To more accurately assess the metabolic state and its change from disease progression or therapy in a specific region or tissue in vivo, it may be desirable to separate the downstream 13C metabolite signals resulting from the metabolic activity within the tissue of interest and those brought into the tissue by perfusion. In this study, a spectral-spatial saturation pulse that selectively saturates the signal from the metabolic products [1- 13C] lactate and [1- 13C] alanine was designed and implemented as outer volume suppression for localized MRSI acquisition. Preliminary in vivo results showed that the suppression pulse did not prevent the pre-polarized pyruvate from being delivered throughout the animal while it saturated the metabolites within the targeted saturation region.

  19. The role of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase in pyruvate synthesis during autotrophic growth by the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway.

    PubMed

    Furdui, C; Ragsdale, S W

    2000-09-15

    Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA and CO(2). The catalytic proficiency of this enzyme for the reverse reaction, pyruvate synthase, is poorly understood. Conversion of acetyl-CoA to pyruvate links the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of autotrophic CO(2) fixation to the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, which in these autotrophic anaerobes is the stage for biosynthesis of all cellular macromolecules. The results described here demonstrate that the Clostridium thermoaceticum PFOR is a highly efficient pyruvate synthase. The Michaelis-Menten parameters for pyruvate synthesis by PFOR are: V(max) = 1.6 unit/mg (k(cat) = 3.2 s(-1)), K(m)(Acetyl-CoA) = 9 micrometer, and K(m)(CO(2)) = 2 mm. The intracellular concentrations of acetyl-CoA, CoASH, and pyruvate have been measured. The predicted rate of pyruvate synthesis at physiological concentrations of substrates clearly is sufficient to support the role of PFOR as a pyruvate synthase in vivo. Measurements of its k(cat)/K(m) values demonstrate that ferredoxin is a highly efficient electron carrier in both the oxidative and reductive reactions. On the other hand, rubredoxin is a poor substitute in the oxidative direction and is inept in donating electrons for pyruvate synthesis. PMID:10878009

  20. MRI with hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate detects advanced pancreatic preneoplasia prior to invasive disease in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Eva M; Kettunen, Mikko I; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Dzien, Piotr; Wright, Alan J; Gopinathan, Aarthi; Gallagher, Ferdia A; Lewis, David Y; Frese, Kristopher K; Almeida, Jaime; Howat, William J; Tuveson, David A; Brindle, Kevin M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatic cancer (PCa) is treatable by surgery when detected at an early stage. Non-invasive imaging methods able to detect both established tumours and their precursor lesions are needed to select patients for surgery. We investigated here whether pancreatic preneoplasia could be detected prior to the development of invasive cancers in genetically engineered mouse models of PCa using metabolic imaging. Design The concentrations of alanine and lactate and the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were measured in extracts prepared from the pancreas of animals at different stages of disease progression; from pancreatitis, through tissue with predominantly low-grade and then high-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and then tumour. 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (13C-MRSI) was used to measure non-invasively changes in 13C labelling of alanine and lactate with disease progression, following injection of hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate. Results Progressive decreases in the alanine/lactate concentration ratio and ALT/LDH activity ratio with disease progression were accompanied by a corresponding decrease in the [1-13C]alanine/[1-13C]lactate signal ratio observed in 13C-MRSI images of the pancreas. Conclusions Metabolic imaging with hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate enables detection and monitoring of the progression of PCa precursor lesions. Translation of this MRI technique to the clinic has the potential to improve the management of patients at high risk of developing PCa. PMID:26347531

  1. Pyruvate-dependent preconditioning and cardioprotection in murine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Flood, Amanda; Hack, Benjamin D; Headrick, John P

    2003-03-01

    1. Whether pyruvate inhibits or can actually initiate myocardial preconditioning is unclear and whether pyruvate provides protection via its action as a 'cosubstrate' with glucose or via alternative mechanisms also remains controversial. We examined effects of a high concentration of pyruvate (10 mmol/L) alone or with 15 mmol/L glucose in mouse hearts subjected to 20 min ischaemia and 30 min reperfusion. 2. Provision of 10 mmol/L pyruvate alone or as a cosubstrate markedly reduced ischaemic contracture and enhanced postischaemic recovery. Time to contracture was increased from approximately 3 min to over 8 min, peak contracture was reduced from 90 mmHg to less than 60 mmHg and postischaemic pressure development was also improved. Effects on contracture were independent of the presence of pyruvate during ischaemia and improved postischaemic recovery was evident with pre-ischaemic pyruvate perfusion. 3. Cardioprotection did not require the presence of pyruvate during ischaemia or reperfusion and effects of pyruvate pretreatment could be mimicked by pretreatment with 1 mmol/L dichloroacetate (DCA), an activator of pyruvate dehydrogenase. 4. Myocardial adenosine efflux and Ca2+ content were elevated (by 215 and 65%, respectively) following pretreatment with pyruvate, potentially triggering a preconditioned state. A role for adenosine A1 receptors is supported by lack of added protection with pyruvate in hearts transgenically overexpressing adenosine A1 receptors. 5. Collectively, these observations demonstrate that pre-ischaemic treatment with pyruvate or DCA provides a beneficial preconditioning-like effect in ischaemic and postischaemic myocardium. The response appears unrelated to glycolytic inhibition, but may be mediated via transient changes in adenosine levels and/or cellular Ca2+.

  2. Energy landscape of the Michaelis complex of lactate dehydrogenase: relationship to catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huo-Lei; Deng, Hua; Dyer, R Brian; Callender, Robert

    2014-03-25

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion between pyruvate and lactate with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) as a cofactor. Using isotope-edited difference Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy on the "live" reaction mixture (LDH·NADH·pyruvate ⇌ LDH·NAD(+)·lactate) for the wild-type protein and a mutant with an impaired catalytic efficiency, a set of interconverting conformational substates within the pyruvate side of the Michaelis complex tied to chemical activity is revealed. The important structural features of these substates include (1) electronic orbital overlap between pyruvate's C2═O bond and the nicotinamide ring of NADH, as shown from the observation of a delocalized vibrational mode involving motions from both moieties, and (2) a characteristic hydrogen bond distance between the pyruvate C2═O group and active site residues, as shown by the observation of at least four C2═O stretch bands indicating varying degrees of C2═O bond polarization. These structural features form a critical part of the expected reaction coordinate along the reaction path, and the ability to quantitatively determine them as well as the substate population ratios in the Michaelis complex provides a unique opportunity to probe the structure-activity relationship in LDH catalysis. The various substates have a strong variance in their propensity toward on enzyme chemistry. Our results suggest a physical mechanism for understanding the LDH-catalyzed chemistry in which the bulk of the rate enhancement can be viewed as arising from a stochastic search through an available phase space that, in the enzyme system, involves a restricted ensemble of more reactive conformational substates as compared to the same chemistry in solution.

  3. 21 CFR 862.1650 - Pyruvate kinase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862... to pyruvate kinase deficiency or of acute leukemias. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1650 - Pyruvate kinase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862... to pyruvate kinase deficiency or of acute leukemias. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1650 - Pyruvate kinase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862... to pyruvate kinase deficiency or of acute leukemias. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  6. Liver specific pyruvate kinase in pheasants Phasianus colchicus.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H; Jacques, L

    1987-01-01

    While in chickens, the existence of a liver form of pyruvate kinase is controversial, the liver form of pyruvate kinase in pheasants, murres and puffins is electrophoretically distinct from that in muscle, brain, kidney, lung and small intestine. Although the forms in lungs, muscle, heart, brain and small intestine could not be reliably separated by electrophoresis, the functional characteristics of the lung and muscle forms of pyruvate kinase in the pheasant are distinct and can be classified as K and M isozymes respectively. Our data suggest that these birds possess at least three distinct isozymes of pyruvate kinase. PMID:3609446

  7. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex from Chloroplasts of Pisum sativum L 1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael; Randall, Douglas D.

    1979-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is associated with intact chloroplasts and mitochondria of 9-day-old Pisum sativum L. seedlings. The ratio of the mitochondrial complex to the chloroplast complex activities is about 3 to 1. Maximal rates observed for chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity ranged from 6 to 9 micromoles of NADH produced per milligram of chlorophyll per hour. Osmotic rupture of pea chloroplasts released 88% of the complex activity, indicating that chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is a stromal complex. The pH optimum for chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was between 7.8 and 8.2, whereas the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex had a pH optimum between 7.3 and 7.7. Chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity was specific for pyruvate, dependent upon coenzyme A and NAD and partially dependent upon Mg2+ and thiamine pyrophosphate. Chloroplast-associated pyruvate dehydrogenase complex provides a direct link between pyruvate metabolism and chloroplast fatty acid biosynthesis by providing the substrate, acetyl-CoA, necessary for membrane development in young plants. Images PMID:16661100

  8. 21 CFR 862.1650 - Pyruvate kinase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862... to pyruvate kinase deficiency or of acute leukemias. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  9. [Psychopharmacotherapy in pregnancy and lactation. 2: Lactation].

    PubMed

    Lanczik, M; Knoche, M; Fritze, J

    1998-01-01

    Whilst the incidence of psychiatric disorders decreases during pregnancy, the risk during the postpartum period increases significantly, often leading to the necessity of psychopharmacological intervention during the puerperium, and subsequently during lactation and breast-feeding. The necessity for lithium prophylaxis in manic-depressive women after childbirth has been identified, and it is recommended that weaning rather than omission of psychopharmacological treatment is preferable during the puerperium. PMID:9522328

  10. Cassava root diet induces low pyruvate levels.

    PubMed

    Golay, Van K

    2010-01-01

    The high cyanogenic-glucoside carbohydrate of the cassava root (Manihot esculenta) has special properties that make it an ideal therapeutic food for lowering nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide reduced form (NADH) and inducing Sirtuin (Sirt) gene overexpression when eaten in an exclusive mono-food diet regime. The author, using himself as the sole test subject, repeatedly induced low pyruvate levels (reflective of NADH levels) after being on the diet for 1-2 weeks at a time. The possible influences of exclusive cassava dieting on redox control and Sirtuin activation will be discussed. PMID:20462383

  11. Hyperpolarized (13)C MR imaging detects no lactate production in mutant IDH1 gliomas: Implications for diagnosis and response monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chaumeil, Myriam M; Radoul, Marina; Najac, Chloé; Eriksson, Pia; Viswanath, Pavithra; Blough, Michael D; Chesnelong, Charles; Luchman, H Artee; Cairncross, J Gregory; Ronen, Sabrina M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic imaging of brain tumors using (13)C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate is a promising neuroimaging strategy which, after a decade of preclinical success in glioblastoma (GBM) models, is now entering clinical trials in multiple centers. Typically, the presence of GBM has been associated with elevated hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate produced from [1-(13)C] pyruvate, and response to therapy has been associated with a drop in hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate. However, to date, lower grade gliomas had not been investigated using this approach. The most prevalent mutation in lower grade gliomas is the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation, which, in addition to initiating tumor development, also induces metabolic reprogramming. In particular, mutant IDH1 gliomas are associated with low levels of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) and monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4), three proteins involved in pyruvate metabolism to lactate. We therefore investigated the potential of (13)C MRS of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate for detection of mutant IDH1 gliomas and for monitoring of their therapeutic response. We studied patient-derived mutant IDH1 glioma cells that underexpress LDHA, MCT1 and MCT4, and wild-type IDH1 GBM cells that express high levels of these proteins. Mutant IDH1 cells and tumors produced significantly less hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate compared to GBM, consistent with their metabolic reprogramming. Furthermore, hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate production was not affected by chemotherapeutic treatment with temozolomide (TMZ) in mutant IDH1 tumors, in contrast to previous reports in GBM. Our results demonstrate the unusual metabolic imaging profile of mutant IDH1 gliomas, which, when combined with other clinically available imaging methods, could be used to detect the presence of the IDH1 mutation in vivo. PMID:27437179

  12. Expression of Lactate Dehydrogenase in Aspergillus niger for L-Lactic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Khyati K.; Punekar, Narayan S.

    2015-01-01

    Different engineered organisms have been used to produce L-lactate. Poor yields of lactate at low pH and expensive downstream processing remain as bottlenecks. Aspergillus niger is a prolific citrate producer and a remarkably acid tolerant fungus. Neither a functional lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from nor lactate production by A. niger is reported. Its genome was also investigated for the presence of a functional ldh. The endogenous A. niger citrate synthase promoter relevant to A. niger acidogenic metabolism was employed to drive constitutive expression of mouse lactate dehydrogenase (mldhA). An appraisal of different branches of the A. niger pyruvate node guided the choice of mldhA for heterologous expression. A high copy number transformant C12 strain, displaying highest LDH specific activity, was analyzed under different growth conditions. The C12 strain produced 7.7 g/l of extracellular L-lactate from 60 g/l of glucose, in non-neutralizing minimal media. Significantly, lactate and citrate accumulated under two different growth conditions. Already an established acidogenic platform, A. niger now promises to be a valuable host for lactate production. PMID:26683313

  13. Expression of Lactate Dehydrogenase in Aspergillus niger for L-Lactic Acid Production.

    PubMed

    Dave, Khyati K; Punekar, Narayan S

    2015-01-01

    Different engineered organisms have been used to produce L-lactate. Poor yields of lactate at low pH and expensive downstream processing remain as bottlenecks. Aspergillus niger is a prolific citrate producer and a remarkably acid tolerant fungus. Neither a functional lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from nor lactate production by A. niger is reported. Its genome was also investigated for the presence of a functional ldh. The endogenous A. niger citrate synthase promoter relevant to A. niger acidogenic metabolism was employed to drive constitutive expression of mouse lactate dehydrogenase (mldhA). An appraisal of different branches of the A. niger pyruvate node guided the choice of mldhA for heterologous expression. A high copy number transformant C12 strain, displaying highest LDH specific activity, was analyzed under different growth conditions. The C12 strain produced 7.7 g/l of extracellular L-lactate from 60 g/l of glucose, in non-neutralizing minimal media. Significantly, lactate and citrate accumulated under two different growth conditions. Already an established acidogenic platform, A. niger now promises to be a valuable host for lactate production.

  14. Enzyme-coated microelectrodes to monitor lactate production in a nanoliter microfluidic cell culture device.

    PubMed

    Ges, Igor A; Baudenbacher, Franz

    2010-10-15

    Monitoring the degree of anaerobic respiration of cells in high density microscale culture systems is an enabling key technology and essential for cell-based biosensors. We have fabricated and incorporated miniature amperometric lactate sensing electrodes with working areas from 3 to 5×10(-2) mm2 into a microfluidic-based microscale cell culture system to measure the lactate production rate of fibroblasts in nanoliter volumes. Planar thin film platinum electrode arrays on glass substrates were spin coated with lactate oxidase and a protective Nafion layer. The lactate electrodes had a high enzymatic activity described by a Michaelis-Menten constant of 2.6±0.1 mM, a linear response in the range 0.01-2.5 mM and a sensitivity of 7.3×10(-2) mA/mM cm2. A replica-molded polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device with nanoliter sensing volumes was aligned and sealed to a glass substrate with the sensing electrodes. We trapped fibroblasts in the cell culture volume and measured the lactate production rate using a stop-flow protocol. The average lactate production rate was 0.011±0.0049 mM/min. The lactate production was suppressed with the addition of 2-deoxy-D-glucose, which binds to hexokinase. The blocking of hexokinase prevents the generation of pyruvate, the intermittent substrate required for lactate production even in the presence of glucose.

  15. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlinger, D.J.; Reed, L.J.

    1986-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). No pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase activity was detected at any stage of the purification. However, the purified PDC was phosphorylated and inactivated by purified PDH kinase from bovine kidney mitochondria, Mg/sup 2 +/, and (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. The protein-bound radioactivity was localized in the PDH ..cap alpha.. subunit. The phosphorylated, inactivated PDC was dephosphorylated and reactivated with purified bovine PDH phosphatase, Mg/sup 2 +/, and Ca/sup 2 +/. From a tryptic digest of phosphorylated yeast PDC a radioactive peptide was isolated by anion and reverse phase HPLC. The sequence of this tetradecapeptide is Tyr-Gly-Gly-His-Ser(P)-Met-Ser-Asp-Pro-Gly-Thr-Thr-Tyr-Arg. This sequence is very similar to the sequence of a tryptic phosphopeptide derived from the ..cap alpha.. subunit of bovine kidney and heart PDH: Tyr-His-Gly-His-Ser(P)-Met-Ser-Asp-Pro-Gly-Val-Ser-Tyr-Arg.

  16. Transcriptional regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji Yun; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu

    2012-10-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity is crucial to maintains blood glucose and ATP levels, which largely depends on the phosphorylation status by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) isoenzymes. Although it has been reported that PDC is phosphorylated and inactivated by PDK2 and PDK4 in metabolically active tissues including liver, skeletal muscle, heart, and kidney during starvation and diabetes, the precise mechanisms by which expression of PDK2 and PDK4 are transcriptionally regulated still remains unclear. Insulin represses the expression of PDK2 and PDK4 via phosphorylation of FOXO through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Several nuclear hormone receptors activated due to fasting or increased fat supply, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, estrogen-related receptors, and thyroid hormone receptors, also participate in the up-regulation of PDK2 and PDK4; however, the endogenous ligands that bind those nuclear receptors have not been identified. It has been recently suggested that growth hormone, adiponectin, epinephrine, and rosiglitazone also control the expression of PDK4 in tissue-specific manners. In this review, we discuss several factors involved in the expressional regulation of PDK2 and PDK4, and introduce current studies aimed at providing a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of metabolic diseases such as diabetes. PMID:23130316

  17. Inhibition of endogenous lactate turnover with lactate infusion in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Searle, G.L.; Feingold, K.R.; Hsu, F.S.; Clark, O.H.; Gertz, E.W.; Stanley, W.C. )

    1989-11-01

    The extent to which lactate infusion may inhibit endogenous lactate production, though previously considered, has never been critically assessed. To examine this proposition, single injection tracer methodology (U-{sup 14}C Lactate) has been used for the estimation of lactate kinetics in 12 human subjects under basal conditions and with the infusion of sodium lactate. The basal rate of lactate turnover was measured on a day before the study with lactate infusion, and averaged 63.7 + 5.5 mg/kg/h. Six of these individuals received a stable lactate infusion at an approximate rate of 160 mg/kg/h, while the remaining six individuals were infused at the approximate rate of 100 mg/kg/h. It has been found that stable lactate infused at rates approximating 160 mg/kg/h consistently produced a complete inhibition of endogenous lactate production. Infusion of lactate at 100 mg/kg/h caused a lesser and more variable inhibition of endogenous lactate production (12% to 64%). In conclusion, lactate infusion significantly inhibits endogenous lactate production.

  18. Accelerated Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity Potentiates Osteoclastogenesis via NFATc1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Heejin; Lee, Kyunghee; Kim, Jin Man; Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soo Young; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts seem to be metabolic active during their differentiation and bone-resorptive activation. However, the functional role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a tetrameric enzyme consisting of an A and/or B subunit that catalyzes interconversion of pyruvate to lactate, in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is not known. In this study, RANKL treatment induced gradual gene expression and activation of the LDH A2B2 isotype during osteoclast differentiation as well as the LDH A1B3 and B4 isotypes during osteoclast maturation after pre-osteoclast formation. Glucose consumption and lactate production in growth media were accelerated during osteoclast differentiation, together with enhanced expression of H+-lactate co-transporter and increased extracellular acidification, demonstrating that glycolytic metabolism was stimulated during differentiation. Further, oxygen consumption via mitochondria was stimulated during osteoclast differentiation. On the contrary, depletion of LDH-A or LDH-B subunit suppressed both glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, resulting in reduced mature osteoclast formation via decreased osteoclast precursor fusion and down-regulation of the osteoclastogenic critical transcription factor NFATc1 and its target genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that RANKL-induced LDH activation stimulates glycolytic and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, facilitating mature osteoclast formation via osteoclast precursor fusion and NFATc1 signaling. PMID:27077737

  19. Accelerated Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity Potentiates Osteoclastogenesis via NFATc1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Man; Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soo Young; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts seem to be metabolic active during their differentiation and bone-resorptive activation. However, the functional role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a tetrameric enzyme consisting of an A and/or B subunit that catalyzes interconversion of pyruvate to lactate, in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is not known. In this study, RANKL treatment induced gradual gene expression and activation of the LDH A2B2 isotype during osteoclast differentiation as well as the LDH A1B3 and B4 isotypes during osteoclast maturation after pre-osteoclast formation. Glucose consumption and lactate production in growth media were accelerated during osteoclast differentiation, together with enhanced expression of H+-lactate co-transporter and increased extracellular acidification, demonstrating that glycolytic metabolism was stimulated during differentiation. Further, oxygen consumption via mitochondria was stimulated during osteoclast differentiation. On the contrary, depletion of LDH-A or LDH-B subunit suppressed both glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, resulting in reduced mature osteoclast formation via decreased osteoclast precursor fusion and down-regulation of the osteoclastogenic critical transcription factor NFATc1 and its target genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that RANKL-induced LDH activation stimulates glycolytic and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, facilitating mature osteoclast formation via osteoclast precursor fusion and NFATc1 signaling. PMID:27077737

  20. 21 CFR 862.1650 - Pyruvate kinase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pyruvate kinase test system. 862.1650 Section 862.1650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1650 Pyruvate kinase test system....

  1. Hyperpolarized singlet lifetimes of pyruvate in human blood and in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Marco-Rius, Irene; Tayler, Michael C D; Kettunen, Mikko I; Larkin, Timothy J; Timm, Kerstin N; Serrao, Eva M; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Pileio, Giuseppe; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Levitt, Malcolm H; Brindle, Kevin M

    2013-12-01

    Hyperpolarized NMR is a promising technique for non-invasive imaging of tissue metabolism in vivo. However, the pathways that can be studied are limited by the fast T1 decay of the nuclear spin order. In metabolites containing pairs of coupled nuclear spins-1/2, the spin order may be maintained by exploiting the non-magnetic singlet (spin-0) state of the pair. This may allow preservation of the hyperpolarization in vivo during transport to tissues of interest, such as tumors, or to detect slower metabolic reactions. We show here that in human blood and in a mouse in vivo at millitesla fields the (13)C singlet lifetime of [1,2-(13)C2]pyruvate was significantly longer than the (13)C T1, although it was shorter than the T1 at field strengths of several tesla. We also examine the singlet-derived NMR spectrum observed for hyperpolarized [1,2-(13)C2]lactate, originating from the metabolism of [1,2-(13)C2]pyruvate.

  2. Hyperpolarized singlet lifetimes of pyruvate in human blood and in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Rius, Irene; Tayler, Michael C D; Kettunen, Mikko I; Larkin, Timothy J; Timm, Kerstin N; Serrao, Eva M; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Pileio, Giuseppe; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Levitt, Malcolm H; Brindle, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarized NMR is a promising technique for non-invasive imaging of tissue metabolism in vivo. However, the pathways that can be studied are limited by the fast T1 decay of the nuclear spin order. In metabolites containing pairs of coupled nuclear spins-1/2, the spin order may be maintained by exploiting the non-magnetic singlet (spin-0) state of the pair. This may allow preservation of the hyperpolarization in vivo during transport to tissues of interest, such as tumors, or to detect slower metabolic reactions. We show here that in human blood and in a mouse in vivo at millitesla fields the 13C singlet lifetime of [1,2-13C2]pyruvate was significantly longer than the 13C T1, although it was shorter than the T1 at field strengths of several tesla. We also examine the singlet-derived NMR spectrum observed for hyperpolarized [1,2-13C2]lactate, originating from the metabolism of [1,2-13C2]pyruvate. © 2013 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23946252

  3. Evolution of D-lactate dehydrogenase activity from glycerol dehydrogenase and its utility for D-lactate production from lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-11-22

    Lactic acid, an attractive, renewable chemical for production of biobased plastics (polylactic acid, PLA), is currently commercially produced from food-based sources of sugar. Pure optical isomers of lactate needed for PLA are typically produced by microbial fermentation of sugars at temperatures below 40 °C. Bacillus coagulans produces L(+)-lactate as a primary fermentation product and grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 5, conditions that are optimal for activity of commercial fungal cellulases. This strain was engineered to produce D(-)-lactate by deleting the native ldh (L-lactate dehydrogenase) and alsS (acetolactate synthase) genes to impede anaerobic growth, followed by growth-based selection to isolate suppressor mutants that restored growth. One of these, strain QZ19, produced about 90 g L(-1) of optically pure D(-)-lactic acid from glucose in < 48 h. The new source of D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) activity was identified as a mutated form of glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH; D121N and F245S) that was produced at high levels as a result of a third mutation (insertion sequence). Although the native GlyDH had no detectable activity with pyruvate, the mutated GlyDH had a D-LDH specific activity of 0.8 μmoles min(-1) (mg protein)(-1). By using QZ19 for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to D-lactate (50 °C and pH 5.0), the cellulase usage could be reduced to 1/3 that required for equivalent fermentations by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Together, the native B. coagulans and the QZ19 derivative can be used to produce either L(+) or D(-) optical isomers of lactic acid (respectively) at high titers and yields from nonfood carbohydrates. PMID:22065761

  4. Enzymatic Kinetic Properties of the Lactate Dehydrogenase Isoenzyme C4 of the Plateau Pika (Ochotona curzoniae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Lian; Wei, Dengbang; Li, Xiao; Xu, Lina; Wei, Linna

    2016-01-01

    Testis-specific lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-C4) is one of the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isozymes that catalyze the terminal reaction of pyruvate to lactate in the glycolytic pathway. LDH-C4 in mammals was previously thought to be expressed only in spermatozoa and testis and not in other tissues. Plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) belongs to the genus Ochotona of the Ochotonidea family. It is a hypoxia-tolerant species living in remote mountain areas at altitudes of 3000–5000 m above sea level on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Surprisingly, Ldh-c is expressed not only in its testis and sperm, but also in somatic tissues of plateau pika. To shed light on the function of LDH-C4 in somatic cells, Ldh-a, Ldh-b, and Ldh-c of plateau pika were subcloned into bacterial expression vectors. The pure enzymes of Lactate Dehydrogenase A4 (LDH-A4), Lactate Dehydrogenase B4 (LDH-B4), and LDH-C4 were prepared by a series of expression and purification processes, and the three enzymes were identified by the method of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The enzymatic kinetics properties of these enzymes were studied by Lineweaver-Burk double-reciprocal plots. The results showed the Michaelis constant (Km) of LDH-C4 for pyruvate and lactate was 0.052 and 4.934 mmol/L, respectively, with an approximate 90 times higher affinity of LDH-C4 for pyruvate than for lactate. At relatively high concentrations of lactate, the inhibition constant (Ki) of the LDH isoenzymes varied: LDH-A4 (Ki = 26.900 mmol/L), LDH-B4 (Ki = 23.800 mmol/L), and LDH-C4 (Ki = 65.500 mmol/L). These data suggest that inhibition of lactate by LDH-A4 and LDH-B4 were stronger than LDH-C4. In light of the enzymatic kinetics properties, we suggest that the plateau pika can reduce reliance on oxygen supply and enhance its adaptation to the hypoxic environments due to increased anaerobic glycolysis by LDH-C4. PMID:26751442

  5. Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase deficiency: 2015 status report

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Alberto; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Morton, D. Holmes; Eber, Stefan; Yaish, Hassan; Glader, Bertil

    2015-01-01

    Over the last several decades, our understanding of the genetic variation, pathophysiology, and complications of the hemolytic anemia associated with red cell pyruvate kinase deficiency (PKD) has expanded. Nonetheless, there remain significant gaps in our knowledge with regard to clinical care and monitoring. Treatment remains supportive with phototherapy and/or exchange transfusion in the newborn period, regular or intermittent red cell transfusions in children and adults, and splenectomy to decrease transfusion requirements and/or anemia related symptoms. In this article, we review the clinical diversity of PKD, the current standard of treatment and for supportive care, the complications observed, and future treatment directions.Am. J. Hematol. 90:825–830, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26087744

  6. IFCC methods for the measurement of catalytic concentration of enzymes. Part 8. IFCC method for lactate dehydrogenase (L-lactate: NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.27)

    PubMed Central

    Bais, Renze; Philcox, Margaret

    1994-01-01

    Human lactate dehydrogenase is a tetramer made up of two types of subunits, either H (heart) or M (muscle). Combination of these subunits gives rise to the five isoenzymes of lactate dehydrogenase which are found in mammalian tissues. The relative proportions of the individual isoenzymes found in serum of patients is related to the severity of the lesion in the organ or tissue from which they originate and the half-life of the individual tissue-specific enzymes. Thus, one cannot predict the relative proportions of the different isoenzymes in any one patient sample. Lactate dehydrogenase catalyses the reversible oxidation of lactate to pyruvate and either reaction can be measured readily. However, in this method, the lactate to pyruvate reaction has been selected because of the following reasons; the time-course of the reaction is more linear, the reaction results in an increase in absorbance and optimization of substrates is possible (see appendix A). The principles applied in the selection of the conditions of measurement are those stated in previous publications by the IFCC’s Committee on Enzymes [1]. Human serum and tissue extracts have been used as the sources of enzymes. The final concentration of substrates and the pH have been selected on the basis of experiments and empirical optimization techniques and have been confirmed by calculation from rate equations. The catalytic and physical properties of the isoenzymes differ, but because of the importance of the heart specific isoenzyme (LD1) in the assessment of coronary heart disease and as a tumour marker, this method has been optimized for this isoenzyme. However, the method is also suitable, although less optimally, for the determination of the other isoenzymes of lactate dehydrogenase which may be present in serum. PMID:18924988

  7. Conformational Dynamics and Allostery in Pyruvate Kinase.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Katherine A; Zhu, Shaolong; Liuni, Peter; Peng, Fen; Kessans, Sarah A; Wilson, Derek J; Dobson, Renwick C J

    2016-04-22

    Pyruvate kinase catalyzes the final step in glycolysis and is allosterically regulated to control flux through the pathway. Two models are proposed to explain how Escherichia coli pyruvate kinase type 1 is allosterically regulated: the "domain rotation model" suggests that both the domains within the monomer and the monomers within the tetramer reorient with respect to one another; the "rigid body reorientation model" proposes only a reorientation of the monomers within the tetramer causing rigidification of the active site. To test these hypotheses and elucidate the conformational and dynamic changes that drive allostery, we performed time-resolved electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled to hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies followed by mutagenic analysis to test the activation mechanism. Global exchange experiments, supported by thermostability studies, demonstrate that fructose 1,6-bisphosphate binding to the allosteric domain causes a shift toward a globally more dynamic ensemble of conformations. Mapping deuterium exchange to peptides within the enzyme highlight site-specific regions with altered conformational dynamics, many of which increase in conformational flexibility. Based upon these and mutagenic studies, we propose an allosteric mechanism whereby the binding of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate destabilizes an α-helix that bridges the allosteric and active site domains within the monomeric unit. This destabilizes the β-strands within the (β/α)8-barrel domain and the linked active site loops that are responsible for substrate binding. Our data are consistent with the domain rotation model but inconsistent with the rigid body reorientation model given the increased flexibility at the interdomain interface, and we can for the first time explain how fructose 1,6-bisphosphate affects the active site. PMID:26879751

  8. Structural Studies of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvate in the presence of Mg(2+) and thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) followed by the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The three-dimensional structure of human E1 is elucidated using the methods of macromolecular X-ray crystallography. The structure is an alpha, alpha', beta and beta' tetramer with the protein units being in the tetrahedral arrangement. Each 361-residue alpha-subunit and 329-residue beta-subunit is composed of a beta-sheet core surrounded by alpha-helical domains. Each subunit is in extensive contact with all the three subunits involving TPP and magnesium cofactors, and potassium ions. The two binding sites for TPP are at the alpha-beta' and alpha'-beta interfaces, each involving a magnesium ion and Phe6l, His63, Tyr89, and Met200 from the alpha-subunit (or alpha'-subunit), and Met81 Phe85, His128 from the beta-subunit (or beta'-subunit). K+ ions are nestled between two beta-sheets and the end of an alpha-helix in each beta-subunit, where they are coordinated by four carbonyl oxygen groups from Ile12, Ala160, Asp163, and Asnl65, and a water molecule. The catalytic C2 carbon of thiazolium ring in this structure forms a 3.2 A contact with a water molecule involved in a series of H-bonds with other water molecules, and indirectly with amino acids including those involved in the catalysis and regulation of the enzyme.

  9. The Bifunctional Pyruvate Decarboxylase/Pyruvate Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase from Thermococcus guaymasensis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus guaymasensis produces ethanol as a metabolic end product, and an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) catalyzing the reduction of acetaldehyde to ethanol has been purified and characterized. However, the enzyme catalyzing the formation of acetaldehyde has not been identified. In this study an enzyme catalyzing the production of acetaldehyde from pyruvate was purified and characterized from T. guaymasensis under strictly anaerobic conditions. The enzyme had both pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) activities. It was oxygen sensitive, and the optimal temperatures were 85°C and >95°C for the PDC and POR activities, respectively. The purified enzyme had activities of 3.8 ± 0.22 U mg−1 and 20.2 ± 1.8 U mg−1, with optimal pH-values of 9.5 and 8.4 for each activity, respectively. Coenzyme A was essential for both activities, although it did not serve as a substrate for the former. Enzyme kinetic parameters were determined separately for each activity. The purified enzyme was a heterotetramer. The sequences of the genes encoding the subunits of the bifunctional PDC/POR were determined. It is predicted that all hyperthermophilic β-keto acids ferredoxin oxidoreductases are bifunctional, catalyzing the activities of nonoxidative and oxidative decarboxylation of the corresponding β-keto acids. PMID:24982594

  10. Lactate Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (LATEST) Imaging in vivo A Biomarker for LDH Activity

    PubMed Central

    DeBrosse, Catherine; Nanga, Ravi Prakash Reddy; Bagga, Puneet; Nath, Kavindra; Haris, Mohammad; Marincola, Francesco; Schnall, Mitchell D.; Hariharan, Hari; Reddy, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging of lactate is of enormous significance in cancer and metabolic disorders where glycolysis dominates. Here, for the first time, we describe a chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method (LATEST), based on the exchange between lactate hydroxyl proton and bulk water protons to image lactate with high spatial resolution. We demonstrate the feasibility of imaging lactate with LATEST in lactate phantoms under physiological conditions, in a mouse model of lymphoma tumors, and in skeletal muscle of healthy human subjects pre- and post-exercise. The method is validated by measuring LATEST changes in lymphoma tumors pre- and post-infusion of pyruvate and correlating them with lactate determined from multiple quantum filtered proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (SEL-MQC 1H-MRS). Similarly, dynamic LATEST changes in exercising human skeletal muscle are correlated with lactate determined from SEL-MQC 1H-MRS. The LATEST method does not involve injection of radioactive isotopes or labeled metabolites. It has over two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity compared to conventional 1H-MRS. It is anticipated that this technique will have a wide range of applications including diagnosis and evaluation of therapeutic response of cancer, diabetes, cardiac, and musculoskeletal diseases. The advantages of LATEST over existing methods and its potential challenges are discussed. PMID:26794265

  11. Warburg-like Glycolysis and Lactate Shuttle in Mouse Decidua during Early Pregnancy*

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Ru-Juan; Gu, Xiao-Wei; Qi, Qian-Rong; Wang, Tong-Song; Zhao, Xu-Yu; Liu, Ji-Long; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Decidualization is an essential process of maternal endometrial stromal cells to support pregnancy. Although it is known that enhanced glucose influx is critical for decidualization, the underlying mechanism in regulating glucose metabolism in decidua remains insufficiently understood. Here, we demonstrate that aerobic glycolysis-related genes and factors are all substantially induced during decidualization, indicating the existence of Warburg-like glycolysis in decidua. In vitro, progesterone activates hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (Hif1α) and c-Myc through Pi3k-Akt signaling pathway to maintain aerobic glycolysis in decidualizing cells. Knocking down of pyruvate kinase M2 (Pkm2) attenuates the induction of decidual marker gene. Decidual formation in vivo is also impaired by glycolysis inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate. Besides, lactate exporter monocarboxylate transporter 4 (Mct4) is induced in newly formed decidual cells, whereas lactate importer Mct1 and proliferation marker Ki-67 are complementarily located in the surrounding undifferentiated cells, which are supposed to consume lactate for proliferation. Hif1α activation is required for lactate-dependent proliferation of the undifferentiated cells. Inhibition of lactate flux leads to compromised decidualization and decelerated lactate-dependent proliferation. In summary, we reveal that Warburg-like glycolysis and local lactate shuttle are activated in decidua and play important roles for supporting early pregnancy. PMID:26178372

  12. Postanoxic oxidative injury in rat hepatocytes: lactate-dependent protection against tert-butylhydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, D P; Aw, T Y; Park, Y; Jones, D P

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory showed that hypoxia and anoxia enhance the susceptibility of hepatocytes to tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBH)-induced oxidative injury. To determine whether preceding exposure to anoxia affects postanoxic sensitivity to oxidative injury, viability was studied in hepatocytes incubated under anoxic conditions followed by reoxygenation without or with tert-butylhydroperoxide addition. Results showed that a preceding exposure to 60 min of anoxia substantially increased the vulnerability of cells to injury by the oxidant. Because substantial tissue lactate can accumulate during anoxia, the effect of increased lactate on postanoxic injury due to TBH was determined. Results showed that added lactate protected in a concentration-dependent manner. The TBH elimination rate was stimulated by lactate, and the pyruvate production rate approached the rate of TBH elimination. Thus, lactate protects against postanoxic oxidative injury by supplying reducing equivalents for peroxide reduction. This suggests that lactate accumulation during ischemia may be beneficial and that supplementation with lactate could be considered as a means to protect against postischemic injury. PMID:1563646

  13. Autoregulatory shift from fructolysis to lactate gluconeogenisis in rat hepatocyte suspensions. The problem of metabolic zonation of liver parenchyma.

    PubMed

    Katz, N; Jungermann, K

    1976-03-01

    Hepatocytes were isolated from fed rats with glucose and insulin and freom fasted rats with glucagon in all media in an attempt to obtain cells which might be fixed preferentially in either the glycolytic or gluconeogenic state. When tested enzymatically, both "fed" and fasted" cells catalyzed glucose formation from lactate (gluconeogenesis) and lactate formation from fructose (fructolysis); lactate formation from glucose may have occurred in "fed" cells. Thus it was impossible, at least in the C3 part of the metabolic pathways between triosephosphate and pyruvate, to fix the hepatocytes in either metabolic state. The shift from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis could be investigated for the C3 part in "fasted" cells with fructose as the glycolytic and lactate as the gluconeogenic substrate. Lactate was first formed from fructose and later reutilized to a large extent. This reconsumption was blocked by the gluconeogenesis inhibitor quinolinate, both when tested enzymatically and radiochemically. Thus fructolysis was shifted to lactate gluconeogenesis. This shift at the assumed phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate cycle was autoregulatory, i.e. dependent on substrates and independent of circulating horomes. Maximal velocities and half saturating concentrations were determined for fructose and for lactate as substrates. The kinetic data obtained, especially the sigmoidal pattern of fructolysis, could nicely explain phenomenologically the rather sudden slow-down of lactate production and the shift to lactate consumption. The levels of the metabolites ATP, ADP, AMP, fructose bisphosphate and alanine, which control the enzymes of the assumed phosphoenolypyruvate/pyruvate cycle, were determined in the cytosol and in the mitochondria before and after the shift from fructose glycolysis to lactate gluconeogenesis. The changes observed could not explain the shift. Experiments with [14C] fructose plus unlabelled lactate and reciprocally, with unlabelled fructose plus [14C] lactate

  14. Decarboxylation of Pyruvate to Acetaldehyde for Ethanol Production by Hyperthermophiles

    PubMed Central

    Eram, Mohammad S.; Ma, Kesen

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC encoded by pdc) is a thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP)-containing enzyme responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to acetaldehyde in many mesophilic organisms. However, no pdc/PDC homolog has yet been found in fully sequenced genomes and proteomes of hyper/thermophiles. The only PDC activity reported in hyperthermophiles was a bifunctional, TPP- and CoA-dependent pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR)/PDC enzyme from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. Another enzyme known to be involved in catalysis of acetaldehyde production from pyruvate is CoA-acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (AcDH encoded by mhpF and adhE). Pyruvate is oxidized into acetyl-CoA by either POR or pyruvate formate lyase (PFL), and AcDH catalyzes the reduction of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde in mesophilic organisms. AcDH is present in some mesophilic (such as clostridia) and thermophilic bacteria (e.g., Geobacillus and Thermoanaerobacter). However, no AcDH gene or protein homologs could be found in the released genomes and proteomes of hyperthermophiles. Moreover, no such activity was detectable from the cell-free extracts of different hyperthermophiles under different assay conditions. In conclusion, no commonly-known PDCs was found in hyperthermophiles. Instead of the commonly-known PDC, it appears that at least one multifunctional enzyme is responsible for catalyzing the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde in hyperthermophiles. PMID:24970182

  15. Inactivation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Escherichia coli by fluoropyruvate

    SciTech Connect

    Flournoy, D.S.; Frey, P.A. )

    1989-12-12

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH complex) of Escherichia coli and its pyruvate dehydrogenease component (E{sub 1}) are rapidly inactivated by low concentrations of fluoropyruvate in a thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) dependent process. The inactivation rates for the PDH complex and for its E{sub 1} component are similar. Pyruvate protects the PDH complex and the E{sub 1} component against inactivation by fluoropyruvate. Dihydrolipoamide protects the E{sub 1} component from inactivation. TPP is not covalently bound to the PDH complex or to the E{sub 1} component by the inactivating reaction. When ({sup 14}C)fluoropyruvate is used to inactivate the PDH complex, {sup 14}C remains bound to the complex after gel filtration. This bound radioactivity is cleaved from the protein by NH{sub 2}OH, {sup {minus}}OH, and NaBH{sub 4} but not by dilute acid. When released by {sup {minus}}OH, greater than 90% of the {sup 14}C cochromatographs with acetate on DEAE-Sephadex. When released by NaBH{sub 4}, and {sup 14}C is recovered as ({sup 14}C)ethanol. Colorimetric analysis for sulfhydryl groups on the native E{sub 1} component and the inactivated E{sub 1} component, using 5,5{prime}-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate), reveals that complete inactivation results from covalent modification of 1.37 {plus minus} 0.03 sulfhydryl residues. Fluoropyruvate is known to generate acetyl-TPP at the active of E{sub 1}. The available evidence indicates that acetylation of a sulfhydryl group by acetyl-TPP at the active site of the E{sub 1} component inactivates the enzyme.

  16. Lactate Regulates Rat Male Germ Cell Function through Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Galardo, María Noel; Regueira, Mariana; Riera, María Fernanda; Pellizzari, Eliana Herminia; Cigorraga, Selva Beatriz; Meroni, Silvina Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Besides giving structural support, Sertoli cells regulate the fate of germ cells by supplying a variety of factors. These factors include hormones, several pro- and anti-apoptotic agents and also energetic substrates. Lactate is one of the compounds produced by Sertoli cells, which is utilized as an energetic substrate by germ cells, particularly spermatocytes and spermatids. Beyond its function as an energy source, some studies have proposed a role of lactate in the regulation of gene expression not strictly related to the energetic state of the cells. The general hypothesis that motivated this investigation was that lactate affects male germ cell function, far beyond its well-known role as energetic substrate. To evaluate this hypothesis we investigated: 1) if lactate was able to regulate germ cell gene expression and if reactive oxygen species (ROS) participated in this regulation, 2) if different signal transduction pathways were modified by the production of ROS in response to lactate and 3) possible mechanisms that may be involved in lactate stimulation of ROS production. In order to achieve these goals, cultures of germ cells obtained from male 30-day old rats were exposed to 10 or 20 mM lactate. Increases in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) C and monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)2 expression, in Akt and p38-MAPK phosphorylation levels and in ROS production were observed. These effects were impaired in the presence of a ROS scavenger. Lactate stimulated ROS production was also inhibited by a LDH inhibitor or a NAD(P)H oxidase (NOX) inhibitor. NOX4 expression was identified in male germ cells. The results obtained herein are consistent with a scenario where lactate, taken up by germ cells, becomes oxidized to pyruvate with the resultant increase in NADH, which is a substrate for NOX4. ROS, products of NOX4 activity, may act as second messengers regulating signal transduction pathways and gene expression. PMID:24498241

  17. Isolation of 3-phosphohistidine from phosphorylated pyruvate, phosphate dikinase.

    PubMed Central

    Spronk, A M; Yoshida, H; Wood, H G

    1976-01-01

    Pyruvate, phosphate dikinase (EC 2-7-9-1) catalyzes formation of phosphoenolpyruvate, AMP, and inorganic pyrophosphate from pyruvate, ATP, and orthophosphate. A pyrophosphoryl and phosphoryl form of the enzyme is involved in this transfer. The [32P]phosphoryl form of pyruvate, phosphate dikinase was prepared with enzyme isolated from Bacteroides symbiosus. The [32P]phosphoryl enzyme was found to have properties corresponding to a phosphoramidate linkage and this was confirmed by isolation of 3-[32P]phosphohistidine from alkaline hydrolysates of the enzyme. The histidyl residue is considered to be the pyrophosphoryl- and phosphoryl-carrier between the three substrate sites of this enzyme. PMID:12506

  18. [Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes in the eye, cardiac and skeletal muscles of several decapods].

    PubMed

    Chernyĭ, V G; Chizhevich, E P; Shukoliukov, S A

    1976-01-01

    Properties of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the eye, heart and muscles of Hemigrapsus sanguineus, Paralithodes camtschatica, Erimacrus isenbeckii, Pandalus latirastrus, Pagurus brachiomastus have been studied with acrylamide gel electrophoresis and kinetics analysis. LDH in all the tissues of all the representatives studied was found to be specific for L-pyruvate and lactate; it migrated in electrophoresis as a single band revealing low mobility towards anode. The isoenzyme from P. camtschatica and P. latirastrus differed from the isoenzymes of other animals studied by higher mobility towards anode that reflected higher negative value of its total charge. The LDH isoenzymes in all the animals studied resembled the A4 (LDH5) of the vertebrates being unstable to the denaturing action of high temperature and being unaffected by high concentrations of pyruvate up to 1.0.10-3M. On the other hand, in conrast to the A4 of mammals, the LDH in question displayed enhancement of the reaction rate and decrease of the Km values upon increase in the NAD+ and NAD.H concentrations both in the presence of high or low lactate and pyruvate concentrations. The isoenzymes displayed catalytic activity also in the presence of NADP, the Km values for pyruvate in the presence of equimolar (2.25 mM) concentrations of NAD.H or NADP.H were practically identical and were found to be within the limits of 14-26.10-5 M. Molecular weight of the LDH studied assessed by the gel filtration method was found to be 130-140,000. It is suggested that the LDH isoenzyme from the representatives of the decapod crayfish studied is homologous in its certain properties to the homotetrameric A4 form of the vertebrates.

  19. Energy Landscape of the Michaelis Complex of Lactate Dehydrogenase: Relationship to Catalytic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion between pyruvate and lactate with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) as a cofactor. Using isotope-edited difference Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy on the “live” reaction mixture (LDH·NADH·pyruvate ⇌ LDH·NAD+·lactate) for the wild-type protein and a mutant with an impaired catalytic efficiency, a set of interconverting conformational substates within the pyruvate side of the Michaelis complex tied to chemical activity is revealed. The important structural features of these substates include (1) electronic orbital overlap between pyruvate’s C2=O bond and the nicotinamide ring of NADH, as shown from the observation of a delocalized vibrational mode involving motions from both moieties, and (2) a characteristic hydrogen bond distance between the pyruvate C2=O group and active site residues, as shown by the observation of at least four C2=O stretch bands indicating varying degrees of C2=O bond polarization. These structural features form a critical part of the expected reaction coordinate along the reaction path, and the ability to quantitatively determine them as well as the substate population ratios in the Michaelis complex provides a unique opportunity to probe the structure–activity relationship in LDH catalysis. The various substates have a strong variance in their propensity toward on enzyme chemistry. Our results suggest a physical mechanism for understanding the LDH-catalyzed chemistry in which the bulk of the rate enhancement can be viewed as arising from a stochastic search through an available phase space that, in the enzyme system, involves a restricted ensemble of more reactive conformational substates as compared to the same chemistry in solution. PMID:24576110

  20. Effect of osmolytes on protein dynamics in the lactate dehydrogenase-catalyzed reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhadin, Nickolay; Callender, Robert

    2011-03-15

    Laser-induced temperature jump relaxation spectroscopy was used to probe the effect of osmolytes on the microscopic rate constants of the lactate dehydrogenase-catalyzed reaction. NADH fluorescence and absorption relaxation kinetics were measured for the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) reaction system in the presence of varying amounts of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a protein-stabilizing osmolyte, or urea, a protein-destabilizing osmolyte. Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) at a concentration of 1 M strongly increases the rate of hydride transfer, nearly nullifies its activation energy, and also slightly increases the enthalpy of hydride transfer. In 1 M urea, the hydride transfer enthalpy is almost nullified, but the activation energy of the step is not affected significantly. TMAO increases the preference of the closed conformation of the active site loop in the LDH·NAD(+)·lactate complex; urea decreases it. The loop opening rate in the LDH·NADH·pyruvate complex changes its temperature dependence to inverse Arrhenius with TMAO. In this complex, urea accelerates the loop motion, without changing the loop opening enthalpy. A strong, non-Arrhenius decrease in the pyruvate binding rate in the presence of TMAO offers a decrease in the fraction of the open loop, pyruvate binding competent form at higher temperatures. The pyruvate off rate is not affected by urea but decreases with TMAO. Thus, the osmolytes strongly affect the rates and thermodynamics of specific events along the LDH-catalyzed reaction: binding of substrates, loop closure, and the chemical event. Qualitatively, these results can be understood as an osmolyte-induced change in the energy landscape of the protein complexes, shifting the conformational nature of functional substates within the protein ensemble.

  1. Stimulation of pyruvate transport in metabolizing mitochondria through changes in the transmembrane pH gradient induced by glucagon treatment of rats.

    PubMed

    Halestrap, A P

    1978-06-15

    Glucagon treatment of rats allowed the isolation of liver mitochondria with enhanced rates of pyruvate metabolism measured in either sucrose or KCl media. No change in the activity of the pyruvate carrier itself was apparent, but under metabolizing conditions, use of the inhibitor of pyruvate transport, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate, demonstrated that pyruvate transport limited the rate of pyruvate metabolism. The maximum rate of transport under metabolizing conditions was enhanced by glucagon treatment. Problems involved in measuring the transmembrane pH gradient under metabolizing conditions are discussed and a variety of techniques are used to estimate the matrix pH. From the distribution of methylamine, ammonia and D-lactate and the Ki for inhibition by alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate it is concluded that the matrix is more acid than the medium and that the pH of the matrix rises after glucagon treatment. The increase in matrix pH stimulates pyruvate transport. The membrane potential, ATP concentration and O2 uptake were also increased under metabolizing conditions in glucagon-treated mitochondria. These changes were correlated with a stimulation of the respiratory chain which can be observed in uncoupled mitochondria [Yamazaki (1975) J. Biol. Chem. 250, 7924--7930]. The mitochondrial Mg2+ content (mean +/- S.E.M.) was increased from 38.8 +/- 1.2 (n = 26) to 47.5 +/- 2.0 (n = 26) ng-atoms/mg by glucagon and the K+ content from 126.7 +/- 10.3 (n = 19) ng-atoms/mg. This may represent a change in membrane potential induced by glucagon in vivo. The physiological significance of these results in the control of gluconeogenesis is discussed. PMID:28727

  2. Analysis of Mitochondrial Proteins in the Surviving Myocardium after Ischemia Identifies Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier Expression as Possible Mediator of Tissue Viability.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Caggiano, Mariana; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; CalviñoSantos, Ramón; Aldama López, Guillermo; Generosa Crespo-Leiro, Maria; Eaton, Philip; Doménech, Nieves

    2016-01-01

    The endogenous mechanisms contributing to tissue survival following myocardial infarction are not fully understood. We investigated the alterations in the mitochondrial proteome after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) and its possible implications on cell survival. Mitochondrial proteomic analysis of cardiac tissue from an in vivo porcine I/R model found that surviving tissue in the peri-infarct border zone showed increased expression of several proteins. Notably, these included subunits of the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC), namely MPC1 and MPC2. Western blot, immunohistochemistry, and mRNA analysis corroborated the elevated expression of MPC in the surviving tissue. Furthermore, MPC1 and MPC2 protein levels were found to be markedly elevated in the myocardium of ischemic cardiomyopathy patients. These findings led to the hypothesis that increased MPC expression is cardioprotective due to enhancement of mitochondrial pyruvate uptake in the energy-starved heart following I/R. To test this, isolated mouse hearts perfused with a modified Krebs buffer (containing glucose, pyruvate, and octanoate as metabolic substrates) were subjected to I/R with or without the MPC transport inhibitor UK5099. UK5099 increased myocardial infarction and attenuated post-ischemic recovery of left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. However, aerobically perfused control hearts that were exposed to UK5099 did not modulate contractile function, although pyruvate uptake was blocked as evidenced by increased cytosolic lactate and pyruvate levels. Our findings indicate that increased expression of MPC leads to enhanced uptake and utilization of pyruvate during I/R. We propose this as a putative endogenous mechanism that promotes myocardial survival to limit infarct size.

  3. Therapeutic potential of the mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases in the prevention of hyperglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Sugden, M C; Holness, M J

    2002-07-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyses the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate, and links glycolysis to the tricarboxylic acid cycle and ATP production. Adequate flux through PDC is important in tissues with a high ATP requirement, in lipogenic tissues (since it provides cytosolic acetyl-CoA for fatty acid (FA) synthesis), and in generating cytosolic malonyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT I). Conversely, suppression of PDC activity is crucial for glucose conservation when glucose is scarce. This review describes recent advances relating to the control of mammalian PDC activity by phosphorylation (inactivation) and dephosphorylation (activation, reactivation), in particular regulation of PDC by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) which phosphorylates and inactivates PDC. PDK activity is that of a family of four proteins (PDK1-4). PDK2 and PDK4 appear to be expressed in most major tissues and organs of the body, PDK1 appears to be limited to the heart and pancreatic islets, and PDK3 is limited to the kidney, brain and testis. PDK4 is selectively upregulated in the longer term in most tissues and organs in response to starvation and hormonal imbalances such as insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus and hyperthyroidism. Parallel increases in PDK2 and PDK4 expression appear to be restricted to gluconceogenesic tissues, liver and kidney, which take up as well as generate pyruvate. Factors that regulate PDK4 expression include FA oxidation and adequate insulin action. PDK4 is also either a direct or indirect target of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha. PPAR alpha deficiency in liver and kidney restricts starvation-induced upregulation of PDK4; however, the role of PPAR alpha in heart and skeletal muscle appears to be more complex. These observations may have important implications for the pharmacological modulation of PDK activity (e.g. use of PPAR alpha activators) for the control of whole

  4. Differential roles of pyruvate decarboxylase in aerial and embedded mycelia of the ascomycete Gibberella zeae.

    PubMed

    Son, Hokyoung; Min, Kyunghun; Lee, Jungkwan; Choi, Gyung Ja; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Lee, Yin-Won

    2012-04-01

    The pyruvate-acetaldehyde-acetate (PAA) pathway has diverse roles in eukaryotes. Our previous study on acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase 1 (ACS1) in Gibberella zeae suggested that the PAA pathway is important for lipid production, which is required for perithecia maturation. In this study, we deleted all three pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) genes, which encode enzymes that function upstream of ACS1 in the PAA pathway. Results suggest PDC1 is required for lipid accumulation in the aerial mycelia, and deletion of PDC1 resulted in highly wettable mycelia. However, the total amount of lipids in the PDC1 deletion mutants was similar to that of the wild-type strain, likely due to compensatory lipid production processes in the embedded mycelia. PDC1 was expressed both in the aerial and embedded mycelia, whereas ACS1 was observed only in the aerial mycelia in a PDC1-dependent manner. PDC1 is also involved in vegetative growth of embedded mycelia in G. zeae, possibly through initiating the ethanol fermentation pathway. Thus, PDC1 may function as a key metabolic enzyme crucial for lipid production in the aerial mycelia, but play a different role in the embedded mycelia, where it might be involved in energy generation by ethanol fermentation.

  5. Adiposity and fat metabolism in lactating and fasting northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Daniel E; Champagne, Cory D; Fowler, Melinda A; Houser, Dorian S

    2014-01-01

    Several taxa of animals fast completely from food and water during energy-intensive periods such as lactation, breeding, and development. In elephant seals, these behaviors are sustained by high adiposity, high rates of fat mobilization, and reduced oxidation of carbohydrates and proteins. Adiposity and the regulation of lipolysis directly affect lactation energetics, milk composition, and mating success. Long-term fasting induces changes in regulation of lipolysis and lipid metabolism that influence fatty acid (FA) availability and the onset of insulin resistance. Hypoinsulinemia and elevated circulating FAs are also associated with several unique features of carbohydrate metabolism, including elevated plasma glucose, gluconeogenesis, and Cori cycle activity as well as high rates of pyruvate and tricarboxylic acid cycling. Glucose-lactate pools and triacylglycerol-FA cycles may be linked via glyceroneogenesis and this may be an important pathway influencing both fat and carbohydrate metabolism. Together, these features allow a sustained, high intensity, fat-based metabolism without substantial accumulation of ketoacids.

  6. 21 CFR 862.1655 - Pyruvic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... measure pyruvic acid (an intermediate compound in the metabolism of carbohydrate) in plasma. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the evaluation of electrolyte metabolism and in the diagnosis...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1655 - Pyruvic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... measure pyruvic acid (an intermediate compound in the metabolism of carbohydrate) in plasma. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the evaluation of electrolyte metabolism and in the diagnosis...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1655 - Pyruvic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... measure pyruvic acid (an intermediate compound in the metabolism of carbohydrate) in plasma. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the evaluation of electrolyte metabolism and in the diagnosis...

  9. Pathogenic mechanisms underlying X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMTX6) in patients with a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Perez-Siles, Gonzalo; Ly, Carolyn; Grant, Adrienne; Drew, Alexander P; Yiu, Eppie M; Ryan, Monique M; Chuang, David T; Tso, Shih-Chia; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L

    2016-10-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. An X-linked form of CMT (CMTX6) is caused by a missense mutation (R158H) in the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoenzyme 3 (PDK3) gene. PDK3 is one of 4 isoenzymes that negatively regulate the activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) by reversible phosphorylation of its first catalytic component pyruvate dehydrogenase (designated as E1). Mitochondrial PDC catalyses the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl CoA and links glycolysis to the energy-producing Krebs cycle. We have previously shown the R158H mutation confers PDK3 enzyme hyperactivity. In this study we demonstrate that the increased PDK3 activity in patient fibroblasts (PDK3(R158H)) leads to the attenuation of PDC through hyper-phosphorylation of E1 at selected serine residues. This hyper-phosphorylation can be reversed by treating the PDK3(R158H) fibroblasts with the PDK inhibitor dichloroacetate (DCA). In the patient cells, down-regulation of PDC leads to increased lactate, decreased ATP and alteration of the mitochondrial network. Our findings highlight the potential to develop specific drug targeting of the mutant PDK3 as a therapeutic approach to treating CMTX6.

  10. Pathogenic mechanisms underlying X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMTX6) in patients with a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Perez-Siles, Gonzalo; Ly, Carolyn; Grant, Adrienne; Drew, Alexander P; Yiu, Eppie M; Ryan, Monique M; Chuang, David T; Tso, Shih-Chia; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L

    2016-10-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. An X-linked form of CMT (CMTX6) is caused by a missense mutation (R158H) in the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoenzyme 3 (PDK3) gene. PDK3 is one of 4 isoenzymes that negatively regulate the activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) by reversible phosphorylation of its first catalytic component pyruvate dehydrogenase (designated as E1). Mitochondrial PDC catalyses the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl CoA and links glycolysis to the energy-producing Krebs cycle. We have previously shown the R158H mutation confers PDK3 enzyme hyperactivity. In this study we demonstrate that the increased PDK3 activity in patient fibroblasts (PDK3(R158H)) leads to the attenuation of PDC through hyper-phosphorylation of E1 at selected serine residues. This hyper-phosphorylation can be reversed by treating the PDK3(R158H) fibroblasts with the PDK inhibitor dichloroacetate (DCA). In the patient cells, down-regulation of PDC leads to increased lactate, decreased ATP and alteration of the mitochondrial network. Our findings highlight the potential to develop specific drug targeting of the mutant PDK3 as a therapeutic approach to treating CMTX6. PMID:27388934

  11. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, Gerald Charles; Zoeller, Joseph Robert; Depew, Leslie Sharon

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  12. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, G.C.; Zoeller, J.R.; Depew, L.S.

    1998-03-24

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  13. Pyruvate kinase: function, regulation and role in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Israelsen, William J.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate and ADP to pyruvate and ATP in glycolysis and plays a role in regulating cell metabolism. There are four mammalian pyruvate kinase isoforms with unique tissue expression patterns and regulatory properties. The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) supports anabolic metabolism and is expressed both in cancer and normal tissue. The enzymatic activity of PKM2 is allosterically regulated by both intracellular signaling pathways and metabolites; PKM2 thus integrates signaling and metabolic inputs to modulate glucose metabolism according to the needs of the cell. Recent advances have increased our understanding of metabolic regulation by pyruvate kinase, raised new questions, and suggested the possibility of non-canonical PKM2 functions to regulate gene expression and cell cycle progression via protein-protein interactions and protein kinase activity. Here we review the structure, function, and regulation of pyruvate kinase and discuss how these properties enable regulation of PKM2 for cell proliferation and tumor growth. PMID:26277545

  14. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from higher plant mitochondria and proplastids.

    PubMed

    Reid, E E; Thompson, P; Lyttle, C R; Dennis, D T

    1977-05-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from pea (Pisum sativum L.) mitochondria was purified 23-fold by high speed centrifugation and glycerol gradient fractionation. The complex had a s(20,w) of 47.5S but this is a minimal value since the complex is unstable. The complex is specific for NAD(+) and pyruvate; NADP(+) and other keto acids give no reaction. Mg(2+), thiamine pyrophosphate, and cysteine are also required for maximal activity. The pH optimum for the complex was between 6.5 and 7.5.Continuous sucrose density gradients were used to separate castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) endosperm proplastids from mitochondria. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity was found to be coincident with the proplastid peak on all of the gradients. Some separation of proplastids and mitochondria could be achieved by differential centrifugation and the ratios of the activities of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex to succinic dehydrogenase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase to succinic dehydrogenase were consistent with both the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and acetyl-CoA carboxylase being present in the proplastid. The proplastid fraction has to be treated with a detergent, Triton X-100, before maximal activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity is expressed, indicating that it is bound in the organelle. The complex had a sharp pH optimum of 7.5. The complex required added Mg(2+), cysteine, and thiamine pyrophosphate for maximal activity but thiamine pyrophosphate was inhibitory at higher concentrations.

  15. Loss of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 2 in the Liver Leads to Defects in Gluconeogenesis and Compensation via Pyruvate-Alanine Cycling.

    PubMed

    McCommis, Kyle S; Chen, Zhouji; Fu, Xiaorong; McDonald, William G; Colca, Jerry R; Kletzien, Rolf F; Burgess, Shawn C; Finck, Brian N

    2015-10-01

    Pyruvate transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane is believed to be a prerequisite for gluconeogenesis in hepatocytes, which is important for the maintenance of normoglycemia during prolonged food deprivation but also contributes to hyperglycemia in diabetes. To determine the requirement for mitochondrial pyruvate import in gluconeogenesis, mice with liver-specific deletion of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 2 (LS-Mpc2(-/-)) were generated. Loss of MPC2 impaired, but did not completely abolish, hepatocyte conversion of labeled pyruvate to TCA cycle intermediates and glucose. Unbiased metabolomic analyses of livers from fasted LS-Mpc2(-/-) mice suggested that alterations in amino acid metabolism, including pyruvate-alanine cycling, might compensate for the loss of MPC2. Indeed, inhibition of pyruvate-alanine transamination further reduced mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism and glucose production by LS-Mpc2(-/-) hepatocytes. These data demonstrate an important role for MPC2 in controlling hepatic gluconeogenesis and illuminate a compensatory mechanism for circumventing a block in mitochondrial pyruvate import.

  16. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid and methylglyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Y.; Lim, Y. B.; Altieri, K. E.; Seitzinger, S. P.; Turpin, B. J.

    2012-01-01

    Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including pyruvate, oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Acetic acid plays a central role in the aqueous oxidation of methylglyoxal and it is a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid (20 μM-10 mM) was oxidized by OH radicals, and pyruvic acid and methylglyoxal experimental samples were analyzed using new analytical methods, in order to better understand the formation of SOA from acetic acid and methylglyoxal. Glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids formed from acetic acid and OH radicals. In contrast to the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal, the aqueous OH radical oxidation of acetic acid did not produce succinic acid and oligomers. This suggests that the methylgloxal-derived oligomers do not form through the acid catalyzed esterification pathway proposed previously. Using results from these experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  17. Enantioselective hydrogenation. III. Methyl pyruvate hydrogenation catalyzed by alkaloid-modified iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, K.E.; Johnston, P.; Plum, H.; Wells, P.B.; Ibbotson, A.

    1994-12-01

    Enantioselective hydrogenation of methyl pyruvate, MeCOCOOMe to methyl lactate, MeCH(OH)COOMe, is catalyzed in solution at room temperature by supported iridium catalysts modified with cinchona alkaloids. Modification with cinchonidine or quinine yields R-lactate in excess, whereas modification with cinchonine or quinidine favors S-lactate formation. Ir/SiO{sub 2} catalysts (20%) calcined at 393 to 573 K and reduced at 523 to 593 K were highly active for racemic hydrogenation in the absence of a modifier (rates typically 1.8 mol h{sup -1} g{sub cat}{sup -1}) and were comparably active when modified with cinchonidine but gave an enantiomeric excess of about 30%. Use of higher calcination or reduction temperatures led to substantially inferior activity and selectivity. The high rates recorded for both racemic and enantioselective reactions are dependent on the catalysts being activated before use by a procedure involving exposure of the catalyst to air after the initial reduction. Use of a Cl-free precursor gave an Ir/SiO{sub 2} catalyst (20%) of superior activity but inferior enantioselectivity. Ir/CaCO{sub 3} (5%) was more active for racemic hydrogenation than for enantioselective hydrogenation, but provided the highest value of the enantiomeric excess 39%. Kinematics of reaction are reported. Exchange of H for D in 10,11-dihydrocinchonidine at room temperature over Ir/CaCO{sub 3} occurred in the quinoline moiety but not in the quinuclidine ring system, indicating that the alkaloid was adsorbed to the Ir surface via the interaction of its {pi}-electron system. For both silica-supported and calcium carbonate-supported Ir, the presence of chloride ion in the catalyst was advantageous for the achievement of enantioselectivity. 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Lactate as a Metabolite and a Regulator in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Proia, Patrizia; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Schiera, Gabriella; Fricano, Anna; Di Liegro, Italia

    2016-01-01

    More than two hundred years after its discovery, lactate still remains an intriguing molecule. Considered for a long time as a waste product of metabolism and the culprit behind muscular fatigue, it was then recognized as an important fuel for many cells. In particular, in the nervous system, it has been proposed that lactate, released by astrocytes in response to neuronal activation, is taken up by neurons, oxidized to pyruvate and used for synthesizing acetyl-CoA to be used for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. More recently, in addition to this metabolic role, the discovery of a specific receptor prompted a reconsideration of its role, and lactate is now seen as a sort of hormone, even involved in processes as complex as memory formation and neuroprotection. As a matter of fact, exercise offers many benefits for our organisms, and seems to delay brain aging and neurodegeneration. Now, exercise induces the production and release of lactate into the blood which can reach the liver, the heart, and also the brain. Can lactate be a beneficial molecule produced during exercise, and offer neuroprotection? In this review, we summarize what we have known on lactate, discussing the roles that have been attributed to this molecule over time. PMID:27598136

  19. Lactate as a cerebral metabolic fuel for glucose-6-phosphatase deficient children.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, J; Berger, R; Smit, G P

    1984-04-01

    The main substrates for brain energy metabolism were measured in blood samples taken from the carotid artery and the internal jugular bulb of four children with glycogen storage disease caused by deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase. Multiple paired arterial and venous blood samples were analyzed for glucose, lactate, pyruvate, D-beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, glycerol and O2, and the arteriovenous differences of the concentrations were calculated. In the first three patients the substrates were measured in two successive conditions with lower and higher glucose-intake, respectively, inducing reciprocally higher and lower concentrations of blood lactate. In the fourth patient medium chain triglycerides were administered simultaneously with the glucose-containing gastric drip feeding. Lactate appeared to be taken up significantly. It consumed, if completely oxidized, between 40-50% of the total O2 uptake in most cases. Only once in one patient the uptake of lactate switched to its release, when the blood lactate level decreased to normal. D-beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate arteriovenous (A-V) differences were small to negligible and these ketone bodies, therefore, did not contribute substantially to the brain's energy expenditure. Glycerol was not metabolized by the brain. Lactate thus appeared to be the second brain fuel next to glucose. It may protect the brain against fuel depletion in case of hypoglycemia.

  20. Lactate as a Metabolite and a Regulator in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Proia, Patrizia; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Schiera, Gabriella; Fricano, Anna; Di Liegro, Italia

    2016-01-01

    More than two hundred years after its discovery, lactate still remains an intriguing molecule. Considered for a long time as a waste product of metabolism and the culprit behind muscular fatigue, it was then recognized as an important fuel for many cells. In particular, in the nervous system, it has been proposed that lactate, released by astrocytes in response to neuronal activation, is taken up by neurons, oxidized to pyruvate and used for synthesizing acetyl-CoA to be used for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. More recently, in addition to this metabolic role, the discovery of a specific receptor prompted a reconsideration of its role, and lactate is now seen as a sort of hormone, even involved in processes as complex as memory formation and neuroprotection. As a matter of fact, exercise offers many benefits for our organisms, and seems to delay brain aging and neurodegeneration. Now, exercise induces the production and release of lactate into the blood which can reach the liver, the heart, and also the brain. Can lactate be a beneficial molecule produced during exercise, and offer neuroprotection? In this review, we summarize what we have known on lactate, discussing the roles that have been attributed to this molecule over time. PMID:27598136

  1. Oxamate Improves Glycemic Control and Insulin Sensitivity via Inhibition of Tissue Lactate Production in db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Weiran; Zheng, Yijia; Zhang, Shanshan; Yan, Li; Cheng, Hua; Wu, Muchao

    2016-01-01

    Oxamate (OXA) is a pyruvate analogue that directly inhibits the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-catalyzed conversion process of pyruvate into lactate. Earlier and recent studies have shown elevated blood lactate levels among insulin-resistant and type 2 diabetes subjects and that blood lactate levels independently predicted the development of incident diabetes. To explore the potential of OXA in the treatment of diabetes, db/db mice were treated with OXA in vivo. Treatment of OXA (350–750 mg/kg of body weight) for 12 weeks was shown to decrease body weight gain and blood glucose and HbA1c levels and improve insulin secretion, the morphology of pancreatic islets, and insulin sensitivity in db/db mice. Meanwhile, OXA reduced the lactate production of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle and serum lactate levels and decreased serum levels of TG, FFA, CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α in db/db mice. The PCR array showed that OXA downregulated the expression of Tnf, Il6, leptin, Cxcr3, Map2k1, and Ikbkb, and upregulated the expression of Irs2, Nfkbia, and Pde3b in the skeletal muscle of db/db mice. Interestingly, LDH-A expression increased in the islet cells of db/db mice, and both treatment of OXA and pioglitazone decreased LDH-A expression, which might be related to the improvement of insulin secretion. Taken together, increased lactate production of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle may be at least partially responsible for insulin resistance and diabetes in db/db mice. OXA improved glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in db/db mice primarily via inhibition of tissue lactate production. Oxamic acid derivatives may be a potential drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26938239

  2. Oxamate Improves Glycemic Control and Insulin Sensitivity via Inhibition of Tissue Lactate Production in db/db Mice.

    PubMed

    Ye, Weiran; Zheng, Yijia; Zhang, Shanshan; Yan, Li; Cheng, Hua; Wu, Muchao

    2016-01-01

    Oxamate (OXA) is a pyruvate analogue that directly inhibits the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-catalyzed conversion process of pyruvate into lactate. Earlier and recent studies have shown elevated blood lactate levels among insulin-resistant and type 2 diabetes subjects and that blood lactate levels independently predicted the development of incident diabetes. To explore the potential of OXA in the treatment of diabetes, db/db mice were treated with OXA in vivo. Treatment of OXA (350-750 mg/kg of body weight) for 12 weeks was shown to decrease body weight gain and blood glucose and HbA1c levels and improve insulin secretion, the morphology of pancreatic islets, and insulin sensitivity in db/db mice. Meanwhile, OXA reduced the lactate production of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle and serum lactate levels and decreased serum levels of TG, FFA, CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α in db/db mice. The PCR array showed that OXA downregulated the expression of Tnf, Il6, leptin, Cxcr3, Map2k1, and Ikbkb, and upregulated the expression of Irs2, Nfkbia, and Pde3b in the skeletal muscle of db/db mice. Interestingly, LDH-A expression increased in the islet cells of db/db mice, and both treatment of OXA and pioglitazone decreased LDH-A expression, which might be related to the improvement of insulin secretion. Taken together, increased lactate production of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle may be at least partially responsible for insulin resistance and diabetes in db/db mice. OXA improved glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in db/db mice primarily via inhibition of tissue lactate production. Oxamic acid derivatives may be a potential drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26938239

  3. Flexibility of thiamine diphosphate revealed by kinetic crystallographic studies of the reaction of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase with pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Cavazza, Christine; Contreras-Martel, Carlos; Pieulle, Laetitia; Chabrière, Eric; Hatchikian, E Claude; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C

    2006-02-01

    Pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductases (PFOR) are unique among thiamine pyrophosphate (ThDP)-containing enzymes in giving rise to a rather stable cofactor-based free-radical species upon the decarboxylation of their first substrate, pyruvate. We have obtained snapshots of unreacted and partially reacted (probably as a tetrahedral intermediate) pyruvate-PFOR complexes at different time intervals. We conclude that pyruvate decarboxylation involves very limited substrate-to-product movements but a significant displacement of the thiazolium moiety of ThDP. In this respect, PFOR seems to differ substantially from other ThDP-containing enzymes, such as transketolase and pyruvate decarboxylase. In addition, exposure of PFOR to oxygen in the presence of pyruvate results in significant inhibition of catalytic activity, both in solution and in the crystals. Examination of the crystal structure of inhibited PFOR suggests that the loss of activity results from oxime formation at the 4' amino substituent of the pyrimidine moiety of ThDP. PMID:16472741

  4. Effects of aerobic training on pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Paul J; Peters, Sandra J; Tunstall, Rebecca J; Cameron-Smith, David; Heigenhauser, George J F

    2004-06-01

    This study examined the effects of short- and long-term aerobic training on the stable up-regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and PDH kinase (PDK) in human skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that 8 weeks, but not 1 week, of aerobic training would increase total PDH (PDHt) and PDK activities compared to pretraining, and this would be detectable at the level of gene transcription (mRNA) and/or gene translation (protein). Resting muscle biopsies were taken before and after 1 and 8 weeks of aerobic cycle exercise training. PDHt and PDK activities, and their respective protein and mRNA expression, did not differ after 1 week of aerobic training. PDHt activity increased 31% after 8 weeks and this may be partially due to a 1.3-fold increase in PDH-E(1)alpha protein expression. PDK activity approximately doubled after 8 weeks of aerobic training and this was attributed to a 1.3-fold increase in PDK2 isoform protein expression. Similar to 1 week, no changes were observed at the mRNA level after 8 weeks of training. These findings suggest that aerobically trained human skeletal muscle has an increased maximal capacity to utilize carbohydrates, evident by increased PDHt, but increased metabolic control sensitivity to pyruvate through increased contribution of PDK2 to total PDK activity. PMID:15020699

  5. Increased Interstitial Concentrations of Glutamate and Pyruvate in Vastus Lateralis of Women with Fibromyalgia Syndrome Are Normalized after an Exercise Intervention – A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gerdle, Björn; Ernberg, Malin; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa; Larsson, Britt; Kosek, Eva; Christidis, Nikolaos; Ghafouri, Bijar

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is associated with central alterations, but controversies exist regarding the presence and role of peripheral factors. Microdialysis (MD) can be used in vivo to study muscle alterations in FMS. Furthermore for chronic pain conditions such as FMS, the mechanisms for the positive effects of exercise are unclear. This study investigates the interstitial concentrations of algesics and metabolites in the vastus lateralis muscle of 29 women with FMS and 28 healthy women before and after an exercise intervention. Methods All the participants went through a clinical examination and completed a questionnaire. In addition, their pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) in their upper and lower extremities were determined. For both groups, MD was conducted in the vastus lateralis muscle before and after a 15-week exercise intervention of mainly resistance training of the lower limbs. Muscle blood flow and interstitial muscle concentrations of lactate, pyruvate, glutamate, glucose, and glycerol were determined. Results FMS was associated with significantly increased interstitial concentrations of glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate. After the exercise intervention, the FMS group exhibited significant decreases in pain intensity and in mean interstitial concentrations of glutamate, pyruvate, and glucose. The decrease in pain intensity in FMS correlated significantly with the decreases in pyruvate and glucose. In addition, the FMS group increased their strength and endurance. Conclusion This study supports the suggestion that peripheral metabolic and algesic muscle alterations are present in FMS patients and that these alterations contribute to pain. After an exercise intervention, alterations normalized, pain intensity decreased (but not abolished), and strength and endurance improved, all findings that suggest the effects of exercise are partially peripheral. PMID:27695113

  6. Achromobacter denitrificans Strain YD35 Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Controls NADH Production To Allow Tolerance to Extremely High Nitrite Levels

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Yuki; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Fujita, Tomoya; Nakamura, Akira; Takizawa, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    We identified the extremely nitrite-tolerant bacterium Achromobacter denitrificans YD35 that can grow in complex medium containing 100 mM nitrite (NO2−) under aerobic conditions. Nitrite induced global proteomic changes and upregulated tricarboxylate (TCA) cycle enzymes as well as antioxidant proteins in YD35. Transposon mutagenesis generated NO2−-hypersensitive mutants of YD35 that had mutations at genes for aconitate hydratase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase in the TCA cycle and a pyruvate dehydrogenase (Pdh) E1 component, indicating the importance of TCA cycle metabolism to NO2− tolerance. A mutant in which the pdh gene cluster was disrupted (Δpdh mutant) could not grow in the presence of 100 mM NO2−. Nitrite decreased the cellular NADH/NAD+ ratio and the cellular ATP level. These defects were more severe in the Δpdh mutant, indicating that Pdh contributes to upregulating cellular NADH and ATP and NO2−-tolerant growth. Exogenous acetate, which generates acetyl coenzyme A and then is metabolized by the TCA cycle, compensated for these defects caused by disruption of the pdh gene cluster and those caused by NO2−. These findings demonstrate a link between NO2− tolerance and pyruvate/acetate metabolism through the TCA cycle. The TCA cycle mechanism in YD35 enhances NADH production, and we consider that this contributes to a novel NO2−-tolerating mechanism in this strain. PMID:24413603

  7. Iron-induced changes in pyruvate metabolism of Tritrichomonas foetus and involvement of iron in expression of hydrogenosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Vanácová, S; Rasoloson, D; Rázga, J; Hrdý, I; Kulda, J; Tachezy, J

    2001-01-01

    The main function of the hydrogenosome, a typical organelle of trichomonads, is to convert malate or pyruvate to H(2), CO(2) and acetate by a pathway associated with ATP synthesis. This pathway relies on activity of iron-sulfur proteins such as pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), hydrogenase and ferredoxin. To examine the effect of iron availability on proper hydrogenosomal function, the metabolic activity of the hydrogenosome and expression of hydrogenosomal enzymes were compared in Tritrichomonas foetus maintained under iron-rich (150 microM iron nitrilotriacetate) or iron-restricted (180 microM 2,2-dipyridyl) conditions in vitro. The activities of PFOR and hydrogenase, and also production of acetate and H(2), were markedly decreased or absent in iron-restricted trichomonads. Moreover, a decrease in activity of the hydrogenosomal malic enzyme, which is a non-Fe-S protein, was also observed. Impaired function of hydrogenosomes under iron-restricted conditions was compensated for by activation of the cytosolic pathway, mediating conversion of pyruvate to ethanol via acetaldehyde. This metabolic switch was fully reversible. Production of hydrogen by iron-restricted trichomonads was restored to the level of organisms grown under iron-rich conditions within 3 h after addition of 150 microM iron nitrilotriacetate. Protein analysis of purified hydrogenosomes from iron-restricted cells showed decreased levels of proteins corresponding to PFOR, malic enzyme and ferredoxin. Accordingly, these cells displayed decreased steady-state level and synthesis of mRNAs encoding PFOR and hydrogenosomal malic enzyme. These data demonstrate that iron is essential for function of the hydrogenosome, show its involvement in the expression of hydrogenosomal proteins and indicate the presence of iron-dependent control of gene transcription in Tt. foetus. PMID:11160800

  8. Improved membrane filtration method incorporating catalase and sodium pyruvate for detection of chlorine-stressed coliform bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, J P; Bissonnette, G K

    1990-01-01

    In vitro pure culture studies were conducted on three different strains of Escherichia coli (K-12, EPA 00244, and SWEI) to determine the effect of chlorination on catalase activity. In each case, stationary-phase cells exhibited significant (P less than 0.001) reductions in enzyme activity following exposure to chlorine. Mean differences in activity between control and chlorine-stressed cells ranged from 8.8 to 20.3 U/mg of protein for E. coli SWEI and EPA 00244, respectively. Following initial enzyme studies, resuscitation experiments utilizing the membrane filtration technique were conducted on chlorinated sewage effluent. Five different amendments, including catalase (1,000 U per plate), heat-inactivated catalase (1,000-U per plate), sodium pyruvate (0.05%), a catalase-sodium pyruvate combination (1,500 U/0.01%), and acetic acid (0.05%), were tested for the ability to enhance detection of chlorine-stressed cells on M-fecal coliform (M-FC), mT7, M-Endo, and tryptone-glucose-yeast extract (TGY) media. Significant (P less than 0.001) increases in recovery of fecal coliforms on M-FC, total coliforms on mT7 and M-Endo, and total heterotrophs on TGY were obtained on plates containing catalase, pyruvate, or the combination of these compounds. Supplementation with heat-inactivated catalase and acetic acid did not improve recovery of chlorine-stressed cells compared with recovery on nonamended media. Subsequent analysis of colonies from plates containing compounds which enhanced recovery indicated coliform verification percentages of greater than 80% on M-FC, greater than 90% on mT7, and greater than 94% on M-Endo media. These data suggest that the addition of peroxide-degrading compounds to various standard recovery media may improve detection of both coliform and heterotrophic bacteria in chlorinated waters. PMID:2268162

  9. Lactate in bitches with pyometra.

    PubMed

    Volpato, R; Rodello, L; Abibe, R B; Lopes, M D

    2012-12-01

    Lactate is a compound produced by the anaerobic metabolism of glucose, and hyperlactataemia occurs when the rate of production of lactate exceeds the rate of elimination. This occurs in situations of hypoxia and tissue hypoperfusion. Lactate has been considered a useful prognostic indicator in critically ill patients. Pyometra is a disease of adult female dogs characterized by inflammation of the uterus with an accumulation of exudate, which occurs during the luteal phase. It is one of the most common diseases that occur in the genital tract of female dogs. A total of 31 dogs were diagnosed with pyometra. The diagnosis was confirmed at ultrasonography. Of the 31 dogs, 25 females had open cervix pyometra and six had closed cervix pyometra. Plasma lactate concentrations were determined by an enzymatic colorimetric method. The average concentration (±SD) of plasma lactate in all 31 bitches with pyometra was 3.55 ± 0.46 mm. Healthy dogs had plasma lactate concentrations between 0.3 and 2.5 mm (mean ± SD). Concentrations ranged from 0.8 to 2.9 mm when plasma lactate was measured with a portable device and 0.4-2.6 mm with the blood gas analyser. Even though plasma lactate values vary between several studies and equipment used to measure concentrations, our results for dogs with pyometra are higher indicating hyperlactataemia (Thorneloe et al. , Can Vet J 48, 283-288). Plasma lactate in dogs with closed cervix pyometra was mean ± SD and in dogs with open cervix pyometra, it was mean ± SD. The plasma lactate concentration in dogs with pyometra was higher than in healthy bitches, and there was no influence of patency of the cervix on the concentration of plasma lactate concentrations. Plasma lactate concentrations were similar for animals with open and closed pyometra (3.54 ± 0.52 to 3.64 ± 1.03 mm). PMID:23279532

  10. Homofermentative Production of d- or l-Lactate in Metabolically Engineered Escherichia coli RR1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Dong-Eun; Jung, Heung-Chae; Rhee, Joon-Shick; Pan, Jae-Gu

    1999-01-01

    We investigated metabolic engineering of fermentation pathways in Escherichia coli for production of optically pure d- or l-lactate. Several pta mutant strains were examined, and a pta mutant of E. coli RR1 which was deficient in the phosphotransacetylase of the Pta-AckA pathway was found to metabolize glucose to d-lactate and to produce a small amount of succinate by-product under anaerobic conditions. An additional mutation in ppc made the mutant produce d-lactate like a homofermentative lactic acid bacterium. When the pta ppc double mutant was grown to higher biomass concentrations under aerobic conditions before it shifted to the anaerobic phase of d-lactate production, more than 62.2 g of d-lactate per liter was produced in 60 h, and the volumetric productivity was 1.04 g/liter/h. To examine whether the blocked acetate flux could be reoriented to a nonindigenous l-lactate pathway, an l-lactate dehydrogenase gene from Lactobacillus casei was introduced into a pta ldhA strain which lacked phosphotransacetylase and d-lactate dehydrogenase. This recombinant strain was able to metabolize glucose to l-lactate as the major fermentation product, and up to 45 g of l-lactate per liter was produced in 67 h. These results demonstrate that the central fermentation metabolism of E. coli can be reoriented to the production of d-lactate, an indigenous fermentation product, or to the production of l-lactate, a nonindigenous fermentation product. PMID:10103226

  11. Metabolic Imaging in the Anesthetized Rat Brain Using Hyperpolarized [1-13C] Pyruvate and [1-13C] Ethyl Pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Ralph E.; Yen, Yi-Fen; Mayer, Dirk; Chen, Albert; Wilson, David; Kohler, Susan; Bok, Robert; Vigneron, Daniel; Kurhanewicz, John; Tropp, James; Spielman, Daniel; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-01-01

    Formulation, polarization, and dissolution conditions were developed to obtain a stable hyperpolarized solution of [1-13C]-ethyl pyruvate. A maximum tolerated concentration and injection rate were determined, and 13C spectroscopic imaging was used to compare the uptake of hyperpolarized [1-13C]-ethyl pyruvate relative to hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate into anesthetized rat brain. Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-ethyl pyruvate and [1-13C]-pyruvate metabolic imaging in normal brain is demonstrated and quantified in this feasibility and range-finding study. PMID:20432284

  12. Resveratrol inhibits cancer cell metabolism by down regulating pyruvate kinase M2 via inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mohd Askandar; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2012-01-01

    Metabolism of cancer cells with pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) at its centre stage has assumed a prime significance in cancer research in recent times. Cancer cell metabolism, characterized by enhanced glucose uptake, production of lactate and anabolism is considered an ideal target for therapeutic interventions. Expression of PKM2 switches metabolism in favor of cancer cells, therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the hitherto unknown effect of resveratrol, a phytoalexin, on PKM2 expression and resultant implications on cancer metabolism. We observed that resveratrol down-regulated PKM2 expression by inhibiting mTOR signaling and suppressed cancer metabolism, adjudged by decreased glucose uptake, lactate production (aerobic glycolysis) and reduced anabolism (macromolecule synthesis) in various cancer cell lines. A contingent decrease in intracellular levels of ribose-5-phosphate (R5P), a critical intermediate of pentose phosphate pathway, accounted for a reduced anabolism. Consequently, the state of suppressed cancer metabolism resulted in decreased cellular proliferation. Interestingly, shRNA-mediated silencing of PKM2 inhibited glucose uptake and lactate production, providing evidence for the critical role of PKM2 and its mediation in the observed effects of resveratrol on cancer metabolism. Further, an over-expression of PKM2 abolished the observed effects of resveratrol, signifying the role of PKM2 downregulation as a critical function of resveratrol. The study reports a novel PKM2-mediated effect of resveratrol on cancer metabolism and provides a new dimension to its therapeutic potential.

  13. Multiphase Chemistry of Pyruvic Acid Under Atmospherically Relevant Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaida, V.; Monod, A.; Doussin, J. F.; Reed Harris, A. E.; Griffith, E. C.; Kroll, J. A.; Rapf, R.

    2014-12-01

    Chemistry in the natural environment proceeds in multiple phases and is subject to effects from atmospheric constituents and conditions. This presentation will use pyruvic acid as a case study to demonstrate the complexity of atmospheric multiphase chemistry. The photophysics and photochemistry of pyruvic acid proceeds on different potential energy surfaces with different reaction mechanisms, rates, and products in gas versus the aqueous phase. While the gas phase reaction generally decreases the complexity of products, the aqueous chemistry creates higher molecular weight, surface-active compounds. The studies presented involve a combination of laboratory studies that focus on the photochemistry of pyruvic acid in both the gas and aqueous phases. Further, experiments in an environmental simulation chamber (CESAM) that follow the photochemistry chemistry of pyruvic acid under atmospherically relevant conditions will be presented to highlight the effect of pressure, oxygen, relative humidity, and phase on the photochemistry of pyruvic acid. The results provide new input for atmospheric chemistry models that is required to better describe the behavior of α-keto acids in the environment.

  14. Probing alanine transaminase catalysis with hyperpolarized 13CD3-pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barb, A. W.; Hekmatyar, S. K.; Glushka, J. N.; Prestegard, J. H.

    2013-03-01

    Hyperpolarized metabolites offer a tremendous sensitivity advantage (>104 fold) when measuring flux and enzyme activity in living tissues by magnetic resonance methods. These sensitivity gains can also be applied to mechanistic studies that impose time and metabolite concentration limitations. Here we explore the use of hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in mechanistic studies of alanine transaminase (ALT), a well-established biomarker of liver disease and cancer that converts pyruvate to alanine using glutamate as a nitrogen donor. A specific deuterated, 13C-enriched analog of pyruvic acid, 13C3D3-pyruvic acid, is demonstrated to have advantages in terms of detection by both direct 13C observation and indirect observation through methyl protons introduced by ALT-catalyzed H-D exchange. Exchange on injecting hyperpolarized 13C3D3-pyruvate into ALT dissolved in buffered 1H2O, combined with an experimental approach to measure proton incorporation, provided information on mechanistic details of transaminase action on a 1.5 s timescale. ALT introduced, on average, 0.8 new protons into the methyl group of the alanine produced, indicating the presence of an off-pathway enamine intermediate. The opportunities for exploiting mechanism-dependent molecular signatures as well as indirect detection of hyperpolarized 13C3-pyruvate and products in imaging applications are discussed.

  15. Biosynthesis of the Halogenated Auxin, 4-Chloroindole-3-Acetic Acid1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Tivendale, Nathan D.; Davidson, Sandra E.; Davies, Noel W.; Smith, Jason A.; Dalmais, Marion; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid I.; Quittenden, Laura J.; Sutton, Lily; Bala, Raj K.; Le Signor, Christine; Thompson, Richard; Horne, James; Reid, James B.; Ross, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Seeds of several agriculturally important legumes are rich sources of the only halogenated plant hormone, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid. However, the biosynthesis of this auxin is poorly understood. Here, we show that in pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid is synthesized via the novel intermediate 4-chloroindole-3-pyruvic acid, which is produced from 4-chlorotryptophan by two aminotransferases, TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE RELATED1 and TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE RELATED2. We characterize a tar2 mutant, obtained by Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes, the seeds of which contain dramatically reduced 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid levels as they mature. We also show that the widespread auxin, indole-3-acetic acid, is synthesized by a parallel pathway in pea. PMID:22573801

  16. Ethyl Pyruvate Emerges as a Safe and Fast Acting Agent against Trypanosoma brucei by Targeting Pyruvate Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Worku, Netsanet; Stich, August; Daugschies, Arwid; Wenzel, Iris; Kurz, Randy; Thieme, Rene; Kurz, Susanne; Birkenmeier, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Background Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) also called sleeping sickness is an infectious disease in humans caused by an extracellular protozoan parasite. The disease, if left untreated, results in 100% mortality. Currently available drugs are full of severe drawbacks and fail to escape the fast development of trypanosoma resistance. Due to similarities in cell metabolism between cancerous tumors and trypanosoma cells, some of the current registered drugs against HAT have also been tested in cancer chemotherapy. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the simple ester, ethyl pyruvate, comprises such properties. Results The current study covers the efficacy and corresponding target evaluation of ethyl pyruvate on T. brucei cell lines using a combination of biochemical techniques including cell proliferation assays, enzyme kinetics, phasecontrast microscopic video imaging and ex vivo toxicity tests. We have shown that ethyl pyruvate effectively kills trypanosomes most probably by net ATP depletion through inhibition of pyruvate kinase (Ki = 3.0±0.29 mM). The potential of ethyl pyruvate as a trypanocidal compound is also strengthened by its fast acting property, killing cells within three hours post exposure. This has been demonstrated using video imaging of live cells as well as concentration and time dependency experiments. Most importantly, ethyl pyruvate produces minimal side effects in human red cells and is known to easily cross the blood-brain-barrier. This makes it a promising candidate for effective treatment of the two clinical stages of sleeping sickness. Trypanosome drug-resistance tests indicate irreversible cell death and a low incidence of resistance development under experimental conditions. Conclusion Our results present ethyl pyruvate as a safe and fast acting trypanocidal compound and show that it inhibits the enzyme pyruvate kinase. Competitive inhibition of this enzyme was found to cause ATP depletion and cell death. Due to its ability to

  17. The preparation and properties of pyruvate kinase from yeast

    PubMed Central

    Fell, David A.; Liddle, Peter F.; Peacocke, Arthur R.; Dwek, Raymond A.

    1974-01-01

    A new method is described for the preparation of pyruvate kinase from yeast. This eliminates proteolysis during the preparation. The molecular weight of yeast pyruvate kinase is 215000, and it is composed of four subunits. Such properties of the enzyme as its extinction coefficient, cold-lability, thiol-group reactivity and binding of Mn2+ ions are compared with those previously reported for yeast pyruvate kinase prepared by different methods. The specific activity is significantly higher than previously observed, but otherwise the enzyme is similar, apart from its molecular weight and Mn2+-binding characteristics, to preparations from Saccharomyces cerevisiae obtained in this laboratory (e.g. Fell et al., 1972, and references therein) and that of C. H. Suelter (e.g. Kuczenski & Suelter, 1971, and references therein), and is different from the enzyme isolated from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis by B. Hess and his co-workers (e.g. Wieker & Hess, 1972, and references therein). ImagesFig. 2. PMID:4369339

  18. Uranyl nitrate inhibits lactate gluconeogenesis in isolated human and mouse renal proximal tubules: A {sup 13}C-NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Renault, Sophie; Faiz, Hassan; Gadet, Rudy; Ferrier, Bernard; Martin, Guy; Baverel, Gabriel; Conjard-Duplany, Agnes

    2010-01-01

    As part of a study on uranium nephrotoxicity, we investigated the effect of uranyl nitrate in isolated human and mouse kidney cortex tubules metabolizing the physiological substrate lactate. In the millimolar range, uranyl nitrate reduced lactate removal and gluconeogenesis and the cellular ATP level in a dose-dependent fashion. After incubation in phosphate-free Krebs-Henseleit medium with 5 mM L-[1-{sup 13}C]-, or L-[2-{sup 13}C]-, or L-[3-{sup 13}C]lactate, substrate utilization and product formation were measured by enzymatic and NMR spectroscopic methods. In the presence of 3 mM uranyl nitrate, glucose production and the intracellular ATP content were significantly reduced in both human and mouse tubules. Combination of enzymatic and NMR measurements with a mathematical model of lactate metabolism revealed an inhibition of fluxes through lactate dehydrogenase and the gluconeogenic enzymes in the presence of 3 mM uranyl nitrate; in human and mouse tubules, fluxes were lowered by 20% and 14% (lactate dehydrogenase), 27% and 32% (pyruvate carboxylase), 35% and 36% (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase), and 39% and 45% (glucose-6-phosphatase), respectively. These results indicate that natural uranium is an inhibitor of renal lactate gluconeogenesis in both humans and mice.

  19. Mammary candidosis in lactating women.

    PubMed

    Heinig, M J; Francis, J; Pappagianis, D

    1999-12-01

    Though perceived to be a growing problem by lactation professionals, fungal infection of the breast (mammary candidosis) is largely unstudied. Candida albicans, a commensal organism encountered frequently in the vagina and gastrointestinal tract of humans, has been reported to be responsible for both superficial (cutaneous) and localized (ductal) infection of the mammary gland in lactating women, though the latter association is not universally accepted. Severe pain is considered to be characteristic of yeast infection of the breast and may be a cause of premature weaning among lactating mothers. Given that pain is often the complaint that prompts mothers to consult lactation professionals, it is important that healthcare providers working with lactating women be knowledgeable about this disease. In this article, current research regarding yeast infection of the breast is summarized, including morphology and pathology, diagnosis, risk factors, and common treatment options.

  20. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from germinating castor bean endosperm.

    PubMed

    Rapp, B J; Randall, D D

    1980-02-01

    Subcellular organelles from castor bean (Ricinus communis) endosperm were isolated on discontinuous sucrose gradients from germinating seeds which were 1 to 7 days postimbibition. Marker enzyme activities of the organelles were measured (fumarase, catalase, and triose phosphate isomerase) and the homogeneity of the organelle fractions was examined by electron microscopy. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity was measured only in the mitochondrial fraction and attempts to activate or release the enzyme from the proplastid were not successful. A pathway is proposed for the most efficient use of endosperm carbon for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis that does not require the presence of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the proplastid to provide acetyl-coenzymeA.

  1. Methane from acetate.

    PubMed

    Ferry, J G

    1992-09-01

    The general features are known for the pathway by which most methane is produced in nature. All acetate-utilizing methanogenic microorganisms contain CODH which catalyzes the cleavage of acetyl-CoA; however, the pathway differs from all other acetate-utilizing anaerobes in that the methyl group is reduced to methane with electrons derived from oxidation of the carbonyl group of acetyl-CoA to CO2. The current understanding of the methanogenic fermentation of acetate provides impressions of nature's novel solutions to problems of methyl transfer, electron transport, and energy conservation. The pathway is now at a level of understanding that will permit productive investigations of these and other interesting questions in the near future. PMID:1512186

  2. Intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of calcium pyruvate in the TNBS model of rat colitis: Comparison with ethyl pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Algieri, F; Rodriguez-Nogales, A; Garrido-Mesa, J; Camuesco, D; Vezza, T; Garrido-Mesa, N; Utrilla, P; Rodriguez-Cabezas, M E; Pischel, I; Galvez, J

    2016-03-01

    Pyruvate is a key intermediate of the carbohydrate metabolism with endogenous scavenger properties. However, it cannot be used in clinics due to its instability. Ethyl pyruvate (EP) has shown better stability as well as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Calcium pyruvate monohydrate (CPM) is another stable pyruvate derivative that could also provide the benefits from calcium, fundamental for bone health. Considering everything, we propose CPM as a therapeutic strategy to treat diseases with an immune component in which there is also a significant dysregulation of the skeletal homeostasis. This could be applicable to inflammatory bowel disease, which is characterized by over-production of pro-inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites that induces intestinal mucosal damage and chronic inflammation, and extra-intestinal symptoms like osteopenia and osteoporosis. The effects of CPM and EP (20, 40 and 100mg/kg) were evaluated on the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) model of colitis in rats, after a 7-day oral treatment, with main focus on colonic histology and inflammatory mediators. Both pyruvates showed intestinal anti-inflammatory effects in the TNBS-induced colitis. They were evident both histologically, with a recovery of the mucosal cytoarchitecture and a reduction of the neutrophil infiltration, and through the profile of inflammatory mediators (IL-1, IL-6, IL-17, IL-23, iNOS). However, CPM appeared to be more effective than ethyl pyruvate. In conclusion, CPM exerts intestinal anti-inflammatory effect on the TNBS-induced colitis in rats, although further experiments are needed to explore its beneficial effects on bone health and osteoporosis.

  3. Gluconeogenesis is associated with high rates of tricarboxylic acid and pyruvate cycling in fasting northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Cory D; Houser, Dorian S; Fowler, Melinda A; Costa, Daniel P; Crocker, Daniel E

    2012-08-01

    Animals that endure prolonged periods of food deprivation preserve vital organ function by sparing protein from catabolism. Much of this protein sparing is achieved by reducing metabolic rate and suppressing gluconeogenesis while fasting. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) endure prolonged fasts of up to 3 mo at multiple life stages. During these fasts, elephant seals maintain high levels of activity and energy expenditure associated with breeding, reproduction, lactation, and development while maintaining rates of glucose production typical of a postabsorptive mammal. Therefore, we investigated how fasting elephant seals meet the requirements of glucose-dependent tissues while suppressing protein catabolism by measuring the contribution of glycogenolysis, glycerol, and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to endogenous glucose production (EGP) during their natural 2-mo postweaning fast. Additionally, pathway flux rates associated with the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were measured specifically, flux through phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and pyruvate cycling. The rate of glucose production decreased during the fast (F(1,13) = 5.7, P = 0.04) but remained similar to that of postabsorptive mammals. The fractional contributions of glycogen, glycerol, and PEP did not change with fasting; PEP was the primary gluconeogenic precursor and accounted for ∼95% of EGP. This large contribution of PEP to glucose production occurred without substantial protein loss. Fluxes through the TCA cycle, PEPCK, and pyruvate cycling were higher than reported in other species and were the most energetically costly component of hepatic carbohydrate metabolism. The active pyruvate recycling fluxes detected in elephant seals may serve to rectify gluconeogeneic PEP production during restricted anaplerotic inflow in these fasting-adapted animals.

  4. Pyruvate kinase and aspartate-glutamate carrier distributions reveal key metabolic links between neurons and glia in retina

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Ken J.; Du, Jianhai; Sloat, Stephanie R.; Contreras, Laura; Linton, Jonathan D.; Turner, Sally J.; Sadilek, Martin; Hurley, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic relationships between neurons and glia must adapt to structures, functions, and metabolic roles of the tissues they are in. We show here that Müller glia in retinas have specific enzyme deficiencies that can enhance their ability to synthesize Gln. The metabolic cost of these deficiencies is that they impair the Müller cell’s ability to metabolize Glc. We show here that the cells can compensate for this deficiency by using metabolites produced by neurons. Müller glia are deficient for pyruvate kinase (PK) and for aspartate/glutamate carrier 1 (AGC1), a key component of the malate-aspartate shuttle. In contrast, photoreceptor neurons express AGC1 and the M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase, which is commonly associated with aerobic glycolysis in tumors, proliferating cells, and some other cell types. Our findings reveal a previously unidentified type of metabolic relationship between neurons and glia. Müller glia compensate for their unique metabolic adaptations by using lactate and aspartate from neurons as surrogates for their missing PK and AGC1. PMID:25313047

  5. Simultaneous hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate MRI and (18)F-FDG-PET in cancer (hyperPET): feasibility of a new imaging concept using a clinical PET/MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam E; Henriksen, Sarah T; Johannesen, Helle H; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan; Vignaud, Alexandre; Hansen, Anders E; Børresen, Betina; Klausen, Thomas L; Wittekind, Anne-Mette N; Gillings, Nic; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Clemmensen, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of a new imaging concept - combined hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and (18)F-FDG-PET imaging. This procedure was performed in a clinical PET/MRI scanner with a canine cancer patient. We have named this concept hyper PET. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate results in an increase of (13)C-lactate, (13)C-alanine and (13)C-CO2 ((13)C-HCO3) resonance peaks relative to the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. Accordingly, with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and use of (13)C-pyruvate it is now possible to directly study the Warburg Effect through the rate of conversion of (13)C-pyruvate to (13)C-lactate. In this study, we combined it with (18)F-FDG-PET that studies uptake of glucose in the cells. A canine cancer patient with a histology verified local recurrence of a liposarcoma on the right forepaw was imaged using a combined PET/MR clinical scanner. PET was performed as a single-bed, 10 min acquisition, 107 min post injection of 310 MBq (18)F-FDG. (13)C-chemical shift imaging (CSI) was performed just after FDG-PET and 30 s post injection of 23 mL hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate. Peak heights of (13)C-pyruvate and (13)C-lactate were quantified using a general linear model. Anatomic (1)H-MRI included axial and coronal T1 vibe, coronal T2-tse and axial T1-tse with fat saturation following gadolinium injection. In the tumor we found clearly increased (13)C-lactate production, which also corresponded to high (18)F-FDG uptake on PET. This is in agreement with the fact that glycolysis and production of lactate are increased in tumor cells compared to normal cells. Yet, most interestingly, also in the muscle of the forepaw of the dog high (18)F-FDG uptake was observed. This was due to activity in these muscles prior to anesthesia, which was not accompanied by a similarly high (13)C-lactate production. Accordingly, this clearly

  6. Phylogenetic distributions and histories of proteins involved in anaerobic pyruvate metabolism in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Hug, Laura A; Stechmann, Alexandra; Roger, Andrew J

    2010-02-01

    Protists that live in low oxygen conditions often oxidize pyruvate to acetate via anaerobic ATP-generating pathways. Key enzymes that commonly occur in these pathways are pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) and [FeFe]-hydrogenase (H(2)ase) as well as the associated [FeFe]-H(2)ase maturase proteins HydE, HydF, and HydG. Determining the origins of these proteins in eukaryotes is of key importance to understanding the origins of anaerobic energy metabolism in microbial eukaryotes. We conducted a comprehensive search for genes encoding these proteins in available whole genomes and expressed sequence tag data from diverse eukaryotes. Our analyses of the presence/absence of eukaryotic PFO, [FeFe]-H(2)ase, and H(2)ase maturase sequences across eukaryotic diversity reveal orthologs of these proteins encoded in the genomes of a variety of protists previously not known to contain them. Our phylogenetic analyses revealed: 1) extensive lateral gene transfers of both PFO and [FeFe]-H(2)ase in eubacteria, 2) decreased support for the monophyly of eukaryote PFO domains, and 3) that eukaryotic [FeFe]-H(2)ases are not monophyletic. Although there are few eukaryote [FeFe]-H(2)ase maturase orthologs characterized, phylogenies of these proteins do recover eukaryote monophyly, although a consistent eubacterial sister group for eukaryotic homologs could not be determined. An exhaustive search for these five genes in diverse genomes from two representative eubacterial groups, the Clostridiales and the alpha-proteobacteria, shows that although these enzymes are nearly universally present within the former group, they are very rare in the latter. No alpha-proteobacterial genome sequenced to date encodes all five proteins. Molecular phylogenies and the extremely restricted distribution of PFO, [FeFe]-H(2)ases, and their associated maturases within the alpha-proteobacteria do not support a mitochondrial origin for these enzymes in eukaryotes. However, the unexpected prevalence of PFO

  7. Leukocyte Pyruvate Kinase Expression is Reduced in Normal Human Pregnancy but not in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A.; Romero, Roberto; Hassan, Sonia; Mittal, Pooja; Elfline, Megan; Zhu, Aiping; Petty, Howard R.

    2010-01-01

    Problem Emerging evidence suggests that metabolism influences immune cell signaling and immunoregulation. To examine the immunoregulatory role of glycolysis in pregnancy, we evaluated the properties of pyruvate kinase in leukocytes from non-pregnant women and those with normal pregnancy and pre-eclampsia. Method of study We evaluated pyruvate kinase expression in lymphocytes and neutrophils from non-pregnant, pregnant, and pre-eclampsia patients using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Leukocyte pyruvate kinase activity and pyruvate concentrations were also evaluated. To study pyruvate’s effect on signaling, we labeled Jurkat T cells with Ca2+ dyes and measured cell responses in the presence of agents influencing intracellular pyruvate. Results The expression of pyruvate kinase is reduced in lymphocytes and neutrophils from normal pregnant women in comparison to those of non-pregnant women and pre-eclampsia patients. Similarly, the activity of pyruvate kinase and the intracellular pyruvate concentration are reduced in leukocytes of normal pregnant women in comparison to non-pregnant women and women with pre-eclampsia. Using Jurkat cells as a model of leukocyte signaling, we have shown that perturbations of intracellular pyruvate influence Ca2+ signals. Conclusion Normal pregnancy is characterized by reduced pyruvate kinase expression within lymphocytes and neutrophils. We speculate that reduced pyruvate kinase expression modifies immune cell responses due to reduced pyruvate concentrations. PMID:20560913

  8. Crystal structure of pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae.

    PubMed

    Buddrus, Lisa; Andrews, Emma S V; Leak, David J; Danson, Michael J; Arcus, Vickery L; Crennell, Susan J

    2016-09-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) is a thiamine pyrophosphate- and Mg(2+) ion-dependent enzyme that catalyses the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. It is rare in bacteria, but is a key enzyme in homofermentative metabolism, where ethanol is the major product. Here, the previously unreported crystal structure of the bacterial pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae is presented. The crystals were shown to diffract to 2.15 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 204.56, b = 177.39, c = 244.55 Å and Rr.i.m. = 0.175 (0.714 in the highest resolution bin). The structure was solved by molecular replacement using PDB entry 2vbi as a model and the final R values were Rwork = 0.186 (0.271 in the highest resolution bin) and Rfree = 0.220 (0.300 in the highest resolution bin). Each of the six tetramers is a dimer of dimers, with each monomer sharing its thiamine pyrophosphate across the dimer interface, and some contain ethylene glycol mimicking the substrate pyruvate in the active site. Comparison with other bacterial PDCs shows a correlation of higher thermostability with greater tetramer interface area and number of interactions. PMID:27599861

  9. Purification and biochemical characterization of pyruvate oxidase from Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Sedewitz, B; Schleifer, K H; Götz, F

    1984-10-01

    Pyruvate oxidase (EC 1.2.3.3) was isolated and characterized from Lactobacillus plantarum. The enzyme catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate in the presence of phosphate and oxygen, yielding acetyl phosphate, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen peroxide. This pyruvate oxidase is a flavoprotein, with the relatively tightly bound cofactors flavin adenine dinucleotide, thiamine pyrophosphate, and a divalent metal ion, with Mn2+ being the most effective. The enzyme is only slightly inhibited by EDTA, implying that the enzyme-bound metal ion is poorly accessible to EDTA. Only under relatively drastic conditions, such as acid ammonium sulfate precipitation, could a colorless and entirely inactive apoenzyme be obtained. A partial reactivation of the enzyme was only possible by the combined addition of flavin adenine dinucleotide, thiamine pyrophosphate, and MnSO4. The enzyme has a molecular weight of ca. 260,000 and consists of four subunits with apparently identical molecular weights of 68,000. For catalytic activity the optimum pH is 5.7, and the optimum temperature is 30 degrees C. The Km values for pyruvate, phosphate, and arsenate are 0.4, 2.3, and 1.2 mM, respectively. The substrate specificity revealed that the enzyme reacts also with certain aldehydes and that phosphate can be replaced by arsenate. In addition to oxygen, several artificial compounds can function as electron acceptors.

  10. Near infrared photochemistry of pyruvic acid in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Molly C; Vaida, Veronica

    2012-06-21

    Recent experimental and theoretical results have suggested that organic acids such as pyruvic acid, can be photolyzed in the ground electronic state by the excitation of the OH stretch vibrational overtone. These overtones absorb in the near-infrared and visible regions of the spectrum where the solar photons are plentiful and could provide a reaction pathway for the organic acids and alcohols that are abundant in the earth's atmosphere. In this paper the overtone initiated photochemistry of aqueous pyruvic acid is investigated by monitoring the evolution of carbon dioxide. In these experiments CO(2) is being produced by excitation in the near-infrared, between 850 nm and ∼1150 nm (11,765-8696 cm(-1)), where the second OH vibrational overtone (Δν = 3) of pyruvic acid is expected to absorb. These findings show not only that the overtone initiated photochemical decarboxylation reaction occurs but also that in the aqueous phase it occurs at a lower energy than was predicted for the overtone initiated reaction of pyruvic acid in the gas phase (13,380 cm(-1)). A quantum yield of (3.5 ± 1.0) × 10(-4) is estimated, suggesting that although this process does occur, it does so with a very low efficiency.

  11. Crystal structure of pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae

    PubMed Central

    Buddrus, Lisa; Andrews, Emma S. V.; Leak, David J.; Danson, Michael J.; Arcus, Vickery L.; Crennell, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) is a thiamine pyrophosphate- and Mg2+ ion-dependent enzyme that catalyses the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. It is rare in bacteria, but is a key enzyme in homofermentative metabolism, where ethanol is the major product. Here, the previously unreported crystal structure of the bacterial pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae is presented. The crystals were shown to diffract to 2.15 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 204.56, b = 177.39, c = 244.55 Å and R r.i.m. = 0.175 (0.714 in the highest resolution bin). The structure was solved by molecular replacement using PDB entry 2vbi as a model and the final R values were R work = 0.186 (0.271 in the highest resolution bin) and R free = 0.220 (0.300 in the highest resolution bin). Each of the six tetramers is a dimer of dimers, with each monomer sharing its thiamine pyrophosphate across the dimer interface, and some contain ethylene glycol mimicking the substrate pyruvate in the active site. Comparison with other bacterial PDCs shows a correlation of higher thermostability with greater tetramer interface area and number of interactions. PMID:27599861

  12. 21 CFR 862.1655 - Pyruvic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pyruvic acid test system. 862.1655 Section 862.1655 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1655 - Pyruvic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pyruvic acid test system. 862.1655 Section 862.1655 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  14. Genomic reconstruction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 metabolism reveals previously uncharacterized machinery for lactate utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Yang, Chen; Li, Xiaoqing; Osterman, Andrei L.; Dervyn, Etienne; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Collart, Frank R.; Scott, J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2009-02-24

    The ability to utilize lactate as a sole source of carbon and energy is one of the key metabolic signatures of Shewanellae, a diverse group of dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria commonly found in aquatic and sedimentary environments. Nonetheless, homology searches failed to recognize orthologs of previously described bacterial D- or L-lactate oxidizing enzymes (Escherichia coli genes dld and lldD) in any of the 13 analyzed genomes of Shewanella spp. Using comparative genomic techniques, we identified a conserved chromosomal gene cluster in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (locus tag: SO1522-SO1518) containing lactate permease and candidate genes for both D- and L-lactate dehydrogenase enzymes. The predicted D-LDH gene (dldD, SO1521) is a distant homolog of FAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenase from yeast, whereas the predicted L-LDH is encoded by three genes with previously unknown functions (lldEGF, SO1520-19-18). Through a combination of genetic and biochemical techniques, we experimentally confirmed the predicted physiological role of these novel genes in S. oneidensis MR-1 and carried out successful functional validation studies in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We conclusively showed that dldD and lldEFG encode fully functional D-and L-LDH enzymes, which catalyze the oxidation of the respective lactate stereoisomers to pyruvate. Notably, the S. oneidensis MR-1 LldEFG enzyme is the first described example of a multi-subunit lactate oxidase. Comparative analysis of >400 bacterial species revealed the presence of LldEFG and Dld in a broad range of diverse species accentuating the potential importance of these previously unknown proteins in microbial metabolism.

  15. Determination of degradation products of squalamine lactate using LC/MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong-Jun; Kari, U Prasad; Noecker, Lincoln A; Jones, Stephen R; Sabo, Andrew M; McCormick, Timothy J; Johnston, Sean M

    2003-04-24

    Heat, acid and base stress methods were applied to study the stability of squalamine lactate. Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was used to analyze the degraded samples and tentative structural identifications were assigned based on their molecular weight measurements, reactivity and MS/MS fragmentation. Solid squalamine lactate generated a new amide, namely lactyl squalamide, when heated to 80 degrees C. Chemical structure for this new compound has been established by NMR and MS data interpretation and confirmed by direct comparison between the degradant and the synthesized compound. Squalamine lactate in pH 4 acetate buffer solution produced more degradants under stressed conditions. These degradants are formed due to the loss of the sulfate functionality. Squalamine lactate is stable in refrigerated conditions as well as in basic solution. PMID:12852451

  16. Evolution of the functional properties of pyruvate kinase isozymes: pyruvate kinase L from Rana pipiens.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P; Guderley, H

    1986-01-01

    The regulatory properties of type L pyruvate kinase from Rana pipiens are intermediate between those of the mammalian K and L isozymes. As with mammalian type L, the levels of the frog isozyme are affected by the animal's nutritional state. The mammalian and amphibian isozymes show similar sensitivities to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate activation and amino acid inhibition. By contrast, the frog L isozyme shares several properties of the K class: i.e. irreversible inactivation by oxidized glutathione and lack of response to a cyclic AMP stimulated phosphorylation. Furthermore, as for some mammalian K isozymes, frog type L shows a high PEP affinity and a low cooperativity of PEP binding. Insofar as the properties of this present day enzyme reflect those of its counterpart in the amphibian ancestor of higher vertebrates, our results suggest that at its first expression, the type L resembled the type K. Many important regulatory properties of the L isozyme, especially the sensitivity to phosphorylation, were acquired more recently perhaps in association with an increased importance of constant blood glucose. PMID:3489743

  17. Activation and inhibition of pyruvate carboxylase from Rhizobium etli†

    PubMed Central

    Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Menefee, Ann L.; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Wallace, John C.; Attwood, Paul V.; Maurice, Martin St.; Cleland, W. Wallace

    2011-01-01

    While crystallographic structures of the R. etli pyruvate carboxylase (PC) holoenzyme revealed the location and probable positioning of the essential activator, Mg2+, and non-essential activator, acetyl-CoA, an understanding of how they affect catalysis remains unclear. The current steady-state kinetic investigation indicates that both acetyl-CoA and Mg2+ assist in coupling the MgATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin in the biotin carboxylase (BC) domain with pyruvate carboxylation in the carboxyl transferase (CT) domain. Initial velocity plots of free Mg2+ vs. pyruvate were nonlinear at low concentrations of Mg2+ and a nearly complete loss of coupling between the BC and CT domain reactions was observed in the absence of acetyl-CoA. Increasing concentrations of free Mg2+ also resulted in a decrease in the Ka for acetyl-CoA. Acetyl phosphate was determined to be a suitable phosphoryl donor for the catalytic phosphorylation of MgADP, while phosphonoacetate inhibited both the phosphorylation of MgADP by carbamoyl phosphate (Ki = 0.026 mM) and pyruvate carboxylation (Ki = 2.5 mM). In conjunction with crystal structures of T882A R. etli PC mutant cocrystallized with phosphonoacetate and MgADP, computational docking studies suggest that phosphonoacetate could coordinate to one of two Mg2+ metal centers in the BC domain active site. Based on the pH profiles, inhibition studies and initial velocity patterns, possible mechanisms for the activation, regulation and coordination of catalysis between the two spatially distinct active sites in pyruvate carboxylase from R. etli by acetyl-CoA and Mg2+ are described. PMID:21958066

  18. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and quantity decreases after coronary artery bypass grafting: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Lars W.; Liu, Xiaowen; Peng, Teng J.; Giberson, Tyler A.; Khabbaz, Kamal R.; Donnino, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is a key gatekeeper enzyme in aerobic metabolism. The main purpose of this study was to determine if PDH activity is affected by major stress in the form of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) which has previously been used as a model of critical illness. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study of patients undergoing CABG at an urban, tertiary care hospital. We included adult patients undergoing CABG with or without concomitant valve surgery. Measurements of PDH activity and quantity and thiamine were obtained prior to surgery, at the completion of surgery, and 6 hours post-surgery. Results Fourteen patients were enrolled (age: 67 ± 10 years, 21 % female). Study subjects had a mean 41.7 % (SD: 27.7) reduction in PDH activity after surgery and a mean 32.0% (SD: 31.4) reduction 6 hours after surgery (p < 0.001). Eight patients were thiamine deficient (≤ 7 nmol/L) after surgery compared to none prior to surgery (p = 0.002). Thiamine level was a significantly associated with PDH quantity at all time points (p = 0.01). Post-surgery lactate levels were inversely correlated with post-surgery thiamine levels (r = −0.58 and p = 0.04). Conclusion The stress of major surgery causes decreased PDH activity and quantity, and depletion of thiamine levels. PMID:25526377

  19. Hypoxic repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is necessary for metabolic reprogramming and growth of model tumours.

    PubMed

    Golias, Tereza; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sun, Ramon; Kumar, Bhavna; Brown, Nicole V; Swanson, Benjamin J; Pai, Reetesh; Jaitin, Diego; Le, Quynh-Thu; Teknos, Theodoros N; Denko, Nicholas C

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cells fulfil the bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs of proliferation using the available environmental metabolites. Metabolic adaptation to hypoxia causes decreased mitochondrial function and increased lactate production. This work examines the biological importance of the hypoxia-inducible inhibitory phosphorylations on the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α subunit. Pancreatic cancer cell lines were genetically manipulated to alter the net phosphorylation of PDH E1α through reduced kinase expression or enhanced phosphatase expression. The modified cells were tested for hypoxic changes in phosphorylated E1α, mitochondrial metabolism and growth as xenografted tumours. Even though there are four PDHK genes, PDHK1 is essential for inhibitory PDH phosphorylation of E1α at serine 232, is partially responsible for modification of serines 293 and 300, and these phosphorylations are necessary for model tumour growth. In order to determine the clinical relevance, a cohort of head and neck cancer patient biopsies was examined for phosphorylated E1α and expression of PDHK1. Patients with detectable 232 phosphorylation or expression of PDHK1 tend to have worse clinical outcome. These data show that PDHK1 activity is unique and non-redundant in the family of PHDK enzymes and a PDHK1 specific inhibitor would therefore have anti-cancer activity with reduced chance of side effects from inhibition of other PDHKs. PMID:27498883

  20. Hypoxic repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is necessary for metabolic reprogramming and growth of model tumours

    PubMed Central

    Golias, Tereza; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sun, Ramon; Kumar, Bhavna; Brown, Nicole V.; Swanson, Benjamin J.; Pai, Reetesh; Jaitin, Diego; Le, Quynh-Thu; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Denko, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cells fulfil the bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs of proliferation using the available environmental metabolites. Metabolic adaptation to hypoxia causes decreased mitochondrial function and increased lactate production. This work examines the biological importance of the hypoxia-inducible inhibitory phosphorylations on the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α subunit. Pancreatic cancer cell lines were genetically manipulated to alter the net phosphorylation of PDH E1α through reduced kinase expression or enhanced phosphatase expression. The modified cells were tested for hypoxic changes in phosphorylated E1α, mitochondrial metabolism and growth as xenografted tumours. Even though there are four PDHK genes, PDHK1 is essential for inhibitory PDH phosphorylation of E1α at serine 232, is partially responsible for modification of serines 293 and 300, and these phosphorylations are necessary for model tumour growth. In order to determine the clinical relevance, a cohort of head and neck cancer patient biopsies was examined for phosphorylated E1α and expression of PDHK1. Patients with detectable 232 phosphorylation or expression of PDHK1 tend to have worse clinical outcome. These data show that PDHK1 activity is unique and non-redundant in the family of PHDK enzymes and a PDHK1 specific inhibitor would therefore have anti-cancer activity with reduced chance of side effects from inhibition of other PDHKs. PMID:27498883

  1. SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 regulates pyruvate kinase M2 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Wei-Tien; Hung, Man-Hsin; Chu, Pei-Yi; Chen, Yao-Li; Chen, Li-Ju; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Chen, Min-Husan; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Boo, Yin-Pin; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is known to promote tumourigenesis through dimer formation of p-PKM2Y105. Here, we investigated whether SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) decreases p-PKM2Y105 expression and, thus, determines the sensitivity of sorafenib through inhibiting the nuclear-related function of PKM2. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblot confirmed the effect of SHP-1 on PKM2Y105 dephosphorylation. Lactate production was assayed in cells and tumor samples to determine whether sorafenib reversed the Warburg effect. Clinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumor samples were assessed for PKM2 expression. SHP-1 directly dephosphorylated PKM2 at Y105 and further decreased the proliferative activity of PKM2; similar effects were found in sorafenib-treated HCC cells. PKM2 was also found to determine the sensitivity of targeted drugs, such as sorafenib, brivanib, and sunitinib, by SHP-1 activation. Significant sphere-forming activity was found in HCC cells stably expressing PKM2. Clinical findings suggest that PKM2 acts as a predicting factor of early recurrence in patients with HCC, particularly those without known risk factors (63.6%). SHP-1 dephosphorylates PKM2 at Y105 to inhibit nuclear function of PKM2 and determines the efficacy of targeted drugs. Targeting PKM2 by SHP-1 might provide new therapeutic insights for patients with HCC. PMID:26959741

  2. Medications in pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    McCarter-Spaulding, Deborah E

    2005-01-01

    The issue of medication use during pregnancy is of concern because the physiology of pregnancy affects the pharmokinetics of medications used, and certain medications can reach the fetus and cause harm. Studying medication safety in pregnancy and lactation is challenging; thus, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) categories of medication risk in pregnancy are limited, especially for the lactating mother. A better understanding of the role of physiologic changes in pregnancy, placental function, effects of medication on the fetus, and the mechanisms of drug transfer into breast milk can help nurses teach their patients both preconceptionally and during pregnancy and lactation. This article provides a review of current literature so nurses can become more aware of the basic principles involved in medication use for pregnant and lactating women.

  3. Molecular and biochemical characterization of bifunctional pyruvate decarboxylases and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductases from Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga hypogea.

    PubMed

    Eram, Mohammad S; Wong, Alton; Oduaran, Erica; Ma, Kesen

    2015-12-01

    Hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga hypogea produce ethanol as a metabolic end product, which is resulted from acetaldehyde reduction catalysed by an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). However, the enzyme that is involved in the production of acetaldehyde from pyruvate is not well characterized. An oxygen sensitive and coenzyme A-dependent pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) activity was found to be present in cell free extracts of T. maritima and T. hypogea. Both enzymes were purified and found to have pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) activity, indicating their bifunctionality. Both PDC and POR activities from each of the purified enzymes were characterized in regards to their optimal assay conditions including pH dependency, oxygen sensitivity, thermal stability, temperature dependency and kinetic parameters. The close relatedness of the PORs that was shown by sequence analysis could be an indication of the presence of such bifunctionality in other hyperthermophilic bacteria. This is the first report of a bifunctional PDC/POR enzyme in hyperthermophilic bacteria. The PDC and the previously reported ADHs are most likely the key enzymes catalysing the production of ethanol from pyruvate in bacterial hyperthermophiles.

  4. Cloning of the two pyruvate kinase isoenzyme structural genes from Escherichia coli: the relative roles of these enzymes in pyruvate biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, E; Flores, N; Martinez, A; Valle, F; Bolívar, F

    1995-01-01

    We report the cloning of the pykA and pykF genes from Escherichia coli, which code for the two pyruvate kinase isoenzymes (ATP:pyruvate 2-O-phosphotransferases; EC 2.7.1.40) in this microorganism. These genes were insertionally inactivated with antibiotic resistance markers and utilized to interrupt one or both pyk genes in the E. coli chromosome. With these constructions, we were able to study the role of these isoenzymes in pyruvate biosynthesis. PMID:7559366

  5. Syntrophic Degradation of Lactate in Methanogenic Co-cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Birte; Stahl, David

    2010-05-17

    In environments where the amount of the inorganic electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, sulfate, sulfur oroxidized metal ions (Fe3+;Mn4+) is insufficient for complete breakdown of organic matter, methane is formed as the major reduced end product. In such methanogenic environments organic acids are degraded by syntrophic associations of fermenting, acetogenic bacteria (e.g., sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) as"secondary fermenters") and methanogenic archaea. In these consortia, the conversion of lactate to acetate, CO2 and methane depends on the cooperating activities of both metabolically distinct microbial groups that are tightly linked by the need to maintain the exchanged metabolites (hydrogenandformate) at very low concentrations.

  6. Fructose 1,6-diphosphate-activated L-lactate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus lactis: kinetic properties and factors affecting activation.

    PubMed Central

    Crow, V L; Pritchard, G G

    1977-01-01

    The L-(+)-lactate dehydrogenase (L-lactate:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.27) of Streptococcus lactis C10, like that of other streptococci, was activated by fructose 1,6-diphosphate (FDP). The enzyme showed some activity in the absence of FDP, with a pH optimum of 8.2; FDP decreased the Km for both pyruvate and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and shifted the pH optimum to 6.9. Enzyme activity showed a hyperbolic response to both NADH and pyruvate in all the buffers tried except phosphate buffer, in which the response to increasing NADH was sigmoidal. The FDP concentration required for half-maximal velocity (FDP0.5V) was markedly influenced by the nature of the assay buffer used. Thus the FDP0.5V was 0.002 mM in 90 mM triethanolamine buffer, 0.2 mM in 90 mM tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethanemaleate buffer, and 4.4 mM in 90 mM phosphate buffer. Phosphate inhibition of FDP binding is not a general property of streptococcal lactate dehydrogenase, since the FDP0.5V value for S. faecalis 8043 lactate dehydrogenase was not increased by phosphate. The S. faecalis and S. lactis lactate dehydrogenases also differed in that Mn2+ enhanced FDP binding in S. faecalis but had no effect on the S. lactis dehydrogenase. The FDP concentration (12 to 15 mM) found in S. lactis cells during logarithmic growth on a high-carbohydrate (3% lactose) medium would be adequate to give almost complete activation of the lactate dehydrogenase even if the high FDP0.5V value found in 90 mM phosphate were similar to the FDP requirement in vivo. PMID:17595

  7. 21 CFR 73.165 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferrous lactate. 73.165 Section 73.165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.165 Ferrous lactate. (a) Identity. The color additive ferrous lactate is the ferrous lactate defined...

  8. Lactate levels with glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Kahlon, Arunpreet Singh; Alexander, Mariam; Kahlon, Arundeep

    2016-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman with known glioblastoma multiforme was admitted for treatment of new deep vein thrombosis. Anion gap and plasma lactate levels were found to be elevated. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a stable, advanced glioblastoma multiforme. All causes of lactic acidosis, including infections and medications, were ruled out. Aggressive tumors have been shown to produce lactate levels in minute quantities in their microenvironment, which helps them metastasize and evade immune response and even radiation. PMID:27365883

  9. Increased aerobic glycolysis through beta2 stimulation is a common mechanism involved in lactate formation during shock states.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruno; Desebbe, Olivier; Montemont, Chantal; Gibot, Sebastien

    2008-10-01

    During septic shock, muscle produces lactate by way of an exaggerated NaK-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase)-stimulated aerobic glycolysis associated with epinephrine stimulation possibly through beta2 adrenoreceptor involvement. It therefore seems logical that a proportion of hyperlactatemia in low cardiac output states would be also related to this mechanism. Thus, in low-flow and normal-to-high-flow models of shock, we investigate (1) whether muscle produces lactate and (2) whether muscle lactate production is linked to beta2 adrenergic stimulation and Na+K+-ATPase. We locally modulated the adrenergic pathway and Na+K+-ATPase activity in male Wistar rats' skeletal muscle using microdialysis with nonselective and selective beta blockers and ouabain in different models of rodent shock (endotoxin, peritonitis, and hemorrhage). Blood flow at the probe site was evaluated by ethanol clearance. We measured the difference between muscle lactate and blood lactate concentration, with a positive gradient indicating muscle lactate or pyruvate production. Epinephrine levels were elevated in all shock groups. All models were associated with hypotension and marked hyperlactatemia. Muscle lactate concentrations were consistently higher than arterial levels, with a mean gradient of 2.5+/-0.3 in endotoxic shock, 2.1+/-0.2 mM in peritonitis group, and 0.9+/-0.2 mM in hemorrhagic shock (P<0.05 for all groups). Muscle pyruvate concentrations were also always higher than arterial levels, with a mean gradient of 260+/-40 microM in endotoxic shock, 210+/-30 microM in peritonitis group, and 90+/-10 microM in hemorrhagic shock (P<0.05 for all groups). Despite a decrease in blood flow, lactate formation was decreased by all the pharmacological agents studied irrespective of shock mechanism. This demonstrates that lactate production during shock states is related, at least in part, to increased NaK-ATPase activity under beta2 stimulation. In shock state associated with a reduced or

  10. Maternal lead exposure during lactation persistently impairs testicular development and steroidogenesis in male offspring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Ji, Yan-Li; Wang, Qun; Zhao, Xian-Feng; Ning, Huan; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Cheng; Yu, Tao; Zhang, Ying; Meng, Xiu-Hong; Xu, De-Xiang

    2013-12-01

    Lead (Pb) is a testicular toxicant. In the present study, we investigated the effects of maternal Pb exposure during lactation on testicular development and steroidogenesis in male offspring. Maternal mice were exposed to different concentration of lead acetate (200 or 2000 ppm) through drinking water from postnatal day (PND) 0 to PND21. As expected, a high concentration of Pb was measured in the kidneys and liver of pups whose mothers were exposed to Pb during lactation. In addition, maternal Pb exposure during lactation elevated, to a less extent, Pb content in testes of weaning pups. Testis weight in weaning pups was significantly decreased when maternal mice were exposed to Pb during lactation. The level of serum and testicular T was reduced in Pb-exposed pups. The expression of P450scc, P450(17α) and 17β-HSD, key enzymes for T synthesis, was down-regulated in testes of weaning pups whose mothers were exposed to Pb during lactation. Interestingly, the level of serum and testicular T remained decreased in adult offspring whose mothers were exposed to Pb during lactation. Importantly, the number of spermatozoa was significantly reduced in Pb-exposed male offspring. Taken together, these results suggest that Pb could be transported from dams to pups through milk. Maternal Pb exposure during lactation persistently disrupts testicular development and steroidogenesis in male offspring.

  11. Aerobic Production and Utilization of Lactate Satisfy Increased Energy Demands Upon Neuronal Activation in Hippocampal Slices and Provide Neuroprotection Against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Schurr, Avital; Gozal, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Ever since it was shown for the first time that lactate can support neuronal function in vitro as a sole oxidative energy substrate, investigators in the field of neuroenergetics have been debating the role, if any, of this glycolytic product in cerebral energy metabolism. Our experiments employed the rat hippocampal slice preparation with electrophysiological and biochemical methodologies. The data generated by these experiments (a) support the hypothesis that lactate, not pyruvate, is the end-product of cerebral aerobic glycolysis; (b) indicate that lactate plays a major and crucial role in affording neural tissue to respond adequately to glutamate excitation and to recover unscathed post-excitation; (c) suggest that neural tissue activation is accompanied by aerobic lactate and NADH production, the latter being produced when the former is converted to pyruvate by mitochondrial lactate dehydrogenase (mLDH); (d) imply that NADH can be utilized as an endogenous scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to provide neuroprotection against ROS-induced neuronal damage. PMID:22275901

  12. Acetate Production by Methanogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Peter; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Mah, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Methanosarcina barkeri MS and 227 and Methanosarcina mazei S-6 produced acetate when grown on H2-CO2, methanol, or trimethylamine. Marked differences in acetate production by the two bacterial species were found, even though methane and cell yields were nearly the same. M. barkeri produced 30 to 75 μmol of acetate per mmol of CH4 formed, but M. mazei produced only 8 to 9 μmol of acetate per mmol of CH4. PMID:16348006

  13. Acetate dependence of tumors.

    PubMed

    Comerford, Sarah A; Huang, Zhiguang; Du, Xinlin; Wang, Yun; Cai, Ling; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Walters, Holly; Tantawy, Mohammed N; Fu, Allie; Manning, H Charles; Horton, Jay D; Hammer, Robert E; McKnight, Steven L; Tu, Benjamin P

    2014-12-18

    Acetyl-CoA represents a central node of carbon metabolism that plays a key role in bioenergetics, cell proliferation, and the regulation of gene expression. Highly glycolytic or hypoxic tumors must produce sufficient quantities of this metabolite to support cell growth and survival under nutrient-limiting conditions. Here, we show that the nucleocytosolic acetyl-CoA synthetase enzyme, ACSS2, supplies a key source of acetyl-CoA for tumors by capturing acetate as a carbon source. Despite exhibiting no gross deficits in growth or development, adult mice lacking ACSS2 exhibit a significant reduction in tumor burden in two different models of hepatocellular carcinoma. ACSS2 is expressed in a large proportion of human tumors, and its activity is responsible for the majority of cellular acetate uptake into both lipids and histones. These observations may qualify ACSS2 as a targetable metabolic vulnerability of a wide spectrum of tumors.

  14. Hyperpolarized [1,(13)C]pyruvate in lysed human erythrocytes: effects of co-substrate supply on reaction time courses.

    PubMed

    Pagès, Guilhem; Tan, Yee Ling; Kuchel, Philip W

    2014-10-01

    Hyperpolarized [1,(13)C]pyruvate was injected rapidly into haemolysates in which hydrolysis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P))/NAD(P)H had been inhibited with nicotinamide. Haemolysates provide a stable glycolytic system in which membrane permeability is not a flux-controlling step, and they enable the concentration of NADH to be adjusted experimentally while keeping the rest of the sample with the same composition as that of the cytoplasm of the cell (albeit diluted twofold at the time of injection of the [1,(13)C]pyruvate). We showed that the maximum amplitude of the (13)C NMR signal from the [1,(13)C]L-lactate, produced from [1,(13)C]pyruvate, and the time at which it occurred was dependent on NADH concentration, as predicted by enzyme-kinetic analysis. The main feature of such curves was dictated by the immediacy of the supply of the co-substrate of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27), and we posit that this also pertains in vivo in various tissues including neoplasms. By constructing an appropriate mathematical model and by using a Markov-chain Monte Carlo approach, we fitted experimental data to estimate LDH and NADH concentrations. Experiments carried out with only endogenous NADH present enabled the estimation of its effective concentration in human RBCs; the ability to make this estimate is a special feature of the rapid-dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization method. We found an endogenous NADH concentration in human RBCs two to four times higher than previously reported. PMID:25111006

  15. Lactate modulates the intracellular pH sensitivity of human TREK1 channels.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Swagata; Sikdar, Sujit Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Tissue acidosis and high lactate concentrations are associated with cerebral ischaemia. The degree of acidosis is dependent on circulating glucose concentration, hyperglycaemia being associated with increased acidosis. Among other agents, lactate and protons have been shown to activate the leak potassium channel; TREK1 (TWIK related potassium channel 1) from the intracellular side and its increased activity is implicated in tolerance towards ischaemic cell damage. In the present study, we show that ischaemic concentrations of lactate (30 mM) at pH 7.0 and 6.5, commonly observed during ischemia, cause robust potentiation of human TREK1 (hTREK1) activity at single-channel level in cell-free inside-out membrane patches, while 30 mM lactate at pH 6.0 to 5.5, commonly observed during hyperglycaemic ischemia, reduces hTREK1 channel activity significantly. The biphasic effect of 30 mM lactate (ischaemic concentrations) on modulation of hTREK1 by varying pH conditions is specific since basal concentrations of lactate (3 mM) and 30 mM pyruvate at pH 7.0 and 5.5 failed to show similar effect as lactate. Experiments with deletion and point mutants of hTREK1 channel suggest that lactate changes the pH modulation of hTREK1 by interacting differently with the histidine residue at 328th position (H328) above and below its pKa (∼6.0) in the intracellular carboxyl-terminal domain of TREK1. This lactate-induced pH modulation of hTREK1 is absent in C-terminal deletion mutant, CTDΔ100, and is similar in E321A-hTREK1 mutant as in wild-type hTREK1 suggesting that it is independent of pH-sensitive glutamate residue at 321st position. Such a differential pH-dependent effect of lactate on an ion channel function has not been reported earlier and has important implications in different stages of ischaemia.

  16. Direct Evidence of Catalytic Heterogeneity in Lactate Dehydrogenase by Temperature Jump Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein conformational heterogeneity and dynamics are known to play an important role in enzyme catalysis, but their influence has been difficult to observe directly. We have studied the effects of heterogeneity in the catalytic reaction of pig heart lactate dehydrogenase using isotope edited infrared spectroscopy, laser-induced temperature jump relaxation, and kinetic modeling. The isotope edited infrared spectrum reveals the presence of multiple reactive conformations of pyruvate bound to the enzyme, with three major reactive populations having substrate C2 carbonyl stretches at 1686, 1679, and 1674 cm–1, respectively. The temperature jump relaxation measurements and kinetic modeling indicate that these substates form a heterogeneous branched reaction pathway, and each substate catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to lactate with a different rate. Furthermore, the rate of hydride transfer is inversely correlated with the frequency of the C2 carbonyl stretch (the rate increases as the frequency decreases), consistent with the relationship between the frequency of this mode and the polarization of the bond, which determines its reactivity toward hydride transfer. The enzyme does not appear to be optimized to use the fastest pathway preferentially but rather accesses multiple pathways in a search process that often selects slower ones. These results provide further support for a dynamic view of enzyme catalysis where the role of the enzyme is not just to bring reactants together but also to guide the conformational search for chemically competent interactions. PMID:25149276

  17. Lactate is a possible mediator of the glucose effect on platelet inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, Gennadi; Mardla, Vilja; Samel, Nigulas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Glucose has been found to impair the inhibition of platelets with aspirin and alter the basal activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in platelets. The aim of this work was to study the effects of glucose on the inhibitory pathways in activated platelets. A short-term incubation of glucose impaired the inhibition of platelet aggregation induced by agents activating an NOS-dependent pathway, such as l-arginine, adenosine and α-tocopherol. However, glucose had no effect on the inhibition induced by iloprost and BW245C, agents that activate the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling pathway. Potassium lactate attenuated the effects of the same inhibitors as glucose did. The inhibitors of glucose transport prevented the effect of glucose. Dichloroacetate, known to prevent the conversion of pyruvate to lactate and to decrease lactate in platelets, significantly attenuated the effect of glucose in platelets. The data support the suggestion that the effect of glucose on the inhibition of platelets by agents activating an NOS-dependent pathway is mediated by glucose metabolite lactate. PMID:23909711

  18. The role of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wanqing; Liu, Quan; Leng, Jiyan; Zheng, Yang; Li, Ji

    2015-01-15

    The regulation of mammalian myocardial carbohydrate metabolism is complex; many factors such as arterial substrate and hormone levels, coronary flow, inotropic state and the nutritional status of the tissue play a role in regulating mammalian myocardial carbohydrate metabolism. The Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex (PDHc), a mitochondrial matrix multienzyme complex, plays an important role in energy homeostasis in the heart by providing the link between glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. In TCA cycle, PDHc catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate into acetyl-CoA. This review determines that there is altered cardiac glucose in various pathophysiological states consequently causing PDC to be altered. This review further summarizes evidence for the metabolism mechanism of the heart under normal and pathological conditions including ischemia, diabetes, hypertrophy and heart failure.

  19. Pyruvate carboxylase deficiency--insights from liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, William L; Khanna, Ajai; Barshop, Bruce A; Naviaux, Robert K; Precht, Andrew F; Lavine, Joel E; Hart, Marquis A; Hainline, Bryan E; Wappner, Rebecca S; Nichols, Sharon; Haas, Richard H

    2002-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase deficiency, complex form, presents in early infancy with lethal metabolic acidosis, resulting from ketoacidosis and lactic acidemia. Renal tubular acidosis, hyperammonemia, and citrullinemia complete the picture. In an infant with this disease, large amounts of glucose ameliorated the ketoacidosis, but worsened the lactic acidosis. Orthotopic hepatic transplantation completely reversed the ketoacidosis and the renal tubular abnormality and ameliorated the lactic acidemia. Concentrations of glutamine in cerebrospinal fluid were low and did not improve with liver transplantation.

  20. Characterization of testis-specific isoenzyme of human pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Korotchkina, Lioubov G; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S

    2006-04-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), the first component of the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, has two isoenzymes, somatic cell-specific PDH1 and testis-specific PDH2 with 87% sequence identity in the alpha subunit of alpha(2) beta(2) PDH. The presence of functional testis-specific PDH2 is important for sperm cells generating nearly all their energy from carbohydrates via pyruvate oxidation. Kinetic and regulatory properties of recombinant human PDH2 and PDH1 were compared in this study. Site-specific phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of the three phosphorylation sites by four PDH kinases (PDK1-4) and two PDH phosphatases (PDP1-2) were investigated by substituting serines with alanine or glutamate in PDHs. PDH2 was found to be very similar to PDH1 as follows: (i) in specific activities and kinetic parameters as determined by the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex assay; (ii) in thermostability at 37 degrees C; (iii) in the mechanism of inactivation by phosphorylation of three sites; and (iv) in the phosphorylation of sites 1 and 2 by PDK3. In contrast, the differences for PDH2 were indicated as follows: (i) by a 2.4-fold increase in binding affinity for the PDH-binding domain of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase as measured by surface plasmon resonance; (ii) by possible involvement of Ser-264 (site 1) of PDH2 in catalysis as evident by its kinetic behavior; and (iii) by the lower activities of PDK1, PDK2, and PDK4 as well as PDP1 and PDP2 toward PDH2. These differences between PDH2 and PDH1 are less than expected from substitution of 47 amino acids in each PDH2 alpha subunit. The multiple substitutions may have compensated for any drastic alterations in PDH2 structure thereby preserving its kinetic and regulatory characteristics largely similar to that of PDH1. PMID:16436377

  1. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate carboxylase in developing rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, F. J.; Hanson, R. W.

    1967-01-01

    1. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate carboxylase were measured in foetal, newborn and adult rat liver extracts by a radiochemical assay involving the fixation of [14C]bicarbonate. 2. Pyruvate-carboxylase activity in both foetal and adult liver occurs mainly in mitochondrial and nuclear fractions, with about 10% of the activity in the cytoplasm. 3. Similar studies of the intracellular distribution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase show that more than 90% of the activity is in the cytoplasm. However, in the 17-day foetal liver about 90% of the activity is in mitochondria and nuclei. 4. Pyruvate-carboxylase activity in both particulate and soluble fractions is very low in the 17-day foetal liver and increases to near adult levels before birth. 5. Phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxykinase activity in the soluble cell fraction increases 25-fold in the first 2 days after birth. This same enzyme in the mitochondria has considerable activity in the foetal and adult liver and is lower in the newborn. 6. Kinetic and other studies on the properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase have shown no differences between the soluble and mitochondrial enzymes. 7. It is suggested that the appearance of the soluble phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase at birth initiates the rapid increase in overall gluconeogenesis at this stage. PMID:6049928

  2. Developmental changes in the pyruvate kinase isozymes of coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H E; Cardenas, J M

    1979-04-01

    Pyruvate kinase exists as two major isozymes in coho salmon. As in mammals and birds, one form is present in the early embryo and maintains a wide tissue distribution in adults. This salmonid type K shows anodal migration during electrophoresis at pH 7.5. The appearence of functional musculature in the developing embryos. In adult animals this second form is the only pyruvate kinase in muscle. Brain, kidney, liver and gill contain primarily the type K pyruvate kinase while heart contains both major forms along with three intermediate forms which presumably constitute a hybrid set. Since there is no additional isozyme restricted to gluconeogenic tissues, we conclude that a type L isozyme has not developed in these animals. The two major isozymes are immunologically distincy. Both forms are dubject to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate activation of phosphoenolpyruvate binding, but the magnitude of the effect is small. The affinities for phosphoenolpyruvate are similar, but salmon type K has hyperbolic saturation curves with this substrate and type M has sigmoidal saturation curves. While the immunological data indicates considerable divergence in structure, the kinetic parameters of the two forms have remained relatively similar. PMID:469475

  3. Biosynthesis of pyruvic acid from glucose by Blastobotrys adeninivorans.

    PubMed

    Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Morgunov, Igor G

    2016-09-01

    The ability of taxonomically different yeasts to synthesize pyruvic acid (PA) from glucose was studied. The study showed that many yeasts are able to produce PA from glucose under the condition of growth limitation by thiamine. This ability was found in the yeast Blastobotrys adeninivorans for the first time. The production (oversynthesis) of PA in this yeast can be explained by disturbance in the function of thiamine-dependent pyruvate dehydrogenase. Namely, the partial inhibition of this enzyme brings about the excretion of PA from the yeast cells. Due to incomplete inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, the formation of acetyl-CoA continues, although at a lower level, maintaining the synthesis of α-ketoglutaric acid (KGA) in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. KGA is no longer oxidized in the TCA cycle, because thiamine limitation inhibits α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. As a result, KGA is excreted from the yeast cells as a byproduct of PA oversynthesis. Furthermore, the increased level of KGA in the yeast cells inhibits NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase in the TCA cycle and enhances the production and excretion of citric acid, another byproduct of PA oversynthesis. During cultivation in a fermentor, the strain Blastobotrys adeninivorans VKM Y-2677 produced 43.2 g l(-1) PA from glucose with a product yield (YPA) of 0.77 g PA/g glucose. The proportion of PA to byproducts was 18:1 for KGA and 8:1 for citric acid.

  4. Spinach pyruvate kinase isoforms: partial purification and regulatory properties

    SciTech Connect

    Baysdorfer, C.; Bassham, J.A.

    1984-02-01

    Pyruvate kinase from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaves consists of two isoforms, separable by blue agarose chromatography. Both isoforms share similar pH profiles and substrate and alternate nucleotide K/sub m/ values. In addition, both isoforms are inhibited by oxalate and ATP and activated by AMP. The isoforms differ in their response to three key metabolites; citrate, aspartate, and glutamate. The first isoform is similar to previously reported plant pyruvate kinases in its sensitivity to citrate inhibition. The K/sub i/ for this inhibition is 1.2 millimolar citrate. The second isoform is not affected by citrate but is regulated by aspartate and glutamate. Aspartate is an activator with a K/sub a/ of 0.05 millimolar, and glutamate is an inhibitor with a K/sub i/ of 0.68 millimolar. A pyruvate kinase with these properties has not been previously reported. Based on these considerations, the authors suggest that the activity of the first isoform is regulated by respiratory metabolism. The second isoform, in contrast, may be regulated by the demand for carbon skeletons for use in ammonia assimilation.

  5. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from higher plant mitochondria and proplastids: kinetics.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P; Reid, E E; Lyttle, C R; Dennis, D T

    1977-05-01

    A steady-state kinetic analysis has been performed on the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from pea (Pisum sativum L.) mitochondria and castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) proplastids. Substrate interaction kinetics for all substrates gave parallel lines consistent with a multisite ping-pong mechanism. Product inhibition studies showed uncompetitive inhibition between acetyl-CoA and pyruvate and competitive inhibition between NADH and NAD(+), both of which are also consistent with this mechanism. In the mitochondrial complex, acetyl-CoA showed noncompetitive inhibition versus CoA which suggests that the intermediate complex is kinetically important in the lipoamide transacetylase component of this complex. In contrast, the proplastid complex showed competitive inhibition in this interaction. NADH is a noncompetitive inhibitor versus CoA in both complexes indicating that these complexes, like the mammalian complex, may have protein-protein interactions between the second and third enzymes of the complex. Since NADH also shows noncompetitive inhibition versus pyruvate, this interaction may extend to all components of the complex. Acetyl-CoA shows noncompetitive inhibition versus NAD(+) which may also be a result of interaction between the second and third enzymes of the complex. The limiting Michaelis constants for substrates and the inhibitor constants for both complexes were determined.

  6. Loss of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 2 in the Liver Leads to Defects in Gluconeogenesis and Compensation via Pyruvate-Alanine Cycling.

    PubMed

    McCommis, Kyle S; Chen, Zhouji; Fu, Xiaorong; McDonald, William G; Colca, Jerry R; Kletzien, Rolf F; Burgess, Shawn C; Finck, Brian N

    2015-10-01

    Pyruvate transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane is believed to be a prerequisite for gluconeogenesis in hepatocytes, which is important for the maintenance of normoglycemia during prolonged food deprivation but also contributes to hyperglycemia in diabetes. To determine the requirement for mitochondrial pyruvate import in gluconeogenesis, mice with liver-specific deletion of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 2 (LS-Mpc2(-/-)) were generated. Loss of MPC2 impaired, but did not completely abolish, hepatocyte conversion of labeled pyruvate to TCA cycle intermediates and glucose. Unbiased metabolomic analyses of livers from fasted LS-Mpc2(-/-) mice suggested that alterations in amino acid metabolism, including pyruvate-alanine cycling, might compensate for the loss of MPC2. Indeed, inhibition of pyruvate-alanine transamination further reduced mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism and glucose production by LS-Mpc2(-/-) hepatocytes. These data demonstrate an important role for MPC2 in controlling hepatic gluconeogenesis and illuminate a compensatory mechanism for circumventing a block in mitochondrial pyruvate import. PMID:26344101

  7. Lactivibrio alcoholicus gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, mesophilic, lactate-, alcohol-, carbohydrate- and amino-acid-degrading bacterium in the phylum Synergistetes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yan-Ling; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Guo, Rong-Bo; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2014-06-01

    A mesophilic, obligately anaerobic, lactate-, alcohol-, carbohydrate- and amino-acid- degrading bacterium, designated strain 7WAY-8-7(T), was isolated from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating high-strength organic wastewater from isomerized sugar production processes. Cells of strain 7WAY-8-7(T) were motile, curved rods (0.7-1.0×5.0-8.0 µm). Spore formation was not observed. The strain grew optimally at 37 °C (range for growth was 25-40 °C) and pH 7.0 (pH 6.0-7.5), and could grow fermentatively on yeast extract, glucose, ribose, xylose, malate, tryptone, pyruvate, fumarate, Casamino acids, serine and cysteine. The main end-products of glucose fermentation were acetate and hydrogen. In co-culture with the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanospirillum hungatei DSM 864(T), strain 7WAY-8-7(T) could utilize lactate, glycerol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, L-glutamate, alanine, leucine, isoleucine, valine, histidine, asparagine, glutamine, arginine, lysine, threonine, 2-oxoglutarate, aspartate and methionine. A Stickland reaction was not observed with some pairs of amino acids. Yeast extract was required for growth. Nitrate, sulfate, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite and Fe (III) were not used as terminal electron acceptors. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 61.4 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolate belongs to the uncultured environmental clone clade (called 'PD-UASB-13' in the Greengenes database) in the bacterial phylum Synergistetes, showing less than 90% sequence similarity with closely related described species such as Aminivibrio pyruvatiphilus and Aminobacterium colombiense (89.7% and 88.7%, respectively). The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C(13 : 0), iso-C(15 : 0), anteiso-C(15 : 0), C(18 : 1), C(19 : 1), C(20 : 1) and C(21 : 1). A novel genus and species, Lactivibrio alcoholicus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate strain 7WAY-8-7(T) ( = JCM 17151(T

  8. Fine Tuning of the Lactate and Diacetyl Production through Promoter Engineering in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tingting; Kong, Jian; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Chenchen; Hu, Shumin

    2012-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a well-studied bacterium widely used in dairy fermentation and capable of producing metabolites with organoleptic and nutritional characteristics. For fine tuning of the distribution of glycolytic flux at the pyruvate branch from lactate to diacetyl and balancing the production of the two metabolites under aerobic conditions, a constitutive promoter library was constructed by randomizing the promoter sequence of the H2O-forming NADH oxidase gene in L. lactis. The library consisted of 30 promoters covering a wide range of activities from 7,000 to 380,000 relative fluorescence units using a green fluorescent protein as reporter. Eleven typical promoters of the library were selected for the constitutive expression of the H2O-forming NADH oxidase gene in L. lactis, and the NADH oxidase activity increased from 9.43 to 58.17-fold of the wild-type strain in small steps of activity change under aerobic conditions. Meanwhile, the lactate yield decreased from 21.15±0.08 mM to 9.94±0.07 mM, and the corresponding diacetyl production increased from 1.07±0.03 mM to 4.16±0.06 mM with the intracellular NADH/NAD+ ratios varying from 0.711±0.005 to 0.383±0.003. The results indicated that the reduced pyruvate to lactate flux was rerouted to the diacetyl with an almost linear flux variation via altered NADH/NAD+ ratios. Therefore, we provided a novel strategy to precisely control the pyruvate distribution for fine tuning of the lactate and diacetyl production through promoter engineering in L. lactis. Interestingly, the increased H2O-forming NADH oxidase activity led to 76.95% lower H2O2 concentration in the recombinant strain than that of the wild-type strain after 24 h of aerated cultivation. The viable cells were significantly elevated by four orders of magnitude within 28 days of storage at 4°C, suggesting that the increased enzyme activity could eliminate H2O2 accumulation and prolong cell survival. PMID:22558426

  9. Reactions upstream of glycerate-1,3-bisphosphate drive Corynebacterium glutamicum (D)-lactate productivity under oxygen deprivation.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Yota; Yamamoto, Shougo; Suda, Masako; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2013-08-01

    We previously demonstrated the simplicity of oxygen-deprived Corynebacterium glutamicum to produce D-lactate, a primary building block of next-generation biodegradable plastics, at very high optical purity by introducing heterologous D-ldhA gene from Lactobacillus delbrueckii. Here, we independently evaluated the effects of overexpressing each of genes encoding the ten glycolytic enzymes on D-lactate production in C. glutamicum. We consequently show that while the reactions catalyzed by glucokinase (GLK), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), phosphofructokinase (PFK), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), and bisphosphate aldolase had positive effects on D-lactate productivity by increasing 98, 39, 15, 13, and 10 %, respectively, in 10 h reactions in minimal salts medium, the reaction catalyzed by pyruvate kinase had large negative effect by decreasing 70 %. The other glycolytic enzymes did not affect D-lactate productivity when each of encoding genes was overexpressed. It is noteworthy that all reactions associated with positive effects are located upstream of glycerate-1,3-bisphosphate in the glycolytic pathway. The D-lactate yield also increased by especially overexpressing TPI encoding gene up to 94.5 %. Interestingly, overexpression of PFK encoding gene reduced the yield of succinate, one of the main by-products of D-lactate production, by 52 %, whereas overexpression of GAPDH encoding gene increased succinate yield by 26 %. Overexpression of GLK encoding gene markedly increased the yield of dihydroxyacetone and glycerol by 10- and 5.8-fold in exchange with decreasing the D-lactate yield. The effect of overexpressing glycolytic genes was also evaluated in 80 h long-term reactions. The variety of effects of overexpressing each of genes encoding the ten glycolytic enzymes on D-lactate production is discussed. PMID:23712891

  10. Lactate production is the major metabolic fate of glucose in splenocytes and is altered in spontaneously diabetic BB rats.

    PubMed Central

    Field, C J; Wu, G; Métroz-Dayer, M D; Montambault, M; Marliss, E B

    1990-01-01

    Enhanced glucose metabolism is necessary to support the activation and proliferation of lymphocytes. To define further quantitatively the metabolic fates of glucose and assess glucose utilization both in normal cells and in an autoimmune disease with abnormal lymphocytes, [U-14C]glucose conversion into 14CO2 and the production of lactate and pyruvate were measured in splenocytes. Cells from non-diabetes-prone (BBn) and spontaneously diabetic (BBd) rats were studied both freshly isolated 'resting' and cultured for 96 h with and without concanavalin A (Con A) stimulation. (1) Lactate was confirmed to be the major end product in both freshly isolated (53% of utilized glucose) and unstimulated cultured (62% of utilized glucose) cells from BBn animals studied at (2-8) x 10(6) cells/ml concentration. The use of concentrations from 10 x 10(6) to 300 x 10(6) cells/ml resulted in progressively less lactate production per 10(6) splenocytes. (2) Cells from BBd animals after stimulation with Con A incorporated less [3H]thymidine and produced significantly less lactate (155 +/- 14 versus 305 +/- 24 nmol/2 h per 10(6) cells) than did BBn cells (P less than 0.05). (3) However, more lactate (101 +/- 8 versus 78 +/- 6 nmol/5 h per 10(6) cells) was produced by 'resting' cells from BBd animals compared with BBn (P less than 0.03), and this difference was sustained after 4 days in culture. (4) Significantly greater amounts of pyruvate were produced by BBd than by BBn cells, particularly when stimulated with Con A, suggesting an alteration in the availability of reducing equivalents in BBd cells. (5) These results are consistent with prior metabolic as well as immunological 'activation' of cells in vivo in the BB diabetic animals. PMID:2268272

  11. Metabolic Response to Heat Stress in Late-Pregnant and Early Lactation Dairy Cows: Implications to Liver-Muscle Crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Koch, Franziska; Lamp, Ole; Eslamizad, Mehdi; Weitzel, Joachim; Kuhla, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Climate changes lead to rising temperatures during summer periods and dramatic economic losses in dairy production. Modern high-yielding dairy cows experience severe metabolic stress during the transition period between late gestation and early lactation to meet the high energy and nutrient requirements of the fetus or the mammary gland, and additional thermal stress during this time has adverse implications on metabolism and welfare. The mechanisms enabling metabolic adaptation to heat apart from the decline in feed intake and milk yield are not fully elucidated yet. To distinguish between feed intake and heat stress related effects, German Holstein dairy cows were first kept at thermoneutral conditions at 15°C followed by exposure to heat-stressed (HS) at 28°C or pair-feeding (PF) at 15°C for 6 days; in late-pregnancy and again in early lactation. Liver and muscle biopsies and plasma samples were taken to assess major metabolic pathway regulation using real-time PCR and Western Blot. The results indicate that during heat stress, late pregnant cows activate Cahill but reduce Cori cycling, prevent increase in skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation, and utilize increased amounts of pyruvate for gluconeogenesis, without altering ureagenesis despite reduced plane of nutrition. These homeorhetic adaptations are employed to reduce endogenous heat production while diverting amino acids to the growing fetus. Metabolic adaptation to heat stress in early lactation involves increased long-chain fatty acid degradation in muscle peroxisomes, allowance for muscle glucose utilization but diminished hepatic use of amino acid-derived pyruvate for gluconeogenesis and reduced peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and ATP production in liver of HS compared to PF cows in early lactation. Consequently, metabolic adaptation to heat stress and reduced feed intake differ between late pregnancy and early lactation of dairy cows to maintain energy supply for fetus development or milk production

  12. Metabolic Response to Heat Stress in Late-Pregnant and Early Lactation Dairy Cows: Implications to Liver-Muscle Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Eslamizad, Mehdi; Weitzel, Joachim; Kuhla, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Climate changes lead to rising temperatures during summer periods and dramatic economic losses in dairy production. Modern high-yielding dairy cows experience severe metabolic stress during the transition period between late gestation and early lactation to meet the high energy and nutrient requirements of the fetus or the mammary gland, and additional thermal stress during this time has adverse implications on metabolism and welfare. The mechanisms enabling metabolic adaptation to heat apart from the decline in feed intake and milk yield are not fully elucidated yet. To distinguish between feed intake and heat stress related effects, German Holstein dairy cows were first kept at thermoneutral conditions at 15°C followed by exposure to heat-stressed (HS) at 28°C or pair-feeding (PF) at 15°C for 6 days; in late-pregnancy and again in early lactation. Liver and muscle biopsies and plasma samples were taken to assess major metabolic pathway regulation using real-time PCR and Western Blot. The results indicate that during heat stress, late pregnant cows activate Cahill but reduce Cori cycling, prevent increase in skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation, and utilize increased amounts of pyruvate for gluconeogenesis, without altering ureagenesis despite reduced plane of nutrition. These homeorhetic adaptations are employed to reduce endogenous heat production while diverting amino acids to the growing fetus. Metabolic adaptation to heat stress in early lactation involves increased long-chain fatty acid degradation in muscle peroxisomes, allowance for muscle glucose utilization but diminished hepatic use of amino acid-derived pyruvate for gluconeogenesis and reduced peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and ATP production in liver of HS compared to PF cows in early lactation. Consequently, metabolic adaptation to heat stress and reduced feed intake differ between late pregnancy and early lactation of dairy cows to maintain energy supply for fetus development or milk production

  13. Effect of octreotide acetate on the plasma concentration and urinary excretion of uridine and purine bases.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Moriwaki, Yuji; Takahashi, Sumio; Tsutsumi, Zenta; Ka, Tsuneyoshi; Hada, Toshikazu

    2002-04-01

    To determine the effect of octreotide acetate on urinary excretion of uric acid and plasma concentration of uridine, we subcutaneously administered octreotide acetate (1 microg/kg of body weight) to 5 healthy subjects. Ninety minutes after administration, octreotide acetate increased the plasma concentration of uridine by 15% and decreased the plasma concentration of glucagon by 24% and that of insulin to below the detection limits. In addition, octreotide acetate decreased the urinary excretion of uric acid, sodium, and chloride by 60%, 40%, and 38%, respectively, at 1 hour after administration. However, octreotide acetate did not affect the concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid, cyclic AMP in plasma, lactic acid and pyruvic acid in blood, urinary excretion of hypoxanthine and xanthine, or creatinine clearance. From these results, we speculated that octreotide acetate decreases the urinary excretion of uric acid by decreasing the concentration of glucagon and/or urinary excretion of sodium, and increases the plasma concentration of uridine via decreased concentrations of glucagon and insulin.

  14. Body fat mobilization in early lactation influences methane production of dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Bielak, A.; Derno, M.; Tuchscherer, A.; Hammon, H. M.; Susenbeth, A.; Kuhla, B.

    2016-01-01

    Long-chain fatty acids mobilized during early lactation of dairy cows are increasingly used as energy substrate at the expense of acetate. As the synthesis of acetate in the rumen is closely linked to methane (CH4) production, we hypothesized that decreased acetate utilization would result in lower ruminal acetate levels and thus CH4 production. Twenty heifers were sampled for blood, rumen fluid and milk, and CH4 production was measured in respiration chambers in week −4, +5, +13 and +42 relative to first parturition. Based on plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration determined in week +5, animals were grouped to the ten highest (HM; NEFA > 580 μmol) and ten lowest (LM; NEFA < 580 μmol) mobilizing cows. Dry matter intake (DMI), milk yield and ruminal short-chain fatty acids did not differ between groups, but CH4/DMI was lower in HM cows in week +5. There was a negative regression between plasma NEFA and plasma acetate, between plasma NEFA and CH4/DMI and between plasma cholecystokinin and CH4/DMI in week +5. Our data show for the first time that fat mobilization of the host in early lactation is inversely related with ruminal CH4 production and that this effect is not attributed to different DMI. PMID:27306038

  15. Body fat mobilization in early lactation influences methane production of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bielak, A; Derno, M; Tuchscherer, A; Hammon, H M; Susenbeth, A; Kuhla, B

    2016-01-01

    Long-chain fatty acids mobilized during early lactation of dairy cows are increasingly used as energy substrate at the expense of acetate. As the synthesis of acetate in the rumen is closely linked to methane (CH4) production, we hypothesized that decreased acetate utilization would result in lower ruminal acetate levels and thus CH4 production. Twenty heifers were sampled for blood, rumen fluid and milk, and CH4 production was measured in respiration chambers in week -4, +5, +13 and +42 relative to first parturition. Based on plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration determined in week +5, animals were grouped to the ten highest (HM; NEFA > 580 μmol) and ten lowest (LM; NEFA < 580 μmol) mobilizing cows. Dry matter intake (DMI), milk yield and ruminal short-chain fatty acids did not differ between groups, but CH4/DMI was lower in HM cows in week +5. There was a negative regression between plasma NEFA and plasma acetate, between plasma NEFA and CH4/DMI and between plasma cholecystokinin and CH4/DMI in week +5. Our data show for the first time that fat mobilization of the host in early lactation is inversely related with ruminal CH4 production and that this effect is not attributed to different DMI. PMID:27306038

  16. Some Aspects of Yeast Anaerobic Metabolism Examined by the Inhibition of Pyruvate Decarboxylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Earl V.

    1998-10-01

    Incubation of yeast cells with various sugars in aqueous alkaline phosphate solutions under anaerobic conditions results in the accumulation of pyruvate in the cell medium after short periods of up to 15 minutes. This accumulation of pyruvate as the end product of glycolysis results from the inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylase under the conditions. This pyruvate production can be readily measured in the cell-free medium by a spectrophotometric assay using lactic dehydrogenase and NADH. The production of pyruvate can be directly related to the ability of the yeast cells to metabolize particular carbon sources provided. Comparison of pyruvate production by yeast from a variety of common sugars, for example, provides students with a means to assess what sugars are readily utilized by this organism. An additional advantage for student laboratory studies is the availability of Sacchromyces cerevisiae at minimal cost as dry granules which are easily weighed and quickly activated.

  17. Superior Cardiac Function Via Anaplerotic Pyruvate in the Immature Swine Heart After Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Reperfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Aaron; Hyyti, Outi M.; Cohen, Gordon A.; Ning, Xue-Han; Sadilek, Martin; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2008-12-01

    Pyruvate produces inotropic responses in the adult reperfused heart. Pyruvate oxidation and anaplerotic entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) via carboxylation are linked to stimulation of contractile function. The goals of this study were to determine if these metabolic pathways operate and are maintained in the developing myocardium after reperfusion. Immature male swine (age 10-18 days) were subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Intracoronary infusion of [2]-13C-pyruvate (to achieve a final concentration of 8 mM) was given for 35 minutes starting either during weaning (Group I), after discontinuation (Group II) or without (Control) CPB. Hemodynamic data was collected. 13C NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the fraction of pyruvate entering the CAC via pyruvate carboxylation (PC) to total CAC entry (PC plus decarboxlyation via pyruvate dehydrogenase). Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to determine total glutamate enrichment.

  18. 21 CFR 582.5311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5311 Ferrous lactate. (a) Product. Ferrous lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5311 Ferrous lactate. (a) Product. Ferrous lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5311 Ferrous lactate. (a) Product. Ferrous lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5311 Ferrous lactate. (a) Product. Ferrous lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5311 Ferrous lactate. (a) Product. Ferrous lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  3. Imaging Pregnant and Lactating Patients.

    PubMed

    Tirada, Nikki; Dreizin, David; Khati, Nadia J; Akin, Esma A; Zeman, Robert K

    2015-10-01

    As use of imaging in the evaluation of pregnant and lactating patients continues to increase, misperceptions of radiation and safety risks have proliferated, which has led to often unwarranted concerns among patients and clinicians. When radiologic examinations are appropriately used, the benefits derived from the information gained usually outweigh the risks. This review describes appropriateness and safety issues, estimated doses for imaging examinations that use iodizing radiation (ie, radiography, computed tomography, nuclear scintigraphy, and fluoroscopically guided interventional radiology), radiation risks to the mother and conceptus during various stages of pregnancy, and use of iodinated or gadolinium-based contrast agents and radiotracers in pregnant and lactating women. Maternal radiation risk must be weighed with the potential consequences of missing a life-threatening diagnosis such as pulmonary embolus. Fetal risks (ie, spontaneous abortion, teratogenesis, or carcinogenesis) vary with gestational age and imaging modality and should be considered in the context of the potential benefit of medically necessary diagnostic imaging. When feasible and medically indicated, modalities that do not use ionizing radiation (eg, magnetic resonance imaging) are preferred in pregnant and lactating patients. Radiologists should strive to minimize risks of radiation to the mother and fetus, counsel patients effectively, and promote a realistic understanding of risks related to imaging during pregnancy and lactation. PMID:26466183

  4. Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and bifunctional aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase are essential for energy metabolism under oxidative stress in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Erika; Encalada, Rusely; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S; Olivos-García, Alfonso; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma

    2010-08-01

    The in vitro Entamoeba histolytica pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (EhPFOR) kinetic properties and the effect of oxidative stress on glycolytic pathway enzymes and fluxes in live trophozoites were evaluated. EhPFOR showed a strong preference for pyruvate as substrate over other oxoacids. The enzyme was irreversibly inactivated by a long period of saturating O(2) exposure (IC(50) 0.034 mm), whereas short-term exposure (< 30 min) leading to > 90% inhibition allowed for partial restoration by addition of Fe(2+). CoA and acetyl-CoA prevented, whereas pyruvate exacerbated, inactivation induced by short-term saturating O(2) exposure. Superoxide dismutase was more effective than catalase in preventing the inactivation, indicating that reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved. Hydrogen peroxide caused inactivation in an Fe(2+)-reversible fashion that was not prevented by the coenzymes, suggesting different mechanisms of enzyme inactivation by ROS. Structural analysis on an EhPFOR 3D model suggested that the protection against ROS provided by coenzymes could be attributable to their proximity to the Fe-S clusters. After O(2) exposure, live parasites displayed decreased enzyme activities only for PFOR (90%) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH; 68%) of the bifunctional aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (EhADH2), whereas acetyl-CoA synthetase remained unchanged, explaining the increased acetate and lowered ethanol fluxes. Remarkably, PFOR and ALDH activities were restored after return of the parasites to normoxic conditions, which correlated with higher ethanol and lower acetate fluxes. These results identified amebal PFOR and ALDH of EhADH2 activities as markers of oxidative stress, and outlined their relevance as significant controlling steps of energy metabolism in parasites subjected to oxidative stress. PMID:20629749

  5. Lactate promotes PGE2 synthesis and gluconeogenesis in monocytes to benefit the growth of inflammation-associated colorectal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Libin; Zhou, Yuxin; Yao, Jing; Qiao, Chen; Ni, Ting; Guo, Ruichen; Guo, Qinglong; Lu, Na

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming energy metabolism, such as enhanced glycolysis, is an Achilles' heel in cancer treatment. Most studies have been performed on isolated cancer cells. Here, we studied the energy-transfer mechanism in inflammatory tumor microenvironment. We found that human THP-1 monocytes took up lactate secreted from tumor cells through monocarboxylate transporter 1. In THP-1 monocytes, the oxidation product of lactate, pyruvate competed with the substrate of proline hydroxylase and inhibited its activity, resulting in the stabilization of HIF-1α under normoxia. Mechanistically, activated hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α in THP-1 monocytes promoted the transcriptions of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, which were the key enzyme of prostaglandin E2 synthesis and gluconeogenesis, respectively, and promote the growth of human colon cancer HCT116 cells. Interestingly, lactate could not accelerate the growth of colon cancer directly in vivo. Instead, the human monocytic cells affected by lactate would play critical roles to ‘feed’ the colon cancer cells. Thus, recycling of lactate for glucose regeneration was reported in cancer metabolism. The anabolic metabolism of monocytes in inflammatory tumor microenvironment may be a critical event during tumor development, allowing accelerated tumor growth. PMID:25938544

  6. Simultaneous investigation of cardiac pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, Krebs cycle metabolism and pH, using hyperpolarized [1,2-(13)C2]pyruvate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Albert P; Hurd, Ralph E; Schroeder, Marie A; Lau, Angus Z; Gu, Yi-ping; Lam, Wilfred W; Barry, Jennifer; Tropp, James; Cunningham, Charles H

    2012-02-01

    (13)C MR spectroscopy studies performed on hearts ex vivo and in vivo following perfusion of prepolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate have shown that changes in pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) flux may be monitored non-invasively. However, to allow investigation of Krebs cycle metabolism, the (13)C label must be placed on the C2 position of pyruvate. Thus, the utilization of either C1 or C2 labeled prepolarized pyruvate as a tracer can only afford a partial view of cardiac pyruvate metabolism in health and disease. If the prepolarized pyruvate molecules were labeled at both C1 and C2 positions, then it would be possible to observe the downstream metabolites that were the results of both PDH flux ((13)CO(2) and H(13)CO(3)(-)) and Krebs cycle flux ([5-(13)C]glutamate) with a single dose of the agent. Cardiac pH could also be monitored in the same experiment, but adequate SNR of the (13)CO(2) resonance may be difficult to obtain in vivo. Using an interleaved selective RF pulse acquisition scheme to improve (13)CO(2) detection, the feasibility of using dual-labeled hyperpolarized [1,2-(13)C(2)]pyruvate as a substrate for dynamic cardiac metabolic MRS studies to allow simultaneous investigation of PDH flux, Krebs cycle flux and pH, was demonstrated in vivo.

  7. Influence of pyruvate, threonine and phosphoethanolamine on activities of some acetaldehyde-producing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gerashchenko, D; Gorenshtein, B; Pyzhik, T; Ostrovsky, Y u

    1993-07-01

    Threonine (50 mg/100 g, i.p.) leads to increased hepatic threonine aldolase activity in rats, although endogenous ethanol concentrations remain stable. After pyruvate administration (50 mg/100 g, i.p.), endogenous blood ethanol levels are raised within 30 min, but return to normal at 60 min. The activity of threonine aldolase is decreased in the liver, whereas phosphoethanolamine lyase and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities remain unchanged. Phosphoethanolamine administration (23 mg/100 g, i.p.) did not change the endogenous ethanol concentration or pyruvate dehydrogenase, threonine aldolase and phosphoethanolamine lyase activities. Pyruvate appears to be a better precursor of acetaldehyde than threonine or phosphoethanolamine.

  8. A Patient With Pyruvate Carboxylase Deficiency and Nemaline Rods on Muscle Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Unal, Ozlem; Orhan, Diclehan; Ostergaard, Elsebet; Tokatli, Aysegul; Dursun, Ali; Ozturk-Hismi, Burcu; Coskun, Turgay; Wibrand, Flemming; Kalkanoglu-Sivri, H Serap

    2013-11-01

    Nemaline rods are the pathologic hallmark of nemaline myopathy, but they have also been described as a secondary phenomenon in a variety of other disorders. Nemaline rods have not been reported in pyruvate carboxylase deficiency before. Here we present a patient with pyruvate carboxylase deficiency and nemaline rods detected on muscle biopsy. The nemaline rods may be due to cellular energy shortage and altered energy metabolism in pyruvate carboxylase deficiency, similar to that in the previously reported patients. The mechanism of nemaline rod formation may be associated with the role of pyruvate carboxylase in cellular energy pathways. PMID:22965558

  9. 21 CFR 184.1311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... reacting calcium lactate or sodium lactate with ferrous sulfate, direct reaction of lactic acid with iron filings, reaction of ferrous chloride with sodium lactate, or reaction of ferrous sulfate with ammonium... to 155, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1311 - Ferrous lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (1996), pp. 154 to 155, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... prepared by reacting calcium lactate or sodium lactate with ferrous sulfate, direct reaction of lactic acid with iron filings, reaction of ferrous chloride with sodium lactate, or reaction of ferrous...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 582.1207 Section 582.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Product. Calcium lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 582.1207 Section 582.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Product. Calcium lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 582.1207 Section 582.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Product. Calcium lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 582.1207 Section 582.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Product. Calcium lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 582.1207 Section 582.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Product. Calcium lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  16. Kinetic modeling of hyperpolarized 13C 1-pyruvate metabolism in normal rats and TRAMP mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierhut, Matthew L.; Yen, Yi-Fen; Chen, Albert P.; Bok, Robert; Albers, Mark J.; Zhang, Vickie; Tropp, Jim; Park, Ilwoo; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Kurhanewicz, John; Hurd, Ralph E.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2010-01-01

    PurposeTo investigate metabolic exchange between 13C 1-pyruvate, 13C 1-lactate, and 13C 1-alanine in pre-clinical model systems using kinetic modeling of dynamic hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopic data and to examine the relationship between fitted parameters and dose-response. Materials and methodsDynamic 13C spectroscopy data were acquired in normal rats, wild type mice, and mice with transgenic prostate tumors (TRAMP) either within a single slice or using a one-dimensional echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (1D-EPSI) encoding technique. Rate constants were estimated by fitting a set of exponential equations to the dynamic data. Variations in fitted parameters were used to determine model robustness in 15 mm slices centered on normal rat kidneys. Parameter values were used to investigate differences in metabolism between and within TRAMP and wild type mice. ResultsThe kinetic model was shown here to be robust when fitting data from a rat given similar doses. In normal rats, Michaelis-Menten kinetics were able to describe the dose-response of the fitted exchange rate constants with a 13.65% and 16.75% scaled fitting error (SFE) for kpyr→lac and kpyr→ala, respectively. In TRAMP mice, kpyr→lac increased an average of 94% after up to 23 days of disease progression, whether the mice were untreated or treated with casodex. Parameters estimated from dynamic 13C 1D-EPSI data were able to differentiate anatomical structures within both wild type and TRAMP mice. ConclusionsThe metabolic parameters estimated using this approach may be useful for in vivo monitoring of tumor progression and treatment efficacy, as well as to distinguish between various tissues based on metabolic activity.

  17. FORMATE—PYRUVATE EXCHANGE REACTION IN STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS II.

    PubMed Central

    Oster, M. O.; Wood, N. P.

    1964-01-01

    Oster, M. O. (A. & M. College of Texas, College Station), and N. P. Wood. Formate-pyruvate exchange reaction in Streptococcus faecalis. II. Reaction conditions for cell extracts. J. Bacteriol. 87:104–113. 1964.—In contrast to intact cells of Streptococcus faecalis, no stimulation of the formate-pyruvate exchange reaction was observed in cell extracts when yeast extract was added to the reaction mixture. A heated extract of Micrococcus lactilyticus, vitamin K5, ferrous sulfate, and ferrous ammonium sulfate stimulated an active exchange by protecting the system from oxygen. Tetrahydrofolate, 2,3-dimercaptopropanol, and sodium sulfide provided partial protection, whereas ascorbate, glutathione, sodium hydrosulfite, ammonium sulfide, and sodium bisulfite gave insufficient protection or were inhibitory. Oxidation-reduction (O-R) indicators were not inhibitory and were used to estimate the O-R potentials of reaction mixtures. A potential at least as negative as −125 mv was estimated to be necessary to preserve or initiate formate-pyruvate exchange activity. The reaction operated over a narrow pH range when strict anaerobic conditions were not maintained but, when the system was suitably poised, the pH range was broader. The influence of high phosphate concentrations was less under strictly anaerobic conditions, and orthophosphate could be replaced by small amounts of pyrophosphate. Effect of temperature, time, and amount of extract is presented. Addition of reduced benzyl viologen and hydrogen-saturated palladium in the buffer during 8 hr of dialysis prevented inactivation of extracts. Recovery of activity could be obtained after ammonium sulfate treatment when a combination of palladium chloride, neutral red, and hydrogen bubbling were used. PMID:14102842

  18. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of pyridoxamine–pyruvate aminotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikane, Yu; Yokochi, Nana; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Yagi, Toshiharu

    2006-01-01

    Pyridoxamine–pyruvate aminotransferase is a PLP (pyridoxal 5′-phosphate) (a coenzyme form of vitamin B6)-independent aminotransferase which catalyses a reversible transamination reaction between pyridoxamine and pyruvate to form pyridoxal and L-alanine. The gene encoding the enzyme has been identified, cloned and overexpressed for the first time. The mlr6806 gene on the chromosome of a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Mesorhizobium loti, encoded the enzyme, which consists of 393 amino acid residues. The primary sequence was identical with those of archaeal aspartate aminotransferase and rat serine–pyruvate aminotransferase, which are PLP-dependent aminotransferases. The results of fold-type analysis and the consensus amino acid residues found around the active-site lysine residue identified in the present study showed that the enzyme could be classified into class V aminotransferases of fold type I or the AT IV subfamily of the α family of the PLP-dependent enzymes. Analyses of the absorption and CD spectra of the wild-type and point-mutated enzymes showed that Lys197 was essential for the enzyme activity, and was the active-site lysine residue that corresponded to that found in the PLP-dependent aminotransferases, as had been suggested previously [Hodsdon, Kolb, Snell and Cole (1978) Biochem. J. 169, 429–432]. The Kd value for pyridoxal determined by means of CD was 100-fold lower than the Km value for it, suggesting that Schiff base formation between pyridoxal and the active-site lysine residue is partially rate determining in the catalysis of pyridoxal. The active-site structure and evolutionary aspects of the enzyme are discussed. PMID:16545075

  19. Inhibitor-bound structures of human pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4.

    PubMed

    Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Tokmakov, Alexander; Terada, Takaho; Ohbayashi, Naomi; Fujimoto, Takako; Gomi, Sumiko; Shiromizu, Ikuya; Kawamoto, Masaki; Matsusue, Tomokazu; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2011-09-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. PDC activity is tightly regulated by four members of a family of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoforms (PDK1-4), which phosphorylate and inactivate PDC. Recently, the development of specific inhibitors of PDK4 has become an especially important focus for the pharmaceutical management of diabetes and obesity. In this study, crystal structures of human PDK4 complexed with either AMPPNP, ADP or the inhibitor M77976 were determined. ADP-bound PDK4 has a slightly wider active-site cleft and a more disordered ATP lid compared with AMPPNP-bound PDK4, although both forms of PDK4 assume open conformations with a wider active-site cleft than that in the closed conformation of the previously reported ADP-bound PDK2 structure. M77976 binds to the ATP-binding pocket of PDK4 and causes local conformational changes with complete disordering of the ATP lid. M77976 binding also leads to a large domain rearrangement that further expands the active-site cleft of PDK4 compared with the ADP- and AMPPNP-bound forms. Biochemical analyses revealed that M77976 inhibits PDK4 with increased potency compared with the previously characterized PDK inhibitor radicicol. Thus, the present structures demonstrate for the first time the flexible and dynamic aspects of PDK4 in the open conformation and provide a basis for the development of novel inhibitors targeting the nucleotide-binding pocket of PDK4. PMID:21904029

  20. Response to lactation induction differs by season of year and breed of dairy ewes.

    PubMed

    Andrade, B Ramírez; Salama, A A K; Caja, G; Castillo, V; Albanell, E; Such, X

    2008-06-01

    Lactation artificially induced (ART) by steroid hormones and natural lactation (NAT) after lambing were compared in 2 dairy sheep breeds (Manchega and Lacaune) in 2 experiments conducted during winter and spring. In experiment 1, ART ewes (14 Manchega and 9 Lacaune) were induced into lactation in winter by the standard protocol, which consisted of s.c. injections of estradiol and progesterone administered in 2 portions daily from d 1 to 7. Hydrocortisone acetate was injected s.c. daily on d 18 to 20. Milking was initiated on d 21 and continued for 13 wk. A similar group of NAT ewes was selected for the contemporary comparison of NAT vs. ART lactation. All Lacaune ewes, but only 3 of the 14 Manchega ewes (21%), were successfully induced into lactation. Despite the successful induction of lactation in Lacaune ewes, milk yield was much lower than that obtained in NAT lactation (1.23 +/- 0.14 vs. 2.51 +/- 0.15 L/ d). Milk composition from wk 5 to 13 did not differ between groups, except for whey protein, which was greater in ART than in NAT ewes (1.47 vs. 1.25%). In experiment 2, 19 Manchega ewes were divided into 2 groups and induced into lactation in spring by using the standard induction protocol, similar to that used in experiment 1 (control, n = 9), or the standard protocol modified with bovine somatotropin (bST, 250 mg/ewe on d 11; n = 10). Manchega ewes had an improved response to the standard protocol of lactation induction in spring compared with winter. Milk yield in bST-treated Manchega ewes was 98% greater than that in control ewes (402 +/- 85 vs. 203 +/- 86 mL/d). The use of bST during mammogenesis did not affect milk composition. In conclusion, marked differences between Manchega and Lacaune dairy ewes were observed in their response to lactation induction when using the standard protocol during different photoperiod conditions. The Manchega ewes were unable to establish lactation in winter but were able to do so in spring. The response to lactation

  1. Primary structure of chicken muscle pyruvate kinase mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Lonberg, N; Gilbert, W

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the cDNA sequence corresponding to chicken muscle pyruvate kinase mRNA; the predicted coding region spans 529 amino acids and establishes the complete amino acid sequence for the vertebrate enzyme. We demonstrate that the level of mRNA for this enzyme is under developmental control and suggest a structural model for the protein kinase-mediated regulation of the mammalian liver isozyme. We report a method for the direct analysis of, and the preparation of cDNA probes from, mRNA which has been fractionated on methylmercury/agarose gels. Images PMID:6574503

  2. Resolution of brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase into two isozymes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, D J; Dikdan, G; Jordan, F

    1986-03-01

    A novel purification method was developed for brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1) that for the first time resolved the enzyme into two isozymes on DEAE-Sephadex chromatography. The isozymes were found to be distinct according to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis: the first one to be eluted gave rise to one band, the second to two bands. The isozymes were virtually the same so far as specific activity, KM, inhibition kinetics and irreversible binding properties by the mechanism-based inhibitor (E)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid are concerned. This finding resolves a longstanding controversy concerning the quaternary structure of this enzyme.

  3. Reactive oxygen species-mediated loss of bovine sperm motility in egg yolk Tris extender: protection by pyruvate, metal chelators and bovine liver or oviductal fluid catalase.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Jean-François; Blanchette, Sophie; Cormier, Nathaly; Sirard, Marc-André

    2002-02-01

    Improvement of bovine semen cryopreservation requires a better understanding of the properties of the currently used extenders. At present, about half of the spermatozoa die or become immotile following cryopreservation. The implication of an oxidative stress during or following the process of cryopreservation has been suspected to alter sperm functions. However, insufficient information is available on the effect of oxidative stress on sperm functions in their surrounding environment, the extender, such as the one based on egg yolk, Tris and glycerol. In this study, we investigated the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide anion (O2*-) on bovine sperm motility in a widely used egg yolk Tris glycerol (EYTG) extender in comparison to a reference medium, the Tyrode's albumen lactate pyruvate (TALP). Bovine sperm were incubated for 6 h with or without concentrations of H2O2 ranging from 12.5 microM to 1.25 mM and with the hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase system (X/XOD) that generates O2*-. Sperm motility was established by computer assisted semen analysis (CASA) in four similar experiments using the same frozen pool of semen. We have found that sperm motility was reduced significantly by H2O2 concentrations 20-fold lower in EYTG than in TALP medium. The differential resistance of the two media was explained by pyruvate present in TALP that acts as an antioxidant and metals ions, chelated by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DETAPAC), found in egg yolk that might react with H2O2. Addition of only 5 U/ml of bovine liver catalase or oviductal fluid catalase (OFC) were sufficient to overcome the loss of sperm motility caused by 100 microM H2O2 in both EYTG and TALP. However, OFC was the most effective of the two catalases in EYTG. In addition to maintain sperm motility, catalase (5 U/ml) and pyruvate (5 mM) increased the intracellular sperm ATP level in comparison to sperm incubated alone for 6 h at 38.5 degrees C in

  4. [Isolation and identification of a lactate-utilizing, butyrate-producing bacterium and its primary metabolic characteristics].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhu, Wei-yun; Yao, Wen; Mao, Sheng-yong

    2007-06-01

    The distal mammalian gut harbors prodigiously abundant microbes, which provide unique metabolic traits to host. A lactate-utilizing, butyrate-producing bacterium, strain LB01, was isolated from adult swine feces by utilizing modified Hungate technique with rumen liquid-independent YCFA medium supplemented with lactate as the single carbon source. It was an obligate anaerobic, Gram positive bacterium, and could utilize glucose, fructose, maltose and lactate with a large amount of gas products. 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed that it had the high similarity with members of the genus Megasphaera. The metabolic characteristics of strain LB01 was investigated by using in vitro fermentation system. Lactate at the concentration of 65 mmol/L in YCFA medium was rapidly consumed within 9 hours and was mainly converted to propionate and butyrate after 24h. As the level of acetate declined, the concentration of butyrate rose only in the presence of glucose, suggesting that butyrate could possibly be synthesized by the acetyl CoA: butyryl CoA transferase. When co-cultured with lactic acid bacteria strain K9, strain LB01 evidently reduced the concentration of lactate produced by strain K9 and decelerated the rapid pH drop, finally producing 12.11 mmol/L butyrate and 4.06 mmol/L propionate. The metabolic characteristics that strain LB01 efficiently converts toxic lactate and excessive acetate to butyrate can prevent lactate and acetate accumulation in the large intestine and maintain the slightly acidic environment of the large intestine, consequently revealing that stain LB01 could act as a potential probiotics.

  5. Quantum magnetic deflagration in acetate.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Mínguez, A; Hernandez, J M; Macià, F; García-Santiago, A; Tejada, J; Santos, P V

    2005-11-18

    We report controlled ignition of magnetization reversal avalanches by surface acoustic waves in a single crystal of acetate. Our data show that the speed of the avalanche exhibits maxima on the magnetic field at the tunneling resonances of Mn(12). Combined with the evidence of magnetic deflagration in Mn(12) acetate, this suggests a novel physical phenomenon: deflagration assisted by quantum tunneling. PMID:16384178

  6. Quantum magnetic deflagration in acetate.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Mínguez, A; Hernandez, J M; Macià, F; García-Santiago, A; Tejada, J; Santos, P V

    2005-11-18

    We report controlled ignition of magnetization reversal avalanches by surface acoustic waves in a single crystal of acetate. Our data show that the speed of the avalanche exhibits maxima on the magnetic field at the tunneling resonances of Mn(12). Combined with the evidence of magnetic deflagration in Mn(12) acetate, this suggests a novel physical phenomenon: deflagration assisted by quantum tunneling.

  7. Acetate production from whey lactose using co-immobilized cells of homolactic and homoacetic bacteria in a fibrous-bed bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.; Yang, S.T.

    1998-11-20

    Acetate was produced from whey lactose in batch and fed-batch fermentations using co-immobilized cells of Clostridium formicoaceticum and Lactococcus lactis. The cells were immobilized in a spirally wound fibrous sheet packed in a 0.45-L column reactor, with liquid circulated through a 5-L stirred-tank fermentor. Industrial-grade nitrogen sources, including corn steep liquor, casein hydrolysate, and yeast hydrolysate, were studied as inexpensive nutrient supplements to whey permeate and acid whey. Supplementation with either 2.5% (v/v) corn steep liquor or 1.5 g/L casein hydrolysate was adequate for the cocultured fermentation. The overall acetic acid yield from lactose was 0.9 g/g, and the productivity was 0.25 g/(L h). Both lactate and acetate at high concentrations inhibited the homoacetic fermentation. To overcome these inhibitions, fed-batch fermentations were used to keep lactate concentration low and to adapt cells to high-concentration acetate. The final acetate concentration obtained in the fed-batch fermentations were used to keep lactate concentration low and to adapt cells to high-concentration acetate. The final acetate concentration obtained in the fed-batch fermentation was 75 g/L, which was the highest acetate concentration ever produced by C. formicoaceticum. Even at this high acetate concentration, the overall productivity was 0.18 g/(L h) based on the total medium volume and 1.23 g/(L h) based on the fibrous-bed reactor volume. The cells isolated from the fibrous-bed bioreactor at the end of this study were more tolerant to acetic acid than the original culture used to seed the bioreactor, indicating that adaptation and natural selection of acetate-tolerant strains occurred. This cocultured fermentation process could be used to produce a low-cost acetate deicer from whey permeate and acid whey.

  8. Evidence of In Vivo Absorption of Lactate and Modulation of Short Chain Fatty Acid Absorption from the Reticulorumen of Non-Lactating Cattle Fed High Concentrate Diets

    PubMed Central

    Qumar, Muhammad; Khiaosa-ard, Ratchaneewan; Pourazad, Poulad; Wetzels, Stefanie U.; Klevenhusen, Fenja; Kandler, Wolfgang; Aschenbach, Jörg R.; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and lactate are endproducts of rumen fermentation and important energy sources for the host ruminant. Because their rapid accumulation results in ruminal acidosis, enhancement of the absorption of SCFA and lactate across reticuloruminal wall is instrumental in increasing energy supply and preventing ruminal acidosis in cattle. This study investigated whether the reticuloruminal absorption of SCFAs and lactate was altered by different strategies of high concentrate feeding. Eight rumen-cannulated, non-lactating Holstein cows were fed a forage-only diet (baseline) and then gradually adapted over 6 d to a 60% concentrate level. Thereafter, this concentrate-rich diet was fed for 4 wk either continuously (Con; n = 8) or interruptedly (Int; n = 8). Absorption of SCFAs and lactate was determined in vivo from the experimental buffer introduced into the washed reticulorumen. The buffer contained acetate, propionate, butyrate and lactate at a concentration of 60, 30, 10 and 5 mmol/L, respectively and Cr-EDTA as a marker for correcting ruminal water fluxes. The reticuloruminal absorption after 35 and 65 min of buffer incubation was measured at the baseline, after 1 wk of 60% concentrate feeding in the interrupted model (Int-1) and after 4 wk of concentrate feeding in both feeding models (Int-4 and Con-4). Data showed that the absorption rates of individual and total SCFAs during the first 35 min of incubation of Con-4 were highest (~1.7 times compared to baseline), while Int-1 and Int-4 were similar to respective baseline. Lactate was not absorbed during forage-only baseline and 1-wk concentrate feeding, but after 4-wk feeding of concentrates in both models. In conclusion, SCFAs absorption across the reticulorumen of non-lactating cattle was enhanced by the 4-wk continuous concentrate feeding, which seems to be more advantageous in terms of rumen acidosis prevention compared to the interrupted feeding model. The study provides evidence of

  9. Evidence that the flux control coefficient of the respiratory chain is high during gluconeogenesis from lactate in hepatocytes from starved rats. Implications for the hormonal control of gluconeogenesis and action of hypoglycaemic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, H J; Smyth, J E; Quinlan, P T; Halestrap, A P

    1987-01-01

    1. Increasing concentrations of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), a mild respiratory-chain inhibitor [Halestrap (1987) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 927, 280-290], caused progressive inhibition of glucose production from lactate + pyruvate by hepatocytes from starved rats incubated in the presence or absence of oleate and gluconeogenic hormones. 2. No significant changes in tissue ATP content were observed, but there were concomitant decreases in ketone-body output and cytochrome c reduction and increases in NADH fluorescence and the ratios of [lactate]/[pyruvate] and [beta-hydroxybutyrate]/[acetoacetate]. 3. The inhibition by DCMU of palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by isolated liver mitochondria was used to calculate a flux control coefficient of the respiratory chain towards gluconeogenesis. In the presence of 1 mM-oleate, the calculated values were 0.61, 0.39 and 0.25 in the absence of hormone and in the presence of glucagon or phenylephrine respectively, consistent with activation of the respiratory chain in situ as previously suggested [Quinlan & Halestrap (1986) Biochem. J. 236, 789-800]. 4. Cytoplasmic oxaloacetate concentrations were shown to decrease under these conditions, implying inhibition of pyruvate carboxylase. 5. Inhibition of gluconeogenesis from fructose and dihydroxyacetone was also observed with DCMU and was accompanied by an increased output of lactate + pyruvate, suggesting that activation of pyruvate kinase was occurring. With the latter substrate, measurements of tissue ADP and ATP contents showed that DCMU caused a small fall in [ATP]/[ADP] ratio. 6. Two inhibitors of fatty acid oxidation, pent-4-enoate and 2-tetradecylglycidate, were shown to abolish and to decrease respectively the effects of hormones, but not valinomycin, on gluconeogenesis from lactate + pyruvate, without changing tissue ATP content. 7. It is concluded that the hormonal increase in mitochondrial matrix volume stimulates fatty acid oxidation and respiratory

  10. Lactate Dehydrogenase in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Something Old, Something New

    PubMed Central

    Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Memeo, Riccardo; Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Giampieri, Riccardo; Bittoni, Alessandro; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Del Prete, Michela; Cascinu, Stefano; Scartozzi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver tumour (80–90%) and represents more than 5.7% of all cancers. Although in recent years the therapeutic options for these patients have increased, clinical results are yet unsatisfactory and the prognosis remains dismal. Clinical or molecular criteria allowing a more accurate selection of patients are in fact largely lacking. Lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) is a glycolytic key enzyme in the conversion of pyruvate to lactate under anaerobic conditions. In preclinical models, upregulation of LDH has been suggested to ensure both an efficient anaerobic/glycolytic metabolism and a reduced dependence on oxygen under hypoxic conditions in tumour cells. Data from several analyses on different tumour types seem to suggest that LDH levels may be a significant prognostic factor. The role of LDH in HCC has been investigated by different authors in heterogeneous populations of patients. It has been tested as a potential biomarker in retrospective, small, and nonfocused studies in patients undergoing surgery, transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and systemic therapy. In the major part of these studies, high LDH serum levels seem to predict a poorer outcome. We have reviewed literature in this setting trying to resume basis for future studies validating the role of LDH in this disease. PMID:27314036

  11. Recent Update on Human Lactate Dehydrogenase Enzyme 5 (hLDH5) Inhibitors: A Promising Approach for Cancer Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rani, Reshma; Kumar, Vinit

    2016-01-28

    Human lactate dehydrogenase (hLDH5), a glycolytic enzyme responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to lactate coupled with oxidation of NADH to NAD(+), plays a crucial role in the promotion of glycolysis in invasive tumor cells. Recently, hLDH5 has been considered a vital therapeutic target for invasive cancers. Selective inhibition of hLDH5 using small molecules holds potential prospects for the treatment of cancer and associated diseases. Consequently, significant progress has been made in the discovery of selective small-molecule hLDH5 inhibitors displaying remarkable inhibitory potencies. The purpose of this review is to discuss briefly the roles of hLDH isoforms and to compile small hLDH5 inhibitors into groups based on their chemical classes and pharmacological applications.

  12. The pivotal role of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases in metabolic flexibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Hulver, Matthew W; McMillan, Ryan P; Cline, Mark A; Gilbert, Elizabeth R

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic flexibility is the capacity of a system to adjust fuel (primarily glucose and fatty acids) oxidation based on nutrient availability. The ability to alter substrate oxidation in response to nutritional state depends on the genetically influenced balance between oxidation and storage capacities. Competition between fatty acids and glucose for oxidation occurs at the level of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). The PDC is normally active in most tissues in the fed state, and suppressing PDC activity by pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase (PDK) is crucial to maintain energy homeostasis under some extreme nutritional conditions in mammals. Conversely, inappropriate suppression of PDC activity might promote the development of metabolic diseases. This review summarizes PDKs' pivotal role in control of metabolic flexibility under various nutrient conditions and in different tissues, with emphasis on the best characterized PDK4. Understanding the regulation of PDC and PDKs and their roles in energy homeostasis could be beneficial to alleviate metabolic inflexibility and to provide possible therapies for metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes (T2D). PMID:24520982

  13. Pyruvate kinase M2 is a phosphotyrosine-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Christofk, H.R.; Vander Heiden, M.G.; Wu, N.; Asara, J.M.; Cantley, L.C.

    2008-06-03

    Growth factors stimulate cells to take up excess nutrients and to use them for anabolic processes. The biochemical mechanism by which this is accomplished is not fully understood but it is initiated by phosphorylation of signalling proteins on tyrosine residues. Using a novel proteomic screen for phosphotyrosine-binding proteins, we have made the observation that an enzyme involved in glycolysis, the human M2 (fetal) isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2), binds directly and selectively to tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides. We show that binding of phosphotyrosine peptides to PKM2 results in release of the allosteric activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, leading to inhibition of PKM2 enzymatic activity. We also provide evidence that this regulation of PKM2 by phosphotyrosine signalling diverts glucose metabolites from energy production to anabolic processes when cells are stimulated by certain growth factors. Collectively, our results indicate that expression of this phosphotyrosine-binding form of pyruvate kinase is critical for rapid growth in cancer cells.

  14. Octomeric pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Garczarek, Florian; Dong, Ming; Typke, Dieter; Witkowska, H Ewa; Hazen, Terry C; Nogales, Eva; Biggin, Mark D; Glaeser, Robert M

    2007-07-01

    Pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductatse (PFOR) carries out the central step in oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. We have purified this enzyme from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) as part of a systematic characterization of as many multiprotein complexes as possible for this organism, and the three-dimensional structure of this enzyme has been determined by a combination of electron microscopy (EM), single particle image analysis, homology modeling and computational molecular docking. Our results show that the 1MDa DvH PFOR complex is a homo-octomer, or more precisely, a tetramer of the dimeric form of the related enzyme found in Desulfovibrio africanus (Da), with which it shares a sequence identity of 69%. Our homology model of the DvH PFOR dimer is based on the Da PFOR X-ray structure. Docking of this model into our 17A resolution EM-reconstruction of negatively stained DvH PFOR octomers strongly suggests that the difference in oligomerization state for the two species is due to the insertion of a single valine residue (Val383) within a surface loop of the DvH enzyme. This study demonstrates that the strategy of intermediate resolution EM reconstruction coupled to homology modeling and docking can be powerful enough to infer the functionality of single amino acid residues. PMID:17400475

  15. Differing roles of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases during mouse oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaojing; Zhang, Liang; Han, Longsen; Ge, Juan; Ma, Rujun; Zhang, Xuesen; Moley, Kelle; Schedl, Tim; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) modulate energy homeostasis in multiple tissues and cell types, under various nutrient conditions, through phosphorylation of the α subunit (PDHE1α, also known as PDHA1) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. However, the roles of PDKs in meiotic maturation are currently unknown. Here, by undertaking knockdown and overexpression analysis of PDK paralogs (PDK1–PDK4) in mouse oocytes, we established the site-specificity of PDKs towards the phosphorylation of three serine residues (Ser232, Ser293 and Ser300) on PDHE1α. We found that PDK3-mediated phosphorylation of Ser293-PDHE1α results in disruption of meiotic spindle morphology and chromosome alignment and decreased total ATP levels, probably through inhibition of PDH activity. Unexpectedly, we discovered that PDK1 and PDK2 promote meiotic maturation, as their knockdown disturbs the assembly of the meiotic apparatus, without significantly altering ATP content. Moreover, phosphorylation of Ser232-PDHE1α was demonstrated to mediate PDK1 and PDK2 action in meiotic maturation, possibly through a mechanism that is distinct from PDH inactivation. These findings reveal that there are divergent roles of PDKs during oocyte maturation and indicate a new mechanism controlling meiotic structure. PMID:25991547

  16. Differing roles of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases during mouse oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaojing; Zhang, Liang; Han, Longsen; Ge, Juan; Ma, Rujun; Zhang, Xuesen; Moley, Kelle; Schedl, Tim; Wang, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) modulate energy homeostasis in multiple tissues and cell types, under various nutrient conditions, through phosphorylation of the α subunit (PDHE1α, also known as PDHA1) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. However, the roles of PDKs in meiotic maturation are currently unknown. Here, by undertaking knockdown and overexpression analysis of PDK paralogs (PDK1-PDK4) in mouse oocytes, we established the site-specificity of PDKs towards the phosphorylation of three serine residues (Ser232, Ser293 and Ser300) on PDHE1α. We found that PDK3-mediated phosphorylation of Ser293-PDHE1α results in disruption of meiotic spindle morphology and chromosome alignment and decreased total ATP levels, probably through inhibition of PDH activity. Unexpectedly, we discovered that PDK1 and PDK2 promote meiotic maturation, as their knockdown disturbs the assembly of the meiotic apparatus, without significantly altering ATP content. Moreover, phosphorylation of Ser232-PDHE1α was demonstrated to mediate PDK1 and PDK2 action in meiotic maturation, possibly through a mechanism that is distinct from PDH inactivation. These findings reveal that there are divergent roles of PDKs during oocyte maturation and indicate a new mechanism controlling meiotic structure. PMID:25991547

  17. An ipdC gene knock-out of Azospirillum brasilense strain SM and its implications on indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis and plant growth promotion.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Mandira; Srivastava, Sheela

    2008-05-01

    The indole-3-pyruvate decarboxylase gene (ipdC), coding for a key enzyme of the indole-3-pyruvic acid pathway of IAA biosynthesis in Azospirillum brasilense SM was functionally disrupted in a site-specific manner. This disruption was brought about by group II intron-based Targetron gene knock-out system as other conventional methods were unsuccessful in generating an IAA-attenuated mutant. Intron insertion was targeted to position 568 on the sense strand of ipdC, resulting in the knock-out strain, SMIT568s10 which showed a significant (~50%) decrease in the levels of indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-acetaldehyde and tryptophol compared to the wild type strain SM. In addition, a significant decrease in indole-3-pyruvate decarboxylase enzyme activity by approximately 50% was identified confirming a functional knock-out. Consequently, a reduction in the plant growth promoting response of strain SMIT568s10 was observed in terms of root length and lateral root proliferation as well as the total dry weight of the treated plants. Residual indole-3-pyruvate decarboxylase enzyme activity, and indole-3-acetic acid, tryptophol and indole-3-acetaldehyde formed along with the plant growth promoting response by strain SMIT568s10 in comparison with an untreated set suggest the presence of more than one copy of ipdC in the A. brasilense SM genome.

  18. Identification of Genes Involved in Indole-3-Acetic Acid Biosynthesis by Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAL5 Strain Using Transposon Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Elisete P.; Soares, Cleiton de Paula; Galvão, Patrícia G.; Imada, Eddie L.; Simões-Araújo, Jean L.; Rouws, Luc F. M.; de Oliveira, André L. M.; Vidal, Márcia S.; Baldani, José I.

    2016-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a beneficial nitrogen-fixing endophyte found in association with sugarcane plants and other important crops. Beneficial effects of G. diazotrophicus on sugarcane growth and productivity have been attributed to biological nitrogen fixation process and production of phytohormones especially indole-3-acetic acid (IAA); however, information about the biosynthesis and function of IAA in G. diazotrophicus is still scarce. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify genes and pathways involved in IAA biosynthesis in this bacterium. In our study, the screening of two independent Tn5 mutant libraries of PAL5T strain using the Salkowski colorimetric assay revealed two mutants (Gdiaa34 and Gdiaa01), which exhibited 95% less indolic compounds than the parental strain when grown in LGIP medium supplemented with L-tryptophan. HPLC chromatograms of the wild-type strain revealed the presence of IAA and of the biosynthetic intermediates indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPyA) and indole-3-lactate (ILA). In contrast, the HPLC profiles of both mutants showed no IAA but only a large peak of non-metabolized tryptophan and low levels of IPyA and ILA were detected. Molecular characterization revealed that Gdiaa01 and Gdiaa34 mutants had unique Tn5 insertions at different sites within the GDI2456 open read frame, which is predicted to encode a L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO). GDI2456 (lao gene) forms a cluster with GDI2455 and GDI2454 ORFs, which are predicted to encode a cytochrome C and an RidA protein, respectively. RT-qPCR showed that transcript levels of lao. cccA, and ridA genes were reduced in the Gdiaa01 as compared to PAL5T. In addition, rice plants inoculated with Gdiaa01 showed significantly smaller root development (length, surface area, number of forks and tips) than those plants inoculated with PAL5T. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that G. diazotrophicus PAL5T produces IAA via the IPyA pathway in cultures supplemented with tryptophan and

  19. Myristica fragrans Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metabolism by Inhibiting Lactate Dehydrogenase A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Yeong; Choi, Hee-Jung; Park, Mi-Ju; Jung, Yeon-Seop; Lee, Syng-Ook; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Choi, Jung-Hye; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Most cancer cells predominantly produce ATP by maintaining a high rate of lactate fermentation, rather than by maintaining a comparatively low rate of tricarboxylic acid cycle, i.e., Warburg's effect. In the pathway, the pyruvate produced by glycolysis is converted to lactic acid by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Here, we demonstrated that water extracts from the seeds of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (MF) inhibit the in vitro enzymatic activity of LDH. MF effectively suppressed cell growth and the overall Warburg effect in HT29 human colon cancer cells. Although the expression of LDH-A was not changed by MF, both lactate production and LDH activity were decreased in MF-treated cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In addition, intracellular ATP levels were also decreased by MF treatment, and the uptake of glucose was also reduced by MF treatment. Furthermore, the experiment on tumor growth in the in vivo mice model revealed that MF effectively reduced the growth of allotransplanted Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Taken together, these results suggest that MF effectively inhibits cancer growth and metabolism by inhibiting the activity of LDH, a major enzyme responsible for regulating cancer metabolism. These results implicate MF as a potential candidate for development into a novel drug against cancer through inhibition of LDH activity.

  20. Metabolic engineering of CHO cells to alter lactate metabolism during fed-batch cultures.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Cécile; Henry, Olivier; Durocher, Yves

    2016-01-10

    Recombinant yeast pyruvate carboxylase (PYC2) expression was previously shown to be an effective metabolic engineering strategy for reducing lactate formation in a number of relevant mammalian cell lines, but, in the case of CHO cells, did not consistently lead to significant improvement in terms of cell growth, product titer and energy metabolism efficiency. In the present study, we report on the establishment of a PYC2-expressing CHO cell line producing a monoclonal antibody and displaying a significantly altered lactate metabolism compared to its parental line. All clones exhibiting strong PYC2 expression were shown to experience a significant and systematic metabolic shift toward lactate consumption, as well as a prolonged exponential growth phase leading to an increased maximum cell concentration and volumetric product titer. Of salient interest, PYC2-expressing CHO cells were shown to maintain a highly efficient metabolism in fed-batch cultures, even when exposed to high glucose levels, thereby alleviating the need of controlling nutrient at low levels and the potential negative impact of such strategy on product glycosylation. In bioreactor operated in fed-batch mode, the higher maximum cell density achieved with the PYC2 clone led to a net gain (20%) in final volumetric productivity. PMID:26603123

  1. Metabolic engineering of CHO cells to alter lactate metabolism during fed-batch cultures.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Cécile; Henry, Olivier; Durocher, Yves

    2016-01-10

    Recombinant yeast pyruvate carboxylase (PYC2) expression was previously shown to be an effective metabolic engineering strategy for reducing lactate formation in a number of relevant mammalian cell lines, but, in the case of CHO cells, did not consistently lead to significant improvement in terms of cell growth, product titer and energy metabolism efficiency. In the present study, we report on the establishment of a PYC2-expressing CHO cell line producing a monoclonal antibody and displaying a significantly altered lactate metabolism compared to its parental line. All clones exhibiting strong PYC2 expression were shown to experience a significant and systematic metabolic shift toward lactate consumption, as well as a prolonged exponential growth phase leading to an increased maximum cell concentration and volumetric product titer. Of salient interest, PYC2-expressing CHO cells were shown to maintain a highly efficient metabolism in fed-batch cultures, even when exposed to high glucose levels, thereby alleviating the need of controlling nutrient at low levels and the potential negative impact of such strategy on product glycosylation. In bioreactor operated in fed-batch mode, the higher maximum cell density achieved with the PYC2 clone led to a net gain (20%) in final volumetric productivity.

  2. Adiposity and fat metabolism in lactating and fasting northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Daniel E; Champagne, Cory D; Fowler, Melinda A; Houser, Dorian S

    2014-01-01

    Several taxa of animals fast completely from food and water during energy-intensive periods such as lactation, breeding, and development. In elephant seals, these behaviors are sustained by high adiposity, high rates of fat mobilization, and reduced oxidation of carbohydrates and proteins. Adiposity and the regulation of lipolysis directly affect lactation energetics, milk composition, and mating success. Long-term fasting induces changes in regulation of lipolysis and lipid metabolism that influence fatty acid (FA) availability and the onset of insulin resistance. Hypoinsulinemia and elevated circulating FAs are also associated with several unique features of carbohydrate metabolism, including elevated plasma glucose, gluconeogenesis, and Cori cycle activity as well as high rates of pyruvate and tricarboxylic acid cycling. Glucose-lactate pools and triacylglycerol-FA cycles may be linked via glyceroneogenesis and this may be an important pathway influencing both fat and carbohydrate metabolism. Together, these features allow a sustained, high intensity, fat-based metabolism without substantial accumulation of ketoacids. PMID:24425723

  3. Myristica fragrans Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metabolism by Inhibiting Lactate Dehydrogenase A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Yeong; Choi, Hee-Jung; Park, Mi-Ju; Jung, Yeon-Seop; Lee, Syng-Ook; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Choi, Jung-Hye; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Most cancer cells predominantly produce ATP by maintaining a high rate of lactate fermentation, rather than by maintaining a comparatively low rate of tricarboxylic acid cycle, i.e., Warburg's effect. In the pathway, the pyruvate produced by glycolysis is converted to lactic acid by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Here, we demonstrated that water extracts from the seeds of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (MF) inhibit the in vitro enzymatic activity of LDH. MF effectively suppressed cell growth and the overall Warburg effect in HT29 human colon cancer cells. Although the expression of LDH-A was not changed by MF, both lactate production and LDH activity were decreased in MF-treated cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In addition, intracellular ATP levels were also decreased by MF treatment, and the uptake of glucose was also reduced by MF treatment. Furthermore, the experiment on tumor growth in the in vivo mice model revealed that MF effectively reduced the growth of allotransplanted Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Taken together, these results suggest that MF effectively inhibits cancer growth and metabolism by inhibiting the activity of LDH, a major enzyme responsible for regulating cancer metabolism. These results implicate MF as a potential candidate for development into a novel drug against cancer through inhibition of LDH activity. PMID:27430914

  4. Comparison of fumerate-pyruvate media and beef extract media for aerobically culturing Campylobacter species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Media supplemented with fumarate, pyruvate, and a vitamin-mineral solution or with beef extract were compared for the ability to support aerobic growth of Campylobacter. Basal broth composed of tryptose, yeast extract, bicarbonate, and agar was supplemented with 30 mM fumarate, 100 mM pyruvate, and ...

  5. Effect of bicarbonate concentration on aerobic growth of campylobacter in a fumarate-pyruvate medium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) concentration on aerobic growth of Campylobacter in a fumarate-pyruvate medium. Fumarate-pyruvate broth medium was supplemented with 0.00 to 0.10% NaHCO3 and inoculated with Campylobacter coli 33559, Campyloba...

  6. Differential Resuscitative Effect of Pyruvate and its Analogues on VBNC (Viable But Non-Culturable) Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Morishige, Yuta; Fujimori, Ko; Amano, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    An environmental isolate of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), grown to the logarithmic phase, rapidly lost culturability by the addition of 3 mM H2O2 to cultures grown in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium; however, some H2O2-treated bacteria regained their culturability in M9 minimal medium, if sodium pyruvate was present at at least 0.3 mM. In addition, most pyruvate analogues, such as bromopyruvate or phenylpyruvate, did not show restoration activity similar to that of pyruvate, except in the case of α-ketobutyrate. Further analysis of the mechanism underlying the resuscitation by pyruvate revealed that although many of the bacteria showed respiratory activity on CTC (5-cyano-2,3-di-(p-tolyl) tetrazolium chloride) reduction with or without pyruvate, the biosynthesis of DNA and protein synthesis were quite different in the presence or absence of pyruvate, i.e., pyruvate endowed the cells with the ability to incorporate much more radio-label into precursors during the resuscitation process. These results suggest that pyruvate is one of the key molecules working in the resuscitation process by taking bacteria from the non-culturable state to the growing and colony-forming state by triggering the synthesis of macromolecules such as DNA and protein. PMID:23595023

  7. Differential resuscitative effect of pyruvate and its analogues on VBNC (viable but non-culturable) Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Morishige, Yuta; Fujimori, Ko; Amano, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    An environmental isolate of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), grown to the logarithmic phase, rapidly lost culturability by the addition of 3 mM H2O2 to cultures grown in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium; however, some H2O2-treated bacteria regained their culturability in M9 minimal medium, if sodium pyruvate was present at at least 0.3 mM. In addition, most pyruvate analogues, such as bromopyruvate or phenylpyruvate, did not show restoration activity similar to that of pyruvate, except in the case of α-ketobutyrate. Further analysis of the mechanism underlying the resuscitation by pyruvate revealed that although many of the bacteria showed respiratory activity on CTC (5-cyano-2,3-di-(p-tolyl) tetrazolium chloride) reduction with or without pyruvate, the biosynthesis of DNA and protein synthesis were quite different in the presence or absence of pyruvate, i.e., pyruvate endowed the cells with the ability to incorporate much more radio-label into precursors during the resuscitation process. These results suggest that pyruvate is one of the key molecules working in the resuscitation process by taking bacteria from the non-culturable state to the growing and colony-forming state by triggering the synthesis of macromolecules such as DNA and protein. PMID:23595023

  8. Effects of alpha-adrenergic stimulation on the regulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the perfused rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.A.; Tanabe, S.; Buxton, D.B.; Olson, M.S.

    1985-08-05

    The regulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex was investigated during alpha-adrenergic stimulation with phenylephrine in the isolated perfused rat liver. The metabolic flux through the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was monitored by measuring the production of UCO2 from infused (1- UC) pyruvate. In livers from fed animals perfused with a low concentration of pyruvate (0.05 mM), phenylephrine infusion significantly inhibited the rate of pyruvate decarboxylation without affecting the amount of pyruvate dehydrogenase in its active form. Results show that alpha-adrenergic agonists do not exert short term regulatory effects on pyruvate dehydrogenase in the liver. Furthermore, the results suggest either that the rat liver pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is insensitive to changes in mitochondrial calcium or that changes in intramitochondrial calcium levels as a result of alpha-adrenergic stimulation are considerably less than suggested by others.

  9. Inhibition of monocarboxylate transporter 2 in the retrotrapezoid nucleus in rats: a test of the astrocyte-neuron lactate-shuttle hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Erlichman, Joseph S; Hewitt, Amy; Damon, Tracey L; Hart, Michael; Kurascz, Jennifer; Li, Aihua; Leiter, James C

    2008-05-01

    The astrocyte-neuronal lactate-shuttle hypothesis posits that lactate released from astrocytes into the extracellular space is metabolized by neurons. The lactate released should alter extracellular pH (pHe), and changes in pH in central chemosensory regions of the brainstem stimulate ventilation. Therefore, we assessed the impact of disrupting the lactate shuttle by administering 100 microM alpha-cyano-4-hydroxy-cinnamate (4-CIN), a dose that blocks the neuronal monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 2 but not the astrocytic MCTs (MCT1 and MCT4). Administration of 4-CIN focally in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a medullary central chemosensory nucleus, increased ventilation and decreased pHe in intact animals. In medullary brain slices, 4-CIN reduced astrocytic intracellular pH (pHi) slightly but alkalinized neuronal pHi. Nonetheless, pHi fell significantly in both cell types when they were treated with exogenous lactate, although 100 microM 4-CIN significantly reduced the magnitude of the acidosis in neurons but not astrocytes. Finally, 4-CIN treatment increased the uptake of a fluorescent 2-deoxy-D-glucose analog in neurons but did not alter the uptake rate of this 2-deoxy-D-glucose analog in astrocytes. These data confirm the existence of an astrocyte to neuron lactate shuttle in intact animals in the RTN, and lactate derived from astrocytes forms part of the central chemosensory stimulus for ventilation in this nucleus. When the lactate shuttle was disrupted by treatment with 4-CIN, neurons increased the uptake of glucose. Therefore, neurons seem to metabolize a combination of glucose and lactate (and other substances such as pyruvate) depending, in part, on the availability of each of these particular substrates.

  10. Evidence That Does Not Support Pyruvate Kinase M2 (PKM2)-catalyzed Reaction as a Rate-limiting Step in Cancer Cell Glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiansheng; Dai, Chunyan; Hu, Xun

    2016-04-22

    It has been recognized that the rate-limiting function of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) in glycolysis plays an important role in distributing glycolytic intermediates for anabolic and catabolic purposes in cancer cells. However, after analysis of the catalytic capacity of PKM2 relative to other glycolytic enzymes, the regulation range of PKM2 activity, metabolic flux control, and thermodynamics, we suggest that the PKM2-catalyzed reaction is not a rate-limiting step in cancer cell glycolysis. Hexokinase and phosphofructokinase 1 (PFK1), the first and third enzyme along the pathway, are rate-limiting enzymes that limit the overall glycolytic rate, whereas PKM2 and lactate dehydrogenase, the last two enzymes in the pathway, are for the fast removal of upstream intermediates to prevent the obstruction of the pathway. The argument is in accordance with the catalytic capacity of glycolytic enzymes, regulation range of enzyme activities, metabolic flux control, and thermodynamics.

  11. The Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi has an active pyruvate phosphate dikinase.

    PubMed

    Raverdy, Sylvine; Foster, Jeremy M; Roopenian, Erica; Carlow, Clotilde K S

    2008-08-01

    Genome analysis of the glycolytic/gluconeogenic pathway in the Wolbachia endosymbiont from the filarial parasite Brugia malayi (wBm) has revealed that wBm lacks pyruvate kinase (PK) and may instead utilize the enzyme pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK; ATP:pyruvate, orthophosphate phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.9.1). PPDK catalyses the reversible conversion of AMP, PPi and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) into ATP, Pi and pyruvate. The glycolytic pathway of most organisms, including mammals, contains exclusively PK for the production of pyruvate from PEP. Therefore, the absence of PPDK in mammals makes the enzyme an attractive Wolbachia drug target. In the present study, we have cloned and expressed an active wBm-PPDK, thereby providing insight into the energy metabolism of the endosymbiont. Our results support the development of wBm-PPDK as a promising new drug target in an anti-symbiotic approach to controlling filarial infection.

  12. Effect of phenylpyruvate on pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in rat brain mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Land, John M.; Clark, John B.

    1973-01-01

    1. The effects of phenylpyruvate, a metabolite produced in phenylketonuria, on the pyruvate dehydrogenase-complex activity were investigated in rat brain mitochondria. 2. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was measured by two methods, one measuring the release of 14CO2 from [1-14C]pyruvate and the other measuring the acetyl-CoA formed by means of the coupling enzyme, pigeon liver arylamine acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.5). In neither case was there significant inhibition of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by phenylpyruvate at concentrations below 2mm. 3. However, phenylpyruvate acted as a classical competitive inhibitor of the coupling enzyme arylamine acetyltransferase, with a Ki of 100μm. 4. It was concluded that the inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase by phenylpyruvate is unlikely to be a primary enzyme defect in phenylketonuria. PMID:16742815

  13. Localization of pyruvate carboxylase in organic acid-producing Aspergillus strains.

    PubMed

    Bercovitz, A; Peleg, Y; Battat, E; Rokem, J S; Goldberg, I

    1990-06-01

    The localization of pyruvate carboxylase (cytosolic or mitochondrial) was studied in nine different Aspergillus species (14 strains). In some species (A. aculeatus, A. flavus, A. foetidus, A. nidulans, A. ochraceus, and A. sojae), the pyruvate carboxylase activity could be detected only in the cytosolic fraction of the cells. Pyruvate carboxylase has been found only in the mitochondrial fraction of two strains of Aspergillus wentii. In Aspergillus oryzae and in five strains of Aspergillus niger, pyruvate carboxylase activity was detected both in the mitochondrial fraction and in the cytosol. There was no quantitative or qualitative correlation between the activities of pyruvate carboxylase in the mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions of the cells and the ability of the various Aspergillus strains to accumulate different organic acids.

  14. Lactate metabolism in the fetal rabbit lung

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, M.J.; Brown, D.J.; Dooley, M.

    1986-05-01

    Lactate is frequently overlooked as a potential substrate for the fetal lung, even though it is present in the fetal circulation in concentrations as high as 8 mM. These high concentrations, coupled with the relatively low levels of glucose in the fetal blood, may indicate that lactate can substitute for glucose in pulmonary energy generation and phospholipid synthesis. A series of experiments was therefore undertaken in order to investigate the role of lactate in perinatal pulmonary development. Explants from 30 day gestation fetal rabbit lungs were incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer supplemented with 3 mM (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose and varying levels of lactate. In the absence of medium lactate, fetal rabbit lung explants were capable of producing lactate at a rate of approximately 200 etamoles/mg protein/hour. The addition of lactate to the bathing medium immediately reduced net lactate production and above 4 mM, fetal rabbit lung explants became net utilizers of lactate. Media lactate concentrations of 2.5 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM also decreased glucose incorporation into total tissue disaturated phosphatidylcholine by approximately 20%, 35%, and 45%, respectively. Glucose incorporation into surfactant phosphatidylcholine was also reduced by approximately 50%, when lactate was present in the incubation medium at a concentration of 5 mM. Additional experiments also revealed that fetal lung lactate dehydrogenase activity was almost twice that found in the adult rabbit lung. These data indicate that lactate may be an important carbon source for the developing lung and could be a significant component in the manufacture of surfactant phosphatidylcholine during late gestation.

  15. Pyruvate kinase M2 affects liver cancer cell behavior through up-regulation of HIF-1α and Bcl-xL in culture.

    PubMed

    Dong, Tianfu; Yan, Youde; Chai, Hao; Chen, Shenglin; Xiong, Xinkui; Sun, Daoyi; Yu, Yue; Deng, Lei; Cheng, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Cancer cells consume large amounts of glucose to produce lactate, even in the presence of ample oxygen. This phenomenon is known as the Warburg effect. The pyruvate kinase promotes aerobic glycolysis, and the pyruvate kinase M2 isoform (PKM2) is highly expressed in many cancer cells. Although the Warburg effect is a hallmark of cancer, the mechanism by which PKM2 contributes to the Warburg effect, and its role in tumor growth remain to be defined. We proposed that PKM2 activates transcription of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) by phosphorylating STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) at Y705 (tyrosine 705) as a plausible mechanism for liver cancer cell proliferation. In the current study, we observed that PKM2 was over-expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues. The experiments further indicate that nuclear PKM2 is an active protein kinase in cultured cells. Knockdown of PKM2 affected the levels of HIF-1α and Bcl-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large), suggesting that PKM2 plays an important role in promoting cell proliferation. In conclusion, the current findings demonstrate that PKM2 is an active protein kinase, and promotes liver cancer cell proliferation by up-regulating HIF-1α and Bcl-xL expression.

  16. Carbohydrate metabolism during prolonged exercise and recovery: interactions between pyruvate dehydrogenase, fatty acids, and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Mourtzakis, Marina; Saltin, Bengt; Graham, Terry; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2006-06-01

    During prolonged exercise, carbohydrate oxidation may result from decreased pyruvate production and increased fatty acid supply and ultimately lead to reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity. Pyruvate also interacts with the amino acids alanine, glutamine, and glutamate, whereby the decline in pyruvate production could affect tricarboxycylic acid cycle flux as well as gluconeogenesis. To enhance our understanding of these interactions, we studied the time course of changes in substrate utilization in six men who cycled at 44+/-1% peak oxygen consumption (mean+/-SE) until exhaustion (exhaustion at 3 h 23 min+/-11 min). Femoral arterial and venous blood, blood flow measurements, and muscle samples were obtained hourly during exercise and recovery (3 h). Carbohydrate oxidation peaked at 30 min of exercise and subsequently decreased for the remainder of the exercise bout (P<0.05). PDH activity peaked at 2 h of exercise, whereas pyruvate production peaked at 1 h of exercise and was reduced (approximately 30%) thereafter, suggesting that pyruvate availability primarily accounted for reduced carbohydrate oxidation. Increased free fatty acid uptake (P<0.05) was also associated with decreasing PDH activity (P<0.05) and increased PDH kinase 4 mRNA (P<0.05) during exercise and recovery. At 1 h of exercise, pyruvate production was greatest and was closely linked to glutamate, which was the predominant amino acid taken up during exercise and recovery. Alanine and glutamine were also associated with pyruvate metabolism, and they comprised approximately 68% of total amino-acid release during exercise and recovery. Thus reduced pyruvate production was primarily associated with reduced carbohydrate oxidation, whereas the greatest production of pyruvate was related to glutamate, glutamine, and alanine metabolism in early exercise. PMID:16424076

  17. Conformational flexibility related to enzyme activity: evidence for a dynamic active-site gatekeeper function of Tyr215 in Aerococcus viridans lactate oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Stoisser, Thomas; Brunsteiner, Michael; Wilson, David K.; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    L-Lactate oxidase (LOX) belongs to a large family of flavoenzymes that catalyze oxidation of α-hydroxy acids. How in these enzymes the protein structure controls reactivity presents an important but elusive problem. LOX contains a prominent tyrosine in the substrate binding pocket (Tyr215 in Aerococcus viridans LOX) that is partially responsible for securing a flexible loop which sequesters the active site. To characterize the role of Tyr215, effects of substitutions of the tyrosine (Y215F, Y215H) were analyzed kinetically, crystallographically and by molecular dynamics simulations. Enzyme variants showed slowed flavin reduction and oxidation by up to 33-fold. Pyruvate release was also decelerated and in Y215F, it was the slowest step overall. A 2.6-Å crystal structure of Y215F in complex with pyruvate shows the hydrogen bond between the phenolic hydroxyl and the keto oxygen in pyruvate is replaced with a potentially stronger hydrophobic interaction between the phenylalanine and the methyl group of pyruvate. Residues 200 through 215 or 216 appear to be disordered in two of the eight monomers in the asymmetric unit suggesting that they function as a lid controlling substrate entry and product exit from the active site. Substitutions of Tyr215 can thus lead to a kinetic bottleneck in product release. PMID:27302031

  18. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-mediated Glycolytic Metabolic Shift in the Dorsal Root Ganglion Drives Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Habibur; Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Kim, Jong-Heon; Nam, Youngpyo; Lee, Maan Gee; Go, Younghoon; Harris, Robert A; Park, Dong Ho; Kook, Hyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-03-11

    The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is a highly vulnerable site in diabetic neuropathy. Under diabetic conditions, the DRG is subjected to tissue ischemia or lower ambient oxygen tension that leads to aberrant metabolic functions. Metabolic dysfunctions have been documented to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of diverse pain hypersensitivities. However, the contribution of diabetes-induced metabolic dysfunctions in the DRG to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy remains ill-explored. In this study, we report that pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK2 and PDK4), key regulatory enzymes in glucose metabolism, mediate glycolytic metabolic shift in the DRG leading to painful diabetic neuropathy. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes substantially enhanced the expression and activity of the PDKs in the DRG, and the genetic ablation of Pdk2 and Pdk4 attenuated the hyperglycemia-induced pain hypersensitivity. Mechanistically, Pdk2/4 deficiency inhibited the diabetes-induced lactate surge, expression of pain-related ion channels, activation of satellite glial cells, and infiltration of macrophages in the DRG, in addition to reducing central sensitization and neuroinflammation hallmarks in the spinal cord, which probably accounts for the attenuated pain hypersensitivity. Pdk2/4-deficient mice were partly resistant to the diabetes-induced loss of peripheral nerve structure and function. Furthermore, in the experiments using DRG neuron cultures, lactic acid treatment enhanced the expression of the ion channels and compromised cell viability. Finally, the pharmacological inhibition of DRG PDKs or lactic acid production substantially attenuated diabetes-induced pain hypersensitivity. Taken together, PDK2/4 induction and the subsequent lactate surge induce the metabolic shift in the diabetic DRG, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy.

  19. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-mediated Glycolytic Metabolic Shift in the Dorsal Root Ganglion Drives Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Habibur; Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Kim, Jong-Heon; Nam, Youngpyo; Lee, Maan Gee; Go, Younghoon; Harris, Robert A; Park, Dong Ho; Kook, Hyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-03-11

    The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is a highly vulnerable site in diabetic neuropathy. Under diabetic conditions, the DRG is subjected to tissue ischemia or lower ambient oxygen tension that leads to aberrant metabolic functions. Metabolic dysfunctions have been documented to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of diverse pain hypersensitivities. However, the contribution of diabetes-induced metabolic dysfunctions in the DRG to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy remains ill-explored. In this study, we report that pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK2 and PDK4), key regulatory enzymes in glucose metabolism, mediate glycolytic metabolic shift in the DRG leading to painful diabetic neuropathy. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes substantially enhanced the expression and activity of the PDKs in the DRG, and the genetic ablation of Pdk2 and Pdk4 attenuated the hyperglycemia-induced pain hypersensitivity. Mechanistically, Pdk2/4 deficiency inhibited the diabetes-induced lactate surge, expression of pain-related ion channels, activation of satellite glial cells, and infiltration of macrophages in the DRG, in addition to reducing central sensitization and neuroinflammation hallmarks in the spinal cord, which probably accounts for the attenuated pain hypersensitivity. Pdk2/4-deficient mice were partly resistant to the diabetes-induced loss of peripheral nerve structure and function. Furthermore, in the experiments using DRG neuron cultures, lactic acid treatment enhanced the expression of the ion channels and compromised cell viability. Finally, the pharmacological inhibition of DRG PDKs or lactic acid production substantially attenuated diabetes-induced pain hypersensitivity. Taken together, PDK2/4 induction and the subsequent lactate surge induce the metabolic shift in the diabetic DRG, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26769971

  20. Epidermal growth factor precursor in mouse lactating mammary gland alveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.F.; Teng, C.T.; Pentecost, B.T.; DiAugustine, R.P. )

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that high levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) occur in human and rodent milk and that oral administration of this polypeptide stimulates rodent gastrointestinal development. It is not known whether EGF in milk originates from cells of the lactating mammary gland or is sequestered from an extramammary source. In the present study, prepro-EGF mRNA (approximately 4.7 kilobases) was detected in the CD-1 mouse mammary gland throughout the period of lactation; by comparison, negligible levels of this EGF transcript were found in the gland during pregnancy. Low levels of EGF immunoreactivity (4-5 ng/g wet wt tissue) were extracted from lactating (day 18) mammary glands with dilute acetic acid. Immunolocalization was evident with antisera to either EGF or two other regions of the EGF precursor in essentially all alveolar cells of the lactating gland. The most prominent staining with antiserum to EGF was observed along the luminal borders of cells; this pattern of cellular staining required proteolytic pretreatment of tissue sections. Western blot analyses of cell membranes isolated from the day 16 lactating mammary gland revealed an EGF-immunoreactive band at about 145K, which was equivalent in size to the EGF precursor found in mouse kidney cell membranes. Despite these findings, labeling of lactating mammary gland mince with L-(35S)methionine and cysteine for up to 4 h did not reveal any specific bands in immunoprecipitates. These cumulative findings suggest that the precursor form of EGF occurs in alveolar cells of lactating mammary gland and that this protein is translocated to the cell membrane.

  1. A biochemical and genetic study of Leishmania donovani pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Will; Isea, Raúl; Rodriguez, Evelyn; Ramirez, Jose Luis

    2008-11-15

    Here we present a biochemical and molecular biology study of the enzyme pyruvate kinase (PYK) from the parasitic protozoa Leishmania donovani. The PYK gene was cloned, mutagenised and over expressed and its kinetic parameters determined. Like in other kinetoplastids, L. donovani PYK is allosterically stimulated by the effector fructose 2,6 biphosphate and not by fructose 1,6 biphosphate. When the putative effector binding site of L. donovani PYK was mutagenised, we obtained two mutants with extreme kinetic behavior: Lys453Leu, which retained a sigmoidal kinetics and was little affected by the effector; and His480Gln, which deployed a hyperbolic kinetics that was not changed by the addition of the effector. Molecular Dynamics (MD) studies revealed that the mutations not only altered the effector binding site of L. donovani PYK but also changed the folding of its domain C. PMID:18725273

  2. The long and winding road to the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The extraction of energy and biosynthetic building blocks from fuel metabolism is a fundamental requisite for life. Through the action of cellular enzymes, complex carbon structures are broken down in reactions coupled to the production of high-energy phosphates as in ATP and GTP as well as electron carriers such as NADH and FADH2. These processes traverse across compartments inside the cell in order to access specific enzymes and environments. Pyruvate is the end product of cytosolic glycolysis and has a variety of possible fates, the major one being mitochondrial oxidation. While this metabolite has been known to cross the inner mitochondrial membrane for decades, it is only recently that proteins necessary for this activity have been identified. This review will chronicle more than 40 years of research interrogating this critical process and will discuss some of the possible implications of this discovery for cancer metabolism. PMID:24280073

  3. Parkin Regulates the Activity of Pyruvate Kinase M2*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Li, Fanzhou; Han, Haichao; Chen, Yue; Mao, Zebin; Luo, Jianyuan; Zhao, Yingming; Zheng, Bin; Gu, Wei; Zhao, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    Parkin, a ubiquitin E3 ligase, is mutated in most cases of autosomal recessive early onset Parkinson disease. It was discovered that Parkin is also mutated in glioblastoma and other human malignancies and that it inhibits tumor cell growth. Here, we identified pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) as a unique substrate for parkin through biochemical purification. We found that parkin interacts with PKM2 both in vitro and in vivo, and this interaction dramatically increases during glucose starvation. Ubiquitylation of PKM2 by parkin does not affect its stability but decreases its enzymatic activity. Parkin regulates the glycolysis pathway and affects the cell metabolism. Our studies revealed the novel important roles of parkin in tumor cell metabolism and provided new insight for therapy of Parkinson disease. PMID:26975375

  4. Light regulation of pyruvate allocation into primary and secondary carbon metabolism in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K.; Werner, C.; Wegener, F.; Meyers, K.; Abrell, L.

    2012-12-01

    While plant metabolic processes are known to exert a large influence on climate and air quality through the emission of CO2 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), controls over the allocation of assimilated carbon to these important components of the global carbon cycle are poorly understood. In plants, pyruvate lies at the heart of carbon metabolism by acting as a key product of photosynthesis and glycolysis and as a substrate used in respiratory and secondary biosynthetic pathways (e.g. VOCs). It is now well recognized that light has a strong inhibitory effect on mitochondrial respiration and recent studies have shown this contributes to an accumulation of pyruvate. However, little is known about the impact(s) this has on biosynthetic processes including VOCs and how the different carbon atoms within pyruvate are utilized. In this study, we quantified diurnal VOC and CO2 fluxes from intact branches of a Mediterranean shrub (Halimium halimifolium) under controlled light conditions. In addition, we utilized positionally specific 13C-labeled pyruvate branch feeding together with stable isotope analysis to trace the partitioning of C1, C2, and C3 carbon atoms of pyruvate into VOCs and CO2 emissions in the light and in the dark. In the light, we found high emission rates of a large array of VOC including volatile isoprenoids, oxygenated VOCs, green leaf volatiles, aromatics, sulfides, and nitrogen containing VOCs. In addition, elevated 13C-VOC emissions were stimulated by pyruvate-2-13C and pyruvate-2,3-13C but not pyruvate-1-13C while the opposite was the case for 13CO2 emissions (respiration). Moreover, we found that in the dark, 13C-VOC emissions dramatically declined while 13CO2 emissions were strongly stimulated. Our observations suggest that in the light, H. halimifolium dedicates a high pyruvate flux through secondary biosynthetic pathways including the pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass, mevalonic acid, MEP/DOXP, shikimic acid, and fatty acid pathways, which are

  5. Effect of oxygen on glucose metabolism: utilization of lactate in Staphylococcus aureus as revealed by in vivo NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria Teresa; Manso, Ana S; Gaspar, Paula; Pinho, Mariana G; Neves, Ana Rute

    2013-01-01

    The ability to successfully adapt to changing host conditions is crucial for full virulence of bacterial pathogens. Staphylococcus aureus has to cope with fluctuating oxygen concentrations during the course of infection. Hence, we studied the effect of oxygen on glucose metabolism in non-growing S. aureus COL-S cells by in vivo(13)C-NMR. Glucose catabolism was probed at different oxygen concentrations in suspensions of cells grown aerobically (direct effects on metabolism) or anaerobically (transcriptional adjustment to oxygen deprivation). In aerobically-grown cells, the rate of glucose consumption diminished progressively with decreasing oxygen concentrations. Additionally, oxygen deprivation resulted in biphasic glucose consumption, with the second phase presenting a higher rate. The fructose-1,6-bisphosphate pool peaked while glucose was still abundant, but the transient maximum varied with the oxygen concentration. As oxygen became limiting mannitol/mannitol-1-phosphate were detected as products of glucose catabolism. Under anoxic conditions, accumulation of mannitol-1-phosphate ceased with the switch to higher glucose consumption rates, which implies the activation of a more efficient means by which NAD(+) can be regenerated. The distribution of end-products deriving from glucose catabolism was dramatically affected by oxygen: acetate increased and lactate decreased with the oxygen concentration; ethanol was formed only anaerobically. Moreover, oxygen promoted the energetically favourable conversion of lactate into acetate, which was particularly noticeable under fully oxygenated conditions. Interestingly, under aerobiosis growing S. aureus cells also converted lactate to acetate, used simultaneously glucose and lactate as substrates for growth, and grew considerably well on lactate-medium. We propose that the efficient lactate catabolism may endow S. aureus with a metabolic advantage in its ecological niche.

  6. The Crystal Structure of Toxoplasma gondii Pyruvate Kinase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bakszt, R.; Wernimont, A; Allali-Hassani, A; Mok, M; Hills, T; Hui, R; Pizarro, J

    2010-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK), which catalyzes the final step in glycolysis converting phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate, is a central metabolic regulator in most organisms. Consequently PK represents an attractive therapeutic target in cancer and human pathogens, like Apicomplexans. The phylum Aplicomplexa, a group of exclusively parasitic organisms, includes the genera Plasmodium, Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma, the etiological agents of malaria, cryptosporidiosis and toxoplasmosis respectively. Toxoplasma gondii infection causes a mild illness and is a very common infection affecting nearly one third of the world's population. We have determined the crystal structure of the PK1 enzyme from T. gondii, with the B domain in the open and closed conformations. We have also characterized its enzymatic activity and confirmed glucose-6-phosphate as its allosteric activator. This is the first description of a PK enzyme in a closed inactive conformation without any bound substrate. Comparison of the two tetrameric TgPK1 structures indicates a reorientation of the monomers with a concomitant change in the buried surface among adjacent monomers. The change in the buried surface was associated with significant B domain movements in one of the interacting monomers. We hypothesize that a loop in the interface between the A and B domains plays an important role linking the position of the B domain to the buried surface among monomers through two {alpha}-helices. The proposed model links the catalytic cycle of the enzyme with its domain movements and highlights the contribution of the interface between adjacent subunits. In addition, an unusual ordered conformation was observed in one of the allosteric binding domains and it is related to a specific apicomplexan insertion. The sequence and structural particularity would explain the atypical activation by a mono-phosphorylated sugar. The sum of peculiarities raises this enzyme as an emerging target for drug discovery.

  7. Pyruvate kinase deficiency in mice protects against malaria.

    PubMed

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Fortin, Anny; Tam, Mi-Fong; Nantel, André; Stevenson, Mary M; Gros, Philippe

    2003-12-01

    The global health impact of malaria is enormous, with an estimated 300-500 million clinical cases and 1 million annual deaths. In humans, initial susceptibility to infection with Plasmodium species, disease severity and ultimate outcome of malaria (self-healing or lethal) are under complex genetic control. Alleles associated with sickle cell anemia, beta-thalassemia and deficiency in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase have a protective effect against malaria and may have been retained by positive selection in areas of endemic malaria. Likewise, genetic variations in erythrocyte antigens and levels of host cytokines affect type and severity of disease. A mouse model of infection with Plasmodium chabaudi was used to study the genetic component of malaria susceptibility. Segregation analyses in informative F2 crosses derived from resistant C57BL/6J and susceptible A/J, C3H and SJL strains using extent of blood stage replication of the parasite and survival as traits mapped three P. chabaudi resistance (Char) loci on chromosomes 9 (Char1), 8 (Char2) and 17 (Char3, MHC-linked). Recombinant congenic strains AcB55 and AcB61 are unusually resistant to malaria despite carrying susceptibility alleles at Char1 and Char2. Malaria resistance in AcB55 and AcB61 is associated with splenomegaly and constitutive reticulocytosis, is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion and is controlled by a locus on chromosome 3 (Char4). Sequencing of candidate genes from the Char4 region identified a loss-of-function mutation (269T-->A, resulting in the amino acid substitution I90N) in the pyruvate kinase gene (Pklr) that underlies the malaria resistance in AcB55 and AcB61. These results suggest that pyruvate kinase deficiency may similarly protect humans against malaria. PMID:14595440

  8. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from higher plant mitochondria and proplastids: regulation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P; Reid, E E; Lyttle, C R; Dennis, D T

    1977-05-01

    The activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from pea (Pisum sativum L.) mitochondria is inhibited when MgATP is added to the reaction mixture; 50% inhibition occurs at 4 mm ATP. The inhibition does not increase with time and is higher in the more highly purified preparations. Crude preparations of the complex show a time-dependent inactivation when incubated with 7.5 mm MgATP alone but this is not found with the more highly purified complex. This inactivation does not occur at 0 C. The complex could not be reactivated by high concentrations of Mg(2+). It is suggested that a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mechanism may occur in plants, but the phosphatase and kinase are not tightly bound to the complex and are lost on isolation. The complex does not respond in a significant manner to energy charge. The NAD(+) to NADH ratio is the principal means of regulation of the complex, NADH being competitive with NAD(+) for the dihydrolipoamide component. The CoA to acetyl-CoA ratio is not important in regulation.The castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) proplastid complex is inhibited by the addition of 2 mm MgATP to the assay mixture. The inhibition is immediate, suggesting that phosphorylation of the enzyme is not involved or must be very rapid. Incubation of the complex with 20 mm MgCl(2) causes an activation of the complex. Maximum activity is not expressed in this case for 30 minutes. A similar activation can be achieved by preincubating the complex with 1 mm pyruvate. These data suggest that the complex is not fully activated on isolation.

  9. Lactation amenorrhea in Saudi women.

    PubMed Central

    Madani, K A; Khashoggi, R H; al-Nowaisser, A A; Nasrat, H A; Khalil, M H

    1994-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The study aimed to investigate some aspects of breast feeding, namely-lactation amenorrhea, the average interval between pregnancies, and the extent of knowledge that an average Saudi woman has about breast feeding. DESIGN--This was a cross sectional study in which a pretested questionnaire was used to collect the information. SETTING--The study was conducted in the Taif area between January and April of 1990. Seventy nine primary health care centres participated. PARTICIPANTS--Altogether 1019 of 2400 women contacted who agreed to participate and met the criteria were studied. Eligible subjects were defined as Saudi women, between 16 and 40 years old, who came with their infants for vaccination, and had delivered between one week and 12 months previously. Each mother had at least one other child. MEASUREMENT AND MAIN RESULT--At birth, the percentage of infants who were initially breast fed was 98% but within three days of delivery over two thirds (68.9%) of the mothers gave other supplementary liquids to their infants. At the time of interview more than half (55.1%) of mothers had lactation amenorrhea. The mean (SD) lactation amenorrhea period and birth interval were 5.95 (5) and 26.8 (14.1) months, respectively. Mothers obtained information on breast feeding mainly from their doctors and television. Within families, husbands had the primary role in encouraging their wives to breast feed, followed by the mother and then by the mother in law. It was found that a high percentage (94.2%) of women had breast fed their previous child. CONCLUSION--The lack of adequate information on breast feeding and the short interval between births are local problems which should be considered by the health authorities. PMID:8051529

  10. [Resumption of menstruation during lactation after delivery].

    PubMed

    Baszak, E; Radomański, T; Sikorski, R

    2000-09-01

    Twenty-three women in the menstruation resumption during lactation were evaluated. Average period of lactational amenorrhoea was 7 months after delivery. Ovulation before the first menstruation has occurred in 7 breastfeeding women (39%), but only in one case it took place earlier than 6 months after labour. The correlation was established between the resumption of menstruation and entirely period of breastfeeding per day. The Lactational Amenorrhoea Method (LAM) as the family planning procedure was discussed. PMID:11082964

  11. 21 CFR 184.1639 - Potassium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium lactate. 184.1639 Section 184.1639 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1639 Potassium lactate. (a) Potassium lactate (C3H5O3K, CAS Reg. No. 996-31-6) is the potassium salt of lactic acid. It is a hydroscopic, white, odorless solid and...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1639 - Potassium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium lactate. 184.1639 Section 184.1639 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1639 Potassium lactate. (a) Potassium lactate (C3H5O3K, CAS Reg. No. 996-31-6) is the potassium salt of lactic acid. It is a hydroscopic, white, odorless solid and...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1639 - Potassium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium lactate. 184.1639 Section 184.1639 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1639 Potassium lactate. (a) Potassium lactate (C3H5O3K, CAS Reg. No. 996-31-6) is the potassium salt of lactic acid. It is a hydroscopic, white, odorless solid and...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1639 - Potassium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium lactate. 184.1639 Section 184.1639 Food... GRAS § 184.1639 Potassium lactate. (a) Potassium lactate (C3H5O3K, CAS Reg. No. 996-31-6) is the potassium salt of lactic acid. It is a hydroscopic, white, odorless solid and is prepared commercially...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O, where... lactic acid with calcium carbonate or calcium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O, where x is any... calcium carbonate or calcium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food... GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O, where x is any integer up to 5, CAS Reg. No. 814-80-2) is prepared commercially by the neutralization of lactic acid with...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O, where... lactic acid with calcium carbonate or calcium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O, where... lactic acid with calcium carbonate or calcium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1639 - Potassium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium lactate. 184.1639 Section 184.1639 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1639 Potassium lactate. (a) Potassium lactate (C3H5O3K, CAS Reg. No. 996-31-6) is the potassium salt of lactic acid. It is a hydroscopic, white, odorless solid and...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1768 - Sodium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... sodium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for its intended use. (c) In accordance... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium lactate. 184.1768 Section 184.1768 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1768 Sodium lactate. (a) Sodium lactate (C3H5O3Na, CAS Reg. No. 72-17-3)...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1768 - Sodium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sodium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for its intended use. (c) In accordance... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium lactate. 184.1768 Section 184.1768 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1768 Sodium lactate. (a) Sodium lactate (C3H5O3Na, CAS Reg. No. 72-17-3)...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1768 - Sodium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sodium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for its intended use. (c) In accordance... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium lactate. 184.1768 Section 184.1768 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1768 Sodium lactate. (a) Sodium lactate (C3H5O3Na, CAS Reg. No. 72-17-3)...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1768 - Sodium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... sodium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for its intended use. (c) In accordance... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium lactate. 184.1768 Section 184.1768 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1768 Sodium lactate. (a) Sodium lactate (C3H5O3Na, CAS Reg. No. 72-17-3)...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1768 - Sodium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....1768 Sodium lactate. (a) Sodium lactate (C3H5O3Na, CAS Reg. No. 72-17-3) is the sodium salt of lactic acid. It is prepared commercially by the neutralization of lactic acid with sodium hydroxide. (b) The... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium lactate. 184.1768 Section 184.1768 Food...

  6. Cerebral Lactate Metabolism After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Patet, Camille; Suys, Tamarah; Carteron, Laurent; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral energy dysfunction has emerged as an important determinant of prognosis following traumatic brain injury (TBI). A number of studies using cerebral microdialysis, positron emission tomography, and jugular bulb oximetry to explore cerebral metabolism in patients with TBI have demonstrated a critical decrease in the availability of the main energy substrate of brain cells (i.e., glucose). Energy dysfunction induces adaptations of cerebral metabolism that include the utilization of alternative energy resources that the brain constitutively has, such as lactate. Two decades of experimental and human investigations have convincingly shown that lactate stands as a major actor of cerebral metabolism. Glutamate-induced activation of glycolysis stimulates lactate production from glucose in astrocytes, with subsequent lactate transfer to neurons (astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle). Lactate is not only used as an extra energy substrate but also acts as a signaling molecule and regulator of systemic and brain glucose use in the cerebral circulation. In animal models of brain injury (e.g., TBI, stroke), supplementation with exogenous lactate exerts significant neuroprotection. Here, we summarize the main clinical studies showing the pivotal role of lactate and cerebral lactate metabolism after TBI. We also review pilot interventional studies that examined exogenous lactate supplementation in patients with TBI and found hypertonic lactate infusions had several beneficial properties on the injured brain, including decrease of brain edema, improvement of neuroenergetics via a "cerebral glucose-sparing effect," and increase of cerebral blood flow. Hypertonic lactate represents a promising area of therapeutic investigation; however, larger studies are needed to further examine mechanisms of action and impact on outcome. PMID:26898683

  7. Amperometric lactate biosensor for flow injection analysis based on a screen-printed carbon electrode containing Meldola's Blue-Reinecke salt, coated with lactate dehydrogenase and NAD+.

    PubMed

    Piano, M; Serban, S; Pittson, R; Drago, G A; Hart, J P

    2010-06-30

    A biosensor for the measurement of lactate in serum has been developed, which is based on a screen-printed carbon electrode, modified with Meldola's Blue-Reinecke Salt (MBRS-SPCE), coated with the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase NAD(+) dependent (from Porcine heart), and NAD(+). A cellulose acetate layer was deposited on the top of the device to act as a permselective membrane. The biosensor was incorporated into a commercially available, thin-layer, amperometric flow cell operated at a potential of only +0.05 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The mobile phase consisted of 0.2 M phosphate buffer pH 10 containing 0.1 M potassium chloride solution; a flow rate of 0.8 ml min(-1) was used throughout the investigation. The biosensor response was linear over the range 0.55-10 mM lactate; the former represents the detection limit. The precision of the system was determined by carrying out 10 repeat injections of 10 mM l(+)lactic acid standard; the calculated coefficient of variation was 4.28%. It was demonstrated that this biosensor system could be applied to the direct measurement of lactate in serum without pre-treatment; therefore, this would allow high throughput-analysis, at low cost, for this clinically important analyte. PMID:20685431

  8. Apparent target size of rat brain benzodiazepine receptor, acetylcholinesterase, and pyruvate kinase is highly influenced by experimental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, M.; Braestrup, C.

    1988-08-25

    Radiation inactivation is a method to determine the apparent target size of molecules. In this report we examined whether radiation inactivation of various enzymes and brain receptors is influenced by the preparation of samples preceding irradiation. The apparent target sizes of endogenous acetylcholinesterase and pyruvate kinase from rat brain and from rabbit muscle and benzodiazepine receptor from rat brain were investigated in some detail. In addition the target sizes of alcohol dehydrogenase (from yeast and horse liver), beta-galactosidase (from Escherichia coli), lactate dehydrogenase (endogenous from rat brain), and 5-HT2 receptors, acetylcholine muscarine receptors, and (/sup 35/S) butyl bicyclophosphorothionate tertiary binding sites from rat brain were determined. The results show that apparent target sizes are highly influenced by the procedure applied for sample preparation before irradiation. The data indicate that irradiation of frozen whole tissue as opposed to lyophilized tissue or frozen tissue homogenates will estimate the smallest and most relevant functional target size of a receptor or an enzyme.

  9. Improvement of 2,3-Butanediol Yield in Klebsiella pneumoniae by Deletion of the Pyruvate Formate-Lyase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Moo-Young; Mazumdar, Suman; Shin, Sang Heum; Yang, Kap-Seok; Lee, Jinwon

    2014-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is considered a good host strain for the production of 2,3-butanediol, which is a promising platform chemical with various industrial applications. In this study, three genes, including those encoding glucosyltransferase (wabG), lactate dehydrogenase (ldhA), and pyruvate formate-lyase (pflB), were disrupted in K. pneumoniae to reduce both its pathogenic characteristics and the production of several by-products. In flask cultivation with minimal medium, the yield of 2,3-butanediol from rationally engineered K. pneumoniae (ΔwabG ΔldhA ΔpflB) reached 0.461 g/g glucose, which was 92.2% of the theoretical maximum, with a significant reduction in by-product formation. However, the growth rate of the pflB mutant was slightly reduced compared to that of its parental strain. Comparison with similar mutants of Escherichia coli suggested that the growth defect of pflB-deficient K. pneumoniae was caused by redox imbalance rather than reduced level of intracellular acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). From an analysis of the transcriptome, it was confirmed that the removal of pflB from K. pneumoniae significantly repressed the expression of genes involved in the formate hydrogen lyase (FHL) system. PMID:25085487

  10. Hemichannel-mediated release of lactate

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Anastassios; Sylantyev, Sergiy; Hadjihambi, Anna; Hosford, Patrick S; Kasparov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    In the central nervous system lactate contributes to the extracellular pool of readily available energy substrates and may also function as a signaling molecule which mediates communication between glial cells and neurons. Monocarboxylate transporters are believed to provide the main pathway for lactate transport across the membranes. Here we tested the hypothesis that lactate could also be released via opening of pannexin and/or functional connexin hemichannels. In acute slices prepared from the brainstem, hippocampus, hypothalamus and cortex of adult rats, enzymatic amperometric biosensors detected significant tonic lactate release inhibited by compounds, which block pannexin/connexin hemichannels and facilitated by lowering extracellular [Ca2+] or increased PCO2. Enhanced lactate release triggered by hypoxia was reduced by ∼50% by either connexin or monocarboxylate transporter blockers. Stimulation of Schaffer collateral fibers triggered lactate release in CA1 area of the hippocampus, which was facilitated in conditions of low extracellular [Ca2+], markedly reduced by blockade of connexin hemichannels and abolished by lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor oxamate. These results indicate that lactate transport across the membranes may occur via mechanisms other than monocarboxylate transporters. In the central nervous system, hemichannels may function as a conduit of lactate release, and this mechanism is recruited during hypoxia and periods of enhanced neuronal activity. PMID:26661210

  11. Specific inhibition by synthetic analogs of pyruvate reveals that the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction is essential for metabolism and viability of glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Bunik, Victoria I.; Artiukhov, Artem; Kazantsev, Alexey; Goncalves, Renata; Daloso, Danilo; Oppermann, Henry; Kulakovskaya, Elena; Lukashev, Nikolay; Fernie, Alisdair; Brand, Martin; Gaunitz, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and its phosphorylation are considered essential for oncotransformation, but it is unclear whether cancer cells require PDHC to be functional or silenced. We used specific inhibition of PDHC by synthetic structural analogs of pyruvate to resolve this question. With isolated and intramitochondrial PDHC, acetyl phosphinate (AcPH, KiAcPH = 0.1 μM) was a much more potent competitive inhibitor than the methyl ester of acetyl phosphonate (AcPMe, KiAcPMe = 40 μM). When preincubated with the complex, AcPH also irreversibly inactivated PDHC. Pyruvate prevented, but did not reverse the inactivation. The pyruvate analogs did not significantly inhibit other 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases. Different cell lines were exposed to the inhibitors and a membrane-permeable precursor of AcPMe, dimethyl acetyl phosphonate, which did not inhibit isolated PDHC. Using an ATP-based assay, dependence of cellular viability on the concentration of the pyruvate analogs was followed. The highest toxicity of the membrane-permeable precursor suggested that the cellular action of charged AcPH and AcPMe requires monocarboxylate transporters. The relevant cell-specific transcripts extracted from Gene Expression Omnibus database indicated that cell lines with higher expression of monocarboxylate transporters and PDHC components were more sensitive to the PDHC inhibitors. Prior to a detectable antiproliferative action, AcPH significantly changed metabolic profiles of the investigated glioblastoma cell lines. We conclude that catalytic transformation of pyruvate by pyruvate dehydrogenase is essential for the metabolism and viability of glioblastoma cell lines, although metabolic heterogeneity causes different cellular sensitivities and/or abilities to cope with PDHC inhibition. PMID:26503465

  12. Monitoring electron donor metabolism under variable electron acceptor conditions using 13C-labeled lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.; Yang, L.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Three sets of flow-through columns constructed with aquifer sediment from Hanford (WA) were used to study reduction of Cr(VI) to poorly soluble Cr(III) under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing/fermentative, and iron-reducing conditions with lactate as the electron donor. In order to understand the relationship between electron donors and biomarkers, and to determine the differences in carbon isotope fractionation resulting from different microbial metabolic processes, we monitored the variation in carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), in total organic carbon (TOC), and in lactate, acetate and propionate. The greatest enrichment in 13C in columns was observed under denitrifying conditions. The δ13C of DIC increased by ~1750 to ~2000‰ fifteen days after supplementation of natural abundance lactate with a 13C-labeled lactate tracer (for an influent δ13C of ~2250‰ for the lactate) indicating almost complete oxidation of the electron donor. The denitrifying columns were among the most active columns and had the highest cell counts and the denitrification rate was highly correlated with Cr(VI) reduction rate. δ13C values of DIC ranged from ~540 to ~1170‰ for iron-reducing conditions. The lower enrichment in iron columns was related to the lower biological activity observed with lower yields of RNA and cell numbers in the column effluents. The carbon isotope shift in the sulfate-reducing ~198 to ~1960‰ for sulfate-reducing conditions reflecting the lower levels of the lactate in these columns. Additionally, in two of the sulfate columns, almost complete fermentation of the lactate occurred, producing acetate and propionate with the labeled carbon signature, but relatively smaller amounts of inorganic carbon. For all electron-accepting conditions, TOC yielded similar δ13C values as lactate stock solutions. Differences in C use efficiency, metabolic rate or metabolic pathway contributed to the differing TOC δ13C to DIC δ13C ratios between treatments

  13. Properties of human testis-specific lactate dehydrogenase expressed from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    LeVan, K M; Goldberg, E

    1991-01-01

    The cDNA encoding the C4 isoenzyme of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-C4) was engineered for expression in Escherichia coli. The Ldh-c open reading frame was constructed as a cassette for production of the native protein. The modified Ldh-c cDNA was subcloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pKK223-3. Transformed E. coli cells were grown to mid-exponential phase, and induced with isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside for positive regulation of the tac promoter. Induced cells expressed the 35 kDa subunit, which spontaneously formed the enzymically active 140 kDa tetramer. Human LDH-C4 was purified over 200-fold from litre cultures of cells by AMP and oxamate affinity chromatography to a specific activity of 106 units/mg. The enzyme was inhibited by pyruvate concentrations above 0.3 mM, had a Km for pyruvate of 0.03 mM, a turnover number (nmol of NADH oxidized/mol of LDH-C4 per min at 25 degrees C) of 14,000 and was heat-stable. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1996957

  14. Pyruvic acid levels in serum and saliva: A new course for oral cancer screening?

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Manohara A; Prasad, KVV; Trivedi, Dheeraj; Rajeev, BR; Battur, Hemanth

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cancerous cells show increased glycolysis rate. This will increase overall levels of pyruvate as it is one of the end products of glycolysis. The present on-going study is to estimate the levels of pyruvate in saliva and serum among healthy and oral cancer subjects. Settings and Design: Hospital-based cross-sectional comparative study. Methodology: A total of 50 subjects among healthy and oral cancer subjects were selected based on clinical and histological criteria. Saliva and serum samples were collected and subjected to pyruvate level estimation using biochemical analysis. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive analysis and Mann-Whitney test were used to find the statistical difference between the two independent groups. Results: Serum pyruvic acid levels of the healthy group were 1.09 ± 0.14 and for oral cancer, it was 2.95 ± 0.59 and salivary level were 3.49 ± 0.47 and 1.32 ± 0.10 respectively. Mann-Whitney test showed statistically significant difference in serum and salivary pyruvate level in between two groups (P < 0.000 respectively). Conclusion: The present study showed noticeable variation in the level of pyruvic acid among healthy and oral cancer subjects. This generates the hypothesis that estimation of the pyruvic acid can be a new tool to screening of the cancer. PMID:27194870

  15. Pyruvate metabolism: A therapeutic opportunity in radiation-induced skin injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Hyun; Kang, Jeong Wook; Lee, Dong Won; Oh, Sang Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Eun-Jung; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-05-08

    Ionizing radiation is used to treat a range of cancers. Despite recent technological progress, radiation therapy can damage the skin at the administration site. The specific molecular mechanisms involved in this effect have not been fully characterized. In this study, the effects of pyruvate, on radiation-induced skin injury were investigated, including the role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) signaling pathway. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a wide range of gene expression differences between the control and irradiated mice, including reduced expression of PDK2. This was confirmed using Q-PCR. Cell culture studies demonstrated that PDK2 overexpression and a high cellular pyruvate concentration inhibited radiation-induced cytokine expression. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated radiation-induced skin thickening and gene expression changes. Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness and inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicated that regulation of the pyruvate metabolic pathway could provide an effective approach to the control of radiation-induced skin damage. - Highlights: • The effects of radiation on skin thickness in mice. • Next generation sequencing revealed that radiation inhibited pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 expression. • PDK2 inhibited irradiation-induced cytokine gene expression. • Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness.

  16. Regulation of thiamine synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for improved pyruvate production.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoqiang; Hua, Qiang; Duan, Ningjun; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2012-06-01

    Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for high-yield production of carboxylic acid requires a cytosolic pyruvate pool as precursor. In this study, a novel strategy to improve pyruvate production and reduce metabolic by-products via regulating thiamine synthesis was explored. Two of the thiamine biosynthesis regulatory genes, THI2 and THI3, were disrupted in the S. cerevisiae parent strain FMME-002. The mutants FMME-002ΔTHI2 and FMME-002ΔTHI3 both exhibited an enhanced pyruvate yield. Moreover, FMME-002ΔTHI2 achieved a relatively higher pyruvate production, and the highest concentration of pyruvate was achieved when 0.04 µ m thiamine was added. Enzyme assays and fermentation profiles of the THI2-complemented strain indicated that the observed metabolic changes represented intrinsic effects of THI2 deletion on the physiology of S. cerevisiae. Under optimal C:N ratio conditions, FMME-002ΔTHI2 produced pyruvate up to 8.21 ± 0.30 g/l, whereas the ethanol titre decreased to 2.21 ± 0.24 g/l after 96 h of cultivation. These results demonstrate the possibility of improving pyruvate production by regulating thiamine synthesis in S. cerevisiae.

  17. Structural Basis for "Flip-Flop" Action of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand

    2003-01-01

    The derivative of vitamin B1, thiamin pyrophosphate is a cofactor of pyruvate dehydrogenase, a component enzyme of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex that plays a major role in directing energy metabolism in the cell. This cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha)-C(=O) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. In alpha(sub 2)beta(sub 2)-tetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, there are two cofactor binding sites, each of them being a center of independently conducted, although highly coordinated enzymatic reactions. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites can now be understood based on the recently determined crystal structure of the holo-form of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.95A resolution. The structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase was determined using a combination of MAD phasing and molecular replacement followed by rounds of torsion-angles molecular-dynamics simulated-annealing refinement. The final pyruvate dehydrogenase structure included coordinates for all protein amino acids two cofactor molecules, two magnesium and two potassium ions, and 742 water molecules. The structure was refined to R = 0.202 and R(sub free) = 0.244. Our structural analysis of the enzyme folding and domain assembly identified a simple mechanism of this protein motion required for the conduct of catalytic action.

  18. Triiodothyronine activates lactate oxidation without impairing fatty acid oxidation and improves weaning from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Kajimoto, Hidemi; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides a rescue for children with severe cardiac failure. We previously showed that triiodothyronine (T3) improves cardiac function by modulating pyruvate oxidation during weaning. This study was focused on fatty acid (FA) metabolism modulated by T3 for weaning from ECMO after cardiac injury. Methods: Nineteen immature piglets (9.1-15.3 kg) were separated into 3 groups with ECMO (6.5 hours) and wean: normal circulation (Group-C);transient coronary occlusion (10 minutes) followed by ECMO (Group-IR); and IR with T3 supplementation (Group-IR-T3). 13-Carbon labeled lactate, medium-chain and long-chain FAs were infused as oxidative substrates. Substrate fractional contribution to the citric acid cycle (FC) was analyzed by 13-Carbon nuclear magnetic resonance. Results: ECMO depressed circulating T3 levels to 40% baseline at 4 hours and were restored in Group-IR-T3. Group-IR decreased cardiac power, which was not fully restorable and 2 pigs were lost because of weaning failure. Group-IR also depressed FC-lactate, while the excellent contractile function and energy efficiency in Group-IR-T3 occurred along with a marked FC-lactate increase and [ATP]/[ADP] without either decreasing FC-FAs or elevating myocardial oxygen consumption over Group-C or -IR. Conclusions: T3 releases inhibition of lactate oxidation following ischemia-reperfusion injury without impairing FA oxidation. These findings indicate that T3 depression during ECMO is maladaptive, and that restoring levels improves metabolic flux and enhances contractile function during weaning.

  19. Enforced ATP futile cycling increases specific productivity and yield of anaerobic lactate production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hädicke, Oliver; Bettenbrock, Katja; Klamt, Steffen

    2015-10-01

    The manipulation of cofactor pools such as ATP or NAD(P)H has for long been recognized as key targets for metabolic engineering of microorganisms to improve yields and productivities of biotechnological processes. Several works in the past have shown that enforcing ATP futile cycling may enhance the synthesis of certain products under aerobic conditions. However, case studies demonstrating that ATP wasting may also have beneficial effects for anaerobic production processes are scarce. Taking lactic acid as an economically relevant product, we demonstrate that induction of ATP futile cycling in Escherichia coli leads to increased yields and specific production rates under anaerobic conditions, even in the case where lactate is already produced with high yields. Specifically, we constructed a high lactate producer strain KBM10111 (= MG1655 ΔadhE::Cam ΔackA-pta) and implemented an IPTG-inducible overexpression of ppsA encoding for PEP synthase which, together with pyruvate kinase, gives rise to an ATP consuming cycle. Under induction of ppsA, KBM10111 exhibits a 25% higher specific lactate productivity as well as an 8% higher lactate yield. Furthermore, the specific substrate uptake rate was increased by 14%. However, trade-offs between specific and volumetric productivities must be considered when ATP wasting strategies are used to shift substrate conversion from biomass to product synthesis and we discuss potential solutions to design optimal processes. In summary, enforced ATP futile cycling has great potential to optimize a variety of production processes and our study demonstrates that this holds true also for anaerobic processes.

  20. Lactate Sensors on Flexible Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuesong; Fu, Timothy; Kota, Pavan Kumar; Tjia, Maggie; Nguyen, Cuong Manh; Chiao, Jung-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Lactate detection by an in situ sensor is of great need in clinical medicine, food processing, and athletic performance monitoring. In this paper, a flexible, easy to fabricate, and low-cost biosensor base on lactate oxidase is presented. The fabrication processes, including metal deposition, sol-gel IrOx deposition, and drop-dry enzyme loading method, are described in detail. The loaded enzyme was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Cyclic voltammetry was used to characterize the sensors. Durability, sensibility, and selectivity of the biosensors were examined. The comparison for different electrode sizes and different sensing film materials was conducted. The sensor could last for four weeks with an average surface area normalized sensitivity of 950 nA/(cm2 mM) and 9250 nA/(cm2 mM) for Au-based electrodes, and IrOx-modified electrodes respectively, both with an electrode size of 100 × 50 μm. The self-referencing method to record noises simultaneously with the working electrode greatly improved sensor sensitivity and selectivity. The sensor showed little response to interference chemicals, such as glutamate and dopamine. PMID:27657147

  1. Factors Altering Pyruvate Excretion in a Glycogen Storage Mutant of the Cyanobacterium, Synechococcus PCC7942

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Phoebe J.; Purcell-Meyerink, Diane; Hocart, Charles H.; Truong, Thy T.; James, Gabriel O.; Rourke, Loraine; Djordjevic, Michael A.; Blackburn, Susan I.; Price, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the production of carbon commodities from photosynthetically fixed CO2 has focused attention on cyanobacteria as a target for metabolic engineering and pathway investigation. We investigated the redirection of carbon flux in the model cyanobacterial species, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, under nitrogen deprivation, for optimized production of the industrially desirable compound, pyruvate. Under nitrogen limited conditions, excess carbon is naturally stored as the multi-branched polysaccharide, glycogen, but a block in glycogen synthesis, via knockout mutation in the gene encoding ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (glgC), results in the accumulation of the organic acids, pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate, as overflow excretions into the extracellular media. The ΔglgC strain, under 48 h of N-deprivation was shown to excrete pyruvate for the first time in this strain. Additionally, by increasing culture pH, to pH 10, it was possible to substantially elevate excretion of pyruvate, suggesting the involvement of an unknown substrate/proton symporter for export. The ΔglgC mutant was also engineered to express foreign transporters for glucose and sucrose, and then grown photomixotrophically with exogenous organic carbon supply, as added 5 mM glucose or sucrose during N- deprivation. Under these conditions we observed a fourfold increase in extracellular pyruvate excretion when glucose was added, and a smaller increase with added sucrose. Although the magnitude of pyruvate excretion did not correlate with the capacity of the ΔglgC strain for bicarbonate-dependent photosynthetic O2 evolution, or with light intensity, there was, however, a positive correlation observed between the density of the starter culture prior to N-deprivat